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Sample records for amino-butyric acid gaba

  1. Modes and nodes explain the mechanism of action of vortioxetine, a multimodal agent (MMA): modifying serotonin's downstream effects on glutamate and GABA (gamma amino butyric acid) release.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Stephen M

    2015-08-01

    Vortioxetine is an antidepressant with multiple pharmacologic modes of action at targets where serotonin neurons connect with other neurons. These actions modify the release of both glutamate and GABA (gamma amino butyric acid) within various brain circuits. PMID:26062900

  2. EFFECT OF LEAD ON GAMMA AMINO BUTYRIC ACID SYNTHESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The project studies the inhibitory effect of lead on the enzymatic activity of brain glutamic amino acid decarboxylase (GADC). The enzyme is responsible for the catalytic formation of gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) inhibitory neurons which is believed to be involved with the tra...

  3. Production of ?-Amino Butyric Acid in Tea Leaves wit Treatment of Lactic Acid Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yuko; Hayakawa, Kiyoshi; Ueno, Hiroshi

    Lactic acid bacteria was searched for producing termented tea that contained a lot of ?-amino butyric acid(GABA). Also examined were the growth condition, GABA production and changes in catechin contents in the tea leaves. Lactobacillus brevis L12 was found to be suitable for the production of fermented tea since it gave as much GABA as gabaron tea when tea leaves being suspended with water at 10% and incubated for 4 days at 25C. The amount of GABA produced was more than calculated based upon the content of glutamic acid in tea leaves. It is probable to assume that glutamate derived from glutamine and theanine is converted into GABA.

  4. Gamma amino butyric acid accumulation in medicinal plants without stress

    PubMed Central

    Anju, P.; Moothedath, Ismail; Rema Shree, Azhimala Bhaskaranpillai

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) is an important ubiquitous four carbon nonprotein amino acid with an amino group attached to gamma carbon instead of beta carbon. It exists in different organisms including bacteria, plants, and animals and plays a crucial role in humans by regulating neuronal excitability throughout the nervous system. It is directly responsible for the regulation of muscle tone and also effective in lowering stress, blood pressure, and hypertension. Aim and Objective: The aim of the study was to develop the fingerprint profile of selected medicinally and economically important plants having central nervous system (CNS) activity and to determine the quantity of GABA in the selected plants grown under natural conditions without any added stress. Materials and Methods: The high-performance thin layer chromatography analysis was performed on precoated silica gel plate 60F254 plate (20 cm 10 cm) in the form of bands with width 8 mm using Hamilton syringe (100 ?l) using n-butanol, acetic acid, and water in the proportion 5:2:2 as mobile phase in a CAMAG chamber which was previously saturated for 30 min. CAMAG TLC scanner 3 was used for the densitometric scanning at 550 nm. Specific marker compounds were used for the quantification. Results and Conclusion: Among the screened medicinal plants, Zingiber officinale and Solanum torvum were found to have GABA. The percentage of GABA present in Z. officinale and S. torvum were found to be 0.0114% and 0.0119%, respectively. The present work confirmed that among the selected CNS active medicinal plants, only two plants contain GABA. We found a negative correlation with plant having CNS activity and accumulation of GABA. The GABA shunt is a conserved pathway in eukaryotes and prokaryotes but, although the role of GABA as a neurotransmitter in mammals is clearly established, its role in plants is still vague. PMID:25861139

  5. The Long and Winding Road to Gamma-Amino-Butyric Acid as Neurotransmitter.

    PubMed

    Avoli, Massimo; Krnjević, Krešimir

    2016-03-01

    This review centers on the discoveries made during more than six decades of neuroscience research on the role of gamma-amino-butyric acid (GABA) as neurotransmitter. In doing so, special emphasis is directed to the significant involvement of Canadian scientists in these advances. Starting with the early studies that established GABA as an inhibitory neurotransmitter at central synapses, we summarize the results pointing at the GABA receptor as a drug target as well as more recent evidence showing that GABAA receptor signaling plays a surprisingly active role in neuronal network synchronization, both during development and in the adult brain. Finally, we briefly address the involvement of GABA in neurological conditions that encompass epileptic disorders and mental retardation. RESUMÉ: Le chemin long et sinueux pour que le GABA soit reconnu comme un neurotransmetteur. Cette revue est axée sur les découvertes réalisées durant plus de six décennies de recherche en neurosciences sur l'acide gamma-aminobutyrique (GABA) comme neurotransmetteur. À cet effet, nous mettons une emphase particulière sur le rôle significatif de chercheurs canadiens dans ce domaine de recherche. En prenant comme point de départ les premières études qui ont établi que le GABA était un neurotransmetteur au niveau de synapses centrales, nous faisons le sommaire des résultats identifiant le récepteur GABA comme étant une cible thérapeutique ainsi que des données plus récentes montrant que la signalisation du récepteur GABAA joue, de façon surprenante, un rôle actif dans la synchronisation du réseau neuronal, tant au cours du développement que dans le cerveau adulte. Finalement, nous traitons brièvement du rôle de GABA dans les maladies neurologiques incluant les troubles épileptiques et l'arriération mentale. PMID:26763167

  6. The relaxant effect of sex steroids in rat myometrium is independent of the gamma-amino butyric acid system.

    PubMed

    Perusqua, M; Villaln, C M

    1996-01-01

    The mechanism of action on the uterine-relaxant effect of sex steroids has been suggested to involve an interaction with gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) receptors. However, other lines of evidence do not seem to support this suggestion. In view of this controversy, this study was designed to investigate the potential relaxant effect of GABA, muscimol (a GABA(A) receptor agonist), testosterone, progesterone and their 5-reduced metabolites in rat uterus at different endocrine stages (pregnant, nonpregnant and estrogenized), with particular emphasis on verifying if the relaxant effect of steroids involves an interaction with GABA(A) receptors. Contractions from uterine rings were recorded by isometric method, the sequential addition of either GABA (at different concentrations) on the spontaneous and KCl-induced contraction or muscimol (also at different concentrations) on the contraction induced by KCl was devoid of any significant effect. In contrast, the sequential addition of progesterone relaxed the tonic KCl-induced contraction in a concentration-dependent manner. This effect of progesterone was mimicked by its 5-reduced metabolites. The 5(beta)-configured isomers were more potent than progesterone and the 5(alpha)-configured ones. Interestingly, the relaxation produced by the above steroids was not blocked by the GABA(A) receptor antagonists, picrotoxin or bicuculline, but was reversed by calcium. Taken together, the above findings suggest that the relaxant action of the sex steroids analyzed in this study is not mediated by an interaction with GABA(A) receptors, instead a blockade of calcium influx appears to be responsible. PMID:8786697

  7. Relieving occupational fatigue by consumption of a beverage containing ?-amino butyric acid.

    PubMed

    Kanehira, Tsutomu; Nakamura, Yoshiko; Nakamura, Kenji; Horie, Kenji; Horie, Noriko; Furugori, Kaori; Sauchi, Yusuke; Yokogoshi, Hidehiko

    2011-01-01

    To elucidate the effect of ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on both psychological and physical fatigue and on the performance advances for task solving, we assigned an arithmetic task for the Uchida-Kraepelin Psychodiagnostic Test (UKT) to 30 healthy Japanese subjects, 9 of whom were diagnosed as having chronic fatigue. The subjects were administered 250 mL of a test beverage containing GABA at the dose of 0, 25, and 50 mg before assigning task for the UKT. Psychological fatigue assessed by the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) was significantly lower in the group administrated the beverage containing 50 mg GABA than in the control group (p<0.05). The results of the Profile of Mood States (POMS) also indicated that psychological fatigue was significantly reduced in the 50-mg-GABA group. The salivary secretion levels of chromogranin A and cortisol-markers of physical fatigue-in both 25-mg and 50-mg-GABA groups were significantly lower than those in the control group. The 50-mg-GABA group also showed higher score on UKT by solving the arithmetic task more accurately than the control group (p<0.01). The results suggest that intake of GABA-containing beverages, especially those containing 50 mg of GABA, may help reduce both psychological and physical fatigue and improve task-solving ability. PMID:21512285

  8. Cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex response to intermedin microinjection into paraventricular nucleus is mediated by nitric oxide and ?-amino butyric acid in hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hong; Sun, Hai-jian; Chang, Jin-rui; Ding, Lei; Gao, Qing; Tang, Chao-shu; Zhu, Guo-qing; Zhou, Ye-bo

    2014-10-01

    Intermedin (IMD) is a member of calcitonin/calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and involves in the regulation of cardiovascular function in both peripheral tissues and central nervous system (CNS). Paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of hypothalamus is an important site in the control of cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex (CSAR) which participates in sympathetic over-excitation of hypertension. The aim of this study is to investigate whether IMD in the PVN is involved in the inhibition of CSAR and its related mechanism in hypertension. Rats were subjected to two-kidney one-clip (2K1C) surgery to induce renovascular hypertension or sham-operation (Sham). Acute experiments were carried out four weeks later under anesthesia. The CSAR was evaluated with the renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) responses to the epicardial application of capsaicin. The RSNA and MAP were recorded in sinoaortic-denervated, cervical-vagotomized and anesthetized rats. Bilateral PVN microinjection of IMD (25?pmol) caused greater decrease in the CSAR in 2K1C rats than in Sham rats, which was prevented by pretreatment with adrenomedullin (AM) receptor antagonist AM22-52, non-selective nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS) inhibitor L-NAME or ?-amino butyric acid (GABA)B receptor blocker CGP-35348. PVN pretreatment with CGRP receptor antagonist CGRP8-37 or GABA(A) receptor blocker gabazine had no significant effect on the CSAR response to IMD. AM22-52, L-NAME and CGP-35348 in the PVN could increase CSAR in Sham and 2K1C rats. These data indicate that IMD in the PVN inhibits CSAR via AM receptor, and both NO and GABA in the PVN involve in the effect of IMD on CSAR in Sham and renovascular hypertensive rats. PMID:24872434

  9. Involvement of glutamate and ?-amino-butyric acid receptor systems on gastric acid secretion induced by activation of ?-opioid receptors in the central nervous system in rats

    PubMed Central

    Minowa, Sachie; Ishihara, Satomi; Tsuchiya, Shizuko; Horie, Syunji; Watanabe, Kazuo; Murayama, Toshihiko

    2003-01-01

    Various neurotransmitters in the brain regulate gastric acid secretion. Previously, we reported that the central injection of ?-opioid receptor agonists stimulated this secretion in rats. Although the existence of ?1?3-opioid receptor subtypes has been proposed, the character is not defined. We investigated the interactions between ?-opioid receptor subtypes and glutamate, ?-amino-butyric acid (GABA) or 5-hydroxy tryptamine (5-HT) receptors in the rat brain. Gastric acid secretion induced by the injection of U69593 (8.41 nmol, a putative ?1-opioid receptor agonist) into the lateral cerebroventricle was completely inhibited by the central injection of 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX, 10.9 nmol, an antagonist for non-N-methyl-D-aspartate (non-NMDA) receptors) and by bicuculline infusion (222 ?g kg?1 per 10 min, i.v., GABAA receptor antagonist). The secretion induced by bremazocine (8.52 nmol, a putative ?2-opioid receptor agonist) was inhibited by bicuculline infusion, but not by CNQX. The secretion induced by naloxone benzoylhydrazone (224 nmol, a putative ?3-opioid receptor agonist) was slightly and partially inhibited by CNQX and bicuculline. Treatment with CNQX and bicuculline inhibited gastric acid secretion induced by the injection of dynorphin A-(1-17) into the lateral, but not the fourth, cerebroventricle. Antagonists for NMDA, GABAB and 5-HT2/1C receptors did not inhibit the secretions by ?-opioid receptor agonists. In rat brain regions close to the lateral cerebroventricle, ?-opioid receptor systems (?1>?3??2) are regulated by the non-NMDA type of glutamate receptor system, and ?1- and ?2-opioid receptor systems are regulated by the GABAA receptor system. The present findings show pharmacological evidence for ?-opioid receptor subtypes that regulate gastric acid secretion in the rat brain. PMID:12684260

  10. LeProT1, a transporter for proline, glycine betaine, and gamma-amino butyric acid in tomato pollen.

    PubMed Central

    Schwacke, R; Grallath, S; Breitkreuz, K E; Stransky, E; Stransky, H; Frommer, W B; Rentsch, D

    1999-01-01

    During maturation, pollen undergoes a period of dehydration accompanied by the accumulation of compatible solutes. Solute import across the pollen plasma membrane, which occurs via proteinaceous transporters, is required to support pollen development and also for subsequent germination and pollen tube growth. Analysis of the free amino acid composition of various tissues in tomato revealed that the proline content in flowers was 60 times higher than in any other organ analyzed. Within the floral organs, proline was confined predominantly to pollen, where it represented >70% of total free amino acids. Uptake experiments demonstrated that mature as well as germinated pollen rapidly take up proline. To identify proline transporters in tomato pollen, we isolated genes homologous to Arabidopsis proline transporters. LeProT1 was specifically expressed both in mature and germinating pollen, as demonstrated by RNA in situ hybridization. Expression in a yeast mutant demonstrated that LeProT1 transports proline and gamma-amino butyric acid with low affinity and glycine betaine with high affinity. Direct uptake and competition studies demonstrate that LeProT1 constitutes a general transporter for compatible solutes. PMID:10072398

  11. Mutations in y-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transaminase genes in plants or Pseudomonas syringae reduce bacterial virulence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 is a bacterial pathogen of Arabidopsis and tomato that grows in the apoplast. The non-protein amino acid '-amino butyric acid (GABA) is produced by Arabidopsis and tomato and is the most abundant amino acid in the apoplastic fluid of tomato. The DC3000 genome h...

  12. Seed priming with BABA (β-amino butyric acid): a cost-effective method of abiotic stress tolerance in Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek.

    PubMed

    Jisha, K C; Puthur, Jos T

    2016-03-01

    The effects of β-amino butyric acid (BABA) on abiotic stress tolerance potential of three Vigna radiata varieties were studied. The reduction in the growth of seedlings subjected to NaCl/polyethylene glycol (PEG) stress is alleviated by BABA seed priming, which also enhanced photosynthetic pigment content and photosynthetic and mitochondrial activities, and also modified the chlorophyll a fluorescence-related parameters. Moreover, BABA seed priming reduced malondialdehyde content in the seedlings and enhanced the accumulation of proline, total protein, total carbohydrate, nitrate reductase activity, and activities of antioxidant enzymes like guaiacol peroxidase and superoxide dismutase. Most of these positive features of BABA priming were predominantly exhibited when the plants were encountered with stress (NaCl/PEG). The BABA content in the BABA-treated green gram seeds and seedlings was also detected and quantified with high-performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC), and it revealed that the priming effect of BABA initiated in seeds and further gets carried over to the seedlings. It was concluded that BABA seed priming improved the drought and salinity stress tolerance potential of all the three green gram varieties, and it was evident in the NaCl-tolerant variety Pusa Vishal as compared to Pusa Ratna (abiotic stress sensitive) and Pusa 9531(drought tolerant). Dual mode in cost effectiveness of BABA priming is evident from: (1) the positive features of priming are being exhibited more during the exposure of plants to stress, and (2) priming of seedlings can be carried out by BABA application to seeds at very low concentration and volume. PMID:25837010

  13. GABA as a rising gliotransmitter

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Bo-Eun; Lee, C. Justin

    2014-01-01

    Gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter that is known to be synthesized and released from GABAergic neurons in the brain. However, recent studies have shown that not only neurons but also astrocytes contain a considerable amount of GABA that can be released and activate GABA receptors in neighboring neurons. These exciting new findings for glial GABA raise further interesting questions about the source of GABA, its mechanism of release and regulation and the functional role of glial GABA. In this review, we highlight recent studies that identify the presence and release of GABA in glial cells, we show several proposed potential pathways for accumulation and modulation of glial intracellular and extracellular GABA content, and finally we discuss functional roles for glial GABA in the brain. PMID:25565970

  14. Disorders of GABA metabolism: SSADH and GABA-transaminase deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Parviz, Mahsa; Vogel, Kara; Gibson, K. Michael; Pearl, Phillip L.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical disorders known to affect inherited gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) metabolism are autosomal recessively inherited succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase and GABA-transaminase deficiency. The clinical presentation of succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency includes intellectual disability, ataxia, obsessive-compulsive disorder and epilepsy with a nonprogressive course in typical cases, although a progressive form in early childhood as well as deterioration in adulthood with worsening epilepsy are reported. GABA-transaminase deficiency is associated with a severe neonatal-infantile epileptic encephalopathy. PMID:25485164

  15. GABA.

    PubMed Central

    Jorgensen, Erik M

    2005-01-01

    The most abundant synapses in the central nervous system of vertebrates are inhibitory synapses that use the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). GABA is also an important neurotransmitter in C. elegans; however, in contrast to vertebrates where GABA acts at synapses of the central nervous system, in nematodes GABA acts primarily at neuromuscular synapses. Specifically, GABA acts to relax the body muscles during locomotion and foraging and to contract the enteric muscles during defecation. The importance of this neurotransmitter for basic motor functions of the worm has facilitated the genetic analysis of proteins required for GABA function. Genetic screens have identified the GABA biosynthetic enzyme, the vesicular transporter, inhibitory and excitatory receptors, and a transcription factor required for the differentiation of GABA cell identity. The plasma membrane transporter and other GABA receptors have been identified by molecular criteria. PMID:18050397

  16. Perinatal exposure to germinated brown rice and its gamma amino-butyric acid-rich extract prevents high fat diet-induced insulin resistance in first generation rat offspring

    PubMed Central

    Adamu, Hadiza Altine; Imam, Mustapha Umar; Ooi, Der-Jiun; Esa, Norhaizan Mohd; Rosli, Rozita; Ismail, Maznah

    2016-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests perinatal environments influence the risk of developing insulin resistance. Objective The present study was aimed at determining the effects of intrauterine exposure to germinated brown rice (GBR) and GBR-derived gamma (γ) aminobutyric acid (GABA) extract on epigenetically mediated high fat diet–induced insulin resistance. Design Pregnant Sprague Dawley rats were fed high-fat diet (HFD), HFD+GBR, or HFD+GABA throughout pregnancy until 4 weeks postdelivery. The pups were weighed weekly and maintained on normal pellet until 8 weeks postdelivery. After sacrifice, biochemical markers of obesity and insulin resistance including oral glucose tolerance test, adiponectin, leptin, and retinol binding protein-4 (RBP4) were measured. Hepatic gene expression changes and the global methylation and histone acetylation levels were also evaluated. Results Detailed analyses revealed that mothers given GBR and GABA extract, and their offspring had increased adiponectin levels and reduced insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, leptin, oxidative stress, and RBP4 levels, while their hepatic mRNA levels of GLUT2 and IPF1 were increased. Furthermore, GBR and GABA extract lowered global DNA methylation levels and modulated H3 and H4 acetylation levels. Conclusions These results showed that intrauterine exposure to GBR-influenced metabolic outcomes in offspring of rats with underlying epigenetic changes and transcriptional implications that led to improved glucose homeostasis. PMID:26842399

  17. The role of GABA in the regulation of GnRH neurons

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Miho; Fukuda, Atsuo; Nabekura, Junichi

    2014-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons form the final common pathway for the central regulation of reproduction. Gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) has long been implicated as one of the major players in the regulation of GnRH neurons. Although GABA is typically an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mature adult central nervous system, most mature GnRH neurons show the unusual characteristic of being excited by GABA. While many reports have provided much insight into the contribution of GABA to the activity of GnRH neurons, the precise physiological role of the excitatory action of GABA on GnRH neurons remains elusive. This brief review presents the current knowledge of the role of GABA signaling in GnRH neuronal activity. We also discuss the modulation of GABA signaling by neurotransmitters and neuromodulators and the functional consequence of GABAergic inputs to GnRH neurons in both the physiology and pathology of reproduction. PMID:25506316

  18. Zinc mediated allylations of chlorosilanes promoted by ultrasound: synthesis of novel constrained sila amino acids.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Remya; Reddy, D Srinivasa

    2014-06-28

    A simple, fast and efficient method for allylation and propargylation of chlorosilanes through zinc mediation and ultrasound promotion is reported. As a direct application of the resulting bis-allylsilanes, three novel, constrained sila amino acids are prepared for the first time. The design and synthesis of the constrained sila analogue of GABA (?-amino butyric acid) is a highlight of this work. PMID:24827151

  19. GABA release by hippocampal astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Le Meur, Karim; Mendizabal-Zubiaga, Juan; Grandes, Pedro; Audinat, Etienne

    2012-01-01

    Astrocytes can directly influence neuronal activity through the release of various transmitters acting on membrane receptors expressed by neurons. However, in contrast to glutamate and ATP for instance, the release of GABA (γ-amino-butyric acid) by astrocytes is still poorly documented. Here, we used whole-cell recordings in rat acute brain slices and electron microscopy to test whether hippocampal astrocytes release the inhibitory transmitter GABA. We observed that slow transient inhibitory currents due to the activation of GABAA receptors occur spontaneously in principal neurons of the three main hippocampal fields (CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus). These currents share characteristics with the slow NMDA receptor-mediated currents previously shown to result from astrocytic glutamate release: they occur in the absence of synaptic transmission and have variable kinetics and amplitudes as well as low frequencies. Osmotic pressure reduction, known to enhance transmitter release from astrocytes, similarly increased the frequency of non-synaptic GABA and glutamate currents. Simultaneous occurrence of slow inhibitory and excitatory currents was extremely rare. Yet, electron microscopy examination of immunostained hippocampal sections shows that about 80% of hippocampal astrocytes [positive for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)] were immunostained for GABA. Our results provide quantitative characteristics of the astrocyte-to-neuron GABAergic signaling. They also suggest that all principal neurons of the hippocampal network are under a dual, excitatory and inhibitory, influence of astrocytes. The relevance of the astrocytic release of GABA, and glutamate, on the physiopathology of the hippocampus remains to be established. PMID:22912614

  20. Fast detection of extrasynaptic GABA with a whole-cell sniffer

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Rasmus K.; Petersen, Anders V.; Schmitt, Nicole; Perrier, Jean-Franois

    2014-01-01

    Gamma-amino-butyric acid (GABA) is the main inhibitory transmitter of the brain. It operates by binding to specific receptors located both inside and outside synapses. The extrasynaptic receptors are activated by spillover from GABAergic synapses and by ambient GABA in the extracellular space. Ambient GABA is essential for adjusting the excitability of neurons. However, due to the lack of suitable methods, little is known about its dynamics. Here we describe a new technique that allows detection of GABA transients and measurement of the steady state GABA concentration with high spatial and temporal resolution. We used a human embryonic kidney (HEK) cell line that stably expresses GABAA receptors composed of ?1, ?2, and ?2 subunits. We recorded from such a HEK cell with the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. The presence of GABA near the HEK cell generated a measurable electric current whose magnitude increased with concentration. A fraction of the current did not inactivate during prolonged exposition to GABA. This technique, which we refer to as a sniffer allows the measurement of ambient GABA concentration inside nervous tissue with a resolution of few tens of nanomolars. In addition, the sniffer detects variations in the extrasynaptic GABA concentration with millisecond time resolution. Pilot experiments demonstrate that the sniffer is able to report spillover of GABA induced by synaptic activation in real time. This is the first report on a GABA sensor that combines the ability to detect fast transients and to measure steady concentrations. PMID:24860433

  1. Effect of ?-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) Producing Bacteria on In vitro Rumen Fermentation, Biogenic Amine Production and Anti-oxidation Using Corn Meal as Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Bum Seung; Mamuad, Lovelia L.; Kim, Seon-Ho; Jeong, Chang Dae; Soriano, Alvin P.; Lee, Ho-Il; Nam, Ki-Chang; Ha, Jong K.; Lee, Sang Suk

    2013-01-01

    The effects and significance of ?-amino butyric acid (GABA) producing bacteria (GPB) on in vitro rumen fermentation and reduction of biogenic amines (histamine, methylamine, ethylamine, and tyramine) using corn meal as a substrate were determined. Ruminal samples collected from ruminally fistulated Holstein cows served as inoculum and corn was used as substrate at 2% dry matter (DM). Different inclusion rates of GPB and GABA were evaluated. After incubation, addition of GPB had no significant effect on in vitro fermentation pH and total gas production, but significantly increased the ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N) concentration and reduced the total biogenic amines production (p<0.05). Furthermore, antioxidation activity was improved as indicated by the significantly higher concentration of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) among treated samples when compared to the control (p<0.05). Additionally, 0.2% GPB was established as the optimum inclusion level. Taken together, these results suggest the potential of utilizing GPB as feed additives to improve growth performance in ruminants by reducing biogenic amines and increasing anti-oxidation. PMID:25049853

  2. GABA exists as a negative regulator of cell proliferation in spermatogonial stem cells. [corrected].

    PubMed

    Du, Yong; Du, Zhao; Zheng, Hongping; Wang, Dan; Li, Shifeng; Yan, Yuanchang; Li, Yiping

    2013-06-01

    ?-amino butyric acid (GABA) is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system. GABA is also found in many peripheral tissues, where it has important functions during development. Here, we identified the existence of the GABA system in spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) and found that GABA negatively regulates SSC proliferation. First, we demonstrated that GABA and its synthesizing enzymes were abundant in the testes 6 days postpartum (dpp), suggesting that GABA signaling regulates SSCs function in vivo. In order to directly examine the effect of GABA on SSC proliferation, we then established an in vitro culture system for long-term expansion of SSCs. We showed that GABAA receptor subunits, including ?1, ?5, ?1, ?2, ?3 and ?3, the synthesizing enzyme GAD67, and the transporter GAT-1, are expressed in SSCs. Using phosphorylated histone H3 (pH3) staining, we demonstrated that GABA or the GABAAR-specific agonist muscimol reduced the proliferation of SSCs. This GABA regulation of SSC proliferation was shown to be independent of apoptosis using the TUNEL assay. These results suggest that GABA acts as a negative regulator of SSC proliferation to maintain the homeostasis of spermatogenesis in the testes. PMID:23430456

  3. Allosteric modulation of retinal GABA receptors by ascorbic acid

    PubMed Central

    Calero, Cecilia I.; Vickers, Evan; Moraga Cid, Gustavo; Aguayo, Luis G.; von Gersdorff, Henrique; Calvo, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Ionotropic γ-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABAA and GABAC) belong to the cys-loop receptor family of ligand-gated ion channels. GABAC receptors are highly expressed in the retina, mainly localized at the axon terminals of bipolar cells. Ascorbic acid, an endogenous redox agent, modulates the function of diverse proteins, and basal levels of ascorbic acid in the retina are very high. However, the effect of ascorbic acid on retinal GABA receptors has not been studied. Here we show that the function of GABAC and GABAA receptors is regulated by ascorbic acid. Patch-clamp recordings from bipolar cell terminals in goldfish retinal slices revealed that GABAC receptor-mediated currents activated by tonic background levels of extracellular GABA, and GABAC currents elicited by local GABA puffs, are both significantly enhanced by ascorbic acid. In addition, a significant rundown of GABA-puff evoked currents was observed in the absence of ascorbic acid. GABA-evoked Cl- currents mediated by homomeric ρ1 GABAC receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes were also potentiated by ascorbic acid in a concentration-dependent, stereospecific, reversible, and voltage-independent manner. Studies involving the chemical modification of sulfhydryl groups showed that the two cys-loop cysteines and histidine 141, all located in the ρ1 subunit extracellular domain, each play a key role in the modulation of GABAC receptors by ascorbic acid. Additionally, we show that retinal GABAA IPSCs and heterologously expressed GABAA receptor currents are similarly augmented by ascorbic acid. Our results suggest that ascorbic acid may act as an endogenous agent capable of potentiating GABAergic neurotransmission in the CNS. PMID:21715633

  4. Regulation of GABA-modulin phosphorylation and GABA receptor binding by excitatory amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Vaccarino, F.; Guidotti, A.

    1987-05-01

    Primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells phosphorylate numerous proteins including GABA-modulin (GM), which is a putative allosteric modulator of GABA receptors. Cell depolarization and treatment with dicarboxylic excitatory amino acids, which activate PI turnover, Ca/sup 2 +/ influx and guanylate cyclase in granule cells increase the phosphorylation of specific proteins. To determine GM phosphorylation by endogenous protein kinases in living granule cell cultures, GM was isolated by immunoprecipitation and reverse-phase HPLC. High K/sup +/, veratridine, glutamate and NMDA treatment stimulated GM phosphorylation over 2-fold. This increase was abolished by the absence of extracellular Ca/sup 2 +/ and was antagonized by Mg/sup 2 +/ ions and by AVP. The excitatory amino acid action was mimicked by phorbol esters but not by forskolin or by cGMP, and thus may be mediated by an activation of protein kinase C (PKC). Moreover, excitatory amino acids increase /sup 3/H-labelled phorbol ester binding sites in granule cell membrane. The same cultures, treated with glutamate or kainate, showed a 50-fold greater efficacy of muscimol for the stimulation of benzodiazepine (BZ) binding. These data-suggest that excitatory amino acid stimulation of neurons triggers PKC translocation and the activated enzyme phosphorylates GM. The extent of GM phosphorylation may regulate the coupling between GABA and BZ binding sites.

  5. GABA Receptors: Pharmacological Potential and Pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Jembrek, Maja Jazvinscak; Vlainic, Josipa

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA), the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system, plays a key role in the regulation of neuronal transmission throughout the brain, affecting numerous physiological and psychological processes. Changes in GABA levels provoke disbalance between excitatory and inhibitory signals, and are involved in the development of numerous neuropsychiatric disorders. GABA exerts its effects via ionotropic (GABAA) and metabotropic (GABAB) receptors. Both types of receptors are targeted by many clinically important drugs that affect GABAergic function and are widely used in the treatment of anxiety disorder, epilepsy, insomnia, spasticity, aggressive behaviour, and other pathophysiological conditions and diseases. Of particular importance are drugs that modulate GABAA receptor complex, such as benzodiazepines, barbiturates, neuroactive steroids, intravenous and inhalational anesthetics, and ethanol. Molecular interactions and subsequent pharmacological effects induced by drugs acting at GABAA receptors are extremely complex due to structural heterogeneity of GABAA receptors and existence of numerous allosterically interconnected binding sites and various chemically distinct ligands that are able to bound to them. There is a growing interest in the development and application of subtype-selective drugs that will achieve specific therapeutic benefits without undesirable side effects. The aim of this review is to briefly summarize the key pharmacological properties of GABA receptors, and to present selected novel findings with the potential to open new perspectives in the development of more effective therapeutic strategies. PMID:26365137

  6. GABA sub A (gamma-aminobutyric acid) type binding sites on membranes of spermatozoa

    SciTech Connect

    Erdoe, S.L. ); Wekerle, L. )

    1990-01-01

    The binding of ({sup 3}H) gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) to seminal membranes of swines and rams was examined. Specific, GABA binding was demonstrated in both species, which showed the features of GABA{sub A} type receptors. The affinity of binding was similar in both species, whereas the density of seminal GABA binding sites was 5 times higher in swine. Our findings suggest that GABA may have a direct effect on spermatozoa.

  7. Frontal Lobe GABA Levels during Adolescence: Associations with Impulsivity and Response Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Silveri, Marisa M.; Sneider, Jennifer T.; Crowley, David J.; Covell, Michael J.; Acharya, Deepa; Rosso, Isabelle M.; Jensen, J. Eric

    2013-01-01

    Background The brain undergoes major remodeling during adolescence, resulting in improved cognitive control and decision-making, and reduced impulsivity, components of behavior mediated in part by the maturing frontal lobe. Gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA), the main inhibitory neurotransmitter system, also matures during adolescence, with frontal lobe GABA receptors reaching adult levels late in adolescence. Thus, the objective of this study was to characterize in vivo developmental differences in brain GABA levels. Methods Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was employed at 4 Tesla to acquire metabolite data from the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and the parieto-occipital (POC) cortex in adolescents (n=30) and emerging adults (n=20). Results ACC GABA/Cr levels were significantly lower in adolescents relative to emerging adults, whereas no age differences were observed in the POC. Lower ACC GABA/Cr levels were significantly associated with greater impulsivity and worse response inhibition, with relationships being most pronounced for ACC GABA/Cr and No-Go response inhibition in adolescent males. Conclusions These data provide the first human developmental in vivo evidence confirming frontal lobe GABA maturation, which was linked to impulsiveness and cognitive control. These findings suggest that reduced GABA may be an important neurobiological mechanism in the immature adolescent brain, contributing to the reduced, yet rapidly developing, ability to inhibit risky behaviors and to make decisions, which could compromise adolescent health and safety. PMID:23498139

  8. Mutation of the Drosophila vesicular GABA transporter disrupts visual figure detection

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Hao; Chow, Dawnis M.; Chen, Audrey; Romero-Calderón, Rafael; Ong, Wei S.; Ackerson, Larry C.; Maidment, Nigel T.; Simpson, Julie H.; Frye, Mark A.; Krantz, David E.

    2010-01-01

    The role of gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) release and inhibitory neurotransmission in regulating most behaviors remains unclear. The vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT) is required for the storage of GABA in synaptic vesicles and provides a potentially useful probe for inhibitory circuits. However, specific pharmacologic agents for VGAT are not available, and VGAT knockout mice are embryonically lethal, thus precluding behavioral studies. We have identified the Drosophila ortholog of the vesicular GABA transporter gene (which we refer to as dVGAT), immunocytologically mapped dVGAT protein expression in the larva and adult and characterized a dVGATminos mutant allele. dVGAT is embryonically lethal and we do not detect residual dVGAT expression, suggesting that it is either a strong hypomorph or a null. To investigate the function of VGAT and GABA signaling in adult visual flight behavior, we have selectively rescued the dVGAT mutant during development. We show that reduced GABA release does not compromise the active optomotor control of wide-field pattern motion. Conversely, reduced dVGAT expression disrupts normal object tracking and figure–ground discrimination. These results demonstrate that visual behaviors are segregated by the level of GABA signaling in flies, and more generally establish dVGAT as a model to study the contribution of GABA release to other complex behaviors. PMID:20435823

  9. Production of gaba (γ – Aminobutyric acid) by microorganisms: a review

    PubMed Central

    Dhakal, Radhika; Bajpai, Vivek K.; Baek, Kwang-Hyun

    2012-01-01

    GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) is a four carbon non-protein amino acid that is widely distributed in plants, animals and microorganisms. As a metabolic product of plants and microorganisms produced by the decarboxylation of glutamic acid, GABA functions as an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain that directly affects the personality and the stress management. A wide range of traditional foods produced by microbial fermentation contain GABA, in which GABA is safe and eco-friendly, and also has the possibility of providing new health-benefited products enriched with GABA. Synthesis of GABA is catalyzed by glutamate decarboxylase, therefore, the optimal fermentation condition is mainly based on the biochemical properties of the enzyme. Major GABA producing microorganisms are lactic acid bacteria (LAB), which make food spoilage pathogens unable to grow and act as probiotics in the gastrointestinal tract. The major factors affecting the production of GABA by microbial fermentation are temperature, pH, fermentation time and different media additives, therefore, these factors are summarized to provide the most up-dated information for effective GABA synthesis. There has been a huge accumulation of knowledge on GABA application for human health accompanying with a demand on natural GABA supply. Only the GABA production by microorganisms can fulfill the demand with GABA-enriched health beneficial foods. PMID:24031948

  10. The Arabidopsis her1 mutant implicates GABA in E-2-hexenal responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Mirabella, Rossana; Rauwerda, Han; Struys, Eduard A; Jakobs, Cornelis; Triantaphylids, Christian; Haring, Michel A; Schuurink, Robert C

    2008-01-01

    When wounded or attacked by herbivores or pathogens, plants produce a blend of six-carbon alcohols, aldehydes and esters, known as C6-volatiles. Undamaged plants, when exposed to C6-volatiles, respond by inducing defense-related genes and secondary metabolites, suggesting that C6-volatiles can act as signaling molecules regulating plant defense responses. However, to date, the molecular mechanisms by which plants perceive and respond to these volatiles are unknown. To elucidate such mechanisms, we decided to isolate Arabidopsis thaliana mutants in which responses to C6-volatiles were altered. We observed that treatment of Arabidopsis seedlings with the C6-volatile E-2-hexenal inhibits root elongation. Among C6-volatiles this response is specific to E-2-hexenal, and is not dependent on ethylene, jasmonic and salicylic acid. Using this bioassay, we isolated 18 E-2-hexenal-response (her) mutants that showed sustained root growth after E-2-hexenal treatment. Here, we focused on the molecular characterization of one of these mutants, her1. Microarray and map-based cloning revealed that her1 encodes a gamma-amino butyric acid transaminase (GABA-TP), an enzyme that degrades GABA. As a consequence of the mutation, her1 plants accumulate high GABA levels in all their organs. Based on the observation that E-2-hexenal treatment induces GABA accumulation, and that high GABA levels confer resistance to E-2-hexenal, we propose a role for GABA in mediating E-2-hexenal responses. PMID:17971036

  11. GABA-ergic cell therapy for epilepsy: Advances, limitations and challenges.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Ashok K; Upadhya, Dinesh

    2016-03-01

    Diminution in the number of gamma-amino butyric acid positive (GABA-ergic) interneurons and their axon terminals, and/or alterations in functional inhibition are conspicuous brain alterations believed to contribute to the persistence of seizures in acquired epilepsies such as temporal lobe epilepsy. This has steered a perception that replacement of lost GABA-ergic interneurons would improve inhibitory synaptic neurotransmission in the epileptic brain region and thereby reduce the occurrence of seizures. Indeed, studies using animal prototypes have reported that grafting of GABA-ergic progenitors derived from multiple sources into epileptic regions can reduce seizures. This review deliberates recent advances, limitations and challenges concerning the development of GABA-ergic cell therapy for epilepsy. The efficacy and limitations of grafts of primary GABA-ergic progenitors from the embryonic lateral ganglionic eminence and medial ganglionic eminence (MGE), neural stem/progenitor cells expanded from MGE, and MGE-like progenitors generated from human pluripotent stem cells for alleviating seizures and co-morbidities of epilepsy are conferred. Additional studies required for possible clinical application of GABA-ergic cell therapy for epilepsy are also summarized. PMID:26748379

  12. Tolerance to allopregnanolone with focus on the GABA-A receptor.

    PubMed

    Turkmen, Sahruh; Backstrom, Torbjorn; Wahlstrom, Goran; Andreen, Lotta; Johansson, Inga-Maj

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have suggested a relationship between stress, sex steroids, and negative mental and mood changes in humans. The progesterone metabolite allopregnanolone is a potent endogenous ligand of the ?-amino butyric acid -A (GABA-A) receptor, and the most discussed neuroactive steroid. Variations in the levels of neuroactive steroids that influence the activity of the GABA-A receptor cause a vulnerability to mental and emotional pathology. There are physiological conditions in which allopregnanolone production increases acutely (e.g. stress) or chronically (e.g. menstrual cycle, pregnancy), thus exposing the GABA-A receptor to high and continuous allopregnanolone concentrations. In such conditions, tolerance to allopregnanolone may develop. We have shown that both acute and chronic tolerances can develop to the effects of allopregnanolone. Following the development of acute allopregnanolone tolerance, there is a decrease in the abundance of the GABA-A receptor ?4 subunit and the expression of the ?4 subunit mRNA in the ventral-posteriomedial nucleus of the thalamus. Little is known about the mechanism behind allopregnanolone tolerance and its effects on assembly of the GABA-A receptor composition. The exact mechanism of the allopregnanolone tolerance phenomena remains unclear. The purpose of this review is to summarize certain aspects of current knowledge concerning allopregnanolone tolerance and changes in the GABA-A receptors. PMID:20883478

  13. Synthesis and Proton NMR Spectroscopy of Intra-Vesicular Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA)*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Luke Y.-J.; Tong, Rong; Kohane, Daniel S.

    2014-01-01

    We report the synthesis of vesicles containing gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and their proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectra. These vesicles were constructed to more closely mimic the intracellular environment wherein GABA exists. For this study, these GABA-containing vesicles were examined under 1H NMR as a potential platform for future studies on the differences between aqueous phantoms, ex vivo brain extracts, and in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy results. We found that intra-vesicular GABA faithfully yielded the chemical shifts and J-coupling constants of free aqueous GABA, alongside the chemical shift signals of the vesicle wall. PMID:24109882

  14. A study on the involvement of GABA-transaminase in MCT induced pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lingeshwar, Poorella; Kaur, Gurpreet; Singh, Neetu; Singh, Seema; Mishra, Akanksha; Shukla, Shubha; Ramakrishna, Rachumallu; Laxman, Tulsankar Sachin; Bhatta, Rabi Sankar; Siddiqui, Hefazat H; Hanif, Kashif

    2016-02-01

    Increased sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity is associated with cardiovascular diseases but its role has not been completely explored in pulmonary hypertension (PH). Increased SNS activity is distinguished by elevated level of norepinephrine (NE) and activity of γ-Amino butyric acid Transminase (GABA-T) which degrades GABA, an inhibitory neurotransmitter within the central and peripheral nervous system. Therefore, we hypothesized that GABA-T may contribute in pathophysiology of PH by modulating level of GABA and NE. The effect of daily oral administration of GABA-T inhibitor, Vigabatrin (GVG, 50 and 75 mg/kg/day, 35 days) was studied following a single subcutaneous administration of monocrotaline (MCT, 60 mg/kg) in male SD rats. The pressure and hypertrophy of right ventricle (RV), oxidative stress, inflammation, pulmonary vascular remodelling were assessed after 35 days in MCT treated rats. The expression of GABA-T and HIF-1α was studied in lung tissue. The levels of plasma NE (by High performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrochemical detector; HPLC-ECD) and lung GABA (by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry) were also estimated. GVG at both doses significantly attenuated increased in pressure (35.82 ± 4.80 mm Hg, p < 0.001; 28.37 ± 3.32 mm Hg, p < 0.001 respectively) and hypertrophy of RV, pulmonary vascular remodelling, oxidative stress and inflammation in lungs of MCT exposed rats. GVG also reduced the expression of GABA-T and HIF-1α in MCT treated rats. Increased NE level and decreased GABA level was also reversed by GVG in MCT exposed rats. GABA-T plays an important role in PH by modulating SNS activity and may be considered as a therapeutic target in PH. PMID:26608704

  15. Electronic and structural features of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and four of its direct agonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipkowitz, Kenny B.; Gilardi, Richard D.; Aprison, M. H.

    1989-04-01

    To understand better how the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) functions at its postsynaptic receptor site, electronic and structural features of the natural inhibitor were compared with four direct GABA agonists: muscimol, trans-3-amino-1-cyclopentane carboxylic acid ( trans-3 ACPC), isoguvacine and 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo [5,4-c]-pyridin-3-ol (THIP). The structures of isoguvacine and THIP were determined by X-ray crystallography. The structures of GABA and muscimol were retrieved from the literature and that of trans-3 ACPC was computed with AM1. A relationship was found between published IC50 values obtained from ( 3H)-GABA binding data and the per cent polar surface area scaled by molecular ionization potential. The structural features of GABA and its agonists were compared and a hypothesis for GABA agonist activity based upon position of the ammonium ion with respect to the carboxylate is presented.

  16. Interrelation of resting state functional connectivity, striatal GABA levels, and cognitive control processes.

    PubMed

    Haag, Lauren; Quetscher, Clara; Dharmadhikari, Shalmali; Dydak, Ulrike; Schmidt-Wilcke, Tobias; Beste, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Important issues for cognitive control are response selection processes, known to depend on fronto-striatal networks with recent evidence suggesting that striatal gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) levels play an important role. Regional GABA concentrations have also been shown to modulate intrinsic connectivity, e.g. of the default mode network. However, the interrelation between striatal GABA levels, basal ganglia network (BGN) connectivity, and performance in cognitive control is elusive. In the current study, we measure striatal GABA levels using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and resting state parameters using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Resting state parameters include activity within the BGN, as determined by the low frequency power (LFP) within the network, and the functional connectivity between the BGN and somatomotor network (SMN). Specifically, we examine the interrelation between GABA, resting state parameters, and performance (i.e., accuracy) in conflict monitoring using a Simon task. Response control was affected by striatal GABA+ levels and activity within the BGN, especially when response selection was complicated by altered stimulus-response mappings. The data suggest that there are two mechanisms supporting response selection accuracy. One is related to resting state activity within the BGN and modulated by striatal GABA+ levels. The other is related to decreased cortico-striatal network connectivity, unrelated to the GABAergic system. The inclusion of all three factors (i.e., striatal GABA+ levels, activity within the BGN, and BGN-SMN network connectivity) explained a considerable amount of variance in task accuracy. Striatal neurobiochemical (GABA+) and parameters of the resting state BGN represent important modulators of response control. Hum Brain Mapp 36:4383-4393, 2015. 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26354091

  17. Decreased GABA receptor in the cerebral cortex of epileptic rats: effect of Bacopa monnieri and Bacoside-A

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstact Background Gamma amino butyric acid (GABA), the principal inhibitory neurotransmitter in the cerebral cortex, maintains the inhibitory tones that counter balances neuronal excitation. When this balance is perturbed, seizures may ensue. Methods In the present study, alterations of the general GABA, GABAA and GABAB receptors in the cerebral cortex of the epileptic rat and the therapeutic application of Bacopa monnieri were investigated. Results Scatchard analysis of [3H]GABA, [3H]bicuculline and [3H]baclofen in the cerebral cortex of the epileptic rat showed significant decrease in Bmax (P < 0.001) compared to control. Real Time PCR amplification of GABA receptor subunits such as GABAA?1, GABAA?, GABAA?, GABAB and GAD where down regulated (P < 0.001) in epileptic rats. GABAA?5 subunit and Cyclic AMP responsible element binding protein were up regulated. Confocal imaging study confirmed the decreased GABA receptors in epileptic rats. Epileptic rats have deficit in radial arm and Y maze performance. Conclusions Bacopa monnieri and Bacoside-A treatment reverses epilepsy associated changes to near control suggesting that decreased GABA receptors in the cerebral cortex have an important role in epileptic occurrence; Bacopa monnieri and Bacoside-A have therapeutic application in epilepsy management. PMID:22364254

  18. Antiepileptic activity of lobeline isolated from the leaf of Lobelia nicotianaefolia and its effect on brain GABA level in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tamboli, Abrar M; Rub, Rukhsana A; Ghosh, Pinaki; Bodhankar, SL

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the anticonvulsant activity of the lobeline isolated from the Lobelia nicotianaefolia in chemoconvulsant-induced seizures and its biochemical mechanism by investigating relationship between seizure activities and altered gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) in brain of mice in Pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) seizure models. Methods The anticonvulsant activity of the isolated lobeline (5, 10, 20 and 30 mg/kg, i.p.) was investigated in PTZ and strychnine induced seizures in mice and the effect of isolated lobeline on brain GABA level in seizures induced by PTZ. Diazepam was used as reference anticonvulsant drugs for comparison. Results Isolated lobeline (10, 20 and 30 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly delayed and antagonized (P < 0.050–0.001) the onset of PTZ-induced seizures. It also antagonized strychnine induced seizures. The mortality was also prevented in the test group of animals. In biochemical evaluation, isolated lobeline (5, 10 and 20 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly increased the brain GABA level. And at dose of 30 mg/kg GABA level showed slight decrease in PTZ model. Conclusions In our findings, isolated lobeline (20mg/kg) exhibited potent anticonvulsant activity against PTZ induced seizures. Also a biochemical evaluation suggested significant increase in barain GABA level at 20 mg/kg i.p. of isolated lobeline. Hence, we may propose that lobeline reduces epileptic seizures by enhancing the GABA release supporting the GABAergic mechanism. PMID:23569966

  19. Friedreich ataxia: failure of GABA-ergic and glycinergic synaptic transmission in the dentate nucleus.

    PubMed

    Koeppen, Arnulf H; Ramirez, R Liane; Becker, Alyssa B; Feustel, Paul J; Mazurkiewicz, Joseph E

    2015-02-01

    Atrophy of large neurons in the dentate nucleus (DN) is an important pathologic correlate of neurologic disability in patients with Friedreich ataxia (FA). Thinning of the DN was quantified in 29 autopsy cases of FA and 2 carriers by measuring the thickness of the gray matter ribbon on stains with anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of ?-amino-butyric acid (GABA). The DN was thinner than normal in all cases of FA, and atrophy correlated inversely with disease duration but not with age at onset or length of the homozygous guanine-adenine-adenine trinucleotide expansions. In 13 of the FA cases, frozen DN tissue was available for assay of frataxin. Dentate nucleus atrophy was more severe when frataxin was very low. Immunohistochemical staining for glutamic acid decarboxylase revealed grumose reaction and preservation of small GABA-ergic neurons in the DN of FA patients. Residual small DN neurons and varicose axons also contained the glycine transporter 2, identifying them as glycinergic. Immunohistochemistry also confirmed severe loss of GABA-A and glycine receptors in the DN with comparable depletion of the receptor-anchoring protein gephyrin. Thus, loss of gephyrin and failure to position GABA-A and glycine receptors correctly may reduce trophic support of large DN neurons and contribute to their atrophy. By contrast, Purkinje cells may escape retrograde atrophy in FA by issuing new axonal sprouts to small surviving DN neurons where they form reparative grumose clusters. PMID:25575136

  20. A functional role for both γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter-1 and GABA transporter-3 in the modulation of extracellular GABA and GABAergic tonic conductances in the rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Kersanté, Flavie; Rowley, Samuel C S; Pavlov, Ivan; Gutièrrez-Mecinas, María; Semyanov, Alexey; Reul, Johannes M H M; Walker, Matthew C; Linthorst, Astrid C E

    2013-01-01

    Tonic γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor-mediated signalling controls neuronal network excitability in the hippocampus. Although the extracellular concentration of GABA (e[GABA]) is critical in determining tonic conductances, knowledge on how e[GABA] is regulated by different GABA transporters (GATs) in vivo is limited. Therefore, we studied the role of GATs in the regulation of hippocampal e[GABA] using in vivo microdialysis in freely moving rats. Here we show that GAT-1, which is predominantly presynaptically located, is the major GABA transporter under baseline, quiescent conditions. Furthermore, a significant contribution of GAT-3 in regulating e[GABA] was revealed by administration of the GAT-3 inhibitor SNAP-5114 during simultaneous blockade of GAT-1 by NNC-711. Thus, the GABA transporting activity of GAT-3 (the expression of which is confined to astrocytes) is apparent under conditions in which GAT-1 is blocked. However, sustained neuronal activation by K+-induced depolarization caused a profound spillover of GABA into the extrasynaptic space and this increase in e[GABA] was significantly potentiated by sole blockade of GAT-3 (i.e. even when uptake of GAT-1 is intact). Furthermore, experiments using tetrodotoxin to block action potentials revealed that GAT-3 regulates extrasynaptic GABA levels from action potential-independent sources when GAT-1 is blocked. Importantly, changes in e[GABA] resulting from both GAT-1 and GAT-3 inhibition directly precipitate changes in tonic conductances in dentate granule cells as measured by whole-cell patch-clamp recording. Thus, astrocytic GAT-3 contributes to the regulation of e[GABA] in the hippocampus in vivo and may play an important role in controlling the excitability of hippocampal cells when network activity is increased. PMID:23381899

  1. A Fluorescence-Coupled Assay for Gamma Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) Reveals Metabolic Stress-Induced Modulation of GABA Content in Neuroendocrine Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ippolito, Joseph E.; Piwnica-Worms, David

    2014-01-01

    Pathways involved in the synthesis of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of high grade neuroendocrine (NE) neoplasms as well as neoplasms from a non-NE lineage. Using The Cancer Genome Atlas, overexpression of the GABA synthetic enzyme, glutamate decarboxylase 1 (GAD1), was found to be associated with decreased disease free-survival in prostate adenocarcinoma and decreased overall survival in clear cell renal cell carcinomas. Furthermore, GAD1 was found to be expressed in castrate-resistant prostate cancer cell lines, but not androgen-responsive cell lines. Using a novel fluorescence-coupled enzymatic microplate assay for GABA mediated through reduction of resazurin in a prostate neuroendocrine carcinoma (PNEC) cell line, acid microenvironment-induced stress increased GABA levels while alkaline microenvironment-induced stress decreased GABA through modulation of GAD1 and glutamine synthetase (GLUL) activities. Moreover, glutamine but not glucose deprivation decreased GABA through modulation of GLUL. Consistent with evidence in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms that GABA synthesis mediated through GAD1 may play a crucial role in surviving stress, GABA may be an important mediator of stress survival in neoplasms. These findings identify GABA synthesis and metabolism as a potentially important pathway for regulating cancer cell stress response as well as a potential target for therapeutic strategies. PMID:24551133

  2. A tonoplast Glu/Asp/GABA exchanger that affects tomato fruit amino acid composition.

    PubMed

    Snowden, Christopher J; Thomas, Benjamin; Baxter, Charles J; Smith, J Andrew C; Sweetlove, Lee J

    2015-03-01

    Vacuolar accumulation of acidic metabolites is an important aspect of tomato fruit flavour and nutritional quality. The amino acids Asp and Glu accumulate to high concentrations during ripening, while γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) shows an approximately stoichiometric decline. Given that GABA can be catabolised to form Glu and subsequently Asp, and the requirement for the fruit to maintain osmotic homeostasis during ripening, we hypothesised the existence of a tonoplast transporter that exports GABA from the vacuole in exchange for import of either Asp or Glu. We show here that the tomato vacuolar membrane possesses such a transport property: transport of Glu across isolated tonoplast vesicle membranes was trans-stimulated in counterexchange mode by GABA, Glu and Asp. We identified SlCAT9 as a candidate protein for this exchanger using quantitative proteomics of a tonoplast-enriched membrane fraction. Transient expression of a SlCAT9-YFP fusion in tobacco confirmed a tonoplast localisation. The function of the protein was examined by overexpression of SlCAT9 in transgenic tomato plants. Tonoplast vesicles isolated from transgenic plants showed higher rates of Glu and GABA transport than wild-type (WT) only when assayed in counterexchange mode with Glu, Asp, or GABA. Moreover, there were substantial increases in the content of all three cognate amino acids in ripe fruit from the transgenic plants. We conclude that SlCAT9 is a tonoplast Glu/Asp/GABA exchanger that strongly influences the accumulation of these amino acids during fruit development. PMID:25602029

  3. Contributions of GABA to alcohol responsivity during adolescence: Insights from preclinical and clinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Silveri, Marisa M.

    2015-01-01

    There is a considerable body of literature demonstrating that adolescence is a unique age period, which includes rapid and dramatic maturation of behavioral, cognitive, hormonal and neurobiological systems. Most notably, adolescence is also a period of unique responsiveness to alcohol effects, with both hyposensitivity and hypersensitivity observed to the various effects of alcohol. Multiple neurotransmitter systems are undergoing fine-tuning during this critical period of brain development, including those that contribute to the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse. The role of developmental maturation of the γ-amino-butyric acid (GABA) system, however, has received less attention in contributing to age-specific alcohol sensitivities. This review integrates GABA findings from human magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies as they may translate to understanding adolescent-specific responsiveness to alcohol effects. Better understanding of the vulnerability of the GABA system both during adolescent development, and in psychiatric conditions that include alcohol dependence, could point to a putative mechanism, boosting brain GABA, that may have increased effectiveness for treating alcohol abuse disorders. PMID:24631274

  4. V1 surface size predicts GABA concentration in medial occipital cortex.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Johanna; Pilatus, Ulrich; Genç, Erhan; Kohler, Axel; Singer, Wolf; Pearson, Joel

    2016-01-01

    A number of recent studies have established a link between behavior and the anatomy of the primary visual cortex (V1). However, one often-raised criticism has been that these studies provide little insight into the mechanisms of the observed relationships. As inhibitory neural interactions have been postulated as an important mechanism for those behaviors related to V1 anatomy, we measured the concentration of inhibitory gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) in the medial occipital cortex where V1 is located using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and estimated the surface area of V1 using fMRI retinotopic mapping. We found a significant positive relationship between GABA concentration and V1 surface area. This relationship was present irrespective of whether the MRS voxel had a fixed size across participants or was proportionally sized to each individual's V1 surface area. Hence, individuals with a larger V1 had a higher GABA concentration in the medial occipital cortex. By tying together V1 size and GABA concentration, our findings point towards individual differences in the level of neural inhibition that might partially mediate the relationships between behavior and V1 neuroanatomy. In addition, they illustrate how stable microscopic properties of neural activity and function are reflected in macro-measures of V1 structure. PMID:26416651

  5. Differential effects of GABA in modulating nociceptive vs. non-nociceptive synapses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Summers, T; Peterson, W; Miiller, E; Burrell, B D

    2015-07-01

    GABA (?-amino-butyric acid) -mediated signaling is normally associated with synaptic inhibition due to ionotropic GABA receptors that gate an inward Cl(-) current, hyperpolarizing the membrane potential. However, there are also situations where ionotropic GABA receptors trigger a Cl(-) efflux that results in depolarization. The well-characterized central nervous system of the medicinal leech was used to study the functional significance of opposing effects of GABA at the synaptic circuit level. Specifically, we focused on synapses made by the nociceptive N cell and the non-nociceptive P (pressure) cell that converge onto a common postsynaptic target. It is already known that GABA hyperpolarizes the P cell, but depolarizes the N cell and that inhibition of ionotropic GABA receptors by bicuculline (BIC) has opposing effects on the synapses made by these two inputs; enhancing P cell synaptic transmission, but depressing N cell synapses. The goal of the present study was to determine whether the opposing effects of GABA were due to differences in Cl(-) homeostasis between the two presynaptic neurons. VU 0240551 (VU), an inhibitor of the Cl(-) exporter K-Cl co-transporter isoform 2 (KCC2), attenuated GABA-mediated hyperpolarization of the non-nociceptive afferent while bumetanide (BUM), an inhibitor of the Cl(-) importer Na-K-Cl co-transporter isoform 1 (NKCC1), reduced GABA-mediated depolarization of the nociceptive neuron. VU treatment also enhanced P cell synaptic signaling, similar to the previously observed effects of BIC and consistent with the idea that GABA inhibits synaptic signaling at the presynaptic level. BUM treatment depressed N cell synapses, again similar to what is observed following BIC treatment and suggests that GABA has an excitatory effect on these synapses. The opposing effects of GABA could also be observed at the behavioral level with BIC and VU increasing responsiveness to non-nociceptive stimulation while BIC and BUM decreased responsiveness to nociceptive stimulation. These findings demonstrate that distinct synaptic inputs within a shared neural circuit can be differentially modulated by GABA in a functionally relevant manner. PMID:25931332

  6. Contents of Neo-flavored Tea (GABA Kintaro) Containing γ-Aminobutyric Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraki, Yoshiya

    The contents of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), catechins, theaflavins, caffeine and pheophorbide-a in neo-flavored tea (GABA Kintaro tea) were analyzed. 1)The amounts of GABA were increased over 1.5mg/g by means of infrared ray irradiation with agitation treatment. 2)There was a tendency for the amount of catechins to be decreased by this treatment, whereas the amount of theaflavins tended to increase with the same treatment. The composition of these contents in this GABA Kintaro tea was almost the same as that of black tea. 3)There was a tendency for the amount of caffeine to be decreased by this treatment. 4)There was a tendency for the amount of pheophorbide-a to be increased by this treatment. 5)The result of this study showed that the amounts of GABA and theaflavins in this GABA Kintaro tea were higher than ordinary green tea but contained few catechins.It became clear that the amount of pheophorbide-a in this GABA Kintaro tea was less than the standard value established in processed chlorella.

  7. Cloning of the. gamma. -aminobutyric acid (GABA). rho. sub 1 cDNA: A GABA receptor subunit highly expressed in the retina

    SciTech Connect

    Cutting, G.R.; Lu, Luo; Kasch, L.M.; Montrose-Rafizadeh, C.; Antonarakis, S.E.; Guggino, W.B.; Kazazian, H.H. Jr. ); O'Hara, B.F.; Donovan, D.M.; Shimada, Shoichi ); Uhl, G.R. Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD )

    1991-04-01

    Type A {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA{sub A}) receptors are a family of ligand-gated chloride channels that are the major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the nervous system. Molecular cloning has revealed diversity in the subunits that compose this heterooligomeric receptor, but each previously elucidated subunit displays amino acid similarity in conserved structural elements. The authors have used these highly conserved regions to identify additional members of this family by using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). One PCR product was used to isolate a full-length cDNA from a human retina cDNA library. The mature protein predicted from this cDNA sequence is 458 amino acids long and displays between 30 and 38% amino acid similarity to the previously identified GABA{sub A} subunits. This gene is expressed primarily in the retina but transcripts are also detected in the brain, lung, and thymus. Injection of Xenopus oocytes with RNA transcribed in vitro produces a GABA-responsive chloride conductance and expression of the cDNA in COS cells yields GABA-displaceable muscimol binding. These features are consistent with our identification of a GABA subunit, GABA {rho}{sub 1}, with prominent retinal expression that increases the diversity and tissue specificity of this ligand-gated ion-channel receptor family.

  8. Effects of traditionally used anxiolytic botanicals on enzymes of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) system.

    PubMed

    Awad, R; Levac, D; Cybulska, P; Merali, Z; Trudeau, V L; Arnason, J T

    2007-09-01

    In Canada, the use of botanical natural health products (NHPs) for anxiety disorders is on the rise, and a critical evaluation of their safety and efficacy is required. The purpose of this study was to determine whether commercially available botanicals directly affect the primary brain enzymes responsible for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) metabolism. Anxiolytic plants may interact with either glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) or GABA transaminase (GABA-T) and ultimately influence brain GABA levels and neurotransmission. Two in vitro rat brain homogenate assays were developed to determine the inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of aqueous and ethanolic plant extracts. Approximately 70% of all extracts that were tested showed little or no inhibitory effect (IC50 values greater than 1 mg/mL) and are therefore unlikely to affect GABA metabolism as tested. The aqueous extract of Melissa officinalis (lemon balm) exhibited the greatest inhibition of GABA-T activity (IC50 = 0.35 mg/mL). Extracts from Centella asiatica (gotu kola) and Valeriana officinalis (valerian) stimulated GAD activity by over 40% at a dose of 1 mg/mL. On the other hand, both Matricaria recutita (German chamomile) and Humulus lupulus (hops) showed significant inhibition of GAD activity (0.11-0.65 mg/mL). Several of these species may therefore warrant further pharmacological investigation. The relation between enzyme activity and possible in vivo mode of action is discussed. PMID:18066140

  9. Cloning of the mouse GABA-benzodiazepine receptor. alpha. 1 subunit in a study of alcohol neurosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Keir, W.J.; Deitrich, R.A.; Sikela, J.M. )

    1989-02-09

    The inhibitory action of gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) is mediated by its binding to the benzodiazepine (BDZ) receptor and opening of a chloride channel. This receptor contains a variety of binding sites for several behavorially active drugs. Recent studies with SS and LS mice which were selected for differential neurosensitivity to ethanol, suggest that the GABAergic system plays a role in this differential sensitivity. Thus genes controlling the GABAergic system may also influence the acute hypnotic actions of ethanol. As a fist step towards verifying this hypothesis we have cloned and partially sequenced the mouse GABA-BDZ {alpha}1 subunit cDNA using a 40 bp oligonucleotide derived from the N terminus of a published bovine {alpha} subunit cDNA. A positive clone from a mouse brain cDNA library was identified and contains an insert of approximately 2.5 Kb. Partial sequence analysis indicates that this clone corresponds to the mouse homolog of the {alpha}1 subunit of the GABA-BDZ receptor. This clone is being used as a probe to identify restriction fragment length polymorphisms in several mouse genotypes which differ in their neurosensitivity to ethanol in an attempt to identify molecular genetic changes in the GABA-BDZ receptor that are related to differential ethanol neurosensitivity.

  10. Neuronal gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptors undergo cognate ligand chaperoning in the endoplasmic reticulum by endogenous GABA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping; Eshaq, Randa S.; Meshul, Charles K.; Moore, Cynthia; Hood, Rebecca L.; Leidenheimer, Nancy J.

    2015-01-01

    GABAA receptors mediate fast inhibitory neurotransmission in the brain. Dysfunction of these receptors is associated with various psychiatric/neurological disorders and drugs targeting this receptor are widely used therapeutic agents. Both the efficacy and plasticity of GABAA receptor-mediated neurotransmission depends on the number of surface GABAA receptors. An understudied aspect of receptor cell surface expression is the post-translational regulation of receptor biogenesis within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We have previously shown that exogenous GABA can act as a ligand chaperone of recombinant GABAA receptors in the early secretory pathway leading us to now investigate whether endogenous GABA facilitates the biogenesis of GABAA receptors in primary cerebral cortical cultures. In immunofluorescence labeling experiments, we have determined that neurons expressing surface GABAA receptors contain both GABA and its degradative enzyme GABA transaminase (GABA-T). Treatment of neurons with GABA-T inhibitors, a treatment known to increase intracellular GABA levels, decreases the interaction of the receptor with the ER quality control protein calnexin, concomittantly increasing receptor forward-trafficking and plasma membrane insertion. The effect of GABA-T inhibition on the receptor/calnexin interaction is not due to the activation of surface GABAA or GABAB receptors. Consistent with our hypothesis that GABA acts as a cognate ligand chaperone in the ER, immunogold-labeling of rodent brain slices reveals the presence of GABA within the rough ER. The density of this labeling is similar to that present in mitochondria, the organelle in which GABA is degraded. Lastly, the effect of GABA-T inhibition on the receptor/calnexin interaction was prevented by pretreatment with a GABA transporter inhibitor. Together, these data indicate that endogenous GABA acts in the rough ER as a cognate ligand chaperone to facilitate the biogenesis of neuronal GABAA receptors. PMID:26041994

  11. ?-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) administration improves action selection processes: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Steenbergen, Laura; Sellaro, Roberta; Stock, Ann-Kathrin; Beste, Christian; Colzato, Lorenza S.

    2015-01-01

    In order to accomplish a task goal, real-life environments require us to develop different action control strategies in order to rapidly react to fast-moving visual and auditory stimuli. When engaging in complex scenarios, it is essential to prioritise and cascade different actions. Recent studies have pointed to an important role of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic system in the neuromodulation of action cascading. In this study we assessed the specific causal role of the GABA-ergic system in modulating the efficiency of action cascading by administering 800?mg of synthetic GABA or 800?mg oral of microcrystalline cellulose (placebo). In a double-blind, randomised, between-group design, 30 healthy adults performed a stop-change paradigm. Results showed that the administration of GABA, compared to placebo, increased action selection when an interruption (stop) and a change towards an alternative response were required simultaneously, and when such a change had to occur after the completion of the stop process. These findings, involving the systemic administration of synthetic GABA, provide the first evidence for a possible causal role of the GABA-ergic system in modulating performance in action cascading. PMID:26227783

  12. ?-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) administration improves action selection processes: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Steenbergen, Laura; Sellaro, Roberta; Stock, Ann-Kathrin; Beste, Christian; Colzato, Lorenza S

    2015-01-01

    In order to accomplish a task goal, real-life environments require us to develop different action control strategies in order to rapidly react to fast-moving visual and auditory stimuli. When engaging in complex scenarios, it is essential to prioritise and cascade different actions. Recent studies have pointed to an important role of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic system in the neuromodulation of action cascading. In this study we assessed the specific causal role of the GABA-ergic system in modulating the efficiency of action cascading by administering 800 mg of synthetic GABA or 800 mg oral of microcrystalline cellulose (placebo). In a double-blind, randomised, between-group design, 30 healthy adults performed a stop-change paradigm. Results showed that the administration of GABA, compared to placebo, increased action selection when an interruption (stop) and a change towards an alternative response were required simultaneously, and when such a change had to occur after the completion of the stop process. These findings, involving the systemic administration of synthetic GABA, provide the first evidence for a possible causal role of the GABA-ergic system in modulating performance in action cascading. PMID:26227783

  13. γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentration inversely correlates with basal perfusion in human occipital lobe

    PubMed Central

    Donahue, Manus J; Rane, Swati; Hussey, Erin; Mason, Emily; Pradhan, Subechhya; Waddell, Kevin W; Ally, Brandon A

    2014-01-01

    Commonly used neuroimaging approaches in humans exploit hemodynamic or metabolic indicators of brain function. However, fundamental gaps remain in our ability to relate such hemo-metabolic reactivity to neurotransmission, with recent reports providing paradoxical information regarding the relationship among basal perfusion, functional imaging contrast, and neurotransmission in awake humans. Here, sequential magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) measurements of the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA+macromolecules normalized by the complex N-acetyl aspartate-N-acetyl aspartyl glutamic acid: [GABA+]/[NAA–NAAG]), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements of perfusion, fractional gray-matter volume, and arterial arrival time (AAT) are recorded in human visual cortex from a controlled cohort of young adult male volunteers with neurocognitive battery-confirmed comparable cognitive capacity (3 T; n=16; age=23±3 years). Regression analyses reveal an inverse correlation between [GABA+]/[NAA–NAAG] and perfusion (R=−0.46; P=0.037), yet no relationship between AAT and [GABA+]/[NAA–NAAG] (R=−0.12; P=0.33). Perfusion measurements that do not control for AAT variations reveal reduced correlations between [GABA+]/[NAA–NAAG] and perfusion (R=−0.13; P=0.32). These findings largely reconcile contradictory reports between perfusion and inhibitory tone, and underscore the physiologic origins of the growing literature relating functional imaging signals, hemodynamics, and neurotransmission. PMID:24398941

  14. Optimization of culture condition for ACEI and GABA production by lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tung, Yi-Ting; Lee, Bao-Hong; Liu, Chin-Feng; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) are compounds which can influence hypertension. The goal of this study is to optimize the culture condition for GABA and ACEI production by?Lactobacillus plantarum?NTU 102 fermented skim milk. In this study, we used 3-factor-3-level Box-Behnken design combining with response surface methodology, where the 3 factors represent the concentration of skim milk, the concentration of monosodium glutamate, and culture temperature. Best conditions for GABA and ACEI production differed. The results indicated that?L. plantarum?NTU 102 produced the highest combined levels of GABA and ACEI at 37 C, in milk having 8% to 12% nonfat solids supplemented with 0.6% to 1% MSG. Agitation of the medium during fermentation had no effect on GABA or ACEI production but extended incubation (up to 6 d) increases levels of the bioactive compounds.?L. plantarum?NTU 102 fermented products may be a potential functional food source for regulating hypertension. PMID:22416709

  15. Hypocretin/orexin antagonism enhances sleep-related adenosine and GABA neurotransmission in rat basal forebrain.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-DeRose, Jacqueline; Schwartz, Michael D; Nguyen, Alexander T; Warrier, Deepti R; Gulati, Srishti; Mathew, Thomas K; Neylan, Thomas C; Kilduff, Thomas S

    2016-03-01

    Hypocretin/orexin (HCRT) neurons provide excitatory input to wake-promoting brain regions including the basal forebrain (BF). The dual HCRT receptor antagonist almorexant (ALM) decreases waking and increases sleep. We hypothesized that HCRT antagonists induce sleep, in part, through disfacilitation of BF neurons; consequently, ALM should have reduced efficacy in BF-lesioned (BFx) animals. To test this hypothesis, rats were given bilateral IgG-192-saporin injections, which predominantly targets cholinergic BF neurons. BFx and intact rats were then given oral ALM, the benzodiazepine agonist zolpidem (ZOL) or vehicle (VEH) at lights-out. ALM was less effective than ZOL at inducing sleep in BFx rats compared to controls. BF adenosine (ADO), γ-amino-butyric acid (GABA), and glutamate levels were then determined via microdialysis from intact, freely behaving rats following oral ALM, ZOL or VEH. ALM increased BF ADO and GABA levels during waking and mixed vigilance states, and preserved sleep-associated increases in GABA under low and high sleep pressure conditions. ALM infusion into the BF also enhanced cortical ADO release, demonstrating that HCRT input is critical for ADO signaling in the BF. In contrast, oral ZOL and BF-infused ZOL had no effect on ADO levels in either BF or cortex. ALM increased BF ADO (an endogenous sleep-promoting substance) and GABA (which is increased during normal sleep), and required an intact BF for maximal efficacy, whereas ZOL blocked sleep-associated BF GABA release, and required no functional contribution from the BF to induce sleep. ALM thus induces sleep by facilitating the neural mechanisms underlying the normal transition to sleep. PMID:25431268

  16. Conversion into GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) may reduce the capacity of L-glutamine as an insulin secretagogue.

    PubMed Central

    Fernndez-Pascual, Sergio; Mukala-Nsengu-Tshibangu, Andr; Martn Del Ro, Rafael; Tamarit-Rodrguez, Jorge

    2004-01-01

    We have carried out a detailed examination of L-glutamine metabolism in rat islets in order to elucidate the paradoxical failure of L-glutamine to stimulate insulin secretion. L-Glutamine was converted by isolated islets into GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid), L-aspartate and L-glutamate. Saturation of the intracellular concentrations of all of these amino acids occurred at approx. 10 mmol/l L-glutamine, and their half-maximal values were attained at progressively increasing concentrations of L-glutamine (0.3 mmol/l for GABA; 0.5 and 1.0 mmol/l for Asp and Glu respectively). GABA accumulation accounted for most of the 14CO2 produced at various L-[U-14C]glutamine concentrations. Potentiation by L-glutamine of L-leucine-induced insulin secretion in perifused islets was suppressed by malonic acid dimethyl ester, was accompanied by a significant decrease in islet GABA accumulation, and was not modified in the presence of GABA receptor antagonists [50 micromol/l saclofen or 10 micromol/l (+)-bicuculline]. L-Leucine activated islet glutamate dehydrogenase activity, but had no effect on either glutamate decarboxylase or GABA transaminase activity, in islet homogenates. We conclude that (i) L-glutamine is metabolized preferentially to GABA and L-aspartate, which accumulate in islets, thus preventing its complete oxidation in the Krebs cycle, which accounts for its failure to stimulate insulin secretion; (ii) potentiation by L-glutamine of L-leucine-induced insulin secretion involves increased metabolism of L-glutamate and GABA via the Krebs cycle (glutamate dehydrogenase activation) and the GABA shunt (2-oxoglutarate availability for GABA transaminase) respectively, and (iii) islet release of GABA does not seem to play an important role in the modulation of the islet secretory response to the combination of L-leucine and L-glutamine. PMID:14763900

  17. Oxo-4-methylpentanoic acid directs the metabolism of GABA into the Krebs cycle in rat pancreatic islets

    PubMed Central

    Hernndez-Fisac, Ins; Fernndez-Pascual, Sergio; Ortster, Henrik; Pizarro-Delgado, Javier; Martn Del Ro, Rafael; Bergsten, Peter; Tamarit-Rodriguez, Jorge

    2006-01-01

    OMP (oxo-4-methylpentanoic acid) stimulates by itself a biphasic secretion of insulin whereas L-leucine requires the presence of L-glutamine. L-Glutamine is predominantly converted into GABA (?-aminobutyric acid) in rat islets and L-leucine seems to promote its metabolism in the GABA shunt [Fernndez-Pascual, Mukala-Nsengu-Tshibangu, Martn del Ro and Tamarit-Rodrguez (2004) Biochem. J. 379, 721729]. In the present study, we have investigated how 10mM OMP affects L-glutamine metabolism to uncover possible differences with L-leucine that might help to elucidate whether they share a common mechanism of stimulation of insulin secretion. In contrast with L-leucine, OMP alone stimulated a biphasic insulin secretion in rat perifused islets and decreased the islet content of GABA without modifying its extracellular release irrespective of the concentration of L-glutamine in the medium. GABA was transaminated to L-leucine whose intracellular concentration did not change because it was efficiently transported out of the islet cells. The L-[U-14C]-Glutamine (at 0.5 and 10.0mM) conversion to 14CO2 was enhanced by 10mM OMP within 30% and 70% respectively. Gabaculine (250?M), a GABA transaminase inhibitor, suppressed OMP-induced oxygen consumption but not L-leucine- or glucose-stimulated respiration. It also suppressed the OMP-induced decrease in islet GABA content and the OMP-induced increase in insulin release. These results support the view that OMP promotes islet metabolism in the GABA shunt generating 2-oxo-glutarate, in the branched-chain ?-amino acid transaminase reaction, which would in turn trigger GABA deamination by GABA transaminase. OMP, but not L-leucine, suppressed islet semialdehyde succinic acid reductase activity and this might shift the metabolic flux of the GABA shunt from ?-hydroxybutyrate to succinic acid production. PMID:16819942

  18. Molecular docking based screening of GABA (A) receptor inhibitors from plant derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Sahila, Mohammed Marunnan; Babitha, Pallikkara Pulikkal; Bandaru, Srinivas; Nayarisseri, Anuraj; Doss, Victor Arokia

    2015-01-01

    The present antipsychotic drugs have known to show serious concerns like extra pyramidal side effects therefore, pursuit for novel antipsychotic GABAnergic drugs has lately focused on the folkloric medicine from plant derivatives as better treatment option of schizophrenia. The present study centers to identify potential inhibitors of plant origin for GABA receptor through in silico approaches. Three compound datasets were undertaken in the study. The first set consisted of seven compounds which included Magnolol, Honokiol and other plant derivatives. The second set consisted of 16 derivatives of N-diarylalkenyl-piperidinecarboxylic acid synthesized by Zheng et al., 2006. The third dataset had thirty two compounds which were Magnolol and Honokiol analogues synthesized by Fuchs et al., 2014. All the compounds were docked at the allosteric site of the GABA (A) receptor. The compounds were further tested for ADMET and biological activity. We observed Honokiol and its derivatives demonstrated superior druglike properties than any compound undertaken in the study. Further, compound 61 [2-(4-methoxyphenyl)-4-propylphenol] of dataset three - a synthetic derivative of honokiol had better profile than its parent compound. In a possible attempt to identify compound with even better efficacious compound than 61, virtual screening was performed, 135 compounds akin to compound 61 were retrieved. Interestingly none of the 135 compounds showed better druggable properties than compound 61. Our in silico pharmacological profiling of compounds is in coherence and is complemented by the findings of Fuchs et al, which also revealed compound 61 to be the good potentiator of GABA receptor. Abbreviations GABA (A) R - Gamma Amino Butyric Acid Receptor, subtype A, GPCR - G Protein Coupled Receptor, OPLS - Optimized Potentials for Liquid Simulations, PDB - Protein Data Bank, PLP - Piece wise Linear Potential, T.E.S.T - Toxicity Estimation Software Tool, TCM - Traditional Chinese Medicine. PMID:26229288

  19. Gas release-based prescreening combined with reversed-phase HPLC quantitation for efficient selection of high-γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-producing lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qinglong; Shah, Nagendra P

    2015-02-01

    High γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-producing lactobacilli are promising for the manufacture of GABA-rich foods and to synthesize GRAS (generally recognized as safe)-grade GABA. However, common chromatography-based screening is time-consuming and inefficient. In the present study, Korean kimchi was used as a model of lactic acid-based fermented foods, and a gas release-based prescreening of potential GABA producers was developed. The ability to produce GABA by potential GABA producers in de Man, Rogosa, and Sharpe medium supplemented with or without monosodium glutamate was further determined by HPLC. Based on the results, 9 isolates were regarded as high GABA producers, and were further genetically identified as Lactobacillus brevis based on the sequences of 16S rRNA gene. Gas release-based prescreening combined with reversed-phase HPLC confirmation was an efficient and cost-effective method to identify high-GABA-producing LAB, which could be good candidates for probiotics. The GABA that is naturally produced by these high-GABA-producing LAB could be used as a food additive. PMID:25497828

  20. Selective antagonism of the GABA(A) receptor by ciprofloxacin and biphenylacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Green, M A; Halliwell, R F

    1997-10-01

    1. Previous studies have shown that ciprofloxacin and biphenylacetic acid (BPAA) synergistically inhibit y-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptors. In the present study, we have investigated the actions of these two drugs on other neuronal ligand-gated ion channels. 2. Agonist-evoked depolarizations were recorded from rat vagus and optic nerves in vitro by use of an extracellular recording technique. 3. GABA (50 microM)-evoked responses, in the vagus nerve in vitro, were inhibited by bicuculline (0.3-10 microM) and picrotoxin (0.3-10 microM), with IC50 values and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of 1.2 microM (1.1-1.4) and 3.6 microM (3.0-4.3), respectively, and were potentiated by sodium pentobarbitone (30 microM) and diazepam (1 microM) to (mean+/-s.e.mean) 168+/-18% and 117+/-4% of control, respectively. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; 0.5 microM)-evoked responses were inhibited by MDL 72222 (1 microM) to 10+/-4% of control; DMPP (10 microM)-evoked responses were inhibited by hexamethonium (100 microM) to 12+/-5% of control, and alphabetaMeATP (30 microM)-evoked responses were inhibited by PPADS (10 microM) to 21+/-5% of control. Together, these data are consistent with activation of GABA(A), 5-HT3, nicotinic ACh and P2X receptors, respectively. 4 Ciprofloxacin (10-3000 microM) inhibited GABA(A)-mediated responses in the vagus nerve with an IC50 (and 95% CI) of 202 microM (148-275). BPAA (1-1000 microM) had little or no effect on the GABA(A)-mediated response but concentration-dependently potentiated the effects of ciprofloxacin by up to 33,000 times. 5. Responses mediated by 5-HT3, nicotinic ACh and P2X receptors in the vagus nerve and strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors in the optic nerve were little or unaffected by ciprofloxacin (100 microM), BPAA (100 microM) or the combination of these drugs (both at 100 microM). 6. GABA (1 mM)-evoked responses in the optic nerve were inhibited by bicuculline with an IC50 of 3.6 microM (2.8-4.5), a value not significantly different from that determined in the vagus nerve. Ciprofloxacin also inhibited the GABA-evoked response with an IC50 of 334 microM (256-437) and BPAA (100 microM) potentiated these antagonist effects. However, the magnitude of the synergy was 48 times less than that seen in the vagus nerve. 7. These data indicate that ciprofloxacin and BPAA are selective antagonists of GABA(A) receptors, an action that may contribute to their excitatory effects in vivo. Additionally, our data suggest that the molecular properties of GABA(A) receptors in different regions of the CNS influence the extent to which these drugs synergistically inhibit the GABA(A) receptor. PMID:9351519

  1. Calpain Cleavage of Brain Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase 65 Is Pathological and Impairs GABA Neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Buddhala, Chandana; Suarez, Marjorie; Modi, Jigar; Prentice, Howard; Ma, Zhiyuan; Tao, Rui; Wu, Jang Yen

    2012-01-01

    Previously, we have shown that the GABA synthesizing enzyme, L-glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65) is cleaved to form its truncated form (tGAD65) which is 23 times more active than the full length form (fGAD65). The enzyme responsible for cleavage was later identified as calpain. Calpain is known to cleave its substrates either under a transient physiological stimulus or upon a sustained pathological insult. However, the precise role of calpain cleavage of fGAD65 is poorly understood. In this communication, we examined the cleavage of fGAD65 under diverse pathological conditions including rats under ischemia/reperfusion insult as well as rat brain synaptosomes and primary neuronal cultures subjected to excessive stimulation with high concentration of KCl. We have shown that the formation of tGAD65 progressively increases with increasing stimulus concentration both in rat brain synaptosomes and primary rat embryo cultures. More importantly, direct cleavage of synaptic vesicle - associated fGAD65 by calpain was demonstrated and the resulting tGAD65 bearing the active site of the enzyme was detached from the synaptic vesicles. Vesicular GABA transport of the newly synthesized GABA was found to be reduced in calpain treated SVs. Furthermore, we also observed that the levels of tGAD65 in the focal cerebral ischemic rat brain tissue increased corresponding to the elevation of local glutamate as indicated by microdialysis. Moreover, the levels of tGAD65 was also proportional to the degree of cell death when the primary neuronal cultures were exposed to high KCl. Based on these observations, we conclude that calpain-mediated cleavage of fGAD65 is pathological, presumably due to decrease in the activity of synaptic vesicle - associated fGAD65 resulting in a decrease in the GABA synthesis - packaging coupling process leading to reduced GABA neurotransmission. PMID:22427928

  2. Oxidative stress mediated neuronal damage in the corpus striatum of 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned Parkinson's rats: neuroprotection by serotonin, GABA and bone marrow cells supplementation.

