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Sample records for ammonia nitrite nitrate

  1. Toxicity of ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate to fishes. Book chapter

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, R.C.; Thurston, R.V.

    1991-01-01

    Ammonia and nitrite are highly toxic to fishes, with ammonia occurring in surface waters more commonly than nitrite. Nitrate is a related compound but is not significantly toxic to fishes. The acute toxicity of ammonia to aquatic organisms is affected by water pH, dissolved oxygen, temperature, concentration fluctuations, degree of salinity, presence of other chemicals, and prior acclimation. The acute toxicity of nitrite is known to be affected by water pH and the presence of chloride and calcium. More research is needed on the effects of these and other variables on the acute toxicity of both ammonia and nitrite, as well as the chronic effects of both of these toxins.

  2. TOXICITY OF AMMONIA, NITRITE AND NITRATE TO FISHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ammonia and nitrite are highly toxic to fishes, wig ammonia occurring in urface waters more commonly than nitrite. itrate is a related compound but is not ignificantly toxic to fishes. he acute toxicity of ammonia to aquatic organisms s affected by water pH, dissolved oxygen, tem...

  3. Nitrate Reduction to Nitrite, Nitric Oxide and Ammonia by Gut Bacteria under Physiological Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Tiso, Mauro; Schechter, Alan N.

    2015-01-01

    The biological nitrogen cycle involves step-wise reduction of nitrogen oxides to ammonium salts and oxidation of ammonia back to nitrites and nitrates by plants and bacteria. Neither process has been thought to have relevance to mammalian physiology; however in recent years the salivary bacterial reduction of nitrate to nitrite has been recognized as an important metabolic conversion in humans. Several enteric bacteria have also shown the ability of catalytic reduction of nitrate to ammonia via nitrite during dissimilatory respiration; however, the importance of this pathway in bacterial species colonizing the human intestine has been little studied. We measured nitrite, nitric oxide (NO) and ammonia formation in cultures of Escherichia coli, Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species grown at different sodium nitrate concentrations and oxygen levels. We found that the presence of 5 mM nitrate provided a growth benefit and induced both nitrite and ammonia generation in E.coli and L.plantarum bacteria grown at oxygen concentrations compatible with the content in the gastrointestinal tract. Nitrite and ammonia accumulated in the growth medium when at least 2.5 mM nitrate was present. Time-course curves suggest that nitrate is first converted to nitrite and subsequently to ammonia. Strains of L.rhamnosus, L.acidophilus and B.longum infantis grown with nitrate produced minor changes in nitrite or ammonia levels in the cultures. However, when supplied with exogenous nitrite, NO gas was readily produced independently of added nitrate. Bacterial production of lactic acid causes medium acidification that in turn generates NO by non-enzymatic nitrite reduction. In contrast, nitrite was converted to NO by E.coli cultures even at neutral pH. We suggest that the bacterial nitrate reduction to ammonia, as well as the related NO formation in the gut, could be an important aspect of the overall mammalian nitrate/nitrite/NO metabolism and is yet another way in which the microbiome

  4. Nitrate reduction to nitrite, nitric oxide and ammonia by gut bacteria under physiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Tiso, Mauro; Schechter, Alan N

    2015-01-01

    The biological nitrogen cycle involves step-wise reduction of nitrogen oxides to ammonium salts and oxidation of ammonia back to nitrites and nitrates by plants and bacteria. Neither process has been thought to have relevance to mammalian physiology; however in recent years the salivary bacterial reduction of nitrate to nitrite has been recognized as an important metabolic conversion in humans. Several enteric bacteria have also shown the ability of catalytic reduction of nitrate to ammonia via nitrite during dissimilatory respiration; however, the importance of this pathway in bacterial species colonizing the human intestine has been little studied. We measured nitrite, nitric oxide (NO) and ammonia formation in cultures of Escherichia coli, Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species grown at different sodium nitrate concentrations and oxygen levels. We found that the presence of 5 mM nitrate provided a growth benefit and induced both nitrite and ammonia generation in E.coli and L.plantarum bacteria grown at oxygen concentrations compatible with the content in the gastrointestinal tract. Nitrite and ammonia accumulated in the growth medium when at least 2.5 mM nitrate was present. Time-course curves suggest that nitrate is first converted to nitrite and subsequently to ammonia. Strains of L.rhamnosus, L.acidophilus and B.longum infantis grown with nitrate produced minor changes in nitrite or ammonia levels in the cultures. However, when supplied with exogenous nitrite, NO gas was readily produced independently of added nitrate. Bacterial production of lactic acid causes medium acidification that in turn generates NO by non-enzymatic nitrite reduction. In contrast, nitrite was converted to NO by E.coli cultures even at neutral pH. We suggest that the bacterial nitrate reduction to ammonia, as well as the related NO formation in the gut, could be an important aspect of the overall mammalian nitrate/nitrite/NO metabolism and is yet another way in which the microbiome

  5. Utilization of urea, ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate by crop plants in a Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffaker, R. C.; Rains, D. W.; Qualset, C. O.

    1982-01-01

    The utilization of nitrogen compounds by crop plants is studied. The selection of crop varieties for efficient production using urea, ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate, and the assimilation of mixed nitrogen sources by cereal leaves and roots are discussed.

  6. Short-term toxicity of ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate to early life stages of the rare minnow (Gobiocypris rarus).

    PubMed

    Luo, Si; Wu, Benli; Xiong, Xiaoqin; Wang, Jianwei

    2016-06-01

    Nitrogenous pollutants including ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate are a widespread concern in natural waters and aquaculture. In the present study, the toxicity of ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate to rare minnow (Gobiocypris rarus) in the early life stage were evaluated by 2 short-term toxicity tests. In the short-term toxicity test, conducted on embryo and sac-fry stages, 30 fertilized eggs with 3 replicates were randomly exposed to varying levels of ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate until 3 d posthatch (dph). In the 7-d larval subchronic toxicity test, 30 newly hatched larvae with 3 replicates were randomly exposed to varying levels of ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate until 7 dph. The results showed that the 7-d larval subchronic toxicity test was more sensitive than the short-term toxicity test on embryo and sac-fry stages. Both toxicity tests revealed that ammonia was most toxic to rare minnows, followed by nitrite and nitrate. High levels of ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate decreased growth, retarded development, and increased mortality. The no-observed-effect concentrations of ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate for larval growth were 2.49 mg L(-1) , 13.33 mg L(-1) , and 19.95 mg L(-1) nitrogen, respectively. The present study's results demonstrate that nitrogenous pollutants pose a threat to wild populations of rare minnows and provide useful information for establishing water quality criteria for this laboratory fish. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1422-1427. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26472009

  7. Ammonia Formation by the Reduction of Nitrite/Nitrate by FeS: Ammonia Formation Under Acidic Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, David P.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    FeS reduces nitrite to, ammonia at pHs lower than the corresponding reduction by aqueous Fe+2. The reduction follows a reasonable first order decay, in nitrite concentration, with a half life of about 150 min (room temperature, CO2, pH 6.25). The highest ammonia product yield measured was 53%. Under CO2, the product yield decreases from pH 5.0 to pH 6.9. The increasing concentration of bicarbonate at higher pH interferes with the reaction. Bicarbonate interference is shown by comparing runs under N2 and CO2. The reaction proceeds well in the presence of such species as chloride, sulfate, and phosphate though the yield drops significantly with phosphate. FeS also reduces nitrate and, unlike with Fe+2, the reduction shows more reproducibility. Again, the product yield decreases with increasing pH, from 7% at pH 4.7 to 0% at pH 6.9. It appears as if nitrate is much more sensitive to the presence of added species, perhaps not competing as well for binding sites on the FeS surface. This may be the cause of the lack of reproducibility of nitrate reduction by Fe+2 (which also can be sensitive to binding by certain species).

  8. [Spatial Variation of Ammonia-N, Nitrate-N and Nitrite-N in Groundwater of Dongshan Island].

    PubMed

    Wiu, Hai-yan; Fu, Shi-feng; Cai, Xiao-qiong; Tang, Kun-xian; Cao, Chao; Chen, Qing-hui; Liang, Xiu-yu

    2015-09-01

    In Dongshan Island, groundwater is the main resource of the local residents' drinking water, domestic water, agriculture irrigation and freshwater aquaculture. This study aimed to investigate the spatial distribution characteristic and its variation pattern of ammonia-N, nitrate-N and nitrite-N in groundwater, as well as its pollution source and influence factors. It is very important to understand the pollution level of ammonia-N, nitrate-N and nitrite-N in groundwater of Dongshan Island, the control and prevention of ammonia-N, nitrate-N and nitrite-N pollution, which is of great significance to the residents' health. In this study, the spatial variability characteristics of ammonia-N, nitrate-N and nitrite-N concentration in groundwater of Dongshan Island was analysed by geo- statistic method, the values of the non-observation points were determined by Kriging method, and the pollution characteristics of ammonia-N, nitrate-N and nitrite-N in groundwater of Dongshan Island was also analyzed. Our results showed that the ammonia-N and nitrite-N concentration in groundwater of Dongshan Island were at low levels, but their spatial variability were high, and their autocorrelation were poor; however, the nitrate-N concentration was general high, its spatial variability was moderate, and the autocorrelation was much good. The distribution characteristics of ammonia-N, nitrate-N and nitrite-N in groundwater of Dongshan Island were similar that the high concentration areas were all located in the coastal land. The domestic pollutants and human and animal wastes from towns and villages were the main sources of nitrogen pollution, which would be the first step to control the nitrogen pollution of Dongshan Island. Land use pattern, soil type, groundwater depth, pH, dissolved oxygen, season, and the existence of Fe2+, were the impact factors that influence the distribution and transformation of ammonia-N, nitrate-N and nitrite-N in groundwater, which could be the considerable

  9. DEAMOX--new biological nitrogen removal process based on anaerobic ammonia oxidation coupled to sulphide-driven conversion of nitrate into nitrite.

    PubMed

    Kalyuzhnyi, Sergey; Gladchenko, Marina; Mulder, Arnold; Versprille, Bram

    2006-11-01

    This paper reports about the successful laboratory testing of a new nitrogen removal process called DEAMOX (DEnitrifying AMmonium OXidation) for treatment of typical strong nitrogenous wastewater such as baker's yeast effluent. The concept of this process combines the recently discovered anammox (anaerobic ammonium oxidation) reaction with autotrophic denitrifying conditions using sulphide as an electron donor for the production of nitrite from nitrate within an anaerobic biofilm. To generate sulphide and ammonia, a Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Bed (UASB) reactor was used as a pre-treatment step. The UASB effluent was split and partially fed to a nitrifying reactor (to generate nitrate) and the remaining part was directly fed to the DEAMOX reactor where this stream was mixed with the nitrified effluent. Stable process performance and volumetric nitrogen loading rates of the DEAMOX reactor well above 1000 mgN/l/d with total nitrogen removal efficiencies of around 90% were obtained after long-term (410 days) optimisation of the process. Important prerequisites for this performance are appropriate influent ratios of the key species fed to the DEAMOX reactor, namely influent N-NO(x)/N-NH(4) ratios >1.2 (stoichiometry of the anammox reaction) and influent S-H(2)S/N-NO(3) ratios >0.57 mgS/mgN (stoichiometry of the sulphide-driven denitrification of nitrate to nitrite). The paper further describes some characteristics of the DEAMOX sludge as well as the preliminary results of its microbiological characterisation. PMID:16893559

  10. [Characteristics and Transport Patterns of Ammonia, Nitrites, Nitrates and Inorganic Nitrogen Flux at Epikarst Springs and a Subterranean Stream in Nanshan, Chongqing].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan-zhu; He, Qiu-fang; Jiang, Yong-jun; Li, Yong

    2016-04-15

    In a karst groundwater system, it develops complex multiple flows because of its special geological structure and unique physical patterns of aquifers. In order to investigate the characteristics and transport patterns of ammonia, nitrite and nitrate in epikarst water and subterranean stream, the water samples were collected monthly in a fast-urbanizing karst region. The results showed distinctive characteristics of three forms of inorganic nitrogen. The concentration of inorganic nitrogen was stable in the epikarst water while it was fluctuant in the subterranean stream. Epikarst water was less affected by rainfall and sewage compared with subterranean stream. In epikarst water, the nitrate concentration was much higher than the ammonia concentration. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen, mainly from non-point source pollution related to agricultural activities, passed in and out of the epikarst water based on a series of physical; chemical and biological processes in the epikarst zone, such as ammonification, adsorption and nitrification. On the contrary, subterranean stream showed a result of NH₄⁺-N > NO₃⁻-N in dry seasons and NO₃⁻-N > NH₄⁺-N in rainy seasons. This can be due to the fact that sanitary and industrial sewage flowed into subterranean river through sinkholes, fissures and grikes in dry season. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen in subterranean river was mainly from the non-point source pollution in wet season. Non-point source pollutants entered into subterranean water by two transport ways, one by penetration along with vadose flow through fissures and grikes, and the other by conduit flow through sinkholes from the surface runoff, soil water flow and epikarst flow. The export flux of DIN was 56.05 kg · (hm² · a)⁻¹, and NH₄⁺-N and NO₃⁻-N accounted for 46.03% and 52.51%, respectively. The contributions of point-source pollution and non point-source pollution to the export flux of DIN were 25.08% and 74.92%, respectively, based on run

  11. Nitrates, Nitrites, and Health. Bulletin 750.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deeb, Barbara S.; Sloan, Kenneth W.

