Science.gov

Sample records for amine-type corrosion inhibitors

  1. Novel corrosion inhibitor technology

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Ven, P.; Fritz, P.; Pellet, R.

    1999-11-01

    A novel, patented corrosion inhibitor technology has been identified for use in heat transfer applications such as automotive and heavy-duty coolant. The new technology is based on a low-toxic, virtually depletion-free carboxylic acid corrosion inhibitor package that performs equally well in mono ethylene glycol and in less toxic propylene glycol coolants. An aqueous inhibitor concentrate is available to provide corrosion protection where freezing protection is not an issue. In the present paper, this inhibitor package is evaluated in the different base fluids: mono ethylene glycol, mono propylene glycol and water. Results are obtained in both standardized and specific corrosion tests as well as in selected field trials. These results indicate that the inhibitor package remains effective and retains the benefits previously identified in automotive engine coolant applications: excellent corrosion protection under localized conditions, general corrosion conditions as well as at high temperature.

  2. Corrosion inhibitors from expired drugs.

    PubMed

    Vaszilcsin, Nicolae; Ordodi, Valentin; Borza, Alexandra

    2012-07-15

    This paper presents a method of expired or unused drugs valorization as corrosion inhibitors for metals in various media. Cyclic voltammograms were drawn on platinum in order to assess the stability of pharmaceutically active substances from drugs at the metal-corrosive environment interface. Tafel slope method was used to determine corrosion rates of steel in the absence and presence of inhibitors. Expired Carbamazepine and Paracetamol tablets were used to obtain corrosion inhibitors. For the former, the corrosion inhibition of carbon steel in 0.1 mol L(-1) sulfuric acid solution was about 90%, whereas for the latter, the corrosion inhibition efficiency of the same material in the 0.25 mol L(-1) acetic acid-0.25 mol L(-1) sodium acetate buffer solution was about 85%. PMID:22561212

  3. Electrochemical studies of corrosion inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of single salts, as well as multicomponent mixtures, on corrosion inhibition was studied for type 1010 steel; for 5052, 1100, and 2219-T87 aluminum alloys; and for copper. Molybdate-containing inhibitors exhibit an immediate, positive effect for steel corrosion, but an incubation period may be required for aluminum before the effect of a given inhibitor can be determined. The absence of oxygen was found to provide a positive effect (smaller corrosion rate) for steel and copper, but a negative effect for aluminum. This is attributed to the two possible mechanisms by which aluminum can oxidize. Corrosion inhibition is generally similar for oxygen-rich and oxygen-free environments. The results show that the electrochemical method is an effective means of screening inhibitors for the corrosion of single metals, with caution to be exercised in the case of aluminum.

  4. Electrochemical corrosion testing: An effective tool for corrosion inhibitor evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Bartley, L.S.; Van de Ven, P.; Mowlem, J.K.

    1996-10-01

    Corrosivity of an Antifreeze/Coolant can lead to localized attacks which are a major cause for metal failure. To prevent this phenomenon, specific corrosion inhibitors are used to protect the different metals in service. This paper will discuss the electrochemical principles behind corrosion, Realized corrosion and corrosion inhibition. It will also discuss electrochemical techniques which allow for the evaluation of these inhibitors.

  5. Corrosion Inhibitors for Aluminum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Bodo

    1995-01-01

    Describes a simple and reliable test method used to investigate the corrosion-inhibiting effects of various chelating agents on aluminum pigments in aqueous alkaline media. The experiments that are presented require no complicated or expensive electronic equipment. (DDR)

  6. Corrosion inhibitor selection for wet pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, E.

    1995-12-31

    Selection of corrosion inhibitors for wet pipelines is based on laboratory testing and field confirmation. Both the use and selection of corrosion inhibitors are driven by economics. Economics of alternative corrosion protection methods is not treated in this paper, but the economics of proper inhibitor selection are. The key to successful inhibitor selection is careful analysis of pipeline flow conditions and experimental emulation of its corrosive environment. Transportation of inhibitor to the corroding interface must be explicitly considered in the emulation. Standard corrosion rate measurement methods are used to evaluate inhibitors. Inhibitor properties tabulated during evaluation form a core database for continuing quality control.

  7. Less-toxic corrosion inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.

    1981-01-01

    Combinations of borates, nitrates, phosphates, silicates, and sodium MBT protect aluminum from corrosion in fresh water. Most effective combinations contained sodium phosphate and were alkaline. These inhibitors replace toxic chromates which are subject to governmental restrictions, but must be used in larger quantities. Experimental exposure times varied from 1 to 14 months depending upon nature of submersion solution.

  8. Migrating corrosion inhibitor protection of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Bjegovic, D.; Miksic, B.

    1999-11-01

    Migrating corrosion inhibitors (MCI) were developed to protect steel rebar from corrosion in concrete. They were designed to be incorporated as an admixture during concrete batching or used for surface impregnation of existing concrete structures. Two investigations are summarized. One studied the effectiveness of MCIs as a corrosion inhibitor for steel rebar when used as an admixture in fresh concrete mix. The other is a long-term study of MCI concrete impregnation that chronicles corrosion rates of rebar in concrete specimens. Based on data from each study, it was concluded that migrating corrosion inhibitors are compatible with concrete and effectively delay the onset of corrosion.

  9. Macrocyclic compounds as corrosion inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Quraishi, M.A.; Rawat, J.; Ajmal, M.

    1998-12-01

    The influence of three macrocyclic compounds on corrosion of mild steel (MS) in hydrochloric acid (HCl) was investigated using weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization, alternating current (AC) impedance, and hydrogen permeation techniques. All the investigated compounds showed significant efficiencies and reduced permeation of hydrogen through MS in HCl. Inhibition efficiency (IE) varied with the nature and concentrations of the inhibitors, temperature, and concentrations of the acid solutions. The addition of iodide ions (I{sup {minus}}) increased IE of all the tested compounds as a result of the synergistic effect. Potentiodynamic polarization results revealed that macrocyclic compounds acted as mixed inhibitors in 1 M HCl to 5 M HCl. Adsorption on the metal surface obeyed Temkin`s adsorption isotherm. Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) of the polished MS surface, exposed with tetraphenyldithia-octaazacyclotetradeca-hexaene (PTAT) proved adsorption of this compound on the surface through nitrogen and sulfur atoms.

  10. New sulfur-containing corrosion inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Prince, P.

    2000-04-01

    No corrosion inhibitor available today is ideal in every way, but a new class of sulfur-containing compounds promises to address many field requirements. This article describes the performance characteristics of these compounds and discusses possible inhibition mechanisms. The emphasis in this work was on better understanding corrosion inhibition by sulfur-containing inhibitors under high shear-stress conditions, with special focus on localized (pitting) corrosion. The results indicate that the new sulfur-containing inhibitors (e.g., mercaptoalcohol [MA]) could be more effective in the field than currently available inhibitors.

  11. Corrosion protection with eco-friendly inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahid, Muhammad

    2011-12-01

    Corrosion occurs as a result of the interaction of a metal with its environment. The extent of corrosion depends on the type of metal, the existing conditions in the environment and the type of aggressive ions present in the medium. For example, CO3‑2 and NO‑3 produce an insoluble deposit on the surface of iron, resulting in the isolation of metal and consequent decrease of corrosion. On the other hand, halide ions are adsorbed selectively on the metal surface and prevent formation of the oxide phase on the metal surface, resulting in continuous corrosion. Iron, aluminum and their alloys are widely used, both domestically and industrially. Linear alkylbenzene and linear alkylbenzene sulfonate are commonly used as detergents. They have also been found together in waste water. It is claimed that these chemicals act as inhibitors for stainless steel and aluminum. Release of toxic gases as a result of corrosion in pipelines may lead in certain cases to air pollution and possible health hazards. Therefore, there are two ways to look at the relationship between corrosion and pollution: (i) corrosion of metals and alloys due to environmental pollution and (ii) environmental pollution as a result of corrosion protection. This paper encompasses the two scenarios and possible remedies for various cases, using 'green' inhibitors obtained either from plant extracts or from pharmaceutical compounds. In the present study, the effect of piperacillin sodium as a corrosion inhibitor for mild steel was investigated using a weight-loss method as well as a three-electrode dc electrochemical technique. It was found that the corrosion rate decreased as the concentration of the inhibitor increased up to 9×10‑4 M 93% efficiency was exhibited at this concentration.

  12. Agricultural Polymers as Corrosion Inhibitors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural polymers were composed of extra-cellular polysaccharides secreted by Leuconostoc mesenteroides have been shown to inhibit corrosion on corrosion-sensitive metals. The substantially pure exopolysaccharide has a general structure consisting of alpha(1-6)-linked D-glucose backbone and appr...

  13. Controlling CO{sub 2} corrosion with inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, J.A.

    1998-12-31

    Transport of corrosion inhibitor to the location where they are needed is one of the primary concerns in the use of corrosion inhibitors. Two different types of inhibitors for controlling CO{sub 2} corrosion in gas well wellheads and flowlines are used as examples. In one example, the inhibitor forms a micelle in water which assists in the transport of inhibitor to the metal surface . In the other example, the inhibitor is readily dispersible in the water phase but must be stirred to ensure transport of the inhibitor to the metal surface. Field monitored corrosion rates using continuous application of inhibitor are presented for both types of inhibitor.

  14. Corrosion Inhibitors as Penetrant Dyes for Radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, Howard L.; Hall, Phillip B.

    2003-01-01

    Liquid/vapor-phase corrosion inhibitors (LVCIs) have been found to be additionally useful as penetrant dyes for neutron radiography (and perhaps also x-radiography). Enhancement of radiographic contrasts by use of LVCIs can reveal cracks, corrosion, and other defects that may be undetectable by ultrasonic inspection, that are hidden from direct optical inspection, and/or that are difficult or impossible to detect in radiographs made without dyes.

  15. Temperature effects on inhibitors and corrosion inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, A.

    1996-12-01

    Inhibitor systems commonly employed in industrial operations at elevated and high temperatures are surveyed and the available literature data on their performance characteristics at elevated temperatures are analyzed. The functional behavior of phosphates, amines, benzotriazole, and other important inhibitors are briefly summarized. The inhibitors degrade due to thermal decomposition and/or reaction on the metal surface or with other species present in the environment. Degradation modes of various kinds of amines used in steam systems are reviewed and the resultant limitations for use pointed out. Inhibitor systems in heating, heat exchanger-type cooling, hot acid pickling, in hot corrosive environments in turbine engines, as well as systems to prevent stress corrosion cracking at elevated temperatures are analyzed based on literature data.

  16. Heterocyclics as corrosion inhibitors for acid media

    SciTech Connect

    Ajmal, M.; Khan, M.A.W.; Ahmad, S.; Quraishi, M.A.

    1996-12-01

    The available literature on the use of heterocyclic compounds as corrosion inhibitors in acid media has been reviewed. It has been noted that the workers in this field have either used sulfur or nitrogen containing heterocyclic compounds for studying inhibition action. The authors have synthesized compounds containing sulfur and nitrogen both in the same ring and studied their inhibition action in acid media. These compounds were found to be better inhibitors than those containing either atoms alone.

  17. Inhibitor prevents corrosion, scale in Chinese waterflood

    SciTech Connect

    Yong, W.; Jianhua, W. )

    1994-03-14

    An imidazoline derivative-based series inhibitor has prevented both corrosion and scale formation in produced-water treatment and water-injection equipment in China National Petroleum Co.'s (CNPC) Shengli oil field. Development of the inhibitor started in 1986, and after successful field trials the chemical is now being extensively applied. To increase oil recovery, water injection is widely used in China's onshore oil fields. Oil production in the Shengli oil field, for example, requires injection of about 4 bbl of water/1 bbl of oil produced. The large volumes of produced formation water contain many substances that can cause serious corrosion and scale. Also, the makeup water from other sources, subsurface or surface, complicates water handling. The paper discusses the following: corrosion and scale, oxygen, carbon dioxide, H[sub 2]S and sulfur reducing bacteria, temperature, inhibition, field tests, applications, and economics.

  18. Evaluation of Encapsulated Inhibitor for Autonomous Corrosion Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnsey, M. N.; Li, W.; Buhrow, J. W.; Calle, L. M.; Pearman, B. P.; Zhang, X.

    2015-01-01

    This work concerns the development of smart coating technologies based on microencapsulation for the autonomous control of corrosion. Microencapsulation allows the incorporation of corrosion inhibitors into coating which provides protection through corrosion-controlled release of these inhibitors.One critical aspect of a corrosion protective smart coating is the selection of corrosion inhibitor for encapsulation and comparison of the inhibitor function before and after encapsulation. For this purpose, a systematic approach is being used to evaluate free and encapsulated corrosion inhibitors by salt immersion. Visual, optical microscope, and Scanning Electron Microscope (with low-angle backscatter electron detector) are used to evaluate these inhibitors. It has been found that the combination of different characterization tools provide an effective method for evaluation of early stage localized corrosion and the effectiveness of corrosion inhibitors.

  19. Corrosion inhibitors for solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.

    1978-01-01

    Inhibitors which appeared promising in previous tests and additional inhibitors including several proprietary products were evaluated. Evaluation of the inhibitors was based on corrosion protection afforded an aluminum-mild steel-copper-stainless steel assembly in a hot corrosive water. Of the inhibitors tested two were found to be effective and show promise for protecting multimetallic solar heating systems.

  20. Waste of cleaning emulsion sewage as inhibitors of steel corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazullin, D. D.; Mavrin, G. V.; Shaikhiev, I. G.

    2016-06-01

    The article describes the corrosion test of steel of the brand 20 in the stratal water. To increase corrosion resistance as a corrosion inhibitor the concentrate waste emulsion of the mark "Incam- 1" was provided. The article presents studies of the corrosion rate with different dosages of corrosion inhibitor in the stratal water. Based on these research results are revealed that the degree of protection of steel is 27% at a dosage of 3.8 g / dm3.

  1. Effects of multiphase flow on corrosion inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Jepson, W.P.; Chen, H.J.

    1999-11-01

    This paper investigates the inhibition performance of a typical imidazoline based inhibitor under multiphase flow. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements were carried out in a 101.6 mm I.D., 15 m long acrylic flow loop using ASTM substitute saltwater and carbon dioxide gas. This flow loop system can generate slug flow, fill pipe flow and other multiphase flow patterns. Effects of different flow conditions on inhibition performance of this typical inhibitor were examined. The system was maintained at a pressure of 0.136 MPa and a temperature of 40 C. EIS measurements for this inhibitor in a Rotating Cylinder Electrode (RCE) system were also conducted. Different equivalent circuit models were used to fit the experiment data for both the RCE and flow loop systems. The high shear stress and turbulence due to the mixing vortex and the bubble impact in multiphase flow can enhance the corrosion or reduce the inhibition performance of inhibitors.

  2. Effect of variables on downhole corrosion inhibitor application

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, J.A.

    1996-08-01

    One inhibitor was studied in detail to determine the effect of solvent, temperature, concentration and contact time on inhibitor application. The laboratory corrosion tests used the rotating cylinder electrode and linear polarization to measure the corrosion rate. The corrosion rate was also verified by iron loss measurements. Inhibitor was extracted from the electrode surface and the quantity determined by gas liquid chromatography. The inhibitor was also detected on the surface of the electrode by Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy. Corrosion rate data monitored in the field and inhibitor residue on field coupons confirm the laboratory test data.

  3. A novel molluscicide, corrosion inhibitor, and dispersant

    SciTech Connect

    Kreuser, R.T.; Vanlaer, A.; Damour, A.

    1997-12-01

    The efficacy of filming amines as corrosion inhibitors and dispersants in steam systems is well-documented. A novel formulation retains these functions of traditional filming amines and adds molluscicide capability for controlling macrofouling in fresh water and sea water. Criteria for this development included low toxicity to mammals and to non-target aquatic species, rapid biodegradation, and multifunctionality. Low mammalian toxicity and lack of other hazards exempt it from reporting requirements under SARA Title 3. Toxicity (LC{sub 50}) levels for rainbow trout and fathead minnow are higher than typical dosage rates. Biodegradation is rapid; half life is 22 hours in river water. By effectively dispersing slimes (along with biofilm, scale, and tubercles), it controls slimes without toxicity to biofilm organisms. As corrosion inhibitor, it reduces the open cell potential of metal surfaces by 50--200 millivolts and retards pitting and crevice corrosion. Its molluscicide activity gradually kills and disperses mussels, clams, and barnacles. The protective film, renewed by dosage for a brief period of time each day, proactively prevents scale and slime deposits and repels settling and adhesion by macrofouling species. Refinement of established technology has produced a multi-functional formulation that is safe to handle and has minimal impact on the environment.

  4. Characterization of Encapsulated Corrosion Inhibitors for Environmentally Friendly Smart Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearman, Benjamin Pieter; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry; Zhang, Xuejun; Surma, Jan; Fitzpatrick, Lilly; Montgomery, Eliza; Calle, Luz Marina

    2014-01-01

    Research efforts are under way to replace current corrosion inhibitors with more environmentally friendly alternatives. However, problems with corrosion inhibition efficiency, coating compatibility and solubility have hindered the use of many of these materials as simple pigment additives.This paper will present technical details on how the Corrosion Technology Lab at NASAs Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has addressed these issues by encapsulating environmentally friendly inhibitors into organic and inorganic microparticles and microcapsules. The synthetic process for polymer particles was characterized and post-synthesis analysis was performed to determine the interactions between the inhibitors and the encapsulation material. The pH-controlled release of inhibitors from various particle formulations in aqueous base was monitored and compared to both electrochemical and salt immersion accelerated corrosion experiment. Furthermore, synergistic corrosion inhibition effects observed during the corrosion testing of several inhibitor combinations will be presented.

  5. Corrosion inhibitor for aqueous ammonia absorption system

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Benjamin A.; Whitlow, Eugene P.

    1998-09-22

    A method of inhibiting corrosion and the formation of hydrogen and thus improving absorption in an ammonia/water absorption refrigeration, air conditioning or heat pump system by maintaining the hydroxyl ion concentration of the aqueous ammonia working fluid within a selected range under anaerobic conditions at temperatures up to 425.degree. F. This hydroxyl ion concentration is maintained by introducing to the aqueous ammonia working fluid an inhibitor in an amount effective to produce a hydroxyl ion concentration corresponding to a normality of the inhibitor relative to the water content ranging from about 0.015 N to about 0.2 N at 25.degree. C. Also, working fluids for inhibiting the corrosion of carbon steel and resulting hydrogen formation and improving absorption in an ammonia/water absorption system under anaerobic conditions at up to 425.degree. F. The working fluids may be aqueous solutions of ammonia and a strong base or aqueous solutions of ammonia, a strong base, and a specified buffer.

  6. Corrosion inhibitor for aqueous ammonia absorption system

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, B.A.; Whitlow, E.P.

    1998-09-22

    A method is described for inhibiting corrosion and the formation of hydrogen and thus improving absorption in an ammonia/water absorption refrigeration, air conditioning or heat pump system by maintaining the hydroxyl ion concentration of the aqueous ammonia working fluid within a selected range under anaerobic conditions at temperatures up to 425 F. This hydroxyl ion concentration is maintained by introducing to the aqueous ammonia working fluid an inhibitor in an amount effective to produce a hydroxyl ion concentration corresponding to a normality of the inhibitor relative to the water content ranging from about 0.015 N to about 0.2 N at 25 C. Also, working fluids for inhibiting the corrosion of carbon steel and resulting hydrogen formation and improving absorption in an ammonia/water absorption system under anaerobic conditions at up to 425 F. The working fluids may be aqueous solutions of ammonia and a strong base or aqueous solutions of ammonia, a strong base, and a specified buffer. 5 figs.

  7. Dual Use Corrosion Inhibitor and Penetrant for Anomaly Detection in Neutron/X Radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Phillip B. (Inventor); Novak, Howard L. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A dual purpose corrosion inhibitor and penetrant composition sensitive to radiography interrogation is provided. The corrosion inhibitor mitigates or eliminates corrosion on the surface of a substrate upon which the corrosion inhibitor is applied. In addition, the corrosion inhibitor provides for the attenuation of a signal used during radiography interrogation thereby providing for detection of anomalies on the surface of the substrate.

  8. Corrosion inhibitors for solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Deramus, G. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Problems dealing with corrosion and corrosion protection of solar heating and cooling systems are discussed. A test program was conducted to find suitable and effective corrosion inhibitors for systems employing either water or antifreeze solutions for heat transfer and storage. Aluminum-mild-steel-copper-stainless steel assemblies in electrical contact were used to simulate a multimetallic system which is the type most likely to be employed. Several inhibitors show promise for this application.

  9. Migrating corrosion inhibitor blend for reinforced concrete: Part 1 -- Prevention of corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Elsener, B.; Buechler, M.; Stalder, F.; Boehni, H.

    1999-12-01

    The efficiency of a migrating corrosion inhibitor in preventing corrosion of mild steel was investigated in saturated calcium hydroxide (Ca[OH]{sub 2}) solutions and in mortar. The protective effect of the inhibitor against pitting corrosion caused by chloride attack and against uniform corrosion as a result of carbonation was determined. Results showed that high concentrations ({approx}10%) allowed the inhibition of pitting corrosion tritiation in solution containing 1 M/L sodium chloride (NaCl). However, inhibiting properties can be lost by evaporation of the volatile constituent of the inhibitor or by the precipitation of the nonvolatile fraction of the inhibitor in presence of calcium ions. Addition of the inhibitor blend to mortar yielded a retardation of the corrosion initiation in the case of chloride-induced corrosion, but o significant reduction in corrosion rate. No effect was found in carbonated samples, and no influence on the corrosion rate was detected. Additionally, the estimation of the extent of the retarding effect on corrosion initiation on real structures was difficult, as the inhibitor was found to evaporate from the mortar. This evaporation resulted in a loss of inhibiting properties. Hence, the long-term efficiency of the inhibitor could not be guaranteed.

  10. Natural compounds as corrosion inhibitors for highly cycled systems

    SciTech Connect

    Quraishi, M.A.; Farooqi, I.H.; Saini, P.A.

    1999-11-01

    Strict environmental legislations have led to the development of green inhibitors in recent years. In continuation of the authors` research work on development of green inhibitors, they have investigated the aqueous extracts of three plants namely: Azadirachta indica, Punica Granatum and Momordica charantia as corrosion inhibitors for mild steel in 3% NaCl using weight loss and electrochemical methods. All the investigated compounds exhibited excellent corrosion inhibition properties comparable to that of HEDP. Azadirachta showed better scale inhibition effect than HEDP.

  11. Effect of vapor phase corrosion inhibitor on microbial corrosion of aluminum alloys.

    PubMed

    Yang, S S; Ku, C H; Bor, H J; Lin, Y T

    1996-02-01

    Vapor phase corrosion inhibitors were used to investigate the antimicrobial activities and anticorrosion of aluminum alloy. Aspergillus flavus, A. niger, A. versicolor, Chaetomium globosum and Penicillium funiculosum had moderate to abundant growth on the aluminum alloy AA 1100 at Aw 0.901, while there was less growth at Aw 0.842. High humidity stimulated microbial growth and induced microbial corrosion. Dicyclohexylammonium carbonate had a high inhibitory effect on the growth of test fungi and the microbial corrosion of aluminum alloy, dicyclohexylammonium caprate and dicyclohexylammonium stearate were the next. Aluminum alloy coating with vapor phase corrosion inhibitor could prevent microbial growth and retard microbial corrosion. PMID:10592784

  12. Corrosion inhibitors for water-base slurry in multiblade sawing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Odonnell, T. P.

    1982-01-01

    The use of a water-base slurry instead of the standard PC oil vehicle was proposed for multiblade sawing (MBS) silicon wafering technology. Potential cost savings were considerable; however, significant failures of high-carbon steel blades were observed in limited tests using a water-based slurry during silicon wafering. Failures were attributed to stress corrosion. A specially designed fatigue test of 1095 steel blades in distilled water with various corrosion inhibitor solutions was used to determine the feasibility of using corrosion inhibitors in water-base MBS wafering. Fatigue tests indicate that several corrosion inhibitors have significant potential for use in a water-base MBS operation. Blade samples tested in these specific corrosion-inhibitor solutions exhibited considerably greater lifetime than those blades tested in PC oil.

  13. Corrosion inhibitors for water-base slurry in multiblade sawing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. P.; Odonnell, T. P.

    1982-02-01

    The use of a water-base slurry instead of the standard PC oil vehicle was proposed for multiblade sawing (MBS) silicon wafering technology. Potential cost savings were considerable; however, significant failures of high-carbon steel blades were observed in limited tests using a water-based slurry during silicon wafering. Failures were attributed to stress corrosion. A specially designed fatigue test of 1095 steel blades in distilled water with various corrosion inhibitor solutions was used to determine the feasibility of using corrosion inhibitors in water-base MBS wafering. Fatigue tests indicate that several corrosion inhibitors have significant potential for use in a water-base MBS operation. Blade samples tested in these specific corrosion-inhibitor solutions exhibited considerably greater lifetime than those blades tested in PC oil.

  14. Corrosion inhibitor film formation studied by ATR-FTIR

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, S.; Jovancicevic, V.

    1999-11-01

    The development of an inhibitor film is essential for the effective performance of a corrosion inhibitor. The use of attenuated total reflection fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) allows the development of inhibitor films on iron oxides to be monitored. For two distinct corrosion inhibitor chemistries, oleic imidazoline and phosphate ester, the film formation and corrosion processes are monitored on Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} in a powdered form (a model surface). Additional data following on the physical and chemical properties are obtained using XPS and SEM techniques, which allows for a more complete characterization of the model inhibitor/oxide system. By the proper choice of system and measurement techniques, the complex phenomenon of corrosion inhibition may be analyzed directly.

  15. Hydroxyapatite microparticles as feedback-active reservoirs of corrosion inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Snihirova, D; Lamaka, S V; Taryba, M; Salak, A N; Kallip, S; Zheludkevich, M L; Ferreira, M G S; Montemor, M F

    2010-11-01

    This work contributes to the development of new feedback-active anticorrosion systems. Inhibitor-doped hydroxyapatite microparticles (HAP) are used as reservoirs, storing corrosion inhibitor to be released on demand. Release of the entrapped inhibitor is triggered by redox reactions associated with the corrosion process. HAP were used as reservoirs for several inhibiting species: cerium(III), lanthanum(III), salicylaldoxime, and 8-hydroxyquinoline. These species are effective corrosion inhibitors for a 2024 aluminum alloy (AA2024), used here as a model metallic substrate. Dissolution of the microparticles and release of the inhibitor are triggered by local acidification resulting from the anodic half-reaction during corrosion of AA2024. Calculated values and experimentally measured local acidification over the aluminum anode (down to pH = 3.65) are presented. The anticorrosion properties of inhibitor-doped HAP were assessed using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The microparticles impregnated with the corrosion inhibitors were introduced into a hybrid silica-zirconia sol-gel film, acting as a thin protective coating for AA2024, an alloy used for aeronautical applications. The protective properties of the sol-gel films were improved by the addition of HAP, proving their applicability as submicrometer-sized reservoirs of corrosion inhibitors for active anticorrosion coatings. PMID:20942404

  16. Characterization of Encapsulated Corrosion Inhibitors for Environmentally Friendly Smart Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearman, B. P.; Calle, L. M.; Zhang, X.; Li, W.; Buhrow, J. W.; Johnsey, M. N.; Montgomery, E. L.; Fitzpatrick, L.; Surma, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Kennedy Space Center's Corrosion Technology Lab at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, U.S.A. has been developing multifunctional smart coatings based on the microencapsulation of environmentally friendly corrosion indicators, inhibitors and self-healing agents. This allows the incorporation of autonomous corrosion control functionalities, such as corrosion detection and inhibition as well as the self-healing of mechanical damage, into coatings. This paper presents technical details on the characterization of inhibitor-containing particles and their corrosion inhibitive effects using electrochemical and mass loss methods. Three organic environmentally friendly corrosion inhibitors were encapsulated in organic microparticles that are compatible with desired coatings. The release of the inhibitors from the microparticles in basic solution was studied. Fast release, for immediate corrosion protection, as well as long-term release for continued protection, was observed. The inhibition efficacy of the inhibitors, incorporated directly and in microparticles, on carbon steel was evaluated. Polarization curves and mass loss measurements showed that, in the case of 2MBT, its corrosion inhibition effectiveness was greater when it was delivered from microparticles.

  17. Low toxic corrosion inhibitors for aluminum in fresh water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.

    1978-01-01

    Combinations of chemical compounds that reportedly reduce the corrosion of aluminum in fresh water were evaluated. These included combinations of borates, nitrates, nitrites, phosphates, silicates, and mercaptobenzothiazole. Eight of fifty inhibitor combinations evaluated gave excellent corrosion protection and compared favorably with sodium chromate, which has generally been considered standard for many years.

  18. An update of corrosion inhibitors for mild steel exposed to 32-0-0 UAN solution

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.T.; Nichols, D.E.; Lohry, E.J.

    1994-10-01

    This is a continuation of corrosion studies on the effectiveness of commercial and newly-developed corrosion inhibitors for use with mild steel exposed to urea-ammonium nitrate (UAN) solution. This paper provides updated information on five newly-developed corrosion inhibitors. Tests were conducted with mild steel exposed to 32-0-0 UAN solution containing each corrosion inhibitor at ambient temperature and under static conditions. Real-time corrosion of the test specimens was monitored using AC impedance techniques. Corrosion performance of the inhibitors was evaluated based on comparison of the corrosion rate of specimens exposed to 32-0-0 UAN solution with and without a corrosion inhibitor.

  19. Effect of treatment method on corrosion inhibitor performance

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, J.A.

    1997-12-01

    Two types of corrosion inhibitors are studied in laboratory tests simulating batch and continuous treatment methods. Type 1 is an inhibitor which is adsorbed on the corrosion product layer and forms an inhibitor film. Type 2 reacts with the corrosion product layer to form a protective film. With both inhibitors, the protection offered by continuous treatment at 100 to 1,000 ppm inhibitor compared favorably with batch treatment using neat or 10% solutions of inhibitor. The results show batch treatment of gas phase and liquid phase coupons with a 50% solution of Type 1 inhibitor gives optimum protection. The treatment gave 91% protection on the liquid phase coupons and only 70% protection on the gas phase coupons, indicating the gas phase coupons are more difficult to inhibit. Batch treatment with neat Type 2 inhibitor gave better protection than treatment with 10% solutions of the inhibitor in methanol, crude oil or resid oil. The Type 2 inhibitor at 100 ppm in a continuous application gave as much protection as batch treatment with neat or 10% solutions of the inhibitor in solvents.

  20. Effect of Wall Shear Stress on Corrosion Inhibitor Film Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canto Maya, Christian M.

    In oil and gas production, internal corrosion of pipelines causes the highest incidence of recurring failures. Ensuring the integrity of ageing pipeline infrastructure is an increasingly important requirement. One of the most widely applied methods to reduce internal corrosion rates is the continuous injection of chemicals in very small quantities, called corrosion inhibitors. These chemical substances form thin films at the pipeline internal surface that reduce the magnitude of the cathodic and/or anodic reactions. However, the efficacy of such corrosion inhibitor films can be reduced by different factors such as multiphase flow, due to enhanced shear stress and mass transfer effects, loss of inhibitor due to adsorption on other interfaces such as solid particles, bubbles and droplets entrained by the bulk phase, and due to chemical interaction with other incompatible substances present in the stream. The first part of the present project investigated the electrochemical behavior of two organic corrosion inhibitors (a TOFA/DETA imidazolinium, and an alkylbenzyl dimethyl ammonium chloride), with and without an inorganic salt (sodium thiosulfate), and the resulting enhancement. The second part of the work explored the performance of corrosion inhibitor under multiphase (gas/liquid, solid/liquid) flow. The effect of gas/liquid multiphase flow was investigated using small and large scale apparatus. The small scale tests were conducted using a glass cell and a submersed jet impingement attachment with three different hydrodynamic patterns (water jet, CO 2 bubbles impact, and water vapor cavitation). The large scale experiments were conducted applying different flow loops (hilly terrain and standing slug systems). Measurements of weight loss, linear polarization resistance (LPR), and adsorption mass (using an electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance, EQCM) were used to quantify the effect of wall shear stress on the performance and integrity of corrosion inhibitor

  1. Corrosion inhibitors for solar-heating and cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.

    1979-01-01

    Report describes results of tests conducted to evaluate abilities of 12 candidate corrosion inhibitors to protect aluminum, steel, copper, or stainless steel at typical conditions encountered in solar heating and cooling systems. Inhibitors are based on sodium salts including nitrates, borates, silicates, and phosphates.

  2. Corrosion inhibitor evaluation for a gas compression system

    SciTech Connect

    Perdomo, J.J.; Ramirez, M.; Viloria, A.; Morales, J.L.

    1999-11-01

    The injection of chemicals for gas systems is a common practice to prevent corrosion and asphaltene deposition. A laboratory study was conducted to evaluate 5 commercially available corrosion inhibitors and an asphaltene dispersant for a gas compression plant. This study was set out to look at the compatibility of a pipeline corrosion inhibitor with both an anti asphaltene and a gas compression inhibitor which is required to have a relatively large flammable point and resist the pressure and temperature of the process without igniting or aging. Also, the effect of precorroded surfaces was studied to establish its effect on the performance of the pipeline inhibitor. The efficiency of the products was evaluated through either coupon weight loss tests or polarization resistance. Corrosion inhibitor aging was carried out in autoclaves emulating operating conditions, subsequently, gel permeation chromatography (GPC), total nitrogen and viscosity measurements were performed on the products before and after aging to establish the variation of their physical and chemical properties. Additionally, X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and energy dispersion spectroscopy (EDS) were used to identify corrosion products. From the study, an efficiency of 86% was obtained for a line inhibitor at a 45-PPM dosage (at 36 psi pCO{sub 2} and 0.006 psi of H{sub 2}S at 120 F), lowering its efficiency to 76% after precorroding the surface for three days. The presence of asphaltene may reduce the corrosion rate; however, the injection of a dispersant accelerates the corrosion process. No significant changes in efficiency and physical properties were observed during the evaluation of one of the compression-line inhibitor mixtures tested.

  3. Bonding-Compatible Corrosion Inhibitor for Rinsing Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, C. R.; Wurth, L. A.; Radar, A.

    2005-01-01

    A corrosion-inhibiting mixture of compounds has been developed for addition to the water used to rinse metal parts that have been cleaned with aqueous solutions in preparation for adhesive bonding of the metals to rubber and rubber-like materials. Prior to the development of this corrosion inhibitor, the parts (made, variously, of D6AC steel and 7075-T73 aluminum) were rinsed by deionized water, which caused corrosion in some places on the steel parts especially in such occluded places as sealing surfaces and threaded blind holes. An integral part of the particular cleaning process is the deposition of a thin layer of silicates and silane primers that increase the strength of the adhesive bond. The corrosion inhibitor is formulated, not only to inhibit corrosion of both D6AC steel and 7075- T73 aluminum, but also to either increase or at least not reduce the strength of the adhesive bond to be formed subsequently. The corrosion inhibitor is a mixture of sodium silicate and sodium tetraborate. The sodium silicate functions as both a corrosion inhibitor and a bond-strength promoter in association with the silane primers. The sodium tetraborate buffers the rinse solution at the optimum pH and functions as a secondary corrosion inhibitor for the steel. For a given application, the concentrations of sodium silicate and sodium tetraborate must be chosen in a compromise among the needs to inhibit corrosion of steel, inhibit corrosion of aluminum, and minimize cosmetic staining of both steel and aluminum. Concentrations of sodium silicate in excess of 150 parts of silicon per million parts of solution (ppm Si) have been determined to enhance inhibition of corrosion; unfortunately, because of the alkalinity of sodium silicate, even a small concentration can raise the pH of the rinse solution to such a level that aluminum becomes corroded despite the inhibiting effect. The pH of a solution that contains a high concentration of sodium silicate can be decreased by adding

  4. Benzotriazole a Corrosion Inhibitor for Antiques: Some Practical Surface Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Robert

    1980-01-01

    Describes the structure and inhibitive properties of Benzotriazole. The chemical may be employed as an inhibitor to reduce corrosion of articles during storage or display. It may be applied to copper and copper-based antiques as well as to silver and other metals. (Author/JN)

  5. A new electrochemical approach for evaluation of corrosion inhibitors in neutral aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Jovancicevic, V.; Hartwick, D.

    1997-12-01

    A new comprehensive electrochemical approach to corrosion inhibitor evaluation in neutral aqueous solutions has been developed. It consists of using concurrently three different but complementary electrochemical methods. Linear polarization resistance (LPR), concentration-step potentiostatic (CSP) and constant-concentration potentiostatic (CCP) methods are used to determine the overall corrosion rates, corrosion inhibition mechanism, and stability of the passive oxide film in the presence of corrosion inhibitors. This approach has been used successfully to evaluate corrosion inhibition of three organic inhibitor systems: a phosphonate-based corrosion inhibitor (hydroxyphosphonoacetic acid, HPA), a polymeric corrosion inhibitor (polyacrylic acid, PAA) and a non-phosphorus containing corrosion inhibitor (L-tartaric acid). Short-term CSP/CCP test results for these three inhibitors are in good agreement with long-term weight loss measurements.

  6. Compatibility of a corrosion inhibitor with gas sweetening agents

    SciTech Connect

    Ramkez, M.; Morales, J.L.; Afonso, M.E.; Viloria, A.

    1998-12-31

    A methodology to establish the effect of a corrosion inhibitor on the behavior of two gas sweetening agents namely an amine (A) and a solid product constituted by iron oxides (B), has been developed. This information will be useful in case of traces of inhibitor passing through these two sweetening systems. Tests conducted in a static autoclave tester in gas sweetening conditions were made to determine the sour gas absorption power of the two agents, A and B, in presence or absence of inhibitor. Additionally, the effect of the inhibitor on the foaming power of agent A was evaluated, at room conditions. According to the results obtained, in the range of conditions considered in this study, neither does the inhibitor affect the sour gas absorption power nor the foaming power of agent A. Nevertheless, the anticorrosive product diminished by 12.5% the sour gas removal capability of agent B.

  7. Prediction aluminum corrosion inhibitor efficiency using artificial neural network (ANN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Sh; Kalhor, E. G.; Nabavi, S. R.; Alamiparvin, L.; Pogaku, R.

    2016-06-01

    In this study, activity of some Schiff bases as aluminum corrosion inhibitor was investigated using artificial neural network (ANN). Hence, corrosion inhibition efficiency of Schiff bases (in any type) were gathered from different references. Then these molecules were drawn and optimized in Hyperchem software. Molecular descriptors generating and descriptors selection were fulfilled by Dragon software and principal component analysis (PCA) method, respectively. These structural descriptors along with environmental descriptors (ambient temperature, time of exposure, pH and the concentration of inhibitor) were used as input variables. Furthermore, aluminum corrosion inhibition efficiency was used as output variable. Experimental data were split into three sets: training set (for model building) and test set (for model validation) and simulation (for general model). Modeling was performed by Multiple linear regression (MLR) methods and artificial neural network (ANN). The results obtained in linear models showed poor correlation between experimental and theoretical data. However nonlinear model presented satisfactory results. Higher correlation coefficient of ANN (R > 0.9) revealed that ANN can be successfully applied for prediction of aluminum corrosion inhibitor efficiency of Schiff bases in different environmental conditions.

  8. pH Sensitive Microcapsules for Delivery of Corrosion Inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wenyan; Calle, Luz M.

    2006-01-01

    A considerable number of corrosion problems can be solved by coatings. However, even the best protective coatings can fail by allowing the slow diffusion of oxygen and moisture to the metal surface. Corrosion accelerates when a coating delaminates. Often, the problems start when microscopic nicks or pits on the surface develop during manufacturing or through wear and tear. This problem can be solved by the incorporation of a self-healing function into the coating. Several new concepts are currently under development to incorporate this function into a coating. Conductive polymers, nanoparticles, and microcapsules are used to release corrosion-inhibiting ions at a defect site. The objective of this investigation is to develop a smart coating for the early detection and inhibition of corrosion. The dual function of this new smart coating system is performed by pH-triggered release microcapsules. The microcapsules can be used to deliver healing agents to terminate the corrosion process at its early stage or as corrosion indicators by releasing dyes at the localized corrosion sites. The dyes can be color dyes or fluorescent dyes, with or without pH sensitivity. Microcapsules were formed through the interfacial polymerization process. The average size of the microcapsules can be adjusted from 1 to 100 micron by adjusting the emulsion formula and the microcapsule forming conditions. A typical microcapsule size is around 10 microns with a narrow size distribution. The pH sensitivity of the microcapsule can also be controlled by adjusting the emulsion formula and the polymerization reaction time. Both corrosion indicator (pH indicator) and corrosion inhibitor containing microcapsules were formed and incorporated into paint systems. Test panels of selected steels and aluminum alloys were painted using these paints. Testing of compatibility between the microcapsule system and different paint systems are in progress. Initial experiments with the microcapsule containing paint

  9. A new environmentally-preferred copper corrosion inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, L.; May, R.C.; Given, K.M.

    1999-11-01

    Copper and its alloys have excellent heat transfer properties and are widely used in industrial cooling water systems. A corrosion inhibitor, however, is needed to prevent equipment failures and to reduce the discharge of toxic copper compounds into the environment. Although azoles such as benzotriazole and tolyltriazole have been used to protect copper alloys from corrosion, they react with oxidizing halogens which are commonly used to control microbiological activity. Their reaction with chlorine, for example, produces species that are not protective to copper. The inhibitor films formed on copper also deteriorate in the presence of halogens, leading to high copper corrosion rates. A number of new azole derivatives have been discovered that provide superior copper protection in halogenated cooling water systems. A new halogen resistant azole (HRA) has been developed which has minimal reactivity with halogens and protects copper when chlorine is present. As a result, elimination of copper-induced pitting corrosion on mild steel was also achieved. This novel material has numerous environmental benefits. Laboratory and field results are presented.

  10. Field trials for corrosion inhibitor selection and optimization, using a new generation of electrical resistance probes

    SciTech Connect

    Ridd, B.; Blakset, T.J.; Queen, D.

    1998-12-31

    Even with today`s availability of corrosion resistant alloys, carbon steels protected by corrosion inhibitors still dominate the material selection for pipework in the oil and gas production. Even though laboratory screening tests of corrosion inhibitor performance provides valuable data, the real performance of the chemical can only be studied through field trials which provide the ultimate test to evaluate the effectiveness of an inhibitor under actual operating conditions. A new generation of electrical resistance probe has been developed, allowing highly sensitive and immediate response to changes in corrosion rates on the internal environment of production pipework. Because of the high sensitivity, the probe responds to small changes in the corrosion rate, and it provides the corrosion engineer with a highly effective method of optimizing the use of inhibitor chemicals resulting in confidence in corrosion control and minimizing detrimental environmental effects.

  11. The corrosion behaviour of galvanized steel in cooling tower water containing a biocide and a corrosion inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Minnoş, Bihter; Ilhan-Sungur, Esra; Çotuk, Ayşın; Güngör, Nihal Doğruöz; Cansever, Nurhan

    2013-01-01

    The corrosion behaviour of galvanized steel in cooling tower water containing a biocide and a corrosion inhibitor was investigated over a 10-month period in a hotel. Planktonic and sessile numbers of sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB) and heterotrophic bacteria were monitored. The corrosion rate was determined by the weight loss method. The corrosion products were analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. A mineralized, heterogeneous biofilm was observed on the coupons. Although a biocide and a corrosion inhibitor were regularly added to the cooling water, the results showed that microorganisms, such as SRB in the mixed species biofilm, caused corrosion of galvanized steel. It was observed that Zn layers on the test coupons were completely depleted after 3 months. The Fe concentrations in the biofilm showed significant correlations with the weight loss and carbohydrate concentration (respectively, p < 0.01 and p < 0.01). PMID:23439037

  12. Characterization of Encapsulated Corrosion Inhibitors Containing Microparticles for Environmentally Friendly Smart Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearman, Benjamin Pieter; Calle, Luz M.

    2015-01-01

    This poster presents the results obtained from experiments designed to evaluate the release properties, as well as the corrosion inhibition effectiveness, of several encapsulated corrosion inhibitors. Microencapsulation has been used in the development of environmentally friendly multifunctional smart coatings. This technique enables the incorporation of autonomous corrosion detection, inhibition and self-healing functionalities into many commercially available coating systems. Select environmentally friendly corrosion inhibitors were encapsulated in organic and inorganic pH-sensitive microparticles and their release in basic solutions was studied. The release rate results showed that the encapsulation can be tailored from fast, for immediate corrosion protection, to slow, which will provide continued long-term corrosion protection. The incorporation of several corrosion inhibitor release profiles into a coating provides effective corrosion protection properties. To investigate the corrosion inhibition efficiency of the encapsulated inhibitors, electrochemical techniques were used to obtain corrosion potential, polarization curve and polarization resistance data. These measurements were performed using the free as well as the encapsulated inhibitors singly or in combinations. Results from these electrochemical tests will be compared to those obtained from weight loss and other accelerated corrosion experiments.

  13. Release Properties and Electrochemical Characterization of Encapsulated Corrosion Inhibitors for Environmentally Friendly Smart Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearman, B. P.; Calle, L. M.; Zhang, X.; Li, W.; Buhrow, J. W.; Johnsey, M. N.; Montgomery, E. L.; Fitzpatrick, L.; Surma, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Kennedy Space Center's Corrosion Technology Lab at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, U.S.A. has been developing multifunctional smart coatings based on the microencapsulation of environmentally friendly corrosion indicators, inhibitors and self-healing agents. This allows for the incorporation of autonomous corrosion control functionalities, such as corrosion detection and inhibition as well as the self-healing of mechanical damage, into coatings. This paper presents technical details on the characterization of inhibitor-containing particles and their corrosion inhibitive effects using electrochemical and mass loss methods. Three organic environmentally friendly corrosion inhibitors were encapsulated in organic microparticles that are compatible with desired coatings. The total inhibitor content and the release of one of the inhibitors from the microparticles in basic solution was measured. Particles with inhibitor contents of up 60 wt% were synthesized. Fast release, for immediate corrosion protection, as well as long-term release for continued protection, was observed. The inhibition efficacy of the inhibitors, both as the pure materials and in microparticles, on carbon steel was evaluated. Polarization curves and mass loss measurements showed that, in the case of 2MBT, its corrosion inhibition effectiveness was greater when it was delivered from microparticles.

  14. Development and testing of a low toxicity acid corrosion inhibitor for industrial cleaning applications

    SciTech Connect

    Frenier, W.W.

    1997-02-01

    A low toxicity corrosion inhibitor used in hydrochloric acid cleaning formulations has been developed. This formulation does not contain formaldehyde. It contains cinnamaldehyde, quaternary nitrogen salts, and a nonionic surfactant, none of which are currently known or suspected to be carcinogens. In laboratory tests, corrosion protection values were equivalent to those provided by current commercial acid inhibitors. Field tests using the low toxicity inhibitor were conducted.

  15. Development of a non-toxic corrosion inhibitor for MEA plants

    SciTech Connect

    Tebba, S.; Kane, R.D.; Shumaimriand, B.N.; Mukhopadhyay, P.K.

    1998-12-31

    A non-toxic corrosion inhibitor based on organic compounds was developed to replace a heavy metal toxic inhibitor in MEA plants. The tasks involved in the development program are presented in this paper. A search for non-toxic organic chemicals with potential inhibitive properties was performed first followed by the preliminary screening tests. The best three chemicals were then tested in an autoclave at several concentrations. Slow strain rate runs were also performed to test the susceptibility of welded as well as non-welded carbon steel specimens to stress corrosion cracking. The single best performing chemical was then tested under turbulent and laminar flow conditions in a flow loop. High alloys materials typically found in amine plants were also tested in an autoclave setting to determine if they were compatible with the inhibitor. The single best performing inhibitor was then finally tested in a refinery gas plant for 18 months. The corrosion rates data, analytical results and physical inspection of the field equipment showed that the non-toxic corrosion inhibitor was very effective in reducing corrosion. Based on the results of the laboratory and field testing program, it was decided to replace the previous toxic corrosion inhibitor by the newly developed non-toxic corrosion inhibitor.

  16. Evaluating the effects of test methods and fluids compositions on the performance of corrosion inhibitors electrochemically

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.J.

    1999-11-01

    In an attempt to answer the question ``can carbon steel be adequately protected from corrosion by use of corrosion inhibitors due to the high CO{sub 2} concentration``, the authors initiated a project to identify the best commercial corrosion inhibitor by conducting a series of performance evaluation tests. They solicited the inhibitors from various chemical suppliers and evaluated their performance using various test methods in test fluid compositions simulating field conditions. Inhibitor performance was evaluated using electrochemical techniques including EIS and DC in the Rotating Cylinder Electrode (RCE) system and the conventional weight loss methods. Various tests were conducted for the purpose of determining the effect of velocity, chemical partition, and dispersibility on inhibitor performance in various test fluids. Physical characteristics testing including emulsion tendency and brine dispersibility were also conducted. Results show that some commercial corrosion inhibitors can be used to protect carbon steel in high CO{sub 2} concentration. There are significant performance differences among commercial products in various test methods and fluid compositions. Results show the importance of multiple performance evaluations when selecting corrosion inhibitors for particular field applications. An inhibitor that out performs others under various testing conditions would have a much greater chance to protect against corrosion in the field.

  17. New corrosion inhibitor acrylamide methyl ether for mild steel in 1 M HCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xinyu; Jiang, Xiaohui; Xia, Shuwei; Shan, Mingli; Li, Xia; Yu, Liangmin; Tang, Qunwei

    2016-05-01

    Pursuit of good inhibition performance has been a persistent objective for advanced inhibitor industry. Here we demonstrate the experimental realization of a new corrosion inhibitor acrylamide methyl ether (AAME) from N-Methylol acrylamide (N-MAM) for mild steel in 1 M HCl. The resultant adsorption films have inhibition efficiency as high as 96.2%. Moreover, a theoretical investigation is also launched to demonstrate the potential mechanism behind the promising corrosion behaviors. This work represents a significant step forward, as it demonstrates how to make scalable AAME inhibitors as well as to enhance inhibition performances for high-efficiency and cost-effective corrosion inhibition platforms.

  18. The effect of corrosion inhibitors on microbial communities associated with corrosion in a model flow cell system.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Kathleen E; Perez-Ibarra, Beatriz Monica; Jenneman, Gary; Harris, Jennifer Busch; Webb, Robert; Sublette, Kerry

    2014-01-01

    A model flow cell system was designed to investigate pitting corrosion in pipelines associated with microbial communities. A microbial inoculum producing copious amounts of H₂S was enriched from an oil pipeline biofilm sample. Reservoirs containing a nutrient solution and the microbial inoculum were pumped continuously through six flow cells containing mild steel corrosion coupons. Two cells received corrosion inhibitor "A", two received corrosion inhibitor "B", and two ("untreated") received no additional chemicals. Coupons were removed after 1 month and analyzed for corrosion profiles and biofilm microbial communities. Coupons from replicate cells showed a high degree of similarity in pitting parameters and in microbial community profiles, as determined by 16S rRNA gene sequence libraries but differed with treatment regimen, suggesting that the corrosion inhibitors differentially affected microbial species. Viable microbial biomass values were more than 10-fold higher for coupons from flow cells treated with corrosion inhibitors than for coupons from untreated flow cells. The total number of pits >10 mils diameter and maximum pitting rate were significantly correlated with each other and the total number of pits with the estimated abundance of sequences classified as Desulfomicrobium. The maximum pitting rate was significantly correlated with the sum of the estimated abundance of Desulfomicrobium plus Clostridiales, and with the sum of the estimated abundance of Desulfomicrobium plus Betaproteobacteria. The lack of significant correlation with the estimated abundance of Deltaproteobacteria suggests not all Deltaproteobacteria species contribute equally to microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) and that it is not sufficient to target one bacterial group when monitoring for MIC. PMID:23636692

  19. Volatile corrosion inhibitor film formation on carbon steel surface and its inhibition effect on the atmospheric corrosion of carbon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Da-quan; An, Zhong-xun; Pan, Qing-yi; Gao, Li-xin; Zhou, Guo-ding

    2006-11-01

    A novel volatile corrosion inhibitor (VCI), bis-piperidiniummethyl-urea (BPMU), was developed for temporary protection of carbon steel. Its vapor corrosion inhibition property was evaluated under simulated operational conditions. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was applied to study the inhibition effect of BPMU on the corrosion of carbon steel with a thin stimulated atmospheric corrosion water layers. Adsorption of BPMU on carbon steel surfaces was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicate that BPMU can form a protective film on the metal surface, which protects the metal against further corrosion. The structure of the protective film was suggested as one BPMU molecule chelated with one Fe atom to form a complex with two hexa-rings.

  20. Technical considerations in the analysis for residual concentrations of corrosion inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Son, A.J.; Muckleroy, B.S.

    1997-08-01

    The paper discusses the application and partitioning behavior of water-dispersible corrosion inhibitors in 2-phase production/pipeline systems with condensate as the hydrocarbon phase. The practice of using the residual corrosion inhibitor concentration to monitor systems protection and to adjust treatment levels is evaluated. Recommendations are presented based on a good understanding of the partitioning pathways. Case histories of two production systems are presented. In these systems, the production waters are very different in salinity and the produced water/condensate ratios are drastically different. The first system produces very little water with no significant changes in the fluid ratios. The second system produces more water with fluctuating fluid ratios. Two new corrosion inhibitor blends were designed for the systems and the paper discusses laboratory and field testing related to the two systems. The monitoring techniques developed for each corrosion inhibitor key on one of the major components, usually the more water-soluble/dispersible component. It was demonstrated that components of corrosion inhibitors designed to be completely water-soluble still partitions to the condensate. In one case, both phases were analyzed and the mass balance account for the inhibitor injected after the system equilibration. The pitfalls or drawbacks encountered in analysis are discussed. In the second system, it is demonstrated that residual analysis should be a guide rather than a determinant of performance. In the testing of a new corrosion inhibitor, concerns with low residual concentration levels were proven wrong through performance monitoring using electrochemical techniques.

  1. Natural Corrosion Inhibitors for Steel Reinforcement in Concrete — a Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja, Pandian Bothi; Ghoreishiamiri, Seyedmojtaba; Ismail, Mohammad

    2015-04-01

    Reinforced concrete is one of the widely used construction materials for bridges, buildings, platforms and tunnels. Though reinforced concrete is capable of withstanding a large range of severe environments including marine, industrial and alpine conditions, there are still a large number of failures in concrete structures for many reasons. Either carbonation or chloride attack is the main culprit which is due to depassivation of reinforced steel and subsequently leads to rapid steel corrosion. Among many corrosion prevention measures, application of corrosion inhibitors play a vital role in metal protection. Numerous range of corrosion inhibitors were reported for concrete protection that were also used commercially in industries. This review summarizes the application of natural products as corrosion inhibitors for concrete protection and also scrutinizes various factors influencing its applicability.

  2. Tannin bark Melalauca cajuputi powell (gelam) as green corrosion inhibitor of mild steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talib, Nur Atiqah Abu; Zakaria, Sarani; Hua, Chia Chin; Othman, Norinsan Kamil

    2014-09-01

    Tannin was extracted from gelam bark and used to produce corrosion inhibitor for mild steel. Tannin was extracted from gelam bark using 70% aqueous acetone for 6 hour. Tannin powder was characterization using fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to analyse chemical component in tannin and Scanning electron microscope (SEM) for tannin physical structure. The tannin effect on the corrosion inhibition of mild steel has been investigated in 1Mol HCl solution for 6 hour followed ASTM. The weight loss method were applied to study the mild steel corrosion behavior in the present and absend of different concentration of tannin (250, 300, 350)ppm. Tannin act good inhibitor as corrosion inhibitor for mild steel in acid medium. Surface morphology of carbon steel with and without inhibitor was investigated by scanning electron microscopy.

  3. Tannin bark Melalauca cajuputi powell (gelam) as green corrosion inhibitor of mild steel

    SciTech Connect

    Talib, Nur Atiqah Abu; Zakaria, Sarani; Hua, Chia Chin; Othman, Norinsan Kamil

    2014-09-03

    Tannin was extracted from gelam bark and used to produce corrosion inhibitor for mild steel. Tannin was extracted from gelam bark using 70% aqueous acetone for 6 hour. Tannin powder was characterization using fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to analyse chemical component in tannin and Scanning electron microscope (SEM) for tannin physical structure. The tannin effect on the corrosion inhibition of mild steel has been investigated in 1Mol HCl solution for 6 hour followed ASTM. The weight loss method were applied to study the mild steel corrosion behavior in the present and absend of different concentration of tannin (250, 300, 350)ppm. Tannin act good inhibitor as corrosion inhibitor for mild steel in acid medium. Surface morphology of carbon steel with and without inhibitor was investigated by scanning electron microscopy.

  4. Evaluation of corrosion inhibitor for low-pH ammonium nitrate-methanol completion fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Krilov, Z.; Soric, T.; Tomic, M.; Wojtanowicz, A.K.

    1997-02-01

    A specially formulated completion fluid, low-pH ammonium nitrate-methanol-water mixture (ANM), compatible with argillaceous and calcareous Adriatic Sea sandstone formations, appears to be very corrosive for steel wellbore equipment. More than 12 commercially available, as well as some originally formulated, chemical additives were laboratory tested at room temperature using weight-loss and electrochemical methods to find an effective corrosion inhibitor for ANM. Two inhibitors, a commercially available, organic, amine base (OA) and an originally formulated, inorganic, ammonium dihydrogen phosphate base (IB), showed effective protection of carbon steel in contact with ANM fluid (corrosion rate was less than 5 mil/yr). Both selected corrosion inhibitors did not exhibit any additional rock permeability impairment during fluid-rock compatibility flow tests if ANM fluid was filtered before injection into the core samples. For inorganic inhibitor IB, additional filtration of inhibited fluid is not required.

  5. Protection of reinforcement with corrosion inhibitors, phase 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Allyn, M.; Frantz, G.C.; Stephens, J.E.

    1998-11-01

    Costs due to corrosion in reinforcement in concrete caused by deicing salts has been estimated at up to $1 billion per year in the US alone. For most situations, corrosion inhibiting admixtures offer significant advantages over other protection methods to delay initiation of corrosion for the service life of the structure. Two new prototype corrosion inhibiting chemicals were evaluated and compared with two commercial corrosion inhibiting admixtures as well as with a typical air-entrained control concrete. Corrosion testing consisted of weekly wetting (with salt solution) and drying cycles applied to slab type specimens and to both 2-inch and 3-inch diameter lollipop specimens. Some lollipop specimens were also `pre-cracked` prior to corrosion testing. Linear polarization techniques measured corrosion rates. Reinforcing bar were removed and visually examined at completion of testing. Other concrete material test results included compression strength, freeze-thaw resistance, and absorption.