    PubMed

    Kuruvilla, Korah P; Nandhu, M S; Paul, Jes; Paulose, C S

    2013-08-15

    Oxidative stress-induced neuronal cell death has been implicated in Parkinson's disease (PD). Oxidative stress initiated by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) causes mitochondrial dysfunction leading to apoptosis and Parkinsonian neurodegeneration. We investigated the neuroprotective potential of serotonin (5-HT), gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) and autologous bone marrow cells (BMC) in combination against oxidative stress-induced cell death. PD was induced in adult male Wistar rats by intranigral infusion of 6-OHDA (8 μg/μl). The activities of antioxidant enzymes--superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were analysed. The extent of lipid peroxidation was quantified by measuring the formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARs). Real Time PCR gene expression of SOD, CAT and GPx were performed using specific Taqman probes. 6-OHDA induced decreased activity of SOD, CAT and GPx in corpus striatum was significantly reversed to near control (p<0.001) by treatment with 5-HT, GABA and bone marrow cells. Gene expression studies of SOD, CAT and GPx using Real Time PCR confirmed the above observation. TBAR levels were elevated (p<0.001) in 6-OHDA treated rats indicating lipid peroxidation. 5-HT and GABA along with autologous bone marrow cell supplementation significantly ameliorated 6-OHDA-induced lipid peroxidation (p<0.001). Our results suggest a new therapeutic strategy of neuroprotection against damage by oxidative stress in Parkinson's disease. PMID:23726276

  3. Detection of ?-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) by Longitudinal Scalar Order Difference Editing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, Robin A.; Rothman, Douglas L.

    2001-09-01

    Two novel spectral editing techniques for the in vivo detection of ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) are presented. The techniques rely on the generation of longitudinal scalar order (LSO) coherences, which in combination with J-difference editing results in the selective detection of GABA. The utilization of LSO coherences makes the editing sequences insensitive to phase and frequency instabilities. Furthermore, the spectral editing selectivity can be increased independent of the echo time, thereby opening the echo time for state-of-the-art water suppression and/or spatial localization techniques. The performance of the LSO editing techniques is theoretically demonstrated with product operator calculations and density matrix simulations and experimentally evaluated on phantoms in vitro and on human brain in vivo.

  4. Systematic Analysis of ?-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) Metabolism and Function in the Social Amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuantai; Janetopoulos, Chris

    2013-01-01

    While GABA has been suggested to regulate spore encapsulation in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, the metabolic profile and other potential functions of GABA during development remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the homeostasis of GABA metabolism by disrupting genes related to GABA metabolism and signaling. Extracellular levels of GABA are tightly regulated during early development, and GABA is generated by the glutamate decarboxylase, GadB, during growth and in early development. However, overexpression of the prespore-specific homologue, GadA, in the presence of GadB reduces production of extracellular GABA. Perturbation of extracellular GABA levels delays the process of aggregation. Cytosolic GABA is degraded by the GABA transaminase, GabT, in the mitochondria. Disruption of a putative vesicular GABA transporter (vGAT) homologue DdvGAT reduces secreted GABA. We identified the GABAB receptor-like family member GrlB as the major GABA receptor during early development, and either disruption or overexpression of GrlB delays aggregation. This delay is likely the result of an abolished pre-starvation response and late expression of several early developmental genes. Distinct genes are employed for GABA generation during sporulation. During sporulation, GadA alone is required for generating GABA and DdvGAT is likely responsible for GABA secretion. GrlE but not GrlB is the GABA receptor during late development. PMID:23548898

  5. Efficient production of gamma-aminobutyric acid using Escherichia coli by co-localization of glutamate synthase, glutamate decarboxylase, and GABA transporter.

    PubMed

    Dung Pham, Van; Somasundaram, Sivachandiran; Lee, Seung Hwan; Park, Si Jae; Hong, Soon Ho

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an important bio-product, which is used in pharmaceutical formulations, nutritional supplements, and biopolymer monomer. The traditional GABA process involves the decarboxylation of glutamate. However, the direct production of GABA from glucose is a more efficient process. To construct the recombinant strains of Escherichia coli, a novel synthetic scaffold was introduced. By carrying out the co-localization of glutamate synthase, glutamate decarboxylase, and GABA transporter, we redirected the TCA cycle flux to GABA pathway. The genetically engineered E. coli strain produced 1.08 g/L of GABA from 10 g/L of initial glucose. Thus, with the introduction of a synthetic scaffold, we increased GABA production by 2.2-fold. The final GABA concentration was increased by 21.8 % by inactivating competing pathways. PMID:26620318

  6. Levofloxacin, an optical isomer of ofloxacin, has attenuated epileptogenic activity in mice and inhibitory potency in GABA receptor binding.

    PubMed

    Akahane, K; Tsutomi, Y; Kimura, Y; Kitano, Y

    1994-01-01

    The combination of some new quinolone antibacterials with 4-biphenylacetic acid (BPAA) functionally inhibits the gamma-amino-butyric acid (GABA) receptors and thereby induces clonic convulsions. We examined the effects of ofloxacin and its optical isomers on this quinolone-induced neurotoxicity. Norfloxacin at 10(-5) M alone or at 10(-7) M in combination with BPAA (10(-4) M) inhibited [3H]muscimol binding to rat brain synaptic membranes. Ofloxacin and its optical isomers did not affect muscimol binding by themselves. While they slightly reduced muscimol binding at 10(-4) M in combination with BPAA, the inhibitory activity of the l-isomer levofloxacin (DR-3355) on muscimol binding was slightly, but significantly, weaker than that of the d-isomer DR-3354 and ofloxacin. Intracisternal injection of norfloxacin (5 micrograms), ofloxacin, levofloxacin or DR-3354 (50 micrograms each) induced clonic convulsions in mice. The incidence of these convulsions was enhanced by the combination with BPAA (50 micrograms). The epileptogenic activity of levofloxacin was also weaker than that of DR-3354 or ofloxacin when quinolones were given alone or in combination with BPAA. These results suggest that epileptogenic activity of quinolones is closely related to the inhibitory potency in GABA receptor binding and that levofloxacin may have lower neurotoxicity than ofloxacin and DR-3354. PMID:7842825

  7. Phosphonic acid analogs of GABA through reductive dealkylation of phosphonic diesters with lithium trialkylborohydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, Sarwat; Muni, Niraj J.; Greenwood, Nicholas P.; Pepperberg, Dr. David R.; Standaert, Robert F

    2007-01-01

    Lithium trialkylborohydrides were found to effect rapid monodealkylation of phosphonic diesters, and this reaction was applied to the synthesis of alkylphosphonic acid 2-aminoethyl esters [H2N(CH2)2OP(OH)R, 4], a little-explored class of analogs of the inhibitory neurotransmitter ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Compound 4a (R = Me) proved to be a potent antagonist at human ?1 GABAC receptors (expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes), with an IC50 of 11.1 M, but is inactive at ?1?2?2 GABAA receptors.

  8. Peripheral markers of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic system in Angelman's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Borgatti, Renato; Piccinelli, Paulo; Passoni, Davide; Romeo, Antonino; Viri, Maurizio; Musumeci, Sebastiano A; Elia, Maurizio; Cogliati, Tiziana; Valseriati, Daniela; Grasso, Rita; Raggi, Maria E; Ferrarese, Carlo

    2003-01-01

    It has recently been demonstrated that patients with Angelman's syndrome who exhibited a deletion on cytogenetic tests show more severe clinical pictures with drug-resistant epilepsy than patients with Angelman's syndrome not carrying the deletion. To verify if this difference in clinical severity can be attributed to genes for the three gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor subunits (GABRB3, GABRA5, GABRG3) located in the deleted region, a possible modification of peripheral markers of the GABAergic system was investigated in 12 subjects with Angelman's syndrome and 20 age-matched subjects (8 with idiopathic epilepsy and 12 not affected by neurologic diseases). The results confirmed a more severe clinical picture, and epilepsy syndrome in particular, in Angelman's syndrome patients with deletions versus patients without deletions. In contrast, biochemical study (based on dosage of plasma levels of GABA and diazepam binding inhibitor, an endogenous ligand of GABAA and peripheral benzodiazepine receptors, showed contradictory results: patients with Angelman's syndrome showed significantly higher levels of GABA and diazepam binding inhibitor than patients without neurologic impairment but significantly lower levels than epileptic controls. PMID:12661934

  9. Effects of NaCl Replacement with Gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) on the Quality Characteristics and Sensorial Properties of Model Meat Products

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Ji-Yeon; Cho, Hyung-Yong; Min, Sang-Gi

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of γ-aminobutylic acid (GABA) on the quality and sensorial properties of both the GABA/NaCl complex and model meat products. GABA/NaCl complex was prepared by spray-drying, and the surface dimensions, morphology, rheology, and saltiness were characterized. For model meat products, pork patties were prepared by replacing NaCl with GABA. For characteristics of the complex, increasing GABA concentration increased the surface dimensions of the complex. However, GABA did not affect the rheological properties of solutions containing the complex. The addition of 2% GABA exhibited significantly higher saltiness than the control (no GABA treatment). In the case of pork patties, sensory testing indicated that the addition of GABA decreased the saltiness intensity. Both the intensity of juiciness and tenderness of patties containing GABA also scored lower than the control, based on the NaCl reduction. These results were consistent with the quality characteristics (cooking loss and texture profile analysis). Nevertheless, overall acceptability of the pork patties showed that up to 1.5%, patties containing GABA did not significantly differ from the control. Consequently, the results indicated that GABA has a potential application in meat products, but also manifested a deterioration of quality by the NaCl reduction, which warrants further exploration. PMID:26761294

  10. Presence of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid (Gaba) in the Pedal Mucus of the Critically Endangered Species Patella ferruginea.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Ingraham, G A; Espinosa, F; Krock, B

    2015-05-01

    Patella ferruginea is a giant patellid limpet endemic to the Mediterranean Sea. It presently is in danger of extinction, and many have called for developing conservation measures including the mass production of spats for re-introduction projects. However, so far all attempts have been relatively unsuccessful. Previous work analyzing the effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on the recruitment of patellid limpets has shown that larvae respond to the presence of this signaling molecule. This response could explain the gregarious distribution typical of this species. In the present study, we demonstrated that GABA is naturally secreted by P. ferruginea in the pedal mucus. GABA is preferentially secreted during the summer, coinciding with the reproductive resting period of the species. Further research should aim to analyze the effects of GABA on larval development and metamorphosis in order to assess its potential use to improve conservation efforts. PMID:25902959

  11. Effect of GABA on oxidative stress in the skeletal muscles and plasma free amino acids in mice fed high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Xie, Z X; Xia, S F; Qiao, Y; Shi, Y H; Le, G W

    2015-06-01

    Increased levels of plasma free amino acids (pFAAs) can disturb the blood glucose levels in patients with obesity, diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome (MS) and are associated with enhanced protein oxidation. Oxidation of proteins, especially in the muscles, can promote protein degradation and elevate the levels of pFAAs. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), a food additive, can reduce high-fat diet (HFD)-induced hyperglycaemia; however, the mechanisms remain unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of GABA on protein oxidation and pFAAs changes. One hundred male C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into five groups that were fed with control diet, HFD and HFD supplied with 0.2%, 0.12% and 0.06% GABA in drinking water for 20 weeks respectively. HFD feeding led to muscular oxidative stress, protein oxidation, pFAA disorders, hyperglycaemia and augmented plasma GABA levels. Treatment with GABA restored normally fasting blood glucose level and dose-dependently inhibited body weight gains, muscular oxidation and protein degradation. While medium and low doses of GABA mitigated HFD-induced pFAA disorders, the high dose of GABA deteriorated the pFAA disorders. Medium dose of GABA increased the levels of GABA, but high dose of GABA reduced the levels of plasma GABA and increased the activity of succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase in the liver. Therefore, treatment with GABA mitigated HFD-induced hyperglycaemia probably by repairing HFD-induced muscular oxidative stress and pFAA disorders in mice. Our data also suggest that an optimal dose of GABA is crucial for the prevention of excess GABA-related decrease in the levels of pFAA and GABA as well as obesity. PMID:25266692

  12. Reproducibility and effect of tissue composition on cerebellar γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) MRS in an elderly population.

    PubMed

    Long, Zaiyang; Dyke, Jonathan P; Ma, Ruoyun; Huang, Chaorui C; Louis, Elan D; Dydak, Ulrike

    2015-10-01

    MRS provides a valuable tool for the non-invasive detection of brain γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in vivo. GABAergic dysfunction has been observed in the aging cerebellum. The study of cerebellar GABA changes is of considerable interest in understanding certain age-related motor disorders. However, little is known about the reproducibility of GABA MRS in an aged population. Therefore, this study aimed to explore the feasibility and reproducibility of GABA MRS in the aged cerebellum at 3.0 T and to examine the effect of differing tissue composition on GABA measurements. MRI and (1)H MRS examinations were performed on 10 healthy elderly volunteers (mean age, 75.2 ± 6.5 years) using a 3.0-T Siemens Tim Trio scanner. Among them, five subjects were scanned twice to assess the short-term reproducibility. The MEGA-PRESS (Mescher-Garwood point-resolved spectroscopy) J-editing sequence was used for GABA detection in two volumes of interest (VOIs) in the left and right cerebellar dentate. MRS data processing and quantification were performed with LCModel 6.3-0L using two separate basis sets, generated from density matrix simulations using published values for chemical shifts and J couplings. Raw metabolite levels from LCModel outputs were corrected for cerebrospinal fluid contamination and relaxation. GABA-edited spectra yielded robust and stable GABA measurements with averaged intra-individual coefficients of variation for corrected GABA+ between 4.0 ± 2.8% and 13.4 ± 6.3%, and inter-individual coefficients of variation between 12.6% and 24.2%. In addition, there was a significant correlation between GABA+ obtained with the two LCModel basis sets. Overall, our results demonstrated the feasibility and reproducibility of cerebellar GABA-edited MRS at 3.0 T in an elderly population. This information might be helpful for studies using this technique to study GABA changes in normal or diseased aging brain, e.g. for power calculations and the interpretation of longitudinal observations. PMID:26314380

  13. Stimulation of GABA-Induced Ca2+ Influx Enhances Maturation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Rushton, David J.; Mattis, Virginia B.; Svendsen, Clive N.; Allen, Nicholas D.; Kemp, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Optimal use of patient-derived, induced pluripotent stem cells for modeling neuronal diseases is crucially dependent upon the proper physiological maturation of derived neurons. As a strategy to develop defined differentiation protocols that optimize electrophysiological function, we investigated the role of Ca2+ channel regulation by astrocyte conditioned medium in neuronal maturation, using whole-cell patch clamp and Ca2+ imaging. Standard control medium supported basic differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons, as assayed by the ability to fire simple, single, induced action potentials. In contrast, treatment with astrocyte conditioned medium elicited complex and spontaneous neuronal activity, often with rhythmic and biphasic characteristics. Such augmented spontaneous activity correlated with astrocyte conditioned medium-evoked hyperpolarization and was dependent upon regulated function of L-, N- and R-type Ca2+ channels. The requirement for astrocyte conditioned medium could be substituted by simply supplementing control differentiation medium with high Ca2+ or ?-amino butyric acid (GABA). Importantly, even in the absence of GABA signalling, opening Ca2+ channels directly using Bay K8644 was able to hyperpolarise neurons and enhance excitability, producing fully functional neurons. These data provide mechanistic insight into how secreted astrocyte factors control differentiation and, importantly, suggest that pharmacological modulation of Ca2+ channel function leads to the development of a defined protocol for improved maturation of induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons. PMID:24278369

  14. Effects of Vigabatrin, an Irreversible GABA Transaminase Inhibitor, on Ethanol Reinforcement and Ethanol Discriminative Stimuli in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, William C.; Nguyen, Shaun A.; Deleon, Christopher P.; Middaugh, Lawrence D.

    2012-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the irreversible gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) transaminase inhibitor, ?-vinyl GABA (Vigabatrin; VGB) would reduce ethanol reinforcement and enhance the discriminative stimulus effect of ethanol, effectively reducing ethanol intake. The present studies used adult C57BL/6J (B6) mice in well-established operant, two-bottle choice consumption, locomotor activity and ethanol discrimination procedures, to examine comprehensively the effects of VGB on ethanol-supported behaviors. VGB dose-dependently reduced operant responding for ethanol as well as ethanol consumption for long periods of time. Importantly, a low dose (200 mg/kg) of VGB was selective for reducing ethanol responding without altering intake of food or water reinforcement. Higher VGB doses (>200 mg/kg) still reduced ethanol intake, but also significantly increased water consumption and, more modestly, increased food consumption. While not affecting locomotor activity on its own, VGB interacted with ethanol to reduce the stimulatory effects of ethanol on locomotion. Finally, VGB (200 mg/kg) significantly enhanced the discriminative stimulus effects of ethanol as evidenced by significant left-ward and up-ward shifts in ethanol generalization curves. Interestingly, VGB treatment was associated with slight increases in blood ethanol concentrations. The reduction in ethanol intake by VGB appears to be related to the ability of VGB to potentiate the pharmacological effects of ethanol. PMID:22336593

  15. Effects of the gamma-aminobutyrate transaminase inhibitors gabaculine and gamma-vinyl GABA on gamma-aminobutyric acid release from slices of rat cerebral cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Bedwani, J.R.; Mehta, A.

    1987-01-01

    The release of (/sup 3/H)gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) from pre-loaded slices of rat cerebral cortex was investigated in the presence and absence of the GABA-transaminase inhibitors gabaculine and gamma-vinyl GABA. In the experiments carried out without an inhibitor, an ion-exchange column chromatographic technique was used to separate (/sup 3/H)GABA from tritiated metabolites released with it into the superfusate. The presence of gabaculine (5 microM) substantially reduced the Ca2+-dependence of the release of (/sup 3/H)GABA evoked by a 4 min 30 mM K+ pulse, whereas this was not appreciably reduced by the presence of gamma-vinyl GABA (2 mM or 10 mM). Nevertheless, the characteristics of (/sup 3/H)GABA release were not identical in the presence and absence of either inhibitor.

  16. Exogenous ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) affects pollen tube growth via modulating putative Ca2+-permeable membrane channels and is coupled to negative regulation on glutamate decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Guang-Hui; Zou, Jie; Feng, Jing; Peng, Xiong-Bo; Wu, Ju-You; Wu, Ying-Liang; Palanivelu, Ravishankar; Sun, Meng-Xiang

    2014-01-01

    ?-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is implicated in pollen tube growth, but the molecular and cellular mechanisms that it mediates are largely unknown. Here, it is shown that exogenous GABA modulates putative Ca2+-permeable channels on the plasma membranes of tobacco pollen grains and pollen tubes. Whole-cell voltage-clamp experiments and non-invasive micromeasurement technology (NMT) revealed that the influx of Ca2+ increases in pollen tubes in response to exogenous GABA. It is also demonstrated that glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), the rate-limiting enzyme of GABA biosynthesis, is involved in feedback controls of Ca2+-permeable channels to fluctuate intracellular GABA levels and thus modulate pollen tube growth. The findings suggest that GAD activity linked with Ca2+-permeable channels relays an extracellular GABA signal and integrates multiple signal pathways to modulate tobacco pollen tube growth. Thus, the data explain how GABA mediates the communication between the style and the growing pollen tubes. PMID:24799560

  17. Parvalbumin and neuropeptide Y expressing hippocampal GABA-ergic inhibitory interneuron numbers decline in a model of Gulf War illness

    PubMed Central

    Megahed, Tarick; Hattiangady, Bharathi; Shuai, Bing; Shetty, Ashok K.

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is amongst the most conspicuous symptoms in Gulf War illness (GWI). Combined exposure to the nerve gas antidote pyridostigmine bromide (PB), pesticides and stress during the Persian Gulf War-1 (PGW-1) are presumed to be among the major causes of GWI. Indeed, our recent studies in rat models have shown that exposure to GWI-related (GWIR) chemicals and mild stress for 4 weeks engenders cognitive impairments accompanied with several detrimental changes in the hippocampus. In this study, we tested whether reduced numbers of hippocampal gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA)-ergic interneurons are among the pathological changes induced by GWIR-chemicals and stress. Animals were exposed to low doses of GWIR-chemicals and mild stress for 4 weeks. Three months after this exposure, subpopulations of GABA-ergic interneurons expressing the calcium binding protein parvalbumin (PV), the neuropeptide Y (NPY) and somatostatin (SS) in the hippocampus were stereologically quantified. Animals exposed to GWIR-chemicals and stress for 4 weeks displayed reduced numbers of PV-expressing GABA-ergic interneurons in the dentate gyrus and NPY-expressing interneurons in the CA1 and CA3 subfields. However, no changes in SS+ interneuron population were observed in the hippocampus. Furthermore, GABA-ergic interneuron deficiency in these animals was associated with greatly diminished hippocampus neurogenesis. Because PV+ and NPY+ interneurons play roles in maintaining normal cognitive function and neurogenesis, and controlling the activity of excitatory neurons in the hippocampus, reduced numbers of these interneurons may be one of the major causes of cognitive dysfunction and reduced neurogenesis observed in GWI. Hence, strategies that improve inhibitory neurotransmission in the hippocampus may prove beneficial for reversing cognitive dysfunction in GWI. PMID:25620912

  18. SYSTEMIC ADMINISTRATION OF KAINIC ACID INCREASES GABA LEVELS IN PERFUSATE FROM THE HIPPOCAMPUS OF RATS IN VIVO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ventral hippocampi of male, Fischer-344 rats were implanted with microdialysis probes and the effects of systemically administered kainic acid (KA) (8 mg/kg, s.c.) on the in vivo release of amino acids were measured for four hours after administration. n order to measure GABA...

  19. Determination of γ-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) in Rambutan Fruit cv. Rongrian by HPLC-ELSD and Separation of GABA from Rambutan Fruit Using Dowex 50W-X8 Column.

    PubMed

    Meeploy, Maneerat; Deewatthanawong, Rujira

    2016-03-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatography method coupled with an evaporative light scattering detector (ELSD) was validated for the determination of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in rambutan fruit without any sample pretreatment or derivatization. In the concentration range of 0.05-1.0 mg/mL GABA, the ELSD response was linear with a correlation coefficient (r) >0.999. Limit of detection and limit of quantitation were found to be 0.7 and 2.0 µg/mL, respectively. The method enabled the complete separation of GABA in the aqueous extract of rambutan flesh from the impurity peaks at 45.7 min. The recoveries of sample added GABA were obtained in the range of 92.0-99.3%. Intraday and interday relative standard deviations were <5.3%. Repeatability of the extraction process showed the acceptable precision. From the analysis of GABA content in rambutan flesh, 0.71 ± 0.23 mg of GABA was found in 1 g fresh weight. The recovery of GABA after passing through the Dowex 50W-X8 column was 96.65%. The analytical methodology could be potentially applied to the detection and quantification of GABA in other fruits and complex matrices when a sufficient quantity is available. PMID:26590236

  20. Activation of GABA-A receptors during postnatal brain development increases anxiety- and depression-related behaviors in a time- and dose-dependent manner in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Salari, Ali-Akbar; Bakhtiari, Amir; Homberg, Judith R

    2015-08-01

    Disturbances of the gamma-amino butyric acid-ergic (GABAergic) system during postnatal development can have long-lasting consequences for later life behavior, like the individual's response to stress. However, it is unclear which postnatal windows of sensitivity to GABA-ergic modulations are associated with what later-life behavioral outcomes. Therefore, we sought to determine whether neonatal activation of the GABA-A receptor during two postnatal periods, an early window (postnatal day 3-5) and a late window (postnatal day 14-16), can affect anxiety- and depression-related behaviors in male mice in later life. To this end, mice were treated with either saline or muscimol (50, 100, 200, 300 and 500?g/kg) during the early and late postnatal periods. An additional group of mice was treated with the GABA-A receptor antagonist bicuculline+muscimol. When grown to adulthood male mice were exposed to behavioral tests to measure anxiety- and depression-related behaviors. Baseline and stress-induced corticosterone (CORT) levels were also measured. The results indicate that early postnatal and to a lesser extent later postnatal exposure to the GABA-A receptor agonist muscimol increased anxiety-like behavior and stress-induced CORT levels in adults. Moreover, the early postnatal treatment with muscimol increased depression-like behavior with increasing baseline CORT levels. The anxiogenic and depression-like later-life consequences could be antagonized by bicuculline. Our findings suggest that GABA-A receptor signaling during early-life can influence anxiety- and depression-related behaviors in a time- and dose-dependent manner in later life. Our findings help to increase insight in the developmental mechanisms contributing to stress-related disorders. PMID:25983020

  1. Molecular and Therapeutic Potential and Toxicity of Valproic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Chateauvieux, Sbastien; Morceau, Franck; Dicato, Mario; Diederich, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA), a branched short-chain fatty acid, is widely used as an antiepileptic drug and a mood stabilizer. Antiepileptic properties have been attributed to inhibition of Gamma Amino Butyrate (GABA) transaminobutyrate and of ion channels. VPA was recently classified among the Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors, acting directly at the level of gene transcription by inhibiting histone deacetylation and making transcription sites more accessible. VPA is a widely used drug, particularly for children suffering from epilepsy. Due to the increasing number of clinical trials involving VPA, and interesting results obtained, this molecule will be implicated in an increasing number of therapies. However side effects of VPA are substantially described in the literature whereas they are poorly discussed in articles focusing on its therapeutic use. This paper aims to give an overview of the different clinical-trials involving VPA and its side effects encountered during treatment as well as its molecular properties. PMID:20798865

  2. GABA-BZD Receptor Modulating Mechanism of Panax quinquefolius against 72-h Sleep Deprivation Induced Anxiety like Behavior: Possible Roles of Oxidative Stress, Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Chanana, Priyanka; Kumar, Anil

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: Panax quinquefolius (American Ginseng) is known for its therapeutic potential against various neurological disorders, but its plausible mechanism of action still remains undeciphered. GABA (Gamma Amino Butyric Acid) plays an important role in sleep wake cycle homeostasis. Thus, there exists rationale in exploring the GABA-ergic potential of Panax quinquefolius as neuroprotective strategy in sleep deprivation induced secondary neurological problems. Objective: The present study was designed to explore the possible GABA-ergic mechanism in the neuro-protective effect of Panax quinquefolius against 72-h sleep deprivation induced anxiety like behavior, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, HPA-axis activation and neuroinflammation. Materials and Methods: Male laca mice were sleep deprived for 72-h by using Grid suspended over water method. Panax quinquefolius (American Ginseng 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg) was administered alone and in combination with GABA modulators (GABA Cl− channel inhibitor, GABA-benzodiazepine receptor inhibitor and GABAA agonist) for 8 days, starting 5 days prior to 72-h sleep deprivation period. Various behavioral (locomotor activity, mirror chamber test), biochemical (lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione, catalase, nitrite levels), mitochondrial complexes, neuroinflammation marker (Tumor Necrosis Factor, TNF-alpha), serum corticosterone, and histopathological sections of brains were assessed. Results: Seventy two hours sleep deprivation significantly impaired locomotor activity, caused anxiety-like behavior, conditions of oxidative stress, alterations in mitochondrial enzyme complex activities, raised serum corticosterone levels, brain TNFα levels and led to neuroinflammation like signs in discrete brain areas as compared to naive group. Panax quinquefolius (100 and 200 mg/kg) treatment restored the behavioral, biochemical, mitochondrial, molecular and histopathological alterations. Pre-treatment of GABA Cl− channel inhibitor as well as GABA-benzodiazepine receptor inhibitor, significantly reversed the protective effect of P. quinquefolius (100 mg/kg) in 72-h sleep deprived animals (P < 0.05). However, pretreatment with GABAA agonist, potentiated Panax quinquefolius's protective effect which was significant as compared to their effect per se (p < 0.05). Conclusion: GABA-ergic mechanism could be involved in the neuroprotective effect of P.quinquefolius against sleep deprivation induced anxiety-like behavior, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, HPA axis activation and neuroinflammation. PMID:27013946

  3. Promoters inducible by aromatic amino acids and ?-aminobutyrate (GABA) for metabolic engineering applications in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sujin; Lee, Kyusung; Bae, Sang-Jeong; Hahn, Ji-Sook

    2015-03-01

    A wide range of promoters with different strengths and regulatory mechanisms are valuable tools in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology. While there are many constitutive promoters available, the number of inducible promoters is still limited for pathway engineering in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we constructed aromatic amino-acid-inducible promoters based on the binding sites of Aro80 transcription factor, which is involved in the catabolism of aromatic amino acids through transcriptional activation of ARO9 and ARO10 genes in response to aromatic amino acids. A dynamic range of tryptophan-inducible promoter strengths can be obtained by modulating the number of Aro80 binding sites, plasmid copy numbers, and tryptophan concentrations. Using low and high copy number plasmid vectors and different tryptophan concentrations, a 29-fold range of fluorescence intensities of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter could be achieved from a synthetic U4C ARO9 promoter, which is composed of four repeats of Aro80 binding half site (CCG) and ARO9 core promoter element. The U4C ARO9 promoter was applied to express alsS and alsD genes from Bacillus subtilis for acetoin production in S. cerevisiae, resulting in a gradual increase in acetoin titers depending on tryptophan concentrations. Furthermore, we demonstrated that ?-aminobutyrate (GABA)-inducible UGA4 promoter, regulated by Uga3, can also be used in metabolic engineering as a dose-dependent inducible promoter. The wide range of controllable expression levels provided by these tryptophan- and GABA-inducible promoters might contribute to fine-tuning gene expression levels and timing for the optimization of pathways in metabolic engineering. PMID:25573467

  4. p-Coumaric acid activates the GABA-A receptor in vitro and is orally anxiolytic in vivo.

    PubMed

    Scheepens, Arjan; Bisson, Jean-Francois; Skinner, Margot

    2014-02-01

    The increasing prevalence and social burden of subclinical anxiety in the western world represents a significant psychosocial and financial cost. Consumers are favouring a more natural and nonpharmacological approach for alleviating the effects of everyday stress and anxiety. The gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor is the primary mediator of central inhibitory neurotransmission, and GABA-receptor agonists are well known to convey anxiolytic effects. Using an in vitro screening approach to identify naturally occurring phytochemical GABA agonists, we discovered the plant secondary metabolite p-coumaric acid to have significant GABAergic activity, an effect that could be blocked by co-administration of the specific GABA-receptor antagonist, picrotoxin. Oral administration of p-coumaric acid to rodents induced a significant anxiolytic effect in vivo as measured using the elevated plus paradigm, in line with the effects of oral diazepam. Given that p-coumaric acid is reasonably well absorbed following oral consumption in man and is relatively nontoxic, it may be suitable for the formulation of a safe and effective anxiolytic functional food. PMID:23533066

  5. Application of ?-aminobutyric acid demonstrates a protective role of polyamine and GABA metabolism in muskmelon seedlings under Ca(NO3)2 stress.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaohui; Xu, Zhiran; Xu, Weinan; Li, Jianming; Zhao, Ning; Zhou, Yue

    2015-07-01

    The effects of exogenous ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) application on growth, polyamine and endogenous GABA metabolism in muskmelon leaves and roots were measured. Plants were treated under control or 80 mM Ca(NO3)2 stress conditions with or without foliar spraying 50 mM GABA. Ca(NO3)2 stress significantly suppressed seedling growth and GABA transaminase activity, and enhanced glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) activity and endogenous GABA levels. Polyamine (PA) biosynthesis and degradation capacity increased in parallel with increasing GAD activity. Exogenous GABA application effectively alleviated the growth inhibition caused by Ca(NO3)2 stress, and significantly enhanced the activities of arginine decarboxylase (ADC), ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (SAMDC), polyamine oxidase (PAO), and diamine oxidase (DAO). Exogenous GABA also significantly reduced the accumulation of free putrescine (Put) and increased the levels of free spermidine (Spd) and spermine (Spm) in leaves, which improved the capacity for polyamine biosynthesis. Application of exogenous GABA under Ca(NO3)2 stress enables the plants to maintain a higher ratio of free Spd and free Spm with respect to free Put. Our data suggest that exogenous GABA has an important role in improving muskmelon seedling tolerance to Ca(NO3)2 stress by improving biosynthesis of PAs and GABA, and by preventing PA degradation. There is a potential positive feedback mechanism that results from higher endogenous GABA content and the combined effects of Ca(NO3)2 stress and exogenous GABA, which coordinately alleviate Ca(NO3)2 stress injury by enhancing PA biosynthesis and converting free Put to an insoluble bound PA form, and reduce PA degradation in muskmelon seedlings. PMID:25885476

  6. Intraocular injections of nipecotic acid produce a preferential block of neuronal /sup 3/H-GABA accumulation in adult rabbit retina

    SciTech Connect

    Madtes, P. Jr.; Redburn, D.A.

    1983-07-01

    A procedure by which the activity of the retinal GABA uptake system can be manipulated in vivo has been developed. Intraocular injections of nipecotic acid, a proported GABA uptake blocker, were administered to adult rabbits every 48 hours for a two-week period. No behavioral or systemic changes were observed. Injections were well-tolerated with less than 10% loss of the tissue caused by physical damage or injection. Biochemical analyses demonstrated a dose-dependent inhibition of /sup 14/C-GABA uptake into retinal tissue. No effect on uptake was observed for saline-treated tissue. Autoradiographic analyses showed that in vivo treatment with nipecotic acid preferentially blocked accumulation of /sup 3/H-GABA into the amacrine cell bodies and processes in the inner plexiform layer. This treatment may be especially useful in assessing the functional significance of GABA transport in vivo.

  7. Biphenylacetic acid enhances the antagonistic action of fluoroquinolones on the GABA(A)-mediated responses of the isolated guinea-pig ileum.

    PubMed

    Koutsoviti-Papadopoulou, M; Nikolaidis, E; Kounenis, G

    2001-09-01

    This paper examines the effect of biphenylacetic acid on the antagonistic action of norfloxacin and enoxacin on the GABA(A)-mediated responses of the isolated guinea-pig ileum. GABA produced transient contractions followed by relaxation. The contractile effect of exogenously applied GABA was concentration-dependent with EC(50)= 9.8 x 10(-6) M. This contractile effect was not significantly modified by biphenylacetic acid, and the EC(50) value for GABA in the presence of 10(-5) M biphenylacetic acid was 1.15 x 10(-5) M. The GABA contractile effect was inhibited, dose-dependently, by either norfloxacin or enoxacin, but only at concentrations higher than 10(-5) M. The response of the ileum to GABA (at EC(50)) was reduced to 35 and 36% by pretreatment with 10(-5) M norfloxacin or enoxacin, respectively. However, in the presence of 10(-5) M biphenylacetic acid, the response of the ileum to GABA was reduced to 2.2% by pretreatment with 10(-5) M enoxacin, while it was completely abolished by pretreatment with 10(-5) M norfloxacin and the IC(50) values were 5.5 x 10(-7) and 1.5 x 10(-6) M for norfloxacin and enoxacin, respectively. These data show that biphenylacetic acid whilst having no effect at the GABA(A)-mediated contractile response of the guinea-pig ileum, enhances the antagonistic effect of both enoxacin and norfloxacin. This suggests that combined administration of fluoroquinolones and biphenylacetic acid synergistically inhibits GABA(A)-receptors at the intestinal level. PMID:11529690

  8. Glutamate-modulated production of GABA in immortalized astrocytes transduced by a glutamic acid decarboxylase-expressing retrovirus.

    PubMed

    Sacchettoni, S A; Benchaibi, M; Sindou, M; Belin, M F; Jacquemont, B

    1998-01-01

    Replication-defective Moloney murine leukemia virus expressing the GAD67 gene under the control of the GFAP promoter was produced using selected clones of a fibroblast-packaging cell line. A spontaneously immortalized astrocyte cell line was infected with this virus and cellular clones expressing GAD67 selected. Astrocyte and fibroblast clones expressed functional GAD (detected by glutamic acid decarboxylation), but only fibroblasts were able to also produce GABA in the extracellular medium. When exposed to 200 microM glutamate, despite an observed difference in the rates of glutamate accumulation in control and GAD67-expressing astrocytes, similar proportions of glutamate taken up were detected. In GAD67-expressing astrocytes, the glutamate was mainly converted into GABA, suggesting GAD transgene activity to be dominant over other glutamate metabolic pathways, such as glutamine synthetase and glutamate dehydrogenase. Moreover, rapid GABA release into the cell medium was also observed, suggesting the involvement of reverse GABA transporters. The use of the GFAP promoter might be able to take advantage of its activation in response to factors inducing reactive gliosis observed in pathological insults. GAD67-expressing astrocytes might therefore be used for future grafting in pathological situations in which an excess of glutamate results in neuronal dysfunction or cell death. PMID:9436790

  9. A unique amino acid of the Drosophila GABA receptor with influence on drug sensitivity by two mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, H G; ffrench-Constant, R H; Jackson, M B

    1994-01-01

    1. The Drosophila gene Rdl (resistance to dieldrin) encodes a GABA receptor. An alanine-to-serine mutation in this gene at residue 302 confers resistance to cyclodiene insecticides and picrotoxin. Patch clamp analysis of GABA receptors in cultured neurons from wild type and mutant Drosophila was undertaken to investigate the biophysical basis of resistance. 2. In cultured neurons from both wild type and mutant strains, GABA activated a channel that reversed near 0 mV in symmetrical chloride. GABA dose-response characteristics of wild type and mutant receptors were very similar. 3. GABA responses in neurons from the mutant strains showed reduced sensitivity to the GABA antagonists picrotoxin, lindane and t-butyl-bicyclophosphorothionate. Resistance ratios were 116, 970 and 9 for the three blockers, respectively. Inhibition increased with blocker concentration in a manner consistent with saturation of a single binding site. 4. The mutation reduced the single channel conductance by 5% for inward current and 17% for outward current. The single channel current was approximately 60% lower for outward current than for inward current in both wild type and mutant. 5. Open and closed times were both well fitted by the sum of two exponentials. Resistance was associated with longer open times and shorter closed times, reflecting a net stabilization of the channel open state by a factor of approximately five. 6. The mutation was associated with a marked reduction in the rate of GABA-induced desensitization, and a net destabilization of the desensitized conformation by a factor of 29. 7. The Rdl mutation manifests resistance through two different mechanisms. (a) The mutation weakens drug binding to the antagonist-favoured (desensitized) conformation by a structural change at the drug binding site. (b) The mutation destabilizes the antagonist-favoured conformation in an allosteric sense. The global association of a single amino acid replacement with cyclodiene resistance suggests that the resistance phenotype depends on changes in both of these properties, and that insecticides have selected residue 302 of Rdl for replacement because of its unique ability to influence both of these functions. 8. The location of alanine 302 in the sequence of the Rdl gene product supports a mechanism of action in which convulsants such as picrotoxin bind within the channel lumen, where they induce a rapid conformational change to the desensitized state. PMID:7527461

  10. Reciprocal regulation of fatty acid release in the brain by GABA and glutamate.

    PubMed

    Birkle, D L

    1992-01-01

    Several model systems have been used to test the hypothesis that the release of FFA in the brain is regulated by depolarization of neurons. This FFA release is likely the result of the activation of phospholipase A2. The increased neuronal activity that occurs due to synchronous depolarization during seizures causes activation of phospholipase A2. Decreasing neuronal activity by administering the anxiolytic, diazepam, appears to decrease the activity of phospholipase A2. The GABA antagonist, bicuculline, which causes depolarization by negating the hyperpolarizing tone imposed on neurons by GABA, causes FFA release in synaptosomes and in neurons in tissue culture. Likewise, the glutamate agonist, kainic acid, which depolarizes neurons by opening sodium channels, increases the activity of phospholipase A2. PC-specific phospholipase C, another enzyme important in the generation of the second messenger, DG, is also activated by depolarization. Several important questions remain to be answered. The site of FFA release, in terms of the pre-vs. postsynaptic membrane, is not clear, although the experiments with synaptosomes support the hypothesis that activation of phospholipase A2 may be an important regulator of presynaptic events. This idea has also been suggested by studies on the phenomenon of long-term potentiation, where free 20:4 or its metabolites may be involved in presynaptic facilitation of neurotransmitter release (Freeman et al., 1990; Massicotte et al., 1990; Williams et al., 1989; also see Dorman, this volume). The activation of the PI cycle and subsequent stimulation of protein kinase C may be a postsynaptic event important in the integration of inputs at the dendrite and soma or a presynaptic event involved in the modulation of neurotransmitter release (Taniyama et al., 1990; El-Fakahany et al., 1990; also see Nishizuka, this volume). Therefore the stimulation of a PC-specific phospholipase C, which is capable of generating large amounts of DG over a prolonged period of time (Exton, 1990; Martinson et al., 1990; Diaz-Laviada et al., 1990), could occur at either site. Another important question is the role of FFA and DG in affecting cell-cell signaling events, particularly with regard to ion fluxes. Modulation of an acetylcholine-linked K+ channel in the heart by FFA and their oxygenation products has been reported (Kim and Clapham, 1989). The cardiac muscarinic receptor is linked to a hyperpolarizing K+ channel via a G protein.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:1353287

  11. Dual effects of slightly acidic electrolyzed water (SAEW) treatment on the accumulation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and rutin in germinated buckwheat.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jianxiong; Wu, Tongjiao; Li, Huiying; Wang, Wei; Liu, Haijie

    2016-06-15

    In the present study, the dual effects of slightly acidic electrolyzed water (SAEW) treatment on γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and rutin accumulation of germinated buckwheat were evaluated during germination. The results showed that SAEW treatment (pH 5.83, ACC of 20.3mg/L) could promote the accumulation of GABA and rutin in germinated buckwheat. The GABA and rutin contents of SAEW-germinated buckwheat reached 143.20 and 739.9mg/100g respectively, which is significantly higher than those of control (P<0.05). Moreover, SAEW treatment could increase the activity of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and phenylalanine ammonialyase (PAL) and thus result in the GABA and rutin accumulation of germinated buckwheat. The results suggested that SAEW treatment could promote the rutin accumulation of germinated buckwheat by influencing phenylpropanoid secondary metabolic pathway instead of the inhibition of rutin degrading enzyme (RDE) activity. In addition, SAEW treatment had no adverse impact on the sprouts growth and could reduce the microbial populations of germinated buckwheat during germination. PMID:26868552

  12. Genetics Home Reference: Succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePLUS

    ... that transmits signals in the brain (neurotransmitter) called gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA). The primary role of ... amount of GABA and a related molecule called gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) in the body, particularly the brain ...

  13. A Glutamic Acid-Producing Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Malaysian Fermented Foods

    PubMed Central

    Zareian, Mohsen; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Bakar, Fatimah Abu; Mohamed, Abdul Karim Sabo; Forghani, Bita; Ab-Kadir, Mohd Safuan B.; Saari, Nazamid

    2012-01-01

    l-glutamaic acid is the principal excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain and an important intermediate in metabolism. In the present study, lactic acid bacteria (218) were isolated from six different fermented foods as potent sources of glutamic acid producers. The presumptive bacteria were tested for their ability to synthesize glutamic acid. Out of the 35 strains showing this capability, strain MNZ was determined as the highest glutamic-acid producer. Identification tests including 16S rRNA gene sequencing and sugar assimilation ability identified the strain MNZ as Lactobacillus plantarum. The characteristics of this microorganism related to its glutamic acid-producing ability, growth rate, glucose consumption and pH profile were studied. Results revealed that glutamic acid was formed inside the cell and excreted into the extracellular medium. Glutamic acid production was found to be growth-associated and glucose significantly enhanced glutamic acid production (1.032 mmol/L) compared to other carbon sources. A concentration of 0.7% ammonium nitrate as a nitrogen source effectively enhanced glutamic acid production. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of glutamic acid production by lactic acid bacteria. The results of this study can be further applied for developing functional foods enriched in glutamic acid and subsequently ?-amino butyric acid (GABA) as a bioactive compound. PMID:22754309

  14. Presumed case of stiffhorse syndrome caused by decreased gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) production in an American Paint mare

    PubMed Central

    Purcell, Tawna Backman; Sellers, Ann Davidson; Goehring, Lutz S.

    2012-01-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) converts glutamic acid into the inhibitory neurotransmitter ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Increased serum GAD (auto) antibody concentrations were found in a mare with increased postural musculature tone resulting in stiffness and recumbence. The mare was treated with dexamethasone which resulted in resolution of clinical signs and decreased GAD antibody concentrations. PMID:22753968

  15. Detection of amino acid neurotransmitters by surface enhanced Raman scattering and hollow core photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Vidhu S.; Khetani, Altaf; Monfared, Ali Momenpour T.; Smith, Brett; Anis, Hanan; Trudeau, Vance L.

    2012-03-01

    The present work explores the feasibility of using surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for detecting the neurotransmitters such as glutamate (GLU) and gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA). These amino acid neurotransmitters that respectively mediate fast excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission in the brain, are important for neuroendocrine control, and upsets in their synthesis are also linked to epilepsy. Our SERS-based detection scheme enabled the detection of low amounts of GLU (10-7 M) and GABA (10-4 M). It may complement existing techniques for characterizing such kinds of neurotransmitters that include high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) or mass spectrography (MS). This is mainly because SERS has other advantages such as ease of sample preparation, molecular specificity and sensitivity, thus making it potentially applicable to characterization of experimental brain extracts or clinical diagnostic samples of cerebrospinal fluid and saliva. Using hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF) further enhanced the Raman signal relative to that in a standard cuvette providing sensitive detection of GLU and GABA in micro-litre volume of aqueous solutions.

  16. Arachidonic acid attenuates learning and memory dysfunction induced by repeated isoflurane anesthesia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunjiang; Wang, Qingwei; Li, Lanlan; Liu, Yun; Diao, Hongwei

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to explore the effects of arachidonic acid (ARA) on learning and memory dysfunction in rats exposed to repeated isoflurane anesthesia and the underlying mechanisms. Fifty rats were randomly divided into five groups: sham control group, isoflurane group, low dose ARA + isoflurane group, moderate dose ARA + isoflurane group, high dose ARA + isoflurane group. The Morris water maze test was performed to assess learning and memory function and the hippocampus tissues were obtained for biochemical analysis. The results showed that administration of ARA improved learning and memory deficit induced by repeated isofluane anesthesia in Morris water maze test and in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, ARA increased the activities of choline acetyl transferase (ChAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and the levels of acetycholine (Ach) and ?-amino-butyric acid (GABA), whereas decreased the activity of acetylcholine esterase (AchE), the content of glutamate (Glu) and malondialdehyde (MDA), and the radio of Glu/GABA. Meanwhile, ARA elevated the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax and inhibited the activity of caspase-3. In conclusion, ARA has potential therapeutic value in alleviating isoflurane-induced learning and memory impairment. The mechanism might be involved in regulating the cholinergic and Glu/GABA regulatory system, decreasing oxidative damage and inhibiting cell apoptosis. PMID:26550146

  17. On the existence of two GABA pools associated with newly synthesized GABA and with newly taken up GABA in nerve terminals

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, M.; Matsuda, M.

    1983-05-01

    (/sup 14/C)Glutamic acid and (/sup 3/H)GABA were injected into the lateral ventricle of mouse and then (/sup 14/C)GABA and (/sup 3/H)GABA in synaptosomes isolated from the animals were analysed. The (/sup 14/C)GABA was interpreted to be newly synthesized GABA from (/sup 14/C)glutamic acid while the (/sup 3/H)GABA to be newly taken up GABA. We have obtained the following results: (1) when the animals were pretreated with aminooxyacetic acid and thus the GABA content in synaptosomes increased to about 2 times of the control level, only the (/sup 3/H)GABA was enhanced to 3 times of the control level without any change of (/sup 14/C)GABA, (2) the release of (/sup 14/C)GABA from synaptosomes by high K+ depolarization was 1.5 times greater than that of (/sup 3/H)GABA, (3) the releases of both (/sup 14/C)GABA and (/sup 3/H)GABA were increased in the presence of cold GABA, L-2,4-diaminobutyric acid or gamma-amino-beta-hydroxybutyric acid, but only slightly increased in the presence of beta-alanine. These results would suggest that newly synthesized GABA and newly taken up GABA localized individually in different pools, which might localize either in different nerve terminals or separately in the same nerve terminal.

  18. Gestational changes of GABA levels and GABA binding in the human uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Erdoe, S.L.; Villanyi, P.; Laszlo, A.

    1989-01-01

    The concentrations of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the activities of L-glutamate decarboxylase and GABA-transaminase, and the nature of the sodium-independent binding of GABA were examined in uterine tissue pieces obtained surgically from pregnant and non-pregnant women. GABA concentrations were reduced, while the activity of GABA-transaminase and the specific binding of (/sup 3/H)GABA significantly increased in specimens from pregnant subjects. These findings suggest some gestation-related functional role for the GABA system in the human uterus.

  19. Stable isotope dilution HILIC-MS/MS method for accurate quantification of glutamic acid, glutamine, pyroglutamic acid, GABA and theanine in mouse brain tissues.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Koichi; Miyazaki, Yasuto; Unno, Keiko; Min, Jun Zhe; Todoroki, Kenichiro; Toyo'oka, Toshimasa

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we developed the stable isotope dilution hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (HILIC-MS/MS) technique for the accurate, reasonable and simultaneous quantification of glutamic acid (Glu), glutamine (Gln), pyroglutamic acid (pGlu), ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and theanine in mouse brain tissues. The quantification of these analytes was accomplished using stable isotope internal standards and the HILIC separating mode to fully correct the intramolecular cyclization during the electrospray ionization. It was shown that linear calibrations were available with high coefficients of correlation (r(2) ?>?0.999, range from 10 pmol/mL to 50?nmol/mL). For application of the theanine intake, the determination of Glu, Gln, pGlu, GABA and theanine in the hippocampus and central cortex tissues was performed based on our developed method. In the region of the hippocampus, the concentration levels of Glu and pGlu were significantly reduced during reality-based theanine intake. Conversely, the concentration level of GABA increased. This result showed that transited theanine has an effect on the metabolic balance of Glu analogs in the hippocampus. Copyright 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26033549

  20. Why Are Cortical GABA Neurons Relevant to Internal Focus in Depression? A cross-level model linking cellular, biochemical, and neural network findings

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Major Depression is a complex and severe psychiatric disorder whose symptomatology encompasses a critical shift in awareness, specifically in the balance from external to internal mental focus. This is reflected by unspecific somatic symptoms and the predominance of the own cognitions manifested in increased self-focus and rumination. We posit here that sufficient empirical data has accumulated to build a coherent biological model that links these psychological concepts and symptom dimensions to observed biochemical, cellular, regional and neural network deficits. Specifically, deficits in inhibitory gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) regulating excitatory cell input/output and local cell circuit processing of information in key brain regions may underlie the shift that is observed in depressed subjects in resting state activities between the perigenual anterior cingulate cortex (PACC) and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). This regional dysbalance translates at the network level in a dysbalance between default-mode and executive networks, which psychopathologically surfaces as a shift in focus from external to internal mental content and associated symptoms (See overview in Figure 1). We focus here on primary evidence at each of those levels and on putative mechanistic links between those levels. Apart from its implications for neuropsychiatric disorders, our model provides for the first time a set of hypotheses for cross-level mechanisms of how internal and external mental contents may be constituted and balanced in healthy subjects, and thus also contributes to the neuroscientific debate on the neural correlates of consciousness. PMID:25048001

  1. Role of a gamma-aminobutryic acid (GABA) receptor mutation in the evolution and spread of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera resistance to cyclodiene insecticides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An alanine to serine amino acid substitution within the Rdl subunit of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor confers resistance to cyclodiene insecticides in many species. The corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, is a damaging pest of cultivated corn that was partially controlled by ...

  2. The availability of surface GABA B receptors is independent of gamma-aminobutyric acid but controlled by glutamate in central neurons.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Karina J; Terunuma, Miho; Tello, Judith A; Pangalos, Menelas N; Moss, Stephen J; Couve, Andrés

    2008-09-01

    The efficacy of synaptic transmission depends on the availability of ionotropic and metabotropic neurotransmitter receptors at the plasma membrane, but the contribution of the endocytic and recycling pathways in the regulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid type B (GABA(B)) receptors remains controversial. To understand the mechanisms that regulate the abundance of GABA(B) receptors, we have studied their turnover combining surface biotin labeling and a microscopic immunoendocytosis assay in hippocampal and cortical neurons. We report that internalization of GABA(B) receptors is agonist-independent. We also demonstrate that receptors endocytose in the cell body and dendrites but not in axons. Additionally, we show that GABA(B) receptors endocytose as heterodimers via clathrin- and dynamin-1-dependent mechanisms and that they recycle to the plasma membrane after endocytosis. More importantly, we show that glutamate decreases the levels of cell surface receptors in a manner dependent on an intact proteasome pathway. These observations indicate that glutamate and not GABA controls the abundance of surface GABA(B) receptors in central neurons, consistent with their enrichment at glutamatergic synapses. PMID:18579521

  3. Enhancing Contents of γ-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) and Other Micronutrients in Dehulled Rice during Germination under Normoxic and Hypoxic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Ding, Junzhou; Yang, Tewu; Feng, Hao; Dong, Mengyi; Slavin, Margaret; Xiong, Shanbai; Zhao, Siming

    2016-02-10

    Biofortification of staple grains with high contents of essential micronutrients is an important strategy to overcome micronutrient malnutrition. However, few attempts have targeted at γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), a functional nutrient for aging populations. In this study, two rice cultivars, Heinuo and Xianhui 207, were used to investigate changes in GABA and other nutritional compounds of dehulled rice after germination under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Forty-one metabolites were identified in both cultivars treated by normoxic germination, whereas the germinated dehulled rice of Heinuo and Xianhui 207 under hypoxic treatment had 43 and 41 metabolites identified, respectively. GABA increased in dehulled rice after germination, especially under hypoxia. Meanwhile, a number of other health-beneficial and/or flavor-related compounds such as lysine and d-mannose increased after the hypoxic treatment. The accumulation of GABA exhibited genotype-specific modes in both normoxic and hypoxic treatments. With regard to GABA production, Xianhui 207 was more responsive to the germination process than Heinuo, whereas Heinuo was more responsive to hypoxia than Xianhui 207. This study provides a promising approach to biofortify dehulled rice with increased GABA and other nutrients through metabolomic-based regulation. PMID:26765954

  4. Psychological stress-reducing effect of chocolate enriched with gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in humans: assessment of stress using heart rate variability and salivary chromogranin A.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, H; Takishima, T; Kometani, T; Yokogoshi, H

    2009-01-01

    We studied the psychological stress-reducing effect of chocolate enriched with gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), on stress induced by an arithmetic task using changes of heart rate variability (HRV) and salivary chromogranin A (CgA). Subjects ingested 10 g chocolate enriched with 28 mg GABA (GABA chocolate); 15 min after the ingestion, subjects were assigned an arithmetic task for 15 min. After the task, an electrocardiogram was recorded and saliva samples were collected. HRV was determined from the electrocardiogram, and the activity of the autonomic nervous system was estimated through HRV. The CgA concentration of all saliva samples, an index for acute psychological stress, was measured. From HRV, those taking GABA chocolate made a quick recovery to the normal state from the stressful state. The CgA value after the task in those taking GABA chocolate did not increased in comparison with that before ingestion. From these results, GABA chocolate was considered to have a psychological stress-reducing effect. PMID:19462324

  5. Closing the loop on the GABA shunt in plants: are GABA metabolism and signaling entwined?

    PubMed Central

    Michaeli, Simon; Fromm, Hillel

    2015-01-01

    ?-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a non-proteinogenic amino acid that is found in uni- and multi-cellular organisms and is involved in many aspects of plant life cycle. GABA metabolism occurs by the action of evolutionary conserved enzymes that constitute the GABA shunt, bypassing two steps of the TCA cycle. The central position of GABA in the interface between plant carbon and nitrogen metabolism is well established. In parallel, there is evidence to support a role for GABA as a signaling molecule in plants. Here we cover some of the recent findings on GABA metabolism and signaling in plants and further suggest that the metabolic and signaling aspects of GABA may actually be inseparable. PMID:26106401

  6. Synthesis of 2-azaspiro[3.3]heptane-derived amino acids: ornitine and GABA analogues.

    PubMed

    Radchenko, Dmytro S; Grygorenko, Oleksandr O; Komarov, Igor V

    2010-07-01

    Synthesis of 6-amino-2-azaspiro[3.3]heptane-6-carboxylic acid and 2-azaspiro[3.3]heptane-6-carboxylic acid was performed. Both four-membered rings in the spirocyclic scaffold were constructed by subsequent ring closure of corresponding 1,3-bis-electrophiles at 1,1-C- or 1,1-N-bis-nucleophiles. The two novel amino acids were added to the family of the sterically constrained amino acids for the use in chemistry, biochemistry, and drug design. PMID:20108009

  7. Anthelmintic efficacy of genistein, the active principle of Flemingia vestita (Fabaceae): alterations in the free amino acid pool and ammonia levels in the fluke, Fasciolopsis buski.

    PubMed

    Kar, Pradip Kumar; Tandon, Veena; Saha, Nirmalendu

    2004-12-01

    The crude root-peel extract of Flemingia vestita, its active principle genistein and the reference flukicide oxyclozanide were tested against Fasciolopsis buski, the giant intestinal trematode. The amino acid composition of F. buski was demonstrated using HPLC and it was observed that the free amino acid (FAA) pool of the control worm consisted of aspartate, threonine, serine, glutamic acid, glutamine, proline, glycine, alanine, valine, methionine, isoleucine, leucine, tyrosine, lysine, histidine, arginine, phosphoserine, taurine, citrulline, ornithine, beta-alanine, and gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA). Of the amino acids detected valine was found to be the maximum in quantitative analysis. In qualitative analysis the FAA pool of the parasites under various treatments remained same as that of the control; however, quantitatively the level of various FAAs in the parasite was significantly affected. The treated parasites showed a marked decrease in the levels of arginine, ornithine, tyrosine, leucine, isoleucine, valine, alanine, glycine, proline, serine, threonine, and taurine following treatment with 20 mg/ml of crude peel extract, 0.5 mg/ml of genistein and 20 mg/ml of the reference drug, though an increase in the levels of glutamic acid, glutamine, phosphoserine, citrulline and GABA was noticeable. Enhanced levels of GABA and citrulline under the influence of genistein may be implicated in alterations of nitric oxide release and consequent neurological change (e.g. paralysis) in the parasite. Ammonia in the tissue homogenate as well as in the incubation medium showed a quantitative increase compared to the controls after treatment with the various test materials. The ammonia level increased by 40.7%, 66.4% and 18.16% in treatments with F. vestita, genistein and oxyclozanide, respectively, at the mentioned dosages. The changes in the levels of the amino acids and nitrogen components post treatment suggest that the amino acid metabolism in the parasite may have been altered under the influence of the test materials. PMID:15464437

  8. Autoradiographic analysis of 3H-glutamate, 3H-dopamine, and 3H-GABA accumulation in rabbit retina after kainic acid treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Hampton, C.K.; Redburn, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    We have previously reported that exposure of isolated rabbit retina to 10(-3) M kainic acid produces profound morphological changes in specific retinal neurons (Hampton et al, 1981). We noted specific swelling of horizontal cell bodies and neurites, necrosis of cell bodies in the amacrine and ganglion cell layers, and swelling of elements in the inner plexiform layer. We now report a differential sensitivity to kainic acid of specific subclasses of amacrine cells autoradiographically labeled with 3H-glutamate, 3H-GABA, or 3H-dopamine. Three different effects were observed: (1) Labeling of neurons after incubation in 3H-glutamate was uniformly reduced while labeling of glia was much less affected. (2) The accumulation of 3H-dopamine was also decreased by kainic acid in two of the three labeled bands of the inner plexiform layer. The outermost labeled band was insensitive to kainic acid at the highest concentration tested (10(-2) M). These findings provide a basis for the subclassification of dopaminergic amacrine cells into at least two subclasses based on their sensitivity to kainic acid. (3) Kainic acid caused a dramatic increase in the labeling of GABAergic amacrine cell bodies and their terminals. This increased intensity may reflect a compensatory increase in uptake activity in response to kainic acid-induced depletion of endogenous GABA stores. These results confirm the highly toxic nature of kainic acid and demonstrate a high degree of specificity and complexity in its action in the retina.

  9. GABA interaction with lipids in organic medium

    SciTech Connect

    Beltramo, D.; Kivatinitz, S.; Lassaga, E.; Arce, A.

    1987-08-10

    The interaction of TH-GABA and UC-glutamate with lipids in an aqueous organic partition system was studied. With this partition system TH-GABA and UC-glutamate were able to interact with sphingomyelin, sulfatide, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidic acid but not with cholesterol or ceramide. In an homogeneous aqueous medium the authors could not demonstrate any interaction between TH-GABA-lipids. The apparent dissociation constants (K/sub d/) for TH-GABA-lipids or UC-glutamate-lipids interactions inorganic medium were in the millimolar range and maximal charge between 3 and 7 moles of GABA or glutamate by mole of lipid. Amino acids such as glutamic acid, US -alanine and glycine displaced TH-GABA with the same potency as GABA itself; thus these results show that the interaction lacks pharmacological specificity. To detect this interaction lipid concentrations higher than 2 M were required and in the partition system TH-GABA and lipid phosphorus were both concentrated at the interface. Therefore, lipids tested with a biphasic partition system do not fulfill the classical criteria for a neurotransmitter receptor at least not for GABA and glutamate. 15 references, 1 figure, 3 tables.

  10. Combinations of intrathecal gamma-amino-butyrate receptor agonists and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists in rats with neuropathic spinal cord injury pain

    PubMed Central

    Hama, Aldric; Sagen, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    Underlying below-level cutaneous hypersensitivity observed following spinal cord injury (SCI) is a concurrent loss of inhibition with an increase in excitation in the spinal dorsal horn. Thus, a dual pharmacological approach, increasing spinal γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) inhibition and decreasing N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated excitation, could be more beneficial than either approach alone. The current study evaluated the antinociceptive effects of lumbar intrathecal (i.t.) administration of GABA receptor agonists and NMDA receptor antagonists alone and in combination in rats with neuropathic SCI pain. Rats developed markedly decreased hind paw withdrawal thresholds following an acute thoracic spinal cord compression, indicative of below-level hypersensitivity. Separately, i.t. GABAA receptor agonist muscimol and GABAB receptor agonist baclofen demonstrated dose-dependent antinociception, whereas i.t. NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine and the endogenous peptide [Ser1]histogranin, a putative NMDA receptor antagonist, demonstrated no efficacy. The combination of baclofen and ketamine resulted in a supra-additive (synergistic) antinociception whereas the combinations with muscimol were merely additive. Intrathecal pretreatment with the GABAB receptor antagonist CGP 35348 prevented the antinociceptive effect of the baclofen and ketamine combination. The data indicate that blocking spinal NMDA receptors alone is not sufficient to ameliorate SCI hypersensitivity, whereas a combined approach, simultaneous activation of spinal GABAB receptors and NMDA receptors blockade with ketamine, leads to significant antinociception. By engaging diverse pain modulating systems at the spinal level, combination drug treatment may be a useful approach in treating neuropathic SCI pain. PMID:22449374

  11. The Uptake of GABA in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Galvez Rojas, Robert L; Ahn, Il-Young; Surez Mantilla, Brian; Sant'Anna, Celso; Pral, Elizabeth Mieko Furusho; Silber, Ariel Mariano

    2015-01-01

    Gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) is widely known as a neurotransmitter and signal transduction molecule found in vertebrates, plants, and some protozoan organisms. However, the presence of GABA and its role in trypanosomatids is unknown. Here, we report the presence of intracellular GABA and the biochemical characterization of its uptake in Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas' disease. Kinetic parameters indicated that GABA is taken up by a single transport system in pathogenic and nonpathogenic forms. Temperature dependence assays showed a profile similar to glutamate transport, but the effect of extracellular cations Na(+) , K(+) , and H(+) on GABA uptake differed, suggesting a different uptake mechanism. In contrast to reports for other amino acid transporters in T. cruzi, GABA uptake was Na(+) dependent and increased with pH, with a maximum activity at pH 8.5. The sensitivity to oligomycin showed that GABA uptake is dependent on ATP synthesis. These data point to a secondary active Na(+) /GABA symporter energized by Na(+) -exporting ATPase. Finally, we show that GABA occurs in the parasite's cytoplasm under normal culture conditions, indicating that it is regularly taken up from the culture medium or synthesized through an still undescribed metabolic pathway. PMID:25851259

  12. Decreased levels of free D-aspartic acid in the forebrain of serine racemase (Srr) knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Horio, Mao; Ishima, Tamaki; Fujita, Yuko; Inoue, Ran; Mori, Hisashi; Hashimoto, Kenji

    2013-05-01

    d-Serine, an endogenous co-agonist of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor is synthesized from l-serine by serine racemase (SRR). A previous study of Srr knockout (Srr-KO) mice showed that levels of d-serine in forebrain regions, such as frontal cortex, hippocampus, and striatum, but not cerebellum, of mutant mice are significantly lower than those of wild-type (WT) mice, suggesting that SRR is responsible for d-serine production in the forebrain. In this study, we attempted to determine whether SRR affects the level of other amino acids in brain tissue. We found that tissue levels of d-aspartic acid in the forebrains (frontal cortex, hippocampus and striatum) of Srr-KO mice were significantly lower than in WT mice, whereas levels of d-aspartic acid in the cerebellum were not altered. Levels of d-alanine, l-alanine, l-aspartic acid, taurine, asparagine, arginine, threonine, ?-amino butyric acid (GABA) and methionine, remained the same in frontal cortex, hippocampus, striatum and cerebellum of WT and mutant mice. Furthermore, no differences in d-aspartate oxidase (DDO) activity were detected in the forebrains of WT and Srr-KO mice. These results suggest that SRR and/or d-serine may be involved in the production of d-aspartic acid in mouse forebrains, although further detailed studies will be necessary to confirm this finding. PMID:23439386

  13. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and neuropeptides in neural areas mediating motion-induced emesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Damelio, F.; Daunton, Nancy G.; Fox, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    Immunocytochemical methods were employed to localize the neurotransmitter amino acid gamma-aminobutyric acid and the neuropeptides substance P and Met-enkephalin in the area postrema (AP), area subpostrema (ASP), nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS), dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve (DMNV), and lateral vestibular nucleus (LVN). Glutamic acid decarboxylase immunoreactive (GAD-IR) terminals and fibers were observed in the AP and particularly in the ASP. A gradual decrease in the density of terminals was seen towards the solitary complex. The DMNV revealed irregularly scattered GAD-IR terminals within the neuropil or closely surrounding neuronal cell bodies. The LVN, particularly the dorsal division, showed numerous axon terminals which were mostly localize around large neurons and their proximal dendrites. Substance P immunoreactive (SP-IR) terminals and fibers showed high density in the solitary complex, in particular within the lateral division. The ASP showed medium to low density of SP-IR fibers and terminals. The AP exhibited a small number of fibers and terminals irregularly distributed. The DMNV revealed a high density of SP-IR terminals and fibers that were mainly concentrated in the periphery. Very few terminals were detected in the LVN. Met-enkephalin immunoreactive (Met-Enk-IR) fibers and terminals showed high density and uniform distribution in the DMNV. Scattered terminals and fibers were observed in the AP, ASP, and NTS (particularly the lateral division). The very few fibers were observed in the LVN surrounded the neuronal cell bodies. The present report is part of a study designed to investigate the interaction between neuropeptides and conventional neurotransmitters under conditions producing motion sickness and in the process of sensory-motor adaptation.

  14. Structure-activity relationships in a new series of insecticidally active dioxatricycloalkenes derived by structural comparison of the GABA (. gamma. -aminobutyric acid) antagonists bicycloorthocarboxylates and endosulfan

    SciTech Connect

    Ozoe, Yoshihisa; Sawada, Yoshihiro; Mochida, Kazuo; Nakamura, Toshiie ); Matsumura, Fumio )

    1990-05-01

    To study structural requirements for picrotoxinin-type GABA ({gamma}-aminobutyric acid) antagonists to interact with the receptor site, 5-substituted 4,6-dioxatricyclo(7.2.1.0{sup 2,8})dodec-10-enes and related compounds were prepared and examined for their insecticidal activity and potency in displacing ({sup 35}S)tert-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (TBPS) binding. Compounds with high insecticidal activity possessed a phenyl group with an electron-withdrawing para substituent, a cycloalkyl group, or a C{sub 3}-C{sub 5} straight-chain alkyl group at the 5-position. The effect of the 5-substituents on insecticidal activity was very similar to that of the 1-substituents of the bicyloorthocarboxylate GABA antagonists. Representative dioxatricycloalkenes displaced the binding of the GABA antagonist ({sup 35}S)TBPS to housefly head membranes by 29-53% at 10 {mu}M. X-ray crystal structure analysis demonstrated that this class of compounds had structures superimposable on those of 4-tert-butylbicycloorthocarboxylates. These findings indicate that the dioxatricycloalkenes and some other analogues occupy the picrotoxinin binding site in such a way that the fourth interacting subsite of the receptor site accommodates the 5-substituent.

  15. Probing Structural Features and Binding Mode of 3-Arylpyrimidin-2,4-diones within Housefly γ-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qinfan; Zhang, Lihui; Ma, Zhi; Kong, Xiangya; Wang, Fangfang; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Yonghua

    2011-01-01

    In order to obtain structural features of 3-arylpyrimidin-2,4-diones emerged as promising inhibitors of insect γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor, a set of ligand-/receptor-based 3D-QSAR models for 60 derivatives are generated using Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA) and Comparative Molecular Similarity Index Analysis (CoMSIA). The statistically optimal CoMSIA model is produced with highest q2 of 0.62, r2ncv of 0.97, and r2pred of 0.95. A minor/bulky electronegative hydrophilic polar substituent at the 1-/6-postion of the uracil ring, and bulky substituents at the 3′-, 4′- and 5′-positions of the benzene ring are beneficial for the enhanced potency of the inhibitors as revealed by the obtained 3D-contour maps. Furthermore, homology modeling, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and molecular docking are also carried out to gain a better understanding of the probable binding modes of these inhibitors, and the results show that residues Ala-183(C), Thr-187(B), Thr-187(D) and Thr-187(E) in the second transmembrane domains of GABA receptor are responsible for the H-bonding interactions with the inhibitor. The good correlation between docking observations and 3D-QSAR analyses further proves the model reasonability in probing the structural features and the binding mode of 3-arylpyrimidin-2,4-dione derivatives within the housefly GABA receptor. PMID:22016659

  16. GABA[subscript A] Receptor Downregulation in Brains of Subjects with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fatemi, S. Hossein; Reutiman, Teri J.; Folsom, Timothy D.; Thuras, Paul D.

    2009-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABA[subscript A]) receptors are ligand-gated ion channels responsible for mediation of fast inhibitory action of GABA in the brain. Preliminary reports have demonstrated altered expression of GABA receptors in the brains of subjects with autism suggesting GABA/glutamate system dysregulation. We investigated the

  17. Muscimol as an ionotropic GABA receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Graham A R

    2014-10-01

    Muscimol, a psychoactive isoxazole from Amanita muscaria and related mushrooms, has proved to be a remarkably selective agonist at ionotropic receptors for the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA. This historic overview highlights the discovery and development of muscimol and related compounds as a GABA agonist by Danish and Australian neurochemists. Muscimol is widely used as a ligand to probe GABA receptors and was the lead compound in the development of a range of GABAergic agents including nipecotic acid, tiagabine, 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo(5,4-c)pyridin-3-ol, (Gaboxadol(®)) and 4-PIOL. PMID:24473816

  18. Recent advances in GABA research.

    PubMed

    Kardos, J

    1999-05-01

    In this article I throw attention on to this GABA issue by outlining several aspects of current interest in the field of GABA research. The theme was selected in association with the Pharmacology and Therapeutical Potential of the GABA System symposium of the Second European Congress of Pharmacology held in July 1999 in Budapest, Hungary. A wide range of topics relating to the GABA system were outlined, including new members of the GABAA receptor gene family, subunit composition of native GABA(A) receptors, surface expression and clustering of GABA(A) receptor subunits, allosteric modulation of GABA(A) receptors, localization of agonist binding sites, GABA release, GABA(A)-GABA(B) receptor crosstalk, GABA(A) and GABA(B) receptor functions in different brain areas, altered transport and GABA(A) receptor pattern in different models of epilepsy. PMID:10397362

  19. Functional milk beverage fortified with phenolic compounds extracted from olive vegetation water, and fermented with functional lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Servili, M; Rizzello, C G; Taticchi, A; Esposto, S; Urbani, S; Mazzacane, F; Di Maio, I; Selvaggini, R; Gobbetti, M; Di Cagno, R

    2011-05-14

    Functional milk beverages (FMB100 and FMB200) fortified with phenolic compounds (100 and 200mg/l) extracted from olive vegetable water, and fermented with ?-amino butyric acid (GABA)-producing (Lactobacillus plantarum C48) and autochthonous human gastro-intestinal (Lactobacillus paracasei 15N) lactic acid bacteria were manufactured. A milk beverage (MB), without addition of phenolic compounds, was used as the control. Except for a longer latency phase of FMB200, the three beverages showed an almost similar kinetic of acidification, consumption of lactose and synthesis of lactic acid. Apart from the beverage, Lb. plantarum C48 showed a decrease of ca. Log 2.52-2.24 cfu/ml during storage. The cell density of functional Lb. paracasei 15N remained always above the value of Log 8.0 cfu/ml. During fermentation, the total concentration of free amino acids markedly increased without significant (P > 0.05) differences between beverages. The concentration of GABA increased during fermentation and further storage (63.0 0.6-67.0 2.1mg/l) without significant (P > 0.05) differences between beverages. After fermentation, FMB100 and FMB200 showed the same phenolic composition of the phenol extract from olive vegetable water but a different ratio between 3,4-DHPEA and 3,4-DHPEA-EDA. During storage, the concentrations of 3,4-DHPEA-EDA, p-HPEA and verbascoside of both FMB100 and FMB200 decreased. Only the concentration of 3,4-DHPEA increased. As shown by SPME-GC-MS analysis, diactetyl, acetoin and, especially, acetaldehyde were the main volatile compounds found. The concentration of phenolic compounds does not interfere with the volatile composition. Sensory analyses based on triangle and paired comparison tests showed that phenolic compounds at the concentrations of 100 or 200mg/l were suitable for addition to functional milk beverages. PMID:21458095

  20. Measurement of release of endogenous GABA and catabolites of (/sup 3/H)GABA from synaptosomal preparations using ion-exchange chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Grove, J.; Gardner, C.R.; Richards, M.H.

