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Sample records for amino acid requirements

  1. Human Protein and Amino Acid Requirements.

    PubMed

    Hoffer, L John

    2016-05-01

    Human protein and amino acid nutrition encompasses a wide, complex, frequently misunderstood, and often contentious area of clinical research and practice. This tutorial explains the basic biochemical and physiologic principles that underlie our current understanding of protein and amino acid nutrition. The following topics are discussed: (1) the identity, measurement, and essentiality of nutritional proteins; (2) the definition and determination of minimum requirements; (3) nutrition adaptation; (4) obligatory nitrogen excretion and the minimum protein requirement; (5) minimum versus optimum protein intakes; (6) metabolic responses to surfeit and deficient protein intakes; (7) body composition and protein requirements; (8) labile protein; (9) N balance; (10) the principles of protein and amino acid turnover, including an analysis of the controversial indicator amino acid oxidation technique; (11) general guidelines for evaluating protein turnover articles; (12) amino acid turnover versus clearance; (13) the protein content of hydrated amino acid solutions; (14) protein requirements in special situations, including protein-catabolic critical illness; (15) amino acid supplements and additives, including monosodium glutamate and glutamine; and (16) a perspective on the future of protein and amino acid nutrition research. In addition to providing practical information, this tutorial aims to demonstrate the importance of rigorous physiologic reasoning, stimulate intellectual curiosity, and encourage fresh ideas in this dynamic area of human nutrition. In general, references are provided only for topics that are not well covered in modern textbooks. PMID:26796095

  2. Protein and Amino Acid Requirements during Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Elango, Rajavel; Ball, Ronald O

    2016-07-01

    Protein forms an essential component of a healthy diet in humans to support both growth and maintenance. During pregnancy, an exceptional stage of life defined by rapid growth and development, adequate dietary protein is crucial to ensure a healthy outcome. Protein deposition in maternal and fetal tissues increases throughout pregnancy, with most occurring during the third trimester. Dietary protein intake recommendations are based on factorial estimates because the traditional method of determining protein requirements, nitrogen balance, is invasive and undesirable during pregnancy. The current Estimated Average Requirement and RDA recommendations of 0.88 and 1.1 g · kg(-1) · d(-1), respectively, are for all stages of pregnancy. The single recommendation does not take into account the changing needs during different stages of pregnancy. Recently, with the use of the minimally invasive indicator amino acid oxidation method, we defined the requirements to be, on average, 1.2 and 1.52 g · kg(-1) · d(-1) during early (∼16 wk) and late (∼36 wk) stages of pregnancy, respectively. Although the requirements are substantially higher than current recommendations, our values are ∼14-18% of total energy and fit within the Acceptable Macronutrient Distribution Range. Using swine as an animal model we showed that the requirements for several indispensable amino acids increase dramatically during late gestation compared with early gestation. Additional studies should be conducted during pregnancy to confirm the newly determined protein requirements and to determine the indispensable amino acid requirements during pregnancy in humans. PMID:27422521

  3. Parenteral sulfur amino acid requirements in septic infants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To investigate parenteral methionine requirements of critically ill, septic infants, we conducted an investigation involving 12 infants (age 2+/-1 years; weight 13+/-2kg) using the intravenous indicator amino acid oxidation and balance technique. They received a balanced parenteral amino acid formul...

  4. Amino acids

    MedlinePlus

    Amino acids are organic compounds that combine to form proteins . Amino acids and proteins are the building blocks of life. When proteins are digested or broken down, amino acids are left. The human body uses amino acids ...

  5. Macronutrient requirement for growth: Protein/amino acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current recommendations by the Institute of Medicine on amino acid requirements in healthy children older than 6 months and for children and adolescents have been established using the factorial approach, which takes into account: i) maintenance for obligatory losses, which is estimated by regressio...

  6. Amino Acid and Vitamin Requirements of Several Bacteroides Strains

    PubMed Central

    Quinto, Grace

    1966-01-01

    Nutritional studies were performed on nine Bacteroides strains, by use of the methodology and media of anaerobic rumen microbiology. Ristella perfoetens CCI required l-arginine hydrochloride, l-tryptophan, l-leucine, l-histidine hydrochloride, l-cysteine hydrochloride, dl-valine, dl-tyrosine, and the vitamin calcium-d-pantothenate, since scant turbidity developed in media without these nutrients. R. perfoetens was stimulated by glycine, dl-lysine hydrochloride, dl-isoleucine, l-proline, l-glutamic acid, dl-alanine, dl-phenylalanine, dl-methionine, and the vitamins nicotinamide and p-aminobenzoic acid, since maximal turbidity developed more slowly in media without these nutrients than in complete medium. Medium A-23, which was devised for R. perfoetens, contained salts, 0.0002% nicotinamide and calcium d-pantothenate, 0.00001% p-aminobenzoic acid, 0.044% l-tryptophan, 0.09% l-glutamic acid, and 0.1% of the other 13 amino acids listed above. Zuberella clostridiformis and seven strains of R. pseudoinsolita did not require vitamins, and showed no absolute requirement for any one amino acid. Various strains produced maximal turbidity more slowly in media deficient in l-proline, glycine, l-glutamic acid, dl-serine, l-histidine hydrochloride, dl-alanine, or l-cysteine hydrochloride, than in complete medium. These eight strains grew optimally in medium A-23 plus 0.1% dl-serine but without vitamins. PMID:16349673

  7. Amino acids

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002222.htm Amino acids To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Amino acids are organic compounds that combine to form proteins . ...

  8. The requirements of protein & amino acid during acute & chronic infections.

    PubMed

    Kurpad, Anura V

    2006-08-01

    Nutrition and infection interact with each other in a synergistic vicious cycle, leading to an adverse nutritional status and increased susceptibility to infection. Infectious episodes result in hypermetabolism and a negative nitrogen balance which is modulated by hormones, cytokines and other pro-inflammatory mediators, and is compounded by a reduced food intake. The extent of the negative nitrogen balance varies with the type of infection and its duration; however, it is reasonable to suggest that the loss of body protein could be minimized by the provision of dietary nitrogen, although anorexia will limit this. Further, distinctions need to be made about the provision of nutrients or protein during the catabolic and anabolic or recovery phase of the infection, since the capacity of the body to retain protein is enhanced in the anabolic recovery phase. Meeting the increased requirement for protein (and other nutrients) in infection does not imply a complete therapeutic strategy. Infections need to be treated appropriately, with nutrition as an adjunct to the treatment. Prior undernutrition could also impair the body's response to infection, although the weight of the evidence would suggest that this happens more particularly in oedematous undernutrition. In general, the amount of extra protein that would appear to be needed is of the order of 20-25 per cent of the recommended intake, for most infections. In acute infections, this is particularly relevant during the convalescence period. Community trials have suggested that lysine supplementation to the level required for normal daily nutriture, in predominantly wheat eating or potentially lysine deficient communities, improves immune function among other functional nutritional parameters; however, there is as yet insufficient evidence to suggest a specific requirement for amino acids in infections over and above the normal daily requirement as based on recent evidence. Some clinical studies that have showed

  9. The cysteine, total sulfur amino acid, tyrosine, phenylalanine + tyrosine, and non-essential amino acid maintenance requirements of broiler breeders.

    PubMed

    Ekmay, R D; Mei, S J; Sakomura, N K; Coon, C N

    2016-06-01

    Two hundred and fifty Cobb-Vantress broiler breeders were used to determine the maintenance requirement and efficiency of utilization of dietary Cys, Tyr, and non-essential amino acids (AA) in a 21-day experiment. The breeders were fed crystalline amino acid diets containing graded levels of Cys or Tyr representing 0, 10, 20, 30, and 40% of their suggested requirement level with all other amino acids maintained at 40% of their suggested requirement level. To determine the non-essential AA maintenance requirement, graded levels of non-essential AA were provided by glutamic acid to represent 12, 19, 26, 33, and 40% of the ideal level of glutamic acid with all other amino acids maintained at their maintenance requirement level. The total sulfur amino acid (TSAA) and Phe + Tyr requirements were calculated by combining Cys and Tyr results, respectively, with previously determined Met and Phe, respectively. The slope of Cys, Tyr, and non-essential AA accretion regression line indicated that 29% Cys, 24% TSAA, 21% Tyr, 20% Phe + Tyr, and 9% non-essential AA of crystalline amino acids were retained. The Cys requirement for zero protein accretion was calculated to be 30.48 mg/d or 17.006 mg/ kgBW(0.75)/d or 75.426 mg/kgCP/d. The TSAA requirement for zero accretion was calculated to be 132.25 mg/b/d, 71.48 mg/kgBW(0.75)/d, and 307.55 mg/kgCP/d. The Tyr requirement for zero protein accretion was calculated to be 65.907 mg/d or 37.233 mg/ kgBW(0.75)/d or 175.566 mg/kgCP/d. The Phe + Tyr requirement for zero protein accretion was calculated to be 352.18 mg/b/d, 190.37 mg/kgBW(0.75)/d, and 749.33 mg/kgCP/d. The non-essential AA requirement for zero protein accretion was calculated to be 3715.194 mg/d or 2003.155 mg/kgBW(0.75)/d or 9452.954 mg/kgCP/d. PMID:26994191

  10. High hydrostatic pressure increases amino acid requirements in the piezo-hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus barophilus.

    PubMed

    Cario, Anaïs; Lormières, Florence; Xiang, Xiao; Oger, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    We have established a defined growth medium for the piezophilic hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus barophilus, which allows growth yields of ca. 10(8) cells/ml under both atmospheric and high hydrostatic pressure. Our results demonstrate a major impact of hydrostatic pressure on amino acid metabolism, with increases from 3 amino acids required at atmospheric pressure to 17 at 40 MPa. We observe in T. barophilus and other Thermococcales a similar discrepancy between the presence/absence of amino acid synthesis pathways and amino acid requirements, which supports the existence of alternate, but yet unknown, amino acid synthesis pathways, and may explain the low number of essential amino acids observed in T. barophilus and other Thermococcales. T. barophilus displays a strong metabolic preference for organic polymers such as polypeptides and chitin, which may constitute a more readily available resource of carbon and energy in situ in deep-sea hydrothermal vents. We hypothesize that the low energy yields of fermentation of organic polymers, together with energetic constraints imposed by high hydrostatic pressure, may render de novo synthesis of amino acids ecologically unfavorable. Induction of this metabolic switch to amino acid recycling can explain the requirement for non-essential amino acids by Thermococcales for efficient growth in defined medium. PMID:26226334

  11. 77 FR 65537 - Requirements for Patent Applications Containing Nucleotide Sequence and/or Amino Acid Sequence...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-29

    ... Amino Acid Sequence Disclosures ACTION: Proposed collection; comment request. SUMMARY: The United States....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Abstract Patent applications that contain nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence disclosures must include a copy of the sequence listing in accordance with the requirements in 37 CFR...

  12. Estimated quantitative amino acid requirements for Florida pompano reared in low-salinity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As with most marine carnivores, Florida pompano require relatively high crude protein diets to obtain optimal growth. Precision formulations to match the dietary indispensable amino acid (IAA) pattern to a species’ requirements can be used to lower the overall dietary protein. However IAA requirem...

  13. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... defects & other health conditions > Amino acid metabolism disorders Amino acid metabolism disorders E-mail to a friend Please ... baby’s newborn screening may include testing for certain amino acid metabolism disorders. These are rare health conditions that ...

  14. Plasma amino acids

    MedlinePlus

    Amino acids blood test ... types of methods used to determine the individual amino acid levels in the blood. ... test is done to measure the level of amino acids in the blood. An increased level of a ...

  15. Current issues in determining dietary protein and amino-acid requirements.

    PubMed

    Pencharz, P; Jahoor, F; Kurpad, A; Michaelsen, K F; Slater, C; Tomé, D; Weisell, R

    2014-03-01

    Pregnancy and the first two years of life are periods of rapid growth and yet the knowledge of requirements for protein and dietary indispensable amino acids is very limited. The development of carbon oxidation methods opens the way to studies that should fill these important gaps in knowledge. PMID:24424080

  16. Requirement for alanine in the amino acid control of deprivation-induced protein degradation in liver.

    PubMed Central

    Pösö, A R; Mortimore, G E

    1984-01-01

    Protein degradation in liver is actively controlled by a small group of inhibitory amino acids--leucine, tyrosine (or phenylalanine), glutamine, proline, histidine, tryptophan, and methionine. Other evidence, however, suggests that one or more of the remaining 12 noninhibitory amino acids is also required for suppression of proteolysis at normal concentrations. This question was investigated in livers of fed rats perfused in the single-pass mode. The deletion of alanine at normal (1x), but not at 4x or 10x normal, plasma amino acid concentrations evoked a near-maximal acceleration of protein degradation. No other noninhibitory amino acid was effective. Because alanine alone was not directly inhibitory and its omission was not associated with a decrease in inhibitory amino acid pools, alanine was presumed to act as a coregulator in the expression of inhibitory activity. When tested alone, the inhibitory group was as effective as the complete mixture at 0.5x and 4x levels, but it lost its suppressive ability within a narrow zone of concentration centered slightly above 1x. The addition of 1x (0.48 mM) alanine completely restored the inhibition. Pyruvate and lactate could be effectively substituted, but only at concentrations 10-20 times greater than that of alanine. These, together with earlier findings, indicate the existence of a regulatory complex that recognizes specific amino acids and transmits positive and negative signals to proteolytic sites. The results also suggest that alanine can provide an important regulatory link between energy demands and protein degradation. PMID:6589593

  17. Practical starter pig amino acid requirements in relation to immunity, gut health and growth performance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Immune system activation begins a host of physiological responses. Infectious agents are recognized by monocytes and macrophages which in turn stimulate cytokine production. It is the hormone-like factors called cytokines that orchestrate the immune response. The classic responses observed with immune system activation and cytokine production include: anorexia, fever, lethargy, recruitment of other immune cells, and phagocytosis. While production of immune system components is known to require some amino acids, increases in amino acid requirements are more than offset by the associated decrease in protein accretion and increased muscle protein degradation that also accompanies immune system activation. However, the biggest impact of cytokine production is a decrease in feed intake. Therefore, as feed intake decreases, the energy needed to drive protein synthesis is also decreased. This suggests that diets should still be formulated on a similar calorie:lysine ratio as those formulated for non-immune challenged pigs. The evidence is sparse or equivocal for increasing nutrient requirements during an immune challenge. Nutritionists and swine producers should resist the pressure to alter the diet, limit feed, or add expensive feed additives during an immune challenge. While immune stimulation does not necessitate changes in diet formulation, when pigs are challenged with non-pathogenic diarrhea there are potential advantages on gut health with the increased use of crystalline amino acids rather than intact protein sources (i.e., soybean meal). This is because reducing crude protein decreases the quantity of fermentable protein entering the large intestine, which lowers post weaning diarrhea. It also lowers the requirement for expensive specialty protein sources or other protein sources such as soybean meal that present immunological challenges to the gut. The objective of this review is two-fold. The first is to discuss immunity by nutrition interactions, or lack

  18. The dietary branched chain amino acid requirements of hybrid striped bass(Morone chrysops x M. saxatilis)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The requirements for branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) are unknown in hybrid striped bass and necessary for formulating efficient and nutritious diets. Moreover, the dietary balance among these three amino acids can substantially influence the performance of meat animals fed those diets. The diet...

  19. [Amino acids in saliva].

    PubMed

    Klinger, G; Gruhn, K

    1984-01-01

    Total amino acids in saliva and free and peptide-bound amino acids from 21 saliva samples were determined. The contents of amino acids was 25 mmol/1; total nitrogen content was 78-80 mmol/1. Amino acids consist of Prolin in 25%. Some patients were examined before and after application of the depot estrogen ethinyl estradiosulfonat, which stimulates the assimilation of protein. After application, amino acids increased and the authors found a shift between the single amino acids. Estrogen medication induced an increase in proteins with the character of collagens. Clinical effects are discussed. (author's modified) PMID:6240853

  20. Studies on the protein and sulfur amino acid requirements of young bobwhite quail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Serafin, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    Four experiments were conducted with purified diets to examine the influence of protein level and to estimate the sulfur amino acid (S.A.A.) requirement of young Bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus). These studies demonstrated (I) that 26% protein was sufficient for rapid growth when the diet was supplemented with methionine; (2) that diets containing higher levels of protein (29.3% and 31.3%) failed to support satisfactory growth unless they contained supplemental methionine; and (3) that young Bobwhite quail require no more than 1.0% sulfur-containing amino acids for optimal growth and efficiency of feed utilization. A fifth experiment was conducted to examine the protein and S.A.A. requirements of young Bobwhite quail using practical rations and to compare results with those obtained with purified diets. Diets containing 24%, 26% and 28% protein were supplied with and without supplemental methionine in a five week study. Results showed significant growth responses to protein and supplemental methionine. Responses showed that Bobwhite quail require no more than 26% protein for maximum growth and efficiency of feed utilization when the S.A.A. level of the diet was approximately 1.0%. The results were in close agreement with those obtained with purified diets. These findings define more precisely than had been known the quantitative requirements of young Bobwhite quail for protein and for the S.A.A. necessary for optimal growth.

  1. Proteins and Amino Acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins are the most abundant substances in living organisms and cells. All proteins are constructed from the same twenty amino acids that are linked together by covalent bonds. Shorter chains of two or more amino acids can be linked by covalent bonds to form polypeptides. There are twenty amino...

  2. Amino acid analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winitz, M.; Graff, J. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The process and apparatus for qualitative and quantitative analysis of the amino acid content of a biological sample are presented. The sample is deposited on a cation exchange resin and then is washed with suitable solvents. The amino acids and various cations and organic material with a basic function remain on the resin. The resin is eluted with an acid eluant, and the eluate containing the amino acids is transferred to a reaction vessel where the eluant is removed. Final analysis of the purified acylated amino acid esters is accomplished by gas-liquid chromatographic techniques.

  3. Dietary requirements of synthesizable amino acids by animals: a paradigm shift in protein nutrition

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Amino acids are building blocks for proteins in all animals. Based on growth or nitrogen balance, amino acids were traditionally classified as nutritionally essential or nonessential for mammals, birds and fish. It was assumed that all the “nutritionally nonessential amino acids (NEAA)” were synthesized sufficiently in the body to meet the needs for maximal growth and optimal health. However, careful analysis of the scientific literature reveals that over the past century there has not been compelling experimental evidence to support this assumption. NEAA (e.g., glutamine, glutamate, proline, glycine and arginine) play important roles in regulating gene expression, cell signaling, antioxidative responses, fertility, neurotransmission, and immunity. Additionally, glutamate, glutamine and aspartate are major metabolic fuels for the small intestine to maintain its digestive function and to protect the integrity of the intestinal mucosa. Thus, diets for animals must contain all NEAA to optimize their survival, growth, development, reproduction, and health. Furthermore, NEAA should be taken into consideration in revising the “ideal protein” concept that is currently used to formulate swine and poultry diets. Adequate provision of all amino acids (including NEAA) in diets enhances the efficiency of animal production. In this regard, amino acids should not be classified as nutritionally essential or nonessential in animal or human nutrition. The new Texas A&M University’s optimal ratios of dietary amino acids for swine and chickens are expected to beneficially reduce dietary protein content and improve the efficiency of their nutrient utilization, growth, and production performance. PMID:24999386

  4. Dietary requirements of synthesizable amino acids by animals: a paradigm shift in protein nutrition.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guoyao

    2014-01-01

    Amino acids are building blocks for proteins in all animals. Based on growth or nitrogen balance, amino acids were traditionally classified as nutritionally essential or nonessential for mammals, birds and fish. It was assumed that all the "nutritionally nonessential amino acids (NEAA)" were synthesized sufficiently in the body to meet the needs for maximal growth and optimal health. However, careful analysis of the scientific literature reveals that over the past century there has not been compelling experimental evidence to support this assumption. NEAA (e.g., glutamine, glutamate, proline, glycine and arginine) play important roles in regulating gene expression, cell signaling, antioxidative responses, fertility, neurotransmission, and immunity. Additionally, glutamate, glutamine and aspartate are major metabolic fuels for the small intestine to maintain its digestive function and to protect the integrity of the intestinal mucosa. Thus, diets for animals must contain all NEAA to optimize their survival, growth, development, reproduction, and health. Furthermore, NEAA should be taken into consideration in revising the "ideal protein" concept that is currently used to formulate swine and poultry diets. Adequate provision of all amino acids (including NEAA) in diets enhances the efficiency of animal production. In this regard, amino acids should not be classified as nutritionally essential or nonessential in animal or human nutrition. The new Texas A&M University's optimal ratios of dietary amino acids for swine and chickens are expected to beneficially reduce dietary protein content and improve the efficiency of their nutrient utilization, growth, and production performance. PMID:24999386

  5. Lactobacillus gasseri requires peptides, not proteins or free amino acids, for growth in milk.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, K; Matsunaga, K; Takihiro, S; Moritoki, A; Ryuto, S; Kawai, Y; Masuda, T; Miyamoto, T

    2015-03-01

    Lactobacillus gasseri is a widespread commensal lactic acid bacterium inhabiting human mucosal niches and has many beneficial effects as a probiotic. However, L. gasseri is difficult to grow in milk, which hurts usability for the food industry. It had been previously reported that supplementation with yeast extract or proteose peptone, including peptides, enables L. gasseri to grow well in milk. In this study, our objective was to confirm peptide requirement of L. gasseri and evaluate efficacy of peptide release by enzymatic proteolysis on growth of L. gassei in milk. Three strains of L. gasseri did not grow well in modified DeMan, Rogosa, Sharpe broth without any nitrogen sources (MRS-N), but addition of a casein-derived peptide mixture, tryptone, promoted growth. In contrast, little effect was observed after adding casein or a casein-derived amino acid mixture, casamino acids. These results indicate that L. gasseri requires peptides, not proteins or free amino acids, among milk-derived nitrogen sources for growth. Lactobacillus gasseri JCM 1131T hardly had growth capacity in 6 kinds of milk-based media: bovine milk, human milk, skim milk, cheese whey, modified MRS-N (MRSL-N) supplemented with acid whey, and MRSL-N supplemented with casein. Moreover, treatment with digestive proteases, particularly pepsin, to release peptides made it grow well in each milk-based medium. The pepsin treatment was the most effective for growth of strain JCM 1131T in skim milk among the tested food-grade proteases such as trypsin, α-chymotrypsin, calf rennet, ficin, bromelain, and papain. As well as strain JCM 1131T, pepsinolysis of milk improved growth of other L. gasseri strains and some strains of enteric lactobacilli such as Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus gallinarum, Lactobacillus johnsonii, and Lactobacillus reuteri. These results suggest that some relatives of L. gasseri also use peptides as desirable nitrogen sources, and that milk may be a good supplier of nutritious

  6. Distinct Amino Acid Compositional Requirements for Formation and Maintenance of the [PSI+] Prion in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    MacLea, Kyle S.; Paul, Kacy R.; Ben-Musa, Zobaida; Waechter, Aubrey; Shattuck, Jenifer E.; Gruca, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    Multiple yeast prions have been identified that result from the structural conversion of proteins into a self-propagating amyloid form. Amyloid-based prion activity in yeast requires a series of discrete steps. First, the prion protein must form an amyloid nucleus that can recruit and structurally convert additional soluble proteins. Subsequently, maintenance of the prion during cell division requires fragmentation of these aggregates to create new heritable propagons. For the Saccharomyces cerevisiae prion protein Sup35, these different activities are encoded by different regions of the Sup35 prion domain. An N-terminal glutamine/asparagine-rich nucleation domain is required for nucleation and fiber growth, while an adjacent oligopeptide repeat domain is largely dispensable for prion nucleation and fiber growth but is required for chaperone-dependent prion maintenance. Although prion activity of glutamine/asparagine-rich proteins is predominantly determined by amino acid composition, the nucleation and oligopeptide repeat domains of Sup35 have distinct compositional requirements. Here, we quantitatively define these compositional requirements in vivo. We show that aromatic residues strongly promote both prion formation and chaperone-dependent prion maintenance. In contrast, nonaromatic hydrophobic residues strongly promote prion formation but inhibit prion propagation. These results provide insight into why some aggregation-prone proteins are unable to propagate as prions. PMID:25547291

  7. Amino Acid Crossword Puzzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Learning the 20 standard amino acids is an essential component of an introductory course in biochemistry. Later in the course, the students study metabolism and learn about various catabolic and anabolic pathways involving amino acids. Learning new material or concepts often is easier if one can connect the new material to what one already knows;…

  8. Branched-chain amino acid interactions with reference to amino acid requirements in adult men: Valine metabolism at different leucine intakes

    SciTech Connect

    Pelletier, V.; Marks, L.; Wagner, D.A.; Hoerr, R.A.; Young, V.R. )

    1991-08-01

    The authors explored whether the oxidation of valine and by implication the physiological requirement for this amino acid are affected by changes in leucine intake over a physiological range. Six young adult men received, in random order, four L-amino acid-based diets for 5 d supplying either 20 or 10 mg valine.kg body wt-1.d-1, each in combination with 80 or 40 mg leucine.kg-1.d-1. On day 6 subjects were studied with an 8-h continuous intravenous infusion of (1-13C)valine (and (2H3)leucine) to determine valine oxidation in the fasted state (first 3 h) and fed state (last 5 h). Valine oxidation in the fasted state was similar among all diets but was lower (P less than 0.05) in the fed state for the 10 vs 20 mg valine.kg-1.d-1 intake. Leucine intake did not affect valine oxidation. Mean daily valine balance approximated +1.3 mg.kg-1.d-1 for the 20-mg intake and -1.6 mg.kg-1.d-1 for the 10-mg intake. These findings support our previously suggested mean valine requirement estimate of approximately 20 mg.kg-1.d-1.

  9. Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Aspiration Syndrome Additional Content Medical News Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism By Lee M. Sanders, MD, MPH NOTE: ... Metabolic Disorders Disorders of Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders of Lipid Metabolism Amino acids are ...

  10. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolism is the process your body uses to make energy from the food you eat. Food is ... One group of these disorders is amino acid metabolism disorders. They include phenylketonuria (PKU) and maple syrup ...

  11. Amino Acids and Chirality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jamie E.

    2012-01-01

    Amino acids are among the most heavily studied organic compound class in carbonaceous chondrites. The abundance, distributions, enantiomeric compositions, and stable isotopic ratios of amino acids have been determined in carbonaceous chondrites fi'om a range of classes and petrographic types, with interesting correlations observed between these properties and the class and typc of the chondritcs. In particular, isomeric distributions appear to correlate with parent bodies (chondrite class). In addition, certain chiral amino acids are found in enantiomeric excess in some chondrites. The delivery of these enantiomeric excesses to the early Earth may have contributed to the origin of the homochirality that is central to life on Earth today. This talk will explore the amino acids in carbonaceous chondritcs and their relevance to the origin of life.

  12. Requirement of novel amino acid fragments of orphan nuclear receptor TR3/Nur77 for its functions in angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Marianne A.; Peng, Jin; Ye, Taiyang; Zhao, Dezheng; Zeng, Huiyan

    2015-01-01

    Pathological angiogenesis is a hallmark of many diseases. We demonstrated that TR3/Nur77 is an excellent target for pro-angiogenesis and anti-angiogenesis therapies. Here, we report that TR3 transcriptionally regulates endothelial cell migration, permeability and the formation of actin stress fibers that is independent of RhoA GTPase. 1) Amino acid residues 344-GRR-346 and de-phosphorylation of amino acid residue serine 351 in the DNA binding domain, and 2) phosphorylation of amino acid residues in the 41-61 amino acid fragment of the transactivation domain, of TR3 are required for its induction of the formation of actin stress fibers, cell proliferation, migration and permeability. The 41-61 amino acid fragment contains one of the three potential protein interaction motifs in the transactivation domain of TR3, predicted by computational modeling and analysis. These studies further our understanding of the molecular mechanism, by which TR3 regulates angiogenesis, identify novel therapeutic targeted sites of TR3, and set the foundation for the development of high-throughput screening assays to identify compounds targeting TR3/Nur77 for pro-angiogenesis and anti-angiogenesis therapies. PMID:26155943

  13. Essential amino acid transporter Lat4 (Slc43a2) is required for mouse development

    PubMed Central

    Guetg, Adriano; Mariotta, Luca; Bock, Lukas; Herzog, Brigitte; Fingerhut, Ralph; Camargo, Simone M R; Verrey, François

    2015-01-01

    Amino acid (AA) uniporter Lat4 (Slc43a2) mediates facilitated diffusion of branched-chain AAs, methionine and phenylalanine, although its physiological role and subcellular localization are not known. We report that Slc43a2 knockout mice were born at expected Mendelian frequency but displayed an ∼10% intrauterine growth retardation and low amniotic fluid AAs, suggesting defective transplacental transport. Postnatal growth was strongly reduced, with premature death occurring within 9 days such that further investigations were made within 3 days of birth. Lat4 immunofluorescence showed a strong basolateral signal in the small intestine, kidney proximal tubule and thick ascending limb epithelial cells of wild-type but not Slc43a2 null littermates and no signal in liver and skeletal muscle. Experiments using Xenopus laevis oocytes demonstrated that Lat4 functioned as a symmetrical low affinity uniporter with a K0.5 of ∼5 mm for both in- and efflux. Plasma AA concentration was decreased in Slc43a2 null pups, in particular that of non-essential AAs alanine, serine, histidine and proline. Together with an increased level of plasma long chain acylcarnitines and a strong alteration of liver gene expression, this indicates malnutrition. Attempts to rescue pups by decreasing the litter size or by nutrients injected i.p. did not succeed. Radioactively labelled leucine but not lysine given per os accumulated in the small intestine of Slc43a2null pups, suggesting the defective transcellular transport of Lat4 substrates. In summary, Lat4 is a symmetrical uniporter for neutral essential AAs localizing at the basolateral side of (re)absorbing epithelia and is necessary for early nutrition and development. Key points Lat4 (Slc43a2) transports branched-chain amino acids, phenylalanine and methionine, and is expressed in kidney tubule and small intestine epithelial cells. Using a new knockout model as a negative control, it is shown that Lat4 is expressed at the basolateral

  14. Brain amino acid sensing.

    PubMed

    Tsurugizawa, T; Uneyama, H; Torii, K

    2014-09-01

    The 20 different amino acids, in blood as well as in the brain, are strictly maintained at the same levels throughout the day, regardless of food intake. Gastric vagal afferents only respond to free glutamate and sugars, providing recognition of food intake and initiating digestion. Metabolic control of amino acid homeostasis and diet-induced thermogenesis is triggered by this glutamate signalling in the stomach through the gut-brain axis. Rats chronically fed high-sugar and high-fat diets do not develop obesity when a 1% (w/v) monosodium glutamate (MSG) solution is available in a choice paradigm. Deficiency of the essential amino acid lysine (Lys) induced a plasticity in rats in response to Lys. This result shows how the body is able to identify deficient nutrients to maintain homeostasis. This plastic effect is induced by activin A activity in the brain, particularly in certain neurons in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) which is the centre for amino acid homeostasis and appetite. These neurons respond to glutamate signalling in the oral cavity by which umami taste is perceived. They play a quantitative role in regulating ingestion of deficient nutrients, thereby leading to a healthier life. After recovery from malnutrition, rats prefer MSG solutions, which serve as biomarkers for protein nutrition. PMID:25200295

  15. Amino acid analysis.

    PubMed

    Crabb, J W; West, K A; Dodson, W S; Hulmes, J D

    2001-05-01

    Amino acid analysis (AAA) is one of the best methods to quantify peptides and proteins. Two general approaches to quantitative AAA exist, namely, classical postcolumn derivatization following ion-exchange chromatography and precolumn derivatization followed by reversed-phase HPLC (RP-HPLC). Excellent instrumentation and several specific methodologies are available for both approaches, and both have advantages and disadvantages. This unit focuses on picomole-level AAA of peptides and proteins using the most popular precolumn-derivatization method, namely, phenylthiocarbamyl amino acid analysis (PTC-AAA). It is directed primarily toward those interested in establishing the technology with a modest budget. PTC derivatization and analysis conditions are described, and support and alternate protocols describe additional techniques necessary or useful for most any AAA method--e.g., sample preparation, hydrolysis, instrument calibration, data interpretation, and analysis of difficult or unusual residues such as cysteine, tryptophan, phosphoamino acids, and hydroxyproline. PMID:18429107

  16. Pairwise amino acid secondary structural propensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemmama, Ilan E.; Chapagain, Prem P.; Gerstman, Bernard S.