  6. Corrosion inhibitor selection for arctic and subsea high-velocity flowlines

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, J.A.

    2000-03-01

    Qualifying corrosion inhibitors for use in high-velocity multiphase flowlines in arctic or subsea environments is discussed. The criteria include high-velocity flow loop corrosion tests, pumpability through 0.125-in. (0.318-cm) capillary at low temperatures, compatibility with nylon 11, emulsion tendency testing, and partitioning characteristics. Laboratory and field data show the importance of using these criteria for inhibitor selection.

  7. Nitrogen-containing corrosion inhibitors for metals based on sugar cane wax

    SciTech Connect

    Ledovskykh, V.M.; Gonzales Rigotty, H.D.; Shapovalova, Yu.P.

    1988-05-01

    Requirements have been developed, reactions have been studied, and synthesis has been carried out for inhibitors of the carbonic acid amide and 2-alkylimidazoline classes from sugar cane wax. The efficiency of their inhibition on corrosion of metals in two phase media has been demonstrated in laboratory and pilot tests. The research was conducted to assess the feasibility of generating corrosion inhibitors from the waste products of sugar cane treatment for use in the Cuban oil production and refining industry.

  8. Protection of bronze artefacts through polymeric coatings based on nanocarriers filled with corrosion inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Luna, Martina Salzano; Buonocore, Giovanna; Di Carlo, Gabriella; Giuliani, Chiara; Ingo, Gabriel M.; Lavorgna, Marino

    2016-05-01

    Protective coatings based on polymers synthesized from renewable sources (chitosan or an amorphous vinyl alcohol based polymer) have been prepared for the protection of bronze artifacts from corrosion. Besides acting as an effective barrier against corrosive species present in the environment, the efficiency of the coatings has been improved by adding corrosion inhibitor compounds (benzotriazole or mercaptobenzothiazole) to the formulations. The liquid medium of the formulations has been carefully selected looking at maximizing the wettability on the bronze substrate and optimizing the solvent evaporation rate. The minimum amount of inhibitor compounds has been optimized by performing accelerated corrosion tests on coated bronze substrates. The inhibitors have been directly dissolved in the coating-forming solutions and/or introduced by means of nanocarriers, which allow to control the release kinetics. The free dissolved inhibitor molecules immediately provide a sufficient protection against corrosion. On the other hand, the inhibitor molecules contained in the nanocarriers serve as long-term reservoir, which can be activated by external corrosion-related stimuli in case of particularly severe conditions. Particular attention has been paid to other features which affect the coating performances. Specifically, the adhesion of the protective polymer layer to the bronze substrate has been assessed, as well as its permeability properties and transparency, the latter being a fundamental feature of protective coating for cultural heritages. Finally, the protective efficiency of the produced smart coatings has been assessed through accelerated corrosion tests.

  9. The measurement of corrosion inhibitor film life in high velocity flow

    SciTech Connect

    Chesnut, G.; Blumer, D.; Choi, H.J.

    1995-10-01

    Corrosion inhibitor applied with a tubing displacement technique is used in the Prudhoe Bay field to control corrosion of downhole tubulars. In this application a ``pill`` of corrosion inhibitor/crude oil mixture is pumped into the tubing and then displaced down the tubing string by pumping crude oil into the tubing. The inhibitor forms a protective film on the tubing wall which protects the tubular until the next treatment is done. Currently there are no reliable methods for predicting film life. Optimizing a treatment schedule based on corrosion monitoring or well corrosion history is very expensive and can easily exceed the cost of the treatments. Fluid velocity is widely believed to be an important factor in the removal of inhibitor films. However, other well characteristics such as water cut could be important. This paper presents the results of a test program aimed at developing more cost effective treatments for the Prudhoe Bay field. Laboratory and field test methods were used to measure the film life of several commercial corrosion inhibitors. These tests also provided some insight into what factors are important in the removal of inhibitor films.

  10. Investigation of ginkgo biloba leave extracts as corrosion and Oil field microorganism inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Zhang, Min; Zhao, Jingrui; Zhou, Rui; Meng, Zuchao; Zhang, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Ginkgo biloba (Ginkgoaceae), originating from China, now distributes all over the world. Wide application of Ginkgo biloba extracts is determined by the main active substances, flavonoids and terpenoids, which indicates its extracts suitable to be used as an effective corrosion inhibitor. The extracts of Ginkgo biloba leave have been investigated on the corrosion inhibition of Q235A steel with weight loss and potentiodynamic polarisation techniques. The inhibition efficiency of the extracts varies with extract concentration. The extracts inhibit corrosion mainly by adsorption mechanism. Potentiodynamic polarisation studies show that extracts are mixed type inhibitors. The antibacterial activity of the extracts against oil field microorganism (SRB, IB and TGB) was also investigated. PMID:23651921

  11. Corrosion inhibitor evaluation for materials used in closed cooling water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Moccari, A.A.

    1999-09-01

    Electrochemical tests were conducted to evaluate the inhibition effects of a commercial sodium nitrite (NaNO{sub 2})/sodium tolyltriazole (nitrite/TTA)-based corrosion inhibitor added to deionized water at 50 C. General and pitting corrosion of materials commonly used in closed cooling water systems were examined. Tests also were performed in deionized water to which Cl{sup {minus}} had been added. At the tested concentrations, nitrite/TTA was found to be an effective corrosion inhibitor for all of the materials tested in plain deionized water and Cl{sup {minus}}-containing water.

  12. Evaluation of passivation method and corrosion inhibitors for steel-reinforced concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Richard; Lee, K. Wayne; Cao, Yong

    1999-02-01

    Corrosion of reinforcing steel due to the ingression of chloride ions from deicing salt and/or seawater has been a major cause of the deterioration of reinforced concrete structures. Typically reinforcing steel is protected from corrosion by the formation of passive film because of highly alkaline concrete environment. The film can be damaged with the introduction of chloride ions to concrete, then corrosion occurs. There are mainly three approaches to tackle this problem, i.e., protective coating, cathodic protection and corrosion inhibitors.

  13. Interfacial modification of clay nanotubes for the sustained release of corrosion inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Anupam; Abdullayev, Elshad; Vasiliev, Alexandre; Volkova, Olga; Lvov, Yuri

    2013-06-18

    Long-lasting anticorrosive coatings for steel have been developed on the basis of halloysite nanotubes loaded with three corrosion inhibitors: benzotriazole, mercaptobenzothiazole, and mercaptobenzimidazole. The inhibitors' loaded tubes were admixed at 5-10 wt % to oil-based alkyd paint providing sustained agent release and corrosion healing in the coating defects. The slow 20-30 h release of the inhibitors at defect points caused a remarkable improvement in the anticorrosion efficiency of the coatings. Further time expansion of anticorrosion agent release has been achieved by the formation of release stoppers at nanotube ends with urea-formaldehyde copolymer and copper-inhibitor complexation. The corrosion protection efficiency was tested on ASTM A366 steel plates in a 0.5 M NaCl solution with the microscanning of corrosion current development by microscopy inspection and studying paint adhesion. The best protection was found using halloysite/mercaptobenzimidazole and benzotriazole inhibitors. Stopper formation with urea-formaldehyde copolymer provided an additional increase in corrosion efficiency as a result of the longer release of inhibitors. PMID:23214412

  14. Eco-Friendly Inhibitors for Copper Corrosion in Nitric Acid: Experimental and Theoretical Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savita; Mourya, Punita; Chaubey, Namrata; Singh, V. K.; Singh, M. M.

    2016-02-01

    The inhibitive performance of Vitex negundo, Adhatoda vasica, and Saraka asoka leaf extracts on corrosion of copper in 3M HNO3 solution was investigated using gravimetric, potentiodynamic polarization, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic techniques. Potentiodynamic polarization studies indicated that these extracts act as efficient and predominantly cathodic mixed inhibitor. Thermodynamic parameters revealed that the adsorption of these inhibitors on copper surface was spontaneous, controlled by physiochemical processes and occurred according to the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. AFM examination of copper surface confirmed that the inhibitor prevented corrosion by forming protective layer on its surface. The correlation between inhibitive effect and molecular structure was ascertained by density functional theory data.

  15. Corrosion inhibitor testing and selection for exploration and production: A user's perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Kapusta, S.D.

    1999-06-01

    Inhibitor users need simple, reliable, and representative tests to select the best product from a number of candidates. This article describes a procedure that can help users test and select inhibitors for carbon dioxide/hydrogen sulfide (CO[sub 2]/H[sub 2]S) corrosion in oil and gas production, in a fast and cost-effective manner. The selection is based on two criteria: performance (effectiveness) against corrosion, and compatibility with other chemicals. The compatibility of the inhibitor with the injection and production systems must be confirmed.

  16. Intentional synthesis of corrosion inhibitors based on secondary products of sugar cane processing

    SciTech Connect

    Ledovskykh, V.M.

    1988-07-01

    Secondary products of sugar cane processing (mosto, wax, furfurol) were studied as starting raw materials for creating inhibitors for different purposes and temporary means of protecting metals from corrosion. In order to protect metals in different corrosive media the following inhibitors have been developed: an inhibitor for acid solutions (pickling metals, acid washing of the equipment) based on high-tonnage water-soluble waste mosto and combined synergistic inhibitors based on mixtures of it with cation- and anion-active surfactants, including nitrogen- and sulfur-containing substances obtained by intentional synthesis of another secondary product, furfurol; inhibitors for two-phase media (oil recovery and refining) of the carbonic acid amide and 2-alkylimidazoline classes from sugar cane wax; and inhibitors comprised of Li-, Na-, Ca-, and Al-plastic greases from sugar cane wax for atmospheric conditions.

  17. Corrosion inhibitors for solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabony, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    Candidate materials were tested for their ability to limit corrosion under conditions that approximate those found in typical solar-energy system. In addition to presentation of data, report also includes discussion of different forms of corrosion and recommendations for future work.

  18. The Effect of Adding Corrosion Inhibitors into an Electroless Nickel Plating Bath for Magnesium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Rong; Su, Yongyao; Liu, Hongdong; Cheng, Jiang; Yang, Xin; Shao, Zhongcai

    2016-08-01

    In this work, corrosion inhibitors were added into an electroless nickel plating bath to realize nickel-phosphorus (Ni-P) coating deposition on magnesium alloy directly. The performance of five corrosion inhibitors was evaluated by inhibition efficiency. The results showed that only ammonium hydrogen fluoride (NH4HF2) and ammonium molybdate ((NH4)2MoO4) could be used as corrosion inhibitors for magnesium alloy in the bath. Moreover, compounding NH4HF2 and (NH4)2MoO4, the optimal concentrations were both at 1.5 ~ 2%. The deposition process of Ni-P coating was observed by using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). It showed corrosion inhibitors inhibited undesired dissolution of magnesium substrate during the electroless plating process. In addition, SEM observation indicated that the corrosion inhibition reaction and the Ni2+ replacement reaction were competitive at the initial deposition time. Both electrochemical analysis and thermal shock test revealed that the Ni-P coating exhibited excellent corrosion resistance and adhesion properties in protecting the magnesium alloy.

  19. Environmentally Compatible Vapor-Phase Corrosion Inhibitor for Space Shuttle Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, Howard L.; Hall, Phillip B.

    2003-01-01

    USA-SRB Element is responsible for the assembly and refurbishment of the non-motor components of the SRB as part of Space Shuttle. Thrust Vector Control (TVC) frames structurally support components of the TVC system located in the aft skirt of the SRB. TVC frames are exposed to the seacoast environment after refurbishment and, also, to seawater immersion after splashdown, and during tow-back to CCAFS-Hangar AF refurbishment facilities. During refurbishment operations it was found that numerous TVC frames were experiencing internal corrosion and coating failures, both from salt air and seawater intrusions. Inspectors using borescopes would visually examine the internal cavities of the complicated aluminum alloy welded tubular structure. It was very difficult for inspectors to examine cavity corners and tubing intersections and particularly, to determine the extent of the corrosion and coating anomalies. Physical access to TVC frame internal cavities for corrosion removal and coating repair was virtually impossible, and an improved method using a Liquid (water based) Vapor-phase Corrosion Inhibitor (LVCI) for preventing initiation of new corrosion, and mitigating and/or stopping existing corrosion growth was recommended in lieu of hazardous paint solvents and high VOC / solvent based corrosion inhibitors. In addition, the borescopic inspection method used to detect corrosion, and/or coating anomalies had severe limitations because of part geometry, and an improved non-destructive inspection (NDI) method using Neutron Radiography (N-Ray) was also recommended.

  20. Environmentally Compatible Vapor-Phase Corrosion Inhibitor for Space Shuttle Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, Howard L.; Hall, Phillip B.; Martin, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    USA-SRB Element is responsible for the assembly and refurbishment of the non-motor components of the SRB as part of Space Shuttle. Thrust Vector Control (TVC) frames structurally support components of the TVC system located in the aft skirt of the SRB (Solid Rocket Booster). TVC frames are exposed to the seacoast environment after refurbishment and, also, to seawater immersion after splashdown, and during tow-back to CCAFS-Hangar AF refurbishment facilities. During refurbishment operations it was found that numerous TVC frames were experiencing internal corrosion and coating failures, both from salt air and seawater intrusions. Inspectors using borescopes would visually examine the internal cavities of the complicated aluminum alloy welded tubular structure. It was very difficult for inspectors to examine cavity corners and tubing intersections and particularly. to determine the extent of the corrosion and coating anomalies. Physical access to TVC frame internal cavities for corrosion removal and coating repair was virtually impossible, and an improved method using a Liquid (water based) Vapor-phase Corrosion Inhibitor (LVCI) for preventing initiation of new corrosion, and mitigating and/or stopping existing corrosion growth was recommended in lieu of hazardous paint solvents and high VOC/solvent based corrosion inhibitors. In addition, the borescopic inspection method used to detect corrosion, and/or coating anomalies had severe limitations because of part geometry, and an improved non-destructive inspection (NDI) method using Neutron Radiography (N-Ray) was also recommended.

  1. Environmentally Compatible Vapor-Phase Corrosion Inhibitor for Space Shuttle Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, Howard L.; Hall, Phillip B.; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    USA-SRB Element is responsible for the assembly and refurbishment of the non-motor components of the SRB as part of Space Shuttle. Thrust Vector Control (TVC) frames structurally support components of the TVC system located in the aft skirt of the SRB. TVC frames are exposed to the seacoast environment after refurbishment and, also, to seawater immersion after splashdown, and during tow-back to CCAFS-Hangar AF refurbishment facilities. During refurbishment operations it was found that numerous TVC frames were experiencing internal corrosion and coating failures, both from salt air and seawater intrusions. Inspectors using borescopes would visually examine the internal cavities of the complicated aluminum alloy welded tubular structure. It was very difficult for inspectors to examine cavity corners and tubing intersections and particularly, to determine the extent of the corrosion and coating anomalies. Physical access to TVC frame internal cavities for corrosion removal and coating repair was virtually impossible, and an improved method using a Liquid (water based) Vapor-phase Corrosion Inhibitor (LVCI) for preventing initiation of new corrosion, and mitigating and/or stopping existing corrosion growth was recommended in lieu of hazardous paint solvents and high VOC/solvent based corrosion inhibitors. In addition, the borescopic inspection method used to detect corrosion, and/or coating anomalies had severe limitations because of part geometry, and an improved non-destructive inspection (NDI) method using Neutron Radiography (N-Ray) was also recommended.

  2. Effect of silicate-based corrosion inhibitor from rice husk ash on aluminum alloy in 0.5M HCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, N. K.; Mohamad, N.; Zulkafli, R.; Jalar, A.

    2013-05-01

    Silicate-based corrosion inhibitor prepared by treating silica powder extracted from rice husk ash with concentrated alkaline. The electrochemical behavior of the Al 6061 immersed in 0.5 M hydrochloric acid (HCl) has been studied using the measurements of weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization and optical or scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that, the optimum concentration of silicate-based corrosion inhibitor was prominent at 5 ppm. The small addition of silicate-based corrosion inhibitor was exhibited the decreasing of the weight loss of Al 6061 in acidic medium. SEM micrograph proved that the morphology of untreated Al 6061 with silicate-base corrosion inhibitor contributes more corrosion attack on sample compared to that treated Al 6061. The purpose of this research is to understand the effect of silicate-based corrosion inhibitor concentration yielded from rice husk ash on aluminum alloy.

  3. Fouling characteristics of cooling tower water containing corrosion inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Santoso, E.

    1987-01-01

    Corrosion inhibitors investigated included zinc-chromate and phosphates. In addition, additives including polyacrylate and phosphonate (HEDP and AMP) were used to determine their effectiveness as antifoulants. The tests were conducted in a simulated cooling tower water system. The parameters investigated were: test section surface temperature 130, 145 and 160{degree}F, velocity in test section 3.0, 5.5 and 8.5 ft/sec, pH 6.0 -8.0, and material of the fouling surface (stainless steel, carbon steel, 90/10 copper/nickel, and admiralty brass). The water bulk temperature in all tests was 115{degree}F. The water had a total hardness of 800-1000 ppm as CaCO{sub 3}, total sulfate of 800-1000 ppm as SO{sub 4} and silica of 40-45 ppm as SiO{sub 2}. For each test, a fouling resistance - time curve was obtained. This curve was fitted to the equation Rf = Rf (1-exp(-({theta}-{theta}d)/{theta}c)) to yield the values of {theta}c and Rf{sup *}. Rf is the fouling resistance predicted by the regression equation, Rf{sup *} is the asymptotic fouling resistance, {theta} is time, {theta}d is dead time and {theta}c is the time constant for the asymptotic decay. The values of {theta}c and Rf{sup *} from regression analysis have been correlated with the various parameters by the Heat Transfer Research, Inc., (HTRI) fouling model. For the range of conditions studied, the correlation equations relate the fouling resistance, Rf, to the surface temperature, wall shear stress and water quality. Seventeen different water qualities were investigated to determine the values of 5 parameters, which are specific for each water quality. For each of the seventeen water qualities studied threshold curves for three threshold values of Rf{sup *} have been developed as a function of velocity and surface temperature. These curves are useful to obtain the conditions required to maintain a desired value of Rf{sup *} in a heat exchanger.

  4. The evaluation of corrosion inhibitor film persistency using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and electrochemical noise analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Y.J.; Kinsella, B.; Bailey, S.

    1996-10-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and electrochemical noise analysis (ENA) were used as combined techniques to study and evaluate the film persistency of several commercial batch treatment inhibitors which are used for protecting oil-wells, gas-wells or pipelines from CO{sub 2} corrosion. It was found that the inhibitors film deterioration was accompanied by typical changes in the EIS spectra, which could be used as indicators for monitoring inhibitor film breakdown. ENA was shown to be able to continuously follow and monitor the inhibitor film deterioration processes. The noise resistance (R{sub noise}) was confirmed to be strongly correlated to linear polarization resistance (R{sub p}) and this correlation was explained based on a concept called statistical linear polarization. The presence of the hydrocarbon phase and CO{sub 2} corrosion product scale were found to be factors which greatly affect batch treatment inhibitor film persistency.

  5. Electrochemical methods for monitoring performance of corrosion inhibitor under multiphase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Gopal, M.

    1999-07-01

    The corrosion inhibitor is the main tool for preventing internal corrosion in carbon steel pipelines, which are used to transport multiphase mixtures from oil production. This paper presents results of an imidazoline based inhibitor using the Electrochemical Noise (ECN) and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) techniques in a multiphase flow pipeline. ECN and EIS measurements were made simultaneously in a 101.6mm I.D., 15m long acrylic pipeline using saltwater and carbon dioxide mixtures. Full pipe flow was studied for liquid velocity of 1.25 m/s and slug flow for Froude numbers 6 and 9. Experiments were carried out at a constant pressure of 136kPa and temperature of 40 C. The ECN signals and EIS spectra of blank and inhibition tests were obtained. The ECN technique is able to monitor the inhibitor film formation continuously. The current noise fluctuation is correlated to the corrosion rate for both blank test and inhibitor test. The higher current fluctuation indicates higher corrosion rates. Different EIS spectra were obtained for blank and inhibitor studies. The simple charge transfer process was seen to occur for blank tests while charge transfer and diffusion processes were taking place under inhibitor effects.

  6. Use of the scanning reference electrode technique for the evaluation of environmentally friendly, nonchromate corrosion inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, S.M.; McMurray, H.N.; Worsley, D.A.

    1999-11-01

    The scanning reference electrode technique (SRET) has been used to study the influence of a range of anodic and cathodic corrosion inhibitors on patterns of localized corrosion occurring on the intact zinc surface of galvanized sheet steel. SRET spatially can resolve localized anodic and cathodic activity occurring across the zinc surface had has highlighted some promising novel inhibitor species (i.e., rare-earth metal salts containing cerium [III], lanthanum [III], and yttrium [III] cations). Conversely, anodic inhibitor systems containing tungstate (WO{sub 4}{sup 2}{minus}) and molybdate (MoO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}) anions have been shown to induce severe pitting corrosion accelerating perforation of the zinc coating and exposing the steel substrate.

  7. Synthesis of Oxide Nanoparticles in Hybrid Nanocomposite Coatings as Nanoreservoirs of Corrosion Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirhady Tavandashti, Nahid; Sanjabi, Sohrab

    Nanostructured hybrid silica/epoxy films containing boehmite nanoparticles were investigated in the present work as pretreatments for AA2024 alloy. To produce the nanocomposite sol-gel films, boehmite nanoparticles prepared from hydrolysis/condensation of aluminum isopropoxide (AlI) were doped into another hybrid organosiloxane sol. The produced oxide nanoparticles have the capability to act as nanoreservoirs of corrosion inhibitors, releasing them controllably to protect the metallic substrate from corrosion. For this purpose the corrosion inhibitor, cerium nitrate, was introduced into the sol-gel system via loading the nanoparticles. The morphology and the structure of the hybrid sol-gel films were studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The corrosion protection properties of the films were investigated by Potentiodynamic Scanning (PDS) and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). The results show that the presence of boehmite nanoparticles highly improved the corrosion protection performance of the silica/epoxy coatings. Moreover, they can act as nanoreservoirs of corrosion inhibitors and provide prolonged release of cerium ions, offering a self-healing property to the film.

  8. Evaluation of corrosion inhibitor film persistency by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.J.

    1996-08-01

    Film persistency of commercially available oilfield corrosion inhibitors has been evaluated in CO{sub 2}-saturated 5% sodium chloride solution using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The effect of inhibitor concentration and contact time on inhibitor film persistency was also investigated. This study demonstrates that EIS is a feasible method for evaluating and ranking inhibitor film persistency and can be used to monitor inhibitor film life. EIS can provide the corrosion rate and characteristics of the inhibited film and generate the parameters related to the specific inhibitor film. It was found that there is an excellent correlation between an EIS parameter, namely the high breakpoint frequency at a 45{degree} phase angle and inhibitor film persistency. The identification of this correlation, for which Chevron has been granted a patent, is significant because there are advantages associated with measuring this parameter. This discovery enables EIS to be used in the field to monitor and optimize corrosion inhibition programs, thus reducing the chemical and operation costs.

  9. A Theoretical Study of Carbohydrates as Corrosion Inhibitors of Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, Salim M.; Ali-Shattle, Elbashir E.; Ali, Nozha M.

    2013-09-01

    The inhibitive effect of fructose, glucose, lactose, maltose, and sucrose against the iron corrosion is investigated using density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-31 G level (d) to search the relation between the molecular structure and corrosion inhibition. The electronic properties such as the energy of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO), the energy of lowest unoccupied orbital (LUMO), the energy gap (LUMO-HOMO), quantum chemical parameters such as hardness, softness, the fraction of the electron transferred, and the electrophilicity index are reported. The inhibition efficiency of the investigated carbohydrates follows the trend: maltose

  10. Multiphysics modelling, quantum chemistry and risk analysis for corrosion inhibitor design and lifetime prediction.

    PubMed

    Taylor, C D; Chandra, A; Vera, J; Sridhar, N

    2015-01-01

    Organic corrosion inhibitors can provide an effective means to extend the life of equipment in aggressive environments, decrease the environmental, economic, health and safety risks associated with corrosion failures and enable the use of low cost steels in place of corrosion resistant alloys. To guide the construction of advanced models for the design and optimization of the chemical composition of organic inhibitors, and to develop predictive tools for inhibitor performance as a function of alloy and environment, a multiphysics model has been constructed following Staehle's principles of "domains and microprocesses". The multiphysics framework provides a way for science-based modelling of the various phenomena that impact inhibitor efficiency, including chemical thermodynamics and speciation, oil/water partitioning, effect of the inhibitor on multiphase flow, surface adsorption and self-assembled monolayer formation, and the effect of the inhibitor on cathodic and anodic reaction pathways. The fundamental tools required to solve the resulting modelling from a first-principles perspective are also described. Quantification of uncertainty is significant to the development of lifetime prediction models, due to their application for risk management. We therefore also discuss how uncertainty analysis can be coupled with the first-principles approach laid out in this paper. PMID:25912625

  11. 21 CFR 178.3300 - Corrosion inhibitors used for steel or tinplate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Corrosion inhibitors used for steel or tinplate. 178.3300 Section 178.3300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: ADJUVANTS, PRODUCTION AIDS, AND SANITIZERS Certain Adjuvants...

  12. Amine neutralized alkenylsuccinic anhydride propylene glycol adducts as corrosion inhibitors for hydrocarbon fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, G.R.

    1989-10-17

    This patent describes a corrosion inhibitor composition for hydrocarbon fuels from the group consisting of gasolines and diesel fuel oils. It comprises: a C{sub 10}-C{sub 24} alkenyl succinic anhydride esterified with between 0.5-1.5 moles of a water-soluble glycol and then neutralized with an aliphatic hydrocarbon amine.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF AN ENVIRONMENTALLY BENIGN MICROBIAL INHIBITOR TO CONTROL INTERNAL PIPELINE CORROSION

    SciTech Connect

    Bill W. Bogan; Brigid M. Lamb; Gemma Husmillo; Kristine Lowe; J. Robert Paterek; John J. Kilbane II

    2004-12-01

    The overall program objective is to develop and evaluate environmentally benign agents or products that are effective in the prevention, inhibition, and mitigation of microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) in the internal surfaces of metallic natural gas pipelines. The goal is to develop one or more environmentally benign (a.k.a. ''green'') products that can be applied to maintain the structure and dependability of the natural gas infrastructure. Various chemicals that inhibit the growth and/or the metabolism of corrosion-associated microbes such as sulfate reducing bacteria, denitrifying bacteria, and methanogenic bacteria were evaluated to determine their ability to inhibit corrosion in experiments utilizing pure and mixed bacterial cultures, and planktonic cultures as well as mature biofilms. Planktonic cultures are easier to inhibit than mature biofilms but several compounds were shown to be effective in decreasing the amount of metal corrosion. Of the compounds tested hexane extracts of Capsicum pepper plants and molybdate were the most effective inhibitors of sulfate reducing bacteria, bismuth nitrate was the most effective inhibitor of nitrate reducing bacteria, and 4-((pyridine-2-yl)methylamino)benzoic acid (PMBA) was the most effective inhibitor of methanogenic bacteria. All of these compounds were demonstrated to minimize corrosion due to MIC, at least in some circumstances. The results obtained in this project are consistent with the hypothesis that any compound that disrupts the metabolism of any of the major microbial groups present in corrosion-associated biofilms shows promise in limiting the amount/rate of corrosion. This approach of controlling MIC by controlling the metabolism of biofilms is more environmentally benign than the current approach involving the use of potent biocides, and warrants further investigation.

  14. Decyl glucoside as a corrosion inhibitor for magnesium-air battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deyab, M. A.

    2016-09-01

    In this research, the effects of decyl glucoside (DG) on the corrosion inhibition and battery performance of Mg-air battery have been investigated. Chemical and electrochemical techniques have been used to evaluate the corrosion rate and inhibitor efficiency. Mg surface has been characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). A significant reduction in the corrosion rate of Mg in battery electrolyte (3.5% NaCl solution) has been observed in the presence of DG surfactant. Maximum inhibition efficiency (>94%) is achieved at critical micelle concentration of DG surfactant (CMC = 2.5 mM). The presence of DG surfactant increases the activation energy of the corrosion reaction. Physisorption mechanism has been suggested for the inhibition action of DG surfactant. The Mg-air battery containing DG surfactant offers higher operating voltage, discharge capacity and anodic utilization than in its absence.

  15. Antibacterial drugs as corrosion inhibitors for bronze surfaces in acidic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotaru, Ileana; Varvara, Simona; Gaina, Luiza; Muresan, Liana Maria

    2014-12-01

    The present study is aiming to investigate the effect of four antibiotics (amoxicillin, ciprofloxacin, doxycycline and streptomycin,) belonging to different classes of antibacterial drugs on bronze corrosion in a solution simulating an acid rain (pH 4). Due to their ability to form protective films on the metal surface, the tested antibiotics act as corrosion inhibitors for bronze. The antibiotics were tested at various concentrations in order to determine the optimal concentration range for the best corrosion inhibiting effect. In evaluating the inhibition efficiency, polarization curves, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, SEM and XPS measurements were used. Moreover, a correlation between the inhibition efficiency of some antibacterial drugs and certain molecular parameters was determined by quantum chemical computations. Parameters like energies EHOMO and ELUMO and HOMO-LUMO energy gap were used for correlation with the corrosion data.

  16. The use of an organic inhibitor to control corrosion in alkanolamine units processing gas containing CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, E.F.; Edwards, M.A.

    1999-11-01

    Alkanolamine plants processing natural gas and gas liquids containing only carbon dioxide as the contaminant acid gas are often troubled by high corrosion rates. Capital constraints sometimes require the plant operator to use carbon steel in the construction of piping and vessels in locations where stainless steel might otherwise be employed. Rich amine acid gas loadings sometimes exceed recommended or design levels, increasing the corrosivity of the system. Typical corrosion inhibitor products and packages are sometime ineffective in controlling corrosion at desired levels when one or both of the above conditions are present. This paper presents a procedure used to test the effectiveness of corrosion inhibitors on-stream and demonstrates the effectiveness of a sulfur-containing inhibitor in controlling CO{sub 2} corrosion in gas/gas and gas/liquid amine plants.

  17. Theoretical study of inhibition efficiencies of some amino acids on corrosion of carbon steel in acidic media: green corrosion inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dehdab, Maryam; Shahraki, Mehdi; Habibi-Khorassani, Sayyed Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition efficiencies of three amino acids [tryptophan (B), tyrosine (c), and serine (A)] have been studied as green corrosion inhibitors on corrosion of carbon steel using density functional theory (DFT) method in gas and aqueous phases. Quantum chemical parameters such as EH OMO (highest occupied molecular orbital energy), E LUMO (lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy), hardness (η), polarizability ([Formula: see text]), total negative charges on atoms (TNC), molecular volume (MV) and total energy (TE) have been calculated at the B3LYP level of theory with 6-311++G** basis set. Consistent with experimental data, theoretical results showed that the order of inhibition efficiency is tryptophan (B) > tyrosine (C) > serine (A). In order to determine the possible sites of nucleophilic and electrophilic attacks, local reactivity has been evaluated through Fukui indices. PMID:26347374

  18. Electrochemical and surface studies of some Porphines as corrosion inhibitor for J55 steel in sweet corrosion environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ambrish; Lin, Yuanhua; Ansari, K. R.; Quraishi, M. A.; Ebenso, Eno. E.; Chen, Songsong; Liu, Wanying

    2015-12-01

    Corrosion inhibition of J55 steel in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution saturated with CO2 by the three Porphines 5,10,15,20-Tetra(4-pyridyl)-21H,23H-porphine (P1), 5,10,15,20-Tetraphenyl-21H,23H-porphine (P2), 5,10,15,20-Tetrakis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-21H,23H-porphine (P3), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), Contact angle measurement, scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Adsorption of such Porphines on the J55 steel surface obeyed to the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), SECM, and Contact angle results confirm the formation of inhibitor film on J55 steel surface thereby mitigating corrosion.

  19. Curcumin Derivatives as Green Corrosion Inhibitors for α-Brass in Nitric Acid Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouda, A. S.; Elattar, K. M.

    2012-11-01

    1,7- Bis-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-phenyl)-hepta-1,6-diene-4-arylazo-3,5-dione I-V have been investigated as corrosion inhibitors for α-brass in 2 M nitric acid solution using weight-loss and galvanostatic polarization techniques. The efficiency of the inhibitors increases with the increase in the inhibitor concentration but decreases with a rise in temperature. The conjoint effect of the curcumin derivatives and KSCN has also been studied. The apparent activation energy ( E a*) and other thermodynamic parameters for the corrosion process have also been calculated. The galvanostatic polarization data indicated that the inhibitors were of mixed-type, but the cathode is more polarized than the anode. The slopes of the cathodic and anodic Tafel lines ( b c and b a) are maintained approximately equal for various inhibitor concentrations. However, the value of the Tafel slopes increases together as inhibitor concentration increases. The adsorption of these compounds on α-brass surface has been found to obey the Frumkin's adsorption isotherm. The mechanism of inhibition was discussed in the light of the chemical structure of the undertaken inhibitors.

  20. DETERMINATION OF CORROSION INHIBITOR CRITERIA FOR TYPE III IIIA TANKS DURING SALT DISSOLUTION OPERATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B

    2008-01-04

    Preparation of high level waste for vitrification involves in part the dissolution of salt cake from the carbon steel storage tanks. The salt crystals composing this cake are high in nitrate concentration with the interstitial liquid being high in hydroxide and nitrite concentration. During the salt dissolution process, a stage is reached in which the inhibitors, hydroxide and nitrite, are insufficient to prevent nitrate stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and fall outside the requirements of the corrosion control program. Additional inhibitors, which are necessary to meet the requirements, may be counterproductive to the efficiency of the process and waste minimization. Corrosion testing was initiated to better characterize the necessary inhibitor concentration for high nitrate waste during salt dissolution processing. A four-phase test program is being conducted: (1) electrochemical characterization, (2) accelerated or polarized U-bend testing, (3) long-term (non-polarized) U-bend testing and (4) vapor space U-bend tests. Electrochemical testing, which included cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP), linear polarization resistance (LPR) and open-circuit potential (OCP) measurements, was performed to identify stress corrosion cracking susceptibility, to characterize pitting resistance and to determine the general corrosion rate. Polarized U-bend tests were utilized to assess the effect of minimum inhibitor concentrations and heat treatment on SCC and to determine test parameters for future long-term U-bend testing. Results from CPP, LPR and OCP tests demonstrated that carbon steel formed a protective oxide film and the potential became electropositive during exposure to the waste at all inhibitor concentrations. The tenacity of this film improved as the inhibitor concentration level was increased and the temperature was decreased. This passive film increased the resistance to localized corrosion significantly. Therefore if any of these inhibitor levels are selected

  1. Chitosan as a green inhibitor for copper corrosion in acidic medium.

    PubMed

    El-Haddad, Mahmoud N

    2013-04-01

    The behavior of copper in 0.5 M HCl acid containing different concentrations of chitosan has been studied by weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and electrochemical frequency modulation (EFM) measurements. Potentiodynamic polarization measurements show that the chitosan acts essentially as a mixed-type inhibitor. EFM can be used as a rapid and non destructive technique for corrosion rate measurements without prior knowledge of Tafel constants. The results of EIS indicate that the value of CPEs tends to decrease and both charge transfer resistance and inhibition efficiency tend to increase by increasing the inhibitor concentration. The investigated inhibitor has shown good inhibition efficiency in 0.5 M HCl. The adsorption of inhibitor on the copper surface obeys Langmuir's isotherm. Metal surface characterization was performed using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Also, the relationship between quantum chemical calculations and experimental inhibition efficiency of the inhibitor was discussed. PMID:23298849

  2. [Main results of experimental studies on the toxicology of inhibitors of atmospheric corrosion of metals].

    PubMed

    Paustovskaia, V V

    1990-01-01

    Basing on experimental toxicity research it was established that, out of 50 atmosphere metal corrosion inhibitors, some 14 per cent were found extremely hazardous, 42 per cent--of high level hazardous, 33 percent--of moderate and 11 per cent--of low hazardous. Relationships were identified between the structure of polymethylene amine salts, azole compounds and carbonic acid, and the way they influence human organism. It was also found that inhibitors exercise a polytropic action in man, the toxicity action being concentrated on oxidation processes, and the inhibitors specifically influence protein, carbohydrate and phosphoric metabolisms, as well as the red blood system. This causes functional and structural disorders of CNS and in the parenchymal organs. Inhibitors are characterized by local and skin-resorption actions, their degree and specific features depending on their chemical structures. 22 MACs of working zone inhibitors are proposed, along with early diagnostic tests and preventive measures. PMID:2351297

  3. Ab initio modeling of the bonding of benzotriazole corrosion inhibitor to reduced and oxidized copper surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kokalj, Anton

    2015-01-01

    The bonding of benzotriazole-an outstanding corrosion inhibitor for copper-on reduced and oxidized copper surfaces is discussed on the basis of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Calculations reveal that benzotriazole is able to bond with oxide-free and oxidized copper surfaces and on both of them it bonds significantly stronger to coordinatively unsaturated Cu sites. This suggests that benzotriazole is able to passivate the reactive under-coordinated surface sites that are plausible microscopic sites for corrosion attack. Benzotriazole can adsorb in a variety of different forms, yet it forms a strong molecule-surface bond only in deprotonated form. The bonding is even stronger when the deprotonated form is incorporated into organometallic adcomplexes. This is consistent with existing experimental evidence that benzotriazole inhibits corrosion by forming protective organometallic complexes. It is further shown that adsorption of benzotriazole considerably reduces the metal work function, which is a consequence of a large permanent molecular dipole and a properly oriented adsorption structure. It is argued that such a pronounced effect on the work function might be relevant for corrosion inhibition, because it should diminish the anodic corrosion reaction, which is consistent with existing experimental evidence that benzotriazole, although a mixed type inhibitor, predominantly affects the anodic reaction. PMID:25955130

  4. Application of carbohydrate polymers as corrosion inhibitors for metal substrates in different media: A review.

    PubMed

    Umoren, Saviour A; Eduok, Ubong M

    2016-04-20

    Naturally occurring polysaccharides are biopolymers existing as products of biochemical processes in living systems. A wide variety of them have been employed for various material applications; as binders, coatings, drug delivery, corrosion inhibitors etc. This review describes the application of some green and benign carbohydrate biopolymers and their derivatives for inhibition of metal corrosion. Their modes and mechanisms of protection have also been described as directly related to their macromolecular weights, chemical composition and their unique molecular and electronic structures. For instance, cellulose and chitosan possess free amine and hydroxyl groups capable of metal ion chelation and their lone pairs of electrons are readily utilized for coordinate bonding at the metal/solution interface. Some of the carbohydrate polymers reviewed in this work are either pure or modified forms; their grafted systems and nanoparticle composites with multitude potentials for metal protection applications have also been highlighted. Few inhibitors grafted to introduce more compact structures with polar groups capable of increasing the total energy of the surface have also been mentioned. Exudate gums, carboxymethyl and hydroxyethyl cellulose, starch, pectin and pectates, substituted/modified chitosans, carrageenan, dextrin/cyclodextrins and alginates have been elaborately reviewed, including the effects of halide additives on their anticorrosion performances. Aspects of computational/theoretical approach to corrosion monitoring have been recommended for future studies. This non-experimental approach to corrosion could foster a better understanding of the corrosion inhibition processes by correlating actual inhibition mechanisms with molecular structures of these carbohydrate polymers. PMID:26876859

  5. A pharmaceutical product as corrosion inhibitor for carbon steel in acidic environments.

    PubMed

    Samide, Adriana

    2013-01-01

    A pharmaceutical product, Trimethoprim (TMP), IUPAC name: 5-(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzyl)pyrimidine-2,4-diamine was investigated, as inhibitor to prevent carbon steel corrosion in acidic environments. The study was performed using weight loss and electrochemical measurements, in temperatures ranging between 25-55°C. The surface morphology before and after corrosion of carbon steel in 1.0 M HCl solution in the presence and absence of TMP was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The inhibition efficiency (IE) increased with the increasing of the inhibitor concentration, reaching a maximum value of 92% at 25°C and 0.9 mM TMP, and decreased with increasing temperature. The inhibition of carbon steel corrosion by TMP can be attributed to the adsorption ability of inhibitor molecules onto the reactive sites of the metal surface. The adsorption is spontaneous and it is best described by the Langmuir isotherm. The apparent activation energy (E(a)) for the corrosion process in the absence and presence of TMP was evaluated from Arrhenius equation, to elucidate its inhibitive properties. PMID:23043337

  6. Performance evaluation of pectin as ecofriendly corrosion inhibitor for X60 pipeline steel in acid medium: experimental and theoretical approaches.

    PubMed

    Umoren, Saviour A; Obot, Ime B; Madhankumar, A; Gasem, Zuhair M

    2015-06-25

    The corrosion inhibition effect of pectin (a biopolymer) for X60 pipeline steel in HCl medium was investigated using weight loss, electrochemical, water contact angle measurements, and scanning electron microscopy techniques. The results obtained show that pectin acts as a good corrosion inhibitor for X60 steel. Inhibition efficiency increased with increase in pectin concentration and temperature. Potentiodynamic polarization results reveal that pectin could be classified as a mixed-type corrosion inhibitor with predominant control of the cathodic reaction. The effective corrosion inhibition potential of pectin could be related to the adsorption of pectin molecules at the metal/solution interface which is found to accord with the Langmuir adsorption isotherm model and a protective film formation. Quantum chemical calculations provided insights into the active sites and reactivity parameters governing pectin activity as a good corrosion inhibitor for X60 steel. PMID:25839822

  7. Investigation of some green compounds as corrosion and scale inhibitors for cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Quraishi, M.A.; Farooqi, I.H.; Saini, P.A. )

    1999-05-01

    The performance of an open-recirculating cooling system, an important component in most industries, is affected by corrosion and scale formation. Numerous additives have been used in the past for the control of corrosion and scale formation. Effects of the naturally occurring compounds azadirachta indica (leaves), punica granatum (shell), and momordica charantia (fruits), on corrosion of mild steel in 3% sodium chloride (NaCl) were assessed using weight loss, electrochemical polarization, and impedance techniques. Extracts of the compounds exhibited excellent inhibition efficiencies comparable to that of hydroxyethylidine diphosphonic acid (HEDP), the most preferred cooling water inhibitor. The compounds were found effective under static and flowing conditions. Extracts were quite effective in retarding formation of scales, and the maximum antiscaling efficiency was exhibited by the extract of azadirachta indica (98%). The blowdown of the cooling system possessed color and chemical oxygen demand (COD). Concentrations of these parameters were reduced by an adsorption process using activated carbon as an adsorbent.

  8. Effect of B-Mo-W Complex Inhibitor on Corrosion of Mild Steel in 55% LiBr Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jielan; Liang, Chenghao; Huang, Naibao

    2015-11-01

    The inhibition effects of B-Mo-W complex inhibitor on corrosion of mild steel in 55% LiBr solution were investigated using weight-loss method, electrochemistry tests, SEM, EDX, and XRD. The ingredients of B-Mo-W complex inhibitor included organic phosphonic acid B, Na2MoO4, and Na2WO4. The results revealed that B-Mo-W complex inhibitor was capable of inhibiting the corrosion of mild steel in 55% LiBr solution, exhibiting high inhibition efficiencies around 97.7%. B-Mo-W complex inhibitor promoted the formation of a protective passive film composed of Fe, Mo, W, and O elements. The passive film decreased the corrosion rate, improved the electrochemistry performance, and enhanced anti-corrosion ability of mild steel.

  9. Enhancement of active corrosion protection via combination of inhibitor-loaded nanocontainers.

    PubMed

    Tedim, J; Poznyak, S K; Kuznetsova, A; Raps, D; Hack, T; Zheludkevich, M L; Ferreira, M G S

    2010-05-01

    The present work reports the synthesis of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) nanocontainers loaded with different corrosion inhibitors (vanadate, phosphate, and 2-mercaptobenzothiazolate) and the characterization of the resulting pigments by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The anticorrosion activity of these nanocontainers with respect to aluminum alloy AA2024 was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The bare metallic substrates were immersed in dispersions of nanocontainers in sodium chloride solution and tested to understand the inhibition mechanisms and efficiency. The nanocontainers were also incorporated into commercial coatings used for aeronautical applications to study the active corrosion protection properties in systems of industrial relevance. The results show that an enhancement of the active protection effect can be reached when nanocontainers loaded with different inhibitors are combined in the same protective coating system. PMID:20455547

  10. AC impedance spectroscopy - A dynamic tool for the design of corrosion inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Growcock, F.B.; Jasinski, R.J.

    1988-05-01

    Corrosion of steel during oil well acidizing or acid pickling treatments can be controlled effectively and economically with corrosion inhibitors. It is generally accepted that these additives function by forming an adherent barrier on the steel surface, the nature of which depends on various physiochemical properties of the inhibitor. Work to date has established that acetylenic alcohols first chemisorb and subsequently polymerize on steel surfaces. ..cap alpha.., BETA-Unsaturated aldehydes and ..cap alpha..-alkenylphenones behave in a similar manner. On the other hand, quaternary nitrogen salts adsorb electrostatically and do not appear to form macroscopic films. In this paper, the authors describe some AC impedance spectroscopy studies they have undertaken with the objective of elucidating the roles that adsorption and film formation play in the inhibition mechanisms of the compounds mentioned above.

  11. Mechanisms of corrosion inhibitors used in acidizing wells

    SciTech Connect

    Frenier, W.W.; Growcock, F.B.; Lopp, V.R. )

    1988-11-01

    Two model compounds, n-dodecylpyridinium bromide (n-DDPB) and 1-octyn-3-ol, were tested in HCL acid as inhibitors for J55 oilfield steel. This paper describes the kinetic and chemical analyses conducted to arrive at inhibition mechanisms for these model compounds. These studies show that the pyridinium forms a weak bond with the chloride-covered surface and is sensitive to temperature and (HCl). Octynol, however, chemisorbs and produces a film that contains a reaction product of the acetylenic alcohol. This film is quite insensitive to changes in temperature and (HCl).

  12. Electrochemical research on corrosion behavior of A3 steel in compound sodium molybadate and organic inhibitor solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, C. X.; Chen, Y. M.; Xu, H. W.; Zhang, M.; Chen, M.; Xue, M.; Wu, J. Y.; Huang, C. S.

    2015-07-01

    The electrochemical corrosion behavior of A3 in compound sodium molybdate and organic inhibitor solution was tested by the electrochemical workstation method. The concentration of the compound inhibitor set to range 250 mg/L to 3000 mg/L. The polarization curve results of A3 in different concentration inhibitor solutions show that the inhibitor markedly represses the anodic processes. The EIS has two time constant. The extreme concentration is 1500 mg/L.

  13. Electrochemical Studies on Silicate and Bicarbonate Ions for Corrosion Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohorich, Michael E.; Lamb, Joshua; Chandra, Dhanesh; Daemen, Jaak; Rebak, Raul B.

    2010-10-01

    Several types of carbon and high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steels are being considered for use in the underground reinforcement of the Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository. In this study, potentiodynamic polarization under reducing conditions was used to determine the corrosion rates (CRs) and passivity behavior of AISI 4340 steel using different combinations of sodium silicate (Na2SiO3) and sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3), in both pure water (PW) and simulated seawater (SW, 3.5 pct NaCl). These experiments were carried out to examine the potential inhibiting properties of the silicate or bicarbonate ions on the surface of the steel. The addition of sodium silicate to solution reduced the observed CR at room temperature to 19 μm/y at 0.005 M concentration and 7 μm/y at 0.025 M concentration in PW. The addition of sodium bicarbonate increased the CR from 84 μm/y (C = 0.1 M) to 455 μm/y (C = 1 M). These same behaviors were also observed at higher temperatures.

  14. Effect of precorrosion on the performance of inhibitors for CO{sub 2} corrosion of carbon steel

    SciTech Connect

    Gulbrandsen, E.; Nesic, S.; Stangeland, A.; Burchardt, T.; Sundaer, B.; Hesjevik, S.M.; Skjerve, S.

    1998-12-31

    Four commercially available, water soluble corrosion inhibitors for CO{sub 2} corrosion have been tested in the laboratory on carbon steel specimens that were corroded for up to 18 days in the medium prior to inhibitor addition. The tests were performed at 20--50 C, pH 5, 1 bar CO{sub 2}, 1--3 wt% NaCl in glass cells and a glass loop. The results show that inhibitor performances were impaired with increasing precorrosion time and increasing temperature. The resulting corrosion attack was localized within deep pits. The detrimental effect is influenced both by the nature of the steel and the inhibitor composition. The inhibitor failure is related to the formation of a cementite layer at the steel surface.

  15. Corrosion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slabaugh, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Presents some materials for use in demonstration and experimentation of corrosion processes, including corrosion stimulation and inhibition. Indicates that basic concepts of electrochemistry, crystal structure, and kinetics can be extended to practical chemistry through corrosion explanation. (CC)

  16. Study of caffeine as corrosion inhibitors of carbon steel in chloride solution containing hydrogen sulfide using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solehudin, Agus; Berman, Ega Taqwali; Nurdin, Isdiriayani

    2015-09-01

    The corrosion behaviour of steel surface in the absence and presence of caffeine in 3.5% NaCl solution containing dissolved H2S gas is studied using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The experimental results of carbon steel corrosion in 3.5% NaCl solution containing 500 mg/l H2S at different caffeine concentrations showed that corrosion rate of carbon steel decreases with increasing of caffeine concentrations from 0 to 0,1 mmol/l. Whereas, the corrosion rate increase with increasing of caffeine concentrations from 1 to 10 mmol/l. It is clear that no inhibition efficiency increases with increasing inhibitor concentration. The optimum value of inhibition efficiency was 90% at a caffeine concentration of 0.1 mmol/l. This suggests that caffeine's performance as a corrosion inhibitor is more effective at a concentration of 0.1 mmol/l.

  17. [Effect of several inhibitors of atmospheric metal corrosion (amines of the polymethylene series) on embryogenesis].

    PubMed

    Bariliak, I R; Paustovskaia, V V; Torbin, V F

    1978-01-01

    The influence of some polymethylene amines (inhibitors protecting metals from atmospheric corrosion) on the generative function in general and on the embryogenesis in particular was studied. Such inhibitors as MCDA-II (dicyclohexylamine salt dissolving in oil), HDA (dicyclohexylamine nitrate) and M-I (cyclohexylamine salt dissolving in oil) were investigated by intraorganic injection during the whole course of gestation (21 days), 2 and 4 months. The compounds in question were stated to possess a pronounced gonado- and embryotoxic effect depending on the dose and chemical composition of the substance. The least active was M-I inhibitor. Doses not affecting rat gonades were: for HDA--0.825 mg/kg, MCDA-II--4.7 mg/kg, M-I--34.9 mg/kg; their embryonic effects were 0.54, 2.35 and 349 mg/kg respectively. PMID:646657

  18. Effect of multi-functional inhibitors on the electrochemistry within a corrosion crack

    SciTech Connect

    Omura, H.

    1984-01-01

    The electrochemical and mass transport mechanisms in stress corrosion cracking, which depend on the rate of metal dissolution and production of hydrogen, have been used to establish analytically the electrode potential distribution within the crack. When crack growth occurs by enhanced anodic dissolution of the plastically strained tip, the electrode potential at the crack tip always is more active than at the crack mouth because of the electric potential gradient that exists in the electrolyte within the crack. This also gives rise to additional or alternative electrochemical reactions such as hydrogen evolution and anodic dissolution at the crack tip. Furthermore, because of the potential difference from the crack mouth, the electrochemical driving force becomes more favorable for the development of corrosion inside the crack. The analysis predicts the distribution of electrode potential within a crack, and theoretical results have been compared with experimental measurements recorded from a model electrode system. Under free corrosion, a small potential difference may cause a concentration change of Cl/sup -/ ion and increase the chloride attack. In order to reduce the chloride and hydrogen attack, multifunctional inhibitors, such as borax-nitrite with small amounts of surfactant such as MBT or amino-methyl-propanol, are excellent inhibitors. The surfactant interferes in the dissolution reaction and blocks active chloride ion and hydrogen ion by interacting synergistically with the passive film produced by the borax-nitrite, which results in development of a stronger and thicker protective film.

  19. Application of a cosmetic additive as an eco-friendly inhibitor for mild steel corrosion in HCl solution.

    PubMed

    Liao, Liu Li; Mo, Shi; Lei, Jing Lei; Luo, Hong Qun; Li, Nian Bing

    2016-07-15

    The use of the cosmetic ingredient cocamidopropylamine oxide (CAO) to inhibit the corrosion of steel in 0.5mol/LHCl is investigated. Electrochemical and weight loss methods were used to evaluate the inhibiting effect of CAO and the influences of inhibitor concentration and temperature were determined. It was found that CAO acted as a mix-type inhibitor and was adsorbed chemically onto the steel in HCl solution, and the maximum inhibition efficiency was found at critical micelle concentration (CMC) of CAO in tested corrosive media. Moreover, it was speculated that relationships of the two adsorption sites of the inhibitor and steel surface were different. PMID:27105388

  20. Indole Alkaloids of Alstonia angustifolia var. latifolia as Green Inhibitor for Mild Steel Corrosion in 1 M HCl Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja, Pandian Bothi; Qureshi, Ahmad Kaleem; Rahim, Afidah Abdul; Awang, Khalijah; Mukhtar, Mat Ropi; Osman, Hasnah

    2013-04-01

    The inhibition effect of mild steel (MS) corrosion in 1 M HCl was studied by the addition of indole alkaloids (crude) isolated from Alstonia angustifolia var. latifolia ( A. latifolia) leaves at 303 K. Potentiodynamic polarization, impedance spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analyses were used for this study. Results show that the isolated alkaloid extract of A. latifolia is a good inhibitor and exhibited maximum inhibition efficiency (above 80%) at concentrations between 3 and 5 mg/L. Polarization measurements indicated that the inhibitor does not alter the mechanism of either anodic or cathodic reactions and acted as mixed-type inhibitor. The inhibition efficiencies of both electrochemical techniques are found to be in good agreement and adsorption of inhibitor follows Langmuir isotherm. Adsorption of inhibitor over metal surface was well supported by the SEM studies, while FTIR studies evidenced the presence of indole alkaloids as green inhibitor that reduces the rate of corrosion.

  1. Task-specific ionic liquid as a new green inhibitor of mild steel corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowsari, E.; Payami, M.; Amini, R.; Ramezanzadeh, B.; Javanbakht, M.

    2014-01-01

    The corrosion inhibition effects of an imidazolium-based task specific ionic liquid (TSIL) were investigated on a low carbon steel in 1 M HCl solution. Samples were exposed to 1 M HCl solution without and with different concentrations of TSIL. Weight loss measurements, potentiodynamic polarization test, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), scanning electron microscope (SEM), atomic force microscope (AFM) and contact angle measurements were utilized to investigate the inhibition effects of TSIL. The results obtained from the polarization studies revealed that both the anodic and cathodic branches slopes affected in the presence of TSIL. It was shown that TSIL behaved as a mixed type inhibitor with a dominant effect on the anodic reaction rate depression. It was shown that the increase in polarization resistance and the decrease in corrosion current density were more pronounced using 100 mg/L of TSIL after 2 h immersion time. It was also shown that the adsorption of TSIL followed a Langmuir adsorption isotherm.

  2. In pursuit of non-phosphorus corrosion inhibitors for cold water cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wyman, D.P.

    1998-12-31

    An exploratory program was conducted to evaluate a number of polymers and carboxylic acid combinations with polymers as non-phosphorus containing, all organic corrosion inhibitors for cold water systems such as evaporative towers. The concentrations of treatment were approximately those which would obtain for current commercial formulations. There was a strong dependency of performance on the aggressiveness of the water, especially the conductivity. The polymers were adequate for non-aggressive waters, and one, polymaleic acid (as the sodium salt) performed reasonably in somewhat more corrosive systems. Certain alkenyl substituted dibasic acids were also found to perform well in the less challenging waters as did simpler dibasic materials such as maleic, fumaric and aspartic acids. A tetrabasic acid with the carboxyl groups located in proximity to each other, BTA, in combination with certain, but, not all, polymers showed considerable promise.

  3. Preparation of Some Eco-friendly Corrosion Inhibitors Having Antibacterial Activity from Sea Food Waste.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Mohamed H M; El-Hady, Mohamed F; Shehata, Hassan A H; Hegazy, Mohammad A; Hefni, Hassan H H

    2013-03-01

    Chitosan is one of the important biopolymers and it is extracted from exoskeletons of crustaceans in sea food waste. It is a suitable eco-friendly carbon steel corrosion inhibitor in acid media; the deacetylation degree of prepared chitosan is more than 85.16 %, and the molecular weight average is 109 kDa. Chitosan was modified to 2-N,N-diethylbenzene ammonium chloride N-oxoethyl chitosan (compound I), and 12-ammonium chloride N-oxododecan chitosan (compound II) as soluble water derivatives. The corrosion inhibition efficiency for carbon steel of compound (I) in 1 M HCl at varying temperature is higher than for chitosan and compound (II). However, the antibacterial activity of chitosan for Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida albicans is higher than for its derivatives, and the minimum inhibition concentration and minimum bacterial concentration of chitosan and its derivatives were carried out with the same strain. PMID:23420292

  4. A corrosion control concept by scale engineering: a novel green inhibitor applied for high temperature and pressure aqueous supercritical CO2 systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jiabin, Han; Carey, James W; Zhang, Jinsuo

    2011-01-27

    Traditional corrosion inhibitors are bio-toxic chemicals with organic components that bond to the fresh metal surface and thus isolate them from corrosive environments. The shortcoming of these inhibitors is that they are less effective in high-temperature and high-pressure environments, and where corrosion scale is formed or particulates are deposited. In this paper, we describe a novel green inorganic inhibitor made of environmentally friendly and cost-effective geo-material that was developed for high-temperature and high-pressure environments, particularly under scale-forming conditions. It inhibits corrosion by enhancing the protectiveness of corrosion scale. In contrast to traditional corrosion inhibitors which are efficient for bare surface corrosion but not effective with scale, the novel inhibitor has no effect on bare surface corrosion but greatly improves corrosion inhibition under scale-formation conditions. This is because a homogeneous scale doped with inhibitor component forms. This enhanced corrosion scale demonstrated excellent protection against corrosion. In high-pressure CO{sub 2} systems (pCO{sub 2}=10 Mpa, T=50 C and [NaCl]=1 wt%) without inhibitor, the bare-surface corrosion rate decreases from ca. 10 mm/y to 0.3 mm/year due to formation of scale. Application of a six hundred ppm solution ofthe new inorganic inhibitor reduced the corrosion rate to 0.01 mm/year, an additional factor of 30. The current inhibitor product was designed for application to CO{sub 2} systems that form corrosion scale, including but not limited to oil and gas wells, offshore production of oil and gas, CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced geothermal production involving CO{sub 2}.