    1982-05-01

    Picomole quantities of endogenous GABA in acidified superfusates of synaptosomal preparations have been measured using micro-bore ion-exchange chromatography and post-column formation of the fluorescent iso-indole derivative. Using this technique superfusates have been analyzed directly, without further manipulations, to investigate the release of endogenous GABA. Spontaneous release of GABA was 2-5 pmol/200 microliters superfusate increasing to 20 pmol/200 microliters with potassium stimulation. When gamma-vinyl GABA (RMI 71754), an inhibitor of GABA-T was injected into rats (750 mg/kg) and synaptosomes prepared the potassium-evoked release of GABA was increased 3-fold compared to controls. Chromatographic separations and measurement of release of endogenous and radiolabeled GABA allowed the real specific activity of released GABA to be calculated. Only when 500 microM amino-oxyacetic acid was added during isolation of synaptosomes was the specific activity of released GABA the same as the initial specific activity.

  1. Changes in striatal electroencephalography and neurochemistry induced by kainic acid seizures are modified by dopamine receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Bourne, J A; Fosbraey, P; Halliday, J

    2001-02-16

    We investigated the involvement of striatal dopamine release in electrographic and motor seizure activity evoked by kainic acid in the guinea pig. The involvement of the dopamine receptor subtypes was studied by systemic administration of the dopamine D(1) receptor antagonist, R(+)-7-chloro-8-hydroxy-3-methyl-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine hydrochloride (SCH 23390; 0.5 mg kg(-1)), or the dopamine D(2) antagonist, (5-aminosulphonyl)-N-[(1-ethyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)-methyl]-2-methoxybenzamide (sulpiride, 30 mg kg(-1)). Microdialysis and high performance liquid chromatography were used to monitor changes in extracellular levels of striatal dopamine and its metabolites, glutamate, aspartate and gamma-amino-butyric acid (GABA). These data were correlated with changes in the striatal and cortical electroencephalographs and clinical signs. We found that, although neither dopamine receptor antagonist inhibited behavioural seizure activity, blockade of the dopamine D(1)-like receptor with SCH 23390 significantly reduced both the 'power' of the electrical seizure activity and the associated change in extracellular striatal concentration of glutamate, whilst increasing the extracellular striatal concentration of GABA. In contrast, blockade of the dopamine D(2)-like receptor with sulpiride significantly increased the extracellular, striatal content of glutamate and the dopamine metabolites. These results confirm previous evidence in other models of chemically-evoked seizures that antagonism of the dopamine D(1) receptor tends to reduce motor and electrographic seizure activity as well as excitatory amino-acid transmitter activity, while antagonism of the dopamine D(2) receptor has relatively less apparent effect. PMID:11226392

  2. GABA uptake inhibitors. Design, molecular pharmacology and therapeutic aspects.

    PubMed

    Krogsgaard-Larsen, P; Frølund, B; Frydenvang, K

    2000-08-01

    In the mid seventies a drug design programme using the Amanita muscaria constituent muscimol (7) as a lead structure, led to the design of guvacine (23) and (R)-nipecotic acid (24) as specific GABA uptake inhibitors and the isomeric compounds isoguvacine (10) and isonipecotic acid (11) as specific GABAA receptor agonists. The availability of these compounds made it possible to study the pharmacology of the GABA uptake systems and the GABAA receptors separately. Based on extensive cellular and molecular pharmacological studies using 23, 24, and a number of mono- and bicyclic analogues, it has been demonstrated that neuronal and glial GABA transport mechanisms have dissimilar substrate specificities. With GABA transport mechanisms as pharmacological targets, strategies for pharmacological interventions with the purpose of stimulating GABA neurotransmission seem to be (1) effective blockade of neuronal as well as glial GABA uptake in order to enhance the inhibitory effects of synaptically released GABA, or (2) selective blockade of glial GABA uptake in order to increase the amount of GABA taken up into, and subsequently released from, nerve terminals. The bicyclic compound (R)-N-Me-exo-THPO (17) has recently been reported as the most selective glial GABA uptake inhibitor so far known and may be a useful tool for further elucidation of the pharmacology of GABA transporters. In recent years, a variety of lipophilic analogues of the amino acids 23 and 24 have been developed, and one of these compounds, tiagabine (49) containing (R)-nipecotic acid (24) as the GABA transport carrier-recognizing structure element, is now marketed as an antiepileptic agent. PMID:10903390

  3. [Autoantibodies to glutamate and GABA in opiate addiction].

    PubMed

    Vetrile, L A; Fomina, V G; Nevidimova, T I; Vetlugina, T P; Batukhtina, E I; Savochkina, D N; Zakharova, I A; Davydova, T V

    2015-01-01

    Blood serum from 129 patients with opium addiction at different stages of the disease and 63 donors (control group) was examined for the presence of autoantibodies to the exciting and inhibitory amino acids glutamate and GABA. It was shown enhanced production of autoantibodies to glutamate and GABA. Dependence of the level and frequency of detec- tion of autoantibodies to glutamate and GABA on the stage of the disease was revealed. PMID:26852594

  4. Effects of prenatal exposure to 2,4-D/2,4,5-T mixture on postnatal changes in rat brain glutamate, GABA protein, and nucleic acid levels

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammad, F.K.; Omer, V.E.V.

    1988-02-01

    The opportunity of maternal exposure to various chemicals in the work place and the general environments have increased, and the fetus and neonate may be at greater risk than the adult. However, the embryotoxic and teratogenic effects of the chlorinated phenoxy herbicides 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T), the main chemicals in Agent Orange, are well documented only in laboratory animals. The brain of the developing fetus is vulnerable to the toxic effects of the phenoxy herbicides which readily cross the placental barrier and distribute into fetal tissues, including brain. Although the neurochemical basis for the behavioral teratogenicity of the phenoxy herbicides is not know, it was recently reported that non-teratogenic doses of a 1:1 mixture of 2,4-D and 2,4,5-T delayed the ontogeny of dopamine and serotonin in the brain of the developing rate. This communication provides further descriptive information about the ontogeny of rat brain nucleic acid, protein, glutamate and ..gamma..-aminobutyrate (GABA) following in utero exposure to non-teratogenic levels of a 1:1 mixture of 2,4-D/2,4,5-T.

  5. Quantitative autoradiographic characterization of GA-BA sub B receptors in mammalian central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, D.Chin-Mei.

    1989-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of the amino acid neurotransmitter {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA) within the nervous system appear to be mediated through two distinct classes of receptors: GABA{sub A} and GABA{sub B} receptors. A quantitative autoradiographic method with {sup 3}H-GABA was developed to examine the hypotheses that GABA{sub A} and GABA{sub B} sites have distinct anatomical distributions, pharmacologic properties, and synaptic localizations within the rodent nervous system. The method was also applied to a comparative study of these receptors in postmortem human brain from individuals afflicted with Alzheimer's disease and those without neurologic disease. The results indicated that GABA{sub B} receptors occur in fewer numbers and have a lower affinity for GABA than GABA{sub A} receptors in both rodent and human brain. Within rodent brain, the distribution of these two receptor populations were clearly distinct. GABA{sub B} receptors were enriched in the medial habenula, interpeduncular nucleus, cerebellar molecular layer and olfactory glomerular layer. After selective lesions of postsynaptic neurons of the corticostriatal and perforant pathway, both GABA{sub B} and GABA{sub A} receptors were significantly decreased in number. Lesions of the presynaptic limbs of the perforant but not the corticostriatal pathway resulted in upregulation of both GABA receptors in the area of innervation. GABA{sub B} receptors were also upregulated in CA3 dendritic regions after destruction of dentate granule neurons.

  6. Lens GABA receptors are a target of GABA-related agonists that mitigate experimental myopia.

    PubMed

    Frederikse, Peter H; Kasinathan, Chinnaswamy

    2015-06-01

    Coordinated growth of eye tissues is required to achieve visual acuity. However, visual experience also guides this process. Experimental myopia can be produced by altering light entering the eye, but also by changing light/dark regimens. Drug discovery studies demonstrated that ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-related agonists (e.g., baclofen) will mitigate experimental myopia, and are also drugs studied for their capacity to affect neurodevelopmental disorders that include Fragile X Syndrome and related autism spectrum disorders. GABA receptors thought to mediate these responses in the eye have been studied in the neural retina as well as the cornea and sclera which are both innervated tissues. In addition to neurons, lenses express GAD25/65/67 GABA metabolic enzymes and at least 13 GABA receptor subunits with developmental expression profiles that match neural development. Evidence that lens GABA receptors are expressed in a cell environment comparable to neurons is seen in the lens expression of AMPA and NMDA glutamate receptors together with an unexpectedly comprehensive array of associated signaling proteins that include post-synaptic-density 95 (PSD95), calcium calmodulin kinase II? (CaMKII?), Fragile X Syndrome mental retardation protein (FMRP), ephrin receptors, Ca(V)1.2, 1.3 channels, cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5), and neuronal C-src among others. Moreover, lens cells share fundamental molecular regulatory mechanisms that integrate the regulation and function of these genes at the DNA, RNA, and protein levels in neurons. GABA has trophic, growth promoting effects early in neuron development and later assumes its classic inhibitory role in the adult neural system. We hypothesize that the extensive parallels between GABA and glutamate receptor biology in lens and brain identifies the lens as a site of GABA agonist drug action affecting experimental myopia, acting through lens GABA receptors to similarly affect growth in both elongated cell types. PMID:25841296

  7. Isolation, characterization, and purification to homogeneity of a rat brain protein (GABA-modulin).

    PubMed Central

    Guidotti, A; Konkel, D R; Ebstein, B; Corda, M G; Wise, B C; Krutzsch, H; Meek, J L; Costa, E

    1982-01-01

    gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA)-modulin is a brain neuropeptide that appears to modulate specific high-affinity (20 nM) GABA recognition sites in brain. When added to crude synaptic membranes this peptide inhibits binding of [3H]GABA to the high-affinity site and prevents facilitation of [3H]diazepam binding elicited by GABA. GABA-modulin has been purified to homogeneity by ammonium sulfate precipitation, gel chromatography, and reverse-phase HPLC. Homogeneity was confirmed by a variety of means, including chromatography under four different HPLC conditions, two different polyacrylamide gel electrophoreses, and end group analysis. Purified GABA-modulin contains approximately 126 amino acids and has a molecular weight of 16,500. The GABA-modulin molecule contains an abundance of hydrophilic basic residues, and neither cysteine nor GABA is present. End group analyses of GABA-modulin showed that histidine is the free COOH terminus and the NH2 terminus is blocked. GABA-modulin specifically blocked both [3H]GABA binding to synaptic membranes (IC50, 0.5 microM) and GABA-stimulated [3H]diazepam binding; the binding of [3H]GABA to low-affinity sites was not affected. Images PMID:6964401

  8. Selected biomarkers as predictive tools in testing efficacy of melatonin and coenzyme Q on propionic acid - induced neurotoxicity in rodent model of autism

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Exposures to environmental toxins are now thought to contribute to the development of autism spectrum disorder. Propionic acid (PA) found as a metabolic product of gut bacteria has been reported to mimic/mediate the neurotoxic effects of autism. Results from animal studies may guide investigations on human populations toward identifying environmental contaminants that produce or drugs that protect from neurotoxicity. Forty-eight young male Western Albino rats were used in the present study. They were grouped into six equal groups 8 rats each. The first group received a neurotoxic dose of buffered PA (250 mg/Kg body weight/day for 3 consecutive days). The second group received only phosphate buffered saline (control group). The third and fourth groups were intoxicated with PA as described above followed by treatment with either coenzyme Q (4.5 mg/kg body weight) or melatonin (10 mg/kg body weight) for one week (therapeutically treated groups). The fifth and sixth groups were administered both compounds for one week prior to PA (protected groups). Heat shock protein70 (Hsp70), Gamma amino-butyric acid (GABA), serotonin, dopamine, oxytocin and interferon γ-inducible protein 16 together with Comet DNA assay were measured in brain tissues of the six studied groups. Results The obtained data showed that PA caused multiple signs of brain toxicity revealed in depletion of GABA, serotonin, and dopamine, are which important neurotransmitters that reflect brain function, interferon γ-inducible protein 16 and oxytocin. A high significant increase in tail length, tail DNA% damage and tail moment was reported indicating the genotoxic effect of PA. Administration of melatonin or coenzyme Q showed both protective and therapeutic effects on PA–treated rats demonstrated in a remarkable amelioration of most of the measured parameters. Conclusion In conclusion, melatonin and coenzyme Q have potential protective and restorative effects against PA-induced brain injury, confirmed by improvement in biochemical markers and DNA double strand breaks. PMID:24568717

  9. Distribution of 3H-GABA uptake sites in the nematode Ascaris

    SciTech Connect

    Guastella, J.; Stretton, A.O. )

    1991-05-22

    The distribution of uptake sites for the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the nematode Ascaris suum was examined by autoradiography of 3H-GABA uptake. Single neural processes in both the ventral and dorsal nerve cords were labeled with 3H-GABA. Serial section analysis identified the cells of origin of these processes as the RMEV-like and RMED-like neurons. These cells belong to a set of four neurons in the nerve ring, all of which are labeled by 3H-GABA. 3H-GABA labeling of at least two other sets of cephalic neurons was seen. One of these pairs consists of medium-sized lateral ganglia neurons, located at the level of the amphid commissure bundle. A second pair is located in the lateral ganglia at the level of the deirid commissure bundle. The position and size of these lateral ganglia cells suggest that they are the GABA-immunoreactive lateral ganglia cells frequently seen in whole-mount immunocytochemical preparations. Four neuronal cell bodies located in the retrovesicular ganglion were also labeled with 3H-GABA. These cells, which are probably cholinergic excitatory motor neurons, do not contain detectable GABA-like immunoreactivity. Heavy labeling of muscle cells was also observed. The ventral and dorsal nerve cord inhibitory motor neurons, which are known to contain GABA-like immunoreactivity, were not labeled above background with 3H-GABA. Together with the experiments reported previously, these results define three classes of GABA-associated neurons in Ascaris: (1) neurons that contain endogenous GABA and possess a GABA uptake system; (2) neurons that contain endogenous GABA, but that either lack a GABA uptake system or possess a GABA uptake system of low activity; (3) neurons that possess a GABA uptake system, but that lack endogenous GABA.

  10. Cloning and expression of a rat brain GABA transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Guastella, J.; Czyzyk, L.; Davidson, N.; Lester, H.A. ); Nelson, N.; Nelson, H.; Miedel, M.C. ); Keynan, S.; Kanner, B.I. )

    1990-09-14

    A complementary DNA clone (designated GAT-1) encoding a transporter for the neurotransmitter {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA) has been isolated from rat brain, and its functional properties have been examined in Xenopus oocytes. Oocytes injected with GAT-1 synthetic messenger RNA accumulated ({sup 3}H)GABA to levels above control values. The transporter encoded by GAT-1 has a high affinity for GABA, is sodium- and chloride-dependent, and is pharmacologically similar to neuronal GABA transporters. The GAT-1 protein shares antigenic determinants with a native rat brain GABA transporter. The nucleotide sequence of GAT-1 predicts a protein of 599 amino acids with a molecular weight of 67 kilodaltons. Hydropathy analysis of the deduced protein suggests multiple transmembrane regions, a feature shared by several cloned transporters; however, database searches indicate that GAT-1 is not homologous to any previously identified proteins. Therefore, GAT-1 appears to be a member of a previously uncharacterized family of transport molecules.

  11. Neurochemical correlates of. gamma. -aminobutyrate (GABA) inhibition in cat visual cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Balcar, V.J.; Dreher, B. )

    1990-01-01

    High affinity binding of ({sup 3}H){gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA) to neuronal membranes from different parts of cat visual cortex was tested for sensitivity to GABA{sub A} agonists isoguvacine and THIP, GABA{sub A} antagonist SR95531 and GABA{sub B} agonist baclofen. Some of the GABA{sub A}-binding sites were found to have a very low affinity for THIP, suggesting the presence and, possibly, uneven distribution of non-synaptic GABA{sub A} receptors in cat visual cortex. There were no differences in K{sub m} and V{sub max} values of high affinity uptake of GABA and in the potency of K{sup +}-stimulated release of GABA, between primary and association cortices. Consequently, the present results indicate that despite the anatomical and physiological differences between the primary and association feline visual cortices the neurochemical characteristics of GABAergic inhibition are very similar in the two regions.

  12. Agonist pharmacology of two Drosophila GABA receptor splice variants.

    PubMed Central

    Hosie, A. M.; Sattelle, D. B.

    1996-01-01

    1. The Drosophila melanogaster gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor subunits, RDLac and DRC 17-1-2, form functional homo-oligomeric receptors when heterologously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. The subunits differ in only 17 amino acids, principally in regions of the N-terminal domain which determine agonist pharmacology in vertebrate ionotropic neurotransmitter receptors. A range of conformationally restricted GABA analogues were tested on the two homo-oligomers and their agonists pharmacology compared with that of insect and vertebrate iontropic GABA receptors. 2. The actions of GABA, isoguvacine and isonipecotic acid on RDLac and DRC 17-1-2 homo-oligomers were compared, by use of two-electrode voltage-clamp. All three compounds were full agonists of both receptors, but were 4-6 fold less potent agonists of DRC 17-1-2 homo-oligomers than of RDLac. However, the relative potencies of these agonists on each receptor were very similar. 3. A more complete agonist profile was established for RDLac homo-oligomers. The most potent agonists of these receptors were GABA, muscimol and trans-aminocrotonic acid (TACA), which were approximately equipotent. RDLac homo-oligomers were fully activated by a range of GABA analogues, with the order of potency: GABA > ZAPA ((Z)-3-[(aminoiminomethyl)thio]prop-2-enoic acid) > isoguvacine > imidazole-4-acetic acid > or = isonipecotic acid > or = cis-aminocrotonic acid (CACA) > beta-alanine. 3-Aminopropane sulphonic acid (3-APS), a partial agonist of RDLac homo-oligomers, was the weakest agonist tested and 100 fold less potent than GABA. 4. SR95531, an antagonist of vertebrate GABAA receptors, competitively inhibited the GABA responses of RDLac homo-oligomers, which have previously been found to insensitive to bicuculline. However, its potency (IC50 500 microM) was much reduced when compared to GABAA receptors. 5. The agonist pharmacology of Drosophila RDLac homo-oligomers exhibits aspects of the characteristic pharmacology of certain native insect GABA receptors which distinguish them from vertebrate GABA receptors. The high potency and efficacy of isoguvacine and ZAPA distinguishes RDLac homo-oligomers from bicuculline-insensitive vertebrate GABAC receptors, while the low potency of SR95531 and 3-APS distinguishes them from GABAA receptors. The differences in the potency of agonists on RDLac and DRC 17-1-2 homo-oligomers observed in the present study may assist in identification of further molecular determinants of GABA receptor function. PMID:8982504

  13. Development and Validation of a HPTLC Method for Simultaneous Estimation of L-Glutamic Acid and γ-Aminobutyric Acid in Mice Brain

    PubMed Central

    Sancheti, J. S.; Shaikh, M. F.; Khatwani, P. F.; Kulkarni, Savita R.; Sathaye, Sadhana

    2013-01-01

    A new robust, simple and economic high performance thin layer chromatographic method was developed for simultaneous estimation of L-glutamic acid and γ-amino butyric acid in brain homogenate. The high performance thin layer chromatographic separation of these amino acid was achieved using n-butanol:glacial acetic acid:water (22:3:5 v/v/v) as mobile phase and ninhydrin as a derivatising agent. Quantitation of the method was achieved by densitometric method at 550 nm over the concentration range of 10-100 ng/spot. This method showed good separation of amino acids in the brain homogenate with Rf value of L-glutamic acid and γ-amino butyric acid as 21.67±0.58 and 33.67±0.58, respectively. The limit of detection and limit of quantification for L-glutamic acid was found to be 10 and 20 ng and for γ-amino butyric acid it was 4 and 10 ng, respectively. The method was also validated in terms of accuracy, precision and repeatability. The developed method was found to be precise and accurate with good reproducibility and shows promising applicability for studying pathological status of disease and therapeutic significance of drug treatment. PMID:24591747

  14. GABA Predicts Time Perception

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Sonia; Near, Jamie; Stagg, Charlotte J.; Cohen Kadosh, Roi

    2014-01-01

    Our perception of time constrains our experience of the world and exerts a pivotal influence over a myriad array of cognitive and motor functions. There is emerging evidence that the perceived duration of subsecond intervals is driven by sensory-specific neural activity in human and nonhuman animals, but the mechanisms underlying individual differences in time perception remain elusive. We tested the hypothesis that elevated visual cortex GABA impairs the coding of particular visual stimuli, resulting in a dampening of visual processing and concomitant positive time-order error (relative underestimation) in the perceived duration of subsecond visual intervals. Participants completed psychophysical tasks measuring visual interval discrimination and temporal reproduction and we measured in vivo resting state GABA in visual cortex using magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Time-order error selectively correlated with GABA concentrations in visual cortex, with elevated GABA associated with a rightward horizontal shift in psychometric functions, reflecting a positive time-order error (relative underestimation). These results demonstrate anatomical, neurochemical, and task specificity and suggest that visual cortex GABA contributes to individual differences in time perception. PMID:24647956

  15. Lactic acid bacteria contribution to gut microbiota complexity: lights and shadows

    PubMed Central

    Pessione, Enrica

    2012-01-01

    Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) are ancient organisms that cannot biosynthesize functional cytochromes, and cannot get ATP from respiration. Besides sugar fermentation, they evolved electrogenic decarboxylations and ATP-forming deiminations. The right balance between sugar fermentation and decarboxylation/deimination ensures buffered environments thus enabling LAB to survive in human gastric trait and colonize gut. A complex molecular cross-talk between LAB and host exists. LAB moonlight proteins are made in response to gut stimuli and promote bacterial adhesion to mucosa and stimulate immune cells. Similarly, when LAB are present, human enterocytes activate specific gene expression of specific genes only. Furthermore, LAB antagonistic relationships with other microorganisms constitute the basis for their anti-infective role. Histamine and tyramine are LAB bioactive catabolites that act on the CNS, causing hypertension and allergies. Nevertheless, some LAB biosynthesize both gamma-amino-butyrate (GABA), that has relaxing effect on gut smooth muscles, and beta-phenylethylamine, that controls satiety and mood. Since LAB have reduced amino acid biosynthetic abilities, they developed a sophisticated proteolytic system, that is also involved in antihypertensive and opiod peptide generation from milk proteins. Short-chain fatty acids are glycolytic and phosphoketolase end-products, regulating epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation. Nevertheless, they constitute a supplementary energy source for the host, causing weight gain. Human metabolism can also be affected by anabolic LAB products such as conjugated linoleic acids (CLA). Some CLA isomers reduce cancer cell viability and ameliorate insulin resistance, while others lower the HDL/LDL ratio and modify eicosanoid production, with detrimental health effects. A further appreciated LAB feature is the ability to fix selenium into seleno-cysteine. Thus, opening interesting perspectives for their utilization as antioxidant nutraceutical vectors. PMID:22919677

  16. Lactic acid bacteria contribution to gut microbiota complexity: lights and shadows.

    PubMed

    Pessione, Enrica

    2012-01-01

    Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) are ancient organisms that cannot biosynthesize functional cytochromes, and cannot get ATP from respiration. Besides sugar fermentation, they evolved electrogenic decarboxylations and ATP-forming deiminations. The right balance between sugar fermentation and decarboxylation/deimination ensures buffered environments thus enabling LAB to survive in human gastric trait and colonize gut. A complex molecular cross-talk between LAB and host exists. LAB moonlight proteins are made in response to gut stimuli and promote bacterial adhesion to mucosa and stimulate immune cells. Similarly, when LAB are present, human enterocytes activate specific gene expression of specific genes only. Furthermore, LAB antagonistic relationships with other microorganisms constitute the basis for their anti-infective role. Histamine and tyramine are LAB bioactive catabolites that act on the CNS, causing hypertension and allergies. Nevertheless, some LAB biosynthesize both gamma-amino-butyrate (GABA), that has relaxing effect on gut smooth muscles, and beta-phenylethylamine, that controls satiety and mood. Since LAB have reduced amino acid biosynthetic abilities, they developed a sophisticated proteolytic system, that is also involved in antihypertensive and opiod peptide generation from milk proteins. Short-chain fatty acids are glycolytic and phosphoketolase end-products, regulating epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation. Nevertheless, they constitute a supplementary energy source for the host, causing weight gain. Human metabolism can also be affected by anabolic LAB products such as conjugated linoleic acids (CLA). Some CLA isomers reduce cancer cell viability and ameliorate insulin resistance, while others lower the HDL/LDL ratio and modify eicosanoid production, with detrimental health effects. A further appreciated LAB feature is the ability to fix selenium into seleno-cysteine. Thus, opening interesting perspectives for their utilization as antioxidant nutraceutical vectors. PMID:22919677

  17. Glutamate and GABA in Appetite Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, Teresa C.

    2013-01-01

    Appetite is regulated by a coordinated interplay between gut, adipose tissue, and brain. A primary site for the regulation of appetite is the hypothalamus where interaction between orexigenic neurons, expressing Neuropeptide Y/Agouti-related protein, and anorexigenic neurons, expressing Pro-opiomelanocortin cocaine/Amphetamine-related transcript, controls energy homeostasis. Within the hypothalamus, several peripheral signals have been shown to modulate the activity of these neurons, including the orexigenic peptide ghrelin and the anorexigenic hormones insulin and leptin. In addition to the accumulated knowledge on neuropeptide signaling, presence and function of amino acid neurotransmitters in key hypothalamic neurons brought a new light into appetite regulation. Therefore, the principal aim of this review will be to describe the current knowledge of the role of amino acid neurotransmitters in the mechanism of neuronal activation during appetite regulation and the associated neuronal-astrocytic metabolic coupling mechanisms. Glutamate and GABA dominate synaptic transmission in the hypothalamus and administration of their receptors agonists into hypothalamic nuclei stimulates feeding. By using 13C High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy based analysis, the Cerdn group has shown that increased neuronal firing in mice hypothalamus, as triggered by appetite during the feeding-fasting paradigm, may stimulate the use of lactate as neuronal fuel leading to increased astrocytic glucose consumption and glycolysis. Moreover, fasted mice showed increased hypothalamic [2-13C]GABA content, which may be explained by the existence of GABAergic neurons in key appetite regulation hypothalamic nuclei. Interestingly, increased [2-13C]GABA concentration in the hypothalamus of fasted animals appears to result mainly from reduction in GABA metabolizing pathways, rather than increased GABA synthesis by augmented activity of the glutamate-glutamine-GABA cycle. PMID:23966982

  18. 7-(1,1-Dimethylethyl)-6-(2-ethyl-2H-1,2,4-triazol-3-ylmethoxy)-3-(2-fluorophenyl)-1,2,4-triazolo[4,3-b]pyridazine: a functionally selective gamma-aminobutyric acid(A) (GABA(A)) alpha2/alpha3-subtype selective agonist that exhibits potent anxiolytic activity but is not sedating in animal models.

    PubMed

    Carling, Robert W; Madin, Andrew; Guiblin, Alec; Russell, Michael G N; Moore, Kevin W; Mitchinson, Andrew; Sohal, Bindi; Pike, Andrew; Cook, Susan M; Ragan, Ian C; McKernan, Ruth M; Quirk, Kathleen; Ferris, Pushpinder; Marshall, George; Thompson, Sally Ann; Wafford, Keith A; Dawson, Gerard R; Atack, John R; Harrison, Timothy; Castro, Jos L; Street, Leslie J

    2005-11-17

    There is increasing evidence that compounds with selectivity for gamma-aminobutyric acid(A) (GABA(A)) alpha2- and/or alpha3-subtypes may retain the desirable anxiolytic activity of nonselective benzodiazepines but possess an improved side effect profile. Herein we describe a novel series of GABA(A) alpha2/alpha3 subtype-selective agonists leading to the identification of the development candidate 17, a nonsedating anxiolytic in preclinical animal assays. PMID:16279764

  19. Neurotoxins from snake venoms and α-conotoxin ImI inhibit functionally active ionotropic γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors.

    PubMed

    Kudryavtsev, Denis S; Shelukhina, Irina V; Son, Lina V; Ojomoko, Lucy O; Kryukova, Elena V; Lyukmanova, Ekaterina N; Zhmak, Maxim N; Dolgikh, Dmitry A; Ivanov, Igor A; Kasheverov, Igor E; Starkov, Vladislav G; Ramerstorfer, Joachim; Sieghart, Werner; Tsetlin, Victor I; Utkin, Yuri N

    2015-09-11

    Ionotropic receptors of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAAR) regulate neuronal inhibition and are targeted by benzodiazepines and general anesthetics. We show that a fluorescent derivative of α-cobratoxin (α-Ctx), belonging to the family of three-finger toxins from snake venoms, specifically stained the α1β3γ2 receptor; and at 10 μm α-Ctx completely blocked GABA-induced currents in this receptor expressed in Xenopus oocytes (IC50 = 236 nm) and less potently inhibited α1β2γ2 ≈ α2β2γ2 > α5β2γ2 > α2β3γ2 and α1β3δ GABAARs. The α1β3γ2 receptor was also inhibited by some other three-finger toxins, long α-neurotoxin Ls III and nonconventional toxin WTX. α-Conotoxin ImI displayed inhibitory activity as well. Electrophysiology experiments showed mixed competitive and noncompetitive α-Ctx action. Fluorescent α-Ctx, however, could be displaced by muscimol indicating that most of the α-Ctx-binding sites overlap with the orthosteric sites at the β/α subunit interface. Modeling and molecular dynamic studies indicated that α-Ctx or α-bungarotoxin seem to interact with GABAAR in a way similar to their interaction with the acetylcholine-binding protein or the ligand-binding domain of nicotinic receptors. This was supported by mutagenesis studies and experiments with α-conotoxin ImI and a chimeric Naja oxiana α-neurotoxin indicating that the major role in α-Ctx binding to GABAAR is played by the tip of its central loop II accommodating under loop C of the receptors. PMID:26221036

  20. A mitochondrial GABA permease connects the GABA shunt and the TCA cycle, and is essential for normal carbon metabolism.

    PubMed

    Michaeli, Simon; Fait, Aaron; Lagor, Kelly; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Grillich, Nicole; Yellin, Ayelet; Bar, Dana; Khan, Munziba; Fernie, Alisdair R; Turano, Frank J; Fromm, Hillel

    2011-08-01

    In plants, ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) accumulates in the cytosol in response to a variety of stresses. GABA is transported into mitochondria, where it is catabolized into TCA cycle or other intermediates. Although there is circumstantial evidence for mitochondrial GABA transporters in eukaryotes, none have yet been identified. Described here is an Arabidopsis protein similar in sequence and topology to unicellular GABA transporters. The expression of this protein complements a GABA-transport-deficient yeast mutant. Thus the protein was termed AtGABP to indicate GABA-permease activity. In vivo localization of GABP fused to GFP and immunobloting of subcellular fractions demonstrate its mitochondrial localization. Direct [(3) H]GABA uptake measurements into isolated mitochondria revealed impaired uptake into mitochondria of a gabp mutant compared with wild-type (WT) mitochondria, implicating AtGABP as a major mitochondrial GABA carrier. Measurements of CO(2) release, derived from radiolabeled substrates in whole seedlings and in isolated mitochondria, demonstrate impaired GABA-derived input into the TCA cycle, and a compensatory increase in TCA cycle activity in gabp mutants. Finally, growth abnormalities of gabp mutants under limited carbon availability on artificial media, and in soil under low light intensity, combined with their metabolite profiles, suggest an important role for AtGABP in primary carbon metabolism and plant growth. Thus, AtGABP-mediated transport of GABA from the cytosol into mitochondria is important to ensure proper GABA-mediated respiration and carbon metabolism. This function is particularly essential for plant growth under conditions of limited carbon. PMID:21501262

  1. GABA selectively increases mucin-1 expression in isolated pig jejunum.

    PubMed

    Braun, Hannah-Sophie; Sponder, Gerhard; Pieper, Robert; Aschenbach, Jrg R; Deiner, Carolin

    2015-11-01

    The inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA (?-aminobutyric acid) is synthesized by glutamic acid decarboxylase, which is expressed in the central nervous system and in various other tissues including the intestine. Moreover, GABA can be ingested in vegetarian diets or produced by bacterial commensals in the gastrointestinal tract. As previous studies in lung have suggested a link between locally increased GABA availability and mucin 5AC production, the present study sought to test whether the presence or lack of GABA (and its precursor glutamine) has an effect on intestinal mucin expression. Porcine jejunum epithelial preparations were incubated with two different amounts of GABA or glutamine on the mucosal side for 4h, and changes in the relative gene expression of seven different mucins, enzymes involved in mucin shedding, GABA B receptor, enzymes involved in glutamine/GABA metabolism, glutathione peroxidase 2, and interleukin 10 were examined by quantitative PCR (TaqMan() assays). Protein expression of mucin-1 (MUC1) was analyzed by Western blot. On the RNA level, only MUC1 was significantly up-regulated by both GABA concentrations compared with the control. Glutamine-treated groups showed the same trend. On the protein level, all treatment groups showed a significantly higher MUC1 expression than the control group. We conclude that GABA selectively increases the expression of MUC1, a cell surface mucin that prevents the adhesion of microorganisms, because of its size and negative charge, and therefore propose that the well-described positive effects of glutamine on enterocytes and intestinal integrity are partly attributable to effects of its metabolite GABA. PMID:26471792

  2. Relative efficacies of 1,4-diazepines on GABA-stimulated chloride influx in rat brain vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Masaaki; Weber, K.H.; Bechtel, W.D.; Malatynska, E.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of 1,4-diazepines with two annelated heterocycles (brotizolam (WE 941), ciclotizolam (WE 973) and WE 1008) on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-stimulated chloride influx into rat brain membrane vesicles were examined. Brotizolam enhanced GABA-stimulated /sup 36/Cl/sup /minus// influx, while ciclotizolam and WE 1008 showed only a small enhancement of GABA-stimulated /sup 36/Cl/sup /minus// uptake. Brotizolam resulted in a left shift of the GABA dose response curve at lower concentrations of GABA, while at higher concentrations of GABA, brotizolam caused a reduction of the maximal response. The enhancement of GABA-stimulated /sup 36/Cl/sup /minus// uptake by brotizolam was antagonized by Ro 15-1788. At higher concentration of GABA (300 /mu/M), brotizolam inhibited GABA-stimulated /sup 36/Cl/sup /minus// uptake in a dose dependent manner and Ro 15-1788 failed to antagonize this effect.

  3. On the presence of 3H-GABA uptake mechanism in bovine spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Tartaglione, C M; Ritta, M N

    2008-10-01

    In the present study, existence of 3H-GABA uptake mechanism in bovine spermatozoa and the modulation of 3H-GABA transport by GABA itself were evaluated. The hypothesis was tyrosine phosphorylation affects transporter (GAT) function. 3H-GABA uptake assays were performed on bovine spermatozoa and it resulted to be temperature- and time-dependent and Km was 1.48microM. Uptake was inhibited by the metabolic inhibitor ouabain and different blockers of GAT-1 (beta-alanine, l-DABA, nipecotic acid, tiagabine). Extracellular GABA up-regulated GABA transport, while the addition of SKF89976A, a high affinity inhibitor of the rat brain GABA transporter, reduced GABA uptake. Tyrosine phosphorylation affects transporter function since genistein, a broad-spectrum tyrosine kinase inhibitor, decreased 3H-GABA uptake. Reduction in uptake did not occur in the presence of daidzein, an inactive genistein analogue. Furthermore, the genistein-mediated reduction in transport could be prevented by the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor pervanadate. The action of these drugs on GABA transport is likely mediated through the GABA transporter GAT-1 since SKF89976A blocked a majority of GABA uptake. Wash-out experiments indicated that the genistein effect was reversible. When the experiments were conducted using "in vitro" capacitated spermatozoa there was no detectable uptake. Present results demonstrate that the carrier-mediated GABA uptake system in bovine spermatozoa modulates its function in response to extracellular GABA, that changes in lipid distribution and membrane composition which occur during capacitation eliminates GABA uptake and suggest the involvement of tyrosine phosphorylation in GABA transport. PMID:17954017

  4. GABA Acts as a Ligand Chaperone in the Early Secretory Pathway to Promote Cell Surface Expression of GABAA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Eshaq, Randa S.; Stahl, Letha D.; Stone, Randolph; Smith, Sheryl S.; Robinson, Lucy C.; Leidenheimer, Nancy J.

    2010-01-01

    GABA (?-aminobutyric acid) is the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter in brain. The fast inhibitory effect of GABA is mediated through the GABAA receptor, a postsynaptic ligand-gated chloride channel. We propose that GABA can act as a ligand chaperone in the early secretory pathway to facilitate GABAA receptor cell surface expression. Forty-two hrs of GABA treatment increased the surface expression of recombinant receptors expressed in HEK 293 cells, an effect accompanied by an increase in GABA-gated chloride currents. In time-course experiments, a 1 hr GABA exposure, followed by a 5 hr incubation in GABA-free medium, was sufficient to increase receptor surface expression. A shorter GABA exposure could be used in HEK 293 cells stably transfected with the GABA transporter GAT-1. In rGAT-1HEK 293 cells, the GABA effect was blocked by the GAT-1 inhibitor NO-711, indicating that GABA was acting intracellularly. The effect of GABA was prevented by brefeldin A (BFA), an inhibitor of early secretory pathway trafficking. Coexpression of GABAA receptors with the GABA synthetic enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67) also resulted in an increase in receptor surface levels. GABA treatment failed to promote the surface expression of GABA binding site mutant receptors, which themselves were poorly expressed at the surface. Consistent with an intracellular action of GABA, we show that GABA does not act by stabilizing surface receptors. Furthermore, GABA treatment rescued the surface expression of a receptor construct that was retained within the secretory pathway. Lastly, the lipophilic competitive antagonist (+)bicuculline promoted receptor surface expression, including the rescue of an secretory pathway-retained receptor. Our results indicate that a neurotransmitter can act as a ligand chaperone in the early secretory pathway to regulate the surface expression of its receptor. This effect appears to rely on binding site occupancy, rather than agonist-induced structural changes, since chaperoning is observed with both an agonist and a competitive antagonist. PMID:20580636

  5. el-aminobutyric acid (GABA) mediated transmembrane chloride flux with membrane vesicles from rat brain measured by quench flow technique: kinetic homogeneity of ion flux and receptor desensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Cash, D.J.; Subbarao, K.

    1987-07-27

    Transmembrane chloride flux mediated by the GABA/sub A/ receptor and the desensitization of the receptor were followed using quench flow technique with TWCl and a membrane preparation from rat cerebral cortex. Measurements in short times allowed these two processes to be resolved. In general the ion-flux activity was desensitized in two phases. A fast phase took place in circa 200 ms (100 M GABA) followed by a slower phase in several seconds. A minority of the membrane preparations did not display the fast phase. It is desirable to be able to separate these two phases of desensitization to facilitate analysis of the responses of the receptor. A short preincubation with GABA removed the fast phase from a subsequent measurement. In the absence of the fast phase the whole ion-flux equilibrium was seen as a single phase. The measurements presented covering a time range of 0.01 seconds to 10 seconds show a single phase of ion flux which can be described by a first order ion influx process and a single first order desensitization process with a halt time of circa 1 s (100 M GABA). The results imply a single population of vesicles containing a single population of GABA receptor (remaining active) with a single phase of desensitization. An understanding of this homogeneity, and how to ensure it, gives a basis for quantitatively testing the effects of drugs on these responses. Ion flux measurements with quench flow technique are a suitable tool for investigation of the mechanism of action of neurotransmitter receptors from brain. 37 references, 3 figures.

  6. Effects of GABA(B) receptor antagonists on spontaneous and on GABA-induced mechanical activity of guinea-pig smooth muscle preparations.

    PubMed

    Kristev, A D; Getova, D P; Spassov, V A; Turiiski, V I

    2001-11-23

    The majority of GABA(B) receptor antagonists have been based on alterations of the acidic moiety of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) or baclofen, such as the first selective antagonist phaclofen. More recently, a new structural class of compounds derived by p-alkyl substitution in the phosphinic analog of GABA, such as CGP35348 (3-amino-propyl-(diethoxymethyl)-phosphinic acid), have been introduced as GABA(B) receptor antagonists. The present study examine the influence of a series of structurally related phosphinic acid analogues on mechanical activity and their effect on GABA-induced reactions in ileal smooth muscle. In our experiments, GABA exerted a biphasic contractile-relaxation effect with pronounced dose-dependent characteristics. 3-[[1-(S)-(3,4-Dihydrophenyl) ethyl]amino]-2-(S)-hydroxy-propyl]-(phenylmethyl)-phosphinic acid hydrochloride (CGP55845A) induced prolonged relaxation without changing the phasic activity of the ileum preparations. [3-[1-R-[[2-(S)-hydroxy-3-[hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl]-methyl]-phosphinyl]-propyl]-aminoethyl]-benzoic acid (CGP62349) did not change the mechanical activity of smooth muscle preparation. Trans 3-[6-[[Cyclo hexylmethyl-hydroxy-phosphinyl]-methyl]-3-morpholinyl]-benzoic acid (CGP71982) itself induced smooth muscle contractions. GABA(B) receptor antagonists decreased concentration-dependently the relaxation phase of the action of GABA from 50% to 90%. Their effect on the contractile phase of the action of GABA was quite different-CGP55845A decreased it dose-dependently, whereas CGP62349 and CGP71982 did not change it significantly. These findings prompted us to assume that the GABA(B) receptor antagonists studied, being phosphinic analogues, probably act on GABA(B) receptors in guinea-pig ileum smooth muscles. PMID:11730727

  7. Regulation of /sup 3/H-dopamine release by presynaptic GABA and glutamate heteroreceptors in rat brain nucleus accumbens synaptosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Kovalev, G.I.; Hetey, L.

    1987-06-01

    The aim of this investigation was a neurochemical study of the effect of agonists of different types of GABA receptors - muscimol (type A receptor), baclofen (type B receptor), delta-aminolevulinic acid (DALA; GABA autoreceptor), and also of GABA itself - on tritium-labelled dopamine release, stimulated by potassium cations, from synaptosomes of the nuclei accumbenes of the rat brain.

  8. 3H-GABA uptake selectively labels identifiable neurons in the leech central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, H.T.

    1983-04-10

    Segmental ganglia of the leech ventral nerve cord synthesize the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) when incubated in the presence of the precursor glutamate, suggesting that there may be GABA-ergic neurons in the leech nerve cord. GABA-accumulating neurons of the two taxonomically distant leech species, Haementeria ghilianii and Hirudo medicinalis, have been labeled by taking advantage of their high-affinity uptake system for the neurotransmitter. Autoradiography of sectioned segmental ganglia previously exposed to 3H-GABA reveals a reproducible pattern of about thirty 3H-GABA-labeled neuronal cell bodies per ganglion. The majority of 3H-GABA-labeled neuronal cell bodies are bilaterally paired, although some apparently unpaired cell bodies also accumulate label. Neuronal processes were reproducibly labeled by GABA uptake and could be traced in the neuropil through commissures and fiber tracts into the segmental nerve roots and interganglionic connectives, respectively.

  9. Local GABA Concentration Predicts Perceptual Improvements After Repetitive Sensory Stimulation in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Heba, Stefanie; Puts, Nicolaas A. J.; Kalisch, Tobias; Glaubitz, Benjamin; Haag, Lauren M.; Lenz, Melanie; Dinse, Hubert R.; Edden, Richard A. E.; Tegenthoff, Martin; Schmidt-Wilcke, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Learning mechanisms are based on synaptic plasticity processes. Numerous studies on synaptic plasticity suggest that the regulation of the inhibitory neurotransmitter ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) plays a central role maintaining the delicate balance of inhibition and excitation. However, in humans, a link between learning outcome and GABA levels has not been shown so far. Using magnetic resonance spectroscopy of GABA prior to and after repetitive tactile stimulation, we show here that baseline GABA+ levels predict changes in perceptual outcome. Although no net changes in GABA+ are observed, the GABA+ concentration prior to intervention explains almost 60% of the variance in learning outcome. Our data suggest that behavioral effects can be predicted by baseline GABA+ levels, which provide new insights into the role of inhibitory mechanisms during perceptual learning. PMID:26637451

  10. Local GABA Concentration Predicts Perceptual Improvements After Repetitive Sensory Stimulation in Humans.

    PubMed

    Heba, Stefanie; Puts, Nicolaas A J; Kalisch, Tobias; Glaubitz, Benjamin; Haag, Lauren M; Lenz, Melanie; Dinse, Hubert R; Edden, Richard A E; Tegenthoff, Martin; Schmidt-Wilcke, Tobias

    2016-03-01

    Learning mechanisms are based on synaptic plasticity processes. Numerous studies on synaptic plasticity suggest that the regulation of the inhibitory neurotransmitter ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) plays a central role maintaining the delicate balance of inhibition and excitation. However, in humans, a link between learning outcome and GABA levels has not been shown so far. Using magnetic resonance spectroscopy of GABA prior to and after repetitive tactile stimulation, we show here that baseline GABA+ levels predict changes in perceptual outcome. Although no net changes in GABA+ are observed, the GABA+ concentration prior to intervention explains almost 60% of the variance in learning outcome. Our data suggest that behavioral effects can be predicted by baseline GABA+ levels, which provide new insights into the role of inhibitory mechanisms during perceptual learning. PMID:26637451

  11. Insights into GABA receptor signalling in TM3 Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Doepner, Richard F G; Geigerseder, Christof; Frungieri, Monica B; Gonzalez-Calvar, Silvia I; Calandra, Ricardo S; Raemsch, Romi; Fohr, Karl; Kunz, Lars; Mayerhofer, Artur

    2005-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an emerging signalling molecule in endocrine organs, since it is produced by endocrine cells and acts via GABA(A) receptors in a paracrine/autocrine fashion. Testicular Leydig cells are producers and targets for GABA. These cells express GABA(A) receptor subunits and in the murine Leydig cell line TM3 pharmacological activation leads to increased proliferation. The signalling pathway of GABA in these cells is not known in this study. We therefore attempted to elucidate details of GABA(A) signalling in TM3 and adult mouse Leydig cells using several experimental approaches. TM3 cells not only express GABA(A )receptor subunits, but also bind the GABA agonist [(3)H]muscimol with a binding affinity in the range reported for other endocrine cells (K(d) = 2.740 +/- 0.721 nM). However, they exhibit a low B(max) value of 28.08 fmol/mg protein. Typical GABA(A) receptor-associated events, including Cl(-) currents, changes in resting membrane potential, intracellular Ca(2+) or cAMP, were not measurable with the methods employed in TM3 cells, or, as studied in part, in primary mouse Leydig cells. GABA or GABA(A) agonist isoguvacine treatment resulted in increased or decreased levels of several mRNAs, including transcription factors (c-fos, hsf-1, egr-1) and cell cycle-associated genes (Cdk2, cyclin D1). In an attempt to verify the cDNA array results and because egr-1 was recently implied in Leydig cell development, we further studied this factor. RT-PCR and Western blotting confirmed a time-dependent regulation of egr-1 in TM3. In the postnatal testis egr-1 was seen in cytoplasmic and nuclear locations of developing Leydig cells, which bear GABA(A) receptors and correspond well to TM3 cells. Thus, GABA acts via an atypical novel signalling pathway in TM3 cells. Further details of this pathway remain to be elucidated. PMID:16276116

  12. In vivo neurochemistry of primary focal hand dystonia: a magnetic resonance spectroscopic neurometabolite profiling study at 3T.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Herath P; Gallea C; van der Veen JW; Horovitz SG; Hallett M

    2010-12-15

    The neurochemical basis of dystonia is unknown. The purpose of this study was to assess the differences of the inhibitory neurotransmitter, gamma amino butyric acid (GABA), in the sensorimotor cortex and the basal ganglia using magnetic resonance spectroscopy with optimized GABA sensitivity. Twenty-two patients with focal hand dystonia and 22 healthy controls were studied. No significant differences in GABA were observed between the groups in either the sensorimotor cortex or in the basal ganglia.

  13. Polychlorocycloalkane insecticide action on GABA-and glycine-dependent chloride flux.

    PubMed

    Suol, C; Vale, C; Rodrguez-Farr, E

    1998-01-01

    The inhibitory neurotransmitters gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glycine directly cause an increase in conductance to Cl- by binding to ligand-operated ion channel receptors at the postsynaptic membranes, so that opening of Cl- channels usually leads to a net hyperpolarization. The GABA(A) receptor has separate but allosterically interacting binding sites for GABA, benzodiazepines, barbiturates, anesthetic steroids and the convulsant picrotoxinin. The GABA(C) receptor also forms a Cl- channel, however its pharmacology differs from that of the GABA(A) receptor. Neurotoxic organochlorine pesticides belonging to the group of polychlorocycloalkanes (cyclodienes and gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane or lindane) induce in mammals an hyperexcitability syndrome that can progress until the production of tonic-clonic convulsions. They act as non-competitive GABA antagonists interacting with the picrotoxinin site both in membranes and in intact cultured neurons, thereby inhibiting the GABA-induced Cl- flux following activation of either GABA(A) or GABA(C) receptors. We also report the effects of polychlorocycloalkanes on glycine-induced 36Cl- flux in primary neuronal cultures. The delta isomer of hexachlorocyclohexane is a depressant compound, that increases the GABA-induced Cl- flux and allosterically increases benzodiazepine binding at the GABA(A) receptor. We discuss the mechanism of action of these compounds in relation to the disruption of ligand-operated Cl- channel receptors and the relevance of their convulsant/depressant actions. PMID:9745914

  14. Disruption of the GABA shunt affects mitochondrial respiration and virulence in the cereal pathogen Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Bnnighausen, Jakob; Gebhard, Daniel; Krger, Cathrin; Hadeler, Birgit; Tumforde, Thomas; Lieberei, Reinhard; Bergemann, Jrg; Schfer, Wilhelm; Bormann, Jrg

    2015-12-01

    The cereal pathogen Fusarium graminearum threatens food and feed production worldwide. It reduces the yield and poisons the remaining kernels with mycotoxins, notably deoxynivalenol (DON). We analyzed the importance of gamma-aminobutanoic acid (GABA) metabolism for the life cycle of this fungal pathogen. GABA metabolism in F. graminearum is partially regulated by the global nitrogen regulator AreA. Genetic disruption of the GABA shunt by deletion of two GABA transaminases renders the pathogen unable to utilize the plant stress metabolites GABA and putrescine. The mutants showed increased sensitivity against oxidative stress, GABA accumulation in the mycelium, downregulation of two key enzymes of the TCA cycle, disturbed potential gradient in the mitochondrial membrane and lower mitochondrial oxygen consumption. In contrast, addition of GABA to the wild type resulted in its rapid turnover and increased mitochondrial steady state oxygen consumption. GABA concentrations are highly upregulated in infected wheat tissues. We conclude that GABA is metabolized by the pathogen during infection increasing its energy production, whereas the mutants accumulate GABA intracellularly resulting in decreased energy production. Consequently, the GABA mutants are strongly reduced in virulence but, because of their DON production, are able to cross the rachis node. PMID:26305050

  15. Effect of GABA and baclofen on gastric mucosal protective factors.

    PubMed

    Abbas, W R; Maiti, R N; Goel, R K; Bhattacharya, S K

    1998-02-01

    GABA and baclofen (BAC), a GABA-mimetic agent, were investigated for antiulcerogenic activity. Orally administered GABA (100 mg/kg) and BAC (10 mg/kg) showed significant ulcer protection when given either alone for one day or for 4 days, or when given together with aspirin (ASP; 200 mg/kg x 3 days) in their 4 days treatment time in pylorus-ligated rats. Both the drugs showed a tendency to increase acid and decrease peptic output, and increased gastric mucus secretion in terms of total carbohydrate to protein ratio (TC:P) in both the above treatment groups. ASP tended to decrease acid and increase peptic output and significantly decreased TC:P ratio. Both GABA and BAC tended to reverse aspirin-induced effects, though they had little per se effect on TC:P ratio of gastric mucosal glycoproteins except an increase in sialic acid content both after one day or four days treatment. No, per se, effect on cell shedding (DNA and protein content of gastric juice) or cell proliferation (DNA/mg protein) was noted with GABA or BAC but the enhanced cell shedding induced by ASP was attenuated by them. ASP was found to enhance cell proliferation. However, neither of drug showed any effect on cell proliferation when given either alone or in combination with ASP. The antiulcerogenic effect of GABA and BAC may be due to their predominant effects on mucosal defensive factors like enhanced mucin secretion and decreased cell shedding or mucosal damage. PMID:9754049

  16. GABA(B) receptors as potential therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Vacher, Claire-Marie; Bettler, Bernhard

    2003-08-01

    gamma-Aminobutyric acid-B (GABA(B)) receptors are broadly expressed in the nervous system and have been implicated in a wide variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders. To date the only GABA(B) drug on the market is the agonist baclofen (Lioresal((R))) that is used to treat severe spasticity of cerebral and spinal origin. In addition baclofen is effective in animal models for many central and peripheral disorders, but side-effects and the development of tolerance prohibited a more widespread use of this drug in man. Similarly GABA(B) antagonists show great therapeutic promise but their shortcomings, e.g. the lack of brain penetration or some proconvulsive potential, prevented clinical development. The cloning of GABA(B) receptors in 1997 revived interest in these receptors as drug targets. The long-awaited availability of the tools that were necessary to develop more selective and safer drugs stimulated an impressive activity in the field. The demonstration that GABA(B) receptors needed to heteromerize for function provided new insights into the structure of G-protein coupled receptors in general and enabled to identify allosteric GABA(B) drugs. Gene knockout mice revealed neuronal systems that are under tonic GABA(B) control and therefore best suited for therapeutic intervention. Significant advances were made in clarifying the relationship between GABA(B) receptors and the receptors for gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), a drug of abuse. Here we provide and update on the molecular composition, the physiology and the pharmacology of GABA(B) receptors and discuss to what extent our current knowledge influences ongoing and future drug discovery efforts. PMID:12871035

  17. GABA-A receptors: a viable target for novel anxiolytics?

    PubMed

    Whiting, Paul J

    2006-02-01

    Benzodiazepine (BZ) anxiolytics mediate their clinical effects by enhancing the effect of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) at the GABA-A receptor. Classical BZ full agonists such as diazepam, which maximally enhance the function of GABA-A receptors, are effective anxiolytics but carry unwanted side effects including sedation, dependence and abuse liability, limiting their utility. Although a second generation of 'partial agonist' BZs have been pursued, promising preclinical data, in terms of anxiolytic efficacy and decreased unwanted effects, have so far failed to translate to the clinic. Following the insights into GABA-A receptor subtypes mediating the effects of BZs, a third generation of 'receptor subtype-selective' BZ site ligands have been developed. However, it remains to be determined whether promising preclinical data are recapitulated in the clinic. PMID:16359919

  18. Alterations of Cortical GABA Neurons and Network Oscillations in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Burgos, Guillermo; Hashimoto, Takanori; Lewis, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The hypothesis that alterations of cortical inhibitory γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurons are a central element in the pathology of schizophrenia has emerged from a series of postmortem studies. How such abnormalities may contribute to the clinical features of schizophrenia has been substantially informed by a convergence with basic neuroscience studies revealing complex details of GABA neuron function in the healthy brain. Importantly, activity of the parvalbumin-containing class of GABA neurons has been linked to the production of cortical network oscillations. Furthermore, growing knowledge supports the concept that γ band oscillations (30–80 Hz) are an essential mechanism for cortical information transmission and processing. Herein we review recent studies further indicating that inhibition from parvalbumin-positive GABA neurons is necessary to produce γ oscillations in cortical circuits; provide an update on postmortem studies documenting that deficits in the expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase67, which accounts for most GABA synthesis in the cortex, are widely observed in schizophrenia; and describe studies using novel, noninvasive approaches directly assessing potential relations between alterations in GABA, oscillations, and cognitive function in schizophrenia. PMID:20556669

  19. Cotransmission of acetylcholine and GABA.

    PubMed

    Granger, Adam J; Mulder, Nicole; Saunders, Arpiar; Sabatini, Bernardo L

    2016-01-01

    Neurons that produce acetylcholine (ACh) are positioned to broadly influence the brain, with axonal arborizations that extend throughout the cerebral cortex, striatum, and hippocampus. While the action of these neurons has typically been attributed entirely to ACh, neurons often release more than one primary neurotransmitter. Here, we review evidence for the cotransmission of the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA from cholinergic neurons throughout the mammalian central nervous system. Functional cotransmission of ACh and GABA has been reported in the retina and cortex, and anatomical studies suggest that GABA cotransmission is a common feature of nearly all forebrain ACh-producing neurons. Further experiments are necessary to confirm the extent of GABA cotransmission from cholinergic neurons, and the contribution of GABA needs to be considered when studying the functional impact of activity in ACh-producing neurons. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Synaptopathy--from Biology to Therapy'. PMID:26220313

  20. GABA synthesis in Schwann cells is induced by the neuroactive steroid allopregnanolone.

    PubMed

    Magnaghi, Valerio; Parducz, Arpad; Frasca, Angelisa; Ballabio, Marinella; Procacci, Patrizia; Racagni, Giorgio; Bonanno, Giambattista; Fumagalli, Fabio

    2010-02-01

    Recent evidence showed that neurotransmitters are synthesised in glial cells, such as the Schwann cells, which form myelin sheaths in the PNS. While the presence of GABA type A (GABA-A) receptors has been previously demonstrated in these cells, the evidence of GABA synthesis remained still elusive. In an attempt to demonstrate the presence of GABA in rat Schwann cells, we adopted a strategy, using several integrated neurochemical, molecular as well as immunocytochemical approaches. We first demonstrated the presence of glutamic acid decarboxylase of 67 kDa (GAD67) in Schwann cells, a crucial enzyme of the GABA synthesis mechanism. Second, we demonstrated that GABA is synthesized and localized in Schwann cells. As the third step we showed that allopregnanolone (10 nM), a potent allosteric modulator of GABA-A receptors, stimulates GABA synthesis through increased levels of GAD67 in Schwann cells. Analysis of intracellular signalling mechanisms revealed that the protein kinase A pathway, through enhanced cAMP levels and cAMP response element binding protein phosphorylation, modulates the allosteric action of allopregnanolone at the GABA-A receptor in Schwann cells. Our findings are the first to demonstrate that this GABA mechanism is active in Schwann cells thus establishing new potential therapeutic targets to control Schwann cell biology, which may prove useful in the treatment of several neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:19943853

  1. GABA and Glutamate Transporters in Brain

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yun; Danbolt, Niels Christian

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian genome contains four genes encoding GABA transporters (GAT1, slc6a1; GAT2, slc6a13; GAT3, slc6a11; BGT1, slc6a12) and five glutamate transporter genes (EAAT1, slc1a3; EAAT2, slc1a2; EAAT3, slc1a1; EAAT4, slc1a6; EAAT5, slc1a7). These transporters keep the extracellular levels of GABA and excitatory amino acids low and provide amino acids for metabolic purposes. The various transporters have different properties both with respect to their transport functions and with respect to their ability to act as ion channels. Further, they are differentially regulated. To understand the physiological roles of the individual transporter subtypes, it is necessary to obtain information on their distributions and expression levels. Quantitative data are important as the functional capacity is limited by the number of transporter molecules. The most important and most abundant transporters for removal of transmitter glutamate in the brain are EAAT2 (GLT-1) and EAAT1 (GLAST), while GAT1 and GAT3 are the major GABA transporters in the brain. EAAT3 (EAAC1) does not appear to play a role in signal transduction, but plays other roles. Due to their high uncoupled anion conductance, EAAT4 and EAAT5 seem to be acting more like inhibitory glutamate receptors than as glutamate transporters. GAT2 and BGT1 are primarily expressed in the liver and kidney, but are also found in the leptomeninges, while the levels in brain tissue proper are too low to have any impact on GABA removal, at least in normal young adult mice. The present review will provide summary of what is currently known and will also discuss some methodological pitfalls. PMID:24273530

  2. A Role for GAT-1 in Presynaptic GABA Homeostasis?

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Fiorenzo; Melone, Marcello; Fattorini, Giorgia; Bragina, Luca; Ciappelloni, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    In monoamine-releasing terminals, neurotransmitter transporters in addition to terminating synaptic transmission by clearing released transmitters from the extracellular space are the primary mechanism for replenishing transmitter stores and thus regulate presynaptic homeostasis. Here, we analyze whether GAT-1, the main plasma membrane GABA transporter, plays a similar role in GABAergic terminals. Re-examination of existing literature and recent data gathered in our laboratory show that GABA homeostasis in GABAergic terminals is dominated by the activity of the GABA synthesizing enzyme and that GAT-1-mediated GABA transport contributes to cytosolic GABA levels. However, analysis of GAT-1 KO, besides demonstrating the effects of reduced clearance, reveals the existence of changes compatible with an impaired presynaptic function, as miniature IPSCs frequency is reduced by one-third and glutamic acid decarboxylases and phosphate-activated glutaminase levels are significantly up-regulated. Although the changes observed are less robust than those reported in mice with impaired dopamine, noradrenaline, and serotonin plasma membrane transporters, they suggest that in GABAergic terminals GAT-1 impacts on presynaptic GABA homeostasis, and may contribute to the activity-dependent regulation of inhibitory efficacy. PMID:21503156

  3. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1a1 mediates a GABA synthesis pathway in midbrain dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Ick; Ganesan, Subhashree; Luo, Sarah X; Wu, Yu-Wei; Park, Esther; Huang, Eric J; Chen, Lu; Ding, Jun B

    2015-10-01

    Midbrain dopamine neurons are an essential component of the basal ganglia circuitry, playing key roles in the control of fine movement and reward. Recently, it has been demonstrated that ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the chief inhibitory neurotransmitter, is co-released by dopamine neurons. Here, we show that GABA co-release in dopamine neurons does not use the conventional GABA-synthesizing enzymes, glutamate decarboxylases GAD65 and GAD67. Our experiments reveal an evolutionarily conserved GABA synthesis pathway mediated by aldehyde dehydrogenase 1a1 (ALDH1a1). Moreover, GABA co-release is modulated by ethanol (EtOH) at concentrations seen in blood alcohol after binge drinking, and diminished ALDH1a1 leads to enhanced alcohol consumption and preference. These findings provide insights into the functional role of GABA co-release in midbrain dopamine neurons, which may be essential for reward-based behavior and addiction. PMID:26430123

  4. Expression and distribution of GABA and GABAB-receptor in the rat adrenal gland

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Kanae; Nakagawa, Chieko; Murabayashi, Hiroshi; Oomori, Yukio

    2014-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the central and peripheral nervous systems and the endocrine system are mediated by two different GABA receptors: GABAA-receptor (GABAA-R) and GABAB-receptor (GABAB-R). GABAA-R, but not GABAB-R, has been observed in the rat adrenal gland, where GABA is known to be released. This study sought to determine whether both GABA and GABAB-R are present in the endocrine and neuronal elements of the rat adrenal gland, and to investigate whether GABAB-R may play a role in mediating the effects of GABA in secretory activity of these cells. GABA-immunoreactive nerve fibers were observed in the superficial cortex. Some GABA-immunoreactive nerve fiberswere found to be associated with blood vessels. Double-immunostaining revealed GABA-immunoreactive nerve fibers in the cortex were choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-immunonegative. Some GABA-immunoreactive nerve fibers ran through the cortex toward the medulla. In the medulla, GABA-immunoreactivity was seen in some large ganglion cells, but not in the chromaffin cells. Double-immunostaining also showed GABA-immunoreactive ganglion cells were nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-immunopositive. However, neither immunohistochemistry combined with fluorescent microscopy nor double-immunostaining revealed GABA-immunoreactivity in the noradrenaline cells with blue-white fluorescence or in the adrenaline cells with phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT)-immunoreactivity. Furthermore, GABA-immunoreactive nerve fibers were observed in close contact with ganglion cells, but not chromaffin cells. Double-immunostaining also showed that the GABA-immunoreactive nerve fibers were in close contact with NOS-or neuropeptide tyrosine (NPY)-immunoreactive ganglion cells. A few of the GABA-immunoreactive nerve fibers were ChAT-immunopositive, while most of the GABA-immunoreactive nerve fibers were ChAT-immunonegative. Numerous ChAT-immunoreactive nerve fibers were observed in close contact with the ganglion cells and chromaffin cells in the medulla. The GABAB-R-immunoreactivity was found only in ganglion cells in the medulla and not at all in the cortex. Immunohistochemistry combined with fluorescent microscopy and double-immunostaining showed no GABAB-R-immunoreactivity in noradrenaline cells with blue-white fluorescence or in adrenaline cells with PNMT-immunoreactivity. These immunoreactive ganglion cells were NOS-or NPY-immunopositive on double-immunostaining. These findings suggest that GABA from the intra-adrenal nerve fibers may have an inhibitory effect on the secretory activity of ganglion cells and cortical cells, and on the motility of blood vessels in the rat adrenal gland, mediated by GABA-Rs. PMID:24252118

  5. A study on quality components and sleep-promoting effects of GABA black tea.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wenfang; Li, Yun; Ma, William; Ge, Yazhong; Huang, Yahui

    2015-10-01

    The aims of this study were to analyze the changes in quality components of gamma (?)-aminobutyric acid (GABA) black tea during processing, and to investigate the effect of three dosages of GABA black tea on sleep improvement. The results showed that the GABA content was increased significantly up to 2.70 mg g(-1) after vacuum anaerobic and aerobic treatment. In addition, the content of GABA after drying reached 2.34 mg g(-1), which achieved the standard of GABA tea. During the entire processing of GABA black tea, the contents of tea polyphenols, caffeine and total catechins displayed a gradually descending trend, while the contents of free amino acids and GABA were firstly increased, and then reduced. The GABA black tea had significant effects on prolonging the sleeping time with sodium pentobarbital (P < 0.05) and significantly enhancing the sleeping rate induced by sodium pentobarbital at a sub-threshold dose (P < 0.05). But its effect on shortening the sleeping latency period induced by sodium barbital was not significant (P > 0.05). It had no effect on directly inducing sleep and the mouse body weight. The extract of GABA black tea improved the sleeping quality of mice to extend with an optimal effect being found in the high dose-treated mice. PMID:26290415

  6. Sodium-independent, bicuculline-sensitive (/sup 3/H)GABA binding to isolated rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Minuk, G.Y.; Bear, C.E.; Sarjeant, E.J.

    1987-05-01

    To determine whether hepatocytes possess specific receptor sites for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), a potent amino acid neurotransmitter, (/sup 3/H)GABA, was added to sodium-free suspensions of Percoll-purified hepatocytes derived from collagenase-perfused rat livers under various experimental conditions and in the presence or absence of specific GABA receptor agonists (muscimol) and antagonists (bicuculline). The effects of GABA, muscimol, and bicuculline on hepatocyte resting membrane potentials were also determined. Specific binding of (/sup 3/H)GABA to hepatocytes was a consistent finding. GABA-hepatocyte interactions were reversible and temperature dependent. Muscimol and bicuculline inhibited binding in a dose-dependent manner (IC50, 30 nM and 50 microM, respectively), whereas strychnine (1.0-100 microM), a nonspecific central nervous system stimulant, had no appreciable effect. Both GABA and muscimol (100 microM) caused significant hyperpolarization of hepatocyte resting membrane potential (delta PD 5.4 +/- 3.1 and 22.2 +/- 16.2 mV, respectively, means +/- SD, P less than 0.0005). Bicuculline (100 microM) inhibited the effect of muscimol (P less than 0.05). The results of this study suggest that specific GABA receptor sites exist on the surface of isolated rat hepatocytes. The presence of such sites raises the possibility that, in addition to adrenergic and cholinergic innervation, hepatic function may be influenced by GABA-ergic neurotransmitter mechanisms.

  7. GABA affects novel object recognition memory and working memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Thanapreedawat, Panicha; Kobayashi, Hiroki; Inui, Naoto; Sakamoto, Kazuhiro; Kim, Mujo; Yoto, Ai; Yokogoshi, Hidehiko

    2013-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an amino acid found in unpolished rice, chocolate, tea, and other foods. It is an important inhibitory neurotransmitter. However, the influence of GABA on object recognition and working memory is still unknown. In this study, the effects of GABA on novel object recognition (NOR) memory and working memory were examined. The proper retention interval and delay time were also investigated for the NOR test and T-maze test, respectively. Male 3-wk-old Wistar rats were allowed free access to food and water containing 0.5% GABA or 1% GABA for a month. After that, the rats performed the NOR test at a 48 h retention interval and T-maze test at a 900 s delay time to estimate the effects of GABA on learning behavior. The results showed that the object information in the NOR test was stored as long-term memory and the recognition index (RI) was significantly increased after GABA administration. The accuracy rate also significantly increased after GABA administration. These indicate that GABA may be involved in long-term object recognition memory and working memory. PMID:23727647

  8. Aberrant control of motoneuronal excitability in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: excitatory glutamate/D-serine vs. inhibitory glycine/gamma-aminobutanoic acid (GABA).

    PubMed

    Sasabe, Jumpei; Aiso, Sadakazu

    2010-06-01

    The mechanism underlying selective motoneuronal loss in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) remains uncertain. The pathogenesis appears to be a complex and multifactorial process. Glutamate excitotoxicity to motoneuron is one of the most intensely investigated targets for the treatment of ALS, and excessive motoneuronal excitation by glutamate through ionotropic glutamate receptors has been mainly demonstrated. However, development of clinically effective drug targeting glutamate is sometimes difficult, because some aspects of glutamergic signals also could be beneficial, as the injured neurons attempt to recruit endogenous recovery. This review is focused on identifying other mechanisms of imbalanced excitation in ALS motoneurons including excitation-modulating D-serine and inhibitory glycine/GABA. Further, validation of these mechanisms might ultimately lead us to new therapeutic targets for ALS. PMID:20564566

  9. Glucose inhibits GABA release by pancreatic beta-cells through an increase in GABA shunt activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Kerckhofs, Karen; Van de Casteele, Mark; Smolders, Ilse; Pipeleers, Daniel; Ling, Zhidong

    2006-03-01

    GABA is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the nervous system. It is also released by the insulin-producing beta-cells, providing them with a potential paracrine regulator. Because glucose was found to inhibit GABA release, we investigated whether extracellular GABA can serve as a marker for glucose-induced mitochondrial activity and thus for the functional state of beta-cells. GABA release by rat and human beta-cells was shown to reflect net GABA production, varying with the functional state of the cells. Net GABA production is the result of GABA formation through glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) and GABA catabolism involving a GABA-transferase (GABA-T)-mediated shunt to the TCA cycle. GABA-T exhibits K(m) values for GABA (1.25 mM) and for alpha-ketoglutarate (alpha-KG; 0.49 mM) that are, respectively, similar to and lower than those in brain. The GABA-T inhibitor gamma-vinyl GABA was used to assess the relative contribution of GABA formation and catabolism to net production and release. The nutrient status of the beta-cells was found to regulate both processes. Glutamine dose-dependently increased GAD-mediated formation of GABA, whereas glucose metabolism shunts part of this GABA to mitochondrial catabolism, involving alpha-KG-induced activation of GABA-T. In absence of extracellular glutamine, glucose also contributed to GABA formation through aminotransferase generation of glutamate from alpha-KG; this stimulatory effect increased GABA release only when GABA-T activity was suppressed. We conclude that GABA release from beta-cells is regulated by glutamine and glucose. Glucose inhibits glutamine-driven GABA formation and release through increasing GABA-T shunt activity by its cellular metabolism. Our data indicate that GABA release by beta-cells can be used to monitor their metabolic responsiveness to glucose irrespective of their insulin-secretory activity. PMID:16249254

  10. Conformationally sensitive proximity of extracellular loops 2 and 4 of the ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter GAT-1 inferred from paired cysteine mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Hilwi, Maram; Dayan, Oshrat; Kanner, Baruch I

    2014-12-01

    The sodium- and chloride-coupled GABA transporter GAT-1 is a member of the neurotransmitter:sodium:symporters, which are crucial for synaptic transmission. Structural work on the bacterial homologue LeuT suggests that extracellular loop 4 closes the extracellular solvent pathway when the transporter becomes inward-facing. To test whether this model can be extrapolated to GAT-1, cysteine residues were introduced at positions 359 and 448 of extracellular loop 4 and transmembrane helix 10, respectively. Treatment of HeLa cells, expressing the double cysteine mutant S359C/K448C with the oxidizing reagent copper(II)(1,10-phenantroline)3, resulted in a significant inhibition of [(3)H]GABA transport. However, transport by the single cysteine mutant S359C was also inhibited by the oxidant, whereas its activity was almost 4-fold stimulated by dithiothreitol. Both effects were attenuated when the conserved cysteine residues, Cys-164 and/or Cys-173, were replaced by serine. These cysteines are located in extracellular loop 2, the role of which in the structure and function of the eukaryotic neurotransmitter:sodium:symporters remains unknown. The inhibition of transport of S359C by the oxidant was markedly reduced under conditions expected to increase the proportion of inward-facing transporters, whereas the reactivity of the mutants to a membrane-impermeant sulfhydryl reagent was not conformationally sensitive. Our data suggest that extracellular loops 2 and 4 come into close proximity to each other in the outward-facing conformation of GAT-1. PMID:25339171

  11. Downregulation of GABA[Subscript A] Receptor Protein Subunits a6, ß2, d, e, ?2, ?, and ?2 in Superior Frontal Cortex of Subjects with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fatemi, S. Hossein; Reutiman, Teri J.; Folsom, Timothy D.; Rustan, Oyvind G.; Rooney, Robert J.; Thuras, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    We measured protein and mRNA levels for nine gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABA[subscript A]) receptor subunits in three brain regions (cerebellum, superior frontal cortex, and parietal cortex) in subjects with autism versus matched controls. We observed changes in mRNA for a number of GABA[subscript A] and GABA[subscript B] subunits and overall…

  12. Downregulation of GABA[Subscript A] Receptor Protein Subunits a6, 2, d, e, ?2, ?, and ?2 in Superior Frontal Cortex of Subjects with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fatemi, S. Hossein; Reutiman, Teri J.; Folsom, Timothy D.; Rustan, Oyvind G.; Rooney, Robert J.; Thuras, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    We measured protein and mRNA levels for nine gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABA[subscript A]) receptor subunits in three brain regions (cerebellum, superior frontal cortex, and parietal cortex) in subjects with autism versus matched controls. We observed changes in mRNA for a number of GABA[subscript A] and GABA[subscript B] subunits and overall

  13. Novel GABA receptor pesticide targets.

    PubMed

    Casida, John E; Durkin, Kathleen A

    2015-06-01

    The ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor has four distinct but overlapping and coupled targets of pesticide action importantly associated with little or no cross-resistance. The target sites are differentiated by binding assays with specific radioligands, resistant strains, site-directed mutagenesis and molecular modeling. Three of the targets are for non-competitive antagonists (NCAs) or channel blockers of widely varied chemotypes. The target of the first generation (20th century) NCAs differs between the larger or elongated compounds (NCA-IA) including many important insecticides of the past (cyclodienes and polychlorocycloalkanes) or present (fiproles) and the smaller or compact compounds (NCA-IB) highly toxic to mammals and known as cage convulsants, rodenticides or chemical threat agents. The target of greatest current interest is designated NCA-II for the second generation (21st century) of NCAs consisting for now of isoxazolines and meta-diamides. This new and uniquely different NCA-II site apparently differs enough between insects and mammals to confer selective toxicity. The fourth target is the avermectin site (AVE) for allosteric modulators of the chloride channel. NCA pesticides vary in molecular surface area and solvent accessible volume relative to avermectin with NCA-IBs at 20-22%, NCA-IAs at 40-45% and NCA-IIs at 57-60%. The same type of relationship relative to ligand-docked length is 27-43% for NCA-IBs, 63-71% for NCA-IAs and 85-105% for NCA-IIs. The four targets are compared by molecular modeling for the Drosophila melanogaster GABA-R. The principal sites of interaction are proposed to be: pore V1' and A2' for NCA-IB compounds; pore A2', L6' and T9' for NCA-IA compounds; pore T9' to S15' in proximity to M1/M3 subunit interface (or alternatively an interstitial site) for NCA-II compounds; and M1/M3, M2 interfaces for AVE. Understanding the relationships of these four binding sites is important in resistance management and in the discovery and use of safe and effective pest control agents. PMID:26047108

  14. Stimulation of TM3 Leydig cell proliferation via GABAA receptors: A new role for testicular GABA

    PubMed Central

    Geigerseder, Christof; Doepner, Richard FG; Thalhammer, Andrea; Krieger, Annette; Mayerhofer, Artur

    2004-01-01

    The neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and subtypes of GABA receptors were recently identified in adult testes. Since adult Leydig cells possess both the GABA biosynthetic enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), as well as GABAA and GABAB receptors, it is possible that GABA may act as auto-/paracrine molecule to regulate Leydig cell function. The present study was aimed to examine effects of GABA, which may include trophic action. This assumption is based on reports pinpointing GABA as regulator of proliferation and differentiation of developing neurons via GABAA receptors. Assuming such a role for the developing testis, we studied whether GABA synthesis and GABA receptors are already present in the postnatal testis, where fetal Leydig cells and, to a much greater extend, cells of the adult Leydig cell lineage proliferate. Immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR, Western blotting and a radioactive enzymatic GAD assay evidenced that fetal Leydig cells of five-six days old rats possess active GAD protein, and that both fetal Leydig cells and cells of the adult Leydig cell lineage possess GABAA receptor subunits. TM3 cells, a proliferating mouse Leydig cell line, which we showed to possess GABAA receptor subunits by RT-PCR, served to study effects of GABA on proliferation. Using a colorimetric proliferation assay and Western Blotting for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) we demonstrated that GABA or the GABAA agonist isoguvacine significantly increased TM3 cell number and PCNA content in TM3 cells. These effects were blocked by the GABAA antagonist bicuculline, implying a role for GABAA receptors. In conclusion, GABA increases proliferation of TM3 Leydig cells via GABAA receptor activation and proliferating Leydig cells in the postnatal rodent testis bear a GABAergic system. Thus testicular GABA may play an as yet unrecognized role in the development of Leydig cells during the differentiation of the testicular interstitial compartment. PMID:15040802

  15. Comparative Mapping of GABA-Immunoreactive Neurons in the Buccal Ganglia of Nudipleura Molluscs.

    PubMed

    Gunaratne, Charuni A; Katz, Paul S

    2016-04-15

    Phylogenetic comparisons of neurotransmitter distribution are important for understanding the ground plan organization of nervous systems. This study describes the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-immunoreactive (GABA-ir) neurons in the buccal ganglia of six sea slug species (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Euthyneura, Nudipleura). In the nudibranch species, Hermissenda crassicornis, Tritonia diomedea, Tochuina tetraquetra, and Dendronotus iris, the number of GABA-ir neurons was highly consistent. Another nudibranch, Melibe leonina, however, contained approximately half the number of GABA-ir neurons. This may relate to its loss of a radula and its unique feeding behavior. The GABA immunoreactivity in a sister group to the nudibranchs, Pleurobranchaea californica, differed drastically from that of the nudibranchs. Not only did it have significantly more GABA-ir neurons but it also had a unique GABA distribution pattern. Furthermore, unlike the nudibranchs, the Pleurobranchaea GABA distribution was also different from that of other, more distantly related, euopisthobranch and panpulmonate snails and slugs. This suggests that the Pleurobranchaea GABA distribution may be a derived feature, unique to this lineage. The majority of GABA-ir axons and neuropil in the Nudipleura were restricted to the buccal ganglia, commissures, and connectives. However, in Tritonia and Pleurobranchaea, we detected a few GABA-ir fibers in buccal nerves that innervate feeding muscles. Although the specific functions of the GABA-ir neurons in the species in this study are not known, the innervation pattern suggests these neurons may play an integrative or regulatory role in bilaterally coordinated behaviors in the Nudipleura. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:1181-1192, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26355705

  16. Neurotransmitters as food supplements: the effects of GABA on brain and behavior

    PubMed Central

    Boonstra, Evert; de Kleijn, Roy; Colzato, Lorenza S.; Alkemade, Anneke; Forstmann, Birte U.; Nieuwenhuis, Sander

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the human cortex. The food supplement version of GABA is widely available online. Although many consumers claim that they experience benefits from the use of these products, it is unclear whether these supplements confer benefits beyond a placebo effect. Currently, the mechanism of action behind these products is unknown. It has long been thought that GABA is unable to cross the blood–brain barrier (BBB), but the studies that have assessed this issue are often contradictory and range widely in their employed methods. Accordingly, future research needs to establish the effects of oral GABA administration on GABA levels in the human brain, for example using magnetic resonance spectroscopy. There is some evidence in favor of a calming effect of GABA food supplements, but most of this evidence was reported by researchers with a potential conflict of interest. We suggest that any veridical effects of GABA food supplements on brain and cognition might be exerted through BBB passage or, more indirectly, via an effect on the enteric nervous system. We conclude that the mechanism of action of GABA food supplements is far from clear, and that further work is needed to establish the behavioral effects of GABA. PMID:26500584

  17. Development of tolerance to the effects of vigabatrin (gamma-vinyl-GABA) on GABA release from rat cerebral cortex, spinal cord and retina.