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the propensities for amino acids to form a specific secondary structure when they are paired with other amino acids. Our investigations use molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations, and we compare the results to those from the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Proper comparison requires weighting of the MD results in a manner consistent with the relative frequency of appearance in the PDB of each possible pair of amino acids. We find that the propensity for an amino acid to assume a secondary structure varies dramatically depending on the amino acid that is before or after it in the primary sequence. This cooperative effect means that when selecting amino acids to facilitate the formation of a secondary structure in peptide engineering experiments, the adjacent amino acids must be considered. We also examine the preference for a secondary structure in bacterial proteins and compare the results to those of human proteins.

  17. Amino acid imbalance in cystinuria

    PubMed Central

    Asatoor, A. M.; Freedman, P. S.; Gabriel, J. R. T.; Milne, M. D.; Prosser, D. I.; Roberts, J. T.; Willoughby, C. P.

    1974-01-01

    After oral ingestion of a free amino acid mixture by three cystinuric patients, plasma increments of lysine and arginine were lower and those of many other amino acids were significantly higher than those found in control subjects. Similar results were obtained in control subjects after amino acid imbalance had been artificially induced by the omission of cystine, lysine, and arginine from the amino acid mixture. Especially high increments of alanine and proline provided the best evidence of amino acid imbalance caused by a temporary lysine and, to a lesser extent, arginine and cystine deficit. No such amino acid imbalance was found to occur in the cystinuric patients after ingestion of whole protein, indicating that absorption of oligopeptides produced by protein digestion provided a balanced physiological serum amino acid increment. This is considered to explain the lack of any unequivocal nutritional deficit in cystinuric patients despite poor absorption of the essential free amino acid, lysine. PMID:4411931

  18. G glycoprotein amino acid residues required for human monoclonal antibody RAB1 neutralization are conserved in rabies virus street isolates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Rowley, Kirk J; Booth, Brian J; Sloan, Susan E; Ambrosino, Donna M; Babcock, Gregory J

    2011-08-01

    Replacement of polyclonal anti-rabies immunoglobulin (RIG) used in rabies post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) with a monoclonal antibody will eliminate cost and availability constraints that currently exist using RIG in the developing world. The human monoclonal antibody RAB1 has been shown to neutralize all rabies street isolates tested; however for the laboratory-adapted fixed strain, CVS-11, mutation in the G glycoprotein of amino acid 336 from asparagine (N) to aspartic acid (D) resulted in resistance to neutralization. Interestingly, this same mutation in the G glycoprotein of a second laboratory-adapted fixed strain (ERA) did not confer resistance to RAB1 neutralization. Using cell surface staining and lentivirus pseudotyped with rabies virus G glycoprotein (RABVpp), we identified an amino acid alteration in CVS-11 (K346), not present in ERA (R346), which was required in combination with D336 to confer resistance to RAB1. A complete analysis of G glycoprotein sequences from GenBank demonstrated that no identified rabies isolates contain the necessary combination of G glycoprotein mutations for resistance to RAB1 neutralization, consistent with the broad neutralization of RAB1 observed in direct viral neutralization experiments with street isolates. All combinations of amino acids 336 and 346 reported in the sequence database were engineered into the ERA G glycoprotein and RAB1 was able to neutralize RABVpp bearing ERA G glycoprotein containing all known combinations at these critical residues. These data demonstrate that RAB1 has the capacity to neutralize all identified rabies isolates and a minimum of two distinct mutations in the G glycoprotein are required for abrogation of RAB1 neutralization. PMID:21693135

  19. Amino acids in Arctic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalabrin, E.; Zangrando, R.; Barbaro, E.; Kehrwald, N. M.; Gabrieli, J.; Barbante, C.; Gambaro, A.

    2012-11-01

    Amino acids are significant components of atmospheric aerosols, affecting organic nitrogen input to marine ecosystems, atmospheric radiation balance, and the global water cycle. The wide range of amino acid reactivities suggest that amino acids may serve as markers of atmospheric transport and deposition of particles. Despite this potential, few measurements have been conducted in remote areas to assess amino acid concentrations and potential sources. Polar regions offer a unique opportunity to investigate atmospheric processes and to conduct source apportionment studies of such compounds. In order to better understand the importance of amino acid compounds in the global atmosphere, we determined free amino acids (FAAs) in seventeen size-segregated aerosol samples collected in a polar station in the Svalbard Islands from 19 April until 14 September 2010. We used an HPLC coupled with a tandem mass spectrometer (ESI-MS/MS) to analyze 20 amino acids and quantify compounds at fmol m-3 levels. Mean total FAA concentration was 1070 fmol m-3 where serine and glycine were the most abundant compounds in almost all samples and accounted for 45-60% of the total amino acid relative abundance. The other eighteen compounds had average concentrations between 0.3 and 98 fmol m-3. The higher amino acid concentrations were present in the ultrafine aerosol fraction (< 0.49 μm) and accounted for the majority of the total amino acid content. Local marine sources dominate the boreal summer amino acid concentrations, with the exception of the regional input from Icelandic volcanic emissions.

  20. Amino acids in Arctic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalabrin, E.; Zangrando, R.; Barbaro, E.; Kehrwald, N. M.; Gabrieli, J.; Barbante, C.; Gambaro, A.

    2012-07-01

    Amino acids are significant components of atmospheric aerosols, affecting organic nitrogen input to marine ecosystems, atmospheric radiation balance, and the global water cycle. The wide range of amino acid reactivities suggest that amino acids may serve as markers of atmospheric transport and deposition of particles. Despite this potential, few measurements have been conducted in remote areas to assess amino acid concentrations and potential sources. Polar regions offer a unique opportunity to investigate atmospheric processes and to conduct source apportionment studies of such compounds. In order to better understand the importance of amino acid compounds in the global atmosphere, we determined free amino acids (FAAs) in seventeen size-segregated aerosol samples collected in a polar station in the Svalbard Islands from 19 April until 14 September 2010. We used an HPLC coupled with a tandem mass spectrometer (ESI-MS/MS) to analyze 20 amino acids to quantify compounds at fmol m-3 levels. Mean total FAA concentration was 1070 fmol m-3 where serine and glycine were the most abundant compounds in almost all samples and accounted for 45-60% of the total amino acid relative abundance. The other eighteen compounds had average concentrations between 0.3 and 98 fmol m-3. The higher amino acid concentrations were present in the ultrafine aerosol fraction (<0.49 μm) and accounted for the majority of the total amino acid content. Local marine sources dominate the boreal summer amino acid concentrations, with the exception of the regional input from Icelandic volcanics.

  1. Synthesis of amino acids

    DOEpatents

    Davis, J.W. Jr.

    1979-09-21

    A method is described for synthesizing amino acids preceding through novel intermediates of the formulas: R/sub 1/R/sub 2/C(OSOC1)CN, R/sub 1/R/sub 2/C(C1)CN and (R/sub 1/R/sub 2/C(CN)O)/sub 2/SO wherein R/sub 1/ and R/sub 2/ are each selected from hydrogen and monovalent hydrocarbon radicals of 1 to 10 carbon atoms. The use of these intermediates allows the synthesis steps to be exothermic and results in an overall synthesis method which is faster than the synthesis methods of the prior art.

  2. Protein turnover, amino acid requirements and recommendations for athletes and active populations.

    PubMed

    Poortmans, J R; Carpentier, A; Pereira-Lancha, L O; Lancha Jr, A

    2012-10-01

    Skeletal muscle is the major deposit of protein molecules. As for any cell or tissue, total muscle protein reflects a dynamic turnover between net protein synthesis and degradation. Noninvasive and invasive techniques have been applied to determine amino acid catabolism and muscle protein building at rest, during exercise and during the recovery period after a single experiment or training sessions. Stable isotopic tracers ((13)C-lysine, (15)N-glycine, ²H5-phenylalanine) and arteriovenous differences have been used in studies of skeletal muscle and collagen tissues under resting and exercise conditions. There are different fractional synthesis rates in skeletal muscle and tendon tissues, but there is no major difference between collagen and myofibrillar protein synthesis. Strenuous exercise provokes increased proteolysis and decreased protein synthesis, the opposite occurring during the recovery period. Individuals who exercise respond differently when resistance and endurance types of contractions are compared. Endurance exercise induces a greater oxidative capacity (enzymes) compared to resistance exercise, which induces fiber hypertrophy (myofibrils). Nitrogen balance (difference between protein intake and protein degradation) for athletes is usually balanced when the intake of protein reaches 1.2 g · kg(-1) · day(-1) compared to 0.8 g · kg(-1) · day(-1) in resting individuals. Muscular activities promote a cascade of signals leading to the stimulation of eukaryotic initiation of myofibrillar protein synthesis. As suggested in several publications, a bolus of 15-20 g protein (from skimmed milk or whey proteins) and carbohydrate (± 30 g maltodextrine) drinks is needed immediately after stopping exercise to stimulate muscle protein and tendon collagen turnover within 1 h. PMID:22666780

  3. Protein turnover, amino acid requirements and recommendations for athletes and active populations

    PubMed Central

    Poortmans, J.R.; Carpentier, A.; Pereira-Lancha, L.O.; Lancha, A.

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is the major deposit of protein molecules. As for any cell or tissue, total muscle protein reflects a dynamic turnover between net protein synthesis and degradation. Noninvasive and invasive techniques have been applied to determine amino acid catabolism and muscle protein building at rest, during exercise and during the recovery period after a single experiment or training sessions. Stable isotopic tracers (13C-lysine, 15N-glycine, 2H5-phenylalanine) and arteriovenous differences have been used in studies of skeletal muscle and collagen tissues under resting and exercise conditions. There are different fractional synthesis rates in skeletal muscle and tendon tissues, but there is no major difference between collagen and myofibrillar protein synthesis. Strenuous exercise provokes increased proteolysis and decreased protein synthesis, the opposite occurring during the recovery period. Individuals who exercise respond differently when resistance and endurance types of contractions are compared. Endurance exercise induces a greater oxidative capacity (enzymes) compared to resistance exercise, which induces fiber hypertrophy (myofibrils). Nitrogen balance (difference between protein intake and protein degradation) for athletes is usually balanced when the intake of protein reaches 1.2 g·kg−1·day−1 compared to 0.8 g·kg−1·day−1 in resting individuals. Muscular activities promote a cascade of signals leading to the stimulation of eukaryotic initiation of myofibrillar protein synthesis. As suggested in several publications, a bolus of 15-20 g protein (from skimmed milk or whey proteins) and carbohydrate (± 30 g maltodextrine) drinks is needed immediately after stopping exercise to stimulate muscle protein and tendon collagen turnover within 1 h. PMID:22666780

  4. Determination of protein and amino acid requirements of lactating sows using a population-based factorial approach.

    PubMed

    Strathe, A V; Strathe, A B; Theil, P K; Hansen, C F; Kebreab, E

    2015-08-01

    Determination of appropriate nutritional requirements is essential to optimize the productivity and longevity of lactating sows. The current recommendations for requirements do not consider the large variation between animals. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the amino acid recommendations for lactating sows using a stochastic modeling approach that integrates population variation and uncertainty of key parameters into establishing nutritional recommendations for lactating sows. The requirement for individual sows was calculated using a factorial approach by adding the requirement for maintenance and milk. The energy balance of the sows was either negative or zero depending on feed intake being a limiting factor. Some parameters in the model were sow-specific and others were population-specific, depending on state of knowledge. Each simulation was for 1000 sows repeated 100 times using Monte Carlo simulation techniques. BW, back fat thickness of the sow, litter size (LS), average litter gain (LG), dietary energy density and feed intake were inputs to the model. The model was tested using results from the literature, and the values were all within ±1 s.d. of the estimated requirements. Simulations were made for a group of low- (LS=10 (s.d.=1), LG=2 kg/day (s.d.=0.6)), medium- (LS=12 (s.d.=1), LG=2.5 kg/day (s.d.=0.6)) and high-producing (LS=14 (s.d.=1), LG=3.5 kg/day (s.d.=0.6)) sows, where the average requirement was the result. In another simulation, the requirements were estimated for each week of lactation. The results were given as the median and s.d. The average daily standardized ileal digestible (SID) protein and lysine requirements for low-, medium- and high-producing sows were 623 (CV=2.5%) and 45.1 (CV=4.8%); 765 (CV=4.9%) and 54.7 (CV=7.0%); and 996 (CV=8.5%) and 70.8 g/day (CV=9.6%), respectively. The SID protein and lysine requirements were lowest at week 1, intermediate at week 2 and 4 and the highest at week 3 of lactation. The

  5. Assessment of protein requirement in octogenarian women with use of the indicator amino acid oxidation technique123

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Minghua; McCabe, George P; Elango, Rajavel; Pencharz, Paul B; Ball, Ronald O; Campbell, Wayne W

    2014-01-01

    Background: Data on the protein requirements of elderly adults are limited, because it is impractical to conduct repeated nitrogen balance protocols in these vulnerable humans. Objective: This study was designed to determine the dietary protein requirement of elderly women by using the recently developed minimally invasive indicator amino acid oxidation (IAAO) technique. Design: Six white women aged 80–87 y [mean ± SEM: 82 ± 1 y and body mass index (in kg/m2) 26 ± 2] completed a 3-d protocol 7 times. Each woman consumed an adaptation diet for 2 d and on day 3 consumed a complete test diet with a crystalline amino acid mixture containing 1 of 7 protein intakes (0.1, 0.3, 0.6, 0.9, 1.2, 1.5, or 1.8 g · kg−1 · d−1) tested randomly. A group-based protein requirement was assessed by using a nonlinear mixed model of protein intake and l-[1-13C]phenylalanine oxidation. The breakpoint, at which there was no further decline in the rate of appearance of 13C in the breath, was used as an index of the mean protein requirement. Results: The mean protein requirement (95% CI) was 0.85 (0.60, 1.09) g · kg−1 · d−1. This requirement is 29% higher than the current Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) for adults of 0.66 g · kg−1 · d−1 based on the nitrogen balance technique, although the 95% CI includes the current EAR. The corresponding adequate protein allowance of 1.15 (0.77, 1.54) g · kg−1 · d−1 is 44% higher, although the 95% CI includes the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) of 0.80 g · kg−1 · d−1. Conclusions: Notwithstanding uncertainty about the validity of the use of the IAAO technique to assess protein requirements, the results of this study with octogenarian women suggest that the current EAR and RDA for elderly women may be underestimated. The limitations of this short-term, noninvasive method underscore the need for new research that uses alternative experimental designs and measuring physiologic, morphologic, and health

  6. Protein biosynthesis with conformationally restricted amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, D. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA ); Ellman, J.; Schultz, P.G. )

    1993-05-19

    The incorporation of conformationally constrained amino acids into peptides is a powerful approach for generating structurally defined peptides as conformational probes and bioactive agents. The ability to site-specifically introduce constrained amino acids into large polypeptide chains would provide a similar opportunity to probe the flexibility, conformation, folding and stability of proteins. To this end, we have examined the competence of the Escherichia coli protein biosynthetic machinery to incorporate a number of these unnatural amino acids into the 164 residue protein T4 lysozyme (T4L). Results clearly demonstrate that the protein biosynthetic machinery can accommodate a wide variety of conformationally constrained amino acids. The expansion of structural motifs that can be biosynthetically incorporated into proteins to include a large number of conformationally constrained amino acids significantly increases the power of mutagenesis methods as probes of protein structure and function and provides additional insights into the steric requirements of the translational machinery. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Microfluidics in amino acid analysis.

    PubMed

    Pumera, Martin

    2007-07-01

    Microfluidic devices have been widely used to derivatize, separate, and detect amino acids employing many different strategies. Virtually zero-dead volume interconnections and fast mass transfer in small volume microchannels enable dramatic increases in on-chip derivatization reaction speed, while only minute amounts of sample and reagent are needed. Due to short channel path, fast subsecond separations can be carried out. With sophisticated miniaturized detectors, the whole analytical process can be integrated on one platform. This article reviews developments of lab-on-chip technology in amino acid analysis, it shows important design features such as sample preconcentration, precolumn and postcolumn amino acid derivatization, and unlabeled and labeled amino acid detection with focus on advanced designs. The review also describes important biomedical and space exploration applications of amino acid analysis on microfluidic devices. PMID:17542043

  8. Natural amino acids do not require their native tRNAs for efficient selection by the ribosome.

    PubMed

    Effraim, Philip R; Wang, Jiangning; Englander, Michael T; Avins, Josh; Leyh, Thomas S; Gonzalez, Ruben L; Cornish, Virginia W

    2009-12-01

    The involvement of tRNA structural elements beyond the anticodon in aminoacyl-tRNA (aa-tRNA) selection by the ribosome has revealed that substrate recognition is considerably more complex than originally envisioned in the adaptor hypothesis. By combining recent breakthroughs in aa-tRNA synthesis and mechanistic and structural studies of protein synthesis, we have investigated whether aa-tRNA recognition further extends to the amino acid, which would explain various translation disorders exhibited by misacylated tRNAs. Contrary to expectation, we find that natural amino acids misacylated onto natural but non-native tRNAs are selected with efficiencies very similar to those of their correctly acylated counterparts. Despite this, small but reproducible differences in selection indeed demonstrate that the translational machinery is sensitive to the amino acid-tRNA pairing. These results suggest either that the ribosome is an exquisite sensor of natural versus unnatural amino acid-tRNA pairings and/or that aa-tRNA selection is not the primary step governing the amino acid specificity of the ribosome. PMID:19915542

  9. Growth requirements of hyperthermophilic sulfur-dependent heterotrophic archaea isolated from a shallow submarine geothermal system with reference to their essential amino acids.

    PubMed Central

    Hoaki, T; Nishijima, M; Kato, M; Adachi, K; Mizobuchi, S; Hanzawa, N; Maruyama, T

    1994-01-01

    Three hyperthermophilic sulfur-dependent heterotrophs were isolated from a shallow submarine hydrothermal system at an inlet of Kodakara-jima island, Kagoshima, Japan. The isolates grew at 60 to 97 degrees C, with the optimum temperatures at 85 to 90 degrees C. Sensitivity to rifampin and the existence of ether lipids indicated that the isolates are hyperthermophilic archaea. Partial sequencing of the genes coding for 16S rRNA showed that the three isolates are closely related to the genus Thermococcus. They grew on proteinaceous mixtures, such as yeast extract, Casamino Acids, and purified proteins (e.g., casein and gelatin), but not on carbohydrates or organic acids as sole carbon and energy sources. Nine amino acids were essential for growth of isolate KS-1 (Thr, Leu, Ile, Val, Met, Phe, His, Tyr, and Arg). Isolate KS-2 required Lys in addition to the nine amino acids, and KS-8 required Lys instead of Tyr. In comparative studies, it was shown that Thermococcus celer DSM 2476 required 10 amino acids (Thr, Leu, Ile, Val, Met, Phe, Tyr, Trp, Lys, and Arg) while Pyrococcus furiosus DSM 3638 required only Ile and Val. The hyperthermophilic fermentative eubacterium Thermotoga neapolitana DSM 4359 did not require any amino acids for growth. Images PMID:8085828

  10. Amino acids in human and animal nutrition.

    PubMed

    Karau, Andreas; Grayson, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Amino acids are key components of human and animal nutrition, both as part of a protein-containing diet, and as supplemented individual products. In the last 10 years there has been a marked move away from the extraction of amino acids from natural products, which has been replaced by efficient fermentation processes using nonanimal carbon sources. Today several amino acids are produced in fermentation plants with capacities of more than 100,000 tonnes to serve the requirements of animal feed and human nutrition. The main fermentative amino acids for animal nutrition are L-lysine, L-threonine, and L-tryptophan. DL-Methionine continues to be manufactured for animal feed use principally by chemical synthesis, and a pharmaceutical grade is manufactured by enzymatic resolution. Amino acids play an important role in medical nutrition, particularly in parenteral nutrition, where there are high purity requirements for infusion grade products. Amino acids are also appearing more often in dietary supplements, initially for performance athletes, but increasingly for the general population. As the understanding of the effects of the individual amino acids on the human metabolism is deepened, more specialized product mixtures are being offered to improve athletic performance and for body-building. PMID:24676880

  11. Amino acid analysis for pharmacopoeial purposes.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Oliver; Holzgrabe, Ulrike

    2016-07-01

    The impurity profile of amino acids depends strongly on the production process. Since there are many different production methods (e.g. fermentation, protein hydrolysis or chemical synthesis) universal, state of the art methods are required to determine the impurity profile of amino acids produced by all relevant competitors. At the moment TLC tests provided by the Ph. Eur. are being replaced by a very specific amino acid analysis procedure possibly missing out on currently unknown process related impurities. Production methods and possible impurities as well as separation and detection methods suitable for said impurities are subject to this review. PMID:27154660

  12. The Lysine and Total Sulfur Amino Acid Requirements of Six- to Twelve-kilogram Pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three experiments (Exp.) were conducted to determine the Lys and TSAA requirement of 6- to 12-kg pigs. There were five replications of five or six pigs per pen (n = 150, 150, and 168 with initial BW of 6.3, 6.7, and 6.4 kg and final BW of 10.8, 11.7, and 11.2 kg for Exp. 1, 2, and 3, respectively). ...

  13. Amino Acids from a Comet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jamie Elisla

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Stardust spacecraft returned samples from comet 81P/Wild 2 to Earth in January 2006. Examinations of the organic compounds in cometary samples can reveal information about the prebiotic organic inventory present on the early Earth and within the early Solar System, which may have contributed to the origin of life. Preliminary studies of Stardust material revealed the presence of a suite of organic compounds including several amines and amino acids, but the origin of these compounds (cometary- vs. terrestrial contamination) could not be identified. We have recently measured the carbon isotopic ratios of these amino acids to determine their origin, leading to the first detection of a coetary amino acid.

  14. Protein Requirements Are Elevated in Endurance Athletes after Exercise as Determined by the Indicator Amino Acid Oxidation Method

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Katsuya; Bannai, Makoto; Moore, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    A higher protein intake has been recommended for endurance athletes compared with healthy non-exercising individuals based primarily on nitrogen balance methodology. The aim of this study was to determine the estimated average protein requirement and recommended protein intake in endurance athletes during an acute 3-d controlled training period using the indicator amino acid oxidation method. After 2-d of controlled diet (1.4 g protein/kg/d) and training (10 and 5km/d, respectively), six male endurance-trained adults (28±4 y of age; Body weight, 64.5±10.0 kg; VO2peak, 60.3±6.7 ml·kg-1·min-1; means±SD) performed an acute bout of endurance exercise (20 km treadmill run) prior to consuming test diets providing variable amounts of protein (0.2–2.8 g·kg-1·d-1) and sufficient energy. Protein was provided as a crystalline amino acid mixture based on the composition of egg protein with [1-13C]phenylalanine provided to determine whole body phenylalanine flux, 13CO2 excretion, and phenylalanine oxidation. The estimated average protein requirement was determined as the breakpoint after biphasic linear regression analysis with a recommended protein intake defined as the upper 95% confidence interval. Phenylalanine flux (68.8±8.5 μmol·kg-1·h-1) was not affected by protein intake. 13CO2 excretion displayed a robust bi-phase linear relationship (R2 = 0.86) that resulted in an estimated average requirement and a recommended protein intake of 1.65 and 1.83 g protein·kg-1·d-1, respectively, which was similar to values based on phenylalanine oxidation (1.53 and 1.70 g·kg-1·d-1, respectively). We report a recommended protein intake that is greater than the RDA (0.8 g·kg-1·d-1) and current recommendations for endurance athletes (1.2–1.4 g·kg-1·d-1). Our results suggest that the metabolic demand for protein in endurance-trained adults on a higher volume training day is greater than their sedentary peers and current recommendations for athletes based primarily on

  15. Fed levels of amino acids are required for the somatotropin-induced increase in muscle protein synthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic somatotropin (pST) treatment in pigs increases muscle protein synthesis and circulating insulin, a known promoter of protein synthesis. Previously, we showed that the pST-mediated rise in insulin could not account for the pST-induced increase in muscle protein synthesis when amino acids were...

  16. Treatment of Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment of amino acid metabolism disorders Treatment of amino acid metabolism disorders E-mail to a friend Please ... this page It's been added to your dashboard . Amino acid metabolism disorders are rare health conditions that affect ...

  17. Amino acid residues required for fast Na(+)-channel inactivation: charge neutralizations and deletions in the III-IV linker.

    PubMed Central

    Patton, D E; West, J W; Catterall, W A; Goldin, A L

    1992-01-01

    The cytoplasmic linker connecting domains III and IV of the voltage-gated Na+ channel is thought to be involved in fast inactivation. This linker is highly conserved among the various Na+ channels that have been cloned. In the rat brain IIA Na+ channel, it consists of 53 amino acids of which 15 are charged. To investigate the role of this linker in inactivation, we mutated all 15 of the charged residues in various combinations. All but one of these mutants expressed functional channels, and all of these inactivated with kinetics similar to the wild-type channel. We then constructed a series of deletion mutations that span the III-IV linker to determine if any region of the linker is essential for fast inactivation. Deletion of the first 10 amino acids completely eliminated fast inactivation in the channel, whereas deletion of the last 10 amino acids had no substantial effect on inactivation. These results demonstrate that some residues in the amino end of the III-IV linker are critical for fast Na(+)-channel inactivation, but that the highly conserved positively charged and paired negatively charged residues are not essential. PMID:1332059

  18. D-amino acids trigger biofilm disassembly.

    PubMed

    Kolodkin-Gal, Ilana; Romero, Diego; Cao, Shugeng; Clardy, Jon; Kolter, Roberto; Losick, Richard

    2010-04-30

    Bacteria form communities known as biofilms, which disassemble over time. In our studies outlined here, we found that, before biofilm disassembly, Bacillus subtilis produced a factor that prevented biofilm formation and could break down existing biofilms. The factor was shown to be a mixture of D-leucine, D-methionine, D-tyrosine, and D-tryptophan that could act at nanomolar concentrations. D-amino acid treatment caused the release of amyloid fibers that linked cells in the biofilm together. Mutants able to form biofilms in the presence of D-amino acids contained alterations in a protein (YqxM) required for the formation and anchoring of the fibers to the cell. D-amino acids also prevented biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. D-amino acids are produced by many bacteria and, thus, may be a widespread signal for biofilm disassembly. PMID:20431016

  19. Development of a semipurified test diet for determining amino acid requirements of Florida pompano Trachinotus carolinus reared under low-salinity conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two trials were conducted to develop a semipurified test diet for determining indispensable amino acid (IAA) requirements for Florida pompano Trachinotus carolinus. The objective of the first trial was to evaluate casein and corn gluten meal as principal intact protein sources, and the ability of F...

  20. Combinatorics of aliphatic amino acids.

    PubMed

    Grützmann, Konrad; Böcker, Sebastian; Schuster, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    This study combines biology and mathematics, showing that a relatively simple question from molecular biology can lead to complicated mathematics. The question is how to calculate the number of theoretically possible aliphatic amino acids as a function of the number of carbon atoms in the side chain. The presented calculation is based on earlier results from theoretical chemistry concerning alkyl compounds. Mathematical properties of this number series are highlighted. We discuss which of the theoretically possible structures really occur in living organisms, such as leucine and isoleucine with a chain length of four. This is done both for a strict definition of aliphatic amino acids only involving carbon and hydrogen atoms in their side chain and for a less strict definition allowing sulphur, nitrogen and oxygen atoms. While the main focus is on proteinogenic amino acids, we also give several examples of non-proteinogenic aliphatic amino acids, playing a role, for instance, in signalling. The results are in agreement with a general phenomenon found in biology: Usually, only a small number of molecules are chosen as building blocks to assemble an inconceivable number of different macromolecules as proteins. Thus, natural biological complexity arises from the multifarious combination of building blocks. PMID:21120449

  1. Amino Acid Transport in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Kay, W. W.; Gronlund, Audrey F.

    1969-01-01

    Properties of the transport systems for amino acids in Pseudomonas aeruginosa were investigated. Exogenous 14C-labeled amino acids were shown to equilibrate with the internal native amino acid pool prior to incorporation into protein. When added at low external concentrations, the majority of the amino acids examined entered the protein of the cell unaltered. The rates of amino acid transport, established at low concentrations with 18 commonly occurring amino acids, varied as much as 40-fold. The transport process became saturated at high external amino acid concentrations, was temperature-sensitive, and was inhibited by sodium azide and iodoacetamide. Intracellular to extracellular amino acid ratios of 100- to 300-fold were maintained during exponential growth of the population in a glucose minimal medium. When the medium became depleted of glucose, neither extracellular nor intracellular amino acids could be detected. PMID:4974392

  2. An amino-terminal domain of Enterococcus faecalis aggregation substance is required for aggregation, bacterial internalization by epithelial cells and binding to lipoteichoic acid.