  5. Corrosion damage of the surface of high-speed tool steel in acid-inhibitor pickling

    SciTech Connect

    Mindyuk, A.K.; Sholok, V.I.; Shvets, V.V. Gural', V.M.

    1988-01-01

    Profilograms were recorded of the surface of 20-mm-diameter 1.5-mm-thick specimens prepared from hardened and tempered R6M5 high-speed tool steel (62 HRC) and also of similar specimens subjected to the action of pure hydrochloric acid etching solution and of the same solutions with additions of KhOSP-10, KhOSP-10D, and urotropin inhibitors at 30, 60, and 90/sup 0/C for 4.0, 2.0, and 0.5 h, respectively. The analysis of corrosion damage and determination of the surface finish of the steel made it possible to develop the optimum method of acid-inhibitor pickling specifying the addition to the acid of 1.5 g/liter KhOSP-10 inhibitor and a temperature of 30/sup 0/C. This suppressed the corrosion rate, hydrogen impregnation and embrittlement, decarburization of the steel, and sensitivity to crack formation, and reduced the number of scrapped parts.

  6. Benzimidazole as corrosion inhibitor for heat treated 6061 Al- SiCp composite in acetic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacko, Melby; Nayak, Jagannath

    2015-06-01

    6061 Al-SiCpcomposite was solutionizedat 350 °C for 30 minutes and water quenched. It was then underaged at 140 °C (T6 treatment). The aging behaviour of the composite was studied using Rockwell B hardness measurement. Corrosion behaviour of the underaged sample was studied in different concentrations of acetic acid and at different temperatures. Benzimidazole at different concentrations was used for the inhibition studies. Inhibition efficiency of benzimidazole was calculated for different experimental conditions. Thermodynamic parameters were found out which suggested benzimidazole is an efficient inhibitor and it adsorbed on to the surface of composite by mixed adsorption where chemisorption is predominant.

  7. Dianils: New and effective corrosion inhibitors for oil-well steel (N-80) and mild steel in boiling hydrochloric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Quraishi, M.A.; Jamal, D.

    2000-02-01

    Selected condensation products of aromatic aldehydes and p-phenylenediamine have been synthesized and evaluated as corrosion inhibitors for mild steel (MS) and oil-well steel (N-80) in 15% hydrochloric acid (HCl) at 105 C {+-} 2 C by the weight loss method. All the condensation products showed excellent performance. 2,4-dicinnamyledene aminophenylene (DCAP) was found to be the best corrosion inhibitor. It exhibited 99.75% inhibition efficiency (IE) for MS and 99.12% for N-80 steel at 5,000 ppm of inhibitor concentration. The potentiodynamic polarization studies carried out at room temperature on MS in 15% HCl containing 500 ppm of condensation products showed that all the investigated compounds were mixed type inhibitors, whereas 500 ppm DCAP on N-80 steel behaved predominantly as anodic inhibitors. The adsorption of all the condensation products was found to obey Temkin's adsorption isotherm.

  8. Density functional theory and molecular dynamics simulation study on corrosion inhibition performance of mild steel by mercapto-quinoline Schiff base corrosion inhibitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Sourav Kr.; Ghosh, Pritam; Hens, Abhiram; Murmu, Naresh Chandra; Banerjee, Priyabrata

    2015-02-01

    Corrosion inhibition mechanism of two mercapto-quinoline Schiff bases, eg., 3-((phenylimino)methyl)quinoline-2-thiol (PMQ) and 3-((5-methylthiazol-2-ylimino)methyl) quinoline-2-thiol (MMQT) on mild steel surface is investigated by quantum chemical calculation and molecular dynamics simulation. Quantum chemical parameters such as EHOMO, ELUMO, energy gap (ΔE), dipolemoment (μ), electronegativity (χ), global hardness (η) and fraction of electron transfers from the inhibitor molecule to the metallic atom surface (ΔN) have been studied to investigate their relative corrosion inhibition performance. Parameters like local reactive sites of the present molecule have been analyzed through Fukui indices. Moreover, adsorption behavior of the inhibitor molecules on Fe (1 1 0) surface have been analyzed using molecular dynamics simulation. The binding strength of the concerned inhibitor molecules on mild steel surface follows the order MMQT>PMQ, which is in good agreement with the experimentally determined inhibition efficiencies. In view of the above, our approach will be helpful for quick prediction of a potential inhibitor from a lot of similar inhibitors and subsequently in their rational designed synthesis for corrosion inhibition application following a wet chemical synthetic route.

  9. Development of system design information for carbon dioxide using an amine type sorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rankin, R. L.; Roehlich, F.; Vancheri, F.

    1971-01-01

    Development work on system design information for amine type carbon dioxide sorber is reported. Amberlite IR-45, an aminated styrene divinyl benzene matrix, was investigated to determine the influence of design parameters of sorber particle size, process flow rate, CO2 partial pressure, total pressure, and bed designs. CO2 capacity and energy requirements for a 4-man size system were related mathematically to important operational parameters. Some fundamental studies in CO2 sorber capacity, energy requirements, and process operation were also performed.

  10. A new dioxime corrosion inhibitor for the protection and conservation of copper: synthesis, characterization and evaluation in acidic chloride solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Baker, Ahmad N.; Al-Qudah, Mahmoud A.

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate a new dioxime compound as a corrosion inhibitor for copper. The compound (4,6-dihydroxy benzene-1,3-dicarbaldehyde dioxime) was synthesized and characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarization measurements were used to compare the dioxime compound with benzotriazole for their effectiveness as corrosion inhibitors for copper in 0.1 M HCl solution. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to investigate the bonding mechanisms and morphological changes of the two inhibitors on the copper surface. The electrochemical techniques showed that the new dioxime compound was more effective than benzotriazole in inhibiting copper corrosion in the acidic chloride medium. The FTIR and SEM results indicated that the dioxime compound was able to coordinate with copper ions and formed a protective film on the copper surface. It was concluded that the new dioxime compound proved effectiveness to be used as a corrosion inhibitor for the protection and conservation of copper.

  11. Electrochemical evaluation of antibacterial drugs as environment-friendly inhibitors for corrosion of carbon steel in HCl solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golestani, Gh.; Shahidi, M.; Ghazanfari, D.

    2014-07-01

    The effect of penicillin G, ampicillin and amoxicillin drugs on the corrosion behavior of carbon steel (ASTM 1015) in 1.0 mol L-1 hydrochloric acid solution was investigated using potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and electrochemical noise (EN) techniques. The inhibition efficiency was found to increase with increasing inhibitor concentration. The effect of temperature on the rate of corrosion in the absence and presence of these drugs was also studied. Some thermodynamic parameters were computed from the effect of temperature on corrosion and inhibition processes. Adsorption of these inhibitors was found to obey Langmuir adsorption isotherm. There was a case of mixed mode of adsorption here but while penicillin was adsorbed mainly through chemisorption, two other drugs were adsorbed mainly through physisorption. Potentiodynamic polarization measurements indicated that the inhibitors were of mixed type. In addition, this paper suggests that the electrochemical noise (EN) technique under open circuit conditions as the truly noninvasive electrochemical method can be employed for the quantitative evaluation of corrosion inhibition. This was done by using the standard deviation of partial signal (SDPS) for calculation of the amount of noise charges at the particular interval of frequency, thereby obtaining the inhibition efficiency (IE) of an inhibitor. These IE values showed a reasonable agreement with those obtained from potentiodynamic polarization and EIS measurements.

  12. Electrochemical Study on the Inhibition Effect of Phenanthroline and Its Cobalt Complex as Corrosion Inhibitors for Mild Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xia; Okafor, Peter C.; Jiang, Bin; Hu, Hongxiang; Zheng, Yugui

    2015-09-01

    The corrosion inhibition effect of phenanthroline (Phen) and its cobalt complex (CoPhen) on the corrosion of carbon steel in sulphuric acid solutions was studied using potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques at 20, 30, and 40 °C. Scanning electron microscopy techniques were used to characterize the mild steel surface. The results indicate that the compounds inhibit the corrosion of mild steel in H2SO4 solutions through a predominant physical adsorption following the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Polarization curves suggest that the complex and ligand are mixed-type inhibitors. The efficiency of the inhibitors is concentration- and temperature-dependent and follows the trend CoPhen > Phen.

  13. [Current problems of occupational hygiene in the manufacture and use of inhibitors of the atmospheric corrosion of metals].

    PubMed

    Paustovskaia, V V

    1994-01-01

    On the basis of the data obtained from in-plant hygienic investigations designed to study conditions of labour of employees working with the inhibitors of the metal atmospheric corrosion, acid corrosion, for two-phase systems and hydrogen sulfide corrosion, assessment of these was made in accordance with the "Hygienic classification of labour (as to the indices of health and safety hazards from exposures to factors of an employee's occupational environment, hardness and strenuousness of the work process"), 1986. Degree of hardness of the job done by the workmen engaged in the production and application of the inhibitors in different branches of national economy was assessed. Hygienic and treatment-and-prophylactic requirements were substantiated. PMID:7900368

  14. DETERMINATION OF CORROSION INHIBITOR CRITERIA FOR TYPE III/IIIA TANKS DURING SALT DISSOLUTION OPERATIONS SUMMARY DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J.; Wiersma, B.; Garcia-Diaz, B.

    2009-10-01

    Dissolution of salt from Type III/IIIA waste tanks at the Savannah River Site may create solutions with inhibitor concentrations below those currently required (0.6M OH{sup -} and 1.1M OH{sup -} + NO{sub 2}{sup -}) per the Corrosion Control Program for high nitrate salt solutions (5.5 to 8.5M NO{sub 3}{sup -}). An experimental program was conducted to evaluate the corrosion susceptibility of grade A537 carbon steel for waste simulants containing 4.5-8.5M NaNO{sub 3} with maximum inhibitor concentrations of 0.6M NaOH and 0.2M NaNO{sub 2}. These maximum inhibitor concentrations used in this program are at a reduced level from those currently required. Current requirements were initially established for the Types I, II and IV tanks made of A285 carbon steel. The experimental program involved corrosion testing to evaluate the pitting and stress corrosion stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of the Type III/IIIA waste tank materials. The program was conducted in two phases; the results of the first phase were reported previously (WSRC-STI-2006-00029). In this second phase, the corrosion specimens were modified to represent the 'as-fabricated' condition of the tank wall, and included specimens with mill scale, ground welds and stress-relief heat treatments. The complete description of the corrosion testing and the results are reported herein. The collective corrosion test results for A537 carbon steel in high nitrate waste simulants (4.5 - 8.5M) with the maximum inhibitor concentrations of 0.6M NaOH and 0.2M NaNO{sub 2} were as follows: (1) In long-term non-polarized U-bend testing, heat treatment, similar to the waste tank stress relief regime, reduced the incidence of cracking over the 18-month test period. Vapor space SCC was found to initiate on non-heat treated U-bend coupons. (2) In polarized U-bend testing, cracking occurred on U-bend coupons that had welds prepared similar to those in the waste tanks, i.e. ground and heat treated. (3) In electrochemical

  15. Carboxylates and sulfated carboxylates as inhibitors of steel corrosion in neutral media

    SciTech Connect

    Podobaev, N.I.; Larionov, E.A.

    1995-03-01

    Effects of carboxylates and sulfocarboxylates as well as their mixtures with o-nitrobenzoate on the corrosion of St3 steel in freely aerated distilled water and 0.01 - 0.04 M NaCl solutions (pH 7) are studied electrochemically and by the gravimetric technique. A noticeable improvement of the protective properties of sulfated mustard soap and sulfated castor oil is observed after the addition of 20 mg/l o-nitrobenzoate. Armco iron spontaneously passivates in 0.25 M CH{sub 3}COONa solution at a certain content of inhibitors and under a hydrodynamical regime. Sulfated carboxylates suppress the anodic process more strongly than do nonsulfated carboxylates.

  16. Corrosion Behavior of Carbon Steel with Hmta Inhibitor in Pickling Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D.; Huang, L. P.

    In this investigation, attempts have been made to study the inhibitive effect of hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) on carbon steel in 10% HCl (mass%) by weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization, EIS, and AFM. Results indicate that inhibition efficiency (IE) of HMTA increases with the increase in pickling immersion time from 10 to 60 min, and IE also increases with the increase in temperature. At higher temperatures (80°C), the IE values are higher and almost independent of pickling time. HMTA can be adsorbed on the surface of metal and reduce the corrosion rate of metal. HMTA is a kind of mixed inhibitor and can retard both the anodic dissolution and cathodic hydrogen evolution reactions independently. IE increases with the concentration of HMTA. Electrochemistry measurement shows that adsorption follows the Langmuir isotherm and the value of free energies of adsorption (ΔGads) is < 0, so the adsorption process can occur automatically. AFM analyses show HMTA can affect the surface roughness and protect metal.

  17. Localized dealloying corrosion mediated by self-assembled monolayers used as an inhibitor system.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, B R; Bashir, A; Ankah, G N; Valtiner, M; Renner, F U

    2015-01-01

    The structure and chemistry of thiol or selenol self-assembled organic monolayers have been frequently addressed due to the unique opportunities in functionalization of materials. Such organic films can also act as effective inhibition layers to mitigate oxidation or corrosion. Cu-Au alloy substrates covered by self-assembled monolayers show a different dealloying mechanism compared to bare surfaces. The organic surface layer inhibits dealloying of noble metal alloys by a suppression of surface diffusion at lower potentials but at higher applied potentials dealloying proceeds in localized regions due to passivity breakdown. We present an in situ atomic force microscopy study of a patterned thiol layer applied on Cu-Au alloy surfaces and further explore approaches to change the local composition of the surface layers by exchange of molecules. The pattern for the in situ experiment has been applied by micro-contact printing. This allows the study of corrosion protection with its dependence on different molecule densities at different sites. Low-density thiol areas surrounding the high-density patterns are completely protected and initiation of dealloying proceeds only along the areas with the lowest inhibitor concentration. Dealloying patterns are highly influenced and controlled by molecular thiol to selenol exchange and are also affected by introducing structural defects such as scratches or polishing defects. PMID:25920488

  18. Model boiler testing to evaluate inhibitors for caustic induced stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Daret, J.; Paine, J.P.N.; Partridge, M.J.

    1995-12-31

    A series of model boiler tests, using a mixture of precracked and non-precracked (virgin) tube-to-tube support plate intersections was performed. The testing supported the qualification of inhibitors for mitigating the secondary side corrosion of alloy 600 steam generator tubes. Many utilities suspect that the caustic impurities come from the feedwater. Candidate inhibitors included boric acid (as a reference), cerous acetate, and two forms of titanium dioxide: a laboratory produced titania-silica sol-gel, and manometer sized anatase The latter was combined with a 150 C pre-soaking with a titanium lactate, and was tested with and without a zeta potential treatment by sodium aluminate. Effectiveness of boric acid to prevent and retard caustic induced intergranular corrosion was confirmed in all crevice configurations (open and packed). The cerous acetate treatment multiplied by two to four the time necessary to detect a primary-to-secondary leak on virgin tubes, and reduced the propagation rate on precracked tubes. Cerium was found intimately mixed, as cerianite, with the free span and crevice deposits, when the crevices were sufficiently accessible. Due to its very low solubility and large particle size, the titania-silica sol-gel was unable to penetrate the crevices and had no effect on the degradation process. The nanometric particle size titania treatment and/or the preceding soaking with soluble titanium lactate drastically increased the titanium concentration in free span and open crevice deposit (with no added sodium aluminate, titania reacted with magnetite to form ilmenite) and showed undeniable capacity to prevent tubing degradation. Its effectiveness, in the case of packed crevices and for arresting cracks, was not so conclusive.

  19. Corrosion inhibition by inorganic cationic inhibitors on the high strength alumunium alloy, 2024-T3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilukuri, Anusha

    The toxicity and carcinogenic nature of chromates has led to the investigation of environmentally friendly compounds that offer good corrosion resistance to AA 2024-T3. Among the candidate inhibitors are rare earth metal cationic (REM) and zinc compounds, which have received much of attention over the past two decades. A comparative study on the corrosion inhibition caused by rare earth metal cations, Ce3+, Pr3+, La3+ and Zn2+ cations on the alloy was done. Cathodic polarization showed that these inhibitor ions suppress the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) to varying extents with Zn2+ providing the best inhibition. Pr3+ exhibited windows of concentration (100-300 ppm) in which the corrosion rate is minimum; similar to the Ce3+ cation. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) studies showed that the mechanism of inhibition of the Pr3+ ion is also similar to that of the Ce3+ ion. Potentiodynamic polarization experiments after 30 min immersion time showed greatest suppression of oxygen reduction reaction in neutral chloride solutions (pH 7), which reached a maximum at a Zn2+ ion concentration of 5 mM. Anodic polarization experiments after 30 min immersion time, showed no anodic inhibition by the inhibitor in any concentration (0.1 mM - 10 mM) and at any pH. However, anodic polarization of samples immersed after longer immersion times (upto 4 days) in mildly acidic Zn2+ (pH 4) solutions showed significant reduction in anodic kinetics indicating that zinc also acts as a “slow anodic inhibitor”. In contrast to the polarization experiments, coupons exposed to inhibited acidic solutions at pH 4 showed complete suppression of dissolution of Al2CuMg particles compared to zinc-free solutions in the SEM studies. Samples exposed in pH 4 Zn2+-bearing solution exhibited highest polarization resistance which was also observed to increase with time. In deaerated solutions, the inhibition by Zn2+ at pH 4 is not observed as strongly. The ability to make the interfacial electrolyte

  20. Assessment of multi-phase movements in a gas-gathering pipeline and the relevance to on-line, real-time corrosion monitoring and inhibitor injection

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, M.A.; Asperger, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the time required for aqueous fluid to travel 100 miles (160 km) from an offshore platform in the Gulf of Mexico to landfill. If this time is short, the corrosivity of the water at landfall may be used as the basis for setting the offshore corrosion inhibitor injection rates. But, for this particular system, the traveling time was found to be long, greater than 65 days. Therefore, the corrosivity as measured on-shore can not be used for online, real-time adjustments of the offshore, corrosion inhibitor chemical pumps.

  1. DETERMINATION OF CORROSION INHIBITOR CRITERIA FOR TYPE III/IIIA TANKS DURING SALT DISSOLUTION OPERATIONS INTERIM REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Counts, K; Bruce Wiersma, B; John Mickalonis, J

    2007-12-31

    Preparation of high level waste for vitrification involves in part the dissolution of salt cake from the carbon steel storage tanks. During dissolution, a point is reached in which the corrosion inhibitors, hydroxide and nitrite, are diluted below established guidelines, and nitrate stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is possible. Because the addition of inhibitors may be counterproductive to process efficiency and waste minimization, corrosion testing was initiated to revisit and possibly revise the guidelines for inhibitor limits. The bases for the work summarized in this status report are results from previously-completed phases of study. In the first two phases of study, several reduced-inhibitor levels were tested in HLW simulants with nitrate concentrations ranging from 4.5 M to 8.5 M. The first two phases of work determined, among other things, the reduced-inhibitor levels and solution chemistries in which heat-treated and non-heat-treated A537 carbon steel is susceptible to SCC, crevice corrosion, and pitting. The work covered in this current task both builds on and verifies the conclusions of the previous work. The current work involves testing of low levels of inhibitors in HLW simulants with 5.5 M to 8.5 M nitrate concentrations. Stressed U-bend specimens, both polarized and non-polarized, were tested. Non-polarized U-bend testing is ongoing, with the U-bends currently in test for 100 days. The purpose of the testing is to determine SCC susceptibility in the vapor space (VS) and liquid air interface (LAI) regions of the HLW tanks under conditions expected during salt dissolution, and also to verify previous accelerated testing. The simulated wastes being tested have nitrate concentrations of 5.5 M and 8.5 M and inhibitor levels of 0.01 M/0.01 M hydroxide/nitrite and 0.1 M/ 0.1 M hydroxide/nitrite. The open circuit potential measurements being monitored and the corrosion morphology of the U-bends are in agreement with results and observations of previous

  2. Aluminum corrosion mitigation in alkaline electrolytes containing hybrid inorganic/organic inhibitor system for power sources applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelman, Danny; Lasman, Itay; Elfimchev, Sergey; Starosvetsky, David; Ein-Eli, Yair

    2015-07-01

    The severe corrosion accompanied with hydrogen evolution process is the main obstacle preventing the implementation of Al as an anode in alkaline batteries. It impairs the functionality of alkaline battery, due to a drastic capacity loss and a short shelf life. The possibility to reduce Al corrosion rate in alkaline solution with the use of hybrid organic∖inorganic inhibitor based on poly (ethylene glycol) di-acid (PEG di-acid) and zinc oxide (ZnO) was examined in this work. A correlation between an Al corrosion rates and the concentrations of both PEG di-acid and ZnO in alkaline is shown. Selecting 5000 ppm PEG di-acid and 16 gr/l ZnO provides substantial corrosion protection of Al, reducing the corrosion rate in a strong alkaline solution by more than one order of magnitude. Moreover, utilizing the same formulation results in increase in Al-air battery discharge capacity, from 44.5 (for a battery utilizing only KOH in the electrolyte) to 70 mhA/cm2 (for a battery utilizing ZnO/PEG di-acid hybrid inhibitor in the electrolyte). The morphology and composition of the Al electrode surface (studied by SEM, EDS, and XRD) depend on PEG di-acid and ZnO concentrations.

  3. Study of benzotriazole as corrosion inhibitors of carbon steel in chloride solution containing hydrogen sulfide using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Solehudin, Agus; Nurdin, Isdiriayani

    2014-03-24

    Corrosion and inhibition studies on API 5LX65 carbon steel in chloride solution containing various concentrations of benzotriazole has been conducted at temperature of 70°C using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). Corroded carbon steel surface with and without inhibitor have been observed using X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). The objectives of this research are to study the performance of benzotriazole as corrosion inhibitors. The experimental results of carbon steel corrosion in 3.5% NaCl solution containing 500 mg/l H{sub 2}S at different BTAH concentrations showed that corrosion rate of carbon steel decreases with increasing of BTAH concentrations from 0 to 10 mmol/l. The inhibition efficiency of BTAH was found to be affected by its concentration. The optimum efficiency obtained of BTAH is 93% at concentration of 5 mmol/l. The result of XRD and EDS analysis reveal the iron sulfide (FeS) formation on corroded carbon steel surface without inhibitor. The EDS spectrum show the Nitrogen (N) bond on carbon steel surface inhibited by BTAH.

  4. Study of benzotriazole as corrosion inhibitors of carbon steel in chloride solution containing hydrogen sulfide using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solehudin, Agus; Nurdin, Isdiriayani

    2014-03-01

    Corrosion and inhibition studies on API 5LX65 carbon steel in chloride solution containing various concentrations of benzotriazole has been conducted at temperature of 70°C using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). Corroded carbon steel surface with and without inhibitor have been observed using X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). The objectives of this research are to study the performance of benzotriazole as corrosion inhibitors. The experimental results of carbon steel corrosion in 3.5% NaCl solution containing 500 mg/l H2S at different BTAH concentrations showed that corrosion rate of carbon steel decreases with increasing of BTAH concentrations from 0 to 10 mmol/l. The inhibition efficiency of BTAH was found to be affected by its concentration. The optimum efficiency obtained of BTAH is 93% at concentration of 5 mmol/l. The result of XRD and EDS analysis reveal the iron sulfide (FeS) formation on corroded carbon steel surface without inhibitor. The EDS spectrum show the Nitrogen (N) bond on carbon steel surface inhibited by BTAH.

  5. Screening and Quantification of Aliphatic Primary Alkyl Corrosion Inhibitor Amines in Water Samples by Paper Spray Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jjunju, Fred P M; Maher, Simon; Damon, Deidre E; Barrett, Richard M; Syed, S U; Heeren, Ron M A; Taylor, Stephen; Badu-Tawiah, Abraham K

    2016-01-19

    Direct analysis and identification of long chain aliphatic primary diamine Duomeen O (n-oleyl-1,3-diaminopropane), corrosion inhibitor in raw water samples taken from a large medium pressure water tube boiler plant water samples at low LODs (<0.1 pg) has been demonstrated for the first time, without any sample preparation using paper spray mass spectrometry (PS-MS). The presence of Duomeen O in water samples was confirmed via tandem mass spectrometry using collision-induced dissociation and supported by exact mass measurement and reactive paper spray experiments using an LTQ Orbitrap Exactive instrument. Data shown herein indicate that paper spray ambient ionization can be readily used as a rapid and robust method for in situ direct analysis of polymanine corrosion inhibitors in an industrial water boiler plant and other related samples in the water treatment industry. This approach was applied for the analysis of three complex water samples including feedwater, condensate water, and boiler water, all collected from large medium pressure (MP) water tube boiler plants, known to be dosed with varying amounts of polyamine and amine corrosion inhibitor components. Polyamine chemistry is widely used for example in large high pressure (HP) boilers operating in municipal waste and recycling facilities to prevent corrosion of metals. The samples used in this study are from such a facility in Coventry waste treatment facility, U.K., which has 3 × 40 tonne/hour boilers operating at 17.5 bar. PMID:26727190

  6. Investigation of Synthesized Sulfonated Melamine Formaldehyde as a Novel Corrosion Inhibitor for Mild Steel in Saline Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi, Zahra; Pakshir, Mahmoud; Mohamadi, Somayeh

    2015-02-01

    A water soluble compound named sulfonated melamine formaldehyde (SMF) was synthesized and its corrosion inhibition behavior was studied for carbon steel in 3.5% NaCl solution by polarization measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). SMF was characterized with hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and then its physical properties and corrosion prevention efficiencies were investigated. The corrosion behavior of SMF was found to be dependent strongly on the electric nature of functional groups which are present in its structure. The decrease in ( i corr) and the increase in inhibition efficiency (% IE) with increasing the SMF concentrations proves that it protects C-steel in 3.5% NaCl solution from being corroded and Nyquist diagrams indicate that increasing charge transfer resistance is associated with a decrease in the capacitance and increase in the percentage inhibition efficiency. The decrease in capacitance values could be attributed to the adsorption of the inhibitor molecules at the metal surface by increasing the concentration of inhibitor in the solution the inhibition efficiency increased and the best inhibition was obtained at 1000 ppm inhibitor concentration. The scanning electron microscope was used to investigate the surface morphology of specimens in the absence and presence of inhibitor compound.

  7. Aluminum surface corrosion and the mechanism of inhibitors using pH and metal ion selective imaging fiber bundles.

    PubMed

    Szunerits, Sabine; Walt, David R

    2002-02-15

    The localized corrosion behavior of a galvanic aluminum copper couple was investigated by in situ fluorescence imaging with a fiber-optic imaging sensor. Three different, but complementary methods were used for visualizing remote corrosion sites, mapping the topography of the metal surface, and measuring local chemical concentrations of H+, OH-, and Al3+. The first method is based on a pH-sensitive imaging fiber, where the fluorescent dye SNAFL was covalently attached to the fiber's distal end. Fluorescence images were acquired as a function of time at different areas of the galvanic couple. In a second method, the fluorescent dye morin was immobilized on the fiber-optic imaging sensor, which allowed the in situ localization of corrosion processes on pure aluminum to be visualized over time by monitoring the release of Al3+. The development of fluorescence on the aluminum surface defined the areas associated with the anodic dissolution of aluminum. We also investigated the inhibition of corrosion of pure aluminum by CeCl3 and 8-hydroxyquinoline. The decrease in current, the decrease in the number of active sites on the aluminum surface, and the faster surface passivation are all consistent indications that cerium chloride and 8-hydroxyquinoline inhibit corrosion effectively. From the number and extent of corrosion sites and the release of aluminum ions monitored with the fiber, it was shown that 8-hydroxyquinoline is a more effective inhibitor than cerium chloride. PMID:11866069

  8. Templating route for mesostructured calcium phosphates with carboxylic acid- and amine-type surfactants.

    PubMed

    Ikawa, Nobuaki; Hori, Hideki; Kimura, Tatsuo; Oumi, Yasunori; Sano, Tsuneji

    2008-11-18

    Mesostructured calcium phosphates constructed by ionic frameworks were synthesized using carboxylic acid- and amine-type surfactants in mixed solvent systems of ethanol and water. A lamellar mesostructured calcium phosphate was prepared using palmitic acid as an anionic surfactant, as in the case using n-alkylamines. A wormhole-like mesostructured calcium phosphate can be obtained using dicarboxyl N-lauroyl- l-glutamic acid, whose headgroup is larger than that of palmitic acid. Similar mesostructured product was obtained using 4-dodecyldiethylenetriamine with a large headgroup containing two primary amine groups. Interactions of carboxyl and primary amino groups in the surfactant molecules with inorganic species are quite important for the formation of mesostructured calcium phosphates. The Ca/P molar ratio of mesostructured calcium phosphates was strongly affected by the molecular structure of surfactants containing carboxyl and primary amino groups. Ca-rich materials can be obtained using carboxylic acid-type surfactants (Ca/P approximately 1.7) rather than amine-type surfactants (Ca/P approximately 1.0). PMID:18947246

  9. In situ monitoring of corrosion mechanisms and phosphate inhibitor surface deposition during corrosion of zinc-magnesium-aluminium (ZMA) alloys using novel time-lapse microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, James; Cooze, Nathan; Gallagher, Callum; Lewis, Tom; Prosek, Tomas; Thierry, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    In situ time-lapse optical microscopy was used to examine the microstructural corrosion mechanisms in three zinc-magnesium-aluminium (ZMA) alloy coated steels immersed in 1% NaCl pH 7. Preferential corrosion of MgZn(2) lamellae within the eutectic phases was observed in all the ZMA alloys followed by subsequent dissolution of Zn rich phases. The total extent and rate of corrosion, measured using time-lapse image analysis and scanning vibrating electrode technique (SVET) estimated mass loss, decreased as Mg and Al alloying additions were increased up to a level of 3 wt% Mg and 3.7 wt% Al. This was probably due to the increased presence of MgO and Al(2)O(3) at the alloy surface retarding the kinetics of cathodic oxygen reduction. The addition of 1 × 10(-2) mol dm(-3) Na(3)PO(4) to 1% NaCl pH 7 had a dramatic influence on the corrosion mechanism for a ZMA with passivation of anodic sites through phosphate precipitation observed using time-lapse image analysis. Intriguing rapid precipitation of filamentous phosphate was also observed and it is postulated that these filaments nucleate and grow due to super saturation effects. Polarisation experiments showed that the addition of 1 × 10(-2) mol dm(-3) Na(3)PO(4) to the 1% NaCl electrolyte promoted an anodic shift of 50 mV in open circuit potential for the ZMA alloy with a reduction in anodic current of 2.5 orders of magnitude suggesting that it was acting primarily as an anodic inhibitor supporting the inferences from the time-lapse investigations. These phosphate additions resulted in a 98% reduction in estimated mass loss as measured by SVET demonstrating the effectiveness of phosphate inhibitors for this alloy system. PMID:25912828

  10. Corrosion mitigation of N-(2-hydroxy-3-trimethyl ammonium)propyl chitosan chloride as inhibitor on mild steel.

    PubMed

    Sangeetha, Y; Meenakshi, S; SairamSundaram, C

    2015-01-01

    The biopolymer N-(2-hydroxy-3-trimethyl ammonium)propyl chitosan chloride (HTACC) was synthesised and its influence as a novel corrosion inhibitor on mild steel in 1M HCl was studied using gravimetric and electrochemical experiments. The compound obtained was characterised using FTIR and NMR studies. The inhibition efficiency increased with the increase in concentration and reached a maximum of 98.9% at 500 ppm concentration. Polarisation studies revealed that HTACC acts both as anodic and cathodic inhibitor. Electrochemical impedance studies confirmed that the inhibition is through adsorption on the metal surface. The extent of inhibition exhibits a negative trend with increase in temperature. Langmuir isotherm provides the best description on the adsorption nature of the inhibitor. SEM analysis indicated the presence of protective film formed by the inhibitor on the metal surface. PMID:25450546

  11. Complexes of Imidazole with Poly(ethylene glycol) as a Corrosion Inhibitor for Carbon Steel in Sulphuric Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salimi, Saeed; Nasr-Esfahani, Mojtaba; Umoren, Saviour A.; Saebnoori, Ehsan

    2015-12-01

    The inhibiting action of polyethylene glycol and imidazole (PEG/IMZ)) complexes prepared by a simple deprotonation procedure on carbon steel corrosion in 0.5 mol/L sulphuric acid was evaluated using the weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques complemented by surface analysis using scanning electron microscopy. The inhibiting effect of the PEG/IMZ complexes on carbon steel corrosion was compared with the non-complex forms. Results obtained show that PEG/IMZ complex is a very effective corrosion inhibitor of carbon steel in the acid environment. The inhibition efficiency increased with the increase in the temperature and also with increasing percentage of imidazole in the complex. Corrosion inhibition occurs by virtue of adsorption of PEG/IMZ complexes on the steel surface which was found to follow the Temkin adsorption isotherm model. The PEG/IMZ complexes function as a mixed-type inhibitor. Results from all the methods employed are in a reasonably good agreement.

  12. Evolution of the corrosion process of AA 2024-T3 in an alkaline NaCl solution with sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate and lanthanum chloride inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Biner; Wang, Yishan; Zuo, Yu

    2015-12-01

    The evolution of the corrosion process of AA 2024-T3 in 0.58 g L-1 NaCl solution (pH 10) with sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (SDBS) and lanthanum chloride inhibitors was studied with electrochemical and surface analysis methods. With the addition of the compounded LaCl3 and SDBS inhibitors, in the early stage the polarization behavior of AA 2024-T3 changed from active corrosion to passivation, and both the general corrosion and pitting corrosion were inhibited. However, with the immersion time extended, the passive behavior gradually disappeared and pitting happened at the Cu-rich phases. After 24 h immersion, the compounded inhibitors still showed good inhibition for general corrosion, but the polarization curve again presented the characteristic similar to active polarization. The compounded inhibitors also inhibited the pitting corrosion to some extent. The acting mechanism of the inhibitors SDBS and La3Cl on the corrosion process of AA 2024-T3 in the test solution was discussed.

  13. Preparation and application of crosslinked poly(sodium acrylate)--coated magnetite nanoparticles as corrosion inhibitors for carbon steel alloy.

    PubMed

    Atta, Ayman M; El-Mahdy, Gamal A; Al-Lohedan, Hamad A; El-Saeed, Ashraf M

    2015-01-01

    This work presents a new method to prepare poly(sodium acrylate) magnetite composite nanoparticles. Core/shell type magnetite nanocomposites were synthesized using sodium acrylate as monomer and N,N-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA) as crosslinker. Microemulsion polymerization was used for constructing core/shell structures with magnetite nanoparticles as core and poly(sodium acrylate) as shell. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was employed to characterize the nanocomposite chemical structure. Transmittance electron microscopy (TEM) was used to examine the morphology of the modified poly(sodium acrylate) magnetite composite nanoparticles. These particle will be evaluated for effective anticorrosion behavior as a hydrophobic surface on stainless steel. The composite nanoparticles has been designed by dispersing nanocomposites which act as a corrosion inhibitor. The inhibition effect of AA-Na/magnetite composites on steel corrosion in 1 M HCl solution was investigated using potentiodynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Polarization measurements indicated that the studied inhibitor acts as mixed type corrosion inhibitor. EIS spectra exhibit one capacitive loop. The different techniques confirmed that the inhibition efficiency reaches 99% at 50 ppm concentration. This study has led to a better understanding of active anticorrosive magnetite nanoparticles with embedded nanocomposites and the factors influencing their anticorrosion performance. PMID:25594340

  14. SERS and DFT study of copper surfaces coated with corrosion inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Muniz-Miranda, Maurizio; Muniz-Miranda, Francesco; Caporali, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Azole derivatives are common inhibitors of copper corrosion due to the chemical adsorption occurring on the metal surface that gives rise to a protective film. In particular, 1,2,4-triazole performs comparable to benzotriazole, which is much more widely used, but is by no means an environmentally friendly agent. In this study, we have analyzed the adsorption of 1,2,4-triazole on copper by taking advantage of the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect, which highlights the vibrational features of organic ligand monolayers adhering to rough surfaces of some metals such as gold, silver and copper. To ensure the necessary SERS activation, a roughening procedure was implemented on the copper substrates, resulting in nanoscale surface structures, as evidenced by microscopic investigation. To obtain sufficient information on the molecule-metal interaction and the formation of an anticorrosive thin film, the SERS spectra were interpreted with the aid of theoretical calculations based on the density functional theory (DFT) approach. PMID:25671144

  15. SERS and DFT study of copper surfaces coated with corrosion inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Muniz-Miranda, Francesco; Caporali, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Summary Azole derivatives are common inhibitors of copper corrosion due to the chemical adsorption occurring on the metal surface that gives rise to a protective film. In particular, 1,2,4-triazole performs comparable to benzotriazole, which is much more widely used, but is by no means an environmentally friendly agent. In this study, we have analyzed the adsorption of 1,2,4-triazole on copper by taking advantage of the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect, which highlights the vibrational features of organic ligand monolayers adhering to rough surfaces of some metals such as gold, silver and copper. To ensure the necessary SERS activation, a roughening procedure was implemented on the copper substrates, resulting in nanoscale surface structures, as evidenced by microscopic investigation. To obtain sufficient information on the molecule–metal interaction and the formation of an anticorrosive thin film, the SERS spectra were interpreted with the aid of theoretical calculations based on the density functional theory (DFT) approach. PMID:25671144

  16. Hydrazino-methoxy-1,3,5-triazine Derivatives' Excellent Corrosion Organic Inhibitors of Steel in Acidic Chloride Solution.

    PubMed

    El-Faham, Ayman; Osman, Sameh M; Al-Lohedan, Hamad A; El-Mahdy, Gamal A

    2016-01-01

    The corrosion inhibition performance of 2-hydrazino-4,6-dimethoxy-1,3,5-tirazine (DMeHT), 2,4-dihydrazino-6-methoxy-1,3,5-triaizine (DHMeT), and 2,4,6-tridydrazino-1,3,5-triaizne (TH₃) on steel corrosion in acidic media was examined using electrochemical techniques. The results showed 2,4-Ddihydrazino-6-methoxy-1,3,5-triaizine (DHMeT) gave the best corrosion protection performance among the other hydrazino derivatives even at a low concentration of 25 ppm (95%). The number of hydrazino groups play an important role in the corrosion inhibition, where the two hydrazine groups increased the electrostatic interactions between the protonated tested compounds, the negatively charged steel surface resulted from the adsorption of the chloride anions, and the presence of the methoxy group made the compound more reliable for formation of film protection on the surface of steel through the lone pair of oxygen atoms. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) measurements suggested that the corrosion process of steel in presence of the hydrazino-s-triazine derivatives (TH₃, DMeHT and DHMeT) were being controlled by the charge transfer reaction. Polarization curves indicated that the examined TH₃, DMeHT and DHMeT behaved as mixed type inhibitors. PMID:27258241

  17. Erosion-corrosion in carbon dioxide saturated systems in presence of sand, inhibitor, oil, and high concentration of salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassani, Shokrollah

    Oil and gas production is usually accompanied by formation water which typically contains high levels of chloride. Some effects of chloride concentration on corrosion are not widely known in the literature, and this can result in misleading conclusions. One goal of this research was to contribute to a better understanding of the effects of chloride concentration in CO2 corrosion. Experimental and theoretical studies conducted in the present work have shown that increasing the NaCl concentration in solution has three important effects on corrosion results. First, standard pH meter readings in high NaCl concentration solutions require corrections. Second, increasing the NaCl concentration decreases the CO2 concentration in solution and therefore contributes to a decrease in the corrosion rate. Third, increasing the NaCl concentration increases the solubility of FeCO3 and therefore reduces the likelihood of forming an iron carbonate scale. High NaCl concentration also decreases the sand erosion rate of the metal slightly by increasing the density and viscosity of the liquid. There are two main contributions of this research. The first contribution is the experimental characterization of inhibited erosion-corrosion behavior of mild steel under CO2-saturated conditions with a high salt concentration. Chemical inhibition is one the most important techniques for controlling erosion-corrosion in offshore mild steel pipelines, tubing and pipe fittings in oil and gas industry. The second contribution is the introduction of a new approach for predicting inhibited erosion-corrosion in mild steel pipes including the effects of flow and environmental conditions, sand production, and an oil phase. Sand erosion can decrease the efficiency of corrosion protection systems including iron-carbonate scale formation and chemical inhibition. The need to be able to predict inhibitor performance under sand production conditions is particularly acute when the wells are deep or off

  18. Corrosion inhibition mechanisms of aluminum alloy 2024-T3 by selected non-chromate inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Garrity, Omar A.

    The pursuit to find a chromate-alternative has led to the development of several chromate-free aerospace primers and coating systems that offer good protection. However, fundamental understanding of the functionality of the chromate-free pigments that are embedded within these coating systems is lacking. The objective of this study was to understand the fundamental mechanism of corrosion inhibition of aluminum alloy 2024-T3 by molybdate (MoO 42-), silicate (SiO32-), and praseodymium (Pr3+) with the goal of developing the kind of understanding that was accomplished for chromate. Furthermore, since most inhibiting conversion coatings and pigments act by releasing soluble species into the local environment, it was of interest to understand the mechanism of inhibition in aqueous 0.1 M NaCl solution. The mechanism of inhibition of AA2024-T3 by the select non-chromate inhibitors was investigated using various electrochemical, microscopic and spectroscopic techniques. Naturally aerated polarization curves showed that molybdate provided mixed inhibition in near-neutral pH and at a threshold concentration of 0.1 M. The largest effect was a 250 mV increase in the breakdown potential associated with pitting and a 350 mV decrease in the open-circuit potential (OCP). In addition, electrochemical impedance indicated that the corrosion inhibition mechanism is oxygen-dependent owing to the protection afforded by Mo(VI) species. It was proposed that the corrosion inhibition of AA2024-T3 by molybdate may occur following a two-step process whereby molybdate is rapidly reduced to MoO.(OH)2 over the intermetallic particles and is subsequently oxidized to intermediate molybdenum oxides (e.g. Mo4O11) in the presence of oxygen which is reduced. This in turn may lead to a local acidification, promoting the condensation and polymerization of molybdate species in solution to form polymolybdate species (Mo7O24 6- and Mo8O264-). Furthermore, S-phase particle dissolution is decreased

  19. Quinoxaline derivatives as corrosion inhibitors for mild steel in hydrochloric acid medium: Electrochemical and quantum chemical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olasunkanmi, Lukman O.; Kabanda, Mwadham M.; Ebenso, Eno E.

    2016-02-01

    The corrosion inhibition potential of four quinoxaline derivatives namely, 1-[3-(4-methylphenyl)-5-(quinoxalin-6-yl)-4,5-dihydropyrazol-1-yl]butan-1-one (Me-4-PQPB), 1-(3-(4-methoxyphenyl)-5-(quinoxalin-6-yl)-4,5-dihydropyrazol-1-yl)butan-1-one (Mt-4-PQPB), 1-[3-(3-methoxyphenyl)-5-(quinoxalin-6-yl)-4,5-dihydropyrazol-1-yl]butan-1-one (Mt-3-PQPB) and 1-[3-(2H-1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-5-(quinoxalin-6-yl)-4,5-dihydropyrazol-1-yl]butan-1-one (Oxo-1,3-PQPB) was studied for mild steel corrosion in 1 M HCl solution using electrochemical, spectroscopic techniques and quantum chemical calculations. The results of both potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic studies revealed that the compounds are mixed-type inhibitors and the order of corrosion inhibition efficiency at 100 ppm is Me-4-PQPB>Mt-3-PQPB>Oxo-1,3-PQPB>Mt-4-PQPB. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopic analyses confirmed the presence of chemical interactions between the inhibitors and mild steel surface. The adsorption of the inhibitor molecules on mild steel surface was found to be both physisorption and chemisorption but predominantly chemisorption. The experimental data obey Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Scanning electron microscopy studies revealed the formation of protective films of the inhibitors on mild steel surface. Quantum chemical parameters obtained from density functional theory (DFT) calculations support experimental results.

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF AN ENVIRONMENTALLY BENIGN MICROBIAL INHIBITOR TO CONTROL INTERNAL PIPELINE CORROSION

    SciTech Connect

    Bill W. Bogan; Brigid M. Lamb; John J. Kilbane II

    2004-10-30

    The overall program objective is to develop and evaluate environmentally benign agents or products that are effective in the prevention, inhibition, and mitigation of microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) in the internal surfaces of metallic natural gas pipelines. The goal is to develop one or more environmentally benign (a.k.a. ''green'') products that can be applied to maintain the structure and dependability of the natural gas infrastructure. Previous testing indicated that the growth, and the metal corrosion caused by pure cultures of sulfate reducing bacteria were inhibited by hexane extracts of some pepper plants. This quarter tests were performed to determine if chemical compounds other than pepper extracts could inhibit the growth of corrosion-associated microbes and to determine if pepper extracts and other compounds can inhibit corrosion when mature biofilms are present. Several chemical compounds were shown to be capable of inhibiting the growth of corrosion-associated microorganisms, and all of these compounds limited the amount of corrosion caused by mature biofilms to a similar extent. It is difficult to control corrosion caused by mature biofilms, but any compound that disrupts the metabolism of any of the major microbial groups present in corrosion-associated biofilms shows promise in limiting the amount/rate of corrosion.

  1. Experimental and theoretical studies of xanthan gum and its graft co-polymer as corrosion inhibitor for mild steel in 15% HCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Amrita; Pal, Sagar; Udayabhanu, G.

    2015-10-01

    Xanthan gum (XG) and its graft co-polymer have been investigated as corrosion inhibitors for mild steel in 15% HCl. Gravimetric analysis, potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) methods were employed for investigating the effectiveness of these inhibitors. Results indicate that both the inhibitors are of mixed type and follow Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) study also confirmed the protection of the metal surface by XG and xanthan gum-graft-poly(acrylamide) (XG-g-PAM). Theoretical calculations using Density Functional Theory (DFT) were used to establish the correlation between the structure and corrosion protection efficiencies.

  2. Influence of the state of the surface of steel St3 on the adsorption of inhibitor EMFTs and the corrosion retardation produced by it in water recirculation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, E.S.; Nikitina, R.A.

    1985-07-01

    Adsorption of the inhibitor on metal surfaces prepared in various ways, is studied in this paper. The investigations of the kinetics of adsorption and desorption of the inhibitor EMFTs on St3 with various surface states have revealed that EMFTs is best adsorbed on a clean polished surface of metal which has not been in contact with a corrosion medium, giving the maximal protective effect. The corrosion inhibitor EMFTs can be recommended for new water recycling systems and also for old systems after preparation by pickling with inhibited acids.

  3. Cysteine as a green corrosion inhibitor for Cu37Zn brass in neutral and weakly alkaline sulphate solutions.

    PubMed

    Radovanović, Milan B; Petrović, Marija B; Simonović, Ana T; Milić, Snežana M; Antonijević, Milan M

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate electrochemical properties of brass in neutral and weakly alkaline solutions in the presence of cysteine as a nontoxic and ecological corrosion inhibitor. Potentiodynamic measurements, open circuit potential measurements, as well as chronoamperometric measurements were the methods used during investigation of the inhibitory effect of cysteine on the corrosion behaviour of brass. Potentiodynamic measurements showed that cysteine behaves as a mixed-type inhibitor in the investigated media. Based on polarization curves for brass in a weakly alkaline solution of sodium sulphate at varying cysteine concentrations, an interaction occurs between Cu(+) ions and the inhibitor, resulting in the formation of a protective complex on the electrode surface. The results of chronoamperometric measurements confirm the results obtained by potentiodynamic measurements. Optical microphotography of the brass surface also confirms the formation of a protective film in the presence of a 1 × 10(-4) mol/dm(3) cysteine. Adsorption of cysteine on the brass surface proceeds according to the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. PMID:22836675

  4. Optimization of a Three-Component Green Corrosion Inhibitor Mixture for Using in Cooling Water by Experimental Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asghari, E.; Ashassi-Sorkhabi, H.; Ahangari, M.; Bagheri, R.

    2016-04-01

    Factors such as inhibitor concentration, solution hydrodynamics, and temperature influence the performance of corrosion inhibitor mixtures. The simultaneous studying of the impact of different factors is a time- and cost-consuming process. The use of experimental design methods can be useful in minimizing the number of experiments and finding local optimized conditions for factors under the investigation. In the present work, the inhibition performance of a three-component inhibitor mixture against corrosion of St37 steel rotating disk electrode, RDE, was studied. The mixture was composed of citric acid, lanthanum(III) nitrate, and tetrabutylammonium perchlorate. In order to decrease the number of experiments, the L16 Taguchi orthogonal array was used. The "control factors" were the concentration of each component and the rotation rate of RDE and the "response factor" was the inhibition efficiency. The scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy techniques verified the formation of islands of adsorbed citrate complexes with lanthanum ions and insoluble lanthanum(III) hydroxide. From the Taguchi analysis results the mixture of 0.50 mM lanthanum(III) nitrate, 0.50 mM citric acid, and 2.0 mM tetrabutylammonium perchlorate under the electrode rotation rate of 1000 rpm was found as optimum conditions.

  5. ENVIRONMENTALLY COMPLIANT CORROSION-ACTIVATED INHIBITOR SYSTEM FOR ALUMINUM ALLOYS - PHASE I

    EPA Science Inventory

    The federal government is estimated to spend $1 billion on painting/repainting aircraft annually. Aircraft have surfaces composed of aluminum alloys that are highly susceptible to corrosion and must be protected with corrosion-preventative treatments that typically conta...

  6. Novel Schiff-base molecules as efficient corrosion inhibitors for mild steel surface in 1 M HCl medium: experimental and theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sourav Kr; Dutta, Alokdut; Ghosh, Pritam; Sukul, Dipankar; Banerjee, Priyabrata

    2016-07-21

    In order to evaluate the effect of the functional group present in the ligand backbone towards corrosion inhibition performances, three Schiff-base molecules namely, (E)-4-((2-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)hydrazono)methyl)pyridine (L(1)), (E)-4-(2-(pyridin-4-ylmethylene)hydrazinyl)benzonitrile (L(2)) and (E)-4-((2-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)hydrazono)methyl)phenol (L(3)) were synthesized and used as corrosion inhibitors on mild steel in 1 M HCl medium. The corrosion inhibition effectiveness of the studied inhibitors was investigated by weight loss and several sophisticated analytical tools such as potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements. Experimentally obtained results revealed that corrosion inhibition efficiencies followed the sequence: L(3) > L(1) > L(2). Electrochemical findings showed that inhibitors impart high resistance towards charge transfer across the metal-electrolyte interface and behaved as mixed type inhibitors. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was also employed to examine the protective film formed on the mild steel surface. The adsorption as well as inhibition ability of the inhibitor molecules on the mild steel surface was investigated by quantum chemical calculation and molecular dynamic (MD) simulation. In quantum chemical calculations, geometry optimized structures of the Schiff-base inhibitors, electron density distribution in HOMO and LUMO and Fukui indices of each atom were employed for their possible mode of interaction with the mild steel surfaces. MD simulations revealed that all the inhibitors molecules adsorbed in parallel orientation with respect to the Fe(110) surface. PMID:27315235

  7. The microwave assisted synthesis of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide as potential corrosion inhibitor toward carbon steel in 1 M HCl solution saturated with carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasasa, Norman Vincent A.; Bundjali, Bunbun; Wahyuningrum, Deana

    2015-09-01

    Injection of corrosion inhibitor into the fluid current of oil and gas pipelines is an effective way to mitigate corrosion rate on the inner-surface parts of pipelines, especially carbon steel pipelines. In this research, two alkylimidazolium ionic liquids, 1-decyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide (IL1) and 1-dodecyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide (IL2) have been synthesized and studied as a potential corrosion inhibitor towards carbon steel in 1 M HCl solution saturated with carbon dioxide. IL1 and IL2 were synthesized using microwave assisted organic synthesis (MAOS) method. Mass Spectrometry analysis of IL1 and IL2 showed molecular mass [M-H+] peak at 223.2166 and 251.2484, respectively. The FTIR,1H-NMR and 13C-NMR spectra confirmed that IL1 and IL2 were successfully synthesized. Corrosion inhibition activity of IL1 and IL2 were determined using weight loss method. The results showed that IL1 and IL2 have the potential as good corrosion inhibitors with corrosion inhibition efficiency of IL1 and IL2 are 96.00% at 100 ppm (343 K) and 95.60% at 50 ppm (343 K), respectively. The increase in the concentration of IL1 and IL2 tends to improve their corrosion inhibition activities. Analysis of the data obtained from the weight loss method shows that the adsorption of IL1 and IL2 on carbon steel is classified into chemisorption which obeys Langmuir's adsorption isotherm.

  8. Valoniopsis pachynema Extract as a Green Inhibitor for Corrosion of Brass in 0.1 N Phosphoric Acid Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selva Kumar, R.; Chandrasekaran, V.

    2016-04-01

    The effect of marine alga Valoniopsis pachynema extract on corrosion inhibition of brass in phosphoric acid was investigated by weight-loss method, potentiodynamic polarization, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy studies. The inhibition efficiency is found to increase with increasing concentration of extract and decreases with rise in temperature. The activation energy, thermodynamic parameters (free energy, enthalpy, and entropy change) and kinetic parameters (rate constant and half-life) for inhibition process were calculated. These thermodynamic and kinetic parameters indicate a strong interaction between the inhibitor and the brass surface. The inhibition is assumed to occur via adsorption of inhibitor molecules on brass surface, which obeys Temkin adsorption isotherm. The adsorption of inhibitor on the brass surface is exothermic, physical, and spontaneous, and follows first-order kinetics. The polarization measurements showed that the inhibitor behaves as a mixed type inhibitor and the higher inhibition surface coverage on the brass was predicted. Inhibition efficiency values were found to show good trend with weight-loss method, potentiodynamic polarization, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy studies. Surface study techniques (FT-IR and SEM) were carried out to ascertain the inhibitive nature of the algal extract on the brass surface.

  9. The Corrosion and Preservation of Iron Antiques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Robert

    1982-01-01

    Discusses general corrosion reactions (iron to rust), including corrosion of iron, sulfur dioxide, chlorides, immersed corrosion, and underground corrosion. Also discusses corrosion inhibition, including corrosion inhibitors (anodic, cathodic, mixed, organic); safe/dangerous inhibitors; and corrosion/inhibition in concrete/marble, showcases/boxes,…

  10. Experimental and theoretical study of [N-substituted] p-aminoazobenzene derivatives as corrosion inhibitors for mild steel in sulfuric acid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shihab, Mehdi Salih; Al-Doori, Hanan Hussien

    2014-11-01

    [N-substituted] p-aminoazobenzene derivatives (1), (2), (3), (4) and (5) were prepared and investigated as corrosion inhibitors for mild steel in 1 M H2SO4 solution by weight loss measurements. It has been observed that the corrosion rate decreases, inhibition efficiencies increase and surface coverage degree increases with increasing inhibitor concentration. Inhibition efficiencies for prepared compounds were ordered: (1) > (2) > (5) > (4) > (3) with the highest inhibiting efficiency of 63% for 10-3 M. The values of ΔGadso are showing physisorption effect for all prepared compounds. Semiempirical molecular orbital calculations for (1), (2), (3), (4) and (5) could be used as a useful tool to obtain information for explaining the nature of interaction between the metal surface and the organic molecule as a corrosion inhibitor.

  11. New coumarin derivative as an eco-friendly inhibitor of corrosion of mild steel in Acid medium.

    PubMed

    Al-Amiery, Ahmed A; Al-Majedy, Yasameen K; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H; Mohamad, Abu Bakar

    2015-01-01

    The anticorrosion ability of a synthesized coumarin, namely 2-(coumarin-4-yloxy)acetohydrazide (EFCI), for mild steel (MS) in 1 M hydrochloric acid solution has been studied using a weight loss method. The effect of temperature on the corrosion rate was investigated, and some thermodynamic parameters were calculated. The results indicated that inhibition efficiencies were enhanced with an increase in concentration of inhibitor and decreased with a rise in temperature. The IE value reaches 94.7% at the highest used concentration of the new eco-friendly inhibitor. The adsorption of inhibitor on MS surface was found to obey a Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was performed on inhibited and uninhibited mild steel samples to characterize the surface. The Density Function theory (DFT) was employed for quantum-chemical calculations such as EHOMO (highest occupied molecular orbital energy), ELUMO (lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy) and μ (dipole moment), and the obtained results were found to be consistent with the experimental findings. The synthesized inhibitor was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic studies. PMID:25551187

  12. sym-Trisubstituted 1,3,5-Triazine Derivatives as Promising Organic Corrosion Inhibitors for Steel in Acidic Solution.

    PubMed

    El-Faham, Ayman; Dahlous, Kholood A; Al Othman, Zeid A; Al-Lohedan, Hamad A; El-Mahdy, Gamal A

    2016-01-01

    Triazine derivatives, namely, 2,4,6-tris(quinolin-8-yloxy)-1,3,5-triazine (T3Q), N²,N⁴,N⁶-tris(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)-1,3,5-triazine-2,4,6-triamine (T3AMPy) and 2,2',2''-[(1,3,5-triazine-2,4,6-triyl)tris(azanediyl)] tris(ethan-1-ol) (T3EA) were synthesized and their inhibition of steel corrosion in hydrochloric acid solution was investigated using electrochemical techniques. The corrosion protection of the prepared compounds increased with increasing concentration and reached up to 98% at 250 ppm. The adsorption of T3Q, T3AMPy, and T3EA on the steel surface was in accordance with the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The electrochemical results revealed that T3Q, T3AMPy and T3EA act as excellent organic inhibitors and can labeled as mixed type inhibitors. The efficiencies of the tested compounds were affected by the nature of the side chain present in the triazine ring, where T3EA gave the least inhibition while T3Q and T3AMPy gave higher and almost the same inhibition effects. The inhibition efficiencies obtained from the different electrochemical techniques were in good agreement. PMID:27043517

  13. Benevolent behavior of Kleinia grandiflora leaf extract as a green corrosion inhibitor for mild steel in sulfuric acid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitchaipillai, Muthukrishnan; Raj, Karthik; Balasubramanian, Jeyaprabha; Periakaruppan, Prakash

    2014-11-01

    The ethanolic extract of Kleinia grandiflora leaves was characterized and tested for its potential anticorrosion properties on mild steel in 1 M H2SO4 medium using mass-loss analysis, potentiodynamic polarization measurements, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, UV-visible spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction analysis. The effect of temperature on the corrosion behavior of mild steel was studied in the range of 308 to 328 K. The inhibition efficiency was observed to increase with increasing concentration of the extract. Polarization curves revealed that the Kleinia grandiflora leaf extract is a mixed inhibitor. Impedance diagrams revealed that an increase of Kleinia grandiflora leaf extract concentration increased the charge transfer resistance and decreased the double-layer capacitance. The adsorption process obeys Langmuir's model, with a standard free energy of adsorption (Δ G ads) of -18.62 kJ/mol. The obtained results indicate that the Kleinia grandiflora leaf extract can serve as an effective inhibitor for the corrosion of mild steel in a sulfuric acid medium.