    This review is intended to assess available literature in order to define the range of nitrate/nitrite effects on animals. Though the literature deals primarily with livestock and experimental animals, much of the contemporary research is concerned with human nitrite intoxication. Thus, the effects on man are discussed where appropriate. Some of…

  12. The abiotic fixation of nitrogen on mars and other terrestrial planets: conversion of nitrogen, through NO, into nitrate, nitrite, ammonia, and nitrous oxide.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, David; Basa, Ranor; Khare, Bishun; Rodoni, David

    The abiotic fixation of nitrogen is critical to understanding habitability, planetary evolution and the potential origin of life on terrestrial planets such as Mars. A non-biological source of biochemically accessible nitrogen is necessary for the origin and early evolution of life. The Martian surface has become uninhabitable, in part due to loss of atmospheric gases, such as nitrogen, resulting in an incapacity to sustain liquid surface water. Chemical sequestration in the crust is one possible mechanism for such loss. The products of nitrogen fixation also impact the climate and geochemistry of the planet. Shock heating of a non-reducing atmosphere will produce NO. This process has been well studied. We have been experimentally studying the pathways possible from NO to more stable forms in the atmosphere and crust. Our work has observed that there are multiple pathways for the fixation. One pathway observed is consistent with the theoretically predicted route via photochemical formation of HNO. Inter-estingly, this pathway is coupled to the formation of formaldehyde from CO. With liquid water, this pathway leads to nitrate and nitrite. In the presence of just water vapor, HNO appears to mostly dimerize to form N2 O. A second pathway involves the formation of NO2 from CO2 and NO. This pathway becomes more dominant without water, but the reaction of NO2 with any form of water, even just adsorbed water, can lead to nitric acid. Finally, with FeS suspended in liquid water, the direct reduction of NO to ammonia is observed. This last pathway represents the most efficient way to reduced nitrogen, with product yields in excess of 50 % in a single step. In conjunction with the reduction of NO, there is also a catalytic disproportionation at the mineral surface, converting NO to NO2 and N2 O, providing an abiotic source of nitrous oxide. This chemistry has implications for a number epochs in Martian history. For example, chemistry in the presence of water is relevant to

  13. Nitrate Reduction to Nitrite, a Possible Source of Nitrite for Growth of Nitrite-Oxidizing Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Belser, L. W.

    1977-01-01

    Growth yields and other parameters characterizing the kinetics of growth of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria are presented. These parameters were measured during laboratory enrichments of soil samples with added nitrite. They were then used to reanalyze data for nitrite oxidizer growth in a previously reported field study (M. G. Volz, L. W. Belser, M. S. Ardakani, and A. D. McLaren, J. Environ. Qual. 4:179-182, 1975), where nitrate, but not nitrite or ammonium, was added. In that report, analysis of the field data indicated that in unsaturated soils, the reduction of nitrate to nitrite may be a significant source of nitrite for the growth of nitrite oxidizers. A yield of 1.23 × 104 cells per μg of N was determined to be most appropriate for application to the field. It was determined that if nitrite came only from mineralized organic nitrogen via ammonium oxidation, 35 to 90% of the organic nitrogen would have had to have been mineralized to produce the growth observed. However, it is estimated that only about 2% of the organic nitrogen could have been mineralized during the growth period. Thus, it appears that another source of nitrite is required, the most likely being the reduction of nitrate to nitrite coupled to the oxidation of organic matter. PMID:921264

  14. 9 CFR 319.2 - Products and nitrates and nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Products and nitrates and nitrites... and nitrates and nitrites. Any product, such as frankfurters and corned beef, for which there is a standard in this part and to which nitrate or nitrite is permitted or required to be added, may be...

  15. 9 CFR 319.2 - Products and nitrates and nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Products and nitrates and nitrites... and nitrates and nitrites. Any product, such as frankfurters and corned beef, for which there is a standard in this part and to which nitrate or nitrite is permitted or required to be added, may be...

  16. 9 CFR 319.2 - Products and nitrates and nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Products and nitrates and nitrites... and nitrates and nitrites. Any product, such as frankfurters and corned beef, for which there is a standard in this part and to which nitrate or nitrite is permitted or required to be added, may be...

  17. 9 CFR 319.2 - Products and nitrates and nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Products and nitrates and nitrites... and nitrates and nitrites. Any product, such as frankfurters and corned beef, for which there is a standard in this part and to which nitrate or nitrite is permitted or required to be added, may be...

  18. 9 CFR 319.2 - Products and nitrates and nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Products and nitrates and nitrites... and nitrates and nitrites. Any product, such as frankfurters and corned beef, for which there is a standard in this part and to which nitrate or nitrite is permitted or required to be added, may be...

  19. Sources and sinks for ammonia and nitrite on the early Earth and the reaction of nitrite with ammonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, D. P.

    1999-01-01

    An analysis of sources and sinks for ammonia and nitrite on the early Earth was conducted. Rates of formation and destruction, and steady state concentrations of both species were determined by steady state kinetics. The importance of the reaction of nitrite with ammonia on the feasibility of ammonia formation from nitrite was evaluated. The analysis considered conditions such as temperature, ferrous iron concentration, and pH. For sinks we considered the reduction of nitrite to ammonia, reaction between nitrite and ammonia, photochemical destruction of both species, and destruction at hydrothermal vents. Under most environmental conditions, the primary sink for nitrite is reduction to ammonia. The reaction between ammonia and nitrite is not an important sink for either nitrite or ammonia. Destruction at hydrothermal vents is important at acidic pH's and at low ferrous iron concentrations. Photochemical destruction, even in a worst case scenario, is unimportant under many conditions except possibly under acidic, low iron concentration, or low temperature conditions. The primary sink for ammonia is photochemical destruction in the atmosphere. Under acidic conditions, more of the ammonia is tied up as ammonium (reducing its vapor pressure and keeping it in solution) and hydrothermal destruction becomes more important.

  20. Molecular Components of Nitrate and Nitrite Efflux in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Elisa; González-Montelongo, Rafaela; Giraldez, Teresa; de la Rosa, Diego Alvarez

    2014-01-01

    Some eukaryotes, such as plant and fungi, are capable of utilizing nitrate as the sole nitrogen source. Once transported into the cell, nitrate is reduced to ammonium by the consecutive action of nitrate and nitrite reductase. How nitrate assimilation is balanced with nitrate and nitrite efflux is unknown, as are the proteins involved. The nitrate assimilatory yeast Hansenula polymorpha was used as a model to dissect these efflux systems. We identified the sulfite transporters Ssu1 and Ssu2 as effective nitrate exporters, Ssu2 being quantitatively more important, and we characterize the Nar1 protein as a nitrate/nitrite exporter. The use of strains lacking either SSU2 or NAR1 along with the nitrate reductase gene YNR1 showed that nitrate reductase activity is not required for net nitrate uptake. Growth test experiments indicated that Ssu2 and Nar1 exporters allow yeast to cope with nitrite toxicity. We also have shown that the well-known Saccharomyces cerevisiae sulfite efflux permease Ssu1 is also able to excrete nitrite and nitrate. These results characterize for the first time essential components of the nitrate/nitrite efflux system and their impact on net nitrate uptake and its regulation. PMID:24363367

  1. Ammonia and nitrite oxidation in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xuefeng; Fuchsman, Clara A.; Jayakumar, Amal; Oleynik, Sergey; Martens-Habbena, Willm; Devol, Allan H.; Ward, Bess B.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrification plays a key role in the marine nitrogen (N) cycle, including in oceanic oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), which are hot spots for denitrification and anaerobic ammonia oxidation (anammox). Recent evidence suggests that nitrification links the source (remineralized organic matter) and sink (denitrification and anammox) of fixed N directly in the steep oxycline in the OMZs. We performed shipboard incubations with 15N tracers to characterize the depth distribution of nitrification in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific (ETNP). Additional experiments were conducted to investigate photoinhibition. Allylthiourea (ATU) was used to distinguish the contribution of archaeal and bacterial ammonia oxidation. The abundance of archaeal and β-proteobacterial ammonia monooxygenase gene subunit A (amoA) was determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The rates of ammonia and nitrite oxidation showed distinct subsurface maxima, with the latter slightly deeper than the former. The ammonia oxidation maximum coincided with the primary nitrite concentration maximum, archaeal amoA gene maximum, and the subsurface nitrous oxide maximum. Negligible rates of ammonia oxidation were found at anoxic depths, where high rates of nitrite oxidation were measured. Archaeal amoA gene abundance was generally 1 to 2 orders of magnitude higher than bacterial amoA gene abundance, and inhibition of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria with 10 μM ATU did not affect ammonia oxidation rates, indicating the dominance of archaea in ammonia oxidation. These results depict highly dynamic activities of ammonia and nitrite oxidation in the oxycline of the ETNP OMZ.

  2. Selection of denitrifying phosphorous accumulating organisms in IFAS systems: comparison of nitrite with nitrate as an electron acceptor.

    PubMed

    Jabari, Pouria; Munz, Giulio; Oleszkiewicz, Jan A

    2014-08-01

    Nitrite and nitrate were compared as electron acceptors to select for denitrifying phosphorous accumulating organisms (DPAO) in two integrated fixed film activated sludge (IFAS 1 and IFAS 2) systems operated as sequencing batch reactors. The bench-scale experiment lasted one year and synthetic wastewater was used as feed. During anoxic conditions 20mgNO3(-)-NL(-1) were dosed into IFAS-1 and 20mgNO2(-)-NL(-1) were dosed into IFAS-2. Long term phosphorous and ammonia removal via nitritation were achieved in both systems and both attached and suspended biomass contributed to phosphorous and ammonia removal. DPAO showed no specific adaptation to the electron acceptor as evidenced by short term switch of feeding with nitrate or nitrite. Anoxic phosphorus uptake rate was significantly higher with nitrite than with nitrate. Results showed that DPAO activity with nitrite could be integrated into attached and suspended biomass of IFAS systems in long term operation. PMID:24873702

  3. ACUTE TOXICITY OF AMMONIA AND NITRITE TO CUTTHROAT TROUT FRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The toxicity of ammonia and of nitrite was tested on cutthroat trout (Salmo clarki) fry (1-3 g) for periods up to a month in eight laboratory flow-through bioassays. Median lethal concentration (LC50) values for ammonia (mg/liter un-ionized NH3) were 0.5-0.8 for 96 hours, and 0.3...

  4. Crystal Structure of a Nitrate/Nitrite Exchanger

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hongjin; Wisedchaisri, Goragot; Gonen, Tamir

    2013-01-01

    Summary Mineral nitrogen in nature is often found in the form of nitrate (NO3-). Numerous microorganisms evolved to assimilate nitrate and use it as a major source of mineral nitrogen uptake1. Nitrate, which is central in nitrogen metabolism, is first reduced to nitrite (NO2-) through a two-electron reduction reaction2,3. The accumulation of cellular nitrite can be harmful because nitrite can be reduced to the cytotoxic nitric oxide. Instead, nitrite is rapidly removed from the cell by channels and transporters, or reduced to ammonium or dinitrogen through the action of assimilatory enzymes3. Despite decades of effort no structure is currently available for any nitrate transport protein and the mechanism by which nitrate is transported remains largely obscure. Here we report the structure of a bacterial nitrate/nitrite transport protein, NarK, from Escherichia coli, with and without substrate. The structures reveal a positively charged substrate-translocation pathway lacking protonatable residues, suggesting that NarK functions as a nitrate/nitrite exchanger and that H+s are unlikely to be co-transported. Conserved arginine residues form the substrate-binding pocket, which is formed by association of helices from the two halves of NarK. Key residues that are important for substrate recognition and transport are identified and related to extensive mutagenesis and functional studies. We propose that NarK exchanges nitrate for nitrite by a rocker-switch mechanism facilitated by inter-domain H-bond networks. PMID:23665960

  5. Reduction of Nitrite and Nitrate to Ammonium on Pyrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singireddy, Soujanya; Gordon, Alexander D.; Smirnov, Alexander; Vance, Michael A.; Schoonen, Martin A. A.; Szilagyi, Robert K.; Strongin, Daniel R.

