Sample records for amino acid requirements

  1. Parenteral sulfur amino acid requirements in septic infants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To investigate parenteral methionine requirements of critically ill, septic infants, we conducted an investigation involving 12 infants (age 2+/-1 years; weight 13+/-2kg) using the intravenous indicator amino acid oxidation and balance technique. They received a balanced parenteral amino acid formul...

  2. Amino acids

    MedlinePLUS

    Amino acids are organic compounds that combine to form proteins . Amino acids and proteins are the building blocks of life. When proteins are digested or broken down, amino acids are left. The human body uses amino acids ...

  3. Macronutrient requirement for growth: Protein/amino acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current recommendations by the Institute of Medicine on amino acid requirements in healthy children older than 6 months and for children and adolescents have been established using the factorial approach, which takes into account: i) maintenance for obligatory losses, which is estimated by regressio...

  4. Differential Amino Acid Requirements for Sporulation in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Doering, Jeffrey L.; Bott, Kenneth F.

    1972-01-01

    The amino acid requirements for sporulation were studied by use of auxotrophic mutants of Bacillus subtilis 168. Cells were grown to T0 in medium containing the test amino acid and were then transferred to a minimal medium lacking that amino acid. Omission of leucine caused no reduction in sporulation. Omission of methionine, lysine, and phenylalanine appeared to cause reduced levels of sporulation, and sporulation was completely inhibited when isoleucine, tryptophan, and threonine were omitted. The amino acids in this third class showed a sequence of requirements, with tryptophan required earlier than isoleucine, which in turn was required earlier in the sporulation process than threonine. Isoleucine omission did not affect the early sporulation functions of extracellular protease formation or septum formation, but prevented the increased levels of protein synthesis and oxygen consumption that normally accompany early sporulation stages. Isoleucine did not appear to be metabolized to other compounds in significant amounts during sporulation. The role of isoleucine in the sporulation process remains unclear. PMID:4627926

  5. Autophagy and amino acid homeostasis are required for chronological longevity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    E-print Network

    Aris, John P.

    Autophagy and amino acid homeostasis are required for chronological longevity in Saccharomyces). Autophagy is a degra- dative process responsible for amino acid recycling in response to nitrogen starvation and amino acid limitation. We have investigated the role of autophagy during chronological aging of yeast

  6. A Model of Proto-Anti-Codon RNA Enzymes Requiring L-Amino Acid Homochirality

    E-print Network

    Erives, Albert J.

    A Model of Proto-Anti-Codon RNA Enzymes Requiring L-Amino Acid Homochirality Albert Erives Received natural amino acid units of polypeptides using a universal scheme of triplet nucleotide ``codons) the absence of any codons for D-amino acids; (ii) the odd combination of alternate codon patterns for some

  7. Recent advances in determining protein and amino acid requirements in humans.

    PubMed

    Elango, Rajavel; Ball, Ronald O; Pencharz, Paul B

    2012-08-01

    During the past 25 years a significant amount of research has been conducted to determine amino acid requirements in humans. This is primarily due to advancements in the application of stable isotopes to examine amino acid requirements. The indicator amino acid oxidation (IAAO) method has emerged as a robust and minimally invasive technique to identify requirements. The IAAO method is based on the concept that when one indispensable dietary amino acid (IDAA) is deficient for protein synthesis, then the excess of all other IDAA, including the indicator amino acid, will be oxidized. With increasing intakes of the limiting amino acid, IAAO will decrease, reflecting increasing incorporation into protein. Once the requirement for the limiting amino acid is met there will be no further change in the indicator oxidation. The IAAO method has been systematically applied to determine most IDAA requirements in adults. The estimates are comparable to the values obtained using the more elaborate 24h-indicator amino acid oxidation and balance (24h-IAAO/IAAB) model. Due to its non-invasive nature the IAAO method has also been used to determine requirements for amino acids in neonates, children and in disease. The IAAO model has recently been applied to determine total protein requirements in humans. The IAAO method is rapid, reliable and has been used to determine amino acid requirements in different species, across the life cycle and in disease. The recent application of IAAO to determine protein requirements in humans is novel and has significant implications for dietary protein intake recommendations globally. PMID:23107531

  8. Amino acid nutrition of the red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus): development of an improved test diet and determination of the total sulfur amino acid requirement

    E-print Network

    Moon, Hae Young

    1990-01-01

    AMINO ACID NUTRITION OF THE RED DRUM (SCIAENOPS OCELLATUS): DEVELOPMENT OF AN IMPROVED TEST DIET AND DETERMINATION OF THE TOTAL SULFUR AMINO ACID REQUIREMENT A Thesis by HAE YOUNG MOON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A...&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1990 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences AMINO ACID NUTRITION OF THE RED DRUM (SCIAENOPS OCELLATUS): DEVELOPMENT OF AN IMPROVED TEST DIET...

  9. Amino Acids

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Featured Molecules this month are the 20 standard ?-amino acids found in proteins and serve as background to the paper by Barone and Schmidt on the Nonfood Applications of Proteinaceous Renewable Materials. The molecules are presented in two formats, the neutral form and the ionized form found in solution at physiologic pH.

  10. Multiple nutritional requirements of lactobacilli: genetic lesions affecting amino acid biosynthetic pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Morishita, T; Deguchi, Y; Yajima, M; Sakurai, T; Yura, T

    1981-01-01

    Genetic lesions responsible for amino acid requirements in several species of multiple auxotrophic lactobacilli were investigated. Systematic attempts were made to isolate mutants that could grow in the absence of each of the amino acids required by the parental strains of Lactobacillus plantarum, L. casei, L. helveticus, and L. acidophilus. After treatment with appropriate mutagens, such mutants could be obtained with respect to many but not all required amino acids. Successful isolation of mutants for a given amino acid means that a minor genetic lesion reparable by single-step mutations affects its biosynthesis; a failure to isolate mutants suggests the involvement of more extensive lesions. Analysis of these results as well as the specific requirements exhibited by the parental strains revealed certain regularities; some of the biosynthetic pathways for individual amino acids were virtually unaffected by more extensive lesions in at least species tested, whereas others were affected by more extensive lesions in at least some species. Both the number and the kind of pathways affected by extensive lesions differed appreciably among different species. Furthermore, the growth response of the parental strains to some putative amino acid precursors revealed a clear correlation between the extent of genetic lesions and the occurrence and location of a genetic block(s) for a given pathway. These findings are discussed in relation to the phylogeny, ecology, and evolution of lactic acid bacteria. PMID:6793557

  11. Autophagy and amino acid homeostasis are required for chronological longevity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Alvers, Ashley L.; Fishwick, Laura K.; Wood, Michael S.; Hu, Doreen; Chung, Hye Sun; Dunn, William A.; Aris, John P.

    2009-01-01

    Following cessation of growth, yeast cells remain viable in a non-dividing state for a period of time known as the chronological life span (CLS). Autophagy is a degradative process responsible for amino acid recycling in response to nitrogen starvation and amino acid limitation. We have investigated the role of autophagy during chronological aging of yeast grown in glucose minimal media containing different supplemental essential and non-essential amino acids. Deletion of ATG1 or ATG7, both of which are required for autophagy, reduces CLS, whereas deletion of ATG11, which is required for selective targeting of cellular components to the vacuole for degradation, does not reduce CLS. The non-essential amino acids isoleucine and valine, and the essential amino acid leucine, extend CLS in autophagy-deficient as well as autophagy-competent yeast. This extension is suppressed by constitutive expression of GCN4, which encodes a transcriptional regulator of general amino acid control (GAAC). Consistent with this, GCN4 expression is reduced by isoleucine and valine. Furthermore, elimination of the leucine requirement extends CLS and prevents the effects of constitutive expression of GCN4. Interestingly, deletion of LEU3, a GAAC target gene encoding a transcriptional regulator of branched side chain amino acid synthesis, dramatically increases CLS in the absence of amino acid supplements. In general, this indicates that activation of GAAC reduces CLS whereas suppression of GAAC extends CLS in minimal medium. These findings demonstrate important roles for autophagy and amino acid homeostasis in determining CLS in yeast. PMID:19302372

  12. 37 CFR 1.823 - Requirements for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequences as part of the application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Requirements for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequences as part of the application...Disclosures Containing Nucleotide And/or Amino Acid Sequences § 1.823 Requirements for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequences as part of the application....

  13. Amino acid requirements of fish larvae and post-larvae: new tools and recent findings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. E. C. Conceição; H. Grasdalen; I. Rønnestad

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews methodologies and recent findings in the study of the amino acid (AA) metabolism of fish larvae and post-larvae, in order to better understand the AA requirements. The larval indispensable AA (IAA) profile can be used as index of the IAA requirements. When turbot larvae and live food IAA profiles are compared, the profile of the latter seems

  14. DIGESTIBLE SULFUR AMINO ACID REQUIREMENTS FOR MALE TURKEYS TO FIVE WEEKS OF AGE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. T. MOORE; K. BAKER; J. D. FIRMAN

    SUMMARY Previous research with batteries has been conducted to determine the digestible sulfur amino acid (SAA) requirements of hen turkeys. These trials were conducted under floor pen conditions to determine the digestible SAA requirement of male turkeys for the production period to 5 wk. The first experiment used 48 pens with eight treatments of six replicate pens using a randomized

  15. Estimated quantitative amino acid requirements for Florida pompano reared in low-salinity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As with most marine carnivores, Florida pompano require relatively high crude protein diets to obtain optimal growth. Precision formulations to match the dietary indispensable amino acid (IAA) pattern to a species’ requirements can be used to lower the overall dietary protein. However IAA requirem...

  16. Studies on the amino acid requirements of horses

    E-print Network

    Word, James Dewey

    1968-01-01

    (1966) 304 grams to 340 grams, American Quarter kIorse Association (1961) 540 to 590 grams. The recom- mended digestible energy allowance for the type of animals used above according to the National Research Council is 12. 4 to 14. 8 meal. per day...!!uija and Harper (1963) showed that. an aiojrcc! ac id i!. ". ? hain!. cc. crea!!ed '. iy a '!ling a mixture oF indispensable a!a!no acids lack- . . !! Ii is Lic1 1!. to a c! let ca!iso!1 cIe pr ' sion i!1 g! oiitll sad fee i ii!'!. - ke. Agi jn Faiiihi' j efi...

  17. Plasma amino acids

    MedlinePLUS

    Amino acids blood test ... types of methods used to determine the individual amino acids levels in the blood. ... test is done to measure the level of amino acids in the blood. An increased level of a ...

  18. Amino acid sequence and length requirements for assembly and function of the colicin A lysis protein.

    PubMed Central

    Howard, S P; Cavard, D; Lazdunski, C

    1989-01-01

    The roles of the various parts of the mature colicin A lysis protein (Cal) in its assembly into the envelope and its function in causing "quasi-lysis," the release of colicin A, and the activation of phospholipase A were investigated. By using cassette mutagenesis, many missense mutations were introduced into the highly conserved portion of the lysis protein. In vitro mutagenesis was also used to introduce stop codons after amino acids 16 and 18 and a frameshift mutation at amino acid 17 of the mature Cal sequence. The processing and modification of the mutants were identical to those of the wild type, except for the truncated Cal proteins, which were neither acylated nor processed. Thus, the carboxy-terminal half of Cal must be present (or replaced by another peptide) for the proper processing and assembly of the protein. However, the specific sequence of this region is not required for the membrane-damaging function of the protein. Furthermore, the sequence specificity for even the conserved amino acids of the amino-terminal half of the protein is apparently exceedingly relaxed, since only those mutant Cal proteins in which a highly conserved amino acid has been replaced by a glutamate were impaired in their function. Images PMID:2644198

  19. 77 FR 65537 - Requirements for Patent Applications Containing Nucleotide Sequence and/or Amino Acid Sequence...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-29

    ...Applications Containing Nucleotide Sequence and/or Amino Acid Sequence Disclosures ACTION: Proposed collection; comment...Patent applications that contain nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence disclosures must include a copy of the...

  20. Practical starter pig amino acid requirements in relation to immunity, gut health and growth performance.

    PubMed

    Goodband, Bob; Tokach, Mike; Dritz, Steve; Derouchey, Joel; Woodworth, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Immune system activation begins a host of physiological responses. Infectious agents are recognized by monocytes and macrophages which in turn stimulate cytokine production. It is the hormone-like factors called cytokines that orchestrate the immune response. The classic responses observed with immune system activation and cytokine production include: anorexia, fever, lethargy, recruitment of other immune cells, and phagocytosis. While production of immune system components is known to require some amino acids, increases in amino acid requirements are more than offset by the associated decrease in protein accretion and increased muscle protein degradation that also accompanies immune system activation. However, the biggest impact of cytokine production is a decrease in feed intake. Therefore, as feed intake decreases, the energy needed to drive protein synthesis is also decreased. This suggests that diets should still be formulated on a similar calorie:lysine ratio as those formulated for non-immune challenged pigs. The evidence is sparse or equivocal for increasing nutrient requirements during an immune challenge. Nutritionists and swine producers should resist the pressure to alter the diet, limit feed, or add expensive feed additives during an immune challenge. While immune stimulation does not necessitate changes in diet formulation, when pigs are challenged with non-pathogenic diarrhea there are potential advantages on gut health with the increased use of crystalline amino acids rather than intact protein sources (i.e., soybean meal). This is because reducing crude protein decreases the quantity of fermentable protein entering the large intestine, which lowers post weaning diarrhea. It also lowers the requirement for expensive specialty protein sources or other protein sources such as soybean meal that present immunological challenges to the gut. The objective of this review is two-fold. The first is to discuss immunity by nutrition interactions, or lack thereof, and secondly, to review amino acid requirement estimates for nursery pigs. PMID:24533455

  1. Practical starter pig amino acid requirements in relation to immunity, gut health and growth performance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Immune system activation begins a host of physiological responses. Infectious agents are recognized by monocytes and macrophages which in turn stimulate cytokine production. It is the hormone-like factors called cytokines that orchestrate the immune response. The classic responses observed with immune system activation and cytokine production include: anorexia, fever, lethargy, recruitment of other immune cells, and phagocytosis. While production of immune system components is known to require some amino acids, increases in amino acid requirements are more than offset by the associated decrease in protein accretion and increased muscle protein degradation that also accompanies immune system activation. However, the biggest impact of cytokine production is a decrease in feed intake. Therefore, as feed intake decreases, the energy needed to drive protein synthesis is also decreased. This suggests that diets should still be formulated on a similar calorie:lysine ratio as those formulated for non-immune challenged pigs. The evidence is sparse or equivocal for increasing nutrient requirements during an immune challenge. Nutritionists and swine producers should resist the pressure to alter the diet, limit feed, or add expensive feed additives during an immune challenge. While immune stimulation does not necessitate changes in diet formulation, when pigs are challenged with non-pathogenic diarrhea there are potential advantages on gut health with the increased use of crystalline amino acids rather than intact protein sources (i.e., soybean meal). This is because reducing crude protein decreases the quantity of fermentable protein entering the large intestine, which lowers post weaning diarrhea. It also lowers the requirement for expensive specialty protein sources or other protein sources such as soybean meal that present immunological challenges to the gut. The objective of this review is two-fold. The first is to discuss immunity by nutrition interactions, or lack thereof, and secondly, to review amino acid requirement estimates for nursery pigs. PMID:24533455

  2. Decreased amino acid requirements of growing chicks due to immunologic stress.

    PubMed

    Klasing, K C; Barnes, D M

    1988-09-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the influence of immunologic stress on methionine and lysine requirements of growing chicks. Immunologic stress was elicited by injection of either Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide or heat-killed Staphylococcus aureus every other day for 6 d. In the first experiment, diets were formulated to provide methionine levels of 0.30, 0.50 and 0.70%. In the second experiment, diets contained 0.75, 0.90 or 1.2% lysine. In chicks fed amino acid-sufficient diets, those chicks injected with immunogens had slower growth, lower feed intake and poorer efficiency of feed utilization than those injected with saline. The decreases due to immunogens were diminished in chicks fed amino acid-deficient diets. The methionine requirements of saline- and immunogen-injected chicks were above 0.5% and between 0.3 and 0.5%, respectively; the lysine requirements were greater than 0.95% and between 0.7 and 0.95%, respectively. Thus immunogen injection decreased methionine and lysine requirements, probably because of a decreased need of amino acids for growth and tissue accretion. Immunogen-induced depression in serum zinc and increase in serum copper levels were ameliorated by lysine or methionine deficiencies. Compared with saline-injected chicks, immunogen-injected chicks had significantly higher serum interleukin-1 (IL-1) activity by 53% when fed the methionine-sufficient diet, but they did not have significantly greater IL-1 levels when fed the methionine-deficient diet. These observations indicate that the diminished expression of immunologic stress in amino acid-deficient chicks is due to an impaired immune response. PMID:2458441

  3. The dietary branched chain amino acid requirements of hybrid striped bass(Morone chrysops x M. saxatilis)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The requirements for branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) are unknown in hybrid striped bass and necessary for formulating efficient and nutritious diets. Moreover, the dietary balance among these three amino acids can substantially influence the performance of meat animals fed those diets. The diet...

  4. Studies on the protein and sulfur amino acid requirements of young bobwhite quail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Serafin, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    Four experiments were conducted with purified diets to examine the influence of protein level and to estimate the sulfur amino acid (S.A.A.) requirement of young Bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus). These studies demonstrated (I) that 26% protein was sufficient for rapid growth when the diet was supplemented with methionine; (2) that diets containing higher levels of protein (29.3% and 31.3%) failed to support satisfactory growth unless they contained supplemental methionine; and (3) that young Bobwhite quail require no more than 1.0% sulfur-containing amino acids for optimal growth and efficiency of feed utilization. A fifth experiment was conducted to examine the protein and S.A.A. requirements of young Bobwhite quail using practical rations and to compare results with those obtained with purified diets. Diets containing 24%, 26% and 28% protein were supplied with and without supplemental methionine in a five week study. Results showed significant growth responses to protein and supplemental methionine. Responses showed that Bobwhite quail require no more than 26% protein for maximum growth and efficiency of feed utilization when the S.A.A. level of the diet was approximately 1.0%. The results were in close agreement with those obtained with purified diets. These findings define more precisely than had been known the quantitative requirements of young Bobwhite quail for protein and for the S.A.A. necessary for optimal growth.

  5. Extreme genetic code optimality from a molecular dynamics calculation of amino acid polar requirement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Thomas; Goldenfeld, Nigel; Mathew, Damien; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida

    2009-06-01

    A molecular dynamics calculation of the amino acid polar requirement is used to score the canonical genetic code. Monte Carlo simulation shows that this computational polar requirement has been optimized by the canonical genetic code, an order of magnitude more than any previously known measure, effectively ruling out a vertical evolution dynamics. The sensitivity of the optimization to the precise metric used in code scoring is consistent with code evolution having proceeded through the communal dynamics of statistical proteins using horizontal gene transfer, as recently proposed. The extreme optimization of the genetic code therefore strongly supports the idea that the genetic code evolved from a communal state of life prior to the last universal common ancestor.

  6. Determination of the amino acid requirements for a protein hinge in triosephosphate isomerase.

    PubMed Central

    Sun, J.; Sampson, N. S.

    1998-01-01

    We have determined the sequence requirements for a protein hinge in triosephosphate isomerase. The codons encoding the hinge at the C-terminus of the active-site lid of triosephosphate isomerase were replaced with a genetic library of all possible 8,000 amino acid combinations. The most active of these 8,000 mutants were selected using in vivo complementation of a triosephosphate isomerase deficient strain of E. coli, DF502. Approximately 3% of the mutants complement DF502 with an activity that is above 70% of wild-type activity. The sequences of these hinge mutants reveal that the solutions to the hinge flexibility problem are varied. Moreover, these preferences are sequence dependent; that is, certain pairs occur frequently. They fall into six families of similar sequences. In addition to the hinge sequences expected on the basis of phylogenetic analysis, we selected three new families of 3-amino-acid hinges: X(A/S)(L/K/M), X(aromatic/beta-branched)(L/K), and XP(S/N). The absence of these hinge families in the more than 60 known species of triosephosphate isomerase suggests that during evolution, not all of sequence space is sampled, perhaps because there is no neutral mutation pathway to access the other families. PMID:9684881

  7. Amino acid analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winitz, M.; Graff, J. (inventors)

    1974-01-01

    The process and apparatus for qualitative and quantitative analysis of the amino acid content of a biological sample are presented. The sample is deposited on a cation exchange resin and then is washed with suitable solvents. The amino acids and various cations and organic material with a basic function remain on the resin. The resin is eluted with an acid eluant, and the eluate containing the amino acids is transferred to a reaction vessel where the eluant is removed. Final analysis of the purified acylated amino acid esters is accomplished by gas-liquid chromatographic techniques.

  8. Dietary requirements of synthesizable amino acids by animals: a paradigm shift in protein nutrition

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Amino acids are building blocks for proteins in all animals. Based on growth or nitrogen balance, amino acids were traditionally classified as nutritionally essential or nonessential for mammals, birds and fish. It was assumed that all the “nutritionally nonessential amino acids (NEAA)” were synthesized sufficiently in the body to meet the needs for maximal growth and optimal health. However, careful analysis of the scientific literature reveals that over the past century there has not been compelling experimental evidence to support this assumption. NEAA (e.g., glutamine, glutamate, proline, glycine and arginine) play important roles in regulating gene expression, cell signaling, antioxidative responses, fertility, neurotransmission, and immunity. Additionally, glutamate, glutamine and aspartate are major metabolic fuels for the small intestine to maintain its digestive function and to protect the integrity of the intestinal mucosa. Thus, diets for animals must contain all NEAA to optimize their survival, growth, development, reproduction, and health. Furthermore, NEAA should be taken into consideration in revising the “ideal protein” concept that is currently used to formulate swine and poultry diets. Adequate provision of all amino acids (including NEAA) in diets enhances the efficiency of animal production. In this regard, amino acids should not be classified as nutritionally essential or nonessential in animal or human nutrition. The new Texas A&M University’s optimal ratios of dietary amino acids for swine and chickens are expected to beneficially reduce dietary protein content and improve the efficiency of their nutrient utilization, growth, and production performance. PMID:24999386

  9. Iron amino acid chelates.

    PubMed

    Hertrampf, Eva; Olivares, Manuel

    2004-11-01

    Iron amino acid chelates, such as iron glycinate chelates, have been developed to be used as food fortificants and therapeutic agents in the prevention and treatment of iron deficiency anemia. Ferrous bis-glycine chelate (FeBC), ferric tris-glycine chelate, ferric glycinate, and ferrous bis-glycinate hydrochloride are available commercially. FeBC is the most studied and used form. Iron absorption from FeBC is affected by enhancers and inhibitors of iron absorption, but to a lesser extent than ferrous sulfate. Its absorption is regulated by iron stores. FeBC is better absorbed from milk, wheat, whole maize flour, and precooked corn flour than is ferrous sulfate. Supplementation trials have demonstrated that FeBC is efficacious in treating iron deficiency anemia. Consumption of FeBC-fortified liquid milk, dairy products, wheat rolls, and multi-nutrient beverages is associated with an improvement of iron status. The main limitations to the widespread use of FeBC in national fortification programs are the cost and the potential for promoting organoleptic changes in some food matrices. Additional research is required to establish the bioavailability of FeBC in different food matrices. Other amino acid chelates should also be evaluated. Finally there is an urgent need for more rigorous efficacy trials designed to define the relative merits of amino acid chelates when compared with bioavailable iron salts such as ferrous sulfate and ferrous fumarate and to determine appropriate fortification levels PMID:15743019

  10. Branched-chain amino acid interactions with reference to amino acid requirements in adult men: Valine metabolism at different leucine intakes

    SciTech Connect

    Pelletier, V.; Marks, L.; Wagner, D.A.; Hoerr, R.A.; Young, V.R. (Laboratory of Human Nutrition, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (USA))

    1991-08-01

    The authors explored whether the oxidation of valine and by implication the physiological requirement for this amino acid are affected by changes in leucine intake over a physiological range. Six young adult men received, in random order, four L-amino acid-based diets for 5 d supplying either 20 or 10 mg valine.kg body wt-1.d-1, each in combination with 80 or 40 mg leucine.kg-1.d-1. On day 6 subjects were studied with an 8-h continuous intravenous infusion of (1-13C)valine (and (2H3)leucine) to determine valine oxidation in the fasted state (first 3 h) and fed state (last 5 h). Valine oxidation in the fasted state was similar among all diets but was lower (P less than 0.05) in the fed state for the 10 vs 20 mg valine.kg-1.d-1 intake. Leucine intake did not affect valine oxidation. Mean daily valine balance approximated +1.3 mg.kg-1.d-1 for the 20-mg intake and -1.6 mg.kg-1.d-1 for the 10-mg intake. These findings support our previously suggested mean valine requirement estimate of approximately 20 mg.kg-1.d-1.

  11. Amino Acid Crossword Puzzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Learning the 20 standard amino acids is an essential component of an introductory course in biochemistry. Later in the course, the students study metabolism and learn about various catabolic and anabolic pathways involving amino acids. Learning new material or concepts often is easier if one can connect the new material to what one already knows;…

  12. Inorganic polyphosphate kinase is required to stimulate protein degradation and for adaptation to amino acid starvation in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Akio; Tanaka, Shoutaro; Ikeda, Tsukasa; Kato, Junichi; Takiguchi, Noboru; Ohtake, Hisao

    1999-01-01

    Inorganic polyphosphate (polyP) kinase was studied for its roles in physiological responses to nutritional deprivation in Escherichia coli. A mutant lacking polyP kinase exhibited an extended lag phase of growth, when shifted from a rich to a minimal medium (nutritional downshift). Supplementation of amino acids to the minimal medium abolished the extended growth lag of the mutant. Levels of the stringent response factor, guanosine 5?-diphosphate 3?-diphosphate, increased in response to the nutritional downshift, but, unlike in the wild type, the levels were sustained in the mutant. These results suggested that the mutant was impaired in the induction of amino acid biosynthetic enzymes. The expression of an amino acid biosynthetic gene, hisG, was examined by using a transcriptional lacZ fusion. Although the mutant did not express the fusion in response to the nutritional downshift, Northern blot analysis revealed a significant increase of hisG-lacZ mRNA. Amino acids generated by intracellular protein degradation are very important for the synthesis of enzymes at the onset of starvation. In the wild type, the rate of protein degradation increased in response to the nutritional downshift whereas it did not in the mutant. Supplementation of amino acids at low concentrations to the minimal medium enabled the mutant to express the hisG-lacZ fusion. Thus, the impaired regulation of protein degradation results in the adaptation defect, suggesting that polyP kinase is required to stimulate protein degradation. PMID:10588694

  13. Amino Acids and Chirality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jamie E.

    2012-01-01

    Amino acids are among the most heavily studied organic compound class in carbonaceous chondrites. The abundance, distributions, enantiomeric compositions, and stable isotopic ratios of amino acids have been determined in carbonaceous chondrites fi'om a range of classes and petrographic types, with interesting correlations observed between these properties and the class and typc of the chondritcs. In particular, isomeric distributions appear to correlate with parent bodies (chondrite class). In addition, certain chiral amino acids are found in enantiomeric excess in some chondrites. The delivery of these enantiomeric excesses to the early Earth may have contributed to the origin of the homochirality that is central to life on Earth today. This talk will explore the amino acids in carbonaceous chondritcs and their relevance to the origin of life.

  14. Amino Acid Homeostasis and Chronological Longevity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    E-print Network

    Aris, John P.

    Chapter 8 Amino Acid Homeostasis and Chronological Longevity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae John P is amino acid homeostasis. Amino acid homeostasis requires three principal functions: amino acid uptake, de novo synthesis, and recycling. Autophagy plays a key role in recycling amino acids and other metabolic

  15. Whole body amino acid composition of European seabass ( Dicentrarchus labrax), gilthead seabream ( Sparus aurata) and turbot ( Psetta maxima) with an estimation of their IAA requirement profiles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sadasivam J. Kaushik

    1998-01-01

    The amino acid compositions of whole body tissue of European seabass, gilthead seabream and turbot of two different size classes were determined. No significant differences were detected between species and the composition was not affected by body size. Based on whole body indispensable amino acids (IAA) to total IAA ratios (A\\/E ratios), the IAA requirement profiles for the three species

  16. Brain amino acid sensing.

    PubMed

    Tsurugizawa, T; Uneyama, H; Torii, K

    2014-09-01

    The 20 different amino acids, in blood as well as in the brain, are strictly maintained at the same levels throughout the day, regardless of food intake. Gastric vagal afferents only respond to free glutamate and sugars, providing recognition of food intake and initiating digestion. Metabolic control of amino acid homeostasis and diet-induced thermogenesis is triggered by this glutamate signalling in the stomach through the gut-brain axis. Rats chronically fed high-sugar and high-fat diets do not develop obesity when a 1% (w/v) monosodium glutamate (MSG) solution is available in a choice paradigm. Deficiency of the essential amino acid lysine (Lys) induced a plasticity in rats in response to Lys. This result shows how the body is able to identify deficient nutrients to maintain homeostasis. This plastic effect is induced by activin A activity in the brain, particularly in certain neurons in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) which is the centre for amino acid homeostasis and appetite. These neurons respond to glutamate signalling in the oral cavity by which umami taste is perceived. They play a quantitative role in regulating ingestion of deficient nutrients, thereby leading to a healthier life. After recovery from malnutrition, rats prefer MSG solutions, which serve as biomarkers for protein nutrition. PMID:25200295

  17. The GCN2 eIF2  Kinase Is Required for Adaptation to Amino Acid Deprivation in Mice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peichuan Zhang; Barbara C. McGrath; Jamie Reinert; DeAnne S. Olsen; Li Lei; Sangeeta Gill; Sheree A. Wek; Krishna M. Vattem; Ronald C. Wek; Scot R. Kimball; Leonard S. Jefferson; Douglas R. Cavener

    2002-01-01

    The GCN2 eIF2 kinase is essential for activation of the general amino acid control pathway in yeast when one or more amino acids become limiting for growth. GCN2's function in mammals is unknown, but must differ, since mammals, unlike yeast, can synthesize only half of the standard 20 amino acids. To investigate the function of mammalian GCN2, we have generated

  18. Enantiomeric separation of amino acids and nonprotein amino acids using a particle-loaded

    E-print Network

    Zare, Richard N.

    Enantiomeric separation of amino acids and nonprotein amino acids using a particle acids and three nonprotein amino acids are derivatized with the fluorogenic reagent 4-fluoro-7-nitro-2 liquid chromatography (HPLC). Keywords: Amino acid / Nonprotein amino acid / Capillary

  19. Induction of CHOP Expression by Amino Acid Limitation Requires Both ATF4 Expression and ATF2 Phosphorylation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julien Averous; Alain Bruhat; Celine Jousse; Valerie Carraro; Gerald Thiel; Pierre Fafournoux

    2003-01-01

    The CHOP gene is transcriptionally induced by amino acid starvation. We have previously identified a genomic cis-acting element (amino acid response ele- ment (AARE)) involved in the transcriptional activation of the human CHOP gene by leucine starvation and shown that it binds the activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2). The present study was designed to identify other transcription factors capable of

  20. Amino acids in Arctic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalabrin, E.; Zangrando, R.; Barbaro, E.; Kehrwald, N. M.; Gabrieli, J.; Barbante, C.; Gambaro, A.

    2012-11-01

    Amino acids are significant components of atmospheric aerosols, affecting organic nitrogen input to marine ecosystems, atmospheric radiation balance, and the global water cycle. The wide range of amino acid reactivities suggest that amino acids may serve as markers of atmospheric transport and deposition of particles. Despite this potential, few measurements have been conducted in remote areas to assess amino acid concentrations and potential sources. Polar regions offer a unique opportunity to investigate atmospheric processes and to conduct source apportionment studies of such compounds. In order to better understand the importance of amino acid compounds in the global atmosphere, we determined free amino acids (FAAs) in seventeen size-segregated aerosol samples collected in a polar station in the Svalbard Islands from 19 April until 14 September 2010. We used an HPLC coupled with a tandem mass spectrometer (ESI-MS/MS) to analyze 20 amino acids and quantify compounds at fmol m-3 levels. Mean total FAA concentration was 1070 fmol m-3 where serine and glycine were the most abundant compounds in almost all samples and accounted for 45-60% of the total amino acid relative abundance. The other eighteen compounds had average concentrations between 0.3 and 98 fmol m-3. The higher amino acid concentrations were present in the ultrafine aerosol fraction (< 0.49 ?m) and accounted for the majority of the total amino acid content. Local marine sources dominate the boreal summer amino acid concentrations, with the exception of the regional input from Icelandic volcanic emissions.

  1. Amino acids in Arctic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalabrin, E.; Zangrando, R.; Barbaro, E.; Kehrwald, N. M.; Gabrieli, J.; Barbante, C.; Gambaro, A.

    2012-07-01

    Amino acids are significant components of atmospheric aerosols, affecting organic nitrogen input to marine ecosystems, atmospheric radiation balance, and the global water cycle. The wide range of amino acid reactivities suggest that amino acids may serve as markers of atmospheric transport and deposition of particles. Despite this potential, few measurements have been conducted in remote areas to assess amino acid concentrations and potential sources. Polar regions offer a unique opportunity to investigate atmospheric processes and to conduct source apportionment studies of such compounds. In order to better understand the importance of amino acid compounds in the global atmosphere, we determined free amino acids (FAAs) in seventeen size-segregated aerosol samples collected in a polar station in the Svalbard Islands from 19 April until 14 September 2010. We used an HPLC coupled with a tandem mass spectrometer (ESI-MS/MS) to analyze 20 amino acids to quantify compounds at fmol m-3 levels. Mean total FAA concentration was 1070 fmol m-3 where serine and glycine were the most abundant compounds in almost all samples and accounted for 45-60% of the total amino acid relative abundance. The other eighteen compounds had average concentrations between 0.3 and 98 fmol m-3. The higher amino acid concentrations were present in the ultrafine aerosol fraction (<0.49 ?m) and accounted for the majority of the total amino acid content. Local marine sources dominate the boreal summer amino acid concentrations, with the exception of the regional input from Icelandic volcanics.

  2. Amino Acid Signaling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a Permease Like Sensor of External Amino Acids and F-Box Protein Grr1p Are Required for Transcriptional Induction of the AGP1 Gene, Which Encodes a Broad-Specificity Amino Acid Permease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ISMAIL IRAQUI; STEPHAN VISSERS; FLORENT BERNARD; JOHAN-OWEN DE CRAENE; ECKHARD BOLES; ANTONIO URRESTARAZU; BRUNO ANDRE

    1999-01-01

    reminiscent of those distinguishing the Snf3p and Rgt2p glucose sensors from the other proteins of the sugar transporter family. We show here that SSY1 is required for transcriptional induction, in response to multiple amino acids, of the AGP1 gene encoding a low-affinity, broad-specificity amino acid permease. Total nonin- duction of the AGP1 gene in the ssy1D mutant is not due

  3. Protein turnover, amino acid requirements and recommendations for athletes and active populations

    PubMed Central

    Poortmans, J.R.; Carpentier, A.; Pereira-Lancha, L.O.; Lancha, A.

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is the major deposit of protein molecules. As for any cell or tissue, total muscle protein reflects a dynamic turnover between net protein synthesis and degradation. Noninvasive and invasive techniques have been applied to determine amino acid catabolism and muscle protein building at rest, during exercise and during the recovery period after a single experiment or training sessions. Stable isotopic tracers (13C-lysine, 15N-glycine, 2H5-phenylalanine) and arteriovenous differences have been used in studies of skeletal muscle and collagen tissues under resting and exercise conditions. There are different fractional synthesis rates in skeletal muscle and tendon tissues, but there is no major difference between collagen and myofibrillar protein synthesis. Strenuous exercise provokes increased proteolysis and decreased protein synthesis, the opposite occurring during the recovery period. Individuals who exercise respond differently when resistance and endurance types of contractions are compared. Endurance exercise induces a greater oxidative capacity (enzymes) compared to resistance exercise, which induces fiber hypertrophy (myofibrils). Nitrogen balance (difference between protein intake and protein degradation) for athletes is usually balanced when the intake of protein reaches 1.2?g·kg?1·day?1 compared to 0.8?g·kg?1·day?1 in resting individuals. Muscular activities promote a cascade of signals leading to the stimulation of eukaryotic initiation of myofibrillar protein synthesis. As suggested in several publications, a bolus of 15-20?g protein (from skimmed milk or whey proteins) and carbohydrate (± 30?g maltodextrine) drinks is needed immediately after stopping exercise to stimulate muscle protein and tendon collagen turnover within 1?h. PMID:22666780

  4. Protein turnover, amino acid requirements and recommendations for athletes and active populations.

    PubMed

    Poortmans, J R; Carpentier, A; Pereira-Lancha, L O; Lancha Jr, A

    2012-10-01

    Skeletal muscle is the major deposit of protein molecules. As for any cell or tissue, total muscle protein reflects a dynamic turnover between net protein synthesis and degradation. Noninvasive and invasive techniques have been applied to determine amino acid catabolism and muscle protein building at rest, during exercise and during the recovery period after a single experiment or training sessions. Stable isotopic tracers ((13)C-lysine, (15)N-glycine, ²H5-phenylalanine) and arteriovenous differences have been used in studies of skeletal muscle and collagen tissues under resting and exercise conditions. There are different fractional synthesis rates in skeletal muscle and tendon tissues, but there is no major difference between collagen and myofibrillar protein synthesis. Strenuous exercise provokes increased proteolysis and decreased protein synthesis, the opposite occurring during the recovery period. Individuals who exercise respond differently when resistance and endurance types of contractions are compared. Endurance exercise induces a greater oxidative capacity (enzymes) compared to resistance exercise, which induces fiber hypertrophy (myofibrils). Nitrogen balance (difference between protein intake and protein degradation) for athletes is usually balanced when the intake of protein reaches 1.2 g · kg(-1) · day(-1) compared to 0.8 g · kg(-1) · day(-1) in resting individuals. Muscular activities promote a cascade of signals leading to the stimulation of eukaryotic initiation of myofibrillar protein synthesis. As suggested in several publications, a bolus of 15-20 g protein (from skimmed milk or whey proteins) and carbohydrate (± 30 g maltodextrine) drinks is needed immediately after stopping exercise to stimulate muscle protein and tendon collagen turnover within 1 h. PMID:22666780

  5. A Stereodivergent Approach to Amino Acids, Amino Alcohols, or

    E-print Network

    Spino, Claude

    A Stereodivergent Approach to Amino Acids, Amino Alcohols, or Oxazolidinones of High Enantiomeric of r-amino acids, amino alcohols, or oxazolidinones. The sequence includes the SN2 displacement by a cuprate reagent and a Curtius rearrangement as key steps. Amino acids1 and amino alcohols2,3 are compounds

  6. Transformation of some hydroxy amino acids to other amino acids

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. S. U. Choughuley; A. S. Subbaraman; Z. A. Kazi; M. S. Chadha

    1975-01-01

    It has been observed that ß-hydroxy-a-amino acids are transformed into other amino acids, when heated in dilute solutions with phosphorous acid, phosphoric acid or their ammonium salts. It has been shown that as in the case of previously reported glycine-aldehyde reactions, glycine also reacts with acetone to give ß-hydroxyvaline under prebiologically feasible conditions. It is suggested, therefore, that the formation

  7. Transformation of some hydroxy amino acids to other amino acids

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. S. U. Choughuley; A. S. Subbaraman; Z. A. Kazi; M. S. Chadha

    1975-01-01

    It has been observed that beta-hydroxy-alpha-amino acids are transformed into other amino acids, when heated in dilute solutions with phosphorous acid, phosphoric acid or their ammonium salts. It has been shown that as in the case of previously reported glycine-aldehyde reactions, glycine also reacts with acetone to give beta-hydroxyvaline under prebiologically feasible conditions. It is suggested, therefore, that the formation

  8. Assessment of protein requirement in octogenarian women with use of the indicator amino acid oxidation technique123

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Minghua; McCabe, George P; Elango, Rajavel; Pencharz, Paul B; Ball, Ronald O; Campbell, Wayne W

    2014-01-01

    Background: Data on the protein requirements of elderly adults are limited, because it is impractical to conduct repeated nitrogen balance protocols in these vulnerable humans. Objective: This study was designed to determine the dietary protein requirement of elderly women by using the recently developed minimally invasive indicator amino acid oxidation (IAAO) technique. Design: Six white women aged 80–87 y [mean ± SEM: 82 ± 1 y and body mass index (in kg/m2) 26 ± 2] completed a 3-d protocol 7 times. Each woman consumed an adaptation diet for 2 d and on day 3 consumed a complete test diet with a crystalline amino acid mixture containing 1 of 7 protein intakes (0.1, 0.3, 0.6, 0.9, 1.2, 1.5, or 1.8 g · kg?1 · d?1) tested randomly. A group-based protein requirement was assessed by using a nonlinear mixed model of protein intake and l-[1-13C]phenylalanine oxidation. The breakpoint, at which there was no further decline in the rate of appearance of 13C in the breath, was used as an index of the mean protein requirement. Results: The mean protein requirement (95% CI) was 0.85 (0.60, 1.09) g · kg?1 · d?1. This requirement is 29% higher than the current Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) for adults of 0.66 g · kg?1 · d?1 based on the nitrogen balance technique, although the 95% CI includes the current EAR. The corresponding adequate protein allowance of 1.15 (0.77, 1.54) g · kg?1 · d?1 is 44% higher, although the 95% CI includes the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) of 0.80 g · kg?1 · d?1. Conclusions: Notwithstanding uncertainty about the validity of the use of the IAAO technique to assess protein requirements, the results of this study with octogenarian women suggest that the current EAR and RDA for elderly women may be underestimated. The limitations of this short-term, noninvasive method underscore the need for new research that uses alternative experimental designs and measuring physiologic, morphologic, and health-related outcomes. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01193946. PMID:24429540

  9. Growth requirements of hyperthermophilic sulfur-dependent heterotrophic archaea isolated from a shallow submarine geothermal system with reference to their essential amino acids.

    PubMed Central

    Hoaki, T; Nishijima, M; Kato, M; Adachi, K; Mizobuchi, S; Hanzawa, N; Maruyama, T

    1994-01-01

    Three hyperthermophilic sulfur-dependent heterotrophs were isolated from a shallow submarine hydrothermal system at an inlet of Kodakara-jima island, Kagoshima, Japan. The isolates grew at 60 to 97 degrees C, with the optimum temperatures at 85 to 90 degrees C. Sensitivity to rifampin and the existence of ether lipids indicated that the isolates are hyperthermophilic archaea. Partial sequencing of the genes coding for 16S rRNA showed that the three isolates are closely related to the genus Thermococcus. They grew on proteinaceous mixtures, such as yeast extract, Casamino Acids, and purified proteins (e.g., casein and gelatin), but not on carbohydrates or organic acids as sole carbon and energy sources. Nine amino acids were essential for growth of isolate KS-1 (Thr, Leu, Ile, Val, Met, Phe, His, Tyr, and Arg). Isolate KS-2 required Lys in addition to the nine amino acids, and KS-8 required Lys instead of Tyr. In comparative studies, it was shown that Thermococcus celer DSM 2476 required 10 amino acids (Thr, Leu, Ile, Val, Met, Phe, Tyr, Trp, Lys, and Arg) while Pyrococcus furiosus DSM 3638 required only Ile and Val. The hyperthermophilic fermentative eubacterium Thermotoga neapolitana DSM 4359 did not require any amino acids for growth. Images PMID:8085828

  10. Arrangement of Domains, and Amino Acid Residues Required for Binding of Vascular Cell Adhesion

    E-print Network

    Kirchhausen, Tomas

    requires the first and the other requires the homologous fourth immunoglobulin-like domain. Rotary shadowing and electron microscopy of recombinant soluble VCAM-7D molecules suggests that the seven Ig

  11. An Abstracting Transformation for Amino Acid Polymorphism

    E-print Network

    Texas at San Antonio, University of

    An Abstracting Transformation for Amino Acid Polymorphism Anthony M. Castaldo, PhD Research three nucleotide se- quences (a codon) into amino acids: Amino Acid (or signal) Codons A (Alanine) GCT believe what is important is the sequence of amino acids produced, and because amino acids average about

  12. Amino acid residues of heparin cofactor II required for stimulation of thrombin inhibition by sulphated polyanions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Niall S Colwell; Michael J Grupe; Douglas M Tollefsen

    1999-01-01

    A variety of sulphated polyanions in addition to heparin and dermatan sulphate stimulate the inhibition of thrombin by heparin cofactor II (HCII). Previous investigations indicated that the binding sites on HCII for heparin and dermatan sulphate overlap but are not identical. In this study we determined the concentrations (IC50) of various polyanions required to stimulate thrombin inhibition by native recombinant

  13. Amino Acids from a Comet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jamie Elisla

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Stardust spacecraft returned samples from comet 81P/Wild 2 to Earth in January 2006. Examinations of the organic compounds in cometary samples can reveal information about the prebiotic organic inventory present on the early Earth and within the early Solar System, which may have contributed to the origin of life. Preliminary studies of Stardust material revealed the presence of a suite of organic compounds including several amines and amino acids, but the origin of these compounds (cometary- vs. terrestrial contamination) could not be identified. We have recently measured the carbon isotopic ratios of these amino acids to determine their origin, leading to the first detection of a coetary amino acid.

  14. Both the RGS Domain and the Six C-Terminal Amino Acids of Mouse Axin Are Required for Normal Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chia, Ian V.; Kim, Min Jung; Itoh, Keiji; Sokol, Sergei Y.; Costantini, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Axin is a negative regulator of canonical Wnt signaling, which promotes the degradation of ?-catenin, the major effector in this signaling cascade. While many protein-binding domains of Axin have been identified, their significance has not been evaluated in vivo. Here, we report the generation and analysis of mice carrying modified Axin alleles in which either the RGS domain or the six C-terminal amino acids (C6 motif) were deleted. The RGS domain is required for APC-binding, while the C6 motif has been implicated in the activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase, but is not required for the effects of Axin on the Wnt/?-catenin pathway, in vitro. Both mutant Axin alleles caused recessive embryonic lethality at E9.5–E10.5, with defects indistinguishable from those caused by a null allele. As Axin-?RGS protein was produced at normal levels, its inability to support embryogenesis confirms the importance of interactions between Axin and APC. In contrast, Axin-?C6 protein was expressed at only 25–30% of the normal level, which may account for the recessive lethality of this allele. Furthermore, many Axin?C6/?C6 embryos that were heterozygous for a ?-catenin null mutation survived to term, demonstrating that early lethality was due to failure to negatively regulate ?-catenin. PMID:19204372

  15. Inorganic Polyphosphate Kinase in Required to Stimulate Protein Degradation and for Adaptation to Amino Acid Starvation in Escherichia coli

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Akio Kuroda; Shoutaro Tanaka; Tsukasa Ikeda; Junichi Kato; Noboru Takiguchi; Hisao Ohtake

    1999-01-01

    Inorganic polyphosphate (polyP) kinase was studied for its roles in physiological responses to nutritional deprivation in Escherichia coli. A mutant lacking polyP kinase exhibited an extended lag phase of growth, when shifted from a rich to a minimal medium (nutritional downshift). Supplementation of amino acids to the minimal medium abolished the extended growth lag of the mutant. Levels of the

  16. Amino acids and cell regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Forster, R. P.; Goldstein, L.

    1979-01-01

    Free amino play an important role in regulating cell volume in fishes. Four tissues/cells (skeletal muscle, RBC, brain, and myocardium) of the little skate, Raja erinacea, were selected for detailed study because of their special importance or unique advantage as experimental models. Three particular amino acids, beta-alanine, taurine, and sarcosine play a predominant role in all four tissues. As in higher vertebrates, amino acid uptake in skate brain, heart, and RBC is mediated via a Na+-dependent process. Amino acids leave the skate brain rapidly in response to a sudden decrease in plasma osmolality and/or to a simultaneous drop in extracellular Na+ concentration. However, although amino acids are important for volume regulation in normal brain cells, they do not appear to be likely candidates for the unidentified "idiogenic" osmolytes in mammalian brain cells. The high concentration of taurine in skate myocardium is of special interest because of the special role of this amino acid in myocardial contractility. Thus, unlike beta-alanine and sarcosine, taurine may play a dual role in regulating both cell volume and contractility of myocardial cells. The isolated skate atrium is well suited for in vitro studies of these two processes. PMID:395764

  17. Cry1Aa binding to the cadherin receptor does not require conserved amino acid sequences in the domain II loops

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Yuki; Tanaka, Shiho; Otsuki, Manami; Hoshino, Yasushi; Morimoto, Chinatsu; Kotani, Takuya; Harashima, Yuko; Endo, Haruka; Yoshizawa, Yasutaka; Sato, Ryoichi

    2012-01-01

    Characterizing the binding mechanism of Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis) Cry toxin to the cadherin receptor is indispensable to understanding the specific insecticidal activity of this toxin. To this end, we constructed 30 loop mutants by randomly inserting four serial amino acids covering all four receptor binding loops (loops ?8, 1, 2 and 3) and analysed their binding affinities for Bombyx mori cadherin receptors via Biacore. High binding affinities were confirmed for all 30 mutants containing loop sequences that differed from those of wild-type. Insecticidal activities were confirmed in at least one mutant from loops 1, 2 and 3, suggesting that there is no critical amino acid sequence for the binding of the four loops to BtR175. When two mutations at different loops were integrated into one molecule, no reduction in binding affinity was observed compared with wild-type sequences. Based on these results, we discussed the binding mechanism of Cry toxin to cadherin protein. PMID:23145814

  18. Amino acid-based surfactants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    María Rosa Infante; Lourdes Pérez; Aurora Pinazo; Pere Clapés; María Carmen Morán; Marta Angelet; María Teresa García; María Pilar Vinardell

    2004-01-01

    There is a pressing need for developing efficiently surfactants that are biodegradable and biocompatible. Surfactant molecules from renewable raw materials that mimic natural lipoamino acids are one of the preferred choices for food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic applications. Given their natural and simple structure they show low toxicity and quick biodegradation. The value of amino acids and vegetable oil derivatives as

  19. in amino-acid concentration enhanced amino-acid and glucose utilization for lipogenesis, with no

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    in amino-acid concentration enhanced amino- acid and glucose utilization for lipogenesis more strongly amino-acid and glucose incorporation into cellular lipids, the glu- cose incorporation showed a synergistic effect between insulin and amino acids for up to 1.59 g/I amino acid in the medium

  20. The standard amino acids alanine ala A

    E-print Network

    Guevara-Vasquez, Fernando

    The standard amino acids alanine ala A cysteine cys C aspartic acid asp D glutamic acid glu E's the mapping from nucleotide triplets in DNA sequences (via messenger RNA) to individual amino acids, and T) but only 20 amino acids, and that the code is redundant or "degenerate" in the sense that several

  1. Identification of Amino Acid Residues Required for the Substrate Specificity of Human and Mouse Chondroitin Sulfate Hydrolase (Conventional Hyaluronidase-4)*

    PubMed Central

    Kaneiwa, Tomoyuki; Miyazaki, Anzu; Kogawa, Ryo; Mizumoto, Shuji; Sugahara, Kazuyuki; Yamada, Shuhei

    2012-01-01

    Human hyaluronidase-4 (hHYAL4), a member of the hyaluronidase family, has no hyaluronidase activity, but is a chondroitin sulfate (CS)-specific endo-?-N-acetylgalactosaminidase. The expression of hHYAL4 is not ubiquitous but restricted to placenta, skeletal muscle, and testis, suggesting that hHYAL4 is not involved in the systemic catabolism of CS, but rather has specific functions in particular organs or tissues. To elucidate the function of hyaluronidase-4 in vivo, mouse hyaluronidase-4 (mHyal4) was characterized. mHyal4 was also demonstrated to be a CS-specific endo-?-N-acetylgalactosaminidase. However, mHyal4 and hHYAL4 differed in the sulfate groups they recognized. Although hHYAL4 strongly preferred GlcUA(2-O-sulfate)-GalNAc(6-O-sulfate)-containing sequences typical in CS-D, where GlcUA represents d-glucuronic acid, mHyal4 depolymerized various CS isoforms to a similar extent, suggesting broad substrate specificity. To identify the amino acid residues responsible for this difference, a series of human/mouse HYAL4 chimeric proteins and HYAL4 point mutants were generated, and their preference for substrates was investigated. A combination of the amino acid residues at 261–265 and glutamine at 305 was demonstrated to be essential for the enzymatic activity as well as substrate specificity of mHyal4. PMID:23086929

  2. Available versus digestible amino acids - new stable isotope methods.

    PubMed

    Elango, Rajavel; Levesque, Crystal; Ball, Ronald O; Pencharz, Paul B

    2012-08-01

    The nutritive value of food protein sources is dependent on the amino acid composition and the bioavailability of the nutritionally indispensable amino acids. Traditionally the methods developed to determine amino acid bioavailability have focused on intestinal absorption or digestibility, which is calculated as the percent of amino acid intake that does not appear in digesta or faeces. Traditional digestibility based methods do not always account for gut endogenous amino acid losses or absorbed amino acids which are unavailable due to the effect of heat processing and the presence of anti-nutritional factors, though methods have been developed to address these issues. Furthermore, digestibility based methods require the use of animal models, thus there is a need to develop in vivo methods that can be applied directly in human subjects to identify the proportion of dietary amino acids which is bioavailable, or metabolically available to the body for protein synthesis following digestion and absorption. The indicator amino acid oxidation (IAAO) method developed in our laboratory for humans has been systematically applied to determine almost all indispensable amino acid requirements in adult humans. Oxidation of the indicator amino acid is inversely proportional to whole body protein synthesis and responds rapidly to changes in the bioavailability of amino acids for metabolic processes. Using the IAAO concept, we developed a new in vivo method in growing pigs, pregnant sows and adult humans to identify the metabolic availability of amino acids in foods. The stable isotope based metabolic availability method is suitable for rapid and routine analysis in humans, and can be used to integrate amino acid requirement data with dietary amino acid availability of foods. PMID:23107543

  3. Role of amino acid transporters in amino acid sensing1234

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Amino acid (AA) transporters may act as sensors, as well as carriers, of tissue nutrient supplies. This review considers recent advances in our understanding of the AA-sensing functions of AA transporters in both epithelial and nonepithelial cells. These transporters mediate AA exchanges between extracellular and intracellular fluid compartments, delivering substrates to intracellular AA sensors. AA transporters on endosomal (eg, lysosomal) membranes may themselves function as intracellular AA sensors. AA transporters at the cell surface, particularly those for large neutral AAs such as leucine, interact functionally with intracellular nutrient-signaling pathways that regulate metabolism: for example, the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway, which promotes cell growth, and the general control non-derepressible (GCN) pathway, which is activated by AA starvation. Under some circumstances, upregulation of AA transporter expression [notably a leucine transporter, solute carrier 7A5 (SLC7A5)] is required to initiate AA-dependent activation of the mTORC1 pathway. Certain AA transporters may have dual receptor-transporter functions, operating as “transceptors” to sense extracellular (or intracellular) AA availability upstream of intracellular signaling pathways. New opportunities for nutritional therapy may include targeting of AA transporters (or mechanisms that upregulate their expression) to promote protein-anabolic signals for retention or recovery of lean tissue mass. PMID:24284439

  4. 40 CFR 721.10126 - Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product...substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product...substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10126 - Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product...substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product...substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10126 - Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product...substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product...substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10126 - Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product...substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product...substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction...

