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Sample records for amino acid requirements

  1. Parenteral sulfur amino acid requirements in septic infants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To investigate parenteral methionine requirements of critically ill, septic infants, we conducted an investigation involving 12 infants (age 2+/-1 years; weight 13+/-2kg) using the intravenous indicator amino acid oxidation and balance technique. They received a balanced parenteral amino acid formul...

  2. Macronutrient requirement for growth: Protein/amino acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current recommendations by the Institute of Medicine on amino acid requirements in healthy children older than 6 months and for children and adolescents have been established using the factorial approach, which takes into account: i) maintenance for obligatory losses, which is estimated by regressio...

  3. Amino acid requirement of six strains of Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Siddiqi, R; Khan, M A

    1989-07-01

    Different serovars of Listeria monocytogenes grew well in a chemically defined medium. Sixteen amino acids were tested for the growth of L. monocytogenes. Most strains required cystine, valine, isoleucine, and leucine. Phenylalanine was a stimulatory growth factor for all six strains of Listeria. Whilst tryptophan was essentially required by NCTC 7973, LM and C-286 and stimulatory for 4155 and C-294, none of the strains did exhibit requirements of asparagine, glutamine, proline, histidine and tyrosine as essential/stimulatory growth factor. PMID:2505787

  4. Carbobenzoxy amino acids: Structural requirements for cholecystokinin receptor antagonist activity

    SciTech Connect

    Maton, P.N.; Sutliff, V.E.; Jensen, R.T.; Gardner, J.D.

    1985-04-01

    The authors used dispersed acini prepared from guinea pig pancreas to examine 28 carbobenzoxy (CBZ) amino acids for their abilities to function as cholecystokinin receptor antagonists. All amino acid derivatives tested, except for CBZ-alanine, CBZ-glycine, and N alpha-CBZ- lysine, were able to inhibit the stimulation of amylase secretion caused by the C-terminal octapeptide of cholecystokinin. In general, there was a good correlation between the ability of a carbobenzoxy amino acid to inhibit stimulated amylase secretion and the ability of the amino acid derivative to inhibit binding of /sup 125/I-cholecystokinin. The inhibition of cholecystokinin-stimulated amylase secretion was competitive, fully reversible, and specific for those secretagogues that interact with the cholecystokinin receptor. The potencies with which the various carbobenzoxy amino acids inhibited the action of cholecystokinin varied 100-fold and CBZ-cystine was the most potent cholecystokinin receptor antagonist. This variation in potency was primarily but not exclusively a function of the hydrophobicity of the amino acid side chain.

  5. High hydrostatic pressure increases amino acid requirements in the piezo-hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus barophilus.

    PubMed

    Cario, Anaïs; Lormières, Florence; Xiang, Xiao; Oger, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    We have established a defined growth medium for the piezophilic hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus barophilus, which allows growth yields of ca. 10(8) cells/ml under both atmospheric and high hydrostatic pressure. Our results demonstrate a major impact of hydrostatic pressure on amino acid metabolism, with increases from 3 amino acids required at atmospheric pressure to 17 at 40 MPa. We observe in T. barophilus and other Thermococcales a similar discrepancy between the presence/absence of amino acid synthesis pathways and amino acid requirements, which supports the existence of alternate, but yet unknown, amino acid synthesis pathways, and may explain the low number of essential amino acids observed in T. barophilus and other Thermococcales. T. barophilus displays a strong metabolic preference for organic polymers such as polypeptides and chitin, which may constitute a more readily available resource of carbon and energy in situ in deep-sea hydrothermal vents. We hypothesize that the low energy yields of fermentation of organic polymers, together with energetic constraints imposed by high hydrostatic pressure, may render de novo synthesis of amino acids ecologically unfavorable. Induction of this metabolic switch to amino acid recycling can explain the requirement for non-essential amino acids by Thermococcales for efficient growth in defined medium. PMID:26226334

  6. 77 FR 65537 - Requirements for Patent Applications Containing Nucleotide Sequence and/or Amino Acid Sequence...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-29

    ... Patent and Trademark Office Requirements for Patent Applications Containing Nucleotide Sequence and/or....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Abstract Patent applications that contain nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence... contains the sequence listings that are submitted with biotechnology patent applications....

  7. Requirements of juvenile milkfish (Chanos chanos Forsskal) for essential amino acids.

    PubMed

    Borlongan, I G; Coloso, R M

    1993-01-01

    The dietary requirements of juvenile milkfish (Chanos chanos Forsskal) for essential amino acids were determined in a series of experiments. The fish (< or = 8.0 g) were reared in fiber glass tanks provided with flow-through seawater at 28 degrees C and salinity of 32 g/L for 12 wk. In each experiment, a series of amino acid test diets was formulated containing a combination of intact protein sources (casein-gelatin, fish meal-gelatin, fish meal-soybean meal or fish meal-zein) and crystalline amino acids to simulate the levels found in milkfish tissue proteins except for the test amino acid. Each set of isonitrogenous diets contained 40-45% protein and graded levels of the amino acid to be tested. At the end of the feeding experiment, growth, survival and feed efficiency were determined. The requirement level for each essential amino acid was estimated from breakpoint analysis of the growth curve. The dietary essential amino acid requirements (as the percentage of dietary protein) of milkfish juveniles were as follows: arginine, 5.25; histidine, 2.00; isoleucine, 4.00; leucine, 5.11; lysine, 4.00; methionine, 2.50 (cystine, 0.75); phenylalanine, 4.22 (tyrosine, 1.00) or 2.80 (tyrosine, 2.67); threonine, 4.50; tryptophan, 0.60; valine, 3.55. This information is valuable in developing cost-effective practical or commercial feeds and research diets for milkfish juveniles. PMID:8421223

  8. Estimated quantitative amino acid requirements for Florida pompano reared in low-salinity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As with most marine carnivores, Florida pompano require relatively high crude protein diets to obtain optimal growth. Precision formulations to match the dietary indispensable amino acid (IAA) pattern to a species’ requirements can be used to lower the overall dietary protein. However IAA requirem...

  9. Defining meal requirements for protein to optimize metabolic roles of amino acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary protein provides essential amino acids (EAAs) for the synthesis of new proteins plus an array of other metabolic functions; many of these functions are sensitive to postprandial plasma and intracellular amino acid concentrations. Recent research has focused on amino acids as metabolic signal...

  10. Defining meal requirements for protein to optimize metabolic roles of amino acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary protein provides essential amino acids (EAA) for the synthesis of new proteins plus an array of other metabolic functions; many of these functions are sensitive to post-prandial plasma and intracellular amino acid concentrations. Recent research has focused on amino acids as metabolic signal...

  11. Plasma amino acids

    MedlinePLUS

    Plasma amino acids is a screening test done on infants that looks at the amounts of amino ... Laboratory error High or low amounts of individual plasma amino acids must be considered with other information. ...

  12. Sparing of methionine requirements: evaluation of human data takes sulfur amino acids beyond protein.

    PubMed

    Fukagawa, Naomi K

    2006-06-01

    The intimate relation between amino acids and protein and nitrogen requirements is well recognized. Nutrition research has focused on the capacity of food to meet the need for nitrogen and indispensable amino acids (IAA) and led to the conclusion that the quality, not just the quantity, of protein is critical. This is especially relevant in regard to the sulfur amino acids (SAA) methionine and cysteine because of the increased understanding of their relation to chronic diseases (e.g., cardiovascular disease, dementia, cirrhosis), immunomodulation, DNA transcription, and RNA translation. Considerable effort has been expended to determine whether and to what extent cysteine can spare the requirement for the IAA methionine. In vivo studies in humans generally concur that the dietary requirement of the SAA ranges between 13 and 16 mg.kg(-1).d(-1), but how much can be met by cysteine relative to methionine remains controversial. This review examines the current status of in vivo estimates of methionine and cysteine requirements in human adults and considers needs beyond what is necessary for protein synthesis. Factors influencing the utilization of methionine and cysteine, especially those conditions that lead to toxicity on the one hand or beneficial effects on the other, are discussed. Data on alternative dietary sources of methyl groups (e.g., betaine, choline, phosphatidylcholine, S-adenosylmethionine, S-methylmethionine) or sulfur (e.g., N-acetylcysteine or L-2-oxothiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid) support a role for the SAA "beyond protein." Other pathways may influence the specific requirement for methionine and/or cysteine, especially when the person is challenged by disease, inadequate availability of food, or environmental stress. PMID:16702339

  13. The dietary branched chain amino acid requirements of hybrid striped bass(Morone chrysops x M. saxatilis)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The requirements for branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) are unknown in hybrid striped bass and necessary for formulating efficient and nutritious diets. Moreover, the dietary balance among these three amino acids can substantially influence the performance of meat animals fed those diets. The diet...

  14. Wheat proteins in relation to protein requirements and availability of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Young, V R; Pellett, P L

    1985-05-01

    Wheat is a major source of plant protein for man. In parallel with other cereal staples, wheat proteins do not contain as high a concentration of the nutritionally indispensable amino acids as do animal protein foods. Thus, when consumed as an essentially sole source of protein they are not utilized with the same efficiency as animal protein foods and more wheat protein is required to meet the physiological needs in children and adults for both total protein and specific indispensable amino acids, especially lysine and also for threonine and tryptophan in specific cases. However, when combined with other food proteins such as legumes, oil seeds or animal products the proteins of wheat exhibit excellent nutritional complementarity. Furthermore, when wheat-based foods are considered in relation to broader concerns for diet, food habits and long-term health it is to be concluded that the proteins of wheat can and should continue to make a nutritionally important role toward meeting the protein and amino acid needs of populations throughout both the developing and developed regions of the world. Further research devoted toward improving the digestibility and overall nutritional value of wheat proteins and developing acceptable and economic sources of wheat protein concentrates should contribute to an even more substantial longterm role of wheat as a source of protein in human nutrition. PMID:3887888

  15. Studies on the protein and sulfur amino acid requirements of young bobwhite quail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Serafin, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    Four experiments were conducted with purified diets to examine the influence of protein level and to estimate the sulfur amino acid (S.A.A.) requirement of young Bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus). These studies demonstrated (I) that 26% protein was sufficient for rapid growth when the diet was supplemented with methionine; (2) that diets containing higher levels of protein (29.3% and 31.3%) failed to support satisfactory growth unless they contained supplemental methionine; and (3) that young Bobwhite quail require no more than 1.0% sulfur-containing amino acids for optimal growth and efficiency of feed utilization. A fifth experiment was conducted to examine the protein and S.A.A. requirements of young Bobwhite quail using practical rations and to compare results with those obtained with purified diets. Diets containing 24%, 26% and 28% protein were supplied with and without supplemental methionine in a five week study. Results showed significant growth responses to protein and supplemental methionine. Responses showed that Bobwhite quail require no more than 26% protein for maximum growth and efficiency of feed utilization when the S.A.A. level of the diet was approximately 1.0%. The results were in close agreement with those obtained with purified diets. These findings define more precisely than had been known the quantitative requirements of young Bobwhite quail for protein and for the S.A.A. necessary for optimal growth.

  16. Asymmetric Amino Acid Catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crdova, Armando

    2008-03-01

    The origins of biological homochirality have intrigued researchers since Pasteur's discovery of the optical activity of biomolecules. Herein, I discuss our observations of asymmetric amplification in amino acid catalyzed carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions under homogenous reaction conditions. Our model shows a synergistic mechanism between the amino acid catalyst and the optically active products such as sugars and amino acid derivatives.

  17. Proteins and Amino Acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins are the most abundant substances in living organisms and cells. All proteins are constructed from the same twenty amino acids that are linked together by covalent bonds. Shorter chains of two or more amino acids can be linked by covalent bonds to form polypeptides. There are twenty amino...

  18. Riboflavin requirement of chicks fed purified amino acid and conventional corn-soybean meal diets.

    PubMed

    Chung, T K; Baker, D H

    1990-08-01

    Three experiments were conducted to determine the riboflavin requirement for maximal growth of young chicks. Graded levels of crystalline riboflavin were added to either riboflavin-free, purified amino acid diets or corn-soybean meal diets. Chick growth responses were obtained upon adding riboflavin to both diets. Chicks fed the purified diet required 1.8 mg of riboflavin per kg of diet, but those fed the corn-soybean meal diet required 2.63 mg of riboflavin per kg of diet. Retarded growth and leg paralysis, rather than curled-toe paralysis, were the predominant signs of riboflavin deficiency. Calculations suggested that riboflavin bioavailability in the corn-soybean meal diet was 59.1%. PMID:2235849

  19. Amino acid analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winitz, M.; Graff, J. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The process and apparatus for qualitative and quantitative analysis of the amino acid content of a biological sample are presented. The sample is deposited on a cation exchange resin and then is washed with suitable solvents. The amino acids and various cations and organic material with a basic function remain on the resin. The resin is eluted with an acid eluant, and the eluate containing the amino acids is transferred to a reaction vessel where the eluant is removed. Final analysis of the purified acylated amino acid esters is accomplished by gas-liquid chromatographic techniques.

  20. Extreme genetic code optimality from a molecular dynamics calculation of amino acid polar requirement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Thomas; Goldenfeld, Nigel; Mathew, Damien; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida

    2009-06-01

    A molecular dynamics calculation of the amino acid polar requirement is used to score the canonical genetic code. Monte Carlo simulation shows that this computational polar requirement has been optimized by the canonical genetic code, an order of magnitude more than any previously known measure, effectively ruling out a vertical evolution dynamics. The sensitivity of the optimization to the precise metric used in code scoring is consistent with code evolution having proceeded through the communal dynamics of statistical proteins using horizontal gene transfer, as recently proposed. The extreme optimization of the genetic code therefore strongly supports the idea that the genetic code evolved from a communal state of life prior to the last universal common ancestor.

  1. Dietary requirements of synthesizable amino acids by animals: a paradigm shift in protein nutrition

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Amino acids are building blocks for proteins in all animals. Based on growth or nitrogen balance, amino acids were traditionally classified as nutritionally essential or nonessential for mammals, birds and fish. It was assumed that all the “nutritionally nonessential amino acids (NEAA)” were synthesized sufficiently in the body to meet the needs for maximal growth and optimal health. However, careful analysis of the scientific literature reveals that over the past century there has not been compelling experimental evidence to support this assumption. NEAA (e.g., glutamine, glutamate, proline, glycine and arginine) play important roles in regulating gene expression, cell signaling, antioxidative responses, fertility, neurotransmission, and immunity. Additionally, glutamate, glutamine and aspartate are major metabolic fuels for the small intestine to maintain its digestive function and to protect the integrity of the intestinal mucosa. Thus, diets for animals must contain all NEAA to optimize their survival, growth, development, reproduction, and health. Furthermore, NEAA should be taken into consideration in revising the “ideal protein” concept that is currently used to formulate swine and poultry diets. Adequate provision of all amino acids (including NEAA) in diets enhances the efficiency of animal production. In this regard, amino acids should not be classified as nutritionally essential or nonessential in animal or human nutrition. The new Texas A&M University’s optimal ratios of dietary amino acids for swine and chickens are expected to beneficially reduce dietary protein content and improve the efficiency of their nutrient utilization, growth, and production performance. PMID:24999386

  2. Lactobacillus gasseri requires peptides, not proteins or free amino acids, for growth in milk.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, K; Matsunaga, K; Takihiro, S; Moritoki, A; Ryuto, S; Kawai, Y; Masuda, T; Miyamoto, T

    2015-03-01

    Lactobacillus gasseri is a widespread commensal lactic acid bacterium inhabiting human mucosal niches and has many beneficial effects as a probiotic. However, L. gasseri is difficult to grow in milk, which hurts usability for the food industry. It had been previously reported that supplementation with yeast extract or proteose peptone, including peptides, enables L. gasseri to grow well in milk. In this study, our objective was to confirm peptide requirement of L. gasseri and evaluate efficacy of peptide release by enzymatic proteolysis on growth of L. gassei in milk. Three strains of L. gasseri did not grow well in modified DeMan, Rogosa, Sharpe broth without any nitrogen sources (MRS-N), but addition of a casein-derived peptide mixture, tryptone, promoted growth. In contrast, little effect was observed after adding casein or a casein-derived amino acid mixture, casamino acids. These results indicate that L. gasseri requires peptides, not proteins or free amino acids, among milk-derived nitrogen sources for growth. Lactobacillus gasseri JCM 1131T hardly had growth capacity in 6 kinds of milk-based media: bovine milk, human milk, skim milk, cheese whey, modified MRS-N (MRSL-N) supplemented with acid whey, and MRSL-N supplemented with casein. Moreover, treatment with digestive proteases, particularly pepsin, to release peptides made it grow well in each milk-based medium. The pepsin treatment was the most effective for growth of strain JCM 1131T in skim milk among the tested food-grade proteases such as trypsin, ?-chymotrypsin, calf rennet, ficin, bromelain, and papain. As well as strain JCM 1131T, pepsinolysis of milk improved growth of other L. gasseri strains and some strains of enteric lactobacilli such as Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus gallinarum, Lactobacillus johnsonii, and Lactobacillus reuteri. These results suggest that some relatives of L. gasseri also use peptides as desirable nitrogen sources, and that milk may be a good supplier of nutritious peptides to enteric lactobacilli including L. gasseri after peptic digestion in the gastrointestinal tract. This is the first report showing peptide requirement of L. gasseri and efficacy of pepsinolysis on the growth of L. gasseri and its relatives in milk. This study would contribute to increasing usability of L. gasseri and its relatives as probiotics in dairy foods. PMID:25529420

  3. Distinct amino acid compositional requirements for formation and maintenance of the [PSI?] prion in yeast.

    PubMed

    MacLea, Kyle S; Paul, Kacy R; Ben-Musa, Zobaida; Waechter, Aubrey; Shattuck, Jenifer E; Gruca, Margaret; Ross, Eric D

    2015-03-01

    Multiple yeast prions have been identified that result from the structural conversion of proteins into a self-propagating amyloid form. Amyloid-based prion activity in yeast requires a series of discrete steps. First, the prion protein must form an amyloid nucleus that can recruit and structurally convert additional soluble proteins. Subsequently, maintenance of the prion during cell division requires fragmentation of these aggregates to create new heritable propagons. For the Saccharomyces cerevisiae prion protein Sup35, these different activities are encoded by different regions of the Sup35 prion domain. An N-terminal glutamine/asparagine-rich nucleation domain is required for nucleation and fiber growth, while an adjacent oligopeptide repeat domain is largely dispensable for prion nucleation and fiber growth but is required for chaperone-dependent prion maintenance. Although prion activity of glutamine/asparagine-rich proteins is predominantly determined by amino acid composition, the nucleation and oligopeptide repeat domains of Sup35 have distinct compositional requirements. Here, we quantitatively define these compositional requirements in vivo. We show that aromatic residues strongly promote both prion formation and chaperone-dependent prion maintenance. In contrast, nonaromatic hydrophobic residues strongly promote prion formation but inhibit prion propagation. These results provide insight into why some aggregation-prone proteins are unable to propagate as prions. PMID:25547291

  4. Distinct Amino Acid Compositional Requirements for Formation and Maintenance of the [PSI+] Prion in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    MacLea, Kyle S.; Paul, Kacy R.; Ben-Musa, Zobaida; Waechter, Aubrey; Shattuck, Jenifer E.; Gruca, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    Multiple yeast prions have been identified that result from the structural conversion of proteins into a self-propagating amyloid form. Amyloid-based prion activity in yeast requires a series of discrete steps. First, the prion protein must form an amyloid nucleus that can recruit and structurally convert additional soluble proteins. Subsequently, maintenance of the prion during cell division requires fragmentation of these aggregates to create new heritable propagons. For the Saccharomyces cerevisiae prion protein Sup35, these different activities are encoded by different regions of the Sup35 prion domain. An N-terminal glutamine/asparagine-rich nucleation domain is required for nucleation and fiber growth, while an adjacent oligopeptide repeat domain is largely dispensable for prion nucleation and fiber growth but is required for chaperone-dependent prion maintenance. Although prion activity of glutamine/asparagine-rich proteins is predominantly determined by amino acid composition, the nucleation and oligopeptide repeat domains of Sup35 have distinct compositional requirements. Here, we quantitatively define these compositional requirements in vivo. We show that aromatic residues strongly promote both prion formation and chaperone-dependent prion maintenance. In contrast, nonaromatic hydrophobic residues strongly promote prion formation but inhibit prion propagation. These results provide insight into why some aggregation-prone proteins are unable to propagate as prions. PMID:25547291

  5. Amino acid management in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsun, Zhi-Yang; Possemato, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Amino acids have a dual role in cellular metabolism, as they are both the building blocks for protein synthesis and intermediate metabolites which fuel other biosynthetic reactions. Recent work has demonstrated that deregulation of both arms of amino acid management are common alterations seen in cancer. Among the most highly consumed nutrients by cancer cells are the amino acids glutamine and serine, and the biosynthetic pathways that metabolize them are required in various cancer subtypes and the object of current efforts to target cancer metabolism. Also altered in cancer are components of the machinery which sense amino acid sufficiency, nucleated by the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), a key regulator of cell growth via modulation of key processes including protein synthesis and autophagy. The precise ways in which altered amino acid management supports cellular transformation remain mostly elusive, and a fuller mechanistic understanding of these processes will be important for efforts to exploit such alterations for cancer therapy. PMID:26277542

  6. Amino Acid Crossword Puzzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Learning the 20 standard amino acids is an essential component of an introductory course in biochemistry. Later in the course, the students study metabolism and learn about various catabolic and anabolic pathways involving amino acids. Learning new material or concepts often is easier if one can connect the new material to what one already knows;…

  7. Amino Acid Crossword Puzzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Learning the 20 standard amino acids is an essential component of an introductory course in biochemistry. Later in the course, the students study metabolism and learn about various catabolic and anabolic pathways involving amino acids. Learning new material or concepts often is easier if one can connect the new material to what one already knows;

  8. Rapid Degradation of Auxin/Indoleacetic Acid Proteins Requires Conserved Amino Acids of Domain II and Is Proteasome Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Jason A.; Zenser, Nathan; Leyser, Ottoline; Callis, Judy

    2001-01-01

    Auxin rapidly induces auxin/indoleacetic acid (Aux/IAA) transcription. The proteins encoded are short-lived nucleus-localized transcriptional regulators that share four conserved domains. In a transient assay measuring protein accumulation, an Aux/IAA 13amino acid domain II consensus sequence was sufficient to target firefly luciferase (LUC) for low protein accumulation equivalent to that observed previously for full-length PSIAA6. Single amino acid substitutions in these 13 amino acids, corresponding to known auxin response mutants, resulted in a sixfold to 20-fold increase in protein accumulation. Naturally occurring variant amino acids had no effect. Residues identified as essential by single alanine substitutions were not sufficient when all flanking amino acids were alanine, indicating the importance of flanking regions. Using direct protein degradation measurements in transgenic Arabidopsis seedlings, full-length IAA1, PSIAA6, and the N-terminal 73 PSIAA6 amino acids targeted LUC for rapid degradation with 8-min half-lives. The C-terminal 109 amino acids did not affect LUC half-life. Smaller regions containing domain II also targeted LUC for rapid degradation, but the rates were not equivalent to those of the full-length protein. A single domain II substitution in the context of full-length PSIAA6 increased half-life 30-fold. Proteasome inhibitors affected Aux/IAA::LUC fusion protein accumulation, demonstrating the involvement of the proteasome. PMID:11595806

  9. Enhanced survival of Drosophila Akt1 hypomorphs during amino-acid starvation requires foxo.

    PubMed

    Slade, Jennifer D; Staveley, Brian E

    2016-02-01

    Disordered eating includes any pattern of irregular eating that may lead to either extreme weight loss or obesity. The conserved insulin receptor signalling pathway acts to regulate energy balance and nutrient intake, and its central component Akt1 and endpoint effector foxo are pivotal for survival during nutritional stress. Recently generated Akt1 hypomorphic mutant lines exhibit a moderate decrease in lifespan when aged upon standard media, yet show a considerable increase in survival upon amino-acid starvation media. While the loss of foxo function significantly reduces the survival response to amino-acid starvation, a combination of these Akt1 hypomorphs and a null foxo mutation reveal a synergystic and severe reduction in lifespan upon standard media, and an epistatic relationship when undergoing amino-acid starvation. Evaluation of survivorship upon amino-acid starvation media of these double mutants indicate a phenotype similar to the original foxo mutant demonstrating the role of foxo in this Akt1 phenotype. These results indicate that the subtle manipulation of foxo through Akt1 can enhance survival during adverse nutrient conditions to model the ability of individuals to tolerate nutrient deprivation. Ultimately, we believe that a Drosophila model of disordered eating could generate new avenues to develop potential therapies for related human conditions. PMID:26783834

  10. The nutritional value of plant-based diets in relation to human amino acid and protein requirements.

    PubMed

    Millward, D J

    1999-05-01

    The adequacy of plant-based diets in developed and developing countries as sources of protein and amino acids for human subjects of all ages is examined. Protein quantity is shown not to be an issue. Digestibility is identified as a problem for some cereals (millet (Panicum miliaceum) and sorghum (Sorghum sp.)) and generally is poorly understood. Direct measurements of biological value in children are reviewed and scoring is considered. Various existing requirement values for amino acids and especially lysine are reviewed, and it is concluded that stable-isotope studies do not yet provide adequate alternative values of N balance data, which for lysine are robust after recalculation and adjustment. A new maintenance requirement pattern is developed, with higher values than those of Food and Agriculture Organization/World Health Organization/United Nations University (1985) but lower values than the Massachusetts Institute of Technology pattern (Young et al. 1989). Calculations of age-related amino acid requirements are based on most recent estimates of human growth and maintenance protein requirements, a tissue amino acid pattern and the new maintenance amino acid pattern. These values appear valid when used to score plant proteins, since they indicate values similar to or less than the biological value measured directly in young children. When used to score plant-based diets in India, no marked deficiencies are identified. All regions score > 1 for adults, whilst for children scores range from > 1, (Tamil Nadhu) from 6 months of age to 0.78 (West Bengal), rising to 0.9 in the 2-5 year old, consistent with reports that high-lysine maize supports similar weight and height growth to that of casein. Inadequate amino acid supply is not an issue with most cereal-based diets. PMID:10466163

  11. Amino Acids and Chirality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jamie E.

    2012-01-01

    Amino acids are among the most heavily studied organic compound class in carbonaceous chondrites. The abundance, distributions, enantiomeric compositions, and stable isotopic ratios of amino acids have been determined in carbonaceous chondrites fi'om a range of classes and petrographic types, with interesting correlations observed between these properties and the class and typc of the chondritcs. In particular, isomeric distributions appear to correlate with parent bodies (chondrite class). In addition, certain chiral amino acids are found in enantiomeric excess in some chondrites. The delivery of these enantiomeric excesses to the early Earth may have contributed to the origin of the homochirality that is central to life on Earth today. This talk will explore the amino acids in carbonaceous chondritcs and their relevance to the origin of life.

  12. Requirement for lysosomal localization of mTOR for its activation differs between leucine and other amino acids.

    PubMed

    Averous, Julien; Lambert-Langlais, Sarah; Carraro, Valérie; Gourbeyre, Ophélie; Parry, Laurent; B'Chir, Wafa; Muranishi, Yuki; Jousse, Céline; Bruhat, Alain; Maurin, Anne-Catherine; Proud, Christopher G; Fafournoux, Pierre

    2014-09-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a master regulator of cell growth and metabolism. It controls many cell functions by integrating nutrient availability and growth factor signals. Amino acids, and in particular leucine, are among the main positive regulators of mTORC1 signaling. The current model for the regulation of mTORC1 by amino acids involves the movement of mTOR to the lysosome mediated by the Rag-GTPases. Here, we have examined the control of mTORC1 signaling and mTOR localization by amino acids and leucine in serum-fed cells, because both serum growth factors (or, e.g., insulin) and amino acids are required for full activation of mTORC1 signaling. We demonstrate that mTORC1 activity does not closely correlate with the lysosomal localization of mTOR. In particular, leucine controls mTORC1 activity without any detectable modification of the lysosomal localization of mTOR, indicating that the signal(s) exerted by leucine is likely distinct from those exerted by other amino acids. In addition, knock-down of the Rag-GTPases attenuated the inhibitory effect of amino acid- or leucine-starvation on the phosphorylation of mTORC1 targets. Furthermore, data from cells where Rag expression has been knocked down revealed that leucine can promote mTORC1 signaling independently of the lysosomal localization of mTOR. Our data complement existing models for the regulation of mTORC1 by amino acids and provide new insights into this important topic. PMID:24793303

  13. Sulfur amino acid requirement and foot pad dermatitis in turkey poults.

    PubMed

    Murillo, M G; Jensen, L S

    1976-03-01

    Five experiments were conducted with Large White poults to determine the effect of methionine and other sulfur-containing compounds on the incidence and severity of dermatitis and on growth and feed efficiency to three or four weeks of age. The poults were housed in battery brooders with wire screen floors in four experiments" and in floor pens with litter in one experiment. Male turkeys were used in four experiments and female turkeys in one experiment. Either a corn-soy diet or a cornstarch-soy diet was used as the basal diet in the various studies. A high incidence of foot-pad dermatitis was observed in poults fed the basal diets unsupplemented with methionine. A high incidence of a dermatitis on the upper part of the beak was also observed in poults maintained in battery brooders but not in floor pens. Adding methionine to the diets significantly lowered the incidence and severity of dermatitis, but cystine and potassium sulfate failed to modify dermatitis. Some foot-pad dermatitis was still observed in poults fed levels of methionine more than adequate to meet the requirements for optimum growth and feed efficiency. The incidence and severity of foot-pad dermatitis generally increased with age during the experiment among poults fed methionine-supplemented diets. Although methionine deficiency is a major cause of foot-pad dermatitis in poults, other environmental or dietary factors also appeared to be involved in the development of the condition. The methionine requirement for optimum growth, feed efficiency, and prevention of dermatitis was approximately 0.6% or 2.1 g. per mcal. of metabolizable energy (M.E.). This is higher than the present recommendation of the National Research Council. With corn-soybean meal diets the requirement for total sulfur amino acids is approximately 1.05% or 3.7 g. per mcal. of M.E. PMID:945569

  14. Requirement of novel amino acid fragments of orphan nuclear receptor TR3/Nur77 for its functions in angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Marianne A.; Peng, Jin; Ye, Taiyang; Zhao, Dezheng; Zeng, Huiyan

    2015-01-01

    Pathological angiogenesis is a hallmark of many diseases. We demonstrated that TR3/Nur77 is an excellent target for pro-angiogenesis and anti-angiogenesis therapies. Here, we report that TR3 transcriptionally regulates endothelial cell migration, permeability and the formation of actin stress fibers that is independent of RhoA GTPase. 1) Amino acid residues 344-GRR-346 and de-phosphorylation of amino acid residue serine 351 in the DNA binding domain, and 2) phosphorylation of amino acid residues in the 41-61 amino acid fragment of the transactivation domain, of TR3 are required for its induction of the formation of actin stress fibers, cell proliferation, migration and permeability. The 41-61 amino acid fragment contains one of the three potential protein interaction motifs in the transactivation domain of TR3, predicted by computational modeling and analysis. These studies further our understanding of the molecular mechanism, by which TR3 regulates angiogenesis, identify novel therapeutic targeted sites of TR3, and set the foundation for the development of high-throughput screening assays to identify compounds targeting TR3/Nur77 for pro-angiogenesis and anti-angiogenesis therapies. PMID:26155943

  15. A formal method of determining the dietary amino acid requirements of laying-type pullets during their growing period.

    PubMed

    Martin, P A; Bradford, G D; Gous, R M

    1994-12-01

    1. The amino acid requirements of laying type pullets during the growing period can be estimated by measuring the growth of different components of the body and making use of nutritional constants that define the amount of each amino acid that is required for the production of the tissues being formed. 2. In this experiment, carcase analyses of each of three breeds of pullets were conducted at weekly intervals throughout the growth of the pullets, to 18 weeks of age. Measurements were made of body weight, gut-fill and feather weight, and chemical analyses consisted of water, protein, lipid and ash measurements of both the body and the feathers. Each age group comprised 10 birds of each breed. 3. Gompertz functions accurately estimated the growth of both body protein and feather protein, to 18 weeks of age, from which the rate of growth of these two components of the body could be estimated. The mature weight of pullets was overestimated by the Gompertz growth curve, which may indicate that a pullet ceases to increase in body protein content once sexual maturity has been reached. 4. Using allometric relationships between the chemical components of the body and of feathers, all the components of growth could be estimated from the growth of body protein and feather protein. These components were then added together to determine the growth rate of the body as a whole. 5. The daily amino acid requirements for 4 functions were calculated, namely, those for the maintenance of body protein and feather protein, and for the gain in body protein and feather protein. These requirements were then summed to determine the requirement of pullets on each day of the growing period. 6. Using the 'effective energy' system, the amount of energy required by these pullets was calculated for each day of the growing period, from which the desired daily food intake of the pullets could be predicted. By dividing the amino acid requirement by this daily food intake it was possible to determine the concentration of amino acids that would be needed in the diet in order to meet the requirements of a pullet. 7. The results indicate that the ratio between the requirement for lysine and for methionine and cysteine changes dramatically during the growing period, negating the concept of a fixed ratio between all the amino acids during growth.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:7719736

  16. Essential amino acid transporter Lat4 (Slc43a2) is required for mouse development

    PubMed Central

    Guetg, Adriano; Mariotta, Luca; Bock, Lukas; Herzog, Brigitte; Fingerhut, Ralph; Camargo, Simone M R; Verrey, Franois

    2015-01-01

    Amino acid (AA) uniporter Lat4 (Slc43a2) mediates facilitated diffusion of branched-chain AAs, methionine and phenylalanine, although its physiological role and subcellular localization are not known. We report that Slc43a2 knockout mice were born at expected Mendelian frequency but displayed an ?10% intrauterine growth retardation and low amniotic fluid AAs, suggesting defective transplacental transport. Postnatal growth was strongly reduced, with premature death occurring within 9days such that further investigations were made within 3days of birth. Lat4 immunofluorescence showed a strong basolateral signal in the small intestine, kidney proximal tubule and thick ascending limb epithelial cells of wild-type but not Slc43a2 null littermates and no signal in liver and skeletal muscle. Experiments using Xenopus laevis oocytes demonstrated that Lat4 functioned as a symmetrical low affinity uniporter with a K0.5 of ?5mm for both in- and efflux. Plasma AA concentration was decreased in Slc43a2 null pups, in particular that of non-essential AAs alanine, serine, histidine and proline. Together with an increased level of plasma long chain acylcarnitines and a strong alteration of liver gene expression, this indicates malnutrition. Attempts to rescue pups by decreasing the litter size or by nutrients injected i.p. did not succeed. Radioactively labelled leucine but not lysine given per os accumulated in the small intestine of Slc43a2null pups, suggesting the defective transcellular transport of Lat4 substrates. In summary, Lat4 is a symmetrical uniporter for neutral essential AAs localizing at the basolateral side of (re)absorbing epithelia and is necessary for early nutrition and development. Key points Lat4 (Slc43a2) transports branched-chain amino acids, phenylalanine and methionine, and is expressed in kidney tubule and small intestine epithelial cells. Using a new knockout model as a negative control, it is shown that Lat4 is expressed at the basolateral side of small intestine enterocytes and kidney epithelial cells of the proximal tubule, thick ascending limb and distal convoluted tubule. In the Xenopus oocyte expression system, Lat4 is shown to function as a uniporter with symmetric intracellular and extracellular apparent affinities for phenylalanine. Mice lacking Lat4 display a slight intrauterine growth restriction, postnatal malnutrition and early death, presumably as a result of defective amino acid (re)absorption. These results demonstrate the crucial role that the uniporter Lat4 plays for amino acid transport across cellular barriers and mouse development. PMID:25480797

  17. Autophagy in Trypanosoma brucei: Amino Acid Requirement and Regulation during Different Growth Phases

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Remo S.; Btikofer, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy in the protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma brucei, may be involved in differentiation between different life cycle forms and during growth in culture. We have generated multiple parasite cell lines stably expressing green fluorescent protein- or hemagglutinin-tagged forms of the autophagy marker proteins, TbAtg8.1 and TbAtg8.2, in T. brucei procyclic forms to establish a trypanosome system for quick and reliable determination of autophagy under different culture conditions using flow cytometry. We found that starvation-induced autophagy in T. brucei can be inhibited by addition of a single amino acid, histidine, to the incubation buffer. In addition, we show that autophagy is induced when parasites enter stationary growth phase in culture and that their capacity to undergo starvation-induced autophagy decreases with increasing cell density. PMID:24699810

  18. Chromatographic determination of amino acids in foods.

    PubMed

    Peace, Robert W; Gilani, G Sarwar

    2005-01-01

    Amino acids in foods exist in a free form or bound in peptides, proteins, or nonpeptide bonded polymers. Naturally occurring L-amino acids are required for protein synthesis and are precursors for essential molecules, such as co-enzymes and nucleic acids. Nonprotein amino acids may also occur in animal tissues as metabolic intermediates or have other important functions. The development of bacterially derived food proteins, genetically modified foods, and new methods of food processing; the production of amino acids for food fortification; and the introduction of new plant food sources have meant that protein amino acids and amino acid enantiomers in foods can have both nutritional and safety implications for humans. There is, therefore, a need for the rapid and accurate determination of amino acids in foods. Determination of the total amino acid content of foods requires protein hydrolysis by various means that must take into account variations in stability of individual amino acids and resistance of different peptide bonds to the hydrolysis procedures. Modern methods for separation and quantitation of free amino acids either before or after protein hydrolysis include ion exchange chromatography, high performance liquid chromatography (LC), gas chromatography, and capillary electrophoresis. Chemical derivatization of amino acids may be required to change them into forms amenable to separation by the various chromatographic methods or to create derivatives with properties, such as fluorescence, that improve their detection. Official methods for hydrolysis and analysis of amino acids in foods for nutritional purposes have been established. LC is currently the most widely used analytical technique, although there is a need for collaborative testing of methods available. Newer developments in chromatographic methodology and detector technology have reduced sample and reagent requirements and improved identification, resolution, and sensitivity of amino acid analyses of food samples. PMID:16001866

  19. Pairwise amino acid secondary structural propensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemmama, Ilan E.; Chapagain, Prem P.; Gerstman, Bernard S.

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the propensities for amino acids to form a specific secondary structure when they are paired with other amino acids. Our investigations use molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations, and we compare the results to those from the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Proper comparison requires weighting of the MD results in a manner consistent with the relative frequency of appearance in the PDB of each possible pair of amino acids. We find that the propensity for an amino acid to assume a secondary structure varies dramatically depending on the amino acid that is before or after it in the primary sequence. This cooperative effect means that when selecting amino acids to facilitate the formation of a secondary structure in peptide engineering experiments, the adjacent amino acids must be considered. We also examine the preference for a secondary structure in bacterial proteins and compare the results to those of human proteins.

  20. Amino acids in Arctic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalabrin, E.; Zangrando, R.; Barbaro, E.; Kehrwald, N. M.; Gabrieli, J.; Barbante, C.; Gambaro, A.

    2012-07-01

    Amino acids are significant components of atmospheric aerosols, affecting organic nitrogen input to marine ecosystems, atmospheric radiation balance, and the global water cycle. The wide range of amino acid reactivities suggest that amino acids may serve as markers of atmospheric transport and deposition of particles. Despite this potential, few measurements have been conducted in remote areas to assess amino acid concentrations and potential sources. Polar regions offer a unique opportunity to investigate atmospheric processes and to conduct source apportionment studies of such compounds. In order to better understand the importance of amino acid compounds in the global atmosphere, we determined free amino acids (FAAs) in seventeen size-segregated aerosol samples collected in a polar station in the Svalbard Islands from 19 April until 14 September 2010. We used an HPLC coupled with a tandem mass spectrometer (ESI-MS/MS) to analyze 20 amino acids to quantify compounds at fmol m-3 levels. Mean total FAA concentration was 1070 fmol m-3 where serine and glycine were the most abundant compounds in almost all samples and accounted for 45-60% of the total amino acid relative abundance. The other eighteen compounds had average concentrations between 0.3 and 98 fmol m-3. The higher amino acid concentrations were present in the ultrafine aerosol fraction (<0.49 ?m) and accounted for the majority of the total amino acid content. Local marine sources dominate the boreal summer amino acid concentrations, with the exception of the regional input from Icelandic volcanics.

  1. Amino acids in Arctic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalabrin, E.; Zangrando, R.; Barbaro, E.; Kehrwald, N. M.; Gabrieli, J.; Barbante, C.; Gambaro, A.

    2012-11-01

    Amino acids are significant components of atmospheric aerosols, affecting organic nitrogen input to marine ecosystems, atmospheric radiation balance, and the global water cycle. The wide range of amino acid reactivities suggest that amino acids may serve as markers of atmospheric transport and deposition of particles. Despite this potential, few measurements have been conducted in remote areas to assess amino acid concentrations and potential sources. Polar regions offer a unique opportunity to investigate atmospheric processes and to conduct source apportionment studies of such compounds. In order to better understand the importance of amino acid compounds in the global atmosphere, we determined free amino acids (FAAs) in seventeen size-segregated aerosol samples collected in a polar station in the Svalbard Islands from 19 April until 14 September 2010. We used an HPLC coupled with a tandem mass spectrometer (ESI-MS/MS) to analyze 20 amino acids and quantify compounds at fmol m-3 levels. Mean total FAA concentration was 1070 fmol m-3 where serine and glycine were the most abundant compounds in almost all samples and accounted for 45-60% of the total amino acid relative abundance. The other eighteen compounds had average concentrations between 0.3 and 98 fmol m-3. The higher amino acid concentrations were present in the ultrafine aerosol fraction (< 0.49 ?m) and accounted for the majority of the total amino acid content. Local marine sources dominate the boreal summer amino acid concentrations, with the exception of the regional input from Icelandic volcanic emissions.

  2. Amino Acid Catabolism in Plants.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, Tatjana M; Nunes Nesi, Adriano; Arajo, Wagner L; Braun, Hans-Peter

    2015-11-01

    Amino acids have various prominent functions in plants. Besides their usage during protein biosynthesis, they also represent building blocks for several other biosynthesis pathways and play pivotal roles during signaling processes as well as in plant stress response. In general, pool sizes of the 20 amino acids differ strongly and change dynamically depending on the developmental and physiological state of the plant cell. Besides amino acid biosynthesis, which has already been investigated in great detail, the catabolism of amino acids is of central importance for adjusting their pool sizes but so far has drawn much less attention. The degradation of amino acids can also contribute substantially to the energy state of plant cells under certain physiological conditions, e.g. carbon starvation. In this review, we discuss the biological role of amino acid catabolism and summarize current knowledge on amino acid degradation pathways and their regulation in the context of plant cell physiology. PMID:26384576

  3. Synthesis of amino acids

    DOEpatents

    Davis, J.W. Jr.

    1979-09-21

    A method is described for synthesizing amino acids preceding through novel intermediates of the formulas: R/sub 1/R/sub 2/C(OSOC1)CN, R/sub 1/R/sub 2/C(C1)CN and (R/sub 1/R/sub 2/C(CN)O)/sub 2/SO wherein R/sub 1/ and R/sub 2/ are each selected from hydrogen and monovalent hydrocarbon radicals of 1 to 10 carbon atoms. The use of these intermediates allows the synthesis steps to be exothermic and results in an overall synthesis method which is faster than the synthesis methods of the prior art.

  4. Protein turnover, amino acid requirements and recommendations for athletes and active populations

    PubMed Central

    Poortmans, J.R.; Carpentier, A.; Pereira-Lancha, L.O.; Lancha, A.

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is the major deposit of protein molecules. As for any cell or tissue, total muscle protein reflects a dynamic turnover between net protein synthesis and degradation. Noninvasive and invasive techniques have been applied to determine amino acid catabolism and muscle protein building at rest, during exercise and during the recovery period after a single experiment or training sessions. Stable isotopic tracers (13C-lysine, 15N-glycine, 2H5-phenylalanine) and arteriovenous differences have been used in studies of skeletal muscle and collagen tissues under resting and exercise conditions. There are different fractional synthesis rates in skeletal muscle and tendon tissues, but there is no major difference between collagen and myofibrillar protein synthesis. Strenuous exercise provokes increased proteolysis and decreased protein synthesis, the opposite occurring during the recovery period. Individuals who exercise respond differently when resistance and endurance types of contractions are compared. Endurance exercise induces a greater oxidative capacity (enzymes) compared to resistance exercise, which induces fiber hypertrophy (myofibrils). Nitrogen balance (difference between protein intake and protein degradation) for athletes is usually balanced when the intake of protein reaches 1.2 g·kg−1·day−1 compared to 0.8 g·kg−1·day−1 in resting individuals. Muscular activities promote a cascade of signals leading to the stimulation of eukaryotic initiation of myofibrillar protein synthesis. As suggested in several publications, a bolus of 15-20 g protein (from skimmed milk or whey proteins) and carbohydrate (± 30 g maltodextrine) drinks is needed immediately after stopping exercise to stimulate muscle protein and tendon collagen turnover within 1 h. PMID:22666780

  5. Piezoelectricity in protein amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemanov, V. V.; Popov, S. N.; Pankova, G. A.

    2011-06-01

    The piezoelectric activity of protein amino acids and their compounds has been measured using the pulse method at a frequency of 10 MHz. It has been established that, at room temperature, the piezoelectric effect is not observed in ?-glycine (achiral amino acid) and protein amino acids of the L modification, namely, methionine, phenylalanine, and tryptophan. An assumption has been made that this phenomenon is associated with the enhanced damping of elastic vibrations excited in samples due to the piezoelectric effect.

  6. Region and amino acid residues required for Rad51C binding in the human Xrcc3 protein

    PubMed Central

    Kurumizaka, Hitoshi; Enomoto, Rima; Nakada, Maki; Eda, Keiko; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Shibata, Takehiko

    2003-01-01

    The Xrcc3 protein, which is required for the homologous recombinational repair of damaged DNA, forms a complex with the Rad51C protein in human cells. Mutations in either the Xrcc3 or Rad51C gene cause extreme sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents and generate the genomic instability frequently found in tumors. In the present study, we found that the Xrcc3 segment containing amino acid residues 63346, Xrcc363346, is the Rad51C-binding region. Biochemical analyses revealed that Xrcc363346 forms a complex with Rad51C, and the Xrcc363346 Rad51C complex possesses ssDNA and dsDNA binding abilities comparable to those of the full-length Xrcc3Rad51C complex. Based on the structure of RecA, which is thought to be the ancestor of Xrcc3, six Xrcc3 point mutants were designed. Two-hybrid and biochemical analyses of the Xrcc3 point mutants revealed that Tyr139 and Phe249 are essential amino acid residues for Rad51C binding. Superposition of the Xrcc3 Tyr139 and Phe249 residues on the RecA structure suggested that Tyr139 may function to ensure proper folding and Phe249 may be important to constitute the Rad51C-binding interface in Xrcc3. PMID:12853621

  7. Presence of an amino acid residue at position 619 required for the function of YidC in Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dongqing; Gao, Yanyan; Wang, Ping; Ran, Tingting; Wang, Weiwu

    2015-10-16

    YidC, the bacterial homologous protein of Oxa1 and Alb3, could insert membrane proteins into the membrane. Rhodobacter sphaeroides is a kind of photobacteria with abundant intracytoplasmic membranes. In this study, the functions of R.sphaeroides YidC and its C-terminus were investigated in the Escherichia coli YidC gene depletion strain FTL10. The results showed that RS_YidC could complement the growth of the strain FTL10, but the RS_YidC last 5 residues (619-623, KKRKP) deletion mutant could not. Interestingly, the site-directed RS_YidC mutants of any one or all of these 5 residues were still active. The deletion mutant of the last 4 residues and even the last 4 residues deletion mutant with substitution of the Ala or Glu for Lys619 still had sufficient activity to complement the growth of the strain FTL10. These results indicated that the length of the C-terminus of Rs_YidC is more important for its function than the amino acid composition or the charges of it, and the presence of an amino acid residue at position 619 is required for Rs_YidC function in E.coli. Our result also suggests that Rs_YidC may function differently as compared to its homologs. PMID:26362178

  8. Branched-chain amino acids are required for the survival and virulence of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae in swine.

    PubMed

    Subashchandrabose, Sargurunathan; LeVeque, Rhiannon M; Wagner, Trevor K; Kirkwood, Roy N; Kiupel, Matti; Mulks, Martha H

    2009-11-01

    In Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, which causes porcine pleuropneumonia, ilvI was identified as an in vivo-induced (ivi) gene and encodes the enzyme acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) required for branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) biosynthesis. ilvI and 7 of 32 additional ivi promoters were upregulated in vitro when grown in chemically defined medium (CDM) lacking BCAA. Based on these observations, we hypothesized that BCAA would be found at limiting concentrations in pulmonary secretions and that A. pleuropneumoniae mutants unable to synthesize BCAA would be attenuated in a porcine infection model. Quantitation of free amino acids in porcine pulmonary epithelial lining fluid showed concentrations of BCAA ranging from 8 to 30 micromol/liter, which is 10 to 17% of the concentration in plasma. The expression of both ilvI and lrp, a global regulator that is required for ilvI expression, was strongly upregulated in CDM containing concentrations of BCAA similar to those found in pulmonary secretions. Deletion-disruption mutants of ilvI and lrp were both auxotrophic for BCAA in CDM and attenuated compared to wild-type A. pleuropneumoniae in competitive index experiments in a pig infection model. Wild-type A. pleuropneumoniae grew in CDM+BCAA but not in CDM-BCAA in the presence of sulfonylurea AHAS inhibitors. These results clearly demonstrate that BCAA availability is limited in the lungs and support the hypothesis that A. pleuropneumoniae, and potentially other pulmonary pathogens, uses limitation of BCAA as a cue to regulate the expression of genes required for survival and virulence. These results further suggest a potential role for AHAS inhibitors as antimicrobial agents against pulmonary pathogens. PMID:19703979

  9. A single-amino-acid substitution eliminates the stringent carbohydrate requirement for intracellular transport of a viral glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Pitta, A M; Rose, J K; Machamer, C E

    1989-01-01

    In this report, we have investigated the contribution of primary sequence to the carbohydrate requirement for intracellular transport of two closely related glycoproteins, the G proteins of the San Juan and Orsay strains of vesicular stomatitis virus. We used site-directed mutagenesis of the coding sequence to eliminate the two consensus sites for glycosylation in the Orsay G protein. Whereas the nonglycosylated San Juan G protein required at least one of its two asparagine-linked oligosaccharides for transport to the plasma membrane at 37 degrees C, a fraction of the Orsay G protein was transported without carbohydrate. Of the 10 amino acid differences between these two proteins, residue 172 (tyrosine in San Juan, aspartic acid in Orsay) played the major role in determining the stringency for the carbohydrate requirement. The rates at which the glycosylated and nonglycosylated Orsay G proteins were transported to the cell surface were the same, although a smaller fraction of the nonglycosylated protein was transported. These results suggest that the carbohydrate does not promote intracellular transport directly but influences a polypeptide folding or oligomerization step which is critical for transport. Images PMID:2760984

  10. Hydrothermal synthesis of amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, William L.

    1994-05-01

    This study presents further evidence that amino acids can be synthesized rapidly in hydrothermal solutions from reactants that may have been present in primitive environments. Aqueous NH 4HCO 3 solutions were reacted with C 2H 2, H 2, and O 2 (formed in situ from CaC 2, Ca, and H 2O 2) at 200-275C over 0.2-2 h periods to synthesize several amino acids and abundant amines. These amino acid and amine producing reactions were not observed to occur below 150C. Amino acids and amines also were synthesized at 210C from solutions of NH 4OH, HCHO, NaCN, and H 2. When NH 4OH was replaced by NH 4HCO 3, the syntheses predominantly confirmed the recent results of RENNET et al. (1992). Additionally, amino acids and amines were observed to form by reactions among NH 4OH, HCHO, and H 2 at hydrothermal conditions, essentially confirming the results of FOX and WINDSOR (1970). Inclusion of both carbonate and O 2 in these latter solutions greatly enhanced the production rate of amino acids. The amines synthesized hydrothermally could be significant if they are precursors in the amino acid syntheses either at hydrothermal or later at lower temperatures. These observations provide additional input to the current questions of synthesis, stability, and decomposition of amino acids at hydrothermal conditions, and their possible relevance to the origin of life.

  11. Regulation of the plasma amino acid profile by leucine via the system L amino acid transporter.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Hongmin; Nakamura, Koichi; Kitaura, Yasuyuki; Kadota, Yoshihiro; Ishikawa, Takuya; Kondo, Yusuke; Xu, Minjun; Shimomura, Yoshiharu

    2015-12-01

    Plasma concentrations of amino acids reflect the intracellular amino acid pool in mammals. However, the regulatory mechanism requires clarification. In this study, we examined the effect of leucine administration on plasma amino acid profiles in mice with and without the treatment of 2-aminobicyclo-(2,2,1)-heptane-2-carboxylic acid (BCH) or rapamycin as an inhibitor of system L or mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1, respectively. The elevation of plasma leucine concentration after leucine administration was associated with a significant decrease in the plasma concentrations of isoleucine, valine, methionine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine; BCH treatment almost completely blocked the leucine-induced decrease in plasma amino acid concentrations. Rapamycin treatment had much less effects on the actions of leucine than BCH treatment. These results suggest that leucine regulates the plasma concentrations of branched-chain amino acids, methionine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine, and that system L amino acid transporters are involved in the leucine action. PMID:26125295

  12. Amino Acid Derangements in Patients With Sepsis: Treatment With Branched Chain Amino Acid Rich Infusions

    PubMed Central

    Freund, Herbert R.; Ryan, John A.; Fischer, Josef E.

    1978-01-01

    Sepsis is a major catabolic insult resulting in modifications in carbohydrate and fat energy metabolism, and leading to increased muscle breakdown and nitrogen loss. Insulin resistance, which develops in sepsis, decreases glucose utilization, but plasma insulin levels are sufficiently elevated to prevent lipolysis, resulting in a further energy deficit. The availability of fuels in sepsis is therefore limited, and the body resorts to muscle breakdown, gluconeogenesis, and amino acid oxidation for energy supply. Previous work has not defined, however, the exact alterations in amino acid metabolism. Therefore, the following studies were undertaken. Blood samples were drawn from fifteen patients in whom the diagnosis of sepsis was clinically established; the samples were analyzed for amino acid, ?-hydroxyphenylethanolamines, glucose, insulin and glucagon concentrations. The plasma amino acid pattern observed was characterized by an increase in total amino acid content, due mainly to high levels of the aromatic amino acids (phenylalanine and tyrosine) and the sulfur-containing amino acids (taurine, cystine and methionine). Alanine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid and proline were also elevated, but to a lesser degree. The branched chain amino acids (valine, leucine and isoleucine) were within normal limits, as were glycine, serine, threonine, lysine, histidine and tryptophan. Those patients who did not survive sepsis had higher levels of aromatic and sulfur-containing amino acids as compared to those patients surviving sepsis. On the other hand, those patients surviving sepsis had higher levels of alanine and the branched chain amino acids. In a second group of five patients with overwhelming sepsis accompanied by a state of metabolic encephalopathy, a parenteral nutrition solution consisting of 23% dextrose, and an amino acid formulation enriched with branched chain amino acids was administered. In these five patients, normalization of the plasma amino acid pattern and reversal of encephalopathy was observed. The following sequence of events may be postulated: The septic patient develops insulin resistance in the peripheral tissues, primarily muscle, while the adipose tissue is much less affected. The insulin resistance and the inability to utilize fat leads to increased muscle proteolysis. Muscle breakdown results in release into the blood of enormous amounts of various amino acids; the muscle itself is able to oxidize the branched chain amino acids, supplying the muscles' own energy requirements and alanine for gluconeogenesis. The extensive muscle proteolysis coupled with relative hepatic insufficiency occurring early in sepsis results in the appearance in the plasma of high levels of most of the amino acids present in muscle, particularly the aromatic and the sulfur-containing amino acids. The outcome of patients with sepsis might be positively affected by combined therapy with glucose, insulin and branched chain amino acids. PMID:99098

  13. Amino Acids from a Comet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jamie Elisla

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Stardust spacecraft returned samples from comet 81P/Wild 2 to Earth in January 2006. Examinations of the organic compounds in cometary samples can reveal information about the prebiotic organic inventory present on the early Earth and within the early Solar System, which may have contributed to the origin of life. Preliminary studies of Stardust material revealed the presence of a suite of organic compounds including several amines and amino acids, but the origin of these compounds (cometary- vs. terrestrial contamination) could not be identified. We have recently measured the carbon isotopic ratios of these amino acids to determine their origin, leading to the first detection of a coetary amino acid.

  14. Fed levels of amino acids are required for the somatotropin-induced increase in muscle protein synthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic somatotropin (pST) treatment in pigs increases muscle protein synthesis and circulating insulin, a known promoter of protein synthesis. Previously, we showed that the pST-mediated rise in insulin could not account for the pST-induced increase in muscle protein synthesis when amino acids were...

  15. Genome-wide siRNA screen reveals amino acid starvation-induced autophagy requires SCOC and WAC

    PubMed Central

    McKnight, Nicole C; Jefferies, Harold B J; Alemu, Endalkachew A; Saunders, Rebecca E; Howell, Michael; Johansen, Terje; Tooze, Sharon A

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic process by which cytoplasmic components are sequestered and transported by autophagosomes to lysosomes for degradation, enabling recycling of these components and providing cells with amino acids during starvation. It is a highly regulated process and its deregulation contributes to multiple diseases. Despite its importance in cell homeostasis, autophagy is not fully understood. To find new proteins that modulate starvation-induced autophagy, we performed a genome-wide siRNA screen in a stable human cell line expressing GFPLC3, the marker-protein for autophagosomes. Using stringent validation criteria, our screen identified nine novel autophagy regulators. Among the hits required for autophagosome formation are SCOC (short coiled-coil protein), a Golgi protein, which interacts with fasciculation and elongation protein zeta 1 (FEZ1), an ULK1-binding protein. SCOC forms a starvation-sensitive trimeric complex with UVRAG (UV radiation resistance associated gene) and FEZ1 and may regulate ULK1 and Beclin 1 complex activities. A second candidate WAC is required for starvation-induced autophagy but also acts as a potential negative regulator of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. The identification of these novel regulatory proteins with diverse functions in autophagy contributes towards a fuller understanding of autophagosome formation. PMID:22354037

  16. Amino acid residues required for fast Na(+)-channel inactivation: charge neutralizations and deletions in the III-IV linker.

    PubMed Central

    Patton, D E; West, J W; Catterall, W A; Goldin, A L

    1992-01-01

    The cytoplasmic linker connecting domains III and IV of the voltage-gated Na+ channel is thought to be involved in fast inactivation. This linker is highly conserved among the various Na+ channels that have been cloned. In the rat brain IIA Na+ channel, it consists of 53 amino acids of which 15 are charged. To investigate the role of this linker in inactivation, we mutated all 15 of the charged residues in various combinations. All but one of these mutants expressed functional channels, and all of these inactivated with kinetics similar to the wild-type channel. We then constructed a series of deletion mutations that span the III-IV linker to determine if any region of the linker is essential for fast inactivation. Deletion of the first 10 amino acids completely eliminated fast inactivation in the channel, whereas deletion of the last 10 amino acids had no substantial effect on inactivation. These results demonstrate that some residues in the amino end of the III-IV linker are critical for fast Na(+)-channel inactivation, but that the highly conserved positively charged and paired negatively charged residues are not essential. PMID:1332059

  17. Enzymatic detection of D-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Molla, Gianluca; Piubelli, Luciano; Volont, Federica; Pilone, Mirella S

    2012-01-01

    D: -Amino acids play several key roles and are widely diffused in living organisms, from bacteria (in which D-alanine is a component of the cell wall) to mammals (where D-serine is involved in glutamatergic neurotransmission in the central nervous system). The study of the biological processes involving D-amino acids and their use as clinical or biotechnological biomarkers requires reliable methods of quantifying them. Although "traditional" analytical techniques have been (and still are) employed for such tasks, enzymatic assays based on enzymes which possess a strict stereospecificity (i.e., that are only active on the D-enantiomers of amino acids) allowed the set-up of low-cost protocols with a high sensitivity and selectivity and suitable for determining the D-amino acid content of complex biological samples. The most exploited enzyme in these assays is D-amino acid oxidase, a flavoenzyme that exclusively oxidizes D-amino acids and possesses with a broad substrate specificity and a high kinetic efficiency. PMID:21956570

  18. 21 CFR 172.320 - Amino acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Amino acids. 172.320 Section 172.320 Food and... Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.320 Amino acids. The food additive amino acids may be safely used... consists of one or more of the following individual amino acids in the free, hydrated or anhydrous form...

  19. 21 CFR 172.320 - Amino acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Amino acids. 172.320 Section 172.320 Food and... Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.320 Amino acids. The food additive amino acids may be safely used... consists of one or more of the following individual amino acids in the free, hydrated or anhydrous form...

  20. 21 CFR 172.320 - Amino acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Amino acids. 172.320 Section 172.320 Food and... Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.320 Amino acids. The food additive amino acids may be safely used... consists of one or more of the following individual amino acids in the free, hydrated or anhydrous form...

  1. 21 CFR 172.320 - Amino acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Amino acids. 172.320 Section 172.320 Food and....320 Amino acids. The food additive amino acids may be safely used as nutrients added to foods in... individual amino acids in the free, hydrated, or anhydrous form, or as the hydrochloride, sodium,...

  2. 21 CFR 172.320 - Amino acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Amino acids. 172.320 Section 172.320 Food and Drugs... Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.320 Amino acids. The food additive amino acids may be safely used... consists of one or more of the following individual amino acids in the free, hydrated or anhydrous form...

  3. Role of amino acid transporters in amino acid sensing.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Peter M

    2014-01-01

    Amino acid (AA) transporters may act as sensors, as well as carriers, of tissue nutrient supplies. This review considers recent advances in our understanding of the AA-sensing functions of AA transporters in both epithelial and nonepithelial cells. These transporters mediate AA exchanges between extracellular and intracellular fluid compartments, delivering substrates to intracellular AA sensors. AA transporters on endosomal (eg, lysosomal) membranes may themselves function as intracellular AA sensors. AA transporters at the cell surface, particularly those for large neutral AAs such as leucine, interact functionally with intracellular nutrient-signaling pathways that regulate metabolism: for example, the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway, which promotes cell growth, and the general control non-derepressible (GCN) pathway, which is activated by AA starvation. Under some circumstances, upregulation of AA transporter expression [notably a leucine transporter, solute carrier 7A5 (SLC7A5)] is required to initiate AA-dependent activation of the mTORC1 pathway. Certain AA transporters may have dual receptor-transporter functions, operating as "transceptors" to sense extracellular (or intracellular) AA availability upstream of intracellular signaling pathways. New opportunities for nutritional therapy may include targeting of AA transporters (or mechanisms that upregulate their expression) to promote protein-anabolic signals for retention or recovery of lean tissue mass. PMID:24284439

  4. Amino acids of Diclidophora merlangi (Monogenea).

    PubMed

    Arme, C; Whyte, A

    1975-02-01

    The level of free amino acids in Diclidophora merlangi is high, comprising over 500 mu moles/g ethanol extracted dry weight. A single amino acid, proline, constitutes some 70% of the total pool. Analysis of parasite protein and host blood and mucus revealed low proline levels, suggesting that the high free pool content was not related to a requirement for protein systhesis or to its abundance in the diet of the worm. Experiments revealed that proline was not involved specifically in osmoregulation, and the reasons for the large amounts present in Diclidophora remain unknown. PMID:1118186

  5. Amino acids in sheep production.

    PubMed

    McCoard, Susan A; Sales, Francisco A; Sciascia, Quentin L

    2016-01-01

    Increasing production efficiency with a high standard of animal welfare and respect for the environment is a goal of sheep farming systems. Substantial gains in productivity have been achieved through improved genetics, nutrition and management changes; however the survival and growth performance of multiple-born lambs still remains a problem. This is a significant production efficiency and animal well-being issue. There is a growing body of evidence that some amino acids have a role in regulating growth, reproduction and immunity through modulation of metabolic and cell signaling pathways. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of what is currently known about the role of amino acids in sheep production and the potential for supplementation strategies to influence on-farm survival and growth of lambs. PMID:26709661

  6. Amino acids and central fatigue.

    PubMed

    Blomstrand, E

    2001-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in the mechanisms behind central fatigue, particularly in relation to changes in brain monoamine metabolism and the influence of specific amino acids on fatigue. Several studies in experimental animals have shown that physical exercise increases the synthesis and metabolism of brain 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). Support for the involvement of 5-HT in fatigue can be found in studies where the brain concentration of 5-HT has been altered by means of pharmacological agents. When the 5-HT level was elevated in this way the performance was impaired in both rats and human subjects, and in accordance with this a decrease in the 5-HT level caused an improvement in running performance in rats. The precursor of 5-HT is the amino acid tryptophan and the synthesis of 5-HT in the brain is thought to be regulated by the blood supply of free tryptophan in relation to other large neutral amino acids (including the branched-chain amino acids, BCAA) since these compete with tryptophan for transport into the brain. Studies in human subjects have shown that the plasma ratio of free tryptophan/BCAA increases during and, particularly, after sustained exercise. This would favour the transport of tryptophan into the brain and also the synthesis and release of 5-HT which may lead to central fatigue. Attempts have been made to influence the 5-HT level by giving BCAA to human subjects during different types of sustained heavy exercise. The results indicate that ingestion of BCAA reduces the perceived exertion and mental fatigue during exercise and improves cognitive performance after the exercise. In addition, in some situations ingestion of BCAA might also improve physical performance; during exercise in the heat or in a competitive race when the central component of fatigue is assumed to be more pronounced than in a laboratory experiment. However, more experiments are needed to further clarify the effect of BCAA and also of tryptophan ingestion on physical performance and mental fatigue. PMID:11310928

  7. The cholesterol recognition/interaction amino acid consensus motif of the influenza A virus M2 protein is not required for virus replication but contributes to virulence

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Shaun M; Wu, Wai-Hong; Lalime, Erin N

    2010-01-01

    Influenza A virus particles assemble and bud from plasma membrane domains enriched with the viral glycoproteins but only a small fraction of the total M2 protein is incorporated into virus particles when compared to the other viral glycoproteins. A membrane proximal cholesterol recognition/interaction amino acid consensus (CRAC) motif was previously identified in M2 and suggested to play a role in protein function. We investigated the importance of the CRAC motif on virus replication by generating recombinant proteins and viruses containing amino acid substitutions in this motif. Alteration or completion of the M2 CRAC motif in two different virus strains caused no changes in virus replication in vitro. Viruses lacking an M2 CRAC motif had decreased morbidity and mortality in the mouse model of infection, suggesting that this motif is a virulence determinant which may facilitate virus replication in vivo but is not required for basic virus replication in tissue culture. PMID:20655564

  8. The cholesterol recognition/interaction amino acid consensus motif of the influenza A virus M2 protein is not required for virus replication but contributes to virulence.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Shaun M; Wu, Wai-Hong; Lalime, Erin N; Pekosz, Andrew

    2010-09-30

    Influenza A virus particles assemble and bud from plasma membrane domains enriched with the viral glycoproteins but only a small fraction of the total M2 protein is incorporated into virus particles when compared to the other viral glycoproteins. A membrane proximal cholesterol recognition/interaction amino acid consensus (CRAC) motif was previously identified in M2 and suggested to play a role in protein function. We investigated the importance of the CRAC motif on virus replication by generating recombinant proteins and viruses containing amino acid substitutions in this motif. Alteration or completion of the M2 CRAC motif in two different virus strains caused no changes in virus replication in vitro. Viruses lacking an M2 CRAC motif had decreased morbidity and mortality in the mouse model of infection, suggesting that this motif is a virulence determinant which may facilitate virus replication in vivo but is not required for basic virus replication in tissue culture. PMID:20655564

  9. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    SciTech Connect

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, T. Ashton; Chin, Jason W.; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2011-02-15

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  10. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    SciTech Connect

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, T. Ashton; Chin, Jason W.; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2011-08-09

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNAsyn-thetases, pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  11. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    SciTech Connect

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, Ashton T; Chin, Jason W; Anderson, Christopher J; Schultz, Peter G

    2013-05-21

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  12. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    SciTech Connect

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, T. Ashton; Chin, Jason W.; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2014-08-26

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  13. Intestinal metabolism of sulfur amino acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gastrointestinal tract (GIT) serves a key function in the digestion of dietary protein and absorption of amino acids. However, the GIT is also an important site of amino acid metabolism in the body. Methionine is an indispensable amino acid and must be supplied in the diet. In addition, consider...

