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Sample records for amino acid requirements

  1. Parenteral sulfur amino acid requirements in septic infants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To investigate parenteral methionine requirements of critically ill, septic infants, we conducted an investigation involving 12 infants (age 2+/-1 years; weight 13+/-2kg) using the intravenous indicator amino acid oxidation and balance technique. They received a balanced parenteral amino acid formul...

  2. Amino acids

    MedlinePLUS

    Amino acids are organic compounds that combine to form proteins . Amino acids and proteins are the building blocks of life. When proteins are digested or broken down, amino acids are left. The human body uses amino acids ...

  3. Autophagy and amino acid homeostasis are required for chronological longevity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    E-print Network

    Aris, John P.

    Autophagy and amino acid homeostasis are required for chronological longevity in Saccharomyces homeostasis in determining CLS in yeast. Key words: aging; amino acid homeostasis; autophagy; Saccharomyces

  4. Macronutrient requirement for growth: Protein/amino acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current recommendations by the Institute of Medicine on amino acid requirements in healthy children older than 6 months and for children and adolescents have been established using the factorial approach, which takes into account: i) maintenance for obligatory losses, which is estimated by regressio...

  5. 37 CFR 1.823 - Requirements for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequences as part of the application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Requirements for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequences as part of the application...Disclosures Containing Nucleotide And/or Amino Acid Sequences § 1.823 Requirements for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequences as part of the...

  6. 37 CFR 1.823 - Requirements for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequences as part of the application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Requirements for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequences as part of the application...Disclosures Containing Nucleotide And/or Amino Acid Sequences § 1.823 Requirements for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequences as part of the...

  7. 37 CFR 1.823 - Requirements for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequences as part of the application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Requirements for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequences as part of the application...Disclosures Containing Nucleotide And/or Amino Acid Sequences § 1.823 Requirements for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequences as part of the...

  8. 37 CFR 1.823 - Requirements for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequences as part of the application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Requirements for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequences as part of the application...Disclosures Containing Nucleotide And/or Amino Acid Sequences § 1.823 Requirements for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequences as part of the...

  9. 37 CFR 1.823 - Requirements for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequences as part of the application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Requirements for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequences as part of the application...Disclosures Containing Nucleotide And/or Amino Acid Sequences § 1.823 Requirements for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequences as part of the...

  10. A Model of Proto-Anti-Codon RNA Enzymes Requiring L-Amino Acid Homochirality

    E-print Network

    Erives, Albert J.

    A Model of Proto-Anti-Codon RNA Enzymes Requiring L-Amino Acid Homochirality Albert Erives Received natural amino acid units of polypeptides using a universal scheme of triplet nucleotide ``codons) the absence of any codons for D-amino acids; (ii) the odd combination of alternate codon patterns for some

  11. High hydrostatic pressure increases amino acid requirements in the piezo-hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus barophilus.

    PubMed

    Cario, Anaïs; Lormières, Florence; Xiang, Xiao; Oger, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    We have established a defined growth medium for the piezophilic hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus barophilus, which allows growth yields of ca. 10(8) cells/ml under both atmospheric and high hydrostatic pressure. Our results demonstrate a major impact of hydrostatic pressure on amino acid metabolism, with increases from 3 amino acids required at atmospheric pressure to 17 at 40 MPa. We observe in T. barophilus and other Thermococcales a similar discrepancy between the presence/absence of amino acid synthesis pathways and amino acid requirements, which supports the existence of alternate, but yet unknown, amino acid synthesis pathways, and may explain the low number of essential amino acids observed in T. barophilus and other Thermococcales. T. barophilus displays a strong metabolic preference for organic polymers such as polypeptides and chitin, which may constitute a more readily available resource of carbon and energy in situ in deep-sea hydrothermal vents. We hypothesize that the low energy yields of fermentation of organic polymers, together with energetic constraints imposed by high hydrostatic pressure, may render de novo synthesis of amino acids ecologically unfavorable. Induction of this metabolic switch to amino acid recycling can explain the requirement for non-essential amino acids by Thermococcales for efficient growth in defined medium. PMID:26226334

  12. 77 FR 65537 - Requirements for Patent Applications Containing Nucleotide Sequence and/or Amino Acid Sequence...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-29

    ... Patent and Trademark Office Requirements for Patent Applications Containing Nucleotide Sequence and/or....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Abstract Patent applications that contain nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence... contains the sequence listings that are submitted with biotechnology patent applications....

  13. Plasma amino acids

    MedlinePLUS

    Amino acids blood test ... types of methods used to determine the individual amino acids levels in the blood. ... test is done to measure the level of amino acids in the blood. An increased level of a ...

  14. Estimated quantitative amino acid requirements for Florida pompano reared in low-salinity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As with most marine carnivores, Florida pompano require relatively high crude protein diets to obtain optimal growth. Precision formulations to match the dietary indispensable amino acid (IAA) pattern to a species’ requirements can be used to lower the overall dietary protein. However IAA requirem...

  15. 77 FR 65537 - Requirements for Patent Applications Containing Nucleotide Sequence and/or Amino Acid Sequence...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-29

    ...Applications Containing Nucleotide Sequence and/or Amino Acid Sequence Disclosures ACTION: Proposed collection; comment...Patent applications that contain nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence disclosures must include a copy of the...

  16. Amino acid analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winitz, M.; Graff, J. (inventors)

    1974-01-01

    The process and apparatus for qualitative and quantitative analysis of the amino acid content of a biological sample are presented. The sample is deposited on a cation exchange resin and then is washed with suitable solvents. The amino acids and various cations and organic material with a basic function remain on the resin. The resin is eluted with an acid eluant, and the eluate containing the amino acids is transferred to a reaction vessel where the eluant is removed. Final analysis of the purified acylated amino acid esters is accomplished by gas-liquid chromatographic techniques.

  17. Studies on the protein and sulfur amino acid requirements of young bobwhite quail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Serafin, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    Four experiments were conducted with purified diets to examine the influence of protein level and to estimate the sulfur amino acid (S.A.A.) requirement of young Bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus). These studies demonstrated (I) that 26% protein was sufficient for rapid growth when the diet was supplemented with methionine; (2) that diets containing higher levels of protein (29.3% and 31.3%) failed to support satisfactory growth unless they contained supplemental methionine; and (3) that young Bobwhite quail require no more than 1.0% sulfur-containing amino acids for optimal growth and efficiency of feed utilization. A fifth experiment was conducted to examine the protein and S.A.A. requirements of young Bobwhite quail using practical rations and to compare results with those obtained with purified diets. Diets containing 24%, 26% and 28% protein were supplied with and without supplemental methionine in a five week study. Results showed significant growth responses to protein and supplemental methionine. Responses showed that Bobwhite quail require no more than 26% protein for maximum growth and efficiency of feed utilization when the S.A.A. level of the diet was approximately 1.0%. The results were in close agreement with those obtained with purified diets. These findings define more precisely than had been known the quantitative requirements of young Bobwhite quail for protein and for the S.A.A. necessary for optimal growth.

  18. Amino Acid Crossword Puzzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Learning the 20 standard amino acids is an essential component of an introductory course in biochemistry. Later in the course, the students study metabolism and learn about various catabolic and anabolic pathways involving amino acids. Learning new material or concepts often is easier if one can connect the new material to what one already knows;…

  19. Extreme genetic code optimality from a molecular dynamics calculation of amino acid polar requirement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Thomas; Goldenfeld, Nigel; Mathew, Damien; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida

    2009-06-01

    A molecular dynamics calculation of the amino acid polar requirement is used to score the canonical genetic code. Monte Carlo simulation shows that this computational polar requirement has been optimized by the canonical genetic code, an order of magnitude more than any previously known measure, effectively ruling out a vertical evolution dynamics. The sensitivity of the optimization to the precise metric used in code scoring is consistent with code evolution having proceeded through the communal dynamics of statistical proteins using horizontal gene transfer, as recently proposed. The extreme optimization of the genetic code therefore strongly supports the idea that the genetic code evolved from a communal state of life prior to the last universal common ancestor.

  20. Dietary requirements of synthesizable amino acids by animals: a paradigm shift in protein nutrition

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Amino acids are building blocks for proteins in all animals. Based on growth or nitrogen balance, amino acids were traditionally classified as nutritionally essential or nonessential for mammals, birds and fish. It was assumed that all the “nutritionally nonessential amino acids (NEAA)” were synthesized sufficiently in the body to meet the needs for maximal growth and optimal health. However, careful analysis of the scientific literature reveals that over the past century there has not been compelling experimental evidence to support this assumption. NEAA (e.g., glutamine, glutamate, proline, glycine and arginine) play important roles in regulating gene expression, cell signaling, antioxidative responses, fertility, neurotransmission, and immunity. Additionally, glutamate, glutamine and aspartate are major metabolic fuels for the small intestine to maintain its digestive function and to protect the integrity of the intestinal mucosa. Thus, diets for animals must contain all NEAA to optimize their survival, growth, development, reproduction, and health. Furthermore, NEAA should be taken into consideration in revising the “ideal protein” concept that is currently used to formulate swine and poultry diets. Adequate provision of all amino acids (including NEAA) in diets enhances the efficiency of animal production. In this regard, amino acids should not be classified as nutritionally essential or nonessential in animal or human nutrition. The new Texas A&M University’s optimal ratios of dietary amino acids for swine and chickens are expected to beneficially reduce dietary protein content and improve the efficiency of their nutrient utilization, growth, and production performance. PMID:24999386

  1. Amino Acids and Chirality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jamie E.

    2012-01-01

    Amino acids are among the most heavily studied organic compound class in carbonaceous chondrites. The abundance, distributions, enantiomeric compositions, and stable isotopic ratios of amino acids have been determined in carbonaceous chondrites fi'om a range of classes and petrographic types, with interesting correlations observed between these properties and the class and typc of the chondritcs. In particular, isomeric distributions appear to correlate with parent bodies (chondrite class). In addition, certain chiral amino acids are found in enantiomeric excess in some chondrites. The delivery of these enantiomeric excesses to the early Earth may have contributed to the origin of the homochirality that is central to life on Earth today. This talk will explore the amino acids in carbonaceous chondritcs and their relevance to the origin of life.

  2. Lactobacillus gasseri requires peptides, not proteins or free amino acids, for growth in milk.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, K; Matsunaga, K; Takihiro, S; Moritoki, A; Ryuto, S; Kawai, Y; Masuda, T; Miyamoto, T

    2015-03-01

    Lactobacillus gasseri is a widespread commensal lactic acid bacterium inhabiting human mucosal niches and has many beneficial effects as a probiotic. However, L. gasseri is difficult to grow in milk, which hurts usability for the food industry. It had been previously reported that supplementation with yeast extract or proteose peptone, including peptides, enables L. gasseri to grow well in milk. In this study, our objective was to confirm peptide requirement of L. gasseri and evaluate efficacy of peptide release by enzymatic proteolysis on growth of L. gassei in milk. Three strains of L. gasseri did not grow well in modified DeMan, Rogosa, Sharpe broth without any nitrogen sources (MRS-N), but addition of a casein-derived peptide mixture, tryptone, promoted growth. In contrast, little effect was observed after adding casein or a casein-derived amino acid mixture, casamino acids. These results indicate that L. gasseri requires peptides, not proteins or free amino acids, among milk-derived nitrogen sources for growth. Lactobacillus gasseri JCM 1131T hardly had growth capacity in 6 kinds of milk-based media: bovine milk, human milk, skim milk, cheese whey, modified MRS-N (MRSL-N) supplemented with acid whey, and MRSL-N supplemented with casein. Moreover, treatment with digestive proteases, particularly pepsin, to release peptides made it grow well in each milk-based medium. The pepsin treatment was the most effective for growth of strain JCM 1131T in skim milk among the tested food-grade proteases such as trypsin, ?-chymotrypsin, calf rennet, ficin, bromelain, and papain. As well as strain JCM 1131T, pepsinolysis of milk improved growth of other L. gasseri strains and some strains of enteric lactobacilli such as Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus gallinarum, Lactobacillus johnsonii, and Lactobacillus reuteri. These results suggest that some relatives of L. gasseri also use peptides as desirable nitrogen sources, and that milk may be a good supplier of nutritious peptides to enteric lactobacilli including L. gasseri after peptic digestion in the gastrointestinal tract. This is the first report showing peptide requirement of L. gasseri and efficacy of pepsinolysis on the growth of L. gasseri and its relatives in milk. This study would contribute to increasing usability of L. gasseri and its relatives as probiotics in dairy foods. PMID:25529420

  3. Distinct amino acid compositional requirements for formation and maintenance of the [PSI?] prion in yeast.

    PubMed

    MacLea, Kyle S; Paul, Kacy R; Ben-Musa, Zobaida; Waechter, Aubrey; Shattuck, Jenifer E; Gruca, Margaret; Ross, Eric D

    2015-03-01

    Multiple yeast prions have been identified that result from the structural conversion of proteins into a self-propagating amyloid form. Amyloid-based prion activity in yeast requires a series of discrete steps. First, the prion protein must form an amyloid nucleus that can recruit and structurally convert additional soluble proteins. Subsequently, maintenance of the prion during cell division requires fragmentation of these aggregates to create new heritable propagons. For the Saccharomyces cerevisiae prion protein Sup35, these different activities are encoded by different regions of the Sup35 prion domain. An N-terminal glutamine/asparagine-rich nucleation domain is required for nucleation and fiber growth, while an adjacent oligopeptide repeat domain is largely dispensable for prion nucleation and fiber growth but is required for chaperone-dependent prion maintenance. Although prion activity of glutamine/asparagine-rich proteins is predominantly determined by amino acid composition, the nucleation and oligopeptide repeat domains of Sup35 have distinct compositional requirements. Here, we quantitatively define these compositional requirements in vivo. We show that aromatic residues strongly promote both prion formation and chaperone-dependent prion maintenance. In contrast, nonaromatic hydrophobic residues strongly promote prion formation but inhibit prion propagation. These results provide insight into why some aggregation-prone proteins are unable to propagate as prions. PMID:25547291

  4. Amino Acid Homeostasis and Chronological Longevity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    E-print Network

    Aris, John P.

    Chapter 8 Amino Acid Homeostasis and Chronological Longevity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae John P is amino acid homeostasis. Amino acid homeostasis requires three principal functions: amino acid uptake, de organelles. Regulation of amino acid homeostasis and autophagy is accomplished by a complex web of pathways

  5. 37 CFR 1.823 - Requirements for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequences as part of the application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Requirements for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequences as part of the application. 1.823 Section 1.823 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES Biotechnology...

  6. 37 CFR 1.823 - Requirements for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequences as part of the application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... unusual L-amino acid or modified base was used in a sequence. Location Specify location within sequence... conditions: if “n,” “Xaa,” or a modified or unusual L-amino acid or modified base was used in a sequence... “n,” “Xaa,” or a modified or unusual L-amino acid or modified base was used in a sequence;...

  7. 37 CFR 1.823 - Requirements for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequences as part of the application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... unusual L-amino acid or modified base was used in a sequence. Location Specify location within sequence... conditions: if “n,” “Xaa,” or a modified or unusual L-amino acid or modified base was used in a sequence... “n,” “Xaa,” or a modified or unusual L-amino acid or modified base was used in a sequence;...

  8. 37 CFR 1.823 - Requirements for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequences as part of the application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... unusual L-amino acid or modified base was used in a sequence. Location Specify location within sequence... conditions: if “n,” “Xaa,” or a modified or unusual L-amino acid or modified base was used in a sequence... “n,” “Xaa,” or a modified or unusual L-amino acid or modified base was used in a sequence;...

  9. 37 CFR 1.823 - Requirements for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequences as part of the application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... unusual L-amino acid or modified base was used in a sequence. Location Specify location within sequence... conditions: if “n,” “Xaa,” or a modified or unusual L-amino acid or modified base was used in a sequence... “n,” “Xaa,” or a modified or unusual L-amino acid or modified base was used in a sequence;...

  10. A study of the protein and amino acid requirements of the growing New Zealand White rabbit with emphasis on lysine and the sulphur-containing amino acids.

    PubMed

    Spreadbury, D

    1978-05-01

    1. New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits were given, between 4 and 8 weeks of age, a range of diets, based on oats and fish meal, containing from 104 to 255 g crude protein (nitrogen x 6.25; CP)/kg to establish the level of CP below which growth was retarded. 2. In three experiments each diet was fed to four animals and food intake, growth and N balance were measured over 4 weeks. Body analysis was also carried out after two of the experiments. 3. The rates of food intake and growth of animals increased with dietary CP concentration until a CP concentration of approximately 150 g/kg diet had been reached. Beyond this there was little further improvement. N balance studies showed that once this dietary concentration of CP had been reached, there was a reduced rate of N retention. 4. Good agreement was found between N retention measured by balance methods and by body analysis: body composition showed a tendency towards an increase 5. Microbial protein produced in the caecum and eaten during coprophagy, was found to supplement the dietary protein by approximately 2 g CP/d, or by only 0.1 of a normal dietary intake of CP. 6. In the second part of the study NZW rabbits were offered, between 5 and 8 weeks of age, diets based on oats containing 150 g CP/kg. The protein supplied by oats was supplemented with maize gluten, gelatin, groundnut meal, casein, soya-bean meal or fish meal. 7. Rabbits offered diets containing casein, soya-bean meal and fish meal gained 40-50 g/d similar, to animals given a well-balanced control diet, while those given diets containing maize gluten, gelatin or groundnut meal gained approximately 30 g/d. This indicated that amino acid balance in dietary protein was important to the growing rabbit. 8. In later experiments, diets based on cereals and groundnut meal supplemented with varying amounts of lysine and methionine were offered during a 3-week-post-weaning period in order to assess requirements for those limiting amino acids. 9. The addition of both lysine and methionine improved growth rates. The minimum requirements for normal growth were found to be 6.2 g methionine+cystine and 9.4 g lysine/kg diet. PMID:638127

  11. Enantiomeric separation of amino acids and nonprotein amino acids using a particle-loaded

    E-print Network

    Zare, Richard N.

    Enantiomeric separation of amino acids and nonprotein amino acids using a particle acids and three nonprotein amino acids are derivatized with the fluorogenic reagent 4-fluoro-7-nitro-2 liquid chromatography (HPLC). Keywords: Amino acid / Nonprotein amino acid / Capillary

  12. Amino Acid Catabolism in Plants.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, Tatjana M; Nunes Nesi, Adriano; Araújo, Wagner L; Braun, Hans-Peter

    2015-11-01

    Amino acids have various prominent functions in plants. Besides their usage during protein biosynthesis, they also represent building blocks for several other biosynthesis pathways and play pivotal roles during signaling processes as well as in plant stress response. In general, pool sizes of the 20 amino acids differ strongly and change dynamically depending on the developmental and physiological state of the plant cell. Besides amino acid biosynthesis, which has already been investigated in great detail, the catabolism of amino acids is of central importance for adjusting their pool sizes but so far has drawn much less attention. The degradation of amino acids can also contribute substantially to the energy state of plant cells under certain physiological conditions, e.g. carbon starvation. In this review, we discuss the biological role of amino acid catabolism and summarize current knowledge on amino acid degradation pathways and their regulation in the context of plant cell physiology. PMID:26384576

  13. Amino acid transport in insects.

    PubMed

    Wolfersberger, M G

    2000-01-01

    Most insect cell membranes seem to contain uniporters that facilitate the diffusion of amino acids into and out of the cells. In addition to these passive diffusion systems, all but one of the insect tissues studied to date seem to contain at least one amino acid-cation symport system that allows their cells to accumulate certain amino acids from the extracellular medium. cDNAs encoding three such symporters have very recently been cloned and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence of each insect symporter was determined to be homologous to that of symporters mediating the transport of the same or related substrates in mammalian tissues. PMID:10761572

  14. Regulation of the plasma amino acid profile by leucine via the system L amino acid transporter.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Hongmin; Nakamura, Koichi; Kitaura, Yasuyuki; Kadota, Yoshihiro; Ishikawa, Takuya; Kondo, Yusuke; Xu, Minjun; Shimomura, Yoshiharu

    2015-12-01

    Plasma concentrations of amino acids reflect the intracellular amino acid pool in mammals. However, the regulatory mechanism requires clarification. In this study, we examined the effect of leucine administration on plasma amino acid profiles in mice with and without the treatment of 2-aminobicyclo-(2,2,1)-heptane-2-carboxylic acid (BCH) or rapamycin as an inhibitor of system L or mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1, respectively. The elevation of plasma leucine concentration after leucine administration was associated with a significant decrease in the plasma concentrations of isoleucine, valine, methionine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine; BCH treatment almost completely blocked the leucine-induced decrease in plasma amino acid concentrations. Rapamycin treatment had much less effects on the actions of leucine than BCH treatment. These results suggest that leucine regulates the plasma concentrations of branched-chain amino acids, methionine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine, and that system L amino acid transporters are involved in the leucine action. PMID:26125295

  15. Amino Acid Derangements in Patients With Sepsis: Treatment With Branched Chain Amino Acid Rich Infusions

    PubMed Central

    Freund, Herbert R.; Ryan, John A.; Fischer, Josef E.

    1978-01-01

    Sepsis is a major catabolic insult resulting in modifications in carbohydrate and fat energy metabolism, and leading to increased muscle breakdown and nitrogen loss. Insulin resistance, which develops in sepsis, decreases glucose utilization, but plasma insulin levels are sufficiently elevated to prevent lipolysis, resulting in a further energy deficit. The availability of fuels in sepsis is therefore limited, and the body resorts to muscle breakdown, gluconeogenesis, and amino acid oxidation for energy supply. Previous work has not defined, however, the exact alterations in amino acid metabolism. Therefore, the following studies were undertaken. Blood samples were drawn from fifteen patients in whom the diagnosis of sepsis was clinically established; the samples were analyzed for amino acid, ?-hydroxyphenylethanolamines, glucose, insulin and glucagon concentrations. The plasma amino acid pattern observed was characterized by an increase in total amino acid content, due mainly to high levels of the aromatic amino acids (phenylalanine and tyrosine) and the sulfur-containing amino acids (taurine, cystine and methionine). Alanine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid and proline were also elevated, but to a lesser degree. The branched chain amino acids (valine, leucine and isoleucine) were within normal limits, as were glycine, serine, threonine, lysine, histidine and tryptophan. Those patients who did not survive sepsis had higher levels of aromatic and sulfur-containing amino acids as compared to those patients surviving sepsis. On the other hand, those patients surviving sepsis had higher levels of alanine and the branched chain amino acids. In a second group of five patients with overwhelming sepsis accompanied by a state of metabolic encephalopathy, a parenteral nutrition solution consisting of 23% dextrose, and an amino acid formulation enriched with branched chain amino acids was administered. In these five patients, normalization of the plasma amino acid pattern and reversal of encephalopathy was observed. The following sequence of events may be postulated: The septic patient develops insulin resistance in the peripheral tissues, primarily muscle, while the adipose tissue is much less affected. The insulin resistance and the inability to utilize fat leads to increased muscle proteolysis. Muscle breakdown results in release into the blood of enormous amounts of various amino acids; the muscle itself is able to oxidize the branched chain amino acids, supplying the muscles' own energy requirements and alanine for gluconeogenesis. The extensive muscle proteolysis coupled with relative hepatic insufficiency occurring early in sepsis results in the appearance in the plasma of high levels of most of the amino acids present in muscle, particularly the aromatic and the sulfur-containing amino acids. The outcome of patients with sepsis might be positively affected by combined therapy with glucose, insulin and branched chain amino acids. PMID:99098

  16. Microfluidics in amino acid analysis.

    PubMed

    Pumera, Martin

    2007-07-01

    Microfluidic devices have been widely used to derivatize, separate, and detect amino acids employing many different strategies. Virtually zero-dead volume interconnections and fast mass transfer in small volume microchannels enable dramatic increases in on-chip derivatization reaction speed, while only minute amounts of sample and reagent are needed. Due to short channel path, fast subsecond separations can be carried out. With sophisticated miniaturized detectors, the whole analytical process can be integrated on one platform. This article reviews developments of lab-on-chip technology in amino acid analysis, it shows important design features such as sample preconcentration, precolumn and postcolumn amino acid derivatization, and unlabeled and labeled amino acid detection with focus on advanced designs. The review also describes important biomedical and space exploration applications of amino acid analysis on microfluidic devices. PMID:17542043

  17. An Abstracting Transformation for Amino Acid Polymorphism

    E-print Network

    Zhu, Dakai

    An Abstracting Transformation for Amino Acid Polymorphism Anthony M. Castaldo, PhD Research three nucleotide se- quences (a codon) into amino acids: Amino Acid (or signal) Codons A (Alanine) GCT believe what is important is the sequence of amino acids produced, and because amino acids average about

  18. Protein turnover, amino acid requirements and recommendations for athletes and active populations

    PubMed Central

    Poortmans, J.R.; Carpentier, A.; Pereira-Lancha, L.O.; Lancha, A.

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is the major deposit of protein molecules. As for any cell or tissue, total muscle protein reflects a dynamic turnover between net protein synthesis and degradation. Noninvasive and invasive techniques have been applied to determine amino acid catabolism and muscle protein building at rest, during exercise and during the recovery period after a single experiment or training sessions. Stable isotopic tracers (13C-lysine, 15N-glycine, 2H5-phenylalanine) and arteriovenous differences have been used in studies of skeletal muscle and collagen tissues under resting and exercise conditions. There are different fractional synthesis rates in skeletal muscle and tendon tissues, but there is no major difference between collagen and myofibrillar protein synthesis. Strenuous exercise provokes increased proteolysis and decreased protein synthesis, the opposite occurring during the recovery period. Individuals who exercise respond differently when resistance and endurance types of contractions are compared. Endurance exercise induces a greater oxidative capacity (enzymes) compared to resistance exercise, which induces fiber hypertrophy (myofibrils). Nitrogen balance (difference between protein intake and protein degradation) for athletes is usually balanced when the intake of protein reaches 1.2?g·kg?1·day?1 compared to 0.8?g·kg?1·day?1 in resting individuals. Muscular activities promote a cascade of signals leading to the stimulation of eukaryotic initiation of myofibrillar protein synthesis. As suggested in several publications, a bolus of 15-20?g protein (from skimmed milk or whey proteins) and carbohydrate (± 30?g maltodextrine) drinks is needed immediately after stopping exercise to stimulate muscle protein and tendon collagen turnover within 1?h. PMID:22666780

  19. Protein turnover, amino acid requirements and recommendations for athletes and active populations.

    PubMed

    Poortmans, J R; Carpentier, A; Pereira-Lancha, L O; Lancha Jr, A

    2012-10-01

    Skeletal muscle is the major deposit of protein molecules. As for any cell or tissue, total muscle protein reflects a dynamic turnover between net protein synthesis and degradation. Noninvasive and invasive techniques have been applied to determine amino acid catabolism and muscle protein building at rest, during exercise and during the recovery period after a single experiment or training sessions. Stable isotopic tracers ((13)C-lysine, (15)N-glycine, ²H5-phenylalanine) and arteriovenous differences have been used in studies of skeletal muscle and collagen tissues under resting and exercise conditions. There are different fractional synthesis rates in skeletal muscle and tendon tissues, but there is no major difference between collagen and myofibrillar protein synthesis. Strenuous exercise provokes increased proteolysis and decreased protein synthesis, the opposite occurring during the recovery period. Individuals who exercise respond differently when resistance and endurance types of contractions are compared. Endurance exercise induces a greater oxidative capacity (enzymes) compared to resistance exercise, which induces fiber hypertrophy (myofibrils). Nitrogen balance (difference between protein intake and protein degradation) for athletes is usually balanced when the intake of protein reaches 1.2 g · kg(-1) · day(-1) compared to 0.8 g · kg(-1) · day(-1) in resting individuals. Muscular activities promote a cascade of signals leading to the stimulation of eukaryotic initiation of myofibrillar protein synthesis. As suggested in several publications, a bolus of 15-20 g protein (from skimmed milk or whey proteins) and carbohydrate (± 30 g maltodextrine) drinks is needed immediately after stopping exercise to stimulate muscle protein and tendon collagen turnover within 1 h. PMID:22666780

  20. Amino Acids from a Comet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jamie Elisla

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Stardust spacecraft returned samples from comet 81P/Wild 2 to Earth in January 2006. Examinations of the organic compounds in cometary samples can reveal information about the prebiotic organic inventory present on the early Earth and within the early Solar System, which may have contributed to the origin of life. Preliminary studies of Stardust material revealed the presence of a suite of organic compounds including several amines and amino acids, but the origin of these compounds (cometary- vs. terrestrial contamination) could not be identified. We have recently measured the carbon isotopic ratios of these amino acids to determine their origin, leading to the first detection of a coetary amino acid.

  1. Determination of protein and amino acid requirements of lactating sows using a population-based factorial approach.

    PubMed

    Strathe, A V; Strathe, A B; Theil, P K; Hansen, C F; Kebreab, E

    2015-08-01

    Determination of appropriate nutritional requirements is essential to optimize the productivity and longevity of lactating sows. The current recommendations for requirements do not consider the large variation between animals. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the amino acid recommendations for lactating sows using a stochastic modeling approach that integrates population variation and uncertainty of key parameters into establishing nutritional recommendations for lactating sows. The requirement for individual sows was calculated using a factorial approach by adding the requirement for maintenance and milk. The energy balance of the sows was either negative or zero depending on feed intake being a limiting factor. Some parameters in the model were sow-specific and others were population-specific, depending on state of knowledge. Each simulation was for 1000 sows repeated 100 times using Monte Carlo simulation techniques. BW, back fat thickness of the sow, litter size (LS), average litter gain (LG), dietary energy density and feed intake were inputs to the model. The model was tested using results from the literature, and the values were all within ±1 s.d. of the estimated requirements. Simulations were made for a group of low- (LS=10 (s.d.=1), LG=2 kg/day (s.d.=0.6)), medium- (LS=12 (s.d.=1), LG=2.5 kg/day (s.d.=0.6)) and high-producing (LS=14 (s.d.=1), LG=3.5 kg/day (s.d.=0.6)) sows, where the average requirement was the result. In another simulation, the requirements were estimated for each week of lactation. The results were given as the median and s.d. The average daily standardized ileal digestible (SID) protein and lysine requirements for low-, medium- and high-producing sows were 623 (CV=2.5%) and 45.1 (CV=4.8%); 765 (CV=4.9%) and 54.7 (CV=7.0%); and 996 (CV=8.5%) and 70.8 g/day (CV=9.6%), respectively. The SID protein and lysine requirements were lowest at week 1, intermediate at week 2 and 4 and the highest at week 3 of lactation. The model is a valuable tool to develop new feeding strategies by taking into account the variable requirement between groups of sows and changes during lactation. The inclusion of between-sow variation gives information on safety margins when developing new dietary recommendations of amino acids and protein for lactating sows. PMID:25902188

  2. Branched-Chain Amino Acids Are Required for the Survival and Virulence of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae in Swine?

    PubMed Central

    Subashchandrabose, Sargurunathan; LeVeque, Rhiannon M.; Wagner, Trevor K.; Kirkwood, Roy N.; Kiupel, Matti; Mulks, Martha H.

    2009-01-01

    In Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, which causes porcine pleuropneumonia, ilvI was identified as an in vivo-induced (ivi) gene and encodes the enzyme acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) required for branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) biosynthesis. ilvI and 7 of 32 additional ivi promoters were upregulated in vitro when grown in chemically defined medium (CDM) lacking BCAA. Based on these observations, we hypothesized that BCAA would be found at limiting concentrations in pulmonary secretions and that A. pleuropneumoniae mutants unable to synthesize BCAA would be attenuated in a porcine infection model. Quantitation of free amino acids in porcine pulmonary epithelial lining fluid showed concentrations of BCAA ranging from 8 to 30 ?mol/liter, which is 10 to 17% of the concentration in plasma. The expression of both ilvI and lrp, a global regulator that is required for ilvI expression, was strongly upregulated in CDM containing concentrations of BCAA similar to those found in pulmonary secretions. Deletion-disruption mutants of ilvI and lrp were both auxotrophic for BCAA in CDM and attenuated compared to wild-type A. pleuropneumoniae in competitive index experiments in a pig infection model. Wild-type A. pleuropneumoniae grew in CDM+BCAA but not in CDM?BCAA in the presence of sulfonylurea AHAS inhibitors. These results clearly demonstrate that BCAA availability is limited in the lungs and support the hypothesis that A. pleuropneumoniae, and potentially other pulmonary pathogens, uses limitation of BCAA as a cue to regulate the expression of genes required for survival and virulence. These results further suggest a potential role for AHAS inhibitors as antimicrobial agents against pulmonary pathogens. PMID:19703979

  3. What rate of infusion of intravenous nutrition solution is required to stimulate uptake of amino acids by peripheral tissues in depleted patients?

    PubMed Central

    Loder, P B; Smith, R C; Kee, A J; Kohlhardt, S R; Fisher, M M; Jones, M; Reeve, T S

    1990-01-01

    We examined the effect of varying the quantities (0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, and 0.4 gN.kg-1.[day]-1) of nitrogen input on N balance, 3-methylhistidine (3MH) excretion, plasma amino acid concentration and the net flux of amino acids across the leg in depleted patients requiring parenteral nutrition. The calorie-to-nitrogen ratio was 140 to 1 (kcal:1 gN) and consequently the patients received varying amounts of calories (8, 14, 28, 42, and 56 kcal.kg-1.[day]-10. There was negative nitrogen balance and net loss of amino acids from the limb during fasting. An infusion of 0.2 gN.kg-1.[day]-1 of IVN reversed the net catabolic process and resulted in equilibrium of peripheral total amino acid flux and of tyrosine flux without a decrease in 3MH excretion. Net uptake of total amino acids and tyrosine in peripheral tissues was achieved with 0.4 gN.kg-1.[day]-1 and 56 kcal.kg-1.[day]-1. This was associated with a fivefold increase in 3MH excretion (p less than 0.01), indicating that net anabolism occurred with increased protein turnover. Fifty per cent of the amino acids taken up by peripheral tissues during infusions of 0.4 gN.kg-1.[day]-1 was due to the uptake of glutamate (Glu) and 20% was due to the uptake of branched chain amino acids (BCAA). Plasma Glu concentration, [Glu], did not increase with increasing IVN infusion, but BCAA concentrations did. Although the mean plasma [Glu] did not change with IVN infusion, there was an independent effect of plasma [Glu] (p less than 0.0001) and of N input (p less than 0.0001) on Glu flux, indicating that even at high infusion rates the maximal capacity of peripheral tissues to take up Glu had not been reached. PMID:2106843

  4. The standard amino acids alanine ala A

    E-print Network

    Guevara-Vasquez, Fernando

    that the amino-acid sequences of proteins must be specified by the sequence of nucleotide bases in the DNAThe standard amino acids alanine ala A cysteine cys C aspartic acid asp D glutamic acid glu E's the mapping from nucleotide triplets in DNA sequences (via messenger RNA) to individual amino acids

  5. Fed levels of amino acids are required for the somatotropin-induced increase in muscle protein synthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic somatotropin (pST) treatment in pigs increases muscle protein synthesis and circulating insulin, a known promoter of protein synthesis. Previously, we showed that the pST-mediated rise in insulin could not account for the pST-induced increase in muscle protein synthesis when amino acids were...

  6. Genome-wide siRNA screen reveals amino acid starvation-induced autophagy requires SCOC and WAC

    PubMed Central

    McKnight, Nicole C; Jefferies, Harold B J; Alemu, Endalkachew A; Saunders, Rebecca E; Howell, Michael; Johansen, Terje; Tooze, Sharon A

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic process by which cytoplasmic components are sequestered and transported by autophagosomes to lysosomes for degradation, enabling recycling of these components and providing cells with amino acids during starvation. It is a highly regulated process and its deregulation contributes to multiple diseases. Despite its importance in cell homeostasis, autophagy is not fully understood. To find new proteins that modulate starvation-induced autophagy, we performed a genome-wide siRNA screen in a stable human cell line expressing GFP–LC3, the marker-protein for autophagosomes. Using stringent validation criteria, our screen identified nine novel autophagy regulators. Among the hits required for autophagosome formation are SCOC (short coiled-coil protein), a Golgi protein, which interacts with fasciculation and elongation protein zeta 1 (FEZ1), an ULK1-binding protein. SCOC forms a starvation-sensitive trimeric complex with UVRAG (UV radiation resistance associated gene) and FEZ1 and may regulate ULK1 and Beclin 1 complex activities. A second candidate WAC is required for starvation-induced autophagy but also acts as a potential negative regulator of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. The identification of these novel regulatory proteins with diverse functions in autophagy contributes towards a fuller understanding of autophagosome formation. PMID:22354037

  7. Amino acid residues required for fast Na(+)-channel inactivation: charge neutralizations and deletions in the III-IV linker.

    PubMed Central

    Patton, D E; West, J W; Catterall, W A; Goldin, A L

    1992-01-01

    The cytoplasmic linker connecting domains III and IV of the voltage-gated Na+ channel is thought to be involved in fast inactivation. This linker is highly conserved among the various Na+ channels that have been cloned. In the rat brain IIA Na+ channel, it consists of 53 amino acids of which 15 are charged. To investigate the role of this linker in inactivation, we mutated all 15 of the charged residues in various combinations. All but one of these mutants expressed functional channels, and all of these inactivated with kinetics similar to the wild-type channel. We then constructed a series of deletion mutations that span the III-IV linker to determine if any region of the linker is essential for fast inactivation. Deletion of the first 10 amino acids completely eliminated fast inactivation in the channel, whereas deletion of the last 10 amino acids had no substantial effect on inactivation. These results demonstrate that some residues in the amino end of the III-IV linker are critical for fast Na(+)-channel inactivation, but that the highly conserved positively charged and paired negatively charged residues are not essential. PMID:1332059

  8. Amino acid nutrition and feed efficiency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In growing pigs, whole body protein deposition (PD) is the main determinant of dietary amino acid requirements and is closely associated with lean tissue growth, feed efficiency, and carcass quality. In North America, the typical mean PD for barrows and gilts between 25 and 125 kg body weight is app...

  9. Quinone-Amino Acid Conjugates Targeting Leishmania Amino Acid Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Lizzi, Federica; Belluti, Federica; Koren, Roni; Zilberstein, Dan; Bolognesi, Maria Laura

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the feasibility of targeting Leishmania transporters via appropriately designed chemical probes. Leishmania donovani, the parasite that causes visceral leishmaniasis, is auxotrophic for arginine and lysine and has specific transporters (LdAAP3 and LdAAP7) to import these nutrients. Probes 1–15 were originated by conjugating cytotoxic quinone fragments (II and III) with amino acids (i.e. arginine and lysine) by means of an amide linkage. The toxicity of the synthesized conjugates against Leishmania extracellular (promastigotes) and intracellular (amastigotes) forms was investigated, as well their inhibition of the relevant amino acid transporters. We observed that some conjugates indeed displayed toxicity against the parasites; in particular, 7 was identified as the most potent derivative (at concentrations of 1 µg/mL and 2.5 µg/mL residual cell viability was reduced to 15% and 48% in promastigotes and amastigotes, respectively). Notably, 6, while retaining the cytotoxic activity of quinone II, displayed no toxicity against mammalian THP1 cells. Transport assays indicated that the novel conjugates inhibited transport activity of lysine, arginine and proline transporters. Furthermore, our analyses suggested that the toxic conjugates might be translocated by the transporters into the cells. The non-toxic probes that inhibited transport competed with the natural substrates for binding to the transporters without being translocated. Thus, it is likely that 6, by exploiting amino acid transporters, can selectively deliver its toxic effects to Leishmania cells. This work provides the first evidence that amino acid transporters of the human pathogen Leishmania might be modulated by small molecules, and warrants their further investigation from drug discovery and chemical biology perspectives. PMID:25254495

  10. 40 CFR 721.1643 - Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-. 721... § 721.1643 Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-. ...generically as a benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-...

  11. 40 CFR 721.1643 - Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-. 721... § 721.1643 Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-. ...generically as a benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-...

  12. 40 CFR 721.1643 - Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-. 721... § 721.1643 Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-. ...generically as a benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-...

  13. 40 CFR 721.1643 - Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-. 721... § 721.1643 Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-. ...generically as a benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-...

  14. 40 CFR 721.1643 - Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-. 721... § 721.1643 Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-. ...generically as a benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-...

  15. Amino acids in sheep production.

    PubMed

    McCoard, Susan A; Sales, Francisco A; Sciascia, Quentin L

    2016-01-01

    Increasing production efficiency with a high standard of animal welfare and respect for the environment is a goal of sheep farming systems. Substantial gains in productivity have been achieved through improved genetics, nutrition and management changes; however the survival and growth performance of multiple-born lambs still remains a problem. This is a significant production efficiency and animal well-being issue. There is a growing body of evidence that some amino acids have a role in regulating growth, reproduction and immunity through modulation of metabolic and cell signaling pathways. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of what is currently known about the role of amino acids in sheep production and the potential for supplementation strategies to influence on-farm survival and growth of lambs. PMID:26709661

  16. 21 CFR 172.320 - Amino acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Amino acids. 172.320 Section 172.320 Food and...Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.320 Amino acids. The food additive amino acids may be safely used as nutrients added to...

  17. 21 CFR 172.320 - Amino acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Amino acids. 172.320 Section 172.320 Food and...Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.320 Amino acids. The food additive amino acids may be safely used as nutrients added to...

  18. 21 CFR 172.320 - Amino acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Amino acids. 172.320 Section 172.320 Food and...Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.320 Amino acids. The food additive amino acids may be safely used as nutrients added to...

  19. 21 CFR 172.320 - Amino acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Amino acids. 172.320 Section 172.320 Food and...Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.320 Amino acids. The food additive amino acids may be safely used as nutrients added to...

  20. 21 CFR 172.320 - Amino acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Amino acids. 172.320 Section 172.320 Food and...Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.320 Amino acids. The food additive amino acids may be safely used as nutrients added to...

  1. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    DOEpatents

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, Ashton T; Chin, Jason W; Anderson, Christopher J; Schultz, Peter G

    2013-05-21

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  2. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    DOEpatents

    Deiters, Alexander (La Jolla, CA); Cropp, T. Ashton (San Diego, CA); Chin, Jason W. (Cambridge, GB); Anderson, J. Christopher (San Francisco, CA); Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA)

    2011-02-15

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  3. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    DOEpatents

    Deiters, Alexander (La Jolla, CA); Cropp, T. Ashton (Bethesda, MD); Chin, Jason W. (Cambridge, GB); Anderson, J. Christopher (San Francisco, CA); Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA)

    2011-08-09

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNAsyn-thetases, pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  4. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    SciTech Connect

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, T. Ashton; Chin, Jason W.; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2014-08-26

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  5. Intestinal metabolism of sulfur amino acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gastrointestinal tract (GIT) serves a key function in the digestion of dietary protein and absorption of amino acids. However, the GIT is also an important site of amino acid metabolism in the body. Methionine is an indispensable amino acid and must be supplied in the diet. In addition, consider...

  6. Amino acid analyses of Apollo 14 samples.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrke, C. W.; Zumwalt, R. W.; Kuo, K.; Aue, W. A.; Stalling, D. L.; Kvenvolden, K. A.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1972-01-01

    Detection limits were between 300 pg and 1 ng for different amino acids, in an analysis by gas-liquid chromatography of water extracts from Apollo 14 lunar fines in which amino acids were converted to their N-trifluoro-acetyl-n-butyl esters. Initial analyses of water and HCl extracts of sample 14240 and 14298 samples showed no amino acids above background levels.

  7. IV. -Amino Acids: carboxyl and amino groups bonded to -Carbo n A. Acid/Base properties

    E-print Network

    Frey, Terry

    IV. -Amino Acids: carboxyl and amino groups bonded to -Carbo n A. Acid/Base properties 1. carboxyl group is proton donor ! weak acid 2. amino group is proton acceptor ! weak base 3. At physiological p natural amino acids (few exceptions) 2. 20 different R groups C. Classification based on R-group - know

  8. Shikimic Acid Pathway and Aromatic Amino Acid Biosynthesis

    E-print Network

    Constabel, Peter

    Shikimic Acid Pathway and Aromatic Amino Acid Biosynthesis 1. Introduction · Define: Pathway to Shikimic acid, from which the aromatic amino acids Trp, Tyr, Phe are derived. 2. Why is it important? · for essential aromatic amino acids · biosynthetic precursors (phenylpropanoids, alkaloids) · agricultural

  9. Current topics in the biotechnological production of essential amino acids, functional amino acids, and dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Mitsuhashi, Satoshi

    2014-04-01

    Amino acids play important roles in both human and animal nutrition and in the maintenance of health. Here, amino acids are classified into three groups: first, essential amino acids, which are essential to nutrition; second, functional amino acids, recently found to be important in the promotion of physiological functions; and third, dipeptides, which are used to resolve problematic features of specific free amino acids, such as their instability or insolubility. This review focusses on recent researches concerning the microbial production of essential amino acids (lysine and methionine), functional amino acids (histidine and ornithine), and a dipeptide (L-alanyl-L-glutamine). PMID:24679256

  10. Amino Acid Properties Conserved in Molecular Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Rudnicki, Witold R.; Mroczek, Teresa; Cudek, Pawe?

    2014-01-01

    That amino acid properties are responsible for the way protein molecules evolve is natural and is also reasonably well supported both by the structure of the genetic code and, to a large extent, by the experimental measures of the amino acid similarity. Nevertheless, there remains a significant gap between observed similarity matrices and their reconstructions from amino acid properties. Therefore, we introduce a simple theoretical model of amino acid similarity matrices, which allows splitting the matrix into two parts – one that depends only on mutabilities of amino acids and another that depends on pairwise similarities between them. Then the new synthetic amino acid properties are derived from the pairwise similarities and used to reconstruct similarity matrices covering a wide range of information entropies. Our model allows us to explain up to 94% of the variability in the BLOSUM family of the amino acids similarity matrices in terms of amino acid properties. The new properties derived from amino acid similarity matrices correlate highly with properties known to be important for molecular evolution such as hydrophobicity, size, shape and charge of amino acids. This result closes the gap in our understanding of the influence of amino acids on evolution at the molecular level. The methods were applied to the single family of similarity matrices used often in general sequence homology searches, but it is general and can be used also for more specific matrices. The new synthetic properties can be used in analyzes of protein sequences in various biological applications. PMID:24967708

  11. Amino acid code of protein secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Shestopalov, B V

    2003-01-01

    The calculation of protein three-dimensional structure from the amino acid sequence is a fundamental problem to be solved. This paper presents principles of the code theory of protein secondary structure, and their consequence--the amino acid code of protein secondary structure. The doublet code model of protein secondary structure, developed earlier by the author (Shestopalov, 1990), is part of this theory. The theory basis are: 1) the name secondary structure is assigned to the conformation, stabilized only by the nearest (intraresidual) and middle-range (at a distance no more than that between residues i and i + 5) interactions; 2) the secondary structure consists of regular (alpha-helical and beta-structural) and irregular (coil) segments; 3) the alpha-helices, beta-strands and coil segments are encoded, respectively, by residue pairs (i, i + 4), (i, i + 2), (i, i = 1), according to the numbers of residues per period, 3.6, 2, 1; 4) all such pairs in the amino acid sequence are codons for elementary structural elements, or structurons; 5) the codons are divided into 21 types depending on their strength, i.e. their encoding capability; 6) overlappings of structurons of one and the same structure generate the longer segments of this structure; 7) overlapping of structurons of different structures is forbidden, and therefore selection of codons is required, the codon selection is hierarchic; 8) the code theory of protein secondary structure generates six variants of the amino acid code of protein secondary structure. There are two possible kinds of model construction based on the theory: the physical one using physical properties of amino acid residues, and the statistical one using results of statistical analysis of a great body of structural data. Some evident consequences of the theory are: a) the theory can be used for calculating the secondary structure from the amino acid sequence as a partial solution of the problem of calculation of protein three-dimensional structure from the amino acid sequence, and the calculated secondary structure and codon strength distribution can be used for simulating the next step of protein folding; b) one can propose that the same secondary structures can be folded into different tertiary structures and, vice versa, different secondary structures can be folded into the same tertiary structures, provided codon distributions are considered also; c) codons can be considered as first elements of protein three-dimensional structure language. PMID:14989164

  12. Production of amino acids using auxotrophic mutants of methylotrophic bacillus

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, Richard S. (Wayzata, MN); Flickinger, Michael C. (St. Paul, MN); Schendel, Frederick J. (Falcon Heights, MN); Guettler, Michael V. (Waconia, MN)

    2001-07-17

    A method of producing amino acids by culturing an amino acid auxotroph of a biologically pure strain of a type I methylotrophic bacterium of the genus Bacillus which exhibits sustained growth at 50.degree. C. using methanol as a carbon and energy source and requiring vitamin B.sub.12 and biotin is provided.

  13. Nonprotein Amino Acids from Spark Discharges and Their Comparison with the Murchison Meteorite Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Wolman, Yecheskel; Haverland, William J.; Miller, Stanley L.

    1972-01-01

    All the nonprotein amino acids found in the Murchison meteorite are products of the action of electric discharge on a mixture of methane, nitrogen, and water with traces of ammonia. These amino acids include ?-amino-n-butyric acid, ?-aminoisobutyric acid, norvaline, isovaline, pipecolic acid, ?-alanine, ?-amino-n-butyric acid, ?-aminoisobutyric acid, ?-aminobutyric acid, sarcosine, N-ethylglycine, and N-methylalanine. In addition, norleucine, alloisoleucine, N-propylglycine, N-isopropylglycine, N-methyl-?-alanine, N-ethyl-?-alanine ?,?-diaminopropionic acid, isoserine, ?,?-diaminobutyric acid, and ?-hydroxy-?-aminobutyric acid are produced by the electric discharge, but have not been found in the meteorite. PMID:16591973

  14. Indigenous amino acids in primitive CR meteorites

    E-print Network

    Z. Martins; C. M. O'D. Alexander; G. E. Orzechowska; M. L. Fogel; P. Ehrenfreund

    2008-03-10

    CR meteorites are among the most primitive meteorites. In this paper, we report the first measurements of amino acids in Antarctic CR meteorites, two of which show the highest amino acid concentrations ever found in a chondrite. EET92042, GRA95229 and GRO95577 were analyzed for their amino acid content using high performance liquid chromatography with UV fluorescence detection (HPLC-FD) and gas chromatographymass spectrometry (GC-MS). Our data show that EET92042 and GRA95229 are the most amino acid-rich chondrites ever analyzed, with total amino acid concentrations ranging from 180 parts-per-million (ppm) to 249 ppm. GRO95577, however, is depleted in amino acids. The most abundant amino acids present in the EET92042 and GRA95229 meteorites are the alpha-amino acids glycine, isovaline, alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (alpha-AIB), and alanine, with delta13C values ranging from +31.6per mil to +50.5per mil. The carbon isotope results together with racemic enantiomeric ratios determined for most amino acids strongly indicate an extraterrestrial origin of these compounds. In addition, the relative abundances of alpha-AIB and beta-alanine in the Antarctic CR meteorites analyzed appear to correspond to the degree of aqueous alteration on their respective parent body.

  15. Amino acids precursors in lunar finds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.; Harada, K.; Hare, P. E.; Hinsch, G.; Mueller, G.

    1975-01-01

    The consistent pattern is discussed of amino acids found in lunar dust from Apollo missions. The evidence indicates that compounds yielding amino acids were implanted into the surface of the moon by the solar wind, and the kind and amounts of amino acids found on the moon are closely similar to those found in meteorites. It is concluded that there is a common cosmochemical pattern for the moom and meteorites, and this offers evidence of a common course of cosmochemical reactions for carbon.

  16. Amino acids in the Tagish Lake Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kminek, G.; Botta, O.; Glavin, D. P.; Bada, J. L.

    2002-01-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) based amino acid analysis of a Tagish Lake meteorite sample recovered 3 months after the meteorite fell to Earth have revealed that the amino acid composition of Tagish Lake is strikingly different from that of the CM and CI carbonaceous chondrites. We found that the Tagish Lake meteorite contains only trace levels of amino acids (total abundance = 880 ppb), which is much lower than the total abundance of amino acids in the CI Orgueil (4100 ppb) and the CM Murchison (16 900 ppb). Because most of the same amino acids found in the Tagish Lake meteorite are also present in the Tagish Lake ice melt water, we conclude that the amino acids detected in the meteorite are terrestrial contamination. We found that the exposure of a sample of Murchison to cold water lead to a substantial reduction over a period of several weeks in the amount of amino acids that are not strongly bound to the meteorite matrix. However, strongly bound amino acids that are extracted by direct HCl hydrolysis are not affected by the leaching process. Thus even if there had been leaching of amino acids from our Tagish Lake meteorite sample during its 3 month residence in Tagish Lake ice and melt water, a Murchison type abundance of endogenous amino acids in the meteorite would have still been readily detectable. The low amino acid content of Tagish Lake indicates that this meteorite originated fiom a different type of parent body than the CM and CI chondrites. The parent body was apparently devoid of the reagents such as aldehyldes/ketones, HCN and ammonia needed for the effective abiotic synthesis of amino acids. Based on reflectance spectral measurements, Tagish Lake has been associated with P- or D-type asteroids. If the Tagish Lake meteorite was indeed derived fiom these types of parent bodies, our understanding of these primitive asteroids needs to be reevaluated with respect to their potential inventory of biologically important organic compounds.