    2012-08-01

    An important constraint on the formation of the building blocks of life in the Hadean is the availability of small, activated compounds such as ammonia (NH3) relative to its inert dinitrogen source. Iron-sulfur particles and/or mineral surfaces have been implicated to provide the catalytic active sites for the reduction of dinitrogen. Here we provide a combined kinetic, spectroscopic, and computational modeling study for an alternative source of ammonia from water soluble nitrogen oxide ions. The adsorption of aqueous nitrite (NO{2/-}) and nitrate (NO{3/-}) on pyrite (FeS2) and subsequent reduction chemistry to ammonia was investigated at 22°C, 70°C, and 120°C. Batch geochemical and in situ Attenuated Total Reflection - Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy experiments were used to determine the reduction kinetics to NH3 and to elucidate the identity of the surface complexes, respectively, during the reaction chemistry of NO{2/-} and NO{3/-}. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations aided the interpretation of the vibrational data for a representative set of surface species. Under the experimental conditions used in this study, we detected the adsorption of nitric oxide (NO) intermediate on the pyrite surface. NH3 production from NO{2/-} occurred at 70 and 120°C and from NO{3/-} occurred only at 120°C.

  6. Dietary nitrate and nitrite: Benefits, risks, and evolving perceptions.

    PubMed

    Bedale, Wendy; Sindelar, Jeffrey J; Milkowski, Andrew L

    2016-10-01

    Consumers have an illogical relationship with nitrite (and its precursor, nitrate) in food. Despite a long history of use, nitrite was nearly banned from use in foods in the 1970s due to health concerns related to the potential for carcinogenic nitrosamine formation. Changes in meat processing methods reduced those potential risks, and nitrite continued to be used in foods. Since then, two opposing movements continue to shape how consumers view dietary nitrate and nitrite. The discovery of the profound physiological importance of nitric oxide led to the realization that dietary nitrate contributes significantly to the nitrogen reservoir for nitric oxide formation. Numerous clinical studies have also demonstrated beneficial effects from dietary nitrate consumption, especially in vascular and metabolic health. However, the latest wave of consumer sentiment against food additives, the clean-label movement, has renewed consumer fear and avoidance of preservatives, including nitrite. Education is necessary but may not be sufficient to resolve this disconnect in consumer perception. PMID:26994928

  7. Modulation of nitrate-nitrite conversion in the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    van Maanen, J M; van Geel, A A; Kleinjans, J C

    1996-01-01

    The formation of nitrite from ingested nitrate can give rise to the induction of methemoglobinemia and endogenous nitrosation resulting in the formation of carcinogenic N-nitroso compounds. We investigated the possibility of modulation of the conversion of nitrate into nitrite in the oral cavity in order to seek ways of reducing the formation of the deleterious nitrite. We investigated the effectiveness of several mouthwash solutions with antibacterial constituents on the reduction of nitrate into nitrite in the oral cavity. In 15 studied subjects, the mean percentage of salivary nitrate reduced to nitrite after ingestion of 235 mg (3.8 mmol) nitrate was found to be 16.1 +/- 6.2%. The use of an antiseptic mouthwash with active antibacterial constituent chlorhexidine resulted in an almost complete decrease of the mean percentage of reduced nitrate, to 0.9 +/- 0.8%. Mouthwash solutions with antibacterial component triclosan or antimicrobial enzymes amyloglucosidase and glucose oxidase did not affect the reduction of nitrate into nitrite. A toothpaste with active components triclosan and zinc citrate with synergistic antiplaque activity was also without effect. Use of a pH-regulating chewing gum resulted in a rise in the pH in the oral cavity from 6.8 to 7.3. At 30 min after nitrate ingestion, this rise was accompanied by a significant increase in the salivary nitrite concentration, which might be explained by the pH being close to the optimal pH for nitrate reductase of 8. In conclusion, a limited number of possibilities of modulation of the conversion of nitrate into nitrite in the oral cavity are available. PMID:8939344

  8. Sugar-driven prebiotic synthesis of ammonia from nitrite.

    PubMed

    Weber, Arthur L

    2010-06-01

    Reaction of 3-5 carbon sugars, glycolaldehyde, and alpha-ketoaldehydes with nitrite under mild anaerobic aqueous conditions yielded ammonia, an essential substrate for the synthesis of nitrogen-containing molecules during abiogenesis. Under the same conditions, ammonia synthesis was not driven by formaldehyde, glyoxylate, 2-deoxyribose, and glucose, a result indicating that the reduction process requires an organic reductant containing either an accessible alpha-hydroxycarbonyl group or an alpha-dicarbonyl group. Small amounts of aqueous Fe(+3) catalyzed the sugar-driven synthesis of ammonia. The glyceraldehyde concentration dependence of ammonia synthesis, and control studies of ammonia's reaction with glyceraldehyde, indicated that ammonia formation is accompanied by incorporation of part of the synthesized ammonia into sugar-derived organic products. The ability of sugars to drive the synthesis of ammonia is considered important to abiogenesis because it provides a way to generate photochemically unstable ammonia at sites of sugar-based origin-of-life processes from nitrite, a plausible prebiotic nitrogen species. PMID:20213158

  9. Sugar-Driven Prebiotic Synthesis of Ammonia from Nitrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    2010-03-01

    Reaction of 3-5 carbon sugars, glycolaldehyde, and α-ketoaldehydes with nitrite under mild anaerobic aqueous conditions yielded ammonia, an essential substrate for the synthesis of nitrogen-containing molecules during abiogenesis. Under the same conditions, ammonia synthesis was not driven by formaldehyde, glyoxylate, 2-deoxyribose, and glucose, a result indicating that the reduction process requires an organic reductant containing either an accessible α-hydroxycarbonyl group or an α-dicarbonyl group. Small amounts of aqueous Fe+3 catalyzed the sugar-driven synthesis of ammonia. The glyceraldehyde concentration dependence of ammonia synthesis, and control studies of ammonia’s reaction with glyceraldehyde, indicated that ammonia formation is accompanied by incorporation of part of the synthesized ammonia into sugar-derived organic products. The ability of sugars to drive the synthesis of ammonia is considered important to abiogenesis because it provides a way to generate photochemically unstable ammonia at sites of sugar-based origin-of-life processes from nitrite, a plausible prebiotic nitrogen species.

  10. Nitrate ammonification in mangrove soils: a hidden source of nitrite?

    PubMed

    Balk, Melike; Laverman, Anniet M; Keuskamp, Joost A; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate reduction is considered to be a minor microbial pathway in the oxidation of mangrove-derived organic matter due to a limited supply of nitrate in mangrove soils. At a limited availability of this electron acceptor compared to the supply of degradable carbon, nitrate ammonification is thought to be the preferential pathway of nitrate reduction. Mangrove forest mutually differ in their productivity, which may lead to different available carbon to nitrate ratios in their soil. Hence, nitrate ammonification is expected to be of more importance in high- compared to low-productive forests. The hypothesis was tested in flow-through reactors that contain undisturbed mangrove soils from high-productive Avicennia germinans and Rhizophora mangle forests in Florida and low-productive Avicennia marina forests in Saudi Arabia. Nitrate was undetectable in the soils from both regions. It was assumed that a legacy of nitrate ammonification would be reflected by a higher ammonium production from these soils upon the addition of nitrate. Unexpectedly, the soils from the low-productive forests in Saudi Arabia produced considerably more ammonium than the soils from the high-productive forests in Florida. Hence, other environmental factors than productivity must govern the selection of nitrate ammonification or denitrification. A rather intriguing observation was the 1:1 production of nitrite and ammonium during the consumption of nitrate, more or less independent from sampling region, location, sampling depth, mangrove species and from the absence or presence of additional degradable carbon. This 1:1 ratio points to a coupled production of ammonium and nitrite by one group of nitrate-reducing microorganisms. Such a production of nitrite will be hidden by the presence of active nitrite-reducing microorganisms under the nitrate-limited conditions of most mangrove forest soils. PMID:25784903

  11. Ultrasonic Treatment Enhanced Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacterial (AOB) Activity for Nitritation Process.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Min; Liu, Yan-Chen; Xin, Jia; Zuo, Hao; Wang, Cheng-Wen; Wu, Wei-Min

    2016-01-19

    Oxidation of ammonia to nitrite rather than nitrate is critical for nitritation process for wastewater treatment. We proposed a promising approach by using controlled ultrasonic treatment to enhance the activity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and suppress that of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB). Batch activity assays indicated that when ultrasound was applied, AOB activity reached a peak level and then declined but NOB activity deteriorated continuously as the power intensity of ultrasound increased. Kinetic analysis of relative microbial activity versus ultrasonic energy density was performed to investigate the effect of operational factors (power, sludge concentration, and aeration) on AOB and NOB activities and the test parameters were selected for reactor tests. Laboratory sequential batch reactor (SBR) was further used to test the ultrasonic stimulus with 8 h per day operational cycle and synthetic waste urine as influent. With specific ultrasonic energy density of 0.09 kJ/mg VSS and continuously fed influent containing above 200 mg NH3-N/L, high AOB reproductive activity was achieved and nearly complete conversion of ammonia-N to nitrite was maintained. Microbial structure analysis confirmed that the treatment changed community of AOB, NOB, and heterotrophs. Known AOB Nitrosomonas genus remained at similar level in the biomass while typical NOB Nitrospira genus disappeared in the SBR under ultrasonic treatment and after the treatment was off for 30 days. PMID:26678011

  12. Increased Salivary Nitrite and Nitrate Excretion in Rats with Cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Mahmoodi, Somayeh; Rahmatollahi, Mahdieh; Shahsavari, Fatemeh; Shafaroodi, Hamed; Grayesh-Nejad, Siyavash; Dehpour, Ahmad R

    2015-11-01

    Increased nitric oxide (NO) formation is mechanistically linked to pathophysiology of the extrahepatic complications of cirrhosis. NO is formed by either enzymatic or non-enzymatic pathways. Enzymatic production is catalyzed by NO synthase (NOS) while entero-salivary circulation of nitrate and nitrite is linked to non-enzymatic formation of NO under acidic pH in the stomach. There is no data on salivary excretion of nitrate and nitrite in cirrhosis. This study was aimed to investigate salivary levels of nitrate and nitrite in a rat model of biliary cirrhosis. Cirrhosis was induced by bile duct ligation (BDL). Four weeks after the operation, submandibular ducts of anesthetized BDL and control rats were cannulated with polyethylene microtube for saliva collection. Assessment of pH, nitrite and nitrate levels was performed in our research. We also investigated NOS expression by real time RT-PCR to estimate eNOS, nNOS and iNOS mRNA levels in the submandibular glands. Salivary pH was significantly lower in BDL rats in comparison to control animals. We also observed a statistically significant increase in salivary levels of nitrite as well as nitrate in BDL rats while there was no elevation in the mRNA expression of nNOS, eNOS, and iNOS in submandibular glands of cirrhotic groups. This indicates that an increased salivary level of nitrite/nitrate is less likely to be linked to increased enzymatic production of NO in the salivary epithelium. It appears that nitrate/nitrite can be transported from the blood stream by submandibular glands and excreted into saliva as entero-salivary circulation, and this mechanism may have been exaggerated during cirrhosis. PMID:26786986

  13. Nitrite reduction in paracoccus halodenitrificans: Evidence for the role of a cd-type cytochrome in ammonia formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, L. I.; Cronin, S. E.

    1984-01-01

    Cell-free extracts prepared from Paracoccus halodenitrificans catalyzed the reduction of nitrate to ammonia in the presence of dithionite and methyl viologen. Enzyme activity was located in the soluble fraction and was associated with a cytochrome whose spectral properties resembled those of a cd-type cytochrome. Unlike the sissimilatory cd-cytochrome nitrate reductase associated with the membrane fraction of P. halodenitrificans, this soluble cd-cytochrome did not reduce nitrite to nitrous oxide.