    PubMed

    Waters, Christopher M; Hirt, Helmut; McCormick, John K; Schlievert, Patrick M; Wells, Carol L; Dunny, G M

    2004-05-01

    Aggregation substance (AS), a plasmid-encoded surface protein of Enterococcus faecalis, plays important roles in virulence and antibiotic resistance transfer. Previous studies have suggested that AS-mediated aggregation of enterococcal cells could involve the binding of this protein to cell wall lipoteichoic acid (LTA). Here, a method to purify an undegraded form of Asc10, the AS of the plasmid pCF10, is described. Using this purified protein, direct binding of Asc10 to purified E. faecalis LTA was demonstrated. Equivalent binding of Asc10 to LTA purified from INY3000, an E. faecalis strain that is incapable of aggregation, was also observed. Surprisingly, mutations in a previously identified aggregation domain from amino acids 473 to 683 that abolished aggregation had no effect on LTA binding. In frame deletion analysis of Asc10 was used to identify a second aggregation domain located in the N-terminus of the protein from amino acids 156 to 358. A purified Asc10 mutant protein lacking this domain showed reduced LTA binding, while a purified N-terminal fragment from amino acids 44-331 had high LTA binding. Like the previously described aggregation domain, the newly identified Asc10((156-358)) aggregation domain was also required for efficient internalization of E. faecalis into HT-29 enterocytes. Thus, Asc10 possess two distinct domains required for aggregation and eukaryotic cell internalization: an N-terminal domain that promotes binding to LTA and a second domain located near the middle of the protein. PMID:15130132

  3. Nonprotein Amino Acids in the Murchison Meteorite

    PubMed Central

    Kvenvolden, Keith A.; Lawless, James G.; Ponnamperuma, Cyril

    1971-01-01

    Twelve nonprotein amino acids appear to be present in the Murchison meteorite. The identity of eight of them has been conclusively established as N-methylglycine, β-alanine, 2-methylalanine, α-amino-n-butyric acid, β-amino-n-butyric acid, γ-amino-n-butyric acid, isovaline, and pipecolic acid. Tentative evidence is presented for the presence of N-methylalanine, N-ethylglycine, β-aminoisobutyric acid, and norvaline. These amino acids appear to be extraterrestrial in origin and may provide new evidence for the hypothesis of chemical evolution. PMID:16591908

  4. [Inherited amino acid transport disorders].

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Y; Tada, K

    1992-07-01

    Disorders due to inherited amino acids transport defect are reviewed. The disorders were categorized into three types of transport defects, namely, brush-border membrane of epithelial cells of small intestine and kidney tubules (Hartnup disease, blue diaper syndrome, cystinuria, iminoglycinuria and lysine malabsorption syndrome), basolateral membrane (lysinuric protein intolerance) and membrane of intracellular organelles (cystinosis and hyperornitinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria syndrome). Pathogenesis, clinical feature, laboratory findings, diagnosis, genetics and treatment of these disorders are described, briefly. There is not much data for the transport systems themselves, so that further investigation in molecular and gene levels for transport systems is necessary to clarify the characteristics of the transport and heterogeneity of phenotypes in inherited amino acids transport disorders. PMID:1404888

  5. Amino acids in sheep production.

    PubMed

    McCoard, Susan A; Sales, Francisco A; Sciascia, Quentin L

    2016-01-01

    Increasing production efficiency with a high standard of animal welfare and respect for the environment is a goal of sheep farming systems. Substantial gains in productivity have been achieved through improved genetics, nutrition and management changes; however the survival and growth performance of multiple-born lambs still remains a problem. This is a significant production efficiency and animal well-being issue. There is a growing body of evidence that some amino acids have a role in regulating growth, reproduction and immunity through modulation of metabolic and cell signaling pathways. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of what is currently known about the role of amino acids in sheep production and the potential for supplementation strategies to influence on-farm survival and growth of lambs. PMID:26709661

  6. Intestinal metabolism of sulfur amino acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gastrointestinal tract (GIT) serves a key function in the digestion of dietary protein and absorption of amino acids. However, the GIT is also an important site of amino acid metabolism in the body. Methionine is an indispensable amino acid and must be supplied in the diet. In addition, consider...

  7. Amino acid analyses of Apollo 14 samples.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrke, C. W.; Zumwalt, R. W.; Kuo, K.; Aue, W. A.; Stalling, D. L.; Kvenvolden, K. A.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1972-01-01

    Detection limits were between 300 pg and 1 ng for different amino acids, in an analysis by gas-liquid chromatography of water extracts from Apollo 14 lunar fines in which amino acids were converted to their N-trifluoro-acetyl-n-butyl esters. Initial analyses of water and HCl extracts of sample 14240 and 14298 samples showed no amino acids above background levels.

  8. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    SciTech Connect

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, T. Ashton; Chin, Jason W.; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2011-08-09

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNAsyn-thetases, pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  9. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    SciTech Connect

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, Ashton T; Chin, Jason W; Anderson, Christopher J; Schultz, Peter G

    2013-05-21

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  10. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    SciTech Connect

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, T. Ashton; Chin, Jason W.; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2014-08-26

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  11. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    SciTech Connect

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, T. Ashton; Chin, Jason W.; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2011-02-15

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  12. Amino acids as antioxidants for frying oil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Amino acids, proteins and hydrolysates of proteins have been known to protect edible oils from oxidation. While amino acids and related materials have high potential as antioxidants for frying oil, effectiveness of each amino acid and mechanisms of their activities are not well understood yet. Propo...

  13. Symmetry scheme for amino acid codons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, J.

    2002-02-01

    Group theoretical concepts are invoked in a specific model to explain how only twenty amino acids occur in nature out of a possible sixty four. The methods we use enable us to justify the occurrence of the recently discovered 21st amino acid selenocysteine, and also enables us to predict the possible existence of two more, as yet undiscovered amino acids.

  14. Amino acid sequence requirements in the hinge of human immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) for cleavage by streptococcal IgA1 proteases.

    PubMed

    Batten, Margaret R; Senior, Bernard W; Kilian, Mogens; Woof, Jenny M

    2003-03-01

    The amino acid sequence requirements in the hinge of human immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) for cleavage by IgA1 proteases of different species of Streptococcus were investigated. Recombinant IgA1 antibodies were generated with point mutations at proline 227 and threonine 228, the residues lying on either side of the peptide bond at which all streptococcal IgA1 proteases cleave wild-type human IgA1. The amino acid substitutions produced no major effect upon the structure of the mutant IgA1 antibodies or their functional ability to bind to Fcalpha receptors. However, the substitutions had a substantial effect upon sensitivity to cleavage with some streptococcal IgA1 proteases, with, in some cases, a single point mutation rendering the antibody resistant to a particular IgA1 protease. This effect was least marked with the IgA1 protease from Streptococcus pneumoniae, which showed no absolute requirement for either proline or threonine at residues 227 to 228. By contrast, the IgA1 proteases of Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus sanguis, and Streptococcus mitis had an absolute requirement for proline at 227 but not for threonine at 228, which could be replaced by valine. There was evidence in S. mitis that proteases from different strains may have different amino acid requirements for cleavage. Remarkably, some streptococcal proteases appeared able to cleave the hinge at a distant alternative site if substitution prevented efficient cleavage of the original site. Hence, this study has identified key residues required for the recognition of the IgA1 hinge as a substrate by streptococcal IgA1 proteases, and it marks a preliminary step towards development of specific enzyme inhibitors. PMID:12595464

  15. The WD protein Cpc2p is required for repression of Gcn4 protein activity in yeast in the absence of amino-acid starvation.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, B; Mösch, H U; Sattlegger, E; Barthelmess, I B; Hinnebusch, A; Braus, G H

    1999-02-01

    The CPC2 gene of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a G beta-like WD protein which is involved in regulating the activity of the general control activator Gcn4p. The CPC2 gene encodes a premRNA which is spliced and constitutively expressed in the presence or absence of amino acids. Loss of CPC2 gene function suppresses a deletion of the GCN2 gene encoding the general control sensor kinase, but not a deletion in the GCN4 gene. The resulting phenotype has resistance against amino-acid analogues. The Neurospora crassa cpc-2 and the rat RACK1 genes are homologues of CPC2 that complement the yeast cpc2 deletion. The cpc2 delta mutation leads to increased transcription of Gcn4p-dependent genes under non-starvation conditions without increasing GCN4 expression or the DNA binding activity of Gcn4p. Cpc2p-mediated transcriptional repression requires the Gcn4p transcriptional activator and a Gcn4p recognition element in the target promoter. Frameshift mutations resulting in a shortened G beta-like protein cause a different phenotype that has sensitivity against amino-acid analogues similar to a gcn2 deletion. Cpc2p seems to be part of an additional control of Gcn4p activity, independent of its translational regulation. PMID:10048025

  16. Current topics in the biotechnological production of essential amino acids, functional amino acids, and dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Mitsuhashi, Satoshi

    2014-04-01

    Amino acids play important roles in both human and animal nutrition and in the maintenance of health. Here, amino acids are classified into three groups: first, essential amino acids, which are essential to nutrition; second, functional amino acids, recently found to be important in the promotion of physiological functions; and third, dipeptides, which are used to resolve problematic features of specific free amino acids, such as their instability or insolubility. This review focusses on recent researches concerning the microbial production of essential amino acids (lysine and methionine), functional amino acids (histidine and ornithine), and a dipeptide (L-alanyl-L-glutamine). PMID:24679256

  17. Sugar amino acids in designing new molecules.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Tushar Kanti; Srinivasu, Pothukanuri; Tapadar, Subhasish; Mohan, Bajjuri Krishna

    2005-03-01

    Emulating the basic principles followed by nature to build its vast repertoire of biomolecules, organic chemists are developing many novel multifunctional building blocks and using them to create 'nature-like' and yet unnatural organic molecules. Sugar amino acids constitute an important class of such polyfunctional scaffolds where the carboxyl, amino and hydroxyl termini provide an excellent opportunity to organic chemists to create structural diversities akin to Nature's molecular arsenal. This article describes some of our works on various sugar amino acids and many other related building blocks, like furan amino acids, pyrrole amino acids etc. used in wide-ranging peptidomimetic studies. PMID:16133829

  18. Stereoselective synthesis of stable-isotope-labeled amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Unkefer, C.J.; Martinez, R.A.; Silks, L.A. III; Lodwig, S.N.

    1994-12-01

    For magnetic resonance and vibrational spectroscopies to reach their full potential, they must be used in combination with sophisticated site-specific stable isotope labeling of biological macromolecules. Labeled amino acids are required for the study of the structure and function of enzymes and proteins. Because there are 20 common amino acids, each with its own distinguishing chemistry, they remain a synthetic challenge. The Oppolzer chiral auxiliary provides a general tool with which to approach the synthesis of labeled amino acids. By using the Oppolzer auxiliary, amino acids can be constructed from several small molecules, which is ideal for stable isotope labeling. In addition to directing the stereochemistry at the {alpha}-carbon, the camphorsultam can be used for stereo-specific isotope labeling at prochiral centers in amino acids. By using the camphorsultam auxiliary we have the potential to synthesize virtually any isotopomer of all of the common amino acids.

  19. cpc-3, the Neurospora crassa homologue of yeast GCN2, encodes a polypeptide with juxtaposed eIF2alpha kinase and histidyl-tRNA synthetase-related domains required for general amino acid control.

    PubMed

    Sattlegger, E; Hinnebusch, A G; Barthelmess, I B

    1998-08-01

    Based on characteristic amino acid sequences of kinases that phosphorylate the alpha subunit of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2alpha kinases), degenerate oligonucleotide primers were constructed and used to polymerase chain reaction-amplify from genomic DNA of Neurospora crassa a sequence encoding part of a putative protein kinase. With this sequence an open reading frame was identified encoding a predicted polypeptide with juxtaposed eIF2alpha kinase and histidyl-tRNA synthetase-related domains. The 1646 amino acid sequence of this gene, called cpc-3, showed 35% positional identity over almost the entire sequence with GCN2 of yeast, which stimulates translation of the transcriptional activator of amino acid biosynthetic genes encoded by GCN4. Strains disrupted for cpc-3 were unable to induce increased transcription and derepression of amino acid biosynthetic enzymes in amino acid-deprived cells. The cpc-3 mutation did not affect the ability to up-regulate mRNA levels of cpc-1, encoding the GCN4 homologue and transcriptional activator of amino acid biosynthetic genes in N. crassa, but the mutation abolished the dramatic increase of CPC1 protein level in response to amino acid deprivation. These findings suggest that cpc-3 is the functional homologue of GCN2, being required for increased translation of cpc-1 mRNA in amino acid-starved cells. PMID:9685394

  20. Amino-acid contamination of aqueous hydrochloric acid.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolman, Y.; Miller, S. L.

    1971-01-01

    Considerable amino-acid contamination in commercially available analytical grade hydrochloric acid (37% HCl) was found. One bottle contained 8,300 nmol of amino-acids per liter. A bottle from another supplier contained 6,700 nmol per liter. The contaminants were mostly protein amino-acids and several unknowns. Data on the volatility of the amino-acids during HCl distillation were also obtained.

  1. Amino acid determination in some edible Mexican insects.

    PubMed

    Ladrón de Guevara, O; Padilla, P; García, L; Pino, J M; Ramos-Elorduy, J

    1995-06-01

    The amino acid contents of edible insects from different provinces of Mexico and reference proteins were analysed by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and ion exchange chromatography. The insect amino acid contents were higher than the adult requirements indicated by the WHO/FAO pattern. PMID:24178816

  2. Production of amino acids using auxotrophic mutants of methylotrophic bacillus

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, Richard S.; Flickinger, Michael C.; Schendel, Frederick J.; Guettler, Michael V.

    2001-07-17

    A method of producing amino acids by culturing an amino acid auxotroph of a biologically pure strain of a type I methylotrophic bacterium of the genus Bacillus which exhibits sustained growth at 50.degree. C. using methanol as a carbon and energy source and requiring vitamin B.sub.12 and biotin is provided.

  3. Enantiomeric excesses in meteoritic amino acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronin, J. R.; Pizzarello, S.

    1997-01-01

    Gas chromatographic-mass spectral analyses of the four stereoisomers of 2-amino-2,3-dimethylpentanoic acid (dl-alpha-methylisoleucine and dl-alpha-methylalloisoleucine) obtained from the Murchison meteorite show that the L enantiomer occurs in excess (7.0 and 9.1%, respectively) in both of the enantiomeric pairs. Similar results were obtained for two other alpha-methyl amino acids, isovaline and alpha-methylnorvaline, although the alpha hydrogen analogs of these amino acids, alpha-amino-n-butyric acid and norvaline, were found to be racemates. With the exception of alpha-amino-n-butyric acid, these amino acids are either unknown or of limited occurrence in the biosphere. Because carbonaceous chondrites formed 4.5 billion years ago, the results are indicative of an asymmetric influence on organic chemical evolution before the origin of life.

  4. RNA binding by the novel helical domain of the influenza virus NS1 protein requires its dimer structure and a small number of specific basic amino acids.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, W; Riedel, K; Lynch, P; Chien, C Y; Montelione, G T; Krug, R M

    1999-01-01

    The RNA-binding/dimerization domain of the NS1 protein of influenza A virus (73 amino acids in length) exhibits a novel dimeric six-helical fold. It is not known how this domain binds to its specific RNA targets, one of which is double-stranded RNA. To elucidate the mode of RNA binding, we introduced single alanine replacements into the NS1 RNA-binding domain at specific positions in the three-dimensional structure. Our results indicate that the dimer structure is essential for RNA binding, because any alanine replacement that causes disruption of the dimer also leads to the loss of RNA-binding activity. Surprisingly, the arginine side chain at position 38, which is in the second helix of each monomer, is the only amino-acid side chain that is absolutely required only for RNA binding and not for dimerization, indicating that this side chain probably interacts directly with the RNA target. This interaction is primarily electrostatic, because replacement of this arginine with lysine had no effect on RNA binding. A second basic amino acid, the lysine at position 41, which is also in helix 2, makes a strong contribution to the affinity of binding. We conclude that helix 2 and helix 2', which are antiparallel and next to each other in the dimer conformation, constitute the interaction face between the NS1 RNA-binding domain and its RNA targets, and that the arginine side chain at position 38 and possibly the lysine side chain at position 41 in each of these antiparallel helices contact the phosphate backbone of the RNA target. PMID:10024172

  5. Amino acids in the Tagish Lake Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kminek, G.; Botta, O.; Glavin, D. P.; Bada, J. L.

    2002-01-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) based amino acid analysis of a Tagish Lake meteorite sample recovered 3 months after the meteorite fell to Earth have revealed that the amino acid composition of Tagish Lake is strikingly different from that of the CM and CI carbonaceous chondrites. We found that the Tagish Lake meteorite contains only trace levels of amino acids (total abundance = 880 ppb), which is much lower than the total abundance of amino acids in the CI Orgueil (4100 ppb) and the CM Murchison (16 900 ppb). Because most of the same amino acids found in the Tagish Lake meteorite are also present in the Tagish Lake ice melt water, we conclude that the amino acids detected in the meteorite are terrestrial contamination. We found that the exposure of a sample of Murchison to cold water lead to a substantial reduction over a period of several weeks in the amount of amino acids that are not strongly bound to the meteorite matrix. However, strongly bound amino acids that are extracted by direct HCl hydrolysis are not affected by the leaching process. Thus even if there had been leaching of amino acids from our Tagish Lake meteorite sample during its 3 month residence in Tagish Lake ice and melt water, a Murchison type abundance of endogenous amino acids in the meteorite would have still been readily detectable. The low amino acid content of Tagish Lake indicates that this meteorite originated fiom a different type of parent body than the CM and CI chondrites. The parent body was apparently devoid of the reagents such as aldehyldes/ketones, HCN and ammonia needed for the effective abiotic synthesis of amino acids. Based on reflectance spectral measurements, Tagish Lake has been associated with P- or D-type asteroids. If the Tagish Lake meteorite was indeed derived fiom these types of parent bodies, our understanding of these primitive asteroids needs to be reevaluated with respect to their potential inventory of biologically important organic compounds.

  6. Amino acids precursors in lunar finds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.; Harada, K.; Hare, P. E.; Hinsch, G.; Mueller, G.

    1975-01-01

    The consistent pattern is discussed of amino acids found in lunar dust from Apollo missions. The evidence indicates that compounds yielding amino acids were implanted into the surface of the moon by the solar wind, and the kind and amounts of amino acids found on the moon are closely similar to those found in meteorites. It is concluded that there is a common cosmochemical pattern for the moom and meteorites, and this offers evidence of a common course of cosmochemical reactions for carbon.

  7. Umbilical uptake of amino acids in the unstressed fetal lamb.

    PubMed Central

    Lemons, J A; Adcock, E W; Jones, M D; Naughton, M A; Meschia, G; Battaglia, F C

    1976-01-01

    The whole blood concentrations of 22 amino acids were measured in a chronic, unstressed fetal lamb preparations. Samples were taken daily from the umbilical artery, umbilical vein, and maternal artery over the latter quarter of gestation. 73 sets of samples (from the umbilical artery and vein and the maternal artery) from 13 animals were analyzed for amino acid levels. Oxygen contents were determined simultaneously in 48 sets (umbilical artery and vein) to relate fetal oxygen consumption to amino acid uptake via the umbilical circulation. The results indicate that there is no umbilical uptake of the acidic amino acids, glutamate and aspartate; there is, in fact, a net flux of glutamate out of the fetus into the placenta. As both of these amino acids are major constituents of body proteins, the data indicate that they are formed within the fetus. The umbilical uptake of some neutral and basic amino acids (e.g., valine, leucine, isoleucine, arginine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine) is in considerable excess of estimated growth requirements, suggesting that some amino acids undergo extensive transamination and oxidative degradation in the fetus. Finally, the net uptake of nitrogen, carbon, and calories by the growing ovine fetus in the form of amino acids, glucose, and lactate is compared to estimated requirements as determined in previous studies. PMID:1033209

  8. Regulation of the proteome by amino acids.

    PubMed

    Bourgoin-Voillard, Sandrine; Goron, Arthur; Seve, Michel; Moinard, Christophe

    2016-03-01

    Besides their main contribution as substrates for protein synthesis, amino acids as signaling molecules could exert some regulatory functions on protein synthesis and/or proteolysis that have been emphasized in a number of recent studies. Several publications have highlighted supplemental roles of those amino acids in protein metabolism as well as in immunity, heat shock response, or apoptosis processes. In this way, via their regulatory properties, selected amino acids (such as leucine, glutamine, arginine, citrulline, or methionine) directly influence the proteome. In this review, we are proposing an overview of the regulation of the proteome by amino acids in mammals. PMID:26786846

  9. α-Amino Acid-Isosteric α-Amino Tetrazoles.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ting; Kurpiewska, Katarzyna; Kalinowska-Tłuścik, Justyna; Herdtweck, Eberhardt; Dömling, Alexander

    2016-02-24

    The synthesis of all 20 common natural proteinogenic and 4 otherα-amino acid-isosteric α-amino tetrazoles has been accomplished, whereby the carboxyl group is replaced by the isosteric 5-tetrazolyl group. The short process involves the use of the key Ugi tetrazole reaction followed by deprotection chemistries. The tetrazole group is bioisosteric to the carboxylic acid and is widely used in medicinal chemistry and drug design. Surprisingly, several of the common α-amino acid-isosteric α-amino tetrazoles are unknown up to now. Therefore a rapid synthetic access to this compound class and non-natural derivatives is of high interest to advance the field. PMID:26817531

  10. Relationship between amino acid usage and amino acid evolution in primates.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haoxuan; Xie, Zhengqing; Tan, Shengjun; Zhang, Xiaohui; Yang, Sihai

    2015-02-25

    Amino acid usage varies from species to species. A previous study has found a universal trend in amino acid gain and loss in many taxa and a one-way model of amino acid evolution in which the number of new amino acids increases as the number of old amino acids decreases was proposed. Later studies showed that this pattern of amino acid gain and loss is likely to be compatible with the neutral theory. The present work aimed to further study this problem by investigating the evolutionary patterns of amino acids in 8 primates (the nucleotide and protein alignments are available online http://gattaca.nju.edu.cn/pub_data.html). First, the number of amino acids gained and lost was calculated and the evolution trend of each amino acid was inferred. These values were found to be closely related to the usage of each amino acid. Then we analyzed the mutational trend of amino acid substitution in human using SNPs, this trend is highly correlated with fixation trend only with greater variance. Finally, the trends in the evolution of 20 amino acids were evaluated in human on different time scales, and the increasing rate of 5 significantly increasing amino acids was found to decrease as a function of time elapsed since divergence, and the dS/dN ratio also found to increase as a function of time elapsed since divergence. These results suggested that the observed amino acid substitution pattern is influenced by mutation and purifying selection. In conclusion, the present study shows that usage of amino acids is an important factor capable of influencing the observed pattern of amino acid evolution, and also presented evidences suggesting that the observed universal trend of amino acid gain and loss is compatible with neutral evolution. PMID:25527119

  11. Synergistic Transcriptional Activation by TATA-Binding Protein and hTAFII28 Requires Specific Amino Acids of the hTAFII28 Histone Fold

    PubMed Central

    Lavigne, Anne-Claire; Gangloff, Yann-Gaël; Carré, Lucie; Mengus, Gabrielle; Birck, Catherine; Poch, Olivier; Romier, Christophe; Moras, Dino; Davidson, Irwin

    1999-01-01

    Coexpression of the human TATA-binding protein (TBP)-associated factor 28 (hTAFII28) with the altered-specificity mutant TBP spm3 synergistically enhances transcriptional activation by the activation function 2 of the nuclear receptors (NRs) for estrogen and vitamin D3 from a reporter plasmid containing a TGTA element in mammalian cells. This synergy is abolished by mutation of specific amino acids in the α2-helix of the histone fold in the conserved C-terminal region of hTAFII28. Critical amino acids are found on both the exposed hydrophilic face of this helix and the hydrophobic interface with TAFII18. This α-helix of hTAFII28 therefore mediates multiple interactions required for coactivator activity. We further show that mutation of specific residues in the H1′ α-helix of TBP either reduces or increases interactions with hTAFII28. The mutations which reduce interactions with hTAFII28 do not affect functional synergy, whereas the TBP mutation which increases interaction with hTAFII28 is defective in its ability to synergistically enhance activation by NRs. However, this TBP mutant supports activation by other activators and is thus specifically defective for its ability to synergize with hTAFII28. PMID:10373554

  12. Research for amino acids in lunar samples.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrke, C. W.; Zumwalt, R. W.; Kuo, K.; Rash, J. J.; Aue , W. A.; Stalling, D. L.; Kvenvolden, K. A.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1972-01-01

    The study was primarily directed toward the examination of Apollo 14 lunar fines for indigenous amino acids or materials which could be converted to amino acids on hydrolysis with 6 N hydrochloric acid. Initial experiments were conducted to confirm the integrity of the derivatization reactions and reagents, and to optimize the gas-liquid chromatographic (GLC) instrumental and chromatographic system for the separation and flame ionization detection of the amino acid derivatives. In studies on the recovery of amino acids added to lunar fines, low recoveries were obtained when 10 ng of each amino acid were added to 50 mg of virgin fines, but the subsequent addition of 50 ng of each to the previously extracted sample resulted in much higher recoveries.

  13. Amino acid regulation of gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Fafournoux, P; Bruhat, A; Jousse, C

    2000-01-01

    The impact of nutrients on gene expression in mammals has become an important area of research. Nevertheless, the current understanding of the amino acid-dependent control of gene expression is limited. Because amino acids have multiple and important functions, their homoeostasis has to be finely maintained. However, amino-acidaemia can be affected by certain nutritional conditions or various forms of stress. It follows that mammals have to adjust several of their physiological functions involved in the adaptation to amino acid availability by regulating the expression of numerous genes. The aim of the present review is to examine the role of amino acids in regulating mammalian gene expression and protein turnover. It has been reported that some genes involved in the control of growth or amino acid metabolism are regulated by amino acid availability. For instance, limitation of several amino acids greatly increases the expression of the genes encoding insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1, CHOP (C/EBP homologous protein, where C/EBP is CCAAT/enhancer binding protein) and asparagine synthetase. Elevated mRNA levels result from both an increase in the rate of transcription and an increase in mRNA stability. Several observations suggest that the amino acid regulation of gene expression observed in mammalian cells and the general control process described in yeast share common features. Moreover, amino acid response elements have been characterized in the promoters of the CHOP and asparagine synthetase genes. Taken together, the results discussed in the present review demonstrate that amino acids, by themselves, can, in concert with hormones, play an important role in the control of gene expression. PMID:10998343

  14. Nutritional value of D-amino acids, D-peptides, and amino acid derivatives in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper describes a method for determining the nutritional value of D-amino acids, D-peptides, and amino acid derivatives using a growth assay in mice fed a synthetic all-amino acid diet. A large number of experiments were carried out in which a molar equivalent of the test compound replaced a n...

  15. 6th Amino Acid Assessment Workshop

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The focus of the 6th workshop is on lysine, arginine, and related amino acids. Functions, metabolic pathways, clinical uses, and upper tolerance intakes are emphasized in the articles that follow. Lysine is arguably the most deficient amino acid in the food supply of countries where poverty exists, ...

  16. The Apollo Program and Amino Acids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Sidney W.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the determination of hydrolyzable amino acid precursors and a group of six amino acids in the returned lunar samples of the Apollo programs. Indicates that molecular evolution is arrested at the precursor stage on the Moon because of lack of water. (CC)

  17. 21 CFR 172.320 - Amino acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Amino acids. 172.320 Section 172.320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.320 Amino acids. The food additive...

  18. Animal models of human amino acid responses.

    PubMed

    Baker, David H

    2004-06-01

    The principal differences between experimental animals and humans with regard to amino acid responses are 1) growing animals partition most of their amino acid intake to protein accretion, whereas growing children partition most of their intake to maintenance; 2) invasive assessment procedures are common in animals but very limited in humans; and 3) humans can describe how they feel in response to amino acid levels or balances, whereas animals cannot. New (pharmacologic) uses of amino acids have been and are being discovered (e.g., cysteine, arginine, leucine, glutamine), and this makes it imperative that tolerance limits be established. Work with pigs suggests that excessive intake of methionine and tryptophan present the biggest problems, whereas excessive intake of threonine, glutamate, and the branched-chain amino acids seems to be well tolerated. PMID:15173445

  19. Amino acids in the Martian meteorite Nakhla

    PubMed Central

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Bada, Jeffrey L.; Brinton, Karen L. F.; McDonald, Gene D.

    1999-01-01

    A suite of protein and nonprotein amino acids were detected with high-performance liquid chromatography in the water- and acid-soluble components of an interior fragment of the Martian meteorite Nakhla, which fell in Egypt in 1911. Aspartic and glutamic acids, glycine, alanine, β-alanine, and γ-amino-n-butyric acid (γ-ABA) were the most abundant amino acids detected and were found primarily in the 6 M HCl-hydrolyzed, hot water extract. The concentrations ranged from 20 to 330 parts per billion of bulk meteorite. The amino acid distribution in Nakhla, including the d/l ratios (values range from <0.1 to 0.5), is similar to what is found in bacterially degraded organic matter. The amino acids in Nakhla appear to be derived from terrestrial organic matter that infiltrated the meteorite soon after its fall to Earth, although it is possible that some of the amino acids are endogenous to the meteorite. The rapid amino acid contamination of Martian meteorites after direct exposure to the terrestrial environment has important implications for Mars sample-return missions and the curation of the samples from the time of their delivery to Earth. PMID:10430856

  20. Amino acids in the Martian meteorite Nakhla

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Bada, J. L.; Brinton, K. L.; McDonald, G. D.

    1999-01-01

    A suite of protein and nonprotein amino acids were detected with high-performance liquid chromatography in the water- and acid-soluble components of an interior fragment of the Martian meteorite Nakhla, which fell in Egypt in 1911. Aspartic and glutamic acids, glycine, alanine, beta-alanine, and gamma-amino-n-butyric acid (gamma-ABA) were the most abundant amino acids detected and were found primarily in the 6 M HCl-hydrolyzed, hot water extract. The concentrations ranged from 20 to 330 parts per billion of bulk meteorite. The amino acid distribution in Nakhla, including the D/L ratios (values range from <0.1 to 0.5), is similar to what is found in bacterially degraded organic matter. The amino acids in Nakhla appear to be derived from terrestrial organic matter that infiltrated the meteorite soon after its fall to Earth, although it is possible that some of the amino acids are endogenous to the meteorite. The rapid amino acid contamination of Martian meteorites after direct exposure to the terrestrial environment has important implications for Mars sample-return missions and the curation of the samples from the time of their delivery to Earth.