  17. Relationship between amino acid usage and amino acid evolution in primates.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haoxuan; Xie, Zhengqing; Tan, Shengjun; Zhang, Xiaohui; Yang, Sihai

    2015-02-25

    Amino acid usage varies from species to species. A previous study has found a universal trend in amino acid gain and loss in many taxa and a one-way model of amino acid evolution in which the number of new amino acids increases as the number of old amino acids decreases was proposed. Later studies showed that this pattern of amino acid gain and loss is likely to be compatible with the neutral theory. The present work aimed to further study this problem by investigating the evolutionary patterns of amino acids in 8 primates (the nucleotide and protein alignments are available online http://gattaca.nju.edu.cn/pub_data.html). First, the number of amino acids gained and lost was calculated and the evolution trend of each amino acid was inferred. These values were found to be closely related to the usage of each amino acid. Then we analyzed the mutational trend of amino acid substitution in human using SNPs, this trend is highly correlated with fixation trend only with greater variance. Finally, the trends in the evolution of 20 amino acids were evaluated in human on different time scales, and the increasing rate of 5 significantly increasing amino acids was found to decrease as a function of time elapsed since divergence, and the dS/dN ratio also found to increase as a function of time elapsed since divergence. These results suggested that the observed amino acid substitution pattern is influenced by mutation and purifying selection. In conclusion, the present study shows that usage of amino acids is an important factor capable of influencing the observed pattern of amino acid evolution, and also presented evidences suggesting that the observed universal trend of amino acid gain and loss is compatible with neutral evolution. PMID:25527119

  18. Preferred amino acids and thermostability.

    PubMed

    Farias, Sávio T; Bonato, Maria Christina M

    2003-01-01

    Most organisms grow at temperatures from 20 to 50 degrees C, but some prokaryotes, including Archaea and Bacteria, are capable of withstanding higher temperatures, from 60 to >100 degrees C. Their biomolecules, especially proteins, must be sufficiently stable to function under these extreme conditions; however, the basis for thermostability remains elusive. We investigated the preferential usage of certain groupings of amino acids and codons in thermally adapted organisms, by comparative proteome analysis, using 28 complete genomes from 18 mesophiles (M), 4 thermophiles (T), and 6 hyperthermophiles (HT). Whenever the percent of glutamate (E) and lysine (K) increased in the HT proteomes, the percent of glutamine (Q) and histidine (H) decreased, so that the E + K/Q + H ratio was >4.5; it was <2.5 in the M proteomes, and 3.2 to 4.6 in T. The E + K/Q + H ratios for chaperonins, potentially thermostable proteins, were higher than their proteome ratios, whereas for DNA ligases, which are not necessarily thermostable, they followed the proteome ratios. Analysis of codon usage revealed that HT had more AGR codons for Arg than they did CGN codons, which were more common in mesophiles. The E + K/Q + H ratio may provide a useful marker for distinguishing HT, T and M prokaryotes, and the high percentage of the amino acid couple E + K, consistently associated with a low percentage of the pair Q + H, could contribute to protein thermostability. The preponderance of AGR codons for Arg is a signature of all HT so far analyzed. The E + K/Q + H ratio and the codon bias for Arg are apparently not related to phylogeny. HT members of the Bacteria show the same values as the HT members of the Archaea; the values for T organisms are related to their lifestyle (intermediate temperature) and not to their domain (Archaea) and the values for M are similar in Eukarya, Bacteria and Archaea. PMID:15011142

  19. mTORC1 Senses Lysosomal Amino Acids Through an Inside-Out Mechanism That Requires the Vacuolar H+-ATPase

    E-print Network

    Zoncu, Roberto

    The mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) protein kinase is a master growth regulator that is stimulated by amino acids. Amino acids activate the Rag guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases), which promote the translocation of mTORC1 to the ...

  20. TyrR, the regulator of aromatic amino acid metabolism, is required for mice infection of Yersinia pestis

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Zhongliang; Liu, Zizhong; He, Junming; Wang, Jing; Yan, Yanfeng; Wang, Xiaoyi; Cui, Yujun; Bi, Yujing; Du, Zongmin; Song, Yajun; Yang, Ruifu; Han, Yanping

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, poses a serious health threat to rodents and human beings. TyrR is a transcriptional regulator (TyrR) that controls the metabolism of aromatic amino acids in Escherichia coli. In this paper, TyrR played an important role in Y. pestis virulence. Inactivation of tyrR did not seem to affect the in vitro growth of this organism, but resulted in at least 10,000-fold attenuation compared with the wild-type (WT) strain upon subcutaneous infection to mice. In addition, loads of tyrR mutant within mice livers and spleens significantly decreased compared with the WT strain. Transcriptome analysis revealed that TyrR, directly or indirectly, regulated 29 genes encoded on Y. pestis chromosome or plasmids under in vitro growth condition. Similar to the regulatory function of this protein in E. coli, five aromatic-pathway genes (aroF-tyrA, aroP, aroL, and tyrP) were significantly reduced upon deletion of the tyrR gene. Two genes (glnL and glnG) that encode sensory histidine kinase and regulator in a two-component regulatory system involved in nitrogen assimilation were downregulated in the tyrR mutant. Several genes encoding type III secretion proteins were transcribed by 2.0–4.2-fold in a tyrR mutant relative to the WT strain. Interestingly, the acid-stressed genes, hdeB and hdeD, were downregulated, and such downregulation partly accounted for the decrease in tolerance of the tyrR mutant under acidic conditions. In conclusion, regulation of TyrR in Y. pestis is similar to, but distinct from, that in E. coli. TyrR is a metabolic virulence determinant in Y. pestis that is important for extracellular survival and/or proliferation. PMID:25729381

  1. Supernovae, neutrinos and the chirality of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Richard N; Kajino, Toshitaka; Onaka, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    A mechanism for creating an enantioenrichment in the amino acids, the building blocks of the proteins, that involves global selection of one handedness by interactions between the amino acids and neutrinos from core-collapse supernovae is defined. The chiral selection involves the dependence of the interaction cross sections on the orientations of the spins of the neutrinos and the (14)N nuclei in the amino acids, or in precursor molecules, which in turn couple to the molecular chirality. It also requires an asymmetric distribution of neutrinos emitted from the supernova. The subsequent chemical evolution and galactic mixing would ultimately populate the Galaxy with the selected species. The resulting amino acids could either be the source thereof on Earth, or could have triggered the chirality that was ultimately achieved for Earth's proteinaceous amino acids. PMID:21747686

  2. Supernovae, Neutrinos and the Chirality of Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Richard N.; Kajino, Toshitaka; Onaka, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    A mechanism for creating an enantioenrichment in the amino acids, the building blocks of the proteins, that involves global selection of one handedness by interactions between the amino acids and neutrinos from core-collapse supernovae is defined. The chiral selection involves the dependence of the interaction cross sections on the orientations of the spins of the neutrinos and the 14N nuclei in the amino acids, or in precursor molecules, which in turn couple to the molecular chirality. It also requires an asymmetric distribution of neutrinos emitted from the supernova. The subsequent chemical evolution and galactic mixing would ultimately populate the Galaxy with the selected species. The resulting amino acids could either be the source thereof on Earth, or could have triggered the chirality that was ultimately achieved for Earth’s proteinaceous amino acids. PMID:21747686

  3. Research for amino acids in lunar samples.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrke, C. W.; Zumwalt, R. W.; Kuo, K.; Rash, J. J.; Aue , W. A.; Stalling, D. L.; Kvenvolden, K. A.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1972-01-01

    The study was primarily directed toward the examination of Apollo 14 lunar fines for indigenous amino acids or materials which could be converted to amino acids on hydrolysis with 6 N hydrochloric acid. Initial experiments were conducted to confirm the integrity of the derivatization reactions and reagents, and to optimize the gas-liquid chromatographic (GLC) instrumental and chromatographic system for the separation and flame ionization detection of the amino acid derivatives. In studies on the recovery of amino acids added to lunar fines, low recoveries were obtained when 10 ng of each amino acid were added to 50 mg of virgin fines, but the subsequent addition of 50 ng of each to the previously extracted sample resulted in much higher recoveries.

  4. The Apollo Program and Amino Acids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Sidney W.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the determination of hydrolyzable amino acid precursors and a group of six amino acids in the returned lunar samples of the Apollo programs. Indicates that molecular evolution is arrested at the precursor stage on the Moon because of lack of water. (CC)

  5. 6th Amino Acid Assessment Workshop

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The focus of the 6th workshop is on lysine, arginine, and related amino acids. Functions, metabolic pathways, clinical uses, and upper tolerance intakes are emphasized in the articles that follow. Lysine is arguably the most deficient amino acid in the food supply of countries where poverty exists, ...

  6. 21 CFR 172.320 - Amino acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.320 Amino acids. The food additive amino acids may be safely used as nutrients added to foods in accordance with the following conditions: (a) The food additive...-Threonine L-Tryptophan L-Tyrosine L-Valine (b) The food additive meets the following specifications: (1)...

  7. 21 CFR 172.320 - Amino acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.320 Amino acids. The food additive amino acids may be safely used as nutrients added to foods in accordance with the following conditions: (a) The food additive...-Threonine L-Tryptophan L-Tyrosine L-Valine (b) The food additive meets the following specifications: (1)...

  8. 21 CFR 172.320 - Amino acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.320 Amino acids. The food additive amino acids may be safely used as nutrients added to foods in accordance with the following conditions: (a) The food additive...-Threonine L-Tryptophan L-Tyrosine L-Valine (b) The food additive meets the following specifications: (1)...

  9. 21 CFR 172.320 - Amino acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.320 Amino acids. The food additive amino acids may be safely used as nutrients added to foods in accordance with the following conditions: (a) The food additive...-Threonine L-Tryptophan L-Tyrosine L-Valine (b) The food additive meets the following specifications: (1)...

  10. 21 CFR 172.320 - Amino acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... of the Federal Register under 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be examined at the Food.../federal-register/cfr/ibr-locations.html. (1) AOAC INTERNATIONAL, 481 North Frederick Ave., suite 500....320 Amino acids. The food additive amino acids may be safely used as nutrients added to foods...

  11. Nucleotide Mutation and Amino Acid Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra, Jose; Gerstman, Bernard

    2006-03-01

    We have found a set of nucleotide coupling propensities (ncp) that best reproduces the currently observed probability distribution of amino acids found in protein data banks. These ncp represent the biochemical potentials that produce different probabilities for different mutations within a sequence of nucleotides. We have allowed these ncp to act on a random sequence of nucleotides whose codons initially produce a random arrangement of amino acid residues. Interestingly, though the mutating action of the ncp on the chain of nucleotides results in the correct evolution of the probability of appearance of each individual amino acid towards the present distribution, there is however no evolutionary trend in major global characteristics of the amino acid distribution. We present results that show that properties of amino acids that are considered important for protein structure do not evolve on average, such as: hydrophobic/hydrophilic, size, aromatic/non-aromatic, aliphatic/non-aliphatic, helical-preference/beta-strand.

  12. The putative Cationic Amino Acid Transporter 9 is targeted to vesicles and may be involved in plant amino acid homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huaiyu; Stierhof, York-Dieter; Ludewig, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Amino acids are major primary metabolites. Their uptake, translocation, compartmentation, and re-mobilization require a diverse set of cellular transporters. Here, the broadly expressed gene product of CATIONIC AMINO ACID TRANSPORTER 9 (CAT9) was identified as mainly localized to vesicular membranes that are involved in vacuolar trafficking, including those of the trans-Golgi network. In order to probe whether and how these compartments are involved in amino acid homeostasis, a loss-of-function cat9-1 mutant and ectopic over-expressor plants were isolated. Under restricted nitrogen supply in soil, cat9-1 showed a chlorotic phenotype, which was reversed in the over-expressors. The total soluble amino acid pools were affected in the mutants, but this was only significant under poor nitrogen supply. Upon nitrogen starvation, the soluble amino acid leaf pools were lower in the over-expressor, compared with cat9-1. Over-expression generally affected total soluble amino acid concentrations, slightly delayed development, and finally improved the survival upon severe nitrogen starvation. The results potentially identify a novel function of vesicular amino acid transport mediated by CAT9 in the cellular nitrogen-dependent amino acid homeostasis. PMID:25883600

  13. Amino acids in the Martian meteorite Nakhla

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Bada, J. L.; Brinton, K. L.; McDonald, G. D.

    1999-01-01

    A suite of protein and nonprotein amino acids were detected with high-performance liquid chromatography in the water- and acid-soluble components of an interior fragment of the Martian meteorite Nakhla, which fell in Egypt in 1911. Aspartic and glutamic acids, glycine, alanine, beta-alanine, and gamma-amino-n-butyric acid (gamma-ABA) were the most abundant amino acids detected and were found primarily in the 6 M HCl-hydrolyzed, hot water extract. The concentrations ranged from 20 to 330 parts per billion of bulk meteorite. The amino acid distribution in Nakhla, including the D/L ratios (values range from <0.1 to 0.5), is similar to what is found in bacterially degraded organic matter. The amino acids in Nakhla appear to be derived from terrestrial organic matter that infiltrated the meteorite soon after its fall to Earth, although it is possible that some of the amino acids are endogenous to the meteorite. The rapid amino acid contamination of Martian meteorites after direct exposure to the terrestrial environment has important implications for Mars sample-return missions and the curation of the samples from the time of their delivery to Earth.

  14. RELATING PHYSICOCHEMMICAL PROPERTIES OF AMINO ACIDS TO VARIABLE NUCLEOTIDE SUBSTITUTION

    E-print Network

    Yang, Ziheng

    RELATING PHYSICOCHEMMICAL PROPERTIES OF AMINO ACIDS TO VARIABLE NUCLEOTIDE SUBSTITUTION PATTERNS) as well as heterogeneity of amino acid substitution pattern over sites. The codon (amino acid) sites of amino acid substitution and the effect of amino acid chemical properties vary. Parameters are estimated

  15. Amino acid analogs for tumor imaging

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, M.M.; Shoup, T.

    1998-10-06

    The invention provides novel amino acid compounds of use in detecting and evaluating brain and body tumors. These compounds combine the advantageous properties of 1-amino-cycloalkyl-1-carboxylic acids, namely, their rapid uptake and prolonged retention in tumors with the properties of halogen substituents, including certain useful halogen isotopes including fluorine-18, iodine-123, iodine-125, iodine-131, bromine-75, bromine-76, bromine-77 and bromine-82. In one aspect, the invention features amino acid compounds that have a high specificity for target sites when administered to a subject in vivo. Preferred amino acid compounds show a target to non-target ratio of at least 5:1, are stable in vivo and substantially localized to target within 1 hour after administration. An especially preferred amino acid compound is [{sup 18}F]-1-amino-3-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC). In another aspect, the invention features pharmaceutical compositions comprised of an {alpha}-amino acid moiety attached to either a four, five, or a six member carbon-chain ring. In addition, the invention features analogs of {alpha}-aminoisobutyric acid.

  16. Amino acid analogs for tumor imaging

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, M.M.; Shoup, T.

    1998-09-15

    The invention provides novel amino acid compounds of use in detecting and evaluating brain and body tumors. These compounds combine the advantageous properties of 1-amino-cycloalkyl-1-carboxylic acids, namely, their rapid uptake and prolonged retention in tumors with the properties of halogen substituents, including certain useful halogen isotopes including fluorine-18, iodine-123, iodine-125, iodine-131, bromine-75, bromine-76, bromine-77 and bromine-82. In one aspect, the invention features amino acid compounds that have a high specificity for target sites when administered to a subject in vivo. Preferred amino acid compounds show a target to non-target ratio of at least 5:1, are stable in vivo and substantially localized to target within 1 hour after administration. An especially preferred amino acid compound is [{sup 18}F]-1-amino-3-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC). In another aspect, the invention features pharmaceutical compositions comprised of an {alpha}-amino acid moiety attached to either a four, five, or a six member carbon-chain ring. In addition, the invention features analogs of {alpha}-aminoisobutyric acid.

  17. Amino acid analogs for tumor imaging

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M. (Atlanta, GA); Shoup, Timothy (Decatur, GA)

    1998-10-06

    The invention provides novel amino acid compounds of use in detecting and evaluating brain and body tumors. These compounds combine the advantageous properties of 1-amino-cycloalkyl-1-carboxylic acids, namely, their rapid uptake and prolonged retention in tumors with the properties of halogen substituents, including certain useful halogen isotopes including fluorine-18, iodine-123, iodine-125, iodine-131, bromine-75, bromine-76, bromine-77 and bromine-82. In one aspect, the invention features amino acid compounds that have a high specificity for target sites when administered to a subject in vivo. Preferred amino acid compounds show a target to non-target ratio of at least 5:1, are stable in vivo and substantially localized to target within 1 hour after administration. An especially preferred amino acid compound is ›.sup.18 F!-1-amino-3-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC). In another aspect, the invention features pharmaceutical compositions comprised of an .alpha.-amino acid moiety attached to either a four, five, or a six member carbon-chain ring. In addition, the invention features analogs of .alpha.-aminoisobutyric acid.

  18. Amino acid analogs for tumor imaging

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M. (Atlanta, GA); Shoup, Timothy (Decatur, GA)

    1998-09-15

    The invention provides novel amino acid compounds of use in detecting and evaluating brain and body tumors. These compounds combine the advantageous properties of 1-amino-cycloalkyl-1-carboxylic acids, namely, their rapid uptake and prolonged retention in tumors with the properties of halogen substituents, including certain useful halogen isotopes including fluorine-18, iodine-123, iodine-125, iodine-131, bromine-75, bromine-76, bromine-77 and bromine-82. In one aspect, the invention features amino acid compounds that have a high specificity for target sites when administered to a subject in vivo. Preferred amino acid compounds show a target to non-target ratio of at least 5:1, are stable in vivo and substantially localized to target within 1 hour after administration. An especially preferred amino acid compound is ›.sup.18 F!-1-amino-3-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC). In another aspect, the invention features pharmaceutical compositions comprised of an .alpha.-amino acid moiety attached to either a four, five, or a six member carbon-chain ring. In addition, the invention features analogs of .alpha.-aminoisobutyric acid.

  19. Polycondensation of alpha-amino acids by pyrosulfuric acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denes, F.; Fox, S. W.

    1976-01-01

    The thermal polycondensation of amino acids common to protein is promoted at 80 deg C by pyrosulfuric acid. This is in contrast to the noncondensation at 100 deg C in the presence of concentrated sulfuric acid. These results are in accord with an anhydride mechanism, as proposed earlier for copolycondensation promoted by polyphosphoric acid. The amino acid composition, molecular weight, near-homogeneity, and infrared absorption of the polymer formed are described. The potential significance of planetary pyrosulfuric acid is discussed.

  20. Distribution of Amino Acids in Lunar Regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, J. E.; Callahan, M. P.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.; Noble, S. K.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    One of the most eagerly studied questions upon initial return of lunar samples was whether significant amounts of organic compounds, including amino acids, were present. Analyses during the 1970s produced only tentative and inconclusive identifications of indigenous amino acids. Those analyses were hampered by analytical difficulties including relative insensitivity to certain compounds, the inability to separate chiral enantiomers, and the lack of compound-specific isotopic measurements, which made it impossible to determine whether the detected amino acids were indigenous to the lunar samples or the results of contamination. Numerous advances have been made in instrumentation and methodology for amino acid characterization in extraterrestrial samples in the intervening years, yet the origin of amino acids in lunar regolith samples has been revisited only once for a single lunar sample, (3) and remains unclear. Here, we present initial data from the analyses of amino acid abundances in 12 lunar regolith samples. We discuss these abundances in the context of four potential amino acid sources: (1) terrestrial biological contamination; (2) contamination from lunar module (LM) exhaust; (3) derivation from solar windimplanted precursors; and (4) exogenous delivery from meteorites.

  1. The immunogenicity of dinitrophenyl amino acids.

    PubMed

    Frey, J R; de Weck, A L; Geleick, H; Lergier, W

    1969-11-01

    Numerous dinitrophenyl amino acid preparations injected intradermally induced contact hypersensitivity to dinitrochlorobenzene, delayed type skin reactions to DNP-amino acids, and anti-DNP antibodies in guinea pigs. Some DNP-amino adds induced precipitating anti-DNP antibodies in rabbits as well. Some of the DNP-ammo acids studied were regularly immunogenic, possible immunogenic impurities having been excluded by extensive purification procedures. Others were either constantly nonimmunogenic or irregularly immunogenic, e.g., their immunogenicity varying from one preparation lot to another. By means of extensive chemical analyses and the establishment of dose-response curves, we were able to demonstrate in most cases that the immunogenicity was not due to contamination with unreacted dinitrofluorobenzene or other DNP derivatives, to photodecomposition or other degradation products, or to DNP-protein contaminants. Nevertheless, the irregular immunogenicity of several DNP-amino acid preparations can only be explained by a highly immunogenic impurity (or impurities) which we were unable to detect analytically. The regular immunogenicity of some other DNP-amino acids (e.g. di-DNP-L-histidine) appears to be based on a "transconjugation" phenomenon, the DNP group being able to split off from its amino acid carrier and to conjugate secondarily with proteins in vivo and in vitro. Accordingly, the interpretation of some recent data concerning the immunogenicity of low molecular weight hapten-amino acids may have to be reevaluated. PMID:4981513

  2. Amino Acid Stability in the Early Oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, E. T.; Brinton, K. L.; Burton, A. S.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.; Bada, J. L.

    2015-01-01

    It is likely that a variety of amino acids existed in the early oceans of the Earth at the time of the origin and early evolution of life. "Primordial soup", hydrothermal vent, and meteorite based processes could have contributed to such an inventory. Several "protein" amino acids were likely present, however, based on prebiotic synthesis experiments and carbonaceous meteorite studies, non-protein amino acids, which are rare on Earth today, were likely the most abundant. An important uncertainty is the length of time these amino acids could have persisted before their destruction by abiotic and biotic processes. Prior to life, amino acid concentrations in the oceans were likely regulated by circulation through hydro-thermal vents. Today, the entire ocean circulates through vent systems every 10(exp 7) years. On the early Earth, this value was likely smaller due to higher heat flow and thus marine amino acid life-time would have been shorter. After life, amino acids in the oceans could have been assimilated by primitive organisms.

  3. 40 CFR 721.2584 - Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. 721.2584 Section 721...Substances § 721.2584 Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. (a) Chemical substance...substance identified as dodecanoic acid, 12-amino- (PMN P-98-0823;...

  4. 40 CFR 721.2584 - Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. 721.2584 Section 721...Substances § 721.2584 Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. (a) Chemical substance...substance identified as dodecanoic acid, 12-amino- (PMN P-98-0823;...

  5. 40 CFR 721.2584 - Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. 721.2584 Section 721...Substances § 721.2584 Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. (a) Chemical substance...substance identified as dodecanoic acid, 12-amino- (PMN P-98-0823;...

  6. 40 CFR 721.2584 - Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. 721.2584 Section 721...Substances § 721.2584 Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. (a) Chemical substance...substance identified as dodecanoic acid, 12-amino- (PMN P-98-0823;...

  7. 40 CFR 721.2584 - Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. 721.2584 Section 721...Substances § 721.2584 Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. (a) Chemical substance...substance identified as dodecanoic acid, 12-amino- (PMN P-98-0823;...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: Aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency

    MedlinePLUS

    ... OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency On this page: Description Genetic changes ... Reviewed May 2008 What is aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency? Aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) ...

  9. Highly Efficient Asymmetric Synthesis of -Amino Acid Derivatives via

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Xumu

    Highly Efficient Asymmetric Synthesis of -Amino Acid Derivatives via Rhodium pure -amino acids and their deriva- tives are important building blocks for the synthesis of -peptides of -amino acids has attracted extensive interest. Although several stoichio- metric and catalytic methods

  10. 1. Abstract 2. Naturally Metamorphic Proteins: One Amino Acid

    E-print Network

    Metamorphic Proteins: One Amino Acid Sequence, Two Different Structures 130 Diverse Proteins Represented as Amino Acid Sequence, Clustered: Sta+s+cs of amino acids in promiscuous and stringent regions of sequence

  11. Intermolecular Vibrations in Hydrophobic Amino Acid Crystals: Experiments and Calculations

    E-print Network

    Intermolecular Vibrations in Hydrophobic Amino Acid Crystals: Experiments and Calculations Michael-8107, United States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: Intermolecular vibrations of amino acid crystals occur not previously been compared. Theoretical modeling of intermolecular vibrations in hydrophobic amino acids

  12. Amino Acid Degradation after Meteoritic Impact Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertrand, M.; Westall, F.; vanderGaast, S.; Vilas, F.; Hoerz, F.; Barnes, G.; Chabin, A.; Brack, A.

    2008-01-01

    Amino acids are among the most important prebiotic molecules as it is from these precursors that the building blocks of life were formed [1]. Although organic molecules were among the components of the planetesimals making up the terrestrial planets, large amounts of primitive organic precursor molecules are believed to be exogenous in origin and to have been imported to the Earth via micrometeorites, carbonaceous meteorites and comets, especially during the early stages of the formation of the Solar System [1,2]. Our study concerns the hypothesis that prebiotic organic matter, present on Earth, was synthesized in the interstellar environment, and then imported to Earth by meteorites or micrometeorites. We are particularly concerned with the formation and fate of amino acids. We have already shown that amino acid synthesis is possible inside cometary grains under interstellar environment conditions [3]. We are now interested in the effects of space conditions and meteoritic impact on these amino acids [4-6]. Most of the extraterrestrial organic molecules known today have been identified in carbonaceous chondrite meteorites [7]. One of the components of these meteorites is a clay with a composition close to that of saponite, used in our experiments. Two American teams have studied the effects of impact on various amino acids [8,9]. [8] investigated amino acids in saturated solution in water with pressure ranges between 5.1 and 21 GPa and temperature ranges between 412 and 870 K. [9] studied amino acids in solid form associated with and without minerals (Murchison and Allende meteorite extracts) and pressure ranges between 3 and 30 GPa. In these two experiments, the amino acids survived up to 15 GPa. At higher pressure, the quantity of preserved amino acids decreases quickly. Some secondary products such as dipeptides and diketopiperazins were identified in the [8] experiment.

  13. Development of sustainable precision farming systems for swine: estimating real-time individual amino acid requirements in growing-finishing pigs.

    PubMed

    Hauschild, L; Lovatto, P A; Pomar, J; Pomar, C

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate a mathematical model used to estimate the daily amino acid requirements of individual growing-finishing pigs. The model includes empirical and mechanistic model components. The empirical component estimates daily feed intake (DFI), BW, and daily gain (DG) based on individual pig information collected in real time. Based on DFI, BW, and DG estimates, the mechanistic component uses classic factorial equations to estimate the optimal concentration of amino acids that must be offered to each pig to meet its requirements. The model was evaluated with data from a study that investigated the effect of feeding pigs with a 3-phase or daily multiphase system. The DFI and BW values measured in this study were compared with those estimated by the empirical component of the model. The coherence of the values estimated by the mechanistic component was evaluated by analyzing if it followed a normal pattern of requirements. Lastly, the proposed model was evaluated by comparing its estimates with those generated by the existing growth model (InraPorc). The precision of the proposed model and InraPorc in estimating DFI and BW was evaluated through the mean absolute error. The empirical component results indicated that the DFI and BW trajectories of individual pigs fed ad libitum could be predicted 1 d (DFI) or 7 d (BW) ahead with the average mean absolute error of 12.45 and 1.85%, respectively. The average mean absolute error obtained with the InraPorc for the average individual of the population was 14.72% for DFI and 5.38% for BW. Major differences were observed when estimates from InraPorc were compared with individual observations. The proposed model, however, was effective in tracking the change in DFI and BW for each individual pig. The mechanistic model component estimated the optimal standardized ileal digestible Lys to NE ratio with reasonable between animal (average CV = 7%) and overtime (average CV = 14%) variation. Thus, the amino acid requirements estimated by model are animal- and time-dependent and follow, in real time, the individual DFI and BW growth patterns. The proposed model can follow the average feed intake and feed weight trajectory of each individual pig in real time with good accuracy. Based on these trajectories and using classical factorial equations, the model makes it possible to estimate dynamically the AA requirements of each animal, taking into account the intake and growth changes of the animal. PMID:22287679

  14. Amino acids in healthy aging skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Riddle, Emily S; Stipanuk, Martha H; Thalacker-Mercer, Anna E

    2016-01-01

    Life expectancy in the U.S. and globally continues to increase. Despite increased life expectancy quality of life is not enhanced, and older adults often experience chronic age-related disease and functional disability, including frailty. Additionally, changes in body composition such as the involuntary loss of skeletal muscle mass (i.e. sarcopenia) and subsequent increases in adipose tissue can augment disease and disability in this population. Furthermore, increased oxidative stress and decreased antioxidant concentrations may also lead to metabolic dysfunction in older adults. Specific amino acids, including leucine, cysteine and its derivative taurine, and arginine can play various roles in healthy aging, especially in regards to skeletal muscle health. Leucine and arginine play important roles in muscle protein synthesis and cell growth while cysteine and arginine play important roles in quenching oxidative stress. Evidence suggests that supplemental doses of each of these amino acids may improve the aging phenotype. However, additional research is required to establish the doses required to achieve positive outcomes in humans. PMID:26709665

  15. Polymers with complexing properties. Simple poly(amino acids)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roque, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    The free amino (0.3 equiv/residue) and carboxyl (0.5 equiv/residue) groups of thermal polylysine increased dramatically on treatment with distilled water. The total hydrolysis of such a polymer was abnormal in that only about 50% of the expected amino acids were recovered. Poly (lysine-co-alanine-co-glycine) under usual conditions hydrolyzed completely in 8 hours; whereas, when it was pretreated with diazomethane, a normal period of 24 hours was required to give (nearly) the same amounts of each free amino acid as compared with those obtained from the untreated polymer. The amino groups of the basic thermal poly(amino acids) were sterically hindered. The existence of nitrogen atoms linking two or three chains and reactive groups (anhydride, imine) were proposed.

  16. 40 CFR 721.1705 - Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with 6-amino-4-hydroxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with...Substances § 721.1705 Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with...generically identified as benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled...

  17. 40 CFR 721.1705 - Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with 6-amino-4-hydroxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with...Substances § 721.1705 Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with...generically identified as benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled...

  18. 40 CFR 721.1705 - Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with 6-amino-4-hydroxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with...Substances § 721.1705 Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with...generically identified as benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled...

  19. 40 CFR 721.1705 - Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with 6-amino-4-hydroxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with...Substances § 721.1705 Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with...generically identified as benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled...

  20. 40 CFR 721.1705 - Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with 6-amino-4-hydroxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with...Substances § 721.1705 Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with...generically identified as benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled...

  1. Amino Acid Biosynthesis Pathways in Diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Bromke, Mariusz A.

    2013-01-01

    Amino acids are not only building blocks for proteins but serve as precursors for the synthesis of many metabolites with multiple functions in growth and other biological processes of a living organism. The biosynthesis of amino acids is tightly connected with central carbon, nitrogen and sulfur metabolism. Recent publication of genome sequences for two diatoms Thalassiosira pseudonana and Phaeodactylum tricornutum created an opportunity for extensive studies on the structure of these metabolic pathways. Based on sequence homology found in the analyzed diatomal genes, the biosynthesis of amino acids in diatoms seems to be similar to higher plants. However, one of the most striking differences between the pathways in plants and in diatomas is that the latter possess and utilize the urea cycle. It serves as an important anaplerotic pathway for carbon fixation into amino acids and other N-containing compounds, which are essential for diatom growth and contribute to their high productivity. PMID:24957993

  2. Calcitonin gene-related peptide analogues with aza and indolizidinone amino acid residues reveal conformational requirements for antagonist activity at the human calcitonin gene-related peptide 1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Boeglin, Damien; Hamdan, Fadi F; Melendez, Rosa E; Cluzeau, Jérôme; Laperriere, Andre; Héroux, Madeleine; Bouvier, Michel; Lubell, William D

    2007-03-22

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists have potential for the treatment and prevention of disease states such as non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, migraine headache, pain, and inflammation. To gain insight into the spatial requirements for CGRP antagonism, three strategies were employed to restrict the conformation of the potent undecapeptide antagonist, [D31,P34,F35]CGRP27-37. First, aza-amino acid scanning was performed, and ten aza-peptide analogues were synthesized and examined for biological activity. Second, (3S,6S,9S)-2-oxo-3-amino-indolizidin-2-one amino acid (I2aa) and (2S,6S,8S)-9-oxo-8-amino-indolizidin-9-one amino acid (I9aa) both were introduced at positions 31-32, 32-33, 33-34, and 34-35, regions of the backbone expected to adopt turns. Finally, the conformation of the backbone and side-chain of the C-terminal residue, Phe35-Ala36-Phe37-NH2, was explored employing (2S,4R,6R,8S)-9-oxo-8-amino-4-phenyl-indolizidin-9-one amino acid (4-Ph-I9aa) as a constrained phenylalanine mimic. The structure-activity relationships exhibited by our 26 analogues illustrate conformational requirements important for designing CGRP antagonists and highlight the importance of beta-turns centered at Gly33-Pro34 for potency. PMID:17319653

  3. A statistical theory of amino acid mutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Liaofu; Zhou, Yuming

    1990-09-01

    Assuming that the observed mutation frequency of an amino acid depends on two factors. The first is mutation coefficient which describes the rate of the nucleotide substitution stochastically and the second is the similarity of amino acids which represents the fitness of a mutant under the selective pressure. A statistical theory is proposed and 380 mutation frequencies are calculated, only 10 of which disagree obviously with the observed data.

  4. Genetically encoded fluorescent coumarin amino acids

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jiangyun (San Diego, CA); Xie, Jianming (San Diego, CA); Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA)

    2010-10-05

    The invention relates to orthogonal pairs of tRNAs and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases that can incorporate the coumarin unnatural amino acid L-(7-hydroxycoumarin-4-yl) ethylglycine into proteins produced in eubacterial host cells such as E. coli. The invention provides, for example but not limited to, novel orthogonal synthetases, methods for identifying and making the novel synthetases, methods for producing proteins containing the unnatural amino acid L-(7-hydroxycoumarin-4-yl)ethylglycine and related translation systems.

  5. Genetically encoded fluorescent coumarin amino acids

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jiangyun (San Diego, CA); Xie, Jianming (San Diego, CA); Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA)

    2012-06-05

    The invention relates to orthogonal pairs of tRNAs and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases that can incorporate the coumarin unnatural amino acid L-(7-hydroxycoumarin-4-yl)ethylglycine into proteins produced in eubacterial host cells such as E. coli. The invention provides, for example but not limited to, novel orthogonal synthetases, methods for identifying and making the novel synthetases, methods for producing proteins containing the unnatural amino acid L-(7-hydroxycoumarin-4-yl)ethylglycine and related translation systems.

  6. From one amino acid to another: tRNA-dependent amino acid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, Kelly; Yuan, Jing; Hohn, Michael J.; Jester, Brian; Devine, Kevin M.; Söll, Dieter

    2008-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNAs (aa-tRNAs) are the essential substrates for translation. Most aa-tRNAs are formed by direct aminoacylation of tRNA catalyzed by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. However, a smaller number of aa-tRNAs (Asn-tRNA, Gln-tRNA, Cys-tRNA and Sec-tRNA) are made by synthesizing the amino acid on the tRNA by first attaching a non-cognate amino acid to the tRNA, which is then converted to the cognate one catalyzed by tRNA-dependent modifying enzymes. Asn-tRNA or Gln-tRNA formation in most prokaryotes requires amidation of Asp-tRNA or Glu-tRNA by amidotransferases that couple an amidase or an asparaginase to liberate ammonia with a tRNA-dependent kinase. Both archaeal and eukaryotic Sec-tRNA biosynthesis and Cys-tRNA synthesis in methanogens require O-phosophoseryl-tRNA formation. For tRNA-dependent Cys biosynthesis, O-phosphoseryl-tRNA synthetase directly attaches the amino acid to the tRNA which is then converted to Cys by Sep-tRNA: Cys-tRNA synthase. In Sec-tRNA synthesis, O-phosphoseryl-tRNA kinase phosphorylates Ser-tRNA to form the intermediate which is then modified to Sec-tRNA by Sep-tRNA:Sec-tRNA synthase. Complex formation between enzymes in the same pathway may protect the fidelity of protein synthesis. How these tRNA-dependent amino acid biosynthetic routes are integrated into overall metabolism may explain why they are still retained in so many organisms. PMID:18252769

  7. 40 CFR 721.10126 - Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkyl amino substituted triazine...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10126 - Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkyl amino substituted triazine...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10126 - Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkyl amino substituted triazine...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10126 - Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkyl amino substituted triazine...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10126 - Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkyl amino substituted triazine...

  12. Amino acids in the Yamato carbonaceous chrondrite from Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimoyama, A.; Ponnamperuma, C.; Yanai, K.

    1979-01-01

    Evidence for the presence of amino acids of extraterrestrial origin in the Antarctic Yamato carbonaceous chrondrite is presented. Hydrolyzed and nonhydrolyzed water-extracted amino acid samples from exterior, middle and interior portions of the meteorite were analyzed by an amino acid analyzer and by gas chromatography of N-TFA-isopropyl amino acid derivatives. Nine protein and six nonprotein amino acids were detected in the meteorite at abundances between 34 and less than one nmole/g, with equal amounts in interior and exterior portions. Nearly equal abundances of the D and L enantiomers of alanine, aspartic acid and glutamic acid were found, indicating the abiotic, therefore extraterrestrial, origin of the amino acids. The Antarctic environment and the uniformity of protein amino acid abundances are discussed as evidence against the racemization of terrestrially acquired amino acids, and similarities between Yamato amino acid compositions and the amino acid compositions of the Murchison and Murray type II carbonaceous chrondrites are indicated.

  13. Amino acid composition and chemical evaluation of protein quality of cereals as affected by insect infestation.

    PubMed

    Jood, S; Kapoor, A C; Singh, R

    1995-09-01

    A significant decrease in essential amino acids of wheat, maize and sorghum was observed due to grain infestation caused by mixed populations of Trogoderma granarium Everts and Rhizopertha dominica Fabricius (50:50). Non-essential amino acids were also adversely affected. Among the essential amino acids, maximum reduction was found in methionine, isoleucine and lysine in infested wheat, maize and sorghum grains, respectively. Lysine, with lowest chemical score in uninfested and infested grains of three cereals, is the first limiting amino acid. Insect infestation caused significant (p < 0.05) reduction in the chemical score of all the essential amino acids, yet did not change the position of first and second limiting amino acids in wheat and sorghum. However, in case of maize, isoleucine became the second limiting amino acid. Infested grains also showed substantial reduction in essential amino acid index, calculated biological value and requirement index. PMID:8837875

  14. Amino acids in modern and fossil woods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, C.; Bada, J. L.; Peterson, E.

    1976-01-01

    The amino acid composition and the extent of racemization in several modern and fossil woods are reported. The method of analysis is described, and data are presented on the total amino acid concentration, the amino acid ratios, and the enantiomeric ratios in each sample. It is found that the amino acid concentration per gram of dry wood decreases with age of the sample, that the extent of racemization increases with increasing age, and that the amounts of aspartic acid, threonine, and serine decrease relative to valine with increasing age. The relative racemization rates of amino acids in wood, bone, and aqueous solution are compared, and it is shown that racemization in wood is much slower than in bone or aqueous solution. Racemization results for woods from the Kalambo Falls area of Zambia are used to calculate a minimum age of 110,000 years for the transition between the Sangoan and Acheulian industries at that site. This result is shown to be consistent with numerous radiometric dates for older Acheulian sites in Africa and to compare well with geologically inferred dates for the beginning of the Eemian and the end of the Acheulian industry in southern Africa.

  15. Amino acids derived from Titan tholins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, B. N.; Sagan, C.; Ogino, H.; Nagy, B.; Er, C.; Schram, K. H.; Arakawa, E. T.

    1986-01-01

    An organic heteropolymer (Titan tholin) was produced by continuous dc discharge through a 0.9 N2/0.1 CH4 gas mixture at 0.2 mbar pressure, roughly simulating the cloudtop atmosphere of Titan. Treatment of this tholin with 6N HCl yielded 16 amino acids by gas chromatography after derivatization of N-trifluroacetyl isopropyl esters on two different capillary columns. Identifications were confirmed by GC/MS. Glycine, aspartic acid, and alpha- and beta-alanine were produced in greatest abundance; the total yield of amino acids was approximately 10(-2), approximately equal to the yield of urea. The presence of "nonbiological" amino acids, the absence of serine, and the fact that the amino acids are racemic within experimental error together indicate that these molecules are not due to microbial or other contamination, but are derived from the tholin. In addition to the HCN, HC2CN, and (CN)2 found by Voyager, nitriles and aminonitriles should be sought in the Titanian atmosphere and, eventually, amino acids on the surface. These results suggest that episodes of liquid water in the past or future of Titan might lead to major further steps in prebiological organic chemistry on that body.

  16. Identification of Amino Acids in HIV-1 and Avian Sarcoma Virus Integrase Subsites Required for Specific Recognition of the Long Terminal Repeat Ends*S

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Aiping; Weber, Irene T.; Harrison, Robert W.; Leis, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    A tetramer model for HIV-1 integrase (IN) with DNA representing 20 bp of the U3 and U5 long terminal repeats (LTR) termini was assembled using structural and biochemical data and molecular dynamics simulations. It predicted amino acid residues on the enzyme surface that can interact with the LTR termini. A separate structural alignment of HIV-1, simian sarcoma virus (SIV), and avian sarcoma virus (ASV) INs predicted which of these residues were unique. To determine whether these residues were responsible for specific recognition of the LTR termini, the amino acids from ASV IN were substituted into the structurally equivalent positions of HIV-1 IN, and the ability of the chimeras to 3? process U5 HIV-1 or ASV duplex oligos was determined. This analysis demonstrated that there are multiple amino acid contacts with the LTRs and that substitution of ASV IN amino acids at many of the analogous positions in HIV-1 IN conferred partial ability to cleave ASV substrates with a concomitant loss in the ability to cleave the homologous HIV-1 substrate. HIV-1 IN residues that changed specificity include Val72, Ser153, Lys160–Ile161, Gly163–Val165, and His171–Leu172. Because a chimera that combines several of these substitutions showed a specificity of cleavage of the U5 ASV substrate closer to wild type ASV IN compared with chimeras with individual amino acid substitutions, it appears that the sum of the IN interactions with the LTRs determines the specificity. Finally, residues Ser153 and Val72 in HIV-1 IN are among those that change in enzymes that develop resistance to naphthyridine carboxamide- and diketo acid-related inhibitors in cells. Thus, amino acid residues involved in recognition of the LTRs are among these positions that change in development of drug resistance. PMID:16298997

  17. Computational Protein Design Quantifies Structural Constraints on Amino Acid Covariation

    PubMed Central

    Ollikainen, Noah; Kortemme, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    Amino acid covariation, where the identities of amino acids at different sequence positions are correlated, is a hallmark of naturally occurring proteins. This covariation can arise from multiple factors, including selective pressures for maintaining protein structure, requirements imposed by a specific function, or from phylogenetic sampling bias. Here we employed flexible backbone computational protein design to quantify the extent to which protein structure has constrained amino acid covariation for 40 diverse protein domains. We find significant similarities between the amino acid covariation in alignments of natural protein sequences and sequences optimized for their structures by computational protein design methods. These results indicate that the structural constraints imposed by protein architecture play a dominant role in shaping amino acid covariation and that computational protein design methods can capture these effects. We also find that the similarity between natural and designed covariation is sensitive to the magnitude and mechanism of backbone flexibility used in computational protein design. Our results thus highlight the necessity of including backbone flexibility to correctly model precise details of correlated amino acid changes and give insights into the pressures underlying these correlations. PMID:24244128

  18. What Amino Acid Properties Affect Protein Evolution? Xuhua Xia,1

    E-print Network

    Xia, Xuhua

    What Amino Acid Properties Affect Protein Evolution? Xuhua Xia,1 Wen-Hsiung Li2 1 Department the effects of 10 amino acid properties on the evolution of the genetic code, the amino acid composition of proteins, and the pattern of nonsynonymous substitutions. The 10 amino acid properties studied

  19. Amino acid isotopic analysis in agricultural systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A relatively new approach to stable isotopic analysis—referred to as compound-specific isotopic analysis (CSIA)—has emerged, centering on the measurement of 15N:14N ratios in amino acids (glutamic acid and phenylalanine). CSIA has recently been used to generate trophic position estimates among anima...

  20. Detection of non-protein amino acids in the presence of protein amino acids. II.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapshak, P.; Okaji, M.

    1972-01-01

    Studies conducted with the JEOL 5AH amino acid analyzer are described. This instrument makes possible the programming of the chromatographic process. Data are presented showing the separations of seventeen non-protein amino acids in the presence of eighteen protein amino acids. It is pointed out that distinct separations could be obtained in the case of a number of chemically similar compounds, such as ornithine and lysine, N-amidino alanine and arginine, and iminodiacetic acid and S-carboxymethyl cysteine and aspartic acid.

  1. Seaweed proteins and amino acids as nutraceuticals.

    PubMed

    ?erná, Monika

    2011-01-01

    Seaweeds demonstrate original and interesting nutritional characteristics. Protein concentration ranges from 5% to 47% of dry basic. Its value depends particularly on species and the environmental conditions. Seaweed protein is a source of all amino acids, especially glycine, alanine, arginine, proline, glutamic, and aspartic acids. In algae, essential amino acids (EAAs) represent almost a half of total amino acids and their protein profile is close to the profile of egg protein. In case of non-EAAs, all three groups (green, brown, and red seaweeds) contain the similar amount. Red seaweed seems to be a good source of protein because its value reaches 47%. The issue of protein malnutrition supports the trend to find a new and cheap alternative source of protein. Algae could play an important role in the above-mentioned challenge because of relatively high content of nitrogen compounds. Algae may be used in the industry as a source of ingredients with high nutritional quality. PMID:22054957

  2. Amino Acid Correlation Functions in Protein Structures.

    PubMed

    Kržišnik, Klemen; Urbic, Tomaz

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the spatial folding of proteins from their amino acid sequences has an enormous potential in contemporary life sciences. The ability to predict secondary and tertiary structures from primary ones through the use of computers will enable a much faster and more efficient discovery of organic substances with therapeutic or otherwise bioactive potential, largely eliminating the need for synthesis and testing of large numbers of organic substances for physiological effects. Our manuscript presents an application of correlation function analysis, usually used to describe properties of liquids, to protein structures in order to elucidate statistically favored distances among amino acids. Pairwise distribution functions were calculated between C-alpha atoms of 20 amino acids in a large ensemble of Protein Data Bank structures. The correlation functions show characteristic distances in amino acid interactions. Different propensities for forming various secondary structure elements among all 210 possible amino acid pairs have been visualized and some have been interpreted. Notably, we found helices to be surprisingly common among certain pairs. PMID:26454591

  3. Amino acid uptake in rust fungi

    PubMed Central

    Struck, Christine

    2015-01-01

    The plant pathogenic rust fungi colonize leaf tissue and feed off their host plants without killing them. Certain economically important species of different genera such as Melampsora, Phakopsora, Puccinia, or Uromyces are extensively studied for resolving the mechanisms of the obligate biotrophy. As obligate parasites rust fungi only can complete their life cycle on living hosts where they grow through the leaf tissue by developing an extended network of intercellular hyphae from which intracellular haustoria are differentiated. Haustoria are involved in key functions of the obligate biotrophic lifestyle: suppressing host defense responses and acquiring nutrients. This review provides a survey of rust fungi nitrogen nutrition with special emphasis on amino acid uptake. A variety of sequences of amino acid transporter genes of rust fungi have been published; however, transport activity of only three in planta highly up-regulated amino acid permeases have been characterized. Functional and immunohistochemical investigations have shown the specificity and localization of these transporters. Sequence data of various genome projects allowed identification of numerous rust amino acid transporter genes. An in silico analysis reveals that these genes can be classified into different transporter families. In addition, genetic and molecular data of amino acid transporters have provided new insights in the corresponding metabolic pathways. PMID:25699068

  4. Amino Acids Profiles in Biological Media

    SciTech Connect

    Iordache, A.; Horj, E.; Morar, S.; Cozar, O.; Culea, M.; Ani, A. R.; Mesaros, C.

    2010-08-04

    An accurate analytical method was developed to determine amino acids in some biological specimens by GC/MS technique. Stable isotopes provide useful tools for a variety of studies, offering ideal internal standards in quantitative information. Isotopic dilution gas chromatography--mass spectrometry (ID-GC/MS) is the techniques used for quantitative analysis of compounds labeled with stable isotopes. A Trace DSQ Thermo Finnigan quadrupole mass spectrometer coupled with a Trace GC was used. Amino acids were separated on a Rtx-5 MS capillary column, 30 mx0.25 mm, 0.25 {mu}m film thickness, using a temperature program from 50 deg. C, 1 min, 6 deg. C/min at 100 deg. C, 4 deg. C/min at 200 deg. C, 20 deg. C/min at 300 deg. C, (3 min). The transfer line temperature was 250 deg. C, the injector temperature 200 deg. C and ion source temperature 250 deg. C; splitter: 10:1. Electron energy was 70 eV and emission current, 100 {mu}A. The amino acids were purified on a Dowex 50W-W8 exchange resin and were derivatized in a procedure following two steps to obtain trifluoroacetyl butyl esters. The identification of amino acids was obtained by using NIST library but also by using amino acid standards.

  5. Distinguishing Proteins From Arbitrary Amino Acid Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Stephen S.-T.; Mao, Wei-Guang; Benson, Max; He, Rong Lucy

    2015-01-01

    What kinds of amino acid sequences could possibly be protein sequences? From all existing databases that we can find, known proteins are only a small fraction of all possible combinations of amino acids. Beginning with Sanger's first detailed determination of a protein sequence in 1952, previous studies have focused on describing the structure of existing protein sequences in order to construct the protein universe. No one, however, has developed a criteria for determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Here we show that when the collection of arbitrary amino acid sequences is viewed in an appropriate geometric context, the protein sequences cluster together. This leads to a new computational test, described here, that has proved to be remarkably accurate at determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Even more, if the results of this test indicate that the sequence can be a protein, and it is indeed a protein sequence, then its identity as a protein sequence is uniquely defined. We anticipate our computational test will be useful for those who are attempting to complete the job of discovering all proteins, or constructing the protein universe. PMID:25609314

  6. Temperature dependence of amino acid hydrophobicities

    PubMed Central

    Wolfenden, Richard; Lewis, Charles A.; Yuan, Yang; Carter, Charles W.

    2015-01-01

    The hydrophobicities of the 20 common amino acids are reflected in their tendencies to appear in interior positions in globular proteins and in deeply buried positions of membrane proteins. To determine whether these relationships might also have been valid in the warm surroundings where life may have originated, we examined the effect of temperature on the hydrophobicities of the amino acids as measured by the equilibrium constants for transfer of their side-chains from neutral solution to cyclohexane (Kw>c). The hydrophobicities of most amino acids were found to increase with increasing temperature. Because that effect is more pronounced for the more polar amino acids, the numerical range of Kw>c values decreases with increasing temperature. There are also modest changes in the ordering of the more polar amino acids. However, those changes are such that they would have tended to minimize the otherwise disruptive effects of a changing thermal environment on the evolution of protein structure. Earlier, the genetic code was found to be organized in such a way that—with a single exception (threonine)—the side-chain dichotomy polar/nonpolar matches the nucleic acid base dichotomy purine/pyrimidine at the second position of each coding triplet at 25 °C. That dichotomy is preserved at 100 °C. The accessible surface areas of amino acid side-chains in folded proteins are moderately correlated with hydrophobicity, but when free energies of vapor-to-cyclohexane transfer (corresponding to size) are taken into consideration, a closer relationship becomes apparent. PMID:26034278

  7. Temperature dependence of amino acid hydrophobicities.

    PubMed

    Wolfenden, Richard; Lewis, Charles A; Yuan, Yang; Carter, Charles W

    2015-06-16

    The hydrophobicities of the 20 common amino acids are reflected in their tendencies to appear in interior positions in globular proteins and in deeply buried positions of membrane proteins. To determine whether these relationships might also have been valid in the warm surroundings where life may have originated, we examined the effect of temperature on the hydrophobicities of the amino acids as measured by the equilibrium constants for transfer of their side-chains from neutral solution to cyclohexane (K(w > c)). The hydrophobicities of most amino acids were found to increase with increasing temperature. Because that effect is more pronounced for the more polar amino acids, the numerical range of K(w > c) values decreases with increasing temperature. There are also modest changes in the ordering of the more polar amino acids. However, those changes are such that they would have tended to minimize the otherwise disruptive effects of a changing thermal environment on the evolution of protein structure. Earlier, the genetic code was found to be organized in such a way that--with a single exception (threonine)--the side-chain dichotomy polar/nonpolar matches the nucleic acid base dichotomy purine/pyrimidine at the second position of each coding triplet at 25 °C. That dichotomy is preserved at 100 °C. The accessible surface areas of amino acid side-chains in folded proteins are moderately correlated with hydrophobicity, but when free energies of vapor-to-cyclohexane transfer (corresponding to size) are taken into consideration, a closer relationship becomes apparent. PMID:26034278

  8. Shikimate 2015 p. 1 Shikimic Acid Pathway and Aromatic Amino Acid Biosynthesis

    E-print Network

    Constabel, Peter

    Shikimate 2015 p. 1 Shikimic Acid Pathway and Aromatic Amino Acid Biosynthesis 1. Define: Pathway to shikimic acid, from which the aromatic amino this pathway? - synthesis of "essential" amino acids - biosynthetic precursors

  9. Cometary Amino Acids from the STARDUST Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jamie Elsila

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Stardust spacecraft returned samples from comet 81 P/WiId 2 to Earth in January 2006. Examinations of the organic compounds in cometary samples can reveal information about the prebiotic organic inventory present on the early Earth and within the early Solar System, which may have contributed to the origin of life. Preliminary studies of Stardust material revealed the presence of a suite of organic compounds including several amines and amino acids, but the origin of these compounds (cometary vs. terrestrial contamination) could not be identified. We have recently measured the carbon isotopic ratios of these amino acids to determine their origin, leading to the first detection of a cometary amino acid.