  8. Quinone-Amino Acid Conjugates Targeting Leishmania Amino Acid Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Lizzi, Federica; Belluti, Federica; Koren, Roni; Zilberstein, Dan; Bolognesi, Maria Laura

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the feasibility of targeting Leishmania transporters via appropriately designed chemical probes. Leishmania donovani, the parasite that causes visceral leishmaniasis, is auxotrophic for arginine and lysine and has specific transporters (LdAAP3 and LdAAP7) to import these nutrients. Probes 1–15 were originated by conjugating cytotoxic quinone fragments (II and III) with amino acids (i.e. arginine and lysine) by means of an amide linkage. The toxicity of the synthesized conjugates against Leishmania extracellular (promastigotes) and intracellular (amastigotes) forms was investigated, as well their inhibition of the relevant amino acid transporters. We observed that some conjugates indeed displayed toxicity against the parasites; in particular, 7 was identified as the most potent derivative (at concentrations of 1 µg/mL and 2.5 µg/mL residual cell viability was reduced to 15% and 48% in promastigotes and amastigotes, respectively). Notably, 6, while retaining the cytotoxic activity of quinone II, displayed no toxicity against mammalian THP1 cells. Transport assays indicated that the novel conjugates inhibited transport activity of lysine, arginine and proline transporters. Furthermore, our analyses suggested that the toxic conjugates might be translocated by the transporters into the cells. The non-toxic probes that inhibited transport competed with the natural substrates for binding to the transporters without being translocated. Thus, it is likely that 6, by exploiting amino acid transporters, can selectively deliver its toxic effects to Leishmania cells. This work provides the first evidence that amino acid transporters of the human pathogen Leishmania might be modulated by small molecules, and warrants their further investigation from drug discovery and chemical biology perspectives. PMID:25254495

  9. Nonprotein Amino Acids in the Murchison Meteorite

    PubMed Central

    Kvenvolden, Keith A.; Lawless, James G.; Ponnamperuma, Cyril

    1971-01-01

    Twelve nonprotein amino acids appear to be present in the Murchison meteorite. The identity of eight of them has been conclusively established as N-methylglycine, ?-alanine, 2-methylalanine, ?-amino-n-butyric acid, ?-amino-n-butyric acid, ?-amino-n-butyric acid, isovaline, and pipecolic acid. Tentative evidence is presented for the presence of N-methylalanine, N-ethylglycine, ?-aminoisobutyric acid, and norvaline. These amino acids appear to be extraterrestrial in origin and may provide new evidence for the hypothesis of chemical evolution. PMID:16591908

  10. 40 CFR 721.1643 - Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-. 721... § 721.1643 Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-. ...generically as a benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-...

  11. 40 CFR 721.1643 - Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-. 721... § 721.1643 Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-. ...generically as a benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-...

  12. 40 CFR 721.1643 - Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-. 721... § 721.1643 Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-. ...generically as a benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-...

  13. 40 CFR 721.1643 - Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-. 721... § 721.1643 Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-. ...generically as a benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-...

  14. 40 CFR 721.1643 - Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-. 721... § 721.1643 Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-. ...generically as a benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-...

  15. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    DOEpatents

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, Ashton T; Chin, Jason W; Anderson, Christopher J; Schultz, Peter G

    2013-05-21

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  16. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    SciTech Connect

    Deiters, Alexander (La Jolla, CA); Cropp, T. Ashton (San Diego, CA); Chin, Jason W. (Cambridge, GB); Anderson, J. Christopher (San Francisco, CA); Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA)

    2011-02-15

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  17. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    SciTech Connect

    Deiters, Alexander (La Jolla, CA); Cropp, T. Ashton (Bethesda, MD); Chin, Jason W. (Cambridge, GB); Anderson, J. Christopher (San Francisco, CA); Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA)

    2011-08-09

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNAsyn-thetases, pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  18. 21 CFR 172.320 - Amino acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Amino acids. 172.320 Section 172.320 Food and...Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.320 Amino acids. The food additive amino acids may be safely used as nutrients added to...

  19. 21 CFR 172.320 - Amino acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Amino acids. 172.320 Section 172.320 Food and...Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.320 Amino acids. The food additive amino acids may be safely used as nutrients added to...

  20. 21 CFR 172.320 - Amino acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Amino acids. 172.320 Section 172.320 Food and...Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.320 Amino acids. The food additive amino acids may be safely used as nutrients added to...

  1. Evolutionarily Conserved Optimization of Amino Acid Biosynthesis

    E-print Network

    de Bivort, Benjamin

    Evolutionarily Conserved Optimization of Amino Acid Biosynthesis Ethan O. Perlstein Æ Benjamin L in evolutionary history the biosynthetic enzymes for amino acid x gradually lost residues of x, thereby reducing the threshold for deleterious effects of x scarcity. The resulting reduction in cognate amino acid composition

  2. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    DOEpatents

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, T. Ashton; Chin, Jason W.; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2014-08-26

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  3. Effect of defaunation and amino acid supplementation on growth and amino acid balance in growing sheep

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Effect of defaunation and amino acid supplementation on growth and amino acid balance in growing, and the wool growth. The supplementation with protected amino acids may increase the growth rate and may lead and the addition of protected methionine and lysine on animal growth and amino acids digestibility in the body

  4. IV. -Amino Acids: carboxyl and amino groups bonded to -Carbo n A. Acid/Base properties

    E-print Network

    Frey, Terry

    IV. -Amino Acids: carboxyl and amino groups bonded to -Carbo n A. Acid/Base properties 1. carboxyl group is proton donor ! weak acid 2. amino group is proton acceptor ! weak base 3. At physiological p natural amino acids (few exceptions) 2. 20 different R groups C. Classification based on R-group - know

  5. TyrR, the regulator of aromatic amino acid metabolism, is required for mice infection of Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhongliang; Liu, Zizhong; He, Junming; Wang, Jing; Yan, Yanfeng; Wang, Xiaoyi; Cui, Yujun; Bi, Yujing; Du, Zongmin; Song, Yajun; Yang, Ruifu; Han, Yanping

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, poses a serious health threat to rodents and human beings. TyrR is a transcriptional regulator (TyrR) that controls the metabolism of aromatic amino acids in Escherichia coli. In this paper, TyrR played an important role in Y. pestis virulence. Inactivation of tyrR did not seem to affect the in vitro growth of this organism, but resulted in at least 10,000-fold attenuation compared with the wild-type (WT) strain upon subcutaneous infection to mice. In addition, loads of tyrR mutant within mice livers and spleens significantly decreased compared with the WT strain. Transcriptome analysis revealed that TyrR, directly or indirectly, regulated 29 genes encoded on Y. pestis chromosome or plasmids under in vitro growth condition. Similar to the regulatory function of this protein in E. coli, five aromatic-pathway genes (aroF-tyrA, aroP, aroL, and tyrP) were significantly reduced upon deletion of the tyrR gene. Two genes (glnL and glnG) that encode sensory histidine kinase and regulator in a two-component regulatory system involved in nitrogen assimilation were downregulated in the tyrR mutant. Several genes encoding type III secretion proteins were transcribed by 2.0-4.2-fold in a tyrR mutant relative to the WT strain. Interestingly, the acid-stressed genes, hdeB and hdeD, were downregulated, and such downregulation partly accounted for the decrease in tolerance of the tyrR mutant under acidic conditions. In conclusion, regulation of TyrR in Y. pestis is similar to, but distinct from, that in E. coli. TyrR is a metabolic virulence determinant in Y. pestis that is important for extracellular survival and/or proliferation. PMID:25729381

  6. Amino acid catabolic pathways of lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fernández, María; Zúñiga, Manuel

    2006-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) constitute a diverse group of Gram positive obligately fermentative microorganisms which include both beneficial and pathogenic strains. LAB generally have complex nutritional requirements and therefore they are usually associated with nutrient-rich environments such as animal bodies, plants and foodstuffs. Amino acids represent an important resource for LAB and their utilization serves a number of physiological roles such as intracellular pH control, generation of metabolic energy or redox power, and resistance to stress. As a consequence, the regulation of amino acid catabolism involves a wide set of both general and specific regulators and shows significant differences among LAB. Moreover, due to their fermentative metabolism, LAB amino acid catabolic pathways in some cases differ significantly from those described in best studied prokaryotic model organisms such as Escherichia coli or Bacillus subtilis. Thus, LAB amino acid catabolism constitutes an interesting case for the study of metabolic pathways. Furthermore, LAB are involved in the production of a great variety of fermented products so that the products of amino acid catabolism are also relevant for the safety and the quality of fermented products. PMID:16893752

  7. Polymerization of ?-amino Acids in Aqueous Solution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rihe Liu; Leslie E. Orgel

    1998-01-01

    We have compared carbonyl diimidazole (CDI) and 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDAC) as activating agents for the oligomerization of negatively-charged a- and ß-amino acids in homogeneous aqueous solution. a-Amino acids can be oligomerized efficiently using CDI, but not by EDAC. ß-Amino acids can be oligomerized efficiently using EDAC, but not by CDI. Aspartic acid, an a- and ß-dicarboxylic acid is oligomerized efficiently

  8. Amino Acid Properties Conserved in Molecular Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Rudnicki, Witold R.; Mroczek, Teresa; Cudek, Pawe?

    2014-01-01

    That amino acid properties are responsible for the way protein molecules evolve is natural and is also reasonably well supported both by the structure of the genetic code and, to a large extent, by the experimental measures of the amino acid similarity. Nevertheless, there remains a significant gap between observed similarity matrices and their reconstructions from amino acid properties. Therefore, we introduce a simple theoretical model of amino acid similarity matrices, which allows splitting the matrix into two parts – one that depends only on mutabilities of amino acids and another that depends on pairwise similarities between them. Then the new synthetic amino acid properties are derived from the pairwise similarities and used to reconstruct similarity matrices covering a wide range of information entropies. Our model allows us to explain up to 94% of the variability in the BLOSUM family of the amino acids similarity matrices in terms of amino acid properties. The new properties derived from amino acid similarity matrices correlate highly with properties known to be important for molecular evolution such as hydrophobicity, size, shape and charge of amino acids. This result closes the gap in our understanding of the influence of amino acids on evolution at the molecular level. The methods were applied to the single family of similarity matrices used often in general sequence homology searches, but it is general and can be used also for more specific matrices. The new synthetic properties can be used in analyzes of protein sequences in various biological applications. PMID:24967708

  9. ANTIGENICITY OF POLYPEPTIDES (POLY ALPHA AMINO ACIDS)

    PubMed Central

    Maurer, Paul H.

    1965-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that polymers consisting solely of D-?-amino acids are not immunogenic in rabbits, guinea pigs, man, and mouse, whereas the same polymers of L-?-amino acids are very effective antigens. This has been attributed to the importance of metabolizability of a polymer in contributing to its immunogenicity. In the glu-lys-ala series of polymers, the immunogenicity of a polymer of 2 L-amino acids and a D-amino acid appears to be governed by the immunogenicity of the 2 L-amino acids. However, some of the specificity may be directed towards configurations containing the D-amino acid. It has been noted that injections of rabbits with polymers of D-amino acids has resulted in a reduced response against the isomeric L polymer. PMID:14271319

  10. Original article Effects of amino acids on the growth of an anaerobic

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Original article Effects of amino acids on the growth of an anaerobic rumen fungus Neocallimastix (Received 2 January 1996; accepted 25 March 1996) Summary ― The amino acid requirements amino acids (10 EAA) or eight nonessen- tial amino acids (8 NEAA), or both (18 AA). Although the fungus

  11. Production of amino acids using auxotrophic mutants of methylotrophic bacillus

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, Richard S. (Wayzata, MN); Flickinger, Michael C. (St. Paul, MN); Schendel, Frederick J. (Falcon Heights, MN); Guettler, Michael V. (Waconia, MN)

    2001-07-17

    A method of producing amino acids by culturing an amino acid auxotroph of a biologically pure strain of a type I methylotrophic bacterium of the genus Bacillus which exhibits sustained growth at 50.degree. C. using methanol as a carbon and energy source and requiring vitamin B.sub.12 and biotin is provided.

  12. Nonprotein Amino Acids from Spark Discharges and Their Comparison with the Murchison Meteorite Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Wolman, Yecheskel; Haverland, William J.; Miller, Stanley L.

    1972-01-01

    All the nonprotein amino acids found in the Murchison meteorite are products of the action of electric discharge on a mixture of methane, nitrogen, and water with traces of ammonia. These amino acids include ?-amino-n-butyric acid, ?-aminoisobutyric acid, norvaline, isovaline, pipecolic acid, ?-alanine, ?-amino-n-butyric acid, ?-aminoisobutyric acid, ?-aminobutyric acid, sarcosine, N-ethylglycine, and N-methylalanine. In addition, norleucine, alloisoleucine, N-propylglycine, N-isopropylglycine, N-methyl-?-alanine, N-ethyl-?-alanine ?,?-diaminopropionic acid, isoserine, ?,?-diaminobutyric acid, and ?-hydroxy-?-aminobutyric acid are produced by the electric discharge, but have not been found in the meteorite. PMID:16591973

  13. Enantiomeric excesses in meteoritic amino acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronin, J. R.; Pizzarello, S.

    1997-01-01

    Gas chromatographic-mass spectral analyses of the four stereoisomers of 2-amino-2,3-dimethylpentanoic acid (dl-alpha-methylisoleucine and dl-alpha-methylalloisoleucine) obtained from the Murchison meteorite show that the L enantiomer occurs in excess (7.0 and 9.1%, respectively) in both of the enantiomeric pairs. Similar results were obtained for two other alpha-methyl amino acids, isovaline and alpha-methylnorvaline, although the alpha hydrogen analogs of these amino acids, alpha-amino-n-butyric acid and norvaline, were found to be racemates. With the exception of alpha-amino-n-butyric acid, these amino acids are either unknown or of limited occurrence in the biosphere. Because carbonaceous chondrites formed 4.5 billion years ago, the results are indicative of an asymmetric influence on organic chemical evolution before the origin of life.

  14. Indigenous amino acids in primitive CR meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Z.; Alexander, C. M. O. D.; Orzechowska, G. E.; Fogel, M. L.; Ehrenfreund, P.

    CR chondrites are among the most primitive meteorites. In this paper, we report the first measurements of amino acids in Antarctic CR meteorites. Three CRs, Elephant Moraine (EET) 92042, Graves Nunataks (GRA) 95229, and Grosvenor Mountains (GRO) 95577, were analyzed for their amino acid content using high-performance liquid chromatography with UV fluorescence detection (HPLC-FD) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Our data show that EET 92042 and GRA 95229 are the most amino acid-rich chondrites ever analyzed, with total amino acid concentrations ranging from 180 ppm to 249 ppm. The most abundant amino acids present in the EET 92042 and GRA 95229 meteorites are the ?-amino acids glycine, isovaline, ?-aminoisobutyric acid (?-AIB), and alanine, with ?13C values ranging from +31.6‰ to +50.5‰. The carbon isotope results together with racemic enantiomeric ratios determined for most amino acids strongly indicate an extraterrestrial origin for these compounds. Compared to Elephant Moraine (EET) 92042 and GRA 95229, the more aqueously altered GRO 95577 is depleted in amino acids. In both CRs and CMs, the absolute amino acid abundances appear to be related to the degree of aqueous alteration in their parent bodies. In addition, the relative abundances of ?-AIB and ?-alanine in the Antarctic CRs also appear to depend on the degree of aqueous alteration.

  15. Indigenous amino acids in primitive CR meteorites

    E-print Network

    Z. Martins; C. M. O'D. Alexander; G. E. Orzechowska; M. L. Fogel; P. Ehrenfreund

    2008-03-10

    CR meteorites are among the most primitive meteorites. In this paper, we report the first measurements of amino acids in Antarctic CR meteorites, two of which show the highest amino acid concentrations ever found in a chondrite. EET92042, GRA95229 and GRO95577 were analyzed for their amino acid content using high performance liquid chromatography with UV fluorescence detection (HPLC-FD) and gas chromatographymass spectrometry (GC-MS). Our data show that EET92042 and GRA95229 are the most amino acid-rich chondrites ever analyzed, with total amino acid concentrations ranging from 180 parts-per-million (ppm) to 249 ppm. GRO95577, however, is depleted in amino acids. The most abundant amino acids present in the EET92042 and GRA95229 meteorites are the alpha-amino acids glycine, isovaline, alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (alpha-AIB), and alanine, with delta13C values ranging from +31.6per mil to +50.5per mil. The carbon isotope results together with racemic enantiomeric ratios determined for most amino acids strongly indicate an extraterrestrial origin of these compounds. In addition, the relative abundances of alpha-AIB and beta-alanine in the Antarctic CR meteorites analyzed appear to correspond to the degree of aqueous alteration on their respective parent body.

  16. Development of sustainable precision farming systems for swine: estimating real-time individual amino acid requirements in growing-finishing pigs.

    PubMed

    Hauschild, L; Lovatto, P A; Pomar, J; Pomar, C

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate a mathematical model used to estimate the daily amino acid requirements of individual growing-finishing pigs. The model includes empirical and mechanistic model components. The empirical component estimates daily feed intake (DFI), BW, and daily gain (DG) based on individual pig information collected in real time. Based on DFI, BW, and DG estimates, the mechanistic component uses classic factorial equations to estimate the optimal concentration of amino acids that must be offered to each pig to meet its requirements. The model was evaluated with data from a study that investigated the effect of feeding pigs with a 3-phase or daily multiphase system. The DFI and BW values measured in this study were compared with those estimated by the empirical component of the model. The coherence of the values estimated by the mechanistic component was evaluated by analyzing if it followed a normal pattern of requirements. Lastly, the proposed model was evaluated by comparing its estimates with those generated by the existing growth model (InraPorc). The precision of the proposed model and InraPorc in estimating DFI and BW was evaluated through the mean absolute error. The empirical component results indicated that the DFI and BW trajectories of individual pigs fed ad libitum could be predicted 1 d (DFI) or 7 d (BW) ahead with the average mean absolute error of 12.45 and 1.85%, respectively. The average mean absolute error obtained with the InraPorc for the average individual of the population was 14.72% for DFI and 5.38% for BW. Major differences were observed when estimates from InraPorc were compared with individual observations. The proposed model, however, was effective in tracking the change in DFI and BW for each individual pig. The mechanistic model component estimated the optimal standardized ileal digestible Lys to NE ratio with reasonable between animal (average CV = 7%) and overtime (average CV = 14%) variation. Thus, the amino acid requirements estimated by model are animal- and time-dependent and follow, in real time, the individual DFI and BW growth patterns. The proposed model can follow the average feed intake and feed weight trajectory of each individual pig in real time with good accuracy. Based on these trajectories and using classical factorial equations, the model makes it possible to estimate dynamically the AA requirements of each animal, taking into account the intake and growth changes of the animal. PMID:22287679

  17. AminoAcid Sequence of Porcine Pepsin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Tang; P. Sepulveda; J. Marciniszyn; K. C. S. Chen; W.-Y. Huang; N. Tao; D. Liu; J. P. Lanier

    1973-01-01

    As the culmination of several years of experiments, we propose a complete amino-acid sequence for porcine pepsin, an enzyme containing 327 amino-acid residues in a single polypeptide chain. In the sequence determination, the enzyme was treated with cyanogen bromide. Five resulting fragments were purified. The amino-acid sequence of four of the fragments accounted for 290 residues. Because the structure of

  18. Amino acids in the Tagish Lake Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kminek, G.; Botta, O.; Glavin, D. P.; Bada, J. L.

    2002-01-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) based amino acid analysis of a Tagish Lake meteorite sample recovered 3 months after the meteorite fell to Earth have revealed that the amino acid composition of Tagish Lake is strikingly different from that of the CM and CI carbonaceous chondrites. We found that the Tagish Lake meteorite contains only trace levels of amino acids (total abundance = 880 ppb), which is much lower than the total abundance of amino acids in the CI Orgueil (4100 ppb) and the CM Murchison (16 900 ppb). Because most of the same amino acids found in the Tagish Lake meteorite are also present in the Tagish Lake ice melt water, we conclude that the amino acids detected in the meteorite are terrestrial contamination. We found that the exposure of a sample of Murchison to cold water lead to a substantial reduction over a period of several weeks in the amount of amino acids that are not strongly bound to the meteorite matrix. However, strongly bound amino acids that are extracted by direct HCl hydrolysis are not affected by the leaching process. Thus even if there had been leaching of amino acids from our Tagish Lake meteorite sample during its 3 month residence in Tagish Lake ice and melt water, a Murchison type abundance of endogenous amino acids in the meteorite would have still been readily detectable. The low amino acid content of Tagish Lake indicates that this meteorite originated fiom a different type of parent body than the CM and CI chondrites. The parent body was apparently devoid of the reagents such as aldehyldes/ketones, HCN and ammonia needed for the effective abiotic synthesis of amino acids. Based on reflectance spectral measurements, Tagish Lake has been associated with P- or D-type asteroids. If the Tagish Lake meteorite was indeed derived fiom these types of parent bodies, our understanding of these primitive asteroids needs to be reevaluated with respect to their potential inventory of biologically important organic compounds.

  19. Amino acids precursors in lunar finds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.; Harada, K.; Hare, P. E.; Hinsch, G.; Mueller, G.

    1975-01-01

    The consistent pattern is discussed of amino acids found in lunar dust from Apollo missions. The evidence indicates that compounds yielding amino acids were implanted into the surface of the moon by the solar wind, and the kind and amounts of amino acids found on the moon are closely similar to those found in meteorites. It is concluded that there is a common cosmochemical pattern for the moom and meteorites, and this offers evidence of a common course of cosmochemical reactions for carbon.

  20. Relationship between amino acid usage and amino acid evolution in primates.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haoxuan; Xie, Zhengqing; Tan, Shengjun; Zhang, Xiaohui; Yang, Sihai

    2015-02-25

    Amino acid usage varies from species to species. A previous study has found a universal trend in amino acid gain and loss in many taxa and a one-way model of amino acid evolution in which the number of new amino acids increases as the number of old amino acids decreases was proposed. Later studies showed that this pattern of amino acid gain and loss is likely to be compatible with the neutral theory. The present work aimed to further study this problem by investigating the evolutionary patterns of amino acids in 8 primates (the nucleotide and protein alignments are available online http://gattaca.nju.edu.cn/pub_data.html). First, the number of amino acids gained and lost was calculated and the evolution trend of each amino acid was inferred. These values were found to be closely related to the usage of each amino acid. Then we analyzed the mutational trend of amino acid substitution in human using SNPs, this trend is highly correlated with fixation trend only with greater variance. Finally, the trends in the evolution of 20 amino acids were evaluated in human on different time scales, and the increasing rate of 5 significantly increasing amino acids was found to decrease as a function of time elapsed since divergence, and the dS/dN ratio also found to increase as a function of time elapsed since divergence. These results suggested that the observed amino acid substitution pattern is influenced by mutation and purifying selection. In conclusion, the present study shows that usage of amino acids is an important factor capable of influencing the observed pattern of amino acid evolution, and also presented evidences suggesting that the observed universal trend of amino acid gain and loss is compatible with neutral evolution. PMID:25527119

  1. A sulfur amino acid deficiency changes the amino acid composition of body protein in piglets.

    PubMed

    Conde-Aguilera, J A; Barea, R; Le Floc'h, N; Lefaucheur, L; van Milgen, J

    2010-08-01

    Experiments carried out to determine the amino acid requirement in growing animals are often based on the premise that the amino acid composition of body protein is constant. However, there are indications that this assumption may not be correct. The objective of this study was to test the effect of feeding piglets a diet deficient or not in total sulfur amino acids (TSAA; Met + Cys) on nitrogen retention and amino acid composition of proteins in different body compartments. Six blocks of three pigs each were used in a combined comparative slaughter and nitrogen balance study. One piglet in each block was slaughtered at 42 days of age, whereas the other piglets received a diet deficient or not in TSAA for 19 days and were slaughtered thereafter. Two diets were formulated to provide either 0.20% Met and 0.45% TSAA (on a standardized ileal digestible basis) or 0.46% Met and 0.70% TSAA. Diets were offered approximately 25% below ad libitum intake. At slaughter, the whole animal was divided into carcass, blood, intestines, liver, and the combined head, tail, feet and other organs (HFTO), which were analyzed for nitrogen and amino acid contents. Samples of the longissimus muscle (LM) were analyzed for myosin heavy chain (MyHC) and actin contents. Nitrogen retention was 20% lower in piglets receiving the TSAA-deficient diet (P < 0.01). In these piglets, the nitrogen content in tissue gain was lower in the empty body, carcass, LM and blood (P < 0.05) or tended to be lower in HFTO (P < 0.10), but was not different in the intestines and liver. The Met content in retained protein was lower in the empty body, LM and blood (P < 0.05), and tended to be lower in the carcass (P < 0.10). The Cys content was lower in LM, but higher in blood of piglets receiving the TSAA-deficient diet (P < 0.05). Skeletal muscle appeared to be affected most by the TSAA deficiency. In LM, the Met content in retained protein was reduced by 12% and total Met retention by more than 60%. The MyHC and actin contents in LM were not affected by the TSAA content of the diet. These results show that a deficient TSAA supply affects the amino acid composition of different body proteins. This questions the use of a constant ideal amino acid profile to express dietary amino acid requirements, but also illustrates the plasticity of the animal to cope with nutritional challenges. PMID:22444655

  2. Amino Acid Free Energy Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Fairchild, Michael; Livesay, Dennis; Jacobs, Donald

    2009-03-01

    The Distance Constraint Model (DCM) describes protein thermodynamics at a coarse-grained level based on a Free Energy Decomposition (FED) that assigns energy and entropy contributions to specific molecular interactions. Application of constraint theory accounts for non-additivity in conformational entropy so that the total free energy of a system can be reconstituted from all its molecular parts. In prior work, a minimal DCM utilized a simple FED involving temperature-independent parameters indiscriminately applied to all residues. Here, we describe a residue-specific FED that depends on local conformational states. The FED of an amino acid is constructed by weighting the energy spectrums associated with local energy minimums in configuration space by absolute entropies estimated using a quasi-harmonic approximation. Interesting temperature-dependent behavior is found. Support is from NIH R01 GM073082 and a CRI postdoctoral Duke research fellowship for H. Wang.

  3. Supernovae, neutrinos and the chirality of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Richard N; Kajino, Toshitaka; Onaka, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    A mechanism for creating an enantioenrichment in the amino acids, the building blocks of the proteins, that involves global selection of one handedness by interactions between the amino acids and neutrinos from core-collapse supernovae is defined. The chiral selection involves the dependence of the interaction cross sections on the orientations of the spins of the neutrinos and the (14)N nuclei in the amino acids, or in precursor molecules, which in turn couple to the molecular chirality. It also requires an asymmetric distribution of neutrinos emitted from the supernova. The subsequent chemical evolution and galactic mixing would ultimately populate the Galaxy with the selected species. The resulting amino acids could either be the source thereof on Earth, or could have triggered the chirality that was ultimately achieved for Earth's proteinaceous amino acids. PMID:21747686

  4. Supernovae, Neutrinos and the Chirality of Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Richard N.; Kajino, Toshitaka; Onaka, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    A mechanism for creating an enantioenrichment in the amino acids, the building blocks of the proteins, that involves global selection of one handedness by interactions between the amino acids and neutrinos from core-collapse supernovae is defined. The chiral selection involves the dependence of the interaction cross sections on the orientations of the spins of the neutrinos and the 14N nuclei in the amino acids, or in precursor molecules, which in turn couple to the molecular chirality. It also requires an asymmetric distribution of neutrinos emitted from the supernova. The subsequent chemical evolution and galactic mixing would ultimately populate the Galaxy with the selected species. The resulting amino acids could either be the source thereof on Earth, or could have triggered the chirality that was ultimately achieved for Earth’s proteinaceous amino acids. PMID:21747686

  5. Physiological role of d -amino acid- N -acetyltransferase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae : detoxification of d -amino acids

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Geok-Yong Yow; Takuma Uo; Tohru Yoshimura; Nobuyoshi Esaki

    2006-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is sensitive to d-amino acids: those corresponding to almost all proteinous l-amino acids inhibit the growth of yeast even at low concentrations (e.g. 0.1 mM). We have determined that d-amino acid-N-acetyltransferase (DNT) of the yeast is involved in the detoxification of d-amino acids on the basis of the following findings. When the DNT gene was disrupted, the resulting mutant

  6. Nutritional value of D-amino acids, D-peptides, and amino acid derivatives in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper describes a method for determining the nutritional value of D-amino acids, D-peptides, and amino acid derivatives using a growth assay in mice fed a synthetic all-amino acid diet. A large number of experiments were carried out in which a molar equivalent of the test compound replaced a n...

  7. Free radical-mediated oxidation of free amino acids and amino acid residues in proteins

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. R. Stadtman; R. L. Levine

    2003-01-01

    Summary. We summarize here results of studies designed to elucidate basic mechanisms of reactive oxygen (ROS)-mediated oxidation of proteins and free amino acids. These studies have shown that oxidation of proteins can lead to hydroxylation of aromatic groups and aliphatic amino acid side chains, nitration of aromatic amino acid residues, nitrosylation of sulfhydryl groups, sulfoxidation of methionine residues, chlorination of

  8. The Apollo Program and Amino Acids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Sidney W.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the determination of hydrolyzable amino acid precursors and a group of six amino acids in the returned lunar samples of the Apollo programs. Indicates that molecular evolution is arrested at the precursor stage on the Moon because of lack of water. (CC)

  9. Inhibitors of Aromatic Amino Acid Biosynthesis

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This lesson will detail the biochemical mechanisms that are affected by herbicides which inhibit a plantâ??s ability to synthesize amino acids. The significance of amino acids and proteins will also be described. The herbicide glyphosate, will be studied at length, including the advances made by biotechnology.

  10. Amino acid racemization dating of fossil bones

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeffrey L. Bada; Patricia Masters Helfman

    1975-01-01

    The development of amino acid racemization as a dating technique holds considerable promise for resolving questions of human evolution and culture histories. The advantages of this method are: fossil bone can be directly dated; only gram quantities are needed for analysis; and the range extends beyond that of radiocarbon. Amino acid racemization rates are dependent upon both time and temperature.

  11. 6th Amino Acid Assessment Workshop

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The focus of the 6th workshop is on lysine, arginine, and related amino acids. Functions, metabolic pathways, clinical uses, and upper tolerance intakes are emphasized in the articles that follow. Lysine is arguably the most deficient amino acid in the food supply of countries where poverty exists, ...

  12. Amino acids in an Antarctic carbonaceous chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronin, J. R.; Pizzarello, S.; Moore, C. B.

    1979-01-01

    Amino acids have been found in aqueous extracts of a C2 carbonaceous chondrite recovered from Antarctica. The composition of the amino acids strongly suggests that they have a meteoritic origin. Comparison of these results with those obtained with other C2 chondrites supports the view that Antarctic meteorites have not been significantly altered by terrestrial processes since their fall.

  13. Amino Acid Degradation after Meteoritic Impact Simulation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Bertrand; S. van der Gaast; F. Vilas; F. Horz; G. Barnes; B. Barbier; A. Chabin; A. Braak; A. Westall

    2004-01-01

    Our study concerns the hypothesis that prebiotic organic matter, present on Earth, was synthesized in the interstellar environment, and then imported to Earth by the meteorites or micrometeorites. We are particularly concerned with the formation and fate of amino acids. We have already shown that amino acid synthesis is possible inside cometary grains under interstellar environment conditions (Munoz Caro, et

  14. Mechanisms controlling renal hemodynamics and electrolyte excretion during amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, L.L.; Mizelle, H.L.; Montani, J.P.; Hall, J.E.

    1986-08-01

    Our purpose was to investigate the mechanisms by which increased plasma amino acids elevate renal blood flow (RBF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Since transport of amino acids and Na is linked in the proximal tubule, the authors hypothesized that increased amino acids might stimulate proximal tubular Na reabsorption (PR/sub Na/) and thus increase RBF and GFR by a macula densa feedback mechanism. A solution of four amino acids (Ala, Ser, Gly, Pro) was infused intravenously into anesthetized dogs with normal kidneys (NK) and with kidneys in which the tubuloglomerular feedback mechanism was blunted by lowering renal artery pressure (LPK) or blocked by making the kidneys nonfiltering (NFK). In NK, RBF and GFR increased by 35 +/- 4% and 30 +/- 7% after 90 min of amino acid infusion, while PR/sub Na/ (estimated from lithium clearance) and O2 consumption increased by 31 +/- 5% and 29 +/- 5% and distal Na delivery remained relatively constant. Autoregulation of RBF and GFR in response to step deceases in renal artery pressure was impaired during amino acids in NK. The hemodynamic responses to amino acids were abolished in LPK and NFK. Infusion of the nonmetabolized -aminoisobutyric acid into NK produced changes in renal hemodynamics that were similar to the responses observed with the four metabolizable amino acids. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that elevation of plasma amino acids increases RBF and GFR by a mechanism that requires an intact macula densa feedback. Metabolism of the amino acids does not appear to be necessary for these changes to occur.

  15. Dietary amino acids and brain function.

    PubMed

    Fernstrom, J D

    1994-01-01

    Two groups of amino acids--the aromatic and the acidic amino acids--are reputed to influence brain function when their ingestion in food changes the levels of these amino acids in the brain. The aromatic amino acids (tryptophan, tyrosine, phenylalanine) are the biosynthetic precursors for the neurotransmitters serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine. Single meals, depending on their protein content, can rapidly influence uptake of aromatic amino acid into the brain and, as a result, directly modify their conversion to neurotransmitters. Such alterations in the production of transmitters can directly modify their release from neurons and, thus, influence brain function. The acidic amino acids glutamate and aspartate are themselves brain neurotransmitters. However, they do not have ready access to the brain from the circulation or the diet. As a result, the ingestion of proteins, which are naturally rich in aspartate and glutamate, has no effect on the level of acidic amino acid in the brain (or, thus, on brain function by this mechanism). Nevertheless, the food additives monosodium glutamate and aspartame (which contains aspartate) have been reputed to raise the level of acidic amino acid in the brain (when ingested in enormous amounts), to modify brain function, and even to cause neuronal damage. Despite such claims, a substantial body of published evidence clearly indicates that the brain is not affected by ingestion of aspartame and is affected by glutamate only when the amino acid is administered alone in extremely large doses. Therefore, when consumed in the diet neither compound presents a risk to normal brain function. PMID:7903674

  16. The putative Cationic Amino Acid Transporter 9 is targeted to vesicles and may be involved in plant amino acid homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huaiyu; Stierhof, York-Dieter; Ludewig, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Amino acids are major primary metabolites. Their uptake, translocation, compartmentation, and re-mobilization require a diverse set of cellular transporters. Here, the broadly expressed gene product of CATIONIC AMINO ACID TRANSPORTER 9 (CAT9) was identified as mainly localized to vesicular membranes that are involved in vacuolar trafficking, including those of the trans-Golgi network. In order to probe whether and how these compartments are involved in amino acid homeostasis, a loss-of-function cat9-1 mutant and ectopic over-expressor plants were isolated. Under restricted nitrogen supply in soil, cat9-1 showed a chlorotic phenotype, which was reversed in the over-expressors. The total soluble amino acid pools were affected in the mutants, but this was only significant under poor nitrogen supply. Upon nitrogen starvation, the soluble amino acid leaf pools were lower in the over-expressor, compared with cat9-1. Over-expression generally affected total soluble amino acid concentrations, slightly delayed development, and finally improved the survival upon severe nitrogen starvation. The results potentially identify a novel function of vesicular amino acid transport mediated by CAT9 in the cellular nitrogen-dependent amino acid homeostasis.

  17. Amino acids in the Martian meteorite Nakhla

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Bada, J. L.; Brinton, K. L.; McDonald, G. D.

    1999-01-01

    A suite of protein and nonprotein amino acids were detected with high-performance liquid chromatography in the water- and acid-soluble components of an interior fragment of the Martian meteorite Nakhla, which fell in Egypt in 1911. Aspartic and glutamic acids, glycine, alanine, beta-alanine, and gamma-amino-n-butyric acid (gamma-ABA) were the most abundant amino acids detected and were found primarily in the 6 M HCl-hydrolyzed, hot water extract. The concentrations ranged from 20 to 330 parts per billion of bulk meteorite. The amino acid distribution in Nakhla, including the D/L ratios (values range from <0.1 to 0.5), is similar to what is found in bacterially degraded organic matter. The amino acids in Nakhla appear to be derived from terrestrial organic matter that infiltrated the meteorite soon after its fall to Earth, although it is possible that some of the amino acids are endogenous to the meteorite. The rapid amino acid contamination of Martian meteorites after direct exposure to the terrestrial environment has important implications for Mars sample-return missions and the curation of the samples from the time of their delivery to Earth.

  18. Enzymatic aminoacylation of tRNA with unnatural amino acids

    E-print Network

    Heller, Eric

    Enzymatic aminoacylation of tRNA with unnatural amino acids Matthew C. T. Hartman, KristopherRNAs with amino acids. We have developed an AARS assay based on mass spectrometry that can be used to rapidly functional properties. Remarkably, many -amino acids, N-methyl amino acids, and , -disubstituted amino acids

  19. RELATING PHYSICOCHEMMICAL PROPERTIES OF AMINO ACIDS TO VARIABLE NUCLEOTIDE SUBSTITUTION

    E-print Network

    Yang, Ziheng

    RELATING PHYSICOCHEMMICAL PROPERTIES OF AMINO ACIDS TO VARIABLE NUCLEOTIDE SUBSTITUTION PATTERNS) as well as heterogeneity of amino acid substitution pattern over sites. The codon (amino acid) sites of amino acid substitution and the effect of amino acid chemical properties vary. Parameters are estimated

  20. Amino acid transporters: roles in amino acid sensing and signalling in animal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hyde, Russell; Taylor, Peter M; Hundal, Harinder S

    2003-01-01

    Amino acid availability regulates cellular physiology by modulating gene expression and signal transduction pathways. However, although the signalling intermediates between nutrient availability and altered gene expression have become increasingly well documented, how eukaryotic cells sense the presence of either a nutritionally rich or deprived medium is still uncertain. From recent studies it appears that the intracellular amino acid pool size is particularly important in regulating translational effectors, thus, regulated transport of amino acids across the plasma membrane represents a means by which the cellular response to amino acids could be controlled. Furthermore, evidence from studies with transportable amino acid analogues has demonstrated that flux through amino acid transporters may act as an initiator of nutritional signalling. This evidence, coupled with the substrate selectivity and sensitivity to nutrient availability classically associated with amino acid transporters, plus the recent discovery of transporter-associated signalling proteins, demonstrates a potential role for nutrient transporters as initiators of cellular nutrient signalling. Here, we review the evidence supporting the idea that distinct amino acid "receptors" function to detect and transmit certain nutrient stimuli in higher eukaryotes. In particular, we focus on the role that amino acid transporters may play in the sensing of amino acid levels, both directly as initiators of nutrient signalling and indirectly as regulators of external amino acid access to intracellular receptor/signalling mechanisms. PMID:12879880

  1. Amino acid analogs for tumor imaging

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M. (Atlanta, GA); Shoup, Timothy (Decatur, GA)

    1998-09-15

    The invention provides novel amino acid compounds of use in detecting and evaluating brain and body tumors. These compounds combine the advantageous properties of 1-amino-cycloalkyl-1-carboxylic acids, namely, their rapid uptake and prolonged retention in tumors with the properties of halogen substituents, including certain useful halogen isotopes including fluorine-18, iodine-123, iodine-125, iodine-131, bromine-75, bromine-76, bromine-77 and bromine-82. In one aspect, the invention features amino acid compounds that have a high specificity for target sites when administered to a subject in vivo. Preferred amino acid compounds show a target to non-target ratio of at least 5:1, are stable in vivo and substantially localized to target within 1 hour after administration. An especially preferred amino acid compound is ›.sup.18 F!-1-amino-3-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC). In another aspect, the invention features pharmaceutical compositions comprised of an .alpha.-amino acid moiety attached to either a four, five, or a six member carbon-chain ring. In addition, the invention features analogs of .alpha.-aminoisobutyric acid.

  2. Amino acid analogs for tumor imaging

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, M.M.; Shoup, T.

    1998-10-06

    The invention provides novel amino acid compounds of use in detecting and evaluating brain and body tumors. These compounds combine the advantageous properties of 1-amino-cycloalkyl-1-carboxylic acids, namely, their rapid uptake and prolonged retention in tumors with the properties of halogen substituents, including certain useful halogen isotopes including fluorine-18, iodine-123, iodine-125, iodine-131, bromine-75, bromine-76, bromine-77 and bromine-82. In one aspect, the invention features amino acid compounds that have a high specificity for target sites when administered to a subject in vivo. Preferred amino acid compounds show a target to non-target ratio of at least 5:1, are stable in vivo and substantially localized to target within 1 hour after administration. An especially preferred amino acid compound is [{sup 18}F]-1-amino-3-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC). In another aspect, the invention features pharmaceutical compositions comprised of an {alpha}-amino acid moiety attached to either a four, five, or a six member carbon-chain ring. In addition, the invention features analogs of {alpha}-aminoisobutyric acid.

  3. Amino acid analogs for tumor imaging

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M. (Atlanta, GA); Shoup, Timothy (Decatur, GA)

    1998-10-06

    The invention provides novel amino acid compounds of use in detecting and evaluating brain and body tumors. These compounds combine the advantageous properties of 1-amino-cycloalkyl-1-carboxylic acids, namely, their rapid uptake and prolonged retention in tumors with the properties of halogen substituents, including certain useful halogen isotopes including fluorine-18, iodine-123, iodine-125, iodine-131, bromine-75, bromine-76, bromine-77 and bromine-82. In one aspect, the invention features amino acid compounds that have a high specificity for target sites when administered to a subject in vivo. Preferred amino acid compounds show a target to non-target ratio of at least 5:1, are stable in vivo and substantially localized to target within 1 hour after administration. An especially preferred amino acid compound is ›.sup.18 F!-1-amino-3-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC). In another aspect, the invention features pharmaceutical compositions comprised of an .alpha.-amino acid moiety attached to either a four, five, or a six member carbon-chain ring. In addition, the invention features analogs of .alpha.-aminoisobutyric acid.

  4. Amino acid analogs for tumor imaging

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, M.M.; Shoup, T.

    1998-09-15

    The invention provides novel amino acid compounds of use in detecting and evaluating brain and body tumors. These compounds combine the advantageous properties of 1-amino-cycloalkyl-1-carboxylic acids, namely, their rapid uptake and prolonged retention in tumors with the properties of halogen substituents, including certain useful halogen isotopes including fluorine-18, iodine-123, iodine-125, iodine-131, bromine-75, bromine-76, bromine-77 and bromine-82. In one aspect, the invention features amino acid compounds that have a high specificity for target sites when administered to a subject in vivo. Preferred amino acid compounds show a target to non-target ratio of at least 5:1, are stable in vivo and substantially localized to target within 1 hour after administration. An especially preferred amino acid compound is [{sup 18}F]-1-amino-3-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC). In another aspect, the invention features pharmaceutical compositions comprised of an {alpha}-amino acid moiety attached to either a four, five, or a six member carbon-chain ring. In addition, the invention features analogs of {alpha}-aminoisobutyric acid.

  5. Effects of branched-chain amino acids on protein turnover.

    PubMed

    May, M E; Buse, M G

    1989-05-01

    Amino acid availability rapidly regulates protein synthesis and degradation. Increasing amino acid concentrations above the levels found in post-absorptive plasma stimulates protein synthesis in a dose-dependent manner at the level of mRNA translation-initiation and inhibits protein degradation by inhibiting lysosomal autophagy. The anabolic effects of insulin on protein synthesis and protein degradation are exerted at the same sites (i.e., peptide chain initiation and lysosomal stabilization) allowing for a rapid synergistic response when both amino acids and insulin increase after a protein-containing meal. In perfused liver preparations, protein anabolic effects are exerted by a group of amino acids acting in concert. The BCAA are among the amino acids required for stimulation of hepatic protein synthesis, but there is no evidence that BCAA or leucine alone are effective. Leucine alone is an important inhibitor of hepatic protein degradation, but maximal inhibition requires in addition several other regulatory amino acids. In heart and skeletal muscle in vitro, increasing the concentration of the three BCAA or of leucine alone reproduces the effects of increasing the supply of all amino acids in stimulating protein synthesis and inhibiting protein degradation. Skeletal muscle is the largest repository of metabolically active protein and a major contributor to total body nitrogen balance. Supplying energy alone (i.e., carbohydrate and lipids) cannot prevent negative nitrogen balance (net protein catabolism) in animals or humans; only provision of amino acids allows the attainment of nitrogen balance. In rats and in humans nourished parenterally, provision of balanced amino acid solutions or of only the three BCAA cause similar improvements in nitrogen balance for several days. There is some evidence that infusions of leucine alone can stimulate muscle protein synthesis in vivo; the effect may be transitory and was not observed by all investigators; provisions of excess leucine alone does not seem to affect total body or muscle protein degradation in vivo. In postabsorptive rats, in vivo, infusion of the three BCAA together stimulates muscle protein synthesis as much as the infusion of a complete amino acid mixture or of a mixture of essential amino acids; the in vivo effect requires coinfusion of glucose or of small (physiological) doses of insulin, suggesting synergism between insulin and amino acids.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:2656154

  6. Enantiomer-specific selection of amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Xueying; Tellez, Luis A; de Araujo, Ivan E

    2013-01-01

    Dietary intake of L-amino acids impacts on several physiological functions, including the control of gastrointestinal motility, pancreatic secretion, and appetite. However, the biological mechanisms regulating behavioral predilections for certain amino acid types remain poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that, in mice, the potency with which a given glucogenic amino acid increases glucose utilization reflects its rewarding properties. We have found that: 1. During long-, but not short-, term preference tests, L-alanine and L-serine were preferred over their D-enantiomer counterparts, while no such effect was observed for L-threonine vs. D-threonine; 2. These behavioral patterns were closely associated with the ability of L-amino acids to promote increases in respiratory exchange ratios such that those, and only those, L-amino acids able to promote increases in respiratory exchange ratios were preferred over their D-isomers; 3. These behavioral preferences were independent of gustatory influences, since taste-deficient Trpm5 knockout mice displayed ingestive responses very similar to those of their wild-type counterparts. We conclude that the ability to promote increases in respiratory exchange ratios enhances the reward value of nutritionally relevant amino acids, and suggest a mechanistic link between substrate utilization and amino acid preferences. PMID:24072505

  7. Amino Acid Metabolism Conflicts with Protein Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Krick, Teresa; Verstraete, Nina; Alonso, Leonardo G.; Shub, David A.; Ferreiro, Diego U.; Shub, Michael; Sánchez, Ignacio E.

    2014-01-01

    The 20 protein-coding amino acids are found in proteomes with different relative abundances. The most abundant amino acid, leucine, is nearly an order of magnitude more prevalent than the least abundant amino acid, cysteine. Amino acid metabolic costs differ similarly, constraining their incorporation into proteins. On the other hand, a diverse set of protein sequences is necessary to build functional proteomes. Here, we present a simple model for a cost-diversity trade-off postulating that natural proteomes minimize amino acid metabolic flux while maximizing sequence entropy. The model explains the relative abundances of amino acids across a diverse set of proteomes. We found that the data are remarkably well explained when the cost function accounts for amino acid chemical decay. More than 100 organisms reach comparable solutions to the trade-off by different combinations of proteome cost and sequence diversity. Quantifying the interplay between proteome size and entropy shows that proteomes can get optimally large and diverse. PMID:25086000

  8. Distribution of Amino Acids in Lunar Regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, J. E.; Callahan, M. P.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.; Noble, S. K.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    One of the most eagerly studied questions upon initial return of lunar samples was whether significant amounts of organic compounds, including amino acids, were present. Analyses during the 1970s produced only tentative and inconclusive identifications of indigenous amino acids. Those analyses were hampered by analytical difficulties including relative insensitivity to certain compounds, the inability to separate chiral enantiomers, and the lack of compound-specific isotopic measurements, which made it impossible to determine whether the detected amino acids were indigenous to the lunar samples or the results of contamination. Numerous advances have been made in instrumentation and methodology for amino acid characterization in extraterrestrial samples in the intervening years, yet the origin of amino acids in lunar regolith samples has been revisited only once for a single lunar sample, (3) and remains unclear. Here, we present initial data from the analyses of amino acid abundances in 12 lunar regolith samples. We discuss these abundances in the context of four potential amino acid sources: (1) terrestrial biological contamination; (2) contamination from lunar module (LM) exhaust; (3) derivation from solar windimplanted precursors; and (4) exogenous delivery from meteorites.