  14. Alkaloids extract of Retama monosperma (L.) Boiss. seeds used as novel eco-friendly inhibitor for carbon steel corrosion in 1 M HCl solution: Electrochemical and surface studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Hamdani, Naoual; Fdil, Rabiaa; Tourabi, Mustapha; Jama, Charafeddine; Bentiss, Fouad

    2015-12-01

    Current research efforts now focus on the development of non-toxic, inexpensive and environmentally friendly corrosion inhibitors as alternatives to different organic and non-organic compounds. In this field, alkaloids extract of Retama monosperma (L.) Boiss. seeds (AERS) was tested for the first time as corrosion inhibitor for carbon steel in 1 M HCl medium using electrochemical and surface characterization techniques. The obtained results showed that this plant extract's acts as an efficient corrosion inhibitor for carbon steel in 1 M HCl and an inhibition efficiency of 94.4% was reached with 400 mg/L of AERS at 30 °C. Ac impedance experimental data revealed a frequency distribution of the capacitance, simulated as constant phase element. Impedance results demonstrated that the addition of the AERS in the corrosive solution decreases the charge capacitance and simultaneously increases the function of the charge/discharge of the interface, facilitating the formation of an adsorbed layer over the steel surface. Polarization curves indicated that AERS is a mixed inhibitor. Adsorption of such alkaloid extract on the steel surface obeyed to the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) showed that the inhibition of steel corrosion in normal hydrochloric solution by AERS is mainly controlled by a physisorption process and the inhibitive layer is composed of an iron oxide/hydroxide mixture where AERS molecules are incorporated.

  15. Investigation of SiO{sub 2}:Na{sub 2}O ratio as a corrosion inhibitor for metal alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamad, N.; Othman, N. K.; Jalar, A.

    2013-11-27

    The silicate is one of the potential compounds used as a corrosion inhibitor for metal alloys. The mixture between silica and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) succeeded to produce the silicate product. The formulation of a silicate product normally variable depended by the different ratio of SiO{sub 2}:Na{sub 2}O. This research utilized the agriculture waste product of paddy using its rice husk. In this study, the amorphous silica content in rice husk ash was used after rice husk burnt in a muffle furnace at a certain temperature. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis was done to determine the existence of amorphous phase of silica in the rice husk ash. There are several studies that recognized rice husk as an alternative source that obtained high silica content. The X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis was carried out to clarify the percentage amount of Si and O elements, which referred the silica compound in rice husk ash. The preparation of sodium silicate formulation were differ based on the SiO{sub 2}:Na{sub 2}O ratio (SiO{sub 2}:Na{sub 2}O ratio = 1.00, 2.00 and 3.00). These silicate based corrosion inhibitors were tested on several testing samples, which were copper (99.9%), aluminum alloy (AA 6061) and carbon steel (SAE 1045). The purpose of this study is to determine the appropriate SiO{sub 2}:Na{sub 2}O ratio and understand how this SiO{sub 2}:Na{sub 2}O ratio can affect the corrosion rate of each metal alloys immersed in acidic medium. In order to investigate this study, weight loss test was conducted in 0.5 M hydrochloric acid (HCl) for 24 hours at room temperature.

  16. Investigation of SiO2:Na2O ratio as a corrosion inhibitor for metal alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamad, N.; Othman, N. K.; Jalar, A.

    2013-11-01

    The silicate is one of the potential compounds used as a corrosion inhibitor for metal alloys. The mixture between silica and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) succeeded to produce the silicate product. The formulation of a silicate product normally variable depended by the different ratio of SiO2:Na2O. This research utilized the agriculture waste product of paddy using its rice husk. In this study, the amorphous silica content in rice husk ash was used after rice husk burnt in a muffle furnace at a certain temperature. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis was done to determine the existence of amorphous phase of silica in the rice husk ash. There are several studies that recognized rice husk as an alternative source that obtained high silica content. The X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis was carried out to clarify the percentage amount of Si and O elements, which referred the silica compound in rice husk ash. The preparation of sodium silicate formulation were differ based on the SiO2:Na2O ratio (SiO2:Na2O ratio = 1.00, 2.00 and 3.00). These silicate based corrosion inhibitors were tested on several testing samples, which were copper (99.9%), aluminum alloy (AA 6061) and carbon steel (SAE 1045). The purpose of this study is to determine the appropriate SiO2:Na2O ratio and understand how this SiO2:Na2O ratio can affect the corrosion rate of each metal alloys immersed in acidic medium. In order to investigate this study, weight loss test was conducted in 0.5 M hydrochloric acid (HCl) for 24 hours at room temperature.

  17. Comparative study on lithium borates as corrosion inhibitors of aluminum current collector in lithium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kisung; Yu, Sunghun; Lee, Chulhaeng; Lee, Hochun

    2015-11-01

    Lithium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide (LiFSI) is a promising salt that can possibly overcome the limitations of lithium hexafluorophosphate (LiPF6) in current Li-ion batteries (LIBs). Aluminum (Al) corrosion issue, however, is a major bottleneck for the wide use of LiFSI. This study investigates lithium borate salts as Al corrosion inhibitors in LiFSI electrolytes. Through a systematic comparison among lithium tetrafluoroborate (LiBF4), lithium bis(oxalato)borate (LiBOB), and lithium difluoro(oxalato)borate (LiDFOB), and LiPF6, the inhibition ability of the additives is revealed to be in the following order: LiDFOB > LiBF4 ≈ LiPF6 > LiBOB. In particular, the inhibition effect of LiDFOB is outstanding; the anodic behavior of Al in 0.8 M LiFSI + 0.2 M LiDFOB ethylene carbonate (EC)-based electrolyte is comparable to that of corrosion-free 1 M LiPF6 solution. The superior inhibition ability of LiDFOB is attributed to the formation of a passive layer composed of Al-F, Al2O3, and B-O species, as evidenced by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements. A LiCoO2/graphite cell with 0.8 M LiFSI + 0.2 M LiDFOB electrolyte exhibits a rate capability comparable to a cell with 1 M LiPF6 solution, whereas a cell with 0.8 M LiFSI solution without LiDFOB suffers from poor power performance resulting from severe Al corrosion.

  18. EVELOPMENT OF AN ENVIRONMENTALLY BENIGN MICROBIAL INHIBITOR TO CONTROL INTERNAL PIPELINE CORROSION

    SciTech Connect

    Bill W. Bogan; Wendy R. Sullivan; Kristine M. H. Cruz; Kristine L. Lowe; John J. Kilbane II

    2004-04-30

    The overall program objective is to develop and evaluate environmentally benign agents or products that are effective in the prevention, inhibition, and mitigation of microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) in the internal surfaces of metallic natural gas pipelines. The goal is to develop one or more environmentally benign (a.k.a. ''green'') products that can be applied to maintain the structure and dependability of the natural gas infrastructure. Previous testing of pepper extracts resulted in preliminary data indicating that some pepper extracts inhibit the growth of some corrosion-associated microorganisms. This quarter additional tests were performed to more specifically investigate the ability of three pepper extracts to inhibit the growth, and to influence the metal corrosion caused by two microbial species: Desulfovibrio vulgaris, and Comomonas denitrificans. All three pepper extracts rapidly killed Desulfovibrio vulgaris, but did not appear to inhibit Comomonas denitrificans. While corrosion rates were at control levels in experiments with Desulfovibrio vulgaris that received pepper extract, corrosion rates were increased in the presence of Comomonas denitrificans plus pepper extract. Further testing with a wider range of pure bacterial cultures, and more importantly, with mixed bacterial cultures should be performed to determine the potential effectiveness of pepper extracts to inhibit MIC.

  19. Succinonitrile as a corrosion inhibitor of copper current collectors for overdischarge protection of lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Soo; Lee, Seon-Ha; Son, Mi-Young; Jung, Young Mee; Song, Hyun-Kon; Lee, Hochun

    2014-02-12

    Succinonitrile (SN) is investigated as an electrolyte additive for copper corrosion inhibition to provide overdischarge (OD) protection to lithium ion batteries (LIBs). The anodic Cu corrosion, occurring above 3.5 V (vs Li/Li(+)) in conventional LIB electrolytes, is suppressed until a voltage of 4.5 V is reached in the presence of SN. The corrosion inhibition by SN is ascribed to the formation of an SN-induced passive layer, which spontaneously develops on the copper surface during the first anodic scan. The passive layer is composed mainly of Cu(SN)2PF6 units, which is evidenced by Raman spectroscopy and electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance measurements. The effects of the SN additive on OD protection are confirmed by using 750 mAh pouch-type full cells of LiCoO2 and graphite with lithium metal as a reference electrode. Addition of SN completely prevents corrosion of the copper current collector in the full cell configuration, thereby tuning the LIB chemistry to be inherently immune to the OD abuses. PMID:24444831

  20. The effect of inhibitor sodium nitrate on pitting corrosion of dissimilar material weldment joint of stainless steel AISI 304 and mild steel SS 400

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilca, B. R.; Triyono

    2016-03-01

    This study experimentally evaluated the effect of Sodium Nitrate inhibitor (NaNO3) of 0.1%, 0.3%, and 0.5% on NaCl 3.5% toward pitting corrosion of dissimilar metal welding joint between stainless steel AISI 304 and mild steel SS 400. Electrochemical corrosion was tested using potentiodynamic polarization. Further the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) conducted to analyze the specimen. Chemical composition analysis used Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometry (EDS). The highest efficiency of sodium nitrate for ER 308 attained 63.8% and 64.89%for ER 309L. The specimen surface which observed through SEM showed decrease of pitting corrosion respectively with the addition of sodium nitrate content as inhibitor.

  1. The microwave assisted synthesis of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide as potential corrosion inhibitor toward carbon steel in 1 M HCl solution saturated with carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Pasasa, Norman Vincent A. Bundjali, Bunbun; Wahyuningrum, Deana

    2015-09-30

    Injection of corrosion inhibitor into the fluid current of oil and gas pipelines is an effective way to mitigate corrosion rate on the inner-surface parts of pipelines, especially carbon steel pipelines. In this research, two alkylimidazolium ionic liquids, 1-decyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide (IL1) and 1-dodecyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide (IL2) have been synthesized and studied as a potential corrosion inhibitor towards carbon steel in 1 M HCl solution saturated with carbon dioxide. IL1 and IL2 were synthesized using microwave assisted organic synthesis (MAOS) method. Mass Spectrometry analysis of IL1 and IL2 showed molecular mass [M-H+] peak at 223.2166 and 251.2484, respectively. The FTIR,{sup 1}H-NMR and {sup 13}C-NMR spectra confirmed that IL1 and IL2 were successfully synthesized. Corrosion inhibition activity of IL1 and IL2 were determined using weight loss method. The results showed that IL1 and IL2 have the potential as good corrosion inhibitors with corrosion inhibition efficiency of IL1 and IL2 are 96.00% at 100 ppm (343 K) and 95.60% at 50 ppm (343 K), respectively. The increase in the concentration of IL1 and IL2 tends to improve their corrosion inhibition activities. Analysis of the data obtained from the weight loss method shows that the adsorption of IL1 and IL2 on carbon steel is classified into chemisorption which obeys Langmuir’s adsorption isotherm.

  2. Introducing the Santolina chamaecyparissus Extract as a Suitable Green Inhibitor for 304 Stainless Steel Corrosion in Strong Acidic Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabani-Nooshabadi, Mehdi; Ghandchi, Maryam-Sadat

    2015-11-01

    The inhibitive action of extract of Santolina chamaecyparissus ( Santolina) as a green inhibitor on corrosion of 304 stainless steel (304 SS) in 6 M HCl solution was investigated by weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques, and scanning electron microscopic observations. The results of potentiodynamic polarization studies indicate that the extract shows mixed-type inhibition behavior and inhibition efficiency of 95.5 pct was achieved with the addition of 1.0 g L-1 extract. Impedance curves show that increasing Santolina concentration increases charge transfer resistance and decreases double-layer capacitance. The corrosion rate decreased with increasing concentration of extract and increased with the increase in temperature of the medium. The effect of temperature and related activation parameters was studied. Adsorption of the extract obeyed the Langmuir isotherm model. The negative value of the standard free energy of adsorption in the presence of the extract suggests the spontaneous adsorption of Santolina on 304 stainless steel surface. The inhibition efficiencies obtained from electrochemical tests were in good agreement with those obtained from weight loss measurements.

  3. A New Green Ionic Liquid-Based Corrosion Inhibitor for Steel in Acidic Environments.

    PubMed

    Atta, Ayman M; El-Mahdy, Gamal A; Al-Lohedan, Hamad A; Ezzat, Abdel Rahman O

    2015-01-01

    This work examines the use of new hydrophobic ionic liquid derivatives, namely octadecylammonium tosylate (ODA-TS) and oleylammonium tosylate (OA-TS) for corrosion protection of steel in 1 M hydrochloric acid solution. Their chemical structures were determined from NMR analyses. The surface activity characteristics of the prepared ODA-TS and OA-TS were evaluated from conductance, surface tension and contact angle measurements. The data indicate the presence of a double bond in the chemical structure of OA-TS modified its surface activity parameters. Potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements, scanning electron microscope (SEM), Energy dispersive X-rays (EDX) analysis and contact angle measurements were utilized to investigate the corrosion protection performance of ODA-TS and OA-TS on steel in acidic solution. The OA-TS and ODA-TS compounds showed good protection performance in acidic chloride solution due to formation of an inhibitive film on the steel surface. PMID:26091073

  4. Corrosion inhibitor storage and release property of TiO{sub 2} nanotube powder synthesized by rapid breakdown anodization method

    SciTech Connect

    Arunchandran, C.; Ramya, S.; George, R.P.; Kamachi Mudali, U.

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► TiO{sub 2} nanotube powders were synthesized by rapid breakdown anodization method. ► Benzotriazole was loaded into the TiO{sub 2} nanotube powders. ► Low pH induced release of benzotriazole from TiO{sub 2} nanotube powders was proved. -- Abstract: Titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) is one of the most studied substances in material science due to its versatile properties and diverse applications. In this study titanium dioxide nanotube powder were synthesized by rapid breakdown anodization (RBA) method. The synthesis involved potentiostatic anodization of titanium foil in 0.1 M HClO{sub 4} electrolyte under an applied voltage of 20 V and rapid stirring. The morphology and the phase of titanium dioxide nanotube powder were studied using field emission scanning electron microscopy, laser Raman spectroscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. Benzotriazole was chosen as model inhibitor to evaluate TiO{sub 2} nanotube powder's corrosion inhibitor loading and releasing properties. The storage and release properties of TiO{sub 2} nanotube powder were studied using UV–visible spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis.

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF AN ENVIRONMENTALLY BENIGN MICROBIAL INHIBITOR TO CONTROL INTERNAL PIPELINE CORROSION

    SciTech Connect

    Kristine L. Lowe; Bill W. Bogan; Wendy R. Sullivan; Kristine Mila H. Cruz; Brigid M. Lamb; John J. Kilbane II

    2004-07-30

    The overall program objective is to develop and evaluate environmentally benign agents or products that are effective in the prevention, inhibition, and mitigation of microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) in the internal surfaces of metallic natural gas pipelines. The goal is to develop one or more environmentally benign (a.k.a. ''green'') products that can be applied to maintain the structure and dependability of the natural gas infrastructure. Previous testing indicated that the growth, and the metal corrosion caused by pure cultures of sulfate reducing bacteria were inhibited by hexane extracts of some pepper plants. This quarter tests were performed with mixed bacterial cultures obtained from natural gas pipelines. Treatment with the pepper extracts affected the growth and metabolic activity of the microbial consortia. Specifically, the growth and metabolism of sulfate reducing bacteria was inhibited. The demonstration that pepper extracts can inhibit the growth and metabolism of sulfate reducing bacteria in mixed cultures is a significant observation validating a key hypothesis of the project. Future tests to determine the effects of pepper extracts on mature/established biofilms will be performed next.

  6. Corrosion inhibition in 2.0 M sulfuric acid solutions of high strength maraging steel by aminophenyl tetrazole as a corrosion inhibitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherif, El-Sayed M.

    2014-02-01

    The corrosion of high strength maraging steel after varied immersion times in concentrated solution, 2.0 M, of sulfuric acid has been investigated. The work was also extended to study the effect of 5-(3-aminophenyl)-tetrazole (APTA) on the inhibition of the steel corrosion. The study has been carried out using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), potentiodynamic polarization and scanning electron microscope (SEM) along with energy dispersive X-ray analyzer (EDX) investigations. EIS spectra showed that the corrosion and polarization resistances decrease with increasing the immersion time of the steel before measurement and increase in the presence of APTA and the increase of its concentration. Polarization data agreed with the EIS measurements and indicated that the increase of immersion time increases the corrosion of steel by increasing its corrosion current and corrosion rate and lowering its polarization resistance. On the other hand, the addition of APTA and the increase of its concentration minimized the corrosion of steel through decreasing the corrosion current and corrosion rate and increasing the polarization resistance at all exposure test periods. SEM and EDX investigations confirmed that the inhibition of the maraging steel in the 2.0 M H2SO4 solutions is achieved via the adsorption of the APTA molecules onto the steel protecting its surface from being dissolved easily.

  7. Corrosion/95 conference papers

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The papers in this conference represent the latest technological advances in corrosion control and prevention. The following subject areas are covered: cathodic protection in natural waters; materials for fossil fuel combustion and conversion systems; modern problems in atmospheric corrosion; innovative ideas for controlling the decaying infrastructure; deposits and their effects on corrosion in industry; volatile high temperature and non aqueous corrosion inhibitors; corrosion of light-weight and precoated metals for automotive application; refining industry corrosion; corrosion in pulp and paper industry; arctic/cold weather corrosion; materials selection for waste incinerators and associated equipment; corrosion measurement technology; environmental cracking of materials; advancing technology in the coating industry; corrosion in gas treating; green inhibition; recent advances in corrosion control of rail equipment; velocity effects and erosion corrosion in oil and gas production; marine corrosion; corrosion of materials in nuclear systems; underground corrosion control; corrosion in potable and industrial water systems in buildings and its impact on environmental compliance; deposit related boiler tube failures; boiler systems monitoring and control; recent developments and experiences in reactive metals; microbiologically influenced corrosion; corrosion and corrosion control for steel reinforced concrete; international symposium on the use of 12 and 13 Cr stainless steels in oil and gas production environments; subsea corrosion /erosion monitoring in production facilities; fiberglass reinforced pipe and tubulars in oilfield service; corrosion control technology in power transmission and distribution; mechanisms and methods of scale and deposit control; closing the loop -- results oriented cooling system monitoring and control; and minimization of aqueous discharge.

  8. Corrosion 99: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1999-11-01

    This conference includes the following; Corrosion in Gas Treating; Advances in Scale and Deposit Control; Uses of Computers for Improved Corrosion Control; Erosion-Corrosion in Steam Generating Systems; Electrochemical Noise Measurements for Corrosion Evaluations; Materials Performance in Fossil Fuel Combustion and Conversion Systems; Corrosion in Super Critical Processes; Cathodic Protection of External Surfaces for Underground and Aboveground Storage Tanks; Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion; Advances in Materials for Oilfield Applications; Refining Industry Corrosion; Green Corrosion/Scale Inhibition Technologies; Managing Corrosion With Plastics; Corrosion Measurement Technology; Marine Corrosion; Improved Understanding and Mitigation of CO{sub 2} Corrosion; Thermal Spray Coatings for Corrosion Protection; Volatile Corrosion Inhibitors; Corrosion Testing in Concrete; Stress Corrosion Cracking: Field Laboratory Correlations; Materials Performance in Incineration and Waste Fuel Combustion Environments; Water Reuse in Industry; Corrosion Control and Prevention of Military and Aerospace Equipment; Corrosion in Nuclear Systems; Latest Developments in Aboveground Storage Tanks Corrosion Control, Monitoring and Evaluation Technology; Internal In-line Inspection of Pipelines and Evaluation of Results; New Developments in Cathodic Protection of Reinforcing Steels in Concrete; Cathodic Protection in Natural Waters; Corrosion in the Pulp and Paper Industry; Advanced Materials for High Temperature Service in Chemical Process Industry; Advances in Cooling Water Treatment; Materials, Fabrication, and Inspection Guidelines for Wet H{sub 2}S Service; Environmental Wear of Nonmetallics in Oilfield Service; and Corrosion and Scale Control in Low Pressure Boiler and Steam Systems in Buildings. Separate abstracts were prepared for most of the papers.

  9. Corrosion 99: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-01-01

    This conference includes the following; Corrosion in Gas Treating; Advances in Scale and Deposit Control; Uses of Computers for Improved Corrosion Control; Erosion-Corrosion in Steam Generating Systems; Electrochemical Noise Measurements for Corrosion Evaluations; Materials Performance in Fossil Fuel Combustion and Conversion Systems; Corrosion in Super Critical Processes; Cathodic Protection of External Surfaces for Underground and Aboveground Storage Tanks; Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion; Advances in Materials for Oilfield Applications; Refining Industry Corrosion; Green Corrosion/Scale Inhibition Technologies; Managing Corrosion With Plastics; Corrosion Measurement Technology; Marine Corrosion; Improved Understanding and Mitigation of CO[sub 2] Corrosion; Thermal Spray Coatings for Corrosion Protection; Volatile Corrosion Inhibitors; Corrosion Testing in Concrete; Stress Corrosion Cracking: Field Laboratory Correlations; Materials Performance in Incineration and Waste Fuel Combustion Environments; Water Reuse in Industry; Corrosion Control and Prevention of Military and Aerospace Equipment; Corrosion in Nuclear Systems; Latest Developments in Aboveground Storage Tanks Corrosion Control, Monitoring and Evaluation Technology; Internal In-line Inspection of Pipelines and Evaluation of Results; New Developments in Cathodic Protection of Reinforcing Steels in Concrete; Cathodic Protection in Natural Waters; Corrosion in the Pulp and Paper Industry; Advanced Materials for High Temperature Service in Chemical Process Industry; Advances in Cooling Water Treatment; Materials, Fabrication, and Inspection Guidelines for Wet H[sub 2]S Service; Environmental Wear of Nonmetallics in Oilfield Service; and Corrosion and Scale Control in Low Pressure Boiler and Steam Systems in Buildings. Separate abstracts were prepared for most of the papers.

  10. Products of the Black Sea alga Phyllophora nervosa as corrosion inhibitor for steel in acids

    SciTech Connect

    Popelyukh, G.M.; Andrianov, A.M.; Burtnenko, L.M.; Gazha, P.A.; Talavira, L.I.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have investigated the inhibiting properties of the processing products of the Black Sea red seaweed Phyllophora nervosa on specimens of steel St3 in phosphoric and hydrochloric acids of various concentrations at temperatures in the range from 30 to 95 /sup 0/C. They have studied how the concentrations of urotropin, sodium chloride, and Fe/sup 3 +/ ions influence the protective properties of the seaweed inhibitor. They have made preliminary investigations of the mechanisms of the protective action.

  11. Simple preparation of aminothiourea-modified chitosan as corrosion inhibitor and heavy metal ion adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Li, Manlin; Xu, Juan; Li, Ronghua; Wang, Dongen; Li, Tianbao; Yuan, Maosen; Wang, Jinyi

    2014-03-01

    By a simple and convenient method of using formaldehyde as linkages, two new chitosan (CS) derivatives modified respectively with thiosemicarbazide (TSFCS) and thiocarbohydrazide (TCFCS) were synthesized. The new compounds were characterized and studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, elemental analysis, thermal gravity analysis and differential scanning calorimetry, and their surface morphologies were determined via scanning electron microscopy. These CS derivatives could form pH dependent gels. The behavior of 304 steel in 2% acetic acid containing different inhibitors or different concentrations of inhibitor had been studied by potentiodynamic polarization test. The preliminary results show that the new compound TCFCS can act as a mixed-type metal anticorrosion inhibitor in some extent; its inhibition efficiency is 92% when the concentration was 60 mg/L. The adsorption studies on a metal ion mixture aqueous solution show that two samples TSFCS and TCFCS can absorb As (V), Ni (II), Cu (II), Cd (II) and Pb (II) efficiently at pH 9 and 4. PMID:24407668

  12. Quantum chemical studies of some rhodanine azosulpha drugs as corrosion inhibitors for mild steel in acidic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebenso, Eno E.; Arslan, Taner; Kandemirli, Fatma; Caner, Necmettin; Love, Ian

    The density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/6-31G (d,p) and B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) basis set levels and ab initio calculations using the HF/6-31G (d,p) and HF/6-311G(d,p) methods were performed on four rhodanine azosulpha drugs (namely 5-sulfadiazineazo-3-phenyl-2-thioxo-4-thiazolidinone, 5- sulfamethazineazo-3-phenyl-2-thioxo-4-thiazolidinone, 5-sulfadimethoxineazo-3-phenyl-2-thioxo- 4-thiazolidinone, and 5-sulfamethoxazoleazo-3-phenyl-2-thioxo-4-thiazolidinone) used as corrosion inhibitors for mild steel in acidic medium to determine the relationship between the molecular structure of the rhodanine azosulpha drugs and inhibition efficiency(%IE). The quantum chemical parameters/descriptors, namely, EHOMO (highest occupied molecular orbital energy), ELUMO (lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy), the energy difference (ΔE) between EHOMO and ELUMO, dipole moment (μ), electron affinity (A), ionization potential (I), the absolute electronegativity (X), absolute hardness (η), softness (σ), polarizability (α), the Mulliken charges, and the fraction of electrons (ΔN) transfer from inhibitors to iron, were calculated and correlated with the experimental %IE. Quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) approach has been used, and a composite index of some quantum chemical parameters/descriptors was performed to characterize the inhibition performance of the studied molecules. The results showed that the inhibition efficiency (%IE) of the rhodanine azo sulfa drugs studied was closely related to some of the quantum chemical parameters/descriptors but with varying degrees of correlation coefficient (R2). The %IE also increased with the increase in EHOMO and decrease in EHOMO-ELUMO; and the areas containing N atoms are the most possible sites for bonding to the metal iron surface by donating electrons to the metal. The HOMO orbitals consist of 61.73-63.04% double bonded S atom (7(S)), and most of the rest are concentrated on the rhodanine group; so, the

  13. Hydroxyethyl cellulose as efficient organic inhibitor of zinc-carbon battery corrosion in ammonium chloride solution: Electrochemical and surface morphology studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deyab, M. A.

    2015-04-01

    Hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC) has been investigated as corrosion inhibitor for zinc-carbon battery by polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. The obtained results show that the maximum inhibition efficiency by HEC in 26% NH4Cl solution at 300 ppm and 298 K is 92.07%. Tafel polarization studies reveal that HEC acts as an efficient mixed inhibitor. The corrosion rate is suppressed by the adsorption of HEC on the zinc surface. HEC adsorption obeys the Langmuir isotherm and the thermodynamic parameters Kads and Δ Gadso have been also calculated and discussed. Both physisorption and chemisorption may occur on the zinc surface. Surface characterization investigation using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is used to ascertain the nature of the protective film.

  14. Effect of acid-corrosion inhibitors on the pickling of scale from steels

    SciTech Connect

    Podobaev, N.I.

    1988-07-01

    This article examines features of the dissolution of scale and its component oxides in contact with steel in acids. It also looks at possible kinetic mechanisms of the dissolution of iron oxides, the effect of inhibitors and other additives on the dissolution of the metal and scale, and methods of measuring the dynamics of pickling. A distinction is made between high-temperature scale formed on plain-carbon and low-alloy steels above 570-800/degree/C and low-temperature scale formed below 570/degree/C.

  15. Effect of superficially applied ZrO 2 inhibitor on the high temperature corrosion performance of some Fe-, Co- and Ni-base superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, G.; Singh, H.; Prakash, S.

    2008-08-01

    High temperature corrosion is an acute form of corrosion occurring at elevated temperature in the presence of an oxidizing gas and is associated with a thin electrolytic deposit (salt or ash) on alloy. Inhibitors and fuel additives have been used with varying success to combat oil ash corrosion. In this paper, the effect of an oxide additive namely ZrO 2 on the hot corrosion behaviour of some superalloys, viz. Superfer 800H (alloy A), Superco 605 (alloy B) and Superni 75 (alloy C) has been investigated in an Na 2SO 4-60%V 2O 5 environment at 900 °C for 50 cycles. Each cycle consisted of 1 h heating in a Silicon Carbide Tube furnace followed by 20 min cooling in ambient air. Weight change measurements after each cycle were taken by an electronic balance having an accuracy of 0.01 mg. XRD, SEM and EPMA analyses of the exposed specimens were carried out to characterize the oxide scales. In the Na 2SO 4-60%V 2O 5 environment, the corrosion rate for the Co-base alloy was found to be highest, whereas that for the Ni-base Superni 75 a lowest. Whereas, with ZrO 2 superficial coating, the overall weight gains got reduced for the alloys B and C, however the inhibitor was marginally effective in the alloy A. A thick scale was observed in the latter case, which was rich in Cr, Ni, Fe and V. Absence of protective continuous chromia layer and presence of less protective NiO was probably the main reason for more corrosion rate in this case.

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF AN ENVIRONMENTALLY BENIGN MICROBIAL INHIBITOR TO CONTROL INTERNAL PIPELINE CORROSION

    SciTech Connect

    J. Robert Paterek; Gemma Husmillo

    2002-07-01

    The overall program objective is to develop and evaluate environmental benign agents or products that are effective in the prevention, inhibition, and mitigation of microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) in the internal surfaces of metallic natural gas pipelines. The goal is one or more environmental benign, a.k.a. ''green'' products that can be applied to maintain the structure and dependability of the natural gas infrastructure. Capsicum sp. extracts and pure compounds were screened for their antimicrobial activity against MIC causing bacteria. Studies on the ability of these compounds to dissociate biofilm from the substratum were conducted using microtiter plate assays. Tests using laboratory scale pipeline simulators continued. Preliminary results showed that the natural extracts possess strong antimicrobial activity being comparable to or even better than the pure compounds tested against strains of sulfate reducers. Their minimum inhibitory concentrations had been determined. It was also found that they possess bactericidal properties at minimal concentrations. Biofilm dissociation activity as assessed by microtiter plate assays demonstrated varying degrees of differences between the treated and untreated group with the superior performance of the extracts over pure compounds. Such is an indication of the possible benefits that could be obtained from these natural products. Confirmatory experiments are underway.

  17. Discharge of three benzotriazole corrosion inhibitors with municipal wastewater and improvements by membrane bioreactor treatment and ozonation.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Stefan; Jakobs, Jutta; Reemtsma, Thorsten

    2006-12-01

    A set of three benzotriazole corrosion inhibitors was analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in wastewaters and in a partially closed water cycle in the Berlin region. Benzotriazole (BTri) and two isomers of tolyltriazole (TTri) were determined in untreated municipal wastewater with mean dissolved concentrations of 12 microg/L (BTri), 2.1 microg/L (4-TTri), and 1.3 microg/L (5-TTri). Removal in conventional activated sludge (CAS) municipal wastewater treatment ranged from 37% for BTri to insignificant removal for 4-TTri. In laboratory batch tests 5-TTri was mineralized completely and 4-TTri was mineralized to only 25%. This different behavior of the three benzotriazoles was confirmed by following the triazoles through a partially closed water cycle, into bank filtrate used for drinking water production, where BTri (0.1 microg/L) and 4-TTri (0.03 microg/ L) but no 5-TTri were detected after a travel time of several months. The environmental half-life appears to increase from 5-TTri over BTri to 4-TTri. Treatment of municipal wastewater by a lab-scale membrane bioreactor (MBR) instead of CAS improved the removal of BTri and 5-TTri but could not avoid their discharge. Almost complete removal was achieved by ozonation of the treatment plant effluent with 1 mg O3/mg DOC. PMID:17180966

  18. Determination of benzotriazole corrosion inhibitors from aqueous environmental samples by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Stefan; Reemtsma, Thorsten

    2005-11-15

    The first method for the determination of commonly used corrosion inhibitors in environmental water samples by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry is presented. Benzotriazole (BTri) and the two isomers of tolyltriazole (5- and 4-TTri) are separated in an isocratic run. By gradient elution, BTri, 4-TTri, 5-TTri, and xylyltriazole can be determined simultaneously with three benzothiazoles, but here TTri isomers coelute. The instrumental detection limit of 2 pg allows the determination of the three most important benzotriazoles from municipal wastewater and most surface waters by direct injection into the HPLC system without previous enrichment. When solid-phase extraction is employed with mean recovery rates of 95-113%, the limit of quantification for benzotriazoles range from 10 ng/L in groundwater to 25 ng/L in untreated wastewater. BTri and TTri were determined in municipal wastewater in microgram per liter concentrations. Elimination in wastewater treatment appears to be poor, and BTri and TTri can be followed through a water cycle from treated municipal wastewater through surface water to bank filtrate used for drinking water production. The TTri isomers show markedly different biodegradation behavior with 4-TTri being more stable. PMID:16285694

  19. Limiting production rates in C-steel pipes. Removal of inhibitors/corrosion products by fatigue/yield action of liquid or gas/liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Soentvedt, T.

    1996-08-01

    The objective of this paper has been to form a link between the limiting production rates and the strength of the corrosion product formed on carbon steel. This paper has studied the available experimental data related to the failure of corrosion products with and without strengthening by inhibitors. Corrosion products in smooth pipes, bends and weldlike obstacles have been investigated. A model has been developed based on these observations which connects the strength of the corrosion product with the wall shear stress in both liquid and multiphase flow. Given the chemistry, temperature and metallurgy of the material the model allows the transformation from simple liquid tests to different flow conditions in the field. Thus limiting production rates in a field can be determined based on simple model tests. Relationships for the wall shear stress amplitudes, frequencies and mean values for various flow regimes have been developed. These relations are required in the model simulating the strength of the corrosion product. The paper shows why bends and weldlike obstacles constitute exposed areas. This study is the first of its kind. Thus the models developed lack detailed experimental verifications. The paper therefore briefly describes further work which has been initiated in order to verify the hypothesis formed.

  20. Adsorption and Corrosion Inhibition Studies of Some Selected Dyes as Corrosion Inhibitors for Mild Steel in Acidic Medium: Gravimetric, Electrochemical, Quantum Chemical Studies and Synergistic Effect with Iodide Ions.

    PubMed

    Peme, Thabo; Olasunkanmi, Lukman O; Bahadur, Indra; Adekunle, Abolanle S; Kabanda, Mwadham M; Ebenso, Eno E

    2015-01-01

    The corrosion inhibition properties of some organic dyes, namely Sunset Yellow (SS), Amaranth (AM), Allura Red (AR), Tartrazine (TZ) and Fast Green (FG), for mild steel corrosion in 0.5 M HCl solution, were investigated using gravimetric, potentiodynamic polarization techniques and quantum chemical calculations. The results showed that the studied dyes are good corrosion inhibitors with enhanced inhibition efficiencies. The inhibition efficiency of all the studied dyes increases with increase in concentration, and decreases with increase in temperature. The results showed that the inhibition efficiency of the dyes increases in the presence of KI due to synergistic interactions of the dye molecules with iodide (I(-)) ions. Potentiodynamic polarization results revealed that the studied dyes are mixed-type inhibitors both in the absence and presence of KI. The adsorption of the studied dyes on mild steel surface, with and without KI, obeys the Langmuir adsorption isotherm and involves physical adsorption mechanism. Quantum chemical calculations revealed that the most likely sites in the dye molecules for interactions with mild steel are the S, O, and N heteroatoms. PMID:26364631

  1. Electrochemical and quantum chemical studies of N,N'-bis(4-hydroxybenzaldehyde)-2,2-dimethylpropandiimine Schiff base as corrosion inhibitor for low carbon steel in HCl solution.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Hojat; Danaee, Iman; Eskandari, Hadi; Rashvandavei, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    A synthesized Schiff base N,N'-bis(4-hydroxybenzaldehyde)-2,2-dimethylpropandiimine (p-HBDP) was studied as green inhibitor for the corrosion of low carbon steel in 1 M HCl solution using electrochemical, surface and quantum chemical methods. Results showed that the inhibition occurs through the adsorption of the inhibitor molecules on the metal surface. The inhibition efficiency was found to increase with increasing inhibitor concentration and de-creased with increasing temper-ature, which is due to the fact that the rate of corrosion of steel is higher than the rate of adsorption. Thermodynamic parameters for adsorp-tion and activation processes were determined. Polarization data indicated that this compound act as mixed-type inhibitors and the adsorption isotherm basically obeys the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The calculations of reactivity indices of p-HBDP such as softness and natural charge distributions together with local reactivity by means of Fukui indices were used to explain the electron transfer mechanism between the p-HBDP molecules and the steel surface. PMID:23947700

  2. Corrosion/96 conference papers

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    Topics covered by this conference include: cathodic protection in natural waters; cleaning and repassivation of building HVAC systems; worldwide opportunities in flue gas desulfurization; advancements in materials technology for use in oil and gas service; fossil fuel combustion and conversion; technology of corrosion inhibitors; computers in corrosion control--modeling and information processing; recent experiences and advances of austenitic alloys; managing corrosion with plastics; corrosion measurement technology; corrosion inhibitors for concrete; refining industry; advances in corrosion control for rail and tank trailer equipment; CO{sub 2} corrosion--mechanisms and control; microbiologically influenced corrosion; corrosion in nuclear systems; role of corrosion in boiler failures; effects of water reuse on monitoring and control technology in cooling water applications; methods and mechanisms of scale and deposit control; corrosion detection in petroleum production lines; underground corrosion control; environmental cracking--relating laboratory results and field behavior; corrosion control in reinforced concrete structures; corrosion and its control in aerospace and military hardware; injection and process addition facilities; progress reports on the results of reinspection of deaerators inspected or repaired per RP0590 criteria; near 100% volume solids coating technology and application methods; materials performance in high temperature environments containing halides; impact of toxicity studies on use of corrosion/scale inhibitors; mineral scale deposit control in oilfield related operations; corrosion in gas treating; marine corrosion; cold climate corrosion; corrosion in the pulp and paper industry; gaseous chlorine alternatives in cooling water systems; practical applications of ozone in recirculating cooling water systems; and water reuse in industry. Over 400 papers from this conference have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  3. Demonstration of multifunctional DNBM corrosion inhibitors in protective coatings for Naval Air/Weapon Systems. Final report, September 1989-July 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Bailin, L.J.

    1993-12-01

    The corrosion protective properties of multifunctional DNBM salts (quaternary ammonium dichromate, nitrate, borate, and molybdate) have been demonstrated on high-strength steel and aluminum alloys found in prototype aerospace weapon systems. The 100% DNBM mixture added to MIL-P-23377 epoxy-polyamide, minus strontium chromate inhibitor, on bare 7075-T6 aluminum alloy resisted 1000 h ASTM B-117 salt spray. However, the coatings were not resistant to hydraulic fluid immersion at the higher concentrations required for the corrosion inhibition. Microencapsulation of the reactive DNBM mixture was adopted as a means to prevent this susceptibility, as well as the destructive oxidation of the hydroxyl groups in the epoxy resin during cure. In the scale-up operation, approximately 20 gallons of DNBM weighing 64 kg (141 lb) was prepared from the four starting quarternary salts synthesized in a chemical process pilot plant. The salts were mixed by dissolving in toluene. Following removal of solvent, the resultant dark-brown liquid, approximating molasses in viscosity, was microencapsulated by the following method: The DNBM was dispersed to form an oil-in-water emulsion in an aqueous colloidal solution of low-viscosity, high-purity methyl cellulose using a Gifford-Wood homogenizer, followed by spray drying in an Anhydro spray dryer. The maximum practicable payload was 75% DNBM. After spray drying, the capsules Corrosion inhibitors, DNBM, Microencapsulation, Epoxy primers, Protective coatings.

  4. Inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Community Counts Blood Safety Inhibitors Articles & Key Findings Free Materials Videos Starting the Conversation Playing it Safe A Look at Hemophilia Joint Range of Motion My Story Links to Other Websites ...

  5. Application of Essential Oil of Artemisia Herba Alba as Green Corrosion Inhibitor for Steel in 0.5 M H2SO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouachikh, O.; Bouyanzer, A.; Bouklah, M.; Desjobert, J.-M.; Costa, J.; Hammouti, B.; Majidi, L.

    Essential oil from Artemisia herba alba (Art) was hydrodistilled and tested as corrosion inhibitor of steel in 0.5 M H2SO4 using weight loss measurements and electrochemical polarization methods. Results gathered show that this natural oil reduced the corrosion rate by the cathodic action. Its inhibition efficiency attains the maximum (74%) at 1 g/L. The inhibition efficiency of Arm oil increases with the rise of temperature. The adsorption isotherm of natural product on the steel has been determined. A. herba alba essential oil was obtained by hydrodistillation and its chemical composition oil was investigated by capillary GC and GC/MS. The major components were chrysanthenone (30.6%) and camphor (24.4%).

  6. Hydroxyethylcellulose used as an eco-friendly inhibitor for 1018 c-steel corrosion in 3.5% NaCl solution.

    PubMed

    El-Haddad, Mahmoud N

    2014-11-01

    The inhibition effect of hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) on 1018 c-steel corrosion in 3.5% NaCl solution was investigated by using potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical frequency modulation (EFM) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. The potentiodynamic polarization studies suggested that HEC acts as a mixed-type inhibitor. Data obtained from EIS were analyzed to model the corrosion inhibition process through equivalent circuit. Results obtained from EFM technique were shown to be in agreement with potentiodynamic and EIS techniques. The adsorption behavior of HEC on steel surface follows the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Thermodynamic parameter (ΔG°(ads)) and activation parameters (Ea(*), ΔH(*) and ΔS(*)) were calculated to investigate mechanism of inhibition. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis system were performed to characterize the film formed on the metal surface. DMol(3) quantum chemical calculations were performed to support the adsorption mechanism with the structure of HEC molecule. PMID:25129787

  7. A new insight into resource recovery of excess sewage sludge: feasibility of extracting mixed amino acids as an environment-friendly corrosion inhibitor for industrial pickling.

    PubMed

    Su, Wen; Tang, Bing; Fu, Fenglian; Huang, Shaosong; Zhao, Shiyuan; Bin, Liying; Ding, Jiewei; Chen, Cuiqun

    2014-08-30

    The work mainly presented a laboratory-scale investigation on an effective process to extract a value-added product from municipal excess sludge. The functional groups in the hydrolysate were characterized with Fourier transform infrared spectrum, and the contained amino acids were measured by means of an automatic amino acid analyzer. The corrosion-inhibition characteristics of the hydrolysate were determined with weight-loss measurement, electrochemical polarization and scanning electron microscopy. Results indicated that the hydrolysate contained 15 kinds of amino acid, and their adsorption on the surface could effectively inhibit the corrosion reaction of the steel from the acid medium. Polarization curves indicated that the obtained hydrolysate was a mixed-type inhibitor, but mainly restricted metal dissolution on the anode. The adsorption accorded well with the Langmuir adsorption isotherm, involved an increase in entropy, and was a spontaneous, exothermic process. PMID:25036999

  8. Palladium(II) and zinc(II) complexes of neutral [N2O2] donor Schiff bases derived from furfuraldehyde: synthesis, characterization, fluorescence and corrosion inhibitors of ligands.

    PubMed

    Ali, Omyma A M

    2014-11-11

    Metal complexes of Schiff bases derived from furfuraldehyde and 4,5-dimethyl-1,2-phenylendiamine (L1) or 4,5-dichloro-1,2-phenylendiamine (L2) have been reported and characterized based on elemental analyses, IR, 1H NMR, UV-Vis, magnetic moment, molar conductance and thermal analysis. The complexes are found to have the formulae [PdL1-2]Cl2 and [ZnL1-2](AcO)2·H2O. The molar conductance data reveal that Pd(II) and Zn(II) chelates are ionic in nature and are of the type 2:1 electrolytes. The spectral data are consistent with a square planar and tetrahedral geometry around Pd(II) and Zn(II), respectively, in which the ligands act as tetradentate ligands. The thermal behavior of some chelates is studied and the activation thermodynamic parameters are calculated using Coats-Redfern method. The corrosion inhibition of stainless steel types 410 and 304 in 1 M HCl using the synthesized Schiff bases as inhibitors have been studied by weight loss method. The obtained data considered these ligands as efficient corrosion inhibitors. The ligands and their metal complexes exhibited considerable antibacterial activity against Staphylococcusaureus, and Escherichiacoli and antifungal activity against Candida albicans. PMID:24858346

  9. Palladium(II) and zinc(II) complexes of neutral [N2O2] donor Schiff bases derived from furfuraldehyde: Synthesis, characterization, fluorescence and corrosion inhibitors of ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Omyma A. M.

    2014-11-01

    Metal complexes of Schiff bases derived from furfuraldehyde and 4,5-dimethyl-1,2-phenylendiamine (L1) or 4,5-dichloro-1,2-phenylendiamine (L2) have been reported and characterized based on elemental analyses, IR, 1H NMR, UV-Vis, magnetic moment, molar conductance and thermal analysis. The complexes are found to have the formulae [PdL1-2]Cl2 and [ZnL1-2](AcO)2·H2O. The molar conductance data reveal that Pd(II) and Zn(II) chelates are ionic in nature and are of the type 2:1 electrolytes. The spectral data are consistent with a square planar and tetrahedral geometry around Pd(II) and Zn(II), respectively, in which the ligands act as tetradentate ligands. The thermal behavior of some chelates is studied and the activation thermodynamic parameters are calculated using Coats-Redfern method. The corrosion inhibition of stainless steel types 410 and 304 in 1 M HCl using the synthesized Schiff bases as inhibitors have been studied by weight loss method. The obtained data considered these ligands as efficient corrosion inhibitors. The ligands and their metal complexes exhibited considerable antibacterial activity against Staphylococcusaureus, and Escherichiacoli and antifungal activity against Candida albicans.

  10. Some Phthalocyanine and Naphthalocyanine Derivatives as Corrosion Inhibitors for Aluminium in Acidic Medium: Experimental, Quantum Chemical Calculations, QSAR Studies and Synergistic Effect of Iodide Ions.

    PubMed

    Dibetsoe, Masego; Olasunkanmi, Lukman O; Fayemi, Omolola E; Yesudass, Sasikumar; Ramaganthan, Baskar; Bahadur, Indra; Adekunle, Abolanle S; Kabanda, Mwadham M; Ebenso, Eno E

    2015-01-01

    The effects of seven macrocyclic compounds comprising four phthalocyanines (Pcs) namely 1,4,8,11,15,18,22,25-octabutoxy-29H,31H-phthalocyanine (Pc1), 2,3,9,10,16,17,23,24-octakis(octyloxy)-29H,31H-phthalocyanine (Pc2), 2,9,16,23-tetra-tert-butyl-29H,31H-phthalocyanine (Pc3) and 29H,31H-phthalocyanine (Pc4), and three naphthalocyanines namely 5,9,14,18,23,27,32,36-octabutoxy-2,3-naphthalocyanine (nPc1), 2,11,20,29-tetra-tert-butyl-2,3-naphthalocyanine (nPc2) and 2,3-naphthalocyanine (nP3) were investigated on the corrosion of aluminium (Al) in 1 M HCl using a gravimetric method, potentiodynamic polarization technique, quantum chemical calculations and quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR). Synergistic effects of KI on the corrosion inhibition properties of the compounds were also investigated. All the studied compounds showed appreciable inhibition efficiencies, which decrease with increasing temperature from 30 °C to 70 °C. At each concentration of the inhibitor, addition of 0.1% KI increased the inhibition efficiency compared to the absence of KI indicating the occurrence of synergistic interactions between the studied molecules and I(-) ions. From the potentiodynamic polarization studies, the studied Pcs and nPcs are mixed type corrosion inhibitors both without and with addition of KI. The adsorption of the studied molecules on Al surface obeys the Langmuir adsorption isotherm, while the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters revealed that the adsorption of the studied compounds on Al surface is spontaneous and involves competitive physisorption and chemisorption mechanisms. The experimental results revealed the aggregated interactions between the inhibitor molecules and the results further indicated that the peripheral groups on the compounds affect these interactions. The calculated quantum chemical parameters and the QSAR results revealed the possibility of strong interactions between the studied inhibitors and metal surface. QSAR analysis on the

  11. Requirements for inhibition of localized corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Gunaltun, Y.M.; Chevrot, T.

    1999-11-01

    Localized corrosion is the principal cause of line failure when corrosion is internal. As the inhibition is the most common way to control corrosion in wet gas and oil production lines, the inhibitor should be able to control localized corrosion in all cases where it may occur. Therefore, inhibitor selection philosophy should be based on this approach. Laboratory and field evaluation of corrosion inhibitors showed that some products are almost 100% efficient in preventing localized corrosion if their concentration in the water phase is above a threshold value. The main uncertainty, which then remains, is the inhibitor availability at the pipe surface.

  12. Microencapsulation Technology for Corrosion Mitigation by Smart Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buhrow, Jerry; Li, Wenyan; Jolley, Scott; Calle, Luz M.

    2011-01-01

    A multifunctional, smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion is being developed based on micro-encapsulation technology. Corrosion indicators as well as corrosion inhibitors have been incorporated into microcapsules, blended into several paint systems, and tested for corrosion detection and protection effectiveness. This paper summarizes the development, optimization, and testing of microcapsules specifically designed to be incorporated into a smart coating that will deliver corrosion inhibitors to mitigate corrosion autonomously. Key words: smart coating, corrosion inhibition, microencapsulation, microcapsule, pH sensitive microcapsule, corrosion inhibitor, corrosion protection pain

  13. Electrochemical corrosion studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knockemus, W. W.

    1986-01-01

    The objective was to gain familiarity with the Model 350 Corrosion Measurement Console, to determine if metal protection by grease coatings can be measured by the polarization-resistance method, and to compare corrosion rates of 4130 steel coated with various greases. Results show that grease protection of steel may be determined electrochemically. Studies were also conducted to determine the effectiveness of certain corrosion inhibitors on aluminum and steel.

  14. Multicomponent Synthesis and Evaluation of New 1,2,3-Triazole Derivatives of Dihydropyrimidinones as Acidic Corrosion Inhibitors for Steel.

    PubMed

    González-Olvera, Rodrigo; Román-Rodríguez, Viridiana; Negrón-Silva, Guillermo E; Espinoza-Vázquez, Araceli; Rodríguez-Gómez, Francisco Javier; Santillan, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    An efficient one-pot synthesis of 1,2,3-triazole derivatives of dihydropyrimidinones has been developed using two multicomponent reactions. The aldehyde-1,2,3-triazoles were obtained in good yields from in situ-generated organic azides and O-propargylbenzaldehyde. The target heterocycles were synthesized through the Biginelli reaction in which the aldehyde-1,2,3-triazoles reacted with ethyl acetoacetate and urea in the presence of Ce(OTf)₃ as the catalyst. The corrosion inhibition of steel grade API 5 L X52 in 1 M HCl by the synthesized compounds was investigated using the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy technique. The measurements revealed that these heterocycles are promising candidates to inhibit acidic corrosion of steel. PMID:26907242

  15. Porphyrins as Corrosion Inhibitors for N80 Steel in 3.5% NaCl Solution: Electrochemical, Quantum Chemical, QSAR and Monte Carlo Simulations Studies.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ambrish; Lin, Yuanhua; Quraishi, Mumtaz A; Olasunkanmi, Lukman O; Fayemi, Omolola E; Sasikumar, Yesudass; Ramaganthan, Baskar; Bahadur, Indra; Obot, Ime B; Adekunle, Abolanle S; Kabanda, Mwadham M; Ebenso, Eno E

    2015-01-01

    The inhibition of the corrosion of N80 steel in 3.5 wt. % NaCl solution saturated with CO2 by four porphyrins, namely 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-21H,23H-porphyrin (HPTB), 5,10,15,20-tetra(4-pyridyl)-21H,23H-porphyrin (T4PP), 4,4',4″,4‴-(porphyrin-5,10,15,20-tetrayl)tetrakis(benzoic acid) (THP) and 5,10,15,20-tetraphenyl-21H,23H-porphyrin (TPP) was studied using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), potentiodynamic polarization, scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. The results showed that the inhibition efficiency, η% increases with increasing concentration of the inhibitors. The EIS results revealed that the N80 steel surface with adsorbed porphyrins exhibited non-ideal capacitive behaviour with reduced charge transfer activity. Potentiodynamic polarization measurements indicated that the studied porphyrins acted as mixed type inhibitors. The SECM results confirmed the adsorption of the porphyrins on N80 steel thereby forming a relatively insulated surface. The SEM also confirmed the formation of protective films of the porphyrins on N80 steel surface thereby protecting the surface from direct acid attack. Quantum chemical calculations, quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) were also carried out on the studied porphyrins and the results showed that the corrosion inhibition performances of the porphyrins could be related to their EHOMO, ELUMO, ω, and μ values. Monte Carlo simulation studies showed that THP has the highest adsorption energy, while T4PP has the least adsorption energy in agreement with the values of σ from quantum chemical calculations. PMID:26295223

  16. Corrosion and protection of heterogeneous cast Al-Si (356) and Al-Si-Cu-Fe (380) alloys by chromate adn cerium inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Syadwad

    In this study, the localized corrosion and conversion coating on cast alloys 356 (Al-7.0Si-0.3Mg) and 380 (Al-8.5Si-3.5Cu-1.6Fe) were characterized. The intermetallic phases presence in the permanent mold cast alloy 356 are primary-Si, Al5FeSi, Al8Si6Mg3Fe and Mg2Si. The die cast alloy 380 is rich in Cu and Fe elements. These alloying elements result in formation of the intermetallic phases Al 5FeSi, Al2Cu and Al(FeCuCr) along with primary-Si. The Cu- and Fe-rich IMPS are cathodic with respect to the matrix phase and strongly govern the corrosion behavior of the two cast alloys in an aggressive environment due to formation of local electrochemical cell in their vicinity. Results have shown that corrosion behavior of permanent mould cast alloy 356 is significantly better than the die cast aluminum alloy 380, primarily due to high content of Cu- and Fe-rich phases such as Al2Cu and Al 5FeSi in the latter. The IMPS also alter the protection mechanism of the cast alloys in the presence of inhibitors in an environment. The presence of chromate in the solution results in reduced cathodic activity on all the phases. Chromate provides some anodic inhibition by increasing pitting potentials and altering corrosion potentials for the phases. Results have shown that performance of CCC was much better on 356 than on 380, primarily due to inhomogeneous and incomplete coating deposition on Cu- and Fe- phases present in alloy 380. XPS and Raman were used to characterize coating deposition on intermetallics. Results show evidence of cyanide complex formation on the intermetallic phases. The presence of this complex is speculated to locally suppress CCC formation. Formation and breakdown of cerium conversion coatings on 356 and 380 was also analyzed. Results showed that deposition of cerium hydroxide started with heavy precipitation on intermetallic particles with the coatings growing outwards onto the matrix. Electrochemical analysis of synthesized intermetallics compounds in the

  17. Molecular modeling of organic corrosion inhibitors: why bare metal cations are not appropriate models of oxidized metal surfaces and solvated metal cations.

    PubMed

    Kokalj, Anton

    2014-01-01

    The applicability of various models of oxidized metal surfaces - bare metal cations, clusters of various size, and extended (periodic) slabs - that are used in the field of quantum-chemical modeling of corrosion inhibitors is examined and discussed. As representative model systems imidazole inhibitor, MgO surface, and solvated Mg(2+) ion are considered by means of density-functional-theory calculations. Although the results of cluster models are prone to cluster size and shape effects, the clusters of moderate size seem useful at least for qualitative purposes. In contrast, the bare metal cations are useless not only as models of oxidized surfaces but also as models of solvated cations, because they bind molecules several times stronger than the more appropriate models. In particular, bare Mg(2+) binds imidazole by 5.9 eV, while the slab model of MgO(001) by only 0.35 eV. Such binding is even stronger for 3+ cations, e.g., bare Al(3+) binds imidazole by 17.9 eV. The reasons for these fantastically strong binding energies are discussed and it is shown that the strong bonding is predominantly due to electron charge transfer from molecule to metal cation, which stems from differences between molecular and metal ionization potentials. PMID:25125117

  18. Concentrated sulfite-yeast fermenting mixture as a corrosion inhibitor of copper in mixtures of sulfuric and nitric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Agaev, N.M.; Smorodin, A.E.; Rzaev, E.R.; Tyr, S.G.; Shlimak, Ya.B.; Geidarova, G.D.; Eremeeva, R.A.; Nasirov, G.N.

    1987-03-01

    At the Baku factory of residential air conditioning systems both preliminary and final pickling of copper tubing is carried out in a solution of sulfuric and nitric acids. The authors of this study, in seeking an inhibitor to control this process, evaluate the protective properties of an inhibitor based on a concentrated sulfite-yeast fermenting mixture that is generated as a common waste product by the cellulose-pulp industry. It consists of calcium, sodium, and ammonium salts of lignin sulfonic acids. Tests revealed not only its inhibiting effectiveness but also its capacity to lower toxic gas levels of nitrogen oxides in the plant environment.

  19. Synthesis and evaluation of poly(Sodium 2-Acrylamido-2-Methylpropane Sulfonate-co-Styrene)/magnetite nanoparticle composites as corrosion inhibitors for steel.