  14. Amino acid analyses of Apollo 14 samples.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrke, C. W.; Zumwalt, R. W.; Kuo, K.; Aue, W. A.; Stalling, D. L.; Kvenvolden, K. A.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1972-01-01

    Detection limits were between 300 pg and 1 ng for different amino acids, in an analysis by gas-liquid chromatography of water extracts from Apollo 14 lunar fines in which amino acids were converted to their N-trifluoro-acetyl-n-butyl esters. Initial analyses of water and HCl extracts of sample 14240 and 14298 samples showed no amino acids above background levels.

  15. Symmetry scheme for amino acid codons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, J.

    2002-02-01

    Group theoretical concepts are invoked in a specific model to explain how only twenty amino acids occur in nature out of a possible sixty four. The methods we use enable us to justify the occurrence of the recently discovered 21st amino acid selenocysteine, and also enables us to predict the possible existence of two more, as yet undiscovered amino acids.

  16. Evolutionary Systems Biology of Amino Acid Biosynthetic Cost in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Michael D.; Delneri, Daniela; Oliver, Stephen G.; Rattray, Magnus; Bergman, Casey M.

    2010-01-01

    Every protein has a biosynthetic cost to the cell based on the synthesis of its constituent amino acids. In order to optimise growth and reproduction, natural selection is expected, where possible, to favour the use of proteins whose constituents are cheaper to produce, as reduced biosynthetic cost may confer a fitness advantage to the organism. Quantifying the cost of amino acid biosynthesis presents challenges, since energetic requirements may change across different cellular and environmental conditions. We developed a systems biology approach to estimate the cost of amino acid synthesis based on genome-scale metabolic models and investigated the effects of the cost of amino acid synthesis on Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene expression and protein evolution. First, we used our two new and six previously reported measures of amino acid cost in conjunction with codon usage bias, tRNA gene number and atomic composition to identify which of these factors best predict transcript and protein levels. Second, we compared amino acid cost with rates of amino acid substitution across four species in the genus Saccharomyces. Regardless of which cost measure is used, amino acid biosynthetic cost is weakly associated with transcript and protein levels. In contrast, we find that biosynthetic cost and amino acid substitution rates show a negative correlation, but for only a subset of cost measures. In the economy of the yeast cell, we find that the cost of amino acid synthesis plays a limited role in shaping transcript and protein expression levels compared to that of translational optimisation. Biosynthetic cost does, however, appear to affect rates of amino acid evolution in Saccharomyces, suggesting that expensive amino acids may only be used when they have specific structural or functional roles in protein sequences. However, as there appears to be no single currency to compute the cost of amino acid synthesis across all cellular and environmental conditions, we conclude that a systems approach is necessary to unravel the full effects of amino acid biosynthetic cost in complex biological systems. PMID:20808905

  17. Diurnal changes in salivary amino acid concentrations.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yuki; Kodama, Haruki; Satoh, Tomosuke; Adachi, Kazunori; Watanabe, Shigeru; Yokote, Yoshiko; Sakagami, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that the features of saliva (e.g. fluidity, secretion and amino acid concentration) reflect physiological and psychological state of primates as well as subprimates, however, studies which revealed the relationship between the circadian rhythm and the concentrations of salivary amino acids have been limited. In order to better understand their physiological role, diurnal changes of salivary amino acids were investigated in three undergraduate students. Salivary amino acids were recovered after deproteinization with 5% trichloroacetic acid and determined by an amino acid analyzer. Most amino acids, except for methionine, cysteine and asparagine, were detected in the saliva. The intake of lunch or amino acid supplement transiently increased the salivary amino acids, and in the latter case, the amino acid levels returned to baseline within 10 minutes. Physical exercise also slightly elevated the salivary amino acid levels. During the university examination period, the secretion of saliva was slightly, but not significantly, increased, accompanied by the elevation of glycine, alanine, ornithine, histidine and threonine, and the decline of lysine, leucine, aspartic acid and hydroxyproline. Salivary amino acid levels may be useful to evaluate stressful conditions. PMID:21164041

  18. TyrR, the regulator of aromatic amino acid metabolism, is required for mice infection of Yersinia pestis

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Zhongliang; Liu, Zizhong; He, Junming; Wang, Jing; Yan, Yanfeng; Wang, Xiaoyi; Cui, Yujun; Bi, Yujing; Du, Zongmin; Song, Yajun; Yang, Ruifu; Han, Yanping

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, poses a serious health threat to rodents and human beings. TyrR is a transcriptional regulator (TyrR) that controls the metabolism of aromatic amino acids in Escherichia coli. In this paper, TyrR played an important role in Y. pestis virulence. Inactivation of tyrR did not seem to affect the in vitro growth of this organism, but resulted in at least 10,000-fold attenuation compared with the wild-type (WT) strain upon subcutaneous infection to mice. In addition, loads of tyrR mutant within mice livers and spleens significantly decreased compared with the WT strain. Transcriptome analysis revealed that TyrR, directly or indirectly, regulated 29 genes encoded on Y. pestis chromosome or plasmids under in vitro growth condition. Similar to the regulatory function of this protein in E. coli, five aromatic-pathway genes (aroF-tyrA, aroP, aroL, and tyrP) were significantly reduced upon deletion of the tyrR gene. Two genes (glnL and glnG) that encode sensory histidine kinase and regulator in a two-component regulatory system involved in nitrogen assimilation were downregulated in the tyrR mutant. Several genes encoding type III secretion proteins were transcribed by 2.04.2-fold in a tyrR mutant relative to the WT strain. Interestingly, the acid-stressed genes, hdeB and hdeD, were downregulated, and such downregulation partly accounted for the decrease in tolerance of the tyrR mutant under acidic conditions. In conclusion, regulation of TyrR in Y. pestis is similar to, but distinct from, that in E. coli. TyrR is a metabolic virulence determinant in Y. pestis that is important for extracellular survival and/or proliferation. PMID:25729381

  19. Bacterial synthesis of D-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Radkov, Atanas D; Moe, Luke A

    2014-06-01

    Recent work has shed light on the abundance and diversity of D-amino acids in bacterial extracellular/periplasmic molecules, bacterial cell culture, and bacteria-rich environments. Within the extracellular/periplasmic space, D-amino acids are necessary components of peptidoglycan, and disruption of their synthesis leads to cell death. As such, enzymes responsible for D-amino acid synthesis are promising targets for antibacterial compounds. Further, bacteria are shown to incorporate a diverse collection of D-amino acids into their peptidoglycan, and differences in D-amino acid incorporation may occur in response to differences in growth conditions. Certain D-amino acids can accumulate to millimolar levels in cell culture, and their synthesis is proposed to foretell movement from exponential growth phase into stationary phase. While enzymes responsible for synthesis of D-amino acids necessary for peptidoglycan (D-alanine and D-glutamate) have been characterized from a number of different bacteria, the D-amino acid synthesis enzymes characterized to date cannot account for the diversity of D-amino acids identified in bacteria or bacteria-rich environments. Free D-amino acids are synthesized by racemization or epimerization at the ?-carbon of the corresponding L-amino acid by amino acid racemase or amino acid epimerase enzymes. Additionally, D-amino acids can be synthesized by stereospecific amination of ?-ketoacids. Below, we review the roles of D-amino acids in bacterial physiology and biotechnology, and we describe the known mechanisms by which they are synthesized by bacteria. PMID:24752840

  20. Current topics in the biotechnological production of essential amino acids, functional amino acids, and dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Mitsuhashi, Satoshi

    2014-04-01

    Amino acids play important roles in both human and animal nutrition and in the maintenance of health. Here, amino acids are classified into three groups: first, essential amino acids, which are essential to nutrition; second, functional amino acids, recently found to be important in the promotion of physiological functions; and third, dipeptides, which are used to resolve problematic features of specific free amino acids, such as their instability or insolubility. This review focusses on recent researches concerning the microbial production of essential amino acids (lysine and methionine), functional amino acids (histidine and ornithine), and a dipeptide (L-alanyl-L-glutamine). PMID:24679256

  1. Amino Acid Properties Conserved in Molecular Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Rudnicki, Witold R.; Mroczek, Teresa; Cudek, Pawe?

    2014-01-01

    That amino acid properties are responsible for the way protein molecules evolve is natural and is also reasonably well supported both by the structure of the genetic code and, to a large extent, by the experimental measures of the amino acid similarity. Nevertheless, there remains a significant gap between observed similarity matrices and their reconstructions from amino acid properties. Therefore, we introduce a simple theoretical model of amino acid similarity matrices, which allows splitting the matrix into two parts one that depends only on mutabilities of amino acids and another that depends on pairwise similarities between them. Then the new synthetic amino acid properties are derived from the pairwise similarities and used to reconstruct similarity matrices covering a wide range of information entropies. Our model allows us to explain up to 94% of the variability in the BLOSUM family of the amino acids similarity matrices in terms of amino acid properties. The new properties derived from amino acid similarity matrices correlate highly with properties known to be important for molecular evolution such as hydrophobicity, size, shape and charge of amino acids. This result closes the gap in our understanding of the influence of amino acids on evolution at the molecular level. The methods were applied to the single family of similarity matrices used often in general sequence homology searches, but it is general and can be used also for more specific matrices. The new synthetic properties can be used in analyzes of protein sequences in various biological applications. PMID:24967708

  2. Amino acid residues Leu135 and Tyr236 are required for RNA binding activity of CFIm25 in Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Ospina-Villa, Juan David; Zamorano-Carrillo, Absalom; Lopez-Camarillo, Cesar; Castaon-Sanchez, Carlos A; Soto-Sanchez, Jacqueline; Ramirez-Moreno, Esther; Marchat, Laurence A

    2015-08-01

    Pre-mRNA 3' end processing in the nucleus is essential for mRNA stability, efficient nuclear transport, and translation in eukaryotic cells. In Human, the cleavage/polyadenylation machinery contains the 25kDa subunit of the Cleavage Factor Im (CFIm25), which specifically recognizes two UGUA elements and regulates the assembly of polyadenylation factors, poly(A) site selection and polyadenylation. In Entamoeba histolytica, the protozoan parasite responsible for human amoebiasis, EhCFIm25 has been reported as a RNA binding protein that interacts with the Poly(A) Polymerase. Here, we follow-up with the study of EhCFIm25 to characterize its interaction with RNA. Using in silico strategy, we identified Leu135 and Tyr236 in EhCFIm25 as conserved amino acids among CFIm25 homologues. We therefore generated mutant EhCFIm25 proteins to investigate the role of these residues for RNA interaction. Results showed that RNA binding activity was totally abrogated when Leu135 and Tyr236 were replaced with Ala residue, and Tyr236 was changed for Phe. In contrast, RNA binding activity was less affected when Leu135 was substituted by Thr. Our data revealed for the first time -until we know-the functional relevance of the conserved Leu135 and Tyr236 in EhCFIm25 for RNA binding activity. They also gave some insights about the possible chemical groups that could be interacting with the RNA molecule. PMID:25941172

  3. Amino acid code of protein secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Shestopalov, B V

    2003-01-01

    The calculation of protein three-dimensional structure from the amino acid sequence is a fundamental problem to be solved. This paper presents principles of the code theory of protein secondary structure, and their consequence--the amino acid code of protein secondary structure. The doublet code model of protein secondary structure, developed earlier by the author (Shestopalov, 1990), is part of this theory. The theory basis are: 1) the name secondary structure is assigned to the conformation, stabilized only by the nearest (intraresidual) and middle-range (at a distance no more than that between residues i and i + 5) interactions; 2) the secondary structure consists of regular (alpha-helical and beta-structural) and irregular (coil) segments; 3) the alpha-helices, beta-strands and coil segments are encoded, respectively, by residue pairs (i, i + 4), (i, i + 2), (i, i = 1), according to the numbers of residues per period, 3.6, 2, 1; 4) all such pairs in the amino acid sequence are codons for elementary structural elements, or structurons; 5) the codons are divided into 21 types depending on their strength, i.e. their encoding capability; 6) overlappings of structurons of one and the same structure generate the longer segments of this structure; 7) overlapping of structurons of different structures is forbidden, and therefore selection of codons is required, the codon selection is hierarchic; 8) the code theory of protein secondary structure generates six variants of the amino acid code of protein secondary structure. There are two possible kinds of model construction based on the theory: the physical one using physical properties of amino acid residues, and the statistical one using results of statistical analysis of a great body of structural data. Some evident consequences of the theory are: a) the theory can be used for calculating the secondary structure from the amino acid sequence as a partial solution of the problem of calculation of protein three-dimensional structure from the amino acid sequence, and the calculated secondary structure and codon strength distribution can be used for simulating the next step of protein folding; b) one can propose that the same secondary structures can be folded into different tertiary structures and, vice versa, different secondary structures can be folded into the same tertiary structures, provided codon distributions are considered also; c) codons can be considered as first elements of protein three-dimensional structure language. PMID:14989164

  4. Sugar amino acids in designing new molecules.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Tushar Kanti; Srinivasu, Pothukanuri; Tapadar, Subhasish; Mohan, Bajjuri Krishna

    2005-03-01

    Emulating the basic principles followed by nature to build its vast repertoire of biomolecules, organic chemists are developing many novel multifunctional building blocks and using them to create 'nature-like' and yet unnatural organic molecules. Sugar amino acids constitute an important class of such polyfunctional scaffolds where the carboxyl, amino and hydroxyl termini provide an excellent opportunity to organic chemists to create structural diversities akin to Nature's molecular arsenal. This article describes some of our works on various sugar amino acids and many other related building blocks, like furan amino acids, pyrrole amino acids etc. used in wide-ranging peptidomimetic studies. PMID:16133829

  5. Amino acid composition in parenteral nutrition: what is the evidence?

    PubMed Central

    Yarandi, Shadi S.; Zhao, Vivian M.; Hebbar, Gautam; Ziegler, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review Complete parenteral nutrition solutions contain mixed amino acid products providing all nine essential amino acids and a varying composition of nonessential amino acids. Relatively little rigorous comparative efficacy research on altered parenteral nutrition amino acid composition has been published in recent years. Recent findings Limited data from randomized, double-blind, adequately powered clinical trials to define optimal doses of total or individual amino acids in parenteral nutrition are available. An exception is the growing number of studies on the efficacy of glutamine supplementation of parenteral nutrition or given as a single parenteral agent. Parenteral glutamine appears to confer benefit in selected patients; however, additional data to define optimal glutamine dosing and the patient subgroups who may most benefit from this amino acid are needed. Although some promising studies have been published, little data are available in the current era of nutrition support on the clinical efficacy of altered doses of arginine, branched chain amino acids, cysteine, or taurine supplementation of parenteral nutrition. Summary Despite routine use of parenteral nutrition, surprisingly little clinical efficacy data are available to guide total or specific amino acid dosing in adult and pediatric patients requiring this therapy. This warrants increased attention by the research community and funding agencies to better define optimal amino acid administration strategies in patient subgroups requiring parenteral nutrition. PMID:21076291

  6. Amino and fatty acids in carbonaceous meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvenvolden, K. A.

    1974-01-01

    Analyses of two carbonaceous meteorites have provided much of the latest evidence which seems to support Oparin's theory on the origin of life. The meteorites involved are the Murray meteorite, which fell in 1950, and the Murchison meteorite, which fell in 1969. The amino acids in the two meteorites are similar in composition. Eight of the twenty amino acids found belong to amino acids present in proteins. A number of monocarboxylic and dicarboxylic fatty acids were also found in the meteorites.

  7. Amino-acid contamination of aqueous hydrochloric acid.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolman, Y.; Miller, S. L.

    1971-01-01

    Considerable amino-acid contamination in commercially available analytical grade hydrochloric acid (37% HCl) was found. One bottle contained 8,300 nmol of amino-acids per liter. A bottle from another supplier contained 6,700 nmol per liter. The contaminants were mostly protein amino-acids and several unknowns. Data on the volatility of the amino-acids during HCl distillation were also obtained.

  8. Production of amino acids using auxotrophic mutants of methylotrophic bacillus

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, Richard S. (Wayzata, MN); Flickinger, Michael C. (St. Paul, MN); Schendel, Frederick J. (Falcon Heights, MN); Guettler, Michael V. (Waconia, MN)

    2001-07-17

    A method of producing amino acids by culturing an amino acid auxotroph of a biologically pure strain of a type I methylotrophic bacterium of the genus Bacillus which exhibits sustained growth at 50.degree. C. using methanol as a carbon and energy source and requiring vitamin B.sub.12 and biotin is provided.

  9. Nonprotein Amino Acids from Spark Discharges and Their Comparison with the Murchison Meteorite Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Wolman, Yecheskel; Haverland, William J.; Miller, Stanley L.

    1972-01-01

    All the nonprotein amino acids found in the Murchison meteorite are products of the action of electric discharge on a mixture of methane, nitrogen, and water with traces of ammonia. These amino acids include ?-amino-n-butyric acid, ?-aminoisobutyric acid, norvaline, isovaline, pipecolic acid, ?-alanine, ?-amino-n-butyric acid, ?-aminoisobutyric acid, ?-aminobutyric acid, sarcosine, N-ethylglycine, and N-methylalanine. In addition, norleucine, alloisoleucine, N-propylglycine, N-isopropylglycine, N-methyl-?-alanine, N-ethyl-?-alanine ?,?-diaminopropionic acid, isoserine, ?,?-diaminobutyric acid, and ?-hydroxy-?-aminobutyric acid are produced by the electric discharge, but have not been found in the meteorite. PMID:16591973

  10. Characterization of Amino Acid Efflux from Isolated Soybean Cells 1

    PubMed Central

    Secor, Jacob; Schrader, Larry E.

    1984-01-01

    Cells from reproductive soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) plants were isolated using a mechanical-enzymic technique that produced a high yield of uniform, physiologically active cells. Cells were incubated in a pH 6.0 buffered solution and subjected to various treatments in order to determine the nature of net amino acid efflux. Total net amino acid (ninhydrinreactive substances) efflux was not affected by the following conditions: (a) darkness, (b) aeration, (c) K+ concentrations of 0.1, 1.0, 10, or 100 millimolar and (d) pH 4, 5, 6, 7, or 8. The Q10 for net amino acid efflux between 10C and 30C was 1.6. Thus, it seems that net amino acid efflux requires neither current photosynthetic energy nor a pH/ion concentration gradient. Amino acid analyses of the intra-and extracellular fractions over time showed that each amino acid was exported linearly for at least 210 minutes, but that export rate was not necessarily related to internal amino acid pools. Amino acids that were exported fastest were alanine, lysine, leucine, and glycine. Addition of the inhibitor p-chloromercuriphenyl sulfonic acid, 3(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea, or carbonylcyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone increased the rate of total amino acid efflux but had specific effects on the efflux of certain amino acids. For example, p-chloromercuriphenyl sulfonic acid greatly enhanced efflux of ?-aminobutyric acid, which is not normally exported rapidly even though a high concentration normally exists within cells. The data suggest that net amino acid efflux is a selective diffusional process. Because net efflux is the result of simultaneous efflux and influx, we propose that efflux is a facilitated diffusion process whereas influx involves energy-dependent carrier proteins. PMID:16663380

  11. Design and Characterization of Auxotrophy-Based Amino Acid Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Bertels, Felix; Merker, Holger; Kost, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Efficient and inexpensive methods are required for the high-throughput quantification of amino acids in physiological fluids or microbial cell cultures. Here we develop an array of Escherichia coli biosensors to sensitively quantify eleven different amino acids. By using online databases, genes involved in amino acid biosynthesis were identified that – upon deletion – should render the corresponding mutant auxotrophic for one particular amino acid. This rational design strategy suggested genes involved in the biosynthesis of arginine, histidine, isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, proline, threonine, tryptophan, and tyrosine as potential genetic targets. A detailed phenotypic characterization of the corresponding single-gene deletion mutants indeed confirmed that these strains could neither grow on a minimal medium lacking amino acids nor transform any other proteinogenic amino acid into the focal one. Site-specific integration of the egfp gene into the chromosome of each biosensor decreased the detection limit of the GFP-labeled cells by 30% relative to turbidometric measurements. Finally, using the biosensors to determine the amino acid concentration in the supernatants of two amino acid overproducing E. coli strains (i.e. ΔhisL and ΔtdcC) both turbidometrically and via GFP fluorescence emission and comparing the results to conventional HPLC measurements confirmed the utility of the developed biosensor system. Taken together, our study provides not only a genotypically and phenotypically well-characterized set of publicly available amino acid biosensors, but also demonstrates the feasibility of the rational design strategy used. PMID:22829942

  12. Excitatory amino acids in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Urbanska, E M; Czuczwar, S J; Kleinrok, Z; Turski, W A

    1998-01-01

    Epilepsy has been described as a neurological disorder with a prevalence rate estimated at approximately 0.5% of population. In recent years there have been significant advances in our understanding of the contribution of excitatory glutamatergic transmission to seizures. Glutamate appeared to participate in the initiation, propagation and maintenance of epileptic activity. In epileptic patients, changes in glutamate concentration and receptor function were found. Intracerebral or systemic administration of glutamate receptor agonists has become a popular way to induce seizures in rodents. Glutamate antagonists were shown to be potent anticonvulsants in varying experimental seizure models determined genetically, induced chemically and electrically, or due to kindling. A potential therapeutic role for drugs affecting glutamatergic mechanisms in epilepsy has not yet been defined but is constantly attracting interest. In this review we summarize data from studies performed in humans and animals and focus on iono- and metabotropic excitatory amino acid receptor-mediated events in seizures and epilepsy. PMID:12671285

  13. Amino acids in the Tagish Lake Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kminek, G.; Botta, O.; Glavin, D. P.; Bada, J. L.

    2002-01-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) based amino acid analysis of a Tagish Lake meteorite sample recovered 3 months after the meteorite fell to Earth have revealed that the amino acid composition of Tagish Lake is strikingly different from that of the CM and CI carbonaceous chondrites. We found that the Tagish Lake meteorite contains only trace levels of amino acids (total abundance = 880 ppb), which is much lower than the total abundance of amino acids in the CI Orgueil (4100 ppb) and the CM Murchison (16 900 ppb). Because most of the same amino acids found in the Tagish Lake meteorite are also present in the Tagish Lake ice melt water, we conclude that the amino acids detected in the meteorite are terrestrial contamination. We found that the exposure of a sample of Murchison to cold water lead to a substantial reduction over a period of several weeks in the amount of amino acids that are not strongly bound to the meteorite matrix. However, strongly bound amino acids that are extracted by direct HCl hydrolysis are not affected by the leaching process. Thus even if there had been leaching of amino acids from our Tagish Lake meteorite sample during its 3 month residence in Tagish Lake ice and melt water, a Murchison type abundance of endogenous amino acids in the meteorite would have still been readily detectable. The low amino acid content of Tagish Lake indicates that this meteorite originated fiom a different type of parent body than the CM and CI chondrites. The parent body was apparently devoid of the reagents such as aldehyldes/ketones, HCN and ammonia needed for the effective abiotic synthesis of amino acids. Based on reflectance spectral measurements, Tagish Lake has been associated with P- or D-type asteroids. If the Tagish Lake meteorite was indeed derived fiom these types of parent bodies, our understanding of these primitive asteroids needs to be reevaluated with respect to their potential inventory of biologically important organic compounds.

  14. Amino acids precursors in lunar finds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.; Harada, K.; Hare, P. E.; Hinsch, G.; Mueller, G.

    1975-01-01

    The consistent pattern is discussed of amino acids found in lunar dust from Apollo missions. The evidence indicates that compounds yielding amino acids were implanted into the surface of the moon by the solar wind, and the kind and amounts of amino acids found on the moon are closely similar to those found in meteorites. It is concluded that there is a common cosmochemical pattern for the moom and meteorites, and this offers evidence of a common course of cosmochemical reactions for carbon.

  15. The Ubiquitin E3 Ligase LOSS OF GDU2 Is Required for GLUTAMINE DUMPER1-Induced Amino Acid Secretion in Arabidopsis1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Pratelli, Rjane; Guerra, Damian D.; Yu, Shi; Wogulis, Mark; Kraft, Edward; Frommer, Wolf B.; Callis, Judy; Pilot, Guillaume

    2012-01-01

    Amino acids serve as transport forms for organic nitrogen in the plant, and multiple transport steps are involved in cellular import and export. While the nature of the export mechanism is unknown, overexpression of GLUTAMINE DUMPER1 (GDU1) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) led to increased amino acid export. To gain insight into GDU1s role, we searched for ethyl-methanesulfonate suppressor mutants and performed yeast-two-hybrid screens. Both methods uncovered the same gene, LOSS OF GDU2 (LOG2), which encodes a RING-type E3 ubiquitin ligase. The interaction between LOG2 and GDU1 was confirmed by glutathione S-transferase pull-down, in vitro ubiquitination, and in planta coimmunoprecipitation experiments. Confocal microscopy and subcellular fractionation indicated that LOG2 and GDU1 both localized to membranes and were enriched at the plasma membrane. LOG2 expression overlapped with GDU1 in the xylem and phloem tissues of Arabidopsis. The GDU1 protein encoded by the previously characterized intragenic suppressor mutant log1-1, with an arginine in place of a conserved glycine, failed to interact in the multiple assays, suggesting that the Gdu1D phenotype requires the interaction of GDU1 with LOG2. This hypothesis was supported by suppression of the Gdu1D phenotype after reduction of LOG2 expression using either artificial microRNAs or a LOG2 T-DNA insertion. Altogether, in accordance with the emerging bulk of data showing membrane protein regulation via ubiquitination, these data suggest that the interaction of GDU1 and the ubiquitin ligase LOG2 plays a significant role in the regulation of amino acid export from plant cells. PMID:22291198

  16. Regulation of the proteome by amino acids.

    PubMed

    Bourgoin-Voillard, Sandrine; Goron, Arthur; Seve, Michel; Moinard, Christophe

    2016-03-01

    Besides their main contribution as substrates for protein synthesis, amino acids as signaling molecules could exert some regulatory functions on protein synthesis and/or proteolysis that have been emphasized in a number of recent studies. Several publications have highlighted supplemental roles of those amino acids in protein metabolism as well as in immunity, heat shock response, or apoptosis processes. In this way, via their regulatory properties, selected amino acids (such as leucine, glutamine, arginine, citrulline, or methionine) directly influence the proteome. In this review, we are proposing an overview of the regulation of the proteome by amino acids in mammals. PMID:26786846

  17. Relationship between amino acid usage and amino acid evolution in primates.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haoxuan; Xie, Zhengqing; Tan, Shengjun; Zhang, Xiaohui; Yang, Sihai

    2015-02-25

    Amino acid usage varies from species to species. A previous study has found a universal trend in amino acid gain and loss in many taxa and a one-way model of amino acid evolution in which the number of new amino acids increases as the number of old amino acids decreases was proposed. Later studies showed that this pattern of amino acid gain and loss is likely to be compatible with the neutral theory. The present work aimed to further study this problem by investigating the evolutionary patterns of amino acids in 8 primates (the nucleotide and protein alignments are available online http://gattaca.nju.edu.cn/pub_data.html). First, the number of amino acids gained and lost was calculated and the evolution trend of each amino acid was inferred. These values were found to be closely related to the usage of each amino acid. Then we analyzed the mutational trend of amino acid substitution in human using SNPs, this trend is highly correlated with fixation trend only with greater variance. Finally, the trends in the evolution of 20 amino acids were evaluated in human on different time scales, and the increasing rate of 5 significantly increasing amino acids was found to decrease as a function of time elapsed since divergence, and the dS/dN ratio also found to increase as a function of time elapsed since divergence. These results suggested that the observed amino acid substitution pattern is influenced by mutation and purifying selection. In conclusion, the present study shows that usage of amino acids is an important factor capable of influencing the observed pattern of amino acid evolution, and also presented evidences suggesting that the observed universal trend of amino acid gain and loss is compatible with neutral evolution. PMID:25527119

  18. Identification of amino acid residues in APOBEC3G required for regulation by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Vif and Virion encapsidation.

    PubMed

    Huthoff, Hendrik; Malim, Michael H

    2007-04-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) accessory protein Vif serves to neutralize the human antiviral proteins apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme, catalytic polypeptide-like 3G (APOBEC3G [A3G]) and A3F. As such, the therapeutic blockade of Vif function represents a logical objective for rational drug design. To facilitate such endeavors, we have employed molecular genetics to define features of A3G that are required for its interaction with Vif. Using alanine-scanning mutations and multiple different substitutions at key residues, we confirm the central role played by the aspartic acid at position 128 and identify proline 129 and aspartic acid 130 as important contributory residues. The overall negative charge of this 3-amino-acid motif appears critical for recognition by Vif, as single lysine substitutions are particularly deleterious and a double alanine substitution at positions 128 and 130 is far more inhibitory than single-residue mutations at either position. Our analyses also reveal that the immediately adjacent 4 amino acids, residues 124 to 127, are important for the packaging of A3G into HIV-1 particles. Most important are tyrosine 124 and tryptophan 127, and mutations at these positions can ablate virion incorporation, as well as the capacity to inhibit virus infection. Thus, while pharmacologic agents that target the acidic motif at residues 128 to 130 have the potential to rescue A3G expression by occluding recognition by Vif, care will have to be taken not to perturb the contributions of the neighboring 124-to-127 region to packaging if such agents are to have therapeutic benefit by promoting A3G incorporation into progeny virions. PMID:17267497

  19. A sulfur amino acid deficiency changes the amino acid composition of body protein in piglets.

    PubMed

    Conde-Aguilera, J A; Barea, R; Le Floc'h, N; Lefaucheur, L; van Milgen, J

    2010-08-01

    Experiments carried out to determine the amino acid requirement in growing animals are often based on the premise that the amino acid composition of body protein is constant. However, there are indications that this assumption may not be correct. The objective of this study was to test the effect of feeding piglets a diet deficient or not in total sulfur amino acids (TSAA; Met + Cys) on nitrogen retention and amino acid composition of proteins in different body compartments. Six blocks of three pigs each were used in a combined comparative slaughter and nitrogen balance study. One piglet in each block was slaughtered at 42 days of age, whereas the other piglets received a diet deficient or not in TSAA for 19 days and were slaughtered thereafter. Two diets were formulated to provide either 0.20% Met and 0.45% TSAA (on a standardized ileal digestible basis) or 0.46% Met and 0.70% TSAA. Diets were offered approximately 25% below ad libitum intake. At slaughter, the whole animal was divided into carcass, blood, intestines, liver, and the combined head, tail, feet and other organs (HFTO), which were analyzed for nitrogen and amino acid contents. Samples of the longissimus muscle (LM) were analyzed for myosin heavy chain (MyHC) and actin contents. Nitrogen retention was 20% lower in piglets receiving the TSAA-deficient diet (P < 0.01). In these piglets, the nitrogen content in tissue gain was lower in the empty body, carcass, LM and blood (P < 0.05) or tended to be lower in HFTO (P < 0.10), but was not different in the intestines and liver. The Met content in retained protein was lower in the empty body, LM and blood (P < 0.05), and tended to be lower in the carcass (P < 0.10). The Cys content was lower in LM, but higher in blood of piglets receiving the TSAA-deficient diet (P < 0.05). Skeletal muscle appeared to be affected most by the TSAA deficiency. In LM, the Met content in retained protein was reduced by 12% and total Met retention by more than 60%. The MyHC and actin contents in LM were not affected by the TSAA content of the diet. These results show that a deficient TSAA supply affects the amino acid composition of different body proteins. This questions the use of a constant ideal amino acid profile to express dietary amino acid requirements, but also illustrates the plasticity of the animal to cope with nutritional challenges. PMID:22444655

  20. Research for amino acids in lunar samples.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrke, C. W.; Zumwalt, R. W.; Kuo, K.; Rash, J. J.; Aue , W. A.; Stalling, D. L.; Kvenvolden, K. A.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1972-01-01

    The study was primarily directed toward the examination of Apollo 14 lunar fines for indigenous amino acids or materials which could be converted to amino acids on hydrolysis with 6 N hydrochloric acid. Initial experiments were conducted to confirm the integrity of the derivatization reactions and reagents, and to optimize the gas-liquid chromatographic (GLC) instrumental and chromatographic system for the separation and flame ionization detection of the amino acid derivatives. In studies on the recovery of amino acids added to lunar fines, low recoveries were obtained when 10 ng of each amino acid were added to 50 mg of virgin fines, but the subsequent addition of 50 ng of each to the previously extracted sample resulted in much higher recoveries.

  1. Arrangement of domains, and amino acid residues required for binding of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 to its counter-receptor VLA-4 (alpha 4 beta 1)

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Interaction of the vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) with its counter-receptor very late antigen-4 (VLA-4) (integrin alpha 4 beta 1) is important for a number of developmental pathways and inflammatory functions. We are investigating the molecular mechanism of this binding, in the interest of developing new anti-inflammatory drugs that block it. In a previous report, we showed that the predominant form of VCAM-1 on stimulated endothelial cells, seven-domain VCAM (VCAM-7D), is a functionally bivalent molecule. One binding site requires the first and the other requires the homologous immunoglobulin-like domain. Rotary shadowing and electron microscopy of recombinant soluble VCAM-7D molecules suggests that the seven Ig-like domains are extended in a slightly bent linear array, rather than compactly folded together. We have systematically mutagenized the first domain of VCAM-6D (a monovalent, alternately spliced version mission domain 4) by replacing 3-4 amino acids of the VCAM sequence with corresponding portions of the related ICAM-1 molecule. Specific amino acids, important for binding VLA-4 include aspartate 40 (D40), which corresponds to the acidic ICAM- 1 residue glutamate 34 (E34) previously reported to be essential for binding of ICAM-1 to its integrin counter-receptor LFA-1. A small region of VCAM including D40, QIDS, can be replaced by the similar ICAM- 1 sequence, GIET, without affecting function or epitopes, indicating that this region is part of a general integrin-binding structure rather than a determinant of binding specificity for a particular integrin. The VCAM-1 sequence G65NEH also appears to be involved in binding VLA-4. PMID:7508942

  2. Amino acid regulation of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Fafournoux, P; Bruhat, A; Jousse, C

    2000-10-01

    The impact of nutrients on gene expression in mammals has become an important area of research. Nevertheless, the current understanding of the amino acid-dependent control of gene expression is limited. Because amino acids have multiple and important functions, their homoeostasis has to be finely maintained. However, amino-acidaemia can be affected by certain nutritional conditions or various forms of stress. It follows that mammals have to adjust several of their physiological functions involved in the adaptation to amino acid availability by regulating the expression of numerous genes. The aim of the present review is to examine the role of amino acids in regulating mammalian gene expression and protein turnover. It has been reported that some genes involved in the control of growth or amino acid metabolism are regulated by amino acid availability. For instance, limitation of several amino acids greatly increases the expression of the genes encoding insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1, CHOP (C/EBP homologous protein, where C/EBP is CCAAT/enhancer binding protein) and asparagine synthetase. Elevated mRNA levels result from both an increase in the rate of transcription and an increase in mRNA stability. Several observations suggest that the amino acid regulation of gene expression observed in mammalian cells and the general control process described in yeast share common features. Moreover, amino acid response elements have been characterized in the promoters of the CHOP and asparagine synthetase genes. Taken together, the results discussed in the present review demonstrate that amino acids, by themselves, can, in concert with hormones, play an important role in the control of gene expression. PMID:10998343

  3. Amino acid regulation of gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Fafournoux, P; Bruhat, A; Jousse, C

    2000-01-01

    The impact of nutrients on gene expression in mammals has become an important area of research. Nevertheless, the current understanding of the amino acid-dependent control of gene expression is limited. Because amino acids have multiple and important functions, their homoeostasis has to be finely maintained. However, amino-acidaemia can be affected by certain nutritional conditions or various forms of stress. It follows that mammals have to adjust several of their physiological functions involved in the adaptation to amino acid availability by regulating the expression of numerous genes. The aim of the present review is to examine the role of amino acids in regulating mammalian gene expression and protein turnover. It has been reported that some genes involved in the control of growth or amino acid metabolism are regulated by amino acid availability. For instance, limitation of several amino acids greatly increases the expression of the genes encoding insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1, CHOP (C/EBP homologous protein, where C/EBP is CCAAT/enhancer binding protein) and asparagine synthetase. Elevated mRNA levels result from both an increase in the rate of transcription and an increase in mRNA stability. Several observations suggest that the amino acid regulation of gene expression observed in mammalian cells and the general control process described in yeast share common features. Moreover, amino acid response elements have been characterized in the promoters of the CHOP and asparagine synthetase genes. Taken together, the results discussed in the present review demonstrate that amino acids, by themselves, can, in concert with hormones, play an important role in the control of gene expression. PMID:10998343

  4. Nutritional value of D-amino acids, D-peptides, and amino acid derivatives in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper describes a method for determining the nutritional value of D-amino acids, D-peptides, and amino acid derivatives using a growth assay in mice fed a synthetic all-amino acid diet. A large number of experiments were carried out in which a molar equivalent of the test compound replaced a n...

  5. Supernovae, Neutrinos and the Chirality of Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Richard N.; Kajino, Toshitaka; Onaka, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    A mechanism for creating an enantioenrichment in the amino acids, the building blocks of the proteins, that involves global selection of one handedness by interactions between the amino acids and neutrinos from core-collapse supernovae is defined. The chiral selection involves the dependence of the interaction cross sections on the orientations of the spins of the neutrinos and the 14N nuclei in the amino acids, or in precursor molecules, which in turn couple to the molecular chirality. It also requires an asymmetric distribution of neutrinos emitted from the supernova. The subsequent chemical evolution and galactic mixing would ultimately populate the Galaxy with the selected species. The resulting amino acids could either be the source thereof on Earth, or could have triggered the chirality that was ultimately achieved for Earth’s proteinaceous amino acids. PMID:21747686

  6. Transport of Amino Acids to the Maize Root 1

    PubMed Central

    Oaks, Ann

    1966-01-01

    When 5-mm maize root tips were excised and placed in an inorganic salts solution for 6 hours, there was a loss of alcohol-insoluble nitrogen. The levels of threonine, proline, valine, isoleucine, leucine, tyrosine, phenylalanine, and lysine in the alcohol soluble fraction were severely reduced, whereas those of glutamate, aspartate, ornithine, and alanine were scarcely affected. There was a 4-fold increase in the level of ?-aminobutyrate. Those amino acids whose synthesis appeared to be deficient in excised root tips also showed poor incorporation of acetate carbon. In addition, the results show that asparagine and the amino acids of the neutral and basic fraction were preferentially transported to the root tip region. The results therefore suggest that the synthesis of certain amino acids in the root tip region is restricted, and that this requirement for amino acids in the growing region could regulate the flow of amino acids to the root tip. PMID:16656225

  7. The Apollo Program and Amino Acids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Sidney W.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the determination of hydrolyzable amino acid precursors and a group of six amino acids in the returned lunar samples of the Apollo programs. Indicates that molecular evolution is arrested at the precursor stage on the Moon because of lack of water. (CC)

  8. Manure amino acid compounds and their bioavailability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Amino acids (AA) have long been known to be present in animal manure. Amino acid compounds are widely presumed to be the primary pool of organic nitrogen (N) in soil, which provides nutrition for plant growth through N mineralization. Recent studies have also demonstrated some plants can directly ta...

  9. 6th Amino Acid Assessment Workshop

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The focus of the 6th workshop is on lysine, arginine, and related amino acids. Functions, metabolic pathways, clinical uses, and upper tolerance intakes are emphasized in the articles that follow. Lysine is arguably the most deficient amino acid in the food supply of countries where poverty exists, ...

  10. Amino acid signatures in carbonaceous meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botta, Oliver; Glavin, Daniel P.; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2002-02-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites, a class of stony meteorites that contains up to 3 weight-% of organic carbon, are subdivided into types by chemical and mineralogical characteristics. These meteorites are thought to originate from asteroidal parent bodies on which secondary processing in the early history of the solar system has altered interstellar organic precursors into more complex compounds such as amino acids and nucleobases. We have analyzed nine different carbonaceous chondrites and have compared the total and relative amino acid concentrations of hydrolyzed hot-water extracts of these meteorites. When the relative amino acid concentrations [(Beta) -alanine]/[glycine], [AIB]/[glycine] and [D- alanine]/[glycine] of meteorites are plotted against each other, a clustering of the data points of the CM and CI type carbonaceous chondrites can be observed. This signature indicates that the amino acids in the Cms were synthesized via the Strecker synthetic pathway, whereas the amino acids found in the Cis probably have a different synthetic origin.

  11. Urinary Amino Acid Analysis: A Comparison of iTRAQ®-LC-MS/MS, GC-MS, and Amino Acid Analyzer

    PubMed Central

    Kaspar, Hannelore; Dettmer, Katja; Chan, Queenie; Daniels, Scott; Nimkar, Subodh; Daviglus, Martha L.; Stamler, Jeremiah; Elliott, Paul; Oefner, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    Urinary amino acid analysis is typically done by cation-exchange chromatography followed by post-column derivatization with ninhydrin and UV detection. This method lacks throughput and specificity. Two recently introduced stable isotope ratio mass spectrometric methods promise to overcome those shortcomings. Using two blinded sets of urine replicates and a certified amino acid standard, we compared the precision and accuracy of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) of propyl chloroformate and iTRAQ® derivatized amino acids, respectively, to conventional amino acid analysis. The GC-MS method builds on the direct derivatization of amino acids in diluted urine with propyl chloroformate, GC separation and mass spectrometric quantification of derivatives using stable isotope labeled standards. The LC-MS/MS method requires prior urinary protein precipitation followed by labeling of urinary and standard amino acids with iTRAQ® tags containing different cleavable reporter ions distinguishable by MS/MS fragmentation. Means and standard deviations of percent technical error (%TE) computed for 20 amino acids determined by amino acid analyzer, GC-MS, and iTRAQ®-LC-MS/MS analyses of 33 duplicate and triplicate urine specimens were 7.27±5.22, 21.18±10.94, and 18.34±14.67, respectively. Corresponding values for 13 amino acids determined in a second batch of 144 urine specimens measured in duplicate or triplicate were 8.39±5.35, 6.23±3.84, and 35.37±29.42. Both GC-MS and iTRAQ®-LC-MS/MS are suited for high-throughput amino acid analysis, with the former offering at present higher reproducibility and completely automated sample pretreatment, while the latter covers more amino acids and related amines. PMID:19481989

  12. Amino acids in the Martian meteorite Nakhla

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Bada, J. L.; Brinton, K. L.; McDonald, G. D.

    1999-01-01

    A suite of protein and nonprotein amino acids were detected with high-performance liquid chromatography in the water- and acid-soluble components of an interior fragment of the Martian meteorite Nakhla, which fell in Egypt in 1911. Aspartic and glutamic acids, glycine, alanine, beta-alanine, and gamma-amino-n-butyric acid (gamma-ABA) were the most abundant amino acids detected and were found primarily in the 6 M HCl-hydrolyzed, hot water extract. The concentrations ranged from 20 to 330 parts per billion of bulk meteorite. The amino acid distribution in Nakhla, including the D/L ratios (values range from <0.1 to 0.5), is similar to what is found in bacterially degraded organic matter. The amino acids in Nakhla appear to be derived from terrestrial organic matter that infiltrated the meteorite soon after its fall to Earth, although it is possible that some of the amino acids are endogenous to the meteorite. The rapid amino acid contamination of Martian meteorites after direct exposure to the terrestrial environment has important implications for Mars sample-return missions and the curation of the samples from the time of their delivery to Earth.

  13. Amino acids in the Martian meteorite Nakhla

    PubMed Central

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Bada, Jeffrey L.; Brinton, Karen L. F.; McDonald, Gene D.

    1999-01-01

    A suite of protein and nonprotein amino acids were detected with high-performance liquid chromatography in the water- and acid-soluble components of an interior fragment of the Martian meteorite Nakhla, which fell in Egypt in 1911. Aspartic and glutamic acids, glycine, alanine, ?-alanine, and ?-amino-n-butyric acid (?-ABA) were the most abundant amino acids detected and were found primarily in the 6 M HCl-hydrolyzed, hot water extract. The concentrations ranged from 20 to 330 parts per billion of bulk meteorite. The amino acid distribution in Nakhla, including the d/l ratios (values range from <0.1 to 0.5), is similar to what is found in bacterially degraded organic matter. The amino acids in Nakhla appear to be derived from terrestrial organic matter that infiltrated the meteorite soon after its fall to Earth, although it is possible that some of the amino acids are endogenous to the meteorite. The rapid amino acid contamination of Martian meteorites after direct exposure to the terrestrial environment has important implications for Mars sample-return missions and the curation of the samples from the time of their delivery to Earth. PMID:10430856

  14. Amino acids in the Martian meteorite Nakhla.

    PubMed

    Glavin, D P; Bada, J L; Brinton, K L; McDonald, G D

    1999-08-01

    A suite of protein and nonprotein amino acids were detected with high-performance liquid chromatography in the water- and acid-soluble components of an interior fragment of the Martian meteorite Nakhla, which fell in Egypt in 1911. Aspartic and glutamic acids, glycine, alanine, beta-alanine, and gamma-amino-n-butyric acid (gamma-ABA) were the most abundant amino acids detected and were found primarily in the 6 M HCl-hydrolyzed, hot water extract. The concentrations ranged from 20 to 330 parts per billion of bulk meteorite. The amino acid distribution in Nakhla, including the D/L ratios (values range from <0.1 to 0.5), is similar to what is found in bacterially degraded organic matter. The amino acids in Nakhla appear to be derived from terrestrial organic matter that infiltrated the meteorite soon after its fall to Earth, although it is possible that some of the amino acids are endogenous to the meteorite. The rapid amino acid contamination of Martian meteorites after direct exposure to the terrestrial environment has important implications for Mars sample-return missions and the curation of the samples from the time of their delivery to Earth. PMID:10430856

  15. A preparation of N-Fmoc-N-methyl-alpha-amino acids and N-nosyl-N-methyl-alpha-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Di Gioia, Maria Luisa; Leggio, Antonella; Liguori, Angelo; Perri, Francesca; Siciliano, Carlo; Viscomi, Maria Caterina

    2010-01-01

    A convenient route for the synthesis of lipophilic N-Fmoc-N-methyl-alpha-amino acids and N-nosyl-N-methyl-alpha-amino acids, interesting building blocks to be used for the preparation of N-methylated peptides, is presented. Both nosyl- and Fmoc-protected monomers are accessible, so these compounds can be used in solution as well as in solid phase peptide synthesis. The methodology is based on the use of benzhydryl group to protect temporarily the carboxyl function of N-nosyl-alpha-amino acids and on the subsequent methylation of the N-nosyl-alpha-amino acid benzhydryl esters with diazomethane. The benzhydryl esters offer several beneficial features such as simple preparation, stability to methylation and selective deprotection under mild conditions. The overall procedure is highly efficient in that the adopted conditions keep the chiral integrity of amino acid precursors and the process does not require chromatographic purification of the methylated products. PMID:19052843

  16. Amino acid analogs for tumor imaging

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M.; Shoup, Timothy

    1998-10-06

    The invention provides novel amino acid compounds of use in detecting and evaluating brain and body tumors. These compounds combine the advantageous properties of 1-amino-cycloalkyl-1-carboxylic acids, namely, their rapid uptake and prolonged retention in tumors with the properties of halogen substituents, including certain useful halogen isotopes including fluorine-18, iodine-123, iodine-125, iodine-131, bromine-75, bromine-76, bromine-77 and bromine-82. In one aspect, the invention features amino acid compounds that have a high specificity for target sites when administered to a subject in vivo. Preferred amino acid compounds show a target to non-target ratio of at least 5:1, are stable in vivo and substantially localized to target within 1 hour after administration. An especially preferred amino acid compound is ›.sup.18 F!-1-amino-3-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC). In another aspect, the invention features pharmaceutical compositions comprised of an .alpha.-amino acid moiety attached to either a four, five, or a six member carbon-chain ring. In addition, the invention features analogs of .alpha.-aminoisobutyric acid.

  17. Amino acid analogs for tumor imaging

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, M.M.; Shoup, T.

    1998-09-15

    The invention provides novel amino acid compounds of use in detecting and evaluating brain and body tumors. These compounds combine the advantageous properties of 1-amino-cycloalkyl-1-carboxylic acids, namely, their rapid uptake and prolonged retention in tumors with the properties of halogen substituents, including certain useful halogen isotopes including fluorine-18, iodine-123, iodine-125, iodine-131, bromine-75, bromine-76, bromine-77 and bromine-82. In one aspect, the invention features amino acid compounds that have a high specificity for target sites when administered to a subject in vivo. Preferred amino acid compounds show a target to non-target ratio of at least 5:1, are stable in vivo and substantially localized to target within 1 hour after administration. An especially preferred amino acid compound is [{sup 18}F]-1-amino-3-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC). In another aspect, the invention features pharmaceutical compositions comprised of an {alpha}-amino acid moiety attached to either a four, five, or a six member carbon-chain ring. In addition, the invention features analogs of {alpha}-aminoisobutyric acid.

  18. Amino acid analogs for tumor imaging

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M.; Shoup, Timothy

    1998-09-15

    The invention provides novel amino acid compounds of use in detecting and evaluating brain and body tumors. These compounds combine the advantageous properties of 1-amino-cycloalkyl-1-carboxylic acids, namely, their rapid uptake and prolonged retention in tumors with the properties of halogen substituents, including certain useful halogen isotopes including fluorine-18, iodine-123, iodine-125, iodine-131, bromine-75, bromine-76, bromine-77 and bromine-82. In one aspect, the invention features amino acid compounds that have a high specificity for target sites when administered to a subject in vivo. Preferred amino acid compounds show a target to non-target ratio of at least 5:1, are stable in vivo and substantially localized to target within 1 hour after administration. An especially preferred amino acid compound is ›.sup.18 F!-1-amino-3-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC). In another aspect, the invention features pharmaceutical compositions comprised of an .alpha.-amino acid moiety attached to either a four, five, or a six member carbon-chain ring. In addition, the invention features analogs of .alpha.-aminoisobutyric acid.

  19. Amino acid analogs for tumor imaging

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, M.M.; Shoup, T.

    1998-10-06

    The invention provides novel amino acid compounds of use in detecting and evaluating brain and body tumors. These compounds combine the advantageous properties of 1-amino-cycloalkyl-1-carboxylic acids, namely, their rapid uptake and prolonged retention in tumors with the properties of halogen substituents, including certain useful halogen isotopes including fluorine-18, iodine-123, iodine-125, iodine-131, bromine-75, bromine-76, bromine-77 and bromine-82. In one aspect, the invention features amino acid compounds that have a high specificity for target sites when administered to a subject in vivo. Preferred amino acid compounds show a target to non-target ratio of at least 5:1, are stable in vivo and substantially localized to target within 1 hour after administration. An especially preferred amino acid compound is [{sup 18}F]-1-amino-3-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC). In another aspect, the invention features pharmaceutical compositions comprised of an {alpha}-amino acid moiety attached to either a four, five, or a six member carbon-chain ring. In addition, the invention features analogs of {alpha}-aminoisobutyric acid.

  20. Amino acid analogs for tumor imaging

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M. (Atlanta, GA); Shoup, Timothy (Decatur, GA)

    1998-10-06

    The invention provides novel amino acid compounds of use in detecting and evaluating brain and body tumors. These compounds combine the advantageous properties of 1-amino-cycloalkyl-1-carboxylic acids, namely, their rapid uptake and prolonged retention in tumors with the properties of halogen substituents, including certain useful halogen isotopes including fluorine-18, iodine-123, iodine-125, iodine-131, bromine-75, bromine-76, bromine-77 and bromine-82. In one aspect, the invention features amino acid compounds that have a high specificity for target sites when administered to a subject in vivo. Preferred amino acid compounds show a target to non-target ratio of at least 5:1, are stable in vivo and substantially localized to target within 1 hour after administration. An especially preferred amino acid compound is .sup.18 F!-1-amino-3-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC). In another aspect, the invention features pharmaceutical compositions comprised of an .alpha.-amino acid moiety attached to either a four, five, or a six member carbon-chain ring. In addition, the invention features analogs of .alpha.-aminoisobutyric acid.

  1. Amino acid analogs for tumor imaging

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M. (Atlanta, GA); Shoup, Timothy (Decatur, GA)

    1998-09-15

    The invention provides novel amino acid compounds of use in detecting and evaluating brain and body tumors. These compounds combine the advantageous properties of 1-amino-cycloalkyl-1-carboxylic acids, namely, their rapid uptake and prolonged retention in tumors with the properties of halogen substituents, including certain useful halogen isotopes including fluorine-18, iodine-123, iodine-125, iodine-131, bromine-75, bromine-76, bromine-77 and bromine-82. In one aspect, the invention features amino acid compounds that have a high specificity for target sites when administered to a subject in vivo. Preferred amino acid compounds show a target to non-target ratio of at least 5:1, are stable in vivo and substantially localized to target within 1 hour after administration. An especially preferred amino acid compound is .sup.18 F!-1-amino-3-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC). In another aspect, the invention features pharmaceutical compositions comprised of an .alpha.-amino acid moiety attached to either a four, five, or a six member carbon-chain ring. In addition, the invention features analogs of .alpha.-aminoisobutyric acid.

  2. Soil Bacteria Take Up D-Amino Acids, Protect Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, H. J.; Zhang, G.

    2011-12-01

    Recently, many groups reported D-amino acid uptake by plant roots, raising the question of whether soil D-amino acids represent a source of nitrogen or a source of toxicity. The discussion needs to be placed in the context of competition with rhizosphere bacteria. To provide this context, we followed the concentrations of D- and L-enantiomers of alanine, glutamic acid, aspartic acid, and leucine after they were added to soils in the laboratory. In all cases, the uptake of L-enantiomer began immediately and proceeded rapidly until exhausted. In contrast, the uptake of D-enantiomer required induction: an initial period of inactivity followed by rapid consumption comparable in rate to L-enantiomer. The induced nature of the D activity was confirmed by the addition of rifampicin, an mRNA synthesis inhibitor. Preventing the synthesis of new enzymes abolished soil flora's ability to consume D-amino acids, but not L-amino acids. These results suggest that inducible special racemase enzymes, which can convert D-amino acids back to their native L-forms, are widespread among soil microorganisms. This finding does not rule out the possibility that some plants may out-compete microorganisms and be able to access D-amino acids. It does suggest, however, that rhizosphere bacteria can shield plants from the toxic effect of D-amino acids.

  3. The putative Cationic Amino Acid Transporter 9 is targeted to vesicles and may be involved in plant amino acid homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huaiyu; Stierhof, York-Dieter; Ludewig, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Amino acids are major primary metabolites. Their uptake, translocation, compartmentation, and re-mobilization require a diverse set of cellular transporters. Here, the broadly expressed gene product of CATIONIC AMINO ACID TRANSPORTER 9 (CAT9) was identified as mainly localized to vesicular membranes that are involved in vacuolar trafficking, including those of the trans-Golgi network. In order to probe whether and how these compartments are involved in amino acid homeostasis, a loss-of-function cat9-1 mutant and ectopic over-expressor plants were isolated. Under restricted nitrogen supply in soil, cat9-1 showed a chlorotic phenotype, which was reversed in the over-expressors. The total soluble amino acid pools were affected in the mutants, but this was only significant under poor nitrogen supply. Upon nitrogen starvation, the soluble amino acid leaf pools were lower in the over-expressor, compared with cat9-1. Over-expression generally affected total soluble amino acid concentrations, slightly delayed development, and finally improved the survival upon severe nitrogen starvation. The results potentially identify a novel function of vesicular amino acid transport mediated by CAT9 in the cellular nitrogen-dependent amino acid homeostasis. PMID:25883600

  4. Amino acid transporters: roles in amino acid sensing and signalling in animal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hyde, Russell; Taylor, Peter M; Hundal, Harinder S

    2003-01-01

    Amino acid availability regulates cellular physiology by modulating gene expression and signal transduction pathways. However, although the signalling intermediates between nutrient availability and altered gene expression have become increasingly well documented, how eukaryotic cells sense the presence of either a nutritionally rich or deprived medium is still uncertain. From recent studies it appears that the intracellular amino acid pool size is particularly important in regulating translational effectors, thus, regulated transport of amino acids across the plasma membrane represents a means by which the cellular response to amino acids could be controlled. Furthermore, evidence from studies with transportable amino acid analogues has demonstrated that flux through amino acid transporters may act as an initiator of nutritional signalling. This evidence, coupled with the substrate selectivity and sensitivity to nutrient availability classically associated with amino acid transporters, plus the recent discovery of transporter-associated signalling proteins, demonstrates a potential role for nutrient transporters as initiators of cellular nutrient signalling. Here, we review the evidence supporting the idea that distinct amino acid "receptors" function to detect and transmit certain nutrient stimuli in higher eukaryotes. In particular, we focus on the role that amino acid transporters may play in the sensing of amino acid levels, both directly as initiators of nutrient signalling and indirectly as regulators of external amino acid access to intracellular receptor/signalling mechanisms. PMID:12879880

  5. Calcitonin gene-related peptide analogues with aza and indolizidinone amino acid residues reveal conformational requirements for antagonist activity at the human calcitonin gene-related peptide 1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Boeglin, Damien; Hamdan, Fadi F; Melendez, Rosa E; Cluzeau, Jrme; Laperriere, Andre; Hroux, Madeleine; Bouvier, Michel; Lubell, William D

    2007-03-22

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists have potential for the treatment and prevention of disease states such as non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, migraine headache, pain, and inflammation. To gain insight into the spatial requirements for CGRP antagonism, three strategies were employed to restrict the conformation of the potent undecapeptide antagonist, [D31,P34,F35]CGRP27-37. First, aza-amino acid scanning was performed, and ten aza-peptide analogues were synthesized and examined for biological activity. Second, (3S,6S,9S)-2-oxo-3-amino-indolizidin-2-one amino acid (I2aa) and (2S,6S,8S)-9-oxo-8-amino-indolizidin-9-one amino acid (I9aa) both were introduced at positions 31-32, 32-33, 33-34, and 34-35, regions of the backbone expected to adopt turns. Finally, the conformation of the backbone and side-chain of the C-terminal residue, Phe35-Ala36-Phe37-NH2, was explored employing (2S,4R,6R,8S)-9-oxo-8-amino-4-phenyl-indolizidin-9-one amino acid (4-Ph-I9aa) as a constrained phenylalanine mimic. The structure-activity relationships exhibited by our 26 analogues illustrate conformational requirements important for designing CGRP antagonists and highlight the importance of beta-turns centered at Gly33-Pro34 for potency. PMID:17319653

  6. Distribution of Amino Acids in Lunar Regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, J. E.; Callahan, M. P.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.; Noble, S. K.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    One of the most eagerly studied questions upon initial return of lunar samples was whether significant amounts of organic compounds, including amino acids, were present. Analyses during the 1970s produced only tentative and inconclusive identifications of indigenous amino acids. Those analyses were hampered by analytical difficulties including relative insensitivity to certain compounds, the inability to separate chiral enantiomers, and the lack of compound-specific isotopic measurements, which made it impossible to determine whether the detected amino acids were indigenous to the lunar samples or the results of contamination. Numerous advances have been made in instrumentation and methodology for amino acid characterization in extraterrestrial samples in the intervening years, yet the origin of amino acids in lunar regolith samples has been revisited only once for a single lunar sample, (3) and remains unclear. Here, we present initial data from the analyses of amino acid abundances in 12 lunar regolith samples. We discuss these abundances in the context of four potential amino acid sources: (1) terrestrial biological contamination; (2) contamination from lunar module (LM) exhaust; (3) derivation from solar windimplanted precursors; and (4) exogenous delivery from meteorites.

  7. The immunogenicity of dinitrophenyl amino acids.

    PubMed

    Frey, J R; de Weck, A L; Geleick, H; Lergier, W

    1969-11-01

    Numerous dinitrophenyl amino acid preparations injected intradermally induced contact hypersensitivity to dinitrochlorobenzene, delayed type skin reactions to DNP-amino acids, and anti-DNP antibodies in guinea pigs. Some DNP-amino adds induced precipitating anti-DNP antibodies in rabbits as well. Some of the DNP-ammo acids studied were regularly immunogenic, possible immunogenic impurities having been excluded by extensive purification procedures. Others were either constantly nonimmunogenic or irregularly immunogenic, e.g., their immunogenicity varying from one preparation lot to another. By means of extensive chemical analyses and the establishment of dose-response curves, we were able to demonstrate in most cases that the immunogenicity was not due to contamination with unreacted dinitrofluorobenzene or other DNP derivatives, to photodecomposition or other degradation products, or to DNP-protein contaminants. Nevertheless, the irregular immunogenicity of several DNP-amino acid preparations can only be explained by a highly immunogenic impurity (or impurities) which we were unable to detect analytically. The regular immunogenicity of some other DNP-amino acids (e.g. di-DNP-L-histidine) appears to be based on a "transconjugation" phenomenon, the DNP group being able to split off from its amino acid carrier and to conjugate secondarily with proteins in vivo and in vitro. Accordingly, the interpretation of some recent data concerning the immunogenicity of low molecular weight hapten-amino acids may have to be reevaluated. PMID:4981513

  8. Amino Acid Stability in the Early Oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, E. T.; Brinton, K. L.; Burton, A. S.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.; Bada, J. L.

    2015-01-01

    It is likely that a variety of amino acids existed in the early oceans of the Earth at the time of the origin and early evolution of life. "Primordial soup", hydrothermal vent, and meteorite based processes could have contributed to such an inventory. Several "protein" amino acids were likely present, however, based on prebiotic synthesis experiments and carbonaceous meteorite studies, non-protein amino acids, which are rare on Earth today, were likely the most abundant. An important uncertainty is the length of time these amino acids could have persisted before their destruction by abiotic and biotic processes. Prior to life, amino acid concentrations in the oceans were likely regulated by circulation through hydro-thermal vents. Today, the entire ocean circulates through vent systems every 10(exp 7) years. On the early Earth, this value was likely smaller due to higher heat flow and thus marine amino acid life-time would have been shorter. After life, amino acids in the oceans could have been assimilated by primitive organisms.