  9. Non-essential amino acid metabolism in rats

    E-print Network

    Crooks, James Darrell

    1971-01-01

    NON-ESSENTIAL AMINO ACID METABOLISM IN RATS A Thesis by JAMES DARRELL CROOKS, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1971 Major Subject...: Animal Nutrition O 4 0 E ? NON ESSENTIAL AMINO ACID METABOLISM IN RATS A Thesis by JAMES DARRELL CROOKS& JR. Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Member) (Head of Department) (Member) May 197 1 ABSTRACT Non...

  10. Amino Acid Degradation after Meteoritic Impact Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertrand, M.; Westall, F.; vanderGaast, S.; Vilas, F.; Hoerz, F.; Barnes, G.; Chabin, A.; Brack, A.

    2008-01-01

    Amino acids are among the most important prebiotic molecules as it is from these precursors that the building blocks of life were formed [1]. Although organic molecules were among the components of the planetesimals making up the terrestrial planets, large amounts of primitive organic precursor molecules are believed to be exogenous in origin and to have been imported to the Earth via micrometeorites, carbonaceous meteorites and comets, especially during the early stages of the formation of the Solar System [1,2]. Our study concerns the hypothesis that prebiotic organic matter, present on Earth, was synthesized in the interstellar environment, and then imported to Earth by meteorites or micrometeorites. We are particularly concerned with the formation and fate of amino acids. We have already shown that amino acid synthesis is possible inside cometary grains under interstellar environment conditions [3]. We are now interested in the effects of space conditions and meteoritic impact on these amino acids [4-6]. Most of the extraterrestrial organic molecules known today have been identified in carbonaceous chondrite meteorites [7]. One of the components of these meteorites is a clay with a composition close to that of saponite, used in our experiments. Two American teams have studied the effects of impact on various amino acids [8,9]. [8] investigated amino acids in saturated solution in water with pressure ranges between 5.1 and 21 GPa and temperature ranges between 412 and 870 K. [9] studied amino acids in solid form associated with and without minerals (Murchison and Allende meteorite extracts) and pressure ranges between 3 and 30 GPa. In these two experiments, the amino acids survived up to 15 GPa. At higher pressure, the quantity of preserved amino acids decreases quickly. Some secondary products such as dipeptides and diketopiperazins were identified in the [8] experiment.

  11. Protein, amino acids and the control of food intake.

    PubMed

    Tome, Daniel

    2004-08-01

    The influence of protein and amino acid on the control of food intake and the specific control of protein and amino acid intakes remains incompletely understood. The most commonly accepted conclusions are: (1) the existence of an aversive response to diets deficient in or devoid of protein or deficient in at least one essential amino acid; (2) the existence of a mechanism that enables attainment of the minimum requirement for N and essential amino acids by increasing intake of a low-protein diet; (3) a decrease in the intake of a high-protein diet is associated with different processes, including the high satiating effect of protein. Ingested proteins are believed to generate pre- and post-absorptive signals that contribute to the control of gastric kinetics, pancreatic secretion and food intake. At the brain level, two major afferent pathways are involved in protein and amino acid monitoring: the indirect neuro-mediated (mainly vagus-mediated) pathway and the direct blood pathway. The neuro-mediated pathway transfers pre-absorptive and visceral information. This information is for the main part transferred through the vagus nerve that innervates part of the oro-sensory zone: the stomach, the duodenum and the liver. Other information is directly monitored in the blood. It is likely that the system responds precisely when protein and essential amino acid intake is inadequate, but in contrast allows a large range of adaptive capacities through amino acid degradation and substrate interconversion. PMID:15384319

  12. 40 CFR 721.2584 - Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. 721.2584 Section 721...Substances § 721.2584 Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. (a) Chemical substance...substance identified as dodecanoic acid, 12-amino- (PMN P-98-0823;...

  13. 40 CFR 721.2584 - Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. 721.2584 Section 721...Substances § 721.2584 Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. (a) Chemical substance...substance identified as dodecanoic acid, 12-amino- (PMN P-98-0823;...

  14. 40 CFR 721.2584 - Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. 721.2584 Section 721...Substances § 721.2584 Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. (a) Chemical substance...substance identified as dodecanoic acid, 12-amino- (PMN P-98-0823;...

  15. 40 CFR 721.2584 - Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. 721.2584 Section 721...Substances § 721.2584 Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. (a) Chemical substance...substance identified as dodecanoic acid, 12-amino- (PMN P-98-0823;...

  16. 40 CFR 721.2584 - Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. 721.2584 Section 721...Substances § 721.2584 Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. (a) Chemical substance...substance identified as dodecanoic acid, 12-amino- (PMN P-98-0823;...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency

    MedlinePLUS

    ... OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency On this page: Description Genetic changes ... Reviewed May 2008 What is aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency? Aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) ...

  18. Landscape patterns of free amino acids in arctic tundra soils

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Knut Kielland

    1995-01-01

    Concentrations of free amino acids were measured in soils from four major ecosystem types in arctic Alaska. Total free amino acid concentrations were several-fold higher than ammonium (the major form of inorganic nitrogen) in water extracts of soils. The dominant free amino acids in these soils were glycine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, and arginine. Concentrations of total amino acids

  19. Inhibitors of Branched Chain Amino Acid Biosynthesis

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Herbicides that inhibit the production of the branched chain amino acids valine, leucine and isoleucine are used for total vegetation management and selective weed control in a wide variety of crops.  There are currently four different chemical families that share this MOA.  Before the development of glyphosate-tolerance crop technology, branched chain amino acid inhibitors were the mainstay for several major row crops.  While this is still a very important herbicide MOA, the major increase in herbicide resistance weeds since 1980 has been the direct result selection pressure from these herbicides.  There are currently more weed species resistant to branched chain amino acid inhibitors than any other herbicide MOA.

  20. Amino acids in the Tagish Lake Meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kminek, G.; Botta, O.; Glavin, D. P.; Bada, J. L.

    2002-05-01

    High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) based amino acid analysis of a Tagish Lake meteorite sample recovered three months after the meteorite fell to Earth have revealed that the amino acid composition of Tagish Lake is strikingly different from that of the CM and CI carbonaceous chondrites. We found that the Tagish Lake meteorite contains only trace levels of amino acids (total abundance = 880 parts per billion, ppb), which is much lower than the total abundance of amino acids in the CI Orgueil (4,100 ppb) and the CM Murchison (16,900 ppb). Because most of the same amino acids found in the Tagish Lake meteorite are also present in the Tagish Lake ice melt water, we conclude that the amino acids detected in the meteorite are terrestrial contamination. We found that the exposure of a sample of Murchison to cold water lead to a substantial reduction over a period of several weeks in the amount of amino acids that are not strongly bound to the meteorite matrix. However, strongly bound amino acids that are extracted by direct HCl hydrolysis, are not affected by the leaching process. Thus even if there had been leaching of amino acids from our Tagish Lake meteorite sample during its three month residence in Tagish Lake ice and melt water, a Murchison type abundance of endogenous amino acids in the meteorite would have still been readily detectable. The low amino acid content of Tagish Lake indicates that this meteorite originated from a different type of parent body than the CM's and CI's. The parent body was apparently devoid of the reagents such as aldehyldes/ketones, HCN and ammonia needed for the effective abiotic synthesis of amino acids. Based on reflectance spectral measurements, Tagish Lake has been associated with P or D- type asteroids. If the Tagish Lake meteorite was indeed derived from these types of parent bodies, our understanding of these primitive asteroids needs to be re-evaluated with respect to their potential inventory of biologically important organic compounds.

  1. Polymers with complexing properties. Simple poly(amino acids)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roque, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    The free amino (0.3 equiv/residue) and carboxyl (0.5 equiv/residue) groups of thermal polylysine increased dramatically on treatment with distilled water. The total hydrolysis of such a polymer was abnormal in that only about 50% of the expected amino acids were recovered. Poly (lysine-co-alanine-co-glycine) under usual conditions hydrolyzed completely in 8 hours; whereas, when it was pretreated with diazomethane, a normal period of 24 hours was required to give (nearly) the same amounts of each free amino acid as compared with those obtained from the untreated polymer. The amino groups of the basic thermal poly(amino acids) were sterically hindered. The existence of nitrogen atoms linking two or three chains and reactive groups (anhydride, imine) were proposed.

  2. 40 CFR 721.1705 - Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with 6-amino-4-hydroxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with...Substances § 721.1705 Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with...generically identified as benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled...

  3. 40 CFR 721.1705 - Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with 6-amino-4-hydroxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with...Substances § 721.1705 Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with...generically identified as benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled...

  4. 40 CFR 721.1705 - Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with 6-amino-4-hydroxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with...Substances § 721.1705 Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with...generically identified as benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled...

  5. 40 CFR 721.1705 - Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with 6-amino-4-hydroxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with...Substances § 721.1705 Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with...generically identified as benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled...

  6. 40 CFR 721.1705 - Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with 6-amino-4-hydroxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with...Substances § 721.1705 Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with...generically identified as benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled...

  7. Differential D-glucose requirements of the general amino-acid permease and protein synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. ellipsoideus.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, R; Ferreras, J M; Muñoz, R; Arias, F J; Rojo, M A; Girbés, T

    1990-01-01

    The dependence of the general aminoacid permease and protein synthesis on the availability of D-glucose as energy source was studied. Stimulation by the sugar was immediate once added to the cell suspensions and seems to be mediated by energy derived directly from glycolysis. The general aminoacid permease was saturated linearly with D-glucose whereas protein synthesis was saturated sigmoidealy requiring much higher concentration of the sugar than the general aminoacid permease. PMID:2073683

  8. How to build optically active ? -amino acids

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Calmes; J. Daunis

    1999-01-01

    Summary Various methodologies published in the literature dealing witha-amino carboxylic acid asymmetric synthesis are presented in a digest form. In each case, only some recent or most typical works are mentioned.

  9. Amino Acid biosynthesis pathways in diatoms.

    PubMed

    Bromke, Mariusz A

    2013-01-01

    Amino acids are not only building blocks for proteins but serve as precursors for the synthesis of many metabolites with multiple functions in growth and other biological processes of a living organism. The biosynthesis of amino acids is tightly connected with central carbon, nitrogen and sulfur metabolism. Recent publication of genome sequences for two diatoms Thalassiosira pseudonana and Phaeodactylum tricornutum created an opportunity for extensive studies on the structure of these metabolic pathways. Based on sequence homology found in the analyzed diatomal genes, the biosynthesis of amino acids in diatoms seems to be similar to higher plants. However, one of the most striking differences between the pathways in plants and in diatomas is that the latter possess and utilize the urea cycle. It serves as an important anaplerotic pathway for carbon fixation into amino acids and other N-containing compounds, which are essential for diatom growth and contribute to their high productivity. PMID:24957993

  10. Amino Acid Biosynthesis Pathways in Diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Bromke, Mariusz A.

    2013-01-01

    Amino acids are not only building blocks for proteins but serve as precursors for the synthesis of many metabolites with multiple functions in growth and other biological processes of a living organism. The biosynthesis of amino acids is tightly connected with central carbon, nitrogen and sulfur metabolism. Recent publication of genome sequences for two diatoms Thalassiosira pseudonana and Phaeodactylum tricornutum created an opportunity for extensive studies on the structure of these metabolic pathways. Based on sequence homology found in the analyzed diatomal genes, the biosynthesis of amino acids in diatoms seems to be similar to higher plants. However, one of the most striking differences between the pathways in plants and in diatomas is that the latter possess and utilize the urea cycle. It serves as an important anaplerotic pathway for carbon fixation into amino acids and other N-containing compounds, which are essential for diatom growth and contribute to their high productivity. PMID:24957993

  11. The mitochondrial sulfur dioxygenase ETHYLMALONIC ENCEPHALOPATHY PROTEIN1 is required for amino acid catabolism during carbohydrate starvation and embryo development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Krüßel, Lena; Junemann, Johannes; Wirtz, Markus; Birke, Hannah; Thornton, Jeremy D; Browning, Luke W; Poschet, Gernot; Hell, Rüdiger; Balk, Janneke; Braun, Hans-Peter; Hildebrandt, Tatjana M

    2014-05-01

    The sulfur dioxygenase ETHYLMALONIC ENCEPHALOPATHY PROTEIN1 (ETHE1) catalyzes the oxidation of persulfides in the mitochondrial matrix and is essential for early embryo development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We investigated the biochemical and physiological functions of ETHE1 in plant metabolism using recombinant Arabidopsis ETHE1 and three transfer DNA insertion lines with 50% to 99% decreased sulfur dioxygenase activity. Our results identified a new mitochondrial pathway catalyzing the detoxification of reduced sulfur species derived from cysteine catabolism by oxidation to thiosulfate. Knockdown of the sulfur dioxygenase impaired embryo development and produced phenotypes of starvation-induced chlorosis during short-day growth conditions and extended darkness, indicating that ETHE1 has a key function in situations of high protein turnover, such as seed production and the use of amino acids as alternative respiratory substrates during carbohydrate starvation. The amino acid profile of mutant plants was similar to that caused by defects in the electron-transfer flavoprotein/electron-transfer flavoprotein:ubiquinone oxidoreductase complex and associated dehydrogenases. Thus, in addition to sulfur amino acid catabolism, ETHE1 also affects the oxidation of branched-chain amino acids and lysine. PMID:24692429

  12. Restricted activation of general amino acid control under conditions of glutamine limitation in Neurospora crassa

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Johanna Kolanus; Jens Michalczyk; Harry J. Flint; Ilse B. Barthelmess

    1990-01-01

    In Neurospora crassa limitation for single amino acids normally results in increased formation of enzymes required for amino acid synthesis via ‘general amino acid control’. Glutamine limitation, however, led to comparatively low and delayed derepression of enzyme synthesis. Nitrate reductase activity increased steeply under these conditions confirming that de novo protein synthesis could occur. Derepression levels were unaffected by addition

  13. An Evaluation of the FAO Amino Acid Reference Pattern in Human Nutrition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MARIAN E. SWENDSEID; CHERYL L. HARRIS; ANDSTEWART G. TUTTLE

    each amino acid needed for nitrogen equi librium was determined using dietary con ditions wherein the essential amino acids were proportioned as in whole egg pro teins, with the exception of the amino acid under study, and the total nitrogen was maintained at a constant and ade quate level. It appears that the require ments of young women for at

  14. From one amino acid to another: tRNA-dependent amino acid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, Kelly; Yuan, Jing; Hohn, Michael J.; Jester, Brian; Devine, Kevin M.; Söll, Dieter

    2008-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNAs (aa-tRNAs) are the essential substrates for translation. Most aa-tRNAs are formed by direct aminoacylation of tRNA catalyzed by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. However, a smaller number of aa-tRNAs (Asn-tRNA, Gln-tRNA, Cys-tRNA and Sec-tRNA) are made by synthesizing the amino acid on the tRNA by first attaching a non-cognate amino acid to the tRNA, which is then converted to the cognate one catalyzed by tRNA-dependent modifying enzymes. Asn-tRNA or Gln-tRNA formation in most prokaryotes requires amidation of Asp-tRNA or Glu-tRNA by amidotransferases that couple an amidase or an asparaginase to liberate ammonia with a tRNA-dependent kinase. Both archaeal and eukaryotic Sec-tRNA biosynthesis and Cys-tRNA synthesis in methanogens require O-phosophoseryl-tRNA formation. For tRNA-dependent Cys biosynthesis, O-phosphoseryl-tRNA synthetase directly attaches the amino acid to the tRNA which is then converted to Cys by Sep-tRNA: Cys-tRNA synthase. In Sec-tRNA synthesis, O-phosphoseryl-tRNA kinase phosphorylates Ser-tRNA to form the intermediate which is then modified to Sec-tRNA by Sep-tRNA:Sec-tRNA synthase. Complex formation between enzymes in the same pathway may protect the fidelity of protein synthesis. How these tRNA-dependent amino acid biosynthetic routes are integrated into overall metabolism may explain why they are still retained in so many organisms. PMID:18252769

  15. Genetically encoded fluorescent coumarin amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jiangyun (San Diego, CA); Xie, Jianming (San Diego, CA); Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA)

    2010-10-05

    The invention relates to orthogonal pairs of tRNAs and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases that can incorporate the coumarin unnatural amino acid L-(7-hydroxycoumarin-4-yl) ethylglycine into proteins produced in eubacterial host cells such as E. coli. The invention provides, for example but not limited to, novel orthogonal synthetases, methods for identifying and making the novel synthetases, methods for producing proteins containing the unnatural amino acid L-(7-hydroxycoumarin-4-yl)ethylglycine and related translation systems.

  16. Genetically encoded fluorescent coumarin amino acids

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jiangyun (San Diego, CA); Xie, Jianming (San Diego, CA); Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA)

    2012-06-05

    The invention relates to orthogonal pairs of tRNAs and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases that can incorporate the coumarin unnatural amino acid L-(7-hydroxycoumarin-4-yl)ethylglycine into proteins produced in eubacterial host cells such as E. coli. The invention provides, for example but not limited to, novel orthogonal synthetases, methods for identifying and making the novel synthetases, methods for producing proteins containing the unnatural amino acid L-(7-hydroxycoumarin-4-yl)ethylglycine and related translation systems.

  17. Amino Acid Degradation after Meteoritic Impact Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, M.; van der Gaast, S.; Vilas, F.; Horz, F.; Barnes, G.; Barbier, B.; Chabin, A.; Braak, A.; Westall, A.

    2004-11-01

    Our study concerns the hypothesis that prebiotic organic matter, present on Earth, was synthesized in the interstellar environment, and then imported to Earth by the meteorites or micrometeorites. We are particularly concerned with the formation and fate of amino acids. We have already shown that amino acid synthesis is possible inside cometary grains under interstellar environment conditions (Munoz Caro, et al. Nature 416, 403 (2002).). We are now interested in the effects of space conditions and meteoritic impact on these amino acids (Barbier B., et al. Planet. Space Sci. 46, 391 (1998), Barbier B., et al. , Planet. Space Sci. 50, 353 (2002) ; Boillot F., et al. Origins of Life and Evol. Biosphere 32, 359 (2002)). Most of the extraterrestrial organic molecules known today have been identified in carbonaceous chondrite meteorites. One of the components of these meteorites is a clay with a composition close to that of saponite. Thus, in order to study the effects of meteoritic impact on amino acids, three amino acids (alanine, glycine, and b-alanine) were mixed with 0,275 mg saponite clay to simulate a carbonaceous chondrite meteorite. These three amino acids were identified in the Murchison meteorite, and two of them (Gly and Ala) are used in biological systems. A pressure of 15 GPa, simulating a meteorite impact with a velocity of 1.2 km/sec was applied to this artificial meteorite at the NASA Johnson Space Center Experimental Impact Laboratory. The sample extracts show a good preservation of the amino acids : 34% of glycine, about 46% of D-alanine and about 20% of b-alanine were preserved. Another experiment has been carried out using different amino-acids and higher pressures. We are now analyzing the samples. The preparation and the analysis of samples were carried out in Orléans (France) at the Molecular Biophysics Center.

  18. Amino Acid Patterns around Disulfide Bonds

    PubMed Central

    Marques, José R. F.; da Fonseca, Rute R.; Drury, Brett; Melo, André

    2010-01-01

    Disulfide bonds provide an inexhaustible source of information on molecular evolution and biological specificity. In this work, we described the amino acid composition around disulfide bonds in a set of disulfide-rich proteins using appropriate descriptors, based on ANOVA (for all twenty natural amino acids or classes of amino acids clustered according to their chemical similarities) and Scheffé (for the disulfide-rich proteins superfamilies) statistics. We found that weakly hydrophilic and aromatic amino acids are quite abundant in the regions around disulfide bonds, contrary to aliphatic and hydrophobic amino acids. The density distributions (as a function of the distance to the center of the disulfide bonds) for all defined entities presented an overall unimodal behavior: the densities are null at short distances, have maxima at intermediate distances and decrease for long distances. In the end, the amino acid environment around the disulfide bonds was found to be different for different superfamilies, allowing the clustering of proteins in a biologically relevant way, suggesting that this type of chemical information might be used as a tool to assess the relationship between very divergent sets of disulfide-rich proteins. PMID:21151463

  19. Evaluating lysine requirements of nursery pigs fed low protein diets with different sources of nonessential amino acids.

    PubMed

    Jones, C K; Tokach, M D; Usry, J L; Neill, C R; Patience, J F

    2014-08-01

    The Lys requirement of nursery pigs may be dependent on the source of nonessential AA (NEAA) nitrogen or the source of Lys itself. However, little peer-reviewed data examines these phenomena. The objectives of these experiments were to determine if the Lys requirement of pigs is altered when 1) low protein diets are supplemented with different sources of NEAA nitrogen or 2) Lys is supplied as a crystalline source instead of intact protein such as soybean meal (SBM). Two 14-d experiments were conducted using 450 (Exp. 1) and 540 (Exp. 2) pigs (PIC C22/C29 × 337). There were 10 treatments in each experiment, each aligned as a 2 × 5 factorial. In Exp. 1, there were 2 sources of NEAA (l-Gln + l-Gly or l-Gly + l-Ala + l-Pro + l-His) and 5 levels of Lys (1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, and 1.6%). In Exp. 2, there were 2 sources of proteins providing additional Lys (l-Lys HCl or SBM) and the same 5 levels of Lys. Following weaning at 18 to 22 d of age, pigs were fed a common starter diet for 5 d postweaning followed by a 14-d treatment period. Pigs were weighed and feed disappearance determined on d 0, 7, and 14 of the experiment. Data were analyzed using the MIXED and NLIN procedures of SAS (SAS Inst., Cary, NC). In Exp. 1, increasing CP and Lys resulted in a quadratic increase (P < 0.05) in ADG and a linear improvement (P < 0.05) in G:F during the 14-d treatment period. Breakpoint regression analyses revealed that optimum ADG was obtained at 1.36% Lys, while optimum G:F was obtained at 1.45% Lys. The source of NEAA did not affect (P > 0.10) growth performance during the treatment period. In Exp. 2, both ADG and G:F increased linearly (P < 0.05) with increasing Lys. Optimal ADG was obtained at 1.47% Lys, but the breakpoint for optimum G:F was above tested levels. Source of Lys did not affect (P > 0.10) ADG, but pigs fed additional Lys from crystalline sources had improved (P < 0.05) G:F than those fed additional Lys from intact protein at 1.50% Lys; however, the analyzed Lys values at this level differ. Overall, these data show that the standardized ileal digestibility Lys requirement of pigs is not altered when low protein diets are supplemented with different sources of NEAA nitrogen. Feed efficiency appears to be maximized when additional Lys is supplied by l-Lys HCl instead of SBM, but more research is needed to confirm this phenomenon. PMID:25074452

  20. Evaluating lysine requirements of nursery pigs fed low protein diets with different sources of non-essential amino acids.

    PubMed

    Jones, C K; Tokach, M D; Usry, J L; Neill, C R; Patience, J F

    2014-07-01

    The Lys requirement of nursery pigs may be dependent upon the source of non-essential AA nitrogen (NEAA) or the source of Lys itself. However, little peer-reviewed data examines these phenomena. The objectives of these experiments were to determine if the Lys requirement of pigs is altered when 1) low protein diets are supplemented with different sources NEAA nitrogen or 2) Lys is supplied as a crystalline source instead of intact protein such as soybean meal (SBM). Two 14-d experiments were conducted using 450 (Exp. 1) and 540 (Exp. 2) pigs (PIC C22/C29 × 337). There were 10 treatments in each experiment, each aligned as a 2 × 5 factorial. In Exp. 1, there were 2 sources of NEAA (L-Gln + L-Gly or L-Gly + L-Ala + L-Pro + L-His) and 5 levels of Lys (1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6). In Exp. 2, there were 2 sources of proteins providing additional Lys, (L-Lys•HCl or SBM) and the same 5 levels of Lys. Following weaning at 18 to 22 days of age, pigs were fed a common starter diet for 5 d post-weaning, followed by a 14-d treatment period. Pigs were weighed and feed disappearance determined on d 0, 7, and 14 of the experiment. Data were analyzed using the MIXED and NLIN procedures of SAS (SAS Inst., Cary, NC). In Exp. 1, increasing CP and Lys resulted in a quadratic increase (P < 0.05) in ADG and a linear improvement (P < 0.05) in G:F during the 14-d treatment period. Break point regression analyses revealed that optimum ADG was obtained at 1.36% Lys, while optimum G:F was obtained at 1.45% Lys. The source of NEAA did not affect (P > 0.10) growth performance during the treatment period. In Exp. 2, both ADG and G:F increased linearly (P < 0.05) with increasing Lys. Optimal ADG was obtained at 1.47% Lys, but the break point for optimum G:F was above tested levels. Source of Lys did not affect (P > 0.10) ADG, but pigs fed additional Lys from crystalline sources had improved (P < 0.05) G:F than those fed additional Lys from intact protein at 1.50% Lys; however the analyzed Lys values at this level differ. Overall, these data show that the standardized ileal digestibility (SID) Lys requirement of pigs is not altered when low protein diets are supplemented with different sources of NEAA nitrogen. Feed efficiency appears to be maximized when additional Lys is supplied by L-Lys·HCl instead of SBM, but more research is needed to confirm this phenomenon. PMID:24987075

  1. Monoclonal antibodies recognizing single amino acid substitutions in hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Stanker, L.H.; Branscomb, E.; Vanderlaan, M.; Jensen, R.H.

    1986-06-01

    Four monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to non-human primate hemoglobin referred to as Cap-4, Cap-5, Rh-2, and Rh-4, and two mAb to human hemoglobin, referred to as H-1 and H-3 were isolated and were partially characterized. Binding studies with these mAb on a panel of hemoglobins and isolated ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. globin chains revealed a unique reactivity pattern for each mAb. Amino acid sequence analysis of the antigens used to generate the binding data suggests that the specific recognition of certain hemoglobin antigens by each mAb is controlled by the presence of a particular amino acid at a specific position within the epitope. The use of synthetic peptides as antigens confirmed this observation for five of the mAb. No synthetic peptides were tested with the sixth mAb, Rh-2. The amino acids required for binding of mAb Cap-4, Cap-5, Rh-4, and Rh-2 to hemoglobin are alanine at ..beta..5, threonine at ..beta..13, glutamine at ..beta..125, and leucine at ..cap alpha..68. The non-human primate hemoglobin antibodies require a specific amino acid that is not present in human hemoglobin. The amino acid required for binding of Cap-4, Cap-5, and Rh-4 could arise by a single base change in the ..beta.. globin gene, whereas the amino acid required for Rh-2 binding could only occur if two base changes occurred. Thus these mAb are candidate probes for a somatic cell mutation assay on the basis of the detection of peripheral blood red cells that possess single amino acid substituted hemoglobin as a result of single base substitutions in the globin genes of precursor cells.

  2. Amino acids in the Yamato carbonaceous chrondrite from Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimoyama, A.; Ponnamperuma, C.; Yanai, K.

    1979-01-01

    Evidence for the presence of amino acids of extraterrestrial origin in the Antarctic Yamato carbonaceous chrondrite is presented. Hydrolyzed and nonhydrolyzed water-extracted amino acid samples from exterior, middle and interior portions of the meteorite were analyzed by an amino acid analyzer and by gas chromatography of N-TFA-isopropyl amino acid derivatives. Nine protein and six nonprotein amino acids were detected in the meteorite at abundances between 34 and less than one nmole/g, with equal amounts in interior and exterior portions. Nearly equal abundances of the D and L enantiomers of alanine, aspartic acid and glutamic acid were found, indicating the abiotic, therefore extraterrestrial, origin of the amino acids. The Antarctic environment and the uniformity of protein amino acid abundances are discussed as evidence against the racemization of terrestrially acquired amino acids, and similarities between Yamato amino acid compositions and the amino acid compositions of the Murchison and Murray type II carbonaceous chrondrites are indicated.

  3. Amino acids in modern and fossil woods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, C.; Bada, J. L.; Peterson, E.

    1976-01-01

    The amino acid composition and the extent of racemization in several modern and fossil woods are reported. The method of analysis is described, and data are presented on the total amino acid concentration, the amino acid ratios, and the enantiomeric ratios in each sample. It is found that the amino acid concentration per gram of dry wood decreases with age of the sample, that the extent of racemization increases with increasing age, and that the amounts of aspartic acid, threonine, and serine decrease relative to valine with increasing age. The relative racemization rates of amino acids in wood, bone, and aqueous solution are compared, and it is shown that racemization in wood is much slower than in bone or aqueous solution. Racemization results for woods from the Kalambo Falls area of Zambia are used to calculate a minimum age of 110,000 years for the transition between the Sangoan and Acheulian industries at that site. This result is shown to be consistent with numerous radiometric dates for older Acheulian sites in Africa and to compare well with geologically inferred dates for the beginning of the Eemian and the end of the Acheulian industry in southern Africa.

  4. Amino acid isotopic analysis in agricultural systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A relatively new approach to stable isotopic analysis—referred to as compound-specific isotopic analysis (CSIA)—has emerged, centering on the measurement of 15N:14N ratios in amino acids (glutamic acid and phenylalanine). CSIA has recently been used to generate trophic position estimates among anima...

  5. Original article Rumen effective degradability of amino acids

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Rumen effective degradability of amino acids from soybean meal corrected degradation kinetics and effective degradability of individual amino acids, total analysed amino acids (TAA was similar for TAA and CP (74.7 vs. 75.7%). Degradability values of individual amino acids varied moderately

  6. What Amino Acid Properties Affect Protein Evolution? Xuhua Xia,1

    E-print Network

    Xia, Xuhua

    What Amino Acid Properties Affect Protein Evolution? Xuhua Xia,1 Wen-Hsiung Li2 1 Department the effects of 10 amino acid properties on the evolution of the genetic code, the amino acid composition of proteins, and the pattern of nonsynonymous substitutions. The 10 amino acid properties studied

  7. Amino acids of the Murchison meteorite. III - Seven carbon acyclic primary alpha-amino alkanoic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronin, John R.; Pizzarello, Sandra

    1986-01-01

    All of the eighteen possible seven-carbon acyclic primary alpha-amino alkanoic acids have been positively identified in a hot-water extract of the Murchison meteorite by the combined use of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, ion exchange chromatography and reversed-phase chromatography. None of these amino acids has previously been found in meteorites or in any other natural material. They range in concentration from less than or equal to 0.5 to 5.3 nmol/g. Configuration assignments were made for 2-amino-3,4-dimethylpentanoic acid and allo-2-amino-3,4-dimethylpentanoic acid and the diasteromer ratio was determined. Fifty-five amino acids have now been positively identified in the Murchison meteorite, 36 of which are unknown in terrestrial materials. This unique suite of amino acids is characterized by the occurrence of all structural isomers within the two major classes of amino acids represented, by the predominance of branched chain isomers, and by an exponential decline in amount with increasing carbon chain length within homologous series. These characteristics of the Murchison amino acids are suggestive of synthesis before incorporation into a parent body.

  8. Permeability of membranes to amino acids and modified amino acids: Mechanisms involved in translocation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. C. Chakrabarti

    1994-01-01

    The amino acid permeability of membranes is of interest because they are one of the key solutes involved in cell function. Membrane permeability coefficients (P) for amino acid classes, including neutral, polar, hydrophobic, and charged species, have been measured and compared using a variety of techniques. Decreasing lipid chain length increased permeability slightly (5-fold), while variations in pH had only

  9. Amino Acids Profiles in Biological Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iordache, A.; Horj, E.; Ani, A. R.; Mesaros, C.; Morar, S.; Cozar, O.; Culea, M.

    2010-08-01

    An accurate analytical method was developed to determine amino acids in some biological specimens by GC/MS technique. Stable isotopes provide useful tools for a variety of studies, offering ideal internal standards in quantitative information. Isotopic dilution gas chromatography—mass spectrometry (ID-GC/MS) is the techniques used for quantitative analysis of compounds labeled with stable isotopes. A Trace DSQ Thermo Finnigan quadrupole mass spectrometer coupled with a Trace GC was used. Amino acids were separated on a Rtx-5 MS capillary column, 30 m×0.25 mm, 0.25 ?m film thickness, using a temperature program from 50 °C, 1 min, 6 °C/min at 100 °C, 4 °C/min at 200 °C, 20 °C/min at 300 °C, (3 min). The transfer line temperature was 250 °C, the injector temperature 200 °C and ion source temperature 250 °C; splitter: 10:1. Electron energy was 70 eV and emission current, 100 ?A. The amino acids were purified on a Dowex 50W-W8 exchange resin and were derivatized in a procedure following two steps to obtain trifluoroacetyl butyl esters. The identification of amino acids was obtained by using NIST library but also by using amino acid standards.

  10. Amino Acids Profiles in Biological Media

    SciTech Connect

    Iordache, A. [National R and D Institute of Cryogenics and Isotopic Technologies-ICSI Rm. Valcea, 4 Uzinei St., Rm. Valcea, 240050 (Romania); Horj, E.; Morar, S.; Cozar, O.; Culea, M. ['Babes-Bolyai' University, 1 M. Kogalniceanu St., Cluj-Napoca, 400084 (Romania); Ani, A. R. [University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Cluj-Napoca-USAMV, 3-5 Manastur St., 400372 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Mesaros, C. [University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 38 Gh. Marinescu St., 540000, Targu Mures (Romania)

    2010-08-04

    An accurate analytical method was developed to determine amino acids in some biological specimens by GC/MS technique. Stable isotopes provide useful tools for a variety of studies, offering ideal internal standards in quantitative information. Isotopic dilution gas chromatography--mass spectrometry (ID-GC/MS) is the techniques used for quantitative analysis of compounds labeled with stable isotopes. A Trace DSQ Thermo Finnigan quadrupole mass spectrometer coupled with a Trace GC was used. Amino acids were separated on a Rtx-5 MS capillary column, 30 mx0.25 mm, 0.25 {mu}m film thickness, using a temperature program from 50 deg. C, 1 min, 6 deg. C/min at 100 deg. C, 4 deg. C/min at 200 deg. C, 20 deg. C/min at 300 deg. C, (3 min). The transfer line temperature was 250 deg. C, the injector temperature 200 deg. C and ion source temperature 250 deg. C; splitter: 10:1. Electron energy was 70 eV and emission current, 100 {mu}A. The amino acids were purified on a Dowex 50W-W8 exchange resin and were derivatized in a procedure following two steps to obtain trifluoroacetyl butyl esters. The identification of amino acids was obtained by using NIST library but also by using amino acid standards.

  11. Amino acid uptake in rust fungi

    PubMed Central

    Struck, Christine

    2015-01-01

    The plant pathogenic rust fungi colonize leaf tissue and feed off their host plants without killing them. Certain economically important species of different genera such as Melampsora, Phakopsora, Puccinia, or Uromyces are extensively studied for resolving the mechanisms of the obligate biotrophy. As obligate parasites rust fungi only can complete their life cycle on living hosts where they grow through the leaf tissue by developing an extended network of intercellular hyphae from which intracellular haustoria are differentiated. Haustoria are involved in key functions of the obligate biotrophic lifestyle: suppressing host defense responses and acquiring nutrients. This review provides a survey of rust fungi nitrogen nutrition with special emphasis on amino acid uptake. A variety of sequences of amino acid transporter genes of rust fungi have been published; however, transport activity of only three in planta highly up-regulated amino acid permeases have been characterized. Functional and immunohistochemical investigations have shown the specificity and localization of these transporters. Sequence data of various genome projects allowed identification of numerous rust amino acid transporter genes. An in silico analysis reveals that these genes can be classified into different transporter families. In addition, genetic and molecular data of amino acid transporters have provided new insights in the corresponding metabolic pathways. PMID:25699068

  12. Distinguishing Proteins From Arbitrary Amino Acid Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Stephen S.-T.; Mao, Wei-Guang; Benson, Max; He, Rong Lucy

    2015-01-01

    What kinds of amino acid sequences could possibly be protein sequences? From all existing databases that we can find, known proteins are only a small fraction of all possible combinations of amino acids. Beginning with Sanger's first detailed determination of a protein sequence in 1952, previous studies have focused on describing the structure of existing protein sequences in order to construct the protein universe. No one, however, has developed a criteria for determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Here we show that when the collection of arbitrary amino acid sequences is viewed in an appropriate geometric context, the protein sequences cluster together. This leads to a new computational test, described here, that has proved to be remarkably accurate at determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Even more, if the results of this test indicate that the sequence can be a protein, and it is indeed a protein sequence, then its identity as a protein sequence is uniquely defined. We anticipate our computational test will be useful for those who are attempting to complete the job of discovering all proteins, or constructing the protein universe. PMID:25609314

  13. Distinguishing proteins from arbitrary amino acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Yau, Stephen S-T; Mao, Wei-Guang; Benson, Max; He, Rong Lucy

    2015-01-01

    What kinds of amino acid sequences could possibly be protein sequences? From all existing databases that we can find, known proteins are only a small fraction of all possible combinations of amino acids. Beginning with Sanger's first detailed determination of a protein sequence in 1952, previous studies have focused on describing the structure of existing protein sequences in order to construct the protein universe. No one, however, has developed a criteria for determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Here we show that when the collection of arbitrary amino acid sequences is viewed in an appropriate geometric context, the protein sequences cluster together. This leads to a new computational test, described here, that has proved to be remarkably accurate at determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Even more, if the results of this test indicate that the sequence can be a protein, and it is indeed a protein sequence, then its identity as a protein sequence is uniquely defined. We anticipate our computational test will be useful for those who are attempting to complete the job of discovering all proteins, or constructing the protein universe. PMID:25609314

  14. Amino acid uptake in rust fungi.

    PubMed

    Struck, Christine

    2015-01-01

    The plant pathogenic rust fungi colonize leaf tissue and feed off their host plants without killing them. Certain economically important species of different genera such as Melampsora, Phakopsora, Puccinia, or Uromyces are extensively studied for resolving the mechanisms of the obligate biotrophy. As obligate parasites rust fungi only can complete their life cycle on living hosts where they grow through the leaf tissue by developing an extended network of intercellular hyphae from which intracellular haustoria are differentiated. Haustoria are involved in key functions of the obligate biotrophic lifestyle: suppressing host defense responses and acquiring nutrients. This review provides a survey of rust fungi nitrogen nutrition with special emphasis on amino acid uptake. A variety of sequences of amino acid transporter genes of rust fungi have been published; however, transport activity of only three in planta highly up-regulated amino acid permeases have been characterized. Functional and immunohistochemical investigations have shown the specificity and localization of these transporters. Sequence data of various genome projects allowed identification of numerous rust amino acid transporter genes. An in silico analysis reveals that these genes can be classified into different transporter families. In addition, genetic and molecular data of amino acid transporters have provided new insights in the corresponding metabolic pathways. PMID:25699068

  15. Nitrogen regulation of amino acid utilization by Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed Central

    DeBusk, R M; Ogilvie, S

    1984-01-01

    The production of an extracellular deaminase activity involved with the utilization of amino acids as sole sources of nitrogen is under the control of the nit-2 locus of Neurospora crassa. This locus is the sole major nitrogen regulatory locus described for N. crassa and is believed to encode a positive effector required for induction of activities involved with the utilization of alternate nitrogen sources. Production of deaminase activity requires the lifting of nitrogen metabolite repression, the presence of a functional nit-2 gene product, and specific induction by amino acids. Additional parameters of enzyme production are described. PMID:6238945

  16. Aspergillus nidulans CkiA is an essential casein kinase I required for delivery of amino acid transporters to the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Apostolaki, Angeliki; Harispe, Laura; Calcagno-Pizarelli, Ana María; Vangelatos, Ioannis; Sophianopoulou, Vicky; Arst, Herbert N; Peñalva, Miguel Angel; Amillis, Sotiris; Scazzocchio, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    Summary Type I casein kinases are highly conserved among Eukaryotes. Of the two Aspergillus nidulans casein kinases I, CkiA is related to the ?/? mammalian kinases and to Saccharomyces cerevisiæ Hrr25p. CkiA is essential. Three recessive ckiA mutations leading to single residue substitutions, and downregulation using a repressible promoter, result in partial loss-of-function, which leads to a pleiotropic defect in amino acid utilization and resistance to toxic amino acid analogues. These phenotypes correlate with miss-routing of the YAT plasma membrane transporters AgtA (glutamate) and PrnB (proline) to the vacuole under conditions that, in the wild type, result in their delivery to the plasma membrane. Miss-routing to the vacuole and subsequent transporter degradation results in a major deficiency in the uptake of the corresponding amino acids that underlies the inability of the mutant strains to catabolize them. Our findings may have important implications for understanding how CkiA, Hrr25p and other fungal orthologues regulate the directionality of transport at the ER-Golgi interface. PMID:22489878

  17. 40 CFR 721.10126 - Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato...phenyl azo substituted benzenesulfonic acid copper compound (generic). 721.10126...triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

  18. L-amino acid oxidases with specificity for basic L-amino acids in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Gau, Achim E; Heindl, Achim; Nodop, Anke; Kahmann, Uwe; Pistorius, Elfriede K

    2007-01-01

    The two closely related fresh water cyanobacteria Synechococcus elongatus PCC 6301 and Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 have previously been shown to constitutively express a FAD-containing L-amino acid oxidase with high specificity for basic L-amino acids (L-arginine being the best substrate). In this paper we show that such an enzyme is also present in the fresh water cyanobacterium Synechococcus cedrorum PCC 6908. In addition, an improved evaluation of the nucleotide/amino acid sequence of the L-amino acid oxidase of Synechococcus elongatus PCC 6301 (encoded by the aoxA gene) with respect to the FAD-binding site and a translocation pathway signal sequence will be given. Moreover, the genome sequences of 24 cyanobacteria will be evaluated for the occurrence of an aoxA-similar gene. In the evaluated cyanobacteria 15 genes encoding an L-amino acid oxidase-similar protein will be found. PMID:17542496

  19. Apical Transporters for Neutral Amino Acids: Physiology and Pathophysiology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Stefan Broer (Australian National University)

    2008-04-01

    Absorption of amino acids in kidney and intestine involves a variety of transporters for different groups of amino acids. This is illustrated by inherited disorders of amino acid absorption, such as Hartnup disorder, cystinuria, iminoglycinuria, dicarboxylic aminoaciduria, and lysinuric protein intolerance, affecting separate groups of amino acids. Recent advances in the molecular identification of apical neutral amino acid transporters has shed a light on the molecular basis of Hartnup disorder and iminoglycinuria.

  20. New Enzymatic Method of Chiral Amino Acid Synthesis by Dynamic Kinetic Resolution of Amino Acid Amides: Use of Stereoselective Amino Acid Amidases in the Presence of ?-Amino-?-Caprolactam Racemase?

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Shigenori; Komeda, Hidenobu; Asano, Yasuhisa

    2007-01-01

    d- and l-amino acids were produced from l- and d-amino acid amides by d-aminopeptidase from Ochrobactrum anthropi C1-38 and l-amino acid amidase from Pseudomonas azotoformans IAM 1603, respectively, in the presence of ?-amino-?-caprolactam racemase from Achromobacter obae as the catalyst by dynamic kinetic resolution of amino acid amides. PMID:17586677

  1. Amino acid precursors in lunar samples.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.; Harada, K.; Hare, P. E.

    1972-01-01

    The use of hot water to extract lunar samples, followed by the hydrolysis of the aqueous extract, appears to be the method of choice for identification and quantitation of amino acid precursors in extraterrestrial sources. The net inferences from the analyses to date are (1) that amino acid precursors are verifiably present in lunar dust, and (2) that they are quite certainly not the consequence of contamination by terrestrial organisms, including man. It is suggested that prebiotic evolutionary pathways such as have been traversed on the earth were terminated on the moon for lack of sufficient water. Although some or all of the amino acid precursors may be indigenous, the low level observed suggests that they may also result from onfall of organic compounds from interstellar matter, comets, tails, solar wind, or meteorites.

  2. Cometary Amino Acids from the STARDUST Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jamie Elsila

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Stardust spacecraft returned samples from comet 81 P/WiId 2 to Earth in January 2006. Examinations of the organic compounds in cometary samples can reveal information about the prebiotic organic inventory present on the early Earth and within the early Solar System, which may have contributed to the origin of life. Preliminary studies of Stardust material revealed the presence of a suite of organic compounds including several amines and amino acids, but the origin of these compounds (cometary vs. terrestrial contamination) could not be identified. We have recently measured the carbon isotopic ratios of these amino acids to determine their origin, leading to the first detection of a cometary amino acid.

  3. Sensitive Amino Acid Composition and Chirality Analysis with the Mars Organic Analyzer (MOA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skelley, Alison M.; Scherer, James R.; Aubrey, Andrew D.; Grover, William H.; Ivester, Robin H. C.; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Grunthaner, Frank J.; Bada, Jeffrey L.; Mathies, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    Detection of life on Mars requires definition of a suitable biomarker and development of sensitive yet compact instrumentation capable of performing in situ analyses. Our studies are focused on amino acid analysis because amino acids are more resistant to decomposition than other biomolecules, and because amino acid chirality is a well-defined biomarker. Amino acid composition and chirality analysis has been previously demonstrated in the lab using microfabricated capillary electrophoresis (CE) chips. To analyze amino acids in the field, we have developed the Mars Organic Analyzer (MOA), a portable analysis system that consists of a compact instrument and a novel multi-layer CE microchip.

  4. Symmetrical and Thermodynamic Properties of Phenotypic Graphs of Amino Acids Encoded by the Primeval RNY Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    José, Marco V.; Zamudio, Gabriel S.; Palacios-Pérez, Miryam; Bobadilla, Juan R.; de Farías, Sávio Torres

    2015-03-01

    The 12 different types of graphs of the 8 amino acids encoded by the presumably primeval RNY code are derived. The symmetry groups of these graphs are analyzed and coincide with the corresponding values of polar requirement for each amino acid. The symmetry groups at the codon level are partially carried over as a group or subgroup at the amino acid level. Measures of centrality of the 12 graphs indicate that all amino acids were equally relevant irrespective of its chronological order of its appearance. The elimination of any amino acid would be strongly selected against and therefore the genetic code at this stage was already frozen.

  5. The Genetics of Heteromeric Amino Acid Transporters

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Manuel Palacín (University of Barcelona Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology)

    2005-04-01

    Heteromeric amino acid transporters (HATs) are composed of a heavy (SLC3 family) and a light (SLC7 family) subunit. Mutations in system b0,+ (rBAT-b0,+AT) and in system y+L (4F2hc-y+LAT1) cause the primary inherited aminoacidurias (PIAs) cystinuria and lysinuric protein intolerance, respectively. Recent developments [including the identification of the first Hartnup disorder gene (B0AT1; SLC6A19)] and knockout mouse models have begun to reveal the basis of renal and intestinal reabsorption of amino acids in mammals.

  6. Determination of protein and amino acid digestibility in foods including implications of gut microbial amino acid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Malcolm

    2012-08-01

    To meet the protein and amino acid requirements of individuals and of populations requires information not only about their requirements but also about the capacity of available foods to meet those requirements. Most of our current knowledge of the digestibility of food proteins and the methods to estimate it has been derived from work with animals. Because the microbiota of the large intestine alter the amino acid composition of the digesta, and because only trivial quantities of amino acids are absorbed intact from the large intestine, the current method of choice for assessing amino acid digestibility is ileal digestibility corrected for basal endogenous losses, that is, standardized ileal digestibility. For protein as a whole, however, because nitrogen absorbed in forms other than as amino acids can contribute to the nitrogen economy, the absorption of nitrogen over the whole digestive tract is the more appropriate measure. Most of the methods developed for estimating ileal amino acid outflow in animals are not directly applicable to man: the exception is the use of volunteers with an ileostomy. The flow and composition of ileal digesta in human subjects can also be measured by the infusion of a marker and withdrawal of samples through a naso-intestinal tube. However, this method is too demanding for routine use and is likely to be restricted to validating the application to humans of digestibility data obtained either from animals, of which the pig seems most suitable, or in vitro methods. Microbial activity in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is not confined to the large intestine: the numbers and metabolic activity of the upper GI microbiota lead to substantial amounts of microbial protein leaving the ileum. It appears however that a large proportion of the amino acids used by the upper GI microbiota are preformed - from the diet or from endogenous materials - rather than from de novo synthesis. Although there are still uncertainties about the impact of microbial activity in the upper GI tract, the amino acid composition of ileal digesta provides the best available basis for estimating the proportion of dietary amino acids available for metabolism. PMID:23107534

  7. Chloride dependent amino acid transport in the human small intestine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L K Munck

    1995-01-01

    Carriers of beta amino acids and imino acids in the small intestine of rabbits and guinea pigs are chloride dependent, and a cotransport of chloride, sodium, and 2-methyl-aminoisobutyric acid has been shown. This study examines the chloride dependence of amino acid transport in the human small intestine. The steady state tissue uptake of amino acids, given as the ratio between

  8. Original article Ileal true digestibility of amino acids

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Ileal true digestibility of amino acids in wheat milling by-products for pigs (WF), 3 of wheat bran (WB) ­ were analysed and studied for their protein and amino acid ileal true the least digestible amino acids, whereas methionine was among the most digestible ones. N and all amino

  9. Food Intake Regulation: Amino Acid Toxicity and Changes in Rat Brain and Plasma Amino Acids1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. PENG; J. GUBIN; A. E. HARPER; M. G. VAVICH; A. R. KEMMERER

    Food intake and changes of brain and plasma amino acid concentrations of young rats fed diets high in individual amino acid (6% casein diet plus 5% of L-methionine, L-tryptophan, L-histidine, L-leucine, L-phenylalanine, DL-threonine, L-lysine or L-glutamic acid) were investigated. Inclusion of methionine or tryptophan in the diet produced the most severe depressions in food intake and growth, followed in decreasing

  10. Hereditary folate malabsorption: A positively charged amino acid at position 113 of the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT/SLC46A1) is required for folic acid binding

    SciTech Connect

    Lasry, Inbal; Berman, Bluma [The Fred Wyszkowski Cancer Research Laboratory, Dept. of Biology, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)] [The Fred Wyszkowski Cancer Research Laboratory, Dept. of Biology, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Glaser, Fabian [Bioinformatics Knowledge Unit, The Lorry I. Lokey Interdisciplinary Center for Life Sciences and Engineering, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel)] [Bioinformatics Knowledge Unit, The Lorry I. Lokey Interdisciplinary Center for Life Sciences and Engineering, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Jansen, Gerrit [Department of Rheumatology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Rheumatology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Assaraf, Yehuda G., E-mail: assaraf@tx.technion.ac.il [The Fred Wyszkowski Cancer Research Laboratory, Dept. of Biology, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2009-08-28

    The proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT/SLC46A1) mediates intestinal folate uptake at acidic pH. Some loss of folic acid (FA) transport mutations in PCFT from hereditary folate malabsorption (HFM) patients cluster in R113, thereby suggesting a functional role for this residue. Herein, unlike non-conservative substitutions, an R113H mutant displayed 80-fold increase in the FA transport Km while retaining parental Vmax, hence indicating a major fall in folate substrate affinity. Furthermore, consistent with the preservation of 9% of parental transport activity, R113H transfectants displayed a substantial decrease in the FA growth requirement relative to mock transfectants. Homology modeling based on the crystal structures of the Escherichia coli transporter homologues EmrD and glycerol-3-phosphate transporter revealed that the R113H rotamer properly protrudes into the cytoplasmic face of the minor cleft normally occupied by R113. These findings constitute the first demonstration that a basic amino acid at position 113 is required for folate substrate binding.