  1. Genetics of Amino Acid Taste and Appetite.

    PubMed

    Bachmanov, Alexander A; Bosak, Natalia P; Glendinning, John I; Inoue, Masashi; Li, Xia; Manita, Satoshi; McCaughey, Stuart A; Murata, Yuko; Reed, Danielle R; Tordoff, Michael G; Beauchamp, Gary K

    2016-07-01

    The consumption of amino acids by animals is controlled by both oral and postoral mechanisms. We used a genetic approach to investigate these mechanisms. Our studies have shown that inbred mouse strains differ in voluntary amino acid consumption, and these differences depend on sensory and nutritive properties of amino acids. Like humans, mice perceive some amino acids as having a sweet (sucrose-like) taste and others as having an umami (glutamate-like) taste. Mouse strain differences in the consumption of some sweet-tasting amino acids (d-phenylalanine, d-tryptophan, and l-proline) are associated with polymorphisms of a taste receptor, type 1, member 3 gene (Tas1r3), and involve differential peripheral taste responsiveness. Strain differences in the consumption of some other sweet-tasting amino acids (glycine, l-alanine, l-glutamine, and l-threonine) do not depend on Tas1r3 polymorphisms and so must be due to allelic variation in other, as yet unknown, genes involved in sweet taste. Strain differences in the consumption of l-glutamate may depend on postingestive rather than taste mechanisms. Thus, genes and physiologic mechanisms responsible for strain differences in the consumption of each amino acid depend on the nature of its taste and postingestive properties. Overall, mouse strain differences in amino acid taste and appetite have a complex genetic architecture. In addition to the Tas1r3 gene, these differences depend on other genes likely involved in determining the taste and postingestive effects of amino acids. The identification of these genes may lead to the discovery of novel mechanisms that regulate amino acid taste and appetite. PMID:27422518

  2. Exogenous amino acids as fuel in shock.

    PubMed

    Daniel, A M; Kapadia, B; MacLean, L D

    1982-01-01

    It has been suggested that in shock branched-chain amino acids are preferentially oxidized resulting in continued proteolysis and stimulated gluconeogenesis. To determine if exogenous amino acids could be used as fuel in shock, dogs rendered hypotensive by controlled cardiac tamponade and normotensive controls were infused with amino acid mixtures and individual amino acids. When Nephramine, a mixture rich in branched-chain amino acids, was infused, plasma alpha-amino nitrogen levels rose but urea output did not increase in either the control state or in shock, suggesting that these amino acids were not rapidly deaminated to serve as fuels. Travasol, which in addition contained large amounts of alanine and glycine, tripled urea output in the controls and doubled it in shock. The limit of urea production was reached in both groups at 35 mumoles urea/minute/kg. In the Travasol-infused animals plasma alpha-amino nitrogen levels were maintained in normotension but rose sharply in shock. When glycine alone was infused into five dogs in shock urea production rate was 30.6 + 2.1 mumoles/minute/kg; with alanine the same value was 22.5 + 2.2 mumoles/minute/kg. In both cases plasma alpha-amino nitrogen levels were high, suggesting that transport of these amino acids into the cell was slow in shock. In four dogs in shock glycine-14C was added to the glycine infusate as a tracer. At radioactive equilibrium 28% of the label infused appeared in CO2; another 22% appeared in glucose. It is concluded that of all the amino acids tested only glycine and alanine are deaminated rapidly enough to serve as exogenous fuels in shock. PMID:6814205

  3. Amino acid decarboxylations produced by lipid-derived reactive carbonyls in amino acid mixtures.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Francisco J; León, M Mercedes; Zamora, Rosario

    2016-10-15

    The formation of 2-phenylethylamine and phenylacetaldehyde in mixtures of phenylalanine, a lipid oxidation product, and a second amino acid was studied to determine the role of the second amino acid in the degradation of phenylalanine produced by lipid-derived reactive carbonyls. The presence of the second amino acid usually increased the formation of the amine and reduced the formation of the Strecker aldehyde. The reasons for this behaviour seem to be related to the α-amino group and the other functional groups (mainly amino or similar groups) present in the side-chain of the amino acid. These groups are suggested to modify the lipid-derived reactive carbonyl but not the reaction mechanism because the Ea of formation of both 2-phenylethylamine and phenylacetaldehyde remained unchanged in all studied systems. All these results suggest that the amine/aldehyde ratio obtained by amino acid degradation can be modified by adding free amino acids during food formulation. PMID:27173560

  4. The acidic amino-terminal region of herpes simplex virus type 1 alpha protein ICP27 is required for an essential lytic function.

    PubMed Central

    Rice, S A; Lam, V; Knipe, D M

    1993-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) alpha protein ICP27 regulates the transition between the delayed-early and late phases of the viral infection. Previous genetic analyses have suggested that the important functional domains of ICP27 map to its carboxyl-terminal half. One striking feature of the primary sequence of ICP27, however, is an extremely acidic region near its amino terminus. To determine whether this region is required for ICP27 function, we deleted the sequences in the ICP27 gene which encode it (codons 12 through 63). In transient expression assays, the deletion mutant was unable to efficiently repress the expression of a cotransfected reporter gene or to efficiently complement the growth of d27-1, an HSV-1 ICP27 null mutant. These results suggested that the acidic region of ICP27 is involved in a regulatory function required for lytic growth. To test this possibility further, we introduced the mutant allele into the HSV-1 genome by marker transfer. Two independently derived isolates of the mutant virus, designated d1-2a and d1-2b, were recovered and analyzed. Both isolates were defective for growth in Vero cells, exhibiting a 100-fold reduction in virus yield compared with the wild-type infection. Vero cells infected with the d1-2 isolates showed a three- to eightfold reduction in viral DNA replication, a moderate reduction in the expression of viral gamma genes, and a delay in the repression of beta genes. The phenotype of the d1-2 isolates differs substantially from the phenotypes of previously isolated ICP27 mutants, which show much more severe defects in viral gene expression. Our results demonstrate that the amino-terminal half of ICP27 participates in its regulatory activities in both infected and transfected cells. Images PMID:8383210

  5. Amino acid analogs for tumor imaging

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M.; Shoup, Timothy

    1998-09-15

    The invention provides novel amino acid compounds of use in detecting and evaluating brain and body tumors. These compounds combine the advantageous properties of 1-amino-cycloalkyl-1-carboxylic acids, namely, their rapid uptake and prolonged retention in tumors with the properties of halogen substituents, including certain useful halogen isotopes including fluorine-18, iodine-123, iodine-125, iodine-131, bromine-75, bromine-76, bromine-77 and bromine-82. In one aspect, the invention features amino acid compounds that have a high specificity for target sites when administered to a subject in vivo. Preferred amino acid compounds show a target to non-target ratio of at least 5:1, are stable in vivo and substantially localized to target within 1 hour after administration. An especially preferred amino acid compound is ›.sup.18 F!-1-amino-3-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC). In another aspect, the invention features pharmaceutical compositions comprised of an .alpha.-amino acid moiety attached to either a four, five, or a six member carbon-chain ring. In addition, the invention features analogs of .alpha.-aminoisobutyric acid.

  6. Amino acid analogs for tumor imaging

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M.; Shoup, Timothy

    1998-10-06

    The invention provides novel amino acid compounds of use in detecting and evaluating brain and body tumors. These compounds combine the advantageous properties of 1-amino-cycloalkyl-1-carboxylic acids, namely, their rapid uptake and prolonged retention in tumors with the properties of halogen substituents, including certain useful halogen isotopes including fluorine-18, iodine-123, iodine-125, iodine-131, bromine-75, bromine-76, bromine-77 and bromine-82. In one aspect, the invention features amino acid compounds that have a high specificity for target sites when administered to a subject in vivo. Preferred amino acid compounds show a target to non-target ratio of at least 5:1, are stable in vivo and substantially localized to target within 1 hour after administration. An especially preferred amino acid compound is ›.sup.18 F!-1-amino-3-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC). In another aspect, the invention features pharmaceutical compositions comprised of an .alpha.-amino acid moiety attached to either a four, five, or a six member carbon-chain ring. In addition, the invention features analogs of .alpha.-aminoisobutyric acid.

  7. Amino acid analogs for tumor imaging

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, M.M.; Shoup, T.

    1998-09-15

    The invention provides novel amino acid compounds of use in detecting and evaluating brain and body tumors. These compounds combine the advantageous properties of 1-amino-cycloalkyl-1-carboxylic acids, namely, their rapid uptake and prolonged retention in tumors with the properties of halogen substituents, including certain useful halogen isotopes including fluorine-18, iodine-123, iodine-125, iodine-131, bromine-75, bromine-76, bromine-77 and bromine-82. In one aspect, the invention features amino acid compounds that have a high specificity for target sites when administered to a subject in vivo. Preferred amino acid compounds show a target to non-target ratio of at least 5:1, are stable in vivo and substantially localized to target within 1 hour after administration. An especially preferred amino acid compound is [{sup 18}F]-1-amino-3-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC). In another aspect, the invention features pharmaceutical compositions comprised of an {alpha}-amino acid moiety attached to either a four, five, or a six member carbon-chain ring. In addition, the invention features analogs of {alpha}-aminoisobutyric acid.

  8. Amino acid analogs for tumor imaging

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, M.M.; Shoup, T.

    1998-10-06

    The invention provides novel amino acid compounds of use in detecting and evaluating brain and body tumors. These compounds combine the advantageous properties of 1-amino-cycloalkyl-1-carboxylic acids, namely, their rapid uptake and prolonged retention in tumors with the properties of halogen substituents, including certain useful halogen isotopes including fluorine-18, iodine-123, iodine-125, iodine-131, bromine-75, bromine-76, bromine-77 and bromine-82. In one aspect, the invention features amino acid compounds that have a high specificity for target sites when administered to a subject in vivo. Preferred amino acid compounds show a target to non-target ratio of at least 5:1, are stable in vivo and substantially localized to target within 1 hour after administration. An especially preferred amino acid compound is [{sup 18}F]-1-amino-3-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC). In another aspect, the invention features pharmaceutical compositions comprised of an {alpha}-amino acid moiety attached to either a four, five, or a six member carbon-chain ring. In addition, the invention features analogs of {alpha}-aminoisobutyric acid.

  9. Soil Bacteria Take Up D-Amino Acids, Protect Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, H. J.; Zhang, G.

    2011-12-01

    Recently, many groups reported D-amino acid uptake by plant roots, raising the question of whether soil D-amino acids represent a source of nitrogen or a source of toxicity. The discussion needs to be placed in the context of competition with rhizosphere bacteria. To provide this context, we followed the concentrations of D- and L-enantiomers of alanine, glutamic acid, aspartic acid, and leucine after they were added to soils in the laboratory. In all cases, the uptake of L-enantiomer began immediately and proceeded rapidly until exhausted. In contrast, the uptake of D-enantiomer required induction: an initial period of inactivity followed by rapid consumption comparable in rate to L-enantiomer. The induced nature of the D activity was confirmed by the addition of rifampicin, an mRNA synthesis inhibitor. Preventing the synthesis of new enzymes abolished soil flora's ability to consume D-amino acids, but not L-amino acids. These results suggest that inducible special racemase enzymes, which can convert D-amino acids back to their native L-forms, are widespread among soil microorganisms. This finding does not rule out the possibility that some plants may out-compete microorganisms and be able to access D-amino acids. It does suggest, however, that rhizosphere bacteria can shield plants from the toxic effect of D-amino acids.

  10. The putative Cationic Amino Acid Transporter 9 is targeted to vesicles and may be involved in plant amino acid homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huaiyu; Stierhof, York-Dieter; Ludewig, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Amino acids are major primary metabolites. Their uptake, translocation, compartmentation, and re-mobilization require a diverse set of cellular transporters. Here, the broadly expressed gene product of CATIONIC AMINO ACID TRANSPORTER 9 (CAT9) was identified as mainly localized to vesicular membranes that are involved in vacuolar trafficking, including those of the trans-Golgi network. In order to probe whether and how these compartments are involved in amino acid homeostasis, a loss-of-function cat9-1 mutant and ectopic over-expressor plants were isolated. Under restricted nitrogen supply in soil, cat9-1 showed a chlorotic phenotype, which was reversed in the over-expressors. The total soluble amino acid pools were affected in the mutants, but this was only significant under poor nitrogen supply. Upon nitrogen starvation, the soluble amino acid leaf pools were lower in the over-expressor, compared with cat9-1. Over-expression generally affected total soluble amino acid concentrations, slightly delayed development, and finally improved the survival upon severe nitrogen starvation. The results potentially identify a novel function of vesicular amino acid transport mediated by CAT9 in the cellular nitrogen-dependent amino acid homeostasis. PMID:25883600

  11. The putative Cationic Amino Acid Transporter 9 is targeted to vesicles and may be involved in plant amino acid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huaiyu; Stierhof, York-Dieter; Ludewig, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Amino acids are major primary metabolites. Their uptake, translocation, compartmentation, and re-mobilization require a diverse set of cellular transporters. Here, the broadly expressed gene product of CATIONIC AMINO ACID TRANSPORTER 9 (CAT9) was identified as mainly localized to vesicular membranes that are involved in vacuolar trafficking, including those of the trans-Golgi network. In order to probe whether and how these compartments are involved in amino acid homeostasis, a loss-of-function cat9-1 mutant and ectopic over-expressor plants were isolated. Under restricted nitrogen supply in soil, cat9-1 showed a chlorotic phenotype, which was reversed in the over-expressors. The total soluble amino acid pools were affected in the mutants, but this was only significant under poor nitrogen supply. Upon nitrogen starvation, the soluble amino acid leaf pools were lower in the over-expressor, compared with cat9-1. Over-expression generally affected total soluble amino acid concentrations, slightly delayed development, and finally improved the survival upon severe nitrogen starvation. The results potentially identify a novel function of vesicular amino acid transport mediated by CAT9 in the cellular nitrogen-dependent amino acid homeostasis. PMID:25883600

  12. Amino acid transporters: roles in amino acid sensing and signalling in animal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hyde, Russell; Taylor, Peter M; Hundal, Harinder S

    2003-01-01

    Amino acid availability regulates cellular physiology by modulating gene expression and signal transduction pathways. However, although the signalling intermediates between nutrient availability and altered gene expression have become increasingly well documented, how eukaryotic cells sense the presence of either a nutritionally rich or deprived medium is still uncertain. From recent studies it appears that the intracellular amino acid pool size is particularly important in regulating translational effectors, thus, regulated transport of amino acids across the plasma membrane represents a means by which the cellular response to amino acids could be controlled. Furthermore, evidence from studies with transportable amino acid analogues has demonstrated that flux through amino acid transporters may act as an initiator of nutritional signalling. This evidence, coupled with the substrate selectivity and sensitivity to nutrient availability classically associated with amino acid transporters, plus the recent discovery of transporter-associated signalling proteins, demonstrates a potential role for nutrient transporters as initiators of cellular nutrient signalling. Here, we review the evidence supporting the idea that distinct amino acid "receptors" function to detect and transmit certain nutrient stimuli in higher eukaryotes. In particular, we focus on the role that amino acid transporters may play in the sensing of amino acid levels, both directly as initiators of nutrient signalling and indirectly as regulators of external amino acid access to intracellular receptor/signalling mechanisms. PMID:12879880

  13. The immunogenicity of dinitrophenyl amino acids.

    PubMed

    Frey, J R; de Weck, A L; Geleick, H; Lergier, W

    1969-11-01

    Numerous dinitrophenyl amino acid preparations injected intradermally induced contact hypersensitivity to dinitrochlorobenzene, delayed type skin reactions to DNP-amino acids, and anti-DNP antibodies in guinea pigs. Some DNP-amino adds induced precipitating anti-DNP antibodies in rabbits as well. Some of the DNP-ammo acids studied were regularly immunogenic, possible immunogenic impurities having been excluded by extensive purification procedures. Others were either constantly nonimmunogenic or irregularly immunogenic, e.g., their immunogenicity varying from one preparation lot to another. By means of extensive chemical analyses and the establishment of dose-response curves, we were able to demonstrate in most cases that the immunogenicity was not due to contamination with unreacted dinitrofluorobenzene or other DNP derivatives, to photodecomposition or other degradation products, or to DNP-protein contaminants. Nevertheless, the irregular immunogenicity of several DNP-amino acid preparations can only be explained by a highly immunogenic impurity (or impurities) which we were unable to detect analytically. The regular immunogenicity of some other DNP-amino acids (e.g. di-DNP-L-histidine) appears to be based on a "transconjugation" phenomenon, the DNP group being able to split off from its amino acid carrier and to conjugate secondarily with proteins in vivo and in vitro. Accordingly, the interpretation of some recent data concerning the immunogenicity of low molecular weight hapten-amino acids may have to be reevaluated. PMID:4981513

  14. Distribution of Amino Acids in Lunar Regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, J. E.; Callahan, M. P.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.; Noble, S. K.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    One of the most eagerly studied questions upon initial return of lunar samples was whether significant amounts of organic compounds, including amino acids, were present. Analyses during the 1970s produced only tentative and inconclusive identifications of indigenous amino acids. Those analyses were hampered by analytical difficulties including relative insensitivity to certain compounds, the inability to separate chiral enantiomers, and the lack of compound-specific isotopic measurements, which made it impossible to determine whether the detected amino acids were indigenous to the lunar samples or the results of contamination. Numerous advances have been made in instrumentation and methodology for amino acid characterization in extraterrestrial samples in the intervening years, yet the origin of amino acids in lunar regolith samples has been revisited only once for a single lunar sample, (3) and remains unclear. Here, we present initial data from the analyses of amino acid abundances in 12 lunar regolith samples. We discuss these abundances in the context of four potential amino acid sources: (1) terrestrial biological contamination; (2) contamination from lunar module (LM) exhaust; (3) derivation from solar windimplanted precursors; and (4) exogenous delivery from meteorites.

  15. Amino Acid Stability in the Early Oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, E. T.; Brinton, K. L.; Burton, A. S.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.; Bada, J. L.

    2015-01-01

    It is likely that a variety of amino acids existed in the early oceans of the Earth at the time of the origin and early evolution of life. "Primordial soup", hydrothermal vent, and meteorite based processes could have contributed to such an inventory. Several "protein" amino acids were likely present, however, based on prebiotic synthesis experiments and carbonaceous meteorite studies, non-protein amino acids, which are rare on Earth today, were likely the most abundant. An important uncertainty is the length of time these amino acids could have persisted before their destruction by abiotic and biotic processes. Prior to life, amino acid concentrations in the oceans were likely regulated by circulation through hydro-thermal vents. Today, the entire ocean circulates through vent systems every 10(exp 7) years. On the early Earth, this value was likely smaller due to higher heat flow and thus marine amino acid life-time would have been shorter. After life, amino acids in the oceans could have been assimilated by primitive organisms.

  16. Amino Acid Degradation after Meteoritic Impact Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertrand, M.; Westall, F.; vanderGaast, S.; Vilas, F.; Hoerz, F.; Barnes, G.; Chabin, A.; Brack, A.

    2008-01-01

    Amino acids are among the most important prebiotic molecules as it is from these precursors that the building blocks of life were formed [1]. Although organic molecules were among the components of the planetesimals making up the terrestrial planets, large amounts of primitive organic precursor molecules are believed to be exogenous in origin and to have been imported to the Earth via micrometeorites, carbonaceous meteorites and comets, especially during the early stages of the formation of the Solar System [1,2]. Our study concerns the hypothesis that prebiotic organic matter, present on Earth, was synthesized in the interstellar environment, and then imported to Earth by meteorites or micrometeorites. We are particularly concerned with the formation and fate of amino acids. We have already shown that amino acid synthesis is possible inside cometary grains under interstellar environment conditions [3]. We are now interested in the effects of space conditions and meteoritic impact on these amino acids [4-6]. Most of the extraterrestrial organic molecules known today have been identified in carbonaceous chondrite meteorites [7]. One of the components of these meteorites is a clay with a composition close to that of saponite, used in our experiments. Two American teams have studied the effects of impact on various amino acids [8,9]. [8] investigated amino acids in saturated solution in water with pressure ranges between 5.1 and 21 GPa and temperature ranges between 412 and 870 K. [9] studied amino acids in solid form associated with and without minerals (Murchison and Allende meteorite extracts) and pressure ranges between 3 and 30 GPa. In these two experiments, the amino acids survived up to 15 GPa. At higher pressure, the quantity of preserved amino acids decreases quickly. Some secondary products such as dipeptides and diketopiperazins were identified in the [8] experiment.

  17. Identification of an amino acid residue required for differential recognition of a viral movement protein by the Tomato mosaic virus resistance gene Tm-2(2).

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Michie; Yamamoto-Katou, Ayako; Katou, Shinpei; Hirai, Katsuyuki; Meshi, Tetsuo; Ohashi, Yuko; Mitsuhara, Ichiro

    2011-07-01

    The Tm-2 gene of tomato and its allelic gene, Tm-2(2), confer resistance to Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) and encode a member of the coiled-coil/nucleotide binding-ARC/leucine-rich repeat (LRR) protein class of plant resistance (R) genes. Despite exhibiting only four amino acid differences between the products of Tm-2 and Tm-2(2), Tm-2(2) confers resistance to ToMV mutant B7, whereas Tm-2 is broken by ToMV-B7. An Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression system was used to study the mechanism of differential recognition of the movement proteins (MPs), an avirulence factor for ToMV resistance, of ToMV-B7 by Tm-2 and Tm-2(2). Although resistance induced by Tm-2 and Tm-2(2) is not usually accompanied by hypersensitive response (HR), Tm-2 and Tm-2(2) induced HR-like cell death by co-expression with MP of a wild-type ToMV, a strain that causes resistance for these R genes, and Tm-2(2) but not Tm-2 induced cell death with B7-MP in this system. Site-directed amino acid mutagenesis revealed that Tyr-767 in the LRR of Tm-2(2) is required for the specific recognition of the B7-MP. These results suggest that the Tyr residue in LRR contributes to the recognition of B7-MP, and that Tm-2 and Tm-2(2) are involved in HR cell death. PMID:21310506

  18. Genetics Home Reference: aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... PDF Open All Close All Description Aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) deficiency is an inherited disorder that ...

  19. Rag GTPase in amino acid signaling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joungmok; Kim, Eunjung

    2016-04-01

    Rag small GTPases were identified as the sixth subfamily of Ras-related GTPases. Compelling evidence suggests that Rag heterodimer (RagA/B and RagC/D) plays an important role in amino acid signaling toward mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), which is a central player in the control of cell growth in response to a variety of environmental cues, including growth factors, cellular energy/oxygen status, and amino acids. Upon amino acid stimulation, active Rag heterodimer (RagA/B(GTP)-RagC/D(GDP)) recruits mTORC1 to the lysosomal membrane where Rheb resides. In this review, we provide a current understanding on the amino acid-regulated cell growth control via Rag-mTORC1 with recently identified key players, including Ragulator, v-ATPase, and GATOR complexes. Moreover, the functions of Rag in physiological systems and in autophagy are discussed. PMID:26781224

  20. Identification of amino acid sequence motifs in desmocollin, a desmosomal glycoprotein, that are required for plakoglobin binding and plaque formation.

    PubMed

    Troyanovsky, S M; Troyanovsky, R B; Eshkind, L G; Leube, R E; Franke, W W

    1994-11-01

    By transfecting epithelial cells with gene constructs encoding chimeric proteins of the transmembrane part of the gap junction protein connexin 32 in combination with various segments of the cytoplasmic part of the desmosomal cadherin desmocollin 1a, we have determined that a relatively short sequence element is necessary for the formation of desmosome-like plaques and for the specific anchorage of bundles of intermediate-sized filaments (IFs). Deletion of as little as the carboxyl-terminal 37 aa resulted in a lack of IF anchorage and binding of the plaque protein plakoglobin, as shown by immunolocalization and immunoprecipitation experiments. In addition, we show that the sequence requirements for the recruitment of desmoplakin, another desmosomal plaque protein, differ and that a short (10 aa) segment of the desmocollin 1a tail, located close to the plasma membrane, is also required for the binding of plakoglobin, as well as of desmoplakin, and also for IF anchorage. The importance of the carboxyl-terminal domain, homologous in diverse types of cadherins, is emphasized, as it must harbor, in a mutually exclusive pattern, the information for assembly of the IF-anchoring desmosomal plaque in desmocollins and for formation of the alpha-/beta-catenin- and vinculin-containing, actin filament-anchoring plaque in E- and N-cadherin. PMID:7971964

  1. Polymers with complexing properties. Simple poly(amino acids)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roque, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    The free amino (0.3 equiv/residue) and carboxyl (0.5 equiv/residue) groups of thermal polylysine increased dramatically on treatment with distilled water. The total hydrolysis of such a polymer was abnormal in that only about 50% of the expected amino acids were recovered. Poly (lysine-co-alanine-co-glycine) under usual conditions hydrolyzed completely in 8 hours; whereas, when it was pretreated with diazomethane, a normal period of 24 hours was required to give (nearly) the same amounts of each free amino acid as compared with those obtained from the untreated polymer. The amino groups of the basic thermal poly(amino acids) were sterically hindered. The existence of nitrogen atoms linking two or three chains and reactive groups (anhydride, imine) were proposed.

  2. Genetically encoded fluorescent coumarin amino acids

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jiangyun; Xie, Jianming; Schultz, Peter G.

    2010-10-05

    The invention relates to orthogonal pairs of tRNAs and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases that can incorporate the coumarin unnatural amino acid L-(7-hydroxycoumarin-4-yl) ethylglycine into proteins produced in eubacterial host cells such as E. coli. The invention provides, for example but not limited to, novel orthogonal synthetases, methods for identifying and making the novel synthetases, methods for producing proteins containing the unnatural amino acid L-(7-hydroxycoumarin-4-yl)ethylglycine and related translation systems.

  3. Genetically encoded fluorescent coumarin amino acids

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jiangyun; Xie, Jianming; Schultz, Peter G.

    2012-06-05

    The invention relates to orthogonal pairs of tRNAs and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases that can incorporate the coumarin unnatural amino acid L-(7-hydroxycoumarin-4-yl)ethylglycine into proteins produced in eubacterial host cells such as E. coli. The invention provides, for example but not limited to, novel orthogonal synthetases, methods for identifying and making the novel synthetases, methods for producing proteins containing the unnatural amino acid L-(7-hydroxycoumarin-4-yl)ethylglycine and related translation systems.

  4. Nonprotein Amino Acids from Spark Discharges and Their Comparison with the Murchison Meteorite Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Wolman, Yecheskel; Haverland, William J.; Miller, Stanley L.

    1972-01-01

    All the nonprotein amino acids found in the Murchison meteorite are products of the action of electric discharge on a mixture of methane, nitrogen, and water with traces of ammonia. These amino acids include α-amino-n-butyric acid, α-aminoisobutyric acid, norvaline, isovaline, pipecolic acid, β-alanine, β-amino-n-butyric acid, β-aminoisobutyric acid, γ-aminobutyric acid, sarcosine, N-ethylglycine, and N-methylalanine. In addition, norleucine, alloisoleucine, N-propylglycine, N-isopropylglycine, N-methyl-β-alanine, N-ethyl-β-alanine α,β-diaminopropionic acid, isoserine, α,γ-diaminobutyric acid, and α-hydroxy-γ-aminobutyric acid are produced by the electric discharge, but have not been found in the meteorite. PMID:16591973

  5. Nonprotein amino acids from spark discharges and their comparison with the murchison meteorite amino acids.

    PubMed

    Wolman, Y; Haverland, W J; Miller, S L

    1972-04-01

    All the nonprotein amino acids found in the Murchison meteorite are products of the action of electric discharge on a mixture of methane, nitrogen, and water with traces of ammonia. These amino acids include alpha-amino-n-butyric acid, alpha-aminoisobutyric acid, norvaline, isovaline, pipecolic acid, beta-alanine, beta-amino-n-butyric acid, beta-aminoisobutyric acid, gamma-aminobutyric acid, sarcosine, N-ethylglycine, and N-methylalanine. In addition, norleucine, alloisoleucine, N-propylglycine, N-isopropylglycine, N-methyl-beta-alanine, N-ethyl-beta-alanine alpha,beta-diaminopropionic acid, isoserine, alpha,gamma-diaminobutyric acid, and alpha-hydroxy-gamma-aminobutyric acid are produced by the electric discharge, but have not been found in the meteorite. PMID:16591973

  6. The Mitochondrial Sulfur Dioxygenase ETHYLMALONIC ENCEPHALOPATHY PROTEIN1 Is Required for Amino Acid Catabolism during Carbohydrate Starvation and Embryo Development in Arabidopsis1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Krüßel, Lena; Junemann, Johannes; Wirtz, Markus; Birke, Hannah; Thornton, Jeremy D.; Browning, Luke W.; Poschet, Gernot; Hell, Rüdiger; Balk, Janneke; Braun, Hans-Peter; Hildebrandt, Tatjana M.

    2014-01-01

    The sulfur dioxygenase ETHYLMALONIC ENCEPHALOPATHY PROTEIN1 (ETHE1) catalyzes the oxidation of persulfides in the mitochondrial matrix and is essential for early embryo development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We investigated the biochemical and physiological functions of ETHE1 in plant metabolism using recombinant Arabidopsis ETHE1 and three transfer DNA insertion lines with 50% to 99% decreased sulfur dioxygenase activity. Our results identified a new mitochondrial pathway catalyzing the detoxification of reduced sulfur species derived from cysteine catabolism by oxidation to thiosulfate. Knockdown of the sulfur dioxygenase impaired embryo development and produced phenotypes of starvation-induced chlorosis during short-day growth conditions and extended darkness, indicating that ETHE1 has a key function in situations of high protein turnover, such as seed production and the use of amino acids as alternative respiratory substrates during carbohydrate starvation. The amino acid profile of mutant plants was similar to that caused by defects in the electron-transfer flavoprotein/electron-transfer flavoprotein:ubiquinone oxidoreductase complex and associated dehydrogenases. Thus, in addition to sulfur amino acid catabolism, ETHE1 also affects the oxidation of branched-chain amino acids and lysine. PMID:24692429

  7. Separate domains in GCN1 for binding protein kinase GCN2 and ribosomes are required for GCN2 activation in amino acid-starved cells

    PubMed Central

    Sattlegger, Evelyn; Hinnebusch, Alan G.

    2000-01-01

    GCN2 stimulates GCN4 translation in amino acid-starved cells by phosphorylating the α-subunit of translation initiation factor 2. GCN2 function in vivo requires the GCN1/GCN20 complex, which binds to the N-terminal domain of GCN2. A C-terminal segment of GCN1 (residues 2052–2428) was found to be necessary and sufficient for binding GCN2 in vivo and in vitro. Overexpression of this fragment in wild-type cells impaired association of GCN2 with native GCN1 and had a dominant Gcn– phenotype, dependent on Arg2259 in the GCN1 fragment. Substitution of Arg2259 with Ala in full-length GCN1 abolished complex formation with native GCN2 and destroyed GCN1 regulatory function. Consistently, the Gcn– phenotype of gcn1-R2259A, but not that of gcn1Δ, was suppressed by overexpressing GCN2. These findings prove that GCN2 binding to the C-terminal domain of GCN1, dependent on Arg2259, is required for high level GCN2 function in vivo. GCN1 expression conferred sensitivity to paromomycin in a manner dependent on its ribosome binding domain, supporting the idea that GCN1 binds near the ribosomal acceptor site to promote GCN2 activation by uncharged tRNA. PMID:11101534

  8. Separate domains in GCN1 for binding protein kinase GCN2 and ribosomes are required for GCN2 activation in amino acid-starved cells.

