Science.gov

Sample records for aminoglycoside resistance genes

  1. AMINOGLYCOSIDE RESISTANCE GENES IN Pseudomonas aeruginosa ISOLATES FROM CUMANA, VENEZUELA.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Bertinellys; Rodulfo, Hectorina; Carreño, Numirin; Guzmán, Militza; Salazar, Elsa; De Donato, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    The enzymatic modification of aminoglycosides by aminoglycoside-acetyltransferases (AAC), aminoglycoside-adenyltransferases (AAD), and aminoglycoside-phosphotransferases (APH), is the most common resistance mechanism in P. aeruginosa and these enzymes can be coded on mobile genetic elements that contribute to their dispersion. One hundred and thirty seven P. aeruginosa isolates from the University Hospital, Cumana, Venezuela (HUAPA) were evaluated. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion method and theaac, aadB and aph genes were detected by PCR. Most of the P. aeruginosa isolates (33/137) were identified from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), mainly from discharges (96/137). The frequency of resistant P. aeruginosaisolates was found to be higher for the aminoglycosides tobramycin and amikacin (30.7 and 29.9%, respectively). Phenotype VI, resistant to these antibiotics, was the most frequent (14/49), followed by phenotype I, resistant to all the aminoglycosides tested (12/49). The aac(6´)-Ib,aphA1 and aadB genes were the most frequently detected, and the simultaneous presence of several resistance genes in the same isolate was demonstrated. Aminoglycoside resistance in isolates ofP. aeruginosa at the HUAPA is partly due to the presence of the aac(6´)-Ib, aphA1 andaadB genes, but the high rates of antimicrobial resistance suggest the existence of several mechanisms acting together. This is the first report of aminoglycoside resistance genes in Venezuela and one of the few in Latin America. PMID:27007556

  2. AMINOGLYCOSIDE RESISTANCE GENES IN Pseudomonas aeruginosa ISOLATES FROM CUMANA, VENEZUELA

    PubMed Central

    TEIXEIRA, Bertinellys; RODULFO, Hectorina; CARREÑO, Numirin; GUZMÁN, Militza; SALAZAR, Elsa; DONATO, Marcos DE

    2016-01-01

    The enzymatic modification of aminoglycosides by aminoglycoside-acetyltransferases (AAC), aminoglycoside-adenyltransferases (AAD), and aminoglycoside-phosphotransferases (APH), is the most common resistance mechanism in P. aeruginosa and these enzymes can be coded on mobile genetic elements that contribute to their dispersion. One hundred and thirty seven P. aeruginosa isolates from the University Hospital, Cumana, Venezuela (HUAPA) were evaluated. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion method and theaac, aadB and aph genes were detected by PCR. Most of the P. aeruginosa isolates (33/137) were identified from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), mainly from discharges (96/137). The frequency of resistant P. aeruginosaisolates was found to be higher for the aminoglycosides tobramycin and amikacin (30.7 and 29.9%, respectively). Phenotype VI, resistant to these antibiotics, was the most frequent (14/49), followed by phenotype I, resistant to all the aminoglycosides tested (12/49). The aac(6´)-Ib,aphA1 and aadB genes were the most frequently detected, and the simultaneous presence of several resistance genes in the same isolate was demonstrated. Aminoglycoside resistance in isolates ofP. aeruginosa at the HUAPA is partly due to the presence of the aac(6´)-Ib, aphA1 andaadB genes, but the high rates of antimicrobial resistance suggest the existence of several mechanisms acting together. This is the first report of aminoglycoside resistance genes in Venezuela and one of the few in Latin America. PMID:27007556

  3. Molecular genetics of aminoglycoside resistance genes and familial relationships of the aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, K J; Rather, P N; Hare, R S; Miller, G H

    1993-01-01

    The three classes of enzymes which inactivate aminoglycosides and lead to bacterial resistance are reviewed. DNA hybridization studies have shown that different genes can encode aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes with identical resistance profiles. Comparisons of the amino acid sequences of 49 aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes have revealed new insights into the evolution and relatedness of these proteins. A preliminary assessment of the amino acids which may be important in binding aminoglycosides was obtained from these data and from the results of mutational analysis of several of the genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes. Recent studies have demonstrated that aminoglycoside resistance can emerge as a result of alterations in the regulation of normally quiescent cellular genes or as a result of acquiring genes which may have originated from aminoglycoside-producing organisms or from other resistant organisms. Dissemination of these genes is aided by a variety of genetic elements including integrons, transposons, and broad-host-range plasmids. As knowledge of the molecular structure of these enzymes increases, progress can be made in our understanding of how resistance to new aminoglycosides emerges. Images PMID:8385262

  4. Prevalence of Aminoglycoside Resistance Genes in Acinetobacter baumannii Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Aliakbarzade, Katayun; Farajnia, Safar; Karimi Nik, Ashraf; Zarei, Farzaneh; Tanomand, Asghar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the major causes of nosocomial infections and is resistant to most available antibiotics. Aminoglycosides remain as drugs of choice for treatment of Acinetobacter infections yet resistance to aminoglycosides has increased in the recent years. Objectives: The present study investigated the prevalence of genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes in A. baumannii strains isolated from patients of Tabriz city, northwest of Iran. Materials and Methods: A total of 103 Acinetobacter isolates were collected from Imam Reza Hospital of Tabriz University of medical sciences. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of the isolates to different antimicrobial agents including cephalosporins, gentamicin, amikacin, tobramycin, colistin and polymyxin, were evaluated by the disc diffusion method. The frequency of aminoglycoside modifying enzymes encoding genes aacC1, aphA6, aadA1 and aadB was analyzed by the PCR method. Results: Antimicrobial susceptibility analysis showed that the highest resistance was towards beta−lactam antibiotics including cephalosporins whereas the highest sensitivity was observed towards colistin (77%) and polymyxin (84%). The resistance rate to aminoglycosides was 81%, 86% and 63% for amikacin, gentamicin and tobramycin, respectively. The PCR results showed that among the 103 A. baumannii isolates, 56 (65.11 %) were positive for aacC1, 52 (60.46 %) for aphA6, 24 (27.9 %) for aadA1 and 16 (18.6 %) for aadB resistant genes. Conclusions: The results of this study indicated that the genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes are prevalent in A. baumannii isolates in the study region, which highlighted the necessity of considering preventive measures to control dissemination of these resistance genes. PMID:25632323

  5. The prevalence of aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme and virulence genes among enterococci with high-level aminoglycoside resistance in Inner Mongolia, China.

    PubMed

    Niu, Haiying; Yu, Hui; Hu, Tangping; Tian, Gailin; Zhang, Lixia; Guo, Xiang; Hu, Hai; Wang, Zhanli

    2016-01-01

    This study highlights the prevalence of aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme genes and virulence determinants among clinical enterococci with high-level aminoglycoside resistance in Inner Mongolia, China. Screening for high-level aminoglycoside resistance against 117 enterococcal clinical isolates was performed using the agar-screening method. Out of the 117 enterococcal isolates, 46 were selected for further detection and determination of the distribution of aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme-encoding genes and virulence determinants using polymerase chain reaction -based methods. Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis were identified as the species of greatest clinical importance. The aac(6')-Ie-aph(2″)-Ia and ant(6')-Ia genes were found to be the most common aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme genes among high-level gentamicin resistance and high-level streptomycin resistance isolates, respectively. Moreover, gelE was the most common virulence gene among high-level aminoglycoside resistance isolates. Compared to Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus faecalis harbored multiple virulence determinants. The results further indicated no correlation between aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme gene profiles and the distribution of virulence genes among the enterococcal isolates with high-level gentamicin resistance or high-level streptomycin resistance evaluated in our study. PMID:27268115

  6. Characterization of aminoglycoside resistance and virulence genes among Enterococcus spp. isolated from a hospital in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Wanxiang; Li, Jing; Wei, Quhao; Hu, Qingfeng; Lin, Xiaowei; Chen, Mengquan; Ye, Renji; Lv, Huoyang

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the aminoglycoside resistance phenotypes and genotypes, as well as the prevalence of virulence genes, in Enterococcus species isolated from clinical patients in China. A total of 160 enterococcal isolates from various clinical samples collected from September 2013 to July 2014 were identified to the species level using the VITEK-2 COMPACT system. The antimicrobial susceptibilities of the identified Enterococcus strains were determined by the Kirby-Bauer (K-B) disc diffusion method. PCR-based assays were used to detect the aminoglycoside resistance and virulence genes in all enterococcal isolates. Of 160 Enterococcus isolates, 105 were identified as E. faecium, 35 as E. faecalis, and 20 isolates were classified as "other" Enterococcus species. High-level aminoglycoside resistance (HLAR) for gentamicin, streptomycin, and both antibiotics was identified in 58.8, 50, and 34.4% of strains, respectively. The most common virulence gene (50.6% of isolates) was efaA, followed by asa1 (28.8%). The most prevalent aminoglycoside resistance genes were aac(6')-Ie-aph(2''), aph(2')-Id, aph(3')-IIIa, and ant(6')-Ia, present in 49.4%, 1.3%, 48.8% and 31.3% of strains, respectively. Overall, E. faecium and E. faecalis were most frequently associated with hospital-acquired enterococcal infections in Zhejiang Province. All aminoglycoside resistance genes, except aph(2'')-Id, were significantly more prevalent in HLAR strains than amongst high level aminoglycoside susceptible (HLAS) strains, while there was no significant difference between HLAR and HLAS strains in regard to the prevalence of virulence genes, apart from esp, therefore, measures should be taken to manage infections caused by multi-drug resistant Enterococcus species. PMID:25768240

  7. Study of Aminoglycoside Resistance Genes in Enterococcus and Salmonella Strains Isolated From Ilam and Milad Hospitals, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Samadi, Nasser; Pakzad, Iraj; Monadi Sefidan, Alireza; Hosainzadegan, Hasan; Tanomand, Asghar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Aminoglycosides are a group of antibiotics that have been widely used in the treatment of life-threatening infections of Gram-negative bacteria. Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the frequency of aminoglycoside resistance genes in Enterococcus and Salmonella strains isolated from clinical samples by PCR. Materials and Methods: In this study, 140 and 79 isolates of Enterococcus and Salmonella were collected, respectively. After phenotypic biochemical confirmation, 117 and 77 isolates were identified as Enterococcus and Salmonella, respectively. After the biochemical identification of the isolates, antibiotic susceptibility for screening of resistance was done using the Kirby-Bauer method for gentamicin, amikacin, kanamycin, tobramycin and netilmycin. DNA was extracted from resistant strains and the presence of acc (3)-Ia, aac (3′)-Ib, acc (6)-IIa ,16SrRNA methylase genes (armA and rat) was detected by PCR amplification using special primers and positive controls. Results: Enterococcus isolates have the highest prevalence of resistance to both kanamycin and amikacin (68.4%), and Salmonella isolates have the highest prevalence of resistance against kanamycin (6.9%). Ninety-three and 26 isolates of Enterococcus and Salmonella at least were resistant against one of the aminoglycosides, respectively. Moreover, 72.04%, 66.7%, and 36.6% of the resistant strains of Enterococcus had the aac (3′)-Ia, aac (3′)-IIa, and acc (6′)-Ib genes, respectively. None of the Salmonella isolates have the studied aminoglycoside genes. Conclusions: Our results indicate that acetylation genes have an important role in aminoglycoside resistance of the Enterococcus isolates from clinical samples. Moreover, Salmonella strains indicate very low level of aminoglycoside resistance, and aminoglycoside resistance genes were not found in Salmonella isolates. These results indicate that other resistance mechanisms, including efflux pumps have an important role in

  8. An aminoglycoside sensing riboswitch controls the expression of aminoglycoside resistance acetyltransferase and adenyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dongrong; Murchie, Alastair I H

    2014-10-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistance in human pathogens is an increasing threat to public health. The fundamental mechanisms that control the high levels of expression of antibiotic resistance genes are not yet completely understood. The aminoglycosides are one of the earliest classes of antibiotics that were introduced in the 1940s. In the clinic aminoglycoside resistance is conferred most commonly through enzymatic modification of the drug although resistance through enzymatic modification of the target rRNA through methylation or the overexpression of efflux pumps is also appearing. An aminoglycoside sensing riboswitch has been identified that controls expression of the aminoglycoside resistance genes that encode the aminoglycoside acetyltransferase (AAC) and aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferase (ANT) (adenyltransferase (AAD)) enzymes. AAC and ANT cause resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics through modification of the drugs. Expression of the AAC and ANT resistance genes is regulated by aminoglycoside binding to the 5' leader RNA of the aac/aad genes. The aminoglycoside sensing RNA is also associated with the integron cassette system that captures antibiotic resistance genes. Specific aminoglycoside binding to the leader RNA induces a structural transition in the leader RNA, and consequently induction of resistance protein expression. Reporter gene expression, direct measurements of drug RNA binding, chemical probing and UV cross-linking combined with mutational analysis demonstrated that the leader RNA functioned as an aminoglycoside sensing riboswitch in which drug binding to the leader RNA leads to the induction of aminoglycoside antibiotic resistance. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Riboswitches. PMID:24631585

  9. Involvement of aph(3')-IIa in the formation of mosaic aminoglycoside resistance genes in natural environments.

    PubMed

    Woegerbauer, Markus; Kuffner, Melanie; Domingues, Sara; Nielsen, Kaare M

    2015-01-01

    Intragenic recombination leading to mosaic gene formation is known to alter resistance profiles for particular genes and bacterial species. Few studies have examined to what extent aminoglycoside resistance genes undergo intragenic recombination. We screened the GenBank database for mosaic gene formation in homologs of the aph(3')-IIa (nptII) gene. APH(3')-IIa inactivates important aminoglycoside antibiotics. The gene is widely used as a selectable marker in biotechnology and enters the environment via laboratory discharges and the release of transgenic organisms. Such releases may provide opportunities for recombination in competent environmental bacteria. The retrieved GenBank sequences were grouped in three datasets comprising river water samples, duck pathogens and full-length variants from various bacterial genomes and plasmids. Analysis for recombination in these datasets was performed with the Recombination Detection Program (RDP4), and the Genetic Algorithm for Recombination Detection (GARD). From a total of 89 homologous sequences, 83% showed 99-100% sequence identity with aph(3')-IIa originally described as part of transposon Tn5. Fifty one were unique sequence variants eligible for recombination analysis. Only a single recombination event was identified with high confidence and indicated the involvement of aph(3')-IIa in the formation of a mosaic gene located on a plasmid of environmental origin in the multi-resistant isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA96. The available data suggest that aph(3')-IIa is not an archetypical mosaic gene as the divergence between the described sequence variants and the number of detectable recombination events is low. This is in contrast to the numerous mosaic alleles reported for certain penicillin or tetracycline resistance determinants. PMID:26042098

  10. Distribution of genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes among clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Perumal, N; Murugesan, S; Krishnan, P

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the distribution of genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs) and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) elements among clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant staphylococci (MRS). Antibiotic susceptibility test was done using Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. The presence of SCCmec types and AME genes, namely, aac (6')-Ie-aph (2''), aph (3')-IIIa and ant (4')-Ia was determined using two different multiplex polymerase chain reaction. The most encountered AME genes were aac (6')-Ie-aph (2'') (55.4%) followed by aph (3')-IIIa (32.3%) and ant (4')-Ia gene (9%). SCCmec type I (34%) was predominant in this study. In conclusion, the aac (6')-Ie-aph (2'') was the most common AME gene and SCCmec type I was most predominant among the MRS isolates. PMID:27514959

  11. Efficient transformation and regeneration of transgenic cassava using the neomycin phosphotransferase gene as aminoglycoside resistance marker gene.

    PubMed

    Niklaus, Michael; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Vanderschuren, Hervé

    2011-01-01

    Cassava is one of the most important crops in the tropics. Its industrial use for starch and biofuel production is also increasing its importance for agricultural production in tropical countries. In the last decade cassava biotechnology has emerged as a valuable alternative to the breeding constraints of this highly heterozygous crop for improved trait development of cassava germplasm. Cassava transformation remains difficult and time-consuming because of limitations in selecting transgenic tissues and regeneration of transgenic plantlets. We have recently reported an efficient and robust cassava transformation protocol using the hygromycin phosphotransferase II (hptII) gene as selection marker and the aminoglycoside hygromycin at optimal concentrations to maximize the regeneration of transgenic plantlets. In the present work, we expanded the transformation protocol to the use of the neomycin phosphotransferase II (nptII) gene as selection marker. Several aminoglycosides compatible with the use of nptII were tested and optimal concentrations for cassava transformation were determined. Given its efficiency equivalent to hptII as selection marker with the described protocol, the use of nptII opens new possibilities to engineer transgenic cassava lines with multiple T-DNA insertions and to produce transgenic cassava with a resistance marker gene that is already deregulated in several commercial transgenic crops. PMID:22179195

  12. Aminoglycoside uptake increased by tet gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Merlin, T L; Davis, G E; Anderson, W L; Moyzis, R K; Griffith, J K

    1989-01-01

    The expression of extrachromosomal tet genes not only confers tetracycline resistance but also increases the susceptibilities of gram-negative bacteria to commonly used aminoglycoside antibiotics. We investigated the possibility that tet expression increases aminoglycoside susceptibility by increasing bacterial uptake of aminoglycoside. Studies of [3H]gentamicin uptake in paired sets of Escherichia coli HB101 and Salmonella typhimurium LT2 expressing and not expressing tet showed that tet expression accelerates energy-dependent [3H]gentamicin uptake. Increased [3H]gentamicin uptake was accompanied by decreased bacterial protein synthesis and bacterial growth. Increased aminoglycoside uptake occurred whether tet expression was constitutive or induced, whether the tet gene was class B or C, and whether the tet gene was plasmid borne or integrated into the bacterial chromosome. tet expression produced no measurable change in membrane potential, suggesting that tet expression increases aminoglycoside uptake either by increasing the availability of specific carriers or by lowering the minimum membrane potential that is necessary for uptake. PMID:2684011

  13. Involvement of aph(3′)-IIa in the formation of mosaic aminoglycoside resistance genes in natural environments

    PubMed Central

    Woegerbauer, Markus; Kuffner, Melanie; Domingues, Sara; Nielsen, Kaare M.

    2015-01-01

    Intragenic recombination leading to mosaic gene formation is known to alter resistance profiles for particular genes and bacterial species. Few studies have examined to what extent aminoglycoside resistance genes undergo intragenic recombination. We screened the GenBank database for mosaic gene formation in homologs of the aph(3′)-IIa (nptII) gene. APH(3′)-IIa inactivates important aminoglycoside antibiotics. The gene is widely used as a selectable marker in biotechnology and enters the environment via laboratory discharges and the release of transgenic organisms. Such releases may provide opportunities for recombination in competent environmental bacteria. The retrieved GenBank sequences were grouped in three datasets comprising river water samples, duck pathogens and full-length variants from various bacterial genomes and plasmids. Analysis for recombination in these datasets was performed with the Recombination Detection Program (RDP4), and the Genetic Algorithm for Recombination Detection (GARD). From a total of 89 homologous sequences, 83% showed 99–100% sequence identity with aph(3′)-IIa originally described as part of transposon Tn5. Fifty one were unique sequence variants eligible for recombination analysis. Only a single recombination event was identified with high confidence and indicated the involvement of aph(3′)-IIa in the formation of a mosaic gene located on a plasmid of environmental origin in the multi-resistant isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA96. The available data suggest that aph(3′)-IIa is not an archetypical mosaic gene as the divergence between the described sequence variants and the number of detectable recombination events is low. This is in contrast to the numerous mosaic alleles reported for certain penicillin or tetracycline resistance determinants. PMID:26042098

  14. Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain That Caused an Outbreak in a Neurosurgery Ward and Its aac(6′)-Iae Gene Cassette Encoding a Novel Aminoglycoside Acetyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Sekiguchi, Jun-ichiro; Asagi, Tsukasa; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Fujino, Tomoko; Kobayashi, Intetsu; Morita, Koji; Kikuchi, Yoshihiro; Kuratsuji, Tadatoshi; Kirikae, Teruo

    2005-01-01

    We characterized multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from patients involved in an outbreak of catheter-associated urinary tract infections that occurred in a neurosurgery ward of a hospital in Sendai, Japan. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of SpeI-, XbaI-, or HpaI-digested genomic DNAs from the isolates revealed that clonal expansion of a P. aeruginosa strain designated IMCJ2.S1 had occurred in the ward. This strain possessed broad-spectrum resistance to aminoglycosides, β-lactams, fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines, sulfonamides, and chlorhexidine. Strain IMCJ2.S1 showed a level of resistance to some kinds of disinfectants similar to that of a control strain of P. aeruginosa, ATCC 27853. IMCJ2.S1 contained a novel class 1 integron, In113, in the chromosome but not on a plasmid. In113 contains an array of three gene cassettes of blaIMP-1, a novel aminoglycoside resistance gene, and the aadA1 gene. The aminoglycoside resistance gene, designated aac(6′)-Iae, encoded a 183-amino-acid protein that shared 57.1% identity with AAC(6′)-Iq. Recombinant AAC(6′)-Iae protein showed aminoglycoside 6′-N-acetyltransferase activity by thin-layer chromatography. Escherichia coli expressing exogenous aac(6′)-Iae showed resistance to amikacin, dibekacin, isepamicin, kanamycin, netilmicin, sisomicin, and tobramycin but not to arbekacin, gentamicins, or streptomycin. Alterations of gyrA and parC at the amino acid sequence level were detected in IMCJ2.S1, suggesting that such mutations confer the resistance to fluoroquinolones observed for this strain. These results indicate that P. aeruginosa IMCJ2.S1 has developed multidrug resistance by acquiring resistance determinants, including a novel member of the aac(6′)-I family and mutations in drug resistance genes. PMID:16127047

  15. A degenerate PCR-based strategy as a means of identifying homologues of aminoglycoside and β-lactam resistance genes in the gut microbiota

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The potential for the human gut microbiota to serve as a reservoir for antibiotic resistance genes has been the subject of recent discussion. However, this has yet to be investigated using a rapid PCR-based approach. In light of this, here we aim to determine if degenerate PCR primers can detect aminoglycoside and β-lactam resistance genes in the gut microbiota of healthy adults, without the need for an initial culture-based screen for resistant isolates. In doing so, we would determine if the gut microbiota of healthy adults, lacking recent antibiotic exposure, is a reservoir for resistance genes. Results The strategy employed resulted in the identification of numerous aminoglycoside (acetylation, adenylation and phosphorylation) and β-lactam (including blaOXA, blaTEM, blaSHV and blaCTX-M) resistance gene homologues. On the basis of homology, it would appear that these genes originated from different bacterial taxa, with members of the Enterobacteriaceae being a particularly rich source. The results demonstrate that, even in the absence of recent antibiotic exposure, the human gut microbiota is a considerable reservoir for antibiotic resistance genes. Conclusions This study has demonstrated that the gut can be a significant source of aminoglycoside and β-lactam resistance genes, even in the absence of recent antibiotic exposure. The results also demonstrate that PCR-based approaches can be successfully applied to detect antibiotic resistance genes in the human gut microbiota, without the need to isolate resistant strains. This approach could also be used to rapidly screen other complex environments for target genes. PMID:24499167

  16. Increasing Prevalence of Aminoglycoside-Resistant Enterococcus faecalis Isolates Due to the aac(6’)-aph(2”) Gene: A Therapeutic Problem in Kermanshah, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Khani, Mitra; Fatollahzade, Mahdie; Pajavand, Hamid; Bakhtiari, Somaye; Abiri, Ramin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Enterococci are important pathogens in nosocomial infections. Various types of antibiotics, such as aminoglycosides, are used for treatment of these infections. Enterococci can acquire resistant traits, which can lead to therapeutic problems with aminoglycosides. Objectives: This study was designed to identify the prevalence of, and to compare, the aac(6’)-aph(2”) and aph(3)-IIIa genes and their antimicrobial resistance patterns among Enterococcus faecalis and E. faecium isolates from patients at Imam Reza hospital in Kermanshah in 2011 - 2012. Patients and Methods: One hundred thirty-eight clinical specimens collected from different wards of Imam Reza hospital were identified to the species level by biochemical tests. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests against kanamycin, teicoplanin, streptomycin, imipenem, ciprofloxacin, and ampicillin were performed by the disk diffusion method. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of gentamicin, streptomycin, kanamycin, and amikacin were evaluated with the microbroth dilution method. The aminoglycoside resistance genes aac(6’)-aph(2”) and aph(3”)-IIIa were analyzed with multiplex PCR. Results: The prevalence of isolates was 33 (24.1%) for E. faecium and 63 (46%) for E. faecalis. Eighty-nine percent of the isolates were high-level gentamicin resistant (HLGR), and 32.8% of E. faecium isolates and 67.2% of E. faecalis isolates carried aac(6’)-aph(2”). The prevalence of aph(3”)-IIIa among the E. faecalis and E. faecium isolates was 22.7% and 77.3%, respectively. Conclusions: Remarkably increased incidence of aac(6’)-aph(2”) among HLGR isolates explains the relationship between this gene and the high level of resistance to aminoglycosides. As the resistant gene among enterococci can be transferred, the use of new-generation antibiotics is necessary. PMID:27217920

  17. Modifying enzymes related aminoglycoside: analyses of resistant Acinetobacter isolates

    PubMed Central

    Atasoy, Ali Riza; Ciftci, Ihsan Hakki; Petek, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Enzymatic modification of aminoglycosides by nucleotidyltransferases, acetyltransferases and/or phosphotransferases accounts for the majority of aminoglycoside-resistant Acinetobacter isolates. In this study, we investigated the relationship between aminoglycoside resistance and the presence of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes in Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolate groups with different resistance profiles. Thirty-two clinical A. baumannii isolates were included in this study. Acinetobacter isolates were divided into 4 groups according to results of susceptibility testing. The presence of genes encoding the following aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes; aph (3’)-V1, aph (3’)-Ia, aac (3)-Ia, aac (3) IIa, aac (6’)-Ih, aac (6’)-Ib and ant (2’)-Ia responsible for resistance was investigated by PCR in all strains. The acetyltransferase (aac (6’)-Ib, aac (3)-Ia) and phosphotransferase (aph (3’)-Ia) gene regions were identified in the first group, which comprised nine imipenem, meropenem, and gentamicin-resistant isolates. The acetyltransferase (aac (6’)-Ib, aac (3)-Ia), phosphotransferase (aph (3’)-VI) and nucleotidyltransferase (ant2-Ia) gene regions were identified in the second group, which was composed of nine imipenem-resistant, meropenem-resistant and gentamicin-sensitive isolates. The acetyltransferase (aac (3)-Ia) and phosphotransferase (aph (3’)-Ia) regions were identified in the fourth group, which comprised eight imipenem-sensitive, meropenem-sensitive and gentamicin-resistant isolates. Modifying enzyme gene regions were not detected in the third group, which was composed of six imipenem, meropenem and gentamicin-sensitive isolates. Our data are consistent with previous reports, with the exception of four isolates. Both acetyltransferases and phosphotransferases were widespread in A. baumannii clinical isolates in our study. However, the presence of the enzyme alone is insufficient to explain the resistance rates. Therefore, the

  18. Determination of aminoglycoside resistance in Staphylococcus aureus by DNA hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Dickgiesser, N; Kreiswirth, B N

    1986-01-01

    A method is described for identification of the genes conferring aminoglycoside resistance in Staphylococcus aureus by dot-blot and Southern blot techniques. As radioactive probes, fragments of plasmids pAT48, pUBH2, and pH13, carrying the genes for an aminocyclitol-3'-phosphotransferase, an aminocyclitol-4'-adenylyltransferase, and an aminocyclitol-2''-phosphotransferase-aminocyclitol-6'-acetyltransferase, respectively, were used. Images PMID:3729351

  19. New mobile gene cassettes containing an aminoglycoside resistance gene, aacA7, and a chloramphenicol resistance gene, catB3, in an integron in pBWH301.

    PubMed Central

    Bunny, K L; Hall, R M; Stokes, H W

    1995-01-01

    The multidrug resistance plasmid pBWH301 was shown to contain a sull-associated integron with five inserted gene cassettes, aacA7-catB3-aadB-oxa2-orfD, all of which can be mobilized by the integron-encoded DNA integrase. The aadB, oxa2, and orfD cassettes are identical to known cassettes. The aacA7 gene encodes a protein that is a member of one of the three known families of aminoglycoside acetyltransferases classified as AAC(6')-I. The chloramphenicol acetyltransferase encoded by the catB3 gene is closely related to members of a recently identified family of chloramphenicol acetyltransferases. The catB3 gene displays a relatively high degree of sequence identity to a chromosomally located open reading frame in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and this may represent evidence for the acquisition by a cassette of a chromosomal gene. PMID:7793874

  20. Transferable amikacin resistance in Acinetobacter spp. due to a new type of 3'-aminoglycoside phosphotransferase.

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, T; Gerbaud, G; Courvalin, P

    1988-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii BM2580 resistant to kanamycin and structurally related antibiotics, including amikacin, was isolated from a clinical specimen. A phosphocellulose paper-binding assay and DNA annealing studies indicated that resistance to aminoglycosides in BM2580 was due to synthesis of a new type of 3'-aminoglycoside phosphotransferase. The gene conferring resistance to kanamycin-amikacin in this strain was carried by a 63-kilobase plasmid, pIP1841, self-transferable to A. baumannii, A. haemolyticus, and A. lwoffii but not to Escherichia coli. The aminoglycoside resistance gene of pIP1841 was cloned in E. coli, where it was expressed. Images PMID:2831812

  1. 16S ribosomal RNA methylation: emerging resistance mechanism against aminoglycosides.

    PubMed

    Doi, Yohei; Arakawa, Yoshichika

    2007-07-01

    Methylation of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) has recently emerged as a new mechanism of resistance against aminoglycosides among gram-negative pathogens belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae and glucose-nonfermentative microbes, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter species. This event is mediated by a newly recognized group of 16S rRNA methylases, which share modest similarity to those produced by aminoglycoside-producing actinomycetes. Their presence confers a high level of resistance to all parenterally administered aminoglycosides that are currently in clinical use. The responsible genes are mostly located on transposons within transferable plasmids, which provides them with the potential to spread horizontally and may in part explain the already worldwide distribution of this novel resistance mechanism. Some of these organisms have been found to coproduce extended-spectrum beta-lactamases or metallo-beta-lactamases, contributing to their multidrug-resistant phenotypes. A 2-tiered approach, consisting of disk diffusion tests followed by confirmation with polymerase chain reaction, is recommended for detection of 16S rRNA methylase-mediated resistance. PMID:17554708

  2. A Site-Specific Integrative Plasmid Found in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Clinical Isolate HS87 along with A Plasmid Carrying an Aminoglycoside-Resistant Gene.

    PubMed

    Bi, Dexi; Xie, Yingzhou; Tai, Cui; Jiang, Xiaofei; Zhang, Jie; Harrison, Ewan M; Jia, Shiru; Deng, Zixin; Rajakumar, Kumar; Ou, Hong-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Plasmids play critical roles in bacterial fitness and evolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Here two plasmids found in a drug-resistant P. aeruginosa clinical isolate HS87 were completely sequenced. The pHS87b plasmid (11.2 kb) carries phage-related genes and function-unknown genes. Notably, pHS87b encodes an integrase and has an adjacent tRNAThr-associated attachment site. A corresponding integrated form of pHS87b at the tRNAThr locus was identified on the chromosome of P. aeruginosa, showing that pHS87b is able to site-specifically integrate into the 3'-end of the tRNAThr gene. The pHS87a plasmid (26.8 kb) displays a plastic structure containing a putative replication module, stability factors and a variable region. The RepA of pHS87a shows significant similarity to the replication proteins of pPT23A-family plasmids. pHS87a carries a transposon Tn6049, a truncated insertion sequence ΔIS1071 and a Tn402-like class 1 integron which contains an aacA4 cassette that may confer aminoglycoside resistance. Thus, pHS87b is a site-specific integrative plasmid whereas pHS87a is a plastic antibiotic resistance plasmid. The two native plasmids may promote the fitness and evolution of P. aeruginosa. PMID:26841043

  3. A Site-Specific Integrative Plasmid Found in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Clinical Isolate HS87 along with A Plasmid Carrying an Aminoglycoside-Resistant Gene

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Cui; Jiang, Xiaofei; Zhang, Jie; Harrison, Ewan M.; Jia, Shiru; Deng, Zixin; Rajakumar, Kumar; Ou, Hong-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Plasmids play critical roles in bacterial fitness and evolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Here two plasmids found in a drug-resistant P. aeruginosa clinical isolate HS87 were completely sequenced. The pHS87b plasmid (11.2 kb) carries phage-related genes and function-unknown genes. Notably, pHS87b encodes an integrase and has an adjacent tRNAThr-associated attachment site. A corresponding integrated form of pHS87b at the tRNAThr locus was identified on the chromosome of P. aeruginosa, showing that pHS87b is able to site-specifically integrate into the 3’-end of the tRNAThr gene. The pHS87a plasmid (26.8 kb) displays a plastic structure containing a putative replication module, stability factors and a variable region. The RepA of pHS87a shows significant similarity to the replication proteins of pPT23A-family plasmids. pHS87a carries a transposon Tn6049, a truncated insertion sequence ΔIS1071 and a Tn402-like class 1 integron which contains an aacA4 cassette that may confer aminoglycoside resistance. Thus, pHS87b is a site-specific integrative plasmid whereas pHS87a is a plastic antibiotic resistance plasmid. The two native plasmids may promote the fitness and evolution of P. aeruginosa. PMID:26841043

  4. Emerging resistance to aminoglycosides in lactic acid bacteria of food origin-an impending menace.

    PubMed

    Jaimee, G; Halami, P M

    2016-02-01

    Aminoglycosides are the most preferred choice of therapy against serious infections in humans. Therefore, its use in animal husbandry has been strictly regulated in the EU, UK, and USA to avoid the hazards of aminoglycoside resistance in gut microflora. Nevertheless, aminoglycosides are recommended for prophylaxis and therapeutics in food animals and agriculture owing to its bactericidal nature. In the recent past, the global surge in aminoglycoside-resistant lactic acid bacteria (LAB) from food sources has been noticed that might question its continued use in animal husbandry. Upon antibiotic administration, a selective pressure is created in the gut environment; in such instances, LAB could act as reservoirs of antibiotic resistance which may facilitate their transfer to pathogenic organisms contradicting its probiotic and industrial significance. This may be a risk to human health as the presence of one aminoglycoside resistance gene renders the bacteria tolerant to almost all antibiotics of the same class, thereby challenging its therapeutic efficacy. Low doses of aminoglycosides are recommended in farm animals due to its toxic nature and insolubility in blood. However, recent investigations indicate that use of aminoglycosides in sub-lethal concentrations can trigger the selection and conjugal transfer of aminoglycoside resistance in probiotic LAB. Resistance to erythromycin, tetracyclines, and fluoroquinolones in LAB were reported earlier to which immediate regulatory measures were adopted by some countries. Paradoxically, lack of regulations on antibiotic use in farms in most developing countries makes them a potential source of antibiotic resistance and its uncontrolled spread around the globe. The prevalence of aminoglycoside resistance was observed in enterococci from food origin earlier; however, its emergence in lactobacilli and pediococci suggests its spread in probiotic cultures which prompts immediate precautionary methods. This review highlights the

  5. Prospects for circumventing aminoglycoside kinase mediated antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Kun; Caldwell, Shane J.; Fong, Desiree H.; Berghuis, Albert M.

    2013-01-01

    Aminoglycosides are a class of antibiotics with a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity. Unfortunately, resistance in clinical isolates is pervasive, rendering many aminoglycosides ineffective. The most widely disseminated means of resistance to this class of antibiotics is inactivation of the drug by aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs). There are two principal strategies to overcoming the effects of AMEs. The first approach involves the design of novel aminoglycosides that can evade modification. Although this strategy has yielded a number of superior aminoglycoside variants, their efficacy cannot be sustained in the long term. The second approach entails the development of molecules that interfere with the mechanism of AMEs such that the activity of aminoglycosides is preserved. Although such a molecule has yet to enter clinical development, the search for AME inhibitors has been greatly facilitated by the wealth of structural information amassed in recent years. In particular, aminoglycoside phosphotransferases or kinases (APHs) have been studied extensively and crystal structures of a number of APHs with diverse regiospecificity and substrate specificity have been elucidated. In this review, we present a comprehensive overview of the available APH structures and recent progress in APH inhibitor development, with a focus on the structure-guided strategies. PMID:23805415

  6. Genetic basis of aminoglycoside resistance following changes in aminoglycoside prescription patterns.

    PubMed

    Kosmidis, Chris; Giannopoulou, Maria; Flountzi, Anastasia; Markogiannakis, Antonis; Goukos, Dimitris; Petrikkos, George; Daikos, George L; Tzanetou, Konstantina

    2013-08-01

    Aminoglycosides (AG) offer an important therapeutic option for the treatment of infections caused by multiresistant Enterobacteriaceae. We observed a change in AG usage patterns in our institution between 1997 and 2006, namely a reduction in use of all AG except amikacin. We studied the changes in AG susceptibility rates in these time periods and correlated with prevalence of different molecular resistance mechanisms. Enterobacteriaceae isolated from blood cultures from 1997 and 2006 were studied. Susceptibilities to AG were determined with the disk diffusion method. PCR was used to detect genes encoding AG-modifying enzymes and methylases. Gentamicin resistance rates dropped from 14·5 to 8·8%, whereas resistance rates to other AG remained unchanged. The AAC(6')-I+AAC(3)-I combination was more common in 1997, whereas AAC(6')-I was the most common mechanism in 2006. Reduction in gentamicin use may preserve the usefulness of this agent against severe infections by multiresistant bacteria such as carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae. PMID:23906075

  7. Extracellular DNA Acidifies Biofilms and Induces Aminoglycoside Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Wilton, Mike; Charron-Mazenod, Laetitia; Moore, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms consist of surface-adhered bacterial communities encased in an extracellular matrix composed of DNA, exopolysaccharides, and proteins. Extracellular DNA (eDNA) has a structural role in the formation of biofilms, can bind and shield biofilms from aminoglycosides, and induces antimicrobial peptide resistance mechanisms. Here, we provide evidence that eDNA is responsible for the acidification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa planktonic cultures and biofilms. Further, we show that acidic pH and acidification via eDNA constitute a signal that is perceived by P. aeruginosa to induce the expression of genes regulated by the PhoPQ and PmrAB two-component regulatory systems. Planktonic P. aeruginosa cultured in exogenous 0.2% DNA or under acidic conditions demonstrates a 2- to 8-fold increase in aminoglycoside resistance. This resistance phenotype requires the aminoarabinose modification of lipid A and the production of spermidine on the bacterial outer membrane, which likely reduce the entry of aminoglycosides. Interestingly, the additions of the basic amino acid l-arginine and sodium bicarbonate neutralize the pH and restore P. aeruginosa susceptibility to aminoglycosides, even in the presence of eDNA. These data illustrate that the accumulation of eDNA in biofilms and infection sites can acidify the local environment and that acidic pH promotes the P. aeruginosa antibiotic resistance phenotype. PMID:26552982

  8. Novel Aminoglycoside Resistance Transposons and Transposon-Derived Circular Forms Detected in Carbapenem-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Clinical Isolates.

    PubMed

    Karah, Nabil; Dwibedi, Chinmay Kumar; Sjöström, Karin; Edquist, Petra; Johansson, Anders; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Uhlin, Bernt Eric

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as an important opportunistic pathogen equipped with a growing number of antibiotic resistance genes. Our study investigated the molecular epidemiology and antibiotic resistance features of 28 consecutive carbapenem-resistant clinical isolates of A. baumannii collected throughout Sweden in 2012 and 2013. The isolates mainly belonged to clonal complexes (CCs) with an extensive international distribution, such as CC2 (n = 16) and CC25 (n = 7). Resistance to carbapenems was related to blaOXA-23 (20 isolates), blaOXA-24/40-like (6 isolates), blaOXA-467 (1 isolate), and ISAba1-blaOXA-69 (1 isolate). Ceftazidime resistance was associated with blaPER-7 in the CC25 isolates. Two classical point mutations were responsible for resistance to quinolones in all the isolates. Isolates with high levels of resistance to aminoglycosides carried the 16S rRNA methylase armA gene. The isolates also carried a variety of genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes. Several novel structures involved in aminoglycoside resistance were identified, including Tn6279, ΔTn6279, Ab-ST3-aadB, and different assemblies of Tn6020 and TnaphA6. Importantly, a number of circular forms related to the IS26 or ISAba125 composite transposons were detected. The frequent occurrence of these circular forms in the populations of several isolates indicates a potential role of these circular forms in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes. PMID:26824943

  9. Novel Aminoglycoside Resistance Transposons and Transposon-Derived Circular Forms Detected in Carbapenem-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Dwibedi, Chinmay Kumar; Sjöström, Karin; Edquist, Petra; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Uhlin, Bernt Eric

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as an important opportunistic pathogen equipped with a growing number of antibiotic resistance genes. Our study investigated the molecular epidemiology and antibiotic resistance features of 28 consecutive carbapenem-resistant clinical isolates of A. baumannii collected throughout Sweden in 2012 and 2013. The isolates mainly belonged to clonal complexes (CCs) with an extensive international distribution, such as CC2 (n = 16) and CC25 (n = 7). Resistance to carbapenems was related to blaOXA-23 (20 isolates), blaOXA-24/40-like (6 isolates), blaOXA-467 (1 isolate), and ISAba1-blaOXA-69 (1 isolate). Ceftazidime resistance was associated with blaPER-7 in the CC25 isolates. Two classical point mutations were responsible for resistance to quinolones in all the isolates. Isolates with high levels of resistance to aminoglycosides carried the 16S rRNA methylase armA gene. The isolates also carried a variety of genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes. Several novel structures involved in aminoglycoside resistance were identified, including Tn6279, ΔTn6279, Ab-ST3-aadB, and different assemblies of Tn6020 and TnaphA6. Importantly, a number of circular forms related to the IS26 or ISAba125 composite transposons were detected. The frequent occurrence of these circular forms in the populations of several isolates indicates a potential role of these circular forms in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes. PMID:26824943

  10. Regenerated hair cells exhibit a transient resistance to aminoglycoside toxicity.

    PubMed

    Hashino, E; Salvi, R J

    1996-05-13

    Recent studies have demonstrated that sensory hair cells in the avian inner ear are reproduced by cell proliferation in response to the death of the original hair cell population. The regenerated hair cells appear to construct functional synaptic contacts, thereby transmitting acoustic signals to the peripheral nervous system. One of the most extraordinary, but overlooked characteristics of these regenerated hair cells, is their ability to survive in a highly ototoxic environment. Here, we report that hair cells regenerated after kanamycin induced hair cell loss can survive for a substantially longer time period than their predecessors during prolonged exposure to aminoglycoside antibiotics. The prolonged survival, however, belongs solely to the immature status of regenerated hair cells. Once the regenerated hair cells reach morphological maturation, they become vulnerable to aminoglycoside toxicity. Immunohistochemical evaluation of kanamycin suggested that kanamycin may be taken up into hair cells via a receptor-mediated endocytosis at their apical surfaces. By contrast, kanamycin was rarely incorporated into the cytoplasm of the regenerated hair cells. These results suggest that the process of a receptor-mediated transmembrane transport at the apical surface of hair cells is developmentally regulated, and that the lack of some of the assembly involved in the transmembrane transport could be responsible for the inhibition of aminoglycoside uptake, leading immature hair cells to be aminoglycoside resistant. PMID:8782910

  11. The genetic basis of aminoglycoside ototoxicity: The search for susceptibility genes

    SciTech Connect

    Prezant, T.R.; Fischel-Ghodsian, F.

    1994-09-01

    The susceptibility to aminoglycoside ototoxicity appears to be genetically determined. Recently we identified a mutation in the small ribosomal RNA gene of the mitochondrial DNA that can cause deafness after aminoglycoside treatment in families with maternally-inherited susceptibility to the ototoxic effect of these antibiotics. The mutation produces a structural change in the 12S rRNA, which allows increased binding of aminoglycosides, mistranslation of mitochondrial proteins, decreased energy production, and cell death. Because only a minority of sporadic patients have mutations in the 12S rRNA gene, we anticipate the involvement of other genes in ototoxic deafness. We have developed a model system in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to functionally identify genes whose products interact with aminoglycosides. Besides its small genome size and well-developed genetic tools, a unique advantage of using this haploid organism is that recessive drug-responsive mutations will not be missed. An additional advantage is that yeast can be grown in either fermentative or respiratory media, allowing the functional categorization of mutants. Over 100 antibiotic-resistant mutants have now been isolated. The majority of these mutations (69%) are dominant and are being sorted by segregation tests. The 31% of mutations that are recessive have been sorted into two major complementation groups, indicating that two genes appear to be responsible for most of the recessive cases. Our strategy is to isolate the yeast genes that most commonly acquire mutations, clone the human homologs, and screen patients for susceptibility mutations.

  12. Studying aminoglycoside modification by the acetyltransferase class of resistance-causing enzymes via microarray

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Olivia J.; Pushechnikov, Alexei; Wu, Meilan; Disney, Matthew D.

    2008-01-01

    Aminoglycosides are broad-spectrum antibacterials to which some bacteria have acquired resistance. The most common mode of resistance to aminoglycosides is enzymatic modification of the drug by different classes of enzymes including acetyltransferases (AAC’s). Thus, the modification of aminoglycosides by AAC(2’) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and AAC(3) from Escherichia coli was studied using aminoglycoside microarrays. Results show that both enzymes modify their substrates displayed on an array surface in a manner that mimics their relative levels of modification in solution. Because aminoglycosides that are modified by resistance-causing enzymes have reduced affinities for binding their therapeutic target, the bacterial rRNA aminoacyl-tRNA site (A-site), arrays were probed for binding to a fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide mimic of the A-site after modification. A decrease in binding was observed when aminoglycosides were modified by AAC(3). In contrast, a decrease in binding of the A-site is not observed when aminoglycosides are modified by AAC(2’). Interestingly, these effects mirror the biological functions of these enzymes: the AAC(3) used in this study is known to confer aminoglycoside resistance while the AAC(2’) is chromosomally encoded and unlikely to play a role in resistance. These studies lay a direct foundation for studying resistance to aminoglycosides and can also have more broad applications in identifying and studying non-aminoglycoside carbohydrates or proteins as substrates for acetyltransferase enzymes. PMID:18774127

  13. Mechanisms of Resistance to Aminoglycoside Antibiotics: Overview and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Aminoglycoside (AG) antibiotics are used to treat many Gram-negative and some Gram-positive infections and, importantly, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Among various bacterial species, resistance to AGs arises through a variety of intrinsic and acquired mechanisms. The bacterial cell wall serves as a natural barrier for small molecules such as AGs and may be further fortified via acquired mutations. Efflux pumps work to expel AGs from bacterial cells, and modifications here too may cause further resistance to AGs. Mutations in the ribosomal target of AGs, while rare, also contribute to resistance. Of growing clinical prominence is resistance caused by ribosome methyltransferases. By far the most widespread mechanism of resistance to AGs is the inactivation of these antibiotics by AG-modifying enzymes. We provide here an overview of these mechanisms by which bacteria become resistant to AGs and discuss their prevalence and potential for clinical relevance. PMID:26877861

  14. Genetic basis of high level aminoglycoside resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii from Beijing, China

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Lu; Lv, Yuemeng; Yuan, Min; Hu, Xinxin; Nie, Tongying; Yang, Xinyi; Li, Guoqing; Pang, Jing; Zhang, Jingpu; Li, Congran; Wang, Xiukun; You, Xuefu

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the genetic basis of high level aminoglycoside resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates from Beijing, China. 173 A. baumannii clinical isolates from hospitals in Beijing from 2006 to 2009 were first subjected to high level aminoglycoside resistance (HLAR, MIC to gentamicin and amikacin>512 µg/mL) phenotype selection by broth microdilution method. The strains were then subjected to genetic basis analysis by PCR detection of the aminoglycoside modifying enzyme genes (aac(3)-I, aac(3)-IIc, aac(6′)-Ib, aac(6′)-II, aph(4)-Ia, aph(3′)-I, aph(3′)-IIb, aph(3′)-IIIa, aph(3′)-VIa, aph(2″)-Ib, aph(2″)-Ic, aph(2″)-Id, ant(2″)-Ia, ant(3″)-I and ant(4′)-Ia) and the 16S rRNA methylase genes (armA, rmtB and rmtC). Correlation analysis between the presence of aminoglycoside resistance gene and HLAR phenotype were performed by SPSS. Totally 102 (58.96%) HLAR isolates were selected. The HLAR rates for year 2006, 2007, 2008 and 2009 were 52.63%, 65.22%, 51.11% and 70.83%, respectively. Five modifying enzyme genes (aac(3)-I, detection rate of 65.69%; aac(6′)-Ib, detection rate of 45.10%; aph(3′)-I, detection rate of 47.06%; aph(3′)-IIb, detection rate of 0.98%; ant(3″)-I, detection rate of 95.10%) and one methylase gene (armA, detection rate of 98.04%) were detected in the 102 A. baumannii with aac(3)-I+aac(6′)-Ib+ant(3″)-I+armA (detection rate of 25.49%), aac(3)-I+aph(3′)-I+ant(3″)-I+armA (detection rate of 21.57%) and ant(3″)-I+armA (detection rate of 12.75%) being the most prevalent gene profiles. The values of chi-square tests showed correlation of armA, ant(3″)-I, aac(3)-I, aph(3′)-I and aac(6′)-Ib with HLAR. armA had significant correlation (contingency coefficient 0.685) and good contingency with HLAR (kappa 0.940). The high rates of HLAR may cause a serious problem for combination therapy of aminoglycoside with β-lactams against A. baumannii infections. As armA was

  15. Identification of Genes Coding Aminoglycoside Modifying Enzymes in E. coli of UTI Patients in India

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Yasir; Dar, Firdous Ahmad; Sekhar, M.

    2016-01-01

    This study is to probe the pattern of antibiotic resistance against aminoglycosides and its mechanism in E. coli obtained from patients from Chennai, India. Isolation and identification of pathogens were done on MacConkey agar. Antimicrobial sensitivity testing was done by disc diffusion test. The identification of genes encoding aminoglycoside modifying enzymes was done by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). Out of 98 isolates, 71 (72.45%) isolates were identified as E. coli and the remaining 27 (27.55%) as other bacteria. Disc diffusion method results showed a resistance level of 72.15% for streptomycin, 73.4% for gentamicin, 63.26% for neomycin, 57.14% for tobramycin, 47.9% for netilmicin, and 8.16% for amikacin in E. coli. PCR screening showed the presence of four genes, namely, rrs, aacC2, aacA-aphD, and aphA3, in their plasmid DNA. The results point towards the novel mechanism of drug resistance in E. coli from UTI patients in India as they confirm the presence of genes encoding enzymes that cause resistance to aminoglycoside drugs. This could be an alarm for drug prescription to UTI patients. PMID:27403451

  16. Mapping of the gene specifying aminoglycoside 3'-phosphotransferase II on the Pseudomonas aeruginosa chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Okii, M; Iyobe, S; Mitsuhashi, S

    1983-01-01

    We examined the aminoglycoside inactivation enzymes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, seven clinical isolates and seven laboratory strains without plasmids. All strains were found to possess the enzyme aminoglycoside 3'-phosphotransferase II [APH(3')-II]. We isolated an APH(3')-II-deficient mutant from a PAO strain by mutagenesis with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. By plasmid (FP5 or R68.45)-mediated conjugation, we determined the locus of the gene specifying the APH(3')-II between trp-6 and pro-82 on the PAO chromosome and designated this gene aphA. It was concluded that the intrinsic resistance of P. aeruginosa to kanamycins, neomycins, paromomycins, ribostamycin, and butirosins was due to this newly determined gene. PMID:6307974

  17. Mutational Activation of the AmgRS Two-Component System in Aminoglycoside-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Calvin Ho-Fung; Fraud, Sebastien; Jones, Marcus; Peterson, Scott N.; Poole, Keith

    2013-01-01

    The amgRS operon encodes a presumed membrane stress-responsive two-component system linked to intrinsic aminoglycoside resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Genome sequencing of a lab isolate showing modest pan-aminoglycoside resistance, strain K2979, revealed a number of mutations, including a substitution in amgS that produced an R182C change in the AmgS sensor kinase product of this gene. Introduction of this mutation into an otherwise wild-type strain recapitulated the resistance phenotype, while correcting the mutation in the resistant mutant abrogated the resistant phenotype, confirming that the amgS mutation is responsible for the aminoglycoside resistance of strain K2979. The amgSR182 mutation promoted an AmgR-dependent, 2- to 3-fold increase in expression of the AmgRS target genes htpX and PA5528, mirroring the impact of aminoglycoside exposure of wild-type cells on htpX and PA5528 expression. This suggests that amgSR182 is a gain-of-function mutation that activates AmgS and the AmgRS two-component system in promoting modest resistance to aminoglycosides. Screening of several pan-aminoglycoside-resistant clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa revealed three that showed elevated htpX and PA5528 expression and harbored single amino acid-altering mutations in amgS (V121G or D106N) and no mutations in amgR. Introduction of the amgSV121G mutation into wild-type P. aeruginosa generated a resistance phenotype reminiscent of the amgSR182 mutant and produced a 2- to 3-fold increase in htpX and PA5528 expression, confirming that it, too, is a gain-of-function aminoglycoside resistance-promoting mutation. These results highlight the contribution of amgS mutations and activation of the AmgRS two-component system to acquired aminoglycoside resistance in lab and clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa. PMID:23459488

  18. Structural Basis of APH(3)-IIIa-Mediated Resistance to N1-Substituted Aminoglycoside Antibiotics

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, D.; Berghuis, A

    2009-01-01

    Butirosin is unique among the naturally occurring aminoglycosides, having a substituted amino group at position 1 (N1) of the 2-deoxystreptamine ring with an (S)-4-amino-2-hydroxybutyrate (AHB) group. While bacterial resistance to aminoglycosides can be ascribed chiefly to drug inactivation by plasmid-encoded aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes, the presence of an AHB group protects the aminoglycoside from binding to many resistance enzymes, and hence, the antibiotic retains its bactericidal properties. Consequently, several semisynthetic N1-substituted aminoglycosides, such as amikacin, isepamicin, and netilmicin, were developed. Unfortunately, butirosin, amikacin, and isepamicin are not resistant to inactivation by 3'-aminoglycoside O-phosphotransferase type IIIa [APH(3')-IIIa]. We report here the crystal structure of APH(3')-IIIa in complex with an ATP analog, AMPPNP [adenosine 5'-(?,{gamma}-imido)triphosphate], and butirosin A to 2.4-A resolution. The structure shows that butirosin A binds to the enzyme in a manner analogous to other 4,5-disubstituted aminoglycosides, and the flexible antibiotic-binding loop is key to the accommodation of structurally diverse substrates. Based on the crystal structure, we have also constructed a model of APH(3')-IIIa in complex with amikacin, a commonly used semisynthetic N1-substituted 4,6-disubstituted aminoglycoside. Together, these results suggest a strategy to further derivatize the AHB group in order to generate new aminoglycoside derivatives that can elude inactivation by resistance enzymes while maintaining their ability to bind to the ribosomal A site.

  19. Synergistic effect of [10]-gingerol and aminoglycosides against vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE).

    PubMed

    Nagoshi, Chihiro; Shiota, Sumiko; Kuroda, Teruo; Hatano, Tsutomu; Yoshida, Takashi; Kariyama, Reiko; Tsuchiya, Tomofusa

    2006-03-01

    An extract from ginger (root of Zingiber officinale) reduced the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of aminoglycosides in vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE). The effective compound was isolated and identified as [10]-gingerol. In the presence of [10]-gingerol at 1/10 concentration of its own MIC, the MIC of arbekacin was lowered by 1/32 to 1/16. [10]-Gingerol also reduced the MICs of other aminoglycosides, and of bacitracin and polymixin B, but not of other antimicrobial agents tested. Because [10]-gingerol reduced the MICs of several aminoglycosides both in strains possessing or lacking aminoglycoside-modification enzymes, it seems that the effect of [10]-gingerol is not related to these enzymes, which mainly confer bacterial resistance against aminoglycosides. It seemed that a detergent-like effect of [10]-gingerol potentiated the antimicrobial activity of the aminoglycosides. In fact, some detergents such as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and Triton X-100 reduced the MICs of aminoglycosides, bacitracin and polymixin B in VRE. Since the intrinsic resistance to aminoglycosides in enterococci is due to low level of entry of the drugs into the cells, increase in the membrane permeability caused by [10]-gingerol will enhance the influx of aminoglycosides into enterococcal cells. PMID:16508142

  20. Aminoglycoside Modifying Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Maria S.; Tolmasky, Marcelo E.

    2010-01-01

    Aminoglycosides have been an essential component of the armamentarium in the treatment of life-threatening infections. Unfortunately, their efficacy has been reduced by the surge and dissemination of resistance. In some cases the levels of resistance reached the point that rendered them virtually useless. Among many known mechanisms of resistance to aminoglycosides, enzymatic modification is the most prevalent in the clinical setting. Aminoglycoside modifying enzymes catalyze the modification at different −OH or −NH2 groups of the 2-deoxystreptamine nucleus or the sugar moieties and can be nucleotidyltranferases, phosphotransferases, or acetyltransferases. The number of aminoglycoside modifying enzymes identified to date as well as the genetic environments where the coding genes are located is impressive and there is virtually no bacteria that is unable to support enzymatic resistance to aminoglycosides. Aside from the development of new aminoglycosides refractory to as many as possible modifying enzymes there are currently two main strategies being pursued to overcome the action of aminoglycoside modifying enzymes. Their successful development would extend the useful life of existing antibiotics that have proven effective in the treatment of infections. These strategies consist of the development of inhibitors of the enzymatic action or of the expression of the modifying enzymes. PMID:20833577

  1. Novel Approach To Optimize Synergistic Carbapenem-Aminoglycoside Combinations against Carbapenem-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Rajbharan; Landersdorfer, Cornelia B.; Nation, Roger L.; Boyce, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is among the most dangerous pathogens and emergence of resistance is highly problematic. Our objective was to identify and rationally optimize β-lactam-plus-aminoglycoside combinations via novel mechanism-based modeling that synergistically kill and prevent resistance of carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii. We studied combinations of 10 β-lactams and three aminoglycosides against four A. baumannii strains, including two imipenem-intermediate (MIC, 4 mg/liter) and one imipenem-resistant (MIC, 32 mg/liter) clinical isolate, using high-inoculum static-concentration time-kill studies. We present the first application of mechanism-based modeling for killing and resistance of A. baumannii using Monte Carlo simulations of human pharmacokinetics to rationally optimize combination dosage regimens for immunocompromised, critically ill patients. All monotherapies achieved limited killing (≤2.3 log10) of A. baumannii ATCC 19606 followed by extensive regrowth for aminoglycosides. Against this strain, imipenem-plus-aminoglycoside combinations yielded more rapid and extensive killing than other β-lactam-plus-aminoglycoside combinations. Imipenem at 8 mg/liter combined with an aminoglycoside yielded synergistic killing (>5 log10) and prevented regrowth of all four strains. Modeling demonstrated that imipenem likely killed the aminoglycoside-resistant population and vice versa and that aminoglycosides enhanced the target site penetration of imipenem. Against carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii (MIC, 32 mg/liter), optimized combination regimens (imipenem at 4 g/day as a continuous infusion plus tobramycin at 7 mg/kg of body weight every 24 h) were predicted to achieve >5 log10 killing without regrowth in 98.2% of patients. Bacterial killing and suppression of regrowth were best achieved for combination regimens with unbound imipenem steady-state concentrations of at least 8 mg/liter. Imipenem-plus-aminoglycoside combination regimens are highly promising and

  2. Molecular epidemiology and genetic linkage of macrolide and aminoglycoside resistance in Staphylococcus intermedius of canine origin.

    PubMed

    Boerlin, P; Burnens, A P; Frey, J; Kuhnert, P; Nicolet, J

    2001-03-20

    A collection of 77 Staphylococcus intermedius isolates from dogs and cats in Switzerland was examined for resistance to erythromycin. Resistance profiles for 14 additional antibiotics were compared between erythromycin-resistant and susceptible isolates. A resistance prevalence of 27% for erythromycin was observed in the population under study. Complete correlation between resistance to erythromycin, and to spiramycin, streptomycin, and neomycin was observed. The erythromycin-resistant isolates all had a reduced susceptibility to clindamycin when compared to the erythromycin-susceptible isolates. Both constitutive and inducible resistance phenotypes were observed for clindamycin. Ribotyping showed that macrolide-aminoglycoside resistance was randomly distributed among unrelated strains. This suggests that this particular resistance profile is not related to a single bacterial clone but to the horizontal transfer of resistance gene clusters in S. intermedius populations. The erythromycin-resistant isolates were all carrying erm(B), but not erm(A), erm(C), or msr(A). The erm(B) gene was physically linked to Tn5405-like elements known as resistance determinants for streptomycin, streptothricin, neomycin and kanamycin. Analysis of the region flanking erm(B) showed the presence of two different groups of erm(B)-Tn5405-like elements in the S. intermedius population examined and of elements found in Gram-positive species other than staphylococci. This strongly suggests that erm(B) or the whole erm(B)-Tn5405-like elements in S. intermedius originate from other bacterial species, possibly from enterococci. PMID:11230937

  3. Inhibition of aminoglycoside acetyltransferase resistance enzymes by metal salts.

    PubMed

    Li, Yijia; Green, Keith D; Johnson, Brooke R; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2015-07-01

    Aminoglycosides (AGs) are clinically relevant antibiotics used to treat infections caused by both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, as well as Mycobacteria. As with all current antibacterial agents, resistance to AGs is an increasing problem. The most common mechanism of resistance to AGs is the presence of AG-modifying enzymes (AMEs) in bacterial cells, with AG acetyltransferases (AACs) being the most prevalent. Recently, it was discovered that Zn(2+) metal ions displayed an inhibitory effect on the resistance enzyme AAC(6')-Ib in Acinetobacter baumannii and Escherichia coli. In this study, we explore a wide array of metal salts (Mg(2+), Cr(3+), Cr(6+), Mn(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), and Au(3+) with different counter ions) and their inhibitory effect on a large repertoire of AACs [AAC(2')-Ic, AAC(3)-Ia, AAC(3)-Ib, AAC(3)-IV, AAC(6')-Ib', AAC(6')-Ie, AAC(6')-IId, and Eis]. In addition, we determine the MIC values for amikacin and tobramycin in combination with a zinc pyrithione complex in clinical isolates of various bacterial strains (two strains of A. baumannii, three of Enterobacter cloacae, and four of Klebsiella pneumoniae) and one representative of each species purchased from the American Type Culture Collection. PMID:25941215

  4. Inhibition of Aminoglycoside Acetyltransferase Resistance Enzymes by Metal Salts

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yijia; Green, Keith D.; Johnson, Brooke R.

    2015-01-01

    Aminoglycosides (AGs) are clinically relevant antibiotics used to treat infections caused by both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, as well as Mycobacteria. As with all current antibacterial agents, resistance to AGs is an increasing problem. The most common mechanism of resistance to AGs is the presence of AG-modifying enzymes (AMEs) in bacterial cells, with AG acetyltransferases (AACs) being the most prevalent. Recently, it was discovered that Zn2+ metal ions displayed an inhibitory effect on the resistance enzyme AAC(6′)-Ib in Acinetobacter baumannii and Escherichia coli. In this study, we explore a wide array of metal salts (Mg2+, Cr3+, Cr6+, Mn2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+, and Au3+ with different counter ions) and their inhibitory effect on a large repertoire of AACs [AAC(2′)-Ic, AAC(3)-Ia, AAC(3)-Ib, AAC(3)-IV, AAC(6′)-Ib′, AAC(6′)-Ie, AAC(6′)-IId, and Eis]. In addition, we determine the MIC values for amikacin and tobramycin in combination with a zinc pyrithione complex in clinical isolates of various bacterial strains (two strains of A. baumannii, three of Enterobacter cloacae, and four of Klebsiella pneumoniae) and one representative of each species purchased from the American Type Culture Collection. PMID:25941215

  5. OCCURRENCE OF HIGH-LEVEL AMINOGLYCOSIDE RESISTANCE IN ENVIRONMENTAL ISOLATES OF ENTEROCOCCI

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-level resistance fo aminoglycosides was observed in environmental isolates of enterococci. Various aquatic habitats, including agricultural runoff, creeks, rivers, wastewater, and wells, were analyzed. Strains of Enterococcus faecalis, e.faecium, E. gallinarum, and other Ent...

  6. Cholera in Vietnam: changes in genotypes and emergence of class I integrons containing aminoglycoside resistance gene cassettes in vibrio cholerae O1 strains isolated from 1979 to 1996.

    PubMed

    Dalsgaard, A; Forslund, A; Tam, N V; Vinh, D X; Cam, P D

    1999-03-01

    The number of cholera cases and the mortality rates reported from different regions of Vietnam varied considerably in the period from 1979 to 1996, with between 2,500 and 6,000 cases reported annually from 1992 to 1995. Annual mortality rates ranged from 2.0 to 9.6% from 1979 to 1983 to less than 1.8% after 1983. Major cholera outbreaks were reported from the High Plateau region for the first time in 1994 and 1995; this is an area with limited access to health services and safe drinking-water supplies. All cases were associated with Vibrio cholerae O1. Using ribotyping, cholera toxin (CT) genotyping, and characterization of antibiotic susceptibility patterns and antibiotic resistance genes by PCR, we show that strains isolated after 1990 were clearly different from strains isolated before 1991. In contrast to strains isolated before 1991, 94% of 104 strains isolated after 1990 showed an identical ribotype R1, were resistant to sulfamethoxazole and streptomycin, and showed a different CT genotype. Furthermore, PCR analysis revealed that sulfamethoxazole-resistant strains harbored class I integrons containing a gene cassette ant(3")-1a encoding resistance to streptomycin and spectinomycin. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of class I integrons in V. cholerae. The development of cholera and the changes in the phenotypic and genotypic properties of V. cholerae O1 shown in the present study highlight the importance of monitoring V. cholerae O1 in Vietnam as in other parts of the world. In particular, the emergence of the new ribotype R1 strain containing class I integrons should be further studied. PMID:9986842

  7. Studying Modification of Aminoglycoside Antibiotics by Resistance-Causing Enzymes via Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Disney, Matthew D.

    2013-01-01

    Widespread bacterial resistance to antibiotics is a significant public health concern. To remain a step ahead of evolving bacteria, new methods to study resistance to antibacterials and to uncover novel antibiotics that evade resistance are urgently needed. Herein, microarray-based methods that have been developed to study aminoglycoside modification by resistance-causing enzymes are reviewed. These arrays can also be used to study the binding of aminoglycoside antibiotics to a mimic of their therapeutic target, the rRNA aminoacyl site (A-site), and how modification by resistance-causing enzymes affects their abilities to bind RNA. PMID:22057534

  8. Studying modification of aminoglycoside antibiotics by resistance-causing enzymes via microarray.

    PubMed

    Disney, Matthew D

    2012-01-01

    Widespread bacterial resistance to antibiotics is a significant public health concern. To remain a step ahead of evolving bacteria, new methods to study resistance to antibacterials and to uncover novel antibiotics that evade resistance are urgently needed. Herein, microarray-based methods that have been developed to study aminoglycoside modification by resistance-causing enzymes are reviewed. These arrays can also be used to study the binding of aminoglycoside antibiotics to a mimic of their therapeutic target, the rRNA aminoacyl site (A-site), and how modification by resistance-causing enzymes affects their abilities to bind RNA. PMID:22057534

  9. Aminoglycoside Resistance: The Emergence of Acquired 16S Ribosomal RNA Methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Doi, Yohei; Wachino, Jun-Ichi; Arakawa, Yoshichika

    2016-06-01

    Aminoglycoside-producing Actinobacteria are known to protect themselves from their own aminoglycoside metabolites by producing 16S ribosomal RNA methyltransferase (16S-RMTase), which prevents them from binding to the 16S rRNA targets. Ten acquired 16S-RMTases have been reported from gram-negative pathogens. Most of them posttranscriptionally methylate residue G1405 of 16S rRNA resulting in high-level resistance to gentamicin, tobramycin, amikacin, and plazomicin. Strains that produce 16S-RMTase are frequently multidrug-resistant or even extensively drug-resistant. Although the direct clinical impact of high-level aminoglycoside resistance resulting from production of 16S-RMTase is yet to be determined, ongoing spread of this mechanism will further limit treatment options for multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant gram-negative infections. PMID:27208771

  10. Development of aminoglycoside and β-lactamase resistance among intestinal microbiota of swine treated with lincomycin, chlortetracycline, and amoxicillin

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jian; Li, Liang; Liu, Baotao; Xia, Jing; Liao, Xiaoping; Liu, Yahong

    2014-01-01

    Lincomycin, chlortetracycline, and amoxicillin are commonly used antimicrobials for growth promotion and infectious disease prophylaxis in swine production. In this study, we investigated the shifts and resistance development among intestinal microbiota in pregnant sows before and after lincomycin, chlortetracycline, and amoxicillin treatment by using phylogenetic analysis, bacterial enumeration, and PCR. After the antimicrobial treatment, shifts in microbial community, an increased proportion of resistant bacteria, and genes related to antimicrobial resistance as compared to the day before antimicrobial administration (day 0) were observed. Importantly, a positive correlation between antimicrobial resistance gene expression in different categories, especially those encoding aminoglycoside and β-lactamase and antimicrobial resistance, was observed. These findings demonstrate an important role of antimicrobial usage in animals in the development of antimicrobial resistance, and support the notion that prudent use of antimicrobials in swine is needed to reduce the risk of the emergence of multi-drug resistant zoonotic pathogens. PMID:25408688

  11. Toward Overcoming Staphylococcus aureus Aminoglycoside Resistance Mechanisms with a Functionally Designed Neomycin Analogue

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Deoxygenation of the diol groups in rings A and D of neomycin in combination with the introduction of an N1-(l)-HABA group in the 2-deoxystreptamine subunit (ring B) leads to a novel and potent antibiotic (1) with activity against strains of S. aureus carrying known aminoglycoside resistance determinants, as well as against an extended panel of Methicillin-resistant S. aureus isolates (n = 50). Antibiotic 1 displayed >64 fold improvement in MIC50 and MIC90 against this MRSA collection when compared to the clinically relevant aminoglycosides amikacin and gentamicin. The synthesis was achieved in six steps and 15% overall yield. PMID:24900282

  12. Multiple ESBL-Producing Escherichia coli Sequence Types Carrying Quinolone and Aminoglycoside Resistance Genes Circulating in Companion and Domestic Farm Animals in Mwanza, Tanzania, Harbor Commonly Occurring Plasmids.

    PubMed

    Seni, Jeremiah; Falgenhauer, Linda; Simeo, Nabina; Mirambo, Mariam M; Imirzalioglu, Can; Matee, Mecky; Rweyemamu, Mark; Chakraborty, Trinad; Mshana, Stephen E

    2016-01-01

    The increased presence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing bacteria in humans, animals, and their surrounding environments is of global concern. Currently there is limited information on ESBL presence in rural farming communities worldwide. We performed a cross-sectional study in Mwanza, Tanzania, involving 600 companion and domestic farm animals between August/September 2014. Rectal swab/cloaca specimens were processed to identify ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae. We detected 130 (21.7%) animals carrying ESBL-producing bacteria, the highest carriage being among dogs and pigs [39.2% (51/130) and 33.1% (43/130), respectively]. The majority of isolates were Escherichia coli [93.3% (125/134)] and exotic breed type [OR (95%CI) = 2.372 (1.460-3.854), p-value < 0.001] was found to be a predictor of ESBL carriage among animals. Whole-genome sequences of 25 ESBL-producing E. coli were analyzed for phylogenetic relationships using multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) and core genome comparisons. Fourteen different sequence types were detected of which ST617 (7/25), ST2852 (3/25), ST1303 (3/25) were the most abundant. All isolates harbored the bla CTX-M-15 allele, 22/25 carried strA and strB, 12/25 aac(6')-lb-cr, and 11/25 qnrS1. Antibiotic resistance was associated with IncF, IncY, as well as non-typable plasmids. Eleven isolates carried pPGRT46-related plasmids, previously reported from isolates in Nigeria. Five isolates had plasmids exhibiting 85-99% homology to pCA28, previously detected in isolates from the US. Our findings indicate a pan-species distribution of ESBL-producing E. coli clonal groups in farming communities and provide evidence for plasmids harboring antibiotic resistances of regional and international impact. PMID:26904015

  13. Multiple ESBL-Producing Escherichia coli Sequence Types Carrying Quinolone and Aminoglycoside Resistance Genes Circulating in Companion and Domestic Farm Animals in Mwanza, Tanzania, Harbor Commonly Occurring Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Seni, Jeremiah; Falgenhauer, Linda; Simeo, Nabina; Mirambo, Mariam M.; Imirzalioglu, Can; Matee, Mecky; Rweyemamu, Mark; Chakraborty, Trinad; Mshana, Stephen E.