  11. D-Amino Acids in Living Higher Organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Noriko

    2002-04-01

    The homochirality of biological amino acids (L-amino acids) and of the RNA/DNA backbone (D-ribose) might have become established before the origin of life. It has been considered that D-amino acids and L-sugars were eliminated on the primitive Earth. Therefore, the presence and function of D-amino acids in living organisms have not been studied except for D-amino acids in the cell walls of microorganisms. However, D-amino acids were recently found in various living higher organisms in the form of free amino acids, peptides, and proteins. Free D-aspartate and D-serine are present and may have important physiological functions in mammals. D-amino acids in peptides are well known as opioid peptides and neuropeptides. In protein, D-aspartate residues increase during aging. This review deals with recent advances in the study of D-amino acids in higher organisms.

  12. Quantitation of fourteen urinary alpha-amino acids using isobutane gas chromatography chemical ionization mass spectrometry with 13C amino acids as internal standards.

    PubMed

    Finlayson, P J; Christopher, R K; Duffield, A M

    1980-10-01

    Isobutane chemical ionization gas chromatography mass spectometry of the N-trifluoroacetyl-carboxy-n-butyl ester derivatives of amino acids, using a commercial per-13C-amino acid mixture as internal standards, provided a sensitive and specific method for quantitative analysis of fourteen urinary alpha-amino acids. A computer controlled quadrupole mass spectrometer was used in a selected ion monitoring mode to record the ion current due to the protonated molecular ions of each alpha-amino acid/13C analogue pair. BASIC programmes located peak maxima, and using previously established standard curves, calculated the amino acid content on the bases of both peak height and peak area ratios. Duplicate amino acid analyses are possible on 5 microliter of urine. Instrumental analysis required 25 minutes, automated data processing 10 minutes, and sample preparation 2 hours. Detection limits approached 1 ng with a typical mean standard deviation of 2% for the instrumental analysis. PMID:6452181

  13. Polymerization of amino acids containing nucleotide bases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ben Cheikh, Azzouz; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1990-01-01

    The nucleoamino acids 1-(3'-amino,3'-carboxypropyl)uracil (3) and 9-(3'-amino,3'-carboxypropyl)adenine (4) have been prepared as (L)-en-antiomers and as racemic mixtures. When 3 or 4 is suspended in water and treated with N,N'-carbon-yldiimidazole, peptides are formed in good yield. The products formed from the (L)-enantiomers are hydrolyzed to the monomeric amino acids by pronase. Attempts to improve the efficiency of these oligomerizations by including a polyuridylate template in the reaction mixture were not successful. Similarly, oligomers derived from the (L)-enantiomer of 3 did not act as templates to facilitate the oligomerization of 4.

  14. Molecular Evolution of Plant AAP and LHT Amino Acid Transporters.

    PubMed

    Tegeder, Mechthild; Ward, John M

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen is an essential mineral nutrient and it is often transported within living organisms in its reduced form, as amino acids. Transport of amino acids across cellular membranes requires proteins, and here we report the phylogenetic analysis across taxa of two amino acid transporter families, the amino acid permeases (AAPs) and the lysine-histidine-like transporters (LHTs). We found that the two transporter families form two distinct groups in plants supporting the concept that both are essential. AAP transporters seem to be restricted to land plants. They were found in Selaginella moellendorffii and Physcomitrella patens but not in Chlorophyte, Charophyte, or Rhodophyte algae. AAPs were strongly represented in vascular plants, consistent with their major function in phloem (vascular tissue) loading of amino acids for sink nitrogen supply. LHTs on the other hand appeared prior to land plants. LHTs were not found in chlorophyte algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carterii. However, the characean alga Klebsormidium flaccidum encodes KfLHT13 and phylogenetic analysis indicates that it is basal to land plant LHTs. This is consistent with the hypothesis that characean algae are ancestral to land plants. LHTs were also found in both S. moellendorffii and P. patens as well as in monocots and eudicots. To date, AAPs and LHTs have mainly been characterized in Arabidopsis (eudicots) and these studies provide clues to the functions of the newly identified homologs. PMID:22645574

  15. Molecular Evolution of Plant AAP and LHT Amino Acid Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Tegeder, Mechthild; Ward, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen is an essential mineral nutrient and it is often transported within living organisms in its reduced form, as amino acids. Transport of amino acids across cellular membranes requires proteins, and here we report the phylogenetic analysis across taxa of two amino acid transporter families, the amino acid permeases (AAPs) and the lysine–histidine-like transporters (LHTs). We found that the two transporter families form two distinct groups in plants supporting the concept that both are essential. AAP transporters seem to be restricted to land plants. They were found in Selaginella moellendorffii and Physcomitrella patens but not in Chlorophyte, Charophyte, or Rhodophyte algae. AAPs were strongly represented in vascular plants, consistent with their major function in phloem (vascular tissue) loading of amino acids for sink nitrogen supply. LHTs on the other hand appeared prior to land plants. LHTs were not found in chlorophyte algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carterii. However, the characean alga Klebsormidium flaccidum encodes KfLHT13 and phylogenetic analysis indicates that it is basal to land plant LHTs. This is consistent with the hypothesis that characean algae are ancestral to land plants. LHTs were also found in both S. moellendorffii and P. patens as well as in monocots and eudicots. To date, AAPs and LHTs have mainly been characterized in Arabidopsis (eudicots) and these studies provide clues to the functions of the newly identified homologs. PMID:22645574

  16. Amino acid metabolism of Lemna minor L

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, D.; Rich, P.J.; Brunk, D.G. (Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (USA))

    1989-04-01

    A serious limitation to the use of N(O,S)-heptafluorobutyryl isobutyl amino acid derivatives in the analysis of {sup 15}N-labeling kinetics of amino acids in plant tissues, is that the amides glutamine and asparagine undergo acid hydrolysis to glutamate and aspartate, respectively, during derivatization. This led us to consider an alternative procedure for derivatization of glutamine and asparagine with N-methyl-N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-trifluoroacetamide in pyridine. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry yielded fragment ions (M-57) of mass 417 and 431 for the ({sup 14}N)asparagine and ({sup 14}N)glutamine derivatives, respectively, suitable for monitoring unlabeled, single-{sup 15}N- and double-{sup 15}N-labeled amide species from the ion clusters at mass to charge ratio (m/z) 415 to 423 for asparagine, and m/z 429 to 437 for glutamine. From separate analyses of the specific isotope abundance of the amino-N groups of asparagine and glutamine as their N-heptafluorobutyryl isobutyl derivatives, the specific amide-({sup 15}N) abundance of these amino acids was determined.

  17. Molecular biology of mammalian amino acid

    Microsoft Academic Search

    RAYMOND DINGLEDINE; SCOTT J. MYERS; ROBERT A. NICHOLAS

    The amino acid receptor proteins are ubiquitous trans- ducers of most excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission in the brain. In July 1987 two reports ap- peared describing the molecular cloning of a pair of subunits of the GABAA receptor (7) and one subunit of the glycine receptor (13). These papers sparked wide interest and led quickly to the concept of

  18. Amino acid substitution matrices from protein blocks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven Henikoff; Jorja G. Henikoff

    1992-01-01

    Methods for alignment of protein sequences typically measure similarity by using a substitution matrix with scores for all possible exchanges of one amino acid with another. The most widely used matrices are based on the Dayhoff model of evolutionary rates. Using a different approach, we have derived substitution matrices from about 2000 blocks of aligned sequence segments characterizing more than

  19. Amino acid modifications on tRNA

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jing; Sheppard, Kelly; Söll, Dieter

    2008-01-01

    The accurate formation of cognate aminoacyl-tRNAs (aa-tRNAs) is essential for the fidelity of translation. Most amino acids are esterified onto their cognate tRNA isoacceptors directly by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs). However, in the case of four amino acids (Gln, Asn, Cys and Sec), aminoacyl-tRNAs are made through indirect pathways in many organisms across all three domains of life. The process begins with the charging of noncognate amino acids to tRNAs by a specialized synthetase in the case of Cys-tRNACys formation or by synthetases with relaxed specificity such as the non-discriminating glutamyl-tRNA synthetase (ND-GluRS), non-discriminating aspartyl-tRNA synthetase (ND-AspRS) and seryl-tRNA synthetase (SerRS). The resulting misacylated tRNAs are then converted to cognate pairs through transformation of the amino acids on the tRNA, which is catalyzed by a group of tRNA-dependent modifying enzymes such as tRNA-dependent amidotransferases, Sep-tRNA:Cys-tRNA synthase (SepCysS), O-phosphoseryl-tRNA kinase (PSTK) and Sep-tRNA:Sec-tRNA synthase (SepSecS). The majority of these indirect pathways are widely spread in all domains of life and thought to be ancient in the course of evolution. PMID:18604446

  20. Optimization of short amino acid sequences classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcz, Aleksy; Szyma?ski, Zbigniew

    This article describes processing methods used for short amino acid sequences classification. The data processed are 9-symbols string representations of amino acid sequences, divided into 49 data sets - each one containing samples labeled as reacting or not with given enzyme. The goal of the classification is to determine for a single enzyme, whether an amino acid sequence would react with it or not. Each data set is processed separately. Feature selection is performed to reduce the number of dimensions for each data set. The method used for feature selection consists of two phases. During the first phase, significant positions are selected using Classification and Regression Trees. Afterwards, symbols appearing at the selected positions are substituted with numeric values of amino acid properties taken from the AAindex database. In the second phase the new set of features is reduced using a correlation-based ranking formula and Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization. Finally, the preprocessed data is used for training LS-SVM classifiers. SPDE, an evolutionary algorithm, is used to obtain optimal hyperparameters for the LS-SVM classifier, such as error penalty parameter C and kernel-specific hyperparameters. A simple score penalty is used to adapt the SPDE algorithm to the task of selecting classifiers with best performance measures values.

  1. Manganese alters rat brain amino acids levels

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Dinamene; Batoreu, M. Camila; Almeida, Isabel; Ramos, Ruben; Sidoryk-Wegrzynowicz, M.; Aschner, Michael; Marreilha dos Santos, A.P.

    2012-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential element and it acts as a cofactor for a number of enzymatic reactions, including those involved in amino acid, lipid, protein and carbohydrate metabolism. Excessive exposure to Mn can lead to poisoning, characterized by psychiatric disturbances and an extrapyramidal disorder. Mn-induced neuronal degeneration is associated with alterations in amino acids metabolism. In the present study, we analyzed whole rat brain amino acid content subsequent to 4 or 8 intraperitoneal (ip) injections, with 25 mg MnCl2/kg/day, at 48-hour (h) intervals. We noted a significant increase in glycine brain levels after 4 or 8 Mn injections (p<0.05 and p<0.01, respectively) and arginine also after 4 or 8 injections (p<0.001). Significant increases were also noted in brain proline (p<0.01), cysteine (p<0.05), phenylalanine (p<0.01) and tyrosine (p<0.01) levels after 8 Mn injections vs. the control group. These findings suggest that Mn-induced alterations in amino acid levels secondary to Mn affect the neurochemical milieu. PMID:22971893

  2. Amino acid profile in Down's syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Heggarty, H J; Ball, R; Smith, M; Henderson, M J

    1996-01-01

    Fasting plasma and urinary amino acid concentrations were studied under carefully controlled conditions in 22 children with Down's syndrome and in age matched controls. The only significant difference between the groups was a higher mean plasma lysine concentration in Down's syndrome patients compared to controls. PMID:8669939

  3. Amino Acids in the Antarctic Martian Meteorite MIL03346

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Aubrey, A.; Dworkin, J. P.; Botta, O.; Bada, J. L.

    2005-01-01

    The report by McKay et al. that the Martian meteorite ALH84001 contains evidence for life on Mars remains controversial. Of central importance is whether ALH84001 and other Antarctic Martian meteorites contain endogenous organic compounds. In any investigation of organic compounds possibly derived from Mars it is important to focus on compounds that play an essential role in biochemistry as we know it and that have properties such as chirality which can be used to distinguish between biotic versus abiotic origins. Amino acids are one of the few compounds that fulfill these requirements. Previous analyses of the Antarctic Martian meteorites ALH84001 and EETA79001 have shown that these meteorites contain low levels of terrestrial amino acid contamination derived from Antarctic ice meltwater. Here we report preliminary amino acid investigations of a third Antarctic Martian meteorite MIL03346 which was discovered in Antarctica during the 2003-04 ANSMET season. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract

  4. Evolution from amino acids - Lunar occurrence of their precursors.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.

    1972-01-01

    Review of the present state of experimentally based concepts of organic evolution from amino acids. Earlier studies of the synthesis of amino acid precursors from meteoritic material, lunar dust, and terrestrial lava are briefly summarized, and laboratory experiments in which polymers of amino acids were obtained either by direct heating of dry amino acids or by heating aqueous solutions of mixtures of amino acids are described. In particular, a process is described by which alpha-amino acids were made to react to form linear chains of proteinoids. It is concluded that a proteinoid microsystem was a common ancestor of all life on earth.

  5. FREE AMINO ACID CONTENT OF EWE UTERINE FLUID

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    FREE AMINO ACID CONTENT OF EWE UTERINE FLUID UNDER VARIOUS HORMONAL TREATMENTS DURING EARLY Recherches zootechniques, I. N. R. A., i'8350 Jouy en Josas SUMMARY Free amino acids are dosed in ewe uterine secretions are very rich in free amino acids, especially glutamic acid + glutamine and glycine. However

  6. Hybrid Crystals of Calcium Carbonate and Amino Acids

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ayako Kai; Toshikatsu Miki

    2000-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of amino acids on the crystallization of calcium carbonate (CaCO3), and the reactivity between amino acids and CaCO3. Noncharged-polar and acidic amino acids are highly incorporated into CaCO3 and stabilize cauliflower-like grains composed of vaterite which is thermodynamically unstable in the CaCO3 polymorphs. Amino acids in the hybrid CaCO3 form radicals different from those in

  7. Synthesis of a conformationally constrained ?-amino acid building block.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Elaine; Pes, Lara; Ortin, Yannick; Müller-Bunz, Helge; Paradisi, Francesca

    2013-02-01

    Conformationally restricted amino acids are important components in peptidomimetics and drug design. Herein, we describe the synthesis of a novel, non-proteinogenic constrained delta amino acid containing a cyclobutane ring, cis-3(aminomethyl)cyclobutane carboxylic acid (ACCA). The synthesis of the target amino acid was achieved in seven steps, with the key reaction being a base induced intramolecular nucleophilic substitution. A small library of dipeptides was prepared through the coupling of ACCA with proteinogenic amino acids. PMID:22851051

  8. Pre-and post-calving plasma-free amino acids in high-yielding dairy cows

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Pre- and post-calving plasma-free amino acids in high-yielding dairy cows G Piva, F Masoero, L, Italy Glutamine, glutamic acid, methionine, and phenyl- alanine are thought to be limiting amino acids in early lactating animals. A possible approach to estimate the amino-acid requirements of the very high

  9. Chemical Properties of Amino Acids and Identification of Unknown Amino Acids

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Karen Sprague (University of Oregon; )

    1996-01-01

    This resource describes two related laboratory exercises on the chemical properties and identification of amino acids (the building blocks of proteins). Detailed pre-lab assignments and guidelines for students' laboratory reports are provided.

  10. Identification of conserved amino acids in the herpes simplex virus type 1 UL8 protein required for DNA synthesis and UL52 primase interaction in the virus replisome.

    PubMed

    Muylaert, Isabella; Zhao, Zhiyuan; Andersson, Torbjörn; Elias, Per

    2012-09-28

    We have used oriS-dependent transient replication assays to search for species-specific interactions within the herpes simplex virus replisome. Hybrid replisomes derived from herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) failed to support DNA replication in cells. Moreover, the replisomes showed a preference for their cognate origin of replication. The results demonstrate that the herpesvirus replisome behaves as a molecular machine relying on functionally important interactions. We then searched for functional interactions in the replisome context by subjecting HSV-1 UL8 protein to extensive mutagenesis. 52 mutants were made by replacing single or clustered charged amino acids with alanines. Four mutants showed severe replication defects. Mutant A23 exhibited a lethal phenotype, and mutants A49, A52 and A53 had temperature-sensitive phenotypes. Mutants A49 and A53 did not interact with UL52 primase as determined by co-immunoprecipitation experiments. Using GFP-tagged UL8, we demonstrate that all mutants were unable to support formation of ICP8-containing nuclear replication foci. Extended mutagenesis suggested that a highly conserved motif corresponding to mutant A49 serves an important role for establishing a physical contact between UL8 and UL52. The replication-defective mutations affected conserved amino acids, and similar phenotypes were observed when the corresponding mutations were introduced into EHV-1 UL8. PMID:22851167

  11. Identification of Conserved Amino Acids in the Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 UL8 Protein Required for DNA Synthesis and UL52 Primase Interaction in the Virus Replisome*

    PubMed Central

    Muylaert, Isabella; Zhao, Zhiyuan; Andersson, Torbjörn; Elias, Per

    2012-01-01

    We have used oriS-dependent transient replication assays to search for species-specific interactions within the herpes simplex virus replisome. Hybrid replisomes derived from herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) failed to support DNA replication in cells. Moreover, the replisomes showed a preference for their cognate origin of replication. The results demonstrate that the herpesvirus replisome behaves as a molecular machine relying on functionally important interactions. We then searched for functional interactions in the replisome context by subjecting HSV-1 UL8 protein to extensive mutagenesis. 52 mutants were made by replacing single or clustered charged amino acids with alanines. Four mutants showed severe replication defects. Mutant A23 exhibited a lethal phenotype, and mutants A49, A52 and A53 had temperature-sensitive phenotypes. Mutants A49 and A53 did not interact with UL52 primase as determined by co-immunoprecipitation experiments. Using GFP-tagged UL8, we demonstrate that all mutants were unable to support formation of ICP8-containing nuclear replication foci. Extended mutagenesis suggested that a highly conserved motif corresponding to mutant A49 serves an important role for establishing a physical contact between UL8 and UL52. The replication-defective mutations affected conserved amino acids, and similar phenotypes were observed when the corresponding mutations were introduced into EHV-1 UL8. PMID:22851167

  12. Permeability of membranes to amino acids and modified amino acids: mechanisms involved in translocation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarti, A. C.; Deamer, D. W. (Principal Investigator); Miller, S. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    The amino acid permeability of membranes is of interest because they are one of the key solutes involved in cell function. Membrane permeability coefficients (P) for amino acid classes, including neutral, polar, hydrophobic, and charged species, have been measured and compared using a variety of techniques. Decreasing lipid chain length increased permeability slightly (5-fold), while variations in pH had only minor effects on the permeability coefficients of the amino acids tested in liposomes. Increasing the membrane surface charge increased the permeability of amino acids of the opposite charge, while increasing the cholesterol content decreased membrane permeability. The permeability coefficients for most amino acids tested were surprisingly similar to those previously measured for monovalent cations such as sodium and potassium (approximately 10(-12)-10(-13) cm s-1). This observation suggests that the permeation rates for the neutral, polar and charged amino acids are controlled by bilayer fluctuations and transient defects, rather than partition coefficients and Born energy barriers. Hydrophobic amino acids were 10(2) more permeable than the hydrophilic forms, reflecting their increased partition coefficient values. External pH had dramatic effects on the permeation rates for the modified amino acid lysine methyl ester in response to transmembrane pH gradients. It was established that lysine methyl ester and other modified short peptides permeate rapidly (P = 10(-2) cm s-1) as neutral (deprotonated) molecules. It was also shown that charge distributions dramatically alter permeation rates for modified di-peptides. These results may relate to the movement of peptides through membranes during protein translocation and to the origin of cellular membrane transport on the early Earth.

  13. Plant amino acid-derived vitamins: biosynthesis and function.

    PubMed

    Miret, Javier A; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2014-04-01

    Vitamins are essential organic compounds for humans, having lost the ability to de novo synthesize them. Hence, they represent dietary requirements, which are covered by plants as the main dietary source of most vitamins (through food or livestock's feed). Most vitamins synthesized by plants present amino acids as precursors (B1, B2, B3, B5, B7, B9 and E) and are therefore linked to plant nitrogen metabolism. Amino acids play different roles in their biosynthesis and metabolism, either incorporated into the backbone of the vitamin or as amino, sulfur or one-carbon group donors. There is a high natural variation in vitamin contents in crops and its exploitation through breeding, metabolic engineering and agronomic practices can enhance their nutritional quality. While the underlying biochemical roles of vitamins as cosubstrates or cofactors are usually common for most eukaryotes, the impact of vitamins B and E in metabolism and physiology can be quite different on plants and animals. Here, we first aim at giving an overview of the biosynthesis of amino acid-derived vitamins in plants, with a particular focus on how this knowledge can be exploited to increase vitamin contents in crops. Second, we will focus on the functions of these vitamins in both plants and animals (and humans in particular), to unravel common and specific roles for vitamins in evolutionary distant organisms, in which these amino acid-derived vitamins play, however, an essential role. PMID:24368523

  14. How Do Haloarchaea Synthesize Aromatic Amino Acids?

    PubMed Central

    Gulko, Miriam Kolog; Dyall-Smith, Mike; Gonzalez, Orland; Oesterhelt, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Genomic analysis of H. salinarum indicated that the de novo pathway for aromatic amino acid (AroAA) biosynthesis does not follow the classical pathway but begins from non-classical precursors, as is the case for M. jannaschii. The first two steps in the pathway were predicted to be carried out by genes OE1472F and OE1475F, while the 3rd step follows the canonical pathway involving gene OE1477R. The functions of these genes and their products were tested by biochemical and genetic methods. In this study, we provide evidence that supports the role of proteins OE1472F and OE1475F catalyzing consecutive enzymatic reactions leading to the production of 3-dehydroquinate (DHQ), after which AroAA production proceeds via the canonical pathway starting with the formation of DHS (dehydroshikimate), catalyzed by the product of ORF OE1477R. Nutritional requirements and AroAA uptake studies of the mutants gave results that were consistent with the proposed roles of these ORFs in AroAA biosynthesis. DNA microarray data indicated that the 13 genes of the canonical pathway appear to be utilised for AroAA biosynthesis in H. salinarum, as they are differentially expressed when cells are grown in medium lacking AroAA. PMID:25216252

  15. Amino acids of the Murchison meteorite. I - Six carbon acyclic primary alpha-amino alkanoic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronin, J. R.; Gandy, W. E.; Pizzarello, S.

    1981-01-01

    Six of the seven chain isomers of six-carbon acyclic primary alpha-amino alkanoic acids (leucine isomers) have been either identified or confirmed in hot-water extracts of the Murchison meteorite using combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and ion exchange chromatography. 2-Amino-2-ethylbutyric acid, 2-amino-2,3-dimethylbutyric acid, pseudoleucine, and 2-methylnorvaline were positively identified by GC-MS. These amino acids have not been previously reported to occur in natural materials and may be uniquely meteoritic in origin. The presence of leucine and isoleucine (including the diastereoisomer, alloisoleucine) was confirmed. Peaks corresponding to norleucine were seen by ion-exchange and gas chromatography but characteristic mass spectra were not obtained. The alpha-branched chain isomers in this series are quantitatively the most significant. These results are compared with literature data on amino acid synthesis by electrical discharge and Fischer-Tropsch-type catalysis. Neither model system produces an amino acid suite that is completely comparable to that found in the Murchison meteorite.

  16. Alterations of amino Acid level in depressed rat brain.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pei; Li, Xuechun; Ni, Jian; Tian, Jingchen; Jing, Fu; Qu, Changhai; Lin, Longfei; Zhang, Hui

    2014-10-01

    Amino-acid neurotransmitter system dysfunction plays a major role in the pathophysiology of depression. Several studies have demonstrated the potential of amino acids as a source of neuro-specific biomarkers could be used in future diagnosis of depression. Only partial amino acids such as glycine and asparagine were determined from certain parts of rats' brain included hippocampi and cerebral cortex in previous studies. However, according to systematic biology, amino acids in different area of brain are interacted and interrelated. Hence, the determination of 34 amino acids through entire rats' brain was conducted in this study in order to demonstrate more possibilities for biomarkers of depression by discovering other potential amino acids in more areas of rats' brain. As a result, 4 amino acids (L-aspartic acid, L-glutamine, taurine and ?-amino-n-butyric acid) among 34 were typically identified as potentially primary biomarkers of depression by data statistics. Meanwhile, an antidepressant called Fluoxetine was employed to verify other potential amino acids which were not identified by data statistics. Eventually, we found L-?-amino-adipic acid could also become a new potentially secondary biomarker of depression after drug validation. In conclusion, we suggested that L-aspartic acid, L-glutamine, taurine, ?-amino-n-butyric acid and L-?-amino-adipic acid might become potential biomarkers for future diagnosis of depression and development of antidepressant. PMID:25352755

  17. Alterations of Amino Acid Level in Depressed Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Pei; Li, Xuechun; Tian, Jingchen; Jing, Fu; Qu, Changhai; Lin, Longfei; Zhang, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Amino-acid neurotransmitter system dysfunction plays a major role in the pathophysiology of depression. Several studies have demonstrated the potential of amino acids as a source of neuro-specific biomarkers could be used in future diagnosis of depression. Only partial amino acids such as glycine and asparagine were determined from certain parts of rats' brain included hippocampi and cerebral cortex in previous studies. However, according to systematic biology, amino acids in different area of brain are interacted and interrelated. Hence, the determination of 34 amino acids through entire rats' brain was conducted in this study in order to demonstrate more possibilities for biomarkers of depression by discovering other potential amino acids in more areas of rats' brain. As a result, 4 amino acids (L-aspartic acid, L-glutamine, taurine and ?-amino-n-butyric acid) among 34 were typically identified as potentially primary biomarkers of depression by data statistics. Meanwhile, an antidepressant called Fluoxetine was employed to verify other potential amino acids which were not identified by data statistics. Eventually, we found L-?-amino-adipic acid could also become a new potentially secondary biomarker of depression after drug validation. In conclusion, we suggested that L-aspartic acid, L-glutamine, taurine, ?-amino-n-butyric acid and L-?-amino-adipic acid might become potential biomarkers for future diagnosis of depression and development of antidepressant. PMID:25352755

  18. Peptidases and amino acid catabolism in lactic acid bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeffrey E. Christensen; Edward G. Dudley; Jeffrey A. Pederson; James L. Steele

    1999-01-01

    The conversion of peptides to free amino acids and their subsequent utilization is a central metabolic activity in prokaryotes. At least 16 peptidases from lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been characterized biochemically and\\/or genetically. Among LAB, the peptidase systems of Lactobacillus helveticus and Lactococcus lactis have been examined in greatest detail. While there are homologous enzymes common to both systems,

  19. Fatty acid-amino acid conjugates diversification in Lepidopteran caterpillars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fatty acid amino acid conjugates (FACs) have been found in Noctuid as well as Sphingid caterpillar oral secretions and especially volicitin [N-(17-hydroxylinolenoyl)-L-Glutamine] and its biochemical precursor, N-linolenoyl-L-glutamine, are known elicitors of induced volatile emissions in corn plants...

  20. Amino acid analyses of R and CK chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Aaron S.; McLain, Hannah; Glavin, Daniel P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Davidson, Jemma; Miller, Kelly E.; Andronikov, Alexander V.; Lauretta, Dante; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2015-03-01

    Exogenous delivery of amino acids and other organic molecules to planetary surfaces may have played an important role in the origins of life on Earth and other solar system bodies. Previous studies have revealed the presence of indigenous amino acids in a wide range of carbon-rich meteorites, with the abundances and structural distributions differing significantly depending on parent body mineralogy and alteration conditions. Here we report on the amino acid abundances of seven type 3-6 CK chondrites and two Rumuruti (R) chondrites. Amino acid measurements were made on hot water extracts from these meteorites by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Of the nine meteorites analyzed, four were depleted in amino acids, and one had experienced significant amino acid contamination by terrestrial biology. The remaining four, comprised of two R and two CK chondrites, contained low levels of amino acids that were predominantly the straight chain, amino-terminal (n-?-amino) acids ?-alanine, and ?-amino-n-butyric acid. This amino acid distribution is similar to what we reported previously for thermally altered ureilites and CV and CO chondrites, and these n-?-amino acids appear to be indigenous to the meteorites and not the result of terrestrial contamination. The amino acids may have been formed by Fischer-Tropsch-type reactions, although this hypothesis needs further testing.

  1. Allied Health Chemistry Laboratory: Amino Acids, Insulin, Proteins, and Skin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dever, David F.

    1975-01-01

    Presents a laboratory experiment specifically designed for allied health students. The students construct molecular models of amino acids, extract amino acids from their skin with hot water, and chromatographically analyze the skin extract and hydrolyzed insulin. (MLH)

  2. Single amino acid supplementation in aminoacidopathies: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Aminoacidopathies are a group of rare and diverse disorders, caused by the deficiency of an enzyme or transporter involved in amino acid metabolism. For most aminoacidopathies, dietary management is the mainstay of treatment. Such treatment includes severe natural protein restriction, combined with protein substitution with all amino acids except the amino acids prior to the metabolic block and enriched with the amino acid that has become essential by the enzymatic defect. For some aminoacidopathies, supplementation of one or two amino acids, that have not become essential by the enzymatic defect, has been suggested. This so-called single amino acid supplementation can serve different treatment objectives, but evidence is limited. The aim of the present article is to provide a systematic review on the reasons for applications of single amino acid supplementation in aminoacidopathies treated with natural protein restriction and synthetic amino acid mixtures. PMID:24422943

  3. Seleno-amino acid found in Astragalus bisulcatus.

    PubMed

    TRELEASE, S F; DI SOMMA, A A; JACOBS, A L

    1960-09-01

    Ion-exchange and filter-paper columns were used in a separation of amino acids from an extract of Astragalus bisulcatus. Two amino acids were identified, S-methylcysteine and Se-methylselenocysteine. PMID:13839255

  4. Comparative nutrition and metabolism: Explication of open questions with emphasis on protein and amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Baker, David H.

    2005-01-01

    The 20th century saw numerous important discoveries in the nutritional sciences. Nonetheless, many unresolved questions still remain. Fifteen questions dealing with amino acid nutrition and metabolism are posed in this review. The first six deal with the functionality of sulfur amino acids (methionine and cysteine) and related compounds. Other unresolved problems that are discussed include priorities of use for amino acids having multiple functions; interactions among lysine, niacin and tryptophan; amino acid contributions to requirements from gut biosynthesis; the potential for gluconeogenesis to divert amino acids away from protein synthesis; the unique nutritional and metabolic idiosyncrasies of feline species, with emphasis on arginine; controversies surrounding human amino acid requirements; and the potential for maternal diet to influence sex ratio of offspring. PMID:16326801

  5. The free amino acid content of ovine cervicovaginal mucus

    E-print Network

    Woodward, Thomas Lee

    1969-01-01

    Major Subject; Physiology of Reproduction THE FREE AMINO ACID CONTENT OF OVINE CERVICOVAGINAL MUCUS A Thesis THOMAS LEE WOODWARD Approved as to style and content by: ad of Department) (Member) August, 1969 ABSTRACT The Free Amino Acid Content... (83. 3%) but the difference was not significant. Cervicovaginal mucus collected at estrus from 19 con. trol and 36 synchronized ewes was anal. yzed for free amino acid content. Fifteen free amino acids were identified and quantitated. The mucus...

  6. A Search for Extraterrestrial Amino Acids in Carbonaceous Antarctic Micrometeorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinton, Karen L. F.; Engrand, Cécile; Glavin, Daniel P.; Bada, Jeffrey L.; Maurette, Michel

    1998-10-01

    Antarctic micrometeorites (AMMs) in the 100-400 ?m size range are the dominant mass fraction of extraterrestrial material accreted by the Earth today. A high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) based technique exploited at the limits of sensitivity has been used to search for the extraterrestrial amino acids ?-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) and isovaline in AMMs. Five samples, each containing about 30 to 35 grains, were analyzed. All the samples possess a terrestrial amino acid component, indicated by the excess of the L-enantiomers of common protein amino acids. In only one sample (A91) was AIB found to be present at a level significantly above the background blanks. The concentration of AIB (~280 ppm), and the AIB/isovaline ratio (>=10), in this sample are both much higher than in CM chondrites. The apparently large variation in the AIB concentrations of the samples suggests that AIB may be concentrated in rare subset of micrometeorites. Because the AIB/isovaline ratio in sample A91 is much larger than in CM chondrites, the synthesis of amino acids in the micrometeorite parent bodies might have involved a different process requiring an HCN-rich environment, such as that found in comets. If the present day characteristics of the meteorite and micrometeorite fluxes can be extrapolated back in time, then the flux of large carbonaceous micrometeorites could have contributed to the inventory of prebiotic molecules on the early Earth.

  7. A search for extraterrestrial amino acids in carbonaceous Antarctic micrometeorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinton, K. L.; Engrand, C.; Glavin, D. P.; Bada, J. L.; Maurette, M.

    1998-01-01

    Antarctic micrometeorites (AMMs) in the 100-400 microns size range are the dominant mass fraction of extraterrestrial material accreted by the Earth today. A high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) based technique exploited at the limits of sensitivity has been used to search for the extraterrestrial amino acids alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) and isovaline in AMMs. Five samples, each containing about 30 to 35 grains, were analyzed. All the samples possess a terrestrial amino acid component, indicated by the excess of the L-enantiomers of common protein amino acids. In only one sample (A91) was AIB found to be present at a level significantly above the background blanks. The concentration of AIB (approximately 280 ppm), and the AIB/isovaline ratio (> or = 10), in this sample are both much higher than in CM chondrites. The apparently large variation in the AIB concentrations of the samples suggests that AIB may be concentrated in rare subset of micrometeorites. Because the AIB/isovaline ratio in sample A91 is much larger than in CM chondrites, the synthesis of amino acids in the micrometeorite parent bodies might have involved a different process requiring an HCN-rich environment, such as that found in comets. If the present day characteristics of the meteorite and micrometeorite fluxes can be extrapolated back in time, then the flux of large carbonaceous micrometeorites could have contributed to the inventory of prebiotic molecules on the early Earth.

  8. Amino Acids as Metabolic Substrates during Cardiac Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Kenneth J.; Sidorov, Veniamin Y.; McGuinness, Owen P.; Wasserman, David H.; Wikswo, John P.

    2013-01-01

    The heart is well known as a metabolic omnivore in that it is capable of consuming fatty acids, glucose, ketone bodies, pyruvate, lactate, amino acids and even its own constituent proteins, in order of decreasing preference. The energy from these substrates supports not only mechanical contraction, but also the various transmembrane pumps and transporters required for ionic homeostasis, electrical activity, metabolism and catabolism. Cardiac ischemia – for example, due to compromise of the coronary vasculature or end-stage heart failure – will alter both electrical and metabolic activity. While the effects of myocardial ischemia on electrical propagation and stability have been studied in depth, the effects of ischemia on metabolic substrate preference has not been fully appreciated: oxygen deprivation during ischemia will significantly alter the relative ability of the heart to utilize each of these substrates. Although changes in cardiac metabolism are understood to be an underlying component in almost all cardiac myopathies, the potential contribution of amino acids in maintaining cardiac electrical conductance and stability during ischemia is underappreciated. Despite clear evidence that amino acids exert cardioprotective effects in ischemia and other cardiac disorders, their role in the metabolism of the ischemic heart has yet to be fully elucidated. This review synthesizes the current literature of the metabolic contribution of amino acids during ischemia by analyzing relevant historical and recent research. PMID:23354395

  9. Amino acids as metabolic substrates during cardiac ischemia.

    PubMed

    Drake, Kenneth J; Sidorov, Veniamin Y; McGuinness, Owen P; Wasserman, David H; Wikswo, John P

    2012-12-01

    The heart is well known as a metabolic omnivore in that it is capable of consuming fatty acids, glucose, ketone bodies, pyruvate, lactate, amino acids and even its own constituent proteins, in order of decreasing preference. The energy from these substrates supports not only mechanical contraction, but also the various transmembrane pumps and transporters required for ionic homeostasis, electrical activity, metabolism and catabolism. Cardiac ischemia - for example, due to compromise of the coronary vasculature or end-stage heart failure - will alter both electrical and metabolic activity. While the effects of myocardial ischemia on electrical propagation and stability have been studied in depth, the effects of ischemia on metabolic substrate preference has not been fully appreciated: oxygen deprivation during ischemia will significantly alter the relative ability of the heart to utilize each of these substrates. Although changes in cardiac metabolism are understood to be an underlying component in almost all cardiac myopathies, the potential contribution of amino acids in maintaining cardiac electrical conductance and stability during ischemia is underappreciated. Despite clear evidence that amino acids exert cardioprotective effects in ischemia and other cardiac disorders, their role in the metabolism of the ischemic heart has yet to be fully elucidated. This review synthesizes the current literature of the metabolic contribution of amino acids during ischemia by analyzing relevant historical and recent research. PMID:23354395

  10. Expanded Cellular Amino Acid Pools Containing Phosphoserine, Phosphothreonine, and Phosphotyrosine

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Adding nonstandard amino acids to the genetic code of E. coli expands the chemical and biological functional space for proteins. This is accomplished with engineered, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase and tRNA pairs that require a nonstandard amino acid in sufficient intracellular quantities to support protein synthesis. While cotranslational insertion of phosphoserine into proteins has been accomplished, conditions that modulate intracellular phosphoamino acid concentrations are still poorly understood. Here we used genetic and metabolic engineering to increase the free intracellular levels of phosphoserine in E. coli. We show that deletion of the phosphoserine phosphatase serB elevates the intracellular levels of phosphoserine within ranges comparable to those of standard amino acids. These new conditions improved insertion of phosphoserine into recombinant proteins. Surprisingly, we also observed dramatic increases in intracellular levels of phosphothreonine and phosphotyrosine when WT cells were grown in LB with supplemented phosphothreonine and serB deficient cells were grown in low phosphate media with supplemented phosphotyrosine, respectively. These findings remove a major barrier for further expansion of the genetic code with additional phosphorylated amino acids. PMID:24646179

  11. Amino acids: metabolism, functions, and nutrition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Guoyao Wu

    2009-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed the discovery that amino acids (AA) are not only cell signaling molecules but are also regulators\\u000a of gene expression and the protein phosphorylation cascade. Additionally, AA are key precursors for syntheses of hormones\\u000a and low-molecular weight nitrogenous substances with each having enormous biological importance. Physiological concentrations\\u000a of AA and their metabolites (e.g., nitric oxide, polyamines, glutathione,

  12. Alimentary proteins, amino acids and cholesterolemia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    François Blachier; Antonio H. Lancha; Claire Boutry; Daniel Tomé

    2010-01-01

    Numerous data from both epidemiological and experimental origins indicate that some alimentary proteins and amino acids in\\u000a supplements can modify the blood LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol and total cholesterol. After an initial approval of the\\u000a health claim for soy protein consumption for the prevention of coronary heart disease, more recently it has been concluded\\u000a from an overall analysis of literature

  13. Variation in competitive abilities of plants and microbes for specific amino acids

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. A. Lipson; T. K. Raab; S. K. Schmidt; R. K. Monson

    1999-01-01

    Microbes are assumed to possess strong competitive advantages over plants for uptake of nutrients from the soil. The finding\\u000a that non-mycorrhizal plants can obtain a significant fraction of their N requirement from soil amino acids contradicts this\\u000a assumption. The amino acid glycine (Gly) has been used as a model amino acid in many recent studies. Our preliminary studies\\u000a showed that

  14. Nutritional and medicinal aspects of D-amino acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper describes a method for determining the nutritional value of D-amino acids, D-peptides, and amino acid derivatives using a growth assay in mice fed a synthetic all-amino acid diet. A large number of experiments were carried out in which a molar equivalent of the test compound replaced a nu...

  15. Proteins: From Structural Classification to Amino Acid Interaction Networks

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Proteins: From Structural Classification to Amino Acid Interaction Networks O. GACI LITIS are the protein's amino acids and whose edges are the inter- actions between them. Using a graph theory approach: proteins, amino acid, interaction network, structural classification 1 Introduction Proteins are biological

  16. Stochastic Analysis of Amino Acid Substitution in Protein Synthesis

    E-print Network

    de Vink, Erik

    Stochastic Analysis of Amino Acid Substitution in Protein Synthesis D. Bosnacki1 , H.M.M. ten present a formal analysis of amino acid replacement dur- ing mRNA translation. Building on an abstract of the insertion of amino acids into the nascent polypeptide chain. To this end, we integrate the probabilistic

  17. Jacobs University Bremen Encoding of Amino Acids and Proteins

    E-print Network

    Henkel, Werner

    Jacobs University Bremen Encoding of Amino Acids and Proteins from a Communications and Information School of Engineering and Science Encoding of Amino Acids and Proteins from a Communications). The 2-D plots of ECM show that most mutations occur between codons that encode the same amino acid, i

  18. Racemic amino acids from the ultraviolet photolysis of

    E-print Network

    .............................................................. Racemic amino acids from for the origin and early evolution of life1 . Indigenous amino acids have been found in meteorites2 --over 70 in the Murchison meteorite alone3 . Although it has been generally accepted that the meteoritic amino acids formed

  19. Chemical Genetic Programming The Effect of Evolving Amino Acids

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Thomas

    Chemical Genetic Programming ­ The Effect of Evolving Amino Acids Wojciech Piaseczny1 , Hideaki of amino acids is prepared, mainly through assimilation of smaller inorganic compounds in plants, and through digestion of food in animals. Each amino acid is a bio- chemical building block, so together

  20. ASTROCHEMISTRY Radiolysis and radioracemization of 20 amino acids

    E-print Network

    ASTROCHEMISTRY Radiolysis and radioracemization of 20 amino acids from the beginning of the Solar-Verlag 2011 Abstract A series of chiral amino acids in the levo form used in the current terrestrial. For each amino acids, the radiolysis degree and the radioracemization degree was measured, respectively

  1. Amino Acids DOI: 10.1002/anie.200602801

    E-print Network

    Lectka, Thomas

    Amino Acids DOI: 10.1002/anie.200602801 Catalytic, Asymmetric Synthesis of 1,4- Benzoxazinones: A Remarkably Enantioselective Route to a-Amino Acid Derivatives from o-Benzoquinone Imides** Jamison Wolfer enantiomeri- cally enriched a-amino acids and related derivatives.[4] Herein, we present the first catalytic

  2. Reconstructing Amino Acid Interaction Networks by an Ant Colony Approach

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Reconstructing Amino Acid Interaction Networks by an Ant Colony Approach Omar GACI and Stefan BALEV are the proteins amino acids and whose edges are the interactions between them. We consider the problem of reconstructing protein's interaction network from its amino acid sequence. We rely on a probability that two

  3. Chemoenzymatic Synthesis of Unnatural Amino Acids via Modified Claisen

    E-print Network

    Hudlicky, Tomas

    Chemoenzymatic Synthesis of Unnatural Amino Acids via Modified Claisen Rearrangement of Glycine functionalized R-cyclo- hexenyl amino acid such as 2, obtained via a [3,3]-sig- matropic rearrangement in our first publication in this area.7 The first synthesis of amino acids by Claisen rearrangement

  4. Origin, Microbiology, Nutrition, and Pharmacology of D-Amino Acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exposure of food proteins to certain processing conditions induces two major chemical changes: racemization of all L-amino acids (LAA) to D-amino acids (DAA) and concurrent formation of crosslinked amino acids such as lysinoalanine (LAL). The diet contains both processing-induced and naturally-form...

  5. Metabolomics method to comprehensively analyze amino acids in different domains.

    PubMed

    Gu, Haiwei; Du, Jianhai; Carnevale Neto, Fausto; Carroll, Patrick A; Turner, Sally J; Chiorean, E Gabriela; Eisenman, Robert N; Raftery, Daniel

    2015-04-21

    Amino acids play essential roles in both metabolism and the proteome. Many studies have profiled free amino acids (FAAs) or proteins; however, few have connected the measurement of FAA with individual amino acids in the proteome. In this study, we developed a metabolomics method to comprehensively analyze amino acids in different domains, using two examples of different sample types and disease models. We first examined the responses of FAAs and insoluble-proteome amino acids (IPAAs) to the Myc oncogene in Tet21N human neuroblastoma cells. The metabolic and proteomic amino acid profiles were quite different, even under the same Myc condition, and their combination provided a better understanding of the biological status. In addition, amino acids were measured in 3 domains (FAAs, free and soluble-proteome amino acids (FSPAAs), and IPAAs) to study changes in serum amino acid profiles related to colon cancer. A penalized logistic regression model based on the amino acids from the three domains had better sensitivity and specificity than that from each individual domain. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to perform a combined analysis of amino acids in different domains, and indicates the useful biological information available from a metabolomics analysis of the protein pellet. This study lays the foundation for further quantitative tracking of the distribution of amino acids in different domains, with opportunities for better diagnosis and mechanistic studies of various diseases. PMID:25699545

  6. Original article Whole blood and plasma amino acid transfers across

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Whole blood and plasma amino acid transfers across the portal drained viscera (WB) and plasma (P) amino acid transfers across the portal drained viscera and the liver were amino acid concentrations were determined in the CA, PV and HV. The plasma/WB ratios showed

  7. Rapid and Precise Determination of Cellular Amino Acid Flux Rates

    E-print Network

    Wikswo, John

    Rapid and Precise Determination of Cellular Amino Acid Flux Rates Using HPLC with Automated Derivatization with Absorbance Detection Abstract A method is presented for analyzing primary amino acids detection. Amino acids are derivatized with orthophthaldildehyde (OPA) using an online injector program

  8. Some Aspects of the Amino Acid Metabolism of Penicillium chrysogenum

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. J. H. Pyle

    1954-01-01

    SUMMARY: Paper chromatographic methods were used to determine the amino acids in unhydrolysed corn steep liquor and to study the uptake and synthesis of amino acids by Penicillium chysogenum. Of the eleven amino acids found in corn steep liquor all were taken up by the organism prior to the main period of penicillin formation. Only traces of ninhydrin-reacting material were

  9. Soil amino acid composition across a boreal forest successional sequence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nancy R. Werdin-Pfisterer; Knut Kielland; Richard D. Boone

    2009-01-01

    Soil amino acids are important sources of organic nitrogen for plant nutrition, yet few studies have examined which amino acids are most prevalent in the soil. In this study, we examined the composition, concentration, and seasonal patterns of soil amino acids across a primary successional sequence encompassing a natural gradient of plant productivity and soil physicochemical characteristics. Soil was collected

  10. Bioavailable amino acids in sediments: A biomimetic, kinetics based approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    LAWRENCE M. MAYER; LINDA L. SCHICK; THOMAS SAWYER; CRAIG J. PLANTE; PETER A. JUMARS; ROBERT L. SELF

    1995-01-01

    We developed a biomimetic approach, based on direct incubation with proteolytic enzymes, to measure bioavailable amino acids in sediments. The kinetics of release of monomers and oligopeptides, which are amenable to absorption by cells, is measured as either individual or total amino acids. Microbial proteases incubated with fresh sediments yield amino acids at a similar rate as gut juices from

  11. Cyclisation of Aminyl Radicals Derived from Amino Acids

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. Russell Bowman; Michael J Broadhurst; Daniel R Coghlan; Kirk A Lewis

    1997-01-01

    ?-Amino acid aminyl radicals have been generated from sulfenamide precursors using Bu3SnH. The aminyl radicals undergo 5-exo-trig cyclisation reactions onto suitably placed N-alkenyl or ?-alkenyl chains on the amino acids with reasonable diastereoselectivity. The ?-ester of the amino acid imparts electrophilic behaviour to the aminyl radicals and facilitates cyclisation onto alkenes. © 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  12. Transport of acidic amino acids by human jejunal brush-border membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, V M; Harig, J M; Adams, M B; Ramaswamy, K

    1987-01-01

    This study characterizes the transport of radiolabeled acidic amino acids into brush-border membrane vesicles prepared from human jejunum. The uptakes of L-glutamic, L-aspartic, and D-aspartic acids were stimulated by a Na+ gradient (extravesicular greater than intravesicular). Concentrative uptake (resulting in an "overshoot" phenomenon) of these dicarboxylic amino acids occurred when there was an outward K+ gradient (intravesicular greater than extravesicular). In addition, increasing K+ gradients (0-100 mM) resulted in enhanced uptake of L-glutamic acid. This K+ requirement is somewhat specific as Rb+ and Cs+ could enhance uptake to a limited extent, whereas Li+ and choline+ showed no enhancement. The presence of a K+ gradient did not affect the affinity of the carrier system for L-glutamic acid but it did increase the Vmax. The presence of extravesicular anions having differing membrane permeabilities did not alter L-glutamic acid uptake indicating an absence of an effect of membrane potential on the transport process. Finally, the human transport system for L-glutamic acid appears to be specific for acidic amino acids as demonstrated by inhibition studies. Our studies demonstrate a transport system in human jejunum specific for acidic amino acids that is energized by an inward Na+ gradient and an outward K+ gradient. PMID:2880511

  13. Digestible indispensable amino acid score and digestible amino acids in eight cereal grains.

    PubMed

    Cervantes-Pahm, Sarah K; Liu, Yanhong; Stein, Hans H

    2014-05-01

    To determine values for the digestible indispensable amino acid score (DIAAS), it is recommended that ileal amino acid (AA) digestibility values obtained in growing pigs are used to characterise protein quality in different foods. Therefore, an experiment was conducted to determine the standardised ileal digestibility (SID) of AA in eight cereal grains (yellow dent maize, Nutridense maize, dehulled barley, dehulled oats, polished white rice, rye, sorghum and wheat) fed to pigs, where SID values in pigs can be used to calculate approximate DIAAS values in humans. In the present experiment, twenty-four barrows with a T-cannula inserted in the distal ileum were allotted to eight diets and fed for three periods to give a total of nine replicate pigs per diet. Each period lasted 14 d, and ileal digesta samples were collected on days 13 and 14. Among the SID values obtained for all cereal grains, values for total indispensable AA were greatest (P< 0·05) in rice and lowest (P< 0·05) in rye and sorghum. The concentrations of SID indispensable AA in rice were less (P< 0·05) than in dehulled oats, but greater (P< 0·05) than in the other cereal grains, and the concentrations of SID indispensable AA in Nutridense maize were greater (P< 0·05) than in yellow dent maize and sorghum, but less (P< 0·05) than in the other cereal grains, except rye. In conclusion, results indicate that to meet dietary requirements for AA in humans, diets based on yellow dent maize or sorghum require more AA supplementation than diets based on other cereal grains. PMID:24480298

  14. Different and overlapping functions of Arabidopsis LHT6 and AAP1 transporters in root amino acid uptake

    PubMed Central

    Perchlik, Molly; Foster, Justin; Tegeder, Mechthild

    2014-01-01

    Plants acquire nitrogen in the form of amino acids from the soil, and transport proteins located in the plasma membrane of root cells are required for this process. It was found that the Arabidopsis lysine-histidine-like transporter LHT6 is expressed in root cells important for amino acid uptake, including the epidermis, root hairs, and cortex. Transport studies with lht6 mutants using high levels of amino acids demonstrated that LHT6 is in fact involved in amino acid uptake. To determine if LHT6 plays a role in nitrogen acquisition at soil amino acid concentrations, growth and uptake studies were performed with low levels of toxic amino acid analogues and radiolabelled amino acids, respectively. In addition, mutants of AAP1, another root amino acid transporter, and lht6/aap1 double mutants were examined. The results showed that LHT6 is involved in uptake of acidic amino acids, glutamine and alanine, and probably phenylalanine. LHT6 seems not to transport basic or other neutral amino acids, or, alternatively, other transporters might compensate for eliminated LHT6 function. Previous studies suggested that AAP1 only takes up amino acids at high concentrations; however, here it is demonstrated that the transporter functions in acquisition of glutamate and neutral amino acids when present at soil concentrations. When comparing the characterized root uptake systems, it appears that transporters both with overlapping substrate specificity and with preference for specific substrates are required to access the soil amino acid pool. PMID:25005136

  15. Microbial Poly(L-Lactide)Degrading Enzyme Induced by Amino Acids, Peptides, and Poly(L-Amino Acids)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amnat Jarerat; Yutaka Tokiwa; Hideo Tanaka

    2004-01-01

    Poly(L-lactide)(PLA)-degrading activities of a fungus, Tritirachium album, and two strains of actinomycetes,Lentzea waywayandensis and Amycolatopsis orientalis, were inducible by some proteins (poly-L-amino acid), peptides and amino acids. Extracellular PLA-degrading activity of the culture filtrates was detected when these strains grew in liquid basal medium containing 0.1% (w\\/v) of (poly-L-amino acids), peptides or amino acids as the enzyme inducer. In addition

  16. Amino Acid Export in Plants: A Missing Link in Nitrogen Cycling

    PubMed Central

    Okumoto, Sakiko; Pilot, Guillaume

    2011-01-01

    The export of nutrients from source organs to parts of the body where they are required (e.g. sink organs) is a fundamental biological process. Export of amino acids, one of the most abundant nitrogen species in plant long-distance transport tissues (i.e. xylem and phloem), is an essential process for the proper distribution of nitrogen in the plant. Physiological studies have detected the presence of multiple amino acid export systems in plant cell membranes. Yet, surprisingly little is known about the molecular identity of amino acid exporters, partially due to the technical difficulties hampering the identification of exporter proteins. In this short review, we will summarize our current knowledge about amino acid export systems in plants. Several studies have described plant amino acid transporters capable of bi-directional, facilitative transport, reminiscent of activities identified by earlier physiological studies. Moreover, recent expansion in the number of available amino acid transporter sequences have revealed evolutionary relationships between amino acid exporters from other organisms with a number of uncharacterized plant proteins, some of which might also function as amino acid exporters. In addition, genes that may regulate export of amino acids have been discovered. Studies of these putative transporter and regulator proteins may help in understanding the elusive molecular mechanisms of amino acid export in plants. PMID:21324969

  17. A study of protein structure using amino acid interaction networks 1 A study of protein structure using amino acid

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A study of protein structure using amino acid interaction networks 1 X A study of protein structure using amino acid interaction networks Omar Gaci and Stefan Balev University of Le Havre France 1 of interacting amino acids. We believe that understanding these networks can help to better understand

  18. Some of the amino acid chemistry going on in the Laboratory of Amino Acids, Peptides and Proteins

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Bouifraden; C. Drouot; M. El Hadrami; F. Guenoun; L. Lecointe; N. Mai; C. Pothion; M. Sadoune; B. Sauvagnat; M. Amblard; J. L. Aubagnac; M. Calmes; P. Chevallet; J. Daunis; C. Enjalbal; J. A. Fehrentz; F. Lamaty; J. P. Lavergne; R. Lazaro; V. Rolland; M. L. Roumestant; Ph. Viallefont; Y. Vidal; J. Martinez

    1999-01-01

    Summary Some of the chemistry of amino acids going on in our laboratory (Laboratoire des Amino acides Peptides et Protéines) is described as well as some mass spectrometry methodology for their characterization particularly on solid supports. Several aspects are presented including: (i) the stereoselective synthesis of natural and unnatural amino acids using 2-hydroxypinan-3-one as chiral auxiliary; (ii) the stereoselective synthesis

  19. New enzymatic method of chiral amino acid synthesis by dynamic kinetic resolution of amino acid amides: use of stereoselective amino acid amidases in the presence of alpha-amino-epsilon-caprolactam racemase.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Shigenori; Komeda, Hidenobu; Asano, Yasuhisa

    2007-08-01

    D- and L-amino acids were produced from L- and D-amino acid amides by D-aminopeptidase from Ochrobactrum anthropi C1-38 and L-amino acid amidase from Pseudomonas azotoformans IAM 1603, respectively, in the presence of alpha-amino-epsilon-caprolactam racemase from Achromobacter obae as the catalyst by dynamic kinetic resolution of amino acid amides. PMID:17586677

  20. Sublimation of natural amino acids and induction of asymmetry by meteoritic amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasevych, Arkadii V.; Guillemin, Jean-Claude

    It is believed that the homochirality of building blocks of life like amino acids (AAs) and sugars is a prerequisite requirement for the origin and evolution of life. Among different mechanisms that might have triggered the initial disparity in the enantiomeric ratio on the primitive Earth, the key roles were assigned to: (i) local chiral symmetry breaking and (ii) the inflow of extraterrestrial matter (eg the carbonaceous meteorites containing non-racemic AAs). Recently it has been revealed that sublimation, a subject almost completely neglected for a long time, gives a pathway to enantioenrichment of natural AAs (1,2 and references herein). Sublimation is however one of the key physical processes that occur on comets. Starting from a mixture with a low content of an enantiopure AA, a partial sublimation gives an important enrichment of the sublimate (1,2). The resulted disparity in the ratio between enantiomers of a partial sublimate is determined by the crystalline nature of the starting mixture: we observed a drastic difference in the behavior of (i) mixtures based on true racemic compounds and (ii) mechanical mixtures of two enantiopure solid phases. On the other hand, combination of crystallization and sublimation can lead to segregation of enantioenriched fractions starting from racemic composition of sublimable aliphatic AAs (Ala, Leu, Pro, Val) in mixtures with non-volatile enantiopure ones (Asn, Asp, Glu, Ser, Thr) (3). The resulted sense of chirality correlates with the handedness of the non-volatile AAs: the observed changes in enantiomeric ratios clearly demonstrate the preferential homochiral interactions and a tendency of natural amino acids to homochiral self-organization. It is noteworthy that just these 5 (Asn, Asp, Glu, Ser, Thr) out of 22 proteinogenic amino acids are able to local symmetry breaking. On the other hand, recent data on the enantiomeric composition of the Tagish Lake, a C2-type carbonaceous meteorite, revealed a large L-enantiomeric excess of Asp and Glu (4) that we used in our experiments. These experimental data may shed some light on one of the facets of complex and mysterious preobiotic processes that eventually could have led to the origin of life. References: 1. Bellec A, Guillemin JC. Chem Commun 2010, 46:1482-1484. 2. Tarasevych AV, Sorochinsky AE, Kukhar VP, Chollet A, Daniellou R, Guillemin JC. J Org Chem 2013, 78:10530-10533. 3. Tarasevych AV, Sorochinsky AE, Kukhar VP, Guillemin JC. Orig Life Evol Biosph 2013, 43:129-135. 4. Glavin DP, Elsila JE, Burton AS, Callahan MP, Dworkin JP, Hilts RW, Herd CDK. Meteor Planet Sci 2012, 47:1347-1364.