  9. Amino Acid Degradation after Meteoritic Impact Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertrand, M.; Westall, F.; vanderGaast, S.; Vilas, F.; Hoerz, F.; Barnes, G.; Chabin, A.; Brack, A.

    2008-01-01

    Amino acids are among the most important prebiotic molecules as it is from these precursors that the building blocks of life were formed [1]. Although organic molecules were among the components of the planetesimals making up the terrestrial planets, large amounts of primitive organic precursor molecules are believed to be exogenous in origin and to have been imported to the Earth via micrometeorites, carbonaceous meteorites and comets, especially during the early stages of the formation of the Solar System [1,2]. Our study concerns the hypothesis that prebiotic organic matter, present on Earth, was synthesized in the interstellar environment, and then imported to Earth by meteorites or micrometeorites. We are particularly concerned with the formation and fate of amino acids. We have already shown that amino acid synthesis is possible inside cometary grains under interstellar environment conditions [3]. We are now interested in the effects of space conditions and meteoritic impact on these amino acids [4-6]. Most of the extraterrestrial organic molecules known today have been identified in carbonaceous chondrite meteorites [7]. One of the components of these meteorites is a clay with a composition close to that of saponite, used in our experiments. Two American teams have studied the effects of impact on various amino acids [8,9]. [8] investigated amino acids in saturated solution in water with pressure ranges between 5.1 and 21 GPa and temperature ranges between 412 and 870 K. [9] studied amino acids in solid form associated with and without minerals (Murchison and Allende meteorite extracts) and pressure ranges between 3 and 30 GPa. In these two experiments, the amino acids survived up to 15 GPa. At higher pressure, the quantity of preserved amino acids decreases quickly. Some secondary products such as dipeptides and diketopiperazins were identified in the [8] experiment.

  10. Polycondensation of alpha-amino acids by pyrosulfuric acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denes, F.; Fox, S. W.

    1976-01-01

    The thermal polycondensation of amino acids common to protein is promoted at 80 deg C by pyrosulfuric acid. This is in contrast to the noncondensation at 100 deg C in the presence of concentrated sulfuric acid. These results are in accord with an anhydride mechanism, as proposed earlier for copolycondensation promoted by polyphosphoric acid. The amino acid composition, molecular weight, near-homogeneity, and infrared absorption of the polymer formed are described. The potential significance of planetary pyrosulfuric acid is discussed.

  11. Amino acids in healthy aging skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Riddle, Emily S; Stipanuk, Martha H; Thalacker-Mercer, Anna E

    2016-01-01

    Life expectancy in the U.S. and globally continues to increase. Despite increased life expectancy quality of life is not enhanced, and older adults often experience chronic age-related disease and functional disability, including frailty. Additionally, changes in body composition such as the involuntary loss of skeletal muscle mass (i.e. sarcopenia) and subsequent increases in adipose tissue can augment disease and disability in this population. Furthermore, increased oxidative stress and decreased antioxidant concentrations may also lead to metabolic dysfunction in older adults. Specific amino acids, including leucine, cysteine and its derivative taurine, and arginine can play various roles in healthy aging, especially in regards to skeletal muscle health. Leucine and arginine play important roles in muscle protein synthesis and cell growth while cysteine and arginine play important roles in quenching oxidative stress. Evidence suggests that supplemental doses of each of these amino acids may improve the aging phenotype. However, additional research is required to establish the doses required to achieve positive outcomes in humans. PMID:26709665

  12. Influence on performance of three to six-week-old broilers of varying dietary protein contents with supplementation of essential amino acid requirements.

    PubMed

    Fancher, B I; Jensen, L S

    1989-01-01

    Effects were evaluated of feeding diets differing in CP content but formulated to be adequate in essential amino acids (EAA) on performance and certain plasma metabolites of female broilers from 21 to 42 days of age. In Experiment 1, isocaloric diets containing either 22.6, 18.2, 15.7, 14.2, or 12.3% CP were used. Experiment 2 was similar to Experiment 1 but included three additional diets, which consisted of the three lowest CP diets supplemented with L-glutamic acid (GLU) to increase formulated CP levels to 18%. Protein efficiency ratio and abdominal fat deposition (AFD) decreased linearly as CP increased in both experiments. Increasing CP increased plasma thyroxine in Experiment 1 but not in Experiment 2. Plasma triiodothyronine and triglycerides were not significantly influenced by treatment. A positive curvilinear relationship existed between CP level and body weight gain in both experiments. The calculated CP requirement for growth 95% of maximum ranged from 16.0 +/- 1.8 (Experiment 1) to 17.5 +/- 1.8% (Experiment 2). Feed efficiency (FE) increased in a curvilinear manner as CP increased in Experiment 1, and the calculated CP requirement for FE 95% of maximum was 18.9 +/- 2.5%. In Experiment 2, however, improvements in FE were obtained with each increase in CP. The calculated requirement levels of CP for optimal growth were low compared to conventionally fed levels. However, obtaining optimal growth consistently with the former levels appeared unlikely because of the magnitude of associated standard errors. The CP level required for optimal FE was clearly higher than that for optimal growth. PMID:2704667

  13. Genetics Home Reference: Aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency

    MedlinePLUS

    ... literature OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency On this page: Description Genetic changes ... definitions Reviewed May 2008 What is aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency? Aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency

    MedlinePLUS

    ... OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency On this page: Description Genetic changes ... Reviewed May 2008 What is aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency? Aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) ...

  15. Polymers with complexing properties. Simple poly(amino acids)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roque, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    The free amino (0.3 equiv/residue) and carboxyl (0.5 equiv/residue) groups of thermal polylysine increased dramatically on treatment with distilled water. The total hydrolysis of such a polymer was abnormal in that only about 50% of the expected amino acids were recovered. Poly (lysine-co-alanine-co-glycine) under usual conditions hydrolyzed completely in 8 hours; whereas, when it was pretreated with diazomethane, a normal period of 24 hours was required to give (nearly) the same amounts of each free amino acid as compared with those obtained from the untreated polymer. The amino groups of the basic thermal poly(amino acids) were sterically hindered. The existence of nitrogen atoms linking two or three chains and reactive groups (anhydride, imine) were proposed.

  16. Rag GTPase in amino acid signaling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joungmok; Kim, Eunjung

    2016-04-01

    Rag small GTPases were identified as the sixth subfamily of Ras-related GTPases. Compelling evidence suggests that Rag heterodimer (RagA/B and RagC/D) plays an important role in amino acid signaling toward mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), which is a central player in the control of cell growth in response to a variety of environmental cues, including growth factors, cellular energy/oxygen status, and amino acids. Upon amino acid stimulation, active Rag heterodimer (RagA/B(GTP)-RagC/D(GDP)) recruits mTORC1 to the lysosomal membrane where Rheb resides. In this review, we provide a current understanding on the amino acid-regulated cell growth control via Rag-mTORC1 with recently identified key players, including Ragulator, v-ATPase, and GATOR complexes. Moreover, the functions of Rag in physiological systems and in autophagy are discussed. PMID:26781224

  17. Amino Acid Biosynthesis Pathways in Diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Bromke, Mariusz A.

    2013-01-01

    Amino acids are not only building blocks for proteins but serve as precursors for the synthesis of many metabolites with multiple functions in growth and other biological processes of a living organism. The biosynthesis of amino acids is tightly connected with central carbon, nitrogen and sulfur metabolism. Recent publication of genome sequences for two diatoms Thalassiosira pseudonana and Phaeodactylum tricornutum created an opportunity for extensive studies on the structure of these metabolic pathways. Based on sequence homology found in the analyzed diatomal genes, the biosynthesis of amino acids in diatoms seems to be similar to higher plants. However, one of the most striking differences between the pathways in plants and in diatomas is that the latter possess and utilize the urea cycle. It serves as an important anaplerotic pathway for carbon fixation into amino acids and other N-containing compounds, which are essential for diatom growth and contribute to their high productivity. PMID:24957993

  18. Essential amino acids are primarily responsible for the amino acid stimulation of muscle protein anabolism in healthy elderly adults

    PubMed Central

    Volpi, Elena; Kobayashi, Hisamine; Sheffield-Moore, Melinda; Mittendorfer, Bettina; Wolfe, Robert R

    2011-01-01

    Background Nutritional supplementation may be used to treat muscle loss with aging (sarcopenia). However, if physical activity does not increase, the elderly tend to compensate for the increased energy delivered by the supplements with reduced food intake, which results in a calorie substitution rather than supplementation. Thus, an effective supplement should stimulate muscle anabolism more efficiently than food or common protein supplements. We have shown that balanced amino acids stimulate muscle protein anabolism in the elderly, but it is unknown whether all amino acids are necessary to achieve this effect. Objective We assessed whether nonessential amino acids are required in a nutritional supplement to stimulate muscle protein anabolism in the elderly. Design We compared the response of muscle protein metabolism to either 18 g essential amino acids (EAA group: n = 6, age 69 ± 2 y; x̄ ± SD) or 40 g balanced amino acids (18 g essential amino acids + 22 g nonessential amino acids, BAA group; n = 8, age 71 ± 2 y) given orally in small boluses every 10 min for 3 h to healthy elderly volunteers. Muscle protein metabolism was measured in the basal state and during amino acid administration via l-[ring-2H5]phenylalanine infusion, femoral arterial and venous catheterization, and muscle biopsies. Results Phenylalanine net balance (in nmol · min−1 · 100 mL leg volume−1) increased from the basal state (P < 0.01), with no differences between groups (BAA: from −16 ± 5 to 16 ± 4; EAA: from −18 ± 5 to 14 ± 13) because of an increase (P < 0.01) in muscle protein synthesis and no change in breakdown. Conclusion Essential amino acids are primarily responsible for the amino acid–induced stimulation of muscle protein anabolism in the elderly. PMID:12885705

  19. Genetically encoded fluorescent coumarin amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jiangyun; Xie, Jianming; Schultz, Peter G.

    2012-06-05

    The invention relates to orthogonal pairs of tRNAs and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases that can incorporate the coumarin unnatural amino acid L-(7-hydroxycoumarin-4-yl)ethylglycine into proteins produced in eubacterial host cells such as E. coli. The invention provides, for example but not limited to, novel orthogonal synthetases, methods for identifying and making the novel synthetases, methods for producing proteins containing the unnatural amino acid L-(7-hydroxycoumarin-4-yl)ethylglycine and related translation systems.

  20. Genetically encoded fluorescent coumarin amino acids

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jiangyun (San Diego, CA); Xie, Jianming (San Diego, CA); Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA)

    2010-10-05

    The invention relates to orthogonal pairs of tRNAs and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases that can incorporate the coumarin unnatural amino acid L-(7-hydroxycoumarin-4-yl) ethylglycine into proteins produced in eubacterial host cells such as E. coli. The invention provides, for example but not limited to, novel orthogonal synthetases, methods for identifying and making the novel synthetases, methods for producing proteins containing the unnatural amino acid L-(7-hydroxycoumarin-4-yl)ethylglycine and related translation systems.

  1. Amino Acid Patterns around Disulfide Bonds

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Jos R. F.; da Fonseca, Rute R.; Drury, Brett; Melo, Andr

    2010-01-01

    Disulfide bonds provide an inexhaustible source of information on molecular evolution and biological specificity. In this work, we described the amino acid composition around disulfide bonds in a set of disulfide-rich proteins using appropriate descriptors, based on ANOVA (for all twenty natural amino acids or classes of amino acids clustered according to their chemical similarities) and Scheff (for the disulfide-rich proteins superfamilies) statistics. We found that weakly hydrophilic and aromatic amino acids are quite abundant in the regions around disulfide bonds, contrary to aliphatic and hydrophobic amino acids. The density distributions (as a function of the distance to the center of the disulfide bonds) for all defined entities presented an overall unimodal behavior: the densities are null at short distances, have maxima at intermediate distances and decrease for long distances. In the end, the amino acid environment around the disulfide bonds was found to be different for different superfamilies, allowing the clustering of proteins in a biologically relevant way, suggesting that this type of chemical information might be used as a tool to assess the relationship between very divergent sets of disulfide-rich proteins. PMID:21151463

  2. Free amino acids in spider hemolymph.

    PubMed

    Tillinghast, Edward K; Townley, Mark A

    2008-11-01

    We examined the free amino acid composition of hemolymph from representatives of five spider families with an interest in knowing if the amino acid profile in the hemolymph of orb-web-building spiders reflects the high demands for small organic compounds in the sticky droplets of their webs. In nearly all analyses, on both orb and non-orb builders, glutamine was the most abundant free amino acid. Glycine, taurine, proline, histidine, and alanine also tended to be well-represented in orb and non-orb builders. While indications of taxon-specific differences in amino acid composition were observed, it was not apparent that two presumptive precursors (glutamine, taurine) of orb web sticky droplet compounds were uniquely enriched in araneids (orb builders). However, total amino acid concentrations were invariably highest in the araneids and especially so in overwintering juveniles, even as several of the essential amino acids declined during this winter diapause. Comparing the data from this study with those from earlier studies revealed a number of discrepancies. The possible origins of these differences are discussed. PMID:18692589

  3. The mitochondrial sulfur dioxygenase ETHYLMALONIC ENCEPHALOPATHY PROTEIN1 is required for amino acid catabolism during carbohydrate starvation and embryo development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Krel, Lena; Junemann, Johannes; Wirtz, Markus; Birke, Hannah; Thornton, Jeremy D; Browning, Luke W; Poschet, Gernot; Hell, Rdiger; Balk, Janneke; Braun, Hans-Peter; Hildebrandt, Tatjana M

    2014-05-01

    The sulfur dioxygenase ETHYLMALONIC ENCEPHALOPATHY PROTEIN1 (ETHE1) catalyzes the oxidation of persulfides in the mitochondrial matrix and is essential for early embryo development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We investigated the biochemical and physiological functions of ETHE1 in plant metabolism using recombinant Arabidopsis ETHE1 and three transfer DNA insertion lines with 50% to 99% decreased sulfur dioxygenase activity. Our results identified a new mitochondrial pathway catalyzing the detoxification of reduced sulfur species derived from cysteine catabolism by oxidation to thiosulfate. Knockdown of the sulfur dioxygenase impaired embryo development and produced phenotypes of starvation-induced chlorosis during short-day growth conditions and extended darkness, indicating that ETHE1 has a key function in situations of high protein turnover, such as seed production and the use of amino acids as alternative respiratory substrates during carbohydrate starvation. The amino acid profile of mutant plants was similar to that caused by defects in the electron-transfer flavoprotein/electron-transfer flavoprotein:ubiquinone oxidoreductase complex and associated dehydrogenases. Thus, in addition to sulfur amino acid catabolism, ETHE1 also affects the oxidation of branched-chain amino acids and lysine. PMID:24692429

  4. Conserved amino acid motifs from the novel Piv/MooV family of transposases and site-specific recombinases are required for catalysis of DNA inversion by Piv.

    PubMed

    Tobiason, D M; Buchner, J M; Thiel, W H; Gernert, K M; Karls, A C

    2001-02-01

    Piv, a site-specific invertase from Moraxella lacunata, exhibits amino acid homology with the transposases of the IS110/IS492 family of insertion elements. The functions of conserved amino acid motifs that define this novel family of both transposases and site-specific recombinases (Piv/MooV family) were examined by mutagenesis of fully conserved amino acids within each motif in Piv. All Piv mutants altered in conserved residues were defective for in vivo inversion of the M. lacunata invertible DNA segment, but competent for in vivo binding to Piv DNA recognition sequences. Although the primary amino acid sequences of the Piv/MooV recombinases do not contain a conserved DDE motif, which defines the retroviral integrase/transposase (IN/Tnps) family, the predicted secondary structural elements of Piv align well with those of the IN/Tnps for which crystal structures have been determined. Molecular modelling of Piv based on these alignments predicts that E59, conserved as either E or D in the Piv/MooV family, forms a catalytic pocket with the conserved D9 and D101 residues. Analysis of Piv E59G confirms a role for E59 in catalysis of inversion. These results suggest that Piv and the related IS110/IS492 transposases mediate DNA recombination by a common mechanism involving a catalytic DED or DDD motif. PMID:11169105

  5. The Mitochondrial Sulfur Dioxygenase ETHYLMALONIC ENCEPHALOPATHY PROTEIN1 Is Required for Amino Acid Catabolism during Carbohydrate Starvation and Embryo Development in Arabidopsis1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Krüßel, Lena; Junemann, Johannes; Wirtz, Markus; Birke, Hannah; Thornton, Jeremy D.; Browning, Luke W.; Poschet, Gernot; Hell, Rüdiger; Balk, Janneke; Braun, Hans-Peter; Hildebrandt, Tatjana M.

    2014-01-01

    The sulfur dioxygenase ETHYLMALONIC ENCEPHALOPATHY PROTEIN1 (ETHE1) catalyzes the oxidation of persulfides in the mitochondrial matrix and is essential for early embryo development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We investigated the biochemical and physiological functions of ETHE1 in plant metabolism using recombinant Arabidopsis ETHE1 and three transfer DNA insertion lines with 50% to 99% decreased sulfur dioxygenase activity. Our results identified a new mitochondrial pathway catalyzing the detoxification of reduced sulfur species derived from cysteine catabolism by oxidation to thiosulfate. Knockdown of the sulfur dioxygenase impaired embryo development and produced phenotypes of starvation-induced chlorosis during short-day growth conditions and extended darkness, indicating that ETHE1 has a key function in situations of high protein turnover, such as seed production and the use of amino acids as alternative respiratory substrates during carbohydrate starvation. The amino acid profile of mutant plants was similar to that caused by defects in the electron-transfer flavoprotein/electron-transfer flavoprotein:ubiquinone oxidoreductase complex and associated dehydrogenases. Thus, in addition to sulfur amino acid catabolism, ETHE1 also affects the oxidation of branched-chain amino acids and lysine. PMID:24692429

  6. Evaluating lysine requirements of nursery pigs fed low protein diets with different sources of nonessential amino acids.

    PubMed

    Jones, C K; Tokach, M D; Usry, J L; Neill, C R; Patience, J F

    2014-08-01

    The Lys requirement of nursery pigs may be dependent on the source of nonessential AA (NEAA) nitrogen or the source of Lys itself. However, little peer-reviewed data examines these phenomena. The objectives of these experiments were to determine if the Lys requirement of pigs is altered when 1) low protein diets are supplemented with different sources of NEAA nitrogen or 2) Lys is supplied as a crystalline source instead of intact protein such as soybean meal (SBM). Two 14-d experiments were conducted using 450 (Exp. 1) and 540 (Exp. 2) pigs (PIC C22/C29 337). There were 10 treatments in each experiment, each aligned as a 2 5 factorial. In Exp. 1, there were 2 sources of NEAA (l-Gln + l-Gly or l-Gly + l-Ala + l-Pro + l-His) and 5 levels of Lys (1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, and 1.6%). In Exp. 2, there were 2 sources of proteins providing additional Lys (l-Lys HCl or SBM) and the same 5 levels of Lys. Following weaning at 18 to 22 d of age, pigs were fed a common starter diet for 5 d postweaning followed by a 14-d treatment period. Pigs were weighed and feed disappearance determined on d 0, 7, and 14 of the experiment. Data were analyzed using the MIXED and NLIN procedures of SAS (SAS Inst., Cary, NC). In Exp. 1, increasing CP and Lys resulted in a quadratic increase (P < 0.05) in ADG and a linear improvement (P < 0.05) in G:F during the 14-d treatment period. Breakpoint regression analyses revealed that optimum ADG was obtained at 1.36% Lys, while optimum G:F was obtained at 1.45% Lys. The source of NEAA did not affect (P > 0.10) growth performance during the treatment period. In Exp. 2, both ADG and G:F increased linearly (P < 0.05) with increasing Lys. Optimal ADG was obtained at 1.47% Lys, but the breakpoint for optimum G:F was above tested levels. Source of Lys did not affect (P > 0.10) ADG, but pigs fed additional Lys from crystalline sources had improved (P < 0.05) G:F than those fed additional Lys from intact protein at 1.50% Lys; however, the analyzed Lys values at this level differ. Overall, these data show that the standardized ileal digestibility Lys requirement of pigs is not altered when low protein diets are supplemented with different sources of NEAA nitrogen. Feed efficiency appears to be maximized when additional Lys is supplied by l-Lys HCl instead of SBM, but more research is needed to confirm this phenomenon. PMID:25074452

  7. Amino Acid Substitutions at Ambler Position Gly238 in the SHV-1 ?-Lactamase: Exploring Sequence Requirements for Resistance to Penicillins and Cephalosporins

    PubMed Central

    Hujer, Andrea M.; Hujer, Kristine M.; Helfand, Marion S.; Anderson, Vernon E.; Bonomo, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    Site saturation mutagenesis of the 238 position in the SHV ?-lactamase was performed to identify the complete sequence requirements needed for the extended spectrum ?-lactamase (ESBL) phenotype. MICs (in micrograms per milliliter) in an isogenic background, Escherichia coli DH10B, demonstrated that the Gly238Ala mutation conferred the most resistance to penicillins and cephalosporins. The absolute increase in resistance was greatest against cefotaxime for the Gly238Ala mutant (0.06 to 8 ?g/ml). Except for the strain possessing the Gly238Pro ?-lactamase, ceftazidime MICs were also elevated. None of the mutant SHV ?-lactamases were expressed in as great an amount as the wild-type ?-lactamase. Kinetic analysis of the Gly238Ala mutant revealed that penicillin and cephalosporin substrates have a lower Km for the enzyme because of this mutation. Ampicillin and piperacillin MICs were inversely proportional to the side chain volume of the amino acid in cases larger than Ser, suggesting that steric considerations may be a primary requirement for penicillin resistance. Secondary structural effects explain increased resistance to oxyiminocephalosporins. Based upon this study, we anticipate that additional mutations of Gly238 in the SHV ?-lactamase will continue to be discovered with an ESBL (ceftazidime or cefotaxime resistant) phenotype. PMID:12435703

  8. Structural and mutational analysis of archaeal ATP-dependent RNA ligase identifies amino acids required for RNA binding and catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Huiqiong; Yoshinari, Shigeo; Ghosh, Raka; Ignatochkina, Anna V.; Gollnick, Paul D.; Murakami, Katsuhiko S.; Ho, C. Kiong

    2016-01-01

    An ATP-dependent RNA ligase from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum (MthRnl) catalyzes intramolecular ligation of single-stranded RNA to form a closed circular RNA via covalent ligase-AMP and RNA-adenylylate intermediate. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structures of an MthRnl•ATP complex as well as the covalent MthRnl–AMP intermediate. We also performed structure-guided mutational analysis to survey the functions of 36 residues in three component steps of the ligation pathway including ligase-adenylylation (step 1), RNA adenylylation (step 2) and phosphodiester bond synthesis (step 3). Kinetic analysis underscored the importance of motif 1a loop structure in promoting phosphodiester bond synthesis. Alanine substitutions of Thr117 or Arg118 favor the reverse step 2 reaction to deadenylate the 5′-AMP from the RNA-adenylate, thereby inhibiting step 3 reaction. Tyr159, Phe281 and Glu285, which are conserved among archaeal ATP-dependent RNA ligases and are situated on the surface of the enzyme, are required for RNA binding. We propose an RNA binding interface of the MthRnl based on the mutational studies and two sulfate ions that co-crystallized at the active site cleft in the MthRnl–AMP complex. PMID:26896806

  9. Structural and mutational analysis of archaeal ATP-dependent RNA ligase identifies amino acids required for RNA binding and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Gu, Huiqiong; Yoshinari, Shigeo; Ghosh, Raka; Ignatochkina, Anna V; Gollnick, Paul D; Murakami, Katsuhiko S; Ho, C Kiong

    2016-03-18

    An ATP-dependent RNA ligase from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum (MthRnl) catalyzes intramolecular ligation of single-stranded RNA to form a closed circular RNA via covalent ligase-AMP and RNA-adenylylate intermediate. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structures of an MthRnl•ATP complex as well as the covalent MthRnl-AMP intermediate. We also performed structure-guided mutational analysis to survey the functions of 36 residues in three component steps of the ligation pathway including ligase-adenylylation (step 1), RNA adenylylation (step 2) and phosphodiester bond synthesis (step 3). Kinetic analysis underscored the importance of motif 1a loop structure in promoting phosphodiester bond synthesis. Alanine substitutions of Thr117 or Arg118 favor the reverse step 2 reaction to deadenylate the 5'-AMP from the RNA-adenylate, thereby inhibiting step 3 reaction. Tyr159, Phe281 and Glu285, which are conserved among archaeal ATP-dependent RNA ligases and are situated on the surface of the enzyme, are required for RNA binding. We propose an RNA binding interface of the MthRnl based on the mutational studies and two sulfate ions that co-crystallized at the active site cleft in the MthRnl-AMP complex. PMID:26896806

  10. 40 CFR 721.10126 - Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkyl amino substituted triazine...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10126 - Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkyl amino substituted triazine...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10126 - Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkyl amino substituted triazine...

  13. Branched chain amino acid uptake and muscle free amino acid concentrations predict postoperative muscle nitrogen balance.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D J; Jiang, Z M; Colpoys, M; Kapadia, C R; Smith, R J; Wilmore, D W

    1986-11-01

    Amino acid solutions rich in branched chain amino acids (BCAA) are commonly utilized both clinically and in experimental protocols in an attempt to reduce skeletal muscle and whole body protein catabolism. To investigate the effectiveness of BCAA infusion, amino acid formulas containing varying concentrations of BCAA were given during operation in this study to three groups of dogs undergoing a standard laparotomy and retroperitoneal dissection. A fourth group was given saline alone. With the use of previously described hindquarter flux techniques, individual and total amino acid nitrogen exchange rates were measured and utilized in estimating skeletal muscle protein catabolism. Intracellular free amino acid concentrations were measured in percutaneous muscle biopsy samples. Although there was no relationship with the rate of BCAA infusion, there was a significant correlation between the rate of BCAA uptake by muscle and diminished total nitrogen release from hindquarter skeletal muscle after operation. There was also a significant relationship between muscle nitrogen balance and the postoperative change in the muscle concentration of either total amino acids or the single amino acid glutamine. When combined in a single equation, BCAA uptake and the change in muscle free amino acid concentration predict skeletal muscle nitrogen release with an r = 0.86. Thus, the rate of BCAA uptake and the free glutamine or total amino acid concentration in muscle appear to be independent predictors of muscle nitrogen balance. The nitrogen-sparing effect of BCAA in skeletal muscle is unrelated to infusion concentration or rate of infusion. PMID:3767484

  14. Amino acids derived from Titan Tholins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khare, Bishun N.; Sagan, Carl; Ogino, Hiroshi; Nagy, Bartholomew; Er, Cevat; Schram, Karl H.; Arakawa, Edward T.

    1986-10-01

    An organic heteropolymer(Titan tholin) was produced by continuous dc discharge through a 0.9 N 2/0.1 CH 4 gas mixture at 0.2 mbar pressure, roughly simulating the cloudtop atmosphere of Titan. Treatment of this tholin with 6 N HCI yielded 16 amino acids by gas chromatography after derivazation to N-trifluroacetyl isopropyl esters on two different capillary columns. Identifications were confirmed by GC/MS. Glycine, aspartic acid, and ?- and ?-alanine were produced in greatest abundance; the total yield of amino acids was 10 -2, approximately equal to the yield of urea. The presence of "nonbiological" amino acids, the absence of serine, and the fact that the amino acids are racemic within experimental error together indicate that these molecules are not due to microbial or other contamination, but are derived from the tholin. In addition to the HCN, HC 2CN, and (CN) 2 found by Voyager, nitriles and aminonitriles should be sought in the Titanian atmosphere and, eventually, amino acids on the surface. These results suggest that episodes of liquid water in the past or future of Titan might lead to major further steps in prebiological organic chemistry on that body.

  15. Amino acid survival in large cometary impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierazzo, E.; Chyba, C. F.

    1999-11-01

    A significant fraction of the Earth's prebiotic volatile inventory may have been delivered by asteroidal and cometary impacts during the period of heavy bombardment. The realization that comets are particularly rich in organic material seemed to strengthen this suggestion. Previous modeling studies, however, indicated that most organics would be entirely destroyed in large comet and asteroid impacts. The availability of new kinetic parameters for the thermal degradation of amino acids in the solid phase made it possible to readdress this question. We present the results of new high-resolution hydrocode simulations of asteroid and comet impact coupled with recent experimental data for amino acid pyrolysis in the solid phase. Differences due to impact velocity as well as projectile material have been investigated. Effects of angle of impacts were also addressed. The results suggest that some amino acids would survive the shock heating of large (kilometer-radius) cometary impacts. At the time of the origins of life on Earth, the steady-state oceanic concentration of certain amino acids (like aspartic and glutamic acid) delivered by comets could have equaled or substantially exceeded that due to Miller-Urey synthesis in a carbon dioxide-rich atmosphere. Furthermore, in the unlikely case of a grazing impact (impact angle around 5 degrees from the horizontal) an amount of some amino acids comparable to that due to the background steady-state production or delivery would be delivered to the early Earth.

  16. Amino acids in modern and fossil woods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, C.; Bada, J. L.; Peterson, E.

    1976-01-01

    The amino acid composition and the extent of racemization in several modern and fossil woods are reported. The method of analysis is described, and data are presented on the total amino acid concentration, the amino acid ratios, and the enantiomeric ratios in each sample. It is found that the amino acid concentration per gram of dry wood decreases with age of the sample, that the extent of racemization increases with increasing age, and that the amounts of aspartic acid, threonine, and serine decrease relative to valine with increasing age. The relative racemization rates of amino acids in wood, bone, and aqueous solution are compared, and it is shown that racemization in wood is much slower than in bone or aqueous solution. Racemization results for woods from the Kalambo Falls area of Zambia are used to calculate a minimum age of 110,000 years for the transition between the Sangoan and Acheulian industries at that site. This result is shown to be consistent with numerous radiometric dates for older Acheulian sites in Africa and to compare well with geologically inferred dates for the beginning of the Eemian and the end of the Acheulian industry in southern Africa.

  17. Amino acids derived from Titan tholins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, B. N.; Sagan, C.; Ogino, H.; Nagy, B.; Er, C.; Schram, K. H.; Arakawa, E. T.

    1986-01-01

    An organic heteropolymer (Titan tholin) was produced by continuous dc discharge through a 0.9 N2/0.1 CH4 gas mixture at 0.2 mbar pressure, roughly simulating the cloudtop atmosphere of Titan. Treatment of this tholin with 6N HCl yielded 16 amino acids by gas chromatography after derivatization of N-trifluroacetyl isopropyl esters on two different capillary columns. Identifications were confirmed by GC/MS. Glycine, aspartic acid, and alpha- and beta-alanine were produced in greatest abundance; the total yield of amino acids was approximately 10(-2), approximately equal to the yield of urea. The presence of "nonbiological" amino acids, the absence of serine, and the fact that the amino acids are racemic within experimental error together indicate that these molecules are not due to microbial or other contamination, but are derived from the tholin. In addition to the HCN, HC2CN, and (CN)2 found by Voyager, nitriles and aminonitriles should be sought in the Titanian atmosphere and, eventually, amino acids on the surface. These results suggest that episodes of liquid water in the past or future of Titan might lead to major further steps in prebiological organic chemistry on that body.

  18. Genetic incorporation of recycled unnatural amino acids.

    PubMed

    Ko, Wooseok; Kim, Sanggil; Jo, Kyubong; Lee, Hyun Soo

    2016-02-01

    The genetic incorporation of unnatural amino acids (UAAs) into proteins has been a useful tool for protein engineering. However, most UAAs are expensive, and the method requires a high concentration of UAAs, which has been a drawback of the technology, especially for large-scale applications. To address this problem, a method to recycle cultured UAAs was developed. The method is based on recycling a culture medium containing the UAA, in which some of essential nutrients were resupplemented after each culture cycle, and induction of protein expression was controlled with glucose. Under optimal conditions, five UAAs were recycled for up to seven rounds of expression without a decrease in expression level, cell density, or incorporation fidelity. This method can generally be applied to other UAAs; therefore, it is useful for reducing the cost of UAAs for genetic incorporation and helpful for expanding the use of the technology to industrial applications. PMID:26358464

  19. Amino acids in the Yamato carbonaceous chrondrite from Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimoyama, A.; Ponnamperuma, C.; Yanai, K.

    1979-01-01

    Evidence for the presence of amino acids of extraterrestrial origin in the Antarctic Yamato carbonaceous chrondrite is presented. Hydrolyzed and nonhydrolyzed water-extracted amino acid samples from exterior, middle and interior portions of the meteorite were analyzed by an amino acid analyzer and by gas chromatography of N-TFA-isopropyl amino acid derivatives. Nine protein and six nonprotein amino acids were detected in the meteorite at abundances between 34 and less than one nmole/g, with equal amounts in interior and exterior portions. Nearly equal abundances of the D and L enantiomers of alanine, aspartic acid and glutamic acid were found, indicating the abiotic, therefore extraterrestrial, origin of the amino acids. The Antarctic environment and the uniformity of protein amino acid abundances are discussed as evidence against the racemization of terrestrially acquired amino acids, and similarities between Yamato amino acid compositions and the amino acid compositions of the Murchison and Murray type II carbonaceous chrondrites are indicated.

  20. Amino acid isotopic analysis in agricultural systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A relatively new approach to stable isotopic analysisreferred to as compound-specific isotopic analysis (CSIA)has emerged, centering on the measurement of 15N:14N ratios in amino acids (glutamic acid and phenylalanine). CSIA has recently been used to generate trophic position estimates among anima...

  1. Experimental peripheral neuropathy decreases the dose of substance P required to increase excitatory amino acid release in the CSF of the rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Skilling, S R; Harkness, D H; Larson, A A

    1992-05-11

    Partial ligation of the sciatic nerve of rats produces hyperalgesia similar to that seen in humans following nerve injury. In this study, we used microdialysis of the spinal cord cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) to test the hypothesis that hyperalgesia is due to an enhanced release of excitatory amino acids (EAA) in response to substance P (SP). Intrathecal SP caused release of aspartate and glutamate in the CSF of rats with partial sciatic ligation at a dose of SP that did not cause release in sham operated animals. Neonatal capsaicin pretreatment blocked SP-induced EAA release in both sham and sciatic ligated animals. Release of EAAs in ligated animals was not significantly different from release in sham-operated animals following higher doses of SP or chemical nociceptive stimulation. These results demonstrate a partial sciatic ligation-induced decrease in the dose of SP required to initiate EAA release in the CSF of the spinal cord, a change which could play an important role in hyperalgesia. PMID:1383886

  2. Dissociation of Paramyxovirus Interferon Evasion Activities: Universal and Virus-Specific Requirements for Conserved V Protein Amino Acids in MDA5 Interference ?

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Aparna; Horvath, Curt M.

    2010-01-01

    The V protein of the paramyxovirus subfamily Paramyxovirinae is an important virulence factor that can interfere with host innate immunity by inactivating the cytosolic pathogen recognition receptor MDA5. This interference is a result of a protein-protein interaction between the highly conserved carboxyl-terminal domain of the V protein and the helicase domain of MDA5. The V protein C-terminal domain (CTD) is an evolutionarily conserved 49- to 68-amino-acid region that coordinates two zinc atoms per protein chain. Site-directed mutagenesis of conserved residues in the V protein CTD has revealed both universal and virus-specific requirements for zinc coordination in MDA5 engagement and has also identified other conserved residues as critical for MDA5 interaction and interference. Mutation of these residues produces V proteins that are specifically defective for MDA5 interference and not impaired in targeting STAT1 for proteasomal degradation via the VDC ubiquitin ligase complex. Results demonstrate that mutation of conserved charged residues in the V proteins of Nipah virus, measles virus, and mumps virus also abolishes MDA5 interaction. These findings clearly define molecular determinants for MDA5 inhibition by the paramyxovirus V proteins. PMID:20719949

  3. Amino acids substitutions in ?1 and ?1 outer capsid proteins of a Vero cell-adapted mammalian orthoreovirus are required for optimal virus binding and disassembly.

    PubMed

    Sandekian, Vronique; Lemay, Guy

    2015-01-22

    In a recent study, the serotype 3 Dearing strain of mammalian orthoreovirus was adapted to Vero cells; cells that exhibit a limited ability to support the early steps of reovirus uncoating and are unable to produce interferon as an antiviral response upon infection. The Vero cell-adapted virus (VeroAV) exhibits amino acids substitutions in both the ?1 and ?1 outer capsid proteins but no changes in the ?3 protein. Accordingly, the virus was shown not to behave as a classical uncoating mutant. In the present study, an increased ability of the virus to bind at the Vero cell surface was observed and is likely associated with an increased ability to bind onto cell-surface sialic acid residues. In addition, the kinetics of ?1 disassembly from the virions appears to be altered. The plasmid-based reverse genetics approach confirmed the importance of ?1 amino acids substitutions in VeroAV's ability to efficiently infect Vero cells, although ?1 co-adaptation appears necessary to optimize viral infection. This approach of combining in vitro selection of reoviruses with reverse genetics to identify pertinent amino acids substitutions appears promising in the context of eventual reovirus modification to increase its potential as an oncolytic virus. PMID:25445342

  4. Detection of non-protein amino acids in the presence of protein amino acids. II.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapshak, P.; Okaji, M.

    1972-01-01

    Studies conducted with the JEOL 5AH amino acid analyzer are described. This instrument makes possible the programming of the chromatographic process. Data are presented showing the separations of seventeen non-protein amino acids in the presence of eighteen protein amino acids. It is pointed out that distinct separations could be obtained in the case of a number of chemically similar compounds, such as ornithine and lysine, N-amidino alanine and arginine, and iminodiacetic acid and S-carboxymethyl cysteine and aspartic acid.

  5. Amino Acids Profiles in Biological Media

    SciTech Connect

    Iordache, A.; Horj, E.; Morar, S.; Cozar, O.; Culea, M.; Ani, A. R.; Mesaros, C.

    2010-08-04

    An accurate analytical method was developed to determine amino acids in some biological specimens by GC/MS technique. Stable isotopes provide useful tools for a variety of studies, offering ideal internal standards in quantitative information. Isotopic dilution gas chromatography--mass spectrometry (ID-GC/MS) is the techniques used for quantitative analysis of compounds labeled with stable isotopes. A Trace DSQ Thermo Finnigan quadrupole mass spectrometer coupled with a Trace GC was used. Amino acids were separated on a Rtx-5 MS capillary column, 30 mx0.25 mm, 0.25 {mu}m film thickness, using a temperature program from 50 deg. C, 1 min, 6 deg. C/min at 100 deg. C, 4 deg. C/min at 200 deg. C, 20 deg. C/min at 300 deg. C, (3 min). The transfer line temperature was 250 deg. C, the injector temperature 200 deg. C and ion source temperature 250 deg. C; splitter: 10:1. Electron energy was 70 eV and emission current, 100 {mu}A. The amino acids were purified on a Dowex 50W-W8 exchange resin and were derivatized in a procedure following two steps to obtain trifluoroacetyl butyl esters. The identification of amino acids was obtained by using NIST library but also by using amino acid standards.

  6. Distinguishing Proteins From Arbitrary Amino Acid Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Stephen S.-T.; Mao, Wei-Guang; Benson, Max; He, Rong Lucy

    2015-01-01

    What kinds of amino acid sequences could possibly be protein sequences? From all existing databases that we can find, known proteins are only a small fraction of all possible combinations of amino acids. Beginning with Sanger's first detailed determination of a protein sequence in 1952, previous studies have focused on describing the structure of existing protein sequences in order to construct the protein universe. No one, however, has developed a criteria for determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Here we show that when the collection of arbitrary amino acid sequences is viewed in an appropriate geometric context, the protein sequences cluster together. This leads to a new computational test, described here, that has proved to be remarkably accurate at determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Even more, if the results of this test indicate that the sequence can be a protein, and it is indeed a protein sequence, then its identity as a protein sequence is uniquely defined. We anticipate our computational test will be useful for those who are attempting to complete the job of discovering all proteins, or constructing the protein universe. PMID:25609314

  7. Amino acid uptake in rust fungi

    PubMed Central

    Struck, Christine

    2015-01-01

    The plant pathogenic rust fungi colonize leaf tissue and feed off their host plants without killing them. Certain economically important species of different genera such as Melampsora, Phakopsora, Puccinia, or Uromyces are extensively studied for resolving the mechanisms of the obligate biotrophy. As obligate parasites rust fungi only can complete their life cycle on living hosts where they grow through the leaf tissue by developing an extended network of intercellular hyphae from which intracellular haustoria are differentiated. Haustoria are involved in key functions of the obligate biotrophic lifestyle: suppressing host defense responses and acquiring nutrients. This review provides a survey of rust fungi nitrogen nutrition with special emphasis on amino acid uptake. A variety of sequences of amino acid transporter genes of rust fungi have been published; however, transport activity of only three in planta highly up-regulated amino acid permeases have been characterized. Functional and immunohistochemical investigations have shown the specificity and localization of these transporters. Sequence data of various genome projects allowed identification of numerous rust amino acid transporter genes. An in silico analysis reveals that these genes can be classified into different transporter families. In addition, genetic and molecular data of amino acid transporters have provided new insights in the corresponding metabolic pathways. PMID:25699068

  8. Amino Acid Correlation Functions in Protein Structures.

    PubMed

    Krinik, Klemen; Urbic, Tomaz

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the spatial folding of proteins from their amino acid sequences has an enormous potential in contemporary life sciences. The ability to predict secondary and tertiary structures from primary ones through the use of computers will enable a much faster and more efficient discovery of organic substances with therapeutic or otherwise bioactive potential, largely eliminating the need for synthesis and testing of large numbers of organic substances for physiological effects. Our manuscript presents an application of correlation function analysis, usually used to describe properties of liquids, to protein structures in order to elucidate statistically favored distances among amino acids. Pairwise distribution functions were calculated between C-alpha atoms of 20 amino acids in a large ensemble of Protein Data Bank structures. The correlation functions show characteristic distances in amino acid interactions. Different propensities for forming various secondary structure elements among all 210 possible amino acid pairs have been visualized and some have been interpreted. Notably, we found helices to be surprisingly common among certain pairs. PMID:26454591

  9. Control of the translational machinery by amino acids.

    PubMed

    Proud, Christopher G

    2014-01-01

    Amino acids are the precursors for the synthesis of proteins. In humans, approximately half of the 20 different amino acids are essential, ie, must be obtained from the diet. Cells must therefore take account of amino acid availability to achieve sustainable rates of protein synthesis. One of the major mechanisms involved in this is signaling through a complex of proteins termed mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTORC) 1, which is activated by amino acids. In turn, mTORC1 regulates the production of ribosomes, the molecular machines that make proteins, and the activity of other cellular components required for protein synthesis. mTORC1 signaling promotes the transcription of the genes for ribosomal RNAs and many other components involved in ribosome production. It also positively regulates the translation of the messenger RNAs (mRNAs) for ribosomal proteins. Indeed, recent studies have shown that mammalian target of rapamycin signaling drives the translation of mRNAs for many anabolic enzymes and other proteins involved in diverse cellular functions. The translational machinery is also regulated by the absence of amino acids through the protein kinase GCN2 (general control nonrepressed 2), which phosphorylates and in end-effect inhibits the translation initiation factor eIF2 (eukaryotic initiation factor 2). This process shuts down general protein synthesis to conserve amino acids. PMID:24284441

  10. Computational Protein Design Quantifies Structural Constraints on Amino Acid Covariation

    PubMed Central

    Ollikainen, Noah; Kortemme, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    Amino acid covariation, where the identities of amino acids at different sequence positions are correlated, is a hallmark of naturally occurring proteins. This covariation can arise from multiple factors, including selective pressures for maintaining protein structure, requirements imposed by a specific function, or from phylogenetic sampling bias. Here we employed flexible backbone computational protein design to quantify the extent to which protein structure has constrained amino acid covariation for 40 diverse protein domains. We find significant similarities between the amino acid covariation in alignments of natural protein sequences and sequences optimized for their structures by computational protein design methods. These results indicate that the structural constraints imposed by protein architecture play a dominant role in shaping amino acid covariation and that computational protein design methods can capture these effects. We also find that the similarity between natural and designed covariation is sensitive to the magnitude and mechanism of backbone flexibility used in computational protein design. Our results thus highlight the necessity of including backbone flexibility to correctly model precise details of correlated amino acid changes and give insights into the pressures underlying these correlations. PMID:24244128

  11. Role of specific dietary amino acids in clinical conditions

    PubMed Central

    Jonker, Renate; Engelen, Marille P. K. J.; Deutz, Nicolaas E. P.

    2016-01-01

    In a variety of chronic and acute disease states, alterations in protein synthesis, breakdown and protein turnover rates occur that are related to the loss of body protein and skeletal muscle wasting. A key observation is the stimulation of protein breakdown in muscle and the stimulation of protein synthesis in the splanchnic area; mainly liver. An altered splanchnic extraction of amino acids as well as an anabolic resistance to dietary protein, related to stress, disuse and aging play a key role in the pathogenesis of muscle wasting in these conditions. To overcome these factors, specific dietary protein and amino acid diets have been introduced. The main focus of these diets is the quantity and quality of dietary proteins and whether a balanced mixture or solely dietary essential amino acids are required with or without higher intake levels of specific amino acids. Specifically in cancer patients, stimulated muscle protein synthesis has been obtained by increasing the amount of protein in a meal and by providing additional leucine. Also in other chronic diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis, meals with specific dietary proteins and specific combinations of dietary essential amino acids are able to stimulate anabolism. In acute diseases, a special role for the amino acid arginine and its precursor citrulline as anabolic drivers has been observed. Thus, there is growing evidence that modifying the dietary amino acid composition of a meal will positively influence the net balance between muscle protein synthesis and breakdown, leading to muscle protein anabolism in a variety of chronic and acute disease states. Specific amino acids with anabolic potential are leucine, arginine and citrulline. PMID:23107525

  12. Amino acid "little Big Bang": Representing amino acid substitution matrices as dot products of Euclidian vectors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Sequence comparisons make use of a one-letter representation for amino acids, the necessary quantitative information being supplied by the substitution matrices. This paper deals with the problem of finding a representation that provides a comprehensive description of amino acid intrinsic properties consistent with the substitution matrices. Results We present a Euclidian vector representation of the amino acids, obtained by the singular value decomposition of the substitution matrices. The substitution matrix entries correspond to the dot product of amino acid vectors. We apply this vector encoding to the study of the relative importance of various amino acid physicochemical properties upon the substitution matrices. We also characterize and compare the PAM and BLOSUM series substitution matrices. Conclusions This vector encoding introduces a Euclidian metric in the amino acid space, consistent with substitution matrices. Such a numerical description of the amino acid is useful when intrinsic properties of amino acids are necessary, for instance, building sequence profiles or finding consensus sequences, using machine learning algorithms such as Support Vector Machine and Neural Networks algorithms. PMID:20047649

  13. Temperature dependence of amino acid hydrophobicities.

    PubMed

    Wolfenden, Richard; Lewis, Charles A; Yuan, Yang; Carter, Charles W

    2015-06-16

    The hydrophobicities of the 20 common amino acids are reflected in their tendencies to appear in interior positions in globular proteins and in deeply buried positions of membrane proteins. To determine whether these relationships might also have been valid in the warm surroundings where life may have originated, we examined the effect of temperature on the hydrophobicities of the amino acids as measured by the equilibrium constants for transfer of their side-chains from neutral solution to cyclohexane (K(w > c)). The hydrophobicities of most amino acids were found to increase with increasing temperature. Because that effect is more pronounced for the more polar amino acids, the numerical range of K(w > c) values decreases with increasing temperature. There are also modest changes in the ordering of the more polar amino acids. However, those changes are such that they would have tended to minimize the otherwise disruptive effects of a changing thermal environment on the evolution of protein structure. Earlier, the genetic code was found to be organized in such a way that--with a single exception (threonine)--the side-chain dichotomy polar/nonpolar matches the nucleic acid base dichotomy purine/pyrimidine at the second position of each coding triplet at 25 C. That dichotomy is preserved at 100 C. The accessible surface areas of amino acid side-chains in folded proteins are moderately correlated with hydrophobicity, but when free energies of vapor-to-cyclohexane transfer (corresponding to size) are taken into consideration, a closer relationship becomes apparent. PMID:26034278

  14. Economic aspects of amino acids production.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Udo; Huebner, Susanna

    2003-01-01

    Amino acids represent basic elements of proteins, which as a main source of nutrition themselves serve as a major reserve for maintaining essential functions of humans as well as animals. Taking the recent state of scientific knowledge into account, the industrial sector of amino acids is a priori "suitable" to a specific kind of an ecologically sound way of production, which is based on biotechnology. The following article may point out characteristics of this particular industrial sector and illustrates the applicability of the latest economic methods, founded on development of the discipline of bionics in order to describe economic aspects of amino acids markets. The several biochemical and technological fields of application of amino acids lead to specific market structures in high developed and permanently evolving systems. The Harvard tradition of industrial economics explains how market structures mould the behaviour of the participants and influences market results beyond that. A global increase in intensity of competition confirms the notion that the supply-side is characterised by asymmetric information in contrast to Kantzenbachs concept of "narrow oligopoly" with symmetrical shared knowledge about market information. Departing from this point, certain strategies of companies in this market form shall be derived. The importance of Research and Development increases rapidly and leads to innovative manufacturing methods which replace more polluting manufacturing processes like acid hydrolysis. In addition to these modifications within the production processes the article deals furthermore with the pricing based on product life cycle concept and introduces specific applications of tools like activity based costing and target costing to the field of amino acid production. The authors come to the conclusion that based on a good transferability of latest findings in bionics and ecological compatibility competitors in amino acids manufacturing are well advised to exercise concepts of the management of complex systems in order to choose the right strategy towards gaining market leadership. PMID:12523391

  15. Cometary Amino Acids from the STARDUST Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jamie Elsila

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Stardust spacecraft returned samples from comet 81 P/WiId 2 to Earth in January 2006. Examinations of the organic compounds in cometary samples can reveal information about the prebiotic organic inventory present on the early Earth and within the early Solar System, which may have contributed to the origin of life. Preliminary studies of Stardust material revealed the presence of a suite of organic compounds including several amines and amino acids, but the origin of these compounds (cometary vs. terrestrial contamination) could not be identified. We have recently measured the carbon isotopic ratios of these amino acids to determine their origin, leading to the first detection of a cometary amino acid.

  16. Amino acid precursors in lunar samples.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.; Harada, K.; Hare, P. E.

    1972-01-01

    The use of hot water to extract lunar samples, followed by the hydrolysis of the aqueous extract, appears to be the method of choice for identification and quantitation of amino acid precursors in extraterrestrial sources. The net inferences from the analyses to date are (1) that amino acid precursors are verifiably present in lunar dust, and (2) that they are quite certainly not the consequence of contamination by terrestrial organisms, including man. It is suggested that prebiotic evolutionary pathways such as have been traversed on the earth were terminated on the moon for lack of sufficient water. Although some or all of the amino acid precursors may be indigenous, the low level observed suggests that they may also result from onfall of organic compounds from interstellar matter, comets, tails, solar wind, or meteorites.

  17. Amino acid homeostasis in the preterm infant.

    PubMed

    Vlaardingerbroek, Hester; van den Akker, Chris H; van der Schoor, Sophie R D; van Goudoever, Johannes B

    2013-01-01

    Functional outcome of preterm infants is highly related to the quality and quantity of nutrients provided during the first few weeks of life. New guidelines, as published by the ESPGHAN in 2010, have provided means to prevent undernutrition in the NICU. Especially proteins and amino acids seem to play a pivotal role, and the optimal regimen has not yet been determined. New data on the intrauterine nutrient supply suggest a high amino acid intake during the fetal period. How these results might translate into improvement of especially neurocognitive outcome needs to be investigated. PMID:23887116

  18. Protein and amino Acid supplementation in athletes.

    PubMed

    Armsey, Thomas D; Grime, Todd E

    2002-08-01

    Amino acid supplementation is practiced by numerous individuals with the hope of increasing muscle mass and function by increasing available proteins. Theoretically, this makes a great deal of sense; the scientific facts, however, fail to conclusively prove that ingesting more than the recommended dietary allowance of protein has any effect on otherwise healthy adults. Athletes may be the exception to this rule. This review examines the most current literature pertaining to amino acid supplementation, and reports on the potential benefits and risks of this common practice. PMID:12831703

  19. Interactive Hangman teaches amino acid structures and abbreviations.

    PubMed

    Pennington, Britney O; Sears, Duane; Clegg, Dennis O

    2014-01-01

    We developed an interactive exercise to teach students how to draw the structures of the 20 standard amino acids and to identify the one-letter abbreviations by modifying the familiar game of "Hangman." Amino acid structures were used to represent single letters throughout the game. To provide additional practice in identifying structures, hints to the answers were written in "amino acid sentences" for the students to translate. Students were required to draw the structure of the corresponding letter they wished to guess on a whiteboard. Each student received a reference sheet of the structures and abbreviations, but was required to draw from memory when guessing a letter. Preassessments and postassessments revealed a drastic improvement in the students' ability to recognize and draw structures from memory. This activity provides a fun, educational game to play in biochemistry discussion sections or during long incubations in biochemistry laboratories. PMID:25345852

  20. Regional amino acid transport into brain during diabetes: Effect of plasma amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Mans, A.M.; DeJoseph, M.R.; Davis D.W.; Hawkins, R.A. )

    1987-11-01

    Transport of phenylalanine and lysine into the brain was measured in 4-wk streptozotocin-diabetic rats to assess the effect on the neutral and basic amino acid transport systems at the blood-brain barrier. Amino acid concentrations in plasma and brain were also measured. Regional permeability-times-surface area (PS) products and influx were determined using a continuous infusion method and quantitative autoradiography. The PS of phenylalanine was decreased by an average of 40% throughout the entire brain. Influx was depressed by 35%. The PS of lysine was increased by an average of 44%, but the influx was decreased by 27%. Several plasma neutral amino acids (branched chain) were increased, whereas all basic amino acids were decreased. Brain tryptophan, phenylalanine, tyrosine, methionine, and lysine contents were markedly decreased. The transport changes were almost entirely accounted for by the alterations in the concentrations of the plasma amino acids that compete for the neutral and basic amino acid carriers. The reduced influx could be responsible for the low brain content of some essential amino acids, with possibly deleterious consequences for brain functions.

  1. Polymerization of amino acids containing nucleotide bases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ben Cheikh, Azzouz; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1990-01-01

    The nucleoamino acids 1-(3'-amino,3'-carboxypropyl)uracil (3) and 9-(3'-amino,3'-carboxypropyl)adenine (4) have been prepared as (L)-en-antiomers and as racemic mixtures. When 3 or 4 is suspended in water and treated with N,N'-carbon-yldiimidazole, peptides are formed in good yield. The products formed from the (L)-enantiomers are hydrolyzed to the monomeric amino acids by pronase. Attempts to improve the efficiency of these oligomerizations by including a polyuridylate template in the reaction mixture were not successful. Similarly, oligomers derived from the (L)-enantiomer of 3 did not act as templates to facilitate the oligomerization of 4.

  2. Amino acid metabolism of Lemna minor L

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, D.; Rich, P.J.; Brunk, D.G. )

    1989-04-01

    A serious limitation to the use of N(O,S)-heptafluorobutyryl isobutyl amino acid derivatives in the analysis of {sup 15}N-labeling kinetics of amino acids in plant tissues, is that the amides glutamine and asparagine undergo acid hydrolysis to glutamate and aspartate, respectively, during derivatization. This led us to consider an alternative procedure for derivatization of glutamine and asparagine with N-methyl-N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-trifluoroacetamide in pyridine. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry yielded fragment ions (M-57) of mass 417 and 431 for the ({sup 14}N)asparagine and ({sup 14}N)glutamine derivatives, respectively, suitable for monitoring unlabeled, single-{sup 15}N- and double-{sup 15}N-labeled amide species from the ion clusters at mass to charge ratio (m/z) 415 to 423 for asparagine, and m/z 429 to 437 for glutamine. From separate analyses of the specific isotope abundance of the amino-N groups of asparagine and glutamine as their N-heptafluorobutyryl isobutyl derivatives, the specific amide-({sup 15}N) abundance of these amino acids was determined.

  3. Intestinal metabolism of sulfur amino acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gastrointestinal tract (GIT) is a metabolically significant site of sulfur amino acid (SAA) metabolism in the body and metabolizes approx. 20% of the dietary methionine intake that is mainly transmethylated to homocysteine and transsulfurated to cysteine. The GIT accounts for approx. 25% of the ...

  4. Optimization of short amino acid sequences classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcz, Aleksy; Szymański, Zbigniew

    This article describes processing methods used for short amino acid sequences classification. The data processed are 9-symbols string representations of amino acid sequences, divided into 49 data sets - each one containing samples labeled as reacting or not with given enzyme. The goal of the classification is to determine for a single enzyme, whether an amino acid sequence would react with it or not. Each data set is processed separately. Feature selection is performed to reduce the number of dimensions for each data set. The method used for feature selection consists of two phases. During the first phase, significant positions are selected using Classification and Regression Trees. Afterwards, symbols appearing at the selected positions are substituted with numeric values of amino acid properties taken from the AAindex database. In the second phase the new set of features is reduced using a correlation-based ranking formula and Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization. Finally, the preprocessed data is used for training LS-SVM classifiers. SPDE, an evolutionary algorithm, is used to obtain optimal hyperparameters for the LS-SVM classifier, such as error penalty parameter C and kernel-specific hyperparameters. A simple score penalty is used to adapt the SPDE algorithm to the task of selecting classifiers with best performance measures values.

  5. Dietary Supplements and Sports Performance: Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Melvin

    2005-01-01

    This is the third in a series of six articles to discuss the major classes of dietary supplements (vitamins; minerals; amino acids; herbs or botanicals; metabolites, constituents/extracts, or combinations). The major focus is on efficacy of such dietary supplements to enhance exercise or sport performance. PMID:18500957

  6. Enantioenrichment in sublimed amino acid mixtures.

    PubMed

    Viedma, Cristbal; Ortiz, Jos E; de Torres, Trinidad; Cintas, Pedro

    2012-04-14

    A real amplification of an initial enantiomeric excess can be detected when two amino acids are sublimed at high temperature, even if one of the components is a racemic compound that does not convert into a conglomerate by sublimation. PMID:22388769

  7. Sensitive Amino Acid Composition and Chirality Analysis with the Mars Organic Analyzer (MOA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skelley, Alison M.; Scherer, James R.; Aubrey, Andrew D.; Grover, William H.; Ivester, Robin H. C.; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Grunthaner, Frank J.; Bada, Jeffrey L.; Mathies, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    Detection of life on Mars requires definition of a suitable biomarker and development of sensitive yet compact instrumentation capable of performing in situ analyses. Our studies are focused on amino acid analysis because amino acids are more resistant to decomposition than other biomolecules, and because amino acid chirality is a well-defined biomarker. Amino acid composition and chirality analysis has been previously demonstrated in the lab using microfabricated capillary electrophoresis (CE) chips. To analyze amino acids in the field, we have developed the Mars Organic Analyzer (MOA), a portable analysis system that consists of a compact instrument and a novel multi-layer CE microchip.

  8. Symmetrical and Thermodynamic Properties of Phenotypic Graphs of Amino Acids Encoded by the Primeval RNY Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jos, Marco V.; Zamudio, Gabriel S.; Palacios-Prez, Miryam; Bobadilla, Juan R.; de Faras, Svio Torres

    2015-06-01

    The 12 different types of graphs of the 8 amino acids encoded by the presumably primeval RNY code are derived. The symmetry groups of these graphs are analyzed and coincide with the corresponding values of polar requirement for each amino acid. The symmetry groups at the codon level are partially carried over as a group or subgroup at the amino acid level. Measures of centrality of the 12 graphs indicate that all amino acids were equally relevant irrespective of its chronological order of its appearance. The elimination of any amino acid would be strongly selected against and therefore the genetic code at this stage was already frozen.

  9. Amino acid composition of humic substances in tundra soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilevich, R. S.; Beznosikov, V. A.

    2015-06-01

    Peripheral amino acid fragments of humic and fulvic acid molecules from tundra soils have been identified and quantified. A significant weight fraction of amino acids has been found in humic acid preparations, which exceeds their content in fulvic acids. Features of the amino acid composition of humic substances along the soil profile and depending on the degree of hydromorphism and the proportions of different (neutral, basic, acidic, cyclic) groups in amino acids have been revealed. The molar ratio between the hydroxy and heterocyclic amino acids reflects the degree of humification of the soil.

  10. D-Amino Acids in Living Higher Organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Noriko

    2002-04-01

    The homochirality of biological amino acids (L-amino acids) and of the RNA/DNA backbone (D-ribose) might have become established before the origin of life. It has been considered that D-amino acids and L-sugars were eliminated on the primitive Earth. Therefore, the presence and function of D-amino acids in living organisms have not been studied except for D-amino acids in the cell walls of microorganisms. However, D-amino acids were recently found in various living higher organisms in the form of free amino acids, peptides, and proteins. Free D-aspartate and D-serine are present and may have important physiological functions in mammals. D-amino acids in peptides are well known as opioid peptides and neuropeptides. In protein, D-aspartate residues increase during aging. This review deals with recent advances in the study of D-amino acids in higher organisms.

  11. Brain amino acid metabolism and ketosis.

    PubMed

    Yudkoff, M; Daikhin, Y; Nissim, I; Lazarow, A; Nissim, I

    2001-10-15

    The relationship between ketosis and brain amino acid metabolism was studied in mice that consumed a ketogenic diet (>90% of calories as lipid). After 3 days on the diet the blood concentration of 3-OH-butyrate was approximately 5 mmol/l (control = 0.06-0.1 mmol/l). In forebrain and cerebellum the concentration of 3-OH-butyrate was approximately 10-fold higher than control. Brain [citrate] and [lactate] were greater in the ketotic animals. The concentration of whole brain free coenzyme A was lower in ketotic mice. Brain [aspartate] was reduced in forebrain and cerebellum, but [glutamate] and [glutamine] were unchanged. When [(15)N]leucine was administered to follow N metabolism, this labeled amino acid accumulated to a greater extent in the blood and brain of ketotic mice. Total brain aspartate ((14)N + (15)N) was reduced in the ketotic group. The [(15)N]aspartate/[(15)N]glutamate ratio was lower in ketotic animals, consistent with a shift in the equilibrium of the aspartate aminotransferase reaction away from aspartate. Label in [(15)N]GABA and total [(15)N]GABA was increased in ketotic animals. When the ketotic animals were injected with glucose, there was a partial blunting of ketoacidemia within 40 min as well as an increase of brain [aspartate], which was similar to control. When [U-(13)C(6)]glucose was injected, the (13)C label appeared rapidly in brain lactate and in amino acids. Label in brain [U-(13)C(3)]lactate was greater in the ketotic group. The ratio of brain (13)C-amino acid/(13)C-lactate, which reflects the fraction of amino acid carbon that is derived from glucose, was much lower in ketosis, indicating that another carbon source, i.e., ketone bodies, were precursor to aspartate, glutamate, glutamine and GABA. PMID:11592124

  12. Hereditary folate malabsorption: A positively charged amino acid at position 113 of the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT/SLC46A1) is required for folic acid binding

    SciTech Connect

    Lasry, Inbal; Berman, Bluma; Glaser, Fabian; Jansen, Gerrit; Assaraf, Yehuda G.

    2009-08-28

    The proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT/SLC46A1) mediates intestinal folate uptake at acidic pH. Some loss of folic acid (FA) transport mutations in PCFT from hereditary folate malabsorption (HFM) patients cluster in R113, thereby suggesting a functional role for this residue. Herein, unlike non-conservative substitutions, an R113H mutant displayed 80-fold increase in the FA transport Km while retaining parental Vmax, hence indicating a major fall in folate substrate affinity. Furthermore, consistent with the preservation of 9% of parental transport activity, R113H transfectants displayed a substantial decrease in the FA growth requirement relative to mock transfectants. Homology modeling based on the crystal structures of the Escherichia coli transporter homologues EmrD and glycerol-3-phosphate transporter revealed that the R113H rotamer properly protrudes into the cytoplasmic face of the minor cleft normally occupied by R113. These findings constitute the first demonstration that a basic amino acid at position 113 is required for folate substrate binding.