    2016-01-01

    The increased presence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing bacteria in humans, animals, and their surrounding environments is of global concern. Currently there is limited information on ESBL presence in rural farming communities worldwide. We performed a cross-sectional study in Mwanza, Tanzania, involving 600 companion and domestic farm animals between August/September 2014. Rectal swab/cloaca specimens were processed to identify ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae. We detected 130 (21.7%) animals carrying ESBL-producing bacteria, the highest carriage being among dogs and pigs [39.2% (51/130) and 33.1% (43/130), respectively]. The majority of isolates were Escherichia coli [93.3% (125/134)] and exotic breed type [OR (95%CI) = 2.372 (1.460–3.854), p-value < 0.001] was found to be a predictor of ESBL carriage among animals. Whole-genome sequences of 25 ESBL-producing E. coli were analyzed for phylogenetic relationships using multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) and core genome comparisons. Fourteen different sequence types were detected of which ST617 (7/25), ST2852 (3/25), ST1303 (3/25) were the most abundant. All isolates harbored the blaCTX-M-15 allele, 22/25 carried strA and strB, 12/25 aac(6′)-lb-cr, and 11/25 qnrS1. Antibiotic resistance was associated with IncF, IncY, as well as non-typable plasmids. Eleven isolates carried pPGRT46-related plasmids, previously reported from isolates in Nigeria. Five isolates had plasmids exhibiting 85–99% homology to pCA28, previously detected in isolates from the US. Our findings indicate a pan-species distribution of ESBL-producing E. coli clonal groups in farming communities and provide evidence for plasmids harboring antibiotic resistances of regional and international impact. PMID:26904015

  14. Flipping the Switch "On" for Aminoglycoside-Resistance Enzymes: The Mechanism Is Finally Revealed!

    PubMed

    Ngo, Huy X; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2016-07-01

    In a recent issue of Structure, Caldwell et al. (2016) determined crystal structures of APH(2″)-Ia in complex with various combinations of aminoglycosides and nucleosides, which compellingly revealed that the catalytic activity of this resistance enzyme is regulated by a conformational change of the triphosphate of GTP, a mechanism previously unknown for antibiotic kinases. PMID:27387794

  15. Failure of aminoglycoside antibiotics to kill anaerobic, low-pH, and resistant cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Schlessinger, D

    1988-01-01

    The critical inhibition of ribosome function by aminoglycosides has long been established. But the binding of drug to ribosomes is reversible: why then are aminoglycosides bactericidal? Several groups have shown that irreversible action (lethality) results from irreversible uptake into susceptible cells; conversely, resistance in cases such as anaerobiosis is associated with the failure of uptake. Oddly, the pattern of results excludes all traditional transport mechanisms; most unusual is the apparent dependence of uptake on the interaction of drug with ribosomes. A traditional view that ribosomes may function during uptake as a "sink" for aminoglycosides cannot explain all the data. Instead, the alternative is considered that cycling ribosomes at the cell membrane help to induce "one-way endocytic pores." Although no detailed mechanism is formulated, the results do suggest a way that the permeation of antibiotics might be systematically controllable to render them more cidal. PMID:3060245

  16. Cilia-Associated Genes Play Differing Roles in Aminoglycoside-Induced Hair Cell Death in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Stawicki, Tamara M.; Hernandez, Liana; Esterberg, Robert; Linbo, Tor; Owens, Kelly N.; Shah, Arish N.; Thapa, Nihal; Roberts, Brock; Moens, Cecilia B.; Rubel, Edwin W.; Raible, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Hair cells possess a single primary cilium, called the kinocilium, early in development. While the kinocilium is lost in auditory hair cells of most species it is maintained in vestibular hair cells. It has generally been believed that the primary role of the kinocilium and cilia-associated genes in hair cells is in the establishment of the polarity of actin-based stereocilia, the hair cell mechanotransduction apparatus. Through genetic screening and testing of candidate genes in zebrafish (Danio rerio) we have found that mutations in multiple cilia genes implicated in intraflagellar transport (dync2h1, wdr35, ift88, and traf3ip), and the ciliary transition zone (cc2d2a, mks1, and cep290) lead to resistance to aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death. These genes appear to have differing roles in hair cells, as mutations in intraflagellar transport genes, but not transition zone genes, lead to defects in kinocilia formation and processes dependent upon hair cell mechanotransduction activity. These mutants highlight a novel role of cilia-associated genes in hair cells, and provide powerful tools for further study. PMID:27207957

  17. Cilia-Associated Genes Play Differing Roles in Aminoglycoside-Induced Hair Cell Death in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Stawicki, Tamara M; Hernandez, Liana; Esterberg, Robert; Linbo, Tor; Owens, Kelly N; Shah, Arish N; Thapa, Nihal; Roberts, Brock; Moens, Cecilia B; Rubel, Edwin W; Raible, David W

    2016-01-01

    Hair cells possess a single primary cilium, called the kinocilium, early in development. While the kinocilium is lost in auditory hair cells of most species it is maintained in vestibular hair cells. It has generally been believed that the primary role of the kinocilium and cilia-associated genes in hair cells is in the establishment of the polarity of actin-based stereocilia, the hair cell mechanotransduction apparatus. Through genetic screening and testing of candidate genes in zebrafish (Danio rerio) we have found that mutations in multiple cilia genes implicated in intraflagellar transport (dync2h1, wdr35, ift88, and traf3ip), and the ciliary transition zone (cc2d2a, mks1, and cep290) lead to resistance to aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death. These genes appear to have differing roles in hair cells, as mutations in intraflagellar transport genes, but not transition zone genes, lead to defects in kinocilia formation and processes dependent upon hair cell mechanotransduction activity. These mutants highlight a novel role of cilia-associated genes in hair cells, and provide powerful tools for further study. PMID:27207957

  18. Resistance-nodulation-cell division-type efflux pump involved in aminoglycoside resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii strain BM4454.

    PubMed

    Magnet, S; Courvalin, P; Lambert, T

    2001-12-01

    Multidrug-resistant strain Acinetobacter baumannii BM4454 was isolated from a patient with a urinary tract infection. The adeB gene, which encodes a resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) protein, was detected in this strain by PCR with two degenerate oligodeoxynucleotides. Insertional inactivation of adeB in BM4454, which generated BM4454-1, showed that the corresponding protein was responsible for aminoglycoside resistance and was involved in the level of susceptibility to other drugs including fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines, chloramphenicol, erythromycin, trimethoprim, and ethidium bromide. Study of ethidium bromide accumulation in BM4454 and BM4454-1, in the presence or in the absence of carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, demonstrated that AdeB was responsible for the decrease in intracellular ethidium bromide levels in a proton motive force-dependent manner. The adeB gene was part of a cluster that included adeA and adeC which encodes proteins homologous to membrane fusion and outer membrane proteins of RND-type three-component efflux systems, respectively. The products of two upstream open reading frames encoding a putative two-component regulatory system might be involved in the regulation of expression of the adeABC gene cluster. PMID:11709311

  19. Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division-Type Efflux Pump Involved in Aminoglycoside Resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii Strain BM4454

    PubMed Central

    Magnet, Sophie; Courvalin, Patrice; Lambert, Thierry

    2001-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant strain Acinetobacter baumannii BM4454 was isolated from a patient with a urinary tract infection. The adeB gene, which encodes a resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) protein, was detected in this strain by PCR with two degenerate oligodeoxynucleotides. Insertional inactivation of adeB in BM4454, which generated BM4454-1, showed that the corresponding protein was responsible for aminoglycoside resistance and was involved in the level of susceptibility to other drugs including fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines, chloramphenicol, erythromycin, trimethoprim, and ethidium bromide. Study of ethidium bromide accumulation in BM4454 and BM4454-1, in the presence or in the absence of carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, demonstrated that AdeB was responsible for the decrease in intracellular ethidium bromide levels in a proton motive force-dependent manner. The adeB gene was part of a cluster that included adeA and adeC which encodes proteins homologous to membrane fusion and outer membrane proteins of RND-type three-component efflux systems, respectively. The products of two upstream open reading frames encoding a putative two-component regulatory system might be involved in the regulation of expression of the adeABC gene cluster. PMID:11709311

  20. Identification of genes involved in low aminoglycoside-induced SOS response in Vibrio cholerae: a role for transcription stalling and Mfd helicase

    PubMed Central

    Baharoglu, Zeynep; Babosan, Anamaria; Mazel, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Sub-inhibitory concentrations (sub-MIC) of antibiotics play a very important role in selection and development of resistances. Unlike Escherichia coli, Vibrio cholerae induces its SOS response in presence of sub-MIC aminoglycosides. A role for oxidized guanine residues was observed, but the mechanisms of this induction remained unclear. To select for V. cholerae mutants that do not induce low aminoglycoside-mediated SOS induction, we developed a genetic screen that renders induction of SOS lethal. We identified genes involved in this pathway using two strategies, inactivation by transposition and gene overexpression. Interestingly, we obtained mutants inactivated for the expression of proteins known to destabilize the RNA polymerase complex. Reconstruction of the corresponding mutants confirmed their specific involvement in induction of SOS by low aminoglycoside concentrations. We propose that DNA lesions formed on aminoglycoside treatment are repaired through the formation of single-stranded DNA intermediates, inducing SOS. Inactivation of functions that dislodge RNA polymerase leads to prolonged stalling on these lesions, which hampers SOS induction and repair and reduces viability under antibiotic stress. The importance of these mechanisms is illustrated by a reduction of aminoglycoside sub-MIC. Our results point to a central role for transcription blocking at DNA lesions in SOS induction, so far underestimated. PMID:24319148

  1. In70 of plasmid pAX22, a bla(VIM-1)-containing integron carrying a new aminoglycoside phosphotransferase gene cassette.

    PubMed

    Riccio, M L; Pallecchi, L; Fontana, R; Rossolini, G M

    2001-04-01

    An Achromobacter xylosoxydans strain showing broad-spectrum resistance to beta-lactams (including carbapenems) and aminoglycosides was isolated at the University Hospital of Verona (Verona, Italy). This strain was found to produce metallo-beta-lactamase activity and to harbor a 30-kb nonconjugative plasmid, named pAX22, carrying a bla(VIM-1) determinant inserted into a class 1 integron. Characterization of this integron, named In70, revealed an original array of four gene cassettes containing, respectively, the bla(VIM-1) gene and three different aminoglycoside resistance determinants, including an aacA4 allele, a new aph-like gene named aphA15, and an aadA1 allele. The aphA15 gene is the first example of an aph-like gene carried on a mobile gene cassette, and its product exhibits close similarity to the APH(3')-IIa aminoglycoside phosphotransferase encoded by Tn5 (36% amino acid identity) and to an APH(3')-IIb enzyme from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (38% amino acid identity). Expression of the cloned aphA15 gene in Escherichia coli reduced the susceptibility to kanamycin and neomycin as well as (slightly) to amikacin, netilmicin, and streptomycin. Characterization of the 5' and 3' conserved segments of In70 and of their flanking regions showed that In70 belongs to the group of class 1 integrons associated with defective transposon derivatives originating from Tn402-like elements. The structure of the 3' conserved segment indicates the closest ancestry with members of the In0-In2 lineage. In70, with its array of cassette-borne resistance genes, can mediate broad-spectrum resistance to most beta-lactams and aminoglycosides. PMID:11257042

  2. In70 of Plasmid pAX22, a blaVIM-1-Containing Integron Carrying a New Aminoglycoside Phosphotransferase Gene Cassette

    PubMed Central

    Riccio, Maria Letizia; Pallecchi, Lucia; Fontana, Roberta; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2001-01-01

    An Achromobacter xylosoxydans strain showing broad-spectrum resistance to β-lactams (including carbapenems) and aminoglycosides was isolated at the University Hospital of Verona (Verona, Italy). This strain was found to produce metallo-β-lactamase activity and to harbor a 30-kb nonconjugative plasmid, named pAX22, carrying a blaVIM-1 determinant inserted into a class 1 integron. Characterization of this integron, named In70, revealed an original array of four gene cassettes containing, respectively, the blaVIM-1 gene and three different aminoglycoside resistance determinants, including an aacA4 allele, a new aph-like gene named aphA15, and an aadA1 allele. The aphA15 gene is the first example of an aph-like gene carried on a mobile gene cassette, and its product exhibits close similarity to the APH(3′)-IIa aminoglycoside phosphotransferase encoded by Tn5 (36% amino acid identity) and to an APH(3′)-IIb enzyme from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (38% amino acid identity). Expression of the cloned aphA15 gene in Escherichia coli reduced the susceptibility to kanamycin and neomycin as well as (slightly) to amikacin, netilmicin, and streptomycin. Characterization of the 5′ and 3′ conserved segments of In70 and of their flanking regions showed that In70 belongs to the group of class 1 integrons associated with defective transposon derivatives originating from Tn402-like elements. The structure of the 3′ conserved segment indicates the closest ancestry with members of the In0-In2 lineage. In70, with its array of cassette-borne resistance genes, can mediate broad-spectrum resistance to most β-lactams and aminoglycosides. PMID:11257042

  3. The MisR Response Regulator Is Necessary for Intrinsic Cationic Antimicrobial Peptide and Aminoglycoside Resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Kandler, Justin L; Holley, Concerta L; Reimche, Jennifer L; Dhulipala, Vijaya; Balthazar, Jacqueline T; Muszyński, Artur; Carlson, Russell W; Shafer, William M

    2016-08-01

    During infection, the sexually transmitted pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae (the gonococcus) encounters numerous host-derived antimicrobials, including cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) produced by epithelial and phagocytic cells. CAMPs have both direct and indirect killing mechanisms and help link the innate and adaptive immune responses during infection. Gonococcal CAMP resistance is likely important for avoidance of host nonoxidative killing systems expressed by polymorphonuclear granulocytes (e.g., neutrophils) and intracellular survival. Previously studied gonococcal CAMP resistance mechanisms include modification of lipid A with phosphoethanolamine by LptA and export of CAMPs by the MtrCDE efflux pump. In the related pathogen Neisseria meningitidis, a two-component regulatory system (2CRS) termed MisR-MisS has been shown to contribute to the capacity of the meningococcus to resist CAMP killing. We report that the gonococcal MisR response regulator but not the MisS sensor kinase is involved in constitutive and inducible CAMP resistance and is also required for intrinsic low-level resistance to aminoglycosides. The 4- to 8-fold increased susceptibility of misR-deficient gonococci to CAMPs and aminoglycosides was independent of phosphoethanolamine decoration of lipid A and the levels of the MtrCDE efflux pump and seemed to correlate with a general increase in membrane permeability. Transcriptional profiling and biochemical studies confirmed that expression of lptA and mtrCDE was not impacted by the loss of MisR. However, several genes encoding proteins involved in membrane integrity and redox control gave evidence of being MisR regulated. We propose that MisR modulates the levels of gonococcal susceptibility to antimicrobials by influencing the expression of genes involved in determining membrane integrity. PMID:27216061

  4. Dissecting the cosubstrate structure requirements of the Staphylococcus aureus aminoglycoside resistance enzyme ANT(4').

    PubMed

    Porter, Vanessa R; Green, Keith D; Zolova, Olga E; Houghton, Jacob L; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2010-12-01

    Aminoglycosides are important antibiotics used against a wide range of pathogens. As a mechanism of defense, bacteria have evolved enzymes able to inactivate these drugs by regio-selectively adding a variety of functionalities (acetyl, phospho, and nucelotidyl groups) to their scaffolds. The aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferase ANT(4') is one of the most prevalent and unique modifying-enzymes. Here, by TLC, HRMS, and colorimetric assays, we demonstrate that the resistance enzyme ANT(4') from Staphylococcus aureus is highly substrate and cosubstrate promiscuous. We show that deoxy-ribonucleotide triphosphates (dNTPs) are better cosubstrates than NTPs. We demonstrate that the position of the triphosphate group (5' and not 3') on the ribose/deoxyribose ring is important for recognition by ANT(4'), and that NTPs with larger substituents at the 3'-position of the ribose ring are not cosubstrates for ANT(4'). We confirm that for all aminoglycosides tested, the respective nucleotidylated products are completely inactive. These results provide valuable insights into the development of strategies to combat the ever-growing bacterial resistance problem. PMID:21040710

  5. Chaperonin GroEL/GroES Over-Expression Promotes Aminoglycoside Resistance and Reduces Drug Susceptibilities in Escherichia coli Following Exposure to Sublethal Aminoglycoside Doses

    PubMed Central

    Goltermann, Lise; Sarusie, Menachem V.; Bentin, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is an increasing challenge to modern healthcare. Aminoglycoside antibiotics cause translation corruption and protein misfolding and aggregation in Escherichia coli. We previously showed that chaperonin GroEL/GroES depletion and over-expression sensitize and promote short-term tolerance, respectively, to this drug class. Here, we show that chaperonin GroEL/GroES over-expression accelerates acquisition of streptomycin resistance and reduces susceptibility to several other antibiotics following sub-lethal streptomycin antibiotic exposure. Chaperonin buffering could provide a novel mechanism for emergence of antibiotic resistance. PMID:26858694

  6. Chaperonin GroEL/GroES Over-Expression Promotes Aminoglycoside Resistance and Reduces Drug Susceptibilities in Escherichia coli Following Exposure to Sublethal Aminoglycoside Doses.

    PubMed

    Goltermann, Lise; Sarusie, Menachem V; Bentin, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is an increasing challenge to modern healthcare. Aminoglycoside antibiotics cause translation corruption and protein misfolding and aggregation in Escherichia coli. We previously showed that chaperonin GroEL/GroES depletion and over-expression sensitize and promote short-term tolerance, respectively, to this drug class. Here, we show that chaperonin GroEL/GroES over-expression accelerates acquisition of streptomycin resistance and reduces susceptibility to several other antibiotics following sub-lethal streptomycin antibiotic exposure. Chaperonin buffering could provide a novel mechanism for emergence of antibiotic resistance. PMID:26858694

  7. Mechanism of Enhanced Activity of Liposome-Entrapped Aminoglycosides against Resistant Strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Mugabe, Clement; Halwani, Majed; Azghani, Ali O.; Lafrenie, Robert M.; Omri, Abdelwahab

    2006-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is inherently resistant to most conventional antibiotics. The mechanism of resistance of this bacterium is mainly associated with the low permeability of its outer membrane to these agents. We sought to assess the bactericidal efficacy of liposome-entrapped aminoglycosides against resistant clinical strains of P. aeruginosa and to define the mechanism of liposome-bacterium interactions. Aminoglycosides were incorporated into liposomes, and the bactericidal efficacies of both free and liposomal drugs were evaluated. To define the mechanism of liposome-bacterium interactions, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), flow cytometry, lipid mixing assay, and immunocytochemistry were employed. Encapsulation of aminoglycosides into liposomes significantly increased their antibacterial activity against the resistant strains used in this study (MICs of ≥32 versus ≤8 μg/ml). TEM observations showed that liposomes interact intimately with the outer membrane of P. aeruginosa, leading to the membrane deformation. The flow cytometry and lipid mixing assays confirmed liposome-bacterial membrane fusion, which increased as a function of incubation time. The maximum fusion rate was 54.3% ± 1.5% for an antibiotic-sensitive strain of P. aeruginosa and 57.8% ± 1.9% for a drug-resistant strain. The fusion between liposomes and P. aeruginosa significantly enhanced the antibiotics' penetration into the bacterial cells (3.2 ± 2.3 versus 24.2 ± 6.2 gold particles/bacterium, P ≤ 0.001). Our data suggest that liposome-entrapped antibiotics could successfully resolve infections caused by antibiotic-resistant P. aeruginosa through an enhanced mechanism of drug entry into the bacterial cells. PMID:16723560

  8. Mechanism of enhanced activity of liposome-entrapped aminoglycosides against resistant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Mugabe, Clement; Halwani, Majed; Azghani, Ali O; Lafrenie, Robert M; Omri, Abdelwahab

    2006-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is inherently resistant to most conventional antibiotics. The mechanism of resistance of this bacterium is mainly associated with the low permeability of its outer membrane to these agents. We sought to assess the bactericidal efficacy of liposome-entrapped aminoglycosides against resistant clinical strains of P. aeruginosa and to define the mechanism of liposome-bacterium interactions. Aminoglycosides were incorporated into liposomes, and the bactericidal efficacies of both free and liposomal drugs were evaluated. To define the mechanism of liposome-bacterium interactions, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), flow cytometry, lipid mixing assay, and immunocytochemistry were employed. Encapsulation of aminoglycosides into liposomes significantly increased their antibacterial activity against the resistant strains used in this study (MICs of > or =32 versus < or =8 microg/ml). TEM observations showed that liposomes interact intimately with the outer membrane of P. aeruginosa, leading to the membrane deformation. The flow cytometry and lipid mixing assays confirmed liposome-bacterial membrane fusion, which increased as a function of incubation time. The maximum fusion rate was 54.3% +/- 1.5% for an antibiotic-sensitive strain of P. aeruginosa and 57.8% +/- 1.9% for a drug-resistant strain. The fusion between liposomes and P. aeruginosa significantly enhanced the antibiotics' penetration into the bacterial cells (3.2 +/- 2.3 versus 24.2 +/- 6.2 gold particles/bacterium, P < or = 0.001). Our data suggest that liposome-entrapped antibiotics could successfully resolve infections caused by antibiotic-resistant P. aeruginosa through an enhanced mechanism of drug entry into the bacterial cells. PMID:16723560

  9. Distribution of innate efflux-mediated aminoglycoside resistance among different Achromobacter species

    PubMed Central

    Bador, J.; Neuwirth, C.; Liszczynski, P.; Mézier, M.-C.; Chrétiennot, M.; Grenot, E.; Chapuis, A.; de Curraize, C.; Amoureux, L.

    2015-01-01

    Achromobacter spp. are emerging respiratory pathogens in cystic fibrosis patients. Since 2013 the genus Achromobacter includes 15 species for which innate antibiotic resistance is unknown. Previously the AxyXY-OprZ efflux system has been described to confer aminoglycoside (AG) resistance in A. xylosoxidans. Nevertheless, some Achromobacter spp. strains are susceptible to AG. This study including 49 Achromobacter isolates reveals that AG resistance is correlated with different Achromobacter spp. It is noteworthy that the axyXY-oprZ operon is detected only in AG-resistant species, including the most frequently encountered in cystic fibrosis patients: A. xylosoxidans, A. ruhlandii, A. dolens and A. insuavis. PMID:26904200

  10. Berberine Is a Novel Type Efflux Inhibitor Which Attenuates the MexXY-Mediated Aminoglycoside Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Yuji; Nakashima, Ken-ichi; Nishino, Kunihiko; Kotani, Kenta; Tomida, Junko; Inoue, Makoto; Kawamura, Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    The emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa infections is of great concern, as very few agents are effective against strains of this species. Methanolic extracts from the Coptidis Rhizoma (the rhizomes of Coptis japonica var. major Satake) or Phellodendri Cortex (the bark of Phellodendron chinense Schneider) markedly reduced resistance to anti-pseudomonal aminoglycosides (e.g., amikacin) in multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa strains. Berberine, the most abundant benzylisoquinoline alkaloid in the two extracts, reduced aminoglycoside resistance of P. aeruginosa via a mechanism that required the MexXY multidrug efflux system; berberine also reduced aminoglycoside MICs in Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Burkholderia cepacia, two species that harbor intrinsic multidrug efflux systems very similar to the MexXY. Furthermore this compound inhibited MexXY-dependent antibiotic resistance of other classes including cephalosporins (cefepime), macrolides (erythromycin), and lincosamides (lincomycin) demonstrated using a pseudomonad lacking the four other major Mex pumps. Although phenylalanine-arginine beta-naphthylamide (PAβN), a well-known efflux inhibitor, antagonized aminoglycoside in a MexXY-dependent manner, a lower concentration of berberine was sufficient to reduce amikacin resistance of P. aeruginosa in the presence of PAβN. Moreover, berberine enhanced the synergistic effects of amikacin and piperacillin (and vice versa) in multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa strains. Thus, berberine appears to be a novel type inhibitor of the MexXY-dependent aminoglycoside efflux in P. aeruginosa. As aminoglycosides are molecules of choice to treat severe infections the clinical impact is potentially important. PMID:27547203

  11. Aminoglycoside-Resistant Aeromonas hydrophila as Part of a Polymicrobial Infection following a Traumatic Fall into Freshwater▿

    PubMed Central

    Shak, Joshua R.; Whitaker, Jennifer A.; Ribner, Bruce S.; Burd, Eileen M.

    2011-01-01

    Amikacin is a first-line treatment for Aeromonas infection due to high efficacy. There are few reports of aminoglycoside-resistant Aeromonas spp. We report a soft tissue infection containing multiple pathogens, including a strain of Aeromonas hydrophila resistant to amikacin, tobramycin, and multiple cephalosporins. PMID:21209173

  12. Development and evaluation of immunochromatography to detect Gram-negative bacteria producing ArmA 16S rRNA methylase responsible for aminoglycoside resistance.

    PubMed

    Oshiro, Satoshi; Tada, Tatsuya; Kameoka, Yousuke; Suzuki, Kazuo; Ohmagari, Norio; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Kirikae, Teruo

    2015-11-01

    Rapid and reliable detection of aminoglycoside-resistant bacteria is an important infection-control measure and a crucial aspect of antimicrobial chemotherapy. The enzyme 16S rRNA methylase has been shown to mediate aminoglycoside resistance in bacteria. This study describes a newly developed immunochromatographic assay using novel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that recognize ArmA 16S rRNA methylase. Epitope mapping showed that these mAbs recognized amino acids 1-93 of ArmA, which consists of 257 amino acids. Evaluation of the assay using ArmA producing and non-producing bacterial species, as well as bacteria producing other types of 16S rRNA methylases, indicated that immunochromatographic detection of the ArmA-type 16S rRNA methylase was fully consistent with PCR analysis for armA genes, with all immunochromatographically positive strains being resistant to aminoglycosides (MIC≥128μg/mL). The detection limit of the assay was 12ng ArmA. These findings indicate that this assay can be used for the rapid and reliable detection of the production of ArmA 16S rRNA methylase by Gram-negative bacteria, including Acinetobacter baumannii and Escherichia coli. PMID:26381663

  13. Structural and Molecular Basis for Resistance to Aminoglycoside Antibiotics by the Adenylyltransferase ANT(2″)-Ia

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Georgina; Stogios, Peter J.; Savchenko, Alexei

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT   The aminoglycosides are highly effective broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents. However, their efficacy is diminished due to enzyme-mediated covalent modification, which reduces affinity of the drug for the target ribosome. One of the most prevalent aminoglycoside resistance enzymes in Gram-negative pathogens is the adenylyltransferase ANT(2″)-Ia, which confers resistance to gentamicin, tobramycin, and kanamycin. Despite the importance of this enzyme in drug resistance, its structure and molecular mechanism have been elusive. This study describes the structural and mechanistic basis for adenylylation of aminoglycosides by the ANT(2″)-Ia enzyme. ANT(2″)-Ia confers resistance by magnesium-dependent transfer of a nucleoside monophosphate (AMP) to the 2″-hydroxyl of aminoglycoside substrates containing a 2-deoxystreptamine core. The catalyzed reaction follows a direct AMP transfer mechanism from ATP to the substrate antibiotic. Central to catalysis is the coordination of two Mg2+ ions, positioning of the modifiable substrate ring, and the presence of a catalytic base (Asp86). Comparative structural analysis revealed that ANT(2″)-Ia has a two-domain structure with an N-terminal active-site architecture that is conserved among other antibiotic nucleotidyltransferases, including Lnu(A), LinB, ANT(4′)-Ia, ANT(4″)-Ib, and ANT(6)-Ia. There is also similarity between the nucleotidyltransferase fold of ANT(2″)-Ia and DNA polymerase β. This similarity is consistent with evolution from a common ancestor, with the nucleotidyltransferase fold having adapted for activity against chemically distinct molecules. Importance   To successfully manage the threat associated with multidrug-resistant infectious diseases, innovative therapeutic strategies need to be developed. One such approach involves the enhancement or potentiation of existing antibiotics against resistant strains of bacteria. The reduction in clinical usefulness of the aminoglycosides is a

  14. Structural and molecular basis for resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics by the adenylyltransferase ANT(2″)-Ia.

    PubMed

    Cox, Georgina; Stogios, Peter J; Savchenko, Alexei; Wright, Gerard D

    2015-01-01

    The aminoglycosides are highly effective broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents. However, their efficacy is diminished due to enzyme-mediated covalent modification, which reduces affinity of the drug for the target ribosome. One of the most prevalent aminoglycoside resistance enzymes in Gram-negative pathogens is the adenylyltransferase ANT(2″)-Ia, which confers resistance to gentamicin, tobramycin, and kanamycin. Despite the importance of this enzyme in drug resistance, its structure and molecular mechanism have been elusive. This study describes the structural and mechanistic basis for adenylylation of aminoglycosides by the ANT(2″)-Ia enzyme. ANT(2″)-Ia confers resistance by magnesium-dependent transfer of a nucleoside monophosphate (AMP) to the 2″-hydroxyl of aminoglycoside substrates containing a 2-deoxystreptamine core. The catalyzed reaction follows a direct AMP transfer mechanism from ATP to the substrate antibiotic. Central to catalysis is the coordination of two Mg(2+) ions, positioning of the modifiable substrate ring, and the presence of a catalytic base (Asp86). Comparative structural analysis revealed that ANT(2″)-Ia has a two-domain structure with an N-terminal active-site architecture that is conserved among other antibiotic nucleotidyltransferases, including Lnu(A), LinB, ANT(4')-Ia, ANT(4″)-Ib, and ANT(6)-Ia. There is also similarity between the nucleotidyltransferase fold of ANT(2″)-Ia and DNA polymerase β. This similarity is consistent with evolution from a common ancestor, with the nucleotidyltransferase fold having adapted for activity against chemically distinct molecules. IMPORTANCE  : To successfully manage the threat associated with multidrug-resistant infectious diseases, innovative therapeutic strategies need to be developed. One such approach involves the enhancement or potentiation of existing antibiotics against resistant strains of bacteria. The reduction in clinical usefulness of the aminoglycosides is a particular

  15. Distribution of 16S rRNA methylases among different species of Gram-negative bacilli with high-level resistance to aminoglycosides.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y; Yu, H; Guo, Q; Xu, X; Ye, X; Wu, S; Guo, Y; Wang, M

    2010-11-01

    16S rRNA methylases confer high-level resistance to most aminoglycosides in Gram-negative bacteria. Seven 16S rRNA methylase genes, armA, rmtA, rmtB, rmtC, rmtD, rmtE and npmA, have been identified since 2003. We studied the distribution of methylase genes in more than 200 aminoglycoside-resistant Gram-negative clinical isolates collected in 2007 at our hospital in Shanghai, China. 16S rRNA methylase genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) among 217 consecutive clinical isolates of Gram-negative bacilli resistant to gentamicin and amikacin by a disk diffusion method. 16S rRNA methylase genes were present in 97.5% (193/198) of clinical isolates highly resistant to amikacin (≥512 μg/ml), with armA and rmtB detected in 67.2 and 30.3% of strains, respectively, while no 16S rRNA methylase genes were detected in 19 strains with amikacin minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ≤256 μg/ml. armA or rmtB genes were detected in 100% of 104 strains of Enterobacteriaceae, and these two genes were equally represented (49 vs. 55 strains). Genes for armA or rmtB were detected in 94.7% (89/94) of Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, and armA was predominant (84 vs. 5 strains with rmtB). No rmtA, rmtC, rmtD or npmA genes were found. Enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequence (ERIC-PCR) indicated that armA and rmtB genes were spread by both horizontal transfer and clonal dissemination. PMID:20614151

  16. Self-transmissible plasmids in staphylococci that encode resistance to aminoglycosides.

    PubMed Central

    Archer, G L; Johnston, J L

    1983-01-01

    High-level resistance to gentamicin, tobramycin, and kanamycin was transferred between staphylococci of the same and different species by filter mating. Resistance and transfer proficiency were mediated by plasmids ranging from 38 to 54 kilobases in size. All of the plasmids encoded intermediate resistance to amikacin and netilmicin and resistance to ethidium bromide; some encoded beta-lactamase production. None of these plasmids carried resistance to other antibiotics or heavy metals. Transfer of antibiotic resistance occurred by a mechanism similar to that of conjugation, because it was DNase resistant, required cell-to-cell contact, and did not appear to involve phage. The participation of phage in transfer appeared to be unlikely because mijtomicin C-induced lysates of donor isolates did not mediate transfer, filter mating transfer proceeded at high frequency between nonlysogenic donor and recipient cells, and transfer of the aminoglycoside resistance plasmid mobilized the transfer of as many as five additional plasmids. All 17 gentamicin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and all 6 Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates obtained from an outbreak of staphylococcal infections in a newborn nursery contained conjugative plasmids, as did all 6 gentamicin-resistant S. aureus isolates from bacteremic adults. However, only 3 of 10 gentamicin-resistant S. epidermidis isolates from colonized cardiac surgery patients and 1 of 2 S. epidermidis isolates from patients with prosthetic valve endocarditis transferred gentamicin resistance by filter mating. The recent increase in nosocomial infections caused by gentamicin-resistant staphylococci may be partially explained by the evolution of self-transmissible plasmids in these isolates. Images PMID:6625557

  17. Transferable Resistance to Aminoglycosides by Methylation of G1405 in 16S rRNA and to Hydrophilic Fluoroquinolones by QepA-Mediated Efflux in Escherichia coli▿

    PubMed Central

    Périchon, Bruno; Courvalin, Patrice; Galimand, Marc

    2007-01-01

    Plasmid pIP1206 was detected in Escherichia coli strain 1540 during the screening of clinical isolates of Enterobacteriaceae for high-level resistance to aminoglycosides. The sequence of this IncFI conjugative plasmid of ca. 100 kb was partially determined. pIP1206 carried the rmtB gene for a ribosome methyltransferase that was shown to modify the N7 position of nucleotide G1405, located in the A site of 16S rRNA. It also contained the qepA (quinolone efflux pump) gene that encodes a 14-transmembrane-segment putative efflux pump belonging to the major facilitator superfamily of proton-dependent transporters. Disruption of membrane proton potential by the efflux pump inhibitor carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone in a transconjugant harboring the qepA gene resulted in elevation of norfloxacin accumulation. The transporter conferred resistance to the hydrophilic quinolones norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin. PMID:17470656

  18. Aminoglycoside resistance 16S rRNA methyltransferases block endogenous methylation, affect translation efficiency and fitness of the host

    PubMed Central

    Lioy, Virginia S.; Goussard, Sylvie; Guerineau, Vincent; Yoon, Eun-Jeong; Courvalin, Patrice; Galimand, Marc; Grillot-Courvalin, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    In Gram-negative bacteria, acquired 16S rRNA methyltransferases ArmA and NpmA confer high-level resistance to all clinically useful aminoglycosides by modifying, respectively, G1405 and A1408 in the A-site. These enzymes must coexist with several endogenous methyltransferases that are essential for fine-tuning of the decoding center, such as RsmH and RsmI in Escherichia coli, which methylate C1402 and RsmF C1407. The resistance methyltransferases have a contrasting distribution—ArmA has spread worldwide, whereas a single clinical isolate producing NpmA has been reported. The rate of dissemination of resistance depends on the fitness cost associated with its expression. We have compared ArmA and NpmA in isogenic Escherichia coli harboring the corresponding structural genes and their inactive point mutants cloned under the control of their native constitutive promoter in the stable plasmid pGB2. Growth rate determination and competition experiments showed that ArmA had a fitness cost due to methylation of G1405, whereas NpmA conferred only a slight disadvantage to the host due to production of the enzyme. MALDI MS indicated that ArmA impeded one of the methylations at C1402 by RsmI, and not at C1407 as previously proposed, whereas NpmA blocked the activity of RsmF at C1407. A dual luciferase assay showed that methylation at G1405 and A1408 and lack of methylation at C1407 affect translation accuracy. These results indicate that resistance methyltransferases impair endogenous methylation with different consequences on cell fitness. PMID:24398977

  19. Ribozyme-based aminoglycoside switches of gene expression engineered by genetic selection in S. cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Klauser, Benedikt; Atanasov, Janina; Siewert, Lena K; Hartig, Jörg S

    2015-05-15

    Systems for conditional gene expression are powerful tools in basic research as well as in biotechnology. For future applications, it is of great importance to engineer orthogonal genetic switches that function reliably in diverse contexts. RNA-based switches have the advantage that effector molecules interact immediately with regulatory modules inserted into the target RNAs, getting rid of the need of transcription factors usually mediating genetic control. Artificial riboswitches are characterized by their simplicity and small size accompanied by a high degree of modularity. We have recently reported a series of hammerhead ribozyme-based artificial riboswitches that allow for post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression via switching mRNA, tRNA, or rRNA functions. A more widespread application was so far hampered by moderate switching performances and a limited set of effector molecules available. Here, we report the re-engineering of hammerhead ribozymes in order to respond efficiently to aminoglycoside antibiotics. We first established an in vivo selection protocol in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that enabled us to search large sequence spaces for optimized switches. We then envisioned and characterized a novel strategy of attaching the aptamer to the ribozyme catalytic core, increasing the design options for rendering the ribozyme ligand-dependent. These innovations enabled the development of neomycin-dependent RNA modules that switch gene expression up to 25-fold. The presented aminoglycoside-responsive riboswitches belong to the best-performing RNA-based genetic regulators reported so far. The developed in vivo selection protocol should allow for sampling of large sequence spaces for engineering of further optimized riboswitches. PMID:24871672

  20. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid enhances the activities of aminoglycosides against methicillin- sensitive and resistant Staphylococcus aureus in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham-Oakes, Edward; Soren, Odel; Moussa, Caroline; Rathor, Getika; Liu, Yingjun; Coates, Anthony; Hu, Yanmin

    2015-01-01

    Infections caused by methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) are prevalent. MRSA infections are difficult to treat and there are no new classes of antibiotics produced to the market to treat infections caused by the resistant bacteria. Therefore, using antibiotic enhancers to rescue existing classes of antibiotics is an attractive strategy. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) is an antioxidant compound found in extracts from plant Larrea Tridentata. It exhibits antimicrobial activity and may target bacterial cell membrane. Combination efficacies of NDGA with many classes of antibiotics were examined by chequerboard method against 200 clinical isolates of MRSA and MSSA. NDGA in combination with gentamicin, neomycin, and tobramycin was examined by time-kill assays. The synergistic combinations of NDGA and aminoglycosides were tested in vivo using a murine skin infection model. Calculations of the fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) showed that NDGA when combined with gentamicin, neomycin, or tobramycin displayed synergistic activities in more than 97% of MSSA and MRSA, respectively. Time kill analysis demonstrated that NDGA significantly augmented the activities of these aminoglycosides against MRSA and MSSA in vitro and in murine skin infection model. The enhanced activity of NDGA resides on its ability to damage bacterial cell membrane leading to accumulation of the antibiotics inside bacterial cells. We demonstrated that NDGA strongly revived the therapeutic potencies of aminoglycosides in vitro and in vivo. This combinational strategy could contribute major clinical implications to treat antibiotic resistant bacterial infections. PMID:26579101

  1. Expansion of the aminoglycoside-resistance 16S rRNA (m1A1408) methyltransferase family: expression and functional characterization of four hypothetical enzymes of diverse bacterial origin

    PubMed Central

    Witek, Marta A.; Conn, Graeme L.

    2014-01-01

    The global dissemination, potential activity in diverse species and broad resistance spectrum conferred by the aminoglycoside-resistance ribosomal RNA methyltransferases make them a significant potential new threat to the efficacy of aminoglycoside antibiotics in the treatment of serious bacterial infections. The N1 methylation of adenosine 1408 (m1A1408) confers resistance to structurally diverse aminoglycosides, including kanamycin, neomycin and apramycin. The limited analyses to date of the enzymes responsible have identified common features but also potential differences in their molecular details of action. Therefore, with the goal of expanding the known 16S rRNA (m1A1408) methyltransferase family as a platform for developing a more complete mechanistic understanding, we report here the cloning, expression and functional analyses of four hypothetical aminoglycoside-resistance rRNA methyltransferases from recent genome sequences of diverse bacterial species. Each of the genes produced a soluble, folded protein with a secondary structure, as determined from circular dichroism (CD) spectra, consistent with enzymes for which high-resolution structures are available. For each enzyme, antibiotic minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assays revealed a resistance spectrum characteristic of the known 16S rRNA (m1A1408) methyltransferases and the modified nucleotide was confirmed by reverse transcription as A1408. In common with other family members, higher binding affinity for the methylation reaction by-product S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) than the cosubstrate S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) was observed for three methyltransferases, while one unexpectedly showed no measurable affinity for SAH. Collectively, these results confirm each hypothetical enzyme is a functional 16S rRNA (m1A1408) methyltransferase but also point to further potential mechanistic variation within this enzyme family. PMID:24963996

  2. Aminoglycoside Resistance in Clinical Isolates of Gram Negative Bacilli at the University Hospital of the West Indies, Jamaica: Comparison of Two Time Periods

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds-Campbell, G; Nicholson, A; Christian, N; Hardie, R; Cook, J

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Aminoglycosides were introduced into use over 60 years ago. The University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI), a tertiary care teaching hospital, in Kingston, Jamaica, introduced the use of gentamicin in 1973 and amikacin in 1980. This report examined the susceptibility patterns to these agents in 1547 consecutive isolates of Gram negative bacilli (GNB) encountered between September 1 and November 30, 2011, at UHWI and compares the data with that observed previously in 1981 at the same institution. Methods: The Vitek 2 (bioMeriéux, Durham, NC) was used for isolate identification, minimum inhibitory concentration determination and aminoglycoside susceptibility testing. Quality control was done using American Type Culture Collection standard strains of E coli (ATCC 25922) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 27853). Results: Of the 1547 organisms, 267 had resistance to one or both aminoglycosides. Amikacin resistance increased from 0.6% (1981) to 7.2% [2011] (p < 0.05), while gentamicin resistance increased from 6.7% to 14.8% (p < 0.05) for the corresponding period. The majority of samples with aminoglycoside resistant organisms came from the intensive care unit and surgical inpatients. Urine samples persistently produced the largest amount of gentamicin resistant isolates. Conclusions: Although there has been a statistically significant rise in aminoglycoside resistance, aminoglycosides continue to remain highly effective against approximately 83% of GNB despite continuous usage at this institution for over three decades. Continued national surveillance, implementation of infection control policies and antibiotic stewardship are all essential in retaining low resistance levels. PMID:26360679

  3. Inhibition of aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase type Ib-mediated amikacin resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae by zinc and copper pyrithione.

    PubMed

    Chiem, Kevin; Fuentes, Brooke A; Lin, David L; Tran, Tung; Jackson, Alexis; Ramirez, Maria S; Tolmasky, Marcelo E

    2015-09-01

    The in vitro activity of the aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase type Ib [AAC(6')-Ib] was inhibited by CuCl2 with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 2.8 μM. The growth of an amikacin-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae strain isolated from a neonate with meningitis was inhibited when amikacin was supplemented by the addition of Zn(2+) or Cu(2+) in complex with the ionophore pyrithione. Coordination complexes between cations and ionophores could be developed for their use, in combination with aminoglycosides, to treat resistant infections. PMID:26169410

  4. Inhibition of Aminoglycoside 6′-N-Acetyltransferase Type Ib-Mediated Amikacin Resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae by Zinc and Copper Pyrithione

    PubMed Central

    Chiem, Kevin; Fuentes, Brooke A.; Lin, David L.; Tran, Tung; Jackson, Alexis; Ramirez, Maria S.

    2015-01-01

    The in vitro activity of the aminoglycoside 6′-N-acetyltransferase type Ib [AAC(6′)-Ib] was inhibited by CuCl2 with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 2.8 μM. The growth of an amikacin-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae strain isolated from a neonate with meningitis was inhibited when amikacin was supplemented by the addition of Zn2+ or Cu2+ in complex with the ionophore pyrithione. Coordination complexes between cations and ionophores could be developed for their use, in combination with aminoglycosides, to treat resistant infections. PMID:26169410

  5. Structural Basis for the Methylation of G1405 in 16S rRNA by Aminoglycoside Resistance Methyltransferase Sgm from an Antibiotic Producer: a Diversity of Active Sites in m7G Methyltransferases

    SciTech Connect

    Husain, N.; Tkaczuk, K; Tulsidas, S; Kaminska, K; Cubrilo, S; Maravic -Vlahovicek, G; Bujnicki, J; Sivaraman, J

    2010-01-01

    Sgm (Sisomicin-gentamicin methyltransferase) from antibiotic-producing bacterium Micromonospora zionensis is an enzyme that confers resistance to aminoglycosides like gentamicin and sisomicin by specifically methylating G1405 in bacterial 16S rRNA. Sgm belongs to the aminoglycoside resistance methyltransferase (Arm) family of enzymes that have been recently found to spread by horizontal gene transfer among disease-causing bacteria. Structural characterization of Arm enzymes is the key to understand their mechanism of action and to develop inhibitors that would block their activity. Here we report the structure of Sgm in complex with cofactors S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) and S-adenosylhomocysteine (AdoHcy) at 2.0 and 2.1 {angstrom} resolution, respectively, and results of mutagenesis and rRNA footprinting, and protein-substrate docking. We propose the mechanism of methylation of G1405 by Sgm and compare it with other m{sup 7}G methyltransferases, revealing a surprising diversity of active sites and binding modes for the same basic reaction of RNA modification. This analysis can serve as a stepping stone towards developing drugs that would specifically block the activity of Arm methyltransferases and thereby re-sensitize pathogenic bacteria to aminoglycoside antibiotics.

  6. 30S Subunit-Dependent Activation of the Sorangium cellulosum So ce56 Aminoglycoside Resistance-Conferring 16S rRNA Methyltransferase Kmr

    PubMed Central

    Savic, Miloje; Sunita, S.; Zelinskaya, Natalia; Desai, Pooja M.; Macmaster, Rachel; Vinal, Kellie

    2015-01-01

    Methylation of bacterial 16S rRNA within the ribosomal decoding center confers exceptionally high resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics. This resistance mechanism is exploited by aminoglycoside producers for self-protection while functionally equivalent methyltransferases have been acquired by human and animal pathogenic bacteria. Here, we report structural and functional analyses of the Sorangium cellulosum So ce56 aminoglycoside resistance-conferring methyltransferase Kmr. Our results demonstrate that Kmr is a 16S rRNA methyltransferase acting at residue A1408 to confer a canonical aminoglycoside resistance spectrum in Escherichia coli. Kmr possesses a class I methyltransferase core fold but with dramatic differences in the regions which augment this structure to confer substrate specificity in functionally related enzymes. Most strikingly, the region linking core β-strands 6 and 7, which forms part of the S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) binding pocket and contributes to base flipping by the m1A1408 methyltransferase NpmA, is disordered in Kmr, correlating with an exceptionally weak affinity for SAM. Kmr is unexpectedly insensitive to substitutions of residues critical for activity of other 16S rRNA (A1408) methyltransferases and also to the effects of by-product inhibition by S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH). Collectively, our results indicate that adoption of a catalytically competent Kmr conformation and binding of the obligatory cosubstrate SAM must be induced by interaction with the 30S subunit substrate. PMID:25733511

  7. Vancomycin and High Level Aminoglycoside Resistance in Enterococcus spp. in a Tertiary Health Care Centre: A Therapeutic Concern.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Seema; Singla, Pooja; Deep, Antariksha; Bala, Kiran; Sikka, Rama; Garg, Meenu; Chaudhary, Uma

    2016-01-01

    Aims. This study was aimed at knowing the prevalence of vancomycin and high level aminoglycoside resistance in enterococcal strains among clinical samples. Study Design. It was an investigational study. Place and Duration of Study. It was conducted on 100 Enterococcus isolates, in the Department of Microbiology, Pt. BDS PGIMS, Rohtak, over a period of six months from July to December 2014. Methodology. Clinical specimens including urine, pus, blood, semen, vaginal swab, and throat swab were processed and Enterococcus isolates were identified by standard protocols. Antibiotic sensitivity testing of enterococci was performed using Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Results. High level gentamicin resistance (HLGR) was more common in urine samples (41.5%) followed by blood (36%) samples. High level streptomycin resistance (HLSR) was more common in pus samples (52.6%) followed by blood samples (36%). Resistance to vancomycin was maximum in blood isolates. Conclusion. Enterococci resistant to multiple antimicrobial agents have been recognized. Thus, it is crucial for laboratories to provide accurate antimicrobial resistance patterns for enterococci so that effective therapy and infection control measures can be initiated. PMID:27047693

  8. Vancomycin and High Level Aminoglycoside Resistance in Enterococcus spp. in a Tertiary Health Care Centre: A Therapeutic Concern

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Pooja; Deep, Antariksha; Bala, Kiran; Sikka, Rama; Garg, Meenu; Chaudhary, Uma

    2016-01-01

    Aims. This study was aimed at knowing the prevalence of vancomycin and high level aminoglycoside resistance in enterococcal strains among clinical samples. Study Design. It was an investigational study. Place and Duration of Study. It was conducted on 100 Enterococcus isolates, in the Department of Microbiology, Pt. BDS PGIMS, Rohtak, over a period of six months from July to December 2014. Methodology. Clinical specimens including urine, pus, blood, semen, vaginal swab, and throat swab were processed and Enterococcus isolates were identified by standard protocols. Antibiotic sensitivity testing of enterococci was performed using Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Results. High level gentamicin resistance (HLGR) was more common in urine samples (41.5%) followed by blood (36%) samples. High level streptomycin resistance (HLSR) was more common in pus samples (52.6%) followed by blood samples (36%). Resistance to vancomycin was maximum in blood isolates. Conclusion. Enterococci resistant to multiple antimicrobial agents have been recognized. Thus, it is crucial for laboratories to provide accurate antimicrobial resistance patterns for enterococci so that effective therapy and infection control measures can be initiated. PMID:27047693

  9. Partial characterization of an endemic strain of a methicillin- and aminoglycoside-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MARSA) homogeneously resistant to beta-lactam antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Jacob, J; Meers, P D

    1992-06-01

    Selected strains of methicillin- and aminoglycoside-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MARSA) were subjected to a preliminary examination. They were representative of a larger group collected in a routine clinical microbiology laboratory over a period of 2 years. MARSA was endemic in the associated hospital. The characteristics investigated were antimicrobial resistance, the production of beta-lactamase, free and bound coagulase, protein A, DNA-ase, urease, lipase and pigment. The MARSA strains were generally indistinguishable, other than in their antimicrobial resistances. The resistance to methicillin was completely homogeneous. Except with imipenem, growth extended to the edge of discs containing methicillin and the other beta-lactam antibiotics tested when the strains were cultured at 37 degrees C on media without added salt. Homogeneous resistance may confer an epidemiological advantage on strains of this phenotype. PMID:1353087

  10. Crystallographic Studies of Two Bacterial AntibioticResistance Enzymes: Aminoglycoside Phosphotransferase (2')-Ic and GES-1\\beta-lactamase

    SciTech Connect

    Brynes, Laura; /Rensselaer Poly.

    2007-10-31

    Guiana Extended-Spectrum-1 (GES-1) and Aminoglycoside phosphotransferase (2')-Ic (APH(2')-Ic) are two bacteria-produced enzymes that essentially perform the same task: they provide resistance to an array of antibiotics. Both enzymes are part of a growing resistance problem in the medical world. In order to overcome the ever-growing arsenal of antibiotic-resistance enzymes, it is necessary to understand the molecular basis of their action. Accurate structures of these proteins have become an invaluable tool to do this. Using protein crystallography techniques and X-ray diffraction, the protein structure of GES-1 bound to imipenem (an inhibitor) has been solved. Also, APH(2')-Ic has been successfully crystallized, but its structure was unable to be solved using molecular replacement using APH(2')-Ib as a search model. The structure of GES-1, with bound imipenem was solved to a resolution of 1.89A, and though the inhibitor is bound with only moderate occupancy, the structure shows crucial interactions inside the active site that render the enzyme unable to complete the hydrolysis of the {beta}-lactam ring. The APH(2')-Ic dataset could not be matched to the model, APH(2')-Ib, with which it shares 25% sequence identity. The structural information gained from GES-1, and future studies using isomorphous replacement to solve the APH(2')-Ic structure can aid directly to the creation of novel drugs to combat both of these classes of resistance enzymes.

  11. Frequency of Aminoglycoside-Modifying Enzymes and ArmA Among Different Sequence Groups of Acinetobacter baumannii in Iran.

    PubMed

    Hasani, Alka; Sheikhalizadeh, Vajihe; Ahangarzadeh Rezaee, Mohammad; Rahmati-Yamchi, Mohammad; Hasani, Akbar; Ghotaslou, Reza; Goli, Hamid Reza

    2016-07-01

    We evaluated aminoglycoside resistance in 87 Acinetobacter baumannii strains isolated from four hospitals located in the North West region of Iran and typed them in sequence groups (SGs) using trilocus sequence-based scheme to compare their clonal relationships with international clones. Resistance toward aminoglycosides was assayed by minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and presence of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs), and ArmA-encoding genes were evaluated in different SGs. The majority of isolates belonged to SG1 (39%), SG2 (33.3%), and SG3 (12.6%), whereas the remaining ones were assigned to six novel variants of SGs. MIC determination revealed netilmicin as the most and kanamycin as the least active aminoglycosides against all groups. Among the varied SGs, isolates of SG2 showed more susceptibility toward all tested aminoglycosides. APH(3'')-VIa-encoding gene was predominant in SG1 (47%), SG2 (62%), and SG6-9 (100%). However, AAC(3')-Ia (100%) and ANT(2')-Ia (90.9%) were the dominant AMEs in SG3. There was significant association between harboring of aminoglycoside resistance genes and specific aminoglycosides: gene encoded by APH(3')-VIa was allied to resistance against amikacin and kanamycin, whereas ANT(2')-Ia was related to the resistance toward gentamicin and tobramycin in SG2. In SG1, tobramycin resistance was correlated with harboring of AAC(6')-Ib. Screening of armA demonstrated the presence of this gene in SG1 (58.8%), SG2 (10.3%), as well as SG3 (9%). Our results revealed definite correlation between the phenotypes and genotypes of aminoglycoside resistance in different clonal lineages of A. baumannii. PMID:26779992

  12. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Aminoglycosides Resistant and Susceptible Mycobacterium tuberculosis Clinical Isolates for Exploring Potential Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Divakar; Kumar, Bhavnesh; Lata, Manju; Joshi, Beenu; Venkatesan, Krishnamurthy; Shukla, Sangeeta; Bisht, Deepa

    2015-01-01

    Aminoglycosides, amikacin (AK) and kanamycin (KM) are second line anti-tuberculosis drugs used to treat tuberculosis (TB) and resistance to them affects the treatment. Membrane and membrane associated proteins have an anticipated role in biological processes and pathogenesis and are potential targets for the development of new diagnostics/vaccine/therapeutics. In this study we compared membrane and membrane associated proteins of AK and KM resistant and susceptible Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates by 2DE coupled with MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS and bioinformatic tools. Twelve proteins were found to have increased intensities (PDQuest Advanced Software) in resistant isolates and were identified as ATP synthase subunit alpha (Rv1308), Trigger factor (Rv2462c), Dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (Rv0462), Elongation factor Tu (Rv0685), Transcriptional regulator MoxR1(Rv1479), Universal stress protein (Rv2005c), 35kDa hypothetical protein (Rv2744c), Proteasome subunit alpha (Rv2109c), Putative short-chain type dehydrogenase/reductase (Rv0148), Bacterioferritin (Rv1876), Ferritin (Rv3841) and Alpha-crystallin/HspX (Rv2031c). Among these Rv2005c, Rv2744c and Rv0148 are proteins with unknown functions. Docking showed that both drugs bind to the conserved domain (Usp, PspA and SDR domain) of these hypothetical proteins and GPS-PUP predicted potential pupylation sites within them. Increased intensities of these proteins and proteasome subunit alpha might not only be neutralized/modulated the drug molecules but also involved in protein turnover to overcome the AK and KM resistance. Besides that Rv1876, Rv3841 and Rv0685 were found to be associated with iron regulation signifying the role of iron in resistance. Further research is needed to explore how these potential protein targets contribute to resistance of AK and KM. PMID:26436944

  13. Novel 6′-N-Aminoglycoside Acetyltransferase AAC(6′)-Iaj from a Clinical Isolate of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Tada, Tatsuya; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Shimada, Kayo; Shimojima, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa NCGM1588 has a novel chromosomal class 1 integron, In151, which includes the aac(6′)-Iaj gene. The encoded protein, AAC(6′)-Iaj, was found to consist of 184 amino acids, with 70% identity to AAC(6′)-Ia. Escherichia coli transformed with a plasmid containing the aac(6′)-Iaj gene acquired resistance to all aminoglycosides tested except gentamicin. Of note, aac(6′)-Iaj contributed to the resistance to arbekacin. Thin-layer chromatography revealed that AAC(6′)-Iaj acetylated all aminoglycosides tested except gentamicin. These findings indicated that AAC(6′)-Iaj is a functional acetyltransferase that modifies the amino groups at the 6′ positions of aminoglycosides and contributes to aminoglycoside resistance of P. aeruginosa NCGM1588, including arbekacin. PMID:23070167

  14. An outbreak of infections caused by strains of Staphylococcus aureus resistant to methicillin and aminoglycosides. II. Epidemiologic studies.

    PubMed

    Crossley, K; Landesman, B; Zaske, D

    1979-03-01

    Studies to determine the epidemiologic behavior of strains of Staphylococcus aureus resistant to methicillin and aminoglycosides (MARS) were conducted over a period of two and one-half years, during which MARS were isolated from 201 patients at a hospital in the midwestern United States. Most cases of infection or colonization with MARS (156 of 201) occurred in patients with burns. In the burn unit, MARS were recovered from the air, from the hair and hands of personnel, and from inanimate objects. Nasal (72%) and rectal (66%) colonization were common among burned patients with infected or colonized burn wounds but occurred in only six of 74 burn unit personnel. When compared with two control periods, the prophylactic use of antistaphylococcal agents in patients with burns increased markedly at the time the outbreak began. Of the 45 patients without burns from whom MARS were isolated, 42 (93%) were surgical patients. MARS were not demonstrated in the air or environment of patients with infected surgical wounds. None of 334 non-burn unit hospital personnel were found to be carriers of MARS. Four phage types (83A, 6/75/85, 29/52/80, and 92) were recovered during the outbreak. A determinant of antibiotic resistance was probably transmitted among strains of S. aureus. PMID:255553

  15. Enhancement of the antibiotic activity of aminoglycosides by extracts from Anadenanthera colubrine (Vell.) Brenan var. cebil against multi-drug resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Barreto, Humberto M; Coelho, Kivia M R N; Ferreira, Josie H L; Dos Santos, Bernadete H C; de Abreu, Aislan P L; Coutinho, Henrique D M; da Silva, Romezio A C; de Sousa, Taciana O; Citó, Antonia M das G L; Lopes, José A D

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of ethanol (EEAC) and hexane (HFAC) extracts from the stem bark of Anadenanthera colubrina (Vell.) Brenan var. cebil alone or in combination with aminoglycosides against multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacteria. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of the extracts were determined by using microdilution assay. For the evaluation of extracts as modulators of antibiotic resistance, MICs of neomycin and amikacin were determined in presence or absence of each compound at sub-inhibitory concentrations. Both EEAC and HFAC did not show antimicrobial activity against MDR strains tested. However, the addition of EEAC and HFAC enhanced the activity of neomycin and amikacin against Staphylococcus aureus SA10 strain. When the natural products were replaced by chlorpromazine, the same effect was observed. Anadenanthera colubrine var. cebil may be a source of phytochemicals able to potentiate the aminoglycoside activity against MDR S. aureus by the inhibition of efflux pump. PMID:26158209

  16. Aminoglycosides: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Krause, Kevin M; Serio, Alisa W; Kane, Timothy R; Connolly, Lynn E

    2016-01-01

    Aminoglycosides are natural or semisynthetic antibiotics derived from actinomycetes. They were among the first antibiotics to be introduced for routine clinical use and several examples have been approved for use in humans. They found widespread use as first-line agents in the early days of antimicrobial chemotherapy, but were eventually replaced in the 1980s with cephalosporins, carbapenems, and fluoroquinolones. Aminoglycosides synergize with a variety of other antibacterial classes, which, in combination with the continued increase in the rise of multidrug-resistant bacteria and the potential to improve the safety and efficacy of the class through optimized dosing regimens, has led to a renewed interest in these broad-spectrum and rapidly bactericidal antibacterials. PMID:27252397

  17. Comparative Evaluation of Sloppy Molecular Beacon and Dual-Labeled Probe Melting Temperature Assays to Identify Mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Resulting in Rifampin, Fluoroquinolone and Aminoglycoside Resistance.

    PubMed

    Roh, Sandy S; Smith, Laura E; Lee, Jong Seok; Via, Laura E; Barry, Clifton E; Alland, David; Chakravorty, Soumitesh

    2015-01-01

    Several molecular assays to detect resistance to Rifampin, the Fluoroquinolones, and Aminoglycosides in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) have been recently described. A systematic approach for comparing these assays in the laboratory is needed in order to determine the relative advantage of each assay and to decide which ones should be advanced to evaluation. We performed an analytic comparison of a Sloppy Molecular Beacon (SMB) melting temperature (Tm) assay and a Dual labeled probe (DLP) Tm assay. Both assays targeted the M. tuberculosis rpoB, gyrA, rrs genes and the eis promoter region. The sensitivity and specificity to detect mutations, analytic limit of detection (LOD) and the detection of heteroresistance were tested using a panel of 56 clinical DNA samples from drug resistant M. tuberculosis strains. Both SMB and DLP assays detected 29/29 (100%) samples with rpoB RRDR mutations and 3/3 (100%) samples with eis promoter mutations correctly. The SMB assay detected all 17/17 gyrA mutants and 22/22 rrs mutants, while the DLP assay detected 16/17 (94%) gyrA mutants and 12/22 (55%) rrs mutants. Both assays showed comparable LODs for detecting rpoB and eis mutations; however, the SMB assay LODs were at least two logs better for detecting wild type and mutants in gyrA and rrs targets. The SMB assay was also moderately better at detecting heteroresistance. In summary, both assays appeared to be promising methods to detect drug resistance associated mutations in M. tuberculosis; however, the relative advantage of each assay varied under each test condition. PMID:25938476

  18. Diversity of enterococcal species and characterization of high-level aminoglycoside resistant enterococci of samples of wastewater and surface water in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Ben Said, Leila; Klibi, Naouel; Lozano, Carmen; Dziri, Raoudha; Ben Slama, Karim; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Torres, Carmen

    2015-10-15

    One hundred-fourteen samples of wastewater (n=64) and surface-water (n=50) were inoculated in Slanetz-Bartley agar plates supplemented or not with gentamicin (SB-Gen and SB plates, respectively) for enterococci recovery. Enterococci were obtained from 75% of tested samples in SB media (72% in wastewater; 78% in surface-water), and 85 enterococcal isolates (one/positive-sample) were obtained. Enterococcus faecium was the most prevalent species (63.5%), followed by Enterococcus faecalis (20%), Enterococcus hirae (9.4%), Enterococcus casseliflavus (4.7%), and Enterococcus gallinarum/Enterococcus durans (2.4%). Antibiotic resistance detected among these enterococci was as follows [percentage/detected gene (number isolates)]: kanamycin [29%/aph(3')-IIIa (n=22)], streptomycin [8%/ant(6)-Ia (n=4)], erythromycin [44%/erm(B) (n=34)], tetracycline [18%/tet(M) (n=6)/tet(M)-tet(L) (n=9)], chloramphenicol [2%/cat(A) (n=1)], ciprofloxacin [7%] and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole [94%]. High-level-gentamicin resistant (HLR-G) enterococci were recovered from 15 samples in SB-Gen or SB plates [12/64 samples of wastewater (19%) and 3/50 samples of surface-water (6%)]; HLR-G isolates were identified as E. faecium (n=7), E. faecalis (n=6), and E. casseliflavus (n=2). These HLR-G enterococci carried the aac(6')-Ie-aph(2")-Ia and erm(B) genes, in addition to aph(3')-IIIa (n=10), ant(6)-Ia (n=9), tet(M) (n=13), tet(L) (n=8) and cat(A) genes (n=2). Three HLR-G enterococci carried the esp virulence gene. Sequence-types detected among HLR-G enterococci were as follows: E. faecalis (ST480, ST314, ST202, ST55, and the new ones ST531 and ST532) and E. faecium (ST327, ST12, ST296, and the new ones ST985 and ST986). Thirty-two different PFGE patterns were detected among 36 high-level-aminoglycoside-resistant enterococci recovered in water samples. Diverse genetic lineages of HLR-G enterococci were detected in wastewater and surface-water in Tunisia. Water can represent an important source for the

  19. An In Silico Approach for Characterization of an Aminoglycoside Antibiotic-Resistant Methyltransferase Protein from Pyrococcus furiosus (DSM 3638)

    PubMed Central

    Oany, Arafat Rahman; Jyoti, Tahmina Pervin; Ahmad, Shah Adil Ishtiyaq

    2014-01-01

    Pyrococcus furiosus is a hyperthermophilic archaea. A hypothetical protein of this archaea, PF0847, was selected for computational analysis. Basic local alignment search tool and multiple sequence alignment (MSA) tool were employed to search for related proteins. Both the secondary and tertiary structure prediction were obtained for further analysis. Three-dimensional model was assessed by PROCHECK and QMEAN6 programs. To get insights about the physical and functional associations of the protein, STRING network analysis was performed. Binding of the SAM (S-adenosyl-l-methionine) ligand with our protein, fetched from an antibiotic-related methyltransferase (PDB code: 3P2K: D), showed high docking energy and suggested the function of the protein as methyltransferase. Finally, we tried to look for a specific function of the proposed methyltransferase, and binding of the geneticin bound to the eubacterial 16S rRNA A-site (PDB code: 1MWL) in the active site of the PF0847 gave us the indication to predict the protein responsible for aminoglycoside antibiotic resistance. PMID:24683305

  20. Luteolin potentiates the effects of aminoglycoside and β-lactam antibiotics against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in vitro

    PubMed Central

    JOUNG, DAE-KI; KANG, OK-HWA; SEO, YUN-SOO; ZHOU, TIAN; LEE, YOUNG-SEOB; HAN, SIN-HEE; MUN, SU-HYUN; KONG, RYONG; SONG, HO-JUN; SHIN, DONG-WON; KWON, DONG-YEUL

    2016-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection has become a serious clinical problem worldwide, and alternative natural or combination drug therapies are required for its treatment. The aim of the present study was to examined the antimicrobial activity of luteolin (LUT) against MRSA. Luteolin is a polyphenolic flavonoid compound with a wide spectrum of biological activities. The antimicrobial activities of LUT and the antibiotics ampicillin (AM), oxacillin (OX) and gentamicin (GT), used alone or in combination, were evaluated against five clinical MRSA isolates and two reference strains using a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assay, MTT colorimetric assay, checkerboard dilution test and time-kill assay. The MIC of LUT against all strains was found to be 62.5 µg/ml. The combinations of LUT and antibiotics exhibited a synergistic effect against MRSA in the majority of cases, as determined by the checkerboard method. Time-kill curves revealed that a combination of LUT with AM, OX or GT significantly reduced bacterial counts, which dropped below the lowest detectable limit after 24 h. These results indicate that LUT potentiates the effects of β-lactam and aminoglycoside antibiotics against MRSA. PMID:27284353

  1. Resistance gene capture.

    PubMed

    Rowe-Magnus, D A; Mazel, D

    1999-10-01

    Integrons are the primary mechanism for antibiotic-resistance gene capture and dissemination among Gram-negative bacteria. The recent finding of super-integron structures in the genomes of several bacterial species has expanded their role in genome evolution and suggests that they are the source of mobile multi-resistant integrons. PMID:10508722

  2. Hair cell stereociliary bundle regeneration by espin gene transduction after aminoglycoside damage and hair cell induction by Notch inhibition.

    PubMed

    Taura, A; Taura, K; Koyama, Y; Yamamoto, N; Nakagawa, T; Ito, J; Ryan, A F

    2016-05-01

    Once inner ear hair cells (HCs) are damaged by drugs, noise or aging, their apical structures including the stereociliary arrays are frequently the first cellular feature to be lost. Although this can be followed by progressive loss of HC somata, a significant number of HC bodies often remain even after stereociliary loss. However, in the absence of stereocilia they are nonfunctional. HCs can sometimes be regenerated by Atoh1 transduction or Notch inhibition, but they also may lack stereociliary bundles. It is therefore important to develop methods for the regeneration of stereocilia, in order to achieve HC functional recovery. Espin is an actin-bundling protein known to participate in sterociliary elongation during development. We evaluated stereociliary array regeneration in damaged vestibular sensory epithelia in tissue culture, using viral vector transduction of two espin isoforms. Utricular HCs were damaged with aminoglycosides. The utricles were then treated with a γ-secretase inhibitor, followed by espin or control transduction and histochemistry. Although γ-secretase inhibition increased the number of HCs, few had stereociliary arrays. In contrast, 46 h after espin1 transduction, a significant increase in hair-bundle-like structures was observed. These were confirmed to be immature stereociliary arrays by scanning electron microscopy. Increased uptake of FM1-43 uptake provided evidence of stereociliary function. Espin4 transduction had no effect. The results demonstrate that espin1 gene therapy can restore stereocilia on damaged or regenerated HCs. PMID:26886463

  3. Interactions of aminoglycoside antibiotics with rRNA.

    PubMed

    Trylska, Joanna; Kulik, Marta

    2016-08-15

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics are protein synthesis inhibitors applied to treat infections caused mainly by aerobic Gram-negative bacteria. Due to their adverse side effects they are last resort antibiotics typically used to combat pathogens resistant to other drugs. Aminoglycosides target ribosomes. We describe the interactions of aminoglycoside antibiotics containing a 2-deoxystreptamine (2-DOS) ring with 16S rRNA. We review the computational studies, with a focus on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations performed on RNA models mimicking the 2-DOS aminoglycoside binding site in the small ribosomal subunit. We also briefly discuss thermodynamics of interactions of these aminoglycosides with their 16S RNA target. PMID:27528743

  4. Mobilization properties of small ColE1-like plasmids carrying kanamycin resistance gene isolated from Salmonella enterica serotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Previously we isolated and characterized various groups of small kanamycin resistance (KanR) ColE1-like plasmids from different serotypes of Salmonella enterica isolates. These plasmids all carried the aph(3)-I gene encoding the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase responsible for the kanam...

  5. Diverse Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Dairy Cow Manure

    PubMed Central

    Wichmann, Fabienne; Udikovic-Kolic, Nikolina; Andrew, Sheila; Handelsman, Jo

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Application of manure from antibiotic-treated animals to crops facilitates the dissemination of antibiotic resistance determinants into the environment. However, our knowledge of the identity, diversity, and patterns of distribution of these antibiotic resistance determinants remains limited. We used a new combination of methods to examine the resistome of dairy cow manure, a common soil amendment. Metagenomic libraries constructed with DNA extracted from manure were screened for resistance to beta-lactams, phenicols, aminoglycosides, and tetracyclines. Functional screening of fosmid and small-insert libraries identified 80 different antibiotic resistance genes whose deduced protein sequences were on average 50 to 60% identical to sequences deposited in GenBank. The resistance genes were frequently found in clusters and originated from a taxonomically diverse set of species, suggesting that some microorganisms in manure harbor multiple resistance genes. Furthermore, amid the great genetic diversity in manure, we discovered a novel clade of chloramphenicol acetyltransferases. Our study combined functional metagenomics with third-generation PacBio sequencing to significantly extend the roster of functional antibiotic resistance genes found in animal gut bacteria, providing a particularly broad resource for understanding the origins and dispersal of antibiotic resistance genes in agriculture and clinical settings. PMID:24757214

  6. Identification of a novel 6'-N-aminoglycoside acetyltransferase, AAC(6')-Iak, from a multidrug-resistant clinical isolate of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia.

    PubMed

    Tada, Tatsuya; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Dahal, Rajan K; Mishra, Shyam K; Shimada, Kayo; Ohara, Hiroshi; Kirikae, Teruo; Pokhrel, Bharat M

    2014-10-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia IOMTU250 has a novel 6'-N-aminoglycoside acetyltransferase-encoding gene, aac(6')-Iak. The encoded protein, AAC(6')-Iak, consists of 153 amino acids and has 86.3% identity to AAC(6')-Iz. Escherichia coli transformed with a plasmid containing aac(6')-Iak exhibited decreased susceptibility to arbekacin, dibekacin, neomycin, netilmicin, sisomicin, and tobramycin. Thin-layer chromatography showed that AAC(6')-Iak acetylated amikacin, arbekacin, dibekacin, isepamicin, kanamycin, neomycin, netilmicin, sisomicin, and tobramycin but not apramycin, gentamicin, or lividomycin. PMID:25092711

  7. Characterization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants supersensitive to aminoglycoside antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, J F; Chan, R K

    1985-01-01

    We describe mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that are more sensitive than the wild type to the aminoglycoside antibiotics G418, hygromycin B, destomycin A, and gentamicin X2. In addition, the mutants are sensitive to apramycin, kanamycin B, lividomycin A, neamine, neomycin, paromomycin, and tobramycin--antibiotics which do not inhibit wild-type strains. Mapping studies suggest that supersensitivity is caused by mutations in at least three genes, denoted AGS1, AGS2, and AGS3 (for aminoglycoside antibiotic sensitivity). Mutations in all three genes are required for highest antibiotic sensitivity; ags1 ags2 double mutants have intermediate antibiotic sensitivity. AGS1 was mapped 8 centimorgans distal from LEU2 on chromosome III. Analyses of yeast strains transformed with vectors carrying antibiotic resistance genes revealed that G418, gentamicin X2, kanamycin B, lividomycin A, neamine, and paromomycin are inactivated by the Tn903 phosphotransferase and that destomycin A is inactivated by the hygromycin B phosphotransferase. ags strains are improved host strains for vectors carrying the phosphotransferase genes because a wide spectrum of aminoglycoside antibiotics can be used to select for plasmid maintenance. PMID:2989254

  8. Glomerular nephrotoxicity of aminoglycosides

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Salgado, Carlos Lopez-Hernandez, Francisco J.; Lopez-Novoa, Jose M.