    PubMed

    Sattlegger, E; Hinnebusch, A G

    2000-12-01

    GCN2 stimulates GCN4 translation in amino acid-starved cells by phosphorylating the alpha-subunit of translation initiation factor 2. GCN2 function in vivo requires the GCN1/GCN20 complex, which binds to the N-terminal domain of GCN2. A C-terminal segment of GCN1 (residues 2052-2428) was found to be necessary and sufficient for binding GCN2 in vivo and in vitro. Overexpression of this fragment in wild-type cells impaired association of GCN2 with native GCN1 and had a dominant Gcn(-) phenotype, dependent on Arg2259 in the GCN1 fragment. Substitution of Arg2259 with Ala in full-length GCN1 abolished complex formation with native GCN2 and destroyed GCN1 regulatory function. Consistently, the Gcn(-) phenotype of gcn1-R2259A, but not that of gcn1Delta, was suppressed by overexpressing GCN2. These findings prove that GCN2 binding to the C-terminal domain of GCN1, dependent on Arg2259, is required for high level GCN2 function in vivo. GCN1 expression conferred sensitivity to paromomycin in a manner dependent on its ribosome binding domain, supporting the idea that GCN1 binds near the ribosomal acceptor site to promote GCN2 activation by uncharged tRNA. PMID:11101534

  9. Structural and mutational analysis of archaeal ATP-dependent RNA ligase identifies amino acids required for RNA binding and catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Huiqiong; Yoshinari, Shigeo; Ghosh, Raka; Ignatochkina, Anna V.; Gollnick, Paul D.; Murakami, Katsuhiko S.; Ho, C. Kiong

    2016-01-01

    An ATP-dependent RNA ligase from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum (MthRnl) catalyzes intramolecular ligation of single-stranded RNA to form a closed circular RNA via covalent ligase-AMP and RNA-adenylylate intermediate. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structures of an MthRnl•ATP complex as well as the covalent MthRnl–AMP intermediate. We also performed structure-guided mutational analysis to survey the functions of 36 residues in three component steps of the ligation pathway including ligase-adenylylation (step 1), RNA adenylylation (step 2) and phosphodiester bond synthesis (step 3). Kinetic analysis underscored the importance of motif 1a loop structure in promoting phosphodiester bond synthesis. Alanine substitutions of Thr117 or Arg118 favor the reverse step 2 reaction to deadenylate the 5′-AMP from the RNA-adenylate, thereby inhibiting step 3 reaction. Tyr159, Phe281 and Glu285, which are conserved among archaeal ATP-dependent RNA ligases and are situated on the surface of the enzyme, are required for RNA binding. We propose an RNA binding interface of the MthRnl based on the mutational studies and two sulfate ions that co-crystallized at the active site cleft in the MthRnl–AMP complex. PMID:26896806

  10. Amino acid composition and amino acid-metabolic network in supragingival plaque.

    PubMed

    Washio, Jumpei; Ogawa, Tamaki; Suzuki, Keisuke; Tsukiboshi, Yosuke; Watanabe, Motohiro; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Dental plaque metabolizes both carbohydrates and amino acids. The former can be degraded to acids mainly, while the latter can be degraded to various metabolites, including ammonia, acids and amines, and associated with acid-neutralization, oral malodor and tissue inflammation. However, amino acid metabolism in dental plaque is still unclear. This study aimed to elucidate what kinds of amino acids are available as metabolic substrates and how the amino acids are metabolized in supragingival plaque, by a metabolome analysis. Amino acids and the related metabolites in supragingival plaque were extracted and quantified comprehensively by CE-TOFMS. Plaque samples were also incubated with amino acids, and the amounts of ammonia and amino acid-related metabolites were measured. The concentration of glutamate was the highest in supragingival plaque, while the ammonia-production was the highest from glutamine. The obtained metabolome profile revealed that amino acids are degraded through various metabolic pathways, including deamination, decarboxylation and transamination and that these metabolic systems may link each other, as well as with carbohydrate metabolic pathways in dental plaque ecosystem. Moreover, glutamine and glutamate might be the main source of ammonia production, as well as arginine, and contribute to pH-homeostasis and counteraction to acid-induced demineralization in supragingival plaque. PMID:27545001

  11. Amino acids in modern and fossil woods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, C.; Bada, J. L.; Peterson, E.

    1976-01-01

    The amino acid composition and the extent of racemization in several modern and fossil woods are reported. The method of analysis is described, and data are presented on the total amino acid concentration, the amino acid ratios, and the enantiomeric ratios in each sample. It is found that the amino acid concentration per gram of dry wood decreases with age of the sample, that the extent of racemization increases with increasing age, and that the amounts of aspartic acid, threonine, and serine decrease relative to valine with increasing age. The relative racemization rates of amino acids in wood, bone, and aqueous solution are compared, and it is shown that racemization in wood is much slower than in bone or aqueous solution. Racemization results for woods from the Kalambo Falls area of Zambia are used to calculate a minimum age of 110,000 years for the transition between the Sangoan and Acheulian industries at that site. This result is shown to be consistent with numerous radiometric dates for older Acheulian sites in Africa and to compare well with geologically inferred dates for the beginning of the Eemian and the end of the Acheulian industry in southern Africa.

  12. Amino acid survival in large cometary impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierazzo, E.; Chyba, C. F.

    1999-11-01

    A significant fraction of the Earth's prebiotic volatile inventory may have been delivered by asteroidal and cometary impacts during the period of heavy bombardment. The realization that comets are particularly rich in organic material seemed to strengthen this suggestion. Previous modeling studies, however, indicated that most organics would be entirely destroyed in large comet and asteroid impacts. The availability of new kinetic parameters for the thermal degradation of amino acids in the solid phase made it possible to readdress this question. We present the results of new high-resolution hydrocode simulations of asteroid and comet impact coupled with recent experimental data for amino acid pyrolysis in the solid phase. Differences due to impact velocity as well as projectile material have been investigated. Effects of angle of impacts were also addressed. The results suggest that some amino acids would survive the shock heating of large (kilometer-radius) cometary impacts. At the time of the origins of life on Earth, the steady-state oceanic concentration of certain amino acids (like aspartic and glutamic acid) delivered by comets could have equaled or substantially exceeded that due to Miller-Urey synthesis in a carbon dioxide-rich atmosphere. Furthermore, in the unlikely case of a grazing impact (impact angle around 5 degrees from the horizontal) an amount of some amino acids comparable to that due to the background steady-state production or delivery would be delivered to the early Earth.

  13. Dissociation of Paramyxovirus Interferon Evasion Activities: Universal and Virus-Specific Requirements for Conserved V Protein Amino Acids in MDA5 Interference ▿

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Aparna; Horvath, Curt M.

    2010-01-01

    The V protein of the paramyxovirus subfamily Paramyxovirinae is an important virulence factor that can interfere with host innate immunity by inactivating the cytosolic pathogen recognition receptor MDA5. This interference is a result of a protein-protein interaction between the highly conserved carboxyl-terminal domain of the V protein and the helicase domain of MDA5. The V protein C-terminal domain (CTD) is an evolutionarily conserved 49- to 68-amino-acid region that coordinates two zinc atoms per protein chain. Site-directed mutagenesis of conserved residues in the V protein CTD has revealed both universal and virus-specific requirements for zinc coordination in MDA5 engagement and has also identified other conserved residues as critical for MDA5 interaction and interference. Mutation of these residues produces V proteins that are specifically defective for MDA5 interference and not impaired in targeting STAT1 for proteasomal degradation via the VDC ubiquitin ligase complex. Results demonstrate that mutation of conserved charged residues in the V proteins of Nipah virus, measles virus, and mumps virus also abolishes MDA5 interaction. These findings clearly define molecular determinants for MDA5 inhibition by the paramyxovirus V proteins. PMID:20719949

  14. Amino acid isotopic analysis in agricultural systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A relatively new approach to stable isotopic analysis—referred to as compound-specific isotopic analysis (CSIA)—has emerged, centering on the measurement of 15N:14N ratios in amino acids (glutamic acid and phenylalanine). CSIA has recently been used to generate trophic position estimates among anima...

  15. Amino acids in the Yamato carbonaceous chrondrite from Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimoyama, A.; Ponnamperuma, C.; Yanai, K.

    1979-01-01

    Evidence for the presence of amino acids of extraterrestrial origin in the Antarctic Yamato carbonaceous chrondrite is presented. Hydrolyzed and nonhydrolyzed water-extracted amino acid samples from exterior, middle and interior portions of the meteorite were analyzed by an amino acid analyzer and by gas chromatography of N-TFA-isopropyl amino acid derivatives. Nine protein and six nonprotein amino acids were detected in the meteorite at abundances between 34 and less than one nmole/g, with equal amounts in interior and exterior portions. Nearly equal abundances of the D and L enantiomers of alanine, aspartic acid and glutamic acid were found, indicating the abiotic, therefore extraterrestrial, origin of the amino acids. The Antarctic environment and the uniformity of protein amino acid abundances are discussed as evidence against the racemization of terrestrially acquired amino acids, and similarities between Yamato amino acid compositions and the amino acid compositions of the Murchison and Murray type II carbonaceous chrondrites are indicated.

  16. Detection of non-protein amino acids in the presence of protein amino acids. II.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapshak, P.; Okaji, M.

    1972-01-01

    Studies conducted with the JEOL 5AH amino acid analyzer are described. This instrument makes possible the programming of the chromatographic process. Data are presented showing the separations of seventeen non-protein amino acids in the presence of eighteen protein amino acids. It is pointed out that distinct separations could be obtained in the case of a number of chemically similar compounds, such as ornithine and lysine, N-amidino alanine and arginine, and iminodiacetic acid and S-carboxymethyl cysteine and aspartic acid.

  17. Amino Acids Profiles in Biological Media

    SciTech Connect

    Iordache, A.; Horj, E.; Morar, S.; Cozar, O.; Culea, M.; Ani, A. R.; Mesaros, C.

    2010-08-04

    An accurate analytical method was developed to determine amino acids in some biological specimens by GC/MS technique. Stable isotopes provide useful tools for a variety of studies, offering ideal internal standards in quantitative information. Isotopic dilution gas chromatography--mass spectrometry (ID-GC/MS) is the techniques used for quantitative analysis of compounds labeled with stable isotopes. A Trace DSQ Thermo Finnigan quadrupole mass spectrometer coupled with a Trace GC was used. Amino acids were separated on a Rtx-5 MS capillary column, 30 mx0.25 mm, 0.25 {mu}m film thickness, using a temperature program from 50 deg. C, 1 min, 6 deg. C/min at 100 deg. C, 4 deg. C/min at 200 deg. C, 20 deg. C/min at 300 deg. C, (3 min). The transfer line temperature was 250 deg. C, the injector temperature 200 deg. C and ion source temperature 250 deg. C; splitter: 10:1. Electron energy was 70 eV and emission current, 100 {mu}A. The amino acids were purified on a Dowex 50W-W8 exchange resin and were derivatized in a procedure following two steps to obtain trifluoroacetyl butyl esters. The identification of amino acids was obtained by using NIST library but also by using amino acid standards.

  18. Distinguishing Proteins From Arbitrary Amino Acid Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Stephen S.-T.; Mao, Wei-Guang; Benson, Max; He, Rong Lucy

    2015-01-01

    What kinds of amino acid sequences could possibly be protein sequences? From all existing databases that we can find, known proteins are only a small fraction of all possible combinations of amino acids. Beginning with Sanger's first detailed determination of a protein sequence in 1952, previous studies have focused on describing the structure of existing protein sequences in order to construct the protein universe. No one, however, has developed a criteria for determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Here we show that when the collection of arbitrary amino acid sequences is viewed in an appropriate geometric context, the protein sequences cluster together. This leads to a new computational test, described here, that has proved to be remarkably accurate at determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Even more, if the results of this test indicate that the sequence can be a protein, and it is indeed a protein sequence, then its identity as a protein sequence is uniquely defined. We anticipate our computational test will be useful for those who are attempting to complete the job of discovering all proteins, or constructing the protein universe. PMID:25609314

  19. Amino Acids Profiles in Biological Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iordache, A.; Horj, E.; Ani, A. R.; Mesaros, C.; Morar, S.; Cozar, O.; Culea, M.

    2010-08-01

    An accurate analytical method was developed to determine amino acids in some biological specimens by GC/MS technique. Stable isotopes provide useful tools for a variety of studies, offering ideal internal standards in quantitative information. Isotopic dilution gas chromatography—mass spectrometry (ID-GC/MS) is the techniques used for quantitative analysis of compounds labeled with stable isotopes. A Trace DSQ Thermo Finnigan quadrupole mass spectrometer coupled with a Trace GC was used. Amino acids were separated on a Rtx-5 MS capillary column, 30 m×0.25 mm, 0.25 μm film thickness, using a temperature program from 50 °C, 1 min, 6 °C/min at 100 °C, 4 °C/min at 200 °C, 20 °C/min at 300 °C, (3 min). The transfer line temperature was 250 °C, the injector temperature 200 °C and ion source temperature 250 °C; splitter: 10:1. Electron energy was 70 eV and emission current, 100 μA. The amino acids were purified on a Dowex 50W-W8 exchange resin and were derivatized in a procedure following two steps to obtain trifluoroacetyl butyl esters. The identification of amino acids was obtained by using NIST library but also by using amino acid standards.

  20. Environmental roles of microbial amino acid racemases.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Sara B; Cava, Felipe

    2016-06-01

    Enzymes catalysing the stereo-chemical inter-conversion of amino acids are known as amino acid racemases. In bacteria, these enzymes are fundamental to synthesize the D-Ala and D-Glu that are critical components of the peptidoglycan. In addition to this structural function in cell wall assembly, D-amino acids produced by microbial amino acid racemases have been described as relevant constituents in other prokaryotic structures (e.g. capsule, non-ribosomal peptides) and have been associated to growth fitness and to processes such as biofilm development, spore germination and signalling. The recent discovery of broad spectrum racemases able to produce and release several D-amino acids to the environment suggests that these enzymes might have a great impact in microbial ecology. Consequently, new data on the biochemistry and regulation of racemases is key to understand the biological significance of D-enantiomers in nature, in particular their effect on microbial social networks. This review summarizes current knowledge on the environmental roles of bacterial racemases with an emphasis on the potential roles of the new broad spectrum enzymes in natural environments. PMID:26419727

  1. Amino acids of the Murchison meteorite. III - Seven carbon acyclic primary alpha-amino alkanoic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronin, John R.; Pizzarello, Sandra

    1986-01-01

    All of the eighteen possible seven-carbon acyclic primary alpha-amino alkanoic acids have been positively identified in a hot-water extract of the Murchison meteorite by the combined use of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, ion exchange chromatography and reversed-phase chromatography. None of these amino acids has previously been found in meteorites or in any other natural material. They range in concentration from less than or equal to 0.5 to 5.3 nmol/g. Configuration assignments were made for 2-amino-3,4-dimethylpentanoic acid and allo-2-amino-3,4-dimethylpentanoic acid and the diasteromer ratio was determined. Fifty-five amino acids have now been positively identified in the Murchison meteorite, 36 of which are unknown in terrestrial materials. This unique suite of amino acids is characterized by the occurrence of all structural isomers within the two major classes of amino acids represented, by the predominance of branched chain isomers, and by an exponential decline in amount with increasing carbon chain length within homologous series. These characteristics of the Murchison amino acids are suggestive of synthesis before incorporation into a parent body.

  2. Economic aspects of amino acids production.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Udo; Huebner, Susanna

    2003-01-01

    Amino acids represent basic elements of proteins, which as a main source of nutrition themselves serve as a major reserve for maintaining essential functions of humans as well as animals. Taking the recent state of scientific knowledge into account, the industrial sector of amino acids is a priori "suitable" to a specific kind of an ecologically sound way of production, which is based on biotechnology. The following article may point out characteristics of this particular industrial sector and illustrates the applicability of the latest economic methods, founded on development of the discipline of bionics in order to describe economic aspects of amino acids markets. The several biochemical and technological fields of application of amino acids lead to specific market structures in high developed and permanently evolving systems. The Harvard tradition of industrial economics explains how market structures mould the behaviour of the participants and influences market results beyond that. A global increase in intensity of competition confirms the notion that the supply-side is characterised by asymmetric information in contrast to Kantzenbachs concept of "narrow oligopoly" with symmetrical shared knowledge about market information. Departing from this point, certain strategies of companies in this market form shall be derived. The importance of Research and Development increases rapidly and leads to innovative manufacturing methods which replace more polluting manufacturing processes like acid hydrolysis. In addition to these modifications within the production processes the article deals furthermore with the pricing based on product life cycle concept and introduces specific applications of tools like activity based costing and target costing to the field of amino acid production. The authors come to the conclusion that based on a good transferability of latest findings in bionics and ecological compatibility competitors in amino acids manufacturing are well advised

  3. Temperature dependence of amino acid hydrophobicities

    PubMed Central

    Wolfenden, Richard; Lewis, Charles A.; Yuan, Yang; Carter, Charles W.

    2015-01-01

    The hydrophobicities of the 20 common amino acids are reflected in their tendencies to appear in interior positions in globular proteins and in deeply buried positions of membrane proteins. To determine whether these relationships might also have been valid in the warm surroundings where life may have originated, we examined the effect of temperature on the hydrophobicities of the amino acids as measured by the equilibrium constants for transfer of their side-chains from neutral solution to cyclohexane (Kw>c). The hydrophobicities of most amino acids were found to increase with increasing temperature. Because that effect is more pronounced for the more polar amino acids, the numerical range of Kw>c values decreases with increasing temperature. There are also modest changes in the ordering of the more polar amino acids. However, those changes are such that they would have tended to minimize the otherwise disruptive effects of a changing thermal environment on the evolution of protein structure. Earlier, the genetic code was found to be organized in such a way that—with a single exception (threonine)—the side-chain dichotomy polar/nonpolar matches the nucleic acid base dichotomy purine/pyrimidine at the second position of each coding triplet at 25 °C. That dichotomy is preserved at 100 °C. The accessible surface areas of amino acid side-chains in folded proteins are moderately correlated with hydrophobicity, but when free energies of vapor-to-cyclohexane transfer (corresponding to size) are taken into consideration, a closer relationship becomes apparent. PMID:26034278

  4. Delta-elimination by T4 endonuclease V at a thymine dimer site requires a secondary binding event and amino acid Glu-23.

    PubMed

    Latham, K A; Lloyd, R S

    1995-07-11

    Endonuclease V from bacteriophage T4 is a well characterized enzyme that initiates the repair of ultraviolet light induced pyrimidine dimers. Scission of the phosphodiester backbone between the pyrimidines within a dimer, or 3' to an abasic (AP) site, occurs by a beta-elimination mechanism. In addition, high concentrations of endonuclease V have been reported to catalyze the cleavage of the C5'-O-P bond in a reaction referred to as delta-elimination. To better understand the enzymology of endonuclease V, the delta-elimination reaction of the enzyme has been investigated using an oligonucleotide containing a site-specific cis-syn cyclobutane thymine dimer. The slower kinetics of the delta-elimination reaction compared to beta-elimination and the ability of unlabeled dimer-containing DNA to compete more efficiently for delta-elimination than beta-elimination indicate that delta-elimination most likely occurs during a separate enzyme encounter with the incised DNA. Previous studies have shown that both the alpha-amino group of the N-terminus and the acidic residue Glu-23 are necessary for the N-glycosylase and AP lyase activities of endonuclease V. Experiments with T2P, E23Q, and E23D mutants, which are defective in pyrimidine dimer-specific nicking, demonstrated that delta-elimination requires Glu-23, but not the primary amine at the N-terminus. In fact, the T2P mutant was much more efficient at promoting delta-elimination than the wild-type enzyme. Besides lending further proof that delta-elimination requires a second encounter between enzyme and DNA, this result may reflect an enhanced binding of the T2P mutant to dimer-containing DNA. PMID:7612620

  5. Polyribosome binding by GCN1 is required for full activation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2{alpha} kinase GCN2 during amino acid starvation.

    PubMed

    Sattlegger, Evelyn; Hinnebusch, Alan G

    2005-04-22

    The protein kinase GCN2 mediates translational control of gene expression in amino acid-starved cells by phosphorylating eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2alpha. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, activation of GCN2 by uncharged tRNAs in starved cells requires its direct interaction with both the GCN1.GCN20 regulatory complex and ribosomes. GCN1 also interacts with ribosomes in cell extracts, but it was unknown whether this activity is crucial for its ability to stimulate GCN2 function in starved cells. We describe point mutations in two conserved, noncontiguous segments of GCN1 that lead to reduced polyribosome association by GCN1.GCN20 in living cells without reducing GCN1 expression or its interaction with GCN20. Mutating both segments simultaneously produced a greater reduction in polyribosome binding by GCN1.GCN20 and a stronger decrease in eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2alpha phosphorylation than did mutating in one segment alone. These findings provide strong evidence that ribosome binding by GCN1 is required for its role as a positive regulator of GCN2. A particular mutation in the GCN1 domain, related in sequence to translation elongation factor 3 (eEF3), decreased GCN2 activation much more than it reduced ribosome binding by GCN1. Hence, the eEF3-like domain appears to have an effector function in GCN2 activation. This conclusion supports the model that an eEF3-related activity of GCN1 influences occupancy of the ribosomal decoding site by uncharged tRNA in starved cells. PMID:15722345

  6. L-amino acid oxidases with specificity for basic L-amino acids in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Gau, Achim E; Heindl, Achim; Nodop, Anke; Kahmann, Uwe; Pistorius, Elfriede K

    2007-01-01

    The two closely related fresh water cyanobacteria Synechococcus elongatus PCC 6301 and Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 have previously been shown to constitutively express a FAD-containing L-amino acid oxidase with high specificity for basic L-amino acids (L-arginine being the best substrate). In this paper we show that such an enzyme is also present in the fresh water cyanobacterium Synechococcus cedrorum PCC 6908. In addition, an improved evaluation of the nucleotide/amino acid sequence of the L-amino acid oxidase of Synechococcus elongatus PCC 6301 (encoded by the aoxA gene) with respect to the FAD-binding site and a translocation pathway signal sequence will be given. Moreover, the genome sequences of 24 cyanobacteria will be evaluated for the occurrence of an aoxA-similar gene. In the evaluated cyanobacteria 15 genes encoding an L-amino acid oxidase-similar protein will be found. PMID:17542496

  7. Amino acid precursors in lunar samples.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.; Harada, K.; Hare, P. E.

    1972-01-01

    The use of hot water to extract lunar samples, followed by the hydrolysis of the aqueous extract, appears to be the method of choice for identification and quantitation of amino acid precursors in extraterrestrial sources. The net inferences from the analyses to date are (1) that amino acid precursors are verifiably present in lunar dust, and (2) that they are quite certainly not the consequence of contamination by terrestrial organisms, including man. It is suggested that prebiotic evolutionary pathways such as have been traversed on the earth were terminated on the moon for lack of sufficient water. Although some or all of the amino acid precursors may be indigenous, the low level observed suggests that they may also result from onfall of organic compounds from interstellar matter, comets, tails, solar wind, or meteorites.

  8. Antibody conjugates with unnatural amino acids.

    PubMed

    Hallam, Trevor J; Wold, Erik; Wahl, Alan; Smider, Vaughn V

    2015-06-01

    Antibody conjugates are important in many areas of medicine and biological research, and antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are becoming an important next generation class of therapeutics for cancer treatment. Early conjugation technologies relied upon random conjugation to multiple amino acid side chains, resulting in heterogeneous mixtures of labeled antibody. Recent studies, however, strongly support the notion that site-specific conjugation produces a homogeneous population of antibody conjugates with improved pharmacologic properties over randomly coupled molecules. Genetically incorporated unnatural amino acids (uAAs) allow unique orthogonal coupling strategies compared to those used for the 20 naturally occurring amino acids. Thus, uAAs provide a novel paradigm for creation of next generation ADCs. Additionally, uAA-based site-specific conjugation could also empower creation of additional multifunctional conjugates important as biopharmaceuticals, diagnostics, or reagents. PMID:25898256

  9. Terahertz broadband spectroscopic investigations of amino acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, De-chong; Zhang, Liang-liang; Zhong, Hua; Zhang, Cun-lin

    2011-08-01

    We present an experimental terahertz (THz) spectroscopic investigation of amino acid using an air-breakdown-coherent detection (ABCD) system. The strong and ultra-broadband (0.1 to 10THz) terahertz radiations generated by two-color laser induced air plasma and measured by coherent heterodyne detection. The broadband THz reflection spectra of L-Lysine (C6H14N2O2) and L-Arginine (C6H14N2O2) are obtained. To solve the phase-retrieval problem in RTDS, the absorption signatures of the materials are extracted directly from the first derivative of the relative reflectance with respect to frequency. The absorption features of the two amino acids are characterized in the 0.5~6 THz region. It is found that both the two amino acids have an absorption peak at 1.10 THz.

  10. Probing protein stability with unnatural amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, D.; Ellman, J.A.; Zhiyuh Chang; Veenstra, D.L.; Kollman, P.A.; Schultz, P.G. )

    1992-06-26

    Unnatural amino acid mutagenesis, in combination with molecular modeling and simulation techniques, was used to probe the effect of side chain structure on protein stability. Specific replacements at position 133 in T4 lysozyme included (1) leucine (wt), norvaline, ethylglycine, and alanine to measure the cost of stepwise removal of methyl groups from the hydrophobic core, (2) norvaline and O-methyl serine to evaluate the effects of side chain solvation, and (3) leucine, S,S-2-amino-4-methylhexanoic acid, and S-2-amino-3-cyclopentylpropanoic acid to measure the influence of packing density and side chain conformational entropy on protein stability. All of these factors (hydrophobicity, packing, conformational entropy, and cavity formation) significantly influence protein stability and must be considered when analyzing any structural change to proteins.

  11. Cometary Amino Acids from the STARDUST Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jamie Elsila

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Stardust spacecraft returned samples from comet 81 P/WiId 2 to Earth in January 2006. Examinations of the organic compounds in cometary samples can reveal information about the prebiotic organic inventory present on the early Earth and within the early Solar System, which may have contributed to the origin of life. Preliminary studies of Stardust material revealed the presence of a suite of organic compounds including several amines and amino acids, but the origin of these compounds (cometary vs. terrestrial contamination) could not be identified. We have recently measured the carbon isotopic ratios of these amino acids to determine their origin, leading to the first detection of a cometary amino acid.

  12. Amino-Acid Sequence of Porcine Pepsin

    PubMed Central

    Tang, J.; Sepulveda, P.; Marciniszyn, J.; Chen, K. C. S.; Huang, W-Y.; Tao, N.; Liu, D.; Lanier, J. P.

    1973-01-01

    As the culmination of several years of experiments, we propose a complete amino-acid sequence for porcine pepsin, an enzyme containing 327 amino-acid residues in a single polypeptide chain. In the sequence determination, the enzyme was treated with cyanogen bromide. Five resulting fragments were purified. The amino-acid sequence of four of the fragments accounted for 290 residues. Because the structure of a 37-residue carboxyl-terminal fragment was already known, it was not studied. The alignment of these fragments was determined from the sequence of methionyl-peptides we had previously reported. We also discovered the locations of activesite aspartyl residues, as well as the pairing of the three disulfide bridges. A minor component of commercial crystalline pepsin was found to contain two extra amino-acid residues, Ala-Leu-, at the amino-terminus of the molecule. This minor component was apparently derived from a different site of cleavage during the activation of porcine pepsinogen. PMID:4587252

  13. Biosynthesis of the Aromatic Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Pittard, James; Yang, Ji

    2008-09-01

    This chapter describes in detail the genes and proteins of Escherichia coli involved in the biosynthesis and transport of the three aromatic amino acids tyrosine, phenylalanine, and tryptophan. It provides a historical perspective on the elaboration of the various reactions of the common pathway converting erythrose-4-phosphate and phosphoenolpyruvate to chorismate and those of the three terminal pathways converting chorismate to phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan. The regulation of key reactions by feedback inhibition, attenuation, repression, and activation are also discussed. Two regulatory proteins, TrpR (108 amino acids) and TyrR (513 amino acids), play a major role in transcriptional regulation. The TrpR protein functions only as a dimer which, in the presence of tryptophan, represses the expression of trp operon plus four other genes (the TrpR regulon). The TyrR protein, which can function both as a dimer and as a hexamer, regulates the expression of nine genes constituting the TyrR regulon. TyrR can bind each of the three aromatic amino acids and ATP and under their influence can act as a repressor or activator of gene expression. The various domains of this protein involved in binding the aromatic amino acids and ATP, recognizing DNA binding sites, interacting with the alpha subunit of RNA polymerase, and changing from a monomer to a dimer or a hexamer are all described. There is also an analysis of the various strategies which allow TyrR in conjunction with particular amino acids to differentially affect the expression of individual genes of the TyrR regulon. PMID:26443741

  14. Modulation of phagosomal pH by Candida albicans promotes hyphal morphogenesis and requires Stp2p, a regulator of amino acid transport.

    PubMed

    Vylkova, Slavena; Lorenz, Michael C

    2014-03-01

    Candida albicans, the most important fungal pathogen of humans, has a unique interaction with macrophages in which phagocytosis induces a switch from the yeast to hyphal form, allowing it to escape by rupturing the immune cell. While a variety of factors induce this switch in vitro, including neutral pH, it is not clear what triggers morphogenesis within the macrophage where the acidic environment should inhibit this transition. In vitro, C. albicans grown in similar conditions in which amino acids are the primary carbon source generate large quantities of ammonia to raise the extracellular pH and induce the hyphal switch. We show here that C. albicans cells neutralize the macrophage phagosome and that neutral pH is a key inducer of germination in phagocytosed cells by using a mutant lacking STP2, a transcription factor that regulates the expression of multiple amino acid permeases, that is completely deficient in alkalinization in vitro. Phagocytosed stp2Δ mutant cells showed significant reduction in hypha formation and escaped from macrophages less readily compared to wild type cells; as a result stp2Δ mutant cells were killed at a higher rate and caused less damage to RAW264.7 macrophages. Stp2p-regulated import leads to alkalinization of the phagosome, since the majority of the wild type cells fail to co-localize with acidophilic dyes, whereas the stp2Δ mutant cells were located in acidic phagosomes. Furthermore, stp2Δ mutant cells were able to form hyphae and escape from neutral phagosomes, indicating that the survival defect in these cells was pH dependent. Finally, these defects are reflected in an attenuation of virulence in a mouse model of disseminated candidiasis. Altogether our results suggest that C. albicans utilizes amino acids to promote neutralization of the phagosomal pH, hyphal morphogenesis, and escape from macrophages. PMID:24626429

  15. Protein and amino Acid supplementation in athletes.

    PubMed

    Armsey, Thomas D; Grime, Todd E

    2002-08-01

    Amino acid supplementation is practiced by numerous individuals with the hope of increasing muscle mass and function by increasing available proteins. Theoretically, this makes a great deal of sense; the scientific facts, however, fail to conclusively prove that ingesting more than the recommended dietary allowance of protein has any effect on otherwise healthy adults. Athletes may be the exception to this rule. This review examines the most current literature pertaining to amino acid supplementation, and reports on the potential benefits and risks of this common practice. PMID:12831703

  16. Apical transporters for neutral amino acids: physiology and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Bröer, Stefan

    2008-04-01

    Absorption of amino acids in kidney and intestine involves a variety of transporters for different groups of amino acids. This is illustrated by inherited disorders of amino acid absorption, such as Hartnup disorder, cystinuria, iminoglycinuria, dicarboxylic aminoaciduria, and lysinuric protein intolerance, affecting separate groups of amino acids. Recent advances in the molecular identification of apical neutral amino acid transporters has shed a light on the molecular basis of Hartnup disorder and iminoglycinuria. PMID:18400692

  17. Amino Acid Metabolism of Lemna minor L. 1

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, David; Hogan, Austin L.; Deal, Luanne; Jamieson, Gene C.; Haworth, Philip

    1987-01-01

    Chlorsulfuron, an inhibitor of acetolactate synthase (EC 4.1.3.18) (TB Ray 1984 Plant Physiol 75: 827-831), markedly inhibited the growth of Lemna minor at concentrations of 10−8 molar and above, but had no inhibitory effects on growth at 10−9 molar. At growth inhibitory concentrations, chlorsulfuron caused a pronounced increase in total free amino acid levels within 24 hours. Valine, leucine, and isoleucine, however, became smaller percentages of the total free amino acid pool as the concentration of chlorsulfuron was increased. At concentrations of chlorsulfuron of 10−8 molar and above, a new amino acid was accumulated in the free pool. This amino acid was identified as α-amino-n-butyrate by chemical ionization and electron impact gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The amount of α-amino-n-butyrate increased from undetectable levels in untreated plants, to as high as 840 nanomoles per gram fresh weight (2.44% of the total free pool) in plants treated with 10−4 molar chlorsulfuron for 24 hours. The accumulation of this amino acid was completely inhibited by methionine sulfoximine. Chlorsulfuron did not inhibit the methionine sulfoximine induced accumulations of valine, leucine, and isoleucine, supporting the idea that the accumulation of the branched-chain amino acids in methionine sulfoximine treated plants is the result of protein turnover rather than enhanced synthesis. Protein turnover may be primarily responsible for the failure to achieve complete depletion of valine, leucine, and isoleucine even at concentrations of chlorsulfuron some 104 times greater than that required to inhibit growth. Tracer studies with 15N demonstrate that chlorsulfuron inhibits the incorporation of 15N into valine, leucine, and isoleucine. The α-amino-n-butyrate accumulated in the presence of chlorsulfuron and [15N]H4+ was heavily labeled with 15N at early time points and appeared to be derived by transamination from a rapidly labeled amino acid such as glutamate or

  18. Polymerization of amino acids containing nucleotide bases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ben Cheikh, Azzouz; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1990-01-01

    The nucleoamino acids 1-(3'-amino,3'-carboxypropyl)uracil (3) and 9-(3'-amino,3'-carboxypropyl)adenine (4) have been prepared as (L)-en-antiomers and as racemic mixtures. When 3 or 4 is suspended in water and treated with N,N'-carbon-yldiimidazole, peptides are formed in good yield. The products formed from the (L)-enantiomers are hydrolyzed to the monomeric amino acids by pronase. Attempts to improve the efficiency of these oligomerizations by including a polyuridylate template in the reaction mixture were not successful. Similarly, oligomers derived from the (L)-enantiomer of 3 did not act as templates to facilitate the oligomerization of 4.