  14. Plasma nitrate and nitrite are increased by a high nitrate supplement, but not by high nitrate foods in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Gary D.; Marsh, Anthony P.; Dove, Robin W.; Beavers, Daniel; Presley, Tennille; Helms, Christine; Bechtold, Erika; King, S. Bruce; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the effect of dietary nitrate on the nitrate/nitrite/NO (nitric oxide) cycle in older adults. We examined the effect of a 3-day control diet vs. high nitrate diet, with and without a high nitrate supplement (beetroot juice), on plasma nitrate and nitrite kinetics, and blood pressure using a randomized four period cross-over controlled design. We hypothesized that the high nitrate diet would show higher levels of plasma nitrate/nitrite and blood pressure compared to the control diet, which would be potentiated by the supplement. Participants were eight normotensive older men and women (5 female, 3 male, 72.5±4.7 yrs) with no overt disease or medications that affect NO metabolism. Plasma nitrate and nitrite levels and blood pressure were measured prior to and hourly for 3 hours after each meal. The mean daily changes in plasma nitrate and nitrite were significantly different from baseline for both control diet+supplement (p<0.001 and =0.017 for nitrate and nitrite, respectively) and high nitrate diet+supplement (p=0.001 and 0.002), but not for control diet (p=0.713 and 0.741) or high nitrate diet (p=0.852 and 0.500). Blood pressure decreased from the morning baseline measure to the three 2 hr post-meal follow-up time-points for all treatments, but there was no main effect for treatment. In healthy older adults, a high nitrate supplement consumed at breakfast elevated plasma nitrate and nitrite levels throughout the day. This observation may have practical utility for the timing of intake of a nitrate supplement with physical activity for older adults with vascular dysfunction. PMID:22464802

  15. Impacts of Nitrate and Nitrite on Physiology of Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haiyan; Fu, Huihui; Wang, Jixuan; Sun, Linlin; Jiang, Yaoming; Zhang, Lili; Gao, Haichun

    2013-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis exhibits a remarkable versatility in anaerobic respiration, which largely relies on its diverse respiratory pathways. Some of these are expressed in response to the existence of their corresponding electron acceptors (EAs) under aerobic conditions. However, little is known about respiration and the impact of non-oxygen EAs on the physiology of the microorganism when oxygen is present. Here we undertook a study to elucidate the basis for nitrate and nitrite inhibition of growth under aerobic conditions. We discovered that nitrate in the form of NaNO3 exerts its inhibitory effects as a precursor to nitrite at low concentrations and as an osmotic-stress provider (Na+) at high concentrations. In contrast, nitrite is extremely toxic, with 25 mM abolishing growth completely. We subsequently found that oxygen represses utilization of all EAs but nitrate. To order to utilize EAs with less positive redox potential, such as nitrite and fumarate, S. oneidensis must enter the stationary phase, when oxygen respiration becomes unfavorable. In addition, we demonstrated that during aerobic respiration the cytochrome bd oxidase confers S. oneidensis resistance to nitrite, which likely functions via nitric oxide (NO). PMID:23626841

  16. Acute toxicity of ammonia and nitrite to shortnose sturgeon fingerlings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fontenot, Q.C.; Isely, J.J.; Tomasso, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    The 96-h median-lethal concentration (96-h LC50) of total ammonia nitrogen (ammonia-N) to fingerling shortnose sturgeon Acipenser brevirostrum was 149.8 ?? 55.20 mg/L (mean ?? SD, 17.9 ?? 0.62??C, pH = 6.8-7.3). Calculated 96-h LC50 for un-ionized ammonia-N was 0.58 ?? 0.213 mg/L. The 96-h LC50 of nitrite nitrogen to shortnose sturgeon fingerlings was 11.3 ?? 8.17 mg/L (17.9 ?? 0.31??C, <1.0 mg chloride/L, <1.0 mg magnesium/L, 1.8 mg calcium/L, 7.7 mg sodium/L).

  17. Ultraviolet irradiation effects incorporation of nitrate and nitrite nitrogen into aquatic natural organic matter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, Kevin A.; Cox, Larry G.

    2012-01-01

    One of the concerns regarding the safety and efficacy of ultraviolet radiation for treatment of drinking water and wastewater is the fate of nitrate, particularly its photolysis to nitrite. In this study, 15N NMR was used to establish for the first time that UV irradiation effects the incorporation of nitrate and nitrite nitrogen into aquatic natural organic matter (NOM). Irradiation of 15N-labeled nitrate in aqueous solution with an unfiltered medium pressure mercury lamp resulted in the incorporation of nitrogen into Suwannee River NOM (SRNOM) via nitrosation and other reactions over a range of pH from approximately 3.2 to 8.0, both in the presence and absence of bicarbonate, confirming photonitrosation of the NOM. The major forms of the incorporated label include nitrosophenol, oxime/nitro, pyridine, nitrile, and amide nitrogens. Natural organic matter also catalyzed the reduction of nitrate to ammonia on irradiation. The nitrosophenol and oxime/nitro nitrogens were found to be susceptible to photodegradation on further irradiation when nitrate was removed from the system. At pH 7.5, unfiltered irradiation resulted in the incorporation of 15N-labeled nitrite into SRNOM in the form of amide, nitrile, and pyridine nitrogen. In the presence of bicarbonate at pH 7.4, Pyrex filtered (cutoff below 290–300 nm) irradiation also effected incorporation of nitrite into SRNOM as amide nitrogen. We speculate that nitrosation of NOM from the UV irradiation of nitrate also leads to production of nitrogen gas and nitrous oxide, a process that may be termed photo-chemodenitrification. Irradiation of SRNOM alone resulted in transformation or loss of naturally abundant heterocyclic nitrogens.

  18. Spectrophotometric determination of nitrite and nitrate using phosphomolybdenum blue complex.

    PubMed

    Zatar, N A; Abu-Eid, M A; Eid, A F

    1999-11-15

    A method for spectrophotometric determination of nitrite and nitrate is described. This method is based on the reduction of phosphomolybdic acid to phosphomolybdenum blue complex by sodium sulfide. The obtained phosphomolybdenum blue complex is oxidized by the addition of nitrite and this causes a reduction in intensity of the blue color. The absolute decrease in the absorbance of the blue color or the rate of its decrease is found to be directly proportional to the amount of nitrite added. The absorbance of the phosphomolybdenum blue complex is monitored spectrophotometrically at 814 nm and related to the concentration of nitrite present. The effect of different factors such as acidity, stability of the complex, time, temperature, phosphate concentration, molybdenum concentration, sodium sulfide concentration and the tolerance amount of other ions have been reported. Maximum absorbance is at 814 nm. The range of linearity using the conventional method is 0.5-2.0 ppm with molar absorptivity of 1.1 x 10(4) l mol(-1) cm(-1). and a relative standard deviation of 2.6% for five measurements. The range of linearity using the reaction rate method is 0.2-3.6 ppm with a relative standard deviation of 2.4% for five measurements. The method is applied for determination of nitrite and nitrate in water, meat products and vegetables. PMID:18967772

  19. Ammonia on the prebiotic Earth: Iron(II) reduction of nitrite. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, David P.; Chang, Sherwood

    1994-01-01

    Theories for the origin of life require the availability of reduced nitrogen. In the non-reducing atmosphere suggested by geochemical evidence, production in the atmosphere and survival of NH3 against photochemical destruction are problematic. Electric discharges and impact shocks would produce NO rather than HCN or NH3. Conversion of NO to nitrous and nitric acid (by way of HNO) and precipitation in acid rain would provide a source of fixed nitrogen to the early ocean. One solution to the NH3 problem may have been the reduction of nitrite/nitrate in the ocean with aqueous ferrous iron, Fe(2+): 6Fe(+2) + 7 H2O + NO2(-) yields 3Fe2O3 + 11 H(+) + NH3. We have measured the kinetics of this reaction as a function of temperature, pH, and concentrations of salts, Fe(+2), and NO2(-). Cations (Na(+), Mg(2+), K(+)) and anions (Cl(-), Br(-), SO4(2-)) increase the rate by factors of 4 to 8. Although a competing pathway yields N2, the efficiency of the conversion of nitrite to ammonia ranges from 25% to 85%. Nitrate reduction was not consistently reproducible; however, when it was observed, its rate was slower by at least 8X than that of nitrite reduction. If the prebiotic atmosphere contained 0.2 to 10 atmospheres CO2 as suggested by Walker (1985), the Fe(+2) concentration and the rate would have been limited by siderite (FeCO3) solubility.

  20. Nitrate metabolism in tobacco leaves overexpressing Arabidopsis nitrite reductase.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Susie; Le Lay, Pascaline; Sanchez-Tamburrrino, Juan Pablo

    2015-12-01

    Primary nitrogen assimilation in plants includes the reduction of nitrite to ammonium in the chloroplasts by the enzyme nitrite reductase (NiR EC:1.7.7.1) or in the plastids of non-photosynthetic organs. Here we report on a study overexpressing the Arabidopsis thaliana NiR (AtNiR) gene in tobacco plants under the control of a constitutive promoter (CERV - Carnation Etched Ring Virus). The aim was to overexpress AtNiR in an attempt to alter the level of residual nitrite in the leaf which can act as precursor to the formation of nitrosamines. The impact of increasing the activity of AtNiR produced an increase in leaf protein and a stay-green phenotype in the primary transformed AtNiR population. Investigation of the T1 homozygous population demonstrated elevated nitrate reductase (NR) activity, reductions in leaf nitrite and nitrate and the amino acids proline, glutamine and glutamate. Chlorophyl content of the transgenic lines was increased, as evidenced by the stay-green phenotype. This reveals the importance of NiR in primary nitrogen assimilation and how modification of this key enzyme affects both the nitrogen and carbon metabolism of tobacco plants. PMID:26447683

  1. Determination of Ammonia Oxidizing Bacteria and Nitrate Oxidizing Bacteria in Wastewater and Bioreactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francis, Somilez Asya

    2014-01-01

    The process of water purification has many different physical, chemical, and biological processes. One part of the biological process is the task of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB). Both play critical roles in the treatment of wastewater by oxidizing toxic compounds. The broad term is nitrification, a naturally occurring process that is carried out by AOB and NOB by using oxidation to convert ammonia to nitrite and nitrite to nitrate. To monitor this biological activity, bacterial staining was performed on wastewater contained in inoculum tanks and biofilm samples from bioreactors. Using microscopy and qPCR, the purpose of this experiment was to determine if the population of AOB and NOB in wastewater and membrane bioreactors changed depending on temperature and hibernation conditions to determine the optimal parameters for AOB/NOB culture to effectively clean wastewater.

  2. The nasB operon and nasA gene are required for nitrate/nitrite assimilation in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, K; Akagawa, E; Yamane, K; Sun, Z W; LaCelle, M; Zuber, P; Nakano, M M

    1995-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis can use either nitrate or nitrite as a sole source of nitrogen. The isolation of the nasABCDEF genes of B. subtilis, which are required for nitrate/nitrite assimilation, is reported. The probable gene products include subunits of nitrate/nitrite reductases and an enzyme involved in the synthesis of siroheme, a cofactor for nitrite reductase. PMID:7868621

  3. Self-powered denitration of landfill leachate through ammonia/nitrate coupled redox fuel cell reactor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huimin; Xu, Wei; Feng, Daolun; Liu, Zhanmeng; Wu, Zucheng

    2016-03-01

    In order to explore the feasibility of energy-free denitrifying N-rich wastewater, a self-powered device was uniquely assembled, in which ammonia/nitrate coupled redox fuel cell (CRFC) reactor was served as removing nitrogen and harvesting electric energy simultaneously. Ammonia is oxidized at anodic compartment and nitrate is reduced at cathodic compartment spontaneously by electrocatalysis. In 7.14 mM ammonia+0.2M KOH anolyte and 4.29 mM KNO3+0.1M H2SO4 catholyte, the nitrate removal efficiency was 46.9% after 18 h. Meanwhile, a maximum power density of 170 mW m(-2) was achieved when applying Pd/C cathode. When NH4Cl/nitrate and ammonia/nitrite CRFCs were tested, 26.2% N-NH4Cl and 91.4% N-NO2(-) were removed respectively. Nitrogen removal efficiency for real leachate at the same initial NH3-N concentration is 22.9% and nitrification of ammonia in leachate can be used as nitrate source. This work demonstrated a new way for N-rich wastewater remediation with electricity generation. PMID:26720140

  4. Nitrite and nitrate as electron acceptors for biological sulphide oxidation.

    PubMed

    Munz, G; Mannucci, A; Arreola-Vargas, J; Alatriste-Mondragon, F; Giaccherini, F; Mori, G

    2015-01-01

    Autotrophic denitrification with sulphide using nitrate (R1) and nitrite (R2) as electron acceptor was investigated at bench scale. Different solids retention times (SRT) (5 and 20 d) have been tested in R1 while R2 was operated at SRT=13 d. The results indicated that the process allows complete sulphide removal to be achieved in all tested conditions. Tested sulphide loads were estimated from the H2S produced in a pilot-scale anaerobic digester treating vegetable tannery primary sludge; nitrogen loads originated from the nitrification of the supernatant. Average nitrogen removal efficiencies higher than 80% were observed in all the tested conditions once steady state was reached. A maximum specific nitrate removal rate equal to 0.35 g N-NO3- g VSS(-1) d(-1) was reached in R1. Due to sulphide limitation, incomplete denitrification was observed and nitrite and thiosulphate tend to accumulate especially in the presence of variable environmental conditions in both R1 and R2. Lower SRT caused higher NO2accumulated/NO3reduced ratios (0.22 and 0.24, with SRT of 5 d and 20 d, respectively) using nitrate as electron acceptor in steady-state condition. Temperature decrease caused sudden NO2accumulated/NO3reduced ratio increase in R1 and NO2- removal decrease in R2. PMID:26247758

  5. Mammalian nitrate biosynthesis: mouse macrophages produce nitrite and nitrate in response to Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide

    SciTech Connect

    Stuehr, D.J.; Marletta, M.A.