    2007-08-15

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics are the most commonly used antibiotics worldwide in the treatment of Gram-negative bacterial infections. However, aminoglycosides induce nephrotoxicity in 10-20% of therapeutic courses. Aminoglycoside-induced nephrotoxicity is characterized by slow rises in serum creatinine, tubular necrosis and marked decreases in glomerular filtration rate and in the ultrafiltration coefficient. Regulation of the ultrafiltration coefficient depends on the activity of intraglomerular mesangial cells. The mechanisms responsible for tubular nephrotoxicity of aminoglycosides have been intensively reviewed previously, but glomerular toxicity has received less attention. The purpose of this review is to critically assess the published literature regarding the toxic mechanisms of action of aminoglycosides on renal glomeruli and mesangial cells. The main goal of this review is to provide an actualized and mechanistic vision of pathways involved in glomerular toxic effects of aminoglycosides.

  9. Cloning, sequencing, and use as a molecular probe of a gene encoding an aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase of broad substrate profile.

    PubMed Central

    Terán, F J; Suárez, J E; Mendoza, M C

    1991-01-01

    A gene coding for an aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase that was able to modify amikacin was cloned from a plasmid isolated from a clinical strain of Enterobacter cloacae. Sequencing of a 955-bp segment which mediates the modifying activity revealed a single open reading frame of 432 nucleotides that predicted a polypeptide of 144 amino acid residues with a molecular weight of 16,021. Putative ribosomal binding sites and -10 and -35 sequences were located at the 5' end of the gene. The size of the polypeptide was confirmed through minicell analysis of the expression products of plasmids containing the sequence. The use of the gene as a molecular probe revealed its specificity toward strains harboring genes coding for related enzymes. This probe is therefore useful for epidemiological studies. Images PMID:2069376

  10. Regulation of the Two-Component Regulator CpxR on Aminoglycosides and β-lactams Resistance in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hui; Sun, Yawei; Yuan, Li; Pan, Yushan; Gao, Yanlin; Ma, Caihui; Hu, Gongzheng

    2016-01-01

    pump acrD and mdtA genes, as compared to strain JSΔcpxR. Our results indicate that the two-component regulator CpxR contributes to resistance of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium to aminoglycosides and β-lactams by influencing the expression level of the MDR-related genes. PMID:27199934

  11. Marker-free plasmids for gene therapeutic applications--lack of antibiotic resistance gene substantially improves the manufacturing process.

    PubMed

    Mairhofer, Jürgen; Cserjan-Puschmann, Monika; Striedner, Gerald; Nöbauer, Katharina; Razzazi-Fazeli, Ebrahim; Grabherr, Reingard

    2010-04-01

    Plasmid DNA is being considered as a promising alternative to traditional protein vaccines or viral delivery methods for gene therapeutic applications. DNA-based products are highly flexible, stable, are easily stored and can be manufactured on a large scale. Although, much safer than viral approaches, issues have been raised with regard to safety due to possible integration of plasmid DNA into cellular DNA or spread of antibiotic resistance genes to intestinal bacteria by horizontal gene transfer. Accordingly, there is interest in methods for the production of plasmid DNA that lacks the antibiotic resistance gene to further improve their safety profile. Here, we report for the first time the gram-scale manufacturing of a minimized plasmid that is devoid of any additional sequence elements on the plasmid backbone, and merely consists of the target expression cassette and the bacterial origin of replication. Three different host/vector combinations were cultivated in a fed-batch fermentation process, comparing the progenitor strain JM108 to modified strains JM108murselect, hosting a plasmid either containing the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase which provides kanamycin resistance, or a marker-free variant of the same plasmid. The metabolic load exerted by expression of the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase was monitored by measuring ppGpp- and cAMP-levels. Moreover, we revealed that JM108 is deficient of the Lon protease and thereby refined the genotype of JM108. The main consequences of Lon-deficiency with regard to plasmid DNA production are discussed herein. Additionally, we found that the expression of the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase, conferring resistance to kanamycin, was very high in plasmid DNA producing processes that actually inclusion bodies were formed. Thereby, a severe metabolic load on the host cell was imposed, detrimental for overall plasmid yield. Hence, deleting the antibiotic resistance gene from the vector backbone is not only beneficial

  12. The impact of methicillin- and aminoglycoside-resistant Staphylococcus aureus on the pattern of hospital-acquired infection in an acute hospital.

    PubMed

    Meers, P D; Leong, K Y

    1990-10-01

    Infections due to methicillin- and aminoglycoside-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MARSA) appeared in a new teaching hospital shortly after it opened. The effect this had on the pattern of hospital-acquired infections in the four years that followed is described. No control measures were applied and MARSA became endemic. New infections appeared at a rate of about four for each 1000 patients discharged. It established itself at different levels of incidence in various specialist units, patients under intensive care being most severely affected. MARSA was implicated in half of all hospital-acquired infections due to S. aureus but it was not more pathogenic than its more sensitive counterpart. It had little impact on the life of the hospital. PMID:1979573

  13. Cellular Uptake of Aminoglycosides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steyger, Peter S.

    2005-01-01

    Aminoglycosides exert their cytotoxic effect at three different locations: at the cell surface, in the cytosol, or in the nucleus. At the cell surface, aminoglycoside binding can cause temporary hearing loss, motor paralysis at the neuromuscular junction, ion wasting in kidneys, or analgesia in mechano- and nocioreceptors (touch and pain sensory…

  14. Chromosomal aadD2 encodes an aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferase in Bacillus clausii.

    PubMed

    Bozdogan, Bülent; Galopin, Sébastien; Gerbaud, Guy; Courvalin, Patrice; Leclercq, Roland

    2003-04-01

    Bacillus clausii SIN is one of the four strains of B. clausii composing a probiotic administered to humans for the prevention of gastrointestinal side effects due to oral antibiotic therapy. The strain is resistant to kanamycin, tobramycin, and amikacin. A gene conferring aminoglycoside resistance was cloned into Escherichia coli and sequenced. The gene, called aadD2, encoding a putative 246-amino acid protein, shared 47% identity with ant(4')-Ia from Staphylococcus aureus, which encodes an aminoglycoside 4'-O-nucleotidyltransferase. Phosphocellulose paper-binding assays indicated that the gene product was responsible for nucleotidylation of kanamycin, tobramycin, and amikacin. The aadD2 gene was detected by DNA-DNA hybridization in the three other strains of the probiotic mixture and in the reference strain B. clausii DSM8716, although it did not confer resistance in these strains. Mutations in the sequence of the putative promoter for aadD2 from B. clausii SIN resulted in higher identity with consensus promoter sequences and may account for aminoglycoside resistance in that strain. The aadD2 gene was chromosomally located in all strains and was not transferable by conjugation. These data indicate that chromosomal aadD2 is specific to B. clausii. PMID:12654668

  15. Functional Metagenome Mining of Soil for a Novel Gentamicin Resistance Gene.

    PubMed

    Im, Hyunjoo; Kim, Kyung Mo; Lee, Sang-Heon; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2016-03-01

    Extensive use of antibiotics over recent decades has led to bacterial resistance against antibiotics, including gentamicin, one of the most effective aminoglycosides. The emergence of resistance is problematic for hospitals, since gentamicin is an important broad-spectrum antibiotic for the control of bacterial pathogens in the clinic. Previous study to identify gentamicin resistance genes from environmental samples have been conducted using culture-dependent screening methods. To overcome these limitations, we employed a metagenome-based culture-independent protocol to identify gentamicin resistance genes. Through functional screening of metagenome libraries derived from soil samples, a fosmid clone was selected as it conferred strong gentamicin resistance. To identify a specific functioning gene conferring gentamicin resistance from a selected fosmid clone (35-40 kb), a shot-gun library was constructed and four shot-gun clones (2-3 kb) were selected. Further characterization of these clones revealed that they contained sequences similar to that of the RNA ligase, T4 rnlA that is known as a toxin gene. The overexpression of the rnlA-like gene in Escherichia coli increased gentamicin resistance, indicating that this toxin gene modulates this trait. The results of our metagenome library analysis suggest that the rnlA-like gene may represent a new class of gentamicin resistance genes in pathogenic bacteria. In addition, we demonstrate that the soil metagenome can provide an important resource for the identification of antibiotic resistance genes, which are valuable molecular targets in efforts to overcome antibiotic resistance. PMID:26699755

  16. Aminoglycosides: Molecular Insights on the Recognition of RNA and Aminoglycoside Mimics

    PubMed Central

    Chittapragada, Maruthi; Roberts, Sarah; Ham, Young Wan

    2009-01-01

    RNA is increasingly recognized for its significant functions in biological systems and has recently become an important molecular target for therapeutics development. Aminoglycosides, a large class of clinically significant antibiotics, exert their biological functions by binding to prokaryotic ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and interfering with protein translation, resulting in bacterial cell death. They are also known to bind to viral mRNAs such as HIV-1 RRE and TAR. Consequently, aminoglycosides are accepted as the single most important model in understanding the principles that govern small molecule-RNA recognition, which is essential for the development of novel antibacterial, antiviral or even anti-oncogenic agents. This review outlines the chemical structures and mechanisms of molecular recognition and antibacterial activity of aminoglycosides and various aminoglycoside mimics that have recently been devised to improve biological efficacy, binding affinity and selectivity, or to circumvent bacterial resistance. PMID:19812740

  17. Resistance Gene Transfer during Treatments for Experimental Avian Colibacillosis

    PubMed Central

    Dheilly, Alexandra; Le Devendec, Laëtitia; Mourand, Gwenaëlle; Bouder, Axelle; Jouy, Eric

    2012-01-01

    An experiment was conducted in animal facilities to compare the impacts of four avian colibacillosis treatments—oxytetracycline (OTC), trimethoprim-sulfadimethoxine (SXT), amoxicillin (AMX), or enrofloxacin (ENR)—on the susceptibility of Escherichia coli in broiler intestinal tracts. Birds were first orally inoculated with rifampin-resistant E. coli strains bearing plasmid genes conferring resistance to fluoroquinolones (qnr), cephalosporins (blaCTX-M or blaFOX), trimethoprim-sulfonamides, aminoglycosides, or tetracyclines. Feces samples were collected before, during, and after antimicrobial treatments. The susceptibilities of E. coli strains were studied, and resistance gene transfer was analyzed. An increase in the tetracycline-resistant E. coli population was observed only in OTC-treated birds, whereas multiresistant E. coli was detected in the dominant E. coli populations of SXT-, AMX-, or ENR-treated birds. Most multiresistant E. coli strains were susceptible to rifampin and exhibited various pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiles, suggesting the transfer of one of the multiresistance plasmids from the inoculated strains to other E. coli strains in the intestinal tract. In conclusion, this study clearly illustrates how, in E. coli, “old” antimicrobials may coselect antimicrobial resistance to recent and critical molecules. PMID:21986830

  18. Mining microbial metatranscriptomes for expression of antibiotic resistance genes under natural conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Versluis, Dennis; D'Andrea, Marco Maria; Ramiro Garcia, Javier; Leimena, Milkha M.; Hugenholtz, Floor; Zhang, Jing; Öztürk, Başak; Nylund, Lotta; Sipkema, Detmer; Schaik, Willem Van; de Vos, Willem M.; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Smidt, Hauke; Passel, Mark W. J. Van

    2015-07-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes are found in a broad range of ecological niches associated with complex microbiota. Here we investigated if resistance genes are not only present, but also transcribed under natural conditions. Furthermore, we examined the potential for antibiotic production by assessing the expression of associated secondary metabolite biosynthesis gene clusters. Metatranscriptome datasets from intestinal microbiota of four human adults, one human infant, 15 mice and six pigs, of which only the latter have received antibiotics prior to the study, as well as from sea bacterioplankton, a marine sponge, forest soil and sub-seafloor sediment, were investigated. We found that resistance genes are expressed in all studied ecological niches, albeit with niche-specific differences in relative expression levels and diversity of transcripts. For example, in mice and human infant microbiota predominantly tetracycline resistance genes were expressed while in human adult microbiota the spectrum of expressed genes was more diverse, and also included β-lactam, aminoglycoside and macrolide resistance genes. Resistance gene expression could result from the presence of natural antibiotics in the environment, although we could not link it to expression of corresponding secondary metabolites biosynthesis clusters. Alternatively, resistance gene expression could be constitutive, or these genes serve alternative roles besides antibiotic resistance.

  19. Providencia stuartii Isolates from Greece: Co-Carriage of Cephalosporin (blaSHV-5, blaVEB-1), Carbapenem (blaVIM-1), and Aminoglycoside (rmtB) Resistance Determinants by a Multidrug-Resistant Outbreak Clone.

    PubMed

    Oikonomou, Olga; Liakopoulos, Apostolos; Phee, Lynette M; Betts, Jonathan; Mevius, Dik; Wareham, David W

    2016-07-01

    Providencia stuartii has emerged as an important nosocomial pathogen. We describe an outbreak due to a multidrug-resistant strain over a 4-month period in a critical care unit in Athens. Molecular typing revealed each of the isolates to be clonally related with coresistance to cephalosporins, carbapenems, aminoglycosides, and quinolones. Each isolate contained a 220-kb multi-replicon (IncA/C and IncR) conjugative plasmid encoding TEM-1, SHV-5, VEB-1, and VIM-1 β-lactamases and the 16S rDNA methylase RmtB. Antimicrobial therapy was unsuccessful in 3 of 6 cases, and resistance was readily transmissible to susceptible strains of Escherichia coli by transformation and conjugation. This highlights the clinical importance of P. stuartii and its ability to disseminate critical resistance determinants to other bacterial pathogens. PMID:27380549

  20. Triclosan-Induced Aminoglycoside-Tolerant Listeria monocytogenes Isolates Can Appear as Small-Colony Variants

    PubMed Central

    Kastbjerg, Vicky G.; Hein-Kristensen, Line

    2014-01-01

    Exposure of the human food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to sublethal concentrations of triclosan can cause resistance to several aminoglycosides. Aminoglycoside-resistant isolates exhibit two colony morphologies: normal-size and pinpoint colonies. The purposes of the present study were to characterize the small colonies of L. monocytogenes and to determine if specific genetic changes could explain the triclosan-induced aminoglycoside resistance in both pinpoint and normal-size isolates. Isolates from the pinpoint colonies grew poorly under aerated conditions, but growth was restored by addition of antibiotics. Pinpoint isolates had decreased hemolytic activity under stagnant conditions and a changed spectrum of carbohydrate utilization compared to the wild type and isolates from normal-size colonies. Genome sequence comparison revealed that all seven pinpoint isolates had a mutation in a heme gene, and addition of heme caused the pinpoint isolates to revert to normal colony size. Triclosan-induced gentamicin-resistant isolates had mutations in several different genes, and it cannot be directly concluded how the different mutations caused gentamicin resistance. However, since many of the mutations affected proteins involved in respiration, it seems likely that the mutations affected the active transport of the antibiotic and thereby caused resistance by decreasing the amount of aminoglycoside that enters the bacterial cell. Our study emphasizes that triclosan likely has more targets than just fabI and that exposure to triclosan can cause resistance to antibiotics that enters the cell via active transport. Further studies are needed to elucidate if L. monocytogenes pinpoint isolates could have any clinical impact, e.g., in persistent infections. PMID:24637686

  1. Incidence of antimicrobial-resistance genes and integrons in antibiotic-resistant bacteria isolated from eels and aquaculture ponds.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mao; Wu, Xiaomei; Yan, Qingpi; Ma, Ying; Huang, Lixing; Qin, Yingxue; Xu, Xiaojin

    2016-07-01

    The overuse of antimicrobials in aquaculture has promoted the selection of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria. Here we investigated the abundance of antimicrobial-resistance genes and integrons in 108 strains of antibiotic-resistant bacteria isolated from eels and aquaculture ponds in China. Conventional PCR was implemented to examine common antibiotic-resistance genes, integrons, and their gene cassette arrays. The results showed that the antibiotic-resistance genes blaTEM, tetC, sulI, aadA, floR, and qnrB were detected at high percentages, as were a number of other resistance genes. Class I integrons were present in 79.63% of the strains, and 10 out of 108 isolates carried class II integrons. Class III integrons were not detected. Three strains carried both class I and class II integrons, and 73.26% of the class I integron-positive isolates contained the qacEΔ1/sul1 gene. Fourteen types of integron cassette arrays were found among class I integron-positive isolates. A new array, dfrB4-catB3-blaOXA-10-aadA1, was discovered in this study. The gene cassette array dfrA12-orfF-aadA2 was the most widely distributed. In summary, 23 different gene cassettes encoding resistance to 8 classes of antibiotics were identified in the class I integrons, and the main cassettes contained genes encoding resistance to aminoglycosides (aad) and trimethoprim (dfr). All class II integron-positive strains had only a single gene cassette array, viz. dfrA1-catB2-sat2-aadA1. High levels of antimicrobial-resistance genes and integrons in eels and auqauculture ponds suggest that the overuse of antimicrobials should be strictly controlled and that the levels of bacterial antimicrobial-resistance genes in aquaculture should be monitored. PMID:27409235

  2. New trends in aminoglycosides use

    PubMed Central

    Fosso, Marina Y.; Li, Yijia; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    Despite their inherent toxicity and the acquired bacterial resistance that continuously threaten their long-term clinical use, aminoglycosides (AGs) still remain valuable components of the antibiotic armamentarium. Recent literature shows that the AGs’ role has been further expanded as multi-tasking players in different areas of study. This review aims at presenting some of the new trends observed in the use of AGs in the past decade, along with the current understanding of their mechanisms of action in various bacterial and eukaryotic cellular processes. PMID:25071928

  3. Synergistic Effect of Oleanolic Acid on Aminoglycoside Antibiotics against Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Bora; Park, Woojun

    2015-01-01

    Difficulties involved in treating drug-resistant pathogens have created a need for new therapies. In this study, we investigated the possibility of using oleanolic acid (OA), a natural pentacyclic triterpenoid, as a natural adjuvant for antibiotics against Acinetobacter baumannii. High concentrations of OA can kill cells, partly because it generates reactive oxygen species. Measurement of the fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) for OA and time-kill experiments demonstrated that it only synergizes with aminoglycoside antibiotics (e.g., gentamicin, kanamycin). Other classes of antibiotics (e.g., ampicillin, rifampicin, norfloxacin, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline) have no interactions with OA. Microarray and quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis indicated that genes involved in ATP synthesis and cell membrane permeability, the gene encoding glycosyltransferase, peptidoglycan-related genes, phage-related genes, and DNA repair genes were upregulated under OA. OA highly induces the expression of adk, which encodes an adenylate kinase, and des6, which encodes a linoleoyl-CoA desaturase, and deletion of these genes increased FICs; these observations indicate that adk and des6 are involved in the synergism of OA with aminoglycosides. Data obtained using 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid, fluorescence-conjugated gentamicin, and membrane fatty acid analysis indicates that adk and des6 are involved in changes in membrane permeability. Proton-motive force and ATP synthesis tests show that those genes are also involved in energy metabolism. Taken together, our data show that OA boosts aminoglycoside uptake by changing membrane permeability and energy metabolism in A. baumannii. PMID:26360766

  4. Aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing loss is associated with the G7444A mutation in the mitochondrial COI/tRNA{sup Ser(UCN)} genes in two Chinese families

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Yi; Liao Zhisu; Li Zhiyuan; Chen Jianfu; Qian Yaping; Tang Xiaowen; Wang Jindan; Yang Li; Li Ronghua; Ji Jinzhang; Choo, Daniel I. |; Lu Jianxin . E-mail: jx@mail.wz.zj.cn; Guan Minxin |||. E-mail: min-xin.guan@chmcc.org

    2006-04-14

    We report here the clinical, genetic, and molecular characterization of two Chinese families with aminoglycoside induced and non-syndromic hearing impairment. Clinical and genetic evaluations revealed the variable severity and age-of-onset in hearing impairment in these families. Strikingly, there were extremely low penetrances of hearing impairment in these Chinese families. Sequence analysis of the complete mitochondrial genomes in these pedigrees showed the distinct sets of mtDNA polymorphism, in addition to the identical G7444A mutation associated with hearing loss. Indeed, the G7444A mutation in the CO1 gene and the precursor of tRNA{sup Ser(UCN)} gene is present in homoplasmy only in the maternal lineage of those pedigrees but not other members of these families and 164 Chinese controls. Their mitochondrial genomes belong to the Eastern Asian haplogroups C5a and D4a, respectively. In fact, the occurrence of the G7444A mutation in these several genetically unrelated subjects affected by hearing impairment strongly indicates that this mutation is involved in the pathogenesis of hearing impairment. However, there was the absence of other functionally significant mtDNA mutations in two Chinese pedigrees carrying the G7444A mutation. Therefore, nuclear modifier gene(s) or aminoglycoside(s) may play a role in the phenotypic expression of the deafness-associated G7444A mutation in these Chinese pedigrees.

  5. AAC(3)-XI, a new aminoglycoside 3-N-acetyltransferase from Corynebacterium striatum.

    PubMed

    Galimand, Marc; Fishovitz, Jennifer; Lambert, Thierry; Barbe, Valérie; Zajicek, Jaroslav; Mobashery, Shahriar; Courvalin, Patrice

    2015-09-01

    Corynebacterium striatum BM4687 was resistant to gentamicin and tobramycin but susceptible to kanamycin A and amikacin, a phenotype distinct among Gram-positive bacteria. Analysis of the entire genome of this strain did not detect any genes for known aminoglycoside resistance enzymes. Yet, annotation of the coding sequences identified 12 putative acetyltransferases or GCN5-related N-acetyltransferases. A total of 11 of these coding sequences were also present in the genomes of other Corynebacterium spp. The 12th coding sequence had 55 to 60% amino acid identity with acetyltransferases in Actinomycetales. The gene was cloned in Escherichia coli, where it conferred resistance to aminoglycosides by acetylation. The protein was purified to homogeneity, and its steady-state kinetic parameters were determined for dibekacin and kanamycin B. The product of the turnover of dibekacin was purified, and its structure was elucidated by high-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), indicating transfer of the acetyl group to the amine at the C-3 position. Due to the unique profile of the reaction, it was designated aminoglycoside 3-N-acetyltransferase type XI. PMID:26149994

  6. AAC(3)-XI, a New Aminoglycoside 3-N-Acetyltransferase from Corynebacterium striatum

    PubMed Central

    Galimand, Marc; Fishovitz, Jennifer; Lambert, Thierry; Barbe, Valérie; Zajicek, Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    Corynebacterium striatum BM4687 was resistant to gentamicin and tobramycin but susceptible to kanamycin A and amikacin, a phenotype distinct among Gram-positive bacteria. Analysis of the entire genome of this strain did not detect any genes for known aminoglycoside resistance enzymes. Yet, annotation of the coding sequences identified 12 putative acetyltransferases or GCN5-related N-acetyltransferases. A total of 11 of these coding sequences were also present in the genomes of other Corynebacterium spp. The 12th coding sequence had 55 to 60% amino acid identity with acetyltransferases in Actinomycetales. The gene was cloned in Escherichia coli, where it conferred resistance to aminoglycosides by acetylation. The protein was purified to homogeneity, and its steady-state kinetic parameters were determined for dibekacin and kanamycin B. The product of the turnover of dibekacin was purified, and its structure was elucidated by high-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), indicating transfer of the acetyl group to the amine at the C-3 position. Due to the unique profile of the reaction, it was designated aminoglycoside 3-N-acetyltransferase type XI. PMID:26149994

  7. Aquaculture changes the profile of antibiotic resistance and mobile genetic element associated genes in Baltic Sea sediments.

    PubMed

    Muziasari, Windi I; Pärnänen, Katariina; Johnson, Timothy A; Lyra, Christina; Karkman, Antti; Stedtfeld, Robert D; Tamminen, Manu; Tiedje, James M; Virta, Marko

    2016-04-01

    Antibiotics are commonly used in aquaculture and they can change the environmental resistome by increasing antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). Sediment samples were collected from two fish farms located in the Northern Baltic Sea, Finland, and from a site outside the farms (control). The sediment resistome was assessed by using a highly parallel qPCR array containing 295 primer sets to detect ARGs, mobile genetic elements and the 16S rRNA gene. The fish farm resistomes were enriched in transposon and integron associated genes and in ARGs encoding resistance to antibiotics which had been used to treat fish at the farms. Aminoglycoside resistance genes were also enriched in the farm sediments despite the farms not having used aminoglycosides. In contrast, the total relative abundance values of ARGs were higher in the control sediment resistome and they were mainly genes encoding efflux pumps followed by beta-lactam resistance genes, which are found intrinsically in many bacteria. This suggests that there is a natural Baltic sediment resistome. The resistome associated with fish farms can be from native ARGs enriched by antibiotic use at the farms and/or from ARGs and mobile elements that have been introduced by fish farming. PMID:26976842

  8. Resistance Genes and Genetic Elements Associated with Antibiotic Resistance in Clinical and Commensal Isolates of Streptococcus salivarius.

    PubMed

    Chaffanel, Fanny; Charron-Bourgoin, Florence; Libante, Virginie; Leblond-Bourget, Nathalie; Payot, Sophie

    2015-06-15

    The diversity of clinical (n = 92) and oral and digestive commensal (n = 120) isolates of Streptococcus salivarius was analyzed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). No clustering of clinical or commensal strains can be observed in the phylogenetic tree. Selected strains (92 clinical and 46 commensal strains) were then examined for their susceptibilities to tetracyclines, macrolides, lincosamides, aminoglycosides, and phenicol antibiotics. The presence of resistance genes tet(M), tet(O), erm(A), erm(B), mef(A/E), and catQ and associated genetic elements was investigated by PCR, as was the genetic linkage of resistance genes. High rates of erythromycin and tetracycline resistance were observed among the strains. Clinical strains displayed either the erm(B) (macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B [MLSB] phenotype) or mef(A/E) (M phenotype) resistance determinant, whereas almost all the commensal strains harbored the mef(A/E) resistance gene, carried by a macrolide efflux genetic assembly (MEGA) element. A genetic linkage between a macrolide resistance gene and genes of Tn916 was detected in 23 clinical strains and 5 commensal strains, with a predominance of Tn3872 elements (n = 13), followed by Tn6002 (n = 11) and Tn2009 (n = 4) elements. Four strains harboring a mef(A/E) gene were also resistant to chloramphenicol and carried a catQ gene. Sequencing of the genome of one of these strains revealed that these genes colocalized on an IQ-like element, as already described for other viridans group streptococci. ICESt3-related elements were also detected in half of the isolates. This work highlights the potential role of S. salivarius in the spread of antibiotic resistance genes both in the oral sphere and in the gut. PMID:25862227

  9. Resistance Genes and Genetic Elements Associated with Antibiotic Resistance in Clinical and Commensal Isolates of Streptococcus salivarius

    PubMed Central

    Chaffanel, Fanny; Charron-Bourgoin, Florence; Libante, Virginie; Leblond-Bourget, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    The diversity of clinical (n = 92) and oral and digestive commensal (n = 120) isolates of Streptococcus salivarius was analyzed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). No clustering of clinical or commensal strains can be observed in the phylogenetic tree. Selected strains (92 clinical and 46 commensal strains) were then examined for their susceptibilities to tetracyclines, macrolides, lincosamides, aminoglycosides, and phenicol antibiotics. The presence of resistance genes tet(M), tet(O), erm(A), erm(B), mef(A/E), and catQ and associated genetic elements was investigated by PCR, as was the genetic linkage of resistance genes. High rates of erythromycin and tetracycline resistance were observed among the strains. Clinical strains displayed either the erm(B) (macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B [MLSB] phenotype) or mef(A/E) (M phenotype) resistance determinant, whereas almost all the commensal strains harbored the mef(A/E) resistance gene, carried by a macrolide efflux genetic assembly (MEGA) element. A genetic linkage between a macrolide resistance gene and genes of Tn916 was detected in 23 clinical strains and 5 commensal strains, with a predominance of Tn3872 elements (n = 13), followed by Tn6002 (n = 11) and Tn2009 (n = 4) elements. Four strains harboring a mef(A/E) gene were also resistant to chloramphenicol and carried a catQ gene. Sequencing of the genome of one of these strains revealed that these genes colocalized on an IQ-like element, as already described for other viridans group streptococci. ICESt3-related elements were also detected in half of the isolates. This work highlights the potential role of S. salivarius in the spread of antibiotic resistance genes both in the oral sphere and in the gut. PMID:25862227

  10. Diversity of Plasmids and Antimicrobial Resistance Genes in Multidrug-Resistant Escherichia coli Isolated from Healthy Companion Animals.

    PubMed

    Jackson, C R; Davis, J A; Frye, J G; Barrett, J B; Hiott, L M

    2015-09-01

    The presence and transfer of antimicrobial resistance genes from commensal bacteria in companion animals to more pathogenic bacteria may contribute to dissemination of antimicrobial resistance. The purpose of this study was to determine antimicrobial resistance gene content and the presence of genetic elements in antimicrobial resistant Escherichia coli from healthy companion animals. In our previous study, from May to August, 2007, healthy companion animals (155 dogs and 121 cats) from three veterinary clinics in the Athens, GA, USA area were sampled and multidrug-resistant E. coli (n = 36; MDR, resistance to ≥ 2 antimicrobial classes) were obtained. Of the 25 different plasmid replicon types tested by PCR, at least one plasmid replicon type was detected in 94% (34/36) of the MDR E. coli; four isolates contained as many as five different plasmid replicons. Nine replicon types (FIA, FIB, FII, I2, A/C, U, P, I1 and HI2) were identified with FIB, FII, I2 as the most common pattern. The presence of class I integrons (intI) was detected in 61% (22/36) of the isolates with eight isolates containing aminoglycoside- and/or trimethoprim-resistance genes in the variable cassette region of intI. Microarray analysis of a subset of the MDR E. coli (n = 9) identified the presence of genes conferring resistance to aminoglycosides (aac, aad, aph and strA/B), β-lactams (ampC, cmy, tem and vim), chloramphenicol (cat), sulfonamides (sulI and sulII), tetracycline [tet(A), tet(B), tet(C), tet(D) and regulator, tetR] and trimethoprim (dfrA). Antimicrobial resistance to eight antimicrobials (ampicillin, cefoxitin, ceftiofur, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, streptomycin, gentamicin, sulfisoxazole and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole) and five plasmid replicons (FIA, FIB, FII, I1 and I2) were transferred via conjugation. The presence of antimicrobial resistance genes, intI and transferable plasmid replicons indicate that E. coli from companion animals may play an important role in the

  11. DNA-aptamers binding aminoglycoside antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Nikolaus, Nadia; Strehlitz, Beate

    2014-01-01

    Aptamers are short, single stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides that are able to bind specifically and with high affinity to their non-nucleic acid target molecules. This binding reaction enables their application as biorecognition elements in biosensors and assays. As antibiotic residues pose a problem contributing to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens and thereby reducing the effectiveness of the drug to fight human infections, we selected aptamers targeted against the aminoglycoside antibiotic kanamycin A with the aim of constructing a robust and functional assay that can be used for water analysis. With this work we show that aptamers that were derived from a Capture-SELEX procedure targeting against kanamycin A also display binding to related aminoglycoside antibiotics. The binding patterns differ among all tested aptamers so that there are highly substance specific aptamers and more group specific aptamers binding to a different variety of aminoglycoside antibiotics. Also the region of the aminoglycoside antibiotics responsible for aptamer binding can be estimated. Affinities of the different aptamers for their target substance, kanamycin A, are measured with different approaches and are in the micromolar range. Finally, the proof of principle of an assay for detection of kanamycin A in a real water sample is given. PMID:24566637

  12. Analysis of antimicrobial resistance genes and plasmids from commensal Escherichia coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Escherichia coli are commonly associated with various animal and environmental sources. They often acquire antimicrobial resistance (AR) to classes of drugs that are used to treat Gram-negative infections such as aminoglycosides, cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones and sulfonamides. Plasmi...

  13. Metagenomic and network analysis reveal wide distribution and co-occurrence of environmental antibiotic resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing; Yang, Ying; Ma, Liping; Ju, Feng; Guo, Feng; Tiedje, James M; Zhang, Tong

    2015-11-01

    A metagenomic approach and network analysis was used to investigate the wide-spectrum profiles of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and their co-occurrence patterns in 50 samples from 10 typical environments. In total, 260 ARG subtypes belonging to 18 ARG types were detected with an abundance range of 5.4 × 10(-6)-2.2 × 10(-1) copy of ARG per copy of 16S-rRNA gene. The trend of the total ARG abundances in environments matched well with the levels of anthropogenic impacts on these environments. From the less impacted environments to the seriously impacted environments, the total ARG abundances increased up to three orders of magnitude, that is, from 3.2 × 10(-3) to 3.1 × 10(0) copy of ARG per copy of 16S-rRNA gene. The abundant ARGs were associated with aminoglycoside, bacitracin, β-lactam, chloramphenicol, macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin, quinolone, sulphonamide and tetracycline, in agreement with the antibiotics extensively used in human medicine or veterinary medicine/promoters. The widespread occurrences and abundance variation trend of vancomycin resistance genes in different environments might imply the spread of vancomycin resistance genes because of the selective pressure resulting from vancomycin use. The simultaneous enrichment of 12 ARG types in adult chicken faeces suggests the coselection of multiple ARGs in this production system. Non-metric multidimensional scaling analysis revealed that samples belonging to the same environment generally possessed similar ARG compositions. Based on the co-occurrence pattern revealed by network analysis, tetM and aminoglycoside resistance protein, the hubs of the ARG network, are proposed to be indicators to quantitatively estimate the abundance of 23 other co-occurring ARG subtypes by power functions. PMID:25918831

  14. Aminoglycoside binding and catalysis specificity of aminoglycoside 2″-phosphotransferase IVa: A thermodynamic, structural and kinetic study

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Elise; Guichou, Jean-François; Chaloin, Laurent; Kunzelmann, Simone; Leban, Nadia; Serpersu, Engin H.; Lionne, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    Background Aminoglycoside O-phosphotransferases make up a large class of bacterial enzymes that is widely distributed among pathogens and confer a high resistance to several clinically used aminoglycoside antibiotics. Aminoglycoside 2″-phosphotransferase IVa, APH(2″)-IVa, is an important member of this class, but there is little information on the thermodynamics of aminoglycoside binding and on the nature of its rate-limiting step. Methods We used isothermal titration calorimetry, electrostatic potential calculations, molecular dynamics simulations and X-ray crystallography to study the interactions between the enzyme and different aminoglycosides. We determined the rate-limiting step of the reaction by the means of transient kinetic measurements. Results For the first time, Kd values were determined directly for APH(2″)-IVa and different aminoglycosides. The affinity of the enzyme seems to anti-correlate with the molecular weight of the ligand, suggesting a limited degree of freedom in the binding site. The main interactions are electrostatic bonds between the positively charged amino groups of aminoglycosides and Glu or Asp residues of APH. In spite of the significantly different ratio Kd/Km, there is no large difference in the transient kinetics obtained with the different aminoglycosides. We show that a product release step is rate-limiting for the overall reaction. Conclusions APH(2″)-IVa has a higher affinity for aminoglycosides carrying an amino group in 2′ and 6′, but tighter bindings do not correlate with higher catalytic efficiencies. As with APH(3′)-IIIa, an intermediate containing product is preponderant during the steady state. General significance This intermediate may constitute a good target for future drug design. PMID:26802312

  15. Inhibition of aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase type Ib by zinc: reversal of amikacin resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii and Escherichia coli by a zinc ionophore.

    PubMed

    Lin, David L; Tran, Tung; Alam, Jamal Y; Herron, Steven R; Ramirez, Maria Soledad; Tolmasky, Marcelo E

    2014-07-01

    In vitro activity of the aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase type Ib [AAC(6')-Ib] was inhibited by ZnCl2 with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 15 μM. Growth of Acinetobacter baumannii or Escherichia coli harboring aac(6')-Ib in cultures containing 8 μg/ml amikacin was significantly inhibited by the addition of 2 μM Zn(2+) in complex with the ionophore pyrithione (ZnPT). PMID:24820083

  16. First report of an OXA-48-producing multidrug-resistant Proteus mirabilis strain from Gaza, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Al Laham, Nahed; Chavda, Kalyan D; Mediavilla, Jose R; Jacobs, Michael R; Bonomo, Robert A; Kreiswirth, Barry N

    2015-07-01

    We report the first multidrug-resistant Proteus mirabilis strain producing the carbapenemase OXA-48 (Pm-OXA-48) isolated at Al-Shifa hospital in Gaza, Palestine. Draft genome sequencing of Pm-OXA-48 identified 16 antimicrobial resistance genes, encoding resistance to β-lactams, aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, phenicols, streptothricin, tetracycline, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Complete sequencing of the bla(OXA-48)-harboring plasmid revealed that it is a 72 kb long IncL/M plasmid, harboring carbapenemase gene bla(OXA-48), extended spectrum β-lactamase gene bla(CTX-M-14), and aminoglycoside resistance genes strA, strB, and aph(3')-VIb. PMID:25896692

  17. [In vitro combination effects of doripenem with aminoglycoside or ciprofloxacin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    PubMed

    Anan, Naomi; Toba, Shinsuke; Ito, Akinobu; Nakamura, Rio; Tsuji, Masakatsu

    2011-08-01

    This study evaluated the in vitro activity of combinations of doripenem (DRPM) with aminoglycosides (tobramycin or amikacin) or fluoroquinolone (ciprofloxacin) against 92 isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from 16 clinical facilities in 2004 in Japan. We also tested combination effect of other carbapenems (imipenem (IPM), meropenem, biapenem) with aminoglycosides or fluoroquinolone by checkerboard dilution methods. DRPM showed synergistic or additive effects with the aminoglycosides or the fluoroquinolone against 90% of the isolates. The combination of DRPM and aminoglycosides showed the strongest synergistic effects against IPM-intermediate resistant and IPM resistant strains among the tested combinations. These results suggested that combination of DRPM with aminoglycosides would be useful for the treatment of infections caused by P aeruginosa including IPM-resistant strains. PMID:22066345

  18. Engineering of ribozyme-based aminoglycoside switches of gene expression by in vivo genetic selection in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Klauser, Benedikt; Rehm, Charlotte; Summerer, Daniel; Hartig, Jörg S

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic RNA-based switches are a growing class of genetic controllers applied in synthetic biology to engineer cellular functions. In this chapter, we detail a protocol for the selection of posttranscriptional controllers of gene expression in yeast using the Schistosoma mansoni hammerhead ribozyme as a central catalytic unit. Incorporation of a small molecule-sensing aptamer domain into the ribozyme renders its activity ligand-dependent. Aptazymes display numerous advantages over conventional protein-based transcriptional controllers, namely, the use of little genomic space for encryption, their modular architecture allowing for easy reprogramming to new inputs, the physical linkage to the message to be controlled, and the ability to function without protein cofactors. Herein, we describe the method to select ribozyme-based switches of gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that we successfully implemented to engineer neomycin- and theophylline-responsive switches. We also highlight how to adapt the protocol to screen for switches responsive to other ligands. Reprogramming of the sensor unit and incorporation into any RNA of interest enables the fulfillment of a variety of regulatory functions. However, proper functioning of the aptazyme is largely dependent on optimal connection between the aptamer and the catalytic core. We obtained functional switches from a pool of variants carrying randomized connection sequences by an in vivo selection in MaV203 yeast cells that allows screening of a large sequence space of up to 1×10(9) variants. The protocol given explains how to construct aptazyme libraries, carry out the in vivo selection and characterize novel ON- and OFF-switches. PMID:25605392

  19. Resistance Gene Analogs in Cherries (Prunus spp.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic studies have shown that NBS-LRR Resistance Gene Analogs (RGAs) tend to occur in clusters and often map to major resistances gene or QTL. The identification and use of specific RGAs as molecular markers among plant material displaying differential resistance phenotypes has the potential to di...

  20. Analysis of antimicrobial resistance genes detected in multiple-drug-resistant Escherichia coli isolates from broiler chicken carcasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacteria in food animals are a potential problem in both animal and human health. In this study, MDR commensal Escherichia coli isolates from poultry were examined. Thirty-two E. coli isolates from broiler carcass rinses were selected based on resistance to aminoglycosid...

  1. Prevalence of antibiotic resistance genes of wastewater and surface water in livestock farms of Jiangsu Province, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Biao; Hao, Lijun; Guo, Xinyan; Wang, Na; Ye, Boping

    2015-09-01

    The overuse of antibiotics in livestock farms is general, leading to a wide distribution of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in aquatic environment adjacent to livestock farms. However, researches of the distribution and types of ARGs in aquatic environment of China are still in the initial stage. In this study, wastewater and surface water samples were collected from 12 livestock farms (four pig farms, four cattle farms, and four chicken farms) in Jiangsu Province of China. The prevalence, abundance, and distribution of 22 ARGs were investigated, which were categorized into six groups, including nine tetracyclin resistance genes, three sulfonamides resistance genes, three quinolone resistance genes, two macrolide resistance genes, three aminoglycoside resistance genes, and two multidrug resistance genes, employing quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). The results suggested that all of the 22 ARGs were detected in samples. Sul1, sul2, and tetM were the most abundant with the average concentration of 3.84 × 10(1) copies/16S recombinant RNA (rRNA) gene copies, 1.62 × 10(1) copies/16S rRNA gene copies, 2.33 × 10(1) copies/16S rRNA gene copies, respectively. Principle component analysis revealed that the comprehensive pollution of ARGs in northern Jiangsu was more serious. ARGs in wastewater were more abundant when compared to that in surface water. A preliminary study regarding the fate of ARGs after an aerobiotic process showed that tetA, tetC, sul1, sul2, oqxB, and qnrS were significantly increased. And, among the tetracycline resistance genes, the efflux pump genes were enriched while the ribosomal protection protein encoding genes were decreased in the aerobiotic process. The prevalance of ARGs in water environment is of concern; more surveillance is required to determine the pollution level and pattern of antibiotic resistance genes. PMID:25948386

  2. Shift in antibiotic resistance gene profiles associated with nanosilver during wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yanjun; Metch, Jacob W; Yang, Ying; Pruden, Amy; Zhang, Tong

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated the response of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) to nanosilver (Ag) in lab-scale nitrifying sequencing batch reactors (SBRs), compared to Ag(+)-dosed and undosed controls. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR) targeting sul1, tet(O), ermB and the class I integron gene intI1 and corresponding RNA expression did not indicate measureable effects of nanoAg or Ag(+) on abundance or expression of these genes. However, high-throughput sequencing based metagenomic analysis provided a much broader profile of gene responses and revealed a greater abundance of aminoglycoside resistance genes (mainly strA) in reactors dosed with nanoAg. In contrast, bacitracin and macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin (MLS) resistance genes were more abundant in the SBRs dosed with Ag(+). The distinct ARG profiles associated with nanoAg and Ag(+) were correlated with the taxonomic composition of the microbial communities. This study indicates that nanoAg may interact with bacteria differently from Ag(+) during biological wastewater treatment. Therefore, it cannot necessarily be assumed that nanosilver behaves identically as Ag(+) when conducting a risk assessment for release into the environment. PMID:26850160

  3. Increased Selectivity towards Cytoplasmic versus Mitochondrial Ribosome Confers Improved Efficiency of Synthetic Aminoglycosides in Fixing Damaged Genes: A Strategy for Treatment of Genetic Diseases Caused by Nonsense Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Kandasamy, Jeyakumar; Atia-Glikin, Dana; Shulman, Eli; Shapira, Katya; Shavit, Michal; Belakhov, Valery; Baasov, Timor

    2012-01-01

    Compelling evidence is now available that gentamicin and geneticin (G418) can induce mammalian ribosome to suppress disease-causing nonsense mutations and partially restore the expression of functional proteins. However, toxicity and relative lack of efficacy at subtoxic doses limit the use of gentamicin for suppression therapy. Although G418 exhibits strongest activity, it is very cytotoxic even at low doses. We describe here the first systematic development of the novel aminoglycoside (S)-11 exhibiting similar in vitro and ex vivo activity to that of G418, while its cell toxicity is significantly lower than those of gentamicin and G418. Using a series of biochemical assays, we provide proof of principle that antibacterial activity and toxicity of aminoglycosides can be dissected from their suppression activity. The data further indicate that the increased specificity towards cytoplasmic ribosome correlates with the increased activity, and that the decreased specificity towards mitochondrial ribosome confers to the lowered cytotoxicity. PMID:23148581

  4. Virulence genes, antibiotic resistance and integrons in Escherichia coli strains isolated from synanthropic birds from Spain.

    PubMed

    Sacristán, C; Esperón, F; Herrera-León, S; Iglesias, I; Neves, E; Nogal, V; Muñoz, M J; de la Torre, A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the presence of virulence genes and antibiotic resistance profiles in 164 Escherichia coli strains isolated from birds (feral pigeons, hybrid ducks, house sparrows and spotless starlings) inhabiting urban and rural environments. A total of eight atypical enteropathogenic E. coli strains were identified: one in a house sparrow, four in feral pigeons and three in spotless starlings. Antibiotic resistance was present in 32.9% (54) of E. coli strains. The dominant type of resistance was to tetracycline (21.3%), ampicillin (19.5%) and sulfamethoxazole (18.9%). Five isolates had class 1 integrons containing gene cassettes encoding for dihydrofolate reductase A (dfrA) and aminoglycoside adenyltransferase A (aadA), one in a feral pigeon and four in spotless starlings. To our knowledge, the present study constitutes the first detection of virulence genes from E. coli in spotless starlings and house sparrows, and is also the first identification worldwide of integrons containing antibiotic resistance gene cassettes in E. coli strains from spotless starlings and pigeons. PMID:24689431

  5. Coexistence of SFO-1 and NDM-1 β-lactamase genes and fosfomycin resistance gene fosA3 in an Escherichia coli clinical isolate.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing-yi; Zhu, Yuan-qi; Li, Yan-nian; Mu, Xiao-dong; You, Li-ping; Xu, Cha; Qin, Ping; Ma, Jin-long

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to characterize antimicrobial resistance and antimicrobial resistance genetic determinants of an Escherichia coli clinical isolate HD0149 from China in 2012. This strain displayed high-level resistance to cephalosporins, carbapenems, fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides and fosfomycin. A range of antimicrobial resistance genes was detected responsible for its multiple antimicrobial resistances, involving the blaCMY-2, blaCTX-M-65, blaNDM-1, blaSFO-1, blaTEM-1, fosA3, rmtB, sul1 and sul2 genes. Four amino acid substitutions were detected in the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of GyrA (S83L and D87N), ParC (S80I) and ParE (S458A). Conjugation experiments revealed two multiresistance plasmids present in E. coli HD0149. The blaSFO-1 gene associated with blaNDM-1 gene was located in a 190 kb IncA/C plasmid and the blaCTX-M-65, fosA3 and rmtB genes were located in a 110 kb IncF plasmid. This is the first identification of the blaSFO-1 gene in an E. coli isolate and on a conjugative IncA/C plasmid. This may dramatically enhance the international prevalence and dissemination of blaSFO-1 among Enterobacteriaceae. PMID:25790496

  6. Structure of the bifunctional aminoglycoside-resistance enzyme AAC(6′)-Ie-APH(2′′)-Ia revealed by crystallographic and small-angle X-ray scattering analysis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Clyde A.; Toth, Marta; Weiss, Thomas M.; Frase, Hilary; Vakulenko, Sergei B.

    2014-01-01

    Broad-spectrum resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics in clinically important Gram-positive staphylococcal and entero­coccal pathogens is primarily conferred by the bifunctional enzyme AAC(6′)-Ie-APH(2′′)-Ia. This enzyme possesses an N-terminal coenzyme A-dependent acetyltransferase domain [AAC(6′)-Ie] and a C-terminal GTP-dependent phosphotransferase domain [APH(2′′)-Ia], and together they produce resistance to almost all known aminoglycosides in clinical use. Despite considerable effort over the last two or more decades, structural details of AAC(6′)-Ie-APH(2′′)-Ia have remained elusive. In a recent breakthrough, the structure of the isolated C-terminal APH(2′′)-Ia enzyme was determined as the binary Mg2GDP complex. Here, the high-resolution structure of the N-terminal AAC(6′)-Ie enzyme is reported as a ternary kanamycin/coenzyme A abortive complex. The structure of the full-length bifunctional enzyme has subsequently been elucidated based upon small-angle X-ray scattering data using the two crystallographic models. The AAC(6′)-Ie enzyme is joined to APH(2′′)-Ia by a short, predominantly rigid linker at the N-terminal end of a long α-helix. This α-helix is in turn intrinsically associated with the N-terminus of APH(2′′)-Ia. This structural arrangement supports earlier observations that the presence of the intact α-helix is essential to the activity of both functionalities of the full-length AAC(6′)-Ie-APH(2′′)-Ia enzyme. PMID:25286858

  7. Outbreak of Serratia marcescens Coproducing ArmA and CTX-M-15 Mediated High Levels of Resistance to Aminoglycoside and Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamases, Algeria.

    PubMed

    Batah, Rima; Loucif, Lotfi; Olaitan, Abiola Olumuyiwa; Boutefnouchet, Nafissa; Allag, Hamoudi; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2015-08-01

    Serratia marcescens is one of the most important pathogens responsible for nosocomial infections worldwide. Here, we have investigated the molecular support of antibiotic resistance and genetic relationships in a series of 54 S. marcescens clinical isolates collected from Eastern Algeria between December 2011 and July 2013. The 54 isolates were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed by disc diffusion and E-test methods. Antibiotic resistance genes were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The genetic transfer of antibiotic resistance was performed by conjugation using azide-resistant Escherichia coli J53 as the recipient strain, and plasmid analysis was done by PCR-based replicon typing. The relatedness of our isolates was determined by phylogenetic analysis based on partial sequences of four protein-encoding genes (gyrB, rpoB, infB, and atpD) and then compared to MALDI-TOF MS clustering. Thirty-five out of 54 isolates yielded an extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) phenotype and carried bla(CTX-M-15) (n=32), bla(TEM-1) (n=26), bla(TEM-71) (n=1), bla(SHV-1a) (n=1), and bla(PER-2) (n=12). Among these isolates, we identified a cluster of 15 isolates from a urology unit that coharbored ESBL and the 16S rRNA methyltransferase armA. Conjugation was successful for five selected strains, demonstrating the transferability of a conjugative plasmid of incompatibility group incL/M type. Phylogenetic analysis along with MALDI-TOF clustering likely suggested an outbreak of such isolates in the urology unit. In this study, we report for the first time the co-occurrence of armA methyltransferase with ESBL in S. marcescens clinical isolates in Eastern Algeria. PMID:25884511

  8. Linezolid-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain 1128105, the first known clinical isolate possessing the cfr multidrug resistance gene.

    PubMed

    Locke, Jeffrey B; Zuill, Douglas E; Scharn, Caitlyn R; Deane, Jennifer; Sahm, Daniel F; Denys, Gerald A; Goering, Richard V; Shaw, Karen J

    2014-11-01

    The Cfr methyltransferase confers resistance to six classes of drugs which target the peptidyl transferase center of the 50S ribosomal subunit, including some oxazolidinones, such as linezolid (LZD). The mobile cfr gene was identified in European veterinary isolates from the late 1990s, although the earliest report of a clinical cfr-positive strain was the 2005 Colombian methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolate CM05. Here, through retrospective analysis of LZD(r) clinical strains from a U.S. surveillance program, we identified a cfr-positive MRSA isolate, 1128105, from January 2005, predating CM05 by 5 months. Molecular typing of 1128105 revealed a unique pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profile most similar to that of USA100, spa type t002, and multilocus sequence type 5 (ST5). In addition to cfr, LZD resistance in 1128105 is partially attributed to the presence of a single copy of the 23S rRNA gene mutation T2500A. Transformation of the ∼37-kb conjugative p1128105 cfr-bearing plasmid from 1128105 into S. aureus ATCC 29213 background strains was successful in recapitulating the Cfr antibiogram, as well as resistance to aminoglycosides and trimethoprim. A 7-kb cfr-containing region of p1128105 possessed sequence nearly identical to that found in the Chinese veterinary Proteus vulgaris isolate PV-01 and in U.S. clinical S. aureus isolate 1900, although the presence of IS431-like sequences is unique to p1128105. The cfr gene environment in this early clinical cfr-positive isolate has now been identified in Gram-positive and Gram-negative strains of clinical and veterinary origin and has been associated with multiple mobile elements, highlighting the versatility of this multidrug resistance gene and its potential for further dissemination. PMID:25155597

  9. Gene flow from glyphosate-resistant crops.

    PubMed

    Mallory-Smith, Carol; Zapiola, Maria

    2008-04-01

    Gene flow from transgenic glyphosate-resistant crops can result in the adventitious presence of the transgene, which may negatively impact markets. Gene flow can also produce glyphosate-resistant plants that may interfere with weed management systems. The objective of this article is to review the gene flow literature as it pertains to glyphosate-resistant crops. Gene flow is a natural phenomenon not unique to transgenic crops and can occur via pollen, seed and, in some cases, vegetative propagules. Gene flow via pollen can occur in all crops, even those that are considered to be self-pollinated, because all have low levels of outcrossing. Gene flow via seed or vegetative propagules occurs when they are moved naturally or by humans during crop production and commercialization. There are many factors that influence gene flow; therefore, it is difficult to prevent or predict. Gene flow via pollen and seed from glyphosate-resistant canola and creeping bentgrass fields has been documented. The adventitious presence of the transgene responsible for glyphosate resistance has been found in commercial seed lots of canola, corn and soybeans. In general, the glyphosate-resistant trait is not considered to provide an ecological advantage. However, regulators should consider the examples of gene flow from glyphosate-resistant crops when formulating rules for the release of crops with traits that could negatively impact the environment or human health. PMID:18181145

  10. Enhancing Plant Disease Resistance without R Genes.

    PubMed

    Sarma, Birinchi Kumar; Singh, Harikesh Bahadur; Fernando, Dilantha; Silva, Roberto Nascimento; Gupta, Vijai Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Crop plants encounter constant biotic challenges, and these challenges have historically been best managed with resistance (R) genes. However, the rapid evolution of new pathogenic strains along with the nonavailability or nonidentification of R genes in cultivated crop species against a large number of plant pathogens have led researchers to think beyond R genes. Biotechnological tools have shown promise in dealing with such challenges. Technologies such as transgenerational plant immunity, interspecies transfer of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), pathogen-derived resistance (PDR), gene regulation, and expression of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) in host plants from other plant species have led to enhanced disease resistance and increased food security. PMID:27113633

  11. Hypoionic shock treatment enables aminoglycosides antibiotics to eradicate bacterial persisters

    PubMed Central

    Jiafeng, Liu; Fu, Xinmiao; Chang, Zengyi

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial persisters, usually being considered as dormant cells that are tolerant to antibiotics, are an important source for recurrent infection and emergence of antibiotic resistant pathogens. Clinical eradication of pathogenic persisters is highly desired but greatly difficult mainly due to the substantial reduction in antibiotics uptake as well as the non-active state of the drug targets. Here we report that bacterial persisters (normal growing cells as well) can be effectively eradicated by aminoglycoside antibiotics upon hypoionic shock (e.g. pure water treatment) even for less than one minute. Such hypoionic shock potentiation effect on aminoglycosides is proton motive force-independent, and is apparently achieved by promoting the entrance of aminoglycosides, speculatively through the mechanosensitive ion channels. Our revelations may provide a simple and powerful strategy to eradicate pathogen persisters. PMID:26435063

  12. Molecular surveillance for carbapenemase genes in carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Australian patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Tai, Anna S; Kidd, Timothy J; Whiley, David M; Ramsay, Kay A; Buckley, Cameron; Bell, Scott C

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of acquired carbapenemase genes amongst carbapenem non-susceptible Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in Australian patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Cross-sectional molecular surveillance for acquired carbapenemase genes was performed on CF P. aeruginosa isolates from two isolate banks comprising: (i) 662 carbapenem resistant P. aeruginosa isolates from 227 patients attending 10 geographically diverse Australian CF centres (2007-2009), and (ii) 519 P. aeruginosa isolates from a cohort of 173 adult patients attending one Queensland CF clinic in 2011. All 1189 P. aeruginosa isolates were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) protocols targeting ten common carbapenemase genes, as well the Class 1 integron intI1 gene and the aadB aminoglycoside resistance gene. No carbapenemase genes were identified among all isolates tested. The intI1 and aadB genes were frequently detected and were significantly associated with the AUST-02 strain (OR 24.6, 95% CI 9.3-65.6; p < 0.0001) predominantly from Queensland patients. Despite the high prevalence of carbapenem resistance in P. aeruginosa in Australian patients with CF, no acquired carbapenemase genes were detected in the study, suggesting chromosomal mutations remain the key resistance mechanism in CF isolates. Systematic surveillance for carbapenemase-producing P. aeruginosa in CF by molecular surveillance is ongoing. PMID:25551306

  13. Constitutive presence of antibiotic resistance genes within the bacterial community of a large subalpine lake.

    PubMed

    Di Cesare, Andrea; Eckert, Ester M; Teruggi, Alessia; Fontaneto, Diego; Bertoni, Roberto; Callieri, Cristiana; Corno, Gianluca

    2015-08-01

    The fate of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in environmental microbial communities is of primary concern as prodromal of a potential transfer to pathogenic bacteria. Although of diverse origin, the persistence of ARGs in aquatic environments is highly influenced by anthropic activities, allowing potential control actions in well-studied environments. However, knowledge of abundance and space-time distribution of ARGs in ecosystems is still scarce. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we investigated the presence and the abundance of twelve ARGs (against tetracyclines, β-lactams, aminoglycosides, quinolones and sulphonamides) at different sampling sites, depths and seasons, in Lake Maggiore, a large subalpine lake, and in the area of its watershed. We then evaluated the correlation between each ARG and a number of ecological parameters in the water column in the deepest part of the lake. Our results suggest the constitutive presence of at least four ARGs within the bacterial community with a high proportion of bacteria potentially resistant to tetracyclines and sulphonamides. The presence of these ARGs was independent of the total bacterial density and temperature. The dynamics of tet(A) and sulII genes were, however, positively correlated with dissolved oxygen and negatively to chlorophyll a, suggesting that the resistant microbes inhabit specific niches. These observations indicate that the lake is a reservoir of antibiotic resistances, highlighting the need of a deeper understanding of the sources of ARGs and the factors allowing their persistence in waters. PMID:26118321

  14. Study of the Aminoglycoside Subsistence Phenotype of Bacteria Residing in the Gut of Humans and Zoo Animals

    PubMed Central

    Bello González, Teresita de J.; Zuidema, Tina; Bor, Gerrit; Smidt, Hauke; van Passel, Mark W. J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that next to antibiotic resistance, bacteria are able to subsist on antibiotics as a carbon source. Here we evaluated the potential of gut bacteria from healthy human volunteers and zoo animals to subsist on antibiotics. Nine gut isolates of Escherichia coli and Cellulosimicrobium sp. displayed increases in colony forming units (CFU) during incubations in minimal medium with only antibiotics added, i.e., the antibiotic subsistence phenotype. Furthermore, laboratory strains of E. coli and Pseudomonas putida equipped with the aminoglycoside 3′ phosphotransferase II gene also displayed the subsistence phenotype on aminoglycosides. In order to address which endogenous genes could be involved in these subsistence phenotypes, the broad-range glycosyl-hydrolase inhibiting iminosugar deoxynojirimycin (DNJ) was used. Addition of DNJ to minimal medium containing glucose showed initial growth retardation of resistant E. coli, which was rapidly recovered to normal growth. In contrast, addition of DNJ to minimal medium containing kanamycin arrested resistant E. coli growth, suggesting that glycosyl-hydrolases were involved in the subsistence phenotype. However, antibiotic degradation experiments showed no reduction in kanamycin, even though the number of CFUs increased. Although antibiotic subsistence phenotypes are readily observed in bacterial species, and are even found in susceptible laboratory strains carrying standard resistance genes, we conclude there is a discrepancy between the observed antibiotic subsistence phenotype and actual antibiotic degradation. Based on these results we can hypothesize that aminoglycoside modifying enzymes might first inactivate the antibiotic (i.e., by acetylation of amino groups, modification of hydroxyl groups by adenylation and phosphorylation respectively), before the subsequent action of catabolic enzymes. Even though we do not dispute that antibiotics could be used as a single carbon source, our observations

  15. Draft Genome Sequence for a Clinical Isolate of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Keesha E; Madinger, Nancy E; Chatterjee, Anushree

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of a multidrug-resistant Enterococcus faecalis strain, isolated from a patient at the University of Colorado Hospital. The genome assembly is 3,040,186 bp in length with 37.6% GC content. This isolate encodes eleven resistance genes, including those for glycopeptide, aminoglycoside, macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin, and tetracycline resistance. PMID:27340066

  16. Draft Genome Sequence for a Clinical Isolate of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus faecalis

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Keesha E.; Madinger, Nancy E.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of a multidrug-resistant Enterococcus faecalis strain, isolated from a patient at the University of Colorado Hospital. The genome assembly is 3,040,186 bp in length with 37.6% GC content. This isolate encodes eleven resistance genes, including those for glycopeptide, aminoglycoside, macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin, and tetracycline resistance. PMID:27340066

  17. Identification of acquired antimicrobial resistance genes

    PubMed Central

    Zankari, Ea; Hasman, Henrik; Cosentino, Salvatore; Vestergaard, Martin; Rasmussen, Simon; Lund, Ole; Aarestrup, Frank M.; Larsen, Mette Voldby

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Identification of antimicrobial resistance genes is important for understanding the underlying mechanisms and the epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance. As the costs of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) continue to decline, it becomes increasingly available in routine diagnostic laboratories and is anticipated to substitute traditional methods for resistance gene identification. Thus, the current challenge is to extract the relevant information from the large amount of generated data. Methods We developed a web-based method, ResFinder that uses BLAST for identification of acquired antimicrobial resistance genes in whole-genome data. As input, the method can use both pre-assembled, complete or partial genomes, and short sequence reads from four different sequencing platforms. The method was evaluated on 1862 GenBank files containing 1411 different resistance genes, as well as on 23 de-novo-sequenced isolates. Results When testing the 1862 GenBank files, the method identified the resistance genes with an ID = 100% (100% identity) to the genes in ResFinder. Agreement between in silico predictions and phenotypic testing was found when the method was further tested on 23 isolates of five different bacterial species, with available phenotypes. Furthermore, ResFinder was evaluated on WGS chromosomes and plasmids of 30 isolates. Seven of these isolates were annotated to have antimicrobial resistance, and in all cases, annotations were compatible with the ResFinder results. Conclusions A web server providing a convenient way of identifying acquired antimicrobial resistance genes in completely sequenced isolates was created. ResFinder can be accessed at www.genomicepidemiology.org. ResFinder will continuously be updated as new resistance genes are identified. PMID:22782487

  18. Mobility of gentamicin resistance genes from staphylococci isolated in the United States: identification of Tn4031, a gentamicin resistance transposon from Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, W D; Archer, G L

    1989-01-01

    Homologous genes encoding resistance to gentamicin, tobramycin, and kanamycin through the bifunctional acetylating [AAC(6')] and phosphorylating [APH(2")] aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme were identified in staphylococci isolated from patients in the United States. The mobility of gentamicin resistance (Gmr) genes found on a prototype conjugative plasmid (pGO1) was compared with that of genes cloned from chromosomal sites. Plasmid-encoded Gmr genes and flanking sequences were introduced onto a temperature-sensitive plasmid (pRN3208) from pGO1 by homologous recombination between insertion sequence-like elements present on both replicons. Growth of Staphylococcus aureus strains containing the temperature-sensitive recombinant (pGO161) at the nonpermissive temperature for plasmid replication (42 degrees C) revealed no translocation of Gmr from its plasmid location. A transposon (Tn551) resident on the same replicon did translocate. Chromosomal Gmr determinants were cloned, together with the gene for trimethoprim resistance (dfrA), from three geographically distinct S. epidermidis isolates; two were subcloned onto temperature-sensitive Escherichia coli-S. aureus shuttle plasmids as 7.2-kilobase BglII fragments. Growth of both recombination-deficient and-proficient S. aureus strains containing the cloned genes at 42 degrees C allowed detection of transposition of Gmr sequences and identification of insertion into random chromosomal sites. We have designated this 5-kilobase transposon from S. epidermidis as Tn4031. Images PMID:2552907

  19. Disease Resistance Gene Analogs (RGAs) in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Sekhwal, Manoj Kumar; Li, Pingchuan; Lam, Irene; Wang, Xiue; Cloutier, Sylvie; You, Frank M.

    2015-01-01

    Plants have developed effective mechanisms to recognize and respond to infections caused by pathogens. Plant resistance gene analogs (RGAs), as resistance (R) gene candidates, have conserved domains and motifs that play specific roles in pathogens’ resistance. Well-known RGAs are nucleotide binding site leucine rich repeats, receptor like kinases, and receptor like proteins. Others include pentatricopeptide repeats and apoplastic peroxidases. RGAs can be detected using bioinformatics tools based on their conserved structural features. Thousands of RGAs have been identified from sequenced plant genomes. High-density genome-wide RGA genetic maps are useful for designing diagnostic markers and identifying quantitative trait loci (QTL) or markers associated with plant disease resistance. This review focuses on recent advances in structures and mechanisms of RGAs, and their identification from sequenced genomes using bioinformatics tools. Applications in enhancing fine mapping and cloning of plant disease resistance genes are also discussed. PMID:26287177

  20. Acquired Antibiotic Resistance Genes: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    van Hoek, Angela H. A. M.; Mevius, Dik; Guerra, Beatriz; Mullany, Peter; Roberts, Adam Paul; Aarts, Henk J. M.

    2011-01-01

    In this review an overview is given on antibiotic resistance (AR) mechanisms with special attentions to the AR genes described so far preceded by a short introduction on the discovery and mode of action of the different classes of antibiotics. As this review is only dealing with acquired resistance, attention is also paid to mobile genetic elements such as plasmids, transposons, and integrons, which are associated with AR genes, and involved in the dispersal of antimicrobial determinants between different bacteria. PMID:22046172

  1. Molecular Characterization of Potato Disease Resistance Genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A key long-term management strategy for combating potato diseases is to develop cultivars with high levels of resistance through identification and integration of major resistance (R) genes. This talk will summarize our results of cloning and characterizing major late blight and Verticillium wilt R...

  2. Antibiotic resistance genes and human bacterial pathogens: Co-occurrence, removal, and enrichment in municipal sewage sludge digesters.

    PubMed

    Ju, Feng; Li, Bing; Ma, Liping; Wang, Yubo; Huang, Danping; Zhang, Tong

    2016-03-15

    Understanding which/how antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) contribute to increased acquisition of resistance by pathogens in aquatic environments are challenges of profound significance. We explored the co-occurrence and removal versus enrichment of ARGs and human bacterial pathogens (HBPs) in municipal sewage sludge digesters. We combined metagenomic detection of a wide spectrum of 323 ARGs and 83 HBPs with a correlation-based statistical approach and charted a network of their co-occurrence relationships. The results indicate that most ARGs and a minor proportion of HBPs (mainly Collinsella aerofaciens, Streptococcus salivarius and Gordonia bronchialis) could not be removed by anaerobic digestion, revealing a biological risk of post-digestion sludge in disseminating antibiotic resistance and pathogenicity. Moreover, preferential co-occurrence patterns were evident within one ARG type (e.g., multidrug, beta-lactam, and aminoglycoside) and between two different ARG types (i.e., aminoglycoside and beta-lactam), possibly implicating co-effects of antibiotic selection pressure and co-resistance on shaping antibiotic resistome in sewage sludge. Unlike beta-lactam resistance genes, ARGs of multidrug and macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin tended to co-occur more with HBPs. Strikingly, we presented evidence that the most straightforward biological origin of an ARG-species co-occurring event is a hosting relationship. Furthermore, a significant and robust HBP-species co-occurrence correlation provides a proper scenario for nominating HBP indicators (e.g., Bifidobacterium spp. are perfect indicators of C. aerofaciens; r = 0.92-0.99 and P-values < 0.01). Combined, this study demonstrates a creative and effective network-based metagenomic approach for exploring ARG hosts and HBP indicators and assessing ARGs acquisition by HBPs in human-impacted environments where ARGs and HBPs may co-thrive. PMID:26773390

  3. Antibiotic resistance marker genes as environmental pollutants in GMO-pristine agricultural soils in Austria.

    PubMed

    Woegerbauer, Markus; Zeinzinger, Josef; Gottsberger, Richard Alexander; Pascher, Kathrin; Hufnagl, Peter; Indra, Alexander; Fuchs, Reinhard; Hofrichter, Johannes; Kopacka, Ian; Korschineck, Irina; Schleicher, Corina; Schwarz, Michael; Steinwider, Johann; Springer, Burkhard; Allerberger, Franz; Nielsen, Kaare M; Fuchs, Klemens

    2015-11-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes may be considered as environmental pollutants if anthropogenic emission and manipulations increase their prevalence above usually occurring background levels. The prevalence of aph(3')-IIa/nptII and aph(3')-IIIa/nptIII - frequent marker genes in plant biotechnology conferring resistance to certain aminoglycosides - was determined in Austrian soils from 100 maize and potato fields not yet exposed to but eligible for GMO crop cultivation. Total soil DNA extracts were analysed by nptII/nptIII-specific TaqMan real time PCR. Of all fields 6% were positive for nptII (median: 150 copies/g soil; range: 31-856) and 85% for nptIII (1190 copies/g soil; 13-61600). The copy-number deduced prevalence of nptIII carriers was 14-fold higher compared to nptII. Of the cultivable kanamycin-resistant soil bacteria 1.8% (95% confidence interval: 0-3.3%) were positive for nptIII, none for nptII (0-0.8%). The nptII-load of the studied soils was low rendering nptII a typical candidate as environmental pollutant upon anthropogenic release into these ecosystems. PMID:26232739

  4. Cotransfer of antibiotic resistance genes and a hylEfm-containing virulence plasmid in Enterococcus faecium.

    PubMed

    Arias, Cesar A; Panesso, Diana; Singh, Kavindra V; Rice, Louis B; Murray, Barbara E

    2009-10-01

    The hyl(Efm) gene (encoding a putative hyaluronidase) has been found almost exclusively in Enterococcus faecium clinical isolates, and recently, it was shown to be on a plasmid which increased the ability of E. faecium strains to colonize the gastrointestinal tract. In this work, the results of mating experiments between hyl(Efm)-containing strains of E. faecium belonging to clonal cluster 17 and isolated in the United States and Colombia indicated that the hyl(Efm) gene of these strains is also carried on large plasmids (>145 kb) which we showed transfer readily from clinical strains to E. faecium hosts. Cotransfer of resistance to vancomycin and high-level resistance (HLR) to aminoglycosides (gentamicin and streptomycin) and erythromycin was also observed. The vanA gene cluster and gentamicin resistance determinants were genetically linked to hyl(Efm), whereas erm(B) and ant(6)-I, conferring macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance and HLR to streptomycin, respectively, were not. A hyl(Efm)-positive transconjugant resulting from a mating between a well-characterized endocarditis strain [TX0016 (DO)] and a derivative of a fecal strain of E. faecium from a healthy human volunteer (TX1330RF) exhibited increased virulence in a mouse peritonitis model. These results indicate that E. faecium strains use a strategy which involves the recruitment into the same genetic unit of antibiotic resistance genes and determinants that increase the ability to produce disease. Our findings indicate that the acquisition of the hyl(Efm) plasmids may explain, at least in part, the recent successful emergence of some E. faecium strains as nosocomial pathogens. PMID:19667280

  5. Purification, Crystallization And Preliminary X-Ray Analysis of Aminoglycoside-2 ''-Phosphotransferase-Ic [APH(2 '')-Ic] From Enterococcus Gallinarum

    SciTech Connect

    Byrnes, L.J.; Badarau, A.; Vakulenko, S.B.; Smith, C.A.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2009-04-30

    Bacterial resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics is primarily the result of deactivation of the drugs. Three families of enzymes are responsible for this activity, with one such family being the aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs). The gene encoding one of these enzymes, aminoglycoside-2{double_prime}-phosphotransferase-Ic [APH(2{double_prime})-Ic] from Enterococcus gallinarum, has been cloned and the wild-type protein (comprising 308 amino-acid residues) and three mutants that showed elevated minimum inhibitory concentrations towards gentamicin (F108L, H258L and a double mutant F108L/H258L) were expressed in Escherichia coli and subsequently purified. All APH(2{double_prime})-Ic variants were crystallized in the presence of 14-20%(w/v) PEG 4000, 0.25 M MgCl{sub 2}, 0.1 M Tris-HCl pH 8.5 and 1 mM Mg{sub 2}GTP. The crystals belong to the monoclinic space group C2, with one molecule in the asymmetric unit. The approximate unit-cell parameters are a = 82.4, b = 54.2, c = 77.0 {angstrom}, {beta} = 108.8{sup o}. X-ray diffraction data were collected to approximately 2.15 {angstrom} resolution from an F108L crystal at beamline BL9-2 at SSRL, Stanford, California, USA.

  6. Dissociation of antibacterial activity and aminoglycoside ototoxicity in the 4-monosubstituted 2-deoxystreptamine apramycin

    PubMed Central

    Matt, Tanja; Ng, Chyan Leong; Lang, Kathrin; Sha, Su-Hua; Akbergenov, Rashid; Shcherbakov, Dmitri; Meyer, Martin; Duscha, Stefan; Xie, Jing; Dubbaka, Srinivas R.; Perez-Fernandez, Déborah; Vasella, Andrea; Ramakrishnan, V.; Schacht, Jochen; Böttger, Erik C.