  19. The Exchangeability of Amino Acids in Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yampolsky, Lev Y.; Stoltzfus, Arlin

    2005-01-01

    The comparative analysis of protein sequences depends crucially on measures of amino acid similarity or distance. Many such measures exist, yet it is not known how well these measures reflect the operational exchangeability of amino acids in proteins, since most are derived by methods that confound a variety of effects, including effects of mutation. In pursuit of a pure measure of exchangeability, we present (1) a compilation of data on the effects of 9671 amino acid exchanges engineered and assayed in a set of 12 proteins; (2) a statistical procedure to combine results from diverse assays of exchange effects; (3) a matrix of “experimental exchangeability” values EXij derived from applying this procedure to the compiled data; and (4) a set of three tests designed to evaluate the power of an exchangeability measure to (i) predict the effects of amino acid exchanges in the laboratory, (ii) account for the disease-causing potential of missense mutations in the human population, and (iii) model the probability of fixation of missense mutations in evolution. EX not only captures useful information on exchangeability while remaining free of other effects, but also outperforms all measures tested except for the best-performing alignment scoring matrix, which is comparable in performance. PMID:15944362

  20. 21 CFR 172.320 - Amino acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Amino acids. 172.320 Section 172.320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives §...

  1. Intestinal metabolism of sulfur amino acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gastrointestinal tract (GIT) is a metabolically significant site of sulfur amino acid (SAA) metabolism in the body and metabolizes approx. 20% of the dietary methionine intake that is mainly transmethylated to homocysteine and transsulfurated to cysteine. The GIT accounts for approx. 25% of the ...

  2. [Plasma amino acid concentrations in aggressive dogs].

    PubMed

    Juhr, Norbert-Christian; Brand, Ulrike; Riedel, Eberhard

    2005-01-01

    Following the hypothesis that metabolic screens may be useful tools in the diagnosis of canine aggression we have investigated the blood plasma amino acid levels of dogs which have been found aggressive (N = 10) against dogs or men in comparison to non-aggressive dogs (N = 10). In summary, the aggressive dogs showed elevated plasma concentrations of the neurophysiological active aromatic amino acids tryptophan (46/171 micromol/l, p < 0,001), tyrosine (38/67 micromol/l, p < 0.01) and histidine (74/91 micromol/l, p < 0.01) and lower lysine concentrations (175/151 micromol/l, p < 0.05), which seems to point to a stress situation of these dogs. The nitrogen metabolism is impaired in the urea-cycle in the conversion of ornithine (17/34 micromol/l, p < 0.01) to citrulline (64/47 micromol/l). Higher levels of branched chain amino acids, especially leucine (122/150 micromol/l, p < 0.01), mainly metabolized in muscles, and isoleucin (60/71 micromol/l, p < 0.05) show a high energy potential. The acidose-stimulator methionine (48/78 micromol/l, p < 0.01) proved elevated. The results show that the changed behavior in the aggressive dogs is also reflected in their free amino acid plasma concentrations, independent of the question whether these data are the cause or the result of the aggressivity. PMID:15803756

  3. Constitutive and Hyperresponsive Signaling by Mutant Forms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Amino Acid Sensor Ssy1†

    PubMed Central

    Gaber, Richard F.; Ottow, Kim; Andersen, Helge A.; Kielland-Brandt, Morten C.

    2003-01-01

    Sensing of extracellular amino acids results in transcriptional induction of amino acid permease genes in yeast. Ssy1, a membrane protein resembling amino acid permeases, is required for signaling but is apparently unable to transport amino acids and is thus believed to be a sensor. By using a novel genetic screen in which potassium uptake was made dependent on amino acid signaling, we obtained gain-of-function mutations in SSY1. Some alleles confer inducer-independent signaling; others increase the apparent affinity for inducers. The results reveal that amino acid transport is not required for signaling and support the notion that sensing by Ssy1 occurs via its direct interaction with extracellular amino acids. PMID:14555474

  4. Active-Site Residues of Escherichia coli DNA Gyrase Required in Coupling ATP Hydrolysis to DNA Supercoiling and Amino Acid Substitutions Leading to Novobiocin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Christian H.; Parsons, Jonathan D.; Grossman, Trudy H.; Charifson, Paul S.; Bellon, Steven; Jernee, James; Dwyer, Maureen; Chambers, Stephen P.; Markland, William; Botfield, Martyn; Raybuck, Scott A.

    2003-01-01

    DNA gyrase is a bacterial type II topoisomerase which couples the free energy of ATP hydrolysis to the introduction of negative supercoils into DNA. Amino acids in proximity to bound nonhydrolyzable ATP analog (AMP · PNP) or novobiocin in the gyrase B (GyrB) subunit crystal structures were examined for their roles in enzyme function and novobiocin resistance by site-directed mutagenesis. Purified Escherichia coli GyrB mutant proteins were complexed with the gyrase A subunit to form the functional A2B2 gyrase enzyme. Mutant proteins with alanine substitutions at residues E42, N46, E50, D73, R76, G77, and I78 had reduced or no detectable ATPase activity, indicating a role for these residues in ATP hydrolysis. Interestingly, GyrB proteins with P79A and K103A substitutions retained significant levels of ATPase activity yet demonstrated no DNA supercoiling activity, even with 40-fold more enzyme than the wild-type enzyme, suggesting that these amino acid side chains have a role in the coupling of the two activities. All enzymes relaxed supercoiled DNA to the same extent as the wild-type enzyme did, implying that only ATP-dependent reactions were affected. Mutant genes were examined in vivo for their abilities to complement a temperature-sensitive E. coli gyrB mutant, and the activities correlated well with the in vitro activities. We show that the known R136 novobiocin resistance mutations bestow a significant loss of inhibitor potency in the ATPase assay. Four new residues (D73, G77, I78, and T165) that, when changed to the appropriate amino acid, result in both significant levels of novobiocin resistance and maintain in vivo function were identified in E. coli. PMID:12604539

  5. Transport and signaling via the amino acid binding site of the yeast Gap1 amino acid transceptor.

    PubMed

    Van Zeebroeck, Griet; Bonini, Beatriz Monge; Versele, Matthias; Thevelein, Johan M

    2009-01-01

    Transporter-related nutrient sensors, called transceptors, mediate nutrient activation of signaling pathways through the plasma membrane. The mechanism of action of transporting and nontransporting transceptors is unknown. We have screened 319 amino acid analogs to identify compounds that act on Gap1, a transporting amino acid transceptor in yeast that triggers activation of the protein kinase A pathway. We identified competitive and noncompetitive inhibitors of transport, either with or without agonist action for signaling, including nontransported agonists. Using substituted cysteine accessibility method (SCAM) analysis, we identified Ser388 and Val389 as being exposed into the amino acid binding site, and we show that agonist action for signaling uses the same binding site as used for transport. Our results provide the first insight, to our knowledge, into the mechanism of action of transceptors. They indicate that signaling requires a ligand-induced specific conformational change that may be part of but does not require the complete transport cycle. PMID:19060912

  6. Amino acid composition of humic substances in tundra soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilevich, R. S.; Beznosikov, V. A.

    2015-06-01

    Peripheral amino acid fragments of humic and fulvic acid molecules from tundra soils have been identified and quantified. A significant weight fraction of amino acids has been found in humic acid preparations, which exceeds their content in fulvic acids. Features of the amino acid composition of humic substances along the soil profile and depending on the degree of hydromorphism and the proportions of different (neutral, basic, acidic, cyclic) groups in amino acids have been revealed. The molar ratio between the hydroxy and heterocyclic amino acids reflects the degree of humification of the soil.

  7. Amino acid sequence requirements in the human IgA1 hinge for cleavage by streptococcal IgA1 proteases.

    PubMed

    Senior, B W; Batten, M R; Kilian, M; Woof, J M

    2002-08-01

    All the IgA1 proteases of the different pathogenic species of Streptococcus cleave the hinge of the alpha chain of human IgA1 only at one proline-threonine peptide bond. In order to study the importance of these amino acids for cleavage, several hinge mutant recombinant IgA1 antibodies were constructed. The mutations were found to be without major effect upon the structure or functional abilities of the antibodies. However, they had a major effect upon their sensitivity to cleavage by some of the IgA1 proteases. PMID:12196126

  8. Sensitive Amino Acid Composition and Chirality Analysis with the Mars Organic Analyzer (MOA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skelley, Alison M.; Scherer, James R.; Aubrey, Andrew D.; Grover, William H.; Ivester, Robin H. C.; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Grunthaner, Frank J.; Bada, Jeffrey L.; Mathies, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    Detection of life on Mars requires definition of a suitable biomarker and development of sensitive yet compact instrumentation capable of performing in situ analyses. Our studies are focused on amino acid analysis because amino acids are more resistant to decomposition than other biomolecules, and because amino acid chirality is a well-defined biomarker. Amino acid composition and chirality analysis has been previously demonstrated in the lab using microfabricated capillary electrophoresis (CE) chips. To analyze amino acids in the field, we have developed the Mars Organic Analyzer (MOA), a portable analysis system that consists of a compact instrument and a novel multi-layer CE microchip.

  9. D-Amino Acids in Living Higher Organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Noriko

    2002-04-01

    The homochirality of biological amino acids (L-amino acids) and of the RNA/DNA backbone (D-ribose) might have become established before the origin of life. It has been considered that D-amino acids and L-sugars were eliminated on the primitive Earth. Therefore, the presence and function of D-amino acids in living organisms have not been studied except for D-amino acids in the cell walls of microorganisms. However, D-amino acids were recently found in various living higher organisms in the form of free amino acids, peptides, and proteins. Free D-aspartate and D-serine are present and may have important physiological functions in mammals. D-amino acids in peptides are well known as opioid peptides and neuropeptides. In protein, D-aspartate residues increase during aging. This review deals with recent advances in the study of D-amino acids in higher organisms.

  10. Hereditary folate malabsorption: A positively charged amino acid at position 113 of the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT/SLC46A1) is required for folic acid binding

    SciTech Connect

    Lasry, Inbal; Berman, Bluma; Glaser, Fabian; Jansen, Gerrit; Assaraf, Yehuda G.

    2009-08-28

    The proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT/SLC46A1) mediates intestinal folate uptake at acidic pH. Some loss of folic acid (FA) transport mutations in PCFT from hereditary folate malabsorption (HFM) patients cluster in R113, thereby suggesting a functional role for this residue. Herein, unlike non-conservative substitutions, an R113H mutant displayed 80-fold increase in the FA transport Km while retaining parental Vmax, hence indicating a major fall in folate substrate affinity. Furthermore, consistent with the preservation of 9% of parental transport activity, R113H transfectants displayed a substantial decrease in the FA growth requirement relative to mock transfectants. Homology modeling based on the crystal structures of the Escherichia coli transporter homologues EmrD and glycerol-3-phosphate transporter revealed that the R113H rotamer properly protrudes into the cytoplasmic face of the minor cleft normally occupied by R113. These findings constitute the first demonstration that a basic amino acid at position 113 is required for folate substrate binding.

  11. Molecular Evolution of Plant AAP and LHT Amino Acid Transporters.

    PubMed

    Tegeder, Mechthild; Ward, John M

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen is an essential mineral nutrient and it is often transported within living organisms in its reduced form, as amino acids. Transport of amino acids across cellular membranes requires proteins, and here we report the phylogenetic analysis across taxa of two amino acid transporter families, the amino acid permeases (AAPs) and the lysine-histidine-like transporters (LHTs). We found that the two transporter families form two distinct groups in plants supporting the concept that both are essential. AAP transporters seem to be restricted to land plants. They were found in Selaginella moellendorffii and Physcomitrella patens but not in Chlorophyte, Charophyte, or Rhodophyte algae. AAPs were strongly represented in vascular plants, consistent with their major function in phloem (vascular tissue) loading of amino acids for sink nitrogen supply. LHTs on the other hand appeared prior to land plants. LHTs were not found in chlorophyte algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carterii. However, the characean alga Klebsormidium flaccidum encodes KfLHT13 and phylogenetic analysis indicates that it is basal to land plant LHTs. This is consistent with the hypothesis that characean algae are ancestral to land plants. LHTs were also found in both S. moellendorffii and P. patens as well as in monocots and eudicots. To date, AAPs and LHTs have mainly been characterized in Arabidopsis (eudicots) and these studies provide clues to the functions of the newly identified homologs. PMID:22645574

  12. Molecular Evolution of Plant AAP and LHT Amino Acid Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Tegeder, Mechthild; Ward, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen is an essential mineral nutrient and it is often transported within living organisms in its reduced form, as amino acids. Transport of amino acids across cellular membranes requires proteins, and here we report the phylogenetic analysis across taxa of two amino acid transporter families, the amino acid permeases (AAPs) and the lysine–histidine-like transporters (LHTs). We found that the two transporter families form two distinct groups in plants supporting the concept that both are essential. AAP transporters seem to be restricted to land plants. They were found in Selaginella moellendorffii and Physcomitrella patens but not in Chlorophyte, Charophyte, or Rhodophyte algae. AAPs were strongly represented in vascular plants, consistent with their major function in phloem (vascular tissue) loading of amino acids for sink nitrogen supply. LHTs on the other hand appeared prior to land plants. LHTs were not found in chlorophyte algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carterii. However, the characean alga Klebsormidium flaccidum encodes KfLHT13 and phylogenetic analysis indicates that it is basal to land plant LHTs. This is consistent with the hypothesis that characean algae are ancestral to land plants. LHTs were also found in both S. moellendorffii and P. patens as well as in monocots and eudicots. To date, AAPs and LHTs have mainly been characterized in Arabidopsis (eudicots) and these studies provide clues to the functions of the newly identified homologs. PMID:22645574

  13. FLU, an amino acid substitution model for influenza proteins

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The amino acid substitution model is the core component of many protein analysis systems such as sequence similarity search, sequence alignment, and phylogenetic inference. Although several general amino acid substitution models have been estimated from large and diverse protein databases, they remain inappropriate for analyzing specific species, e.g., viruses. Emerging epidemics of influenza viruses raise the need for comprehensive studies of these dangerous viruses. We propose an influenza-specific amino acid substitution model to enhance the understanding of the evolution of influenza viruses. Results A maximum likelihood approach was applied to estimate an amino acid substitution model (FLU) from ~113, 000 influenza protein sequences, consisting of ~20 million residues. FLU outperforms 14 widely used models in constructing maximum likelihood phylogenetic trees for the majority of influenza protein alignments. On average, FLU gains ~42 log likelihood points with an alignment of 300 sites. Moreover, topologies of trees constructed using FLU and other models are frequently different. FLU does indeed have an impact on likelihood improvement as well as tree topologies. It was implemented in PhyML and can be downloaded from ftp://ftp.sanger.ac.uk/pub/1000genomes/lsq/FLU or included in PhyML 3.0 server at http://www.atgc-montpellier.fr/phyml/. Conclusions FLU should be useful for any influenza protein analysis system which requires an accurate description of amino acid substitutions. PMID:20384985

  14. Amino Acids in the Antarctic Martian Meteorite MIL03346

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Aubrey, A.; Dworkin, J. P.; Botta, O.; Bada, J. L.

    2005-01-01

    The report by McKay et al. that the Martian meteorite ALH84001 contains evidence for life on Mars remains controversial. Of central importance is whether ALH84001 and other Antarctic Martian meteorites contain endogenous organic compounds. In any investigation of organic compounds possibly derived from Mars it is important to focus on compounds that play an essential role in biochemistry as we know it and that have properties such as chirality which can be used to distinguish between biotic versus abiotic origins. Amino acids are one of the few compounds that fulfill these requirements. Previous analyses of the Antarctic Martian meteorites ALH84001 and EETA79001 have shown that these meteorites contain low levels of terrestrial amino acid contamination derived from Antarctic ice meltwater. Here we report preliminary amino acid investigations of a third Antarctic Martian meteorite MIL03346 which was discovered in Antarctica during the 2003-04 ANSMET season. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract

  15. Molecular basis of essential amino acid transport from studies of insect nutrient amino acid transporters of the SLC6 family (NAT-SLC6)

    PubMed Central

    Boudko, Dmitri Y.

    2012-01-01

    Two protein families that represent major components of essential amino acid transport in insects have been identified. They are annotated as the SLC6 and SLC7 families of transporters according to phylogenetic proximity to characterized amino acid transporters (HUGO nomenclature). Members of these families have been identified as important apical and basolateral parts of transepithelial essential amino acid absorption in the metazoan alimentary canal. Synergistically, they play critical physiological roles as essential substrate providers to diverse metabolic processes, including generic protein synthesis. This review briefly clarifies the requirements for amino acid transport and a variety of amino acid transport mechanisms, including the aforementioned families. Further it focuses on the large group of Nutrient Amino acid Transporters (NATs), which comprise a recently identified subfamily of the Neurotransmitter Sodium Symporter family (NSS or SLC6). The first insect NAT, cloned from the caterpillar gut, has a broad substrate spectrum similar to mammalian B0 transporters. Several new NAT-SLC6 members have been characterized in an effort to explore mechanisms for the essential amino acid absorption in model dipteran insects. The identification and functional characterization of new B0-like and narrow specificity transporters of essential amino acids in fruit fly and mosquitoes leads to a fundamentally important insight: that NATs evolved and act together as the integrated active core of a transport network that mediates active alimentary absorption and systemic distribution of essential amino acids. This role of NATs is projected from the most primitive prokaryotes to the most complex metazoan organisms, and represents an interesting platform for unraveling the molecular evolution of amino acid transport and modeling amino acid transport disorders. The comparative study of NATs elucidates important adaptive differences between essential amino acid transportomes

  16. 40 CFR 721.10126 - Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo substituted phenyl azo... CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10126 Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10126 - Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo substituted phenyl azo... CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10126 Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato...

  18. Permeability of membranes to amino acids and modified amino acids: mechanisms involved in translocation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarti, A. C.; Deamer, D. W. (Principal Investigator); Miller, S. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    The amino acid permeability of membranes is of interest because they are one of the key solutes involved in cell function. Membrane permeability coefficients (P) for amino acid classes, including neutral, polar, hydrophobic, and charged species, have been measured and compared using a variety of techniques. Decreasing lipid chain length increased permeability slightly (5-fold), while variations in pH had only minor effects on the permeability coefficients of the amino acids tested in liposomes. Increasing the membrane surface charge increased the permeability of amino acids of the opposite charge, while increasing the cholesterol content decreased membrane permeability. The permeability coefficients for most amino acids tested were surprisingly similar to those previously measured for monovalent cations such as sodium and potassium (approximately 10(-12)-10(-13) cm s-1). This observation suggests that the permeation rates for the neutral, polar and charged amino acids are controlled by bilayer fluctuations and transient defects, rather than partition coefficients and Born energy barriers. Hydrophobic amino acids were 10(2) more permeable than the hydrophilic forms, reflecting their increased partition coefficient values. External pH had dramatic effects on the permeation rates for the modified amino acid lysine methyl ester in response to transmembrane pH gradients. It was established that lysine methyl ester and other modified short peptides permeate rapidly (P = 10(-2) cm s-1) as neutral (deprotonated) molecules. It was also shown that charge distributions dramatically alter permeation rates for modified di-peptides. These results may relate to the movement of peptides through membranes during protein translocation and to the origin of cellular membrane transport on the early Earth.

  19. How Do Haloarchaea Synthesize Aromatic Amino Acids?

    PubMed Central

    Gulko, Miriam Kolog; Dyall-Smith, Mike; Gonzalez, Orland; Oesterhelt, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Genomic analysis of H. salinarum indicated that the de novo pathway for aromatic amino acid (AroAA) biosynthesis does not follow the classical pathway but begins from non-classical precursors, as is the case for M. jannaschii. The first two steps in the pathway were predicted to be carried out by genes OE1472F and OE1475F, while the 3rd step follows the canonical pathway involving gene OE1477R. The functions of these genes and their products were tested by biochemical and genetic methods. In this study, we provide evidence that supports the role of proteins OE1472F and OE1475F catalyzing consecutive enzymatic reactions leading to the production of 3-dehydroquinate (DHQ), after which AroAA production proceeds via the canonical pathway starting with the formation of DHS (dehydroshikimate), catalyzed by the product of ORF OE1477R. Nutritional requirements and AroAA uptake studies of the mutants gave results that were consistent with the proposed roles of these ORFs in AroAA biosynthesis. DNA microarray data indicated that the 13 genes of the canonical pathway appear to be utilised for AroAA biosynthesis in H. salinarum, as they are differentially expressed when cells are grown in medium lacking AroAA. PMID:25216252

  20. Identification of Amino Acid Residues in Fibroblast Growth Factor 14 (FGF14) Required for Structure-Function Interactions with Voltage-gated Sodium Channel Nav1.6.

    PubMed

    Ali, Syed R; Singh, Aditya K; Laezza, Fernanda

    2016-05-20

    The voltage-gated Na(+) (Nav) channel provides the basis for electrical excitability in the brain. This channel is regulated by a number of accessory proteins including fibroblast growth factor 14 (FGF14), a member of the intracellular FGF family. In addition to forming homodimers, FGF14 binds directly to the Nav1.6 channel C-tail, regulating channel gating and expression, properties that are required for intrinsic excitability in neurons. Seeking amino acid residues with unique roles at the protein-protein interaction interface (PPI) of FGF14·Nav1.6, we engineered model-guided mutations of FGF14 and validated their impact on the FGF14·Nav1.6 complex and the FGF14:FGF14 dimer formation using a luciferase assay. Divergence was found in the β-9 sheet of FGF14 where an alanine (Ala) mutation of Val-160 impaired binding to Nav1.6 but had no effect on FGF14:FGF14 dimer formation. Additional analysis revealed also a key role of residues Lys-74/Ile-76 at the N-terminal of FGF14 in the FGF14·Nav1.6 complex and FGF14:FGF14 dimer formation. Using whole-cell patch clamp electrophysiology, we demonstrated that either the FGF14(V160A) or the FGF14(K74A/I76A) mutation was sufficient to abolish the FGF14-dependent regulation of peak transient Na(+) currents and the voltage-dependent activation and steady-state inactivation of Nav1.6; but only V160A with a concomitant alanine mutation at Tyr-158 could impede FGF14-dependent modulation of the channel fast inactivation. Intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy of purified proteins confirmed a stronger binding reduction of FGF14(V160A) to the Nav1.6 C-tail compared with FGF14(K74A/I76A) Altogether these studies indicate that the β-9 sheet and the N terminus of FGF14 are well positioned targets for drug development of PPI-based allosteric modulators of Nav channels. PMID:26994141

  1. Amino acids of the Murchison meteorite. I - Six carbon acyclic primary alpha-amino alkanoic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronin, J. R.; Gandy, W. E.; Pizzarello, S.

    1981-01-01

    Six of the seven chain isomers of six-carbon acyclic primary alpha-amino alkanoic acids (leucine isomers) have been either identified or confirmed in hot-water extracts of the Murchison meteorite using combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and ion exchange chromatography. 2-Amino-2-ethylbutyric acid, 2-amino-2,3-dimethylbutyric acid, pseudoleucine, and 2-methylnorvaline were positively identified by GC-MS. These amino acids have not been previously reported to occur in natural materials and may be uniquely meteoritic in origin. The presence of leucine and isoleucine (including the diastereoisomer, alloisoleucine) was confirmed. Peaks corresponding to norleucine were seen by ion-exchange and gas chromatography but characteristic mass spectra were not obtained. The alpha-branched chain isomers in this series are quantitatively the most significant. These results are compared with literature data on amino acid synthesis by electrical discharge and Fischer-Tropsch-type catalysis. Neither model system produces an amino acid suite that is completely comparable to that found in the Murchison meteorite.

  2. Roles of phytochemicals in amino acid nutrition.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiangfeng; Wu, Guoyao; Yin, Yinlong

    2011-01-01

    Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) is often used as dietary supplements to maintain good health in animals and humans. Here, we review the current knowledge about effects of CHM (including ultra-fine Chinese herbal powder, Acanthopanax senticosus extracts, Astragalus polysaccharide, and glycyrrhetinic acid) as dietary additives on physiological and biochemical parameters in pigs, chickens and rodents. Additionally, we propose possible mechanisms for the beneficial effects of CHM on the animals. These mechanisms include (a) increased digestion and absorption of dietary amino acids; (b) altered catabolism of amino acids in the small intestine and other tissues; (c) enhanced synthesis of functional amino acids (e.g., arginine, glutamine and proline) and polyamines; and (d) improved metabolic control of nutrient utilization through cell signaling. Notably, some phytochemicals and glucocorticoids share similarities in structure and physiological actions. New research findings provide a scientific and clinical basis for the use of CHM to improve well-being in livestock species and poultry, while enhancing the efficiency of protein accretion. Results obtained from animal studies also have important implications for human nutrition and health. PMID:21196382

  3. Fatty acid-amino acid conjugates diversification in Lepidopteran caterpillars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fatty acid amino acid conjugates (FACs) have been found in Noctuid as well as Sphingid caterpillar oral secretions and especially volicitin [N-(17-hydroxylinolenoyl)-L-Glutamine] and its biochemical precursor, N-linolenoyl-L-glutamine, are known elicitors of induced volatile emissions in corn plants...

  4. 40 CFR 721.1705 - Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with 6-amino-4-hydroxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with 6-amino-4-hydroxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid, diazotized, (3-aminophenyl)phosphonic acid and... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1705 Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized,...

  5. 40 CFR 721.1705 - Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with 6-amino-4-hydroxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with 6-amino-4-hydroxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid, diazotized, (3-aminophenyl)phosphonic acid and... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1705 Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized,...

  6. 40 CFR 721.1705 - Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with 6-amino-4-hydroxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with 6-amino-4-hydroxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid, diazotized, (3-aminophenyl)phosphonic acid and... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1705 Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized,...

  7. Amino acid analyses of R and CK chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Aaron S.; McLain, Hannah; Glavin, Daniel P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Davidson, Jemma; Miller, Kelly E.; Andronikov, Alexander V.; Lauretta, Dante; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2015-03-01

    Exogenous delivery of amino acids and other organic molecules to planetary surfaces may have played an important role in the origins of life on Earth and other solar system bodies. Previous studies have revealed the presence of indigenous amino acids in a wide range of carbon-rich meteorites, with the abundances and structural distributions differing significantly depending on parent body mineralogy and alteration conditions. Here we report on the amino acid abundances of seven type 3-6 CK chondrites and two Rumuruti (R) chondrites. Amino acid measurements were made on hot water extracts from these meteorites by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Of the nine meteorites analyzed, four were depleted in amino acids, and one had experienced significant amino acid contamination by terrestrial biology. The remaining four, comprised of two R and two CK chondrites, contained low levels of amino acids that were predominantly the straight chain, amino-terminal (n-ω-amino) acids β-alanine, and γ-amino-n-butyric acid. This amino acid distribution is similar to what we reported previously for thermally altered ureilites and CV and CO chondrites, and these n-ω-amino acids appear to be indigenous to the meteorites and not the result of terrestrial contamination. The amino acids may have been formed by Fischer-Tropsch-type reactions, although this hypothesis needs further testing.

  8. Rotational Study of Natural Amino Acid Glutamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela, Marcelino; Cabezas, Carlos; Alonso, José L.

    2014-06-01

    Recent improvements in laser ablation molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy (LA-MB-FTMW) have allowed the investigation of glutamine (COOH-CH(NH2)-CH2-CH2-CONH2), a natural amino acid with a long polar side chain. One dominant structure has been detected in the rotational spectrum. The nuclear quadrupole hyperfine structure of two 14N nuclei has been totally resolved allowing the conclusive identification of the observed species.

  9. Allied Health Chemistry Laboratory: Amino Acids, Insulin, Proteins, and Skin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dever, David F.