  10. Combinatorial codon-based amino acid substitutions

    PubMed Central

    Yáñez, Jorge; Argüello, Martha; Osuna, Joel; Soberón, Xavier; Gaytán, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Twenty Fmoc-protected trinucleotide phosphoramidites representing a complete set of codons for the natural amino acids were chemically synthesized for the first time. A pool of these reagents was incorporated into oligonucleotides at substoichiometric levels to generate two libraries of variants that randomly carry either few or many codon replacements on a region encoding nine amino acids of the bacterial enzyme TEM-1 ?-lactamase. Assembly of the libraries was performed in a completely automated mode through a simple modification of ordinary protocols. This technology eliminates codon redundancy, stop codons and enables complete exploration of sequence space for single, double and triple mutations throughout a protein region spanning several residues. Sequence analysis of many non-selected clones revealed a good incorporation of the trinucleotides, producing combinations of mutations quite different from those obtained using conventional degenerate oligonucleotides. Ceftazidime-selection experiments yielded several never before reported variants containing novel amino acid combinations in the ?-lactamase omega loop region. PMID:15537836

  11. Amino acid precursors in lunar samples.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.; Harada, K.; Hare, P. E.

    1972-01-01

    The use of hot water to extract lunar samples, followed by the hydrolysis of the aqueous extract, appears to be the method of choice for identification and quantitation of amino acid precursors in extraterrestrial sources. The net inferences from the analyses to date are (1) that amino acid precursors are verifiably present in lunar dust, and (2) that they are quite certainly not the consequence of contamination by terrestrial organisms, including man. It is suggested that prebiotic evolutionary pathways such as have been traversed on the earth were terminated on the moon for lack of sufficient water. Although some or all of the amino acid precursors may be indigenous, the low level observed suggests that they may also result from onfall of organic compounds from interstellar matter, comets, tails, solar wind, or meteorites.

  12. Terahertz broadband spectroscopic investigations of amino acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, De-chong; Zhang, Liang-liang; Zhong, Hua; Zhang, Cun-lin

    2011-08-01

    We present an experimental terahertz (THz) spectroscopic investigation of amino acid using an air-breakdown-coherent detection (ABCD) system. The strong and ultra-broadband (0.1 to 10THz) terahertz radiations generated by two-color laser induced air plasma and measured by coherent heterodyne detection. The broadband THz reflection spectra of L-Lysine (C6H14N2O2) and L-Arginine (C6H14N2O2) are obtained. To solve the phase-retrieval problem in RTDS, the absorption signatures of the materials are extracted directly from the first derivative of the relative reflectance with respect to frequency. The absorption features of the two amino acids are characterized in the 0.5~6 THz region. It is found that both the two amino acids have an absorption peak at 1.10 THz.

  13. Improving the Reliability of Optimal In-Feed Amino Acid Ratios Based on Individual Amino Acid Efficiency Data from N Balance Studies in Growing Chicken

    PubMed Central

    Wecke, Christian; Liebert, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Simple Summary Dietary amino acid concentration should closely meet the quantitative requirement of animals dependent on genotype, gender, age, aimed performance and housing conditions. Both under- and over-supply yield impaired efficacy of individual amino acid utilization and increase the nitrogen excretion. Hence, for optimal feed formulation, a validated knowledge about adequacy of dietary amino acid balance is necessary. Present studies contribute toward ensuring ideal amino acid ratios in diets for growing broiler chicken making use of a new amino acid efficiency-based procedure. Abstract Three consecutive nitrogen balance experiments with fast-growing male broiler chickens (ROSS 308), both during starter and grower periods, were conducted to determine the ideal ratios of several indispensable amino acids relative to lysine. The control diets based on corn, wheat, fishmeal, field peas, wheat gluten and soybean oil were formulated by computer optimizing to meet the assumed ideal amino acid ratios and to fulfill both the energy and nutrient requirements of growing chicken. According to principles of the diet dilution technique, balanced control diets were diluted by wheat starch and refilled by crystalline amino acids and remaining feed ingredients, except the amino acid under study. The lysine, threonine, tryptophan, arginine, isoleucine and valine diluted diets resulted in significantly lower protein quality as compared to control diet, especially following increased dietary lysine supply (experiments II and III) and stronger amino acid dilution (experiment III). Accordingly, the limiting position of individual amino acids was confirmed, and the derived amino acid efficiency data were utilized to derive ideal amino acid ratios for the starter period: Lys (100): Thr (60): Trp (19): Arg (105): Ile (55): Val (63); and the grower period: Lys (100): Thr (62): Trp (17): Arg (105): Ile (65): Val (79). PMID:26479521

  14. Interactive Hangman teaches amino acid structures and abbreviations.

    PubMed

    Pennington, Britney O; Sears, Duane; Clegg, Dennis O

    2014-01-01

    We developed an interactive exercise to teach students how to draw the structures of the 20 standard amino acids and to identify the one-letter abbreviations by modifying the familiar game of "Hangman." Amino acid structures were used to represent single letters throughout the game. To provide additional practice in identifying structures, hints to the answers were written in "amino acid sentences" for the students to translate. Students were required to draw the structure of the corresponding letter they wished to guess on a whiteboard. Each student received a reference sheet of the structures and abbreviations, but was required to draw from memory when guessing a letter. Preassessments and postassessments revealed a drastic improvement in the students' ability to recognize and draw structures from memory. This activity provides a fun, educational game to play in biochemistry discussion sections or during long incubations in biochemistry laboratories. PMID:25345852

  15. Sensitive Amino Acid Composition and Chirality Analysis with the Mars Organic Analyzer (MOA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skelley, Alison M.; Scherer, James R.; Aubrey, Andrew D.; Grover, William H.; Ivester, Robin H. C.; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Grunthaner, Frank J.; Bada, Jeffrey L.; Mathies, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    Detection of life on Mars requires definition of a suitable biomarker and development of sensitive yet compact instrumentation capable of performing in situ analyses. Our studies are focused on amino acid analysis because amino acids are more resistant to decomposition than other biomolecules, and because amino acid chirality is a well-defined biomarker. Amino acid composition and chirality analysis has been previously demonstrated in the lab using microfabricated capillary electrophoresis (CE) chips. To analyze amino acids in the field, we have developed the Mars Organic Analyzer (MOA), a portable analysis system that consists of a compact instrument and a novel multi-layer CE microchip.

  16. The Mitochondrial Sulfur Dioxygenase ETHYLMALONIC ENCEPHALOPATHY PROTEIN1 Is Required for Amino Acid Catabolism during Carbohydrate Starvation and Embryo Development in Arabidopsis1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Krüßel, Lena; Junemann, Johannes; Wirtz, Markus; Birke, Hannah; Thornton, Jeremy D.; Browning, Luke W.; Poschet, Gernot; Hell, Rüdiger; Balk, Janneke; Braun, Hans-Peter; Hildebrandt, Tatjana M.

    2014-01-01

    The sulfur dioxygenase ETHYLMALONIC ENCEPHALOPATHY PROTEIN1 (ETHE1) catalyzes the oxidation of persulfides in the mitochondrial matrix and is essential for early embryo development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We investigated the biochemical and physiological functions of ETHE1 in plant metabolism using recombinant Arabidopsis ETHE1 and three transfer DNA insertion lines with 50% to 99% decreased sulfur dioxygenase activity. Our results identified a new mitochondrial pathway catalyzing the detoxification of reduced sulfur species derived from cysteine catabolism by oxidation to thiosulfate. Knockdown of the sulfur dioxygenase impaired embryo development and produced phenotypes of starvation-induced chlorosis during short-day growth conditions and extended darkness, indicating that ETHE1 has a key function in situations of high protein turnover, such as seed production and the use of amino acids as alternative respiratory substrates during carbohydrate starvation. The amino acid profile of mutant plants was similar to that caused by defects in the electron-transfer flavoprotein/electron-transfer flavoprotein:ubiquinone oxidoreductase complex and associated dehydrogenases. Thus, in addition to sulfur amino acid catabolism, ETHE1 also affects the oxidation of branched-chain amino acids and lysine. PMID:24692429

  17. Amino Acid Substitutions at Ambler Position Gly238 in the SHV-1 ?-Lactamase: Exploring Sequence Requirements for Resistance to Penicillins and Cephalosporins

    PubMed Central

    Hujer, Andrea M.; Hujer, Kristine M.; Helfand, Marion S.; Anderson, Vernon E.; Bonomo, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    Site saturation mutagenesis of the 238 position in the SHV ?-lactamase was performed to identify the complete sequence requirements needed for the extended spectrum ?-lactamase (ESBL) phenotype. MICs (in micrograms per milliliter) in an isogenic background, Escherichia coli DH10B, demonstrated that the Gly238Ala mutation conferred the most resistance to penicillins and cephalosporins. The absolute increase in resistance was greatest against cefotaxime for the Gly238Ala mutant (0.06 to 8 ?g/ml). Except for the strain possessing the Gly238Pro ?-lactamase, ceftazidime MICs were also elevated. None of the mutant SHV ?-lactamases were expressed in as great an amount as the wild-type ?-lactamase. Kinetic analysis of the Gly238Ala mutant revealed that penicillin and cephalosporin substrates have a lower Km for the enzyme because of this mutation. Ampicillin and piperacillin MICs were inversely proportional to the side chain volume of the amino acid in cases larger than Ser, suggesting that steric considerations may be a primary requirement for penicillin resistance. Secondary structural effects explain increased resistance to oxyiminocephalosporins. Based upon this study, we anticipate that additional mutations of Gly238 in the SHV ?-lactamase will continue to be discovered with an ESBL (ceftazidime or cefotaxime resistant) phenotype. PMID:12435703

  18. Amino acid composition of humic substances in tundra soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilevich, R. S.; Beznosikov, V. A.

    2015-06-01

    Peripheral amino acid fragments of humic and fulvic acid molecules from tundra soils have been identified and quantified. A significant weight fraction of amino acids has been found in humic acid preparations, which exceeds their content in fulvic acids. Features of the amino acid composition of humic substances along the soil profile and depending on the degree of hydromorphism and the proportions of different (neutral, basic, acidic, cyclic) groups in amino acids have been revealed. The molar ratio between the hydroxy and heterocyclic amino acids reflects the degree of humification of the soil.

  19. D-Amino Acids in Living Higher Organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Noriko

    2002-04-01

    The homochirality of biological amino acids (L-amino acids) and of the RNA/DNA backbone (D-ribose) might have become established before the origin of life. It has been considered that D-amino acids and L-sugars were eliminated on the primitive Earth. Therefore, the presence and function of D-amino acids in living organisms have not been studied except for D-amino acids in the cell walls of microorganisms. However, D-amino acids were recently found in various living higher organisms in the form of free amino acids, peptides, and proteins. Free D-aspartate and D-serine are present and may have important physiological functions in mammals. D-amino acids in peptides are well known as opioid peptides and neuropeptides. In protein, D-aspartate residues increase during aging. This review deals with recent advances in the study of D-amino acids in higher organisms.

  20. Polymerization of amino acids containing nucleotide bases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ben Cheikh, Azzouz; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1990-01-01

    The nucleoamino acids 1-(3'-amino,3'-carboxypropyl)uracil (3) and 9-(3'-amino,3'-carboxypropyl)adenine (4) have been prepared as (L)-en-antiomers and as racemic mixtures. When 3 or 4 is suspended in water and treated with N,N'-carbon-yldiimidazole, peptides are formed in good yield. The products formed from the (L)-enantiomers are hydrolyzed to the monomeric amino acids by pronase. Attempts to improve the efficiency of these oligomerizations by including a polyuridylate template in the reaction mixture were not successful. Similarly, oligomers derived from the (L)-enantiomer of 3 did not act as templates to facilitate the oligomerization of 4.

  1. Optimization of short amino acid sequences classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcz, Aleksy; Szyma?ski, Zbigniew

    This article describes processing methods used for short amino acid sequences classification. The data processed are 9-symbols string representations of amino acid sequences, divided into 49 data sets - each one containing samples labeled as reacting or not with given enzyme. The goal of the classification is to determine for a single enzyme, whether an amino acid sequence would react with it or not. Each data set is processed separately. Feature selection is performed to reduce the number of dimensions for each data set. The method used for feature selection consists of two phases. During the first phase, significant positions are selected using Classification and Regression Trees. Afterwards, symbols appearing at the selected positions are substituted with numeric values of amino acid properties taken from the AAindex database. In the second phase the new set of features is reduced using a correlation-based ranking formula and Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization. Finally, the preprocessed data is used for training LS-SVM classifiers. SPDE, an evolutionary algorithm, is used to obtain optimal hyperparameters for the LS-SVM classifier, such as error penalty parameter C and kernel-specific hyperparameters. A simple score penalty is used to adapt the SPDE algorithm to the task of selecting classifiers with best performance measures values.

  2. Dietary Supplements and Sports Performance: Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Melvin

    2005-01-01

    This is the third in a series of six articles to discuss the major classes of dietary supplements (vitamins; minerals; amino acids; herbs or botanicals; metabolites, constituents/extracts, or combinations). The major focus is on efficacy of such dietary supplements to enhance exercise or sport performance. PMID:18500957

  3. Amino acid profile in Down's syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Heggarty, H J; Ball, R; Smith, M; Henderson, M J

    1996-01-01

    Fasting plasma and urinary amino acid concentrations were studied under carefully controlled conditions in 22 children with Down's syndrome and in age matched controls. The only significant difference between the groups was a higher mean plasma lysine concentration in Down's syndrome patients compared to controls. PMID:8669939

  4. Amino acid metabolism of Lemna minor L

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, D.; Rich, P.J.; Brunk, D.G. )

    1989-04-01

    A serious limitation to the use of N(O,S)-heptafluorobutyryl isobutyl amino acid derivatives in the analysis of {sup 15}N-labeling kinetics of amino acids in plant tissues, is that the amides glutamine and asparagine undergo acid hydrolysis to glutamate and aspartate, respectively, during derivatization. This led us to consider an alternative procedure for derivatization of glutamine and asparagine with N-methyl-N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-trifluoroacetamide in pyridine. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry yielded fragment ions (M-57) of mass 417 and 431 for the ({sup 14}N)asparagine and ({sup 14}N)glutamine derivatives, respectively, suitable for monitoring unlabeled, single-{sup 15}N- and double-{sup 15}N-labeled amide species from the ion clusters at mass to charge ratio (m/z) 415 to 423 for asparagine, and m/z 429 to 437 for glutamine. From separate analyses of the specific isotope abundance of the amino-N groups of asparagine and glutamine as their N-heptafluorobutyryl isobutyl derivatives, the specific amide-({sup 15}N) abundance of these amino acids was determined.

  5. Enantioenrichment in sublimed amino acid mixtures.

    PubMed

    Viedma, Cristóbal; Ortiz, José E; de Torres, Trinidad; Cintas, Pedro

    2012-04-14

    A real amplification of an initial enantiomeric excess can be detected when two amino acids are sublimed at high temperature, even if one of the components is a racemic compound that does not convert into a conglomerate by sublimation. PMID:22388769

  6. Amino acid modifications on tRNA

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jing; Sheppard, Kelly; Söll, Dieter

    2008-01-01

    The accurate formation of cognate aminoacyl-tRNAs (aa-tRNAs) is essential for the fidelity of translation. Most amino acids are esterified onto their cognate tRNA isoacceptors directly by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs). However, in the case of four amino acids (Gln, Asn, Cys and Sec), aminoacyl-tRNAs are made through indirect pathways in many organisms across all three domains of life. The process begins with the charging of noncognate amino acids to tRNAs by a specialized synthetase in the case of Cys-tRNACys formation or by synthetases with relaxed specificity such as the non-discriminating glutamyl-tRNA synthetase (ND-GluRS), non-discriminating aspartyl-tRNA synthetase (ND-AspRS) and seryl-tRNA synthetase (SerRS). The resulting misacylated tRNAs are then converted to cognate pairs through transformation of the amino acids on the tRNA, which is catalyzed by a group of tRNA-dependent modifying enzymes such as tRNA-dependent amidotransferases, Sep-tRNA:Cys-tRNA synthase (SepCysS), O-phosphoseryl-tRNA kinase (PSTK) and Sep-tRNA:Sec-tRNA synthase (SepSecS). The majority of these indirect pathways are widely spread in all domains of life and thought to be ancient in the course of evolution. PMID:18604446

  7. Molecular Evolution of Plant AAP and LHT Amino Acid Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Tegeder, Mechthild; Ward, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen is an essential mineral nutrient and it is often transported within living organisms in its reduced form, as amino acids. Transport of amino acids across cellular membranes requires proteins, and here we report the phylogenetic analysis across taxa of two amino acid transporter families, the amino acid permeases (AAPs) and the lysine–histidine-like transporters (LHTs). We found that the two transporter families form two distinct groups in plants supporting the concept that both are essential. AAP transporters seem to be restricted to land plants. They were found in Selaginella moellendorffii and Physcomitrella patens but not in Chlorophyte, Charophyte, or Rhodophyte algae. AAPs were strongly represented in vascular plants, consistent with their major function in phloem (vascular tissue) loading of amino acids for sink nitrogen supply. LHTs on the other hand appeared prior to land plants. LHTs were not found in chlorophyte algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carterii. However, the characean alga Klebsormidium flaccidum encodes KfLHT13 and phylogenetic analysis indicates that it is basal to land plant LHTs. This is consistent with the hypothesis that characean algae are ancestral to land plants. LHTs were also found in both S. moellendorffii and P. patens as well as in monocots and eudicots. To date, AAPs and LHTs have mainly been characterized in Arabidopsis (eudicots) and these studies provide clues to the functions of the newly identified homologs. PMID:22645574

  8. Formation Mechanism of Coamorphous Drug-Amino Acid Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Katrine Tarp; Larsen, Flemming Hofmann; Cornett, Claus; Löbmann, Korbinian; Grohganz, Holger; Rades, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    Two coamorphous drug-amino acid systems, indomethacin-tryptophan (Ind-Trp) and furosemide-tryptophan (Fur-Trp), were analyzed toward their ease of amorphization and mechanism of coamorphization during ball milling. The two mixtures were compared to the corresponding amorphization of the pure drug without amino acid. Powder blends at a 1:1 molar ratio were milled for varying times, and their physicochemical properties were investigated using XRPD, (13)C solid state NMR (ssNMR), and DSC. Comilling the drug with the amino acid reduced the milling time required to obtain an amorphous powder from more than 90 min in the case of the pure drugs to 30 min for the coamorphous powders. Amorphization was observed as reductions in XRPD reflections and was additionally quantified based on normalized principal component analysis (PCA) scores of the ssNMR spectra. Furthermore, the evolution in the glass temperature (Tg) of the coamorphous systems over time indicated complete coamorphization after 30 min of milling. Based on the DSC data it was possible to identify the formation mechanism of the two coamorphous systems. The Tg position of the samples suggested that coamorphous Ind-Trp was formed by the amino acid being dissolved in the amorphous drug, whereas coamorphous Fur-Trp was formed by the drug being dissolved in the amorphous amino acid. PMID:26057950

  9. Tailored amino acid diversity for the evolution of antibody affinity

    PubMed Central

    González-Muñoz, Andrea; Bokma, Evert; O’Shea, Desmond; Minton, Kevin; Strain, Martin; Vousden, Katherine; Rossant, Christine; Jermutus, Lutz; Minter, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    Antibodies are a unique class of proteins with the ability to adapt their binding sites for high affinity and high specificity to a multitude of antigens. Many analyses have been performed on antibody sequences and structures to elucidate which amino acids have a predominant role in antibody interactions with antigens. These studies have generally not distinguished between amino acids selected for broad antigen specificity in the primary immune response and those selected for high affinity in the secondary immune response. By studying a large data set of affinity matured antibodies derived from in vitro directed evolution experiments, we were able to specifically highlight a subset of amino acids associated with affinity improvements. In a comparison of affinity maturations using either tailored or full amino acid diversification, the tailored approach was found to be at least as effective at improving affinity while requiring fewer mutagenesis libraries than the traditional method. The resulting sequence data also highlight the potential for further reducing amino acid diversity for high affinity binding interactions. PMID:22926024

  10. Amino Acids in the Antarctic Martian Meteorite MIL03346

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Aubrey, A.; Dworkin, J. P.; Botta, O.; Bada, J. L.

    2005-01-01

    The report by McKay et al. that the Martian meteorite ALH84001 contains evidence for life on Mars remains controversial. Of central importance is whether ALH84001 and other Antarctic Martian meteorites contain endogenous organic compounds. In any investigation of organic compounds possibly derived from Mars it is important to focus on compounds that play an essential role in biochemistry as we know it and that have properties such as chirality which can be used to distinguish between biotic versus abiotic origins. Amino acids are one of the few compounds that fulfill these requirements. Previous analyses of the Antarctic Martian meteorites ALH84001 and EETA79001 have shown that these meteorites contain low levels of terrestrial amino acid contamination derived from Antarctic ice meltwater. Here we report preliminary amino acid investigations of a third Antarctic Martian meteorite MIL03346 which was discovered in Antarctica during the 2003-04 ANSMET season. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract

  11. Synthesis of a conformationally constrained ?-amino acid building block.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Elaine; Pes, Lara; Ortin, Yannick; Müller-Bunz, Helge; Paradisi, Francesca

    2013-02-01

    Conformationally restricted amino acids are important components in peptidomimetics and drug design. Herein, we describe the synthesis of a novel, non-proteinogenic constrained delta amino acid containing a cyclobutane ring, cis-3(aminomethyl)cyclobutane carboxylic acid (ACCA). The synthesis of the target amino acid was achieved in seven steps, with the key reaction being a base induced intramolecular nucleophilic substitution. A small library of dipeptides was prepared through the coupling of ACCA with proteinogenic amino acids. PMID:22851051

  12. Dissociation of Paramyxovirus Interferon Evasion Activities: Universal and Virus-Specific Requirements for Conserved V Protein Amino Acids in MDA5 Interference ?

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Aparna; Horvath, Curt M.

    2010-01-01

    The V protein of the paramyxovirus subfamily Paramyxovirinae is an important virulence factor that can interfere with host innate immunity by inactivating the cytosolic pathogen recognition receptor MDA5. This interference is a result of a protein-protein interaction between the highly conserved carboxyl-terminal domain of the V protein and the helicase domain of MDA5. The V protein C-terminal domain (CTD) is an evolutionarily conserved 49- to 68-amino-acid region that coordinates two zinc atoms per protein chain. Site-directed mutagenesis of conserved residues in the V protein CTD has revealed both universal and virus-specific requirements for zinc coordination in MDA5 engagement and has also identified other conserved residues as critical for MDA5 interaction and interference. Mutation of these residues produces V proteins that are specifically defective for MDA5 interference and not impaired in targeting STAT1 for proteasomal degradation via the VDC ubiquitin ligase complex. Results demonstrate that mutation of conserved charged residues in the V proteins of Nipah virus, measles virus, and mumps virus also abolishes MDA5 interaction. These findings clearly define molecular determinants for MDA5 inhibition by the paramyxovirus V proteins. PMID:20719949

  13. Permeability of membranes to amino acids and modified amino acids: mechanisms involved in translocation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarti, A. C.; Deamer, D. W. (Principal Investigator); Miller, S. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    The amino acid permeability of membranes is of interest because they are one of the key solutes involved in cell function. Membrane permeability coefficients (P) for amino acid classes, including neutral, polar, hydrophobic, and charged species, have been measured and compared using a variety of techniques. Decreasing lipid chain length increased permeability slightly (5-fold), while variations in pH had only minor effects on the permeability coefficients of the amino acids tested in liposomes. Increasing the membrane surface charge increased the permeability of amino acids of the opposite charge, while increasing the cholesterol content decreased membrane permeability. The permeability coefficients for most amino acids tested were surprisingly similar to those previously measured for monovalent cations such as sodium and potassium (approximately 10(-12)-10(-13) cm s-1). This observation suggests that the permeation rates for the neutral, polar and charged amino acids are controlled by bilayer fluctuations and transient defects, rather than partition coefficients and Born energy barriers. Hydrophobic amino acids were 10(2) more permeable than the hydrophilic forms, reflecting their increased partition coefficient values. External pH had dramatic effects on the permeation rates for the modified amino acid lysine methyl ester in response to transmembrane pH gradients. It was established that lysine methyl ester and other modified short peptides permeate rapidly (P = 10(-2) cm s-1) as neutral (deprotonated) molecules. It was also shown that charge distributions dramatically alter permeation rates for modified di-peptides. These results may relate to the movement of peptides through membranes during protein translocation and to the origin of cellular membrane transport on the early Earth.

  14. 40 CFR 721.1705 - Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with 6-amino-4-hydroxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with 6-amino-4-hydroxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid, diazotized, (3-aminophenyl)phosphonic acid and... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1705 Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized,...

  15. 40 CFR 721.1705 - Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with 6-amino-4-hydroxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with 6-amino-4-hydroxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid, diazotized, (3-aminophenyl)phosphonic acid and... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1705 Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized,...

  16. 40 CFR 721.1705 - Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with 6-amino-4-hydroxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with 6-amino-4-hydroxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid, diazotized, (3-aminophenyl)phosphonic acid and... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1705 Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized,...

  17. 40 CFR 721.1705 - Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with 6-amino-4-hydroxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with 6-amino-4-hydroxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid, diazotized, (3-aminophenyl)phosphonic acid and... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1705 Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized,...

  18. 40 CFR 721.1705 - Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with 6-amino-4-hydroxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with 6-amino-4-hydroxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid, diazotized, (3-aminophenyl)phosphonic acid and... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1705 Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized,...

  19. Alterations of Amino Acid Level in Depressed Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Pei; Li, Xuechun; Tian, Jingchen; Jing, Fu; Qu, Changhai; Lin, Longfei; Zhang, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Amino-acid neurotransmitter system dysfunction plays a major role in the pathophysiology of depression. Several studies have demonstrated the potential of amino acids as a source of neuro-specific biomarkers could be used in future diagnosis of depression. Only partial amino acids such as glycine and asparagine were determined from certain parts of rats' brain included hippocampi and cerebral cortex in previous studies. However, according to systematic biology, amino acids in different area of brain are interacted and interrelated. Hence, the determination of 34 amino acids through entire rats' brain was conducted in this study in order to demonstrate more possibilities for biomarkers of depression by discovering other potential amino acids in more areas of rats' brain. As a result, 4 amino acids (L-aspartic acid, L-glutamine, taurine and ?-amino-n-butyric acid) among 34 were typically identified as potentially primary biomarkers of depression by data statistics. Meanwhile, an antidepressant called Fluoxetine was employed to verify other potential amino acids which were not identified by data statistics. Eventually, we found L-?-amino-adipic acid could also become a new potentially secondary biomarker of depression after drug validation. In conclusion, we suggested that L-aspartic acid, L-glutamine, taurine, ?-amino-n-butyric acid and L-?-amino-adipic acid might become potential biomarkers for future diagnosis of depression and development of antidepressant. PMID:25352755

  20. Plant amino acid-derived vitamins: biosynthesis and function.

    PubMed

    Miret, Javier A; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2014-04-01

    Vitamins are essential organic compounds for humans, having lost the ability to de novo synthesize them. Hence, they represent dietary requirements, which are covered by plants as the main dietary source of most vitamins (through food or livestock's feed). Most vitamins synthesized by plants present amino acids as precursors (B1, B2, B3, B5, B7, B9 and E) and are therefore linked to plant nitrogen metabolism. Amino acids play different roles in their biosynthesis and metabolism, either incorporated into the backbone of the vitamin or as amino, sulfur or one-carbon group donors. There is a high natural variation in vitamin contents in crops and its exploitation through breeding, metabolic engineering and agronomic practices can enhance their nutritional quality. While the underlying biochemical roles of vitamins as cosubstrates or cofactors are usually common for most eukaryotes, the impact of vitamins B and E in metabolism and physiology can be quite different on plants and animals. Here, we first aim at giving an overview of the biosynthesis of amino acid-derived vitamins in plants, with a particular focus on how this knowledge can be exploited to increase vitamin contents in crops. Second, we will focus on the functions of these vitamins in both plants and animals (and humans in particular), to unravel common and specific roles for vitamins in evolutionary distant organisms, in which these amino acid-derived vitamins play, however, an essential role. PMID:24368523

  1. Fatty acid-amino acid conjugates diversification in Lepidopteran caterpillars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fatty acid amino acid conjugates (FACs) have been found in Noctuid as well as Sphingid caterpillar oral secretions and especially volicitin [N-(17-hydroxylinolenoyl)-L-Glutamine] and its biochemical precursor, N-linolenoyl-L-glutamine, are known elicitors of induced volatile emissions in corn plants...

  2. Amino acid analyses of R and CK chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Aaron S.; McLain, Hannah; Glavin, Daniel P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Davidson, Jemma; Miller, Kelly E.; Andronikov, Alexander V.; Lauretta, Dante; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2015-03-01

    Exogenous delivery of amino acids and other organic molecules to planetary surfaces may have played an important role in the origins of life on Earth and other solar system bodies. Previous studies have revealed the presence of indigenous amino acids in a wide range of carbon-rich meteorites, with the abundances and structural distributions differing significantly depending on parent body mineralogy and alteration conditions. Here we report on the amino acid abundances of seven type 3-6 CK chondrites and two Rumuruti (R) chondrites. Amino acid measurements were made on hot water extracts from these meteorites by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Of the nine meteorites analyzed, four were depleted in amino acids, and one had experienced significant amino acid contamination by terrestrial biology. The remaining four, comprised of two R and two CK chondrites, contained low levels of amino acids that were predominantly the straight chain, amino-terminal (n-?-amino) acids ?-alanine, and ?-amino-n-butyric acid. This amino acid distribution is similar to what we reported previously for thermally altered ureilites and CV and CO chondrites, and these n-?-amino acids appear to be indigenous to the meteorites and not the result of terrestrial contamination. The amino acids may have been formed by Fischer-Tropsch-type reactions, although this hypothesis needs further testing.

  3. Allied Health Chemistry Laboratory: Amino Acids, Insulin, Proteins, and Skin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dever, David F.

    1975-01-01

    Presents a laboratory experiment specifically designed for allied health students. The students construct molecular models of amino acids, extract amino acids from their skin with hot water, and chromatographically analyze the skin extract and hydrolyzed insulin. (MLH)

  4. Cyclobutane amino acids and peptidomimetics, parallel catalyst screening for aziridination 

    E-print Network

    Li, Shih-ming

    1996-01-01

    amino acids and peptide mimetics are important in synthetic and medicinal chemistry. Recent discovery of naturally occurring cyclobutane amino acids has raised considerable interest in the syntheses and biological studies of these types of compounds...

  5. How Do Haloarchaea Synthesize Aromatic Amino Acids?

    PubMed Central

    Gulko, Miriam Kolog; Dyall-Smith, Mike; Gonzalez, Orland; Oesterhelt, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Genomic analysis of H. salinarum indicated that the de novo pathway for aromatic amino acid (AroAA) biosynthesis does not follow the classical pathway but begins from non-classical precursors, as is the case for M. jannaschii. The first two steps in the pathway were predicted to be carried out by genes OE1472F and OE1475F, while the 3rd step follows the canonical pathway involving gene OE1477R. The functions of these genes and their products were tested by biochemical and genetic methods. In this study, we provide evidence that supports the role of proteins OE1472F and OE1475F catalyzing consecutive enzymatic reactions leading to the production of 3-dehydroquinate (DHQ), after which AroAA production proceeds via the canonical pathway starting with the formation of DHS (dehydroshikimate), catalyzed by the product of ORF OE1477R. Nutritional requirements and AroAA uptake studies of the mutants gave results that were consistent with the proposed roles of these ORFs in AroAA biosynthesis. DNA microarray data indicated that the 13 genes of the canonical pathway appear to be utilised for AroAA biosynthesis in H. salinarum, as they are differentially expressed when cells are grown in medium lacking AroAA. PMID:25216252

  6. Comparative nutrition and metabolism: Explication of open questions with emphasis on protein and amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Baker, David H.

    2005-01-01

    The 20th century saw numerous important discoveries in the nutritional sciences. Nonetheless, many unresolved questions still remain. Fifteen questions dealing with amino acid nutrition and metabolism are posed in this review. The first six deal with the functionality of sulfur amino acids (methionine and cysteine) and related compounds. Other unresolved problems that are discussed include priorities of use for amino acids having multiple functions; interactions among lysine, niacin and tryptophan; amino acid contributions to requirements from gut biosynthesis; the potential for gluconeogenesis to divert amino acids away from protein synthesis; the unique nutritional and metabolic idiosyncrasies of feline species, with emphasis on arginine; controversies surrounding human amino acid requirements; and the potential for maternal diet to influence sex ratio of offspring. PMID:16326801

  7. Chemical Genetic Programming The Effect of Evolving Amino Acids

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Thomas

    Chemical Genetic Programming ­ The Effect of Evolving Amino Acids Wojciech Piaseczny1 , Hideaki of amino acids is prepared, mainly through assimilation of smaller inorganic compounds in plants, and through digestion of food in animals. Each amino acid is a bio- chemical building block, so together

  8. Racemic amino acids from the ultraviolet photolysis of

    E-print Network

    .............................................................. Racemic amino acids from for the origin and early evolution of life1 . Indigenous amino acids have been found in meteorites2 --over 70 in the Murchison meteorite alone3 . Although it has been generally accepted that the meteoritic amino acids formed

  9. Jacobs University Bremen Encoding of Amino Acids and Proteins

    E-print Network

    Henkel, Werner

    Jacobs University Bremen Encoding of Amino Acids and Proteins from a Communications and Information School of Engineering and Science Encoding of Amino Acids and Proteins from a Communications). The 2-D plots of ECM show that most mutations occur between codons that encode the same amino acid, i

  10. Efficient Synthesis of Enantiopure -Amino--Keto Acids from

    E-print Network

    Hergenrother, Paul J.

    Efficient Synthesis of Enantiopure -Amino--Keto Acids from L-Homoserine Anil K. Sharma and Paul J hergenro@uiuc.edu Received March 26, 2003 ABSTRACT A variety of -amino--keto acids were prepared in four-catalyzed Grignard addition to a N-protected derivative of L-homoserine. One of the -amino--keto acids was then used

  11. Origin, Microbiology, Nutrition, and Pharmacology of D-Amino Acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exposure of food proteins to certain processing conditions induces two major chemical changes: racemization of all L-amino acids (LAA) to D-amino acids (DAA) and concurrent formation of crosslinked amino acids such as lysinoalanine (LAL). The diet contains both processing-induced and naturally-form...

  12. 40 CFR 721.1643 - Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Benzenesulfonic acid, amino... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1643 Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-. (a) Chemical... as a benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo- (PMN P-95-86) is subject to reporting...

  13. Rapid and Precise Determination of Cellular Amino Acid Flux Rates

    E-print Network

    Wikswo, John

    Rapid and Precise Determination of Cellular Amino Acid Flux Rates Using HPLC with Automated Derivatization with Absorbance Detection Abstract A method is presented for analyzing primary amino acids detection. Amino acids are derivatized with orthophthaldildehyde (OPA) using an online injector program

  14. Enantiomeric Selective Adsorption of Amino Acid by Polysaccharide Composite Materials

    E-print Network

    Reid, Scott A.

    Enantiomeric Selective Adsorption of Amino Acid by Polysaccharide Composite Materials Simon Duri, was found to exhibit remarkable enantiomeric selectivity toward the adsorption of amino acids. The highest adsorption capacity and enantiomeric selectivity are exhibited by 100% CS. A racemic amino acid can

  15. 40 CFR 721.2584 - Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. 721.2584... Substances § 721.2584 Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as dodecanoic acid, 12-amino- (PMN P-98-0823; CAS No....

  16. 40 CFR 721.1643 - Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Benzenesulfonic acid, amino... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1643 Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-. (a) Chemical... as a benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo- (PMN P-95-86) is subject to reporting...

  17. BIOMOLECULAR INVARIANTS OF AMINO ACID TREES Debra Knisley

    E-print Network

    BIOMOLECULAR INVARIANTS OF AMINO ACID TREES By Debra Knisley Jeff Knisley and Leonard Roberts IMA: 612/626-7370 URL: http://www.ima.umn.edu #12;Biomolecular Invariants of Amino Acid Trees Debra Knisley amino acids are represented by a graph-theoretic tree. Biomolecular descriptors are defined by graphical

  18. 40 CFR 721.1643 - Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Benzenesulfonic acid, amino... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1643 Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-. (a) Chemical... as a benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo- (PMN P-95-86) is subject to reporting...

  19. Stochastic Analysis of Amino Acid Substitution in Protein Synthesis

    E-print Network

    de Vink, Erik

    Stochastic Analysis of Amino Acid Substitution in Protein Synthesis D. Bosnacki1 , H.M.M. ten present a formal analysis of amino acid replacement dur- ing mRNA translation. Building on an abstract of the insertion of amino acids into the nascent polypeptide chain. To this end, we integrate the probabilistic

  20. 40 CFR 721.2584 - Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. 721.2584... Substances § 721.2584 Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as dodecanoic acid, 12-amino- (PMN P-98-0823; CAS No....

  1. 40 CFR 721.1643 - Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Benzenesulfonic acid, amino... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1643 Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-. (a) Chemical... as a benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo- (PMN P-95-86) is subject to reporting...

  2. Highly Efficient Synthesis of Chiral -Amino Acid Derivatives via

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Xumu

    Highly Efficient Synthesis of Chiral -Amino Acid Derivatives via Asymmetric Hydrogenation Wenjun-TangPhos complex is an efficient hydrogenation catalyst for making chiral -amino acid derivatives. With the Rh -amino acids has drawn a great deal of attention due to its importance in biomedical research

  3. 40 CFR 721.1643 - Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Benzenesulfonic acid, amino... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1643 Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-. (a) Chemical... as a benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo- (PMN P-95-86) is subject to reporting...

  4. 40 CFR 721.2584 - Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. 721.2584... Substances § 721.2584 Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as dodecanoic acid, 12-amino- (PMN P-98-0823; CAS No....

  5. Amino Acids as Metabolic Substrates during Cardiac Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Kenneth J.; Sidorov, Veniamin Y.; McGuinness, Owen P.; Wasserman, David H.; Wikswo, John P.

    2013-01-01

    The heart is well known as a metabolic omnivore in that it is capable of consuming fatty acids, glucose, ketone bodies, pyruvate, lactate, amino acids and even its own constituent proteins, in order of decreasing preference. The energy from these substrates supports not only mechanical contraction, but also the various transmembrane pumps and transporters required for ionic homeostasis, electrical activity, metabolism and catabolism. Cardiac ischemia – for example, due to compromise of the coronary vasculature or end-stage heart failure – will alter both electrical and metabolic activity. While the effects of myocardial ischemia on electrical propagation and stability have been studied in depth, the effects of ischemia on metabolic substrate preference has not been fully appreciated: oxygen deprivation during ischemia will significantly alter the relative ability of the heart to utilize each of these substrates. Although changes in cardiac metabolism are understood to be an underlying component in almost all cardiac myopathies, the potential contribution of amino acids in maintaining cardiac electrical conductance and stability during ischemia is underappreciated. Despite clear evidence that amino acids exert cardioprotective effects in ischemia and other cardiac disorders, their role in the metabolism of the ischemic heart has yet to be fully elucidated. This review synthesizes the current literature of the metabolic contribution of amino acids during ischemia by analyzing relevant historical and recent research. PMID:23354395

  6. A search for extraterrestrial amino acids in carbonaceous Antarctic micrometeorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinton, K. L.; Engrand, C.; Glavin, D. P.; Bada, J. L.; Maurette, M.

    1998-01-01

    Antarctic micrometeorites (AMMs) in the 100-400 microns size range are the dominant mass fraction of extraterrestrial material accreted by the Earth today. A high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) based technique exploited at the limits of sensitivity has been used to search for the extraterrestrial amino acids alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) and isovaline in AMMs. Five samples, each containing about 30 to 35 grains, were analyzed. All the samples possess a terrestrial amino acid component, indicated by the excess of the L-enantiomers of common protein amino acids. In only one sample (A91) was AIB found to be present at a level significantly above the background blanks. The concentration of AIB (approximately 280 ppm), and the AIB/isovaline ratio (> or = 10), in this sample are both much higher than in CM chondrites. The apparently large variation in the AIB concentrations of the samples suggests that AIB may be concentrated in rare subset of micrometeorites. Because the AIB/isovaline ratio in sample A91 is much larger than in CM chondrites, the synthesis of amino acids in the micrometeorite parent bodies might have involved a different process requiring an HCN-rich environment, such as that found in comets. If the present day characteristics of the meteorite and micrometeorite fluxes can be extrapolated back in time, then the flux of large carbonaceous micrometeorites could have contributed to the inventory of prebiotic molecules on the early Earth.

  7. A Search for Extraterrestrial Amino Acids in Carbonaceous Antarctic Micrometeorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinton, Karen L. F.; Engrand, Cécile; Glavin, Daniel P.; Bada, Jeffrey L.; Maurette, Michel

    1998-10-01

    Antarctic micrometeorites (AMMs) in the 100-400 ?m size range are the dominant mass fraction of extraterrestrial material accreted by the Earth today. A high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) based technique exploited at the limits of sensitivity has been used to search for the extraterrestrial amino acids ?-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) and isovaline in AMMs. Five samples, each containing about 30 to 35 grains, were analyzed. All the samples possess a terrestrial amino acid component, indicated by the excess of the L-enantiomers of common protein amino acids. In only one sample (A91) was AIB found to be present at a level significantly above the background blanks. The concentration of AIB (~280 ppm), and the AIB/isovaline ratio (>=10), in this sample are both much higher than in CM chondrites. The apparently large variation in the AIB concentrations of the samples suggests that AIB may be concentrated in rare subset of micrometeorites. Because the AIB/isovaline ratio in sample A91 is much larger than in CM chondrites, the synthesis of amino acids in the micrometeorite parent bodies might have involved a different process requiring an HCN-rich environment, such as that found in comets. If the present day characteristics of the meteorite and micrometeorite fluxes can be extrapolated back in time, then the flux of large carbonaceous micrometeorites could have contributed to the inventory of prebiotic molecules on the early Earth.

  8. Adult bile acid amino transferase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Lord, Richard S.; Tuttle, Daniel M.; Cantor, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Female, 70 Final Diagnosis: Bile acid amino transferase deficiency Symptoms: Headache • indigestion • itching skin • nausea • vomiting Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Challenging differential diagnosis Background: Bile acid synthesis impairments are difficult to diagnose due to non-specific manifestations related to progressive failure to absorb essential fatty acids and fat soluble vitamins and failure to maintain normal intestinal microbiota. Case Report: A 70-year-old female presented with long-standing history of recurrent headaches, indigestion, dry, scaly, itching skin, and fluid around knee joints. Quantitative Electroencephalography (QEEG) revealed widespread excess theta maximum in the temporal regions. A rare pattern of elevated plasma glycine and taurine led to suspicion of BAATD. A stool profile employing molecular probes for commensal bacteria revealed elevation of Fusobacteria spp. Implementation of bile acid replacement therapy (BART) produced rapid remission of headache and other symptoms and a three-month follow up stool profile revealed normalization of fecal Fusobacteria populations that remained normal after one year of BART. QEEG analyses 4 weeks following BART showed evidence of significant improvement in CNS functioning. Conclusions: This case illustrates the potential for diagnosis of latent, adult BAATD by finding a unique pattern of plasma amino acids and monitoring of therapy by observing normalization of fecal commensal bacteria and functional brain assessments. PMID:24587851

  9. Hereditary folate malabsorption: A positively charged amino acid at position 113 of the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT/SLC46A1) is required for folic acid binding

    SciTech Connect

    Lasry, Inbal; Berman, Bluma; Glaser, Fabian; Jansen, Gerrit; Assaraf, Yehuda G.

    2009-08-28

    The proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT/SLC46A1) mediates intestinal folate uptake at acidic pH. Some loss of folic acid (FA) transport mutations in PCFT from hereditary folate malabsorption (HFM) patients cluster in R113, thereby suggesting a functional role for this residue. Herein, unlike non-conservative substitutions, an R113H mutant displayed 80-fold increase in the FA transport Km while retaining parental Vmax, hence indicating a major fall in folate substrate affinity. Furthermore, consistent with the preservation of 9% of parental transport activity, R113H transfectants displayed a substantial decrease in the FA growth requirement relative to mock transfectants. Homology modeling based on the crystal structures of the Escherichia coli transporter homologues EmrD and glycerol-3-phosphate transporter revealed that the R113H rotamer properly protrudes into the cytoplasmic face of the minor cleft normally occupied by R113. These findings constitute the first demonstration that a basic amino acid at position 113 is required for folate substrate binding.

  10. Hair and amino acids: the interactions and the effects.

    PubMed

    Oshimura, Eiko; Abe, Hiroshi; Oota, Rina

    2007-01-01

    The interaction and the function of some amino acids in hair care applications are discussed. When amino acids are applied to hair in the form of simple aqueous solution, uptake of the amino acids is mainly controlled by ionic equilibrium. When amino acids were incorporated in a hair conditioner, the result was quite different, suggesting the importance of interaction between the amino acids and the cationic surfactants. Uptake of pyrrolidone carboxylic acid (PCA), a derivative of glutamic acid, is enhanced by combining with arginine, an amino with strong affinity towards hair. Effects of some amino acids on bleached/dyed hair are described. A hair conditioner incorporated with alanine improves hair surface hydrophobicity of bleach-damaged hair. Histidine and phenylalanine improve tensile strength. PCA was proved to be effective to improve color-retention of dyed hair. PMID:17728935

  11. Neighbor preferences of amino acids and context-dependent effects of amino acid substitutions in human, mouse, and dog.

    PubMed

    Fu, Mingchuan; Huang, Zhuoran; Mao, Yuanhui; Tao, Shiheng

    2014-01-01

    Amino acids show apparent propensities toward their neighbors. In addition to preferences of amino acids for their neighborhood context, amino acid substitutions are also considered to be context-dependent. However, context-dependence patterns of amino acid substitutions still remain poorly understood. Using relative entropy, we investigated the neighbor preferences of 20 amino acids and the context-dependent effects of amino acid substitutions with protein sequences in human, mouse, and dog. For 20 amino acids, the highest relative entropy was mostly observed at the nearest adjacent site of either N- or C-terminus except C and G. C showed the highest relative entropy at the third flanking site and periodic pattern was detected at G flanking sites. Furthermore, neighbor preference patterns of amino acids varied greatly in different secondary structures. We then comprehensively investigated the context-dependent effects of amino acid substitutions. Our results showed that nearly half of 380 substitution types were evidently context dependent, and the context-dependent patterns relied on protein secondary structures. Among 20 amino acids, P elicited the greatest effect on amino acid substitutions. The underlying mechanisms of context-dependent effects of amino acid substitutions were possibly mutation bias at a DNA level and natural selection. Our findings may improve secondary structure prediction algorithms and protein design; moreover, this study provided useful information to develop empirical models of protein evolution that consider dependence between residues. PMID:25210846

  12. Neighbor Preferences of Amino Acids and Context-Dependent Effects of Amino Acid Substitutions in Human, Mouse, and Dog

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Mingchuan; Huang, Zhuoran; Mao, Yuanhui; Tao, Shiheng

    2014-01-01

    Amino acids show apparent propensities toward their neighbors. In addition to preferences of amino acids for their neighborhood context, amino acid substitutions are also considered to be context-dependent. However, context-dependence patterns of amino acid substitutions still remain poorly understood. Using relative entropy, we investigated the neighbor preferences of 20 amino acids and the context-dependent effects of amino acid substitutions with protein sequences in human, mouse, and dog. For 20 amino acids, the highest relative entropy was mostly observed at the nearest adjacent site of either N- or C-terminus except C and G. C showed the highest relative entropy at the third flanking site and periodic pattern was detected at G flanking sites. Furthermore, neighbor preference patterns of amino acids varied greatly in different secondary structures. We then comprehensively investigated the context-dependent effects of amino acid substitutions. Our results showed that nearly half of 380 substitution types were evidently context dependent, and the context-dependent patterns relied on protein secondary structures. Among 20 amino acids, P elicited the greatest effect on amino acid substitutions. The underlying mechanisms of context-dependent effects of amino acid substitutions were possibly mutation bias at a DNA level and natural selection. Our findings may improve secondary structure prediction algorithms and protein design; moreover, this study provided useful information to develop empirical models of protein evolution that consider dependence between residues. PMID:25210846

  13. Assays for transfer RNA-dependent amino acid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, Kelly; Akochy, Pierre-Marie; Söll, Dieter

    2008-01-01

    Selenocysteinyl-tRNASec, cysteinyl-tRNACys, glutaminyl-tRNAGln, and asparaginyl-tRNAAsn in many organisms are formed in an indirect pathway in which a non-cognate amino acid is first attached to the tRNA. This non-cognate amino acid is then converted to the cognate amino acid by a tRNA-dependent modifying enzyme. The in vitro characterization of these modifying enzymes is challenging due to the fact the substrate, aminoacyl-tRNA, is labile and requires a prior enzymatic step to be synthesized. The need to separate product aa-tRNA from unreacted substrate is typically a labor- and time-intensive task; this adds another impediment in the investigation of these enzymes. Here we review four different approaches for studying these tRNA-dependent amino acid modifications. In addition, we describe in detail a [32P]/nuclease P1 assay for glutaminyl-tRNAGln and asparaginyl-tRNAAsn formation which is sensitive, enables monitoring of the aminoacyl state of the tRNA, and is less time consuming than some of the other techniques. This [32P]/nuclease P1 method should be adaptable to studying tRNA-dependent selenocysteine and cysteine synthesis. PMID:18241795

  14. Amino acid compositional shifts during streptophyte transitions to terrestrial habitats.

    PubMed

    Jobson, Richard W; Qiu, Yin-Long

    2011-02-01

    Across the streptophyte lineage, which includes charophycean algae and embryophytic plants, there have been at least four independent transitions to the terrestrial habitat. One of these involved the evolution of embryophytes (bryophytes and tracheophytes) from a charophycean ancestor, while others involved the earliest branching lineages, containing the monotypic genera Mesostigma and Chlorokybus, and within the Klebsormidiales and Zygnematales lineages. To overcome heat, water stress, and increased exposure to ultraviolet radiation, which must have accompanied these transitions, adaptive mechanisms would have been required. During periods of dehydration and/or desiccation, proteomes struggle to maintain adequate cytoplasmic solute concentrations. The increased usage of charged amino acids (DEHKR) may be one way of maintaining protein hydration, while increased use of aromatic residues (FHWY) protects proteins and nucleic acids by absorbing damaging UV, with both groups of residues thought to be important for the stabilization of protein structures. To test these hypotheses we examined amino acid sequences of orthologous proteins representing both mitochondrion- and plastid-encoded proteomes across streptophytic lineages. We compared relative differences within categories of amino acid residues and found consistent patterns of amino acid compositional fluxuation in extra-membranous regions that correspond with episodes of terrestrialization: positive change in usage frequency for residues with charged side-chains, and aromatic residues of the light-capturing chloroplast proteomes. We also found a general decrease in the usage frequency of hydrophobic, aliphatic, and small residues. These results suggest that amino acid compositional shifts in extra-membrane regions of plastid and mitochondrial proteins may represent biochemical adaptations that allowed green plants to colonize the land. PMID:21153633

  15. The Role of Microbial Amino Acid Metabolism in Host Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Neis, Evelien P. J. G.; Dejong, Cornelis H. C.; Rensen, Sander S.

    2015-01-01

    Disruptions in gut microbiota composition and function are increasingly implicated in the pathogenesis of obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The functional output of the gut microbiota, including short-chain fatty acids and amino acids, are thought to be important modulators underlying the development of these disorders. Gut bacteria can alter the bioavailability of amino acids by utilization of several amino acids originating from both alimentary and endogenous proteins. In turn, gut bacteria also provide amino acids to the host. This could have significant implications in the context of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus, conditions associated with elevated systemic concentrations of certain amino acids, in particular the aromatic and branched-chain amino acids. Moreover, several amino acids released by gut bacteria can serve as precursors for the synthesis of short-chain fatty acids, which also play a role in the development of obesity. In this review, we aim to compile the available evidence on the contribution of microbial amino acids to host amino acid homeostasis, and to assess the role of the gut microbiota as a determinant of amino acid and short-chain fatty acid perturbations in human obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:25894657

  16. Organic geochemistry of amino acids: Precambrian to recent

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, M.H.; Macko, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    Since the discovery of amino acids in fossils (Abelson, 1954), considerable effort has been made to elucidate the origin and distribution of amino acids in geologic materials. Racemization and decomposition reactions of amino acids and peptides derived via the natural hydrolysis of protein constituents of organisms have been extensively studied. While the ubiquity of amino acids presents a challenge for discerning their indigeneity in geologic samples, careful analyses have resulted in successful applications of amino acid racemization and decomposition reactions for investigations of geochronologic, paleoclimatic, stratigraphic, diagenetic and chemotaxonomic problems for Quaternary age samples. An investigation of amino acids in sediments from Baffin Island fjords indicates that their distribution may also provide data with respect to the relative contributions of marine and terrigenous organic matter to recent sediments. While the absence of unstable amino acids and the presence of racemic amino acids in a sample may preclude very recent contamination, the possibility of retardation of amino acid racemization rates subsequent to geopolymer formation must also be considered. Studies of amino acids in Paleozoic, Mesozoic and early Cenozoic age samples are limited. Precambrian samples, however, have received much attention, given the potential (however slight) for isolating compounds representative of the earliest living systems. A future approach for elucidating the origin(s) of amino acids in ancient samples may be analyses of their individual stable isotopic compositions.