    PubMed Central

    Neal, M. J.; Shah, M. A.

    1990-01-01

    1. The effects of acute and chronic vigabatrin (gamma-vinyl-GABA) (GVG) administration on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels and release in rat cortical slices, spinal cord slices and retinas were studied. 2. GVG (250 mgkg-1 i.p.) administered to rats 18 h before death (acute administration) produced an almost 3 fold increase in GABA levels of the cortex and spinal cord and a 6 fold increase in retinal GABA. The levels of glutamate, aspartate, glycine and taurine were unaffected. 3. When GVG (250 mgkg-1 i.p.) was administered daily for 17 days (chronic administration) a similar (almost 3 fold) increase in cortical GABA occurred but the increases in spinal and retinal GABA were reduced by approximately 40%. 4. Acute administration of GVG strikingly increased the potassium-evoked release (KCl 50 mM) of GABA from all three tissues. This enhanced evoked release was reduced by about 50% in tissues taken from rats that had been chronically treated with GVG. 5. Acute administration of GVG reduced GABA-transaminase (GABA-T) activity by approximately 80% in cortex and cord and by 98% in the retina. Following the chronic administration of GVG, there was a trend for GABA-T activities to recover (significant only in cortex). Acute administration of GVG had no effect on glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) activity in cortex or spinal cord. However, chronic treatment resulted in significant decreases in GAD activity in both the cortex and cord (35% and 50% reduction respectively).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2379037

  18. Focal uncaging of GABA reveals a temporally defined role for GABAergic inhibition during appetitive associative olfactory conditioning in honeybees.

    PubMed

    Raccuglia, Davide; Mueller, Uli

    2013-08-01

    Throughout the animal kingdom, the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a key modulator of physiological processes including learning. With respect to associative learning, the exact time in which GABA interferes with the molecular events of learning has not yet been clearly defined. To address this issue, we used two different approaches to activate GABA receptors during appetitive olfactory conditioning in the honeybee. Injection of GABA-A receptor agonist muscimol 20 min before but not 20 min after associative conditioning affects memory performance. These memory deficits were attenuated by additional training sessions. Muscimol has no effect on sensory perception, odor generalization, and nonassociative learning, indicating a specific role of GABA during associative conditioning. We used photolytic uncaging of GABA to identify the GABA-sensitive time window during the short pairing of the conditioned stimulus (CS) and the unconditioned stimulus (US) that lasts only seconds. Either uncaging of GABA in the antennal lobes or the mushroom bodies during the CS presentation of the CS-US pairing impairs memory formation, while uncaging GABA during the US phase has no effect on memory. Uncaging GABA during the CS presentation in memory retrieval also has no effect. Thus, in honeybee appetitive olfactory learning GABA specifically interferes with the integration of CS and US during associative conditioning and exerts a modulatory role in memory formation depending on the training strength. PMID:23860600

  19. Amiloride and GMQ Allosteric Modulation of the GABA-A ρ1 Receptor: Influences of the Intersubunit Site.

    PubMed

    Snell, Heather D; Gonzales, Eric B

    2015-06-01

    Amiloride, a diuretic used in the treatment of hypertension and congestive heart failure, and 2-guanidine-4-methylquinazoline (GMQ) are guanidine compounds that modulate acid-sensing ion channels. Both compounds have demonstrated affinity for a variety of membrane proteins, including members of the Cys-loop family of ligand-gated ion channels, such as the heteromeric GABA-A αβγ receptors. The actions of these guanidine compounds on the homomeric GABA-A ρ1 receptor remains unclear, especially in light of how many GABA-A αβγ receptor modulators have different effects in the GABA-A ρ1 receptors. We sought to characterize the influence of amiloride and GMQ on the human GABA-A ρ1 receptors using whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology. The diuretic amiloride potentiated the human GABA-A ρ1 GABA-mediated current, whereas GMQ antagonized the receptor. Furthermore, a GABA-A second transmembrane domain site, the intersubunit site, responsible for allosteric modulation in the heteromeric GABA-A receptors mediated amiloride's positive allosteric actions. In contrast, the mutation did not remove GMQ antagonism but only changed the guanidine compound's potency within the human GABA-A ρ1 receptor. Through modeling and introduction of point mutations, we propose that the GABA-A ρ1 intersubunit site plays a role in mediating the allosteric effects of amiloride and GMQ. PMID:25829529

  20. Potentiation of the ionotropic GABA receptor response by whiskey fragrance.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Sheikh Julfikar; Aoshima, Hitoshi; Koda, Hirofumi; Kiso, Yoshinobu

    2002-11-01

    It is well-known that the target of most mood-defining compounds is an ionotropic gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABA(A) receptor). The potentiation of the response of these inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors induces anxiolytic, sedative, and anesthetic activity in the human brain. To study the effects of whiskey fragrance on the GABA(A) receptor-mediated response, GABA(A) receptors were expressed in Xenopus oocyte by injecting rat whole brain mRNA or cRNA prepared from the cloned cDNA for the alpha(1) and beta(1) subunits of the bovine receptors. Most whiskey components such as phenol, ethoxy, and lactone derivatives potentiated the electrical responses of GABA(A) receptors, especially ethyl phenylpropanoate (EPP), which strongly potentiated the response. When this compound was applied to mice through respiration, the convulsions induced by pentetrazole were delayed, suggesting that EPP was absorbed by the brain, where it could potentiate the GABA(A) receptor responses. The extract of other alcoholic drinks such as wine, sake, brandy, and shochu also potentiated the responses to varying degrees. Although these fragrant components are present in alcoholic drinks at low concentrations (extremely small quantities compared with ethanol), they may also modulate the mood or consciousness of the human through the potentiation of the GABA(A) receptor response after absorption into the brain, because these hydrophobic fragrant compounds are easily absorbed into the brain through the blood-brain barrier and are several thousands times as potent as ethanol in the potentiation of the GABA(A) receptor-mediated response. PMID:12405783

  1. Pharmacology of skeletal muscle GABA-gated chloride channels in the cockroach Periplaneta americana.

    PubMed

    Schnee, M; Rauh, J; Buckingham, S D; Sattelle, D B

    1997-12-01

    The pharmacology of -aminobutyric acid (GABA)-gated chloride channels of the coxal levator (182c,d) muscle of the cockroach Periplaneta americana has been investigated and the data compared with similar findings for the cell body of the cockroach fast coxal depressor motor neurone (Df). Muscle GABA receptors resembled those of the motor neurone cell body in their sensitivity to picrotoxinin and insensitivity to bicuculline. However, muscle GABA receptors were insensitive to the neuronal GABA receptor agonists isoguvacine (10(-4) mol l-1) and 3-aminopropane sulphonic acid (10(-3 )mol l-1). The benzodiazepine flunitrazepam, which at 10(-6 )mol l-1 greatly enhances the amplitude of the motor neurone GABA-induced responses, failed to affect muscle responses to GABA when tested at the same and at a higher (10(-4 )mol l-1) concentration. The convulsant t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate was a weak antagonist of cockroach muscle GABA receptors, whereas several cyclodienes were much more effective antagonists. Thus, studies using a benzodiazepine and several convulsant antagonists reveal differences in the pharmacology of muscle and neuronal GABA receptors of the cockroach Periplaneta americana. PMID:9359880

  2. Role of proline and GABA in sexual reproduction of angiosperms

    PubMed Central

    Biancucci, Marco; Mattioli, Roberto; Forlani, Giuseppe; Funck, Dietmar; Costantino, Paolo; Trovato, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Two glutamate derivatives, proline and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), appear to play pivotal roles in different aspects of sexual reproduction in angiosperms, although their precise function in plant reproduction and the molecular basis of their action are not yet fully understood. Proline and GABA have long been regarded as pivotal amino acids in pollen vitality and fertility. Proline may constitute up to 70% of the free amino acid pool in pollen grains and it has been recently shown that Arabidopsis mutants affected in the first and rate-limiting step in proline synthesis produce aberrant and infertile pollen grains, indicating that proline synthesis is required for pollen development and fertility. Concerning GABA, a large body of evidence points to this glutamate derivative as a key determinant of post-pollination fertilization. Intriguingly, proline has also been associated with pollination, another aspect of sexual reproduction, since honeybees were reported to show a strong preference for proline-enriched nectars. In this review, we survey current knowledge on the roles of proline and GABA in plant fertility, and discuss future perspectives potentially capable to improve our understanding on the functions of these amino acids in pollen development, pollination, and pollen tube guidance. PMID:26388884

  3. Attenuated inhibition by levofloxacin, l-isomer of ofloxacin, on GABA response in the dissociated rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Imanishi, T; Akahane, K; Akaike, N

    1995-06-30

    The effects of ofloxacin (OFLX) and its isomers, levofloxacin (LVFX) and DR-3354, on the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-induced Cl- current in acutely dissociated rat hippocampal CA1 neurons were investigated using nystatin perforated patch recording configuration under voltage-clamp conditions. At 10(-5) M these 3 compounds themselves did not affect the GABA response. Biphenylacetic acid (BPA) at 10(-5) M also had no effect on the GABA response, but BPA greatly suppressed the GABA response in combination with these 3 compounds without affecting the reversal potential of GABA response. The inhibitory effects of OFLX and DR-3354 on the GABA response were stronger than that of LVFX. LVFX inhibited the response in a competitive and voltage-independent manner. The results suggest that LVFX has lower CNS adverse effects, such as convulsions, compared to OFLX. PMID:7478164

  4. Actions of insecticides on the insect GABA receptor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Bermudez, I.; Hawkins, C.A.; Taylor, A.M.; Beadle, D.J. )

    1991-01-01

    The actions of insecticides on the insect gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor were investigated using (35S)t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (( 35S)TBPS) binding and voltage-clamp techniques. Specific binding of (35S)TBPS to a membrane homogenate derived from the brain of Locusta migratoria locusts is characterised by a Kd value of 79.3 {plus minus} 2.9 nM and a Bmax value of 1770 {plus minus} 40 fmol/mg protein. (35S)TBPS binding is inhibited by mM concentrations of barbiturates and benzodiazepines. In contrast dieldrin, ivermectin, lindane, picrotoxin and TBPS are inhibitors of (35S)TBPS binding at the nanomolar range. Bicuculline, baclofen and pyrethroid insecticides have no effect on (35S)TBPS binding. These results are similar to those obtained in electrophysiological studies of the current elicited by GABA in both Locusta and Periplaneta americana central neurones. Noise analysis of the effects of lindane, TBPS, dieldrin and picrotoxin on the cockroach GABA responses reveals that these compounds decrease the variance of the GABA-induced current but have no effect on its mean open time. All these compounds, with the exception of dieldrin, significantly decrease the conductance of GABA-evoked single current.

  5. GABA receptors modulate trigeminovascular nociceptive neurotransmission in the trigeminocervical complex

    PubMed Central

    Storer, R James; Akerman, Simon; Goadsby, Peter J

    2001-01-01

    GABA (?-aminobutyric acid) receptors involved in craniovascular nociceptive pathways were characterised by in vivo microiontophoresis of GABA receptor agonists and antagonists onto neurones in the trigeminocervical complex of the cat.Extracellular recordings were made from neurones in the trigeminocervical complex activated by supramaximal electrical stimulation of superior sagittal sinus, which were subsequently stimulated with L-glutamate.Cell firing evoked by microiontophoretic application of L-glutamate (n=30) was reversibly inhibited by GABA in every cell tested (n=19), the GABAA agonist muscimol (n=10) in all cells tested, or both where tested, but not by iontophoresis of either sodium or chloride ions at comparable ejection currents. Inhibited cells received wide dynamic range (WDR) or nociceptive specific input from cutaneous receptive fields on the face or forepaws.The inhibition of trigeminal neurones by GABA or muscimol could be antagonized by the GABAA antagonist N-methylbicuculline, 1(S),9(R) in all but two cells tested (n=16), but not by the GABAB antagonist 2-hydroxysaclofen (n=11).R(?)-baclofen, a GABAB agonist, inhibited the firing of three out of seven cells activated by L-glutamate. Where tested, this inhibition could be antagonized by 2-hydroxysaclofen. These baclofen-inhibited cells were characterized as having low threshold mechanoreceptor/WDR input.GABA thus appears to modulate nociceptive input to the trigeminocervical complex mainly through GABAA receptors. GABAA receptors may therefore provide a target for the development of new therapeutic agents for primary headache disorders. PMID:11606331

  6. GABA signalling modulates plant growth by directly regulating the activity of plant-specific anion transporters

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Sunita A.; Tyerman, Stephen D.; Xu, Bo; Bose, Jayakumar; Kaur, Satwinder; Conn, Vanessa; Domingos, Patricia; Ullah, Sana; Wege, Stefanie; Shabala, Sergey; Feijó, José A.; Ryan, Peter R.; Gillham, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    The non-protein amino acid, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) rapidly accumulates in plant tissues in response to biotic and abiotic stress, and regulates plant growth. Until now it was not known whether GABA exerts its effects in plants through the regulation of carbon metabolism or via an unidentified signalling pathway. Here, we demonstrate that anion flux through plant aluminium-activated malate transporter (ALMT) proteins is activated by anions and negatively regulated by GABA. Site-directed mutagenesis of selected amino acids within ALMT proteins abolishes GABA efficacy but does not alter other transport properties. GABA modulation of ALMT activity results in altered root growth and altered root tolerance to alkaline pH, acid pH and aluminium ions. We propose that GABA exerts its multiple physiological effects in plants via ALMT, including the regulation of pollen tube and root growth, and that GABA can finally be considered a legitimate signalling molecule in both the plant and animal kingdoms. PMID:26219411

  7. GABA signalling modulates plant growth by directly regulating the activity of plant-specific anion transporters.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Sunita A; Tyerman, Stephen D; Xu, Bo; Bose, Jayakumar; Kaur, Satwinder; Conn, Vanessa; Domingos, Patricia; Ullah, Sana; Wege, Stefanie; Shabala, Sergey; Feijó, José A; Ryan, Peter R; Gilliham, Matthew; Gillham, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    The non-protein amino acid, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) rapidly accumulates in plant tissues in response to biotic and abiotic stress, and regulates plant growth. Until now it was not known whether GABA exerts its effects in plants through the regulation of carbon metabolism or via an unidentified signalling pathway. Here, we demonstrate that anion flux through plant aluminium-activated malate transporter (ALMT) proteins is activated by anions and negatively regulated by GABA. Site-directed mutagenesis of selected amino acids within ALMT proteins abolishes GABA efficacy but does not alter other transport properties. GABA modulation of ALMT activity results in altered root growth and altered root tolerance to alkaline pH, acid pH and aluminium ions. We propose that GABA exerts its multiple physiological effects in plants via ALMT, including the regulation of pollen tube and root growth, and that GABA can finally be considered a legitimate signalling molecule in both the plant and animal kingdoms. PMID:26219411

  8. Decreased intracellular GABA levels contribute to spinal cord stimulation-induced analgesia in rats suffering from painful peripheral neuropathy: the role of KCC2 and GABA(A) receptor-mediated inhibition.

    PubMed

    Janssen, S P; Gerard, S; Raijmakers, M E; Truin, M; Van Kleef, M; Joosten, E A

    2012-01-01

    Elevated spinal extracellular ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels have been described during spinal cord stimulation (SCS)-induced analgesia in experimental chronic peripheral neuropathy. Interestingly, these increased GABA levels strongly exceeded the time frame of SCS-induced analgesia. In line with the former, pharmacologically-enhanced extracellular GABA levels by GABA(B) receptor agonists in combination with SCS in non-responders to SCS solely could convert these non-responders into responders. However, similar treatment with GABA(A) receptor agonists and SCS is known to be less efficient. Since K? Cl? cotransporter 2 (KCC2) functionality strongly determines proper GABA(A) receptor-mediated inhibition, both decreased numbers of GABA(A) receptors as well as reduced KCC2 protein expression might play a pivotal role in this loss of GABA(A) receptor-mediated inhibition in non-responders. Here, we explored the mechanisms underlying both changes in extracellular GABA levels and impaired GABA(A) receptor-mediated inhibition after 30 min of SCS in rats suffering from partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSNL). Immediately after cessation of SCS, a decreased spinal intracellular dorsal horn GABA-immunoreactivity was observed in responders when compared to non-responders or sham SCS rats. One hour later however, GABA-immunoreactivity was already increased to similar levels as those observed in non-responder or sham SCS rats. These changes did not coincide with alterations in the number of GABA-immunoreactive cells. C-Fos/GABA double-fluorescence clearly confirmed a SCS-induced activation of GABA-immunoreactive cells in responders immediately after SCS. Differences in spinal dorsal horn GABA(A) receptor-immunoreactivity and KCC2 protein levels were absent between all SCS groups. However, KCC2 protein levels were significantly decreased compared to sham PSNL animals. In conclusion, reduced intracellular GABA levels are only present during the time frame of SCS in responders and strongly point to a SCS-mediated on/off GABAergic release mechanism. Furthermore, a KCC2-dependent impaired GABA(A) receptor-mediated inhibition seems to be present both in responders and non-responders to SCS due to similar KCC2 and GABA(A) receptor levels. PMID:22107704

  9. Insect Herbivory-Elicited GABA Accumulation in Plants is a Wound-Induced, Direct, Systemic, and Jasmonate-Independent Defense Response

    PubMed Central

    Scholz, Sandra S.; Reichelt, Michael; Mekonnen, Dereje W.; Ludewig, Frank; Mithöfer, Axel

    2015-01-01

    The non-proteinogenic amino acid γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is present in all organisms analyzed so far. In invertebrates GABA acts as a neurotransmitter; in plants different functions are under discussion. Among others, its involvement in abiotic stress reactions and as a defensive compound against feeding insects is suggested. GABA is synthesized from glutamate by glutamate decarboxylases and degraded by GABA-transaminases. Here, in Arabidopsis thaliana, gad1/2 double mutants showing reduced GABA concentrations as well as GABA-enriched triple mutants (gad1/2 x pop2-5) were generated and employed for a systematic study of GABA induction, accumulation and related effects in Arabidopsis leaves upon herbivory. The results demonstrate that GABA accumulation is stimulated by insect feeding-like wounding by a robotic caterpillar, MecWorm, as well as by real insect (Spodoptera littoralis) herbivory. Higher GABA levels in both plant tissue and artificial dietary supplements in turn affect the performance of feeding larvae. GABA enrichment occurs not only in the challenged but also in adjacent leaf. This induced response is neither dependent on herbivore defense-related phytohormones, jasmonates, nor is jasmonate induction dependent on the presence of GABA. Thus, in Arabidopsis the rapid accumulation of GABA very likely represents a general, direct and systemic defense reaction against insect herbivores. PMID:26734035

  10. Morphological and electrophysiological evidence for an ionotropic GABA receptor of novel pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Shen, D-W; Higgs, M H; Salvay, D; Olney, J W; Lukasiewicz, P D; Romano, C

    2002-01-01

    Evidence from toxicological studies suggested that an ionotropic GABA receptor of novel pharmacology (picrotoxin-insensitive, bicuculline-sensitive) exists in the chick embryo retina. In this report, we provide direct morphological and electrophysiological evidence for the existence of such an iGABA receptor. Chick embryo retinas (14-16 days old) incubated in the presence of kainic acid showed pronounced histopathology in all retinal layers. Maximal protection from this toxicity required a combination of bicuculline and picrotoxin. Individual application of the antagonists indicated that a picrotoxin-insensitive, bicuculline-sensitive GABA receptor is likely to be present on ganglion and amacrine, but not bipolar, cells. GABA currents in embryonic and mature chicken retinal neurons were measured by whole cell patch clamp. GABA was puffed at the dendritic processes in the IPL. Picrotoxin (500 microM, in the bath) eliminated all (>95%) the GABA current in the majority of ganglion and amacrine cells tested, but many cells possessed a substantial picrotoxin-insensitive component. This current was eliminated by bicuculline (200 microM). This current was not a transporter-associated current, since it was not altered by GABA transport blockers or sodium removal. The current-voltage relation was linear and reversed near E(Cl), as expected for a ligand-gated chloride current. Both pentobarbital and lorazepam enhanced the picrotoxin-insensitive current. We conclude that chicken retinal ganglion and amacrine cells express a GABA receptor that is GABA-A-like, in that it can be blocked by bicuculline, and positively modulated by barbiturates and benzodiazepines, but is insensitive to the noncompetitive blocker picrotoxin. Understanding the molecular properties of this receptor will be important for understanding both physiological GABA neurotransmission and the pathology of GABA receptor overactivation. PMID:11784747

  11. Excitatory Synaptic Responses Mediated by GABA_A Receptors in the Hippocampus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelson, Hillary B.; Wong, Robert K. S.

    1991-09-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the cortex. Activation of postsynaptic GABA_A receptors hyperpolarizes cells and inhibits neuronal activity. Synaptic responses mediated by GABA_A receptors also strongly excited hippocampal neurons. This excitatory response was recorded in morphologically identified interneurons in the presence of 4-aminopyridine or after elevation of extracellular potassium concentrations. The synaptic excitation sustained by GABA_A receptors synchronized the activity of inhibitory interneurons. This synchronized discharge of interneurons in turn elicited large-amplitude inhibitory postsynaptic potentials in pyramidal and granule cells. Excitatory synaptic responses mediated by GABA_A receptors may thus provide a mechanism for the recruitment of GABAergic interneurons through their recurrent connections.

  12. Temperature dependence and GABA modulation of (TH)triazolam binding in the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Earle, M.E.; Concas, A.; Wamsley, J.K.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1987-07-27

    The hypnotic triazolam (TZ), a triazolobenzodiazepine displays a short physiological half life and has been used for the treatment of insomnia related to anxiety states. The authors major objectives were the direct measurement of the temperature dependence and the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) effect of (TH)TZ binding in the rat brain. Saturation studies showed a shift to lower affinity with increasing temperatures (K/sub d/ = 0.27 +/- 08 nM at 0C; K/sub d/ = 1.96 +/- 0.85 nM at 37C) while the B/sub max/ values remained unchanged (1220 +/- 176 fmoles/mg protein at 0C and 1160 +/- 383 fmoles/mg protein at 37C). Saturation studies of (TH)TZ binding in the presence or absence of GABA (100 M) showed a GABA-shift. At 0C the K/sub d/ values were (K/sub d/ = 0.24 +/- 0.03 nM/-GABA; K/sub d/ = 0.16 +/- 0.04/+GABA) and at 37C the K/sub d/ values were (K/sub d/ = 1.84 +/- 0.44 nM/-GABA; K/sub d/ = 0.95 +/- 0.29 nM/+GABA). In contrast to reported literature, the authors findings show that TZ interacts with benzodiazepine receptors with a temperature dependence and GABA-shift consistent with predicted behavior for benzodiazepine agonists. 20 references, 3 tables.

  13. GABA-immunoreactive intrinsic and -immunonegative secondary neurons in the cat pineal organ.

    PubMed

    Vigh-Teichmann, I; Petter, H; Vigh, B

    1991-01-01

    The pineal organ of the cat was studied by postembedding gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) immunocytochemistry. Two polyclonal rabbit GABA antisera were used with light microscopic peroxidase and electron microscopic immunogold techniques. A considerable number of intrinsic neurons are scattered in the proximal portion of the pineal organ. Some of the nerve cells were GABA-immunoreactive; other neurons as well as pinealocytes and glial/ependymal cells were immunonegative. A few GABA-immunoreactive neurons behave like CSF-contacting neurons by penetrating the ependymal lining of the pineal recess. GABA-immunoreactive neurons were more frequently found in the subependymal region. Small bundles of thin immunoreactive unmyelinated and thick immunoreactive myelinated nerve fibers occurred in the proximal pineal, especially near the habenular commissure. There were synapses of various types between GABA-immunoreactive and -immunonegative fibers. Myelinated immunoreactive axons seemed to loose their sheaths after entering the organ. Axon-like processes of pinealocytes terminated on dendrites of immunonegative neurons present near the posterior and habenular commissures. The axons of these neurons were found to join the commissural fibers and may represent a pinealofugal pathway conducting information originating from pinealocytes. The pinealocytic axons forming ribbon-containing synapses on dendrites of secondary neurons speak in favor of the sensory-cell nature of the pinealocytes. The pinealopetal myelinated GABA-immunoreactive axons and the intrinsic "GABA-ergic" neurons are proposed to inhibit the action of intrapineal neurons on which the pinealocytic axons terminate. PMID:2056427

  14. GABA Concentration in Posterior Cingulate Cortex Predicts Putamen Response during Resting State fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Arrubla, Jorge; Tse, Desmond H. Y.; Amkreutz, Christin; Neuner, Irene; Shah, N. Jon

    2014-01-01

    The role of neurotransmitters in the activity of resting state networks has been gaining attention and has become a field of research with magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) being one of the key techniques. MRS permits the measurement of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate levels, the central biochemical constituents of the excitation-inhibition balance in vivo. The inhibitory effects of GABA in the brain have been largely investigated in relation to the activity of resting state networks in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). In this study GABA concentration in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) was measured using single voxel spectra acquired with standard point resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) from 20 healthy male volunteers at 3 T. Resting state fMRI was consecutively measured and the values of GABA/Creatine+Phosphocreatine ratio (GABA ratio) were included in a general linear model matrix as a step of dual regression analysis in order to identify voxels whose neuroimaging metrics during rest were related to individual levels of the GABA ratio. Our data show that the connection strength of putamen to the default-mode network during resting state has a negative linear relationship with the GABA ratio measured in the PCC. These findings highlight the role of PCC and GABA in segregation of the motor input, which is an inherent condition that characterises resting state. PMID:25184505

  15. Actions of the insecticide fipronil, on dieldrin-sensitive and- resistant GABA receptors of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Hosie, A. M.; Baylis, H. A.; Buckingham, S. D.; Sattelle, D. B.

    1995-01-01

    1. Blocking actions of the novel insecticide, fipronil, were examined on GABA responses recorded from Xenopus oocytes expressing either wild type (dieldrin-sensitive) or mutant (dieldrin-resistant) forms of the Drosophila melanogaster GABA-gated chloride channel homo-oligomer, RDL (the product of the resistance to dieldrin locus: Rdl). 2. In the case of the wild type receptor, fipronil blocked GABA-induced currents inducing both a shift to the right in the GABA dose-response curve and depressing the maximum amplitude of responses to GABA. The potency of fipronil was dependent on the GABA concentration but was unaffected by membrane potential. 3. Mutant RDL GABA-receptors, which have a naturally occurring amino acid substitution (A302-->S) in the putative ion-channel lining region, conferring resistance to dieldrin and picrotoxinin, were markedly less sensitive to fipronil than the wild-type receptors. 4. Fipronil antagonism is qualitatively similar to that produced by the structurally distinct compound, picrotoxinin. As the mutation A302-->S reduces the potency of both fipronil and picrotoxinin, homooligomeric RDL receptors should facilitate detailed studies of the molecular basis of convulsant/insecticide antagonist actions on GABA receptors. PMID:7582519

  16. Effect of GABA, a Bacterial Metabolite, on Pseudomonas fluorescens Surface Properties and Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Dagorn, Audrey; Chapalain, Annelise; Mijouin, Lily; Hillion, Mélanie; Duclairoir-Poc, Cécile; Chevalier, Sylvie; Taupin, Laure; Orange, Nicole; Feuilloley, Marc G. J.

    2013-01-01

    Different bacterial species and, particularly Pseudomonas fluorescens, can produce gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and express GABA-binding proteins. In this study, we investigated the effect of GABA on the virulence and biofilm formation activity of different strains of P. fluorescens. Exposure of a psychotropic strain of P. fluorescens (MF37) to GABA (10−5 M) increased its necrotic-like activity on eukaryotic (glial) cells, but reduced its apoptotic effect. Conversely, muscimol and bicuculline, the selective agonist and antagonist of eukaryote GABAA receptors, respectively, were ineffective. P. fluorescens MF37 did not produce biosurfactants, and its caseinase, esterase, amylase, hemolytic activity or pyoverdine productions were unchanged. In contrast, the effect of GABA was associated to rearrangements of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) structure, particularly in the lipid A region. The surface hydrophobicity of MF37 was marginally modified, and GABA reduced its biofilm formation activity on PVC, but not on glass, although the initial adhesion was increased. Five other P. fluorescens strains were studied, and only one, MFP05, a strain isolated from human skin, showed structural differences of biofilm maturation after exposure to GABA. These results reveal that GABA can regulate the LPS structure and cytotoxicity of P. fluorescens, but that this property is specific to some strains. PMID:23743829

  17. Drosophila melanogaster GRD and LCCH3 subunits form heteromultimeric GABA-gated cation channels

    PubMed Central

    Gisselmann, Gnter; Plonka, Justina; Pusch, Hermann; Hatt, Hanns

    2004-01-01

    In addition to its action as a fast inhibitory neurotransmitter, ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is thought to mediate excitatory action by activating cation currents in some cell types in invertebrates. However, to date no GABA receptor capable of mediating such action has been identified at the molecular level in insects. Using a systematic expression screening approach, we found that the Drosophila ligand-gated ion channel subunits GRD and LCCH3 combine to form cation-selective GABA-gated ion channels when coexpressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. The heteromultimeric receptor is activated by GABA (EC50=4.5 ?M), muscimol (EC50=4.8 ?M) and trans-4-aminocrotonic acid (EC50=104.5 ?M), and partially by cis-4-aminocrotonic acid (EC50=106.3 ?M). Picrotoxin effectively blocked the GABA-gated channel (IC50=0.25 ?M), but bicuculline, TPMTA, dieldrin and lindane did not. The benzodiazepines flunitrazepam and diazepam did not potentiate the GABA-evoked current. Our data suggest that heteromultimeric channels composed of GRD and LCCH3 subunits form GABA-gated cation channels in insects. PMID:15148245

  18. Aspartate immunoreactivity in the telencephalon of the adult sea lamprey: comparison with GABA immunoreactivity.

    PubMed

    Villar-Cervio, Verona; Barreiro-Iglesias, Antn; Anadn, Ramn; Rodicio, Mara Celina

    2008-03-18

    The excitatory amino acid l-aspartate (Asp) plays a number of roles in neuronal function. We studied the distribution of Asp-immunoreactive (ir) cells in the telencephalon of young and upstream migrating adult sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus, and compared it with the distribution of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) immunoreactivity, by using double immunofluorescence methods. Our results reveal for the first time the existence of Asp-ir neuronal populations in the lamprey forebrain. In the olfactory bulbs, Asp-ir neurons were observed in the mitral cell layer and in the inner cellular layer. Many granule-like cells were both Asp-ir and GABA-ir. In the pallium, Asp-ir cells were abundant in the lateral pallium and most of them were also GABA-ir. In the septum/terminal lamina nucleus, some cerebrospinal fluid-contacting type (CSF-c) cells were either Asp-ir or GABA-ir, and a few were double-labeled. Some non-CSF-c septal cells were both Asp-ir and GABA-ir. In the striatum, Asp-ir and/or GABA-ir cells were either subependymal or located in the characteristic arched cell row. In the lateral preoptic region, a few small Asp-ir/GABA-ir neurons were observed. In the caudal preoptic recess nucleus, numerous CSF-c cells were Asp-ir and/or GABA-ir. This study also reveals that colocalization of GABA and Asp immunoreactivities in telencephalic neurons is partial. Further investigation is required to establish whether Asp is a neurotransmitter and/or an intermediate in GABA synthesis in lamprey telencephalon. PMID:18331879

  19. GABA-shunt enzymes activity in GH3 cells with reduced level of PMCA2 or PMCA3 isoform

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalski, Antoni

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} Suppression of PMCA2 or PMCA3 slows down proliferation of GH3 cells. {yields} PMCA2 suppression lowers the activity of GABA-shunt enzymes. {yields} PMCA3 suppression increases the expression of glutamate decarboxylase 65. {yields} PMCA2 and PMCA3 function appears to be linked to regulation of GABA metabolism. -- Abstract: GABA ({gamma}-aminobutyric acid) is important neurotransmitter and regulator of endocrine functions. Its metabolism involves three enzymes: glutamate decarboxylase (GAD65 and GAD67), GABA aminotransferase (GABA-T) and succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH). As many cellular processes GABA turnover can depend on calcium homeostasis, which is maintained by plasma membrane calcium ATPases (PMCAs). In excitable cells PMCA2 and PMCA3 isoforms are particularly important. In this study we focused on GABA-metabolizing enzymes expression and activity in rat anterior pituitary GH3 cells with suppressed expression of PMCA2 or PMCA3. We observed that PMCA3-reduced cells have increased GAD65 expression. Suppression of PMCA2 caused a decrease in total GAD and GABA-T activity. These results indicate that PMCA2 and PMCA3 presence may be an important regulatory factor in GABA metabolism. Results suggest that PMCA2 and PMCA3 function is rather related to regulation of GABA synthesis and degradation than supplying cells with metabolites, which can be potentially energetic source.

  20. Involvement of GABA systems in feedback regulation of glutamate-and GABA-mediated synaptic potentials in rat neostriatum.

    PubMed Central

    Calabresi, P; Mercuri, N B; De Murtas, M; Bernardi, G

    1991-01-01

    1. Neostriatal neurones were recorded intracellularly from a rat corticostriatal slice preparation. Depolarizing postsynaptic potentials (DPSPs) were evoked by either cortical or intrastriatal stimulation. 2. Kynurenic acid (600 microM), an antagonist of excitatory amino acids, reduced the cortically-evoked DPSPs by 88% while the intrastriatally evoked potentials were reduced by 48%. Bicuculline (100 microM) produced only a slight inhibition of the cortically evoked DPSPs (12%), but clearly depressed intrastriatal potentials (52%). 3. The effects of (-)-baclofen, a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)B receptor agonist, were studied on the cortically evoked DPSPs. In all the tested neurones (-)-baclofen, added to the superfusion medium, caused a concentration-dependent decrease of these potentials (half-maximal effect (EC50) = 800 nM). This effect was not affected by bicuculline. (-)-Baclofen did not change the membrane potential, the input resistance, current-evoked firing frequency, or postsynaptic responses to exogenously applied glutamate. 4. The effects of (-)-baclofen on the DPSPs were compared to those produced by application of GABA and muscimol. GABA and muscimol decreased the DPSPs and caused a membrane depolarization coupled with a decrease of the membrane resistance. Bicuculline (100 microM) blocked the GABA-induced changes of the membrane potential and of the resistance, but not the decrease of the synaptic potentials. All the effects produced by muscimol were blocked by bicuculline. 5. Following intrastriatal stimulation a residual kynurenate-insensitive potential persisted; this potential was blocked by bicuculline (100 microM). (-)-Baclofen produced a dose-dependent decrease of this potential (EC50 = 800 nM). The postsynaptic responses to exogenously applied GABA were unchanged by (-)-baclofen. 6. The amplitude of kynurenate and bicuculline-sensitive DPSPs were stable at a frequency of 0.1 Hz. At frequencies between 0.3 and 3 Hz both these potentials were attenuated with the second stimulus and after about five stimuli a steady state was reached. Membrane potential and input resistance were not affected by these frequencies of stimulation. 7. Application of the GABA uptake inhibitor nipecotic acid (100-300 microM) clearly reduced the amplitude of both kynurenate-and bicuculline-sensitive DPSPs evoked at low frequencies of stimulation (0.01-0.3 Hz), but had lower effects at higher stimulation rates (1-3 Hz). Application of nipecotic acid increased the duration of membrane responses to exogenously applied GABA.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:1666654

  1. GABA/sub A/ receptor-controlled /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ influx in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kardos, J.; Maderspach, K.

    1987-07-20

    ..gamma..-Aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated and bicuculline-sensitive /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ influx and bicuculline-sensitive (/sup 3/H) GABA binding were demonstrated in cultures of rat cerebellar granule cells. The addition of 10/sup -5/ M GABA produced a two-fold increase in /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ influx over the basal level and the maximal increase was observed after approximately 20 sec. Progressive occupation of GABA/sub A/ receptor by (/sup 3/H)-(1S-9R)-bicuculline methiodide decreased /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ influx activated by 10 ..mu..M GABA. The above results suggest that primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule cells provide a new and reliable model for studying the GABA activated chloride fluxes. 41 references, 4 figures.

  2. GABA release from mouse axonal growth cones

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiao-Bing; van den Pol, Anthony N

    2000-01-01

    Using developing hypothalamic neurons from transgenic mice that express high levels of green fluorescent protein in growing axons, and an outside-out patch from mature neuronal membranes that contain neurotransmitter receptors as a sensitive detector, we found that GABA is released by a vesicular mechanism from the growth cones of developing axons prior to synapse formation. A low level of GABA release occurs spontaneously from the growth cone, and this is substantially increased by evoked action potentials. Neurotransmitters such as acetylcholine can enhance protein kinase C (PKC) activity even prior to synapse formation; PKC activation caused a substantial increase in spontaneous GABA release from the growth cone, probably acting at the axon terminal. These data indicate that GABA is secreted from axons during a stage of neuronal development when GABA is excitatory, and that neuromodulators could alter GABA release from the growing axon, potentially enabling other developing neurons of different transmitter phenotype to modulate the early actions of GABA. PMID:10718743

  3. A comparative density functional theory study of electronic structure and optical properties of ?-aminobutyric acid and its cocrystals with oxalic and benzoic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva Filho, J. G.; Freire, V. N.; Caetano, E. W. S.; Ladeira, L. O.; Fulco, U. L.; Albuquerque, E. L.

    2013-11-01

    In this letter, we study the electronic structure and optical properties of the active medicinal component ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and its cocrystals with oxalic (OXA) and benzoic (BZA) acid by means of the density functional theory formalism. It is shown that the cocrystallization strongly weakens the zwitterionic character of the GABA molecule leading to striking differences among the electronic band structures and optical absorption spectra of the GABA crystal and GABA:OXA, GABA:BZA cocrystals, originating from distinct sets of hydrogen bonds. Calculated band widths and ?-sol band gap estimates indicate that both GABA and GABA:OXA, GABA:BZA cocrystals are indirect gap insulators.

  4. Focal Uncaging of GABA Reveals a Temporally Defined Role for GABAergic Inhibition during Appetitive Associative Olfactory Conditioning in Honeybees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raccuglia, Davide; Mueller, Uli

    2013-01-01

    Throughout the animal kingdom, the inhibitory neurotransmitter ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a key modulator of physiological processes including learning. With respect to associative learning, the exact time in which GABA interferes with the molecular events of learning has not yet been clearly defined. To address this issue, we used two

  5. The Memory-Impairing Effects of Septal GABA Receptor Activation Involve GABAergic Septo-Hippocampal Projection Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krebs-Kraft, Desiree L.; Wheeler, Marina G.; Parent, Marise B.

    2007-01-01

    Septal infusions of the [gamma]-aminobutyric acid (GABA)[subscript A] agonist muscimol impair memory, and the effect likely involves the hippocampus. GABA[subscript A] receptors are present on the perikarya of cholinergic and GABAergic septo-hippocampal (SH) projections. The current experiments determined whether GABAergic SH projections are

  6. The Memory-Impairing Effects of Septal GABA Receptor Activation Involve GABAergic Septo-Hippocampal Projection Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krebs-Kraft, Desiree L.; Wheeler, Marina G.; Parent, Marise B.

    2007-01-01

    Septal infusions of the [gamma]-aminobutyric acid (GABA)[subscript A] agonist muscimol impair memory, and the effect likely involves the hippocampus. GABA[subscript A] receptors are present on the perikarya of cholinergic and GABAergic septo-hippocampal (SH) projections. The current experiments determined whether GABAergic SH projections are…

  7. Focal Uncaging of GABA Reveals a Temporally Defined Role for GABAergic Inhibition during Appetitive Associative Olfactory Conditioning in Honeybees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raccuglia, Davide; Mueller, Uli

    2013-01-01

    Throughout the animal kingdom, the inhibitory neurotransmitter ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a key modulator of physiological processes including learning. With respect to associative learning, the exact time in which GABA interferes with the molecular events of learning has not yet been clearly defined. To address this issue, we used two…

  8. Medial frontal GABA is lower in older schizophrenia: a MEGA-PRESS with macromolecule suppression study.

    PubMed

    Rowland, L M; Krause, B W; Wijtenburg, S A; McMahon, R P; Chiappelli, J; Nugent, K L; Nisonger, S J; Korenic, S A; Kochunov, P; Hong, L E

    2016-02-01

    Gamma-butyric acid (GABA) dysfunction has been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and its cognitive deficits. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was used to test the hypothesis that older participants with schizophrenia have lower anterior cingulate GABA levels compared with older control participants. One-hundred forty-five participants completed this study. For detection of GABA, spectra were acquired from the medial frontal/anterior cingulate cortex using a macromolecule-suppressed MEGA-PRESS sequence. Patients were evaluated for psychopathology and all participants completed neuropsychological tests of working memory, processing speed and functional capacity. GABA levels were significantly lower in the older participants with schizophrenia (n=31) compared with the older control (n=37) group (P=0.003) but not between the younger control (n=40) and schizophrenia (n=29) groups (P=0.994). Age strongly predicted GABA levels in the schizophrenia group accounting for 42% of the variance, but the effect of age was less in the control group accounting for 5.7% of the variance. GABA levels were specifically related to working memory but not processing speed performance, functional capacity, or positive or negative symptom severity. This is the largest MRS study of GABA in schizophrenia and the first to examine GABA without macromolecule contamination, a potentially significant issue in previous studies. GABA levels more rapidly declined with advancing age in the schizophrenia compared with the control group. Interventions targeted at halting the decline or increasing GABA levels may improve functional outcomes and quality of life as patients with schizophrenia age. PMID:25824298

  9. Pathophysiological power of improper tonic GABA(A) conductances in mature and immature models.

    PubMed

    Egawa, Kiyoshi; Fukuda, Atsuo

    2013-01-01

    High-affinity extrasynaptic gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABA(A)) receptors are tonically activated by low and consistent levels of ambient GABA, mediating chronic inhibition against neuronal excitability (tonic inhibition) and the modulation of neural development. Synaptic (phasic) inhibition is spatially and temporally precise compared with tonic inhibition, which provides blunt yet strong integral inhibitory force by shunting electrical signaling. Although effects of acute modification of tonic inhibition are known, its pathophysiological significance remains unclear because homeostatic regulation of neuronal excitability can compensate for long-term deficit of extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptor activation. Nevertheless, tonic inhibition is of great interest for its pathophysiological involvement in central nervous system (CNS) diseases and thus as a therapeutic target. Together with the development of experimental models for various pathological states, recent evidence demonstrates such pathological involvements of tonic inhibition in neuronal dysfunction. This review focuses on the recent progress of tonic activation of GABA(A) conductance on the development and pathology of the CNS. Findings indicate that neuronal function in various brain regions are exacerbated with a gain or loss of function of tonic inhibition by GABA spillover. Disturbance of tonic GABA(A) conductance mediated by non-synaptic ambient GABA may result in brain mal-development. Therefore, various pathological states (epilepsy, motor dysfunctions, psychiatric disorders, and neurodevelopmental disorders) may be partly attributable to abnormal tonic GABA(A) conductances. Thus, the tone of tonic conductance and level of ambient GABA may be precisely tuned to maintain the regular function and development of the CNS. Therefore, receptor expression and factors for regulating the ambient GABA concentration are highlighted to gain a deeper understanding of pathology and therapeutic strategy for CNS diseases. PMID:24167475

  10. Calcium-independent GABA release from striatal slices: the role of calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Bernath, S; Zigmond, M J

    1990-01-01

    We have investigated the role of Ca2+ and Ca2+ channels in the modulation of GABA release. Brain slices prepared from rat striatum were preincubated with [3H]GABA, superfused with Krebs bicarbonate buffer, and exposed to electrical field stimulation (2 Hz for 3 min). Tritium efflux was measured as an index of GABA release. Both resting and evoked efflux were greatly accelerated by deleting Ca2+ from the medium and adding EGTA (1 mM). However, when the concentration of Mg2+ in the buffer was elevated to 10 mM, no effect of the Ca2(+)-deficiency was observed on resting release and its impact on evoked overflow was diminished. Moreover, addition of verapamil (10 microM), a Ca2+ channel blocking agent, reduced evoked overflow even in the absence of external Ca2+, while 4-aminopyridine (10 microM), a K+ channel inhibitor, enhanced GABA efflux in normal buffer but had no effect in the absence of Ca2+. Finally, we have shown previously that nipecotic acid, an inhibitor of high affinity GABA transport, increases GABA overflow in normal buffer, but blocks it in Ca2(+)-free buffer. Collectively, these results suggest that Ca2+ channels may play two roles in the regulation of depolarization-induced GABA release. Firstly, these channels permit a depolarization-induced influx of Ca2+ which then promotes GABA release. In addition, these channels influence GABA release through a mechanism that does not involve external Ca2+. Although the precise nature of this latter involvement is unclear, we propose that the Ca2+ channels serve to permit an influx of Na+, which in turn promotes Ca2(+)-independent release through an influence on the high affinity GABA transport system. PMID:2172861

  11. Role of GABA Release From Leptin Receptor-Expressing Neurons in Body Weight Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yuanzhong; O'Brien, William G.; Lee, Cheng-Chi; Myers, Martin G.

    2012-01-01

    It is well established that leptin regulates energy balance largely through isoform B leptin receptor-expressing neurons (LepR neurons) in the brain and that leptin activates one subset of LepR neurons (leptin-excited neurons) while inhibiting the other (leptin-inhibited neurons). However, the neurotransmitters released from LepR neurons that mediate leptin action in the brain are not well understood. Previous results demonstrate that leptin mainly acts on ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic neurons to reduce body weight, and that leptin activates proopiomelanocortin neuron activity by reducing GABA release onto these neurons, suggesting a body weight-promoting role for GABA released from leptin-inhibited neurons. To directly examine the role of GABA release from LepR neurons in body weight regulation, mice with disruption of GABA release specifically from LepR neurons were generated by deletion of vesicular GABA transporter in LepR neurons. Interestingly, these mice developed mild obesity on chow diet and were sensitive to diet-induced obesity, which were associated with higher food intake and lower energy expenditure. Moreover, these mice showed blunted responses in both food intake and body weight to acute leptin administration. These results demonstrate that GABA plays an important role in mediating leptin action. In combination with the previous studies that leptin reduces GABA release onto proopiomelanocortin neurons through leptin-inhibited neurons and that disruption of GABA release from agouti gene-related protein neurons, one subset of LepR-inhibited neurons, leads to a lean phenotype, our results suggest that, under our experimental conditions, GABA release from leptin-excited neuron dominates over leptin-inhibited ones. PMID:22334723

  12. GABA in Paraventricular Nucleus Regulates Adipose Afferent Reflex in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Lei; Gao, Run; Xiong, Xiao-Qing; Gao, Xing-Ya; Chen, Qi; Li, Yue-Hua; Kang, Yu-Ming; Zhu, Guo-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Background Chemical stimulation of white adipose tissue (WAT) induces adipose afferent reflex (AAR), and thereby causes a general sympathetic activation. Paraventricular nucleus (PVN) is important in control of sympathetic outflow. This study was designed to investigate the role of ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in PVN in regulating the AAR. Methodology/Principal Findings Experiments were carried out in anesthetized rats. Renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were continuously recorded. AAR was evaluated by the RSNA and MAP responses to electrical stimulation of the right epididymal WAT (eWAT) afferent nerve. Electrical stimulation of eWAT afferent nerve increase RSNA. Bilateral microinjection of the GABAA receptor agonist isoguvacine or the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen attenuated the AAR. The effect of isoguvacine on the AAR was greater than that of baclofen. The GABAA receptor antagonist gabazine enhanced the AAR, while the GABAB receptor antagonist CGP-35348 had no significant effect on the AAR. Bilateral PVN microinjection of vigabatrin, a selective GABA-transaminase inhibitor, to increase endogenous GABA levels in the PVN abolished the AAR. The inhibitory effect of vigabatrin on the AAR was attenuated by the pretreatment with gabazine or CGP-35348. Pretreatment with combined gabazine and CGP-35348 abolished the effects of vigabatrin. Conclusions Activation of GABAA or GABAB receptors in the PVN inhibits the AAR. Blockade of GABAA receptors in the PVN enhances the AAR. Endogenous GABA in the PVN plays an important role in regulating the AAR. PMID:26317425

  13. Action of tremorgenic mycotoxins on GABA/sub A/ receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Gant, D.B.; Cole, R.J.; Valdes, J.J.; Eldefrawi, M.E.; Eldefrawi, A.T.

    1987-11-09

    The effects of four tremorgenic and one nontremorgenic mycotoxins were studied on ..gamma..-aminobutyric acid (GABA/sub A/) receptor binding and function in rat brain and on binding of a voltage-operated Cl/sup -/ channel in Torpedo electric organ. None of the mycotoxins had significant effect on (/sup 3/H)muscimol or (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam binding to the GAMA/sup A/ receptor. However, only the four tremorgenic mycotoxins inhibited GABA-induced /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ influx and (/sup 35/S)t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate ((/sup 35/S)TBPS) binding in rate brain membranes, while the nontremorgenic verruculotoxin had no effect. Inhibition of (/sup 35/S)TBPS binding by paspalinine was non-competitive. This suggests that tremorgenic mycotoxins inhibit GABA/sub A/ receptor function by binding close to the receptor's Cl/sup -/ channel. On the voltage-operated Cl/sup -/ channel, only high concentrations of verruculogen and verruculotoxin caused significant inhibition of the channel's binding of (/sup 35/S)TBPS. The data suggest that the tremorgenic action of these mycotoxins may be due in part to their inhibition of GABA/sub A/ receptor function. 21 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  14. GABA metabolism pathway genes, UGA1 and GAD1, regulate replicative lifespan in Saccharomycescerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Kamei, Yuka; Tamura, Takayuki; Yoshida, Ryo; Ohta, Shinji; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Mukai, Yukio

    2011-04-01

    Highlights: {yields}We demonstrate that two genes in the yeast GABA metabolism pathway affect aging. {yields} Deletion of the UGA1 or GAD1 genes extends replicative lifespan. {yields} Addition of GABA to wild-type cultures has no effect on lifespan. {yields} Intracellular GABA levels do not differ in longevity mutants and wild-type cells. {yields} Levels of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates positively correlate with lifespan. -- Abstract: Many of the genes involved in aging have been identified in organisms ranging from yeast to human. Our previous study showed that deletion of the UGA3 gene-which encodes a zinc-finger transcription factor necessary for {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-dependent induction of the UGA1 (GABA aminotransferase), UGA2 (succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase), and UGA4 (GABA permease) genes-extends replicative lifespan in the budding yeast Saccharomycescerevisiae. Here, we found that deletion of UGA1 lengthened the lifespan, as did deletion of UGA3; in contrast, strains with UGA2 or UGA4 deletions exhibited no lifespan extension. The {Delta}uga1 strain cannot deaminate GABA to succinate semialdehyde. Deletion of GAD1, which encodes the glutamate decarboxylase that converts glutamate into GABA, also increased lifespan. Therefore, two genes in the GABA metabolism pathway, UGA1 and GAD1, were identified as aging genes. Unexpectedly, intracellular GABA levels in mutant cells (except for {Delta}uga2 cells) did not differ from those in wild-type cells. Addition of GABA to culture media, which induces transcription of the UGA structural genes, had no effect on replicative lifespan of wild-type cells. Multivariate analysis of {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spectra for the whole-cell metabolite levels demonstrated a separation between long-lived and normal-lived strains. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of identified metabolites showed that levels of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates positively correlated with lifespan extension. These results strongly suggest reduced activity of the GABA-metabolizing enzymes extends lifespan by shifting carbon metabolism toward respiration, as calorie restriction does.

  15. Gad1 mRNA as a reliable indicator of altered GABA release from orexigenic neurons in the hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Dicken, Matthew S; Hughes, Alexander R; Hentges, Shane T

    2015-11-01

    The strength of ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated inhibitory synaptic input is a principle determinant of neuronal activity. However, because of differences in the number of GABA afferent inputs and the sites of synapses, it is difficult to directly assay for altered GABA transmission between specific cells. The present study tested the hypothesis that the level of mRNA for the GABA synthetic enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) can provide a reliable proxy for GABA release. This was tested in a mouse hypothalamic circuit important in the regulation of energy balance. Fluorescent in situ hybridization results show that the expression of Gad1 mRNA (encoding the GAD67 enzyme) was increased in hypothalamic neuropeptide Y/agouti-related peptide (NPY/AgRP) neurons after an overnight fast, consistent with the ability of GABA from these neurons to stimulate food intake. Optogenetic studies confirmed that the observed increase in Gad1 mRNA correlated with an increase in the probability of GABA release from NPY/AgRP neurons onto downstream proopiomelanocortin neurons. Likewise, there was an increase in the readily releasable pool of GABA in NPY/AgRP neurons. Selective inhibition of GAD activity in NPY/AgRP neurons decreased GABA release, indicating that GAD67 activity, which is largely dictated by expression level, is a key determinant of GABA release. Altogether, it appears that Gad expression may be a reliable proxy of altered GABAergic transmission. Examining changes in Gad mRNA as a proxy for GABA release may be particularly helpful when the downstream targets are not known or when limited tools exist for detecting GABA release at a particular synapse. PMID:26370162

  16. Multiple motifs regulate the trafficking of GABA(B) receptors at distinct checkpoints within the secretory pathway.

    PubMed

    Restituito, Sophie; Couve, Andrés; Bawagan, Hinayana; Jourdain, Sabine; Pangalos, Menelas N; Calver, Andrew R; Freeman, Katie B; Moss, Stephen J

    2005-04-01

    gamma-Aminobutyric acid type B receptors (GABA(B)) are G-protein-coupled receptors that mediate GABAergic inhibition in the brain. Their functional expression is dependent upon the formation of heterodimers between GABA(B)R1 and GABA(B)R2 subunits, a process that occurs within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). However, the mechanisms that regulate receptor surface expression remain largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that access to the cell surface for GABA(B)R1 is sequentially controlled by an RSR(R) motif and a LL motif within its cytoplasmic domain. In addition, we reveal that msec7-1, a guanine-nucleotide-exchange factor (GEF) for the ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) family of GTPases, critical regulators of vesicular membrane trafficking, interacts with GABA(B)R1 via the LL motif in this subunit. Finally, we establish that msec7-1 modulates the cell surface expression of GABA(B) receptors, a process that is dependent upon the integrity of the LL motif in GABA(B)R1. Together, our results demonstrate that the cell surface expression of the GABA(B)R1 subunit is regulated by multiple motifs, which act at distinct checkpoints in the secretory pathway, and also suggest a novel role for msec7-1 in regulating the membrane trafficking of GABA(B)R1 subunits. PMID:15797721

  17. Release of GABA from sensory neurons transduced with a GAD67-expressing vector occurs by non-vesicular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Tai, Changfeng; de Groat, William C; Peng, Xiang-min; Mata, Marina; Fink, David J

    2006-02-16

    We have demonstrated that dorsal root ganglion neurons transduced with a recombinant replication-defective herpes simplex virus vector coding for glutamic acid decarboxylase (QHGAD67) release GABA to produce an analgesic effect in rodent models of pain. In this study, we examined the mechanism of transgene-mediated GABA release from dorsal root ganglion neurons in vitro and in vivo. Release of GABA from dorsal root ganglion neurons transduced with QHGAD67 was not increased by membrane depolarization induced by 60 mM extracellular K+ nor reduced by the removal of Ca2+ from the medium. Release of GABA from transduced dorsal root ganglion neurons was, however, blocked in a dose-dependent manner by NO-711, a selective inhibitor of the GABA transporter-1. The amount of GABA released from a spinal cord slice preparation, prepared from animals transduced by subcutaneous inoculation of QHGAD67 in the hind paws, was substantially increased compared to animals transduced with control vector Q0ZHG or normal animals, but the amount of GABA released was not changed by stimulation of the dorsal roots at either low (0.1 mA, 0.5-ms duration) or high (10 mA, 0.5-ms duration) intensity. We conclude that QHGAD67-mediated GABA release from dorsal root ganglion neurons is non-vesicular, independent of electrical depolarization, and that this efflux is mediated through reversal of the GABA transporter. PMID:16460707

  18. GABA-mediated inhibition of the anaphylactic response in the guinea-pig trachea.

    PubMed Central

    Gentilini, G.; Franchi-Micheli, S.; Mugnai, S.; Bindi, D.; Zilletti, L.

    1995-01-01

    1. In sensitized guinea-pigs, the effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and GABAmimetic drugs have been investigated on tracheal segments contracted by cumulative application of an allergen (ovoalbumin, OA) and on serosal mast cells. The same drugs have also been tested on activation of alveolar macrophages isolated from unsensitized guinea-pigs. 2. Superfusion with GABA (1-1000 microM) reduced the contraction intensity of tracheal strips. The effect of GABA (100 microM) was not affected by the carrier blockers, nipecotic acid and beta-alanine (300 microM each). It was mimicked by the GABAB agonist (-)-baclofen (100 microM) but not 3-aminopropanephosphinic acid (100 microM, 3-APA). The GABAA agonist, isoguvacine (100 microM) did not exert any effect. GABA (10 microM)-induced inhibition of tracheal contractions was reduced by the GABAB antagonist, 2-hydroxysaclofen (100 microM, 2-HS), but not by the GABAA antagonist, bicuculline (30 microM). 3. The reduction in contraction intensity induced by GABA (100 microM) was prevented by a 40 min preincubation of tracheal strips with capsaicin (10 microM), but not tetrodotoxin (TTX, 0.3 microM). The effect of GABA (1000 microM) was absent after preincubation with indomethacin (2.8 microM) but unmodified when nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA, 3.3 microM) was used. Finally, removal of the epithelium prevented the GABA effect. 4. Anaphylactic histamine release from serosal mast cells isolated from sensitized animals was not affected either by GABA (10-1000 microM) or the selective receptor agonists (-)-baclofen (0.1-1000 microM) and isoguvacine (10-1000 microM).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7582447

  19. Metabolomic Approaches to Defining the Role(s) of GABA? Receptors in the Brain.

    PubMed

    Rae, Caroline; Nasrallah, Fatima A; Balcar, Vladimir J; Rowlands, Benjamin D; Johnston, Graham A R; Hanrahan, Jane R

    2015-09-01

    The inhibitory neurotransmitter ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) acts through various types of receptors in the central nervous system. GABA? receptors, defined by their characteristic pharmacology and presence of ? subunits in the channel structure, are poorly understood and their role in the cortex is ill-defined. Here, we used a targeted pharmacological, NMR-based functional metabolomic approach in Guinea pig brain cortical tissue slices to identify a distinct role for these receptors. We compared metabolic fingerprints generated by a range of ligands active at GABA? and included these in a principal components analysis with a library of other metabolic fingerprints obtained using ligands active at GABAA and GABAB, with inhibitors of GABA uptake and with compounds acting to inhibit enzymes active in the GABAergic system. This enabled us to generate a metabolic "footprint" of the GABAergic system which revealed classes of metabolic activity associated with GABA? which are distinct from other GABA receptors. Antagonised GABA? produce large metabolic effects at extrasynaptic sites suggesting they may be involved in tonic inhibition. PMID:25577264

  20. Regulation of (/sup 3/H)GABA release from strips of guinea pig urinary bladder

    SciTech Connect

    Shirakawa, J.; Taniyama, K.; Iwai, S.; Tanaka, C.

    1988-12-01

    The presence of receptors that regulate the release of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was studied in strips of the guinea pig urinary bladder. GABA (10(-8)-10(-5) M) and muscimol (10(-8)-10(-5) M), but not baclofen (10(-5) M), reduced the Ca2+-dependent, tetrodotoxin-resistant release of (/sup 3/H)GABA evoked by high K+ from the urinary bladder strips preloaded with (/sup 3/H)GABA. The inhibitory effect of muscimol was antagonized by bicuculline and potentiated by diazepam, clonazepam, and pentobarbital sodium. The potentiating effect of clonazepam was antagonized by Ro 15-1788. Acetylcholine (ACh) inhibited the high K+-evoked release of (/sup 3/H)GABA. The inhibitory effect of ACh was antagonized by atropine sulfate and pirenzepine but not by hexamethonium. Norepinephrine (NE) inhibited the evoked release of (/sup 3/H)GABA. The inhibitory effect of NE was mimicked by clonidine, but not by phenylephrine, and was antagonized by yohimbine but not by prazosin. These results provide evidence that the release of GABA from strips of guinea pig urinary bladder is regulated via the bicuculline-sensitive GABAA receptor, M1-muscarinic, and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors.

  1. Correlation between the enhancement of flunitrazepam binding by GABA and seizure susceptibility in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Marley, R.J.; Wehner, J.M.

    1987-06-08

    Various populations of mice exhibit differential sensitivity to seizure-inducing agents. The relationship of seizure susceptibility to alterations in the GABA receptor complex was investigated in six different populations of mice consisting of four inbred strains (C57BL, DBA, C3H, and BALB) and two selected lines (long sleep and short sleep). Seizure activity was induced by intraperitoneal administration of the GAD inhibitor, 3-mercaptopropionic acid, and latencies to seizure onset and tonus were measured. In naive mice of the same populations, GABA enhancement of TH-flunitrazepam binding was measured in extensively washed whole brain membranes at several GABA concentrations. Both differential seizure sensitivity to 3-mercaptopropionic acid and differential enhancement of TH-flunitrazepam binding by GABA were observed in these six populations of mice. Correlational analyses indicated a positive correlation between the degree of GABA enhancement of TH-flunitrazepam binding and resistance to the seizure-inducing properties of 3-mercaptopropionic acid. These data suggest that genetic differences in sensitivity to seizure-inducing agents that disrupt the GABAergic system may be related to differences in coupling between the various receptors associated with the GABA receptor complex.

  2. Comparison of taurine, GABA, Glu, and Asp as scavengers of malondialdehyde in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yan; Wang, Wei; Yu, Pingfeng; Xi, Zhijiang; Xu, Lijian; Li, Xiaolong; He, Nongyue

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine if amino acid neurotransmitters such as gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), taurine, glutamate (Glu), and aspartate (Asp) can scavenge activated carbonyl toxicants. In vitro, direct reaction between malondialdehyde (MDA) and amino acids was researched using different analytical methods. The results indicated that scavenging activated carbonyl function of taurine and GABA is very strong and that of Glu and Asp is very weak in pathophysiological situations. The results provided perspective into the reaction mechanism of taurine and GABA as targets of activated carbonyl such as MDA in protecting nerve terminals. In vivo, we studied the effect of taurine and GABA as antioxidants by detecting MDA concentration and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities. It was shown that MDA concentration was decreased significantly, and the activities of SOD and GSH-Px were increased significantly in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of acute epileptic state rats, after the administration of taurine and GABA. The results indicated that the peripherally administered taurine and GABA can scavenge free radicals and protect the tissue against activated carbonyl in vivo and in vitro.

  3. Aging of whiskey increases the potentiation of GABA(A) receptor response.

    PubMed

    Koda, Hirofumi; Hossain, Sheikh Julfikar; Kiso, Yoshinobu; Aoshima, Hitoshi

    2003-08-27

    It is known that the target of most mood-defining compounds such as ethanol is an ionotropic gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABA(A) receptor). The potentiation of the response of these inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors induces anxiolytic, sedative, and anesthetic activities in the human brain. Because both extracts of whiskey by pentane and fragrant components in whiskey potentiate the GABA(A) receptor-mediated response, GABA(A) receptors were expressed in Xenopus oocyte by injecting cRNAs prepared from the cloned cDNA for the alpha(1) and beta(1) subunits of the bovine receptors in order to study the effects of whiskey itself on the GABA(A) receptor-mediated response. Whiskey itself also potentiated the electrical responses of GABA(A) receptors generally more than ethanol at the same concentration as that of the whiskey. The potentiation of the GABA(A) receptor-mediated response increased with the aging period of the whiskey. Inhalation of whiskey to mice increased the sleeping time induced by pentobarbital more than that of the same concentration of ethanol as the whiskey. These results suggest that not only ethanol but also minor components in whiskey play an important role in the potentiation of GABA(A) receptor-mediated response and possibly the sedative effect of whiskey. Although the minor components are present in extremely small quantities compared with ethanol in alcoholic beverages, they may modulate the mood or consciousness of humans through the potentiation of the GABA(A) receptor response after absorption into the brain, because these hydrophobic compounds are easily absorbed into the brain across the blood-brain barrier and are several thousands times as potent as ethanol in the potentiation of the GABA(A) receptor-mediated response. PMID:12926865

  4. Microtransplantation of cellular membranes from squid stellate ganglion reveals ionotropic GABA receptors.

    PubMed

    Conti, Luca; Limon, Agenor; Palma, Eleonora; Miledi, Ricardo

    2013-02-01

    The squid has been the most studied cephalopod, and it has served as a very useful model for investigating the events associated with nerve impulse generation and synaptic transmission. While the physiology of squid giant axons has been extensively studied, very little is known about the distribution and function of the neurotransmitters and receptors that mediate inhibitory transmission at the synapses. In this study we investigated whether ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) activates neurotransmitter receptors in stellate ganglia membranes. To overcome the low abundance of GABA-like mRNAs in invertebrates and the low expression of GABA in cephalopods, we used a two-electrode voltage clamp technique to determine if Xenopus laevis oocytes injected with cell membranes from squid stellate ganglia responded to GABA. Using this method, membrane patches containing proteins and ion channels from the squid's stellate ganglion were incorporated into the surface of oocytes. We demonstrated that GABA activates membrane receptors in cellular membranes isolated from squid stellate ganglia. Using the same approach, we were able to record native glutamate-evoked currents. The squid's GABA receptors showed an EC(50) of 98 ?mol l(-1) to GABA and were inhibited by zinc (IC(50) = 356 ?mol l(-1)). Interestingly, GABA receptors from the squid were only partially blocked by bicuculline. These results indicate that the microtransplantation of native cell membranes is useful to identify and characterize scarce membrane proteins. Moreover, our data also support the role of GABA as an ionotropic neurotransmitter in cephalopods, acting through chloride-permeable membrane receptors. PMID:23493508

  5. GABA: a pioneer transmitter that excites immature neurons and generates primitive oscillations.

    PubMed

    Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Gaiarsa, Jean-Luc; Tyzio, Roman; Khazipov, Rustem

    2007-10-01

    Developing networks follow common rules to shift from silent cells to coactive networks that operate via thousands of synapses. This review deals with some of these rules and in particular those concerning the crucial role of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobuytric acid (GABA), which operates primarily via chloride-permeable GABA(A) receptor channels. In all developing animal species and brain structures investigated, neurons have a higher intracellular chloride concentration at an early stage leading to an efflux of chloride and excitatory actions of GABA in immature neurons. This triggers sodium spikes, activates voltage-gated calcium channels, and acts in synergy with NMDA channels by removing the voltage-dependent magnesium block. GABA signaling is also established before glutamatergic transmission, suggesting that GABA is the principal excitatory transmitter during early development. In fact, even before synapse formation, GABA signaling can modulate the cell cycle and migration. The consequence of these rules is that developing networks generate primitive patterns of network activity, notably the giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs), largely through the excitatory actions of GABA and its synergistic interactions with glutamate signaling. These early types of network activity are likely required for neurons to fire together and thus to "wire together" so that functional units within cortical networks are formed. In addition, depolarizing GABA has a strong impact on synaptic plasticity and pathological insults, notably seizures of the immature brain. In conclusion, it is suggested that an evolutionary preserved role for excitatory GABA in immature cells provides an important mechanism in the formation of synapses and activity in neuronal networks. PMID:17928584

  6. The transporter GAT1 plays an important role in GABA-mediated carbon-nitrogen interactions in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Batushansky, Albert; Kirma, Menny; Grillich, Nicole; Pham, Phuong A.; Rentsch, Doris; Galili, Gad; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Fait, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate derived ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is synthetized in the cytosol prior to delivery to the mitochondria where it is catabolized via the TCA cycle. GABA accumulates under various environmental conditions, but an increasing number of studies show its involvement at the crossroad between C and N metabolism. To assess the role of GABA in modulating cellular metabolism, we exposed seedlings of A. thaliana GABA transporter gat1 mutant to full nutrition medium and media deficient in C and N combined with feeding of different concentrations (0.5 and 1 mM) of exogenous GABA. GC-MS based metabolite profiling showed an expected effect of medium composition on the seedlings metabolism of mutant and wild type alike. That being said, a significant interaction between GAT1 deficiency and medium composition was determined with respect to magnitude of change in relative amino acid levels. The effect of exogenous GABA treatment on metabolism was contingent on both the medium and the genotype, leading for instance to a drop in asparagine under full nutrition and low C conditions and glucose under all tested media, but not to changes in GABA content. We additionally assessed the effect of GAT1 deficiency on the expression of glutamate metabolism related genes and genes involved in abiotic stress responses. These results suggest a role for GAT1 in GABA-mediated metabolic alterations in the context of the C-N equilibrium of plant cells. PMID:26483804

  7. The transporter GAT1 plays an important role in GABA-mediated carbon-nitrogen interactions in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Batushansky, Albert; Kirma, Menny; Grillich, Nicole; Pham, Phuong A; Rentsch, Doris; Galili, Gad; Fernie, Alisdair R; Fait, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate derived γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is synthetized in the cytosol prior to delivery to the mitochondria where it is catabolized via the TCA cycle. GABA accumulates under various environmental conditions, but an increasing number of studies show its involvement at the crossroad between C and N metabolism. To assess the role of GABA in modulating cellular metabolism, we exposed seedlings of A. thaliana GABA transporter gat1 mutant to full nutrition medium and media deficient in C and N combined with feeding of different concentrations (0.5 and 1 mM) of exogenous GABA. GC-MS based metabolite profiling showed an expected effect of medium composition on the seedlings metabolism of mutant and wild type alike. That being said, a significant interaction between GAT1 deficiency and medium composition was determined with respect to magnitude of change in relative amino acid levels. The effect of exogenous GABA treatment on metabolism was contingent on both the medium and the genotype, leading for instance to a drop in asparagine under full nutrition and low C conditions and glucose under all tested media, but not to changes in GABA content. We additionally assessed the effect of GAT1 deficiency on the expression of glutamate metabolism related genes and genes involved in abiotic stress responses. These results suggest a role for GAT1 in GABA-mediated metabolic alterations in the context of the C-N equilibrium of plant cells. PMID:26483804

  8. GABA-dependent firing of glutamate-evoked action potentials at AMPA/kainate receptors in developing hypothalamic neurons.

    PubMed

    Gao, X B; Chen, G; van den Pol, A N

    1998-02-01

    Although it plays a major inhibitory role in the adult mammalian CNS, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) may have an excitatory function in developing neurons. The present study focuses on the dependence of glutamate on GABA to generate action potentials in developing hypothalamic neurons. Under conditions where glutamate by itself could not evoke an action potential, GABA facilitated glutamate-mediated depolarization to fire action potentials. This facilitation had a broad time window during the decaying phase of the GABA-mediated depolarization in developing neurons in culture. The glutamate-mediated depolarization was shunted only during the peak of GABA-mediated depolarization, but was facilitated after that. Similar results were obtained in the presence of 2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP5), indicating that GABA can facilitate glutamate responses independent of relief of the Mg2+ block of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor. This novel interaction between GABA- and glutamate-mediated excitation could play a role in strengthening neuronal circuits during early development and would exert a maximal effect if GABA and glutamate receptors were activated after a slight temporal delay. PMID:9463435

  9. GABA-mediated effects of some taurine derivatives injected i.c.v. on rabbit rectal temperature and gross motor behavior.

    PubMed

    Frosini, M; Ricci, L; Saponara, S; Palmi, M; Valoti, M; Sgaragli, G

    2006-05-01

    Some synthetic taurine analogues, namely ethanolamine-O-sulphate (EOS), N,N-dimethyltaurine (DMT), N,N,N-trimethyltaurine (TMT) and 2-aminoethylphosphonic acid (AEP) were shown to interact with rabbit brain GABA(A)- or GABA(B)-receptors, while (+/-)piperidine-3-sulfonic acid (PSA) inhibited the activity of rabbit brain 4-aminobutyrate transaminase. This suggests that they behave like direct/indirect GABA agonists or GABA antagonists and affect thermoregulation and gross motor behaviour (GMB) which are under GABA control. In the present study micromole (1.2-48) amounts of these compounds were i.c.v. injected in conscious, restrained rabbits while monitoring rectal temperature (RT), ear skin temperature (EST) and GMB. AEP, EOS, DMT and TMT induced a dose-related hyperthermia, ear vasoconstriction and excitation of GMB, while PSA induced a dose-related hypothermia, ear vasodilation and inhibition of GMB. EOS antagonized in a dose-related fashion hypothermia induced by 60 nmol THIP, a GABA(A) agonist, while AEP, DMT and TMT counteracted that induced by 8 nmol R(-)Baclofen, a GABA(B) agonist. In conclusion, EOS and AEP, DMT, TMT seem to act as GABA(A) and GABA(B) antagonists, respectively, while PSA behaves like an indirect GABA agonist, all affecting the central mechanisms which drive rabbit thermoregulation. PMID:16583317

  10. GABA transporters control GABAergic neurotransmission in the mouse subplate.

    PubMed

    Unichenko, P; Kirischuk, S; Luhmann, H J

    2015-09-24

    The subplate is a transient layer between the cortical plate and intermediate zone in the developing cortex. Thalamo-cortical axons form temporary synapses on subplate neurons (SPns) before invading the cortical plate. Neuronal activity within the subplate is of critical importance for the development of neocortical circuits and architecture. Although both glutamatergic and GABAergic inputs on SPns were reported, short-term plasticity of GABAergic transmission has not been investigated yet. GABAergic postsynaptic currents (GPSCs) were recorded from SPns in coronal neocortical slices prepared from postnatal day 3-4 mice using whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Evoked GPSCs (eGPSCs) elicited by electrical paired-pulse stimulation demonstrated paired-pulse depression at all interstimulus intervals tested. Baclofen, a specific GABAB receptor (GABABR) agonist, reduced eGPSC amplitudes and increased paired-pulse ratio (PPR), suggesting presynaptic location of functional GABABRs. Baclofen-induced effects were alleviated by (2S)-3-[[(1S)-1-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]amino-2-hydroxypropyl](phenylmethyl)phosphinic acid (CGP55845), a selective GABABR blocker. Moreover, CGP55845 increased eGPSC amplitudes and decreased PPR even under control conditions, indicating that GABABRs are tonically activated by ambient GABA. Because extracellular GABA concentration is mainly regulated by GABA transporters (GATs), we asked whether GATs release GABA. 1,2,5,6-tetrahydro-1-[2-[[(diphenylmethylene)amino]oxy]ethyl]-3-pyridinecarboxylic acid (NNC-711) (10μM), a selective GAT-1 blocker, increased eGPSC decay time, decreased eGPSC amplitudes and PPR. The two last effects but not the first one were blocked by CGP55845, indicating that GAT-1 blockade causes an elevation of extracellular GABA concentration and in turn activation of extrasynaptic GABAARs and presynaptic GABABRs. 1-[2-[tris(4-methoxyphenyl)methoxy]ethyl]-(S)-3-piperidinecarboxylic acid (SNAP-5114), a specific GAT-2/3 blocker, failed to affect eGPSC kinetics. However, in contrast to NNC-711 SNAP-5114 increased eGPSC amplitudes and decreased PPR. In the presence of SNAP-5114 CGP55845 did not influence GABAergic transmission, indicating that GABABRs are not activated any longer. We conclude that in the subplate GAT-2/3 operates in reverse mode. GABA released via GAT-2/3 activates presynaptic GABABRs on GABAergic synapses and tonically inhibits GABAergic inputs on SPns. PMID:26232716

  11. GABA withdrawal syndrome: GABAA receptor, synapse, neurobiological implications and analogies with other abstinences.