    1975-01-01

    Presents a laboratory experiment specifically designed for allied health students. The students construct molecular models of amino acids, extract amino acids from their skin with hot water, and chromatographically analyze the skin extract and hydrolyzed insulin. (MLH)

  10. Single amino acid supplementation in aminoacidopathies: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Aminoacidopathies are a group of rare and diverse disorders, caused by the deficiency of an enzyme or transporter involved in amino acid metabolism. For most aminoacidopathies, dietary management is the mainstay of treatment. Such treatment includes severe natural protein restriction, combined with protein substitution with all amino acids except the amino acids prior to the metabolic block and enriched with the amino acid that has become essential by the enzymatic defect. For some aminoacidopathies, supplementation of one or two amino acids, that have not become essential by the enzymatic defect, has been suggested. This so-called single amino acid supplementation can serve different treatment objectives, but evidence is limited. The aim of the present article is to provide a systematic review on the reasons for applications of single amino acid supplementation in aminoacidopathies treated with natural protein restriction and synthetic amino acid mixtures. PMID:24422943

  11. Branched-Chain Amino Acid Metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Binder, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Valine, leucine and isoleucine form the small group of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) classified by their small branched hydrocarbon residues. Unlike animals, plants are able to de novo synthesize these amino acids from pyruvate, 2-oxobutanoate and acetyl-CoA. In plants, biosynthesis follows the typical reaction pathways established for the formation of these amino acids in microorganisms. Val and Ile are synthesized in two parallel pathways using a single set of enzymes. The pathway to Leu branches of from the final intermediate of Val biosynthesis. The formation of this amino acid requires a three-step pathway generating a 2-oxoacid elongated by a methylene group. In Arabidopsis thaliana and other Brassicaceae, a homologous three-step pathway is also involved in Met chain elongation required for the biosynthesis of aliphatic glucosinolates, an important class of specialized metabolites in Brassicaceae. This is a prime example for the evolutionary relationship of pathways from primary and specialized metabolism. Similar to animals, plants also have the ability to degrade BCAAs. The importance of BCAA turnover has long been unclear, but now it seems apparent that the breakdown process might by relevant under certain environmental conditions. In this review, I summarize the current knowledge about BCAA metabolism, its regulation and its particular features in Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:22303262

  12. Amino acid synthesis in Europa's subsurface environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Sam H.; Schulze-Makuch, Dirk

    2008-10-01

    It has been suggested that Europa's subsurface environment may provide a haven for prebiotic evolution and the development of exotic biotic systems. The detection of hydrogen peroxide, sulfuric acid, water, hydrates and related species on the surface, coupled with observed mobility of icebergs, suggests the presence of a substantial subsurface liquid reservoir that actively exchanges materials with the surface environment. The atmospheric, surface and subsurface environments are described with their known chemistry. Three synthetic schemes using hydrogen peroxide, sulfuric acid and hydrocyanic acid leading to the production of larger biologically important molecules such as amino acids are described. Metabolic pathways based on properties of the subsurface ocean environment are detailed. Tidal heating, osmotic gradients, chemical cycling, as well as hydrothermal vents, provide energy and materials that may support a course of prebiotic evolution leading to the development or sustenance of simple biotic systems. Putative organisms may employ metabolic pathways based on chemical oxidation reduction cycles occurring in the putative subsurface ocean environment.

  13. A search for extraterrestrial amino acids in carbonaceous Antarctic micrometeorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinton, K. L.; Engrand, C.; Glavin, D. P.; Bada, J. L.; Maurette, M.

    1998-01-01

    Antarctic micrometeorites (AMMs) in the 100-400 microns size range are the dominant mass fraction of extraterrestrial material accreted by the Earth today. A high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) based technique exploited at the limits of sensitivity has been used to search for the extraterrestrial amino acids alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) and isovaline in AMMs. Five samples, each containing about 30 to 35 grains, were analyzed. All the samples possess a terrestrial amino acid component, indicated by the excess of the L-enantiomers of common protein amino acids. In only one sample (A91) was AIB found to be present at a level significantly above the background blanks. The concentration of AIB (approximately 280 ppm), and the AIB/isovaline ratio (> or = 10), in this sample are both much higher than in CM chondrites. The apparently large variation in the AIB concentrations of the samples suggests that AIB may be concentrated in rare subset of micrometeorites. Because the AIB/isovaline ratio in sample A91 is much larger than in CM chondrites, the synthesis of amino acids in the micrometeorite parent bodies might have involved a different process requiring an HCN-rich environment, such as that found in comets. If the present day characteristics of the meteorite and micrometeorite fluxes can be extrapolated back in time, then the flux of large carbonaceous micrometeorites could have contributed to the inventory of prebiotic molecules on the early Earth.

  14. Amino Acids as Metabolic Substrates during Cardiac Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Kenneth J.; Sidorov, Veniamin Y.; McGuinness, Owen P.; Wasserman, David H.; Wikswo, John P.

    2013-01-01

    The heart is well known as a metabolic omnivore in that it is capable of consuming fatty acids, glucose, ketone bodies, pyruvate, lactate, amino acids and even its own constituent proteins, in order of decreasing preference. The energy from these substrates supports not only mechanical contraction, but also the various transmembrane pumps and transporters required for ionic homeostasis, electrical activity, metabolism and catabolism. Cardiac ischemia – for example, due to compromise of the coronary vasculature or end-stage heart failure – will alter both electrical and metabolic activity. While the effects of myocardial ischemia on electrical propagation and stability have been studied in depth, the effects of ischemia on metabolic substrate preference has not been fully appreciated: oxygen deprivation during ischemia will significantly alter the relative ability of the heart to utilize each of these substrates. Although changes in cardiac metabolism are understood to be an underlying component in almost all cardiac myopathies, the potential contribution of amino acids in maintaining cardiac electrical conductance and stability during ischemia is underappreciated. Despite clear evidence that amino acids exert cardioprotective effects in ischemia and other cardiac disorders, their role in the metabolism of the ischemic heart has yet to be fully elucidated. This review synthesizes the current literature of the metabolic contribution of amino acids during ischemia by analyzing relevant historical and recent research. PMID:23354395

  15. 40 CFR 721.1643 - Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Benzenesulfonic acid, amino... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1643 Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-. (a) Chemical... as a benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo- (PMN P-95-86) is subject to reporting...

  16. 40 CFR 721.1643 - Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Benzenesulfonic acid, amino... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1643 Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-. (a) Chemical... as a benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo- (PMN P-95-86) is subject to reporting...

  17. 40 CFR 721.1643 - Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Benzenesulfonic acid, amino... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1643 Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-. (a) Chemical... as a benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo- (PMN P-95-86) is subject to reporting...

  18. 40 CFR 721.2584 - Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. 721.2584... Substances § 721.2584 Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as dodecanoic acid, 12-amino- (PMN P-98-0823; CAS No....

  19. 40 CFR 721.1643 - Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Benzenesulfonic acid, amino... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1643 Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-. (a) Chemical... as a benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo- (PMN P-95-86) is subject to reporting...

  20. 40 CFR 721.2584 - Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. 721.2584... Substances § 721.2584 Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as dodecanoic acid, 12-amino- (PMN P-98-0823; CAS No....

  1. 40 CFR 721.2584 - Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. 721.2584... Substances § 721.2584 Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as dodecanoic acid, 12-amino- (PMN P-98-0823; CAS No....

  2. 40 CFR 721.1643 - Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Benzenesulfonic acid, amino... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1643 Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-. (a) Chemical... as a benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo- (PMN P-95-86) is subject to reporting...

  3. Nutritional and medicinal aspects of D-amino acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper describes a method for determining the nutritional value of D-amino acids, D-peptides, and amino acid derivatives using a growth assay in mice fed a synthetic all-amino acid diet. A large number of experiments were carried out in which a molar equivalent of the test compound replaced a nu...

  4. Origin, Microbiology, Nutrition, and Pharmacology of D-Amino Acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exposure of food proteins to certain processing conditions induces two major chemical changes: racemization of all L-amino acids (LAA) to D-amino acids (DAA) and concurrent formation of crosslinked amino acids such as lysinoalanine (LAL). The diet contains both processing-induced and naturally-form...

  5. Amino acid sequence of Salmonella typhimurium branched-chain amino acid aminotransferase.

    PubMed

    Feild, M J; Nguyen, D C; Armstrong, F B

    1989-06-13

    The complete amino acid sequence of the subunit of branched-chain amino acid aminotransferase (transaminase B, EC 2.6.1.42) of Salmonella typhimurium was determined. An Escherichia coli recombinant containing the ilvGEDAY gene cluster of Salmonella was used as the source of the hexameric enzyme. The peptide fragments used for sequencing were generated by treatment with trypsin, Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease, endoproteinase Lys-C, and cyanogen bromide. The enzyme subunit contains 308 residues and has a molecular weight of 33,920. To determine the coenzyme-binding site, the pyridoxal 5-phosphate containing enzyme was treated with tritiated sodium borohydride prior to trypsin digestion. Peptide map comparisons with an apoenzyme tryptic digest and monitoring radioactivity incorporation allowed identification of the pyridoxylated peptide, which was then isolated and sequenced. The coenzyme-binding site is the lysyl residue at position 159. The amino acid sequence of Salmonella transaminase B is 97.4% identical with that of Escherichia coli, differing in only eight amino acid positions. Sequence comparisons of transaminase B to other known aminotransferase sequences revealed limited sequence similarity (24-33%) when conserved amino acid substitutions are allowed and alignments were forced to occur on the coenzyme-binding site. PMID:2669973

  6. Comparative nutrition and metabolism: Explication of open questions with emphasis on protein and amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Baker, David H.

    2005-01-01

    The 20th century saw numerous important discoveries in the nutritional sciences. Nonetheless, many unresolved questions still remain. Fifteen questions dealing with amino acid nutrition and metabolism are posed in this review. The first six deal with the functionality of sulfur amino acids (methionine and cysteine) and related compounds. Other unresolved problems that are discussed include priorities of use for amino acids having multiple functions; interactions among lysine, niacin and tryptophan; amino acid contributions to requirements from gut biosynthesis; the potential for gluconeogenesis to divert amino acids away from protein synthesis; the unique nutritional and metabolic idiosyncrasies of feline species, with emphasis on arginine; controversies surrounding human amino acid requirements; and the potential for maternal diet to influence sex ratio of offspring. PMID:16326801

  7. Sublimation of natural amino acids and induction of asymmetry by meteoritic amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasevych, Arkadii V.; Guillemin, Jean-Claude

    It is believed that the homochirality of building blocks of life like amino acids (AAs) and sugars is a prerequisite requirement for the origin and evolution of life. Among different mechanisms that might have triggered the initial disparity in the enantiomeric ratio on the primitive Earth, the key roles were assigned to: (i) local chiral symmetry breaking and (ii) the inflow of extraterrestrial matter (eg the carbonaceous meteorites containing non-racemic AAs). Recently it has been revealed that sublimation, a subject almost completely neglected for a long time, gives a pathway to enantioenrichment of natural AAs (1,2 and references herein). Sublimation is however one of the key physical processes that occur on comets. Starting from a mixture with a low content of an enantiopure AA, a partial sublimation gives an important enrichment of the sublimate (1,2). The resulted disparity in the ratio between enantiomers of a partial sublimate is determined by the crystalline nature of the starting mixture: we observed a drastic difference in the behavior of (i) mixtures based on true racemic compounds and (ii) mechanical mixtures of two enantiopure solid phases. On the other hand, combination of crystallization and sublimation can lead to segregation of enantioenriched fractions starting from racemic composition of sublimable aliphatic AAs (Ala, Leu, Pro, Val) in mixtures with non-volatile enantiopure ones (Asn, Asp, Glu, Ser, Thr) (3). The resulted sense of chirality correlates with the handedness of the non-volatile AAs: the observed changes in enantiomeric ratios clearly demonstrate the preferential homochiral interactions and a tendency of natural amino acids to homochiral self-organization. It is noteworthy that just these 5 (Asn, Asp, Glu, Ser, Thr) out of 22 proteinogenic amino acids are able to local symmetry breaking. On the other hand, recent data on the enantiomeric composition of the Tagish Lake, a C2-type carbonaceous meteorite, revealed a large L

  8. Hair and amino acids: the interactions and the effects.

    PubMed

    Oshimura, Eiko; Abe, Hiroshi; Oota, Rina

    2007-01-01

    The interaction and the function of some amino acids in hair care applications are discussed. When amino acids are applied to hair in the form of simple aqueous solution, uptake of the amino acids is mainly controlled by ionic equilibrium. When amino acids were incorporated in a hair conditioner, the result was quite different, suggesting the importance of interaction between the amino acids and the cationic surfactants. Uptake of pyrrolidone carboxylic acid (PCA), a derivative of glutamic acid, is enhanced by combining with arginine, an amino with strong affinity towards hair. Effects of some amino acids on bleached/dyed hair are described. A hair conditioner incorporated with alanine improves hair surface hydrophobicity of bleach-damaged hair. Histidine and phenylalanine improve tensile strength. PCA was proved to be effective to improve color-retention of dyed hair. PMID:17728935

  9. Amino acids as cryoprotectants for liposomal delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Afzal R; Coombes, Allan G A; Perrie, Yvonne

    2007-04-01

    Liposomes provide an efficient delivery system for solubilisation and delivery of both small and macro molecules. However, they suffer from the disadvantage of instability when stored as aqueous dispersions. Cryoprotection of the liposomal systems provides an effective approach to overcome poor stability whilst maintaining formulation characteristics, although, the formulation of a freeze-dried product requires the consideration of not only the selection of an appropriate cryoprotectant, but also needs careful consideration of the processing parameters including pre-freezing conditions, primary and secondary drying protocols along with optimisation of cryoprotectant concentration. This current work investigates the application of amino acids as potential cryoprotectants for the stabilisation of liposomes, and results indicate that amino acids show biphasic nature of stabilisation with 4 mol of cryoprotectant per mole of the lipid exhibiting optimum cryoprotection. The investigations of process parameters showed that the pre-freezing temperatures below the glass transition of the amino acids followed by drying for over 6h resulted in stable formulations. Studies investigating the efficiency of drug retention showed that the cryoprotection offered by lysine was similar to that shown by trehalose, suggesting that amino acids act as effective stabilizers. ESEM analysis was carried out to monitor morphology of the rehydrated liposomes. PMID:17317117

  10. Biosynthesis of amino acids in Clostridium pasteurianum

    PubMed Central

    Dainty, R. H.; Peel, J. L.

    1970-01-01

    1. Clostridium pasteurianum was grown on a synthetic medium with the following carbon sources: (a) 14C-labelled glucose, alone or with unlabelled aspartate or glutamate, or (b) unlabelled glucose plus 14C-labelled aspartate, glutamate, threonine, serine or glycine. The incorporation of 14C into the amino acids of the cell protein was examined. 2. In both series of experiments carbon from exogenous glutamate was incorporated into proline and arginine; carbon from aspartate was incorporated into glutamate, proline, arginine, lysine, methionine, threonine, isoleucine, glycine and serine. Incorporations from the other exogenous amino acids indicated the metabolic sequence: aspartate → threonine → glycine ⇌ serine. 3. The following activities were demonstrated in cell-free extracts of the organism: (a) the formation of aspartate by carboxylation of phosphoenolpyruvate or pyruvate, followed by transamination; (b) the individual reactions of the tricarboxylic acid route to 2-oxoglutarate from oxaloacetate; glutamate dehydrogenase was not detected; (c) the conversion of aspartate into threonine via homoserine; (d) the conversion of threonine into glycine by a constitutive threonine aldolase; (e) serine transaminase, phosphoserine transaminase, glycerate dehydrogenase and phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase. This last activity was abnormally high. 4. The combined evidence indicates that in C. pasteurianum the biosynthetic role of aspartate and glutamate is generally similar to that in aerobic and facultatively aerobic organisms, but that glycine is synthesized from glucose via aspartate and threonine. PMID:5419750

  11. The Role of Microbial Amino Acid Metabolism in Host Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Neis, Evelien P. J. G.; Dejong, Cornelis H. C.; Rensen, Sander S.

    2015-01-01

    Disruptions in gut microbiota composition and function are increasingly implicated in the pathogenesis of obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The functional output of the gut microbiota, including short-chain fatty acids and amino acids, are thought to be important modulators underlying the development of these disorders. Gut bacteria can alter the bioavailability of amino acids by utilization of several amino acids originating from both alimentary and endogenous proteins. In turn, gut bacteria also provide amino acids to the host. This could have significant implications in the context of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus, conditions associated with elevated systemic concentrations of certain amino acids, in particular the aromatic and branched-chain amino acids. Moreover, several amino acids released by gut bacteria can serve as precursors for the synthesis of short-chain fatty acids, which also play a role in the development of obesity. In this review, we aim to compile the available evidence on the contribution of microbial amino acids to host amino acid homeostasis, and to assess the role of the gut microbiota as a determinant of amino acid and short-chain fatty acid perturbations in human obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:25894657

  12. Organic geochemistry of amino acids: Precambrian to recent

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, M.H.; Macko, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    Since the discovery of amino acids in fossils (Abelson, 1954), considerable effort has been made to elucidate the origin and distribution of amino acids in geologic materials. Racemization and decomposition reactions of amino acids and peptides derived via the natural hydrolysis of protein constituents of organisms have been extensively studied. While the ubiquity of amino acids presents a challenge for discerning their indigeneity in geologic samples, careful analyses have resulted in successful applications of amino acid racemization and decomposition reactions for investigations of geochronologic, paleoclimatic, stratigraphic, diagenetic and chemotaxonomic problems for Quaternary age samples. An investigation of amino acids in sediments from Baffin Island fjords indicates that their distribution may also provide data with respect to the relative contributions of marine and terrigenous organic matter to recent sediments. While the absence of unstable amino acids and the presence of racemic amino acids in a sample may preclude very recent contamination, the possibility of retardation of amino acid racemization rates subsequent to geopolymer formation must also be considered. Studies of amino acids in Paleozoic, Mesozoic and early Cenozoic age samples are limited. Precambrian samples, however, have received much attention, given the potential (however slight) for isolating compounds representative of the earliest living systems. A future approach for elucidating the origin(s) of amino acids in ancient samples may be analyses of their individual stable isotopic compositions.

  13. Dissolved amino acids in oceanic basaltic basement fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Huei-Ting; Amend, Jan P.; LaRowe, Douglas E.; Bingham, Jon-Paul; Cowen, James P.

    2015-09-01

    The oceanic basaltic basement contains the largest aquifer on Earth and potentially plays an important role in the global carbon cycle as a net sink for dissolved organic carbon (DOC). However, few details of the organic matter cycling in the subsurface are known because great water depths and thick sediments typically hinder direct access to this environment. In an effort to examine the role of water-rock-microorganism interaction on organic matter cycling in the oceanic basaltic crust, basement fluid samples collected from three borehole observatories installed on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge were analyzed for dissolved amino acids. Our data show that dissolved free amino acids (1-13 nM) and dissolved hydrolyzable amino acids (43-89 nM) are present in the basement. The amino acid concentrations in the ridge-flank basement fluids are at the low end of all submarine hydrothermal fluids reported in the literature and are similar to those in deep seawater. Amino acids in recharging deep seawater, in situ amino acid production, and diffusional input from overlying sediments are potential sources of amino acids in the basement fluids. Thermodynamic modeling shows that amino acid synthesis in the basement can be sustained by energy supplied from inorganic substrates via chemolithotrophic metabolisms. Furthermore, an analysis of amino acid concentrations and compositions in basement fluids support the notion that heterotrophic activity is ongoing. Similarly, the enrichment of acidic amino acids and depletion of hydrophobic ones relative to sedimentary particulate organic matter suggests that surface sorption and desorption also alters amino acids in the basaltic basement. In summary, although the oceanic basement aquifer is a net sink for deep seawater DOC, similar amino acid concentrations in basement aquifer and deep seawater suggest that DOC is preferentially removed in the basement over dissolved amino acids. Our data also suggest that organic carbon

  14. Isotope composition of carbon in amino acids of solid bitumens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanina, S. N.; Bushnev, D. A.

    2014-06-01

    Primary data are presented on the isotope composition of carbon in individual amino acids from solid bitumens and several biological objects. The amino acids of biological objects are characterized by wide variations of the isotope composition of carbon. This fact occurs owing to the difference in biochemical paths of metabolism resulting in the synthesis of individual amino acids. The δ13C values are somewhat decreased for individual amino acids in asphaltenes, varying from -7.7 to -31.7‰. The carbon of amino acids is weighted in kerits from Bad'el' compared to asphaltenes. All the natural bitumens retain the characteristic trend for natural substances: the isotopically heavy and light amino acids by carbon are glycine and leucine, respectively. The isotope composition of amino-acid carbon is lightened compared to natural bitumens in the samples formed under a pronounced thermal impact (asphalt-like crust and kirishite).

  15. Intermolecular Vibrations of Hydrophobic Amino Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Michael Roy Casselman

    Hydrophobic amino acids interact with their chemical environment through a combination of electrostatic, hydrogen bonding, dipole, induced dipole, and dispersion forces. These interactions all have their own characteristic energy scale and distance dependence. The low-frequency (0.1-5 THz, 5-150 cm-1) vibrational modes of amino acids in the solid state are a direct indicator of the interactions between the molecules, which include interactions between an amino acid functional group and its surroundings. This information is central to understanding the dynamics and morphology of proteins. The alpha-carbon is a chiral center for all of the hydrophobic amino acids, meaning that they exist in two forms, traditionally referred to as L- and D-enantiomers. This nomenclature indicates which direction the molecule rotates plane-polarized visible light (levorotory and dextrorotory). Chiral a-amino acids in proteins are exclusively the L-variety In the solid state, the crystal lattice of the pure L-enantiomer is the mirror image of the D-enantiomer crystal lattice. These solids are energetically identical. Enantiomers also have identical spectroscopic properties except when the measurement is polarization sensitive. A mixture of equal amounts D- and L-amino acid enantiomers can crystallize into a racemic (DL-) structure that is different from that of the pure enantiomers. Whether a solution of both enantiomers will crystallize into a racemic form or spontaneously resolve into a mixture of separate D- and L-crystals largely depends on the interactions between molecules available in the various possible configurations. This is an active area of research. Low-frequency vibrations with intermolecular character are very sensitive to changes in lattice geometry, and consequently the vibrational spectra of racemic crystals are usually quite distinct from the spectra of the crystals of the corresponding pure enantiomers in the far-infrared (far-IR). THz time-domain spectroscopy (THz

  16. Synthesis of alpha-amino acids

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Jr., Jefferson W.

    1983-01-01

    A method for synthesizing alpha amino acids proceding through novel intermediates of the formulas: R.sub.1 R.sub.2 C(OSOCl)CN, R.sub.1 R.sub.2 C(Cl)CN and [R.sub.1 R.sub.2 C(CN)O].sub.2 SO wherein R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 are each selected from hydrogen monovalent substituted and unsubstituted hydrocarbon radicals of 1 to 10 carbon atoms. The use of these intermediates allows the synthesis steps to be exothermic and results in an overall synthesis method which is faster than the snythesis methods of the prior art.

  17. Synthesis of alpha-amino acids

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Jr., Jefferson W.

    1983-01-01

    A method for synthesizing alpha amino acids proceeding through novel intermediates of the formulas: R.sub.1 R.sub.2 C(OSOCl)CN, R.sub.1 R.sub.2 C(Cl)CN and [R.sub.1 R.sub.2 C(CN)O].sub.2 SO wherein R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 are each selected from hydrogen monovalent substituted and unsubstituted hydrocarbon radicals of 1 to 12 carbon atoms. The use of these intermediates allows the synthesis steps to be exothermic and results in an overall synthesis method which is faster than the synthesis methods of the prior art.

  18. Synthesis of alpha-amino acids

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Jr., Jefferson W.

    1983-01-01

    A method for synthesizing alpha amino acids proceding through novel intermediates of the formulas: R.sub.1 R.sub.2 C(OSOCl)CN, R.sub.1 R.sub.2 C(Cl)CN and [R.sub.1 R.sub.2 C(CN)O].sub.2 SO wherein R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 are each selected from hydrogen monovalent substituted and unsubstituted hydrocarbon radicals of 1 to 12 carbon atoms. The use of these intermediates allows the synthesis steps to be exothermic and results in an overall synthesis method which is faster than the synthesis methods of the prior art.

  19. Tuning hardness in calcite by incorporation of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Carloni, Joseph D; Demarchi, Beatrice; Sparks, David; Reid, David G; Kunitake, Miki E; Tang, Chiu C; Duer, Melinda J; Freeman, Colin L; Pokroy, Boaz; Penkman, Kirsty; Harding, John H; Estroff, Lara A; Baker, Shefford P; Meldrum, Fiona C

    2016-08-01

    Structural biominerals are inorganic/organic composites that exhibit remarkable mechanical properties. However, the structure-property relationships of even the simplest building unit-mineral single crystals containing embedded macromolecules-remain poorly understood. Here, by means of a model biomineral made from calcite single crystals containing glycine (0-7 mol%) or aspartic acid (0-4 mol%), we elucidate the origin of the superior hardness of biogenic calcite. We analysed lattice distortions in these model crystals by using X-ray diffraction and molecular dynamics simulations, and by means of solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance show that the amino acids are incorporated as individual molecules. We also demonstrate that nanoindentation hardness increased with amino acid content, reaching values equivalent to their biogenic counterparts. A dislocation pinning model reveals that the enhanced hardness is determined by the force required to cut covalent bonds in the molecules. PMID:27135858

  20. Tuning hardness in calcite by incorporation of amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Carloni, Joseph D.; Demarchi, Beatrice; Sparks, David; Reid, David G.; Kunitake, Miki E.; Tang, Chiu C.; Duer, Melinda J.; Freeman, Colin L.; Pokroy, Boaz; Penkman, Kirsty; Harding, John H.; Estroff, Lara A.; Baker, Shefford P.; Meldrum, Fiona C.

    2016-08-01

    Structural biominerals are inorganic/organic composites that exhibit remarkable mechanical properties. However, the structure-property relationships of even the simplest building unit--mineral single crystals containing embedded macromolecules--remain poorly understood. Here, by means of a model biomineral made from calcite single crystals containing glycine (0-7 mol%) or aspartic acid (0-4 mol%), we elucidate the origin of the superior hardness of biogenic calcite. We analysed lattice distortions in these model crystals by using X-ray diffraction and molecular dynamics simulations, and by means of solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance show that the amino acids are incorporated as individual molecules. We also demonstrate that nanoindentation hardness increased with amino acid content, reaching values equivalent to their biogenic counterparts. A dislocation pinning model reveals that the enhanced hardness is determined by the force required to cut covalent bonds in the molecules.

  1. Complexing of amino acids to DNA by chromate in intact cells.

    PubMed Central

    Voitkun, V; Zhitkovich, A; Costa, M

    1994-01-01

    Using o-pthaldialdehyde (OPT) fluorescence, the amino acids associated with DNA were studied following exposure of intact Chinese hamster ovary cells to chromate. Rigorous extraction with EDTA, acid, or base was required to release the amino acids cross-linked to the DNA isolated from control or chromate-treated cells by standard procedures (i.e., proteinase K, phenol, etc.). Amino acids resisting extraction from DNA were not studied since analysis was limited to those that could be released by these procedures. There was a chromate dose-dependent increase in amino acids complexed with the DNA that could be released by EDTA, acid, and base, and these amino acids were separated by HPLC and identified. Substantial increases in cysteine, glutamine, glutamic acid, histidine, threonine, and tyrosine were found as a function of increasing concentrations of chromate. There was also a time-dependent increase in complexing of these amino acids to the DNA by chromate. The amino acids found complexed to DNA in intact cells by chromate were thought to originate from reactions of free amino acids or small peptides with the DNA rather than being proteolytic products derived from larger proteins that were cross-linked to the DNA. This was supported by a number of experiments: a) free amino acids or bovine serum albumin (BSA) were cross-linked by chromium to DNA in vitro and the DNA was isolated by standard procedures.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7843108

  2. Latency, duration and dose response relationships of amino acid effects on human muscle protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Rennie, Michael J; Bohé, Julien; Wolfe, Robert R

    2002-10-01

    The components of the stimulatory effect of food on net deposition of protein are beginning to be identified and separated. One of the most important of these appears to be the effect of amino acids per se in stimulating muscle anabolism. Amino acids appear to have a linear stimulatory effect within the range of normal diurnal plasma concentrations from postabsorptive to postprandial. Within this range, muscle protein synthesis (measured by incorporation of stable isotope tracers of amino acids into biopsied muscle protein) appears to be stimulated approximately twofold; however, little further increase occurs when very high concentrations of amino acids (>2.5 times the normal postabsorptive plasma concentration) are made available. Amino acids provided in surfeit of the ability of the system to synthesize protein are disposed of by oxidation, ureagenesis and gluconeogenesis. The stimulatory effect of amino acids appears to be time dependent; a square wave increase in the availability of amino acids causes muscle protein synthesis to be stimulated and to fall back to basal values, despite continued amino acid availability. The relationship between muscle protein synthesis and insulin availability suggests that most of the stimulatory effects occur at low insulin concentrations, with large increases having no effect. These findings may have implications for our understanding of the body's requirements for protein. The maximal capacity for storage of amino acids as muscle protein probably sets an upper value on the extent to which amino acids can be stored after a single meal. PMID:12368422

  3. Extraterrestrial Amino Acids in the Almahata Sitta Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Aubrey, Andrew D.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Parker, Eric T.; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2010-01-01

    Amino acid analysis of a meteorite fragment of asteroid 2008 TC3 called Almahata Sitta was carried out using reverse-phase liquid chromatography coupled with UV fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-FD/ToF-MS) as part of a sample analysis consortium. LC-FD/ToF-MS analyses of hot-water extracts from the meteorite revealed a complex distribution of two- to seven-carbon aliphatic amino acids and one- to three-carbon amines with abundances ranging from 0.5 to 149 parts-per-billion (ppb). The enantiomeric ratios of the amino acids alanine, R-amino-n-butyric acid (beta-ABA), 2-amino-2-methylbutanoic acid (isovaline), and 2-aminopentanoic acid (norvaline) in the meteorite were racemic (D/L approximately 1), indicating that these amino acids are indigenous to the meteorite and not terrestrial contaminants. Several other non-protein amino acids were also identified in the meteorite above background levels including alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (alpha-AIB), 4-amino-2- methylbutanoic acid, 4-amino-3-methylbutanoic acid, and 3-, 4-, and 5-aminopentanoic acid. The total abundances of isovaline and alpha-AIB in Almahata Sitta are 1000 times lower than the abundances of these amino acids found in the CM carbonaceous chondrite Murchison. The extremely low abundances and unusual distribution of five carbon amino acids in Almahata Sitta compared to Cl, CM, and CR carbonaceous chondrites may reflect extensive thermal alteration of amino acids on the parent asteroid by partial melting during formation or subsequent impact shock heating. It is also possible that amino acids were synthesized by catalytic reactions on the parent body after asteroid 2008 TC3 cooled to lower temperatures.

  4. Extraterrestrial amino acids in the Almahata Sitta meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Aubrey, Andrew D.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Parker, Eric T.; Bada, Jeffrey L.; Jenniskens, Peter; Shaddad, Muawia H.