    2012-01-01

    Aminoglycosides are potent antibacterials, but therapy is compromised by substantial toxicity causing, in particular, irreversible hearing loss. Aminoglycoside ototoxicity occurs both in a sporadic dose-dependent and in a genetically predisposed fashion. We recently have developed a mechanistic concept that postulates a key role for the mitochondrial ribosome (mitoribosome) in aminoglycoside ototoxicity. We now report on the surprising finding that apramycin, a structurally unique aminoglycoside licensed for veterinary use, shows little activity toward eukaryotic ribosomes, including hybrid ribosomes which were genetically engineered to carry the mitoribosomal aminoglycoside-susceptibility A1555G allele. In ex vivo cultures of cochlear explants and in the in vivo guinea pig model of chronic ototoxicity, apramycin causes only little hair cell damage and hearing loss but it is a potent antibacterial with good activity against a range of clinical pathogens, including multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These data provide proof of concept that antibacterial activity can be dissected from aminoglycoside ototoxicity. Together with 3D structures of apramycin-ribosome complexes at 3.5-Å resolution, our results provide a conceptual framework for further development of less toxic aminoglycosides by hypothesis-driven chemical synthesis. PMID:22699498

  7. Tetracycline resistance genes acquired at birth.

    PubMed

    Alicea-Serrano, Angela M; Contreras, Mónica; Magris, Magda; Hidalgo, Glida; Dominguez-Bello, Maria G

    2013-06-01

    Newborns acquire their first microbiota at birth. Maternal vaginal or skin bacteria colonize newborns delivered vaginally or by C-section, respectively (Dominguez-Bello et al. 2010 #884). We aimed to determine differences in the presence of four tetracycline (tet) resistance genes, in the microbes of ten newborns and in the mouth and vagina of their mothers, at the time of birth. DNA was amplified by PCR with primers specific for [tet(M), tet(O), tet(Q), and tet(W)]. Maternal vaginas harbored all four tet resistance genes, but most commonly tet(M) and tet(O) (63 and 38 %, respectively). Genes coding for tet resistance differed by birth mode, with 50 % of vaginally delivered babies had tet(M) and tet(O) and 16 and 13 % of infants born by C-section had tet(O) and tet(W), respectively. Newborns acquire antibiotic resistance genes at birth, and the resistance gene profile varies by mode of delivery. PMID:23483141

  8. Exploring antibiotic resistance genes and metal resistance genes in plasmid metagenomes from wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Li, An-Dong; Li, Li-Guan; Zhang, Tong

    2015-01-01

    Plasmids operate as independent genetic elements in microorganism communities. Through horizontal gene transfer (HGT), they can provide their host microorganisms with important functions such as antibiotic resistance and heavy metal resistance. In this study, six metagenomic libraries were constructed with plasmid DNA extracted from influent, activated sludge (AS) and digested sludge (DS) of two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Compared with the metagenomes of the total DNA extracted from the same sectors of the wastewater treatment plant, the plasmid metagenomes had significantly higher annotation rates, indicating that the functional genes on plasmids are commonly shared by those studied microorganisms. Meanwhile, the plasmid metagenomes also encoded many more genes related to defense mechanisms, including ARGs. Searching against an antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) database and a metal resistance genes (MRGs) database revealed a broad-spectrum of antibiotic (323 out of a total 618 subtypes) and MRGs (23 out of a total 23 types) on these plasmid metagenomes. The influent plasmid metagenomes contained many more resistance genes (both ARGs and MRGs) than the AS and the DS metagenomes. Sixteen novel plasmids with a complete circular structure that carried these resistance genes were assembled from the plasmid metagenomes. The results of this study demonstrated that the plasmids in WWTPs could be important reservoirs for resistance genes, and may play a significant role in the horizontal transfer of these genes. PMID:26441947

  9. Exploring antibiotic resistance genes and metal resistance genes in plasmid metagenomes from wastewater treatment plants

    PubMed Central

    Li, An-Dong; Li, Li-Guan; Zhang, Tong

    2015-01-01

    Plasmids operate as independent genetic elements in microorganism communities. Through horizontal gene transfer (HGT), they can provide their host microorganisms with important functions such as antibiotic resistance and heavy metal resistance. In this study, six metagenomic libraries were constructed with plasmid DNA extracted from influent, activated sludge (AS) and digested sludge (DS) of two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Compared with the metagenomes of the total DNA extracted from the same sectors of the wastewater treatment plant, the plasmid metagenomes had significantly higher annotation rates, indicating that the functional genes on plasmids are commonly shared by those studied microorganisms. Meanwhile, the plasmid metagenomes also encoded many more genes related to defense mechanisms, including ARGs. Searching against an antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) database and a metal resistance genes (MRGs) database revealed a broad-spectrum of antibiotic (323 out of a total 618 subtypes) and MRGs (23 out of a total 23 types) on these plasmid metagenomes. The influent plasmid metagenomes contained many more resistance genes (both ARGs and MRGs) than the AS and the DS metagenomes. Sixteen novel plasmids with a complete circular structure that carried these resistance genes were assembled from the plasmid metagenomes. The results of this study demonstrated that the plasmids in WWTPs could be important reservoirs for resistance genes, and may play a significant role in the horizontal transfer of these genes. PMID:26441947

  10. Antimicrobial resistance genes in multi-drug resistant Salmonella enterica serovars isolated most frequently from animals, retail meat, and humans in the U.S. and Canada

    PubMed Central

    Glenn, LaShanda M.; Lindsey, Rebecca L.; Folster, Jason P.; Whichard, Jean M.; Pecic, Gary; Boerlin, Patrick; Gilmour, Mathew W.; McDermott, Patrick F.; Harbottle, Heather; Fedorka-Cray, Paula J.; Frye, Jonathan G.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is a prevalent food-borne pathogen which can carry multi-drug resistance (MDR) and could pose a threat to human health. Identifying the genetic elements associated with MDR in Salmonella isolated from animals, food, and humans can help determine the sources of MDR in food animals and their impact on human health. Representatives of MDR S. enterica serovars most frequently isolated from healthy animals, retail meat, and human infections in the U.S. and Canada were subjected to detailed genetic analysis (n=56). These included U.S. slaughter (n=12), retail (n=9), and human (9) isolates, and Canadian slaughter (n=9), retail (n=9), and human (n=8) isolates. These isolates were assayed by microarray for antimicrobial resistance and MDR plasmid genes. Genes detected encoded resistance to aminoglycosides (alleles of aac, aad, aph, strA/B); beta-lactams (blaTEM, blaCMY, blaPSE-1); chloramphenicol (cat, flo, cmlA); sulfamethoxazole (sulI); tetracycline (tet(A, B, C, D) and tetR); and trimethoprim (dfrA). Similar resistance genes were detected regardless of serovar, source, or location. Hybridization with IncA/C plasmid gene probes indicated that 27/56 isolates carried a member of this plasmid family; however these plasmids differed in several highly variable regions. Cluster analysis based on genes detected separated most of the isolates into two groups, one with IncA/C plasmids and one without IncA/C plasmids. Other plasmid replicons were detected in all but one isolate, and included I1 (25/56), N (23/56) and FIB (10/56). The presence of different mobile elements along with similar resistance genes suggest that these genetic elements may acquire similar resistance cassettes, and serve as multiple sources for MDR in Salmonella from food animals, retail meat, and human infections. PMID:23350745

  11. Antimicrobial resistance and virulence gene profiles in multi-drug resistant enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli isolated from pigs with post-weaning diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Smith, M G; Jordan, D; Chapman, T A; Chin, J J-C; Barton, M D; Do, T N; Fahy, V A; Fairbrother, J M; Trott, D J

    2010-10-26

    This study aimed to characterize antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes in multi-drug resistant enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) isolates (n=117) collected from porcine post-weaning diarrhoea cases in Australia (1999-2005). Isolates were serotyped, antibiogram-phenotyped for 12 antimicrobial agents and genotyped by PCR for 30 plasmid-mediated antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs), 22 intestinal and 38 extraintestinal E. coli virulence genes (VGs). Nine serogroups were identified, the most prevalent being O149 (46.2%), O141 (11.2%) and Ont (31.6%). None of the isolates showed resistance to ceftiofur or enrofloxacin and 9.4% were resistant to florfenicol. No corresponding extended-spectrum/AmpC β-lactamase, fluoroquinolone or floR ARGs were detected. An antimicrobial resistance index (ARI) was calculated from the combined data with a weighting for each antimicrobial agent dependent upon its significance to human health. Serogroup O141 isolates had a significantly higher ARI due to an elevated prevalence of aminoglycoside ARGs and possession of more virulence genes (VGs), including ExPEC or EHEC adhesins (bmaE, sfa/focDE, fimH, ihA) in toxin-producing strains that lacked the normally associated F4 and F18 fimbriae. Few associations between ARGs and VGs were apparent, apart from tetC, sfa/focDE and ompT which, for a sub-set of O141 isolates, suggest possible plasmid acquisition from ExPEC. The multi-drug resistant ETEC ARG/VG profiles indicate a high probability of considerable strain and plasmid diversity, reflecting various selection pressures at the individual farm level rather than emergence and lateral spread of MDR resistant/virulent clones. PMID:20688440

  12. Whole-Genome Sequence of Multidrug-Resistant Campylobacter coli Strain COL B1-266, Isolated from the Colombian Poultry Chain.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Johan F; Donado-Godoy, Pilar; Arévalo, Alejandra; Duarte, Carolina; Realpe, María E; Díaz, Paula L; Gómez, Yolanda; Rodríguez, Fernando; Agarwala, Richa; Landsman, David; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter coli is considered one of the main causes of food-borne illness worldwide. We report here the whole-genome sequence of multidrug-resistant Campylobacter coli strain COL B1-266, isolated from the Colombian poultry chain. The genome sequences encode genes for a variety of antimicrobial resistance genes, including aminoglycosides, β-lactams, lincosamides, fluoroquinolones, and tetracyclines. PMID:26988047

  13. Whole-Genome Sequence of Multidrug-Resistant Campylobacter coli Strain COL B1-266, Isolated from the Colombian Poultry Chain

    PubMed Central

    Bernal, Johan F.; Donado-Godoy, Pilar; Arévalo, Alejandra; Duarte, Carolina; Realpe, María E.; Díaz, Paula L.; Gómez, Yolanda; Rodríguez, Fernando; Agarwala, Richa; Landsman, David

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter coli is considered one of the main causes of food-borne illness worldwide. We report here the whole-genome sequence of multidrug-resistant Campylobacter coli strain COL B1-266, isolated from the Colombian poultry chain. The genome sequences encode genes for a variety of antimicrobial resistance genes, including aminoglycosides, β-lactams, lincosamides, fluoroquinolones, and tetracyclines. PMID:26988047

  14. A gene expression signature for insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Konstantopoulos, Nicky; Foletta, Victoria C; Segal, David H; Shields, Katherine A; Sanigorski, Andrew; Windmill, Kelly; Swinton, Courtney; Connor, Tim; Wanyonyi, Stephen; Dyer, Thomas D; Fahey, Richard P; Watt, Rose A; Curran, Joanne E; Molero, Juan-Carlos; Krippner, Guy; Collier, Greg R; James, David E; Blangero, John; Jowett, Jeremy B; Walder, Ken R

    2011-02-11

    Insulin resistance is a heterogeneous disorder caused by a range of genetic and environmental factors, and we hypothesize that its etiology varies considerably between individuals. This heterogeneity provides significant challenges to the development of effective therapeutic regimes for long-term management of type 2 diabetes. We describe a novel strategy, using large-scale gene expression profiling, to develop a gene expression signature (GES) that reflects the overall state of insulin resistance in cells and patients. The GES was developed from 3T3-L1 adipocytes that were made "insulin resistant" by treatment with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and then reversed with aspirin and troglitazone ("resensitized"). The GES consisted of five genes whose expression levels best discriminated between the insulin-resistant and insulin-resensitized states. We then used this GES to screen a compound library for agents that affected the GES genes in 3T3-L1 adipocytes in a way that most closely resembled the changes seen when insulin resistance was successfully reversed with aspirin and troglitazone. This screen identified both known and new insulin-sensitizing compounds including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, β-adrenergic antagonists, β-lactams, and sodium channel blockers. We tested the biological relevance of this GES in participants in the San Antonio Family Heart Study (n = 1,240) and showed that patients with the lowest GES scores were more insulin resistant (according to HOMA_IR and fasting plasma insulin levels; P < 0.001). These findings show that GES technology can be used for both the discovery of insulin-sensitizing compounds and the characterization of patients into subtypes of insulin resistance according to GES scores, opening the possibility of developing a personalized medicine approach to type 2 diabetes. PMID:21081660

  15. Fe-S cluster biosynthesis controls uptake of aminoglycosides in a ROS-less death pathway.

    PubMed

    Ezraty, Benjamin; Vergnes, Alexandra; Banzhaf, Manuel; Duverger, Yohann; Huguenot, Allison; Brochado, Ana Rita; Su, Shu-Yi; Espinosa, Leon; Loiseau, Laurent; Py, Béatrice; Typas, Athanasios; Barras, Frédéric

    2013-06-28

    All bactericidal antibiotics were recently proposed to kill by inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, causing destabilization of iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters and generating Fenton chemistry. We find that the ROS response is dispensable upon treatment with bactericidal antibiotics. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Fe-S clusters are required for killing only by aminoglycosides. In contrast to cells, using the major Fe-S cluster biosynthesis machinery, ISC, cells using the alternative machinery, SUF, cannot efficiently mature respiratory complexes I and II, resulting in impendence of the proton motive force (PMF), which is required for bactericidal aminoglycoside uptake. Similarly, during iron limitation, cells become intrinsically resistant to aminoglycosides by switching from ISC to SUF and down-regulating both respiratory complexes. We conclude that Fe-S proteins promote aminoglycoside killing by enabling their uptake. PMID:23812717

  16. DETECTION OF ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE GENES BY DNA MICROARRAY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To study the spread of antimicrobial resistance in bacteria it is necessary to identify the genes responsible for resistance. Currently, each gene must be screened individually in order to identify the gene(s) responsible for the observed resistance expressed by a bacterium. The inability to rapidly...

  17. Detection of antimicrobial resistance genes by DNA microarray

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To study the spread of antimicrobial resistance in bacteria it is necessary to detect and characterize the genes responsible for resistance. Currently, each gene must be screened individually in order to identify the gene(s) responsible for the observed resistance expressed by a bacterium. The inabi...

  18. Detection of antimicrobial resistance genes by DNA microarray

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To study the spread of antimicrobial resistance in bacteria it is necessary to identify the genes responsible for resistance. Currently, each gene must be screened individually in order to identify the gene(s) responsible for the observed resistance expressed by a bacterium. The inability to rapidly...

  19. Transposon tagging of disease resistance genes

    SciTech Connect

    Michelmore, R.W. . Dept. of Physics)

    1989-01-01

    We are developing a transposon mutagenesis system for lettuce to clone genes for resistance to the fungal pathogen, Bremia lactucae. Activity of heterologous transposons is being studied in transgenic plants. Southern analysis of T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} plants containing Tam3 from Antirrhinum provided ambiguous results. Multiple endonuclease digests indicated that transposition had occurred; however, in no plant were all endonuclease digests consistent with a simple excision event. Southern or PCR analysis of over 50 plans containing Ac from maize have also failed to reveal clear evidence of transposition; this is contrast to experiments by others with the same constructs who have observed high rates of Ac excision in other plant species. Nearly all of 65 T{sub 2} families containing Ac interrupting a chimeric streptomycin resistance gene (Courtesy J. Jones, Sainsbury Lab., UK) clearly segregated for streptomycin resistance. Southern analyses, however, showed no evidence of transposition, indicating restoration of a functional message by other mechanisms, possibly mRNA processing. Transgenic plants have also been generated containing CaMV 35S or hsp70 promoters fused to transposase coding sequences or a Ds element interrupting a chimeric GUS gene (Courtesy M. Lassner, UC Davis). F{sub 1} plants containing both constructs were analyzed for transposition. Only two plants containing both constructs were obtained from 48 progeny, far fewer than expected, and neither showed evidence of transposition in Southerns and GUS assays. We are currently constructing further chimeric transposase fusions. To test for the stability of the targeted disease resistance genes, 50,000 F{sub 1} plants heterozygous for three resistance genes were generated; no mutants have been identified in the 5000 so far screened.

  20. Application of Microarray and Functional-Based Screening Methods for the Detection of Antimicrobial Resistance Genes in the Microbiomes of Healthy Humans

    PubMed Central

    Card, Roderick M.; Warburton, Philip J.; MacLaren, Nikki; Mullany, Peter; Allan, Elaine; Anjum, Muna F.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to screen for the presence of antimicrobial resistance genes within the saliva and faecal microbiomes of healthy adult human volunteers from five European countries. Two non-culture based approaches were employed to obviate potential bias associated with difficult to culture members of the microbiota. In a gene target-based approach, a microarray was employed to screen for the presence of over 70 clinically important resistance genes in the saliva and faecal microbiomes. A total of 14 different resistance genes were detected encoding resistances to six antibiotic classes (aminoglycosides, β-lactams, macrolides, sulphonamides, tetracyclines and trimethoprim). The most commonly detected genes were erm(B), blaTEM, and sul2. In a functional-based approach, DNA prepared from pooled saliva samples was cloned into Escherichia coli and screened for expression of resistance to ampicillin or sulphonamide, two of the most common resistances found by array. The functional ampicillin resistance screen recovered genes encoding components of a predicted AcrRAB efflux pump. In the functional sulphonamide resistance screen, folP genes were recovered encoding mutant dihydropteroate synthase, the target of sulphonamide action. The genes recovered from the functional screens were from the chromosomes of commensal species that are opportunistically pathogenic and capable of exchanging DNA with related pathogenic species. Genes identified by microarray were not recovered in the activity-based screen, indicating that these two methods can be complementary in facilitating the identification of a range of resistance mechanisms present within the human microbiome. It also provides further evidence of the diverse reservoir of resistance mechanisms present in bacterial populations in the human gut and saliva. In future the methods described in this study can be used to monitor changes in the resistome in response to antibiotic therapy. PMID:24466089

  1. Whole-Genome Sequences of Two Campylobacter coli Isolates from the Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring Program in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Bernal, Johan F.; Donado-Godoy, Pilar; Valencia, María Fernanda; León, Maribel; Gómez, Yolanda; Rodríguez, Fernando; Agarwala, Richa; Landsman, David

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter coli, along with Campylobacter jejuni, is a major agent of gastroenteritis and acute enterocolitis in humans. We report the whole-genome sequences of two multidrug-resistance C. coli strains, isolated from the Colombian poultry chain. The isolates contain a variety of antimicrobial resistance genes for aminoglycosides, lincosamides, fluoroquinolones, and tetracycline. PMID:26988048

  2. Metagenomic Assembly Reveals Hosts of Antibiotic Resistance Genes and the Shared Resistome in Pig, Chicken, and Human Feces.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liping; Xia, Yu; Li, Bing; Yang, Ying; Li, Li-Guan; Tiedje, James M; Zhang, Tong

    2016-01-01

    The risk associated with antibiotic resistance disseminating from animal and human feces is an urgent public issue. In the present study, we sought to establish a pipeline for annotating antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) based on metagenomic assembly to investigate ARGs and their co-occurrence with associated genetic elements. Genetic elements found on the assembled genomic fragments include mobile genetic elements (MGEs) and metal resistance genes (MRGs). We then explored the hosts of these resistance genes and the shared resistome of pig, chicken and human fecal samples. High levels of tetracycline, multidrug, erythromycin, and aminoglycoside resistance genes were discovered in these fecal samples. In particular, significantly high level of ARGs (7762 ×/Gb) was detected in adult chicken feces, indicating higher ARG contamination level than other fecal samples. Many ARGs arrangements (e.g., macA-macB and tetA-tetR) were discovered shared by chicken, pig and human feces. In addition, MGEs such as the aadA5-dfrA17-carrying class 1 integron were identified on an assembled scaffold of chicken feces, and are carried by human pathogens. Differential coverage binning analysis revealed significant ARG enrichment in adult chicken feces. A draft genome, annotated as multidrug resistant Escherichia coli, was retrieved from chicken feces metagenomes and was determined to carry diverse ARGs (multidrug, acriflavine, and macrolide). The present study demonstrates the determination of ARG hosts and the shared resistome from metagenomic data sets and successfully establishes the relationship between ARGs, hosts, and environments. This ARG annotation pipeline based on metagenomic assembly will help to bridge the knowledge gaps regarding ARG-associated genes and ARG hosts with metagenomic data sets. Moreover, this pipeline will facilitate the evaluation of environmental risks in the genetic context of ARGs. PMID:26650334

  3. Multifunctional hyperbranched glycoconjugated polymers based on natural aminoglycosides.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mingsheng; Hu, Mei; Wang, Dali; Wang, Guojian; Zhu, Xinyuan; Yan, Deyue; Sun, Jian

    2012-06-20

    Multifunctional gene vectors with high transfection, low cytotoxicity, and good antitumor and antibacterial activities were prepared from natural aminoglycosides. Through the Michael-addition polymerization of gentamycin and N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide, cationic hyperbranched glycoconjugated polymers were synthesized, and their physical and chemical properties were analyzed by FTIR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, GPC, ζ-potential, and acid-base titration techniques. The cytotoxicity of these hyperbranched glycoconjugated polycations was low because of the hydrolysis of degradable glycosidic and amide linkages in acid conditions. Owing to the presence of various primary, secondary, and tertiary amines in the polymers, hyperbranched glycoconjugated polymers showed high buffering capacity and strong DNA condensation ability, resulting in the high transfection efficiency. In the meantime, due to the introduction of natural aminoglycosides into the polymeric backbone, the resultant hyperbranched glycoconjugated polymers inhibited the growth of cancer cells and bacteria efficiently. Combining the gene transfection, antitumor, and antibacterial abilities together, the multifunctional hyperbranched glycoconjugated polymers based on natural aminoglycosides may play an important role in protecting cancer patients from bacterial infections. PMID:22591322

  4. Novel small molecules potentiate premature termination codon readthrough by aminoglycosides.

    PubMed

    Baradaran-Heravi, Alireza; Balgi, Aruna D; Zimmerman, Carla; Choi, Kunho; Shidmoossavee, Fahimeh S; Tan, Jason S; Bergeaud, Célia; Krause, Alexandra; Flibotte, Stéphane; Shimizu, Yoko; Anderson, Hilary J; Mouly, Vincent; Jan, Eric; Pfeifer, Tom; Jaquith, James B; Roberge, Michel

    2016-08-19

    Nonsense mutations introduce premature termination codons and underlie 11% of genetic disease cases. High concentrations of aminoglycosides can restore gene function by eliciting premature termination codon readthrough but with low efficiency. Using a high-throughput screen, we identified compounds that potentiate readthrough by aminoglycosides at multiple nonsense alleles in yeast. Chemical optimization generated phthalimide derivative CDX5-1 with activity in human cells. Alone, CDX5-1 did not induce readthrough or increase TP53 mRNA levels in HDQ-P1 cancer cells with a homozygous TP53 nonsense mutation. However, in combination with aminoglycoside G418, it enhanced readthrough up to 180-fold over G418 alone. The combination also increased readthrough at all three nonsense codons in cancer cells with other TP53 nonsense mutations, as well as in cells from rare genetic disease patients with nonsense mutations in the CLN2, SMARCAL1 and DMD genes. These findings open up the possibility of treating patients across a spectrum of genetic diseases caused by nonsense mutations. PMID:27407112

  5. XBP1 mitigates aminoglycoside-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and neuronal cell death

    PubMed Central

    Oishi, N; Duscha, S; Boukari, H; Meyer, M; Xie, J; Wei, G; Schrepfer, T; Roschitzki, B; Boettger, E C; Schacht, J

    2015-01-01

    Here we study links between aminoglycoside-induced mistranslation, protein misfolding and neuropathy. We demonstrate that aminoglycosides induce misreading in mammalian cells and assess endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and unfolded protein response (UPR) pathways. Genome-wide transcriptome and proteome analyses revealed upregulation of genes related to protein folding and degradation. Quantitative PCR confirmed induction of UPR markers including C/EBP homologous protein, glucose-regulated protein 94, binding immunoglobulin protein and X-box binding protein-1 (XBP1) mRNA splicing, which is crucial for UPR activation. We studied the effect of a compromised UPR on aminoglycoside ototoxicity in haploinsufficient XBP1 (XBP1+/−) mice. Intra-tympanic aminoglycoside treatment caused high-frequency hearing loss in XBP1+/− mice but not in wild-type littermates. Densities of spiral ganglion cells and synaptic ribbons were decreased in gentamicin-treated XBP1+/− mice, while sensory cells were preserved. Co-injection of the chemical chaperone tauroursodeoxycholic acid attenuated hearing loss. These results suggest that aminoglycoside-induced ER stress and cell death in spiral ganglion neurons is mitigated by XBP1, masking aminoglycoside neurotoxicity at the organismal level. PMID:25973683

  6. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of Enterococcus casseliflavus aminoglycoside-2′′-phosphotransferase-IVa

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Marta; Vakulenko, Sergei; Smith, Clyde A.

    2010-01-01

    The deactivation of aminoglycoside antibiotics by chemical modification is one of the major sources of bacterial resistance to this family of therapeutic compounds, which includes the clinically relevant drugs streptomycin, kanamycin and gentamicin. The aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs) form one such family of enzymes responsible for this resistance. The gene encoding one of these enzymes, aminoglycoside-2′′-phosphotransferase-IVa [APH(2′′)-IVa] from Enterococcus casseliflavus, has been cloned and the protein (comprising 306 amino-acid residues) has been expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The enzyme was crystallized in three substrate-free forms. Two of the crystal forms belonged to the orthorhombic space group P212121 with similar unit-cell parameters, although one of the crystal forms had a unit-cell volume that was approximately 13% smaller than the other and a very low solvent content of around 38%. The third crystal form belonged to the monoclinic space group P21 and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis was consistent with the presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit. The orthorhombic crystal forms of apo APH(2′′)-IVa both diffracted to 2.2 Å resolution and the monoclinic crystal form diffracted to 2.4 Å resolution; synchrotron diffraction data were collected from these crystals at SSRL (Stanford, California, USA). Structure determination by molecular replacement using the structure of the related enzyme APH(2′′)-IIa is proceeding. PMID:20057078

  7. Accumulation of clinically relevant antibiotic-resistance genes, bacterial load, and metals in freshwater lake sediments in Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Devarajan, Naresh; Laffite, Amandine; Graham, Neil D; Meijer, Maria; Prabakar, Kandasamy; Mubedi, Josué I; Elongo, Vicky; Mpiana, Pius T; Ibelings, Bastiaan Willem; Wildi, Walter; Poté, John

    2015-06-01

    Wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) receive the effluents from various sources (communities, industrial, and hospital effluents) and are recognized as reservoir for antibiotic-resistance genes (ARGs) that are associated with clinical pathogens. The aquatic environment is considered a hot-spot for horizontal gene transfer, and lake sediments offer the opportunity for reconstructing the pollution history and evaluating the impacts. In this context, variation with depth and time of the total bacterial load, the abundance of faecal indicator bacteria (FIB; E. coli and Enterococcus spp. (ENT)), Pseudomonas spp., and ARGs (blaTEM, blaSHV, blaCTX-M, blaNDM, and aadA) were quantified in sediment profiles of different parts of Lake Geneva using quantitative PCR. The abundance of bacterial marker genes was identified in sediments contaminated by WWTP following eutrophication of the lake. Additionally, ARGs, including the extended-spectrum ß-lactam- and aminoglycoside-resistance genes, were identified in the surface sediments. The ARG and FIB abundance strongly correlated (r ≥ 0.403, p < 0.05, n = 34) with organic matter and metal concentrations in the sediments, indicating a common and contemporary source of contamination. The contamination of sediments by untreated or partially treated effluent water can affect the quality of ecosystem. Therefore, the reduction of contaminants from the source is recommended for further improvement of water quality. PMID:25933054

  8. Factors potentially influencing aminoglycoside use and expenditure

    SciTech Connect

    DiPiro, J.T.; Kilsdonk, G.F.; Amerson, A.B.; Record, K.E.

    1982-07-01

    Factors that may have influenced aminoglycoside use and expenditure in one hospital were examined. Factors that were evaluated as to their influence on aminoglycoside-use patterns were: (1) formulary status; (2) bacterial susceptibility patterns; (3) identified or perceived differences in toxicity; (4) changes in patient population; (5) price paid by the hospital for aminoglycosides; (6) distribution of newsletters or memoranda; (7) advertising and detailing; and (8) pharmacy policies. For FY 1976-77 to 1979-80, the largest proportion of aminoglycoside expense was for gentamicin. During FY 1980-81, the expenditure for gentamicin decreased and tobramycin accounted for the largest proportion of total expenditure. Monthly gentamicin use decreased 20% during FY 1980-81 from the previous year. Tobramycin use increased from January 1979 to November 1980 and decreased from December 1980 to June 1981. Kanamycin use and amikacin use were fairly constant during the study period. Based on temporal relationships, the following factors appeared to influence aminoglycoside use and expenditure: (1) a study conducted at the institution from June 1977 to June 1979 comparing gentamicin and tobramycin nephrotoxicity; (2) a comparative nephrotoxicity study published in a widely circulated medical journal in May 1980; and (3) an intramural newsletter and memorandum distributed in March 1981 encouraging selective aminoglycoside use. The identification of factors that potentially influenced aminoglycoside use can be used to anticipate the future impact of similar events and to devise strategies to influence antimicrobial use.

  9. Therapeutic drug monitoring of aminoglycosides in acute myeloid leukaemia patients.

    PubMed

    Mareville, Julie; Gay, Julie; Cliquennois, Emmanuel; Herbaux, Charles; Pasquier, Florence; Allorge, Delphine; Blondiaux, Nicolas; Berthon, Céline; Alfandari, Serge

    2012-05-01

    International guidelines limit the use of aminoglycosides in febrile neutropenia to severe situations. We retrospectively reviewed the use of aminoglycosides in adult acute myeloid leukaemia patients admitted in 2009. Our guidelines include precise indications (severe sepsis, shock, drug resistance), dosing regimens (once-daily 20 mg/kg/day amikacin, 5 mg/kg/day gentamicin), durations of treatment, drug monitoring timing, and target C(max) concentrations (40 mg/l amikacin, 20 mg/l gentamicin). Thirty-one patients received 46 aminoglycoside courses: 31 amikacin and 15 gentamicin. The mean prescribed dosage was 19 ± 2.8 mg/kg/day for amikacin and 4.7 ± 0.9 mg/kg/day for gentamicin. The mean duration of use was 2.9 days for both drugs. The mean C(max) for amikacin was 47 ± 13 mg/l and for gentamicin was 13.6 ± 7.5 mg/l. In compliant regimens, all amikacin patients and a third of gentamicin patients had adequate C(max). Among 23 isolated pathogens, 65.5% were susceptible to both drugs and 11.5% to amikacin only. This vindicates the 20 mg/kg/day amikacin dosage and suggests a need to increase the gentamicin dosage. PMID:22235869

  10. Purification and characterization of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes from Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed Central

    Ubukata, K; Yamashita, N; Gotoh, A; Konno, M

    1984-01-01

    Several strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis, exhibiting characteristic resistance patterns to aminoglycoside antibiotics, were examined. The aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes from these strains were purified by DEAE-Sephadex A-50 chromatography, affinity chromatography, and Sephadex G-100 gel filtration. Three enzymes, a 3'-phosphotransferase III (molecular weight, 31,000; pI 4.1), a bifunctional enzyme having 6'-acetyltransferase and 2"-phosphotransferase (molecular weight, 56,000; pI 4.1) activity, and a 4'4"-adenylytransferase (molecular weight, 34,000; pI 4.7), were isolated from crude extracts of the resistant strains. Aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes with identical enzymatic properties derived from S. aureus and S. epidermidis were also immunologically identical. Images PMID:6331299

  11. Elevating crop disease resistance with cloned genes

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jonathan D. G.; Witek, Kamil; Verweij, Walter; Jupe, Florian; Cooke, David; Dorling, Stephen; Tomlinson, Laurence; Smoker, Matthew; Perkins, Sara; Foster, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Essentially all plant species exhibit heritable genetic variation for resistance to a variety of plant diseases caused by fungi, bacteria, oomycetes or viruses. Disease losses in crop monocultures are already significant, and would be greater but for applications of disease-controlling agrichemicals. For sustainable intensification of crop production, we argue that disease control should as far as possible be achieved using genetics rather than using costly recurrent chemical sprays. The latter imply CO2 emissions from diesel fuel and potential soil compaction from tractor journeys. Great progress has been made in the past 25 years in our understanding of the molecular basis of plant disease resistance mechanisms, and of how pathogens circumvent them. These insights can inform more sophisticated approaches to elevating disease resistance in crops that help us tip the evolutionary balance in favour of the crop and away from the pathogen. We illustrate this theme with an account of a genetically modified (GM) blight-resistant potato trial in Norwich, using the Rpi-vnt1.1 gene isolated from a wild relative of potato, Solanum venturii, and introduced by GM methods into the potato variety Desiree. PMID:24535396

  12. Elevating crop disease resistance with cloned genes.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jonathan D G; Witek, Kamil; Verweij, Walter; Jupe, Florian; Cooke, David; Dorling, Stephen; Tomlinson, Laurence; Smoker, Matthew; Perkins, Sara; Foster, Simon

    2014-04-01

    Essentially all plant species exhibit heritable genetic variation for resistance to a variety of plant diseases caused by fungi, bacteria, oomycetes or viruses. Disease losses in crop monocultures are already significant, and would be greater but for applications of disease-controlling agrichemicals. For sustainable intensification of crop production, we argue that disease control should as far as possible be achieved using genetics rather than using costly recurrent chemical sprays. The latter imply CO₂ emissions from diesel fuel and potential soil compaction from tractor journeys. Great progress has been made in the past 25 years in our understanding of the molecular basis of plant disease resistance mechanisms, and of how pathogens circumvent them. These insights can inform more sophisticated approaches to elevating disease resistance in crops that help us tip the evolutionary balance in favour of the crop and away from the pathogen. We illustrate this theme with an account of a genetically modified (GM) blight-resistant potato trial in Norwich, using the Rpi-vnt1.1 gene isolated from a wild relative of potato, Solanum venturii, and introduced by GM methods into the potato variety Desiree. PMID:24535396

  13. Antibiotic resistance genes in water environment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Zhang, Tong; Fang, Herbert H P

    2009-03-01

    The use of antibiotics may accelerate the development of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and bacteria which shade health risks to humans and animals. The emerging of ARGs in the water environment is becoming an increasing worldwide concern. Hundreds of various ARGs encoding resistance to a broad range of antibiotics have been found in microorganisms distributed not only in hospital wastewaters and animal production wastewaters, but also in sewage, wastewater treatment plants, surface water, groundwater, and even in drinking water. This review summarizes recently published information on the types, distributions, and horizontal transfer of ARGs in various aquatic environments, as well as the molecular methods used to detect environmental ARGs, including specific and multiplex PCR (polymerase chain reaction), real-time PCR, DNA sequencing, and hybridization based techniques. PMID:19130050

  14. Emergence of Staphylococcus aureus carrying multiple drug resistance genes on a plasmid encoding exfoliative toxin B.

    PubMed

    Hisatsune, Junzo; Hirakawa, Hideki; Yamaguchi, Takayuki; Fudaba, Yasuyuki; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Kato, Fuminori; Kayama, Shizuo; Sugai, Motoyuki

    2013-12-01

    We report the complete nucleotide sequence and analysis of pETBTY825, a Staphylococcus aureus TY825 plasmid encoding exfoliative toxin B (ETB). S. aureus TY825 is a clinical isolate obtained from an impetigo patient in 2002. The size of pETBTY825, 60.6 kbp, was unexpectedly larger than that of the archetype pETBTY4 (∼30 kbp). Genomic comparison of the plasmids shows that pETBTY825 has the archetype pETBTY4 as the backbone and has a single large extra DNA region of 22.4 kbp. The extra DNA region contains genes for resistance to aminoglycoside [aac(6')/aph(2″)], macrolide (msrA), and penicillin (blaZ). A plasmid deletion experiment indicated that these three resistance elements were functionally active. We retrospectively examined the resistance profile of the clinical ETB-producing S. aureus strains isolated in 1977 to 2007 using a MIC determination with gentamicin (GM), arbekacin (ABK), and erythromycin (EM) and by PCR analyses for aac(6')/aph(2″) and msrA using purified plasmid preparations. The ETB-producing S. aureus strains began to display high resistance to GM, which was parallel with the detection of aac(6')/aph(2″) and mecA, after 1990. Conversely, there was no significant change in the ABK MIC during the testing period, although it had a tendency to slightly increase. After 2001, isolates resistant to EM significantly increased; however, msrA was hardly detected in ETB-producing S. aureus strains, and only five isolates were positive for both aac(6')/aph(2″) and msrA. In this study, we report the emergence of a fusion plasmid carrying the toxin gene etb and drug resistance genes. Prevalence of the pETBTY825 carrier may further increase the clinical threat, since ETB-producing S. aureus is closely related to more severe impetigo or staphylococcal scalded-skin syndrome (SSSS), which requires a general antimicrobial treatment. PMID:24080652

  15. BacMet: antibacterial biocide and metal resistance genes database

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Chandan; Bengtsson-Palme, Johan; Rensing, Christopher; Kristiansson, Erik; Larsson, D. G. Joakim

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance has become a major human health concern due to widespread use, misuse and overuse of antibiotics. In addition to antibiotics, antibacterial biocides and metals can contribute to the development and maintenance of antibiotic resistance in bacterial communities through co-selection. Information on metal and biocide resistance genes, including their sequences and molecular functions, is, however, scattered. Here, we introduce BacMet (http://bacmet.biomedicine.gu.se)—a manually curated database of antibacterial biocide- and metal-resistance genes based on an in-depth review of the scientific literature. The BacMet database contains 470 experimentally verified resistance genes. In addition, the database also contains 25 477 potential resistance genes collected from public sequence repositories. All resistance genes in the BacMet database have been organized according to their molecular function and induced resistance phenotype. PMID:24304895

  16. Draft Whole-Genome Sequence of VIM-1-Producing Multidrug-Resistant Enterobacter cloacae EC_38VIM1

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Jennifer; Viedma, Esther; Otero, Joaquín R.

    2013-01-01

    The VIM-1-producing multidrug-resistant strain Enterobacter cloacae was isolated from blood culture. The strain showed multiple resistances to clinically used antibiotics, including all β-lactams, fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, and sulfonamides. Sequence analysis showed the presence of 14 genes associated with resistance to antibiotics, including the metallo-β-lactamase VIM-1 gene, which was located in a class 1 integron. PMID:24009122

  17. DNA microarray detection of antimicrobial resistance genes in Detection and Characterization of Antibiotic Resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Detection of antimicrobial resistance genes is essential for research and an important tool for clinical diagnostics. Most techniques used to identify resistance genes can only detect one or a few genes per assay, whereas DNA microarray technology can detect thousands of genes in a single assay. Sev...

  18. Activation tag screening to identify novel genes for trichothecene resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The goal of our research is to identify plant genes which enhance trichothecene resistance and, ultimately, Fusarium Head Blight resistance in wheat and barley. We are taking a two pronged approach using Arabidopsis to identify plant genes which confer resistance to trichothecenes. The first approac...

  19. A Comprehensive Analysis on Spread and Distribution Characteristic of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Livestock Farms of Southeastern China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Na; Guo, Xinyan; Yan, Zheng; Wang, Wei; Chen, Biao; Ge, Feng; Ye, Boping

    2016-01-01

    The pollution of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in livestock farms is a problem which need to be paid more attention to, due to the severe resistance dissemination and the further human health risk. In this study, all the relevant exposure matrices (manure, soil and water) of sixteen animal farms in Southeastern China were sampled to determine twenty-two ARGs conferring resistance to five major classes of antibiotics including tetracyclines, sulfonamides, quinolones, aminoglycosides, and macrolides. The results showed that the spread property of sul genes was most extensive and strong, followed by tet and erm genes. The abundance of tet genes expressing ribosomal protection proteins (tetM, tetO, tetQ, tetT and tetW) was higher than that expressing efflux pump proteins (tetA, tetC, tetE and tetG) in each type of samples. The high abundance and frequency of ermB gene in the matrices should be paid more attention, because macrolides is a major medicine for human use. For manures, it was found that the similar ARGs distribution rules were existing in poultry manure or porcine manure samples, despite of the different origins of these two types of livestock farms. Meanwhile, it was interesting that the distribution rule of tet genes in animal manure was nearly the same as all the ARGs. For soils, the result of nonmetric multi-dimensional scaling (NMDS) analysis showed that the pollution of ARGs in the soils fertilized by poultry and cattle manures were more substantial in northern Jiangsu, but no significant ARGs diversity was observed among porcine manured soils of five different regions. Furthermore, most ARGs showed significant positive relationships with environmental variables such as concentration of sulfonamides, tetracyclines, Cu, Zn and total organic carbon (TOC). The pollution profile and characteristics of so many ARGs in livestock farms can provide significative foundation for the regulation and legislation of antibiotics in China. PMID:27388166

  20. A Comprehensive Analysis on Spread and Distribution Characteristic of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Livestock Farms of Southeastern China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Na; Guo, Xinyan; Yan, Zheng; Wang, Wei; Chen, Biao; Ge, Feng; Ye, Boping

    2016-01-01

    The pollution of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in livestock farms is a problem which need to be paid more attention to, due to the severe resistance dissemination and the further human health risk. In this study, all the relevant exposure matrices (manure, soil and water) of sixteen animal farms in Southeastern China were sampled to determine twenty-two ARGs conferring resistance to five major classes of antibiotics including tetracyclines, sulfonamides, quinolones, aminoglycosides, and macrolides. The results showed that the spread property of sul genes was most extensive and strong, followed by tet and erm genes. The abundance of tet genes expressing ribosomal protection proteins (tetM, tetO, tetQ, tetT and tetW) was higher than that expressing efflux pump proteins (tetA, tetC, tetE and tetG) in each type of samples. The high abundance and frequency of ermB gene in the matrices should be paid more attention, because macrolides is a major medicine for human use. For manures, it was found that the similar ARGs distribution rules were existing in poultry manure or porcine manure samples, despite of the different origins of these two types of livestock farms. Meanwhile, it was interesting that the distribution rule of tet genes in animal manure was nearly the same as all the ARGs. For soils, the result of nonmetric multi-dimensional scaling (NMDS) analysis showed that the pollution of ARGs in the soils fertilized by poultry and cattle manures were more substantial in northern Jiangsu, but no significant ARGs diversity was observed among porcine manured soils of five different regions. Furthermore, most ARGs showed significant positive relationships with environmental variables such as concentration of sulfonamides, tetracyclines, Cu, Zn and total organic carbon (TOC). The pollution profile and characteristics of so many ARGs in livestock farms can provide significative foundation for the regulation and legislation of antibiotics in China. PMID:27388166

  1. Resistance Gene Mining in Wild and Cultivated Potato Germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A key long-term management strategy for combating potato diseases is to develop cultivars with high levels of resistance through identification and integration of major resistance (R) genes. This talk will summarize our results of cloning major R genes from potato germplasm using a candidate gene a...

  2. Major gene for field stem rust resistance co-locates with resistance gene Sr12 in "Thatcher" wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis (Pgt), is a damaging disease of wheat that can be controlled by utilizing effecting stem rust resistance genes. "Thatcher" wheat carries complex resistance to stem rust that is enhanced in the presence of the resistance gene Lr34. The purpose of this study was ...

  3. First Report of an OXA-48-Producing Multidrug-Resistant Proteus mirabilis Strain from Gaza, Palestine

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liang; Chavda, Kalyan D.; Mediavilla, Jose R.; Jacobs, Michael R.; Bonomo, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    We report the first multidrug-resistant Proteus mirabilis strain producing the carbapenemase OXA-48 (Pm-OXA-48) isolated at Al-Shifa hospital in Gaza, Palestine. Draft genome sequencing of Pm-OXA-48 identified 16 antimicrobial resistance genes, encoding resistance to β-lactams, aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, phenicols, streptothricin, tetracycline, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Complete sequencing of the blaOXA-48-harboring plasmid revealed that it is a 72 kb long IncL/M plasmid, harboring carbapenemase gene blaOXA-48, extended spectrum β-lactamase gene blaCTX-M-14, and aminoglycoside resistance genes strA, strB, and aph(3′)-VIb. PMID:25896692

  4. Antibiotic resistance gene discovery in food-producing animals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Numerous environmental reservoirs contribute to the widespread antibiotic resistance problem in human pathogens. One environmental reservoir of particular importance is the intestinal bacteria of food-producing animals. In this review I examine recent discoveries of antibiotic resistance genes in ...

  5. Structural characterization of the novel aminoglycoside phosphotransferase AphVIII from Streptomyces rimosus with enzymatic activity modulated by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Boyko, Konstantin M; Gorbacheva, Marina A; Korzhenevskiy, Dmitry A; Alekseeva, Maria G; Mavletova, Dilara A; Zakharevich, Natalia V; Elizarov, Sergey M; Rudakova, Natalia N; Danilenko, Valery N; Popov, Vladimir O

    2016-09-01

    Aminoglycoside phosphotransferases represent a broad class of enzymes that promote bacterial resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics via the phosphorylation of hydroxyl groups in the latter. Here we report the spatial structure of the 3'-aminoglycoside phosphotransferase of novel VIII class (AphVIII) solved by X-ray diffraction method with a resolution of 2.15 Å. Deep analysis of APHVIII structure and its comparison with known structures of aminoglycoside phosphotransferases of various types reveals that AphVIII has a typical two-domain fold and, however, possesses some unique characteristics that distinguish the enzyme from its known homologues. The most important difference is the presence of the activation loop with unique Ser146 residue. We demonstrate that in the apo-state of the enzyme the activation loop does not interact with other parts of the enzyme and seems to adopt catalytically competent state only after substrate binding. PMID:27338640

  6. Electrostatic Interactions in Aminoglycoside-RNA Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Kulik, Marta; Goral, Anna M.; Jasiński, Maciej; Dominiak, Paulina M.; Trylska, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Electrostatic interactions often play key roles in the recognition of small molecules by nucleic acids. An example is aminoglycoside antibiotics, which by binding to ribosomal RNA (rRNA) affect bacterial protein synthesis. These antibiotics remain one of the few valid treatments against hospital-acquired infections by Gram-negative bacteria. It is necessary to understand the amplitude of electrostatic interactions between aminoglycosides and their rRNA targets to introduce aminoglycoside modifications that would enhance their binding or to design new scaffolds. Here, we calculated the electrostatic energy of interactions and its per-ring contributions between aminoglycosides and their primary rRNA binding site. We applied either the methodology based on the exact potential multipole moment (EPMM) or classical molecular mechanics force field single-point partial charges with Coulomb formula. For EPMM, we first reconstructed the aspherical electron density of 12 aminoglycoside-RNA complexes from the atomic parameters deposited in the University at Buffalo Databank. The University at Buffalo Databank concept assumes transferability of electron density between atoms in chemically equivalent vicinities and allows reconstruction of the electron densities from experimental structural data. From the electron density, we then calculated the electrostatic energy of interaction using EPMM. Finally, we compared the two approaches. The calculated electrostatic interaction energies between various aminoglycosides and their binding sites correlate with experimentally obtained binding free energies. Based on the calculated energetic contributions of water molecules mediating the interactions between the antibiotic and rRNA, we suggest possible modifications that could enhance aminoglycoside binding affinity. PMID:25650932

  7. [Identification of Sorghum genes responsible for resistance to Green bug].

    PubMed

    Radchenko, E E

    2000-04-01

    Genes responsible for resistance to greenbug (Schizaphis graminum Rond.) were identified in sorghum. The dominant (Sgr1) and recessive (Sgr2) genes for resistance were revealed in sample k-457 (PI264453, United States). The samples i-589430 (PI264453, Spain) and k-3852 (Sarvasi, Hungary) carry gene Sgr1. These accessions are assumed to also have gene Sgr2. The samples k-9921 (Shallu, United States) and k-9922 (KS-30, United States) have incompletely dominant resistance gene Sgr3. A symbol Sgr4 was assigned to the dominant gene from sample k-6694 (Deer, United States). The dominant Sgr5 and recessive Sgr6 genes were revealed in the samples k-1362 (Durra Belaya, Syria) and k-1240 (Dzhugara Belaya, China). The cultivar Sorgogradskoe (k-9436, Rostovskaya oblast) has gene Sgr5. The samples k-10092 (Odesskii 360, Ukraine) and k-5091 (Cherhata, Marocco) are assumed to have genes Sgr5 and Sgr6. Sample k-924 (Dzhugara Belaya, China) is protected by the dominant gene Srg7 and recessive gene Sgr8. Sample k-923 (Dzhugara Belaya, China) has at least one of these genes. Two dominant complementary genes for resistance (Sgr9 and Sgr10) were revealed in sample k-930 (Dzhugara Belaya, China). One of two dominant genes of sample k-1237 (Dzhugara Belaya, China) was assigned the symbol Sgr11. Genes Sgr5-Sgr11 responsible for resistance to greenbug are new and were not previously used in breeding. PMID:10822813

  8. Lantana montevidensis Briq improves the aminoglycoside activity against multiresistant Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Erlanio O.; Almeida, Thiago S.; Rodrigues, Fabíola F.G.; Campos, Adriana R.; Lima, Sidney G.; Costa, José G.M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: In this work, we report the antibacterial and modulatory activity of Lantana montevidensis Briq. Materials and Methods: The antibacterial activities of leaf (LELm) and root (RELm) extracts alone or in association with aminoglycosides were determined by a microdilution test. Multiresistant strains of Escherichia coli (Ec 27) and Staphylococcus aureus (Sa 358) were used. Results: The results show the inhibitory activity of LELm against E. coli (minimal inhibitory concentration [MIC] 16 μg/mL) and S. aureus (MIC 128 μg/mL). The synergistic effect of the extracts and aminoglycosides was verified too. The maximum effects were obtained with RELm with gentamicin against E. coli with MIC reduction (312 to 2 μL). Conclusion: The data from this study are indicative of the activity antibacterial of extracts of L. montevidensis and its potential in modifying the resistance of aminoglycosides. PMID:21572654

  9. Structure of AadA from Salmonella enterica: a monomeric aminoglycoside (3′′)(9) adenyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yang; Näsvall, Joakim; Wu, Shiying; Andersson, Dan I.; Selmer, Maria

    2015-10-31

    The crystal structure of the aminoglycoside-adenylating enzyme AadA is reported together with functional experiments providing insights into its oligomeric state, ligand binding and catalysis. Aminoglycoside resistance is commonly conferred by enzymatic modification of drugs by aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes such as aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferases (ANTs). Here, the first crystal structure of an ANT(3′′)(9) adenyltransferase, AadA from Salmonella enterica, is presented. AadA catalyses the magnesium-dependent transfer of adenosine monophosphate from ATP to the two chemically dissimilar drugs streptomycin and spectinomycin. The structure was solved using selenium SAD phasing and refined to 2.5 Å resolution. AadA consists of a nucleotidyltransferase domain and an α-helical bundle domain. AadA crystallizes as a monomer and is a monomer in solution as confirmed by small-angle X-ray scattering, in contrast to structurally similar homodimeric adenylating enzymes such as kanamycin nucleotidyltransferase. Isothermal titration calorimetry experiments show that ATP binding has to occur before binding of the aminoglycoside substrate, and structure analysis suggests that ATP binding repositions the two domains for aminoglycoside binding in the interdomain cleft. Candidate residues for ligand binding and catalysis were subjected to site-directed mutagenesis. In vivo resistance and in vitro binding assays support the role of Glu87 as the catalytic base in adenylation, while Arg192 and Lys205 are shown to be critical for ATP binding.

  10. TWO MAJOR RESISTANCE GENES CONFER RESISTANCE TO RACE SHIFT ISOLATES OVERCOMING BLAST RESISTANCE GENC PI-TA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the major challenges for blast disease management is that major resistance genes are often defeated by new virulent isolates. The goal of this project is to identify and characterize blast resistance genes to facilitate the development of blast resistant US cultivars by marker-assisted selec...

  11. Molecular markers for leaf rust resistance genes in wheat.

    PubMed

    Chełkowski, J; Stepień, L

    2001-01-01

    Over 100 genes of resistance to rust fungi: Puccinia recondita f. sp. tritici, (47 Lr - leaf rust genes), P. striiformis (18 Yr - yellow rust genes) and P. graminis f. sp. tritici (41 Sr - stripe rust genes) have been identified in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and its wild relatives according to recent papers. Sixteen Lr resistance genes have been mapped using restriction fragments length polymorphism (RFLP) markers on wheat chromosomes. More than ten Lr genes can be identified in breeding materials by sequence tagged site (STS) specific markers. Gene Lrk 10, closely linked to gene Lr 10, has been cloned and its function recognized. Available markers are presented in this review. The STS, cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) and sequence characterized amplified regions (SCAR) markers found in the literature should be verified using Triticum spp. with different genetic background. Simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers for Lr resistance genes are now also available. PMID:14564046

  12. Subinhibitory Doses of Aminoglycoside Antibiotics Induce Changes in the Phenotype of Mycobacterium abscessus

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Sheng-Hui; Lai, Hsin-Chih

    2015-01-01

    Subinhibitory doses of antibiotics have been shown to cause changes in bacterial morphology, adherence ability, and resistance to antibiotics. In this study, the effects of subinhibitory doses of aminoglycoside antibiotics on Mycobacterium abscessus were investigated. The treatment of M. abscessus cells with subinhibitory doses of amikacin was found to change their colony from a smooth to a rough morphotype and increase their ability to adhere to a polyvinylchloride plate, aggregate in culture, and resist phagocytosis and killing by macrophages. M. abscessus cells treated with a subinhibitory dose of amikacin also became more potent in Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2) stimulation, leading to increased tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) production by macrophages. The MAB_3508c gene was shown to play a role in mediating these phenotypic changes, as its expression in M. abscessus cells was increased when they were treated with a subinhibitory dose of amikacin. In addition, overexpression of MAB_3508c in M. abscessus cells caused changes similar to those induced by subinhibitory doses of amikacin, including a switch from smooth to rough colony morphology, increased ability to aggregate in liquid culture, decreased motility, and increased resistance to killing by macrophages. These findings suggest the importance of using sufficient doses of antibiotics for the treatment of M. abscessus infections. PMID:26195529

  13. The Ocean as a Global Reservoir of Antibiotic Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Hatosy, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies of natural environments have revealed vast genetic reservoirs of antibiotic resistance (AR) genes. Soil bacteria and human pathogens share AR genes, and AR genes have been discovered in a variety of habitats. However, there is little knowledge about the presence and diversity of AR genes in marine environments and which organisms host AR genes. To address this, we identified the diversity of genes conferring resistance to ampicillin, tetracycline, nitrofurantoin, and sulfadimethoxine in diverse marine environments using functional metagenomics (the cloning and screening of random DNA fragments). Marine environments were host to a diversity of AR-conferring genes. Antibiotic-resistant clones were found at all sites, with 28% of the genes identified as known AR genes (encoding beta-lactamases, bicyclomycin resistance pumps, etc.). However, the majority of AR genes were not previously classified as such but had products similar to proteins such as transport pumps, oxidoreductases, and hydrolases. Furthermore, 44% of the genes conferring antibiotic resistance were found in abundant marine taxa (e.g., Pelagibacter, Prochlorococcus, and Vibrio). Therefore, we uncovered a previously unknown diversity of genes that conferred an AR phenotype among marine environments, which makes the ocean a global reservoir of both clinically relevant and potentially novel AR genes. PMID:26296734

  14. Comparative Genotypes, Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec (SCCmec) Genes and Antimicrobial Resistance amongst Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus haemolyticus Isolates from Infections in Humans and Companion Animals

    PubMed Central

    McManus, Brenda A.; Coleman, David C.; Deasy, Emily C.; Brennan, Gráinne I.; O’ Connell, Brian; Monecke, Stefan; Ehricht, Ralf; Leggett, Bernadette; Leonard, Nola; Shore, Anna C.

    2015-01-01

    This study compares the characteristics of Staphylococcus epidermidis (SE) and Staphylococcus haemolyticus (SH) isolates from epidemiologically unrelated infections in humans (Hu) (28 SE-Hu; 8 SH-Hu) and companion animals (CpA) (12 SE-CpA; 13 SH-CpA). All isolates underwent antimicrobial susceptibility testing, multilocus sequence typing and DNA microarray profiling to detect antimicrobial resistance and SCCmec-associated genes. All methicillin-resistant (MR) isolates (33/40 SE, 20/21 SH) underwent dru and mecA allele typing. Isolates were predominantly assigned to sequence types (STs) within a single clonal complex (CC2, SE, 84.8%; CC1, SH, 95.2%). SCCmec IV predominated among MRSE with ST2-MRSE-IVc common to both Hu (40.9%) and CpA (54.5%). Identical mecA alleles and nontypeable dru types (dts) were identified in one ST2-MRSE-IVc Hu and CpA isolate, however, all mecA alleles and 2/4 dts detected among 18 ST2-MRSE-IVc isolates were closely related, sharing >96.5% DNA sequence homology. Although only one ST-SCCmec type combination (ST1 with a non-typeable [NT] SCCmec NT9 [class C mec and ccrB4]) was common to four MRSH-Hu and one MRSH-CpA, all MRSH isolates were closely related based on similar STs, SCCmec genes (V/VT or components thereof), mecA alleles and dts. Overall, 39.6% of MR isolates harbored NT SCCmec elements, and ACME was more common amongst MRSE and CpA isolates. Multidrug resistance (MDR) was detected among 96.7% of isolates but they differed in the prevalence of specific macrolide, aminoglycoside and trimethoprim resistance genes amongst SE and SH isolates. Ciprofloxacin, rifampicin, chloramphenicol [fexA, cat-pC221], tetracycline [tet(K)], aminoglycosides [aadD, aphA3] and fusidic acid [fusB] resistance was significantly more common amongst CpA isolates. SE and SH isolates causing infections in Hu and CpA hosts belong predominantly to STs within a single lineage, harboring similar but variable SCCmec genes, mecA alleles and dts. Host and

  15. Mechanisms of drug resistance: quinolone resistance

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, David C.; Jacoby, George A.

    2015-01-01

    Quinolone antimicrobials are synthetic and widely used in clinical medicine. Resistance emerged with clinical use and became common in some bacterial pathogens. Mechanisms of resistance include two categories of mutation and acquisition of resistance-conferring genes. Resistance mutations in one or both of the two drug target enzymes, DNA gyrase and DNA topoisomerase IV, are commonly in a localized domain of the GyrA and ParE subunits of the respective enzymes and reduce drug binding to the enzyme-DNA complex. Other resistance mutations occur in regulatory genes that control the expression of native efflux pumps localized in the bacterial membrane(s). These pumps have broad substrate profiles that include quinolones as well as other antimicrobials, disinfectants, and dyes. Mutations of both types can accumulate with selection pressure and produce highly resistant strains. Resistance genes acquired on plasmids can confer low-level resistance that promotes the selection of mutational high-level resistance. Plasmid-encoded resistance is due to Qnr proteins that protect the target enzymes from quinolone action, one mutant aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme that also modifies certain quinolones, and mobile efflux pumps. Plasmids with these mechanisms often encode additional antimicrobial resistances and can transfer multidrug resistance that includes quinolones. Thus, the bacterial quinolone resistance armamentarium is large. PMID:26190223

  16. Mechanisms of drug resistance: quinolone resistance.

    PubMed

    Hooper, David C; Jacoby, George A

    2015-09-01

    Quinolone antimicrobials are synthetic and widely used in clinical medicine. Resistance emerged with clinical use and became common in some bacterial pathogens. Mechanisms of resistance include two categories of mutation and acquisition of resistance-conferring genes. Resistance mutations in one or both of the two drug target enzymes, DNA gyrase and DNA topoisomerase IV, are commonly in a localized domain of the GyrA and ParE subunits of the respective enzymes and reduce drug binding to the enzyme-DNA complex. Other resistance mutations occur in regulatory genes that control the expression of native efflux pumps localized in the bacterial membrane(s). These pumps have broad substrate profiles that include quinolones as well as other antimicrobials, disinfectants, and dyes. Mutations of both types can accumulate with selection pressure and produce highly resistant strains. Resistance genes acquired on plasmids can confer low-level resistance that promotes the selection of mutational high-level resistance. Plasmid-encoded resistance is due to Qnr proteins that protect the target enzymes from quinolone action, one mutant aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme that also modifies certain quinolones, and mobile efflux pumps. Plasmids with these mechanisms often encode additional antimicrobial resistances and can transfer multidrug resistance that includes quinolones. Thus, the bacterial quinolone resistance armamentarium is large. PMID:26190223

  17. Pseudomonas Aeruginosa: Resistance to the Max

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Keith

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is intrinsically resistant to a variety of antimicrobials and can develop resistance during anti-pseudomonal chemotherapy both of which compromise treatment of infections caused by this organism. Resistance to multiple classes of antimicrobials (multidrug resistance) in particular is increasingly common in P. aeruginosa, with a number of reports of pan-resistant isolates treatable with a single agent, colistin. Acquired resistance in this organism is multifactorial and attributable to chromosomal mutations and the acquisition of resistance genes via horizontal gene transfer. Mutational changes impacting resistance include upregulation of multidrug efflux systems to promote antimicrobial expulsion, derepression of ampC, AmpC alterations that expand the enzyme's substrate specificity (i.e., extended-spectrum AmpC), alterations to outer membrane permeability to limit antimicrobial entry and alterations to antimicrobial targets. Acquired mechanisms contributing to resistance in P. aeruginosa include β-lactamases, notably the extended-spectrum β-lactamases and the carbapenemases that hydrolyze most β-lactams, aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes, and 16S rRNA methylases that provide high-level pan-aminoglycoside resistance. The organism's propensity to grow in vivo as antimicrobial-tolerant biofilms and the occurrence of hypermutator strains that yield antimicrobial resistant mutants at higher frequency also compromise anti-pseudomonal chemotherapy. With limited therapeutic options and increasing resistance will the untreatable P. aeruginosa infection soon be upon us? PMID:21747788

  18. Distribution of Antimicrobial Resistance and Virulence Genes in Enterococcus spp. and Characterization of Isolates from Broiler Chickens ▿ † ‡

    PubMed Central

    Diarra, Moussa S.; Rempel, Heidi; Champagne, Julie; Masson, Luke; Pritchard, Jane; Topp, Edward

    2010-01-01

    Enterococci are now frequent causative agents of nosocomial infections. In this study, we analyzed the frequency and distribution of antibiotic resistance and virulence genotypes of Enterococcus isolates from broiler chickens. Fecal and cecal samples from nine commercial poultry farms were collected to quantify total enterococci. Sixty-nine presumptive enterococci were isolated and identified by API 20 Strep, and their susceptibilities to antibiotics were determined. Genotypes were assessed through the use of a novel DNA microarray carrying 70 taxonomic, 17 virulence, and 174 antibiotic resistance gene probes. Total enterococcal counts were different from farm to farm and between sample sources (P < 0.01). Fifty-one (74%) of the isolates were identified as E. faecium, whereas nine (13%), seven (10%), and two (3%) isolates were identified as E. hirae, E. faecalis, and E. gallinarum, respectively. Multiple-antibiotic resistance was evident in E. faecium and E. faecalis isolates. The most common multiple-antibiotic resistance phenotype was Bac Ery Tyl Lin Str Gen Tet Cip. Genes conferring resistance to aminoglycoside (aac, aacA-aphD, aadB, aphA, sat4), macrolide (ermA, ermB, ermAM, msrC), tetracycline (tetL, tetM, tetO), streptogramin (satG_vatE8), bacitracin (bcrR), and lincosamide (linB) antibiotics were detected in corresponding phenotypes. A range of 9 to 12 different virulence genes was found in E. faecalis, including ace, agg, agrBEfs (agrB gene of E. faecalis), cad1, the cAM373 and cCF10 genes, cob, cpd1, cylAB, efaAEfs, and gelE. All seven E. faecalis isolates were found to carry the gelE gene and to hydrolize gelatin and bile salts. Results from this study showed the presence of enterococci of public and environmental health concerns in broiler chicken farms and demonstrated the utility of a microarray to quickly and reliably analyze resistance and virulence genotypes of Enterococcus spp. PMID:20971861

  19. Gene amplification confers glyphosate resistance in Amaranthus palmeri

    PubMed Central

    Gaines, Todd A.; Zhang, Wenli; Wang, Dafu; Bukun, Bekir; Chisholm, Stephen T.; Shaner, Dale L.; Nissen, Scott J.; Patzoldt, William L.; Tranel, Patrick J.; Culpepper, A. Stanley; Grey, Timothy L.; Webster, Theodore M.; Vencill, William K.; Sammons, R. Douglas; Jiang, Jiming; Preston, Christopher; Leach, Jan E.; Westra, Philip

    2009-01-01

    The herbicide glyphosate became widely used in the United States and other parts of the world after the commercialization of glyphosate-resistant crops. These crops have constitutive overexpression of a glyphosate-insensitive form of the herbicide target site gene, 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS). Increased use of glyphosate over multiple years imposes selective genetic pressure on weed populations. We investigated recently discovered glyphosate-resistant Amaranthus palmeri populations from Georgia, in comparison with normally sensitive populations. EPSPS enzyme activity from resistant and susceptible plants was equally inhibited by glyphosate, which led us to use quantitative PCR to measure relative copy numbers of the EPSPS gene. Genomes of resistant plants contained from 5-fold to more than 160-fold more copies of the EPSPS gene than did genomes of susceptible plants. Quantitative RT-PCR on cDNA revealed that EPSPS expression was positively correlated with genomic EPSPS relative copy number. Immunoblot analyses showed that increased EPSPS protein level also correlated with EPSPS genomic copy number. EPSPS gene amplification was heritable, correlated with resistance in pseudo-F2 populations, and is proposed to be the molecular basis of glyphosate resistance. FISH revealed that EPSPS genes were present on every chromosome and, therefore, gene amplification was likely not caused by unequal chromosome crossing over. This occurrence of gene amplification as an herbicide resistance mechanism in a naturally occurring weed population is particularly significant because it could threaten the sustainable use of glyphosate-resistant crop technology. PMID:20018685

  20. Engineering disease resistance with pectate lyase-like genes

    DOEpatents

    Vogel, John; Somerville, Shauna

    2005-03-08

    A mutant gene coding for pectate lyase and homologs thereof is provided, which when incorporated in transgenic plants effect an increased level disease resistance in such plants. Also is provided the polypeptide sequence for the pectate lyase of the present invention. Methods of obtaining the mutant gene, producing transgenic plants which include the nucleotide sequence for the mutant gene and producing improved disease resistance in a crop of such transgenic plants are also provided.

  1. Amplification of a Gene Related to Mammalian mdr Genes in Drug-Resistant Plasmodium falciparum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Craig M.; Serrano, Adelfa E.; Wasley, Annemarie; Bogenschutz, Michael P.; Shankar, Anuraj H.; Wirth, Dyann F.

    1989-06-01

    The malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum contains at least two genes related to the mammalian multiple drug resistance genes, and at least one of the P. falciparum genes is expressed at a higher level and is present in higher copy number in a strain that is resistant to multiple drugs than in a strain that is sensitive to the drugs.

  2. Mobile antibiotic resistance - the spread of genes determining the resistance of bacteria through food products.

    PubMed

    Godziszewska, Jolanta; Guzek, Dominika; Głąbski, Krzysztof; Wierzbicka, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, more and more antibiotics have become ineffective in the treatment of bacterial nfections. The acquisition of antibiotic resistance by bacteria is associated with circulation of genes in the environment. Determinants of antibiotic resistance may be transferred to pathogenic bacteria. It has been shown that conjugation is one of the key mechanisms responsible for spread of antibiotic resistance genes, which is highly efficient and allows the barrier to restrictions and modifications to be avoided. Some conjugative modules enable the transfer of plasmids even between phylogenetically distant bacterial species. Many scientific reports indicate that food is one of the main reservoirs of these genes. Antibiotic resistance genes have been identified in meat products, milk, fruits and vegetables. The reason for such a wide spread of antibiotic resistance genes is the overuse of antibiotics by breeders of plants and animals, as well as by horizontal gene transfer. It was shown, that resistance determinants located on mobile genetic elements, which are isolated from food products, can easily be transferred to another niche. The antibiotic resistance genes have been in the environment for 30 000 years. Their removal from food products is not possible, but the risks associated with the emergence of multiresistant pathogenic strains are very large. The only option is to control the emergence, selection and spread of these genes. Therefore measures are sought to prevent horizontal transfer of genes. Promising concepts involve the combination of developmental biology, evolution and ecology in the fight against the spread of antibiotic resistance. PMID:27383577

  3. Linking microbial community structure and function to characterize antibiotic resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistant genes from cattle feces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is widespread interest in monitoring the development of antibiotic resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes in agriculturally impacted environments, however little is known about the relationships between bacterial community structure, and antibiotic resistance gene profiles. Cattl...

  4. Antibiotic Binding Drives Catalytic Activation of Aminoglycoside Kinase APH(2″)-Ia.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Shane J; Huang, Yue; Berghuis, Albert M

    2016-06-01

    APH(2″)-Ia is a widely disseminated resistance factor frequently found in clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and pathogenic enterococci, where it is constitutively expressed. APH(2″)-Ia confers high-level resistance to gentamicin and related aminoglycosides through phosphorylation of the antibiotic using guanosine triphosphate (GTP) as phosphate donor. We have determined crystal structures of the APH(2″)-Ia in complex with GTP analogs, guanosine diphosphate, and aminoglycosides. These structures collectively demonstrate that aminoglycoside binding to the GTP-bound kinase drives conformational changes that bring distant regions of the protein into contact. These changes in turn drive a switch of the triphosphate cofactor from an inactive, stabilized conformation to a catalytically competent active conformation. This switch has not been previously reported for antibiotic kinases or for the structurally related eukaryotic protein kinases. This catalytic triphosphate switch presents a means by which the enzyme can curtail wasteful hydrolysis of GTP in the absence of aminoglycosides, providing an evolutionary advantage to this enzyme. PMID:27161980

  5. In vitro and in vivo antimicrobial activities of sporaricin A, a new aminoglycoside.

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, F; Saino, Y; Koshi, T; Hattori, Y

    1980-01-01

    The in vitro and in vivo antimicrobial activity of sporaricin A, a new aminoglycoside, was compared with that of amikacin, dibekacin, and gentamicin. Sporaricin A showed a broad spectrum of activity against various gram-positive and -negative bacteria, including amikacin-, dibekacin-, or gentamicin-resistant strains. Sporaricin A inhibited more than 90% of clinical isolates of staphylococci, Klebsiella, Enterobacter, Citrobacter, Serratia, and Proteus, except for P. morganii and P. inconstans, at the concentration of 3.13 microgram/ml. This activity, except for that against Serratia, was similar to that of amikacin. Against P. inconstans and S. marcescens, sporaricin A was more effective than amikacin, dibekacin, and gentamicin. However, its activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa was relatively weak in comparison with three other aminoglycosides. Sporaricin A was highly effective against bacteria that had various aminoglycoside-inactivating enzymes and that were resistant to the other drugs tested, but it was not active against those with aminoglycoside 3-acetyltransferase-I. The activity of sporaricin A tended to be greater with a reduction in inoculum size of bacteria and an increase in medium pH and decreased slightly in the presence of 10 to 50% horse serum. The in vitro activity was confirmed by in vivo tests in experimental infections with various bacteria. Its protective effect seemed to be equal to or greater than that of amikacin or dibekacin. PMID:7425599

  6. Aminoglycosides Restore Full-length Type VII Collagen by Overcoming Premature Termination Codons: Therapeutic Implications for Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa

    PubMed Central

    Cogan, Jon; Weinstein, Jacqueline; Wang, Xinyi; Hou, Yingping; Martin, Sabrina; South, Andrew P; Woodley, David T; Chen, Mei

    2014-01-01

    Patients with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) have severe, incurable skin fragility, blistering, and multiple skin wounds due to mutations in the gene encoding type VII collagen (C7), the major component of anchoring fibrils mediating epidermal-dermal adherence. Nearly 10–25% of RDEB patients carry nonsense mutations leading to premature stop codons (PTCs) that result in truncated C7. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of using aminoglycosides to suppress PTCs and induce C7 expression in two RDEB keratinocyte cell lines (Q251X/Q251X and R578X/R906) and two primary RDEB fibroblasts (R578X/R578X and R163X/R1683X). Incubation of these cells with aminoglycosides (geneticin, gentamicin, and paromomycin) resulted in the synthesis and secretion of a full-length C7 in a dose-dependent and sustained manner. Importantly, aminoglycoside-induced C7 reversed the abnormal RDEB cell phenotype and incorporated into the dermal-epidermal junction of skin equivalents. We further demonstrated the general utility of aminoglycoside-mediated readthrough in 293 cells transiently transfected with expression vectors encoding 22 different RDEB nonsense mutations. This is the first study demonstrating that aminoglycosides can induce PTC readthrough and restore functional C7 in RDEB caused by nonsense mutations. Therefore, aminoglycosides may have therapeutic potential for RDEB patients and other inherited skin diseases caused by nonsense mutations. PMID:25155989

  7. Plasmid encoded antibiotic resistance: acquisition and transfer of antibiotic resistance genes in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, P M

    2008-01-01

    Bacteria have existed on Earth for three billion years or so and have become adept at protecting themselves against toxic chemicals. Antibiotics have been in clinical use for a little more than 6 decades. That antibiotic resistance is now a major clinical problem all over the world attests to the success and speed of bacterial adaptation. Mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in bacteria are varied and include target protection, target substitution, antibiotic detoxification and block of intracellular antibiotic accumulation. Acquisition of genes needed to elaborate the various mechanisms is greatly aided by a variety of promiscuous gene transfer systems, such as bacterial conjugative plasmids, transposable elements and integron systems, that move genes from one DNA system to another and from one bacterial cell to another, not necessarily one related to the gene donor. Bacterial plasmids serve as the scaffold on which are assembled arrays of antibiotic resistance genes, by transposition (transposable elements and ISCR mediated transposition) and site-specific recombination mechanisms (integron gene cassettes). The evidence suggests that antibiotic resistance genes in human bacterial pathogens originate from a multitude of bacterial sources, indicating that the genomes of all bacteria can be considered as a single global gene pool into which most, if not all, bacteria can dip for genes necessary for survival. In terms of antibiotic resistance, plasmids serve a central role, as the vehicles for resistance gene capture and their subsequent dissemination. These various aspects of bacterial resistance to antibiotics will be explored in this presentation. PMID:18193080

  8. Plasmid encoded antibiotic resistance: acquisition and transfer of antibiotic resistance genes in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bennett, P M

    2008-03-01

    Bacteria have existed on Earth for three billion years or so and have become adept at protecting themselves against toxic chemicals. Antibiotics have been in clinical use for a little more than 6 decades. That antibiotic resistance is now a major clinical problem all over the world attests to the success and speed of bacterial adaptation. Mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in bacteria are varied and include target protection, target substitution, antibiotic detoxification and block of intracellular antibiotic accumulation. Acquisition of genes needed to elaborate the various mechanisms is greatly aided by a variety of promiscuous gene transfer systems, such as bacterial conjugative plasmids, transposable elements and integron systems, that move genes from one DNA system to another and from one bacterial cell to another, not necessarily one related to the gene donor. Bacterial plasmids serve as the scaffold on which are assembled arrays of antibiotic resistance genes, by transposition (transposable elements and ISCR mediated transposition) and site-specific recombination mechanisms (integron gene cassettes).The evidence suggests that antibiotic resistance genes in human bacterial pathogens originate from a multitude of bacterial sources, indicating that the genomes of all bacteria can be considered as a single global gene pool into which most, if not all, bacteria can dip for genes necessary for survival. In terms of antibiotic resistance, plasmids serve a central role, as the vehicles for resistance gene capture and their subsequent dissemination. These various aspects of bacterial resistance to antibiotics will be explored in this presentation. PMID:18193080

  9. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of aminoglycoside-2′′-phosphotransferase-Ic [APH(2′′)-Ic] from Enterococcus gallinarum

    SciTech Connect

    Byrnes, Laura J.; Badarau, Adriana; Vakulenko, Sergei B.; Smith, Clyde A.