    PubMed

    Calixto, E

    2016-01-28

    The sudden interruption of the increase of the concentration of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), determines an increase in neuronal activity. GABA withdrawal (GW) is a heuristic analogy, with withdrawal symptoms developed by other GABA receptor-agonists such as alcohol, benzodiazepines, and neurosteroids. GW comprises a model of neuronal excitability validated by electroencephalogram (EEG) in which high-frequency and high-amplitude spike-wave complexes appear. In brain slices, GW was identified by increased firing synchronization of pyramidal neurons and by changes in the active properties of the neuronal membrane. GW induces pre- and postsynaptic changes: a decrease in GABA synthesis/release, and the decrease in the expression and composition of GABAA receptors associated with increased calcium entry into the cell. GW is an excellent bioassay for studying partial epilepsy, epilepsy refractory to drug treatment, and a model to reverse or prevent the generation of abstinences from different drugs. PMID:26592722

  12. Anterior Cingulate GABA Levels Predict Whole-Brain Cerebral Blood Flow

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Benjamin W.; Wijtenburg, S. Andrea; Holcomb, Henry H.; Kochunov, Peter; Wang, Danny J.J.; Hong, L. Elliot; Rowland, Laura M.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the relationship of ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate levels from the anterior and posterior cingulates (AC and PC) with cerebral blood flow (CBF) at rest. 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements in the AC and PC and pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling data were acquired from 10 healthy controls. GABA levels from the AC were strongly inversely correlated with global (whole-brain) CBF (r =?0.91, p=0.0015). GABA levels from the PC and glutamate levels from both regions were not significantly correlated with CBF. We hypothesize that GABA-mediated inhibition of AC activation of the locus coeruleus-norepinephrine pathway may influence global CBF. PMID:24397910

  13. Decreased Phosphorylated Protein Kinase B (Akt) in Individuals with Autism Associated with High Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) and Low Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA)

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Anthony J

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of the PI3K/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway could contribute to the pathogenesis of autism spectrum disorders. In this study, phosphorylated Akt concentration was measured in 37 autistic children and 12, gender and age similar neurotypical, controls using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Akt levels were compared to biomarkers known to be associated with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and c-Met (hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) receptor) pathways and severity levels of 19 autism-related symptoms. We found phosphorylated Akt levels significantly lower in autistic children and low Akt levels correlated with high EGFR and HGF and low gamma-aminobutyric acid, but not other biomarkers. Low Akt levels also correlated significantly with increased severity of receptive language, conversational language, hypotonia, rocking and pacing, and stimming, These results suggest a relationship between decreased phosphorylated Akt and selected symptom severity in autistic children and support the suggestion that the AKT pathways may be associated with the etiology of autism. PMID:26508828

  14. Some dipeptides reverse the inhibitory effect of GABA on /sup 35/S-TBPS binding

    SciTech Connect

    Squires, R.F.; Saederup, E.

    1987-05-01

    All known GABA-A receptor blocker reverse the inhibitory effect of GABA on /sup 35/S-t-butylphosphorothionate (TBPS) binding to rat brain membranes in vitro. This system has already been used to identify several novel GABA antagonists. The authors now report that 12 out of 52 dipeptides tested (all containing L-amino acids), at 1 mM, significantly reverse the inhibitory effect of 1 ..mu..M GABA, which inhibits specific /sup 35/S-TBPS binding about 60%. Most of the active dipeptides contain an aromatic and a basic amino acid. Tryptophan usually conferred greater activity than phe or tyr, while arg usually conferred greater activity than lys or his. Several larger peptides containing the HFRW sequence found in ACTH were also GABA antagonists; ACTH(1-24), ACTH(1-18), ACTH(1-13), ACTH(4-10) and ..gamma..-MSH while ACTH(11-24) was inactive. The excitatory effects of these later peptides may be in part due to blockade of GABA-A receptors.

  15. Inhibition of GABA uptake potentiates the conductance increase produced by GABA-mimetic compounds on single neurones in isolated olfactory cortex slices of the guinea-pig.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, D. A.; Scholfield, C. N.

    1984-01-01

    Membrane potential and input conductance were recorded in single neurones in slices of guinea-pig olfactory cortex in vitro. gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) and GABA-mimetic compounds were applied by bath-perfusion. Potency was measured as the concentration required to double the input conductance. The potency of GABA was increased (i.e. the equi-effective concentrations were reduced) by 15.5 +/- 2.3 times (mean +/- s.e. mean) on reducing external [Na+] from 144 to 20 mmol l-1, by replacement with Mg2+. Corresponding potency changes for other agonists were + 10.8 +/- 2.5 for 3-aminopropanesulphonic acid (3-APS); 3.25 +/- 1.06 for isoguvacine and 2.43 +/- 0.69 for muscimol. Nipecotic acid (0.5 mM) produced the following increases in potency: GABA 2.68 +/- 0.02; 3-aminopropanesulphonic acid, 3.11 +/- 0.07; isoguvacine, 1.92 +/- 0.34; muscimol, 2.24 +/- 0.17. The concentration of GABA in the bathing fluid necessary to double input conductance increased with increasing depth of the recording site from the cut surface. The apparent potency fell 10 times for each 60 micron depth increment up to 150 micron. The recording depth also affected the apparent potency of muscimol and 3-APS but to a lesser extent. Reduction of external [Na+] reduced the depth-dependence of both GABA and 3-APS potency. No clear change in the duration of the recurrent inhibitory postsynaptic conductance could be detected in the presence of 0.5 mmol l-1 nipecotic acid.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6237704

  16. Characterization of [3H]GABA release from striatal slices: evidence for a calcium-independent process via the GABA uptake system.

    PubMed

    Bernath, S; Zigmond, M J

    1988-11-01

    GABA can be released by depolarization even in the absence of external Ca2+. To investigate the underlying mechanism of this phenomenon, GABA release was studied using slices prepared from rat striatum. Slices were preincubated with [3H]GABA in the presence of beta-alanine and superfused with Krebs buffer. Total tritium efflux was measured as an index of GABA release. Electrical stimulation at 2 Hz for 3 min elevated resting tritium efflux approximately two-fold. Decreasing external Ca2+ to 0.1 mM increased basal tritium efflux and reduced electrically evoked overflow, while omitting Ca2+ entirely (and adding 1 mM EGTA) increased both basal efflux and evoked overflow. Tetrodotoxin (5 microM) abolished the evoked release of tritium but did not affect the resting outflow in either normal or Ca2+-deficient conditions. In the presence of normal Ca2+, nipecotic acid (0.1-1 mM), an inhibitor of GABA transport into neurons as well as glia, enhanced both spontaneous efflux and evoked overflow of tritium. Nipecotic acid also increased spontaneous release when external Ca2+ was reduced or removed; however, under these conditions electrically evoked overflow was reduced. These results suggest that the electrically evoked release of [3H]GABA from striatal slices is of neuronal origin, but can occur in part in the absence of external Ca2+. They further suggest that this Ca2+-independent release, which may co-exist with the Ca2+-dependent release, takes place via the same carrier system utilized for high-affinity GABA uptake. PMID:3217004

  17. Strychnine antagonizes GABA-evoked 36Cl- uptake in membrane vesicles from rat and rabbit cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Puka, M; Lazarewicz, J W

    1993-01-01

    The uptake of 36Cl- into the fraction of membrane vesicles from rat and rabbit cortex and rabbit hippocampus was measured to investigate the selectivity of agonists and antagonists of inhibitory amino acid receptors coupled to chloride channels in the forebrain gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) produced a dose-dependent 36Cl- uptake into membrane vesicles, whereas glycine and taurine were ineffective. The chloride uptake induced by GABA was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by bicuculline and picrotoxin, established antagonists of GABAA receptors. GABA elicited chloride influx was also inhibited, with similar potency, by strychnine, thus indicating a limited selectivity of this glycine receptor antagonist. PMID:8109260

  18. mRNA and Protein Levels for GABA[subscript A][alpha]4, [alpha]5, [beta]1 and GABA[subscript B]R1 Receptors are Altered in Brains from Subjects with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fatemi, S. Hossein; Reutiman, Teri J.; Folsom, Timothy D.; Rooney, Robert J.; Patel, Diven H.; Thuras, Paul D.

    2010-01-01

    We have shown altered expression of gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABA[subscript A]) and gamma-aminobutyric acid B (GABA[subscript B]) receptors in the brains of subjects with autism. In the current study, we sought to verify our western blotting data for GABBR1 via qRT-PCR and to expand our previous work to measure mRNA and protein levels of 3…

  19. mRNA and Protein Levels for GABA[subscript A][alpha]4, [alpha]5, [beta]1 and GABA[subscript B]R1 Receptors are Altered in Brains from Subjects with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fatemi, S. Hossein; Reutiman, Teri J.; Folsom, Timothy D.; Rooney, Robert J.; Patel, Diven H.; Thuras, Paul D.

    2010-01-01

    We have shown altered expression of gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABA[subscript A]) and gamma-aminobutyric acid B (GABA[subscript B]) receptors in the brains of subjects with autism. In the current study, we sought to verify our western blotting data for GABBR1 via qRT-PCR and to expand our previous work to measure mRNA and protein levels of 3

  20. GABA localization in the nematode Ascaris

    SciTech Connect

    Guastella, J.

    1988-01-01

    A histochemical approach was used to examine the distribution of GABA-associated neurons in the nematode Ascaris, an organism whose small number of morphologically simple neurons make it an excellent preparation for analyzing neuronal phenotypes. Two GABAergic markers were examined: GABA-like immunoreactivity (GLIR), a marker for endogenous stores of GABA; and ({sup 3}H)-GABA uptake, a marker for GABA uptake sites. Strong GLIR was present in the cell bodies, neurites and commissures of dorsal and ventral inhibitory motorneurons present in this region. Strong GLIR was also present in the cell bodies and processes of the four RME neurons in the nerve ring and in several other ganglionic neurons. Staining was absent in excitatory motorneurons, in ventral cord interneurons and in muscle cells and hypodermis. GABA uptake sites were found in single neural processes in both the ventral and dorsal nerve cords. ({sup 3}H)-GABA labeling was also observed in the other two RME cells and several other cephalic neurons. Four putative cholinergic excitatory motorneurons in the retrovesicular ganglion (RVG) were heavily labeled. Ventral and dorsal nerve cord inhibitory motorneurons did not take up ({sup 3}H)-GABA. Labeling of the ventral cord excitatory motorneuron somata and cell bodies was at or slightly above background. Heavy labeling of muscle cells was also observed.

  1. Structure, function, and plasticity of GABA transporters

    PubMed Central

    Scimemi, Annalisa

    2014-01-01

    GABA transporters belong to a large family of neurotransmitter:sodium symporters. They are widely expressed throughout the brain, with different levels of expression in different brain regions. GABA transporters are present in neurons and in astrocytes and their activity is crucial to regulate the extracellular concentration of GABA under basal conditions and during ongoing synaptic events. Numerous efforts have been devoted to determine the structural and functional properties of GABA transporters. There is also evidence that the expression of GABA transporters on the cell membrane and their lateral mobility can be modulated by different intracellular signaling cascades. The strength of individual synaptic contacts and the activity of entire neuronal networks may be finely tuned by altering the density, distribution and diffusion rate of GABA transporters within the cell membrane. These findings are intriguing because they suggest the existence of complex regulatory systems that control the plasticity of GABAergic transmission in the brain. Here we review the current knowledge on the structural and functional properties of GABA transporters and highlight the molecular mechanisms that alter the expression and mobility of GABA transporters at central synapses. PMID:24987330

  2. Characterization of GABA/sub A/ receptor-mediated /sup 36/chloride uptake in rat brain synaptoneurosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Luu, M.D.; Morrow, A.L.; Paul, S.M.; Schwartz, R.D.

    1987-09-07

    ..gamma..-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor-mediated /sup 36/chloride (/sup 36/Cl/sup -/) uptake was measured in synaptoneurosomes from rat brain. GABA and GABA agonists stimulated /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ uptake in a concentration-dependent manner with the following order of potency: Muscimol>GABA>piperidine-4-sulfonic acid (P4S)>4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo-(5,4-c)pyridin-3-ol (THIP)=3-aminopropanesulfonic acid (3APS)>>taurine. Both P4S and 3APS behaved as partial agonists, while the GABA/sub B/ agonist, baclofen, was ineffective. The response to muscimol was inhibited by bicuculline and picrotoxin in a mixed competitive/non-competitive manner. Other inhibitors of GABA receptor-opened channels or non-neuronal anion channels such as penicillin, picrate, furosemide and disulfonic acid stilbenes also inhibited the response to muscimol. A regional variation in muscimol-stimulated /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ uptake was observed; the largest responses were observed in the cerebral cortex, cerebellum and hippocampus, moderate responses were obtained in the striatum and hypothalamus and the smallest response was observed in the pons-medulla. GABA receptor-mediated /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ uptake was also dependent on the anion present in the media. The muscinol response varied in media containing the following anions: Br/sup -/>Cl/sup -/greater than or equal toNO/sub 3//sup -/>I/sup -/greater than or equal toSCN/sup -/>>C/sub 3/H/sub 5/OO/sup -/greater than or equal toClO/sub 4//sup -/>F/sup -/, consistent with the relative anion permeability through GABA receptor-gated anion channels and the enhancement of convulsant binding to the GABA receptor-gated Cl/sup -/ channel. 43 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  3. Genome Sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis NCDO 2118, a GABA-Producing Strain

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Letcia C.; Saraiva, Tesslia D. L.; Soares, Siomar C.; Ramos, Rommel T. J.; S, Pablo H. C. G.; Carneiro, Adriana R.; Miranda, Fbio; Freire, Matheus; Renan, Wendel; Jnior, Alberto F. O.; Santos, Anderson R.; Pinto, Anne C.; Souza, Bianca M.; Castro, Camila P.; Diniz, Carlos A. A.; Rocha, Clarissa S.; Mariano, Diego C. B.; de Aguiar, Edgar L.; Folador, Edson L.; Barbosa, Eudes G. V.; Aburjaile, Flavia F.; Gonalves, Lucas A.; Guimares, Lus C.; Azevedo, Marcela; Agresti, Pamela C. M.; Silva, Renata F.; Tiwari, Sandeep; Almeida, Sintia S.; Hassan, Syed S.; Pereira, Vanessa B.; Abreu, Vinicius A. C.; Pereira, Ulisses P.; Dorella, Fernanda A.; Carvalho, Alex F.; Pereira, Felipe L.; Leal, Carlos A. G.; Figueiredo, Henrique C. P.; Silva, Artur; Miyoshi, Anderson

    2014-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis NCDO 2118 is a nondairy lactic acid bacterium, a xylose fermenter, and a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) producer isolated from frozen peas. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of L.lactis NCDO 2118, a strain with probiotic potential activity. PMID:25278529

  4. Prefrontal cortical GABA transmission modulates discrimination and latent inhibition of conditioned fear: relevance for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Piantadosi, Patrick T; Floresco, Stan B

    2014-09-01

    Inhibitory gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transmission within the prefrontal cortex (PFC) regulates numerous functions, and perturbations in GABAergic transmission within this region have been proposed to contribute to some of the cognitive and behavioral abnormalities associated with disorders such as schizophrenia. These abnormalities include deficits in emotional regulation and aberrant attributions of affective salience. Yet, how PFC GABA regulates these types of emotional processes are unclear. To address this issue, we investigated the contribution of PFC GABA transmission to different aspects of Pavlovian emotional learning in rats using translational discriminative fear conditioning and latent inhibition (LI) assays. Reducing prelimbic PFC GABAA transmission via infusions of the antagonist bicuculline before the acquisition or expression of fear conditioning eliminated the ability to discriminate between an aversive conditioned stimulus (CS+) paired with footshock vs a neutral CS-, resembling similar deficits observed in schizophrenic patients. In a separate experiment, blockade of PFC GABAA receptors before CS preexposure (PE) and conditioning did not affect subsequent expression of LI, but did enhance fear in rats that were not preexposed to the CS. In contrast, PFC GABA-blockade before a fear expression test disrupted the recall of learned irrelevance and abolished LI. These data suggest that normal PFC GABA transmission is critical for regulating and mitigating multiple aspects of aversive learning, including discrimination between fear vs safety signals and recall of information about the irrelevance of stimuli. Furthermore, they suggest that similar deficits in emotional regulation observed in schizophrenia may be driven in part by deficient PFC GABA activity. PMID:24784549

  5. GABA Expression and Regulation by Sensory Experience in the Developing Visual System

    PubMed Central

    Miraucourt, Loïs S.; da Silva, Jorge Santos; Burgos, Kasandra; Li, Jianli; Abe, Hikari; Ruthazer, Edward S.; Cline, Hollis T.

    2012-01-01

    The developing retinotectal system of the Xenopus laevis tadpole is a model of choice for studying visual experience-dependent circuit maturation in the intact animal. The neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) has been shown to play a critical role in the formation of sensory circuits in this preparation, however a comprehensive neuroanatomical study of GABAergic cell distribution in the developing tadpole has not been conducted. We report a detailed description of the spatial expression of GABA immunoreactivity in the Xenopus laevis tadpole brain at two key developmental stages: stage 40/42 around the onset of retinotectal innervation and stage 47 when the retinotectal circuit supports visually-guided behavior. During this period, GABAergic neurons within specific brain structures appeared to redistribute from clusters of neuronal somata to a sparser, more uniform distribution. Furthermore, we found that GABA levels were regulated by recent sensory experience. Both ELISA measurements of GABA concentration and quantitative analysis of GABA immunoreactivity in tissue sections from the optic tectum show that GABA increased in response to a 4 hr period of enhanced visual stimulation in stage 47 tadpoles. These observations reveal a remarkable degree of adaptability of GABAergic neurons in the developing brain, consistent with their key contributions to circuit development and function. PMID:22242157

  6. Dopaminergic neurons inhibit striatal output via non-canonical release of GABA

    PubMed Central

    Tritsch, Nicolas X.; Ding, Jun B.; Sabatini, Bernardo L.

    2012-01-01

    The substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) and ventral tegmental area (VTA) contain the two largest populations of dopamine (DA)-releasing neurons in the mammalian brain. These neurons extend elaborate projections in striatum, a large subcortical structure implicated in motor planning and reward-based learning. Phasic activation of dopaminergic neurons in response to salient or reward-predicting stimuli is thought to modulate striatal output via the release of DA to promote and reinforce motor action14. Here we show that activation of DA neurons in striatal slices rapidly inhibits action potential firing in both direct-and indirect-pathway striatal projection neurons (SPNs) through vesicular release of the inhibitory transmitter ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA). GABA is released directly from dopaminergic axons but in a manner that is independent of the vesicular GABA transporter VGAT. Instead GABA release requires activity of the vesicular monoamine transporter VMAT2, which is the vesicular transporter for DA. Furthermore, VMAT2 expression in GABAergic neurons lacking VGAT is sufficient to sustain GABA release. Thus, these findings expand the repertoire of synaptic mechanisms employed by DA neurons to influence basal ganglia circuits, reveal a novel substrate whose transport is dependent on VMAT2, and demonstrate that GABA can function as a bona fide co-transmitter in monoaminergic neurons. PMID:23034651

  7. Molecular basis of the alternative recruitment of GABA(A) versus glycine receptors through gephyrin.

    PubMed

    Maric, Hans Michael; Kasaragod, Vikram Babu; Hausrat, Torben Johann; Kneussel, Matthias; Tretter, Verena; Strmgaard, Kristian; Schindelin, Hermann

    2014-01-01

    ?-Aminobutyric acid type A and glycine receptors (GABA(A)Rs, GlyRs) are the major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors and contribute to many synaptic functions, dysfunctions and human diseases. GABA(A)Rs are important drug targets regulated by direct interactions with the scaffolding protein gephyrin. Here we deduce the molecular basis of this interaction by chemical, biophysical and structural studies of the gephyrin-GABA(A)R ?3 complex, revealing that the N-terminal region of the ?3 peptide occupies the same binding site as the GlyR ? subunit, whereas the C-terminal moiety, which is conserved among all synaptic GABA(A)R ? subunits, engages in unique interactions. Thermodynamic dissections of the gephyrin-receptor interactions identify two residues as primary determinants for gephyrin's subunit preference. This first structural evidence for the gephyrin-mediated synaptic accumulation of GABA(A)Rs offers a framework for future investigations into the regulation of inhibitory synaptic strength and for the development of mechanistically and therapeutically relevant compounds targeting the gephyrin-GABA(A)R interaction. PMID:25531214

  8. Mechanisms of fast desensitization of GABA(B) receptor-gated currents.

    PubMed

    Raveh, Adi; Turecek, Rostislav; Bettler, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    GABA(B) receptors (GABA(B)Rs) regulate the excitability of most neurons in the central nervous system by modulating the activity of enzymes and ion channels. In the sustained presence of the neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid, GABA(B)Rs exhibit a time-dependent decrease in the receptor response-a phenomenon referred to as homologous desensitization. Desensitization prevents excessive receptor influences on neuronal activity. Much work focused on the mechanisms of GABA(B)R desensitization that operate at the receptor and control receptor expression at the plasma membrane. Over the past few years, it became apparent that GABA(B)Rs additionally evolved mechanisms for faster desensitization. These mechanisms operate at the G protein rather than at the receptor and inhibit G protein signaling within seconds of agonist exposure. The mechanisms for fast desensitization are ideally suited to regulate receptor-activated ion channel responses, which influence neuronal activity on a faster timescale than effector enzymes. Here, we provide an update on the mechanisms for fast desensitization of GABA(B)R responses and discuss physiological and pathophysiological implications. PMID:25637440

  9. GABA regulates synaptic integration of newly generated neurons in the adult brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Shaoyu; Goh, Eyleen L. K.; Sailor, Kurt A.; Kitabatake, Yasuji; Ming, Guo-Li; Song, Hongjun

    2006-02-01

    Adult neurogenesis, the birth and integration of new neurons from adult neural stem cells, is a striking form of structural plasticity and highlights the regenerative capacity of the adult mammalian brain. Accumulating evidence suggests that neuronal activity regulates adult neurogenesis and that new neurons contribute to specific brain functions. The mechanism that regulates the integration of newly generated neurons into the pre-existing functional circuitry in the adult brain is unknown. Here we show that newborn granule cells in the dentate gyrus of the adult hippocampus are tonically activated by ambient GABA (?-aminobutyric acid) before being sequentially innervated by GABA- and glutamate-mediated synaptic inputs. GABA, the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult brain, initially exerts an excitatory action on newborn neurons owing to their high cytoplasmic chloride ion content. Conversion of GABA-induced depolarization (excitation) into hyperpolarization (inhibition) in newborn neurons leads to marked defects in their synapse formation and dendritic development in vivo. Our study identifies an essential role for GABA in the synaptic integration of newly generated neurons in the adult brain, and suggests an unexpected mechanism for activity-dependent regulation of adult neurogenesis, in which newborn neurons may sense neuronal network activity through tonic and phasic GABA activation.

  10. Treatment of GABA from Fermented Rice Germ Ameliorates Caffeine-Induced Sleep Disturbance in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mabunga, Darine Froy N.; Gonzales, Edson Luck T.; Kim, Hee Jin; Choung, Se Young

    2015-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system, is involved in sleep physiology. Caffeine is widely used psychoactive substance known to induce wakefulness and insomnia to its consumers. This study was performed to examine whether GABA extracts from fermented rice germ ameliorates caffeine-induced sleep disturbance in mice, without affecting spontaneous locomotor activity and motor coordination. Indeed, caffeine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) delayed sleep onset and reduced sleep duration of mice. Conversely, rice germ ferment extracts-GABA treatment (10, 30, or 100 mg/kg, p.o.), especially at 100 mg/kg, normalized the sleep disturbance induced by caffeine. In locomotor tests, rice germ ferment extracts-GABA slightly but not significantly reduced the caffeine-induced increase in locomotor activity without affecting motor coordination. Additionally, rice germ ferment extracts-GABA per se did not affect the spontaneous locomotor activity and motor coordination of mice. In conclusion, rice germ ferment extracts-GABA supplementation can counter the sleep disturbance induced by caffeine, without affecting the general locomotor activities of mice. PMID:25995826

  11. Is GABA neurotransmission enhanced in auditory thalamus relative to inferior colliculus?

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Rui; Kalappa, Bopanna I.; Brozoski, Thomas J.; Ling, Lynne L.

    2013-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central auditory system. Sensory thalamic structures show high levels of non-desensitizing extrasynaptic GABAA receptors (GABAARs) and a reduction in the redundancy of coded information. The present study compared the inhibitory potency of GABA acting at GABAARs between the inferior colliculus (IC) and the medial geniculate body (MGB) using quantitative in vivo, in vitro, and ex vivo experimental approaches. In vivo single unit studies compared the ability of half maximal inhibitory concentrations of GABA to inhibit sound-evoked temporal responses, and found that GABA was two to three times (P < 0.01) more potent at suppressing MGB single unit responses than IC unit responses. In vitro whole cell patch-clamp slice recordings were used to demonstrate that gaboxadol, a δ-subunit selective GABAAR agonist, was significantly more potent at evoking tonic inhibitory currents from MGB neurons than IC neurons (P < 0.01). These electrophysiological findings were supported by an in vitro receptor binding assay which used the picrotoxin analog [3H]TBOB to assess binding in the GABAAR chloride channel. MGB GABAARs had significantly greater total open chloride channel capacity relative to GABAARs in IC (P < 0.05) as shown by increased total [3H]TBOB binding. Finally, a comparative ex vivo measurement compared endogenous GABA levels and suggested a trend towards higher GABA concentrations in MGB than in IC. Collectively, these studies suggest that, per unit GABA, high affinity extrasynaptic and synaptic GABAARs confer a significant inhibitory GABAAR advantage to MGB neurons relative to IC neurons. This increased GABA sensitivity likely underpins the vital filtering role of auditory thalamus. PMID:24155003

  12. Thalamic GABA Predicts Fine Motor Performance in Manganese-Exposed Smelter Workers

    PubMed Central

    Long, Zaiyang; Li, Xiang-Rong; Xu, Jun; Edden, Richard A. E.; Qin, Wei-Ping; Long, Li-Ling; Murdoch, James B.; Zheng, Wei; Jiang, Yue-Ming; Dydak, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    Overexposure to manganese (Mn) may lead to parkinsonian symptoms including motor deficits. The main inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is known to play a pivotal role in the regulation and performance of movement. Therefore this study was aimed at testing the hypothesis that an alteration of GABA following Mn exposure may be associated with fine motor performance in occupationally exposed workers and may underlie the mechanism of Mn-induced motor deficits. A cohort of nine Mn-exposed male smelter workers from an Mn-iron alloy factory and 23 gender- and age-matched controls were recruited and underwent neurological exams, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) measurements, and Purdue pegboard motor testing. Short-echo-time MRS was used to measure N-Acetyl-aspartate (NAA) and myo-inositol (mI). GABA was detected with a MEGA-PRESS J-editing MRS sequence. The mean thalamic GABA level was significantly increased in smelter workers compared to controls (p = 0.009). Multiple linear regression analysis reveals (1) a significant association between the increase in GABA level and the duration of exposure (R2 = 0.660, p = 0.039), and (2) significant inverse associations between GABA levels and all Purdue pegboard test scores (for summation of all scores R2 = 0.902, p = 0.001) in the smelter workers. In addition, levels of mI were reduced significantly in the thalamus and PCC of smelter workers compared to controls (p = 0.030 and p = 0.009, respectively). In conclusion, our results show clear associations between thalamic GABA levels and fine motor performance. Thus in Mn-exposed subjects, increased thalamic GABA levels may serve as a biomarker for subtle deficits in motor control and may become valuable for early diagnosis of Mn poisoning. PMID:24505436

  13. The brefeldin A-inhibited GDP/GTP exchange factor 2, a protein involved in vesicular trafficking, interacts with the beta subunits of the GABA receptors.

    PubMed

    Charych, Erik I; Yu, Wendou; Miralles, Celia P; Serwanski, David R; Li, Xuejing; Rubio, Maria; De Blas, Angel L

    2004-07-01

    We have found that the brefeldin A-inhibited GDP/GTP exchange factor 2 (BIG2) interacts with the beta subunits of the gamma-aminobutyric acid type-A receptor (GABA(A)R). BIG2 is a Sec7 domain-containing guanine nucleotide exchange factor known to be involved in vesicular and protein trafficking. The interaction between the 110 amino acid C-terminal fragment of BIG2 and the large intracellular loop of the GABA(A)R beta subunits was revealed with a yeast two-hybrid assay. The native BIG2 and GABA(A)Rs interact in the brain since both coprecipitated from detergent extracts with either anti-GABA(A)R or anti-BIG2 antibodies. In transfected human embryonic kidney cell line 293 cells, BIG2 promotes the exit of GABA(A)Rs from endoplasmic reticulum. Double label immunofluorescence of cultured hippocampal neurons and electron microscopy immunocytochemistry of rat brain tissue show that BIG2 concentrates in the trans-Golgi network. BIG2 is also present in vesicle-like structures in the dendritic cytoplasm, sometimes colocalizing with GABA(A)Rs. BIG2 is present in both inhibitory GABAergic synapses that contain GABA(A)Rs and in asymmetric excitatory synapses. The results are consistent with the hypotheses that the interaction of BIG2 with the GABA(A)R beta subunits plays a role in the exocytosis and trafficking of assembled GABA(A)R to the cell surface. PMID:15198677

  14. Pontine Reticular Formation (PnO) Administration of Hypocretin-1 Increases PnO GABA Levels and Wakefulness

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Christopher J.; Soto-Calderon, Haideliza; Lydic, Ralph; Baghdoyan, Helen A.

    2008-01-01

    Study Objectives: GABAergic transmission in the oral part of the pontine reticular formation (PnO) increases wakefulness. The hypothalamic peptide hypocretin-1 (orexin A) promotes wakefulness, and the PnO receives hypocretinergic input. The present study tested the hypothesis that PnO administration of hypocretin-1 increases PnO GABA levels and increases wakefulness. This study also tested the hypothesis that wakefulness is either increased or decreased, respectively, by PnO administration of drugs known to selectively increase or decrease GABA levels. Design: A within-subjects design was used for microdialysis and microinjection experiments. Setting: University of Michigan. Patients or Participants: Experiments were performed using adult male Crl:CD (SD)IGS BR (Sprague-Dawley) rats (n = 46). Interventions: PnO administration of hypocretin-1, nipecotic acid (a GABA uptake inhibitor that increases extracellular GABA levels), 3-mercaptopropionic acid (a GABA synthesis inhibitor that decreases extracellular GABA levels; 3-MPA), and Ringer solution (vehicle control). Measurements and Results: Dialysis administration of hypocretin-1 to the PnO caused a statistically significant, concentration-dependent increase in PnO GABA levels. PnO microinjection of hypocretin-1 or nipecotic acid caused a significant increase in wakefulness and a significant decrease in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and REM sleep. Microinjecting 3-MPA into the PnO caused a significant increase in NREM sleep and REM sleep and a significant decrease in wakefulness. Conclusions: An increase or a decrease in PnO GABA levels causes an increase or decrease, respectively, in wakefulness. Hypocretin-1 may promote wakefulness, at least in part, by increasing GABAergic transmission in the PnO. Citation: Watson CJ; Soto-Calderon H; Lydic R; Baghdoyan HA. Pontine reticular formation (PnO) administration of hypocretin-1 increases PnO GABA levels and wakefulness. SLEEP 2008;31(4):453-464. PMID:18457232

  15. {gamma}-aminobutyric acid{sub A} (GABA{sub A}) receptor regulates ERK1/2 phosphorylation in rat hippocampus in high doses of Methyl Tert-Butyl Ether (MTBE)-induced impairment of spatial memory

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Gang; Zhang Wenbin; Zhang Yun; Chen Yaoming; Liu Mingchao; Yao Ting; Yang Yanxia; Zhao Fang; Li Jingxia; Huang Chuanshu; Luo Wenjing Chen Jingyuan

    2009-04-15

    Experimental and occupational exposure to Methyl Tert-Butyl Ether (MTBE) has been reported to induce neurotoxicological and neurobehavioral effects, such as headache, nausea, dizziness, and disorientation, etc. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in MTBE-induced neurotoxicity are still not well understood. In the present study, we investigated the effects of MTBE on spatial memory and the expression and function of GABA{sub A} receptor in the hippocampus. Our results demonstrated that intraventricular injection of MTBE impaired the performance of the rats in a Morris water maze task, and significantly increased the expression of GABA{sub A} receptor {alpha}1 subunit in the hippocampus. The phosphorylation of ERK1/2 decreased after the MTBE injection. Furthermore, the decreased ability of learning and the reduction of phosphorylated ERK1/2 level of the MTBE-treated rats was partly reversed by bicuculline injected 30 min before the training. These results suggested that MTBE exposure could result in impaired spatial memory. GABA{sub A} receptor may play an important role in the MTBE-induced impairment of learning and memory by regulating the phosphorylation of ERK in the hippocampus.

  16. Ionotropic GABA and Glutamate Receptor Mutations and Human Neurologic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hongjie; Low, Chian-Ming; Moody, Olivia A; Jenkins, Andrew; Traynelis, Stephen F

    2015-07-01

    The advent of whole exome/genome sequencing and the technology-driven reduction in the cost of next-generation sequencing as well as the introduction of diagnostic-targeted sequencing chips have resulted in an unprecedented volume of data directly linking patient genomic variability to disorders of the brain. This information has the potential to transform our understanding of neurologic disorders by improving diagnoses, illuminating the molecular heterogeneity underlying diseases, and identifying new targets for therapeutic treatment. There is a strong history of mutations in GABA receptor genes being involved in neurologic diseases, particularly the epilepsies. In addition, a substantial number of variants and mutations have been found in GABA receptor genes in patients with autism, schizophrenia, and addiction, suggesting potential links between the GABA receptors and these conditions. A new and unexpected outcome from sequencing efforts has been the surprising number of mutations found in glutamate receptor subunits, with the GRIN2A gene encoding the GluN2A N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit being most often affected. These mutations are associated with multiple neurologic conditions, for which seizure disorders comprise the largest group. The GluN2A subunit appears to be a locus for epilepsy, which holds important therapeutic implications. Virtually all ?-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor mutations, most of which occur within GRIA3, are from patients with intellectual disabilities, suggesting a link to this condition. Similarly, the most common phenotype for kainate receptor variants is intellectual disability. Herein, we summarize the current understanding of disease-associated mutations in ionotropic GABA and glutamate receptor families, and discuss implications regarding the identification of human mutations and treatment of neurologic diseases. PMID:25904555

  17. Turnover and release of GABA in rat cortical slices: effect of a GABA-T inhibitor, gabaculine

    SciTech Connect

    Szerb, J.C.

    1982-02-01

    The turnover and release of endogenous and labeled GABA were followed in rat cortical slices after incubation with (/sup 3/H)GABA. High performance liquid chromatography was used to measure endogenous GABA and to separate (/sup 3/H)GABA from its metabolites. During superfusion with 3 mM K/sup +/ the slices rapidly lost their (/sup 3/H)GABA content while maintaining constant GABA levels. Exposure to 50 mM K/sup +/ for 25 min caused an initial rapid rise in the release of both endogenous and (/sup 3/H)GABA followed by a more rapid decline in the release of the latter. The specific activity of released GABA was two to four times higher than that in the slices. Depolarization lead to a net synthesis of GABA. The GABA -T inhibitor, gabaculine, (5 micrometers) in vitro arrested the metabolism of (/sup 3/H)GABA and rapidly doubled the GABA content but did not significantly increase the high K/sup +/ evoked release of endogenous GABA. In vivo pretreatment with 0.5 mM/kg gabaculine quadrupled GABA content and increased both the spontaneous and evoked release of endogenous GABA but while its Ca/sup 2 +/ -dependent release increased by 50%, the Ca/sup 2 +/ -independent release was enhanced sevenfold. This large Ca/sup 2 +/ -independent release of GABA is likely to have different functional significance from the normal Ca/sup 2 +/ -dependent release.

  18. GABA tea prevents cardiac fibrosis by attenuating TNF-alpha and Fas/FasL-mediated apoptosis in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Cherng, Shur-Hueih; Huang, Chih-Yang; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Lai, Shue-Er; Tseng, Chien-Yu; Lin, Yueh-Min; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Wang, Hsueh-Fang

    2014-03-01

    GABA tea is a tea product that contains a high level of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). This study investigated the effects of GABA tea on the heart in a diabetic rat model. Male Wistar rats were injected with 55mg/kg streptozotocin (STZ) to induce diabetes for 2weeks and then orally given dosages of 4.55 and 45.5mg/kg/day GABA tea extract for 6weeks. The results revealed that fasting blood glucose levels returned to normal levels in GABA tea-treated diabetic rats, but not in the untreated diabetic rats. Additionally, GABA tea effectively inhibited cardiac fibrosis induced by STZ. Further experiments showed that the STZ-induced protein levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), Fas, activated caspase-8 and caspase-3 were significantly inhibited by the GABA tea treatment. Therefore, our data suggest that the inhibiting effect of GABA tea on STZ-induced cardiac fibrosis in diabetic rats may be mediated by reducing blood glucose and further attenuating TNF-alpha expression and/or Fas/Fas ligand (FasL)-mediated apoptosis. These findings will provide implications for the potential anti-diabetic properties of GABA tea. PMID:24374093

  19. GABA concentration in superior temporal sulcus predicts gamma power and perception in the sound-induced flash illusion.

    PubMed

    Balz, Johanna; Keil, Julian; Roa Romero, Yadira; Mekle, Ralf; Schubert, Florian; Aydin, Semiha; Ittermann, Bernd; Gallinat, Jürgen; Senkowski, Daniel

    2016-01-15

    In everyday life we are confronted with inputs of multisensory stimuli that need to be integrated across our senses. Individuals vary considerably in how they integrate multisensory information, yet the neurochemical foundations underlying this variability are not well understood. Neural oscillations, especially in the gamma band (>30Hz) play an important role in multisensory processing. Furthermore, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurotransmission contributes to the generation of gamma band oscillations (GBO), which can be sustained by activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors. Hence, differences in the GABA and glutamate systems might contribute to individual differences in multisensory processing. In this combined magnetic resonance spectroscopy and electroencephalography study, we examined the relationships between GABA and glutamate concentrations in the superior temporal sulcus (STS), source localized GBO, and illusion rate in the sound-induced flash illusion (SIFI). In 39 human volunteers we found robust relationships between GABA concentration, GBO power, and the SIFI perception rate (r-values=0.44 to 0.53). The correlation between GBO power and SIFI perception rate was about twofold higher when the modulating influence of the GABA level was included in the analysis as compared to when it was excluded. No significant effects were obtained for glutamate concentration. Our study suggests that the GABA level shapes individual differences in audiovisual perception through its modulating influence on GBO. GABA neurotransmission could be a promising target for treatment interventions of multisensory processing deficits in clinical populations, such as schizophrenia or autism. PMID:26546865

  20. Synaptic GABA release prevents GABA transporter type-1 reversal during excessive network activity

    PubMed Central

    Savtchenko, Leonid; Megalogeni, Maria; Rusakov, Dmitri A.; Walker, Matthew C.; Pavlov, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    GABA transporters control extracellular GABA, which regulates the key aspects of neuronal and network behaviour. A prevailing view is that modest neuronal depolarization results in GABA transporter type-1 (GAT-1) reversal causing non-vesicular GABA release into the extracellular space during intense network activity. This has important implications for GABA uptake-targeting therapies. Here we combined a realistic kinetic model of GAT-1 with experimental measurements of tonic GABAA receptor currents in ex vivo hippocampal slices to examine GAT-1 operation under varying network conditions. Our simulations predict that synaptic GABA release during network activity robustly prevents GAT-1 reversal. We test this in the 0 Mg2+ model of epileptiform discharges using slices from healthy and chronically epileptic rats and find that epileptiform activity is associated with increased synaptic GABA release and is not accompanied by GAT-1 reversal. We conclude that sustained efflux of GABA through GAT-1 is unlikely to occur during physiological or pathological network activity. PMID:25798861

  1. Effects of insecticides on GABA-induced chloride influx into rat brain microsacs.

    PubMed

    Abalis, I M; Eldefrawi, M E; Eldefrawi, A T

    1986-01-01

    The actions of different insecticides known to affect binding of ligands to gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors were studied on the function of GABAA receptors in rat brain as assayed by GABA-induced 36Cl- influx into membrane microsacs. This flux was inhibited by the competitive antagonist bicuculline and the noncompetitive antagonist t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate, and the GABA effect was potentiated by the tranquilizer flunitrazepam and the depressant pentobarbital, as expected for effects on a GABAA receptor. The GABA-induced 36Cl- flux was inhibited by several cyclodienes and gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane (gamma-BHC) with the following order of decreasing potency: endosulfan I greater than endrin greater than endosulfan II greater than dieldrin greater than heptachlor epoxide greater than gamma-BHC greater than heptachlor. The noninsecticidal beta-BHC had no effect, while the IC 50 values for gamma-BHC and endrin were 1 and 0.2 microM, respectively. The four pyrethroids tested also inhibited the GABA-induced 36Cl- flux with the following decreasing potencies: 1R,cis,alpha S-cypermethrin greater than 1R,trans, alpha S-cypermethrin greater than fluvalinate greater than allethrin. Avermectin B1a was the only insecticide tested that, in the absence of GABA, stimulated 36Cl- flux in a dose-dependent manner, and this flux was inhibited by bicuculline. The stereospecific inhibition of the GABA-induced 36Cl- influx by the cyclodienes and gamma-BHC supports previously published data on their binding to mammalian brain GABAA receptor and suggests that these insecticides inhibit this receptor's function. It is also suggested that type II pyrethroids are potent inhibitors of the same receptor. However, avermectin B1a appears to act as a partial agonist of GABAA receptors. PMID:3009836

  2. Comparative mapping of GABA-immunoreactive neurons in the central nervous systems of nudibranch molluscs.

    PubMed

    Gunaratne, Charuni A; Sakurai, Akira; Katz, Paul S

    2014-03-01

    The relative simplicity of certain invertebrate nervous systems, such as those of gastropod molluscs, allows behaviors to be dissected at the level of small neural circuits composed of individually identifiable neurons. Elucidating the neurotransmitter phenotype of neurons in neural circuits is important for understanding how those neural circuits function. In this study, we examined the distribution of γ-aminobutyric-acid;-immunoreactive (GABA-ir) neurons in four species of sea slugs (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Opisthobranchia, Nudibranchia): Tritonia diomedea, Melibe leonina, Dendronotus iris, and Hermissenda crassicornis. We found consistent patterns of GABA immunoreactivity in the pedal and cerebral-pleural ganglia across species. In particular, there were bilateral clusters in the lateral and medial regions of the dorsal surface of the cerebral ganglia as well as a cluster on the ventral surface of the pedal ganglia. There were also individual GABA-ir neurons that were recognizable across species. The invariant presence of these individual neurons and clusters suggests that they are homologous, although there were interspecies differences in the numbers of neurons in the clusters. The GABAergic system was largely restricted to the central nervous system, with the majority of axons confined to ganglionic connectives and commissures, suggesting a central, integrative role for GABA. GABA was a candidate inhibitory neurotransmitter for neurons in central pattern generator (CPG) circuits underlying swimming behaviors in these species, however none of the known swim CPG neurons were GABA-ir. Although the functions of these GABA-ir neurons are not known, it is clear that their presence has been strongly conserved across nudibranchs. PMID:24638845

  3. Free amino acids, copper, iron and zinc composition in sera of patients with thyrometabolic diseases.

    PubMed

    Hassan, M A; al-Awqati, M A; Issac, D; Yadav, G K; Bahman, M A

    1990-02-01

    Free amino acids together with copper, iron and zinc were measured in sera of 67 adult patients with thyrotoxicosis (n = 29) or hypothyroidism (n = 38). In contradistinction to the almost indifferences exhibited by the three metals, many amino acids displayed significant relationships with the thyrometabolic activity (mainly tyrosine and arginine with r values of 0.5 and 0.44, respectively). Additional analyses revealed certain patterns, between trace metals and amino acids, which conferred challenging difficulties to interpretation. Thus while zinc was associated positively with some amino acids (such as glutamic acid and alanine), copper correlated almost invariably in a negative manner with citrulline, alpha-amino-butyric acid, proline, glycine and valine. This new information should contribute to our knowledge of the complex metabolism of both trace metals and amino acids. PMID:2323728

  4. Functional Maturation of GABA Synapses During Postnatal Development of the Monkey Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Burgos, Guillermo; Miyamae, Takeaki; Pafundo, Diego E; Yoshino, Hiroki; Rotaru, Diana C; Hoftman, Gil; Datta, Dibyadeep; Zhang, Yun; Hammond, Mahjub; Sampson, Allan R; Fish, Kenneth N; Ermentrout, G Bard; Lewis, David A

    2015-11-01

    Development of inhibition onto pyramidal cells may be crucial for the emergence of cortical network activity, including gamma oscillations. In primate dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), inhibitory synaptogenesis starts in utero and inhibitory synapse density reaches adult levels before birth. However, in DLPFC, the expression levels of ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) synapse-related gene products changes markedly during development until young adult age, suggesting a highly protracted maturation of GABA synapse function. Therefore, we examined the development of GABA synapses by recording GABAAR-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents (GABAAR-IPSCs) from pyramidal cells in the DLPFC of neonatal, prepubertal, peripubertal, and adult macaque monkeys. We found that the decay of GABAAR-IPSCs, possibly including those from parvalbumin-positive GABA neurons, shortened by prepubertal age, while their amplitude increased until the peripubertal period. Interestingly, both GABAAR-mediated quantal response size, estimated by miniature GABAAR-IPSCs, and the density of GABAAR synaptic appositions, measured with immunofluorescence microscopy, were stable with age. Simulations in a computational model network with constant GABA synapse density showed that the developmental changes in GABAAR-IPSC properties had a significant impact on oscillatory activity and predicted that, whereas DLPFC circuits can generate gamma frequency oscillations by prepubertal age, mature levels of gamma band power are attained at late stages of development. PMID:24904071

  5. Effect of pressure on (/sup 3/H)GABA release by synaptosomes isolated from cerebral cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, S.C.; Colton, J.S.; Hallenbeck, J.M.

    1986-12-01

    High hydrostatic pressure has been shown to produce neurological changes in humans which manifest, in part, as tremor, myoclonic jerks, electroencephalographic changes, and convulsions. This clinical pattern has been termed high-pressure nervous syndrome (HPNS). These symptoms may represent an alteration in synaptic transmission in the central nervous system with the inhibitory neural pathways being affected in particular. Since gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transmission has been implicated in other seizure disorders, it was of interest to study GABAergic function at high pressure. Isolated synaptosomes were used to follow GABA release at 67.7 ATA of pressure. The major observation was a 33% depression in total (/sup 3/H)GABA efflux from depolarized cerebrocortical synaptosomes at 67.7 ATA. The Ca2+-dependent component of release was found to be completely blocked during the 1st min of (/sup 3/H)GABA efflux with a slow rise over the subsequent 3 min. These findings lead us to conclude that high pressure interferes with the intraterminal cascade for Ca2+-dependent release of GABA.

  6. Growth hormone response to the GABA-B agonist baclofen in 3-week abstinent alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Ozsoy, Saliha; Esel, Ertugrul; Turan, Tayfun; Kula, Mustafa

    2007-12-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) dysfunction is a known feature of alcoholism. We investigated GABA-B receptor activity in 3-week abstinent alcoholics using the growth hormone (GH) response to baclofen, a GABA-B receptor agonist. The study aimed to investigate the relationship between GABA-B receptor activity and alcohol withdrawal. GH response to baclofen was measured in alcohol-dependent males without depression (n = 22) who were on day 21 of alcohol abstinence and in healthy control male subjects (n = 23). After 20mg baclofen was given orally to the subjects, blood samples for GH assay were obtained every 30 min for the subsequent 150 min. The patients were divided into two subgroups (continuing withdrawal and recovered withdrawal subgroups) according to their withdrawal symptom severity scores on day 21 of alcohol cessation. Baclofen administration significantly altered GH secretion in the controls, but not in the patients. When GH response to baclofen was assessed as DeltaGH, it was lower in the patients with continuing withdrawal symptoms than in the controls and in the recovered withdrawal group. Impaired GH response to baclofen in all patients mainly pertained to the patients whose withdrawal symptoms partly continued. Our results suggest that reduced GABA-B receptor activity might be associated with longer-term alcohol withdrawal symptoms in alcoholic patients. PMID:18047908

  7. The role of the GABA system in amphetamine-type stimulant use disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Dongliang; liu, Yao; Li, Xiaohong; liu, Jinggen; Zhao, Min

    2015-01-01

    Abuse of amphetamine-type stimulants (ATS) has become a global public health problem. ATS causes severe neurotoxicity, which could lead to addiction and could induce psychotic disorders or cognitive dysfunctions. However, until now, there has been a lack of effective medicines for treating ATS-related problems. Findings from recent studies indicate that in addition to the traditional dopamine-ergic system, the GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid)-ergic system plays an important role in ATS abuse. However, the exact mechanisms of the GABA-ergic system in amphetamine-type stimulant use disorders are not fully understood. This review discusses the role of the GABA-ergic system in ATS use disorders, including ATS induced psychotic disorders and cognitive dysfunctions. We conclude that the GABA-ergic system are importantly involved in the development of ATS use disorders through multiple pathways, and that therapies or medicines that target specific members of the GABA-ergic system may be novel effective interventions for the treatment of ATS use disorders. PMID:25999814

  8. Activation of GABA-A Receptor Ameliorates Homocysteine-Induced MMP-9 Activation by ERK Pathway

    PubMed Central

    TYAGI, NEETU; GILLESPIE, WILLIAM; VACEK, JONATHAN C.; SEN, UTPAL; TYAGI, SURESH C.; LOMINADZE, DAVID

    2010-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) is a risk factor for neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. Homocysteine (Hcy) induces redox stress, in part, by activating matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), which degrades the matrix and leads to bloodbrain barrier dysfunction. Hcy competitively binds to ?-aminbutyric acid (GABA) receptors, which are excitatory neurotransmitter receptors. However, the role of GABA-A receptor in Hcy-induced cerebrovascular remodeling is not clear. We hypothesized that Hcy causes cerebrovascular remodeling by increasing redox stress and MMP-9 activity via the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway and by inhibition of GABA-A receptors, thus behaving as an inhibitory neurotransmitter. Hcy-induced reactive oxygen species production was detected using the fluorescent probe, 2?7?-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate. Hcy increased nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase-4 concomitantly suppressing thioredoxin. Hcy caused activation of MMP-9, measured by gelatin zymography. The GABA-A receptor agonist, muscimol ameliorated the Hcy-mediated MMP-9 activation. In parallel, Hcy caused phosphorylation of ERK and selectively decreased levels of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase-4 (TIMP-4). Treatment of the endothelial cell with muscimol restored the levels of TIMP-4 to the levels in control group. Hcy induced expression of iNOS and decreased eNOS expression, which lead to a decreased NO bioavailability. Furthermore muscimol attenuated Hcy-induced MMP-9 via ERK signaling pathway. These results suggest that Hcy competes with GABA-A receptors, inducing the oxidative stress transduction pathway and leading to ERK activation. PMID:19308943

  9. Hypoxia and GABA shunt activation in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Antero; Jouhten, Paula; Sarajärvi, Timo; Haapasalo, Annakaisa; Hiltunen, Mikko

    2016-01-01

    We have previously observed that the conversion of mild cognitive impairment to definitive Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with a significant increase in the serum level of 2,4-dihydroxybutyrate (2,4-DHBA). The metabolic generation of 2,4-DHBA is linked to the activation of the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) shunt, an alternative energy production pathway activated during cellular stress, when the function of Krebs cycle is compromised. The GABA shunt can be triggered by local hypoperfusion and subsequent hypoxia in AD brains caused by cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) is a key enzyme in the GABA shunt, converting succinic semialdehyde (SSA) into succinate, a Krebs cycle intermediate. A deficiency of SSADH activity stimulates the conversion of SSA into γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), an alternative route from the GABA shunt. GHB can exert not only acute neuroprotective activities but unfortunately also chronic detrimental effects which may lead to cognitive impairment. Subsequently, GHB can be metabolized to 2,4-DHBA and secreted from the brain. Thus, the activation of the GABA shunt and the generation of GHB and 2,4-DHBA can have an important role in the early phase of AD pathogenesis. PMID:26617286

  10. GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex in long-sleep and short-sleep mice

    SciTech Connect

    Marley, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    LS mice are more sensitive to benzodiazepine-induced anesthesia; however, the two lines do not differ in their hypothermic response to flurazepam. SS mice are more resistant to 3-mercaptopropionic acid-induced seizures and more sensitive to the anticonvulsant effects of benzodiazepines. The various correlates of GABA and benzodiazepine actions probably are the results of different mechanisms of action and/or differential regional control. Bicuculline competition for /sup 3/H-GABA binding sites is greater in SS cerebellar tissue and /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam binding is greater in the mid-brain region of LS mice. GABA enhancement of /sup 3/H-flunitrazepma binding is greater in SS mice. Ethanol also enhances /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam binding and increases the levels of /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam binding above those observed for GABA. Using correlational techniques on data from LS and SS mice and several inbred mouse strains, it was demonstrated that a positive relationship exists between the degree of receptor coupling within the GABA receptor complex and the degree of resistance to seizures.

  11. Genetic differences in the ethanol sensitivity of GABA sub A receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Wafford, K.A.; Burnett, D.M.; Dunwiddie, T.V.; Harris, R.A. )

    1990-07-20

    Animal lines selected for differences in drug sensitivity can be used to help determine the molecular basis of drug action. Long-sleep (LS) and short-sleep (SS) mice differ markedly in their genetic sensitivity to ethanol. To investigate the molecular basis for this difference, mRNA from brains of LS and SS mice was expressed in Xenopus oocytes and the ethanol sensitivity of gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABA{sub A})- and N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) - activated ion channels was tested. Ethanol facilitated GABA responses in oocytes injected with mRNA from LS mice but antagonized responses in oocytes injected with mRNA from SS animals. Ethanol inhibited NMDA responses equally in the two lines. Thus, genes coding for the GABA{sub A} receptor or associated proteins may be critical determinants of individual differences in ethanol sensitivity.

  12. The Stop and Go of Nicotine Dependence: Role of GABA and Glutamate

    PubMed Central

    DSouza, Manoranjan S.; Markou, Athina

    2013-01-01

    Nicotine plays an important role in the initiation and maintenance of tobacco smoking. Importantly, chronic nicotine exposure alters the function of brain reward systems, resulting in the development of a nicotine-dependent state. This nicotine-dependent state is associated with aversive affective and somatic signs upon abstinence from smoking, often leading to relapse in abstinent smokers. This article reviews the role of the major excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters glutamate and ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA), respectively, in both the reinforcing effects of nicotine and development of nicotine dependence. Evidence suggests that blockade of glutamatergic neurotransmission attenuates both nicotine intake and nicotine seeking. In contrast, both nicotine intake and nicotine seeking are attenuated when GABA neurotransmission is facilitated. In conclusion, medications that either attenuate/negatively modulate glutamatergic neurotransmission or facilitate/positively modulate GABA neurotransmission may be useful for promoting smoking cessation in humans. PMID:23732855

  13. Mutations in the GABA Transporter SLC6A1 Cause Epilepsy with Myoclonic-Atonic Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Carvill, GemmaL.; McMahon, JacintaM.; Schneider, Amy; Zemel, Matthew; Myers, CandaceT.; Saykally, Julia; Nguyen, John; Robbiano, Angela; Zara, Federico; Specchio, Nicola; Mecarelli, Oriano; Smith, RobertL.; Leventer, RichardJ.; Mller, RikkeS.; Nikanorova, Marina; Dimova, Petia; Jordanova, Albena; Petrou, Steven; Helbig, Ingo; Striano, Pasquale; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Berkovic, SamuelF.; Scheffer, IngridE.; Mefford, HeatherC.

    2015-01-01

    GAT-1, encoded by SLC6A1, is one of the major gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporters in the brain and is responsible for re-uptake of GABA from the synapse. In this study, targeted resequencing of 644 individuals with epileptic encephalopathies led to the identification of six SLC6A1 mutations in seven individuals, all of whom have epilepsy with myoclonic-atonic seizures (MAE). We describe two truncations and four missense alterations, all of which most likely lead to loss of function of GAT-1 and thus reduced GABA re-uptake from the synapse. These individuals share many of the electrophysiological properties of Gat1-deficient mice, including spontaneous spike-wave discharges. Overall, pathogenic mutations occurred in 6/160 individuals with MAE, accounting for ?4% of unsolved MAE cases. PMID:25865495

  14. “Brain MR spectroscopy in autism spectrum disorder—the GABA excitatory/inhibitory imbalance theory revisited”

    PubMed Central

    Brix, Maiken K.; Ersland, Lars; Hugdahl, Kenneth; Grüner, Renate; Posserud, Maj-Britt; Hammar, Åsa; Craven, Alexander R.; Noeske, Ralph; Evans, C. John; Walker, Hanne B.; Midtvedt, Tore; Beyer, Mona K.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) from voxels placed in the left anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) was measured from 14 boys with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and 24 gender and age-matched typically developing (TD) control group. Our main aims were to compare the concentration of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) between the two groups, and to investigate the relationship between brain metabolites and autism symptom severity in the ASD group. We did find a significant negative correlation in the ASD group between Autism Spectrum Screening Questionnaire (ASSQ) and GABA+/Cr, which may imply that severity of symptoms in ASD is associated with differences in the level of GABA in the brain, supporting the excitatory/inhibitory (E/I) imbalance theory. However we did not find a significant difference between the two groups in GABA levels. PMID:26157380

  15. Contribution of polyamines metabolism and GABA shunt to chilling tolerance induced by nitric oxide in cold-stored banana fruit.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yansheng; Luo, Zisheng; Mao, Linchun; Ying, Tiejin

    2016-04-15

    Effect of exogenous nitric oxide (NO) on polyamines (PAs) catabolism, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) shunt, proline accumulation and chilling injury of banana fruit under cold storage was investigated. Banana fruit treated with NO sustained lower chilling injury index than the control. Notably elevated nitric oxide synthetase activity and endogenous NO level were observed in NO-treated banana fruit. PAs contents in treated fruit were significantly higher than control fruit, due to the elevated activities of arginine decarboxylase and ornithine decarboxylase. NO treatment increased the activities of diamine oxidase, polyamine oxidase and glutamate decarboxylase, while reduced GABA transaminase activity to lower levels compared with control fruit, which resulted the accumulation of GABA. Besides, NO treatment upregulated proline content and significantly enhanced the ornithine aminotransferase activity. These results indicated that the chilling tolerance induced by NO treatment might be ascribed to the enhanced catabolism of PAs, GABA and proline. PMID:26616957

  16. An excitatory GABA loop operating in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Astorga, Guadalupe; Bao, Jin; Marty, Alain; Augustine, George J.; Franconville, Romain; Jalil, Abdelali; Bradley, Jonathan; Llano, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    While it has been proposed that the conventional inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA can be excitatory in the mammalian brain, much remains to be learned concerning the circumstances and the cellular mechanisms governing potential excitatory GABA action. Using a combination of optogenetics and two-photon calcium imaging in vivo, we find that activation of chloride-permeable GABAA receptors in parallel fibers (PFs) of the cerebellar molecular layer of adult mice causes parallel fiber excitation. Stimulation of PFs at submaximal stimulus intensities leads to GABA release from molecular layer interneurons (MLIs), thus creating a positive feedback loop that enhances excitation near the center of an activated PF bundle. Our results imply that elevated chloride concentration can occur in specific intracellular compartments of mature mammalian neurons and suggest an excitatory role for GABAA receptors in the cerebellar cortex of adult mice. PMID:26236197

  17. GABA-ergic neurons in the leach central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, H.T.

    1985-01-01

    GABA is a candidate for an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the leech central nervous system because of the well-documented inhibitory action of GABA in other invertebrates. To demonstrate that GABA meets the criteria used to identify a substance as a neurotransmitter, the author examined GABA metabolism and synaptic interactions of inhibitory motor neurons in two leech species, Hirudo medicinalis and Haementeria ghilianii. Segmental ganglia of the leech ventral nerve cord and identified inhibitors have the capacity to synthesize GABA when incubated in the presence of the precursor glutamate. Application of GABA to cell bodies of excitatory motor neurons or muscle fibers innervated by the inhibitors hyperpolarizes the membrane potential of the target cell and activates a chloride ion conductance channel, similar to the inhibitory membrane response following intracellular stimulation of the inhibitor. Bicuculline methiodide (5 x 10/sup -5/M), GABA receptor antagonist, blocks reversibly the response to applied GABA and the inhibitory synaptic inputs onto the postsynaptic neurons or muscle fibers without interfering with their excitatory inputs. Furthermore, the inhibitors are included among approximately 25 neurons per segmental ganglion that take up GABA by a high affinity uptake system, as revealed by /sup 3/H-GABA-autoradiography. The development of the capacities to synthesize and to take up GABA were examined in leech embryos. The embryos are able to synthesize GABA at early stages of the development of the nervous system, before any neurons have extended neutrites.

  18. GABA(A) receptor and glycine receptor activation by paracrine/autocrine release of endogenous agonists: more than a simple communication pathway.

    PubMed

    Le-Corronc, Herve; Rigo, Jean-Michel; Branchereau, Pascal; Legendre, Pascal

    2011-08-01

    It is a common and widely accepted assumption that glycine and GABA are the main inhibitory transmitters in the central nervous system (CNS). But, in the past 20years, several studies have clearly demonstrated that these amino acids can also be excitatory in the immature central nervous system. In addition, it is now established that both GABA receptors (GABARs) and glycine receptors (GlyRs) can be located extrasynaptically and can be activated by paracrine release of endogenous agonists, such as GABA, glycine, and taurine. Recently, non-synaptic release of GABA, glycine, and taurine gained further attention with increasing evidence suggesting a developmental role of these neurotransmitters in neuronal network formation before and during synaptogenesis. This review summarizes recent knowledge about the non-synaptic activation of GABA(A)Rs and GlyRs, both in developing and adult CNS. We first present studies that reveal the functional specialization of both non-synaptic GABA(A)Rs and GlyRs and we discuss the neuronal versus non-neuronal origin of the paracrine release of GABA(A)R and GlyR agonists. We then discuss the proposed non-synaptic release mechanisms and/or pathways for GABA, glycine, and taurine. Finally, we summarize recent data about the various roles of non-synaptic GABAergic and glycinergic systems during the development of neuronal networks and in the adult. PMID:21547557

  19. Vibrational Spectra of ?-Aminobutyric Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, D. M.; Sajan, D.; Laladas, K. P.; Joe, I. Hubert; Jayakumar, V. S.

    2008-11-01

    The NIR-FT Raman, FT-IR spectral analysis of ?-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) a simple amino acid is carried out by density functional computations. The vibrational spectra confirm the existence of NH3+ in GABA. Hydroxyl groups H-bonded to the different extents are analysed, supported by computed results.

  20. The GABA(B2) subunit is critical for the trafficking and function of native GABA(B) receptors.

    PubMed

    Thuault, Seb J; Brown, Jon T; Sheardown, Steven A; Jourdain, Sabine; Fairfax, Benjamin; Spencer, Jonathan P; Restituito, Sophie; Nation, Josephine H L; Topps, Stephanie; Medhurst, Andrew D; Randall, Andrew D; Couve, Andres; Moss, Stephen J; Collingridge, Graham L; Pangalos, Menelas N; Davies, Ceri H; Calver, Andrew R

    2004-10-15

    Studies in heterologous systems have demonstrated that heterodimerisation of the two GABA(B) receptor subunits appears to be crucial for the trafficking and signalling of the receptor. Gene targeting of the GABA(B1) gene has demonstrated that the expression of GABA(B1) is essential for GABA(B) receptor function in the central nervous system (CNS). However, the contribution of the GABA(B2) subunit in the formation of native GABA(B) receptors is still unclear, in particular whether other proteins can substitute for this subunit. We have created a transgenic mouse in which the endogenous GABA(B2) gene has been mutated in order to express a C-terminally truncated version of the protein. As a result, the GABA(B1) subunit does not reach the cell surface and concomitantly both pre- and post-synaptic GABA(B) receptor functions are abolished. Taken together with previous gene deletion studies for the GABA(B1) subunit, this suggests that classical GABA(B) function in the brain is exclusively mediated by GABA(B1/2) heteromers. PMID:15451409

  1. Presynaptic ionotropic glutamate receptors modulate GABA release in the mouse dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus.

    PubMed

    Xu, H; Smith, B N

    2015-11-12

    Regulation of GABA release in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV) potently influences vagal output to the viscera. The presence of functional ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) on GABAergic terminals that rapidly alter GABA release onto DMV motor neurons has been suggested previously, but the receptor subtypes contributing to the response are unknown. We examined the effect of selective activation and inhibition of iGluRs on tetrodotoxin-insensitive, miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs) in DMV neurons using patch-clamp recordings in brainstem slices from mice. Capsaicin, which activates transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptors and increases mIPSC frequency in the DMV via an iGluR-mediated, heterosynaptic mechanism, was also applied to assess GABA release subsequent to capsaicin-stimulated glutamate release. Application of glutamate, N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA), or kainic acid (KA), but not AMPA, resulted in increased mIPSC frequency in most neurons. Inhibition of AMPA/KA receptors reduced mIPSC frequency, but selective antagonism of AMPA receptors did not alter GABA release, implicating the presence of presynaptic KA receptors on GABAergic terminals. Whereas NMDA application increased mIPSC frequency, blocking NMDA receptors was without effect, indicating that presynaptic NMDA receptors were present, but not activated by ambient glutamate levels in the slice. The effect of NMDA was prevented by AMPA/KA receptor blockade, suggesting indirect involvement of NMDA receptors. The stimulatory effect of capsaicin on GABA release was prevented when AMPA/KA or NMDA, but not AMPA receptors were blocked. Results of these studies indicate that presynaptic NMDAR and KA receptors regulate GABA release in the DMV, representing a heterosynaptic arrangement for rapidly modulating parasympathetic output, especially when synaptic excitation is elevated. PMID:26343294

  2. Valerian Inhibits Rat Hepatocarcinogenesis by Activating GABA(A) Receptor-Mediated Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kakehashi, Anna; Kato, Ayumi; Ishii, Naomi; Wei, Min; Morimura, Keiichirou; Fukushima, Shoji; Wanibuchi, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Valerian is widely used as a traditional medicine to improve the quality of sleep due to interaction of several active components with the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) A receptor (GABA(A)R) system. Recently, activation of GABA signaling in stem cells has been reported to suppress cell cycle progression in vivo. Furthermore, possible inhibitory effects of GABA(A)R agonists on hepatocarcinogenesis have been reported. The present study was performed to investigate modulating effects of Valerian on hepatocarcinogenesis using a medium-term rat liver bioassay. Male F344 rats were treated with one of the most powerful Valerian species (Valeriana sitchensis) at doses of 0, 50, 500 and 5000 ppm in their drinking water after initiation of hepatocarcinogenesis with diethylnitrosamine (DEN). Formation of glutathione S-transferase placental form positive (GST-P+) foci was significantly inhibited by Valerian at all applied doses compared with DEN initiation control rats. Generation of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine in the rat liver was significantly suppressed by all doses of Valerian, likely due to suppression of Nrf2, CYP7A1 and induction of catalase expression. Cell proliferation was significantly inhibited, while apoptosis was induced in areas of GST-P+ foci of Valerian groups associated with suppression of c-myc, Mafb, cyclin D1 and induction of p21Waf1/Cip1, p53 and Bax mRNA expression. Interestingly, expression of the GABA(A)R alpha 1 subunit was observed in GST-P+ foci of DEN control rats, with significant elevation associated with Valerian treatment. These results indicate that Valerian exhibits inhibitory effects on rat hepatocarcinogenesis by inhibiting oxidative DNA damage, suppressing cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis in GST-P+ foci by activating GABA(A)R-mediated signaling. PMID:25419570

  3. Decreased auditory GABA+ concentrations in presbycusis demonstrated by edited magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Fei; Wang, Guangbin; Ma, Wen; Ren, Fuxin; Li, Muwei; Dong, Yuling; Liu, Cheng; Liu, Bo; Bai, Xue; Zhao, Bin; Edden, Richard A.E.

    2014-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central auditory system. Altered GABAergic neurotransmission has been found in both the inferior colliculus and the auditory cortex in animal models of presbycusis. Edited magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), using the MEGA-PRESS sequence, is the most widely used technique for detecting GABA in the human brain. However, to date there has been a paucity of studies exploring changes to the GABA concentrations in the auditory region of patients with presbycusis. In this study, sixteen patients with presbycusis (5 males/11 females, mean age 63.1 ± 2.6 years) and twenty healthy controls (6 males/14 females, mean age 62.5 ± 2.3 years) underwent audiological and MRS examinations. Pure tone audiometry from 0.125 to 8 KHz and tympanometry were used to assess the hearing abilities of all subjects. The pure tone average (PTA; the average of hearing thresholds at 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 kHz) was calculated. The MEGA-PRESS sequence was used to measure GABA+ concentrations in 4 × 3 × 3 cm3 volumes centered on the left and right Heschl’s gyri. GABA+ concentrations were significantly lower in the presbycusis group compared to the control group (left auditory regions: p = 0.002, right auditory regions: p = 0.008). Significant negative correlations were observed between PTA and GABA+ concentrations in the presbycusis group (r = −0.57, p = 0.02), while a similar trend was found in the control group (r = −0.40, p = 0.08). These results are consistent with a hypothesis of dysfunctional GABAergic neurotransmission in the central auditory system in presbycusis, and suggest a potential treatment target for presbycusis. PMID:25463460

  4. GABA(B) receptors, schizophrenia and sleep dysfunction: a review of the relationship and its potential clinical and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Kantrowitz, Joshua; Citrome, Leslie; Javitt, Daniel

    2009-08-01

    Evidence for an intrinsic relationship between sleep, cognition and the symptomatic manifestations of schizophrenia is accumulating. This review presents evidence for the possible utility of GABA(B) receptor agonists for the treatment of subjective and objective sleep abnormalities related to schizophrenia. At the phenotypic level, sleep disturbance occurs in 16-30% of patients with schizophrenia and is related to reduced quality of life and poor coping skills. On the neurophysiological level, studies suggest that sleep deficits reflect a core component of schizophrenia. Specifically, slow-wave sleep deficits, which are inversely correlated with cognition scores, are seen. Moreover, sleep plays an increasingly well documented role in memory consolidation in schizophrenia. Correlations of slow-wave sleep deficits with impaired reaction time and declarative memory have also been reported. Thus, both behavioural insomnia and sleep architecture are critical therapeutic targets in patients with schizophrenia. However, long-term treatment with antipsychotics often results in residual sleep dysfunction and does not improve slow-wave sleep, and adjunctive GABA(A) receptor modulators, such as benzodiazepines and zolpidem, can impair sleep architecture and cognition in schizophrenia. GABA(B) receptor agonists have therapeutic potential in schizophrenia. These agents have minimal effect on rapid eye movement sleep while increasing slow-wave sleep. Preclinical associations with increased expression of genes related to slow-wave sleep production and circadian rhythm function have also been reported. GABA(B) receptor deficits result in a sustained hyperdopaminergic state and can be reversed by a GABA(B) receptor agonist. Genetic, postmortem and electrophysiological studies also associate GABA(B) receptors with schizophrenia. While studies thus far have not shown significant effects, prior focus on the use of GABA(B) receptor agonists has been on the positive symptoms of schizophrenia, with minimal investigation of GABA(B) receptor agonists such as baclofen or gamma-hydroxybutyric acid and their effects on sleep architecture, cognition and negative symptoms in patients with schizophrenia. Further study is needed. PMID:19594197

  5. Low visual cortex GABA levels in hepatic encephalopathy: links to blood ammonia, critical flicker frequency, and brain osmolytes.

    PubMed

    Oeltzschner, Georg; Butz, Markus; Baumgarten, Thomas J; Hoogenboom, Nienke; Wittsack, Hans-Jrg; Schnitzler, Alfons

    2015-12-01

    The pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is not fully understood yet. Hyperammonemia due to liver failure and subsequent disturbance of cerebral osmolytic balance is thought to play a pivotal role in the emergence of HE. The aim of this in-vivo MR spectroscopy study was to investigate the levels of ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and its correlations with clinical symptoms of HE, blood ammonia, critical flicker frequency, and osmolytic levels. Thirty patients with minimal HE or HE1 and 16 age-matched healthy controls underwent graduation of HE according to the West-Haven criteria and including the critical flicker frequency (CFF), neuropsychometric testing and blood testing. Edited proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H MRS) was used to non-invasively measure the concentrations of GABA, glutamate (Glu), glutamine (Gln), and myo-inositol (mI) - all normalized to creatine (Cr) - in visual and sensorimotor cortex. GABA/Cr in the visual area was significantly decreased in mHE and HE1 patients and correlated both to the CFF (r=0.401, P=0.013) and blood ammonia levels (r=-0.434, P=0.006). Visual GABA/Cr was also strongly linked to mI/Cr (r=0.720, P<0.001) and Gln/Cr (r=-0.699, P<0.001). No group differences or correlations were found for GABA/Cr in the sensorimotor area. Hepatic encephalopathy is associated with a regional specific decrease of GABA levels in the visual cortex, while no changes were revealed for the sensorimotor cortex. Correlations of visual GABA/Cr with CFF, blood ammonia, and osmolytic regulators mI and Gln indicate that decreased visual GABA levels might contribute to HE symptoms, most likely as a consequence of hyperammonemia. PMID:26359122

  6. A point mutation in a Drosophila GABA receptor confers insecticide resistance.

    PubMed

    Ffrench-Constant, R H; Rocheleau, T A; Steichen, J C; Chalmers, A E

    1993-06-01

    Vertebrates and invertebrates both have GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) as a major inhibitory neurotransmitter. GABAA receptors in vertebrates assemble as heteromultimers to form an integral chloride ion channel. These receptors are targets for drugs and pesticides and are also implicated in seizure-related diseases. Picrotoxinin (PTX) and cyclodiene insecticides are GABAA receptor antagonists which competitively displace each other from the same binding site. Insects and vertebrates showing resistance to cyclodienes also show cross-resistance to PTX. Previously, we used a field-isolated Drosophila mutant Rdl (Resistant to dieldrin) insensitive to PTX and cyclodienes to clone a putative GABA receptor. Here we report the functional expression and novel pharmacology of this GABA receptor and examine the functionality of a resistance-associated point mutation (alanine to serine) within the second membrane-spanning domain, the region thought to line the chloride ion channel pore. This substitution is found globally in Drosophila populations. This mutation not only identifies a single amino acid conferring high levels of resistance to the important GABA receptor antagonist PTX but also, by conferring resistance to cyclodienes, may account for over 60% of reported cases of insecticide resistance. PMID:8389005

  7. Distribution and ultrastructure of neurons in opossum piriform cortex displaying immunoreactivity to GABA and GAD and high-affinity tritiated GABA uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Haberly, L.B.; Hansen, D.J.; Feig, S.L.; Presto, S.

    1987-12-08

    GABAergic neurons have been identified in the piriform cortex of the opossum at light and electron microscopic levels by immunocytochemical localization of GABA and the GABA-synthesizing enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase and by autoradiographic visualization of high-affinity /sup 3/H-GABA uptake. Four major neuron populations have been distinguished on the basis of soma size, shape, and segregation at specific depths and locations: large horizontal cells in layer Ia of the anterior piriform cortex, small globular cells with thin dendrites concentrated in layers Ib and II of the posterior piriform cortex, and multipolar and fusiform cells concentrated in the deep part of layer III in anterior and posterior parts of the piriform cortex and the subjacent endopiriform nucleus. All four populations were well visualized with both antisera, but the large layer Ia horizontal cells displayed only very light /sup 3/H-GABA uptake, thus suggesting a lack of local axon collaterals or lack of high-affinity GABA uptake sites. The large, ultrastructurally distinctive somata of layer Ia horizontal cells receive a very small number of symmetrical synapses; the thin, axonlike dendrites of small globular cells are exclusively postsynaptic and receive large numbers of both symmetrical and asymmetrical synapses, in contrast to somata which receive a small number of both types; and the deep multipolar and fusiform cells receive a highly variable number of symmetrical and asymmetrical synapses on somata and proximal dendrites. Labeled puncta of axon terminal dimensions were found in large numbers in the neuropil surrounding pyramidal cell somata in layer II and in the endopiriform nucleus. Moderately large numbers of labeled puncta were found in layer I at the depth of pyramidal cell apical dendrites with greater numbers in layer Ia at the depth of distal apical segments than in layer Ib.

  8. Free radical modification of high-affinity GABA transport in the central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Debler, E.A.

    1985-01-01

    Presynaptic nerve terminals of DNS neurons can be characterized as dynamic self-contained subunits of the overall neuron. These neuron subunits together with the adjacent post-synaptic terminals constitute the functional unit of neurotransmission. One major function of the presynaptic nerve terminal in neurotransmission is its role in the release and subsequent reuptake of neurotransmitters. Neurochemical and morphological analysis of this high-affinity uptake process, for the amino acid neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), revealed that free radical modification (lipid peroxidation) of presynaptic nerve terminal membrane structures resulted in a decrease in high-affinity (/sup 14/C)GABA uptake. Depolarized nerve terminals exposed to horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-generated superoxide radicals (.O/sub 2//sup -/) exhibited an alteration of synaptic vesicle membrane structure and a reduction of high-affinity (/sup 14/C)GABA uptake. In the kinetic analysis of high affinity (/sup 14/C)GABA uptake, hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase (HPX/XOD)-treated synaptosomes exhibited a significant reduction in V/sub max/ but no significant alteration of K/sub m/. This HPX/XOD treatment also resulted in significant structural alterations of both the synaptic vesicle membrane and the synaptosomal plasma membrane. Structural and functional correlates appear to exist between synaptic vesicle and plasma membrane systems and high-affinity (/sup 14/C)GABA uptake. Together, the selectivity of the .O/sub 2//sup -/ toxicity and that of the high-K/sup +//Na/sup +/-free effect support the idea of two separate and different amino acid uptake systems in CNS tissue.