    1985-11-01

    Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitrate biosynthesis was studied in LPS-sensitive C3H/He and LPS-resistant C3H/HeJ mice. Intraperitoneal injection of 15 ..mu..g of LPS led to a temporary 5- to 6-fold increase in blood nitrate concentration in the C3H/He strain. Levels of nitrate excreted in the urine were also increased. In contrast, no increase was observed in the C3H/HeJ strain with LPS injections up to 175 ..mu..g. Furthermore, thioglycolate-elicited peritoneal macrophages from C3H/He, but not from C3H/HeJ mice, produced nitrite (60%) and nitrate (40%) when cultured with LPS (10 ..mu..g/ml). T-lymphocyte addition/depletion experiments showed the presence of T cells enhanced this response. However, LPS did not cause nitrite or nitrate production in cultures of spleen lymphocytes from either strain. LPS-induced nitrate synthesis was also observed with nude mice and CBA/N mice, indicating that neither functional T lymphocytes nor LPS-responsive B lymphocytes were required for the response in vivo. This was consistent with the in vitro results showing macrophages alone were competent. Mycobacterium bovis infection of C3H/He and C3H/HeJ mice resulted in a large increase in nitrate production over the course of the infection for both strains, suggesting T-lymphocyte-mediated activation of macrophages as a potent stimulus for nitrate biosynthesis. The synthesis of nitrite is significant in that it can directly participate in the endogenous formation of nitrosamines and may also be involved in some aspect of the chemistry of cytotoxicity.

  6. Mammalian nitrate biosynthesis: mouse macrophages produce nitrite and nitrate in response to Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Stuehr, D J; Marletta, M A

    1985-01-01

    Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitrate biosynthesis was studied in LPS-sensitive C3H/He and LPS-resistant C3H/HeJ mice. Intraperitoneal injection of 15 micrograms of LPS led to a temporary 5- to 6-fold increase in blood nitrate concentration in the C3H/He strain. Levels of nitrate excreted in the urine were also increased. In contrast, no increase was observed in the C3H/HeJ strain with LPS injections up to 175 micrograms. Furthermore, thioglycolate-elicited peritoneal macrophages from C3H/He, but not from C3H/HeJ mice, produced nitrite (60%) and nitrate (40%) when cultured with LPS (10 micrograms/ml). T-lymphocyte addition/depletion experiments showed the presence of T cells enhanced this response. However, LPS did not cause nitrite or nitrate production in cultures of spleen lymphocytes from either strain. LPS-induced nitrate synthesis was also observed with nude mice and CBA/N mice, indicating that neither functional T lymphocytes nor LPS-responsive B lymphocytes were required for the response in vivo. This was consistent with the in vitro results showing macrophages alone were competent. Mycobacterium bovis infection of C3H/He and C3H/HeJ mice resulted in a large increase in nitrate production over the course of the infection for both strains, suggesting T-lymphocyte-mediated activation of macrophages as a potent stimulus for nitrate biosynthesis. The synthesis of nitrite is significant in that it can directly participate in the endogenous formation of nitrosamines and may also be involved in some aspect of the chemistry of cytotoxicity. PMID:3906650

  7. Toluene nitration in irradiated nitric acid and nitrite solution

    SciTech Connect

    Gracy Elias; Bruce J. Mincher; Stephen P. Mezyk; Jim Muller; Leigh R. Martin

    2011-04-01

    The kinetics, mechanisms, and stable products produced for the aryl alkyl mild ortho-para director - toluene, in irradiated nitric acid and neutral nitrite solutions were investigated using ?, and pulse radiolysis. Electron pulse radiolysis was used to determine the bimolecular rate constants for the reaction of toluene with different transient species produced by irradiation. HPLC with UV detection was primarily used to assess the stable reaction products. GC-MS and LC-MS were used to confirm the results from HPLC. Free-radical nitration reaction products were found in irradiated acidic and neutral media. In acidic medium, the ring substitution and side chain substitution and oxidation produced different nitro products. In ring substitution, nitrogen oxide radicals were added mainly to hydroxyl radical-produced cyclohexadienyl radical, and in side chain substitution they were added to the carbon-centered benzyl radical produced by H-atom abstraction. In neutral nitrite toluene solution, radiolytic ring nitration products approached a statistically random distribution, suggesting a free-radical reaction involving addition of the •NO2 radical.

  8. A composite biochemical system for bacterial nitrate and nitrite assimilation as exemplified by Paracoccus denitrificans.

    PubMed

    Gates, Andrew J; Luque-Almagro, Victor M; Goddard, Alan D; Ferguson, Stuart J; Roldán, M Dolores; Richardson, David J

    2011-05-01

    The denitrifying bacterium Paracoccus denitrificans can grow aerobically or anaerobically using nitrate or nitrite as the sole nitrogen source. The biochemical pathway responsible is expressed from a gene cluster comprising a nitrate/nitrite transporter (NasA), nitrite transporter (NasH), nitrite reductase (NasB), ferredoxin (NasG) and nitrate reductase (NasC). NasB and NasG are essential for growth with nitrate or nitrite as the nitrogen source. NADH serves as the electron donor for nitrate and nitrite reduction, but only NasB has a NADH-oxidizing domain. Nitrate and nitrite reductase activities show the same Km for NADH and can be separated by anion-exchange chromatography, but only fractions containing NasB retain the ability to oxidize NADH. This implies that NasG mediates electron flux from the NADH-oxidizing site in NasB to the sites of nitrate and nitrite reduction in NasC and NasB respectively. Delivery of extracellular nitrate to NasBGC is mediated by NasA, but both NasA and NasH contribute to nitrite uptake. The roles of NasA and NasC can be substituted during anaerobic growth by the biochemically distinct membrane-bound respiratory nitrate reductase (Nar), demonstrating functional overlap. nasG is highly conserved in nitrate/nitrite assimilation gene clusters, which is consistent with a key role for the NasG ferredoxin, as part of a phylogenetically widespread composite nitrate and nitrite reductase system. PMID:21348864

  9. Nitrate to ammonia ceramic (NAC) bench scale stabilization study

    SciTech Connect

    Caime, W.J.; Hoeffner, S.L.

    1995-10-01

    Department of Energy (DOE) sites such as the Hanford site, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Savannah River site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have large quantities of sodium-nitrate based liquid wastes. A process to reduce the nitrates to ammonia has been developed at ORNL. This technology creates a sludge lower in nitrates. This report describes stabilization possibilities of the sludge.

  10. 75 FR 29534 - Inorganic Nitrates-Nitrite, Carbon and Carbon Dioxide, and Sulfur Registration Review; Draft...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-26

    ... AGENCY Inorganic Nitrates-Nitrite, Carbon and Carbon Dioxide, and Sulfur Registration Review; Draft... draft ecological risk assessment for the registration review of inorganic nitrates - nitrites, carbon and carbon dioxide, and gas cartridge uses of sulfur, and opens a public comment period on...

  11. Uptake of Nitrite by Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Schloemer, Robert H.; Garrett, Reginald H.

    1974-01-01

    Like the nitrate transport system, the nitrite uptake system in Neurospora crassa is induced by either nitrate or nitrite. This induction is prevented by cycloheximide, puromycin, or 6-methyl purine. The Km for nitrite of the induced nitrite uptake system is 86 μM, and the Vmax is 100 μmol of nitrite per g (wet weight) per h. Nitrite uptake is inhibited by metabolic poisons such as arsenate, dinitrophenol, cyanide, and antimycin A. No repression or inhibition of the nitrite transport system by ammonia, nitrate, or Casamino Acids was observed. PMID:4274458

  12. A novel control method for nitritation: The domination of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria by high concentrations of inorganic carbon in an airlift-fluidized bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Tokutomi, Takaaki; Shibayama, Chizu; Soda, Satoshi; Ike, Michihiko

    2010-07-01

    A novel nitritation method based on the addition of inorganic carbon (IC) was verified using an airlift-fluidized bed reactor packed with sponge cubes. A continuous-treatment experiment demonstrated that the type of nitrification-nitrite or nitrate accumulation-could be controlled by the addition of different alkalinity sources (NaHCO(3) or NaOH, respectively). The maximum rate of ammonia oxidation at 30 degrees C was 2.47kg-N/(m(3) d), with nitrate formation of less than 0.5% of the converted ammonia. Nitrite accumulation of over 90% was maintained stably over 250 days at 30 degrees C and was achieved even at 19 degrees C. Qualitative and quantitative shifts of nitrifying bacteria in the biofilm were monitored by real-time PCR and T-RFLP analysis. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) were dominant but nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) were eliminated in the reactor when NaHCO(3) was used as the alkalinity source. From the kinetic data, we inferred that high IC concentrations drive stable nitritation by promoting a higher growth rate for AOB than for NOB. PMID:20554306

  13. Effects of agriculture production systems on nitrate and nitrite accumulation on baby-leaf salads

    PubMed Central

    Aires, Alfredo; Carvalho, Rosa; Rosa, Eduardo A S; Saavedra, Maria J

    2013-01-01

    Nitrate and nitrite are widespread contaminants of vegetables, fruits, and waters. The levels of these compounds are increased as a result of using organic wastes from chemical industries, domestic wastes, effluents, nitrogenous fertilizers, and herbicides in agriculture. Therefore, determining the nitrate and nitrite levels in biological, food, and environmental samples is important to protect human health and the environment. In this context, we set this study, in which we report the effect of production system (conventional and organic) on the accumulation of nitrates and nitrites in fresh baby-leaf samples. The average levels of the nitrate () and nitrite () contents in six different baby-leaf salads of a single species (green lettuce, red lettuce, watercress, rucola, chard, and corn salad) produced in organic and conventional agriculture system were evaluated. Spectrophotometric analytical method recently published was validated and used. Nitrates and nitrites were detected in all samples. The nitrates levels from organic production varied between 1.45 and 6.40 mg/kg fresh weight (FW), whereas those from conventional production ranged from 10.5 to 45.19 mg/kg FW. The nitrites content was lower than nitrates and ranged from 0.32 to 1.89 mg/kg FW in organic production system and between 0.14 and 1.41 mg/kg FW in conventional production system. Our results showed that the nitrate content was dependent on the agricultural production system, while for nitrites, this dependency was less pronounced. PMID:24804008

  14. Automated, colorimetric methods for determination of nitrate plus nitrite, nitrite, ammonium and orthophosphate ions in natural water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Antweiler, Ronald C.; Patton, Charles J.; Taylor, Howard E.

    1996-01-01

    The apparatus and methods used for the automatic, colorimetric determinations of dissolved nutrients (nitrate plus nitrite, nitrite, ammonium and orthophosphate) in natural waters are described. These techniques allow for the determination of nitrate plus nitrite for the concentration range 0.02 to 8 mg/L (milligrams per liter) as N (nitrogen); for nitrite, the range is 0.002 to 1.0 mg/L as N; for ammonium, the range is 0.006 to 2.0 mg/L as N; and for orthophosphate, the range is 0.002 to 1.0 mg/L as P (phosphorus). Data are presented that demonstrate the accuracy, precision and quality control of the methods.