    2008-02-01

    APH(2′′)-Ic is an enzyme that is responsible for high-level gentamicin resistance in E. gallinarum isolates. Crystals of the wild-type enzyme and three mutants have been prepared and a complete X-ray diffraction data set was collected to 2.15 Å resolution from an F108L crystal. Bacterial resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics is primarily the result of deactivation of the drugs. Three families of enzymes are responsible for this activity, with one such family being the aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs). The gene encoding one of these enzymes, aminoglycoside-2′′-phosphotransferase-Ic [APH(2′′)-Ic] from Enterococcus gallinarum, has been cloned and the wild-type protein (comprising 308 amino-acid residues) and three mutants that showed elevated minimum inhibitory concentrations towards gentamicin (F108L, H258L and a double mutant F108L/H258L) were expressed in Escherichia coli and subsequently purified. All APH(2′′)-Ic variants were crystallized in the presence of 14–20%(w/v) PEG 4000, 0.25 M MgCl{sub 2}, 0.1 M Tris–HCl pH 8.5 and 1 mM Mg{sub 2}GTP. The crystals belong to the monoclinic space group C2, with one molecule in the asymmetric unit. The approximate unit-cell parameters are a = 82.4, b = 54.2, c = 77.0 Å, β = 108.8°. X-ray diffraction data were collected to approximately 2.15 Å resolution from an F108L crystal at beamline BL9-2 at SSRL, Stanford, California, USA.

  10. Standardized Plant Disease Evaluations will Enhance Resistance Gene Discovery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gene discovery and marker development using DNA based tools require plant populations with well-documented phenotypes. Related crops such as apples and pears may share a number of genes, for example resistance to common diseases, and data mining in one crop may reveal genes for the other. However, u...

  11. Whole genome sequencing of diverse Shiga toxin-producing and non-producing Escherichia coli strains reveals a variety of virulence and novel antibiotic resistance plasmids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genomes of a diverse set of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli strains and the presence of 38 plasmids among all the isolates were determined. Among the novel plasmids found, there were eight that encoded resistance genes to antibiotics, including aminoglycosides, carbapenems, penicillins, cephalosp...

  12. Modulation of RNA function by aminoglycoside antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, R; Waldsich, C; Wank, H

    2000-01-01

    One of the most important families of antibiotics are the aminoglycosides, including drugs such as neomycin B, paromomycin, gentamicin and streptomycin. With the discovery of the catalytic potential of RNA, these antibiotics became very popular due to their RNA-binding capacity. They serve for the analysis of RNA function as well as for the study of RNA as a potential therapeutic target. Improvements in RNA structure determination recently provided first insights into the decoding site of the ribosome at high resolution and how aminoglycosides might induce misreading of the genetic code. In addition to inhibiting prokaryotic translation, aminoglycosides inhibit several catalytic RNAs such as self-splicing group I introns, RNase P and small ribozymes in vitro. Furthermore, these antibiotics interfere with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication by disrupting essential RNA-protein contacts. Most exciting is the potential of many RNA-binding antibiotics to stimulate RNA activities, conceiving small-molecule partners for the hypothesis of an ancient RNA world. SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) has been used in this evolutionary game leading to small synthetic RNAs, whose NMR structures gave valuable information on how aminoglycosides interact with RNA, which could possibly be used in applied science. PMID:10619838

  13. Audiological Management of Patients Receiving Aminoglycoside Antibiotics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konrad-Martin, Dawn; Wilmington, Debra J.; Gordon, Jane S.; Reavis, Kelly M.; Fausti, Stephen A.

    2005-01-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics, commonly prescribed for adults and children to treat a wide range of bacterial infections, are potentially ototoxic, often causing irreversible damage to the auditory and vestibular systems. Ototoxic hearing loss usually begins at the higher frequencies and can progress to lower frequencies necessary for understanding…

  14. Physiological and Molecular Pathology of Aminoglycoside Ototoxicity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sha, Su-Hua

    2005-01-01

    The problem of aminoglycoside-induced ototoxicity, which was recognized within a year of the discovery of streptomycin to combat tuberculosis in 1944, is still of great concern due to the widespread use of these powerful antibacterial agents. These drugs can damage to varying degrees the cochlea and vestibular system. Their primary targets are the…

  15. Selective condensation of DNA by aminoglycoside antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Kopaczynska, M; Schulz, A; Fraczkowska, K; Kraszewski, S; Podbielska, H; Fuhrhop, J H

    2016-05-01

    The condensing effect of aminoglycoside antibiotics on the structure of double-stranded DNA was examined. The selective condensation of DNA by small molecules is an interesting approach in biotechnology. Here, we present the interaction between calf thymus DNA and three types of antibiotic molecules: tobramycin, kanamycin, and neomycin. Several techniques were applied to study this effect. Atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy images, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra showed that the interaction of tobramycin with double-stranded DNA caused the rod, toroid, and sphere formation and very strong condensation of DNA strands, which was not observed in the case of other aminoglycosides used in the experiment. Studies on the mechanisms by which small molecules interact with DNA are important in understanding their functioning in cells, in designing new and efficient drugs, or in minimizing their adverse side effects. Specific interactions between tobramycin and DNA double helix was modeled using molecular dynamics simulations. Simulation study shows the aminoglycoside specificity to bend DNA double helix, shedding light on the origins of toroid formation. This phenomenon may lighten the ototoxicity or nephrotoxicity issues, but also other adverse reactions of aminoglycoside antibiotics in the human body. PMID:26646261

  16. Fate of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria and Genes during Wastewater Chlorination: Implication for Antibiotic Resistance Control

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Qing-Bin; Guo, Mei-Ting; Yang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated fates of nine antibiotic-resistant bacteria as well as two series of antibiotic resistance genes in wastewater treated by various doses of chlorine (0, 15, 30, 60, 150 and 300 mg Cl2 min/L). The results indicated that chlorination was effective in inactivating antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Most bacteria were inactivated completely at the lowest dose (15 mg Cl2 min/L). By comparison, sulfadiazine- and erythromycin-resistant bacteria exhibited tolerance to low chlorine dose (up to 60 mg Cl2 min/L). However, quantitative real-time PCRs revealed that chlorination decreased limited erythromycin or tetracycline resistance genes, with the removal levels of overall erythromycin and tetracycline resistance genes at 0.42 ± 0.12 log and 0.10 ± 0.02 log, respectively. About 40% of erythromycin-resistance genes and 80% of tetracycline resistance genes could not be removed by chlorination. Chlorination was considered not effective in controlling antimicrobial resistance. More concern needs to be paid to the potential risk of antibiotic resistance genes in the wastewater after chlorination. PMID:25738838

  17. Use of a bacterial antimicrobial resistance gene microarray for the identification of resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Garneau, P; Labrecque, O; Maynard, C; Messier, S; Masson, L; Archambault, M; Harel, J

    2010-11-01

    As diagnostic and surveillance activities are vital to determine measures needed to control antimicrobial resistance (AMR), new and rapid laboratory methods are necessary to facilitate this important effort. DNA microarray technology allows the detection of a large number of genes in a single reaction. This technology is simple, specific and high-throughput. We have developed a bacterial antimicrobial resistance gene DNA microarray that will allow rapid antimicrobial resistance gene screening for all Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. A prototype microarray was designed using a 70-mer based oligonucleotide set targeting AMR genes of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. In the present version, the microarray consists of 182 oligonucleotides corresponding to 166 different acquired AMR gene targets, covering most of the resistance genes found in both Gram-negative and -positive bacteria. A test study was performed on a collection of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from milk samples from dairy farms in Québec, Canada. The reproducibility of the hybridizations was determined, and the microarray results were compared with those obtained by phenotypic resistance tests (either MIC or Kirby-Bauer). The microarray genotyping demonstrated a correlation between penicillin, tetracycline and erythromycin resistance phenotypes with the corresponding acquired resistance genes. The hybridizations showed that the 38 antimicrobial resistant S. aureus isolates possessed at least one AMR gene. PMID:21083822

  18. Selectable markers: antibiotic and herbicide resistance.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Julia L; Pastori, Gabriela M; Davey, Michael R; Jones, Huw D

    2005-01-01

    The low efficiencies of most plant transformation methods necessitate the use of selectable marker genes to identify those cells that successfully integrate and express transferred DNA. Genes conferring resistance to various antibiotics or herbicides are commonly used in laboratory transformation research. They encode proteins that detoxify corresponding selection agents and allow the preferential growth of transformed cells. This chapter describes the application of two selection systems on the transformation of wheat. One is based on the nptII gene and corresponding aminoglycoside antibiotics, the other is based on the bar gene and corresponding glufosinate ammonium herbicides. PMID:15310922

  19. Recombinant Rp1 genes confer necrotic or nonspecific resistance phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Shavannor M; Steinau, Martin; Trick, Harold N; Hulbert, Scot H

    2010-06-01

    Genes at the Rp1 rust resistance locus of maize confer race-specific resistance to the common rust fungus Puccinia sorghi. Three variant genes with nonspecific effects (HRp1 -Kr1N, -D*21 and -MD*19) were found to be generated by intragenic crossing over within the LRR region. The LRR region of most NBS-LRR encoding genes is quite variable and codes for one of the regions in resistance gene proteins that controls specificity. Sequence comparisons demonstrated that the Rp1-Kr1N recombinant gene was identical to the N-terminus of the rp1-kp2 gene and C-terminus of another gene from its HRp1-K grandparent. The Rp1-D*21 recombinant gene consists of the N-terminus of the rp1-dp2 gene and C-terminus of the Rp1-D gene from the parental haplotype. Similarly, a recombinant gene from the Rp1-MD*19 haplotype has the N-terminus of an rp1 gene from the HRp1-M parent and C-terminus of the rp1-D19 gene from the HRp1-D parent. The recombinant Rp1 -Kr1N, -D*21 and -MD*19 genes activated defense responses in the absence of their AVR proteins triggering HR (hypersensitive response) in the absence of the pathogen. The results indicate that the frequent intragenic recombination events that occur in the Rp1 gene cluster not only recombine the genes into novel haplotypes, but also create genes with nonspecific effects. Some of these may contribute to nonspecific quantitative resistance but others have severe consequences for the fitness of the plant. PMID:20443026

  20. Occurrence, virulence genes and antibiotic resistance of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) from twelve bovine farms in the north-east of Ireland.

    PubMed

    Bolton, D J; Ennis, C; McDowell, D

    2014-03-01

    Cattle faecal samples (n = 480) were collected from a cluster of 12 farms, and PCR screened for the presence of the intimin gene (eae). Positive samples were cultured, and colonies were examined for the presence of eae and verocytotoxin (vtx) genes. Colonies which were positive for the intimin gene and negative for the verocytotoxin genes were further screened using PCR for a range of virulence factors including bfpA, espA, espB, tir ehxA, toxB, etpD, katP, saa, iha, lpfAO157/OI-141 and lpfAO157/OI-154. Of the 480 faecal samples, 5.8% (28/480) were PCR positive, and one isolate was obtained from each. All 28 isolates obtained were bfpA negative and therefore atypical EPEC (aEPEC). The serotypes detected included O2:H27, O8:H36, O15:H2, O49:H+, O84:H28, O105:H7 and O132:H34 but half of the isolates could not be serogrouped using currently available antisera. Twenty-two (79%) of the isolates carried the tir gene but only 25% were espB positive, and all other virulence genes tested for were scarce or absent. Several isolates showed intermediate resistance to ciprofloxacin, kanamycin, nalidixic acid, minocycline and tetracycline; full resistance to nalidixic acid or tetracycline with one isolate (O-:H8) displaying resistance to aminoglycosides (kanamycin and streptomycin), quinolones (nalidixic acid) and sulphonamides. This study provides further evidence that cattle are a potential source of aEPEC and add to the very limited data currently available on virulence genes and antibiotic resistance in this pathogenic E. coli group in animals. PMID:23782867

  1. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of Enterococcus faecium aminoglycoside-2′′-phosphotransferase-Ib [APH(2′′)-Ib

    SciTech Connect

    Walanj, Rupa; Young, Paul; Baker, Heather M.; Baker, Edward N.; Metcalf, Peter; Chow, Joseph W.; Lerner, Stephen; Vakulenko, Sergei; Smith, Clyde A.

    2005-04-01

    APH(2′′)-Ib is an enzyme responsible for high-level gentamicin resistance in E. faecium isolates. Native crystals of this enzyme have been prepared and preliminary X-ray diffraction experiments have been undertaken. Bacterial resistance to the aminoglycoside antibiotics is primarily the result of deactivation of the drugs. Three families of enzymes are responsible for this activity, with one such family being the aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs). The gene encoding one of these enzymes, APH(2′′)-Ib, has been cloned and the protein (comprising 299 amino-acid residues) expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized in the presence of 16%(w/v) PEG 3350 and gentamicin. The crystals belong to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with approximate unit-cell parameters a = 79.7, b = 58.8, c = 81.4 Å, β = 98.4°, and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis is consistent with the presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit. Synchrotron diffraction data to approximately 2.65 Å resolution were collected from a native APH(2′′)-Ib crystal at beamline BL9-2 at SSRL (Stanford, CA, USA). Selenium-substituted crystals have also been produced and structure determination is proceeding.

  2. Amikacin Resistance in Staphylococcus pseudintermedius Isolated from Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Gold, R. M.; Cohen, N. D.

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is the most common microorganism isolated from canine pyoderma and postoperative wound infections. The prevalence of methicillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius (MRSP) has increased, and recently, isolates that are resistant not only to methicillin but also to other classes of antibiotic drugs, including aminoglycosides, have become common. A total of 422 S. pseudintermedius isolates collected from 413 dogs were analyzed for amikacin and methicillin resistance using broth microdilution and disk diffusion testing. Methicillin-resistant isolates were significantly (P < 0.0001) more likely to be resistant to amikacin (37%, 31/84) than were methicillin-susceptible isolates (7%, 22/338). Additionally, resistance to non-β-lactam antibiotics was significantly associated with resistance to amikacin irrespective of methicillin resistance. Among the 422 isolates, 32 that tested positive for amikacin resistance by broth microdilution or disk diffusion testing were investigated further for the presence of aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme genes using multiplex PCR. Of these isolates, 66% (21/32) were methicillin resistant. In contrast to previous studies of Staphylococcus aureus, the most prevalent gene detected was aph(3′)-IIIa found in 75% (24/32) of isolates followed by aac(6′)/aph(2″) and ant(4′)-Ia in 12% (4/32) and 3% (1/32), respectively. Understanding the differences in antimicrobial resistance gene carriage between different species of Staphylococcus may improve antimicrobial drug selection for clinical therapy and provide insights into how resistance develops in S. pseudintermedius. PMID:25078911

  3. Structure of AadA from Salmonella enterica: a monomeric aminoglycoside (3′′)(9) adenyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yang; Näsvall, Joakim; Wu, Shiying; Andersson, Dan I.; Selmer, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Aminoglycoside resistance is commonly conferred by enzymatic modification of drugs by aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes such as aminoglycoside nucleo­tidyltransferases (ANTs). Here, the first crystal structure of an ANT(3′′)(9) adenyltransferase, AadA from Salmonella enterica, is presented. AadA catalyses the magnesium-dependent transfer of adenosine monophosphate from ATP to the two chemically dissimilar drugs streptomycin and spectinomycin. The structure was solved using selenium SAD phasing and refined to 2.5 Å resolution. AadA consists of a nucleotidyltransferase domain and an α-helical bundle domain. AadA crystallizes as a monomer and is a monomer in solution as confirmed by small-angle X-ray scattering, in contrast to structurally similar homodimeric adenylating enzymes such as kanamycin nucleotidyltransferase. Isothermal titration calorimetry experiments show that ATP binding has to occur before binding of the aminoglycoside substrate, and structure analysis suggests that ATP binding repositions the two domains for aminoglycoside binding in the interdomain cleft. Candidate residues for ligand binding and catalysis were subjected to site-directed mutagenesis. In vivo resistance and in vitro binding assays support the role of Glu87 as the catalytic base in adenylation, while Arg192 and Lys205 are shown to be critical for ATP binding. PMID:26527143

  4. Genes for resistance to zucchini yellow mosaic in tropical pumpkin.

    PubMed

    Pachner, Martin; Paris, Harry S; Lelley, Tamas

    2011-01-01

    Four cultigens of Cucurbita moschata resistant to zucchini yellow mosaic virus were crossed with the susceptible 'Waltham Butternut' and with each other in order to clarify the mode of inheritance of resistance and relationships among the genes involved. Five loci were segregating, with genes for resistance Zym-0 and Zym-4 carried by 'Nigerian Local' and one of them also carried by 'Nicklow's Delight,' Zym-1 carried by 'Menina,' and zym-6 carried by 'Soler.' A recessive gene carried by 'Waltham Butternut,' zym-5, is complementary with the dominant Zym-4 of 'Nigerian Local,' that is, the resistance conferred by Zym-4 is only expressed in zym-5/zym-5 individuals. Gene zym-6 appears to be linked to either Zym-0 or Zym-4, and it is also possible that Zym-1 is linked to one of them as well. PMID:21493595

  5. [SSR mapping of stripe rust resistance gene from Ae. tauschii].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Quan; Jia, Ji-Zeng; Yang, Hong; Zhang, Bao-Shi

    2008-04-01

    A dominant wheat stripe rust resistance gene, temporarily designated as YrY201, was identified in an accession Y201 of Aegilops tauschii. By bulk segregation analysis, three microsatellite markers Xgwm273b, Xgwm37 and Wmc14 were found to be linked to YrY201 with genetic distance of 11.5, 5.8 and 10.9 cM , respectively. According to the locations of the linked markers, the resistance gene was located on chromosome 7DL. Based on the chromosomal location and the resistance pattern of the gene, we proposed that YrY201 was a novel stripe rust resistance gene, and could be selected by marker-assisted selection. PMID:18424421

  6. Prevalence of antimicrobial resistance and resistance genes in faecal Escherichia coli isolates recovered from healthy pets.

    PubMed

    Costa, Daniela; Poeta, Patricia; Sáenz, Yolanda; Coelho, Ana Cláudia; Matos, Manuela; Vinué, Laura; Rodrigues, Jorge; Torres, Carmen

    2008-02-01

    Faecal samples of healthy dogs (n=39) and cats (n=36) obtained in Northern Portugal were seeded on Levine agar plates, and two Escherichia coli isolates per sample were recovered (78 of dogs and 66 of cats). The susceptibility to 16 antimicrobial agents was tested in this series of 144 E. coli isolates. Almost 20% of them showed tetracycline resistance and 12 and 15% presented ampicillin or streptomycin resistance, respectively. The percentage of resistance to the other antimicrobial agents was in all cases below 4%, and no resistant isolates were detected for ceftazidime, imipenem, cefoxitin or amikacin. Two isolates (from one dog) showed cefotaxime-resistance and harboured both the CTX-M-1 and OXA-30 beta-lactamases. A bla(TEM) gene was detected in 12 of 17 ampicillin-resistant isolates, the aac(3)-II gene in the three gentamicin-resistant isolates, aadA in 7 of 22 streptomycin-resistant isolates, and tet(A) and/or tet(B) gene in all 28 tetracycline-resistant isolates. The gene encoding class 1 integrase was detected in six E. coli isolates, including the four trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole-resistant isolates and those two harbouring CTX-M-1 and OXA-30 beta-lactamases; different gene cassette arrangements were identified: dfrA1+aadA1 (two isolates), dfrA12+orfF+aadA2 (two isolates) and bla(OXA30)+aadA1 (two isolates). One amino acid change in GyrA protein (Ser83Leu or Asp87Tyr) was detected in four nalidixic acid-resistant and ciprofloxacin-susceptible isolates and two amino acid changes in GyrA (Ser83Leu+Asp87Asn) and one in ParC (Ser80Ile) were identified in one nalidixic acid- and ciprofloxacin-resistant isolate. Faecal E. coli isolates of healthy pets could be a reservoir of antimicrobial resistance genes. PMID:17870255

  7. Functional Characterization of Bacteria Isolated from Ancient Arctic Soil Exposes Diverse Resistance Mechanisms to Modern Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Perron, Gabriel G.; Whyte, Lyle; Turnbaugh, Peter J.; Goordial, Jacqueline; Hanage, William P.; Dantas, Gautam; Desai, Michael M.

    2015-01-01

    Using functional metagenomics to study the resistomes of bacterial communities isolated from different layers of the Canadian high Arctic permafrost, we show that microbial communities harbored diverse resistance mechanisms at least 5,000 years ago. Among bacteria sampled from the ancient layers of a permafrost core, we isolated eight genes conferring clinical levels of resistance against aminoglycoside, β-lactam and tetracycline antibiotics that are naturally produced by microorganisms. Among these resistance genes, four also conferred resistance against amikacin, a modern semi-synthetic antibiotic that does not naturally occur in microorganisms. In bacteria sampled from the overlaying active layer, we isolated ten different genes conferring resistance to all six antibiotics tested in this study, including aminoglycoside, β-lactam and tetracycline variants that are naturally produced by microorganisms as well as semi-synthetic variants produced in the laboratory. On average, we found that resistance genes found in permafrost bacteria conferred lower levels of resistance against clinically relevant antibiotics than resistance genes sampled from the active layer. Our results demonstrate that antibiotic resistance genes were functionally diverse prior to the anthropogenic use of antibiotics, contributing to the evolution of natural reservoirs of resistance genes. PMID:25807523

  8. Functional characterization of bacteria isolated from ancient arctic soil exposes diverse resistance mechanisms to modern antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Perron, Gabriel G; Whyte, Lyle; Turnbaugh, Peter J; Goordial, Jacqueline; Hanage, William P; Dantas, Gautam; Desai, Michael M

    2015-01-01

    Using functional metagenomics to study the resistomes of bacterial communities isolated from different layers of the Canadian high Arctic permafrost, we show that microbial communities harbored diverse resistance mechanisms at least 5,000 years ago. Among bacteria sampled from the ancient layers of a permafrost core, we isolated eight genes conferring clinical levels of resistance against aminoglycoside, β-lactam and tetracycline antibiotics that are naturally produced by microorganisms. Among these resistance genes, four also conferred resistance against amikacin, a modern semi-synthetic antibiotic that does not naturally occur in microorganisms. In bacteria sampled from the overlaying active layer, we isolated ten different genes conferring resistance to all six antibiotics tested in this study, including aminoglycoside, β-lactam and tetracycline variants that are naturally produced by microorganisms as well as semi-synthetic variants produced in the laboratory. On average, we found that resistance genes found in permafrost bacteria conferred lower levels of resistance against clinically relevant antibiotics than resistance genes sampled from the active layer. Our results demonstrate that antibiotic resistance genes were functionally diverse prior to the anthropogenic use of antibiotics, contributing to the evolution of natural reservoirs of resistance genes. PMID:25807523

  9. Structural Analysis of a Putative Aminoglycoside N-Acetyltransferase from Bacillus anthracis

    SciTech Connect

    Klimecka, Maria M.; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Font, Jose; Skarina, Tatiana; Shumilin, Igor; Onopryienko, Olena; Porebski, Przemyslaw J.; Cymborowski, Marcin; Zimmerman, Matthew D.; Hasseman, Jeremy; Glomski, Ian J.; Lebioda, Lukasz; Savchenko, Alexei; Edwards, Aled; Minor, Wladek

    2012-02-15

    For the last decade, worldwide efforts for the treatment of anthrax infection have focused on developing effective vaccines. Patients that are already infected are still treated traditionally using different types of standard antimicrobial agents. The most popular are antibiotics such as tetracyclines and fluoroquinolones. While aminoglycosides appear to be less effective antimicrobial agents than other antibiotics, synthetic aminoglycosides have been shown to act as potent inhibitors of anthrax lethal factor and may have potential application as antitoxins. Here, we present a structural analysis of the BA2930 protein, a putative aminoglycoside acetyltransferase, which may be a component of the bacterium's aminoglycoside resistance mechanism. The determined structures revealed details of a fold characteristic only for one other protein structure in the Protein Data Bank, namely, YokD from Bacillus subtilis. Both BA2930 and YokD are members of the Antibiotic-NAT superfamily (PF02522). Sequential and structural analyses showed that residues conserved throughout the Antibiotic-NAT superfamily are responsible for the binding of the cofactor acetyl coenzyme A. The interaction of BA2930 with cofactors was characterized by both crystallographic and binding studies.

  10. Sodium Nitrite Blocks the Activity of Aminoglycosides against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Zemke, Anna C.; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2015-01-01

    Sodium nitrite has broad antimicrobial activity at pH 6.5, including the ability to prevent biofilm growth by Pseudomonas aeruginosa on the surfaces of airway epithelial cells. Because of its antimicrobial activity, nitrite is being investigated as an inhaled agent for chronic P. aeruginosa airway infections in cystic fibrosis patients. However, the interaction between nitrite and commonly used aminoglycosides is unknown. This paper investigates the interaction between nitrite and tobramycin in liquid culture, abiotic biofilms, and a biotic biofilm model simulating the conditions in the cystic fibrosis airway. The addition of nitrite prevented killing by aminoglycosides in liquid culture, with dose dependence between 1.5 and 15 mM. The effect was not blocked by the nitric oxide scavenger CPTIO or dependent on efflux pump activity. Nitrite shifted the biofilm minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC-biofilm) from 256 μg/ml to >1,024 μg/ml in an abiotic biofilm model. In a biotic biofilm model, the addition of 50 mM nitrite decreased the antibiofilm activity of tobramycin by up to 1.2 log. Respiratory chain inhibition recapitulated the inhibition of aminoglycoside activity by nitrite, suggesting a potential mechanism of inhibition of energy-dependent aminoglycoside uptake. In summary, sodium nitrite induces resistance to both gentamicin and tobramycin in P. aeruginosa grown in liquid culture, as an abiotic biofilm, or as a biotic biofilm. PMID:25801569

  11. Gene heterogeneity for tetracycline resistance in Staphylococcus spp.

    PubMed Central

    Bismuth, R; Zilhao, R; Sakamoto, H; Guesdon, J L; Courvalin, P

    1990-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences related to four tet genes were studied by hybridization in 183 clinical Staphylococcus isolates. tet(K) predominated in strains resistant only to tetracycline, while tet(M) was responsible for combined tetracycline and minocycline resistance. In strains harboring both genes, they contributed additively. tet(L) was detected in only five strains, and no hybridization was observed with tet(O). PMID:2221873

  12. Molecular Characterization of High-Level Mupirocin Resistance in Staphylococcus pseudintermedius

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Roth, Eduardo; Pintarić, Selma; Šeol Martinec, Branka

    2013-01-01

    The genetic analysis of high-level mupirocin resistance (Hi-Mupr) in a Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolate from a dog is presented. The Hi-Mupr ileS2 gene flanked by a novel rearrangement of directly repeated insertion sequence IS257 elements was located, together with the aminoglycoside resistance aacA-aphD determinant, on a conjugative plasmid related to the pSK41/pGO1 family plasmids. PMID:23269741

  13. Novel metal resistance genes from microorganisms: a functional metagenomic approach.

    PubMed

    González-Pastor, José E; Mirete, Salvador

    2010-01-01

    Most of the known metal resistance mechanisms are based on studies of cultured microorganisms, and the abundant uncultured fraction could be an important source of genes responsible for uncharacterized resistance mechanisms. A functional metagenomic approach was selected to recover metal resistance genes from the rhizosphere microbial community of an acid-mine drainage (AMD)-adapted plant, Erica andevalensis, from Rio Tinto, Spain. A total of 13 nickel resistant clones were isolated and analyzed, encoding hypothetical or conserved hypothetical proteins of uncertain functions, or well-characterized proteins, but not previously reported to be related to nickel resistance. The resistance clones were classified into two groups according to their nickel accumulation properties: those preventing or those favoring metal accumulation. Two clones encoding putative ABC transporter components and a serine O-acetyltransferase were found as representatives of each group, respectively. PMID:20830571

  14. Gene Expression Signatures from Three Genetically Separable Resistance Gene Signaling Pathways for Downy Mildew Resistance1[w

    PubMed Central

    Eulgem, Thomas; Weigman, Victor J.; Chang, Hur-Song; McDowell, John M.; Holub, Eric B.; Glazebrook, Jane; Zhu, Tong; Dangl, Jeffery L.

    2004-01-01

    Resistance gene-dependent disease resistance to pathogenic microorganisms is mediated by genetically separable regulatory pathways. Using the GeneChip Arabidopsis genome array, we compared the expression profiles of approximately 8,000 Arabidopsis genes following activation of three RPP genes directed against the pathogenic oomycete Peronospora parasitica. Judicious choice of P. parasitica isolates and loss of resistance plant mutants allowed us to compare the responses controlled by three genetically distinct resistance gene-mediated signaling pathways. We found that all three pathways can converge, leading to up-regulation of common sets of target genes. At least two temporal patterns of gene activation are triggered by two of the pathways examined. Many genes defined by their early and transient increases in expression encode proteins that execute defense biochemistry, while genes exhibiting a sustained or delayed expression increase predominantly encode putative signaling proteins. Previously defined and novel sequence motifs were found to be enriched in the promoters of genes coregulated by the local defense-signaling network. These putative promoter elements may operate downstream from signal convergence points. PMID:15181204

  15. Characterization of Fosfomycin Resistance Gene, fosB, in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chunhui; Guo, Yan; Ma, Ying; Yang, Yang; Hu, Fupin; Xu, Xiaogang; Wang, Minggui

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence, location and genetic environments of fosfomycin-resistance (fos) genes in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clinical strains, 67 fosfomycin-resistant MRSA strains were isolated from the blood and cerebrospinal fluid samples at a teaching hospital in Shanghai. The presence of fos genes in these clinical strains was detected by PCR and sequencing. The locations of fos genes were determined by Southern blotting and genetic environments were analyzed by primer walking sequencing. Multiple locus sequence typing (MLST) was used to characterize genetic diversity. Conjugation was performed to evaluate the transferability of fos genes. Among 67 fosfomycin-resistant MRSA strains, nine high level fosfomycin resistant strains (≥128 μg/ml) were fosB-positive. Three new subtypes of fosB, designated as fosB4, fosB5, and fosB6, were identified. fosB1, fosB4 or fosB6 genes were located on small plasmids (ca. 2.5 kb) and flanked by an analogous replication gene (rep). Differently, the fosB5 gene was surrounded by a shorter rep gene and two copies of a transposon gene (tnp) that shared high identity with the IS257-like transposon. Four MLST types were found among the nine fosB-positive strains. Transconjugants with the fosB genes were resistant to fosfomycin with MIC 64 or 128 μg/ml. In conclusion, different subtypes and genetic environment of fosB genes indicate that gene heterogeneity for fosfomycin resistance in MRSA isolates. PMID:27144405

  16. Progress on introduction of rust resistance genes into confection sunflower

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sunflower rust (Puccinia helianthi) emerged as a serious disease in the last few years. Confection sunflower is particularly vulnerable to the disease due to the lack of resistance sources. The objectives of this project are to transfer rust resistance genes from oil sunflower to confectionery sunfl...

  17. Rapid Identification of Genes Contributing to FH Resistance in Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Development of wheat and barley with improved Fusarium head blight resistance will be greatly aided by knowledge of the plant genes that make essential contributions to the FHB resistance mechanism. This knowledge will permit identification of the best naturally occurring variants for use in breedin...

  18. Natural selection mapping of the warfarin-resistance gene

    PubMed Central

    Kohn, Michael H.; Pelz, Hans-Joachim; Wayne, Robert K.

    2000-01-01

    In theory, genes under natural selection can be revealed by unique patterns of linkage disequilibrium (LD) and polymorphism at physically linked loci. However, given the effects of recombination and mutation, the physical extent and persistence of LD patterns in natural populations is uncertain. To assess the LD signature of selection, we survey variation in 26 microsatellite loci spanning an ≈32-cM region that includes the warfarin-resistance gene (Rw) in five wild rat populations having resistance levels between 0 and 95%. We find a high frequency of heterozygote deficiency at microsatellite loci in resistant populations, and a negative association between gene diversity (H) and resistance. Contrary to previous studies, these data suggest that directional rather than overdominant selection may predominate during periods of intense anticoagulant treatment. In highly resistant populations, extensive LD was observed over a chromosome segment spanning ≈14% of rat chromosome 1. In contrast, LD in a moderately resistant population was more localized and, in conjunction with likelihood ratios, allowed assignment of Rw to a 2.2-cM interval. Within this genomic window, a diagnostic marker, D1Rat219, assigned 91% of rats to the correct resistance category. These results further demonstrate that “natural selection mapping” in field populations can detect and map major fitness-related genes, and question overdominance as the predominant mode of selection in anticoagulant-resistant rat populations. PMID:10884423

  19. Molecular Mapping of Wheat Leaf Rust Resistance Gene Lr42

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leaf rust, caused by Puccinia triticina Eriks., is an important foliar disease of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) worldwide. Leaf rust resistance gene Lr42 from Aegilops tauschii Coss. has been used as a source of rust resistance in breeding programs. To identify molecular markers closely linked to Lr4...

  20. Transferring Sclerotinia Resistance Genes from Wild Helianthus into Cultivated Sunflower

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To enhance resistance to Sclerotinia head and stalk rot in cultivated sunflower, mining and introgression of Sclerotinia resistance genes from diverse wild Helianthus accessions into cultivated sunflower has been conducted using backcrossing method since 2004. During the last four years, numerous in...

  1. Characterization of novel blast resistant genes for US rice breeding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blast resistance genes, such as Pi-ta, conveying resistance up to 8 common US races of the blast pathogen (Magnaporthe oryzae), have been used for 20 years in the US rice (Oryza sativa) industry. However, Pi-ta is susceptible to two known US races of blast. Race IE-1K has caused blast outbreaks in A...

  2. CNL Disease Resistance Genes in Soybean and Their Evolutionary Divergence

    PubMed Central

    Nepal, Madhav P; Benson, Benjamin V

    2015-01-01

    Disease resistance genes (R-genes) encode proteins involved in detecting pathogen attack and activating downstream defense molecules. Recent availability of soybean genome sequences makes it possible to examine the diversity of gene families including disease-resistant genes. The objectives of this study were to identify coiled-coil NBS-LRR (= CNL) R-genes in soybean, infer their evolutionary relationships, and assess structural as well as functional divergence of the R-genes. Profile hidden Markov models were used for sequence identification and model-based maximum likelihood was used for phylogenetic analysis, and variation in chromosomal positioning, gene clustering, and functional divergence were assessed. We identified 188 soybean CNL genes nested into four clades consistent to their orthologs in Arabidopsis. Gene clustering analysis revealed the presence of 41 gene clusters located on 13 different chromosomes. Analyses of the Ks-values and chromosomal positioning suggest duplication events occurring at varying timescales, and an extrapericentromeric positioning may have facilitated their rapid evolution. Each of the four CNL clades exhibited distinct patterns of gene expression. Phylogenetic analysis further supported the extrapericentromeric positioning effect on the divergence and retention of the CNL genes. The results are important for understanding the diversity and divergence of CNL genes in soybean, which would have implication in soybean crop improvement in future. PMID:25922568

  3. Genome-Wide Architecture of Disease Resistance Genes in Lettuce.

    PubMed

    Christopoulou, Marilena; Wo, Sebastian Reyes-Chin; Kozik, Alex; McHale, Leah K; Truco, Maria-Jose; Wroblewski, Tadeusz; Michelmore, Richard W

    2015-12-01

    Genome-wide motif searches identified 1134 genes in the lettuce reference genome of cv. Salinas that are potentially involved in pathogen recognition, of which 385 were predicted to encode nucleotide binding-leucine rich repeat receptor (NLR) proteins. Using a maximum-likelihood approach, we grouped the NLRs into 25 multigene families and 17 singletons. Forty-one percent of these NLR-encoding genes belong to three families, the largest being RGC16 with 62 genes in cv. Salinas. The majority of NLR-encoding genes are located in five major resistance clusters (MRCs) on chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4, and 8 and cosegregate with multiple disease resistance phenotypes. Most MRCs contain primarily members of a single NLR gene family but a few are more complex. MRC2 spans 73 Mb and contains 61 NLRs of six different gene families that cosegregate with nine disease resistance phenotypes. MRC3, which is 25 Mb, contains 22 RGC21 genes and colocates with Dm13. A library of 33 transgenic RNA interference tester stocks was generated for functional analysis of NLR-encoding genes that cosegregated with disease resistance phenotypes in each of the MRCs. Members of four NLR-encoding families, RGC1, RGC2, RGC21, and RGC12 were shown to be required for 16 disease resistance phenotypes in lettuce. The general composition of MRCs is conserved across different genotypes; however, the specific repertoire of NLR-encoding genes varied particularly of the rapidly evolving Type I genes. These tester stocks are valuable resources for future analyses of additional resistance phenotypes. PMID:26449254

  4. Genome-Wide Architecture of Disease Resistance Genes in Lettuce

    PubMed Central

    Christopoulou, Marilena; Wo, Sebastian Reyes-Chin; Kozik, Alex; McHale, Leah K.; Truco, Maria-Jose; Wroblewski, Tadeusz; Michelmore, Richard W.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide motif searches identified 1134 genes in the lettuce reference genome of cv. Salinas that are potentially involved in pathogen recognition, of which 385 were predicted to encode nucleotide binding-leucine rich repeat receptor (NLR) proteins. Using a maximum-likelihood approach, we grouped the NLRs into 25 multigene families and 17 singletons. Forty-one percent of these NLR-encoding genes belong to three families, the largest being RGC16 with 62 genes in cv. Salinas. The majority of NLR-encoding genes are located in five major resistance clusters (MRCs) on chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4, and 8 and cosegregate with multiple disease resistance phenotypes. Most MRCs contain primarily members of a single NLR gene family but a few are more complex. MRC2 spans 73 Mb and contains 61 NLRs of six different gene families that cosegregate with nine disease resistance phenotypes. MRC3, which is 25 Mb, contains 22 RGC21 genes and colocates with Dm13. A library of 33 transgenic RNA interference tester stocks was generated for functional analysis of NLR-encoding genes that cosegregated with disease resistance phenotypes in each of the MRCs. Members of four NLR-encoding families, RGC1, RGC2, RGC21, and RGC12 were shown to be required for 16 disease resistance phenotypes in lettuce. The general composition of MRCs is conserved across different genotypes; however, the specific repertoire of NLR-encoding genes varied particularly of the rapidly evolving Type I genes. These tester stocks are valuable resources for future analyses of additional resistance phenotypes. PMID:26449254

  5. Readthrough of stop codons by use of aminoglycosides in cells from xeroderma pigmentosum group C patients.

    PubMed

    Kuschal, Christiane; Khan, Sikandar G; Enk, Benedikt; DiGiovanna, John J; Kraemer, Kenneth H

    2015-04-01

    Readthrough of premature termination (stop) codons (PTC) is a new approach to treatment of genetic diseases. We recently reported that readthrough of PTC in cells from some xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C (XP-C) patients could be achieved with the aminoglycosides geneticin or gentamicin. We found that the response depended on several factors including the PTC sequence, its location within the gene and the aminoglycoside used. Here, we extended these studies to investigate the effects of other aminoglycosides that are already on the market. We reasoned that topical treatment could deliver much higher concentrations of drug to the skin, the therapeutic target, and thus increase the therapeutic effect while reducing renal or ototoxicity in comparison with systemic treatment. Our prior clinical studies indicated that only a few percent of normal XPC expression was associated with mild clinical disease. We found minimal cell toxicity in the XP-C cells with several aminoglycosides. We found increased XPC mRNA expression in PTC-containing XP-C cells with G418, paromomycin, neomycin and kanamycin and increased XPC protein expression with G418. We conclude that in selected patients with XP, topical PTC therapy can be investigated as a method of personalized medicine to alleviate their cutaneous symptoms. PMID:25651777

  6. Horizontal gene transfer in the human gastrointestinal tract: potential spread of antibiotic resistance genes

    PubMed Central

    Huddleston, Jennifer R

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial infections are becoming increasingly difficult to treat due to widespread antibiotic resistance among pathogens. This review aims to give an overview of the major horizontal transfer mechanisms and their evolution and then demonstrate the human lower gastrointestinal tract as an environment in which horizontal gene transfer of resistance determinants occurs. Finally, implications for antibiotic usage and the development of resistant infections and persistence of antibiotic resistance genes in populations as a result of horizontal gene transfer in the large intestine will be discussed. PMID:25018641

  7. Antibiotic Susceptibility Profiles of Dairy Leuconostoc, Analysis of the Genetic Basis of Atypical Resistances and Transfer of Genes In Vitro and in a Food Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, Susana; Alegría, Ángel; Salvetti, Elisa; Felis, Giovanna E.; Mayo, Baltasar; Torriani, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    In spite of a global concern on the transfer of antibiotic resistances (AR) via the food chain, limited information exists on this issue in species of Leuconostoc and Weissella, adjunct cultures used as aroma producers in fermented foods. In this work, the minimum inhibitory concentration was determined for 16 antibiotics in 34 strains of dairy origin, belonging to Leuconostoc mesenteroides (18), Leuconostoc citreum (11), Leuconostoc lactis (2), Weissella hellenica (2), and Leuconostoc carnosum (1). Atypical resistances were found for kanamycin (17 strains), tetracycline and chloramphenicol (two strains each), and erythromycin, clindamycin, virginiamycin, ciprofloxacin, and rifampicin (one strain each). Surprisingly, L. mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides LbE16, showed resistance to four antibiotics, kanamycin, streptomycin, tetracycline and virginiamycin. PCR analysis identified tet(S) as responsible for tetracycline resistance in LbE16, but no gene was detected in a second tetracycline-resistant strain, L. mesenteroides subsp. cremoris LbT16. In Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. dextranicum LbE15, erythromycin and clindamycin resistant, an erm(B) gene was amplified. Hybridization experiments proved erm(B) and tet(S) to be associated to a plasmid of ≈35 kbp and to the chromosome of LbE15 and LbE16, respectively. The complete genome sequence of LbE15 and LbE16 was used to get further insights on the makeup and genetic organization of AR genes. Genome analysis confirmed the presence and location of erm(B) and tet(S), but genes providing tetracycline resistance in LbT16 were again not identified. In the genome of the multi-resistant strain LbE16, genes that might be involved in aminoglycoside (aadE, aphA-3, sat4) and virginiamycin [vat(E)] resistance were further found. The erm(B) gene but not tet(S) was transferred from Leuconostoc to Enterococcus faecalis both under laboratory conditions and in cheese. This study contributes to the characterization of AR in the

  8. Antibiotic Susceptibility Profiles of Dairy Leuconostoc, Analysis of the Genetic Basis of Atypical Resistances and Transfer of Genes In Vitro and in a Food Matrix.

    PubMed

    Flórez, Ana Belén; Campedelli, Ilenia; Delgado, Susana; Alegría, Ángel; Salvetti, Elisa; Felis, Giovanna E; Mayo, Baltasar; Torriani, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    In spite of a global concern on the transfer of antibiotic resistances (AR) via the food chain, limited information exists on this issue in species of Leuconostoc and Weissella, adjunct cultures used as aroma producers in fermented foods. In this work, the minimum inhibitory concentration was determined for 16 antibiotics in 34 strains of dairy origin, belonging to Leuconostoc mesenteroides (18), Leuconostoc citreum (11), Leuconostoc lactis (2), Weissella hellenica (2), and Leuconostoc carnosum (1). Atypical resistances were found for kanamycin (17 strains), tetracycline and chloramphenicol (two strains each), and erythromycin, clindamycin, virginiamycin, ciprofloxacin, and rifampicin (one strain each). Surprisingly, L. mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides LbE16, showed resistance to four antibiotics, kanamycin, streptomycin, tetracycline and virginiamycin. PCR analysis identified tet(S) as responsible for tetracycline resistance in LbE16, but no gene was detected in a second tetracycline-resistant strain, L. mesenteroides subsp. cremoris LbT16. In Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. dextranicum LbE15, erythromycin and clindamycin resistant, an erm(B) gene was amplified. Hybridization experiments proved erm(B) and tet(S) to be associated to a plasmid of ≈35 kbp and to the chromosome of LbE15 and LbE16, respectively. The complete genome sequence of LbE15 and LbE16 was used to get further insights on the makeup and genetic organization of AR genes. Genome analysis confirmed the presence and location of erm(B) and tet(S), but genes providing tetracycline resistance in LbT16 were again not identified. In the genome of the multi-resistant strain LbE16, genes that might be involved in aminoglycoside (aadE, aphA-3, sat4) and virginiamycin [vat(E)] resistance were further found. The erm(B) gene but not tet(S) was transferred from Leuconostoc to Enterococcus faecalis both under laboratory conditions and in cheese. This study contributes to the characterization of AR in the

  9. Identification of major blast resistance genes in the southern US

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance (R) genes in rice play important roles in preventing infections of rice blast fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae. In order to identify more R genes for different rice growing areas in the Southern US, an extensive field survey of the blast fungus was performed from 2012 to 2013. A total of 500 is...

  10. Hygromycin-resistance vectors for gene expression in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Yang, Junjie; Nie, Lei; Chen, Biao; Liu, Yingmiao; Kong, Yimeng; Wang, Haibin; Diao, Liuyang

    2014-04-01

    Pichia pastoris is a common host organism for heterologous protein expression and metabolic engineering. Zeocin-, G418-, nourseothricin- and blasticidin-resistance genes are the only dominant selectable markers currently available for selecting P. pastoris transformants. We describe here new P. pastoris expression vectors that confer a hygromycin resistance base on the Klebsiella pneumoniae hph gene. To demonstrate the application of the vectors for intracellular and secreted protein expression, green fluorescent protein (GFP) and human serum albumin (HSA) were cloned into the vectors and transformed into P. pastoris cells. The resulting strains expressed GFP and HSA constitutively or inducibly. The hygromycin resistance marker was also suitable for post-transformational vector amplication (PTVA) for obtaining strains with high plasmid copy numbers. A strain with multiple copies of the HSA expression cassette after PTVA had increased HSA expression compared with a strain with a single copy of the plasmid. To demonstrate compatibility of the new vectors with other vectors bearing antibiotic-resistance genes, P. pastoris was transformed with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes GSH1, GSH2 or SAM2 on plasmids containing genes for resistance to Zeocin, G418 or hygromycin. The resulting strain produced glutathione and S-adenosyl-L-methionine at levels approximately twice those of the parent strain. The new hygromycin-resistance vectors allow greater flexibility and potential applications in recombinant protein production and other research using P. pastoris. PMID:24822243

  11. Prediction of antibiotic resistance by gene expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Shingo; Horinouchi, Takaaki; Furusawa, Chikara

    2014-01-01

    Although many mutations contributing to antibiotic resistance have been identified, the relationship between the mutations and the related phenotypic changes responsible for the resistance has yet to be fully elucidated. To better characterize phenotype–genotype mapping for drug resistance, here we analyse phenotypic and genotypic changes of antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli strains obtained by laboratory evolution. We demonstrate that the resistances can be quantitatively predicted by the expression changes of a small number of genes. Several candidate mutations contributing to the resistances are identified, while phenotype–genotype mapping is suggested to be complex and includes various mutations that cause similar phenotypic changes. The integration of transcriptome and genome data enables us to extract essential phenotypic changes for drug resistances. PMID:25517437

  12. Consolidating and Exploring Antibiotic Resistance Gene Data Resources.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Basil Britto; Das, Anupam J; Cochrane, Guy; De Ganck, Sandra; Kumar-Singh, Samir; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Goossens, Herman; Malhotra-Kumar, Surbhi

    2016-04-01

    The unrestricted use of antibiotics has resulted in rapid acquisition of antibiotic resistance (AR) and spread of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial pathogens. With the advent of next-generation sequencing technologies and their application in understanding MDR pathogen dynamics, it has become imperative to unify AR gene data resources for easy accessibility for researchers. However, due to the absence of a centralized platform for AR gene resources, availability, consistency, and accuracy of information vary considerably across different databases. In this article, we explore existing AR gene data resources in order to make them more visible to the clinical microbiology community, to identify their limitations, and to propose potential solutions. PMID:26818666

  13. Aminoglycoside binding to Oxytricha Nova Telomeric DNA

    PubMed Central

    Ranjan, Nihar; Andreasen, Katrine F.; Kumar, Sunil; Hyde-volpe, David; Arya, Dev P.

    2012-01-01

    Telomeric DNA sequences have been at the center stage of drug design for cancer treatment in recent years. The ability of these DNA structures to form four stranded nucleic acid structures, called G-quadruplexes, has been perceived as target for inhibiting telomerase activity vital for the longevity of cancer cells. Being highly diverse in structural forms, these G-quadruplexes are subjects of detailed studies of ligand–DNA interactions of different classes, which will pave the way for logical design of more potent ligands in future. The binding of aminoglycosides were investigated with Oxytricha Nova quadruplex forming DNA sequence (GGGGTTTTGGGG)2. Isothermal Titration calorimetry (ITC) determined ligand to quadruplex binding ratio shows 1:1 neomycin:quadruplex binding with association constants (Ka ) ~ 105M−1 while paromomycin was found to have a two-fold weaker affinity than neomycin. The CD titration experiments with neomycin resulted in minimal changes in the CD signal. FID assays, performed to determine the minimum concentration required to displace half of the fluorescent probe bound, showed neomycin as the best of the all aminoglycosides studied for quadruplex binding. Initial NMR footprint suggests that ligand-DNA interactions occur in the wide groove of the quadruplex. Computational docking studies also indicate that aminoglycosides bind in the wide groove of the quadruplex. PMID:20886815

  14. Mechanisms of Aminoglycoside Ototoxicity and Targets of Hair Cell Protection

    PubMed Central

    Huth, M. E.; Ricci, A. J.; Cheng, A. G.

    2011-01-01

    Aminoglycosides are commonly prescribed antibiotics with deleterious side effects to the inner ear. Due to their popular application as a result of their potent antimicrobial activities, many efforts have been undertaken to prevent aminoglycoside ototoxicity. Over the years, understanding of the antimicrobial as well as ototoxic mechanisms of aminoglycosides has increased. These mechanisms are reviewed in regard to established and potential future targets of hair cell protection. PMID:22121370

  15. Cycloheximide resistance in yeast: the gene and its protein.

    PubMed Central

    Käufer, N F; Fried, H M; Schwindinger, W F; Jasin, M; Warner, J R

    1983-01-01

    Mutations in the yeast gene CYH2 can lead to resistance to cycloheximide, an inhibitor of eukaryotic protein synthesis. The gene product of CYH2 is ribosomal protein L29, a component of the 60S ribosomal subunit. We have cloned the wild-type and resistance alleles of CYH2 and determined their nucleotide sequence. Transcription of CYH2 appears to initiate and terminate at multiple sites, as judged by S1 nuclease analysis. The gene is transcribed into an RNA molecule of about 1082 nucleotides, containing an intervening sequence of 510 nucleotides. The splice junction of the intron resides within a codon near the 5' end of the gene. In confirmation of peptide analysis by Stocklein et al. (1) we find that resistance to cycloheximide is due to a transversion mutation resulting in the replacement of a glutamine by glutamic acid in position 37 of L29. Images PMID:6304624

  16. Deinococcus geothermalis: The Pool of Extreme Radiation Resistance Genes Shrinks

    PubMed Central

    Makarova, Kira S.; Omelchenko, Marina V.; Gaidamakova, Elena K.; Matrosova, Vera Y.; Vasilenko, Alexander; Zhai, Min; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Kim, Edwin; Land, Miriam; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Pitluck, Samuel; Richardson, Paul M.; Detter, Chris; Brettin, Thomas; Saunders, Elizabeth; Lai, Barry; Ravel, Bruce; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Wolf, Yuri I.; Sorokin, Alexander; Gerasimova, Anna V.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Fredrickson, James K.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Daly, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Deinococcus are extremely resistant to ionizing radiation (IR), ultraviolet light (UV) and desiccation. The mesophile Deinococcus radiodurans was the first member of this group whose genome was completely sequenced. Analysis of the genome sequence of D. radiodurans, however, failed to identify unique DNA repair systems. To further delineate the genes underlying the resistance phenotypes, we report the whole-genome sequence of a second Deinococcus species, the thermophile Deinococcus geothermalis, which at its optimal growth temperature is as resistant to IR, UV and desiccation as D. radiodurans, and a comparative analysis of the two Deinococcus genomes. Many D. radiodurans genes previously implicated in resistance, but for which no sensitive phenotype was observed upon disruption, are absent in D. geothermalis. In contrast, most D. radiodurans genes whose mutants displayed a radiation-sensitive phenotype in D. radiodurans are conserved in D. geothermalis. Supporting the existence of a Deinococcus radiation response regulon, a common palindromic DNA motif was identified in a conserved set of genes associated with resistance, and a dedicated transcriptional regulator was predicted. We present the case that these two species evolved essentially the same diverse set of gene families, and that the extreme stress-resistance phenotypes of the Deinococcus lineage emerged progressively by amassing cell-cleaning systems from different sources, but not by acquisition of novel DNA repair systems. Our reconstruction of the genomic evolution of the Deinococcus-Thermus phylum indicates that the corresponding set of enzymes proliferated mainly in the common ancestor of Deinococcus. Results of the comparative analysis weaken the arguments for a role of higher-order chromosome alignment structures in resistance; more clearly define and substantially revise downward the number of uncharacterized genes that might participate in DNA repair and contribute to

  17. Deinococcus geothermalis: The Pool of Extreme Radiation Resistance Genes Shrinks

    SciTech Connect

    Makarova, Kira S.; Omelchenko, Marina; Gaidamakova, Elena; Matrosova, Vera; Vasilenko, Alexander; Zhai, Min; Lapidus, Alla L.; Copeland, A; Kim, Edwin; Land, Miriam L; Mavromatis, K; Pitluck, Samual; Richardson, P M; Detter, J. Chris; Brettin, Tom; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Lai, Barry; Ravel, Bruce; Kemner, Kenneth M; Wolf, Yuri; Sorokin, Alexei; Gerasimova, Anna; Gelfand, Mikhail; Fredrickson, James K; Koonin, Eugene; Daly, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Deinococcus are extremely resistant to ionizing radiation (IR), ultraviolet light (UV) and desiccation. The mesophile Deinococcus radiodurans was the first member of this group whose genome was completely sequenced. Analysis of the genome sequence of D. radiodurans, however, failed to identify unique DNA repair systems. To further delineate the genes underlying the resistance phenotypes, we report the whole-genome sequence of a second Deinococcus species, the thermophile Deinococcus geothermalis, which at its optimal growth temperature is as resistant to IR, UV and desiccation as D. radiodurans, and a comparative analysis of the two Deinococcus genomes. Many D. radiodurans genes previously implicated in resistance, but for which no sensitive phenotype was observed upon disruption, are absent in D. geothermalis. In contrast, most D. radiodurans genes whose mutants displayed a radiation-sensitive phenotype in D. radiodurans are conserved in D. geothermalis. Supporting the existence of a Deinococcus radiation response regulon, a common palindromic DNA motif was identified in a conserved set of genes associated with resistance, and a dedicated transcriptional regulator was predicted. We present the case that these two species evolved essentially the same diverse set of gene families, and that the extreme stress-resistance phenotypes of the Deinococcus lineage emerged progressively by amassing cell-cleaning systems from different sources, but not by acquisition of novel DNA repair systems. Our reconstruction of the genomic evolution of the Deinococcus-Thermus phylum indicates that the corresponding set of enzymes proliferated mainly in the common ancestor of Deinococcus. Results of the comparative analysis weaken the arguments for a role of higher-order chromosome alignment structures in resistance; more clearly define and substantially revise downward the number of uncharacterized genes that might participate in DNA repair and contribute to

  18. Deinococcus geothermalis: The Pool of Extreme Radiation Resistance Genes Shrinks

    SciTech Connect

    Makarova, Kira S.; Omelchenko, Marina V.; Gaidamakova, Elena K.; Matrosova, Vera Y.; Vasilenko, Alexander; Zhai, Min; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Kim, Edwin; Land, Miriam; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Pitluck, Samuel; Richardson, Paul M.; Detter, Chris; Brettin, Thomas; Saunders, Elizabeth; Lai, Barry; Ravel, Bruce; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Wolf, Yuri I.; Sorokin, Alexander; Gerasimova, Anna V.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Fredrickson, James K.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Daly, Michael J.

    2007-07-24

    Bacteria of the genus Deinococcus are extremely resistant to ionizing radiation (IR), ultraviolet light (UV) and desiccation. The mesophile Deinococcus radiodurans was the first member of this group whose genome was completely sequenced. Analysis of the genome sequence of D. radiodurans, however, failed to identify unique DNA repair systems. To further delineate the genes underlying the resistance phenotypes, we report the whole-genome sequence of a second Deinococcus species, the thermophile Deinococcus geothermalis, which at itsoptimal growth temperature is as resistant to IR, UV and desiccation as D. radiodurans, and a comparative analysis of the two Deinococcus genomes. Many D. radiodurans genes previously implicated in resistance, but for which no sensitive phenotype was observed upon disruption, are absent in D. geothermalis. In contrast, most D. radiodurans genes whose mutants displayed a radiation-sensitive phenotype in D. radiodurans are conserved in D. geothermalis. Supporting the existence of a Deinococcus radiation response regulon, a common palindromic DNA motif was identified in a conserved set of genes associated with resistance, and a dedicated transcriptional regulator was predicted. We present the case that these two species evolved essentially the same diverse set of gene families, and that the extreme stress-resistance phenotypes of the Deinococcus lineage emerged progressively by amassing cell-cleaning systems from different sources, but not by acquisition of novel DNA repair systems. Our reconstruction of the genomic evolution of the Deinococcus-Thermus phylum indicates that the corresponding set of enzymes proliferated mainly in the common ancestor of Deinococcus. Results of the comparative analysis weaken the arguments for a role of higher-order chromosome alignment structures in resistance; more clearly define and substantially revise downward the number of uncharacterized genes that might participate in DNA repair and contribute to

  19. Ornamental fish as a source of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes and antibiotic resistance plasmids.

    PubMed

    Dobiasova, Hana; Kutilova, Iva; Piackova, Veronika; Vesely, Tomas; Cizek, Alois; Dolejska, Monika

    2014-07-16

    Growing ornamental fish industry is associated with public health concerns including extensive antibiotic use accompanied by increasing antibiotic resistance. The aim of this study was to analyze Aeromonas isolates from imported tropical ornamental fish and coldwater koi carps bred in the Czech Republic to assess the potential risk of ornamental fish as a source of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes (PMQR) and antibiotic resistance plasmids. A collection of Aeromonas spp. with reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin (MIC ≥ 0.05 mg/L) was selected for the detection of PMQR genes. Isolates harbouring PMQR genes were further analyzed for the additional antibiotic resistance, integron content, clonality, biofilm production and transferability of PMQR genes by conjugation and transformation. Comparative analysis of plasmids carrying PMQR genes was performed. Fifteen (19%, n=80) isolates from koi carps and 18 (24%, n=76) isolates from imported ornamental fish were positive for qnrS2, aac(6')-Ib-cr or qnrB17 genes. PMQR-positive isolates from imported ornamental fish showed higher MIC levels to quinolones, multiresistance and diverse content of antibiotic resistance genes and integrons compared to the isolates from the carps. Related IncU plasmids harbouring qnrS2 and aac(6')-Ib-cr genes were found in Aeromonas spp. from imported ornamental fish and koi carps from various geographical areas. Ornamental fish may represent a potential source of multiresistant bacteria and mobile genetic elements for the environment and for humans. PMID:24629900

  20. Differential Gene Expression in Benznidazole-Resistant Trypanosoma cruzi Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal, Diana; Nirdé, Philippe; Hide, Mallorie; Barnabé, Christian; Tibayrenc, Michel

    2005-01-01

    We analyzed the differential gene expression among representative Trypanosoma cruzi stocks in relation to benznidazole exposures using a random differentially expressed sequences (RADES) technique. Studies were carried out with drug pressure both at the natural susceptibility level of the wild-type parasite (50% inhibitory concentration for the wild type) and at different resistance levels. The pattern of differential gene expression performed with resistant stocks was compared to the population structure of this parasite, established by random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis and multilocus enzyme electrophoresis. A RADES band polymorphism was observed, and over- or underexpression was linked to the resistance level of the stock. The analysis of RADES bands suggested that different products may be involved in benznidazole resistance mechanisms. No significant association was found between phylogenetic clustering and benznidazole susceptibility. Benznidazole resistance may involve several mechanisms, depending on the level of drug exposure. PMID:15980339

  1. Tn5393d, a complex Tn5393 derivative carrying the PER-1 extended-spectrum beta-lactamase gene and other resistance determinants.

    PubMed

    Mantengoli, Elisabetta; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2005-08-01

    In Alcaligenes faecalis FL-424/98, a clinical isolate that produces the PER-1 extended-spectrum beta-lactamase, the bla(PER-1) gene was found to be carried on a 44-kb nonconjugative plasmid, named pFL424, that was transferred to Escherichia coli by electroporation. Investigation of the genetic context of the bla(PER-1) gene in pFL424 by means of a combined cloning and PCR mapping approach revealed that the gene is associated with a transposonlike element of the Tn3 family. This 14-kb element is a Tn5393 derivative of original structure, named Tn5393d, which contains the transposition module and the strAB genes typical of other members of the Tn5393 lineage plus additional resistance determinants, including the bla(PER-1) gene and a new allelic variant of the aphA6 aminoglycoside phosphotransferase gene, named aphA6b, whose product is active against kanamycin, streptomycin, and amikacin. Tn5393d apparently originated from the consecutive insertion of two composite transposons into a Tn5393 backbone carrying the aphA6b and the bla(PER-1) genes, respectively. The putative composite transposon carrying bla(PER-1), named Tn4176, is made of two original and nonidentical insertion sequences of the IS4 family, named IS1387a and IS1387b, of which one is interrupted by the insertion of an original insertion sequence of the IS30 family, named IS1066. In pFL424, Tn5393d is inserted into a Tn501-like mercury resistance transposon. Transposition of Tn5393d or modules thereof containing the bla(PER-1) gene from pFL424 to small multicopy plasmids or to a bacterial artificial chromosome was not detected in an E. coli host harboring both replicons. PMID:16048938

  2. In Vitro Emergence of High Persistence upon Periodic Aminoglycoside Challenge in the ESKAPE Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Michiels, Joran Elie; Van den Bergh, Bram; Verstraeten, Natalie; Fauvart, Maarten; Michiels, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Health care-associated infections present a major threat to modern medical care. Six worrisome nosocomial pathogens-Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter spp.-are collectively referred to as the "ESKAPE bugs." They are notorious for extensive multidrug resistance, yet persistence, or the phenotypic tolerance displayed by a variant subpopulation, remains underappreciated in these pathogens. Importantly, persistence can prevent eradication of antibiotic-sensitive bacterial populations and is thought to act as a catalyst for the development of genetic resistance. Concentration- and time-dependent aminoglycoside killing experiments were used to investigate persistence in the ESKAPE pathogens. Additionally, a recently developed method for the experimental evolution of persistence was employed to investigate adaptation to high-dose, extended-interval aminoglycoside therapy in vitro We show that ESKAPE pathogens exhibit biphasic killing kinetics, indicative of persister formation. In vitro cycling between aminoglycoside killing and persister cell regrowth, evocative of clinical high-dose extended-interval therapy, caused a 37- to 213-fold increase in persistence without the emergence of resistance. Increased persistence also manifested in biofilms and provided cross-tolerance to different clinically important antibiotics. Together, our results highlight a possible drawback of intermittent, high-dose antibiotic therapy and suggest that clinical diagnostics might benefit from taking into account persistence. PMID:27185802

  3. Mining metagenomic datasets for antibiotic resistance genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibiotics are medicines that are used to kill, slow down, or prevent the growth of susceptible bacteria. They became widely used in the mid 20th century for controlling disease in humans, animals, and plants, and for a variety of industrial purposes. Antibiotic resistance is a broad term. There ...

  4. Genetic analysis of resistance gene analogues from a sugarcane cultivar resistant to red rot disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the important approaches for disease control in sugarcane is to develop a disease resistant variety; this may be accomplished through identification of resistance genes in sugarcane. In this study, PCR primers targeting the conserved motifs of the nucleotide-binding site (NBS) class and kinas...

  5. Phenotypic characterization of potato late blight resistance mediated by the broad-spectrum resistance gene RB

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato late blight, caused by oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary, is one of the most destructive plant diseases worldwide. One of the best ways to control this disease is through genetically determined resistance. A isolate-nonspecific resistance gene RB, cloned from the wild p...

  6. Soil metatranscriptomics for mining eukaryotic heavy metal resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Lehembre, Frédéric; Doillon, Didier; David, Elise; Perrotto, Sandrine; Baude, Jessica; Foulon, Julie; Harfouche, Lamia; Vallon, Laurent; Poulain, Julie; Da Silva, Corinne; Wincker, Patrick; Oger-Desfeux, Christine; Richaud, Pierre; Colpaert, Jan V; Chalot, Michel; Fraissinet-Tachet, Laurence; Blaudez, Damien; Marmeisse, Roland

    2013-10-01

    Heavy metals are pollutants which affect all organisms. Since a small number of eukaryotes have been investigated with respect to metal resistance, we hypothesize that many genes that control this phenomenon remain to be identified. This was tested by screening soil eukaryotic metatranscriptomes which encompass RNA from organisms belonging to the main eukaryotic phyla. Soil-extracted polyadenylated mRNAs were converted into cDNAs and 35 of them were selected for their ability to rescue the metal (Cd or Zn) sensitive phenotype of yeast mutants. Few of the genes belonged to families known to confer metal resistance when overexpressed in yeast. Several of them were homologous to genes that had not been studied in the context of metal resistance. For instance, the BOLA ones, which conferred cross metal (Zn, Co, Cd, Mn) resistance may act by interfering with Fe homeostasis. Other genes, such as those encoding 110- to 130-amino-acid-long, cysteine-rich polypeptides, had no homologues in databases. This study confirms that functional metatranscriptomics represents a powerful approach to address basic biological processes in eukaryotes. The selected genes can be used to probe new pathways involved in metal homeostasis and to manipulate the resistance level of selected organisms. PMID:23663419

  7. [Investigation of Antibiotic Resistance Genes (ARGs) in Landfill].

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Xu, Jing; Zhao, You-cai; Song, Li-yan

    2015-05-01

    Antibiotic resistant genes (ARGs), an emerging contaminant, have been detected worldwide in various environments such as sediments and river. However, little is known about ARGs distribution in landfill. In this study, we investigated five ARGs [sulfonamides resistant genes (sulI and sulII), chloramphenicols resistant gene (cat), β-lactams resistant gene (bla-SHV), and tetracyclines resistant gene (tetW)] in refuse samples collected from jiangeungou landfill (Xi'an, China) by real-time PCR. We then correlated the ARGs and physiochemical properties of refuse to examine the link between them. Results showed that all tested ARGs have been detected in all samples, suggesting that landfill served as ARGs reservoir. The highest copies numbers of sulII, sulI, tetW, bla-SHV, and cat were (3.70 ± 0.06) x 10(8) copies · g(-1) ( dry refuse), (9.33 · 0.06) x 10(6) copies · g(-1) (dry refuse), (2.27 0.08) x 10(5) copies · g(-1) (dry refuse), (3.68 ± 0.09) x 10(4) copies · g(-1) (dry refuse), and (1.39 ± 0.10) x 10(4) copies · g(-1) (dry refuse), respectively. Further, sulI, sulII, and cat positively correlated to moisture and sulI and cat negatively correlated to pH. PMID:26314129

  8. Low Prevalence of Carbapenem-Resistant Bacteria in River Water: Resistance Is Mostly Related to Intrinsic Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tacão, Marta; Correia, António; Henriques, Isabel S

    2015-10-01

    Carbapenems are last-resort antibiotics to handle serious infections caused by multiresistant bacteria. The incidence of resistance to these antibiotics has been increasing and new resistance mechanisms have emerged. The dissemination of carbapenem resistance in the environment has been overlooked. The main goal of this research was to assess the prevalence and diversity of carbapenem-resistant bacteria in riverine ecosystems. The presence of frequently reported carbapenemase-encoding genes was inspected. The proportion of imipenem-resistant bacteria was on average 2.24 CFU/ml. Imipenem-resistant strains (n=110) were identified as Pseudomonas spp., Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Aeromonas spp., Chromobacterium haemolyticum, Shewanella xiamenensis, and members of Enterobacteriaceae. Carbapenem-resistant bacteria were highly resistant to other beta-lactams such as quinolones, aminoglycosides, chloramphenicol, tetracyclines, and sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim. Carbapenem resistance was mostly associated with intrinsically resistant bacteria. As intrinsic resistance mechanisms, we have identified the blaCphA gene in 77.3% of Aeromonas spp., blaL1 in all S. maltophilia, and blaOXA-48-like in all S. xiamenensis. As acquired resistance mechanisms, we have detected the blaVIM-2 gene in six Pseudomonas spp. (5.45%). Integrons with gene cassettes encoding resistance to aminoglycosides (aacA and aacC genes), trimethoprim (dfrB1b), and carbapenems (blaVIM-2) were found in Pseudomonas spp. Results suggest that carbapenem resistance dissemination in riverine ecosystems is still at an early stage. Nevertheless, monitoring these aquatic compartments for the presence of resistance genes and its host organisms is essential to outline strategies to minimize resistance dissemination. PMID:26430939

  9. Genomes, diversity and resistance gene analogues in Musa species.

    PubMed

    Azhar, M; Heslop-Harrison, J S

    2008-01-01

    Resistance genes (R genes) in plants are abundant and may represent more than 1% of all the genes. Their diversity is critical to the recognition and response to attack from diverse pathogens. Like many other crops, banana and plantain face attacks from potentially devastating fungal and bacterial diseases, increased by a combination of worldwide spread of pathogens, exploitation of a small number of varieties, new pathogen mutations, and the lack of effective, benign and cheap chemical control. The challenge for plant breeders is to identify and exploit genetic resistances to diseases, which is particularly difficult in banana and plantain where the valuable cultivars are sterile, parthenocarpic and mostly triploid so conventional genetic analysis and breeding is impossible. In this paper, we review the nature of R genes and the key motifs, particularly in the Nucleotide Binding Sites (NBS), Leucine Rich Repeat (LRR) gene class. We present data about identity, nature and evolutionary diversity of the NBS domains of Musa R genes in diploid wild species with the Musa acuminata (A), M. balbisiana (B), M. schizocarpa (S), M. textilis (T), M. velutina and M. ornata genomes, and from various cultivated hybrid and triploid accessions, using PCR primers to isolate the domains from genomic DNA. Of 135 new sequences, 75% of the sequenced clones had uninterrupted open reading frames (ORFs), and phylogenetic UPGMA tree construction showed four clusters, one from Musa ornata, one largely from the B and T genomes, one from A and M. velutina, and the largest with A, B, T and S genomes. Only genes of the coiled-coil (non-TIR) class were found, typical of the grasses and presumably monocotyledons. The analysis of R genes in cultivated banana and plantain, and their wild relatives, has implications for identification and selection of resistance genes within the genus which may be useful for plant selection and breeding and also for defining relationships and genome evolution

  10. Modes and Modulations of Antibiotic Resistance Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Depardieu, Florence; Podglajen, Isabelle; Leclercq, Roland; Collatz, Ekkehard; Courvalin, Patrice

    2007-01-01

    Since antibiotic resistance usually affords a gain of function, there is an associated biological cost resulting in a loss of fitness of the bacterial host. Considering that antibiotic resistance is most often only transiently advantageous to bacteria, an efficient and elegant way for them to escape the lethal action of drugs is the alteration of resistance gene expression. It appears that expression of bacterial resistance to antibiotics is frequently regulated, which indicates that modulation of gene expression probably reflects a good compromise between energy saving and adjustment to a rapidly evolving environment. Modulation of gene expression can occur at the transcriptional or translational level following mutations or the movement of mobile genetic elements and may involve induction by the antibiotic. In the latter case, the antibiotic can have a triple activity: as an antibacterial agent, as an inducer of resistance to itself, and as an inducer of the dissemination of resistance determinants. We will review certain mechanisms, all reversible, that bacteria have elaborated to achieve antibiotic resistance by the fine-tuning of the expression of genetic information. PMID:17223624

  11. Diversity of plasmids and antimicrobial resistance genes in multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from healthy companion animals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The presence and transfer of antimicrobial resistance genes from commensal bacteria in companion animals to more pathogenic bacteria may contribute to dissemination of antimicrobial resistance. The purpose of this study was to determine antimicrobial resistance gene content and the presence of gene...