  9. Corelease of acetylcholine and GABA from cholinergic forebrain neurons.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Arpiar; Granger, Adam J; Sabatini, Bernardo L

    2015-01-01

    Neurotransmitter corelease is emerging as a common theme of central neuromodulatory systems. Though corelease of glutamate or GABA with acetylcholine has been reported within the cholinergic system, the full extent is unknown. To explore synaptic signaling of cholinergic forebrain neurons, we activated choline acetyltransferase expressing neurons using channelrhodopsin while recording post-synaptic currents (PSCs) in layer 1 interneurons. Surprisingly, we observed PSCs mediated by GABAA receptors in addition to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Based on PSC latency and pharmacological sensitivity, our results suggest monosynaptic release of both GABA and ACh. Anatomical analysis showed that forebrain cholinergic neurons express the GABA synthetic enzyme Gad2 and the vesicular GABA transporter (Slc32a1). We confirmed the direct release of GABA by knocking out Slc32a1 from cholinergic neurons. Our results identify GABA as an overlooked fast neurotransmitter utilized throughout the forebrain cholinergic system. GABA/ACh corelease may have major implications for modulation of cortical function by cholinergic neurons. PMID:25723967

  10. Age-related Hearing Loss: GABA, Nicotinic Acetylcholine and NMDA Receptor Expression Changes in Spiral Ganglion Neurons of the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiaolan; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Ding, Bo; Walton, Joseph P.; Frisina, Robert D.; Su, Jiping

    2014-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss presbycusis is the number one communication disorder and most prevalent neurodegenerative condition of our aged population. Although speech understanding in background noise is quite difficult for those with presbycusis, there are currently no biomedical treatments to prevent, delay or reverse this condition. A better understanding of the cochlear mechanisms underlying presbycusis will help lead to future treatments. Objectives of the present study were to investigate gamma-amino butyric acid A (GABAA) receptor subunit ?1, nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptor subunit ?2, and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunit NR1 mRNA and protein expression changes in spiral ganglion neurons of the CBA/CaJ mouse cochlea, that occur in age-related hearing loss, utilizing quantitative immunohistochemistry and semi-quantitative RT-PCR techniques. We found that auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds shifted over 40 dB from 348 kHz in old mice compared to young adults. DPOAE thresholds also shifted over 40 dB from 649 kHz in old mice, and their amplitudes were significantly decreased or absent in the same frequency range. Spiral ganglion neuron (SGN) density decreased with age in basal, middle and apical turns, and SGN density of the basal turn declined the most. A positive correlation was observed between SGN density and ABR wave 1 amplitude. mRNA and protein expression of GABAAR ?1 and AChR ?2 decreased with age in SGNs in the old mouse cochlea. mRNA and protein expression of NMDAR NR1 increased with age in SGNs of the old mice. These findings demonstrate that there are functionally-relevant age-related changes of GABAAR, nAChR, NMDAR expression in CBA mouse SGNs reflecting their degeneration, which may be related to functional changes in cochlear synaptic transmission with age, suggesting biological mechanisms for peripheral age-related hearing loss. PMID:24316061

  11. Double isotopic method using dansyl chloride for the determination of GABA in rat C6 astrocytoma cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Kohl, R.L.; Quay, W.B.; Perez-Polo, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    Methods are described for the quantitative measurement of GABA in culture. The method can be adapted to any amino acid or dansyl-chloride-reactive species. The sensitivity and selectivity of the procedure result from the double isotopic design in which (/sup 14/C)-labeled internal standard was added to the samples before reaction with (3M)-labeled dansyl chloride. Values obtained by ion-exchange amino acid analysis of cultures agree closely with the values obtained by the double isotopic method. This method is sensitive enough to measure GABA intracellularly and the condition medium.

  12. GABA{sub A} receptor open-state conformation determines non-competitive antagonist binding

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Ligong; Xue Ling; Giacomini, Kathleen M.; Casida, John E.

    2011-02-01

    The {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptor (GABA{sub A}R) is one of the most important targets for insecticide action. The human recombinant {beta}3 homomer is the best available model for this binding site and 4-n-[{sup 3}H]propyl-4'-ethynylbicycloorthobenzoate ([{sup 3}H]EBOB) is the preferred non-competitive antagonist (NCA) radioligand. The uniquely high sensitivity of the {beta}3 homomer relative to the much-less-active but structurally very-similar {beta}1 homomer provides an ideal comparison to elucidate structural and functional features important for NCA binding. The {beta}1 and {beta}3 subunits were compared using chimeragenesis and mutagenesis and various combinations with the {alpha}1 subunit and modulators. Chimera {beta}3/{beta}1 with the {beta}3 subunit extracellular domain and the {beta}1 subunit transmembrane helices retained the high [{sup 3}H]EBOB binding level of the {beta}3 homomer while chimera {beta}1/{beta}3 with the {beta}1 subunit extracellular domain and the {beta}3 subunit transmembrane helices had low binding activity similar to the {beta}1 homomer. GABA at 3 {mu}M stimulated heteromers {alpha}1{beta}1 and {alpha}1{beta}3 binding levels more than 2-fold by increasing the open probability of the channel. Addition of the {alpha}1 subunit rescued the inactive {beta}1/{beta}3 chimera close to wildtype {alpha}1{beta}1 activity. EBOB binding was significantly altered by mutations {beta}1S15'N and {beta}3N15'S compared with wildtype {beta}1 and {beta}3, respectively. However, the binding activity of {alpha}1{beta}1S15'N was insensitive to GABA and {alpha}1{beta}3N15'S was stimulated much less than wildtype {alpha}1{beta}3 by GABA. The inhibitory effect of etomidate on NCA binding was reduced more than 5-fold by the mutation {beta}3N15'S. Therefore, the NCA binding site is tightly regulated by the open-state conformation that largely determines GABA{sub A} receptor sensitivity. - Graphical Abstract: Display Omitted Research Highlights: > The {beta}1 and {beta}3 subunits were compared by chimeragenesis, mutagenesis and modulators. > Low {beta}1 NCA binding was rescued by replacing its transmembrane helices with those of {beta}3. > GABA at 3 {mu}M stimulated heteromers {alpha}1{beta}1 and {alpha}1{beta}3 binding levels more than 2-fold. > Mutation at 15' position in TM2 reduced GABA stimulation of NCA binding. > The open-state conformation largely determines GABAA receptor sensitivity to NCAs.

  13. Agonist- and antagonist-induced conformational changes of loop F and their contributions to the ρ1 GABA receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianliang; Xue, Fenqin; Chang, Yongchang

    2009-01-01

    Binding of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) to its receptor initiates a conformational change to open the channel, but the mechanism of the channel activation is not well understood. To this end, we scanned loop F (K210–F227) in the N-terminal domain of the ρ1 GABA receptor expressed in Xenopus oocytes using a site-specific fluorescence technique. We detected GABA-induced fluorescence changes at six positions (K210, K211, L216, K217, T218 and I222). At these positions the fluorescence changes were dose dependent and highly correlated to the current dose–response, but with lower Hill coefficients. The competitive antagonist 3-aminopropyl(methyl)phosphinic acid (3-APMPA) induced fluorescence changes in the same direction at the four middle or lower positions. The non-competitive antagonist picrotoxin blocked nearly 50% of GABA-induced fluorescence changes at T218 and I222, but only <20% at K210 and K217 and 0% at K211 and L216 positions. Interestingly, the picrotoxin-blocked fraction of the GABA-induced fluorescence changes was highly correlated to the Hill coefficient of the GABA-induced dose-dependent fluorescence change. The PTX-insensitive mutant L216C exhibited the lowest Hill coefficient, similar to that in binding. Thus, the PTX-sensitive fraction reflects the conformational change related to channel gating, whereas the PTX-insensitive fraction represents a binding effect. The binding effect is further supported by the picrotoxin resistance of a competitive antagonist-induced fluorescence change. A cysteine accessibility test further confirmed that L216C and K217C partially line the binding pocket, and I222C became more exposed by GABA. Our results are consistent with a mechanism that an outward movement of the lower part of loop F is coupled to the channel activation. PMID:19015197

  14. Excitatory actions of GABA in developing rat hypothalamic neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, G; Trombley, P Q; van den Pol, A N

    1996-01-01

    1. Gramicidin-perforated patch clamp recording was employed to study GABA-mediated responses in rat hypothalamic neurones (n = 102) with an intracellular Cl- concentration unaltered by the pipette solution. 2. In young cultures after 1-7 days in vitro (DIV), GABA induced depolarizing membrane potentials (+16.5 +/- 1.3 mV) that often surpassed the threshold for the firing of action potentials (-42 +/- 1 mV) and resulted in an increase in neuronal activity. The depolarizing responses to GABA in young cultures were dose dependent. The concentration of GABA necessary to evoke the half-maximal depolarization (EC50) was 2.8 microM. In contrast, GABA induced hyperpolarizing membrane potentials (-12.0 +/- 1.4 mV) and a decrease in neuronal activity in older neurones (20-33 DIV). Both the depolarization and the hyperpolarization induced by GABA were blocked by bicuculline, indicating a mediation by GABAA receptors. 3. The reversal potentials of the GABA-evoked currents were between -40 to -50 mV during the first week of culture, and shifted to below -70 mV after 3 weeks of culture. In parallel, neurones that were dissociated from older animals (postnatal day 5) had a more negative reversal potential for the GABA-evoked currents than cells from younger animals (embryonic day 15), suggesting that the negative shift of the reversal potential occurs both in vitro and in vivo. Our data suggest that the mechanism for GABA-induced depolarization is the depolarized Cl- reversal potential found in young but not older neurones. 4. Consistent with the depolarizing response to exogenous application of GABA, some spontaneous depolarizing postsynaptic potentials in young cultures were insensitive to AP5-CNQX, but were eliminated by bicuculline, indicating that synaptically released GABA mediated excitatory synaptic transmission in early development. 5. By combining a rapid computer-controlled delivery of GABA with subthreshold positive current injections into recorded neurones, we found in young cultures that the GABA-evoked depolarization could directly trigger action potentials, facilitate some depolarizing input to fire action potentials, and shunt other depolarizing input. Whether the GABA-induced depolarization is excitatory or inhibitory would be determined by the reversal potential of the GABA-evoked current, and the temporal relationship between GABA-evoked depolarizations and other excitatory events. 6. We conclude that the reversal potential of the GABA-evoked current shifts negatively from depolarizing to hyperpolarizing in developing hypothalamus. Consequently, GABA neurotransmission may serve both excitatory and inhibitory roles during early development. PMID:8842004

  15. Conformationally Restricted GABA with Bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane Backbone as the First Highly Selective BGT-1 Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    On the basis of the three-dimensional diversity-oriented conformational restriction strategy using key chiral cyclopropane units, we previously identified 3 ((2S,3R)-4-amino-3,4-methanobutyric acid) with a chiral trans-cyclopropane structure as a ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter inhibitor selective for GABA transporter (GAT) subtypes GAT-3 and BGT-1 (betaine/GABA transporter-1). Further conformational restriction of 3 with the rigid bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane backbone led to the successful development of the first highly potent and selective BGT-1 inhibitor 4 (IC50 = 0.59 ?M). The bioactive conformation of 3 for BGT-1 was also identified. PMID:25147609

  16. Development of GABA-immunoreactive neuron patterning in the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Binor, E; Heathcote, R D

    2001-09-10

    In the frog Xenopus laevis, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-immunoreactive spinal cord neurons (Kolmer-Agduhr cells) formed a dispersed pattern within two columns on either side of the midline. The cellular pattern became established during embryonic and larval development. The GABA-immunoreactive cells are cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-contacting neurons that began to appear by 1.2 days (st 26) of development. This stage occurred shortly after neural tube closure (0.9 days, st 21) and followed the appearance of ultrastructural characteristics of CSF-contacting neurons. The pattern of GABA-immunoreactive cells emerged during embryogenesis, as their density increased. Each longitudinal column was heterogeneous, containing cells with and without GABA immunoreactivity. Spatial analysis at several embryonic and larval stages showed that the cells in each column formed a nonrandom, dispersed pattern even at early stages of differentiation. This one-dimensional pattern resembled that of dopamine-immunoreactive neurons, which are also located in the ventral spinal cord. The patterning of both cell types followed a different time course, but the ultimate spacing of the neurons remained comparable. These results suggested that the mechanism patterning the two cell types within the same region was similar but not identical and may involve related molecular mechanisms. PMID:11503149

  17. Fine Tuning of Synaptic Plasticity and Filtering by GABA Released from Hippocampal Autaptic Granule Cells.

    PubMed

    Valente, Pierluigi; Orlando, Marta; Raimondi, Andrea; Benfenati, Fabio; Baldelli, Pietro

    2016-03-01

    The functional consequence of ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) release at mossy fiber terminals is still a debated topic. Here, we provide multiple evidence of GABA release in cultured autaptic hippocampal granule cells. In ?50% of the excitatory autaptic neurons, GABA, VGAT, or GAD67 colocalized with vesicular glutamate transporter 1-positive puncta, where both GABAB and GABAA receptors (Rs) were present. Patch-clamp recordings showed a clear enhancement of autaptic excitatory postsynaptic currents in response to the application of the GABABR antagonist CGP58845 only in neurons positive to the selective granule cell marker Prox1, and expressing low levels of GAD67. Indeed, GCP non-responsive excitatory autaptic neurons were both Prox1- and GAD67-negative. Although the amount of released GABA was not sufficient to activate functional postsynaptic GABAARs, it effectively activated presynaptic GABABRs that maintain a tonic "brake" on the probability of release and on the size of the readily releasable pool and contributed to resting potential hyperpolarization possibly through extrasynaptic GABAAR activation. The autocrine inhibition exerted by GABABRs on glutamate release enhanced both paired-pulse facilitation and post-tetanic potentiation. Such GABABR-mediated changes in short-term plasticity confer to immature granule cells the capability to modulate their filtering properties in an activity-dependent fashion, with remarkable consequences on the dynamic behavior of neural circuits. PMID:25576534

  18. Presynaptic Na+-dependent transport and exocytose of GABA and glutamate in brain in hypergravity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, T.; Pozdnyakova, N.; Krisanova, N.; Himmelreich, N.

    ?-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) and L-glutamate are the most widespread neurotransmitter amino acids in the mammalian central nervous system. GABA is now widely recognized as the major inhibitory neurotransmitter. L-glutamate mediates the most of excitatory synaptic neurotransmission in the brain. They involved in the main aspects of normal brain function. The nerve terminals (synaptosomes) offer several advantages as a model system for the study of general mechanisms of neurosecretion. Our data allowed to conclude that exposure of animals to hypergravity (centrifugation of rats at 10G for 1 hour) had a profound effect on synaptic processes in brain. Comparative analysis of uptake and release of GABA and glutamate have demonstrated that hypergravity loading evokes oppositely directed alterations in inhibitory and excitatory signal transmission. We studied the maximal velocities of [^3H]GABA reuptake and revealed more than twofold enhancement of GABA transporter activity (Vmax rises from 1.4 |pm 0.3 nmol/min/mg of protein in the control group to 3.3 0.59 nmol/min/mg of protein for animals exposed to hypergravity (P ? 0.05)). Recently we have also demonstrated the significant lowering of glutamate transporter activity (Vmax of glutamate reuptake decreased from 12.5 3.2 nmol/min/mg of protein in the control group to 5.6 0.9 nmol/min/mg of protein in the group of animals, exposed to the hypergravity stress (P ? 0.05)). Significant changes occurred in release of neurotransmitters induced by stimulating exocytosis with the agents, which depolarized nerve terminal plasma membrane. Depolarization-evoked Ca2+-stimulated release was more abundant for GABA (7.2 0.54% and 11,74 1,2 % of total accumulated label for control and hypergravity, respectively (P?0.05)) and was essentially less for glutamate (14.4 0.7% and 6.2 1.9%) after exposure of animals to centrifuge induced artificial gravity. Changes observed in depolarization-evoked exocytotic release seem to be in a concert with alterations of plasma membrane transporters activity studied. Perhaps, lowering of glutamate transporter activity and increase of the velocity of GABA uptake correlated with diminution and augmentation of exocytotic release of these neurotransmitters, respectively. It is possible to suggest that observed changes in the activity of the processes responsible for the uptake and release of excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters are likely to be physiologically important and reflect making protective mechanisms more active for neutralization of harm influence of hypergravity stress.

  19. Two pools of Triton X-100-insoluble GABA(A) receptors are present in the brain, one associated to lipid rafts and another one to the post-synaptic GABAergic complex.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuejing; Serwanski, David R; Miralles, Celia P; Bahr, Ben A; De Blas, Angel L

    2007-08-01

    Rat forebrain synaptosomes were extracted with Triton X-100 at 4 degrees C and the insoluble material, which is enriched in post-synaptic densities (PSDs), was subjected to sedimentation on a continuous sucrose gradient. Two pools of Triton X-100-insoluble gamma-aminobutyric acid type-A receptors (GABA(A)Rs) were identified: (i) a higher-density pool (rho = 1.10-1.15 mg/mL) of GABA(A)Rs that contains the gamma2 subunit (plus alpha and beta subunits) and that is associated to gephyrin and the GABAergic post-synaptic complex and (ii) a lower-density pool (rho = 1.06-1.09 mg/mL) of GABA(A)Rs associated to detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs) that contain alpha and beta subunits but not the gamma2 subunit. Some of these GABA(A)Rs contain the delta subunit. Two pools of GABA(A)Rs insoluble in Triton X-100 at 4 degrees C were also identified in cultured hippocampal neurons: (i) a GABA(A)R pool that forms clusters that co-localize with gephyrin and remains Triton X-100-insoluble after cholesterol depletion and (ii) a GABA(A)R pool that is diffusely distributed at the neuronal surface that can be induced to form GABA(A)R clusters by capping with an anti-alpha1 GABA(A)R subunit antibody and that becomes solubilized in Triton X-100 at 4 degrees C after cholesterol depletion. Thus, there is a pool of GABA(A)Rs associated to lipid rafts that is non-synaptic and that has a subunit composition different from that of the synaptic GABA(A)Rs. Some of the lipid raft-associated GABA(A)Rs might be involved in tonic inhibition. PMID:17663755

  20. Ethanol Activation of Protein Kinase A Regulates GABA(A) Receptor Subunit Expression in the Cerebral Cortex and Contributes to Ethanol-Induced Hypnosis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Ren, Qinglu; Beckley, Jonathon H; O'Buckley, Todd K; Gigante, Eduardo D; Santerre, Jessica L; Werner, David F; Morrow, A Leslie

    2012-01-01

    Protein kinases are implicated in neuronal cell functions such as modulation of ion channel function, trafficking, and synaptic excitability. Both protein kinase C (PKC) and A (PKA) are involved in regulation of ?-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptors through phosphorylation. However, the role of PKA in regulating GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)-R) following acute ethanol exposure is not known. The present study investigated the role of PKA in the effects of ethanol on GABA(A)-R ?1 subunit expression in rat cerebral cortical P2 synaptosomal fractions. Additionally, GABA-related behaviors were examined. Rats were administered ethanol (2.0-3.5?g/kg) or saline and PKC, PKA, and GABA(A)-R ?1 subunit levels were measured by western blot analysis. Ethanol (3.5?g/kg) transiently increased GABA(A)-R ?1 subunit expression and PKA RII? subunit expression at similar time points whereas PKA RII? was increased at later time points. In contrast, PKC isoform expression remained unchanged. Notably, lower ethanol doses (2.0?g/kg) had no effect on GABA(A)-R ?1 subunit levels, although PKA type II regulatory subunits RII? and RII? were increased at 10 and 60?min when PKC isozymes are also known to be elevated. To determine if PKA activation was responsible for the ethanol-induced elevation of GABA(A)-R ?1 subunits, the PKA antagonist H89 was administered to rats prior to ethanol exposure. H89 administration prevented ethanol-induced increases in GABA(A)-R ?1 subunit expression. Moreover, increasing PKA activity intracerebroventricularly with Sp-cAMP prior to a hypnotic dose of ethanol increased ethanol-induced loss of righting reflex (LORR) duration. This effect appears to be mediated in part by GABA(A)-R as increasing PKA activity also increased the duration of muscimol-induced LORR. Overall, these data suggest that PKA mediates ethanol-induced GABA(A)-R expression and contributes to behavioral effects of ethanol involving GABA(A)-R. PMID:22509146

  1. Effects of endogenous melatonin on glutamate and GABA rhythms in the striatum of unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Meng, T; Yuan, S; Zheng, Z; Liu, T; Lin, L

    2015-02-12

    We have previously reported a time-dependent increase in melatonin (MLT) and decrease in dopamine (DA) in striatal dialysate 3 weeks after unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesioning in the rat substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) and medial forebrain bundle (MFB). This study aimed to investigate dynamic and circadian variations in DA, MLT, glutamate (Glu) and ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in striatal dialysates in the same 6-OHDA animal model. These neurotransmitters were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Three weeks following 6-OHDA lesioning, there was a significant increase in extracellular Glu (156%) and decrease in GABA (15%) and DA (85%) in the lesioned striatum. These changes continued over time. Concomitantly, MLT was increased by 107% in the lesioned striatal dialysates after 4 weeks, and continued to increase gradually over time. Six weeks post-treatment, levels of MLT secretion at 12 time points were higher, and the peak time of MLT secretion was earlier, in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats compared with vehicle-treated rats. In addition, significant variations in extracellular levels of Glu and GABA between day and night were observed in vehicle-treated rat striatum. However, no circadian variations were observed in the striatum of unilateral 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. Six weeks post-treatment, MLT levels correlated well with Glu and GABA levels at corresponding time-points in the striatum ipsilateral to the injected side in both groups, and increased MLT levels also correlated well with changes in Glu and GABA in the striatum in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. These data suggest that 6-OHDA lesioning affects the endogenous productions of DA, MLT, Glu and GABA, and changes the MLT secretion pattern. Augmented striatal MLT levels and advanced MLT secretion pattern caused by unilateral intracerebral injection of 6-OHDA may influence the variations in Glu and GABA between day and night. PMID:25499317

  2. 3D GABA imaging with real-time motion correction, shim update and reacquisition of adiabatic spiral MRSI

    PubMed Central

    Bogner, Wolfgang; Gagoski, Borjan; Hess, Aaron T; Bhat, Himanshu; Tisdall, M. Dylan; van der Kouwe, Andre J.W.; Strasser, Bernhard; Marjańska, Małgorzata; Trattnig, Siegfried; Grant, Ellen; Rosen, Bruce; Andronesi, Ovidiu C

    2014-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate (Glu) are the major neurotransmitters in the brain. They are crucial for the functioning of healthy brain and their alteration is a major mechanism in the pathophysiology of many neuro-psychiatric disorders. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is the only way to measure GABA and Glu non-invasively in vivo. GABA detection is particularly challenging and requires special MRS techniques. The most popular is MEscher-GArwood (MEGA) difference editing with single-voxel Point RESolved Spectroscopy (PRESS) localization. This technique has three major limitations: a) MEGA editing is a subtraction technique, hence is very sensitive to scanner instabilities and motion artifacts. b) PRESS is prone to localization errors at high fields (≥3T) that compromise accurate quantification. c) Single-voxel spectroscopy can (similar to a biopsy) only probe average GABA and Glu levels in a single location at a time. To mitigate these problems, we implemented a 3D MEGA-editing MRS imaging sequence with the following three features: a) Real-time motion correction, dynamic shim updates, and selective reacquisition to eliminate subtraction artifacts due to scanner instabilities and subject motion. b) Localization by Adiabatic SElective Refocusing (LASER) to improve the localization accuracy and signal-to-noise ratio. c) K-space encoding via a weighted stack of spirals provides 3D metabolic mapping with flexible scan times. Simulations, phantom and in vivo experiments prove that our MEGA-LASER sequence enables 3D mapping of GABA+ and Glx (Glutamate + Gluatmine), by providing 1.66 times larger signal for the 3.02 ppm multiplet of GABA+ compared to MEGA-PRESS, leading to clinically feasible scan times for 3D brain imaging. Hence, our sequence allows accurate and robust 3D-mapping of brain GABA+ and Glx levels to be performed at clinical 3T MR scanners for use in neuroscience and clinical applications. PMID:25255945

  3. Hippocampal extracellular GABA correlates with metabolism in human epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Cavus, I.; Kim, J.; Hetherington, H. P.; Spencer, D. D.

    2013-01-01

    As the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in human brain, GABA is an important modulator of hyperexcitability in epilepsy patients. Given the high energetic cost of neurotransmission and synaptic activity, GABA concentrations may be hypothesized to correlate with metabolic function. We studied human epilepsy patients undergoing intracranial EEG monitoring for seizure localization to examine microdialysis measures of extracellular GABA (ecGABA), pre-operative MR spectroscopic measures of neuronal mitochondrial function (NAA/Cr), and wherever possible, neuropathology and hippocampal volumetry. Two groups undergoing intracranial monitoring for seizure localization were studied: surgically treated hippocampal epilepsy (MTLE) and neocortical (non-hippocampal seizure onset) epilepsy. All data are hippocampal and thus these groups allow comparisons between the epileptogenic and non-epileptogenic regions. ecGABA was measured using in vivo microdialysis performed during intracranial monitoring. Pre-operative in vivo MR spectroscopic imaging was performed to measure the ratio of N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) to creatine. Standard methods for neuropathology and hippocampal volumetry were used. In the neocortical group, increased ecGABA correlated with greater NAA/Cr (R=+0.70, p<0.015, n=12) while in the MTLE group, increased ecGABA linked with decreased NAA/Cr (R=?0.94, p<0.001, n=8). In MTLE, ecGABA (increased) and NAA/Cr (decreased) correlated with increased glial cell numbers (R=+0.71, p<0.01, n=12, R=?0.76 p<0.03 respectively). No relationship was seen between ecGABA and hippocampal volumes in either group. In epilepsy, ecGABA increases occur across a range of metabolic function. Outside the seizure focus, ecGABA and NAA/Cr increase together; in contrast, within the seizure focus, ecGABA increases with declining mitochondrial function. PMID:18807158

  4. Manganese exposure inhibits the clearance of extracellular GABA and influences taurine homeostasis in the striatum of developing rats

    PubMed Central

    Fordahl, Steve C.; Anderson, Joel G.; Cooney, Paula T.; Weaver, Tara L.; Colyer, Christa L.; Erikson, Keith M.

    2010-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) accumulation in the brain has been shown to alter the neurochemistry of the basal ganglia. Mn-induced alterations in dopamine biology are fairly well understood, but recently more evidence has emerged characterizing the role of ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in this dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to determine if the previously observed Mn-induced increase in extracellular GABA (GABAEC) was due to altered GABA transporter (GAT) function, and whether Mn perturbs other amino acid neurotransmitters, namely taurine and glycine (known modulators of GABA). Extracellular GABA, taurine, and glycine concentrations were collected from the striatum of control (CN) or Mn-exposed Sprague-Dawley rats using in vivo microdialysis, and the GAT inhibitor nipecotic acid (NA) was used to probe GAT function. Tissue and extracellular Mn levels were significantly increased, and the Fe:Mn ratio was decreased 36-fold in the extracellular space due to Mn exposure. NA led to a 2-fold increase in GABAEC of CNs, a response that was attenuated by Mn. Taurine responded inversely to GABA, and a novel 10-fold increase in taurine was observed after the removal of NA in CNs. Mn blunted this response and nearly abolished extracellular taurine throughout collection. Striatal taurine transporter (Slc6a6) mRNA levels were significantly increased with Mn exposure, and Mn significantly increased 3H-Taurine uptake after 3-minute exposure in primary rat astrocytes. These data suggest that Mn increases GABAEC by inhibiting the function of GAT, and that perturbed taurine homeostasis potentially impacts neural function by jeopardizing the osmoregulatory and neuromodulatory functions of taurine in the brain. PMID:20832424

  5. Defective dentate nucleus GABA receptors in essential tremor.

    PubMed

    Paris-Robidas, Sarah; Brochu, Elodie; Sintes, Marion; Emond, Vincent; Bousquet, Mlanie; Vandal, Milne; Pilote, Mireille; Tremblay, Cyntia; Di Paolo, Thrse; Rajput, Ali H; Rajput, Alex; Calon, Frdric

    2012-01-01

    The development of new treatments for essential tremor, the most frequent movement disorder, is limited by a poor understanding of its pathophysiology and the relative paucity of clinicopathological studies. Here, we report a post-mortem decrease in GABA(A) (35% reduction) and GABA(B) (22-31% reduction) receptors in the dentate nucleus of the cerebellum from individuals with essential tremor, compared with controls or individuals with Parkinson's disease, as assessed by receptor-binding autoradiography. Concentrations of GABA(B) receptors in the dentate nucleus were inversely correlated with the duration of essential tremor symptoms (r(2)?=?0.44, P?GABA(B) receptors follows the progression of the disease. In situ hybridization experiments also revealed a diminution of GABA(B(1a+b)) receptor messenger RNA in essential tremor (?27%). In contrast, no significant changes of GABA(A) and GABA(B) receptors (protein and messenger RNA), GluN2B receptors, cytochrome oxidase-1 or GABA concentrations were detected in molecular or granular layers of the cerebellar cortex. It is proposed that a decrease in GABA receptors in the dentate nucleus results in disinhibition of cerebellar pacemaker output activity, propagating along the cerebello-thalamo-cortical pathways to generate tremors. Correction of such defective cerebellar GABAergic drive could have a therapeutic effect in essential tremor. PMID:22120148

  6. GABA modulates baroreflex in the ventral tegmental area in rat.

    PubMed

    Hatam, Masoumeh; Rasoulpanah, Minoo; Nasimi, Ali

    2015-12-01

    There are some reports demonstrating the cardiovascular functions of the ventral tegmental area (VTA). About 20-30% of the VTA neurons are GABAergic, which might play a role in baroreflex modulation. This study was performed to find the effects of GABA(A), GABA(B) receptors and reversible synaptic blockade of the VTA on baroreflex. Drugs were microinjected into the VTA of urethane anesthetized rats, and the maximum change of blood pressure and the gain of the reflex bradycardia in response to intravenous phenylephrine (Phe) injection were compared with the preinjection and the control values. Microinjection of bicuculline methiodide (BMI, 100 pmol/100 nl), a GABA(A) antagonist, into the VTA strongly decreased the Phe-induced hypertension, indicating that GABA itself attenuated the baroreflex. Muscimol, a GABA(A) agonist (30 mM, 100 nl), produced no significant changes. Baclofen, a GABA(B) receptor agonist (1000 pmole/100 nl), moderately attenuated the baroreflex, however phaclofen, a GABA(B) receptor antagonist (1000 pmole/100 nl), had no significant effect. In conclusion, for the first time, we demonstrated that GABA(A) receptors of the VTA strongly attenuate and GABA(B) receptors of the VTA moderately attenuate baroreflex in rat. PMID:26358962

  7. Role of GABA Deficit in Sensitivity to the Psychotomimetic Effects of Amphetamine.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Kyung-Heup; Sewell, Andrew; Elander, Jacqueline; Pittman, Brian; Ranganathan, Mohini; Gunduz-Bruce, Handan; Krystal, John; D'Souza, Deepak Cyril

    2015-11-01

    Some schizophrenia patients are more sensitive to amphetamine (AMPH)-induced exacerbations in psychosis-an effect that correlates with higher striatal dopamine release. This enhanced vulnerability may be related to gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) deficits observed in schizophrenia. We hypothesized that a pharmacologically induced GABA deficit would create vulnerability to the psychotomimetic effects to the 'subthreshold' dose of AMPH in healthy subjects, which by itself would not induce clinically significant increase in positive symptoms. To test this hypothesis, a GABA deficit was induced by intravenous infusion of iomazenil (IOM; 3.7 μg/kg), an antagonist and partial inverse agonist of benzodiazepine receptor. A subthreshold dose of AMPH (0.1 mg/kg) was administered by intravenous infusion. Healthy subjects received placebo IOM followed by placebo AMPH, active IOM followed by placebo AMPH, placebo IOM followed by active AMPH, and active IOM followed by active AMPH in a randomized, double-blind crossover design over 4 test days. Twelve healthy subjects who had a subclinical response to active AMPH alone were included in the analysis. Psychotomimetic effects (Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS)), perceptual alterations (Clinician Administered Dissociative Symptoms Scale (CADSS)), and subjective effects (visual analog scale) were captured before and after the administration of drugs. IOM significantly augmented AMPH-induced peak changes in PANSS positive symptom subscale and both subjective and objective CADSS scores. There were no pharmacokinetic interactions. In conclusion, GABA deficits increased vulnerability to amphetamine-induced psychosis-relevant effects in healthy subjects, suggesting that pre-existing GABA deficits may explain why a subgroup of schizophrenia patients are vulnerable to AMPH. PMID:25953357

  8. Conserved Regional Patterns of GABA-Related Transcript Expression in the Neocortex of Subjects With Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Takanori; Bazmi, H. Holly; Mirnics, Karoly; Wu, Qiang; Sampson, Allan R.; Lewis, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Individuals with schizophrenia exhibit disturbances in a number of cognitive, affective, sensory, and motor functions that depend on the circuitry of different cortical areas. The cognitive deficits associated with dysfunction of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex result, at least in part, from abnormalities in GABA neurotransmission, as reflected in a specific pattern of altered expression of GABA-related genes. Consequently, the authors sought to determine whether this pattern of altered gene expression is restricted to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex or could also contribute to the dysfunction of other cortical areas in subjects with schizophrenia. Method Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to assess the levels of eight GABA-related transcripts in four cortical areas (dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and primary motor and primary visual cortices) of subjects (N=12) with schizophrenia and matched normal comparison subjects. Results Expression levels of seven transcripts were lower in subjects with schizophrenia, with the magnitude of reduction for each transcript comparable across the four areas. The largest reductions were detected for mRNA encoding somatostatin and parvalbumin, followed by moderate decreases in mRNA expression for the 67-kilodalton isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase, the GABA membrane transporter GAT-1, and the ?1 and ? subunits of GABAA receptors. In contrast, the expression of calretinin mRNA did not differ between the subject groups in any of the four areas. Conclusions Because the areas examined represent the major functional domains (e.g., association, limbic, motor, and sensory) of the cerebral cortex, our findings suggest that a conserved set of molecular alterations affecting GABA neurotransmission contribute to the pathophysiology of different clinical features of schizophrenia. PMID:18281411

  9. A unified model of the GABA(A) receptor comprising agonist and benzodiazepine binding sites.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Rikke; Kongsbak, Kristine; Srensen, Pernille Louise; Sander, Tommy; Balle, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We present a full-length ?(1)?(2)?(2) GABA receptor model optimized for agonists and benzodiazepine (BZD) allosteric modulators. We propose binding hypotheses for the agonists GABA, muscimol and THIP and for the allosteric modulator diazepam (DZP). The receptor model is primarily based on the glutamate-gated chloride channel (GluCl) from C. elegans and includes additional structural information from the prokaryotic ligand-gated ion channel ELIC in a few regions. Available mutational data of the binding sites are well explained by the model and the proposed ligand binding poses. We suggest a GABA binding mode similar to the binding mode of glutamate in the GluCl X-ray structure. Key interactions are predicted with residues ?(1)R66, ?(2)T202, ?(1)T129, ?(2)E155, ?(2)Y205 and the backbone of ?(2)S156. Muscimol is predicted to bind similarly, however, with minor differences rationalized with quantum mechanical energy calculations. Muscimol key interactions are predicted to be ?(1)R66, ?(2)T202, ?(1)T129, ?(2)E155, ?(2)Y205 and ?(2)F200. Furthermore, we argue that a water molecule could mediate further interactions between muscimol and the backbone of ?(2)S156 and ?(2)Y157. DZP is predicted to bind with interactions comparable to those of the agonists in the orthosteric site. The carbonyl group of DZP is predicted to interact with two threonines ?(1)T206 and ?(2)T142, similar to the acidic moiety of GABA. The chlorine atom of DZP is placed near the important ?(1)H101 and the N-methyl group near ?(1)Y159, ?(1)T206, and ?(1)Y209. We present a binding mode of DZP in which the pending phenyl moiety of DZP is buried in the binding pocket and thus shielded from solvent exposure. Our full length GABA(A) receptor is made available as Model S1. PMID:23308109

  10. Colocalization of serotonin and GABA in retinal neurons of Ichthyophis kohtaoensis (amphibia; Gymnophiona).

    PubMed

    Dünker, N

    1998-01-01

    Ichthyophis kohtaoensis, a member of the limbless Gymnophiona, has a specialized subterranean burrowing mode of life and a predominantly olfactory-guided orientation. The only visually guided behavior seems to be negative phototaxis. As these animals possess extremely small eyes (only 540 microm in diameter in adults), functional investigations of single retinal cells by electrophysiological methods have so far failed. Therefore, the content and distribution of retinal transmitters have been investigated as indications of a functioning sense organ in an animal that is supposed to be blind. Previous immunohistochemical investigation of the retinal transmitter system revealed immunoreactivity for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), serotonin, dopamine and tyrosine hydroxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the catecholamine synthetic pathway. The present studies have been performed in order to determine a possible colocalization of serotonin and GABA in retinal neurons of the caecilian retina. Therefore retinal cryostat sections of various developmental stages have been investigated by the indirect fluorescence method. In single-label preparations, serotonin is localized to cells in the inner nuclear layer and the ganglion cell layer. GABA immunocytochemistry labels a variety of cell types in the inner nuclear layer as well as cell bodies in the ganglion cell layer. In double-label preparations, some of the serotonergic cells are found to express GABA immunoreactivity and some GABAergic neurons also label for serotonin immunocytochemistry. Thus, despite the fact that caecilians mainly rely on olfaction and are believed to have a reduced visual system, their retina exhibits a surprisingly "normal" distribution of neurotransmitters and neuromodulators, also typical of other anamniotes with a well-developed visual system, including the partial colocalization of serotonin and GABA at all developmental stages of I. kohtaoensis. These results indicate that a functional system that is under no strong selective pressure obviously has a long evolutionary persistence irrespective of its need for use. PMID:9462859

  11. Identification of gamma-aminobutyric acid and its binding sites in Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Schaeffer, J.M.; Bergstrom, A.R.

    1988-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate decarboxylase and GABA-transaminase were identified in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The concentration of GABA in C. elegans is approximately 10-fold lower than the concentration of GABA in rat brain. Glutamate decarboxylase and GABA-transaminase, the GABA anabolic and catabolic enzymes, are also present in C. elegans. Crude membrane fractions were prepared from C. elegans and used to study specific (/sup 3/H) GABA binding sites. GABA binds to C. elegans membranes with high affinity and low capacity. Muscimol is a competitive inhibitor of specific GABA binding with a K/sub I/ value of 120 nM. None of the other GABA agonists or antagonists inhibited greater than 40% of the specific GABA binding at concentrations up to 10/sup -4/M. Thirteen spider venoms were examined as possible GABA agonists or antagonists, the venom from Calilena agelenidae inhibits specific GABA binding with a K/sub I/ value of 6 nl/ml. These results suggest that GABA has a physiological role as a neurotransmitter in C. elegans.

  12. GABA and epileptogenesis: comparing gabrb3 gene-deficient mice with Angelman syndrome in man.

    PubMed

    DeLorey, T M; Olsen, R W

    1999-09-01

    The GABAergic system has long been implicated in epilepsy with defects in GABA neurotransmission being linked to epilepsy in both experimental animal models and human syndromes (Olsen and Avoli, 1997). However, to date no human epileptic syndrome has been directly attributed to an altered GABAergic system. The observed defects in GABA neurotransmission in human epileptic syndromes may be the indirect result of a brain besieged by seizures. The use of animal models of epilepsy has sought to address these matters. The advent of gene targeting methodologies in mice now allows for a more direct assessment of GABA's involvement in epileptogenesis. To date several genes associated with the GABAergic system have been disrupted. These include the genes for glutamic acid decarboxylase, both the 65- and 67-kDa isoforms (GAD65 and GAD67), the tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase gene (TNAP) and genes for the GABA(A) receptor subunits alpha6, beta3, gamma2, and delta (gabra6, gabrb3, gabrg2, and gabrd respectively). Gene disruptions of either GAD67 or gabrg2 result in neonatal lethality, while others, GAD65, TNAP, and gabrb3 exhibit increased mortality and spontaneous seizures. GABA receptor expression has been found to be both regionally and developmentally regulated. Thus in addition to their obvious role in controlling excitability in adult brain, a deficit in GABAergic function during development could be expected to elicit pleiotropic neurodevelopmental abnormalities perhaps including epilepsy. The GABA(A) receptor beta3 subunit gene, gabrb3/GABRB3 (mouse/human), is of particular interest because of its expression early in development and its possible role in the neurodevelopmental disorder Angelman syndrome. Individuals with this syndrome exhibit severe mental retardation and epilepsy. Mice with the gabrb3 gene disrupted likewise exhibit electroencephalograph (EEG) abnormalities, seizures, and behavioral characteristics typically associated with Angelman syndrome. These gabrb3 gene knockout mice provide direct evidence that a reduction of a specific subunit of the GABA(A) receptor system can result in epilepsy and support a GABAergic role in the pathophysiology of Angelman syndrome. PMID:10515160

  13. Identification and characterization of GABA(A) receptor modulatory diterpenes from Biota orientalis that decrease locomotor activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Zaugg, Janine; Khom, Sophia; Eigenmann, Daniela; Baburin, Igor; Hamburger, Matthias; Hering, Steffen

    2011-08-26

    An ethyl acetate extract of Biota orientalis leaves potentiated GABA-induced control current by 92.6% 22.5% when tested at 100 ?g/mL in Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing GABA(A) receptors (?????(2S) subtype) in two-microelectrode voltage clamp measurements. HPLC-based activity profiling was used to identify isopimaric acid (4) and sandaracopimaric acid (5) as the compounds largely responsible for the activity. Sandaracopimaradienolal (3) was characterized as a new natural product. Compounds 4 and 5 were investigated for GABA(A) receptor subtype selectivity at the subtypes ?????(2S), ?????(2S), ?????(2S), ?????(2S), ?????(2S), and ?????(2S). Sandaracopimaric acid (5) was significantly more potent than isopimaric acid (4) at the GABA(A) receptor subtypes ?????(2S), ?????(2S), and ?????(2S) (EC??4: 289.5 82.0, 364.8 85.0, and 317.0 83.7 ?M vs EC??5: 48.1 13.4, 31.2 4.8, and 40.7 14.7 ?M). The highest efficiency was reached by 4 and 5 on ??- and ??-containing receptor subtypes. In the open field test, ip administration of 5 induced a dose-dependent decrease of locomotor activity in a range of 3 to 30 mg/kg body weight in mice. No significant anxiolytic-like activity was observed in doses between 1 and 30 mg/kg body weight in mice. PMID:21793559

  14. Zolpidem modulation of phasic and tonic GABA currents in the rat dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hong; Smith, Bret N.

    2010-01-01

    Zolpidem is a widely prescribed sleep aid with relative selectivity for GABAA receptors containing ?13 subunits. We examined the effects of zolpidem on the inhibitory currents mediated by GABAA receptors using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from DMV neurons in transverse brainstem slices from rat. Zolpidem prolonged the decay time of mIPSCs and of muscimol-evoked whole-cell GABAergic currents, and it occasionally enhanced the amplitude of mIPSCs. The effects were blocked by flumazenil, a benzodiazepine antagonist. Zolpidem also hyperpolarized the resting membrane potential, with a concomitant decrease in input resistance and action potential firing activity in a subset of cells. Zolpidem did not clearly alter the GABAA receptor-mediated tonic current (Itonic) under baseline conditions, but after elevating extracellular GABA concentration with nipecotic acid, a non-selective GABA transporter blocker, zolpidem consistently and significantly increased the tonic GABA current. This increase was suppressed by flumazenil and gabazine. These results suggest that ?13 subunits are expressed in synaptic GABAA receptors on DMV neurons. The baseline tonic GABA current is likely not mediated by these same low affinity, zolpidem-sensitive GABAA receptors. However, when the extracellular GABA concentration is increased, zolpidem-sensitive extrasynaptic GABAA receptors containing ?13 subunits contribute to the Itonic. PMID:20226798

  15. Prebiotic syntheses of vitamin coenzymes: II. Pantoic acid, pantothenic acid, and the composition of coenzyme A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, S. L.; Schlesinger, G.

    1993-01-01

    Pantoic acid can by synthesized in good prebiotic yield from isobutyraldehyde or alpha-ketoisovaleric acid + H2CO + HCN. Isobutyraldehyde is the Strecker precursor to valine and alpha-ketoisovaleric acid is the valine transamination product. Mg2+ and Ca2+ as well as several transition metals are catalysts for the alpha-ketoisovaleric acid reaction. Pantothenic acid is produced from pantoyl lactone (easily formed from pantoic acid) and the relatively high concentrations of beta-alanine that would be formed on drying prebiotic amino acid mixtures. There is no selectivity for this reaction over glycine, alanine, or gamma-amino butyric acid. The components of coenzyme A are discussed in terms of ease of prebiotic formation and stability and are shown to be plausible choices, but many other compounds are possible. The gamma-OH of pantoic acid needs to be capped to prevent decomposition of pantothenic acid. These results suggest that coenzyme A function was important in the earliest metabolic pathways and that the coenzyme A precursor contained most of the components of the present coenzyme.

  16. Evidence for glutamate, GABA and NO in coordinating behaviour in the sponge, Ephydatia muelleri (Demospongiae, Spongillidae).

    PubMed

    Elliott, Glen R D; Leys, Sally P

    2010-07-01

    The view that sponges lack tissue level organisation, epithelia, sensory cells and coordinated behaviour is challenged by recent molecular studies showing the existence in Porifera of molecules and proteins that define cell signalling systems in higher order metazoans. Demonstration that freshwater sponges can contract their canals in an organised manner in response to both external and endogenous stimuli prompted us to examine the physiology of the contraction behaviour. Using a combination of digital time-lapse microscopy, high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) analysis, immunocytochemistry and pharmacological manipulations, we tested the role of the diffusible amino acids glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and a short-lived diffusible gas, nitric oxide (NO), in triggering or modulating contractions in Ephydatia muelleri. We identified pools of glutamate, glutamine and GABA used to maintain a metabotropic glutamate and GABA receptor signalling system. Glutamate induced contractions and propagation of a stereotypical behaviour inflating and deflating the canal system, acting in a dose-dependent manner. Glutamate-triggered contractions were blocked by the metabatropic glutamate receptor inhibitor AP3 and by incubation of the sponge in an allosteric competitive inhibitor of glutamate, Kynurenic acid. Incubation in GABA inhibited glutamate-triggered contractions of the sponge. Nitric oxide synthase, involved in the formation of the diffusible gas NO, was localised using NADPH-diaphorase to mesenchyme cells in the osculum and pinacoderm. A cGMP assay showed the same cells were labelled suggesting that the NO system is functional. Our findings suggest sponges coordinate behaviour using chemical messenger systems common to other animals. PMID:20543130

  17. GABA and its B-receptor are present at the node of Ranvier in a small population of sensory fibers, implicating a role in myelination.

    PubMed

    Corell, Mikael; Wicher, Grzegorz; Radomska, Katarzyna J; Da?l?koca, E Duygu; Godskesen, Randi Elberg; Fredriksson, Robert; Benedikz, Eirikur; Magnaghi, Valerio; Fex Svenningsen, Asa

    2015-02-01

    The ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type B receptor has been implicated in glial cell development in the peripheral nervous system (PNS), although the exact function of GABA signaling is not known. To investigate GABA and its B receptor in PNS development and degeneration, we studied the expression of the GABAB receptor, GABA, and glutamic acid decarboxylase GAD65/67 in both development and injury in fetal dissociated dorsal root ganglia (DRG) cell cultures and in the rat sciatic nerve. We found that GABA, GAD65/67, and the GABAB receptor were expressed in premyelinating and nonmyelinating Schwann cells throughout development and after injury. A small population of myelinated sensory fibers displayed all of these molecules at the node of Ranvier, indicating a role in axon-glia communication. Functional studies using GABAB receptor agonists and antagonists were performed in fetal DRG primary cultures to study the function of this receptor during development. The results show that GABA, via its B receptor, is involved in the myelination process but not in Schwann cell proliferation. The data from adult nerves suggest additional roles in axon-glia communication after injury. PMID:25327365

  18. Release of (3H)GABA formed from (3H)glutamate in rat hippocampal slices: comparison with endogenous and exogenous labeled GABA

    SciTech Connect

    Szerb, J.C.

    1983-03-01

    To compare the storage and release of endogenous GABA, of (/sup 3/H)GABA formed endogenously from glutamate, and of exogenous (/sup 14/C)GABA, hippocampal slices were incubated with 5 microCi/ml (3,4-/sup 3/H)1-glutamate and 0.5 microCi/ml (U-/sup 14/C)GABA and then were superfused in the presence or absence of Ca/sup +/ with either 50 mM K/sup +/ or 50 microM veratridine. Exogenous (/sup 14/C)GABA content of the slices declined spontaneously while endogenous GABA and endogenously formed (/sup 3/H)GABA stayed constant over a 48 min period. In the presence of Ca/sup +/ 50 mM K/sup +/ and in the presence or absence of Ca2/sup +/ veratridine released exogenous (/sup 14/C)GABA more rapidly than endogenous or endogenously formed (/sup 3/H)GABA, the release of the latter two occurring always in parallel. The initial specific activity of released exogenous (/sup 14/C)GABA was three times, while that of endogenously formed (/sup 3/H)GABA was only 50% higher than that in the slices. The observation that endogenous GABA and (/sup 3/H)GABA formed endogenously from glutamate are stored and released in parallel but differently from exogenous labelled GABA, suggests that exogenous (/sup 3/H) glutamate can enter a glutamate pool that normally serves as precursor of GABA.

  19. Effects of Antecedent GABA A Receptor Activation on Counterregulatory Responses to Exercise in Healthy Man.

    PubMed

    Hedrington, Maka S; Tate, Donna B; Younk, Lisa M; Davis, Stephen N

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether antecedent stimulation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) A receptors with the benzodiazepine alprazolam can blunt physiologic responses during next-day moderate (90 min) exercise in healthy man. Thirty-one healthy individuals (16 male/15 female aged 28 ± 1 year, BMI 23 ± 3 kg/m(2)) were studied during separate, 2-day protocols. Day 1 consisted of morning and afternoon 2-h hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic or hypoglycemic clamps with or without 1 mg alprazolam given 30 min before a clamp. Day 2 consisted of 90-min euglycemic cycling exercise at 50% VO2max. Despite similar euglycemia (5.3 ± 0.1 mmol/L) and insulinemia (46 ± 6 pmol/L) during day 2 exercise studies, GABA A activation with alprazolam during day 1 euglycemia resulted in significant blunting of plasma epinephrine, norepinephrine, glucagon, cortisol, and growth hormone responses. Lipolysis (glycerol, nonesterified fatty acids) and endogenous glucose production during exercise were also reduced, and glucose infusion rates were increased following prior euglycemia with alprazolam. Prior hypoglycemia with alprazolam resulted in further reduction of glucagon and cortisol responses during exercise. We conclude that prior activation of GABA A pathways can play a significant role in blunting key autonomous nervous system, neuroendocrine, and metabolic physiologic responses during next-day exercise in healthy man. PMID:25901095

  20. Assignment of the human GABA transporter gene (GABATHG) locus to chromosome 3p24-p25

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Fang; Fei, Jian; Guo, Li-He

    1995-09-01

    An essential regulatory process of synaptic transmission is the inactivation of released neurotransmitters by the transmitter-specific uptake mechanism, {gamma}-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an inhibitory transmitter in the vertebrate central nervous system; its activity is terminated by a high-affinity Na{sup +} and Cl{sup -} -dependent specific GABA transporter (GAT), which carries the neurotransmitter to the presynaptic neuron and/or glial elements surrounding the synaptic cleft. Deficiency of the transporter may cause epilepsy and some other nervous diseases. The human GAT gene (GABATHG), approximately 25 kb in length, has been cloned and sequenced by our colleagues (7). Here the results of the in situ hybridization mapping with the gene are presented. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  1. Evidence for a role of GABA- and glutamate-gated chloride channels in olfactory memory.

    PubMed

    Boumghar, Katia; Couret-Fauvel, Thomas; Garcia, Mikael; Armengaud, Catherine

    2012-11-01

    In the honeybee, we investigated the role of transmissions mediated by GABA-gated chloride channels and glutamate-gated chloride channels (GluCls) of the mushroom bodies (MBs) on olfactory learning using a single-trial olfactory conditioning paradigm. The GABAergic antagonist picrotoxin (PTX) or the GluCl antagonist L-trans-pyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylic acid (L-trans-PDC) was injected alone or in combination into the α-lobes of MBs. PTX impaired early long-term olfactory memory when injected before conditioning or before testing. L-trans-PDC alone induced no significant effect on learning and memory but induced a less specific response to the conditioned odor. When injected before PTX, L-trans-PDC was able to modulate PTX effects. These results emphasize the role of MB GABA-gated chloride channels in consolidation processes and strongly support that GluCls are involved in the perception of the conditioned stimulus. PMID:22910533

  2. Electrophoretic method for the determination of the proportion of gamma-aminobutyric acid in a mixture of labeled neurotransmitter and its catabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Cupello, A.; Rapallino, M.V.; Besio, G.; Mainardi, P.

    1987-01-01

    An electrophoretic method for the separation of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) from its metabolites after GABA-transaminase attack is presented. The method is based on the fact that at neutral pH GABA has no net electrical charge, whereas its major metabolites, succinic acid and Krebs cycle intermediates, are negatively charged. The method appears to be especially suitable for evaluation of true-labeled neurotransmitter within the radioactivity which is found in synaptosomes after labeled GABA-uptake studies.

  3. Laser photolysis of DPNI-GABA, a tool for investigating the properties and distribution of GABA receptors and for silencing neurons in situ.

    PubMed

    Trigo, Federico F; Papageorgiou, George; Corrie, John E T; Ogden, David

    2009-07-30

    Laser photolysis to release GABA at precisely defined times and locations permits investigation of the distribution of functional GABA(A) receptors in neuronal compartments, the activation kinetics and pharmacology of GABA(A) receptors in situ, and the role of individual neurons in neural circuits by selective silencing with low GABA concentrations. We describe the experimental evaluation and applications of a new nitroindoline-caged GABA, DPNI-GABA, modified to minimize the pharmacological interference commonly found with caged GABA reagents, but retaining the advantages of nitroindoline cages. Unlike the 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl-7-nitroindolinyl-GABA tested previously, DPNI-GABA inhibited GABA(A) receptors with much lower affinity, reducing peak GABA-evoked responses with an IC(50) of approximately 0.5 mM. Most importantly, the kinetics of receptor activation, determined as 10-90% rise-times, were comparable to synaptic events and were little affected by DPNI-GABA present at 1mM concentration, permitting photolysis of DPNI-GABA to mimic synaptic activation of GABA(A) receptors. With a laser spot of 1 microm applied to cerebellar molecular layer interneurons, the spatial resolution of uncaging DPNI-GABA in dendrites was estimated as 2 microm laterally and 7.5 microm focally. Finally, at low DPNI-GABA concentration, photorelease restricted to the area of the soma suppressed spiking in single Purkinje neurons or molecular layer interneurons for periods controlled by the flash intensity and duration. DPNI-GABA has properties better adapted for fast kinetic studies with laser photolysis at GABA(A) receptors than previously reported caged GABA reagents, and can be used in experiments where spatial resolution is determined by the dimensions of the laser light spot. PMID:19422852

  4. Elevation of gamma-aminobutyric acid in human brain may increase dopaminergic neuronal function.

    PubMed

    Perry, T L; Ito, M; Jones, K; Hansen, S

    1984-09-01

    Studies in experimental animals have yielded conflicting findings as to the influence of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on the activity of nigrostriatal and mesolimbic dopaminergic neurons. We measured cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of GABA and homovanillic acid (HVA) in 19 patients before and during treatment with isoniazid. CSF GABA concentrations increased markedly during isoniazid administration, presumably reflecting increases in brain GABA content. At the same time, HVA concentrations in CSF rose significantly. The net effect of elevating brain GABA content in humans appears to be to increase dopamine release from dopaminergic neurons. PMID:6238245

  5. Neurosteroids and GABA-A Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingde

    2011-01-01

    Neurosteroids represent a class of endogenous steroids that are synthesized in the brain, the adrenals, and the gonads and have potent and selective effects on the GABAA-receptor. 3?-hydroxy A-ring reduced metabolites of progesterone, deoxycorticosterone, and testosterone are positive modulators of GABAA-receptor in a non-genomic manner. Allopregnanolone (3?-OH-5?-pregnan-20-one), 5?-androstane-3?, 17?-diol (Adiol), and 3?5?-tetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone (3?5?-THDOC) enhance the GABA-mediated Cl- currents acting on a site (or sites) distinct from the GABA, benzodiazepine, barbiturate, and picrotoxin binding sites. 3?5?-P and 3?5?-THDOC potentiate synaptic GABAA-receptor function and activate ?-subunit containing extrasynaptic receptors that mediate tonic currents. On the contrary, 3?-OH pregnane steroids and pregnenolone sulfate (PS) are GABAA-receptor antagonists and induce activation-dependent inhibition of the receptor. The activities of neurosteroid are dependent on brain regions and types of neurons. In addition to the slow genomic action of the parent steroids, the non-genomic, and rapid actions of neurosteroids play a significant role in the GABAA-receptor function and shift in mood and memory function. This review describes molecular mechanisms underlying neurosteroid action on the GABAA-receptor, mood changes, and cognitive functions. PMID:22654809

  6. Study of GABA in Healthy Volunteers: Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junfeng; Zhang, Zhaoyun; Liu, Xiaoxia; Wang, Yi; Mao, Fei; Mao, Junjun; Lu, Xiaolan; Jiang, Dongdong; Wan, Yun; Lv, Jia-Ying; Cao, Guoying; Zhang, Jing; Zhao, Naiqing; Atkinson, Mark; Greiner, Dale L.; Prud'homme, Gerald J.; Jiao, Zheng; Li, Yiming; Wang, Qinghua

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical studies show that GABA exerts anti-diabetic effects in rodent models of type 1 diabetes. Because little is known about its absorption and effects in humans, we investigated the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of GABA in healthy volunteers. Twelve subjects were subjected to an open-labeled, three-period trial involving sequential oral administration of placebo, 2 g GABA once, and 2 g GABA three times/day for 7 days, with a 7-day washout between each period. GABA was rapidly absorbed (Tmax: 0.5 ~ 1 h) with the half-life (t1/2) of 5 h. No accumulation was observed after repeated oral GABA administration for 7 days. Remarkably, GABA significantly increased circulating insulin levels in the subjects under either fasting (1.6-fold, single dose; 2.0-fold, repeated dose; p < 0.01) or fed conditions (1.4-fold, single dose; 1.6-fold, repeated dose; p < 0.01). GABA also increased glucagon levels only under fasting conditions (1.3-fold, single dose, p < 0.05; 1.5-fold, repeated dose, p < 0.01). However, there were no significant differences in the insulin-to-glucagon ratio and no significant change in glucose levels in these healthy subjects during the study period. Importantly, GABA significantly decreased glycated albumin levels in the repeated dosing period. Subjects with repeated dosing showed an elevated incidence of minor adverse events in comparison to placebo or the single dosing period, most notably transient discomforts such as dizziness and sore throat. However, there were no serious adverse events observed throughout the study. Our data show that GABA is rapidly absorbed and tolerated in human beings; its endocrine effects, exemplified by increasing islet hormonal secretion, suggest potential therapeutic benefits for diabetes. PMID:26617516

  7. Co-release of acetylcholine and gamma-aminobutyric acid by a retinal neuron

    SciTech Connect

    O'Malley, D.M.; Masland, R.H.

    1989-05-01

    Rabbit retinas were vitally stained with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI), a fluorescent compound that selectively accumulates within the cholinergic amacrine cells. The retinas were then incubated in vitro in the presence of radioactive gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and autoradiographed. The cells that accumulated DAPI were found to accumulate GABA, confirming immunohistochemical evidence that the cholinergic amacrine cells contain GABA. Incubation of retinas in the presence of elevated concentrations of K+ caused them to release acetylcholine and GABA, and autoradiography showed depletion of radioactive GABA from the cholinergic amacrine cells. This indicates that the cholinergic amacrine cells can secrete acetylcholine and GABA. Retinas were double-labeled with (14C)GABA and (3H)acetylcholine, allowing simultaneous measurement of their release. The release of (14C)GABA was found to be independent of extracellular Ca2+. Radioactive GABA synthesized endogenously from (14C)glutamate behaved the same way as radioactive GABA accumulated from the medium. In the same experiments the simultaneously measured release of (3H)acetylcholine was strongly Ca2+-dependent, indicating that the releases of acetylcholine and GABA are controlled by different mechanisms. Synaptic vesicles immunologically isolated from double-labeled retinas contained much (3H)acetylcholine and little or no (14C)GABA. These results suggest that the cholinergic amacrine cells release acetylcholine primarily by vesicle exocytosis and release GABA primarily by means of a carrier.

  8. An evolutionarily conserved switch in response to GABA affects development and behavior of the locomotor circuit of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Han, Bingjie; Bellemer, Andrew; Koelle, Michael R

    2015-04-01

    The neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is depolarizing in the developing vertebrate brain, but in older animals switches to hyperpolarizing and becomes the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in adults. We discovered a similar developmental switch in GABA response in Caenorhabditis elegans and have genetically analyzed its mechanism and function in a well-defined circuit. Worm GABA neurons innervate body wall muscles to control locomotion. Activation of GABAA receptors with their agonist muscimol in newly hatched first larval (L1) stage animals excites muscle contraction and thus is depolarizing. At the mid-L1 stage, as the GABAergic neurons rewire onto their mature muscle targets, muscimol shifts to relaxing muscles and thus has switched to hyperpolarizing. This muscimol response switch depends on chloride transporters in the muscles analogous to those that control GABA response in mammalian neurons: the chloride accumulator sodium-potassium-chloride-cotransporter-1 (NKCC-1) is required for the early depolarizing muscimol response, while the two chloride extruders potassium-chloride-cotransporter-2 (KCC-2) and anion-bicarbonate-transporter-1 (ABTS-1) are required for the later hyperpolarizing response. Using mutations that disrupt GABA signaling, we found that neural circuit development still proceeds to completion but with an ?6-hr delay. Using optogenetic activation of GABAergic neurons, we found that endogenous GABAA signaling in early L1 animals, although presumably depolarizing, does not cause an excitatory response. Thus a developmental depolarizing-to-hyperpolarizing shift is an ancient conserved feature of GABA signaling, but existing theories for why this shift occurs appear inadequate to explain its function upon rigorous genetic analysis of a well-defined neural circuit. PMID:25644702

  9. Endocytosis of GABA(C) receptors depends on subunit composition and is regulated by protein kinase C-? and protein phosphatase 1.

    PubMed

    Linck, Lisa; Binder, Jasmin; Haynl, Christian; Enz, Ralf

    2015-07-01

    Neuronal excitability depends on the surface concentration of neurotransmitter receptors. Type C gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABA(C)R) are composed of ? subunits that are highly expressed in the retina. Molecular mechanisms that guide the surface concentration of this receptor type are largely unknown. Previously, we reported physical interactions of GABA(C)R ? subunits with protein kinase C-? (PKC?) via adapter proteins of the ZIP protein family, as well as of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) via PNUTS. Here, we demonstrate that co-expressing ?1 with ZIP3 and PKC? enhanced basal internalization of GABA(C)R, while receptor internalization was reduced in the presence of PNUTS and PP1. Co-expression of ?1 with individual binding partners showed no alterations, except for PP1. Heterooligomeric GABA(C)R composed of ?1 and ?2 subunits had a significant higher endocytosis rate than ?1 containing homooligomeric receptors. Mutant constructs lacking binding sites for protein interactions ensured the specificity of our data. Finally, substitution of serine and threonine residues with alanines indicated that GABA(C)R internalization depends on serine/threonine kinases and phosphatases, but not on tyrosine phosphorylation. We conclude that GABA(C)R internalization is reciprocally regulated by PKC? and PP1 that are anchored to the receptor via ZIP3 or PNUTS respectively. PMID:25868914

  10. Strain-Dependent Variations in Stress Coping Behavior Are Mediated by a 5-HT/GABA Interaction within the Prefrontal Corticolimbic System

    PubMed Central

    Maran, Dario; Viscomi, Maria Teresa; Puglisi-Allegra, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Background: Serotonin and ?aminobutyric acid (GABA) transmission is crucial in coping strategies. Methods: Here, using mice from 2 inbred strains widely exploited in behavioral neurochemistry, we investigated whether serotonin transmission in medial prefrontal cortex and GABA in basolateral amygdala determine strain-dependent liability to stress response and differences in coping. Results: C57BL/6J mice displayed greater immobility in the forced swimming test, higher serotonin outflow in medial prefrontal cortex, higher GABA outflow in basolateral amygdala induced by stress, and higher serotonin 1A receptor levels in medial prefrontal cortex accompanied by lower GABAb receptor levels in basolateral amygdala than DBA/2J mice. In assessing whether serotonin in medial prefrontal cortex determines GABA functioning in response to stress and passive coping behavior in C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice, we observed that selective prefrontal serotonin depletion in C57BL/6J and DBA/2J reduced stress-induced GABA outflow in basolateral amygdala and immobility in the forced swimming test. Conclusions: These results show that strain-dependent prefrontal corticolimbic serotonin/GABA regulation determines the strain differences in stress-coping behavior in the forced swimming test and point to a role of a specific neuronal system in genetic susceptibility to stress that opens up new prospects for innovative therapies for stress disorders. PMID:25522413

  11. Presynaptic control of corticostriatal synapses by endogenous GABA.

    PubMed

    Logie, Christopher; Bagetta, Vincenza; Bracci, Enrico

    2013-09-25

    Corticostriatal terminals have presynaptic GABA(B) receptors that limit glutamate release, but how these receptors are activated by endogenous GABA released by different types of striatal neurons is still unknown. To address this issue, we used single and paired whole-cell recordings combined with stimulation of corticostriatal fibers in rats and mice. In the presence of opioid, GABA(A), and NK1 receptor antagonists, antidromic stimulation of a population of striatal projection neurons caused suppression of subsequently evoked EPSPs in projection neurons. These effects were larger at intervals of 500 ms than 1 or 2 s, and were fully blocked by the selective GABA(B) receptor antagonist CGP 52432. Bursts of spikes in individual projection neurons were not able to inhibit evoked EPSPs. Similarly, spikes in fast spiking interneurons and low-threshold spike interneurons failed to elicit detectable effects mediated by GABA(B) receptors. Conversely, spikes in individual neurogliaform interneurons suppressed evoked EPSPs, and these effects were blocked by CGP 52432. These results provide the first demonstration of how GABA(B) receptors are activated by endogenous GABA released by striatal neuronal types. PMID:24068811

  12. Corelease of acetylcholine and GABA from cholinergic forebrain neurons

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Arpiar; Granger, Adam J; Sabatini, Bernardo L

    2015-01-01

    Neurotransmitter corelease is emerging as a common theme of central neuromodulatory systems. Though corelease of glutamate or GABA with acetylcholine has been reported within the cholinergic system, the full extent is unknown. To explore synaptic signaling of cholinergic forebrain neurons, we activated choline acetyltransferase expressing neurons using channelrhodopsin while recording post-synaptic currents (PSCs) in layer 1 interneurons. Surprisingly, we observed PSCs mediated by GABAA receptors in addition to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Based on PSC latency and pharmacological sensitivity, our results suggest monosynaptic release of both GABA and ACh. Anatomical analysis showed that forebrain cholinergic neurons express the GABA synthetic enzyme Gad2 and the vesicular GABA transporter (Slc32a1). We confirmed the direct release of GABA by knocking out Slc32a1 from cholinergic neurons. Our results identify GABA as an overlooked fast neurotransmitter utilized throughout the forebrain cholinergic system. GABA/ACh corelease may have major implications for modulation of cortical function by cholinergic neurons. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06412.001 PMID:25723967

  13. Functional properties of GABA synaptic inputs onto GABA neurons in monkey prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Rotaru, Diana C; Olezene, Cameron; Miyamae, Takeaki; Povysheva, Nadezhda V; Zaitsev, Aleksey V; Lewis, David A; Gonzalez-Burgos, Guillermo

    2015-03-15

    In rodent cortex GABAA receptor (GABAAR)-mediated synapses are a significant source of input onto GABA neurons, and the properties of these inputs vary among GABA neuron subtypes that differ in molecular markers and firing patterns. Some features of cortical interneurons are different between rodents and primates, but it is not known whether inhibition of GABA neurons is prominent in the primate cortex and, if so, whether these inputs show heterogeneity across GABA neuron subtypes. We thus studied GABAAR-mediated miniature synaptic events in GABAergic interneurons in layer 3 of monkey dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Interneurons were identified on the basis of their firing pattern as fast spiking (FS), regular spiking (RS), burst spiking (BS), or irregular spiking (IS). Miniature synaptic events were common in all of the recorded interneurons, and the frequency of these events was highest in FS neurons. The amplitude and kinetics of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (mIPSPs) also differed between DLPFC interneuron subtypes in a manner correlated with their input resistance and membrane time constant. FS neurons had the fastest mIPSP decay times and the strongest effects of the GABAAR modulator zolpidem, suggesting that the distinctive properties of inhibitory synaptic inputs onto FS cells are in part conferred by GABAARs containing ?1 subunits. Moreover, mIPSCs differed between FS and RS interneurons in a manner consistent with the mIPSP findings. These results show that in the monkey DLPFC GABAAR-mediated synaptic inputs are prominent in layer 3 interneurons and may differentially regulate the activity of different interneuron subtypes. PMID:25540225

  14. Modulation of the release of norepinephrine by gamma-aminobutyric acid and morphine in the frontal cerebral cortex of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Peoples, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    Agents that enhance gamma-aminobutyric acid, or GABA, neurotransmission modulate certain effects of opioids, such as analgesia. Opioid analgesia is mediated in part by norepinephrine in the forebrain. In this study, the interactions between morphine and GABAergic agents on release of ({sup 3}H) norepinephrine from rat frontal cerebral cortical slices were examined. GABA, 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5}-10{sup {minus}3} M, enhanced potassium stimulated ({sup 3}H) norepinephrine release and reversed the inhibitory effect of morphine in a noncompetitive manner. GABA did not enhance release of ({sup 3}H) norepinephrine stimulated by the calcium ionophore A23187. The effect of GABA was reduced by the GABA{sub A} receptor antagonists bicuculline methiodide or picrotoxin, and by the selective inhibitor of GABA uptake SKF 89976A, but was blocked completely only when bicuculline methiodide and SKF 89976A were used in combination. The GABA{sub A} agonist muscimol, 10{sup {minus}4} M, mimicked the effect of GABA, but the GABA{sub B} agonist ({plus minus})baclofen, 10{sup {minus}4} M, did not affect the release of ({sup 3}H) norepinephrine in the absence or the presence of morphine. Thus GABA appears to produce this effect by stimulating GABA uptake and GABA{sub A}, but not GABA{sub B}, receptors. In contrast to the results that would be predicted for an event involving GABA{sub A} receptors, however, the effect of GABA did not desensitize, and benzodiazepine agonists did not enhance the effect of GABA at any concentration tested between 10{sup {minus}8} and 10{sup {minus}4} M. Thus these receptors may constitute a subclass of GABA{sub A} receptors. These results support a role of GABA uptake and GABA{sub A} receptors in enhancing the release of norepinephrine and modulating its inhibition by opioids in the frontal cortex of the rat.

  15. Effects of ABA and CaCl2 on GABA accumulation in fava bean germinating under hypoxia-NaCl stress.

    PubMed

    Yang, Runqiang; Hui, Qianru; Gu, Zhenxin

    2016-03-01

    Effects of exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) and CaCl2 on γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) accumulation of germinated fava bean under hypoxia-NaCl stress were investigated. Exogenous ABA resulted in the enhancement of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) and diamine oxidase (DAO) activity as well as GABA content in cotyledon and shoot. CaCl2 increased both enzyme activities in shoot and GABA content in cotyledon and shoot. ABA downregulated GAD expression in cotyledon and radicle, while upregulated that in shoot; it also upregulated DAO expression in each organ. CaCl2 upregulated GAD expression in cotyledon, while downregulated that in radicle. However, it upregulated DAO expression in shoot, downregulated that in radicle. ABA inhibitor fluridon and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid inhibited GAD and DAO activities significantly so that inhibited GABA accumulation through reducing ABA biosynthesis and chelating Ca(2+), respectively. However, they upregulated GAD and DAO expression in varying degrees. These results indicate that ABA and Ca(2+) participate in GABA biosynthesis in fava bean during germination under hypoxia-NaCl stress. PMID:26644273

  16. Competing pathways in the photo-Favorskii rearrangement and release of esters: Studies on fluorinated p-hydroxyphenacyl GABA and glutamate phototriggers

    PubMed Central

    Stensrud, Kenneth; Noh, Jihyun; Kandler, Karl; Wirz, Jakob; Heger, Dominik

    2012-01-01

    Three new trifluoromethylated p-hydroxyphenacyl (pHP) caged ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate (Glu) derivatives have been examined for their efficacy as photoremovable protecting groups in aqueous solution. By replacing hydrogen with fluorine, e.g., a m-trifluoromethyl or a m-trifluoromethoxy vs. m-methoxy substituents on the pHP chromophore, modest increases in the quantum yields for release of the amino acids GABA and glutamate were realized as well as improved lipophilicity. The pHP triplet undergoes a photo-Favorskii rearrangement with concomitant release of the amino acid substrate. Deprotonation competes with the rearrangement from the triplet excited state and yields the pHP conjugate base that, upon reprotonation, regenerate the starting ketoester, a chemically unproductive or energy wasting process. Employing picosecond pumpprobe spectroscopy, GABA derivatives 2 5 are characterized by short triplet lifetimes, a manifestation of their rapid release of GABA. The bioavailability of released GABA at the GABAA receptor improved when the release took place from m-OCF3 (2) but decreased for m-CF3 (3) when compared with the parent pHP derivative. These studies demonstrate that pKa and lipophilicity exert significant but sometimes opposing influences on the photochemistry and biological activity of pHP phototriggers. PMID:19572582

  17. Investigation of Glutamine and GABA Levels in Patients With Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy Using MEGAPRESS

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Fahmida A.; OGorman, Ruth L.; Nashef, Lina; Elwes, Robert D.; Edden, Richard A.; Murdoch, James B.; Barker, Gareth J.; Richardson, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Idiopathic generalized epilepsies (IGE) comprise a group of clinical syndromes associated with spike wave discharges, putatively linked to alterations in neurotransmission. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether patients with IGE have altered glutamine and ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels indicative of altered excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission in frontal regions. Materials and Methods Single-voxel MEGA-edited PRESS magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) spectra were acquired from a 30-mL voxel in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in 13 patients with IGE (8 female) and 16 controls (9 female) at 3T. Metabolite concentrations were derived using LCModel. Differences between groups were investigated using an unpaired t-test. Results Patients with IGE were found to have significantly higher glutamine than controls (P = 0.02). GABA levels were also elevated in patients with IGE (P = 0.03). Conclusion Patients with IGE have increased frontal glutamine and GABA compared with controls. Since glutamine has been suggested to act as a surrogate for metabolically active glutamate, it may represent a marker for excitatory neurotransmission. PMID:24585443

  18. Linking GABA and glutamate levels to cognitive skill acquisition during development.

    PubMed

    Cohen Kadosh, Kathrin; Krause, Beatrix; King, Andrew J; Near, Jamie; Cohen Kadosh, Roi

    2015-11-01

    Developmental adjustments in the balance of excitation and inhibition are thought to constrain the plasticity of sensory areas of the cortex. It is unknown however, how changes in excitatory or inhibitory neurochemical expression (glutamate, ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA)) contribute to skill acquisition during development. Here we used single-voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) to reveal how differences in cortical glutamate vs. GABA ratios relate to face proficiency and working memory abilities in children and adults. We show that higher glutamate levels in the inferior frontal gyrus correlated positively with face processing proficiency in the children, but not the adults, an effect which was independent of age-dependent differences in underlying cortical gray matter. Moreover, we found that glutamate/GABA levels and gray matter volume are dissociated at the different maturational stages. These findings suggest that increased excitation during development is linked to neuroplasticity and the acquisition of new cognitive skills. They also offer a new, neurochemical approach to investigating the relationship between cognitive performance and brain development across the lifespan. PMID:26350618

  19. Extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptors in the brainstem and spinal cord: structure and function.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Lezama, Rodolfo; Loeza-Alcocer, Emanuel; Andrs, Carmen; Aguilar, Justo; Guertin, Pierre A; Felix, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) plays many of its key roles in embryonic development and functioning of the central nervous system (CNS) by acting on ligand gated chloride-permeable channels known as GABAA receptors (GABAAR). Classically, GABAARmediated synaptic communication is tailored to allow rapid and precise transmission of information to synchronize the activity of large populations of cells to generate and maintain neuronal networks oscillations. An alternative type of inhibition mediated by GABAA receptors, initially described about 25 years ago, is characterized by a tonic activation of receptors that react to ambient extracellular GABA. The receptors that mediate this action are wide-spread throughout the nerve cells but are located distant from the sites of GABA release, and therefore they have been called extrasynaptic GABAA receptors. The molecular nature of the extrasynaptic GABAA receptors and the tonic inhibitory current they generate have been characterized in many brain structures, and due to its relevance in controlling neuron excitability they have become attractive pharmacological targets for a variety of neurological disorders such as schizophrenia, epilepsy and Parkinson disease. In the spinal cord, early studies have implicated these receptors in anesthesia, chronic pain, motor control, and locomotion. This review highlights past and present developments in the field of extrasynaptic GABAA receptors and emphasizes their subunit containing distribution and physiological role in the spinal cord. PMID:23360278

  20. Immunocytochemical Localization of Amines and GABA in the Optic Lobe of the Butterfly, Papilio xuthus

    PubMed Central

    Hamanaka, Yoshitaka; Kinoshita, Michiyo; Homberg, Uwe; Arikawa, Kentaro

    2012-01-01

    Butterflies have sophisticated color vision. While the spectral organization of the compound eye has been well characterized in the Japanese yellow swallowtail butterfly, Papilio xuthus, neural mechanisms underlying its color vision are largely unexplored. Towards a better understanding of signal processing in the visual system of P. xuthus, we used immunocytochemical techniques to analyze the distribution of transmitter candidates, namely, histamine, serotonin, tyramine and ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Photoreceptor terminals in the lamina and medulla exhibited histamine immunoreactivity as demonstrated in other insects. The anti-histamine antiserum also labeled a few large medulla neurons. Medulla intrinsic neurons and centrifugal neurons projecting to the lamina showed serotonin immunoreactivity. Tyramine immunostaining was detected in a subset of large monopolar cells (LMCs) in the lamina, transmedullary neurons projecting to the lobula plate, and cell bodies surrounding the first optic chiasma. An anti-GABA antiserum labeled a subset of LMCs and populations of columnar and tangential neurons surrounding the medulla. Each of the four antisera also labeled a few centrifugal neurons that innervate the lobula complex from the central brain, suggesting that they have neuromodulatory roles. A distinctive feature we found in this study is the possibility that tyramine and GABA act as transmitters in LMCs of P. xuthus, which has not been reported in any other insects so far. PMID:22844431

  1. Volumetric navigated MEGA-SPECIAL for real-time motion and shim corrected GABA editing.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Muhammad G; Alhamud, A; Near, Jamie; van der Kouwe, Andr J W; Meintjes, Ernesta M

    2016-03-01

    Mescher-Garwood (MEGA) editing with spin echo full intensity acquired localization (MEGA-SPECIAL, MSpc) is a technique to acquire ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) without macromolecule (MM) contamination at a TE of 68 ms. However, due to the requirement of multiple shot-localization, it is often susceptible to subject motion and B0 inhomogeneity. A method is presented for real-time shim and motion correction (ShMoCo) using volumetric navigators to correct for motion and motion-related B0 inhomogeneity during MSpc acquisition. A phantom experiment demonstrates that ShMoCo restores the GABA peak and improves spectral quality in the presence of motion and zero- and first-order shim changes. The ShMoCo scans were validated in three subjects who performed up-down and left-right head rotations. Qualitative assessment of these scans indicates effective reduction of subtraction artefacts and well edited GABA peaks, while quantitative analysis indicates superior fitting and spectral quality relative to scans with no correction. Copyright 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26663075

  2. Molecular cloning and expression of a GABA receptor subunit from the crayfish Procambarus clarkii.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Vázquez, Eric N; Díaz-Velásquez, Clara E; Uribe, R M; Arias, Juan M; García, Ubaldo

    2016-02-01

    Molecular cloning has introduced an unexpected, large diversity of neurotransmitter hetero- oligomeric receptors. Extensive research on the molecular structure of the γ-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABAR) has been of great significance for understanding how the nervous system works in both vertebrates and invertebrates. However, only two examples of functional homo-oligomeric GABA-activated Cl(-) channels have been reported. In the vertebrate retina, the GABAρ1 subunit of various species forms homo-oligomeric receptors; in invertebrates, a cDNA encoding a functional GABA-activated Cl(-) channel has been isolated from a Drosophila melanogaster head cDNA library. When expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, these subunits function efficiently as a homo-oligomeric complex. To investigate the structure-function of GABA channels from the crayfish Procambarus clarkii, we cloned a subunit and expressed it in human embryonic kidney cells. Electrophysiological recordings show that this subunit forms a homo-oligomeric ionotropic GABAR that gates a bicuculline-insensitive Cl(-) current. The order of potency of the agonists was GABA > trans-4-amino-crotonic acid = cis-4-aminocrotonic acid > muscimol. These data support the notion that X-organ sinus gland neurons express at least two GABA subunits responsible for the formation of hetero-oligomeric and homo-oligomeric receptors. In addition, by in situ hybridization studies we demonstrate that most X-organ neurons from crayfish eyestalk express the isolated pcGABAA β subunit. This study increases the knowledge of the genetics of the crayfish, furthers the understanding of this important neurotransmitter receptor family, and provides insight into the evolution of these genes among vertebrates and invertebrates. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26577600

  3. Motor dysfunction in cerebellar Purkinje cell-specific vesicular GABA transporter knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Kayakabe, Mikiko; Kakizaki, Toshikazu; Kaneko, Ryosuke; Sasaki, Atsushi; Nakazato, Yoichi; Shibasaki, Koji; Ishizaki, Yasuki; Saito, Hiromitsu; Suzuki, Noboru; Furuya, Nobuhiko; Yanagawa, Yuchio

    2014-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult mammalian central nervous system and plays modulatory roles in neural development. The vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT) is an essential molecule for GABAergic neurotransmission due to its role in vesicular GABA release. Cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs) are GABAergic projection neurons that are indispensable for cerebellar function. To elucidate the significance of VGAT in cerebellar PCs, we generated and characterized PC-specific VGAT knockout (L7-VGAT) mice. VGAT mRNAs and proteins were specifically absent in the 40-week-old L7-VGAT PCs. The morphological characteristics, such as lamination and foliation of the cerebellar cortex, of the L7-VGAT mice were similar to those of the control littermate mice. Moreover, the protein expression levels and patterns of pre- (calbindin and parvalbumin) and postsynaptic (GABA-A receptor α1 subunit and gephyrin) molecules between the L7-VGAT and control mice were similar in the deep cerebellar nuclei that receive PC projections. However, the L7-VGAT mice performed poorly in the accelerating rotarod test and displayed ataxic gait in the footprint test. The L7-VGAT mice also exhibited severer ataxia as VGAT deficits progressed. These results suggest that VGAT in cerebellar PCs is not essential for the rough maintenance of cerebellar structure, but does play an important role in motor coordination. The L7-VGAT mice are a novel model of ataxia without PC degeneration, and would also be useful for studying the role of PCs in cognition and emotion. PMID:24474904

  4. Dorsal raphe 5-HT(2C) receptor and GABA networks regulate anxiety produced by cocaine withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Craige, Caryne P; Lewandowski, Stacia; Kirby, Lynn G; Unterwald, Ellen M

    2015-06-01

    The serotonin system is intimately linked to both the mediation of anxiety and long-term effects of cocaine, potentially through interaction of inhibitory 5-HT2C receptor and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) networks. This study characterized the function of the dorsal raphe (DR) 5-HT2C receptor and GABA network in anxiety produced by chronic cocaine withdrawal. C57BL/6 mice were injected with saline or cocaine (15mg/kg) 3 times daily for 10 days, and tested on the elevated plus maze 30min, 25h, or 7 days after the last injection. Cocaine-withdrawn mice showed heightened anxiety-like behavior at 25h of withdrawal, as compared to saline controls. Anxiety-like behavior was not different when mice were tested 30min or 7 days after the last cocaine injection. Electrophysiology data revealed that serotonin cells from cocaine-withdrawn mice exhibited increased GABA inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) in specific DR subregions dependent on withdrawal time (25h or 7d), an effect that was absent in cells from non-withdrawn mice (30min after the last cocaine injection). Increased IPSC activity was restored to baseline levels following bath application of the 5-HT2C receptor antagonist, SB 242084. In a separate cohort of cocaine-injected mice at 25h of withdrawal, both global and intra-DR blockade of 5-HT2C receptors prior to elevated plus maze testing attenuated anxiety-like behavior. This study demonstrates that DR 5-HT2C receptor blockade prevents anxiety-like behavior produced by cocaine withdrawal, potentially through attenuation of heightened GABA activity, supporting a role for the 5-HT2C receptor in mediating anxiety produced by cocaine withdrawal. PMID:25656481

  5. Bioassay-guided fractionation of lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L.) using an in vitro measure of GABA transaminase activity.