  17. Sublimation of natural amino acids and induction of asymmetry by meteoritic amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasevych, Arkadii V.; Guillemin, Jean-Claude

    It is believed that the homochirality of building blocks of life like amino acids (AAs) and sugars is a prerequisite requirement for the origin and evolution of life. Among different mechanisms that might have triggered the initial disparity in the enantiomeric ratio on the primitive Earth, the key roles were assigned to: (i) local chiral symmetry breaking and (ii) the inflow of extraterrestrial matter (eg the carbonaceous meteorites containing non-racemic AAs). Recently it has been revealed that sublimation, a subject almost completely neglected for a long time, gives a pathway to enantioenrichment of natural AAs (1,2 and references herein). Sublimation is however one of the key physical processes that occur on comets. Starting from a mixture with a low content of an enantiopure AA, a partial sublimation gives an important enrichment of the sublimate (1,2). The resulted disparity in the ratio between enantiomers of a partial sublimate is determined by the crystalline nature of the starting mixture: we observed a drastic difference in the behavior of (i) mixtures based on true racemic compounds and (ii) mechanical mixtures of two enantiopure solid phases. On the other hand, combination of crystallization and sublimation can lead to segregation of enantioenriched fractions starting from racemic composition of sublimable aliphatic AAs (Ala, Leu, Pro, Val) in mixtures with non-volatile enantiopure ones (Asn, Asp, Glu, Ser, Thr) (3). The resulted sense of chirality correlates with the handedness of the non-volatile AAs: the observed changes in enantiomeric ratios clearly demonstrate the preferential homochiral interactions and a tendency of natural amino acids to homochiral self-organization. It is noteworthy that just these 5 (Asn, Asp, Glu, Ser, Thr) out of 22 proteinogenic amino acids are able to local symmetry breaking. On the other hand, recent data on the enantiomeric composition of the Tagish Lake, a C2-type carbonaceous meteorite, revealed a large L-enantiomeric excess of Asp and Glu (4) that we used in our experiments. These experimental data may shed some light on one of the facets of complex and mysterious preobiotic processes that eventually could have led to the origin of life. References: 1. Bellec A, Guillemin JC. Chem Commun 2010, 46:1482-1484. 2. Tarasevych AV, Sorochinsky AE, Kukhar VP, Chollet A, Daniellou R, Guillemin JC. J Org Chem 2013, 78:10530-10533. 3. Tarasevych AV, Sorochinsky AE, Kukhar VP, Guillemin JC. Orig Life Evol Biosph 2013, 43:129-135. 4. Glavin DP, Elsila JE, Burton AS, Callahan MP, Dworkin JP, Hilts RW, Herd CDK. Meteor Planet Sci 2012, 47:1347-1364.

  18. Dissolved amino acids in oceanic basaltic basement fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Huei-Ting; Amend, Jan P.; LaRowe, Douglas E.; Bingham, Jon-Paul; Cowen, James P.

    2015-09-01

    The oceanic basaltic basement contains the largest aquifer on Earth and potentially plays an important role in the global carbon cycle as a net sink for dissolved organic carbon (DOC). However, few details of the organic matter cycling in the subsurface are known because great water depths and thick sediments typically hinder direct access to this environment. In an effort to examine the role of water-rock-microorganism interaction on organic matter cycling in the oceanic basaltic crust, basement fluid samples collected from three borehole observatories installed on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge were analyzed for dissolved amino acids. Our data show that dissolved free amino acids (1-13 nM) and dissolved hydrolyzable amino acids (43-89 nM) are present in the basement. The amino acid concentrations in the ridge-flank basement fluids are at the low end of all submarine hydrothermal fluids reported in the literature and are similar to those in deep seawater. Amino acids in recharging deep seawater, in situ amino acid production, and diffusional input from overlying sediments are potential sources of amino acids in the basement fluids. Thermodynamic modeling shows that amino acid synthesis in the basement can be sustained by energy supplied from inorganic substrates via chemolithotrophic metabolisms. Furthermore, an analysis of amino acid concentrations and compositions in basement fluids support the notion that heterotrophic activity is ongoing. Similarly, the enrichment of acidic amino acids and depletion of hydrophobic ones relative to sedimentary particulate organic matter suggests that surface sorption and desorption also alters amino acids in the basaltic basement. In summary, although the oceanic basement aquifer is a net sink for deep seawater DOC, similar amino acid concentrations in basement aquifer and deep seawater suggest that DOC is preferentially removed in the basement over dissolved amino acids. Our data also suggest that organic carbon cycling occurs in the oceanic basaltic basement, where an active subsurface biosphere is likely responsible for amino acid synthesis and degradation.

  19. Extraction of amino acids from soils and sediments with superheated water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, C. N.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1974-01-01

    A method of extraction for amino acids from soils and sediments involving superheated water has been investigated. About 75-97 per cent of the amino acids contained in four soils of a soil profile from Illinois were extracted by this method. Deep penetration of water into soil aggregates and partial hydrolysis of peptide bonds during this extraction by water at high temperature are likely mechanisms responsible for the release of amino acids from samples. This extraction method does not require subsequent desalting treatments when analyses are carried out with an ion-exchange amino acid analyzer.

  20. [New enzymatic strategies for enantiomers of lactams and amino acids].

    PubMed

    Forró, Eniko

    2011-01-01

    To fulfil the requirements of modern go-ahead research, new direct and indirect enzymatic strategies and new techniques have been devised for the preparation of enantiopure beta- and gamma-lactams and beta- and gamma-amino acids, and some of them have been scaled up. For example, a formal total synthesis of enantiopure Anatoxina, a neurotoxic alkaloid, but a potent and stereospecific agonist at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors has been introduced. An efficient and very simple method has been developed for the synthesis of the antibacterial cispentacin [(1R,2S)-2-amino-1-cyclopentanecarboxylic acid] and 8 new derivatives. A highly efficient enzymatic procedure has been elaborated for the synthesis of the blockbuster drug Abacavir and Carbovir intermediate (1S,4R)-4-aminocyclopent-2-ene-1-carboxylic acid. The first enzymatic method has been devised for the synthesis of (R)-3-amino-4-(2,4,5-trifluorophenyl)butanoic acid, the intermediate for the new antidiabetic drug Sitagliptine. Direct enzymatic strategies have been reported for the synthesis of (2R,3S)-3-phenylisoserine, a key intermediate of the side-chain of the antitumor product Taxol. A new enzymatic method has been developed for the total synthesis of crispine A enantiomers with antitumor activity. As amino acids are among the main products in the above-mentioned enzymatic methods, a new gas-chromatographic method has been acquired for the enantioseparation of acyclic and carbocyclic cis- and trans-beta-amino acids via a rapid double derivatization technique (esterification followed by N-acylation). APPLICABILITY: Through the utilization of enzymes, efficient enantioselective procedures in organic media have been developed and applied for the preparation of enantiopure, biologically active (beta- and gamma-lactams and beta- and gamma-amino acids (Scheme 15). Two of our recently elaborated enzymatic methods for the synthesis of beta- and gamma-amino acids have been patented. Acros Organics and BioBlocks Inc. serve as the sales companies of more than 20 enantiopure products that we have prepared by enzymatic methods. PMID:22165415

  1. Molecular interactions in conjugates of dicarboxylic acids and amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolbe, Alfred; Griehl, Carola; Biehler, Simone

    2003-12-01

    Vibrational spectroscopic studies have been performed to obtain information regarding intermolecular forces acting in conjugates formed by dicarboxylic en-acids (fumaric acid, maleic acid) or their monobenzyl esters with esters of amino acids in the crystalline state and in solution. -NH groups, -COOH groups, and CO amide groups have turned out to be the preferred carriers of those molecular interactions, which are the driving forces to form associates. These associates are mostly different in the crystalline state and in solution. The dimerisation of the molecules via the -COOH groups is suppressed in the preponderate number of cases in these molecular arrangements. The different behaviour of the substances is discussed in detail.

  2. The Next Generation MOD: A Microchip Amino Acid Analyzer for Detecting Extraterrestrial Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathies, R. A.; Hutt, L. D.; Bada, J. L.; Glavin, D.; Grunthaner, F. J.; Grunthaner, P. J.

    2000-01-01

    The MOD (Mars Organic Detector) instrument which has selected for the definition phase of the BEDS package on the 2005 Mars Explorer Program spacecraft is designed to simply detect the presence of amino acids in Martian surface samples at a sensitivity of a few parts per billion (ppb). An additional important aspect of amino acid analyses of Martian samples is identifying and quantifying which compounds are present, and also distinguishing those produced abiotically from those synthesized by either extinct or extant life. Amino acid homochirality provides an unambiguous way of distinguishing between abiotic vs. biotic origins. Proteins made up of mixed D- and L-amino acids would not likely have been efficient catalysts in early organisms because they could not fold into bioactive configurations such as the a-helix. However, enzymes made up of all D-amino acids function just as well as those made up of only L-amino acids, but the two enzymes use the opposite stereoisomeric substrates. There are no biochemical reasons why L-amino acids would be favored over Damino acids. On Earth, the use of only L-amino acids in proteins by life is probably simply a matter of chance. We assume that if proteins and enzymes were a component of extinct or extant life on Mars, then amino acid homochirality would have been a requirement. However, the possibility that Martian life was (or is) based on D-amino acids would be equal to that based on L-amino acids. The detection of a nonracemic mixture of amino acids in a Martian sample would be strong evidence for the presence of an extinct or extant biota on Mars. The finding of an excess of D-amino acids would provide irrefutable evidence of unique Martian life that could not have been derived from seeding the planet with terrestrial life (or the seeding of the Earth with Martian life). In contrast, the presence of racemic amino acids, along with non-protein amino acids such as alpha-aminoisobutyric acid and isovaline, would be indicative of an abiotic origin, although we have to consider the possibility that the racemic amino acids were generated from the racemization of biotically produced amino acids.

  3. Extraterrestrial Amino Acids in the Almahata Sitta Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Aubrey, Andrew D.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Parker, Eric T.; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2010-01-01

    Amino acid analysis of a meteorite fragment of asteroid 2008 TC3 called Almahata Sitta was carried out using reverse-phase liquid chromatography coupled with UV fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-FD/ToF-MS) as part of a sample analysis consortium. LC-FD/ToF-MS analyses of hot-water extracts from the meteorite revealed a complex distribution of two- to seven-carbon aliphatic amino acids and one- to three-carbon amines with abundances ranging from 0.5 to 149 parts-per-billion (ppb). The enantiomeric ratios of the amino acids alanine, R-amino-n-butyric acid (beta-ABA), 2-amino-2-methylbutanoic acid (isovaline), and 2-aminopentanoic acid (norvaline) in the meteorite were racemic (D/L approximately 1), indicating that these amino acids are indigenous to the meteorite and not terrestrial contaminants. Several other non-protein amino acids were also identified in the meteorite above background levels including alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (alpha-AIB), 4-amino-2- methylbutanoic acid, 4-amino-3-methylbutanoic acid, and 3-, 4-, and 5-aminopentanoic acid. The total abundances of isovaline and alpha-AIB in Almahata Sitta are 1000 times lower than the abundances of these amino acids found in the CM carbonaceous chondrite Murchison. The extremely low abundances and unusual distribution of five carbon amino acids in Almahata Sitta compared to Cl, CM, and CR carbonaceous chondrites may reflect extensive thermal alteration of amino acids on the parent asteroid by partial melting during formation or subsequent impact shock heating. It is also possible that amino acids were synthesized by catalytic reactions on the parent body after asteroid 2008 TC3 cooled to lower temperatures.

  4. Induction of amino acid transporters expression by endurance exercise in rat skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Taro Yoshinaga, Mariko

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Regulation of amino acid transporter expression in working muscle remains unclear. •Expression of amino acid transporters for leucine were induced by a bout of exercise. •Requirement of leucine in muscle cells might regulate expression of its transporters. •This information is beneficial for understanding the muscle remodeling by exercise. -- Abstract: We here investigated whether an acute bout of endurance exercise would induce the expression of amino acid transporters that regulate leucine transport across plasma and lysosomal membranes in rat skeletal muscle. Rats ran on a motor-driven treadmill at a speed of 28 m/min for 90 min. Immediately after the exercise, we observed that expression of mRNAs encoding L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) and CD98 was induced in the gastrocnemius, soleus, and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles. Sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2) mRNA was also induced by the exercise in those three muscles. Expression of proton-assisted amino acid transporter 1 (PAT1) mRNA was slightly but not significantly induced by a single bout of exercise in soleus and EDL muscles. Exercise-induced mRNA expression of these amino acid transporters appeared to be attenuated by repeated bouts of the exercise. These results suggested that the expression of amino acid transporters for leucine may be induced in response to an increase in the requirement for this amino acid in the cells of working skeletal muscles.

  5. Role of amino acids and vitamins in nutrition of mesophilic Methanococcus spp

    SciTech Connect

    Whitman, W.B.; Sohn, S.; Kuk, S.; Xing, R.

    1987-10-01

    In this study the authors found that autotrophic methanococci similar to Methanococcus maripaludis obtained up to 57% of their cellular carbon from exogeneous amino acids. About 85% of the incorporation was into protein. Primarily nonpolar and basic amino acids and glycine were incorporated; only small amounts of acidic and some polar amino acids were taken up. An additional 10% of the incorporation was into the nucleic acid fraction. Because little /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ was formed from the /sup 14/C-amino acids, little metabolism of the amino acids occurred. Therefore, the growth stimulation by amino acids was probably due to the sparing of anabolic energy requirements. Of the amino acids incorporated, only alanine was also a sole nitrogen source for these methanococci. In contrast, Methanococcus vannielii and Methanococcus aeolicus are autotrophic methanococci which did not incorporate amino acids and did not utilize alanine as a sole nitrogen source. Although glutamine served as a sole nitrogen source for the autotrophic methanococci and Methanococcus voltae, a heterotrophic methanococcus, growth was due to chemical deamination in the medium. M. voltae requires leucine and isoleucine for growth. However, these amino acids were not significant nitrogen sources, and alanine was not a sole nitrogen source for the growth of M. voltae. The branched-chain amino acids were not extensively metabolized by M. voltae. Pantoyl lactone and pantoic acid were readily incorporated by M. voltae. The intact vitamin pantothenate was neither stimulatory to growth nor incorporated. In conclusion, although amino acids and vitamins are nutritionally important to both autotrophic and heterotrophic methanococci, generally they are not subject to extensive catabolism.

  6. Accumulated analyses of amino acid precursors in returned lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.; Harada, K.; Hare, P. E.

    1973-01-01

    Six amino acids (glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, and threonine) obtained by hydrolysis of extracts have been quantitatively determined in ten collections of fines from five Apollo missions. Although the amounts found, 7-45 ng/g, are small, the lunar amino acid/carbon ratios are comparable to those of the carbonaceous chondrites, Murchison and Murray, as analyzed by the same procedures. Since both the ratios of amino acid to carbon, and the four or five most common types of proteinous amino acid found, are comparable for the two extraterrestrial sources despite different cosmophysical histories of the moon and meteorites, common cosmochemical processes are suggested.

  7. An Escherichia coli K-12 tktA tktB mutant deficient in transketolase activity requires pyridoxine (vitamin B6) as well as the aromatic amino acids and vitamins for growth.

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, G; Winkler, M E

    1994-01-01

    We show that a tktA tktB double mutant, which is devoid of the two known transketolase isoenzymes of Escherichia coli K-12, requires pyridoxine (vitamin B6) as well as the aromatic amino acids and vitamins for growth. This pyridoxine requirement can also be satisfied by 4-hydroxy-L-threonine or glycolaldehyde. These results provide direct evidence that D-erythrose-4-phosphate is a precursor of the pyridine ring of pyridoxine. In addition, they show that the two major E. coli transketolase isoenzymes are not required for the biosynthesis of D-1-deoxyxylulose, which is thought to be another precursor of pyridoxine. PMID:7928977

  8. Formation of Amino Acid Thioesters for Prebiotic Peptide Synthesis: Catalysis By Amino Acid Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The origin of life can be described as a series of events in which a prebiotic chemical process came increasingly under the control of its catalytic products. In our search for this prebiotic process that yielded catalytic takeover products (such as polypeptides), we have been investigating a reaction system that generates peptide-forming amino acid thioesters from formaldehyde, glycolaldehyde, and ammonia in the presence of thiols. As shown below, this model process begins by aldol condensation of formaldehyde and glycolaldehyde to give trioses and releases. These sugars then undergo beta-dehydration yielding their respective alpha-ketoaldehydes. Addition of ammonia to the alpha-ketoaldehydes yields imines which can either: (a) rearrange in the presence of thesis to give amino acid thioesters or (be react with another molecule of aldehyde to give imidazoles. This 'one-pot' reaction system operates under mild aqueous conditions, and like modem amino acid biosynthesis, uses sugar intermediates which are converted to products by energy-yielding redox reactions. Recently, we discovered that amino acids, such as the alanine reaction product, catalyze the first and second steps of the process. In the presence of ammonia the process also generates other synthetically useful products, like the important biochemical -- pyruvic acid.

  9. Amino acids of the Nogoya and Mokoia carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronin, J. R.; Moore, C. B.

    1976-01-01

    Amino acids were found in acid hydrolyzed, hot water extracts of the Nogoya (C2) and Mokoia (C3V) chondrites. About 40 n moles/g of amino acids were found in the Nogoya extract while Mokoia contained less than 1 n mole/g. The amino acid composition of Nogoya differs from that of other C2 chondrites studied earlier. The results from Mokoia are similar to previous data obtained from the C3V chondrite Allende.

  10. Amino Acid Formation on Saturn's Inner Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delitsky, M. L.; Lane, A. L.; Tidwell, T. T.; Henry-Riyad, H.

    2002-09-01

    Titan's atmosphere contributes nitrogen atoms and ions to the Saturnian magnetosphere. These ions have inward motion towards Saturn and should impact the inner satellites, thereby inducing a complex nitrogen oxides chemistry in the surfaces via their interaction with the water ice present. Species formed may include NO, NO2, NO3, HNO2, HNO3, NH2OH, HNO, NH, NH2, N2O, HNNO, and N2. If the surfaces also include CO2, then other species that may be formed as a result of N+ impact into H2O/CO2 ice will be HNCO, NCO and R-OCN. Successive reaction of HNCO with H and CO (which occur in irradiated H2O/CO2 ice) could lead to the smallest amino acid, glycine, in only 5 steps. Addition of CO to HNCO with successive hydrogenation of the oxygen atoms forms an -OH group with a C=O bond still present. Migration of the OH onto the C=O carbon yields a carboxylic acid group (-COOH). The HNCO -> Glycine conversion utilizes only simple and exothermic addition and rearrangement reactions. Both H and CO would be mobile in the water/CO2 ice crystal at the temperatures on the Saturnian satellites. Every step in the sequence is calculated to be exothermic, and the entire sequence is exothermic by a total of 231 kcal/mole. Therefore these sequences may occur under the temporary non-equilibrium conditions resulting from high-energy particle impact and subsequent residual heating. Glycine has its own radiolysis products, such as CHOCOOH (glyoxylic acid), CH3NH2 (methyl amine), HCHO, NH3, H2O2, and H2. Formation of higher-order amino acids, such as alanine and aminobutyric acids, might also occur, from solid-phase radiolysis or gas-phase ionic synthesis of combinations of some of the smaller molecules in the sequence.

  11. Prebiotic Synthesis of Hydrophobic and Protein Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Ring, David; Wolman, Yecheskel; Friedmann, Nadav; Miller, Stanley L.

    1972-01-01

    The formation of amino acids by the action of electric discharges on a mixture of methane, nitrogen, and water with traces of ammonia was studied in detail. The presence of glycine, alanine, ?-amino-n-butyric acid, ?-aminoisobutyric acid, valine, norvaline, isovaline, leucine, isoleucine, alloisoleucine, norleucine, proline, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, threonine, allothreonine, ?-hydroxy-?-aminobutyric acid, and ?,?-diaminobutyric acid was confirmed by ion-exchange chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. All of the primary ?-amino acids found in the Murchison Meteorite have been synthesized by this electric discharge experiment. PMID:4501592

  12. Intermediate Levels of Bacillus subtilis CodY Activity Are Required for Derepression of the Branched-Chain Amino Acid Permease, BraB

    PubMed Central

    Belitsky, Boris R.; Brinsmade, Shaun R.; Sonenshein, Abraham L.

    2015-01-01

    The global transcriptional regulator, CodY, binds strongly to the regulatory region of the braB gene, which encodes a Bacillus subtilis branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) permease. However, under conditions that maximize CodY activity, braB expression was similar in wild-type and codY null mutant cells. Nonetheless, expression from the braB promoter was significantly elevated in cells containing partially active mutant versions of CodY or in wild-type cells under growth conditions leading to intermediate levels of CodY activity. This novel pattern of regulation was shown to be due to two opposing mechanisms, negative and positive, by which CodY affects braB expression. A strong CodY-binding site located downstream of the transcription start point conferred negative regulation by direct interaction with CodY. Additionally, sequences upstream and downstream of the promoter were required for repression by a second pleiotropic B. subtilis regulator, ScoC, whose own expression is repressed by CodY. ScoC-mediated repression of braB in codY null mutants cells was as efficient as direct, CodY-mediated repression in wild-type cells under conditions of high CodY activity. However, under conditions of reduced CodY activity, CodY-mediated repression was relieved to a greater extent than ScoC-mediated repression was increased, leading to elevated braB expression. We conclude that restricting increased expression of braB to conditions of moderate nutrient limitation is the raison d’être of the feed-forward regulatory loop formed by CodY and ScoC at the braB promoter. The increase in BraB expression only at intermediate activities of CodY may facilitate the uptake of BCAA when they are not in excess but prevent unneeded BraB synthesis when other BCAA transporters are active. PMID:26473603

  13. A reexamination of amino acids in lunar soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinton, K. L. F.; Bada, J. L.; Arnold, J. R.

    1993-01-01

    Amino acids in lunar soils provide an important indicator of the level of prebiotic organic compounds on the moon. The results provide insight into the chemistry of amino acid precursors, and furthermore, given the flux of carbonaceous material to the moon, we can evaluate the survival of organics upon impact. The amino acid contents of both hydrolyzed and unhydrolyzed hot-water extracts of Apollo 17 lunar soil were determined using ophthaldialdehyde/N-acetyl cysteine (OPA/NAC) derivatization followed by HPLC analysis. Previous studies of lunar amino acids were inconclusive, as the technique used (derivatization with ninhydrin followed by HPLC analysis) was unable to discriminate between cosmogenic amino acids and terrestrial contaminants. Cosmogenic amino acids are racemic, and many of the amino acids found in carbonaceous meteorites such as Murchison, i.e., alpha-amino-i-butyric acid (aib), are extremely rare on Earth. The ninhydrin method does not distinguish amino acid enantiomers, nor does it detect alpha-alkyl amino acids such as aib, whereas the OPA/NAC technique does both.

  14. Relative Amino Acid Composition Signatures of Organisms and Environments

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Alexandra; Savageau, Michael A.; Alves, Rui

    2013-01-01

    Background Identifying organism-environment interactions at the molecular level is crucial to understanding how organisms adapt to and change the chemical and molecular landscape of their habitats. In this work we investigated whether relative amino acid compositions could be used as a molecular signature of an environment and whether such a signature could also be observed at the level of the cellular amino acid composition of the microorganisms that inhabit that environment. Methodologies/Principal Findings To address these questions we collected and analyzed environmental amino acid determinations from the literature, and estimated from complete genomic sequences the global relative amino acid abundances of organisms that are cognate to the different types of environment. Environmental relative amino acid abundances clustered into broad groups (ocean waters, host-associated environments, grass land environments, sandy soils and sediments, and forest soils), indicating the presence of amino acid signatures specific for each environment. These signatures correlate to those found in organisms. Nevertheless, relative amino acid abundance of organisms was more influenced by GC content than habitat or phylogeny. Conclusions Our results suggest that relative amino acid composition can be used as a signature of an environment. In addition, we observed that the relative amino acid composition of organisms is not highly determined by environment, reinforcing previous studies that find GC content to be the major factor correlating to amino acid composition in living organisms. PMID:24204807

  15. A reexamination of amino acids in lunar soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinton, K. L. F.; Bada, J. L.; Arnold, J. R.

    1993-03-01

    Amino acids in lunar soils provide an important indicator of the level of prebiotic organic compounds on the moon. The results provide insight into the chemistry of amino acid precursors, and furthermore, given the flux of carbonaceous material to the moon, we can evaluate the survival of organics upon impact. The amino acid contents of both hydrolyzed and unhydrolyzed hot-water extracts of Apollo 17 lunar soil were determined using ophthaldialdehyde/N-acetyl cysteine (OPA/NAC) derivatization followed by HPLC analysis. Previous studies of lunar amino acids were inconclusive, as the technique used (derivatization with ninhydrin followed by HPLC analysis) was unable to discriminate between cosmogenic amino acids and terrestrial contaminants. Cosmogenic amino acids are racemic, and many of the amino acids found in carbonaceous meteorites such as Murchison, i.e., alpha-amino-i-butyric acid (aib), are extremely rare on Earth. The ninhydrin method does not distinguish amino acid enantiomers, nor does it detect alpha-alkyl amino acids such as aib, whereas the OPA/NAC technique does both.

  16. Biosynthesis of 'essential' amino acids by scleractinian corals.

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, L M; Szmant, A M

    1997-01-01

    Animals rely on their diet for amino acids that they are incapable either of synthesizing or of synthesizing in sufficient quantities to meet metabolic needs. These are the so-called 'essential amino acids'. This set of amino acids is similar among the vertebrates and many of the invertebrates. Previously, no information was available for amino acid synthesis by the most primitive invertebrates, the Cnidaria. The purpose of this study was to examine amino acid synthesis by representative cnidarians within the Order Scleractinia. Three species of zooxanthellate reef coral, Montastraea faveolata, Acropora cervicornis and Porites divaricata, and two species of non-zooxanthellate coral, Tubastrea coccinea and Astrangia poculata, were incubated with 14C-labelled glucose or with the 14C-labelled amino acids glutamic acid, lysine or valine. Radiolabel tracer was followed into protein amino acids. A total of 17 amino acids, including hydroxyproline, were distinguishable by the techniques used. Of these, only threonine was not found radiolabelled in any of the samples. We could not detect tryptophan or cysteine, nor distinguish between the amino acid pairs glutamic acid and glutamine, or aspartic acid and asparagine. Eight amino acids normally considered essential for animals were made by the five corals tested, although some of them were made only in small quantities. These eight amino acids are valine, isoleucine, leucine, tyrosine, phenylalanine histidine, methionine and lysine. The ability of cnidarians to synthesize these amino acids could be yet another indicator of a separate evolutionary history of the cnidarians from the rest of the Metazoa. PMID:9078264

  17. The prebiotic synthesis of amino acids - interstellar vs. atmospheric mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meierhenrich, U. J.; Muñoz Caro, G. M.; Schutte, W. A.; Barbier, B.; Arcones Segovia, A.; Rosenbauer, H.; Thiemann, W. H.-P.; Brack, A.

    2002-11-01

    Until very recently, prebiotic amino acids were believed to have been generated in the atmosphere of the early Earth, as successfully simulated by the Urey-Miller experiments. Two independent studies now identified ice photochemistry in the interstellar medium as a possible source of prebiotic amino acids. Ultraviolet irradiation of ice mixtures containing identified interstellar molecules (such as H2O, CO2, CO, CH3OH, and NH3) in the conditions of vacuum and low temperature found in the interstellar medium generated amino acid structures including glycine, alanine, serine, valine, proline, and aspartic acid. After warmup, hydrolysis and derivatization, our team was able to identify 16 amino acids as well as furans and pyrroles. Enantioselective analyses of the amino acids showed racemic mixtures. A prebiotic interstellar origin of amino acid structures is now discussed to be a plausible alternative to the Urey-Miller mechanism.

  18. THIN-LAYER SEPARATION OF CITRIC ACID CYCLE INTERMEDIATES, LACTIC ACID, AND THE AMINO ACID TAURINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes a two-dimensional mixed-layer method for separating citric acid cycle intermediates, lactic acid and the amino acid taurine. The method cleanly separates all citric acid cycle intermediates tested, excepting citric acid and isocitric acid. The solvents are in...

  19. Extraterrestrial Amino Acids in the Almahata Sitta Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Aubrey, Andrew D.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Parker, Eric T.; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2009-01-01

    Amino acid analysis of a meteorite fragment of asteroid 2008 TC(sub 3) called Almahata Sitta was carried out using reverse-phase high-perfo rmance liquid chromatography coupled with UV fluorescence detection a nd time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-FD/ToF-MS) as part of a sam ple analysis consortium. HPLC analyses of hot-water extracts from the meteorite revealed a complex distribution of two- to six-carbon aliph atic amino acids and one- to three carbon amines with abundances rang ing from 0.5 to 149 parts-per-billion (ppb). The enantiomeric ratios of the amino acids alanine, Beta-amino-n-butyric acid (Beta-ABA), 2-amino-2- methylbutanoic acid (isovaline), and 2-aminopentanoic acid (no rvaline) in the meteorite were racemic (D/L approximately 1), indicat ing that these amino acids are indigenous to the meteorite and not te rrestrial contaminants. Several other non-protein amino acids were also identified in the meteorite above background levels including alpha -aminoisobutyric acid (alpha-AIB), 4-amino-2- methybutanoic acid, 4-a mino-3-methylbutanoic acid, and 3-, 4-, and 5-aminopentanoic acid. Th e total abundances of isovaline and AlB in Almahata Sitta are approximately 1000 times lower than the abundances of these amino acids found in the CM carbonaceous meteorite Murchison. The extremely love abund ances and unusual distribution of five carbon amino acids in Almahata Sitta compared to Cl, CM, and CR carbonaceous meteorites and may be due to extensive thermal alteration of amino acids on the parent aster oid by partial melting during formation or impact shock heating.

  20. [The transition of amino acid drug development for 50 years in Japan (1)--amino acid parenteral fluid].

    PubMed

    Arai, Yumiko; Uehara, Keiko; Matsumoto, Kazuo

    2008-01-01

    Twenty kinds of alpha-amino acids that form the constituents of proteins in mammalian tissues are all L-form with the exception of glycine. These proteins consist of both dispensable and indispensable alpha-amino acids, and play an important role as nutrients. The artificial mixtures of these alpha-amino acids are also important as ethical drugs. The history of alpha-amino acid parenteral fluid is not as long as one might think in terms of its clinical applications. The first publication of clinical data on the subject only appeared in 1944. In Japan, the first product using alpha-amino acid solution made from casein protein entered the market in 1950. In 1959, an alpha-amino acid solution produced from optically pure L-form was launched in Japan and became a pioneer in the field of artificial mixture solutions worldwide. From the 1960s, the amino acid industry has developed remarkably in Japan by means of chemically synthetic, enzymatic and microbial methodologies. Since then, most of the optically active alpha-amino acids have been easily obtainable, and the clinical uses of a-amino acid solutions using a variety of combinations have developed tremendously. From the 1950s to the 1970s, most of the mixture solutions containing a large number of a-amino acids were clinically developed for nutritional supplements. However, from the 1990s, amino acid solutions targeting diseases such as hepato-nephricpathy have increased, while new pediatric a-amino acid solutions are still being launched today. Since the year 2000, amino acid kit formulations with vitamins have been developed for convenient use in hospitals. PMID:19579826

  1. Distribution and Origin of Amino Acids in Lunar Regolith Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, J. E.; Callahan, M. P.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.; McLain, H. L.; Noble, S. K.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    The existence of organic compounds on the lunar surface has been a question of interest from the Apollo era to the present. Investigations of amino acids immediately after collection of lunar samples yielded inconclusive identifications, in part due to analytical limitations including insensitivity to certain compounds, an inability to separate enantiomers, and lack of compound-specific isotopic measurements. It was not possible to determine if the detected amino acids were indigenous to the lunar samples or the result of terrestrial contamination. Recently, we presented initial data from the analysis of amino acid abundances in 12 lunar regolith samples and discussed those results in the context of four potential amino acid sources [5]. Here, we expand on our previous work, focusing on amino acid abundances and distributions in seven regolith samples and presenting the first compound-specific carbon isotopic ratios measured for amino acids in a lunar sample.

  2. Geochemistry of amino acids in shells of the clam Saxidomus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.; Blunt, D.J.; McMenamin, M.A.; Straham, S.E.

    1980-01-01

    Concentrations of amino acids and their corresponding d l enantiomeric ratios have been measured in shells of the bivalve mollusk Saxidomus from eleven localities, ranging in age from modern to probably more than 500,000 yr, along the Pacific coast of North America. Natural logarithms of amino acid concentrations correlate well with d l ratios, and the relationship provides a possible guide to the selection of fossils for use in amino acid dating. The relative order of the extents of racemization of amino acids at any given time appears to change with increasing sample age. Application of the amino acid dating method to shells from Whidbey Island, Washington, yields an age of about 80,000 yr, in contrast to the previously determined radiocarbon age of 36,000 yr which was measured on some shell carbonate and considered a minimum age. The amino acid age is compatible with the geologic record in the area. ?? 1980.

  3. Transport activity-dependent intracellular sorting of the yeast general amino acid permease

    E-print Network

    Cain, Natalie Elaine

    Intracellular trafficking of the general amino acid permease, Gap1p, of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is regulated by amino acid abundance. When amino acids are scarce Gap1p is sorted to the plasma membrane, whereas when amino ...

  4. Survival of Amino Acids in Micrometeorites During Atmospheric Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2003-01-01

    The delivery of amino acids by micrometeorites to the early Earth during the period of heavy bombardment could have been a significant source of the Earth's prebiotic amino acid inventory provided that these organic compounds survived atmospheric entry heating. To investigate the sublimation of amino acids from a micrometeorite analog at elevated temperature, grains from the CM-type carbonaceous chondrite Murchison were heated to 550 C inside a glass sublimation apparatus (SA) under reduced pressure. The sublimed residue that had collected on the cold finger of the SA after heating was analyzed for amino acids by HPLC. We found that when the temperature of the meteorite reached approx. 150 C, a large fraction of the amino acid glycine had vaporized from the meteorite, recondensed onto the end of the SA cold finger, and survived as the rest of the grains heated to 550 C. alpha-Aminoisobutryic acid and isovaline, which are two of the most abundant non-protein amino acids in Murchison, did not sublime from the meteorite and were completely destroyed during the heating experiment. Our experimental results suggest that sublimation of glycine present in micrometeorite grains may provide a way for this amino acid to survive atmospheric entry heating at temperatures less than 550 C; all other amino acids apparently are destroyed. Key Words: Amino acids-Exogenous delivery-Micrometeorites-Sublimation.

  5. Diversity of amino acids in a typical chernozem of Moldova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frunze, N. I.

    2014-12-01

    The content and composition of the amino acids in typical chernozems were studied. The objects of the study included a reference soil under an old fallow and three variants under fodder crop rotations: not fertilized, with mineral fertilizers, and with organic fertilizers. The contents of 18 amino acids were determined in these soils. The amino acids were extracted by the method of acid hydrolysis and identified by the method of ion-exchange chromatography. The total content of most of the amino acids was maximal in the reference soil; it was much lower in the cultivated soils and decreased in the following sequence: organic background > mineral background > no fertilization. The diversity of amino acids was evaluated quantitatively using different parameters applied in ecology for estimating various aspects of the species composition of communities (Simpson, Margalef, Menhinick, and Shannon's indices). The diversity and contribution of different amino acids to the total pool of amino acids also varied significantly in the studied variants. The maximum diversity of amino acids and maximum evenness of their relative abundance indices were typical of the reference chernozem; these parameters were lower in the cultivated soils. It was concluded that the changes in the structure of the amino acids under the impact of agricultural loads are similar to those that are usually observed under stress conditions.

  6. The Origin of Amino Acids in Lunar Regolith Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jamie E.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Glavin, Daniel P.; McLain, Hannah L.; Noble, Sarah K.; Gibson, Everett K., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the amino acid content of seven lunar regolith samples returned by the Apollo 16 and Apollo 17 missions and stored under NASA curation since collection using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Consistent with results from initial analyses shortly after collection in the 1970s, we observed amino acids at low concentrations in all of the curated samples, ranging from 0.2 parts-per-billion (ppb) to 42.7 ppb in hot-water extracts and 14.5 ppb to 651.1 ppb in 6M HCl acid-vapor-hydrolyzed, hot-water extracts. Amino acids identified in the Apollo soil extracts include glycine, D- and L-alanine, D- and L-aspartic acid, D- and L-glutamic acid, D- and L-serine, L-threonine, and L-valine, all of which had previously been detected in lunar samples, as well as several compounds not previously identified in lunar regoliths: -aminoisobutyric acid (AIB), D-and L-amino-n-butyric acid (-ABA), DL-amino-n-butyric acid, -amino-n-butyric acid, -alanine, and -amino-n-caproic acid. We observed an excess of the L enantiomer in most of the detected proteinogenic amino acids, but racemic alanine and racemic -ABA were present in some samples.

  7. Mild and effective N-phthaloylation of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Q; Liu, Z; Li, B; Wang, F

    2004-10-01

    In the present work various free amino acids, including tryptophan and tyrosine, were effectively N-phthaloylated under reduced pressure and at lower temperature. Moreover, under these conditions, the presence of phthalic acid in phthalic anhydride did not hinder the N-phthaloylation of amino acids. This simple process is economic, environmentally friendly, and suitable for large-scale production. PMID:15316876

  8. Trophic spectra under the lens of amino acid isotopic analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent advances in compound specific isotopic ratio analysis (CSIRA) have allowed researchers to measure trophic fractionation of 15N in specific amino acids, namely glutamic acid and phenylalanine. These amino acids have proven useful in food web studies because of the wide and consistent disparity...

  9. Amino acids regulate the transcription, internal sorting, and intrinsic activity of the general amino acid permease (GAP1) in S. cerevisiae

    E-print Network

    Risinger, April L. (April Lynn)

    2007-01-01

    The high capacity general amino acid permease in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (GAP1) is regulated such that it actively imports amino acids into the cell from the extracellular medium only when internal amino acid levels are ...

  10. A putative amino acid transporter of the SLC6 family is up-regulated by lithium and is required for resistance to lithium toxicity in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kasuya, Junko; Kaas, Garrett A.; Kitamoto, Toshihiro

    2009-01-01

    Lithium is an efficacious drug for the treatment of mood disorders, and its application is also considered a potential therapy for brain damage. However, the mechanisms underlying lithium’s therapeutic action and toxic effects in the nervous system remain largely elusive. Here we report on the use of a versatile genetic model, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, to discover novel molecular components involved in the lithium-responsive neurobiological process. We previously identified CG15088, which encodes a putative nutrient amino acid transporter of the solute carrier 6 (SLC6) family, as one of the genes most significantly up-regulated in response to lithium treatment. This gene was the only SLC6 gene induced by lithium, and was thus designated as Lithium-inducible SLC6 transporter or List. Either RNAi-mediated knockdown or complete deletion of List resulted in a remarkable increase in the susceptibility of adult flies to lithium’s toxic effects, whereas transgenic expression of wild-type List significantly suppressed the lithium hypersensitive phenotype of List-deficient flies. Other ions such as sodium, potassium and chloride did not induce List up-regulation, nor did they affect the viability of flies with suppressed List expression. These results indicate that lithium’s biochemical or physical properties, rather than general osmotic responses, are responsible for the lithium-induced up-regulation of List, as well as for the lithium-susceptible phenotype observed in List knockdown flies. Interestingly, flies became significantly more susceptible to lithium toxicity when List RNAi was specifically expressed in glia than when it was expressed in neurons or muscles, which is consistent with potential glial expression of List. These results show that the List transporter confers resistance to lithium toxicity, possibly as a consequence of its amino acid transporter activity in CNS glia. Our results have provided a new avenue of investigation toward a better understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie lithium-responsive neurobiological process. PMID:19619614

  11. Amino acid substitutions of cysteine residues near the amino terminus of Wheat streak mosaic virus HC-Pro abolishes virus transmission by the wheat curl mite

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The amino-terminal half of HC-Pro of Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) is required for semi-persistent transmission by the wheat curl mite (Aceria tosichella Keifer). The amino-proximal region of WSMV HC-Pro is cysteine-rich with a zinc finger-like motif. Amino acid substitutions were made in this re...

  12. GLC of amino acids - A survey of contamination.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rash, J. J.; Gehrke, C. W.; Kuo, K. C.; Kvenvolden, K. A.; Stalling, D. L.; Zumwalt, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Analyses of biological substances and geochemical samples, of both terrestrial and extraterrestrial origin, are reported for amino acids at the 1-10 nanogram per gram level achieved by gas-liquid and ion-exchange chromatographic methods. These studies have shown that nanogram quantities of amino acids, present in water extracts of geochemical samples or in other samples of low amino acid concentration, can be successfully determined only if the researcher is well aware of the possible sources of contamination.

  13. Methylation of alpha-amino acids and derivatives using trimethylsilyldiazomethane.

    PubMed

    Leggio, Antonella; Liguori, Angelo; Perri, Francesca; Siciliano, Carlo; Viscomi, Maria Caterina

    2009-03-01

    A study of the methylation of N-nosyl-alpha-amino acids and derivatives with trimethylsilyldiazomethane is here reported. Trimethylsilyldiazomethane allows the chemo-specific methylation of the carboxyl function of N-nosyl-alpha-amino acids in high yields and purity. This method provides a practical route to N-methyl-alpha-amino acids avoiding the use of the more toxic and explosive diazomethane. This simple and safe methylation methodology of alpha-amino acids and derivatives is not limited to organic synthesis and involves the use of a commercially available reagent as well. PMID:19207464

  14. Analysis of amino acid and codon usage in Paramecium bursaria.

    PubMed

    Dohra, Hideo; Fujishima, Masahiro; Suzuki, Haruo

    2015-10-01

    The ciliate Paramecium bursaria harbors the green-alga Chlorella symbionts. We reassembled the P. bursaria transcriptome to minimize falsely fused transcripts, and investigated amino acid and codon usage using the transcriptome data. Surface proteins preferentially use smaller amino acid residues like cysteine. Unusual synonymous codon and amino acid usage in highly expressed genes can reflect a balance between translational selection and other factors. A correlation of gene expression level with synonymous codon or amino acid usage is emphasized in genes down-regulated in symbiont-bearing cells compared to symbiont-free cells. Our results imply that the selection is associated with P. bursaria-Chlorella symbiosis. PMID:26341535

  15. Recent advances in microchip electrophoresis for amino acid analysis.

    PubMed

    Ou, Gaozhi; Feng, Xiaojun; Du, Wei; Liu, Xin; Liu, Bi-Feng

    2013-10-01

    With the maturation of microfluidic technologies, microchip electrophoresis has been widely employed for amino acid analysis owing to its advantages of low sample consumption, reduced analysis time, high throughput, and potential for integration and automation. In this article, we review the recent progress in amino acid analysis using microchip electrophoresis during the period from 2007 to 2012. Innovations in microchip materials, surface modification, sample introduction, microchip electrophoresis, and detection methods are documented, as well as nascent applications of amino acid analysis in single-cell analysis, microdialysis sampling, food analysis, and extraterrestrial exploration. Without doubt, more applications of microchip electrophoresis in amino acid analysis may be expected soon. PMID:23436170

  16. Amino Acid Transporters and Release of Hydrophobic Amino Acids in the Heterocyst-Forming Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Pernil, Rafael; Picossi, Silvia; Herrero, Antonia; Flores, Enrique; Mariscal, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is a filamentous cyanobacterium that can use inorganic compounds such as nitrate or ammonium as nitrogen sources. In the absence of combined nitrogen, it can fix N2 in differentiated cells called heterocysts. Anabaena also shows substantial activities of amino acid uptake, and three ABC-type transporters for amino acids have been previously characterized. Seven new loci encoding predicted amino acid transporters were identified in the Anabaena genomic sequence and inactivated. Two of them were involved in amino acid uptake. Locus alr2535-alr2541 encodes the elements of a hydrophobic amino acid ABC-type transporter that is mainly involved in the uptake of glycine. ORF all0342 encodes a putative transporter from the dicarboxylate/amino acid:cation symporter (DAACS) family whose inactivation resulted in an increased uptake of a broad range of amino acids. An assay to study amino acid release from Anabaena filaments to the external medium was set up. Net release of the alanine analogue ?-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) was observed when transport system N-I (a hydrophobic amino acid ABC-type transporter) was engaged in the uptake of a specific substrate. The rate of AIB release was directly proportional to the intracellular AIB concentration, suggesting leakage from the cells by diffusion. PMID:25915115

  17. Amino Acid Transporters and Release of Hydrophobic Amino Acids in the Heterocyst-Forming Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Pernil, Rafael; Picossi, Silvia; Herrero, Antonia; Flores, Enrique; Mariscal, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is a filamentous cyanobacterium that can use inorganic compounds such as nitrate or ammonium as nitrogen sources. In the absence of combined nitrogen, it can fix N2 in differentiated cells called heterocysts. Anabaena also shows substantial activities of amino acid uptake, and three ABC-type transporters for amino acids have been previously characterized. Seven new loci encoding predicted amino acid transporters were identified in the Anabaena genomic sequence and inactivated. Two of them were involved in amino acid uptake. Locus alr2535-alr2541 encodes the elements of a hydrophobic amino acid ABC-type transporter that is mainly involved in the uptake of glycine. ORF all0342 encodes a putative transporter from the dicarboxylate/amino acid:cation symporter (DAACS) family whose inactivation resulted in an increased uptake of a broad range of amino acids. An assay to study amino acid release from Anabaena filaments to the external medium was set up. Net release of the alanine analogue ?-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) was observed when transport system N-I (a hydrophobic amino acid ABC-type transporter) was engaged in the uptake of a specific substrate. The rate of AIB release was directly proportional to the intracellular AIB concentration, suggesting leakage from the cells by diffusion. PMID:25915115

  18. Gas-Phase Acidities of Phosphorylated Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Stover, Michele L; Plummer, Chelsea E; Miller, Sean R; Cassady, Carolyn J; Dixon, David A

    2015-11-19

    Gas-phase acidities and heats of formation have been predicted at the G3(MP2)/SCRF-COSMO level of theory for 10 phosphorylated amino acids and their corresponding amides, including phospho-serine (pSer), -threonine (pThr), and -tyrosine (pTyr), providing the first reliable set of these values. The gas-phase acidities (GAs) of the three named phosphorylated amino acids and their amides have been determined using proton transfer reactions in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometer. Excellent agreement was found between the experimental and predicted GAs. The phosphate group is the deprotonation site for pSer and pThr and deprotonation from the carboxylic acid generated the lowest energy anion for pTyr. The infrared spectra were calculated for six low energy anions of pSer, pThr, and pTyr. For deprotonated pSer and pThr, good agreement is found between the experimental IRMPD spectra and the calculated spectra for our lowest energy anion structure. For pTyr, the IR spectra for a higher energy phosphate deprotonated structure is in good agreement with experiment. Additional experiments tested electrospray ionization (ESI) conditions for pTyr and determined that variations in solvent, temperature, and voltage can result in a different experimental GA value, indicating that ESI conditions affect the conformation of the pTyr anion. PMID:26492552

  19. Prebiotic Amino Acid Thioester Synthesis: Thiol-Dependent Amino Acid Synthesis from Formose substrates (Formaldehyde and Glycolaldehyde) and Ammonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    1998-01-01

    Formaldehyde and glycolaldehyde (substrates of the formose autocatalytic cycle) were shown to react with ammonia yielding alanine and homoserine under mild aqueous conditions in the presence of thiol catalysts. Since similar reactions carried out without ammonia yielded alpha-hydroxy acid thioesters, the thiol-dependent synthesis of alanine and homoserine is presumed to occur via amino acid thioesters-intermediates capable of forming peptides. A pH 5.2 solution of 20 mM formaldehyde, 20 mM glycolaldehyde, 20 mM ammonium chloride, 23 mM 3-mercaptopropionic acid, and 23 mM acetic acid that reacted for 35 days at 40 C yielded (based on initial formaldehyde) 1.8% alanine and 0.08% homoserine. In the absence of thiol catalyst, the synthesis of alanine and homoserine was negligible. Alanine synthesis required both formaldehyde and glycolaldehyde, but homoserine synthesis required only glycolaldehyde. At 25 days the efficiency of alanine synthesis calculated from the ratio of alanine synthesized to formaldehyde reacted was 2.1%, and the yield (based on initial formaldehyde) of triose and tetrose intermediates involved in alanine and homoserine synthesis was 0.3 and 2.1%, respectively. Alanine synthesis was also seen in similar reactions containing only 10 mM each of aldehyde substrates, ammonia, and thiol. The prebiotic significance of these reactions that use the formose reaction to generate sugar intermediates that are converted to reactive amino acid thioesters is discussed.

  20. Kinetic Trapping of Metastable Amino Acid Polymorphs

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy measurements indicate that inkjet-printed racemic solutions of amino acids can produce nanocrystals trapped in metastable polymorph forms upon rapid solvent evaporation. Polymorphism impacts the composition, distribution, and physico-kinetic properties of organic solids, with energetic arguments favoring the most stable polymorph. In this study, unfavored noncentrosymmetric crystal forms were observed by SHG microscopy. Polarization-dependent SHG measurement and synchrotron X-ray microdiffraction analysis of individual printed drops are consistent with formation of homochiral crystal production. Fundamentally, these results provide evidence supporting the ubiquity of Ostwald’s Rule of Stages, describing the hypothesized transitioning of crystals between metastable polymorphic forms in the early stages of crystal formation. Practically, the presence of homochiral metastable forms has implications on chiral resolution and on solid form preparations relying on rapid solvent evaporation. PMID:24451055

  1. Synthesis of alpha-amino acids

    DOEpatents

    Davis, J.W. Jr.

    1983-01-25

    A method is described for synthesizing alpha amino acids proceeding through novel intermediates of the formulas: R[sub 1]R[sub 2]C(OSOCl)CN, R[sub 1]R[sub 2]C(Cl)CN and [R[sub 1]R[sub 2]C(CN)O][sub 2]SO wherein R[sub 1] and R[sub 2] are each selected from hydrogen monovalent substituted and unsubstituted hydrocarbon radicals of 1 to 10 carbon atoms. The use of these intermediates allows the synthesis steps to be exothermic and results in an overall synthesis method which is faster than the synthesis methods of the prior art. No Drawings

  2. Antisickling activity of amino acid benzyl esters.

    PubMed Central

    Gorecki, M; Acquaye, C T; Wilchek, M; Votano, J R; Rich, A

    1980-01-01

    The sickling of homozygous sickel cells upon deoxygenation is inhibited in the presence of 3 mM L-phenylalanine benzyl ester (Phe-OBzl) or benzyl esters of other aromatic or hydrophobic amino acids. Phe-OBzl was found to permeate into erythrocytes rapidly, and the deoxygenated cells maintained considerable flexibility as measured by their ability to pass through 3-micron pores. The osmotic fragility of the cells was unchanged and the oxygen dissociation curve was shifted slightly from a 50% saturation values of 28.5 mm Hg to 31.0 mm Hg. At lower concentrations of Phe-OBzl some antisickling activity was seen. The Phe-OBzl antisickling activity may involve both binding to deoxyhemoglobin S and modification of the erythrocyte membrane. This class of compounds has considerable potential as therapeutic agents for the treatment of sickle cell disease. Images PMID:6928612

  3. Antisickling activity of amino acid benzyl esters.

    PubMed

    Gorecki, M; Acquaye, C T; Wilchek, M; Votano, J R; Rich, A

    1980-01-01

    The sickling of homozygous sickel cells upon deoxygenation is inhibited in the presence of 3 mM L-phenylalanine benzyl ester (Phe-OBzl) or benzyl esters of other aromatic or hydrophobic amino acids. Phe-OBzl was found to permeate into erythrocytes rapidly, and the deoxygenated cells maintained considerable flexibility as measured by their ability to pass through 3-micron pores. The osmotic fragility of the cells was unchanged and the oxygen dissociation curve was shifted slightly from a 50% saturation values of 28.5 mm Hg to 31.0 mm Hg. At lower concentrations of Phe-OBzl some antisickling activity was seen. The Phe-OBzl antisickling activity may involve both binding to deoxyhemoglobin S and modification of the erythrocyte membrane. This class of compounds has considerable potential as therapeutic agents for the treatment of sickle cell disease. PMID:6928612

  4. Hydration energies of protonated amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wincel, Henryk

    2007-05-01

    Sequential hydration thermochemical data for the protonated amino acids, AAH + (AA = Gly, Ala, Phe and Pro), were obtained using a pulsed ion-beam high-pressure mass spectrometer. The hydration bond energies for AAH +(H 2O) n decrease with n. For the complexes, GlyH +(H 2O) n, AlaH +(H 2O) n and PheH +(H 2O) n with n ? 4, the measured enthalpy and entropy changes show that the first three H 2O molecules bind to the hydrogen atoms of the - NH3+ group, while the fourth H 2O forms the second hydration shell. In the case of ProH +(H 2O) nwith n ? 3, two H 2O molecules bind to the - NH2+ group, and the third one is in a second shell.