  12. Are transporter genes other than the chloroquine resistance locus (pfcrt) and multidrug resistance gene (pfmdr) associated with antimalarial drug resistance?

    PubMed

    Anderson, Timothy J C; Nair, Shalini; Qin, Huang; Singlam, Sittaporn; Brockman, Alan; Paiphun, Lucy; Nosten, François

    2005-06-01

    Mu et al. (Mu, J., M. T. Ferdig, X. Feng, D. A. Joy, J. Duan, T. Furuya, G. Subramanian, L. Aravind, R. A. Cooper, J. C. Wootton, M. Xiong, and X. Z. Su, Mol. Microbiol. 49:977-989, 2003) recently reported exciting associations between nine new candidate transporter genes and in vitro resistance to chloroquine (CQ) and quinine (QN), with six of these loci showing association with CQ or QN in a southeast Asian population sample. We replicated and extended this work by examining polymorphisms in these genes and in vitro resistance to eight drugs in parasites collected from the Thailand-Burma border. To minimize problems of multiple testing, we used a two-phase study design, while to minimize problems caused by population structure, we analyzed parasite isolates collected from a single clinic. We first examined associations between genotype and drug response in 108 unique single-clone parasite isolates. We found strong associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms in pfmdr and mefloquine (MFQ), artesunate (AS), and lumefantrine (LUM) response. We also observed associations between an ABC transporter (G7) and response to QN and AS and between another ABC transporter (G49) and response to dihydro-artemisinin (DHA). We reexamined significant associations in an independent sample of 199 unique single-clone infections from the same location. The significant associations with pfmdr-1042 detected in the first survey remained. However, with the exception of the G7-artesunate association, all other associations observed with the nine new candidate transporters disappeared. We also examined linkage disequilibrium (LD) between markers and phenotypic correlations between drug responses. We found minimal LD between genes. Furthermore, we found no correlation between chloroquine and quinine responses, although we did find expected strong correlations between MFQ, QN, AS, DHA, and LUM. To conclude, we found no evidence for an association between 8/9 candidate genes and

  13. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of an aminoglycoside kinase from Legionella pneumophila

    SciTech Connect

    Lemke, Christopher T.; Hwang, Jiyoung; Xiong, Bing; Cianciotto, Nicholas P.; Berghuis, Albert M.

    2005-06-01

    Two crystal forms of the antibiotic resistance enzyme APH(9)-Ia from L. pneumophila are reported. 9-Aminoglycoside phosphotransferase type Ia [APH(9)-Ia] is a resistance factor in Legionella pneuemophila, the causative agent of legionnaires’ disease. It is responsible for providing intrinsic resistance to the antibiotic spectinomycin. APH(9)-Ia phosphorylates one of the hydroxyl moieties of spectinomycin in an ATP-dependent manner, abolishing the antibiotic properties of this drug. Here, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of this enzyme in two crystal forms is reported. One of the these crystal forms provides diffraction data to a resolution of 1.7 Å.

  14. Gene-to-gene interaction between sodium channel-related genes in determining the risk of antiepileptic drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sin-Young; Kim, Myeong-Kyu; Lee, Kee-Ra; Park, Man-Seok; Kim, Byeong-Chae; Cho, Ki-Hyun; Lee, Min-Cheol; Kim, Yo-Sik

    2009-02-01

    The pathogenesis of antiepileptic drug (AED) resistance is multifactorial. However, most candidate gene association studies typically assess the effects of candidate genes independently of each other, which is partly because of the limitations of the parametric-statistical methods for detecting the gene-to-gene interactions. A total of 200 patients with drug-resistant epilepsy and 200 patients with drug-responsive epilepsy were genotyped for 3 representative the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the voltage-gated sodium channel genes (SCN1A, SCN1B, and SCN2A) by polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing analysis. Besides the typical parametric statistical method, a new statistical method (multifactor dimensionality reduction [MDR]) was used to determine whether gene-to-gene interactions increase the risk of AED resistance. None of the individual genotypes or alleles tested in the present study showed a significant association with AED resistance, regardless of their theoretical functional value. With the MDR method, of three possible 2-locus genotype combinations, the combination of SCN2A-PM with SCN1B-PM was the best model for predicting susceptibility to AED resistance, with a p value of 0.0547. MDR, as an analysis paradigm for investigating multi-locus effects in complex disorders, may be a useful statistical method for determining the role of gene-to-gene interactions in the pathogenesis of AED resistance. PMID:19270815

  15. Microarray analysis of R-gene-mediated resistance to viruses.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Takeaki; Sato, Yukiyo; Takahashi, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    The complex process for host-plant resistance to viruses is precisely regulated by a number of genes and signaling compounds. Thus, global gene expression analysis can provide a powerful tool to grasp the complex molecular network for resistance to viruses. The procedures for comparative global gene expression profiling of virus-resistant and control plants by microarray analysis include RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis, cRNA labeling, hybridization, array scanning, and data mining steps. There are several platforms for the microarray analysis. Commercial services for the steps from cDNA synthesis to array scanning are now widely available; however, the data manipulation step is highly dependent on the experimental design and research focus. The protocols presented here are optimized for analyzing global gene expression during the R gene-conferred defense response using commercial oligonucleotide-based arrays. We also demonstrate a technique to screen for differentially expressed genes using Excel software and a simple Internet tool-based data mining approach for characterizing the identified genes. PMID:25287505

  16. High chlorpyrifos resistance in Culex pipiens mosquitoes: strong synergy between resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Alout, H; Labbé, P; Berthomieu, A; Makoundou, P; Fort, P; Pasteur, N; Weill, M

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the genetic determinism of high chlorpyrifos resistance (HCR), a phenotype first described in 1999 in Culex pipiens mosquitoes surviving chlorpyrifos doses ⩾1 mg l(-1) and more recently found in field samples from Tunisia, Israel or Indian Ocean islands. Through chlorpyrifos selection, we selected several HCR strains that displayed over 10 000-fold resistance. All strains were homozygous for resistant alleles at two main loci: the ace-1 gene, with the resistant ace-1(R) allele expressing the insensitive G119S acetylcholinesterase, and a resistant allele of an unknown gene (named T) linked to the sex and ace-2 genes. We constructed a strain carrying only the T-resistant allele and studied its resistance characteristics. By crossing this strain with strains harboring different alleles at the ace-1 locus, we showed that the resistant ace-1(R) and the T alleles act in strong synergy, as they elicited a resistance 100 times higher than expected from a simple multiplicative effect. This effect was specific to chlorpyrifos and parathion and was not affected by synergists. We also examined how HCR was expressed in strains carrying other ace-1-resistant alleles, such as ace-1(V) or the duplicated ace-1(D) allele, currently spreading worldwide. We identified two major parameters that influenced the level of resistance: the number and the nature of the ace-1-resistant alleles and the number of T alleles. Our data fit a model that predicts that the T allele acts by decreasing chlorpyrifos concentration in the compartment targeted in insects. PMID:26463842

  17. Horizontal gene transfer of stress resistance genes through plasmid transport.

    PubMed

    Shoeb, Erum; Badar, Uzma; Akhter, Jameela; Shams, Hina; Sultana, Maria; Ansari, Maqsood A

    2012-03-01

    The horizontal gene transfer of plasmid-determined stress tolerance was achieved under lab conditions. Bacterial isolates, Enterobacter cloacae (DGE50) and Escherichia coli (DGE57) were used throughout the study. Samples were collected from contaminated marine water and soil to isolate bacterial strains having tolerance against heavy metals and antimicrobial agents. We have demonstrated plasmid transfer, from Amp(+)Cu(+)Zn(-) strain (DGE50) to Amp(-)Cu(-)Zn(+) strain (DGE57), producing Amp(+)Cu(+)Zn(+) transconjugants (DGE(TC50→57)) and Amp(+)Cu(-)Zn(+) transformants (DGE(TF50→57)). DGE57 did not carry any plasmid, therefore, it can be speculated that zinc tolerance gene in DGE57 is located on chromosome. DGE50 was found to carry three plasmids, out of which two were transferred through conjugation into DGE57, and only one was transferred through transformation. Plasmid transferred through transformation was one out of the two transferred through conjugation. Through the results of transformation it was revealed that the genes of copper and ampicillin tolerance in DGE50 were located on separate plasmids, since only ampicillin tolerance genes were transferred through transformation as a result of one plasmid transfer. By showing transfer of plasmids under lab conditions and monitoring retention of respective phenotype via conjugation and transformation, it is very well demonstrated how multiple stress tolerant strains are generated in nature. PMID:22805823

  18. New MLSB Resistance Gene erm(43) in Staphylococcus lentus

    PubMed Central

    Schwendener, Sybille

    2012-01-01

    The search for a specific rRNA methylase motif led to the identification of the new macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B resistance gene erm(43) in Staphylococcus lentus. An inducible resistance phenotype was demonstrated by cloning and expressing erm(43) and its regulatory region in Staphylococcus aureus. The erm(43) gene was detected in two different DNA fragments, of 6,230 bp and 1,559 bp, that were each integrated at the same location in the chromosome in several S. lentus isolates of human, dog, and chicken origin. PMID:22733067

  19. Changes of resistome, mobilome and potential hosts of antibiotic resistance genes during the transformation of anaerobic digestion from mesophilic to thermophilic.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhe; Zhang, Yu; Yu, Bo; Yang, Min

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to reveal how antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and their horizontal and vertical transfer-related items (mobilome and bacterial hosts) respond to the transformation of anaerobic digestion (AD) from mesophilic to thermophilic using one-step temperature increase. The resistomes and mobilomes of mesophilic and thermophilic sludge were investigated using metagenome sequencing, and the changes in 24 representative ARGs belonging to three categories, class 1 integron and bacterial genera during the transition period were further followed using quantitative PCR and 454-pyrosequencing. After the temperature increase, resistome abundance in the digested sludge decreased from 125.97 ppm (day 0, mesophilic) to 50.65 ppm (day 57, thermophilic) with the reduction of most ARG types except for the aminoglycoside resistance genes. Thermophilic sludge also had a smaller mobilome, including plasmids, insertion sequences and integrons, than that of mesophilic sludge, suggesting the lower horizontal transfer potential of ARGs under thermophilic conditions. On the other hand, the total abundance of 18 bacterial genera, which were suggested as the possible hosts for 13 ARGs through network analysis, decreased from 23.27% in mesophilic sludge to 11.92% in thermophilic sludge, indicating fewer hosts for the vertical expansion of ARGs after the increase in temperature. These results indicate that the better reduction of resistome abundance by thermophilic AD might be associated with the decrease of both the horizontal and vertical transferability of ARGs. PMID:27108212

  20. Dissemination of metal resistance genes among animal methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative Staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Argudín, M Angeles; Butaye, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    The use of metals as feed supplement has been recognized as a potential driver for co-selection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in pigs. However, the prevalence of these determinants in methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (MRCoNS) is largely unknown. In this study, a collection of 130 MRCoNS from pigs and veal calves were investigated for the presence of metal-resistance genes (czrC, copB, cadD, arsA) associated to SCCmec. Near half of the isolates carried metal resistance genes (czrC 5.4%, copB 38.5%, cadD 7.7%, arsA 26.2%) regardless of their SCCmec type. The increased use of metals in livestock animals, especially zinc in pigs in several European countries may co-select for methicillin-resistance in several staphylococcal species. PMID:27033931

  1. Molecular Responses of the Spiral Ganglion to Aminoglycosides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balaban, Carey D.

    2005-01-01

    Aminoglycosides are toxic to both the inner ear hair cells and the ganglion cells that give rise to the eighth cranial nerve. According to recent studies, these cells have a repertoire of molecular responses to aminoglycoside exposure that engages multiple neuroprotective mechanisms. The responses appear to involve regulation of ionic homeostasis,…

  2. Mechanisms of Aminoglycoside-Induced Hair Cell Death

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangiardi, Dominic A.; Cotanche, Douglas A.

    2005-01-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics are commonly used because of their ability to treat bacterial infections, yet they also are a major cause of deafness. Aminoglycosides selectively damage the cochlea's sensory hair cells, the receptors that respond to the fluid movement in the cochlea to produce neural signals that are relayed to the brain. Sensory hair…

  3. DNA in Antibiotic Preparations: Absence of Intact Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Woegerbauer, Markus; Lagler, Heimo; Graninger, Wolfgang; Burgmann, Heinz

    2005-01-01

    Fragments of erm(E2), otrA, and aph(6) shorter than 400 bp and producer strain-specific rRNA genes were amplified from various antibiotics. The amount of genetic material and the sizes of amplicons recovered from murine feces after oral administration of a β-lactamase-encoding plasmid indicated substantial DNA degradation in the mammalian gastrointestinal tract. These observations imply that antibiotics are no major source for horizontal resistance gene transfer in clinical settings. PMID:15917552

  4. Spread of tetracycline resistance genes at a conventional dairy farm

    PubMed Central

    Kyselková, Martina; Jirout, Jiří; Vrchotová, Naděžda; Schmitt, Heike; Elhottová, Dana

    2015-01-01

    The use of antibiotics in animal husbandry contributes to the worldwide problem of increasing antibiotic resistance in animal and human pathogens. Intensive animal production is considered an important source of antibiotic resistance genes released to the environment, while the contribution of smaller farms remains to be evaluated. Here we monitor the spread of tetracycline resistance (TC-r) genes at a middle-size conventional dairy farm, where chlortetracycline (CTC, as intrauterine suppository) is prophylactically used after each calving. Our study has shown that animals at the farm acquired the TC-r genes in their early age (1–2 weeks), likely due to colonization with TC-resistant bacteria from their mothers and/or the farm environment. The relative abundance of the TC-r genes tet(W), tet(Q), and tet(M) in fresh excrements of calves was about 1–2 orders of magnitude higher compared to heifers and dairy cows, possibly due to the presence of antibiotic residues in milk fed to calves. The occurrence and abundance of TC-r genes in fresh excrements of heifers and adult cows remained unaffected by intrauterine CTC applications, with tet(O), tet(Q), and tet(W) representing a “core TC-resistome” of the farm, and tet(A), tet(M), tet(Y), and tet(X) occurring occasionally. The genes tet(A), tet(M), tet(Y), and tet(X) were shown to be respectively harbored by Shigella, Lactobacillus and Clostridium, Acinetobacter, and Wautersiella. Soil in the farm proximity, as well as field soil to which manure from the farm was applied, was contaminated with TC-r genes occurring in the farm, and some of the TC-r genes persisted in the field over 3 months following the manure application. Concluding, our study shows that antibiotic resistance genes may be a stable part of the intestinal metagenome of cattle even if antibiotics are not used for growth stimulation, and that smaller dairy farms may also contribute to environmental pollution with antibiotic resistance genes. PMID

  5. Spread of tetracycline resistance genes at a conventional dairy farm.

    PubMed

    Kyselková, Martina; Jirout, Jiří; Vrchotová, Naděžda; Schmitt, Heike; Elhottová, Dana

    2015-01-01

    The use of antibiotics in animal husbandry contributes to the worldwide problem of increasing antibiotic resistance in animal and human pathogens. Intensive animal production is considered an important source of antibiotic resistance genes released to the environment, while the contribution of smaller farms remains to be evaluated. Here we monitor the spread of tetracycline resistance (TC-r) genes at a middle-size conventional dairy farm, where chlortetracycline (CTC, as intrauterine suppository) is prophylactically used after each calving. Our study has shown that animals at the farm acquired the TC-r genes in their early age (1-2 weeks), likely due to colonization with TC-resistant bacteria from their mothers and/or the farm environment. The relative abundance of the TC-r genes tet(W), tet(Q), and tet(M) in fresh excrements of calves was about 1-2 orders of magnitude higher compared to heifers and dairy cows, possibly due to the presence of antibiotic residues in milk fed to calves. The occurrence and abundance of TC-r genes in fresh excrements of heifers and adult cows remained unaffected by intrauterine CTC applications, with tet(O), tet(Q), and tet(W) representing a "core TC-resistome" of the farm, and tet(A), tet(M), tet(Y), and tet(X) occurring occasionally. The genes tet(A), tet(M), tet(Y), and tet(X) were shown to be respectively harbored by Shigella, Lactobacillus and Clostridium, Acinetobacter, and Wautersiella. Soil in the farm proximity, as well as field soil to which manure from the farm was applied, was contaminated with TC-r genes occurring in the farm, and some of the TC-r genes persisted in the field over 3 months following the manure application. Concluding, our study shows that antibiotic resistance genes may be a stable part of the intestinal metagenome of cattle even if antibiotics are not used for growth stimulation, and that smaller dairy farms may also contribute to environmental pollution with antibiotic resistance genes. PMID:26074912

  6. Molecular Analysis of Antibiotic Resistance Determinants and Plasmids in Malaysian Isolates of Multidrug Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Al-Marzooq, Farah; Mohd Yusof, Mohd Yasim; Tay, Sun Tee

    2015-01-01

    Infections caused by multidrug resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae have been increasingly reported in many parts of the world. A total of 93 Malaysian multidrug resistant K. pneumoniae isolated from patients attending to University of Malaya Medical Center, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia from 2010-2012 were investigated for antibiotic resistance determinants including extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs), aminoglycoside and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole resistance genes and plasmid replicons. CTX-M-15 (91.3%) was the predominant ESBL gene detected in this study. aacC2 gene (67.7%) was the most common gene detected in aminoglycoside-resistant isolates. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole resistance (90.3%) was attributed to the presence of sul1 (53.8%) and dfrA (59.1%) genes in the isolates. Multiple plasmid replicons (1-4) were detected in 95.7% of the isolates. FIIK was the dominant replicon detected together with 13 other types of plasmid replicons. Conjugative plasmids (1-3 plasmids of ~3-100 kb) were obtained from 27 of 43 K. pneumoniae isolates. An ESBL gene (either CTX-M-15, CTX-M-3 or SHV-12) was detected from each transconjugant. Co-detection with at least one of other antibiotic resistance determinants [sul1, dfrA, aacC2, aac(6ˊ)-Ib, aac(6ˊ)-Ib-cr and qnrB] was noted in most conjugative plasmids. The transconjugants were resistant to multiple antibiotics including β-lactams, gentamicin and cotrimoxazole, but not ciprofloxacin. This is the first study describing the characterization of plasmids circulating in Malaysian multidrug resistant K. pneumoniae isolates. The results of this study suggest the diffusion of highly diverse plasmids with multiple antibiotic resistance determinants among the Malaysian isolates. Effective infection control measures and antibiotic stewardship programs should be adopted to limit the spread of the multidrug resistant bacteria in healthcare settings. PMID:26203651

  7. Genome-level evolution of resistance genes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Baumgarten, Andrew; Cannon, Steven; Spangler, Russ; May, Georgiana

    2003-01-01

    Pathogen resistance genes represent some of the most abundant and diverse gene families found within plant genomes. However, evolutionary mechanisms generating resistance gene diversity at the genome level are not well understood. We used the complete Arabidopsis thaliana genome sequence to show that most duplication of individual NBS-LRR sequences occurs at close physical proximity to the parent sequence and generates clusters of closely related NBS-LRR sequences. Deploying the statistical strength of phylogeographic approaches and using chromosomal location as a proxy for spatial location, we show that apparent duplication of NBS-LRR genes to ectopic chromosomal locations is largely the consequence of segmental chromosome duplication and rearrangement, rather than the independent duplication of individual sequences. Although accounting for a smaller fraction of NBS-LRR gene duplications, segmental chromosome duplication and rearrangement events have a large impact on the evolution of this multigene family. Intergenic exchange is dramatically lower between NBS-LRR sequences located in different chromosome regions as compared to exchange between sequences within the same chromosome region. Consequently, once translocated to new chromosome locations, NBS-LRR gene copies have a greater likelihood of escaping intergenic exchange and adopting new functions than do gene copies located within the same chromosomal region. We propose an evolutionary model that relates processes of genome evolution to mechanisms of evolution for the large, diverse, NBS-LRR gene family. PMID:14504238

  8. Major Gene for Field Stem Rust Resistance Co-Locates with Resistance Gene Sr12 in 'Thatcher' Wheat.

    PubMed

    Hiebert, Colin W; Kolmer, James A; McCartney, Curt A; Briggs, Jordan; Fetch, Tom; Bariana, Harbans; Choulet, Frederic; Rouse, Matthew N; Spielmeyer, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis (Pgt), is a damaging disease of wheat that can be controlled by utilizing effective stem rust resistance genes. 'Thatcher' wheat carries complex resistance to stem rust that is enhanced in the presence of the resistance gene Lr34. The purpose of this study was to examine APR in 'Thatcher' and look for genetic interactions with Lr34. A RIL population was tested for stem rust resistance in field nurseries in Canada, USA, and Kenya. BSA was used to find SNP markers associated with reduced stem rust severity. A major QTL was identified on chromosome 3BL near the centromere in all environments. Seedling testing showed that Sr12 mapped to the same region as the QTL for APR. The SNP markers were physically mapped and the region carrying the resistance was searched for sequences with homology to members of the NB-LRR resistance gene family. SNP marker from one NB-LRR-like sequence, NB-LRR3 co-segregated with Sr12. Two additional populations, including one that lacked Lr34, were tested in field nurseries. NB-LRR3 mapped near the maximum LOD for reduction in stem rust severity in both populations. Lines from a population that segregated for Sr12 and Lr34 were tested for seedling Pgt biomass and infection type, as well as APR to field stem rust which showed an interaction between the genes. We concluded that Sr12, or a gene closely linked to Sr12, was responsible for 'Thatcher'-derived APR in several environments and this resistance was enhanced in the presence of Lr34. PMID:27309724

  9. Major Gene for Field Stem Rust Resistance Co-Locates with Resistance Gene Sr12 in ‘Thatcher’ Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Hiebert, Colin W.; Kolmer, James A.; McCartney, Curt A.; Briggs, Jordan; Fetch, Tom; Bariana, Harbans; Choulet, Frederic; Rouse, Matthew N.; Spielmeyer, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis (Pgt), is a damaging disease of wheat that can be controlled by utilizing effective stem rust resistance genes. ‘Thatcher’ wheat carries complex resistance to stem rust that is enhanced in the presence of the resistance gene Lr34. The purpose of this study was to examine APR in ‘Thatcher’ and look for genetic interactions with Lr34. A RIL population was tested for stem rust resistance in field nurseries in Canada, USA, and Kenya. BSA was used to find SNP markers associated with reduced stem rust severity. A major QTL was identified on chromosome 3BL near the centromere in all environments. Seedling testing showed that Sr12 mapped to the same region as the QTL for APR. The SNP markers were physically mapped and the region carrying the resistance was searched for sequences with homology to members of the NB-LRR resistance gene family. SNP marker from one NB-LRR-like sequence, NB-LRR3 co-segregated with Sr12. Two additional populations, including one that lacked Lr34, were tested in field nurseries. NB-LRR3 mapped near the maximum LOD for reduction in stem rust severity in both populations. Lines from a population that segregated for Sr12 and Lr34 were tested for seedling Pgt biomass and infection type, as well as APR to field stem rust which showed an interaction between the genes. We concluded that Sr12, or a gene closely linked to Sr12, was responsible for ‘Thatcher’-derived APR in several environments and this resistance was enhanced in the presence of Lr34. PMID:27309724

  10. Fine Genetic Mapping Localizes Cucumber Scab Resistance Gene Ccu into an R Gene Cluster

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The scab caused by Cladosporium cucumerinum, is an important disease of cucumber, Cucumis sativus. In this study, we conducted fine genetic mapping of the single dominant scab resistance gene, Ccu, with 148 F9 recombination inbreeding lines (RILs) and 1,944 F2 plants derived from the resistant cucum...

  11. Multiple Herbicide Resistance in Lolium multiflorum and Identification of Conserved Regulatory Elements of Herbicide Resistance Genes.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Khalid; Mathiassen, Solvejg K; Kristensen, Michael; Kudsk, Per

    2016-01-01

    Herbicide resistance is a ubiquitous challenge to herbicide sustainability and a looming threat to control weeds in crops. Recently four genes were found constituently over-expressed in herbicide resistant individuals of Lolium rigidum, a close relative of Lolium multiflorum. These include two cytochrome P450s, one nitronate monooxygenase and one glycosyl-transferase. Higher expressions of these four herbicide metabolism related (HMR) genes were also observed after herbicides exposure in the gene expression databases, indicating them as reliable markers. In order to get an overview of herbicidal resistance status of L. multiflorum L, 19 field populations were collected. Among these populations, four populations were found to be resistant to acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitors while three exhibited resistance to acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) inhibitors in our initial screening and dose response study. The genotyping showed the presence of mutations Trp-574-Leu and Ile-2041-Asn in ALS and ACCase, respectively, and qPCR experiments revealed the enhanced expression of HMR genes in individuals of certain resistant populations. Moreover, co-expression networks and promoter analyses of HMR genes in O. sativa and A. thaliana resulted in the identification of a cis-regulatory motif and zinc finger transcription factors. The identified transcription factors were highly expressed similar to HMR genes in response to xenobiotics whereas the identified motif is known to play a vital role in coping with environmental stresses and maintaining genome stability. Overall, our findings provide an important step forward toward a better understanding of metabolism-based herbicide resistance that can be utilized to devise novel strategies of weed management. PMID:27547209

  12. Multiple Herbicide Resistance in Lolium multiflorum and Identification of Conserved Regulatory Elements of Herbicide Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Khalid; Mathiassen, Solvejg K.; Kristensen, Michael; Kudsk, Per

    2016-01-01

    Herbicide resistance is a ubiquitous challenge to herbicide sustainability and a looming threat to control weeds in crops. Recently four genes were found constituently over-expressed in herbicide resistant individuals of Lolium rigidum, a close relative of Lolium multiflorum. These include two cytochrome P450s, one nitronate monooxygenase and one glycosyl-transferase. Higher expressions of these four herbicide metabolism related (HMR) genes were also observed after herbicides exposure in the gene expression databases, indicating them as reliable markers. In order to get an overview of herbicidal resistance status of L. multiflorum L, 19 field populations were collected. Among these populations, four populations were found to be resistant to acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitors while three exhibited resistance to acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) inhibitors in our initial screening and dose response study. The genotyping showed the presence of mutations Trp-574-Leu and Ile-2041-Asn in ALS and ACCase, respectively, and qPCR experiments revealed the enhanced expression of HMR genes in individuals of certain resistant populations. Moreover, co-expression networks and promoter analyses of HMR genes in O. sativa and A. thaliana resulted in the identification of a cis-regulatory motif and zinc finger transcription factors. The identified transcription factors were highly expressed similar to HMR genes in response to xenobiotics whereas the identified motif is known to play a vital role in coping with environmental stresses and maintaining genome stability. Overall, our findings provide an important step forward toward a better understanding of metabolism-based herbicide resistance that can be utilized to devise novel strategies of weed management. PMID:27547209

  13. Evaluating antibiotic resistance genes in soils with applied manures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibiotics are commonly used in livestock production to promote growth and combat disease. Recent studies have shown the potential for spread of antibiotic resistance genes (ARG) to the environment following application of livestock manures. In this study, concentrations of bacteria with ARG in soi...

  14. A Candidate Gene for Aphid Resistance in Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The greenbug, Schizaphis graminum (Rondani), is an important aphid pest of small grain crops in many parts of the world. A single dominant gene, Gb3 originated from Aegilops tauschii has shown consistent and durable resistance against prevailing greenbug biotypes in wheat fields. Previously, we mapp...

  15. Virus-induced gene silencing of soybean rust resistance genes in Glycine tomentella

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean rust, incited by the fungal pathogen Phakopsora pachyrhizi, is a serious foliar soybean disease capable of causing major economic yield loss. Specific resistance to P. pachyrhizi is known and single dominant genes have been identified in soybean (Rpp1-4), but these genes have been deemed ine...

  16. Gene expression patterns in near isogenic lines for wheat rust resistance gene lr34/yr18.

    PubMed

    Hulbert, S H; Bai, J; Fellers, J P; Pacheco, M G; Bowden, R L

    2007-09-01

    ABSTRACT The Lr34/Yr18 resistance gene provides durable, adult-plant, slow rusting resistance to leaf rust, yellow rust, and several other diseases of wheat. Flag leaves may exhibit spontaneous leaf tip necrosis and tips are more resistant than leaf bases. Despite the importance of this gene, the mechanism of resistance is unknown. Patterns of expression for 55,052 transcripts were examined by microarray analysis in mock-inoculated flag leaves of two pairs of wheat near isogenic lines for Lr34/Yr18 (Jupateco 73S/Jupateco 73R and Thatcher/Thatcher-Lr34). The Thatcher isolines were also examined for patterns of expression after inoculation with leaf rust. Mock-inoculated leaf tips of resistant plants showed up-regulation of 57 transcripts generally associated with ABA inducibility, osmotic stress, cold stress, and/or seed maturation. Several transcripts may be useful as expression markers for Lr34/Yr18. Five transcripts were also up-regulated in resistant leaf bases. The possible role of these transcripts in resistance is discussed. In mock-inoculated plants, pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins were not up-regulated in resistant flag leaves compared with that in susceptible flag leaves. In inoculated plants, the same set of PR proteins was up-regulated in both resistant and susceptible flag leaves. However, expression was often higher in resistant plants, suggesting a possible role for Lr34/Yr18 in priming of defense responses. PMID:18944173

  17. Heavy metal and disinfectant resistance genes among livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates.

    PubMed

    Argudín, M Angeles; Lauzat, Birgit; Kraushaar, Britta; Alba, Patricia; Agerso, Yvonne; Cavaco, Lina; Butaye, Patrick; Porrero, M Concepción; Battisti, Antonio; Tenhagen, Bernd-Alois; Fetsch, Alexandra; Guerra, Beatriz

    2016-08-15

    Livestock associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) has emerged in animal production worldwide. Most LA-MRSA in Europe belong to the clonal complex (CC) 398. The reason for the LA-MRSA emergence is not fully understood. Besides antimicrobial agents used for therapy, other substances with antimicrobial activity applied in animal feed, including metal-containing compounds might contribute to their selection. Some of these genes have been found in various novel SCCmec cassettes. The aim of this study was to assess the occurrence of metal-resistance genes among a LA-S. aureus collection [n=554, including 542 MRSA and 12 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA)] isolated from livestock and food thereof. Most LA-MRSA isolates (76%) carried at least one metal-resistance gene. Among the LA-MRSA CC398 isolates (n=456), 4.8%, 0.2%, 24.3% and 71.5% were positive for arsA (arsenic compounds), cadD (cadmium), copB (copper) and czrC (zinc/cadmium) resistance genes, respectively. In contrast, among the LA-MRSA non-CC398 isolates (n=86), 1.2%, 18.6% and 16.3% were positive for the cadD, copB and czrC genes, respectively, and none were positive for arsA. Of the LA-MRSA CC398 isolates, 72% carried one metal-resistance gene, and the remaining harboured two or more in different combinations. Differences between LA-MRSA CC398 and non-CC398 were statistically significant for arsA and czrC. The czrC gene was almost exclusively found (98%) in the presence of SCCmec V in both CC398 and non-CC398 LA-MRSA isolates from different sources. Regarding the LA-MSSA isolates (n=12), some (n=4) were also positive for metal-resistance genes. This study shows that genes potentially conferring metal-resistance are frequently present in LA-MRSA. PMID:27374912

  18. Origin in Acinetobacter guillouiae and Dissemination of the Aminoglycoside-Modifying Enzyme Aph(3′)-VI

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Eun-Jeong; Goussard, Sylvie; Touchon, Marie; Krizova, Lenka; Cerqueira, Gustavo; Murphy, Cheryl; Lambert, Thierry; Grillot-Courvalin, Catherine; Nemec, Alexandr

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The amikacin resistance gene aphA6 was first detected in the nosocomial pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii and subsequently in other genera. Analysis of 133 whole-genome sequences covering the taxonomic diversity of Acinetobacter spp. detected aphA6 in the chromosome of 2 isolates of A. guillouiae, which is an environmental species, 1 of 8 A. parvus isolates, and 5 of 34 A. baumannii isolates. The gene was also present in 29 out of 36 A. guillouiae isolates screened by PCR, indicating that it is ancestral to this species. The Pnative promoter for aphA6 in A. guillouiae and A. parvus was replaced in A. baumannii by PaphA6, which was generated by use of the insertion sequence ISAba125, which brought a −35 sequence. Study of promoter strength in Escherichia coli and A. baumannii indicated that PaphA6 was four times more potent than Pnative. There was a good correlation between aminoglycoside MICs and aphA6 transcription in A. guillouiae isolates that remained susceptible to amikacin. The marked topology differences of the phylogenetic trees of aphA6 and of the hosts strongly support its recent direct transfer within Acinetobacter spp. and also to evolutionarily remote bacterial genera. Concomitant expression of aphA6 must have occurred because, contrary to the donors, it can confer resistance to the new hosts. Mobilization and expression of aphA6 via composite transposons and the upstream IS-generating hybrid PaphA6, followed by conjugation, seems the most plausible mechanism. This is in agreement with the observation that, in the recipients, aphA6 is carried by conjugative plasmids and flanked by IS that are common in Acinetobacter spp. Our data indicate that resistance genes can also be found in susceptible environmental bacteria.   PMID:25336457

  19. Aminoglycoside activity observed on single pre-translocation ribosome complexes

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Michael B; Terry, Daniel S; Altman, Roger B; Blanchard, Scott C

    2010-01-01

    Aminoglycoside-class antibiotics bind directly to ribosomal RNA, imparting pleiotropic effects on ribosome function. Despite in-depth structural investigations of aminoglycoside–RNA oligonucleotide and aminoglycoside-ribosome interactions, mechanisms explaining the unique ribosome inhibition profiles of chemically similar aminoglycosides remain elusive. Here, using single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) methods, we show that high-affinity aminoglycoside binding to the conserved decoding site region of the functional pre-translocation ribosome complex specifically remodels the nature of intrinsic dynamic processes within the particle. The extents of these effects, which are distinct for each member of the aminoglycoside class, strongly correlate with their inhibition of EF-G–catalyzed translocation. Neomycin, a 4,5-linked amino-glycoside, binds with lower affinity to one or more secondary binding sites, mediating distinct structural and dynamic perturbations that further enhance translocation inhibition. These new insights help explain why closely related aminoglycosides elicit pleiotropic translation activities and demonstrate the potential utility of smFRET as a tool for dissecting the mechanisms of antibiotic action. PMID:19946275

  20. Photochemical Transformation of Aminoglycoside Antibiotics in Simulated Natural Waters.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Zhao, Cen; Yao, Bo; Li, Dan; Yan, Shuwen; O'Shea, Kevin E; Song, Weihua

    2016-03-15

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics are widely used in human therapy and veterinary medicine. We report herein a detailed study on the natural-organic-matter- (NOM-) photosensitized degradation of aminoglycosides in aqueous media under simulated solar irradiation. It appears that the direct reaction of the excited states of NOM ((3)NOM*) with aminoglycosides is minor. The contributions of reactive oxygen species (ROSs) in the bulk solutions are also unimportant, as determined by an assessment based on steady-state concentrations and bimolecular reaction rate constants in a homogeneous reaction model. The inhibition of the photodegradation by isopropamide is rationalized through competitive sorption with aminoglycosides on the NOM surface, whereas the addition of isopropanol negligibly affects degradation because it quenches HO(•) in the bulk solution but not HO(•) localized on the NOM surface where aminoglycosides reside. Therefore, a sorption-enhanced phototransformation mechanism is proposed. The sorption of aminoglycosides on NOM follows a dual-mode model involving Langmuir and linear isotherms. The steady-state concentration of HO(•) on the surface of NOM was calculated as 10(-14) M, 2 orders of magnitude higher than that in the bulk solution. This fundamental information is important in the assessment of the fate and transport of aminoglycosides in aqueous environments. PMID:26886506

  1. Inhibition of renal membrane binding and nephrotoxicity of aminoglycosides

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, P.D.; Hottendorf, G.H.; Bennett, D.B.

    1986-06-01

    The initial event in the renal tubular reabsorption of nephrotoxic aminoglycosides involves binding to brush border membranes. This primary event was measured in renal brush border membrane vesicles prepared from rat renal cortex utilizing (3H)gentamicin. In order to gain structure-activity information regarding this interaction the effect of substances having chemical similarities to aminoglycosides (sugars, polyamines and amino acids) on gentamicin binding to brush border membranes was determined. Polyamino acids were found to possess the greatest inhibitory potency. In addition to polymers of cationic amino acids (lysine, ornithine, arginine and histidine), polymers of neutral (asparagine) and acidic (aspartic and glutamic acid) amino acids also exhibited inhibition of the membrane binding of gentamicin. Inasmuch as inhibition of renal membrane binding has the potential to decrease aminoglycoside nephrotoxicity, several polyamino acids that inhibited membrane binding were tested in vivo for potential protective activity vs. gentamicin- and amikacin-induced nephrotoxicity. Polyasparagine90 and polyaspartic acid100 inhibited gentamicin and amikacin nephrotoxicity completely when coadministered to rats with the aminoglycosides. Polylysine20 provided complete and partial inhibition of gentamicin and amikacin nephrotoxicity, respectively. Whereas in vivo distribution studies revealed that cortical levels of (3H)amikacin were elevated slightly by the coadministration of polyaspartic acid, brush border and basolateral membranes contained significantly lower levels of the aminoglycoside (46 and 41% inhibition, respectively). These results question the role of charge per se in the binding of aminoglycosides to renal membranes and further confirm the importance of membrane binding in the pathogenesis of aminoglycoside nephrotoxicity.

  2. Recombination Rate Heterogeneity within Arabidopsis Disease Resistance Genes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyuha; Reinhard, Carsten; Serra, Heïdi; Ziolkowski, Piotr A; Underwood, Charles J; Zhao, Xiaohui; Hardcastle, Thomas J; Yelina, Nataliya E; Griffin, Catherine; Jackson, Matthew; Mézard, Christine; McVean, Gil; Copenhaver, Gregory P; Henderson, Ian R

    2016-07-01

    Meiotic crossover frequency varies extensively along chromosomes and is typically concentrated in hotspots. As recombination increases genetic diversity, hotspots are predicted to occur at immunity genes, where variation may be beneficial. A major component of plant immunity is recognition of pathogen Avirulence (Avr) effectors by resistance (R) genes that encode NBS-LRR domain proteins. Therefore, we sought to test whether NBS-LRR genes would overlap with meiotic crossover hotspots using experimental genetics in Arabidopsis thaliana. NBS-LRR genes tend to physically cluster in plant genomes; for example, in Arabidopsis most are located in large clusters on the south arms of chromosomes 1 and 5. We experimentally mapped 1,439 crossovers within these clusters and observed NBS-LRR gene associated hotspots, which were also detected as historical hotspots via analysis of linkage disequilibrium. However, we also observed NBS-LRR gene coldspots, which in some cases correlate with structural heterozygosity. To study recombination at the fine-scale we used high-throughput sequencing to analyze ~1,000 crossovers within the RESISTANCE TO ALBUGO CANDIDA1 (RAC1) R gene hotspot. This revealed elevated intragenic crossovers, overlapping nucleosome-occupied exons that encode the TIR, NBS and LRR domains. The highest RAC1 recombination frequency was promoter-proximal and overlapped CTT-repeat DNA sequence motifs, which have previously been associated with plant crossover hotspots. Additionally, we show a significant influence of natural genetic variation on NBS-LRR cluster recombination rates, using crosses between Arabidopsis ecotypes. In conclusion, we show that a subset of NBS-LRR genes are strong hotspots, whereas others are coldspots. This reveals a complex recombination landscape in Arabidopsis NBS-LRR genes, which we propose results from varying coevolutionary pressures exerted by host-pathogen relationships, and is influenced by structural heterozygosity. PMID:27415776

  3. Recombination Rate Heterogeneity within Arabidopsis Disease Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Heïdi; Ziolkowski, Piotr A.; Yelina, Nataliya E.; Jackson, Matthew; Mézard, Christine; McVean, Gil; Henderson, Ian R.

    2016-01-01

    Meiotic crossover frequency varies extensively along chromosomes and is typically concentrated in hotspots. As recombination increases genetic diversity, hotspots are predicted to occur at immunity genes, where variation may be beneficial. A major component of plant immunity is recognition of pathogen Avirulence (Avr) effectors by resistance (R) genes that encode NBS-LRR domain proteins. Therefore, we sought to test whether NBS-LRR genes would overlap with meiotic crossover hotspots using experimental genetics in Arabidopsis thaliana. NBS-LRR genes tend to physically cluster in plant genomes; for example, in Arabidopsis most are located in large clusters on the south arms of chromosomes 1 and 5. We experimentally mapped 1,439 crossovers within these clusters and observed NBS-LRR gene associated hotspots, which were also detected as historical hotspots via analysis of linkage disequilibrium. However, we also observed NBS-LRR gene coldspots, which in some cases correlate with structural heterozygosity. To study recombination at the fine-scale we used high-throughput sequencing to analyze ~1,000 crossovers within the RESISTANCE TO ALBUGO CANDIDA1 (RAC1) R gene hotspot. This revealed elevated intragenic crossovers, overlapping nucleosome-occupied exons that encode the TIR, NBS and LRR domains. The highest RAC1 recombination frequency was promoter-proximal and overlapped CTT-repeat DNA sequence motifs, which have previously been associated with plant crossover hotspots. Additionally, we show a significant influence of natural genetic variation on NBS-LRR cluster recombination rates, using crosses between Arabidopsis ecotypes. In conclusion, we show that a subset of NBS-LRR genes are strong hotspots, whereas others are coldspots. This reveals a complex recombination landscape in Arabidopsis NBS-LRR genes, which we propose results from varying coevolutionary pressures exerted by host-pathogen relationships, and is influenced by structural heterozygosity. PMID:27415776

  4. Negatively Charged Lipids as a Potential Target for New Amphiphilic Aminoglycoside Antibiotics: A BIOPHYSICAL STUDY.

    PubMed

    Sautrey, Guillaume; El Khoury, Micheline; Dos Santos, Andreia Giro; Zimmermann, Louis; Deleu, Magali; Lins, Laurence; Décout, Jean-Luc; Mingeot-Leclercq, Marie-Paule

    2016-06-24

    Bacterial membranes are highly organized, containing specific microdomains that facilitate distinct protein and lipid assemblies. Evidence suggests that cardiolipin molecules segregate into such microdomains, probably conferring a negative curvature to the inner plasma membrane during membrane fission upon cell division. 3',6-Dinonyl neamine is an amphiphilic aminoglycoside derivative active against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, including strains resistant to colistin. The mechanisms involved at the molecular level were identified using lipid models (large unilamellar vesicles, giant unilamelllar vesicles, and lipid monolayers) that mimic the inner membrane of P. aeruginosa The study demonstrated the interaction of 3',6-dinonyl neamine with cardiolipin and phosphatidylglycerol, two negatively charged lipids from inner bacterial membranes. This interaction induced membrane permeabilization and depolarization. Lateral segregation of cardiolipin and membrane hemifusion would be critical for explaining the effects induced on lipid membranes by amphiphilic aminoglycoside antibiotics. The findings contribute to an improved understanding of how amphiphilic aminoglycoside antibiotics that bind to negatively charged lipids like cardiolipin could be promising antibacterial compounds. PMID:27189936

  5. Structural basis for selective targeting of leishmanial ribosomes: aminoglycoside derivatives as promising therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Shalev, Moran; Rozenberg, Haim; Smolkin, Boris; Nasereddin, Abedelmajeed; Kopelyanskiy, Dmitry; Belakhov, Valery; Schrepfer, Thomas; Schacht, Jochen; Jaffe, Charles L.; Adir, Noam; Baasov, Timor

    2015-01-01

    Leishmaniasis comprises an array of diseases caused by pathogenic species of Leishmania, resulting in a spectrum of mild to life-threatening pathologies. Currently available therapies for leishmaniasis include a limited selection of drugs. This coupled with the rather fast emergence of parasite resistance, presents a dire public health concern. Paromomycin (PAR), a broad-spectrum aminoglycoside antibiotic, has been shown in recent years to be highly efficient in treating visceral leishmaniasis (VL)—the life-threatening form of the disease. While much focus has been given to exploration of PAR activities in bacteria, its mechanism of action in Leishmania has received relatively little scrutiny and has yet to be fully deciphered. In the present study we present an X-ray structure of PAR bound to rRNA model mimicking its leishmanial binding target, the ribosomal A-site. We also evaluate PAR inhibitory actions on leishmanial growth and ribosome function, as well as effects on auditory sensory cells, by comparing several structurally related natural and synthetic aminoglycoside derivatives. The results provide insights into the structural elements important for aminoglycoside inhibitory activities and selectivity for leishmanial cytosolic ribosomes, highlighting a novel synthetic derivative, compound 3, as a prospective therapeutic candidate for the treatment of VL. PMID:26264664

  6. Structural basis for selective targeting of leishmanial ribosomes: Aminoglycoside derivatives as promising therapeutics

    SciTech Connect

    Shalev, Moran; Rozenberg, Haim; Smolkin, Boris; Nasereddin, Abedelmajeed; Kopelyanskiy, Dmitry; Belakhov, Valery; Schrepfer, Thomas; Schacht, Jochen; Jaffe, Charles L.; Adir, Noam; Baasov, Timor

    2015-08-11

    Leishmaniasis comprises an array of diseases caused by pathogenic species of Leishmania, resulting in a spectrum of mild to life-threatening pathologies. Currently available therapies for leishmaniasis include a limited selection of drugs. This coupled with the rather fast emergence of parasite resistance, presents a dire public health concern. Paromomycin (PAR), a broad-spectrum aminoglycoside antibiotic, has been shown in recent years to be highly efficient in treating visceral leishmaniasis (VL)—the life-threatening form of the disease. While much focus has been given to exploration of PAR activities in bacteria, its mechanism of action in Leishmania has received relatively little scrutiny and has yet to be fully deciphered. In the present study we present an X-ray structure of PAR bound to rRNA model mimicking its leishmanial binding target, the ribosomal A-site. We evaluate PAR inhibitory actions on leishmanial growth and ribosome function, as well as effects on auditory sensory cells, by comparing several structurally related natural and synthetic aminoglycoside derivatives. The results provide insights into the structural elements important for aminoglycoside inhibitory activities and selectivity for leishmanial cytosolic ribosomes, highlighting a novel synthetic derivative, compound 3, as a prospective therapeutic candidate for the treatment of VL.

  7. Structural basis for selective targeting of leishmanial ribosomes: Aminoglycoside derivatives as promising therapeutics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shalev, Moran; Rozenberg, Haim; Smolkin, Boris; Nasereddin, Abedelmajeed; Kopelyanskiy, Dmitry; Belakhov, Valery; Schrepfer, Thomas; Schacht, Jochen; Jaffe, Charles L.; Adir, Noam; et al

    2015-08-11

    Leishmaniasis comprises an array of diseases caused by pathogenic species of Leishmania, resulting in a spectrum of mild to life-threatening pathologies. Currently available therapies for leishmaniasis include a limited selection of drugs. This coupled with the rather fast emergence of parasite resistance, presents a dire public health concern. Paromomycin (PAR), a broad-spectrum aminoglycoside antibiotic, has been shown in recent years to be highly efficient in treating visceral leishmaniasis (VL)—the life-threatening form of the disease. While much focus has been given to exploration of PAR activities in bacteria, its mechanism of action in Leishmania has received relatively little scrutiny and hasmore » yet to be fully deciphered. In the present study we present an X-ray structure of PAR bound to rRNA model mimicking its leishmanial binding target, the ribosomal A-site. We evaluate PAR inhibitory actions on leishmanial growth and ribosome function, as well as effects on auditory sensory cells, by comparing several structurally related natural and synthetic aminoglycoside derivatives. The results provide insights into the structural elements important for aminoglycoside inhibitory activities and selectivity for leishmanial cytosolic ribosomes, highlighting a novel synthetic derivative, compound 3, as a prospective therapeutic candidate for the treatment of VL.« less

  8. Structural basis for selective targeting of leishmanial ribosomes: aminoglycoside derivatives as promising therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Shalev, Moran; Rozenberg, Haim; Smolkin, Boris; Nasereddin, Abedelmajeed; Kopelyanskiy, Dmitry; Belakhov, Valery; Schrepfer, Thomas; Schacht, Jochen; Jaffe, Charles L; Adir, Noam; Baasov, Timor

    2015-09-30

    Leishmaniasis comprises an array of diseases caused by pathogenic species of Leishmania, resulting in a spectrum of mild to life-threatening pathologies. Currently available therapies for leishmaniasis include a limited selection of drugs. This coupled with the rather fast emergence of parasite resistance, presents a dire public health concern. Paromomycin (PAR), a broad-spectrum aminoglycoside antibiotic, has been shown in recent years to be highly efficient in treating visceral leishmaniasis (VL)-the life-threatening form of the disease. While much focus has been given to exploration of PAR activities in bacteria, its mechanism of action in Leishmania has received relatively little scrutiny and has yet to be fully deciphered. In the present study we present an X-ray structure of PAR bound to rRNA model mimicking its leishmanial binding target, the ribosomal A-site. We also evaluate PAR inhibitory actions on leishmanial growth and ribosome function, as well as effects on auditory sensory cells, by comparing several structurally related natural and synthetic aminoglycoside derivatives. The results provide insights into the structural elements important for aminoglycoside inhibitory activities and selectivity for leishmanial cytosolic ribosomes, highlighting a novel synthetic derivative, compound 3: , as a prospective therapeutic candidate for the treatment of VL. PMID:26264664

  9. Novel aerobic tetracycline resistance gene that chemically modifies tetracycline.

    PubMed Central

    Speer, B S; Salyers, A A

    1989-01-01

    A tetracycline resistance gene that was found originally on the Bacteroides plasmid pBF4 confers resistance on Escherichia coli but only when cells are growing aerobically. When E. coli EM24 carrying this aerobic tetracycline resistance (*Tcr) gene is grown in medium containing tetracycline, the resulting spent medium is no longer toxic to tetracycline-sensitive (Tcs) E. coli EM24 (B.S. Speer and A.A. Salyers, J. Bacteriol. 170: 1423-1429, 1988). To determine whether the *Tcr gene product modified tetracycline, we characterized the material resulting from incubation of E. coli (*Tcr) with tetracycline. When [7-3H(N)]tetracycline was added to cultures of E. coli (*Tcr), at least 90% of the label was recovered in the extracellular fluid. Therefore, tetracycline was not being sequestered by the cells. The labeled material behaved similarly to tetracycline with respect to solubility in various organic solvents. However, the UV-visible light spectrum had a single peak at 258 nm, whereas the tetracycline spectrum had a peak at 364 nm. The labeled material also had a faster migration rate than did tetracycline on thin-layer plates in a solvent system of butanol-methanol-10% citric acid (4:1:2, vol/vol/vol) and was separable from tetracycline by reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography, using an acetronitrile-0.1% trifluoroacetic acid solvent system. These results demonstrate that the *Tcr gene product chemically modifies tetracycline. The *Tcr gene is the first example of a chemically modifying tetracycline resistance mechanism. PMID:2644186

  10. High Levels of Antibiotic Resistance Genes and Their Correlations with Bacterial Community and Mobile Genetic Elements in Pharmaceutical Wastewater Treatment Bioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Wenda; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Zhao, Fuzheng; Huang, Kailong; Ma, Haijun; Wang, Zhu; Ye, Lin; Ren, Hongqiang

    2016-01-01

    To understand the diversity and abundance of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in pharmaceutical wastewater treatment bioreactors, the ARGs in sludge from two full-scale pharmaceutical wastewater treatment plants (PWWTPs) were investigated and compared with sludge samples from three sewage treatment plants (STPs) using metagenomic approach. The results showed that the ARG abundances in PWWTP sludge ranged from 54.7 to 585.0 ppm, which were higher than those in STP sludge (27.2 to 86.4 ppm). Moreover, the diversity of ARGs in PWWTP aerobic sludge (153 subtypes) was higher than that in STP aerobic sludge (118 subtypes). In addition, it was found that the profiles of ARGs in PWWTP aerobic sludge were similar to those in STP aerobic sludge but different from those in PWWTP anaerobic sludge, suggesting that dissolve oxygen (DO) could be one of the important factors affecting the profiles of ARGs. In PWWTP aerobic sludge, aminoglycoside, sulfonamide and multidrug resistance genes were frequently detected. While, tetracycline, macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin and polypeptide resistance genes were abundantly present in PWWTP anaerobic sludge. Furthermore, we investigated the microbial community and the correlation between microbial community and ARGs in PWWTP sludge. And, significant correlations between ARG types and seven bacterial genera were found. In addition, the mobile genetic elements (MGEs) were also examined and correlations between the ARGs and MGEs in PWWTP sludge were observed. Collectively, our results suggested that the microbial community and MGEs, which could be affected by DO, might be the main factors shaping the profiles of ARGs in PWWTP sludge. PMID:27294780

  11. Protective effect of rasagiline in aminoglycoside ototoxicity.

    PubMed

    Polony, G; Humli, V; Andó, R; Aller, M; Horváth, T; Harnos, A; Tamás, L; Vizi, E S; Zelles, T

    2014-04-18

    Sensorineural hearing losses (SNHLs; e.g., ototoxicant- and noise-induced hearing loss or presbycusis) are among the most frequent sensory deficits, but they lack effective drug therapies. The majority of recent therapeutic approaches focused on the trials of antioxidants and reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers in SNHLs. The rationale for these studies was the prominent role of disturbed redox homeostasis and the consequent ROS elevation. Although the antioxidant therapies in several animal studies seemed to be promising, clinical trials have failed to fulfill expectations. We investigated the potential of rasagiline, an FDA-approved monomanine oxidase type B inhibitor (MAO-B) inhibitor type anti-parkinsonian drug, as an otoprotectant. We showed a dose-dependent alleviation of the kanamycin-induced threshold shifts measured by auditory brainstem response (ABR) in an ototoxicant aminoglycoside antibiotic-based hearing loss model in mice. This effect proved to be statistically significant at a 6-mg/kg (s.c.) dose. The most prominent effect appeared at 16kHz, which is the hearing sensitivity optimum for mice. The neuroprotective, antiapoptotic and antioxidant effects of rasagiline in animal models, all targeting a specific mechanism of aminoglycoside injury, may explain this otoprotection. The dopaminergic neurotransmission enhancer effect of rasagiline might also contribute to the protection. Dopamine (DA), released from lateral olivocochlear (LOC) fibers, was shown to exert a protective action against excitotoxicity, a pathological factor in the aminoglycoside-induced SNHL. We have shown that rasagiline enhanced the electric stimulation-evoked release of DA from an acute mouse cochlea preparation in a dose-dependent manner. Using inhibitors of voltage-gated Na(+)-, Ca(2+) channels and DA transporters, we revealed that rasagiline potentiated the action potential-evoked release of DA by inhibiting the reuptake. The complex, multifactorial pathomechanism of SNHLs

  12. Systemic aminoglycosides are trafficked via endolymph into cochlear hair cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongzhe; Steyger, Peter S

    2011-01-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics rapidly enter and kill cochlear hair cells via apical mechanoelectrical transduction (MET) channels in vitro. In vivo, it remains unknown whether systemically-administered aminoglycosides cross the blood-labyrinth barrier into endolymph and enter hair cells. Here we show, for the first time, that systemic aminoglycosides are trafficked across the blood-endolymph barrier and preferentially enter hair cells across their apical membranes. This trafficking route is predominant compared to uptake via hair cell basolateral membranes during perilymph infusion. PMID:22355674

  13. Environmental and Public Health Implications of Water Reuse: Antibiotics, Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria, and Antibiotic Resistance Genes.

    PubMed

    Hong, Pei-Ying; Al-Jassim, Nada; Ansari, Mohd Ikram; Mackie, Roderick I

    2013-01-01

    Water scarcity is a global problem, and is particularly acute in certain regions like Africa, the Middle East, as well as the western states of America. A breakdown on water usage revealed that 70% of freshwater supplies are used for agricultural irrigation. The use of reclaimed water as an alternative water source for agricultural irrigation would greatly alleviate the demand on freshwater sources. This paradigm shift is gaining momentum in several water scarce countries like Saudi Arabia. However, microbial problems associated with reclaimed water may hinder the use of reclaimed water for agricultural irrigation. Of particular concern is that the occurrence of antibiotic residues in the reclaimed water can select for antibiotic resistance genes among the microbial community. Antibiotic resistance genes can be associated with mobile genetic elements, which in turn allow a promiscuous transfer of resistance traits from one bacterium to another. Together with the pathogens that are present in the reclaimed water, antibiotic resistant bacteria can potentially exchange mobile genetic elements to create the "perfect microbial storm". Given the significance of this issue, a deeper understanding of the occurrence of antibiotics in reclaimed water, and their potential influence on the selection of resistant microorganisms would be essential. In this review paper, we collated literature over the past two decades to determine the occurrence of antibiotics in municipal wastewater and livestock manure. We then discuss how these antibiotic resistant bacteria may impose a potential microbial risk to the environment and public health, and the knowledge gaps that would have to be addressed in future studies. Overall, the collation of the literature in wastewater treatment and agriculture serves to frame and identify potential concerns with respect to antibiotics, antibiotic resistant bacteria, and antibiotic resistance genes in reclaimed water. PMID:27029309

  14. Environmental and Public Health Implications of Water Reuse: Antibiotics, Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria, and Antibiotic Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Pei-Ying; Al-Jassim, Nada; Ansari, Mohd Ikram; Mackie, Roderick I.

    2013-01-01

    Water scarcity is a global problem, and is particularly acute in certain regions like Africa, the Middle East, as well as the western states of America. A breakdown on water usage revealed that 70% of freshwater supplies are used for agricultural irrigation. The use of reclaimed water as an alternative water source for agricultural irrigation would greatly alleviate the demand on freshwater sources. This paradigm shift is gaining momentum in several water scarce countries like Saudi Arabia. However, microbial problems associated with reclaimed water may hinder the use of reclaimed water for agricultural irrigation. Of particular concern is that the occurrence of antibiotic residues in the reclaimed water can select for antibiotic resistance genes among the microbial community. Antibiotic resistance genes can be associated with mobile genetic elements, which in turn allow a promiscuous transfer of resistance traits from one bacterium to another. Together with the pathogens that are present in the reclaimed water, antibiotic resistant bacteria can potentially exchange mobile genetic elements to create the “perfect microbial storm”. Given the significance of this issue, a deeper understanding of the occurrence of antibiotics in reclaimed water, and their potential influence on the selection of resistant microorganisms would be essential. In this review paper, we collated literature over the past two decades to determine the occurrence of antibiotics in municipal wastewater and livestock manure. We then discuss how these antibiotic resistant bacteria may impose a potential microbial risk to the environment and public health, and the knowledge gaps that would have to be addressed in future studies. Overall, the collation of the literature in wastewater treatment and agriculture serves to frame and identify potential concerns with respect to antibiotics, antibiotic resistant bacteria, and antibiotic resistance genes in reclaimed water. PMID:27029309

  15. Multiple resistance to sulfonylureas and imidazolinones conferred by an acetohydroxyacid synthase gene with separate mutations for selective resistance.

    PubMed

    Hattori, J; Rutledge, R; Labbé, H; Brown, D; Sunohara, G; Miki, B

    1992-03-01

    The acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) gene from the Arabidopsis thaliana mutant line GH90 carrying the imidazolinone resistance allele imr1 was cloned. Expression of the AHAS gene under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter in transgenic tobacco resulted in selective imidazolinone resistance, confirming that the single base-pair change found near the 3' end of the coding region of this gene is responsible for imidazolinone resistance. A chimeric AHAS gene containing both the imr1 mutation and the csr1 mutation, responsible for selective resistance to sulfonylurea herbicides, was constructed. It conferred on transgenic tobacco plants resistance to both sulfonylurea and imidazolinone herbicides. The data illustrate that a multiple-resistance phenotype can be achieved in an AHAS gene through combinations of separate mutations, each of which individually confers resistance to only one class of herbicides. PMID:1557022

  16. Multidrug resistance genes in staphylococci from animals that confer resistance to critically and highly important antimicrobial agents in human medicine.

    PubMed

    Wendlandt, Sarah; Shen, Jianzhong; Kadlec, Kristina; Wang, Yang; Li, Beibei; Zhang, Wan-Jiang; Feßler, Andrea T; Wu, Congming; Schwarz, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Most antimicrobial resistance genes known so far to occur in staphylococci of animal origin confer resistance to a specific class of antimicrobial agents or to selected members within such a class. However, there are also a few examples of multidrug resistance (MDR) genes that confer resistance to antimicrobial agents of different classes by either target site methylation or active efflux via ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. The present review provides an overview of these MDR genes with particular reference to those genes involved in resistance to critically or highly important antimicrobial agents used in human and veterinary medicine. Moreover, their location on mobile genetic elements and colocated resistance genes, which may play a role in coselection and persistence of the MDR genes, are addressed. PMID:25455417

  17. Mitochondrial 12S rRNA A827G mutation is involved in the genetic susceptibility to aminoglycoside ototoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Xing Guangqian; Chen Zhibin; Wei Qinjun; Tian Huiqin; Li Xiaolu; Zhou Aidong; Bu Xingkuan; Cao Xin . E-mail: caoxin@njmu.edu.cn

    2006-08-11

    We have analyzed the clinical and molecular characterization of a Chinese family with aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing impairment. Clinical evaluations revealed that only those family members who had a history of exposure to aminoglycoside antibiotics subsequently developed hearing loss, suggesting mitochondrial genome involvement. Sequence analysis of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA and tRNA{sup Ser(UCN)} genes led to the identification of a homoplasmic A827G mutation in all maternal relatives, a mutation that was identified previously in a few sporadic patients and in another Chinese family with non-syndromic deafness. The pathogenicity of the A827G mutation is strongly supported by the occurrence of the same mutation in two independent families and several genetically unrelated subjects. The A827G mutation is located at the A-site of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene which is highly conserved in mammals. It is possible that the alteration of the tertiary or quaternary structure of this rRNA by the A827G mutation may lead to mitochondrial dysfunction, thereby playing a role in the pathogenesis of hearing loss and aminoglycoside hypersensitivity. However, incomplete penetrance of hearing impairment indicates that the A827G mutation itself is not sufficient to produce clinical phenotype but requires the involvement of modifier factors for the phenotypic expression. Indeed, aminoglycosides may contribute to the phenotypic manifestation of the A827G mutation in this family. In contrast with the congenital or early-onset hearing impairment in another Chinese family carrying the A827G mutation, three patients in this pedigree developed hearing loss only after use of aminoglycosides. This discrepancy likely reflects the difference of genetic backgrounds, either mitochondrial haplotypes or nuclear modifier genes, between two families.

  18. Analysis Of Proteins Differentially Accumulated During Potato Late Blight Resistance Mediated by the RB Resistance Gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The RB gene cloned from the wild diploid potato species Solanum bulbocastanum confers resistance against the late blight pathogen, Phytophthora infestans. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry was used to examine for the first time the changes of the proteome pattern of ...

  19. PROTEOMIC ANALYSIS OF POTATO LATE BLIGHT RESISTANCE MEDIATED BY THE RB RESISTANCE GENE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Late blight, caused by the oomycete pathogen, Phytophthora infestans, is a devastating disease of potatoes and tomatoes. A gene RB, cloned from the Mexican diploid potato species Solanum bulbocastanum, confers robust resistance to potato late blight. RB encodes a protein belonging to the CC-NBS-LRR ...

  20. Correlation among extracellular polymeric substances, tetracycline resistant bacteria and tetracycline resistance genes under trace tetracycline.

    PubMed

    Huang, Man-hong; Zhang, Wei; Zheng, Yu; Zhang, Wen

    2014-12-01

    Antibiotic resistance occurrences and proliferation in activated sludge have attracted more and more attention nowadays. However, the role which extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) plays on the antibiotic resistance is not clear. The changes and correlation among EPS, tetracycline (TC) resistant bacteria (TRB) and TC resistance genes (TRGs) of sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) were investigated. Performance of SBR without TC was compared with two other SBRs to which different amounts of TC were added. Total average EPS contents were found to increase significantly from 66 mg g−1 VSS to 181 mg g−1 VSS as the TC concentrations increased from 0 to 100 μg L−1. As the EPS content increased, TRB in sludge of the three SBRs increased significantly from 105 to 106 colony forming unit mL−1 after being exposed to TC. In addition, the concentrations of three groups of TRGs (copies mL−1) were determined by real-time fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction and followed the order: efflux pump genes > ribosome protected genes > degradation enzyme genes. The numbers of TRGs in the idle stage were larger than those in the aeration sludge. Correlation coefficients (R2) between EPS and TRB in sludge were 0.823 (p < 0.01) while the correlation between EPS and total TRGs was poor (R2 = 0.463, p > 0.05). But it showed the same tendency that EPS and TRGs in sludge increased with the increasing of TC. PMID:25461932

  1. Gene Prioritization of Resistant Rice Gene against Xanthomas oryzae pv. oryzae by Using Text Mining Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jingbo; Zhang, Xing; Yuan, Daojun; Chen, Lingling; Webster, Jonathan; Fang, Alex Chengyu

    2013-01-01

    To effectively assess the possibility of the unknown rice protein resistant to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, a hybrid strategy is proposed to enhance gene prioritization by combining text mining technologies with a sequence-based approach. The text mining technique of term frequency inverse document frequency is used to measure the importance of distinguished terms which reflect biomedical activity in rice before candidate genes are screened and vital terms are produced. Afterwards, a built-in classifier under the chaos games representation algorithm is used to sieve the best possible candidate gene. Our experiment results show that the combination of these two methods achieves enhanced gene prioritization. PMID:24371834

  2. Antimicrobial resistance of Escherichia coli isolates from canine urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shao-Kuang; Lo, Dan-Yuan; Wei, Hen-Wei; Kuo, Hung-Chih

    2015-01-01

    This study determined the antimicrobial resistance profiles of Escherichia coli isolates from dogs with a presumptive diagnosis of urinary tract infection (UTI). Urine samples from 201 dogs with UTI diagnosed through clinical examination and urinalysis were processed for isolation of Escherichia coli. Colonies from pure cultures were identified by biochemical reactions (n=114) and were tested for susceptibility to 18 antimicrobials. The two most frequent antimicrobials showing resistance in Urinary E. coli isolates were oxytetracycline and ampicillin. Among the resistant isolates, 17 resistance patterns were observed, with 12 patterns involving multidrug resistance (MDR). Of the 69 tetracycline-resistant E. coli isolates, tet(B) was the predominant resistance determinant and was detected in 50.9% of the isolates, whereas the remaining 25.5% isolates carried the tet(A) determinant. Most ampicillin and/or amoxicillin-resistant E. coli isolates carried blaTEM-1 genes. Class 1 integrons were prevalent (28.9%) and contained previously described gene cassettes that are implicated primarily in resistance to aminoglycosides and trimethoprim (dfrA1, dfrA17-aadA5). Of the 44 quinolone-resistant E. coli isolates, 38 were resistant to nalidixic acid, and 6 were resistant to nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin and enrofloxacin. Chromosomal point mutations were found in the GyrA (Ser83Leu) and ParC (Ser80Ile) genes. Furthermore, the aminoglycoside resistance gene aacC2, the chloramphenicol resistant gene cmlA and the florfenicol resistant gene floR were also identified. This study revealed an alarming rate of antimicrobial resistance among E. coli isolates from dogs with UTIs. PMID:25720807

  3. Antimicrobial resistance of Escherichia coli isolates from canine urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shao-Kuang; Lo, Dan-Yuan; Wei, Hen-Wei; Kuo, Hung-Chih

    2014-10-28

    This study determined the antimicrobial resistance profiles of Escherichia coli isolates from dogs with a presumptive diagnosis of urinary tract infection (UTI). Urine samples from 201 dogs with UTI diagnosed through clinical examination and urinalysis were processed for isolation of Escherichia coli. Colonies from pure cultures were identified by biochemical reactions (n=114) and were tested for susceptibility to 18 antimicrobials. The two most frequent antimicrobials showing resistance in Urinary E. coli isolates were oxytetracycline and ampicillin. Among the resistant isolates, 17 resistance patterns were observed, with 12 patterns involving multidrug resistance (MDR). Of the 69 tetracycline-resistant E. coli isolates, tet(B) was the predominant resistance determinant and was detected in 50.9% of the isolates, whereas the remaining 25.5% isolates carried the tet(A) determinant. Most ampicillin and/or amoxicillin-resistant E. coli isolates carried blaTEM-1 genes. Class 1 integrons were prevalent (28.9%) and contained previously described gene cassettes that are implicated primarily in resistance to aminoglycosides and trimethoprim (dfrA1, dfrA17-aadA5). Of the 44 quinolone-resistant E. coli isolates, 38 were resistant to nalidixic acid, and 6 were resistant to nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin and enrofloxacin. Chromosomal point mutations were found in the GyrA (Ser83Leu) and ParC (Ser80Ile) genes. Furthermore, the aminoglycoside resistance gene aacC2, the chloramphenicol resistant gene cmlA and the florfenicol resistant gene floR were also identified. This study revealed an alarming rate of antimicrobial resistance among E. coli isolates from dogs with UTIs. PMID:25354649

  4. Antimicrobial resistance of Escherichia coli isolates from canine urinary tract infections

    PubMed Central

    CHANG, Shao-Kuang; LO, Dan-Yuan; WEI, Hen-Wei; KUO, Hung-Chih

    2014-01-01

    This study determined the antimicrobial resistance profiles of Escherichia coli isolates from dogs with a presumptive diagnosis of urinary tract infection (UTI). Urine samples from 201 dogs with UTI diagnosed through clinical examination and urinalysis were processed for isolation of Escherichia coli. Colonies from pure cultures were identified by biochemical reactions (n=114) and were tested for susceptibility to 18 antimicrobials. The two most frequent antimicrobials showing resistance in Urinary E. coli isolates were oxytetracycline and ampicillin. Among the resistant isolates, 17 resistance patterns were observed, with 12 patterns involving multidrug resistance (MDR). Of the 69 tetracycline-resistant E. coli isolates, tet(B) was the predominant resistance determinant and was detected in 50.9% of the isolates, whereas the remaining 25.5% isolates carried the tet(A) determinant. Most ampicillin and/or amoxicillin-resistant E. coli isolates carried blaTEM-1 genes. Class 1 integrons were prevalent (28.9%) and contained previously described gene cassettes that are implicated primarily in resistance to aminoglycosides and trimethoprim (dfrA1, dfrA17-aadA5). Of the 44 quinolone-resistant E. coli isolates, 38 were resistant to nalidixic acid, and 6 were resistant to nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin and enrofloxacin. Chromosomal point mutations were found in the GyrA (Ser83Leu) and ParC (Ser80Ile) genes. Furthermore, the aminoglycoside resistance gene aacC2, the chloramphenicol resistant gene cmlA and the florfenicol resistant gene floR were also identified. This study revealed an alarming rate of antimicrobial resistance among E. coli isolates from dogs with UTIs. PMID:25720807

  5. Occurrence of antibiotic resistance and characterization of resistant genes and integrons in Enterobacteriaceae isolated from integrated fish farms south China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Su, Hao-Chang; Ying, Guang-Guo; Tao, Ran; Zhang, Rui-Quan; Fogarty, Lisa R.; Kolpin, Dana W.