  15. Electrochemical reduction of nitrate and nitrite in simulated liquid nuclear wastes.

    PubMed

    Katsounaros, I; Dortsiou, M; Kyriacou, G

    2009-11-15

    The electrochemical reduction of nitrate and nitrite in simulated low-level nuclear wastes containing 1.8 M NaNO(3)+0.55 M NaNO(2)+1.16 M NaOH was studied under galvanostatic polarization on tin and bismuth cathodes. The rate of the reduction of nitrate was about the same on both metals. The selectivity (%S) to ammonia was similar on the two metals (12% at 450 mA/cm(2)) and that to nitrogen 82% on Sn and 72% on Bi. On the other hand, the %S to nitrous oxide was lower on Sn (8%) than that on Bi (18%) under the same conditions. The current efficiency (%CE) on both metals was 80% when the 99% of the initial nitrogen was removed. The %CE gradually decreases as the concentration of the nitrogen containing species in the solution decreases during the electrolysis. The energy consumption for the removal of 1g of N was 100 Wh at 450 mA/cm(2) but it can be significantly reduced by a better design of the electrolysis cell.The presence of chromate in the electrolyte, which is a known inhibitor of the cathodic reduction of nitrate, has no influence on the rate of the reduction and the distribution of the products. PMID:19559523

  16. Anisole Nitration During Gamma-Irradiation of Aqueous Nitrite and Nitrate Solutions: Free Radical Versus Ionic Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Gracy Elias; Bruce J. Mincher; Leigh R. Martin; Stephen P. Mezyk; Thomas D. Cullen

    2010-04-01

    The nitration of aromatic compounds in the condensed phase is of interest to nuclear waste treatment applications. This chapter discusses our investigation of radiolytic aromatic nitration mechanisms in the condensed phase toward understanding the nitration products created during nuclear fuel reprocessing. The nitration reactions of anisole, a model aromatic compound, were studied in ?-irradiated acidic nitrate, neutral nitrate, and neutral nitrite solutions. The nitrated anisole product distributions were the same with and without radiation in acidic solution, although more products were formed with radiation. In the irradiated acidic condensed phase, radiation-enhanced nitrous acid-catalyzed nitrosonium ion electrophilic aromatic substitution followed by oxidation reactions dominated over radical addition reactions. Neutral nitrate anisole solutions were dominated by mixed nitrosonium/nitronium ion electrophilic aromatic substitution reactions, but with lower product yields. Irradiation of neutral nitrite anisole solution resulted in a statistical substitution pattern for nitroanisole products, suggesting non-electrophilic free radical reactions involving the •NO2 radical.

  17. Carbon-Fiber Nitrite Microsensor for In Situ Biofilm Monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    During nitrification, nitrite is produced as an intermediate when ammonia is oxidized to nitrate. It is well established that nitrifying biofilm are involved in nitrification episodes in chloraminated drinking water distribution systems with nitrite accumulation occurring during...

  18. Carbon-Fiber Nitrite Microsensor for In Situ Biofilm Monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    During nitrification, nitrite is produced as an intermediate when ammonia is oxidized to nitrate. It is well established that nitrifying biofilm are involved in nitrification episodes in chloraminated drinking water distribution systems with nitrite accumulation occurring during ...

  19. Plasma nitrate and nitrite are increased by a high-nitrate supplement but not by high-nitrate foods in older adults.

    PubMed

    Miller, Gary D; Marsh, Anthony P; Dove, Robin W; Beavers, Daniel; Presley, Tennille; Helms, Christine; Bechtold, Erika; King, S Bruce; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel

    2012-03-01

    Little is known about the effect of dietary nitrate on the nitrate/nitrite/nitric oxide cycle in older adults. We examined the effect of a 3-day control diet vs high-nitrate diet, with and without a high-nitrate supplement (beetroot juice), on plasma nitrate and nitrite kinetics and blood pressure using a randomized 4-period crossover controlled design. We hypothesized that the high-nitrate diet would show higher levels of plasma nitrate/nitrite and lower blood pressure compared with the control diet, which would be potentiated by the supplement. Participants were 8 normotensive older men and women (5 female, 3 male, 72.5 ± 4.7 years old) with no overt disease or medications that affect nitric oxide metabolism. Plasma nitrate and nitrite levels and blood pressure were measured before and hourly for 3 hours after each meal. The mean daily changes in plasma nitrate and nitrite were significantly different from baseline for both control diet + supplement (P < .001 and P = .017 for nitrate and nitrite, respectively) and high-nitrate diet + supplement (P = .001 and P = .002), but not for control diet (P = .713 and P = .741) or high-nitrate diet (P = .852 and P = .500). Blood pressure decreased from the morning baseline measure to the three 2-hour postmeal follow-up time points for all treatments, but there was no main effect for treatment. In healthy older adults, a high-nitrate supplement consumed at breakfast elevated plasma nitrate and nitrite levels throughout the day. This observation may have practical utility for the timing of intake of a nitrate supplement with physical activity for older adults with vascular dysfunction. PMID:22464802

  20. Nitrate and nitrite levels of potable water supply in Warri, Nigeria: a public health concern.

    PubMed

    Nduka, John Kanayochukwu; Orisakwe, Orish Ebere; Ezenweke, Linus Obi

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the authors investigated the nitrate and nitrite in different water sources (surface water, shallow well water, and borehole water) in the market and industrialized areas of Warri in the Niger Delta area of Nigeria. The authors' goal was to find the comparative levels of nitrates and nitrites from these two parts of the community. They selected five sampling sites from industrialized areas and another five from market areas. Nitrate and nitrites were determined using a DR/4000 UV-Vis spectrophotometer. The appreciable quantities of nitrates and nitrites found in these investigations have some public health implications. This study suggests that indiscriminate disposal of waste and poor sanitation may be additional contributing factors in the nitrate pollution of the water supply in the Niger Delta area of Nigeria. PMID:20104831

  1. Therapeutic effects of inorganic nitrate and nitrite in cardiovascular and metabolic diseases.

    PubMed

    Omar, S A; Webb, A J; Lundberg, J O; Weitzberg, E

    2016-04-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is generated endogenously by NO synthases to regulate a number of physiological processes including cardiovascular and metabolic functions. A decrease in the production and bioavailability of NO is a hallmark of many major chronic diseases including hypertension, ischaemia-reperfusion injury, atherosclerosis and diabetes. This NO deficiency is mainly caused by dysfunctional NO synthases and increased scavenging of NO by the formation of reactive oxygen species. Inorganic nitrate and nitrite are emerging as substrates for in vivo NO synthase-independent formation of NO bioactivity. These anions are oxidation products of endogenous NO generation and are also present in the diet, with green leafy vegetables having a high nitrate content. The effects of nitrate and nitrite are diverse and include vasodilatation, improved endothelial function, enhanced mitochondrial efficiency and reduced generation of reactive oxygen species. Administration of nitrate or nitrite in animal models of cardiovascular disease shows promising results, and clinical trials are currently ongoing to investigate the therapeutic potential of nitrate and nitrite in hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, peripheral artery disease and myocardial infarction. In addition, the nutritional aspects of the nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway are interesting as diets suggested to protect against cardiovascular disease, such as the Mediterranean diet, are especially high in nitrate. Here, we discuss the potential therapeutic opportunities for nitrate and nitrite in prevention and treatment of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. PMID:26522443

  2. Ion chromatographic determination of nitrate and nitrite in vegetable and fruit baby foods.

    PubMed

    McMullen, Sarah E; Casanova, John A; Gross, Lois K; Schenck, Frank J

    2005-01-01

    An ion chromatographic method was developed for the determination of nitrate and nitrite in vegetable and fruit baby foods. The introduction of nitrate or nitrite to food may be natural or artificial as a preservative. Because of the higher pH found in babies' stomachs, nitrate can act as a reservoir for the production of nitrite by nitrate-reducing bacteria that can be harbored in the intestinal tract. This problem does not exist in adults because of the lower pH of the adult stomach. Exposure to nitrite by infants can result in methemoglobinemia (blue baby syndrome). There are also indications that carcinogenic nitrosamines can be formed from nitrates at the higher pH. These gastric conditions disappear at approximately 6 months of age. In this method, nitrate and nitrite were separated on a hydroxide-selective anion exchange column using online electrolytically generated high-purity hydroxide eluant and detected using suppressed conductivity detection. Average recoveries of spiked nitrite residue ranged from 91 to 104% and spiked nitrate residue ranged from 87 to 104%. This method and the AOAC Official Method yield comparable results for samples containing incurred nitrate residue. In addition, this method eliminates the hazardous waste associated with the use of cadmium found in the AOAC Official Method. PMID:16526464

  3. Determining Nitrate and Nitrite Content in Beverages, Fruits, Vegetables, and Stews Marketed in Arak, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Rezaei, Mohammad; Fani, Ali; Moini, A. Latif; Mirzajani, Parisa; Malekirad, Ali Akbar; Rafiei, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Presence of excessive nitrite and nitrate in foodstuff can have toxic and carcinogenic effects on humans. This study is aimed at measuring nitrate and nitrite in different foodstuffs available in Arak city market, Iran, in 2013. Methods. Totally 323 samples including stew (102 samples), beverage (116 samples), fruit (55 samples), and vegetables (50 samples) were randomly collected and analyzed according to official AOAC method 973 and ISO 6635 through spectrophotometric method. Results. Average concentration of nitrate and nitrite in the samples was 6.58–136.76, 1.52–38.22 mg kg−1 or liter, respectively. Presence of nitrate and nitrite was confirmed in all samples. High levels of nitrate and nitrite were observed in celery and ghormeh stew; and lower level of nitrate and nitrite was found in traditionally produced vinegar, verjuice, and tomato. Conclusions. It was found that the mean values for nitrite in investigated products were higher than ADI levels of WHO. PMID:27379270

  4. Prevalence of nitrite and nitrate contents and its effect on edible bird nest's color.

    PubMed

    Paydar, Mohammadjavad; Wong, Yi Li; Wong, Won Fen; Hamdi, Omer Abdalla Ahmed; Kadir, Noraniza Abd; Looi, Chung Yeng

    2013-12-01

    Edible bird nests (EBNs) are important ethnomedicinal commodity in the Chinese community. Recently, But and others showed that the white EBNs could turn red by vapors from sodium nitrite (NaNO2) in acidic condition or from bird soil, but this color-changing agent remained elusive. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of nitrite and nitrate contents and its affects on EBN's color. EBNs were collected from swiftlet houses or caves in Southeast Asia. White EBNs were exposed to vapor from NaNO2 in 2% HCl, or bird soil. The levels of nitrite (NO2-) and nitrate (NO3-) in EBNs were determined through ion chromatography analysis. Vapors from NaNO2 in 2% HCl or bird soil stained white bird nests to brown/red colors, which correlated with increase nitrite and nitrate levels. Moreover, naturally formed cave-EBNs (darker in color) also contained higher nitrite and nitrate levels compared to white house-EBNs, suggesting a relationship between nitrite and nitrate with EBN's color. Of note, we detected no presence of hemoglobin in red "blood" nest. Using infrared spectra analysis, we demonstrated that red/brown cave-EBNs contained higher intensities of C-N and N-O bonds compared to white house-EBNs. Together, our study suggested that the color of EBNs was associated with the prevalence of the nitrite and nitrate contents. PMID:24279333

  5. Method 353.4 Determination of Nitrate and Nitrite in Estuarine and Coastal Waters by Gas Segmented Continuous Flow Colorimetric Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    This method provides a procedure for determining nitrate and nitrite concentrations in estuarine and coastal waters. Nitrate is reduced to nitrite by cadmium,1-3 and the resulting nitrite determined by formation of an azo dye.4-6

  6. Nitrite and Nitrate Concentrations and Metabolism in Breast Milk, Infant Formula, and Parenteral Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jesica A.; Ninnis, Janet R.; Hopper, Andrew O.; Ibrahim, Yomna; Merritt, T. Allen; Wan, Kim-Wah; Power, Gordon G.; Blood, Arlin B.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary nitrate and nitrite are sources of gastric NO, which modulates blood flow, mucus production, and microbial flora. However, the intake and importance of these anions in infants is largely unknown. Nitrate and nitrite levels were measured in breast milk of mothers of preterm and term infants, infant formulas, and parenteral nutrition. Nitrite metabolism in breast milk was measured after freeze-thawing, at different temperatures, varying oxygen tensions, and after inhibition of potential nitrite-metabolizing enzymes. Nitrite concentrations averaged 0.07 ± 0.01 μM in milk of mothers of preterm infants, less than that of term infants (0.13 ± 0.02 μM) (P < .01). Nitrate concentrations averaged 13.6 ± 3.7 μM and 12.7 ± 4.9 μM, respectively. Nitrite and nitrate concentrations in infant formulas varied from undetectable to many-fold more than breast milk. Concentrations in parenteral nutrition were equivalent to or lower than those of breast milk. Freeze-thawing decreased nitrite concentration ∼64%, falling with a half-life of 32 minutes at 37°C. The disappearance of nitrite was oxygen-dependent and prevented by ferricyanide and 3 inhibitors of lactoperoxidase. Nitrite concentrations in breast milk decrease with storage and freeze-thawing, a decline likely mediated by lactoperoxidase. Compared to adults, infants ingest relatively little nitrite and nitrate, which may be of importance in the modulation of blood flow and the bacterial flora of the infant GI tract, especially given the protective effects of swallowed nitrite. PMID:23894175