  13. Analytical techniques for the detection of ?-amino-?-methylaminopropionic acid.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Steven A

    2012-05-01

    The non-protein amino acid L-?-amino-?-methylaminopropionic acid (BMAA) has been linked to several neurodegenerative diseases. Its presence in trace amounts in complex sample such as bacterial, plant and mammalian tissue extracts and hydrolyzates makes analysis a complicated process requiring good analytical technique. There are conflicting reports in the literature regarding the presence or absence of BMAA in key samples, but the absence of standardized or validated methods makes comparison of the disparate findings difficult to compare. This critical review will summarize the historic and recent literature, and provide suggestions for improving the methods currently in practice. PMID:22421821

  14. Formation Mechanism of Coamorphous Drug-Amino Acid Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Katrine Tarp; Larsen, Flemming Hofmann; Cornett, Claus; Lbmann, Korbinian; Grohganz, Holger; Rades, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    Two coamorphous drug-amino acid systems, indomethacin-tryptophan (Ind-Trp) and furosemide-tryptophan (Fur-Trp), were analyzed toward their ease of amorphization and mechanism of coamorphization during ball milling. The two mixtures were compared to the corresponding amorphization of the pure drug without amino acid. Powder blends at a 1:1 molar ratio were milled for varying times, and their physicochemical properties were investigated using XRPD, (13)C solid state NMR (ssNMR), and DSC. Comilling the drug with the amino acid reduced the milling time required to obtain an amorphous powder from more than 90 min in the case of the pure drugs to 30 min for the coamorphous powders. Amorphization was observed as reductions in XRPD reflections and was additionally quantified based on normalized principal component analysis (PCA) scores of the ssNMR spectra. Furthermore, the evolution in the glass temperature (Tg) of the coamorphous systems over time indicated complete coamorphization after 30 min of milling. Based on the DSC data it was possible to identify the formation mechanism of the two coamorphous systems. The Tg position of the samples suggested that coamorphous Ind-Trp was formed by the amino acid being dissolved in the amorphous drug, whereas coamorphous Fur-Trp was formed by the drug being dissolved in the amorphous amino acid. PMID:26057950

  15. Tailored amino acid diversity for the evolution of antibody affinity

    PubMed Central

    Gonzlez-Muoz, Andrea; Bokma, Evert; OShea, Desmond; Minton, Kevin; Strain, Martin; Vousden, Katherine; Rossant, Christine; Jermutus, Lutz; Minter, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    Antibodies are a unique class of proteins with the ability to adapt their binding sites for high affinity and high specificity to a multitude of antigens. Many analyses have been performed on antibody sequences and structures to elucidate which amino acids have a predominant role in antibody interactions with antigens. These studies have generally not distinguished between amino acids selected for broad antigen specificity in the primary immune response and those selected for high affinity in the secondary immune response. By studying a large data set of affinity matured antibodies derived from in vitro directed evolution experiments, we were able to specifically highlight a subset of amino acids associated with affinity improvements. In a comparison of affinity maturations using either tailored or full amino acid diversification, the tailored approach was found to be at least as effective at improving affinity while requiring fewer mutagenesis libraries than the traditional method. The resulting sequence data also highlight the potential for further reducing amino acid diversity for high affinity binding interactions. PMID:22926024

  16. Molecular Evolution of Plant AAP and LHT Amino Acid Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Tegeder, Mechthild; Ward, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen is an essential mineral nutrient and it is often transported within living organisms in its reduced form, as amino acids. Transport of amino acids across cellular membranes requires proteins, and here we report the phylogenetic analysis across taxa of two amino acid transporter families, the amino acid permeases (AAPs) and the lysine–histidine-like transporters (LHTs). We found that the two transporter families form two distinct groups in plants supporting the concept that both are essential. AAP transporters seem to be restricted to land plants. They were found in Selaginella moellendorffii and Physcomitrella patens but not in Chlorophyte, Charophyte, or Rhodophyte algae. AAPs were strongly represented in vascular plants, consistent with their major function in phloem (vascular tissue) loading of amino acids for sink nitrogen supply. LHTs on the other hand appeared prior to land plants. LHTs were not found in chlorophyte algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carterii. However, the characean alga Klebsormidium flaccidum encodes KfLHT13 and phylogenetic analysis indicates that it is basal to land plant LHTs. This is consistent with the hypothesis that characean algae are ancestral to land plants. LHTs were also found in both S. moellendorffii and P. patens as well as in monocots and eudicots. To date, AAPs and LHTs have mainly been characterized in Arabidopsis (eudicots) and these studies provide clues to the functions of the newly identified homologs. PMID:22645574

  17. Amino Acids in the Antarctic Martian Meteorite MIL03346

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Aubrey, A.; Dworkin, J. P.; Botta, O.; Bada, J. L.

    2005-01-01

    The report by McKay et al. that the Martian meteorite ALH84001 contains evidence for life on Mars remains controversial. Of central importance is whether ALH84001 and other Antarctic Martian meteorites contain endogenous organic compounds. In any investigation of organic compounds possibly derived from Mars it is important to focus on compounds that play an essential role in biochemistry as we know it and that have properties such as chirality which can be used to distinguish between biotic versus abiotic origins. Amino acids are one of the few compounds that fulfill these requirements. Previous analyses of the Antarctic Martian meteorites ALH84001 and EETA79001 have shown that these meteorites contain low levels of terrestrial amino acid contamination derived from Antarctic ice meltwater. Here we report preliminary amino acid investigations of a third Antarctic Martian meteorite MIL03346 which was discovered in Antarctica during the 2003-04 ANSMET season. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract

  18. Molecular basis of essential amino acid transport from studies of insect nutrient amino acid transporters of the SLC6 family (NAT-SLC6)

    PubMed Central

    Boudko, Dmitri Y.

    2012-01-01

    Two protein families that represent major components of essential amino acid transport in insects have been identified. They are annotated as the SLC6 and SLC7 families of transporters according to phylogenetic proximity to characterized amino acid transporters (HUGO nomenclature). Members of these families have been identified as important apical and basolateral parts of transepithelial essential amino acid absorption in the metazoan alimentary canal. Synergistically, they play critical physiological roles as essential substrate providers to diverse metabolic processes, including generic protein synthesis. This review briefly clarifies the requirements for amino acid transport and a variety of amino acid transport mechanisms, including the aforementioned families. Further it focuses on the large group of Nutrient Amino acid Transporters (NATs), which comprise a recently identified subfamily of the Neurotransmitter Sodium Symporter family (NSS or SLC6). The first insect NAT, cloned from the caterpillar gut, has a broad substrate spectrum similar to mammalian B0 transporters. Several new NAT-SLC6 members have been characterized in an effort to explore mechanisms for the essential amino acid absorption in model dipteran insects. The identification and functional characterization of new B0-like and narrow specificity transporters of essential amino acids in fruit fly and mosquitoes leads to a fundamentally important insight: that NATs evolved and act together as the integrated active core of a transport network that mediates active alimentary absorption and systemic distribution of essential amino acids. This role of NATs is projected from the most primitive prokaryotes to the most complex metazoan organisms, and represents an interesting platform for unraveling the molecular evolution of amino acid transport and modeling amino acid transport disorders. The comparative study of NATs elucidates important adaptive differences between essential amino acid transportomes of invertebrate and vertebrate organisms, outlining a new possibility for selective targeting of essential amino acid absorption mechanisms to control medically and economically important arthropods and other invertebrate organisms. PMID:22230793

  19. Criteria for distinguishing biogenic and abiogenic amino acids - Preliminary considerations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvenvolden, K. A.

    1973-01-01

    Criteria to determine the mode of origin of amino acids can be established by consideration of their structure, enantiometric distribution, composition, and relative abundance. A population of dominantly protein amino acids with one enantiomeric configuration most likely had a biological origin. Biological amino acids do racemize, however, so the absence of optical activity would not rule out the possibility that the amino acids in a racemic mixture were originally synthesized biologically. For racemic amino acids, therefore, structure, composition and relative abundance become important in ascertaining the origin of these compounds. Abiotically synthesized amino acids have a population composed of both protein and nonprotein structures present as racemic mixtures.

  20. Permeability of membranes to amino acids and modified amino acids: mechanisms involved in translocation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarti, A. C.; Deamer, D. W. (Principal Investigator); Miller, S. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    The amino acid permeability of membranes is of interest because they are one of the key solutes involved in cell function. Membrane permeability coefficients (P) for amino acid classes, including neutral, polar, hydrophobic, and charged species, have been measured and compared using a variety of techniques. Decreasing lipid chain length increased permeability slightly (5-fold), while variations in pH had only minor effects on the permeability coefficients of the amino acids tested in liposomes. Increasing the membrane surface charge increased the permeability of amino acids of the opposite charge, while increasing the cholesterol content decreased membrane permeability. The permeability coefficients for most amino acids tested were surprisingly similar to those previously measured for monovalent cations such as sodium and potassium (approximately 10(-12)-10(-13) cm s-1). This observation suggests that the permeation rates for the neutral, polar and charged amino acids are controlled by bilayer fluctuations and transient defects, rather than partition coefficients and Born energy barriers. Hydrophobic amino acids were 10(2) more permeable than the hydrophilic forms, reflecting their increased partition coefficient values. External pH had dramatic effects on the permeation rates for the modified amino acid lysine methyl ester in response to transmembrane pH gradients. It was established that lysine methyl ester and other modified short peptides permeate rapidly (P = 10(-2) cm s-1) as neutral (deprotonated) molecules. It was also shown that charge distributions dramatically alter permeation rates for modified di-peptides. These results may relate to the movement of peptides through membranes during protein translocation and to the origin of cellular membrane transport on the early Earth.

  1. Synthesis of a conformationally constrained ?-amino acid building block.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Elaine; Pes, Lara; Ortin, Yannick; Mller-Bunz, Helge; Paradisi, Francesca

    2013-02-01

    Conformationally restricted amino acids are important components in peptidomimetics and drug design. Herein, we describe the synthesis of a novel, non-proteinogenic constrained delta amino acid containing a cyclobutane ring, cis-3(aminomethyl)cyclobutane carboxylic acid (ACCA). The synthesis of the target amino acid was achieved in seven steps, with the key reaction being a base induced intramolecular nucleophilic substitution. A small library of dipeptides was prepared through the coupling of ACCA with proteinogenic amino acids. PMID:22851051

  2. How Do Haloarchaea Synthesize Aromatic Amino Acids?

    PubMed Central

    Gulko, Miriam Kolog; Dyall-Smith, Mike; Gonzalez, Orland; Oesterhelt, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Genomic analysis of H. salinarum indicated that the de novo pathway for aromatic amino acid (AroAA) biosynthesis does not follow the classical pathway but begins from non-classical precursors, as is the case for M. jannaschii. The first two steps in the pathway were predicted to be carried out by genes OE1472F and OE1475F, while the 3rd step follows the canonical pathway involving gene OE1477R. The functions of these genes and their products were tested by biochemical and genetic methods. In this study, we provide evidence that supports the role of proteins OE1472F and OE1475F catalyzing consecutive enzymatic reactions leading to the production of 3-dehydroquinate (DHQ), after which AroAA production proceeds via the canonical pathway starting with the formation of DHS (dehydroshikimate), catalyzed by the product of ORF OE1477R. Nutritional requirements and AroAA uptake studies of the mutants gave results that were consistent with the proposed roles of these ORFs in AroAA biosynthesis. DNA microarray data indicated that the 13 genes of the canonical pathway appear to be utilised for AroAA biosynthesis in H. salinarum, as they are differentially expressed when cells are grown in medium lacking AroAA. PMID:25216252

  3. Amino acids of the Murchison meteorite. I - Six carbon acyclic primary alpha-amino alkanoic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronin, J. R.; Gandy, W. E.; Pizzarello, S.

    1981-01-01

    Six of the seven chain isomers of six-carbon acyclic primary alpha-amino alkanoic acids (leucine isomers) have been either identified or confirmed in hot-water extracts of the Murchison meteorite using combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and ion exchange chromatography. 2-Amino-2-ethylbutyric acid, 2-amino-2,3-dimethylbutyric acid, pseudoleucine, and 2-methylnorvaline were positively identified by GC-MS. These amino acids have not been previously reported to occur in natural materials and may be uniquely meteoritic in origin. The presence of leucine and isoleucine (including the diastereoisomer, alloisoleucine) was confirmed. Peaks corresponding to norleucine were seen by ion-exchange and gas chromatography but characteristic mass spectra were not obtained. The alpha-branched chain isomers in this series are quantitatively the most significant. These results are compared with literature data on amino acid synthesis by electrical discharge and Fischer-Tropsch-type catalysis. Neither model system produces an amino acid suite that is completely comparable to that found in the Murchison meteorite.

  4. Geochemistry of amino acids in some Florida peat accumulations—II. Amino acid distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casagrande, Daniel J.; Given, P. H.

    1980-10-01

    Distributions of amino acids in some Florida peats have been compared with distributions in plants living now at the surface of the peats and in surface litter. Quantitative determinations were made by gas chromatography of volatile derivatives of both protein and non-protein amino acids. The latter. found also in mineral soils, are believed to represent bacterial cell constituents and/or anabolites. α,ɛ-diaminopimelic acid, a constituent of the mureide complex of bacterial cell walls, was found in peats and surface litter, as were other acids believed in soil ecosystems to result from the living processes of microorganisms. The protein amino acids in peats do not show a distinctive signature of any particular kind of organism, but the nature and concentrations of the non-protein acids support the inference that the higher plant constituents are extensively re-worked and that essentially all of the amino acid material in peats is microbial in proximate origin. Thus microbial amino acids appear to be quite significant participants in the input to coalification.

  5. Intermediate Levels of Bacillus subtilis CodY Activity Are Required for Derepression of the Branched-Chain Amino Acid Permease, BraB

    PubMed Central

    Belitsky, Boris R.; Brinsmade, Shaun R.; Sonenshein, Abraham L.

    2015-01-01

    The global transcriptional regulator, CodY, binds strongly to the regulatory region of the braB gene, which encodes a Bacillus subtilis branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) permease. However, under conditions that maximize CodY activity, braB expression was similar in wild-type and codY null mutant cells. Nonetheless, expression from the braB promoter was significantly elevated in cells containing partially active mutant versions of CodY or in wild-type cells under growth conditions leading to intermediate levels of CodY activity. This novel pattern of regulation was shown to be due to two opposing mechanisms, negative and positive, by which CodY affects braB expression. A strong CodY-binding site located downstream of the transcription start point conferred negative regulation by direct interaction with CodY. Additionally, sequences upstream and downstream of the promoter were required for repression by a second pleiotropic B. subtilis regulator, ScoC, whose own expression is repressed by CodY. ScoC-mediated repression of braB in codY null mutants cells was as efficient as direct, CodY-mediated repression in wild-type cells under conditions of high CodY activity. However, under conditions of reduced CodY activity, CodY-mediated repression was relieved to a greater extent than ScoC-mediated repression was increased, leading to elevated braB expression. We conclude that restricting increased expression of braB to conditions of moderate nutrient limitation is the raison d’être of the feed-forward regulatory loop formed by CodY and ScoC at the braB promoter. The increase in BraB expression only at intermediate activities of CodY may facilitate the uptake of BCAA when they are not in excess but prevent unneeded BraB synthesis when other BCAA transporters are active. PMID:26473603

  6. Intermediate Levels of Bacillus subtilis CodY Activity Are Required for Derepression of the Branched-Chain Amino Acid Permease, BraB.

    PubMed

    Belitsky, Boris R; Brinsmade, Shaun R; Sonenshein, Abraham L

    2015-10-01

    The global transcriptional regulator, CodY, binds strongly to the regulatory region of the braB gene, which encodes a Bacillus subtilis branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) permease. However, under conditions that maximize CodY activity, braB expression was similar in wild-type and codY null mutant cells. Nonetheless, expression from the braB promoter was significantly elevated in cells containing partially active mutant versions of CodY or in wild-type cells under growth conditions leading to intermediate levels of CodY activity. This novel pattern of regulation was shown to be due to two opposing mechanisms, negative and positive, by which CodY affects braB expression. A strong CodY-binding site located downstream of the transcription start point conferred negative regulation by direct interaction with CodY. Additionally, sequences upstream and downstream of the promoter were required for repression by a second pleiotropic B. subtilis regulator, ScoC, whose own expression is repressed by CodY. ScoC-mediated repression of braB in codY null mutants cells was as efficient as direct, CodY-mediated repression in wild-type cells under conditions of high CodY activity. However, under conditions of reduced CodY activity, CodY-mediated repression was relieved to a greater extent than ScoC-mediated repression was increased, leading to elevated braB expression. We conclude that restricting increased expression of braB to conditions of moderate nutrient limitation is the raison d'être of the feed-forward regulatory loop formed by CodY and ScoC at the braB promoter. The increase in BraB expression only at intermediate activities of CodY may facilitate the uptake of BCAA when they are not in excess but prevent unneeded BraB synthesis when other BCAA transporters are active. PMID:26473603

  7. Fatty acid-amino acid conjugates diversification in Lepidopteran caterpillars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fatty acid amino acid conjugates (FACs) have been found in Noctuid as well as Sphingid caterpillar oral secretions and especially volicitin [N-(17-hydroxylinolenoyl)-L-Glutamine] and its biochemical precursor, N-linolenoyl-L-glutamine, are known elicitors of induced volatile emissions in corn plants...

  8. Plant amino acid-derived vitamins: biosynthesis and function.

    PubMed

    Miret, Javier A; Munn-Bosch, Sergi

    2014-04-01

    Vitamins are essential organic compounds for humans, having lost the ability to de novo synthesize them. Hence, they represent dietary requirements, which are covered by plants as the main dietary source of most vitamins (through food or livestock's feed). Most vitamins synthesized by plants present amino acids as precursors (B1, B2, B3, B5, B7, B9 and E) and are therefore linked to plant nitrogen metabolism. Amino acids play different roles in their biosynthesis and metabolism, either incorporated into the backbone of the vitamin or as amino, sulfur or one-carbon group donors. There is a high natural variation in vitamin contents in crops and its exploitation through breeding, metabolic engineering and agronomic practices can enhance their nutritional quality. While the underlying biochemical roles of vitamins as cosubstrates or cofactors are usually common for most eukaryotes, the impact of vitamins B and E in metabolism and physiology can be quite different on plants and animals. Here, we first aim at giving an overview of the biosynthesis of amino acid-derived vitamins in plants, with a particular focus on how this knowledge can be exploited to increase vitamin contents in crops. Second, we will focus on the functions of these vitamins in both plants and animals (and humans in particular), to unravel common and specific roles for vitamins in evolutionary distant organisms, in which these amino acid-derived vitamins play, however, an essential role. PMID:24368523

  9. 40 CFR 721.1705 - Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with 6-amino-4-hydroxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with 6-amino-4-hydroxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid, diazotized, (3-aminophenyl)phosphonic acid and... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1705 Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized,...

  10. 40 CFR 721.1705 - Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with 6-amino-4-hydroxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with 6-amino-4-hydroxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid, diazotized, (3-aminophenyl)phosphonic acid and... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1705 Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized,...

  11. 40 CFR 721.1705 - Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with 6-amino-4-hydroxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with 6-amino-4-hydroxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid, diazotized, (3-aminophenyl)phosphonic acid and... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1705 Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized,...

  12. Protein synthesis in the presence of carbamoyl-amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, L.M.; Stephens, M.C.

    1987-05-01

    The role of exogenous carbamoyl-amino acids in protein biosynthesis has been examined in vitro using a mixture of UC amino acids to label newly synthesized protein in human reticulocyte rich (8-18%) peripheral blood. Aliquots of the radiolabeled newly synthesized protein were acid precipitated, washed and the radioactivity measured. Control samples which measured the synthetic capacity of the blood were aliquots of the same blood- UC amino acid mixture without added carbamoyl-amino acids or cyanate. N-carbamoyl leucine alone or a 3 N-carbamoyl amino acid mixture of leucine, aspartic acid and tyrosine were used to test inhibition of protein synthesis. Also carbamoyl-amino acids were synthesized using cyanate and Pierce hydrolyzate amino acid calibration standards or the mixture of UC amino acids. In this system the carbamoylation of endogenous amino acids by cyanate up to 8 mol/100 l showed a linear decrease in protein synthesis with time which is inversely related to the cyanate concentration. At greater cyanate levels the inhibition of protein synthesis reaches a plateau. When N-carbamoyl-amino acids only are present there is about a 50% decrease in the UC protein at 30 minutes as compared to the synthesis of UC protein without N-carbamoyl-amino acids. These results indicate that the presence of carbamoyl-amino acids interferes with protein synthesis.

  13. Amino acid analyses of R and CK chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Aaron S.; McLain, Hannah; Glavin, Daniel P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Davidson, Jemma; Miller, Kelly E.; Andronikov, Alexander V.; Lauretta, Dante; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2015-03-01

    Exogenous delivery of amino acids and other organic molecules to planetary surfaces may have played an important role in the origins of life on Earth and other solar system bodies. Previous studies have revealed the presence of indigenous amino acids in a wide range of carbon-rich meteorites, with the abundances and structural distributions differing significantly depending on parent body mineralogy and alteration conditions. Here we report on the amino acid abundances of seven type 3-6 CK chondrites and two Rumuruti (R) chondrites. Amino acid measurements were made on hot water extracts from these meteorites by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Of the nine meteorites analyzed, four were depleted in amino acids, and one had experienced significant amino acid contamination by terrestrial biology. The remaining four, comprised of two R and two CK chondrites, contained low levels of amino acids that were predominantly the straight chain, amino-terminal (n-?-amino) acids ?-alanine, and ?-amino-n-butyric acid. This amino acid distribution is similar to what we reported previously for thermally altered ureilites and CV and CO chondrites, and these n-?-amino acids appear to be indigenous to the meteorites and not the result of terrestrial contamination. The amino acids may have been formed by Fischer-Tropsch-type reactions, although this hypothesis needs further testing.

  14. Regulation of intestinal mucosal growth by amino acids.

    PubMed

    Ray, Ramesh M; Johnson, Leonard R

    2014-03-01

    Amino acids, especially glutamine (GLN) have been known for many years to stimulate the growth of small intestinal mucosa. Polyamines are also required for optimal mucosal growth, and the inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the first rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine synthesis, blocks growth. Certain amino acids, primarily asparagine (ASN) and GLN stimulate ODC activity in a solution of physiological salts. More importantly, their presence is also required before growth factors and hormones such as epidermal growth factor and insulin are able to increase ODC activity. ODC activity is inhibited by antizyme-1 (AZ) whose synthesis is stimulated by polyamines, thus, providing a negative feedback regulation of the enzyme. In the absence of amino acids mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is inhibited, whereas, mTORC2 is stimulated leading to the inhibition of global protein synthesis but increasing the synthesis of AZ via a cap-independent mechanism. These data, therefore, explain why ASN or GLN is essential for the activation of ODC. Interestingly, in a number of papers, AZ has been shown to inhibit cell proliferation, stimulate apoptosis, or increase autophagy. Each of these activities results in decreased cellular growth. AZ binds to and accelerates the degradation of ODC and other proteins shown to regulate proliferation and cell death, such as Aurora-A, Cyclin D1, and Smad1. The correlation between the stimulation of ODC activity and the absence of AZ as influenced by amino acids is high. Not only do amino acids such as ASN and GLN stimulate ODC while inhibiting AZ synthesis, but also amino acids such as lysine, valine, and ornithine, which inhibit ODC activity, increase the synthesis of AZ. The question remaining to be answered is whether AZ inhibits growth directly or whether it acts by decreasing the availability of polyamines to the dividing cells. In either case, evidence strongly suggests that the regulation of AZ synthesis is the mechanism through which amino acids influence the growth of intestinal mucosa. This brief article reviews the experiments leading to the information presented above. We also present evidence from the literature that AZ acts directly to inhibit cell proliferation and increase the rate of apoptosis. Finally, we discuss future experiments that will determine the role of AZ in the regulation of intestinal mucosal growth by amino acids. PMID:23904095

  15. Amino acids in eight species of Monogenea.

    PubMed

    Arme, C

    1977-04-15

    The ethanol-extractable amino acids of several species of Monogenea were analysed. In the Monopisthocotylea levels were high ( greater than 1,200 micronmoles/g/ethanol extracted dry wt); in the Polyopisthocotylea lower amounts were present (196-562 micronmoles). High proline levels were present in parasites of hosts from a marine environment but low in freshwater forms. No correlation between diet and proline content was observed. PMID:871066

  16. Single amino acid supplementation in aminoacidopathies: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Aminoacidopathies are a group of rare and diverse disorders, caused by the deficiency of an enzyme or transporter involved in amino acid metabolism. For most aminoacidopathies, dietary management is the mainstay of treatment. Such treatment includes severe natural protein restriction, combined with protein substitution with all amino acids except the amino acids prior to the metabolic block and enriched with the amino acid that has become essential by the enzymatic defect. For some aminoacidopathies, supplementation of one or two amino acids, that have not become essential by the enzymatic defect, has been suggested. This so-called single amino acid supplementation can serve different treatment objectives, but evidence is limited. The aim of the present article is to provide a systematic review on the reasons for applications of single amino acid supplementation in aminoacidopathies treated with natural protein restriction and synthetic amino acid mixtures. PMID:24422943

  17. Allied Health Chemistry Laboratory: Amino Acids, Insulin, Proteins, and Skin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dever, David F.

    1975-01-01

    Presents a laboratory experiment specifically designed for allied health students. The students construct molecular models of amino acids, extract amino acids from their skin with hot water, and chromatographically analyze the skin extract and hydrolyzed insulin. (MLH)

  18. Adult bile acid amino transferase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Lord, Richard S.; Tuttle, Daniel M.; Cantor, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Female, 70 Final Diagnosis: Bile acid amino transferase deficiency Symptoms: Headache indigestion itching skin nausea vomiting Medication: Clinical Procedure: Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Challenging differential diagnosis Background: Bile acid synthesis impairments are difficult to diagnose due to non-specific manifestations related to progressive failure to absorb essential fatty acids and fat soluble vitamins and failure to maintain normal intestinal microbiota. Case Report: A 70-year-old female presented with long-standing history of recurrent headaches, indigestion, dry, scaly, itching skin, and fluid around knee joints. Quantitative Electroencephalography (QEEG) revealed widespread excess theta maximum in the temporal regions. A rare pattern of elevated plasma glycine and taurine led to suspicion of BAATD. A stool profile employing molecular probes for commensal bacteria revealed elevation of Fusobacteria spp. Implementation of bile acid replacement therapy (BART) produced rapid remission of headache and other symptoms and a three-month follow up stool profile revealed normalization of fecal Fusobacteria populations that remained normal after one year of BART. QEEG analyses 4 weeks following BART showed evidence of significant improvement in CNS functioning. Conclusions: This case illustrates the potential for diagnosis of latent, adult BAATD by finding a unique pattern of plasma amino acids and monitoring of therapy by observing normalization of fecal commensal bacteria and functional brain assessments. PMID:24587851

  19. A putative amino acid transporter of the SLC6 family is up-regulated by lithium and is required for resistance to lithium toxicity in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kasuya, Junko; Kaas, Garrett A.; Kitamoto, Toshihiro

    2009-01-01

    Lithium is an efficacious drug for the treatment of mood disorders, and its application is also considered a potential therapy for brain damage. However, the mechanisms underlying lithiums therapeutic action and toxic effects in the nervous system remain largely elusive. Here we report on the use of a versatile genetic model, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, to discover novel molecular components involved in the lithium-responsive neurobiological process. We previously identified CG15088, which encodes a putative nutrient amino acid transporter of the solute carrier 6 (SLC6) family, as one of the genes most significantly up-regulated in response to lithium treatment. This gene was the only SLC6 gene induced by lithium, and was thus designated as Lithium-inducible SLC6 transporter or List. Either RNAi-mediated knockdown or complete deletion of List resulted in a remarkable increase in the susceptibility of adult flies to lithiums toxic effects, whereas transgenic expression of wild-type List significantly suppressed the lithium hypersensitive phenotype of List-deficient flies. Other ions such as sodium, potassium and chloride did not induce List up-regulation, nor did they affect the viability of flies with suppressed List expression. These results indicate that lithiums biochemical or physical properties, rather than general osmotic responses, are responsible for the lithium-induced up-regulation of List, as well as for the lithium-susceptible phenotype observed in List knockdown flies. Interestingly, flies became significantly more susceptible to lithium toxicity when List RNAi was specifically expressed in glia than when it was expressed in neurons or muscles, which is consistent with potential glial expression of List. These results show that the List transporter confers resistance to lithium toxicity, possibly as a consequence of its amino acid transporter activity in CNS glia. Our results have provided a new avenue of investigation toward a better understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie lithium-responsive neurobiological process. PMID:19619614

  20. A search for extraterrestrial amino acids in carbonaceous Antarctic micrometeorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinton, K. L.; Engrand, C.; Glavin, D. P.; Bada, J. L.; Maurette, M.

    1998-01-01

    Antarctic micrometeorites (AMMs) in the 100-400 microns size range are the dominant mass fraction of extraterrestrial material accreted by the Earth today. A high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) based technique exploited at the limits of sensitivity has been used to search for the extraterrestrial amino acids alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) and isovaline in AMMs. Five samples, each containing about 30 to 35 grains, were analyzed. All the samples possess a terrestrial amino acid component, indicated by the excess of the L-enantiomers of common protein amino acids. In only one sample (A91) was AIB found to be present at a level significantly above the background blanks. The concentration of AIB (approximately 280 ppm), and the AIB/isovaline ratio (> or = 10), in this sample are both much higher than in CM chondrites. The apparently large variation in the AIB concentrations of the samples suggests that AIB may be concentrated in rare subset of micrometeorites. Because the AIB/isovaline ratio in sample A91 is much larger than in CM chondrites, the synthesis of amino acids in the micrometeorite parent bodies might have involved a different process requiring an HCN-rich environment, such as that found in comets. If the present day characteristics of the meteorite and micrometeorite fluxes can be extrapolated back in time, then the flux of large carbonaceous micrometeorites could have contributed to the inventory of prebiotic molecules on the early Earth.

  1. 40 CFR 721.2584 - Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. 721.2584... Substances § 721.2584 Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as dodecanoic acid, 12-amino- (PMN P-98-0823; CAS No....

  2. 40 CFR 721.2584 - Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. 721.2584... Substances § 721.2584 Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as dodecanoic acid, 12-amino- (PMN P-98-0823; CAS No....

  3. 40 CFR 721.1643 - Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Benzenesulfonic acid, amino... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1643 Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-. (a) Chemical... as a benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo- (PMN P-95-86) is subject to reporting...

  4. 40 CFR 721.1643 - Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Benzenesulfonic acid, amino... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1643 Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-. (a) Chemical... as a benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo- (PMN P-95-86) is subject to reporting...

  5. 40 CFR 721.2584 - Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. 721.2584... Substances § 721.2584 Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as dodecanoic acid, 12-amino- (PMN P-98-0823; CAS No....

  6. 40 CFR 721.1643 - Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Benzenesulfonic acid, amino... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1643 Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-. (a) Chemical... as a benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo- (PMN P-95-86) is subject to reporting...

  7. Metabolomics method to comprehensively analyze amino acids in different domains.

    PubMed

    Gu, Haiwei; Du, Jianhai; Carnevale Neto, Fausto; Carroll, Patrick A; Turner, Sally J; Chiorean, E Gabriela; Eisenman, Robert N; Raftery, Daniel

    2015-04-21

    Amino acids play essential roles in both metabolism and the proteome. Many studies have profiled free amino acids (FAAs) or proteins; however, few have connected the measurement of FAA with individual amino acids in the proteome. In this study, we developed a metabolomics method to comprehensively analyze amino acids in different domains, using two examples of different sample types and disease models. We first examined the responses of FAAs and insoluble-proteome amino acids (IPAAs) to the Myc oncogene in Tet21N human neuroblastoma cells. The metabolic and proteomic amino acid profiles were quite different, even under the same Myc condition, and their combination provided a better understanding of the biological status. In addition, amino acids were measured in 3 domains (FAAs, free and soluble-proteome amino acids (FSPAAs), and IPAAs) to study changes in serum amino acid profiles related to colon cancer. A penalized logistic regression model based on the amino acids from the three domains had better sensitivity and specificity than that from each individual domain. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to perform a combined analysis of amino acids in different domains, and indicates the useful biological information available from a metabolomics analysis of the protein pellet. This study lays the foundation for further quantitative tracking of the distribution of amino acids in different domains, with opportunities for better diagnosis and mechanistic studies of various diseases. PMID:25699545

  8. Origin, Microbiology, Nutrition, and Pharmacology of D-Amino Acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exposure of food proteins to certain processing conditions induces two major chemical changes: racemization of all L-amino acids (LAA) to D-amino acids (DAA) and concurrent formation of crosslinked amino acids such as lysinoalanine (LAL). The diet contains both processing-induced and naturally-form...

  9. Digestible indispensable amino acid score and digestible amino acids in eight cereal grains.

    PubMed

    Cervantes-Pahm, Sarah K; Liu, Yanhong; Stein, Hans H

    2014-05-01

    To determine values for the digestible indispensable amino acid score (DIAAS), it is recommended that ileal amino acid (AA) digestibility values obtained in growing pigs are used to characterise protein quality in different foods. Therefore, an experiment was conducted to determine the standardised ileal digestibility (SID) of AA in eight cereal grains (yellow dent maize, Nutridense maize, dehulled barley, dehulled oats, polished white rice, rye, sorghum and wheat) fed to pigs, where SID values in pigs can be used to calculate approximate DIAAS values in humans. In the present experiment, twenty-four barrows with a T-cannula inserted in the distal ileum were allotted to eight diets and fed for three periods to give a total of nine replicate pigs per diet. Each period lasted 14d, and ileal digesta samples were collected on days 13 and 14. Among the SID values obtained for all cereal grains, values for total indispensable AA were greatest (P<005) in rice and lowest (P<005) in rye and sorghum. The concentrations of SID indispensable AA in rice were less (P<005) than in dehulled oats, but greater (P<005) than in the other cereal grains, and the concentrations of SID indispensable AA in Nutridense maize were greater (P<005) than in yellow dent maize and sorghum, but less (P<005) than in the other cereal grains, except rye. In conclusion, results indicate that to meet dietary requirements for AA in humans, diets based on yellow dent maize or sorghum require more AA supplementation than diets based on other cereal grains. PMID:24480298

  10. Amino acid utilization and isotope discrimination of amino nitrogen in nitrogen metabolism of rat liver in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sick, H; Roos, N; Saggau, E; Haas, K; Meyn, V; Walch, B; Trugo, N

    1997-12-01

    Urea and plasma protein differ in natural 15N abundance up to 10%. The origin of this difference is the branched nitrogen metabolism in the liver. One main branch is the protein synthesis pathway, the other the urea synthesis pathway. By this branching 15N of precursor amino acids is depleted in urea while it is enriched in protein. With the 15N abundance of precursor amino acids, which may be taken from jejunum tissue, utilization of amino acids in liver metabolism can be calculated from isotope discrimination in either pathway. This was investigated by feeding different proteins to rats. When feeding high quality protein (whey protein) utilization of amino acids in liver metabolism at requirement intake was better than at zero protein intake (> 85% vs. 70%). From this we conclude that the pattern of amino acids available from the metabolic pool at zero protein intake is characterized by an imbalance. This endogenous imbalance can be complemented by exogenous dietary amino acids so that nitrogen excretion may even be smaller than the so-called "obligatory" losses of intakes not exceeding requirement. Thus, the quality of dietary protein is reflected not only by N balance. It also may be quantified by analysis of isotope discrimination in nitrogen metabolism of the liver. In addition, the quality of amino acid pattern available from the metabolic pool is indicated by this method. PMID:9467229

  11. Computational model of abiogenic amino acid condensation to obtain a polar amino acid profile.

    PubMed

    Polanco, Carlos; Buhse, Thomas; Samaniego, Jos Lino; Castan Gonzlez, Jorge Alberto; Arias Estrada, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    In accordance with the second law of thermodynamics, the Universe as a whole tends to higher entropy. However, the sequence of far-from-equilibrium events that led to the emergence of life on Earth could have imposed order and complexity during the course of chemical reactions in the so-called primordial soup of life. Hence, we may expect to find characteristic profiles or biases in the prebiotic product mixtures, as for instance among the first amino acids. Seeking to shed light on this hypothesis, we have designed a high performance computer program that simulates the spontaneous formation of the amino acid monomers in closed environments. The program was designed in reference to a prebiotic scenario proposed by Sydney W. Fox. The amino acid abundances and their polarities as the two principal biases were also taken into consideration. We regarded the computational model as exhaustive since 200,000 amino acid dimers were formed by simulation, subsequently expressed in a vector and compared with the corresponding amino acid dimers that were experimentally obtained by Fox. We found a very high similarity between the experimental results and our simulations. PMID:24809066

  12. Comparative nutrition and metabolism: Explication of open questions with emphasis on protein and amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Baker, David H.

    2005-01-01

    The 20th century saw numerous important discoveries in the nutritional sciences. Nonetheless, many unresolved questions still remain. Fifteen questions dealing with amino acid nutrition and metabolism are posed in this review. The first six deal with the functionality of sulfur amino acids (methionine and cysteine) and related compounds. Other unresolved problems that are discussed include priorities of use for amino acids having multiple functions; interactions among lysine, niacin and tryptophan; amino acid contributions to requirements from gut biosynthesis; the potential for gluconeogenesis to divert amino acids away from protein synthesis; the unique nutritional and metabolic idiosyncrasies of feline species, with emphasis on arginine; controversies surrounding human amino acid requirements; and the potential for maternal diet to influence sex ratio of offspring. PMID:16326801

  13. Retention and utilization of amino acids in piglets fed ad libitum or restrictively diets supplemented with organic acids.

    PubMed

    Walz, O P; Pallauf, J

    1997-01-01

    In a metabolic trial 4 groups of 8 piglets of 5 kg weight each were kept individually for 45 days (final weight 23 kg) and fed a practical diet. At the beginning of the experiment the body amino acid contents of an additional group of 8 piglets were determined by carcass analysis, and at the end of the experiment the body amino acid contents of the 4 test group piglets (A = control fed ad libitum, B and C = supplement of 1.5% fumaric acid fed ad libitum or restrictively, D = supplement of 1.5% citric acid fed ad libitum) were also analysed. The amino acid retention during the experimental period was determined by difference. The supplements of fumaric or citric acid did not influence the amount of the amino acid retention. The quotient of amino acid retention to amino acid consumed or the "productive amino acid value" was calculated and the maintenance requirements of essential amino acids for piglets were used to estimate the productive amino acid value for both retention and maintenance. The mean amino acid retention amounted to about 56 g/d, i.e. 3.49 g/kg W0.75.d of essential amino acids. The essential amino acid requirements for maintenance was 2.0 g, i.e. 0.29 g/kg W0.75.d, showing a variation of 4% (Leu) to 20% (Met+Cys) when related to the amount of the corresponding amino acid retention. With regard to the amino acid pattern for retention of the nutritionally most important amino acids, the following ratios were found: Lys, 100 (6.27 g/16 g N): Met+Cys, 48 (3.03 g): Thr, 56 (3.49 g): Trp, 13 (0.80 g). The productive amino acid values ranged from 40% (Trp), 55% (Thr), 66% (Met) to 80% (Lys). Under the conditions investigated, neither the supplements of organic acids nor the feed restriction influenced the amino acid utilization. PMID:9272221

  14. Nutritional and medicinal aspects of D-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Mendel; Levin, Carol E

    2012-05-01

    This paper reviews and interprets a method for determining the nutritional value of D-amino acids, D-peptides, and amino acid derivatives using a growth assay in mice fed a synthetic all-amino acid diet. A large number of experiments were carried out in which a molar equivalent of the test compound replaced a nutritionally essential amino acid such as L-lysine (L-Lys), L-methionine (L-Met), L-phenylalanine (L-Phe), and L-tryptophan (L-Trp) as well as the semi-essential amino acids L-cysteine (L-Cys) and L-tyrosine (L-Tyr). The results show wide-ranging variations in the biological utilization of test substances. The method is generally applicable to the determination of the biological utilization and safety of any amino acid derivative as a potential nutritional source of the corresponding L-amino acid. Because the organism is forced to use the D-amino acid or amino acid derivative as the sole source of the essential or semi-essential amino acid being replaced, and because a free amino acid diet allows better control of composition, the use of all-amino-acid diets for such determinations may be preferable to protein-based diets. Also covered are brief summaries of the widely scattered literature on dietary and pharmacological aspects of 27 individual D-amino acids, D-peptides, and isomeric amino acid derivatives and suggested research needs in each of these areas. The described results provide a valuable record and resource for further progress on the multifaceted aspects of D-amino acids in food and biological samples. PMID:21519915

  15. Sublimation of natural amino acids and induction of asymmetry by meteoritic amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasevych, Arkadii V.; Guillemin, Jean-Claude

    It is believed that the homochirality of building blocks of life like amino acids (AAs) and sugars is a prerequisite requirement for the origin and evolution of life. Among different mechanisms that might have triggered the initial disparity in the enantiomeric ratio on the primitive Earth, the key roles were assigned to: (i) local chiral symmetry breaking and (ii) the inflow of extraterrestrial matter (eg the carbonaceous meteorites containing non-racemic AAs). Recently it has been revealed that sublimation, a subject almost completely neglected for a long time, gives a pathway to enantioenrichment of natural AAs (1,2 and references herein). Sublimation is however one of the key physical processes that occur on comets. Starting from a mixture with a low content of an enantiopure AA, a partial sublimation gives an important enrichment of the sublimate (1,2). The resulted disparity in the ratio between enantiomers of a partial sublimate is determined by the crystalline nature of the starting mixture: we observed a drastic difference in the behavior of (i) mixtures based on true racemic compounds and (ii) mechanical mixtures of two enantiopure solid phases. On the other hand, combination of crystallization and sublimation can lead to segregation of enantioenriched fractions starting from racemic composition of sublimable aliphatic AAs (Ala, Leu, Pro, Val) in mixtures with non-volatile enantiopure ones (Asn, Asp, Glu, Ser, Thr) (3). The resulted sense of chirality correlates with the handedness of the non-volatile AAs: the observed changes in enantiomeric ratios clearly demonstrate the preferential homochiral interactions and a tendency of natural amino acids to homochiral self-organization. It is noteworthy that just these 5 (Asn, Asp, Glu, Ser, Thr) out of 22 proteinogenic amino acids are able to local symmetry breaking. On the other hand, recent data on the enantiomeric composition of the Tagish Lake, a C2-type carbonaceous meteorite, revealed a large L-enantiomeric excess of Asp and Glu (4) that we used in our experiments. These experimental data may shed some light on one of the facets of complex and mysterious preobiotic processes that eventually could have led to the origin of life. References: 1. Bellec A, Guillemin JC. Chem Commun 2010, 46:1482-1484. 2. Tarasevych AV, Sorochinsky AE, Kukhar VP, Chollet A, Daniellou R, Guillemin JC. J Org Chem 2013, 78:10530-10533. 3. Tarasevych AV, Sorochinsky AE, Kukhar VP, Guillemin JC. Orig Life Evol Biosph 2013, 43:129-135. 4. Glavin DP, Elsila JE, Burton AS, Callahan MP, Dworkin JP, Hilts RW, Herd CDK. Meteor Planet Sci 2012, 47:1347-1364.

  16. Neighbor preferences of amino acids and context-dependent effects of amino acid substitutions in human, mouse, and dog.

    PubMed

    Fu, Mingchuan; Huang, Zhuoran; Mao, Yuanhui; Tao, Shiheng

    2014-01-01

    Amino acids show apparent propensities toward their neighbors. In addition to preferences of amino acids for their neighborhood context, amino acid substitutions are also considered to be context-dependent. However, context-dependence patterns of amino acid substitutions still remain poorly understood. Using relative entropy, we investigated the neighbor preferences of 20 amino acids and the context-dependent effects of amino acid substitutions with protein sequences in human, mouse, and dog. For 20 amino acids, the highest relative entropy was mostly observed at the nearest adjacent site of either N- or C-terminus except C and G. C showed the highest relative entropy at the third flanking site and periodic pattern was detected at G flanking sites. Furthermore, neighbor preference patterns of amino acids varied greatly in different secondary structures. We then comprehensively investigated the context-dependent effects of amino acid substitutions. Our results showed that nearly half of 380 substitution types were evidently context dependent, and the context-dependent patterns relied on protein secondary structures. Among 20 amino acids, P elicited the greatest effect on amino acid substitutions. The underlying mechanisms of context-dependent effects of amino acid substitutions were possibly mutation bias at a DNA level and natural selection. Our findings may improve secondary structure prediction algorithms and protein design; moreover, this study provided useful information to develop empirical models of protein evolution that consider dependence between residues. PMID:25210846

  17. Amino acid compositional shifts during streptophyte transitions to terrestrial habitats.

    PubMed

    Jobson, Richard W; Qiu, Yin-Long

    2011-02-01

    Across the streptophyte lineage, which includes charophycean algae and embryophytic plants, there have been at least four independent transitions to the terrestrial habitat. One of these involved the evolution of embryophytes (bryophytes and tracheophytes) from a charophycean ancestor, while others involved the earliest branching lineages, containing the monotypic genera Mesostigma and Chlorokybus, and within the Klebsormidiales and Zygnematales lineages. To overcome heat, water stress, and increased exposure to ultraviolet radiation, which must have accompanied these transitions, adaptive mechanisms would have been required. During periods of dehydration and/or desiccation, proteomes struggle to maintain adequate cytoplasmic solute concentrations. The increased usage of charged amino acids (DEHKR) may be one way of maintaining protein hydration, while increased use of aromatic residues (FHWY) protects proteins and nucleic acids by absorbing damaging UV, with both groups of residues thought to be important for the stabilization of protein structures. To test these hypotheses we examined amino acid sequences of orthologous proteins representing both mitochondrion- and plastid-encoded proteomes across streptophytic lineages. We compared relative differences within categories of amino acid residues and found consistent patterns of amino acid compositional fluxuation in extra-membranous regions that correspond with episodes of terrestrialization: positive change in usage frequency for residues with charged side-chains, and aromatic residues of the light-capturing chloroplast proteomes. We also found a general decrease in the usage frequency of hydrophobic, aliphatic, and small residues. These results suggest that amino acid compositional shifts in extra-membrane regions of plastid and mitochondrial proteins may represent biochemical adaptations that allowed green plants to colonize the land. PMID:21153633

  18. Molecular interactions in conjugates of dicarboxylic acids and amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolbe, Alfred; Griehl, Carola; Biehler, Simone

    2003-12-01

    Vibrational spectroscopic studies have been performed to obtain information regarding intermolecular forces acting in conjugates formed by dicarboxylic en-acids (fumaric acid, maleic acid) or their monobenzyl esters with esters of amino acids in the crystalline state and in solution. -NH groups, -COOH groups, and CO amide groups have turned out to be the preferred carriers of those molecular interactions, which are the driving forces to form associates. These associates are mostly different in the crystalline state and in solution. The dimerisation of the molecules via the -COOH groups is suppressed in the preponderate number of cases in these molecular arrangements. The different behaviour of the substances is discussed in detail.

  19. The role of microbial amino acid metabolism in host metabolism.

    PubMed

    Neis, Evelien P J G; Dejong, Cornelis H C; Rensen, Sander S

    2015-04-01

    Disruptions in gut microbiota composition and function are increasingly implicated in the pathogenesis of obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The functional output of the gut microbiota, including short-chain fatty acids and amino acids, are thought to be important modulators underlying the development of these disorders. Gut bacteria can alter the bioavailability of amino acids by utilization of several amino acids originating from both alimentary and endogenous proteins. In turn, gut bacteria also provide amino acids to the host. This could have significant implications in the context of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus, conditions associated with elevated systemic concentrations of certain amino acids, in particular the aromatic and branched-chain amino acids. Moreover, several amino acids released by gut bacteria can serve as precursors for the synthesis of short-chain fatty acids, which also play a role in the development of obesity. In this review, we aim to compile the available evidence on the contribution of microbial amino acids to host amino acid homeostasis, and to assess the role of the gut microbiota as a determinant of amino acid and short-chain fatty acid perturbations in human obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:25894657

  20. The Role of Microbial Amino Acid Metabolism in Host Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Neis, Evelien P. J. G.; Dejong, Cornelis H. C.; Rensen, Sander S.

    2015-01-01

    Disruptions in gut microbiota composition and function are increasingly implicated in the pathogenesis of obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The functional output of the gut microbiota, including short-chain fatty acids and amino acids, are thought to be important modulators underlying the development of these disorders. Gut bacteria can alter the bioavailability of amino acids by utilization of several amino acids originating from both alimentary and endogenous proteins. In turn, gut bacteria also provide amino acids to the host. This could have significant implications in the context of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus, conditions associated with elevated systemic concentrations of certain amino acids, in particular the aromatic and branched-chain amino acids. Moreover, several amino acids released by gut bacteria can serve as precursors for the synthesis of short-chain fatty acids, which also play a role in the development of obesity. In this review, we aim to compile the available evidence on the contribution of microbial amino acids to host amino acid homeostasis, and to assess the role of the gut microbiota as a determinant of amino acid and short-chain fatty acid perturbations in human obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:25894657

  1. Biosynthesis of amino acids in Clostridium pasteurianum

    PubMed Central

    Dainty, R. H.; Peel, J. L.

    1970-01-01

    1. Clostridium pasteurianum was grown on a synthetic medium with the following carbon sources: (a) 14C-labelled glucose, alone or with unlabelled aspartate or glutamate, or (b) unlabelled glucose plus 14C-labelled aspartate, glutamate, threonine, serine or glycine. The incorporation of 14C into the amino acids of the cell protein was examined. 2. In both series of experiments carbon from exogenous glutamate was incorporated into proline and arginine; carbon from aspartate was incorporated into glutamate, proline, arginine, lysine, methionine, threonine, isoleucine, glycine and serine. Incorporations from the other exogenous amino acids indicated the metabolic sequence: aspartate → threonine → glycine ⇌ serine. 3. The following activities were demonstrated in cell-free extracts of the organism: (a) the formation of aspartate by carboxylation of phosphoenolpyruvate or pyruvate, followed by transamination; (b) the individual reactions of the tricarboxylic acid route to 2-oxoglutarate from oxaloacetate; glutamate dehydrogenase was not detected; (c) the conversion of aspartate into threonine via homoserine; (d) the conversion of threonine into glycine by a constitutive threonine aldolase; (e) serine transaminase, phosphoserine transaminase, glycerate dehydrogenase and phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase. This last activity was abnormally high. 4. The combined evidence indicates that in C. pasteurianum the biosynthetic role of aspartate and glutamate is generally similar to that in aerobic and facultatively aerobic organisms, but that glycine is synthesized from glucose via aspartate and threonine. PMID:5419750

  2. Organic geochemistry of amino acids: Precambrian to recent

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, M.H.; Macko, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    Since the discovery of amino acids in fossils (Abelson, 1954), considerable effort has been made to elucidate the origin and distribution of amino acids in geologic materials. Racemization and decomposition reactions of amino acids and peptides derived via the natural hydrolysis of protein constituents of organisms have been extensively studied. While the ubiquity of amino acids presents a challenge for discerning their indigeneity in geologic samples, careful analyses have resulted in successful applications of amino acid racemization and decomposition reactions for investigations of geochronologic, paleoclimatic, stratigraphic, diagenetic and chemotaxonomic problems for Quaternary age samples. An investigation of amino acids in sediments from Baffin Island fjords indicates that their distribution may also provide data with respect to the relative contributions of marine and terrigenous organic matter to recent sediments. While the absence of unstable amino acids and the presence of racemic amino acids in a sample may preclude very recent contamination, the possibility of retardation of amino acid racemization rates subsequent to geopolymer formation must also be considered. Studies of amino acids in Paleozoic, Mesozoic and early Cenozoic age samples are limited. Precambrian samples, however, have received much attention, given the potential (however slight) for isolating compounds representative of the earliest living systems. A future approach for elucidating the origin(s) of amino acids in ancient samples may be analyses of their individual stable isotopic compositions.

  3. Dissolved amino acids in oceanic basaltic basement fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Huei-Ting; Amend, Jan P.; LaRowe, Douglas E.; Bingham, Jon-Paul; Cowen, James P.

    2015-09-01

    The oceanic basaltic basement contains the largest aquifer on Earth and potentially plays an important role in the global carbon cycle as a net sink for dissolved organic carbon (DOC). However, few details of the organic matter cycling in the subsurface are known because great water depths and thick sediments typically hinder direct access to this environment. In an effort to examine the role of water-rock-microorganism interaction on organic matter cycling in the oceanic basaltic crust, basement fluid samples collected from three borehole observatories installed on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge were analyzed for dissolved amino acids. Our data show that dissolved free amino acids (1-13 nM) and dissolved hydrolyzable amino acids (43-89 nM) are present in the basement. The amino acid concentrations in the ridge-flank basement fluids are at the low end of all submarine hydrothermal fluids reported in the literature and are similar to those in deep seawater. Amino acids in recharging deep seawater, in situ amino acid production, and diffusional input from overlying sediments are potential sources of amino acids in the basement fluids. Thermodynamic modeling shows that amino acid synthesis in the basement can be sustained by energy supplied from inorganic substrates via chemolithotrophic metabolisms. Furthermore, an analysis of amino acid concentrations and compositions in basement fluids support the notion that heterotrophic activity is ongoing. Similarly, the enrichment of acidic amino acids and depletion of hydrophobic ones relative to sedimentary particulate organic matter suggests that surface sorption and desorption also alters amino acids in the basaltic basement. In summary, although the oceanic basement aquifer is a net sink for deep seawater DOC, similar amino acid concentrations in basement aquifer and deep seawater suggest that DOC is preferentially removed in the basement over dissolved amino acids. Our data also suggest that organic carbon cycling occurs in the oceanic basaltic basement, where an active subsurface biosphere is likely responsible for amino acid synthesis and degradation.

  4. Interaction of aromatic amino acids with neutral polyadenylic acid.

    PubMed

    Raszka, M; Mandel, M

    1971-06-01

    The aromatic amino acids tryptophan, phenylalanine, and histidine interact with singlestranded polyadenylic acid [poly(A)] as observed by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The chemical shift of the C(2) and C(8) protons of the adenine moiety of poly(A) is consistent with a destacking of the initially partly-stacked polynucleotide chain by the intercalation of the planar ring structure. The relative magnitude of this interaction is tryptophan>phenylalanine>histidine. PMID:5288367

  5. [New enzymatic strategies for enantiomers of lactams and amino acids].

    PubMed

    Forr, Eniko

    2011-01-01

    To fulfil the requirements of modern go-ahead research, new direct and indirect enzymatic strategies and new techniques have been devised for the preparation of enantiopure beta- and gamma-lactams and beta- and gamma-amino acids, and some of them have been scaled up. For example, a formal total synthesis of enantiopure Anatoxina, a neurotoxic alkaloid, but a potent and stereospecific agonist at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors has been introduced. An efficient and very simple method has been developed for the synthesis of the antibacterial cispentacin [(1R,2S)-2-amino-1-cyclopentanecarboxylic acid] and 8 new derivatives. A highly efficient enzymatic procedure has been elaborated for the synthesis of the blockbuster drug Abacavir and Carbovir intermediate (1S,4R)-4-aminocyclopent-2-ene-1-carboxylic acid. The first enzymatic method has been devised for the synthesis of (R)-3-amino-4-(2,4,5-trifluorophenyl)butanoic acid, the intermediate for the new antidiabetic drug Sitagliptine. Direct enzymatic strategies have been reported for the synthesis of (2R,3S)-3-phenylisoserine, a key intermediate of the side-chain of the antitumor product Taxol. A new enzymatic method has been developed for the total synthesis of crispine A enantiomers with antitumor activity. As amino acids are among the main products in the above-mentioned enzymatic methods, a new gas-chromatographic method has been acquired for the enantioseparation of acyclic and carbocyclic cis- and trans-beta-amino acids via a rapid double derivatization technique (esterification followed by N-acylation). APPLICABILITY: Through the utilization of enzymes, efficient enantioselective procedures in organic media have been developed and applied for the preparation of enantiopure, biologically active (beta- and gamma-lactams and beta- and gamma-amino acids (Scheme 15). Two of our recently elaborated enzymatic methods for the synthesis of beta- and gamma-amino acids have been patented. Acros Organics and BioBlocks Inc. serve as the sales companies of more than 20 enantiopure products that we have prepared by enzymatic methods. PMID:22165415

  6. Isotope composition of carbon in amino acids of solid bitumens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanina, S. N.; Bushnev, D. A.

    2014-06-01

    Primary data are presented on the isotope composition of carbon in individual amino acids from solid bitumens and several biological objects. The amino acids of biological objects are characterized by wide variations of the isotope composition of carbon. This fact occurs owing to the difference in biochemical paths of metabolism resulting in the synthesis of individual amino acids. The ?13C values are somewhat decreased for individual amino acids in asphaltenes, varying from -7.7 to -31.7. The carbon of amino acids is weighted in kerits from Bad'el' compared to asphaltenes. All the natural bitumens retain the characteristic trend for natural substances: the isotopically heavy and light amino acids by carbon are glycine and leucine, respectively. The isotope composition of amino-acid carbon is lightened compared to natural bitumens in the samples formed under a pronounced thermal impact (asphalt-like crust and kirishite).

  7. Amino Acid Export in Plants: A Missing Link in Nitrogen Cycling

    PubMed Central

    Okumoto, Sakiko; Pilot, Guillaume

    2011-01-01

    The export of nutrients from source organs to parts of the body where they are required (e.g. sink organs) is a fundamental biological process. Export of amino acids, one of the most abundant nitrogen species in plant long-distance transport tissues (i.e. xylem and phloem), is an essential process for the proper distribution of nitrogen in the plant. Physiological studies have detected the presence of multiple amino acid export systems in plant cell membranes. Yet, surprisingly little is known about the molecular identity of amino acid exporters, partially due to the technical difficulties hampering the identification of exporter proteins. In this short review, we will summarize our current knowledge about amino acid export systems in plants. Several studies have described plant amino acid transporters capable of bi-directional, facilitative transport, reminiscent of activities identified by earlier physiological studies. Moreover, recent expansion in the number of available amino acid transporter sequences have revealed evolutionary relationships between amino acid exporters from other organisms with a number of uncharacterized plant proteins, some of which might also function as amino acid exporters. In addition, genes that may regulate export of amino acids have been discovered. Studies of these putative transporter and regulator proteins may help in understanding the elusive molecular mechanisms of amino acid export in plants. PMID:21324969

  8. Intermolecular Vibrations of Hydrophobic Amino Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Michael Roy Casselman

    Hydrophobic amino acids interact with their chemical environment through a combination of electrostatic, hydrogen bonding, dipole, induced dipole, and dispersion forces. These interactions all have their own characteristic energy scale and distance dependence. The low-frequency (0.1-5 THz, 5-150 cm-1) vibrational modes of amino acids in the solid state are a direct indicator of the interactions between the molecules, which include interactions between an amino acid functional group and its surroundings. This information is central to understanding the dynamics and morphology of proteins. The alpha-carbon is a chiral center for all of the hydrophobic amino acids, meaning that they exist in two forms, traditionally referred to as L- and D-enantiomers. This nomenclature indicates which direction the molecule rotates plane-polarized visible light (levorotory and dextrorotory). Chiral a-amino acids in proteins are exclusively the L-variety In the solid state, the crystal lattice of the pure L-enantiomer is the mirror image of the D-enantiomer crystal lattice. These solids are energetically identical. Enantiomers also have identical spectroscopic properties except when the measurement is polarization sensitive. A mixture of equal amounts D- and L-amino acid enantiomers can crystallize into a racemic (DL-) structure that is different from that of the pure enantiomers. Whether a solution of both enantiomers will crystallize into a racemic form or spontaneously resolve into a mixture of separate D- and L-crystals largely depends on the interactions between molecules available in the various possible configurations. This is an active area of research. Low-frequency vibrations with intermolecular character are very sensitive to changes in lattice geometry, and consequently the vibrational spectra of racemic crystals are usually quite distinct from the spectra of the crystals of the corresponding pure enantiomers in the far-infrared (far-IR). THz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) was used to measure the absorption spectra of low-frequency vibrational modes for a variety of hydrophobic amino acids in the solid (polycrystalline) state. The THz-TDS technique uses ultrafast (<50 fs) pulses of light from a visible/near-IR laser to generate single-cycle pulses of THz (far-IR) light. Pulses from the ultrafast laser are also used to coherently gate a THz detector, allowing phase-sensitive measurements of the THz electric field. In some cases, Raman scattering spectra of some of the polycrystalline hydrophobic amino acid samples were measured as well, in this case using an Ar+ laser and a triple monochromator to detect signals at the low Raman-shift values corresponding to the far-IR. THz-TDS was used to measure the low-frequency vibrational absorption spectra of pure L- and pure D-valine crystals as well as the racemic cocrystal, DL-valine. As expected, the Land D-valine THz-TDS absorption spectra are identical to one another (they are enantiomorphous crystals) but very different from the spectrum of DL-valine. In the process of these experiments, it was discovered that it was possible to prepare two distinct polymorphs (different crystalline arrangements) of DL-valine by varying the conditions under which stock material was recrystallized. Once crystallized in a particular form, both polymorphs remained (meta)stable at all temperatures investigated (from 80 K to room temperature), i.e., no phase transformation was observed. The THz-TDS and Raman spectra of the two polymorphs of DL-valine were measured. In addition, THz-TDS and Raman spectra of DL-leucine were measured; this substance has a crystal structure closely analagous to one of the DL-valine polymorphs. The temperature-dependence of the THz-TDS spectrum of each material was also measured. At lower temperatures, it is generally expected that intermolecular vibration frequencies increase (blueshift) due to a shrinking unit cell (effectively squeezing the oscillator potential into a smaller space). While most peaks were indeed observed to blueshift as the sample was cooled, the temperature dependence of the peak position and intensity varied significantly for different modes: while some peaks were hardly affected by the decreasing temperature, others sharpened and/or blueshifted appreciably. Theoretical modeling of intermolecular vibrations in hydrophobic amino acids is challenging because the van der Waals dispersion interactions between the molecules are not accounted for in standard density functional theory (DFT). However, recent advances in theory have made it possible to incorporate these non-local electron correlation forces within the framework of DFT. In addition to carrying out these calculations, methods for comparing results from different theoretical models were devised and evaluated. Perhaps most significantly, a new approach was developed to allow for concise description and easy comparison of vibrational modes that involve complicated mixtures of inter- and intramolecular displacements.

  9. Amino Acid Formation on Saturn's Inner Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delitsky, M. L.; Lane, A. L.; Tidwell, T. T.; Henry-Riyad, H.

    2002-09-01

    Titan's atmosphere contributes nitrogen atoms and ions to the Saturnian magnetosphere. These ions have inward motion towards Saturn and should impact the inner satellites, thereby inducing a complex nitrogen oxides chemistry in the surfaces via their interaction with the water ice present. Species formed may include NO, NO2, NO3, HNO2, HNO3, NH2OH, HNO, NH, NH2, N2O, HNNO, and N2. If the surfaces also include CO2, then other species that may be formed as a result of N+ impact into H2O/CO2 ice will be HNCO, NCO and R-OCN. Successive reaction of HNCO with H and CO (which occur in irradiated H2O/CO2 ice) could lead to the smallest amino acid, glycine, in only 5 steps. Addition of CO to HNCO with successive hydrogenation of the oxygen atoms forms an -OH group with a C=O bond still present. Migration of the OH onto the C=O carbon yields a carboxylic acid group (-COOH). The HNCO -> Glycine conversion utilizes only simple and exothermic addition and rearrangement reactions. Both H and CO would be mobile in the water/CO2 ice crystal at the temperatures on the Saturnian satellites. Every step in the sequence is calculated to be exothermic, and the entire sequence is exothermic by a total of 231 kcal/mole. Therefore these sequences may occur under the temporary non-equilibrium conditions resulting from high-energy particle impact and subsequent residual heating. Glycine has its own radiolysis products, such as CHOCOOH (glyoxylic acid), CH3NH2 (methyl amine), HCHO, NH3, H2O2, and H2. Formation of higher-order amino acids, such as alanine and aminobutyric acids, might also occur, from solid-phase radiolysis or gas-phase ionic synthesis of combinations of some of the smaller molecules in the sequence.

  10. Extraterrestrial Amino Acids in the Almahata Sitta Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Aubrey, Andrew D.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Parker, Eric T.; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2010-01-01

    Amino acid analysis of a meteorite fragment of asteroid 2008 TC3 called Almahata Sitta was carried out using reverse-phase liquid chromatography coupled with UV fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-FD/ToF-MS) as part of a sample analysis consortium. LC-FD/ToF-MS analyses of hot-water extracts from the meteorite revealed a complex distribution of two- to seven-carbon aliphatic amino acids and one- to three-carbon amines with abundances ranging from 0.5 to 149 parts-per-billion (ppb). The enantiomeric ratios of the amino acids alanine, R-amino-n-butyric acid (beta-ABA), 2-amino-2-methylbutanoic acid (isovaline), and 2-aminopentanoic acid (norvaline) in the meteorite were racemic (D/L approximately 1), indicating that these amino acids are indigenous to the meteorite and not terrestrial contaminants. Several other non-protein amino acids were also identified in the meteorite above background levels including alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (alpha-AIB), 4-amino-2- methylbutanoic acid, 4-amino-3-methylbutanoic acid, and 3-, 4-, and 5-aminopentanoic acid. The total abundances of isovaline and alpha-AIB in Almahata Sitta are 1000 times lower than the abundances of these amino acids found in the CM carbonaceous chondrite Murchison. The extremely low abundances and unusual distribution of five carbon amino acids in Almahata Sitta compared to Cl, CM, and CR carbonaceous chondrites may reflect extensive thermal alteration of amino acids on the parent asteroid by partial melting during formation or subsequent impact shock heating. It is also possible that amino acids were synthesized by catalytic reactions on the parent body after asteroid 2008 TC3 cooled to lower temperatures.

  11. Extraterrestrial amino acids in the Almahata Sitta meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Aubrey, Andrew D.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Parker, Eric T.; Bada, Jeffrey L.; Jenniskens, Peter; Shaddad, Muawia H.