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotics are still widely applied in animal husbandry to prevent diseases and used as feed additives to promote animal growth. This could result in antibiotic resistance to bacteria and antibiotic residues in animals. In this paper, Enterobacteriaceae isolated from four integrated fish farms in Zhongshan, South China were tested for antibiotic resistance, tetracycline resistance genes, sulfonamide resistance genes, and class 1 integrons. The Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays were carried out to test antibiotic susceptibility and resistance genes, respectively. Relatively high antibiotic resistance frequencies were found, especially for ampicillin (80%), tetracycline (52%), and trimethoprim (50%). Out of 203 Enterobacteriaceae isolates, 98.5% were resistant to one or more antibiotics tested. Multiple antibiotic resistance (MAR) was found highest in animal manures with a MAR index of 0.56. Tetracycline resistance genes (tet(A), tet(C)) and sulfonamide resistance genes (sul2) were detected in more than 50% of the isolates. The intI1 gene was found in 170 isolates (83.7%). Both classic and non-classic class 1 integrons were found. Four genes, aadA5, aadA22, dfr2, and dfrA17, were detected. To our knowledge, this is the first report for molecular characterization of antibiotic resistance genes in Enterobacteriaceae isolated from integrated fish farms in China and the first time that gene cassette array dfrA17-aadA5 has been detected in such fish farms. Results of this study indicated that fish farms may be a reservoir of highly diverse and abundant antibiotic resistant genes and gene cassettes. Integrons may play a key role in multiple antibiotic resistances posing potential health risks to the general public and aquaculture.

  6. Transport of tylosin and tylosin-resistance genes in subsurface drainage water from manured fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Animal agriculture appears to contribute to the spread of antibiotic resistance genes, but few studies have quantified gene transport in agricultural fields. The transport of tylosin, tylosin-resistance genes (erm B, F, A) and tylosin-resistant Enterococcus were measured in tile drainage water from ...

  7. Beta-lactamase gene expression in a penicillin-resistant Bacillus anthracis strain.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yahua; Tenover, Fred C; Koehler, Theresa M

    2004-12-01

    Expression of the bla1 and bla2 genes in an archetypal Bacillus anthracis strain is insufficient for penicillin resistance. In a penicillin-resistant clinical isolate, both genes are highly transcribed, but bla1 is the major contributor to high-level resistance to ampicillin. Differential expression of the bla genes is dependent upon strain background. PMID:15561870

  8. ERG11 mutations and expression of resistance genes in fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans isolates.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yonghao; Sheng, Fang; Zhao, Jie; Chen, Lamei; Li, Chunyang

    2015-11-01

    Azole resistance in the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans poses significant challenges for its antibiotic treatment. The conformational change of the target enzyme 14 alpha-demethylase (Erg11p) due to ERG11 gene mutations is one of the mechanisms resulting in the azole resistance. ERG11 of 23 isolates (8 susceptible and 15 resistant) and 6 standard strains of Candida albicans were amplified and sequenced. Nineteen missense mutations were detected. Two mutations, G487T (A114S) and T916C (Y257H), coexisted exclusively in 14 fluconazole-resistant isolates. To identify the resistance mechanisms in the isolates with G487T and T916C mutations, we compared the expression of 5 resistance-related genes in the 14 azole-resistant isolates with those in the susceptible type strain ATCC 10231, Saccharomyces cerevisiae AD/CDR1 and AD/CDR2. The tested values of mRNA transcription of CDR1 and CDR2 were higher than that of control strain, while the semi-quantified Cdr1p values were not higher in all of the 14 resistant isolates. And the data analyzed with t test suggest that both of the differences are significant (P < 0.0005) when the resistant isolates are considered as a whole. Cdr2p was up-regulated in 5 isolates, and down-regulated or even undetectable in the remaining 9 isolates. The transcription of ERG11, MDR1, and FLU1 varied in these isolates. These data suggested that overexpression of the five genes might not be the reason of resistance in the 14 isolates with G487T and T916C, especially in the 5 isolates (GZ09, GZ15, GZ16, GZ58, and 4263) in which neither translation of Cdr1p/Cdr2p nor transcription of ERG11, MDR1, or FLU1 was detected up-regulated. The results suggest that Erg11p conformational change due to the point mutations is most likely responsible for the azole resistance in these isolates. PMID:26349561

  9. Detection of Multi-drug Resistant Acinetobacter Lwoffii Isolated from Soil of Mink Farm.

    PubMed

    Sun, Na; Wen, Yong Jun; Zhang, Shu Qin; Zhu, Hong Wei; Guo, Li; Wang, Feng Xue; Chen, Qiang; Ma, Hong Xia; Cheng, Shi Peng

    2016-07-01

    There were 4 Acinetobacter lwoffii obtained from soil samples. The antimicrobial susceptibility of the strains to 16 antimicrobial agents was investigated using K-B method. Three isolates showed the multi-drug resistance. The presence of resistance genes and integrons was determined using PCR. The aadA1, aac(3')-IIc, aph(3')-VII, aac(6')-Ib, sul2, cat2, floR, and tet(K) genes were detected, respectively. Three class 1 integrons were obtained. The arr-3-aacA4 and blaPSE-1 gene cassette, which cause resistance to aminoglycoside and beta-lactamase antibiotics. Our results reported the detection of multi-drug resistant and carried resistant genes Acinetobacter lwoffii from soil. The findings suggested that we should pay close attention to the prevalence of multi-drug resistant bacterial species of environment. PMID:27554122

  10. 4′-O-substitutions determine selectivity of aminoglycoside antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Fernandez, Déborah; Shcherbakov, Dmitri; Matt, Tanja; Leong, Ng Chyan; Kudyba, Iwona; Duscha, Stefan; Boukari, Heithem; Patak, Rashmi; Dubbaka, Srinivas Reddy; Lang, Kathrin; Meyer, Martin; Akbergenov, Rashid; Freihofer, Pietro; Vaddi, Swapna; Thommes, Pia; Ramakrishnan, V.; Vasella, Andrea; Böttger, Erik C.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical use of 2-deoxystreptamine aminoglycoside antibiotics, which target the bacterial ribosome, is compromised by adverse effects related to limited drug selectivity. Here we present a series of 4′,6′-O-acetal and 4′-O-ether modifications on glucopyranosyl ring I of aminoglycosides. Chemical modifications were guided by measuring interactions between the compounds synthesized and ribosomes harbouring single point mutations in the drug-binding site, resulting in aminoglycosides that interact poorly with the drug-binding pocket of eukaryotic mitochondrial or cytosolic ribosomes. Yet, these compounds largely retain their inhibitory activity for bacterial ribosomes and show antibacterial activity. Our data indicate that 4′-O-substituted aminoglycosides possess increased selectivity towards bacterial ribosomes and little activity for any of the human drug-binding pockets. PMID:24473108

  11. Whole-genome analysis of an extensively drug-resistant clinical isolate of Acinetobacter baumannii AC12: insights into the mechanisms of resistance of an ST195 clone from Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Lean, Soo-Sum; Yeo, Chew Chieng; Suhaili, Zarizal; Thong, Kwai-Lin

    2015-02-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as an important nosocomial pathogen owing to its increasing resistance to most, if not all, antibiotics in clinical use. We recently reported the occurrence of extensively drug-resistant (XDR) A. baumannii isolates in a Malaysian tertiary hospital. The genome of one of these XDR isolates (A. baumannii AC12) was completely sequenced and comparative genome analyses were performed to elucidate the genetic basis of its antimicrobial resistance. The A. baumannii AC12 genome consists of a 3.8 Mbp circular chromosome and an 8731 bp cryptic plasmid, pAC12. It belongs to the ST195 lineage and is most closely related to A. baumannii BJAB0715 as well as other strains of the international clone III (IC-III) group. Two antibiotic resistance islands (RIs), designated AC12-RI1 and AC12-RI2, were found in the AC12 chromosome along with a 7 kb Tn1548::armA island conferring resistance to aminoglycosides and macrolides. The 22.8 kb AC12-RI1 interrupts the comM gene and harbours the carbapenem resistance gene blaOXA-23 flanked by ISAba1 within a Tn2006-like structure. AC12-RI1 also harbours resistance determinants for aminoglycosides, tetracyclines and sulphonamides. The 10.3 kb IS26-flanked AC12-RI2 is a derivative of AbGRI2-1, containing aphA1b and blaTEM genes (conferring aminoglycoside and β-lactam resistance, respectively). The presence of numerous genes mediating resistance to various antibiotics in novel RI structures as well as other genes encoding drug transporters and efflux pumps in A. baumannii AC12 most likely contributed to its XDR characteristics. PMID:25481460

  12. M. tuberculosis ferritin (Rv3841): Potential involvement in Amikacin (AK) & Kanamycin (KM) resistance.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Divakar; Lata, Manju; Faheem, Mohammad; Khan, Asad Ullah; Joshi, Beenu; Venkatesan, Krishnamurthy; Shukla, Sangeeta; Bisht, Deepa

    2016-09-16

    Tuberculosis is an infectious disease, caused by one of the most successful human pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Aminoglycosides, Amikacin (AK) & Kanamycin (KM) are commonly used to treat drug resistant tuberculosis. They target the protein synthesis machinery by interacting with several steps of translation. Several explanations have been proposed to explain the mechanism of aminoglycoside resistance but still our information is inadequate. Iron storing/interacting proteins were found to be overexpressed in aminoglycosides resistant isolates. Iron assimilation and utilization in M. tuberculosis plays a crucial role in growth, virulence and latency. To establish the relationship of ferritin with AK & KM resistance ferritin (Rv3841/bfrB) was cloned, expressed and antimicrobial drug susceptibility testing (DST) was carried out. Rv3841/bfrB gene was cloned and expressed in E. coli BL21 using pQE2 expression vector. Etest results for DST against AK & KM showed that the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ferritin recombinant cells was changed. Recombinants showed two fold changes in MIC with AK and three fold with KM E-strips. Overexpression of ferritin reflect the MIC shift which might be playing a critical role in the survival of mycobacteria by inhibiting/modulating the effects of AK & KM. String analysis also suggests that ferritin interacted with few proteins which are directly and indirectly involved in M. tuberculosis growth, Iron assimilation, virulence, resistance, stresses and latency. PMID:27521892

  13. Cloning and expression of resistance gene analogs (RGAs) from wild banana resistant to banana Fusarium wilt.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ya-Ping; Chen, Yun-Feng; Zhao, Jie-Tang; Huang, Xia; Huang, Xue-Lin

    2007-12-01

    Wild banana species are essential natural gene pools for banana improvement. In this study, six RGAs about 500 bp were obtained from leaves of Musa acuminata, a wild banana shown to be resistant to banana Fusarium wilt race 4, by PCR amplification with degenerate primers designed according to the conserved NBS motif and serine/threonine kinase domain of plant resistance (R) genes. Among these RGAs, the deduced amino acids of WNB1 and WNB2 contain NB-ARC domain and WNB1 can be translated into polypeptide uninterrupted by stop codons. The deduced amino acids of other four RGAs (WST1, WST2, WST3 and WST4) all contain the serine/threonine kinase domain and WST3 encodes a polypeptide homologous to that of bacterial blight resistance gene Xa21 of rice. At different time after inoculation with Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (FOC) race 4, the transcript patterns of WNB1 and WST3 was enhanced, which implied that the expression of WNB1 and WST3 may be related to the resistance of banana to Fusarium wilt. PMID:18349511

  14. Cloning of novel rice blast resistance genes from two rapidly evolving NBS-LRR gene families in rice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Changjiang; Sun, Xiaoguang; Chen, Xiao; Yang, Sihai; Li, Jing; Wang, Long; Zhang, Xiaohui

    2016-01-01

    Most rice blast resistance genes (R-genes) encode proteins with nucleotide-binding site (NBS) and leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domains. Our previous study has shown that more rice blast R-genes can be cloned in rapidly evolving NBS-LRR gene families. In the present study, two rapidly evolving R-gene families in rice were selected for cloning a subset of genes from their paralogs in three resistant rice lines. A total of eight functional blast R-genes were identified among nine NBS-LRR genes, and some of these showed resistance to three or more blast strains. Evolutionary analysis indicated that high nucleotide diversity of coding regions served as important parameters in the determination of gene resistance. We also observed that amino-acid variants (nonsynonymous mutations, insertions, or deletions) in essential motifs of the NBS domain contribute to the blast resistance capacity of NBS-LRR genes. These results suggested that the NBS regions might also play an important role in resistance specificity determination. On the other hand, different splicing patterns of introns were commonly observed in R-genes. The results of the present study contribute to improving the effectiveness of R-gene identification by using evolutionary analysis method and acquisition of novel blast resistance genes. PMID:26530637

  15. Designer aminoglycosides prevent cochlear hair cell loss and hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Huth, Markus E.; Han, Kyu-Hee; Sotoudeh, Kayvon; Hsieh, Yi-Ju; Effertz, Thomas; Vu, Andrew A.; Verhoeven, Sarah; Hsieh, Michael H.; Greenhouse, Robert; Cheng, Alan G.; Ricci, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infections represent a rapidly growing challenge to human health. Aminoglycosides are widely used broad-spectrum antibiotics, but they inflict permanent hearing loss in up to ~50% of patients by causing selective sensory hair cell loss. Here, we hypothesized that reducing aminoglycoside entry into hair cells via mechanotransducer channels would reduce ototoxicity, and therefore we synthesized 9 aminoglycosides with modifications based on biophysical properties of the hair cell mechanotransducer channel and interactions between aminoglycosides and the bacterial ribosome. Compared with the parent aminoglycoside sisomicin, all 9 derivatives displayed no or reduced ototoxicity, with the lead compound N1MS 17 times less ototoxic and with reduced penetration of hair cell mechanotransducer channels in rat cochlear cultures. Both N1MS and sisomicin suppressed growth of E. coli and K. pneumoniae, with N1MS exhibiting superior activity against extended spectrum β lactamase producers, despite diminished activity against P. aeruginosa and S. aureus. Moreover, systemic sisomicin treatment of mice resulted in 75% to 85% hair cell loss and profound hearing loss, whereas N1MS treatment preserved both hair cells and hearing. Finally, in mice with E. coli–infected bladders, systemic N1MS treatment eliminated bacteria from urinary tract tissues and serially collected urine samples, without compromising auditory and kidney functions. Together, our findings establish N1MS as a nonototoxic aminoglycoside and support targeted modification as a promising approach to generating nonototoxic antibiotics. PMID:25555219

  16. IS26-Mediated Formation of Transposons Carrying Antibiotic Resistance Genes.

    PubMed

    Harmer, Christopher J; Hall, Ruth M

    2016-01-01

    The IS26 transposase, Tnp26, catalyzes IS26 movement to a new site and deletion or inversion of adjacent DNA via a replicative route. The intramolecular deletion reaction produces a circular molecule consisting of a DNA segment and a single IS26, which we call a translocatable unit or TU. Recently, Tnp26 was shown to catalyze an additional intermolecular, conservative reaction between two preexisting copies of IS26 in different plasmids. Here, we have investigated the relative contributions of homologous recombination and Tnp26-catalyzed reactions to the generation of a transposon from a TU. Circular TUs containing the aphA1a kanamycin and neomycin resistance gene or the tet(D) tetracycline resistance determinant were generated in vitro and transformed into Escherichia coli recA cells carrying R388::IS26. The TU incorporated next to the IS26 in R388::IS26 forms a transposon with the insertion sequence (IS) in direct orientation. Introduction of a second TU produced regions containing both the aphA1a gene and the tet(D) determinant in either order but with only three copies of IS26. The integration reaction, which required a preexisting IS26, was precise and conservative and was 50-fold more efficient when both IS26 copies could produce an active Tnp26. When both ISs were inactivated by a frameshift in tnp26, TU incorporation was not detected in E. coli recA cells, but it did occur in E. coli recA (+) cells. However, the Tnp-catalyzed reaction was 100-fold more efficient than RecA-dependent homologous recombination. The ability of Tnp26 to function in either a replicative or conservative mode is likely to explain the prominence of IS26-bounded transposons in the resistance regions found in Gram-negative bacteria. IMPORTANCE In Gram-negative bacteria, IS26 recruits antibiotic resistance genes into the mobile gene pool by forming transposons carrying many different resistance genes. In addition to replicative transposition, IS26 was recently shown to use a novel

  17. IS26-Mediated Formation of Transposons Carrying Antibiotic Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Harmer, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The IS26 transposase, Tnp26, catalyzes IS26 movement to a new site and deletion or inversion of adjacent DNA via a replicative route. The intramolecular deletion reaction produces a circular molecule consisting of a DNA segment and a single IS26, which we call a translocatable unit or TU. Recently, Tnp26 was shown to catalyze an additional intermolecular, conservative reaction between two preexisting copies of IS26 in different plasmids. Here, we have investigated the relative contributions of homologous recombination and Tnp26-catalyzed reactions to the generation of a transposon from a TU. Circular TUs containing the aphA1a kanamycin and neomycin resistance gene or the tet(D) tetracycline resistance determinant were generated in vitro and transformed into Escherichia coli recA cells carrying R388::IS26. The TU incorporated next to the IS26 in R388::IS26 forms a transposon with the insertion sequence (IS) in direct orientation. Introduction of a second TU produced regions containing both the aphA1a gene and the tet(D) determinant in either order but with only three copies of IS26. The integration reaction, which required a preexisting IS26, was precise and conservative and was 50-fold more efficient when both IS26 copies could produce an active Tnp26. When both ISs were inactivated by a frameshift in tnp26, TU incorporation was not detected in E. coli recA cells, but it did occur in E. coli recA+ cells. However, the Tnp-catalyzed reaction was 100-fold more efficient than RecA-dependent homologous recombination. The ability of Tnp26 to function in either a replicative or conservative mode is likely to explain the prominence of IS26-bounded transposons in the resistance regions found in Gram-negative bacteria. IMPORTANCE In Gram-negative bacteria, IS26 recruits antibiotic resistance genes into the mobile gene pool by forming transposons carrying many different resistance genes. In addition to replicative transposition, IS26 was recently shown to use a

  18. Co-resistance to different classes of antibiotics among ESBL-producers from aquatic systems.

    PubMed

    Tacão, Marta; Moura, Alexandra; Correia, António; Henriques, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    In this study we investigated the co-occurrence of resistance to non-beta-lactams among cefotaxime-resistant extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producers (ESBL(+)) versus non-ESBL producers (ESBL(-)), from aquatic environments. Higher prevalence of resistance to tetracycline, fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides were observed in ESBL(+). Among ESBL(+) resistant to tetracycline (n = 18), tet(A) was detected in 88.9% and tet(B) in 16.7%. Among fluoroquinolone-resistant-ESBL(+) (n = 15), aacA4-cr and qnrVC4 were identified in 26.6% and 40% strains, respectively. The qnrVC4 gene was detected for the first time in Pseudomonas sp. and Escherichia coli. Class 1 integrase genes were detected in 56.41% of ESBL(+) and in 27.67% ESBL(-). Gene cassette arrays identified conferred resistance to aminoglycosides (aadA-type genes and aacA4), trimethoprim (dfrA17), chloramphenicol (catB8), fluoroquinolones (qnrVC4) and beta-lactams (blaOXA-10). Conjugation experiments were performed with CTX-M-producers. Transconjugants showed multiresistance to 3 or more classes of antibiotics, and conjugative plasmids were assigned to IncF, IncK and IncI1 replicons. Results obtained showed that co-selection of resistance to aminoglycosides, quinolones and tetracyclines is prevalent among ESBL-producers and that these features are successfully mobilized by IncF, IncK and IncI1 conjugative plasmids. This study reinforces the importance of natural aquatic systems as reservoir of mobile genetic platforms carrying multiple resistance determinants. Moreover, to the best of our knowledge, this constitutes the first observation of IncK::CTX-M-3 in Aeromonas hydrophila and the first report of IncK plasmids in Portugal. PMID:24091187

  19. Genetic analysis of leaf rust resistance genes and associated markers in the durable resistant wheat cultivar Sinvalocho MA.

    PubMed

    Ingala, L; López, M; Darino, M; Pergolesi, M F; Diéguez, M J; Sacco, F

    2012-05-01

    In the cross of the durable leaf rust resistant wheat Sinvalocho MA and the susceptible line Gama6, four specific genes were identified: the seedling resistance gene Lr3, the adult plant resistance (APR) genes LrSV1 and LrSV2 coming from Sinvalocho MA, and the seedling resistance gene LrG6 coming from Gama6. Lr3 was previously mapped on 6BL in the same cross. LrSV1 was mapped on chromosome 2DS where resistance genes Lr22a and Lr22b have been reported. Results from rust reaction have shown that LrSV1 from Sinvalocho is not the same allele as Lr22b and an allelism test with Lr22a showed that they could be alleles or closely linked genes. LrSV1 was mapped in an 8.5-cM interval delimited by markers gwm296 distal and gwm261 proximal. Adult gene LrSV2 was mapped on chromosome 3BS, cosegregating with gwm533 in a 7.2-cM interval encompassed by markers gwm389 and gwm493, where other disease resistance genes are located, such as seedling gene Lr27 for leaf rust, Sr2 for stem rust, QTL Qfhs.ndsu-3BS for resistance to Fusarium gramineum and wheat powdery mildew resistance. The gene LrG6 was mapped on chromosome 2BL, with the closest marker gwm382 at 0.6 cM. Lines carrying LrSV1, LrSV2 and LrG6 tested under field natural infection conditions, showed low disease infection type and severity, suggesting that this kind of resistance can be explained by additive effects of APR and seedling resistance genes. The identification of new sources of resistance from South American land races and old varieties, supported by modern DNA technology, contributes to sustainability of agriculture through plant breeding. PMID:22278178

  20. Alternatively spliced transcripts of Pi-ta blast resistance gene in Oryza sativa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Pi-ta gene in rice (Oryza sativa L.) confers resistance to races of Magnaporthe oryzae containing its cognate avirulence gene AVR-Pita. Pi-ta is a single-copy gene belonging to the nucleotide-binding site leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) class of plant resistance (R) genes. In the present study, w...

  1. Computational Reclassification of Resistance Gene Analogs in Rosaceae Based on the NBS-LRR Domain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant R genes are known to confer resistance to a variety of pathogens in a gene-for-gene mode. One hundred and ninety-five Rosaceae putative resistance gene analog (RGA) sequences containing conserved NBS-LRR domains were downloaded from the public domain. An additional seventy-six RGAs were amplif...

  2. Diverse and abundant antibiotic resistance genes in Chinese swine farms

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yong-Guan; Johnson, Timothy A.; Su, Jian-Qiang; Qiao, Min; Guo, Guang-Xia; Stedtfeld, Robert D.; Hashsham, Syed A.; Tiedje, James M.

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) are emerging contaminants posing a potential worldwide human health risk. Intensive animal husbandry is believed to be a major contributor to the increased environmental burden of ARGs. Despite the volume of antibiotics used in China, little information is available regarding the corresponding ARGs associated with animal farms. We assessed type and concentrations of ARGs at three stages of manure processing to land disposal at three large-scale (10,000 animals per year) commercial swine farms in China. In-feed or therapeutic antibiotics used on these farms include all major classes of antibiotics except vancomycins. High-capacity quantitative PCR arrays detected 149 unique resistance genes among all of the farm samples, the top 63 ARGs being enriched 192-fold (median) up to 28,000-fold (maximum) compared with their respective antibiotic-free manure or soil controls. Antibiotics and heavy metals used as feed supplements were elevated in the manures, suggesting the potential for coselection of resistance traits. The potential for horizontal transfer of ARGs because of transposon-specific ARGs is implicated by the enrichment of transposases—the top six alleles being enriched 189-fold (median) up to 90,000-fold in manure—as well as the high correlation (r2 = 0.96) between ARG and transposase abundance. In addition, abundance of ARGs correlated directly with antibiotic and metal concentrations, indicating their importance in selection of resistance genes. Diverse, abundant, and potentially mobile ARGs in farm samples suggest that unmonitored use of antibiotics and metals is causing the emergence and release of ARGs to the environment. PMID:23401528

  3. The wheat durable, multipathogen resistance gene Lr34 confers partial blast resistance in rice.

    PubMed

    Krattinger, Simon G; Sucher, Justine; Selter, Liselotte L; Chauhan, Harsh; Zhou, Bo; Tang, Mingzhi; Upadhyaya, Narayana M; Mieulet, Delphine; Guiderdoni, Emmanuel; Weidenbach, Denise; Schaffrath, Ulrich; Lagudah, Evans S; Keller, Beat

    2016-05-01

    The wheat gene Lr34 confers durable and partial field resistance against the obligate biotrophic, pathogenic rust fungi and powdery mildew in adult wheat plants. The resistant Lr34 allele evolved after wheat domestication through two gain-of-function mutations in an ATP-binding cassette transporter gene. An Lr34-like fungal disease resistance with a similar broad-spectrum specificity and durability has not been described in other cereals. Here, we transformed the resistant Lr34 allele into the japonica rice cultivar Nipponbare. Transgenic rice plants expressing Lr34 showed increased resistance against multiple isolates of the hemibiotrophic pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae, the causal agent of rice blast disease. Host cell invasion during the biotrophic growth phase of rice blast was delayed in Lr34-expressing rice plants, resulting in smaller necrotic lesions on leaves. Lines with Lr34 also developed a typical, senescence-based leaf tip necrosis (LTN) phenotype. Development of LTN during early seedling growth had a negative impact on formation of axillary shoots and spikelets in some transgenic lines. One transgenic line developed LTN only at adult plant stage which was correlated with lower Lr34 expression levels at seedling stage. This line showed normal tiller formation and more importantly, disease resistance in this particular line was not compromised. Interestingly, Lr34 in rice is effective against a hemibiotrophic pathogen with a lifestyle and infection strategy that is different from obligate biotrophic rusts and mildew fungi. Lr34 might therefore be used as a source in rice breeding to improve broad-spectrum disease resistance against the most devastating fungal disease of rice. PMID:26471973

  4. Synthesis of 4'-aminopantetheine and derivatives to probe aminoglycoside N-6'-acetyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xuxu; Akinnusi, T Olukayode; Larsen, Aaron T; Auclair, Karine

    2011-03-01

    A convenient synthesis of 4'-aminopantetheine from commercial D-pantethine is reported. The amino group was introduced by reductive amination in order to avoid substitution at a sterically congested position. Derivatives of 4'-aminopantetheine were also prepared to evaluate the effect of O-to-N substitution on inhibitors of the resistance-causing enzyme aminoglycoside N-6'-acetyltransferase. The biological results combined with docking studies indicate that in spite of its reported unusual flexibility and ability to adopt different folds, this enzyme is highly specific for AcCoA. PMID:21225062

  5. Synthesis of 4′-aminopantetheine and derivatives to probe aminoglycoside N-6′-acetyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xuxu; Akinnusi, T. Olukayode; Larsen, Aaron T.; Auclair, Karine

    2011-01-01

    Summary A convenient synthesis of 4′-aminopantetheine from commercial D-pantethine is reported. The amino group was introduced by reductive amination in order to avoid substitution at a sterically congested position. Derivatives of 4′-aminopantetheine were also prepared to evaluate the effect of O-to-N substitution on inhibitors of the resistance-causing enzyme aminoglycoside N-6′-acetyltransferase. The biological results combined with docking studies indicate that in spite of its reported unusual flexibility and ability to adopt different folds, this enzyme is highly specific for AcCoA. PMID:21225062

  6. Identification of a new locus Ptr(t) required for rice blast resistance gene Pi-ta-mediated resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance to the blast pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae is proposed to be initiated by physical binding of a putative cytoplasmic receptor encoded by a NBS-type resistance gene, Pi-ta, to the processed elicitor encoded by the corresponding avirulence gene AVR-Pita. Here we report the identification of a...

  7. Zinc-resistance gene czrC identified in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus hyicus isolated from pigs with exudative epidermitis

    PubMed Central

    Slifierz, Mackenzie J.; Park, Jeonghwa; Friendship, Robert M.; Weese, J. Scott

    2014-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus hyicus (MRSH) was investigated for czrC, a gene conferring zinc-resistance. The czrC gene was identified in 50% (14/28) of MRSH isolates, representing 14 pigs with exudative epidermitis from 8 farms. Newly weaned pigs, which are particularly susceptible to exudative epidermitis, are commonly fed high levels of zinc oxide. PMID:24790238

  8. Zinc-resistance gene CzrC identified in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus hyicus isolated from pigs with exudative epidermitis.

    PubMed

    Slifierz, Mackenzie J; Park, Jeonghwa; Friendship, Robert M; Weese, J Scott

    2014-05-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus hyicus (MRSH) was investigated for czrC, a gene conferring zinc-resistance. The czrC gene was identified in 50% (14/28) of MRSH isolates, representing 14 pigs with exudative epidermitis from 8 farms. Newly weaned pigs, which are particularly susceptible to exudative epidermitis, are commonly fed high levels of zinc oxide. PMID:24790238

  9. Antimicrobial Resistance and Resistance Genes in Aerobic Bacteria Isolated from Pork at Slaughter.

    PubMed

    Li, Lili; Olsen, Rikke Heidemann; Ye, Lei; Yan, He; Nie, Qing; Meng, Hecheng; Shi, Lei

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the phenotypic and genotypic antimicrobial resistance, integrons, and transferability of resistance markers in 243 aerobic bacteria recovered from pork at slaughter in the People's Republic of China. The organisms belonged to 22 genera of gram-negative bacteria (92.2%) and gram-positive bacteria (7.8%). High levels of resistance were detected to tetracycline, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and ampicillin (36.2 to 54.3%), and lower levels were detected to nitrofurantoin, cefotaxime, gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, and chloramphenicol (7.8 to 29.2%). Across species, genes conferring antimicrobial resistance were observed with the following frequencies: blaTEM, 40.7%; blaCMY-2, 15.2%; blaCTX-M, 11.5%; sul2, 27.2%; sul1, 14.4%; tet(A), 5.4%; tet(L), 5.4%; tet(M), 5.0%; tet(E), 3.7%; tet(C), 3.3%; tet(S), 2.5%; and tet(K), 0.8%. Various antimicrobial resistance genes were found in new carriers: blaTEM in Lactococcus garvieae, Myroides odoratimimus, Aeromonas hydrophila, Staphylococcus sciuri, Raoultella terrigena, Macrococcus caseolyticus, Acinetobacter ursingii, Sphingobacterium sp., and Oceanobacillus sp.; blaCMY-2 in Lactococcus lactis, Klebsiella oxytoca, Serratia marcescens, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Myroides phaeus; tet(L) in M. caseolyticus; sul1 in Vibrio cincinnatiensis; sul2 in Acinetobacter bereziniae, Acinetobacter johnsonii, and V. cincinnatiensis; and the class 1 integron and gene cassette aadA2 in V. cincinnatiensis. Approximately 6.6% of isolates contained class 1 integrons, and one isolate harbored class 2 integrons. Plasmid associated intI1 and androgen receptor- encoding genes were transferred into Escherichia coli J53 and E. coli DH5α by conjugation and transformation experiments, respectively. Our study highlights the importance of aerobic bacteria from pork as reservoirs for antimicrobial resistance genes and mobile genetic elements that can readily be transferred intra- and interspecies. PMID:27052863

  10. Genes related to chromate resistance by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Sonia L; Vargas, Eréndira; Ramírez-Díaz, Martha I; Campos-García, Jesús; Cervantes, Carlos

    2008-08-01

    Chromate-hypersensitive mutants of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 strain were isolated using transposon-insertion mutagenesis. Comparison of the nucleotide sequences of the regions interrupted in the mutants with the PAO1 genome revealed that the genes affected in three mutant strains were oprE (ORF PA0291), rmlA (ORF PA5163), and ftsK (ORF PA2615), respectively. A relationship of these genes with chromate tolerance has not been previously reported. No other phenotypic changes were observed in the oprE mutant but its resistance to chromate was not fully restored by expressing the ChrA protein, which extrudes chromate ions from the cytoplasm to the periplasmic space. These data suggest that OprE participates in the efflux of chromate from the periplasm to the outside. Increased susceptibility of the rmlA mutant to the metals cadmium and mercury and to the anion-superoxide generator paraquat suggests a protective role of LPS against chromate toxicity. A higher susceptibility of the ftsK mutant to compounds affecting DNA structure (ciprofloxacin, tellurite, mitomycin C) suggests a role of FtsK in the recombinational repair of DNA damage caused by chromate. In conclusion, the P. aeruginosa genome contains diverse genes related to its intrinsic resistance to chromate. Systems pertaining to the outer membrane (OprE), the cell wall (LPS), and the cytoplasm (FtsK) were identified in this work as involved in chromate protection mechanisms. PMID:18446454

  11. Monitoring and Comparison of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria and Their Resistance Genes in Municipal and Hospital Wastewaters

    PubMed Central

    Aali, Rahim; Nikaeen, Mahnaz; Khanahmad, Hossein; Hassanzadeh, Akbar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Human exposure to antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) is a public health concern which could occur in a number of ways. Wastewaters seem to play an important role in the dissemination of bacteria and antibiotic resistant genes (ARGs) in our environment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of three groups of ARB and their resistance genes in hospital and municipal wastewaters (MWs) as possible sources. Methods: A total of 66 samples were collected from raw MWs and hospital wastewaters (HWs) and final effluents of related wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Samples were analyzed for the detection of three groups of ARB including gentamicin (GM), chloramphenicol (CHL) and ceftazidime resistant bacteria and their ARGs (aac (3)-1, cmlA1 and ctx-m-32, respectively). Results: The mean concentration of GM, CHL and ceftazidime resistant bacteria in raw wastewater samples was 1.24 × 107, 3.29 × 107 and 5.54 × 107 colony forming unit/100 ml, respectively. There is a variation in prevalence of different groups of ARB in MWs and HWs. All WWTPs decreased the concentration of ARB. However, high concentration of ARB was found in the final effluent of WWTPs. Similar to ARB, different groups of ARGs were found frequently in both MWs and HWs. All genes also detected with a relative high frequency in effluent samples of MWs WWTPs. Conclusions: Discharge of final effluent from conventional WWTPs is a potential route for dissemination of ARB and ARGs into the natural environment and poses a hazard to environmental and public health. PMID:25105001

  12. Analysis of Antimicrobial Resistance Genes in Multiple Drug Resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica Isolated from Animals and Humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Multiple Drug Resistant (MDR) foodborne bacteria are a concern in animal and human health. Identification of resistance genes in foodborne pathogens is necessary to determine similarities of resistance mechanisms in animal, food and human clinical isolates. This information will help us ...

  13. A review of the influence of treatment strategies on antibiotic resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Virender K; Johnson, Natalie; Cizmas, Leslie; McDonald, Thomas J; Kim, Hyunook

    2016-05-01

    Antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARG) in the aquatic environment have become an emerging contaminant issue, which has implications for human and ecological health. This review begins with an introduction to the occurrence of ARB and ARG in different environmental systems such as natural environments and drinking water resources. For example, ARG or ARB with resistance to ciprofloxacin, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim, quinolone, vancomycin, or tetracycline (e.g., tet(A), tet(B), tet(C), tet(G), tet(O), tet(M), tet(W), sul I, and sul II) have been detected in the environment. The development of resistance may be intrinsic, may be acquired through spontaneous mutations (de novo), or may occur due to horizontal gene transfer from donor bacteria, phages, or free DNA to recipient bacteria. An overview is also provided of the current knowledge regarding inactivation of ARB and ARG, and the mechanism of the effects of different disinfection processes in water and wastewater (chlorination, UV irradiation, Fenton reaction, ozonation, and photocatalytic oxidation). The effects of constructed wetlands and nanotechnology on ARB and ARG are also summarized. PMID:26775188

  14. Functional Cloning and Characterization of Antibiotic Resistance Genes from the Chicken Gut Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wei; Wang, Ying

    2012-01-01

    Culture-independent sampling in conjunction with a functional cloning approach identified diverse antibiotic resistance genes for different classes of antibiotics in gut microbiomes from both conventionally raised and free-range chickens. Many of the genes are phylogenetically distant from known resistance genes. Two unique genes that conferred ampicillin and spectinomycin resistance were also functional in Campylobacter, a distant relative of the Escherichia coli host used to generate the genomic libraries. PMID:22286984

  15. Fate of antibiotic resistant cultivable heterotrophic bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes in wastewater treatment processes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Songhe; Han, Bing; Gu, Ju; Wang, Chao; Wang, Peifang; Ma, Yanyan; Cao, Jiashun; He, Zhenli

    2015-09-01

    Antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) are emerging contaminants of environmental concern. Heterotrophic bacteria in activated sludge have an important role in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). However, the fate of cultivable heterotrophic ARB and ARGs in WWPTs process remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the antibiotic-resistant phenotypes of cultivable heterotrophic bacteria from influent and effluent water of three WWTPs and analysed thirteen ARGs in ARB and in activated sludge from anoxic, anaerobic and aerobic compartments. From each influent or effluent sample of the three plants, 200 isolates were randomly tested for susceptibility to 12 antibiotics. In these samples, between 5% and 64% isolates showed resistance to >9 antibiotics and the proportion of >9-drug-resistant bacteria was lower in isolates from effluent than from influent. Eighteen genera were identified in 188 isolates from influent (n=94) and effluent (n=94) of one WWTP. Six genera (Aeromonas, Bacillus, Lysinibacillus, Microbacterium, Providencia, and Staphylococcus) were detected in both influent and effluent samples. Gram-negative and -positive isolates dominated in influent and effluent, respectively. The 13 tetracycline-, sulphonamide-, streptomycin- and β-lactam-resistance genes were detected at a higher frequency in ARB from influent than from effluent, except for sulA and CTX-M, while in general, the abundances of ARGs in activated sludge from two of the three plants were higher in aerobic compartments than in anoxic ones, indicating abundant ARGs exit in the excess sledges and/or in uncultivable bacteria. These findings may be useful for elucidating the effect of WWTP on ARB and ARGs. PMID:25950407

  16. Termite usage associated with antibiotic therapy: enhancement of aminoglycoside antibiotic activity by natural products of Nasutitermes corniger (Motschulsky 1855)

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho, Henrique DM; Vasconcellos, Alexandre; Lima, Micheline A; Almeida-Filho, Geraldo G; Alves, Rômulo RN

    2009-01-01

    Background Several species from Insecta are used as remedies. Among these species, the termite Nasutitermes corniger is commonly used in traditional medicine in Northeast Brazil. The present work tests the modifying antibiotic activity of Nasutitermes corniger, a termite used in folk medicine in Northeastern region of Brazil. Methods Chlorpromazine and decocts of N. corniger were collected from two different plant species used in the traditional medicine were tested for their antimicrobial activity against strains of Escherichia coli resistant to aminoglycosides. The growth of two bacterial strains of E. coli was tested using decocts and chlorpromazine alone or associeted with aminogycosides. Results The MIC and MBC values were ≥1024 μg/ml for both strains of E. coli assayed. A significant synergism was observed between both decocts and chlorpromazine when assyed with neomycin. This synergism with neomycin indicates the involvement of an efflux system in the resistance to this aminoglycoside. Conclusion Therefore it is suggested that natural products from N. corniger could be used as a source of zoo-derived natural products with modifying antibiotic activity to aminoglycosides, being a new weapon against the bacterial resistance to antibiotics. PMID:19761599

  17. Fertilizing with Animal Manure Disseminates Antibiotic Resistance Genes to the Farm Environment.

    PubMed

    Ruuskanen, Matti; Muurinen, Johanna; Meierjohan, Axel; Pärnänen, Katariina; Tamminen, Manu; Lyra, Christina; Kronberg, Leif; Virta, Marko

    2016-03-01

    The dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes to the environment is an important factor causing increased prevalence of resistant pathogens. Manure is an important fertilizer, but it contains diverse resistance genes. Therefore, its application to fields may lead to increased abundance of resistance genes in the environment. Farming environments exposed to animal manure have not been studied extensively in countries with comparably low antibiotic use, such as Finland. The effects of manure storage and application to fields on the abundance of resistance genes were studied on two dairy cattle farms and two swine farms in southern Finland. Samples were taken from farms during the 2013 cropping season. Copy numbers of carbapenem (), sulfonamide (), and tetracycline () resistance genes were measured with quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and the data were analyzed using linear mixed models. The relative abundance of antibiotic resistance genes increased about fourfold in soil after manure application. Carbapenemase encoding was detected on all of the studied farms, which indicated that the gene is dispersed in the farm environment. The relative abundance of antibiotic resistance genes increased in stored manure compared with fresh manure roughly fivefold. This study shows that antibiotic resistance genes are disseminated on Finnish production animal farms. The spreading of resistance genes in farm-associated environments could possibly be limited by experimenting with new manure handling methods that could reduce the abundance of the genes in manure used for land application. PMID:27065395

  18. Pyramiding, alternating or mixing: comparative performances of deployment strategies of nematode resistance genes to promote plant resistance efficiency and durability

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Resistant cultivars are key elements for pathogen control and pesticide reduction, but their repeated use may lead to the emergence of virulent pathogen populations, able to overcome the resistance. Increased research efforts, mainly based on theoretical studies, explore spatio-temporal deployment strategies of resistance genes in order to maximize their durability. We evaluated experimentally three of these strategies to control root-knot nematodes: cultivar mixtures, alternating and pyramiding resistance genes, under controlled and field conditions over a 3-years period, assessing the efficiency and the durability of resistance in a protected crop rotation system with pepper as summer crop and lettuce as winter crop. Results The choice of the resistance gene and the genetic background in which it is introgressed, affected the frequency of resistance breakdown. The pyramiding of two different resistance genes in one genotype suppressed the emergence of virulent isolates. Alternating different resistance genes in rotation was also efficient to decrease virulent populations in fields due to the specificity of the virulence and the trapping effect of resistant plants. Mixing resistant cultivars together appeared as a less efficient strategy to control nematodes. Conclusions This work provides experimental evidence that, in a cropping system with seasonal sequences of vegetable species, pyramiding or alternating resistance genes benefit yields in the long-term by increasing the durability of resistant cultivars and improving the long-term control of a soil-borne pest. To our knowledge, this result is the first one obtained for a plant-nematode interaction, which helps demonstrate the general applicability of such strategies for breeding and sustainable management of resistant cultivars against pathogens. PMID:24559060

  19. Diversity of antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes in methicillin-resistant non-Staphylococcus aureus staphylococci from veal calves.

    PubMed

    Argudín, M Angeles; Vanderhaeghen, Wannes; Butaye, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    In this study we determined whether methicillin-resistant non-Staphylococcus aureus (MRNAS) from veal calves may be a potential reservoir of antimicrobial-resistance and virulence genes. Fifty-eight MRNAS were studied by means of DNA-microarray and PCR for detection of antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes. The isolates carried a variety of antimicrobial-resistance genes [aacA-aphD, aadD, aph3, aadE, sat, spc, ampA, erm(A), erm(B), erm(C), erm(F), erm(T), lnu(A), msr(A)-msr(B), vga(A), mph(C), tet(K), tet(M), tet(L), cat, fexA, dfrA, dfrD, dfrG, dfrK, cfr, fusB, fosB, qacA, qacC, merA-merB]. Some isolates carried resistance genes without showing the corresponding resistance phenotype. Most MRNAS carried typical S. aureus virulence factors like proteases (sspP) and enterotoxins (seg) genes. Most Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates carried the arginine catabolic element, and nearly 40% of the Staphylococcus sciuri isolates carried leukocidins, and/or fibronectin-binding protein genes. MRNAS were highly multi-resistant and represent an important reservoir of antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes. PMID:25637268

  20. Survival of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria and Horizontal Gene Transfer Control Antibiotic Resistance Gene Content in Anaerobic Digesters

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jennifer H.; Novak, John T.; Knocke, William R.; Pruden, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Understanding fate of antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) vs. their antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) during wastewater sludge treatment is critical in order to reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance through process optimization. Here, we spiked high concentrations of tetracycline-resistant bacteria, isolated from mesophilic (Iso M1-1—a Pseudomonas sp.) and thermophilic (Iso T10—a Bacillus sp.) anaerobic digested sludge, into batch digesters and monitored their fate by plate counts and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) of their corresponding tetracycline ARGs. In batch studies, spiked ARB plate counts returned to baseline (thermophilic) or 1-log above baseline (mesophilic) while levels of the ARG present in the spiked isolate [tet(G)] remained high in mesophilic batch reactors. To compare results under semi-continuous flow conditions with natural influent variation, tet(O), tet(W), and sul1 ARGs, along with the intI1 integrase gene, were monitored over a 9-month period in the raw feed sludge and effluent sludge of lab-scale thermophilic and mesophilic anaerobic digesters. sul1 and intI1 in mesophilic and thermophilic digesters correlated positively (Spearman rho = 0.457–0.829, P < 0.05) with the raw feed sludge. There was no correlation in tet(O) or tet(W) ratios in raw sludge and mesophilic digested sludge or thermophilic digested sludge (Spearman rho = 0.130–0.486, P = 0.075–0.612). However, in the thermophilic digester, the tet(O) and tet(W) ratios remained consistently low over the entire monitoring period. We conclude that the influent sludge microbial composition can influence the ARG content of a digester, apparently as a result of differential survival or death of ARBs or horizontal gene transfer of genes between raw sludge ARBs and the digester microbial community. Notably, mesophilic digestion was more susceptible to ARG intrusion than thermophilic digestion, which may be attributed to a higher rate of ARB survival and

  1. Survival of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria and Horizontal Gene Transfer Control Antibiotic Resistance Gene Content in Anaerobic Digesters.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jennifer H; Novak, John T; Knocke, William R; Pruden, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Understanding fate of antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) vs. their antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) during wastewater sludge treatment is critical in order to reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance through process optimization. Here, we spiked high concentrations of tetracycline-resistant bacteria, isolated from mesophilic (Iso M1-1-a Pseudomonas sp.) and thermophilic (Iso T10-a Bacillus sp.) anaerobic digested sludge, into batch digesters and monitored their fate by plate counts and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) of their corresponding tetracycline ARGs. In batch studies, spiked ARB plate counts returned to baseline (thermophilic) or 1-log above baseline (mesophilic) while levels of the ARG present in the spiked isolate [tet(G)] remained high in mesophilic batch reactors. To compare results under semi-continuous flow conditions with natural influent variation, tet(O), tet(W), and sul1 ARGs, along with the intI1 integrase gene, were monitored over a 9-month period in the raw feed sludge and effluent sludge of lab-scale thermophilic and mesophilic anaerobic digesters. sul1 and intI1 in mesophilic and thermophilic digesters correlated positively (Spearman rho = 0.457-0.829, P < 0.05) with the raw feed sludge. There was no correlation in tet(O) or tet(W) ratios in raw sludge and mesophilic digested sludge or thermophilic digested sludge (Spearman rho = 0.130-0.486, P = 0.075-0.612). However, in the thermophilic digester, the tet(O) and tet(W) ratios remained consistently low over the entire monitoring period. We conclude that the influent sludge microbial composition can influence the ARG content of a digester, apparently as a result of differential survival or death of ARBs or horizontal gene transfer of genes between raw sludge ARBs and the digester microbial community. Notably, mesophilic digestion was more susceptible to ARG intrusion than thermophilic digestion, which may be attributed to a higher rate of ARB survival and/or horizontal gene

  2. Aminoglycoside-induced cochlear pathology in man.

    PubMed

    Johnsson, L G; Hawkins, J E; Kingsley, T C; Black, F O; Matz, G J

    1981-01-01

    Temporal bones from five patients with hearing loss as a result of aminoglycoside treatment were examined by the method of microdissection and surface preparations, followed by celloidin embedding and serial sectioning of the modiolus. Three patients had received the newer antibiotics, gentamicin, tobramycin, and amikacin; the other two neomycin. In the cochleas from two patients of the first group there was only a small loss of hair cells, restricted to the lower end of the basal turn. The third, who had been treated with several antibiotics over a longer period of time, showed more extensive but strikingly asymmetrical patterns of degeneration in the two ears. This patient, as well as the fourth, who had received neomycin during peritoneal lavage, had numerous patchy areas of complete disappearance of Corti's organ in the basal turn, with incipient degeneration of the distal ends of the nerve fibers in adjacent portions of the osseous spiral lamina. The fifth patient, who had become deaf after prolonged treatment with neomycin by mouth, showed a complete loss of cochlear hair cells. Nerve fibers were present only in the middle and upper turns, where supporting cells remained. Midmodiolar sections showed a proportionately much greater loss of the distal than of the proximal processes of the cells of the spiral ganglion. These findings underscore once again the special hazard for the inner ear that is associated with the clinical use of neomycin, regardless of the route of administration. PMID:6282040

  3. Novel Genes Related to Ceftriaxone Resistance Found among Ceftriaxone-Resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae Strains Selected In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Gong, Zijian; Lai, Wei; Liu, Min; Hua, Zhengshuang; Sun, Yayin; Xu, Qingfang; Xia, Yue; Zhao, Yue; Xie, Xiaoyuan

    2016-04-01

    The emergence of ceftriaxone-resistantNeisseria gonorrhoeaeis currently a global public health concern. However, the mechanism of ceftriaxone resistance is not yet fully understood. To investigate the potential genes related to ceftriaxone resistance inNeisseria gonorrhoeae, we subcultured six gonococcal strains with increasing concentrations of ceftriaxone and isolated the strains that became resistant. After analyzing several frequently reported genes involved in ceftriaxone resistance, we found only a single mutation inpenA(A501V). However, differential analysis of the genomes and transcriptomes between pre- and postselection strains revealed many other mutated genes as well as up- and downregulated genes. Transformation of the mutatedpenAgene into nonresistant strains increased the MIC between 2.0- and 5.3-fold, and transformation of mutatedftsXincreased the MIC between 3.3- and 13.3-fold. Genes encoding the ABC transporters FarB, Tfq, Hfq, and ExbB were overexpressed, whilepilM,pilN, andpilQwere downregulated. Furthermore, the resistant strain developed cross-resistance to penicillin and cefuroxime, had an increased biochemical metabolic rate, and presented fitness defects such as prolonged growth time and downregulated PilMNQ. In conclusion, antimicrobial pressure could result in the emergence of ceftriaxone resistance, and the evolution of resistance ofNeisseria gonorrhoeaeto ceftriaxone is a complicated process at both the pretranscriptional and posttranscriptional levels, involving several resistance mechanisms of increased efflux and decreased entry. PMID:26787702

  4. Distribution and quantification of antibiotic resistance genes and bacteria across agricultural and non-agricultural metagenomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is concern that antibiotic resistance can potentially be transferred from animals to humans through the food chain. The relationship between specific antibiotic resistant bacteria and the genes they carry remains to be described and few details are known about how antibiotic resistance genes i...

  5. Resistance Gene Analogs in Rosaceae: Family-wide Classification Including Raspberry, Cherry, and Wild Apples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic studies have shown that NBS-LRR Resistance Gene Analogs (RGAs)tend to occur in clusters and often map to major resistance genes or QTLs. The identification and use of specific RGAs as molecular markers among plant material displaying different resistance phenotypes has the potential to direc...

  6. Development of wheat lines having a small introgressed segment carrying stem rust resistance gene Sr22

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The wheat stem rust resistance gene Sr22 confers resistance to Puccinia graminis race TTKSK (also known as Ug99) that developed in Africa and is an immediate threat to world wheat production. The resistance gene is present on a chromosomal translocation derived from Triticum boeoticum Boiss., whic...

  7. High throughput LSPR and SERS analysis of aminoglycoside antibiotics.

    PubMed

    McKeating, Kristy S; Couture, Maxime; Dinel, Marie-Pier; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie; Masson, Jean-Francois

    2016-08-15

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics are used in the treatment of infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria, and are often dispensed only in severe cases due to their adverse side effects. Patients undergoing treatment with these antibiotics are therefore commonly subjected to therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) to ensure a safe and effective personalised dosage. The ability to detect these antibiotics in a rapid and sensitive manner in human fluids is therefore of the utmost importance in order to provide effective monitoring of these drugs, which could potentially allow for a more widespread use of this class of antibiotics. Herein, we report on the detection of various aminoglycosides, by exploiting their ability to aggregate gold nanoparticles. The number and position of the amino groups of aminoglycoside antibiotics controlled the aggregation process. We investigated the complementary techniques of surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) for dual detection of these aminoglycoside antibiotics and performed an in-depth study of the feasibility of carrying out TDM of tobramycin using a platform amenable to high throughput analysis. Herein, we also demonstrate dual detection of tobramycin using both LSPR and SERS in a single platform and within the clinically relevant concentration range needed for TDM of this particular aminoglycoside. Additionally we provide evidence that tobramycin can be detected in spiked human serum using only functionalised nanoparticles and SERS analysis. PMID:27412506

  8. 21 CFR 173.170 - Aminoglycoside 3′-phospho-trans-ferase II.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.170 Aminoglycoside 3′-phospho... prescribed conditions: (a) The food additive is the enzyme aminoglycoside 3′-phosphotransferase II (CAS...

  9. 21 CFR 173.170 - Aminoglycoside 3′-phospho-trans-ferase II.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.170 Aminoglycoside 3′-phospho... prescribed conditions: (a) The food additive is the enzyme aminoglycoside 3′-phosphotransferase II (CAS...

  10. 21 CFR 173.170 - Aminoglycoside 3′-phospho-trans-ferase II.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.170 Aminoglycoside 3′-phospho... prescribed conditions: (a) The food additive is the enzyme aminoglycoside 3′-phosphotransferase II (CAS...

  11. 21 CFR 173.170 - Aminoglycoside 3′-phospho-trans-ferase II.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.170 Aminoglycoside 3′-phospho-trans... prescribed conditions: (a) The food additive is the enzyme aminoglycoside 3′-phosphotransferase II (CAS...

  12. Isolation and Diversity Analysis of Resistance Gene Homologues from Switchgrass

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qihui; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L.; Smith, Shavannor M.

    2013-01-01

    Resistance gene homologs (RGHs) were isolated from the switchgrass variety Alamo by a combination of polymerase chain reaction and expressed sequence tag (EST) database mining. Fifty-eight RGHs were isolated by polymerase chain reaction and 295 RGHs were identified in 424,545 switchgrass ESTs. Four nucleotide binding site−leucine-rich repeat RGHs were selected to investigate RGH haplotypic diversity in seven switchgrass varieties chosen for their representation of a broad range of the switchgrass germplasm. Lowland and upland ecotypes were found to be less similar, even from nearby populations, than were more distant populations with similar growth environments. Most (83.5%) of the variability in these four RGHs was found to be attributable to the within-population component. The difference in nucleotide diversity between and within populations was observed to be small, whereas this diversity is maintained to similar degrees at both population and ecotype levels. The results also revealed that the analyzed RGHs were under positive selection in the studied switchgrass accessions. Intragenic recombination was detected in switchgrass RGHs, thereby demonstrating an active genetic process that has the potential to generate new resistance genes with new specificities that might act against newly-arising pathogen races. PMID:23589518

  13. Gene expression patterns of wheat rust resistance gene Lr34/Yr18 indicate novel mode of action

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Lr34/Yr18 resistance gene provides durable, adult-plant, slow-rusting resistance to leaf rust and yellow rust of wheat. Patterns of gene expression were examined by microarray analysis in inoculated and mock-inoculated flag leaves of two pairs of near isogenic lines for Lr34/Yr18 (Thatcher/Thatc...

  14. Apramycin resistance as a selective marker for gene transfer in mycobacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Paget, E; Davies, J

    1996-01-01

    We have explored the potential of using the apramycin resistance gene as a marker in mycobacterial gene transfer studies. Shuttle plasmids available for both electroporation and conjugation studies have been constructed, and we have successfully validated the use of the apramycin resistance gene as a component of cloning vectors for Mycobacterium smegmatis, M. bovis BCG, and M. tuberculosis. PMID:8892841

  15. Influence of Rice Development on the Function of Bacterial Blight Resistance Genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Disease resistance genes most commonly used in breeding programs are single, dominant, resistance (R) genes with relative effectiveness influenced by plant developmental stage. Knowing the developmental stages at which an R gene is functional is important for disease management. In rice, resistanc...

  16. H33: A wheat gene providing Hessian fly resistance for the southeastern United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although more than 33 genes have been identified that confer resistance against Hessian fly attack in wheat, only five genes are currently effective against fly populations in the southeastern US. Because Hessian fly populations adapt to overcome newly deployed resistance genes within a few years of...

  17. Integrated immunogenomics in the chicken: Deciphering the immune response to identify disease resistance genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance to infection takes place at many levels, and involves both non-specific and specific immune mechanisms. The chicken has a different repertoire of immune genes, molecules, cells and organs compared to mammals. To understand the role of any disease resistance gene(s), it is therefore impo...

  18. Mitochondrial 12S ribosomal RNA A1555G mutation associated with cardiomyopathy and hearing loss following high-dose chemotherapy and repeated aminoglycoside exposure.

    PubMed

    Skou, Anne-Sofie; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; Jensen, Tim; Hasle, Henrik

    2014-02-01

    A 19-month-old girl with the A1555G mitochondrial mutation in the 12S ribosomal RNA gene and acute myelogenous leukemia developed dilated cardiomyopathy and bilateral sensorineural hearing loss before undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation. She had received gentamicin during episodes of febrile neutropenia. Testing for the A1555G mutation is recommended in patients frequently treated with aminoglycosides. PMID:24252789

  19. Can chlorination co-select antibiotic-resistance genes?

    PubMed

    Lin, Wenfang; Zhang, Menglu; Zhang, Shenghua; Yu, Xin

    2016-08-01

    Selective pressures, such as chemical or heavy metal pollution, may co-select for bacterial antibiotic resistance in the environment. However, whether chlorination in water treatment can co-select antibiotic-resistant bacteria is controversial. In this study, high capacity quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis was applied to target almost all known antibiotic-resistance genes (ARGs) (282 types) and 13 mobile genetic elements (MGEs) in bacteria detected in secondary effluents from a municipal wastewater treatment plant after chlorination. The results revealed that 125 unique ARGs were detected in non-chlorinated samples, and the number decreased (79-91 types) as the chlorine concentration was increased. Moreover, 7.49 × 10(4)-3.92 × 10(7) copies/100 ml water reduction of ARGs occurred with 4 mg Cl2/l. Considering the relative abundance of ARGs (i.e., ARG copies normalized to 16S rRNA gene copies), 119 ARGs decreased in response to chlorination, whereas only six ARGs, such as dfrA1, tetPB-03, tetPA, ampC-04, tetA-02, and erm(36), were potentially enriched by 10.90-, 10.06-, 8.63-, 6.86-, 3.77-, and 1.09-fold, respectively. Furthermore, the relative abundance of 12 detected MGEs was lower after chlorination. Therefore, chlorination was effective in reducing ARGs and MGEs rather than co-selecting them. PMID:27192478

  20. Gene Expression Profiling Analysis of Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuelei; Wen, Jiling; Li, Rongbing; Qiu, Guangming; Zhou, Lan; Wen, Xiaofei

    2015-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer is a global health issue. Usually, men with metastatic disease will progress to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). We aimed to identify the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in tumor samples from non-castrated and castrated men from LNCaP Orthotopic xenograft models of prostate cancer and to study the mechanisms of CRPC. Material/Methods In this work, GSE46218 containing 4 samples from non-castrated men and 4 samples from castrated men was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus. We identified DEGs using limma Geoquery in R, the Robust Multi-array Average (RMA) method in Bioconductor, and Bias methods, followed by constructing an integrated regulatory network involving DEGs, miRNAs, and TFs using Cytoscape. Then, we analyzed network motifs of the integrated gene regulatory network using FANMOD. We selected regulatory modules corresponding to network motifs from the integrated regulatory network by Perl script. We preformed gene ontology (GO) and pathway enrichment analysis of DEGs in the regulatory modules using DAVID. Results We identified total 443 DEGs. We built an integrated regulatory network, found three motifs (motif 1, motif 2 and motif 3), and got two function modules (module 1 corresponded to motif 1, and module 2 corresponded to motif 2). Several GO terms (such as regulation of cell proliferation, positive regulation of macromolecule metabolic process, phosphorylation, and phosphorus metabolic process) and two pathways (pathway in cancer and Melanoma) were enriched. Furthermore, some significant DEGs (such as CAV1, LYN, FGFR3 and FGFR3) were related to CPRC development. Conclusions These genes might play important roles in the development and progression of CRPC. PMID:25592164

  1. Relationship of cyst nematode gene frequencies to soybean resistance.

    PubMed

    Luedders, V D

    1989-06-01

    Soybean (S, Glycine max (L.) Merr.) lines with relatively few cysts of soybean cyst nematode (CN, Heterodera glycines Ichinohe) populations are usually called CN-resistant. The phenotype of number of cysts per plant is of the CN-S (Cyst Nematode-Soybean) association and determined by the interactions of genes for avirulence-resistance. The acronym "alins" was proposed for these alleles for incompatibility, with "xalin" representing the interaction X of one microsymbiont malin with its host h-alin. These alins are dominant in the gene-for-gene model but may be mostly recessive with CN-S. Definitive genetic studies have been hindered by the heterogeneity of sexually reproducing CN populations and lack of the appropriate genetic models. Loegering's abstract interorganismal genetic model was modified so that one model represented all four possible interactions of dominant-recessive alins for an incompatible phenotype. This involved redefining the Boolean algebra symbol 1 to represent both the alins AND their frequencies. The model was used to derive the relationship: {ie893-01} where the expectation E of cysts (of any CN-S combination, as proportion of number of cysts on a check cultivar) is proportional to the product Π of CN genotypic frequencies expressed as functions of m-alin frequencies. Each m-alin is at a different locus, i.e., {ie893-02}. The number of terms multiplied for each CN-S is equal to the number of alins in the S line (or F2 plant). There are too many unknowns in the equation to solve for any of them. The relationship does explain the continuous distributions of phenotypes that were nearly always observed. Basic genetic principles were used to concurrently derive the models and to obtain discontinuous distributions of numbers of cyst phenotypes in segregating generations due to one recessive alin in a CN-"susceptible" soybean line. PMID:24232909

  2. Misread protein creates membrane channels: an essential step in the bactericidal action of aminoglycosides.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, B D; Chen, L L; Tai, P C

    1986-01-01

    Among the pleiotropic effects of aminoglycosides, their irreversible uptake and their blockade of initiating ribosomes have appeared to explain their bactericidal action, while the contributions of translational misreading and membrane damage and the mechanism of that damage have remained uncertain. We now present evidence that incorporation of misread proteins into the membrane can account for the membrane damage. The bactericidal action thus appears to result from the following sequence, in which each step is essential: slight initial entry of the antibiotic; interaction with chain-elongating ribosomes, resulting in misreading; incorporation of misread protein into the membrane, creating abnormal channels; increased (and irreversible) entry through these channels, and hence increased misreading and formation of channels; and, finally, blockade of initiating ribosomes. This mechanism can account for several previously unexplained observations: that streptomycin uptake requires protein synthesis during, but not after, the lag before the membrane damage; that streptomycin-resistant cells, which fail to take up streptomycin, can do so after treatment by another aminoglycoside; and that puromycin at moderate concentrations accelerates streptomycin uptake, while high concentrations (which release shorter chains) prevent it. In addition, puromycin, prematurely releasing polypeptides of normal sequence, also evidently creates channels, since it is reported to promote streptomycin uptake even in streptomycin-resistant cells. These findings imply that normal membrane proteins must be selected not only for a hydrophobic anchoring surface, but also for a tight fit in the membrane. Images PMID:2426712

  3. Clusters of antibiotic resistance genes enriched together stay together in swine agriculture

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Johnson, Timothy A.; Stedtfeld, Robert D.; Wang, Qiong; Cole, James R.; Hashsham, Syed A.; Looft, Torey; Zhu, Yong -Guan; Tiedje, James M.

    2016-04-12

    Antibiotic resistance is a worldwide health risk, but the influence of animal agriculture on the genetic context and enrichment of individual antibiotic resistance alleles remains unclear. Using quantitative PCR followed by amplicon sequencing, we quantified and sequenced 44 genes related to antibiotic resistance, mobile genetic elements, and bacterial phylogeny in microbiomes from U.S. laboratory swine and from swine farms from three Chinese regions. We identified highly abundant resistance clusters: groups of resistance and mobile genetic element alleles that cooccur. For example, the abundance of genes conferring resistance to six classes of antibiotics together with class 1 integrase and the abundancemore » of IS6100-type transposons in three Chinese regions are directly correlated. These resistance cluster genes likely colocalize in microbial genomes in the farms. Resistance cluster alleles were dramatically enriched (up to 1 to 10% as abundant as 16S rRNA) and indicate that multidrug-resistant bacteria are likely the norm rather than an exception in these communities. This enrichment largely occurred independently of phylogenetic composition; thus, resistance clusters are likely present in many bacterial taxa. Furthermore, resistance clusters contain resistance genes that confer resistance to antibiotics independently of their particular use on the farms. Selection for these clusters is likely due to the use of only a subset of the broad range of chemicals to which the clusters confer resistance. The scale of animal agriculture and its wastes, the enrichment and horizontal gene transfer potential of the clusters, and the vicinity of large human populations suggest that managing this resistance reservoir is important for minimizing human risk.Agricultural antibiotic use results in clusters of cooccurring resistance genes that together confer resistance to multiple antibiotics. The use of a single antibiotic could select for an entire suite of resistance

  4. Haplotype analysis of genes for Fusarium head blight resistance in tetraploid wheat germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Haplotype analysis at the molecular marker loci associated with the known Fusarium head blight (FHB) resistance QTL in wheat can be used to identify resistance genes in the resistant germplasm, and thus provides practical information of pyramiding different sources of resistance for the development ...

  5. Correlation between upstream human activities and riverine antibiotic resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Pruden, Amy; Arabi, Mazdak; Storteboom, Heather N

    2012-11-01

    Antimicrobial resistance remains a serious and growing human health challenge. The water environment may represent a key dissemination pathway of resistance elements to and from humans. However, quantitative relationships between landscape features and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) have not previously been identified. The objective of this study was to examine correlations between ARGs and putative upstream anthropogenic sources in the watershed. sul1 (sulfonamide) and tet(W) (tetracycline) were measured using quantitative polymerase chain reaction in bed and suspended sediment within the South Platte River Basin, which originates from a pristine region in the Rocky Mountains and runs through a gradient of human activities. A geospatial database was constructed to delineate surface water pathways from animal feeding operations, wastewater treatment plants, and fish hatchery and rearing units to river monitoring points. General linear regression models were compared. Riverine sul1 correlated with upstream capacities of animal feeding operations (R(2) = 0.35, p < 0.001) and wastewater treatment plants (R(2) = 0.34, p < 0.001). Weighting for the inverse distances from animal feeding operations along transport pathways strengthened the observed correlations (R(2) = 0.60-0.64, p < 0.001), suggesting the importance of these pathways in ARG dissemination. Correlations were upheld across the four sampling events during the year, and averaging sul1 measurements in bed and suspended sediments over all events yielded the strongest correlation (R(2) = 0.92, p < 0.001). Conversely, a significant relationship with landscape features was not evident for tet(W), which, in contrast to sul1, is broadly distributed in the pristine region and also relatively more prevalent in animal feeding operation lagoons. The findings highlight the need to focus attention on quantifying the contribution of water pathways to the antibiotic resistance disease burden in humans and offer insight

  6. Radioenzymatic assays for aminoglycosides with kanamycin 6'- acetyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, A.; Smith, A.L.; Opheim, K.E.

    1985-03-01

    To facilitate the rapid and accurate quantitation of parenterally administered aminoglycosides, the optimum conditions (pH, duration of incubation, and cofactor concentrations) were defined to permit radioenzymatic assays with kanamycin acetyltransferase. The accuracy in quantitating tobramycin, netilmicin, kanamycin, and amikacin at concentrations in the therapeutic range was greater than 90%, with a mean recovery of 102.8%. The mean of the interassay coefficient of variation was 7.8%. Typical standard curves at six different concentrations resulted in a correlation coefficient (r value) of greater than 0.99 for each aminoglycoside. The radioenzymatic assay correlates well with the bioassay (tobramycin and netilmicin) and radioimmunoassay (amikacin and kanamycin); the correlation coefficient is greater than 0.90 for all. The authors conclude that the radioenzymatic assay utilizing kanamycin 6'-acetyltransferase is feasible for all commercially available parenterally administered aminoglycosides.

  7. Review of Cellular Changes in the Cochlea Due to Aminoglycoside Antibiotics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ding, Dalian; Salvi, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Over the past two decades, considerable progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms underlying aminoglycoside ototoxicity. Aminoglycoside damage progresses from cochlear base to apex and from outer to inner hair cells. Aminoglycoside antibiotics enter hair cells at the apical pole and are taken up into lysosomes and mitochondria.…

  8. In vitro bactericidal activity of aminoglycosides, including the next-generation drug plazomicin, against Brucella spp.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plazomicin is a next-generation aminoglycoside with a potentially improved safety profile compared to other aminoglycosides. This study assessed plazomicin MICs and MBCs in four Brucella spp. reference strains. Like other aminoglycosides and aminocyclitols, plazomicin MBC values equaled MIC values ...

  9. Modulation of gene expression in Leishmania drug resistant mutants as determined by targeted DNA microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Guimond, Chantal; Trudel, Nathalie; Brochu, Christian; Marquis, Nathalie; Fadili, Amal El; Peytavi, Régis; Briand, Guylaine; Richard, Dave; Messier, Nadine; Papadopoulou, Barbara; Corbeil, Jacques; Bergeron, Michel G.; Légaré, Danielle; Ouellette, Marc

    2003-01-01

    In the protozoan parasite Leishmania, drug resistance can be a complex phenomenon. Several metabolic pathways and membrane transporters are implicated in the resistance phenotype. To monitor the expression of these genes, we generated custom DNA microarrays with PCR fragments corresponding to 44 genes involved with drug resistance. Transcript profiling of arsenite and antimony resistant mutants with these arrays pinpointed a number of genes overexpressed in mutants, including the ABC transporter PGPA, the glutathione biosynthesis genes γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (GSH1) and the glutathione synthetase (GSH2). Competitive hybridisations with total RNA derived from sensitive and methotrexate resistant cells revealed the overexpression of genes coding for dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR-TS), pteridine reductase (PTR1) and S-adenosylmethionine synthase (MAT2) and a down regulation of one gene of the folate transporter (FT) family. By labelling the DNA of sensitive and resistant parasites we could also detect several gene amplification events using DNA microarrays including the amplification of the S-adenosyl homocysteine hydrolase gene (SAHH). Alteration in gene expression detected by microarrays was validated by northern blot analysis, while Southern blots indicated that most genes overexpressed were also amplified, although other mechanisms were also present. The microarrays were useful in the study of resistant parasites to pinpoint several genes linked to drug resistance. PMID:14530437

  10. Apramycin and gentamicin resistance in Escherichia coli and salmonellas isolated from farm animals.

    PubMed Central

    Wray, C.; Hedges, R. W.; Shannon, K. P.; Bradley, D. E.

    1986-01-01

    Since the aminoglycoside antibiotic apramycin was licensed for veterinary use in 1980, all isolates of Escherichia coli and salmonellas received at the Central Veterinary Laboratory have been monitored for resistance to apramycin and the related antibiotic gentamicin. During the period 1982-4, the incidence of resistance in E. coli to apramycin increased from 0.6% in 1982 to 2.6% in 1984. In salmonellas the incidence of resistance to apramycin increased from 0.1% in 1982 to 1.4% in 1984. Resistance to both apramycin and gentamicin was detected in six different salmonella serotypes, although an isolate of Salmonella thompson from poultry was resistant to gentamicin but not apramycin. Most of the cultures were isolated from pigs, although the incidence of apramycin resistance in S. typhimurium (DT 204C) from calves has shown a recent dramatic increase. All the isolates with one exception produced the enzyme aminoglycoside 3-N-acetyltransferase IV (ACC(3)IV). The resistance was transferable by conjugation in most of the strains examined, and the plasmids specifying the resistance have been found to belong to a number of different incompatibility groups. Plasmids from three E. coli strains were compatible with all the reference plasmids and belonged to a previously undescribed group which was investigated further. It is suggested that bacteria from humans should be examined for resistance to apramycin and gentamicin to determine the possibility of the antibiotic-resistance bacteria, and their genes, spreading from animals to humans. Images Fig. 1 PMID:3540112

  11. Fine genetic mapping localizes cucumber scab resistance gene Ccu into an R gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Kang, Houxiang; Weng, Yiqun; Yang, Yuhong; Zhang, Zhonghua; Zhang, Shengping; Mao, Zhenchuan; Cheng, Guohua; Gu, Xingfang; Huang, Sanwen; Xie, Bingyan

    2011-03-01

    Scab, caused by Cladosporium cucumerinum, is an important disease of cucumber, Cucumis sativus. In this study, we conducted fine genetic mapping of the single dominant scab resistance gene, Ccu, with 148 F(9) recombinant inbred lines (RILs) and 1,944 F(2) plants derived from the resistant cucumber inbred line 9110Gt and the susceptible line 9930, whose draft genome sequence is now available. A framework linkage map was first constructed with simple sequence repeat markers placing Ccu into the terminal 670 kb region of cucumber Chromosome 2. The 9110Gt genome was sequenced at 5× genome coverage with the Solexa next-generation sequencing technology. Sequence analysis of the assembled 9110Gt contigs and the Ccu region of the 9930 genome identified three insertion/deletion (Indel) markers, Indel01, Indel02, and Indel03 that were closely linked with the Ccu locus. On the high-resolution map developed with the F(2) population, the two closest flanking markers, Indel01 and Indel02, were 0.14 and 0.15 cM away from the target gene Ccu, respectively, and the physical distance between the two markers was approximately 140 kb. Detailed annotation of the 180 kb region harboring the Ccu locus identified a cluster of six resistance gene analogs (RGAs) that belong to the nucleotide binding site (NBS) type R genes. Four RGAs were in the region delimited by markers Indel01 and Indel02, and thus were possible candidates of Ccu. Comparative DNA analysis of this cucumber Ccu gene region with a melon (C. melo) bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone revealed a high degree of micro-synteny and conservation of the RGA tandem repeats in this region. PMID:21104067

  12. Expression of bacterial genes in plant cells.

    PubMed Central

    Fraley, R T; Rogers, S G; Horsch, R B; Sanders, P R; Flick, J S; Adams, S P; Bittner, M L; Brand, L A; Fink, C L; Fry, J S; Galluppi, G R; Goldberg, S B; Hoffmann, N L; Woo, S C

    1983-01-01

    Chimeric bacterial genes conferring resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics have been inserted into the Agrobacterium tumefaciens tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid and introduced into plant cells by in vitro transformation techniques. The chimeric genes contain the nopaline synthase 5' and 3' regulatory regions joined to the genes for neomycin phosphotransferase type I or type II. The chimeric genes were cloned into an intermediate vector, pMON120, and inserted into pTiB6S3 by recombination and then introduced into petunia and tobacco cells by cocultivating A. tumefaciens cells with protoplast-derived cells. Southern hybridization was used to confirm the presence of the chimeric genes in the transformed plant tissues. Expression of the chimeric genes was determined by the ability of the transformed cells to proliferate on medium containing normally inhibitory levels of kanamycin (50 micrograms/ml) or other aminoglycoside antibiotics. Plant cells transformed by wild-type pTiB6S3 or derivatives carrying the bacterial neomycin phosphotransferase genes with their own promoters failed to grow under these conditions. The significance of these results for plant genetic engineering is discussed. Images PMID:6308651

  13. Molecular Screening of Blast Resistance Genes in Rice using SSR Markers

    PubMed Central

    Singh, A. K.; Singh, P. K.; Arya, Madhuri; Singh, N. K.; Singh, U. S.