    PubMed

    Awad, Rosalie; Muhammad, Asim; Durst, Tony; Trudeau, Vance L; Arnason, John T

    2009-08-01

    A novel pharmacological mechanism of action for the anxiolytic botanical Melissa officinalis L. (lemon balm) is reported. The methanol extract was identified as a potent in vitro inhibitor of rat brain GABA transaminase (GABA-T), an enzyme target in the therapy of anxiety, epilepsy and related neurological disorders. Bioassay-guided fractionation led to the identification and isolation of rosmarinic acid (RA) and the triterpenoids, ursolic acid (UA) and oleanolic acid (OA) as active principles. Phytochemical characterization of the crude extract determined RA as the major compound responsible for activity (40% inhibition at 100 microg/mL) since it represented approximately 1.5% of the dry mass of the leaves. Synergistic effects may also play a role. PMID:19165747

  6. GABA-induced /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ influx: a biochemical correlate of the physiological event regulated by GABA receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Gant, D.; Ramadan, A.; Eldefrawi, A.; Eldefrawi, M.

    1986-03-05

    Microsacs from whole rat brain were prepared in HEPES-buffered saline, as described by Harris and Allan. GABA-induced /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ influx into brain microsacs at 30/sup 0/C was dose dependent, saturable, and had an ED/sub 50/ of 25 ..mu..M. The Hill coefficient of the dose-response curve of the GABA response was >1. Other GABA agonists induced /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ influx similarly and with a rank order that paralleled their physiological potencies. Preincubation with GABA produced receptor desensitization and reduced the influx. Bicuculline inhibited the GABA-induced influx competitively, and the inhibition was stereospecific ((+)bicuculline was >10-fold more effective than (-)bicuculline). The convulsants picrotoxinin and t-butyl-bicyclophosphorothionate also inhibited to GABA-induced /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ influx, but noncompetitively. The same effect was observed with cyclodiene insecticides, and their action was stereospecific. Pentobarbital, on the other hand, potentiated the GABA-induced /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ influx.

  7. Chemical integrity of ( sup 3 H)GABA used in binding studies

    SciTech Connect

    Balcar, V.J. )

    1989-07-01

    A method which is claimed to be able to determine the proportion of true GABA within radiolabeled GABA used in binding studies was tested using (3H)GABA. The method was found to be unsuitable for {sup 3}H-labeled GABA and, furthermore, both theoretical considerations and the present experimental data indicated that it could also produce misleading results with ({sup 14}C)GABA.

  8. Virus-induced gene silencing reveals control of reactive oxygen species accumulation and salt tolerance in tomato by ?-aminobutyric acid metabolic pathway.

    PubMed

    Bao, Hexigeduleng; Chen, Xianyang; Lv, Sulian; Jiang, Ping; Feng, Juanjuan; Fan, Pengxiang; Nie, Lingling; Li, Yinxin

    2015-03-01

    ?-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) accumulates in many plant species in response to environmental stress. However, the physiological function of GABA or its metabolic pathway (GABA shunt) in plants remains largely unclear. Here, the genes, including glutamate decarboxylases (SlGADs), GABA?transaminases (SlGABA-Ts) and succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SlSSADH), controlling three steps of the metabolic pathway of GABA, were studied through virus-induced gene silencing approach in tomato. Silencing of SlGADs (GABA biosynthetic genes) and SlGABA-Ts (GABA catabolic genes) led to increased accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as salt sensitivity under 200?mm NaCl treatment. Targeted quantitative analysis of metabolites revealed that GABA decreased and increased in the SlGADs- and SlGABA-Ts-silenced plants, respectively, whereas succinate (the final product of GABA metabolism) decreased in both silenced plants. Contrarily, SlSSADH-silenced plants, also defective in GABA degradation process, showed dwarf phenotype, curled leaves and enhanced accumulation of ROS in normal conditions, suggesting the involvement of a bypath for succinic semialdehyde catabolism to ?-hydroxybutyrate as reported previously in Arabidopsis, were less sensitive to salt stress. These results suggest that GABA shunt is involved in salt tolerance of tomato, probably by affecting the homeostasis of metabolites such as succinate and ?-hydroxybutyrate and subsequent ROS accumulation under salt stress. PMID:25074245

  9. Tryptophan scanning mutagenesis in TM4 of the GABA(A) receptor alpha1 subunit: implications for modulation by inhaled anesthetics and ion channel structure.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Andrew; Andreasen, Alyson; Trudell, James R; Harrison, Neil L

    2002-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that amino acid residues in trans-membrane (TM) segments 1, 2 and 3 of the alpha subunit are critical for the enhancement of GABA(A) receptor function by inhaled anesthetics. In this study we used tryptophan (Trp) scanning mutagenesis between Ile 406 and Asn 417 in the alpha1 subunit to determine the effects of Trp substitution in the fourth transmembrane segment (TM4) on receptor gating and anesthetic modulation. Wild-type and mutant alpha1 subunits were transiently expressed in HEK 293 cells with wild-type beta2 and gamma2s subunits and GABA-activated currents were recorded using whole-cell voltage clamp. The potentiation by three inhaled anesthetics (isoflurane, halothane and chloroform) of responses elicited by a submaximal concentration of GABA were also examined.EC(50) values for GABA at the mutant receptors were in the range 4-60 microM (wild-type=20 microM), indicating that Trp substitution can alter the apparent affinity of the receptor for GABA positively or negatively, dependent on position. The variation of the calculated EC(50) value for GABA exhibited an interesting periodicity, with the cycle length for each repeat corresponding to approximately 3.6 amino acids. These data are consistent with an alpha-helical structure for the TM4 segment of the alpha subunit. Several of these Trp point mutations altered the ability of one or more of the three inhaled anesthetics to modulate receptor function; four of the 12 mutations abolished receptor modulation by one or more of the anesthetics tested. These data are consistent with a role for these residues at the extracellular end of TM4 in anesthetic modulation of GABA(A) receptors. PMID:12367612

  10. Metabotropic GABA signalling modulates longevity in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Lei; Gong, Jianke; Yuan, Fengling; Zhang, Bi; Liu, Hongkang; Zheng, Tianlin; Yu, Teng; Xu, X. Z. Shawn; Liu, Jianfeng

    2015-01-01

    The nervous system plays an important but poorly understood role in modulating longevity. GABA, a prominent inhibitory neurotransmitter, is best known to regulate nervous system function and behaviour in diverse organisms. Whether GABA signalling affects aging, however, has not been explored. Here we examined mutants lacking each of the major neurotransmitters in C. elegans, and find that deficiency in GABA signalling extends lifespan. This pro-longevity effect is mediated by the metabotropic GABAB receptor GBB-1, but not ionotropic GABAA receptors. GBB-1 regulates lifespan through G protein-PLCβ signalling, which transmits longevity signals to the transcription factor DAF-16/FOXO, a key regulator of lifespan. Mammalian GABAB receptors can functionally substitute for GBB-1 in lifespan control in C. elegans. Our results uncover a new role of GABA signalling in lifespan regulation in C. elegans, raising the possibility that a similar process may occur in other organisms. PMID:26537867

  11. Metabotropic GABA signalling modulates longevity in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Chun, Lei; Gong, Jianke; Yuan, Fengling; Zhang, Bi; Liu, Hongkang; Zheng, Tianlin; Yu, Teng; Xu, X Z Shawn; Liu, Jianfeng

    2015-01-01

    The nervous system plays an important but poorly understood role in modulating longevity. GABA, a prominent inhibitory neurotransmitter, is best known to regulate nervous system function and behaviour in diverse organisms. Whether GABA signalling affects aging, however, has not been explored. Here we examined mutants lacking each of the major neurotransmitters in C. elegans, and find that deficiency in GABA signalling extends lifespan. This pro-longevity effect is mediated by the metabotropic GABAB receptor GBB-1, but not ionotropic GABAA receptors. GBB-1 regulates lifespan through G protein-PLCβ signalling, which transmits longevity signals to the transcription factor DAF-16/FOXO, a key regulator of lifespan. Mammalian GABAB receptors can functionally substitute for GBB-1 in lifespan control in C. elegans. Our results uncover a new role of GABA signalling in lifespan regulation in C. elegans, raising the possibility that a similar process may occur in other organisms. PMID:26537867

  12. Sensory integration in mouse insular cortex reflects GABA circuit maturation.

    PubMed

    Gogolla, Nadine; Takesian, Anne E; Feng, Guoping; Fagiolini, Michela; Hensch, Takao K

    2014-08-20

    Insular cortex (IC) contributes to a variety of complex brain functions, such as communication, social behavior, and self-awareness through the integration of sensory, emotional, and cognitive content. How the IC acquires its integrative properties remains unexplored. We compared the emergence of multisensory integration (MSI) in the IC of behaviorally distinct mouse strains. While adult C57BL/6 mice exhibited robust MSI, this capacity was impaired in the inbred BTBR T+tf/J mouse model of idiopathic autism. The deficit reflected weakened γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) circuits and compromised postnatal pruning of cross-modal input. Transient pharmacological enhancement by diazepam in BTBR mice during an early sensitive period rescued inhibition and integration in the adult IC. Moreover, impaired MSI was common across three other monogenic models (GAD65, Shank3, and Mecp2 knockout mice) displaying behavioral phenotypes and parvalbumin-circuit abnormalities. Our findings offer developmental insight into a key neural circuit relevant to neuropsychiatric conditions like schizophrenia and autism. PMID:25088363

  13. Endoplasmic reticulum sorting and kinesin-1 command the targeting of axonal GABAB receptors.

    PubMed

    Valdés, Viviana; Valenzuela, José Ignacio; Salas, Daniela A; Jaureguiberry-Bravo, Matías; Otero, Carolina; Thiede, Christina; Schmidt, Christoph F; Couve, Andrés

    2012-01-01

    In neuronal cells the intracellular trafficking machinery controls the availability of neurotransmitter receptors at the plasma membrane, which is a critical determinant of synaptic strength. Metabotropic γ amino-butyric acid (GABA) type B receptors (GABA(B)Rs) are neurotransmitter receptors that modulate synaptic transmission by mediating the slow and prolonged responses to GABA. GABA(B)Rs are obligatory heteromers constituted by two subunits, GABA(B)R1 and GABA(B)R2. GABA(B)R1a and GABA(B)R1b are the most abundant subunit variants. GABA(B)R1b is located in the somatodendritic domain whereas GABA(B)R1a is additionally targeted to the axon. Sushi domains located at the N-terminus of GABA(B)R1a constitute the only difference between both variants and are necessary and sufficient for axonal targeting. The precise targeting machinery and the organelles involved in sorting and transport have not been described. Here we demonstrate that GABA(B)Rs require the Golgi apparatus for plasma membrane delivery but that axonal sorting and targeting of GABA(B)R1a operate in a pre-Golgi compartment. In the axon GABA(B)R1a subunits are enriched in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and their dynamic behavior and colocalization with other secretory organelles like the ER-to-Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC) suggest that they employ a local secretory route. The transport of axonal GABA(B)R1a is microtubule-dependent and kinesin-1, a molecular motor of the kinesin family, determines axonal localization. Considering that progression of GABA(B)Rs through the secretory pathway is regulated by an ER retention motif our data contribute to understand the role of the axonal ER in non-canonical sorting and targeting of neurotransmitter receptors. PMID:22952914

  14. Nicotine self-administration differentially modulates glutamate and GABA transmission in hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus to enhance the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal response to stress

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Guoliang; Chen, Hao; Wu, Xingjun; Matta, Shannon G.; Sharp, Burt M.

    2010-01-01

    The Mechanisms by which chronic nicotine self-administration augments hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) responses to stress are only partially understood. Nicotine self-administration alters neuropeptide expression in corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) neurons within paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and increases PVN responsiveness to norepinephrine during mild footshock stress. Glutamate and GABA also modulate CRF neurons, but their roles in enhanced HPA responsiveness to footshock during chronic self-administration are unknown. We show that nicotine self-administration augmented footshock-induced PVN glutamate release, but further decreased GABA release. In these rats, intra-PVN kynurenic acid, a glutamate receptor antagonist, blocked enhanced adrenocorticotropic hormone and corticosterone responses to footshock. In contrast, peri-PVN kynurenic acid, which decreases activity of GABA afferents to PVN, enhanced footshock-induced corticosterone secretion only in control rats self-administering saline. Additionally, in rats self-administering nicotine, footshock-induced elevation of corticosterone was significantly less than in controls after intra-PVN saclofen (GABA-B receptor antagonist). Therefore, the exaggerated reduction in GABA release by footshock during nicotine self-administration disinhibits CRF neurons. This disinhibition combined with enhanced glutamate input provides a new mechanism for HPA sensitization to stress by chronic nicotine self-administration. This mechanism, which does not preserve homeostatic plasticity, supports the concept that smoking functions as a chronic stressor that sensitizes the HPA to stress. PMID:20202080

  15. Inter- and intracellular relationship of substance P-containing neurons with serotonin and GABA in the dorsal raphe nucleus: combination of autoradiographic and immunocytochemical techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Magoul, R.; Onteniente, B.; Oblin, A.; Calas, A.

    1986-06-01

    Double-labeling experiments were performed at the electron microscopic level in the dorsal raphe nucleus of rat, in order to study the inter- and intracellular relationship of substance P with gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and serotonin. Autoradiography for either (/sup 3/H)serotonin or (/sup 3/H)GABA was coupled, on the same tissue section, with peroxidase-antiperoxidase immunocytochemistry for substance P in colchicine-treated animals. Intercellular relationships were represented by synaptic contacts made by (/sup 3/H)serotonin-labeled terminals on substance P-containing somata and dendrites, and by substance P-containing terminals on (/sup 3/H)GABA-labeled cells. Intracellular relationships were suggested by the occurrence of the peptide within (/sup 3/H)serotonin-containing and (/sup 3/H)GABA-containing cell bodies and fibers. Doubly labeled varicosities of the two kinds were also observed in the supraependymal plexus adjacent to the dorsal raphe nucleus. The results demonstrated that, in addition to reciprocal synaptic interactions made by substance P with serotonin and GABA, the dorsal raphe nucleus is the site of intracellular relationships between the peptide and either the amine or the amino acid.

  16. Experiment K-6-18. Study of muscarinic and gaba (benzodiazepine) receptors in the sensory-motor cortex, hippcampus and spinal code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daunton, N.; Damelio, F.; Krasnov, I.

    1990-01-01

    Frontal lobe samples of rat brains flown aboard Cosmos 1887 were processed for the study of muscarinic (cholinergic) and GABA (benzodiazepine) receptors and for immunocytochemical localization of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Although radioactive labeling of both muscarinic cholinergic and GABA (benzodiazepine) receptors proved to be successful with the techniques employed, distinct receptor localization of individual laminae of the frontal neocortex was not possible since the sampling of the area was different in the various groups of animals. In spite of efforts made for proper orientation and regional identification of laminae, it was found that a densitometric (quantitation of autoradiograms) analysis of the tissue did not contribute to the final interpretation of the effects of weightlessness on these receptors. As to the immunocytochemical studies the use of both markers, GFAP and GABA antiserum, confirmed the suitability of the techniques for use in frozen material. However, similar problems to those encountered in the receptor studies prevented an adequate interpretation of the effects of micro-G exposure on the localization and distribution of GABA and GFAP. This study did, however, confirm the feasibility of investigating neurotransmitters and their receptors in future space flight experiments.

  17. Blocking Early GABA Depolarization with Bumetanide Results in Permanent Alterations in Cortical Circuits and Sensorimotor Gating Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Kriegstein, Arnold R.

    2011-01-01

    A high incidence of seizures occurs during the neonatal period when immature networks are hyperexcitable and susceptible to hypersyncrhonous activity. During development, ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter in adults, typically excites neurons due to high expression of the Na+-K+-2Cl? cotransporter (NKCC1). NKCC1 facilitates seizures because it renders GABA activity excitatory through intracellular Cl? accumulation, while blocking NKCC1 with bumetanide suppresses seizures. Bumetanide is currently being tested in clinical trials for treatment of neonatal seizures. By blocking NKCC1 with bumetanide during cortical development, we found a critical period for the development of ?-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate synapses. Disruption of GABA signaling during this window resulted in permanent decreases in excitatory synaptic transmission and sensorimotor gating deficits, a common feature in schizophrenia. Our study identifies an essential role for GABA-mediated depolarization in regulating the balance between cortical excitation and inhibition during a critical period and suggests a cautionary approach for using bumetanide in treating neonatal seizures. PMID:20624842

  18. Immunohistochemical evidence for synaptic release of GABA from melanin-concentrating hormone containing varicosities in the locus coeruleus.

    PubMed

    Del Cid-Pellitero, E; Jones, B E

    2012-10-25

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is synthesized by neurons located in the hypothalamus and projecting to widespread regions of the brain, including the locus coeruleus (LC), through which MCH could modulate sleep-wake states. Yet MCH does not appear to exert direct postsynaptic effects on target neurons, including the noradrenergic LC neurons. Previous studies using in situ hybridization showed that MCH neurons synthesize glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and could thus utilize GABA as a neurotransmitter. To determine whether MCH varicosities can release GABA, we examined by fluorescent microscopy in the LC, whether their terminals also contain the vesicular transporter for GABA (VGAT). In dual-immunostained sections, we found that approximately 6% of MCH varicosities was immunopositive for VGAT and a similar proportion for synaptophysin, the presynaptic marker for small synaptic vesicles, whereas <1% was positive for the vesicular glutamate transporter (VGluT2). Moreover, of the MCH varicosities, ?5% abutted puncta that were immunostained for gephyrin, the postsynaptic marker for GABAergic synapses. In triple-immunostained sections viewed with confocal laser scanning microscopy, we established that MCH varicosities that also contained VGAT or abutted upon gephyrin puncta contacted the tyrosine hydroxylase-immunostained neurons of the LC. Our results suggest that although MCH neurons can influence noradrenergic LC neurons through paracrine release and indirect effects of their peptide, they can also do so through synaptic release and direct postsynaptic effects of GABA and thus serve to inhibit the LC neurons during sleep, when they are silent, and the MCH neurons discharge. PMID:22890079

  19. [Influence of GABA(C)-Receptor Antagonist on Formation of Evoked Potentials in Columns of the Rat Somatosensory Cortex].

    PubMed

    Matukhno, A E; Lysenko, L V; Andreeva, Y V; Sukhov, A G

    2015-01-01

    Microelectrode studies of evoked potentials (EP) in neuronal column of rats barrel cortex show activating action of selective GABA(C)-receptor antagonist 1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridin-4-yl-methylphosphinic acid (TPMPA) mainly on secondary components of EP of supragranular afferent layers of column compared to the efferent infragranular layers. These data suggest localization of GABA(C)-receptors on pre- synaptic terminals of thalamo-cortical glutamatergic afferents and ascending apical dendrites of pyramidal cells. A blockade of GABA(C)-receptors with the selective antagonist TPM PA leads to dose-dependent afferent depolarization with development of presynaptic inhibition and suppression of primary components of EP GABA(C)-receptors blocker produces different effects on secondary components of EP in supragranular layers of the cortex caused by the development of neuronal after hyperpolarization followed by high-amplitude primary response and afterdepolarization followed by low-amplitude primary responses with subsequent activation of different voltage-gated channels and formation of different level of cortical direct current potential gradients. PMID:26841661

  20. Control of cortical neuronal migration by glutamate and GABA.

    PubMed

    Luhmann, Heiko J; Fukuda, A; Kilb, W

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal migration in the cortex is controlled by the paracrine action of the classical neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA. Glutamate controls radial migration of pyramidal neurons by acting primarily on NMDA receptors and regulates tangential migration of inhibitory interneurons by activating non-NMDA and NMDA receptors. GABA, acting on ionotropic GABAA-rho and GABAA receptors, has a dichotomic action on radially migrating neurons by acting as a GO signal in lower layers and as a STOP signal in upper cortical plate (CP), respectively. Metabotropic GABAB receptors promote radial migration into the CP and tangential migration of interneurons. Besides GABA, the endogenous GABAergic agonist taurine is a relevant agonist controlling radial migration. To a smaller extent glycine receptor activation can also influence radial and tangential migration. Activation of glutamate and GABA receptors causes increases in intracellular Ca(2+) transients, which promote neuronal migration by acting on the cytoskeleton. Pharmacological or genetic manipulation of glutamate or GABA receptors during early corticogenesis induce heterotopic cell clusters in upper layers and loss of cortical lamination, i.e., neuronal migration disorders which can be associated with neurological or neuropsychiatric diseases. The pivotal role of NMDA and ionotropic GABA receptors in cortical neuronal migration is of major clinical relevance, since a number of drugs acting on these receptors (e.g., anti-epileptics, anesthetics, alcohol) may disturb the normal migration pattern when present during early corticogenesis. PMID:25688185

  1. Control of cortical neuronal migration by glutamate and GABA

    PubMed Central

    Luhmann, Heiko J.; Fukuda, A.; Kilb, W.

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal migration in the cortex is controlled by the paracrine action of the classical neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA. Glutamate controls radial migration of pyramidal neurons by acting primarily on NMDA receptors and regulates tangential migration of inhibitory interneurons by activating non-NMDA and NMDA receptors. GABA, acting on ionotropic GABAA-rho and GABAA receptors, has a dichotomic action on radially migrating neurons by acting as a GO signal in lower layers and as a STOP signal in upper cortical plate (CP), respectively. Metabotropic GABAB receptors promote radial migration into the CP and tangential migration of interneurons. Besides GABA, the endogenous GABAergic agonist taurine is a relevant agonist controlling radial migration. To a smaller extent glycine receptor activation can also influence radial and tangential migration. Activation of glutamate and GABA receptors causes increases in intracellular Ca2+ transients, which promote neuronal migration by acting on the cytoskeleton. Pharmacological or genetic manipulation of glutamate or GABA receptors during early corticogenesis induce heterotopic cell clusters in upper layers and loss of cortical lamination, i.e., neuronal migration disorders which can be associated with neurological or neuropsychiatric diseases. The pivotal role of NMDA and ionotropic GABA receptors in cortical neuronal migration is of major clinical relevance, since a number of drugs acting on these receptors (e.g., anti-epileptics, anesthetics, alcohol) may disturb the normal migration pattern when present during early corticogenesis. PMID:25688185

  2. GABA-independent GABAA Receptor Openings Maintain Tonic Currents

    PubMed Central

    Wlodarczyk, Agnieszka I.; Sylantyev, Sergiy; Herd, Murray B.; Kersanté, Flavie; Lambert, Jeremy J.; Rusakov, Dmitri A.; Linthorst, Astrid C.E.; Semyanov, Alexey; Belelli, Delia; Pavlov, Ivan; Walker, Matthew C.

    2013-01-01

    Activation of GABAA receptors (GABAARs) produces two forms of inhibition: ‘phasic’ inhibition generated by the rapid, transient activation of synaptic GABAARs by presynaptic GABA release, and tonic inhibition generated by the persistent activation of peri- or extrasynaptic GABAARs which can detect extracellular GABA. Such tonic GABAAR-mediated currents are particularly evident in dentate granule cells in which they play a major role in regulating cell excitability. Here we show that in rat dentate granule cells in ex-vivo hippocampal slices, tonic currents are predominantly generated by GABA-independent GABAA receptor openings. This tonic GABAAR conductance is resistant to the competitive GABAAR antagonist SR95531, which at high concentrations acts as a partial agonist, but can be blocked by an open channel blocker picrotoxin. When slices are perfused with 200 nM GABA, a concentration that is comparable to cerebrospinal fluid concentrations but is twice that measured by us in the hippocampus in vivo using zero-net-flux microdialysis, negligible GABA is detected by dentate granule cells. Spontaneously opening GABAARs, therefore, maintain dentate granule cell tonic currents in the face of low extracellular GABA concentrations. PMID:23447601

  3. Discovery and optimization of an azetidine chemical series as a free fatty acid receptor 2 (FFA2) antagonist: from hit to clinic.

    PubMed

    Pizzonero, Mathieu; Dupont, Sonia; Babel, Marielle; Beaumont, Stphane; Bienvenu, Natacha; Blanqu, Roland; Cherel, Latitia; Christophe, Thierry; Crescenzi, Benedetta; De Lemos, Elsa; Delerive, Philippe; Deprez, Pierre; De Vos, Steve; Djata, Fatoumata; Fletcher, Stephen; Kopiejewski, Sabrina; L'Ebraly, Christelle; Lefranois, Jean-Michel; Lavazais, Stphanie; Manioc, Murielle; Nelles, Luc; Oste, Line; Polancec, Denis; Qunhen, Vanessa; Soulas, Florilne; Triballeau, Nicolas; van der Aar, Ellen M; Vandeghinste, Nick; Wakselman, Emanuelle; Brys, Reginald; Saniere, Laurent

    2014-12-11

    FFA2, also called GPR43, is a G-protein coupled receptor for short chain fatty acids which is involved in the mediation of inflammatory responses. A class of azetidines was developed as potent FFA2 antagonists. Multiparametric optimization of early hits with moderate potency and suboptimal ADME properties led to the identification of several compounds with nanomolar potency on the receptor combined with excellent pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters. The most advanced compound, 4-[[(R)-1-(benzo[b]thiophene-3-carbonyl)-2-methyl-azetidine-2-carbonyl]-(3-chloro-benzyl)-amino]-butyric acid 99 (GLPG0974), is able to inhibit acetate-induced neutrophil migration strongly in vitro and demonstrated ability to inhibit a neutrophil-based pharmacodynamic (PD) marker, CD11b activation-specific epitope [AE], in a human whole blood assay. All together, these data supported the progression of 99 toward next phases, becoming the first FFA2 antagonist to reach the clinic. PMID:25380412

  4. Effects of non-sedative anxiolytic drugs on responses to GABA and on diazepam-induced enhancement of these responses on mouse neurones in cell culture.

    PubMed Central

    De Deyn, P. P.; Macdonald, R. L.

    1988-01-01

    1. Intracellular microelectrode recording techniques were performed on mouse spinal cord and cerebral hemisphere neurones grown in primary dissociated cell culture. The effects of several anxiolytics applied by local pressure ejection on responses to gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) evoked by iontophoresis were investigated. Responses to GABA were depolarizing since intracellular chloride ion concentration was increased by injection from potassium chloride (3M)-filled recording micropipettes and neurones were held at large negative membrane potentials (-70 to -90 mV). The agents studied were six 'non-sedative anxiolytics', CL 218,872 (3-methyl-6-(3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)1,2,4-triazolo(4,3-b) pyridazine), PK 8165 (2-phenyl-4-(2-(4-piperidinyl)ethyl)-quinoline), PK 9084 (2-phenyl-4-(2-(3-piperidinyl)ethyl)-quinoline), CGS 9896 (2-(4-chlorophenyl)-2,5-dihydropyrazolo(4,3-c)quinoline-3(3H)-one) , ZK 91296 (ethyl 5-benzyloxy-4-methoxymethyl-beta-carboline-3-beta-carboxylate), buspirone (8-4-[4-(2-pyrimidinyl)-1-piperazinyl]butyl-8-azaspiro[4.5]decane- 7,9- dione), and two sedative anxiolytics, diazepam and zopiclone [( 6-(5-chloro-2-pyridyl)-6,7-dihydro-7-oxo-5H-pyrrolo[3,4-b]pyrazin- 5- yl]4-methyl-1-piperazinecarboxylate). 2. Direct effects on responses to GABA were studied for all drugs applied in varying concentrations. For the drugs which significantly altered responses to GABA, the effects of the benzodiazepine receptor antagonists Ro 15-1788 (ethyl-8-fluoro-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H-imidazo(1,5a)-(1,4)benzodi azepine - 3-carboxylate) and CGS 8216 (2-phenylpyrazolo(4,3-c)-quinolin-3(5H)-one) were evaluated. For the drugs devoid of significant direct effect on responses to GABA, the influence on diazepam-induced enhancement of responses to GABA was evaluated. 3. Diazepam, zopiclone and CL 218,872 concentration-dependently and reversibly enhanced responses to GABA. Maximal enhancement was 82% for diazepam (500 nM), 64% for zopiclone (10 microM) and 20% for CL 218,872 (10 microM). PK 8165 effects varied with concentration, enhancing responses to GABA (up to 18%) at nM concentrations and reducing responses to GABA (up to 90%) at microM concentrations. CGS 9896, ZK 9126, PK 9084 and buspirone, in concentrations ranging from 1 nM to 10 microM, lacked significant direct effects on responses to GABA.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:2905900

  5. Opsoclonus in a patient with increased titers of anti-GAD antibody provides proof for the conductance-based model of saccadic oscillations.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Aasef G; Wilmot, George

    2016-03-15

    Paucity in gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) due to blockage in the action of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), as seen in the syndrome of anti-GAD antibody, causes adult onset cerebellar ataxia, muscle rigidity, and episodic spasms. Downbeat nystagmus, saccadic dysmetria, impaired ocular pursuit, and impaired cancelation of vestibular ocular reflex are typical ocular motor deficits in patients with syndrome of anti-GAD antibody. We describe opsoclonus, in addition to downbeat nystagmus, in a patient with increased titers of anti-GAD antibody. Paucity in GABA leading to disinhibition to Purkinje target neurons at deep cerebellar and vestibular nuclei might have caused downbeat nystagmus in our patient. Anti-GAD antibody can also increase levels of glutamate the precursor of GABA and the substrate for the action of GAD. We propose that opsoclonus might be due to increased levels of glutamate and subsequent hyperexcitability of excitatory and inhibitory burst neurons leading to reverberation in their reciprocally innervating circuit. PMID:26944142

  6. Cloning, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a bacterial GABA receptor with a Venus flytrap fold.

    PubMed

    Moréra, Solange; Gueguen-Chaignon, Virginie; Raffoux, Aurélie; Faure, Denis

    2008-12-01

    In response to infection by the pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens, plants synthesize several stress amino acids, including gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), which modulates the expression of bacterial virulence factors. GABA penetrates into the bacterial cytoplasm via an ABC transporter that is associated with the periplasmic receptor Atu2422. Mature receptor Atu2422 (without its signal peptide) was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. A complete data set was collected to 1.35 A resolution at 100 K. The crystals belonged to the monoclinic space group C2 and contained one molecule in the asymmetric unit. Molecular replacement was performed and the initial electron-density maps revealed a closed form of this Venus flytrap (VFT) receptor, suggesting the presence of an endogenous E. coli ligand. PMID:19052373

  7. Effect of acetylcholine and GABA on the transfer function of electromotility in isolated outer hair cells.

    PubMed

    Sziklai, I; He, D Z; Dallos, P

    1996-05-01

    Outer hair cells (OHC) from high- and low-frequency regions were separately isolated from guinea pig cochleas. The cells were inserted with their ciliary pole first into a partitioning microchamber so that only 20-50% of the cell length was excluded. Somatic length changes due to transcellular electrical stimulation were measured at the cuticular plate in the inserted portion of the cells. Transfer curves of electromotility of the OHCs were obtained by both a series of brief (2.5 ms) and longer (30 ms) square pulses with opposite polarity and linearly increasing size from 40 to 280 mV in both negative and positive directions. Alterations in the transient and steady-state electromotility transfer curves were examined by application of acetylcholine (ACh) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) to the synaptic pole. ACh, in the concentration range of 10-30 microM, evoked a significant magnitude and gain increase of electromotility in both transient and steady-state responses without a measurable shift in the operating point of the displacement-voltage transfer curve. A tonotopic response magnitude difference is found for ACh challenge. Basal turn OHCs responded with greater magnitude increase (+90% increase from control) than apical turn OHCs (+40%). GABA exerted an opposite effect, again in a location-dependent manner. Magnitude response decreased about 30% for long cells and 14% for short ones. Atropin, a muscarinic receptor antagonist, completely blocked the increase in electromotility response due to ACh. However, D-tubocurarine, a nicorinic receptor antagonist, while not blocking the ACh effect, altered the cell's apparent operating point. Bicuculline methiodide, a GABAA-receptor antagonist, completely arrested GABA influences on the electromotility response. These results suggest that both ACh and GABA can change the electromotile activity of OHCs, in a tonotopically biased manner. ACh challenge evokes greater magnitude responses in basal turn OHCs, whereas GABA induces greater motility response decrease in apical turn OHCs. The control of the gain and magnitude of electromotility by the transmitter substances appear to involve at least two mechanisms. One is probably related to conformational changes of the voltage-to-movement converter molecules and a change in their number in an effective operational pool, the other operates via changing the electrical resistance of the basolateral cell membrane. PMID:8793511

  8. Actions of picrodendrin antagonists on dieldrin-sensitive and -resistant Drosophila GABA receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Hosie, A. M.; Ozoe, Y.; Koike, K.; Ohmoto, T.; Nikaido, T.; Sattelle, D. B.

    1996-01-01

    1. A series of terpenoid compounds, recently isolated from Picrodendron baccatum, share a picrotoxane skeleton with picrotoxinin, an antagonist of ionotropic GABA receptors. Referred to as picrodendrins, they inhibit the binding of [35S]-tert-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (TBPS) to rat GABAA receptors. Hitherto, their effects on GABA receptors have not been investigated electrophysiologically. Under two-electrode voltage-clamp, the actions of picrodendrins and related terpenoids have been assayed on homooligomeric GABA receptors formed by the expression of a Drosophila GABA receptor subunit (RDLac) in Xenopus oocytes. 2. All the terpenoids tested, dose-dependently antagonized currents induced by 30 microM (EC50) GABA. 3. Tutin and its analogues (dihydrotutin and isohyenanchin) differ in the structure of their axial C4 substituents. Of these compounds, tutin, which bears an isopropenyl group at this carbon atom, was the most potent antagonist of RDLac homo-oligomers, whereas isohyenanchin, which bears a hydroxyisopropyl group, was the least potent antagonist tested. 4. Picrodendrins differ mainly in the structure of their C9 substituents. The IC50s of picrodendrins ranged from 17 +/- 1.3 nM (picrodendrin-Q) to 1006 +/- 1.3 nM (picrodendrin-O). As such, the most potent picrodendrins (Q, A and B) were approximately equipotent with picrotoxinin as antagonists of RDLac homo-oligomers. 5. Certain picrodendrin compounds effected a use-dependent blockade of RDLac homo-oligomers. Such a biphasic block was not observed with tutin analogues. 6. Picrotoxin-resistant RDLacA3025 homo-oligomers, which have a single amino acid substitution (A302S) in the 2nd transmembrane region, were markedly less sensitive to picrodendrin-O than the wild-type, dieldrin-sensitive, homo-oligomers. 7. The relative potency of tutin analogues demonstrates that the structure-activity relationship of the C4 substituent of picrotoxane-based compounds is conserved in vertebrates and insects. However, the relative order of potency of picrodendrins on RDLac homo-oligomers is distinctly different from that observed in previous radioligand binding studies performed on vertebrate GABAA receptors. As picrodendrin compounds differ in the structure of their C9 substituents, these data suggest that the optimal convulsant pharmacophores of vertebrate GABAA receptors and RDLac homo-oligomers differ with respect to this substituent. PMID:8982503

  9. Evaluation of improved γ-aminobutyric acid production in yogurt using Lactobacillus plantarum NDC75017.

    PubMed

    Shan, Y; Man, C X; Han, X; Li, L; Guo, Y; Deng, Y; Li, T; Zhang, L W; Jiang, Y J

    2015-04-01

    Most γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-producing microorganisms are lactic acid bacteria (LAB), but the yield of GABA is limited in most of these GABA-producing strains. In this study, the production of GABA was carried out by using Lactobacillus plantarum NDC75017, a strain screened from traditional fermented dairy products in China. Concentrations of substrate (l-monosodium glutamate, L-MSG) and coenzyme (pyridoxal-5-phosphate, PLP) of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) and culture temperature were investigated to evaluate their effects on GABA yield of Lb. plantarum NDC75017. The results indicated that GABA production was related to GAD activity and biomass of Lb. plantarum NDC75017. Response surface methodology was used to optimize conditions of GABA production. The optimal factors for GABA production were L-MSG at 80 mM, PLP at 18 μM, and a culture temperature of 36 °C. Under these conditions, production of GABA was maximized at 314.56 mg/100 g. Addition of Lb. plantarum NDC75017 to a commercial starter culture led to higher GABA production in fermented yogurt. Flavor and texture of the prepared yogurt and the control yogurt did not differ significantly. Thus, Lb. plantarum NDC75017 has good potential for manufacture of GABA-enriched fermented milk products. PMID:25622870

  10. Insights into the binding of GABA to the insect RDL receptor from atomistic simulations: a comparison of models.

    PubMed

    Comitani, Federico; Cohen, Netta; Ashby, Jamie; Botten, Dominic; Lummis, Sarah C R; Molteni, Carla

    2014-01-01

    The resistance to dieldrin (RDL) receptor is an insect pentameric ligand-gated ion channel (pLGIC). It is activated by the neurotransmitter ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) binding to its extracellular domain; hence elucidating the atomistic details of this interaction is important for understanding how the RDL receptor functions. As no high resolution structures are currently available, we built homology models of the extracellular domain of the RDL receptor using different templates, including the widely used acetylcholine binding protein and two pLGICs, the Erwinia Chrysanthemi ligand-gated ion channel (ELIC) and the more recently resolved GluCl. We then docked GABA into the selected three dimensional structures, which we used as starting points for classical molecular dynamics simulations. This allowed us to analyze in detail the behavior of GABA in the binding sites, including the hydrogen bond and cation-? interaction networks it formed, the conformers it visited and the possible role of water molecules in mediating the interactions; we also estimated the binding free energies. The models were all stable and showed common features, including interactions consistent with experimental data and similar to other pLGICs; differences could be attributed to the quality of the models, which increases with increasing sequence identity, and the use of a pLGIC template. We supplemented the molecular dynamics information with metadynamics, a rare event method, by exploring the free energy landscape of GABA binding to the RDL receptor. Overall, we show that the GluCl template provided the best models. GABA forming direct salt-bridges with Arg211 and Glu204, and cation-? interactions with an aromatic cage including Tyr109, Phe206 and Tyr254, represents a favorable binding arrangement, and the interaction with Glu204 can also be mediated by a water molecule. PMID:24442887

  11. GABA Receptors Genes Polymorphisms and Alcohol Dependence: No Evidence of an Association in an Italian Male Population

    PubMed Central

    Tucci, Marianna; Di Pietra, Laura; Ferrara, Santo Davide

    2014-01-01

    Objective The genes encoding for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) A and B receptors may be considered as candidates for alcoholism; genetic alterations at this level may produce structural and functional diversity and thus play a role in the response to alcohol addiction treatment. To investigate these aspects further, we conducted a preliminary genetic association study on a population of Italian male alcohol addicts, focusing on GABA A and B receptors. Methods A total of 186 alcohol-dependent subjects (in the first phase 139, then 47 more samples) and 182 controls were genotyped for 25 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of genes encoding the alpha-1 subunit of GABA A receptor (GABRA1) and subunits 1 and 2 of GABA B receptor (GABBR1 and GABBR2). The chi-squared test for allele and genotype distributions and Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium analysis of both subjects and controls were performed. Bonferroni's correction for multiple comparisons was applied. Results Preliminary results comparing 139 alcohol-dependent subjects and 182 controls showed differences in genotype distribution in the former for SNP rs29253, located in the intron region of the GABBR1 gene. In order to clarify the meaning of this association, 47 more samples from alcohol-dependent subjects were tested for this SNP only: the previously found association was not confirmed. Conclusion The lack of significant differences between the two groups does not provide evidence that GABRA 1 and GABBR1 and 2 genes are candidates for alcoholism in this population. Further studies with larger samples are needed, together with investigation of other components of the GABA pathway. PMID:25191505

  12. Quantum Dot Conjugates of GABA and Muscimol: Binding to ?1?2?2 and ?1 GABAA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    GABAA receptors are ligand-gated ion channels that mediate inhibitory synaptic signaling in the CNS. Fluorescent probes with the ability to target these receptors can provide insights into receptor location, distribution and dynamics in live cells, while revealing abnormalities in their distribution and dynamics that could occur in a variety of diseases. We have developed fluorescent probes of GABAA receptors that are composed of a CdSe/ZnS coreshell nanocrystal (quantum dot; qdot) conjugated to pegylated derivatives of the GABA receptor agonists GABA and muscimol (GABA-qdots and muscimol-qdots, respectively). Quantitative fluorescence imaging was used to analyze the binding activity of these conjugates to ?1?2?2 GABAA and ?1 GABAA receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The selectivity of these conjugates for ?1?2?2 GABAA and ?1 GABAA receptors was determined by their ability to compete with the antagonists bicuculline and methyl-(1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridin-4-yl)phosphinic acid (TPMPA). Both GABA- and muscimol-qdots exhibited robust binding to both ?1?2?2 and ?1 GABAA receptors. At ?1?2?2 receptors, pretreatment with bicuculline reduced conjugate binding by ?8-fold on average, an extent far exceeding the reduction produced by TPMPA (?30%). Conversely, at ?1 receptors, pretreatment with TPMPA inhibited binding by ?10-fold, an extent greatly exceeding the change produced by bicuculline (?50% or less). These results indicate specific binding of muscimol-qdots and GABA-qdots to ?1?2?2 GABAA and ?1 GABAA receptors in a manner that preserves the respective pharmacological sensitivities of these receptors to TPMPA and bicuculline, and encourage the use of qdot-conjugated neurotransmitter analogs as labeling agents at GABAA receptors. PMID:23509979

  13. Accuracy and stability of measuring GABA, glutamate, and glutamine by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy: A phantom study at 4 Tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Michael E.; Lauriat, Tara L.; Shanahan, Meghan; Renshaw, Perry F.; Jensen, J. Eric

    2011-02-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy has the potential to provide valuable information about alterations in gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate (Glu), and glutamine (Gln) in psychiatric and neurological disorders. In order to use this technique effectively, it is important to establish the accuracy and reproducibility of the methodology. In this study, phantoms with known metabolite concentrations were used to compare the accuracy of 2D J-resolved MRS, single-echo 30 ms PRESS, and GABA-edited MEGA-PRESS for measuring all three aforementioned neurochemicals simultaneously. The phantoms included metabolite concentrations above and below the physiological range and scans were performed at baseline, 1 week, and 1 month time-points. For GABA measurement, MEGA-PRESS proved optimal with a measured-to-target correlation of R2 = 0.999, with J-resolved providing R2 = 0.973 for GABA. All three methods proved effective in measuring Glu with R2 = 0.987 (30 ms PRESS), R2 = 0.996 (J-resolved) and R2 = 0.910 (MEGA-PRESS). J-resolved and MEGA-PRESS yielded good results for Gln measures with respective R2 = 0.855 (J-resolved) and R2 = 0.815 (MEGA-PRESS). The 30 ms PRESS method proved ineffective in measuring GABA and Gln. When measurement stability at in vivo concentration was assessed as a function of varying spectral quality, J-resolved proved the most stable and immune to signal-to-noise and linewidth fluctuation compared to MEGA-PRESS and 30 ms PRESS.

  14. Cerebral radioprotection by pentobarbital: Dose-response characteristics and association with GABA agonist activity

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, J.J.; Friedman, R.; Orr, K.; Delaney, T.; Oldfield, E.H. )

    1990-05-01

    Pentobarbital reduces cerebral radiation toxicity; however, the mechanism of this phenomenon remains unknown. As an anesthetic and depressant of cerebral metabolism, pentobarbital induces its effects on the central nervous system by stimulating the binding of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) to its receptor and by inhibiting postsynaptic excitatory amino acid activity. The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of these actions as well as other aspects of the radioprotective activity of pentobarbital. Fischer 344 rats were separated into multiple groups and underwent two dose-response evaluations. In one set of experiments to examine the relationship of radioprotection to pentobarbital dose, a range of pentobarbital doses (0 to 75 mg/kg) were given intraperitoneally prior to a constant-level radiation dose (70 Gy). In a second series of experiments to determine the dose-response relationship of radiation protection to radiation dose, a range of radiation doses (10 to 90 Gy) were given with a single pentobarbital dose. Further groups of animals were used to evaluate the importance of the timing of pentobarbital administration, the function of the (+) and (-) isomers of pentobarbital, and the role of an alternative GABA agonist (diazepam). In addition, the potential protective effects of alternative methods of anesthesia (ketamine) and induction of cerebral hypometabolism (hypothermia) were examined. Enhancement of survival time from acute radiation injury due to high-dose single-fraction whole-brain irradiation was maximal with 60 mg/kg of pentobarbital, and occurred over the range of all doses examined between 30 to 90 Gy. Protection was seen only in animals that received the pentobarbital before irradiation. Administration of other compounds that enhance GABA binding (Saffan and diazepam) also significantly enhanced survival time.

  15. GABA? subunits confer a bicuculline-insensitive component to GFAP+ cells of cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Ptriz, Adriana; Reyes-Haro, Daniel; Gonzlez-Gonzlez, Mara Alejandra; Miledi, Ricardo; Martnez-Torres, Atalfo

    2014-01-01

    GABA-A receptors mediating synaptic or extrasynaptic transmission are molecularly and functionally distinct, and glial cells are known to express a plethora of GABA-A subunits. Here we demonstrate that GFAP+ cells of the granular layer of cerebellum express GABA? subunits during early postnatal development, thereby conferring peculiar pharmacologic characteristics to GABA responses. Electron microscopy revealed the presence of GABA? in the plasma membrane of GFAP+ cells. In contrast, expression in the adult was restricted to Purkinje neurons and a subset of ependymal cells. Electrophysiological studies in vitro revealed that astrocytes express functional receptors with an EC50 of 52.2 11.8 ?M for GABA. The evoked currents were inhibited by bicuculline (100 ?M) and TPMPA (IC50, 5.9 0.6 ?M), indicating the presence of a GABA? component. Coimmunoprecipitation demonstrated proteinprotein interactions between GABA?1 and GABA?1, and double immunofluorescence showed that these subunits colocalize in the plasma membrane. Three populations of GABA-A receptors in astrocytes were identified: classic GABA-A, bicuculline-insensitive GABA?, and GABA-AGABA? hybrids. Clusters of GABA-A receptors were distributed in the perinuclear space and along the processes of GFAP+ cells. Time-lapse microscopy showed GABA?2-GFP accumulation in clusters located in the soma and along the processes. The clusters were relatively immobile, with mean displacement of 9.4 0.9 ?m and a net distance traveled of 12 ?m, owing mainly to directional movement or simple diffusion. Modulation of GABA? dynamics may be a novel mechanism of extrasynaptic transmission regulating GABAergic control of GFAP+ cells during early postnatal development. PMID:25422464

  16. Marlin-1, a novel RNA-binding protein associates with GABA receptors.

    PubMed

    Couve, Andrés; Restituito, Sophie; Brandon, Julia M; Charles, Kelly J; Bawagan, Hinayana; Freeman, Katie B; Pangalos, Menelas N; Calver, Andrew R; Moss, Stephen J

    2004-04-01

    GABA(B) receptors are heterodimeric G protein-coupled receptors that mediate slow synaptic inhibition in the central nervous system. Whereas heterodimerization between GABA(B) receptor GABA(B)R1 and GABA(B)R2 subunits is essential for functional expression, how neurons coordinate the assembly of these critical receptors remains to be established. Here we have identified Marlin-1, a novel GABA(B) receptor-binding protein that associates specifically with the GABA(B)R1 subunit in yeast, tissue culture cells, and neurons. Marlin-1 is expressed in the brain and exhibits a granular distribution in cultured hippocampal neurons. Marlin-1 binds different RNA species including the 3'-untranslated regions of both the GABA(B)R1 and GABA(B)R2 mRNAs in vitro and also associates with RNA in cultured neurons. Inhibition of Marlin-1 expression via small RNA interference technology results in enhanced intracellular levels of the GABA(B)R2 receptor subunit without affecting the level of GABA(B)R1. Together our results suggest that Marlin-1 functions to regulate the cellular levels of GABA(B) R2 subunits, which may have significant effects on the production of functional GABA(B) receptor heterodimers. Therefore, our observations provide an added level of regulation for the control of GABA(B) receptor expression and for the efficacy of inhibitory synaptic transmission. PMID:14718537

  17. Plasma and cerebrospinal fluid gamma-aminobutyric acid in neurological disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, D; Löscher, W

    1982-01-01

    In 49 patients with various neurological disorders plasma and CSF gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentrations were determined by radioreceptor assay. The CSF GABA concentration of 127 +/- 47 pmol/ml (range: 65-275; n = 52) was independent of the age, the sex and the intake of various drugs including benzodiazepines, baclofen and antidepressants. Patients with diverse neurological disorders such as multiple sclerosis, ischaemic strokes, intracranial tumour and polyneuropathies had similar CSF GABA levels. The mean plasma GABA concentration was 309 +/- 79 pmol/ml (range: 179-498; n = 44). The correlation between the GABA concentrations of CSF and plasma was very poor (r = 0.18; n = 44). Therefore plasma GABA is not a suitable indicator for CSF GABA. PMID:7143013

  18. GABA and Dopamine Release from Different Brain Regions in Mice with Chronic Exposure to Organophosphate Methamidophos

    PubMed Central

    Noriega-Ortega, Blanca Rosa; Armienta-Aldana, Ernesto; Cervantes-Pompa, José Ángel; Armienta-Aldana, Eduardo; Hernández-Ruíz, Enrique; Chaparro-Huerta, Verónica; Bravo-Cuellar, Alejandro; Beas-Zárate, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Organophosphates such as methamidophos, usually used in the agricultural field, have harmful effects on humans. Exposures to insecticides has been associated with many disorders, including damage to the central and peripheral nervous system. Chronic exposure to organophosphates may lead to persistent neurological and neurobehavioral effects. This study was conducted to determine the effect of methamidophos on [3H]-dopamine (DA) and gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) release from different brain regions after chronic exposure to it for 3, 6 or 9 months. After a six-month methamidophos treatment, the mice showed high susceptibility to convulsive seizures and a reduction in stimulated gamma aminobutyric acid release from the cerebral cortex and hippocampal slices, whereas stimulated (DA) release was slightly decreased from the striatum after three months of methamidophos exposure. The results indicate changes in gamma aminobutyric acid and dopamine neurotransmission, suggesting a specific neuronal damage. PMID:22272056

  19. Design and mechanism of tetrahydrothiophene-based ?-aminobutyric acid aminotransferase inactivators.

    PubMed

    Le, Hoang V; Hawker, Dustin D; Wu, Rui; Doud, Emma; Widom, Julia; Sanishvili, Ruslan; Liu, Dali; Kelleher, Neil L; Silverman, Richard B

    2015-04-01

    Low levels of ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA), one of two major neurotransmitters that regulate brain neuronal activity, are associated with many neurological disorders, such as epilepsy, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, and cocaine addiction. One of the main methods to raise the GABA level in human brain is to use small molecules that cross the blood-brain barrier and inhibit the activity of ?-aminobutyric acid aminotransferase (GABA-AT), the enzyme that degrades GABA. We have designed a series of conformationally restricted tetrahydrothiophene-based GABA analogues with a properly positioned leaving group that could facilitate a ring-opening mechanism, leading to inactivation of GABA-AT. One compound in the series is 8 times more efficient an inactivator of GABA-AT than vigabatrin, the only FDA-approved inactivator of GABA-AT. Our mechanistic studies show that the compound inactivates GABA-AT by a new mechanism. The metabolite resulting from inactivation does not covalently bind to amino acid residues of GABA-AT but stays in the active site via H-bonding interactions with Arg-192, a ?-? interaction with Phe-189, and a weak nonbonded SO?C interaction with Glu-270, thereby inactivating the enzyme. PMID:25781189

  20. Proopiomelanocortin expression in both GABA and glutamate neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hentges, Shane T.; Otero-Corchon, Veronica; Pennock, Reagan L.; King, Connie M.; Low, Malcolm J.

    2009-01-01

    Proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons have been intensively studied because of their essential role in regulating energy balance and body weight. Many effects of POMC neurons can be attributed to their release of cognate neuropeptides from secretory granules in axon terminals. However, these neurons also synaptically release non-peptide neurotransmitters. The aim of this study was to settle the controversy whether there are separate populations of POMC neurons that release GABA or glutamate. Transgenic mice expressing a red fluorescent protein driven by Pomc neuronal regulatory elements (POMC-DsRed) were crossed to mice that expressed green fluorescent protein in GABAergic neurons (GAD67-gfp). Approximately 40% of POMC neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the double transgenic mice expressed the GAD67-gfp transgene. In vitro neurotransmitter release was detected using whole-cell electrophysiologic recordings in cultured GAD67-gfp-positive and -negative POMC neurons that had formed recurrent synapses (autapses). Autapses from GAD67-gfp-positive neurons were uniformly GABAergic. In contrast, autapses from the GAD67-gfp-negative POMC neurons exclusively exhibited postsynaptic currents mediated by glutamate. Together, these results indicate that there are two subpopulations of POMC neurons in the arcuate nucleus differentiated by their amino acid neurotransmitter phenotype. Whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings from POMC neurons in live brain slices indicated that GABAergic and glutamatergic POMC neurons are under similar pre- and post-synaptic regulation although the GABAergic POMC neurons are smaller and have higher input resistance. GABAergic and glutamatergic POMC neurons may mediate distinct aspects of POMC neuron function, including the regulation of energy homeostasis. PMID:19864580

  1. Learning-Dependent Plasticity of the Barrel Cortex Is Impaired by Restricting GABA-Ergic Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Posluszny, Anna; Liguz-Lecznar, Monika; Turzynska, Danuta; Zakrzewska, Renata; Bielecki, Maksymilian; Kossut, Malgorzata

    2015-01-01

    Experience-induced plastic changes in the cerebral cortex are accompanied by alterations in excitatory and inhibitory transmission. Increased excitatory drive, necessary for plasticity, precedes the occurrence of plastic change, while decreased inhibitory signaling often facilitates plasticity. However, an increase of inhibitory interactions was noted in some instances of experience-dependent changes. We previously reported an increase in the number of inhibitory markers in the barrel cortex of mice after fear conditioning engaging vibrissae, observed concurrently with enlargement of the cortical representational area of the row of vibrissae receiving conditioned stimulus (CS). We also observed that an increase of GABA level accompanied the conditioning. Here, to find whether unaltered GABAergic signaling is necessary for learning-dependent rewiring in the murine barrel cortex, we locally decreased GABA production in the barrel cortex or reduced transmission through GABAA receptors (GABAARs) at the time of the conditioning. Injections of 3-mercaptopropionic acid (3-MPA), an inhibitor of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), into the barrel cortex prevented learning-induced enlargement of the conditioned vibrissae representation. A similar effect was observed after injection of gabazine, an antagonist of GABAARs. At the behavioral level, consistent conditioned response (cessation of head movements in response to CS) was impaired. These results show that appropriate functioning of the GABAergic system is required for both manifestation of functional cortical representation plasticity and for the development of a conditioned response. PMID:26641862

  2. The occurrence in and actions of amino acids on isolated supra oral sphincter preparations of the sea anemone Actinia equina

    PubMed Central

    Carlyle, R. F.

    1974-01-01

    1. L-glutamic acid reversibly inhibits the contractions of isolated circular muscle preparations from different body regions of the sea anemone Actinia equina to electrical stimulation. 2. L-glutamic acid does not cause inhibition of contraction by conversion to ammonia or ?-amino-butyric acid, but appears to act on a glutamate receptor. 3. It is postulated that in Actinia equina there is a receptor for glutamic acid whose structural requirements for activation are met by comparatively few analogues of glutamic acid. Of thirty-four analogues tested, only seven were active, most were less active, and only homocysteic acid had a greater activity than L-glutamic acid. 4. Glutamic acid does not depress conduction of contraction in circular muscle preparations. 5. The inhibition produced by L-glutamic acid does not appear to be conducted from one part of a preparation to another. 6. Glutamic acid occurs in high concentrations in supra oral sphincter preparations of Actinia equina. 7. Glutamic acid is released into sea water from sphincter preparations at rest and the amount released is increased by electrical stimulation of the preparation. However, many other amino acids are released at rest and following electrical stimulation, so that it is difficult to suggest that glutamic acid may be involved as a neurotransmitter in the sea anemone. PMID:4150801

  3. Processing cardiovascular information in the vlPAG during electroacupuncture in rats: roles of endocannabinoids and GABA.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Tjen-A-Looi SC; Li P; Longhurst JC

    2009-06-01

    A long-loop pathway, involving the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC), ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG), and the rostral ventrolateral medulla (rVLM), is essential in electroacupuncture (EA) attenuation of sympathoexcitatory cardiovascular reflex responses. The ARC provides excitatory input to the vlPAG, which, in turn, inhibits neuronal activity in the rVLM. Although previous studies have shown that endocannabinoid CB(1) receptor activation modulates gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission in the dorsolateral PAG in stress-induced analgesia, an important role for endocannabinoids in the vlPAG has not yet been observed. We recently have shown (Fu LW, Longhurst JC. J Appl Physiol; doi:10.1152/japplphysiol.91648.2008) that EA reduces the local vlPAG concentration of GABA, but not glutamate, as measured with high-performance liquid chromatography from extracellular samples collected by microdialysis. We, therefore, hypothesized that, during EA, endocannabinoids, acting through CB(1) receptors, presynaptically inhibit GABA release to disinhibit the vlPAG and ultimately modulate excitatory reflex blood pressure responses. Rats were anesthetized, ventilated, and instrumented to measure heart rate and blood pressure. Gastric distention-induced blood pressure responses of 18 +/- 5 mmHg were reduced to 6 +/- 1 mmHg by 30 min of low-current, low-frequency EA applied bilaterally at pericardial P 5-6 acupoints overlying the median nerves. Like EA, microinjection of the fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor URB597 (0.1 nmol, 50 nl) into the vlPAG to increase endocannabinoids locally reduced the gastric distention cardiovascular reflex response from 21 +/- 5 to 3 +/- 4 mmHg. This inhibition was reversed by pretreatment with the GABA(A) antagonist gabazine (27 mM, 50 nl), suggesting that endocannabinoids exert their action through a GABAergic receptor mechanism in the vlPAG. The EA-related inhibition from 18 +/- 3 to 8 +/- 2 mmHg was reversed to 14 +/- 2 mmHg by microinjection of the CB(1) receptor antagonist AM251 (2 nmol, 50 nl) into the vlPAG. Pretreatment with gabazine eliminated reversal following CB(1)-receptor blockade. Thus EA releases endocannabinoids and activates presynaptic CB(1) receptors to inhibit GABA release in the vlPAG. Reduction of GABA release disinhibits vlPAG cells, which, in turn, modulate the activity of rVLM neurons to attenuate the sympathoexcitatory reflex responses.

  4. Processing cardiovascular information in the vlPAG during electroacupuncture in rats: roles of endocannabinoids and GABA.

    PubMed

    Tjen-A-Looi, Stephanie C; Li, Peng; Longhurst, John C

    2009-06-01

    A long-loop pathway, involving the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC), ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG), and the rostral ventrolateral medulla (rVLM), is essential in electroacupuncture (EA) attenuation of sympathoexcitatory cardiovascular reflex responses. The ARC provides excitatory input to the vlPAG, which, in turn, inhibits neuronal activity in the rVLM. Although previous studies have shown that endocannabinoid CB(1) receptor activation modulates gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission in the dorsolateral PAG in stress-induced analgesia, an important role for endocannabinoids in the vlPAG has not yet been observed. We recently have shown (Fu LW, Longhurst JC. J Appl Physiol; doi:10.1152/japplphysiol.91648.2008) that EA reduces the local vlPAG concentration of GABA, but not glutamate, as measured with high-performance liquid chromatography from extracellular samples collected by microdialysis. We, therefore, hypothesized that, during EA, endocannabinoids, acting through CB(1) receptors, presynaptically inhibit GABA release to disinhibit the vlPAG and ultimately modulate excitatory reflex blood pressure responses. Rats were anesthetized, ventilated, and instrumented to measure heart rate and blood pressure. Gastric distention-induced blood pressure responses of 18 +/- 5 mmHg were reduced to 6 +/- 1 mmHg by 30 min of low-current, low-frequency EA applied bilaterally at pericardial P 5-6 acupoints overlying the median nerves. Like EA, microinjection of the fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor URB597 (0.1 nmol, 50 nl) into the vlPAG to increase endocannabinoids locally reduced the gastric distention cardiovascular reflex response from 21 +/- 5 to 3 +/- 4 mmHg. This inhibition was reversed by pretreatment with the GABA(A) antagonist gabazine (27 mM, 50 nl), suggesting that endocannabinoids exert their action through a GABAergic receptor mechanism in the vlPAG. The EA-related inhibition from 18 +/- 3 to 8 +/- 2 mmHg was reversed to 14 +/- 2 mmHg by microinjection of the CB(1) receptor antagonist AM251 (2 nmol, 50 nl) into the vlPAG. Pretreatment with gabazine eliminated reversal following CB(1)-receptor blockade. Thus EA releases endocannabinoids and activates presynaptic CB(1) receptors to inhibit GABA release in the vlPAG. Reduction of GABA release disinhibits vlPAG cells, which, in turn, modulate the activity of rVLM neurons to attenuate the sympathoexcitatory reflex responses. PMID:19325030

  5. Refuting the challenges of the developmental shift of polarity of GABA actions: GABA more exciting than ever!

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Woodin, Melanie A.; Sernagor, Evelyne; Cancedda, Laura; Vinay, Laurent; Rivera, Claudio; Legendre, Pascal; Luhmann, Heiko J.; Bordey, Angelique; Wenner, Peter; Fukuda, Atsuo; van den Pol, Anthony N.; Gaiarsa, Jean-Luc; Cherubini, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    During brain development, there is a progressive reduction of intracellular chloride associated with a shift in GABA polarity: GABA depolarizes and occasionally excites immature neurons, subsequently hyperpolarizing them at later stages of development. This sequence, which has been observed in a wide range of animal species, brain structures and preparations, is thought to play an important role in activity-dependent formation and modulation of functional circuits. This sequence has also been considerably reinforced recently with new data pointing to an evolutionary preserved rule. In a recent Hypothesis and Theory Article, the excitatory action of GABA in early brain development is suggested to be an experimental artefact (Bregestovski and Bernard, 2012). The authors suggest that the excitatory action of GABA is due to an inadequate/insufficient energy supply in glucose-perfused slices and/or to the damage produced by the slicing procedure. However, these observations have been repeatedly contradicted by many groups and are inconsistent with a large body of evidence including the fact that the developmental shift is neither restricted to slices nor to rodents. We summarize the overwhelming evidence in support of both excitatory GABA during development, and the implications this has in developmental neurobiology. PMID:22973192

  6. Characterization of the interaction between a novel convulsant agent, norbiphen, and GABA(A) and other ligand-gated ion channels.

    PubMed

    Halliwell, R F; Su, Jiping; Demuro, A; Martinez-Torres, A; Miledi, R

    2002-09-01

    A hybrid molecule composed of the antimicrobial, norfloxacin, linked to the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), biphenylacetic acid, which we have termed norbiphen, is a lethal convulsant in vivo and an antagonist of rodent GABA(A) receptors in vitro. In the present study, the selectivity, molecular site(s) and mechanism of action of this novel convulsant were investigated using electrophysiological techniques. Sub-maximal GABA-evoked currents recorded from rodent hippocampal neurons were reversibly inhibited by norbiphen (1 microM) to 5+/-2% of control whereas glutamate, NMDA and glycine activated responses were little or unaffected. Sub-maximal GABA-evoked currents recorded from oocytes expressing recombinant human alpha1beta2gamma2s or alpha1beta2 GABA(A) receptors were also reversibly inhibited by norbiphen (1-1000 nM) with an IC(50) (+/-s.e.m.) of 5.7+/-1 and 8.8+/-1 nM, respectively. Similarly, GABA currents recorded from alpha1beta1gamma2s, alpha1beta1 and beta2gamma2s receptors were inhibited with IC(50)s of 16.1+/-1, 18.8+/-1 and 4.2+/-1 nM, respectively. In contrast, norbiphen (100 nM) had little or no effect at rho1 GABA(C) homomers. At alpha1beta2gamma2s receptors, norbiphen had no affect on the GABA reversal potential, and inhibition was not voltage-dependent, suggesting that this compound does not act at the ion channel. The GABA concentration response curve was shifted in a competitive-like fashion by norbiphen (10-300 nM) and a Schild analysis of these data yielded a slope of 0.94+/-0.1 and a pA(2) of 7.77. Our data reveal a novel, selective and highly potent antagonist of GABA(A) receptors. Norbiphen should be a valuable agent in future studies of this receptor complex. PMID:12367622

  7. GABA-B receptor activation and conflict behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Ketelaars, C.E.J.; Bollen, E.L.; Rigter, H.; Bruinvels, J.

    1988-01-01

    Baclofen and oxazepam enhance extinction of conflict behavior in the Geller-Seifter test while baclofen and diazepam release punished behavior in Vogel's conflict test. In order to investigate the possibility that the effect of the selective GABA-B receptor agonist baclofen is mediated indirectly via the GABA-A/benzodiazepine receptor complex, the effect of pretreatment of rats with baclofen on (/sup 3/H)-diazepam binding to washed and unwashed cortical and cerebellar membranes of rats has been studied. Baclofen pretreatment increase Bmax in washed cerebellar membranes when bicuculline was present in the incubation mixture. No effect was seen in cortical membranes. The present results render it unlikely that the effect of baclofen on extinction of conflict behavior and punished drinking is mediated via the GABA-A/benzodiazepine receptor complex. 50 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  8. Drosophila neuroligin 4 regulates sleep through modulating GABA transmission.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Zhou, Zikai; Zhang, Xinwang; Tong, Huawei; Li, Peipei; Zhang, Zi Chao; Jia, Zhengping; Xie, Wei; Han, Junhai

    2013-09-25

    Sleep is an essential and evolutionarily conserved behavior that is closely related to synaptic function. However, whether neuroligins (Nlgs), which are cell adhesion molecules involved in synapse formation and synaptic transmission, are involved in sleep is not clear. Here, we show that Drosophila Nlg4 (DNlg4) is highly expressed in large ventral lateral clock neurons (l-LNvs) and that l-LNv-derived DNlg4 is essential for sleep regulation. GABA transmission is impaired in mutant l-LNv, and sleep defects in dnlg4 mutant flies can be rescued by genetic manipulation of GABA transmission. Furthermore, dnlg4 mutant flies exhibit a severe reduction in GABAA receptor RDL clustering, and DNlg4 associates with RDLs in vivo. These results demonstrate that DNlg4 regulates sleep through modulating GABA transmission in l-LNvs, which provides the first known link between a synaptic adhesion molecule and sleep in Drosophila. PMID:24068821

  9. gamma. -Aminobutyric acid in synovial membrane of rat knee joint

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, A.; Kondo, M.; Taniyama, K.; Tanaka, S.

    1988-01-01

    ..gamma..-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) content was measured, and the release of GABA was studied in the synovial membrane of the rat knee joint. GABA content of the synovial membrane was 20.1 nmol/g tissue. Ten days after unilateral dissection of the sciatic nerve, femoral nerve or both nerves, the GABA contents of the ipsilateral membrane were 13.8, 14.6 and 7.8 nmol/g tissue, respectively. High K/sup +/ evoked the Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent release of (/sup 3/H) GABA from the synovial membranes of intact rats preloaded with (/sup 3/H) GABA, but did not evoke release from the membrane ipsilateral to the dissection of both sciatic and femoral nerves. Evoked release of (/sup 3/H) GABA was obtained in the synovial membrane preloaded with (/sup 3/H) GABA in the presence of ..beta..-alanine, but not in the presence of 2,4L-diaminobutyric acid. These results indicate that GABA is present in the neuronal elements of the synovial membrane of the rat knee joint.

  10. GABA-receptor complex in monkeys treated with MPTP

    SciTech Connect

    Huffman, R.D.; Ticku, M.K.

    1986-03-01

    Tissue samples from the brains of monkeys made parkinsonian by the depletion of dopamine (DA) with dopaminergic neurotoxin (N-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (1.4-3.4 mg/kg, i.v.) were assayed for changed in GABA ((/sup 3/H)-GABA), benzodiazepine ((/sup 3/H)-flunitrazepam) and picrotoxin ((/sup 35/S)-TBPS) binding sites. One point binding assays were performed on globus pallidus (GP), substantia nigra reticulata (SN/sub R/) and VA-VL thalamic samples. GABA binding was markedly increased in the SN/sub R/ (129 +/- 12%, n = 2) and GP (108 +/- 33%, n = 4) and not altered in the striatum or thalamus. However, benzodiazepine binding was increased in the striatum (170%; 257 fm/mg, control; 692 fm/mg, treated) and GP (28%; 317 fm/mg, control, 405 fm/mg, treated) and (/sup 35/S)-TBPS binding was also increased in GP (100%; 32.5 fm/mg, control; 65.5 fm/mg, treated). atScatchard analysis of (/sup 3/H)-GABA binding was also performed on tissue samples of motor cortex, cerebellar vermis and striatum pooled from half brains of 4 parkinsonian and 2 control monkeys. Depletion of DA (92 +/- 5%) in the striatum of these monkeys was not associated with any change in the K/sub D/ or B/sub max/ for the high or low affinity GABA binding sites in the striatum, motor cortex or cerebellum. Thus, in the basal ganglia, DA depletion is associated with an increase in GABA binding sites in GP and SN/sub R/, an increase in picrotoxin binding sites in GP and an increase in benzodiazepine binding sites in the striatum.