    2010-10-01

    Amino acid analysis of a meteorite fragment of asteroid 2008 TC3 called Almahata Sitta was carried out using reverse-phase liquid chromatography coupled with UV fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-FD/ToF-MS) as part of a sample analysis consortium. LC-FD/ToF-MS analyses of hot-water extracts from the meteorite revealed a complex distribution of two- to seven-carbon aliphatic amino acids and one- to three-carbon amines with abundances ranging from 0.5 to 149 parts-per-billion (ppb). The enantiomeric ratios of the amino acids alanine, β-amino-n-butyric acid, 2-amino-2-methylbutanoic acid (isovaline), and 2-aminopentanoic acid (norvaline) in the meteorite were racemic (D/L ˜ 1), indicating that these amino acids are indigenous to the meteorite and not terrestrial contaminants. Several other nonprotein amino acids were also identified in the meteorite above background levels including α-aminoisobutyric acid (α-AIB), 4-amino-2-methylbutanoic acid, 4-amino-3-methylbutanoic acid, and 3-, 4-, and 5-aminopentanoic acid. The total abundances of isovaline and α-AIB in Almahata Sitta are approximately 1000 times lower than the abundances of these amino acids found in the CM carbonaceous chondrite Murchison. The extremely low abundances and unusual distribution of five-carbon amino acids in Almahata Sitta compared to CI, CM, and CR carbonaceous chondrites may reflect extensive thermal alteration of amino acids on the parent asteroid by partial melting during formation or subsequent impact shock heating. It is also possible that amino acids were synthesized by catalytic reactions on the parent body after asteroid 2008 TC3 cooled to lower temperatures, or introduced as a contaminant from unrelated meteorite clasts and chemically altered by α-decarboxylation.

  12. Ribosomal Synthesis of Peptides with Multiple ?-Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Fujino, Tomoshige; Goto, Yuki; Suga, Hiroaki; Murakami, Hiroshi

    2016-02-17

    The compatibility of ?-amino acids with ribosomal translation was studied for decades, but it has been still unclear whether the ribosome can accept various ?-amino acids, and whether the ribosome can introduce multiple ?-amino acids in a peptide. In the present study, by using the Escherichia coli reconstituted cell-free translation system with a reprogramed genetic code, we screened ?-amino acids that give high single incorporation efficiency and used them to synthesize peptides containing multiple ?-amino acids. The experiments of single ?-amino acid incorporation into a peptide revealed that 13 ?-amino acids are compatible with ribosomal translation. Six of the tested ?-amino acids (?hGly, l-?hAla, l-?hGln, l-?hPhg, l-?hMet, and d-?hPhg) showed high incorporation efficiencies, and seven (l-?hLeu, l-?hIle, l-?hAsn, l-?hPhe, l-?hLys, d-?hAla, and d-?hLeu) showed moderate incorporation efficiencies; whereas no full-length peptide was produced using other ?-amino acids (l-?hPro, l-?hTrp, and l-?hGlu). Subsequent double-incorporation experiments using ?-amino acids with high single incorporation efficiency revealed that elongation of peptides with successive ?-amino acids is prohibited. Efficiency of the double-incorporation of the ?-amino acids was restored by the insertion of Tyr or Ile between the two ?-amino acids. On the basis of these experiments, we also designed mRNA sequences of peptides, and demonstrated the ribosomal synthesis of peptides containing different types of ?-amino acids at multiple positions. PMID:26807980

  13. Formation of Amino Acid Thioesters for Prebiotic Peptide Synthesis: Catalysis By Amino Acid Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The origin of life can be described as a series of events in which a prebiotic chemical process came increasingly under the control of its catalytic products. In our search for this prebiotic process that yielded catalytic takeover products (such as polypeptides), we have been investigating a reaction system that generates peptide-forming amino acid thioesters from formaldehyde, glycolaldehyde, and ammonia in the presence of thiols. As shown below, this model process begins by aldol condensation of formaldehyde and glycolaldehyde to give trioses and releases. These sugars then undergo beta-dehydration yielding their respective alpha-ketoaldehydes. Addition of ammonia to the alpha-ketoaldehydes yields imines which can either: (a) rearrange in the presence of thesis to give amino acid thioesters or (be react with another molecule of aldehyde to give imidazoles. This 'one-pot' reaction system operates under mild aqueous conditions, and like modem amino acid biosynthesis, uses sugar intermediates which are converted to products by energy-yielding redox reactions. Recently, we discovered that amino acids, such as the alanine reaction product, catalyze the first and second steps of the process. In the presence of ammonia the process also generates other synthetically useful products, like the important biochemical -- pyruvic acid.

  14. Accumulated analyses of amino acid precursors in returned lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.; Harada, K.; Hare, P. E.

    1973-01-01

    Six amino acids (glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, and threonine) obtained by hydrolysis of extracts have been quantitatively determined in ten collections of fines from five Apollo missions. Although the amounts found, 7-45 ng/g, are small, the lunar amino acid/carbon ratios are comparable to those of the carbonaceous chondrites, Murchison and Murray, as analyzed by the same procedures. Since both the ratios of amino acid to carbon, and the four or five most common types of proteinous amino acid found, are comparable for the two extraterrestrial sources despite different cosmophysical histories of the moon and meteorites, common cosmochemical processes are suggested.

  15. Improving the Reliability of Optimal In-Feed Amino Acid Ratios Based on Individual Amino Acid Efficiency Data from N Balance Studies in Growing Chicken.

    PubMed

    Wecke, Christian; Liebert, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Three consecutive nitrogen balance experiments with fast-growing male broiler chickens (ROSS 308), both during starter and grower periods, were conducted to determine the ideal ratios of several indispensable amino acids relative to lysine. The control diets based on corn, wheat, fishmeal, field peas, wheat gluten and soybean oil were formulated by computer optimizing to meet the assumed ideal amino acid ratios and to fulfill both the energy and nutrient requirements of growing chicken. According to principles of the diet dilution technique, balanced control diets were diluted by wheat starch and refilled by crystalline amino acids and remaining feed ingredients, except the amino acid under study. The lysine, threonine, tryptophan, arginine, isoleucine and valine diluted diets resulted in significantly lower protein quality as compared to control diet, especially following increased dietary lysine supply (experiments II and III) and stronger amino acid dilution (experiment III). Accordingly, the limiting position of individual amino acids was confirmed, and the derived amino acid efficiency data were utilized to derive ideal amino acid ratios for the starter period: Lys (100): Thr (60): Trp (19): Arg (105): Ile (55): Val (63); and the grower period: Lys (100): Thr (62): Trp (17): Arg (105): Ile (65): Val (79). PMID:26479521

  16. Advances in protein-amino acid nutrition of poultry.

    PubMed

    Baker, David H

    2009-05-01

    The ideal protein concept has allowed progress in defining requirements as well as the limiting order of amino acids in corn, soybean meal, and a corn-soybean meal mixture for growth of young chicks. Recent evidence suggests that glycine (or serine) is a key limiting amino acid in reduced protein [23% crude protein (CP) reduced to 16% CP] corn-soybean meal diets for broiler chicks. Research with sulfur amino acids has revealed that small excesses of cysteine are growth depressing in chicks fed methionine-deficient diets. Moreover, high ratios of cysteine:methionine impair utilization of the hydroxy analog of methionine, but not of methionine itself. A high level of dietary L: -cysteine (2.5% or higher) is lethal for young chicks, but a similar level of DL: -methionine, L: -cystine or N-acetyl-L: -cysteine causes no mortality. A supplemental dietary level of 3.0% L: -cysteine (7x requirement) causes acute metabolic acidosis that is characterized by a striking increase in plasma sulfate and decrease in plasma bicarbonate. S-Methylmethionine, an analog of S-adenosylmethionine, has been shown to have choline-sparing activity, but it only spares methionine when diets are deficient in choline and(or) betaine. Creatine, or its precursor guanidinoacetic acid, can spare dietary arginine in chicks. PMID:19009229

  17. Advances in protein-amino acid nutrition of poultry.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Baker DH

    2009-05-01

    The ideal protein concept has allowed progress in defining requirements as well as the limiting order of amino acids in corn, soybean meal, and a corn-soybean meal mixture for growth of young chicks. Recent evidence suggests that glycine (or serine) is a key limiting amino acid in reduced protein [23% crude protein (CP) reduced to 16% CP] corn-soybean meal diets for broiler chicks. Research with sulfur amino acids has revealed that small excesses of cysteine are growth depressing in chicks fed methionine-deficient diets. Moreover, high ratios of cysteine:methionine impair utilization of the hydroxy analog of methionine, but not of methionine itself. A high level of dietary L: -cysteine (2.5% or higher) is lethal for young chicks, but a similar level of DL: -methionine, L: -cystine or N-acetyl-L: -cysteine causes no mortality. A supplemental dietary level of 3.0% L: -cysteine (7x requirement) causes acute metabolic acidosis that is characterized by a striking increase in plasma sulfate and decrease in plasma bicarbonate. S-Methylmethionine, an analog of S-adenosylmethionine, has been shown to have choline-sparing activity, but it only spares methionine when diets are deficient in choline and(or) betaine. Creatine, or its precursor guanidinoacetic acid, can spare dietary arginine in chicks.

  18. Formation and transformation of amino acids and amino acid precursors by high-velocity impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, T.; Kobayashi, K.; Yamori, A.

    A wide variety of organic compounds have been found in extraterrestrial bodies such as comets and carbonaceous chondrites. It is plausible that these extraterrestrial bodies carried organic compounds such as amino acids or their precursors to the early Earth. It is claimed, however, that these extraterrestrial organics were destroyed during impacts to the Earth. We therefore examined possible transformation of amino acids and their precursors during high-velocity impacts by using a rail gun "HYPAC" in ISAS. Starting materials used in the impact experiments were (i) aqueous solution of glycine (10 mM or 1.0 M), and (ii) a mixture of ammonia, methanol and water. The target materials were sealed in stainless steel capsules, and shocked by impact with a polycarbonate projectile accelerated with "HYPAC" to the velocities of 2.5 - 7.0 km/s. A part of the products was acid-hydrolyzed. Both hydrolyzed an unhydrolyzed products were analyzed by mass spectrometry, high performance liquid chromatography and capillary electrophoresis and chromatography. When an aqueous solution containing ammonia, methanol and water was shocked by impact at the velocity of 6.4 km/s, a number of amino acids (e.g., serine and glycine) were detected after hydrolysis. The present results suggest that amino acid precursors could be formed during cometary impacts. When glycine solution was used as a starting material, about 40 % of glycine was recovered even after 6 km/s impact. Methylamine and ammonia, which are known as pyrolytic products of glycine, were detected, besides them, diketopiperazine and an unidentified product whose molecular weight was 134, were detected, while no glycine peptides were identified in them. It was shown that the impact processes resulted in the formation of amino acid condensates. Thermal stability of glycine precursor is comparable with glycine. The present results suggest that organic material could survive and/or formed during an impact process. Most of organic compounds in comets and carbonaceous chondrites were complex organic compounds. Laboratory simulations suggest that they contain precursors of amino acids. We are examining possible alteration of such complex precursors of amino acids by high-velocity impacts.

  19. Conformational properties of oxazoline-amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staś, Monika; Broda, Małgorzata A.; Siodłak, Dawid

    2016-04-01

    Oxazoline-amino acids (Xaa-Ozn) occur in natural peptides of potentially important bioactivity. The conformations of the model compounds: Ac-(S)-Ala-Ozn(4R-Me), Ac-(S)-Ala-Ozn(4S-Me), and (gauche+, gauche-, anti) Ac-(S)-Val-Ozn(4R-Me) were studied at meta-hybrid M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p) method including solvent effect. Boc-L-Ala-L-Ozn-4-COOMe and Boc-L-Val-L-Ozn-4-COOMe were synthesized and studied by FT-IR and NMR-NOE methods. The conformations in crystal state were gathered from the Cambridge Structural Data Base. The main conformational feature of the oxazoline amino acids is the conformation β2 (ϕ,ψ ∼ -161°, -6°), which predominates in weakly polar environment and still is accessible in polar surrounding. The changes of the conformational preferences towards the conformations αR (ϕ,ψ ∼ -70°, -15°) and then β (ϕ,ψ ∼ -57°, -155°) are observed with increase of the environment polarity.

  20. The Next Generation MOD: A Microchip Amino Acid Analyzer for Detecting Extraterrestrial Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathies, R. A.; Hutt, L. D.; Bada, J. L.; Glavin, D.; Grunthaner, F. J.; Grunthaner, P. J.

    2000-01-01

    The MOD (Mars Organic Detector) instrument which has selected for the definition phase of the BEDS package on the 2005 Mars Explorer Program spacecraft is designed to simply detect the presence of amino acids in Martian surface samples at a sensitivity of a few parts per billion (ppb). An additional important aspect of amino acid analyses of Martian samples is identifying and quantifying which compounds are present, and also distinguishing those produced abiotically from those synthesized by either extinct or extant life. Amino acid homochirality provides an unambiguous way of distinguishing between abiotic vs. biotic origins. Proteins made up of mixed D- and L-amino acids would not likely have been efficient catalysts in early organisms because they could not fold into bioactive configurations such as the a-helix. However, enzymes made up of all D-amino acids function just as well as those made up of only L-amino acids, but the two enzymes use the opposite stereoisomeric substrates. There are no biochemical reasons why L-amino acids would be favored over Damino acids. On Earth, the use of only L-amino acids in proteins by life is probably simply a matter of chance. We assume that if proteins and enzymes were a component of extinct or extant life on Mars, then amino acid homochirality would have been a requirement. However, the possibility that Martian life was (or is) based on D-amino acids would be equal to that based on L-amino acids. The detection of a nonracemic mixture of amino acids in a Martian sample would be strong evidence for the presence of an extinct or extant biota on Mars. The finding of an excess of D-amino acids would provide irrefutable evidence of unique Martian life that could not have been derived from seeding the planet with terrestrial life (or the seeding of the Earth with Martian life). In contrast, the presence of racemic amino acids, along with non-protein amino acids such as alpha-aminoisobutyric acid and isovaline, would be indicative of an abiotic origin, although we have to consider the possibility that the racemic amino acids were generated from the racemization of biotically produced amino acids.

  1. Induction of amino acid transporters expression by endurance exercise in rat skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Taro Yoshinaga, Mariko

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Regulation of amino acid transporter expression in working muscle remains unclear. •Expression of amino acid transporters for leucine were induced by a bout of exercise. •Requirement of leucine in muscle cells might regulate expression of its transporters. •This information is beneficial for understanding the muscle remodeling by exercise. -- Abstract: We here investigated whether an acute bout of endurance exercise would induce the expression of amino acid transporters that regulate leucine transport across plasma and lysosomal membranes in rat skeletal muscle. Rats ran on a motor-driven treadmill at a speed of 28 m/min for 90 min. Immediately after the exercise, we observed that expression of mRNAs encoding L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) and CD98 was induced in the gastrocnemius, soleus, and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles. Sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2) mRNA was also induced by the exercise in those three muscles. Expression of proton-assisted amino acid transporter 1 (PAT1) mRNA was slightly but not significantly induced by a single bout of exercise in soleus and EDL muscles. Exercise-induced mRNA expression of these amino acid transporters appeared to be attenuated by repeated bouts of the exercise. These results suggested that the expression of amino acid transporters for leucine may be induced in response to an increase in the requirement for this amino acid in the cells of working skeletal muscles.

  2. Amino acids of the Nogoya and Mokoia carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronin, J. R.; Moore, C. B.

    1976-01-01

    Amino acids were found in acid hydrolyzed, hot water extracts of the Nogoya (C2) and Mokoia (C3V) chondrites. About 40 n moles/g of amino acids were found in the Nogoya extract while Mokoia contained less than 1 n mole/g. The amino acid composition of Nogoya differs from that of other C2 chondrites studied earlier. The results from Mokoia are similar to previous data obtained from the C3V chondrite Allende.

  3. Role of amino acids and vitamins in nutrition of mesophilic Methanococcus spp

    SciTech Connect

    Whitman, W.B.; Sohn, S.; Kuk, S.; Xing, R.

    1987-10-01

    In this study the authors found that autotrophic methanococci similar to Methanococcus maripaludis obtained up to 57% of their cellular carbon from exogeneous amino acids. About 85% of the incorporation was into protein. Primarily nonpolar and basic amino acids and glycine were incorporated; only small amounts of acidic and some polar amino acids were taken up. An additional 10% of the incorporation was into the nucleic acid fraction. Because little /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ was formed from the /sup 14/C-amino acids, little metabolism of the amino acids occurred. Therefore, the growth stimulation by amino acids was probably due to the sparing of anabolic energy requirements. Of the amino acids incorporated, only alanine was also a sole nitrogen source for these methanococci. In contrast, Methanococcus vannielii and Methanococcus aeolicus are autotrophic methanococci which did not incorporate amino acids and did not utilize alanine as a sole nitrogen source. Although glutamine served as a sole nitrogen source for the autotrophic methanococci and Methanococcus voltae, a heterotrophic methanococcus, growth was due to chemical deamination in the medium. M. voltae requires leucine and isoleucine for growth. However, these amino acids were not significant nitrogen sources, and alanine was not a sole nitrogen source for the growth of M. voltae. The branched-chain amino acids were not extensively metabolized by M. voltae. Pantoyl lactone and pantoic acid were readily incorporated by M. voltae. The intact vitamin pantothenate was neither stimulatory to growth nor incorporated. In conclusion, although amino acids and vitamins are nutritionally important to both autotrophic and heterotrophic methanococci, generally they are not subject to extensive catabolism.

  4. Prebiotic Synthesis of Hydrophobic and Protein Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Ring, David; Wolman, Yecheskel; Friedmann, Nadav; Miller, Stanley L.

    1972-01-01

    The formation of amino acids by the action of electric discharges on a mixture of methane, nitrogen, and water with traces of ammonia was studied in detail. The presence of glycine, alanine, ?-amino-n-butyric acid, ?-aminoisobutyric acid, valine, norvaline, isovaline, leucine, isoleucine, alloisoleucine, norleucine, proline, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, threonine, allothreonine, ?-hydroxy-?-aminobutyric acid, and ?,?-diaminobutyric acid was confirmed by ion-exchange chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. All of the primary ?-amino acids found in the Murchison Meteorite have been synthesized by this electric discharge experiment. PMID:4501592

  5. The role of amino acid transporters in nutrition.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Poncet N; Taylor PM

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: We consider recent advances in epithelial amino acid transport physiology and our understanding of the functioning of amino acid transporters as sensors, as well as carriers, of tissue nutrient supplies.RECENT FINDINGS: Gut hormones (e.g. leptin) may regulate intestinal amino acid transporter activity by a variety of mechanisms, although the overall functional significance of such regulation is not yet fully understood. Important functional interactions between amino acid transporters and nutrient-signalling pathways which regulate metabolism [e.g. the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)C1 pathway which promotes cell growth] have been revealed in recent studies. Amino acid transporters on endosomal (e.g. lysosomal) membranes may be of unexpected significance as intracellular nutrient sensors. It is also now evident that certain amino acid transporters may have dual receptor-transporter functions and act as 'transceptors' to sense amino acid availability upstream of signal pathways.SUMMARY: Increased knowledge on the timescale of the amino acid sensor-signal-effector process(es) should help in the optimization of protein-feeding regimes to gain maximum anabolic effect. New opportunities for nutritional therapy include targeting of amino acid transceptors to promote protein-anabolic signals and mechanisms up-regulating amino acid transporter expression to improve absorptive capacity for nutrients.

  6. A reexamination of amino acids in lunar soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinton, K. L. F.; Bada, J. L.; Arnold, J. R.

    1993-01-01

    Amino acids in lunar soils provide an important indicator of the level of prebiotic organic compounds on the moon. The results provide insight into the chemistry of amino acid precursors, and furthermore, given the flux of carbonaceous material to the moon, we can evaluate the survival of organics upon impact. The amino acid contents of both hydrolyzed and unhydrolyzed hot-water extracts of Apollo 17 lunar soil were determined using ophthaldialdehyde/N-acetyl cysteine (OPA/NAC) derivatization followed by HPLC analysis. Previous studies of lunar amino acids were inconclusive, as the technique used (derivatization with ninhydrin followed by HPLC analysis) was unable to discriminate between cosmogenic amino acids and terrestrial contaminants. Cosmogenic amino acids are racemic, and many of the amino acids found in carbonaceous meteorites such as Murchison, i.e., alpha-amino-i-butyric acid (aib), are extremely rare on Earth. The ninhydrin method does not distinguish amino acid enantiomers, nor does it detect alpha-alkyl amino acids such as aib, whereas the OPA/NAC technique does both.

  7. A reexamination of amino acids in lunar soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinton, K. L. F.; Bada, J. L.; Arnold, J. R.

    1993-03-01

    Amino acids in lunar soils provide an important indicator of the level of prebiotic organic compounds on the moon. The results provide insight into the chemistry of amino acid precursors, and furthermore, given the flux of carbonaceous material to the moon, we can evaluate the survival of organics upon impact. The amino acid contents of both hydrolyzed and unhydrolyzed hot-water extracts of Apollo 17 lunar soil were determined using ophthaldialdehyde/N-acetyl cysteine (OPA/NAC) derivatization followed by HPLC analysis. Previous studies of lunar amino acids were inconclusive, as the technique used (derivatization with ninhydrin followed by HPLC analysis) was unable to discriminate between cosmogenic amino acids and terrestrial contaminants. Cosmogenic amino acids are racemic, and many of the amino acids found in carbonaceous meteorites such as Murchison, i.e., alpha-amino-i-butyric acid (aib), are extremely rare on Earth. The ninhydrin method does not distinguish amino acid enantiomers, nor does it detect alpha-alkyl amino acids such as aib, whereas the OPA/NAC technique does both.

  8. The prebiotic synthesis of amino acids - interstellar vs. atmospheric mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meierhenrich, U. J.; Muñoz Caro, G. M.; Schutte, W. A.; Barbier, B.; Arcones Segovia, A.; Rosenbauer, H.; Thiemann, W. H.-P.; Brack, A.

    2002-11-01

    Until very recently, prebiotic amino acids were believed to have been generated in the atmosphere of the early Earth, as successfully simulated by the Urey-Miller experiments. Two independent studies now identified ice photochemistry in the interstellar medium as a possible source of prebiotic amino acids. Ultraviolet irradiation of ice mixtures containing identified interstellar molecules (such as H2O, CO2, CO, CH3OH, and NH3) in the conditions of vacuum and low temperature found in the interstellar medium generated amino acid structures including glycine, alanine, serine, valine, proline, and aspartic acid. After warmup, hydrolysis and derivatization, our team was able to identify 16 amino acids as well as furans and pyrroles. Enantioselective analyses of the amino acids showed racemic mixtures. A prebiotic interstellar origin of amino acid structures is now discussed to be a plausible alternative to the Urey-Miller mechanism.

  9. Characterization of neutral amino acid transport in a marine pseudomonad.

    PubMed Central

    Fein, J E; MacLeod, R A

    1975-01-01

    The transport of neutral amino acids in marine pseudomonad B-16 (ATCC 19855) has been investigated. From patterns of competitive inhibition, mutant analysis, and kinetic data, two active transport systems with overlapping substrate specificities were distinguished and characterized. One system (DAG) served glycine, D-alanine, D-serine, and alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) and, to a lesser extent, L-alanine and possibly other related neutral D- and L-amino acids. The other system (LIV) showed high stereospecificity for neutral amino acids with the L configuration and served primarily to transport L-leucine, L-isoleucine, L-valine, and L-alanine. This system exhibited low affinity for alpha-aminoisobutyric acid. Neither system was able to recognize structural analogues with modified alpha-amino or alpha-carboxyl groups. The kinetic parameters for L-alanine transport by the DAG and LIV systems were determined with appropriate mutants defective in either system. For L-alanine, Kt values of 4.6 X 10(-5) and 1.9 X 10(-4) M and Vmax values of 6.9 and 20.8 nmol/min per mg of cell dry weight were obtained for transport via the DAG and LIV systems respectively. alpha-Aminoisobutyric acid transport heterogeneity was also resolved with the mutants, and Kt values of 2.8 X 10(-5) and 1.4 X 10(-3) M AIB were obtained for transport via the DAG and LIV systems, respectively. Both systems required Na+ for activity (0.3 M Na+ optimal) and in this regard are distinguished from systems of similar substrate specificity reported in nonmarine bacteria. PMID:1194233

  10. Amino acid absorption and endogenous amino acids in the lower ileum and excreta of chicks.

    PubMed

    Bielorai, R; Iosif, B

    1987-08-01

    Five diets containing protein levels supplying 5-35 g N/kg, and an N-free diet, were fed ad libitum to six groups of 15 chicks each, from 10 to 16 d of age. Soybean meal was the only source of protein. Diets contained magnesium ferrite as marker. Individual amino acid absorption was determined by analysis in the lower ileum or excreta as apparent absorption; true absorption was calculated from the slope of the regression curves, obtained by plotting dietary amino acid levels versus amino acids in the lower ileum or excreta. In the excreta, the true values were higher than the apparent ones determined with the three levels of dietary protein (diets 1-3, respectively, were 34.8, 25.7 and 18.1 g N/kg). This difference is the result of elimination of the endogenous fraction as represented by the intercept of the regression line obtained by the calculation method. In the lower ileum both absorption values, the apparent (diets 1-3) and the true (calculated), are almost similar to the true (calculated) ones in the excreta. The method based on regression analysis allows calculation of true absorption from excreta data, without the need to kill the chicks. This has been validated with soybean meal as the source of protein. The determined endogenous amino acids levels in chicks fed an N-free diet were higher than those calculated from the intercept (the endogenous amino acids related to the feed protein tested), both in the excreta and in the lower ileum.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3625310

  11. Expression of Cationic Amino Acid Transporter 2 Is Required for Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cell-Mediated Control of T Cell Immunity.

    PubMed

    Cimen Bozkus, Cansu; Elzey, Bennett D; Crist, Scott A; Ellies, Lesley G; Ratliff, Timothy L

    2015-12-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous population of immature cells that expand during benign and cancer-associated inflammation and are characterized by their ability to inhibit T cell immunity. Increased metabolism of l-Arginine (l-Arg), through the enzymes arginase 1 and NO synthase 2 (NOS2), is well documented as a major MDSC suppressive mechanism. Therefore, we hypothesized that restricting MDSC uptake of l-Arg is a critical control point to modulate their suppressor activity. Using murine models of prostate-specific inflammation and cancer, we have identified the mechanisms by which extracellular l-Arg is transported into MDSCs. We have shown that MDSCs recruited to localized inflammation and tumor sites upregulate cationic amino acid transporter 2 (Cat2), coordinately with Arg1 and Nos2. Cat2 expression is not induced in MDSCs in peripheral organs. CAT2 contributes to the transport of l-Arg in MDSCs and is an important regulator of MDSC suppressive function. MDSCs that lack CAT2 have significantly reduced suppressive ability ex vivo and display impaired capacity for regulating T cell responses in vivo as evidenced by increased T cell expansion and decreased tumor growth in Cat2(-/-) mice. The abrogation of suppressive function is due to low intracellular l-Arg levels, which leads to the impaired ability of NOS2 to catalyze l-Arg-dependent metabolic processes. Together, these findings demonstrate that CAT2 modulates MDSC function. In the absence of CAT2, MDSCs display diminished capacity for controlling T cell immunity in prostate inflammation and cancer models, where the loss of CAT2 results in enhanced antitumor activity. PMID:26491198

  12. Amino acid deletions in loop C of the chlorophyll a-binding protein CP47 alter the chloride requirement and/or prevent the assembly of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Clarke, S M; Eaton-Rye, J J

    2000-11-01

    The chlorophyll a-binding protein CP47 directs excitation energy to the reaction center of photosystem II (PSII) during oxygenic photosynthesis and has additional structural and functional roles associated with the PSII water-oxidizing complex. Oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis was employed to study loop C of CP47 (approximately Trp-162 to Gly-197) which faces the thylakoid lumen. Five short amino acid deletion strains, delta(S169-P171), delta(Y172-G176), delta(G176-P180), delta(E184-A188) and delta(F190-N194), were created that span this domain. The deletion between Gly-176 and Pro-180, located around the middle of loop C, produced an obligate photoheterotroph that could not assemble functional PSII centers. The deletions in mutants delta(S169-P171) and delta(Y172-G176) reduced PSII levels to < or = 20% of the control and thus impaired photoautotrophic growth. In contrast, mutants delta(E184-A188) and delta(F190-N194) were photoautotrophic even though the number of photosystems was decreased by 50%. All PSII complexes assembled in the deletion strains had an increased susceptibility to photoinactivation and deletion of Glu-184 to Ala-188 prevented photoautotrophic growth under chloride-limiting conditions. Furthermore, the removal of the extrinsic PSII-O, PSII-U and PSII-V proteins from mutants delta(E184-A188) and delta(F190-N194) reduced the rates of oxygen evolution and, in the strains lacking either the PSII-O or PSII-V proteins, also increased the photoautotrophic doubling times. These effects were greater in mutant delta(E 184-A188) than in mutant delta(F190-N194) and the order of importance for the removal of the extrinsic proteins was found to be deltaPSII-V > or = deltaPSII-O > deltaPSII-U. PMID:11198421

  13. Opioid receptor binding requirements for the delta-selective peptide deltorphin. I: Phe3 replacement with ring-substituted and heterocyclic amino acids.

    PubMed

    Heyl, D L; Dandabathula, M; Kurtz, K R; Mousigian, C

    1995-03-31

    In order to assess steric, lipophilic, and electronic influences on opioid binding affinity, analogs of the delta receptor selective peptide deltorphin I (Tyr-D-Ala-Phe-Asp-Val-Val-GlyNH2) were prepared in which the residue 3 phenylalanine was replaced with lipophilic fluoro- and methyl-substituted phenylalanines or with the heterocyclic aromatic amino acids 3-(4-thiazolyl)alanine, 3-(2-pyridyl)alanine, 3-(3-pyridyl)alanine, histidine, and 3-(4-thiazolyl)alanine. mu binding was variable, with KiS in excess of 10,000 nM for most analogs, and all of the analogs bound poorly to k receptors. Among the phenyl ring-substituted analogs, those containing the smaller and electron-withdrawing halogens were favored over those with larger, electron-releasing methyl groups, although delta opioid binding affinity was reduced in all cases. The m-fluorophenylalanine analog demonstrated the best delta binding of the group, with a Ki of 4.79 nM. Within the group of heterocyclic analogs, 3-(2-thienyl)alanine proved to be the best modification, displaying a delta receptor Ki of 1.38 nM, while the polar histidine analog suffered the greatest loss in delta binding (Ki = 317). Compounds containing pyridylalanine and thiazolylalanine were intermediate in binding affinity, with delta KiS ranging from 39.5 to 62.4 nM. The major factor influencing the opioid binding of the similar-sized heterocyclic compounds was relative lipophilicity, which outweighed electronic character. PMID:7707326

  14. Catalytic hydrogenation of amino acids to amino alcohols with complete retention of configuration.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Masazumi; Tamura, Riku; Takeda, Yasuyuki; Nakagawa, Yoshinao; Tomishige, Keiichi

    2014-06-25

    Rh-MoOx/SiO2 is an effective heterogeneous catalyst for selective hydrogenation of amino acids to amino alcohols in a water solvent. MoOx modification of Rh drastically enhanced the activity and improved the selectivity and ee. Various amino alcohols were obtained in high yields (90-94%) with complete retention of configuration. PMID:24824793

  15. Extraterrestrial Amino Acids in the Almahata Sitta Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Aubrey, Andrew D.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Parker, Eric T.; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2009-01-01

    Amino acid analysis of a meteorite fragment of asteroid 2008 TC(sub 3) called Almahata Sitta was carried out using reverse-phase high-perfo rmance liquid chromatography coupled with UV fluorescence detection a nd time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-FD/ToF-MS) as part of a sam ple analysis consortium. HPLC analyses of hot-water extracts from the meteorite revealed a complex distribution of two- to six-carbon aliph atic amino acids and one- to three carbon amines with abundances rang ing from 0.5 to 149 parts-per-billion (ppb). The enantiomeric ratios of the amino acids alanine, Beta-amino-n-butyric acid (Beta-ABA), 2-amino-2- methylbutanoic acid (isovaline), and 2-aminopentanoic acid (no rvaline) in the meteorite were racemic (D/L approximately 1), indicat ing that these amino acids are indigenous to the meteorite and not te rrestrial contaminants. Several other non-protein amino acids were also identified in the meteorite above background levels including alpha -aminoisobutyric acid (alpha-AIB), 4-amino-2- methybutanoic acid, 4-a mino-3-methylbutanoic acid, and 3-, 4-, and 5-aminopentanoic acid. Th e total abundances of isovaline and AlB in Almahata Sitta are approximately 1000 times lower than the abundances of these amino acids found in the CM carbonaceous meteorite Murchison. The extremely love abund ances and unusual distribution of five carbon amino acids in Almahata Sitta compared to Cl, CM, and CR carbonaceous meteorites and may be due to extensive thermal alteration of amino acids on the parent aster oid by partial melting during formation or impact shock heating.

  16. THIN-LAYER SEPARATION OF CITRIC ACID CYCLE INTERMEDIATES, LACTIC ACID, AND THE AMINO ACID TAURINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes a two-dimensional mixed-layer method for separating citric acid cycle intermediates, lactic acid and the amino acid taurine. The method cleanly separates all citric acid cycle intermediates tested, excepting citric acid and isocitric acid. The solvents are in...

  17. Geochemistry of amino acids in shells of the clam Saxidomus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.; Blunt, D.J.; McMenamin, M.A.; Straham, S.E.

    1980-01-01

    Concentrations of amino acids and their corresponding d l enantiomeric ratios have been measured in shells of the bivalve mollusk Saxidomus from eleven localities, ranging in age from modern to probably more than 500,000 yr, along the Pacific coast of North America. Natural logarithms of amino acid concentrations correlate well with d l ratios, and the relationship provides a possible guide to the selection of fossils for use in amino acid dating. The relative order of the extents of racemization of amino acids at any given time appears to change with increasing sample age. Application of the amino acid dating method to shells from Whidbey Island, Washington, yields an age of about 80,000 yr, in contrast to the previously determined radiocarbon age of 36,000 yr which was measured on some shell carbonate and considered a minimum age. The amino acid age is compatible with the geologic record in the area. ?? 1980.

  18. Distribution and Origin of Amino Acids in Lunar Regolith Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, J. E.; Callahan, M. P.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.; McLain, H. L.; Noble, S. K.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    The existence of organic compounds on the lunar surface has been a question of interest from the Apollo era to the present. Investigations of amino acids immediately after collection of lunar samples yielded inconclusive identifications, in part due to analytical limitations including insensitivity to certain compounds, an inability to separate enantiomers, and lack of compound-specific isotopic measurements. It was not possible to determine if the detected amino acids were indigenous to the lunar samples or the result of terrestrial contamination. Recently, we presented initial data from the analysis of amino acid abundances in 12 lunar regolith samples and discussed those results in the context of four potential amino acid sources [5]. Here, we expand on our previous work, focusing on amino acid abundances and distributions in seven regolith samples and presenting the first compound-specific carbon isotopic ratios measured for amino acids in a lunar sample.

  19. Survival of Amino Acids in Micrometeorites During Atmospheric Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2003-01-01

    The delivery of amino acids by micrometeorites to the early Earth during the period of heavy bombardment could have been a significant source of the Earth's prebiotic amino acid inventory provided that these organic compounds survived atmospheric entry heating. To investigate the sublimation of amino acids from a micrometeorite analog at elevated temperature, grains from the CM-type carbonaceous chondrite Murchison were heated to 550 C inside a glass sublimation apparatus (SA) under reduced pressure. The sublimed residue that had collected on the cold finger of the SA after heating was analyzed for amino acids by HPLC. We found that when the temperature of the meteorite reached approx. 150 C, a large fraction of the amino acid glycine had vaporized from the meteorite, recondensed onto the end of the SA cold finger, and survived as the rest of the grains heated to 550 C. alpha-Aminoisobutryic acid and isovaline, which are two of the most abundant non-protein amino acids in Murchison, did not sublime from the meteorite and were completely destroyed during the heating experiment. Our experimental results suggest that sublimation of glycine present in micrometeorite grains may provide a way for this amino acid to survive atmospheric entry heating at temperatures less than 550 C; all other amino acids apparently are destroyed. Key Words: Amino acids-Exogenous delivery-Micrometeorites-Sublimation.

  20. Diversity of amino acids in a typical chernozem of Moldova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frunze, N. I.

    2014-12-01

    The content and composition of the amino acids in typical chernozems were studied. The objects of the study included a reference soil under an old fallow and three variants under fodder crop rotations: not fertilized, with mineral fertilizers, and with organic fertilizers. The contents of 18 amino acids were determined in these soils. The amino acids were extracted by the method of acid hydrolysis and identified by the method of ion-exchange chromatography. The total content of most of the amino acids was maximal in the reference soil; it was much lower in the cultivated soils and decreased in the following sequence: organic background > mineral background > no fertilization. The diversity of amino acids was evaluated quantitatively using different parameters applied in ecology for estimating various aspects of the species composition of communities (Simpson, Margalef, Menhinick, and Shannon's indices). The diversity and contribution of different amino acids to the total pool of amino acids also varied significantly in the studied variants. The maximum diversity of amino acids and maximum evenness of their relative abundance indices were typical of the reference chernozem; these parameters were lower in the cultivated soils. It was concluded that the changes in the structure of the amino acids under the impact of agricultural loads are similar to those that are usually observed under stress conditions.

  1. Plasma amino acid concentrations in pregnant rats and in 21-day foetuses.

    PubMed Central

    Palou, A; Arola, L; Alemany, M

    1977-01-01

    Plasma amino acid concentrations were determined in virgin female rats, in pregnant rats (12 and 21 days after impregnation) and in 21-day foetuses. The total amino acid concentration in plasma decreases significantly with pregnancy, being lower at 12 than at 21 days. Alanine, glutamine+glutamate and other 'gluconeogenic' amino acids decrease dramatically by mid-term, but regain their original concentrations at the end of the pregnancy. With most other amino acids, mainly the essential ones, the trend is towards lower concentrations which are maintained throughout pregnancy. These data agree with known nitrogen-conservation schemes in pregnancy and with the important demands on amino acids provoked by foetal growth. In the 21-day foetuses, concentrations of individual amino acids are considerably higher than in their mothers, with high plasma foetal/maternal concentration ratios, especially for lysine, phenylalanine and hydroxy-proline, suggesting active protein biosynthesis and turnover. All other amino acids also have high concentration ratios, presumably owing to their requirement by the foetuses for growth. Alanine, glutamine+glutamate, asparagine+aspartate, glycine, serine and threonine form a lower proportion of the total amino acids in foetuses than in the virgin controls or pregnant rats, probably owing to their role primarily in energy metabolism in the adults. The results indicate that at this phase of foetal growth, the placental amino acid uptake is considerable and seems to be higher than immediately before birth. PMID:901417

  2. Improving amino acid nutrition to prevent intrauterine growth restriction in mammals.

    PubMed

    Lin, Gang; Wang, Xiaoqiu; Wu, Guoyao; Feng, Cuiping; Zhou, Huaijun; Li, Defa; Wang, Junjun

    2014-07-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is one of the most common concerns in human obstetrics and domestic animal production. It is usually caused by placental insufficiency, which decreases fetal uptake of nutrients (especially amino acids) from the placenta. Amino acids are not only building blocks for protein but also key regulators of metabolic pathways in fetoplacental development. The enhanced demands of amino acids by the developing conceptus must be met via active transport systems across the placenta as normal pregnancy advances. Growing evidence indicates that IUGR is associated with a reduction in placental amino acid transport capacity and metabolic pathways within the embryonic/fetal development. The positive relationships between amino acid concentrations in circulating maternal blood and placental amino acid transport into fetus encourage designing new therapies to prevent or treat IUGR by enhancing amino acid availability in maternal diets or maternal circulation. Despite the positive effects of available dietary interventions, nutritional therapy for IUGR is still in its infancy. Based on understanding of the underlying mechanisms whereby amino acids promote fetal growth and of their dietary requirements by IUGR, supplementation with functional amino acids (e.g., arginine and glutamine) hold great promise for preventing fetal growth restriction and improving health and growth of IUGR offspring. PMID:24658999

  3. The Origin of Amino Acids in Lunar Regolith Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jamie E.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Glavin, Daniel P.; McLain, Hannah L.; Noble, Sarah K.; Gibson, Everett K., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the amino acid content of seven lunar regolith samples returned by the Apollo 16 and Apollo 17 missions and stored under NASA curation since collection using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Consistent with results from initial analyses shortly after collection in the 1970s, we observed amino acids at low concentrations in all of the curated samples, ranging from 0.2 parts-per-billion (ppb) to 42.7 ppb in hot-water extracts and 14.5 ppb to 651.1 ppb in 6M HCl acid-vapor-hydrolyzed, hot-water extracts. Amino acids identified in the Apollo soil extracts include glycine, D- and L-alanine, D- and L-aspartic acid, D- and L-glutamic acid, D- and L-serine, L-threonine, and L-valine, all of which had previously been detected in lunar samples, as well as several compounds not previously identified in lunar regoliths: -aminoisobutyric acid (AIB), D-and L-amino-n-butyric acid (-ABA), DL-amino-n-butyric acid, -amino-n-butyric acid, -alanine, and -amino-n-caproic acid. We observed an excess of the L enantiomer in most of the detected proteinogenic amino acids, but racemic alanine and racemic -ABA were present in some samples.

  4. Trophic spectra under the lens of amino acid isotopic analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent advances in compound specific isotopic ratio analysis (CSIRA) have allowed researchers to measure trophic fractionation of 15N in specific amino acids, namely glutamic acid and phenylalanine. These amino acids have proven useful in food web studies because of the wide and consistent disparity...

  5. Synthesis of alpha-amino acids

    DOEpatents

    Davis, J.W. Jr.

    1983-01-25

    A method is described for synthesizing alpha amino acids proceeding through novel intermediates of the formulas: R[sub 1]R[sub 2]C(OSOCl)CN, R[sub 1]R[sub 2]C(Cl)CN and [R[sub 1]R[sub 2]C(CN)O][sub 2]SO wherein R[sub 1] and R[sub 2] are each selected from hydrogen monovalent substituted and unsubstituted hydrocarbon radicals of 1 to 10 carbon atoms. The use of these intermediates allows the synthesis steps to be exothermic and results in an overall synthesis method which is faster than the synthesis methods of the prior art. No Drawings

  6. Chemotaxis toward amino acids by Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus.

    PubMed Central

    LaMarre, A G; Straley, S C; Conti, S F

    1977-01-01

    Chemotaxis toward amino acids by Bdellovibrio bacteriovorous strain UKi2 was studied by the capillary technique of Adler (J. Gen. Microbiol. 74:77-91, 1973). Chemotaxis was shown to be optimal when the capillaries were incubated at between 15 and 40 degrees C for 30 min; the optimal pH was between 7.0 and 8.2. The chemotactic response was proportional to the density of the suspension of bdellovibrios up to a density of 10(8) cells/ml. B. bacteriovorus was attracted to L-asparagine, L-cysteine, L-glutamine, glycine, L-histidine, L-lysine, and L-threonine. The possible roles of chemotaxis in the life of B. bacteriovorus are discussed. PMID:17594

  7. Hydration energies of protonated amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wincel, Henryk

    2007-05-01

    Sequential hydration thermochemical data for the protonated amino acids, AAH + (AA = Gly, Ala, Phe and Pro), were obtained using a pulsed ion-beam high-pressure mass spectrometer. The hydration bond energies for AAH +(H 2O) n decrease with n. For the complexes, GlyH +(H 2O) n, AlaH +(H 2O) n and PheH +(H 2O) n with n ? 4, the measured enthalpy and entropy changes show that the first three H 2O molecules bind to the hydrogen atoms of the - NH3+ group, while the fourth H 2O forms the second hydration shell. In the case of ProH +(H 2O) nwith n ? 3, two H 2O molecules bind to the - NH2+ group, and the third one is in a second shell.

  8. Pyruvate-Derived Amino Acids in Spinach Chloroplasts 1

    PubMed Central

    Schulze-Siebert, Detlef; Heineke, Dieter; Scharf, Horst; Schultz, Gernot

    1984-01-01

    A probable carbon flow from the Calvin cycle to branched chain amino acids and lipids via phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and pyruvate was examined in spinach (Spinacia oleracea) chloroplasts. The interpendence of metabolic pathways in and outside chloroplasts as well as product and feedback inhibition were studied. It was shown that alanine, aromatic, and small amounts of branched chain amino acids were formed from bicarbonate in purified intact chloroplasts. Addition of PEP only favored formation of aromatic amino acids. Mechanisms of regulation remained unclear. Concentrations of PEP and pyruvate within the chloroplast impermeable space during photosynthetic carbon fixation were 15 times higher than in the reaction medium. A direct carbon flow to pyruvate was identified (0.1 micromoles per milligram chlorophyll per hour). Pyruvate was taken up by intact chloroplasts slowly, leading to the formation of lysine, alanine, valine, and leucine plus isoleucine (approximate ratios, 100-500:60-100:40-100:2-10). The Km for the formation of valine and leucine plus isoleucine was estimated to be 0.1 millimolar. Ten micromolar glutamate optimized the transamination reaction regardless of whether bicarbonate or pyruvate was being applied. Alanine and valine formation was enhanced by the addition of acetate to the reaction mixture. The enhancement probably resulted from an inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase by acetyl-S-coenzyme A formed from acetate, and resulting accumulation of hydroxyethylthiamine diphosphate and pyruvate. High concentrations of valine and isoleucine inhibited their own and each others synthesis and enhanced alanine formation. When pyruvate was applied, only amino acids were formed; when complemented with bicarbonate, fatty acids were formed as well. This is probably the result of a requirement of acetyl-S-coenzyme A-carboxylase for bicarbonate. PMID:16663866

  9. Amino acids of the Murchison meteorite. II - Five carbon acyclic primary beta-, gamma-, and delta-amino alkanoic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronin, J. R.; Pizzarello, S.; Yuen, G. U.

    1985-01-01

    The five-carbon acyclic primary beta, gamma, and delta amino alkanoic acids of the Murchison meteorite are studied using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and ion exchange chromatography. The chromatograms reveal that alpha is the most abundant monoamino alkanoic acid followed by gamma and beta, and an exponential increase in the amount of amino acid is observed as the carbon number increases in the homologous series. The influence of frictional heating, spontaneous thermal decomposition, and radiation of the synthesis of amino acids is examined. The data obtained support an amino acid synthesis process involving random combination of single-carbon precursors.

  10. GLC of amino acids - A survey of contamination.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rash, J. J.; Gehrke, C. W.; Kuo, K. C.; Kvenvolden, K. A.; Stalling, D. L.; Zumwalt, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Analyses of biological substances and geochemical samples, of both terrestrial and extraterrestrial origin, are reported for amino acids at the 1-10 nanogram per gram level achieved by gas-liquid and ion-exchange chromatographic methods. These studies have shown that nanogram quantities of amino acids, present in water extracts of geochemical samples or in other samples of low amino acid concentration, can be successfully determined only if the researcher is well aware of the possible sources of contamination.

  11. Gas-Phase Acidities of Phosphorylated Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Stover, Michele L; Plummer, Chelsea E; Miller, Sean R; Cassady, Carolyn J; Dixon, David A

    2015-11-19

    Gas-phase acidities and heats of formation have been predicted at the G3(MP2)/SCRF-COSMO level of theory for 10 phosphorylated amino acids and their corresponding amides, including phospho-serine (pSer), -threonine (pThr), and -tyrosine (pTyr), providing the first reliable set of these values. The gas-phase acidities (GAs) of the three named phosphorylated amino acids and their amides have been determined using proton transfer reactions in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometer. Excellent agreement was found between the experimental and predicted GAs. The phosphate group is the deprotonation site for pSer and pThr and deprotonation from the carboxylic acid generated the lowest energy anion for pTyr. The infrared spectra were calculated for six low energy anions of pSer, pThr, and pTyr. For deprotonated pSer and pThr, good agreement is found between the experimental IRMPD spectra and the calculated spectra for our lowest energy anion structure. For pTyr, the IR spectra for a higher energy phosphate deprotonated structure is in good agreement with experiment. Additional experiments tested electrospray ionization (ESI) conditions for pTyr and determined that variations in solvent, temperature, and voltage can result in a different experimental GA value, indicating that ESI conditions affect the conformation of the pTyr anion. PMID:26492552

  12. Medusamide A, a Panamanian Cyanobacterial Depsipeptide with Multiple ?-Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Fenner, Amanda M; Engene, Niclas; Spadafora, Carmenza; Gerwick, William H; Balunas, Marcy J

    2016-02-01

    From a collection of marine cyanobacteria made in the Coiba National Park along the Pacific coast of the Republic of Panama a novel cyclic depsipeptide, given the trivial name medusamide A, has been isolated and fully characterized. Medusamide A contains four contiguous ?-amino acid (2R,3R)-3-amino-2-methylhexanoic acid (Amha) residues. This is the first report of multiple Amha residues and contiguous ?-amino acid residues within a single cyclic peptide-type natural product. Stereochemical assignment of the Amha residues was completed following the synthesis of reference standards for this ?-amino acid and the subsequent derivatization with Marfey's reagent and LC-MS analysis. PMID:26784681

  13. Analysis of amino acid and codon usage in Paramecium bursaria.

    PubMed

    Dohra, Hideo; Fujishima, Masahiro; Suzuki, Haruo

    2015-10-01

    The ciliate Paramecium bursaria harbors the green-alga Chlorella symbionts. We reassembled the P. bursaria transcriptome to minimize falsely fused transcripts, and investigated amino acid and codon usage using the transcriptome data. Surface proteins preferentially use smaller amino acid residues like cysteine. Unusual synonymous codon and amino acid usage in highly expressed genes can reflect a balance between translational selection and other factors. A correlation of gene expression level with synonymous codon or amino acid usage is emphasized in genes down-regulated in symbiont-bearing cells compared to symbiont-free cells. Our results imply that the selection is associated with P. bursaria-Chlorella symbiosis. PMID:26341535

  14. Methylation of alpha-amino acids and derivatives using trimethylsilyldiazomethane.

    PubMed

    Leggio, Antonella; Liguori, Angelo; Perri, Francesca; Siciliano, Carlo; Viscomi, Maria Caterina

    2009-03-01

    A study of the methylation of N-nosyl-alpha-amino acids and derivatives with trimethylsilyldiazomethane is here reported. Trimethylsilyldiazomethane allows the chemo-specific methylation of the carboxyl function of N-nosyl-alpha-amino acids in high yields and purity. This method provides a practical route to N-methyl-alpha-amino acids avoiding the use of the more toxic and explosive diazomethane. This simple and safe methylation methodology of alpha-amino acids and derivatives is not limited to organic synthesis and involves the use of a commercially available reagent as well. PMID:19207464

  15. Recent advances in microchip electrophoresis for amino acid analysis.

    PubMed

    Ou, Gaozhi; Feng, Xiaojun; Du, Wei; Liu, Xin; Liu, Bi-Feng

    2013-10-01

    With the maturation of microfluidic technologies, microchip electrophoresis has been widely employed for amino acid analysis owing to its advantages of low sample consumption, reduced analysis time, high throughput, and potential for integration and automation. In this article, we review the recent progress in amino acid analysis using microchip electrophoresis during the period from 2007 to 2012. Innovations in microchip materials, surface modification, sample introduction, microchip electrophoresis, and detection methods are documented, as well as nascent applications of amino acid analysis in single-cell analysis, microdialysis sampling, food analysis, and extraterrestrial exploration. Without doubt, more applications of microchip electrophoresis in amino acid analysis may be expected soon. PMID:23436170

  16. Pseudoephedrine-Directed Asymmetric ?-Arylation of ?-Amino Acid Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Rachel C; Fernndez-Nieto, Fernando; Mas Rosell, Josep; Clayden, Jonathan

    2015-07-27

    Available ?-amino acids undergo arylation at their ??position in an enantioselective manner on treatment with base of N'-aryl urea derivatives ligated to pseudoephedrine as a chiral auxiliary. In?situ silylation and enolization induces diastereoselective migration of the N'-aryl group to the ??position of the amino acid, followed by ring closure to a hydantoin with concomitant explulsion of the recyclable auxiliary. The hydrolysis of the hydantoin products provides derivatives of quaternary amino acids. The arylation avoids the use of heavy-metal additives, and is successful with a range of amino acids and with aryl rings of varying electronic character. PMID:26083236

  17. Amino acid substitutions of cysteine residues near the amino terminus of Wheat streak mosaic virus HC-Pro abolishes virus transmission by the wheat curl mite

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The amino-terminal half of HC-Pro of Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) is required for semi-persistent transmission by the wheat curl mite (Aceria tosichella Keifer). The amino-proximal region of WSMV HC-Pro is cysteine-rich with a zinc finger-like motif. Amino acid substitutions were made in this re...

  18. [Amino acid composition of Phaseolus aureus L. seeds and seedlings].

    PubMed

    Min'dyk BuI; Shaposhinkov, G L; Aseeva, K B

    1978-01-01

    The amino acid composition of seeds and 10-day seedlings of mung bean (Phaseolus aureus L.) as well as that of proteins of Ph. aureus seedlings was measured. The seedlings were grown under different conditions of nitrogen nutrition in the light and in the dark. Ph. aureus seeds showed a high content of some essential amino acids. As compared with seeds, the seedlings had higher concentrations of aspartic acid and isoleucine and lower concentrations of glutamic acid, lysine and histidine. Proteins of Ph. aureus seedlings showed greater amounts of isoleucine, phenylalanine, threonine, lysine and lower quantities of glutamic acid. Methionine and cystine were limiting amino acids. PMID:674120

  19. Apparent amino acid absorption from feather meal by chicks.

    PubMed

    Bielorai, R; Harduf, Z; Iosif, B; Alumot, E

    1983-05-01

    The apparent absorption values of individual amino acids from two samples of feather meal (FM) were determined in the lower ileum of chicks fed on diets containing magnesium ferrite as a marker. The average absorption values for FM amino acids were low, approximately 0.50, as compared with approximately 0.85 for soya bean, used as a control. Values for individual amino acids from FM differed distinctly, ranging from 0.20 to 0.70. Low values were obtained for aspartic acid, histidine, lysine, glutamic acid and cystine. An indication of the low absorption of the previously-mentioned amino acids was obtained by analysing the amino acid composition of the FM residues undigested by pepsin or pancreatin. The reasons for testing the apparent rather than the true absorption are discussed. PMID:6407522

  20. Amino Acid Transporters and Release of Hydrophobic Amino Acids in the Heterocyst-Forming Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Pernil, Rafael; Picossi, Silvia; Herrero, Antonia; Flores, Enrique; Mariscal, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is a filamentous cyanobacterium that can use inorganic compounds such as nitrate or ammonium as nitrogen sources. In the absence of combined nitrogen, it can fix N2 in differentiated cells called heterocysts. Anabaena also shows substantial activities of amino acid uptake, and three ABC-type transporters for amino acids have been previously characterized. Seven new loci encoding predicted amino acid transporters were identified in the Anabaena genomic sequence and inactivated. Two of them were involved in amino acid uptake. Locus alr2535-alr2541 encodes the elements of a hydrophobic amino acid ABC-type transporter that is mainly involved in the uptake of glycine. ORF all0342 encodes a putative transporter from the dicarboxylate/amino acid:cation symporter (DAACS) family whose inactivation resulted in an increased uptake of a broad range of amino acids. An assay to study amino acid release from Anabaena filaments to the external medium was set up. Net release of the alanine analogue α-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) was observed when transport system N-I (a hydrophobic amino acid ABC-type transporter) was engaged in the uptake of a specific substrate. The rate of AIB release was directly proportional to the intracellular AIB concentration, suggesting leakage from the cells by diffusion. PMID:25915115

  1. Amino Acid Transporters and Release of Hydrophobic Amino Acids in the Heterocyst-Forming Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Pernil, Rafael; Picossi, Silvia; Herrero, Antonia; Flores, Enrique; Mariscal, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is a filamentous cyanobacterium that can use inorganic compounds such as nitrate or ammonium as nitrogen sources. In the absence of combined nitrogen, it can fix N2 in differentiated cells called heterocysts. Anabaena also shows substantial activities of amino acid uptake, and three ABC-type transporters for amino acids have been previously characterized. Seven new loci encoding predicted amino acid transporters were identified in the Anabaena genomic sequence and inactivated. Two of them were involved in amino acid uptake. Locus alr2535-alr2541 encodes the elements of a hydrophobic amino acid ABC-type transporter that is mainly involved in the uptake of glycine. ORF all0342 encodes a putative transporter from the dicarboxylate/amino acid:cation symporter (DAACS) family whose inactivation resulted in an increased uptake of a broad range of amino acids. An assay to study amino acid release from Anabaena filaments to the external medium was set up. Net release of the alanine analogue α-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) was observed when transport system N-I (a hydrophobic amino acid ABC-type transporter) was engaged in the uptake of a specific substrate. The rate of AIB release was directly proportional to the intracellular AIB concentration, suggesting leakage from the cells by diffusion. PMID:25915115

  2. 40 CFR 721.10126 - Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo substituted phenyl azo substituted benzenesulfonic acid copper compound (generic). 721.10126 Section 721.10126 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10126 - Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo substituted phenyl azo substituted benzenesulfonic acid copper compound (generic). 721.10126 Section 721.10126 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...

  4. 40 CFR 721.1705 - Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with 6-amino-4-hydroxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with 6-amino-4-hydroxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid, diazotized, (3-aminophenyl)phosphonic acid and diazotized 2,5-diethoxybenzenamine. 721.1705 Section 721.1705 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED)...

  5. 40 CFR 721.1705 - Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with 6-amino-4-hydroxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Benzoic acid, 3-amino-, diazotized, coupled with 6-amino-4-hydroxy-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid, diazotized, (3-aminophenyl)phosphonic acid and diazotized 2,5-diethoxybenzenamine. 721.1705 Section 721.1705 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED)...

  6. Prebiotic Amino Acid Thioester Synthesis: Thiol-Dependent Amino Acid Synthesis from Formose substrates (Formaldehyde and Glycolaldehyde) and Ammonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    1998-01-01

    Formaldehyde and glycolaldehyde (substrates of the formose autocatalytic cycle) were shown to react with ammonia yielding alanine and homoserine under mild aqueous conditions in the presence of thiol catalysts. Since similar reactions carried out without ammonia yielded alpha-hydroxy acid thioesters, the thiol-dependent synthesis of alanine and homoserine is presumed to occur via amino acid thioesters-intermediates capable of forming peptides. A pH 5.2 solution of 20 mM formaldehyde, 20 mM glycolaldehyde, 20 mM ammonium chloride, 23 mM 3-mercaptopropionic acid, and 23 mM acetic acid that reacted for 35 days at 40 C yielded (based on initial formaldehyde) 1.8% alanine and 0.08% homoserine. In the absence of thiol catalyst, the synthesis of alanine and homoserine was negligible. Alanine synthesis required both formaldehyde and glycolaldehyde, but homoserine synthesis required only glycolaldehyde. At 25 days the efficiency of alanine synthesis calculated from the ratio of alanine synthesized to formaldehyde reacted was 2.1%, and the yield (based on initial formaldehyde) of triose and tetrose intermediates involved in alanine and homoserine synthesis was 0.3 and 2.1%, respectively. Alanine synthesis was also seen in similar reactions containing only 10 mM each of aldehyde substrates, ammonia, and thiol. The prebiotic significance of these reactions that use the formose reaction to generate sugar intermediates that are converted to reactive amino acid thioesters is discussed.

  7. INCAP studies of energy, amino acids, and protein.

    PubMed

    Viteri, Fernando E

    2010-03-01

    This Special Issue summarizes the results of several studies aimed at providing information on a series of questions related to the adequate protein and energy intakes that allow adequate growth and function in children and work performance and productivity in adults. The effect of different sources of protein on nitrogen balance and the requirements of essential amino acids in young children were also explored in fully recovered, previously malnourished children housed in the Metabolic Ward of the Biomedical Division of INCAP. The following are the main results of these investigations: Animal experiments and studies in children recovering from protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) strongly suggest that even when requirements of all nutrients are satisfied, inactivity reduces the rate of linear growth and physical activity improves it as well as lean body mass repletion. The effects of different energy intakes on nitrogen balance demonstrated how energy intake modifies the need to ingest different amounts of protein to satisfy protein requirements. Insensible nitrogen losses in preschool children and their relation to protein intake was demonstrated. The quality of even "good protein sources" modifies the amount needed to satisfy nitrogen requirements, and corn and bean-based diets can satisfy protein needs for health and even growth of young children. Essential amino acid requirements of 2-year-old children was assessed by diverse measurements of nitrogen metabolism and amino acid levels in blood, and were found lower than those recommended by FAO-WHO. In rural adult populations the relationship between energy and protein intake, productivity and body composition, and the impact of environmental hygiene on nitrogen balance was demonstrated and measured. PMID:20461903

  8. Nutritionally essential amino acids and metabolic signaling in aging.

    PubMed

    Dillon, E Lichar

    2013-09-01

    Aging is associated with a gradual decline in skeletal muscle mass and strength leading to increased risk for functional impairments. Although basal rates of protein synthesis and degradation are largely unaffected with age, the sensitivity of older muscle cells to the anabolic actions of essential amino acids appears to decline. The major pathway through which essential amino acids induce anabolic responses involves the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) Complex 1, a signaling pathway that is especially sensitive to regulation by the branched chain amino acid leucine. Recent evidence suggests that muscle of older individuals require increasing concentrations of leucine to maintain robust anabolic responses through the mTOR pathway. While the exact mechanisms for the age-related alterations in nutritional signaling through the mTOR pathway remain elusive, there is increasing evidence that decreased sensitivity to insulin action, reductions in endothelial function, and increased oxidative stress may be underlying factors in this decrease in anabolic sensitivity. Ensuring adequate nutrition, including sources of high quality protein, and promoting regular physical activity will remain among the frontline defenses against the onset of sarcopenia in older individuals. PMID:23239011

  9. Nutritionally essential amino acids and metabolic signaling in aging

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, E. Lichar

    2012-01-01

    Aging is associated with a gradual decline in skeletal muscle mass and strength leading to increased risk for functional impairments. Although basal rates of protein synthesis and degradation are largely unaffected with age, the sensitivity of older muscle cells to the anabolic actions of essential amino acids appears to decline. The major pathway through which essential amino acids induce anabolic responses involves the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) Complex 1, a signaling pathway that is especially sensitive to regulation by the branched chain amino acid leucine. Recent evidence suggests that muscle of older individuals require increasing concentrations of leucine to maintain robust anabolic responses through the mTOR pathway. While the exact mechanisms for the age related alterations in nutritional signaling through the mTOR pathway remain elusive, there is increasing evidence that decreased sensitivity to insulin action, reductions in endothelial function, and increased oxidative stress may be underlying factors in this decrease in anabolic sensitivity. Ensuring adequate nutrition, including sources of high quality protein, and promoting regular physical activity will remain among the frontline defenses against the onset of sarcopenia in older individuals. PMID:23239011

  10. Amino acid fermentation at the origin of the genetic code

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    There is evidence that the genetic code was established prior to the existence of proteins, when metabolism was powered by ribozymes. Also, early proto-organisms had to rely on simple anaerobic bioenergetic processes. In this work I propose that amino acid fermentation powered metabolism in the RNA world, and that this was facilitated by proto-adapters, the precursors of the tRNAs. Amino acids were used as carbon sources rather than as catalytic or structural elements. In modern bacteria, amino acid fermentation is known as the Stickland reaction. This pathway involves two amino acids: the first undergoes oxidative deamination, and the second acts as an electron acceptor through reductive deamination. This redox reaction results in two keto acids that are employed to synthesise ATP via substrate-level phosphorylation. The Stickland reaction is the basic bioenergetic pathway of some bacteria of the genus Clostridium. Two other facts support Stickland fermentation in the RNA world. First, several Stickland amino acid pairs are synthesised in abiotic amino acid synthesis. This suggests that amino acids that could be used as an energy substrate were freely available. Second, anticodons that have complementary sequences often correspond to amino acids that form Stickland pairs. The main hypothesis of this paper is that pairs of complementary proto-adapters were assigned to Stickland amino acids pairs. There are signatures of this hypothesis in the genetic code. Furthermore, it is argued that the proto-adapters formed double strands that brought amino acid pairs into proximity to facilitate their mutual redox reaction, structurally constraining the anticodon pairs that are assigned to these amino acid pairs. Significance tests which randomise the code are performed to study the extent of the variability of the energetic (ATP) yield. Random assignments can lead to a substantial yield of ATP and maintain enough variability, thus selection can act and refine the assignments into a proto-code that optimises the energetic yield. Monte Carlo simulations are performed to evaluate the establishment of these simple proto-codes, based on amino acid substitutions and codon swapping. In all cases, donor amino acids are assigned to anticodons composed of U+G, and have low redundancy (1-2 codons), whereas acceptor amino acids are assigned to the the remaining codons. These bioenergetic and structural constraints allow for a metabolic role for amino acids before their co-option as catalyst cofactors. Reviewers: this article was reviewed by Prof. William Martin, Prof. Eörs Szathmáry (nominated by Dr. Gáspár Jékely) and Dr. Ádám Kun (nominated by Dr. Sandor Pongor) PMID:22325238

  11. Mitochondrial transporters for ornithine and related amino acids: a review.

    PubMed

    Monn, Magnus; Miniero, Daniela Valeria; Daddabbo, Lucia; Palmieri, Luigi; Porcelli, Vito; Palmieri, Ferdinando

    2015-09-01

    Among the members of the mitochondrial carrier family, there are transporters that catalyze the translocation of ornithine and related substrates, such as arginine, homoarginine, lysine, histidine, and citrulline, across the inner mitochondrial membrane. The mitochondrial carriers ORC1, ORC2, and SLC25A29 from Homo sapiens, BAC1 and BAC2 from Arabidopsis thaliana, and Ort1p from Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been biochemically characterized by transport assays in liposomes. All of them transport ornithine and amino acids with side chains terminating at least with one amine. There are, however, marked differences in their substrate specificities including their affinity for ornithine (KM values in the mM to ?M range). These differences are most likely reflected by minor differences in the substrate binding sites of these carriers. The physiological role of the above-mentioned mitochondrial carriers is to link several metabolic pathways that take place partly in the cytosol and partly in the mitochondrial matrix and to provide basic amino acids for mitochondrial translation. In the liver, human ORC1 catalyzes the citrulline/ornithine exchange across the mitochondrial inner membrane, which is required for the urea cycle. Human ORC1, ORC2, and SLC25A29 are likely to be involved in the biosynthesis and transport of arginine, which can be used as a precursor for the synthesis of NO, agmatine, polyamines, creatine, glutamine, glutamate, and proline, as well as in the degradation of basic amino acids. BAC1 and BAC2 are implicated in some processes similar to those of their human counterparts and in nitrogen and amino acid metabolism linked to stress conditions and the development of plants. Ort1p is involved in the biosynthesis of arginine and polyamines in yeast. PMID:26002808

  12. Abc Amino Acids: Design, Synthesis, and Properties of New Photoelastic Amino Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Standaert, Robert F; Park, Dr Seung Bum

    2006-01-01

    Photoisomerizable amino acids provide a direct avenue to the experimental manipulation of bioactive polypeptides, potentially allowing real-time, remote control of biological systems and enabling useful applications in nanobiotechnology. Herein, we report a new class of photoisomerizable amino acids intended to cause pronounced expansion and contraction in the polypeptide backbone, i.e., to be photoelastic. These compounds, termed Abc amino acids, employ a photoisomerizable azobiphenyl chromophore to control the relative disposition of aminomethyl and carboxyl substituents. Molecular modeling of nine Abc isomers led to the identification of one with particularly attractive properties, including the ability to induce contractions up to 13A in the backbone upon transa?cis photoisomerization. This isomer, designated mpAbc, has substituents at meta and para positions on the inner (azo-linked) and outer rings, respectively. An efficient synthesis of Fmoc-protected mpAbc was executed in which the biaryl components were formed via Suzuki couplings and the azo linkage was formed via amine/nitroso condensation; protected forms of three other Abc isomers were prepared similarly. A decapeptide incorporating mpAbc was synthesized by conventional solid-phase methods and displayed characteristic azobenzene photochemical behavior with optimal conversion to the cis isomer at 360 nm and a thermal cisa?trans half life of 100 min. at 80 AoC.