  1. Isotope composition of carbon in amino acids of solid bitumens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanina, S. N.; Bushnev, D. A.

    2014-06-01

    Primary data are presented on the isotope composition of carbon in individual amino acids from solid bitumens and several biological objects. The amino acids of biological objects are characterized by wide variations of the isotope composition of carbon. This fact occurs owing to the difference in biochemical paths of metabolism resulting in the synthesis of individual amino acids. The ?13C values are somewhat decreased for individual amino acids in asphaltenes, varying from -7.7 to -31.7‰. The carbon of amino acids is weighted in kerits from Bad'el' compared to asphaltenes. All the natural bitumens retain the characteristic trend for natural substances: the isotopically heavy and light amino acids by carbon are glycine and leucine, respectively. The isotope composition of amino-acid carbon is lightened compared to natural bitumens in the samples formed under a pronounced thermal impact (asphalt-like crust and kirishite).

  2. Induction of amino acid transporters expression by endurance exercise in rat skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Taro, E-mail: tamuraka@sgk.ac.jp; Yoshinaga, Mariko

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Regulation of amino acid transporter expression in working muscle remains unclear. •Expression of amino acid transporters for leucine were induced by a bout of exercise. •Requirement of leucine in muscle cells might regulate expression of its transporters. •This information is beneficial for understanding the muscle remodeling by exercise. -- Abstract: We here investigated whether an acute bout of endurance exercise would induce the expression of amino acid transporters that regulate leucine transport across plasma and lysosomal membranes in rat skeletal muscle. Rats ran on a motor-driven treadmill at a speed of 28 m/min for 90 min. Immediately after the exercise, we observed that expression of mRNAs encoding L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) and CD98 was induced in the gastrocnemius, soleus, and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles. Sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2) mRNA was also induced by the exercise in those three muscles. Expression of proton-assisted amino acid transporter 1 (PAT1) mRNA was slightly but not significantly induced by a single bout of exercise in soleus and EDL muscles. Exercise-induced mRNA expression of these amino acid transporters appeared to be attenuated by repeated bouts of the exercise. These results suggested that the expression of amino acid transporters for leucine may be induced in response to an increase in the requirement for this amino acid in the cells of working skeletal muscles.

  3. The Next Generation MOD: A Microchip Amino Acid Analyzer for Detecting Extraterrestrial Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathies, R. A.; Hutt, L. D.; Bada, J. L.; Glavin, D.; Grunthaner, F. J.; Grunthaner, P. J.

    2000-01-01

    The MOD (Mars Organic Detector) instrument which has selected for the definition phase of the BEDS package on the 2005 Mars Explorer Program spacecraft is designed to simply detect the presence of amino acids in Martian surface samples at a sensitivity of a few parts per billion (ppb). An additional important aspect of amino acid analyses of Martian samples is identifying and quantifying which compounds are present, and also distinguishing those produced abiotically from those synthesized by either extinct or extant life. Amino acid homochirality provides an unambiguous way of distinguishing between abiotic vs. biotic origins. Proteins made up of mixed D- and L-amino acids would not likely have been efficient catalysts in early organisms because they could not fold into bioactive configurations such as the a-helix. However, enzymes made up of all D-amino acids function just as well as those made up of only L-amino acids, but the two enzymes use the opposite stereoisomeric substrates. There are no biochemical reasons why L-amino acids would be favored over Damino acids. On Earth, the use of only L-amino acids in proteins by life is probably simply a matter of chance. We assume that if proteins and enzymes were a component of extinct or extant life on Mars, then amino acid homochirality would have been a requirement. However, the possibility that Martian life was (or is) based on D-amino acids would be equal to that based on L-amino acids. The detection of a nonracemic mixture of amino acids in a Martian sample would be strong evidence for the presence of an extinct or extant biota on Mars. The finding of an excess of D-amino acids would provide irrefutable evidence of unique Martian life that could not have been derived from seeding the planet with terrestrial life (or the seeding of the Earth with Martian life). In contrast, the presence of racemic amino acids, along with non-protein amino acids such as alpha-aminoisobutyric acid and isovaline, would be indicative of an abiotic origin, although we have to consider the possibility that the racemic amino acids were generated from the racemization of biotically produced amino acids.

  4. Extraterrestrial amino acids in the Almahata Sitta meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Aubrey, Andrew D.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Parker, Eric T.; Bada, Jeffrey L.; Jenniskens, Peter; Shaddad, Muawia H.

    2010-10-01

    Amino acid analysis of a meteorite fragment of asteroid 2008 TC3 called Almahata Sitta was carried out using reverse-phase liquid chromatography coupled with UV fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-FD/ToF-MS) as part of a sample analysis consortium. LC-FD/ToF-MS analyses of hot-water extracts from the meteorite revealed a complex distribution of two- to seven-carbon aliphatic amino acids and one- to three-carbon amines with abundances ranging from 0.5 to 149 parts-per-billion (ppb). The enantiomeric ratios of the amino acids alanine, ?-amino-n-butyric acid, 2-amino-2-methylbutanoic acid (isovaline), and 2-aminopentanoic acid (norvaline) in the meteorite were racemic (D/L ˜ 1), indicating that these amino acids are indigenous to the meteorite and not terrestrial contaminants. Several other nonprotein amino acids were also identified in the meteorite above background levels including ?-aminoisobutyric acid (?-AIB), 4-amino-2-methylbutanoic acid, 4-amino-3-methylbutanoic acid, and 3-, 4-, and 5-aminopentanoic acid. The total abundances of isovaline and ?-AIB in Almahata Sitta are approximately 1000 times lower than the abundances of these amino acids found in the CM carbonaceous chondrite Murchison. The extremely low abundances and unusual distribution of five-carbon amino acids in Almahata Sitta compared to CI, CM, and CR carbonaceous chondrites may reflect extensive thermal alteration of amino acids on the parent asteroid by partial melting during formation or subsequent impact shock heating. It is also possible that amino acids were synthesized by catalytic reactions on the parent body after asteroid 2008 TC3 cooled to lower temperatures, or introduced as a contaminant from unrelated meteorite clasts and chemically altered by ?-decarboxylation.

  5. Extraterrestrial Amino Acids in the Almahata Sitta Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Aubrey, Andrew D.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Parker, Eric T.; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2010-01-01

    Amino acid analysis of a meteorite fragment of asteroid 2008 TC3 called Almahata Sitta was carried out using reverse-phase liquid chromatography coupled with UV fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-FD/ToF-MS) as part of a sample analysis consortium. LC-FD/ToF-MS analyses of hot-water extracts from the meteorite revealed a complex distribution of two- to seven-carbon aliphatic amino acids and one- to three-carbon amines with abundances ranging from 0.5 to 149 parts-per-billion (ppb). The enantiomeric ratios of the amino acids alanine, R-amino-n-butyric acid (beta-ABA), 2-amino-2-methylbutanoic acid (isovaline), and 2-aminopentanoic acid (norvaline) in the meteorite were racemic (D/L approximately 1), indicating that these amino acids are indigenous to the meteorite and not terrestrial contaminants. Several other non-protein amino acids were also identified in the meteorite above background levels including alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (alpha-AIB), 4-amino-2- methylbutanoic acid, 4-amino-3-methylbutanoic acid, and 3-, 4-, and 5-aminopentanoic acid. The total abundances of isovaline and alpha-AIB in Almahata Sitta are 1000 times lower than the abundances of these amino acids found in the CM carbonaceous chondrite Murchison. The extremely low abundances and unusual distribution of five carbon amino acids in Almahata Sitta compared to Cl, CM, and CR carbonaceous chondrites may reflect extensive thermal alteration of amino acids on the parent asteroid by partial melting during formation or subsequent impact shock heating. It is also possible that amino acids were synthesized by catalytic reactions on the parent body after asteroid 2008 TC3 cooled to lower temperatures.

  6. SOIL AMINO ACID ENRICHMENT FOLLOWING SOYBEAN IN AN IOWA CORN-SOYBEAN ROTATION 1753

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding soil amino acid enrichment may help explain why rates of N fertilization required to attain maximum corn (Zea mays L.) yields are usually lower for corn following soybean (Glycine max L.) than for corn following corn. Our objectives were to quantify the amino acid (AA) pool within a 16...

  7. Identification of remanié fossils using amino acid racemisation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Colin V. Murray-Wallace; Antonio P. Belperio

    1994-01-01

    The extent of racemisation for a range of amino acids for the total acid hydrolysate and free fractions, calibrated against radiocarbon dating, indicates that the foraminifer Marginopora vertebralis, found within ‘modern’ tidal flat sediments between Wardang Island and Goose Island, South Australia, is reworked from the underlying Late Pleistocene Glanville Formation. Analyses of amino acids in the total acid hydrolysate

  8. From one amino acid to another: tRNA-dependent amino acid biosynthesis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kelly Sheppard; Jing Yuan; Michael J. Hohn; Brian Jester; Kevin M. Devine; Dieter Soll

    2008-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNAs (aa-tRNAs) are the essential substrates for translation. Most aa-tRNAs are formed by direct aminoacylation of tRNA catalyzed by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. However, a smal- ler number of aa-tRNAs (Asn-tRNA, Gln-tRNA, Cys-tRNA and Sec-tRNA) are made by synthesizing the amino acid on the tRNA by first attaching a non-cognate amino acid to the tRNA, which is then converted to the cognate

  9. Accumulated analyses of amino acid precursors in returned lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.; Harada, K.; Hare, P. E.

    1973-01-01

    Six amino acids (glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, and threonine) obtained by hydrolysis of extracts have been quantitatively determined in ten collections of fines from five Apollo missions. Although the amounts found, 7-45 ng/g, are small, the lunar amino acid/carbon ratios are comparable to those of the carbonaceous chondrites, Murchison and Murray, as analyzed by the same procedures. Since both the ratios of amino acid to carbon, and the four or five most common types of proteinous amino acid found, are comparable for the two extraterrestrial sources despite different cosmophysical histories of the moon and meteorites, common cosmochemical processes are suggested.

  10. NUTRITIONAL AND FUNCTIONAL IMPORTANCE OF INTESTINAL SULFUR AMINO ACID METABOLISM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The metabolism of sulfur amino acids, methionine and cysteine, has been linked to several key aspects of human health and cellular function. In addition, the metabolism of dietary amino acids by the gastrointestinal tract is nutritionally important for normal function. In the case of sulfur amino ac...

  11. Physiological Adaptation to the Loss of Amino Acid Transport Ability

    PubMed Central

    DeBusk, Ruth M.; Ogilvie-Villa, Susan

    1982-01-01

    A strain of Neurospora crassa devoid of constitutive amino acid transport ability can utilize arginine as the sole nitrogen source. Nitrogen starvation, presence of arginine, and mutational inactivation of the general permease are key factors in signaling production of an extracellular enzyme which removes the alpha-amino group from the amino acid. PMID:6214547

  12. Review: Taurine: A “very essential” amino acid

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Wen

    2012-01-01

    Taurine is an organic osmolyte involved in cell volume regulation, and provides a substrate for the formation of bile salts. It plays a role in the modulation of intracellular free calcium concentration, and although it is one of the few amino acids not incorporated into proteins, taurine is one of the most abundant amino acids in the brain, retina, muscle tissue, and organs throughout the body. Taurine serves a wide variety of functions in the central nervous system, from development to cytoprotection, and taurine deficiency is associated with cardiomyopathy, renal dysfunction, developmental abnormalities, and severe damage to retinal neurons. All ocular tissues contain taurine, and quantitative analysis of ocular tissue extracts of the rat eye revealed that taurine was the most abundant amino acid in the retina, vitreous, lens, cornea, iris, and ciliary body. In the retina, taurine is critical for photoreceptor development and acts as a cytoprotectant against stress-related neuronal damage and other pathological conditions. Despite its many functional properties, however, the cellular and biochemical mechanisms mediating the actions of taurine are not fully known. Nevertheless, considering its broad distribution, its many cytoprotective attributes, and its functional significance in cell development, nutrition, and survival, taurine is undoubtedly one of the most essential substances in the body. Interestingly, taurine satisfies many of the criteria considered essential for inclusion in the inventory of neurotransmitters, but evidence of a taurine-specific receptor has yet to be identified in the vertebrate nervous system. In this report, we present a broad overview of the functional properties of taurine, some of the consequences of taurine deficiency, and the results of studies in animal models suggesting that taurine may play a therapeutic role in the management of epilepsy and diabetes. PMID:23170060

  13. Synthesis of alpha-amino acids

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Jr., Jefferson W. (San Francisco, CA)

    1983-01-01

    A method for synthesizing alpha amino acids proceding through novel intermediates of the formulas: R.sub.1 R.sub.2 C(OSOCl)CN, R.sub.1 R.sub.2 C(Cl)CN and [R.sub.1 R.sub.2 C(CN)O].sub.2 SO wherein R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 are each selected from hydrogen monovalent substituted and unsubstituted hydrocarbon radicals of 1 to 12 carbon atoms. The use of these intermediates allows the synthesis steps to be exothermic and results in an overall synthesis method which is faster than the synthesis methods of the prior art.

  14. Synthesis of alpha-amino acids

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Jr., Jefferson W. (San Francisco, CA)

    1983-01-01

    A method for synthesizing alpha amino acids proceding through novel intermediates of the formulas: R.sub.1 R.sub.2 C(OSOCl)CN, R.sub.1 R.sub.2 C(Cl)CN and [R.sub.1 R.sub.2 C(CN)O].sub.2 SO wherein R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 are each selected from hydrogen monovalent substituted and unsubstituted hydrocarbon radicals of 1 to 10 carbon atoms. The use of these intermediates allows the synthesis steps to be exothermic and results in an overall synthesis method which is faster than the snythesis methods of the prior art.

  15. Synthesis of alpha-amino acids

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Jr., Jefferson W. (San Francisco, CA)

    1983-01-01

    A method for synthesizing alpha amino acids proceeding through novel intermediates of the formulas: R.sub.1 R.sub.2 C(OSOCl)CN, R.sub.1 R.sub.2 C(Cl)CN and [R.sub.1 R.sub.2 C(CN)O].sub.2 SO wherein R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 are each selected from hydrogen monovalent substituted and unsubstituted hydrocarbon radicals of 1 to 12 carbon atoms. The use of these intermediates allows the synthesis steps to be exothermic and results in an overall synthesis method which is faster than the synthesis methods of the prior art.

  16. Formation of Amino Acid Thioesters for Prebiotic Peptide Synthesis: Catalysis By Amino Acid Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The origin of life can be described as a series of events in which a prebiotic chemical process came increasingly under the control of its catalytic products. In our search for this prebiotic process that yielded catalytic takeover products (such as polypeptides), we have been investigating a reaction system that generates peptide-forming amino acid thioesters from formaldehyde, glycolaldehyde, and ammonia in the presence of thiols. As shown below, this model process begins by aldol condensation of formaldehyde and glycolaldehyde to give trioses and releases. These sugars then undergo beta-dehydration yielding their respective alpha-ketoaldehydes. Addition of ammonia to the alpha-ketoaldehydes yields imines which can either: (a) rearrange in the presence of thesis to give amino acid thioesters or (be react with another molecule of aldehyde to give imidazoles. This 'one-pot' reaction system operates under mild aqueous conditions, and like modem amino acid biosynthesis, uses sugar intermediates which are converted to products by energy-yielding redox reactions. Recently, we discovered that amino acids, such as the alanine reaction product, catalyze the first and second steps of the process. In the presence of ammonia the process also generates other synthetically useful products, like the important biochemical -- pyruvic acid.

  17. A review of the role of acid-base balance in amino acid nutrition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. F. Patience; J. E Patience

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acid-base balance and amino acid metabolism are intimately related. Changes in acid-base balance influence the metabolic fate of many amino acids. Also, acid-base homeostasis is achieved in part by alteration of amino acid metabolism, not only in the kidney, but also in liver, muscle and splanchnic tissue. Glutamine is the primary amino acid involved in renal ammonia- genesis, a

  18. Amino acids of the Nogoya and Mokoia carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronin, J. R.; Moore, C. B.

    1976-01-01

    Amino acids were found in acid hydrolyzed, hot water extracts of the Nogoya (C2) and Mokoia (C3V) chondrites. About 40 n moles/g of amino acids were found in the Nogoya extract while Mokoia contained less than 1 n mole/g. The amino acid composition of Nogoya differs from that of other C2 chondrites studied earlier. The results from Mokoia are similar to previous data obtained from the C3V chondrite Allende.

  19. Prebiotic Synthesis of Hydrophobic and Protein Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Ring, David; Wolman, Yecheskel; Friedmann, Nadav; Miller, Stanley L.

    1972-01-01

    The formation of amino acids by the action of electric discharges on a mixture of methane, nitrogen, and water with traces of ammonia was studied in detail. The presence of glycine, alanine, ?-amino-n-butyric acid, ?-aminoisobutyric acid, valine, norvaline, isovaline, leucine, isoleucine, alloisoleucine, norleucine, proline, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, threonine, allothreonine, ?-hydroxy-?-aminobutyric acid, and ?,?-diaminobutyric acid was confirmed by ion-exchange chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. All of the primary ?-amino acids found in the Murchison Meteorite have been synthesized by this electric discharge experiment. PMID:4501592

  20. A reexamination of amino acids in lunar soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinton, K. L. F.; Bada, J. L.; Arnold, J. R.

    1993-03-01

    Amino acids in lunar soils provide an important indicator of the level of prebiotic organic compounds on the moon. The results provide insight into the chemistry of amino acid precursors, and furthermore, given the flux of carbonaceous material to the moon, we can evaluate the survival of organics upon impact. The amino acid contents of both hydrolyzed and unhydrolyzed hot-water extracts of Apollo 17 lunar soil were determined using ophthaldialdehyde/N-acetyl cysteine (OPA/NAC) derivatization followed by HPLC analysis. Previous studies of lunar amino acids were inconclusive, as the technique used (derivatization with ninhydrin followed by HPLC analysis) was unable to discriminate between cosmogenic amino acids and terrestrial contaminants. Cosmogenic amino acids are racemic, and many of the amino acids found in carbonaceous meteorites such as Murchison, i.e., alpha-amino-i-butyric acid (aib), are extremely rare on Earth. The ninhydrin method does not distinguish amino acid enantiomers, nor does it detect alpha-alkyl amino acids such as aib, whereas the OPA/NAC technique does both.

  1. A reexamination of amino acids in lunar soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinton, K. L. F.; Bada, J. L.; Arnold, J. R.

    1993-01-01

    Amino acids in lunar soils provide an important indicator of the level of prebiotic organic compounds on the moon. The results provide insight into the chemistry of amino acid precursors, and furthermore, given the flux of carbonaceous material to the moon, we can evaluate the survival of organics upon impact. The amino acid contents of both hydrolyzed and unhydrolyzed hot-water extracts of Apollo 17 lunar soil were determined using ophthaldialdehyde/N-acetyl cysteine (OPA/NAC) derivatization followed by HPLC analysis. Previous studies of lunar amino acids were inconclusive, as the technique used (derivatization with ninhydrin followed by HPLC analysis) was unable to discriminate between cosmogenic amino acids and terrestrial contaminants. Cosmogenic amino acids are racemic, and many of the amino acids found in carbonaceous meteorites such as Murchison, i.e., alpha-amino-i-butyric acid (aib), are extremely rare on Earth. The ninhydrin method does not distinguish amino acid enantiomers, nor does it detect alpha-alkyl amino acids such as aib, whereas the OPA/NAC technique does both.

  2. Relative Amino Acid Composition Signatures of Organisms and Environments

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Alexandra; Savageau, Michael A.; Alves, Rui

    2013-01-01

    Background Identifying organism-environment interactions at the molecular level is crucial to understanding how organisms adapt to and change the chemical and molecular landscape of their habitats. In this work we investigated whether relative amino acid compositions could be used as a molecular signature of an environment and whether such a signature could also be observed at the level of the cellular amino acid composition of the microorganisms that inhabit that environment. Methodologies/Principal Findings To address these questions we collected and analyzed environmental amino acid determinations from the literature, and estimated from complete genomic sequences the global relative amino acid abundances of organisms that are cognate to the different types of environment. Environmental relative amino acid abundances clustered into broad groups (ocean waters, host-associated environments, grass land environments, sandy soils and sediments, and forest soils), indicating the presence of amino acid signatures specific for each environment. These signatures correlate to those found in organisms. Nevertheless, relative amino acid abundance of organisms was more influenced by GC content than habitat or phylogeny. Conclusions Our results suggest that relative amino acid composition can be used as a signature of an environment. In addition, we observed that the relative amino acid composition of organisms is not highly determined by environment, reinforcing previous studies that find GC content to be the major factor correlating to amino acid composition in living organisms. PMID:24204807

  3. Biosynthesis of 'essential' amino acids by scleractinian corals.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, L M; Szmant, A M

    1997-02-15

    Animals rely on their diet for amino acids that they are incapable either of synthesizing or of synthesizing in sufficient quantities to meet metabolic needs. These are the so-called 'essential amino acids'. This set of amino acids is similar among the vertebrates and many of the invertebrates. Previously, no information was available for amino acid synthesis by the most primitive invertebrates, the Cnidaria. The purpose of this study was to examine amino acid synthesis by representative cnidarians within the Order Scleractinia. Three species of zooxanthellate reef coral, Montastraea faveolata, Acropora cervicornis and Porites divaricata, and two species of non-zooxanthellate coral, Tubastrea coccinea and Astrangia poculata, were incubated with 14C-labelled glucose or with the 14C-labelled amino acids glutamic acid, lysine or valine. Radiolabel tracer was followed into protein amino acids. A total of 17 amino acids, including hydroxyproline, were distinguishable by the techniques used. Of these, only threonine was not found radiolabelled in any of the samples. We could not detect tryptophan or cysteine, nor distinguish between the amino acid pairs glutamic acid and glutamine, or aspartic acid and asparagine. Eight amino acids normally considered essential for animals were made by the five corals tested, although some of them were made only in small quantities. These eight amino acids are valine, isoleucine, leucine, tyrosine, phenylalanine histidine, methionine and lysine. The ability of cnidarians to synthesize these amino acids could be yet another indicator of a separate evolutionary history of the cnidarians from the rest of the Metazoa. PMID:9078264

  4. Kinetic Trapping of Metastable Amino Acid Polymorphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Garth

    2014-06-01

    Second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy was integrated with synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) to test the Ostwald Rule of Stages, in which is hypothesized that crystals dynamically transition through metastable polymorphs before settling on the most thermodynamically favored form. The presence or absence of metastable forms has historically been challenging to probe due to the stochastic randomness of crystal nucleation coupled with the relatively short time-frame over which the metastable forms may survive. In this work, inkjet printing of a racemic amino acid solutions results in rapid solvent evaporation, placing crystallization under kinetic rather than thermodynamic control. SHG microscopy is used to rapidly and selectively identify the positions of metastable crystal forms. Coupling this measurement with synchrotron XRD allows diffraction analysis to be performed on individual inkjet printed dots of only a few pg of total material, prepared from single 1 pL droplets. In studies of amino acids, we have shown that the homochiral crystals emerge when printed, while those same solutions exclusively generate the racemic co-crystals upon slow solvent evaporation.

  5. Amino acid alphabet Twenty amino acids are used in all proteins with the exception of

    E-print Network

    Park, Sheldon

    selenium instead of sulfur #12;The relative abundances of individual amino acids on primordial earth were identify homologous proteins and is crucial for homology modeling The sequence structure relationship may nematodes to humans Consists of 3 alpha helices and a long N-terminal arm A consensus sequence can

  6. THIN-LAYER SEPARATION OF CITRIC ACID CYCLE INTERMEDIATES, LACTIC ACID, AND THE AMINO ACID TAURINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes a two-dimensional mixed-layer method for separating citric acid cycle intermediates, lactic acid and the amino acid taurine. The method cleanly separates all citric acid cycle intermediates tested, excepting citric acid and isocitric acid. The solvents are in...

  7. The bkdR Gene of Streptomyces coelicolor Is Required for Morphogenesis and Antibiotic Production and Encodes a Transcriptional Regulator of a BranchedChain Amino Acid Dehydrogenase Complex

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ondrej Sprusansky; Karen Stirrett; Deborah Skinner; Claudio Denoya; Janet Westpheling

    2005-01-01

    Products from the degradation of the branched-chain amino acids valine, leucine, and isoleucine contribute to the production of a number of important cellular metabolites, including branched-chain fatty acids, ATP and other energy production, cell-cell signaling for morphological development, and the synthesis of precursors for polyketide antibiotics. The first nonreversible reactions in the degradation of all three amino acids are catalyzed

  8. Extraterrestrial Amino Acids in the Almahata Sitta Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Aubrey, Andrew D.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Parker, Eric T.; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2009-01-01

    Amino acid analysis of a meteorite fragment of asteroid 2008 TC(sub 3) called Almahata Sitta was carried out using reverse-phase high-perfo rmance liquid chromatography coupled with UV fluorescence detection a nd time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-FD/ToF-MS) as part of a sam ple analysis consortium. HPLC analyses of hot-water extracts from the meteorite revealed a complex distribution of two- to six-carbon aliph atic amino acids and one- to three carbon amines with abundances rang ing from 0.5 to 149 parts-per-billion (ppb). The enantiomeric ratios of the amino acids alanine, Beta-amino-n-butyric acid (Beta-ABA), 2-amino-2- methylbutanoic acid (isovaline), and 2-aminopentanoic acid (no rvaline) in the meteorite were racemic (D/L approximately 1), indicat ing that these amino acids are indigenous to the meteorite and not te rrestrial contaminants. Several other non-protein amino acids were also identified in the meteorite above background levels including alpha -aminoisobutyric acid (alpha-AIB), 4-amino-2- methybutanoic acid, 4-a mino-3-methylbutanoic acid, and 3-, 4-, and 5-aminopentanoic acid. Th e total abundances of isovaline and AlB in Almahata Sitta are approximately 1000 times lower than the abundances of these amino acids found in the CM carbonaceous meteorite Murchison. The extremely love abund ances and unusual distribution of five carbon amino acids in Almahata Sitta compared to Cl, CM, and CR carbonaceous meteorites and may be due to extensive thermal alteration of amino acids on the parent aster oid by partial melting during formation or impact shock heating.

  9. Unprecedented concentrations of indigenous amino acids in primitive CR meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Martins, Zita; Alexander, Conel; Orzechowska, Grazyna; Fogel, Marylin

    CR meteorites are among the most primitive meteorites. We have performed pioneering work determining the compositional characteristics of amino acids in this type of carbonaceous chondrites. We report the first measurements of amino acids in Antarctic CR meteorites, two of which show the highest amino acid concentrations ever found in a chondrite. We have analyzed the amino acid content of the Antarctic CRs EET92042, GRA95229 and GRO95577 using high performance liquid chromatography with UV fluorescence detection (HPLC-FD) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Additionally, compound-specific carbon isotopic measurements for most of the individual amino acids from the EET92042 and GRA95229 meteorites were achieved by gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS). Our data show that EET92042 and GRA95229 are the most amino acid-rich chondrites ever analyzed, with total amino acid concentrations of 180 and 249 parts-per-million (ppm), respectively. GRO95577, however, is depleted in amino acids (<1 ppm). The most abundant amino acids present in the EET92042 and GRA95229 meteorites are the ?-amino acids glycine, isovaline, ?-aminoisobutyric acid (?-AIB), and alanine, with ? 13 C values ranging from +31.6% to +50.5%. The highly enriched carbon isotope results together with racemic enantiomeric ratios determined for most amino acids indicate that primitive organic matter was preserved in these meteorites. In addition, the relative abundances of ?-AIB and ?-alanine amongst Antarctic CR meteorites appear to correspond to the degree of aqueous alteration on their respective parent body. Investigating the abundances and isotopic composition of amino acids in primitive chondrites helps to understand the role of meteorites as a source of extraterrestrial prebiotic organic compounds to the early Earth.

  10. Geochemistry of amino acids in shells of the clam Saxidomus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.; Blunt, D.J.; McMenamin, M.A.; Straham, S.E.

    1980-01-01

    Concentrations of amino acids and their corresponding d l enantiomeric ratios have been measured in shells of the bivalve mollusk Saxidomus from eleven localities, ranging in age from modern to probably more than 500,000 yr, along the Pacific coast of North America. Natural logarithms of amino acid concentrations correlate well with d l ratios, and the relationship provides a possible guide to the selection of fossils for use in amino acid dating. The relative order of the extents of racemization of amino acids at any given time appears to change with increasing sample age. Application of the amino acid dating method to shells from Whidbey Island, Washington, yields an age of about 80,000 yr, in contrast to the previously determined radiocarbon age of 36,000 yr which was measured on some shell carbonate and considered a minimum age. The amino acid age is compatible with the geologic record in the area. ?? 1980.

  11. Distribution and Origin of Amino Acids in Lunar Regolith Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, J. E.; Callahan, M. P.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.; McLain, H. L.; Noble, S. K.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    The existence of organic compounds on the lunar surface has been a question of interest from the Apollo era to the present. Investigations of amino acids immediately after collection of lunar samples yielded inconclusive identifications, in part due to analytical limitations including insensitivity to certain compounds, an inability to separate enantiomers, and lack of compound-specific isotopic measurements. It was not possible to determine if the detected amino acids were indigenous to the lunar samples or the result of terrestrial contamination. Recently, we presented initial data from the analysis of amino acid abundances in 12 lunar regolith samples and discussed those results in the context of four potential amino acid sources [5]. Here, we expand on our previous work, focusing on amino acid abundances and distributions in seven regolith samples and presenting the first compound-specific carbon isotopic ratios measured for amino acids in a lunar sample.

  12. Survival of Amino Acids in Micrometeorites During Atmospheric Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2003-01-01

    The delivery of amino acids by micrometeorites to the early Earth during the period of heavy bombardment could have been a significant source of the Earth's prebiotic amino acid inventory provided that these organic compounds survived atmospheric entry heating. To investigate the sublimation of amino acids from a micrometeorite analog at elevated temperature, grains from the CM-type carbonaceous chondrite Murchison were heated to 550 C inside a glass sublimation apparatus (SA) under reduced pressure. The sublimed residue that had collected on the cold finger of the SA after heating was analyzed for amino acids by HPLC. We found that when the temperature of the meteorite reached approx. 150 C, a large fraction of the amino acid glycine had vaporized from the meteorite, recondensed onto the end of the SA cold finger, and survived as the rest of the grains heated to 550 C. alpha-Aminoisobutryic acid and isovaline, which are two of the most abundant non-protein amino acids in Murchison, did not sublime from the meteorite and were completely destroyed during the heating experiment. Our experimental results suggest that sublimation of glycine present in micrometeorite grains may provide a way for this amino acid to survive atmospheric entry heating at temperatures less than 550 C; all other amino acids apparently are destroyed. Key Words: Amino acids-Exogenous delivery-Micrometeorites-Sublimation.

  13. Diversity of amino acids in a typical chernozem of Moldova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frunze, N. I.

    2014-12-01

    The content and composition of the amino acids in typical chernozems were studied. The objects of the study included a reference soil under an old fallow and three variants under fodder crop rotations: not fertilized, with mineral fertilizers, and with organic fertilizers. The contents of 18 amino acids were determined in these soils. The amino acids were extracted by the method of acid hydrolysis and identified by the method of ion-exchange chromatography. The total content of most of the amino acids was maximal in the reference soil; it was much lower in the cultivated soils and decreased in the following sequence: organic background > mineral background > no fertilization. The diversity of amino acids was evaluated quantitatively using different parameters applied in ecology for estimating various aspects of the species composition of communities (Simpson, Margalef, Menhinick, and Shannon's indices). The diversity and contribution of different amino acids to the total pool of amino acids also varied significantly in the studied variants. The maximum diversity of amino acids and maximum evenness of their relative abundance indices were typical of the reference chernozem; these parameters were lower in the cultivated soils. It was concluded that the changes in the structure of the amino acids under the impact of agricultural loads are similar to those that are usually observed under stress conditions.

  14. Trophic spectra under the lens of amino acid isotopic analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent advances in compound specific isotopic ratio analysis (CSIRA) have allowed researchers to measure trophic fractionation of 15N in specific amino acids, namely glutamic acid and phenylalanine. These amino acids have proven useful in food web studies because of the wide and consistent disparity...

  15. Salt stress-induced proline transporters and salt stress-repressed broad specificity amino acid permeases identified by suppression of a yeast amino acid permease-targeting mutant

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Doris Rentsch; B. Hirner; W. B. Frommer

    1996-01-01

    A yeast mutant lacking SHR3, a protein specifically required for correct targeting of plasma membrane amino acid permeases, was used to study the targeting of plant transporters and as a tool to isolate new SHR3-independent amino acid transporters. For this purpose, an shr3 mutant was transformed with an Arabidopsis cDNA library. Thirty-four clones were capable of growth under selective conditions,

  16. Transport activity-dependent intracellular sorting of the yeast general amino acid permease

    E-print Network

    Cain, Natalie Elaine

    Intracellular trafficking of the general amino acid permease, Gap1p, of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is regulated by amino acid abundance. When amino acids are scarce Gap1p is sorted to the plasma membrane, whereas when amino ...

  17. Amino acids of the Murchison meteorite. II - Five carbon acyclic primary beta-, gamma-, and delta-amino alkanoic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronin, J. R.; Pizzarello, S.; Yuen, G. U.

    1985-01-01

    The five-carbon acyclic primary beta, gamma, and delta amino alkanoic acids of the Murchison meteorite are studied using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and ion exchange chromatography. The chromatograms reveal that alpha is the most abundant monoamino alkanoic acid followed by gamma and beta, and an exponential increase in the amount of amino acid is observed as the carbon number increases in the homologous series. The influence of frictional heating, spontaneous thermal decomposition, and radiation of the synthesis of amino acids is examined. The data obtained support an amino acid synthesis process involving random combination of single-carbon precursors.

  18. BranchedChain Amino Acids and Brain Function

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John D. Fernstrom

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) influence brain function by modifying large, neutral amino acid (LNAA) transport at the blood-brain barrier. Transport is shared by several LNAAs, notably the BCAAs and the aromatic amino acids (ArAAs), and is competitive. Consequently, when plasma BCAA concentrations rise, which can occur in response to food ingestion or BCAA administration, or with the onset of certain

  19. Which Amino Acids Should Be Used in Prebiotic Chemistry Studies?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dimas A. M. Zaia; Cássia Thaïs B. V. Zaia; Henrique De Santana

    2008-01-01

    The adsorption of amino acids on minerals and their condensation under conditions that resemble those of prebiotic earth is\\u000a a well studied subject. However, which amino acids should be used in these experiments is still an open question. The main\\u000a goal of this review is to attempt to answer this question. There were two sources of amino acids for the

  20. Amino acids regulate the transcription, internal sorting, and intrinsic activity of the general amino acid permease (GAP1) in S. cerevisiae

    E-print Network

    Risinger, April L. (April Lynn)

    2007-01-01

    The high capacity general amino acid permease in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (GAP1) is regulated such that it actively imports amino acids into the cell from the extracellular medium only when internal amino acid levels are ...

  1. Prebiotic Amino Acid Thioester Synthesis: Thiol-Dependent Amino Acid Synthesis from Formose Substrates (Formaldehyde and Glycolaldehyde) and Ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    1998-06-01

    Formaldehyde and glycolaldehyde (substrates of the formose autocatalytic cycle) were shown to react with ammonia yielding alanine and homoserine under mild aqueous conditions in the presence of thiol catalysts. Since similar reactions carried out without ammonia yielded ?-hydroxy acid thioesters (Weber, 1984a, b), the thiol-dependent synthesis of alanine and homoserine is presumed to occur via amino acid thioesters - intermediates capable of forming peptides (Weber and Orgel 1979). A pH 5.2 solution of 20 mM formaldehyde, 20 mM glycolaldehyde, 20 mM ammonium chloride, 23 mM 3-mercaptopropionic acid, and 23 mM acetic acid that reacted for 35 days at 40°C yielded (based on initial formaldehyde) 1.8% alanine and 0.08% homoserine. In the absence of thiol catalyst, the synthesis of alanine and homoserine was negligible. Alanine synthesis required both formaldehyde and glycolaldehyde, but homoserine synthesis required only glycolaldehyde. At 25 days the efficiency of alanine synthesis calculated from the ratio of alanine synthesized to formaldehyde reacted was 2.1%, and the yield (based on initial formaldehyde) of triose and tetrose intermediates involved in alanine and homoserine synthesis was 0.3 and 2.1%, respectively. Alanine synthesis was also seen in similar reactions containing only 10 mM each of aldehyde substrates, ammonia, and thiol. The prebiotic significance of these reactions that use the formose reaction to generate sugar intermediates that are converted to reactive amino acid thioesters is discussed.

  2. Recognition of specific patterns of amino acid inhibition of growth in higher plants, uncomplicated by glutamine-reversible `general amino acid inhibition'

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carol A Bonner; Roy A Jensen

    1997-01-01

    The complexity of the regulatory mechanisms that govern amino acid biosynthesis, particularly in multibranched pathways, frequently results in sensitivity to growth inhibition by exogenous amino acids. Usually the inhibition caused by a given amino acid(s) is relieved by another amino acid(s), thus indicating the cause of inhibition to be a specific interference with endogenous formation of the latter amino acid(s).

  3. Synthesis of alpha-amino acids

    DOEpatents

    Davis, J.W. Jr.

    1983-01-25

    A method is described for synthesizing alpha amino acids proceeding through novel intermediates of the formulas: R[sub 1]R[sub 2]C(OSOCl)CN, R[sub 1]R[sub 2]C(Cl)CN and [R[sub 1]R[sub 2]C(CN)O][sub 2]SO wherein R[sub 1] and R[sub 2] are each selected from hydrogen monovalent substituted and unsubstituted hydrocarbon radicals of 1 to 10 carbon atoms. The use of these intermediates allows the synthesis steps to be exothermic and results in an overall synthesis method which is faster than the synthesis methods of the prior art. No Drawings

  4. Kinetic Trapping of Metastable Amino Acid Polymorphs

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy measurements indicate that inkjet-printed racemic solutions of amino acids can produce nanocrystals trapped in metastable polymorph forms upon rapid solvent evaporation. Polymorphism impacts the composition, distribution, and physico-kinetic properties of organic solids, with energetic arguments favoring the most stable polymorph. In this study, unfavored noncentrosymmetric crystal forms were observed by SHG microscopy. Polarization-dependent SHG measurement and synchrotron X-ray microdiffraction analysis of individual printed drops are consistent with formation of homochiral crystal production. Fundamentally, these results provide evidence supporting the ubiquity of Ostwald’s Rule of Stages, describing the hypothesized transitioning of crystals between metastable polymorphic forms in the early stages of crystal formation. Practically, the presence of homochiral metastable forms has implications on chiral resolution and on solid form preparations relying on rapid solvent evaporation. PMID:24451055

  5. Nutritionally essential amino acids and metabolic signaling in aging

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, E. Lichar

    2012-01-01

    Aging is associated with a gradual decline in skeletal muscle mass and strength leading to increased risk for functional impairments. Although basal rates of protein synthesis and degradation are largely unaffected with age, the sensitivity of older muscle cells to the anabolic actions of essential amino acids appears to decline. The major pathway through which essential amino acids induce anabolic responses involves the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) Complex 1, a signaling pathway that is especially sensitive to regulation by the branched chain amino acid leucine. Recent evidence suggests that muscle of older individuals require increasing concentrations of leucine to maintain robust anabolic responses through the mTOR pathway. While the exact mechanisms for the age related alterations in nutritional signaling through the mTOR pathway remain elusive, there is increasing evidence that decreased sensitivity to insulin action, reductions in endothelial function, and increased oxidative stress may be underlying factors in this decrease in anabolic sensitivity. Ensuring adequate nutrition, including sources of high quality protein, and promoting regular physical activity will remain among the frontline defenses against the onset of sarcopenia in older individuals. PMID:23239011

  6. Patterns of Amino Acid Metabolism by Proliferating Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schop, Deborah; Spitters, Tim W.G.M.; van Dijkhuizen-Radersma, Riemke; Bracke, Madelon; de Bruijn, Joost D.; Martens, Dirk; Karperien, Marcel; van Boxtel, Anton; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A.

    2012-01-01

    The nutritional requirements of stem cells have not been determined; in particular, the amino acid metabolism of stem cells is largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the amino acid metabolism of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), with focus on two questions: Which amino acids are consumed and/or secreted by hMSCs and at what rates? To answer these questions, hMSCs were cultured on tissue culture plastic and in a bioreactor, and their amino acid profile was analyzed. The results showed that the kinetics of hMSCs growth and amino acid metabolism were significantly higher for hMSCs in tissue culture plastic than in the bioreactor. Despite differences in culture conditions, 8 essential and 6 nonessential amino acids were consumed by hMSCs in both tissue culture plastic and bioreactor cultures. Glutamine was the most consumed amino acid with significantly higher rates than for any other amino acid. The metabolism of nonessential amino acids by hMSCs deviated significantly from that of other cell lines. The secretion of alanine, glycine, glutamate, and ornithine by hMSCs showed that there is a strong overflow metabolism that can be due to the high concentrations of amino acids provided in the medium. In addition, the data showed that there is a metabolic pattern for proliferating hMSCs, which can contribute to the design of medium without animal serum for stem cells. Further, this study shows how to implement amino acid rates and metabolic principles in three-dimensional stem cell biology. PMID:21943055

  7. Understanding and identifying amino acid repeats

    PubMed Central

    Nijveen, Harm

    2014-01-01

    Amino acid repeats (AARs) are abundant in protein sequences. They have particular roles in protein function and evolution. Simple repeat patterns generated by DNA slippage tend to introduce length variations and point mutations in repeat regions. Loss of normal and gain of abnormal function owing to their variable length are potential risks leading to diseases. Repeats with complex patterns mostly refer to the functional domain repeats, such as the well-known leucine-rich repeat and WD repeat, which are frequently involved in protein–protein interaction. They are mainly derived from internal gene duplication events and stabilized by ‘gate-keeper’ residues, which play crucial roles in preventing inter-domain aggregation. AARs are widely distributed in different proteomes across a variety of taxonomic ranges, and especially abundant in eukaryotic proteins. However, their specific evolutionary and functional scenarios are still poorly understood. Identifying AARs in protein sequences is the first step for the further investigation of their biological function and evolutionary mechanism. In principle, this is an NP-hard problem, as most of the repeat fragments are shaped by a series of sophisticated evolutionary events and become latent periodical patterns. It is not possible to define a uniform criterion for detecting and verifying various repeat patterns. Instead, different algorithms based on different strategies have been developed to cope with different repeat patterns. In this review, we attempt to describe the amino acid repeat-detection algorithms currently available and compare their strategies based on an in-depth analysis of the biological significance of protein repeats. PMID:23418055

  8. Evaluation of various sulphur amino acid compounds in the diet of red drum, Sciaenops ocellatus

    E-print Network

    Goff, Jonathan B

    2003-01-01

    Refinement of diet formulations to enhance the efficiency of red drum production continues to be pursued. Based on previous studies, the sulfur amino acid (SAA) requirement of red drum for methionine plus cystine appears to be most limiting, which...

  9. Amino acid fermentation at the origin of the genetic code

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    There is evidence that the genetic code was established prior to the existence of proteins, when metabolism was powered by ribozymes. Also, early proto-organisms had to rely on simple anaerobic bioenergetic processes. In this work I propose that amino acid fermentation powered metabolism in the RNA world, and that this was facilitated by proto-adapters, the precursors of the tRNAs. Amino acids were used as carbon sources rather than as catalytic or structural elements. In modern bacteria, amino acid fermentation is known as the Stickland reaction. This pathway involves two amino acids: the first undergoes oxidative deamination, and the second acts as an electron acceptor through reductive deamination. This redox reaction results in two keto acids that are employed to synthesise ATP via substrate-level phosphorylation. The Stickland reaction is the basic bioenergetic pathway of some bacteria of the genus Clostridium. Two other facts support Stickland fermentation in the RNA world. First, several Stickland amino acid pairs are synthesised in abiotic amino acid synthesis. This suggests that amino acids that could be used as an energy substrate were freely available. Second, anticodons that have complementary sequences often correspond to amino acids that form Stickland pairs. The main hypothesis of this paper is that pairs of complementary proto-adapters were assigned to Stickland amino acids pairs. There are signatures of this hypothesis in the genetic code. Furthermore, it is argued that the proto-adapters formed double strands that brought amino acid pairs into proximity to facilitate their mutual redox reaction, structurally constraining the anticodon pairs that are assigned to these amino acid pairs. Significance tests which randomise the code are performed to study the extent of the variability of the energetic (ATP) yield. Random assignments can lead to a substantial yield of ATP and maintain enough variability, thus selection can act and refine the assignments into a proto-code that optimises the energetic yield. Monte Carlo simulations are performed to evaluate the establishment of these simple proto-codes, based on amino acid substitutions and codon swapping. In all cases, donor amino acids are assigned to anticodons composed of U+G, and have low redundancy (1-2 codons), whereas acceptor amino acids are assigned to the the remaining codons. These bioenergetic and structural constraints allow for a metabolic role for amino acids before their co-option as catalyst cofactors. Reviewers: this article was reviewed by Prof. William Martin, Prof. Eörs Szathmáry (nominated by Dr. Gáspár Jékely) and Dr. Ádám Kun (nominated by Dr. Sandor Pongor) PMID:22325238

  10. The biosynthetic gene cluster for coronamic acid, an ethylcyclopropyl amino acid, contains genes homologous to amino acid-activating enzymes and thioesterases.