  7. Nitrogen isotope fractionation during archaeal ammonia oxidation: Coupled estimates from isotopic measurements of ammonium and nitrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooshammer, Maria; Stieglmeier, Michaela; Bayer, Barbara; Jochum, Lara; Melcher, Michael; Wanek, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) are ubiquitous in marine and terrestrial environments and knowledge about the nitrogen (N) isotope effect associated with their ammonia oxidation activity will allow a better understanding of natural abundance isotope ratios, and therefore N transformation processes, in the environment. Here we examine the kinetic isotope effect for ammonia oxidation in a pure soil AOA culture (Ca. Nitrososphaera viennensis) and a marine AOA enrichment culture. We estimated the isotope effect from both isotopic signatures of ammonium and nitrite over the course of ammonia oxidation. Estimates of the isotope effect based on the change in the isotopic signature of ammonium give valuable insight, because these estimates are not subject to the same concerns (e.g., accumulation of an intermediate) as estimates based on isotopic measurements of nitrite. Our results show that both the pure soil AOA culture and a marine AOA enrichment culture have similar but substantial isotope effect during ammonia consumption (31-34 per mill; based on ammonium) and nitrite production (43-45 per mill; based on nitrite). The 15N fractionation factors of both cultures tested fell in the upper range of the reported isotope effects for archaeal and bacterial ammonia oxidation (10-41 per mill) or were even higher than those. The isotope fractionation for nitrite production was significantly larger than for ammonium consumption, indicating that (1) some intermediate (e.g., hydroxylamine) of ammonia oxidation accumulates, allowing for a second 15N fractionation step to be expressed, (2) a fraction of ammonia oxidized is lost via gaseous N forms (e.g., NO or N2O), which is 15N-enriched or (3) a fraction of ammonium is assimilated into AOA biomass, biomass becoming 15N-enriched. The significance of these mechanisms will be explored in more detail for the soil AOA culture, based on isotope modeling and isotopic measurements of biomass and N2O.

  8. Green Alternatives to Nitrates and Nitrites in Meat-based Products-A Review.

    PubMed

    Gassara, Fatma; Kouassi, Anne Patricia; Brar, Satinder Kaur; Belkacemi, Khaled

    2016-10-01

    Several food additives are added in food for their preservation to maintain the freshness of food (antioxidants) or to slow down or stop the growth of microorganisms (preservative agents). Nitrites and nitrates are used as preservative agents in meat. Nitrites give a smoked taste, a pinkish color in the meat and protect the consumers against the risk of bacterial deterioration. Their addition is however very limited as, in high dose, it can have risks on human health and the environment. Nitrites may also combine with secondary or tertiary amines to form N-nitroso derivatives. Certain N-nitroso compounds have been shown to produce cancers in a wide range of laboratory animals. Thus, alternatives of nitrates and nitrites are the object of numerous research studies. Alternatives, such as the addition of vitamins, fruits, chemicals products, natural products containing nitrite or spices, which have similar properties of nitrites, are in evaluation. In fact, spices are considered to have several organoleptic and anti-microbial properties which would be interesting to study. Several spices and combinations of spices are being progressively evaluated. This review discusses the sources of nitrites and nitrates, their use as additives in food products, their physicochemical properties, their negatives effects and the use of alternatives of nitrites and nitrates in preserving meat products. PMID:25750989

  9. Oxidation efficiencies of nitrite to nitrate by freezing of field rain samples

    SciTech Connect

    Takenaka, Norimichi; Daimon, Tohru; Sato, Keiichi

    1996-12-31

    Nitrite is known to be oxidized to nitrate by freezing much more rapidly than in solution. Furthermore, the oxidation efficiency of nitrite to nitrate by freezing is varied by pH or kinds and concentration of coexistences. We report here the oxidation efficiencies of nitrite to nitrate by freezing of field rain samples. The field rain samples were collected at Mt. Ikoma, which is located at about 20 km east of Osaka city, and Osaka Prefecture University. Concentration of nitrite was usually sub to a few {mu}mol/L order in rain and {mu}mol/L order in fog and less than 1 {mu}mol/L in snow. The highest value of nitrite concentration was 43 {mu}mol/L in rain and 620 {mu}mol/L in fog. Nitrite was oxidized immediately to nitrate by freezing at pH lower than 5.2, even when the sample droplet (about 1 mm diameter) was frozen very quickly in liquid nitrogen (77K). The oxidation efficiency was higher at lower pH. However, the efficiency varied from sample to sample. This is probably due to that kinds and concentration of coexistences were difference between samples. The effect of solutes will be also reported. Freezing of rain droplets are observed in freezing of super cooled droplets, growing of graupel and hail, growing of cumulonimbus, and so on. Ratio of nitrate to nitrite was higher in snow than that in rain or fog.

  10. Effects of Certain Herbicides and Their Combinations on Nitrate and Nitrite Reduction 1

    PubMed Central

    Klepper, Lowell A.

    1979-01-01

    A study was made concerning the effect of various herbicides, when used alone or in combination, on nitrite accumulation in excised leaves of wheat (Triticum aestivum L., var. `Centurk'). Treatment of leaves with photosynthetic inhibitor herbicides, known to interfere with the transfer of light energy, caused accumulation of nitrite under illuminated, aerobic conditions. When certain other herbicides, which do not interfere with the photosynthetic process, were applied to leaves and incubated under dark, aerobic conditions, nitrite accumulations were enhanced over those treated with photosynthetic inhibitors or the controls. The combination of photosynthetic inhibitor herbicides and certain other “nonphotosynthetic inhibitor” herbicides caused relatively large amounts of nitrite to accumulate in light or in darkness. Nitrite accumulation occurs when nitrate and nitrite reduction are not in balance. The proposed actions of the herbicides used in this study are discussed. This discussion provides a rationale for the accumulation of nitrite by the herbicide-treated leaves. PMID:16660947

  11. Short-term nitrate (nitrite) inhibition of nitrogen fixation in Azotobacter chroococcum

    SciTech Connect

    Cejudo, F.J.; Paneque, A.

    1986-01-01

    Nitrate-grown Azotobacter chroococcum ATCC 4412 cells lack the ability to fix N/sub 2/. Nitrogenase activity developed after the cells were suspended in a combined nitrogen-free medium and was paralleled by a concomitant decrease in nitrate assimilation capacity. In such treated cells exhibiting transitory nitrate assimilation and N/sub 2/-fixation capacity, nitrate or nitrite caused a short-term inhibitory effect on nitrogenase activity which ceased once the anion was exhausted from the medium. The glutamate analog L-methionine-DL-sulfoximine, an inhibitor of glutamine synthetase, prevented inhibition of nitrogenase activity by nitrate or nitrite without affecting the uptake of these anions, which were reduced and stoichiometrically released into the external medium as ammonium. Inhibition of nitrogenase by nitrate (nitrite) did not take place in A. chroococcum MCD1, which is unable to assimilate either. The authors conclude that the short-term inhibitory effect of nitrate (nitrite) on nitrogenase activity is due to some organic product(s) formed during the assimilation of the ammonium resulting from nitrate (nitrite) reduction.

  12. Interdependence of two NarK domains in a fused nitrate/nitrite transporter.

    PubMed

    Goddard, Alan D; Moir, James W B; Richardson, David J; Ferguson, Stuart J

    2008-11-01

    Nitrate uptake is essential for various bacterial processes and combines with nitrite export to form the usual initial steps of denitrification, a process that reduces nitrate to dinitrogen gas. Although many bacterial species contain NarK-like transporters that are proposed to function as either nitrate/proton symporters or nitrate/nitrite antiporters based on sequence homology, these transporters remain, in general, poorly characterized. Several bacteria appear to contain a transporter that is a fusion of two NarK-like proteins, although the significance of this arrangement remains elusive. We demonstrate that NarK from Paracoccus denitrificans is expressed as a fusion of two NarK-like transporters. NarK1 and NarK2 are separately capable of supporting anaerobic denitrifying growth but with growth defects that are partially mitigated by coexpression of the two domains. NarK1 appears to be a nitrate/proton symporter with high affinity for nitrate and NarK2 a nitrate/nitrite antiporter with lower affinity for nitrate. Each transporter requires two conserved arginine residues for activity. A transporter consisting of inactivated NarK1 fused to active NarK2 has a dramatically increased affinity for nitrate compared with NarK2 alone, implying a functional interaction between the two domains. A potential model for nitrate and nitrite transport in P. denitrificans is proposed. PMID:18823285

  13. Sensitivity to nitrate and nitrite in pond-breeding amphibians from the Pacific Northwest, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Marco, A.; Quilchano, C.; Blaustein, A.R.

    1999-12-01

    In static experiments, the authors studied the effects of nitrate and nitrate solutions on newly hatched larvae of five species of amphibians, namely Rana pretiosa, Rana aurora, Bufo boreas, Hyla regilla, and Ambystoma gracile. When nitrate or nitrite ions were added to the water, some larvae of some species reduced feeding activity, swam less vigorously, showed disequilibrium and paralysis, suffered abnormalities and edemas, and eventually died. The observed effects increased with both concentration and time, and there were significant differences in sensitivity among species. Ambrystoma gracile displayed the highest acute effect in water with nitrate and nitrite. The three ranid species had acute effects in water with nitrite. In chronic exposures, R. pretiosa was the most sensitive species to nitrates and nitrites. All species showed 15-d LC50s lower than 2 mg N-NO{sub 2{sup {minus}}}/L. For both N ions, B. boreas was the least sensitive amphibian. All species showed a high morality at the US Environmental Protection Agency-recommended limits of nitrite for warm-water fishes and a significant larval mortality at the recommended limits of nitrite concentration for drinking water. The recommended levels of nitrate for warm-water fishes were highly toxic for R. pretiosa and A. gracile larvae.

  14. Tolerance of ciliated protozoan Paramecium bursaria (Protozoa, Ciliophora) to ammonia and nitrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Henglong; Song, Weibo; Lu, Lu; Alan, Warren

    2005-09-01

    The tolerance to ammonia and nitrites in freshwater ciliate Paramecium bursaria was measured in a conventional open system. The ciliate was exposed to different concentrations of ammonia and nitrites for 2h and 12h in order to determine the lethal concentrations. Linear regression analysis revealed that the 2h-LC50 value for ammonia was 95.94 mg/L and for nitrite 27.35 mg/L using probit scale method (with 95% confidence intervals). There was a linear correlation between the mortality probit scale and logarithmic concentration of ammonia which fit by a regression equation y=7.32 x 9.51 ( R 2=0.98; y, mortality probit scale; x, logarithmic concentration of ammonia), by which 2 h-LC50 value for ammonia was found to be 95.50 mg/L. A linear correlation between mortality probit scales and logarithmic concentration of nitrite is also followed the regression equation y=2.86 x+0.89 ( R 2=0.95; y, mortality probit scale; x, logarithmic concentration of nitrite). The regression analysis of toxicity curves showed that the linear correlation between exposed time of ammonia-N LC50 value and ammonia-N LC50 value followed the regression equation y=2 862.85 e -0.08 x ( R 2=0.95; y, duration of exposure to LC50 value; x, LC50 value), and that between exposed time of nitrite-N LC50 value and nitrite-N LC50 value followed the regression equation y=127.15 e -0.13 x ( R 2=0.91; y, exposed time of LC50 value; x, LC50 value). The results demonstrate that the tolerance to ammonia in P. bursaria is considerably higher than that of the larvae or juveniles of some metozoa, e.g. cultured prawns and oysters. In addition, ciliates, as bacterial predators, are likely to play a positive role in maintaining and improving water quality in aquatic environments with high-level ammonium, such as sewage treatment systems.

  15. Properties of aqueous nitrate and nitrite from x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jacob W.; Lam, Royce K.; Shih, Orion; Rizzuto, Anthony M.; Prendergast, David; Saykally, Richard J.

    2015-08-01

    Nitrate and nitrite ions are of considerable interest, both for their widespread use in commercial and research contexts and because of their central role in the global nitrogen cycle. The chemistry of atmospheric aerosols, wherein nitrate is abundant, has been found to depend on the interfacial behavior of ionic species. The interfacial behavior of ions is determined largely by their hydration properties; consequently, the study of the hydration and interfacial behavior of nitrate and nitrite comprises a significant field of study. In this work, we describe the study of aqueous solutions of sodium nitrate and nitrite via X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), interpreted in light of first-principles density functional theory electronic structure calculations. Experimental and calculated spectra of the nitrogen K-edge XA spectra of bulk solutions exhibit a large 3.7 eV shift between the XA spectra of nitrate and nitrite resulting from greater stabilization of the nitrogen 1s energy level in nitrate. A similar shift is not observed in the oxygen K-edge XA spectra of NO3- and NO2-. The hydration properties of nitrate and nitrite are found to be similar, with both anions exhibiting a similar propensity towards ion pairing.