    2015-01-01

    Rice Blast is the most devastating disease causing major yield losses in every year worldwide. It had been proved that using resistant rice varieties would be the most effective way to control this disease. Molecular screening and genetic diversities of major rice blast resistance genes were determined in 192 rice germplasm accessions using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. The genetic frequencies of the 10 major rice blast resistance genes varied from 19.79% to 54.69%. Seven accessions IC337593, IC346002, IC346004, IC346813, IC356117, IC356422 and IC383441 had maximum eight blast resistance gene, while FR13B, Hourakani, Kala Rata 1–24, Lemont, Brown Gora, IR87756-20-2-2-3, IC282418, IC356419, PKSLGR-1 and PKSLGR-39 had seven blast resistance genes. Twenty accessions possessed six genes, 36 accessions had five genes, 41 accessions had four genes, 38 accessions had three genes, 26 accessions had two genes, 13 accessions had single R gene and only one accession IC438644 does not possess any one blast resistant gene. Out of 192 accessions only 17 accessions harboured 7 to 8 blast resistance genes. PMID:25774106

  14. Antimicrobial-Resistant Bacterial Populations and Antimicrobial Resistance Genes Obtained from Environments Impacted by Livestock and Municipal Waste.

    PubMed

    Agga, Getahun E; Arthur, Terrance M; Durso, Lisa M; Harhay, Dayna M; Schmidt, John W

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the populations of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria and the repertoire of antimicrobial resistance genes in four environments: effluent of three municipal wastewater treatment facilities, three cattle feedlot runoff catchment ponds, three swine waste lagoons, and two "low impact" environments (an urban lake and a relict prairie). Multiple liquid and solid samples were collected from each environment. The prevalences and concentrations of antimicrobial-resistant (AMR) Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica) and Gram-positive (enterococci) bacteria were determined from individual samples (n = 174). The prevalences of 84 antimicrobial resistance genes in metagenomic DNA isolated from samples pooled (n = 44) by collection date, location, and sample type were determined. The prevalences and concentrations of AMR E. coli and Salmonella were similar among the livestock and municipal sample sources. The levels of erythromycin-resistant enterococci were significantly higher in liquid samples from cattle catchment ponds and swine waste lagoons than in liquid samples from municipal wastewater treatment facilities, but solid samples from these environments did not differ significantly. Similarly, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole-resistant E. coli concentrations were significantly higher in swine liquid than in municipal liquid samples, but there was no difference in solid samples. Multivariate analysis of the distribution of antimicrobial resistance genes using principal coordinate analysis showed distinct clustering of samples with livestock (cattle and swine), low impact environment and municipal samples forming three separate clusters. The numbers of class A beta-lactamase, class C beta-lactamase, and fluoroquinolone resistance genes detected were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in municipal samples than in cattle runoff or swine lagoon samples. In conclusion, we report that AMR is a very widespread phenomenon and that similar prevalences

  15. Antimicrobial-Resistant Bacterial Populations and Antimicrobial Resistance Genes Obtained from Environments Impacted by Livestock and Municipal Waste

    PubMed Central

    Durso, Lisa M.; Harhay, Dayna M.; Schmidt, John W.

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the populations of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria and the repertoire of antimicrobial resistance genes in four environments: effluent of three municipal wastewater treatment facilities, three cattle feedlot runoff catchment ponds, three swine waste lagoons, and two “low impact” environments (an urban lake and a relict prairie). Multiple liquid and solid samples were collected from each environment. The prevalences and concentrations of antimicrobial-resistant (AMR) Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica) and Gram-positive (enterococci) bacteria were determined from individual samples (n = 174). The prevalences of 84 antimicrobial resistance genes in metagenomic DNA isolated from samples pooled (n = 44) by collection date, location, and sample type were determined. The prevalences and concentrations of AMR E. coli and Salmonella were similar among the livestock and municipal sample sources. The levels of erythromycin-resistant enterococci were significantly higher in liquid samples from cattle catchment ponds and swine waste lagoons than in liquid samples from municipal wastewater treatment facilities, but solid samples from these environments did not differ significantly. Similarly, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole-resistant E. coli concentrations were significantly higher in swine liquid than in municipal liquid samples, but there was no difference in solid samples. Multivariate analysis of the distribution of antimicrobial resistance genes using principal coordinate analysis showed distinct clustering of samples with livestock (cattle and swine), low impact environment and municipal samples forming three separate clusters. The numbers of class A beta-lactamase, class C beta-lactamase, and fluoroquinolone resistance genes detected were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in municipal samples than in cattle runoff or swine lagoon samples. In conclusion, we report that AMR is a very widespread phenomenon and that similar

  16. [Classification and prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance qnr genes in China--A review].

    PubMed

    Yan, Lei; Xu, Hai

    2016-02-01

    Quinolone antibacterial drugs, developing from the treatment of urinary tract infection in early time and now from the treatment of intestinal infection and respiratory infection, have been widely used in clinical, animal husbandry and aquaculture. Bacteria gradually become resistant to them and resistance mechanism is more and more complicated. Quinolone resistance mechanism is mainly divided into chromosome mediated resistance and plasmid mediated resistance, the latter plays an important role in spreading of antibiotic resistance. In 1998, plasmid mediated quinolone resistance mechanism was reported for the first time, namely the qnr gene mediated fluoroquinolone resistance mechanism. qnr genes can spread rapidly in different bacteria, which causes the infection difficult to control, makes the nosocomial infection popular in a wide range. In addition, qnr genes are usually associated with β-lactamase resistance gene. They exist in complex integron and integrate with the other varieties of resistance genes, which narrows the space of clinical medicine choose or drug combinations use to treat related bacterial infection and brings us a serious challenge. In this review, we provide a detailed overview for the historical discovery, classification, the resistance mechanisms of qnr genes, and the prevalence of those genes in China. PMID:27373065

  17. Antibiotic resistance genes in anaerobic bacteria isolated from primary dental root canal infections.

    PubMed

    Rôças, Isabela N; Siqueira, José F

    2012-12-01

    Fourty-one bacterial strains isolated from infected dental root canals and identified by 16S rRNA gene sequence were screened for the presence of 14 genes encoding resistance to beta-lactams, tetracycline and macrolides. Thirteen isolates (32%) were positive for at least one of the target antibiotic resistance genes. These strains carrying at least one antibiotic resistance gene belonged to 11 of the 26 (42%) infected root canals sampled. Two of these positive cases had two strains carrying resistance genes. Six out of 7 Fusobacterium strains harbored at least one of the target resistance genes. One Dialister invisus strain was positive for 3 resistance genes, and 4 other strains carried two of the target genes. Of the 6 antibiotic resistance genes detected in root canal strains, the most prevalent were blaTEM (17% of the strains), tetW (10%), and ermC (10%). Some as-yet-uncharacterized Fusobacterium and Prevotella isolates were positive for blaTEM, cfxA and tetM. Findings demonstrated that an unexpectedly large proportion of dental root canal isolates, including as-yet-uncharacterized strains previously regarded as uncultivated phylotypes, can carry antibiotic resistance genes. PMID:23108290

  18. Natural products from the termite Nasutitermes corniger lowers aminoglycoside minimum inhibitory concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho, Henrique D. M.; Vasconcellos, Alexandre; Freire-Pessôa, Hilzeth L.; Gadelha, Carlos A.; Gadelha, Tatiane S.; Almeida-Filho, Geraldo G.

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial infectious agents present a risk to populations, as they are responsible for high morbidity and mortality. For combating these pathogens, our main line of defense is the use of antibiotics. However, indiscriminate use of these drugs develops resistant strains to these same drugs. The present study has tested the antibacterial and modifying antibiotic activity of natural products from Nasutitermes corniger (Termitidae) (Motschulsky), a termite used in folk medicine in Northeast Brazil, by the microdilution and checkerboard methods, respectively. In this study, the aqueous extract from the nest of N. corniger (ANCE) was prepared and tested with chlorpromazine (CPZ) for its antimicrobial activity, using the microdilution method. CPZ and ANCE were used independently and also in combination with aminoglycosides, against a strain of Escherichia coli resistant to these antibiotics, to determine the participation of efflux systems in resistance mechanisms. The fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) index was calculated and evaluated for the occurrence of synergism, using the checkerboard method. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) values were ≥ 2048 μg/mL for both strains of E. coli assayed, indicating low antibacterial activity. However, synergism was observed with kanamycin when the decoction was used, but when chlorpromazine was used, synergism was observed with kanamycin, amikacin, and neomycin. This synergism with CPZ indicated the involvement of an efflux system in the resistance to these aminoglycosides. Therefore, it was suggested that the natural products from N. corniger could be used as a source of zoo-derived natural products with kanamycin-modifying activity, resulting in a new approach against bacterial resistance to antibiotics. PMID:20548928

  19. Are PECTIN ESTERASE INHIBITOR Genes Involved in Mediating Resistance to Rhynchosporium commune in Barley?

    PubMed Central

    Marzin, Stephan; Hanemann, Anja; Sharma, Shailendra; Hensel, Götz; Kumlehn, Jochen; Schweizer, Günther; Röder, Marion S.

    2016-01-01

    A family of putative PECTIN ESTERASE INHIBITOR (PEI) genes, which were detected in the genomic region co-segregating with the resistance gene Rrs2 against scald caused by Rhynchosporium commune in barley, were characterized and tested for their possible involvement in mediating resistance to the pathogen by complementation and overexpression analysis. The sequences of the respective genes were derived from two BAC contigs originating from the susceptible cultivar ‘Morex’. For the genes HvPEI2, HvPEI3, HvPEI4 and HvPEI6, specific haplotypes for 18 resistant and 23 susceptible cultivars were detected after PCR-amplification and haplotype-specific CAPS-markers were developed. None of the tested candidate genes HvPEI2, HvPEI3 and HvPEI4 alone conferred a high resistance level in transgenic over-expression plants, though an improvement of the resistance level was observed especially with OE-lines for gene HvPEI4. These results do not confirm but also do not exclude an involvement of the PEI gene family in the response to the pathogen. A candidate for the resistance gene Rrs2 could not be identified yet. It is possible that Rrs2 is a PEI gene or another type of gene which has not been detected in the susceptible cultivar ‘Morex’ or the full resistance reaction requires the presence of several PEI genes. PMID:26937960

  20. Gene Expression Profiling and Identification of Resistance Genes to Aspergillus flavus Infection in Peanut through EST and Microarray Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Baozhu; Fedorova, Natalie D.; Chen, Xiaoping; Wan, Chun-Hua; Wang, Wei; Nierman, William C.; Bhatnagar, Deepak; Yu, Jiujiang

    2011-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus infect peanut seeds and produce aflatoxins, which are associated with various diseases in domestic animals and humans throughout the world. The most cost-effective strategy to minimize aflatoxin contamination involves the development of peanut cultivars that are resistant to fungal infection and/or aflatoxin production. To identify peanut Aspergillus-interactive and peanut Aspergillus-resistance genes, we carried out a large scale peanut Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) project which we used to construct a peanut glass slide oligonucleotide microarray. The fabricated microarray represents over 40% of the protein coding genes in the peanut genome. For expression profiling, resistant and susceptible peanut cultivars were infected with a mixture of Aspergillus flavus and parasiticus spores. The subsequent microarray analysis identified 62 genes in resistant cultivars that were up-expressed in response to Aspergillus infection. In addition, we identified 22 putative Aspergillus-resistance genes that were constitutively up-expressed in the resistant cultivar in comparison to the susceptible cultivar. Some of these genes were homologous to peanut, corn, and soybean genes that were previously shown to confer resistance to fungal infection. This study is a first step towards a comprehensive genome-scale platform for developing Aspergillus-resistant peanut cultivars through targeted marker-assisted breeding and genetic engineering. PMID:22069737

  1. Mapping of the oat crown rust resistance gene Pc91.

    PubMed

    McCartney, C A; Stonehouse, R G; Rossnagel, B G; Eckstein, P E; Scoles, G J; Zatorski, T; Beattie, A D; Chong, J

    2011-02-01

    Crown rust is an important disease of oat caused by Puccinia coronata Corda f. sp. avenae Eriks. Crown rust is efficiently and effectively managed through the development of resistant oat varieties. Pc91 is a seedling crown rust resistance gene that is highly effective against the current P. coronata population in North America. The primary objective of this study was to develop DNA markers linked to Pc91 for purposes of marker-assisted selection in oat breeding programs. The Pc91 locus was mapped using a population of F7-derived recombinant inbred lines developed from the cross 'CDC Sol-Fi'/'HiFi' made at the Crop Development Centre, University of Saskatchewan. The population was evaluated for reaction to P. coronata in field nurseries in 2008 and 2009. Pc91 mapped to a linkage group consisting of 44 Diversity Array Technology (DArT) markers. DArTs were successfully converted to sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers. Five robust SCARs were developed from three non-redundant DArTs that co-segregated with Pc91. SCAR markers were developed for different assay systems, such that SCARs are available for agarose gel electrophoresis, capillary electrophoresis, and Taqman single nucleotide polymorphism detection. The SCAR markers accurately postulated the Pc91 status of 23 North American oat breeding lines. PMID:20862449

  2. Members of the Arabidopsis HRT/RPP8 Family of Resistance Genes Confer Resistance to Both Viral and Oomycete Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Cooley, Michael B.; Pathirana, Sudam; Wu, Hui-Ju; Kachroo, Pradeep; Klessig, Daniel F.

    2000-01-01

    Turnip crinkle virus (TCV) inoculation onto TCV-resistant Arabidopsis leads to a hypersensitive response (HR) controlled by the dominant gene HRT. HRT is a member of the class of resistance (R) genes that contain a leucine zipper, a nucleotide binding site, and leucine-rich repeats. The chromosomal position of HRT and its homology to resistance gene RPP8 and two RPP8 homologs indicate that unequal crossing over and gene conversion may have contributed to HRT evolution. RPP8 confers resistance to an oomycete pathogen, Peronospora parasitica. Despite very strong similarities within the HRT/RPP8 family, HRT and RPP8 are specific for the respective pathogens they detect. Hence, the HRT/RPP8 family provides molecular evidence that sequence changes between closely related members of multigene families can generate novel specificities for radically different pathogens. Transgenic plants expressing HRT developed an HR but generally remained susceptible to TCV because of a second gene, RRT, that regulates resistance to TCV. However, several transgenic plants that overexpressed HRT produced micro-HRs or no HR when inoculated with TCV and were resistant to infection. Expression of the TCV coat protein gene in seedlings containing HRT resulted in massive necrosis and death, indicating that the avirulence factor detected by the HRT-encoded protein is the TCV coat protein. PMID:10810142

  3. Spread of Enterobacter cloacae carrying blaNDM-1, blaCTX-M-15, blaSHV-12 and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes in a surgical intensive care unit in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Petrosillo, N; Vranić-Ladavac, M; Feudi, C; Villa, L; Fortini, D; Barišić, N; Bedenić, B; Ladavac, R; D'Arezzo, S; Andrašević, A Tambić; Capone, A

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to describe a hospital cluster of NDM-1-producing Enterobacter cloacae infections observed in the surgical intensive care unit (ICU) of a tertiary-care hospital at Pula, Croatia. NDM-1-producing E. cloacae strains isolated from clinical samples were screened by PCR for the presence of carbapenemases. Genetic relatedness of NDM-1-producing E. cloacae strains was determined by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). During the period October 2013 to April 2014, four patients, with overlapping hospital stay in the surgical ICU, developed severe infections caused by E. cloacae demonstrated to produce carbapenemases. According to MLST, all strains belonged to ST133 and were positive by PCR for the blaNDM-1 carbapenemase gene, for blaCTX-M-15 and blaSHV-12 extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) genes, and for blaTEM-1 and blaOXA-1 narrow-spectrum β-lactamase genes. They were negative for other carbapenemases genes including blaOXA-48, blaVIM and blaKPC as well as for AmpC and the armA and rmtB aminoglycoside resistance genes. All strains were positive for the HI2 replicon, suggesting that an IncHI2 plasmid is likely the plasmid carrying the blaNDM-1 gene. Infection control measures were implemented after the first case although they were not effective in avoiding spread of this organism to other patients in the surgical ICU. In conclusion, the evolving epidemiology of NDM-producing micro-organisms and the interspecies diffusion of this resistance mechanism to emerging pathogens such as E. cloacae necessitate the setting up of strong and urgent joint measures to control the spread of NDM carbapenemase especially in the ICU setting. PMID:27436392

  4. Antimicrobial-resistant bacterial populations and antimicrobial resistance genes obtained from environments impacted by livestock and municipal waste

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study compared the populations of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria and the repertoire of antimicrobial resistance genes in four environments: effluent of three municipal waste water treatment facilities, three cattle feedlot runoff catchment ponds, three swine waste lagoons, and two "low impact...

  5. Molecular evolutionary analysis of resistance gene eIF4E and creation of novel resistance alleles in potato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance to viruses has long been an important breeding objective for researchers working with a number of different crops. As molecular techniques have identified the genes underlying virus resistance it has become increasingly apparent that the eukaryotic translation Initiation Factor 4E (eIF4E)...

  6. Identification of I-7 expands the repertoire of genes for resistance to Fusarium wilt in tomato to three resistance gene classes.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Cendales, Yvonne; Catanzariti, Ann-Maree; Baker, Barbara; Mcgrath, Des J; Jones, David A

    2016-04-01

    The tomato I-3 and I-7 genes confer resistance to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol) race 3 and were introgressed into the cultivated tomato, Solanum lycopersicum, from the wild relative Solanum pennellii. I-3 has been identified previously on chromosome 7 and encodes an S-receptor-like kinase, but little is known about I-7. Molecular markers have been developed for the marker-assisted breeding of I-3, but none are available for I-7. We used an RNA-seq and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis approach to map I-7 to a small introgression of S. pennellii DNA (c. 210 kb) on chromosome 8, and identified I-7 as a gene encoding a leucine-rich repeat receptor-like protein (LRR-RLP), thereby expanding the repertoire of resistance protein classes conferring resistance to Fol. Using an eds1 mutant of tomato, we showed that I-7, like many other LRR-RLPs conferring pathogen resistance in tomato, is EDS1 (Enhanced Disease Susceptibility 1) dependent. Using transgenic tomato plants carrying only the I-7 gene for Fol resistance, we found that I-7 also confers resistance to Fol races 1 and 2. Given that Fol race 1 carries Avr1, resistance to Fol race 1 indicates that I-7-mediated resistance, unlike I-2- or I-3-mediated resistance, is not suppressed by Avr1. This suggests that Avr1 is not a general suppressor of Fol resistance in tomato, leading us to hypothesize that Avr1 may be acting against an EDS1-independent pathway for resistance activation. The identification of I-7 has allowed us to develop molecular markers for marker-assisted breeding of both genes currently known to confer Fol race 3 resistance (I-3 and I-7). Given that I-7-mediated resistance is not suppressed by Avr1, I-7 may be a useful addition to I-3 in the tomato breeder's toolbox. PMID:26177154

  7. Ultraviolet disinfection of antibiotic resistant bacteria and their antibiotic resistance genes in water and wastewater.

    PubMed

    McKinney, Chad W; Pruden, Amy

    2012-12-18

    Disinfection of wastewater treatment plant effluent may be an important barrier for limiting the spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARBs) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). While ideally disinfection should destroy ARGs, to prevent horizontal gene transfer to downstream bacteria, little is known about the effect of conventional water disinfection technologies on ARGs. This study examined the potential of UV disinfection to damage four ARGs, mec(A), van(A), tet(A), and amp(C), both in extracellular form and present within a host ARBs: methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE), Escherichia coli SMS-3-5, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 01, respectively. An extended amplicon-length quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay was developed to enhance capture of ARG damage events and also to normalize to an equivalent length of target DNA (∼1000 bp) for comparison. It was found that the two Gram-positive ARBs (MRSA and VRE) were more resistant to UV disinfection than the two Gram-negative ARBs (E. coli and P. aeruginosa). The two Gram-positive organisms also possessed smaller total genome sizes, which could also have reduced their susceptibility to UV because of fewer potential pyrimidine dimer targets. An effect of cell type on damage to ARGs was only observed in VRE and P. aeruginosa, the latter potentially because of extracellular polymeric substances. In general, damage of ARGs required much greater UV doses (200-400 mJ/cm² for 3- to 4-log reduction) than ARB inactivation (10-20 mJ/cm² for 4- to 5-log reduction). The proportion of amplifiable ARGs following UV treatment exhibited a strong negative correlation with the number of adjacent thymines (Pearson r < -0.9; p < 0.0001). ARBs surviving UV treatment were negatively correlated with total genome size (Pearson r < -0.9; p < 0.0001) and adjacent cytosines (Pearson r < -0.88; p < 0.0001) but positively correlated with adjacent thymines (Pearson r

  8. Mathematical modelling of antimicrobial resistance in agricultural waste highlights importance of gene transfer rate.

    PubMed

    Baker, Michelle; Hobman, Jon L; Dodd, Christine E R; Ramsden, Stephen J; Stekel, Dov J

    2016-04-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is of global concern. Most antimicrobial use is in agriculture; manures and slurry are especially important because they contain a mix of bacteria, including potential pathogens, antimicrobial resistance genes and antimicrobials. In many countries, manures and slurry are stored, especially over winter, before spreading onto fields as organic fertilizer. Thus, these are a potential location for gene exchange and selection for resistance. We develop and analyse a mathematical model to quantify the spread of antimicrobial resistance in stored agricultural waste. We use parameters from a slurry tank on a UK dairy farm as an exemplar. We show that the spread of resistance depends in a subtle way on the rates of gene transfer and antibiotic inflow. If the gene transfer rate is high, then its reduction controls resistance, while cutting antibiotic inflow has little impact. If the gene transfer rate is low, then reducing antibiotic inflow controls resistance. Reducing length of storage can also control spread of resistance. Bacterial growth rate, fitness costs of carrying antimicrobial resistance and proportion of resistant bacteria in animal faeces have little impact on spread of resistance. Therefore, effective treatment strategies depend critically on knowledge of gene transfer rates. PMID:26906100

  9. Overcoming of multidrug resistance by introducing the apoptosis gene, bcl-Xs, into MRP-overexpressing drug resistant cells.

    PubMed

    Ohi, Y; Kim, R; Toge, T

    2000-05-01

    Multidrug resistance associated protein (MRP) is one of drug transport membranes that confer multidrug resistance in cancer cells. Multidrug resistance has been known to be associated with resistance to apoptosis. In this study, using MRP overexpressing multidrug resistant nasopharyngeal cancer cells, we examined the expression of apoptosis related genes including p53, p21WAF1, bax and bcl-Xs between drug sensitive KB and its resistant KB/7D cells. We also examined whether the introduction of apoptosis related gene could increase the sensitivity to anticancer drugs in association with apoptotic cell death. The relative resistances to anticancer drugs in KB/7D cells evaluated by IC50 values were 3.6, 61.3, 10.4 and 10.5 to adriamycin (ADM), etoposide (VP-16), vincristine (VCR) and vindesine (VDS), respectively. The resistance to anticancer drugs in KB/7D cells was associated with the attenuation of internucleosomal DNA ladder formation in apoptosis. Of important, the mRNA expression of bcl-Xs gene in KB/7D cells was decreased in one-fourth as compared to that of KB cells among the apoptosis genes. The mRNA expression of bcl-Xs gene in a bcl-Xs transfected clone (KB/7Dbcl-Xs) was increased about 2-fold compared to that of KB/7Dneo cells, while the mRNA expression of MRP gene was not significantly different in KB/7bcl-Xs and KB/7Dneo cells. The sensitivities to anticancer drugs including ADM, VCR and VDS except VP-16 were increased in KB/7Dbcl-Xs cells, in turn, the relative resistance in KB/7Dbcl-Xs cells was decreased to 1.4, 4.0, and 3.0 in ADM, VCR and VDS, respectively, as compared to those of KB/7Dneo cells. Of interest, the studies on the accumulation of [3H]VCR showed that the decrease of [3H]VCR accumulation in KB/7Dbcl-Xs was not significantly different from that of KB/7Dneo cells. Collectively, these results indicated that the mechanism(s) of drug resistance in KB/7D cells could be explained at least by two factors: a) reduced drug accumulation mediated by

  10. Study of the Interference between Plectranthus Species Essential Oils from Brazil and Aminoglycosides.

    PubMed

    Galvão Rodrigues, Fabíola Fernandes; Costa, José Galberto Martins; Rodrigues, Fábio Fernandes Galvao; Campos, Adriana Rolim

    2013-01-01

    Plectranthus is one of the most representative genera of Lamiaceae family. In this study, the essential oils from Plectranthus amboinicus, Plectranthus ornatus, and Plectranthus barbatus were investigated for their chemical composition and antimicrobial and modulatory activities. The major components found were carvacrol (54.4%-P. amboinicus) and eugenol (22.9%-P. ornatus e 25.1%-P. barbatus). In vitro antimicrobial activity was conducted against Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris, Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Staphylococcus aureus (multiresistant) using microdilution method. The results of bioassay showed that all strains were sensitive to the oils, except P. aeruginosa that was resistant to P. amboinicus and P. ornatus. A synergistic effect of all essential oils combined with the aminoglycosides was demonstrated. These results show that P. amboinicus, P. ornatus, and P. barbatus inhibit the growth of pathogenic microorganism, and besides this they present antibiotic modifying activity, providing a new perspective against the problem of bacterial resistance to antibiotics. PMID:23662150

  11. Prevention of Aminoglycoside Ototoxicity: From the Laboratory to the Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talaska, Andra E.; Schacht, Jochen

    2005-01-01

    The search for protection from aminoglycoside ototoxicity is nearly as old as their use as antibiotics. However, only in recent years has focused research on the mechanisms underlying the insults to the inner ear led to coherent attempts at protection, such as antioxidant therapy or interference with cell death signaling pathways. Successful…

  12. Natural variation of the rice blast resistance gene Pi-ta in Oryza species and its corresponding avirulence gene AVR-Pita in Magnaporthe oryzae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Pi-ta gene prevents the infections of M. oryzae races containing the corresponding avirulence gene AVR-Pita in a gene-for-gene manner. Pi-ta is a putative NBS type major resistance gene, and can directly recognize the AVR-Pita putative metalloprotease in triggering effective resistance. We hav...

  13. SYNTHESIS AND CYTOTOXIC ACTIVITY OF NEW 5H-INDOLO[2,3-B]QUINOLINE O-AMINOGLYCOSIDES.

    PubMed

    Badowska-Rosłonek, Katarzyna; Ciesielska, Agnieszka; Switalska, Marta; Piskozub, Małgorzata; Peczyńska-Czoch, Wanda; Wietrzyk, Joanna; Kaczmarek, Łukasz

    2016-01-01

    Novel 5H-indolo[2,3-b]quinoline O-aminoglycosides were synthesized in order to check the hypothesis that the construction of hybrids composed of the active 5H-indolo[2,3-b]quinoline chromophore and daunosaminyl or acosaminyl moiety may result in the cytotoxic activity of the obtained derivatives that is much higher than the one of the parent DIMIQ (5,11-dimethyl-5H-indolo[2,3-b]quinoline) and 6H-indoloquinoline analogs. Actually, 5H-indolo[2,3-b]indoloquinoline O-aminoglycosides showed the anti-proliferative activity in vitro against human lung adenocarcinoma A549, breast cancer MCF-7, melanoma Hs294T, promyelocytic leukemia HL-60, uterine sarcoma MES-SA and colon cancer LoVo cell lines, which was 10 times higher than that of the 6H-analogs and comparable to the one of the referential DIMIQ. Unexpectedly, it appeared that except for HL-60/MX2 (P-gp-independent and topoisomerase II-dependent resistance), other MDR tumor cell lines (LoVo/DX. P-gp-dependent, MRP-, LRP-dependent multidrug resistance) and MES-SA/DX5 (P-gp-dependent resistance to doxorubicin) are also resistant to the 5H-indolo[2,3-b]indoloquinoline O-aminoglycosides tested. This is surprising because 6H-analogs, in general, 10 times less active against non-MDR tumor cell lines, as well as the DIMIQ itself, are able to overcome drug resistance in all MDR cell lines examined. The cytotoxicity of the tested compounds against tumor cell lines and against normal cells (mice fibroblasts BALB/3T3) was comparable. PMID:27476287

  14. Activation of PI3K signaling prevents aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death in the murine cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Jadali, Azadeh

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Loss of sensory hair cells of the inner ear due to aminoglycoside exposure is a major cause of hearing loss. Using an immortalized multipotent otic progenitor (iMOP) cell line, specific signaling pathways that promote otic cell survival were identified. Of the signaling pathways identified, the PI3K pathway emerged as a strong candidate for promoting hair cell survival. In aging animals, components for active PI3K signaling are present but decrease in hair cells. In this study, we determined whether activated PI3K signaling in hair cells promotes survival. To activate PI3K signaling in hair cells, we used a small molecule inhibitor of PTEN or genetically ablated PTEN using a conditional knockout animal. Hair cell survival was challenged by addition of gentamicin to cochlear cultures. Hair cells with activated PI3K signaling were more resistant to aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death. These results indicate that increased PI3K signaling in hair cells promote survival and the PI3K signaling pathway is a target for preventing aminoglycoside-induced hearing loss. PMID:27142333

  15. Activation of PI3K signaling prevents aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death in the murine cochlea.

    PubMed

    Jadali, Azadeh; Kwan, Kelvin Y

    2016-01-01

    Loss of sensory hair cells of the inner ear due to aminoglycoside exposure is a major cause of hearing loss. Using an immortalized multipotent otic progenitor (iMOP) cell line, specific signaling pathways that promote otic cell survival were identified. Of the signaling pathways identified, the PI3K pathway emerged as a strong candidate for promoting hair cell survival. In aging animals, components for active PI3K signaling are present but decrease in hair cells. In this study, we determined whether activated PI3K signaling in hair cells promotes survival. To activate PI3K signaling in hair cells, we used a small molecule inhibitor of PTEN or genetically ablated PTEN using a conditional knockout animal. Hair cell survival was challenged by addition of gentamicin to cochlear cultures. Hair cells with activated PI3K signaling were more resistant to aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death. These results indicate that increased PI3K signaling in hair cells promote survival and the PI3K signaling pathway is a target for preventing aminoglycoside-induced hearing loss. PMID:27142333

  16. Diversity of tet resistance genes in tetracycline-resistant bacteria isolated from a swine lagoon with low antibiotic impact.

    PubMed

    Macauley, John J; Adams, Craig D; Mormile, Melanie R

    2007-12-01

    Tetracycline resistance has been extensively studied and shown to be widespread. A number of previous studies have clearly demonstrated that a variety of tetracycline resistance genes are present in swine fecal material, treatment lagoons, and the environments surrounding concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs). The diversity of tetracycline resistance within a swine lagoon located at a CAFO that used only bacitricin methylene disalicylate as an antibiotic was evaluated by screening 85 tetracycline-resistant isolates for the presence of 18 different genes by performing PCR with primers that target tetracycline efflux genes of Gram-negative bacteria and ribosomal protection proteins. In addition, partial 16S rRNA sequences from each of these isolates were sequenced to determine the identity of these isolates. Of the 85 isolates examined, 17 may represent potential novel species based on BLAST results. Greater than 50% of the isolates (48 out of 85) were found to not contain targeted tet efflux genes. Though minimum inhibitory concentrations ranged widely (16 - >256 mg/L), these values did not give an indication of the tet genes present. Ten new genera were identified that contain at least one tet efflux gene. Five other genera possessed tet efflux genes that were not found in these organisms previously. Interestingly, none of the isolates possessed any of the selected ribosomal protection protein genes. Though tetracycline resistance was found in bacteria isolated from a swine CAFO lagoon, it appears that the limited antibiotic use at this CAFO might have impacted the presence and diversity of tetracycline resistance genes. PMID:18059563

  17. Linkage Mapping of NBS-LRR Disease Resistance Gene Analogs in Watermelon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Watermelon disease resistance gene analogs (WRGA) from ‘Calhoun Gray’, PI 296341, and PI 595203 were isolated using degenerate primers specific for the nucleotide binding sites (NBS) from the NBS-leucine-rich repeat (LRR) resistance gene family. Following cloning, sequencing, and analysis of these ...

  18. Transport and transformation of genetic information in the critical zone: The case of antibiotic resistance genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Y. G.

    2015-12-01

    In addition to material and energy flows, the dynamics and functions of the Earth's critical zone are intensively mediated by biological actions performed by diverse organisms. These biological actions are modulated by the expression of functional genes and their translation into enzymes that catalyze geochemical reactions, such as nutrient turnover and pollutant biodegradation. Although geobiology, as an interdisciplinary research area, is playing and vital role in linking biological and geochemical processes at different temporal and spatial scales, the distribution and transport of functional genes have rarely been investigated from the Earth's critical zone perspectives. To illustrate the framework of studies on the transport and transformation of genetic information in the critical zone, antibiotic resistance is taken as an example. Antibiotic resistance genes are considered as a group of emerging contaminants, and their emergence and spread within the critical zone on one hand are induced by anthropogenic activities, and on other hand are threatening human health worldwide. The transport and transformation of antibiotic resistance genes are controlled by both horizontal gene transfer between bacterial cells and the movement of bacteria harboring antibiotic resistance genes. In this paper, the fate and behavior of antibiotic resistance genes will be discussed in the following aspects: 1) general overview of environmental antibiotic resistance; 2) high through quantification of the resistome in various environmental media; 3) pathways of resistance gene flow within the critical zone; and 4) potential strategies in mitigating antibiotic resistance, particularly from the critical zone perspectives.

  19. Identification and mapping of nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat resistance gene analogs in bermudagrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirty-one bermudagrass (Cynodon spp.) disease resistance gene homologs (BRGH) were cloned and sequenced from diploid, triploid, and hexaploid bermudagrass using degenerate primers to target the nucleotide binding site (NBS) of the NBS- leucine rich repeat (LRR) resistance gene family. Alignment of ...

  20. DNA Microarray Detection of Antimicrobial Resistance Genes in Bacteria Co-Cultured from Swine Feces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One factor leading to the spread of antimicrobial resistance (AR) in bacteria is the horizontal transfer of resistance genes. To study this, a DNA microarray was recently developed to detect these genes. To maximize the capability of this microarray, probes were designed and added to detect all AR g...

  1. Resistance of wheat to Mycosphaerella graminicola involves early and late peaks of gene expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Expression of 14 genes associated with the resistance response of wheat to the Septoria tritici blotch fungus, Mycosphaerella graminicola, was measured from 0 to 27 days after inoculation (DAI) in two resistant and two susceptible cultivars by real-time quantitative PCR. The four genes chitinase, ph...

  2. Worldwide distribution and origin of rice blast resistance gene Pi-ta

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pi-ta is a single resistance (R) gene encoding a putative NBS type receptor with single amino acid alanine at position 918 (G at 6640) determining the resistance specificity. The distribution and origin of the Pi-ta gene were investigated in a germplasm core collection consisting of 1790 accessions ...

  3. Microarray Analysis of Antimicrobial Resistance Genes in Salmonella enterica from Preharvest Poultry Environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rapid detection of drug resistance profiles in Salmonella can be critical in treatment of salmonellosis. A 70-mer oligonucleotide microarray chip with 775 gene probes was used to detect antimicrobial resistance genes in 34 Salmonella isolates from a turkey production facility. The phenotypic antim...

  4. A New Anthracnose Resistance Gene in Andean Common Bean Cultivar Jalo Listras Pretas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anthracnose is one of the most widespread and economically important diseases of common bean worldwide. Most anthracnose resistance genes in common bean are from beans of the Mesoamerican gene pool. The resistant reaction of the Andean common bean cultivar Jalo Listras Pretas to races 9, 64, 65 and ...

  5. Isolation of an Yr5 candidate gene for resistance to wheat stripe rust

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Yr5 gene from the Triticum spelta album wheat confers resistance to all races of the wheat stripe rust pathogen (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici) identified so far in the US. To cloneYr5, a sequence tagged site (STS) marker developed from resistance gene analog polymorphism (RGAP) markers co...

  6. PEDIGREE AND DNA MARKER ANALYSIS OF BLAST RESISTANCE GENES IN US RICE GERMPLASM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blast resistance genes have been effectively used in southern US rice germplasm to reduce crop losses from this serious disease threat. Historical records indicate the most common blast resistance genes in USA rice germplasm are Pi-z and Pi-ks in medium grain and Pi-kh and Pi-ta2 in long grain varie...

  7. Identification of disease resistance genes for enhancement of existing potato cultivars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A plant’s ability to defend itself against host-specific microbes is specified by disease resistance (R) genes. Upon recognition of an invading pathogen, R proteins are responsible for the activation of a multitude of responses ultimately leading to resistance. The majority of R genes are dominant a...

  8. Molecular ecology of tetracycline resistance: development and validation of primers for detection of tetracycline resistance genes encoding ribosomal protection proteins.

    PubMed

    Aminov, R I; Garrigues-Jeanjean, N; Mackie, R I

    2001-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of tetracycline resistance genes encoding the ribosomal protection proteins (RPPs) revealed the monophyletic origin of these genes. The most deeply branching class, exemplified by tet and otrA, consisted of genes from the antibiotic-producing organisms Streptomyces rimosus and Streptomyces lividans. With a high degree of confidence, the corresponding genes of the other seven classes (Tet M, Tet S, Tet O, Tet W, Tet Q, Tet T, and TetB P) formed phylogenetically distinct separate clusters. Based on this phylogenetic analysis, a set of PCR primers for detection, retrieval, and sequence analysis of the corresponding gene fragments from a variety of bacterial and environmental sources was developed and characterized. A pair of degenerate primers targeted all tetracycline resistance genes encoding RPPs except otrA and tet, and seven other primer pairs were designed to target the specific classes. The primers were used to detect the circulation of these genes in the rumina of cows, in swine feed and feces, and in swine fecal streptococci. Classes Tet O and Tet W were found in the intestinal contents of both animals, while Tet M was confined to pigs and Tet Q was confined to the rumen. The tet(O) and tet(W) genes circulating in the microbiota of the rumen and the gastrointestinal tract of pigs were identical despite the differences in animal hosts and antibiotic use regimens. Swine fecal streptococci uniformly possessed the tet(O) gene, and 22% of them also carried tet(M). This population could be considered one of the main reservoirs of these two resistance genes in the pig gastrointestinal tract. All classes of RPPs except Tet T and TetB P were found in the commercial components of swine feed. This is the first demonstration of the applicability of molecular ecology techniques to estimation of the gene pool and the flux of antibiotic resistance genes in production animals. PMID:11133424

  9. Identifying clinically relevant drug resistance genes in drug-induced resistant cancer cell lines and post- chemotherapy tissues

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Mengsha; Zheng, Weicheng; Lu, Xingrong; Ao, Lu; Li, Xiangyu; Guan, Qingzhou; Cai, Hao; Li, Mengyao; Yan, Haidan; Guo, You; Chi, Pan; Guo, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Until recently, few molecular signatures of drug resistance identified in drug-induced resistant cancer cell models can be translated into clinical practice. Here, we defined differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between pre-chemotherapy colorectal cancer (CRC) tissue samples of non-responders and responders for 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin-based therapy as clinically relevant drug resistance genes (CRG5-FU/L-OHP). Taking CRG5-FU/L-OHP as reference, we evaluated the clinical relevance of several types of genes derived from HCT116 CRC cells with resistance to 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin, respectively. The results revealed that DEGs between parental and resistant cells, when both were treated with the corresponding drug for a certain time, were significantly consistent with the CRG5-FU/L-OHP as well as the DEGs between the post-chemotherapy CRC specimens of responders and non-responders. This study suggests a novel strategy to extract clinically relevant drug resistance genes from both drug-induced resistant cell models and post-chemotherapy cancer tissue specimens. PMID:26515599

  10. High-Throughput Screening of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Resistant Genes in CML.

    PubMed

    Ma, Leyuan; Roderick, Justine; Kelliher, Michelle A; Green, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screening in mammalian cells has proven to be a powerful tool for identifying new genes and molecular pathways relevant to many cellular processes and diseases. For example, screening for genes that, when inactivated, lead to resistance to cancer therapeutic drugs can reveal new mechanisms for how resistance develops and identify potential targetable strategies to overcome drug resistance. Here, we describe a detailed procedure for performing a high-throughput RNAi screen using a genome-wide human short hairpin RNA (shRNA) library for identifying tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI)-resistance genes in a human CML cell line model. PMID:27581147

  11. Tetracycline resistance and Class 1 integron genes associated with indoor and outdoor aerosols.

    PubMed

    Ling, Alison L; Pace, Norman R; Hernandez, Mark T; LaPara, Timothy M

    2013-05-01

    Genes encoding tetracycline resistance and the integrase of Class 1 integrons were enumerated using quantitative PCR from aerosols collected from indoor and outdoor environments. Concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) and human-occupied indoor environments (two clinics and a homeless shelter) were found to be a source of airborne tet(X) and tet(W) genes. The CAFOs had 10- to 100-times higher concentrations of airborne 16S rRNA, tet(X), and tet(W) genes than other environments sampled, and increased concentrations of aerosolized bacteria correlated with increased concentrations of airborne resistance genes. The two CAFOs studied had statistically similar concentrations of resistance genes in their aerosol samples, even though antibiotic use was markedly different between the two operations. Additionally, tet(W) genes were recovered in outdoor air within 2 km of livestock operations, which suggests that antibiotic resistance genes may be transported via aerosols on local scales. The integrase gene (intI1) from Class 1 integrons, which has been associated with multidrug resistance, was detected in CAFOs but not in human-occupied indoor environments, suggesting that CAFO aerosols could serve as a reservoir of multidrug resistance. In conclusion, our results show that CAFOs and clinics are sources of aerosolized antibiotic resistance genes that can potentially be transported via air movement. PMID:23517146

  12. Identification of I-7 expands the repertoire of genes for resistance to Fusarium wilt in tomato to three resistance gene classes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The tomato I-3 and I-7 genes confer resistance to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol) race 3 and both genes were introgressed into the cultivated tomato, Solanum lycopersicum, from the wild relative Solanum pennellii. I-3 was identified previously and encodes a S-receptor-like kinase, but li...

  13. Detection of sulfonamide resistance genes via in situ PCR-FISH.

    PubMed

    Gnida, Anna; Kunda, Katarzyna; Ziembińska, Aleksandra; Luczkiewicz, Aneta; Felis, Ewa; Surmacz-Górska, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Due to the rising use of antibiotics and as a consequence of their concentration in the environment an increasing number of antibiotic resistant bacteria is observed. The phenomenon has a hazardous impact on human and animal life. Sulfamethoxazole is one of the sulfonamides commonly detected in surface waters and soil. The aim of the study was to detect sulfamethoxazole resistance genes in activated sludge biocenosis by use of in situ PCR and/or hybridization. So far no FISH probes for the detection of SMX resistance genes have been described in the literature. We have tested common PCR primers used for SMX resistance genes detection as FISH probes as well as a combination of in situ PCR and FISH. Despite the presence of SMX resistance genes in activated sludge confirmed via traditional PCR, the detection of the genes via microscopic visualization failed. PMID:25115110

  14. Ribosome Hibernation Facilitates Tolerance of Stationary-Phase Bacteria to Aminoglycosides

    PubMed Central

    McKay, Susannah L.

    2015-01-01

    Upon entry into stationary phase, bacteria dimerize 70S ribosomes into translationally inactive 100S particles by a process called ribosome hibernation. Previously, we reported that the hibernation-promoting factor (HPF) of Listeria monocytogenes is required for 100S particle formation and facilitates adaptation to a number of stresses. Here, we demonstrate that HPF is required for the high tolerance of stationary-phase cultures to aminoglycosides but not to beta-lactam or quinolone antibiotics. The sensitivity of a Δhpf mutant to gentamicin was suppressed by the bacteriostatic antibiotics chloramphenicol and rifampin, which inhibit translation and transcription, respectively. Disruption of the proton motive force by the ionophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone or mutation of genes involved in respiration also suppressed the sensitivity of the Δhpf mutant. Accordingly, Δhpf mutants had aberrantly high levels of ATP and reducing equivalents during prolonged stationary phase. Analysis of bacterial uptake of fluorescently labeled gentamicin demonstrated that the Δhpf mutant harbored increased intracellular levels of the drug. Finally, deletion of the main ribosome hibernation factor of Escherichia coli, ribosome modulation factor (rmf), rendered these bacteria susceptible to gentamicin. Taken together, these data suggest that HPF-mediated ribosome hibernation results in repression of the metabolic activity that underlies aminoglycoside tolerance. HPF is conserved in nearly every bacterial pathogen, and the role of ribosome hibernation in antibiotic tolerance may have clinical implications. PMID:26324267

  15. Interaction between the Ur-4 and Ur-5 bean rust resistance genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We aimed to use phenotypic and genetic markers to elucidate the interaction between the Ur-4 and Ur-5 genes for resistance to the rust pathogen of common bean. The resistant reaction of Ur-4 is characterized by necrotic spots (HR) with no sporulation. On the other hand, the resistant reaction of the...

  16. Potentiation of Aminoglycoside Activity in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by Targeting the AmgRS Envelope Stress-Responsive Two-Component System.

    PubMed

    Poole, Keith; Gilmour, Christie; Farha, Maya A; Mullen, Erin; Lau, Calvin Ho-Fung; Brown, Eric D

    2016-06-01

    A screen for agents that potentiated the activity of paromomycin (PAR), a 4,5-linked aminoglycoside (AG), against wild-type Pseudomonas aeruginosa identified the RNA polymerase inhibitor rifampin (RIF). RIF potentiated additional 4,5-linked AGs, such as neomycin and ribostamycin, but not the clinically important 4,6-linked AGs amikacin and gentamicin. Potentiation was absent in a mutant lacking the AmgRS envelope stress response two-component system (TCS), which protects the organism from AG-generated membrane-damaging aberrant polypeptides and, thus, promotes AG resistance, an indication that RIF was acting via this TCS in potentiating 4,5-linked AG activity. Potentiation was also absent in a RIF-resistant RNA polymerase mutant, consistent with its potentiation of AG activity being dependent on RNA polymerase perturbation. PAR-inducible expression of the AmgRS-dependent genes htpX and yccA was reduced by RIF, suggesting that AG activation of this TCS was compromised by this agent. Still, RIF did not compromise the membrane-protective activity of AmgRS, an indication that it impacted some other function of this TCS. RIF potentiated the activities of 4,5-linked AGs against several AG-resistant clinical isolates, in two cases also potentiating the activity of the 4,6-linked AGs. These cases were, in one instance, explained by an observed AmgRS-dependent expression of the MexXY multidrug efflux system, which accommodates a range of AGs, with RIF targeting of AmgRS undermining mexXY expression and its promotion of resistance to 4,5- and 4,6-linked AGs. Given this link between AmgRS, MexXY expression, and pan-AG resistance in P. aeruginosa, RIF might be a useful adjuvant in the AG treatment of P. aeruginosa infections. PMID:27021319

  17. Antibiotic resistance genes detected in the marine sponge Petromica citrina from Brazilian coast.

    PubMed

    Laport, Marinella Silva; Pontes, Paula Veronesi Marinho; Dos Santos, Daniela Silva; Santos-Gandelman, Juliana de Fátima; Muricy, Guilherme; Bauwens, Mathieu; Giambiagi-deMarval, Marcia; George, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Although antibiotic-resistant pathogens pose a significant threat to human health, the environmental reservoirs of the resistance determinants are still poorly understood. This study reports the detection of resistance genes (ermB, mecA, mupA, qnrA, qnrB and tetL) to antibiotics among certain culturable and unculturable bacteria associated with the marine sponge Petromica citrina. The antimicrobial activities elicited by P. citrina and its associated bacteria are also described. The results indicate that the marine environment could play an important role in the development of antibiotic resistance and the dissemination of resistance genes among bacteria. PMID:27287338

  18. Detection of the mcr-1 Colistin Resistance Gene in Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae from Different Hospitals in China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hua; Qu, Fen; Shan, Bin; Huang, Bin; Jia, Wei; Chen, Cha; Li, Aiqing; Miao, Minhui; Zhang, Xin; Bao, Chunmei; Xu, Yunmin; Chavda, Kalyan D; Tang, Yi-Wei; Kreiswirth, Barry N; Du, Hong; Chen, Liang

    2016-08-01

    The spread of the plasmid-mediated colistin resistance gene, mcr-1, into carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) clinical isolates poses a significant threat to global health. Here we report the identification of three mcr-1-harboring carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli strains, collected from three patients in two provinces in China. Our results show that mcr-1-harboring CRE strains have started to spread in different hospitals in China. In addition, this report presents the first description of chromosomal integration of mcr-1 into a carbapenem-resistant E. coli strain. PMID:27216058

  19. Identification of Genes Required for Nonhost Resistance to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae Reveals Novel Signaling Components

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wen; Xu, You-Ping; Zhang, Zhi-Xin; Cao, Wen-Yuan; Li, Fei; Zhou, Xueping; Chen, Gong-You; Cai, Xin-Zhong

    2012-01-01

    Background Nonhost resistance is a generalized, durable, broad-spectrum resistance exhibited by plant species to a wide variety of microbial pathogens. Although nonhost resistance is an attractive breeding strategy, the molecular basis of this form of resistance remains unclear for many plant-microbe pathosystems, including interactions with the bacterial pathogen of rice, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo). Methods and Findings Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) and an assay to detect the hypersensitive response (HR) were used to screen for genes required for nonhost resistance to Xoo in N. benthamiana. When infiltrated with Xoo strain YN-1, N. benthamiana plants exhibited a strong necrosis within 24 h and produced a large amount of H2O2 in the infiltrated area. Expression of HR- and defense-related genes was induced, whereas bacterial numbers dramatically decreased during necrosis. VIGS of 45 ACE (Avr/Cf-elicited) genes revealed identified seven genes required for nonhost resistance to Xoo in N. benthamiana. The seven genes encoded a calreticulin protein (ACE35), an ERF transcriptional factor (ACE43), a novel Solanaceous protein (ACE80), a hydrolase (ACE117), a peroxidase (ACE175) and two proteins with unknown function (ACE95 and ACE112). The results indicate that oxidative burst and calcium-dependent signaling pathways play an important role in nonhost resistance to Xoo. VIGS analysis further revealed that ACE35, ACE80, ACE95 and ACE175, but not the other three ACE genes, interfered with the Cf-4/Avr4-dependent HR. Conclusions/Significance N. benthamiana plants inoculated with Xoo respond by rapidly eliciting an HR and nonhost resistance. The oxidative burst and other signaling pathways are pivotal in Xoo-N. benthamiana nonhost resistance, and genes involved in this response partially overlap with those involved in Cf/Avr4-dependent HR. The seven genes required for N. benthamiana-mediated resistance to Xoo provide a basis for further dissecting the molecular

  20. Predictive performance of microarray gene signatures: impact of tumor heterogeneity and multiple mechanisms of drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    A’Hern, Roger; Bidard, Francois-Clement; Lemetre, Christophe; Swanton, Charles; Shen, Ronglai; Reis-Filho, Jorge S.

    2014-01-01

    Gene signatures have failed to predict responses to breast cancer therapy in patients to date. In this study, we used bioinformatic methods to explore the hypothesis that the existence of multiple drug resistance mechanisms in different patients may limit the power of gene signatures to predict responses to therapy. Additionally, we explored whether sub-stratification of resistant cases could improve performance. Gene expression profiles from 1,550 breast cancers analyzed with the same microarray platform were retrieved from publicly available sources. Gene expression changes were introduced in cases defined as sensitive or resistant to a hypothetical therapy. In the resistant group, up to five different mechanisms of drug resistance causing distinct or overlapping gene expression changes were generated bioinformatically, and their impact on sensitivity, specificity and predictive values of the signatures was investigated. We found that increasing the number of resistance mechanisms corresponding to different gene expression changes weakened the performance of the predictive signatures generated, even if the resistance-induced changes in gene expression were sufficiently strong and informative. Performance was also affected by cohort composition and the proportion of sensitive versus resistant cases or resistant cases that were mechanistically distinct. It was possible to improve response prediction by sub-stratifying chemotherapy-resistant cases from actual datasets (non-bioinformatically-perturbed datasets), and by using outliers to model multiple resistance mechanisms. Our work supports the hypothesis that the presence of multiple resistance mechanisms to a given therapy in patients limits the ability of gene signatures to make clinically-useful predictions. PMID:24706696

  1. Cloning and DNA sequence analysis of an aac(3)-Vb gene from Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed Central

    Rather, P N; Mierzwa, R; Hare, R S; Miller, G H; Shaw, K J

    1992-01-01

    The AAC(3)-V resistance mechanism is characterized by high-level resistance to the aminoglycosides gentamicin, netilmicin, 2'-N-ethylnetilmicin, and 6'-N-ethylnetilmicin and moderate resistance levels to tobramycin. Serratia marcescens 82041944 contains an AA(3)-V resistance mechanism as determined from aminoglycoside resistance profiles. This strain, however, does not exhibit hybridization with a probe derived from the previously cloned aac(3)-Va gene, (R. Allmansberger, B. Bräu, and W. Piepersberg, Mol. Gen. Genet. 198:514-520, 1985). High-pressure liquid chromatography analysis of the acetylation products of sisomicin carried out by extracts of S. marcescens 82041944 have demonstrated the presence of an AAC(3) enzyme. We have cloned the gene encoding this acetyltransferase and have designated it aac(3)-Vb. Nucleotide sequence comparisons show that the aac(3)-Va and aac(3)-Vb genes are 72% identical. The predicted AAC(3)-Vb protein is 28,782 Da. Comparisons of the deduced amino acid sequences show 75% identity and 84% similarity between the AAC(3)-Va and AAC(3)-Vb proteins. The use of a DNA fragment internal to the aac(3)-Vb as a hybridization probe demonstrated that the aac(3)-Vb gene is very rare in clinical isolates possessing an AAC(3)-V mechanism. PMID:1444303

  2. Plasmid metagenomics reveals multiple antibiotic resistance gene classes among the gut microbiomes of hospitalised patients.

    PubMed

    Jitwasinkul, Tossawan; Suriyaphol, Prapat; Tangphatsornruang, Sithichoke; Hansen, Martin Asser; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg; Sørensen, Søren Johannes; Permpikul, Chairat; Rongrungruang, Yong; Tribuddharat, Chanwit

    2016-09-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes are rapidly spread between pathogens and the normal flora, with plasmids playing an important role in their circulation. This study aimed to investigate antibiotic resistance plasmids in the gut microbiome of hospitalised patients. Stool samples were collected from seven inpatients at Siriraj Hospital (Bangkok, Thailand) and were compared with a sample from a healthy volunteer. Plasmids from the gut microbiomes extracted from the stool samples were subjected to high-throughput DNA sequencing (GS Junior). Newbler-assembled DNA reads were categorised into known and unknown sequences (using >80% alignment length as the cut-off), and ResFinder was used to classify the antibiotic resistance gene pools. Plasmid replicon modules were used for plasmid typing. Forty-six genes conferring resistance to several classes of antibiotics were identified in the stool samples. Several antibiotic resistance genes were shared by the patients; interestingly, most were reported previously in food animals and healthy humans. Four antibiotic resistance genes were found in the healthy subject. One gene (aph3-III) was identified in the patients and the healthy subject and was related to that in cattle. Uncommon genes of hospital origin such as blaTEM-124-like and fosA, which confer resistance to extended-spectrum β-lactams and fosfomycin, respectively, were identified. The resistance genes did not match the patients' drug treatments. In conclusion, several plasmid types were identified in the gut microbiome; however, it was difficult to link these to the antibiotic resistance genes identified. That the antibiotic resistance genes came from hospital and community environments is worrying. PMID:27530840

  3. Induction of Multidrug Resistance Mechanism in Escherichia coli Biofilms by Interplay between Tetracycline and Ampicillin Resistance Genes▿ †

    PubMed Central

    May, Thithiwat; Ito, Akinobu; Okabe, Satoshi

    2009-01-01

    Biofilms gain resistance to various antimicrobial agents, and the presence of antibiotic resistance genes is thought to contribute to a biofilm-mediated antibiotic resistance. Here we showed the interplay between the tetracycline resistance efflux pump TetA(C) and the ampicillin resistance gene (blaTEM-1) in biofilms of Escherichia coli harboring pBR322 in the presence of the mixture of ampicillin and tetracycline. E. coli in the biofilms could obtain the high-level resistance to ampicillin, tetracycline, penicillin, erythromycin, and chloramphenicol during biofilm development and maturation as a result of the interplay between the marker genes on the plasmids, the increase of plasmid copy number, and consequently the induction of the efflux systems on the bacterial chromosome, especially the EmrY/K and EvgA/S pumps. In addition, we characterized the overexpression of the TetA(C) pump that contributed to osmotic stress response and was involved in the induction of capsular colanic acid production, promoting formation of mature biofilms. However, this investigated phenomenon was highly dependent on the addition of the subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotic mixture, and the biofilm resistance behavior was limited to aminoglycoside antibiotics. Thus, marker genes on plasmids played an important role in both resistance of biofilm cells to antibiotics and in formation of mature biofilms, as they could trigger specific chromosomal resistance mechanisms to confer a high-level resistance during biofilm formation. PMID:19721076

  4. Adult Plant Phenotype of the Rp1-DJ Compound Rust Resistance Gene in Maize.

    PubMed

    Hu, G; Webb, C A; Hulbert, S H

    1997-03-01

    ABSTRACT The complex structure of the rp1 rust resistance locus of maize allows two or more resistance genes to be recombined together in coupling phase. The phenotypic effects of the Rp1-DJ compound gene, which carries both Rp1-D and Rp1-J, were analyzed. The Rp1-DJ compound gene was associated with a chlorotic spotting phenotype in some genetic backgrounds. At the seedling stage, lines carrying Rp1-DJ are fully susceptible to Puccinia sorghi biotype HI1, which is virulent on lines with the two genes singly. At later stages of growth, however, Rp1-DJ lines show partial resistance when compared with sibling lines not carrying the compound gene. The Rp1-DJ gene also confers partial resistance to P. polysora in adult plants. PMID:18945165

  5. In vitro read-through of phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) nonsense mutations using aminoglycosides: a potential therapy for phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Ho, Gladys; Reichardt, Juergen; Christodoulou, John

    2013-11-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU, OMIM 261600) is an autosomal recessive inborn error of phenylalanine metabolism, predominantly caused by mutations in the phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) gene. Approximately 10% of patients carry a nonsense mutation, which results in an inactive or unstable truncated protein. In some genetic disorders, including cystic fibrosis and Duchenne muscular dystrophy, restoration of full-length protein has been achieved by aminoglycoside antibiotics, such as gentamicin and G-418 (Geneticin). More recently, nonsense read-through has been induced at greater rates using a non-aminoglycoside drug, PTC124 (Ataluren), which has the advantage of being non-toxic in contrast to the antibiotics. The efficacy of read-through induced by three compounds, aminoglycosides G418 and gentamicin, and PTC124 were evaluated for four nonsense mutations of PAH in an in vitro expression system in two mammalian cell lines (COS-7 and HEK293). The production of full-length PAH was investigated using western blotting and the functionality confirmed by enzyme activity. Gentamicin and G-418 induced read-through of nonsense PAH mutations in HEK293 cells. The read-through product partially restored enzymatic activity, which was significantly less than that of wild-type, but comparable to a missense mutation of PAH associated with less severe forms of PKU. Treatment with PTC124 up to 100 μM did not result in full-length PAH polypeptide. Nonsense read-through drugs are a potential form of treatment for PKU, although the high dosage of aminoglycosides used is not appropriate in a clinical setting. In vitro studies with new non-toxic read-through agents as well as in vivo studies would also be essential to determine the extent of read-through required to restore normal phenylalanine levels. PMID:23532445

  6. Genes Expressed Differentially in Hessian Fly Larvae Feeding in Resistant and Susceptible Plants.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Shun; Liu, Sanzhen; Wang, Haiyan; Cheng, Xiaoyan; El Bouhssini, Mustapha; Whitworth, R Jeff

    2016-01-01

    The Hessian fly, Mayetiola destructor, is a destructive pest of wheat worldwide and mainly controlled by deploying resistant cultivars. In this study, we investigated the genes that were expressed differentially between larvae in resistant plants and those in susceptible plants through RNA sequencing on the Illumina platform. Informative genes were 11,832, 14,861, 15,708, and 15,071 for the comparisons between larvae in resistant versus susceptible plants for 0.5, 1, 3, and 5 days, respectively, after larvae had reached the feeding site. The transcript abundance corresponding to 5401, 6902, 8457, and 5202 of the informative genes exhibited significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) in the respective paired comparisons. Overall, genes involved in nutrient metabolism, RNA and protein synthesis exhibited lower transcript abundance in larvae from resistant plants, indicating that resistant plants inhibited nutrient metabolism and protein production in larvae. Interestingly, the numbers of cytochrome P450 genes with higher transcript abundance in larvae from resistant plants were comparable to, or higher than those with lower transcript abundance, indicating that toxic chemicals from resistant plants may have played important roles in Hessian fly larval death. Our study also identified several families of genes encoding secreted salivary gland proteins (SSGPs) that were expressed at early stage of 1(st) instar larvae and with more genes with higher transcript abundance in larvae from resistant plants. Those SSGPs are candidate effectors with important roles in plant manipulation. PMID:27529231

  7. Molecular identification and quantification of tetracycline and erythromycin resistance genes in Spanish and Italian retail cheeses.

    PubMed

    Belén Flórez, Ana; Alegría, Ángel; Rossi, Franca; Delgado, Susana; Felis, Giovanna E; Torriani, Sandra; Mayo, Baltasar

    2014-01-01

    Large antibiotic resistance gene pools in the microbiota of foods may ultimately pose a risk for human health. This study reports the identification and quantification of tetracycline- and erythromycin-resistant populations, resistance genes, and gene diversity in traditional Spanish and Italian cheeses, via culturing, conventional PCR, real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR), and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The numbers of resistant bacteria varied widely among the antibiotics and the different cheese varieties; in some cheeses, all the bacterial populations seemed to be resistant. Up to eight antibiotic resistance genes were sought by gene-specific PCR, six with respect to tetracycline, that is, tet(K), tet(L), tet(M), tet(O), tet(S), and tet(W), and two with respect to erythromycin, that is, erm(B) and erm(F). The most common resistance genes in the analysed cheeses were tet(S), tet(W), tet(M), and erm(B). The copy numbers of these genes, as quantified by qPCR, ranged widely between cheeses (from 4.94 to 10.18log10/g). DGGE analysis revealed distinct banding profiles and two polymorphic nucleotide positions for tet(W)-carrying cheeses, though the similarity of the sequences suggests this tet(W) to have a monophyletic origin. Traditional cheeses would therefore appear to act as reservoirs for large numbers of many types of antibiotic resistance determinants. PMID:25302306

  8. Identification of an integron containing the quinolone resistance gene qnrA1 in Shewanella xiamenensis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing-yi; Mu, Xiao-dong; Zhu, Yuan-qi; Xi, Lijun; Xiao, Zijun

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated multidrug resistance in Shewanella xiamenensis isolated from an estuarine water sample in China during 2014. This strain displayed resistance or decreased susceptibility to ampicillin, aztreonam, cefepime, cefotaxime, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, kanamycin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. The antimicrobial resistance genes aacA3, blaOXA-199, qnrA1 and sul1 were identified by PCR amplification and by sequencing. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and DNA hybridization experiments showed that the quinolone resistance gene qnrA1 was chromosomally located. qnrA1 was located in a complex class 1 integron, downstream from an ISCR1, and bracketed by two copies of qacEΔ1-sul1 genes. This integron is similar to In825 with four gene cassettes aacA3, catB11c, dfrA1z and aadA2az. An IS26-mel-mph2-IS26 structure was also detected in the flanking sequences, conferring resistance to macrolides. This is the first identification of the class 1 integron in S. xiamenensis. This is also the first identification of the qnrA1 gene and IS26-mediated macrolide resistance genes in S. xiamenensis. Presence of a variety of resistance genetic determinants in environmental S. xiamenensis suggests the possibility that this species may serve as a potential vehicle of antimicrobial resistance genes in aquatic environments. PMID:26316545

  9. Genes Expressed Differentially in Hessian Fly Larvae Feeding in Resistant and Susceptible Plants

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ming-Shun; Liu, Sanzhen; Wang, Haiyan; Cheng, Xiaoyan; El Bouhssini, Mustapha; Whitworth, R. Jeff

    2016-01-01

    The Hessian fly, Mayetiola destructor, is a destructive pest of wheat worldwide and mainly controlled by deploying resistant cultivars. In this study, we investigated the genes that were expressed differentially between larvae in resistant plants and those in susceptible plants through RNA sequencing on the Illumina platform. Informative genes were 11,832, 14,861, 15,708, and 15,071 for the comparisons between larvae in resistant versus susceptible plants for 0.5, 1, 3, and 5 days, respectively, after larvae had reached the feeding site. The transcript abundance corresponding to 5401, 6902, 8457, and 5202 of the informative genes exhibited significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) in the respective paired comparisons. Overall, genes involved in nutrient metabolism, RNA and protein synthesis exhibited lower transcript abundance in larvae from resistant plants, indicating that resistant plants inhibited nutrient metabolism and protein production in larvae. Interestingly, the numbers of cytochrome P450 genes with higher transcript abundance in larvae from resistant plants were comparable to, or higher than those with lower transcript abundance, indicating that toxic chemicals from resistant plants may have played important roles in Hessian fly larval death. Our study also identified several families of genes encoding secreted salivary gland proteins (SSGPs) that were expressed at early stage of 1st instar larvae and with more genes with higher transcript abundance in larvae from resistant plants. Those SSGPs are candidate effectors with important roles in plant manipulation. PMID:27529231

  10. Molecular Identification and Quantification of Tetracycline and Erythromycin Resistance Genes in Spanish and Italian Retail Cheeses

    PubMed Central

    Flórez, Ana Belén; Alegría, Ángel; Delgado, Susana

    2014-01-01

    Large antibiotic resistance gene pools in the microbiota of foods may ultimately pose a risk for human health. This study reports the identification and quantification of tetracycline- and erythromycin-resistant populations, resistance genes, and gene diversity in traditional Spanish and Italian cheeses, via culturing, conventional PCR, real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR), and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The numbers of resistant bacteria varied widely among the antibiotics and the different cheese varieties; in some cheeses, all the bacterial populations seemed to be resistant. Up to eight antibiotic resistance genes were sought by gene-specific PCR, six with respect to tetracycline, that is, tet(K), tet(L), tet(M), tet(O), tet(S), and tet(W), and two with respect to erythromycin, that is, erm(B) and erm(F). The most common resistance genes in the analysed cheeses were tet(S), tet(W), tet(M), and erm(B). The copy numbers of these genes, as quantified by qPCR, ranged widely between cheeses (from 4.94 to 10.18log⁡10/g). DGGE analysis revealed distinct banding profiles and two polymorphic nucleotide positions for tet(W)-carrying cheeses, though the similarity of the sequences suggests this tet(W) to have a monophyletic origin. Traditional cheeses would therefore appear to act as reservoirs for large numbers of many types of antibiotic resistance determinants. PMID:25302306

  11. RNAi validation of resistance genes and their interactions in the highly DDT-resistant 91-R strain of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Gellatly, Kyle J; Yoon, Kyong Sup; Doherty, Jeffery J; Sun, Weilin; Pittendrigh, Barry R; Clark, J Marshall

    2015-06-01

    4,4'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) has been re-recommended by the World Health Organization for malaria mosquito control. Previous DDT use has resulted in resistance, and with continued use resistance will increase in terms of level and extent. Drosophila melanogaster is a model dipteran that has many available genetic tools, numerous studies done on insecticide resistance mechanisms, and is related to malaria mosquitoes allowing for extrapolation. The 91-R strain of D. melanogaster is highly resistant to DDT (>1500-fold), however, there is no mechanistic scheme that accounts for this level of resistance. Recently, reduced penetration, increased detoxification, and direct excretion have been identified as resistance mechanisms in the 91-R strain. Their interactions, however, remain unclear. Use of UAS-RNAi transgenic lines of D. melanogaster allowed for the targeted knockdown of genes putatively involved in DDT resistance and has validated the role of several cuticular proteins (Cyp4g1 and Lcp1), cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (Cyp6g1 and Cyp12d1), and ATP binding cassette transporters (Mdr50, Mdr65, and Mrp1) involved in DDT resistance. Further, increased sensitivity to DDT in the 91-R strain after intra-abdominal dsRNA injection for Mdr50, Mdr65, and Mrp1 was determined by a DDT contact bioassay, directly implicating these genes in DDT efflux and resistance. PMID:26047118

  12. Integration and bioinformatics analysis of DNA-methylated genes associated with drug resistance in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    YAN, BINGBING; YIN, FUQIANG; WANG, QI; ZHANG, WEI; LI, LI

    2016-01-01

    The main obstacle to the successful treatment of ovarian cancer is the development of drug resistance to combined chemotherapy. Among all the factors associated with drug resistance, DNA methylation apparently plays a critical role. In this study, we performed an integrative analysis of the 26 DNA-methylated genes associated with drug resistance in ovarian cancer, and the genes were further evaluated by comprehensive bioinformatics analysis including gene/protein interaction, biological process enrichment and annotation. The results from the protein interaction analyses revealed that at least 20 of these 26 methylated genes are present in the protein interaction network, indicating that they interact with each other, have a correlation in function, and may participate as a whole in the regulation of ovarian cancer drug resistance. There is a direct interaction between the phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) gene and at least half of the other genes, indicating that PTEN may possess core regulatory functions among these genes. Biological process enrichment and annotation demonstrated that most of these methylated genes were significantly associated with apoptosis, which is possibly an essential way for these genes to be involved in the regulation of multidrug resistance in ovarian cancer. In addition, a comprehensive analysis of clinical factors revealed that the methylation level of genes that are associated with the regulation of drug resistance in ovarian cancer was significantly correlated with the prognosis of ovarian cancer. Overall, this study preliminarily explains the potential correlation between the genes with DNA methylation and drug resistance in ovarian cancer. This finding has significance for our understanding of the regulation of resistant ovarian cancer by methylated genes, the treatment of ovarian cancer, and improvement of the prognosis of ovarian cancer. PMID:27347118

  13. Genetic mapping of the rice resistance-breaking gene of the brown planthopper Nilaparvata lugens

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Suetsugu, Yoshitaka; Kuwazaki, Seigo; Hattori, Makoto; Jairin, Jirapong; Sanada-Morimura, Sachiyo; Matsumura, Masaya

    2014-01-01

    Host plant resistance has been widely used for controlling the major rice pest brown planthopper (BPH, Nilaparvata lugens). However, adaptation of the wild BPH population to resistance limits the effective use of resistant rice varieties. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis was conducted to identify resistance-breaking genes against the anti-feeding mechanism mediated by the rice resistance gene Bph1. QTL analysis in iso-female BPH lines with single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers detected a single region on the 10th linkage group responsible for the virulence. The QTL explained from 57 to 84% of the total phenotypic variation. Bulked segregant analysis with next-generation sequencing in F2 progenies identified five SNPs genetically linked to the virulence. These analyses showed that virulence to Bph1 was controlled by a single recessive gene. In contrast to previous studies, the gene-for-gene relationship between the major resistance gene Bph1 and virulence gene of BPH was confirmed. Identified markers are available for map-based cloning of the major gene controlling BPH virulence to rice resistance. PMID:24870048

  14. Pyramiding B genes in cotton achieves broader but not always higher resistance to bacterial blight.

    PubMed

    Essenberg, Margaret; Bayles, Melanie B; Pierce, Margaret L; Verhalen, Laval M

    2014-10-01

    Near-isogenic lines of upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) carrying single, race-specific genes B4, BIn, and b7 for resistance to bacterial blight were used to develop a pyramid of lines with all possible combinations of two and three genes to learn whether the pyramid could achieve broad and high resistance approaching that of L. A. Brinkerhoff's exceptional line Im216. Isogenic strains of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. malvacearum carrying single avirulence (avr) genes were used to identify plants carrying specific resistance (B) genes. Under field conditions in north-central Oklahoma, pyramid lines exhibited broader resistance to individual races and, consequently, higher resistance t