    PubMed Central

    Ullrich, M; Bender, C L

    1994-01-01

    Coronamic acid (CMA), an ethylcyclopropyl amino acid derived from isoleucine, functions as an intermediate in the biosynthesis of coronatine, a chlorosis-inducing phytotoxin produced by Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea PG4180. The DNA required for CMA biosynthesis (6.9 kb) was sequenced, revealing three distinct open reading frames (ORFs) which share a common orientation for transcription. The deduced amino acid sequence of a 2.7-kb ORF designated cmaA contained six core sequences and two conserved motifs which are present in a variety of amino acid-activating enzymes, including nonribosomal peptide synthetases. Furthermore, CmaA contained a spatial arrangement of histidine, aspartate, and arginine residues which are conserved in the ferrous active site of some nonheme iron(II) enzymes which catalyze oxidative cyclizations. The deduced amino acid sequence of a 1.2-kb ORF designated cmaT was related to thioesterases of both procaryotic and eucaryotic origins. These data suggest that CMA assembly is similar to the thiotemplate mechanism of nonribosomal peptide synthesis. No significant similarities between a 0.9-kb ORF designated cmaU and other database entries were found. The start sites of two transcripts required for CMA biosynthesis were identified in the present study. pRG960sd, a vector containing a promoterless glucuronidase gene, was used to localize and study the promoter regions upstream of the two transcripts. Data obtained in the present study indicate that CMA biosynthesis is regulated at the transcriptional level by temperature. Images PMID:8002582

  11. Contribution of bacterial cells to lacustrine organic matter based on amino sugars and D-amino acids

    E-print Network

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    23 April 2012 Abstract Amino sugars (ASs), D-amino acids (D-AAs), and bacterial cell counts were acids (AAs), neutral sugars, and amino sug- ars (ASs) (Cowie and Hedges, 1992; Benner and Kaiser, 2003Contribution of bacterial cells to lacustrine organic matter based on amino sugars and D-amino

  12. Amino Acids Regulate Transgene Expression in MDCK Cells

    PubMed Central

    Torrente, Marta; Guetg, Adriano; Sass, Jörn Oliver; Arps, Lisa; Ruckstuhl, Lisa; Camargo, Simone M. R.; Verrey, François

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression and cell growth rely on the intracellular concentration of amino acids, which in metazoans depends on extracellular amino acid availability and transmembrane transport. To investigate the impact of extracellular amino acid concentrations on the expression of a concentrative amino acid transporter, we overexpressed the main kidney proximal tubule luminal neutral amino acid transporter B0AT1-collectrin (SLC6A19-TMEM27) in MDCK cell epithelia. Exogenously expressed proteins co-localized at the luminal membrane and mediated neutral amino acid uptake. However, the transgenes were lost over few cell culture passages. In contrast, the expression of a control transgene remained stable. To test whether this loss was due to inappropriately high amino acid uptake, freshly transduced MDCK cell lines were cultivated either with physiological amounts of amino acids or with the high concentration found in standard cell culture media. Expression of exogenous transporters was unaffected by physiological amino acid concentration in the media. Interestingly, mycoplasma infection resulted in a significant increase in transgene expression and correlated with the rapid metabolism of L-arginine. However, L-arginine metabolites were shown to play no role in transgene expression. In contrast, activation of the GCN2 pathway revealed by an increase in eIF2? phosphorylation may trigger transgene derepression. Taken together, high extracellular amino acid concentration provided by cell culture media appears to inhibit the constitutive expression of concentrative amino acid transporters whereas L-arginine depletion by mycoplasma induces the expression of transgenes possibly via stimulation of the GCN2 pathway. PMID:24797296

  13. Preferential Treatment: Interaction Between Amino Acids and Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crapster-Pregont, E. J.; Cleaves, H. J.; Hazen, R. M.

    2008-12-01

    Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins and are important for some models of the origin of life. Polymerization of amino acids from dilute solution is unlikely without a scaffold or catalyst. The surfaces of early Earth minerals are the most likely candidates for this role. The surface adsorption behavior of 12 amino acids (L-alanine, L-serine, L-aspartic acid, L-proline, L- phenylalanine, L-valine, L-arginine, d-amino valeric acid, glycine, L-lysine, L-isoleucine, and B-alanine) on 21 minerals (quartz, calcite, enstatite, illite, olivine, pyrrhotite, pyrite, alkali basalt, albite, analcime, chlorite, barite, hydroxyl apatite, hematite, magnetite, aluminum hydroxide, kaolin, silica gel, corundum, rutile, and montmorillonite) was determined via batch adsorption experiments. Absorption was determined for concentrations between 10-4M and 10-6M in the presence of 0.1M NaCl, and between pH values of 3 and 9 at 25 degrees C. The equilibrated solutions were centrifuged, filtered, derivatized using a fluorescent amino group tag (dansyl-chloride) and analyzed by HPLC. Adsorption was standardized using BET surface area measurements for each mineral to give the number of mols of each amino acid adsorbed per square meter for each mineral. The results indicate an enormous difference in the adsorption of amino acids between minerals, along with major differences in the adsorption of individual amino acids on the same mineral surface. There is also a change in the absorbance of amino acids as the pH changes. Many previous studies of amino acid concentration and catalysis by minerals have used clay minerals because of their high surface areas, however, this data suggests that the surfaces of minerals such as calcite, quartz and pyrite have even higher affinities for amino acids. The results suggest mineral surfaces that could be optimal locations for the polymerization of molecules linked to the origin of life.

  14. Synthesis of gold nanoparticles using various amino acids.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Tatsuo; Fujimoto, Yuhei; Maekawa, Tetsuya

    2015-06-01

    Gold nanoparticles (4-7nm) were synthesized from tetraauric acid using various amino acids as reducing and capping agents. The gold nanoparticles were produced from the incubation of a AuCl4(-) solution with an amino acid at 80°C for 20min. Among the twenty amino acids tested, several amino acids produced gold nanoparticles. The color of the nanoparticle solutions varied with the amino acids used for the reduction. We adopted l-histidine as a reducing agent and investigated the effects of the synthesis conditions on the gold nanoparticles. The His and AuCl4(-) concentrations affected the size of the gold nanoparticles and their aggregates. The pH of the reaction solution also affected the reaction yields and the shape of the gold nanoparticles. PMID:25591824

  15. Survival of Amino Acids in Micrometeorites During Atmospheric Entry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2001-09-01

    The delivery of amino acids by micrometeorites to the early Earth during the period of heavy bombardment could have been a significant source of the Earth's prebiotic amino acid inventory provided that these organic compounds survived atmospheric entry heating. To investigate the sublimation of amino acids from a micrometeorite analog at elevated temperature, grains from the CM-type carbonaceous chondrite Murchison were heated to 550°C inside a glass sublimation apparatus (SA) under reduced pressure. The sublimed residue that had collected on the cold finger of the SA after heating was analyzed for amino acids by HPLC. We found that when the temperature of the meteorite reached ~150°C, a large fraction of the amino acid glycine had vaporized from the meteorite, recondensed onto the end of the SA cold finger, and survived as the rest of the grains heated to 550°C. ?-Aminoisobutryic acid and isovaline, which are two of the most abundant non-protein amino acids in Murchison, did not sublime from the meteorite and were completely destroyed during the heating experiment. Our experimental results suggest that sublimation of glycine present in micrometeorite grains may provide a way for this amino acid to survive atmospheric entry heating at temperatures >550°C; all other amino acids apparently are destroyed.

  16. Substrate specificity of amino acid transport in sheep erythrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Young, J D; Ellory, J C

    1977-01-01

    The specificity of amino acid transport in normal (high-glutathione) sheep erythrocytes was investigated by studying the interaction of various neutral and dibasic amino acids in both competition and exchange experiments. Apparent Ki values were obtained for amino acids as inhibitors of L-alanine influx. Amino acids previously found to be transported by high-glutathione cells at fast rates (L-cysteine, L-alpha-amino-n-butyrate) were the most effective inhibitors. D-Alanine and D-alpha-amino-n-butyrate were without effect. Of the remaining amino acids studied, only L-norvaline, L-valine, L-norleucine, L-serine and L-2,4-diamino-n-butyrate significantly inhibited L-alanine uptake. L-Alanine efflux from pre-loaded cells was markedly stimulated by extracellular L-alanine. Those amino acids that inhibited L-alanine influx also stimulated L-alanine efflux. In addition, D-alanine, D-alpha-amino-n-biutyrate, L-threonine, L-asparagine, L-alpha, beta-diaminoproprionate, L-ornithine, L-lysine and S-2-aminoethyl-L-cysteine also significantly stimulated L-alanine efflux. L-Lysine uptake was inhibited by L-alanine but not by D-alanine, and the inhibitory potency of L-alanine was not influenced by the replacement of Na+ in the incubation medium with choline. L-Lysine efflux from pre-loaded cells was stimulated by L-alanine but not by D-alanine. It is concluded that these cells possess a highly selective stero-specific amino acid-transport system. Although the optimum substrates are small neutral amino acids, this system also has a significant affinity for dibasic amino acids. PMID:849280

  17. Small-intestinal or colonic microbiota as a potential amino acid source in animals.

    PubMed

    Bergen, Werner G

    2015-02-01

    Factors affecting physiological impacts of the microbiome on protein nutrition are discussed for hind-gut fermenters (humans, pigs, rodents). The microbiome flourishes in all gastrointestinal organs, and is a major source of amino acids to fore-gut fermenting animals. In humans, rats and pigs the net effect of microbiome biomass synthesis on amino acid requirements is much less certain. Dietary proteins, amino acids, peptides, endogenous-secreted protein and recycled urea may all be utilized as nitrogen source by growing bacteria in the small intestine and colon. The inclusions of radiolabelled amino acid precursors will result in labeled bacteria which can be digested and absorbed in the ileum and to some degree in the colon. This does not necessarily indicate a significant nutritional role of the microbiome in humans, pigs and rodents. The physiological attributes required for small-intestinal and colon microbiome utilization are a vigorous proteolytic digestion with pancreatic or intestinal enzymes and the presence of amino acid transporters. Findings to date seem to suggest that these two physiological attributes for effective bacterial protein utilization are present in the small intestine; however, these attributes have a much lower capacity/impact in the colon. The gastrointestinal microbiome is likely a protein source of medium to high nutritional quality, but overall the microbiome is not an important amino acid source in humans and animals fed amino acids at requirement levels. PMID:25466904

  18. Polymerization of beta-amino acids in aqueous solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, R.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    We have compared carbonyl diimidazole (CDI) and 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDAC) as activating agents for the oligomerization of negatively-charged alpha- and beta-amino acids in homogeneous aqueous solution. alpha-Amino acids can be oligomerized efficiently using CDI, but not by EDAC. beta-Amino acids can be oligomerized efficiently using EDAC, but not by CDI. Aspartic acid, an alpha- and beta-dicarboxylic acid is oligomerized efficiently by both reagents. These results are explained in terms of the mechanisms of the reactions, and their relevance to prebiotic chemistry is discussed.

  19. Terrestrial evolution of polymerization of amino acids - Heat to ATP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.; Nakashima, T.

    1981-01-01

    Sets of amino acids containing sufficient trifunctional monomer are thermally polymerized at temperatures such as 65 deg; the amino acids order themselves. Various polymers have diverse catalytic activities. The polymers aggregate, in aqueous solution, to cell-like structures having those activities plus emergent properties, e.g. proliferatability. Polyamino acids containing sufficient lysine catalyze conversion of free amino acids, by ATP, to small peptides and a high molecular weight fraction. The lysine-rich proteinoid is active in solution, within suspensions of cell-like particles, or in other particles composed of lysine-rich proteinoid and homopolyribonucleotide. Selectivities are observed. An archaic polyamino acid prelude to coded protein synthesis is indicated.

  20. Microwave-Assisted Esterification of Diverse Carboxylic Acids and Chiral Amino Acids

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Qian Yang; Xiao-jian Wang; Zhi-yu Li; Li Sun; Qi-dong You

    2008-01-01

    A facile and efficient synthetic method of esters from their corresponding carboxylic acids and amino acids is described. The esterification reaction of carboxylic acids and amino acids could be greatly accelerated under microwave irradiation because the reactions described in this article took place in only 5 min with almost quantitative yields, and distinct acidity of catalytic acids was well tolerated. Unlike

  1. Amino Acid Racemization and the Preservation of Ancient DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poinar, Hendrik N.; Hoss, Matthias

    1996-01-01

    The extent of racemization of aspartic acid, alanine, and leucine provides criteria for assessing whether ancient tissue samples contain endogenous DNA. In samples in which the D/L ratio of aspartic acid exceeds 0.08, ancient DNA sequences could not be retrieved. Paleontological finds from which DNA sequences purportedly millions of years old have been reported show extensive racemization, and the amino acids present are mainly contaminates. An exception is the amino acids in some insects preserved in amber.

  2. Boron containing amino acid compounds and methods for their use

    DOEpatents

    Glass, John D. (Shoreham, NY); Coderre, Jeffrey A. (Wading River, NY)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides new boron containing amino acid compounds and methods for making these compounds by contacting melphalan or another nitrogen mustard derivative and sodium borocaptate. The present invention also provides a method of treating a mammal having a tumor by administering to the mammal a therapeutically effective amount of the new boron containing amino acid compounds.

  3. Structural Basis of Amino Acid alpha Helix Propensity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Blaber; Xue-Jun Zhang; Brian W. Matthews

    1993-01-01

    The propensity of an amino acid to form an alpha helix in a protein was determined by multiple amino substitutions at positions 44 and 131 in T4 lysozyme. These positions are solvent-exposed sites within the alpha helices that comprise, respectively, residues 39 to 50 and 126 to 134. Except for two acidic substitutions that may be involved in salt bridges,

  4. Amino Acid Diets and Maximal Growth in the Rat

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Q. R. ROGERS ANDA; E. HARPER

    Amino acid diets fed in an agar gel have been found to support weight gains of rats as great or greater than those obtained with diets containing an equiva lent quantity of casein supplemented with methionine. Over 1% arginine, 0.6% asparagine and feeding the diet in gel form were necessary to obtain maximal weight gain. The diet contained amino acids

  5. Parenteral amino acid intakes in critically ill children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Parenteral amino acid formulas used in parenteral nutrition have a variable composition. To determine the amino acid intake of parenterally fed, critically ill children, and compare it with recommended dietary allowances (RDA) established by the Institute of Medicine (IOM), we retrospectively review...

  6. EFFECT OF LEAD ON GAMMA AMINO BUTYRIC ACID SYNTHESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The project studies the inhibitory effect of lead on the enzymatic activity of brain glutamic amino acid decarboxylase (GADC). The enzyme is responsible for the catalytic formation of gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) inhibitory neurons which is believed to be involved with the tra...

  7. Amino Acid Difference Formula to Help Explain Protein Evolution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Grantham

    1974-01-01

    A formula for difference between amino acids combines properties that correlate best with protein residue substitution frequencies: composition, polarity, and molecular volume. Substitution frequencies agree much better with overall chemical difference between exchanging residues than with minimum base changes between their codons. Correlation coefficients show that fixation of mutations between dissimilar amino acids is generally rare.

  8. Prediction of protein antigenic determinants from amino acid sequences

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. P. Hopp; K. R. Woods

    1981-01-01

    A method is presented for locating protein antigenic determinants by analyzing amino acid sequences in order to find the point of greatest local hydrophilicity. This is accomplished by assigning each amino acid a numerical value (hydrophilicity value) and then repetitively averaging these values along the peptide chain. The point of highest local average hydrophilicity is invariably located in, or immediately

  9. Multiplexed amino acid array utilizing bioluminescent Escherichia coli auxotrophs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Moon Il; Yu, Byung Jo; Woo, Min-Ah; Cho, Daeyeon; Dordick, Jonathan S; Cho, June Hyoung; Choi, Byung-Ok; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2010-05-15

    We describe a novel multiplex "amino acid array" for simultaneously quantifying different amino acids based on the rapid growth of amino acid auxotrophic E. coli. First, we constructed genetically engineered amino acid auxotrophs of E. coli containing a bioluminescence reporter gene, yielding concomitant luminescence as a response to cell growth, and then immobilized the reporter cells within individual agarose of respective wells in a 96-well plate serving as a mimic of a biochip. Using the amino acid array, we were able to determine quantitatively the concentrations of 16 amino acids in biological fluid by simply measuring bioluminescent signals from the immobilized cells within 4 h without pre- and post-treatment. The clinical utility of this method was verified by quantifying different amino acids in dried blood spot specimens from clinical samples for the diagnosis of metabolic diseases of newborn babies. This method serves as a convenient route to the rapid and simultaneous analysis of multiple amino acids from complex biological fluids and represents a new analytical paradigm that can replace conventional, yet laborious methods currently in use. PMID:20405822

  10. Synthesis and Characterization of Novel Bi and Tricyclic ?-Amino Acids

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthew R. Johnson; Jolicia F. Gauuan; Cheng Guo; Peter R. Guzzo; Van-Duc Le; Rajesh A. Shenoy; James Hamby; Howard Roark; Michael Stier; John E. Mangette

    2011-01-01

    As part of a medicinal chemistry collaboration, a number of novel bi- and tricyclic ?-amino acids were prepared through various routes and characterized by H nuclear Overhauser effect difference experiments. The syntheses provide a number of routes to access some highly substituted amino acid derivatives that have not been reported previously. It is envisaged that the chemistry described here could

  11. The Amino Acid Sequence of beta Galactosidase of Escherichia coli

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Audree V. Fowler; Irving Zabin

    1977-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of beta -galactosidase was determined. The protein contains 1021 amino acid residues in a single polypeptide chain. The subunit molecular weight calculated from the sequence is 116,248. The sequence determination, carried out mainly by conventional methods, was aided by complementation tests, by the use of termination mutant strains, and by a new immunochemical method. The five

  12. The amino acid sequence of snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina) ribonuclease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cornelis Schüller; Jaap J. Beintema; Jaap Broos; Janneke Meulenberg

    1985-01-01

    Snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina) ribonuclease was isolated from pancreatic tissue. Turtle ribonuclease binds much more weakly to the affinity chromatography matrix used than mammalian ribonucleases. The amino acid sequence was determined from overlapping peptides obtained from three different digests. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the protein determined by others and homology were used as additional evidence for several overlaps.

  13. Targets of Amino Acid Restriction in Prostate Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    The objective of this application is to identify the molecular target(s) by which specific amino acid dependency modulates the viability and invasiveness of human androgen-independent prostate cancer calls. We hypothesize that specific amino acid-regulated invasion is dependent on the inhibition of FAK and its binding partners.

  14. Interactive Hangman Teaches Amino Acid Structures and Abbreviations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennington, Britney O.; Sears, Duane; Clegg, Dennis O.

    2014-01-01

    We developed an interactive exercise to teach students how to draw the structures of the 20 standard amino acids and to identify the one-letter abbreviations by modifying the familiar game of "Hangman." Amino acid structures were used to represent single letters throughout the game. To provide additional practice in identifying…

  15. Subcritical water extraction of amino acids from Atacama Desert soils

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xenia Amashukeli; Christine C. Pelletier; James P. Kirby; Frank J. Grunthaner

    2007-01-01

    Amino acids are considered organic molecular indicators in the search for extant and extinct life in the Solar System. Extraction of these molecules from a particulate solid matrix, such as Martian regolith, will be critical to their in situ detection and analysis. The goals of this study were to optimize a laboratory amino acid extraction protocol by quantitatively measuring the

  16. Subcritical water extraction of amino acids from Atacama Desert soils

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xenia Amashukeli; Christine C. Pelletier; James P. Kirby; Frank J. Grunthaner

    2007-01-01

    (1) Amino acids are considered organic molecular indicators in the search for extant and extinct life in the Solar System. Extraction of these molecules from a particulate solid matrix, such as Martian regolith, will be critical to their in situ detection and analysis. The goals of this study were to optimize a laboratory amino acid extraction protocol by quantitatively measuring

  17. Extraordinarily Adaptive Properties of the Genetically Encoded Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Ilardo, Melissa; Meringer, Markus; Freeland, Stephen; Rasulev, Bakhtiyor; Cleaves II, H. James

    2015-01-01

    Using novel advances in computational chemistry, we demonstrate that the set of 20 genetically encoded amino acids, used nearly universally to construct all coded terrestrial proteins, has been highly influenced by natural selection. We defined an adaptive set of amino acids as one whose members thoroughly cover relevant physico-chemical properties, or “chemistry space.” Using this metric, we compared the encoded amino acid alphabet to random sets of amino acids. These random sets were drawn from a computationally generated compound library containing 1913 alternative amino acids that lie within the molecular weight range of the encoded amino acids. Sets that cover chemistry space better than the genetically encoded alphabet are extremely rare and energetically costly. Further analysis of more adaptive sets reveals common features and anomalies, and we explore their implications for synthetic biology. We present these computations as evidence that the set of 20 amino acids found within the standard genetic code is the result of considerable natural selection. The amino acids used for constructing coded proteins may represent a largely global optimum, such that any aqueous biochemistry would use a very similar set. PMID:25802223

  18. Extraordinarily adaptive properties of the genetically encoded amino acids.

    PubMed

    Ilardo, Melissa; Meringer, Markus; Freeland, Stephen; Rasulev, Bakhtiyor; Cleaves Ii, H James

    2015-01-01

    Using novel advances in computational chemistry, we demonstrate that the set of 20 genetically encoded amino acids, used nearly universally to construct all coded terrestrial proteins, has been highly influenced by natural selection. We defined an adaptive set of amino acids as one whose members thoroughly cover relevant physico-chemical properties, or "chemistry space." Using this metric, we compared the encoded amino acid alphabet to random sets of amino acids. These random sets were drawn from a computationally generated compound library containing 1913 alternative amino acids that lie within the molecular weight range of the encoded amino acids. Sets that cover chemistry space better than the genetically encoded alphabet are extremely rare and energetically costly. Further analysis of more adaptive sets reveals common features and anomalies, and we explore their implications for synthetic biology. We present these computations as evidence that the set of 20 amino acids found within the standard genetic code is the result of considerable natural selection. The amino acids used for constructing coded proteins may represent a largely global optimum, such that any aqueous biochemistry would use a very similar set. PMID:25802223

  19. The ContextDependence of Amino Acid Properties

    E-print Network

    Ioerger, Thomas R.

    The Context­Dependence of Amino Acid Properties Thomas R. Ioerger Department of Computer Science/threading to match new amino acid segments to fragments of known structure. 4. Refine model using energy minimization sequences. ffl E.g. at least 14 distinct beta­barrels, with various functions. ffl Mandelate Racemase

  20. INTESTINAL SULFUR AMINO ACID METABOLISM IN NEONATAL PIGLETS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: Methionine (Met) is an essential sulfur amino acid that functions as a key precursor for the synthesis of homocysteine and cysteine, via transmethylation (TM) and transsulfuration (TS), respectively. Cysteine is a semi-essential amino acid in neonates.We previously showed that significan...

  1. Two types of amino acid substitutions in protein evolution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Takashi Miyata; Sanzo Miyazawa; Teruo Yasunaga

    1979-01-01

    Summary The frequency of amino acid substitutions, relative to the frequency expected by chance, decreases linearly with the increase in physico-chemical differences between amino acid pairs involved in a substitution. This correlation does not apply to abnormal human hemoglobins. Since abnormal hemoglobins mostly reflect the process of mutation rather than selection, the correlation manifest during protein evolution between substitution frequency

  2. Identification of human l-fucose kinase amino acid sequence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephan Hinderlich; Markus Berger; Astrid Blume; Hao Chen; Darius Ghaderi; Christian Bauer

    2002-01-01

    Fucose is a major component of complex carbohydrates. l-Fucose kinase (fucokinase) takes part in the salvage pathway for reutilization of fucose from the degradation of oligosaccharides. The amino acid sequence of human fucokinase was derived from a cDNA encoding a protein of hitherto unidentified function. Human fucokinase polypeptide chain consists of 990 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of

  3. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA); Wang, Lei (San Diego, CA)

    2009-04-28

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  4. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA); Wang, Lei (San Diego, CA)

    2011-03-22

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  5. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA); Wang, Lei (San Diego, CA)

    2011-12-06

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  6. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA); Wang, Lei (San Diego, CA)

    2008-10-07

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  7. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA); Wang, Lei (San Diego, CA)

    2012-02-14

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  8. Amino acid sensing by enteroendocrine STC-1 cells: role of the Na+-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 2

    PubMed Central

    Young, Steven H.; Rey, Osvaldo; Sternini, Catia

    2010-01-01

    The results presented here show that STC-1 cells, a model of intestinal endocrine cells, respond to a broad range of amino acids, including l-proline, l-serine, l-alanine, l-methionine, l-glycine, l-histidine, and ?-methyl-amino-isobutyric acid (MeAIB) with a rapid increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i). We sought to identify the mechanism by which amino acids induce Ca2+ signaling in these cells. Several lines of evidence suggest that amino acid transport through the Na+-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2) is a major mechanism by which amino acids induced Ca2+ signaling in STC-1 cells: 1) the amino acid efficacy profile for inducing Ca2+ signaling in STC-1 cells closely matches the amino acid specificity of SNAT2; 2) amino acid-induced Ca2+ signaling in STC-1 cells was suppressed by removing Na+ from the medium; 3) the nonmetabolized synthetic substrate of amino acid transport MeAIB produced a marked increase in [Ca2+]i; 4) transfection of small interfering RNA targeting SNAT2 produced a marked decrease in Ca2+ signaling in response to l-proline in STC-1 cells; 5) amino acid-induced increase in [Ca2+]i was associated with membrane depolarization and mediated by Ca2+ influx, since it depended on extracellular Ca2+; 6) the increase in [Ca2+]i in response to l-proline, l-alanine, or MeAIB was abrogated by either nifedipine (1–10 ?M) or nitrendipine (1 ?M), which block L-type voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels. We hypothesize that the inward current of Na+ associated with the function of SNAT2 leads to membrane depolarization and activation of voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels that mediate Ca2+ influx, thereby leading to an increase in the [Ca2+]i in enteroendocrine STC-1 cells. PMID:20219951

  9. Synthesis of amino acids by arc-discharge experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huaibin, Shi; Chunlin, Shao; Zengliang, Yu

    2001-10-01

    Discharge was performed against ammonia water using a graphite rod as the anode and a silver thread as the cathode under an Ar atmosphere. HPLC and thin layer chromatograph (TLC) analyses showed that three kinds of amino acids were produced in the reaction mixture. As the graphite anode is the solitary source of carbon in the system, it is considered that amino acids have been produced by synthetic reaction between graphite and ammonia water. Thus, our results provide a possible way of formation of amino acids from elemental carbon on the primitive earth. In addition, the mechanism for the production of amino acids is discussed and the yields of different amino acids are presented.

  10. Stardust, Supernovae and the Chirality of the Amino Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, R N; Kajino, T; Onaka, T

    2011-03-09

    A mechanism for creating enantiomerism in the amino acids, the building blocks of the proteins, that involves global selection of one chirality by interactions between the amino acids and neutrinos from core-collapse supernovae is described. The selection involves the dependence of the interaction cross sections on the orientations of the spins of the neutrinos and the 14N nuclei in the amino acids, or in precursor molecules, which in turn couple to the molecular chirality. The subsequent chemical evolution and galactic mixing would ultimately populate the Galaxy with the selected species. The resulting amino acids could either be the source thereof on Earth, or could have triggered the chirality that was ultimately achieved for Earth's amino acids.

  11. Adaptive amino acid composition in collagens of parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Austin L

    2015-04-01

    Amino acid composition was analyzed in the glycine-rich repeat region of 306 collagens belonging to three major families of collagens from both parasitic and free-living nematodes. The collagens of parasitic species showed a tendency toward decreased usage of the hydrophilic residues A, D, and Q and increased usage of the hydrophobic resides I, L, and M; and this trend was seen in parasitic species of both the order Rhabdita and the order Spirurida. The amino acid composition of collagens of parasitic Rhabdita thus tended to resemble those of Spirurida more than that of free-living Rhabdita, suggesting an association between amino acid composition and a parasitic lifestyle. Computer predictions suggested that the more hydrophobic amino acid composition was associated with a reduction of the propensity towards B-cell epitope formation, suggesting that evasion of host immune responses may be a major selective factor responsible for the parasite-specific trend in collagen amino acid composition. PMID:25681700

  12. Genetic Incorporation of Unnatural Amino Acids into Proteins in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Wang, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Unnatural amino acids can be genetically incorporated into proteins in live cells by using an orthogonal tRNA/aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase pair. Here we describe a method to efficiently express the orthogonal tRNA and synthetase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which enables unnatural amino acids to be genetically incorporated into target proteins in yeast with high efficiency. We also describe the use of a yeast strain deficient in the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay, which further increases the unnatural amino acid incorporation efficiency when a stop codon is used to encode the unnatural amino acid. These strategies will facilitate the investigation of proteins and their related biological processes in yeast by exploiting the novel properties afforded by unnatural amino acids. PMID:21956564

  13. Single amino acids in sucrose rewards modulate feeding and associative learning in the honeybee

    PubMed Central

    Simcock, Nicola K.; Gray, Helen E.; Wright, Geraldine A.

    2014-01-01

    Obtaining the correct balance of nutrients requires that the brain integrates information about the body’s nutritional state with sensory information from food to guide feeding behaviour. Learning is a mechanism that allows animals to identify cues associated with nutrients so that they can be located quickly when required. Feedback about nutritional state is essential for nutrient balancing and could influence learning. How specific this feedback is to individual nutrients has not often been examined. Here, we tested how the honeybee’s nutritional state influenced the likelihood it would feed on and learn sucrose solutions containing single amino acids. Nutritional state was manipulated by pre-feeding bees with either 1 M sucrose or 1 M sucrose containing 100 mM of isoleucine, proline, phenylalanine, or methionine 24 h prior to olfactory conditioning of the proboscis extension response. We found that bees pre-fed sucrose solution consumed less of solutions containing amino acids and were also less likely to learn to associate amino acid solutions with odours. Unexpectedly, bees pre-fed solutions containing an amino acid were also less likely to learn to associate odours with sucrose the next day. Furthermore, they consumed more of and were more likely to learn when rewarded with an amino acid solution if they were pre-fed isoleucine and proline. Our data indicate that single amino acids at relatively high concentrations inhibit feeding on sucrose solutions containing them, and they can act as appetitive reinforcers during learning. Our data also suggest that select amino acids interact with mechanisms that signal nutritional sufficiency to reduce hunger. Based on these experiments, we predict that nutrient balancing for essential amino acids during learning requires integration of information about several amino acids experienced simultaneously. PMID:24819203

  14. Wet, Carbonaceous Asteroids: Altering Minerals, Changing Amino Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2011-04-01

    Many carbonaceous chondrites contain alteration products from water-rock interactions at low temperature and organic compounds. A fascinating fact known for decades is the presence in some of them of an assortment of organic compounds, including amino acids, sometimes called the building blocks of life. Murchison and other CM carbonaceous chondrites contain hundreds of amino acids. Early measurements indicated that the amino acids in carbonaceous chondrites had equal proportions of L- and D-structures, a situation called racemic. This was in sharp contrast to life on Earth, which heavily favors L- forms. However, beginning in 1997, John Cronin and Sandra Pizzarello (Arizona State University) found L- excesses in isovaline and several other amino acids in the Murchison carbonaceous chondrite. In 2009, Daniel Glavin and Jason Dworkin (Astrobiology Analytical Lab, Goddard Space Flight Center) reported the first independent confirmation of L-isovaline excesses in Murchison using a different analytical technique than employed by Cronin and Pizzarello. Inspired by this work, Daniel Glavin, Michael Callahan, Jason Dworkin, and Jamie Elsila (Astrobiology Analytical Lab, Goddard Space Flight Center), have done an extensive study of the abundance and symmetry of amino acids in carbonaceous chondrites that experienced a range of alteration by water in their parent asteroids. The results show that amino acids are more abundant in the less altered meteorites, implying that aqueous processing changes the mix of amino acids. They also confirmed the enrichment in L-structures of some amino acids, especially isovaline, confirming earlier work. The authors suggest that aqueously-altered planetesimals might have seeded the early Earth with nonracemic amino acids, perhaps explaining why life from microorganisms to people use only L- forms to make proteins. The initial imbalance caused by non-biologic processes in wet asteroids might have been amplified by life on Earth. Alternatively, the same processes that produced the L-amino acid excesses in carbonaceous asteroids also operated on the early Earth.

  15. Amino Acid Analyses of Acid Hydrolysates in Desert Varnish

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Randall S.; Staley, James T.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Engel, Mike

    2001-01-01

    There has long been a debate as to whether rock varnish deposits are microbially mediated or are deposited by inorganic processes. Varnished rocks are found throughout the world primarily in arid and semi-arid regions. The varnish coats are typically up to 200 microns thick and are composed of clays and alternating layers enriched in manganese and iron oxides. The individual layers range in thickness from 1 micron to greater than 10 microns and may continue laterally for more than a 100 microns. Overlapping botryoidal structures are visible in thin section and scanning electron micrographs. The coatings also include small amounts of organic mater and detrital grains. Amino-acid hydrolysates offer a means of assessing the organic composition of rock varnish collected from the Sonoran Desert, near Phoenix, AZ. Chromatographic analyses of hydrolysates from powdered samples of rock varnish suggest that the interior of rock varnish is relatively enriched in amino acids and specifically in d-alanine and glutamic acid. Peptidoglycan (murein) is the main structural component of gram-positive bacterial cell walls. The d-enantiomer of alanine and glutamic acid are specific to peptidoglycan and are consequently an indicator for the presence of bacteria. D-alanine is also found in teichoic acid which is only found in gram-positive bacteria. Several researchers have cultured bacteria from the surface of rock varnish and most have been gram-positive, suggesting that gram-positive bacteria are intimately associated with varnish coatings and may play a role in the formation of varnish coatings.

  16. Extraterrestrial Amino Acids Identified in Metal-Rich CH and CB Carbonaceous Chondrites from Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, Aaron S.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Hein, Jason E.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2013-01-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites contain numerous indigenous organic compounds and could have been an important source of prebiotic compounds required for the origin of life on Earth or elsewhere. Extraterrestrial amino acids have been reported in five of the eight groups of carbonaceous chondrites and are most abundant in CI, CM, and CR chondritesbut are also present in the more thermally altered CV and CO chondrites. We report the abundance, distribution, and enantiomeric and isotopic compositions of simple primary amino acids in six metal-rich CH and CB carbonaceous chondrites that have not previously been investigated for amino acids: Allan Hills (ALH) 85085 (CH3), Pecora Escarpment(PCA) 91467 (CH3), Patuxent Range (PAT) 91546 (CH3), MacAlpine Hills (MAC) 02675(CBb), Miller Range (MIL) 05082 (CB), and Miller Range (MIL) 07411 (CB). Amino acid abundances and carbon isotopic values were obtained by using both liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry and fluorescence, and gas chromatography isotope ratiomass spectrometry. The (delta D, delta C-13, delta N-15) ratios of multiple amino acids fall outside of the terrestrial range and support their extraterrestrial origin. Extracts of CH chondrites were found to be particularly rich in amino acids (1316 parts per million, ppm) while CB chondrite extracts had much lower abundances (0.22 ppm). The amino acid distributions of the CH and CB chondrites were distinct from the distributions observed in type 2 and 3 CM and CR chondrites and contained elevated levels of beta-, gamma-, and delta-amino acids compared to the corresponding alpha-amino acids, providing evidence that multiple amino acid formation mechanisms were important in CH and CB chondrites.

  17. Review: Modelling placental amino acid transfer--from transporters to placental function.

    PubMed

    Lewis, R M; Brooks, S; Crocker, I P; Glazier, J; Hanson, M A; Johnstone, E D; Panitchob, N; Please, C P; Sibley, C P; Widdows, K L; Sengers, B G

    2013-03-01

    Amino acid transfer to the fetus is dependent on several different factors. While these factors can be understood in isolation, it is still not possible to predict the function of the system as a whole. In order to do this an integrated approach is required which incorporates the interactions between the different determinants of amino acid transfer. Computational modelling of amino acid transfer in the term human placenta provides a mechanism by which this integrated approach can be delivered. Such a model would be invaluable for understanding amino acid transfer in both normal and pathological pregnancies. In order to develop a computational model it is necessary to determine all the biological factors which are important contributors to net amino acid transfer and the ways in which they interact. For instance, how different classes of amino acid transporter must interact to transfer amino acids across the placenta. Mathematically, the kinetics of each type of transporter can be represented by separate equations that describe their transfer rate as a non-linear function of amino acid concentrations. These equations can then be combined in the model to predict the overall system behaviour. Testing these predictions experimentally will demonstrate the strengths and weaknesses of the model, which can then be refined with increasing complexity and retested in an iterative fashion. In this way we hope to develop a functional computational model which will allow exploration of the factors that determine amino acid transfer across the placenta. This model may also allow the development of strategies to optimise placental transfer in pathologies associated with impaired amino acid transfer such as fetal growth restriction. PMID:23187090

  18. Aphid genome expression reveals host-symbiont cooperation in the production of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Allison K; Moran, Nancy A

    2011-02-15

    The evolution of intimate symbiosis requires the coordination of gene expression and content between the distinct partner genomes; this coordination allows the fusion of capabilities of each organism into a single integrated metabolism. In aphids, the 10 essential amino acids are scarce in the phloem sap diet and are supplied by the obligate bacterial endosymbiont (Buchnera), which lives inside specialized cells called bacteriocytes. Although Buchnera's genome encodes most genes for essential amino acid biosynthesis, several genes in essential amino acid pathways are missing, as are most genes for production of nonessential amino acids. Additionally, it is unresolved whether the supply of nitrogen for amino acid biosynthesis is supplemented by recycling of waste ammonia. We compared pea aphid gene expression between bacteriocytes and other body tissues using RNA sequencing and pathway analysis and exploiting the genome sequences available for both partners. We found that 26 genes underlying amino acid biosynthesis were up-regulated in bacteriocytes. Seven of these up-regulated genes fill the gaps of Buchnera's essential amino acid pathways. In addition, genes underlying five nonessential amino acid pathways lost from Buchnera are up-regulated in bacteriocytes. Finally, our results reveal that two genes, glutamine synthetase and glutamate synthase, which potentially work together in the incorporation of ammonium nitrogen into glutamate (GOGAT) cycle to assimilate ammonia into glutamate, are up-regulated in bacteriocytes. Thus, host gene expression and symbiont capabilities are closely integrated within bacteriocytes, which function as specialized organs of amino acid production. Furthermore, the GOGAT cycle may be a key source of nitrogen fueling the integrated amino acid metabolism of the aphid-Buchnera partnership. PMID:21282658

  19. Amino acid biogeo- and stereochemistry in coastal Chilean sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomstein, Bente Aa.; Jørgensen, Bo B.; Schubert, Carsten J.; Niggemann, Jutta

    2006-06-01

    The spatial distribution of total hydrolysable amino acids (THAA) and amino acid enantiomers ( D- and L-forms) was investigated in sediments underlying two contrasting Chilean upwelling regions: at ˜23 °S off Antofagasta and at ˜36 °S off Concepción. The contribution of amino acids to total organic carbon (%T AAC: 7-14%) and total nitrogen (%T AAN: 23-38%) in surface sediments decreased with increasing water depth (from 126 to 1350 m) indicating that organic matter becomes increasingly decomposed in surface sediments at greater water depth. Changes in the ratio between the protein amino acid aspartate and its non-protein degradation product ?-alanine confirmed this observation. Furthermore, estimates of THAA mineralization showed that sedimentary amino acid reactivity decreased with both increasing water depth as well as progressive degradation status of the organic matter that was incorporated into the sediment. Reactivity of organic matter in the sediment was also assessed using the Degradation Index (DI) developed by [Dauwe, B., Middelburg, J.J., 1998. Amino acids and hexosamines as indicators of organic matter degradation state in North Sea sediments. Limnol. Oceanogr.43, pp. 782-798.]. Off Concepción, DI was successfully applied to examine the degradation status of sedimentary organic matter at different water depths. However, unexpected results were obtained at the Antofagasta stations as DI increased with sediment depth, suggesting more degraded organic matter at the surface than deeper in the cores. The contribution of peptidoglycan amino acids to THAA was estimated from the concentrations of D-aspartate, D-glutamic acid, D-serine, and D-alanine. Peptidoglycan amino acids accounted for >18% of THAA in all investigated samples. In surface sediments peptidoglycan amino acids accounted for a progressively larger fraction of THAA at increasing water depths (up to >26%). Further, the contribution of peptidoglycan amino acids to THAA increased with increased sediment depth and age (up to 288-year-old) reaching up to 59%. Independent estimates based on D-amino acid concentrations in selected laboratory strains, bacterial counts and the sedimentary concentrations of D-amino acids indicate that a large fraction of the measured D-amino acids (>47 to >97%) originated from cell wall residues rather than from enumerated cells.

  20. Subcritical water extraction of amino acids from Atacama Desert soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amashukeli, Xenia; Pelletier, Christine C.; Kirby, James P.; Grunthaner, Frank J.

    2007-09-01

    Amino acids are considered organic molecular indicators in the search for extant and extinct life in the Solar System. Extraction of these molecules from a particulate solid matrix, such as Martian regolith, will be critical to their in situ detection and analysis. The goals of this study were to optimize a laboratory amino acid extraction protocol by quantitatively measuring the yields of extracted amino acids as a function of liquid water temperature and sample extraction time and to compare the results to the standard HCl vapor-phase hydrolysis yields for the same soil samples. Soil samples from the Yungay region of the Atacama Desert (Martian regolith analog) were collected during a field study in the summer of 2005. The amino acids (alanine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, glycine, serine, and valine) chosen for analysis were present in the samples at concentrations of 1-70 parts-per-billion. Subcritical water extraction efficiency was examined over the temperature range of 30-325 °C, at pressures of 17.2 or 20.0 MPa, and for water-sample contact equilibration times of 0-30 min. None of the amino acids were extracted in detectable amounts at 30 °C (at 17.2 MPa), suggesting that amino acids are too strongly bound by the soil matrix to be extracted at such a low temperature. Between 150 °C and 250 °C (at 17.2 MPa), the extraction efficiencies of glycine, alanine, and valine were observed to increase with increasing water temperature, consistent with higher solubility at higher temperatures, perhaps due to the decreasing dielectric constant of water. Amino acids were not detected in extracts collected at 325 °C (at 20.0 MPa), probably due to amino acid decomposition at this temperature. The optimal subcritical water extraction conditions for these amino acids from Atacama Desert soils were achieved at 200 °C, 17.2 MPa, and a water-sample contact equilibration time of 10 min.

  1. Subcritical Water Extraction of Amino Acids from Atacama Desert Soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amashukeli, Xenia; Pelletier, Christine C.; Kirby, James P.; Grunthaner, Frank J.

    2007-01-01

    Amino acids are considered organic molecular indicators in the search for extant and extinct life in the Solar System. Extraction of these molecules from a particulate solid matrix, such as Martian regolith, will be critical to their in situ detection and analysis. The goals of this study were to optimize a laboratory amino acid extraction protocol by quantitatively measuring the yields of extracted amino acids as a function of liquid water temperature and sample extraction time and to compare the results to the standard HCl vapor- phase hydrolysis yields for the same soil samples. Soil samples from the Yungay region of the Atacama Desert ( Martian regolith analog) were collected during a field study in the summer of 2005. The amino acids ( alanine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, glycine, serine, and valine) chosen for analysis were present in the samples at concentrations of 1 - 70 parts- per- billion. Subcritical water extraction efficiency was examined over the temperature range of 30 - 325 degrees C, at pressures of 17.2 or 20.0 MPa, and for water- sample contact equilibration times of 0 - 30 min. None of the amino acids were extracted in detectable amounts at 30 degrees C ( at 17.2 MPa), suggesting that amino acids are too strongly bound by the soil matrix to be extracted at such a low temperature. Between 150 degrees C and 250 degrees C ( at 17.2 MPa), the extraction efficiencies of glycine, alanine, and valine were observed to increase with increasing water temperature, consistent with higher solubility at higher temperatures, perhaps due to the decreasing dielectric constant of water. Amino acids were not detected in extracts collected at 325 degrees C ( at 20.0 MPa), probably due to amino acid decomposition at this temperature. The optimal subcritical water extraction conditions for these amino acids from Atacama Desert soils were achieved at 200 degrees C, 17.2 MPa, and a water- sample contact equilibration time of 10 min.

  2. Amino acid sensing in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    San Gabriel, Ana; Uneyama, Hisayuki

    2013-09-01

    Rapid progress in gastroenterology during the first part of the last century has shown that gastrointestinal (GI) function is regulated by neuroendocrine, paracrine and endocrine signals. However, recent advances in chemical sensing, especially in the last decade, have revealed that free L-amino acids (AA), among other nutrients, play a critical role in modifying exocrine and endocrine secretion, modulating protein digestion, metabolism and nutrient utilization, and supporting the integrity and defense of the GI mucosa. Many of the mechanisms by which AAs elicit these functions in the GI has been linked to the traditional concept of hormone release and nervous system activation. But most these effects are not direct. AAs appear to function by binding to a chemical communication system such as G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that activate signaling pathways. These intracellular signals, although their molecular bases are not completely elucidated yet, are the ones responsible for the neuronal activity and release of hormones that in turn regulate GI functions. This review aims to describe the distribution of the known GPCRs from the class 3 superfamily that bind to different kinds of AA, especially from the oropharyngeal cavity to the stomach, what kind of taste qualities they elicit, such as umami, bitter or sweet, and their activity in the GI tract. PMID:22865248

  3. Amino Acid Synthesis in a Supercritical Carbon Dioxide - Water System

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Kouki; Futamura, Yasuhiro; Shiohara, Tomoo; Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Kanaya, Fumihide; Manome, Yoshinobu; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Mars is a CO2-abundant planet, whereas early Earth is thought to be also CO2-abundant. In addition, water was also discovered on Mars in 2008. From the facts and theory, we assumed that soda fountains were present on both planets, and this affected amino acid synthesis. Here, using a supercritical CO2/liquid H2O (10:1) system which mimicked crust soda fountains, we demonstrate production of amino acids from hydroxylamine (nitrogen source) and keto acids (oxylic acid sources). In this research, several amino acids were detected with an amino acid analyzer. Moreover, alanine polymers were detected with LC-MS. Our research lights up a new pathway in the study of life’s origin. PMID:19582225

  4. Transaminases for the synthesis of enantiopure beta-amino acids

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Optically pure ?-amino acids constitute interesting building blocks for peptidomimetics and a great variety of pharmaceutically important compounds. Their efficient synthesis still poses a major challenge. Transaminases (also known as aminotransferases) possess a great potential for the synthesis of optically pure ?-amino acids. These pyridoxal 5'-dependent enzymes catalyze the transfer of an amino group from a donor substrate to an acceptor, thus enabling the synthesis of a wide variety of chiral amines and amino acids. Transaminases can be applied either for the kinetic resolution of racemic compounds or the asymmetric synthesis starting from a prochiral substrate. This review gives an overview over microbial transaminases with activity towards ?-amino acids and their substrate spectra. It also outlines current strategies for the screening of new biocatalysts. Particular emphasis is placed on activity assays which are applicable to high-throughput screening. PMID:22293122

  5. On the abiotic formation of amino acids I. HCN as a precursor of amino acids detected in extracts of lunar samples II. Formation of HCN and amino acids from simulated mixtures of gases released from lunar samples

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Yuasa; D. Flory; B. Basile; J. Oró

    1984-01-01

    Summary Two studies on the abiotic formation of amino acids are presented. The first study demonstrates the role of hydrogen cyanide as a precursor of amino acids detected in extracts of lunar samples. The formation of several amino acids, including glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid, under conditions similar to those used for the analysis of lunar samples is

  6. Designing amino acid residues with single-conformations.

    PubMed

    Tran, Tran T; Treutlein, Herbert; Burgess, Antony W

    2006-09-01

    Drug design can benefit from the use of non-coded amino acids, such as alpha-amino isobutyric acids (Aib) or sarcosine (N-methyl-glycine). Non-coded amino acids can confer resistance to enzymatic degradation and increase the conformational stability of the peptides. We have simulated the conformational effects of combining N-methylation, bulky groups on the Calpha atom and/or thioamides using the class II CFF91 force field and our thioamide force field parameters. Although single amino acid substitutions (e.g. Aib) can restrict the available conformations, they do not necessarily lead to unique conformers, however, we predict that some of the amino acids described in this report will fold to a single phi, psi conformation (e.g. N-methylated and thioamide penicillamine). Several other amino acid/thiopeptide combinations were designed, which are predicted to prefer only two conformations. Novel amino acids of this type should prove useful for designing peptides with defined conformations. PMID:16799150

  7. Inorganic Surface and Structure Adhesion of Amino Acids and Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkleberger, Larue; Willett, Robert; Pfeiffer, Loren

    2006-03-01

    Interactions at the interface of biological molecules and inorganic materials are an open question in materials science; understanding these hybrid interfaces at the molecular level can have extensive basic and practical implications. In an extensive set of measurements we have systematically examined the adhesion of amino acids to a series of inorganic surfaces used in semiconductor devices. Peptides comprised of each of the twenty amino acids were exposed in solution to surfaces including metals, insulators, and semiconductors. Significant differential adhesion to the various surfaces is observed over the complement of amino acids, with adhesion determined largely by the amino acid side-chain charge. Mapping of adhesion findings for the amino acids versus materials in multiple solutions has been accomplished, in addition to examination of concentration and pH dependence. These results provide an empirical basis for building peptide to inorganic surface structures. In this vein, we have designed inorganic nano-structures using molecular beam epitaxy that are shown to selectively bind to prescribed primary peptide sequences. The inorganic structures fabricated here are shown to be able to discriminate between peptides with differences of only two to four amino acids. This surprising specific differential adhesion in both open surfaces to varied amino acids and in nanoscale structures to peptides is examined for the physical processes at play.

  8. Nutrient, fatty acid, amino acid and mineral analysis of natural prey of the Hawaiian monk seal, Monachus schauinslandi.

    PubMed

    Goodman-Lowe, G D; Carpenter, J R; Atkinson, S; Ako, H

    1999-06-01

    Proximate nutrients, gross energy content, mineral, amino acid and fatty acid composition were determined for teleost, cephalopod and crustacean prey of the Hawaiian monk seal. Crude protein was highest in the octopus, Octopus cyanea (80.0%), crude fat was highest in the Muraenid teleost, Gymnothorax eurostus (14.1%), whereas crude ash was highest in the lobster, Panulirus marginatus (11.6%). Gross energies ranged from 4.0 +/- 0.01 kcal g-1 in the Labrid teleost Bodianus bilulunatus to 6.0 +/- 0.12 kcal g-1 in the moray eel, Gymnothorax undulatus. Essential amino acids occurred in lower concentrations as a percentage of the total amino acids (35.8 +/- 2.6%) than non-essential amino acids (64.2 +/- 2.6%), but the ratio of individual amino acids to total amino acid concentrations were similar to those required by some monogastric terrestrial species and fingerling salmon. The fatty acid concentrations varied widely among species (range = 1.2-16.5 mg 100 mg-1); however, the teleosts had higher total fatty acids than the non-teleosts. This study indicates that, from a nutritional standpoint, some prey may be more beneficial to the Hawaiian monk seal; however, these prey are not necessarily the most abundant or available to some populations of the monk seal. PMID:10425733

  9. Low-protein amino acid supplemented sorghum-based diets for finishing swine

    E-print Network

    Philippe, Jerome Jean Francois

    1991-01-01

    LOW-PROTEIN AMINO ACID SUPPLEMENTED SORGHUM-BASED DIETS FOR FINISHING SWINE A Thesis by JEROME JEAN FRANCOIS PHILIPPE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1991 Major Subject: Nutrition LOW-PROTEIN AMINO ACID SUPPLEMENTED SORGHUM-BASED DIETS FOR FINISHING SWINE A Thesis by JEROME JEAN FRANCOIS PHILIPPE Approved as to style and content by Darrell A. Knabe (Chair...