  11. Extrasynaptic Release of GABA by Retinal Dopaminergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hirasawa, Hajime; Puopolo, Michelino; Raviola, Elio

    2009-01-01

    GABA release by dopaminergic amacrine (DA) cells of the mouse retina was detected by measuring Cl− currents generated by isolated perikarya in response to their own neurotransmitter. The possibility that the Cl− currents were caused by GABA release from synaptic endings that had survived the dissociation of the retina was ruled out by examining confocal Z series of the surface of dissociated tyrosine hydroxylase-positive perikarya after staining with antibodies to preand postsynaptic markers. GABA release was caused by exocytosis because 1) the current events were transient on the millisecond time scale and thus resembled miniature synaptic currents; 2) they were abolished by treatment with a blocker of the vesicular proton pump, bafilomycin A1; and 3) their frequency was controlled by the intracellular Ca2+ concentration. Because DA cell perikarya do not contain presynaptic active zones, release was by necessity extrasynaptic. A range of depolarizing stimuli caused GABA exocytosis, showing that extrasynaptic release of GABA is controlled by DA cell electrical activity. With all modalities of stimulation, including long-lasting square pulses, segments of pacemaker activity delivered by the action-potential-clamp method and high-frequency trains of ramps, discharge of GABAergic currents exhibited considerable variability in latency and duration, suggesting that coupling between Ca2+ influx and transmitter exocytosis is extremely loose in comparison with the synapse. Paracrine signaling based on extrasynaptic release of GABA by DA cells and other GABAergic amacrines may participate in controlling the excitability of the neuronal processes that interact synaptically in the inner plexiform layer. PMID:19403749

  12. ?-Hydroxybutyrate is the preferred substrate for GABA and glutamate synthesis while glucose is indispensable during depolarization in cultured GABAergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Lund, Trine M; Obel, Linea F; Risa, ystein; Sonnewald, Ursula

    2011-08-01

    The ketogenic diet has multiple beneficial effects not only in treatment of epilepsy, but also in that of glucose transporter 1 deficiency, cancer, Parkinson's disease, obesity and pain. Thus, there is an increasing interest in understanding the mechanism behind this metabolic therapy. Patients on a ketogenic diet reach high plasma levels of ketone bodies, which are used by the brain as energy substrates. The interaction between glucose and ketone bodies is complex and there is still controversy as to what extent it affects the homeostasis of the neurotransmitters glutamate, aspartate and GABA. The present study was conducted to study this metabolic interaction in cultured GABAergic neurons exposed to different combinations of (13)C-labeled and unlabeled glucose and ?-hydroxybutyrate. Depolarization was induced and the incorporation of (13)C into glutamate, GABA and aspartate was analyzed. The presence of ?-hydroxybutyrate together with glucose did not affect the total GABA content but did, however, decrease the aspartate content to a lower value than when either glucose or ?-hydroxybutyrate was employed alone. When combinations of the two substrates were used (13)C-atoms from ?-hydroxybutyrate were found in all three amino acids to a greater extent than (13)C-atoms from glucose, but only the (13)C contribution from [1,6-(13)C]glucose increased upon depolarization. In conclusion, ?-hydroxybutyrate was preferred over glucose as substrate for amino acid synthesis but the total content of aspartate decreased when both substrates were present. Furthermore only the use of glucose increased upon depolarization. PMID:21684314

  13. Effect of taurine on the concentrations of glutamate, GABA, glutamine and alanine in the rat striatum and hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Molchanova, Svetlana M; Oja, Simos S; Saransaari, Pirjo

    2007-01-01

    Taurine, a non-protein amino acid, acts as an osmoregulator and inhibitory neuromodulator in the brain. Here we studied the effects of intraperitoneal injections of taurine on the concentrations of glutamate and GABA, and their precursors, glutamine and alanine, in the rat striatum and hippocampus. Injections of 0.25, 0.5 and 1 g/kg taurine led to a gradual increase in taurine tissue concentrations in both hippocampus and striatum. Glutamate and GABA also increased in the hippocampus, but not in the striatum. Glutamine increased and alanine decreased markedly in both brain structures. The results corroborate the neuromodulatory role of taurine in the brain. Taurine administration results in an imbalance in inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmission in the glutamatergic (hippocampus) and GABAergic (striatum) brain structures, affecting more markedly the neurotransmitter precursors. PMID:18605241

  14. Mechanisms and functions of GABA co-release.

    PubMed

    Tritsch, Nicolas X; Granger, Adam J; Sabatini, Bernardo L

    2016-03-01

    The 'one neuron, one neurotransmitter' doctrine states that synaptic communication between two neurons occurs through the release of a single chemical transmitter. However, recent findings suggest that neurons that communicate using more than one classical neurotransmitter are prevalent throughout the adult mammalian CNS. In particular, several populations of neurons previously thought to release only glutamate, acetylcholine, dopamine or histamine also release the major inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA. Here, we review these findings and discuss the implications of GABA co-release for synaptic transmission and plasticity. PMID:26865019

  15. Glutamate and GABA imbalance promotes neuronal apoptosis in hippocampus after stress

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jie; Wang, He; Liu, Yuan; Li, Ying-yu; Chen, Can; Liu, Liang-ming; Wu, Ya-min; Li, Sen; Yang, Ce

    2014-01-01

    Background People who experience traumatic events have an increased risk of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, PTSD-related pathological changes in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex remain poorly understood. Material/Methods We investigated the effect of a PTSD-like animal model induced by severe stress. The experimental rats received 20 inescapable electric foot shocks in an enclosed box for a total of 6 times in 3 days. The physiological state (body weight and plasma corticosterone concentrations), emotion, cognitive behavior, brain morphology, apoptosis, and balance of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex were observed. Cell damages were examined with histological staining (HE, Nissl, and silver impregnation), while apoptosis was analyzed with flow cytometry using an Annexin V and propidium iodide (PI) binding and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated-dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) method. Results In comparison with the sham litter-mates, the stressed rats showed decreased body weight, inhibition of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activation, increase in freezing response to trauma reminder, hypoactivity and anxiety-like behaviors in elevated plus maze and open field test, poor learning in Morris water maze, and shortened latency in hot-plate test. There were significant damages in the hippocampus but not in the prefrontal cortex. Imbalance between glutamate and GABA was more evident in the hippocampus than in the prefrontal cortex. Conclusions These results suggest that neuronal apoptosis in the hippocampus after severe traumatic stress is related to the imbalance between glutamate and GABA. Such modifications may resemble the profound changes observed in PTSD patients. PMID:24675061

  16. Inhibition of the kinase WNK1/HSN2 ameliorates neuropathic pain by restoring GABA inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kahle, Kristopher T; Schmouth, Jean-François; Lavastre, Valérie; Latremoliere, Alban; Zhang, Jinwei; Andrews, Nick; Omura, Takao; Laganière, Janet; Rochefort, Daniel; Hince, Pascale; Castonguay, Geneviève; Gaudet, Rébecca; Mapplebeck, Josiane C S; Sotocinal, Susana G; Duan, JingJing; Ward, Catherine; Khanna, Arjun R; Mogil, Jeffrey S; Dion, Patrick A; Woolf, Clifford J; Inquimbert, Perrine; Rouleau, Guy A

    2016-01-01

    HSN2is a nervous system predominant exon of the gene encoding the kinase WNK1 and is mutated in an autosomal recessive, inherited form of congenital pain insensitivity. The HSN2-containing splice variant is referred to as WNK1/HSN2. We created a knockout mouse specifically lacking theHsn2exon ofWnk1 Although these mice had normal spinal neuron and peripheral sensory neuron morphology and distribution, the mice were less susceptible to hypersensitivity to cold and mechanical stimuli after peripheral nerve injury. In contrast, thermal and mechanical nociceptive responses were similar to control mice in an inflammation-induced pain model. In the nerve injury model of neuropathic pain, WNK1/HSN2 contributed to a maladaptive decrease in the activity of the K(+)-Cl(-)cotransporter KCC2 by increasing its inhibitory phosphorylation at Thr(906)and Thr(1007), resulting in an associated loss of GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid)-mediated inhibition of spinal pain-transmitting nerves. Electrophysiological analysis showed that WNK1/HSN2 shifted the concentration of Cl(-)such that GABA signaling resulted in a less hyperpolarized state (increased neuronal activity) rather than a more hyperpolarized state (decreased neuronal activity) in mouse spinal nerves. Pharmacologically antagonizing WNK activity reduced cold allodynia and mechanical hyperalgesia, decreased KCC2 Thr(906)and Thr(1007)phosphorylation, and restored GABA-mediated inhibition (hyperpolarization) of injured spinal cord lamina II neurons. These data provide mechanistic insight into, and a compelling therapeutic target for treating, neuropathic pain after nerve injury. PMID:27025876

  17. Benzodiazepines and GABA-GABAA receptor system in the cat carotid body.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, A; Zadzilka, N; Shirahata, M

    2009-01-01

    Benzodiazepines (BZs) suppress ventilation possibly by augmenting the GABA(A) receptor activity in the respiratory control system, but precise sites of action are not well understood. The goals of this study were: (1) to identify GABA(A) receptor subunits in the carotid body (CB) and petrosal ganglion (PG); (2) to test if BZs exert their effects through the GABA(A) receptor in the CB chemosensory unit. Tissues were taken from euthanized adult cats. RNA was extracted from the brain, and cDNA sequences of several GABA(A) receptor subunits were determined. Subsequent RT-PCR analysis demonstrated the gene expression of alpha2, alpha3, beta3, and gamma2 subunits in the CB and the PG. Immunoreactivity for GABA and for GABA(A) receptor beta3 and gamma2 subunits was detected in chemosensory glomus cells (GCs) in the CB and neurons in the PG. The functional aspects of the GABA-GABA(A) receptor system in the CB was studied by measuring CB neural output using in vitro perfusion setup. Two BZs, midazolam and diazepam, decreased the CB neural response to hypoxia. With continuous application of bicuculline, a GABA(A) receptor antagonist, the effects of BZs were abolished. In conclusion, the GABA-GABA(A) receptor system is functioning in the CB chemosensory system. BZs inhibit CB neural response to hypoxia by enhancing GABA(A) receptor activity. PMID:19536478

  18. Depolarizing actions of ?-aminobutyric acid and related compounds on rat superior cervical ganglia in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Bowery, N.G.; Brown, D.A.

    1974-01-01

    1 Potential changes in rat superior cervical ganglia were recorded in vitro with surface electrodes. 2 ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) produced a transient, low-amplitude ganglion depolarization at rest, and a transient hyperpolarization in ganglia depolarized by carbachol. Depolarization was not prevented by preganglionic denervation. The log dose-response curve for depolarization was sigmoid with a mean ED50 of 12.5 ?M. 3 The ganglion was depolarized in similar manner by the following compounds (mean molar potencies relative to GABA (=1) in brackets): 3-aminopropane sulphonic acid (3.4), ?-amino-?-hydroxybutyric acid (0.27), ?-guanidino-propionic acid (0.12), guanidinoacetic acid (0.057), ?-aminovaleric acid (0.048), ?-alanine (0.01), 2,4-diaminobutyric acid, ?-guanidinobutyric acid, taurine and N-methyl-GABA (all <0.01). The following compounds did not depolarize the ganglion at 10 mM concentrations: ?- and ?-amino-n-butyric acids, ?-amino-iso-butyric acid, glycine and glutamic acid. 4 Depolarization declined in the continued presence of GABA. Ganglia thus `desensitized' to GABA showed a diminished response to other amino acids but not to carbachol. 5 The effect of GABA was not antagonized by hyoscine and hexamethonium in combination, in concentrations sufficient to block responses to carbachol. 6 Responses to GABA were blocked more readily than those to carbachol by bicuculline (IC50, 14 ?M) and picrotoxin (IC50, 37 ?M). Strychnine (IC50, 73 ?M) was a relatively weak and less selective GABA-antagonist. 7 It is concluded that sympathetic ganglion cells possess receptors for GABA and related amino acids which are (a) different from the acetylcholine receptors and (b) similar to GABA receptors in the central nervous system. PMID:4154116

  19. Analysis of Glutamate, GABA, Noradrenaline, Dopamine, Serotonin, and Metabolites Using Microbore UHPLC with Electrochemical Detection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The applicability of microbore ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) with electrochemical detection for offline analysis of a number of well-known neurotransmitters in less than 10 μL microdialysis fractions is described. Two methods are presented for the analysis of monoamine or amino acid neurotransmitters, using the same UHPLC instrument. Speed of analysis of noradrenaline (NA), dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT), and the metabolites homovanillic acid (HVA), 5-hydroxyindole aceticacid (5-HIAA), and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) was predominated by the retention behavior of NA, the nonideal behavior of matrix components, and the loss in signal of 5-HT. This method was optimized to meet the requirements for detection sensitivity and minimizing the size of collected fractions, which determines temporal resolution in microdialysis. The amino acid neurotransmitters glutamate (Glu) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) were analyzed after an automated derivatization procedure. Under optimized conditions, Glu was resolved from a number of early eluting system peaks, while the total runtime was decreased to 15 min by a 4-fold increase of the flow rate under UHPLC conditions. The detection limit for Glu and GABA was 10 nmol/L (15 fmol in 1.5 μL); the monoamine neurotransmitters had a detection limit between 32 and 83 pmol/L (0.16–0.42 fmol in 5 μL) in standard solutions. Using UHPLC, the analysis times varied from 15 min to less than 2 min depending on the complexity of the samples and the substances to be analyzed. PMID:23642417

  20. Levels of glutamate, aspartate, GABA, and taurine in different regions of the cerebellum after x-irradiation-induced neuronal loss

    SciTech Connect

    Rea, M.A.; McBride, W.J.; Rohde, B.H.

    1981-01-01

    The levels of glutamate (Glu), aspartate (Asp), gamma-amino-n-butyric acid (GABA), and taurine (Tau) were determined in the cortex, molecular layer, and deep nuclei of cerebella of adult rats exposed to X-irradiation at 12-15 days following birth (to prevent the acquisition of late-forming granule cells; 12-15x group) and 8-15 days following birth (to prevent the acquisition of granule and stellate cells; 8-15x group). Also, the levels of the four amino acids were measured in the crude synaptosomal fraction (P2) isolated from the whole cerebella of the control, 12-15x, and 8-15x groups. The level of Glu was significantly decreased by (1) 6-20% in the cerebellar cortex; (2) 15-20% in the molecular layer; and (3) 25-50% in the P2 fraction of the X-irradiated groups relative to control values. The content of Glu in the deep nuclei was not changed by X-irradiation treatment. Regional levels of Asp were unchanged by X-irradiation, while its level in P2 decreased by 15-30% after treatment. The levels of GABA and Tau in the molecular layer, deep nuclei, or P2 were not changed in the experimental groups. However, there was a 15% increase in the levels of GABA and Tau in the cerebellar cortex of the 8-15x group relative to control values. The data support the proposed role of glutamate as the excitatory transmitter released from the cerebellar granule cells but are inconclusive regarding a transmitter role for either Tau or GABA from cerebellar stellate cells.

  1. The Role of Genetic Sex in Affect Regulation and Expression of GABA-Related Genes Across Species

    PubMed Central

    Seney, Marianne L.; Chang, Lun-Ching; Oh, Hyunjung; Wang, Xingbin; Tseng, George C.; Lewis, David A.; Sibille, Etienne

    2013-01-01

    Although circulating hormones and inhibitory gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-related factors are known to affect mood, considerable knowledge gaps persist for biological mechanisms underlying the female bias in mood disorders. Here, we combine human and mouse studies to investigate sexual dimorphism in the GABA system in the context of major depressive disorder (MDD) and then use a genetic model to dissect the role of sex-related factors in GABA-related gene expression and anxiety-/depressive-like behaviors in mice. First, using meta-analysis of gene array data in human postmortem brain (N?=?51 MDD subjects, 50 controls), we show that the previously reported down-regulation in MDD of somatostatin (SST), a marker of a GABA neuron subtype, is significantly greater in women with MDD. Second, using gene co-expression network analysis in control human subjects (N?=?214; two frontal cortex regions) and expression quantitative trait loci mapping (N?=?170 subjects), we show that expression of SST and the GABA-synthesizing enzymes glutamate decarboxylase 67 (GAD67) and GAD65 are tightly co-regulated and influenced by X-chromosome genetic polymorphisms. Third, using a rodent genetic model [Four Core Genotypes (FCG) mice], in which genetic and gonadal sex are artificially dissociated (N???12/group), we show that genetic sex (i.e., X/Y-chromosome) influences both gene expression (lower Sst, Gad67, Gad65 in XY mice) and anxiety-like behaviors (higher in XY mice). This suggests that in an intact male animal, the observed behavior represents the outcomes of male genetic sex increasing and male-like testosterone decreasing anxiety-like behaviors. Gonadal sex was the only factor influencing depressive-like behavior (gonadal males?GABA-related genes and anxiety-like behaviors. PMID:24062698

  2. Effect of acute and subchronic nicotine treatment on cortical efflux of [3H]-D-aspartate and endogenous GABA in freely moving guinea-pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Beani, L.; Tanganelli, S.; Antonelli, T.; Ferraro, L.; Morari, M.; Spalluto, P.; Nordberg, A.; Bianchi, C.

    1991-01-01

    1. The [3H]-D-aspartate preloading of the parietal cortex of freely moving guinea-pigs equipped with epidural cups makes it possible to investigate drug effects on the efflux of this radiolabel, assumed as a marker of the glutamatergic structures underlying the cup. In the same model, the efflux of [3H]-gamma-aminobutyric acid ([3H]-GABA) and endogenous GABA can be measured. 2. Nicotine, 0.9-3.6 mg kg-1, s.c., or 3-5 micrograms, i.c.v., increased the efflux of [3H]-D-aspartate but reduced that of GABA. 3. These effects were mediated through mecamylamine-sensitive receptors but the ganglionic blocking agent was devoid of any primary activity. 4. The inhibition of GABA efflux induced by nicotine 3.6 mg kg-1, s.c., was abolished by methysergide 2 mg kg-1, i.p. and was reduced by naloxone 3 mg kg-1, i.p. pretreatment, suggesting the involvement of tryptaminergic and opioid systems. In contrast, muscarinic and catecholamine antagonists were ineffective. 5. Chronic treatment with nicotine (3.6 mg kg-1, twice daily for 16 days) reduced the facilitatory effect of [3H]-D-aspartate and abolished the inhibition of endogenous GABA efflux. 6. A slight increase in the number of nicotinic binding sites (by use of [3H]-nicotine as ligand) was found in the neocortex of chronically treated guinea-pigs. 7. The higher degree of tolerance to chronic nicotine treatment shown by GABA as compared with [3H]-D-aspartate efflux suggests that adaptative changes of the inhibitory neuronal pools prevail. This may contribute to the reinforcing and addictive properties of nicotine. PMID:1664759

  3. Intracellular studies of GABA and taurine action on the neurons of the cat sensorimotor cortex.

    PubMed

    Alexandrov, A A; Batuev, A S

    1979-01-01

    The action of taurine and GABA on the cat cerebral cortex neurons was studied. Electrophoretically administered taurine and GABA hyperpolarized the neuron membrane. GABA, in contrast to taurine, sharply increased the somatic membrane conductance. Taurine action was weaker than that of GABA and its effects were not always observed. However, in a number of instances it exerted inhibitory influence similar to GABA action. Some facts make it possible to suppose that taurine acts mainly on the neuron dendrites. The data obtained are in accordance with the supposition that taurine might be an inhibitory transmitter in the cerebral cortex. PMID:423315

  4. GABA Transporter-1 Deficiency Confers Schizophrenia-Like Behavioral Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhe; Fang, Qi; Xiao, Xian; Wang, Yi-Zhi; Cai, You-Qing; Cao, Hui; Hu, Gang; Chen, Zhong; Fei, Jian; Gong, Neng; Xu, Tian-Le

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of schizophrenia remains poorly understood. The hyper-dopamine and hypo-NMDA receptor hypotheses have been the most enduring ideas. Recently, emerging evidence implicates alterations of the major inhibitory system, GABAergic neurotransmission in the schizophrenic patients. However, the pathophysiological role of GABAergic system in schizophrenia still remains dubious. In this study, we took advantage of GABA transporter 1 (GAT1) knockout (KO) mouse, a unique animal model with elevated ambient GABA, to study the schizophrenia-related behavioral abnormalities. We found that GAT1 KO mice displayed multiple behavioral abnormalities related to schizophrenic positive, negative and cognitive symptoms. Moreover, GAT1 deficiency did not change the striatal dopamine levels, but significantly enhanced the tonic GABA currents in prefrontal cortex. The GABAA receptor antagonist picrotoxin could effectively ameliorate several behavioral defects of GAT1 KO mice. These results identified a novel function of GAT1, and indicated that the elevated ambient GABA contributed critically to the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Furthermore, several commonly used antipsychotic drugs were effective in treating the locomotor hyperactivity in GAT1 KO mice, suggesting the utility of GAT1 KO mice as an alternative animal model for studying schizophrenia pathogenesis and developing new antipsychotic drugs. PMID:23922840

  5. Active transport of. gamma. -aminobutyric acid and glycine into synaptic vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Kish, P.E.; Fischer-Bovenkerk, C.; Ueda, T. )

    1989-05-01

    Although {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glycine are recognized as major amino acid inhibitory neurotransmitters in the central nervous system, their storage is poorly understood. In this study the authors have characterized vesicular GABA and glycine uptakes in the cerebrum and spinal cord, respectively. They present evidence that GABA and glycine are each taken up into isolated synaptic vesicles in an ATP-dependent manner and that the uptake is driven by an electrochemical proton gradient. Uptake for both amino acids exhibited kinetics with low affinity similar to a vesicular glutamate uptake. The ATP-dependent GABA uptake was not inhibited by the putative amino acid neurotransmitters glycine, taurine, glutamate, or aspartate or by GABA analogs, agonists, and antagonists. Similarly, ATP-dependent glycine uptake was hardly affected by GABA, taurine, glutamate, or aspartate or by glycine analogs or antagonists. The GABA uptake was not affected by chloride, which is in contrast to the uptake of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate, whereas the glycine uptake was slightly stimulated by low concentrations of chloride. Tissue distribution studies indicate that the vesicular uptake systems for GABA, glycine, and glutamate are distributed in different proportions in the cerebrum and spinal cord. These results suggest that the vesicular uptake systems for GABA, glycine, and glutamate are distinct from each other.

  6. Metabolome analysis of milk fermented by ?-aminobutyric acid-producing Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Hagi, Tatsuro; Kobayashi, Miho; Nomura, Masaru

    2016-02-01

    ?-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is one of the most important functional components in fermented foods because of its physiological functions, such as neurotransmission and antihypertensive activities. However, little is known about components other than GABA in GABA-rich fermented foods. A metabolomic approach offers an opportunity to discover bioactive and flavor components in fermented food. To find specific components in milk fermented with GABA-producing Lactococcus lactis 01-7, we compared the components found in GABA-rich fermented milk with those found in control milk fermented without GABA production using capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry. A principal component analysis score plot showed a clear differentiation between the control milk fermented with L. lactis 01-1, which does not produce GABA, and GABA-rich milk fermented with a combination of L. lactis strains 01-1 and 01-7. As expected, the amount of GABA in GABA-rich fermented milk was much higher (1,216-fold) than that of the control milk. Interestingly, the amount of Orn was also much higher (27-fold) than that of the control milk. Peptide analysis showed that levels of 6 putative angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory peptides were also higher in the GABA-rich fermented milk. Furthermore, ACE-inhibitory activity of GABA-rich fermented milk tended to be higher than that of the control milk. These results indicate that the GABA-producing strain 01-7 provides fermented milk with other functional components in addition to GABA. PMID:26686724

  7. Optogenetic stimulation of GABA neurons can decrease local neuronal activity while increasing cortical blood flow.

    PubMed

    Anenberg, Eitan; Chan, Allen W; Xie, Yicheng; LeDue, Jeffrey M; Murphy, Timothy H

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the link between direct activation of inhibitory neurons, local neuronal activity, and hemodynamics. Direct optogenetic cortical stimulation in the sensorimotor cortex of transgenic mice expressing Channelrhodopsin-2 in GABAergic neurons (VGAT-ChR2) greatly attenuated spontaneous cortical spikes, but was sufficient to increase blood flow as measured with laser speckle contrast imaging. To determine whether the observed optogenetically evoked gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA)-neuron hemodynamic responses were dependent on ionotropic glutamatergic or GABAergic synaptic mechanisms, we paired optogenetic stimulation with application of antagonists to the cortex. Incubation of glutamatergic antagonists directly on the cortex (NBQX and MK-801) blocked cortical sensory evoked responses (as measured with electroencephalography and intrinsic optical signal imaging), but did not significantly attenuate optogenetically evoked hemodynamic responses. Significant light-evoked hemodynamic responses were still present after the addition of picrotoxin (GABA-A receptor antagonist) in the presence of the glutamatergic synaptic blockade. This activation of cortical inhibitory interneurons can mediate large changes in blood flow in a manner that is by and large not dependent on ionotropic glutamatergic or GABAergic synaptic transmission. This supports the hypothesis that activation of inhibitory neurons can increase local cerebral blood flow in a manner that is not entirely dependent on levels of net ongoing neuronal activity. PMID:26082013

  8. GABA and enkephalin tonically alter sympathetic outflows in the rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Belinda R; Goodchild, Ann K

    2015-12-01

    GABA and enkephalin provide significant innervation of sympathetic preganglionic neurons. Despite some investigation as to the identity of premotor sources of these innervations no comprehensive analyses have been conducted. Similarly, although data describing the cardiovascular effects of blockade of GABAA receptors in the spinal cord is available, the effects at other sympathetic outflows are unknown. In contrast the sympathetic effects of opioid blockade in the spinal cord are unclear. The aims of this study were to identify potential sympathetic premotor sources of GABAergic and enkephalinergic input to the spinal cord and to describe the sympathetic and cardiovascular effects of spinal GABAA receptor and delta/mu opioid receptor blockade in urethane anaesthetised rats. Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD67) and preproenkephalin (PPE) mRNA were found in all regions containing sympathetic premotor neurons, with the medullary raphe and RVMM providing the major GABAergic projections, while the PVN, RVMM and medullary raphe provided the major enkephalinergic projections. Intrathecal injection of bicuculline, a GABAA antagonist, elicited large and prolonged increases in all outflows measured, confirming previous work describing a tonic GABAergic influence on vasomotor tone, and revealing a tonic GABAergic inhibition of interscapular brown adipose tissue temperature. Intrathecal naloxone elicited transient small inhibitory effects only on MAP and HR. Thus GABA acting in the spinal cord plays an important role in the tonic suppression of sympathetic outflows while enkephalin appears to play only a minor role. PMID:26329875

  9. Co-activation of VTA DA and GABA neurons mediates nicotine reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Tolu, S; Eddine, R; Marti, F; David, V; Graupner, M; Pons, S; Baudonnat, M; Husson, M; Besson, M; Reperant, C; Zemdegs, J; Pags, C; Hay, Y A H; Lambolez, B; Caboche, J; Gutkin, B; Gardier, A M; Changeux, J-P; Faure, P; Maskos, U

    2013-03-01

    Smoking is the most important preventable cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. This nicotine addiction is mediated through the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), expressed on most neurons, and also many other organs in the body. Even within the ventral tegmental area (VTA), the key brain area responsible for the reinforcing properties of all drugs of abuse, nicotine acts on several different cell types and afferents. Identifying the precise action of nicotine on this microcircuit, in vivo, is important to understand reinforcement, and finally to develop efficient smoking cessation treatments. We used a novel lentiviral system to re-express exclusively high-affinity nAChRs on either dopaminergic (DAergic) or ?-aminobutyric acid-releasing (GABAergic) neurons, or both, in the VTA. Using in vivo electrophysiology, we show that, contrary to widely accepted models, the activation of GABA neurons in the VTA plays a crucial role in the control of nicotine-elicited DAergic activity. Our results demonstrate that both positive and negative motivational values are transmitted through the dopamine (DA) neuron, but that the concerted activity of DA and GABA systems is necessary for the reinforcing actions of nicotine through burst firing of DA neurons. This work identifies the GABAergic interneuron as a potential target for smoking cessation drug development. PMID:22751493

  10. Corelease of acetylcholine and GABA by an amacrine cell: Evidence for independent mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    O'Mally, D.M.

    1989-01-01

    The spatial resolution of the cholinergic cells was measured by illuminating the retina with moving gratings composed of light and dark bars. Retinas that were labelled with {sup 3}H-choline released acetylcholine in response to moving gratings composed of bars as small as 50 {mu}m; 300 to 800 {mu}m wide bars yielded maximal responses. Responses were obtained to gratings moving at speeds from 50 to 6000 {mu}m/sec. Three groups recently reported that the cholinergic cells also contain GABA. To confirm these findings, retinas were double-labeled with {sup 3}H-GABA and DAPI, and processed for autoradiography. The cells that accumulate DAPI were heavily labelled with silver grains due to uptake of {sup 3}H-GABA. Incubation of retinas in the presence of elevated concentrations of K{sup +} caused them to release both acetylcholine and GABA, and autoradiography showed depletion of radioactive GABA, and autoradiography showed depletion of radioactive GABA from the cholinergic amacrine cells. Retinas were double-labeled with {sup 14}C-GABA and {sup 3}H-acetylcholine, allowing simultaneous measurement of their release. The release of {sup 14}C-GABA was independent of extracellular Ca{sup ++}. Radioactive GABA synthesized endogenously from {sup 14}C-glutamate behave the same as radioactive GABA accumulated from the medium. In the same experiments, the simultaneously measured release of {sup 3}H-acetylcholine was strongly Ca{sup ++}-dependent, indicating that acetylcholine and GABA are released by different mechanisms.

  11. Prefrontal Cortical GABA Modulation of Spatial Reference and Working Memory

    PubMed Central

    Auger, Meagan L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dysfunction in prefrontal cortex (PFC) GABA transmission has been proposed to contribute to cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia, yet how this system regulates different cognitive and mnemonic functions remains unclear. Methods: We assessed the effects of pharmacological reduction of GABAA signaling in the medial PFC of rats on spatial reference/working memory using different versions of the radial-arm maze task. We used a massed-trials procedure to probe how PFC GABA regulates susceptibility to proactive interference. Male rats were well-trained to retrieve food from the same 4 arms of an 8-arm maze, receiving 5 trials/day (1–2min intervals). Results: Infusions of the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline (12.5–50ng) markedly increased working and reference memory errors and response latencies. Similar treatments also impaired short-term memory on an 8-baited arm task. These effects did not appear to be due to increased susceptibility to proactive interference. In contrast, PFC inactivation via infusion of GABA agonists baclofen/muscimol did not affect reference/working memory. In comparison to the pronounced effects on the 8-arm maze tasks, PFC GABAA antagonism only causes a slight and transient decrease in accuracy on a 2-arm spatial discrimination. Conclusions: These findings demonstrate that prefrontal GABA hypofunction severely disrupts spatial reference and short-term memory and that disinhibition of the PFC can, in some instances, perturb memory processes not normally dependent on the frontal lobes. Moreover, these impairments closely resemble those observed in schizophrenic patients, suggesting that perturbation in PFC GABA signaling may contribute to these types of cognitive deficits associated with the disorder. PMID:25552433

  12. Astrocytic GABA transporter GAT-1 dysfunction in experimental absence seizures

    PubMed Central

    Pirttimaki, Tiina; Parri, H Rheinallt; Crunelli, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    An enhanced tonic GABAA inhibition in the thalamus plays a crucial role in experimental absence seizures and has been attributed, on the basis of indirect evidence, to a dysfunction of the astrocytic GABA transporter-1 (GAT-1). Here, the GABA transporter current was directly investigated in thalamic astrocytes from a well-established genetic model of absence seizures, the genetic absence epilepsy rats from Strasbourg (GAERS), and its non-epileptic control (NEC) strain. We also characterized the novel form of GABAergic and glutamatergic astrocyte-to-neuron signalling by recording slow outward currents (SOCs) and slow inward currents (SICs), respectively, in thalamocortical (TC) neurons of both strains. In patch-clamped astrocytes, the GABA transporter current was abolished by combined application of the selective GAT-1 and GAT-3 blocker, NO711 (30 ?m) and SNAP5114 (60 ?m), respectively, to GAERS and NEC thalamic slices. NO711 alone significantly reduced (41%) the transporter current in NEC, but had no effect in GAERS. SNAP5114 alone reduced by half the GABA transporter current in NEC, whilst it abolished it in GAERS. SIC properties did not differ between GAERS and NEC TC neurons, whilst moderate changes in SOC amplitude and kinetics were observed. These data provide the first direct demonstration of a malfunction of the astrocytic thalamic GAT-1 transporter in absence epilepsy and support an abnormal astrocytic modulation of thalamic ambient GABA levels. Moreover, while the glutamatergic astrocyteneuron signalling is unaltered in the GAERS thalamus, the changes in some properties of the GABAergic astrocyteneuron signalling in this epileptic strain may contribute to the generation of absence seizures. PMID:23090943

  13. Caenorhabditis elegans Neuromuscular Junction: GABA Receptors and Ivermectin Action

    PubMed Central

    Hernando, Guillermina; Bouzat, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of human and animal helminth infections remains staggeringly high, thus urging the need for concerted efforts towards this area of research. GABA receptors, encoded by the unc-49 gene, mediate body muscle inhibition in Caenorhabditis elegans and parasitic nematodes and are targets of anthelmintic drugs. Thus, the characterization of nematode GABA receptors provides a foundation for rational anti-parasitic drug design. We therefore explored UNC-49 channels from C. elegans muscle cultured cells of the first larval stage at the electrophysiological and behavioral levels. Whole-cell recordings reveal that GABA, muscimol and the anthelmintic piperazine elicit macroscopic currents from UNC-49 receptors that decay in their sustained presence, indicating full desensitization. Single-channel recordings show that all drugs elicit openings of ?2.5 pA (+100 mV), which appear either as brief isolated events or in short bursts. The comparison of the lowest concentration required for detectable channel opening, the frequency of openings and the amplitude of macroscopic currents suggest that piperazine is the least efficacious of the three drugs. Macroscopic and single-channel GABA-activated currents are profoundly and apparently irreversibly inhibited by ivermectin. To gain further insight into ivermectin action at C. elegans muscle, we analyzed its effect on single-channel activity of the levamisol-sensitive nicotinic receptor (L-AChR), the excitatory receptor involved in neuromuscular transmission. Ivermectin produces a profound inhibition of the frequency of channel opening without significant changes in channel properties. By revealing that ivermectin inhibits C. elegans muscle GABA and L-AChR receptors, our study adds two receptors to the already known ivermectin targets, thus contributing to the elucidation of its pleiotropic effects. Behavioral assays in worms show that ivermectin potentiates piperazine-induced paralysis, thus suggesting that their combination is a good strategy to overcome the increasing resistance of parasites, an issue of global concern for human and animal health. PMID:24743647

  14. GABA from reactive astrocytes impairs memory in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Jo, Seonmi; Yarishkin, Oleg; Hwang, Yu Jin; Chun, Ye Eun; Park, Mijeong; Woo, Dong Ho; Bae, Jin Young; Kim, Taekeun; Lee, Jaekwang; Chun, Heejung; Park, Hyun Jung; Lee, Da Yong; Hong, Jinpyo; Kim, Hye Yun; Oh, Soo-Jin; Park, Seung Ju; Lee, Hyo; Yoon, Bo-Eun; Kim, YoungSoo; Jeong, Yong; Shim, Insop; Bae, Yong Chul; Cho, Jeiwon; Kowall, Neil W; Ryu, Hoon; Hwang, Eunmi; Kim, Daesoo; Lee, C Justin

    2014-08-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), memory impairment is the most prominent feature that afflicts patients and their families. Although reactive astrocytes have been observed around amyloid plaques since the disease was first described, their role in memory impairment has been poorly understood. Here, we show that reactive astrocytes aberrantly and abundantly produce the inhibitory gliotransmitter GABA by monoamine oxidase-B (Maob) and abnormally release GABA through the bestrophin 1 channel. In the dentate gyrus of mouse models of AD, the released GABA reduces spike probability of granule cells by acting on presynaptic GABA receptors. Suppressing GABA production or release from reactive astrocytes fully restores the impaired spike probability, synaptic plasticity, and learning and memory in the mice. In the postmortem brain of individuals with AD, astrocytic GABA and MAOB are significantly upregulated. We propose that selective inhibition of astrocytic GABA synthesis or release may serve as an effective therapeutic strategy for treating memory impairment in AD. PMID:24973918

  15. Different transporter systems regulate extracellular GABA from vesicular and non-vesicular sources

    PubMed Central

    Song, Inseon; Volynski, Kirill; Brenner, Tanja; Ushkaryov, Yuri; Walker, Matthew; Semyanov, Alexey

    2013-01-01

    Tonic GABA type A (GABAA) conductance is a key factor regulating neuronal excitability and computation in neuronal networks. The magnitude of the tonic GABAA conductance depends on the concentration of ambient GABA originating from vesicular and non-vesicular sources and is tightly regulated by GABA uptake. Here we show that the transport system regulating ambient GABA responsible for tonic GABAA conductances in hippocampal CA1 interneurons depends on its source. In mice, GABA from vesicular sources is regulated by mouse GABA transporter 1 (mGAT1), while that from non-vesicular sources by mouse GABA transporters 3/4 (mGAT3/4). This finding suggests that the two transporter systems do not just provide backup for each other, but regulate distinct signaling pathways. This allows individual tuning of the two signaling systems and indicates that drugs designed to act at specific transporters will have distinct therapeutic actions. PMID:23494150

  16. Induction of Arabidopsis tryptophan pathway enzymes and camalexin by amino acid starvation, oxidative stress, and an abiotic elicitor.

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, J; Williams, C C; Last, R L

    1998-01-01

    The tryptophan (Trp) biosynthetic pathway leads to the production of many secondary metabolites with diverse functions, and its regulation is predicted to respond to the needs for both protein synthesis and secondary metabolism. We have tested the response of the Trp pathway enzymes and three other amino acid biosynthetic enzymes to starvation for aromatic amino acids, branched-chain amino acids, or methionine. The Trp pathway enzymes and cytosolic glutamine synthetase were induced under all of the amino acid starvation test conditions, whereas methionine synthase and acetolactate synthase were not. The mRNAs for two stress-inducible enzymes unrelated to amino acid biosynthesis and accumulation of the indolic phytoalexin camalexin were also induced by amino acid starvation. These results suggest that regulation of the Trp pathway enzymes under amino acid deprivation conditions is largely a stress response to allow for increased biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. Consistent with this hypothesis, treatments with the oxidative stress-inducing herbicide acifluorfen and the abiotic elicitor alpha-amino butyric acid induced responses similar to those induced by the amino acid starvation treatments. The role of salicylic acid in herbicide-mediated Trp and camalexin induction was investigated. PMID:9501110

  17. Influence of light on the free amino acid content and ?-aminobutyric acid synthesis in Brassica juncea seedlings.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaohua; Kim, Yeon Bok; Uddin, Md Romij; Lee, Sanghyun; Kim, Sun-Ju; Park, Sang Un

    2013-09-11

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD; EC 4.1.1.15) is an important enzyme in ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) biosynthesis. Here we report the influence of light on amino acid accumulation and investigate the molecular mechanism by which light influences GABA biosynthesis at the seedling stage of two mustard (Brassica juncea) cultivars (green-leaf and purple-leaf). Gene expression profiles of four GAD-encoding genes (GAD1, GAD2, GAD4a, and GAD4b) and their impact on GABA biosynthesis were analyzed. Light exerted an obvious influence on amino acid accumulation in mustard seedlings. GAD gene expression was also significantly regulated by light/dark or dark treatment, which differentially regulated GABA biosynthesis in B. juncea seedlings. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) revealed that the seeds of purple cultivars contain a higher amount of free amino acids and GABA than do the seeds of green cultivars. After seed germination, however, the accumulation of free amino acids peaked in dark-treated seedlings on day 9 in both cultivars, whereas GABA synthesis peaked at 9 days under light conditions. This study may provide a foundation for understanding the effect of light on amino acids, particularly GABA biosynthesis in Brassica plants. PMID:23909820

  18. Spectral editing of weakly coupled spins using variable flip angles in PRESS constant echo time difference spectroscopy: Application to GABA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Jeff; Hanstock, Chris C.; Wilman, Alan H.

    2009-10-01

    A general in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy editing technique is presented to detect weakly coupled spin systems through subtraction, while preserving singlets through addition, and is applied to the specific brain metabolite ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) at 4.7 T. The new method uses double spin echo localization (PRESS) and is based on a constant echo time difference spectroscopy approach employing subtraction of two asymmetric echo timings, which is normally only applicable to strongly coupled spin systems. By utilizing flip angle reduction of one of the two refocusing pulses in the PRESS sequence, we demonstrate that this difference method may be extended to weakly coupled systems, thereby providing a very simple yet effective editing process. The difference method is first illustrated analytically using a simple two spin weakly coupled spin system. The technique was then demonstrated for the 3.01 ppm resonance of GABA, which is obscured by the strong singlet peak of creatine in vivo. Full numerical simulations, as well as phantom and in vivo experiments were performed. The difference method used two asymmetric PRESS timings with a constant total echo time of 131 ms and a reduced 120 final pulse, providing 25% GABA yield upon subtraction compared to two short echo standard PRESS experiments. Phantom and in vivo results from human brain demonstrate efficacy of this method in agreement with numerical simulations.

  19. Effects of simulated microgravity on the expression of presynaptic proteins distorting the GABA/glutamate equilibrium - A proteomics approach.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; Iqbal, Javed; Liu, Yahui; Su, Rui; Lu, Song; Peng, Guang; Zhang, Yongqian; Qing, Hong; Deng, Yulin

    2015-11-01

    Microgravity may cause cognition-related changes in the animal nervous system due to the resulting uneven flow of fluids in the body. These changes may restrict the long-term stay of humans in space for various purposes. In this study, a rat tail suspension model (30(o) ) was used to explore the effects of 21 days of prolonged simulated microgravity (SM) on the expression of proteins involved in cognitive functions in the rat hippocampus. SM decreased the content of ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and increased the content of glutamate (Glu) in the rat hippocampus. A comparative (18) O-labeled quantitative proteomics strategy was applied to detect the differential expression of synaptic proteins under SM. Fifty-three proteins were found to be differentially expressed under SM. Microgravity induces difficulty in the formation of the SNARE complex due to the down-regulation of vesicle-associated membrane protein 3(VAMP3) and syntaxin-1A. Synaptic vesicle recycling may also be affected due to the dysregulation of syntaxin-binding protein 5 (tomosyn), rab3A and its effector rim2. Both processes are disturbed, indicating that presynaptic proteins mediate a GABA/Glu imbalance under SM. These findings provide clues for understanding the mechanism of the GABA/Glu equilibrium in the hippocampus induced by microgravity in space and represent steps toward safe space travel. PMID:26359799

  20. Anticonvulsant effects of the wasp Polybia ignobilis venom on chemically induced seizures and action on GABA and glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Alexandra Olimpio Siqueira; Mortari, Mrcia Renata; Oliveira, Luciana; Carolino, Ruither Oliveira Gomes; Coutinho-Netto, Joaquim; dos Santos, Wagner Ferreira

    2005-05-01

    Venoms of spiders and wasps are well recognized to present high affinity to the central nervous tissue of many mammalian species. Here we describe the effects of direct exposure of rat (Rattus norvegicus) brains to the crude and denatured venom of the Brazilian social wasp Polybia ignobilis. Lower doses of crude venom injected via intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) inhibited the exploratory activity of animals, while higher doses provoked severe generalized tonic-clonic seizures, with hind limb extension. The status epilepticus lasted for few minutes leading the animals to respiratory depression and death. In contrast, the denatured venom was anticonvulsant against acute seizures induced by the i.c.v. injection of bicuculline, picrotoxin and kainic acid, but it was ineffective against seizures caused by systemic pentylenetetrazole. Moreover, the [3H]-glutamate binding in membranes from rat brain cortex was inhibited by the denatured venom in lower concentrations than the [3H]-GABA binding. The denatured venom contains free GABA and glutamate (34 and 802 pg/microg of venom, respectively), but they are not the major binding inhibitors. These interactions of venom components with GABA and glutamate receptors could be responsible for the anticonvulsant effects introducing the venom from P. ignobilis as a potential pharmacological source of anticonvulsant drugs. PMID:15953769

  1. Calcium-independent release of GABA from isolated horizontal cells of the toad retina.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, E A

    1982-01-01

    1. When toad retinae were incubated first with veratrine, then with antibodies that reacted with the outer segments of photoreceptors, and finally with complement, horizontal cells survived and most other neurones died. This preparation of 'isolated' horizontal cells accumulated radioactive GABA from the incubation medium. The subsequent release of radioactive GABA could then be measured. 2. The efflux of GABA was increased by exposure to an elevated potassium concentration or added glutamate. Both procedures are known to depolarize horizontal cells. 3. GABA in the external medium also increased the efflux of GABA. 4. The increase in GABA efflux produced by an elevated potassium concentration was unaffected with calcium in the external medium was replaced with cobalt and when sodium was replaced with choline or lithium. 5. The increase in GABA efflux produced by glutamate was unaffected when calcium was replaced with cobalt and when sodium was replaced with lithium, but was inhibited when sodium was replaced with choline. 6. The increase in GABA efflux produced by external GABA was unaffected when calcium was replaced with cobalt but required sodium. Neither choline nor lithium would substitute for sodium. 7. An increase in GABA efflux was accompanied by an increase in sodium efflux. 8. After a high concentration of GABA (2-20 mM) had produced a maximal increase in GABA efflux, the addition of glutamate produced no further effect. Conversely, after a high concentration of glutamate (2-20 mM) had produced a maximal increase in efflux, the addition of external GABA produced only a small further increase. These and the preceding results could occur if GABA release were mediated by a carrier system which could be activated by either depolarization or homoexchange. Images Plate 1 PMID:6808119

  2. Inhibition of recombinant N-type and native high voltage-gated neuronal Ca{sup 2+} channels by AdGABA: Mechanism of action studies

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Hernandez, Elizabeth; Sandoval, Alejandro; Gonzalez-Ramirez, Ricardo; Zoidis, Grigoris; Felix, Ricardo

    2011-02-01

    High-voltage activated Ca{sup 2+} (Ca{sub V}) channels play a key role in the regulation of numerous physiological events by causing transient changes in the intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration. These channels consist of a pore-forming Ca{sub V}{alpha}{sub 1} protein and three auxiliary subunits (Ca{sub V}{beta}, Ca{sub V}{alpha}{sub 2}{delta} and Ca{sub V}{gamma}). Ca{sub V}{alpha}{sub 2}{delta} is an important component of Ca{sub V} channels in many tissues and of great interest as a drug target. It is well known that anticonvulsant agent gabapentin (GBP) binds to Ca{sub V}{alpha}{sub 2}{delta} and reduces Ca{sup 2+} currents by modulating the expression and/or function of the Ca{sub V}{alpha}{sub 1} subunit. Recently, we showed that an adamantane derivative of GABA, AdGABA, has also inhibitory effects on Ca{sub V} channels. However, the importance of the interaction of AdGABA with the Ca{sub V}{alpha}{sub 2}{delta} subunit has not been conclusively demonstrated and the mechanism of action of the drug has yet to be elucidated. Here, we describe studies on the mechanism of action of AdGABA. Using a combined approach of patch-clamp recordings and molecular biology we show that AdGABA inhibits Ca{sup 2+} currents acting on Ca{sub V}{alpha}{sub 2}{delta} only when applied chronically, both in a heterologous expression system and in dorsal root-ganglion neurons. AdGABA seems to require uptake and be acting intracellularly given that its effects are prevented by an inhibitor of the L-amino acid transport system. Interestingly, a mutation in the Ca{sub V}{alpha}{sub 2}{delta} that abolishes GBP binding did not affect AdGABA actions, revealing that its mechanism of action is similar but not identical to that of GBP. These results indicate that AdGABA is an important Ca{sub V}{alpha}{sub 2}{delta} ligand that regulates Ca{sub V} channels.

  3. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy reveals oral Lactobacillus promotion of increases in brain GABA, N-acetyl aspartate and glutamate.

    PubMed

    Janik, Rafal; Thomason, Lynsie A M; Stanisz, Andrew M; Forsythe, Paul; Bienenstock, John; Stanisz, Greg J

    2016-01-15

    The gut microbiome has been shown to regulate the development and functions of the enteric and central nervous systems. Its involvement in the regulation of behavior has attracted particular attention because of its potential translational importance in clinical disorders, however little is known about the pathways involved. We previously have demonstrated that administration of Lactobacillus rhamnosus (JB-1) to healthy male BALB/c mice, promotes consistent changes in GABA-A and -B receptor sub-types in specific brain regions, accompanied by reductions in anxiety and depression-related behaviors. In the present study, using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), we quantitatively assessed two clinically validated biomarkers of brain activity and function, glutamate+glutamine (Glx) and total N-acetyl aspartate+N-acetyl aspartyl glutamic acid (tNAA), as well as GABA, the chief brain inhibitory neurotransmitter. Mice received 1×10(9) cfu of JB-1 per day for 4weeks and were subjected to MRS weekly and again 4weeks after cessation of treatment to ascertain temporal changes in these neurometabolites. Baseline concentrations for Glx, tNAA and GABA were equal to 10.4±0.3mM, 8.7±0.1mM, and 1.2±0.1mM, respectively. Delayed increases were first seen for Glx (~10%) and NAA (~37%) at 2weeks which persisted only to the end of treatment. However, Glx was still elevated 4weeks after treatment had ceased. Significantly elevated GABA (~25%) was only seen at 4weeks. These results suggest specific metabolic pathways in our pursuit of mechanisms of action of psychoactive bacteria. They also offer through application of standard clinical neurodiagnostic techniques, translational opportunities to assess biomarkers accompanying behavioral changes induced by alterations in the gut microbiome. PMID:26577887

  4. The effects of quinolones and NSAIDs upon GABA-evoked currents recorded from rat dorsal root ganglion neurones.

    PubMed

    Halliwell, R F; Davey, P G; Lambert, J J

    1991-02-01

    Recent animal studies have demonstrated a proconvulsant effect of certain quinolone and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug combinations. Radioligand binding experiments have indicated that these actions may be mediated by antagonism of the GABAA receptor. The present study has further investigated this hypothesis in a functional assay by examining the effects of the quinolones ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin alone and in combination with either fenbufen or biphenyl acetic acid (BPAA) upon GABA-evoked currents recorded from voltage-clamped rat dorsal root ganglion neurones (DRG) maintained in cell culture. GABA-evoked whole cell currents were weakly but dose-dependently (30 microM-1 mM) reduced in the presence of ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin. The IC50 for ciprofloxacin was 100 microM but greater than 1 mM for ofloxacin. Application of either fenbufen (100 microM) or BPAA (100 microM) alone produced little effect on the GABA-evoked currents. However, the inhibitory action of ciprofloxacin was enhanced in the presence of 100 microM fenbufen by approximately five-fold whereas the antagonism of GABA responses by ofloxacin was unaffected. In contrast, BPAA (100 microM) had a dramatic effect on the inhibitory actions of both antibiotics such that the IC50 for ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin was reduced to 0.03 and 0.3 microM respectively. The present results support earlier binding studies and extend them by demonstrating electrophysiologically a potent quinolone/NSAID drug interaction at the GABAA receptor. The mechanism(s) of this novel interaction remains to be determined. These results are commensurate with clinical observations of an increased risk of fits in patients prescribed certain quinolones together with certain NSAIDs. PMID:1647389

  5. Ketamine reverses stress-induced depression-like behavior and increased GABA levels in the anterior cingulate: an 11.7 T 1H-MRS study in rats.

    PubMed

    Perrine, Shane A; Ghoddoussi, Farhad; Michaels, Mark S; Sheikh, Imran S; McKelvey, George; Galloway, Matthew P

    2014-06-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the major inhibitory amino acid neurotransmitter in the brain and is primarily responsible for modulating excitatory tone. Clinical neuroimaging studies show decreased GABA levels in the anterior cingulate of patients with mood disorders, including major depressive disorder. Chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) is an animal model thought to mimic the stressful events that may precipitate clinical depression in humans. In this study male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to a modified CUS paradigm that used a random pattern of unpredictable stressors twice daily for 10 days to explore the early developmental stages of depression-like endophenotypes. Control rats were handled daily for 10 days. Some rats from each treatment group received an injection of ketamine (40 mg/kg) after the final stressor. One day following the final stressor rats were tested for behavioral effects in the forced swim test and then euthanized to collect trunk blood and anterior cingulate brain samples. GABA levels were measured in anterior cingulate samples ex vivo using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) at 11.7 T. Animals subjected to CUS had lower body weights, higher levels of blood corticosterone, and increased immobility in the forced swim test; all of which suggest that the stress paradigm induced a depression-like phenotype. GABA levels in the anterior cingulate were significantly increased in the stressed animals compared to controls. Administration of ketamine on the last day of treatment blunted the depression-like behavior and increased GABA levels in the anterior cingulate following CUS. These data indicate that stress disrupts GABAergic signaling, which may over time lead to symptoms of depression and ultimately lower basal levels of cortical (1)H-MRS GABA that are seen in humans with depression. Furthermore, the data suggests that ketamine modulates cortical GABA levels as a mechanism of its antidepressant activity. PMID:24246571

  6. Processing cardiovascular information in the vlPAG during electroacupuncture in rats: roles of endocannabinoids and GABA

    PubMed Central

    Tjen-A-Looi, Stephanie C.; Li, Peng; Longhurst, John C.

    2009-01-01

    A long-loop pathway, involving the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC), ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG), and the rostral ventrolateral medulla (rVLM), is essential in electroacupuncture (EA) attenuation of sympathoexcitatory cardiovascular reflex responses. The ARC provides excitatory input to the vlPAG, which, in turn, inhibits neuronal activity in the rVLM. Although previous studies have shown that endocannabinoid CB1 receptor activation modulates ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission in the dorsolateral PAG in stress-induced analgesia, an important role for endocannabinoids in the vlPAG has not yet been observed. We recently have shown (Fu LW, Longhurst JC. J Appl Physiol; doi:10.1152/japplphysiol.91648.2008) that EA reduces the local vlPAG concentration of GABA, but not glutamate, as measured with high-performance liquid chromatography from extracellular samples collected by microdialysis. We, therefore, hypothesized that, during EA, endocannabinoids, acting through CB1 receptors, presynaptically inhibit GABA release to disinhibit the vlPAG and ultimately modulate excitatory reflex blood pressure responses. Rats were anesthetized, ventilated, and instrumented to measure heart rate and blood pressure. Gastric distention-induced blood pressure responses of 18 5 mmHg were reduced to 6 1 mmHg by 30 min of low-current, low-frequency EA applied bilaterally at pericardial P 56 acupoints overlying the median nerves. Like EA, microinjection of the fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor URB597 (0.1 nmol, 50 nl) into the vlPAG to increase endocannabinoids locally reduced the gastric distention cardiovascular reflex response from 21 5 to 3 4 mmHg. This inhibition was reversed by pretreatment with the GABAA antagonist gabazine (27 mM, 50 nl), suggesting that endocannabinoids exert their action through a GABAergic receptor mechanism in the vlPAG. The EA-related inhibition from 18 3 to 8 2 mmHg was reversed to 14 2 mmHg by microinjection of the CB1 receptor antagonist AM251 (2 nmol, 50 nl) into the vlPAG. Pretreatment with gabazine eliminated reversal following CB1-receptor blockade. Thus EA releases endocannabinoids and activates presynaptic CB1 receptors to inhibit GABA release in the vlPAG. Reduction of GABA release disinhibits vlPAG cells, which, in turn, modulate the activity of rVLM neurons to attenuate the sympathoexcitatory reflex responses. PMID:19325030

  7. ANXIETY IN MAJOR DEPRESSION AND CEREBROSPINAL FLUID FREE GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID

    PubMed Central

    Mann, J. John; Oquendo, Maria A.; Watson, Kalycia Trishana; Boldrini, Maura; Malone, Kevin M.; Ellis, Steven P.; Sullivan, Gregory; Cooper, Thomas B.; Xie, Shan; Currier, Dianne

    2016-01-01

    Background Low gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is implicated in both anxiety and depression pathophysiology. They are often comorbid, but most clinical studies have not examined these relationships separately. We investigated the relationship of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) free GABA to the anxiety and depression components of a major depressive episode (MDE) and to monoamine systems. Methods and Materials Patients with a DSM-IV major depressive episode (N = 167: 130 major depressive disorder; 37 bipolar disorder) and healthy volunteers (N = 38) had CSF free GABA measured by gas chromatography mass spectroscopy. Monoamine metabolites were assayed by high performance liquid chromatography. Symptomatology was assessed by Hamilton depression rating scale. Results Psychic anxiety severity increased with age and correlated with lower CSF free GABA, controlling for age. CSF free GABA declined with age but was not related to depression severity. Other monoamine metabolites correlated positively with CSF GABA but not with psychic anxiety or depression severity. CSF free GABA was lower in MDD compared with bipolar disorder and healthy volunteers. GABA levels did not differ based on a suicide attempt history in mood disorders. Recent exposure to benzodiazepines, but not alcohol or past alcoholism, was associated with a statistical trend for more severe anxiety and lower CSF GABA. Conclusions Lower CSF GABA may explain increasing severity of psychic anxiety in major depression with increasing age. This relationship is not seen with monoamine metabolites, suggesting treatments targeting the GABAergic system should be evaluated in treatment-resistant anxious major depression and in older patients. PMID:24865448

  8. Canadian boreal pulp and paper feedstocks contain neuroactive substances that interact in vitro with GABA and dopaminergic systems in the brain.

    PubMed

    Waye, Andrew; Annal, Malar; Tang, Andrew; Picard, Gabriel; Harnois, Frdric; Guerrero-Analco, Jos A; Saleem, Ammar; Hewitt, L Mark; Milestone, Craig B; MacLatchy, Deborah L; Trudeau, Vance L; Arnason, John T

    2014-01-15

    Pulp and paper wood feedstocks have been previously implicated as a source of chemicals with the ability to interact with or disrupt key neuroendocrine endpoints important in the control of reproduction. We tested nine Canadian conifers commonly used in pulp and paper production as well as 16 phytochemicals that have been observed in various pulp and paper mill effluent streams for their ability to interact in vitro with the enzymes monoamine oxidase (MAO), glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), and GABA-transaminase (GABA-T), and bind to the benzodiazepine-binding site of the GABA(A) receptor (GABA(A)-BZD). These neuroendocrine endpoints are also important targets for treatment of neurological disorders such as anxiety, epilepsy, or depression. MAO and GAD were inhibited by various conifer extracts of different polarities, including major feedstocks such as balsam fir, black spruce, and white spruce. MAO was selectively stimulated or inhibited by many of the tested phytochemicals, with inhibition observed by a group of phenylpropenes (e.g. isoeugenol and vanillin). Selective GAD inhibition was also observed, with all of the resin acids tested being inhibitory. GABA(A)-BZD ligand displacement was also observed. We compiled a table identifying which of these phytochemicals have been described in each of the species tested here. Given the diversity of conifer species and plant chemicals with these specific neuroactivities, it is reasonable to propose that MAO and GAD inhibition reported in effluents is phytochemical in origin. We propose disruption of these neuroendocrine endpoints as a possible mechanism of reproductive inhibition, and also identify an avenue for potential research and sourcing of conifer-derived neuroactive natural products. PMID:24041600

  9. Rapid determination of 4-aminobutyric acid and L-glutamic acid in biological decarboxylation process by capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Sahori; Yamano, Naoko; Kawasaki, Norioki; Ando, Hisanori; Nakayama, Atsuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    4-Aminobutylic acid (GABA) is a monomer of plastic polyamide 4. Bio-based polyamide 4 can be produced by using GABA obtained from biomass. The production of L-glutamic acid (Glu) from biomass has been established. GABA is produced by decarboxylation of Glu in biological process. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with derivatization is generally used to determine the concentration of GABA and Glu in reacted solution samples for the efficient production of GABA. In this study, we have investigated the rapid determination of GABA and Glu by capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (CE-MS) without derivatization. The determination was achieved with the use of a shortened capillary, a new internal standard for GABA, and optimization of sheath liquid composition. Determined concentrations of GABA and Glu by CE-MS were compared with those by pre-column derivatization HPLC with phenylisothiocyanate. The determined values by CE-MS were close to those by HPLC with pre-column derivatization. These results suggest that the determination of GABA and Glu in reacted solution is rapid and simplified by the use of CE-MS. PMID:25940446

  10. Localization of glycine, GABA and neuropeptide containing neurons in tiger salamander retina

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, C.Y.

    1988-01-01

    Putative glycinergic and GABAergic neurons in the salamander retina were localized by a parallel analysis of high affinity {sup 3}H-glycine uptake and glycine-like immunoreactivity (Gly-IR) and a comparative analysis of high affinity {sup 3}H-GABA uptake, GABA, like immunoreactivity (GABA-IR), and glutamate decarboxylase immunoreactivity (GAD-IR) at the light microscopic level. Good correspondence of labeling of {sup 3}H-glycine uptake and Gly-IR as well as that of {sup 3}H-GABA uptake and GABA-IR were observed. In addition, GAD immunoreactive neurons contained GABA-IR as well. Extensive colocalization of {sup 3}H-glycine uptake and Gly-IR and that of {sup 3}H-GABA uptake, GABA-IR and perhaps GAD-IR were indicated by the similarities in the distribution, morphology and labeling frequency of neurons and lamination in the inner plexiform layer (IPL). However, the Gly-IR and the GABA-IR probes appeared to be more sensitive and can thus be a reliable marker for glycine and GABA containing neurons respectively.

  11. Ethanol enhances GABA-induced 36Cl-influx in primary spinal cord cultured neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Ticku, M.K.; Lowrimore, P.; Lehoullier, P.

    1986-07-01

    Ethanol has a pharmacological profile similar to other centrally acting drugs, which facilitate GABAergic transmission. GABA is known to produce its effects by increasing the conductance to Cl- ions. In this study, we have examined the effect of ethanol on GABA-induced 36Cl-influx in primary spinal cord cultured neurons. GABA produces a concentration-dependent, and saturable effect on 36Cl-influx in these neurons. Ethanol potentiates the effect of GABA on 36Cl-influx in these neurons. GABA (20 microM) increased the 36Cl-influx by 75% over the basal value, and in the presence of 50 mM ethanol, the observed increase was 142%. Eadie-Hoffstee analysis of the saturation curves indicated that ethanol decreases the Km value of GABA (10.6 microM to 4.2 microM), and also increases the Vmax. Besides potentiating the effect of GABA, ethanol also appears to have a direct effect in the absence of added GABA. These results suggest that ethanol enhances GABA-induced 36Cl-influx and indicate a role of GABAergic system in the actions of ethanol. These results also support the behavioral and electrophysiological studies, which have implicated GABA systems in the actions of ethanol. The potential mechanism(s) and the role of direct effect of ethanol is not clear at this time, but is currently being investigated.

  12. Endogenous GABA levels in the pontine reticular formation are greater during wakefulness than during REM sleep

    PubMed Central

    Vanini, Giancarlo; Wathen, Bradley L.; Lydic, Ralph; Baghdoyan, Helen A.

    2011-01-01

    Studies using drugs that increase or decrease GABAergic transmission suggest that GABA in the pontine reticular formation (PRF) promotes wakefulness and inhibits rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Cholinergic transmission in the PRF promotes REM sleep, and levels of endogenous acetylcholine (ACh) in the PRF are significantly greater during REM sleep than during wakefulness or non-REM (NREM) sleep. No previous studies have determined whether levels of endogenous GABA in the PRF vary as a function of sleep and wakefulness. This study tested the hypothesis that GABA levels in cat PRF are greatest during wakefulness and lowest during REM sleep. Extracellular GABA levels were measured during wakefulness, NREM sleep, REM sleep, and the REM sleep-like state (REMNeo) caused by microinjecting neostigmine into the PRF. GABA levels varied significantly as a function of sleep and wakefulness, and decreased significantly below waking levels during REM sleep (?42%) and REMNeo (?63%). The decrease in GABA levels during NREM sleep (22% below waking levels) was not statistically significant. Compared to NREM sleep, GABA levels decreased significantly during REM sleep (?27%) and REMNeo (?52%). Comparisons of REM sleep and REMNeo revealed no differences in GABA levels or cortical EEG power. GABA levels did not vary significantly as a function of dialysis site within the PRF. The inverse relationship between changes in PRF levels of GABA and ACh during REM sleep indicates that low GABAergic tone combined with high cholinergic tone in the PRF contributes to the generation of REM sleep. PMID:21325533

  13. The Relationship between Fearfulness, GABA+, and Fear-Related BOLD Responses in the Insula

    PubMed Central

    Lipp, Ilona; Evans, C. John; Lewis, Caroline; Murphy, Kevin; Wise, Richard G.; Caseras, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    The inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA plays a crucial role in anxiety and fear, but its relationship to brain activation during fear reactions is not clear. Previous studies suggest that GABA agonists lead to an attenuation of emotion-processing related BOLD signals in the insula. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between GABA concentration and fear-related BOLD responses in this region. In 44 female participants with different levels of fearfulness, GABA concentration in the left insula was measured using a GABA+ MRS acquisition during rest; additionally, BOLD signals were obtained during performance of a fear provocation paradigm. Fearfulness was not associated with GABA+ in the left insula, but could predict fear-related BOLD responses in a cluster in the left anterior insula. The BOLD signal change in this cluster did not correlate with GABA+ concentration. However, we found a significant positive correlation between GABA+ concentration and fear-related BOLD responses in a different cluster that included parts of the left insula, amygdala and putamen. Our findings indicate that low insular GABA concentration is not a predisposition for fearfulness, and that several factors influence whether a correlation between GABA and BOLD can be found. PMID:25811453

  14. The relationship between fearfulness, GABA+, and fear-related BOLD responses in the insula.

    PubMed

    Lipp, Ilona; Evans, C John; Lewis, Caroline; Murphy, Kevin; Wise, Richard G; Caseras, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    The inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA plays a crucial role in anxiety and fear, but its relationship to brain activation during fear reactions is not clear. Previous studies suggest that GABA agonists lead to an attenuation of emotion-processing related BOLD signals in the insula. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between GABA concentration and fear-related BOLD responses in this region. In 44 female participants with different levels of fearfulness, GABA concentration in the left insula was measured using a GABA+ MRS acquisition during rest; additionally, BOLD signals were obtained during performance of a fear provocation paradigm. Fearfulness was not associated with GABA+ in the left insula, but could predict fear-related BOLD responses in a cluster in the left anterior insula. The BOLD signal change in this cluster did not correlate with GABA+ concentration. However, we found a significant positive correlation between GABA+ concentration and fear-related BOLD responses in a different cluster that included parts of the left insula, amygdala and putamen. Our findings indicate that low insular GABA concentration is not a predisposition for fearfulness, and that several factors influence whether a correlation between GABA and BOLD can be found. PMID:25811453

  15. Glutamate, GABA, and glutamine are synchronously upregulated in the mouse lateral septum during the postpartum period

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Changjiu; Gammie, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    Dramatic structural and functional remodeling occurs in the postpartum brain for the establishment of maternal care, which is essential for the growth and development of young offspring. Glutamate and GABA signaling are critically important in modulating multiple behavioral performances. Large scale signaling changes occur in the postpartum brain, but it is still not clear to what extent the neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA change and whether the ratio of glutamate/GABA remains balanced. In this study, we examined the glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle in the lateral septum (LS) of postpartum female mice. In postpartum females (relative to virgins), tissue levels of glutamate and GABA were elevated in LS and increased mRNA was found for the respective enzymes producing glutamate and GABA, glutaminase (Gls) and glutamate decarboxylase 1 and 2 (Gad1 and Gad2). The common precursor, glutamine, was elevated as was the enzyme that produces it, glutamate-ammonia ligase (Glul). Additionally, glutamate, GABA, and glutamine were positively correlated and the glutamate/GABA ratio was almost identical in the postpartum and virgin females. Collectively, these findings indicate that glutamate and GABA signaling are increased and that the ratio of glutamate/GABA is well balanced in the maternal LS. The postpartum brain may provide a useful model system for understanding how glutamate and GABA are linked despite large signaling changes. Given that some mental health disorders, including depression and schizophrenia display dysregulated glutamate/GABA ratio, and there is increased vulnerability to mental disorders in mothers, it is possible that these postpartum disorders emerge when glutamate and GABA changes are not properly coordinated. PMID:25451092

  16. The distribution of GABA-like-immunoreactive neurons in the brain of the newt, Triturus cristatus carnifex, and the green frog, Rana esculenta.

    PubMed

    Franzoni, M F; Morino, P

    1989-01-01

    The distribution of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) immunoreactivity was studied in the brain of two amphibian species (Triturus cristatus carnifex, Urodela; Rana esculenta, Anura) by employing a specific GABA antiserum. A noteworthy immunoreactive neuronal system was found in the telencephalic dorsal and medial pallium (primordium pallii dorsalis and primordium hippocampi) and in the olfactory bulbs. In the diencephalic habenular nuclei there was a rich GABAergic innervation, and immunoreactive neurons were observed in the dorsal thalamus. In the hypothalamus the GABA immunoreactivity was found in the preoptic area, the paraventricular organ and in the hypothalamo-hypophysial complex. In the preoptic area of the frog some GABA-immunoreactive CSF-contacting cells were shown. In the optic tectum immunolabeled neurons were present in all the cellular layers. A rich GABAergic innervation characterized both the fibrous layers of the tectum and the neuropil of the tegmentum and interpeduncular nucleus. In the cerebellum, in addition to the Purkinje cells showing a variable immunopositivity, some immunoreactive cells bodies appeared in the central grey. Abundant immunolabeled nerve fibers in the acoustico-lateral area and some immunopositive neurons in the region of the raphe nucleus were observed. In conclusion, the GABAergic central systems, well-developed in the amphibian species studied, were generally characterized by close similarities to the pattern described in mammals. PMID:2786752

  17. Identification of a naturally occurring Pro385-Ser385 substitution in the GABA(A) receptor alpha6 subunit gene in alcoholics and healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Iwata, N; Virkkunen, M; Goldman, D

    2000-05-01

    In the rat, variation in alcohol and benzodiazepine sensitivity has been correlated with an inherited variant of the GABA(A)alpha6 receptor. Our goal was to identify polymorphisms in the human GABA(A)alpha6 receptor gene and determine whether a variant of the receptor is associated with alcoholism. The GABA(A)alpha6 receptor gene coding region was screened in 80 unrelated patients with alcoholism using single strand conformational polymorphism analysis. For rapid genotyping, a Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay was developed. A relatively abundant amino acid substitution and three synonymous DNA substitutions were detected. The synonymous variants, 35A>G, 665A>G, and 1031G>C had rare-allele frequencies of 0.25, 0.02, and 0.47, respectively. The Pro385Ser substitution is located in the second intracellular domain of the receptor adjacent to a putative phosphorylation site. Pro385Ser has rarer allele frequencies of 3.3% and 4.8% in 196 Finnish alcoholic patients and 189 controls, respectively (P = NS). A naturally occurring non-conservative Pro385Ser was detected in the GABA(A)alpha6 receptor. The variant is not associated with alcoholism. PMID:10889535

  18. Pacemaker GABA Synaptic Activity May Contribute to Network Synchronization in Pediatric Cortical Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Cepeda, Carlos; Chen, Jane Y.; Wu, Joyce Y.; Fisher, Robin S.; Vinters, Harry V.; Mathern, Gary W.; Levine, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous pacemaker ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor-mediated synaptic activity (PGA) occurs in a subset of tissue samples from pediatric epilepsy surgery patients. In the present study, based on single-cell electrophysiological recordings from 120 cases, we describe the etiologies, cell types, and primary electrophysiological features of PGA. Cells displaying PGA occurred more frequently in the areas of greatest anatomical abnormality in cases of focal cortical dysplasia (CD), often associated with hemimegalencephaly (HME), and only rarely in non-CD etiologies. PGA was characterized by rhythmic synaptic events (510 Hz) and was observed in normal-like, dysmorphic cytomegalic, and immature pyramidal neurons. PGA was action potential-dependent, mediated by GABAA receptors, and unaffected by antagonism of glutamate receptors. We propose that PGA is a unique electrophysiological characteristic associated with CD and HME. It could represent an abnormal signal that may contribute to epileptogenesis in malformed postnatal cortex by facilitating pyramidal neuron synchrony. PMID:24121115

  19. Retinal GABA neurons: localization in vertebrate species using an antiserum to rabbit brain glutamate decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Brandon, C

    1985-10-01

    Retinal gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurons have been localized immunocytochemically using a new antiserum against rabbit brain glutamate decarboxylase (GAD). The animals examined were: dogfish, ratfish, goldfish, catfish, turtle, chick, mouse, rat, pig, rabbit, cat and New World monkey. GAD-containing processes, observed as punctate deposits of immunochemical reaction product, formed discrete bands within the inner plexiform layers of all retinas examined. Immunoreactive, and therefore presumably GABAergic, amacrine cells were observed in all species. Displaced GABAergic amacrine cells were observed in the retinas of goldfish, catfish, turtle and chick, and sparsely in the rabbit as well. GABAergic horizontal cells were detected in catfish, goldfish, chick and turtle. Interplexiform cells in the cat and the rat were clearly immunoreactive for glutamate decarboxylase; this is the first report of GABAergic interplexiform cells in the rat. PMID:2994837

  20. Supraspinal modulation of pain by cannabinoids: the role of GABA and glutamate

    PubMed Central

    Rea, K; Roche, M; Finn, D P

    2007-01-01

    Recent physiological, pharmacological and anatomical studies provide evidence that one of the main roles of the endocannabinoid system in the brain is the regulation of ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate release. This article aims to review this evidence in the context of its implications for pain. We first provide a brief overview of supraspinal regulation of nociception, followed by a review of the evidence that the brain's endocannabinoid system modulates nociception. We look in detail at regulation of supraspinal GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons by the endocannabinoid system and by exogenously administered cannabinoids. Finally, we review the evidence that cannabinoid-mediated modulation of pain involves modulation of GABAergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission in key brain regions. PMID:17828292

  1. Local inhibition of GABA affects precedence effect in the inferior colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanjun; Wang, Ningyu; Wang, Dan; Jia, Jun; Liu, Jinfeng; Xie, Yan; Wen, Xiaohui; Li, Xiaoting

    2014-01-01

    The precedence effect is a prerequisite for faithful sound localization in a complex auditory environment, and is a physiological phenomenon in which the auditory system selectively suppresses the directional information from echoes. Here we investigated how neurons in the inferior colliculus respond to the paired sounds that produce precedence-effect illusions, and whether their firing behavior can be modulated through inhibition with gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). We recorded extracellularly from 36 neurons in rat inferior colliculus under three conditions: no injection, injection with saline, and injection with gamma-aminobutyric acid. The paired sounds that produced precedence effects were two identical 4-ms noise bursts, which were delivered contralaterally or ipsilaterally to the recording site. The normalized neural responses were measured as a function of different inter-stimulus delays and half-maximal interstimulus delays were acquired. Neuronal responses to the lagging sounds were weak when the inter-stimulus delay was short, but increased gradually as the delay was lengthened. Saline injection produced no changes in neural responses, but after local gamma-aminobutyric acid application, responses to the lagging stimulus were suppressed. Application of gamma-aminobutyric acid affected the normalized response to lagging sounds, independently of whether they or the paired sounds were contralateral or ipsilateral to the recording site. These observations suggest that local inhibition by gamma-aminobutyric acid in the rat inferior colliculus shapes the neural responses to lagging sounds, and modulates the precedence effect. PMID:25206830

  2. Identification and distribution of a GABA receptor mutation conferring dieldrin resistance in the malaria vector Anopheles funestus in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Wondji, Charles S.; Dabire, Roch K.; Tukur, Zainab; Irving, Helen; Djouaka, Rousseau; Morgan, John C.

    2011-01-01

    Growing problems of pyrethroid resistance in Anopheles funestus have intensified efforts to identify alternative insecticides. Many agrochemicals target the GABA receptors, but cross-resistance from dieldrin resistance may preclude their introduction. Dieldrin resistance was detected in An. funestus populations from West (Burkina Faso) and central (Cameroon) Africa, but populations from East (Uganda) and Southern Africa (Mozambique and Malawi) were fully susceptible to this insecticide. Partial sequencing of the dieldrin target site, the ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor, identified two amino acid substitutions, A296S and V327I. The A296S mutation has been associated with dieldrin resistance in other species. The V327I mutations was detected in the resistant sample from Burkina Faso and Cameroon and consistently associated with the A296S substitution. The full-length of the An. funestus GABA-receptor gene, amplified by RT-PCR, generated a sequence of 1674bp encoding 557 amino acid of the protein in An. funestus with 98% similarity to that of Anopheles gambiae. Two diagnostic assays were developed to genotype the A296S mutation (pyrosequencing and PCR-RFLP), and use of these assays revealed high frequency of the resistant allele in Burkina Faso (60%) and Cameroon (82%), moderate level in Benin (16%) while low frequency or absence of the mutation was observed respectively in Uganda (7.5%) or 0% in Malawi and Mozambique. The distribution of the RdlR mutation in An. funestus populations in Africa suggests extensive barriers to gene flow between populations from different regions. PMID:21501685

  3. GABA and Endocannabinoids Mediate Depotentiation of Schaffer Collateral Synapses Induced by Stimulation of Temperoammonic Inputs

    PubMed Central

    Izumi, Yukitoshi; Zorumski, Charles F.

    2016-01-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) of Schaffer collateral (SC) synapses in the hippocampus is thought to play a key role in episodic memory formation. Because the hippocampus is a shorter-term, limited capacity storage system, repeated bouts of learning and synaptic plasticity require that SC synapses reset to baseline at some point following LTP. We previously showed that repeated low frequency activation of temperoammonic (TA) inputs to the CA1 region depotentiates SC LTP without persistently altering basal transmission. This heterosynaptic depotentiation involves adenosine A1 receptors but not N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, metabotropic glutamate receptors or L-type calcium channels. In the present study, we used rat hippocampal slices to explore other messengers contributing to TA-induced SC depotentiation, and provide evidence for the involvement of cannabinoid-1 and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type-A receptors as more proximal signaling events leading to synaptic resetting, with A1 receptor activation serving as a downstream event. Surprisingly, we found that TA-induced SC depotentiation is independent of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)/kainate glutamate receptors. We also examined the involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and found a role for extracellular-signal related kinase 1/2 and p38 MAPK, but not c-Jun-N-terminal kinase. These results indicate that low frequency stimulation of TA inputs to CA1 activates a complex signaling network that instructs SC synaptic resetting. The involvement of GABA and endocannabinoids suggest mechanisms that could contribute to cognitive dysfunction associated with substance abuse and neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26862899

  4. Wakefulness Is Governed by GABA and Histamine Cotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiao; Ye, Zhiwen; Houston, Catriona M.; Zecharia, Anna Y.; Ma, Ying; Zhang, Zhe; Uygun, David S.; Parker, Susan; Vyssotski, Alexei L.; Yustos, Raquel; Franks, Nicholas P.; Brickley, Stephen G.; Wisden, William

    2015-01-01

    Summary Histaminergic neurons in the tuberomammilary nucleus (TMN) of the hypothalamus form a widely projecting, wake-active network that sustains arousal. Yet most histaminergic neurons contain GABA. Selective siRNA knockdown of the vesicular GABA transporter (vgat, SLC32A1) in histaminergic neurons produced hyperactive mice with an exceptional amount of sustained wakefulness. Ablation of the vgat gene throughout the TMN further sharpened this phenotype. Optogenetic stimulation in the caudate-putamen and neocortex of “histaminergic” axonal projections from the TMN evoked tonic (extrasynaptic) GABAA receptor Cl− currents onto medium spiny neurons and pyramidal neurons. These currents were abolished following vgat gene removal from the TMN area. Thus wake-active histaminergic neurons generate a paracrine GABAergic signal that serves to provide a brake on overactivation from histamine, but could also increase the precision of neocortical processing. The long range of histamine-GABA axonal projections suggests that extrasynaptic inhibition will be coordinated over large neocortical and striatal areas. PMID:26094607

  5. Early depolarizing GABA controls critical period plasticity in the rat visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Deidda, Gabriele; Allegra, Manuela; Cerri, Chiara; Naskar, Shovan; Bony, Guillaume; Zunino, Giulia; Bozzi, Yuri; Caleo, Matteo; Cancedda, Laura

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Hyperpolarizing and inhibitory GABA regulates critical periods for plasticity in sensory cortices. Here, we examine the role of early, depolarizing GABA in controlling plasticity mechanisms. We report that brief interference with depolarizing GABA during early development prolonged critical period plasticity in visual cortical circuits, without affecting overall development of the visual system. The effects on plasticity were accompanied by dampened inhibitory neurotransmission, down-regulation of BDNF expression, and reduced density of extracellular matrix-perineuronal nets. Early interference with depolarizing GABA decreased perinatal BDNF signaling, and pharmacological increase of BDNF signaling during GABA interference rescued the effects on plasticity and its regulators later in life. We conclude that depolarizing GABA exerts a long-lasting, selective modulation of plasticity of cortical circuits by a strong crosstalk with BDNF. PMID:25485756

  6. Heterogeneous susceptibility of GABA(A) receptor-mediated IPSCs to depolarization-induced suppression of inhibition in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Martin, L A; Wei, D S; Alger, B E

    2001-05-01

    Depolarization-induced suppression of inhibition (DSI) in central neurons is mediated by a transient reduction of [gamma]-aminobutyric acid (GABA) release from interneurons. DSI is induced by a retrograde signal emitted from principal cells. We used electrophysiological recordings from CA1 neurons of the rat hippocampal slice to test the hypothesis that only certain classes of interneurons are susceptible to DSI. DSI of action potential-dependent, spontaneous, inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) in hippocampus is facilitated by carbachol (3 microM), which increases the occurrence of large sIPSCs. Besides carbachol, noradrenaline (norepinephrine; 10 microM), or elevated extracellular potassium (8 mM), could abruptly increase the occurrence of large sIPSCs and DSI in many cases. DSI appeared and disappeared concomitantly with the onset and offset of these large sIPSCs. In contrast, application of AP-5 and CNQX often markedly increased baseline sIPSC activity without enhancing DSI. A brief train of extracellular electrical sti