    PubMed

    El-Mahdy, Gamal A; Atta, Ayman M; Al-Lohedan, Hamad A

    2014-01-01

    Self-stabilized magnetic polymeric composite nanoparticles of coated poly-(sodium 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropane sulfonate-co-styrene)/magnetite (PAMPS-Na-co-St/Fe3O4) were prepared by emulsifier-free miniemulsion polymerization using styrene (St) as a monomer, 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropane sulfonic acid sodium salt (AMPS-Na) as an ionic comonomer, N,N-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA) as crosslinker, hexadecane (HD) as a hydrophobic solvent, and 2,2-azodiisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as an initiator in the presence of hydrophobic oleic acid coated magnetite particles. Hydrophobic oleic acid coated magnetite particles with an average size of about 7-10 nm were prepared with the new modified water-based magnetite ferrofluid, synthesized by a chemical modified coprecipitation method. The morphology and the particle size distributions of the crosslinked PAMPS-Na-co-St/Fe3O4 composite were observed and analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The average Fe3O4 content of PAMPS-Na-co-St/Fe3O4 was determined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The inhibitory action of PAMPS-Na-co-St/Fe3O4 towards steel corrosion in 1 M HCl solutions has been investigated by polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) methods. Polarization measurements indicate that PAMPS-Na-co-St/Fe3O4 acts as a mixed type-inhibitor and the inhibition efficiency increases with inhibitor concentration. The results of potentiodynamic polarization and EIS measurements clearly showed that the inhibition mechanism involves blocking of the steel surface by inhibitor molecules via adsorption. PMID:24487568

  20. Role(s) of pretreatment, inhibitors, and other process steps that effect surface composition on the under-paint corrosion of an aluminum-copper-magnesium alloy 2024-T3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Daryl A.

    2006-12-01

    Under-paint corrosion is a surface corrosion that grows under a coating. The composition of an aluminum alloy, particularly Cu and Fe content, has a direct and dominant effect on the growth rate of filiform corrosion (FFC) and scribe-creep. The Cu and Fe content leads to formation of galvanic cells between intermetallic compounds (IMCs) or replated Cu and the aluminum-rich matrix. However, there is no model which describes scribe-creep behavior and can be used to predict the effect of material and surface pretreatment parameters such as inhibitors, chemical surface pretreatment, and alloy microstructure. Surface pretreatments and aging which control the amount of surface copper and alter IMC distributions decrease the growth rate of scribe-creep. Scribe-creep was observed to be enhanced by temperature, regardless of surface pretreatment, as well as by artificial aging and surface pretreatments. Scribe-creep was accelerated by pretreatments that increased surface copper or left a high capacity for Cu-replating such as Cu-containing IMCs. Pretreatment was rationalized to decrease the cathodic oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) rate, which supports anodic undercutting at the head of the corrosion front. In this galvanic corrosion mechanism, the scribe-creep rate will be proportional to the rate of the anodic dissolution at the head. This, in turn, is proportional to the galvanic corrosion rate. Both charge transfer controlled and mass transport controlled cathodic reaction rates occurred at the fastest rates at the scratch and tail. The charge transfer controlled cathodic reaction rate was directly proportional to the surface coverage of Cu (thetaCu) while the mass transport limited rate was a complex nonlinear function of thetaCu . Based on enhanced understanding a galvanic couple model that describes scribe-creep rates in terms of the relevant processes at the tail and head as well as ohmic voltage between the head and tail was developed in order to explain scribe

  1. Antimony tartrate corrosion inhibitive composition for coolant systems

    SciTech Connect

    Payerle, N.E.

    1987-08-11

    An automobile coolant concentrate is described comprising (a) a liquid polyhydric alcohol chosen from the group consisting of ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, diethylene glycol and mixtures thereof, and (b) corrosion inhibitors in a corrosion inhibitory amount with respect to corrosion of lead-containing solders, the corrosion inhibitors comprising (i) an alkali metal antimony tartrate, and (ii) an azole compound.

  2. A Multifunctional Coating for Autonomous Corrosion Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz M.; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Jolley, Scott t.

    2011-01-01

    Nearly all metals and their alloys are subject to corrosion that causes them to lose their structural integrity or other critical functionality. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to indicate it and control it. The multi-functionality of the coating is based on microencapsulation technology specifically designed for corrosion control applications. This design has, in addition to all the advantages of existing microcapsulation designs, the corrosion controlled release function that triggers the delivery of corrosion indicators and inhibitors on demand, only when and where needed. Microencapsulation of self-healing agents for autonomous repair of mechanical damage to the coating is also being pursued. Corrosion indicators, corrosion inhibitors, as well as self-healing agents, have been encapsulated and dispersed into several paint systems to test the corrosion detection, inhibition, and self-healing properties of the coating. Key words: Corrosion, coating, autonomous corrosion control, corrosion indication, corrosion inhibition, self-healing coating, smart coating, multifunctional coating, microencapsulation.

  3. Evaluation of preservative engine oil containing vapor-phase corrosion inhibitor and a simplified engine-preservation technique. Interim report, Jul 85-Sep 90

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, E.A.

    1990-12-01

    The objectives of this project were: (1) to determine the feasibility of adding a vapor-phase corrosion inhibitor (VCI) component to improve the preservation performance of MIL-L-21260 and (2) to evaluate a less complicated engine preservation procedure. A simultaneous two-phase approach was conducted. Phase 1 involved the formulation and evaluation of experimental VCI oils, while Phase 2 was the evaluation of a simplified engine preservation procedure. VCI oil formulation was conducted by Ronco Laboratory under subcontract. Compatibility of the experimental VCI oils with metal coupons, elastomers, and fuel filters was determined. Effectiveness of the experimental VCI oil was evaluated in a 3-year outdoor engine storage test. The engines were preserved using an experimental, simplified preservation procedure. The simplified engine preservation procedure proved to be acceptable as engines stored for 3 years in a very severe environment were judged to have been adequately preserved. Engine oil meeting specification MIL-L-21260 provided satisfactory protection during the 3-year storage test. The experimental VCI oil also provided satisfactory storage protection during this test; however, there was no observable advantage for the VCI oil. The VCI oil had acceptable compatibility with an elastomeric flex ring, metal coupons (except lead), and fuel filters.

  4. A mild method of amine-type adsorbents syntheses with emulsion graft polymerization of glycidyl methacrylate on polyethylene non-woven fabric by pre-irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hongjuan; Yao, Side; Li, Jingye; Cao, Changqing; Wang, Min

    2012-09-01

    A mild pre-irradiation method was used to graft glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) onto polyethylene (PE) non-woven fabric (NF). The polymer was irradiated by electron beam in air atmosphere at room temperature. The degree of grafting (Dg) was determined as a function of reaction time, absorbed dose, monomer concentration and temperature. After 30 kGy irradiation, with 5% GMA, surfactant Tween 20 (Tw-20) of 0.5% at 55 °C for 15 min, the trunk polymer was made grafted with a Dg of 150%. Selected PE-g-PGMA of different Dg was modified with aminated compounds such as ethylenediamine (EDA), diethylenetriamine (DETA), triethylenetetramine (TETA) and tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA). The obtained amine-type adsorbents were prepared to remove copper and uranium ions from solution. It was shown that at least 90% of copper and 60% of uranium with the initial concentration from 3 to 1000 ppb can be removed from water.

  5. A study on the orientation of imidazoles on copper as corrosion inhibitor and possible adhesion promoter for electric devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Shuji; Ishida, Hatsuo

    1983-06-01

    The structure of various imidazoles on the surfaces of copper and gold mirrors has been studied by Fourier transform infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy in order to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of corrosion inhibition of metal surfaces by imidazoles. Heptadecylimidazole, undecylimidazole, phenylimidazole, and imidazole were used to investigate the orientation of the imidazole ring and the accompanying side groups. When a gold mirror was withdrawn slowly from an ethanol solution of undecylimidazole, the imidazole ring adsorbed onto the surface flatly and the C-C bond of the hydrocarbon chain became parallel to the surface. A similar trend was observed on all imidazole derivatives studied. The orientation of the outer layers was disturbed when the thickness was increased. With a copper mirror, the structure of the imidazole at room temperature depended on the method of adsorption. A slowly withdrawn sample showed a predominant complex formation whereby the solution placed dropwise on the copper surface showed a combination of complexes, randomly oriented layers, and oriented layers similar to gold. The heat treatment at 80 °C eliminated the difference caused by the adsorption methods. Upon complex formation, the orientation of the imidazole became random. This complex is tentatively assigned to diundecylimidazolato copper(II), an inner complex with copper. Further heat treatment at 150 °C yielded another complex. The structure of undecylimidazole adsorbed from an acidic aqueous solution on a copper mirror has also been studied. The imidazole adsorbed very rapidly to form a thick layer due to the acceleration of complex formation by the activated imidazole ring. A similar structure in the imidazole layers was obtained both from an ethanol solution and an acidic aqueous solution. However, coadsorption of the small amount of acid used remains to be a question. Again, the heat treatment at 150 °C yielded the infrared spectrum similar to the complex

  6. Requirements for inhibition of localized corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Gunaltun, Y.M.; Chevrot, T.

    1999-10-01

    In cases of pipeline failures from internal corrosion, localized corrosion (LC) is the principal cause. Inhibition is the most common way to control corrosion in wet gas and oil production lines. Therefore, the inhibitor should be able to control LC in all cases where it may occur. Inhibitor selection philosophy should be based on this requirement. Laboratory and field evaluation of corrosion inhibitors showed that some products were almost 100% efficient in preventing LC if their concentration in the water phase was above a threshold value. The major uncertainty was the inhibitor availability at the pipe surface.

  7. Inhibitor analysis for a solar heating and cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabony, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    A study of potential corrosion inhibitors for the NASA solar heating and cooling system which uses aluminum solar panels is provided. Research consisted of testing using a dynamic corrosion system, along with an economic analysis of proposed corrosion inhibitors. Very good progress was made in finding a suitable inhibitor for the system.

  8. Corrosion-Activated Micro-Containers for Environmentally Friendly Corrosion Protective Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, J. W.; Zhang, X.; Johnsey, M. N.; Pearman, B. P.; Jolley, S. T.; Calle, L. M.

    2016-01-01

    This work concerns the development of environmentally friendly encapsulation technology, specifically designed to incorporate corrosion indicators, inhibitors, and self-healing agents into a coating, in such a way that the delivery of the indicators and inhibitors is triggered by the corrosion process, and the delivery of self-healing agents is triggered by mechanical damage to the coating. Encapsulation of the active corrosion control ingredients allows the incorporation of desired autonomous corrosion control functions such as: early corrosion detection, hidden corrosion detection, corrosion inhibition, and self-healing of mechanical damage into a coating. The technology offers the versatility needed to include one or several corrosion control functions into the same coating.The development of the encapsulation technology has progressed from the initial proof-of-concept work, in which a corrosion indicator was encapsulated into an oil-core (hydrophobic) microcapsule and shown to be delivered autonomously, under simulated corrosion conditions, to a sophisticated portfolio of micro carriers (organic, inorganic, and hybrid) that can be used to deliver a wide range of active corrosion ingredients at a rate that can be adjusted to offer immediate as well as long-term corrosion control. The micro carriers have been incorporated into different coating formulas to test and optimize the autonomous corrosion detection, inhibition, and self-healing functions of the coatings. This paper provides an overview of progress made to date and highlights recent technical developments, such as improved corrosion detection sensitivity, inhibitor test results in various types of coatings, and highly effective self-healing coatings based on green chemistry. The NASA Kennedy Space Centers Corrosion Technology Lab at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, U.S.A. has been developing multifunctional smart coatings based on the microencapsulation of environmentally friendly corrosion

  9. Corrosion inhibition using mercury intensifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Cizek, A.

    1990-03-05

    This patent describes an intensified corrosion inhibitor composition for inhibiting the corrosion of steel in the presence of an acidic medium. It comprises: an effective amount of an acid soluble mercury metal intensifier; and a corrosion inhibitor. This patent also describes a method of treating a subterranean well for enhancement of production within the well, comprising the steps of introducing and positioning within the well a high alloy stec surface exposable to a treatment fluid therewith; introducing into the well and contacting the surface with a treatment fluid comprising an acidic injection medium, an acid corrosion inhibitor, and an intensifier for deposition on or effective treatment contact with the surface, the intensifier comprising an acid soluble mercury metal site circulating the fluid into the well for contact with at least one production zone within the well.

  10. A Multifunctional Coating for Autonomous Corrosion Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz M.; Hintze, Paul E.; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Jolley, Scott T.

    2010-01-01

    Corrosion is a destructive process that often causes failure in metallic components and structures. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional, smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to control it. The multi-functionality of the coating is based on microencapsulation technology specifically designed for corrosion control applications. This design has, in addition to all the advantages of other existing microcapsules designs, the corrosion controlled release function that allows the delivery of corrosion indicators and inhibitors on demand only when and where they are needed. Corrosion indicators as well as corrosion inhibitors have been incorporated into the microcapsules, blended into several paint systems, and tested for corrosion detection and protection efficacy.

  11. pH Responsive Microcapsules for Corrosion Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Li, Wenyan; Muehlberg, Aaron; Boraas, Samuel; Webster, Dean; JohnstonGelling, Victoria; Croll, Stuart; Taylor, S Ray; Contu, Francesco

    2008-01-01

    The best coatings for corrosion protection provide not only barriers to the environment, but also a controlled release of a corrosion inhibitor, as demanded by the presence of corrosion or mechanical damage. NASA has developed pH sensitive microcapsules (patent pending) that can release their core contents when corrosion starts. The objectives of the research presented here were to encapsulate non-toxic corrosion inhibitors, to incorporate the encapsulated inhibitors into paint formulations, and to test the ability of the paints to control corrosion. Results showed that the encapsulated corrosion inhibitors, specifically Ce(NO3)3 , are effective to control corrosion over long periods of time when incorporated at relatively high pigment volume concentrations into a paint formulation.

  12. Corrosion and scaling in solar heating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foresti, R. J., Jr.

    1981-12-01

    Corrosion, as experienced in solar heating systems, is described in simplistic terms to familiarize designers and installers with potential problems and their solutions. The role of a heat transfer fluid in a solar system is briefly discussed, and the choice of an aqueous solution is justified. The complexities of the multiple chemical and physical reactions are discussed in order that uncertainties of corrosion behavior can be anticipated. Some basic theories of corrosion are described, aggressive environments for some common metals are identified, and the role of corrosion inhibitors is delineated. The similarities of thermal and material characteristics of a solor system and an automotive cooling system are discussed. Based on the many years of experience with corrosion in automotive systems, it is recommended that similar antifreezes and corrosion inhibitors should be used in solar systems. The importance of good solar system design and fabrication is stressed and specific characteristics that affect corrosion are identified.

  13. Corrosion `98: 53. annual conference and exposition, proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    This conference was divided into the following sections: Corrosion in Gas Treating; Problems and Solutions in Commercial Building Water Systems; Green Corrosion/Scale Inhibitors; Atmospheric Corrosion; AIRPOL Update/98; Rubber Lining--Answers to Many Problems; Interference Problems; Environmental Assisted Cracking: Fundamental Research and Industrial Applications; Corrosion in Nuclear Systems; New Developments in Scale and Deposit Control; Corrosion and Corrosion Protection in the Transportation Industries; What`s All the Noise About--Electrochemical That Is; Refining Industry Corrosion; Corrosion Problems in Military Hardware: Case Histories, Fixes and Lessons Learned; Cathodic Protection Test Methods and Instrumentation for Underground and On-grade Pipelines and Tanks; Recent Developments in Volatile Corrosion Inhibitors; Corrosion in Supercritical Fluids; Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion; Advances in Understanding and Controlling CO{sub 2} Corrosion; Managing Corrosion with Plastics; Material Developments for Use in Exploration and Production Environments; Corrosion in Cold Regions; The Effect of Downsizing and Outsourcing on Cooling System Monitoring and Control Practices; New Developments in Mechanical and Chemical Industrial Cleaning; Mineral Scale Deposit Control in Oilfield Related Operations; Biocides in Cooling Water; Corrosion and Corrosion Control of Reinforced Concrete Structures; Materials Performance for Fossil Energy Conversion Systems; Marine corrosion; Thermal Spray--Coating and Corrosion Control; Flow Effects on Corrosion in Oil and Gas Production; Corrosion Measurement Technologies; Internal Pipeline Monitoring--Corrosion Monitoring, Intelligent Pigging and Leak Detection; Cathodic Protection in Natural Waters; Corrosion in Radioactive Liquid Waste Systems; On-line Hydrogen Permeation Monitoring Equipment and Techniques, State of the Art; Water Reuse and Recovery; Performance of Materials in High Temperature Environments; Advances in Motor

  14. Unsymmetrical Chelation of N-Thioether-Functionalized Bis(diphenylphosphino)amine-Type Ligands and Substituent Effects on the Nuclearity of Iron(II) Complexes: Structures, Magnetism, and Bonding.

    PubMed

    Fliedel, Christophe; Rosa, Vitor; Falceto, Andrés; Rosa, Patrick; Alvarez, Santiago; Braunstein, Pierre

    2015-07-01

    Starting from the short-bite ligands N-thioether-functionalized bis(diphenylphosphino)amine-type (Ph2P)2N(CH2)3SMe (1) and (Ph2P)2N(p-C6H4)SMe (2), the Fe(II) complexes [FeCl2(1)]n (3), [FeCl2(2)]2 (4), [Fe(OAc)(1)2]PF6 (5), and [Fe(OAc)(2)2]PF6 (6) were synthesized and characterized by Fourier transform IR, mass spectrometry, elemental analysis, and also by X-ray diffraction for 3, 4, and 6. Complex 3 is a coordination polymer in which 1 acts as a P,P-pseudochelate and a (P,P),S-bridge, whereas 4 has a chlorido-bridged dinuclear structure in which 2 acts only as a P,P-pseudochelate. Since these complexes were obtained under strictly similar synthetic and crystallization conditions, these unexpected differences were ascribed to the different spacer between the nitrogen atom and the −SMe group. In both compounds, one Fe–P bond was found to be unusually long, and a theoretical analysis was performed to unravel the electronic or steric reasons for this difference. Density functional theory calculations were performed for a set of complexes of general formula [FeCl2(SR2){R21PN(R2)P′R23}] (R = H, Me; R1, R2, and R3 = H, Me, Ph), to understand the reasons for the significant deviation of the iron coordination sphere away from tetrahedral as well as from trigonal bipyramidal and the varying degree of unsymmetry of the two Fe–P bonds involving pseudochelating PN(R)P ligands. Electronic factors nicely explain the observed structures, and steric reasons were further ruled out by the structural analysis in the solid-state of the bis-chelated complex 6, which displays usual and equivalent Fe–P bond lengths. Magnetic susceptibility studies were performed to examine how the structural differences between 3 and 4 would affect the interactions between the iron centers, and it was concluded that 3 behaves as an isolated high-spin Fe(II) mononuclear complex, while significant intra- and intermolecular ferromagnetic interactions were evidenced for 4 at low temperatures

  15. Corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Goel, V.S.

    1986-01-01

    Various papers on corrosion cracking are presented. The topics addressed include: unique case studies on hydrogen embrittlement failures in components used in aeronautical industry; analysis of subcritical cracking in a Ti-5Al-2.5Sn liquid hydrogen control valve; corrosion fatigue and stress corrosion cracking of 7475-T7351 aluminum alloy; effects of salt water environment and loading frequency on crack initiation in 7075-T7651 aluminum alloy and Ti-6Al-4V; stress corrosion cracking of 4340 steel in aircraft ignition starter residues. Also discussed are: stress corrosion cracking of a titanium alloy in a hydrogen-free environment; automation in corrosion fatigue crack growth rate measurements; the breaking load method, a new approach for assessing resistance to growth of early stage stress corrosion cracks; stress corrosion cracking properties of 2090 Al-Li alloy; repair welding of cracked free machining Invar 36; radial bore cracks in rotating disks.

  16. The performance of a surface-applied corrosion inhibitor for the carbon steel in saturated Ca(OH){sub 2} solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Haibing; Li, Weihua; Ma, Fubin; Kong, Qinglin

    2014-01-15

    In the present work, the performance of an amino alcohol based surface applied inhibitor was studied by the electrochemical techniques in saturated Ca(OH){sub 2} solutions. The surface morphology of the carbon steel was observed by scanning electron microscope, and the energy diffraction spectrum was also tested. Results showed that the inhibitor used in this work demonstrated obvious inhibition efficiency on the carbon steel in saturated Ca(OH){sub 2} solutions. The inhibition mechanism of the inhibitor lies in the quick adsorption of the active component on carbon steel surface.

  17. The effects of addition of poly(vinyl) alcohol (PVA) as a green corrosion inhibitor to the phosphate conversion coating on the anticorrosion and adhesion properties of the epoxy coating on the steel substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramezanzadeh, B.; Vakili, H.; Amini, R.

    2015-02-01

    Steel substrates were chemically treated by room temperature zinc phosphate conversion coating. Poly(vinyl) alcohol (PVA) was added to the phosphate solution as a green corrosion inhibitor. Finally, the epoxy/polyamide coating was applied on the untreated and surface treated steel samples. The effects of PVA on the morphological properties of the phosphate coating were studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle measuring device. The adhesion properties of the epoxy coatings applied on the surface treated samples were investigated by pull-off and cathodic delamination tests. Also, the anticorrosion properties of the epoxy coatings were studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Results showed that addition of PVA to the phosphate coating increased the population density of the phosphate crystals and decreased the phosphate grain size. The contact angle of the steel surface treated by Zn-PVA was lower than Zn treated one. The corrosion resistance of the epoxy coating was considerably increased on the steel substrate treated by zinc phosphate conversion coating containing PVA. PVA also enhanced the adhesion properties of the epoxy coating to the steel surface and decreased the cathodic delamination significantly.

  18. Titanium corrosion in alkaline hydrogen peroxide environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Been, Jantje

    1998-12-01

    The corrosion of Grade 2 titanium in alkaline hydrogen peroxide environments has been studied by weight loss corrosion tests, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), linear polarization resistance (LPR) measurements and potentiodynamic polarography. Calcium ions and wood pulp were investigated as corrosion inhibitors. In alkaline peroxide, the titanium corrosion rate increased with increasing pH, temperature, and hydrogen peroxide concentration. The corrosion controlling mechanism is thought to be the reaction of the oxide with the perhydroxyl ion. No evidence of thermodynamically stable calcium titanate was found in the surface film of test coupons exposed to calcium-inhibited alkaline peroxide solutions. Calcium inhibition is probably the result of low local alkali and peroxide concentrations at the metal surface produced by reaction of adsorbed calcium with hydrogen peroxide. It has been shown that the inhibiting effect of calcium is temporary, possibly through an effect of calcium on the chemical and/or physical stability of the surface oxide. Pulp is an effective and stable corrosion inhibitor. Raising the pulp concentration decreased the corrosion rate. The inhibiting effect of pulp may be related to the adsorption and interaction of the pulp fibers with H 2O2, thereby decreasing the peroxide concentration and rendering the solution less corrosive. The presence of both pulp and calcium led to higher corrosion rates than obtained by either one inhibitor alone. Replacement of hydrofluoric acid with alkaline peroxide for pickling of titanium was investigated. Titanium corrosion rates in alkaline peroxide exceeded those obtained in the conventional hydrofluoric acid bath. General corrosion was observed with extensive roughening of the surface giving a dull gray appearance. Preferred dissolution of certain crystallographic planes was investigated through the corrosion of a titanium single crystal. Whereas the overall effect on the corrosion rate was small

  19. Recent Developments on Autonomous Corrosion Protection Through Encapsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, W.; Buhrow, J. W.; Calle, L. M.; Gillis, M.; Blanton, M.; Hanna, J.; Rawlins, J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper concerns recent progress in the development of a multifunctional smart coating, based on microencapsulation, for the autonomous detection and control of corrosion. Microencapsulation has been validated and optimized to incorporate desired corrosion control functionalities, such as early corrosion detection and inhibition, through corrosion-initiated release of corrosion indicators and inhibitors, as well as self-healing agent release triggered by mechanical damage. While proof-of-concept results have been previously reported, more recent research and development efforts have concentrated on improving coating compatibility and synthesis procedure scalability, with a targeted goal of obtaining easily dispersible pigment-grade type microencapsulated materials. The recent progress has resulted in the development of pH-sensitive microparticles as a corrosion-triggered delivery system for corrosion indicators and inhibitors. The synthesis and early corrosion indication results obtained with coating formulations that incorporate these microparticles are reported. The early corrosion indicating results were obtained with color changing and with fluorescent indicators.

  20. Controlled-Release Microcapsules for Smart Coatings for Corrosion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Corrosion is a serious problem that has enormous costs and serious safety implications. Localized corrosion, such as pitting, is very dangerous and can cause catastrophic failures. The NASA Corrosion Technology Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center is developing a smart coating based on pH-sensitive microcapsules for corrosion applications. These versatile microcapsules are designed to be incorporated into a smart coating and deliver their core content when corrosion starts. Corrosion indication was the first function incorporated into the microcapsules. Current efforts are focused on incorporating the corrosion inhibition function through the encapsulation of corrosion inhibitors into water core and oil core microcapsules. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of encapsulated corrosion inhibitors are shown.

  1. Metalworking corrosion inhibition/drawing lubricant

    SciTech Connect

    Lipinski, H.F.; Wantling, S.J.

    1980-05-06

    A metalworking lubricant composition is disclosed which is effective as both a corrosion inhibitor and drawing lubricant and comprises a mineral oil and an additive combination of barium lanolate soap and barium sulfonate.

  2. Corrosion control in water injection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, C.C. )

    1993-08-01

    Corrosion control in water injection systems encompasses a wide range of technologies, including chemicals (corrosion inhibitors, biocides, and oxygen scavengers); corrosion-resistant materials (metallic and nonmetallic); internal coatings and linings; mechanical removal of dissolved oxygen; velocity control; and prevention of oxygen entry and galvanic couples. This article reviews the way that these technologies are used in modern water-injection systems (both seawater and produced water) to provide an acceptable service life and high-quality injection water.

  3. Corrosion probe. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-05-01

    Over 253 million liters of high-level waste (HLW) generated from plutonium production is stored in mild steel tanks at the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. Corrosion monitoring of double-shell storage tanks (DSTs) is currently performed at Hanford using a combination of process knowledge and tank waste sampling and analysis. Available technologies for corrosion monitoring have progressed to a point where it is feasible to monitor and control corrosion by on-line monitoring of the corrosion process and direct addition of corrosion inhibitors. The electrochemical noise (EN) technique deploys EN-based corrosion monitoring probes into storage tanks. This system is specifically designed to measure corrosion rates and detect changes in waste chemistry that trigger the onset of pitting and cracking. These on-line probes can determine whether additional corrosion inhibitor is required and, if so, provide information on an effective end point to the corrosion inhibitor addition procedure. This report describes the technology, its performance, its application, costs, regulatory and policy issues, and lessons learned.

  4. Compatibility of repair mortar with migrating corrosion inhibiting admixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Bjegovic, D.; Ukrainczyk, V.; Ukrainczyk, B.; Miksic, B.

    1997-08-01

    One of the methods for corrosion protection of reinforced concrete is the use of migrating corrosion inhibitor as an admixture in repair mortars. The admixture must be effective for corrosion protection and compatible with polymers added to repair mortar to improve properties of fresh and hardened mortar. This paper presents experimental results on compatibility of a migrating corrosion inhibitor added to two repair mortars based on an inorganic binder modified with polymers. The influence of a migrating inhibitor on the properties of fresh and hardened mortars was tested. The effectiveness on reinforcement corrosion protection has been tested according to ASTM G 109. Test results prove that the investigated migrating inhibitor is compatible with repair mortars and that it delays corrosion of the reinforcement.

  5. Corrosion protection

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Donald W.; Wagh, Arun S.

    2003-05-27

    There has been invented a chemically bonded phosphate corrosion protection material and process for application of the corrosion protection material for corrosion prevention. A slurry of iron oxide and phosphoric acid is used to contact a warm surface of iron, steel or other metal to be treated. In the presence of ferrous ions from the iron, steel or other metal, the slurry reacts to form iron phosphates which form grains chemically bonded onto the surface of the steel.

  6. Application of nano-sized TiO2 as an inhibitor of stress corrosion cracking in the steam generator tube materials.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Mo; Lee, Eun Hee; Kim, Uh Chul; Choi, Byung Seon

    2010-01-01

    Several chemicals were studied to suppress the damage due to a stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of the steam generator (SG) tubes in nuclear power plants. SCC tests were carried out to investigate the performance of TiO2 on several types of SG tube materials. The SCC tests were conducted by using an m-RUB specimen in a 10% NaOH solution at a temperature of 315 degrees C. The test with the addition of TiO2 showed a decrease in the SCC rate for the SG tubing materials. In order to improve the inhibition property in a crevice of TiO2, a sonochemical technique was applied to reduce the size of the TiO2 particle. From the SCC tests with the RUB specimen, the SG tube materials showed an enhanced cracking resistance with the addition of nano-sized TiO2 and the surface property was also changed. PMID:20352829

  7. Inhibition of slug front corrosion in multiphase flow conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.J.; Jepson, W.P.

    1998-12-31

    Corrosion at the slug front at the bottom of a pipeline is identified as one of the worst cases of corrosion occurring in the pipeline which carries unprocessed multiphase production with a high level of CO{sub 2} gas. One objective of the study in recommending a subsea completion to shore was to determine if commercial corrosion inhibitors can control this type of corrosion using carbon steel pipeline. Thus, inhibitors which showed excellent performance in the lab using the Rotating Cylinder Electrode system (RCE) were further evaluated to confirm their performance in a flow loop simulating the test conditions predicted from the flow modeling for the proposed pipeline. The performance profile of two commercial inhibitors were determined in a 4 in. flow loop at 7O C, 100 psig CO{sub 2} partial pressure in corrosive brines with or without ethylene glycol and/or light hydrocarbon. Results showed that the carbon steel pipeline could be adequately protected at low temperature using a commercial corrosion inhibitor to meet the designed life of the pipeline. Ethylene glycol, which is used in the pipeline to prevent hydrate formation, reduces the corrosivity of the brine and gives no effect on inhibitor performance under the slug flow conditions. A good agreement in inhibitor performance was observed between the flow loop and the RCE testing. The uninhibited corrosion rate of the test brine in this study is in good agreement with the predicted value using deWaard and Williams correlation for CO{sub 2} corrosion.

  8. Fireside Corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon

    2011-07-14

    Oxy-fuel fireside research goals are: (1) determine the effect of oxyfuel combustion on fireside corrosion - flue gas recycle choice, staged combustion ramifications; and (2) develop methods to use chromia solubility in ash as an ash corrosivity measurement - synthetic ashes at first, then boiler and burner rig ashes.

  9. Corrosion Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Charles V.

    A description is provided for a Corrosion and Corrosion Control course offered in the Continuing Engineering Education Program at the General Motors Institute (GMI). GMI is a small cooperative engineering school of approximately 2,000 students who alternate between six-week periods of academic study and six weeks of related work experience in…

  10. Corrosion sensor

    DOEpatents

    Glass, R.S.; Clarke, W.L. Jr.; Ciarlo, D.R.

    1994-04-26

    A corrosion sensor array is described incorporating individual elements for measuring various elements and ions, such as chloride, sulfide, copper, hydrogen (pH), etc. and elements for evaluating the instantaneous corrosion properties of structural materials. The exact combination and number of elements measured or monitored would depend upon the environmental conditions and materials used which are subject to corrosive effects. Such a corrosion monitoring system embedded in or mounted on a structure exposed to the environment would serve as an early warning system for the onset of severe corrosion problems for the structure, thus providing a safety factor as well as economic factors. The sensor array is accessed to an electronics/computational system, which provides a means for data collection and analysis. 7 figures.

  11. Corrosion sensor

    DOEpatents

    Glass, Robert S.; Clarke, Jr., Willis L.; Ciarlo, Dino R.

    1994-01-01

    A corrosion sensor array incorporating individual elements for measuring various elements and ions, such as chloride, sulfide, copper, hydrogen (pH), etc. and elements for evaluating the instantaneous corrosion properties of structural materials. The exact combination and number of elements measured or monitored would depend upon the environmental conditions and materials used which are subject to corrosive effects. Such a corrosion monitoring system embedded in or mounted on a structure exposed to the environment would serve as an early warning system for the onset of severe corrosion problems for the structure, thus providing a safety factor as well as economic factors. The sensor array is accessed to an electronics/computational system, which provides a means for data collection and analysis.

  12. A Multifunctional Smart Coating for Autonomous Corrosion Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Jolley, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    Corrosion is a destructive process that often causes failure in metallic components and structures. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional, smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to control it. The multi-functionality of the coating is based on micro-encapsulation technology specifically designed for corrosion control applications. This design has, in addition to all the advantages of other existing microcapsules designs, the corrosion controlled release function that allows the delivery of corrosion indicators and inhibitors on demand only when and where needed. Corrosion indicators as well as corrosion inhibitors have been incorporated into microcapsules, blended into several paint systems, and tested for corrosion detection and protection efficacy. This

  13. A Multifunctional Coating for Autonomous Corrosion Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, L. M.; Hintze, P. E.; Li, W.; Buhrow, J. W.; Jolley, S. T.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the effects of corrosion on various structures at the Kennedy Space Center, and the work to discover a corrosion control coating that will be autonomous and will indicate corrosion at an early point in the process. Kennedy Space Center has many environmental conditions that are corrosive: ocean salt spray, heat, humidity, sunlight and acidic exhaust from the Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBs). Presented is a chart which shows the corrosion rates of carbon steel at various locations. KSC has the highest corrosion rates with 42.0 mils/yr, leading the next highest Galeta Point Beach, in the Panama Canal Zone with 27 mils/yr corrosion. A chart shows the changes in corrosion rate with the distance from the ocean. The three types of corrosion protective coatings are described: barrier (passive), Barrier plus active corrosion inhibiting components, and smart. A smart coating will detect and respond actively to changes in its environment in a functional and predictable manner and is capable of adapting its properties dynamically. The smart coating uses microcapsules, particles or liquid drops coated in polymers, that can detect and control the corrosion caused by the environment. The mechanism for a pH sensitive microcapsule and the hydrophobic core microcapsule are demonstrated and the chemistry is reviewed. When corrosion begins, the microcapsule will release the contents of the core (indicator, inhibitor, and self healing agent) in close proximity to the corrosion. The response to a pH increase is demonstrated by a series of pictures that show the breakdown of the microcapsule and the contents release. An example of bolt corrosion is used, as an example of corrosion in places that are difficult to ascertain. A comparison of various coating systems is shown.

  14. A complementary set of electrochemical and X-ray synchrotron techniques to determine the passivation mechanism of iron treated in a new corrosion inhibitor solution specifically developed for the preservation of metallic artefacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirambet, F.; Reguer, S.; Rocca, E.; Hollner, S.; Testemale, D.

    2010-05-01

    Metallic artefacts of the cultural heritage are often stored in uncontrolled environmental conditions. They are very sensitive to atmospheric corrosion caused by a succession of wet and dry periods due to variations of relative humidity and temperature. To avoid the complete degradation of the metallic artefacts, new preventive strategies must be developed. In this context, we have studied new compounds based on sodium carboxylates solutions CH3(CH2) n-2COO-, Na+ hereafter called NaC n . They allow the formation of a passive layer at the metallic surface composed of a metal-carboxylate complex. To understand the action of those inhibitors in the passivation process of iron we have performed electrochemical measurements and surface characterisation. Moreover, to monitor in real time the growth of the coating, in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) experiments at iron K-edge were carried out in an electrochemical cell. These analyses have shown that in the case of NaC10 solution, the protection of iron surface is correlated to the precipitation of a well-organised layer of FeC10. These experiments confirmed that this compound is a fully oxidised trinuclear Fe(III) complex containing decanoate anions as ligands. Such information concerning the passive layer is a key factor to evaluate its stability and finally the long-term efficiency of the protection treatment.

  15. Fighting Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Reinforced concrete structures such as bridges, parking decks, and balconies are designed to have a service life of over 50 years. All too often, however, many structures fall short of this goal, requiring expensive repairs and protection work earlier than anticipated. The corrosion of reinforced steel within the concrete infrastructure is a major cause for this premature deterioration. Such corrosion is a particularly dangerous problem for the facilities at NASA s Kennedy Space Center. Located near the Atlantic Ocean in Florida, Kennedy is based in one of the most corrosive-prone areas in the world. In order to protect its launch support structures, highways, pipelines, and other steel-reinforced concrete structures, Kennedy engineers developed the Galvanic Liquid Applied Coating System. The system utilizes an inorganic coating material that slows or stops the corrosion of reinforced steel members inside concrete structures. Early tests determined that the coating meets the criteria of the National Association of Corrosion Engineers for complete protection of steel rebar embedded in concrete. Testing is being continued at the Kennedy's Materials Science Beach Corrosion Test Site.

  16. The Examination of Afyonkarahisar's Geothermal System Corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyuksagis, A.; Erol, S.

    2013-02-01

    Corrosion and scaling of metal surfaces are the major problems caused by geothermal fluids when metallic structures are used. This article describes a study of corrosion and scaling problems in the Afyonkarahisar Geothermal Heating System (AFJET) in Afyonkarahisar, Turkey. Water analysis, XRD, SEM, EDX, IC, ICP-OES analyses, and electrochemical methods were used in this study. Pentasodium triphosphate (Na5P3O10), maleic anhydride (C4H2O3), and 1,3-benzendisulfonic acid disodium salt (C6H4Na2O6S2) were used as corrosion inhibitors. Tests were carried out using geothermal water from AF11 well. The experimental temperatures were chosen as 298, 333, and 358 K. Inhibitor concentrations were chosen as 1 × 10-1, 1 × 10-2, 1 × 10-3, and 1 × 10-4 mol/dm3. Moreover, mixed inhibitor solutions were prepared using the inhibitor concentrations that showed the best inhibition. The first mixed inhibitor solution showed 96% inhibition. The second mixed inhibitor solution showed 90% inhibition. The tested inhibitors act as anodic inhibitors. XRD analysis shows that there is CaCO3 aragonite scaling in the system. Increasing TDS, alkalinity, and hardness all promote scale formation. The photomicrographs from SEM-EDX and the metallographic microscope show that the tested inhibitors form a protective film on the surface. IC and ICP-OES analyses show that the concentration of Ca2+ is very high, which supports scale formation.

  17. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles for active corrosion protection.

    PubMed

    Borisova, Dimitriya; Möhwald, Helmuth; Shchukin, Dmitry G

    2011-03-22

    This work presents the synthesis of monodisperse, mesoporous silica nanoparticles and their application as nanocontainers loaded with corrosion inhibitor (1H-benzotriazole (BTA)) and embedded in hybrid SiOx/ZrOx sol-gel coating for the corrosion protection of aluminum alloy. The developed porous system of mechanically stable silica nanoparticles exhibits high surface area (∼1000 m2·g(-1)), narrow pore size distribution (d∼3 nm), and large pore volume (∼1 mL·g(-1)). As a result, a sufficiently high uptake and storage of the corrosion inhibitor in the mesoporous nanocontainers was achieved. The successful embedding and homogeneous distribution of the BTA-loaded monodisperse silica nanocontainers in the passive anticorrosive SiOx/ZrOx film improve the wet corrosion resistance of the aluminum alloy AA2024 in 0.1 M sodium chloride solution. The enhanced corrosion protection of this newly developed active system in comparison to the passive sol-gel coating was observed during a simulated corrosion process by the scanning vibrating electrode technique (SVET). These results, as well as the controlled pH-dependent release of BTA from the mesoporous silica nanocontainers without additional polyelectrolyte shell, suggest an inhibitor release triggered by the corrosion process leading to a self-healing effect. PMID:21344888

  18. Mechanisms of Inhibition of Crevice Corrosion in Alloy 22

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, Raul B.

    2007-07-01

    Alloy 22 may be susceptible to crevice corrosion in chloride-containing environments, especially at temperatures above ambient. The presence of oxy-anions, especially nitrate, minimizes or eliminates the susceptibility of Alloy 22 to crevice corrosion. Other anions such as sulfate, carbonate and fluoride were also reported as inhibitors of crevice corrosion in Alloy 22. It is argued that the occurrence of crevice corrosion is due to the formation of hydrochloric acid solution in the creviced region. Inhibitors act by eliminating the occurrence of hydrochloric acid or by hampering its action. (author)

  19. PRINCIPLES OF CORROSION AND CORROSION MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent amendments to the National Interim Primary Drinking Water Regulations deal with corrosion and require utilities to assess corrosion in their distribution and home plumbing systems. Problems caused by corrosion can be grouped into 3 categories: health, aesthetics and econom...

  20. Liquefaction corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    DeVan, J.H.; Keiser, J.R.; Baylor, V.B.

    1980-01-01

    The goal of this program is to provide screening data on the susceptibility to corrosion of commercial base metals and welds that are candidate materials of construction for large coal liquefaction plants. Specimens are exposed in operating environments of liquefaction pilot plants and under controlled laboratory conditions to establish acceptable conditions of stress, temperature, time, and environment for candidate alloys. Chemical analyses have been carried out to identify the corrosion-causing constituents of the liquids. The behavior of potential containment materials is being assessed on the basis of results from both in-plant exposure of test specimens as well as results from laboratory tests at ORNL. One portion of the in-plant tests includes exposing stress corrosion cracking specimens in critical areas of liquefaction plants. The critical areas include the dissolver vessel, the pressure letdown vessels, and the factionation columns. Other in-plant tests consist of exposure of corrosion coupons in areas where general corrosion has been severe. These areas include the fractionation columns used for recovery of process and wash solvents. Laboratory tests are being conducted using selected liquid process streams from the pilot plants to simulate SRC environments. Sample materials include the full range of austenitic stainless steels, most of the Inconel, Incoloy and Hastelloy high-nickel alloys, ferritic stainless steels, and Cr-Mo steels, as well as pure materials such as titanium, aluminum and nickel.

  1. Recent Developments on Microencapsulation for Autonomous Corrosion Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz M.; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Fitzpatrick, Lilliana; Jolley, Scott T.; Surma, Jan M.; Pearman, Benjamin P.; Zhang, Xuejun

    2014-01-01

    This work concerns recent progress in the development of a multifunctional smart coating based on microencapsulation for the autonomous control of corrosion. Microencapsulation allows the incorporation of desired corrosion control functionalities, such as early corrosion detection and inhibition through corrosion controlled release of corrosion indicators and inhibitors, as well as self-healing agent release when mechanical damage occurs.While proof-of-concept results have been reported previously, more recent efforts have been concentrated in technical developments to improve coating compatibility, synthesis procedure scalability, as well as fine tuning the release property of encapsulated active agents.

  2. Preceedings of the International Congress (12th), corrosion control for low-cost reliability, held in Houston, Texas on September 19 -24, 1993. Volume 5a. Corrosion: Specific issues

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-24

    Partial contents include: (1) The role of corrosion in aging aircraft; (2) Hidden corrosion - needs and requirements; (3) Corrosion control as a necessary treatment; (4) Computer assisted aircraft paint stripping technology; (5) Reducing aircraft corrosion with desiccant dehumidifiers; (6) Corrosion contribution to environmental cracking failures of critical aircraft parts; (7) Designing metallic surface coatings for improved corrosion resistance; (8) Development of chromium based composite coatings; (9) In-situ analysis of corrosion in the crevice of automotive body by A.C. impedance measurement; (10) Designing a reinforced concrete against corrosion in chloride containing environments; (11) Carbonation of flyash-containing concrete electrochemical studies; (12) Evaluation of concrete corrosion inhibitors; (13) Cathodic protection of new steel reinforced concrete structure; (14) Reliability and corrosion testing of electronic components and assemblies; (15) Corrosion study of polymer-on-metal systems modified by processing conditions; (16) How to formulate corrosion knowledge for expert systems; and (17) Corrosion prediction form laboratory tests using artificial neural networks.

  3. Enhancement of corrosion resistance of carbon steel by Dioscorea Hispida starch in NaCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulhusni, M. D. M.; Othman, N. K.; Lazim, Azwan Mat

    2015-09-01

    Starch is a one of the most abundant natural product in the world and has the potential as corrosion inhibitor replacing harmful synthetic chemical based corrosion inhibitor. This research was aimed to examines the potential of starch extracted from local Malaysian wild yam (Dioscorea hispida), as corrosion inhibitor to carbon steel in NaCl media replicating sea water. By using gravimetric test and analysis, in which the carbon steel specimens were immersed in NaCl media for 24, 48 and 60 hours with the starch as corrosion inhibitor. the corrosion rate (mmpy) and inhibition efficiencies (%) was calculated. The results obtained showed decrease in corrosion rate as higher concentration of starch was employed. The inhibition efficiencies also shows an increasing manner up to 95.97 % as the concentration of the inhibitor increased.

  4. Fouling and the inhibition of salt corrosion. [hot corrosion of superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deadmore, D. L.; Lowell, C. E.

    1980-01-01

    In an attempt to reduce fouling while retaining the beneficial effects of alkaline earth inhibitors on the hot corrosion of superalloys, the use of both additives and the intermittent application of the inhibitors were evaluated. Additions of alkaline earth compounds to combustion gases containing sodium sulfate were shown to inhibit hot corrosion. However, sulfate deposits can lead to turbine fouling in service. For that reason, dual additives and intermittant inhibitor applications were evaluated to reduce such deposit formation. Silicon in conjunction with varium showed some promise. Total deposition was apparently reduced while the inhibition of hot corrosion by barium was unimpaired. The intermittant application of the inhibitor was found to be more effective and controllable.

  5. Environmentally Friendly Coating Technology for Autonomous Corrosion Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz M.; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Johnsey, Marissa N.; Jolley, Scott T.; Pearman, Benjamin P.; Zhang, Xuejun; Fitzpatrick, Lilliana; Gillis, Mathew; Blanton, Michael; Hanna, Joshua S.; Rawlins, James W.

    2016-01-01

    This work concerns the development of environmentally friendly encapsulation technology, specifically designed to incorporate corrosion indicators, inhibitors, and self-healing agents into a coating, in such a way that the delivery of the indicators and inhibitors is triggered by the corrosion process, and the delivery of self-healing agents is triggered by mechanical damage to the coating. Encapsulation of the active corrosion control ingredients allows the incorporation of desired autonomous corrosion control functions such as: early corrosion detection, hidden corrosion detection, corrosion inhibition, and self-healing of mechanical damage into a coating. The technology offers the versatility needed to include one or several corrosion control functions into the same coating.The development of the encapsulation technology has progressed from the initial proof-of-concept work, in which a corrosion indicator was encapsulated into an oil-core (hydrophobic) microcapsule and shown to be delivered autonomously, under simulated corrosion conditions, to a sophisticated portfolio of micro carriers (organic, inorganic, and hybrid) that can be used to deliver a wide range of active corrosion ingredients at a rate that can be adjusted to offer immediate as well as long-term corrosion control. The micro carriers have been incorporated into different coating formulas to test and optimize the autonomous corrosion detection, inhibition, and self-healing functions of the coatings. This paper provides an overview of progress made to date and highlights recent technical developments, such as improved corrosion detection sensitivity, inhibitor test results in various types of coatings, and highly effective self-healing coatings based on green chemistry.

  6. Microencapsulation Technologies for Corrosion Protective Coating Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry; Jolley, Scott; Calle, Luz; Pearman, Benjamin; Zhang, Xuejun

    2015-01-01

    Microencapsulation technologies for functional smart Coatings for autonomous corrosion control have been a research area of strong emphasis during the last decade. This work concerns the development of pH sensitive micro-containers (microparticles and microcapsules) for autonomous corrosion control. This paper presents an overview of the state-of-the-art in the field of microencapsulation for corrosion control applications, as well as the technical details of the pH sensitive microcontainer approach, such as selection criteria for corrosion indicators and corrosion inhibitors; the development and optimization of encapsulation methods; function evaluation before and after incorporation of the microcontainers into coatings; and further optimization to improve coating compatibility and performance.

  7. Atmospheric Corrosion

    PubMed Central

    Eyring, Henry; Robertson, Blake; Chu, Chih Chien; Andersen, Terrell

    1974-01-01

    A model of electrolytic corrosion is developed. It is shown that electrically conducting channels threading through the oxide layer and connecting anodic and cathodic areas, obey the equation for a reactant being catalyzed by its product. The resulting autocatalytic equation is compared with available experimental data and found to be widely applicable and capable of unifying many experimental observations. PMID:16592135

  8. CORROSION INHIBITION

    DOEpatents

    Cartledge, G.H.

    1958-06-01

    The protection of ferrous metsls from the corrosive action of aqueous solutions is accomplished by the incorporation of small amounts of certain additive agents into the aqueous solutions. The method comprises providing a small concentration of technetium, in the form of pertechnetate ion, dissolved in the solution.

  9. Atmospheric corrosion.

    PubMed

    Eyring, H; Robertson, B; Chu, C C; Andersen, T

    1974-02-01

    A model of electrolytic corrosion is developed. It is shown that electrically conducting channels threading through the oxide layer and connecting anodic and cathodic areas, obey the equation for a reactant being catalyzed by its product. The resulting autocatalytic equation is compared with available experimental data and found to be widely applicable and capable of unifying many experimental observations. PMID:16592135

  10. Inhibitor evaluations and correlation of laboratory and field data in CO{sub 2} environments

    SciTech Connect

    Abayarathna, D.; Naraghi, A.; Grahmann, N.; Buchholz, B.; Blumer, D.J.

    1999-11-01

    In oil and gas production environments, one of the techniques utilized for the corrosion control of carbon steel is the application of corrosion inhibitors. The corrosion inhibitors, which are formulated specifically for given field conditions, undergo rigorous qualification and performance evaluations at the laboratory before being submitted for a field application. At the field, the selected chemicals are evaluated in stages, at various production locations before being applied in the main production lines. The corrosion monitoring programs implemented in the production field provide not only the evaluations of chemicals in use but also the overall success of the corrosion control program. Successful corrosion control programs demand cost effective corrosion inhibitors with optimized performance. This paper describes the selection process of a performance optimized cost effective corrosion inhibitor. Various chemical evaluation techniques utilized in the laboratory and the field are discussed and the correlation of these data is presented.

  11. Corrosion and corrosion prevention in gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mom, A. J. A.; Kolkman, H. J.

    1985-01-01

    The conditions governing the corrosion behavior in gas turbines are surveyed. Factors such as temperature, relative humidity, the presence of sulfur and nitrogen dioxide, and fuel quality are discussed. Electromechanical corrosion at relatively low temperature in compressors; oxidation; and hot corrosion (sulfidation) at high temperature in turbines are considered. Corrosion prevention by washing and rinsing, fueld additives, and corrosion resistant materials and coatings are reviewed.

  12. Inhibition of sweet corrosion in subsea flowlines

    SciTech Connect

    Simon Thomas, M.J.J.; Hebert, P.B.; Jordan, K.G.; Lorimer, S.E.

    1998-12-31

    Corrosion inhibition is the principal means of corrosion control in sweet service flowlines between subsea wells and processing platforms in the Gulf of Mexico. In view of the temperatures and the well conditions, hydrate control chemicals have to be injected as well. The paper addresses the challenges of selecting corrosion inhibitors that are suitable for the prevailing flowline conditions, are compatible with hydrate inhibition, and with the materials of the subsea umbilical. Initial experience based on limited field monitoring data is reviewed. Key findings include the need to carefully consider partitioning of inhibitor components in the various liquid and gas phases along the line, the difficulties experienced with interpreting monitoring results and the perceived need for more detailed in-line corrosion monitoring. Inhibitor effectiveness is discussed in terms of a surface blocking model. One candidate inhibitor was rejected as it was ineffective under conditions of low water cut in hexane (simulated dense gas phase). Another inhibitor appears to exhibit different steady states depending on its concentration in the aqueous phase.

  13. Synthetic seawater as stress-corrosion test medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1980-01-01

    Seawater minimizes pitting corrosion of aluminum-alloy test samples. Of three corrosion-inhibiting methods evaluated using (a) chromate inhibitors in saltwater, (b) surface treating sample via anodizing or alodine treatment, and (c) synthetic seawater, synthetic seawater was most effective test medium, since it is more uniform than fresh seawater.

  14. Coatings and methods for corrosion detection and/or reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz M. (Inventor); Li, Wenyan (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Coatings and methods are provided. An embodiment of the coating includes microcapsules that contain at least one of a corrosion inhibitor, a film-forming compound, and an indicator. The microcapsules are dispersed in a coating vehicle. A shell of each microcapsule breaks down in the presence of an alkaline condition, resulting from corrosion.

  15. Inhibition of steel corrosion by thiourea derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, I. )

    1993-06-01

    The thiourea group of sulfur compounds has important theoretical and practical applications. Thioureas have been studied extensively, but their inhibition mechanism is not fully understood. The effect of thiourea; allylthiourea; N,N[prime]-diethylthiourea; N,N[prime]-di-isopropylthiourea; phenylthiourea; thiocarbanilide; and symdiotolylthiourea on the corrosion reaction and on the amount of H[sub 2] absorbed by cold-rolled mild steel in 1 N H[sub 2]SO[sub 4] at 40 C was studied. Inhibitor efficiency increased with increases in molecular weight and inhibitor concentration. Higher inhibitor concentrations decreased H[sub 2] pickup. Thiourea accelerated corrosion reactions and H[sub 2] pickup at higher concentrations. Potential studies showed cathodic reactions were inhibited at lower concentrations and anodic reactions were inhibited at higher concentrations. Results were based on the adsorption theory, and all inhibitors studied followed the Langmuir isotherm.

  16. Chemical Industry Corrosion Management

    SciTech Connect

    2003-02-01

    Improved Corrosion Management Could Provide Significant Cost and Energy Savings for the Chemical Industry. In the chemical industry, corrosion is often responsible for significant shutdown and maintenance costs.

  17. Why does glycol inhibit CO{sub 2} corrosion?

    SciTech Connect

    Gulbrandsen, E.; Morad, J.H.

    1998-12-31

    CO{sub 2} corrosion of carbon steel and its inhibition in mixtures of water and ethylene glycol (MEG) or diethylene glycol (DEG) has been studied at 1 bar CO{sub 2}, 25 C, pH 5 under natural convection conditions. Corrosion rates predicted by the glycol correction factor of DeWaard et al. were in mutual agreement with the experimental results. Analysis of the experimental results shows that the corrosion inhibitor effect of MEG and DEG can be correlated to changes in solution properties with increasing MEG or DEG concentration, such as decreased CO{sub 2} volubility, decreased CO{sub 2} diffusivity/increased solution viscosity, decreased water activity and decreased solution polarity. Also described is an impurity related corrosion inhibition that can be very efficient, and possible ways to improve the inhibitor effect of glycol solutions by adding small amounts of inhibitor compounds.

  18. Chlorine's effects on triazole inhibitor layers on copper

    SciTech Connect

    Holm, R.; Over, J.; Wittig, M.; Minnich, R.; Berg, D. ); Eickmans, J.; Holtkamp, D. ); Meyer, K.; Benninghoven, A. )

    1994-05-01

    The triazole film on copper (Cu) is the result of a dynamic equilibrium between the inhibitor film formation and the corrosion reaction of the underlying metal; therefore, it can be penetrated by water and chlorine molecules, as well as by protons, chloride, and metallic ions. This penetration results in Cu corrosion and is immediately detected through electrochemistry. Degradation of the inhibitor film, which takes some time, can best be observed by surface analysis. Once film degradation has started, penetration is enhanced, and both processes lead to excessive Cu corrosion rates. The effect of this two-step interaction between chlorine and two triazole inhibitors now primarily in use in the industry was investigated.

  19. Development of a corrosion inhibition model. 1: Laboratory studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hausler, R.H.; Martin, T.G.; Stegmann, D.W.; Ward, M.B.

    1999-11-01

    The production of a CO{sub 2} flood in the Oklahoma panhandle led to severe corrosion of the carbon steel production tubing and casing. Traditional approaches to chemical corrosion inhibition were unsuccessful. A laboratory study was initiated to determine first the best corrosion inhibitor, and second the optimum effective inhibitor concentration in the produced fluids as a function of the production rate, CO{sub 2} partial pressure, and water to oil ratio. The tool used was the high speed autoclave test (HSACT) discussed in earlier publications. Statistical experimental designs were used to study the three major parameters. The results were expressed in terms of the inhibitor concentration necessary to achieve a desired corrosion rate (for example 1 mpy), and presented either in the form of response surfaces or linear multiple regression equations. While it was generally known that higher fluid velocities require a higher inhibitor concentration for equal target corrosion rates, it was less well appreciated that the CO{sub 2} partial pressure also has a significant effect on the effective inhibitor concentration. The model as represented either by the response surface or the predictive equations is both inhibitor and field specific.

  20. Microbiological corrosion control in a cooling water system

    SciTech Connect

    Honneysett, D.G.; vanden Bergh, W.D.; O'Brien, P.F.

    1985-10-01

    The failure of a corrosion control program in a closed cooling water system coincided with the use of reclaimed sewage water and the contamination of the system with oil. Other problems were increased corrosion rates, downward pH excursions, increased fouling by corrosion by-products, and increased microbiological activity in the system. The major cause of corrosion was microbiological in origin. The unsuccessful use of a biocide led to the initiation of a full-scale microbiological investigation. The nature of the microflora was determined, biocide selection tests made, and an effective control treatment program initiated. Chromate corrosion treatment was replaced by a coordinated program using an organic filming corrosion inhibitor, a polyacrylate/phosphonate dispersant, and a combination of biocides.

  1. Effects of Solution Hydrodynamics on Corrosion Inhibition of Steel by Citric Acid in Cooling Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashassi-Sorkhabi, H.; Asghari, E.; Mohammadi, M.

    2014-08-01

    Corrosion is a major problem in cooling water systems, which is often controlled using corrosion inhibitors. Solution hydrodynamics is one of the factors affecting corrosion inhibition of metals in these systems. The present work focuses on the study of the combined effects of citric acid concentration (as a green corrosion inhibitor) and fluid flow on corrosion of steel in simulated cooling water. Electrochemical techniques including Tafel polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were used for corrosion studies. Laminar flow was simulated using a rotating disk electrode. The effects of solution hydrodynamics on inhibition performance of citric acid were discussed. The citric acid showed low inhibition performance in quiescent solution; however, when the electrode rotated at 200 rpm, inhibition efficiency increased remarkably. It was attributed mainly to the acceleration of inhibitor mass transport toward metal surface. The efficiencies were then decreased at higher rotation speeds due to enhanced wall shear stresses on metal surface and separation of adsorbed inhibitor molecules. This article is first part of authors' attempts in designing green inhibitor formulations for industrial cooling water. Citric acid showed acceptable corrosion inhibition in low rotation rates; thus, it can be used as a green additive to the corrosion inhibitor formulations.