  5. Amino acid fermentation at the origin of the genetic code

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    There is evidence that the genetic code was established prior to the existence of proteins, when metabolism was powered by ribozymes. Also, early proto-organisms had to rely on simple anaerobic bioenergetic processes. In this work I propose that amino acid fermentation powered metabolism in the RNA world, and that this was facilitated by proto-adapters, the precursors of the tRNAs. Amino acids were used as carbon sources rather than as catalytic or structural elements. In modern bacteria, amino acid fermentation is known as the Stickland reaction. This pathway involves two amino acids: the first undergoes oxidative deamination, and the second acts as an electron acceptor through reductive deamination. This redox reaction results in two keto acids that are employed to synthesise ATP via substrate-level phosphorylation. The Stickland reaction is the basic bioenergetic pathway of some bacteria of the genus Clostridium. Two other facts support Stickland fermentation in the RNA world. First, several Stickland amino acid pairs are synthesised in abiotic amino acid synthesis. This suggests that amino acids that could be used as an energy substrate were freely available. Second, anticodons that have complementary sequences often correspond to amino acids that form Stickland pairs. The main hypothesis of this paper is that pairs of complementary proto-adapters were assigned to Stickland amino acids pairs. There are signatures of this hypothesis in the genetic code. Furthermore, it is argued that the proto-adapters formed double strands that brought amino acid pairs into proximity to facilitate their mutual redox reaction, structurally constraining the anticodon pairs that are assigned to these amino acid pairs. Significance tests which randomise the code are performed to study the extent of the variability of the energetic (ATP) yield. Random assignments can lead to a substantial yield of ATP and maintain enough variability, thus selection can act and refine the assignments into a proto-code that optimises the energetic yield. Monte Carlo simulations are performed to evaluate the establishment of these simple proto-codes, based on amino acid substitutions and codon swapping. In all cases, donor amino acids are assigned to anticodons composed of U+G, and have low redundancy (1-2 codons), whereas acceptor amino acids are assigned to the the remaining codons. These bioenergetic and structural constraints allow for a metabolic role for amino acids before their co-option as catalyst cofactors. Reviewers: this article was reviewed by Prof. William Martin, Prof. Eörs Szathmáry (nominated by Dr. Gáspár Jékely) and Dr. Ádám Kun (nominated by Dr. Sandor Pongor) PMID:22325238

  6. Systematic variation of amino acid substitutions for stringent assessment of pairwise covariation.

    PubMed

    Govindarajan, Sridhar; Ness, Jon E; Kim, Seran; Mundorff, Emily C; Minshull, Jeremy; Gustafsson, Claes

    2003-05-16

    During protein evolution, amino acids change due to a combination of functional constraints and genetic drift. Proteins frequently contain pairs of amino acids that appear to change together (covariation). Analysis of covariation from naturally occurring sets of orthologs cannot distinguish between residue pairs retained by functional requirements of the protein and those pairs existing due to changes along a common evolutionary path. Here, we have separated the two types of covariation by independently recombining every naturally occurring amino acid variant within a set of 15 subtilisin orthologs. Our analysis shows that in this family of subtilisin orthologs, almost all possible pairwise combinations of amino acids can coexist. This suggests that amino acid covariation found in the subtilisin orthologs is almost entirely due to common ancestral origin of the changes rather than functional constraints. We conclude that naturally occurring sequence diversity can be used to identify positions that can vary independently without destroying protein function. PMID:12729741

  7. Amino Acid Availability Modulates Vacuolar H+-ATPase Assembly.

    PubMed

    Stransky, Laura A; Forgac, Michael

    2015-11-01

    The vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase) is an ATP-dependent proton pump composed of a peripheral ATPase domain (V1) and a membrane-integral proton-translocating domain (V0) and is involved in many normal and disease processes. An important mechanism of regulating V-ATPase activity is reversible assembly of the V1 and V0 domains. Increased assembly in mammalian cells occurs under various conditions and has been shown to involve PI3K. The V-ATPase is necessary for amino acid-induced activation of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), which is important in controlling cell growth in response to nutrient availability and growth signals. The V-ATPase undergoes amino acid-dependent interactions with the Ragulator complex, which is involved in recruitment of mTORC1 to the lysosomal membrane during amino acid sensing. We hypothesized that changes in the V-ATPase/Ragulator interaction might involve amino acid-dependent changes in V-ATPase assembly. To test this, we measured V-ATPase assembly by cell fractionation in HEK293T cells treated with and without amino acids. V-ATPase assembly increases upon amino acid starvation, and this effect is reversed upon readdition of amino acids. Lysosomes from amino acid-starved cells possess greater V-ATPase-dependent proton transport, indicating that assembled pumps are catalytically active. Amino acid-dependent changes in both V-ATPase assembly and activity are independent of PI3K and mTORC1 activity, indicating the involvement of signaling pathways distinct from those implicated previously in controlling assembly. By contrast, lysosomal neutralization blocks the amino acid-dependent change in assembly and reactivation of mTORC1 after amino acid starvation. These results identify an important new stimulus for controlling V-ATPase assembly. PMID:26378229

  8. Amino Acids Regulate Transgene Expression in MDCK Cells

    PubMed Central

    Torrente, Marta; Guetg, Adriano; Sass, Jörn Oliver; Arps, Lisa; Ruckstuhl, Lisa; Camargo, Simone M. R.; Verrey, François

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression and cell growth rely on the intracellular concentration of amino acids, which in metazoans depends on extracellular amino acid availability and transmembrane transport. To investigate the impact of extracellular amino acid concentrations on the expression of a concentrative amino acid transporter, we overexpressed the main kidney proximal tubule luminal neutral amino acid transporter B0AT1-collectrin (SLC6A19-TMEM27) in MDCK cell epithelia. Exogenously expressed proteins co-localized at the luminal membrane and mediated neutral amino acid uptake. However, the transgenes were lost over few cell culture passages. In contrast, the expression of a control transgene remained stable. To test whether this loss was due to inappropriately high amino acid uptake, freshly transduced MDCK cell lines were cultivated either with physiological amounts of amino acids or with the high concentration found in standard cell culture media. Expression of exogenous transporters was unaffected by physiological amino acid concentration in the media. Interestingly, mycoplasma infection resulted in a significant increase in transgene expression and correlated with the rapid metabolism of L-arginine. However, L-arginine metabolites were shown to play no role in transgene expression. In contrast, activation of the GCN2 pathway revealed by an increase in eIF2? phosphorylation may trigger transgene derepression. Taken together, high extracellular amino acid concentration provided by cell culture media appears to inhibit the constitutive expression of concentrative amino acid transporters whereas L-arginine depletion by mycoplasma induces the expression of transgenes possibly via stimulation of the GCN2 pathway. PMID:24797296

  9. Evaluation of various sulphur amino acid compounds in the diet of red drum, Sciaenops ocellatus 

    E-print Network

    Goff, Jonathan B

    2003-01-01

    Refinement of diet formulations to enhance the efficiency of red drum production continues to be pursued. Based on previous studies, the sulfur amino acid (SAA) requirement of red drum for methionine plus cystine appears to be most limiting, which...

  10. Adsorption of amino acids by fullerenes and fullerene nanowhiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashizume, Hideo; Hirata, Chika; Fujii, Kazuko; Miyazawa, Kun’ichi

    2015-12-01

    We have investigated the adsorption of some amino acids and an oligopeptide by fullerene (C60) and fullerene nanowhiskers (FNWs). C60 and FNWs hardly adsorbed amino acids. Most of the amino acids used have a hydrophobic side chain. Ala and Val, with an alkyl chain, were not adsorbed by the C60 or FNWs. Trp, Phe and Pro, with a cyclic structure, were not adsorbed by them either. The aromatic group of C60 did not interact with the side chain. The carboxyl or amino group, with the frame structure of an amino acid, has a positive or negative charge in solution. It is likely that the C60 and FNWs would not prefer the charged carboxyl or amino group. Tri-Ala was adsorbed slightly by the C60 and FNWs. The carboxyl or amino group is not close to the center of the methyl group of Tri-Ala. One of the methyl groups in Tri-Ala would interact with the aromatic structure of the C60 and FNWs. We compared our results with the theoretical interaction of 20 bio-amino acids with C60. The theoretical simulations showed the bonding distance between C60 and an amino acid and the dissociation energy. The dissociation energy was shown to increase in the order, Val < Phe < Pro < Asp < Ala < Trp < Tyr < Arg < Leu. However, the simulation was not consistent with our experimental results. The adsorption of albumin (a protein) by C60 showed the effect on the side chains of Try and Trp. The structure of albumin was changed a little by C60. In our study Try and Tyr were hardly adsorbed by C60 and FNWs. These amino acids did not show a different adsorption behavior compared with other amino acids. The adsorptive behavior of mono-amino acids might be different from that of polypeptides.

  11. Terrestrial evolution of polymerization of amino acids - Heat to ATP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.; Nakashima, T.

    1981-01-01

    Sets of amino acids containing sufficient trifunctional monomer are thermally polymerized at temperatures such as 65 deg; the amino acids order themselves. Various polymers have diverse catalytic activities. The polymers aggregate, in aqueous solution, to cell-like structures having those activities plus emergent properties, e.g. proliferatability. Polyamino acids containing sufficient lysine catalyze conversion of free amino acids, by ATP, to small peptides and a high molecular weight fraction. The lysine-rich proteinoid is active in solution, within suspensions of cell-like particles, or in other particles composed of lysine-rich proteinoid and homopolyribonucleotide. Selectivities are observed. An archaic polyamino acid prelude to coded protein synthesis is indicated.

  12. Polymerization of beta-amino acids in aqueous solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, R.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    We have compared carbonyl diimidazole (CDI) and 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDAC) as activating agents for the oligomerization of negatively-charged alpha- and beta-amino acids in homogeneous aqueous solution. alpha-Amino acids can be oligomerized efficiently using CDI, but not by EDAC. beta-Amino acids can be oligomerized efficiently using EDAC, but not by CDI. Aspartic acid, an alpha- and beta-dicarboxylic acid is oligomerized efficiently by both reagents. These results are explained in terms of the mechanisms of the reactions, and their relevance to prebiotic chemistry is discussed.

  13. Amino Acid Racemization and the Preservation of Ancient DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poinar, Hendrik N.; Hoss, Matthias

    1996-01-01

    The extent of racemization of aspartic acid, alanine, and leucine provides criteria for assessing whether ancient tissue samples contain endogenous DNA. In samples in which the D/L ratio of aspartic acid exceeds 0.08, ancient DNA sequences could not be retrieved. Paleontological finds from which DNA sequences purportedly millions of years old have been reported show extensive racemization, and the amino acids present are mainly contaminates. An exception is the amino acids in some insects preserved in amber.

  14. Extraordinarily Adaptive Properties of the Genetically Encoded Amino Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilardo, Melissa; Meringer, Markus; Freeland, Stephen; Rasulev, Bakhtiyor; Cleaves, H. James, II

    2015-03-01

    Using novel advances in computational chemistry, we demonstrate that the set of 20 genetically encoded amino acids, used nearly universally to construct all coded terrestrial proteins, has been highly influenced by natural selection. We defined an adaptive set of amino acids as one whose members thoroughly cover relevant physico-chemical properties, or ``chemistry space.'' Using this metric, we compared the encoded amino acid alphabet to random sets of amino acids. These random sets were drawn from a computationally generated compound library containing 1913 alternative amino acids that lie within the molecular weight range of the encoded amino acids. Sets that cover chemistry space better than the genetically encoded alphabet are extremely rare and energetically costly. Further analysis of more adaptive sets reveals common features and anomalies, and we explore their implications for synthetic biology. We present these computations as evidence that the set of 20 amino acids found within the standard genetic code is the result of considerable natural selection. The amino acids used for constructing coded proteins may represent a largely global optimum, such that any aqueous biochemistry would use a very similar set.

  15. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA); Wang, Lei (San Diego, CA)

    2012-02-14

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  16. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA); Wang, Lei (San Diego, CA)

    2011-03-22

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  17. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA); Wang, Lei (San Diego, CA)

    2011-12-06

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  18. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA); Wang, Lei (San Diego, CA)

    2008-10-07

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  19. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA); Wang, Lei (San Diego, CA)

    2009-04-28

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  20. Boron containing amino acid compounds and methods for their use

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, J.D.; Coderre, J.A.

    2000-01-25

    The present invention provides new boron containing amino acid compounds and methods for making these compounds by contacting melphalan or another nitrogen mustard derivative and sodium borocaptate. The present invention also provides a method of treating a mammal having a tumor by administering to the mammal a therapeutically effective amount of the new boron containing amino acid compounds.

  1. Parenteral amino acid intakes in critically ill children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Parenteral amino acid formulas used in parenteral nutrition have a variable composition. To determine the amino acid intake of parenterally fed, critically ill children, and compare it with recommended dietary allowances (RDA) established by the Institute of Medicine (IOM), we retrospectively review...

  2. EFFECT OF LEAD ON GAMMA AMINO BUTYRIC ACID SYNTHESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The project studies the inhibitory effect of lead on the enzymatic activity of brain glutamic amino acid decarboxylase (GADC). The enzyme is responsible for the catalytic formation of gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) inhibitory neurons which is believed to be involved with the tra...

  3. Extraordinarily Adaptive Properties of the Genetically Encoded Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Ilardo, Melissa; Meringer, Markus; Freeland, Stephen; Rasulev, Bakhtiyor; Cleaves II, H. James

    2015-01-01

    Using novel advances in computational chemistry, we demonstrate that the set of 20 genetically encoded amino acids, used nearly universally to construct all coded terrestrial proteins, has been highly influenced by natural selection. We defined an adaptive set of amino acids as one whose members thoroughly cover relevant physico-chemical properties, or “chemistry space.” Using this metric, we compared the encoded amino acid alphabet to random sets of amino acids. These random sets were drawn from a computationally generated compound library containing 1913 alternative amino acids that lie within the molecular weight range of the encoded amino acids. Sets that cover chemistry space better than the genetically encoded alphabet are extremely rare and energetically costly. Further analysis of more adaptive sets reveals common features and anomalies, and we explore their implications for synthetic biology. We present these computations as evidence that the set of 20 amino acids found within the standard genetic code is the result of considerable natural selection. The amino acids used for constructing coded proteins may represent a largely global optimum, such that any aqueous biochemistry would use a very similar set. PMID:25802223

  4. Type 2 diabetes is associated with postprandial amino acid measures.

    PubMed

    Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O; de Mutsert, Renée; Rensen, Patrick C N; Prehn, Cornelia; Adamski, Jerzy; den Heijer, Martin; le Cessie, Saskia; Suhre, Karsten; Rosendaal, Frits R; Dijk, Ko Willems van

    2016-01-01

    Most studies examining the association between type 2 diabetes (T2D) and amino acids have focused on fasting concentrations. We hypothesized that, besides fasting concentrations, amino acid responses to a standardized meal challenge are also associated with T2D. In a cross-sectional study of 525 participants (165 newly-diagnosed T2D, 186 newly-diagnosed impaired fasting glycaemia, and 174 normal fasting glucose), we examined postprandial amino acid concentrations and the responses (defined as the concentrations and responses 150 min after a standardized meal) of fourteen amino acids in relation to T2D. T2D was associated with lower postprandial concentration of seven amino acids compared to the normal fasting glucose group (lowest effect estimate for serine: -0.54 standard deviations (SD) (95% CI: -0.77, -0.32)), and higher concentrations of phenylalanine, tryptophan, tyrosine and (iso-)leucine (highest effect estimate for (iso-)leucine: 0.44 SD (95% CI: 0.20, 0.67)). Regarding the meal responses, T2D was associated with lower responses of seven amino acids (ranging from -0.55 SD ((95% CI): -0.78, -0.33) for serine to -0.25 SD ((95% CI: -0.45, -0.02) for ornithine). We conclude that T2D is associated with postprandial concentrations of amino acids and a reduced amino acid meal response, indicating that these measures may also be potential markers of T2D. PMID:26271442

  5. Natural toxins that affect plant amino acid metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A diverse range of natural compounds interfere with the synthesis and other aspects of amino acid metabolism. Some are amino acid analogues, but most are not. This review covers a number of specific natural phytotoxic compounds by molecular target site. Inhibition of glutamine synthetase is of part...

  6. Amino-acid-based chiral nanoparticles for enantioselective crystallization.

    PubMed

    Preiss, Laura C; Werber, Liora; Fischer, Viktor; Hanif, Sadaf; Landfester, Katharina; Mastai, Yitzhak; Muñoz-Espí, Rafael

    2015-05-01

    Chiral polymer nanoparticles based on amino acids are prepared by miniemulsion polymerization and are demonstrated to serve as nucleating agents for the enantioselective crystallization of racemic mixtures of amino acids. The synthesized chiral nanoparticles are suited for the development of enantioselective processes and also contribute to a better understanding of chiral recognition on polymer surfaces. PMID:25809528

  7. Amino acids in a carbonaceous chondrite from Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotra, R. K.; Shimoyama, A.; Ponnamperuma, C.; Hare, P. E.

    1979-01-01

    A carbonaceous chondrite from the Antarctic, referred to as the Allan Hills meteorite 77306, appears to be free from terrestrial organic contamination. The presence of both protein and non-protein amino acids and an equal abundance of D- and L-enantiomers of amino acids, is testimony to the extraterrestrial nature of these compounds.

  8. Boron containing amino acid compounds and methods for their use

    DOEpatents

    Glass, John D. (Shoreham, NY); Coderre, Jeffrey A. (Wading River, NY)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides new boron containing amino acid compounds and methods for making these compounds by contacting melphalan or another nitrogen mustard derivative and sodium borocaptate. The present invention also provides a method of treating a mammal having a tumor by administering to the mammal a therapeutically effective amount of the new boron containing amino acid compounds.

  9. Interactive Hangman Teaches Amino Acid Structures and Abbreviations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennington, Britney O.; Sears, Duane; Clegg, Dennis O.

    2014-01-01

    We developed an interactive exercise to teach students how to draw the structures of the 20 standard amino acids and to identify the one-letter abbreviations by modifying the familiar game of "Hangman." Amino acid structures were used to represent single letters throughout the game. To provide additional practice in identifying…

  10. Multiplexed amino acid array utilizing bioluminescent Escherichia coli auxotrophs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Moon Il; Yu, Byung Jo; Woo, Min-Ah; Cho, Daeyeon; Dordick, Jonathan S; Cho, June Hyoung; Choi, Byung-Ok; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2010-05-15

    We describe a novel multiplex "amino acid array" for simultaneously quantifying different amino acids based on the rapid growth of amino acid auxotrophic E. coli. First, we constructed genetically engineered amino acid auxotrophs of E. coli containing a bioluminescence reporter gene, yielding concomitant luminescence as a response to cell growth, and then immobilized the reporter cells within individual agarose of respective wells in a 96-well plate serving as a mimic of a biochip. Using the amino acid array, we were able to determine quantitatively the concentrations of 16 amino acids in biological fluid by simply measuring bioluminescent signals from the immobilized cells within 4 h without pre- and post-treatment. The clinical utility of this method was verified by quantifying different amino acids in dried blood spot specimens from clinical samples for the diagnosis of metabolic diseases of newborn babies. This method serves as a convenient route to the rapid and simultaneous analysis of multiple amino acids from complex biological fluids and represents a new analytical paradigm that can replace conventional, yet laborious methods currently in use. PMID:20405822

  11. Role of sialic acid in synaptosomal transport of amino acid transmitters

    SciTech Connect

    Zaleska, M.M.; Erecinska, M.

    1987-03-01

    Active, high-affinity, sodium-dependent uptake of (/sup 14/C)-aminobutyric acid and of the acidic amino acid D-(/sup 3/H)-aspartate was inhibited by pretreatment of synaptosomes with neuraminidase from Vibrio cholerae. Inhibition was of a noncompetitive type and was related to the amount of sialic acid released. The maximum accumulation ratios of both amino acids (intracellular (amino acid)/extracellular (amino acid)) remained largely unaltered. Treatment with neuraminidase affected neither the synaptosomal energy levels nor the concentration of internal potassium. It is suggested that the ..gamma..-aminobutyric acid and acidic amino acid transporters are glycosylated and that sialic acid is involved in the operation of the carrier proteins directly and not through modification of driving forces responsible for amino acid uptake.

  12. Interaction of metal ions and amino acids - Possible mechanisms for the adsorption of amino acids on homoionic smectite clays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, A.; Loew, G. H.; Lawless, J.

    1983-01-01

    A semiempirical molecular orbital method is used to characterize the binding of amino acids to hexahydrated Cu(2+) and Ni(2+), a process presumed to occur when they are adsorbed in the interlamellar space of homoionic smectite clays. Five alpha-amino acids, beta-alanine, and gamma-aminobutyric acid were used to investigate the metal ion and amino acid specificity in binding. It was assumed that the alpha, beta, and gamma-amino acids would bind as bidentate anionic ligands, forming either 1:1 or 1:2 six-coordinated five, six, and seven-membered-ring chelate complexes, respectively. Energies of complex formation, optimized geometries, and electron and spin distribution were determined; and steric constraints of binding of the amino acids to the ion-exchanged cations in the interlamellar spacing of a clay were examined. Results indicate that hexahydrated Cu(2+) forms more stable complexes than hexahydrated Ni(2+) with all the amino acids studied. However, among these amino acids, complex formation does not favor the adsorption of the biological subset. Calculated energetics of complex formation and steric constraints are shown to predict that 1:1 rather than 1:2 metal-amino acid complexes are generally favored in the clay.

  13. Subtilisin-like proprotein convertase paired basic amino acid-cleaving enzyme 4 is required for chondrogenic differentiation in ATDC5 cells.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, Keizo; Futamatsu, Go; Kawano, Tsuyoshi; Muroshita, Masaki; Kageyama, Yoko; Taichi, Hiromi; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Nagahama, Masami; Matsuda, Yoshiko; Tsuji, Akihiko

    2012-11-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) have been implicated in the regulation of multiple stages of endochondral bone development. BMPs are synthesized as inactive precursors, and activated by removal of the propeptide. The subtilisin-like proprotein convertase (SPC) family comprises seven members [furin/SPC1, PC2/SPC2, PC1/PC3/SPC3, paired basic amino acid-cleaving enzyme 4 (PACE4)/SPC4, PC4/SPC5, PC6/PC5/SPC6, and PC8/PC7/LPC/SPC7], and activates various signaling molecules, including BMPs. In this study, we analyzed the role of this family in chondrogenic differentiation by using the mouse embryonal carcinoma-derived clonal cell line ATDC5. Both SPC-specific inhibitors, decanoyl-Arg-Val-Lys-Arg-chloromethylketone and ?1-antitrypsin Portland variant, suppressed chondrogenic differentiation. RT-PCR analysis revealed that PACE4 mRNA levels increased markedly during chondrogenic differentiation, whereas furin expression remained unchanged. Knockdown of PACE4 expression significantly reduced chondrogenic differentiation. Furthermore, proBMP6, which shows an expression pattern similar to that of PACE4, was efficiently processed into its mature form by PACE4, whereas furin could not process proBMP6. These results suggest that PACE4 may regulate the rate of hypertrophic conversion of ATDC5 cells through activation of proBMP6. PMID:22925071

  14. Peptide and amino acid separation with nanofiltration membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuru, Toshinori; Shutou, Takatoshi; Nakao, Shin-Ichi; Kimura, Shoji )

    1994-05-01

    Several nanofiltration membranes [UTC-20, 60 (Toray Industries), NF-40 (Film-Tech Corporation), Desal-5, G-20 (Desalination Systems), and NTR-7450 (Nitto Electric Industrial Co.)] were applied to separate amino acids and peptides on the basis of charge interaction with the membranes since most of them contain charged functional groups. Nanofiltration membranes having a molecular weight cutoff (MWCO) below 300 (UTC-20, 60, NF-40 and Desal-5) were not suitable for separation of amino acids. On the other hand, separation of amino acids and peptides with nanofiltration membranes having a MWCO around 2000-3000 (NTR-7450 and G-20) was satisfactory based on a charge effect mechanism; charged amino acids and peptides were rejected while neutral amino acids and peptides permeated through the membranes. Separation of peptides having different isoelectric points with nanofiltration membranes was possible by adjusting the pH. 15 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Stardust, Supernovae and the Chirality of the Amino Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, R N; Kajino, T; Onaka, T

    2011-03-09

    A mechanism for creating enantiomerism in the amino acids, the building blocks of the proteins, that involves global selection of one chirality by interactions between the amino acids and neutrinos from core-collapse supernovae is described. The selection involves the dependence of the interaction cross sections on the orientations of the spins of the neutrinos and the 14N nuclei in the amino acids, or in precursor molecules, which in turn couple to the molecular chirality. The subsequent chemical evolution and galactic mixing would ultimately populate the Galaxy with the selected species. The resulting amino acids could either be the source thereof on Earth, or could have triggered the chirality that was ultimately achieved for Earth's amino acids.

  16. The origin of the biologically coded amino acids.

    PubMed

    Cleaves, H James

    2010-04-21

    Biology uses essentially 20 amino acids for its coded protein enzymes, representing a very small subset of the structurally possible set. Most models of the origin of life suggest organisms developed from environmentally available organic compounds. A variety of amino acids are easily produced under conditions which were believed to have existed on the primitive Earth or in the early solar nebula. The types of amino acids produced depend on the conditions which prevailed at the time of synthesis, which remain controversial. The selection of the biological set is likely due to chemical and early biological evolution acting on the environmentally available compounds based on their chemical properties. Once life arose, selection would have proceeded based on the functional utility of amino acids coupled with their accessibility by primitive metabolism and their compatibility with other biochemical processes. Some possible mechanisms by which the modern set of 20 amino acids was selected starting from prebiotic chemistry are discussed. PMID:20034500

  17. Wet, Carbonaceous Asteroids: Altering Minerals, Changing Amino Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2011-04-01

    Many carbonaceous chondrites contain alteration products from water-rock interactions at low temperature and organic compounds. A fascinating fact known for decades is the presence in some of them of an assortment of organic compounds, including amino acids, sometimes called the building blocks of life. Murchison and other CM carbonaceous chondrites contain hundreds of amino acids. Early measurements indicated that the amino acids in carbonaceous chondrites had equal proportions of L- and D-structures, a situation called racemic. This was in sharp contrast to life on Earth, which heavily favors L- forms. However, beginning in 1997, John Cronin and Sandra Pizzarello (Arizona State University) found L- excesses in isovaline and several other amino acids in the Murchison carbonaceous chondrite. In 2009, Daniel Glavin and Jason Dworkin (Astrobiology Analytical Lab, Goddard Space Flight Center) reported the first independent confirmation of L-isovaline excesses in Murchison using a different analytical technique than employed by Cronin and Pizzarello. Inspired by this work, Daniel Glavin, Michael Callahan, Jason Dworkin, and Jamie Elsila (Astrobiology Analytical Lab, Goddard Space Flight Center), have done an extensive study of the abundance and symmetry of amino acids in carbonaceous chondrites that experienced a range of alteration by water in their parent asteroids. The results show that amino acids are more abundant in the less altered meteorites, implying that aqueous processing changes the mix of amino acids. They also confirmed the enrichment in L-structures of some amino acids, especially isovaline, confirming earlier work. The authors suggest that aqueously-altered planetesimals might have seeded the early Earth with nonracemic amino acids, perhaps explaining why life from microorganisms to people use only L- forms to make proteins. The initial imbalance caused by non-biologic processes in wet asteroids might have been amplified by life on Earth. Alternatively, the same processes that produced the L-amino acid excesses in carbonaceous asteroids also operated on the early Earth.

  18. Molecular cloning and amino acid sequence of human 5-lipoxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, T.; Funk, C.D.; Radmark, O.; Hoeoeg, J.O.; Joernvall, H.; Samuelsson, B.

    1988-01-01

    5-Lipoxygenase (EC 1.13.11.34), a Ca/sup 2 +/- and ATP-requiring enzyme, catalyzes the first two steps in the biosynthesis of the peptidoleukotrienes and the chemotactic factor leukotriene B/sub 4/. A cDNA clone corresponding to 5-lipoxygenase was isolated from a human lung lambda gt11 expression library by immunoscreening with a polyclonal antibody. Additional clones from a human placenta lambda gt11 cDNA library were obtained by plaque hybridization with the /sup 32/P-labeled lung cDNA clone. Sequence data obtained from several overlapping clones indicate that the composite DNAs contain the complete coding region for the enzyme. From the deduced primary structure, 5-lipoxygenase encodes a 673 amino acid protein with a calculated molecular weight of 77,839. Direct analysis of the native protein and its proteolytic fragments confirmed the deduced composition, the amino-terminal amino acid sequence, and the structure of many internal segments. 5-Lipoxygenase has no apparent sequence homology with leukotriene A/sub 4/ hydrolase or Ca/sup 2 +/-binding proteins. RNA blot analysis indicated substantial amounts of an mRNA species of approx. = 2700 nucleotides in leukocytes, lung, and placenta.

  19. Amino Acid Analyses of Acid Hydrolysates in Desert Varnish

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Randall S.; Staley, James T.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Engel, Mike

    2001-01-01

    There has long been a debate as to whether rock varnish deposits are microbially mediated or are deposited by inorganic processes. Varnished rocks are found throughout the world primarily in arid and semi-arid regions. The varnish coats are typically up to 200 microns thick and are composed of clays and alternating layers enriched in manganese and iron oxides. The individual layers range in thickness from 1 micron to greater than 10 microns and may continue laterally for more than a 100 microns. Overlapping botryoidal structures are visible in thin section and scanning electron micrographs. The coatings also include small amounts of organic mater and detrital grains. Amino-acid hydrolysates offer a means of assessing the organic composition of rock varnish collected from the Sonoran Desert, near Phoenix, AZ. Chromatographic analyses of hydrolysates from powdered samples of rock varnish suggest that the interior of rock varnish is relatively enriched in amino acids and specifically in d-alanine and glutamic acid. Peptidoglycan (murein) is the main structural component of gram-positive bacterial cell walls. The d-enantiomer of alanine and glutamic acid are specific to peptidoglycan and are consequently an indicator for the presence of bacteria. D-alanine is also found in teichoic acid which is only found in gram-positive bacteria. Several researchers have cultured bacteria from the surface of rock varnish and most have been gram-positive, suggesting that gram-positive bacteria are intimately associated with varnish coatings and may play a role in the formation of varnish coatings.

  20. Single amino acids in sucrose rewards modulate feeding and associative learning in the honeybee

    PubMed Central

    Simcock, Nicola K.; Gray, Helen E.; Wright, Geraldine A.

    2014-01-01

    Obtaining the correct balance of nutrients requires that the brain integrates information about the body’s nutritional state with sensory information from food to guide feeding behaviour. Learning is a mechanism that allows animals to identify cues associated with nutrients so that they can be located quickly when required. Feedback about nutritional state is essential for nutrient balancing and could influence learning. How specific this feedback is to individual nutrients has not often been examined. Here, we tested how the honeybee’s nutritional state influenced the likelihood it would feed on and learn sucrose solutions containing single amino acids. Nutritional state was manipulated by pre-feeding bees with either 1 M sucrose or 1 M sucrose containing 100 mM of isoleucine, proline, phenylalanine, or methionine 24 h prior to olfactory conditioning of the proboscis extension response. We found that bees pre-fed sucrose solution consumed less of solutions containing amino acids and were also less likely to learn to associate amino acid solutions with odours. Unexpectedly, bees pre-fed solutions containing an amino acid were also less likely to learn to associate odours with sucrose the next day. Furthermore, they consumed more of and were more likely to learn when rewarded with an amino acid solution if they were pre-fed isoleucine and proline. Our data indicate that single amino acids at relatively high concentrations inhibit feeding on sucrose solutions containing them, and they can act as appetitive reinforcers during learning. Our data also suggest that select amino acids interact with mechanisms that signal nutritional sufficiency to reduce hunger. Based on these experiments, we predict that nutrient balancing for essential amino acids during learning requires integration of information about several amino acids experienced simultaneously. PMID:24819203

  1. Extraterrestrial Amino Acids Identified in Metal-Rich CH and CB Carbonaceous Chondrites from Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, Aaron S.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Hein, Jason E.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2013-01-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites contain numerous indigenous organic compounds and could have been an important source of prebiotic compounds required for the origin of life on Earth or elsewhere. Extraterrestrial amino acids have been reported in five of the eight groups of carbonaceous chondrites and are most abundant in CI, CM, and CR chondritesbut are also present in the more thermally altered CV and CO chondrites. We report the abundance, distribution, and enantiomeric and isotopic compositions of simple primary amino acids in six metal-rich CH and CB carbonaceous chondrites that have not previously been investigated for amino acids: Allan Hills (ALH) 85085 (CH3), Pecora Escarpment(PCA) 91467 (CH3), Patuxent Range (PAT) 91546 (CH3), MacAlpine Hills (MAC) 02675(CBb), Miller Range (MIL) 05082 (CB), and Miller Range (MIL) 07411 (CB). Amino acid abundances and carbon isotopic values were obtained by using both liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry and fluorescence, and gas chromatography isotope ratiomass spectrometry. The (delta D, delta C-13, delta N-15) ratios of multiple amino acids fall outside of the terrestrial range and support their extraterrestrial origin. Extracts of CH chondrites were found to be particularly rich in amino acids (1316 parts per million, ppm) while CB chondrite extracts had much lower abundances (0.22 ppm). The amino acid distributions of the CH and CB chondrites were distinct from the distributions observed in type 2 and 3 CM and CR chondrites and contained elevated levels of beta-, gamma-, and delta-amino acids compared to the corresponding alpha-amino acids, providing evidence that multiple amino acid formation mechanisms were important in CH and CB chondrites.

  2. PLASMA PROTEIN PRODUCTION INFLUENCED BY AMINO ACID MIXTURES AND LACK OF ESSENTIAL AMINO ACIDS

    PubMed Central

    Madden, S. C.; Anderson, F. W.; Donovan, J. C.; Whipple, G. H.

    1945-01-01

    When blood plasma proteins are depleted by bleeding with return of red cells suspended in saline (plasmapheresis) it is possible to bring dogs to a steady state of hypoproteinemia and a constant level of plasma protein production if the diet nitrogen intake is controlled and limited. Such dogs are outwardly normal but have a lowered resistance to infection and intoxication and probably to vitamin deficiency. When the diet nitrogen is provided by certain mixtures of the ten growth essential amino acids plus glycine, given intravenously at a rapid rate, plasma protein production is good. The same mixture absorbed subcutaneously at a slower rate may be slightly better utilized. Fed orally the same mixture is better utilized and associated with a lower urinary nitrogen excretion. An ample amino acid mixture for the daily intake of a 10 kilo dog may contain in grams dl-threonine 1.4, dl-valine 3, dl-leucine 3, dl-isoleucine 2, l(+)-lysine·HCl·H2O 2.2, dl-tryptophane 0.3, dl-phenylalanine 2, dl-methionine 1.2, l(+)-histidine·HCl·H2O 1, l(+)-arginine·HCl 1, and glycine 2. Half this quantity is inadequate and not improved by addition of a mixture of alanine, serine, norleucine, proline, hydroxyproline, and tyrosine totalling 1.4 gm. Aspartic acid appears to induce vomiting when added to a mixture of amino acids. The same response has been reported for glutamic acid (8). Omission from the intake of leucine or of leucine and isoleucine results in negative nitrogen balance and rapid weight loss but plasma protein production may be temporarily maintained. It is possible that leucine may be captured from red blood cell destruction. Tryptophane deficiency causes an abrupt decline in plasma protein production. No decline occurred during 2 weeks of histidine deficiency but the urinary nitrogen increased to negative balance. Plasma protein production may be impaired during conditions of dietary deficiency not related to the protein or amino acid intake. Skin lesions and liver function impairment are described. Unidentified factors present in liver and yeast appear to be involved. PMID:19871490

  3. Subcritical Water Extraction of Amino Acids from Atacama Desert Soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amashukeli, Xenia; Pelletier, Christine C.; Kirby, James P.; Grunthaner, Frank J.

    2007-01-01

    Amino acids are considered organic molecular indicators in the search for extant and extinct life in the Solar System. Extraction of these molecules from a particulate solid matrix, such as Martian regolith, will be critical to their in situ detection and analysis. The goals of this study were to optimize a laboratory amino acid extraction protocol by quantitatively measuring the yields of extracted amino acids as a function of liquid water temperature and sample extraction time and to compare the results to the standard HCl vapor- phase hydrolysis yields for the same soil samples. Soil samples from the Yungay region of the Atacama Desert ( Martian regolith analog) were collected during a field study in the summer of 2005. The amino acids ( alanine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, glycine, serine, and valine) chosen for analysis were present in the samples at concentrations of 1 - 70 parts- per- billion. Subcritical water extraction efficiency was examined over the temperature range of 30 - 325 degrees C, at pressures of 17.2 or 20.0 MPa, and for water- sample contact equilibration times of 0 - 30 min. None of the amino acids were extracted in detectable amounts at 30 degrees C ( at 17.2 MPa), suggesting that amino acids are too strongly bound by the soil matrix to be extracted at such a low temperature. Between 150 degrees C and 250 degrees C ( at 17.2 MPa), the extraction efficiencies of glycine, alanine, and valine were observed to increase with increasing water temperature, consistent with higher solubility at higher temperatures, perhaps due to the decreasing dielectric constant of water. Amino acids were not detected in extracts collected at 325 degrees C ( at 20.0 MPa), probably due to amino acid decomposition at this temperature. The optimal subcritical water extraction conditions for these amino acids from Atacama Desert soils were achieved at 200 degrees C, 17.2 MPa, and a water- sample contact equilibration time of 10 min.

  4. Graphdiyne as a promising material for detecting amino acids.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Gao, Pengfei; Guo, Lei; Zhang, Shengli

    2015-01-01

    The adsorption of glycine, glutamic acid, histidine and phenylalanine on single-layer graphdiyne/ graphene is investigated by ab initio calculations. The results show that for each amino acid molecule, the adsorption energy on graphdiyne is larger than the adsorption energy on graphene and dispersion interactions predominate in the adsorption. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that at room temperature the amino acid molecules keep migrating and rotating on graphdiyne surface and induce fluctuation in graphdiyne bandgap. Additionally, the photon absorption spectra of graphdiyne-amino-acid systems are investigated. We uncover that the presence of amino acid molecules makes the photon absorption peaks of graphdiyne significantly depressed and shifted. Finally, quantum electronic transport properties of graphdiyne-amino-acid systems are compared with the transport properties of pure graphdiyne. We reveal that the amino acid molecules induce distinct changes in the electronic conductivity of graphdiyne. The results in this paper reveal that graphdiyne is a promising two-dimensional material for sensitively detecting amino acids and may potentially be used in biosensors. PMID:26568200

  5. Graphdiyne as a promising material for detecting amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi; Gao, Pengfei; Guo, Lei; Zhang, Shengli

    2015-01-01

    The adsorption of glycine, glutamic acid, histidine and phenylalanine on single-layer graphdiyne/ graphene is investigated by ab initio calculations. The results show that for each amino acid molecule, the adsorption energy on graphdiyne is larger than the adsorption energy on graphene and dispersion interactions predominate in the adsorption. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that at room temperature the amino acid molecules keep migrating and rotating on graphdiyne surface and induce fluctuation in graphdiyne bandgap. Additionally, the photon absorption spectra of graphdiyne-amino-acid systems are investigated. We uncover that the presence of amino acid molecules makes the photon absorption peaks of graphdiyne significantly depressed and shifted. Finally, quantum electronic transport properties of graphdiyne-amino-acid systems are compared with the transport properties of pure graphdiyne. We reveal that the amino acid molecules induce distinct changes in the electronic conductivity of graphdiyne. The results in this paper reveal that graphdiyne is a promising two-dimensional material for sensitively detecting amino acids and may potentially be used in biosensors. PMID:26568200

  6. Graphdiyne as a promising material for detecting amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Gao, Pengfei; Guo, Lei; Zhang, Shengli

    2015-11-01

    The adsorption of glycine, glutamic acid, histidine and phenylalanine on single-layer graphdiyne/ graphene is investigated by ab initio calculations. The results show that for each amino acid molecule, the adsorption energy on graphdiyne is larger than the adsorption energy on graphene and dispersion interactions predominate in the adsorption. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that at room temperature the amino acid molecules keep migrating and rotating on graphdiyne surface and induce fluctuation in graphdiyne bandgap. Additionally, the photon absorption spectra of graphdiyne-amino-acid systems are investigated. We uncover that the presence of amino acid molecules makes the photon absorption peaks of graphdiyne significantly depressed and shifted. Finally, quantum electronic transport properties of graphdiyne-amino-acid systems are compared with the transport properties of pure graphdiyne. We reveal that the amino acid molecules induce distinct changes in the electronic conductivity of graphdiyne. The results in this paper reveal that graphdiyne is a promising two-dimensional material for sensitively detecting amino acids and may potentially be used in biosensors.

  7. Regulation of myocardial amino acid balance in the conscious dog.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, R G; Barrett, E J; Francis, C K; Jacob, R; Zaret, B L

    1985-01-01

    The effects in vivo of physiologic increases in insulin and amino acids on myocardial amino acid balance were evaluated in conscious dogs. Arterial and coronary sinus concentrations of amino acids and coronary blood flow were measured during a 30-min basal and a 100-min experimental period employing three protocols: euglycemic insulin clamp (plasma insulin equaled 70 +/- 11 microU/ml, n = 6); euglycemic insulin clamp during amino acid infusion (plasma insulin equaled 89 +/- 12 microU/ml, n = 6); and suppression of insulin with somatostatin during amino acid infusion (plasma insulin equaled 15 +/- 4 microU/ml, n = 6). Basally, only leucine and isoleucine were removed significantly by myocardium (net branched chain amino acid [BCAA] uptake equaled 0.5 +/- 0.2 mumol/min), while glycine, alanine, and glutamine were released. Glutamine demonstrated the highest net myocardial production (1.6 +/- 0.2 mumol/min). No net exchange was seen for valine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, cysteine, methionine, glutamate, asparagine, serine, threonine, taurine, and aspartate. In group I, hyperinsulinemia caused a decline of all plasma amino acids except alanine; alanine balance switched from release to an uptake of 0.6 +/- 0.4 mumol/min (P less than 0.05), while the myocardial balance of other amino acids was unchanged. In group II, amino acid concentrations rose, and were accompanied by a marked rise in myocardial BCAA uptake (0.4 +/- 0.1-2.6 +/- 0.3 mumol/min, P less than 0.001). Uptake of alanine was again stimulated (0.9 +/- 0.3 mumol/min, P less than 0.01), while glutamine production was unchanged (1.3 +/- 0.4 vs. 1.6 +/- 0.3 mumol/min). In group III, there was a 4-5-fold increase in the plasma concentration of the infused amino acids, accompanied by marked stimulation in uptake of only BCAA (6.8 +/- 0.7 mumol/min). Myocardial glutamine production was unchanged (1.9 +/- 0.4-1.3 +/- 0.7 mumol/min). Within the three experimental groups there were highly significant linear correlations between myocardial uptake and arterial concentration of leucine, isoleucine, valine, and total BCAA (r = 0.98, 0.98, 0.92, and 0.97, respectively); P less than 0.001 for each). In vivo, BCAA are the principal amino acids taken up by the myocardium basally and during amino acid infusion. Plasma BCAA concentration and not insulin determines the rate of myocardial BCAA uptake. Insulin stimulates myocardial alanine uptake. Neither insulin nor amino acid infusion alters myocardial glutamine release. PMID:2859300

  8. Electrokinetic characterization of magnetite nanoparticles functionalized with amino acids.

    PubMed

    Viota, J L; Arroyo, F J; Delgado, A V; Horno, J

    2010-04-01

    The synthesis of nanoparticles consisting of a magnetite core coated with one or more layers of amino acid (L-arginine, L-lysine, glycine, and L-glutamine) is described in this paper. For all the amino acids it is found that adsorption increases with concentration in solution in the range 0.5-10 mg/mL. The adsorption, however, differs substantially from one amino acid to another, depending on the length of the hydrocarbon chain and the polarity and charge of the side group. Thus, for given concentration and pH, adsorption is found to increase in the order L-arginine < L-lysine < L-glutamine < glycine. This order corresponds roughly to amino acids with decreasing chain length; in addition, the presence of the less polarizable guanidine group in the arginine molecule may explain why this amino acid is slightly less adsorbed than lysine. The pH dependence of the adsorption of each amino acid is reasonably explained considering the surface charge of magnetite and the charge of the amino acid molecules for different pHs, indicating a significant role of electrostatics in adsorption. This is further checked by means of determinations of the electrophoretic mobility of amino acid-coated magnetite as a function of pH: the results indicate a shift of the isoelectric point of the raw magnetite toward more basic pHs, an indication of adsorption of positive species, as confirmed by the tendency of the mobility of amino acid-coated magnetite toward more positive values below neutral pH. The electrophoretic mobility of coated particles was also measured as a function of the concentration of amino acid, and it was found that for low concentrations the four amino acids provoke charge inversion and overcharging of the magnetite surface at pH 6. Finally, the dependence of the electrophoretic mobility on the ionic strength indicated that from an electrophoretic point of view, the functionalized magnetite-amino acid particles do not behave as soft particles, and that the amino acid coating should be very compact. PMID:20096847

  9. Amino Acid Synthesis in a Supercritical Carbon Dioxide - Water System

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Kouki; Futamura, Yasuhiro; Shiohara, Tomoo; Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Kanaya, Fumihide; Manome, Yoshinobu; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Mars is a CO2-abundant planet, whereas early Earth is thought to be also CO2-abundant. In addition, water was also discovered on Mars in 2008. From the facts and theory, we assumed that soda fountains were present on both planets, and this affected amino acid synthesis. Here, using a supercritical CO2/liquid H2O (10:1) system which mimicked crust soda fountains, we demonstrate production of amino acids from hydroxylamine (nitrogen source) and keto acids (oxylic acid sources). In this research, several amino acids were detected with an amino acid analyzer. Moreover, alanine polymers were detected with LC-MS. Our research lights up a new pathway in the study of life’s origin. PMID:19582225

  10. Amino acid synthesis in a supercritical carbon dioxide - water system.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Kouki; Futamura, Yasuhiro; Shiohara, Tomoo; Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Kanaya, Fumihide; Manome, Yoshinobu; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2009-06-01

    Mars is a CO(2)-abundant planet, whereas early Earth is thought to be also CO(2)-abundant. In addition, water was also discovered on Mars in 2008. From the facts and theory, we assumed that soda fountains were present on both planets, and this affected amino acid synthesis. Here, using a supercritical CO(2)/liquid H(2)O (10:1) system which mimicked crust soda fountains, we demonstrate production of amino acids from hydroxylamine (nitrogen source) and keto acids (oxylic acid sources). In this research, several amino acids were detected with an amino acid analyzer. Moreover, alanine polymers were detected with LC-MS. Our research lights up a new pathway in the study of life's origin. PMID:19582225

  11. Amino Acid Carbamates As Prodrugs Of Resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Mattarei, Andrea; Azzolini, Michele; La Spina, Martina; Zoratti, Mario; Paradisi, Cristina; Biasutto, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol (3, 5, 4'-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene), a plant polyphenol, has important drug-like properties, but its pharmacological exploitation in vivo is hindered by its rapid transformation via phase II conjugative metabolism. One approach to bypass this problem relies on prodrugs. We report here the synthesis, characterization, stability and in vivo pharmacokinetic behaviour of prodrugs of resveratrol in which the OH groups are engaged in an N-monosubstituted carbamate ester (-OC(O)NHR) linkage with a natural amino acid (Leu, Ile, Phe, Thr) to prevent conjugation and modulate the physicochemical properties of the molecule. We also report a convenient, high-yield protocol to obtain derivatives of this type. The new carbamate ester derivatives are stable at pH 1, while they undergo slow hydrolysis at physiological pH and hydrolyse with kinetics suitable for use in prodrugs in whole blood. After administration to rats by oral gavage the isoleucine-containing prodrug was significantly absorbed, and was present in the bloodstream as non-metabolized unaltered or partially deprotected species, demonstrating effective shielding from first-pass metabolism. We conclude that prodrugs based on the N-monosubstituted carbamate ester bond have the appropriate stability profile for the systemic delivery of phenolic compounds. PMID:26463125

  12. Amino Acid Carbamates As Prodrugs Of Resveratrol

    PubMed Central

    Mattarei, Andrea; Azzolini, Michele; La Spina, Martina; Zoratti, Mario; Paradisi, Cristina; Biasutto, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol (3, 5, 4?-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene), a plant polyphenol, has important drug-like properties, but its pharmacological exploitation in vivo is hindered by its rapid transformation via phase II conjugative metabolism. One approach to bypass this problem relies on prodrugs. We report here the synthesis, characterization, stability and in vivo pharmacokinetic behaviour of prodrugs of resveratrol in which the OH groups are engaged in an N-monosubstituted carbamate ester (-OC(O)NHR) linkage with a natural amino acid (Leu, Ile, Phe, Thr) to prevent conjugation and modulate the physicochemical properties of the molecule. We also report a convenient, high-yield protocol to obtain derivatives of this type. The new carbamate ester derivatives are stable at pH 1, while they undergo slow hydrolysis at physiological pH and hydrolyse with kinetics suitable for use in prodrugs in whole blood. After administration to rats by oral gavage the isoleucine-containing prodrug was significantly absorbed, and was present in the bloodstream as non-metabolized unaltered or partially deprotected species, demonstrating effective shielding from first-pass metabolism. We conclude that prodrugs based on the N-monosubstituted carbamate ester bond have the appropriate stability profile for the systemic delivery of phenolic compounds. PMID:26463125

  13. Electronic coupling through natural amino acids.

    PubMed

    Berstis, Laura; Beckham, Gregg T; Crowley, Michael F

    2015-12-14

    Myriad scientific domains concern themselves with biological electron transfer (ET) events that span across vast scales of rate and efficiency through a remarkably fine-tuned integration of amino acid (AA) sequences, electronic structure, dynamics, and environment interactions. Within this intricate scheme, many questions persist as to how proteins modulate electron-tunneling properties. To help elucidate these principles, we develop a model set of peptides representing the common ?-helix and ?-strand motifs including all natural AAs within implicit protein-environment solvation. Using an effective Hamiltonian strategy with density functional theory, we characterize the electronic coupling through these peptides, furthermore considering side-chain dynamics. For both motifs, predictions consistently show that backbone-mediated electronic coupling is distinctly sensitive to AA type (aliphatic, polar, aromatic, negatively charged and positively charged), and to side-chain orientation. The unique properties of these residues may be employed to design activated, deactivated, or switch-like superexchange pathways. Electronic structure calculations and Green's function analyses indicate that localized shifts in the electron density along the peptide play a role in modulating these pathways, and further substantiate the experimentally observed behavior of proline residues as superbridges. The distinct sensitivities of tunneling pathways to sequence and conformation revealed in this electronic coupling database help improve our fundamental understanding of the broad diversity of ET reactivity and provide guiding principles for peptide design. PMID:26671404

  14. Boramino acid as a marker for amino acid transporters

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhibo; Chen, Haojun; Chen, Kai; Shao, Yihan; Kiesewetter, Dale O.; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    Amino acid transporters (AATs) are a series of integral channels for uphill cellular uptake of nutrients and neurotransmitters. Abnormal expression of AATs is often associated with cancer, addiction, and multiple mental diseases. Although methods to evaluate in vivo expression of AATs would be highly useful, efforts to develop them have been hampered by a lack of appropriate tracers. We describe a new class of AA mimics—boramino acids (BAAs)—that can serve as general imaging probes for AATs. The structure of a BAA is identical to that of the corresponding natural AA, except for an exotic replacement of the carboxylate with -BF3?. Cellular studies demonstrate strong AAT-mediated cell uptake, and animal studies show high tumor-specific accumulation, suggesting that BAAs hold great promise for the development of new imaging probes and smart AAT-targeting drugs. PMID:26601275

  15. Boramino acid as a marker for amino acid transporters.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhibo; Chen, Haojun; Chen, Kai; Shao, Yihan; Kiesewetter, Dale O; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-09-01

    Amino acid transporters (AATs) are a series of integral channels for uphill cellular uptake of nutrients and neurotransmitters. Abnormal expression of AATs is often associated with cancer, addiction, and multiple mental diseases. Although methods to evaluate in vivo expression of AATs would be highly useful, efforts to develop them have been hampered by a lack of appropriate tracers. We describe a new class of AA mimics-boramino acids (BAAs)-that can serve as general imaging probes for AATs. The structure of a BAA is identical to that of the corresponding natural AA, except for an exotic replacement of the carboxylate with -BF3 (-). Cellular studies demonstrate strong AAT-mediated cell uptake, and animal studies show high tumor-specific accumulation, suggesting that BAAs hold great promise for the development of new imaging probes and smart AAT-targeting drugs. PMID:26601275

  16. Light chains of mouse myeloma proteins: partial amino acid sequence.

    PubMed

    Perham, R; Appella, E; Potter, M

    1966-10-21

    Five kappa chains in the urinary proteins of the BALB/c mouse have the same carboxyl terminal amino acid sequence; this sequence resembles that of kappa light chains in human immunoglobulins. The five chains have amino acid sequence variations at the amino- terminal. The genetic basis for the amino- terminal variations is not understood but could be due either to a mecha nism for differently translating a single genetic message or to the presence of more than one kappa- type structural cistron in the BALB/c genome. PMID:5917087

  17. Expression of Cationic Amino Acid Transporter 2 Is Required for Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cell-Mediated Control of T Cell Immunity.