  10. Amino acid substrate specificity as a probe of the chemical mechanism of tyrosine hydroxylase

    E-print Network

    Meyer, Marc Marinus

    1989-01-01

    AMINO ACID SUBSTRATE SPECIFICITY AS A PROBE OF THE CHEMICAL MECHANISM OF TYROSINE HYDROXYLASE A Thesis by MARC MARINUS MEYER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fufillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1989 Major Subject: Biochemistry AMINO ACID SUBSTRATE SPECIFICITY AS A PROBE OF THE CHEMICAL MECHANISM OF TYROSINE HYDROXYLASE A Thesis by MARC MARINUS MEYER Approved as to style and content by: Paul F. F...

  11. Free amino acids, nitrate, and nitrate reductase in nitrogen fixation by soybean nodules

    E-print Network

    Madtes, Paul Clayton

    1978-01-01

    FREE AMINO ACIDS, NITRATE, AND NITRATE REDUCTASE IN NITROGEN FIXATION BY SOYBEAN NODULES A Thesis by PAUL CLAYTON MADTES, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 Major Subject: Biophysics FREE AMINO ACIDS, NITRATE, AND NITRATE REDUCTASE IN NITROGEN FIXATION BY SOYBEAN NPDULES A Thesis by PAUL CLAYTON MADTES, JR. Approved as to style and content by: g jap (Chairman...

  12. [Studies on interaction of acid-treated nanotube titanic acid and amino acids].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huqin; Chen, Xuemei; Jin, Zhensheng; Liao, Guangxi; Wu, Xiaoming; Du, Jianqiang; Cao, Xiang

    2010-06-01

    Nanotube titanic acid (NTA) has distinct optical and electrical character, and has photocatalysis character. In accordance with these qualities, NTA was treated with acid so as to enhance its surface activity. Surface structures and surface groups of acid-treated NTA were characterized and analyzed by Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry (FT-IR). The interaction between acid-treated NTA and amino acids was investigated. Analysis results showed that the lengths of acid-treated NTA became obviously shorter. The diameters of nanotube bundles did not change obviously with acid-treating. Meanwhile, the surface of acid-treated NTA was cross-linked with carboxyl or esterfunction. In addition, acid-treated NTA can catch amino acid residues easily, and then form close combination. PMID:20649031

  13. Evolution of a genome-encoded bias in amino acid biosynthetic pathways is a potential indicator of amino acid dynamics in the environment.

    PubMed

    Fasani, Rick A; Savageau, Michael A

    2014-11-01

    Overcoming the stress of starvation is one of an organism's most challenging phenotypic responses. Those organisms that frequently survive the challenge, by virtue of their fitness, will have evolved genomes that are shaped by their specific environments. Understanding this genotype-environment-phenotype relationship at a deep level will require quantitative predictive models of the complex molecular systems that link these aspects of an organism's existence. Here, we treat one of the most fundamental molecular systems, protein synthesis, and the amino acid biosynthetic pathways involved in the stringent response to starvation. These systems face an inherent logical dilemma: Building an amino acid biosynthetic pathway to synthesize its product-the cognate amino acid of the pathway-may require that very amino acid when it is no longer available. To study this potential "catch-22," we have created a generic model of amino acid biosynthesis in response to sudden starvation. Our mathematical analysis and computational results indicate that there are two distinctly different outcomes: Partial recovery to a new steady state, or full system failure. Moreover, the cell's fate is dictated by the cognate bias, the number of cognate amino acids in the corresponding biosynthetic pathway relative to the average number of that amino acid in the proteome. We test these implications by analyzing the proteomes of over 1,800 sequenced microbes, which reveals statistically significant evidence of low cognate bias, a genetic trait that would avoid the biosynthetic quandary. Furthermore, these results suggest that the pattern of cognate bias, which is readily derived by genome sequencing, may provide evolutionary clues to an organism's natural environment. PMID:25118252

  14. Evolution of a Genome-Encoded Bias in Amino Acid Biosynthetic Pathways Is a Potential Indicator of Amino Acid Dynamics in the Environment

    PubMed Central

    Fasani, Rick A.; Savageau, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Overcoming the stress of starvation is one of an organism’s most challenging phenotypic responses. Those organisms that frequently survive the challenge, by virtue of their fitness, will have evolved genomes that are shaped by their specific environments. Understanding this genotype–environment–phenotype relationship at a deep level will require quantitative predictive models of the complex molecular systems that link these aspects of an organism’s existence. Here, we treat one of the most fundamental molecular systems, protein synthesis, and the amino acid biosynthetic pathways involved in the stringent response to starvation. These systems face an inherent logical dilemma: Building an amino acid biosynthetic pathway to synthesize its product—the cognate amino acid of the pathway—may require that very amino acid when it is no longer available. To study this potential “catch-22,” we have created a generic model of amino acid biosynthesis in response to sudden starvation. Our mathematical analysis and computational results indicate that there are two distinctly different outcomes: Partial recovery to a new steady state, or full system failure. Moreover, the cell’s fate is dictated by the cognate bias, the number of cognate amino acids in the corresponding biosynthetic pathway relative to the average number of that amino acid in the proteome. We test these implications by analyzing the proteomes of over 1,800 sequenced microbes, which reveals statistically significant evidence of low cognate bias, a genetic trait that would avoid the biosynthetic quandary. Furthermore, these results suggest that the pattern of cognate bias, which is readily derived by genome sequencing, may provide evolutionary clues to an organism’s natural environment. PMID:25118252

  15. 40 CFR 721.1728 - Benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino-, methyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... false Benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino-, methyl ester...721.1728 Benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino-, methyl ester...identified as benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino-, methyl...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10474 - Substituted amino ethane sulfonic acid salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Substituted amino ethane sulfonic acid salt (generic). 721...721.10474 Substituted amino ethane sulfonic acid salt (generic). ...generically as substituted amino ethane sulfonic acid salt (PMN...

  17. 37 CFR 1.821 - Nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence disclosures in patent applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence disclosures in patent applications...Disclosures Containing Nucleotide And/or Amino Acid Sequences § 1.821 Nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence disclosures in patent...

  18. 37 CFR 1.821 - Nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence disclosures in patent applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence disclosures in patent applications...Disclosures Containing Nucleotide And/or Amino Acid Sequences § 1.821 Nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence disclosures in patent...

  19. Accuracies of Ancestral Amino Acid Sequences Inferred by the Parsimony, Likelihood, and Distance Methods

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Jianzhi

    Accuracies of Ancestral Amino Acid Sequences Inferred by the Parsimony, Likelihood, and Distance- cestral organisms is important for identifying critical amino acid substitutions that have caused amino acids inferred by two currently available methods (maximum- parsimony [MP] and maximum

  20. 37 CFR 1.821 - Nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence disclosures in patent applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence disclosures in patent applications...Disclosures Containing Nucleotide And/or Amino Acid Sequences § 1.821 Nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence disclosures in patent...

  1. 40 CFR 721.430 - Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid derivative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... false Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid derivative. 721.430...430 Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid derivative. (a) Chemical...generically as oxo-substituted amino al-kan-oic acid derivative (PMN No....

  2. 40 CFR 721.430 - Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid derivative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... false Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid derivative. 721.430...430 Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid derivative. (a) Chemical...generically as oxo-substituted amino al-kan-oic acid derivative (PMN No....

  3. 4 Aromatic Amino Acids in the Brain M. Cansev . R. J. Wurtman

    E-print Network

    Wurtman, Richard

    4 Aromatic Amino Acids in the Brain M. Cansev . R. J. Wurtman 1 Introduction ..................................................................................... 60 2 Sources of Aromatic Amino Acids .............................................................. 61 3 Plasma Concentrations of the Aromatic Amino Acids ......................................... 62 3

  4. 40 CFR 721.430 - Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid derivative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... false Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid derivative. 721.430...430 Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid derivative. (a) Chemical...generically as oxo-substituted amino al-kan-oic acid derivative (PMN No....

  5. 40 CFR 721.10633 - Aromatic sulfonic acid amino azo dye salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Aromatic sulfonic acid amino azo dye salts (generic). 721...721.10633 Aromatic sulfonic acid amino azo dye salts (generic). ...identified generically as aromatic sulfonic acid amino azo dye salts (PMN...

  6. 40 CFR 721.430 - Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid derivative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... false Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid derivative. 721.430...430 Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid derivative. (a) Chemical...generically as oxo-substituted amino al-kan-oic acid derivative (PMN No....

  7. 40 CFR 721.1728 - Benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino-, methyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... false Benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino-, methyl ester...721.1728 Benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino-, methyl ester...identified as benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino-, methyl...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10380 - Benzoic acid, 3-amino-2-mercapto-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Benzoic acid, 3-amino-2-mercapto-. 721.10380...Substances § 721.10380 Benzoic acid, 3-amino-2-mercapto-. (a) Chemical...substance identified as benzoic acid, 3-amino-2-mercapto- (PMN...

  9. 40 CFR 721.1728 - Benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino-, methyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... false Benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino-, methyl ester...721.1728 Benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino-, methyl ester...identified as benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino-, methyl...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10380 - Benzoic acid, 3-amino-2-mercapto-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Benzoic acid, 3-amino-2-mercapto-. 721.10380...Substances § 721.10380 Benzoic acid, 3-amino-2-mercapto-. (a) Chemical...substance identified as benzoic acid, 3-amino-2-mercapto- (PMN...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10380 - Benzoic acid, 3-amino-2-mercapto-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Benzoic acid, 3-amino-2-mercapto-. 721.10380...Substances § 721.10380 Benzoic acid, 3-amino-2-mercapto-. (a) Chemical...substance identified as benzoic acid, 3-amino-2-mercapto- (PMN...

  12. 37 CFR 1.821 - Nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence disclosures in patent applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence disclosures in patent applications...Disclosures Containing Nucleotide And/or Amino Acid Sequences § 1.821 Nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence disclosures in patent...

  13. 40 CFR 721.1728 - Benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino-, methyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... false Benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino-, methyl ester...721.1728 Benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino-, methyl ester...identified as benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino-, methyl...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10630 - Amino acid, carboxyalkyl, alkylsulfonate, alkali salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Amino acid, carboxyalkyl, alkylsulfonate...Chemical Substances § 721.10630 Amino acid, carboxyalkyl, alkylsulfonate...substances identified generically as amino acid, carboxyalkyl,...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10474 - Substituted amino ethane sulfonic acid salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Substituted amino ethane sulfonic acid salt (generic). 721...721.10474 Substituted amino ethane sulfonic acid salt (generic). ...generically as substituted amino ethane sulfonic acid salt (PMN...

  16. 40 CFR 721.430 - Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid derivative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... false Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid derivative. 721.430...430 Oxo-substituted amino-al-kanoic acid derivative. (a) Chemical...generically as oxo-substituted amino al-kan-oic acid derivative (PMN No....

  17. 40 CFR 721.1728 - Benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino-, methyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... false Benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino-, methyl ester...721.1728 Benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino-, methyl ester...identified as benzoic acid, 2-(3-phenylbutylidene)amino-, methyl...

  18. 37 CFR 1.821 - Nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence disclosures in patent applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence disclosures in patent applications...Disclosures Containing Nucleotide And/or Amino Acid Sequences § 1.821 Nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence disclosures in patent...

  19. An amino acid substitution-selection model adjusts residue fitness to improve phylogenetic estimation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huai-Chun; Susko, Edward; Roger, Andrew J

    2014-04-01

    Standard protein phylogenetic models use fixed rate matrices of amino acid interchange derived from analyses of large databases. Differences between the stationary amino acid frequencies of these rate matrices from those of a data set of interest are typically adjusted for by matrix multiplication that converts the empirical rate matrix to an exchangeability matrix which is then postmultiplied by the amino acid frequencies in the alignment. The result is a time-reversible rate matrix with stationary amino acid frequencies equal to the data set frequencies. On the basis of population genetics principles, we develop an amino acid substitution-selection model that parameterizes the fitness of an amino acid as the logarithm of the ratio of the frequency of the amino acid to the frequency of the same amino acid under no selection. The model gives rise to a different sequence of matrix multiplications to convert an empirical rate matrix to one that has stationary amino acid frequencies equal to the data set frequencies. We incorporated the substitution-selection model with an improved amino acid class frequency mixture (cF) model to partially take into account site-specific amino acid frequencies in the phylogenetic models. We show that 1) the selection models fit data significantly better than corresponding models without selection for most of the 21 test data sets; 2) both cF and cF selection models favored the phylogenetic trees that were inferred under current sophisticated models and methods for three difficult phylogenetic problems (the positions of microsporidia and breviates in eukaryote phylogeny and the position of the root of the angiosperm tree); and 3) for data simulated under site-specific residue frequencies, the cF selection models estimated trees closer to the generating trees than a standard ? model or cF without selection. We also explored several ways of estimating amino acid frequencies under neutral evolution that are required for these selection models. By better modeling the amino acid substitution process, the cF selection models will be valuable for phylogenetic inference and evolutionary studies. PMID:24441033

  20. Exhaustive Database Searching for Amino Acid Mutations in Proteomes

    SciTech Connect

    Hyatt, Philip Douglas [ORNL; Pan, Chongle [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Amino acid mutations in proteins can be found by searching tandem mass spectra acquired in shotgun proteomics experiments against protein sequences predicted from genomes. Traditionally, unconstrained searches for amino acid mutations have been accomplished by using a sequence tagging approach that combines de novo sequencing with database searching. However, this approach is limited by the performance of de novo sequencing. The Sipros algorithm v2.0 was developed to perform unconstrained database searching using high-resolution tandem mass spectra by exhaustively enumerating all single non-isobaric mutations for every residue in a protein database. The performance of Sipros for amino acid mutation identification exceeded that of an established sequence tagging algorithm, Inspect, based on benchmarking results from a Rhodopseudomonas palustris proteomics dataset. To demonstrate the viability of the algorithm for meta-proteomics, Sipros was used to identify amino acid mutations in a natural microbial community in acid mine drainage.

  1. Completely stereocontrolled aldol reaction of chiral ?-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Gazvoda, Martin; Höferl-Prantz, Kathrin; Barth, Roland; Felzmann, Wolfgang; Pevec, Andrej; Košmrlj, Janez

    2015-02-01

    A general protocol to independently access stereoisomerically pure ?'-hydroxy-?-amino acid derivatives that is based on dibutylboron triflate-mediated aldol reaction of suitably protected ?-amino acids bearing chiral oxazolidinone auxiliary is reported. The method smoothly afforded syn-aldol (?,?'-syn) products in pure form and excellent isolated yield. Both ?,?-syn and ?,?-anti isomers are readily accessible solely through the choice of the oxazolidinone chirality. This method allows for the preparation of stereoisomeric ?'-hydroxy-?-amino acid derivatives that were previously unreported. PMID:25616036

  2. Beyond the Canonical 20 Amino Acids: Expanding the Genetic Lexicon*

    PubMed Central

    Young, Travis S.; Schultz, Peter G.

    2010-01-01

    The ability to genetically encode unnatural amino acids beyond the common 20 has allowed unprecedented control over the chemical structures of recombinantly expressed proteins. Orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase/tRNA pairs have been used together with nonsense, rare, or 4-bp codons to incorporate >50 unnatural amino acids into proteins in Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pichia pastoris, and mammalian cell lines. This has allowed the expression of proteins containing amino acids with novel side chains, including fluorophores, post-translational modifications, metal ion chelators, photocaged and photocross-linking moieties, uniquely reactive functional groups, and NMR, IR, and x-ray crystallographic probes. PMID:20147747

  3. How amino acids and peptides shaped the RNA world.

    PubMed

    van der Gulik, Peter T S; Speijer, Dave

    2015-01-01

    The "RNA world" hypothesis is seen as one of the main contenders for a viable theory on the origin of life. Relatively small RNAs have catalytic power, RNA is everywhere in present-day life, the ribosome is seen as a ribozyme, and rRNA and tRNA are crucial for modern protein synthesis. However, this view is incomplete at best. The modern protein-RNA ribosome most probably is not a distorted form of a "pure RNA ribosome" evolution started out with. Though the oldest center of the ribosome seems "RNA only", we cannot conclude from this that it ever functioned in an environment without amino acids and/or peptides. Very small RNAs (versatile and stable due to basepairing) and amino acids, as well as dipeptides, coevolved. Remember, it is the amino group of aminoacylated tRNA that attacks peptidyl-tRNA, destroying the bond between peptide and tRNA. This activity of the amino acid part of aminoacyl-tRNA illustrates the centrality of amino acids in life. With the rise of the "RNA world" view of early life, the pendulum seems to have swung too much towards the ribozymatic part of early biochemistry. The necessary presence and activity of amino acids and peptides is in need of highlighting. In this article, we try to bring the role of the peptide component of early life back into focus. We argue that an RNA world completely independent of amino acids never existed. PMID:25607813

  4. Extraterrestrial Amino Acids in the Almahata Sitta Meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callahan, Michael; Aubrey, A.; Bada, J. L.; Dworkin, J. P.; Elsila, J. E.; Glavin, D. P.; Parker, E.; Jenniskens, P.

    2009-09-01

    The recovery of meteorite fragments from the 2008 TC3 asteroid impact, collectively named Almahata Sitta, revealed a rare, anomalous polymict ureilite containing large carbonaceous grains (Jenniskens et al. 2009). Here we report the first amino acid analysis of a meteorite from an F-type asteroid as part of the Almahata Sitta meteorite sample analysis consortium. A single fragment (piece #4, 1.2 grams) was crushed to a powder, and separate 0.1 g aliquots of the same meteorite were carried through identical hot-water extraction, acid hydrolysis and desalting procedures at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. The o-phthaldialdehyde/N-acetyl-L-cysteine amino acid derivatives in the extracts were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography with UV fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Analyses of the meteorite extracts revealed a complex distribution of two- to six-carbon aliphatic amino acids with abundances ranging from 0.5 to 69 parts-per-billion (ppb). Glycine was the most abundant amino acid detected, however, since this protein amino acid is a common terrestrial contaminant, we are currently unable to rule out at least a partial terrestrial source. However, the D/L ratio of alanine in the meteorite was racemic, suggesting that very little terrestrial amino acid contamination. Several non-protein amino acids that are rare in the biosphere were also identified in the meteorite above background levels including D,L-4-amino-2-methybutyric acid (65 ± 8 ppb), D-isovaline (1.3 ± 0.1 ppb), L-isovaline (1.4 ± 0.1 ppb), and ?-aminoisobutryic acid (7.1 ± 5.8 ppb). The abundance of isovaline and AIB are 1000 times lower than the abundances found in the CM2 meteorite Murchison while D,L-4-amino-2-methybutyric acid is similar. The very low amino acid abundances and the presence of several amino acid decomposition products including methylamine, ethylamine, and isopropylamine are consistent with extensive thermal alteration of organic compounds on the parent asteroid.

  5. The Amino Acid Composition of the Sutter's Mill Carbonaceous Chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Burton, A. S.; Elsila, J. E.; Dworkin, J. P.; Yin, Q. Z.; Cooper, G.; Jenniskens, P.

    2012-01-01

    In contrast to the Murchison meteorite which had a complex distribution of amino acids with a total C2 to Cs amino acid abundance of approx.14,000 parts-per-billion (ppb) [2], the Sutters Mill meteorite was found to be highly depleted in amino acids. Much lower abundances (approx.30 to 180 ppb) of glycine, beta-alanine, L-alanine and L-serine were detected in SM2 above procedural blank levels indicating that this meteorite sample experienced only minimal terrestrial amino acid contamination after its fall to Earth. Carbon isotope measurements will be necessary to establish the origin of glycine and beta-alanine in SM2. Other non-protein amino acids that are rare on Earth, yet commonly found in other CM meteorites such as aaminoisobutyric acid (alpha-AIB) and isovaline, were not identified in SM2. However, traces of beta-AIB (approx.1 ppb) were detected in SM2 and could be" extraterrestrial in origin. The low abundances of amino acids in the Sutter's Mill meteorite is consistent with mineralogical evidence that at least some parts of the Sutter's Mill meteorite parent body experienced extensive aqueous and/or thermal alteration.

  6. Brain amino acid abnormalities in kidney disease and diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, P; Musshoff, F; Hilgers, C; Steins, N; Bürrig, K-F; Jacob, B; Daldrup, T; Madea, B

    2004-06-10

    The present postmortem study examines whether specific amino acid abnormalities associated with renal diseases or diabetes mellitus in animal experiments and on clinical examination may also be found in human brain samples obtained at clinical autopsies. The material includes 12 deceased with renal insufficiency, 23 deceased with diabetes mellitus and 26 control cases with lethal cardiovascular diseases (without a history of hepatic, renal or metabolic disturbances). The autopsy and clinical records were retrospectively analyzed for age, sex, postmortem delay, cause of death, substantial preexisting diseases and histological findings. The analysis of free amino acid concentrations in human brain specimens was performed applying a Beckman amino acid analyzer. The results were evaluated using the U-test according to Mann, Willcox and Whitney. A P-value less than 0.05 was considered to be significantly different. Differences of amino acid concentrations attributable to sex, age and postmortem delay were not significant. The comparison of postmortem amino acid concentrations in the brains of patients with diabetes mellitus and controls did not reveal relevant changes. However, the patients with renal diseases, as compared to controls, showed a significant cerebral increase of urea, phenylethanolamine and gamma-aminobutyric acid. Thus, the postmortem amino acid analysis may contribute to the understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms of uremic encephalopathy and may supplement the conventional postmortem morphological diagnosis in kidney diseases by indication of functional impairment. PMID:15172081

  7. Dipeptide Sequence Determination: Analyzing Phenylthiohydantoin Amino Acids by HPLC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Janice S.; Tang, Chung-Fei; Reed, Steven S.

    2000-02-01

    Amino acid composition and sequence determination, important techniques for characterizing peptides and proteins, are essential for predicting conformation and studying sequence alignment. This experiment presents improved, fundamental methods of sequence analysis for an upper-division biochemistry laboratory. Working in pairs, students use the Edman reagent to prepare phenylthiohydantoin derivatives of amino acids for determination of the sequence of an unknown dipeptide. With a single HPLC technique, students identify both the N-terminal amino acid and the composition of the dipeptide. This method yields good precision of retention times and allows use of a broad range of amino acids as components of the dipeptide. Students learn fundamental principles and techniques of sequence analysis and HPLC.

  8. Plasma-amino acid profiles in sepsis and stress.

    PubMed Central

    Vente, J P; von Meyenfeldt, M F; van Eijk, H M; van Berlo, C L; Gouma, D J; van der Linden, C J; Soeters, P B

    1989-01-01

    Sepsis has been associated with specific plasma amino acid patterns. Sixty-five patients were prospectively investigated as to whether these patterns are indeed sepsis specific, or specific for metabolic stress without concomitant sepsis, or associated with the presence of organ failure. Virtually all aminoacid levels were decreased by 10-30% (p less than 0.05), whereas cystine and phenylalanine were significantly elevated. These changes were more pronounced in severe sepsis. Organ failure was not associated with significantly altered amino acid profiles. No differences were found between sepsis and stress without signs of sepsis. In addition, imminent death was not associated with aberrant amino acid profiles. We conclude that sepsis and metabolic stress are associated with changes in plasma amino acid profiles, but that such changes are aspecific and therefore poor indicators of disease severity. PMID:2910215

  9. Amino acid utilization by Aerobacter aerogenes and Escherichia coli

    E-print Network

    Herrera, Rodolfo Eduardo

    1938-01-01

    A considerable amount of work has been done on the growth of A. aerogenes and E. coli in synthetic media, but little work has been undertaken on the utilization by these organisms of amino acids as comparative sources of ...

  10. Isotopic analyses of amino acids from the Murchison meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzarello, S.; Cronin, J. R.; Krishnamurthy, R. V.; Epstein, S.

    1991-01-01

    An account is given of the results of H-2, C-13 isotopic analyses of the Murchison meteorite incorporating an ultrafiltration step to exclude the possibility of fine particulate contaminants. The meteorite's amino acids were chromatographically separated in order to preclude isotopic enrichment by basic compounds other than the amino acids. The results indicate that the Murchison amino acids are isotopically highly unusual; delta-C-13 is elevated by about 40 percent, and delta-D by fully 2500 percent. This high D content of the meteorite's alpha-amino acids may be due to the synthesis of their molecular precursors by low-temperature ion-molecule reactions in an interstellar cloud.

  11. Comparing Amino Acid Abundances and Distributions Across Carbonaceous Chondrite Groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, Aaron S.; Callahan, Michael P.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2012-01-01

    Meteorites are grouped according to bulk properties such as chemical composition and mineralogy. These parameters can vary significantly among the different carbonaceous chondrite groups (CI, CM, CO, CR, CH, CB, CV and CK). We have determined the amino acid abundances of more than 30 primary amino acids in meteorites from each of the eight groups, revealing several interesting trends. There are noticeable differences in the structural diversity and overall abundances of amino acids between meteorites from the different chondrite groups. Because meteorites may have been an important source of amino acids to the prebiotic Earth and these organic compounds are essential for life as we know it, the observed variations of these molecules may have been important for the origins of life.

  12. Amino acids from the moon - Notes on meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, S. W.; Harada, K.; Hare, P. E.

    Contributions of lunar and meteorite composition studies to present understandings of chemical evolution and the origin of life are discussed. The discovery of amino acids in lunar fines, when properly extracted, hydrolyzed and examined by ion-exchange chromatography, is shown to have confirmed the extraterrestrial nature of the amino acids previously found in meteorites. Differences in analysis and sample preparation methods are considered as sources for the initial disagreements in lunar sample data, and possibilities of biological or chemical contamination of the lunar samples are discounted. The possible sources of lunar and meteoritic amino acids by solar wind implantation are considered. Problems remaining concerning the nature of amino acid precursors, the relations of lunar to meteoritic compounds and the prevalence of cyanide oligomers as evolutionary intermediates are indicated.

  13. Stereospecific Chemical Sensors for Amino Acids and Carbohydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paavola, C. D.; Kabir, M.; Crochet, A. P.; Francis, M.

    2010-04-01

    Specific organic compounds, such as amino acids and carbohydrates, are attractive targets as biomarkers We are developing sensors based on a family of proteins that bind specific analytes with stereochemical specificity to measure enantiomeric excesses in these biomarkers.

  14. Identification of human L-fucose kinase amino acid sequence.

    PubMed

    Hinderlich, Stephan; Berger, Markus; Blume, Astrid; Chen, Hao; Ghaderi, Darius; Bauer, Christian

    2002-06-14

    Fucose is a major component of complex carbohydrates. L-Fucose kinase (fucokinase) takes part in the salvage pathway for reutilization of fucose from the degradation of oligosaccharides. The amino acid sequence of human fucokinase was derived from a cDNA encoding a protein of hitherto unidentified function. Human fucokinase polypeptide chain consists of 990 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 107 kDa. The C-terminal part of its amino acid sequence showed sequence motifs typical for sugar kinases. Fucokinase full-length protein and a deletion mutant lacking the first 363 amino acids of the N-terminus were expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 cells. Both proteins displayed fucokinase activity. These results reveal that the discovered cDNA encodes the fucokinase protein and they confirm that a functional kinase domain is located in the C-terminal part of the enzyme. PMID:12056818

  15. Guanine- Formation During the Thermal Polymerization of Amino Acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mc Caw, B. K.; Munoz, E. F.; Ponnamperuma, C.; Young, R. S.

    1964-01-01

    The action of heat on a mixture of amino acids was studied as a possible abiological pathway for the synthesis of purines and pyrimidines. Guanine was detected. This result is significant in the context of chemical evolution.

  16. Reconstructing a Flavodoxin Oxidoreductase with Early Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ming-Feng; Ji, Hong-Fang; Li, Ting-Xuan; Kang, Shou-Kai; Zhang, Yue-Jie; Zheng, Jue-Fei; Tian, Tian; Jia, Xi-Shuai; Lin, Xing-Ming; Zhang, Hong-Yu

    2013-01-01

    Primitive proteins are proposed to have utilized organic cofactors more frequently than transition metals in redox reactions. Thus, an experimental validation on whether a protein constituted solely by early amino acids and an organic cofactor can perform electron transfer activity is an urgent challenge. In this paper, by substituting “late amino acids (C, F, M, T, W, and Y)” with “early amino acids (A, L, and V)” in a flavodoxin, we constructed a flavodoxin mutant and evaluated its characteristic properties. The major results showed that: (1) The flavodoxin mutant has structural characteristics similar to wild-type protein; (2) Although the semiquinone and hydroquinone flavodoxin mutants possess lower stability than the corresponding form of wild-type flavodoxin, the redox potential of double electron reduction Em,7 (fld) reached ?360 mV, indicating that the flavodoxin mutant constituted solely by early amino acids can exert effective electron transfer activity. PMID:23783279

  17. Amino Acids as Precursors of Trihalomethane and Haloacetic Acid Formation During Chlorination

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. C. Hong; M. H. Wong; Y. Liang

    2009-01-01

    Twenty amino acids were chlorinated and examined for the formation of trihalomethane (THM) and haloacetic acid (HAA). The\\u000a amino acids exhibited a high Cl2 demand (3.4–10 mg Cl2 mg–1 C) but low THM formation (?1 C) except for tryptophan and tyrosine (45.8 ? 147 ?g mg?1 C). Large variation in HAA yield occurred among the amino acids (from not detectable to 106 ?g mg?1

  18. Characterization of 2-aminoisobutyric acid transport in Neurospora crassa: a general amino acid permease-specific substrate.

    PubMed Central

    Ogilvie-Villa, S; DeBusk, R M; DeBusk, A G

    1981-01-01

    We report the characterization of an amino acid 2-aminoisobutyric acid was transported solely by the general amino acid permease and not by the neutral amino acid permease. Furthermore, this substrate was not metabolized after transport. The potential for a system-specific nonmetabolizable substrate as a tool in the analysis of amino acid transport and its regulation is discussed. PMID:6456264

  19. Polypeptide having an amino acid replaced with N-benzylglycine

    DOEpatents

    Mitchell, Alexander R. (Livermore, CA); Young, Janis D. (Los Angeles, CA)

    1996-01-01

    The present invention relates to one or more polypeptides having useful biological activity in a mammal, which comprise: a polypeptide related to bradykinin of four to ten amino acid residues wherein one or more specific amino acids in the polypeptide chain are replaced with achiral N-benzylglycine. These polypeptide analogues have useful potent agonist or antagonist pharmacological properties depending upon the structure. A preferred polypeptide is (N-benzylglycine.sup.7)-bradykinin.

  20. Genetic code correlations - Amino acids and their anticodon nucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, A. L.; Lacey, J. C., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The data here show direct correlations between both the hydrophobicity and the hydrophilicity of the homocodonic amino acids and their anticodon nucleotides. While the differences between properties of uracil and cytosine derivatives are small, further data show that uracil has an affinity for charged species. Although these data suggest that molecular relationships between amino acids and anticodons were responsible for the origin of the code, it is not clear what the mechanism of the origin might have been.

  1. Amino acid quantification in bulk soybeans by transmission Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schulmerich, Matthew V; Gelber, Matthew K; Azam, Hossain M; Harrison, Sandra K; McKinney, John; Thompson, Dennis; Owen, Bridget; Kull, Linda S; Bhargava, Rohit

    2013-12-01

    Soybeans are a commodity crop of significant economic and nutritional interest. As an important source of protein, buyers of soybeans are interested in not only the total protein content but also in the specific amino acids that comprise the total protein content. Raman spectroscopy has the chemical specificity to measure the twenty common amino acids as pure substances. An unsolved challenge, however, is to quantify varying levels of amino acids mixed together and bound in soybeans at relatively low concentrations. Here we report the use of transmission Raman spectroscopy as a secondary analytical approach to nondestructively measure specific amino acids in intact soybeans. With the employment of a transmission-based Raman instrument, built specifically for nondestructive measurements from bulk soybeans, spectra were collected from twenty-four samples to develop a calibration model using a partial least-squares approach with a random-subset cross validation. The calibration model was validated on an independent set of twenty-five samples for oil, protein, and amino acid predictions. After Raman measurements, the samples were reduced to a fine powder and conventional wet chemistry methods were used for quantifying reference values of protein, oil, and 18 amino acids. We found that the greater the concentrations (% by weight component of interest), the better the calibration model and prediction capabilities. Of the 18 amino acids analyzed, 13 had R(2) values greater than 0.75 with a standard error of prediction c.a. 3-4% by weight. Serine, histidine, cystine, tryptophan, and methionine showed poor predictions (R(2) < 0.75), which were likely a result of the small sampling range and the low concentration of these components. It is clear from the correlation plots and root-mean-square error of prediction that Raman spectroscopy has sufficient chemical contrast to nondestructively quantify protein, oil, and specific amino acids in intact soybeans. PMID:24138118

  2. Neuropeptide Y: Complete Amino Acid Sequence of the Brain Peptide

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kazuhiko Tatemoto

    1982-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of neuropeptide Y, a 36-residue peptide recently isolated from porcine brain, has been determined by using high performance liquid chromatography for separation of its tryptic and chymotryptic fragments and subsequent sequence analysis of the isolated fragments by an improved dansyl Edman subtractive technique. The amino acid sequence of neuropeptide Y has been found to be: Tyr-Pro-Ser-Lys-Pro-Asp-Asn-Pro-Gly-Glu-Asp-Ala-Pro-Ala-Glu-Asp-Leu-Ala-

  3. Explanation of enantioseparation of amino acid derivatives in gas chromatography

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Huaiqin Zhu; Peijun Ji; Wei Feng

    2011-01-01

    The enantioseparation of amino acid derivatives by gas chromatography was investigated through molecular dynamics simulation. The chiral stationary phase was based on permethylated ?-cyclodextrin (PM-?-CD). The model enantiomers were four amino acid derivatives. For the inclusion complexes of PM-?-CD with the enantiomers, we studied the binding energy. The competitive binding of l- or d-enantiomers to PM-?-CD was simulated. The interaction

  4. Amino acid uptake in deciduous and coniferous taiga ecosystems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Knut Kielland; Jack McFarland; Karl Olson

    2006-01-01

    We measured in situ uptake of amino acids and ammonium across deciduous and coniferous taiga forest ecosystems in interior Alaska to examine the idea that late successional (coniferous) forests rely more heavily on dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), than do early successional (deciduous) ecosystems. We traced 15N-NH4+ and 13C-15N-amino acids from the soil solution into plant roots and soil pools over

  5. Expression of heteromeric amino acid transporters along the murine intestine

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Mital H; Schulz, Nicole; Zecevic, Marija; Wagner, Carsten A; Verrey, Francois

    2004-01-01

    Members of the new heterodimeric amino acid transporter family are composed of two subunits, a catalytic multitransmembrane spanning protein (light chain) and a type II glycoprotein (heavy chain). These transporters function as exchangers and thereby extend the transmembrane amino acid transport selectivity to specific amino acids. The heavy chain rBAT associates with the light chain b°,+AT to form a cystine and cationic amino acid transporter. The other heavy chain, 4F2hc, can interact with seven different light chains to form various transporters corresponding to systems L, y+L, asc or x?c. The importance of some of these transporters in intestinal and renal (re)absorption of amino acids is highlighted by the fact that mutations in either the rBAT or b°,+AT subunit result in cystinuria whereas a defect in the y+-LAT1 light chain causes lysinuric protein intolerance. Here we investigated the localization of these transporters in intestine since both diseases are also characterized by altered intestinal amino acid absorption. Real time PCR showed organ-specific expression patterns for all transporter subunit mRNAs along the intestine and Western blotting confirmed these findings on the protein level. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated basolateral coexpression of 4F2hc, LAT2 and y+-LAT1 in stomach and small intestine, whereas rBAT and b°,+AT were found colocalizing on the apical side of small intestine epithelium. In stomach, 4F2hc and LAT2 were localized in H+/K+-ATPase-expressing parietal cells. The abundant expression of several members of the heterodimeric transporter family along the murine small intestine suggests their involvement in amino acids absorption. Furthermore, strong expression of rBAT, b°,+AT and y+-LAT1 in the small intestine explains the reduced intestinal absorption of some amino acid in patients with cystinuria or lysinuric protein intolerance. PMID:15155792

  6. The stability of amino acids at submarine hydrothermal vent temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bada, Jeffrey L.; Miller, Stanley L.; Zhao, Meixun

    1995-01-01

    It has been postulated that amino acid stability at hydrothermal vent temperatures is controlled by a metastable thermodynamic equilibrium rather than by kinetics. Experiments reported here demonstrate that the amino acids are irreversibly destroyed by heating at 240 C and that quasi-equilibrium calculations give misleading descriptions of the experimental observations. Equilibrium thermodynamic calculations are not applicable to organic compounds under high-temperature submarine vent conditions.

  7. Regulation of system L amino acid transport by Tetrahymena thermophilia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James P. Davis; G. C. Stephens

    1986-01-01

    1.Tetrahymena thermophilia wild type inbred strain B 1863-III shows increased transport activity for a group of amino acids, corresponding to those ascribed to System L, after 5 h incubation in amino acid-free inorganic medium. This increase is abolished by cycloheximide. In contrast, no increased transport activity is observed in the mutant strain SB 1103.2.Kinetic analysis of influx indicates a significant

  8. 5,6,9/99 Neuman Chapter 22 Peptides, Proteins, and -Amino Acids

    E-print Network

    Reed, Christopher A.

    5,6,9/99 Neuman Chapter 22 0 Chapter 22 Peptides, Proteins, and -Amino Acids from Organic Chemistry. Peptides, Proteins, and -Amino Acids 23. Nucleic Acids, Proteins, and -Amino Acids Preview 22-3 22.1 Peptides 22-3 Peptide Structure (22.1A) 22-3 -Amino Acids

  9. Autophagy and aging--importance of amino acid levels.

    PubMed

    Dröge, Wulf

    2004-03-01

    Melendez et al. [Science 301 (2003) 1387] have recently shown that the increased longevity of Caenorhabditis elegans mutants with defective Daf-2 protein, i.e. an insulin receptor analog, involves increased autophagy. Autophagy increases the free amino acid pool and is in certain cells essential for survival at times of limited amino acid availability. In addition, autophagy plays an important role in the turnover of proteins and organelles including mitochondria. The autophagic activity is sensitive to changes in physiological conditions, i.e. it is strongly inhibited by an increase in amino acid concentrations or in insulin receptor signaling. In line with this fact, clinical studies indicate that autophagy mainly occurs at times of low plasma amino acid and insulin concentrations in the post-absorptive (fasted) state, and that the post-absorptive amino acid-sensitive protein catabolism may be taken as a bona fide indicator of autophagic activity. The increased longevity of insulin receptor mutants or of organisms subjected to calorie restriction may, therefore, be attributed to an increase in autophagic activity. Importantly, the autophagic activity decreases with age. Recent studies suggest that this decrease may result from an age-related increase in post-absorptive amino acid levels and/or from an increase in baseline insulin receptor signaling. If so, it is potentially reversible. PMID:15104104

  10. New amino acid indices based on residue network topology.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian; Kawashima, Shuichi; Kanehisa, Minoru

    2007-01-01

    Amino acid indices are useful tools in bioinformatics. With the appearance of novel theory and technology, and the rapid increase of experimental data, building new indices to cope with new or unsolved old problems is still necessary. In this study, residue networks are constructed from the PDB structures of 640 representative proteins based on the distance between Calpha atoms with an 8 A cutoff. All these networks show typical small world features. New amino acid indices, termed relative connectivity, clustering coefficient, closeness and betweenness, are derived from the corresponding topological parameters of amino acids in the residue networks. The 4 new network based indices are closely clustered together and related to hydrophobicity and beta propensity. When compared with related amino acid indices, the new indices show better or comparable performance in protein surface residue prediction. Relative connectivity is the best index and can reach a useful performance with an area under the curve about 0.75. It indicates that the network property based amino acid indices can be useful complements to the existing physicochemical property based amino acid indices. PMID:18546483

  11. Did Evolution Select a Nonrandom "Alphabet" of Amino Acids?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, Gayle K.; Freeland, Stephen J.

    2011-04-01

    The last universal common ancestor of contemporary biology (LUCA) used a precise set of 20 amino acids as a standard alphabet with which to build genetically encoded protein polymers. Considerable evidence indicates that some of these amino acids were present through nonbiological syntheses prior to the origin of life, while the rest evolved as inventions of early metabolism. However, the same evidence indicates that many alternatives were also available, which highlights the question: what factors led biological evolution on our planet to define its standard alphabet? One possibility is that natural selection favored a set of amino acids that exhibits clear, nonrandom properties - a set of especially useful building blocks. However, previous analysis that tested whether the standard alphabet comprises amino acids with unusually high variance in size, charge, and hydrophobicity (properties that govern what protein structures and functions can be constructed) failed to clearly distinguish evolution's choice from a sample of randomly chosen alternatives. Here, we demonstrate unambiguous support for a refined hypothesis: that an optimal set of amino acids would spread evenly across a broad range of values for each fundamental property. Specifically, we show that the standard set of 20 amino acids represents the possible spectra of size, charge, and hydrophobicity more broadly and more evenly than can be explained by chance alone.

  12. The spark discharge synthesis of amino acids from various hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ring, D.; Miller, S. L.

    1984-01-01

    The spark discharge synthesis of amino acids using an atmosphere of CH4+N2+H2O+NH3 has been investigated with variable pNH3. The amino acids produced using higher hydrocarbons (ethane, ethylene, acetylene, propane, butane, and isobutane) instead of CH4 were also investigated. There was considerable range in the absolute yields of amino acids, but the yields relative to glycine (or alpha-amino-n-butyric acid) were more uniform. The relative yields of the C3 to C6 aliphatic alpha-amino acids are nearly the same (with a few exceptions) with all the hydrocarbons. The glycine yields are more variable. The precursors to the C3-C6 aliphatic amino acids seem to be produced in the same process, which is separate from the synthesis of glycine precursors. It may be possible to use these relative yields as a signature for a spark discharge synthesis provided corrections can be made for subsequent decomposition events (e.g. in the Murchison meteorite).

  13. Extraterrestrial Amino Acids in Ureilites Including Almahata Sitta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, A. S.; Glavin, D. P.; Callahan, M. P.; Dworkin, J. P.

    2011-01-01

    Ureilites are a class of meteorites that lack chondrules (achondrites) but have relatively high carbon abundances, averaging approx.3 wt %. Using highly sensitive liquid chromatography coupled with UV fluorescence and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-FD/ToF-MS), it was recently determined that there are amino acids in. fragment 94 of the Almahata Sitta ureilite[l]. Based on the presence of amino acids that are rare in the Earth's biosphere, as well as the near-racemic enantiomeric ratios of marry of the more common amino acids, it was concluded that most of the detected amino acids were indigenous to the meteorite. Although the composition of the Almahata Sitta ureilite appears to be unlike other recovered ureilites, the discovery of amino acids in this meteorite raises the question of whether other ureilites rnav also contain amino acids. Herein we present the results of LC-FDlTo.F-MS analyses of: a sand sample from the Almahata Sitta strewn held, Almahata Sitta fragments 425 (an ordinary H5 chondrite) and 427 (ureilite), as well as an Antarctic ureilite (Allan lulls, ALHA 77257).

  14. Role of Ferrocyanides in the Prebiotic Synthesis of ?-Amino Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Bermejo, Marta; Osuna-Esteban, Susana; Zorzano, María-Paz

    2013-06-01

    We investigated the synthesis of ?-amino acids under possible prebiotic terrestrial conditions in the presence of dissolved iron (II) in a simulated prebiotic ocean. An aerosol-liquid cycle with a prebiotic atmosphere is shown to produce amino acids via Strecker synthesis with relatively high yields. However, in the presence of iron, the HCN was captured in the form of a ferrocyanide, partially inhibiting the formation of amino acids. We showed how HCN captured as Prussian Blue (or another complex compound) may, in turn, have served as the HCN source when exposed to UV radiation, allowing for the sustained production of amino acids in conjunction with the production of oxyhydroxides that precipitate as by-products. We conclude that ferrocyanides and related compounds may have played a significant role as intermediate products in the prebiotic formation of amino acids and oxyhydroxides, such as those that are found in iron-containing soils and that the aerosol cycle of the primitive ocean may have enhanced the yield of the amino acid production.

  15. When quinones meet amino acids: chemical, physical and biological consequences.

    PubMed

    Bittner, S

    2006-05-01

    Quinones and amino acids are usually compartmentally separated in living systems, however there are several junctions in which they meet, react and influence. It occurs mainly in wounded, cut or crushed plant material during harvest, ensiling or disintegrating cells. Diffusing polyphenols are oxidized by polyphenol oxidases (PPOs) to quinonic compounds, which associate reversibly or irreversibly with amino acids and proteins. The reaction takes place with the free nucleophilic functional groups such as sulfhydryl, amine, amide, indole and imidazole substituents. It results in imine formation, in 1,4-Michael addition via nitrogen or sulphur and in Strecker degradation forming aldehydes. The formation and activity of quinone-amino acids conjugates influences the colour, taste, and aroma of foods. Physical and physiological phenomena such as browning of foods, discoloration of plants during processing, alteration of solubility and digestibility, formation of humic substances, germicidal activity, cytotoxicity and more occur when quinones from disintegrating cells meet amino acids. The mechanisms of toxicity and the pathways by which PCBs may be activated and act as a cancer initiator include oxidation to the corresponding quinones and reaction with amino acids or peptides. Sclerotization of insect cuticle is a biochemical process involving also the reaction between quinones and amino acid derivatives. PMID:16601927

  16. Role of ferrocyanides in the prebiotic synthesis of ?-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Bermejo, Marta; Osuna-Esteban, Susana; Zorzano, María-Paz

    2013-06-01

    We investigated the synthesis of ?-amino acids under possible prebiotic terrestrial conditions in the presence of dissolved iron (II) in a simulated prebiotic ocean. An aerosol-liquid cycle with a prebiotic atmosphere is shown to produce amino acids via Strecker synthesis with relatively high yields. However, in the presence of iron, the HCN was captured in the form of a ferrocyanide, partially inhibiting the formation of amino acids. We showed how HCN captured as Prussian Blue (or another complex compound) may, in turn, have served as the HCN source when exposed to UV radiation, allowing for the sustained production of amino acids in conjunction with the production of oxyhydroxides that precipitate as by-products. We conclude that ferrocyanides and related compounds may have played a significant role as intermediate products in the prebiotic formation of amino acids and oxyhydroxides, such as those that are found in iron-containing soils and that the aerosol cycle of the primitive ocean may have enhanced the yield of the amino acid production. PMID:23780697

  17. 21 CFR 172.320 - Amino acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...acid L-Glutamine Aminoacetic acid (glycine) L-Histidine L-Isoleucine L-Leucine...Monohydrochloride L-Cystine Aminoacetic acid (glycine) L-Leucine DL-Methionine L-Methionine...L-glutamine) 12.4 Aminoacetic acid (glycine) 3.5 L-Histidine 2.4...

  18. On the abiotic formation of amino acids. I - HCN as a precursor of amino acids detected in extracts of lunar samples. II - Formation of HCN and amino acids from simulated mixtures of gases released from lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuasa, S.; Flory, D.; Basile, B.; Oro, J.

    1984-01-01

    Two studies on the abiotic formation of amino acids are presented. The first study demonstrates the role of hydrogen cyanide as a precursor of amino acids detected in extracts of lunar samples. The formation of several amino acids, including glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid, under conditions similar to those used for the analysis of lunar samples is demonstrated. The second study investigates the formation of hydrogen cyanide as well as amino acids from lunar-sample gas mixtures under electrical discharge conditions. These results extend the possibility of synthesis of amino acids to planetary bodies with primordial atmospheres less reducing than a mixture of methane, ammonia, hydrogen and water.

  19. On the abiotic formation of amino acids. I. HCN as a precursor of amino acids detected in extracts of lunar samples. II. Formation of HCN and amino acids from simulated mixtures of gases released from lunar samples.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, S; Flory, D; Basile, B; Oró, J

    1984-01-01

    Two studies on the abiotic formation of amino acids are presented. The first study demonstrates the role of hydrogen cyanide as a precursor of amino acids detected in extracts of lunar samples. The formation of several amino acids, including glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid, under conditions similar to those used for the analysis of lunar samples is demonstrated. The second study investigates the formation of hydrogen cyanide as well as amino acids from lunar-sample gas mixtures under electrical discharge conditions. These results extend the possibility of synthesis of amino acids to planetary bodies with primordial atmospheres less reducing than a mixture of methane, ammonia, hydrogen and water. PMID:6330374

  20. Metabolism of sulfur amino acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, D; Surdin-Kerjan, Y

    1997-01-01

    Sulfur amino acid biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae involves a large number of enzymes required for the de novo biosynthesis of methionine and cysteine and the recycling of organic sulfur metabolites. This review summarizes the details of these processes and analyzes the molecular data which have been acquired in this metabolic area. Sulfur biochemistry appears not to be unique through terrestrial life, and S. cerevisiae is one of the species of sulfate-assimilatory organisms possessing a larger set of enzymes for sulfur metabolism. The review also deals with several enzyme deficiencies that lead to a nutritional requirement for organic sulfur, although they do not correspond to defects within the biosynthetic pathway. In S. cerevisiae, the sulfur amino acid biosynthetic pathway is tightly controlled: in response to an increase in the amount of intracellular S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet), transcription of the coregulated genes is turned off. The second part of the review is devoted to the molecular mechanisms underlying this regulation. The coordinated response to AdoMet requires two cis-acting promoter elements. One centers on the sequence TCACGTG, which also constitutes a component of all S. cerevisiae centromeres. Situated upstream of the sulfur genes, this element is the binding site of a transcription activation complex consisting of a basic helix-loop-helix factor, Cbf1p, and two basic leucine zipper factors, Met4p and Met28p. Molecular studies have unraveled the specific functions for each subunit of the Cbf1p-Met4p-Met28p complex as well as the modalities of its assembly on the DNA. The Cbf1p-Met4p-Met28p complex contains only one transcription activation module, the Met4p subunit. Detailed mutational analysis of Met4p has elucidated its functional organization. In addition to its activation and bZIP domains, Met4p contains two regulatory domains, called the inhibitory region and the auxiliary domain. When the level of intracellular AdoMet increases, the transcription activation function of Met4 is prevented by Met30p, which binds to the Met4 inhibitory region. In addition to the Cbf1p-Met4p-Met28p complex, transcriptional regulation involves two zinc finger-containing proteins, Met31p and Met32p. The AdoMet-mediated control of the sulfur amino acid pathway illustrates the molecular strategies used by eucaryotic cells to couple gene expression to metabolic changes. PMID:9409150

  1. Diel and depth variations in dissolved free amino acids and ammonium in the Baltic Sea determined by shipboard HPL Canalysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    KENNETH MOPPER; PETER LINDROTH

    1982-01-01

    A precolumn fluorimetric labeling method was tested for shipboard HPLC analysis of dis- solved fret amino acids (DFAA) in natural waters. No sample preparation is required and all naturally occurring amino acids plus ammonium are sufficiently separated within 30 min, Striking diel trends were observed to a depth of at least 60 m, with maximal DFAA concen- trations (200400 nM)

  2. Abiotic Racemization Kinetics of Amino Acids in Marine Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Steen, Andrew D.; Jørgensen, Bo Barker; Lomstein, Bente Aa.