    2010-10-01

    Amino acid analysis of a meteorite fragment of asteroid 2008 TC3 called Almahata Sitta was carried out using reverse-phase liquid chromatography coupled with UV fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-FD/ToF-MS) as part of a sample analysis consortium. LC-FD/ToF-MS analyses of hot-water extracts from the meteorite revealed a complex distribution of two- to seven-carbon aliphatic amino acids and one- to three-carbon amines with abundances ranging from 0.5 to 149 parts-per-billion (ppb). The enantiomeric ratios of the amino acids alanine, β-amino-n-butyric acid, 2-amino-2-methylbutanoic acid (isovaline), and 2-aminopentanoic acid (norvaline) in the meteorite were racemic (D/L ˜ 1), indicating that these amino acids are indigenous to the meteorite and not terrestrial contaminants. Several other nonprotein amino acids were also identified in the meteorite above background levels including α-aminoisobutyric acid (α-AIB), 4-amino-2-methylbutanoic acid, 4-amino-3-methylbutanoic acid, and 3-, 4-, and 5-aminopentanoic acid. The total abundances of isovaline and α-AIB in Almahata Sitta are approximately 1000 times lower than the abundances of these amino acids found in the CM carbonaceous chondrite Murchison. The extremely low abundances and unusual distribution of five-carbon amino acids in Almahata Sitta compared to CI, CM, and CR carbonaceous chondrites may reflect extensive thermal alteration of amino acids on the parent asteroid by partial melting during formation or subsequent impact shock heating. It is also possible that amino acids were synthesized by catalytic reactions on the parent body after asteroid 2008 TC3 cooled to lower temperatures, or introduced as a contaminant from unrelated meteorite clasts and chemically altered by α-decarboxylation.

  5. Ribosomal Synthesis of Peptides with Multiple β-Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Fujino, Tomoshige; Goto, Yuki; Suga, Hiroaki; Murakami, Hiroshi

    2016-02-17

    The compatibility of β-amino acids with ribosomal translation was studied for decades, but it has been still unclear whether the ribosome can accept various β-amino acids, and whether the ribosome can introduce multiple β-amino acids in a peptide. In the present study, by using the Escherichia coli reconstituted cell-free translation system with a reprogramed genetic code, we screened β-amino acids that give high single incorporation efficiency and used them to synthesize peptides containing multiple β-amino acids. The experiments of single β-amino acid incorporation into a peptide revealed that 13 β-amino acids are compatible with ribosomal translation. Six of the tested β-amino acids (βhGly, l-βhAla, l-βhGln, l-βhPhg, l-βhMet, and d-βhPhg) showed high incorporation efficiencies, and seven (l-βhLeu, l-βhIle, l-βhAsn, l-βhPhe, l-βhLys, d-βhAla, and d-βhLeu) showed moderate incorporation efficiencies; whereas no full-length peptide was produced using other β-amino acids (l-βhPro, l-βhTrp, and l-βhGlu). Subsequent double-incorporation experiments using β-amino acids with high single incorporation efficiency revealed that elongation of peptides with successive β-amino acids is prohibited. Efficiency of the double-incorporation of the β-amino acids was restored by the insertion of Tyr or Ile between the two β-amino acids. On the basis of these experiments, we also designed mRNA sequences of peptides, and demonstrated the ribosomal synthesis of peptides containing different types of β-amino acids at multiple positions. PMID:26807980

  6. Formation of Amino Acid Thioesters for Prebiotic Peptide Synthesis: Catalysis By Amino Acid Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The origin of life can be described as a series of events in which a prebiotic chemical process came increasingly under the control of its catalytic products. In our search for this prebiotic process that yielded catalytic takeover products (such as polypeptides), we have been investigating a reaction system that generates peptide-forming amino acid thioesters from formaldehyde, glycolaldehyde, and ammonia in the presence of thiols. As shown below, this model process begins by aldol condensation of formaldehyde and glycolaldehyde to give trioses and releases. These sugars then undergo beta-dehydration yielding their respective alpha-ketoaldehydes. Addition of ammonia to the alpha-ketoaldehydes yields imines which can either: (a) rearrange in the presence of thesis to give amino acid thioesters or (be react with another molecule of aldehyde to give imidazoles. This 'one-pot' reaction system operates under mild aqueous conditions, and like modem amino acid biosynthesis, uses sugar intermediates which are converted to products by energy-yielding redox reactions. Recently, we discovered that amino acids, such as the alanine reaction product, catalyze the first and second steps of the process. In the presence of ammonia the process also generates other synthetically useful products, like the important biochemical -- pyruvic acid.

  7. Requirement for Asn298 on D1 protein for oxygen evolution: analyses by exhaustive amino acid substitution in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Hiroshi; Kodama, Natsumi; Sun, Xiao-Yu; Ozawa, Shin-ichiro; Takahashi, Yuichiro

    2014-07-01

    PSII generates strong oxidants used for water oxidation. The secondary electron donor, Y(Z), is Tyr161 on PSII reaction center D1 protein and mediates electron transfer from the oxygen-evolving Mn(4)CaO(5) cluster to the primary electron donor, P680. The latest PSII crystal structure revealed the presence of a hydrogen bond network around Y(Z), which is anticipated to play important roles in the electron and proton transfer reactions. Y(Z) forms a hydrogen bond with His190 which in turn forms a hydrogen bond with Asn298 on D1 protein. Although functional roles of Y(Z) and His190 have already been characterized, little is known about the functional role of Asn298. Here we have generated 19 mutants from a green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, in which the Asn298 has been substituted by each of the other 19 amino acid residues. All mutants showed significantly impaired or no photosynthetic growth. Seven mutants capable of photosynthetic growth showed oxygen-evolving activity although at a significantly reduced rate. Interestingly the oxygen-evolving activity of these mutants was markedly photosensitive. The 19 mutants accumulated PSII at variable levels and showed a light-induced electron transfer reaction from 1,5-diphenylcarbazide (DPC) to 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol (DCIP), suggesting that Asn298 is important for the function and photoprotection of the Mn(4)CaO(5) cluster. PMID:24853102

  8. Physiological Adaptation to the Loss of Amino Acid Transport Ability

    PubMed Central

    DeBusk, Ruth M.; Ogilvie-Villa, Susan

    1982-01-01

    A strain of Neurospora crassa devoid of constitutive amino acid transport ability can utilize arginine as the sole nitrogen source. Nitrogen starvation, presence of arginine, and mutational inactivation of the general permease are key factors in signaling production of an extracellular enzyme which removes the alpha-amino group from the amino acid. PMID:6214547

  9. Accumulated analyses of amino acid precursors in returned lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.; Harada, K.; Hare, P. E.

    1973-01-01

    Six amino acids (glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, and threonine) obtained by hydrolysis of extracts have been quantitatively determined in ten collections of fines from five Apollo missions. Although the amounts found, 7-45 ng/g, are small, the lunar amino acid/carbon ratios are comparable to those of the carbonaceous chondrites, Murchison and Murray, as analyzed by the same procedures. Since both the ratios of amino acid to carbon, and the four or five most common types of proteinous amino acid found, are comparable for the two extraterrestrial sources despite different cosmophysical histories of the moon and meteorites, common cosmochemical processes are suggested.

  10. Advances in protein-amino acid nutrition of poultry.

    PubMed

    Baker, David H

    2009-05-01

    The ideal protein concept has allowed progress in defining requirements as well as the limiting order of amino acids in corn, soybean meal, and a corn-soybean meal mixture for growth of young chicks. Recent evidence suggests that glycine (or serine) is a key limiting amino acid in reduced protein [23% crude protein (CP) reduced to 16% CP] corn-soybean meal diets for broiler chicks. Research with sulfur amino acids has revealed that small excesses of cysteine are growth depressing in chicks fed methionine-deficient diets. Moreover, high ratios of cysteine:methionine impair utilization of the hydroxy analog of methionine, but not of methionine itself. A high level of dietary L: -cysteine (2.5% or higher) is lethal for young chicks, but a similar level of DL: -methionine, L: -cystine or N-acetyl-L: -cysteine causes no mortality. A supplemental dietary level of 3.0% L: -cysteine (7x requirement) causes acute metabolic acidosis that is characterized by a striking increase in plasma sulfate and decrease in plasma bicarbonate. S-Methylmethionine, an analog of S-adenosylmethionine, has been shown to have choline-sparing activity, but it only spares methionine when diets are deficient in choline and(or) betaine. Creatine, or its precursor guanidinoacetic acid, can spare dietary arginine in chicks. PMID:19009229

  11. Improving the Reliability of Optimal In-Feed Amino Acid Ratios Based on Individual Amino Acid Efficiency Data from N Balance Studies in Growing Chicken.

    PubMed

    Wecke, Christian; Liebert, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Three consecutive nitrogen balance experiments with fast-growing male broiler chickens (ROSS 308), both during starter and grower periods, were conducted to determine the ideal ratios of several indispensable amino acids relative to lysine. The control diets based on corn, wheat, fishmeal, field peas, wheat gluten and soybean oil were formulated by computer optimizing to meet the assumed ideal amino acid ratios and to fulfill both the energy and nutrient requirements of growing chicken. According to principles of the diet dilution technique, balanced control diets were diluted by wheat starch and refilled by crystalline amino acids and remaining feed ingredients, except the amino acid under study. The lysine, threonine, tryptophan, arginine, isoleucine and valine diluted diets resulted in significantly lower protein quality as compared to control diet, especially following increased dietary lysine supply (experiments II and III) and stronger amino acid dilution (experiment III). Accordingly, the limiting position of individual amino acids was confirmed, and the derived amino acid efficiency data were utilized to derive ideal amino acid ratios for the starter period: Lys (100): Thr (60): Trp (19): Arg (105): Ile (55): Val (63); and the grower period: Lys (100): Thr (62): Trp (17): Arg (105): Ile (65): Val (79). PMID:26479521

  12. Extraction of amino acids from soils and sediments with superheated water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, C. N.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1974-01-01

    A method of extraction for amino acids from soils and sediments involving superheated water has been investigated. About 75-97 per cent of the amino acids contained in four soils of a soil profile from Illinois were extracted by this method. Deep penetration of water into soil aggregates and partial hydrolysis of peptide bonds during this extraction by water at high temperature are likely mechanisms responsible for the release of amino acids from samples. This extraction method does not require subsequent desalting treatments when analyses are carried out with an ion-exchange amino acid analyzer.

  13. Very high gravity ethanol and fatty acid production of Zymomonas mobilis without amino acid and vitamin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haoyong; Cao, Shangzhi; Wang, William Tianshuo; Wang, Kaven Tianyv; Jia, Xianhui

    2016-06-01

    Very high gravity (VHG) fermentation is the mainstream technology in ethanol industry, which requires the strains be resistant to multiple stresses such as high glucose concentration, high ethanol concentration, high temperature and harsh acidic conditions. To our knowledge, it was not reported previously that any ethanol-producing microbe showed a high performance in VHG fermentations without amino acid and vitamin. Here we demonstrate the engineering of a xylose utilizing recombinant Zymomonas mobilis for VHG ethanol fermentations. The recombinant strain can produce ethanol up to 136 g/L without amino acid and vitamin with a theoretical yield of 90 %, which is significantly superior to that produced by all the reported ethanol-producing strains. The intracellular fatty acids of the bacterial were about 16 % of the bacterial dry biomass, with the ratio of ethanol:fatty acids was about 273:1 (g/g). The recombinant strain was achieved by a multivariate-modular strategy tackles with the multiple stresses which are closely linked to the ethanol productivity of Z. mobilis. The over-expression of metB/yfdZ operon enabled the growth of the recombinant Z. mobilis in a chemically defined medium without amino acid and vitamin; and the fatty acids overproduction significantly increased ethanol tolerance and ethanol production. The coupled production of ethanol with fatty acids of the Z. mobilis without amino acid and vitamin under VHG fermentation conditions may permit a significant reduction of the production cost of ethanol and microbial fatty acids. PMID:27033536

  14. Formation and transformation of amino acids and amino acid precursors by high-velocity impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, T.; Kobayashi, K.; Yamori, A.

    A wide variety of organic compounds have been found in extraterrestrial bodies such as comets and carbonaceous chondrites. It is plausible that these extraterrestrial bodies carried organic compounds such as amino acids or their precursors to the early Earth. It is claimed, however, that these extraterrestrial organics were destroyed during impacts to the Earth. We therefore examined possible transformation of amino acids and their precursors during high-velocity impacts by using a rail gun "HYPAC" in ISAS. Starting materials used in the impact experiments were (i) aqueous solution of glycine (10 mM or 1.0 M), and (ii) a mixture of ammonia, methanol and water. The target materials were sealed in stainless steel capsules, and shocked by impact with a polycarbonate projectile accelerated with "HYPAC" to the velocities of 2.5 - 7.0 km/s. A part of the products was acid-hydrolyzed. Both hydrolyzed an unhydrolyzed products were analyzed by mass spectrometry, high performance liquid chromatography and capillary electrophoresis and chromatography. When an aqueous solution containing ammonia, methanol and water was shocked by impact at the velocity of 6.4 km/s, a number of amino acids (e.g., serine and glycine) were detected after hydrolysis. The present results suggest that amino acid precursors could be formed during cometary impacts. When glycine solution was used as a starting material, about 40 % of glycine was recovered even after 6 km/s impact. Methylamine and ammonia, which are known as pyrolytic products of glycine, were detected, besides them, diketopiperazine and an unidentified product whose molecular weight was 134, were detected, while no glycine peptides were identified in them. It was shown that the impact processes resulted in the formation of amino acid condensates. Thermal stability of glycine precursor is comparable with glycine. The present results suggest that organic material could survive and/or formed during an impact process. Most of organic

  15. Conformational properties of oxazoline-amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staś, Monika; Broda, Małgorzata A.; Siodłak, Dawid

    2016-04-01

    Oxazoline-amino acids (Xaa-Ozn) occur in natural peptides of potentially important bioactivity. The conformations of the model compounds: Ac-(S)-Ala-Ozn(4R-Me), Ac-(S)-Ala-Ozn(4S-Me), and (gauche+, gauche-, anti) Ac-(S)-Val-Ozn(4R-Me) were studied at meta-hybrid M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p) method including solvent effect. Boc-L-Ala-L-Ozn-4-COOMe and Boc-L-Val-L-Ozn-4-COOMe were synthesized and studied by FT-IR and NMR-NOE methods. The conformations in crystal state were gathered from the Cambridge Structural Data Base. The main conformational feature of the oxazoline amino acids is the conformation β2 (ϕ,ψ ∼ -161°, -6°), which predominates in weakly polar environment and still is accessible in polar surrounding. The changes of the conformational preferences towards the conformations αR (ϕ,ψ ∼ -70°, -15°) and then β (ϕ,ψ ∼ -57°, -155°) are observed with increase of the environment polarity.

  16. Amino acids of the Nogoya and Mokoia carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronin, J. R.; Moore, C. B.

    1976-01-01

    Amino acids were found in acid hydrolyzed, hot water extracts of the Nogoya (C2) and Mokoia (C3V) chondrites. About 40 n moles/g of amino acids were found in the Nogoya extract while Mokoia contained less than 1 n mole/g. The amino acid composition of Nogoya differs from that of other C2 chondrites studied earlier. The results from Mokoia are similar to previous data obtained from the C3V chondrite Allende.

  17. The Next Generation MOD: A Microchip Amino Acid Analyzer for Detecting Extraterrestrial Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathies, R. A.; Hutt, L. D.; Bada, J. L.; Glavin, D.; Grunthaner, F. J.; Grunthaner, P. J.

    2000-01-01

    The MOD (Mars Organic Detector) instrument which has selected for the definition phase of the BEDS package on the 2005 Mars Explorer Program spacecraft is designed to simply detect the presence of amino acids in Martian surface samples at a sensitivity of a few parts per billion (ppb). An additional important aspect of amino acid analyses of Martian samples is identifying and quantifying which compounds are present, and also distinguishing those produced abiotically from those synthesized by either extinct or extant life. Amino acid homochirality provides an unambiguous way of distinguishing between abiotic vs. biotic origins. Proteins made up of mixed D- and L-amino acids would not likely have been efficient catalysts in early organisms because they could not fold into bioactive configurations such as the a-helix. However, enzymes made up of all D-amino acids function just as well as those made up of only L-amino acids, but the two enzymes use the opposite stereoisomeric substrates. There are no biochemical reasons why L-amino acids would be favored over Damino acids. On Earth, the use of only L-amino acids in proteins by life is probably simply a matter of chance. We assume that if proteins and enzymes were a component of extinct or extant life on Mars, then amino acid homochirality would have been a requirement. However, the possibility that Martian life was (or is) based on D-amino acids would be equal to that based on L-amino acids. The detection of a nonracemic mixture of amino acids in a Martian sample would be strong evidence for the presence of an extinct or extant biota on Mars. The finding of an excess of D-amino acids would provide irrefutable evidence of unique Martian life that could not have been derived from seeding the planet with terrestrial life (or the seeding of the Earth with Martian life). In contrast, the presence of racemic amino acids, along with non-protein amino acids such as alpha-aminoisobutyric acid and isovaline, would be indicative

  18. Induction of amino acid transporters expression by endurance exercise in rat skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Taro Yoshinaga, Mariko

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Regulation of amino acid transporter expression in working muscle remains unclear. •Expression of amino acid transporters for leucine were induced by a bout of exercise. •Requirement of leucine in muscle cells might regulate expression of its transporters. •This information is beneficial for understanding the muscle remodeling by exercise. -- Abstract: We here investigated whether an acute bout of endurance exercise would induce the expression of amino acid transporters that regulate leucine transport across plasma and lysosomal membranes in rat skeletal muscle. Rats ran on a motor-driven treadmill at a speed of 28 m/min for 90 min. Immediately after the exercise, we observed that expression of mRNAs encoding L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) and CD98 was induced in the gastrocnemius, soleus, and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles. Sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2) mRNA was also induced by the exercise in those three muscles. Expression of proton-assisted amino acid transporter 1 (PAT1) mRNA was slightly but not significantly induced by a single bout of exercise in soleus and EDL muscles. Exercise-induced mRNA expression of these amino acid transporters appeared to be attenuated by repeated bouts of the exercise. These results suggested that the expression of amino acid transporters for leucine may be induced in response to an increase in the requirement for this amino acid in the cells of working skeletal muscles.

  19. Prebiotic Synthesis of Hydrophobic and Protein Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Ring, David; Wolman, Yecheskel; Friedmann, Nadav; Miller, Stanley L.

    1972-01-01

    The formation of amino acids by the action of electric discharges on a mixture of methane, nitrogen, and water with traces of ammonia was studied in detail. The presence of glycine, alanine, α-amino-n-butyric acid, α-aminoisobutyric acid, valine, norvaline, isovaline, leucine, isoleucine, alloisoleucine, norleucine, proline, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, threonine, allothreonine, α-hydroxy-γ-aminobutyric acid, and α,γ-diaminobutyric acid was confirmed by ion-exchange chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. All of the primary α-amino acids found in the Murchison Meteorite have been synthesized by this electric discharge experiment. PMID:4501592

  20. A reexamination of amino acids in lunar soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinton, K. L. F.; Bada, J. L.; Arnold, J. R.

    1993-03-01

    Amino acids in lunar soils provide an important indicator of the level of prebiotic organic compounds on the moon. The results provide insight into the chemistry of amino acid precursors, and furthermore, given the flux of carbonaceous material to the moon, we can evaluate the survival of organics upon impact. The amino acid contents of both hydrolyzed and unhydrolyzed hot-water extracts of Apollo 17 lunar soil were determined using ophthaldialdehyde/N-acetyl cysteine (OPA/NAC) derivatization followed by HPLC analysis. Previous studies of lunar amino acids were inconclusive, as the technique used (derivatization with ninhydrin followed by HPLC analysis) was unable to discriminate between cosmogenic amino acids and terrestrial contaminants. Cosmogenic amino acids are racemic, and many of the amino acids found in carbonaceous meteorites such as Murchison, i.e., alpha-amino-i-butyric acid (aib), are extremely rare on Earth. The ninhydrin method does not distinguish amino acid enantiomers, nor does it detect alpha-alkyl amino acids such as aib, whereas the OPA/NAC technique does both.

  1. A reexamination of amino acids in lunar soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinton, K. L. F.; Bada, J. L.; Arnold, J. R.

    1993-01-01

    Amino acids in lunar soils provide an important indicator of the level of prebiotic organic compounds on the moon. The results provide insight into the chemistry of amino acid precursors, and furthermore, given the flux of carbonaceous material to the moon, we can evaluate the survival of organics upon impact. The amino acid contents of both hydrolyzed and unhydrolyzed hot-water extracts of Apollo 17 lunar soil were determined using ophthaldialdehyde/N-acetyl cysteine (OPA/NAC) derivatization followed by HPLC analysis. Previous studies of lunar amino acids were inconclusive, as the technique used (derivatization with ninhydrin followed by HPLC analysis) was unable to discriminate between cosmogenic amino acids and terrestrial contaminants. Cosmogenic amino acids are racemic, and many of the amino acids found in carbonaceous meteorites such as Murchison, i.e., alpha-amino-i-butyric acid (aib), are extremely rare on Earth. The ninhydrin method does not distinguish amino acid enantiomers, nor does it detect alpha-alkyl amino acids such as aib, whereas the OPA/NAC technique does both.

  2. The prebiotic synthesis of amino acids - interstellar vs. atmospheric mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meierhenrich, U. J.; Muñoz Caro, G. M.; Schutte, W. A.; Barbier, B.; Arcones Segovia, A.; Rosenbauer, H.; Thiemann, W. H.-P.; Brack, A.

    2002-11-01

    Until very recently, prebiotic amino acids were believed to have been generated in the atmosphere of the early Earth, as successfully simulated by the Urey-Miller experiments. Two independent studies now identified ice photochemistry in the interstellar medium as a possible source of prebiotic amino acids. Ultraviolet irradiation of ice mixtures containing identified interstellar molecules (such as H2O, CO2, CO, CH3OH, and NH3) in the conditions of vacuum and low temperature found in the interstellar medium generated amino acid structures including glycine, alanine, serine, valine, proline, and aspartic acid. After warmup, hydrolysis and derivatization, our team was able to identify 16 amino acids as well as furans and pyrroles. Enantioselective analyses of the amino acids showed racemic mixtures. A prebiotic interstellar origin of amino acid structures is now discussed to be a plausible alternative to the Urey-Miller mechanism.

  3. The ubiquitin-specific protease family from Arabidopsis. AtUBP1 and 2 are required for the resistance to the amino acid analog canavanine.

    PubMed

    Yan, N; Doelling, J H; Falbel, T G; Durski, A M; Vierstra, R D

    2000-12-01

    Ubiquitin-specific proteases (UBPs) are a family of unique hydrolases that specifically remove polypeptides covalently linked via peptide or isopeptide bonds to the C-terminal glycine of ubiquitin. UBPs help regulate the ubiquitin/26S proteolytic pathway by generating free ubiquitin monomers from their initial translational products, recycling ubiquitins during the breakdown of ubiquitin-protein conjugates, and/or by removing ubiquitin from specific targets and thus presumably preventing target degradation. Here, we describe a family of 27 UBP genes from Arabidopsis that contain both the conserved cysteine (Cys) and histidine boxes essential for catalysis. They can be clustered into 14 subfamilies based on sequence similarity, genomic organization, and alignments with their closest relatives from other organisms, with seven subfamilies having two or more members. Recombinant AtUBP2 functions as a bona fide UBP: It can release polypeptides attached to ubiquitins via either alpha- or epsilon-amino linkages by an activity that requires the predicted active-site Cys within the Cys box. From the analysis of T-DNA insertion mutants, we demonstrate that the AtUBP1 and 2 subfamily helps confer resistance to the arginine analog canavanine. This phenotype suggests that the AtUBP1 and 2 enzymes are needed for abnormal protein turnover in Arabidopsis. PMID:11115897

  4. THIN-LAYER SEPARATION OF CITRIC ACID CYCLE INTERMEDIATES, LACTIC ACID, AND THE AMINO ACID TAURINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes a two-dimensional mixed-layer method for separating citric acid cycle intermediates, lactic acid and the amino acid taurine. The method cleanly separates all citric acid cycle intermediates tested, excepting citric acid and isocitric acid. The solvents are in...

  5. Extraterrestrial Amino Acids in the Almahata Sitta Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Aubrey, Andrew D.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Parker, Eric T.; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2009-01-01

    Amino acid analysis of a meteorite fragment of asteroid 2008 TC(sub 3) called Almahata Sitta was carried out using reverse-phase high-perfo rmance liquid chromatography coupled with UV fluorescence detection a nd time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-FD/ToF-MS) as part of a sam ple analysis consortium. HPLC analyses of hot-water extracts from the meteorite revealed a complex distribution of two- to six-carbon aliph atic amino acids and one- to three carbon amines with abundances rang ing from 0.5 to 149 parts-per-billion (ppb). The enantiomeric ratios of the amino acids alanine, Beta-amino-n-butyric acid (Beta-ABA), 2-amino-2- methylbutanoic acid (isovaline), and 2-aminopentanoic acid (no rvaline) in the meteorite were racemic (D/L approximately 1), indicat ing that these amino acids are indigenous to the meteorite and not te rrestrial contaminants. Several other non-protein amino acids were also identified in the meteorite above background levels including alpha -aminoisobutyric acid (alpha-AIB), 4-amino-2- methybutanoic acid, 4-a mino-3-methylbutanoic acid, and 3-, 4-, and 5-aminopentanoic acid. Th e total abundances of isovaline and AlB in Almahata Sitta are approximately 1000 times lower than the abundances of these amino acids found in the CM carbonaceous meteorite Murchison. The extremely love abund ances and unusual distribution of five carbon amino acids in Almahata Sitta compared to Cl, CM, and CR carbonaceous meteorites and may be due to extensive thermal alteration of amino acids on the parent aster oid by partial melting during formation or impact shock heating.

  6. Geochemistry of amino acids in shells of the clam Saxidomus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.; Blunt, D.J.; McMenamin, M.A.; Straham, S.E.

    1980-01-01

    Concentrations of amino acids and their corresponding d l enantiomeric ratios have been measured in shells of the bivalve mollusk Saxidomus from eleven localities, ranging in age from modern to probably more than 500,000 yr, along the Pacific coast of North America. Natural logarithms of amino acid concentrations correlate well with d l ratios, and the relationship provides a possible guide to the selection of fossils for use in amino acid dating. The relative order of the extents of racemization of amino acids at any given time appears to change with increasing sample age. Application of the amino acid dating method to shells from Whidbey Island, Washington, yields an age of about 80,000 yr, in contrast to the previously determined radiocarbon age of 36,000 yr which was measured on some shell carbonate and considered a minimum age. The amino acid age is compatible with the geologic record in the area. ?? 1980.

  7. Distribution and Origin of Amino Acids in Lunar Regolith Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, J. E.; Callahan, M. P.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.; McLain, H. L.; Noble, S. K.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    The existence of organic compounds on the lunar surface has been a question of interest from the Apollo era to the present. Investigations of amino acids immediately after collection of lunar samples yielded inconclusive identifications, in part due to analytical limitations including insensitivity to certain compounds, an inability to separate enantiomers, and lack of compound-specific isotopic measurements. It was not possible to determine if the detected amino acids were indigenous to the lunar samples or the result of terrestrial contamination. Recently, we presented initial data from the analysis of amino acid abundances in 12 lunar regolith samples and discussed those results in the context of four potential amino acid sources [5]. Here, we expand on our previous work, focusing on amino acid abundances and distributions in seven regolith samples and presenting the first compound-specific carbon isotopic ratios measured for amino acids in a lunar sample.

  8. Diversity of amino acids in a typical chernozem of Moldova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frunze, N. I.

    2014-12-01

    The content and composition of the amino acids in typical chernozems were studied. The objects of the study included a reference soil under an old fallow and three variants under fodder crop rotations: not fertilized, with mineral fertilizers, and with organic fertilizers. The contents of 18 amino acids were determined in these soils. The amino acids were extracted by the method of acid hydrolysis and identified by the method of ion-exchange chromatography. The total content of most of the amino acids was maximal in the reference soil; it was much lower in the cultivated soils and decreased in the following sequence: organic background > mineral background > no fertilization. The diversity of amino acids was evaluated quantitatively using different parameters applied in ecology for estimating various aspects of the species composition of communities (Simpson, Margalef, Menhinick, and Shannon's indices). The diversity and contribution of different amino acids to the total pool of amino acids also varied significantly in the studied variants. The maximum diversity of amino acids and maximum evenness of their relative abundance indices were typical of the reference chernozem; these parameters were lower in the cultivated soils. It was concluded that the changes in the structure of the amino acids under the impact of agricultural loads are similar to those that are usually observed under stress conditions.

  9. Survival of Amino Acids in Micrometeorites During Atmospheric Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2003-01-01

    The delivery of amino acids by micrometeorites to the early Earth during the period of heavy bombardment could have been a significant source of the Earth's prebiotic amino acid inventory provided that these organic compounds survived atmospheric entry heating. To investigate the sublimation of amino acids from a micrometeorite analog at elevated temperature, grains from the CM-type carbonaceous chondrite Murchison were heated to 550 C inside a glass sublimation apparatus (SA) under reduced pressure. The sublimed residue that had collected on the cold finger of the SA after heating was analyzed for amino acids by HPLC. We found that when the temperature of the meteorite reached approx. 150 C, a large fraction of the amino acid glycine had vaporized from the meteorite, recondensed onto the end of the SA cold finger, and survived as the rest of the grains heated to 550 C. alpha-Aminoisobutryic acid and isovaline, which are two of the most abundant non-protein amino acids in Murchison, did not sublime from the meteorite and were completely destroyed during the heating experiment. Our experimental results suggest that sublimation of glycine present in micrometeorite grains may provide a way for this amino acid to survive atmospheric entry heating at temperatures less than 550 C; all other amino acids apparently are destroyed. Key Words: Amino acids-Exogenous delivery-Micrometeorites-Sublimation.

  10. Computational Design of Multinuclear Metalloproteins Using Unnatural Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Hansen, William A; Mills, Jeremy H; Khare, Sagar D

    2016-01-01

    Multinuclear metal ion clusters, coordinated by proteins, catalyze various critical biological redox reactions, including water oxidation in photosynthesis, and nitrogen fixation. Designed metalloproteins featuring synthetic metal clusters would aid in the design of bio-inspired catalysts for various applications in synthetic biology. The design of metal ion-binding sites in a protein chain requires geometrically constrained and accurate placement of several (between three and six) polar and/or charged amino acid side chains for every metal ion, making the design problem very challenging to address. Here, we describe a general computational method to redesign oligomeric interfaces of symmetric proteins for the purpose of creating novel multinuclear metalloproteins with tunable geometries, electrochemical environments, and metal cofactor stability via first and second-shell interactions.The method requires a target symmetric organometallic cofactor whose coordinating ligands resemble the side chains of a natural or unnatural amino acid and a library of oligomeric protein structures featuring the same symmetry as the target cofactor. Geometric interface matches between target cofactor and scaffold are determined using a program that we call symmetric protein recursive ion-cofactor sampler (SyPRIS). First, the amino acid-bound organometallic cofactor model is built and symmetrically aligned to the axes of symmetry of each scaffold. Depending on the symmetry, rigid body and inverse rotameric degrees of freedom of the cofactor model are then simultaneously sampled to locate scaffold backbone constellations that are geometrically poised to incorporate the cofactor. Optionally, backbone remodeling of loops can be performed if no perfect matches are identified. Finally, the identities of spatially proximal neighbor residues of the cofactor are optimized using Rosetta Design. Selected designs can then be produced in the laboratory using genetically incorporated unnatural