  13. Vibrational and photoionization spectroscopy of biomolecules: Aliphatic amino acid structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yongjun; Bernstein, Elliot R.

    2008-04-01

    The aliphatic amino acids glycine, valine, leucine, and isoleucine are thermally placed into the gas phase and expanded into a vacuum system for access by time of flight mass spectroscopy and infrared (IR) spectroscopy in the energy range of 2500-4000cm-1 (CH, NH, OH, and stretching vibrations). The isolated neutral amino acids are ionized by a single photon of 10.5eV energy (118nm), which exceeds by less than 2eV their reported ionization thresholds. As has been reported for many hydrogen bonded acid-base systems (e.g., water, ammonia, alcohol, acid clusters, and acid molecules), the amino acids undergo a structural rearrangement in the ion state (e.g., in simplest form, a proton transfer) that imparts sufficient excess vibrational energy to the ion to completely fragment it. No parent ions are observed. If the neutral ground state amino acids are exposed to IR radiation prior to ionization, an IR spectrum of the individual isomers for each amino acid can be determined by observation of the ion intensity of the different fragment mass channels. Both the IR spectrum and fragmentation patterns for individual isomers can be qualitatively identified and related to a particular isomer in each instance. Thus, each fragment ion detected presents an IR spectrum of its particular parent amino acid isomer. In some instances, the absorption of IR radiation by the neutral amino acid parent isomer increases a particular fragmentation mass channel intensity, while other fragmentation mass channel intensities decrease. This phenomenon can be rationalized by considering that with added energy in the molecule, the fragmentation channel populations can be modulated by the added vibrational energy in the rearranged ions. This observation also suggests that the IR absorption does not induce isomerization in the ground electronic state of these amino acids. These data are consistent with theoretical predictions for isolated amino acid secondary structures and can be related to previous IR spectra of amino acid conformers.

  14. Amino Acid Availability Modulates Vacuolar H+-ATPase Assembly.

    PubMed

    Stransky, Laura A; Forgac, Michael

    2015-11-01

    The vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase) is an ATP-dependent proton pump composed of a peripheral ATPase domain (V1) and a membrane-integral proton-translocating domain (V0) and is involved in many normal and disease processes. An important mechanism of regulating V-ATPase activity is reversible assembly of the V1 and V0 domains. Increased assembly in mammalian cells occurs under various conditions and has been shown to involve PI3K. The V-ATPase is necessary for amino acid-induced activation of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), which is important in controlling cell growth in response to nutrient availability and growth signals. The V-ATPase undergoes amino acid-dependent interactions with the Ragulator complex, which is involved in recruitment of mTORC1 to the lysosomal membrane during amino acid sensing. We hypothesized that changes in the V-ATPase/Ragulator interaction might involve amino acid-dependent changes in V-ATPase assembly. To test this, we measured V-ATPase assembly by cell fractionation in HEK293T cells treated with and without amino acids. V-ATPase assembly increases upon amino acid starvation, and this effect is reversed upon readdition of amino acids. Lysosomes from amino acid-starved cells possess greater V-ATPase-dependent proton transport, indicating that assembled pumps are catalytically active. Amino acid-dependent changes in both V-ATPase assembly and activity are independent of PI3K and mTORC1 activity, indicating the involvement of signaling pathways distinct from those implicated previously in controlling assembly. By contrast, lysosomal neutralization blocks the amino acid-dependent change in assembly and reactivation of mTORC1 after amino acid starvation. These results identify an important new stimulus for controlling V-ATPase assembly. PMID:26378229

  15. Amino Acids Regulate Transgene Expression in MDCK Cells

    PubMed Central

    Torrente, Marta; Guetg, Adriano; Sass, Jörn Oliver; Arps, Lisa; Ruckstuhl, Lisa; Camargo, Simone M. R.; Verrey, François

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression and cell growth rely on the intracellular concentration of amino acids, which in metazoans depends on extracellular amino acid availability and transmembrane transport. To investigate the impact of extracellular amino acid concentrations on the expression of a concentrative amino acid transporter, we overexpressed the main kidney proximal tubule luminal neutral amino acid transporter B0AT1-collectrin (SLC6A19-TMEM27) in MDCK cell epithelia. Exogenously expressed proteins co-localized at the luminal membrane and mediated neutral amino acid uptake. However, the transgenes were lost over few cell culture passages. In contrast, the expression of a control transgene remained stable. To test whether this loss was due to inappropriately high amino acid uptake, freshly transduced MDCK cell lines were cultivated either with physiological amounts of amino acids or with the high concentration found in standard cell culture media. Expression of exogenous transporters was unaffected by physiological amino acid concentration in the media. Interestingly, mycoplasma infection resulted in a significant increase in transgene expression and correlated with the rapid metabolism of L-arginine. However, L-arginine metabolites were shown to play no role in transgene expression. In contrast, activation of the GCN2 pathway revealed by an increase in eIF2α phosphorylation may trigger transgene derepression. Taken together, high extracellular amino acid concentration provided by cell culture media appears to inhibit the constitutive expression of concentrative amino acid transporters whereas L-arginine depletion by mycoplasma induces the expression of transgenes possibly via stimulation of the GCN2 pathway. PMID:24797296

  16. Amino acids regulate transgene expression in MDCK cells.

    PubMed

    Torrente, Marta; Guetg, Adriano; Sass, Jörn Oliver; Arps, Lisa; Ruckstuhl, Lisa; Camargo, Simone M R; Verrey, François

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression and cell growth rely on the intracellular concentration of amino acids, which in metazoans depends on extracellular amino acid availability and transmembrane transport. To investigate the impact of extracellular amino acid concentrations on the expression of a concentrative amino acid transporter, we overexpressed the main kidney proximal tubule luminal neutral amino acid transporter B0AT1-collectrin (SLC6A19-TMEM27) in MDCK cell epithelia. Exogenously expressed proteins co-localized at the luminal membrane and mediated neutral amino acid uptake. However, the transgenes were lost over few cell culture passages. In contrast, the expression of a control transgene remained stable. To test whether this loss was due to inappropriately high amino acid uptake, freshly transduced MDCK cell lines were cultivated either with physiological amounts of amino acids or with the high concentration found in standard cell culture media. Expression of exogenous transporters was unaffected by physiological amino acid concentration in the media. Interestingly, mycoplasma infection resulted in a significant increase in transgene expression and correlated with the rapid metabolism of L-arginine. However, L-arginine metabolites were shown to play no role in transgene expression. In contrast, activation of the GCN2 pathway revealed by an increase in eIF2α phosphorylation may trigger transgene derepression. Taken together, high extracellular amino acid concentration provided by cell culture media appears to inhibit the constitutive expression of concentrative amino acid transporters whereas L-arginine depletion by mycoplasma induces the expression of transgenes possibly via stimulation of the GCN2 pathway. PMID:24797296

  17. Free amino acids in botanicals and botanical preparations.

    PubMed

    Carrat, B; Boniglia, C; Giammarioli, S; Mosca, M; Sanzini, E

    2008-06-01

    Numerous studies were carried out about aminoacidic composition of vegetable proteins, but information about the free amino acid pool and the role of these substances is very incomplete. The aim of this paper was to contribute to the scarce knowledge concerning the composition of free amino acids in botanicals and botanical preparations widely used as food, in dietary supplements, and in pharmaceutical products. This work studied the composition of free amino acids, identified the major components of 19 species of plants, and evaluated the influence of different types of extraction on the amino acid profile. Amino acids were determined using an automatic precolumn derivatization with fluorenylmethyl-chloroformate and reversed-phase liquid chromatography with fluorescence and ultraviolet detection. The amounts of total free amino acids varied widely between plants, from approximately 12 g in 100 g of Echinacea pallida extract to less than 60 mg in the same amount of Coleus forskohlii, Garcinia cambogia, and Glycine max. In 13 plants arginine, asparagine, glutamine, proline, and gamma-aminobutyric acid were the free amino acids found in preponderant quantities. The levels of free amino acids above the quantification limit in 36 assayed samples of botanicals, extracts, and supplements are shown. PMID:18576976

  18. Adsorption of amino acids by fullerenes and fullerene nanowhiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashizume, Hideo; Hirata, Chika; Fujii, Kazuko; Miyazawa, Kunichi

    2015-12-01

    We have investigated the adsorption of some amino acids and an oligopeptide by fullerene (C60) and fullerene nanowhiskers (FNWs). C60 and FNWs hardly adsorbed amino acids. Most of the amino acids used have a hydrophobic side chain. Ala and Val, with an alkyl chain, were not adsorbed by the C60 or FNWs. Trp, Phe and Pro, with a cyclic structure, were not adsorbed by them either. The aromatic group of C60 did not interact with the side chain. The carboxyl or amino group, with the frame structure of an amino acid, has a positive or negative charge in solution. It is likely that the C60 and FNWs would not prefer the charged carboxyl or amino group. Tri-Ala was adsorbed slightly by the C60 and FNWs. The carboxyl or amino group is not close to the center of the methyl group of Tri-Ala. One of the methyl groups in Tri-Ala would interact with the aromatic structure of the C60 and FNWs. We compared our results with the theoretical interaction of 20 bio-amino acids with C60. The theoretical simulations showed the bonding distance between C60 and an amino acid and the dissociation energy. The dissociation energy was shown to increase in the order, Val < Phe < Pro < Asp < Ala < Trp < Tyr < Arg < Leu. However, the simulation was not consistent with our experimental results. The adsorption of albumin (a protein) by C60 showed the effect on the side chains of Try and Trp. The structure of albumin was changed a little by C60. In our study Try and Tyr were hardly adsorbed by C60 and FNWs. These amino acids did not show a different adsorption behavior compared with other amino acids. The adsorptive behavior of mono-amino acids might be different from that of polypeptides.

  19. Analysis of cyclic pyrolysis products formed from amino acid monomer.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sung-Seen; Ko, Ji-Eun

    2011-11-18

    Amino acid was mixed with silica and tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) to favor pyrolysis of amino acid monomer. The pyrolysis products formed from amino acid monomer were using GC/MS and GC. 20 amino acids of alanine, arginine, asparagine, aspartic acid, cysteine, glutamic acid, glutamine, glycine, histidine, isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, proline, serine, threonine, tryptophan, tyrosine, and valine were analyzed. The pyrolysis products were divided into cyclic and non-cyclic products. Among the 20 amino acids, arginine, asparagine, glutamic acid, glutamine, histidine, lysine, and phenylalanine generated cyclic pyrolysis products of the monomer. New cyclic pyrolysis products were formed by isolation of amino acid monomers. They commonly had polar side functional groups to 5-, 6-, or 7-membered ring structure. Arginine, asparagine, glutamic acid, glutamine, histidine, and phenylalanine generated only 5- or 6-membered ring products. However, lysine generated both 6- and 7-membered ring compounds. Variations of the relative intensities of the cyclic pyrolysis products with the pyrolysis temperature and amino acid concentration were also investigated. PMID:21993510

  20. The Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis II. Amino Acids

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Stepka, W.; Benson, A. A.; Calvin, M.

    1948-05-25

    The radioactive amino acid's synthesized from C{sup 14}O{sub 2} by green algae both in the light and in the dark after CO{sub 2}-free preillumination have been separated and identified using paper chromatography and radioautography. The radioactive amino acids identified were aspartic acid, alanine and smaller amounts of 3- and 4-carbon amino acids. This finding as well as the total absence of radioactive glutamic acid substantiates the mechanism for reduction of CO{sub 2} previously postulated by members of this laboratory.

  1. Terrestrial evolution of polymerization of amino acids - Heat to ATP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.; Nakashima, T.

    1981-01-01

    Sets of amino acids containing sufficient trifunctional monomer are thermally polymerized at temperatures such as 65 deg; the amino acids order themselves. Various polymers have diverse catalytic activities. The polymers aggregate, in aqueous solution, to cell-like structures having those activities plus emergent properties, e.g. proliferatability. Polyamino acids containing sufficient lysine catalyze conversion of free amino acids, by ATP, to small peptides and a high molecular weight fraction. The lysine-rich proteinoid is active in solution, within suspensions of cell-like particles, or in other particles composed of lysine-rich proteinoid and homopolyribonucleotide. Selectivities are observed. An archaic polyamino acid prelude to coded protein synthesis is indicated.

  2. Polymerization of β-amino Acids in Aqueous Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rihe; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1998-02-01

    We have compared carbonyl diimidazole (CDI) and 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDAC) as activating agents for the oligomerization of negatively-charged α- and β-amino acids in homogeneous aqueous solution. α-Amino acids can be oligomerized efficiently using CDI, but not by EDAC. β-Amino acids can be oligomerized efficiently using EDAC, but not by CDI. Aspartic acid, an α- and β-dicarboxylic acid is oligomerized efficiently by both reagents. These results are explained in terms of the mechanisms of the reactions, and their relevance to prebiotic chemistry is discussed.

  3. Polymerization of beta-amino acids in aqueous solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, R.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    We have compared carbonyl diimidazole (CDI) and 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDAC) as activating agents for the oligomerization of negatively-charged alpha- and beta-amino acids in homogeneous aqueous solution. alpha-Amino acids can be oligomerized efficiently using CDI, but not by EDAC. beta-Amino acids can be oligomerized efficiently using EDAC, but not by CDI. Aspartic acid, an alpha- and beta-dicarboxylic acid is oligomerized efficiently by both reagents. These results are explained in terms of the mechanisms of the reactions, and their relevance to prebiotic chemistry is discussed.

  4. Plant proteins in relation to human protein and amino acid nutrition.

    PubMed

    Young, V R; Pellett, P L

    1994-05-01

    Plant protein foods contribute approximately 65% of the per capita supply of protein on a worldwide basis and approximately 32% in the North American region. These sources of protein are discussed in relation to their amino acid content, human amino acid requirements, and dietary protein quality. Mixtures of plant proteins can serve as a complete and well-balanced source of amino acids for meeting human physiological requirements. This short review ends with a list of series of myths and realities concerning the relationship between plant protein and human nutrition and a list of some nutritional issues of concern to the health professional and informed consumer. PMID:8172124

  5. Amino Acid Racemization and the Preservation of Ancient DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poinar, Hendrik N.; Hoss, Matthias

    1996-01-01

    The extent of racemization of aspartic acid, alanine, and leucine provides criteria for assessing whether ancient tissue samples contain endogenous DNA. In samples in which the D/L ratio of aspartic acid exceeds 0.08, ancient DNA sequences could not be retrieved. Paleontological finds from which DNA sequences purportedly millions of years old have been reported show extensive racemization, and the amino acids present are mainly contaminates. An exception is the amino acids in some insects preserved in amber.

  6. Systematic variation of amino acid substitutions for stringent assessment of pairwise covariation.

    PubMed

    Govindarajan, Sridhar; Ness, Jon E; Kim, Seran; Mundorff, Emily C; Minshull, Jeremy; Gustafsson, Claes

    2003-05-16

    During protein evolution, amino acids change due to a combination of functional constraints and genetic drift. Proteins frequently contain pairs of amino acids that appear to change together (covariation). Analysis of covariation from naturally occurring sets of orthologs cannot distinguish between residue pairs retained by functional requirements of the protein and those pairs existing due to changes along a common evolutionary path. Here, we have separated the two types of covariation by independently recombining every naturally occurring amino acid variant within a set of 15 subtilisin orthologs. Our analysis shows that in this family of subtilisin orthologs, almost all possible pairwise combinations of amino acids can coexist. This suggests that amino acid covariation found in the subtilisin orthologs is almost entirely due to common ancestral origin of the changes rather than functional constraints. We conclude that naturally occurring sequence diversity can be used to identify positions that can vary independently without destroying protein function. PMID:12729741

  7. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei

    2011-03-22

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  8. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei

    2012-02-14

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  9. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei

    2011-12-06

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  10. EFFECT OF LEAD ON GAMMA AMINO BUTYRIC ACID SYNTHESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The project studies the inhibitory effect of lead on the enzymatic activity of brain glutamic amino acid decarboxylase (GADC). The enzyme is responsible for the catalytic formation of gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) inhibitory neurons which is believed to be involved with the tra...

  11. The Amino Acid Composition of the Sutter's Mill Carbonaceous Chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Burton, A. S.; Elsila, J. E.; Dworkin, J. P.; Yin, Q.-Z.; Cooper, G.; Jenniskens, P.

    2012-09-01

    We analyzed the amino acid composition of a fragment of the Sutter's Mill meteorite (SM2) using liquid chromatography time of flight mass spectrometry. In contrast to other CM meteorites, only trace levels of amino acids were detected in SM2.

  12. Interactive Hangman Teaches Amino Acid Structures and Abbreviations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennington, Britney O.; Sears, Duane; Clegg, Dennis O.

    2014-01-01

    We developed an interactive exercise to teach students how to draw the structures of the 20 standard amino acids and to identify the one-letter abbreviations by modifying the familiar game of "Hangman." Amino acid structures were used to represent single letters throughout the game. To provide additional practice in identifying…

  13. Natural toxins that affect plant amino acid metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A diverse range of natural compounds interfere with the synthesis and other aspects of amino acid metabolism. Some are amino acid analogues, but most are not. This review covers a number of specific natural phytotoxic compounds by molecular target site. Inhibition of glutamine synthetase is of part...

  14. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA); Wang, Lei (San Diego, CA)

    2008-10-07

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  15. Amino acids in a carbonaceous chondrite from Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotra, R. K.; Shimoyama, A.; Ponnamperuma, C.; Hare, P. E.

    1979-01-01

    A carbonaceous chondrite from the Antarctic, referred to as the Allan Hills meteorite 77306, appears to be free from terrestrial organic contamination. The presence of both protein and non-protein amino acids and an equal abundance of D- and L-enantiomers of amino acids, is testimony to the extraterrestrial nature of these compounds.

  16. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei

    2009-04-28

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  17. Extraordinarily Adaptive Properties of the Genetically Encoded Amino Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilardo, Melissa; Meringer, Markus; Freeland, Stephen; Rasulev, Bakhtiyor; Cleaves, H. James, II

    2015-03-01

    Using novel advances in computational chemistry, we demonstrate that the set of 20 genetically encoded amino acids, used nearly universally to construct all coded terrestrial proteins, has been highly influenced by natural selection. We defined an adaptive set of amino acids as one whose members thoroughly cover relevant physico-chemical properties, or ``chemistry space.'' Using this metric, we compared the encoded amino acid alphabet to random sets of amino acids. These random sets were drawn from a computationally generated compound library containing 1913 alternative amino acids that lie within the molecular weight range of the encoded amino acids. Sets that cover chemistry space better than the genetically encoded alphabet are extremely rare and energetically costly. Further analysis of more adaptive sets reveals common features and anomalies, and we explore their implications for synthetic biology. We present these computations as evidence that the set of 20 amino acids found within the standard genetic code is the result of considerable natural selection. The amino acids used for constructing coded proteins may represent a largely global optimum, such that any aqueous biochemistry would use a very similar set.

  18. Parenteral amino acid intakes in critically ill children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Parenteral amino acid formulas used in parenteral nutrition have a variable composition. To determine the amino acid intake of parenterally fed, critically ill children, and compare it with recommended dietary allowances (RDA) established by the Institute of Medicine (IOM), we retrospectively review...

  19. Extraordinarily adaptive properties of the genetically encoded amino acids.

    PubMed

    Ilardo, Melissa; Meringer, Markus; Freeland, Stephen; Rasulev, Bakhtiyor; Cleaves, H James

    2015-01-01

    Using novel advances in computational chemistry, we demonstrate that the set of 20 genetically encoded amino acids, used nearly universally to construct all coded terrestrial proteins, has been highly influenced by natural selection. We defined an adaptive set of amino acids as one whose members thoroughly cover relevant physico-chemical properties, or "chemistry space." Using this metric, we compared the encoded amino acid alphabet to random sets of amino acids. These random sets were drawn from a computationally generated compound library containing 1913 alternative amino acids that lie within the molecular weight range of the encoded amino acids. Sets that cover chemistry space better than the genetically encoded alphabet are extremely rare and energetically costly. Further analysis of more adaptive sets reveals common features and anomalies, and we explore their implications for synthetic biology. We present these computations as evidence that the set of 20 amino acids found within the standard genetic code is the result of considerable natural selection. The amino acids used for constructing coded proteins may represent a largely global optimum, such that any aqueous biochemistry would use a very similar set. PMID:25802223

  20. Novel Physiological Functions of Branched-Chain Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Shimomura, Yoshiharu; Kitaura, Yasuyuki; Kadota, Yoshihiro; Ishikawa, Takuya; Kondo, Yusuke; Xu, Minjun; Ota, Miki; Morishita, Yukako; Bariuan, Jussiaea V; Zhen, Hongmin

    2015-01-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) are essential amino acids for humans and are major building blocks of proteins. Recent studies indicate that BCAAs act not only as components of proteins, but also as nutrasignals. In this review, we summarize the findings of recent studies investigating the physiological functions of BCAAs in the regulation of protein and glucose metabolism and brain function. PMID:26598818

  1. Interactive Hangman Teaches Amino Acid Structures and Abbreviations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennington, Britney O.; Sears, Duane; Clegg, Dennis O.

    2014-01-01

    We developed an interactive exercise to teach students how to draw the structures of the 20 standard amino acids and to identify the one-letter abbreviations by modifying the familiar game of "Hangman." Amino acid structures were used to represent single letters throughout the game. To provide additional practice in identifying

  2. Type 2 diabetes is associated with postprandial amino acid measures.

    PubMed

    Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O; de Mutsert, Rene; Rensen, Patrick C N; Prehn, Cornelia; Adamski, Jerzy; den Heijer, Martin; le Cessie, Saskia; Suhre, Karsten; Rosendaal, Frits R; Dijk, Ko Willems van

    2016-01-01

    Most studies examining the association between type 2 diabetes (T2D) and amino acids have focused on fasting concentrations. We hypothesized that, besides fasting concentrations, amino acid responses to a standardized meal challenge are also associated with T2D. In a cross-sectional study of 525 participants (165 newly-diagnosed T2D, 186 newly-diagnosed impaired fasting glycaemia, and 174 normal fasting glucose), we examined postprandial amino acid concentrations and the responses (defined as the concentrations and responses 150min after a standardized meal) of fourteen amino acids in relation to T2D. T2D was associated with lower postprandial concentration of seven amino acids compared to the normal fasting glucose group (lowest effect estimate for serine:-0.54 standard deviations (SD) (95% CI:-0.77,-0.32)), and higher concentrations of phenylalanine, tryptophan, tyrosine and (iso-)leucine (highest effect estimate for (iso-)leucine: 0.44 SD (95% CI: 0.20, 0.67)). Regarding the meal responses, T2D was associated with lower responses of seven amino acids (ranging from-0.55 SD ((95% CI):-0.78,-0.33) for serine to-0.25 SD ((95% CI: -0.45,-0.02) for ornithine). We conclude that T2D is associated with postprandial concentrations of amino acids and a reduced amino acid meal response, indicating that these measures may also be potential markers of T2D. PMID:26271442

  3. Boron containing amino acid compounds and methods for their use

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, J.D.; Coderre, J.A.

    2000-01-25

    The present invention provides new boron containing amino acid compounds and methods for making these compounds by contacting melphalan or another nitrogen mustard derivative and sodium borocaptate. The present invention also provides a method of treating a mammal having a tumor by administering to the mammal a therapeutically effective amount of the new boron containing amino acid compounds.

  4. Extraordinarily Adaptive Properties of the Genetically Encoded Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Ilardo, Melissa; Meringer, Markus; Freeland, Stephen; Rasulev, Bakhtiyor; Cleaves II, H. James

    2015-01-01

    Using novel advances in computational chemistry, we demonstrate that the set of 20 genetically encoded amino acids, used nearly universally to construct all coded terrestrial proteins, has been highly influenced by natural selection. We defined an adaptive set of amino acids as one whose members thoroughly cover relevant physico-chemical properties, or “chemistry space.” Using this metric, we compared the encoded amino acid alphabet to random sets of amino acids. These random sets were drawn from a computationally generated compound library containing 1913 alternative amino acids that lie within the molecular weight range of the encoded amino acids. Sets that cover chemistry space better than the genetically encoded alphabet are extremely rare and energetically costly. Further analysis of more adaptive sets reveals common features and anomalies, and we explore their implications for synthetic biology. We present these computations as evidence that the set of 20 amino acids found within the standard genetic code is the result of considerable natural selection. The amino acids used for constructing coded proteins may represent a largely global optimum, such that any aqueous biochemistry would use a very similar set. PMID:25802223

  5. Boron containing amino acid compounds and methods for their use

    DOEpatents

    Glass, John D.; Coderre, Jeffrey A.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides new boron containing amino acid compounds and methods for making these compounds by contacting melphalan or another nitrogen mustard derivative and sodium borocaptate. The present invention also provides a method of treating a mammal having a tumor by administering to the mammal a therapeutically effective amount of the new boron containing amino acid compounds.

  6. Interaction of metal ions and amino acids - Possible mechanisms for the adsorption of amino acids on homoionic smectite clays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, A.; Loew, G. H.; Lawless, J.

    1983-01-01

    A semiempirical molecular orbital method is used to characterize the binding of amino acids to hexahydrated Cu(2+) and Ni(2+), a process presumed to occur when they are adsorbed in the interlamellar space of homoionic smectite clays. Five alpha-amino acids, beta-alanine, and gamma-aminobutyric acid were used to investigate the metal ion and amino acid specificity in binding. It was assumed that the alpha, beta, and gamma-amino acids would bind as bidentate anionic ligands, forming either 1:1 or 1:2 six-coordinated five, six, and seven-membered-ring chelate complexes, respectively. Energies of complex formation, optimized geometries, and electron and spin distribution were determined; and steric constraints of binding of the amino acids to the ion-exchanged cations in the interlamellar spacing of a clay were examined. Results indicate that hexahydrated Cu(2+) forms more stable complexes than hexahydrated Ni(2+) with all the amino acids studied. However, among these amino acids, complex formation does not favor the adsorption of the biological subset. Calculated energetics of complex formation and steric constraints are shown to predict that 1:1 rather than 1:2 metal-amino acid complexes are generally favored in the clay.

  7. Dissolved organic nitrogen dynamics and bacterial amino acid metabolism in Castle Lake, California

    SciTech Connect

    Zehr, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    Heterotrophic bacterioplankton can play an important role in the mineralization of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) in aquatic ecosystems. During the summer growing season, dissolved inorganic nitrogen in the epilimnion of Castle Lake is often below detection, thus phytoplankton production is dependent upon N-regeneration mechanisms. The specific objectives were threefold: (1) analyze seasonal variation of dissolved organic nitrogen in relation to primary productivity and biomass, (2) determine the fraction of dissolved organic nitrogen composed of dissolved free amino acids, and (3) determine mineralization rates of amino acid nitrogen. The concentration and composition of DON varied seasonally. Dissolved free amino acids comprised 5-8% of the DON. Sediment release appeared to be the most important source of the observed increase of DON. The mineralization of amino acid carbon and nitrogen was measured with /sup 14/C- and /sup 15/N-labeled amino acids. Total amino acid nitrogen flux was calculated and a conservative estimate showed that amino acid mineralization could supply a minimum of 2% of the phytoplankton N-requirements. However, amino acids are only one component of DON and there are many other substrates available for bacterial mineralization. Further research on the differential carbon and nitrogen metabolism of other components of DON are still needed. This approach provides useful information on the role of DON in the nitrogen dynamics of aquatic ecosystems.

  8. Stardust, Supernovae and the Chirality of the Amino Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, R N; Kajino, T; Onaka, T

    2011-03-09

    A mechanism for creating enantiomerism in the amino acids, the building blocks of the proteins, that involves global selection of one chirality by interactions between the amino acids and neutrinos from core-collapse supernovae is described. The selection involves the dependence of the interaction cross sections on the orientations of the spins of the neutrinos and the 14N nuclei in the amino acids, or in precursor molecules, which in turn couple to the molecular chirality. The subsequent chemical evolution and galactic mixing would ultimately populate the Galaxy with the selected species. The resulting amino acids could either be the source thereof on Earth, or could have triggered the chirality that was ultimately achieved for Earth's amino acids.

  9. Amino Acid Analyses of Acid Hydrolysates in Desert Varnish

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Randall S.; Staley, James T.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Engel, Mike

    2001-01-01

    There has long been a debate as to whether rock varnish deposits are microbially mediated or are deposited by inorganic processes. Varnished rocks are found throughout the world primarily in arid and semi-arid regions. The varnish coats are typically up to 200 microns thick and are composed of clays and alternating layers enriched in manganese and iron oxides. The individual layers range in thickness from 1 micron to greater than 10 microns and may continue laterally for more than a 100 microns. Overlapping botryoidal structures are visible in thin section and scanning electron micrographs. The coatings also include small amounts of organic mater and detrital grains. Amino-acid hydrolysates offer a means of assessing the organic composition of rock varnish collected from the Sonoran Desert, near Phoenix, AZ. Chromatographic analyses of hydrolysates from powdered samples of rock varnish suggest that the interior of rock varnish is relatively enriched in amino acids and specifically in d-alanine and glutamic acid. Peptidoglycan (murein) is the main structural component of gram-positive bacterial cell walls. The d-enantiomer of alanine and glutamic acid are specific to peptidoglycan and are consequently an indicator for the presence of bacteria. D-alanine is also found in teichoic acid which is only found in gram-positive bacteria. Several researchers have cultured bacteria from the surface of rock varnish and most have been gram-positive, suggesting that gram-positive bacteria are intimately associated with varnish coatings and may play a role in the formation of varnish coatings.

  10. Amino Acid Carbamates As Prodrugs Of Resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Mattarei, Andrea; Azzolini, Michele; La Spina, Martina; Zoratti, Mario; Paradisi, Cristina; Biasutto, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol (3, 5, 4'-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene), a plant polyphenol, has important drug-like properties, but its pharmacological exploitation in vivo is hindered by its rapid transformation via phase II conjugative metabolism. One approach to bypass this problem relies on prodrugs. We report here the synthesis, characterization, stability and in vivo pharmacokinetic behaviour of prodrugs of resveratrol in which the OH groups are engaged in an N-monosubstituted carbamate ester (-OC(O)NHR) linkage with a natural amino acid (Leu, Ile, Phe, Thr) to prevent conjugation and modulate the physicochemical properties of the molecule. We also report a convenient, high-yield protocol to obtain derivatives of this type. The new carbamate ester derivatives are stable at pH 1, while they undergo slow hydrolysis at physiological pH and hydrolyse with kinetics suitable for use in prodrugs in whole blood. After administration to rats by oral gavage the isoleucine-containing prodrug was significantly absorbed, and was present in the bloodstream as non-metabolized unaltered or partially deprotected species, demonstrating effective shielding from first-pass metabolism. We conclude that prodrugs based on the N-monosubstituted carbamate ester bond have the appropriate stability profile for the systemic delivery of phenolic compounds. PMID:26463125

  11. Electronic coupling through natural amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berstis, Laura; Beckham, Gregg T.; Crowley, Michael F.

    2015-12-01

    Myriad scientific domains concern themselves with biological electron transfer (ET) events that span across vast scales of rate and efficiency through a remarkably fine-tuned integration of amino acid (AA) sequences, electronic structure, dynamics, and environment interactions. Within this intricate scheme, many questions persist as to how proteins modulate electron-tunneling properties. To help elucidate these principles, we develop a model set of peptides representing the common α-helix and β-strand motifs including all natural AAs within implicit protein-environment solvation. Using an effective Hamiltonian strategy with density functional theory, we characterize the electronic coupling through these peptides, furthermore considering side-chain dynamics. For both motifs, predictions consistently show that backbone-mediated electronic coupling is distinctly sensitive to AA type (aliphatic, polar, aromatic, negatively charged and positively charged), and to side-chain orientation. The unique properties of these residues may be employed to design activated, deactivated, or switch-like superexchange pathways. Electronic structure calculations and Green's function analyses indicate that localized shifts in the electron density along the peptide play a role in modulating these pathways, and further substantiate the experimentally observed behavior of proline residues as superbridges. The distinct sensitivities of tunneling pathways to sequence and conformation revealed in this electronic coupling database help improve our fundamental understanding of the broad diversity of ET reactivity and provide guiding principles for peptide design.

  12. Amino Acid Carbamates As Prodrugs Of Resveratrol

    PubMed Central

    Mattarei, Andrea; Azzolini, Michele; La Spina, Martina; Zoratti, Mario; Paradisi, Cristina; Biasutto, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol (3, 5, 4?-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene), a plant polyphenol, has important drug-like properties, but its pharmacological exploitation in vivo is hindered by its rapid transformation via phase II conjugative metabolism. One approach to bypass this problem relies on prodrugs. We report here the synthesis, characterization, stability and in vivo pharmacokinetic behaviour of prodrugs of resveratrol in which the OH groups are engaged in an N-monosubstituted carbamate ester (-OC(O)NHR) linkage with a natural amino acid (Leu, Ile, Phe, Thr) to prevent conjugation and modulate the physicochemical properties of the molecule. We also report a convenient, high-yield protocol to obtain derivatives of this type. The new carbamate ester derivatives are stable at pH 1, while they undergo slow hydrolysis at physiological pH and hydrolyse with kinetics suitable for use in prodrugs in whole blood. After administration to rats by oral gavage the isoleucine-containing prodrug was significantly absorbed, and was present in the bloodstream as non-metabolized unaltered or partially deprotected species, demonstrating effective shielding from first-pass metabolism. We conclude that prodrugs based on the N-monosubstituted carbamate ester bond have the appropriate stability profile for the systemic delivery of phenolic compounds. PMID:26463125

  13. Electronic coupling through natural amino acids.

    PubMed

    Berstis, Laura; Beckham, Gregg T; Crowley, Michael F

    2015-12-14

    Myriad scientific domains concern themselves with biological electron transfer (ET) events that span across vast scales of rate and efficiency through a remarkably fine-tuned integration of amino acid (AA) sequences, electronic structure, dynamics, and environment interactions. Within this intricate scheme, many questions persist as to how proteins modulate electron-tunneling properties. To help elucidate these principles, we develop a model set of peptides representing the common ?-helix and ?-strand motifs including all natural AAs within implicit protein-environment solvation. Using an effective Hamiltonian strategy with density functional theory, we characterize the electronic coupling through these peptides, furthermore considering side-chain dynamics. For both motifs, predictions consistently show that backbone-mediated electronic coupling is distinctly sensitive to AA type (aliphatic, polar, aromatic, negatively charged and positively charged), and to side-chain orientation. The unique properties of these residues may be employed to design activated, deactivated, or switch-like superexchange pathways. Electronic structure calculations and Green's function analyses indicate that localized shifts in the electron density along the peptide play a role in modulating these pathways, and further substantiate the experimentally observed behavior of proline residues as superbridges. The distinct sensitivities of tunneling pathways to sequence and conformation revealed in this electronic coupling database help improve our fundamental understanding of the broad diversity of ET reactivity and provide guiding principles for peptide design. PMID:26671404

  14. Molecular cloning and amino acid sequence of human 5-lipoxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, T.; Funk, C.D.; Radmark, O.; Hoeoeg, J.O.; Joernvall, H.; Samuelsson, B.

    1988-01-01

    5-Lipoxygenase (EC 1.13.11.34), a Ca/sup 2 +/- and ATP-requiring enzyme, catalyzes the first two steps in the biosynthesis of the peptidoleukotrienes and the chemotactic factor leukotriene B/sub 4/. A cDNA clone corresponding to 5-lipoxygenase was isolated from a human lung lambda gt11 expression library by immunoscreening with a polyclonal antibody. Additional clones from a human placenta lambda gt11 cDNA library were obtained by plaque hybridization with the /sup 32/P-labeled lung cDNA clone. Sequence data obtained from several overlapping clones indicate that the composite DNAs contain the complete coding region for the enzyme. From the deduced primary structure, 5-lipoxygenase encodes a 673 amino acid protein with a calculated molecular weight of 77,839. Direct analysis of the native protein and its proteolytic fragments confirmed the deduced composition, the amino-terminal amino acid sequence, and the structure of many internal segments. 5-Lipoxygenase has no apparent sequence homology with leukotriene A/sub 4/ hydrolase or Ca/sup 2 +/-binding proteins. RNA blot analysis indicated substantial amounts of an mRNA species of approx. = 2700 nucleotides in leukocytes, lung, and placenta.

  15. Small-intestinal or colonic microbiota as a potential amino acid source in animals.

    PubMed

    Bergen, Werner G

    2015-02-01

    Factors affecting physiological impacts of the microbiome on protein nutrition are discussed for hind-gut fermenters (humans, pigs, rodents). The microbiome flourishes in all gastrointestinal organs, and is a major source of amino acids to fore-gut fermenting animals. In humans, rats and pigs the net effect of microbiome biomass synthesis on amino acid requirements is much less certain. Dietary proteins, amino acids, peptides, endogenous-secreted protein and recycled urea may all be utilized as nitrogen source by growing bacteria in the small intestine and colon. The inclusions of radiolabelled amino acid precursors will result in labeled bacteria which can be digested and absorbed in the ileum and to some degree in the colon. This does not necessarily indicate a significant nutritional role of the microbiome in humans, pigs and rodents. The physiological attributes required for small-intestinal and colon microbiome utilization are a vigorous proteolytic digestion with pancreatic or intestinal enzymes and the presence of amino acid transporters. Findings to date seem to suggest that these two physiological attributes for effective bacterial protein utilization are present in the small intestine; however, these attributes have a much lower capacity/impact in the colon. The gastrointestinal microbiome is likely a protein source of medium to high nutritional quality, but overall the microbiome is not an important amino acid source in humans and animals fed amino acids at requirement levels. PMID:25466904

  16. Role of CCN2 in Amino Acid Metabolism of Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Murase, Yurika; Hattori, Takako; Aoyama, Eriko; Nishida, Takashi; Maeda-Uematsu, Aya; Kawaki, Harumi; Lyons, Karen M; Sasaki, Akira; Takigawa, Masaharu; Kubota, Satoshi

    2016-04-01

    CCN2/connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is a multi-functional molecule that promotes harmonized development and regeneration of cartilage through its matricellular interaction with a variety of extracellular biomolecules. Thus, deficiency in CCN2 supply profoundly affects a variety of cellular activities including basic metabolism. A previous study showed that the expression of a number of ribosomal protein genes was markedly enhanced in Ccn2-null chondrocytes. Therefore, in this study, we analyzed the impact of CCN2 on amino acid and protein metabolism in chondrocytes. Comparative metabolome analysis of the amino acids in Ccn2-null and wild-type mouse chondrocytes revealed stable decreases in the cellular levels of all of the essential amino acids. Unexpectedly, uptake of such amino acids was rather enhanced in Ccn2-null chondrocytes, and the addition of exogenous CCN2 to human chondrocytic cells resulted in decreased amino acid uptake. However, as expected, amino acid consumption by protein synthesis was also accelerated in Ccn2-null chondrocytes. Furthermore, we newly found that expression of two genes encoding two glycolytic enzymes, as well as the previously reported Eno1 gene, was repressed in those cells. Considering the impaired glycolysis and retained mitochondrial membrane potential in Ccn2-null chondrocytes, these findings suggest that Ccn2 deficiency induces amino acid shortage in chondrocytes by accelerated amino acid consumption through protein synthesis and acquisition of aerobic energy. Interestingly, CCN2 was found to capture such free amino acids in vitro. Under physiological conditions, CCN2 may be regulating the levels of free amino acids in the extracellular matrix of cartilage. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 927-937, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26364758

  17. Wet, Carbonaceous Asteroids: Altering Minerals, Changing Amino Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2011-04-01

    Many carbonaceous chondrites contain alteration products from water-rock interactions at low temperature and organic compounds. A fascinating fact known for decades is the presence in some of them of an assortment of organic compounds, including amino acids, sometimes called the building blocks of life. Murchison and other CM carbonaceous chondrites contain hundreds of amino acids. Early measurements indicated that the amino acids in carbonaceous chondrites had equal proportions of L- and D-structures, a situation called racemic. This was in sharp contrast to life on Earth, which heavily favors L- forms. However, beginning in 1997, John Cronin and Sandra Pizzarello (Arizona State University) found L- excesses in isovaline and several other amino acids in the Murchison carbonaceous chondrite. In 2009, Daniel Glavin and Jason Dworkin (Astrobiology Analytical Lab, Goddard Space Flight Center) reported the first independent confirmation of L-isovaline excesses in Murchison using a different analytical technique than employed by Cronin and Pizzarello. Inspired by this work, Daniel Glavin, Michael Callahan, Jason Dworkin, and Jamie Elsila (Astrobiology Analytical Lab, Goddard Space Flight Center), have done an extensive study of the abundance and symmetry of amino acids in carbonaceous chondrites that experienced a range of alteration by water in their parent asteroids. The results show that amino acids are more abundant in the less altered meteorites, implying that aqueous processing changes the mix of amino acids. They also confirmed the enrichment in L-structures of some amino acids, especially isovaline, confirming earlier work. The authors suggest that aqueously-altered planetesimals might have seeded the early Earth with nonracemic amino acids, perhaps explaining why life from microorganisms to people use only L- forms to make proteins. The initial imbalance caused by non-biologic processes in wet asteroids might have been amplified by life on Earth. Alternatively, the same processes that produced the L-amino acid excesses in carbonaceous asteroids also operated on the early Earth.

  18. Hydration of amino acids: FTIR spectra and molecular dynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Panuszko, Aneta; Adamczak, Beata; Czub, Jacek; Goj?o, Emilia; Stangret, Janusz

    2015-11-01

    The hydration of selected amino acids, alanine, glycine, proline, valine, isoleucine and phenylalanine, has been studied in aqueous solutions by means of FTIR spectra of HDO isotopically diluted in H2O. The difference spectra procedure and the chemometric method have been applied to remove the contribution of bulk water and thus to separate the spectra of solute-affected HDO. To support interpretation of obtained spectral results, molecular dynamics simulations of amino acids were performed. The structural-energetic characteristic of these solute-affected water molecules shows that, on average, water affected by amino acids forms stronger and shorter H-bonds than those in pure water. Differences in the influence of amino acids on water structure have been noticed. The effect of the hydrophobic side chain of an amino acid on the solvent interactions seems to be enhanced because of the specific cooperative coupling of water strong H-bond chain, connecting the carboxyl and amino groups, with the clathrate-like H-bond network surrounding the hydrocarbon side chain. The parameter derived from the spectral data, which corresponds to the contributions of the population of weak hydrogen bonds of water molecules which have been substituted by the stronger ones in the hydration sphere of amino acids, correlated well with the amino acid hydrophobicity indexes. PMID:26002810

  19. Role of sialic acid in synaptosomal transport of amino acid transmitters

    SciTech Connect

    Zaleska, M.M.; Erecinska, M.

    1987-03-01

    Active, high-affinity, sodium-dependent uptake of (/sup 14/C)-aminobutyric acid and of the acidic amino acid D-(/sup 3/H)-aspartate was inhibited by pretreatment of synaptosomes with neuraminidase from Vibrio cholerae. Inhibition was of a noncompetitive type and was related to the amount of sialic acid released. The maximum accumulation ratios of both amino acids (intracellular (amino acid)/extracellular (amino acid)) remained largely unaltered. Treatment with neuraminidase affected neither the synaptosomal energy levels nor the concentration of internal potassium. It is suggested that the ..gamma..-aminobutyric acid and acidic amino acid transporters are glycosylated and that sialic acid is involved in the operation of the carrier proteins directly and not through modification of driving forces responsible for amino acid uptake.

  20. Variable denaturation of ovalbumin by incorporation of amino acid analogs.

    PubMed

    Heilig, K; Willand, J; Gast, M J; Hortin, G

    1984-01-30

    Denaturation of hen ovalbumin synthesized in a cell-free system was assayed by examining its sensitivity to trypsin. The native ovalbumin resisted digestion by trypsin, and it remained resistant to digestion when some amino acid analogs, including azetidine-2-carboxylic acid and meta-flourotyrosine, were incorporated into its peptide chain. However, when other amino acid analogs such as beta-hydroxyleucine and 4-thiaisoleucine were incorporated during protein systhesis, ovalbumin became very lablie to trypsin. These experiments demonstrate a sensitive system for detecting protein denaturation and suggest a variable effect of different amino acid analogs on the native conformation of a protein. PMID:6704091

  1. Primordial Coding of Amino Acids by Adsorbed Purine Bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowerby, Stephen J.; Petersen, George B.; Holm, Nils G.

    2002-02-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy and chromatography experiments exploring the potential templating properties of nucleic acid bases adsorbed to the surface of crystalline graphite, revealed that the interactions of amino acids with the bare crystal surface are significantly modulated by the prior adsorption of adenine and hypoxanthine. These bases are the coding elements of a putative purine-only genetic alphabet and the observed effects are different for each of the bases. Such mapping between bases and amino acids provides a coding mechanism. These observations demonstrate that a simple pre-RNA amino acid discrimination mechanism could have existed on the prebiotic Earth providing critical functionality for the origin of life.

  2. Boramino acid as a marker for amino acid transporters.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhibo; Chen, Haojun; Chen, Kai; Shao, Yihan; Kiesewetter, Dale O; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-09-01

    Amino acid transporters (AATs) are a series of integral channels for uphill cellular uptake of nutrients and neurotransmitters. Abnormal expression of AATs is often associated with cancer, addiction, and multiple mental diseases. Although methods to evaluate in vivo expression of AATs would be highly useful, efforts to develop them have been hampered by a lack of appropriate tracers. We describe a new class of AA mimics-boramino acids (BAAs)-that can serve as general imaging probes for AATs. The structure of a BAA is identical to that of the corresponding natural AA, except for an exotic replacement of the carboxylate with -BF3 (-). Cellular studies demonstrate strong AAT-mediated cell uptake, and animal studies show high tumor-specific accumulation, suggesting that BAAs hold great promise for the development of new imaging probes and smart AAT-targeting drugs. PMID:26601275

  3. Boramino acid as a marker for amino acid transporters

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhibo; Chen, Haojun; Chen, Kai; Shao, Yihan; Kiesewetter, Dale O.; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    Amino acid transporters (AATs) are a series of integral channels for uphill cellular uptake of nutrients and neurotransmitters. Abnormal expression of AATs is often associated with cancer, addiction, and multiple mental diseases. Although methods to evaluate in vivo expression of AATs would be highly useful, efforts to develop them have been hampered by a lack of appropriate tracers. We describe a new class of AA mimics—boramino acids (BAAs)—that can serve as general imaging probes for AATs. The structure of a BAA is identical to that of the corresponding natural AA, except for an exotic replacement of the carboxylate with -BF3−. Cellular studies demonstrate strong AAT-mediated cell uptake, and animal studies show high tumor-specific accumulation, suggesting that BAAs hold great promise for the development of new imaging probes and smart AAT-targeting drugs. PMID:26601275

  4. Subcritical Water Extraction of Amino Acids from Atacama Desert Soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amashukeli, Xenia; Pelletier, Christine C.; Kirby, James P.; Grunthaner, Frank J.

    2007-01-01

    Amino acids are considered organic molecular indicators in the search for extant and extinct life in the Solar System. Extraction of these molecules from a particulate solid matrix, such as Martian regolith, will be critical to their in situ detection and analysis. The goals of this study were to optimize a laboratory amino acid extraction protocol by quantitatively measuring the yields of extracted amino acids as a function of liquid water temperature and sample extraction time and to compare the results to the standard HCl vapor- phase hydrolysis yields for the same soil samples. Soil samples from the Yungay region of the Atacama Desert ( Martian regolith analog) were collected during a field study in the summer of 2005. The amino acids ( alanine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, glycine, serine, and valine) chosen for analysis were present in the samples at concentrations of 1 - 70 parts- per- billion. Subcritical water extraction efficiency was examined over the temperature range of 30 - 325 degrees C, at pressures of 17.2 or 20.0 MPa, and for water- sample contact equilibration times of 0 - 30 min. None of the amino acids were extracted in detectable amounts at 30 degrees C ( at 17.2 MPa), suggesting that amino acids are too strongly bound by the soil matrix to be extracted at such a low temperature. Between 150 degrees C and 250 degrees C ( at 17.2 MPa), the extraction efficiencies of glycine, alanine, and valine were observed to increase with increasing water temperature, consistent with higher solubility at higher temperatures, perhaps due to the decreasing dielectric constant of water. Amino acids were not detected in extracts collected at 325 degrees C ( at 20.0 MPa), probably due to amino acid decomposition at this temperature. The optimal subcritical water extraction conditions for these amino acids from Atacama Desert soils were achieved at 200 degrees C, 17.2 MPa, and a water- sample contact equilibration time of 10 min.

  5. Graphdiyne as a promising material for detecting amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Gao, Pengfei; Guo, Lei; Zhang, Shengli

    2015-11-01

    The adsorption of glycine, glutamic acid, histidine and phenylalanine on single-layer graphdiyne/ graphene is investigated by ab initio calculations. The results show that for each amino acid molecule, the adsorption energy on graphdiyne is larger than the adsorption energy on graphene and dispersion interactions predominate in the adsorption. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that at room temperature the amino acid molecules keep migrating and rotating on graphdiyne surface and induce fluctuation in graphdiyne bandgap. Additionally, the photon absorption spectra of graphdiyne-amino-acid systems are investigated. We uncover that the presence of amino acid molecules makes the photon absorption peaks of graphdiyne significantly depressed and shifted. Finally, quantum electronic transport properties of graphdiyne-amino-acid systems are compared with the transport properties of pure graphdiyne. We reveal that the amino acid molecules induce distinct changes in the electronic conductivity of graphdiyne. The results in this paper reveal that graphdiyne is a promising two-dimensional material for sensitively detecting amino acids and may potentially be used in biosensors.

  6. Graphdiyne as a promising material for detecting amino acids.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Gao, Pengfei; Guo, Lei; Zhang, Shengli

    2015-01-01

    The adsorption of glycine, glutamic acid, histidine and phenylalanine on single-layer graphdiyne/ graphene is investigated by ab initio calculations. The results show that for each amino acid molecule, the adsorption energy on graphdiyne is larger than the adsorption energy on graphene and dispersion interactions predominate in the adsorption. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that at room temperature the amino acid molecules keep migrating and rotating on graphdiyne surface and induce fluctuation in graphdiyne bandgap. Additionally, the photon absorption spectra of graphdiyne-amino-acid systems are investigated. We uncover that the presence of amino acid molecules makes the photon absorption peaks of graphdiyne significantly depressed and shifted. Finally, quantum electronic transport properties of graphdiyne-amino-acid systems are compared with the transport properties of pure graphdiyne. We reveal that the amino acid molecules induce distinct changes in the electronic conductivity of graphdiyne. The results in this paper reveal that graphdiyne is a promising two-dimensional material for sensitively detecting amino acids and may potentially be used in biosensors. PMID:26568200

  7. Anatomical and pharmacological characterization of excitatory amino acid receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Monaghan, D.T.

    1985-01-01

    The majority of the excitatory neurotransmission in the vertebrate Central Nervous System is thought to be mediated by acidic amino acid neurotransmitters. However, relatively little is known about the excitatory amino acid receptors and their distribution within the CNS. By analyzing radioligand binding to purified synaptic plasma membranes and to thin tissue sections processed for autoradiography, multiple distinct binding sites were found. These binding sites exhibited the pharmacological properties indicative of the excitatory amino acid receptors, which had been identified by electrophysiological techniques. Specifically, L-(/sup 3/H)-glutamate and D-(/sup 3/H)-amino-5-phosphonopentanoate appear to label N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, L-(/sup 3/H)-glutamate and (/sup 3/H)-kainic acid appear to label kainic acid receptors, and L-(/sup 3/H)-glutamate and (/sup 3/H)-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate appear to label quisqualate receptors. Together, these results confirm the three receptor scheme proposed for excitatory amino acid neurotransmission. These results also show that these transmitter-receptor systems are differentially distributed in the brain, and that the total distribution is consistent with that found by other markers for excitatory amino acid-using neurons.

  8. Plasmatic amino acids in kidney transplantation in children.

    PubMed

    Calvo, C; Ruza, F; Hernanz, A; Madero, R; Arroyo, I; Delgado, M A

    1998-10-01

    We studied the evolution of plasma amino acid levels in children with chronic kidney failure after undergoing a renal transplantation. Plasma amino acid profile was studied in 10 children just before surgery, at admission in paediatric intensive care unit and 4, 8, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h after transplantation. Previous to the graft, plasma levels of glutamic acid (p < 0.01), hydroxyproline (p < 0.01), citrulline (p < 0.01) and arginine (p < 0.05) were significantly increased, whereas plasma levels of serine (p < 0.01), glutamine (p < 0.03), threonine (p < 0.01), tyrosine (p < 0.01), valine (p < 0.01), leucine (p < 0.01), tryptophan (p < 0.01), branched amino acids (BCAA) (p < 0.01), aromatic amino acids (AAA) (p < 0.01) and essential amino acids (EAA) (p < 0.01) were decreased in relation to control children. The amino acid profile evolution run parallel to the settle down of renal function parameters. Within 72 h after surgery, even before in some cases, all amino acids except tryptophan and arginine reached normal levels. PMID:9787956

  9. Graphdiyne as a promising material for detecting amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi; Gao, Pengfei; Guo, Lei; Zhang, Shengli

    2015-01-01

    The adsorption of glycine, glutamic acid, histidine and phenylalanine on single-layer graphdiyne/ graphene is investigated by ab initio calculations. The results show that for each amino acid molecule, the adsorption energy on graphdiyne is larger than the adsorption energy on graphene and dispersion interactions predominate in the adsorption. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that at room temperature the amino acid molecules keep migrating and rotating on graphdiyne surface and induce fluctuation in graphdiyne bandgap. Additionally, the photon absorption spectra of graphdiyne-amino-acid systems are investigated. We uncover that the presence of amino acid molecules makes the photon absorption peaks of graphdiyne significantly depressed and shifted. Finally, quantum electronic transport properties of graphdiyne-amino-acid systems are compared with the transport properties of pure graphdiyne. We reveal that the amino acid molecules induce distinct changes in the electronic conductivity of graphdiyne. The results in this paper reveal that graphdiyne is a promising two-dimensional material for sensitively detecting amino acids and may potentially be used in biosensors. PMID:26568200

  10. Screening of central functions of amino acids and their metabolites for sedative and hypnotic effects using chick models.

    PubMed

    Furuse, Mitsuhiro

    2015-09-01

    The chick has a practical advantage in the screening process in that chicks require only small quantities of drugs. The chick separation stress paradigm has traditionally been recognized as a valid form of anxiolytic screening. Further, chick behavior involving standing motionless with eyes closed or sitting motionless with head drooped is nearly always associated with electrophysiological sleep. When centrally administered, some DNA-encoded L-?-amino acids, as well as some DNA-non-encoded amino acids, such as metabolites of L-?-amino acids, D-amino acid and ?-amino acid, have shown sedative and/or hypnotic effects in chicks. The effects of some of these amino acids have subsequently been confirmed in humans. In conclusion, the chick model is convenient and useful for screening central functions of amino acids and their metabolites for hypnosis and sedation. PMID:26101060

  11. Regulation of myocardial amino acid balance in the conscious dog.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, R G; Barrett, E J; Francis, C K; Jacob, R; Zaret, B L

    1985-01-01

    The effects in vivo of physiologic increases in insulin and amino acids on myocardial amino acid balance were evaluated in conscious dogs. Arterial and coronary sinus concentrations of amino acids and coronary blood flow were measured during a 30-min basal and a 100-min experimental period employing three protocols: euglycemic insulin clamp (plasma insulin equaled 70 +/- 11 microU/ml, n = 6); euglycemic insulin clamp during amino acid infusion (plasma insulin equaled 89 +/- 12 microU/ml, n = 6); and suppression of insulin with somatostatin during amino acid infusion (plasma insulin equaled 15 +/- 4 microU/ml, n = 6). Basally, only leucine and isoleucine were removed significantly by myocardium (net branched chain amino acid [BCAA] uptake equaled 0.5 +/- 0.2 mumol/min), while glycine, alanine, and glutamine were released. Glutamine demonstrated the highest net myocardial production (1.6 +/- 0.2 mumol/min). No net exchange was seen for valine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, cysteine, methionine, glutamate, asparagine, serine, threonine, taurine, and aspartate. In group I, hyperinsulinemia caused a decline of all plasma amino acids except alanine; alanine balance switched from release to an uptake of 0.6 +/- 0.4 mumol/min (P less than 0.05), while the myocardial balance of other amino acids was unchanged. In group II, amino acid concentrations rose, and were accompanied by a marked rise in myocardial BCAA uptake (0.4 +/- 0.1-2.6 +/- 0.3 mumol/min, P less than 0.001). Uptake of alanine was again stimulated (0.9 +/- 0.3 mumol/min, P less than 0.01), while glutamine production was unchanged (1.3 +/- 0.4 vs. 1.6 +/- 0.3 mumol/min). In group III, there was a 4-5-fold increase in the plasma concentration of the infused amino acids, accompanied by marked stimulation in uptake of only BCAA (6.8 +/- 0.7 mumol/min). Myocardial glutamine production was unchanged (1.9 +/- 0.4-1.3 +/- 0.7 mumol/min). Within the three experimental groups there were highly significant linear correlations between myocardial uptake and arterial concentration of leucine, isoleucine, valine, and total BCAA (r = 0.98, 0.98, 0.92, and 0.97, respectively); P less than 0.001 for each). In vivo, BCAA are the principal amino acids taken up by the myocardium basally and during amino acid infusion. Plasma BCAA concentration and not insulin determines the rate of myocardial BCAA uptake. Insulin stimulates myocardial alanine uptake. Neither insulin nor amino acid infusion alters myocardial glutamine release. PMID:2859300

  12. Enantiomeric separation of amino acids and nonprotein amino acids using a particle-loaded monolithic column.

    PubMed

    Kato, M; Dulay, M T; Bennett, B; Chen, J; Zare, R N

    2000-09-01

    A solution is prepared of 5 microm silica particles modified with (S)-N-3,5-dinitrobenzoyl-1-naphthylglycine (particle 1) or (S)-N-3,5-dinitrophenylaminocarbonyl-valine (particle 2) suspended in liquid tetraethylorthosilicate, ethanol, and aqueous hydrochloric acid. This solution is injected under pressure into a 30 cm long, 75 microm inner diameter capillary column and heated for 1 h at 120 degrees C after which the modified particles are embedded in a monolithic column of sol gel. The packed column measures approximately 15 cm from the inlet to the window used to view the laser-induced fluorescence. Thirteen different amino acids and three nonprotein amino acids are derivatized with the fluorogenic reagent 4-fluoro-7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole (NBD-F) before injection onto the column for capillary electrochromatographic separation. The enantiomeric separation of the monolithic column packed with particle 1 results in a resolution ranging from 1.14 to 4.45, whereas that packed with particle 2 results in a resolution ranging from 0.79 to 1.17. On the basis of resolution and amount of chiral packing material the enantiomeric separation obtained by capillary electrochromatography is judged to be superior to that obtained previously with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). PMID:11001212

  13. Echinococcus granulosus: specificity of amino acid transport systems in protoscoleces.

    PubMed

    Jeffs, S A; Arme, C

    1987-08-01

    Protoscoleces of Echinococcus granulosus absorb the L-amino acids proline, methionine, leucine, alanine, serine, phenylalanine, lysine and glutamic acid by a combination of mediated transport and diffusion. All eight amino acids were accumulated against a concentration gradient. Comparison of Kt and Vmax values suggests that a low affinity for a particular compound is compensated for by a relatively larger number of transport sites for that compound. Four systems serve for the transport of the eight substrates studied: 2 for neutral (EgN1, EgN2) and 1 each for acidic (EgA) and basic (EgB) amino acids. All eight amino acids are incorporated into protein to varying degrees and substantial portions of absorbed L-alanine and L-methionine are metabolized into other compounds. PMID:3670900

  14. Amino Acid Synthesis in a Supercritical Carbon Dioxide - Water System

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Kouki; Futamura, Yasuhiro; Shiohara, Tomoo; Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Kanaya, Fumihide; Manome, Yoshinobu; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Mars is a CO2-abundant planet, whereas early Earth is thought to be also CO2-abundant. In addition, water was also discovered on Mars in 2008. From the facts and theory, we assumed that soda fountains were present on both planets, and this affected amino acid synthesis. Here, using a supercritical CO2/liquid H2O (10:1) system which mimicked crust soda fountains, we demonstrate production of amino acids from hydroxylamine (nitrogen source) and keto acids (oxylic acid sources). In this research, several amino acids were detected with an amino acid analyzer. Moreover, alanine polymers were detected with LC-MS. Our research lights up a new pathway in the study of lifes origin. PMID:19582225

  15. Amino acid synthesis in a supercritical carbon dioxide - water system.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Kouki; Futamura, Yasuhiro; Shiohara, Tomoo; Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Kanaya, Fumihide; Manome, Yoshinobu; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2009-06-01

    Mars is a CO(2)-abundant planet, whereas early Earth is thought to be also CO(2)-abundant. In addition, water was also discovered on Mars in 2008. From the facts and theory, we assumed that soda fountains were present on both planets, and this affected amino acid synthesis. Here, using a supercritical CO(2)/liquid H(2)O (10:1) system which mimicked crust soda fountains, we demonstrate production of amino acids from hydroxylamine (nitrogen source) and keto acids (oxylic acid sources). In this research, several amino acids were detected with an amino acid analyzer. Moreover, alanine polymers were detected with LC-MS. Our research lights up a new pathway in the study of life's origin. PMID:19582225

  16. Transaminases for the synthesis of enantiopure beta-amino acids

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Optically pure ?-amino acids constitute interesting building blocks for peptidomimetics and a great variety of pharmaceutically important compounds. Their efficient synthesis still poses a major challenge. Transaminases (also known as aminotransferases) possess a great potential for the synthesis of optically pure ?-amino acids. These pyridoxal 5'-dependent enzymes catalyze the transfer of an amino group from a donor substrate to an acceptor, thus enabling the synthesis of a wide variety of chiral amines and amino acids. Transaminases can be applied either for the kinetic resolution of racemic compounds or the asymmetric synthesis starting from a prochiral substrate. This review gives an overview over microbial transaminases with activity towards ?-amino acids and their substrate spectra. It also outlines current strategies for the screening of new biocatalysts. Particular emphasis is placed on activity assays which are applicable to high-throughput screening. PMID:22293122

  17. Single amino acids in sucrose rewards modulate feeding and associative learning in the honeybee

    PubMed Central

    Simcock, Nicola K.; Gray, Helen E.; Wright, Geraldine A.