    PubMed

    Cimen Bozkus, Cansu; Elzey, Bennett D; Crist, Scott A; Ellies, Lesley G; Ratliff, Timothy L

    2015-12-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous population of immature cells that expand during benign and cancer-associated inflammation and are characterized by their ability to inhibit T cell immunity. Increased metabolism of l-Arginine (l-Arg), through the enzymes arginase 1 and NO synthase 2 (NOS2), is well documented as a major MDSC suppressive mechanism. Therefore, we hypothesized that restricting MDSC uptake of l-Arg is a critical control point to modulate their suppressor activity. Using murine models of prostate-specific inflammation and cancer, we have identified the mechanisms by which extracellular l-Arg is transported into MDSCs. We have shown that MDSCs recruited to localized inflammation and tumor sites upregulate cationic amino acid transporter 2 (Cat2), coordinately with Arg1 and Nos2. Cat2 expression is not induced in MDSCs in peripheral organs. CAT2 contributes to the transport of l-Arg in MDSCs and is an important regulator of MDSC suppressive function. MDSCs that lack CAT2 have significantly reduced suppressive ability ex vivo and display impaired capacity for regulating T cell responses in vivo as evidenced by increased T cell expansion and decreased tumor growth in Cat2(-/-) mice. The abrogation of suppressive function is due to low intracellular l-Arg levels, which leads to the impaired ability of NOS2 to catalyze l-Arg-dependent metabolic processes. Together, these findings demonstrate that CAT2 modulates MDSC function. In the absence of CAT2, MDSCs display diminished capacity for controlling T cell immunity in prostate inflammation and cancer models, where the loss of CAT2 results in enhanced antitumor activity. PMID:26491198

  18. Free amino acids in metamorphosing bonefish (Albula sp.) leptocephali.

    PubMed

    Pfeiler, E

    1987-07-01

    Metamorphosing leptocephalous larvae of the bonefish (Albula sp.) were analyzed for total ninhydrinpositive substances (NPS) and free amino acids. Total NPS content showed little change during metamorphosis. The average NPS value (±S.E.) for 16 larvae was 1.8 (±0.1) mg×larva(-1), which represents approximately 4% and 8% of the total dry weight of early and advanced larvae, respectively. Taurine was the most abundant free amino acid in whole-larva extracts, accounting for 36% and 59% of the total by weight in early and advanced larvae, respectively. The essential amino acids, leucine, isoleucine, phenylalanine, histidine, valine, methionine, lysine and arginine, accounted for about half (47%) of the total in early larvae but were reduced to about 23% of the total in advanced larvae. All of the component essential amino acids decreased during metamorphosis, but the greatest effect was seen with the first five. The remaining non-essential amino acids comprised less than 20% of the total in early larvae and, although the overall value changed little during metamorphosis, certain components such as glycine and glutamic acid showed large increases whereas others such as tyrosine and serine were reduced. Increases in amino acid content after acid hydrolysis of whole-larva extracts indicated that trichloroacetic acid-soluble, low molecular weight peptides were present in both early and advanced leptocephali. PMID:24226035

  19. Nutrient, fatty acid, amino acid and mineral analysis of natural prey of the Hawaiian monk seal, Monachus schauinslandi.

    PubMed

    Goodman-Lowe, G D; Carpenter, J R; Atkinson, S; Ako, H

    1999-06-01

    Proximate nutrients, gross energy content, mineral, amino acid and fatty acid composition were determined for teleost, cephalopod and crustacean prey of the Hawaiian monk seal. Crude protein was highest in the octopus, Octopus cyanea (80.0%), crude fat was highest in the Muraenid teleost, Gymnothorax eurostus (14.1%), whereas crude ash was highest in the lobster, Panulirus marginatus (11.6%). Gross energies ranged from 4.0 +/- 0.01 kcal g-1 in the Labrid teleost Bodianus bilulunatus to 6.0 +/- 0.12 kcal g-1 in the moray eel, Gymnothorax undulatus. Essential amino acids occurred in lower concentrations as a percentage of the total amino acids (35.8 +/- 2.6%) than non-essential amino acids (64.2 +/- 2.6%), but the ratio of individual amino acids to total amino acid concentrations were similar to those required by some monogastric terrestrial species and fingerling salmon. The fatty acid concentrations varied widely among species (range = 1.2-16.5 mg 100 mg-1); however, the teleosts had higher total fatty acids than the non-teleosts. This study indicates that, from a nutritional standpoint, some prey may be more beneficial to the Hawaiian monk seal; however, these prey are not necessarily the most abundant or available to some populations of the monk seal. PMID:10425733

  20. [Studies on interaction of acid-treated nanotube titanic acid and amino acids].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huqin; Chen, Xuemei; Jin, Zhensheng; Liao, Guangxi; Wu, Xiaoming; Du, Jianqiang; Cao, Xiang

    2010-06-01

    Nanotube titanic acid (NTA) has distinct optical and electrical character, and has photocatalysis character. In accordance with these qualities, NTA was treated with acid so as to enhance its surface activity. Surface structures and surface groups of acid-treated NTA were characterized and analyzed by Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry (FT-IR). The interaction between acid-treated NTA and amino acids was investigated. Analysis results showed that the lengths of acid-treated NTA became obviously shorter. The diameters of nanotube bundles did not change obviously with acid-treating. Meanwhile, the surface of acid-treated NTA was cross-linked with carboxyl or esterfunction. In addition, acid-treated NTA can catch amino acid residues easily, and then form close combination. PMID:20649031

  1. 40 CFR 721.10633 - Aromatic sulfonic acid amino azo dye salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Aromatic sulfonic acid amino azo dye salts (generic). 721...721.10633 Aromatic sulfonic acid amino azo dye salts (generic). ...identified generically as aromatic sulfonic acid amino azo dye salts (PMN...

  2. 40 CFR 721.430 - Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid derivative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... false Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid derivative. 721.430...430 Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid derivative. (a) Chemical...generically as oxo-substituted amino al-kan-oic acid derivative (PMN No....

  3. 40 CFR 721.10380 - Benzoic acid, 3-amino-2-mercapto-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Benzoic acid, 3-amino-2-mercapto-. 721.10380...Substances § 721.10380 Benzoic acid, 3-amino-2-mercapto-. (a) Chemical...substance identified as benzoic acid, 3-amino-2-mercapto- (PMN...

  4. 40 CFR 721.1728 - Benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino-, methyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... false Benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino-, methyl ester...721.1728 Benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino-, methyl ester...identified as benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino-, methyl...

  5. 40 CFR 721.1728 - Benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino-, methyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... false Benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino-, methyl ester...721.1728 Benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino-, methyl ester...identified as benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino-, methyl...

  6. 40 CFR 721.430 - Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid derivative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... false Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid derivative. 721.430...430 Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid derivative. (a) Chemical...generically as oxo-substituted amino al-kan-oic acid derivative (PMN No....

  7. 40 CFR 721.430 - Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid derivative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... false Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid derivative. 721.430...430 Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid derivative. (a) Chemical...generically as oxo-substituted amino al-kan-oic acid derivative (PMN No....

  8. 40 CFR 721.1728 - Benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino-, methyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... false Benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino-, methyl ester...721.1728 Benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino-, methyl ester...identified as benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino-, methyl...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10380 - Benzoic acid, 3-amino-2-mercapto-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Benzoic acid, 3-amino-2-mercapto-. 721.10380...Substances § 721.10380 Benzoic acid, 3-amino-2-mercapto-. (a) Chemical...substance identified as benzoic acid, 3-amino-2-mercapto- (PMN...

  10. 40 CFR 721.1728 - Benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino-, methyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... false Benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino-, methyl ester...721.1728 Benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino-, methyl ester...identified as benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino-, methyl...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10474 - Substituted amino ethane sulfonic acid salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Substituted amino ethane sulfonic acid salt (generic). 721...721.10474 Substituted amino ethane sulfonic acid salt (generic). ...generically as substituted amino ethane sulfonic acid salt (PMN...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10380 - Benzoic acid, 3-amino-2-mercapto-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Benzoic acid, 3-amino-2-mercapto-. 721.10380...Substances § 721.10380 Benzoic acid, 3-amino-2-mercapto-. (a) Chemical...substance identified as benzoic acid, 3-amino-2-mercapto- (PMN...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10633 - Aromatic sulfonic acid amino azo dye salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Aromatic sulfonic acid amino azo dye salts (generic). 721...721.10633 Aromatic sulfonic acid amino azo dye salts (generic). ...identified generically as aromatic sulfonic acid amino azo dye salts (PMN...

  14. 40 CFR 721.430 - Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid derivative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... false Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid derivative. 721.430...430 Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid derivative. (a) Chemical...generically as oxo-substituted amino al-kan-oic acid derivative (PMN No....

  15. 40 CFR 721.10474 - Substituted amino ethane sulfonic acid salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Substituted amino ethane sulfonic acid salt (generic). 721...721.10474 Substituted amino ethane sulfonic acid salt (generic). ...generically as substituted amino ethane sulfonic acid salt (PMN...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10630 - Amino acid, carboxyalkyl, alkylsulfonate, alkali salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Amino acid, carboxyalkyl, alkylsulfonate...Chemical Substances § 721.10630 Amino acid, carboxyalkyl, alkylsulfonate...substances identified generically as amino acid, carboxyalkyl,...

  17. 40 CFR 721.430 - Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid derivative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... false Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid derivative. 721.430...430 Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid derivative. (a) Chemical...generically as oxo-substituted amino al-kan-oic acid derivative (PMN No....

  18. 40 CFR 721.10630 - Amino acid, carboxyalkyl, alkylsulfonate, alkali salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Amino acid, carboxyalkyl, alkylsulfonate...Chemical Substances § 721.10630 Amino acid, carboxyalkyl, alkylsulfonate...substances identified generically as amino acid, carboxyalkyl,...

  19. 40 CFR 721.1728 - Benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino-, methyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... false Benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino-, methyl ester...721.1728 Benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino-, methyl ester...identified as benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino-, methyl...

  20. 4 Aromatic Amino Acids in the Brain M. Cansev . R. J. Wurtman

    E-print Network

    Wurtman, Richard

    4 Aromatic Amino Acids in the Brain M. Cansev . R. J. Wurtman 1 Introduction ..................................................................................... 60 2 Sources of Aromatic Amino Acids .............................................................. 61 3 Plasma Concentrations of the Aromatic Amino Acids ......................................... 62 3

  1. Are Convergent and Parallel Amino Acid Substitutions in Protein Evolution More Prevalent Than Neutral Expectations?

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Jianzhi

    Article Are Convergent and Parallel Amino Acid Substitutions in Protein Evolution More Prevalent Abstract Convergent and parallel amino acid substitutions in protein evolution, collectively referred greatly depending on the specific neutral substitution model assumed at each amino acid site

  2. Accuracies of Ancestral Amino Acid Sequences Inferred by the Parsimony, Likelihood, and Distance Methods

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Jianzhi

    Accuracies of Ancestral Amino Acid Sequences Inferred by the Parsimony, Likelihood, and Distance- cestral organisms is important for identifying critical amino acid substitutions that have caused amino acids inferred by two currently available methods (maximum- parsimony [MP] and maximum

  3. Amino acid catalyzed neogenesis of carbohydrates: a plausible ancient transformation.

    PubMed

    Córdova, Armando; Ibrahem, Ismail; Casas, Jesús; Sundén, Henrik; Engqvist, Magnus; Reyes, Efraim

    2005-08-01

    Hexose sugars play a fundamental role in vital biochemical processes and their biosynthesis is achieved through enzyme-catalyzed pathways. Herein we disclose the ability of amino acids to catalyze the asymmetric neogenesis of carbohydrates by sequential cross-aldol reactions. The amino acids mediate the asymmetric de novo synthesis of natural L- and D-hexoses and their analogues with excellent stereoselectivity in organic solvents. In some cases, the four new stereocenters are assembled with almost absolute stereocontrol. The unique feature of these results is that, when an amino acid is employed as the catalyst, a single reaction sequence can convert a protected glycol aldehyde into a hexose in one step. For example, proline and its derivatives catalyze the asymmetric neogenesis of allose with >99 % ee in one chemical manipulation. Furthermore, all amino acids tested catalyzed the asymmetric formation of natural sugars under prebiotic conditions, with alanine being the smallest catalyst. The inherent simplicity of this catalytic process suggests that a catalytic prebiotic "gluconeogenesis" may occur, in which amino acids transfer their stereochemical information to sugars. In addition, the amino acid catalyzed stereoselective sequential cross-aldol reactions were performed as a two-step procedure with different aldehydes as acceptors and nucleophiles. The employment of two different amino acids as catalysts for the iterative direct aldol reactions enabled the asymmetric synthesis of deoxysugars with >99 % ee. In addition, the direct amino acid catalyzed C(2)+C(2)+C(2) methodology is a new entry for the short, highly enantioselective de novo synthesis of carbohydrate derivatives, isotope-labeled sugars, and polyketide natural products. The one-pot asymmetric de novo syntheses of deoxy and polyketide carbohydrates involved a novel dynamic kinetic asymmetric transformation (DYKAT) mediated by an amino acid. PMID:15929141

  4. EFFECT OF TETRACYCLINES ON THE INTRACELLULAR AMINO ACIDS OF MOLDS

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Bob A.; Circo, Richard

    1963-01-01

    Freeman, Bob A. (University of Chicago, Chicago, Ill.) and Richard Circo. Effect of tetracyclines on the intracellular amino acids of molds. J. Bacteriol. 86:38–44. 1963.—The tetracycline antibiotics were shown to alter the amino acid metabolism of molds whose growth is not markedly affected. Eight molds were grown in the presence of these antiobiotics; four exhibited a general reduction in the concentration of the intracellular amino acids, except for glutamic acid and alanine. In most of these four cultures, the tetracyclines also caused the complete disappearance of arginine, lysine, proline, phenylalanine, and tyrosine from the intracellular amino acid pool. The significance of these observations and the usefulness of the method in the study of the mechanisms of antibiotic action are discussed. PMID:14051820

  5. The origin of amino acids in lunar regolith samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsila, Jamie E.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Glavin, Daniel P.; McLain, Hannah L.; Noble, Sarah K.; Gibson, Everett K.

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the amino acid content of seven lunar regolith samples returned by the Apollo 16 and Apollo 17 missions and stored under NASA curation since collection using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Consistent with results from initial analyses shortly after collection in the 1970s, we observed amino acids at low concentrations in all of the curated samples, ranging from 0.2 parts-per-billion (ppb) to 42.7 ppb in hot-water extracts and 14.5-651.1 ppb in 6 M HCl acid-vapor-hydrolyzed, hot-water extracts. Amino acids identified in the Apollo soil extracts include glycine, D- and L-alanine, D- and L-aspartic acid, D- and L-glutamic acid, D- and L-serine, L-threonine, and L-valine, all of which had previously been detected in lunar samples, as well as several compounds not previously identified in lunar regoliths: ?-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB), D- and L-?-amino-n-butyric acid (?-ABA), DL-?-amino-n-butyric acid, ?-amino-n-butyric acid, ?-alanine, and ?-amino-n-caproic acid. We observed an excess of the L enantiomer in most of the detected proteinogenic amino acids, but racemic alanine and racemic ?-ABA were present in some samples. We also examined seven samples from Apollo 15, 16, and 17 that had been previously allocated to a non-curation laboratory, as well as two samples of terrestrial dunite from studies of lunar module engine exhaust that had been stored in the same laboratory. The amino acid content of these samples suggested that contamination had occurred during non-curatorial storage. We measured the compound-specific carbon isotopic ratios of glycine, ?-alanine, and L-alanine in Apollo regolith sample 70011 and found values of -21‰ to -33‰. These values are consistent with those seen in terrestrial biology and, together with the enantiomeric compositions of the proteinogenic amino acids, suggest that terrestrial biological contamination is a primary source of the amino acids in these samples. However, the presence of the non-proteinogenic amino acids such as AIB and ?-ABA suggests the possibility of some contribution from exogenous sources. We did not observe a correlation of amino acid content with proximity to the Apollo 17 lunar module, implying that lunar module exhaust was not a primary source of amino acid precursors. Solar-wind-implanted precursors such as HCN also appear to be at most a minor contributor, given a lack of correlation between amino acid content and soil maturity (as measured by Is/FeO ratio) and the differences between the ?13C values of the amino acids and the solar wind.

  6. Exhaustive Database Searching for Amino Acid Mutations in Proteomes

    SciTech Connect

    Hyatt, Philip Douglas; Pan, Chongle

    2012-01-01

    Amino acid mutations in proteins can be found by searching tandem mass spectra acquired in shotgun proteomics experiments against protein sequences predicted from genomes. Traditionally, unconstrained searches for amino acid mutations have been accomplished by using a sequence tagging approach that combines de novo sequencing with database searching. However, this approach is limited by the performance of de novo sequencing. The Sipros algorithm v2.0 was developed to perform unconstrained database searching using high-resolution tandem mass spectra by exhaustively enumerating all single non-isobaric mutations for every residue in a protein database. The performance of Sipros for amino acid mutation identification exceeded that of an established sequence tagging algorithm, Inspect, based on benchmarking results from a Rhodopseudomonas palustris proteomics dataset. To demonstrate the viability of the algorithm for meta-proteomics, Sipros was used to identify amino acid mutations in a natural microbial community in acid mine drainage.

  7. Evolution of a Genome-Encoded Bias in Amino Acid Biosynthetic Pathways Is a Potential Indicator of Amino Acid Dynamics in the Environment

    PubMed Central

    Fasani, Rick A.; Savageau, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Overcoming the stress of starvation is one of an organism’s most challenging phenotypic responses. Those organisms that frequently survive the challenge, by virtue of their fitness, will have evolved genomes that are shaped by their specific environments. Understanding this genotype–environment–phenotype relationship at a deep level will require quantitative predictive models of the complex molecular systems that link these aspects of an organism’s existence. Here, we treat one of the most fundamental molecular systems, protein synthesis, and the amino acid biosynthetic pathways involved in the stringent response to starvation. These systems face an inherent logical dilemma: Building an amino acid biosynthetic pathway to synthesize its product—the cognate amino acid of the pathway—may require that very amino acid when it is no longer available. To study this potential “catch-22,” we have created a generic model of amino acid biosynthesis in response to sudden starvation. Our mathematical analysis and computational results indicate that there are two distinctly different outcomes: Partial recovery to a new steady state, or full system failure. Moreover, the cell’s fate is dictated by the cognate bias, the number of cognate amino acids in the corresponding biosynthetic pathway relative to the average number of that amino acid in the proteome. We test these implications by analyzing the proteomes of over 1,800 sequenced microbes, which reveals statistically significant evidence of low cognate bias, a genetic trait that would avoid the biosynthetic quandary. Furthermore, these results suggest that the pattern of cognate bias, which is readily derived by genome sequencing, may provide evolutionary clues to an organism’s natural environment. PMID:25118252

  8. Amino acids as promoieties in prodrug design and development.

    PubMed

    Vig, Balvinder S; Huttunen, Kristiina M; Laine, Krista; Rautio, Jarkko

    2013-10-01

    Prodrugs are biologically inactive agents that upon biotransformation in vivo result in active drug molecules. Since prodrugs might alter the tissue distribution, efficacy and the toxicity of the parent drug, prodrug design should be considered at the early stages of preclinical development. In this regard, natural and synthetic amino acids offer wide structural diversity and physicochemical properties. This review covers the use of amino acid prodrugs to improve poor solubility, poor permeability, sustained release, intravenous delivery, drug targeting, and metabolic stability of the parent drug. In addition, practical considerations and challenges associated with the development of amino acid prodrugs are also covered. PMID:23099277

  9. How Amino Acids and Peptides Shaped the RNA World

    PubMed Central

    van der Gulik, Peter T.S.; Speijer, Dave

    2015-01-01

    The “RNA world” hypothesis is seen as one of the main contenders for a viable theory on the origin of life. Relatively small RNAs have catalytic power, RNA is everywhere in present-day life, the ribosome is seen as a ribozyme, and rRNA and tRNA are crucial for modern protein synthesis. However, this view is incomplete at best. The modern protein-RNA ribosome most probably is not a distorted form of a “pure RNA ribosome” evolution started out with. Though the oldest center of the ribosome seems “RNA only”, we cannot conclude from this that it ever functioned in an environment without amino acids and/or peptides. Very small RNAs (versatile and stable due to basepairing) and amino acids, as well as dipeptides, coevolved. Remember, it is the amino group of aminoacylated tRNA that attacks peptidyl-tRNA, destroying the bond between peptide and tRNA. This activity of the amino acid part of aminoacyl-tRNA illustrates the centrality of amino acids in life. With the rise of the “RNA world” view of early life, the pendulum seems to have swung too much towards the ribozymatic part of early biochemistry. The necessary presence and activity of amino acids and peptides is in need of highlighting. In this article, we try to bring the role of the peptide component of early life back into focus. We argue that an RNA world completely independent of amino acids never existed. PMID:25607813

  10. Extraterrestrial Amino Acids in the Almahata Sitta Meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callahan, Michael; Aubrey, A.; Bada, J. L.; Dworkin, J. P.; Elsila, J. E.; Glavin, D. P.; Parker, E.; Jenniskens, P.

    2009-09-01

    The recovery of meteorite fragments from the 2008 TC3 asteroid impact, collectively named Almahata Sitta, revealed a rare, anomalous polymict ureilite containing large carbonaceous grains (Jenniskens et al. 2009). Here we report the first amino acid analysis of a meteorite from an F-type asteroid as part of the Almahata Sitta meteorite sample analysis consortium. A single fragment (piece #4, 1.2 grams) was crushed to a powder, and separate 0.1 g aliquots of the same meteorite were carried through identical hot-water extraction, acid hydrolysis and desalting procedures at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. The o-phthaldialdehyde/N-acetyl-L-cysteine amino acid derivatives in the extracts were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography with UV fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Analyses of the meteorite extracts revealed a complex distribution of two- to six-carbon aliphatic amino acids with abundances ranging from 0.5 to 69 parts-per-billion (ppb). Glycine was the most abundant amino acid detected, however, since this protein amino acid is a common terrestrial contaminant, we are currently unable to rule out at least a partial terrestrial source. However, the D/L ratio of alanine in the meteorite was racemic, suggesting that very little terrestrial amino acid contamination. Several non-protein amino acids that are rare in the biosphere were also identified in the meteorite above background levels including D,L-4-amino-2-methybutyric acid (65 ± 8 ppb), D-isovaline (1.3 ± 0.1 ppb), L-isovaline (1.4 ± 0.1 ppb), and ?-aminoisobutryic acid (7.1 ± 5.8 ppb). The abundance of isovaline and AIB are 1000 times lower than the abundances found in the CM2 meteorite Murchison while D,L-4-amino-2-methybutyric acid is similar. The very low amino acid abundances and the presence of several amino acid decomposition products including methylamine, ethylamine, and isopropylamine are consistent with extensive thermal alteration of organic compounds on the parent asteroid.

  11. The Amino Acid Composition of the Sutter's Mill Carbonaceous Chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Burton, A. S.; Elsila, J. E.; Dworkin, J. P.; Yin, Q. Z.; Cooper, G.; Jenniskens, P.

    2012-01-01

    In contrast to the Murchison meteorite which had a complex distribution of amino acids with a total C2 to Cs amino acid abundance of approx.14,000 parts-per-billion (ppb) [2], the Sutters Mill meteorite was found to be highly depleted in amino acids. Much lower abundances (approx.30 to 180 ppb) of glycine, beta-alanine, L-alanine and L-serine were detected in SM2 above procedural blank levels indicating that this meteorite sample experienced only minimal terrestrial amino acid contamination after its fall to Earth. Carbon isotope measurements will be necessary to establish the origin of glycine and beta-alanine in SM2. Other non-protein amino acids that are rare on Earth, yet commonly found in other CM meteorites such as aaminoisobutyric acid (alpha-AIB) and isovaline, were not identified in SM2. However, traces of beta-AIB (approx.1 ppb) were detected in SM2 and could be" extraterrestrial in origin. The low abundances of amino acids in the Sutter's Mill meteorite is consistent with mineralogical evidence that at least some parts of the Sutter's Mill meteorite parent body experienced extensive aqueous and/or thermal alteration.

  12. Interactions of amino acids, carboxylic acids, and mineral acids with different quinoline derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalita, Dipjyoti; Deka, Himangshu; Samanta, Shyam Sundar; Guchait, Subrata; Baruah, Jubaraj B.

    2011-03-01

    A series of quinoline containing receptors having amide and ester bonds are synthesized and characterised. The relative binding abilities of these receptors with various amino acids, carboxylic acids and mineral acids are determined by monitoring the changes in fluorescence intensity. Among the receptors bis(2-(quinolin-8-yloxy)ethyl) isophthalate shows fluorescence enhancement on addition of amino acids whereas the other receptors shows fluorescence quenching on addition of amino acids. The receptor N-(quinolin-8-yl)-2-(quinolin-8-yloxy) propanamide has higher binding affinity for amino acids. However, the receptor N-(quinolin-8-yl)-2-(quinolin-8-yloxy)acetamide having similar structure do not bind to amino acids. This is attributed to the concave structure of the former which is favoured due to the presence of methyl substituent. The receptor bis(2-(quinolin-8-yloxy)ethyl) isophthalate do not bind to hydroxy carboxylic acids, but is a good receptor for dicarboxylic acids. The crystal structure of bromide and perchlorate salts of receptor 2-bromo-N-(quinolin-8-yl)-propanamide are determined. In both the cases the amide groups are not in the plane of quinoline ring. The structure of N-(quinolin-8-yl)-2-(quinolin-8-yloxy)acetamide, N-(2-methoxyphenethyl)-2-(quinolin-8-yloxy)acetamide and their salts with maleic acid as well as fumaric acid are determined. It is observed that the solid state structures are governed by the double bond geometry of these two acid. Maleic acid forms salt in both the cases, whereas fumaric acid forms either salt or co-crystals.

  13. Amino Acids in the Antarctic CM Meteorite LEW 90500

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botta, O.; Bada, J. L.

    2002-03-01

    The amino acid composition of the Antarctic CM meteorite LEW90500 was determined and compared to that of the CMs Murchison and Murray. The compositional similarity suggest that these meteorites probably originated from the same parent body.

  14. Disturbed Amino Acid Metabolism in HIV: Association with Neuropsychiatric Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Gostner, Johanna M.; Becker, Kathrin; Kurz, Katharina; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Blood levels of the amino acid phenylalanine, as well as of the tryptophan breakdown product kynurenine, are found to be elevated in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected patients. Both essential amino acids, tryptophan and phenylalanine, are important precursor molecules for neurotransmitter biosynthesis. Thus, dysregulated amino acid metabolism may be related to disease-associated neuropsychiatric symptoms, such as development of depression, fatigue, and cognitive impairment. Increased phenylalanine/tyrosine and kynurenine/tryptophan ratios are associated with immune activation in patients with HIV-1 infection and decrease upon effective antiretroviral therapy. Recent large-scale metabolic studies have confirmed the crucial involvement of tryptophan and phenylalanine metabolism in HIV-associated disease. Herein, we summarize the current status of the role of tryptophan and phenylalanine metabolism in HIV disease and discuss how inflammatory stress-associated dysregulation of amino acid metabolism may be part of the pathophysiology of common HIV-associated neuropsychiatric conditions. PMID:26236243

  15. Amino acid utilization by Aerobacter aerogenes and Escherichia coli

    E-print Network

    Herrera, Rodolfo Eduardo

    1938-01-01

    A considerable amount of work has been done on the growth of A. aerogenes and E. coli in synthetic media, but little work has been undertaken on the utilization by these organisms of amino acids as comparative sources of ...

  16. Differential adhesion of amino acids to inorganic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Willett, R L; Baldwin, K W; West, K W; Pfeiffer, L N

    2005-05-31

    A fundamental, yet underexplored, materials system is the interface between biological molecules and inorganic surfaces. In an elemental approach to this problem, we have systematically examined the adhesion of amino acids to a series of inorganic surfaces including metals, insulators, and semiconductors. Significant differential adhesion is observed over the full complement of amino acids, determined largely by amino acid side-chain charge. Extensive mapping of the amino acid adhesion versus materials in multiple solutions is presented, with preliminary mechanisms derived from concentration and pH dependence. These results provide an empirical basis for building peptide to inorganic surface structures, and, using this adhesion data, we design inorganic nanostructures that are shown to selectively bind to prescribed primary peptide sequences. PMID:15901900

  17. Comparing Amino Acid Abundances and Distributions Across Carbonaceous Chondrite Groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, Aaron S.; Callahan, Michael P.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2012-01-01

    Meteorites are grouped according to bulk properties such as chemical composition and mineralogy. These parameters can vary significantly among the different carbonaceous chondrite groups (CI, CM, CO, CR, CH, CB, CV and CK). We have determined the amino acid abundances of more than 30 primary amino acids in meteorites from each of the eight groups, revealing several interesting trends. There are noticeable differences in the structural diversity and overall abundances of amino acids between meteorites from the different chondrite groups. Because meteorites may have been an important source of amino acids to the prebiotic Earth and these organic compounds are essential for life as we know it, the observed variations of these molecules may have been important for the origins of life.

  18. Disturbed Amino Acid Metabolism in HIV: Association with Neuropsychiatric Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Gostner, Johanna M; Becker, Kathrin; Kurz, Katharina; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Blood levels of the amino acid phenylalanine, as well as of the tryptophan breakdown product kynurenine, are found to be elevated in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected patients. Both essential amino acids, tryptophan and phenylalanine, are important precursor molecules for neurotransmitter biosynthesis. Thus, dysregulated amino acid metabolism may be related to disease-associated neuropsychiatric symptoms, such as development of depression, fatigue, and cognitive impairment. Increased phenylalanine/tyrosine and kynurenine/tryptophan ratios are associated with immune activation in patients with HIV-1 infection and decrease upon effective antiretroviral therapy. Recent large-scale metabolic studies have confirmed the crucial involvement of tryptophan and phenylalanine metabolism in HIV-associated disease. Herein, we summarize the current status of the role of tryptophan and phenylalanine metabolism in HIV disease and discuss how inflammatory stress-associated dysregulation of amino acid metabolism may be part of the pathophysiology of common HIV-associated neuropsychiatric conditions. PMID:26236243

  19. Molecular Evolution Directs Protein Translation Using Unnatural Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Cox, Vanessa E; Gaucher, Eric A

    2015-01-01

    Unnatural amino acids have in recent years established their importance in a wide range of fields, from pharmaceuticals to polymer science. Unnatural amino acids can increase the number of chemical groups within proteins and thus expand or enhance biological function. Our ability to utilize these important building blocks, however, has been limited by the inherent difficulty in incorporating these molecules into proteins. To address this challenge, researchers have examined how the canonical twenty amino acids are incorporated, regulated, and modified in nature. This review focuses on achievements and techniques used to engineer the ribosomal protein-translation machinery, including the introduction of orthogonal translation components, how directed evolution enhances the incorporation of unnatural amino acids, and the potential utility of ancient biomolecules for this process. © 2015 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:26629613

  20. Guanine- Formation During the Thermal Polymerization of Amino Acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mc Caw, B. K.; Munoz, E. F.; Ponnamperuma, C.; Young, R. S.

    1964-01-01

    The action of heat on a mixture of amino acids was studied as a possible abiological pathway for the synthesis of purines and pyrimidines. Guanine was detected. This result is significant in the context of chemical evolution.

  1. Effects of divalent amino acids on iron absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, J.M.; Ghannam, M.; Ayres, J.W.

    1984-09-01

    Solutions of each of 10 amino acids or ascorbic acid were mixed with iron and orally administered to rats. Iron was absorbed to a statistically significantly greater extent when mixed with asparagine, glycine, serine, or ascorbic acid as compared with a control solution of iron. The largest effects were for asparagine and glycine, which also increased iron absorption to a significantly greater extent than did serine or ascorbic acid. No statistically significant increase in iron absorption occurred when any of the other amino acids was mixed with iron. The extent of iron absorption from each test solution, as measured by area under the concentration of iron-59 in the blood-time curve (r2 . 0.0002), and the initial rate of iron absorption for each test solution (r2 . 0.01) showed no correlation with the stability constant of the amino acid-iron complex.

  2. Polypeptide having an amino acid replaced with N-benzylglycine

    DOEpatents

    Mitchell, Alexander R. (Livermore, CA); Young, Janis D. (Los Angeles, CA)

    1996-01-01

    The present invention relates to one or more polypeptides having useful biological activity in a mammal, which comprise: a polypeptide related to bradykinin of four to ten amino acid residues wherein one or more specific amino acids in the polypeptide chain are replaced with achiral N-benzylglycine. These polypeptide analogues have useful potent agonist or antagonist pharmacological properties depending upon the structure. A preferred polypeptide is (N-benzylglycine.sup.7)-bradykinin.

  3. The stability of amino acids at submarine hydrothermal vent temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bada, Jeffrey L.; Miller, Stanley L.; Zhao, Meixun

    1995-01-01

    It has been postulated that amino acid stability at hydrothermal vent temperatures is controlled by a metastable thermodynamic equilibrium rather than by kinetics. Experiments reported here demonstrate that the amino acids are irreversibly destroyed by heating at 240 C and that quasi-equilibrium calculations give misleading descriptions of the experimental observations. Equilibrium thermodynamic calculations are not applicable to organic compounds under high-temperature submarine vent conditions.

  4. The amino acid sequence of a mammalian MAP kinase kinase.

    PubMed

    Ashworth, A; Nakielny, S; Cohen, P; Marshall, C

    1992-12-01

    The amino acid sequence of the dual specificity mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MAPKK) has been determined by cDNA cloning and amino acid sequencing. MAPKK (393 residues, Mr 43,330) is a new member of the protein kinase subclass that comprises byr1 and STE7 that are involved in pheromone dependent signal transduction in yeast, wis1 a mitotic regulator in S. pombe and PBS2, which confers antibiotic resistance in S. cerevisiae. PMID:1461659

  5. GCN2 sustains mTORC1 suppression upon amino acid deprivation by inducing Sestrin2.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jiangbin; Palm, Wilhelm; Peng, Min; King, Bryan; Lindsten, Tullia; Li, Ming O; Koumenis, Constantinos; Thompson, Craig B

    2015-11-15

    Mammalian cells possess two amino acid-sensing kinases: general control nonderepressible 2 (GCN2) and mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). Their combined effects orchestrate cellular adaptation to amino acid levels, but how their activities are coordinated remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate an important link between GCN2 and mTORC1 signaling. Upon deprivation of various amino acids, activated GCN2 up-regulates ATF4 to induce expression of the stress response protein Sestrin2, which is required to sustain repression of mTORC1 by blocking its lysosomal localization. Moreover, Sestrin2 induction is necessary for cell survival during glutamine deprivation, indicating that Sestrin2 is a critical effector of GCN2 signaling that regulates amino acid homeostasis through mTORC1 suppression. PMID:26543160

  6. Did Evolution Select a Nonrandom "Alphabet" of Amino Acids?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, Gayle K.; Freeland, Stephen J.

    2011-04-01

    The last universal common ancestor of contemporary biology (LUCA) used a precise set of 20 amino acids as a standard alphabet with which to build genetically encoded protein polymers. Considerable evidence indicates that some of these amino acids were present through nonbiological syntheses prior to the origin of life, while the rest evolved as inventions of early metabolism. However, the same evidence indicates that many alternatives were also available, which highlights the question: what factors led biological evolution on our planet to define its standard alphabet? One possibility is that natural selection favored a set of amino acids that exhibits clear, nonrandom properties - a set of especially useful building blocks. However, previous analysis that tested whether the standard alphabet comprises amino acids with unusually high variance in size, charge, and hydrophobicity (properties that govern what protein structures and functions can be constructed) failed to clearly distinguish evolution's choice from a sample of randomly chosen alternatives. Here, we demonstrate unambiguous support for a refined hypothesis: that an optimal set of amino acids would spread evenly across a broad range of values for each fundamental property. Specifically, we show that the standard set of 20 amino acids represents the possible spectra of size, charge, and hydrophobicity more broadly and more evenly than can be explained by chance alone.

  7. Extraterrestrial Amino Acids in Ureilites Including Almahata Sitta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, A. S.; Glavin, D. P.; Callahan, M. P.; Dworkin, J. P.

    2011-01-01

    Ureilites are a class of meteorites that lack chondrules (achondrites) but have relatively high carbon abundances, averaging approx.3 wt %. Using highly sensitive liquid chromatography coupled with UV fluorescence and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-FD/ToF-MS), it was recently determined that there are amino acids in. fragment 94 of the Almahata Sitta ureilite[l]. Based on the presence of amino acids that are rare in the Earth's biosphere, as well as the near-racemic enantiomeric ratios of marry of the more common amino acids, it was concluded that most of the detected amino acids were indigenous to the meteorite. Although the composition of the Almahata Sitta ureilite appears to be unlike other recovered ureilites, the discovery of amino acids in this meteorite raises the question of whether other ureilites rnav also contain amino acids. Herein we present the results of LC-FDlTo.F-MS analyses of: a sand sample from the Almahata Sitta strewn held, Almahata Sitta fragments 425 (an ordinary H5 chondrite) and 427 (ureilite), as well as an Antarctic ureilite (Allan lulls, ALHA 77257).

  8. FTO expression is regulated by availability of essential amino acids.

    PubMed

    Cheung, M K; Gulati, P; O'Rahilly, S; Yeo, G S H

    2013-05-01

    Genome-wide association studies have revealed that single nucleotide polymorphisms in fat mass and obesity-associated transcript (FTO) are robustly associated with body mass index and obesity. Expression of Fto in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus is bidirectionally regulated as a function of nutritional status; decreasing following a 48-h fast and increasing after 10-week exposure to a high-fat diet. Here, we utilize an in vitro approach to determine which nutrients could regulate FTO levels at a cellular level. Using mouse and human cell lines, we find that FTO levels are not influenced by serum starvation. We demonstrate, however, that both glucose and total amino-acid deprivation regulates FTO expression. In particular, we have found that FTO mRNA and protein levels are dramatically downregulated by total amino-acid deprivation in mouse hypothalamic N46 cells, mouse embryonic fibroblasts and in human HEK293 cells. The drop rate of Fto mRNA is faster than its rate of natural degradation, pointing to regulation at the transcriptional level, which is reversible upon amino-acid replacement. Strikingly, this downregulation was seen only with essential amino-acid deficiency and not nonessential amino acids. These data suggest that FTO might have a role in the sensing of essential amino-acid availability. PMID:22614055

  9. Role of ferrocyanides in the prebiotic synthesis of ?-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Bermejo, Marta; Osuna-Esteban, Susana; Zorzano, María-Paz

    2013-06-01

    We investigated the synthesis of ?-amino acids under possible prebiotic terrestrial conditions in the presence of dissolved iron (II) in a simulated prebiotic ocean. An aerosol-liquid cycle with a prebiotic atmosphere is shown to produce amino acids via Strecker synthesis with relatively high yields. However, in the presence of iron, the HCN was captured in the form of a ferrocyanide, partially inhibiting the formation of amino acids. We showed how HCN captured as Prussian Blue (or another complex compound) may, in turn, have served as the HCN source when exposed to UV radiation, allowing for the sustained production of amino acids in conjunction with the production of oxyhydroxides that precipitate as by-products. We conclude that ferrocyanides and related compounds may have played a significant role as intermediate products in the prebiotic formation of amino acids and oxyhydroxides, such as those that are found in iron-containing soils and that the aerosol cycle of the primitive ocean may have enhanced the yield of the amino acid production. PMID:23780697

  10. Mg Coordination by Amino Acid Side Chains Is Not Required for Assembly and Function of the Special Pair in Bacterial Photosynthetic Reaction Centers

    E-print Network

    Boxer, Steven G.

    oxygen of Leu 234, and another appears to have an ordered water molecule as the ligand (Tronrud et al, the carbonyl oxygen of a formylmethionine at the amino terminus of the R-subunit serves as the axial ligand chlorophyll a/b-protein complex obtained by electron crystallography of two-dimensional crystals suggests

  11. On the abiotic formation of amino acids. I - HCN as a precursor of amino acids detected in extracts of lunar samples. II - Formation of HCN and amino acids from simulated mixtures of gases released from lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuasa, S.; Flory, D.; Basile, B.; Oro, J.

    1984-01-01

    Two studies on the abiotic formation of amino acids are presented. The first study demonstrates the role of hydrogen cyanide as a precursor of amino acids detected in extracts of lunar samples. The formation of several amino acids, including glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid, under conditions similar to those used for the analysis of lunar samples is demonstrated. The second study investigates the formation of hydrogen cyanide as well as amino acids from lunar-sample gas mixtures under electrical discharge conditions. These results extend the possibility of synthesis of amino acids to planetary bodies with primordial atmospheres less reducing than a mixture of methane, ammonia, hydrogen and water.

  12. Origin of d-amino acids detected in the acid hydrolysates of purified Escherichia coli ?-galactosidase.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Tetsuya; Sekine, Masae; Ogawa, Tetsuhiro; Hidaka, Makoto; Homma, Hiroshi; Masaki, Haruhiko

    2015-12-10

    In previous report, we detected d-amino acids in the acid hydrolysates of purified recombinant ?-galactosidase. Here, we employed a deuterium-hydrogen exchange method to discriminate innate d-amino acids from those generated during hydrolytic incubation. After hydrolysis of ?-galactosidase in DCl/D2O, amino acids were derivatized with NBD-F and separated on a reverse-phase column, followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry equipped with a chiral column. Our results show an absence of innate d-amino acid residues in the protein and suggest that the protein undergoes isomerization during a very early stage of hydrolytic incubation. PMID:25999172

  13. Amino acid transport in Myxicola giant axon: stability of the amino acid pool, taurine efflux, and trans effect of sodium

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Lyle W.

    1981-01-01

    1. The giant axon of Myxicola infundibulum was assessed for its suitability as a model preparation for study of amino acid transport mechanisms. 2. The amino acid composition of axoplasm was measured and compared with those of coelomic fluid, muscle and axon sheath. The axoplasmic composition is unique. Axoplasm/coelomic fluid concentration ratios are all much larger than 1. The axoplasmic amino acid concentrations are (mmol/kg plasm): cysteic acid (104), aspartic acid (75), glutamic acid (10), taurine (64), serine (5), glycine (191) and alanine (5). Other amino acids or primary amines, if present, must have concentrations of less than 1 mm. 3. The size of the sheath amino acid pool is 12% or less of the axoplasmic pool. 4. The amino acid pool of axons soaked in sea water for up to 24 h is stable. Removal of Na from sea water causes a large increase of net efflux and net production of amino acids. 5. Net amino acid production can not be detected in sheath. Metabolic production occurs in axoplasm with little accumulation. Time scales for production and net efflux are therefore similar. 6. The Myxicola axon has a vigorous amino acid metabolism and transport systems capable of relatively large fluxes. Homeostasis is strongly linked to Na and may involve Na-coupled co-transport. Conservation of transmembrane amino acid gradients could be promoted in part by trans inhibition of efflux by external Na. 7. Taurine is a useful model substrate because it is not catabolized in Myxicola and its net efflux is sensitive to Na. [3H]taurine efflux was measured from injected axons. Fluxes and internally recorded action potentials are stable for up to 6 h. 8. Axon sheaths take up [3H]taurine from 10 mm-taurine sea water with an apparent half-time of 5 h. [3H]taurine washout from the apparent extracellular space has a half-time of 5 min. Washout from sheath cells has a half-time of 2-3 h. Sheath is not an important parallel compartment for taurine fluxes in the axon. 9. Taurine efflux has a Q10 of 1·8. 10. Taurine efflux is insensitive to external taurine concentrations up to 10 mm. 11. Taurine efflux is sensitive to external Na, but only if internal Na is high. 12. Taurine is transported by a low-affinity Na-dependent system in Myxicola axon. Results could be explained by a carrier which is more mobile in the empty state than in the substrate-loaded state. Trans inhibition of taurine efflux by external Na is an important property of the system, and contributes to conservation of axoplasmic taurine. PMID:7310729

  14. Size does matter: 18 amino acids at the N-terminal tip of an amino acid transporter in Leishmania determine substrate specificity

    PubMed Central

    Schlisselberg, Doreen; Mazarib, Eldar; Inbar, Ehud; Rentsch, Doris; Myler, Peter J.; Zilberstein, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Long N-terminal tails of amino acid transporters are known to act as sensors of the internal pool of amino acids and as positive regulators of substrate flux rate. In this study we establish that N-termini of amino acid transporters can also determine substrate specificity. We show that due to alternative trans splicing, the human pathogen Leishmania naturally expresses two variants of the proline/alanine transporter, one 18 amino acid shorter than the other. We demonstrate that the longer variant (LdAAP24) translocates both proline and alanine, whereas the shorter variant (?18LdAAP24) translocates just proline. Remarkably, co-expressing the hydrophilic N-terminal peptide of the long variant with ?18LdAAP24 was found to recover alanine transport. This restoration of alanine transport could be mediated by a truncated N-terminal tail, though truncations exceeding half of the tail length were no longer functional. Taken together, the data indicate that the first 18 amino acids of the negatively charged N-terminal LdAAP24 tail are required for alanine transport and may facilitate the electrostatic interactions of the entire negatively charged N-terminal tail with the positively charged internal loops in the transmembrane domain, as this mechanism has been shown to underlie regulation of substrate flux rate for other transporters. PMID:26549185

  15. Large hepatitis delta antigen in packaging and replication inhibition: role of the carboxyl-terminal 19 amino acids and amino-terminal sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, C Z; Chen, P J; Chen, D S

    1995-01-01

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) encodes two proteins, the small delta antigen (SHDAg) and large delta antigen (LHDAg). The latter is identical to the former except for the presence of additional 19 amino acids at the C terminus. While SHDAg is required for HDV replication, LHDAg inhibits replication and, together with hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), is required for the assembly of HDV. The last 19 C-terminal amino acids of LHDAg are essential for HDV assembly. Most of LHDAg (amino acids 19 to 146 and 163 to 195) had been shown to be dispensable for packaging with HBsAg. To discern whether the last 19 C-terminal amino acids solely constitute the signal for packaging with HBsAg, we constructed two LHDAg deletion mutants and tested their abilities to be packaged with HBsAg in cotransfection experiments. We found that deletion of amino acids 2 to 21 and 142 to 165 did not affect LHDAg packaging. This result suggested that only the last 19 C-terminal amino acids of LHDAg are required for packaging. We further constructed two plasmids which expressed c-H-ras with or without additional 19 C-terminal amino acids identical to those in LHDAg. Only c-H-ras with additional 19 amino acids could be cosecreted with HBsAg in the cotransfection experiment. This result confirmed that the C-terminal 19 amino acids are the packaging signal for HBsAg. We also tested the trans activation activity and trans-dominant inhibitory activity of the deletion mutants of SHDAg and LHDAg, respectively. In contrast to deletion of amino acids 142 to 165, deletion of amino acids 2 to 21 impaired the trans-dominant inhibitory activity of LHDAg. Deletion of amino acids 2 to 21 and 142 to 165 did not affect the trans activation activity of SHDAg. This result suggested that a functional domain which is important for the trans-dominant inhibitory activity of LHDAg exists in the amino terminus of HDAg. PMID:7636976

  16. Metabolism of sulfur amino acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, D; Surdin-Kerjan, Y

    1997-01-01

    Sulfur amino acid biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae involves a large number of enzymes required for the de novo biosynthesis of methionine and cysteine and the recycling of organic sulfur metabolites. This review summarizes the details of these processes and analyzes the molecular data which have been acquired in this metabolic area. Sulfur biochemistry appears not to be unique through terrestrial life, and S. cerevisiae is one of the species of sulfate-assimilatory organisms possessing a larger set of enzymes for sulfur metabolism. The review also deals with several enzyme deficiencies that lead to a nutritional requirement for organic sulfur, although they do not correspond to defects within the biosynthetic pathway. In S. cerevisiae, the sulfur amino acid biosynthetic pathway is tightly controlled: in response to an increase in the amount of intracellular S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet), transcription of the coregulated genes is turned off. The second part of the review is devoted to the molecular mechanisms underlying this regulation. The coordinated response to AdoMet requires two cis-acting promoter elements. One centers on the sequence TCACGTG, which also constitutes a component of all S. cerevisiae centromeres. Situated upstream of the sulfur genes, this element is the binding site of a transcription activation complex consisting of a basic helix-loop-helix factor, Cbf1p, and two basic leucine zipper factors, Met4p and Met28p. Molecular studies have unraveled the specific functions for each subunit of the Cbf1p-Met4p-Met28p complex as well as the modalities of its assembly on the DNA. The Cbf1p-Met4p-Met28p complex contains only one transcription activation module, the Met4p subunit. Detailed mutational analysis of Met4p has elucidated its functional organization. In addition to its activation and bZIP domains, Met4p contains two regulatory domains, called the inhibitory region and the auxiliary domain. When the level of intracellular AdoMet increases, the transcription activation function of Met4 is prevented by Met30p, which binds to the Met4 inhibitory region. In addition to the Cbf1p-Met4p-Met28p complex, transcriptional regulation involves two zinc finger-containing proteins, Met31p and Met32p. The AdoMet-mediated control of the sulfur amino acid pathway illustrates the molecular strategies used by eucaryotic cells to couple gene expression to metabolic changes. PMID:9409150

  17. Raman spectra of amino acids and their aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guangyong; Zhu, Xian; Fan, Qi; Wan, Xueliang

    2011-03-01

    Amino acids are the basic "building blocks" that combine to form proteins and play an important physiological role in all life-forms. Amino acids can be used as models for the examination of the importance of intermolecular bonding in life processes. Raman spectra serve to obtain information regarding molecular conformation, giving valuable insights into the topology of more complex molecules (peptides and proteins). In this paper, amino acids and their aqueous solution have been studied by Raman spectroscopy. Comparisons of certain values for these frequencies in amino acids and their aqueous solutions are given. Spectra of solids when compared to those of the solute in solution are invariably much more complex and almost always sharper. We present a collection of Raman spectra of 18 kinds of amino acids ( L-alanine, L-arginine, L-aspartic acid, cystine, L-glutamic acid, L-glycine, L-histidine, L-isoluecine, L-leucine, L-lysine, L-phenylalanine, L-methionone, L-proline, L-serine, L-threonine, L-tryptophan, L-tyrosine, L-valine) and their aqueous solutions that can serve as references for the interpretation of Raman spectra of proteins and biological materials.

  18. A Unified Nomenclature and Amino Acid Numbering for Human PTEN

    PubMed Central

    Pulido, Rafael; Baker, Suzanne J.; Barata, Joao T.; Carracedo, Arkaitz; Cid, Victor J.; Chin-Sang, Ian D.; Davé, Vrushank; den Hertog, Jeroen; Devreotes, Peter; Eickholt, Britta J.; Eng, Charis; Furnari, Frank B.; Georgescu, Maria-Magdalena; Gericke, Arne; Hopkins, Benjamin; Jiang, Xeujun; Lee, Seung-Rock; Lösche, Mathias; Malaney, Prerna; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Molina, María; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Parsons, Ramon; Pinton, Paolo; Rivas, Carmen; Rocha, Rafael M.; Rodríguez, Manuel S.; Ross, Alonzo H.; Serrano, Manuel; Stambolic, Vuk; Stiles, Bangyan; Suzuki, Akira; Tan, Seong-Seng; Tonks, Nicholas K.; Trotman, Lloyd C.; Wolff, Nicolas; Woscholski, Rudiger; Wu, Hong; Leslie, Nicholas R.