  2. Inhibition of Corrosion of 3003 Aluminum Alloy in Ethylene Glycol-Water Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Cheng, Y. F.

    2011-03-01

    In this study, the inhibiting effects of four types of inhibitors, including gluconate, cinnamate, molybdate, and nitrate, on corrosion of a 3003 aluminum (Al) alloy were investigated in ethylene glycol-water solutions that simulate the automotive coolant by various electrochemical measurements. It was found that the tested inhibitors were effective to inhibit corrosion of 3003 Al alloy under both static and turbulent flow conditions. They all behave as anodic inhibitors, which inhibit the Al alloy corrosion by passivating Al alloy and decreasing its anodic current density. A turbulent flow of the solution decreases the corrosion resistance of Al alloy and the inhibiting effect of the inhibitors. The inhibiting effect of the inhibitors is ranked as: nitrate > cinnamate > gluconate > molybdate.

  3. Internal Corrosion and Deposition Control

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter reviews the current knowledge of the science of corrosion control and control of scaling in drinking water systems. Topics covered include: types of corrosion; physical, microbial and chemical factors influencing corrosion; corrosion of specific materials; direct ...

  4. Corrosion inhibiting organic coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Sasson, E.

    1984-10-16

    A corrosion inhibiting coating comprises a mixture of waxes, petroleum jelly, a hardener and a solvent. In particular, a corrosion inhibiting coating comprises candelilla wax, carnauba wax, microcrystalline waxes, white petrolatum, an oleoresin, lanolin and a solvent.

  5. Duralumin and Its Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, WM

    1927-01-01

    The types of corrosion and factors of corrosion of duralumin are investigated. Salt water is the most common of the corroding media with which designers have to contend in using duralumin in aircraft and ships.

  6. Vanadium corrosion studies. Final report, 1 February 1989-30 June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Bornstein, N.; Roth, H.; Pike, R.

    1993-06-30

    Vanadium present in certain crude and residual fuel oils, is converted within the burner of the gas turbine engine to the refractory dioxide, which in flight is fully oxidized to the pentoxide. Yttrium oxide, stable in the presence of the oxides of sulfur is identified and verified as a corrosion inhibitor. A chelation process to produce a hydrolytic stable fuel soluble yttrium additive is described.... Vanadium oxide corrosion, Hot corrosion, Sulfidation corrosion, Hot corrosion attenuation, Fuel additives, Water stable fuel soluble yttrium compounds, Chelation.

  7. Corrosion chemistry closing comments: opportunities in corrosion science facilitated by operando experimental characterization combined with multi-scale computational modelling.

    PubMed

    Scully, John R

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in characterization tools, computational capabilities, and theories have created opportunities for advancement in understanding of solid-fluid interfaces at the nanoscale in corroding metallic systems. The Faraday Discussion on Corrosion Chemistry in 2015 highlighted some of the current needs, gaps and opportunities in corrosion science. Themes were organized into several hierarchical categories that provide an organizational framework for corrosion. Opportunities to develop fundamental physical and chemical data which will enable further progress in thermodynamic and kinetic modelling of corrosion were discussed. These will enable new and better understanding of unit processes that govern corrosion at the nanoscale. Additional topics discussed included scales, films and oxides, fluid-surface and molecular-surface interactions, selected topics in corrosion science and engineering as well as corrosion control. Corrosion science and engineering topics included complex alloy dissolution, local corrosion, and modelling of specific corrosion processes that are made up of collections of temporally and spatially varying unit processes such as oxidation, ion transport, and competitive adsorption. Corrosion control and mitigation topics covered some new insights on coatings and inhibitors. Further advances in operando or in situ experimental characterization strategies at the nanoscale combined with computational modelling will enhance progress in the field, especially if coupling across length and time scales can be achieved incorporating the various phenomena encountered in corrosion. Readers are encouraged to not only to use this ad hoc organizational scheme to guide their immersion into the current opportunities in corrosion chemistry, but also to find value in the information presented in their own ways. PMID:26114392

  8. PRINCIPLES OF INTERNAL CORROSION AND CORROSION MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Corrosion, a complex electrochemical phenomenon that cannot always be eliminated but can usually be controlled in a cost-effective manner, may be uniform and attack a surface evenly or may cause severe localized problems such as a crevice or pit. For the corrosion reaction to pro...

  9. Proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Teicher, Beverly A; Tomaszewski, Joseph E

    2015-07-01

    Proteasome inhibitors have a 20 year history in cancer therapy. The first proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib (Velcade, PS-341), a break-through multiple myeloma treatment, moved rapidly through development from bench in 1994 to first approval in 2003. Bortezomib is a reversible boronic acid inhibitor of the chymotrypsin-like activity of the proteasome. Next generation proteasome inhibitors include carfilzomib and oprozomib which are irreversible epoxyketone proteasome inhibitors; and ixazomib and delanzomib which are reversible boronic acid proteasome inhibitors. Two proteasome inhibitors, bortezomib and carfilzomib are FDA approved drugs and ixazomib and oprozomib are in late stage clinical trials. All of the agents are potent cytotoxics. The disease focus for all the proteasome inhibitors is multiple myeloma. This focus arose from clinical observations made in bortezomib early clinical trials. Later preclinical studies confirmed that multiple myeloma cells were indeed more sensitive to proteasome inhibitors than other tumor cell types. The discovery and development of the proteasome inhibitor class of anticancer agents has progressed through a classic route of serendipity and scientific investigation. These agents are continuing to have a major impact in their treatment of hematologic malignancies and are beginning to be explored as potential treatment agent for non-cancer indications. PMID:25935605

  10. Electrolyte for an aluminum air-battery comprising an anti-foaming agent and corrosion exhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Niksa, M.J.; Niksa, A.J.; Noscal, J.M.

    1991-09-17

    This patent describes an electrolyte for an aluminium-air battery. It comprises a caustic or saline solution; an anti-foaming agent in an amount effective to reduce the entrapment of hydrogen bubbles in the solution, the hydrogen bubbles being formed at the battery anode; and a corrosion inhibiting amount of a corrosion inhibitor.

  11. Application of simulation techniques for internal corrosion prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Palacios T, C.A.; Hernandez, Y.

    1997-08-01

    Characterization of corrosion in the oil and gas industry is becoming of increasing importance for safety reasons as well as for the preservation of production facilities; to prevent down time and damage to the environment. This article presents the methodology used by this company to characterize the corrosion behavior of the whole production facility, taking into consideration the hydrodynamic and thermodynamic conditions of the produced fluids (flow velocities, flow pattern, liquid holdup, pressure, temperature, etc.) as they flow from the reservoir through the surface installations (flowlines, gas/oil gathering and transmission lines, gas processing plants, artificial lift systems, etc.). The methodology uses Petroleum Engineering and Two-Phase modeling techniques to: (1) optimize the entire production system to obtain the most efficient objective flow rate taking into consideration the corrosive/erosive nature of the produced fluid and (2) characterize the corrosive nature of the produced fluid as it flows through the above mentioned installations. The modeling techniques were performed using commercially available simulators and CO{sub 2} corrosion rates were determined using well known published correlations. For H{sub 2}S corrosion, NACE MR0175 criteria is applied. The application of this methodology has allowed corrosion control strategies, protection and monitoring criteria, inhibitor optimization and increased the effectiveness of already existing corrosion control systems.

  12. Smart Multifunctional Coatings for Corrosion Detection and Control in the Aerospace Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina

    2015-01-01

    Nearly all metals and their alloys are subject to corrosion that causes them to lose their structural integrity or other critical functionality. It is essential to detect corrosion when it occurs, and preferably at its early stage, so that action can be taken to avoid structural damage or loss of function. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional, smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to indicate it and control it.

  13. SRB seawater corrosion project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozack, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of 2219 aluminum when exposed to seawater was characterized. Controlled corrosion experiments at three different temperatures (30, 60 and 100 C) and two different environments (seawater and 3.5 percent salt solution) were designed to elucidate the initial stages in the corrosion process. It was found that 2219 aluminum is an active catalytic surface for growth of Al2O3, NaCl, and MgO. Formation of Al2O3 is favored at lower temperatures, while MgO is favored at higher temperatures. Visible corrosion products are formed within 30 minutes after seawater exposure. Corrosion characteristics in 3.5 percent salt solution are different than corrosion in seawater. Techniques utilized were: (1) scanning electron microscopy, (2) energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and (3) Auger electron spectroscopy.

  14. Stress corrosion resistant fasteners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roach, T. A.

    1985-01-01

    A family of high performance aerospace fasteners made from corrosion resistant alloys for use in applications where corrosion and stress-corrosion cracking are of major concern are discussed. The materials discussed are mainly A-286, Inconel 718, MP35N and MP159. Most of the fasteners utilize cold worked and aged materials to achieve the desired properties. The fasteners are unique in that they provide a combination of high strength and immunity to stress corrosion cracking not previously attainable. A discussion of fastener stress corrosion failures is presented including a review of the history and a description of the mechanism. Case histories are presented to illustrate the problems which can arise when material selection is made without proper regard for the environmental conditions. Mechanical properties and chemical compositions are included for the fasteners discussed. Several aspects of the application of high performance corrosion resistant fasteners are discussed including galvanic compatibility and torque-tension relationships.

  15. Effective corrosion monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Britton, C.F.; Tofield, B.C.

    1988-04-01

    The results of two surveys (conducted in 1981 and 1984) of users of corrosion monitoring equipment are described. The benefits to be obtained from a well-designed corrosion monitoring system, especially if a corrosion control program is used, are outlined together with the difficulties and barriers that can obstruct successful application. Developing methods such as AC impedance, electrochemical noise, and thin layer activation are discussed in view of the comments received from the surveys.

  16. Prediction of Corrosion of Advanced Materials and Fabricated Components

    SciTech Connect

    A. Anderko; G. Engelhardt; M.M. Lencka; M.A. Jakab; G. Tormoen; N. Sridhar

    2007-09-29

    -base alloys, stainless steels and copper-nickel alloys and (2) the effects of heat treatment on localized corrosion. Excellent agreement with experimental data has been obtained for alloys in various environments, including acids, bases, oxidizing species, inorganic inhibitors, etc. Further, a probabilistic model has been established for predicting the long-term damage due to localized corrosion on the basis of short-term inspection results. This methodology is applicable to pitting, crevice corrosion, stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue. Finally, a comprehensive model has been developed for predicting sensitization of Fe-Ni-Cr-Mo-W-N alloys and its effect on localized corrosion. As a vehicle for the commercialization of this technology, OLI Systems has developed the Corrosion Analyzer, a software tool that is already used by many companies in the chemical process industry. In process design, the Corrosion Analyzer provides the industry with (1) reliable prediction of the tendency of base alloys for localized corrosion as a function of environmental conditions and (2) understanding of how to select alloys for corrosive environments. In process operations, the software will help to predict the remaining useful life of equipment based on limited input data. Thus, users will also be able to identify process changes, corrosion inhibition strategies, and other control options before costly shutdowns, energy waste, and environmental releases occur. With the Corrosion Analyzer, various corrosion mitigation measures can be realistically tested in a virtual laboratory.

  17. Microsensors for corrosion control

    SciTech Connect

    Chawla, S.K.; Anguish, T.; Payer, J.H. )

    1990-05-01

    Sensors have been developed and manufactured by microelectronic fabrication techniques to directly measure corrosion rates and to determine the effectiveness of corrosion control systems. Microsensors based on measurements of corrosion rate by linear polarization, electrical resistance change, and galvanic currents have been devised. Analytical measurements by potentiometric and amperometric techniques using thick-film planar transducers are illustrated. The use of generic sensor elements individually and in combination to attest the status of corrosion control and to provide data for the evaluation of future performance is highlighted.

  18. Corrosion Detection Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, B.

    2003-12-01

    Nondestructive Examination Systems' (NDE) specialists at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site have unique, remotely controllable, corrosion detection capabilities. The corrosion detection devices most frequently used are automated ultrasonic mapping systems, digital radiography imaging devices, infrared imaging, and eddy current mapping systems. These devices have been successfully used in a variety of applications, some of which involve high levels of background radiation. Not only is corrosion located and mapped but other types of anomalies such as cracks have been detected and characterized. Examples of actual corrosion that has been detected will be discussed along with the NDE systems that were used.

  19. Corrosion in bioprocessing applications.

    PubMed

    Junker, Beth

    2009-01-01

    Corrosion in bioprocessing applications is described for a 25-year-old bioprocessing pilot plant facility. Various available stainless steel alloys differ greatly in properties owing to the impact of specific alloying elements and their concentrations. The alloy property evaluated was corrosion resistance as a function of composition under typical bioprocessing conditions such as sterilization, fermentation, and cleaning. Several non-uniform forms of corrosion relevant to bioprocessing applications (e.g., pitting, crevice corrosion, intergranular attack) were investigated for their typical causes and effects, as well as alloy susceptibility. Next, the corrosion resistance of various alloys to specific bioprocessing-relevant sources of corrosion (e.g., medium components, acids/bases used for pH adjustment, organic acid by-products) was evaluated, along with the impact of temperature on corrosion progression. Best practices to minimize corrosion included considerations for fabrication (e.g., welding, heat treatments) and operational (e.g., sterilization, media component selection, cleaning) approaches. Assessments and repair strategies for observed corrosion events were developed and implemented, resulting in improved vessel and overall facility longevity. PMID:18512080

  20. Corrosion Behavior of Aluminum Alloys in Acidic Media

    SciTech Connect

    Ramli, Rosliza; Seoh, S. Y.; Nik, W. B. Wan; Senin, H. B.

    2007-05-09

    The corrosion inhibition of Al and its alloys are the subject of tremendous technological importance due to the increased industrial applications of these materials. This study will report the results of weight loss, polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic (EIS) measurements on the corrosion inhibition of AA6061 and AA6063 aluminum alloys in acidic media using sodium benzoate as an inhibitor. The results showed that addition of sodium benzoate retards the rate of dissolution and hence inhibits the corrosion of the aluminum alloy in acidic media. The inhibition efficiency increases with the increase of immersion time in acetic acid however it displays a different behavior in sulfuric acid. Langmuir adsorption isotherm fits well with the experimental data. EIS studies showed that there was a significant increase in overall resistance after addition of sodium benzoate, when compared to the case without inhibitor. Langmuir adsorption isotherm fits well with the experimental data.

  1. Demystifying Controlling Copper Corrosion

    EPA Science Inventory

    The LCR systematically misses the highest health and corrosion risk sites for copper. Additionally, there are growing concerns for WWTP copper in sludges and discharge levels. There are many corrosion control differences between copper and lead. This talk explains the sometimes c...

  2. Fireside Corrosion USC Steering

    SciTech Connect

    G. R. Holcomb; J. Tylczak

    2011-09-07

    Oxy-Fuel Fireside Research goals are: (1) Determine the effect of oxy-fuel combustion on fireside corrosion - (a) Flue gas recycle choice, Staged combustion ramifications, (c) JCOAL Collaboration; and (2) Develop methods to use chromia solubility in ash as an 'ash corrosivity' measurement - (a) Synthetic ashes at first, then boiler and burner rig ashes, (b) Applicable to SH/RH conditions.

  3. Crude unit corrosion and corrosion control

    SciTech Connect

    Bagdasarian, A.; Feather, J.; Hull, B.; Stephenson, R.; Strong, R.

    1996-08-01

    In the petroleum refining process, the Crude Unit is the initial stage of distillation of the crude oil into useable fractions, either as end products or feed to downstream units. The major pieces of equipment found on units will vary depending on factors such as the assay of the design crude, the age of the refinery, and other downstream units. The unit discussed in this paper has all of the major pieces of equipment found on crude units including double desalting, a preflash section, an atmospheric section, a vacuum section, and a stabilization section. This paper reviews fundamental corrosion issues concerning the Crude Unit process. It is, in concise form, a description of the process and major equipment found in the Crude Unit; types of corrosion and where they occur; corrosion monitoring and inspection advice; and a list of related references for further reading. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  4. The electrochemical corrosion behavior of low-carbon steel in simulated Yucca Mountain repository environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Tiangan

    The corrosion of nuclear waste container materials in possible concentrated underground environments is one of the major concerns in Yucca Mountain repository project. Low carbon steel (LCS) is considered an optional material to serve as a corrosion allowance layer. AISI 1016 low carbon steel was investigated in concentrated J-13 ground waters. The electrochemical behavior of LCS was studied by monitoring corrosion potential behavior, measuring polarization resistance and conducting anodic potentiodynamic polarization and cyclic polarization tests. LCS showed excellent resistance against general corrosion in J-13 waters under de-aerated conditions, with the measured corrosion rates at 25sp° and 90sp°C were less than 0.28 mpy. The temperature, precipitation and overall concentration effects on corrosion rate were minimal under de-aerating conditions. Under aerated conditions, the dissolved oxygen significantly increased corrosion rate of LCS in the J-13 water with low concentration and temperature. Corrosion rate reached 5.5 mpy in aerated 10X J-13 water at 25sp°C. Corrosion rate of LCS decreased in aerated J-13 waters with increasing temperature or concentration. With limitation of solubility, concentration overall species in J-13 water up to 1000X did not increase corrosion rate or tendency of localized corrosion. Resistance to pitting corrosion varies with presence of aggressive Clsp- ions, oxidizer, inhibitors and precipitates. With heavy precipitates in overall concentrated J-13 waters at 90sp°C, measured pitting and protection potentials were increased significantly. Presence of dissolved oxygen or higher Clsp- fraction decreased Esbpit, and significantly decreased Esbprot as well. However, 1000X Clsp- J-13 water formed passive film on LCS at 25sp°C. Addition of Fesp{3+} significantly increased pitting and crevice corrosion tendency, because adding FeClsb3 removed inhibitor and passivator anions from aerated J-13 waters during the solution preparation

  5. Mechanism of corrosion inhibition of AA2024 by rare-earth compounds.

    PubMed

    Yasakau, Kiryl A; Zheludkevich, Mikhail L; Lamaka, Sviatlana V; Ferreira, Mario G S

    2006-03-23

    The mechanism of corrosion protection of the widely used 2024-T3 aluminum alloy by cerium and lanthanum inhibitors in chloride media is described in detail in the present work. The corrosion process was investigated by means of scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy (SKPFM), in situ atomic force microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy. Employment of the high-resolution and in situ techniques results in a deep understanding of the details of the physical chemistry and mechanisms of the corrosion processes. The applicability of the SKPFM for mechanistic analysis of the effect of different corrosion inhibitors is demonstrated for the first time. The inhibitors under study show sufficient hindering of the localized corrosion processes especially in the case of pitting formation located around the intermetallic S-phase particles. The main role of Ce(3+) and La(3+) in the corrosion protection is formation of hydroxide deposits on S-phase inclusions buffering the local increase of pH, which is responsible for the acceleration of the intermetallics dealloying. The formed hydroxide precipitates can also act as a diffusion barrier hindering the corrosion processes in active zones. Cerium nitrate exhibits higher inhibition efficiency in comparison with lanthanum nitrate. The higher effect in the case of cerium is obtained due to lower solubility of the respective hydroxide. A detailed mechanism of the corrosion process and its inhibition is proposed based on thermodynamic analysis. PMID:16539491

  6. The corrosion inhibition of iron and aluminum by various naturally occurring biological molecules

    SciTech Connect

    McCafferty, E.; Hansen, D.C.

    1995-12-31

    Biological polymers that exhibit a strong affinity for metal surfaces are increasingly becoming the focus of research toward the development of environmentally friendly corrosion inhibitors. This paper deals with the use of various naturally occurring organic molecules as corrosion inhibitors for iron or aluminum. Among the organic molecules considered are catecholate and hydroxamate siderophores isolated from bacteria, the adhesive protein from the blue mussel Mytilus edulis L, and caffeic acid and chlorogenic acid. FTIR analysis, anodic polarization curves, and AC impedance measurements were used to determine the adsorption and effectiveness of the various organic molecules as corrosion inhibitors. Parabactin, a catecholate siderophore, was effective in inhibiting both the corrosion of iron in hydrochloric acid and the pitting of aluminum in 0.1 M sodium chloride. The adhesive protein from the blue mussel was also effective in inhibiting the pitting of aluminum.

  7. Inhibitive Performance of Benzotriazole for Steel Corrosion Studied by Electrochemical and AFM Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yuanchao; Cheng, Y. Frank

    2015-12-01

    In this work, the inhibiting effect of benzotriazole (BTA) on corrosion of X65 pipeline steel in bicarbonate solution was investigated by electrochemical measurements, including open-circuit potential, potentiodynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy characterization. It is found that BTA is effective to inhibit the steel corrosion, and the inhibiting efficiency is increased by the increasing inhibitor concentration. The BTA is an anodic inhibitor, which shifts the corrosion potential of the steel less negatively and decreases the anodic current density at individual potential. A layer of inhibitor film is formed on the steel surface to reduce the corrosion rate of the steel. The formed film is quite smooth, with a roughness at the nano-meter scale.

  8. Controlled Release from Core-Shell Nanoporous Silica Particles for Corrosion Inhibition of Aluminum Alloys

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jiang, Xingmao; Jiang, Ying-Bing; Liu, Nanguo; Xu, Huifang; Rathod, Shailendra; Shah, Pratik; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Ceriumore » m (Ce) corrosion inhibitors were encapsulated into hexagonally ordered nanoporous silica particles via single-step aerosol-assisted self-assembly. The core/shell structured particles are effective for corrosion inhibition of aluminum alloy AA2024-T3. Numerical simulation proved that the core-shell nanostructure delays the release process. The effective diffusion coefficient elucidated from release data for monodisperse particles in water was 1.0 × 10 − 14  m 2 s for Ce 3+ compared to 2.5 × 10 − 13  m 2 s for NaCl. The pore size, pore surface chemistry, and the inhibitor solubility are crucial factors for the application. Microporous hydrophobic particles encapsulating a less soluble corrosion inhibitor are desirable for long-term corrosion inhibition.« less

  9. Structural insight into the unique binding properties of pyridylethanol(phenylethyl)amine inhibitor in human CYP51.

    PubMed

    Zelenko, Urška; Hodošček, Milan; Rozman, Damjana; Golič Grdadolnik, Simona

    2014-12-22

    Sterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51) is the main drug target for the treatment of fungal infections. The discovery of new efficient fungal CYP51 inhibitors requires an understanding of the structural requirements for selectivity for the fungal over the human ortholog. In this study, a binding mode of the pyridylethanol(phenylethyl)amine type CYP51 inhibitor to the human ortholog was determined at the atomic level. We isolated and purified a full-length human CYP51. The inhibitor-specific binding and its conformational and dynamic properties were evaluated using UV-visible and NMR spectroscopy. Considering the experimental data in docking calculations and molecular dynamics simulations, the location of the inhibitor moieties and their interactions with the enzyme active site were determined. The inhibitor binds to the enzyme in two diastereomeric forms, which have a common location of aromatic ring moieties, while the less bulky propyl chain can adapt to various hydrophobic regions of the enzyme active site. The halogenated phenyl ring binds in the substrate access channel making numerous contacts with the hydrophobic side chains, and its interactions with the unconserved residues are especially informative. The results reveal the unique binding properties of the investigated inhibitor in comparison to the azoles and provide novel directions for the design of selective fungal inhibitors. PMID:25419870

  10. The corrosion of titanium in alkaline peroxide bleach liquors

    SciTech Connect

    Wyllie, W.E. II; Brown, B.E.; Duquette, D.J.

    1994-12-31

    An experimental program to determine the effects of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and of potential corrosion inhibitors on the corrosion behavior of titanium has been developed. Corrosion rates less than 0.25 mm/y were observed in laboratory bleach liquor at pH 12 to which 5 g/l of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} were added. At pH 13, with 10 g/l H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, the corrosion rates were unacceptably high in both sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and laboratory bleach liquor solutions (>8.38 mm/y). The preliminary results of inhibitor studies indicated that the addition of 3.7 g/l sodium silicate or 0.01 g/l calcium nitrate (Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}) effectively inhibited the corrosion of titanium exposed to 5 g/l of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in NaOH solutions of pH 12. It was also found that in simulated paper mill chemistries, i.e., basic solutions containing 3.7 g/l sodium silicate and 0.6 g/l EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid), corrosion rates increased markedly with the addition of 5 g/l H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. However, subsequent additions of peroxide resulted in corrosion rates which were even lower than those found in NaOH. This is believed to be due to the formation of a black scale on the surface of the sample. The addition of magnesium sulfate (MgSO{sub 4}) in the 0.1--0.5 g/l range also was shown to inhibit corrosion in the NaOH solution, but only after prior exposure to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}.

  11. CFTR Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Verkman, Alan S.; Synder, David; Tradtrantip, Lukmanee; Thiagarajah, Jay R.; Anderson, Marc O.

    2014-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein is a cAMP-regulated Cl− channel whose major function is to facilitate epithelial fluid secretion. Loss-of-function mutations in CFTR cause the genetic disease cystic fibrosis. CFTR is required for transepithelial fluid transport in certain secretory diarrheas, such as cholera, and for cyst expansion in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. High-throughput screening has yielded CFTR inhibitors of the thiazolidinone, glycine hydrazide and quinoxalinedione chemical classes. The glycine hydrazides target the extracellular CFTR pore, whereas the thiazolidinones and quinoxalinediones act at the cytoplasmic surface. These inhibitors have been widely used in cystic fibrosis research to study CFTR function at the cell and organ levels. The most potent CFTR inhibitor has IC50 of approximately 4 nM. Studies in animal models support the development of CFTR inhibitors for antisecretory therapy of enterotoxin-mediated diarrheas and polycystic kidney disease. PMID:23331030

  12. Post-corrosive injuries of upper gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Chibishev, A; Simonovska, N; Shikole, A

    2010-01-01

    Acute poisonings with corrosive substances may cause serious chemical injuries to upper gastrointestinal tract, the most common location being the esophagus and the stomach. If the patient survives the acute phase of the poisoning, regenerative response may result in esophageal and/or gastric stenosis and increased risk for esophageal cancer. Acute corrosive intoxications pose a major problem in clinical toxicology since the most commonly affected population are the young with psychic disorders, suicidal intent and alcohol addiction. In establishing the diagnosis of acute corrosive poisonings, the severity of the post-corrosive endoscopic changes of the esophagus, stomach and duodenum is of major importance. According to Holinder and Fridman classification, post-corrosive endoscopic changes are classified in three degrees: First degree--superficial damage associated with hyperthermia, epithelial desquamation and mucous edema. Second degree--transmucous damage affecting all of the mucosal layers, followed by exudation, erosions and ulcerations. Third degree--transmural damage associated with ulcer's penetration in the deep layers of the tissue and neighboring organs. Severity of the lesions depends on the nature, quantity and concentration of the corrosive substance, the duration of exposure and current state of the exposed organs. Most often caustic injuries occur to the esophagus and stomach since the corrosive substance remains there for a longer period of time. Treatment of the acute corrosive intoxications include: neutralization of corrosive agents, antibiotics, corticosteroids, anti-secretory therapy, nutritional support, collagen synthesis inhibitors, esophageal dilation and stent placement, and surgery. The most common complications that may appear are: perforation, gastrointestinal bleeding, sepsis, esophageal strictures and stenosis, stenosis of gastric antrum and pylorus, cancer of the esophagus and the stomach. Today, owing to the substantially enhanced

  13. Inhibition of hot salt corrosion by metallic additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deadmore, D. L.; Lowell, C. E.

    1978-01-01

    The effectiveness of several potential fuel additives in reducing the effects of sodium sulfate-induced hot corrosion was evaluated in a cyclic Mach 0.3 burner rig. The potential inhibitors examined were salts of Al, Si, Cr, Fe, Zn, Mg, Ca, and Ba. The alloys tested were IN-100, U-700, IN-738, IN-792, Mar M-509, and 304 stainless steel. Each alloy was exposed for 100 cycles of 1 hour each at 900 C in combustion gases doped with the corrodant and inhibitor salts and the extent of attack was determined by measuring maximum metal thickness loss. The most effective and consistent inhibitor additive was Ba (NO3)2 which reduced the hot corrosion attack to nearly that of simple oxidation.

  14. Corrosion-resistant uranium

    DOEpatents

    Hovis, Jr., Victor M.; Pullen, William C.; Kollie, Thomas G.; Bell, Richard T.

    1983-01-01

    The present invention is directed to the protecting of uranium and uranium alloy articles from corrosion by providing the surfaces of the articles with a layer of an ion-plated metal selected from aluminum and zinc to a thickness of at least 60 microinches and then converting at least the outer surface of the ion-plated layer of aluminum or zinc to aluminum chromate or zinc chromate. This conversion of the aluminum or zinc to the chromate form considerably enhances the corrosion resistance of the ion plating so as to effectively protect the coated article from corrosion.

  15. Corrosion-resistant uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, R.T.; Hovis, V.M.; Kollie, T.G.; Pullen, W.C.

    1983-05-31

    The present invention is directed to the protecting of uranium and uranium alloy articles from corrosion by providing the surfaces of the articles with a layer of an ion-plated metal selected from aluminum and zinc to a thickness of at least 60 microinches and then converting at least the outer surface of the ion-plated layer of aluminum or zinc to aluminum chromate or zinc chromate. This conversion of the aluminum or zinc to the chromate form considerably enhances the corrosion resistance of the ion plating so as to effectively protect the coated article from corrosion.

  16. Microbiologically influenced corrosion testing

    SciTech Connect

    Kearns, J.R.; Little, B.J.

    1994-01-01

    This symposium was held November 16--17, 1992 in Miami, Florida. The purpose of the symposium was to provide a forum for state-of-the-art information on the effects of microorganisms on the corrosion of metals. Many industrial needs in the area of microbial influenced corrosion testing are identified in the presentations along with latest laboratory and field testing techniques. Strategies to monitor and control corrosion and biofouling in water distribution systems, underground pipelines, buildings, and marine vessels are discussed. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  17. Irritants and corrosives.

    PubMed

    Tovar, Richard; Leikin, Jerrold B

    2015-02-01

    This article reviews toxic chemicals that cause irritation and damage to single and multiple organ systems (corrosion) in an acute fashion. An irritant toxic chemical causes reversible damage to skin or other organ system, whereas a corrosive agent produces irreversible damage, namely, visible necrosis into integumentary layers, following application of a substance for up to 4 hours. Corrosive reactions can cause coagulation or liquefaction necrosis. Damaged areas are typified by ulcers, bleeding, bloody scabs, and eventual discoloration caused by blanching of the skin, complete areas of alopecia, and scars. Histopathology should be considered to evaluate questionable lesions. PMID:25455665

  18. Corrosion-resistant uranium

    DOEpatents

    Hovis, V.M. Jr.; Pullen, W.C.; Kollie, T.G.; Bell, R.T.

    1981-10-21

    The present invention is directed to the protecting of uranium and uranium alloy articles from corrosion by providing the surfaces of the articles with a layer of an ion-plated metal selected from aluminum and zinc to a thickness of at least 60 microinches and then converting at least the outer surface of the ion-plated layer of aluminum or zinc to aluminum chromate or zinc chromate. This conversion of the aluminum or zinc to the chromate form considerably enhances the corrosion resistance of the ion plating so as to effectively protect the coated article from corrosion.

  19. Mechanism of CO{sub 2} corrosion inhibition by phosphate esters

    SciTech Connect

    Alin, B.; Outlaw, B.; Jovancicevic, V.; Ramachandran, S.; Campbell, S.

    1999-11-01

    The mechanisms of corrosion inhibition of mild steel by phosphate esters in a CO{sub 2} containing environment is studied by using various inhibitor solution characterization techniques (residual analysis, dynamic surface tension, emulsion tendency). Corrosion inhibition and inhibitor film persistence is monitored over time by using a rotating cylinder electrode (RCE) system and linear polarization resistance (LPR) technique. Corrosion rate-time/concentration profiles are obtained for all phosphate esters studied. Optical profilometry is used to assess surface microstructure as related to inhibitor film persistence. The effect of phosphate ester`s chemical structure (aromatic vs. aliphatic hydrophobic group, degree of ethoxylation, mono- vs. di-ester) on inhibitor performance is investigated in terms of their volubility, hydrolytic stability, emulsion properties, iron/calcium salt/complex formation and oil/water partitioning. A synergy between phosphate esters and imidazolines is also investigated.

  20. Hydroxyl carboxylate based non-phosphorus corrosion inhibition process for reclaimed water pipeline and downstream recirculating cooling water system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Wang, Dong; Hou, Deyin

    2016-01-01

    A combined process was developed to inhibit the corrosion both in the pipeline of reclaimed water supplies (PRWS) and in downstream recirculating cooling water systems (RCWS) using the reclaimed water as makeup. Hydroxyl carboxylate-based corrosion inhibitors (e.g., gluconate, citrate, tartrate) and zinc sulfate heptahydrate, which provided Zn(2+) as a synergistic corrosion inhibition additive, were added prior to the PRWS when the phosphate (which could be utilized as a corrosion inhibitor) content in the reclaimed water was below 1.7 mg/L, and no additional corrosion inhibitors were required for the downstream RCWS. Satisfactory corrosion inhibition was achieved even if the RCWS was operated under the condition of high numbers of concentration cycles. The corrosion inhibition requirement was also met by the appropriate combination of PO4(3-) and Zn(2+) when the phosphate content in the reclaimed water was more than 1.7 mg/L. The process integrated not only water reclamation and reuse, and the operation of a highly concentrated RCWS, but also the comprehensive utilization of phosphate in reclaimed water and the application of non-phosphorus corrosion inhibitors. The proposed process reduced the operating cost of the PRWS and the RCWS, and lowered the environmental hazard caused by the excessive discharge of phosphate. Furthermore, larger amounts of water resources could be conserved as a result. PMID:26899639

  1. Inhibition of heavy metal ion corrosion on aluminum in fresh water cooling systems using propylene glycol anti-freeze

    SciTech Connect

    Hack, H.P.; Corbett, R.; Krantz, B.

    1998-12-31

    Electronics cooling and environmental control systems are required in enclosed manned spaces such as the inside of spacecraft or submersibles. Because egress from such spaces may not be possible in a short time frame, coolant leaks must have minimum toxicity. For this reason, propylene glycol coolants are preferred over the traditional ethylene glycol coolants. Corrosion inhibitor formulations are well developed for ethylene glycol coolants, but there is concern that the inhibitor suite for propylene glycol systems may not be as mature. In particular, coolant systems with a mixture of aluminum and copper can develop heavy metal ion corrosion of the aluminum due to precipitation of copper ions from solution onto the aluminum. This type of accelerated corrosion of aluminum does not require electrical contact with copper, as is the case for galvanic corrosion, nor is significant coolant conductivity required for corrosion to occur. This paper presents a study of the ability of a commercial inhibited propylene glycol coolant to prevent heavy metal ion corrosion of aluminum when copper is also present in the coolant system. The inhibited propylene glycol`s performance is compared to that of reagent propylene glycol without inhibitors, a mature ethylene glycol inhibited coolant, and to tap water. The inhibitor suite in the inhibited propylene glycol was found to be as effective in controlling heavy metal ion corrosion as that of the inhibited ethylene glycol coolant, while uninhibited reagent propylene glycol was ineffective in controlling heavy metal ion corrosion.

  2. BWR steel containment corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, C.P.; Bagchi, G.

    1996-04-01

    The report describes regulatory actions taken after corrosion was discovered in the drywell at the Oyster Creek Plant and in the torus at the Nine Mile Point 1 Plant. The report describes the causes of corrosion, requirements for monitoring corrosion, and measures to mitigate the corrosive environment for the two plants. The report describes the issuances of generic letters and information notices either to collect information to determine whether the problem is generic or to alert the licensees of similar plants about the existence of such a problem. Implementation of measures to enhance the containment performance under severe accident conditions is discussed. A study by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) of the performance of a degraded containment under severe accident conditions is summarized. The details of the BNL study are in the appendix to the report.

  3. Corrosion science and technology

    SciTech Connect

    Talbot, D.; Talbot, J.

    1998-01-01

    This book investigates the chemical, electrochemical, and metallurgical aspects of corrosion control in contemporary technologies. By examining the structures of water, oxides, and metals, the text identifies the interactions in which metals corrode in natural and artificial environments. The book also includes profiles of technological use in aviation, automobile manufacturing, food processing, and building construction; explanations of scientific principles, real world applications, and case histories; and extensive references for corrosion-related literature and other information.

  4. Method for inhibiting corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Stapp, P. R.

    1985-12-03

    A composition comprising the reaction adduct or neutralized product resulting from the reaction of a maleic anhydride and an oil containing a polynuclear aromatic compound is provided which, when applied to a metal surface, forms a corrosion-inhibiting film thereon. The composition is particularly useful in the treatment of down-hole metal surfaces in oil and gas wells to inhibit the corrosion of the metal.

  5. Corrosivity Of Pyrolysis Oils

    SciTech Connect

    Keiser, James R; Bestor, Michael A; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur; Storey, John Morse

    2011-01-01

    Pyrolysis oils from several sources have been analyzed and used in corrosion studies which have consisted of exposing corrosion coupons and stress corrosion cracking U-bend samples. The chemical analyses have identified the carboxylic acid compounds as well as the other organic components which are primarily aromatic hydrocarbons. The corrosion studies have shown that raw pyrolysis oil is very corrosive to carbon steel and other alloys with relatively low chromium content. Stress corrosion cracking samples of carbon steel and several low alloy steels developed through-wall cracks after a few hundred hours of exposure at 50 C. Thermochemical processing of biomass can produce solid, liquid and/or gaseous products depending on the temperature and exposure time used for processing. The liquid product, known as pyrolysis oil or bio-oil, as produced contains a significant amount of oxygen, primarily as components of water, carboxylic acids, phenols, ketones and aldehydes. As a result of these constituents, these oils are generally quite acidic with a Total Acid Number (TAN) that can be around 100. Because of this acidity, bio-oil is reported to be corrosive to many common structural materials. Despite this corrosive nature, these oils have the potential to replace some imported petroleum. If the more acidic components can be removed from this bio-oil, it is expected that the oil could be blended with crude oil and then processed in existing petroleum refineries. The refinery products could be transported using customary routes - pipelines, barges, tanker trucks and rail cars - without a need for modification of existing hardware or construction of new infrastructure components - a feature not shared by ethanol.

  6. Corrosion resistant filter unit

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, J.M.

    1992-02-18

    This patent describes a fluid filter assembly adapted for the filtration of corrosive fluid to be injected into a well bore at pressure levels which may exceed 10,000 pounds per square. It comprises: a frame assembly for the mounting of a portion of the fluid filter assembly therein, the frame assembly; filter pods, the plurality of filter pods forming at least two banks of filter pods, each bank having at least two filter pods therein, each bank of the filter pods being supported by one or more the supports of the plurality of supports secured to selected struts of the frame assembly; an inlet manifold to direct the corrosive fluid to the plurality of filter pods, the inlet manifold being interconnected to the banks of filter pods formed by the filter pods whereby flow of the corrosive fluid can be directed to each bank of the filter pods; an outlet manifold to direct the corrosive fluid from the filter pods, the outlet manifold being interconnected to the banks of filter pods formed by the filter pods; a first valve means to control the flow of the corrosive fluid between banks of filter pods formed by the filter pods whereby the flow of the corrosive fluid can be selectively directed to each bank of the filter pods; a second valve means to selectively control the flow of the corrosive fluid between the inlet manifold and the outlet manifold; and union means for interconnecting the filter pods, inlet manifold and outlet manifold, each of the union means including mechanical connection means and internal seal means for isolating the corrosive fluids from the mechanical connection means.

  7. Solderability preservation through the use of organic inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, N.R.; Hosking, F.M.

    1994-12-01

    Organic inhibitors can be used to prevent corrosion of metals and have application in the electronics industry as solderability preservatives. We have developed a model to describe the action of two inhibitors (benzotriazole and imidazole) during the environmental aging and soldering process. The inhibitors bond with the metal surface and form a barrier that prevents or retards oxidation. At soldering temperatures, the metal-organic complex breaks down leaving an oxide-free metal surface that allows excellent wetting by molten solder. The presence of the inhibitor retards the wetting rate relative to clean copper, but provides a vast improvement relative to oxidized copper.

  8. Hydrodynamic modeling for corrosion control in the oil and gas industry

    SciTech Connect

    Palacios, C.A.; Morales, J.L.

    1995-10-01

    This article describes a methodology used to select and establish corrosion control programs. These include corrosion rate predictions using well known correlations for flowing systems, materials selection, optimization of inhibitors and corrosion monitoring techniques. The methodology characterizes internal corrosion phenomenon integrating the hydrodynamic conditions of the flow (flow velocities, flow pattern, liquid holdups, and where the condensation is taking place within a pipeline) with those that predict corrosion rates. It can be applied in the whole oil/gas production system, including subsurface and surface equipment. The methodology uses single and two phase flow modeling techniques to: (1) optimize the entire production system to obtain the most efficient objective flow rate, taking into consideration the corrosive/erosive nature of the produced fluids and (2) characterize the corrosion nature of oil and gas transmission lines. As an example of its use, a characterization of corrosion nature of a gas transmission line is described. The hydrodynamic simulation was performed using commercially available simulators, and the corrosion rates were determined using published correlations. Results using this methodology allowed for corrosion control strategies, protection and monitoring criteria, and inhibition optimization.

  9. Perforation corrosion and its mechanism on galvanized steel sheets on vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Sakae

    1998-12-31

    Mechanism of perforation corrosion on vehicles in the area where deicing salts are dispersed on roads in winter was investigated, using the Gumbel probability plots of the maximum depth of corrosion inside the lapped portion and quantitative analyses of crystalline compositions of the iron rusts which formed on the steel panels of vehicles. It was estimated that perforation occurred in 7 years for zincrometal steel sheet and more than 14 years for galvanized steel sheet with zinc coating weight of 120g/m{sup 2} in the crevice of lapped panel. The composition of the rust in the lapped portion of galvanized steel panels was mainly amorphous at the initial stage of corrosion and moves towards the high content of ({gamma}-FeOOH+Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) regions of the non-galvanized parts. Zinc corrosion product prevented the redox reaction of the iron rust and performed as corrosion inhibitor of steel in laboratory simulation tests. Perforation mechanism on vehicles in real environments will be also discussed in the following stages; (1) corrosion of zinc layer, (2) galvanic corrosion of zinc, (3) corrosion of steel under zinc corrosion product, (4) corrosion of steel.

  10. Dissolution and corrosion inhibition of copper, zinc, and their alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Jinturkar, P.; Guan, Y.C.; Han, K.N.

    1998-02-01

    The corrosion behavior of copper, zinc, and their alloys in sulfuric acid (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) solutions with oxygen and ferric ions (Fe{sup 3+}) was studied using a potentiostat. Oxygen and Fe{sup 3+} ions were shown to play an important role in corrosion of copper and copper-zinc alloys. Cathodic reduction of oxygen mainly was controlled by chemical reaction, and that of Fe{sup 3+} ions was controlled by diffusion. The overall cathodic process was the summation of the reduction of oxygen and Fe{sup 3+} ions. Corrosion of zinc was controlled mainly by reduction of water. Corrosion inhibition using benzotriazole (BTAH) also was investigated in aerated and deaerated solutions. BTAH was found to be a useful inhibitor, and the inhibition layer was shown to be stable and persistent. Morphology of the surface of copper, zinc, and brasses after corrosion in the presence and absence of BTAH was examined by scanning electron microscopy. BTAH formed a protective layer on the surface, thereby inhibiting corrosion. Solution analysis of the dissolution of brasses showed that zinc dissolved preferentially in the initial stages, followed by simultaneous dissolution of copper and zinc.

  11. Corrosion testing using isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Hohorst, F.A.

    1995-12-05

    A method is described for determining the corrosion behavior of a material with respect to a medium in contact with the material by: implanting a substantially chemically inert gas in a matrix so that corrosion experienced by the material causes the inert gas to enter the medium; placing the medium in contact with the material; and measuring the amount of inert gas which enters the medium. A test sample of a material whose resistance to corrosion by a medium is to be tested is described composed of: a body of the material, which body has a surface to be contacted by the medium; and a substantially chemically inert gas implanted into the body to a depth below the surface. A test sample of a material whose resistance to corrosion by a medium is to be tested is described composed of: a substrate of material which is easily corroded by the medium, the substrate having a surface; a substantially chemically inert gas implanted into the substrate; and a sheet of the material whose resistance to corrosion is to be tested, the sheet being disposed against the surface of the substrate and having a defined thickness. 3 figs.

  12. Corrosion testing using isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Hohorst, Frederick A.

    1995-12-05

    A method for determining the corrosion behavior of a material with respect to a medium in contact with the material by: implanting a substantially chemically inert gas in a matrix so that corrosion experienced by the material causes the inert gas to enter the medium; placing the medium in contact with the material; and measuring the amount of inert gas which enters the medium. A test sample of a material whose resistance to corrosion by a medium is to be tested, composed of: a body of the material, which body has a surface to be contacted by the medium; and a substantially chemically inert gas implanted into the body to a depth below the surface. A test sample of a material whose resistance to corrosion by a medium is to be tested, composed of: a substrate of material which is easily corroded by the medium, the substrate having a surface; a substantially chemically inert gas implanted into the substrate; and a sheet of the material whose resistance to corrosion is to be tested, the sheet being disposed against the surface of the substrate and having a defined thickness.

  13. Electrochemical noise measurements of sustained microbially influenced pitting corrosion in a laboratory flow loop system.

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y. J.

    1999-01-13

    when a corrosion inhibitor was added into one of the test loops during the corrosion testing.

  14. Synthetic sea water - An improved stress corrosion test medium for aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1973-01-01

    A major problem in evaluating the stress corrosion cracking resistance of aluminum alloys by alternate immersion in 3.5 percent salt (NaCl) water is excessive pitting corrosion. Several methods were examined to eliminate this problem and to find an improved accelerated test medium. These included the addition of chromate inhibitors, surface treatment of specimens, and immersion in synthetic sea water. The results indicate that alternate immersion in synthetic sea water is a very promising stress corrosion test medium. Neither chromate inhibitors nor surface treatment (anodize and alodine) of the aluminum specimens improved the performance of alternate immersion in 3.5 percent salt water sufficiently to be classified as an effective stress corrosion test method.

  15. [Proteasome inhibitor].

    PubMed

    Yagi, Hideo

    2014-06-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system plays an essential role in degradation of eukaryotic intracellular protein, including cell cycle regulation, cell growth and proliferation, and survival. Cancer cells generally have higher level of proteasome activity compared with normal cells, suggesting proteasome inhibition could be therapeutic target in oncology. Bortezomib, the first proteasome inhibitor introduced into the clinic, is approved for the treatment of patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Although it was approved as single agent in the relapsed setting, bortezomib is now predominantly used in combination with conventional and novel targeted agents because bortezomib has demonstrated additive and synergistic activity in preclinical studies. Recently, several second-generation proteasome inhibitors, such as carfilzomib and MLN9708, have been developed and entered into clinical trials. These agents were investigated in frontline MM in combination with lenalidomide and low-dose dexamethasone. These studies demonstrated positive efficacy and safety, and it is expected that they will be approved in near future. PMID:25016815

  16. Corrosion Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Russ Braunling

    2004-10-31

    The Corrosion Monitoring System (CMS) program developed and demonstrated a continuously on-line system that provides real-time corrosion information. The program focused on detecting pitting corrosion in its early stages. A new invention called the Intelligent Ultrasonic Probe (IUP) was patented on the program. The IUP uses ultrasonic guided waves to detect small defects and a Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique (SAFT) algorithm to provide an image of the pits. Testing of the CMS demonstrated the capability to detect pits with dimensionality in the sub-millimeter range. The CMS was tested in both the laboratory and in a pulp and paper industrial plant. The system is capable of monitoring the plant from a remote location using the internet.

  17. A model of corrosion expertise

    SciTech Connect

    Trethewey, K.R.; Roberge, P.R.

    1996-10-01

    This paper describes an approach to reduce the complexity of knowledge engineering projects in corrosion by developing an object-oriented framework to guide the elicitation and organization of corrosion and materials engineering expertise. A model is presented into which corrosion expertise can be structured in a qualitative and quantitative way. This model could be used as the framework for a corrosion management expert system.

  18. Corrosion-resistant metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    2009-03-24

    The present invention relates to metal surfaces having thereon an ultrathin (e.g., less than ten nanometer thickness) corrosion-resistant film, thereby rendering the metal surfaces corrosion-resistant. The corrosion-resistant film includes an at least partially crosslinked amido-functionalized silanol component in combination with rare-earth metal oxide nanoparticles. The invention also relates to methods for producing such corrosion-resistant films.

  19. Corrosion resistant PEM fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Fronk, Matthew Howard; Borup, Rodney Lynn; Hulett, Jay S.; Brady, Brian K.; Cunningham, Kevin M.

    2002-01-01

    A PEM fuel cell having electrical contact elements comprising a corrosion-susceptible substrate metal coated with an electrically conductive, corrosion-resistant polymer containing a plurality of electrically conductive, corrosion-resistant filler particles. The substrate may have an oxidizable metal first layer (e.g., stainless steel) underlying the polymer coating.

  20. Corrosion resistant PEM fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Fronk, Matthew Howard; Borup, Rodney Lynn; Hulett, Jay S.; Brady, Brian K. NY); Cunningham, Kevin M.

    2011-06-07

    A PEM fuel cell having electrical contact elements comprising a corrosion-susceptible substrate metal coated with an electrically conductive, corrosion-resistant polymer containing a plurality of electrically conductive, corrosion-resistant filler particles. The substrate may have an oxidizable metal first layer (e.g., stainless steel) underlying the polymer coating.

  1. DWPF corrosion study

    SciTech Connect

    Selby, C.L.

    1986-12-17

    Corrosion of candidate alloys for the DWPF SRAT, SME, and melter was tested in the large (1/3 scale) SRAT/SME, the 200th scale SRAT/SME, and the LSFM. Flat or twisted coupons with or without a weld bead and U-bend specimens (specimens bent into a ''U'' shape and bolted together at the ends to stress the bend area) were installed on racks that ensured electrical isolation to avoid galvanic effects. Teflon/reg sign/ washers isolated the low temperature exposure racks and ceramic washers isolated the high temperature exposure racks. Serrated washers simulated crevices, but crevice corrosion did not result. 9 refs., 9 tabs.

  2. CHROMATE INHIBITION OF THE LOCALIZED CORROSION OF ALUMINUM: MEASUREMENTS OF ELECTROCHEMICAL TRANSIENTS.

    SciTech Connect

    SASAKI,K.; ISAACS,H.S.

    2001-09-02

    We investigated the inhibition by chromate ions of the localized corrosion of aluminum by electrochemical transient measurements. In agreement with other work, the measurements demonstrated that chromate is a cathodic inhibitor for aluminum in open circuit. The reduction of hexavalent chromium to trivalent chromium is assumed to take place on catalyzed sites of the surface. The resulting products inhibit oxygen reduction reactions at these sites, thereby retarding pitting corrosion.

  3. Corrosion consequences and inhibition of galvanic couples in petroleum production equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.L.

    1995-06-01

    Electrochemical potential and polarization behavior measurements made in the laboratory, along with zero resistance ammeter (ZRA) measurements made under laboratory and field conditions, were used to delineate galvanic behavior in petroleum production equipment. These measurements, confirmed by electrode weight loss data, were used to predict corrosion rates for brass/carbon steel and stainless steel/carbon steel couples in the presence and absence of a corrosion inhibitor.

  4. Engineering considerations for corrosion monitoring of gas gathering pipeline systems

    SciTech Connect

    Braga, T.G.; Asperger, R.G.

    1987-01-01

    Proper corrosion monitoring of gas gathering pipelines requires a system review to determine the appropriate monitor locations and types of monitoring techniques. This paper develops and discusses a classification of conditions such as flow regime and gas composition. Also discussed are junction categories which, for corrosion monitoring, need to be considered from two points of view. The first is related to fluid flow in the line and the second is related corrosion inhibitor movement along the pipeline. The appropriate application of the various monitoring techniques such as coupons, hydrogen detectors, electrical resistance probe and linear polarization probes are discussed in relation to flow regime and gas composition. Problems caused by semi-conduction from iron sulfide are considered. Advantages and disadvantages of fluid gathering methods such as pots and flow-through drips are discussed in relation to their reliability as on-line monitoring locations.

  5. Replacement inhibitors for high level waste tank cooling coils

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B.J.; Hsu, T.C.

    1996-10-01

    Sodium chromate has been an effective corrosion inhibitor for the cooling coil systems in Savannah River Site (SRS) waste tanks for over 40 years. Due to age and operating history, cooling coils occasionally fail allowing chromated water to leak into the environment. The costs of reporting and cleaning up chromate spills became significant enough for SRS to consider alternate inhibitors. Confirmatory tests were performed to assess the effectiveness of three alternative corrosion inhibitor systems for the waste tank cooling water systems: (1) sodium molybdate (250 ppm as Mo)/sodium hydroxide (pH 10), (2) sodium molybdate (50 ppm as Mo)/sodium silicate (50 ppm as Si), and (3) sodium nitrite (500 ppm)/ sodium hydroxide (0.01 M). The tests were conducted under stagnant conditions to simulate a worst-case scenario. The results showed that these inhibitors were as effective as chromate at minimizing general corrosion at solution temperatures between 30--70 C. However, the initiation of localized attack in crevice regions, in solutions containing the alternative inhibitors at 70 C, was observed. Also, for the nitrite and the molybdate systems to be effective, suitable biocide is needed. On the other hand, interval coupon tests showed that the molybdate inhibitor systems prevented significant propagation of the localized attack.

  6. LABORATORY TESTING TO SIMULATE VAPOR SPACE CORROSION IN RADIOACTIVE WASTE STORAGE TANKS

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B.; Garcia-Diaz, B.; Gray, J.

    2013-08-30

    Radioactive liquid waste has been stored in underground carbon steel tanks for nearly 70 years at the Hanford nuclear facility. Vapor space corrosion of the tank walls has emerged as an ongoing challenge to overcome in maintaining the structural integrity of these tanks. The interaction between corrosive and inhibitor species in condensates/supernates on the tank wall above the liquid level, and their interaction with vapor phase constituents as the liquid evaporates from the tank wall influences the formation of corrosion products and the corrosion of the carbon steel. An effort is underway to gain an understanding of the mechanism of vapor space corrosion. Localized corrosion, in the form of pitting, is of particular interest in the vapor space. CPP testing was utilized to determine the susceptibility of the steel in a simulated vapor space environment. The tests also investigated the impact of ammonia gas in the vapor space area on the corrosion of the steel. Vapor space coupon tests were also performed to investigate the evolution of the corrosion products during longer term exposures. These tests were also conducted at vapor space ammonia levels of 50 and 550 ppm NH{sub 3} (0.005, and 0.055 vol.%) in air. Ammonia was shown to mitigate vapor space corrosion.

  7. Corrosion control when using secondary treated municipal wastewater as alternative makeup water for cooling tower systems.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ming-Kai; Li, Heng; Chien, Shih-Hsiang; Monnell, Jason D; Chowdhury, Indranil; Dzombak, David A; Vidic, Radisav D

    2010-12-01

    Secondary treated municipal wastewater is a promising alternative to fresh water as power plant cooling water system makeup water, especially in arid regions. Laboratory and field testing was conducted in this study to evaluate the corrosiveness of secondary treated municipal wastewater for various metals and metal alloys in cooling systems. Different corrosion control strategies were evaluated based on varied chemical treatment. Orthophosphate, which is abundant in secondary treated municipal wastewater, contributed to more than 80% precipitative removal of phosphorous-based corrosion inhibitors. Tolyltriazole worked effectively to reduce corrosion of copper (greater than 95% inhibition effectiveness). The corrosion rate of mild steel in the presence of free chlorine 1 mg/L (as Cl2) was approximately 50% higher than in the presence of monochloramine 1 mg/L (as Cl2), indicating that monochloramine is a less corrosive biocide than free chlorine. The scaling layers observed on the metal alloys contributed to corrosion inhibition, which could be seen by comparing the mild steel 21-day average corrosion rate with the last 5-day average corrosion rate, the latter being approximately 50% lower than the former. PMID:21214028

  8. Corrosion of radioactive waste tanks containing washed sludge and precipitates

    SciTech Connect

    Bickford, D.F.; Congdon, J.W.; Oblath, S.B.

    1988-05-01

    At the US Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Plant, the corrosion of carbon steel storage tanks containing alkaline, high-level radioactive waste is controlled by specification of limits on waste composition and temperature. Laboratory tests, conducted to determine minimum corrosion inhibitor levels, indicated pitting of carbon steel near the waterline for proposed storage conditions. In situ electrochemical measurements of full-scale radioactive process demonstrations were conducted to assess the validity of laboratory tests. The in situ results are compared to those of laboratory tests, with particular regard given to simulated solution composition. Transition metal hydroxide sludge contains strong passivating species for carbon steel. Washed precipitate contains organic species that lower solution pH and tend to reduce passivating films, requiring higher inhibitor concentrations than the 0.01 M nitrite required for reactor fuel reprocessing wastes.

  9. Surface modification for corrosion protection of steel pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morshed, Ali

    Corrosion of carbon steel oil pipelines in the sweet environments has been a well- known problem in the oil industry all over the world and corrosion inhibitors of the film forming type have been widely used to combat this type of corrosion. In this project numerous effort has been made to devise a similar way of corrosion mitigation by producing an impermeable and protective coating made of precipitated iron carbonate scale. Based on the previous works it was suggested that iron carbonate scale as the corrosion product (of carbon steel and CO2) could to some extent offer protection to its substrate and reduce the corrosion rate effectively. However, precipitating an adherent and protective iron carbonate scale has not been an easy job. Our main objectives during this work have been firstly to define the favourable conditions under which an iron carbonate scale would precipitate in the system and then to investigate how the protective characteristics of the scale could be improved. The effects of several environmental variables like solution pH, solution temperature, additives (scale inhibitors), stirring and solution composition on the scale properties such as adhesion, surface coverage, stability and porosity (scale density) have been investigated. Simultaneously, the adverse effects of certain conditions or variables that tended to reduce the scale protectiveness or prevent its precipitation have been investigated and discussed. Some of the presented results are rather qualitative; nevertheless it is believed that they have contributed in the better understanding of the iron carbonate scale properties and its precipitation process. Based on the results and conclusions of this project few suggestions have been made at the end for the possible continuation of this work.