    2014-01-01

    Obtaining the correct balance of nutrients requires that the brain integrates information about the body’s nutritional state with sensory information from food to guide feeding behaviour. Learning is a mechanism that allows animals to identify cues associated with nutrients so that they can be located quickly when required. Feedback about nutritional state is essential for nutrient balancing and could influence learning. How specific this feedback is to individual nutrients has not often been examined. Here, we tested how the honeybee’s nutritional state influenced the likelihood it would feed on and learn sucrose solutions containing single amino acids. Nutritional state was manipulated by pre-feeding bees with either 1 M sucrose or 1 M sucrose containing 100 mM of isoleucine, proline, phenylalanine, or methionine 24 h prior to olfactory conditioning of the proboscis extension response. We found that bees pre-fed sucrose solution consumed less of solutions containing amino acids and were also less likely to learn to associate amino acid solutions with odours. Unexpectedly, bees pre-fed solutions containing an amino acid were also less likely to learn to associate odours with sucrose the next day. Furthermore, they consumed more of and were more likely to learn when rewarded with an amino acid solution if they were pre-fed isoleucine and proline. Our data indicate that single amino acids at relatively high concentrations inhibit feeding on sucrose solutions containing them, and they can act as appetitive reinforcers during learning. Our data also suggest that select amino acids interact with mechanisms that signal nutritional sufficiency to reduce hunger. Based on these experiments, we predict that nutrient balancing for essential amino acids during learning requires integration of information about several amino acids experienced simultaneously. PMID:24819203

  18. Conformational Interconversions of Amino Acid Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kaminský, Jakub; Jensen, Frank

    2016-02-01

    Exhaustive conformational interconversions including transition structure analyses of N-acetyl-l-glycine-N-methylamide as well as its alanine, serine, and cysteine analogues have been investigated at the MP2/6-31G** level, yielding a total of 142 transition states. Improved estimates of relative energies were obtained by separately extrapolating the Hartree-Fock and MP2 energies to the basis set limit and adding the difference between CCSD(T) and MP2 results with the cc-pVDZ basis set to the extrapolated MP2 results. The performance of eight empirical force fields (AMBER94, AMBER14SB, MM2, MM3, MMFFs, CHARMM22_CMAP, OPLS_2005, and AMOEBAPRO13) in reproducing ab initio energies of transition states was tested. Our results indicate that commonly used class I force fields employing a fixed partial charge model for the electrostatic interaction provide mean errors in the ∼10 kJ/mol range for energies of conformational transition states for amino acid conformers. Modern reparametrized versions, such as CHARMM22_CMAP, and polarizable force fields, such as AMOEBAPRO13, have slightly lower mean errors, but maximal errors are still in the 35 kJ/mol range. There are differences between the force fields in their ability for reproducing conformational transitions classified according to backbone/side-chain or regions in the Ramachandran angles, but the data set is likely too small to draw any general conclusions. Errors in conformational interconversion barriers by ∼10 kJ/mol suggest that the commonly used force field may bias certain types of transitions by several orders of magnitude in rate and thus lead to incorrect dynamics in simulations. It is therefore suggested that information for conformational transition states should be included in parametrizations of new force fields. PMID:26691979

  19. Aphid genome expression reveals hostsymbiont cooperation in the production of amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Allison K.; Moran, Nancy A.

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of intimate symbiosis requires the coordination of gene expression and content between the distinct partner genomes; this coordination allows the fusion of capabilities of each organism into a single integrated metabolism. In aphids, the 10 essential amino acids are scarce in the phloem sap diet and are supplied by the obligate bacterial endosymbiont (Buchnera), which lives inside specialized cells called bacteriocytes. Although Buchneras genome encodes most genes for essential amino acid biosynthesis, several genes in essential amino acid pathways are missing, as are most genes for production of nonessential amino acids. Additionally, it is unresolved whether the supply of nitrogen for amino acid biosynthesis is supplemented by recycling of waste ammonia. We compared pea aphid gene expression between bacteriocytes and other body tissues using RNA sequencing and pathway analysis and exploiting the genome sequences available for both partners. We found that 26 genes underlying amino acid biosynthesis were up-regulated in bacteriocytes. Seven of these up-regulated genes fill the gaps of Buchneras essential amino acid pathways. In addition, genes underlying five nonessential amino acid pathways lost from Buchnera are up-regulated in bacteriocytes. Finally, our results reveal that two genes, glutamine synthetase and glutamate synthase, which potentially work together in the incorporation of ammonium nitrogen into glutamate (GOGAT) cycle to assimilate ammonia into glutamate, are up-regulated in bacteriocytes. Thus, host gene expression and symbiont capabilities are closely integrated within bacteriocytes, which function as specialized organs of amino acid production. Furthermore, the GOGAT cycle may be a key source of nitrogen fueling the integrated amino acid metabolism of the aphidBuchnera partnership. PMID:21282658

  20. Extraterrestrial amino acids identified in metal-rich CH and CB carbonaceous chondrites from Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Aaron S.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Hein, Jason E.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2013-03-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites contain numerous indigenous organic compounds and could have been an important source of prebiotic compounds required for the origin of life on Earth or elsewhere. Extraterrestrial amino acids have been reported in five of the eight groups of carbonaceous chondrites and are most abundant in CI, CM, and CR chondrites but are also present in the more thermally altered CV and CO chondrites. We report the abundance, distribution, and enantiomeric and isotopic compositions of simple primary amino acids in six metal-rich CH and CB carbonaceous chondrites that have not previously been investigated for amino acids: Allan Hills (ALH) 85085 (CH3), Pecora Escarpment (PCA) 91467 (CH3), Patuxent Range (PAT) 91546 (CH3), MacAlpine Hills (MAC) 02675 (CBb), Miller Range (MIL) 05082 (CB), and Miller Range (MIL) 07411 (CB). Amino acid abundances and carbon isotopic values were obtained by using both liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry and fluorescence, and gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The ?13C/12C ratios of multiple amino acids fall outside of the terrestrial range and support their extraterrestrial origin. Extracts of CH chondrites were found to be particularly rich in amino acids (13-16 parts per million, ppm) while CB chondrite extracts had much lower abundances (0.2-2 ppm). The amino acid distributions of the CH and CB chondrites were distinct from the distributions observed in type 2 and 3 CM and CR chondrites and contained elevated levels of ?-, ?-, and ?-amino acids compared to the corresponding ?-amino acids, providing evidence that multiple amino acid formation mechanisms were important in CH and CB chondrites.

  1. Aphid genome expression reveals host-symbiont cooperation in the production of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Allison K; Moran, Nancy A

    2011-02-15

    The evolution of intimate symbiosis requires the coordination of gene expression and content between the distinct partner genomes; this coordination allows the fusion of capabilities of each organism into a single integrated metabolism. In aphids, the 10 essential amino acids are scarce in the phloem sap diet and are supplied by the obligate bacterial endosymbiont (Buchnera), which lives inside specialized cells called bacteriocytes. Although Buchnera's genome encodes most genes for essential amino acid biosynthesis, several genes in essential amino acid pathways are missing, as are most genes for production of nonessential amino acids. Additionally, it is unresolved whether the supply of nitrogen for amino acid biosynthesis is supplemented by recycling of waste ammonia. We compared pea aphid gene expression between bacteriocytes and other body tissues using RNA sequencing and pathway analysis and exploiting the genome sequences available for both partners. We found that 26 genes underlying amino acid biosynthesis were up-regulated in bacteriocytes. Seven of these up-regulated genes fill the gaps of Buchnera's essential amino acid pathways. In addition, genes underlying five nonessential amino acid pathways lost from Buchnera are up-regulated in bacteriocytes. Finally, our results reveal that two genes, glutamine synthetase and glutamate synthase, which potentially work together in the incorporation of ammonium nitrogen into glutamate (GOGAT) cycle to assimilate ammonia into glutamate, are up-regulated in bacteriocytes. Thus, host gene expression and symbiont capabilities are closely integrated within bacteriocytes, which function as specialized organs of amino acid production. Furthermore, the GOGAT cycle may be a key source of nitrogen fueling the integrated amino acid metabolism of the aphid-Buchnera partnership. PMID:21282658

  2. Extraterrestrial Amino Acids Identified in Metal-Rich CH and CB Carbonaceous Chondrites from Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, Aaron S.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Hein, Jason E.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2013-01-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites contain numerous indigenous organic compounds and could have been an important source of prebiotic compounds required for the origin of life on Earth or elsewhere. Extraterrestrial amino acids have been reported in five of the eight groups of carbonaceous chondrites and are most abundant in CI, CM, and CR chondritesbut are also present in the more thermally altered CV and CO chondrites. We report the abundance, distribution, and enantiomeric and isotopic compositions of simple primary amino acids in six metal-rich CH and CB carbonaceous chondrites that have not previously been investigated for amino acids: Allan Hills (ALH) 85085 (CH3), Pecora Escarpment(PCA) 91467 (CH3), Patuxent Range (PAT) 91546 (CH3), MacAlpine Hills (MAC) 02675(CBb), Miller Range (MIL) 05082 (CB), and Miller Range (MIL) 07411 (CB). Amino acid abundances and carbon isotopic values were obtained by using both liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry and fluorescence, and gas chromatography isotope ratiomass spectrometry. The (delta D, delta C-13, delta N-15) ratios of multiple amino acids fall outside of the terrestrial range and support their extraterrestrial origin. Extracts of CH chondrites were found to be particularly rich in amino acids (1316 parts per million, ppm) while CB chondrite extracts had much lower abundances (0.22 ppm). The amino acid distributions of the CH and CB chondrites were distinct from the distributions observed in type 2 and 3 CM and CR chondrites and contained elevated levels of beta-, gamma-, and delta-amino acids compared to the corresponding alpha-amino acids, providing evidence that multiple amino acid formation mechanisms were important in CH and CB chondrites.

  3. [Plasma amino acids profile of healthy pregnant adolescents in Maracaibo, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Ortega, Pablo; Castejón, Haydée V; Argotte, María G; Gómez, Gisela; Bohorquez, Lissette; Urrieta, Jesús R

    2003-06-01

    One hundred female adolescents (13-18 y) were clinical and anthropometrically studied to select only those with adequate nutrition. Most adolescents belonged to IV socio-economic stratum families (worker class). Height, weight, age, body mass index and medial arm circumference were used as anthropometric parameters. After screening, only 41 non pregnant girls (control) and 42 pregnant girls with adequate nutrition were selected to analyze plasma amino acids. Fasting peripheral venous blood was drawn, and plasma amino acids were analyzed by HPLC. Amino acid concentrations were expressed as umol/L +/- SE. SAS/STAT program was used for statistical analysis. Amino acid values of control adolescent group were found in ranges reported by other investigators, with slight variations, mostly in diminution, presumably due to nutritional, metabolic or genetic conditions of people living in tropical regions. In pregnant healthy adolescents, distributed according to gestational age: < 32 weeks (n = 30) and > 32 weeks (n = 12), a diminution of total molar plasma amino acids was found, by comparing with control values. Ten amino acids (Pro, Gly, Gln, Arg, Ser, Orn, Tau, Leu, Thr and Val) appeared significantively diminished throughout gestation, being Gly. Gln and Arg most affected since earlier weeks. During the 2nd period. Thr and Val increased their grade of affectation; whereas some amino acids values (Orn, Pro and Tau) tended to recuperate. Several of affected amino acids are gluconegoenic, thus, they could be utilized to supply the energy required by the pregnant adolescent against her double stress: the fetus development and her own development. The plasma amino acid values reported in both, healthy non pregnant and pregnant adolescents, could be taken as regional referential profile of plasma amino acids in this poblational group for further research on adolescent and fetal--maternal malnutrition. PMID:14528605

  4. Weighted and unweighted network of amino acids within protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aftabuddin, Md.; Kundu, Sudip

    2006-09-01

    The information regarding the structure of a single protein is encoded in the network of interacting amino acids considered as nodes. If any two atoms from two different amino acids (nodes) are within higher cut-off distance of London-van der Waals forces, the amino acids are considered to be linked or connected. Several atoms of any amino acids in a protein may be within the above prescribed distance of several atoms of another amino acid resulting in possible multiple links between them. These multiple links are the basis of the weight of the connectivity in a protein network. Each protein has been considered as a weighted and an unweighted network of amino acids. A total of forty nine protein structures that covers the three branches of life on earth has been analyzed and several network properties have been studied. The probability degree and strength distributions of network connectivity have been obtained. It has been observed that the average strength of amino acid node depends on its degree. The results show that the average clustering coefficient of weighted network is less than that of unweighted network. It implies that the topological clustering is generated by edges with low weights. The power-law behavior of clustering coefficients of weighted and unweighted networks as a function of degree indicates that they have signatures of hierarchy. It has also been observed that the network is of assortative type.

  5. Classification and identification of amino acids based on THz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ping J.; Ma, Ye H.; Li, Xian; Hou, Di B.; Cai, Jin H.; Zhang, Guang X.

    2015-11-01

    Amino acids are important nutrient substances for life, and many of them have several isomerides, while only L-type amino acids can be absorbed by body as nutrients. So it is certain worth to accurately classify and identify amino acids. In this paper, terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) was used to detect isomers of various amino acids to obtain their absorption spectra, and their spectral characteristics were analyzed and compared. Results show that not all isomerides of amino acids have unique spectral characteristics, causing the difficulty of classification and identification. To solve this problem, partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), firstly, was performed on extracting principal component of THz spectroscopy and classifying amino acids. Moreover, variable selection (VS) was employed to optimize spectral interval of feature extraction to improve analysis effect. As a result, the optimal classification model was determined and most samples can be accurately classified. Secondly, for each class of amino acids, PLS-DA combined with VS was also applied to identify isomerides. This work provides a suggestion for material classification and identification with THz spectroscopy.

  6. The fate of amino acids during simulated meteoritic impact.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Marylne; van der Gaast, Sjerry; Vilas, Faith; Hrz, Friedrich; Haynes, Gerald; Chabin, Annie; Brack, Andre; Westall, Frances

    2009-12-01

    Delivery of prebiotic molecules, such as amino acids and peptides, in meteoritic/micrometeoritic materials to early Earth during the first 500 million years is considered to be one of the main processes by which the building blocks of life arrived on Earth. In this context, we present a study in which the effects of impact shock on amino acids and a peptide in artificial meteorites composed of saponite clay were investigated. The samples were subjected to pressures ranging from 12-28.9 GPa, which simulated impact velocities of 2.4-5.8 km/s for typical silicate-silicate impacts on Earth. Volatilization was determined by weight loss measurement, and the amino acid and peptide response was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. For all compounds, degradation increased with peak pressure. At the highest shock pressures, amino acids with an alkyl side chain were more resistant than those with functional side chains. The peptide cleaved into its two primary amino acids. Some chiral amino acids experienced partial racemization during the course of the experiment. Our data indicate that impact shock may act as a selective filter to the delivery of extraterrestrial amino acids via carbonaceous chondrites. PMID:20041747

  7. Stereoselective synthesis of uridine-derived nucleosyl amino acids.

    PubMed

    Spork, Anatol P; Wiegmann, Daniel; Granitzka, Markus; Stalke, Dietmar; Ducho, Christian

    2011-12-16

    Novel hybrid structures of 5'-deoxyuridine and glycine were conceived and synthesized. Such nucleosyl amino acids (NAAs) represent simplified analogues of the core structure of muraymycin nucleoside antibiotics, making them useful synthetic building blocks for structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies. The key step of the developed synthetic route was the efficient and highly diastereoselective asymmetric hydrogenation of didehydro amino acid precursors toward protected NAAs. It was anticipated that the synthesis of unprotected muraymycin derivatives via this route would require a suitable intermediate protecting group at the N-3 of the uracil base. After initial attempts using PMB- and BOM-N-3 protection, both of which resulted in problematic deprotection steps, an N-3 protecting group-free route was envisaged. In spite of the pronounced acidity of the uracil-3-NH, this route worked equally efficient and with identical stereoselectivities as the initial strategies involving N-3 protection. The obtained NAA building blocks were employed for the synthesis of truncated 5'-deoxymuraymycin analogues. PMID:22059552

  8. Synthesis and chirality of amino acids under interstellar conditions.

    PubMed

    Giri, Chaitanya; Goesmann, Fred; Meinert, Cornelia; Evans, Amanda C; Meierhenrich, Uwe J

    2013-01-01

    Amino acids are the fundamental building blocks of proteins, the biomolecules that provide cellular structure and function in all living organisms. A majority of amino acids utilized within living systems possess pre-specified orientation geometry (chirality); however the original source for this specific orientation remains uncertain. In order to trace the chemical evolution of life, an appreciation of the synthetic and evolutional origins of the first chiral amino acids must first be gained. Given that the amino acids in our universe are likely to have been synthesized in molecular clouds in interstellar space, it is necessary to understand where and how the first synthesis might have occurred. The asymmetry of the original amino acid synthesis was probably the result of exposure to chiral photons in the form of circularly polarized light (CPL), which has been detected in interstellar molecular clouds. This chirality transfer event, from photons to amino acids, has been successfully recreated experimentally and is likely a combination of both asymmetric synthesis and enantioselective photolysis. A series of innovative studies have reported successful simulation of these environments and afforded production of chiral amino acids under realistic circumstellar and interstellar conditions: irradiation of interstellar ice analogues (CO, CO2, NH3, CH3OH, and H2O) with circularly polarized ultraviolet photons at low temperatures does result in enantiomer enriched amino acid structures (up to 1.3% ee). This topical review summarizes current knowledge and recent discoveries about the simulated interstellar environments within which amino acids were probably formed. A synopsis of the COSAC experiment onboard the ESA cometary mission ROSETTA concludes this review: the ROSETTA mission will soft-land on the nucleus of the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in November 2014, anticipating the first in situ detection of asymmetric organic molecules in cometary ices. PMID:22976459

  9. The origin of amino acids in lunar regolith samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsila, Jamie E.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Glavin, Daniel P.; McLain, Hannah L.; Noble, Sarah K.; Gibson, Everett K.

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the amino acid content of seven lunar regolith samples returned by the Apollo 16 and Apollo 17 missions and stored under NASA curation since collection using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Consistent with results from initial analyses shortly after collection in the 1970s, we observed amino acids at low concentrations in all of the curated samples, ranging from 0.2 parts-per-billion (ppb) to 42.7 ppb in hot-water extracts and 14.5-651.1 ppb in 6 M HCl acid-vapor-hydrolyzed, hot-water extracts. Amino acids identified in the Apollo soil extracts include glycine, D- and L-alanine, D- and L-aspartic acid, D- and L-glutamic acid, D- and L-serine, L-threonine, and L-valine, all of which had previously been detected in lunar samples, as well as several compounds not previously identified in lunar regoliths: α-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB), D- and L-β-amino-n-butyric acid (β-ABA), DL-α-amino-n-butyric acid, γ-amino-n-butyric acid, β-alanine, and ε-amino-n-caproic acid. We observed an excess of the L enantiomer in most of the detected proteinogenic amino acids, but racemic alanine and racemic β-ABA were present in some samples. We also examined seven samples from Apollo 15, 16, and 17 that had been previously allocated to a non-curation laboratory, as well as two samples of terrestrial dunite from studies of lunar module engine exhaust that had been stored in the same laboratory. The amino acid content of these samples suggested that contamination had occurred during non-curatorial storage. We measured the compound-specific carbon isotopic ratios of glycine, β-alanine, and L-alanine in Apollo regolith sample 70011 and found values of -21‰ to -33‰. These values are consistent with those seen in terrestrial biology and, together with the enantiomeric compositions of the proteinogenic amino acids, suggest that terrestrial biological contamination is a primary source of the amino acids in these samples. However, the presence of the non-proteinogenic amino acids such as AIB and β-ABA suggests the possibility of some contribution from exogenous sources. We did not observe a correlation of amino acid content with proximity to the Apollo 17 lunar module, implying that lunar module exhaust was not a primary source of amino acid precursors. Solar-wind-implanted precursors such as HCN also appear to be at most a minor contributor, given a lack of correlation between amino acid content and soil maturity (as measured by Is/FeO ratio) and the differences between the δ13C values of the amino acids and the solar wind.

  10. Exhaustive Database Searching for Amino Acid Mutations in Proteomes

    SciTech Connect

    Hyatt, Philip Douglas; Pan, Chongle

    2012-01-01

    Amino acid mutations in proteins can be found by searching tandem mass spectra acquired in shotgun proteomics experiments against protein sequences predicted from genomes. Traditionally, unconstrained searches for amino acid mutations have been accomplished by using a sequence tagging approach that combines de novo sequencing with database searching. However, this approach is limited by the performance of de novo sequencing. The Sipros algorithm v2.0 was developed to perform unconstrained database searching using high-resolution tandem mass spectra by exhaustively enumerating all single non-isobaric mutations for every residue in a protein database. The performance of Sipros for amino acid mutation identification exceeded that of an established sequence tagging algorithm, Inspect, based on benchmarking results from a Rhodopseudomonas palustris proteomics dataset. To demonstrate the viability of the algorithm for meta-proteomics, Sipros was used to identify amino acid mutations in a natural microbial community in acid mine drainage.

  11. Hybride magnetic nanostructure based on amino acids functionalized polypyrrole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Alexandrina; Bunge, Alexander; Turcu, Rodica

    2015-12-01

    Conducting polypyrrole is especially promising for many commercial applications because of its unique optical, electric, thermal and mechanical properties. We report the synthesis and characterization of novel pyrrole functionalized monomers and core-shell hybrid nanostructures, consisting of a conjugated polymer layer (amino acids functionalized pyrrole copolymers) and a magnetic nanoparticle core. For functionalization of the pyrrole monomer we used several amino acids: tryptophan, leucine, phenylalanine, serine and tyrosine. These amino acids were linked via different types of hydrophobic linkers to the nitrogen atom of the pyrrole monomer. The magnetic core-shell hybrid nanostructures are characterized by various methods such as FTIR spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and magnetic measurements.

  12. Amino acids as promoieties in prodrug design and development.

    PubMed

    Vig, Balvinder S; Huttunen, Kristiina M; Laine, Krista; Rautio, Jarkko

    2013-10-01

    Prodrugs are biologically inactive agents that upon biotransformation in vivo result in active drug molecules. Since prodrugs might alter the tissue distribution, efficacy and the toxicity of the parent drug, prodrug design should be considered at the early stages of preclinical development. In this regard, natural and synthetic amino acids offer wide structural diversity and physicochemical properties. This review covers the use of amino acid prodrugs to improve poor solubility, poor permeability, sustained release, intravenous delivery, drug targeting, and metabolic stability of the parent drug. In addition, practical considerations and challenges associated with the development of amino acid prodrugs are also covered. PMID:23099277

  13. Muscle amino acid flux in patients receiving branched-chain amino acid solutions after surgery.

    PubMed

    Bonau, R A; Jeevanandam, M; Moldawer, L; Blackburn, G L; Daly, J M

    1987-04-01

    The metabolism and efficacy of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs)-enriched parenteral solutions in patients after surgery are unclear. This prospective clinical study compared two groups of patients (n = 13) receiving either a 25% BCAA solution or a 45% BCAA solution at 30 kcal/kg/day and 1.5 gm protein/kg/day for 7 days after operation. Whole-body nitrogen balance and forearm muscle amino acid and ketoacid flux were measured. There were no significant differences between the two groups in mean cumulative nitrogen balance (+13.1 gm versus +18.0 gm) between the two groups. Patients receiving the 45% BCAA solution had significant mean uptake of total BCAA, leucine, and isoleucine compared with results in patients receiving the 25% BCAA solution. Despite this increased uptake of BCAA in the 45% BCAA group, there was no increased efflux of alanine, glutamine, or the BCAA ketoacids, ketoisocaproic, ketoisovaleric, or ketomethylvaleric. However, increased release of aspartate was noted in the 45% BCAA group compared with the 25% BCAA group. Thus use of a 45% BCAA-enriched solution infused in patients after surgery results in a significant increase in forearm muscle uptake of the BCAA that is not demonstrated in whole-body nitrogen economics. PMID:3563885

  14. [Studies on interaction of acid-treated nanotube titanic acid and amino acids].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huqin; Chen, Xuemei; Jin, Zhensheng; Liao, Guangxi; Wu, Xiaoming; Du, Jianqiang; Cao, Xiang

    2010-06-01

    Nanotube titanic acid (NTA) has distinct optical and electrical character, and has photocatalysis character. In accordance with these qualities, NTA was treated with acid so as to enhance its surface activity. Surface structures and surface groups of acid-treated NTA were characterized and analyzed by Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry (FT-IR). The interaction between acid-treated NTA and amino acids was investigated. Analysis results showed that the lengths of acid-treated NTA became obviously shorter. The diameters of nanotube bundles did not change obviously with acid-treating. Meanwhile, the surface of acid-treated NTA was cross-linked with carboxyl or esterfunction. In addition, acid-treated NTA can catch amino acid residues easily, and then form close combination. PMID:20649031

  15. [Studies on interaction of acid-treated nanotube titanic acid and amino acids].

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Zhang H; Chen X; Jin Z; Liao G; Wu X; Du J; Cao X

    2010-06-01

    Nanotube titanic acid (NTA) has distinct optical and electrical character, and has photocatalysis character. In accordance with these qualities, NTA was treated with acid so as to enhance its surface activity. Surface structures and surface groups of acid-treated NTA were characterized and analyzed by Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry (FT-IR). The interaction between acid-treated NTA and amino acids was investigated. Analysis results showed that the lengths of acid-treated NTA became obviously shorter. The diameters of nanotube bundles did not change obviously with acid-treating. Meanwhile, the surface of acid-treated NTA was cross-linked with carboxyl or esterfunction. In addition, acid-treated NTA can catch amino acid residues easily, and then form close combination.

  16. Recommendations for protein and amino acid intake in phenylketonuric patients.

    PubMed

    Cockburn, F; Clark, B J

    1996-07-01

    The methods for the determination of protein requirements are reviewed and the difficulties in achieving the recommendations of the dietary management of phenylketonuria proposed by a Medical Research Council Working Party on Phenylketonuria using currently available low phenylalanine (Phe) protein substitutes and low protein foods are examined. These recommendations are that all infants whose blood Phe concentrations exceed 600 mumol/l in the presence of a normal or low plasma tyrosine and an otherwise normal plasma amino acid profile while receiving a normal protein intake (2-3 g/kg/day), should start a low Phe diet immediately. Infants whose blood Phe concentrations remain persistently between 400 and 600 mumol/l for more than a few days should also start treatment. The diet should contain a protein substitute which is Phe free (or at least very low in Phe) and otherwise nutritionally complete with a composition sufficient to provide 100-120 mg/kg per day of tyrosine and a total amino acid intake of at least 3 g/kg per day in children under 2 years of age. In children over 2 years the intake of amino acids should be maintained at a level of 2 g/kg per day. The protein substitute should be spread as evenly as possible through the 24 h. Blood Phe concentrations should be maintained between 120 and 360 mumol/l. In children aged over 10 years it is suggested that the protein substitute should supply the protein reference nutrient intake + 50%. An upper blood Phe limit of 480 mumol/l rather than 360 mumol/l may be acceptable in school age children. Adults and adolescents should continue treatment with the aim to maintain blood Phe concentrations no higher than 700 mumol/l. During the period before conception and during pregnancy women should aim to have plasma Phe concentrations between 60-250 mumol/l. PMID:8828627

  17. Extraterrestrial Amino Acids in the Almahata Sitta Meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callahan, Michael; Aubrey, A.; Bada, J. L.; Dworkin, J. P.; Elsila, J. E.; Glavin, D. P.; Parker, E.; Jenniskens, P.

    2009-09-01

    The recovery of meteorite fragments from the 2008 TC3 asteroid impact, collectively named Almahata Sitta, revealed a rare, anomalous polymict ureilite containing large carbonaceous grains (Jenniskens et al. 2009). Here we report the first amino acid analysis of a meteorite from an F-type asteroid as part of the Almahata Sitta meteorite sample analysis consortium. A single fragment (piece #4, 1.2 grams) was crushed to a powder, and separate 0.1 g aliquots of the same meteorite were carried through identical hot-water extraction, acid hydrolysis and desalting procedures at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. The o-phthaldialdehyde/N-acetyl-L-cysteine amino acid derivatives in the extracts were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography with UV fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Analyses of the meteorite extracts revealed a complex distribution of two- to six-carbon aliphatic amino acids with abundances ranging from 0.5 to 69 parts-per-billion (ppb). Glycine was the most abundant amino acid detected, however, since this protein amino acid is a common terrestrial contaminant, we are currently unable to rule out at least a partial terrestrial source. However, the D/L ratio of alanine in the meteorite was racemic, suggesting that very little terrestrial amino acid contamination. Several non-protein amino acids that are rare in the biosphere were also identified in the meteorite above background levels including D,L-4-amino-2-methybutyric acid (65 ± 8 ppb), D-isovaline (1.3 ± 0.1 ppb), L-isovaline (1.4 ± 0.1 ppb), and α-aminoisobutryic acid (7.1 ± 5.8 ppb). The abundance of isovaline and AIB are 1000 times lower than the abundances found in the CM2 meteorite Murchison while D,L-4-amino-2-methybutyric acid is similar. The very low amino acid abundances and the presence of several amino acid decomposition products including methylamine, ethylamine, and isopropylamine are consistent with extensive thermal alteration of organic compounds on the parent asteroid.

  18. Amino Acid transport into membrane vesicles isolated from zucchini : evidence of a proton-amino Acid symport in the plasmalemma.

    PubMed

    Bush, D R; Langston-Unkefer, P J

    1988-10-01

    Several lines of evidence with intact tissues suggest amino acid transport is mediated by a proton-amino acid symport (L Rheinhold, A Kaplan 1984 Annu Rev Plant Physiol 35: 45-83). However, biochemical studies of proton-coupled amino acid transport in isolated membrane vesicles have not been reported. In the experiments presented here, amino acid transport was studied in membrane vesicles isolated from zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L. cv Black Beauty) hypocotyls. An imposed pH gradient (basic interior) was used to energize isolated membrane vesicles and drive amino acid transport. Proton-coupled amino acid accumulation was demonstrated for alanine, glutamate, glutamine, leucine, and tabtoxinine-beta-lactam. Alanine transport into the isolated membrane vesicles was studied in detail. Alanine transport was protonophore sensitive and accumulation ratios exceeding 10 times that predicted by diffusion alone were observed. DeltapH-Dependent alanine transport exhibited saturation kinetics, suggesting translocation was mediated via a carrier transport system. In support of that conclusion, 50 micromolar N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, a hydrophobic modifier of protein carboxyls, completely inhibited proton-coupled alanine accumulation. Transport activity, equilibrated on a linear sucrose gradient, peaked at 1.16 grams per cubic centimeter and co-migrated with a plasmalemma marker (vanadate-sensitive K(+)-Mg(2+)-ATPase). These results provide direct evidence in support of a proton-amino acid symport in the plasmalemma of higher plants. PMID:16666332

  19. Searching for Extraterrestrial Amino Acids in a Contaminated Meteorite: Amino Acid Analyses of the Canakkale L6 Chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, A. S.; Elsila, J. E.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.; Ornek, C. Y.; Esenoglu, H. H.; Unsalan, O.; Ozturk, B.

    2016-01-01

    Amino acids can serve as important markers of cosmochemistry, as their abundances and isomeric and isotopic compositions have been found to vary predictably with changes in parent body chemistry and alteration processes. Amino acids are also of astrobiological interest because they are essential for life on Earth. Analyses of a range of meteorites, including all groups of carbonaceous chondrites, along with H, R, and LL chondrites, ureilites, and a martian shergottite, have revealed that amino acids of plausible extraterrestrial origin can be formed in and persist after a wide range of parent body conditions. However, amino acid analyses of L6 chondrites to date have not provided evidence for indigenous amino acids. In the present study, we performed amino acid analysis on larger samples of a different L6 chondite, Canakkale, to determine whether or not trace levels of indigenous amino acids could be found. The Canakkale meteor was an observed fall in late July, 1964, near Canakkale, Turkey. The meteorite samples (1.36 and 1.09 g) analyzed in this study were allocated by C. Y. Ornek, along with a soil sample (1.5 g) collected near the Canakkale recovery site.

  20. Evolution of a Genome-Encoded Bias in Amino Acid Biosynthetic Pathways Is a Potential Indicator of Amino Acid Dynamics in the Environment

    PubMed Central

    Fasani, Rick A.; Savageau, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Overcoming the stress of starvation is one of an organisms most challenging phenotypic responses. Those organisms that frequently survive the challenge, by virtue of their fitness, will have evolved genomes that are shaped by their specific environments. Understanding this genotypeenvironmentphenotype relationship at a deep level will require quantitative predictive models of the complex molecular systems that link these aspects of an organisms existence. Here, we treat one of the most fundamental molecular systems, protein synthesis, and the amino acid biosynthetic pathways involved in the stringent response to starvation. These systems face an inherent logical dilemma: Building an amino acid biosynthetic pathway to synthesize its productthe cognate amino acid of the pathwaymay require that very amino acid when it is no longer available. To study this potential catch-22, we have created a generic model of amino acid biosynthesis in response to sudden starvation. Our mathematical analysis and computational results indicate that there are two distinctly different outcomes: Partial recovery to a new steady state, or full system failure. Moreover, the cells fate is dictated by the cognate bias, the number of cognate amino acids in the corresponding biosynthetic pathway relative to the average number of that amino acid in the proteome. We test these implications by analyzing the proteomes of over 1,800 sequenced microbes, which reveals statistically significant evidence of low cognate bias, a genetic trait that would avoid the biosynthetic quandary. Furthermore, these results suggest that the pattern of cognate bias, which is readily derived by genome sequencing, may provide evolutionary clues to an organisms natural environment. PMID:25118252

  1. Autistic children exhibit distinct plasma amino acid profile.

    PubMed

    Naushad, Shaik Mohammad; Jain, Jamal Md Nurul; Prasad, Chintakindi Krishna; Naik, Usha; Akella, Radha Rama Devi

    2013-10-01

    In order to ascertain whether autistic children display characteristic metabolic signatures that are of diagnostic value, plasma amino acid analyses were carried out on a cohort of 138 autistic children and 138 normal controls using reverse-phase HPLC. Pre-column derivatization of amino acids with phenyl isothiocyanate forms phenyl thio-carbamate derivates that have a lamba(max) of 254 nm, enabling their detection using photodiode array. Autistic children showed elevated levels of glutamic acid (120 +/- 89 vs. 83 +/- 35 micromol/L) and asparagine (85 +/- 37 vs. 47 +/- 19 micromol/L); lower levels of phenylalanine (45 +/- 20 vs. 59 +/- 18 micromol/L), tryptophan (24 +/- 11 vs. 41 +/- 16 micromol/L), methionine (22 +/- 9 vs. 28 +/- 9 micromol/L) and histidine (45 +/- 21 vs. 58 +/- 15 micromol/L). A low molar ratio of (tryptophan/large neutral amino acids) x 100 was observed in autism (5.4 vs 9.2), indicating lesser availability of tryptophan for neurotransmitter serotonin synthesis. To conclude, elevated levels of excitatory amino acids (glutamate and asparagine), decreased essential amino acids (phenylalanine, tryptophan and methionine) and decreased precursors of neurotransmitters (tyrosine and tryptophan) are the distinct characteristics of plasma amino acid profile of autistic children. Thus, such metabolic signatures might be useful tools for early diagnosis of autism. PMID:24772971

  2. The Amino Acid Composition of the Sutter's Mill Carbonaceous Chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Burton, A. S.; Elsila, J. E.; Dworkin, J. P.; Yin, Q. Z.; Cooper, G.; Jenniskens, P.

    2012-01-01

    In contrast to the Murchison meteorite which had a complex distribution of amino acids with a total C2 to Cs amino acid abundance of approx.14,000 parts-per-billion (ppb) [2], the Sutters Mill meteorite was found to be highly depleted in amino acids. Much lower abundances (approx.30 to 180 ppb) of glycine, beta-alanine, L-alanine and L-serine were detected in SM2 above procedural blank levels indicating that this meteorite sample experienced only minimal terrestrial amino acid contamination after its fall to Earth. Carbon isotope measurements will be necessary to establish the origin of glycine and beta-alanine in SM2. Other non-protein amino acids that are rare on Earth, yet commonly found in other CM meteorites such as aaminoisobutyric acid (alpha-AIB) and isovaline, were not identified in SM2. However, traces of beta-AIB (approx.1 ppb) were detected in SM2 and could be" extraterrestrial in origin. The low abundances of amino acids in the Sutter's Mill meteorite is consistent with mineralogical evidence that at least some parts of the Sutter's Mill meteorite parent body experienced extensive aqueous and/or thermal alteration.

  3. [Role of excitatory amino acids in neuropathology].

    PubMed

    Wikinski, S I; Acosta, G B

    1995-01-01

    Excitatory amino acids (EAA) became known as neurotransmitters of the central nervous system (CNS) in the last decade. The most studied EAA are glutamate and aspartate. Both are synthetized by the same mechanism as gamaaminobutyric acid. (Fig. 1). Glutamate is widely distributed in the CNS and the spinal cord, being the areas of higher concentration the cerebral cortex, the hypocampus and the cerebellum. There have been identified two type of receptors for glutamate: ionotropic and metabotropic. The former includes three different types: NMDA, AMPA and KA. NMDA receptor is coupled to a Na+ and Ca2+ channel being the second ion the most important one. This receptor has several sites of binding for various substances. Along with the site for N-methyl-D-aspartate, which binds glutamate and/or aspartate, there have been identified a site for the binding of glycine (which is different from the strychnine sensitive one), a site for poliamines such as spermine and spermidine, and a site for the binding of Zn2+ (Table 1). AMPA receptor is associated to a Ca(2+)-Na+ channel, being in this case the Na+ the most important ion. There are two metabotropic type receptors: L-AP4 and trans-ACPD. Both are coupled to a G protein and agonists exert their action increasing phospholipase C activity which in turn induces an increment of IP3 and diacyl-glicerol, and a consecutive releasing of Ca2+ from intracellular stores. EAA play a role in some physiological processes. One of them is long-term potentiation (LTP), an electrochemical phenomenon involved in memory consolidation. Antagonists of NMDA and AMPA receptor prevent the development of LTP, and conversely, the agonist of glycine site of NMDA receptor--D-cycloserine--facilitates memory consolidation. Since 1957, EAA are considered neurotoxic substances and there are many indirect evidences to support this statement. Pathogenesis of neuronal damage elicited by EAA involves the events shown in Fig. 3. Prevention of the cascade of events that provokes neurotoxicity may be achieved by NMDA antagonists, but once it has begun it may be only aborted subtracting the Ca2+ from the medium, using nifedipine or blocking AMPA receptor with an antagonist (CNQX). EAA have been shown to play a toxic role in neuronal damage induced by ischemia. Research using various experimental models demonstrated that NMDA receptor antagonists (i.e. MK 801) blocks postischemic damage. Interventions at various levels of the pathogenic cascade shown in Fig. 4 provoke the same results. There is enough evidence to suspect that NMDA and AMPA receptors are altered in epilepsy. NMDA antagonists (i.e. MK801 or AP5) prevent the development of epileptic seizures induced by kindling; CNQX, an AMPA antagonist, blocks the increase in electrical activity induced by K+ in slices of hypocampus; felbamate, an antiepileptic drug, blocks the glycine site (not strychnine sensitive) decreasing NMDA receptor activity. Several neurodegenerative disorders have been associated with exogenous administration or accidental intake of EAA. (i.e. neurolatirism, Guam disease). Similarities between these diseases and lateral aminotrophic sclerosis indicate that in the latter EAA may play a pathogenic role. Finally, the psychotomimetic effect of phencyclidine (an antagonist of NMDA receptor) suggests that in schizophrenia, together with dopaminergic neurotransmission impairment, some dysfunction of glutamate pathways may be present. PMID:8728878

  4. Comparing Amino Acid Abundances and Distributions Across Carbonaceous Chondrite Groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, Aaron S.; Callahan, Michael P.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2012-01-01

    Meteorites are grouped according to bulk properties such as chemical composition and mineralogy. These parameters can vary significantly among the different carbonaceous chondrite groups (CI, CM, CO, CR, CH, CB, CV and CK). We have determined the amino acid abundances of more than 30 primary amino acids in meteorites from each of the eight groups, revealing several interesting trends. There are noticeable differences in the structural diversity and overall abundances of amino acids between meteorites from the different chondrite groups. Because meteorites may have been an important source of amino acids to the prebiotic Earth and these organic compounds are essential for life as we know it, the observed variations of these molecules may have been important for the origins of life.

  5. Amino acid signalling upstream of mTOR.

    PubMed

    Jewell, Jenna L; Russell, Ryan C; Guan, Kun-Liang

    2013-03-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a conserved Ser/Thr kinase that is part of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1), a master regulator that couples amino acid availability to cell growth and autophagy. Multiple cues modulate mTORC1 activity, such as growth factors, stress, energy status and amino acids. Although amino acids are key environmental stimuli, exactly how they are sensed and how they activate mTORC1 is not fully understood. Recently, a model has emerged whereby mTORC1 activation occurs at the lysosome and is mediated through an amino acid sensing cascade involving RAG GTPases, Ragulator and vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (v-ATPase). PMID:23361334

  6. Amino acids from the moon - Notes on meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, S. W.; Harada, K.; Hare, P. E.

    Contributions of lunar and meteorite composition studies to present understandings of chemical evolution and the origin of life are discussed. The discovery of amino acids in lunar fines, when properly extracted, hydrolyzed and examined by ion-exchange chromatography, is shown to have confirmed the extraterrestrial nature of the amino acids previously found in meteorites. Differences in analysis and sample preparation methods are considered as sources for the initial disagreements in lunar sample data, and possibilities of biological or chemical contamination of the lunar samples are discounted. The possible sources of lunar and meteoritic amino acids by solar wind implantation are considered. Problems remaining concerning the nature of amino acid precursors, the relations of lunar to meteoritic compounds and the prevalence of cyanide oligomers as evolutionary intermediates are indicated.

  7. Amino Acids in the Antarctic CM Meteorite LEW 90500

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botta, O.; Bada, J. L.

    2002-03-01

    The amino acid composition of the Antarctic CM meteorite LEW90500 was determined and compared to that of the CMs Murchison and Murray. The compositional similarity suggest that these meteorites probably originated from the same parent body.

  8. Molecular Evolution Directs Protein Translation Using Unnatural Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Cox, Vanessa E; Gaucher, Eric A

    2015-01-01

    Unnatural amino acids have in recent years established their importance in a wide range of fields, from pharmaceuticals to polymer science. Unnatural amino acids can increase the number of chemical groups within proteins and thus expand or enhance biological function. Our ability to utilize these important building blocks, however, has been limited by the inherent difficulty in incorporating these molecules into proteins. To address this challenge, researchers have examined how the canonical twenty amino acids are incorporated, regulated, and modified in nature. This review focuses on achievements and techniques used to engineer the ribosomal protein-translation machinery, including the introduction of orthogonal translation components, how directed evolution enhances the incorporation of unnatural amino acids, and the potential utility of ancient biomolecules for this process. PMID:26629613

  9. Isotopic analyses of amino acids from the Murchison meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzarello, S.; Cronin, J. R.; Krishnamurthy, R. V.; Epstein, S.

    1991-01-01

    An account is given of the results of H-2, C-13 isotopic analyses of the Murchison meteorite incorporating an ultrafiltration step to exclude the possibility of fine particulate contaminants. The meteorite's amino acids were chromatographically separated in order to preclude isotopic enrichment by basic compounds other than the amino acids. The results indicate that the Murchison amino acids are isotopically highly unusual; delta-C-13 is elevated by about 40 percent, and delta-D by fully 2500 percent. This high D content of the meteorite's alpha-amino acids may be due to the synthesis of their molecular precursors by low-temperature ion-molecule reactions in an interstellar cloud.

  10. AAindex: amino acid index database, progress report 2008

    PubMed Central

    Kawashima, Shuichi; Pokarowski, Piotr; Pokarowska, Maria; Kolinski, Andrzej; Katayama, Toshiaki; Kanehisa, Minoru

    2008-01-01

    AAindex is a database of numerical indices representing various physicochemical and biochemical properties of amino acids and pairs of amino acids. We have added a collection of protein contact potentials to the AAindex as a new section. Accordingly AAindex consists of three sections now: AAindex1 for the amino acid index of 20 numerical values, AAindex2 for the amino acid substitution matrix and AAindex3 for the statistical protein contact potentials. All data are derived from published literature. The database can be accessed through the DBGET/LinkDB system at GenomeNet (http://www.genome.jp/dbget-bin/www_bfind?aaindex) or downloaded by anonymous FTP (ftp://ftp.genome.jp/pub/db/community/aaindex/). PMID:17998252

  11. Placental Amino Acids Transport in Intrauterine Growth Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Avagliano, Laura; Garò, Chiara; Marconi, Anna Maria

    2012-01-01

    The placenta represents a key organ for fetal growth as it acts as an interface between mother and fetus, regulating the fetal-maternal exchange of nutrients, gases, and waste products. During pregnancy, amino acids represent one of the major nutrients for fetal life, and both maternal and fetal concentrations are significantly different in pregnancies with intrauterine growth restriction when compared to uncomplicated pregnancies. The transport of amino acids across the placenta is a complex process that includes the influx of neutral, anionic, and cationic amino acids across the microvilluos plasma membrane of the syncytiotrophoblast, the passage through the cytoplasm of the trophoblasts, and the transfer outside the trophoblasts across the basal membrane into the fetal circulation. In this paper, we review the transport mechanisms of amino acids across the placenta in normal pregnancies and in pregnancies complicated by intrauterine growth restriction. PMID:22997583

  12. Disturbed Amino Acid Metabolism in HIV: Association with Neuropsychiatric Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Gostner, Johanna M.; Becker, Kathrin; Kurz, Katharina; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Blood levels of the amino acid phenylalanine, as well as of the tryptophan breakdown product kynurenine, are found to be elevated in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected patients. Both essential amino acids, tryptophan and phenylalanine, are important precursor molecules for neurotransmitter biosynthesis. Thus, dysregulated amino acid metabolism may be related to disease-associated neuropsychiatric symptoms, such as development of depression, fatigue, and cognitive impairment. Increased phenylalanine/tyrosine and kynurenine/tryptophan ratios are associated with immune activation in patients with HIV-1 infection and decrease upon effective antiretroviral therapy. Recent large-scale metabolic studies have confirmed the crucial involvement of tryptophan and phenylalanine metabolism in HIV-associated disease. Herein, we summarize the current status of the role of tryptophan and phenylalanine metabolism in HIV disease and discuss how inflammatory stress-associated dysregulation of amino acid metabolism may be part of the pathophysiology of common HIV-associated neuropsychiatric conditions. PMID:26236243

  13. Differential adhesion of amino acids to inorganic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Willett, R L; Baldwin, K W; West, K W; Pfeiffer, L N

    2005-05-31

    A fundamental, yet underexplored, materials system is the interface between biological molecules and inorganic surfaces. In an elemental approach to this problem, we have systematically examined the adhesion of amino acids to a series of inorganic surfaces including metals, insulators, and semiconductors. Significant differential adhesion is observed over the full complement of amino acids, determined largely by amino acid side-chain charge. Extensive mapping of the amino acid adhesion versus materials in multiple solutions is presented, with preliminary mechanisms derived from concentration and pH dependence. These results provide an empirical basis for building peptide to inorganic surface structures, and, using this adhesion data, we design inorganic nanostructures that are shown to selectively bind to prescribed primary peptide sequences. PMID:15901900

  14. Guanine- Formation During the Thermal Polymerization of Amino Acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mc Caw, B. K.; Munoz, E. F.; Ponnamperuma, C.; Young, R. S.

    1964-01-01

    The action of heat on a mixture of amino acids was studied as a possible abiological pathway for the synthesis of purines and pyrimidines. Guanine was detected. This result is significant in the context of chemical evolution.

  15. Effects of divalent amino acids on iron absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, J.M.; Ghannam, M.; Ayres, J.W.

    1984-09-01

    Solutions of each of 10 amino acids or ascorbic acid were mixed with iron and orally administered to rats. Iron was absorbed to a statistically significantly greater extent when mixed with asparagine, glycine, serine, or ascorbic acid as compared with a control solution of iron. The largest effects were for asparagine and glycine, which also increased iron absorption to a significantly greater extent than did serine or ascorbic acid. No statistically significant increase in iron absorption occurred when any of the other amino acids was mixed with iron. The extent of iron absorption from each test solution, as measured by area under the concentration of iron-59 in the blood-time curve (r2 . 0.0002), and the initial rate of iron absorption for each test solution (r2 . 0.01) showed no correlation with the stability constant of the amino acid-iron complex.

  16. Polypeptide having an amino acid replaced with N-benzylglycine

    DOEpatents

    Mitchell, Alexander R.; Young, Janis D.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention relates to one or more polypeptides having useful biological activity in a mammal, which comprise: a polypeptide related to bradykinin of four to ten amino acid residues wherein one or more specific amino acids in the polypeptide chain are replaced with achiral N-benzylglycine. These polypeptide analogues have useful potent agonist or antagonist pharmacological properties depending upon the structure. A preferred polypeptide is (N-benzylglycine.sup.7)-bradykinin.

  17. Amino acid accumulation and incorporation in rat intestine in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bronk, J R; Parsons, D S

    1966-06-01

    1. Rings of rat jejunum incubated in vitro accumulate a mixture of amino acids at a rate of about 3 mumoles/cm. hr. The rate of incorporation of the accumulated amino acid into the tissue protein corresponds to a rate of synthesis of 50% of the protein of the whole wall in five days.2. Replacement of the Na(+) in the NaCl of the incubation medium by choline or by Li(+) did not prevent amino acid accumulation by the tissue. However, replacement of the Na(+) by K(+) prevented the accumulation.3. The accumulation of amino acids by rat jejunum in vitro proceeded at normal rates not only in the presence in the incubation medium of oxygen tensions below 10 Torr but also in the presence of 2,4-dinitrophenol. Reasons are given for supposing that the findings are compatible with the view that the energy upon which depend the processes of amino acid accumulation by the tissue could be derived from the movement of ions across cellular boundaries.4. The amino acid incorporation into the tissue proteins was reduced to one tenth of the control rate in the presence of 2,4-dinitrophenol or by hypoxia so that the processes of incorporation depend upon energy derived from oxidative metabolism. In the presence of oligomycin the tissue respiration was depressed but the amino acid incorporation into the tissue protein was not inhibited. The view that the amino acid incorporation may be able to function with energy intermediates other than ATP is discussed. PMID:5912214

  18. The stability of amino acids at submarine hydrothermal vent temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bada, Jeffrey L.; Miller, Stanley L.; Zhao, Meixun

    1995-01-01

    It has been postulated that amino acid stability at hydrothermal vent temperatures is controlled by a metastable thermodynamic equilibrium rather than by kinetics. Experiments reported here demonstrate that the amino acids are irreversibly destroyed by heating at 240 C and that quasi-equilibrium calculations give misleading descriptions of the experimental observations. Equilibrium thermodynamic calculations are not applicable to organic compounds under high-temperature submarine vent conditions.

  19. Genetic code correlations - Amino acids and their anticodon nucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, A. L.; Lacey, J. C., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The data here show direct correlations between both the hydrophobicity and the hydrophilicity of the homocodonic amino acids and their anticodon nucleotides. While the differences between properties of uracil and cytosine derivatives are small, further data show that uracil has an affinity for charged species. Although these data suggest that molecular relationships between amino acids and anticodons were responsible for the origin of the code, it is not clear what the mechanism of the origin might have been.

  20. Interactions of amino acids, carboxylic acids, and mineral acids with different quinoline derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalita, Dipjyoti; Deka, Himangshu; Samanta, Shyam Sundar; Guchait, Subrata; Baruah, Jubaraj B.

    2011-03-01

    A series of quinoline containing receptors having amide and ester bonds are synthesized and characterised. The relative binding abilities of these receptors with various amino acids, carboxylic acids and mineral acids are determined by monitoring the changes in fluorescence intensity. Among the receptors bis(2-(quinolin-8-yloxy)ethyl) isophthalate shows fluorescence enhancement on addition of amino acids whereas the other receptors shows fluorescence quenching on addition of amino acids. The receptor N-(quinolin-8-yl)-2-(quinolin-8-yloxy) propanamide has higher binding affinity for amino acids. However, the receptor N-(quinolin-8-yl)-2-(quinolin-8-yloxy)acetamide having similar structure do not bind to amino acids. This is attributed to the concave structure of the former which is favoured due to the presence of methyl substituent. The receptor bis(2-(quinolin-8-yloxy)ethyl) isophthalate do not bind to hydroxy carboxylic acids, but is a good receptor for dicarboxylic acids. The crystal structure of bromide and perchlorate salts of receptor 2-bromo-N-(quinolin-8-yl)-propanamide are determined. In both the cases the amide groups are not in the plane of quinoline ring. The structure of N-(quinolin-8-yl)-2-(quinolin-8-yloxy)acetamide, N-(2-methoxyphenethyl)-2-(quinolin-8-yloxy)acetamide and their salts with maleic acid as well as fumaric acid are determined. It is observed that the solid state structures are governed by the double bond geometry of these two acid. Maleic acid forms salt in both the cases, whereas fumaric acid forms either salt or co-crystals.

  1. Principal transcriptional regulation and genome-wide system interactions of the Asp-family and aromatic amino acid networks of amino acid metabolism in plants.

    PubMed

    Less, Hadar; Angelovici, Ruthie; Tzin, Vered; Galili, Gad

    2010-10-01

    Amino acid metabolism is among the most important and best recognized networks within biological systems. In plants, amino acids serve multiple functions associated with growth. Besides their function in protein synthesis, the amino acids are also catabolized into energy-associated metabolites as well we into numerous secondary metabolites, which are essential for plant growth and response to various stresses. Despite the central importance of amino acids in plants growth, elucidation of the regulation of amino acid metabolism within the context of the entire system, particularly transcriptional regulation, is still in its infancy. The different amino acids are synthesized by a number of distinct metabolic networks, which are expected to possess regulatory cross interactions between them for proper coordination of their interactive functions, such as incorporation into proteins. Yet, individual amino acid metabolic networks are also expected to differentially cross interact with various genome-wide gene expression programs and metabolic networks, in respect to their functions as precursors for various metabolites with distinct functions. In the present review, we discuss our recent genomics, metabolic and bioinformatics studies, which were aimed at addressing these questions, focusing mainly on the Asp-family metabolic network as the main example and also comparing it to the aromatic amino acids metabolic network as a second example (Angelovici et al. in Plant Physiol 151:2058-2072, 2009; Less and Galili in BMC Syst Biol 3:14, 2009; Tzin et al. in Plant J 60:156-167, 2009). Our focus on these two networks is because of the followings: (i) both networks are central to plant metabolism and growth and are also precursors for a wide range of primary and secondary metabolites that are indispensable to plant growth; (ii) the amino acids produced by these two networks are also essential to the nutrition and health of human and farm animals; and (iii) both networks contain branched pathways requiring extensive regulation of fluxes between the different branches. Additional views on the biochemistry, regulation and functional significance of the Asp-family and aromatic amino acid networks and some of their associated metabolites that are discussed in the present report, as well as the nutritional importance of Lys and Trp to human and farm animals, and attempts to improve Lys level in crop plants, can be obtained from the following reviews as examples (Radwanski and Last in Plant Cell 7:921-934, 1995; Halkier and Gershenzon in Annu Rev Plant Biol 57:303-333, 2006; Ufaz and Galili in Plant Physiol 147:954-961, 2008; Jander and Joshi in Mol Plant 3:54-65, 2010). PMID:20364431

  2. Extraterrestrial Amino Acids in Ureilites Including Almahata Sitta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, A. S.; Glavin, D. P.; Callahan, M. P.; Dworkin, J. P.

    2011-01-01

    Ureilites are a class of meteorites that lack chondrules (achondrites) but have relatively high carbon abundances, averaging approx.3 wt %. Using highly sensitive liquid chromatography coupled with UV fluorescence and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-FD/ToF-MS), it was recently determined that there are amino acids in. fragment 94 of the Almahata Sitta ureilite[l]. Based on the presence of amino acids that are rare in the Earth's biosphere, as well as the near-racemic enantiomeric ratios of marry of the more common amino acids, it was concluded that most of the detected amino acids were indigenous to the meteorite. Although the composition of the Almahata Sitta ureilite appears to be unlike other recovered ureilites, the discovery of amino acids in this meteorite raises the question of whether other ureilites rnav also contain amino acids. Herein we present the results of LC-FDlTo.F-MS analyses of: a sand sample from the Almahata Sitta strewn held, Almahata Sitta fragments 425 (an ordinary H5 chondrite) and 427 (ureilite), as well as an Antarctic ureilite (Allan lulls, ALHA 77257).

  3. Steric and electrostatic interactions govern nanofiltration of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Shim, Yongki; Chellam, Shankararaman

    2007-10-01

    Crossflow nanofiltration experiments were performed to investigate the factors influencing the removal of amino acids by a commercially available polymeric thin-film composite membrane. The removals of five monoprotic (Ala, Val, Leu, Gly, and Thr), one diprotic (Asp), and one dibasic (Arg) amino acids in a range of permeate fluxes, feed pH values, and ionic strengths were analyzed using a phenomenological model of membrane transport. At any given pH and ionic strength, reflection coefficients (rejection at asymptotically infinite flux) of monoprotic amino acids increased with molar radius demonstrating the role of steric interactions on their removal. Additionally, consistent with Donnan exclusion, higher reflection coefficients were obtained when the membrane and the amino acids both carried the same nature of charge (positive or negative). In other words, both co-ion repulsion and molecular size determined amino acids removal. Importantly, the removal of effectively neutral amino acids were significantly higher than neutral sugars and alcohols of similar size demonstrating that even near their isoelectric point, zwitterionic characteristics preclude them from being considered as strictly neutral. PMID:17335060

  4. Tsc tumour suppressor proteins antagonize amino-acid-TOR signalling.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xinsheng; Zhang, Yong; Arrazola, Peter; Hino, Okio; Kobayashi, Toshiyuki; Yeung, Raymond S; Ru, Binggeng; Pan, Duojia

    2002-09-01

    Target of Rapamycin (TOR) mediates a signalling pathway that couples amino acid availability to S6 kinase (S6K) activation, translational initiation and cell growth. Here, we show that tuberous sclerosis 1 (Tsc1) and Tsc2, tumour suppressors that are responsible for the tuberous sclerosis syndrome, antagonize this amino acid-TOR signalling pathway. We show that Tsc1 and Tsc2 can physically associate with TOR and function upstream of TOR genetically. In Drosophila melanogaster and mammalian cells, loss of Tsc1 and Tsc2 results in a TOR-dependent increase of S6K activity. Furthermore, although S6K is normally inactivated in animal cells in response to amino acid starvation, loss of Tsc1-Tsc2 renders cells resistant to amino acid starvation. We propose that the Tsc1-Tsc2 complex antagonizes the TOR-mediated response to amino acid availability. Our studies identify Tsc1 and Tsc2 as regulators of the amino acid-TOR pathway and provide a new paradigm for how proteins involved in nutrient sensing function as tumour suppressors. PMID:12172555

  5. Role of ferrocyanides in the prebiotic synthesis of ?-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Bermejo, Marta; Osuna-Esteban, Susana; Zorzano, Mara-Paz

    2013-06-01

    We investigated the synthesis of ?-amino acids under possible prebiotic terrestrial conditions in the presence of dissolved iron (II) in a simulated prebiotic ocean. An aerosol-liquid cycle with a prebiotic atmosphere is shown to produce amino acids via Strecker synthesis with relatively high yields. However, in the presence of iron, the HCN was captured in the form of a ferrocyanide, partially inhibiting the formation of amino acids. We showed how HCN captured as Prussian Blue (or another complex compound) may, in turn, have served as the HCN source when exposed to UV radiation, allowing for the sustained production of amino acids in conjunction with the production of oxyhydroxides that precipitate as by-products. We conclude that ferrocyanides and related compounds may have played a significant role as intermediate products in the prebiotic formation of amino acids and oxyhydroxides, such as those that are found in iron-containing soils and that the aerosol cycle of the primitive ocean may have enhanced the yield of the amino acid production. PMID:23780697

  6. The spark discharge synthesis of amino acids from various hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ring, D.; Miller, S. L.

    1984-01-01

    The spark discharge synthesis of amino acids using an atmosphere of CH4+N2+H2O+NH3 has been investigated with variable pNH3. The amino acids produced using higher hydrocarbons (ethane, ethylene, acetylene, propane, butane, and isobutane) instead of CH4 were also investigated. There was considerable range in the absolute yields of amino acids, but the yields relative to glycine (or alpha-amino-n-butyric acid) were more uniform. The relative yields of the C3 to C6 aliphatic alpha-amino acids are nearly the same (with a few exceptions) with all the hydrocarbons. The glycine yields are more variable. The precursors to the C3-C6 aliphatic amino acids seem to be produced in the same process, which is separate from the synthesis of glycine precursors. It may be possible to use these relative yields as a signature for a spark discharge synthesis provided corrections can be made for subsequent decomposition events (e.g. in the Murchison meteorite).

  7. Did Evolution Select a Nonrandom "Alphabet" of Amino Acids?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, Gayle K.; Freeland, Stephen J.

    2011-04-01

    The last universal common ancestor of contemporary biology (LUCA) used a precise set of 20 amino acids as a standard alphabet with which to build genetically encoded protein polymers. Considerable evidence indicates that some of these amino acids were present through nonbiological syntheses prior to the origin of life, while the rest evolved as inventions of early metabolism. However, the same evidence indicates that many alternatives were also available, which highlights the question: what factors led biological evolution on our planet to define its standard alphabet? One possibility is that natural selection favored a set of amino acids that exhibits clear, nonrandom properties - a set of especially useful building blocks. However, previous analysis that tested whether the standard alphabet comprises amino acids with unusually high variance in size, charge, and hydrophobicity (properties that govern what protein structures and functions can be constructed) failed to clearly distinguish evolution's choice from a sample of randomly chosen alternatives. Here, we demonstrate unambiguous support for a refined hypothesis: that an optimal set of amino acids would spread evenly across a broad range of values for each fundamental property. Specifically, we show that the standard set of 20 amino acids represents the possible spectra of size, charge, and hydrophobicity more broadly and more evenly than can be explained by chance alone.

  8. Aspartate-Derived Amino Acid Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Jander, Georg; Joshi, Vijay

    2009-01-01

    The aspartate-derived amino acid pathway in plants leads to the biosynthesis of lysine, methionine, threonine, and isoleucine. These four amino acids are essential in the diets of humans and other animals, but are present in growth-limiting quantities in some of the world's major food crops. Genetic and biochemical approaches have been used for the functional analysis of almost all Arabidopsis thaliana enzymes involved in aspartate-derived amino acid biosynthesis. The branch-point enzymes aspartate kinase, dihydrodipicolinate synthase, homoserine dehydrogenase, cystathionine gamma synthase, threonine synthase, and threonine deaminase contain well-studied sites for allosteric regulation by pathway products and other plant metabolites. In contrast, relatively little is known about the transcriptional regulation of amino acid biosynthesis and the mechanisms that are used to balance aspartate-derived amino acid biosynthesis with other plant metabolic needs. The aspartate-derived amino acid pathway provides excellent examples of basic research conducted with A. thaliana that has been used to improve the nutritional quality of crop plants, in particular to increase the accumulation of lysine in maize and methionine in potatoes. PMID:22303247

  9. Transport Function of Rice Amino Acid Permeases (AAPs).

    PubMed

    Taylor, Margaret R; Reinders, Anke; Ward, John M

    2015-07-01

    The transport function of four rice (Oryza sativa) amino acid permeases (AAPs), OsAAP1 (Os07g04180), OsAAP3 (Os06g36180), OsAAP7 (Os05g34980) and OsAAP16 (Os12g08090), was analyzed by expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes and electrophysiology. OsAAP1, OsAAP7 and OsAAP16 functioned, similarly to Arabidopsis AAPs, as general amino acid permeases. OsAAP3 had a distinct substrate specificity compared with other rice or Arabidopsis AAPs. OsAAP3 transported the basic amino acids lysine and arginine well but selected against aromatic amino acids. The transport of basic amino acids was further analyzed for OsAAP1 and OsAAP3, and the results support the transport of both neutral and positively charged forms of basic amino acids by the rice AAPs. Cellular localization using the tandem enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-red fluorescent protein (RFP) reporter pHusion showed that OsAAP1 and OsAAP3 localized to the plasma membrane after transient expression in onion epidermal cells or stable expression in Arabidopsis. PMID:25907566

  10. When quinones meet amino acids: chemical, physical and biological consequences.

    PubMed

    Bittner, S

    2006-05-01

    Quinones and amino acids are usually compartmentally separated in living systems, however there are several junctions in which they meet, react and influence. It occurs mainly in wounded, cut or crushed plant material during harvest, ensiling or disintegrating cells. Diffusing polyphenols are oxidized by polyphenol oxidases (PPOs) to quinonic compounds, which associate reversibly or irreversibly with amino acids and proteins. The reaction takes place with the free nucleophilic functional groups such as sulfhydryl, amine, amide, indole and imidazole substituents. It results in imine formation, in 1,4-Michael addition via nitrogen or sulphur and in Strecker degradation forming aldehydes. The formation and activity of quinone-amino acids conjugates influences the colour, taste, and aroma of foods. Physical and physiological phenomena such as browning of foods, discoloration of plants during processing, alteration of solubility and digestibility, formation of humic substances, germicidal activity, cytotoxicity and more occur when quinones from disintegrating cells meet amino acids. The mechanisms of toxicity and the pathways by which PCBs may be activated and act as a cancer initiator include oxidation to the corresponding quinones and reaction with amino acids or peptides. Sclerotization of insect cuticle is a biochemical process involving also the reaction between quinones and amino acid derivatives. PMID:16601927

  11. Evaluation of Amino Acids as Turfgrass Nematicides1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yun; Luc, John E.; Crow, William T.