    2015-01-01

    The tumor suppressor PTEN is a major brake for cell transformation, mainly due to its phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate [PI(3,4,5)P3] phosphatase activity that directly counteracts the oncogenicity of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K). PTEN mutations are frequent in tumors and in the germ line of patients with tumor predisposition or with neurological or cognitive disorders, which makes the PTEN gene and protein a major focus of interest in current biomedical research. After almost two decades of intense investigation on the 403-residue-long PTEN protein, a previously uncharacterized form of PTEN has been discovered that contains 173 amino-terminal extra amino acids, as a result of an alternate translation initiation site. To facilitate research in the field and to avoid ambiguities in the naming and identification of PTEN amino acids from publications and databases, we propose here a unifying nomenclature and amino acid numbering for this longer form of PTEN. PMID:24985344

  19. A unified nomenclature and amino acid numbering for human PTEN.

    PubMed

    Pulido, Rafael; Baker, Suzanne J; Barata, Joao T; Carracedo, Arkaitz; Cid, Victor J; Chin-Sang, Ian D; Davé, Vrushank; den Hertog, Jeroen; Devreotes, Peter; Eickholt, Britta J; Eng, Charis; Furnari, Frank B; Georgescu, Maria-Magdalena; Gericke, Arne; Hopkins, Benjamin; Jiang, Xeujun; Lee, Seung-Rock; Lösche, Mathias; Malaney, Prerna; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Molina, María; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Parsons, Ramon; Pinton, Paolo; Rivas, Carmen; Rocha, Rafael M; Rodríguez, Manuel S; Ross, Alonzo H; Serrano, Manuel; Stambolic, Vuk; Stiles, Bangyan; Suzuki, Akira; Tan, Seong-Seng; Tonks, Nicholas K; Trotman, Lloyd C; Wolff, Nicolas; Woscholski, Rudiger; Wu, Hong; Leslie, Nicholas R

    2014-07-01

    The tumor suppressor PTEN is a major brake for cell transformation, mainly due to its phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate [PI(3,4,5)P3] phosphatase activity that directly counteracts the oncogenicity of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K). PTEN mutations are frequent in tumors and in the germ line of patients with tumor predisposition or with neurological or cognitive disorders, which makes the PTEN gene and protein a major focus of interest in current biomedical research. After almost two decades of intense investigation on the 403-residue-long PTEN protein, a previously uncharacterized form of PTEN has been discovered that contains 173 amino-terminal extra amino acids, as a result of an alternate translation initiation site. To facilitate research in the field and to avoid ambiguities in the naming and identification of PTEN amino acids from publications and databases, we propose here a unifying nomenclature and amino acid numbering for this longer form of PTEN. PMID:24985344

  20. Energetics of Amino Acid Synthesis in Alkaline Hydrothermal Environments.

    PubMed

    Kitadai, Norio

    2015-12-01

    Alkaline hydrothermal systems have received considerable attention as candidates for the origin and evolution of life on the primitive Earth. Nevertheless, sufficient information has not yet been obtained for the thermodynamic properties of amino acids, which are necessary components for life, at high temperatures and alkaline pH. These properties were estimated using experimental high-temperature volume and heat capacity data reported in the literature for several amino acids, together with correlation algorithms and the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) equations of state. This approach enabled determination of a complete set of the standard molal thermodynamic data and the revised HKF parameters for the 20 protein amino acids in their zwitterionic and ionization states. The obtained dataset was then used to evaluate the energetics of amino acid syntheses from simple inorganic precursors (CO2, H2, NH3 and H2S) in a simulated alkaline hydrothermal system on the Hadean Earth. Results show that mixing between CO2-rich seawater and the H2-rich hydrothermal fluid can produce energetically favorable conditions for amino acid syntheses, particularly in the lower-temperature region of such systems. Together with data related to the pH and temperature dependences of the energetics of amino acid polymerizations presented in earlier reports, these results suggest the following. Hadean alkaline hydrothermal settings, where steep pH and temperature gradients may have existed between cool, slightly acidic Hadean ocean water and hot, alkaline hydrothermal fluids at the vent-ocean interface, may be energetically the most suitable environment for the synthesis and polymerization of amino acids. PMID:25796392

  1. Energetics of Amino Acid Synthesis in Alkaline Hydrothermal Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitadai, Norio

    2015-12-01

    Alkaline hydrothermal systems have received considerable attention as candidates for the origin and evolution of life on the primitive Earth. Nevertheless, sufficient information has not yet been obtained for the thermodynamic properties of amino acids, which are necessary components for life, at high temperatures and alkaline pH. These properties were estimated using experimental high-temperature volume and heat capacity data reported in the literature for several amino acids, together with correlation algorithms and the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) equations of state. This approach enabled determination of a complete set of the standard molal thermodynamic data and the revised HKF parameters for the 20 protein amino acids in their zwitterionic and ionization states. The obtained dataset was then used to evaluate the energetics of amino acid syntheses from simple inorganic precursors (CO2, H2, NH3 and H2S) in a simulated alkaline hydrothermal system on the Hadean Earth. Results show that mixing between CO2-rich seawater and the H2-rich hydrothermal fluid can produce energetically favorable conditions for amino acid syntheses, particularly in the lower-temperature region of such systems. Together with data related to the pH and temperature dependences of the energetics of amino acid polymerizations presented in earlier reports, these results suggest the following. Hadean alkaline hydrothermal settings, where steep pH and temperature gradients may have existed between cool, slightly acidic Hadean ocean water and hot, alkaline hydrothermal fluids at the vent-ocean interface, may be energetically the most suitable environment for the synthesis and polymerization of amino acids.

  2. Thermospray liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry study of diastereomeric isoindole derivatives of amino acids and amino acid amides.

    PubMed

    van Leuken, R G; Duchateau, A L; Kwakkenbos, G T

    1995-11-01

    A thermospray liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (TSP-LC/MS) method is described for determination of the enantiomeric excess of alpha-amino acids and alpha-amino acid amides as their o-phthalaldehyde/N-acetyl-L-cysteine (OPA/NAC) derivatives. The source temperature is an important factor in optimizing the sensitivity of the TSP-LC/MS analysis, whereas the repeller voltage is of minor importance. On-column mass spectra were acquired for the OPA/NAC derivatives of several alpha-amino acids and alpha-amino acid amides. For the main fragment ions, mass spectra fragmentation pathways are proposed. The applicability of the method is demonstrated by means of the enantiomeric excess determination of valine in a sample from an enzymatic hydrolysis experiment. Using single ion monitoring, the detection limit of D-valine in the presence of excess L-valine is 10 pmol. The present TSP-LC/MS method is useful for validating the results obtained from LC/UV or LC/fluorescence methods for the enantiomeric excess determination of alpha-amino acids and alpha-amino acid amides. PMID:8788130

  3. Evaluating the technique of using nitrogen retention as a response criterion for amino acid studies in the horse 

    E-print Network

    Antilley, Teri Jill

    2007-09-17

    . With the exception of lysine and threonine, proposed amino acid requirements for yearling horses were calculated using nutrient to calorie ratios of gilts weighing 80-120 kg and gaining 325 g/d. Diet A was amino acid sufficient, as provided by a soybean meal...

  4. 5,6,9/99 Neuman Chapter 22 Peptides, Proteins, and -Amino Acids

    E-print Network

    Reed, Christopher A.

    5,6,9/99 Neuman Chapter 22 0 Chapter 22 Peptides, Proteins, and -Amino Acids from Organic Chemistry. Ketones, Aldehydes, and Carboxylic Acids 14. Substituent Effects 15. Carbonyl Compounds. Esters, Amides. Peptides, Proteins, and -Amino Acids 23. Nucleic Acids

  5. Amino acid modifiers in guayule rubber compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tire producers are increasingly interested in biobased materials, including rubber but also as compounding chemicals. An alternative natural rubber for tire use is produced by guayule, a woody desert shrub native to North America. Alternative compounding chemicals include naturally-occurring amino a...

  6. Extraterrestrial material analysis: loss of amino acids during liquid-phase acid hydrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buch, Arnaud; Brault, Amaury; Szopa, Cyril; Freissinet, Caroline

    2015-04-01

    Searching for building blocks of life in extraterrestrial material is a way to learn more about how life could have appeared on Earth. With this aim, liquid-phase acid hydrolysis has been used, since at least 1970 , in order to extract amino acids and other organic molecules from extraterrestrial materials (e.g. meteorites, lunar fines) or Earth analogues (e.g. Atacama desert soil). This procedure involves drastic conditions such as heating samples in 6N HCl for 24 h, either under inert atmosphere/vacuum, or air. Analysis of the hydrolyzed part of the sample should give its total (free plus bound) amino acid content. The present work deals with the influence of the 6N HCl hydrolysis on amino acid degradation. Our experiments have been performed on a standard solution of 17 amino acids. After liquid-phase acid hydrolysis (6N HCl) under argon atmosphere (24 h at 100°C), the liquid phase was evaporated and the dry residue was derivatized with N-Methyl-N-(t-butyldimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA) and dimethylformamide (DMF), followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. After comparison with derivatized amino acids from the standard solution, a significant reduction of the chromatographic peak areas was observed for most of the amino acids after liquid-phase acid hydrolysis. Furthermore, the same loss pattern was observed when the amino acids were exposed to cold 6N HCl for a short amount of time. The least affected amino acid, i.e. glycine, was found to be 73,93% percent less abundant compared to the non-hydrolyzed standard, while the most affected, i.e. histidine, was not found in the chromatograms after hydrolysis. Our experiments thereby indicate that liquid-phase acid hydrolysis, even under inert atmosphere, leads to a partial or total loss of all of the 17 amino acids present in the standard solution, and that a quick cold contact with 6N HCl is sufficient to lead to a loss of amino acids. Therefore, in the literature, the reported increase of the total quantity of amino acids after acid hydrolysis, due to the formation/release of amino acids during the whole water extraction / liquid-phase acid hydrolysis, could have hidden a loss of amino acids. Thus, in extraterrestrial material studies involving liquid-phase acid hydrolysis, the quantities of total amino acids may have been underestimated.

  7. Fish Oil and the Pan-PPAR Agonist Tetradecylthioacetic Acid Affect the Amino Acid and Carnitine Metabolism in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bjørndal, Bodil; Brattelid, Trond; Strand, Elin; Vigerust, Natalya Filipchuk; Svingen, Gard Frodahl Tveitevåg; Svardal, Asbjørn; Nygård, Ottar; Berge, Rolf Kristian

    2013-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are important in the regulation of lipid and glucose metabolism. Recent studies have shown that PPAR?-activation by WY 14,643 regulates the metabolism of amino acids. We investigated the effect of PPAR activation on plasma amino acid levels using two PPAR? activators with different ligand binding properties, tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA) and fish oil, where the pan-PPAR agonist TTA is a more potent ligand than omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. In addition, plasma L-carnitine esters were investigated to reflect cellular fatty acid catabolism. Male Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus) were fed a high-fat (25% w/w) diet including TTA (0.375%, w/w), fish oil (10%, w/w) or a combination of both. The rats were fed for 50 weeks, and although TTA and fish oil had hypotriglyceridemic effects in these animals, only TTA lowered the body weight gain compared to high fat control animals. Distinct dietary effects of fish oil and TTA were observed on plasma amino acid composition. Administration of TTA led to increased plasma levels of the majority of amino acids, except arginine and lysine, which were reduced. Fish oil however, increased plasma levels of only a few amino acids, and the combination showed an intermediate or TTA-dominated effect. On the other hand, TTA and fish oil additively reduced plasma levels of the L-carnitine precursor ?-butyrobetaine, as well as the carnitine esters acetylcarnitine, propionylcarnitine, valeryl/isovalerylcarnitine, and octanoylcarnitine. These data suggest that while both fish oil and TTA affect lipid metabolism, strong PPAR? activation is required to obtain effects on amino acid plasma levels. TTA and fish oil may influence amino acid metabolism through different metabolic mechanisms. PMID:23826175

  8. A critical evaluation of the application of amino acid racemization to geochronology and geothermometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, K. M.; Smith, G. G.

    1977-01-01

    Attempts have been made to determine the age of biological samples by measuring the racemization of amino acids in protein samples. The pitfalls and inherent complications in diagenetic racemization studies are reviewed, and recent advances in improving techniques are outlined. Methodological topics include isolation of amino acids from geological samples, resolution of amino acid enantiomers, and the effects of acid hydrolysis. The theory and kinetics of amino acid racemization are discussed with attention to the derivation of the rate expression for amino acid racemization, isoleucine and the equilibrium constant, the mechanism of amino acid racemization, the racemization of 'bound' versus 'free' amino acids, and factors affecting the racemization rates of free amino acids in aqueous solution. Applications of amino acid racemization kinetics to geochronology is considered with reference to shells, marine sediments, and bones. Potential complications include heating and diagenesis, diagenetic formation of amino acids, the effect of clays, species effect, and contamination.

  9. Use of free amino acid composition of shell to estimate age since death of recent molluscs

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, A.M.; Powell, E.N.; Stanton, R.J. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    An understanding of death assemblage formation requires a measurement of time since death of constituent individuals. A new dating technique based on the measurement of the free amino acid content of mollusc shells has been developed which is inexpensive, rapid, and effective in dating time scales of a few decades to a few centuries. Since the breakdown of proteins of the matrix of mollusc shells begins soon after deposition, free amino acids gradually increase with shell age. The measurement of these can be used to determine the relative age among a group of shells. The future use of this technique depends on a clearer understanding of how free amino acid accumulation rate varies with age and species and developing effective calibration methods so that absolute rather than relative ages can be readily obtained. Three species were distributed widely enough for use - Rangia cuneata, Tagelus plebeius, and Phacoides pectinatus. A good relationship between free amino acids and relative age was present in all three species over the entire core; however some species and some amino acid were superior to others. Rangia cuneata produced the best correlation because it is epifaunal and thus died at the sediment surface rather than over an extended depth range and, also perhaps, because amino acid accumulation rates were more linear.

  10. Determination of the D and L isomers of some protein amino acids present in soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, G. E.; Cheng, C.-N.; Cronin, S. E.

    1977-01-01

    The D and L isomers of some protein amino acids present in soils were measured by using a gas chromatographic technique. The results of two processing procedures were compared to determine the better method. Results of the comparison indicated that the determination of D and L percentages requires amino acid purification if one is to obtain accurate data. It was found that very significant amounts of D-alanine, D-aspartic acid, and D-glutamic acid were present in the contemporary soils studied. Valine, isoleucine, leucine, proline, and phenylalanine generally contained only a trace to very small amounts of the D isomer. It is probable that the D-amino acids from the alanine, aspartic, and glutamic acids are contributed to the soil primarily via microorganisms. The finding of very significant quantities of some D-amino acids (about 5-16%) in present-day soils may alert some investigators of geological sediments to a possible problem in using amino acid racemization as an age-dating technique.

  11. Amino Acid Supplementation Affects Imprinted Gene Transcription Patterns in Parthenogenetic Porcine Blastocysts

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chi-Hun; Jeong, Young-Hee; Jeong, Yeun-Ik; Kwon, Jeong-Woo; Shin, Taeyoung; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Jeung, Eui-Bae; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Seo, Sang-Kyo; Lee, Chang-Kyu; Hwang, Woo-Suk

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether exogenous amino acids affect gene transcription patterns in parthenogenetic porcine embryos, we investigated the effects of amino acid mixtures in culture medium. Parthenogenetic embryos were cultured in PZM3 medium under four experimental conditions: 1) control (no amino acids except L-glutamine and taurine); 2) nonessential amino acids (NEAA); 3) essential amino acids (EAA); and 4) NEAA and EAA. The rate of development of embryos to the four-cell stage was not affected by treatment. However, fewer (P<0.05) embryos cultured with EAA (12.8%) reached the blastocyst stage as compared with the control group (25.6%) and NEAA group (30.3%). Based on these findings, we identified genes with altered expression in parthenogenetic embryos exposed to medium with or without EAAs. The results indicated that EAA influenced gene expression patterns, particularly those of imprinted genes (e.g., H19, IGF2R, PEG1, XIST). However, NEAAs did not affect impaired imprinted gene expressions induced by EAA. The results also showed that mechanistic target of rapamycin (MTOR) mRNA expression was significantly increased by EAA alone as compared with control cultures, and that the combined treatment with NEAA and EAA did not differ significantly from those of control cultures. Our results revealed that gene transcription levels in porcine embryos changed differentially depending on the presence of EAA or NEAA. However, the changes in the H19 mRNA observed in the parthenogenetic blastocysts expression level was not related to the DNA methylation status in the IGF2/H19 domain. The addition of exogenous amino acid mixtures affected not only early embryonic development, but also gene transcription levels, particularly those of imprinted genes. However, this study did not reveal how amino acids affect expression of imprinted genes under the culture conditions used. Further studies are thus required to fully evaluate how amino acids affect transcriptional regulation in porcine embryos. PMID:25180972

  12. Simplified protein design biased for prebiotic amino acids yields a foldable, halophilic protein

    E-print Network

    Blaber, Michael

    Simplified protein design biased for prebiotic amino acids yields a foldable, halophilic protein of abiotic chemical syntheses identifies a consensus set of 10 "prebiotic" -amino acids. Before the emergence amino acids and a percentage of prebiotic amino acids approaching 80%. These proteins show a sub

  13. BLOMAP: AN ENCODING OF AMINO ACIDS WHICH IMPROVES SIGNAL PEPTIDE CLEAVAGE SITE PREDICTION

    E-print Network

    Wong, Limsoon

    BLOMAP: AN ENCODING OF AMINO ACIDS WHICH IMPROVES SIGNAL PEPTIDE CLEAVAGE SITE PREDICTION STEFAN of amino acid encoding to present amino acid sequences in the most beneficial way for machine learning amino acid residues attached to the N-terminal end of a protein [6]. Signal peptides basically serve

  14. Periodic Distributions of Hydrophobic Amino Acids Allows the Definition of Fundamental Building Blocks

    E-print Network

    Carbone, Alessandra

    Periodic Distributions of Hydrophobic Amino Acids Allows the Definition of Fundamental Building that hydrophobic amino acids are globally conserved even if they are subjected to high rate substitution. Statistical analysis of amino acids evolution within blocks of hydrophobic amino acids detected in sequences

  15. 2/17/05 1Bioinformatics (Lec 12) Amino Acid Structures from Klug & Cummings

    E-print Network

    Narasimhan, Giri

    2/17/05 1Bioinformatics (Lec 12) Amino Acid Structures from Klug & Cummings #12;Amino Acid Structures from Klug & Cummings 2/17/05 2Bioinformatics (Lec 12) #12;Amino Acid Structures from Klug & Cummings 2/17/05 3Bioinformatics (Lec 12) #12;2/17/05 4Bioinformatics (Lec 12) Amino Acid Structures from

  16. Plasma Amino Acids and Insulin Luels in Obesity: Response to Carbohydrate Intake and Tryptophan Supplements

    E-print Network

    Wurtman, Richard

    Plasma Amino Acids and Insulin Luels in Obesity: Response to Carbohydrate Intake and Tryptophan Supplements Benjamin Caballero, Nicholas Finer, and Richard J. Wurtman We assessed the plasma amino acids-chain amino acids, phenylalanine and tyrosine, and the level. of these amino acids declined much less

  17. Identifying amino acids in protein NMR spectra: 1) Glycine (Gly, G)

    E-print Network

    Identifying amino acids in protein NMR spectra: 1) Glycine (Gly, G) Glycine is the only amino acid of other amino acid types. The 13C alpha carbon chemical shift is usually in the range of 43 to 47 ppm, slightly lower than the 13C alpha carbon chemical shift of other amino acid types. 2) Alanine (Ala, A) Look

  18. Inflammation and ER Stress Regulate Branched-Chain Amino Acid Uptake and Metabolism in Adipocytes

    E-print Network

    Weiblen, George D

    Inflammation and ER Stress Regulate Branched-Chain Amino Acid Uptake and Metabolism in Adipocytes on adipocyte energy me- tabolism, particularly that of the mitochondrial branched-chain amino acid (BCAA- chain amino acid catabolism (9). The branched-chain amino acids leucine, isoleucine, and valine

  19. Boron-containing amino carboxylic acid compounds and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Kabalka, George W. (Knoxville, TN); Srivastava, Rajiv R. (Knoxville, TN)

    2000-03-14

    Novel compounds which are useful for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) are disclosed. The compounds comprise a stable boron-containing group and an aminocycloalkane carboxylic acid group or a boronated acyclic hydrocarbon-linked amino carboxylic acid. Methods for synthesis of the compounds and for use of the compounds in BNCT are disclosed.

  20. Fungal Peptaibiotics: Assessing Potential Meteoritic Amino Acid Contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, J. E.; Callahan, M. P.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.; Bruckner, H.

    2010-01-01

    The presence of non-protein alpha-dialkyl-amino acids such as alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (alpha-A1B) and isovaline (Iva), which are relatively rare in the terrestrial biosphere, has long been used as an indication of the indigeneity of meteoritic amino acids, however, the discovery of alpha-AIB in peptides producers by a widespread group of filamentous fungi indicates the possibility of a terrestrial biotic source for the alpha-AIB observed in some meteorites. The alpha-AIB-containing peptides produced by these fungi are dubbed peptaibiotics. We measured the molecular distribution and stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic ratios for amino acids found in the total hydrolysates of four biologically synthesized peptaibiotics. We compared these aneasurenetts with those from the CM2 carbonaceous chondrite Murchison and from three Antarctic CR2 carbonaceous chondrites in order to understand the peptaibiotics as a potential source of meteoritic contamination.

  1. Resolving Discrepancy between Nucleotides and Amino Acids in Deep-Level Arthropod Phylogenomics: Differentiating Serine Codons in 21-Amino-Acid Models

    E-print Network

    Zwick, Andreas; Regier, Jerome C.; Zwickl, Derrick J.

    2012-11-20

    amino acids. This study investigates the cause of that discrepancy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINIDINGS: The hypothesis is tested that failure to distinguish the serine residues encoded by two disjunct clusters of codons (TCN, AGY) in amino acid analyses...

  2. Conformational Entropy of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins from Amino Acid Triads

    PubMed Central

    Baruah, Anupaul; Rani, Pooja; Biswas, Parbati

    2015-01-01

    This work quantitatively characterizes intrinsic disorder in proteins in terms of sequence composition and backbone conformational entropy. Analysis of the normalized relative composition of the amino acid triads highlights a distinct boundary between globular and disordered proteins. The conformational entropy is calculated from the dihedral angles of the middle amino acid in the amino acid triad for the conformational ensemble of the globular, partially and completely disordered proteins relative to the non-redundant database. Both Monte Carlo (MC) and Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations are used to characterize the conformational ensemble of the representative proteins of each group. The results show that the globular proteins span approximately half of the allowed conformational states in the Ramachandran space, while the amino acid triads in disordered proteins sample the entire range of the allowed dihedral angle space following Flory’s isolated-pair hypothesis. Therefore, only the sequence information in terms of the relative amino acid triad composition may be sufficient to predict protein disorder and the backbone conformational entropy, even in the absence of well-defined structure. The predicted entropies are found to agree with those calculated using mutual information expansion and the histogram method. PMID:26138206

  3. Conformational Entropy of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins from Amino Acid Triads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baruah, Anupaul; Rani, Pooja; Biswas, Parbati

    2015-07-01

    This work quantitatively characterizes intrinsic disorder in proteins in terms of sequence composition and backbone conformational entropy. Analysis of the normalized relative composition of the amino acid triads highlights a distinct boundary between globular and disordered proteins. The conformational entropy is calculated from the dihedral angles of the middle amino acid in the amino acid triad for the conformational ensemble of the globular, partially and completely disordered proteins relative to the non-redundant database. Both Monte Carlo (MC) and Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations are used to characterize the conformational ensemble of the representative proteins of each group. The results show that the globular proteins span approximately half of the allowed conformational states in the Ramachandran space, while the amino acid triads in disordered proteins sample the entire range of the allowed dihedral angle space following Flory’s isolated-pair hypothesis. Therefore, only the sequence information in terms of the relative amino acid triad composition may be sufficient to predict protein disorder and the backbone conformational entropy, even in the absence of well-defined structure. The predicted entropies are found to agree with those calculated using mutual information expansion and the histogram method.

  4. Structure determination of a 20 amino acid peptide by NMR The twenty amino acid peptide contains over 100 unique protons that are potentially observable by

    E-print Network

    Structure determination of a 20 amino acid peptide by NMR The twenty amino acid peptide contains information is helpful: a) A table of typical proton NMR chemical shifts for protons within amino acids of the 20 amino acid peptide. It is: K1 T2 L3 T4 L5 E6 A7 A8 L9 R10 N11 A12 W13 L14 R15 E16 V17 G18 L19 K20

  5. Excretion of amino acids by humans during space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, T. P.; Schluter, M. D.

    1998-01-01

    We measured the urine amino acid distribution patterns before, during and after space flight on the Space Shuttle. The urine samples were collected on two separate flights of the space shuttle. The first flight lasted 9.5 days and the second flight 15 days. Urine was collected continuously on 8 subjects for the period beginning 10 d before launch to 6 d after landing. Results: In contrast to the earlier Skylab missions where a pronounced amino aciduria was found, on shuttle the urinary amino acids showed little change with spaceflight except for a marked decrease in all of the amino acids on FD (flight day) 1 (p<0.05) and a reduction in isoleucine and valine on FD3 and FD4 (p<0.05). Conclusions: (i) Amino aciduria is not an inevitable consequence of space flight. (ii) The occurrence of amino aciduria, like muscle protein breakdown is a mission specific effect rather than part of the general human response to microgravity.

  6. Enantiomeric Excesses of Acid Labile Amino Acid Precursors of the Murchison Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzarello, Sandra

    1998-01-01

    Amino acids present in carbonaceous chondrite are extracted in water in part as free compounds and in approximately equal part as acid labile precursors. On the assumption that they would be free of contamination, the precursors of two Murchison amino acids that have terrestrial occurrence, alanine and glutamic acid, have been targeted for analysis of their enantiomeric ratios. Pyroglutamic acid, the precursor of glutamic acid, was found with an L-enantiomeric excess comparable to that of the free acid, while alanine's precursor, N-acetyl alanine, appears approximately racemic. Also alpha-imino propioacetic acid, a proposed end product of alanine synthesis in the meteorite, was analyzed and found racemic.

  7. De Novo Amino Acid Biosynthesis Contributes to Salmonella enterica Growth in Alfalfa Seedling Exudates

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Grace; Pisithkul, Tippapha; Amador-Noguez, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is a member of the plant microbiome. Growth of S. enterica in sprouting-seed exudates is rapid; however, the active metabolic networks essential in this environment are unknown. To examine the metabolic requirements of S. enterica during growth in sprouting-seed exudates, we inoculated alfalfa seeds and identified 305 S. enterica proteins extracted 24 h postinoculation from planktonic cells. Over half the proteins had known metabolic functions, and they are involved in over one-quarter of the known metabolic reactions. Ion and metabolite transport accounted for the majority of detected reactions. Proteins involved in amino acid transport and metabolism were highly represented, suggesting that amino acid metabolic networks may be important for S. enterica growth in association with roots. Amino acid auxotroph growth phenotypes agreed with the proteomic data; auxotrophs in amino acid-biosynthetic pathways that were detected in our screen developed growth defects by 48 h. When the perceived sufficiency of each amino acid was expressed as a ratio of the calculated biomass requirement to the available concentration and compared to growth of each amino acid auxotroph, a correlation between nutrient availability and bacterial growth was found. Furthermore, glutamate transport acted as a fitness factor during S. enterica growth in association with roots. Collectively, these data suggest that S. enterica metabolism is robust in the germinating-alfalfa environment; that single-amino-acid metabolic pathways are important but not essential; and that targeting central metabolic networks, rather than dedicated pathways, may be necessary to achieve dramatic impacts on bacterial growth. PMID:25416761

  8. Amino Acids, Aromatic Compounds, and Carboxylic Acids: How Did They Get Their Common Names?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Sam H.

    2000-01-01

    Surveys the roots of the common names of organic compounds most likely to be encountered by undergraduate organic chemistry students. Includes information for 19 amino acids, 17 aromatic compounds, and 21 carboxylic acids. (WRM)

  9. Figure 1. Comparison of amino-acid frequencies in predicted disordered (freqdis) and ordered (freqord) regions of human proteins. Amino acids are

    E-print Network

    Obradovic, Zoran

    Figure 1. Comparison of amino-acid frequencies in predicted disordered (freqdis) and ordered (freqord) regions of human proteins. Amino acids are sorted by the relative difference (freqdis ­freqord differences between amino acid sequences of IDPs/IDRs and structured globular proteins and domains

  10. Alteration of amino acids and related compounds in space environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, K.; Tsuboi, T.; Kaneko, T.; Takano, Y.; Hashimoto, H.; Haruyama, J.; Yamashita, M.

    Organic compounds have been found in carbonaceous chondrites and in comets, which were possible materials for the first life on the Earth. It is suggested that these organics were originally formed in ice mantles of interstellar dusts (ISD) in molecular cloud. A number of studies were done to simulate reactions in ISD: Formation of amino acid precursors was reported when simulated interstellar media was irradiated with protons [1] or UV [2]. Extraterrestrial amino acids or their precursors in interstellar space, comets or meteorites were exposed to cosmic rays and UV before they were delivered to planets. Here we investigated stability of amino acids and related compounds in interstellar, lunar and planetary environments. Target compounds are (i) free amino acids, (ii) human serum albumin (HSA) and (iii) "possible interstellar complex organics (PICO)", which were formed from a mixture of carbon monoxide, ammonia and water by proton irradiation. Aqueous solutions of the target compounds were irradiated with gamma rays at room temperature, and they were acid-hydrolyzed before amino acid analysis. Recovery ratio of amino acids in HSA and PICO was much more than that of free amino acids. Samples mixed with basalt powder were more stable than those without the regolith. When the targets were irradiated after freeze-dried, their decomposition was not observed up to 30 kGy dosage. The present results show that extraterrestrial amino acids are quite stable if they are present as complex precursors in mineral matrix. Organic compounds in ISD are exposed not only to cosmic rays but also UV photons. It would be of interest to test stability of organic compounds in actual space environments: The exposure facility of International Space Station would be the place where the target molecules can be irradiated with cosmic rays and solar UV (including extreme UV) at the same time. [1] Kobayashi et al., Adv. Space Res., 16, 21 (1995), Kasamatsu et al., Bull. Chem. Soc. Jpn., 70, 1021 (1997). [2] Caro et al., Nature, 416, 403 (2002); Bernstein et al., Nature, 416, 401 (2002), Takano et al., Chem. Lett., 32, 612 (2003).

  11. Amino acids in a Fischer Tropsch type synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, D. L.; Lawless, J. G.

    1974-01-01

    One postulation is described for the presence of organic compounds in meteorites which states that they were formed during the condensation of the solar nebula. A viable laboratory simulation of these conditions can be modeled after the industrial Fischer Tropsch reaction, which is known to produce organic compounds called hydrocarbons. In this simulation, a mixture of carbon monoxide, hydrogen and ammonia is heated in the presence of iron meteorite. The reaction products for amino acids, a class of organic compounds important to life, were examined. A large number of these compounds is found in meteorites and other chemical evolution experiments, but only small quantities of a few amino acids were found in the present simulation work. These results are at odds with the existing literature in which many amino acids were reported.

  12. Thermochemical study of amino acid imprinted polymer films.

    PubMed

    Chai, Ziyi; BelBruno, Joseph J

    2015-11-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymers provide an alternative to traditional methods of amino acid analysis. The imprinted polymers are more robust and significantly less expensive than, for example, ELISA analysis. Amino acid imprinted nylon-6 thin films were studied by differential scanning calorimetry and scanning electron microscopy. Endothermic peaks were observed for imprinted films at temperatures higher than that for pure nylon, indicating the formation of a more-ordered, hydrogen bonded polymer. Removal of the amino acid from the imprinted film resulted in reversion to the peak observed for pure nylon-6. Additives, ?-cyclodextrin and multiwalled carbon nanotubes, were added to the imprinted polymer solutions as a means to increase the porosity of the films. These studies resulted in alternative morphologies and calorimetric results that provide additional functionalities and applications for imprinted polymers. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25990092

  13. Energetics of amino acid synthesis in hydrothermal ecosystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amend, J. P.; Shock, E. L.

    1998-01-01

    Thermodynamic calculations showed that the autotrophic synthesis of all 20 protein-forming amino acids was energetically favored in hot (100 degrees C), moderately reduced, submarine hydrothermal solutions relative to the synthesis in cold (18 degrees C), oxidized, surface seawater. The net synthesis reactions of 11 amino acids were exergonic in the hydrothermal solution, but all were endergonic in surface seawater. The synthesis of the requisite amino acids of nine thermophilic and hyperthermophilic proteins in a 100 degreesC hydrothermal solution yielded between 600 and 8000 kilojoules per mole of protein, which is energy that is available to drive the intracellular synthesis of enzymes and other biopolymers in hyperthermophiles thriving in these ecosystems.

  14. Supernovae and the chirality of the amino acids.

    PubMed

    Boyd, R N; Kajino, T; Onaka, T

    2010-06-01

    A mechanism for creating amino acid enantiomerism that always selects the same large-scale chirality is identified, and subsequent chemical replication and galactic mixing that would populate the Galaxy with the predominant species is described. This involves (1) the spin of the 14N in the amino acids, or in precursor molecules from which amino acids might be formed, that couples to the chirality of the molecules; (2) the neutrinos emitted from the supernova, together with the magnetic field from the nascent neutron star or black hole formed from the supernova, which selectively destroy one orientation of the 14N and thus select the chirality associated with the other 14N orientation; (3) chemical evolution, by which the molecules replicate and evolve to more complex forms of a single chirality on a relatively short timescale; and (4) galactic mixing on a longer timescale that mixes the selected molecules throughout the Galaxy. PMID:20624062

  15. tRNAs: cellular barcodes for amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Rajat; Chen, Shawn; Dare, Kiley; Gilreath, Marla; Praetorius-Ibba, Mette; Raina, Medha; Reynolds, Noah M.; Rogers, Theresa; Roy, Hervé; Yadavalli, Srujana S.; Ibba, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The role of tRNA in translating the genetic code has received considerable attention over the last 50 years, and we now know in great detail how particular amino acids are specifically selected and brought to the ribosome in response to the corresponding mRNA codon. Over the same period, it has also become increasingly clear that the ribosome is not the only destination to which tRNAs deliver amino acids, with processes ranging from lipid modification to antibiotic biosynthesis all using aminoacyl-tRNAs as substrates. Here we review examples of alternative functions for tRNA beyond translation, which together suggest that the role of tRNA is to deliver amino acids for a variety of processes that includes, but is not limited to, protein synthesis. PMID:19903480

  16. Relation between chemotaxis and consumption of amino acids in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yiling; M Pollard, Abiola; Höfler, Carolin; Poschet, Gernot; Wirtz, Markus; Hell, Rüdiger; Sourjik, Victor

    2015-06-01

    Chemotaxis enables bacteria to navigate chemical gradients in their environment, accumulating toward high concentrations of attractants and avoiding high concentrations of repellents. Although finding nutrients is likely to be an important function of bacterial chemotaxis, not all characterized attractants are nutrients. Moreover, even for potential nutrients, the exact relation between the metabolic value of chemicals and their efficiency as chemoattractants has not been systematically explored. Here we compare the chemotactic response of amino acids with their use by bacteria for two well-established models of chemotactic behavior, Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. We demonstrate that in E.?coli chemotaxis toward amino acids indeed strongly correlates with their utilization. However, no such correlation is observed for B.?subtilis, suggesting that in this case, the amino acids are not followed because of their nutritional value but rather as environmental cues. PMID:25807888

  17. Micro-Detection System for Determination of the Biotic or Abiotic Origin of Amino Acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2003-01-01

    The research carried out under this PIDDP involves the development of a breadboard version of a spacecraft-based system for the detection of amino acid chirality (molecular handedness) on solar system bodies. Chirality provides an unambiguous way of distinguishing between abiotic and biotic origins since only one mirror-image form is used in the functional molecules of life. Recent advances in a variety of nano-fabrication technologies have resulted in concepts for enabling miniaturized chemical and biological analytical systems. These are complete application-specific systems that integrate fluid micro handling systems for extracting and reacting target molecules, micro-separation technologies for enhanced sensitivity and resolution, and advanced detection technologies. This effort makes use of a relatively new technology that shows demonstrated promise for spacecraft-based amino acid analysis: microchip-based capillary electrophoresis (muCE). The muCE system is capable of analyzing the type of amino acids present as well as the relative amounts of their mirror image forms. The system we developed will be able to chirally resolve all of the major amino acids found in extraterrestrial material (Gly, Ala, Val, Pro, Asp, Glu, a-aminoisobutyric acid, and isovaline) at sub-part-per-billion levels. The _CE analysis requires that the amino acids be extracted from the sample and derivatized for either optical or electrochemical detection. In our implementation, the amino acids are released from the sample by sublimation and prepared for muCE analysis using a microfluidic circuit. In addition, we have investigated the use of a microfluidic circuit for the release of amino acids from samples in which sublimation has proven to be problematic.

  18. Facts and fallacies of purported ergogenic amino acid supplements.

    PubMed

    Williams, M H

    1999-07-01

    Although current research suggests that individuals involved in either high-intensity resistance or endurance exercise may have an increased need for dietary protein, the available research is either equivocal or negative relative to the ergogenic effects of supplementation with individual amino acids. Although some research suggests that the induction of hyperaminoacidemia via intravenous infusion of a balanced amino acid mixture may induce an increased muscle protein synthesis after exercise, no data support the finding that oral supplementation with amino acids, in contrast to dietary protein, as the source of amino acids is more effective. Some well-controlled studies suggest that aspartate salt supplementation may enhance endurance performance, but other studies do not, meriting additional research. Current data, including results for several well-controlled studies, indicated that supplementation with arginine, ornithine, or lysine, either separately or in combination, does not enhance the effect of exercise stimulation on either hGH or various measures of muscular strength or power in experienced weightlifters. Plasma levels of BCAA and tryptophan may play important roles in the cause of central fatigue during exercise, but the effects of BCAA or tryptophan supplementation do not seem to be effective ergogenics for endurance exercise performance, particularly when compared with carbohydrate supplementation, a more natural choice. Although glutamine supplementation may increase plasma glutamine levels, its effect on enhancement of the immune system and prevention of adverse effects of the overtraining syndrome are equivocal. Glycine, a precursor for creatine, does not seem to possess the ergogenic potential of creatine supplementation. Research with metabolic by-products of amino acid metabolism is in its infancy, and current research findings are equivocal relative to ergogenic applications. In general, physically active individuals are advised to obtain necessary amino acids through consumption of natural, high-quality protein foods. PMID:10410846

  19. Inverse design of proteins with hydrophobic and polar amino acids

    E-print Network

    C. Micheletti; F. Seno; A. Maritan; J. R. Banavar

    1997-12-11

    A two amino acid (hydrophobic and polar) scheme is used to perform the design on target conformations corresponding to the native states of twenty single chain proteins. Strikingly, the percentage of successful identification of the nature of the residues benchmarked against naturally occurring proteins and their homologues is around 75 % independent of the complexity of the design procedure. Typically, the lowest success rate occurs for residues such as alanine that have a high secondary structure functionality. Using a simple lattice model, we argue that one possible shortcoming of the model studied may involve the coarse-graining of the twenty kinds of amino acids into just two effective types.

  20. Preparation of 4-amino-2,4-dioxobutanoic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Unkefer, Pat J.; Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Glass, David R.

    2015-06-02

    A process for synthesizing 4-amino-2,4-dioxobutanoic acid involves reacting diethyl oxalate with sodium ethoxide in ethanol to form a reaction mixture, and afterward adding ethyl cyanoacetate to the reaction mixture and allowing a reaction to proceed under conditions suitable to form a first reaction product of the formula diethyl-2-cyano-3-hydroxy-butenedioate, and then isolating the diethyl-2-cyano-3-hydroxybutenedioate, and afterward reacting the diethyl-2-cyano-3-hydroxy-butenedioate with aqueous sodium hydroxide under conditions suitable to form 4-amino-2,4-dioxobutanoic acid.

  1. Analysis of Underivatized Amino Acids in Geological Samples Using Ion-Pairing Liquid Chromatography and Electrospray Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, De-Ling; Beegle, Luther W.; Kanik, Isik

    2008-04-01

    The capability of detecting biomarkers, such as amino acids, in chemically complex field samples is essential to establishing the knowledge required to search for chemical signatures of life in future planetary explorations. However, due to the complexities of in situ investigations, it is important to establish a new analytical scheme that utilizes a minimal amount of sample preparation. This paper reports the feasibility of a novel and sensitive technique, which has been established to quantitate amino acids in terrestrial crust samples directly without derivatization using volatile ion-pairing liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry equipped with an electrospray ionization source. Adequate separation of 20 underivatized amino acids was achieved on a C18 capillary column within 26 min with nonafluoropentanoic acid (NFPA) as ion-pairing reagent. Each amino acid was identified from its retention time as well as from its characteristic parent-to-daughter ion transition. Using tandem mass spectrometry as a detection technique allows co-elution of some amino acids, as it is more specific than traditional spectrophotometric methods. In the present study, terrestrial samples collected from 3 different locations were analyzed for their water-extractable free amino acid contents, following the removal of metal and organic interferences via ion exchange procedures. This is the first time that amino acids in geological samples were directly determined quantitatively without complicated derivatization steps. Depending on the amino acid, the detection limits varied from 0.02 to 5.7 pmol with the use of a 1 ?l sample injection loop.

  2. Infusion of the Branched Chain Amino Acids in Postoperative Patients: Anticatabolic Properties

    PubMed Central

    Freund, Herbert; Hoover, Herbert C.; Atamian, Susan; Fischer, Josef E.

    1979-01-01

    Postinjury metabolism is characterized by breakdown of muscle protein as substrate for energy production and gluconeogenesis and by the resultant loss of lean body mass and weight loss. The branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) which are principally oxidized by the skeletal muscle have been implicated in recent in vitro and in vivo studies as having special anticatabolic and regulating effects in skeletal muscle. We studied the anticatabolic effects of the BCAAs in 35 patients undergoing operative injury of moderate severity. In a prospective randomized and blinded manner patients were infused for five days starting immediately after surgery with either 5% dextrose or 5% dextrose with an amino acid solution containing 22, 35 or 100% BCAAs. All patients survived and there were no major postoperative complications. Mean hospital stay was 17 days for patients receiving amino acids and 19 days for patients receiving 5% dextrose only (p = ns). All three groups receiving amino acid solutions were in nitrogen equilibrium or in a slight positive nitrogen balance, while the group receiving 5% dextrose only was in a mean negative nitrogen balance of 6.6 ± 0.6 gN/day. The differences between the three groups receiving amino acids were slight and not significant. Weight loss was 2 ± 0.7 kg in the 5% dextrose group, 1 ± 0.7 kg in the 22% BCAAs group, 0.5 ± 0.5 kg in the 35% BCAAs group and the 100% BCAAs group gained 0.4 ± 1.8 kg. Blood chemistries in the different groups and during the study period remained within normal limits except for ammonia levels rising significantly in the 5% dextrose group and SGOT levels rising in the 22% and 35% BCAA groups. With mild variations the plasma amino acid patterns in all groups were similar to the normal pattern, even in the 100% BCAAs group receiving an unbalanced amino acid solution, suggesting the complete cessation of amino acid efflux from muscle, the muscle depending solely on the exogenous supply of BCAAs to satisfy its metabolic requirements. The results suggest that early nutritional suppport in the postoperative period will result in nitrogen equilibrium and that the infusion of the three BCAAs only in the postoperative state is as effective in preventing muscle catabolism as other more balanced amino acid solutions. In the postinjury state balanced amino acid solutions rich in BCAA may prove beneficial. PMID:464673

  3. Main-Chain Conformational Tendencies of Amino Acids Robert J. Anderson,1,2

    E-print Network

    Weng, Zhiping

    Main-Chain Conformational Tendencies of Amino Acids Robert J. Anderson,1,2 Zhiping Weng,2 Robert K tendencies of an amino acid. Despite forty years of research, the shape of Ramachandran plots is still tendencies among amino acids, and showed that the conformational relationships of amino ac- ids are well

  4. A Test of Amino Acid Reversibility Nick G.C. Smith, Adam Eyre-Walker

    E-print Network

    Eyre-Walker, Adam

    A Test of Amino Acid Reversibility Nick G.C. Smith, Adam Eyre-Walker Centre for the Study no evidence to reject the assumption of reversibility in protein evolution. Key words: Amino acid evolution the evolution of proteins, it is generally assumed that the number of substitutions from amino acid X to amino

  5. A Functional Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Operates during Growth of Bordetella pertussis on Amino Acid Mixtures as Sole Carbon Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Garnier, Dominique; Speck, Denis

    2015-01-01

    It has been claimed that citrate synthase, aconitase and isocitrate dehydrogenase activities are non-functional in Bordetella pertussis and that this might explain why this bacterium’s growth is sometimes associated with accumulation of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) and/or free fatty acids. However, the sequenced genome includes the entire citric acid pathway genes. Furthermore, these genes were expressed and the corresponding enzyme activities detected at high levels for the pathway when grown on a defined medium imitating the amino acid content of complex media often used for growth of this pathogenic microorganism. In addition, no significant PHB or fatty acids could be detected. Analysis of the carbon balance and stoichiometric flux analysis based on specific rates of amino acid consumption, and estimated biomass requirements coherent with the observed growth rate, clearly indicate that a fully functional tricarboxylic acid cycle operates in contrast to previous reports. PMID:26684737

  6. Relationship between amino acid dose and gastric secretory response.

    PubMed Central

    Gough, A; Rai, V; Mariano, E; Landor, J H

    1980-01-01

    Gastric secretory dose-response studies, using an 8.5% mixed L-amino acid solution as the agonist, were carried out in three dogs with Heidenhain pouches and gastric fistulae. Secretory responses of the Heidenhain pouches were measured during two hour infusions of amino acids given at rates of 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.8, and 1.6 g/kg/h and plasma amino nitrogen was measured before and during the infusion. Three separate studies at each dose level were made in each dog. The maximum secretory response occurred at the dose of 0.4 g/kg/h and amounted to approximately 20% of the maximal histamine response. Larger doses produced no additional increase in secretion or an actual decrease in secretory rate. It is concluded that the solution of amino acids used acts as a modest gastric agonist and that increases in plasma amino nitrogen such as may be observed after a protein meal are capable of eliciting a slight, but definite, gastric secretory response. PMID:7380343

  7. 40 CFR 721.5279 - 2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 4-amino-3-[[4?2-amino-4-[(3-butoxy-2-hydroxypropyl)amino]phebyl...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Substances § 721.5279 2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 4-amino-3- phebyl]azo]-3,3?-dimethyl -4-yl]azo]-5... reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as 2,7-naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 4-amino-3- phebyl]azo]-3... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false 2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid,...

  8. 40 CFR 721.5279 - 2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 4-amino-3-[[4?2-amino-4-[(3-butoxy-2-hydroxypropyl)amino]phebyl...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Substances § 721.5279 2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 4-amino-3- phebyl]azo]-3,3?-dimethyl -4-yl]azo]-5... reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as 2,7-naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 4-amino-3- phebyl]azo]-3... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false 2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid,...

  9. 40 CFR 721.5279 - 2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 4-amino-3-[[4?2-amino-4-[(3-butoxy-2-hydroxypropyl)amino]phebyl...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Substances § 721.5279 2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 4-amino-3- phebyl]azo]-3,3?-dimethyl -4-yl]azo]-5... reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as 2,7-naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 4-amino-3- phebyl]azo]-3... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false 2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid,...

  10. 40 CFR 721.5279 - 2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 4-amino-3-[[4?2-amino-4-[(3-butoxy-2-hydroxypropyl)amino]phebyl...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Substances § 721.5279 2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 4-amino-3- phebyl]azo]-3,3?-dimethyl -4-yl]azo]-5... reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as 2,7-naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 4-amino-3- phebyl]azo]-3... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false 2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid,...

  11. 40 CFR 721.5279 - 2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 4-amino-3-[[4?2-amino-4-[(3-butoxy-2-hydroxypropyl)amino]phebyl...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Substances § 721.5279 2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 4-amino-3- phebyl]azo]-3,3?-dimethyl -4-yl]azo]-5... reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as 2,7-naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 4-amino-3- phebyl]azo]-3... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false 2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid,...

  12. Polymerization on the rocks: beta-amino acids and arginine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, R.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    We have studied the accumulation of long oligomers of beta-amino acids on the surface of minerals using the 'polymerization on the rocks' protocol. We find that long oligopeptides of beta-glutamic acid which cannot be formed in homogeneous aqueous solution are accumulated efficiently on the surface of hydroxylapatite using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDAC) as condensing agent. The EDAC-induced oligomerization of aspartic acid on hydroxylapatite proceeds even more efficiently. Hydroxylapatite can also facilitate the ligation of the tripeptide (glu)3. The 'polymerization on the rocks' scenario is not restricted to negatively-charged amino acids. Oligoarginines are accumulated on the surface of illite using carbonyldiimidizole (CDI) as condensing agent. We find that FeS2 catalyzes the CDI-induced oligomerization of arginine, although it does not adsorb oligoarginines. These results are relevant to the formation of polypeptides on the primitive earth.

  13. Yeast Display Evolution of a Kinetically Efficient 13-Amino Acid Substrate for Lipoic Acid Ligase

    E-print Network

    Yeast Display Evolution of a Kinetically Efficient 13-Amino Acid Substrate for Lipoic Acid Ligase Received June 5, 2009; E-mail: ating@mit.edu Abstract: Escherichia coli lipoic acid ligase (LplA) catalyzes ATP-dependent covalent ligation of lipoic acid onto specific lysine side chains of three acceptor

  14. Chemical evolution. XXI - The amino acids released on hydrolysis of HCN oligomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, J. P.; Wos, J. D.; Nooner, D. W.; Oro, J.

    1974-01-01

    Major amino acids released by hydrolysis of acidic and basic HCN oligomers are identified by chromatography as Gly, Asp, and diaminosuccinic acid. Smaller amounts of Ala, Ile and alpha-aminoisobutyric acid are also detected. The amino acids released did not change appreciably when the hydrolysis medium was changed from neutral to acidic or basic. The presence of both meso and d, l-diaminosuccinic acids was established by paper chromatography and on an amino acid analyzer.

  15. Synthesis of P,N-Heterocycles from ?-Amino-H-Phosphinates: Conformationally Restricted ?-Amino Acid Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Queffelec, Clémence; Ribière, Patrice; Montchamp, Jean-Luc

    2009-01-01

    P,N-Heterocycles (3-hydroxy-1,3-azaphospholane and 3-hydroxy-1,3-azaphosphorinane-3-oxide) are synthesized in moderate yield from readily available ?-amino-H-phosphinates and aldehydes or ketones via an intramolecular Kabachnik-Fields reaction. The products are conformationally restricted phosphinic analogs of ?-amino acids. The multi-gram scale syntheses of the H2N(CH2)nPO2H2 phosphinic precursors (n = 1, 2, 3) and some derivatives are also described. PMID:18855477

  16. Studies on the mechanism of D-amino acid oxidase 

    E-print Network

    Kurtz, Kevin Anthony

    2000-01-01

    The mechanism of D-amino acid oxidase has been examined using nitroalkane anions, viscosity effects, mutant proteins, and ¹?N kinetic isotope effects. From the studies on the effects of pH on the V/K[] values for the ...

  17. Amino acids in Antarctica: evolution and fate of marine aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbaro, E.; Zangrando, R.; Vecchiato, M.; Piazza, R.; Capodaglio, G.; Barbante, C.; Gambaro, A.

    2014-06-01

    The chemical composition and size distribution of marine aerosols constitute an important parameter to investigate the latter's impact on global climate change. Amino acids are an important component of organic nitrogen in aerosols and have the ability to activate and act as cloud condensation nuclei, with important effects on the radiation balance. In order to understand which physical and chemical transformations occur during transport processes, aerosol samples were collected during four different Antarctic austral summer campaigns. The mean amino acids concentration detected at the Italian coastal base was 11 pmol m-3. The main components were fine fractions, establishing a local marine source. Once produced on the sea surface, marine aerosols undergo an ageing process, due to various phenomena such as coagulation, or photochemical transformations. This was demonstrated by using the samples collected on the Antarctic plateau, where the background values of amino acids (0.7 and 0.8 pmol m-3) were determined, and concentration enrichment in the coarse particles was observed. Another important source of amino acids in marine aerosols is the presence of biological material, demonstrated through a sampling cruise on the R/V Italica on the Southern Ocean.

  18. Trends in codon and amino acid usage in Thermotoga maritima.

    PubMed

    Zavala, Alejandro; Naya, Hugo; Romero, Héctor; Musto, Héctor

    2002-05-01

    The usage of synonymous codons and the frequencies of amino acids were investigated in the complete genome of the bacterium Thermotoga maritima using a multivariate statistical approach. The GC3 content of each gene was the most prominent source of variation of codon usage. Surprisingly the usage of UGU and UGC (synonymous triplets coding for Cys, the least frequent amino acid in this species) was detected as the second most prominent source of variation. However, this result is probably an artifact due to the very low frequency of Cys together with the nonbiased composition of this genome. The third trend was related to the preferential usage of a subset of codons among highly expressed genes, and these triplets are presumed to be translationally optimal. Concerning the amino acid usage, the hydropathy level of each protein (and therefore the frequency of charged residues) was the main trend, while the second factor was related to the frequency of usage of the smaller residues, suggesting that the cell economy strongly influences the architecture of the proteins. The third axis of the analysis discriminated the usage of Phe, Tyr, Trp (aromatic residues) plus Cys, Met, and His. These six residues have in common the property of being the preferential targets of reactive oxygen species, and therefore the anaerobic condition of T. maritima is an important factor for the amino acid frequencies. Finally, the Cys content of each protein was the fourth trend. PMID:11965430

  19. The complex amino acid diet of Francisella in infected macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Barel, Monique; Ramond, Elodie; Gesbert, Gael; Charbit, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Francisella tularensis, the agent of the zoonotic disease tularemia, is a highly infectious bacterium for a large number of animal species and can be transmitted to humans by various means. The bacterium is able to infect a variety of cell types but replicates in mammalian hosts mainly in the cytosol of infected macrophages. In order to resist the stressful and nutrient-restricted intracellular environments, it encounters during its systemic dissemination, Francisella has developed dedicated stress resistance mechanisms and adapted its metabolic and nutritional needs. Recent data form our laboratory and from several other groups have shown that Francisella simultaneously relies on multiple host amino acid sources during its intracellular life cycle. This review will summarize how intracellular Francisella use different amino acid sources, and their role in phagosomal escape and/or cytosolic multiplication and systemic dissemination. We will first summarize the data that we have obtained on two amino acid transporters involved in Francisella phagosomal escape and cytosolic multiplication i.e., the glutamate transporter GadC and the asparagine transporter AnsP, respectively. The specific contribution of glutamate and asparagine to the physiology of the bacterium will be evoked. Then, we will discuss how Francisella has adapted to obtain and utilize host amino acid resources, and notably the contribution of host transporters and autophagy process in the establishment of a nutrient-replete intracellular niche. PMID:25705612

  20. Amino acid-sensing ion channels in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Spalding, Edgar P.

    2014-08-12

    The title of our project is “Amino acid-sensing ion channels in plants”. Its goals are two-fold: to determine the molecular functions of glutamate receptor-like (GLR) proteins, and to elucidate their biological roles (physiological or developmental) in plants. Here is our final technical report. We were highly successful in two of the three aims, modestly successful in the third.