  10. On-demand release of corrosion-inhibiting ions from amorphous Al-Co-Ce alloys.

    PubMed

    Jakab, M A; Scully, J R

    2005-09-01

    Controlled release technologies are often used to supply chemicals or drugs at given rates. Release often occurs on contact with solution. However, some applications, such as corrosion protection, require containment of the active species in a reservoir and their slow release when needed. Conductive polymers have been used as reservoirs for corrosion inhibitors whose triggered release occurs by galvanic reduction or ion exchange. This work shows one of the first examples of pH-controlled release of corrosion-inhibiting ions from an amorphous metallic coating where the pH change that triggers release is a consequence of the onset of corrosion. This corrosion-inhibition strategy provides further corrosion protection beyond the traditional roles of barrier and sacrificial cathodic protection using a metal coating. For instance, zinc galvanizing provides sacrificial cathodic protection and acts as a barrier, but does not supply inhibitor ions. In the coating described here, protection of an underlying structural alloy exposed at coating defects is demonstrated by inhibitor ion release in addition to barrier function and sacrificial cathodic protection. PMID:16086020

  11. Corrosion by liquid lead and lead-bismuth: experimental results review and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jinsuo

    2008-01-01

    Liquid metal technologies for liquid lead and lead-bismuth alloy are under wide investigation and development for advanced nuclear energy systems and waste transmutation systems. Material corrosion is one of the main issues studied a lot recently in the development of the liquid metal technology. This study reviews corrosion by liquid lead and lead bismuth, including the corrosion mechanisms, corrosion inhibitor and the formation of the protective oxide layer. The available experimental data are analyzed by using a corrosion model in which the oxidation and scale removal are coupled. Based on the model, long-term behaviors of steels in liquid lead and lead-bismuth are predictable. This report provides information for the selection of structural materials for typical nuclear reactor coolant systems when selecting liquid lead or lead bismuth as heat transfer media.

  12. Mechanisms contributing to enhanced corrosion in three phase slug flow in horizontal pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Gopal, M.; Kaul, A.; Jepson, W.P.

    1995-10-01

    Flow visualization experiments have been conducted in 7.5 cm and 10 cm I.D. three phase oil-water-gas pipes. The mechanisms that lead to increased corrosion rates in three-phase slug flow have been determined. The results show the existence of pulses of bubbles that have been formed in the mixing zone of the slug. These can impact on the lower pipe wall producing a cavitation-type effect leading to high rates of localized wall shear stress and associated high corrosion rates. This mechanism is sufficient to remove corrosion products and certain corrosion inhibitor film. The corrosion rate is strongly dependent on the flow composition and the Froude Number.

  13. Undoped Polyaniline/Surfactant Complex for the Corrosion Prevention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Lo-Min; Levon, Kalle

    1998-01-01

    Due to the strict regulations on the usage of heavy metals as the additives in the coating industries, the search for effective organic corrosion inhibitors in replace of those metal additives has become essential. Electrically conducting polymers have been shown to be effective for corrosion prevention but the poor solubility of these intractable polymers has been a problem. We have explored a polyaniline/4-dodecylphenol complex (PANi/DDPh) to improve the dissolution and it has been shown to be an effective organic corrosion inhibitor. With the surfactant, DDPh, PANi could be diluted into the coatings and the properties of the coatings were affected. Emeraldine base (EB) form of PANi was also found to be oxidized by the hardener. The oxidized form of polyaniline provides improved corrosion protection of metals than that of emeraldine base since the value of the standard electrode potential for the oxidized form of PANi is higher than that of EB. Additionally, the surfactant improves the wet adhesion property between the coating and the metal surface.

  14. Replacement inhibitors for tank farm cooling coil systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, T.C.

    1995-03-23

    Sodium chromate has been an effective corrosion inhibitor for the cooling coil systems in Savannah River Site (SRS) waste tanks for over 40 years. Due to their age and operating history, cooling coils occasionally fail allowing chromate water to leak into the environment. When the leaks spill 10 lbs. or more of sodium chromate over a 24-hr period, the leak incidents are classified as Unusual Occurrences (UO) per CERCLA (Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act). The cost of reporting and cleaning up chromate spills prompted High Level Waste Engineering (HLWE) to initiate a study to investigate alternative tank cooling water inhibitor systems and the associated cost of replacement. Several inhibitor systems were investigated as potential alternatives to sodium chromate. All would have a lesser regulatory impact, if a spill occurred. However, the conversion cost is estimated to be $8.5 million over a period of 8 to 12 months to convert all 5 cooling systems. Although each of the alternative inhibitors examined is effective in preventing corrosion, there is no inhibitor identified that is as effective as chromate. Assuming 3 major leaks a year (the average over the past several years), the cost of maintaining the existing inhibitor was estimated at $0.5 million per year. Since there is no economic or regulatory incentive to replace the sodium chromate with an alternate inhibitor, HLWE recommends that sodium chromate continue to be used as the inhibitor for the waste tank cooling systems.

  15. Assessment of Tank 18 Corrosion During Waste Removal

    SciTech Connect

    Zapp, P.E.

    2002-09-13

    High-level waste in Tank 18 is to be suspended and transferred to Tank 7, and Tank 18 is then to be isolated and closed. Tank 18 presently contains sufficient inhibitor concentrations to meet the chemistry limits in PCO (Process Condition for Operation) 2.6.2 of the Corrosion Control Program. The process for the removal of the majority of the waste is specified in the Tank 18 Waste Removal Operating Plan.

  16. Corrosion control in electric power plants; 1992 Frank Newman Speller aware lecture

    SciTech Connect

    Syrett, B.C. )

    1992-08-01

    This paper reports that corrosion of components in power plants costs the US electric power utility industry billions of dollars each year. Through the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI) research and development, several approaches have been developed to reduce these huge costs. They include improved materials selection procedures, coatings, cathodic protection, inhibitors, removal of aggressive species from the environment, and on-line corrosion monitoring. In addition, as part of an on-going technology transfer effort, EPRI is developing databases and expert systems that will help utilities obtain corrosion information and guide them in materials selection and failure analysis.

  17. Inhibition of the corrosion of steel in 1 M HCl by eugenol derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaieb, E.; Bouyanzer, A.; Hammouti, B.; Benkaddour, M.

    2005-06-01

    The effect of eugenol (Eug) and its derivative acetyleugenol (AcEug) extracted from the nail of giroflier on the corrosion of steel in molar hydrochloric acid has been studied using weight loss measurements, electrochemical polarisation and EIS methods. The naturally substances reduce the corrosion rate. The inhibition efficiency was found to increase with acetyleugenol content to attain 91% at 0.1737 g/l. Eugenol compounds act as mixed type inhibitors. The effect of temperature on the corrosion behaviour of steel indicates that inhibition efficiency of the natural substance increases with the rise of temperature. The adsorption of natural product on the steel is found to follow the Langmuir adsorption isotherm.

  18. Corrosion resistance of stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, C.P.

    1995-12-31

    This book reviews the mechanisms and forms of corrosion and examines the corrosion of stainless steels and similar chromium-bearing nickel containing higher alloys, detailing various corrosive environments including atmospheric and fire-side corrosion, corrosion by water and soil, and corrosion caused by particular industrial processes. It provides information on specific groups and grades of stainless steels; summarizes typical applications for specific stainless alloys; describes common corrosion problems associated with stainless steels; presents the acceptable isocorrosion parameters of concentration and temperature for over 250 chemicals for which stainless steels are the preferred materials of construction; discusses product forms and their availability; elucidates fabrication, welding, and joining techniques; and covers the effects of pickling and passivation.

  19. Corrosion potential analysis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, Karl F.

    1998-03-01

    Many cities in the northeastern U.S. transport electrical power from place to place via underground cables, which utilize voltages from 68 kv to 348 kv. These cables are placed in seamless steel pipe to protect the conductors. These buried pipe-type-cables (PTCs) are carefully designed and constantly pressurized with transformer oil to prevent any possible contamination. A protective coating placed on the outside diameter of the pipe during manufacture protects the steel pipe from the soil environment. Notwithstanding the protection mechanisms available, the pipes remain vulnerable to electrochemical corrosion processes. If undetected, corrosion can cause the pipes to leak transformer oil into the environment. These leaks can assume serious proportions due to the constant pressure on the inside of the pipe. A need exists for a detection system that can dynamically monitor the corrosive potential on the length of the pipe and dynamically adjust cathodic protection to counter local and global changes in the cathodic environment surrounding the pipes. The northeastern United States contains approximately 1000 miles of this pipe. This milage is critical to the transportation and distribution of power. So critical, that each of the pipe runs has a redundant double running parallel to it. Invocon, Inc. proposed and tested a technically unique and cost effective solution to detect critical corrosion potential and to communicate that information to a central data collection and analysis location. Invocon's solution utilizes the steel of the casing pipe as a communication medium. Each data gathering station on the pipe can act as a relay for information gathered elsewhere on the pipe. These stations must have 'smart' network configuration algorithms that constantly test various communication paths and determine the best and most power efficient route through which information should flow. Each network station also performs data acquisition and analysis tasks that ultimately

  20. Silica mesoporous thin films as containers for benzotriazole for corrosion protection of 2024 aluminium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recloux, Isaline; Mouanga, Maixent; Druart, Marie-Eve; Paint, Yoann; Olivier, Marie-Georges

    2015-08-01

    This work contributes to the development of a new environmentally friendly alternative pretreatment for 2024 aluminium alloys to replace hexavalent chromium based conversion layers in the aeronautical field. A silica mesoporous thin film, synthesized through the evaporation induced self-assembly process, was doped with benzotriazole to obtain active corrosion protection. Inhibitor loading contents were correlated with pore characteristics. The release kinetics was studied as function of pH. The application of the doped mesoporous film on 2024 aluminium alloy revealed a slowing down of corrosion processes, demonstrating its potential as an active inhibitor storage layer.

  1. Corrosion Inhibition and Adsorption Behavior of Setaria verticillata Leaf Extract in 1M Sulphuric Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthukrishnan, P.; Jeyaprabha, B.; Prakash, P.

    2013-12-01

    Setaria verticillata leaf extract (SVLE) as corrosion inhibitor in 1M H2SO4 was investigated by weight loss techniques and electrochemical techniques at 308-328 K. Inhibition efficiency of SVLE was found to increase with increasing concentration but decreased with temperature. Polarization measurements revealed that SVLE acted as mixed-type inhibitor. Impedance diagrams showed that increasing of SVLE concentration increased charge transfer resistance and decreased double layer capacitance. The adsorption of SVLE on the mild surface obeyed the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Protective film formation against corrosion was confirmed by SEM and FTIR.

  2. Mobile evaporator corrosion test results

    SciTech Connect

    Rozeveld, A.; Chamberlain, D.B.

    1997-05-01

    Laboratory corrosion tests were conducted on eight candidates to select a durable and cost-effective alloy for use in mobile evaporators to process radioactive waste solutions. Based on an extensive literature survey of corrosion data, three stainless steel alloys (304L, 316L, AL-6XN), four nickel-based alloys (825, 625, 690, G-30), and titanium were selected for testing. The corrosion tests included vapor phase, liquid junction (interface), liquid immersion, and crevice corrosion tests on plain and welded samples of candidate materials. Tests were conducted at 80{degrees}C for 45 days in two different test solutions: a nitric acid solution. to simulate evaporator conditions during the processing of the cesium ion-exchange eluant and a highly alkaline sodium hydroxide solution to simulate the composition of Tank 241-AW-101 during evaporation. All of the alloys exhibited excellent corrosion resistance in the alkaline test solution. Corrosion rates were very low and localized corrosion was not observed. Results from the nitric acid tests showed that only 316L stainless steel did not meet our performance criteria. The 316L welded interface and crevice specimens had rates of 22.2 mpy and 21.8 mpy, respectively, which exceeds the maximum corrosion rate of 20 mpy. The other welded samples had about the same corrosion resistance as the plain samples. None of the welded samples showed preferential weld or heat-affected zone (HAZ) attack. Vapor corrosion was negligible for all alloys. All of the alloys except 316L exhibited either {open_quotes}satisfactory{close_quotes} (2-20 mpy) or {open_quotes}excellent{close_quotes} (<2 mpy) corrosion resistance as defined by National Association of Corrosion Engineers. However, many of the alloys experienced intergranular corrosion in the nitric acid test solution, which could indicate a susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in this environment.

  3. Inhibition of acid corrosion of pure aluminum with 5-benzylidine-1-methyl-2-methylthio-imidazole-4-one

    SciTech Connect

    El-Mahdy, G.A.; Mahmoud, S.S.

    1995-06-01

    Inhibition of aluminum corrosion in 0.5 M hydrochloric acid (HCl) solution by 5-benzylidine-1-methyl-2-methylthio-imidazole-4-one was tested using weight loss and polarization resistance measurements. Results of tests for weight loss, polarization resistance, and volume of hydrogen evolution (V{sub HE}) indicated inhibitor efficiency (% P) increased with increasing inhibitor concentration, reaching a maximum inhibiting power of 82.5% at its highest values. The rate of aluminum corrosion increased with temperature in the absence and presence of the inhibitor. The decrease in activation energy and increase in % P in the presence of the inhibitor with increasing temperature were indicative of the chemisorption of inhibitor molecules. The degree of surface coverage increased with increasing temperature and increased linearly with the logarithm of the inhibitor concentration, fitting a Temkin isotherm.

  4. Corrosion in a temperature gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; White, M.L.

    2003-01-01

    High temperature corrosion limits the operation of equipment used in the Power Generation Industry. Some of the more destructive corrosive attack occurs on the surfaces of heat exchangers, boilers, and turbines where the alloys are subjected to large temperature gradients that cause a high heat flux through the accumulated ash, the corrosion product, and the alloy. Most current and past corrosion research has, however, been conducted under isothermal conditions. Research on the thermal-gradient-affected corrosion of various metals and alloys is currently being studied at the Albany Research Center’s SECERF (Severe Environment Corrosion and Erosion Research Facility) laboratory. The purpose of this research is to verify theoretical models of heat flux effects on corrosion and to quantify the differences between isothermal and thermal gradient corrosion effects. The effect of a temperature gradient and the resulting heat flux on corrosion of alloys with protective oxide scales is being examined by studying point defect diffusion and corrosion rates. Fick’s first law of diffusion was expanded, using irreversible thermodynamics, to include a heat flux term – a Soret effect. Oxide growth rates are being measured for the high temperature corrosion of cobalt at a metal surface temperature of 900ºC. Corrosion rates are also being determined for the high temperature corrosion of carbon steel boiler tubes in a simulated waste combustion environment consisting of O2, CO2, N2, and water vapor. Tests are being conducted both isothermally and in the presence of a temperature gradient to verify the effects of a heat flux and to compare to isothermal oxidation.

  5. Autophagy inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pasquier, Benoit

    2016-03-01

    Autophagy is a lysosome-dependent mechanism of intracellular degradation. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this process are highly complex and involve multiple proteins, including the kinases ULK1 and Vps34. The main function of autophagy is the maintenance of cell survival when modifications occur in the cellular environment. During the past decade, extensive studies have greatly improved our knowledge and autophagy has exploded as a research field. This process is now widely implicated in pathophysiological processes such as cancer, metabolic, and neurodegenerative disorders, making it an attractive target for drug discovery. In this review, we will summarize the different types of inhibitors that affect the autophagy machinery and provide some potential therapeutic perspectives. PMID:26658914

  6. An Investigation of Tendon Corrosion-Inhibitor Leakage into Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Costello, J.F.; Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.

    1999-07-05

    During inspections performed at US nuclear power plants several years ago, some of the prestressed concrete containment had experienced leakage of the tendon sheathing filler. A study was conducted to indicate the extent of the leakage into the concrete and its potential effects on concrete properties. Concrete core samples were obtained from the Trojan Nuclear Plant. Examination and testing of the core samples indicated that the appearance of tendon sheathing filler on the surface was due to leakage of the filler from the conduits and its subsequent migration to the concrete surface through cracks that were present. Migration of the tendon sheathing filler was confined to the cracks with no perceptible movement into the concrete. Results of compressive strength tests indicated that the concrete quality was consistent in the containment and that the strength had increased relative to the strength at 28 days age.

  7. Corrosion guard tubing nipple

    SciTech Connect

    Guy, W.E.

    1988-09-27

    This patent describes the process of placing a string of tubing in an oil field well; a. the string of tubing when placed extending from the surface of the earth to an oil bearing formation far below the surface, b. the string made from i. a plurality of tubing sections, ii. each section having external threads on each end, and iii. cuffs with internal threads coupling the tubing sections together, c. each of the tubing sections having i. an axis, ii. a wall thickness, and iii. a corrosion resistant coating on its inside bore; wherein the improved method comprises: d. placing a section of tubing into the well with a cuff attached to the upper end at the surface of the earth, e. dropping a corrosion resistant nipple into the cuff, f. the nipple being loose in the cuff, g. attaching an additional section of tubing onto the cuff, and h. screwing the additional section tightly to the cuff.

  8. Corrosion studies with pixe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar Chaudhri, M.; Crawford, A.

    1981-03-01

    To investigate the possible causes of corrosion of some of the tooth paste tubes of a major international cosmetic product manufacturer, the elemental compositions of corroded and clean unused tubes were compared, using PIXE. It was observed that some of the corroded tubes contained much higher amounts of Ti, Fe, Ga and Zn than the clean tubes, while the concentrations of Cr and Ni showed no significant difference between the two types of tubes. Only certain regions of one of the tubes were found to contain higher concentrations of Cu. Those regions were badly corroded and had the highest concentrations of Ti, Fe, Ga and Zn, too. It is suggested that the presence of higher amounts of Ti, Fe, Ga and Zn, and especially of Cu, in the aluminium sheets used to manufacture the tooth paste tubes, may be one of the reasons for the corrosion of some of the tooth paste tubes.

  9. CORROSION PROTECTION OF ALUMINUM

    DOEpatents

    Dalrymple, R.S.; Nelson, W.B.

    1963-07-01

    Treatment of aluminum-base metal surfaces in an autoclave with an aqueous chromic acid solution of 0.5 to 3% by weight and of pH below 2 for 20 to 50 hrs at 160 to 180 deg C produces an extremely corrosion-resistant aluminum oxidechromium film on the surface. A chromic acid concentration of 1 to 2% and a pH of about 1 are preferred. (D.C.W.)

  10. Corrosion Protection of Aluminum

    DOEpatents

    Dalrymple, R. S.; Nelson, W. B.

    1963-07-01

    Treatment of aluminum-base metal surfaces in an autoclave with an aqueous chromic acid solution of 0.5 to 3% by weight and of pH below 2 for 20 to 50 hrs at 160 to 180 deg C produces an extremely corrosion-resistant aluminum oxidechromium film on the surface. A chromic acid concentration of 1 to 2% and a pH of about 1 are preferred.

  11. Corrosion resistant coating

    DOEpatents

    Wrobleski, Debra A.; Benicewicz, Brian C.; Thompson, Karen G.; Bryan, Coleman J.

    1997-01-01

    A method of protecting a metal substrate from corrosion including coating a metal substrate of, e.g., steel, iron or aluminum, with a conductive polymer layer of, e.g., polyaniline, coating upon said metal substrate, and coating the conductive polymer-coated metal substrate with a layer of a topcoat upon the conductive polymer coating layer, is provided, together with the resultant coated article from said method.

  12. Corrosive resistant heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Richlen, Scott L.

    1989-01-01

    A corrosive and errosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is conveyed through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium.

  13. Stress Corrosion Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Advanced testing of structural materials was developed by Lewis Research Center and Langley Research Center working with the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). Under contract, Aluminum Company of America (Alcoa) conducted a study for evaluating stress corrosion cracking, and recommended the "breaking load" method which determines fracture strengths as well as measuring environmental degradation. Alcoa and Langley plan to submit the procedure to ASTM as a new testing method.

  14. Papering Over Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center's battle against corrosion led to a new coating that was licensed to GeoTech and is commercially sold as Catize. The coating uses ligno sulfonic acid doped polyaniline (Ligno-Pani), also known as synthetic metal. Ligno-Pani can be used to extend the operating lives of steel bridges as one example of its applications. future applications include computers, televisions, cellular phones, conductive inks, and stealth technology.

  15. Corrosion resistant coating

    DOEpatents

    Wrobleski, D.A.; Benicewicz, B.C.; Thompson, K.G.; Bryan, C.J.

    1997-08-19

    A method of protecting a metal substrate from corrosion including coating a metal substrate of, e.g., steel, iron or aluminum, with a conductive polymer layer of, e.g., polyaniline, coating upon said metal substrate, and coating the conductive polymer-coated metal substrate with a layer of a topcoat upon the conductive polymer coating layer, is provided, together with the resultant coated article from said method.

  16. Corrosion in supercritical fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Propp, W.A.; Carleson, T.E.; Wai, Chen M.; Taylor, P.R.; Daehling, K.W.; Huang, Shaoping; Abdel-Latif, M.

    1996-05-01

    Integrated studies were carried out in the areas of corrosion, thermodynamic modeling, and electrochemistry under pressure and temperature conditions appropriate for potential applications of supercritical fluid (SCF) extractive metallurgy. Carbon dioxide and water were the primary fluids studied. Modifiers were used in some tests; these consisted of 1 wt% water and 10 wt% methanol for carbon dioxide and of sulfuric acid, sodium sulfate, ammonium sulfate, and ammonium nitrate at concentrations ranging from 0.00517 to 0.010 M for the aqueous fluids. The materials studied were Types 304 and 316 (UNS S30400 and S31600) stainless steel, iron, and AISI-SAE 1080 (UNS G10800) carbon steel. The thermodynamic modeling consisted of development of a personal computer-based program for generating Pourbaix diagrams at supercritical conditions in aqueous systems. As part of the model, a general method for extrapolating entropies and related thermodynamic properties from ambient to SCF conditions was developed. The experimental work was used as a tool to evaluate the predictions of the model for these systems. The model predicted a general loss of passivation in iron-based alloys at SCF conditions that was consistent with experimentally measured corrosion rates and open circuit potentials. For carbon-dioxide-based SCFs, measured corrosion rates were low, indicating that carbon steel would be suitable for use with unmodified carbon dioxide, while Type 304 stainless steel would be suitable for use with water or methanol as modifiers.

  17. Corrosion detection by induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roddenberry, Joshua L.

    Bridges in Florida are exposed to high amounts of humidity due to the state's geography. This excess moisture results in a high incidence of corrosion on the bridge's steel support cables. Also, the inclusion of ineffective waterproofing has resulted in additional corrosion. As this corrosion increases, the steel cables, responsible for maintaining bridge integrity, deteriorate and eventually break. If enough of these cables break, the bridge will experience a catastrophic failure resulting in collapse. Repairing and replacing these cables is very expensive and only increases with further damage. As each of the cables is steel, they have strong conductive properties. By inducing a current along each group of cables and measuring its dissipation over distance, a picture of structural integrity can be determined. The purpose of this thesis is to prove the effectiveness of using electromagnetic techniques to determine cable integrity. By comparing known conductive values (determined in a lab setting) to actual bridge values, the tester will be able to determine the location and severity of any damage, if present.

  18. [Microbial corrosion of dental alloy].

    PubMed

    Li, Lele; Liu, Li

    2004-10-01

    There is a very complicated electrolytical environment in oral cavity with plenty of microorganisms existing there. Various forms of corrosion would develop when metallic prosthesis functions in mouth. One important corrosive form is microbial corrosion. The metabolic products, including organic acid and inorganic acid, will affect the pH of the surface or interface of metallic prosthesis and make a change in composition of the medium, thus influencing the electron-chemical reaction and promoting the development of corrosion. The problem of develpoment of microbial corrosion on dental alloy in the oral environment lies in the primary condition that the bacteria adhere to the surface of alloy and form a relatively independent environment that promotes corrosion. PMID:15553877

  19. Chemical corrosion potential in boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Bairr, D.L.; McDonough, C.J.

    1998-12-31

    Misuse or abuse of chelants has long been recognized as a potential corrosion problem in boilers. In recent years all polymer chemical treatment programs have been introduced and although they are much more benign even all polymer programs must be properly designed and controlled. Under extreme conditions a similar corrosion potential exists. This paper discusses the potential for chelant or polymer corrosion in boilers and the proper safeguards. Case histories are presented.

  20. Accelerated Stress-Corrosion Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Test procedures for accelerated stress-corrosion testing of high-strength aluminum alloys faster and provide more quantitative information than traditional pass/fail tests. Method uses data from tests on specimen sets exposed to corrosive environment at several levels of applied static tensile stress for selected exposure times then subsequently tensile tested to failure. Method potentially applicable to other degrading phenomena (such as fatigue, corrosion fatigue, fretting, wear, and creep) that promote development and growth of cracklike flaws within material.

  1. 49 CFR 172.558 - CORROSIVE placard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SECURITY PLANS Placarding § 172.558 CORROSIVE placard. (a) Except for size and color, the CORROSIVE placard... the CORROSIVE placard must be black in the lower portion with a white triangle in the upper...

  2. 49 CFR 172.558 - CORROSIVE placard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SECURITY PLANS Placarding § 172.558 CORROSIVE placard. (a) Except for size and color, the CORROSIVE placard... the CORROSIVE placard must be black in the lower portion with a white triangle in the upper...

  3. A study of the effects of phosphates on copper corrosion in drinking water: Copper release, electrochemical, and surface analysis approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Young C.

    The following work is the study to evaluate the impact of corrosion inhibitors on the copper metal in drinking water and to investigate the corrosion mechanism in the presence and absence of inhibitors. Electrochemical experiments were conducted to understand the effect of specific corrosion inhibitors in synthetic drinking water which was prepared with controlled specific water quality parameters. Water chemistry was studied by Inductively Coupled Plasma--Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP--AES) to investigate the copper leaching rate with time. Surface morphology, crystallinity of corrosion products, copper oxidation status, and surface composition were characterized by various solid surface analysis methods, such as Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy--Dispersive Spectrometry (SEM/EDS), Grazing-Incidence-angle X-ray Diffraction (GIXRD), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), and Time-of-Flight Secondary Ions Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). The purpose of the first set of experiments was to test various electrochemical techniques for copper corrosion for short term before studying a long term loop system. Surface analysis techniques were carried out to identify and study the corrosion products that form on the fresh copper metal surface when copper coupons were exposed to test solutions for 2 days of experiments time. The second phase of experiments was conducted with a copper pipe loop system in a synthetic tap water over an extended period of time, i.e., 4 months. Copper release and electrochemically measured corrosion activity profiles were monitored carefully with and without corrosion inhibitor, polyphosphate. A correlation between the copper released into the solution and the electrochemically measured corrosion activities was also attempted. To investigate corrosion products on the copper pipe samples, various surface analysis techniques were applied in this study. Especially, static mass spectra acquisition and element distribution mapping were carried out

  4. Use of polyamide 11 in corrosive applications

    SciTech Connect

    Vasselin, T.P.

    1997-08-01

    The industry has relied upon Polyamide 11 (PA 11) for use in the offshore, natural gas distribution, automotive and industrial markets for the past 30 years. Its hydrocarbon resistance is among the best in the industry. As a result, the resin use in the following applications has expanded:offshore flexible pipe liners, natural gas pipe and fittings system, high pressure hydraulic hose and offshore umbilicals for corrosion inhibitors injection. New applications have been developed: (1) PA 11 liner inserted into a corroded steel pipe; it has been successfully used at temperatures up to 85 C where high density polyethylene (HDPE) could not perform; (2) PA 11 for distribution of natural gas in the pressure range of 0.69 Mpa to 1.72 Mpa.

  5. Inhibitors, cladded trees protect sour gas wells in Abu Dhabi

    SciTech Connect

    Morsi, K.M. )

    1994-06-13

    Continuous chemical inhibition has prevented corrosion downhole, and tests indicate that Inconel 625 cladding will protect the christmas trees on wells producing sour gas from the Thamama C reservoir. Metallic corrosion is a costly problem. Estimates indicate that corrosion costs the oil industry several billion dollars per year. In addition, oil companies spend over $100 million/year on corrosion inhibitors for combating downhole tubular and casing corrosion. Abu Dhabi National Oil Co. (Adnoc) has successfully completed wells in extremely harsh operating conditions with high temperatures, pressures, and high concentrations of H[sub 2]S, CO[sub 2], and brine. Such environments require special materials for downhole and surface equipment. The Thamama C reservoir, in an onshore gas field, produces gas containing H[sub 2]S and CO[sub 2] in the range of 0.7--8.0 mole % and 4.0--8.0 mole %, respectively. The Thamama C gas-gathering system comprises 19 wells connected to four trunk lines that transport produced gas and associated condensate to a central processing plant. The paper discusses material and inhibitor selection.

  6. Corrosion and fatigue of surgical implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisagor, W. B.

    1975-01-01

    Implants for the treatment of femoral fractures, mechanisms leading to the failure or degradation of such structures, and current perspectives on surgical implants are discussed. Under the first heading, general usage, materials and procedures, environmental conditions, and laboratory analyses of implants after service are considered. Corrosion, crevice corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, intergranular corrosion, pitting corrosion, fatigue, and corrosion fatigue are the principal degradation mechanisms described. The need for improvement in the reliability of implants is emphasized.

  7. Mitigation of Corrosion on Magnesium Alloy by Predesigned Surface Corrosion

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuming; Wu, Guosong; Peng, Xiang; Li, Limin; Feng, Hongqing; Gao, Biao; Huo, Kaifu; Chu, Paul K.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid corrosion of magnesium alloys is undesirable in structural and biomedical applications and a general way to control corrosion is to form a surface barrier layer isolating the bulk materials from the external environment. Herein, based on the insights gained from the anticorrosion behavior of corrosion products, a special way to mitigate aqueous corrosion is described. The concept is based on pre-corrosion by a hydrothermal treatment of Al-enriched Mg alloys in water. A uniform surface composed of an inner compact layer and top Mg-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) microsheet is produced on a large area using a one-step process and excellent corrosion resistance is achieved in saline solutions. Moreover, inspired by the super-hydrophobic phenomenon in nature such as the lotus leaves effect, the orientation of the top microsheet layer is tailored by adjusting the hydrothermal temperature, time, and pH to produce a water-repellent surface after modification with fluorinated silane. As a result of the trapped air pockets in the microstructure, the super-hydrophobic surface with the Cassie state shows better corrosion resistance in the immersion tests. The results reveal an economical and environmentally friendly means to control and use the pre-corrosion products on magnesium alloys. PMID:26615896

  8. CURRENT CORROSION BY-PRODUCTS AND CORROSION CONTROL RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    USEPA research in the area of corrosion control consists of a combination of in-house research and extramural projects. he extramural projects have recently addressed the corrosion of solder in some Long Island water supplies, impacts of municipal ion-exchange softening on corros...

  9. Monitoring power plant fireside corrosion using corrosion probes

    SciTech Connect

    Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.

    2005-01-01

    The ability to monitor the corrosion degradation of key components in fossil fuel power plants is of utmost importance for Futuregen and ultra-supercritical power plants. Fireside corrosion occurs in the high temperature sections of energy production facilities due to a number of factors: ash deposition, coal composition, thermal gradients, and low NOx conditions, among others. Problems occur when equipment designed for either oxidizing or reducing conditions is exposed to alternating oxidizing and reducing conditions. This can happen especially near the burners. The use of low NOx burners is becoming more commonplace and can produce reducing environments that accelerate corrosion. One method of addressing corrosion of these surfaces is the use of corrosion probes to monitor when process changes cause corrosive conditions. In such a case, corrosion rate could become a process control variable that directs the operation of a coal combustion or coal gasification system. Alternatively, corrosion probes could be used to provide an indication of total metal damage and thus a tool to schedule planned maintenance outages.

  10. Mitigation of Corrosion on Magnesium Alloy by Predesigned Surface Corrosion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuming; Wu, Guosong; Peng, Xiang; Li, Limin; Feng, Hongqing; Gao, Biao; Huo, Kaifu; Chu, Paul K

    2015-01-01

    Rapid corrosion of magnesium alloys is undesirable in structural and biomedical applications and a general way to control corrosion is to form a surface barrier layer isolating the bulk materials from the external environment. Herein, based on the insights gained from the anticorrosion behavior of corrosion products, a special way to mitigate aqueous corrosion is described. The concept is based on pre-corrosion by a hydrothermal treatment of Al-enriched Mg alloys in water. A uniform surface composed of an inner compact layer and top Mg-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) microsheet is produced on a large area using a one-step process and excellent corrosion resistance is achieved in saline solutions. Moreover, inspired by the super-hydrophobic phenomenon in nature such as the lotus leaves effect, the orientation of the top microsheet layer is tailored by adjusting the hydrothermal temperature, time, and pH to produce a water-repellent surface after modification with fluorinated silane. As a result of the trapped air pockets in the microstructure, the super-hydrophobic surface with the Cassie state shows better corrosion resistance in the immersion tests. The results reveal an economical and environmentally friendly means to control and use the pre-corrosion products on magnesium alloys. PMID:26615896

  11. Mitigation of Corrosion on Magnesium Alloy by Predesigned Surface Corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuming; Wu, Guosong; Peng, Xiang; Li, Limin; Feng, Hongqing; Gao, Biao; Huo, Kaifu; Chu, Paul K.

    2015-11-01

    Rapid corrosion of magnesium alloys is undesirable in structural and biomedical applications and a general way to control corrosion is to form a surface barrier layer isolating the bulk materials from the external environment. Herein, based on the insights gained from the anticorrosion behavior of corrosion products, a special way to mitigate aqueous corrosion is described. The concept is based on pre-corrosion by a hydrothermal treatment of Al-enriched Mg alloys in water. A uniform surface composed of an inner compact layer and top Mg-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) microsheet is produced on a large area using a one-step process and excellent corrosion resistance is achieved in saline solutions. Moreover, inspired by the super-hydrophobic phenomenon in nature such as the lotus leaves effect, the orientation of the top microsheet layer is tailored by adjusting the hydrothermal temperature, time, and pH to produce a water-repellent surface after modification with fluorinated silane. As a result of the trapped air pockets in the microstructure, the super-hydrophobic surface with the Cassie state shows better corrosion resistance in the immersion tests. The results reveal an economical and environmentally friendly means to control and use the pre-corrosion products on magnesium alloys.

  12. Microbial corrosion of stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Ibars, J R; Moreno, D A; Ranninger, C

    1992-11-01

    Stainless steel, developed because of their greater resistance to corrosion in different aggressive environments, have proved to be affected, however, by various processes and types of corrosion. Some of these types of corrosion, mainly pitting, is activated and developed in the presence of microorganisms, which acting in an isolated or symbiotic way, according to their adaptation to the environment, create a favorable situation for the corrosion of these steel. The microorganisms that are involved, mainly bacteria of both the aerobic and anaerobic type, modify the environment where the stainless steel is found, creating crevices, differential aeration zones or a more aggressive environment with the presence of metabolites. In these circumstances, a local break of the passive and passivating layer is produced, which is proper to these types of steel and impedes the repassivation that is more favorable to corrosion. In the study and research of these types of microbiologically influenced corrosion are found electrochemical techniques, since corrosion is fundamentally an electrochemical process, and microbiological techniques for the identification, culture, and evaluation of the microorganisms involved in the process, as well as in the laboratory or field study of microorganism-metal pairs. Microstructural characterization studies of stainless steel have also been considered important, since it is known that the microstructure of steel can substantially modify their behavior when faced with corrosion. As for surface analysis studies, it is known that corrosion is a process that is generated on and progresses from the surface. The ways of dealing with microbiologically influenced corrosion must necessarily include biocides, which are not always usable or successful, the design of industrial equipment or components that do not favor the adherence of microorganisms, using microstructures in steel less sensitive to corrosion, or protecting the materials. PMID:1492953

  13. Metal corrosion coupon contamination, corrosion study design, and interpretation problems

    SciTech Connect

    Lytle, D.A.; Schock, M.R.; Tackett, S.

    1992-01-01

    As a result of the new Lead and Copper Rule, some water utilities in the United States have begun or will soon begin corrosion demonstration studies. Demonstration studies may include pipe rig/loop tests, metal coupon tests, and partial-system tests (full-scale). Evaluation of corrosion control treatment through testing may be accomplished by weight loss measurement, metal leaching, corrosion rate, or coupon surface inspection techniques. The purpose of the paper is to (1) briefly introduce 2 corrosion control studies being conducted at the EPA Research Facility, (2) discuss design and operational problems and considerations associated with each of the studies, and (3) present solutions to the problems. The experiences related to the paper may provide useful and time-saving insights into the design, operation, and interpretation of corrosion control studies to water utilities and suppliers.

  14. Application of x-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of corrosion and inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Davenport, A.J.; Isaacs, H.S.

    1991-01-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy is a powerful technique for determination of valency and coordination. Measurements can be made in air or in situ under electrochemical control. The technique will be described and its application to the analysis of passive oxide films, corrosion products, and inhibitors will be reviewed.

  15. Inhibition of iron corrosion in 0.5 M sulphuric acid by metal cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathiyanarayanan, S.; Jeyaprabha, C.; Muralidharan, S.; Venkatachari, G.

    2006-09-01

    Corrosion inhibitors are widely used in acid solutions during pickling and descaling. Mostly organic compounds containing N, O, and S groups are employed as inhibitors. In this study, the inhibition performance of metal cations such as Zn 2+, Mn 2+ and Ce 4+ ions in the concentration range 1-10 × 10 -3 M has been found out. The corrosion behaviour of iron in 0.5 M H 2SO 4 in the presence of metal cations is studied using polarization and impedance methods. It is found that the addition of these metal cations inhibits the corrosion markedly. The inhibition effect is in the following order Ce 4+ ≫ Mn 2+ > Zn 2+.

  16. Inhibitory properties of ocean vegetation products in the corrosion of steel

    SciTech Connect

    Popelyukh, G.M.; Talavira, L.I.

    1988-05-01

    The inhibitory properties of byproducts from the processing of Black Sea red algae Phyllophora nervosa were investigated in solutions of sulfuric and nitric acids, tap water, and sea water. Corrosion tests were conducted gravimetrically on St3, St40, and St60 steels, and on titanium alloy VT-1. Inhibitor effectiveness was measured by corrosion rate, the inhibition coefficient, and the extent of protection. A complete factor matrix was taken. Experimental results were expressed as a partial quadratic equation. The behavior of iron ions in the corrosion process was assessed. Tests established that the byproducts, referred to as inhibitor IFKhI, can be used in steel pickling treatments in sulfuric acid solutions over a wide temperature range.

  17. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of Waste Package Outer Barrier

    SciTech Connect

    K.G. Mon

    2004-10-01

    The waste package design for the License Application is a double-wall waste package underneath a protective drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169480]). The purpose and scope of this model report is to document models for general and localized corrosion of the waste package outer barrier (WPOB) to be used in evaluating waste package performance. The WPOB is constructed of Alloy 22 (UNS N06022), a highly corrosion-resistant nickel-based alloy. The inner vessel of the waste package is constructed of Stainless Steel Type 316 (UNS S31600). Before it fails, the Alloy 22 WPOB protects the Stainless Steel Type 316 inner vessel from exposure to the external environment and any significant degradation. The Stainless Steel Type 316 inner vessel provides structural stability to the thinner Alloy 22 WPOB. Although the waste package inner vessel would also provide some performance for waste containment and potentially decrease the rate of radionuclide transport after WPOB breach before it fails, the potential performance of the inner vessel is far less than that of the more corrosion-resistant Alloy 22 WPOB. For this reason, the corrosion performance of the waste package inner vessel is conservatively ignored in this report and the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA). Treatment of seismic and igneous events and their consequences on waste package outer barrier performance are not specifically discussed in this report, although the general and localized corrosion models developed in this report are suitable for use in these scenarios. The localized corrosion processes considered in this report are pitting corrosion and crevice corrosion. Stress corrosion cracking is discussed in ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]).

  18. Corrosion of Ceramic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1999-01-01

    Non-oxide ceramics are promising materials for a range of high temperature applications. Selected current and future applications are listed. In all such applications, the ceramics are exposed to high temperature gases. Therefore it is critical to understand the response of these materials to their environment. The variables to be considered here include both the type of ceramic and the environment to which it is exposed. Non-oxide ceramics include borides, nitrides, and carbides. Most high temperature corrosion environments contain oxygen and hence the emphasis of this chapter will be on oxidation processes.

  19. INHIBITION OF CORROSION

    DOEpatents

    Atherton, J.E. Jr.; Gurinsky, D.H.

    1958-06-24

    A method is described for preventing corrosion of metallic container materials by a high-temperature liquid bismuth flowing therein. The method comprises fabricating the containment means from a steel which contains between 2 and 12% chromium, between 0.5 and 1.5% of either molybdenum and silicon, and a minimum of nickel and manganese, and maintaining zirconium dissolved in the liquid bismuth at a concentration between 50 parts per million and its saturation value at the lowest temperature in the system.

  20. Vacuum Ampoule Isolates Corrosive Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouch, R. K.; Debnam, W. J.; Taylor, R.

    1983-01-01

    Quartz vacuum ampoule confines corrosive sample wafer between two quartz plugs inserted in quartz tube. One quartz plug is window for measuring sample thermodynamic properties while laser pulse entering other quartz plug heats sample to molten state. Confinement of sample in vacuum prevents contamination of measurement system by hot corrosive vapors and any interference by preferential evaporation of melt.

  1. Atlas 5013 tank corrosion test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutherland, W. M.; Girton, L. D.; Treadway, D. G.

    1978-01-01

    The type and cause of corrosion in spot welded joints were determined by X-ray and chemical analysis. Fatigue and static tests showed the degree of degradation of mechanical properties. The corrosion inhibiting effectiveness of WD-40 compound and required renewal period by exposing typical joint specimens were examined.

  2. INTERNAL CORROSION AND DEPOSITION CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Corrosion is one of the most important problems in the drinking water industry. It can affect public health, public acceptance of a water supply, and the cost of providing safe water. Deterioration of materials resulting from corrosion can necessitate huge yearly expenditures o...

  3. Corrosion beneath disbonded pipeline coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.A.; Thompson, N.G.

    1997-04-01

    The relationship between coatings, cathodic protection (CP), and external corrosion of underground pipelines is described. Historically, this problem has been addressed by focusing on the corrosion and CP processes associated with holidays, e.g., coating disbondment and CP current flow within the disbonded region. These issues and those associated with disbonded areas distant from holidays are also discussed.

  4. DPC materials and corrosion environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Ilgen, Anastasia Gennadyevna; Bryan, Charles R.; Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie; Hardin, Ernest; Clarity, J.

    2014-10-01

    After an exposition of the materials used in DPCs and the factors controlling material corrosion in disposal environments, a survey is given of the corrosion rates, mechanisms, and products for commonly used stainless steels. Research needs are then identified for predicting stability of DPC materials in disposal environments. Stainless steel corrosion rates may be low enough to sustain DPC basket structural integrity for performance periods of as long as 10,000 years, especially in reducing conditions. Uncertainties include basket component design, disposal environment conditions, and the in-package chemical environment including any localized effects from radiolysis. Prospective disposal overpack materials exist for most disposal environments, including both corrosion allowance and corrosion resistant materials. Whereas the behavior of corrosion allowance materials is understood for a wide range of corrosion environments, demonstrating corrosion resistance could be more technically challenging and require environment-specific testing. A preliminary screening of the existing inventory of DPCs and other types of canisters is described, according to the type of closure, whether they can be readily transported, and what types of materials are used in basket construction.

  5. Corrosion of Titanium Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Covino, B.S., Jr.; Alman, D.E.

    2002-09-22

    The corrosion behavior of unalloyed Ti and titanium matrix composites containing up to 20 vol% of TiC or TiB{sub 2} was determined in deaerated 2 wt% HCl at 50, 70, and 90 degrees C. Corrosion rates were calculated from corrosion currents determined by extrapolation of the tafel slopes. All curves exhibited active-passive behavior but no transpassive region. Corrosion rates for Ti + TiC composites were similar to those for unalloyed Ti except at 90 degrees C where the composites were slightly higher. Corrosion rates for Ti + TiB{sub 2} composites were generally higher than those for unalloyed Ti and increased with higher concentrations of TiB{sub 2}. XRD and SEM-EDS analyses showed that the TiC reinforcement did not react with the Ti matrix during fabrication while the TiB{sub 2} reacted to form a TiB phase.

  6. Corrosion of graphite/aluminum metal-matrix composites. Technical report, 1 Mar-31 Dec 90

    SciTech Connect

    Buonanno, M.A.; Latanision, R.M.; Hihara, L.H.; Chiang, J.F.

    1991-02-01

    Several commercial G/Al MMCs have been studied by potentiodynamic polarization in deaerated 0.5 M Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The results have been compared with those which were predicted by the mixed electrode theory. The results indicate that processing conditions, especially the cooling rate, had a strong influence on the corrosion behavior of the G/Al MMCs. Large scale G/Al model MMCs were fabricated at MIT in order to study the corrosion behavior of G/Al galvanic couples with the scanning potential microprobe (SPM). Preliminary results indicate that coating graphite with discontinuous alumina did not reduce the corrosion rate of the G/Al galvanic couple. Ion implanting the surface of G/Al model MMCs with zinc, a cathodic inhibitor, did reduce the corrosion G/Al galvanic couple; however, the protection was incomplete.

  7. Influence of temperature on corrosion inhibition for carbon steel by rice straw extract in HCl solution: Synergistic effect of cationic surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulkafli, Rabiahtul; Othman, Norinsan Kamil; Jalar, Azman

    2013-11-01

    The corrosion inhibitive effects of rice straw extract (RSE) for carbon steel in 1 M HCl solution was investigated. Weight loss method and potentiodynamic polarization was used to study the inhibition efficiency of cationic surfactant, benzalkonium chloride (BKC) additives into rice straw extract corrosion inhibitor. Inhibition efficiency was determined by comparing the inhibition efficiency in the absence and presence of additives. The corrosion inhibition efficiency was found to increase with surfactant concentration and decreased with increasing temperature which is due to the fact that, the rate of carbon steel corrosion was higher than the rate of adsorption of inhibitor molecules. The inhibiting action of the rice straw extract was considerably enhanced by the addition of cationic surfactant. The results obtained from weight loss analysis are in direct agreement with tafel polarization studies. Tafel polarization data indicated that a combination of RSE and BKC acts as a mixed - type inhibitor.

  8. Naval electrochemical corrosion reducer

    DOEpatents

    Clark, Howard L.

    1991-10-01

    A corrosion reducer for use with ships having a hull, a propeller mounted a propeller shaft and extending through the hull, bearings supporting the shaft, at least one thrust bearing and one seal. The improvement includes a current collector and a current reduction assembly for reducing the voltage between the hull and shaft in order to reduce corrosion due to electrolytic action. The current reduction assembly includes an electrical contact, the current collector, and the hull. The current reduction assembly further includes a device for sensing and measuring the voltage between the hull and the shaft and a device for applying a reverse voltage between the hull and the shaft so that the resulting voltage differential is from 0 to 0.05 volts. The current reduction assembly further includes a differential amplifier having a voltage differential between the hull and the shaft. The current reduction assembly further includes an amplifier and a power output circuit receiving signals from the differential amplifier and being supplied by at least one current supply. The current selector includes a brush assembly in contact with a slip ring over the shaft so that its potential may be applied to the differential amplifier.

  9. IN DRIFT CORROSION PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect

    D.M. Jolley

    1999-12-02

    As directed by a written development plan (CRWMS M&O 1999a), a conceptual model for steel and corrosion products in the engineered barrier system (EBS) is to be developed. The purpose of this conceptual model is to assist Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and its Engineered Barrier Performance Department in modeling the geochemical environment within a repository drift, thus allowing PAO to provide a more detailed and complete in-drift geochemical model abstraction and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near-Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). This document provides the conceptual framework for the in-drift corrosion products sub-model to be used in subsequent PAO analyses including the EBS physical and chemical model abstraction effort. This model has been developed to serve as a basis for the in-drift geochemical analyses performed by PAO. However, the concepts discussed within this report may also apply to some near and far-field geochemical processes and may have conceptual application within the unsaturated zone (UZ) and saturated zone (SZ) transport modeling efforts.

  10. Study of corrosion in multimetallic systems. Task 2 of solar collector studies for solar heating and cooling applications. Final technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Diegle, R B

    1980-04-11

    Corrosion measurements were made on candidate alloys of construction for non-concentrating solar collectors under simulated conditions of collector operation. Materials evaluated were aluminum alloys 1100, 3003, and 6061, copper alloy 122, Type 444 stainless steel, and 1018 plain carbon steel. The solutions used were equivolume mixtures of ethylene glycol and water, and propylene glycol and water. They were used without corrosion inhibitors but with addition of chloride, sulfate, and bicarbonate ions. The influences of dissolved oxygen, solution flow velocity, and heat transfer were evaluated. Corrosion morphologies investigated were general attack, pitting, crevice corrosion, and galvanic corrosion. Experimental results indicated that aluminum alloys can experience severe pitting and crevice corrosion at chloride concentrations approaching 50 ppM. The corrosion rate of copper exceeded about 100 ..mu..m/yr in ethylene glycol solutions and about 80 ..mu..m/yr in propylene glycol solutions. Crevice corrosion was not observed for copper, but severe galvanic corrosion occurred when it was coupled to T444 stainless steel. T444 steel corroded at rates of less than 1 ..mu..m/yr under all exposure conditions. During circulation at 100 C in the presence of air, ethylene glycol solutions acidified because of degradation of the glycol. The initial pH of propylene glycol solutions was already low, about 4.5. The inherent corrosivity of propylene glycol was somewhat less than that of ethylene glycol, although this difference was usually less than a factor of two in measured corrosion rates. It was concluded that he corrosion rates of aluminum alloys and copper were prohibitively high in uninhibited glycol solutions, and that corrosion inhibitors are definitely necessary in operating systems.

  11. Influence of poly(aminoquinone) on corrosion inhibition of iron in acid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeyaprabha, C.; Sathiyanarayanan, S.; Phani, K. L. N.; Venkatachari, G.

    2005-11-01

    The inhibitor performance of chemically synthesized water soluble poly(aminoquinone) (PAQ) on iron corrosion in 0.5 M sulphuric acid was studied in relation to inhibitor concentration using potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements. On comparing the inhibition performance of PAQ with that of the monomer o-phenylenediamine (OPD), the OPD gave an efficiency of 80% for 1000 ppm while it was 90% for 100 ppm of PAQ. PAQ was found to be a mixed inhibitor. Besides, PAQ was able to improve the passivation tendency of iron in 0.5 M H 2SO 4 markedly.

  12. Impact of chlorinated disinfection on copper corrosion in hot water systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes, J. Castillo; Hamdani, F.; Creus, J.; Touzain, S.; Correc, O.

    2014-09-01

    In France, hot water quality control inside buildings is occasionally ensured by disinfection treatments using temperature increases or addition of sodium hypochlorite (between 0.5 ppm and 1 ppm residual free chlorine). This disinfectant is a strong oxidiser and it could interact with metallic pipes usually used in hot water systems. This work deals with the study of the impact of these treatments on the durability of copper pipes. The objective of this work was to investigate the influence of sodium hypochlorite concentration and temperature on the copper corrosion mechanism. Copper samples were tested under dynamic and static conditions of ageing with sodium hypochlorite solutions ranging from 0 to 100 ppm with temperature at 50 °C and 70 °C. The efficiency of a corrosion inhibitor was investigated in dynamic conditions. Visual observations and analytical analyses of the internal surface of samples was studied at different ageing duration. Corrosion products were characterised by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Temperature and disinfectant were found to considerably affect the copper corrosion mechanism. Surprisingly, the corrosiveness of the solution was higher at lower temperatures. The temperature influences the nature of corrosion products. The protection efficiency is then strongly depend on the nature of the corrosion products formed at the surface of copper samples exposed to the aggressive solutions containing different concentration of disinfectant.

  13. DEPOSITION TANK CORROSION TESTING FOR ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING POST OXALIC ACID DESTRUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J.

    2011-08-29

    ) for an inhibited waste to a range of 5 to 23.4 mpy, depending on sludge chemistry. F-area-based effluents were, in general, more corrosive. Effective corrosion control measures included evaporation, hydroxide additions and mixing with supernates containing a representative supernate chemistry (5 M hydroxide and 1.5 M nitrite). Corrosion rates with these measures were generally 0.2 mpy. The A537 carbon steel was found to be susceptible to pitting when the corrosion control measure involved mixing the ECC effluent with a supernate chemistry having minimal inhibitor concentrations (0.5 M hydroxide and 0.3 M nitrite). Corrosion rates in this case were near 1 mpy.

  14. Boric acid application guidelines for intergranular corrosion inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Piskor, S.R. . Nuclear Services Div.)

    1990-12-01

    A significant fraction of the operating Pressurized Water Reactor steam generators have used or are using boric acid as an inhibitor to control stress corrosion cracking, intergranular attack, or denting. Boric acid is applied on line, or by means of crevice flushing, low power soaks, or a combination of these methods. When boric acid is used, it is important to have knowledge about its chemical and physical properties, its effect on corrosion, and its correct application. The data on these subjects may be found in a diversity of sources, which are often not readily available or convenient to use. In addition, new information has recently become available. This report has been prepared and revised to be comprehensive treatise on boric acid relevant to its application in nuclear steam generators. Relevant boric acid information from 1987--89 has been added to provide the latest available data from laboratory testing and power plant application. 5 figs.

  15. Mitigation strategies for microbiologically influenced corrosion in gas industry facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, D.H.; Zintel, T.P. ); Cookingham, B.A. ); Howard, D.; Morris, R.G. ); Day, R.A.; Frank, J.R. ); Pogemiller, G.E. )

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on a study of microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) and its mitigation in gas industry facilities. The results show that MIC commonly occurs on both external and internal surfaces of pipes, in down hole tubulars and in process equipment such as separators. Mitigation strategies were tested in side-stream devices at several sites. The results demonstrate that many biocides and corrosion inhibitors are relatively ineffective in controlling the surface microbial populations, at least under the conditions of the tests. Detailed studies with glutaraldehyde demonstrated that reestablishment of surface MIC communities after removal of this biocide was very rapid. Continuous treatment with glutaraldehyde led to the development of surface microbial communities resistant to the effects of the biocide.

  16. Mill Scale Corrosion and Prevention in Carbon Steel Heat Exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Pankaj; Roy, Himadri

    2015-10-01

    The cause of material degradation of an ASTM A-124 grade carbon steel tube belonging to a heat exchanger has been investigated. Visual examination, followed by an in-depth microstructural characterization using optical microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray, and scanning electron microscopy, was carried out for understanding the primary cause of material degradation. Based on the results of an extensive examination as well as the background information provided on the heat exchanger, it was determined that the steel tubes were predominantly damaged by the mechanism of crevice corrosion facilitated by the presence of mill scale. It is concluded that the heat exchanger tubes were not properly investigated for defects after their fabrication. Based on the situation, the proper cleaning method was selected for preventing further corrosion in the system. A chemical cleaning process was designed using acid pickling along with an inhibitor and a surfactant.

  17. PROBABILITY BASED CORROSION CONTROL FOR LIQUID WASTE TANKS - PART III

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.; Edwards, T.

    2010-12-09

    The liquid waste chemistry control program is designed to reduce the pitting corrosion occurrence on tank walls. The chemistry control program has been implemented, in part, by applying engineering judgment safety factors to experimental data. However, the simple application of a general safety factor can result in use of excessive corrosion inhibiting agents. The required use of excess corrosion inhibitors can be costly for tank maintenance, waste processing, and in future tank closure. It is proposed that a probability-based approach can be used to quantify the risk associated with the chemistry control program. This approach can lead to the application of tank-specific chemistry control programs reducing overall costs associated with overly conservative use of inhibitor. Furthermore, when using nitrite as an inhibitor, the current chemistry control program is based on a linear model of increased aggressive species requiring increased protective species. This linear model was primarily supported by experimental data obtained from dilute solutions with nitrate concentrations less than 0.6 M, but is used to produce the current chemistry control program up to 1.0 M nitrate. Therefore, in the nitrate space between 0.6 and 1.0 M, the current control limit is based on assumptions that the linear model developed from data in the <0.6 M region is applicable in the 0.6-1.0 M region. Due to this assumption, further investigation of the nitrate region of 0.6 M to 1.0 M has potential for significant inhibitor reduction, while maintaining the same level of corrosion risk associated with the current chemistry control program. Ongoing studies have been conducted in FY07, FY08, FY09 and FY10 to evaluate the corrosion controls at the SRS tank farm and to assess the minimum nitrite concentrations to inhibit pitting in ASTM A537 carbon steel below 1.0 molar nitrate. The experimentation from FY08 suggested a non-linear model known as the mixture/amount model could be used to predict

  18. Physicochemical studies of glucose, gellan gum, and hydroxypropyl cellulose--inhibition of cast iron corrosion.

    PubMed

    Rajeswari, Velayutham; Kesavan, Devarayan; Gopiraman, Mayakrishnan; Viswanathamurthi, Periasamy

    2013-06-01

    Glucose, gellan gum, and hydroxypropyl cellulose were studied against the acid corrosion of cast iron by means of weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization, and AC impedance spectroscopy techniques. The inhibition efficiency was found to increase with increasing concentration of the inhibitors. The effect of immersion time and temperature were also studied. The addition of potassium iodide to the corrosion-inhibition system showed both antagonism and synergism toward inhibition efficiency. Polarization studies revealed the mixed-type inhibiting nature of the carbohydrates. The adsorption of inhibitors on the cast iron surface obeys Langmuir adsorption isotherm model, both in presence and absence of KI. Physical interaction between the inhibitor molecules and the iron surface was suggested by the thermochemical parameters, rather than chemical interaction. PMID:23618271

  19. Hydrogel-swelling driven delivery device for corrosion resistance of metal in water.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yu; Yang, Li-Ming; Chen, Jie; Wang, Ling-Ling; Chen, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Corrosion on steel and copper pipes in industry can trigger pollution and weakness due to undesired chemical and biochemical reactions. Too much or too little inhibitor can decrease its efficiency, even causing waste and pollution. In this contribution, an innovative delivery device driven by hydrogel swelling, mainly consisting of a semi-permeable membrane, a hydrogel-swelling force drive and a release orifice, was developed to control the release of inhibitor in a water system at a constant rate, leading the amount of inhibitor to maintain a proper concentration. The effects of hydrogel mass and orifice dimension on release property were studied for controlling release rate. Moreover, a weight loss experiment on carbon steels was carried out to show the incredible anti-corrosion function of the system. PMID:26676016

  20. Corrosion of stainless steel, 2. edition

    SciTech Connect

    Sedriks, A.J.