    2013-01-01

    The ratios of d- versus l-amino acids can be used to infer the sources and composition of sedimentary organic matter. Such inferences, however, rely on knowing the rates at which amino acids in sedimentary organic matter racemize abiotically between the d- and the l-forms. Based on a heating experiment, we report kinetic parameters for racemization of aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, and alanine in bulk sediment from Aarhus Bay, Denmark, taken from the surface, 30 cm, and 340 cm depth below seafloor. Extrapolation to a typical cold deep sea sediment temperature of 3°C suggests racemization rate constants of 0.50×10?5–11×10?5 yr?1. These results can be used in conjunction with measurements of sediment age to predict the ratio of d:l amino acids due solely to abiotic racemization of the source material, deviations from which can indicate the abundance and turnover of active microbial populations. PMID:23951211

  3. Formation of amino acids on heating glycine with alumina

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ch. P. Ivanov; N. N. Slavcheva

    1977-01-01

    The conversion of glycine into amino acids on heating at 240°C with basic manganous carbonate and alumina is investigated. Alanine, a-aminobutyric acid, norvaline, norleucine, sarcosine, N-ethylglycine, N-methylalanine, N-ethylalanine, aspartic acid and glutamic acid are identified among the products of the reaction. Paper chromatography, ion-exchange chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance are used for the analysis. A scheme for the observed transformations

  4. Energetics of Amino Acid Synthesis in Alkaline Hydrothermal Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitadai, Norio

    2015-03-01

    Alkaline hydrothermal systems have received considerable attention as candidates for the origin and evolution of life on the primitive Earth. Nevertheless, sufficient information has not yet been obtained for the thermodynamic properties of amino acids, which are necessary components for life, at high temperatures and alkaline pH. These properties were estimated using experimental high-temperature volume and heat capacity data reported in the literature for several amino acids, together with correlation algorithms and the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) equations of state. This approach enabled determination of a complete set of the standard molal thermodynamic data and the revised HKF parameters for the 20 protein amino acids in their zwitterionic and ionization states. The obtained dataset was then used to evaluate the energetics of amino acid syntheses from simple inorganic precursors (CO2, H2, NH3 and H2S) in a simulated alkaline hydrothermal system on the Hadean Earth. Results show that mixing between CO2-rich seawater and the H2-rich hydrothermal fluid can produce energetically favorable conditions for amino acid syntheses, particularly in the lower-temperature region of such systems. Together with data related to the pH and temperature dependences of the energetics of amino acid polymerizations presented in earlier reports, these results suggest the following. Hadean alkaline hydrothermal settings, where steep pH and temperature gradients may have existed between cool, slightly acidic Hadean ocean water and hot, alkaline hydrothermal fluids at the vent-ocean interface, may be energetically the most suitable environment for the synthesis and polymerization of amino acids.

  5. Phenotypic and genetic relationships between growth and feed intake curves and feed efficiency and amino acid requirements in the growing pig.

    PubMed

    Saintilan, R; Brossard, L; Vautier, B; Sellier, P; Bidanel, J; van Milgen, J; Gilbert, H

    2015-01-01

    Improvement of feed efficiency in pigs has been achieved essentially by increasing lean growth rate, which resulted in lower feed intake (FI). The objective was to evaluate the impact of strategies for improving feed efficiency on the dynamics of FI and growth in growing pigs to revisit nutrient recommendations and strategies for feed efficiency improvement. In 2010, three BWs, at 35±2, 63±9 and 107±7 kg, and daily FI during this period were recorded in three French test stations on 379 Large White and 327 French Landrace from maternal pig populations and 215 Large White from a sire population. Individual growth and FI model parameters were obtained with the InraPorc® software and individual nutrient requirements were computed. The model parameters were explored according to feed efficiency as measured by residual feed intake (RFI) or feed conversion ratio (FCR). Animals were separated in groups of better feed efficiency (RFI- or FCR-), medium feed efficiency and poor feed efficiency. Second, genetic relationships between feed efficiency and model parameters were estimated. Despite similar average daily gains (ADG) during the test for all RFI groups, RFI- pigs had a lower initial growth rate and a higher final growth rate compared with other pigs. The same initial growth rate was found for all FCR groups, but FCR- pigs had significantly higher final growth rates than other pigs, resulting in significantly different ADG. Dynamic of FI also differed between RFI or FCR groups. The calculated digestible lysine requirements, expressed in g/MJ net energy (NE), showed the same trends for RFI or FCR groups: the average requirements for the 25% most efficient animals were 13% higher than that of the 25% least efficient animals during the whole test, reaching 0.90 to 0.95 g/MJ NE at the beginning of the test, which is slightly greater than usual feed recommendations for growing pigs. Model parameters were moderately heritable (0.30±0.13 to 0.56±0.13), except for the precocity of growth (0.06±0.08). The parameter representing the quantity of feed at 50 kg BW showed a relatively high genetic correlation with RFI (0.49±0.14), and average protein deposition between 35 and 110 kg had the highest correlation with FCR (-0.76±0.08). Thus, growth and FI dynamics may be envisaged as breeding tools to improve feed efficiency. Furthermore, improvement of feed efficiency should be envisaged jointly with new feeding strategies. PMID:25192352

  6. Fish oil and the pan-PPAR agonist tetradecylthioacetic acid affect the amino acid and carnitine metabolism in rats.

    PubMed

    Bjørndal, Bodil; Brattelid, Trond; Strand, Elin; Vigerust, Natalya Filipchuk; Svingen, Gard Frodahl Tveitevåg; Svardal, Asbjørn; Nygård, Ottar; Berge, Rolf Kristian

    2013-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are important in the regulation of lipid and glucose metabolism. Recent studies have shown that PPAR?-activation by WY 14,643 regulates the metabolism of amino acids. We investigated the effect of PPAR activation on plasma amino acid levels using two PPAR? activators with different ligand binding properties, tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA) and fish oil, where the pan-PPAR agonist TTA is a more potent ligand than omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. In addition, plasma L-carnitine esters were investigated to reflect cellular fatty acid catabolism. Male Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus) were fed a high-fat (25% w/w) diet including TTA (0.375%, w/w), fish oil (10%, w/w) or a combination of both. The rats were fed for 50 weeks, and although TTA and fish oil had hypotriglyceridemic effects in these animals, only TTA lowered the body weight gain compared to high fat control animals. Distinct dietary effects of fish oil and TTA were observed on plasma amino acid composition. Administration of TTA led to increased plasma levels of the majority of amino acids, except arginine and lysine, which were reduced. Fish oil however, increased plasma levels of only a few amino acids, and the combination showed an intermediate or TTA-dominated effect. On the other hand, TTA and fish oil additively reduced plasma levels of the L-carnitine precursor ?-butyrobetaine, as well as the carnitine esters acetylcarnitine, propionylcarnitine, valeryl/isovalerylcarnitine, and octanoylcarnitine. These data suggest that while both fish oil and TTA affect lipid metabolism, strong PPAR? activation is required to obtain effects on amino acid plasma levels. TTA and fish oil may influence amino acid metabolism through different metabolic mechanisms. PMID:23826175

  7. Fish Oil and the Pan-PPAR Agonist Tetradecylthioacetic Acid Affect the Amino Acid and Carnitine Metabolism in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bjørndal, Bodil; Brattelid, Trond; Strand, Elin; Vigerust, Natalya Filipchuk; Svingen, Gard Frodahl Tveitevåg; Svardal, Asbjørn; Nygård, Ottar; Berge, Rolf Kristian

    2013-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are important in the regulation of lipid and glucose metabolism. Recent studies have shown that PPAR?-activation by WY 14,643 regulates the metabolism of amino acids. We investigated the effect of PPAR activation on plasma amino acid levels using two PPAR? activators with different ligand binding properties, tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA) and fish oil, where the pan-PPAR agonist TTA is a more potent ligand than omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. In addition, plasma L-carnitine esters were investigated to reflect cellular fatty acid catabolism. Male Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus) were fed a high-fat (25% w/w) diet including TTA (0.375%, w/w), fish oil (10%, w/w) or a combination of both. The rats were fed for 50 weeks, and although TTA and fish oil had hypotriglyceridemic effects in these animals, only TTA lowered the body weight gain compared to high fat control animals. Distinct dietary effects of fish oil and TTA were observed on plasma amino acid composition. Administration of TTA led to increased plasma levels of the majority of amino acids, except arginine and lysine, which were reduced. Fish oil however, increased plasma levels of only a few amino acids, and the combination showed an intermediate or TTA-dominated effect. On the other hand, TTA and fish oil additively reduced plasma levels of the L-carnitine precursor ?-butyrobetaine, as well as the carnitine esters acetylcarnitine, propionylcarnitine, valeryl/isovalerylcarnitine, and octanoylcarnitine. These data suggest that while both fish oil and TTA affect lipid metabolism, strong PPAR? activation is required to obtain effects on amino acid plasma levels. TTA and fish oil may influence amino acid metabolism through different metabolic mechanisms. PMID:23826175

  8. The red clover necrotic mosaic virus capsid protein N-terminal amino acids possess specific RNA binding activity and are required for stable virion assembly.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Ho; Sit, Tim L; Kim, Kook-Hyung; Lommel, Steven A

    2013-09-01

    The red clover necrotic mosaic virus (RCNMV) bipartite RNA genome is packaged into two virion populations containing either RNA-1 and RNA-2 or multiple copies of RNA-2 only. To understand this distinctive packaging scheme, we investigated the RNA-binding properties of the RCNMV capsid protein (CP). Maltose binding protein-CP fusions exhibited the highest binding affinities for RNA probes containing the RNA-2 trans-activator or the 3' non-coding region from RNA-1. Other viral and non-viral RNA probes displayed CP binding but to a much lower degree. Deletion of the highly basic N-terminal 50 residues abolished CP binding to viral RNA transcripts. In planta studies of select CP deletion mutants within this N-terminal region revealed that it was indispensable for stable virion formation and the region spanning CP residues 5-15 is required for systemic movement. Thus, the N-terminal region of the CP is involved in both producing two virion populations due to its RNA binding properties and virion stability. PMID:23747688

  9. Use of free amino acid composition of shell to estimate age since death of recent molluscs

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, A.M.; Powell, E.N.; Stanton, R.J. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    An understanding of death assemblage formation requires a measurement of time since death of constituent individuals. A new dating technique based on the measurement of the free amino acid content of mollusc shells has been developed which is inexpensive, rapid, and effective in dating time scales of a few decades to a few centuries. Since the breakdown of proteins of the matrix of mollusc shells begins soon after deposition, free amino acids gradually increase with shell age. The measurement of these can be used to determine the relative age among a group of shells. The future use of this technique depends on a clearer understanding of how free amino acid accumulation rate varies with age and species and developing effective calibration methods so that absolute rather than relative ages can be readily obtained. Three species were distributed widely enough for use - Rangia cuneata, Tagelus plebeius, and Phacoides pectinatus. A good relationship between free amino acids and relative age was present in all three species over the entire core; however some species and some amino acid were superior to others. Rangia cuneata produced the best correlation because it is epifaunal and thus died at the sediment surface rather than over an extended depth range and, also perhaps, because amino acid accumulation rates were more linear.

  10. Determination of the D and L isomers of some protein amino acids present in soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, G. E.; Cheng, C.-N.; Cronin, S. E.

    1977-01-01

    The D and L isomers of some protein amino acids present in soils were measured by using a gas chromatographic technique. The results of two processing procedures were compared to determine the better method. Results of the comparison indicated that the determination of D and L percentages requires amino acid purification if one is to obtain accurate data. It was found that very significant amounts of D-alanine, D-aspartic acid, and D-glutamic acid were present in the contemporary soils studied. Valine, isoleucine, leucine, proline, and phenylalanine generally contained only a trace to very small amounts of the D isomer. It is probable that the D-amino acids from the alanine, aspartic, and glutamic acids are contributed to the soil primarily via microorganisms. The finding of very significant quantities of some D-amino acids (about 5-16%) in present-day soils may alert some investigators of geological sediments to a possible problem in using amino acid racemization as an age-dating technique.

  11. Amino Acid Supplementation Affects Imprinted Gene Transcription Patterns in Parthenogenetic Porcine Blastocysts

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chi-Hun; Jeong, Young-Hee; Jeong, Yeun-Ik; Kwon, Jeong-Woo; Shin, Taeyoung; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Jeung, Eui-Bae; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Seo, Sang-Kyo; Lee, Chang-Kyu; Hwang, Woo-Suk

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether exogenous amino acids affect gene transcription patterns in parthenogenetic porcine embryos, we investigated the effects of amino acid mixtures in culture medium. Parthenogenetic embryos were cultured in PZM3 medium under four experimental conditions: 1) control (no amino acids except L-glutamine and taurine); 2) nonessential amino acids (NEAA); 3) essential amino acids (EAA); and 4) NEAA and EAA. The rate of development of embryos to the four-cell stage was not affected by treatment. However, fewer (P<0.05) embryos cultured with EAA (12.8%) reached the blastocyst stage as compared with the control group (25.6%) and NEAA group (30.3%). Based on these findings, we identified genes with altered expression in parthenogenetic embryos exposed to medium with or without EAAs. The results indicated that EAA influenced gene expression patterns, particularly those of imprinted genes (e.g., H19, IGF2R, PEG1, XIST). However, NEAAs did not affect impaired imprinted gene expressions induced by EAA. The results also showed that mechanistic target of rapamycin (MTOR) mRNA expression was significantly increased by EAA alone as compared with control cultures, and that the combined treatment with NEAA and EAA did not differ significantly from those of control cultures. Our results revealed that gene transcription levels in porcine embryos changed differentially depending on the presence of EAA or NEAA. However, the changes in the H19 mRNA observed in the parthenogenetic blastocysts expression level was not related to the DNA methylation status in the IGF2/H19 domain. The addition of exogenous amino acid mixtures affected not only early embryonic development, but also gene transcription levels, particularly those of imprinted genes. However, this study did not reveal how amino acids affect expression of imprinted genes under the culture conditions used. Further studies are thus required to fully evaluate how amino acids affect transcriptional regulation in porcine embryos. PMID:25180972

  12. Selective Lability of Ruthenium(II) Arene Amino Acid Complexes.

    PubMed

    Scrase, Tom G; O'Neill, Michael J; Peel, Andrew J; Senior, Paul W; Matthews, Peter D; Shi, Heyao; Boss, Sally R; Barker, Paul D

    2015-04-01

    A series of organometallic complexes of the form [(PhH)Ru(amino acid)](+) have been synthesized using amino acids able to act as tridentate ligands. The straightforward syntheses gave enantiomerically pure complexes with two stereogenic centers due to the enantiopurity of the chelating ligands. Complexes were characterized in the solid-state and/or solution-state where the stability of the complex allowed. The propensity toward labilization of the coordinatively saturated complexes was investigated. The links between complex stability and structural features are very subtle. Nonetheless, H/D exchange rates of coordinated amino groups reveal more significant differences in reactivity linked to metallocycle ring size resulting in decreasing stability of the metallocycle as the amino acid side-chain length increases. The behavior of these systems in acid is unusual, apparently labilizing the carboxylate residue of the amino acid. This acid-catalyzed hemilability in an organometallic is relevant to the use of Ru(II) arenes in medicinal contexts due to the relatively low pH of cancerous cells. PMID:25799231

  13. Amino Acids from Ion-Irradiated Nitrile-Containing Ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, Reggie L.; Moore, Marla H.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Martin, Mildred P.; Pozun, Zachary D.

    2008-08-01

    Solid CH3CN and solid H2O + CH3CN were ion irradiated near 10 K to initiate chemical reactions thought to occur in extraterrestrial ices. The infrared spectra of these samples after irradiation revealed the synthesis of new molecules. After the irradiated ices were warmed to remove volatiles, the resulting residual material was extracted and analyzed. Both unhydrolyzed and acid-hydrolyzed residues were examined by both liquid and gas chromatographic-mass spectral methods and found to contain a rich mixture of products. The unhydrolyzed samples showed HCN, NH3, acetaldehyde (formed by reaction with background and atmospheric H2O), alkyamines, and numerous other compounds, but no amino acids. However, reaction products in hydrolyzed residues contained a suite of amino acids that included some found in carbonaceous chondrite meteorites. Equal amounts of D- and L-enantiomers were found for each chiral amino acid detected. Extensive use was made of 13C-labeled CH3CN to confirm amino acid identifications and discriminate against possible terrestrial contaminants. The results reported here show that ices exposed to cosmic rays can yield products that, after hydrolysis, form a set of primary amino acids equal in richness to those made by other methods, such as photochemistry.

  14. Differential regulation of placental amino acid transport by saturated and unsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Lager, Susanne; Jansson, Thomas; Powell, Theresa L

    2014-10-15

    Fatty acids are critical for normal fetal development but may also influence placental function. We have previously reported that oleic acid (OA) stimulates amino acid transport in primary human trophoblasts (PHTs). In other tissues, saturated and unsaturated fatty acids have distinct effects on cellular signaling, for instance, palmitic acid (PA) but not OA reduces I?B? expression. We hypothesized that saturated and unsaturated fatty acids differentially affect trophoblast amino acid transport and cellular signaling. To test this hypothesis, PHTs were cultured in docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 50 ?M), OA (100 ?M), or PA (100 ?M). DHA and OA were also combined to test whether DHA could counteract the OA stimulatory effect on amino acid transport. The effects of fatty acids were compared against a vehicle control. Amino acid transport was measured by isotope-labeled tracers. Activation of inflammatory-related signaling pathways and the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway were determined by Western blot analysis. Exposure of PHTs to DHA for 24 h reduced amino acid transport and phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, STAT3, mTOR, eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1, and ribosomal protein (rp)S6. In contrast, OA increased amino acid transport and phosphorylation of ERK, mTOR, S6 kinase 1, and rpS6. The combination of DHA with OA increased amino acid transport and rpS6 phosphorylation. PA did not affect amino acid transport but reduced I?B? expression. In conclusion, these fatty acids differentially regulated placental amino acid transport and cellular signaling. Taken together, these findings suggest that dietary fatty acids could alter the intrauterine environment by modifying placental function, thereby having long-lasting effects on the developing fetus. PMID:25143349

  15. N-Protected amino acid bromides: efficient reagents for the incorporation into peptides of extremely hindered ?,?-dialkyl- and ?-fluoroalkyl-amino acids

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alma DalPozzo; Roberto Bergonzi; Minghong Ni

    2001-01-01

    N-Protected amino acid bromides were found to be exceptionally well suited for the coupling of extremely hindered amino acids. Bromides were generated in situ under neutral conditions and used for coupling with a number of ?,?-dialkyl- and N-Me-amino acids, affording configurationally pure peptides in very high yields. For the first time, peptide bond formation on the amino group of ?-fluoroalkyl-amino

  16. Amino acid phosphoramidate nucleosides: potential ADEPT/GDEPT substrates.

    PubMed

    McIntee, E J; Wagner, C R

    2001-11-01

    A series of aromatic, serum-stable, water soluble and nontoxic amino acid phosphoramidate monoesters of 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine (FUdR) and 1-beta-arabinofuranosylcytosine (Ara-C) was shown to inhibit the cellular growth of the human leukemia cell line CCRF-CEM in the presence of human prostatic acid phosphatase (hPAP). PMID:11597404

  17. Boron-containing amino carboxylic acid compounds and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Kabalka, George W. (Knoxville, TN); Srivastava, Rajiv R. (Knoxville, TN)

    2000-03-14

    Novel compounds which are useful for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) are disclosed. The compounds comprise a stable boron-containing group and an aminocycloalkane carboxylic acid group or a boronated acyclic hydrocarbon-linked amino carboxylic acid. Methods for synthesis of the compounds and for use of the compounds in BNCT are disclosed.

  18. Formation of pyrazines from ascorbic acid and amino acids under dry-roasting conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    An Adams; Norbert De Kimpe

    2009-01-01

    Although the participation of ascorbic acid in Maillard-type reactions has been described, the formation of flavour compounds resulting from the interaction of ascorbic acid with different amino acids has not been reported before. Therefore, the formation of flavour compounds from the model reactions of 20 amino acids with ascorbic acid was studied under dry-roasting conditions. Thirty-six different pyrazines were identified,

  19. Fungal Peptaibiotics: Assessing Potential Meteoritic Amino Acid Contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, J. E.; Callahan, M. P.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.; Bruckner, H.

    2010-01-01

    The presence of non-protein alpha-dialkyl-amino acids such as alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (alpha-A1B) and isovaline (Iva), which are relatively rare in the terrestrial biosphere, has long been used as an indication of the indigeneity of meteoritic amino acids, however, the discovery of alpha-AIB in peptides producers by a widespread group of filamentous fungi indicates the possibility of a terrestrial biotic source for the alpha-AIB observed in some meteorites. The alpha-AIB-containing peptides produced by these fungi are dubbed peptaibiotics. We measured the molecular distribution and stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic ratios for amino acids found in the total hydrolysates of four biologically synthesized peptaibiotics. We compared these aneasurenetts with those from the CM2 carbonaceous chondrite Murchison and from three Antarctic CR2 carbonaceous chondrites in order to understand the peptaibiotics as a potential source of meteoritic contamination.

  20. 2/17/05 1Bioinformatics (Lec 12) Amino Acid Structures from Klug & Cummings

    E-print Network

    Narasimhan, Giri

    2/17/05 1Bioinformatics (Lec 12) Amino Acid Structures from Klug & Cummings #12;Amino Acid Structures from Klug & Cummings 2/17/05 2Bioinformatics (Lec 12) #12;Amino Acid Structures from Klug & Cummings 2/17/05 3Bioinformatics (Lec 12) #12;2/17/05 4Bioinformatics (Lec 12) Amino Acid Structures from

  1. Periodic Distributions of Hydrophobic Amino Acids Allows the Definition of Fundamental Building Blocks

    E-print Network

    Carbone, Alessandra

    Periodic Distributions of Hydrophobic Amino Acids Allows the Definition of Fundamental Building that hydrophobic amino acids are globally conserved even if they are subjected to high rate substitution. Statistical analysis of amino acids evolution within blocks of hydrophobic amino acids detected in sequences

  2. AMINO ACIDS AND PROTEIN ADEQUACY FOR HONEY BEES OF POLLENS FROM DESERT PLANTS AND OTHER FLORAL

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    AMINO ACIDS AND PROTEIN ADEQUACY FOR HONEY BEES OF POLLENS FROM DESERT PLANTS AND OTHER FLORAL from pollen primarily as a source of essential amino acids. Thus, we determined the amino acids, and proline were the predominant amino acids in all desert pollens examined. The desert plants had low protein

  3. AMINO ACID CATABOLISM AND GLUCONEOGENESIS IN SHEEP' A.R. EGAN* J.C. MACRAE

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    AMINO ACID CATABOLISM AND GLUCONEOGENESIS IN SHEEP' A.R. EGAN* J.C. MACRAE * Waite Agricultural of catabolism of amino acids are well described, there is as yet little information on the relationships bet- ween amino acid supply, flux and oxidation, or on the contribution made by certain amino acids

  4. Plasma Amino Acids and Insulin Luels in Obesity: Response to Carbohydrate Intake and Tryptophan Supplements

    E-print Network

    Wurtman, Richard

    Plasma Amino Acids and Insulin Luels in Obesity: Response to Carbohydrate Intake and Tryptophan Supplements Benjamin Caballero, Nicholas Finer, and Richard J. Wurtman We assessed the plasma amino acids-chain amino acids, phenylalanine and tyrosine, and the level. of these amino acids declined much less

  5. Identifying amino acids in protein NMR spectra: 1) Glycine (Gly, G)

    E-print Network

    Identifying amino acids in protein NMR spectra: 1) Glycine (Gly, G) Glycine is the only amino acid of other amino acid types. The 13C alpha carbon chemical shift is usually in the range of 43 to 47 ppm, slightly lower than the 13C alpha carbon chemical shift of other amino acid types. 2) Alanine (Ala, A) Look

  6. Protein digestion and amino acid absorption along the intestine of the common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.),

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Protein digestion and amino acid absorption along the intestine of the common carp (Cyprinus carpio amino acids and the apparent absorption of amino acids (AAaa) were evaluated in different segments of carp intestine. The AAaa analysed using Crz03 as a marker indicated that 73.2 % of the amino acids were

  7. Closed-system behaviour of the intra-crystalline fraction of amino acids in mollusc shells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. E. H. Penkman; D. S. Kaufman; D. Maddy; M. J. Collins

    2008-01-01

    When mollusc shells are analysed conventionally for amino acid geochronology, the entire population of amino acids is included, both inter- and intra-crystalline. This study investigates the utility of removing the amino acids that are most susceptible to environmental effects by isolating the fraction of amino acids encapsulated within mineral crystals of mollusc shells (intra-crystalline fraction). Bleaching, heating and leaching (diffusive

  8. Effect of Histidine and Certain Other Amino Acids on the Absorption of Iron59 by Rats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    DARRELL VAN CAMPEN

    Reports in the literature have indicated that several amino acids can increase the absorption of ferrous iron. The objectives of the experiments reported here were to determine if certain amino acids would increase absorption of 59Fe supplied in the ferric form and, if so, to investigate the mechanism of action of these amino acids. Of six amino acids tested, histidine

  9. INTEGUMENTARY AMINO ACID TRANSPORT AND METABOLISM IN THE APODOUS SEA CUCUMBER, CHIRIDOTA RIGIDA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    GREGORY A. AHEARN; SIDNEY J. TOWNSLEY

    SUMMARY 1. The apodous sea cucumber, Ckiridota rigida, was found to transport exogenous amino acids to intracellular free amino acid pools in the integu- ment, the gastrointestinal epithelium making only a minimal contribution to total animal uptake. 2. Amino acids entering the integumentary free amino acid pool were either completely catabohzed to CO2, incorporated into large molecular weight compounds, such

  10. Distribution, industrial applications, and enzymatic synthesis of D-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiuzhen; Ma, Qinyuan; Zhu, Hailiang

    2015-04-01

    D-Amino acids exist widely in microbes, plants, animals, and food and can be applied in pharmaceutical, food, and cosmetics. Because of their widespread applications in industry, D-amino acids have recently received more and more attention. Enzymes including D-hydantoinase, N-acyl-D-amino acid amidohydrolase, D-amino acid amidase, D-aminopeptidase, D-peptidase, L-amino acid oxidase, D-amino acid aminotransferase, and D-amino acid dehydrogenase can be used for D-amino acids synthesis by kinetic resolution or asymmetric amination. In this review, the distribution, industrial applications, and enzymatic synthesis methods are summarized. And, among all the current enzymatic methods, D-amino acid dehydrogenase method not only produces D-amino acid by a one-step reaction but also takes environment and atom economics into consideration; therefore, it is deserved to be paid more attention. PMID:25758960

  11. Resolving Discrepancy between Nucleotides and Amino Acids in Deep-Level Arthropod Phylogenomics: Differentiating Serine Codons in 21-Amino-Acid Models

    E-print Network

    Zwick, Andreas; Regier, Jerome C.; Zwickl, Derrick J.

    2012-11-20

    amino acids. This study investigates the cause of that discrepancy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINIDINGS: The hypothesis is tested that failure to distinguish the serine residues encoded by two disjunct clusters of codons (TCN, AGY) in amino acid analyses...

  12. Ancestry and progeny of nutrient amino acid transporters

    PubMed Central

    Boudko, Dmitri Y.; Kohn, Andrea B.; Meleshkevitch, Ella A.; Dasher, Michelle K.; Seron, Theresa J.; Stevens, Bruce R.; Harvey, William R.

    2005-01-01

    The biosynthesis of structural and signaling molecules depends on intracellular concentrations of essential amino acids, which are maintained by a specific system of plasma membrane transporters. We identify a unique population of nutrient amino acid transporters (NATs) within the sodium-neurotransmitter symporter family and have characterized a member of the NAT subfamily from the larval midgut of the Yellow Fever vector mosquito, Aedes aegypti (aeAAT1, AAR08269), which primarily supplies phenylalanine, an essential substrate for the synthesis of neuronal and cuticular catecholamines. Further analysis suggests that NATs constitute a comprehensive transport metabolon for the epithelial uptake and redistribution of essential amino acids including precursors of several neurotransmitters. In contrast to the highly conserved subfamily of orthologous neurotransmitter transporters, lineage-specific, paralogous NATs undergo rapid gene multiplication/substitution that enables a high degree of evolutionary plasticity of nutrient amino acid uptake mechanisms and facilitates environmental and nutrient adaptations of organisms. These findings provide a unique model for understanding the molecular mechanisms, physiology, and evolution of amino acid and neurotransmitter transport systems and imply that monoamine and GABA transporters evolved by selection and conservation of earlier neuronal NATs. PMID:15665107

  13. Dietary free amino acids and the gastric phase of digestion.

    PubMed

    Zolotarev, Vasiliy A

    2014-01-01

    In the stomach, pre-absorptive perception of food constituents is of particular importance in maintaining secretion and motility that matches the quantity and quality of nutrients. Products of food protein hydrolysis, free amino acids and short peptides, are the most potent chemical stimulants of the gastric phase of digestion. They are recognized by a variety of extracellular receptors belonging to the G-protein-coupled receptor superfamily, which are expressed by gastric mucosal exocrine and endocrine cells. Enteroendocrine G and D cells are likely the first level of integration of amino-acid-induced signals influencing a balance of endocrine activation and inhibition of gastric functions. This review focuses mainly on the physiological significance of dietary L-glutamate (Glu) in control of the gastric phase of digestion. The Glu signaling system in the stomach is linked to activation of the vagal afferents. In contrast to other natural amino acids, luminal Glu activates a paracrine cascade led by nitric oxide and followed by serotonin (5-HT), interacting in turn with 5- HT3 receptors on the afferent endings in the sub-mucosal layer. Glu, the only amino acid regularly ingested in a free form, enhances secretory and gastroprokinetic responses to protein- and amino-acid-rich diets but has no effect when applied alone or with carbohydrates. Possible mechanisms are discussed. PMID:23886390

  14. Effect of L-amino acids on Mucor rouxii dimorphism.

    PubMed Central

    Leija, A; Ruiz-Herrera, J; Mora, J

    1986-01-01

    Mucor rouxii organisms growing aerobically and exponentially on a well-defined minimal medium are able to differentiate as yeasts or as mycelia, depending on the amino acid as the nitrogen source. When certain amino acids were used as the nitrogen source, spores differentiated only as hyphae, whereas other amino acids gave rise to other morphological forms having different ratios of yeasts to hyphae. In both hyphal and yeast cultures, an aerobic metabolism was predominant, as shown by determining several metabolic parameters such as oxygen tension, glucose consumption, ethanol production, and CO2 release. A complete conversion of yeasts to hyphae was obtained by the appropriate change in the amino acid used as nitrogen source. By preparing spheroplasts from mycelial cultures and transferring them to media with amino acids that induce yeast formation, a 50% yield in the reverse transformation was achieved. A correlation between the change in pH of the medium and cell morphology was observed in different growth conditions. Decrease in the pH of the medium preceded the appearance of hyphae. Also, when the initial pH of the medium was increased, aspartate-containing cultures developed mainly as mycelia, instead of yeasts, with a corresponding decrease in the final pH. Images PMID:3096961

  15. Protein and amino acid metabolism and requirements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins are the major structural and functional components of all cells of the body. Enzymes, membrane carriers, blood transport molecules, intracellular matrix, and even hair and fingernails are proteins, as are many hormones. Proteins also constitute a major portion of all membranes, and the cons...

  16. polymerization on the Rocks: ?-amino Acids and Arginine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rihe Liu; Leslie E. Orgel

    1998-01-01

    We have studied the accumulation of long oligomers of ß-amino acids on the surface of minerals using the ‘polymerization on the rocks’ protocol. We find that long oligopeptides of ß-glutamic acid which cannot be formed in homogeneous aqueous solution are accumulated efficiently on the surface of hydroxylapatite using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDAC) as condensing agent. The EDAC-induced oligomerization of aspartic acid

  17. De novo amino acid biosynthesis contributes to salmonella enterica growth in Alfalfa seedling exudates.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Grace; Pisithkul, Tippapha; Amador-Noguez, Daniel; Barak, Jeri

    2015-02-01

    Salmonella enterica is a member of the plant microbiome. Growth of S. enterica in sprouting-seed exudates is rapid; however, the active metabolic networks essential in this environment are unknown. To examine the metabolic requirements of S. enterica during growth in sprouting-seed exudates, we inoculated alfalfa seeds and identified 305 S. enterica proteins extracted 24 h postinoculation from planktonic cells. Over half the proteins had known metabolic functions, and they are involved in over one-quarter of the known metabolic reactions. Ion and metabolite transport accounted for the majority of detected reactions. Proteins involved in amino acid transport and metabolism were highly represented, suggesting that amino acid metabolic networks may be important for S. enterica growth in association with roots. Amino acid auxotroph growth phenotypes agreed with the proteomic data; auxotrophs in amino acid-biosynthetic pathways that were detected in our screen developed growth defects by 48 h. When the perceived sufficiency of each amino acid was expressed as a ratio of the calculated biomass requirement to the available concentration and compared to growth of each amino acid auxotroph, a correlation between nutrient availability and bacterial growth was found. Furthermore, glutamate transport acted as a fitness factor during S. enterica growth in association with roots. Collectively, these data suggest that S. enterica metabolism is robust in the germinating-alfalfa environment; that single-amino-acid metabolic pathways are important but not essential; and that targeting central metabolic networks, rather than dedicated pathways, may be necessary to achieve dramatic impacts on bacterial growth. PMID:25416761

  18. Composition of antioxidants and amino acids in Stevia leaf infusions.

    PubMed

    Periche, Angela; Koutsidis, Georgios; Escriche, Isabel

    2014-03-01

    Stevia, a non-caloric natural sweetener with beneficial properties and considerable antioxidants and amino acids, is increasingly consumed as an infusion. This work evaluates the influence of the conditions (temperature: 50, 70 or 90 °C and time: 1, 5, 20 or 40 min) applied to obtain Stevia infusions, on antioxidants (total phenols, flavonoids and antioxidant activity) and amino acids. The total concentration of the eleven amino acids found was 11.70 mg/g in dried leaves and from 6.84 to 9.11 mg/g per gram of Stevia in infusions. However, infusions showed higher levels of certain amino acids (alanine, asparagine, leucine and proline), and greater values of the three antioxidant parameters in comparison with dry leaves. Temperature had more influence (minimum values at 50 °C and maximum at 90 °C) than time in the case of antioxidants. At 90 °C there were no important increases in the extraction of antioxidant compounds after 5 min; each gram of Stevia had 117 mg trolox (total antioxidant activity), 90 mg gallic acid (total phenols) and 56 mg catechin equivalents (flavonoids). Varying the temperature and time conditions no notable differences were observed in the concentrations of the majority of amino acids. However, the infusion treatment at 90 °C for 5 min was the best, as it gave the highest yield of 8 of the 11 amino acids. Therefore, with respect to the compounds analyzed in this study, the best way to obtain Stevia leaf infusions is the same as the domestic process, almost boiling water for a short time. PMID:24293005

  19. Extraterrestrial amino acids at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, N.C.; Bada, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    The Earth has apparently been impacted by numerous large asteroids (>10 km diameter) or comets throughout its history. The rate of these collisions is roughly 2-4 x 10/sup -8/ events yr/sup -1/. The collision of a large asteroid or comet with the Earth could result in the addition of extra-terrestrial organic compounds. Certain types of meteorites (C2-carbonaceous chondrites) contain a vast assortment of organics, including amino acids, aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, carboxylic acids, heterocycles, and various low molecular weight compounds. Molecules important in abiotic organic syntheses are present in comets, and thus these objects are also likely rich inorganics. The authors have investigated whether the amino acid ..cap alpha..-amino isobutyric acid (AIBA) can be used to ascertain whether extraterrestrial amino acids (ETAA) were added to the Earth's surface at the proposed asteroid or comet impact event associated with the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary. AIBA was utilized in these studies since it is a dominant amino acid in C2-carbonaceous meteorites and only rarely occurs in terrestrial organisms. Detection of AIBA was performed using OPA pre-column derivatization-HPLC methodology. Since the AIBA fluorescent yield is increased relative to non ..cap alpha..-methyl substituted amino acids at elevated temperatures, derivatization was carried out at both room temperature and 90/sup 0/C. Ocean sediments of various geological ages were analyzed. The results indicate that only in DSDP Leg 43 K-T boundary samples are detectable levels of AIBA present.

  20. Structure determination of a 20 amino acid peptide by NMR The twenty amino acid peptide contains over 100 unique protons that are potentially observable by

    E-print Network

    Structure determination of a 20 amino acid peptide by NMR The twenty amino acid peptide contains information is helpful: a) A table of typical proton NMR chemical shifts for protons within amino acids of the 20 amino acid peptide. It is: K1 T2 L3 T4 L5 E6 A7 A8 L9 R10 N11 A12 W13 L14 R15 E16 V17 G18 L19 K20

  1. Excretion of amino acids by humans during space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, T. P.; Schluter, M. D.

    1998-01-01

    We measured the urine amino acid distribution patterns before, during and after space flight on the Space Shuttle. The urine samples were collected on two separate flights of the space shuttle. The first flight lasted 9.5 days and the second flight 15 days. Urine was collected continuously on 8 subjects for the period beginning 10 d before launch to 6 d after landing. Results: In contrast to the earlier Skylab missions where a pronounced amino aciduria was found, on shuttle the urinary amino acids showed little change with spaceflight except for a marked decrease in all of the amino acids on FD (flight day) 1 (p<0.05) and a reduction in isoleucine and valine on FD3 and FD4 (p<0.05). Conclusions: (i) Amino aciduria is not an inevitable consequence of space flight. (ii) The occurrence of amino aciduria, like muscle protein breakdown is a mission specific effect rather than part of the general human response to microgravity.

  2. Enantiomeric Excesses of Acid Labile Amino Acid Precursors of the Murchison Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzarello, Sandra

    1998-01-01

    Amino acids present in carbonaceous chondrite are extracted in water in part as free compounds and in approximately equal part as acid labile precursors. On the assumption that they would be free of contamination, the precursors of two Murchison amino acids that have terrestrial occurrence, alanine and glutamic acid, have been targeted for analysis of their enantiomeric ratios. Pyroglutamic acid, the precursor of glutamic acid, was found with an L-enantiomeric excess comparable to that of the free acid, while alanine's precursor, N-acetyl alanine, appears approximately racemic. Also alpha-imino propioacetic acid, a proposed end product of alanine synthesis in the meteorite, was analyzed and found racemic.

  3. Amino Acids, Aromatic Compounds, and Carboxylic Acids: How Did They Get Their Common Names?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Sam H.

    2000-01-01

    Surveys the roots of the common names of organic compounds most likely to be encountered by undergraduate organic chemistry students. Includes information for 19 amino acids, 17 aromatic compounds, and 21 carboxylic acids. (WRM)

  4. Amino acids in a Fischer Tropsch type synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, D. L.; Lawless, J. G.

    1974-01-01

    One postulation is described for the presence of organic compounds in meteorites which states that they were formed during the condensation of the solar nebula. A viable laboratory simulation of these conditions can be modeled after the industrial Fischer Tropsch reaction, which is known to produce organic compounds called hydrocarbons. In this simulation, a mixture of carbon monoxide, hydrogen and ammonia is heated in the presence of iron meteorite. The reaction products for amino acids, a class of organic compounds important to life, were examined. A large number of these compounds is found in meteorites and other chemical evolution experiments, but only small quantities of a few amino acids were found in the present simulation work. These results are at odds with the existing literature in which many amino acids were reported.

  5. Energetics of amino acid synthesis in hydrothermal ecosystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amend, J. P.; Shock, E. L.

    1998-01-01

    Thermodynamic calculations showed that the autotrophic synthesis of all 20 protein-forming amino acids was energetically favored in hot (100 degrees C), moderately reduced, submarine hydrothermal solutions relative to the synthesis in cold (18 degrees C), oxidized, surface seawater. The net synthesis reactions of 11 amino acids were exergonic in the hydrothermal solution, but all were endergonic in surface seawater. The synthesis of the requisite amino acids of nine thermophilic and hyperthermophilic proteins in a 100 degreesC hydrothermal solution yielded between 600 and 8000 kilojoules per mole of protein, which is energy that is available to drive the intracellular synthesis of enzymes and other biopolymers in hyperthermophiles thriving in these ecosystems.

  6. The Biology Project: The Chemistry of Amino Acids

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Biology Project at the University of Arizona doesn't shy away from the big (or little) questions of life and science, and this helpful educational resource will be another educational arrow in the quiver of science educators from Seattle to Tashkent. The site provides a basic introduction to amino acids, offering a brief description of their role as the "building blocks" of protein. After reading the introduction, students can learn about the structure of amino acids, and then take on a few exercises in the "Test yourself" section of the site. Of course, that's not all, as visitors can also learn about each amino acid separately, and there's even a handy legend that makes learning that much easier.

  7. Supernovae and the chirality of the amino acids.

    PubMed

    Boyd, R N; Kajino, T; Onaka, T

    2010-06-01

    A mechanism for creating amino acid enantiomerism that always selects the same large-scale chirality is identified, and subsequent chemical replication and galactic mixing that would populate the Galaxy with the predominant species is described. This involves (1) the spin of the 14N in the amino acids, or in precursor molecules from which amino acids might be formed, that couples to the chirality of the molecules; (2) the neutrinos emitted from the supernova, together with the magnetic field from the nascent neutron star or black hole formed from the supernova, which selectively destroy one orientation of the 14N and thus select the chirality associated with the other 14N orientation; (3) chemical evolution, by which the molecules replicate and evolve to more complex forms of a single chirality on a relatively short timescale; and (4) galactic mixing on a longer timescale that mixes the selected molecules throughout the Galaxy. PMID:20624062

  8. Transport of amino acids through the placenta and their role.

    PubMed

    Grillo, M A; Lanza, A; Colombatto, S

    2008-05-01

    Amino acids are transported across the human placenta mediated by transporter proteins that differ in structure, mechanism and substrate specificity. Some of them are Na+-dependent systems, whereas others are Na+-independent. Among these there are transporters composed of a heavy chain, a glycoprotein, and a light chain. Moreover, they can be differently distributed in the two membranes forming the syncytiotrophoblast. The transport mechanisms involved and their regulation are only partially known. In the placenta itself, part of the amino acids is metabolized to form other compounds important for the fetus. This occurs for instance for arginine, which gives rise to polyamines and to NO. Interconversion occurs among few other amino acids Transport is altered in pregnancy complications, such as restricted fetal growth. PMID:18172742

  9. An efficient chiral synthesis of fluoro-containing amino acids: N-benzyloxycarbonyl-2-amino-4,4-difluorobutyric acid methyl ester and its analogs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zilun Hu; Wei Han

    2008-01-01

    Fluoro-containing amino acids, N-benzyloxycarbonyl-2-amino-4,4-difluorobutyric acid methyl ester and analogs, were prepared in high enantiomeric excess. Incorporation of 2-amino-4,4-difluoro butyric acid as P1 group provided a potent HCV NS3 protease inhibitor.

  10. Figure 1. Comparison of amino-acid frequencies in predicted disordered (freqdis) and ordered (freqord) regions of human proteins. Amino acids are

    E-print Network

    Obradovic, Zoran

    Figure 1. Comparison of amino-acid frequencies in predicted disordered (freqdis) and ordered (freqord) regions of human proteins. Amino acids are sorted by the relative difference (freqdis ­freqord differences between amino acid sequences of IDPs/IDRs and structured globular proteins and domains

  11. Krafft temperature and enthalpy of solution of N -acyl amino acid surfactants and their racemic modifications: effect of the amino acid residue

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Akio Ohta; Noriaki Ozawa; Satoru Nakashima; Tsuyoshi Asakawa; Shigeyoshi Miyagishi

    2003-01-01

    The Krafft temperatures and the enthalpies of solution of six kinds of N-hexadecanoyl amino acid surfactant (Gly, Ala, Val, Leu, Ile, and Phe) were obtained from both solubility measurements and differential scanning calorimetry. It was shown that the Krafft temperature of N-hexadecanoyl amino acid surfactant increased with decreasing size of the amino acid residue except for the case of phenylalanine.

  12. Partitioning of acidic, basic and neutral amino acids into imidazolium-based ionic liquids

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ghodratollah AbsalanMorteza Akhond; Morteza Akhond; Leila Sheikhian

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, partitioning behaviors of typical neutral (Alanine), acidic (Glutamic acid) and basic (Lysine) amino acids\\u000a into imidazolium-based ionic liquids [C4mim][PF6], [C6mim][PF6], [C8mim][PF6], [C6mim][BF4] and [C8mim][BF4] as extracting solvents were examined. [C6mim][BF4] showed the best efficiency for partitioning of amino acids. The partition coefficients of amino acids in ionic liquids were\\u000a found to depend strongly on pH of the

  13. Amino acid regions 572-579 and 657-666 of the spacer domain of ADAMTS 13 provide a common antigenic core required for binding of antibodies in patients with acquired TTP

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brenda M. Luken; Ellen A. M. Turenhout; Paul H. P. Kaijen; Mascha J. Greuter; Wouter Pos; Mourik van J. A; Rob Fijnheer; Jan Voorberg

    2006-01-01

    Antibodies directed against ADAMTS13 have been detected in the majority of patients with acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). We have previously localized a major antigenic determinant within the spacer domain of ADAMTS13. To identify the amino acid residues of the spacer domain that are involved in binding of anti-ADAMTS13 antibodies, we constructed a series of fifteen hybrids (designated A-O) in

  14. Micro-Detection System for Determination of the Biotic or Abiotic Origin of Amino Acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2003-01-01

    The research carried out under this PIDDP involves the development of a breadboard version of a spacecraft-based system for the detection of amino acid chirality (molecular handedness) on solar system bodies. Chirality provides an unambiguous way of distinguishing between abiotic and biotic origins since only one mirror-image form is used in the functional molecules of life. Recent advances in a variety of nano-fabrication technologies have resulted in concepts for enabling miniaturized chemical and biological analytical systems. These are complete application-specific systems that integrate fluid micro handling systems for extracting and reacting target molecules, micro-separation technologies for enhanced sensitivity and resolution, and advanced detection technologies. This effort makes use of a relatively new technology that shows demonstrated promise for spacecraft-based amino acid analysis: microchip-based capillary electrophoresis (muCE). The muCE system is capable of analyzing the type of amino acids present as well as the relative amounts of their mirror image forms. The system we developed will be able to chirally resolve all of the major amino acids found in extraterrestrial material (Gly, Ala, Val, Pro, Asp, Glu, a-aminoisobutyric acid, and isovaline) at sub-part-per-billion levels. The _CE analysis requires that the amino acids be extracted from the sample and derivatized for either optical or electrochemical detection. In our implementation, the amino acids are released from the sample by sublimation and prepared for muCE analysis using a microfluidic circuit. In addition, we have investigated the use of a microfluidic circuit for the release of amino acids from samples in which sublimation has proven to be problematic.

  15. Competitive Inhibition of Amino Acid Uptake Suppresses Chlamydial Growth: Involvement of the Chlamydial Amino Acid Transporter BrnQ? †

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Peter R.; Al-Younes, Hesham; Gussmann, Joscha; Klein, Jeannette; Schneider, Erwin; Meyer, Thomas F.

    2008-01-01

    Chlamydiaceae are obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens that strictly depend on host metabolites, such as nucleotides, lipids, and amino acids. Depletion of amino acids in cell culture media results in abnormal chlamydial development in vitro. Surprisingly, enrichment of certain amino acids also retards chlamydial growth. Our experiments revealed that the antichlamydial effects are largely independent of changes in the host cell transcriptome or proteome and in the major signal transduction pathway modulated by amino acids, the mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) pathway. Furthermore, the chlamydial growth inhibition induced by leucine, isoleucine, methionine, or phenylalanine was completely reversed by concomitant addition of valine. In contrast, the growth inhibition induced by serine, glycine, or threonine was not reversed by valine addition. Functional characterization of the only predicted chlamydial transporter for branched-chain amino acids, BrnQ, revealed that it can be blocked by leucine, isoleucine, methionine, or phenylalanine but not by serine, glycine, or threonine. This chlamydial transporter is the only known BrnQ homolog possessing specificity for methionine, suggesting a unique strategy for methionine uptake among gram-negative bacteria. The antichlamydial effects of leucine, isoleucine, methionine, and phenylalanine could be explained as competitive inhibition of the BrnQ transporter and subsequent valine starvation. PMID:18024516

  16. Influence of Foliar Fertilization with Amino Acids and Humic Acids on Productivity and Quality of Asparagus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Tejada; J. L. Gonzalez

    2003-01-01

    The main objective of this work was to study the effect of foliar fertilization with amino acids and humic acids on the productivity and quality of green asparagus (Asparagus officinalis, L. cv. UC-157) (four-year-old plants) located in the Protected Geographical Indication of Huétor-Tájar (Andalusia, Spain). Foliar fertilization with amino acids and humic acids increased cladode and rhizome micronutrients, as well

  17. Analysis of Underivatized Amino Acids in Geological Samples Using Ion-Pairing Liquid Chromatography and Electrospray Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, De-Ling; Beegle, Luther W.; Kanik, Isik

    2008-04-01

    The capability of detecting biomarkers, such as amino acids, in chemically complex field samples is essential to establishing the knowledge required to search for chemical signatures of life in future planetary explorations. However, due to the complexities of in situ investigations, it is important to establish a new analytical scheme that utilizes a minimal amount of sample preparation. This paper reports the feasibility of a novel and sensitive technique, which has been established to quantitate amino acids in terrestrial crust samples directly without derivatization using volatile ion-pairing liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry equipped with an electrospray ionization source. Adequate separation of 20 underivatized amino acids was achieved on a C18 capillary column within 26 min with nonafluoropentanoic acid (NFPA) as ion-pairing reagent. Each amino acid was identified from its retention time as well as from its characteristic parent-to-daughter ion transition. Using tandem mass spectrometry as a detection technique allows co-elution of some amino acids, as it is more specific than traditional spectrophotometric methods. In the present study, terrestrial samples collected from 3 different locations were analyzed for their water-extractable free amino acid contents, following the removal of metal and organic interferences via ion exchange procedures. This is the first time that amino acids in geological samples were directly determined quantitatively without complicated derivatization steps. Depending on the amino acid, the detection limits varied from 0.02 to 5.7 pmol with the use of a 1 ?l sample injection loop.

  18. Inverse design of proteins with hydrophobic and polar amino acids

    E-print Network

    C. Micheletti; F. Seno; A. Maritan; J. R. Banavar

    1997-12-11

    A two amino acid (hydrophobic and polar) scheme is used to perform the design on target conformations corresponding to the native states of twenty single chain proteins. Strikingly, the percentage of successful identification of the nature of the residues benchmarked against naturally occurring proteins and their homologues is around 75 % independent of the complexity of the design procedure. Typically, the lowest success rate occurs for residues such as alanine that have a high secondary structure functionality. Using a simple lattice model, we argue that one possible shortcoming of the model studied may involve the coarse-graining of the twenty kinds of amino acids into just two effective types.

  19. Utilization of sorghum grain protein and amino acids by cattle

    E-print Network

    Henderson, Glen Ray

    1970-01-01

    UTILIZATION OF SORG!VJH GRAIN PROTFIN AND AMINO ACIDS BY CATTLE A Thesis GLEN RAY HENDERSON Submitted to tne Gr duate ColleEe of Texas A&li Unirersity ln partial fulfillment of the reRuirement for the deSree of BASTER OF SC1ENCE January 1970... Najor Subject Ar. imal Nutrition UTILIZATION OF SORGHUM GRAIN PROTEIN AND AMINO ACIDS BY CATTLE A Thesis by GLEN RAY HENDF. RSON Approved as to style and content by: (Head of Department) (M ber) January 1970 ABSTPACT Utilization of Sorghum...

  20. The Monosodium Glutamate Story: The Commercial Production of MSG and Other Amino Acids

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Addison Ault; George B. Kauffman

    2004-01-01

    Examples of the industrial synthesis of pure amino acids are presented. The emphasis is on the synthesis of ( S )-glutamic acid and, to a lesser extent, ( S )-lysine and ( R,S )-methionine. These amino acids account for about 90% of the total world production of amino acids, ( S )-glutamic acid being used as a flavor-enhancing additive (MSG)