  1. Statistical model of amino acid code of protein secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Shestopalov, B V

    2003-01-01

    In the previous paper (Shestopalov, 2003) we presented the amino acid code of protein secondary structure as a partial solution of the fundamental problem of the protein three-dimensional structure calculation from the amino acid sequence. Here a statistical model of the code is described. The model is based on the structural data from 2258 protein chains (417,112 amino acid residues used). 60 and 61% of the secondary structure, calculated using the model, coincide, respectively, with the observed secondary structure in the training subset and test subset (104 protein chains and 21,166 residues used). This is equal to the threshold value for all the secondary structure calculations, based on the models, where, similarly as here, only the nearest and middle-range interactions are considered. Therefore the constructed model can be applied for the protein structure prediction from the amino acid sequence, especially when additional information is used along with expert analysis, as in the most successful prediction methods. The model can be used for analysis of the secondary structure changes during protein folding by comparison of the calculated and observed secondary structures. The information about the conformationally invariant segments can serve for the simulation of the supersecondary structure formation. One can try to obtain and examine the protein subset, in which the calculated and observed secondary structures are very similar. PMID:14989165

  2. On the evolution of the standard amino-acid alphabet

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yi; Freeland, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Although one standard amino-acid 'alphabet' is used by most organisms on Earth, the evolutionary cause(s) and significance of this alphabet remain elusive. Fresh insights into the origin of the alphabet are now emerging from disciplines as diverse as astrobiology, biochemical engineering and bioinformatics. PMID:16515719

  3. Chemotaxonomic studies on davaineid tapeworms, based on amino acid analysis.

    PubMed

    Bhalya, A; Seth, A; Capoor, V N; Malhotra, S K

    1984-12-01

    Twelve amino acids were detected in six davaineid cestodes, Davainea hewetensis Dhawan & Capoor (1972) collected from one Gallus gallus domesticus L. at Allahabad, India. Chemotaxonomic studies within the family Davaineidae have shown the presence of cystine and hydroxyproline only in D. hewetensis, although phenylalanine and proline occur in all species examined previously. PMID:6520376

  4. Protein and amino acid metabolism in the human newborn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Birth and adaptation to extrauterine life involve major shifts in the protein and energy metabolism of the human newborn. These include a shift from a state of continuous supply of nutrients including amino acids from the mother to cyclic periodic oral intake, a change in the redox state of organs, ...

  5. Amino acid classes and the protein folding problem

    E-print Network

    Marek Cieplak; Neal S. Holter; Amos Maritan; Jayanth R. Banavar

    2000-10-18

    We present and implement a distance-based clustering of amino acids within the framework of a statistically derived interaction matrix and show that the resulting groups faithfully reproduce, for well-designed sequences, thermodynamic stability in and kinetic accessibility to the native state. A simple interpretation of the groups is obtained by eigenanalysis of the interaction matrix.

  6. Intraluminal zinc bioavailability - effect of amino acids on zinc solubility

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, F.A.; Nelson, L.S. Jr.; Brushmiller, J.G.

    1986-03-01

    Human and bovine milks and simple solutions modeled after milks (milk models) have been used in the development of an intraluminal system involves subjecting a food, i.e., milk, to the pH range encountered in the digestive tract, and measuring the amount of soluble minerals at various pH's. With this system the authors have demonstrated that co-precipitation of zinc with calcium phosphate is a key factor modulating the solubility of zinc in milks and in milk models. Since a mineral must be soluble in order to be bioavailable, and since free amino acids have been suggested to increase the solubility of zinc by adding various amino acids. Of the amino acids, aspartate, glutamate, histidine, and phosphoserine, only histidine (10 mM) increased the solubility of zinc in a milk model, albeit slightly. Supplementation of bovine milk with 10 mM histidine also resulted in a slight increase in zinc solubility. No increase in zinc solubility was observed at a physiologic histidine level. Free amino acids at physiologic concentrations do not increase zinc solubility in milks, and therefore, do not seem to contribute to zinc bioavailability.

  7. A modular synthesis of dithiocarbamate pendant unnatural ?-amino acids

    EPA Science Inventory

    Unnatural ?-amino acids containing dithiocarbamate side chains were synthesized by a one-pot reaction of in-situ generated dithiocarbamate anions with sulfamidates. A wide range of these anions participated in the highly regio- and stereo-selective ring opening of sulfamidates to...

  8. Integrated Micro-Chip Amino Acid Chirality Detector for MOD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Bada, J. L.; Botta, O.; Kminek, G.; Grunthaner, F.; Mathies, R.

    2001-01-01

    Integration of a micro-chip capillary electrophoresis analyzer with a sublimation-based extraction technique, as used in the Mars Organic Detector (MOD), for the in-situ detection of amino acids and their enantiomers on solar system bodies. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  9. Beta-Amino acid analogs of an insect neuropeptide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insect neuropeptides of the insect kinin class share a common C-terminal pentapeptide sequence FX1X2WG-NH2 (X2 = P,S) and regulate such critical physiological processes as water balance and digestive enzyme release. Incorporation of beta-amino acids in peptides can enhance both resistance to peptid...

  10. PHOTOLYSIS OF COPPER(II)-AMINO ACID COMPLEXES IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Kinetics of the photolysis of Cu2+-amino acid complexes were investigated under sunlight or monochromatic radiation. nder sunlight (latitude 40 degrees N) in the absence of dioxygen, the mean half-lives estimated for the photoreduction of the bis-Cu2+ complexes (CuL2) at pH 8.0 a...

  11. The complex amino acid diet of Francisella in infected macrophages.

    PubMed

    Barel, Monique; Ramond, Elodie; Gesbert, Gael; Charbit, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Francisella tularensis, the agent of the zoonotic disease tularemia, is a highly infectious bacterium for a large number of animal species and can be transmitted to humans by various means. The bacterium is able to infect a variety of cell types but replicates in mammalian hosts mainly in the cytosol of infected macrophages. In order to resist the stressful and nutrient-restricted intracellular environments, it encounters during its systemic dissemination, Francisella has developed dedicated stress resistance mechanisms and adapted its metabolic and nutritional needs. Recent data form our laboratory and from several other groups have shown that Francisella simultaneously relies on multiple host amino acid sources during its intracellular life cycle. This review will summarize how intracellular Francisella use different amino acid sources, and their role in phagosomal escape and/or cytosolic multiplication and systemic dissemination. We will first summarize the data that we have obtained on two amino acid transporters involved in Francisella phagosomal escape and cytosolic multiplication i.e., the glutamate transporter GadC and the asparagine transporter AnsP, respectively. The specific contribution of glutamate and asparagine to the physiology of the bacterium will be evoked. Then, we will discuss how Francisella has adapted to obtain and utilize host amino acid resources, and notably the contribution of host transporters and autophagy process in the establishment of a nutrient-replete intracellular niche. PMID:25705612

  12. Exercise and amino acid anabolic cell signaling and the regulation of skeletal muscle mass.

    PubMed

    Pasiakos, Stefan M

    2012-07-01

    A series of complex intracellular networks influence the regulation of skeletal muscle protein turnover. In recent years, studies have examined how cellular regulators of muscle protein turnover modulate metabolic mechanisms contributing to the loss, gain, or conservation of skeletal muscle mass. Exercise and amino acids both stimulate anabolic signaling potentially through several intracellular pathways including the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 and the mitogen activated protein kinase cell signaling cascades. As novel molecular regulators of muscle integrity continue to be explored, a contemporary analysis of the literature is required to understand the metabolic mechanisms by which contractile forces and amino acids affect cellular process that contribute to long-term adaptations and preservation of muscle mass. This article reviews the literature related to how exercise and amino acid availability affect cellular regulators of skeletal muscle mass, especially highlighting recent investigations that have identified mechanisms by which contractile forces and amino acids modulate muscle health. Furthermore, this review will explore integrated exercise and nutrition strategies that promote the maintenance of muscle health by optimizing exercise, and amino acid-induced cell signaling in aging adults susceptible to muscle loss. PMID:22852061

  13. Novel synthesis of N-alkoxycarbonyl amino acids and surfactant properties of their sodium salts.

    PubMed

    Kawase, Tokuzo; Nishioka, Yukie; Oida, Tatsuo

    2010-01-01

    N-Acyl amino acids have been prepared from fatty acid chlorides and amino acids, but it may not be easy to vary the hydrophobic groups on the view point of availability. In this work, instead of acid halides, long alkyl chloroformates were prepared by the facile reaction of alcohols and triphosgene as an induction agent of hydrophobic group on amino acids. N-Alkoxycarbonyl amino acids were synthesized from alkyl chloroformate and amino acids under Schötten-Baumann reaction condition with some modification. Surfactant properties of their sodium salts were studied by surface tension measurements, dynamic light scattering and foaming test, and compared with those of N-acyl amino acids. Sodium salts of N-alkoxycarbonyl amino acids showed an excellent surface tension lowering ability comparable to N-acyl amino acids, and they also exhibited good foaming ability and stability. PMID:20299766

  14. Amino Acid Metabolism of Lemna minor L. 12

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, David; Rich, Patrick J.; Brunk, Dennis G.

    1989-01-01

    A serious limitation to the use of N(O,S)-heptafluorobutyryl isobutyl amino acid derivatives in the analysis of 15N-labeling kinetics of amino acids in plant tissues, is that the amides glutamine and asparagine undergo acid hydrolysis to glutamate and aspartate, respectively, during derivatization. This led us to consider an alternative procedure (G Fortier et al. [1986] J Chromatogr 361: 253-261) for derivatization of glutamine and asparagine with N-methyl-N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-trifluoroacetamide in pyridine. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (electron ionization) yielded fragment ions (M-57) of mass 417 and 431 for the [14N]asparagine and [14N]glutamine derivatives, respectively, suitable for monitoring unlabeled, single-15N- and double-15N-labeled amide species from the ion clusters at mass to charge ratio (m/z) 415 to 423 for asparagine, and m/z 429 to 437 for glutamine. From separate analyses of the specific isotope abundance of the amino-N groups of asparagine and glutamine as their N-heptafluorobutyryl isobutyl derivatives, the specific amide-[15N] abundance of these amino acids was determined. We demonstrate that this approach to 15N analysis of the amides can yield unique insights as to the compartmentation of asparagine and glutamine in vivo. The ratios of unlabeled:single-15N:double-15N-labeled species are highly diagnostic of the relative sizes and turnover of metabolically active and inactive pools of the amides and their precursors. Kinetic evidence is presented to indicate that a significant proportion (approximately 10%) of the free asparagine pool may be metabolically inactive (vacuolar). If the amide group of asparagine is derived exclusively from glutamine-amide, then asparagine must be synthesized in a compartment of the cell in which both glutamine-amide and aspartate are more heavily labeled with 15N than the bulk pools of these amino acids. This compartment is presumably the chloroplast. The transaminase inhibitor aminooxyacetate is shown to markedly inhibit amino acid synthesis; several amino acid pools accumulated in the presence of aminooxyacetate and [15N]H4+ are 14N-enriched and must be derived primarily from protein turnover. PMID:16666680

  15. Real-time Measurements of Amino Acid and Protein Hydroperoxides Using Coumarin Boronic Acid*

    PubMed Central

    Michalski, Radoslaw; Zielonka, Jacek; Gapys, Ewa; Marcinek, Andrzej; Joseph, Joy; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman

    2014-01-01

    Hydroperoxides of amino acid and amino acid residues (tyrosine, cysteine, tryptophan, and histidine) in proteins are formed during oxidative modification induced by reactive oxygen species. Amino acid hydroperoxides are unstable intermediates that can further propagate oxidative damage in proteins. The existing assays (oxidation of ferrous cation and iodometric assays) cannot be used in real-time measurements. In this study, we show that the profluorescent coumarin boronic acid (CBA) probe reacts with amino acid and protein hydroperoxides to form the corresponding fluorescent product, 7-hydroxycoumarin. 7-Hydroxycoumarin formation was catalase-independent. Based on this observation, we have developed a fluorometric, real-time assay that is adapted to a multiwell plate format. This is the first report showing real-time monitoring of amino acid and protein hydroperoxides using the CBA-based assay. This approach was used to detect protein hydroperoxides in cell lysates obtained from macrophages exposed to visible light and photosensitizer (rose bengal). We also measured the rate constants for the reaction between amino acid hydroperoxides (tyrosyl, tryptophan, and histidine hydroperoxides) and CBA, and these values (7–23 m?1 s?1) were significantly higher than that measured for H2O2 (1.5 m?1 s?1). Using the CBA-based competition kinetics approach, the rate constants for amino acid hydroperoxides with ebselen, a glutathione peroxidase mimic, were also determined, and the values were within the range of 1.1–1.5 × 103 m?1 s?1. Both ebselen and boronates may be used as small molecule scavengers of amino acid and protein hydroperoxides. Here we also show formation of tryptophan hydroperoxide from tryptophan exposed to co-generated fluxes of nitric oxide and superoxide. This observation reveals a new mechanism for amino acid and protein hydroperoxide formation in biological systems. PMID:24928516

  16. New charge-bearing amino acid residues that promote ?-sheet secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Maynard, Stacy J; Almeida, Aaron M; Yoshimi, Yasuharu; Gellman, Samuel H

    2014-11-26

    Proteinogenic amino acid residues that promote ?-sheet secondary structure are hydrophobic (e.g., Ile or Val) or only moderately polar (e.g., Thr). The design of peptides intended to display ?-sheet secondary structure in water typically requires one set of residues to ensure conformational stability and an orthogonal set, with charged side chains, to ensure aqueous solubility and discourage self-association. Here we describe new amino acids that manifest substantial ?-sheet propensity, by virtue of ?-branching, and also bear an ionizable group in the side chain. PMID:25393077

  17. Regulation of protein degradation pathways by amino acids and insulin in skeletal muscle of neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rapid gain in lean mass in neonates requires greater rates of protein synthesis than degradation. We previously delineated the molecular mechanisms by which insulin and amino acids, especially leucine, modulate skeletal muscle protein synthesis and how this changes with development. In the curre...

  18. Methionine restriction extends lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster under conditions of low amino-acid status.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung Cheon; Kaya, Alaattin; Ma, Siming; Kim, Gwansu; Gerashchenko, Maxim V; Yim, Sun Hee; Hu, Zhen; Harshman, Lawrence G; Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2014-01-01

    Reduced methionine (Met) intake can extend lifespan of rodents; however, whether this regimen represents a general strategy for regulating aging has been controversial. Here we report that Met restriction extends lifespan in both fruit flies and yeast, and that this effect requires low amino-acid status. Met restriction in Drosophila mimicks the effect of dietary restriction and is associated with decreased reproduction. However, under conditions of high amino-acid status, Met restriction is ineffective and the trade-off between longevity and reproduction is not observed. Overexpression of InRDN or Tsc2 inhibits lifespan extension by Met restriction, suggesting the role of TOR signalling in the Met control of longevity. Overall, this study defines the specific roles of Met and amino-acid imbalance in aging and suggests that Met restiction is a general strategy for lifespan extension. PMID:24710037

  19. Snake Venom L-Amino Acid Oxidases: Trends in Pharmacology and Biochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Izidoro, Luiz Fernando M.; Sobrinho, Juliana C.; Mendes, Mirian M.; Costa, Tássia R.; Grabner, Amy N.; Rodrigues, Veridiana M.; da Silva, Saulo L.; Zanchi, Fernando B.; Zuliani, Juliana P.; Fernandes, Carla F. C.; Calderon, Leonardo A.; Stábeli, Rodrigo G.; Soares, Andreimar M.

    2014-01-01

    L-amino acid oxidases are enzymes found in several organisms, including venoms of snakes, where they contribute to the toxicity of ophidian envenomation. Their toxicity is primarily due to enzymatic activity, but other mechanisms have been proposed recently which require further investigation. L-amino acid oxidases exert biological and pharmacological effects, including actions on platelet aggregation and the induction of apoptosis, hemorrhage, and cytotoxicity. These proteins present a high biotechnological potential for the development of antimicrobial, antitumor, and antiprotozoan agents. This review provides an overview of the biochemical properties and pharmacological effects of snake venom L-amino acid oxidases, their structure/activity relationship, and supposed mechanisms of action described so far. PMID:24738050

  20. Branched chain amino acid-enriched solutions in the septic patient. A randomized, prospective trial.

    PubMed Central

    Bower, R H; Muggia-Sullam, M; Vallgren, S; Hurst, J M; Kern, K A; LaFrance, R; Fischer, J E

    1986-01-01

    A prospective, randomized trial was undertaken to compare the nutritional efficacy in surgical stress of a standard amino acid solution and two branched chain-enriched amino acid solutions: one enriched primarily with valine, the other with leucine. The study comprised 37 patients in the surgical intensive care unit who received isocaloric, isonitrogenous parenteral nutrition started within 24 hours of the onset of major operation, injury, or sepsis. Nitrogen retention was marginally but statistically significantly better on days 5, 7, and 10 in both groups of patients receiving the branched chain-enriched solutions, but differences in cumulative nitrogen balance were not statistically significant. Amino acid composition appeared to be important in that the group receiving the leucine-enriched solution appeared to maintain hepatic protein synthesis better (as manifest by higher short-turnover plasma protein concentrations) and required less exogenous insulin to maintain euglycemia. Improved outcome was not seen in the groups receiving the branched chain-enriched solutions. PMID:3079994

  1. Proximate composition, amino acid and fatty acid composition of fish maws.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jing; Zeng, Ling; Xu, Youhou; Sun, Yulin; Chen, Ziming; Fan, Sigang

    2016-01-01

    Fish maws are commonly recommended and consumed in Asia over many centuries because it is believed to have some traditional medical properties. This study highlights and provides new information on the proximate composition, amino acid and fatty acid composition of fish maws of Cynoscion acoupa, Congresox talabonoides and Sciades proops. The results indicated that fish maws were excellent protein sources and low in fat content. The proteins in fish maws were rich in functional amino acids (FAAs) and the ratio of FAAs and total amino acids in fish maws ranged from 0.68 to 0.69. Among species, croaker C. acoupa contained the most polyunsaturated fatty acids, arachidonic acid, docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapntemacnioc acid, showing the lowest value of index of atherogenicity and index of thrombogenicity, showing the highest value of hypocholesterolemic/hypercholesterolemic ratio, which is the most desirable. PMID:26190023

  2. Stimulation of rat hepatic amino acid transport by burn injury.

    PubMed

    Lohmann, R; Souba, W W; Zakrzewski, K; Bode, B P

    1998-05-01

    Burn injury accelerates hepatic amino acid metabolism, but the role of transmembrane substrate delivery in this response has not been investigated. We therefore studied the effects of cutaneous scald injury on the Na+-dependent transport of glutamine and alanine in isolated rat liver plasma membrane vesicles. Scald injury resulted in liver damage and a 1.4- to 2.3-fold and 1.5- to 2.8-fold stimulation of hepatic transport rates for glutamine and alanine, respectively, proportional to the total burned surface area (TBSA) after 24 hours. Enhanced uptake of glutamine and alanine was attributable to increases in the maximum velocity (Vmax) of system N and system A activities, respectively. Hepatic amino acid transport activity remained elevated in vesicles from burned animals after 72 hours, but the degree of stimulation (1.3- to 1.7-fold for glutamine and 1.3- to 1.6-fold for alanine) was less than that observed 24 hours after thermal injury. Liver function tests returned to control values after 72 hours as well, indicating rectification of hepatic damage. In contrast to the induction of hepatic system A and system N activity in catabolic states such as cancer and endotoxemia, further studies showed that tumor necrosis factor (TNF) failed to play a significant role in burn-stimulated amino acid transport rates. When combined with plasma liver enzyme profiles, early transient hepatic amino acid transporter stimulation may support amino acid-dependent pathways involved in the repair of burn-dependent hepatic damage. PMID:9591755

  3. Evolution of amino acid metabolism inferred through cladistic analysis.

    PubMed

    Cunchillos, Chomin; Lecointre, Guillaume

    2003-11-28

    Because free amino acids were most probably available in primitive abiotic environments, their metabolism is likely to have provided some of the very first metabolic pathways of life. What were the first enzymatic reactions to emerge? A cladistic analysis of metabolic pathways of the 16 aliphatic amino acids and 2 portions of the Krebs cycle was performed using four criteria of homology. The analysis is not based on sequence comparisons but, rather, on coding similarities in enzyme properties. The properties used are shared specific enzymatic activity, shared enzymatic function without substrate specificity, shared coenzymes, and shared functional family. The tree shows that the earliest pathways to emerge are not portions of the Krebs cycle but metabolisms of aspartate, asparagine, glutamate, and glutamine. The views of Horowitz (Horowitz, N. H. (1945) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 31, 153-157) and Cordón (Cordón, F. (1990) Tratado Evolucionista de Biologia, Aguilar, Madrid, Spain), according to which the upstream reactions in the catabolic pathways and the downstream reactions in the anabolic pathways are the earliest in evolution, are globally corroborated; however, with some exceptions. These are due to later opportunistic connections of pathways (actually already suggested by these authors). Earliest enzymatic functions are mostly catabolic; they were deaminations, transaminations, and decarboxylations. From the consensus tree we extracted four time spans for amino acid metabolism development. For some amino acids catabolism and biosynthesis occurred at the same time (Asp, Glu, Lys, Leu, Ala, Val, Ile, Pro, Arg). For others ultimate reactions that use amino acids as a substrate or as a product are distinct in time, with catabolism preceding anabolism for Asn, Gln, and Cys and anabolism preceding catabolism for Ser, Met, and Thr. Cladistic analysis of the structure of biochemical pathways makes hypotheses in biochemical evolution explicit and parsimonious. PMID:12949083

  4. Investigation of amino acid-polymer aqueous biphasic systems.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Rahmat; Hamidi, Barzan; Ebrahimi, Nosaibah

    2014-08-28

    Aiming at gathering further information to evaluate the recently proposed1,2 mechanism of the salt effect in aqueous polymer solutions, experimental vapor-liquid equilibria (VLE), liquid-liquid equilibria (LLE), and volumetric-compressibility measurements were carried out for several polymer-amino acid aqueous systems. The constant water activity lines (obtained through the isopiestic method at 298.15 K) of aqueous polypropylene glycol 400 (PPG400) + alanine or glycine systems, which form aqueous biphasic systems (salting-out effect), have a concave and convex slope, respectively, in the one-phase and two-phase regions. However, all the investigated polyethylene glycols (PEG400, PEG2000, PEG6000, and PEG10000) do not form aqueous biphasic systems with alanine or glycine (salting-in effect) and their constant water activity lines have a convex slope. In the second part of this work, the apparent molar volume and isentropic compressibility of transfer of alanine and glycine from water to aqueous solutions of PEG200, PEG2000, PEG10000, and PPG400 were studied at different temperatures. The third part of this work is concerned with the determination of LLE phase diagrams for several ternary polymer-amino acid aqueous systems containing polymers PPG400 and PPG725 and amino acids alanine, glycine, serine, and proline at different temperatures. On the basis of the obtained cloud point values of aqueous solutions of PPG725 in the absence and presence of various amino acids, it was found that all the investigated amino acids have a salting-out effect on PPG725 in aqueous solutions and entropy is the driving force for biphasic formation. PMID:25093595

  5. Amino acid-based surfactants – do they deserve more attention?

    PubMed

    Bordes, Romain; Holmberg, Krister

    2015-08-01

    The 20 standard amino acids (together with a few more that are not used in the biosynthesis of proteins) constitute a versatile tool box for synthesis of surfactants. Anionic, cationic and zwitterionic amphiphiles can be prepared and surfactants with several functional groups can be obtained by the proper choice of starting amino acid. This review gives examples of procedures used for preparation and discusses important physicochemical properties of the amphiphiles and how these can be taken advantage of for various applications. Micelles with a chiral surface can be obtained by self-assembly of enantiomerically pure surfactants and such supramolecular chirality can be utilized for asymmetric organic synthesis and for preparation of mesoporous materials with chiral pores. Surfactants based on amino acids with two carboxyl groups are effective chelating agents and can be used as collectors in mineral ore flotation. A surfactant based on cysteine readily oxidizes into the corresponding cystine compound, which can be regarded as a gemini surfactant. The facile and reversible cysteine-cystine transformation has been taken advantage of in the design of a switchable surfactant. A very attractive aspect of surfactants based on amino acids is that the polar head-group is entirely natural and that the linkage to the hydrophobic tail, which is often an ester or an amide bond, is easily cleaved. The rate of degradation can be tailored by the structure of the amphiphile. The ester linkage in betaine ester surfactants is particularly susceptible to alkaline hydrolysis and this surfactant type can be used as a biocide with short-lived action. This paper is not intended as a full review on the topic. Instead it highlights concepts that are unique to amino acid-based surfactants and that we believe can have practical implications. PMID:25846628

  6. Innershell Absorption Spectroscopy of Amino Acids K. Kaznacheyev,* A. Osanna, and C. Jacobsen

    E-print Network

    Hitchcock, Adam P.

    of amino acids and on the bases of ab initio computations. Studies applying innershell excitationInnershell Absorption Spectroscopy of Amino Acids K. Kaznacheyev,* A. Osanna, and C. Jacobsen acids commonly occurring in nature. Qualitative trends among the spectra of amino acids with similar

  7. Amino acid supplementation alters bone metabolism during simulated weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwart, S. R.; Davis-Street, J. E.; Paddon-Jones, D.; Ferrando, A. A.; Wolfe, R. R.; Smith, S. M.

    2005-01-01

    High-protein and acidogenic diets induce hypercalciuria. Foods or supplements with excess sulfur-containing amino acids increase endogenous sulfuric acid production and therefore have the potential to increase calcium excretion and alter bone metabolism. In this study, effects of an amino acid/carbohydrate supplement on bone resorption were examined during bed rest. Thirteen subjects were divided at random into two groups: a control group (Con, n = 6) and an amino acid-supplemented group (AA, n = 7) who consumed an extra 49.5 g essential amino acids and 90 g carbohydrate per day for 28 days. Urine was collected for n-telopeptide (NTX), deoxypyridinoline (DPD), calcium, and pH determinations. Bone mineral content was determined and potential renal acid load was calculated. Bone-specific alkaline phosphatase was measured in serum samples collected on day 1 (immediately before bed rest) and on day 28. Potential renal acid load was higher in the AA group than in the Con group during bed rest (P < 0.05). For all subjects, during bed rest urinary NTX and DPD concentrations were greater than pre-bed rest levels (P < 0.05). Urinary NTX and DPD tended to be higher in the AA group (P = 0.073 and P = 0.056, respectively). During bed rest, urinary calcium was greater than baseline levels (P < 0.05) in the AA group but not the Con group. Total bone mineral content was lower after bed rest than before bed rest in the AA group but not the Con group (P < 0.05). During bed rest, urinary pH decreased (P < 0.05), and it was lower in the AA group than the Con group. These data suggest that bone resorption increased, without changes in bone formation, in the AA group.

  8. Phenotypic and genetic relationships between growth and feed intake curves and feed efficiency and amino acid requirements in the growing pig.

    PubMed

    Saintilan, R; Brossard, L; Vautier, B; Sellier, P; Bidanel, J; van Milgen, J; Gilbert, H

    2015-01-01

    Improvement of feed efficiency in pigs has been achieved essentially by increasing lean growth rate, which resulted in lower feed intake (FI). The objective was to evaluate the impact of strategies for improving feed efficiency on the dynamics of FI and growth in growing pigs to revisit nutrient recommendations and strategies for feed efficiency improvement. In 2010, three BWs, at 35±2, 63±9 and 107±7 kg, and daily FI during this period were recorded in three French test stations on 379 Large White and 327 French Landrace from maternal pig populations and 215 Large White from a sire population. Individual growth and FI model parameters were obtained with the InraPorc® software and individual nutrient requirements were computed. The model parameters were explored according to feed efficiency as measured by residual feed intake (RFI) or feed conversion ratio (FCR). Animals were separated in groups of better feed efficiency (RFI- or FCR-), medium feed efficiency and poor feed efficiency. Second, genetic relationships between feed efficiency and model parameters were estimated. Despite similar average daily gains (ADG) during the test for all RFI groups, RFI- pigs had a lower initial growth rate and a higher final growth rate compared with other pigs. The same initial growth rate was found for all FCR groups, but FCR- pigs had significantly higher final growth rates than other pigs, resulting in significantly different ADG. Dynamic of FI also differed between RFI or FCR groups. The calculated digestible lysine requirements, expressed in g/MJ net energy (NE), showed the same trends for RFI or FCR groups: the average requirements for the 25% most efficient animals were 13% higher than that of the 25% least efficient animals during the whole test, reaching 0.90 to 0.95 g/MJ NE at the beginning of the test, which is slightly greater than usual feed recommendations for growing pigs. Model parameters were moderately heritable (0.30±0.13 to 0.56±0.13), except for the precocity of growth (0.06±0.08). The parameter representing the quantity of feed at 50 kg BW showed a relatively high genetic correlation with RFI (0.49±0.14), and average protein deposition between 35 and 110 kg had the highest correlation with FCR (-0.76±0.08). Thus, growth and FI dynamics may be envisaged as breeding tools to improve feed efficiency. Furthermore, improvement of feed efficiency should be envisaged jointly with new feeding strategies. PMID:25192352

  9. Regulation of adipose branched chain amino acid catabolism enzyme expression and cross-adipose amino acid flux in human obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elevated blood branched chain amino acids (BCAA) are often associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. One possibility is that under these conditions there is a reduced cellular utilization and/or lower complete oxidation of BCAAs. White adipose tissue (WAT) has become appreciated as a...

  10. Complexes of polyadenylic acid and the methyl esters of amino acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khaled, M. A.; Mulins, D. W., Jr.; Swindle, M.; Lacey, J. C., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A study of amino acid methyl esters binding to polyadenylic acid supports the theory that the genetic code originated through weak but selective affinities between amino acids and nucleotides. NMR, insoluble complex analysis, and ultraviolet spectroscopy are used to illustrate a correlation between the hydrophybicities of A amino acids and their binding constants, which, beginning with the largest, are in the order of Phe (having nominally a hydrophobic AAA anticodon), Ile, Leu, Val and Gly (having a hydrophilic anticodon with no A). In general, the binding constants are twice the values by Reuben and Polk (1980) for monomeric AMP, which suggests that polymer amino acids are interacting with only one base. No real differences are found betwen poly A binding for free Phe, Phe methyl ester or Phe amide, except that the amide value is slightly lower.

  11. Gene-Enzyme Relationships of Aromatic Amino Acid Biosynthesis in Higher Plants

    SciTech Connect

    2002-08-12

    Inhibition studies of amino acids in Nicotiana silvestris suspension cells gave clues to the difficulties for obtaining mutants deficient in post prephenate pathway proteins of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis (prephenate aminotransferase, arogenate dehydrogenase and arogenate dehydratase). Such mutants, if successfully obtained, would allow gene-enzyme relationships of aromatic amino acid proteins to be studied. We found that amino acids were inhibitory toward plant cell growth, and thus were unable to rescue analog resistant mutants. Toxicity of all amino acids toward exponentially dividing Nicotiana silvestris suspension cultured cells was monitored by following growth rates. Except for L-glutamine, all 19 protein amino acids inhibited cell growth. Inhibition of growth progressed to cell deterioration. Electron microscopy showed that amino acids triggered a state of cell shrinkage that eventually degenerated to total cellular disorganization. L-glutamine was not only an effective agent for prevention of amino acid toxicity, but enhanced the final growth yield. L-glutamine also was able to completely reverse inhibition effects in cells that had been in the slowed exponential phase. Two types of inhibition occurred and we have proposed that any amino acid inhibition that can be completely antagonized by L-glutamine be called ''general amino acid inhibition''. ''Specific amino acid inhibition'' resulting from particular pathway imbalances caused by certain exogenous amino acids, can be recognized and studied in the presence of L-glutamine which can abolishes the complication effects of general amino acid inhibition.

  12. The Amino Acid Arginine 210 of the Response Regulator HrpG of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri Is Required for HrpG Function in Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Gottig, Natalia; Ottado, Jorgelina

    2015-01-01

    Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri colonizes its hosts through the trafficking of effector proteins to the plant cell by the type III protein secretion system. In X. citri subsp. citri, as in other plant pathogens, the hrp cluster encodes the type III protein secretion system and is regulated by the transcription factors HrpG and HrpX. HrpG belongs to the OmpR family’s response regulator of EnvZ/OmpR two-component signal transduction system. Here, we show that the arginine 210 residue is crucial for the transcriptional activity of HrpG revealed by the absence of disease in host plants and hypersensitive response in non-host plants when a strain carrying this point mutation is used in plant infiltration assays. Also, this strain showed decreased expression levels of hrp genes in bacteria grown in culture or when they were recovered from citrus leaves. Moreover, we show for the first time that HrpG binds to both hrpX and its own promoter, and the change of the arginine 210 by a cysteine does not prevent the binding to both promoters. Nevertheless, in vitro hrpX transcription was observed only with HrpG whereas no transcription was detected with the R210C mutant. HrpG was able to interact with itself as well as with the mutant R210C suggesting that it functions as a dimer. The mutant protein R210C showed altered protease sensitivity, suggesting that Arg210 is essential for protein active conformation and thus for transcriptional activity. Our results indicate that arginine 210 in HrpG, as it may occur with this conserved residue in other members of this family of response regulators, is not required for DNA binding whereas is essential for hrp genes transcription and therefore for pathogenicity and HR induction. PMID:25961560

  13. Oligomerization of Negatively-Charged Amino Acids by Carbonyldiimidazole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Aubrey R., Jr.; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1996-01-01

    The carbonyldiimidazole-induced oligomerizations of aspartic acid, glutamic acid and 0-phospho-serine are amongst the most efficient reported syntheses of biopolymers in aqueous solution. The dependence of the yields of products on the concentrations of reagents, the temperature and the enantiomeric composition of the substrate amino acids are reported. Catalysis by metal ions, particularly by Mg(2+), is described. These reactions do not generate significant amounts of material in the size-range of several tens of residues that are thought to be needed for a polymer to function as a genetic material.

  14. Effects of aerosol formulation to amino acids and fatty acids contents in Haruan extract.

    PubMed

    Febriyenti; Bai-Baie, Saringat Bin; Laila, Lia

    2012-01-01

    Haruan (Channa striatus) extract was formulated to aerosol for wound and burn treatment. Haruan extract is containing amino acids and fatty acids that important for wound healing process. The purpose of this study is to observe the effect of formulation and other excipients in the formula to amino acids and fatty acids content in Haruan extract before and after formulated into aerosol. Precolumn derivatization with 6-aminoquinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate (AQC) method is used for amino acids analysis. Fatty acids in Haruan extract were esterified using transesterification method to form FAMEs before analyzed using GC. Boron trifluoride-methanol reagent is used for transesterification. Tyrosine and methionine concentrations were different after formulated. The concentrations were decrease. There are six fatty acids have amount that significantly different after formulated into concentrate and aerosol. Contents of these fatty acids were increase. Generally, fatty acids which had content increased after formulated were the long-chain fatty acids. This might be happen because of chain extension process. Saponification and decarboxylation would give the chain extended product. Therefore contents of long-chain fatty acids were increase. Generally, the aerosol formulation did not affect the amino acids concentrations in Haruan extract while some long-chain fatty acids concentrations were increase after formulated into concentrate and aerosol. PMID:22186302

  15. Probing the Specificity Determinants of Amino Acid Recognition by Arginase

    SciTech Connect

    Shishova, E.; Di Costanzo, L; Emig, F; Ash, D; Christianson, D

    2009-01-01

    Arginase is a binuclear manganese metalloenzyme that serves as a therapeutic target for the treatment of asthma, erectile dysfunction, and atherosclerosis. In order to better understand the molecular basis of inhibitor affinity, we have employed site-directed mutagenesis, enzyme kinetics, and X-ray crystallography to probe the molecular recognition of the amino acid moiety (i.e., the ?-amino and ?-carboxylate groups) of substrate l-arginine and inhibitors in the active site of arginase I. Specifically, we focus on (1) a water-mediated hydrogen bond between the substrate ?-carboxylate and T135, (2) a direct hydrogen bond between the substrate ?-carboxylate and N130, and (3) a direct charged hydrogen bond between the substrate ?-amino group and D183. Amino acid substitutions for T135, N130, and D183 generally compromise substrate affinity as reflected by increased KM values but have less pronounced effects on catalytic function as reflected by minimal variations of kcat. As with substrate KM values, inhibitor Kd values increase for binding to enzyme mutants and suggest that the relative contribution of intermolecular interactions to amino acid affinity in the arginase active site is water-mediated hydrogen bond < direct hydrogen bond < direct charged hydrogen bond. Structural comparisons of arginase with the related binuclear manganese metalloenzymes agmatinase and proclavaminic acid amidinohydrolase suggest that the evolution of substrate recognition in the arginase fold occurs by mutation of residues contained in specificity loops flanking the mouth of the active site (especially loops 4 and 5), thereby allowing diverse guanidinium substrates to be accommodated for catalysis.

  16. Infusion of Branched-chain Enriched Amino Acid Solution in Patients with Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Freund, Herbert; Dienstag, Jules; Lehrich, James; Yoshimura, Norman; Bradford, Ronald R.; Rosen, Harvey; Atamian, Susan; Slemmer, Elizabeth; Holroyde, Jane; Fischer, Josef E.

    1982-01-01

    Hospitalized patients with hepatic insufficiency often suffer from severe catabolic states and are in urgent need of nutritional support during their acute illness. Protein intolerence, however, remains a significant problem with respect to the provision of adequate nutrition, either enterally or parenterally. The following report is an anecdotal series of 63 consecutive patients in a large urban hospital treated prospectively with nutritional support using a prototype high branched-chain amino acid solution (FO80) given by technique of total parenteral nutrition by the subclavian or internal jugular route with hypertonic dextrose. Sixty-three patients, of which 42 had chronic liver disease (cirrhosis) with acute decompensation and 17 with acute hepatic injury as well as four with hepatorenal syndrome, are the subject of this report. All required intravenous nutritional support and were either intolerant to commercially available parenteral nutrition solutions or were in hepatic encephalopathy at the time they were initially seen. The cirrhotic patients had been hospitalized for a mean of 14.5 ± 1.9 days before therapy, had a mean bilirubin of 13 mg/100 ml, and had been in coma for 4.8 ± 0.7 days despite standard therapy. Patients with acute hepatitis had been in the hospital for 16.2 ± 4.1 days before therapy, had a mean bilirubin of 25 mg/100 ml, and had been in coma 5.2 ± 1.6 days before therapy. Routine tests of liver function, blood chemistries, amino acids, EEGs, and complex neurological testing including Reitan trailmaking tests were used in the evaluation of these patients. Up to 120 grams of synthetic amino acid solution with hypertonic dextrose was tolerated in these patients with improvement noted in encephalopathy of at least one grade in 87% of the patients with cirrhosis and 75% of the patients with hepatitis. Nitrogen balance was achieved when 75 to 80 grams of synthetic amino acids were administered. Survival was 45% in the cirrhotic group and 47% in the acute hepatitis group. Encephalopathy appeared to correlate with individual amino acids differentially in the various groups and with the ratio between the aromatic and the branched-chain amino acids. Ammonia did not correlate with either the degree of encephalopathy or improvement therefrom. In 24 Patients therapy for hepatic encephalopathy was limited to infusion of the branched-chain enriched amino acid solution only, with wake-up in 66% of this group. The results strongly suggest that in protein intolerant patients requiring nutritional support, infusion with branchedchain enriched amino acid solutions is well tolerated with either no worsening of or improvement in hepatic encephalopathy coincident with the achievement of nitrogen equilibrium and adequate nutritional support. PMID:6284073

  17. In vivo unnatural amino acid expression in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Travis; Schultz, Peter G

    2014-02-11

    The invention provides orthogonal translation systems for the production of polypeptides comprising unnatural amino acids in methyltrophic yeast such as Pichia pastoris. Methods for producing polypeptides comprising unnatural amino acids in methyltrophic yeast such as Pichia pastoris are also provided.

  18. A Novel Method for Presenting the Amino Acids in an Introductory Biochemistry Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuehl, LeRoy

    1978-01-01

    Introduces an approach to teaching amino acids that employs the use of a poem containing information on the structure and properties of amino acids, and of slides illustrating the poem. Student response to the method was positive. (MA)

  19. Transport activity dependent regulation of the yeast general amino acid permease

    E-print Network

    Cain, Natalie E. (Natalie Elaine)

    2011-01-01

    The general amino acid permease Gap1p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae scavenges amino acids from the extracellular medium for use as nitrogen sources in starvation conditions. Because unlimited uptake of both naturally occurring ...

  20. Formation and Survival of Amino Acids in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, M. P.; Sandford, S. A.; Allamandola, L. J.

    2003-01-01

    The detection of deuterium enrichments in meteoritic hydroxy and amino acids demonstrates that there is a connection between organic material in the interstellar medium and in primitive meteorites. It has generally been assumed that such molecules formed via reactions of small deuterium enriched insterstellar precursors in liquid water on a large asteroidal or cometary parent body. We have recently show that the W photolysis of interstellar/presolar ices can produce the amino acids alanine, serine, and glycine, as well as hydroxy acids, and glycerol, all of which have been extracted from the Murchison meteorite. Thus, some of the probiologically interesting organic compounds, compounds found in meteorites may have formed in presolar ice and have not solely been a product of parent body liquid water chemistry. We will report on our isotopic labeling studies of the mechanism of formation of these interesting compounds, and on astrophysically relevant kinetic studies UV photodecomposition of amino acid precursors in the solid state. This is our first year of exobiology funding on this project.

  1. Formation and Survival of Amino Acids in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, M. P.; Sandford, S. A.; Allamandola, L. J.

    2003-01-01

    The detection of deuterium enrichments in meteoritic hydroxy and amino acids demonstrates that there is a connection between organic material in the interstellar medium and in piimitive meteorites. It has generally been assumed that such molecules formed via reactions of small deuterium enriched insterstellar precursors in liquid water on a large asteroidal or cometary parent body. We have recently show that the W photolysis of interstellar/presolar ices can produce the amino acids alanine, serine, and glycine, as well as hydroxy acids, and glycerol, all of which have been extracted from the Murchison meteorite. Thus, some of the probiologically interesting organic compounds compounds found in meteorites may have formed in presolar ice and have not solely been a product of parent body liquid water chemistry. We will report on our isotopic labeling studies of the mechanism of formation of these inteiesting compounds, and on astrophysically relevant kinetic studies UV photo-decomposition of amino acid precursors in the solid state. This is our first year of exobiology funding on this project.

  2. Autophagy modulates amino acid signaling network in myotubes: differential effects on mTORC1 pathway and the integrated stress response.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xinlei; Long, Yun Chau

    2015-02-01

    Induction of autophagy and the integrated stress response is important for amino acid homeostasis. It remains unknown whether the autophagy coregulates both mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling and the integrated stress response. In mouse C2C12 myotubes, we found that amino acid limitation induced autophagy and that the subsequent release of amino acid is required to sustain mTORC1 signaling. Inhibition of autophagy by bafilomycin A1 or chloroquine treatment during amino acid scarcity abolished mTORC1 signaling, an effect that could be rescued by inhibiting protein synthesis or amino acid supplementation, respectively. Autophagy is required to sustain the balance of both essential and nonessential amino acids during amino acid starvation, and it has a predominant role over the ubiquitin-proteasome system in the regulation of mTORC1. Inhibition of autophagy was found to activate the integrated stress response, as well as eukaryotic initiation factor 2? (eIF2?) and its target genes independent of amino acid availability. Conversely, autophagy induction via mTOR inhibition is sufficient to reduce eIF2? phosphorylation. Thus, autophagy protects the eIF2?-mediated stress response independent of amino acid supply in cultured myotubes. Our results showed that autophagy uniquely modulates mTORC1 and the integrated stress response in an amino acid-dependent and -independent manner, respectively. PMID:25376834

  3. Thermophilic prokaryotes have characteristic patterns of codon usage, amino acid composition and nucleotide content.

    PubMed

    Singer, Gregory A C; Hickey, Donal A

    2003-10-23

    A number of recent studies have shown that thermophilic prokaryotes have distinguishable patterns of both synonymous codon usage and amino acid composition, indicating the action of natural selection related to thermophily. On the other hand, several other studies of whole genomes have illustrated that nucleotide bias can have dramatic effects on synonymous codon usage and also on the amino acid composition of the encoded proteins. This raises the possibility that the thermophile-specific patterns observed at both the codon and protein levels are merely reflections of a single underlying effect at the level of nucleotide composition. Moreover, such an effect at the nucleotide level might be due entirely to mutational bias. In this study, we have compared the genomes of thermophiles and mesophiles at three levels: nucleotide content, codon usage and amino acid composition. Our results indicate that the genomes of thermophiles are distinguishable from mesophiles at all three levels and that the codon and amino acid frequency differences cannot be explained simply by the patterns of nucleotide composition. At the nucleotide level, we see a consistent tendency for the frequency of adenine to increase at all codon positions within the thermophiles. Thermophiles are also distinguished by their pattern of synonymous codon usage for several amino acids, particularly arginine and isoleucine. At the protein level, the most dramatic effect is a two-fold decrease in the frequency of glutamine residues among thermophiles. These results indicate that adaptation to growth at high temperature requires a coordinated set of evolutionary changes affecting (i) mRNA thermostability, (ii) stability of codon-anticodon interactions and (iii) increased thermostability of the protein products. We conclude that elevated growth temperature imposes selective constraints at all three molecular levels: nucleotide content, codon usage and amino acid composition. In addition to these multiple selective effects, however, the genomes of both thermophiles and mesophiles are often subject to superimposed large changes in composition due to mutational bias. PMID:14604790

  4. Protein and amino acid metabolism and requirements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins are the major structural and functional components of all cells of the body. Enzymes, membrane carriers, blood transport molecules, intracellular matrix, and even hair and fingernails are proteins, as are many hormones. Proteins also constitute a major portion of all membranes, and the cons...

  5. Production of carrier-peptide conjugates using chemically reactive unnatural amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Travis; Schultz, Peter G

    2014-01-28

    Provided are methods of making carrier polypeptide that include incorporating a first unnatural amino acid into a carrier polypeptide variant, incorporating a second unnatural amino acid into a target polypeptide variant, and reacting the first and second unnatural amino acids to produce the conjugate. Conjugates produced using the provided methods are also provided. In addition, orthogonal translation systems in methylotrophic yeast and methods of using these systems to produce carrier and target polypeptide variants comprising unnatural amino acids are provided.

  6. Production of carrier-peptide conjugates using chemically reactive unnatural amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Travis; Schultz, Peter G

    2013-12-17

    Provided are methods of making carrier polypeptide that include incorporating a first unnatural amino acid into a carrier polypeptide variant, incorporating a second unnatural amino acid into a target polypeptide variant, and reacting the first and second unnatural amino acids to produce the conjugate. Conjugates produced using the provided methods are also provided. In addition, orthogonal translation systems in methylotrophic yeast and methods of using these systems to produce carrier and target polypeptide variants comprising unnatural amino acids are provided.

  7. Production of carrier-peptide conjugates using chemically reactive unnatural amino acids

    DOEpatents

    Young, Travis; Schultz, Peter G.

    2015-08-18

    Provided are methods of making carrier polypeptide that include incorporating a first unnatural amino acid into a carrier polypeptide variant, incorporating a second unnatural amino acid into a target polypeptide variant, and reacting the first and second unnatural amino acids to produce the conjugate. Conjugates produced using the provided methods are also provided. In addition, orthogonal translation systems in methylotrophic yeast and methods of using these systems to produce carrier and target polypeptide variants comprising unnatural amino acids are provided.

  8. Amino Acid Mean Excitation Energies and Directional Dependencies from Core and Bond Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Sabin, John R.; Oddershede, Jens; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2008-12-08

    We determine the mean excitation energies of several amino acids using a Bragg Rule developed for molecular fragments or functional groups. As the composition of the amino acids is very similar, we find that the amino acids have similar mean excitation energies (approximately 70 eV). Differences arise from variation of the side chains (-R); addition of-CH2-groups decreases the mean excitation energy. We also speculate concerning the directional dependence of the amino acid mean excitation energies.

  9. Characteristics and formation of amino acids and hydroxy acids of the Murchison meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronin, J. R.; Cooper, G. W.; Pizzarello, S.

    1995-01-01

    Eight characteristics of the unique suite of amino acids and hydroxy acids found in the Murchison meteorite can be recognized on the basis of detailed molecular and isotopic analyses. The marked structural correspondence between the alpha-amino acids and alpha-hydroxy acids and the high deuterium/hydrogen ratio argue persuasively for their formation by aqueous phase Strecker reactions in the meteorite parent body from presolar, i.e., interstellar, aldehydes, ketones, ammonia, and hydrogen cyanide. The characteristics of the meteoritic suite of amino acids and hydroxy acids are briefly enumerated and discussed with regard to their consonance with this interstellar-parent body formation hypothesis. The hypothesis has interesting implications for the organic composition of both the primitive parent body and the presolar nebula.

  10. 40 CFR 721.5262 - 2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 5-[[4-chloro-6-[substituted] amino]-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl]amino]-4...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 5- amino]-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl]amino]-4-hydroxy-3- -, trisodium salt...-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 5- amino]-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl]amino]-4-hydroxy-3- -, trisodium salt (PMN P-00-0803) is...-naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 5- ethyl]amino]-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl]amino]-4-hydroxy-3- -, sodium salt (1:3) (PMN......

  11. Stereochemistry of amino acids in surface samples of a marine sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollock, G.E.; Kvenvolden, K.A.

    1978-01-01

    In two surface samples of marine sediment, the percentages of d-alanine and d-aspartic acid are significantly higher than the other d-amino acids and are similar to the range found in soils. The percentage of d-glutamic acid is also higher than the other amino acids but less than d-alanine and d-aspartic acid. These d-amino acids may come mainly from bacteria. ?? 1978.

  12. Stereochemistry of amino acids in surface samples of a marine sediment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, G. E.; Kvenvolden, K. A.

    1978-01-01

    In two surface samples of marine sediment, the percentages of D-alanine and D-aspartic acid are significantly higher than the other D-amino acids and are similar to the range found in soils. The percentage of D-glutamic acid is also higher than the other amino acids but less than D-alanine and D-aspartic acid. These D-amino acids may come mainly from bacteria.

  13. 40 CFR 721.10243 - Phosphonic acid, P-[2-[bis(2-hydroxyethyl)amino]ethyl]-, bis(2-chloroethyl) ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...false Phosphonic acid, P-[2-[bis(2-hydroxyethyl)amino]ethyl]-, bis...10243 Phosphonic acid, P-[2-[bis(2-hydroxyethyl)amino]ethyl]-, bis...identified as phosphonic acid, P-[2-[bis(2-hydroxyethyl)amino]ethyl]-,...

  14. 40 CFR 721.5280 - 2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 4-amino-5-hydroxy-, coupled with diazotized 4-butylbenzenamine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 4-amino-5-hydroxy-, coupled with... 2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 4-amino-5-hydroxy-, coupled with...2,7-naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 4-amino-5-hydroxy-, coupled...

  15. 40 CFR 721.5280 - 2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 4-amino-5-hydroxy-, coupled with diazotized 4-butylbenzenamine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 4-amino-5-hydroxy-, coupled with... 2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 4-amino-5-hydroxy-, coupled with...2,7-naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 4-amino-5-hydroxy-, coupled...

  16. 21 CFR 862.1055 - Newborn screening test system for amino acids, free carnitine, and acylcarnitines using tandem...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...Newborn screening test system for amino acids, free carnitine, and acylcarnitines...Newborn screening test system for amino acids, free carnitine, and acylcarnitines...newborn screening test system for amino acids, free carnitine, and...

  17. 40 CFR 721.5280 - 2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 4-amino-5-hydroxy-, coupled with diazotized 4-butylbenzenamine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 4-amino-5-hydroxy-, coupled with... 2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 4-amino-5-hydroxy-, coupled with...2,7-naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 4-amino-5-hydroxy-, coupled...

  18. 40 CFR 721.5280 - 2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 4-amino-5-hydroxy-, coupled with diazotized 4-butylbenzenamine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 4-amino-5-hydroxy-, coupled with... 2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 4-amino-5-hydroxy-, coupled with...2,7-naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 4-amino-5-hydroxy-, coupled...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10243 - Phosphonic acid, P-[2-[bis(2-hydroxyethyl)amino]ethyl]-, bis(2-chloroethyl) ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...false Phosphonic acid, P-[2-[bis(2-hydroxyethyl)amino]ethyl]-, bis...10243 Phosphonic acid, P-[2-[bis(2-hydroxyethyl)amino]ethyl]-, bis...identified as phosphonic acid, P-[2-[bis(2-hydroxyethyl)amino]ethyl]-,...

  20. 21 CFR 862.1055 - Newborn screening test system for amino acids, free carnitine, and acylcarnitines using tandem...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...Newborn screening test system for amino acids, free carnitine, and acylcarnitines...Newborn screening test system for amino acids, free carnitine, and acylcarnitines...newborn screening test system for amino acids, free carnitine, and...