    1996-10-01

    The book describes corrosion characteristics in all the major and minor groups of stainless steels, namely, in austenitic, ferritic, martensitic, duplex, and precipitation hardenable steels. Several chapters are spent on those special forms of corrosion that are investigated in the great detail in stainless steels, namely, pitting corrosion, crevice corrosion, and stress corrosion cracking. The influences of thermal treatment (heat affected zone cases), composition, and microstructure on corrosion are given good coverage. Corrosive environments include high temperature oxidation, sulfidation as well as acids, alkalis, various different petroleum plant environments, and even human body fluids (stainless steels are commonly used prosthetic materials).

  1. Atmospheric corrosion model and monitor for low cost solar arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaelble, D. H.; Mansfeld, F. B.; Jeanjaquet, S. L.; Kendig, M.

    1981-01-01

    An atmospheric corrosion model and corrosion monitoring system has been developed for low cost solar arrays (LSA). The corrosion model predicts that corrosion rate is the product of the surface condensation probability of water vapor and the diffusion controlled corrosion current. This corrosion model is verified by simultaneous monitoring of weather conditions and corrosion rates at the solar array test site at Mead, Nebraska.

  2. Corrosion-resistant coating development

    SciTech Connect

    Stinton, D.P.; Kupp, D.M.; Martin, R.L.

    1997-12-01

    SiC-based heat exchangers have been identified as the prime candidate material for use as heat exchangers in advanced combined cycle power plants. Unfortunately, hot corrosion of the SiC-based materials created by alkali metal salts present in the combustion gases dictates the need for corrosion-resistant coatings. The well-documented corrosion resistance of CS-50 combined with its low (and tailorable) coefficient of thermal expansion and low modulus makes CS-50 an ideal candidate for this application. Coatings produced by gelcasting and traditional particulate processing have been evaluated.

  3. Corrosion and corrosion fatigue of airframe aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, G. S.; Gao, M.; Harlow, D. G.; Wei, R. P.

    1994-01-01

    Localized corrosion and corrosion fatigue crack nucleation and growth are recognized as degradation mechanisms that effect the durability and integrity of commercial transport aircraft. Mechanically based understanding is needed to aid the development of effective methodologies for assessing durability and integrity of airframe components. As a part of the methodology development, experiments on pitting corrosion, and on corrosion fatigue crack nucleation and early growth from these pits were conducted. Pitting was found to be associated with constituent particles in the alloys and pit growth often involved coalescence of individual particle-nucleated pits, both laterally and in depth. Fatigue cracks typically nucleated from one of the larger pits that formed by a cluster of particles. The size of pit at which fatigue crack nucleates is a function of stress level and fatigue loading frequency. The experimental results are summarized, and their implications on service performance and life prediction are discussed.

  4. Searching for corrosion intelligence

    SciTech Connect

    Roberge, P.R.

    1999-11-01

    The incredible progress in computing power and availability has created a tremendous wealth of information available at the touch of a few buttons. However, such wealth can easily provoke what is commonly described as `information overload.` The massive number of connections produced by a single search of the Web, for example, can greatly overwhelm users of this new technology. The rapidity of Web searches is due to the synergy between progress made in network connectivity protocols, intelligent search strategies and supporting hardware. This paper will attempt to define the basic elements of machine intelligence in the context of corrosion engineering and examine what has been done or could be done to introduce artificial thinking into daily operations.

  5. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1995-01-01

    Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

  6. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, T.D.

    1996-07-23

    Ceramic materials are disclosed which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200--550 C or organic salt (including SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) at temperatures of 25--200 C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components. 1 fig.

  7. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1996-01-01

    Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

  8. Review on stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue failure of centrifugal compressor impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jiao; Chen, Songying; Qu, Yanpeng; Li, Jianfeng

    2015-03-01

    Corrosion failure, especially stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue, is the main cause of centrifugal compressor impeller failure. And it is concealed and destructive. This paper summarizes the main theories of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue and its latest developments, and it also points out that existing stress corrosion cracking theories can be reduced to the anodic dissolution (AD), the hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC), and the combined AD and HIC mechanisms. The corrosion behavior and the mechanism of corrosion fatigue in the crack propagation stage are similar to stress corrosion cracking. The effects of stress ratio, loading frequency, and corrosive medium on the corrosion fatigue crack propagation rate are analyzed and summarized. The corrosion behavior and the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue in corrosive environments, which contain sulfide, chlorides, and carbonate, are analyzed. The working environments of the centrifugal compressor impeller show the behavior and the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue in different corrosive environments. The current research methods for centrifugal compressor impeller corrosion failure are analyzed. Physical analysis, numerical simulation, and the fluid-structure interaction method play an increasingly important role in the research on impeller deformation and stress distribution caused by the joint action of aerodynamic load and centrifugal load.

  9. Grey relational analysis of amine inhibition of mild steel corrosion in acids

    SciTech Connect

    Li, P.; Tan, T.C.; Lee, J.Y.

    1997-03-01

    Grey relational analysis makes use of relatively simple mathematical procedures to arrive at salient relationships in a complex system. It uses a relatively small amount of data and works with great variability in factors. Grey relational analysis was used to investigate the relationship between inhibitor structure and inhibitor performance for a series of amines of different structures in the corrosion of mild steel in acids. Results showed the molecular weight (MW), the negative of the logarithm of the dissociation constant (pK{sub a}), and the number of nitrogen donor atoms influenced inhibitor effectiveness in the active region. The number of NH bonds was an additional factor for inhibition in the passive region. Trends in these factors were rationalized in terms of adsorptive interactions between the inhibitor molecules and the substrate. Results conformed to findings in the literature and were verified by additional measurements using hexamine as the inhibitor.

  10. Corrosion Problems in Absorption Chillers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stetson, Bruce

    1978-01-01

    Absorption chillers use a lithium bromide solution as the medium of absorption and water as the refrigerant. Discussed are corrosion and related problems, tests and remedies, and cleaning procedures. (Author/MLF)

  11. Minimization of corrosion using activated sodium bromide in a medium-size cooling tower

    SciTech Connect

    Nalepa, C.J.; Moore, R.M.; Golson, G.L.; Wolfe, T.W.; Puckorius, P.R.

    1996-07-01

    The cooling tower at the Albermarle Process Development Center in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, historically used chlorine as a biocide in combination with phosphorus-based corrosion/scale inhibitors. Although this regimen provided biocontrol, sludge and iron buildup was a problem in low-velocity, small cross-sectional areas of piping. A general cleanup of the system was performed in April 1995. This cleanup was followed with a switch to a two-component corrosion inhibitor/dispersant package. Alternate biocides were evaluated at this time. Activated sodium bromide was found to be particularly effective in this tower, which operates at pH {approximately}8.4. Relative to chlorine, the use of activated sodium bromide led to a decrease in general and pitting corrosion on mild steel. The reduced corrosion appears to be due to a combination of both chemical (less attack on passivated metal surfaces) and biological factors (better control of heterotrophic and sessile bacteria). These conclusions are supported by chemical analyses, corrosion meter and coupon data, dip slides, biological activity reaction tests, and visual observations of the tower sump and heat exchanger surfaces.

  12. Case study: Minimization of corrosion using activated sodium bromide in a medium-size cooling tower

    SciTech Connect

    Nalepa, C.J.; Moore, R.M.; Golson, G.L.; Wolfe, T.W.; Puckorius, P.R.

    1996-10-01

    The process loop cooling tower at the Albemarle Process Development Center in Baton Rouge, LA has historically used chlorine as the biocide together with industry accepted phosphorus-based corrosion/scale inhibitors. Although this regimen provided biocontrol, sludge and iron build-up was a recurring problem, especially in low-velocity, small cross-sectional areas of piping. A general clean-up of the system was performed in April, 1995. This clean-up was followed with a switch to a two-component corrosion inhibitor/dispersant package. It was decided to study alternate biocides as well at this time. Activated sodium bromide was found to be particularly effective in this tower, which operates at pH {approximately}8.4. Relative to chlorine, the use of activated sodium bromide led to a decrease in general and pitting corrosion on mild steel while maintaining prior performance on admiralty brass. The reduced corrosion appears to be due to a combination of both chemical (less attack on passivated metal surfaces) and biological factors (better control of heterotrophic and sessile bacteria). These conclusions are supported by chemical analyses, corrosion meter and coupon data, dip slides, BART (biological activity reaction test) tests, and visual observations of the tower sump and heat exchanger surfaces.

  13. Corrosion of alloy steels in oil field fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    Laboratory and field tests have been conducted on two low alloy and two higher alloy steels at a range of brine salinities and sulfide contents typical of oil well production fluids. AISI types 4130 and 4340 show the same behavior in these fluids as mild steel. AISI type 410 stainless steel and 9% chromium - 1% molybdenum steel corrode at rates as great as that of mild steel at higher chloride or sulfide concentrations. Special corrosion inhibitors are required for higher alloy steels when they are exposed to these conditions.

  14. Understanding corrosion inhibition with van der Waals DFT methods: the case of benzotriazole.

    PubMed

    Gattinoni, Chiara; Michaelides, Angelos

    2015-01-01

    The corrosion of materials is an undesirable and costly process affecting many areas of technology and everyday life. As such, considerable effort has gone into understanding and preventing it. Organic molecule based coatings can in certain circumstances act as effective corrosion inhibitors. Although they have been used to great effect for more than sixty years, how they function at the atomic-level is still a matter of debate. In this work, computer simulation approaches based on density functional theory are used to investigate benzotriazole (BTAH), one of the most widely used and studied corrosion inhibitors for copper. In particular, the structures formed by protonated and deprotonated BTAH molecules on Cu(111) have been determined and linked to their inhibiting properties. It is found that hydrogen bonding, van der Waals interactions and steric repulsions all contribute in shaping how BTAH molecules adsorb, with flat-lying structures preferred at low coverage and upright configurations preferred at high coverage. The interaction of the dehydrogenated benzotriazole molecule (BTA) with the copper surface is instead dominated by strong chemisorption via the azole moiety with the aid of copper adatoms. Structures of dimers or chains are found to be the most stable structures at all coverages, in good agreement with scanning tunnelling microscopy results. Benzotriazole thus shows a complex phase behaviour in which van der Waals forces play an important role and which depends on coverage and on its protonation state and all of these factors feasibly contribute to its effectiveness as a corrosion inhibitor. PMID:25907526

  15. Proton pump inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are medicines that work by reducing the amount of stomach acid made by glands in ... Proton pump inhibitors are used to: Relieve symptoms of acid reflux, or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This is a ...

  16. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jor-Shan; Farmer, Joseph C.; Lee, Chuck K.; Walker, Jeffrey; Russell, Paige; Kirkwood, Jon; Yang, Nancy; Champagne, Victor

    2012-05-29

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  17. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jor-Shan; Farmer, Joseph C; Lee, Chuck K; Walker, Jeffrey; Russell, Paige; Kirkwood, Jon; Yang, Nancy; Champagne, Victor

    2013-11-12

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  18. Durability and synergistic effects of KI on the acid corrosion inhibition of mild steel by hydroxypropyl methylcellulose.

    PubMed

    Arukalam, I O

    2014-11-01

    The performance of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) as safe corrosion inhibitor for mild steel in aerated 0.5M H2SO4 solution was appraised by weight loss, impedance and polarization measurements. Results indicate that HPMC functions as a good inhibitor in the studied environment and inhibition efficiency increased with increasing concentration of inhibitor and temperature. Time-dependent effect of the inhibition efficiency reveals that inhibition efficiency increased with time up to the fourth day after which it waned, but improved on addition of KI. The synergism parameter evaluated confirmed the synergistic effect of KI and HPMC. Impedance results clearly show that HPMC inhibited the corrosion reaction via adsorption onto the metal/solution interface following Freundlich adsorption isotherm. Polarization results indicate that HPMC acts as a mixed-type inhibitor with predominant cathodic effect. Theoretical study using density functional theory was employed to establish the correlation between the structure (molecular and electronic) and the inhibition efficiency. PMID:25129747

  19. Electrochemical and DFT studies of quinoline derivatives on corrosion inhibition of AA5052 aluminium alloy in NaCl solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dapeng; Yang, Dong; Zhang, Daquan; Li, Kang; Gao, Lixin; Lin, Tong

    2015-12-01

    Two quinoline derivatives, 8-aminoquinoline (8-AQ) and 8-nitroquinoline (8-NQ), have been used as inhibitors to examine their corrosion protection effect on AA5052 aluminium alloy in 3% NaCl solution. The weight-loss and electrochemical measurement have indicated that 8-AQ and 8-NQ play as anodic inhibitor to retard the anodic electrochemical process. SEM/EDS analysis clearly shows that 8-AQ and 8-NQ form a protective film on the AA5052 alloy surface. Density functional theory (DFT) calculation confirmed the formation of strong hybridization between the p-orbital of reactive sites in the inhibitor molecules and the sp-orbital of the Al atom. 8-aminoquinoline and 8-nitroquinoline may be useful as effective corrosion inhibitors for aluminium alloys.

  20. Corrosion in volcanic hot springs

    SciTech Connect

    Lichti, K.A.; Swann, S.J.; Sanada, N.

    1997-12-31

    Volcanic hot pool environments on White Island, New Zealand have been used to study the corrosion properties of materials which might be used for engineering plant for energy production from deep-seated and magma-ambient geothermal systems. The corrosion chemistry of hot pools encountered in natural volcanic features varies, from being of near neutral pH- or alkalie pH-chloride type waters to acidic-chloride/sulfate waters which are more aggressive to metals and alloys. Potential-pH (Pourbaix) diagram models of corrosion product phase stability for common alloy elements contained in engineering alloys have been developed for hot pool environments using thermodynamic principles and conventional corrosion theory. These diagramatic models give reasons for the observed corrosion kinetics and can be used to help to predict the performance of other alloys in similar environments. Deficiencies in the knowledge base for selection of materials for aggressive geothermal environments are identified, and directions for future research on materials having suitable corrosion resistance for deep-seated and magma-ambient production fluids which have acidic properties are proposed.

  1. Corrosion testing in flash tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, S.J.; Stead, N.J.

    1999-07-01

    As kraft pulp mills adopt modified cooking processes, an increasing amount of corrosion of carbon steel digester systems is being encountered. Many mills have had severe corrosion in the flash tanks, in particular, the first ({number{underscore}sign}1) flash tank. The work described in this report was aimed at characterizing the corrosion. Coupons of carbon steel, several stainless steels and titanium were exposed at two mills. At mill A, identical sets of coupons were exposed in the {number{underscore}sign}1 and {number{underscore}sign}2 flash tank. At mill B, three identical sets of coupons were placed in flash tank {number{underscore}sign}1. The results of the exposures showed that both carbon steel and titanium suffered high rates of general corrosion, while the stainless steels suffered varying degrees of localized attack. The ranking of the resistance of corrosion in the flash tank was the same ranking as would be expected in a reducing acid environment. In the light of the coupon results, organic acids is concluded to be the most likely cause of corrosion of the flash tanks.

  2. Aircraft corrosion surveillance in the military

    SciTech Connect

    Tullmin, M.; Roberge, P.R.; Little, M.A.

    1997-12-01

    In the Canadian Forces, as for other operators of aging aircraft, the need has arisen to utilize new tools for managing corrosion problems more cost effectively. Corrosion surveillance methodologies are focused on the reduction of unnecessary inspections and on optimizing certain maintenance and inspection schedules. To accomplish the former, on-going development of on-board corrosion sensors is required, with the ultimate goal of establishing truly smart structures. For the optimization of these schedules, a link between the corrosivity of the operating environment and these schedules is needed. Information on atmospheric corrosivity of the operating environment and these schedules is needed. Information on atmospheric corrosivity at a marine base is sought in terms of an overall corrosivity map of the base, real-time atmospheric corrosivity measurements in the external atmosphere and air quality monitoring in air-conditioned hangars. Corrosion surveillance information should be integrated with complementary data and information to enhance its value and impact.

  3. Corrosion evaluation of cooling-water treatments for gas centrifuge facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, C. R.; Meredith, P. F.

    1980-11-24

    The corrosion resistance of six different types of weighted metal coupons was evaluated at 29/sup 0/C (84/sup 0/F) in flowing water containing nitrite-borate-silicate corrosion inhibitors. The question for evaluation was whether it would be more advantageous: (1) to drain the treated cooling water from the centrifuge machine and to expose them to moisture-laden air over an assumed shop downtime and repair perid of 1 month; or (2) to let the treated cooling water remain stagnant in the machines during this downtime. The moisture-laden-air exposure was more detrimental.

  4. Corrosion-resistant Foamed Cements for Carbon Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama T.; Gill, S.; Pyatina, T., Muraca, A.; Keese, R.; Khan, A.; Bour, D.

    2012-12-01

    The cementitious material consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate designed as an alternative thermal-shock resistant cement for the Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) wells was treated with cocamidopropyl dimethylamine oxide-based compound as foaming agent (FA) to prepare numerous air bubble-dispersed low density cement slurries of and #61603;1.3 g/cm3. Then, the foamed slurry was modified with acrylic emulsion (AE) as corrosion inhibitor. We detailed the positive effects of the acrylic polymer (AP) in this emulsion on the five different properties of the foamed cement: 1) The hydrothermal stability of the AP in 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cements; 2) the hydrolysis-hydration reactions of the slurry at 85 and #61616;C; 3) the composition of crystalline phases assembled and the microstructure developed in autoclaved cements; 4) the mechanical behaviors of the autoclaved cements; and, 5) the corrosion mitigation of carbon steel (CS) by the polymer. For the first property, the hydrothermal-catalyzed acid-base interactions between the AP and cement resulted in Ca-or Na-complexed carboxylate derivatives, which led to the improvement of thermal stability of the AP. This interaction also stimulated the cement hydration reactions, enhancing the total heat evolved during cement’s curing. Addition of AP did not alter any of the crystalline phase compositions responsible for the strength of the cement. Furthermore, the AP-modified cement developed the porous microstructure with numerous defect-free cavities of disconnected voids. These effects together contributed to the improvement of compressive-strength and –toughness of the cured cement. AP modification of the cement also offered an improved protection of CS against brine-caused corrosion. There were three major factors governing the corrosion protection: 1) Reducing the extents of infiltration and transportation of corrosive electrolytes through the cement layer deposited on the underlying CS

  5. Permeability and corrosion behavior of phenoxy coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Tiburcio, A.C.; Manson, J.A.

    1993-12-31

    The corrosion behavior of a glass-bead-filled phenoxy coating system was studied by correlating permeability and electrochemical measurements with actual corrosion performance. The study emphasized the effects of filler and filler/polymer matrix interactions on corrosion behavior. Water vapor permeability, dissolved oxygen permeability and conductivity measurements were made to determine the rate of transport of the three key ingredients in cathodic delamination and corrosion process (H{sub 2}O, O{sub 2}, and cation). The glass bead filler had a greater effect on both cathodic delamination and corrosion behavior than filler/polymer matrix interaction. Overall, the permeability behavior controlled the delamination and corrosion performance.

  6. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of the Drip Shield

    SciTech Connect

    F. Hua

    2004-09-16

    The repository design includes a drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]) that provides protection for the waste package both as a barrier to seepage water contact and a physical barrier to potential rockfall. The purpose of the process-level models developed in this report is to model dry oxidation, general corrosion, and localized corrosion of the drip shield plate material, which is made of Ti Grade 7. This document is prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan For: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The models developed in this report are used by the waste package degradation analyses for TSPA-LA and serve as a basis to determine the performance of the drip shield. The drip shield may suffer from other forms of failure such as the hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) or stress corrosion cracking (SCC), or both. Stress corrosion cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]). Hydrogen induced cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Hydrogen Induced Cracking of Drip Shield'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169847]).

  7. Inhibition of Chloride Induced Crevice Corrosion in Alloy 22 by Fluoride Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Carranza, R M; Rodr?guez, M A; Rebak, R B

    2005-10-09

    Alloy 22 (N06022) is highly resistant to localized corrosion. Alloy 22 may be susceptible to crevice corrosion in pure chloride (Cl{sup -}) solutions under aggressive environmental conditions. The effect of the fluoride (F{sup -}) over the crevice corrosion induced by chloride ions is still not well established. The objective of the present work was to explore the crevice corrosion resistance of this alloy to different mixtures of fluorides and chlorides. Cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) tests were conducted in deaerated aqueous solutions of pure halide ions and also in different mixtures of chloride and fluoride at 90 C and pH 6. The range of chloride concentration [Cl{sup -}] was 0.001 M {le} [Cl{sup -}] {le} 1 M and the range of molar fluoride to chloride ratio [F{sup -}]/[Cl{sup -}] was 0.1 {le} [F{sup -}]/[Cl{sup -}] {le} 10. Results showed that Alloy 22 was susceptible to crevice corrosion in all the pure chloride solutions but not in the pure fluoride solutions. Fluoride ions showed an inhibitor behavior only in mixtures with a molar ratio [F{sup -}]/[Cl{sup -}] > 2. For mixtures with a molar ratio [F{sup -}]/[Cl{sup -}] of 7 and 10 the inhibition of crevice corrosion was complete.

  8. Pitting corrosion inhibition of aluminum 2024 by Bacillus biofilms secreting polyaspartate or gamma-polyglutamate.

    PubMed

    Ornek, D; Jayaraman, A; Syrett, B C; Hsu, C-H; Mansfeld, F B; Wood, T K

    2002-04-01

    Pitting corrosion of aluminum 2024 in Luria Bertani medium was reduced by the secretion of anionic peptides by engineered and natural Bacillus biofilms and was studied in continuous reactors using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Compared to sterile controls, pitting was reduced dramatically by the presence of the biofilms. The secretion of a 20 amino acid polyaspartate peptide by an engineered Bacillus subtilis WB600/pBE92-Asp biofilm slightly reduced the corrosion rate of the passive aluminum alloy at pH 6.5; however, the secretion of gamma-polyglutamate by a Bacillus licheniformis biofilm reduced the corrosion rate by 90% (compared to the B. subtilis WB600/pBE92 biofilm which did not secrete polyaspartate or gamma-polyglutamate). The corrosion potential ( E(corr)) of aluminum 2024 was increased by about 0.15-0.44 V due to the formation of B. subtilis and B. licheniformis biofilms as compared to sterile controls. The increase of E(corr) and the observed prevention of pitting indicate that the pitting potential ( E(pit)) had increased. This result and the further decrease of corrosion rates for the passive aluminum alloy suggest that the rate of the anodic metal dissolution reaction was reduced by an inhibitor produced by the biofilms. Purified gamma-polyglutamate also decreased the corrosion rates of aluminum 2024. PMID:11956749

  9. Chem I Supplement: Corrosion: A Waste of Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1979

    1979-01-01

    This article, intended for secondary school chemistry students, discusses the corrosion of metals. The discussion includes: (1) thermodynamic aspects of corrosion; (2) electrochemical aspects of corrosion; and (3) inhibition of corrosion processes. (HM)

  10. Report on accelerated corrosion studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Mowry, Curtis Dale; Glass, Sarah Jill; Sorensen, Neil Robert

    2011-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) conducted accelerated atmospheric corrosion testing for the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) to help further the understanding of the development of corrosion products on conductor materials in household electrical components exposed to environmental conditions representative of homes constructed with problem drywall. The conditions of the accelerated testing were chosen to produce corrosion product growth that would be consistent with long-term exposure to environments containing humidity and parts per billion (ppb) levels of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) that are thought to have been the source of corrosion in electrical components from affected homes. This report documents the test set-up, monitoring of electrical performance of powered electrical components during the exposure, and the materials characterization conducted on wires, screws, and contact plates from selected electrical components. No degradation in electrical performance (measured via voltage drop) was measured during the course of the 8-week exposure, which was approximately equivalent to 40 years of exposure in a light industrial environment. Analyses show that corrosion products consisting of various phases of copper sulfide, copper sulfate, and copper oxide are found on exposed surfaces of the conductor materials including wires, screws, and contact plates. The morphology and the thickness of the corrosion products showed a range of character. In some of the copper wires that were observed, corrosion product had flaked or spalled off the surface, exposing fresh metal to the reaction with the contaminant gasses; however, there was no significant change in the wire cross-sectional area.

  11. Cooling tower hardware corrosion studies

    SciTech Connect

    Blue, S.C.

    1983-01-31

    The data presented in this report are interim results of a continuing investigation into the corrosion resistance of metals in the environment of a large cooling tower. Some of the significant observations are as follows: the corrosion of susceptible metals occurs most rapidly in the warm fog conditions between the deck and mist filters; the application of stainless steel must be made on the basis of alloy chemistry and processing history. Some corrosion resistant alloys may develop cracking problems after improper heat treating or welding; combinations of aluminum bronze, stainless steel, and silicon bronze hardware were not susceptible to galvanic corrosion; the service life of structural steel is extended by coal tar epoxy coatings; aluminum coatings appear to protect structural steel on the tower deck and below the distribution nozzles. The corrosion of cooling tower hardware can be easily controlled through the use of 316 stainless steel and silicon bronze. The use of other materials which exhibit general resistance should be specified only after they have been tested in the form of structural assemblies such as weldments and bolted joints in each of the different tower zones.

  12. Corrosion effects on friction factors

    SciTech Connect

    Magleby, H.L.; Shaffer, S.J.

    1996-03-01

    This paper presents the results of NRC-sponsored material specimen tests that were performed to determine if corrosion increases the friction factors of sliding surfaces of motor-operated gate valves, which could require higher forces to close and open safety-related valves when subjected to their design basis differential pressures. Friction tests were performed with uncorroded specimens and specimens subjected to accelerated corrosion. Preliminary tests at ambient conditions showed that corrosion increased the friction factors, indicating the need for additional tests duplicating valve operating parameters at hot conditions. The additional tests showed friction factors of corroded specimens were 0.1 to 0.2 higher than for uncorroded specimens, and that the friction factors of the corroded specimens were not very dependent on contact stress or corrosion film thickness. The measured values of friction factors for the three corrosion films tested (simulating three operating times) were in the range of 0.3 to 0.4. The friction factor for even the shortest simulated operating time was essentially the same as the others, indicating that the friction factors appear to reach a plateau and that the plateau is reached quickly.

  13. Laser Raman Spectroscopy in studies of corrosion and electrocatalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Melendres, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    Laser Raman Spectroscopy (LRS) has become an important tool for the in-situ structural study of electrochemical systems and processes in recent years. Following a brief introduction of the experimental techniques involved in applying LRS to electrochemical systems, we survey the literature for examples of studies in the inhibition of electrode reactions by surface films (e.g., corrosion and passivation phenomena) as well as the acceleration of reactions by electro-sorbates (electrocatalysis). We deal mostly with both normal and resonance Raman effects on fairly thick surface films in contrast to surface-enhanced Raman investigations of monolayer adsorbates, which is covered in another lecture. Laser Raman spectroelectrochemical studies of corrosion and film formation on such metals as Pb, Ag, Fe, Ni, Co, Cr, Au, stainless steel, etc. in various solution conditions are discussed. Further extension of the technique to studies in high-temperature and high-pressure aqueous environments is demonstrated. Results of studies of the structure of corrosion inhibitors are also presented. As applications of the LRS technique in the area of electrocatalysis, we cite studies of the structure of transition metal macrocyclic compounds, i.e., phthalocyanines and porphyrins, used for catalysis of the oxygen reduction reaction. 104 refs., 20 figs.

  14. Stress corrosion cracking of carbon steel in amine systems

    SciTech Connect

    Richert, J.P.; Bagdasarian, A.J.; Shargay, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    NACE Task Group T-8-14 was formed by Group Committee T-8 on Refining Industry Corrosion to conduct a survey on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of existing amine units. The main purpose of the survey was to determine the extent of cracking problems in such units and to examine possible correlations between cracked and noncracked locations to establish possible cause(s) for cracking. A total of 294 completed survey forms were received and analyzed. Cracking was reported in monoethanolamine (MEA), diethanolamine, methyldiethanolamine, and diisopropanolamine solutions but was most prevalent in MEA units. Cracking occurs in all types of equipment and piping operating at all common temperatures. Cracking has been reported in all typical refinery streams containing H/sub 2/S, CO/sub 2/, or a combination of the two. The use of corrosion inhibitors, soda ash, caustic, filters, or reclaimers has no indicated effect on cracking tendencies. The survey results confirmed that stress relieving is a highly effective means of preventing amine SCC.

  15. Influence of Cl- Deposition Content on Corrosion of LY12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Desheng; Li, Di; Zheng, Tianliang

    A series of accelerated corrosion tests were conducted in the simulated marine atmosphere environment to study the corrosion of LY12 aluminum alloy under different Cl- deposition content. The change of corrosion morphology, weight gain and electrochemical parameters (Corrosion Electric Potential, AC Impedance) were inspected in the corrosion course. The different corrosion behaviors caused by the variation of Cl- deposition content were also discussed.

  16. Experimental comparison of the rotating cylinder electrode and full pipe flow for evaluating flow induced CO{sub 2} corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, A.J.; Webster, S.; Paisley, D.; Moros, T.; Harrop, D.

    1995-10-01

    Corrosion of oil and gas pipelines by the internal fluids is complex and difficult to simulate in the laboratory. Here, the rotating cylinder electrode and full pipe flow in a recirculating flow loop give different results for nominally equivalent conditions. Pipe flow produces a higher mass transfer rate for the same nominal wall shear stress. Pipe flow also produces a higher CO{sub 2} corrosion rate for inhibited and uninhibited conditions at either the same shear stress or at the same mass transfer rate. Crucially, the rotating cylinder overestimates the performance of corrosion inhibitors. Therefore, while the cylinder is suitable for preliminary inhibitor screening it is not recommended for final selection of products.

  17. Corrosion problems in light water nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, W.E.

    1984-06-01

    The corrosion problems encountered during the author's career are reviewed. Attention is given to the development of Zircaloys and attendant factors that affect corrosion; the caustic and chloride stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of austenitic stainless steel steam generator tubing; the qualification of Inconel Alloy 600 for steam generator tubing and the subsequent corrosion problem of secondary side wastage, caustic SCC, pitting, intergranular attack, denting, and primary side SCC; and SCC in weld and furnace sensitized stainless steel piping and internals in boiling water reactor primary coolants. Also mentioned are corrosion of metallic uranium alloy fuels; corrosion of aluminum and niobium candidate fuel element claddings; crevice corrosion and seizing of stainless steel journal-sleeve combinations; SCC of precipitation hardened and martensitic stainless steels; low temperature SCC of welded austenitic stainless steels by chloride, fluoride, and sulfur oxy-anions; and corrosion problems experienced by condensers.

  18. Microencapsulation of Corrosion Indicators for Smart Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Jolley, Scott T.; Calle, Luz M.; Hanna,Joshua S.; Rawlins, James W.

    2011-01-01

    A multifunctional smart coating for the autonomous detection, indication, and control of corrosion is been developed based on microencapsulation technology. This paper summarizes the development, optimization, and testing of microcapsules specifically designed for early detection and indication of corrosion when incorporated into a smart coating. Results from experiments designed to test the ability of the microcapsules to detect and indicate corrosion, when blended into several paint systems, show that these experimental coatings generate a color change, indicative of spot specific corrosion events, that can be observed with the naked eye within hours rather than the hundreds of hours or months typical of the standard accelerated corrosion test protocols.. Key words: smart coating, corrosion detection, microencapsulation, microcapsule, pH-sensitive microcapsule, corrosion indicator, corrosion sensing paint

  19. Fireside corrosion probes--an update

    SciTech Connect

    Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Holcomb, G.R.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Matthes, S.A.

    2007-01-01

    The ability to monitor the corrosion degradation of key metallic components in fossil fuel power plants will become increasingly important for FutureGen and ultra-supercritical power plants. A number of factors (ash deposition, coal composition changes, thermal gradients, and low NOx conditions, among others) which occur in the high temperature sections of energy production facilities, will contribute to fireside corrosion. Several years of research have shown that high temperature corrosion rate probes need to be better understood before corrosion rate can be used as a process variable by power plant operators. Our recent research has shown that electrochemical corrosion probes typically measure lower corrosion rates than those measured by standard mass loss techniques. While still useful for monitoring changes in corrosion rates, absolute probe corrosion rates will need a calibration factor to be useful. Continuing research is targeted to help resolve these issues.

  20. Method For Testing Properties Of Corrosive Lubricants

    DOEpatents

    Ohi, James; De La Cruz, Jose L.; Lacey, Paul I.

    2006-01-03

    A method of testing corrosive lubricating media using a wear testing apparatus without a mechanical seal. The wear testing apparatus and methods are effective for testing volatile corrosive lubricating media under pressure and at high temperatures.

  1. Corrosion and Preservation of Bronze Artifacts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Robert

    1980-01-01

    Reviews chemical information relating to the corrosion of bronze artifacts. Properties of copper alloys are reviewed, with a thorough discussion of the specialized properties of bronze. Techniques to reduce or eliminate corrosion are listed. (CS)

  2. Degreasing of titanium to minimize stress corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, S. R.

    1967-01-01

    Stress corrosion of titanium and its alloys at elevated temperatures is minimized by replacing trichloroethylene with methanol or methyl ethyl ketone as a degreasing agent. Wearing cotton gloves reduces stress corrosion from perspiration before the metal components are processed.

  3. Corrosion of nickel-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Scarberry, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    The volume consists of three tutorial lectures and 18 contributed papers. The three tutorial lectures provide state-of-the-art background on the physical metallurgy of nickel-base alloys as it relates to corrosion. Also featured are the mechanisms and applications of these alloys and an insight into the corrosion testing techniques. The three tutorial lecture papers will help acquaint newcomers to this family of alloys with a thorough overview. The contributed papers are categorized into four major topics: general corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, fatigue and localized corrosion. Each topic is key-noted by one invited lecture followed by several contributed papers. The papers in the general corrosion section are wide ranging and cover the aspects of material selection, development of galvanic series in corrosive environments, corrosion resistance characteristics, hydrogen permeation and hydrogen embrittlement of nickel and some nickel-base alloys.

  4. An alternate to chromate conversion coatings for the corrosion protection of aluminum 2024-T3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ruiguang

    Corrosion of high-strength aluminum alloys used for airspace application is an expensive and serious problem. The most significant environmental factor contributing to the corrosion of these alloys is water condensed from humid air and contaminated with soluble chloride salts. The Al 2024 series used for aircraft are particularly susceptible to corrosion in aqueous chloride solutions due to alloying constituents such as copper and other impurities. Chromates are efficient inhibitors of corrosion of aluminum in near neutral aqueous environments containing aggressive anions such as chlorides. Usually, aluminum alloys are initially protected by chromate conversion coatings. Additional polymer coatings are sometimes added during exposure to corrosive atmospheres such as marine environments. Although chromate coatings are widely used, they require the use of noxious solutions, so they have always presented effluent disposal problems. There are health and safety concerns over the use of chromates due to their toxicity and carcinogenic nature and, as a consequence, the environmental and health risks associated with the use of such coatings will be restricted in the future. It was these health and safety concerns that led to the development of alternative non-toxic coating processes with comparable adhesion properties and corrosion protection. A variety of process technologies are under development and are vying for acceptance in industrial markets. As an alternate conversion coating, a new titanate conversion coating was systematically researched and developed. Research concentrated on producing passive surfaces from a simple titanate solution using an immersion process. The corrosion resistance of the treated surface has been evaluated using simple, rapid electrochemical techniques as well as a more long-term salt spray test. Passivation by titanate conversion treatment exhibits many similarities to chromate conversion treatment. Based on this study of corrosion

  5. Corrosion of metals by hydrazine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawton, E. A.; Moran, C. M.; Distefano, S.

    1985-01-01

    The mechanism of corrosion of metals by hydrazine has been studied by means of coupons in sealed ampoules and by electrochemical techniques. The variables considered were temperature, CO2 impurity level, alloy composition and microcrystalline structure. The coupon studies, to date, verify that increasng temperature and the presence of CO2 does increase the corrosion rate as expected. The presence of molybdenum in stainless steels to the 3 percent level is not necessarily deleterious, contrary to published reports. The influence of microcrystalline structure and surface characteristics are more dominant effects. However, with Ti-6Al-4V, two different microcrystalline structures showed no significant differences. Corrosion rates of CRES 304 L in hydrazine have also been measured by several electrochemical techniques such as Tafel plots, polarization resistance and A. C. Impedance. This is the first documented work to show that A. C. Impedance can be used with non-aqueous solvents. Preliminary data correlated satisfactorily with the results of the coupon studies.

  6. Corrosion in NiCd cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badcock, C.; Galligan, J.

    1981-01-01

    Corrosion in the terminals of nickel cadmium cells was investigated. Corrosion, crevice type corrosion, at the interface between the stainless steel material, the nickel material, and the braze was examined. It was concluded that in the welded areas there was no problem. There was corrosion of the crevice type in the brazed areas and some pitting was evident between the braze and the base material.

  7. Smart Coatings for Launch Site Corrosion Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz M.

    2014-01-01

    Smart, environmentally friendly paint system for early corrosion detection, mitigation, and healing that will enable supportability in KSC launch facilities and ground systems through their operational life cycles. KSC's Corrosion Technology Laboratory is developing a smart, self-healing coating that can detect and repair corrosion at an early stage. This coating is being developed using microcapsules specifically designed to deliver the contents of their core when corrosion starts.

  8. Electrochemical Measurement of Atmospheric Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeArmond, Anna H.; Davis, Dennis D.; Beeson, Harold D.

    1999-01-01

    Corrosion of Shuttle thruster components in atmospheres containing high concentrations of nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) and water is an important issue in ground operations of bipropellant systems in humid locations. Measurements of the corrosivities of NTO-containing atmospheres and the responses of different materials to these atmospheres have been accomplished using an electrochemical sensor. The sensor is composed of alternating aluminum/titanium strips separated by thin insulating layers. Under high humidity conditions a thin film of water covers the surface of the sensor. Added NTO vapor reacts with the water film to form a conductive medium and establishes a galvanic cell. The current from this cell can be integrated with respect to time and related to the corrosion activity. The surface layer formed from humid air/NTO reacts in the same way as an aqueous solution of nitric acid. Nitric acid is generally considered an important agent in NTO corrosion situations. The aluminum/titanium sensor is unresponsive to dry air, responds slightly to humid air (> 75% RH), and responds strongly to the combination of humid air and NTO. The sensor response is a power function (n = 2) of the NTO concentration. The sensor does not respond to NTO in dry air. The response of other materials in this type of sensor is related to position of the material in a galvanic series in aqueous nitric acid. The concept and operation of this electrochemical corrosion measurement is being applied to other corrosive atmospheric contaminants such as hydrogen chloride, hydrogen fluoride, sulfur dioxide, and acidic aerosols.

  9. Determination of thermodynamic data for modeling corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Izatt, R.M.; Oscarson, J.L.; Gillespie, S.E.; Chen, X. )

    1992-08-01

    Preventing or diminishing corrosion in PWR steam generators requires an understanding of chemical reactions that occur at the metal-water interface. Tests performed with a high-temperature, corrosion-resistant flow calorimeter yielded important thermodynamic properties of several reactions involving potentially corrosive copper ions, nickel ions, and sodium ions.

  10. A corrosivity classification system for geothermal resources

    SciTech Connect

    Conover, Marshall F.

    1982-10-08

    The most important difference between traditional steam systems and those that utilize geothermal fluids is the potential for corrosion of metals. The recently developed sourcebook ''Materials Selection Guidelines for Geothermal Energy Utilization Systems'' is expected to facilitate corrosion engineering decision making and reduce the cost of geothermal systems where new resources are similar to those presented by the corrosivity classification system.

  11. NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING OF CORROSION UNDER COATINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface corrosion on aluminum aircraft skins, nears joints and around fasteners is often an indicator of buried structural corrosion and cracking. Aircraft paints are routinely removed to reveal the presence of corrosion on the surface of metal structures, and the aircraft is su...

  12. Corrosion beneath disbonded coatings: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.A.; Thompson, N.G.

    1996-12-01

    This paper describes the relationship between coatings, cathodic protection (CP), and external corrosion of underground pipelines. Historically, this problem has been addressed by focusing on the corrosion and CP processes associated with holidays, e.g., coating disbandment and CP current flow within the disbanded region. This paper addresses these issues but also considers corrosion associated with disbanded areas that are distant from holidays.

  13. 7 CFR 2902.44 - Corrosion preventatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Corrosion preventatives. 2902.44 Section 2902.44... Items § 2902.44 Corrosion preventatives. (a) Definition. Products designed to prevent the deterioration (corrosion) of metals. (b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product must have a...

  14. 49 CFR 193.2625 - Corrosion protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Corrosion protection. 193.2625 Section 193.2625...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2625 Corrosion protection. (a) Each operator shall determine which metallic components could, unless corrosion is controlled, have their integrity or...

  15. 49 CFR 193.2625 - Corrosion protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Corrosion protection. 193.2625 Section 193.2625...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2625 Corrosion protection. (a) Each operator shall determine which metallic components could, unless corrosion is controlled, have their integrity or...

  16. 49 CFR 193.2625 - Corrosion protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Corrosion protection. 193.2625 Section 193.2625...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2625 Corrosion protection. (a) Each operator shall determine which metallic components could, unless corrosion is controlled, have their integrity or...

  17. 7 CFR 3201.44 - Corrosion preventatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Corrosion preventatives. 3201.44 Section 3201.44... Designated Items § 3201.44 Corrosion preventatives. (a) Definition. Products designed to prevent the deterioration (corrosion) of metals. (b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product must have...

  18. 49 CFR 193.2625 - Corrosion protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Corrosion protection. 193.2625 Section 193.2625...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2625 Corrosion protection. (a) Each operator shall determine which metallic components could, unless corrosion is controlled, have their integrity or...

  19. 49 CFR 193.2625 - Corrosion protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Corrosion protection. 193.2625 Section 193.2625...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2625 Corrosion protection. (a) Each operator shall determine which metallic components could, unless corrosion is controlled, have their integrity or...

  20. 7 CFR 3201.44 - Corrosion preventatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Corrosion preventatives. 3201.44 Section 3201.44... Designated Items § 3201.44 Corrosion preventatives. (a) Definition. Products designed to prevent the deterioration (corrosion) of metals. (b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product must have...

  1. 7 CFR 3201.44 - Corrosion preventatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Corrosion preventatives. 3201.44 Section 3201.44... Designated Items § 3201.44 Corrosion preventatives. (a) Definition. Products designed to prevent the deterioration (corrosion) of metals. (b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product must have...

  2. Laser diagnostics for NTP fuel corrosion studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wantuck, Paul J.; Butt, D. P.; Sappey, A. D.

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs and explanations on laser diagnostics for nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) fuel corrosion studies are presented. Topics covered include: NTP fuels; U-Zr-C system corrosion products; planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF); utilization of PLIF for corrosion product characterization of nuclear thermal rocket fuel elements under test; ZrC emission spectrum; and PLIF imaging of ZrC plume.

  3. Stress corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, M. J.; Smyrl, W. H.

    1973-01-01

    Service experience applications, experimental data generation, and the development of satisfactory quantitative theories relevant to the suppression and control of stress corrosion cracking in titanium are discussed. The impact of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) on the use of titanium alloys is considered, with emphasis on utilization in the aerospace field. Recent data on hot salt SCC, crack growth in hydrogen gas, and crack growth in liquid environments containing halide ions are reviewed. The status of the understanding of crack growth processes in these environments is also examined.

  4. Corrosion resistant thermal barrier coating

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, S.R.; Miller, R.A.; Hodge, P.E.

    1981-03-01

    A thermal barrier coating system for protecting metal surfaces at high temperature in normally corrosive environments is described. The thermal barrier coating system includes a metal alloy bond coating, the alloy containing nickel, cobalt, iron, or a combination of these metals. The system further includes a corrosion resistant thermal barrier oxide coating containing at least one alkaline earth silicate. The preferred oxides are calcium silicate, barium silicate, magnesium silicate, or combinations of these silicates. Official Gazette of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office

  5. CORROSION RESISTANT JACKETED METAL BODY

    DOEpatents

    Brugmann, E.W.

    1958-08-26

    Jacketed metal bodies of the type used as fuel elements for nuclear reactors, which contain an internal elongated body of fissionable material jacketed in a corrosion resistant metal are described. The ends of the internal bodies are provided with screw threads having a tapered outer end. The jacket material overlaps the ends and extends into the tapered section of the screw threaded opening. Screw caps with a mating tapered section are screwed into the ends of the body to compress the jacket material in the tapered sections to provtde an effective seal against corrosive gases and liquids.

  6. Coatings for improved corrosion resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.

    1992-05-01

    Several coating approaches are being developed to resist attack in coal-fired environments and thereby minimize corrosion of underlying substrate alloys and extend the time for onset of breakaway corrosion. In general, coating systems can be classified as either diffusion or overlay type, which are distinguished principally by the method of deposition and the structure of the resultant coating-substrate bond. The coating techniques examined are pack cementation, electrospark deposition, physical and chemical vapor deposition, plasma spray, and ion implantation. In addition, ceramic coatings are used in some applications.

  7. CO sub 2 induced inhibition of the localized corrosion of aluminum, Al-0. 5% Cu, and Al-2% Cu in dilute HF solution

    SciTech Connect

    Scully, J.R. . Dept. of Materials Science); Peebles, D.E. )

    1991-01-01

    This study presents work on corrosion of aluminum, Al-.5% Cu, and Al-2% Cu. Electrochemical tests were performed in dilute HF solutions both with and without CO{sub 2} sparging. It is suggested that CO{sub 2} or its reaction products interact with the passive film so that exposure of Cu in the oxide-solution interface is minimized. CO{sub 2} is investigated as a corrosion inhibitor. 4 refs. (JDL)

  8. Adsorption and corrosion inhibition properties of thiocarbanilide on the electrochemical behavior of high carbon steel in dilute acid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loto, Roland Tolulope; Loto, Cleophas Akintoye; Joseph, Olufunmilayo; Olanrewaju, Gabriel

    The inhibition performance of thiocarbanilide on the electrochemical corrosion behavior of high carbon steel in 1 M H2SO4 and HCl acid solutions was studied through weight loss method and potentiodynamic polarization test. Data obtained showed that the organic compound performed effectively in acid solutions at all concentrations with an average thiocarbanilide inhibition efficiency above 70% in H2SO4 acid and 80% in HCl acid from weight loss and potentiodynamic polarization test respectively. Results from corrosion thermodynamic calculations showed that the adsorption of thiocarbanilide onto the steel was through chemisorption mechanism whereby the redox electrochemical process responsible for corrosion and the electrolytic transport of corrosive anions were simultaneously suppressed. Statistical derivations through ANOVA analysis confirm that the influences of both the inhibitor concentration and exposure time on inhibition efficiency values are negligible. Adsorption of the compound was determined to obey the Langmuir and Frumkin isotherm model.

  9. Effect of molecular structure of aniline-formaldehyde copolymers on corrosion inhibition of mild steel in hydrochloric acid solution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Nie, Mengyan; Wang, Xiutong; Zhu, Yukun; Shi, Fuhua; Yu, Jianqiang; Hou, Baorong

    2015-05-30

    Aniline-formaldehyde copolymers with different molecular structures have been prepared and investigated for the purpose of corrosion control of mild steel in hydrochloric acid. The copolymers were synthesized by a condensation polymerization process with different ratios of aniline to formaldehyde in acidic precursor solutions. The corrosion inhibition efficiency of as-synthesized copolymers for Q235 mild steel was investigated in 1.0 mol L(-1) hydrochloric acid solution by weight loss measurement, potentiodynamic polarization, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, respectively. All the results demonstrate that as-prepared aniline-formaldehyde copolymers are efficient mixed-type corrosion inhibitors for mild steels in hydrochloric acid. The corrosion inhibition mechanism is discussed in terms of the role of molecular structure on adsorption of the copolymers onto the steel surface in acid solution. PMID:25723887

  10. A comparison of electrochemical noise and impedance spectroscopy for the detection of corrosion in reinforced concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Bertocci, U.

    1996-12-31

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and electrochemical noise measurements (ENM) were carried out on small concrete blocks with embedded steel rods, immersed in solutions of highway deicers, mainly sodium or magnesium chlorides with corrosion inhibitors added. Voltage and current fluctuations between identical electrodes were recorded, and different signal-processing schemes were tested. Various problems experienced in the course of the work are described. Corrosion polarization resistances obtained by EIS are compared with values of the ratio of the standard deviations of the voltage and current fluctuations. The results suggest that the type of ENM used in this work is subject to considerable uncertainties, and further work would be necessary before the method can be applied with sufficient confidence to corrosion monitoring.

  11. Corrosion behaviour of galvanized steel and electroplating steel in aqueous solution: AC impedance study and XPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebrini, M.; Fontaine, G.; Gengembre, L.; Traisnel, M.; Lerasle, O.; Genet, N.

    2008-08-01

    The efficiency of a new triazole derivative, namely, 2-{(2-hydroxyethyl)[(4-methyl-1 H-1,2,3-benzotriazol-1-yl)methyl]amino}ethanol (TTA) has been studied for corrosion inhibition of galvanized steel and electroplating steel in aqueous solution. Corrosion inhibition was studied using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). These studies have shown that TTA was a very good inhibitor. Data obtained from EIS show a frequency distribution and therefore a modelling element with frequency dispersion behaviour, a constant phase element (CPE) has been used. The corrosion behaviour of galvanized steel and electroplating steel in aqueous solution was also investigated in the presence of 4-methyl-1 H-benzotriazole (TTA unsubstituted) by EIS. These studies have shown that the ability of the molecule to adsorb on the steel surface was dependent on the group in triazole ring substituent. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy surface analysis with TTA shows that it chemisorbed on surface of galvanized steel and electroplating steel.

  12. The effects of trace impurities in coal-derived liquid fuels on deposition and accelerated high temperature corrosion of cast superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowell, C. E.; Deadmore, D. J.; Santoro, G. J.; Kohl, F. J.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of trace metal impurities in coal-derived liquids on deposition, high temperature corrosion and fouling were examined. Alloys were burner rig tested from 800 to 1100 C and corrosion was evaluated as a function of potential impurities. Actual and doped fuel test were used to define an empirical life prediction equation. An evaluation of inhibitors to reduce or eliminate accelerated corrosion was made. Barium and strontium were found to limit attack. Intermittent application of the inhibitors or silicon additions were found to be effective techniques for controlling deposition without losing the inhibitor benefits. A computer program was used to predict the dew points and compositions of deposits. These predictions were confirmed in deposition test. The potential for such deposits to plug cooling holes of turbine airfoils was evaluated. Tests indicated that, while a potential problem exists, it strongly depended on minor impurity variations.

  13. METAL CORROSION COUPON CONTAMINATION, CORROSION STUDY DESIGN, AND INTERPRETATION PROBLEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    As a result of the new Lead and Copper Rule, some water utilities in the United States have begun or will soon begin corrosion demonstration studies. emonstration studies may include pipe rig/loop tests, metal coupon tests, and partial-system tests (fullscale). valuation of corro...

  14. [Inhibitors of xanthine oxidoreductase].

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Ken

    2008-04-01

    Inhibitors of xanthine oxidoreductase decrease production of uric acid, thus they act as hypouricemic drugs. Allopurinol, a prototypical xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor, has been widely prescribed for treatment of gout and hyperuricemia. However, severe side effects of allopurinol may occur in patients with renal insufficiency. Recently, novel nonpurine selective inhibitors of xanthine oxidoreductase have been developed as potential alternatives to allopurinol. They have different inhibition mechanisms, utilizing the enzyme structure and the reaction mechanism. Such variation of the inhibition mechanism affects/in vivo/hypouricemic effects of the inhibitors. PMID:18409526

  15. 219-S CORROSION STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    DIVINE JR; PARSONS GL

    2008-12-01

    A minor leak was detected in a drain line for Hood 2B located in the 222-S Laboratory. The line transfers radioactive waste, spent analytical standards, and chemicals used in various analytical procedures. Details are in the report provided by David Comstock, 2B NDE June 2008, work package LAB-WO-07-2012. Including the noted leak, the 222-S Laboratory has experienced two drain line leaks in approximately the last two years of operation. As a consequence, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CH2M HILL) requested the support of ChemMet, Ltd., PC (ChemMet) at the Hanford Site 222-S Laboratory. The corrosion expertise from ChemMet was required prior to preparation of a compatibility assessment for the 222-S Laboratory waste transfer system to assure the expected life of the piping system is extended as much as practicable. The system includes piping within the 222-S Laboratory and the 219-S Waste Storage and Transfer Facility and Operations Process. The ChemMet support was required for an assessment by 222-S staff to analyze what improvements to operational activities may be implemented to extend the tank/piping system life. This assessment will include a summary of the various material types, age, and locations throughout the facility. The assessment will also include a discussion of materials that are safe for drain line disposal on a regular basis, materials that are safe for disposal on a case-by-case basis including specific additional requirements such as flushing, neutralization to a specific pH, and materials prohibited from disposal. The assessment shall include adequate information for 222-S Laboratory personnel to make informed decisions in the future disposal of specific material types by discussing types of compatibility of system materials and potential wastes. The assessment is expected to contain some listing of acceptable waste materials but is not anticipated to be a complete or comprehensive list. Finally the assessment will encompass a brief discussion of

  16. Effect of asphaltene deposition on the internal corrosion in transmission lines

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, J.L.; Viloria, A.; Palacios T, C.A.

    1996-12-31

    Crude oil from Norte de Monagas field, in Venezuela, contains large amounts of asphaltenes, some of them are very unstable with tendency to precipitate. Because liquid is carried over from the separation process in the flow stations, asphaltenes are also present in the gas gathering and transmission lines, precipitating on inner wall of pipelines. The gas gathering and transmission lines contain gas with high partial pressures of CO{sub 2}, some H{sub 2}S and are water saturated; therefore inhibitors are used to control the internal corrosion. There is uncertainty on how inhibitors perform in the presence of asphaltene deposition. To protect the pipelines from external corrosion, cathodic protection is used. Since asphaltenes have polar properties, there exists an uncertainty on whether it enhances asphaltene precipitation and deposition. The purpose of this paper to describe the causes that enhance asphaltene deposition on gas and some of the preliminary result from an ongoing research project carried out by Intevep and Corpoven.

  17. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of Waste Package Outer Barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J.C.; McCright, R.D.

    2000-01-28

    Alloy 22 is an extremely Corrosion Resistant Material, with a very stable passive film. Based upon exposures in the LTCTF, the GC rates of Alloy 22 are typically below the level of detection, with four outliers having reported rates up to 0.75 #mu#m per year. In any event, over the 10,000 year life of the repository, GC of the Alloy 22 (assumed to be 2 cm thick) should not be life limiting. Because measured corrosion potentials are far below threshold potentials, localized breakdown of the passive film is unlikely under plausible conditions, even in SSW at 120 deg C. The pH in ambient-temperature crevices formed from Alloy 22 have been determined experimentally, with only modest lowering of the crevice pH observed under plausible conditions. Extreme lowering of the crevice pH was only observed under situations where the applied potential at the crevice mouth was sufficient to result in catastrophic breakdown of the passive film above the threshold potential in non-buffered conditions not characteristic of the Yucca Mountain environment. In cases where naturally ocurring buffers are present in the crevice solution, little or no lowering of the pH was observed, even with significant applied potential. With exposures of twelve months, no evidence of crevice corrosion has been observed in SDW, SCW and SAW at temperatures up to 90 deg C. An abstracted model has been presented, with parameters determined experimentally, that should enable performance assessment to account for the general and localized corrosion of this material. A feature of this model is the use of the materials specification to limit the range of corrosion and threshold potentials, thereby making sure that substandard materials prone to localized attack are avoided. Model validation will be covered in part by a companion SMR on abstraction of this model.

  18. Mentha pulegium extract as a natural product for the inhibition of corrosion. Part I: electrochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Khadraoui, Abdelkader; Khelifa, Abdellah; Boutoumi, Hocine; Hammouti, Belkheir

    2014-01-01

    The inhibitory effect of Mentha pulegium extract (MPE) on steel corrosion in 1 M HCl solution was investigated using potentiodynamic polarisation and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The inhibition efficiency of MPE was found to increase with the concentration and reached 88% at 33% (v/v). Polarisation measurements show that the natural extract acted as a mixed inhibitor. The remarkable inhibition efficiency of MPE was discussed in terms of blocking of electrode surface by adsorption of inhibitor molecules through active centres. The adsorption of MPE was found to accord with the Temkin isotherm. PMID:24853625

  19. Corrosion inhibition of aminated hydroxyl ethyl cellulose on mild steel in acidic condition.

    PubMed

    Sangeetha, Y; Meenakshi, S; Sairam Sundaram, C

    2016-10-01

    Aminated hydroxyethyl cellulose (AHEC) was synthesized, characterized using Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and the corrosion inhibition of AHEC on mild steel in 1M HCl was studied using chemical and electrochemical studies. Results obtained in weight loss method showed that inhibition efficiency increased with increase in concentration of AHEC. The adsorption of the inhibitor on metal surface followed Frumkin isotherm. Polarization studies revealed that the AHEC inhibits through mixed mode. Thermodynamic parameters and activation energy were calculated and discussed. FTIR and X-ray diffraction studies (XRD) confirmed the adsorption of the inhibitor. The surface morphology was studied using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). PMID:27312608

  20. Corrosion behavior of several metals in ethylene glycol-base heat-transfer fluids under conditions encountered in solar energy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zeman, G.J.

    1980-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of aluminum, copper, and iron in inhibited ethylene glycol-ASTM corrosive water solutions was evaluated in a laboratory loop under isothermal and heat-flux conditions for 1000 h at temperatures between 378 and 413/sup 0/K, in static autoclave tests at 450/sup 0/K for 500 h, and by potentiodynamic polarization measurements at temperatures between 298 and 348/sup 0/K. The effect of time, temperature, and ethylene glycol concentration of the heat-transfer fluid on the extent of inhibitor depletion was determined from analyses of the reserve alkalinity, pH, and inhibitor content of the solutions. The performance of an electrochemical sensor as a monitor of fluid quality was also evaluated. A heat flux of 0.4 to 1.0 kW/m/sup 2/ did not have a significant effect on the corrosion behavior of the various materials at temperatures between 378 and 413/sup 0/K. The corrosion rates of aluminum, copper, and iron in the 50 volume percent inhibited ethylene glycol-corrosive water solution decreased as a function of time during the 1000-h test. At 413/sup 0/K, the corrosion rate of copper was considerably higher than that of iron or aluminum at low flow velocity. Significant degradation of the fluid quality, as indicated by the measurement of the pH, reserve alkalinity, and inhibitor concentrations, occurred after several hundred hours at temperatures of approx. 450/sup 0/K.