    2010-01-01

    Laboratory experiments revealed that DL-methionine, sodium methionate, potassium methionate, and methionine hydroxyl analog at rates of 224 and 448 kg amino acid/ha reduced the number of Belonolaimus longicaudatus mixed life-stages and Meloidogyne incognita J2 in soil, whereas L-threonine and lysine were not effective in reducing the number of either nematode. Futhermore, greenhouse experiments demonstrated that DL-methionine, sodium methionate, potassium methionate, and methionine hydroxyl analog were equally effective against B. longicaudatus at rates of 112, 224, and 448 kg amino acid/ha, and the highest rate (448 kg amino acid/ha) of all amino acids was more effective in reducing the number of B. longicaudatus than the lower rate. However, phytotoxicity was observed on creeping bentgrass (Agrostis palustris) treated with 448 kg amino acid/ha of methionine hydroxyl analog and DL methionine. In addition, in one of two field experiments on bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon C. transvaalensis) turf percentage green cover was increased and the number of B. longicaudatus was reduced by 224 kg amino acid/ha of DL-methionine and potassium methionate compared to untreated controls in one of two trials. PMID:22736861

  12. Did evolution select a nonrandom "alphabet" of amino acids?

    PubMed

    Philip, Gayle K; Freeland, Stephen J

    2011-04-01

    The last universal common ancestor of contemporary biology (LUCA) used a precise set of 20 amino acids as a standard alphabet with which to build genetically encoded protein polymers. Considerable evidence indicates that some of these amino acids were present through nonbiological syntheses prior to the origin of life, while the rest evolved as inventions of early metabolism. However, the same evidence indicates that many alternatives were also available, which highlights the question: what factors led biological evolution on our planet to define its standard alphabet? One possibility is that natural selection favored a set of amino acids that exhibits clear, nonrandom properties-a set of especially useful building blocks. However, previous analysis that tested whether the standard alphabet comprises amino acids with unusually high variance in size, charge, and hydrophobicity (properties that govern what protein structures and functions can be constructed) failed to clearly distinguish evolution's choice from a sample of randomly chosen alternatives. Here, we demonstrate unambiguous support for a refined hypothesis: that an optimal set of amino acids would spread evenly across a broad range of values for each fundamental property. Specifically, we show that the standard set of 20 amino acids represents the possible spectra of size, charge, and hydrophobicity more broadly and more evenly than can be explained by chance alone. PMID:21434765

  13. Amino acid modifiers in guayule rubber compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tire producers are increasingly interested in biobased materials, including rubber but also as compounding chemicals. An alternative natural rubber for tire use is produced by guayule, a woody desert shrub native to North America. Alternative compounding chemicals include naturally-occurring amino a...

  14. Dependence of intestinal amino acid uptake on dietary protein or amino acid levels

    SciTech Connect

    Karasov, W.H.; Solberg, D.H.; Diamond, J.M.

    1987-05-01

    To understand how intestinal amino acid (AA) transport is regulated by dietary substrate levels, the authors measured uptake of seven radioactively-labelled AAs and glucose across the jejunal brush-border membrane of mice kept on one of three isocaloric rations differing in nitrogen content. In the high-protein ration, uptake increased by 77-81% for the nonessential, less toxic AAs, proline, and aspartate but only by 32-61% for the more toxic essential AAs tested. In the nitrogen-deficient ration, uptake decreased for the nonessential aspartate and proline but stayed constant or increased for essential AAs and for the nonessential alanine. These patterns imply independent regulation of the intestine's various AA transporters. With decreasing dietary AA (or protein), the imino acid and acidic AA private transporters are repressed, while activities of the basic AA transporter and the neutral AA public transporter decrease to an asymptote or else go through a minimum. These regulatory patterns can be understood as a compromise among conflicting constraints imposed by protein's multiple roles as a source of calories, nitrogen, and essential AAs and by the toxicity of essential AAs at high concentrations.

  15. Amino acid transport in Myxicola giant axon: stability of the amino acid pool, taurine efflux, and trans effect of sodium

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Lyle W.

    1981-01-01

    1. The giant axon of Myxicola infundibulum was assessed for its suitability as a model preparation for study of amino acid transport mechanisms. 2. The amino acid composition of axoplasm was measured and compared with those of coelomic fluid, muscle and axon sheath. The axoplasmic composition is unique. Axoplasm/coelomic fluid concentration ratios are all much larger than 1. The axoplasmic amino acid concentrations are (mmol/kg plasm): cysteic acid (104), aspartic acid (75), glutamic acid (10), taurine (64), serine (5), glycine (191) and alanine (5). Other amino acids or primary amines, if present, must have concentrations of less than 1 mm. 3. The size of the sheath amino acid pool is 12% or less of the axoplasmic pool. 4. The amino acid pool of axons soaked in sea water for up to 24 h is stable. Removal of Na from sea water causes a large increase of net efflux and net production of amino acids. 5. Net amino acid production can not be detected in sheath. Metabolic production occurs in axoplasm with little accumulation. Time scales for production and net efflux are therefore similar. 6. The Myxicola axon has a vigorous amino acid metabolism and transport systems capable of relatively large fluxes. Homeostasis is strongly linked to Na and may involve Na-coupled co-transport. Conservation of transmembrane amino acid gradients could be promoted in part by trans inhibition of efflux by external Na. 7. Taurine is a useful model substrate because it is not catabolized in Myxicola and its net efflux is sensitive to Na. [3H]taurine efflux was measured from injected axons. Fluxes and internally recorded action potentials are stable for up to 6 h. 8. Axon sheaths take up [3H]taurine from 10 mm-taurine sea water with an apparent half-time of 5 h. [3H]taurine washout from the apparent extracellular space has a half-time of 5 min. Washout from sheath cells has a half-time of 2-3 h. Sheath is not an important parallel compartment for taurine fluxes in the axon. 9. Taurine efflux has a Q10 of 18. 10. Taurine efflux is insensitive to external taurine concentrations up to 10 mm. 11. Taurine efflux is sensitive to external Na, but only if internal Na is high. 12. Taurine is transported by a low-affinity Na-dependent system in Myxicola axon. Results could be explained by a carrier which is more mobile in the empty state than in the substrate-loaded state. Trans inhibition of taurine efflux by external Na is an important property of the system, and contributes to conservation of axoplasmic taurine. PMID:7310729

  16. Simplified protein design biased for prebiotic amino acids yields a foldable, halophilic protein.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Longo LM; Lee J; Blaber M

    2013-02-05

    A compendium of different types of abiotic chemical syntheses identifies a consensus set of 10 "prebiotic" ?-amino acids. Before the emergence of biosynthetic pathways, this set is the most plausible resource for protein formation (i.e., proteogenesis) within the overall process of abiogenesis. An essential unsolved question regarding this prebiotic set is whether it defines a "foldable set"--that is, does it contain sufficient chemical information to permit cooperatively folding polypeptides? If so, what (if any) characteristic properties might such polypeptides exhibit? To investigate these questions, two "primitive" versions of an extant protein fold (the ?-trefoil) were produced by top-down symmetric deconstruction, resulting in a reduced alphabet size of 12 or 13 amino acids and a percentage of prebiotic amino acids approaching 80%. These proteins show a substantial acidification of pI and require high salt concentrations for cooperative folding. The results suggest that the prebiotic amino acids do comprise a foldable set within the halophile environment.

  17. QTIPS: A novel method of unsupervised determination of isotopic amino acid distribution in SILAC experiments

    PubMed Central

    Dilworth, David J.; Saleem, Ramsey A.; Rogers, Richard S.; Mirzaei, Hamid; Boyle, John; Aitchison, John D.

    2010-01-01

    Stable incorporation of labeled amino acids in cell culture is a simple approach to label proteins in vivo for mass spectrometric quantification. Full incorporation of isotopically heavy amino acids facilitates accurate quantification of proteins from different cultures, yet analysis methods for determination of incorporation are cumbersome and time-consuming. We present QTIPS, Quantification by Total Identified Peptides for SILAC, a straightforward, accurate method to determine the level of heavy amino acid incorporation throughout a population of peptides detected by mass spectrometry. Using QTIPS, we show that the incorporation of heavy amino acids in baker’s yeast is unaffected by the use of prototrophic strains, indicating that auxotrophy is not a requirement for SILAC experiments in this organism. This method has general utility for multiple applications where isotopic labeling is used for quantification in mass spectrometry. PMID:20451407

  18. A skewed distribution of amino acids at recognition sites of the hypervariable region of immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Madrazo, E; Lara-Ochoa, F; Jiménez-Montaño, M

    1994-01-01

    Antibody binding site are formed by six hypervariable regions or complementarity determining regions (CDRs). The CDRs, three from the heavy chain and three from the light chain, are known as hypervariable segments and provide a surface complementary to that of the epitope. In recent work it was found that the amino acids in these positions fulfill different functions: Some play a structural role and others are involved in the specificity-determining function. It is reported here that the frequency of amino acids at hypervariable sites is skewed. By means of an informational algorithm, key physicochemical attributes of the dominant residues were identified for some of those sites. The results for about 1,500 antibodies suggest that approximately 35% of sites involved in the recognition process require only general properties such as composition, volume, and bulk or hydrogen bonding which are satisfied by a small set of amino acids instead of any one particular complementary amino acid. PMID:8151710

  19. Physiological significance of L-amino acid sensing by extracellular Ca(2+)-sensing receptors.

    PubMed

    Conigrave, A D; Mun, H-C; Brennan, S C

    2007-11-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor is a multimodal, multimetabolic sensor that mediates the feedback-dependent control of whole body calcium metabolism. Remarkably, in addition to its role in Ca(2+)(o) (extracellular Ca(2+)) sensing, the CaR (Ca(2+)-sensing receptor) also responds to L-amino acids. L-amino acids appear to activate, predominantly, a signalling pathway coupled with intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization, require a threshold concentration of Ca(2+)(o) for efficacy and sensitize the receptor to activation by Ca(2+)(o). Here, we review the evidence that the CaR, like other closely related members of the class 3 GPCR (G-protein-coupled receptor) family including GPRC6A, is a broad-spectrum amino acid-sensing receptor, consider the nature of the signalling response to amino acids and discuss its physiological significance. PMID:17956310

  20. Abiotic Racemization Kinetics of Amino Acids in Marine Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Steen, Andrew D.; Jrgensen, Bo Barker; Lomstein, Bente Aa.

    2013-01-01

    The ratios of d- versus l-amino acids can be used to infer the sources and composition of sedimentary organic matter. Such inferences, however, rely on knowing the rates at which amino acids in sedimentary organic matter racemize abiotically between the d- and the l-forms. Based on a heating experiment, we report kinetic parameters for racemization of aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, and alanine in bulk sediment from Aarhus Bay, Denmark, taken from the surface, 30 cm, and 340 cm depth below seafloor. Extrapolation to a typical cold deep sea sediment temperature of 3C suggests racemization rate constants of 0.5010?51110?5 yr?1. These results can be used in conjunction with measurements of sediment age to predict the ratio of d:l amino acids due solely to abiotic racemization of the source material, deviations from which can indicate the abundance and turnover of active microbial populations. PMID:23951211

  1. A Unified Nomenclature and Amino Acid Numbering for Human PTEN

    PubMed Central

    Pulido, Rafael; Baker, Suzanne J.; Barata, Joao T.; Carracedo, Arkaitz; Cid, Victor J.; Chin-Sang, Ian D.; Dav, Vrushank; den Hertog, Jeroen; Devreotes, Peter; Eickholt, Britta J.; Eng, Charis; Furnari, Frank B.; Georgescu, Maria-Magdalena; Gericke, Arne; Hopkins, Benjamin; Jiang, Xeujun; Lee, Seung-Rock; Lsche, Mathias; Malaney, Prerna; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Molina, Mara; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Parsons, Ramon; Pinton, Paolo; Rivas, Carmen; Rocha, Rafael M.; Rodrguez, Manuel S.; Ross, Alonzo H.; Serrano, Manuel; Stambolic, Vuk; Stiles, Bangyan; Suzuki, Akira; Tan, Seong-Seng; Tonks, Nicholas K.; Trotman, Lloyd C.; Wolff, Nicolas; Woscholski, Rudiger; Wu, Hong; Leslie, Nicholas R.

    2015-01-01

    The tumor suppressor PTEN is a major brake for cell transformation, mainly due to its phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate [PI(3,4,5)P3] phosphatase activity that directly counteracts the oncogenicity of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K). PTEN mutations are frequent in tumors and in the germ line of patients with tumor predisposition or with neurological or cognitive disorders, which makes the PTEN gene and protein a major focus of interest in current biomedical research. After almost two decades of intense investigation on the 403-residue-long PTEN protein, a previously uncharacterized form of PTEN has been discovered that contains 173 amino-terminal extra amino acids, as a result of an alternate translation initiation site. To facilitate research in the field and to avoid ambiguities in the naming and identification of PTEN amino acids from publications and databases, we propose here a unifying nomenclature and amino acid numbering for this longer form of PTEN. PMID:24985344

  2. A unified nomenclature and amino acid numbering for human PTEN.

    PubMed

    Pulido, Rafael; Baker, Suzanne J; Barata, Joao T; Carracedo, Arkaitz; Cid, Victor J; Chin-Sang, Ian D; Dav, Vrushank; den Hertog, Jeroen; Devreotes, Peter; Eickholt, Britta J; Eng, Charis; Furnari, Frank B; Georgescu, Maria-Magdalena; Gericke, Arne; Hopkins, Benjamin; Jiang, Xeujun; Lee, Seung-Rock; Lsche, Mathias; Malaney, Prerna; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Molina, Mara; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Parsons, Ramon; Pinton, Paolo; Rivas, Carmen; Rocha, Rafael M; Rodrguez, Manuel S; Ross, Alonzo H; Serrano, Manuel; Stambolic, Vuk; Stiles, Bangyan; Suzuki, Akira; Tan, Seong-Seng; Tonks, Nicholas K; Trotman, Lloyd C; Wolff, Nicolas; Woscholski, Rudiger; Wu, Hong; Leslie, Nicholas R

    2014-07-01

    The tumor suppressor PTEN is a major brake for cell transformation, mainly due to its phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate [PI(3,4,5)P3] phosphatase activity that directly counteracts the oncogenicity of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K). PTEN mutations are frequent in tumors and in the germ line of patients with tumor predisposition or with neurological or cognitive disorders, which makes the PTEN gene and protein a major focus of interest in current biomedical research. After almost two decades of intense investigation on the 403-residue-long PTEN protein, a previously uncharacterized form of PTEN has been discovered that contains 173 amino-terminal extra amino acids, as a result of an alternate translation initiation site. To facilitate research in the field and to avoid ambiguities in the naming and identification of PTEN amino acids from publications and databases, we propose here a unifying nomenclature and amino acid numbering for this longer form of PTEN. PMID:24985344

  3. Phenotypic and genetic relationships between growth and feed intake curves and feed efficiency and amino acid requirements in the growing pig.

    PubMed

    Saintilan, R; Brossard, L; Vautier, B; Sellier, P; Bidanel, J; van Milgen, J; Gilbert, H

    2015-01-01

    Improvement of feed efficiency in pigs has been achieved essentially by increasing lean growth rate, which resulted in lower feed intake (FI). The objective was to evaluate the impact of strategies for improving feed efficiency on the dynamics of FI and growth in growing pigs to revisit nutrient recommendations and strategies for feed efficiency improvement. In 2010, three BWs, at 352, 639 and 1077 kg, and daily FI during this period were recorded in three French test stations on 379 Large White and 327 French Landrace from maternal pig populations and 215 Large White from a sire population. Individual growth and FI model parameters were obtained with the InraPorc software and individual nutrient requirements were computed. The model parameters were explored according to feed efficiency as measured by residual feed intake (RFI) or feed conversion ratio (FCR). Animals were separated in groups of better feed efficiency (RFI- or FCR-), medium feed efficiency and poor feed efficiency. Second, genetic relationships between feed efficiency and model parameters were estimated. Despite similar average daily gains (ADG) during the test for all RFI groups, RFI- pigs had a lower initial growth rate and a higher final growth rate compared with other pigs. The same initial growth rate was found for all FCR groups, but FCR- pigs had significantly higher final growth rates than other pigs, resulting in significantly different ADG. Dynamic of FI also differed between RFI or FCR groups. The calculated digestible lysine requirements, expressed in g/MJ net energy (NE), showed the same trends for RFI or FCR groups: the average requirements for the 25% most efficient animals were 13% higher than that of the 25% least efficient animals during the whole test, reaching 0.90 to 0.95 g/MJ NE at the beginning of the test, which is slightly greater than usual feed recommendations for growing pigs. Model parameters were moderately heritable (0.300.13 to 0.560.13), except for the precocity of growth (0.060.08). The parameter representing the quantity of feed at 50 kg BW showed a relatively high genetic correlation with RFI (0.490.14), and average protein deposition between 35 and 110 kg had the highest correlation with FCR (-0.760.08). Thus, growth and FI dynamics may be envisaged as breeding tools to improve feed efficiency. Furthermore, improvement of feed efficiency should be envisaged jointly with new feeding strategies. PMID:25192352

  4. Raman spectra of amino acids and their aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guangyong; Zhu, Xian; Fan, Qi; Wan, Xueliang

    2011-03-01

    Amino acids are the basic "building blocks" that combine to form proteins and play an important physiological role in all life-forms. Amino acids can be used as models for the examination of the importance of intermolecular bonding in life processes. Raman spectra serve to obtain information regarding molecular conformation, giving valuable insights into the topology of more complex molecules (peptides and proteins). In this paper, amino acids and their aqueous solution have been studied by Raman spectroscopy. Comparisons of certain values for these frequencies in amino acids and their aqueous solutions are given. Spectra of solids when compared to those of the solute in solution are invariably much more complex and almost always sharper. We present a collection of Raman spectra of 18 kinds of amino acids ( L-alanine, L-arginine, L-aspartic acid, cystine, L-glutamic acid, L-glycine, L-histidine, L-isoluecine, L-leucine, L-lysine, L-phenylalanine, L-methionone, L-proline, L-serine, L-threonine, L-tryptophan, L-tyrosine, L-valine) and their aqueous solutions that can serve as references for the interpretation of Raman spectra of proteins and biological materials.

  5. Non-protein amino acids and neurodegeneration: the enemy within.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Kenneth J

    2014-03-01

    Animals, in common with plants and microorganisms, synthesise proteins from a pool of 20 protein amino acids (plus selenocysteine and pyrolysine) (Hendrickson et al., 2004). This represents a small proportion (~2%) of the total number of amino acids known to exist in nature (Bell, 2003). Many 'non-protein' amino acids are synthesised by plants, and in some cases constitute part of their chemical armoury against pathogens, predators or other species competing for the same resources (Fowden et al., 1967). Microorganisms can also use selectively toxic amino acids to gain advantage over competing organisms (Nunn et al., 2010). Since non-protein amino acids (and imino acids) are present in legumes, fruits, seeds and nuts, they are ubiquitous in the diets of human populations around the world. Toxicity to humans is unlikely to have been the selective force for their evolution, but they have the clear potential to adversely affect human health. In this review we explore the links between exposure to non-protein amino acids and neurodegenerative disorders in humans. Environmental factors play a major role in these complex disorders which are predominantly sporadic (Coppede et al., 2006). The discovery of new genes associated with neurodegenerative diseases, many of which code for aggregation-prone proteins, continues at a spectacular pace but little progress is being made in identifying the environmental factors that impact on these disorders. We make the case that insidious entry of non-protein amino acids into the human food chain and their incorporation into protein might be contributing significantly to neurodegenerative damage. PMID:24374297

  6. Energetics of Amino Acid Synthesis in Alkaline Hydrothermal Environments.

    PubMed

    Kitadai, Norio

    2015-12-01

    Alkaline hydrothermal systems have received considerable attention as candidates for the origin and evolution of life on the primitive Earth. Nevertheless, sufficient information has not yet been obtained for the thermodynamic properties of amino acids, which are necessary components for life, at high temperatures and alkaline pH. These properties were estimated using experimental high-temperature volume and heat capacity data reported in the literature for several amino acids, together with correlation algorithms and the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) equations of state. This approach enabled determination of a complete set of the standard molal thermodynamic data and the revised HKF parameters for the 20 protein amino acids in their zwitterionic and ionization states. The obtained dataset was then used to evaluate the energetics of amino acid syntheses from simple inorganic precursors (CO2, H2, NH3 and H2S) in a simulated alkaline hydrothermal system on the Hadean Earth. Results show that mixing between CO2-rich seawater and the H2-rich hydrothermal fluid can produce energetically favorable conditions for amino acid syntheses, particularly in the lower-temperature region of such systems. Together with data related to the pH and temperature dependences of the energetics of amino acid polymerizations presented in earlier reports, these results suggest the following. Hadean alkaline hydrothermal settings, where steep pH and temperature gradients may have existed between cool, slightly acidic Hadean ocean water and hot, alkaline hydrothermal fluids at the vent-ocean interface, may be energetically the most suitable environment for the synthesis and polymerization of amino acids. PMID:25796392

  7. Energetics of Amino Acid Synthesis in Alkaline Hydrothermal Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitadai, Norio

    2015-12-01

    Alkaline hydrothermal systems have received considerable attention as candidates for the origin and evolution of life on the primitive Earth. Nevertheless, sufficient information has not yet been obtained for the thermodynamic properties of amino acids, which are necessary components for life, at high temperatures and alkaline pH. These properties were estimated using experimental high-temperature volume and heat capacity data reported in the literature for several amino acids, together with correlation algorithms and the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) equations of state. This approach enabled determination of a complete set of the standard molal thermodynamic data and the revised HKF parameters for the 20 protein amino acids in their zwitterionic and ionization states. The obtained dataset was then used to evaluate the energetics of amino acid syntheses from simple inorganic precursors (CO2, H2, NH3 and H2S) in a simulated alkaline hydrothermal system on the Hadean Earth. Results show that mixing between CO2-rich seawater and the H2-rich hydrothermal fluid can produce energetically favorable conditions for amino acid syntheses, particularly in the lower-temperature region of such systems. Together with data related to the pH and temperature dependences of the energetics of amino acid polymerizations presented in earlier reports, these results suggest the following. Hadean alkaline hydrothermal settings, where steep pH and temperature gradients may have existed between cool, slightly acidic Hadean ocean water and hot, alkaline hydrothermal fluids at the vent-ocean interface, may be energetically the most suitable environment for the synthesis and polymerization of amino acids.

  8. On the abiotic formation of amino acids. I - HCN as a precursor of amino acids detected in extracts of lunar samples. II - Formation of HCN and amino acids from simulated mixtures of gases released from lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuasa, S.; Flory, D.; Basile, B.; Oro, J.

    1984-01-01

    Two studies on the abiotic formation of amino acids are presented. The first study demonstrates the role of hydrogen cyanide as a precursor of amino acids detected in extracts of lunar samples. The formation of several amino acids, including glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid, under conditions similar to those used for the analysis of lunar samples is demonstrated. The second study investigates the formation of hydrogen cyanide as well as amino acids from lunar-sample gas mixtures under electrical discharge conditions. These results extend the possibility of synthesis of amino acids to planetary bodies with primordial atmospheres less reducing than a mixture of methane, ammonia, hydrogen and water.

  9. Thermospray liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry study of diastereomeric isoindole derivatives of amino acids and amino acid amides.

    PubMed

    van Leuken, R G; Duchateau, A L; Kwakkenbos, G T

    1995-11-01

    A thermospray liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (TSP-LC/MS) method is described for determination of the enantiomeric excess of alpha-amino acids and alpha-amino acid amides as their o-phthalaldehyde/N-acetyl-L-cysteine (OPA/NAC) derivatives. The source temperature is an important factor in optimizing the sensitivity of the TSP-LC/MS analysis, whereas the repeller voltage is of minor importance. On-column mass spectra were acquired for the OPA/NAC derivatives of several alpha-amino acids and alpha-amino acid amides. For the main fragment ions, mass spectra fragmentation pathways are proposed. The applicability of the method is demonstrated by means of the enantiomeric excess determination of valine in a sample from an enzymatic hydrolysis experiment. Using single ion monitoring, the detection limit of D-valine in the presence of excess L-valine is 10 pmol. The present TSP-LC/MS method is useful for validating the results obtained from LC/UV or LC/fluorescence methods for the enantiomeric excess determination of alpha-amino acids and alpha-amino acid amides. PMID:8788130

  10. Expression pattern of peptide and amino acid genes in digestive tract of transporter juvenile turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dandan; He, Gen; Mai, Kangsen; Zhou, Huihui; Xu, Wei; Song, Fei

    2016-04-01

    Turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus L.), a carnivorous fish species with high dietary protein requirement, was chosen to examine the expression pattern of peptide and amino acid transporter genes along its digestive tract which was divided into six segments including stomach, pyloric caeca, rectum, and three equal parts of the remainder of the intestine. The results showed that the expression of two peptide and eleven amino acid transporters genes exhibited distinct patterns. Peptide transporter 1 (PepT1) was rich in proximal intestine while peptide transporter 2 (PepT2) was abundant in distal intestine. A number of neutral and cationic amino acid transporters expressed richly in whole intestine including B0-type amino acid transporter 1 (B0AT1), L-type amino acid transporter 2 (LAT2), T-type amino acid transporter 1 (TAT1), proton-coupled amino acid transporter 1 (PAT1), y+L-type amino acid transporter 1 (y+LAT1), and cationic amino acid transporter 2 (CAT2) while ASC amino acid transporter 2 (ASCT2), sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2), and y+L-type amino acid transporter 2 (y+LAT2) abundantly expressed in stomach. In addition, system b0,+ transporters (rBAT and b0,+AT) existed richly in distal intestine. These findings comprehensively characterized the distribution of solute carrier family proteins, which revealed the relative importance of peptide and amino acid absorption through luminal membrane. Our findings are helpful to understand the mechanism of the utilization of dietary protein in fish with a short digestive tract.

  11. Size does matter: 18 amino acids at the N-terminal tip of an amino acid transporter in Leishmania determine substrate specificity

    PubMed Central

    Schlisselberg, Doreen; Mazarib, Eldar; Inbar, Ehud; Rentsch, Doris; Myler, Peter J.; Zilberstein, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Long N-terminal tails of amino acid transporters are known to act as sensors of the internal pool of amino acids and as positive regulators of substrate flux rate. In this study we establish that N-termini of amino acid transporters can also determine substrate specificity. We show that due to alternative trans splicing, the human pathogen Leishmania naturally expresses two variants of the proline/alanine transporter, one 18 amino acid shorter than the other. We demonstrate that the longer variant (LdAAP24) translocates both proline and alanine, whereas the shorter variant (∆18LdAAP24) translocates just proline. Remarkably, co-expressing the hydrophilic N-terminal peptide of the long variant with ∆18LdAAP24 was found to recover alanine transport. This restoration of alanine transport could be mediated by a truncated N-terminal tail, though truncations exceeding half of the tail length were no longer functional. Taken together, the data indicate that the first 18 amino acids of the negatively charged N-terminal LdAAP24 tail are required for alanine transport and may facilitate the electrostatic interactions of the entire negatively charged N-terminal tail with the positively charged internal loops in the transmembrane domain, as this mechanism has been shown to underlie regulation of substrate flux rate for other transporters. PMID:26549185

  12. The Amino Acid Arginine 210 of the Response Regulator HrpG of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri Is Required for HrpG Function in Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Gottig, Natalia; Ottado, Jorgelina

    2015-01-01

    Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri colonizes its hosts through the trafficking of effector proteins to the plant cell by the type III protein secretion system. In X. citri subsp. citri, as in other plant pathogens, the hrp cluster encodes the type III protein secretion system and is regulated by the transcription factors HrpG and HrpX. HrpG belongs to the OmpR familys response regulator of EnvZ/OmpR two-component signal transduction system. Here, we show that the arginine 210 residue is crucial for the transcriptional activity of HrpG revealed by the absence of disease in host plants and hypersensitive response in non-host plants when a strain carrying this point mutation is used in plant infiltration assays. Also, this strain showed decreased expression levels of hrp genes in bacteria grown in culture or when they were recovered from citrus leaves. Moreover, we show for the first time that HrpG binds to both hrpX and its own promoter, and the change of the arginine 210 by a cysteine does not prevent the binding to both promoters. Nevertheless, in vitro hrpX transcription was observed only with HrpG whereas no transcription was detected with the R210C mutant. HrpG was able to interact with itself as well as with the mutant R210C suggesting that it functions as a dimer. The mutant protein R210C showed altered protease sensitivity, suggesting that Arg210 is essential for protein active conformation and thus for transcriptional activity. Our results indicate that arginine 210 in HrpG, as it may occur with this conserved residue in other members of this family of response regulators, is not required for DNA binding whereas is essential for hrp genes transcription and therefore for pathogenicity and HR induction. PMID:25961560

  13. Amino acid racemization in Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    PubMed

    Radkov, Atanas D; Moe, Luke A

    2013-11-01

    D-Amino acids have been shown to play an increasingly diverse role in bacterial physiology, yet much remains to be learned about their synthesis and catabolism. Here we used the model soil- and rhizosphere-dwelling organism Pseudomonas putida KT2440 to elaborate on the genomics and enzymology of d-amino acid metabolism. P. putida KT2440 catabolized the d-stereoisomers of lysine, phenylalanine, arginine, alanine, and hydroxyproline as the sole carbon and nitrogen sources. With the exception of phenylalanine, each of these amino acids was racemized by P. putida KT2440 enzymes. Three amino acid racemases were identified from a genomic screen, and the enzymes were further characterized in vitro. The putative biosynthetic alanine racemase Alr showed broad substrate specificity, exhibiting measurable racemase activity with 9 of the 19 chiral amino acids. Among these amino acids, activity was the highest with lysine, and the k(cat)/K(m) values with l- and d-lysine were 3 orders of magnitude greater than the k(cat)/K(m) values with l- and d-alanine. Conversely, the putative catabolic alanine racemase DadX showed narrow substrate specificity, clearly preferring only the alanine stereoisomers as the substrates. However, DadX did show 6- and 9-fold higher k(cat)/K(m) values than Alr with l- and d-alanine, respectively. The annotated proline racemase ProR of P. putida KT2440 showed negligible activity with either stereoisomer of the 19 chiral amino acids but exhibited strong epimerization activity with hydroxyproline as the substrate. Comparative genomic analysis revealed differences among pseudomonads with respect to alanine racemase genes that may point to different roles for these genes among closely related species. PMID:23995642

  14. 40 CFR 721.2584 - Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. 721.2584 Section 721.2584 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2584 Dodecanoic acid,...

  15. 40 CFR 721.2584 - Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. 721.2584 Section 721.2584 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2584 Dodecanoic acid,...

  16. Boron-containing amino carboxylic acid compounds and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Kabalka, George W. (Knoxville, TN); Srivastava, Rajiv R. (Knoxville, TN)

    2000-03-14

    Novel compounds which are useful for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) are disclosed. The compounds comprise a stable boron-containing group and an aminocycloalkane carboxylic acid group or a boronated acyclic hydrocarbon-linked amino carboxylic acid. Methods for synthesis of the compounds and for use of the compounds in BNCT are disclosed.

  17. Promiscuous seven transmembrane receptors sensing L-?-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Smajilovic, Sanela; Wellendorph, Petrine; Bruner-Osborne, Hans

    2014-01-01

    A number of nutrient sensing seven trans-membrane (7TM) receptors have been identified and characterized over the past few years. While the sensing mechanisms to carbohydrates and free fatty acids are well understood, the molecular basis of amino acid sensing has recently come to the limelight. The present review describes the current status of promiscuous L-?-amino acid sensors, the calcium sensing receptor (CaSR), the GPRC6A receptor, the T1R1/T1R3 receptor and also their molecular pharmacology, expression pattern and physiological significance. PMID:23886393

  18. Fungal Peptaibiotics: Assessing Potential Meteoritic Amino Acid Contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, J. E.; Callahan, M. P.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.; Bruckner, H.

    2010-01-01

    The presence of non-protein alpha-dialkyl-amino acids such as alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (alpha-A1B) and isovaline (Iva), which are relatively rare in the terrestrial biosphere, has long been used as an indication of the indigeneity of meteoritic amino acids, however, the discovery of alpha-AIB in peptides producers by a widespread group of filamentous fungi indicates the possibility of a terrestrial biotic source for the alpha-AIB observed in some meteorites. The alpha-AIB-containing peptides produced by these fungi are dubbed peptaibiotics. We measured the molecular distribution and stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic ratios for amino acids found in the total hydrolysates of four biologically synthesized peptaibiotics. We compared these aneasurenetts with those from the CM2 carbonaceous chondrite Murchison and from three Antarctic CR2 carbonaceous chondrites in order to understand the peptaibiotics as a potential source of meteoritic contamination.

  19. Amino acid pool composition of the basidiomycete Coprinus cinereus.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Cynthia E; Gathman, Allen C; Lilly, Walt W

    2007-11-01

    The leaf-litter fungus Coprinus cinereus maintains a pool of free amino acid in its mycelium. When the organism is grown under conditions of high nitrogen availability with 13.2 mmol.L-1 L-asparagine as the nitrogen source, the primary constituents of this pool are glutamine, alanine, and glutamic acid. Together these 3 amino acids comprise approximately 70% of the pool. Nitrogen deprivation reduces the size of the free amino acid pool by 75%, and neither a high concentration of ammonium nor a protein nitrogen source support a similar pool size as L-asparagine. Nitrogen deprivation also reduces the concentration of glutamine to the pool while increasing glutamate. Concomitant with this shift is a marked increase in mycelial ammonium. PMID:18026222

  20. Role of transport systems in amino acid metabolism: leucine toxicity and the branched-chain amino acid transport systems.

    PubMed Central

    Quay, S C; Dick, T E; Oxender, D L

    1977-01-01

    The livR locus, which leads to a trans-recessive derepression of branched-chain amino acid transport and periplasmic branched-chain amino acid-binding proteins, is responsible for greatly increased sensitivity toward growth inhibition by leucine, valine, and serine and, as shown previously, for increased sensitivity toward toxicity by branched-chain amino acid analogues, such as 4-azaleucine or 5',5',5'-trifluoroleucine. These phenotypes are similar to those of relA mutants; however, the livR mutants retain the stringent response of ribonucleic acid synthesis. However, an increase in the rate of transport or in the steady-state intracellular level of amino acids in the livR strain cannot completely account for this sensitivity. The ability of the LIV-I transport system to carry out exchange of pool amino acids for extracellular leucine is a major factor in leucine sensitivity. The previous finding that inhibition of threonine deaminase by leucine contributes to growth inhibition is confirmed by simulating the in vivo conditions using a toluene-treated cell preparation with added amino acids at levels corresponding to the internal pool. The relationship between transport systems and corresponding biosynthetic pathways is discussed and the general principle of a coordination in the regulation of transport and biosynthetic pathways is forwarded. The finding that the LIV-I transport system functions well for amino acid exchange in contrast to the LIV-II system provides another feature that distinguishes these systems in addition to previously described differences in regulation and energetics. PMID:321421

  1. Extraterrestrial material analysis: loss of amino acids during liquid-phase acid hydrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buch, Arnaud; Brault, Amaury; Szopa, Cyril; Freissinet, Caroline

    2015-04-01

    Searching for building blocks of life in extraterrestrial material is a way to learn more about how life could have appeared on Earth. With this aim, liquid-phase acid hydrolysis has been used, since at least 1970 , in order to extract amino acids and other organic molecules from extraterrestrial materials (e.g. meteorites, lunar fines) or Earth analogues (e.g. Atacama desert soil). This procedure involves drastic conditions such as heating samples in 6N HCl for 24 h, either under inert atmosphere/vacuum, or air. Analysis of the hydrolyzed part of the sample should give its total (free plus bound) amino acid content. The present work deals with the influence of the 6N HCl hydrolysis on amino acid degradation. Our experiments have been performed on a standard solution of 17 amino acids. After liquid-phase acid hydrolysis (6N HCl) under argon atmosphere (24 h at 100C), the liquid phase was evaporated and the dry residue was derivatized with N-Methyl-N-(t-butyldimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA) and dimethylformamide (DMF), followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. After comparison with derivatized amino acids from the standard solution, a significant reduction of the chromatographic peak areas was observed for most of the amino acids after liquid-phase acid hydrolysis. Furthermore, the same loss pattern was observed when the amino acids were exposed to cold 6N HCl for a short amount of time. The least affected amino acid, i.e. glycine, was found to be 73,93% percent less abundant compared to the non-hydrolyzed standard, while the most affected, i.e. histidine, was not found in the chromatograms after hydrolysis. Our experiments thereby indicate that liquid-phase acid hydrolysis, even under inert atmosphere, leads to a partial or total loss of all of the 17 amino acids present in the standard solution, and that a quick cold contact with 6N HCl is sufficient to lead to a loss of amino acids. Therefore, in the literature, the reported increase of the total quantity of amino acids after acid hydrolysis, due to the formation/release of amino acids during the whole water extraction / liquid-phase acid hydrolysis, could have hidden a loss of amino acids. Thus, in extraterrestrial material studies involving liquid-phase acid hydrolysis, the quantities of total amino acids may have been underestimated.

  2. How Amino Acids and Peptides Shaped the RNA World

    PubMed Central

    van der Gulik, Peter T.S.; Speijer, Dave

    2015-01-01

    The “RNA world” hypothesis is seen as one of the main contenders for a viable theory on the origin of life. Relatively small RNAs have catalytic power, RNA is everywhere in present-day life, the ribosome is seen as a ribozyme, and rRNA and tRNA are crucial for modern protein synthesis. However, this view is incomplete at best. The modern protein-RNA ribosome most probably is not a distorted form of a “pure RNA ribosome” evolution started out with. Though the oldest center of the ribosome seems “RNA only”, we cannot conclude from this that it ever functioned in an environment without amino acids and/or peptides. Very small RNAs (versatile and stable due to basepairing) and amino acids, as well as dipeptides, coevolved. Remember, it is the amino group of aminoacylated tRNA that attacks peptidyl-tRNA, destroying the bond between peptide and tRNA. This activity of the amino acid part of aminoacyl-tRNA illustrates the centrality of amino acids in life. With the rise of the “RNA world” view of early life, the pendulum seems to have swung too much towards the ribozymatic part of early biochemistry. The necessary presence and activity of amino acids and peptides is in need of highlighting. In this article, we try to bring the role of the peptide component of early life back into focus. We argue that an RNA world completely independent of amino acids never existed. PMID:25607813

  3. Regulation of amino acid metabolic enzymes and transporters in plants.

    PubMed

    Pratelli, Réjane; Pilot, Guillaume

    2014-10-01

    Amino acids play several critical roles in plants, from providing the building blocks of proteins to being essential metabolites interacting with many branches of metabolism. They are also important molecules that shuttle organic nitrogen through the plant. Because of this central role in nitrogen metabolism, amino acid biosynthesis, degradation, and transport are tightly regulated to meet demand in response to nitrogen and carbon availability. While much is known about the feedback regulation of the branched biosynthesis pathways by the amino acids themselves, the regulation mechanisms at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and protein levels remain to be identified. This review focuses mainly on the current state of our understanding of the regulation of the enzymes and transporters at the transcript level. Current results describing the effect of transcription factors and protein modifications lead to a fragmental picture that hints at multiple, complex levels of regulation that control and coordinate transport and enzyme activities. It also appears that amino acid metabolism, amino acid transport, and stress signal integration can influence each other in a so-far unpredictable fashion. PMID:25114014

  4. Intact amino acid uptake by northern hardwood and conifer trees.

    PubMed

    Gallet-Budynek, Anne; Brzostek, Edward; Rodgers, Vikki L; Talbot, Jennifer M; Hyzy, Sharon; Finzi, Adrien C

    2009-05-01

    Empirical and modeling studies of the N cycle in temperate forests of eastern North America have focused on the mechanisms regulating the production of inorganic N, and assumed that only inorganic forms of N are available for plant growth. Recent isotope studies in field conditions suggest that amino acid capture is a widespread ecological phenomenon, although northern temperate forests have yet to be studied. We quantified fine root biomass and applied tracer-level quantities of U-(13)C(2)-(15)N-glycine, (15)NH(4) (+) and (15)NO(3) (-) in two stands, one dominated by sugar maple and white ash, the other dominated by red oak, beech, and hemlock, to assess the importance of amino acids to the N nutrition of northeastern US forests. Significant enrichment of (13)C in fine roots 2 and 5 h following tracer application indicated intact glycine uptake in both stands. Glycine accounted for up to 77% of total N uptake in the oak-beech-hemlock stand, a stand that produces recalcitrant litter, cycles N slowly and has a thick, amino acid-rich organic horizon. By contrast, glycine accounted for only 20% of total N uptake in the sugar maple and white ash stand, a stand characterized by labile litter and rapid rates of amino acid production and turnover resulting in high rates of mineralization and nitrification. This study shows that amino acid uptake is an important process occurring in two widespread, northeastern US temperate forest types with widely differing rates of N cycling. PMID:19238450

  5. Ancestry and progeny of nutrient amino acid transporters.

    PubMed

    Boudko, Dmitri Y; Kohn, Andrea B; Meleshkevitch, Ella A; Dasher, Michelle K; Seron, Theresa J; Stevens, Bruce R; Harvey, William R

    2005-02-01

    The biosynthesis of structural and signaling molecules depends on intracellular concentrations of essential amino acids, which are maintained by a specific system of plasma membrane transporters. We identify a unique population of nutrient amino acid transporters (NATs) within the sodium-neurotransmitter symporter family and have characterized a member of the NAT subfamily from the larval midgut of the Yellow Fever vector mosquito, Aedes aegypti (aeAAT1, AAR08269), which primarily supplies phenylalanine, an essential substrate for the synthesis of neuronal and cuticular catecholamines. Further analysis suggests that NATs constitute a comprehensive transport metabolon for the epithelial uptake and redistribution of essential amino acids including precursors of several neurotransmitters. In contrast to the highly conserved subfamily of orthologous neurotransmitter transporters, lineage-specific, paralogous NATs undergo rapid gene multiplication/substitution that enables a high degree of evolutionary plasticity of nutrient amino acid uptake mechanisms and facilitates environmental and nutrient adaptations of organisms. These findings provide a unique model for understanding the molecular mechanisms, physiology, and evolution of amino acid and neurotransmitter transport systems and imply that monoamine and GABA transporters evolved by selection and conservation of earlier neuronal NATs. PMID:15665107

  6. Conformational Entropy of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins from Amino Acid Triads

    PubMed Central

    Baruah, Anupaul; Rani, Pooja; Biswas, Parbati

    2015-01-01

    This work quantitatively characterizes intrinsic disorder in proteins in terms of sequence composition and backbone conformational entropy. Analysis of the normalized relative composition of the amino acid triads highlights a distinct boundary between globular and disordered proteins. The conformational entropy is calculated from the dihedral angles of the middle amino acid in the amino acid triad for the conformational ensemble of the globular, partially and completely disordered proteins relative to the non-redundant database. Both Monte Carlo (MC) and Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations are used to characterize the conformational ensemble of the representative proteins of each group. The results show that the globular proteins span approximately half of the allowed conformational states in the Ramachandran space, while the amino acid triads in disordered proteins sample the entire range of the allowed dihedral angle space following Florys isolated-pair hypothesis. Therefore, only the sequence information in terms of the relative amino acid triad composition may be sufficient to predict protein disorder and the backbone conformational entropy, even in the absence of well-defined structure. The predicted entropies are found to agree with those calculated using mutual information expansion and the histogram method. PMID:26138206

  7. Effect of L-amino acids on Mucor rouxii dimorphism.

    PubMed

    Leija, A; Ruiz-Herrera, J; Mora, J

    1986-11-01

    Mucor rouxii organisms growing aerobically and exponentially on a well-defined minimal medium are able to differentiate as yeasts or as mycelia, depending on the amino acid as the nitrogen source. When certain amino acids were used as the nitrogen source, spores differentiated only as hyphae, whereas other amino acids gave rise to other morphological forms having different ratios of yeasts to hyphae. In both hyphal and yeast cultures, an aerobic metabolism was predominant, as shown by determining several metabolic parameters such as oxygen tension, glucose consumption, ethanol production, and CO2 release. A complete conversion of yeasts to hyphae was obtained by the appropriate change in the amino acid used as nitrogen source. By preparing spheroplasts from mycelial cultures and transferring them to media with amino acids that induce yeast formation, a 50% yield in the reverse transformation was achieved. A correlation between the change in pH of the medium and cell morphology was observed in different growth conditions. Decrease in the pH of the medium preceded the appearance of hyphae. Also, when the initial pH of the medium was increased, aspartate-containing cultures developed mainly as mycelia, instead of yeasts, with a corresponding decrease in the final pH. PMID:3096961

  8. Chiral analysis of amino acids from conventional and transgenic yeasts.

    PubMed

    Giuffrida, Alessandro; Tabera, Laura; Gonzlez, Ramn; Cucinotta, Vincenzo; Cifuentes, Alejandro

    2008-11-01

    Autolysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast is the main source of molecules that contribute to the quality of sparkling wines made by the traditional method. In this work, a genetically modified yeast (LS11) is compared to its isogenic wild type strain (BY4741) after autolysis. Chiral micellar electrokinetic chromatography with laser-induced fluorescence detection (chiral-MEKC-LIF) is used to identify and quantify the main D- and L-amino acids from both strains after accelerated autolysis. The procedure includes amino acids extraction, derivatization with FITC and chiral-MEKC-LIF separation in a background electrolyte composed of 100 mM sodium tetraborate, 30 mM SDS, 20 mM beta-CD at pH 10.0. The D- and L-forms of Arg, Asn, Ala, Glu and Asp, corresponding to the major amino acids found in these samples, are separated in less than 30 min with efficiencies up to 800,000 plates/m and high sensitivity (i.e., LODs as low as 40 nM were obtained for D-Arg for a signal to noise ratio of three). From these results it is corroborated that the genetic modification brings a faster autolysis of the yeast, releasing a higher amount of L-amino acids to the medium in a short time. Interestingly, the pattern of release of D-amino acids was also different between the transgenic and the conventional yeast strains. PMID:18554993

  9. Protein and amino acid metabolism and requirements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins are the major structural and functional components of all cells of the body. Enzymes, membrane carriers, blood transport molecules, intracellular matrix, and even hair and fingernails are proteins, as are many hormones. Proteins also constitute a major portion of all membranes, and the cons...

  10. A critical evaluation of the application of amino acid racemization to geochronology and geothermometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, K. M.; Smith, G. G.

    1977-01-01

    Attempts have been made to determine the age of biological samples by measuring the racemization of amino acids in protein samples. The pitfalls and inherent complications in diagenetic racemization studies are reviewed, and recent advances in improving techniques are outlined. Methodological topics include isolation of amino acids from geological samples, resolution of amino acid enantiomers, and the effects of acid hydrolysis. The theory and kinetics of amino acid racemization are discussed with attention to the derivation of the rate expression for amino acid racemization, isoleucine and the equilibrium constant, the mechanism of amino acid racemization, the racemization of 'bound' versus 'free' amino acids, and factors affecting the racemization rates of free amino acids in aqueous solution. Applications of amino acid racemization kinetics to geochronology is considered with reference to shells, marine sediments, and bones. Potential complications include heating and diagenesis, diagenetic formation of amino acids, the effect of clays, species effect, and contamination.

  11. Use of free amino acid composition of shell to estimate age since death of recent molluscs

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, A.M.; Powell, E.N.; Stanton, R.J. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    An understanding of death assemblage formation requires a measurement of time since death of constituent individuals. A new dating technique based on the measurement of the free amino acid content of mollusc shells has been developed which is inexpensive, rapid, and effective in dating time scales of a few decades to a few centuries. Since the breakdown of proteins of the matrix of mollusc shells begins soon after deposition, free amino acids gradually increase with shell age. The measurement of these can be used to determine the relative age among a group of shells. The future use of this technique depends on a clearer understanding of how free amino acid accumulation rate varies with age and species and developing effective calibration methods so that absolute rather than relative ages can be readily obtained. Three species were distributed widely enough for use - Rangia cuneata, Tagelus plebeius, and Phacoides pectinatus. A good relationship between free amino acids and relative age was present in all three species over the entire core; however some species and some amino acid were superior to others. Rangia cuneata produced the best correlation because it is epifaunal and thus died at the sediment surface rather than over an extended depth range and, also perhaps, because amino acid accumulation rates were more linear.

  12. Induction of calreticulin expression in response to amino acid deprivation in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed Central

    Heal, R; McGivan, J

    1998-01-01

    The role of calreticulin as a stress-induced molecular chaperone protein of the endoplasmic reticulum is becoming more apparent. We characterize here the induction of calreticulin in response to complete amino acid deprivation in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Amino acid deprivation caused a 4-fold increase in calreticulin protein levels over a period of 4-10 h. In addition to an overall increase in protein levels, the glycosylation of calreticulin was increased. This glycosylation event was blocked by tunicamycin and was not required for the increase in calreticulin protein levels. Immunofluorescence studies localized calreticulin to the ER of CHO cells, and no significant change was observed after amino acid deprivation. Northern-blot analysis showed that calreticulin mRNA levels were increased approx. 10-fold in response to complete amino acid deprivation. The response was sensitive to actinomycin D and alpha-amanitin, implying that regulation is primarily at the level of transcription. These results are similar to the large increases in asparagine synthetase mRNA observed in response to amino acid deprivation, but the amino acid-deprivation-response element identified to be involved in asparagine synthetase induction is absent from the calreticulin promoter. PMID:9425124

  13. Non-essential amino acids attenuate apoptosis of gastric cancer cells induced by glucose starvation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Dai, Lei; Luo, Laisheng; Xu, Wen; Zhang, Chenjing; Zhu, Yimiao; Chen, Zhongting; Hu, Wen; Xu, Xiang; Pan, Wensheng

    2014-07-01

    Energy and nutrition are essential requirements for all living cells, including cancer cells. In the initiating stage of cancer in organs, cancer cells grow fast and have inadequate supplies of glucose, oxygen and other nutrients due to deficient angiogenesis. Anaerobic conditions cause cancer cells to rely on glycolysis, which produces pyruvate and ATP that can be used by cancer cells to survive. However, glucose starvation may result in apoptosis or necrosis of cancer cells. It has been reported that autophagy is a consequence of glucose starvation and that amino acids are products of autophagy. The present study investigated whether amino acids may represent an alternative energy source for cancer cells undergoing glucose starvation. With non-essential amino acids, growth inhibition and apoptosis of gastric cancer cells induced by glucose starvation were attenuated compared with that of cells undergoing glucose starvation without amino acids, as measured by cell viability, apoptosis rates, membrane potential of mitochondria, and apoptosis-related genes. Meanwhile, both mitochondrial DNA copy number and amino acid transporter genes were increased compared with those in control cells. Non-essential amino acids prevented gastric cancer cells from glucose starvation-induced apoptosis. PMID:24858809

  14. Incorporation of non-canonical amino acids into proteins in yeast.

    PubMed

    Wiltschi, Birgit

    2016-04-01

    Non-canonical amino acids add extraordinary chemistries to proteins when they gain access to translation. In yeast, they can be incorporated into proteins by replacing a canonical amino acid or in a site-specific manner in response to an amber stop codon. The first approach simply exploits the natural substrate tolerance of the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in an auxotrophic host. The latter requires the co-expression of an orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase that is specific for the non-canonical amino acid together with an amber suppressor tRNA. This review briefly recaps the residue- and site-specific incorporation techniques for non-canonical amino acids in yeast. It describes the selection system for orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase/suppressor tRNA pairs and compares the different expression systems for these pairs. Numerous examples illustrate the application of non-canonical amino acids for protein engineering in yeast. The compilation includes the chemical structures of the amino acid analogs, the orthogonal pairs that were used for their incorporation and the titers of the labeled variant proteins. PMID:26868890

  15. Isotopic evidence for extraterrestrial non-racemic amino acids in the Murchison meteorite.

    PubMed

    Engel, M H; Macko, S A

    1997-09-18

    Many amino acids contain an asymmetric centre, occurring as laevorotatory, L, or dextrorotatory, D, compounds. It is generally assumed that abiotic synthesis of amino acids on the early Earth resulted in racemic mixtures (L- and D-enantiomers in equal abundance). But the origin of life required, owing to conformational constraints, the almost exclusive selection of either L- or D-enantiomers, and the question of why living systems on the Earth consist of L-enantiomers rather than D-enantiomers is unresolved. A substantial fraction of the organic compounds on the early Earth may have been derived from comet and meteorite impacts. It has been reported previously that amino acids in the Murchison meteorite exhibit an excess of L-enantiomers, raising the possibility that a similar excess was present in the initial inventory of organic compounds on the Earth. The stable carbon isotope compositions of individual amino acids in Murchison support an extraterrestrial origin -- rather than a terrestrial overprint of biological amino acids-although reservations have persisted. Here we show that individual amino-acid enantiomers from Murchison are enriched in 15N relative to their terrestrial counterparts, so confirming an extraterrestrial source for an L-enantiomer excess in the Solar System that may predate the origin of life on the Earth. PMID:9305838

  16. Industrial production of amino acids by coryneform bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Thomas

    2003-09-01

    In the 1950s Corynebacterium glutamicum was found to be a very efficient producer of L-glutamic acid. Since this time biotechnological processes with bacteria of the species Corynebacterium developed to be among the most important in terms of tonnage and economical value. L-Glutamic acid and L-lysine are bulk products nowadays. L-Valine, L-isoleucine, L-threonine, L-aspartic acid and L-alanine are among other amino acids produced by Corynebacteria. Applications range from feed to food and pharmaceutical products. The growing market for amino acids produced with Corynebacteria led to significant improvements in bioprocess and downstream technology as well as in molecular biology. During the last decade big efforts were made to increase the productivity and to decrease the production costs. This review gives an overview of the world market for amino acids produced by Corynebacteria. Significant improvements in bioprocess technology, i.e. repeated fed batch or continuous production are summarised. Bioprocess technology itself was improved furthermore by application of more sophisticated feeding and automatisation strategies. Even though several amino acids developed towards commodities in the last decade, side aspects of the production process like sterility or detection of contaminants still have increasing relevance. Finally one focus of this review is on recent developments in downstream technology. PMID:12948636

  17. Amino Acid Supplementation Affects Imprinted Gene Transcription Patterns in Parthenogenetic Porcine Blastocysts

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chi-Hun; Jeong, Young-Hee; Jeong, Yeun-Ik; Kwon, Jeong-Woo; Shin, Taeyoung; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Jeung, Eui-Bae; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Seo, Sang-Kyo; Lee, Chang-Kyu; Hwang, Woo-Suk

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether exogenous amino acids affect gene transcription patterns in parthenogenetic porcine embryos, we investigated the effects of amino acid mixtures in culture medium. Parthenogenetic embryos were cultured in PZM3 medium under four experimental conditions: 1) control (no amino acids except L-glutamine and taurine); 2) nonessential amino acids (NEAA); 3) essential amino acids (EAA); and 4) NEAA and EAA. The rate of development of embryos to the four-cell stage was not affected by treatment. However, fewer (P<0.05) embryos cultured with EAA (12.8%) reached the blastocyst stage as compared with the control group (25.6%) and NEAA group (30.3%). Based on these findings, we identified genes with altered expression in parthenogenetic embryos exposed to medium with or without EAAs. The results indicated that EAA influenced gene expression patterns, particularly those of imprinted genes (e.g., H19, IGF2R, PEG1, XIST). However, NEAAs did not affect impaired imprinted gene expressions induced by EAA. The results also showed that mechanistic target of rapamycin (MTOR) mRNA expression was significantly increased by EAA alone as compared with control cultures, and that the combined treatment with NEAA and EAA did not differ significantly from those of control cultures. Our results revealed that gene transcription levels in porcine embryos changed differentially depending on the presence of EAA or NEAA. However, the changes in the H19 mRNA observed in the parthenogenetic blastocysts expression level was not related to the DNA methylation status in the IGF2/H19 domain. The addition of exogenous amino acid mixtures affected not only early embryonic development, but also gene transcription levels, particularly those of imprinted genes. However, this study did not reveal how amino acids affect expression of imprinted genes under the culture conditions used. Further studies are thus required to fully evaluate how amino acids affect transcriptional regulation in porcine embryos. PMID:25180972

  18. Determination of the D and L isomers of some protein amino acids present in soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, G. E.; Cheng, C.-N.; Cronin, S. E.

    1977-01-01

    The D and L isomers of some protein amino acids present in soils were measured by using a gas chromatographic technique. The results of two processing procedures were compared to determine the better method. Results of the comparison indicated that the determination of D and L percentages requires amino acid purification if one is to obtain accurate data. It was found that very significant amounts of D-alanine, D-aspartic acid, and D-glutamic acid were present in the contemporary soils studied. Valine, isoleucine, leucine, proline, and phenylalanine generally contained only a trace to very small amounts of the D isomer. It is probable that the D-amino acids from the alanine, aspartic, and glutamic acids are contributed to the soil primarily via microorganisms. The finding of very significant quantities of some D-amino acids (about 5-16%) in present-day soils may alert some investigators of geological sediments to a possible problem in using amino acid racemization as an age-dating technique.

  19. Effects and feasibility of exercise therapy combined with branched-chain amino acid supplementation on muscle strengthening in frail and pre-frail elderly people requiring long-term care: a crossover trial.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Takashi; Aizawa, Junya; Nagasawa, Hiroshi; Gomi, Ikuko; Kugota, Hiroyuki; Nanjo, Keigo; Jinno, Tetsuya; Masuda, Tadashi; Morita, Sadao

    2016-04-01

    This study examined the effects and feasibility of a twice-weekly combined therapy of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) and exercise on physical function improvement in frail and pre-frail elderly people requiring long-term care. We used a crossover design in which the combination of exercise and nutritional interventions was carried out twice a week during cycles A (3 months) and B (3 months) and the exercise intervention alone was performed during the washout period. The exercise intervention entailed the following 5 training sets: 3 sets of muscle training at 30% of maximum voluntary contraction, 1 set of aerobic exercise, and 1 set of balance training. For the nutritional intervention, 6 g of BCAAs or 6 g of maltodextrin was consumed 10 min before starting the exercise. We determined upper and lower limb isometric strength, performance on the Functional Reach Test (FRT) and the Timed Up and Go test, and activity level. In the comparison between the BCAA group and the control group after crossover, the improvement rates in gross lower limb muscle strength (leg press, knee extension) and FRT performance were significantly greater (by approximately 10%) in the BCAA group. In the comparison between different orders of BCAA administration, significant effects were shown for the leg press in both groups only when BCAAs were given. The combination of BCAA intake and exercise therapy yielded significant improvements in gross lower limb muscle strength and dynamic balance ability. PMID:26963483

  20. Extraterrestrial amino acids at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, N.C.; Bada, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    The Earth has apparently been impacted by numerous large asteroids (>10 km diameter) or comets throughout its history. The rate of these collisions is roughly 2-4 x 10/sup -8/ events yr/sup -1/. The collision of a large asteroid or comet with the Earth could result in the addition of extra-terrestrial organic compounds. Certain types of meteorites (C2-carbonaceous chondrites) contain a vast assortment of organics, including amino acids, aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, carboxylic acids, heterocycles, and various low molecular weight compounds. Molecules important in abiotic organic syntheses are present in comets, and thus these objects are also likely rich inorganics. The authors have investigated whether the amino acid ..cap alpha..-amino isobutyric acid (AIBA) can be used to ascertain whether extraterrestrial amino acids (ETAA) were added to the Earth's surface at the proposed asteroid or comet impact event associated with the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary. AIBA was utilized in these studies since it is a dominant amino acid in C2-carbonaceous meteorites and only rarely occurs in terrestrial organisms. Detection of AIBA was performed using OPA pre-column derivatization-HPLC methodology. Since the AIBA fluorescent yield is increased relative to non ..cap alpha..-methyl substituted amino acids at elevated temperatures, derivatization was carried out at both room temperature and 90/sup 0/C. Ocean sediments of various geological ages were analyzed. The results indicate that only in DSDP Leg 43 K-T boundary samples are detectable levels of AIBA present.

  1. Excretion of amino acids by humans during space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, T. P.; Schluter, M. D.

    1998-01-01

    We measured the urine amino acid distribution patterns before, during and after space flight on the Space Shuttle. The urine samples were collected on two separate flights of the space shuttle. The first flight lasted 9.5 days and the second flight 15 days. Urine was collected continuously on 8 subjects for the period beginning 10 d before launch to 6 d after landing. Results: In contrast to the earlier Skylab missions where a pronounced amino aciduria was found, on shuttle the urinary amino acids showed little change with spaceflight except for a marked decrease in all of the amino acids on FD (flight day) 1 (p<0.05) and a reduction in isoleucine and valine on FD3 and FD4 (p<0.05). Conclusions: (i) Amino aciduria is not an inevitable consequence of space flight. (ii) The occurrence of amino aciduria, like muscle protein breakdown is a mission specific effect rather than part of the general human response to microgravity.

  2. Nitrogen retention and plasma amino acids of adults who consumed isonitrogenous diets containing rice and milk or wheat versus their constituent amino acids.

    PubMed

    Clark, H E; Moon W-H; Bailey, L B; Panemangelore, M

    1976-12-01

    Nitrogen retention and concentrations of plasma amino acids were compared when young adults consumed isonitrogenous diets containing proteins (3.0 g of N from rice plus 3.0 g of N from milk or 3.0 g of N from rice plus 3.0 g of N from wheat flour) or mixtures of their constituent amino acids. Diets containing proteins induced greater nitrogen retention than did those containing corresponding amounts of amino acids in crystalline form, and the difference between the combinations of proteins was delineated more sharply. Concentrations of several amino acids were elevated by substituting crystalline amino acids for proteins, especially in postprandial plasma. Subjects responded differently to addition of the limiting amino acids, lysine and tryptophan, to the diets containing amino acids instead of rice plus wheat. Therefore, data obtained by means of combinations of cereals and by mixtures of their constituent amino acids cannot always be used interchangeably. PMID:1036663

  3. Expression of catfish amino acid taste receptors in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Getchell, T V; Grillo, M; Tate, S S; Urade, R; Teeter, J; Margolis, F L

    1990-04-01

    We demonstrate that poly (A+)RNA isolated from catfish barbels directs the expression of functional amino acid taste receptors in the Xenopus oocyte. The activity of these receptors is monitored in ovo by the two electrode voltage clamp technique. Specific conductance changes recorded in response to amino acid stimulation are analogous to those recorded electrophysiologically from intact catfish barbels. These responses exhibit specificity, reproducibility, rapid onset and termination, and desensitization to repetitive stimulation. A functional assay system that encompasses the full complement of transduction events from the ligand-receptor interaction to subsequent conductance changes is necessary to identify molecular components responsible for these events. Our results demonstrate that the Xenopus oocyte can be used to characterize and identify clones coding for amino acid taste receptors analogous to its use in studying receptor molecules for other neuroactive compounds. PMID:1697041

  4. Thermochemical study of amino acid imprinted polymer films.

    PubMed

    Chai, Ziyi; BelBruno, Joseph J

    2015-11-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymers provide an alternative to traditional methods of amino acid analysis. The imprinted polymers are more robust and significantly less expensive than, for example, ELISA analysis. Amino acid imprinted nylon-6 thin films were studied by differential scanning calorimetry and scanning electron microscopy. Endothermic peaks were observed for imprinted films at temperatures higher than that for pure nylon, indicating the formation of a more-ordered, hydrogen bonded polymer. Removal of the amino acid from the imprinted film resulted in reversion to the peak observed for pure nylon-6. Additives, ?-cyclodextrin and multiwalled carbon nanotubes, were added to the imprinted polymer solutions as a means to increase the porosity of the films. These studies resulted in alternative morphologies and calorimetric results that provide additional functionalities and applications for imprinted polymers. PMID:25990092

  5. Supernovae and the chirality of the amino acids.

    PubMed

    Boyd, R N; Kajino, T; Onaka, T

    2010-06-01

    A mechanism for creating amino acid enantiomerism that always selects the same large-scale chirality is identified, and subsequent chemical replication and galactic mixing that would populate the Galaxy with the predominant species is described. This involves (1) the spin of the 14N in the amino acids, or in precursor molecules from which amino acids might be formed, that couples to the chirality of the molecules; (2) the neutrinos emitted from the supernova, together with the magnetic field from the nascent neutron star or black hole formed from the supernova, which selectively destroy one orientation of the 14N and thus select the chirality associated with the other 14N orientation; (3) chemical evolution, by which the molecules replicate and evolve to more complex forms of a single chirality on a relatively short timescale; and (4) galactic mixing on a longer timescale that mixes the selected molecules throughout the Galaxy. PMID:20624062

  6. Amino acids in a Fischer Tropsch type synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)