  16. Properties of aqueous nitrate and nitrite from x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jacob W.; Lam, Royce K.; Saykally, Richard J.; Shih, Orion; Rizzuto, Anthony M.; Prendergast, David

    2015-08-28

    Nitrate and nitrite ions are of considerable interest, both for their widespread use in commercial and research contexts and because of their central role in the global nitrogen cycle. The chemistry of atmospheric aerosols, wherein nitrate is abundant, has been found to depend on the interfacial behavior of ionic species. The interfacial behavior of ions is determined largely by their hydration properties; consequently, the study of the hydration and interfacial behavior of nitrate and nitrite comprises a significant field of study. In this work, we describe the study of aqueous solutions of sodium nitrate and nitrite via X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), interpreted in light of first-principles density functional theory electronic structure calculations. Experimental and calculated spectra of the nitrogen K-edge XA spectra of bulk solutions exhibit a large 3.7 eV shift between the XA spectra of nitrate and nitrite resulting from greater stabilization of the nitrogen 1s energy level in nitrate. A similar shift is not observed in the oxygen K-edge XA spectra of NO{sub 3}{sup −} and NO{sub 2}{sup −}. The hydration properties of nitrate and nitrite are found to be similar, with both anions exhibiting a similar propensity towards ion pairing.

  17. Nitrate as a source of nitrite and nitric oxide during exercise hyperemia in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Piknova, Barbora; Park, Ji Won; Kwan Jeff Lam, Kai; Schechter, Alan N

    2016-05-01

    The presence of nitric oxide (NO) synthase enzymes, mainly the NOS1 isoform, in skeletal muscle had been well established; however in the last decade it has been realized that NO may also be produced by reduction of nitrate and tissue nitrite. We have recently shown that rodent skeletal muscle contains unusually high concentrations of nitrate, compared to blood and other tissues, likely produced by oxidation of NOS1-produced NO. In the present study we measured nitrate and nitrite levels in Wistar rat leg tissue before and after acute and chronic exercise of the animals on a treadmill. We found a very large decrease of muscle nitrate levels immediately after exercise accompanied by a transient increase of nitrite levels. A significant decrease in blood nitrate levels accompanied the changes in muscle levels. Using skeletal muscle tissue homogenates we established that xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) is at least partially responsible for the generation of nitrite and/or NO from nitrate and that this effect is increased by slight lowering of pH and by other processes related to the exercise itself. We hypothesize that the skeletal muscle nitrate reservoir contributes significantly to the generation of nitrite and then, probably via formation of NO, exercise-induced functional hyperemia. A model for these metabolic interconversions in mammals is presented. These reactions could explain the muscle-generated vasodilator causing increased blood flow, with induced contraction, exercise, or hypoxia, postulated more than 100 years ago. PMID:27000467

  18. Sensitivity of nitrate aerosols to ammonia emissions and to nitrate chemistry: implications for present and future nitrate optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulot, F.; Ginoux, P.; Cooke, W. F.; Donner, L. J.; Fan, S.; Lin, M.; Mao, J.; Naik, V.; Horowitz, L. W.

    2015-09-01

    We update and evaluate the treatment of nitrate aerosols in the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) atmospheric model (AM3). Accounting for the radiative effects of nitrate aerosols generally improves the simulated aerosol optical depth, although nitrate concentrations at the surface are biased high. This bias can be reduced by increasing the deposition of nitrate to account for the near-surface volatilization of ammonium nitrate or by neglecting the heterogeneous production of nitric acid to account for the inhibition of N2O5 reactive uptake at high nitrate concentrations. Globally, uncertainties in these processes can impact the simulated nitrate optical depth by up to 25 %, much more than the impact of uncertainties in the seasonality of ammonia emissions (6 %) or in the uptake of nitric acid on dust (13 %). Our best estimate for present-day fine nitrate optical depth at 550 nm is 0.006 (0.005-0.008). We only find a modest increase of nitrate optical depth (< 30 %) in response to the projected changes in the emissions of SO2 (-40 %) and ammonia (+38 %) from 2010 to 2050. Nitrate burden is projected to increase in the tropics and in the free troposphere, but to decrease at the surface in the midlatitudes because of lower nitric acid concentrations. Our results suggest that better constraints on the heterogeneous chemistry of nitric acid on dust, on tropical ammonia emissions, and on the transport of ammonia to the free troposphere are needed to improve projections of aerosol optical depth.

  19. Effects of agriculture production systems on nitrate and nitrite accumulation on baby-leaf salads.

    PubMed

    Aires, Alfredo; Carvalho, Rosa; Rosa, Eduardo A S; Saavedra, Maria J

    2013-01-01

    Nitrate and nitrite are widespread contaminants of vegetables, fruits, and waters. The levels of these compounds are increased as a result of using organic wastes from chemical industries, domestic wastes, effluents, nitrogenous fertilizers, and herbicides in agriculture. Therefore, determining the nitrate and nitrite levels in biological, food, and environmental samples is important to protect human health and the environment. In this context, we set this study, in which we report the effect of production system (conventional and organic) on the accumulation of nitrates and nitrites in fresh baby-leaf samples. The average levels of the nitrate ([Formula: see text]) and nitrite ([Formula: see text]) contents in six different baby-leaf salads of a single species (green lettuce, red lettuce, watercress, rucola, chard, and corn salad) produced in organic and conventional agriculture system were evaluated. Spectrophotometric analytical method recently published was validated and used. Nitrates and nitrites were detected in all samples. The nitrates levels from organic production varied between 1.45 and 6.40 mg/kg fresh weight (FW), whereas those from conventional production ranged from 10.5 to 45.19 mg/kg FW. The nitrites content was lower than nitrates and ranged from 0.32 to 1.89 mg/kg FW in organic production system and between 0.14 and 1.41 mg/kg FW in conventional production system. Our results showed that the nitrate content was dependent on the agricultural production system, while for nitrites, this dependency was less pronounced. PMID:24804008

  20. Inorganic nitrite and nitrate: evidence to support consideration as dietary nutrients.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Nathan S; Ivy, John L

    2015-08-01

    There are now indisputable health benefits of nitrite and nitrate derived from food sources or when administered in a clinical setting for specific diseases. Most of the published reports identify the production of nitric oxide (NO) as the mechanism of action for nitrite and nitrate. Basic science as well as clinical studies demonstrates that nitrite and/or nitrate can restore NO homeostasis as an endothelium-independent source of NO that may be a redundant system for endogenous NO production. Nitrate must first be reduced to nitrite by oral commensal bacteria and then nitrite must be further reduced to NO along the physiological oxygen gradient. The purpose of this review is to define their role as indispensable nutrients needed for maintaining NO homeostasis and describe the daily intake required to achieve a threshold of activation as well as define the upper tolerable limits based on published literature in PubMed databases. Optimal ranges of intake will be discussed to maximize the benefits while mitigating any potential risks of overexposure to these naturally occurring anions. This information will allow for future research using safe and effective doses of nitrite and nitrate in long-term clinical trials to effectively test their roles in disease prevention or treatment. PMID:26189149

  1. Dietary intake of polyphenols, nitrate and nitrite and gastric cancer risk in Mexico City

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Ramírez, Raúl U.; Galván-Portillo, Marcia V.; Ward, Mary H.; Agudo, Antonio; González, Carlos A.; Oñate-Ocaña, Luis F.; Herrera-Goepfert, Roberto; Palma-Coca, Oswaldo; López-Carrillo, Lizbeth

    2009-01-01

    N-Nitroso compounds (NOC) are potent animal carcinogens and potential human carcinogens. The primary source of exposure for most individuals may be endogenous formation, a process that can be inhibited by dietary polyphenols. To estimate the risk of gastric cancer (GC) in relation to the individual and combined consumption of polyphenols and NOC precursors (nitrate and nitrite), a population-based case–control study was carried out in Mexico City from 2004 to 2005 including 257 histologically confirmed GC cases and 478 controls. Intake of polyphenols, nitrate and nitrite were estimated using a food frequency questionnaire. High intakes of cinnamic acids, secoisolariciresinol and coumestrol were associated with an ~50% reduction in GC risk. A high intake of total nitrite as well as nitrate and nitrite from animal sources doubled the GC risk. Odds ratios around 2-fold were observed among individuals with both low intake of cinnamic acids, secoisolariciresinol or coumestrol and high intake of animal-derived nitrate or nitrite, compared to high intake of the polyphenols and low animal nitrate or nitrite intake, respectively. Results were similar for both the intestinal and diffuse types of GC. Our results show, for the first time, a protective effect for GC because of higher intake of cinnamic acids, secoisolariciresinol and coumestrol, and suggest that these polyphenols reduce GC risk through inhibition of endogenous nitrosation. The main sources of these polyphenols were pears, mangos and beans for cinnamic acids; beans, carrots and squash for secoisolariciresinol and legumes for coumestrol. PMID:19449378

  2. Progress report on the evaluation of porous cathode for the electrochemical reduction of nitrates and nitrites in liquid wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.T.; Jha, K.; Weidner, J.W.; White, R.E.

    1995-12-27

    This report describes the experimental and modeling work performed to evaluate porous cathodes for the electrochemical reduction of nitrites in liquid wastes. The experiments were done using the MP{dagger} cell with two different porous cathodes: nickel foam and TySAR{trademark}SB{double_dagger}. The experimental results are compared with each other and to those obtained with a planar nickel cathode. The results show that the ammonia production reaction is the dominant cathodic reaction ({approximately}80% efficiency) for all three electrodes. The temperature range used in this study was 29-37 {circ}C while the catholyte feed was either 0.6M NaNO{sub 2} or 1.9M NaNO{sub 3}, both supported by a 1.33 M NaOH solution. All experiments used a constant current density of 0.25 A/cm{sup 2}. The experimental results suggest that the porous nickel electrode at lower temperatures ({approximately}31{circ}C) is the most efficient of the three electrodes for the reduction of nitrates and nitrites. The porous nickel electrode exhibited the highest conversion of nitrates and nitrites, and the lowest overpotential for a given current density. The partial current fractions at known catholyte concentrations were used to extract the exchange-current densities for the five cathodic reactions. Using these kinetic parameters, dynamic simulations of the four hour experiments were performed. Agreement was found between the model and experimental results for changes in the moles of the nitrate and nitrite and the cell overpotential with time. Future work will determine the effects of temperature and current densities on the exchange-current densities and reaction product distributions. The performance of other porous cathode materials (TySAR{trademark}EP{section}, TySAR{trademark}IM) will also be evaluated.

  3. Quantitative analysis of nitrate and nitrite contents in vegetables commonly consumed in Delta State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Onyesom, I; Okoh, P N

    2006-11-01

    Plasma thiocyanate has been reported to be high among cassava-eating populations such as that in Nigeria because of the cyanide content of cassava. Thiocyanate, which is secreted into the stomach contents of animals, has been demonstrated to catalyse the formation of nitrosamines (potent carcinogens) in the stomach from secondary amines and nitrite. The main source of the nitrite precursor in this environment is vegetables, primarily eaten as the chief supplier of proteins. The present study attempts to analyse the levels of nitrate and nitrite in vegetables commonly grown and consumed in Delta State, Nigeria. The nitrate and nitrite contents in green vegetable (Amaranthus spp.), bitter leaf (Vernonia amygdalina), pumpkin (Telfaria occidentalis) and water leaf (Talinum triangulare) grown in different localities of the state were determined by standard analytical procedures. The results show that those vegetables grown in the industrialised urban centres of the state had higher nitrate (223 (SD 71) mg/kg dry weight; P<0.05) and nitrite (12.6 (SD 1.7) mg/kg dry weight; P>0.05) levels when compared with the same species (188 (SD 77) mg nitrate/kg dry weight and 10.9 (SD 1.1) mg nitrite/kg dry weight) cultivated in less industrialised suburbs. We conclude that frequent consumption of such vegetables whose nitrate and nitrite contents are high by cassava-eating individuals might put them at risk of developing stomach cancer and other possible results of nitrate and/or nitrite toxicity. In order to avoid an outbreak in our communities, appropriate agencies should monitor and regulate the release of chemicals into the environment. In the meantime, the cultivation and consumption of vegetables grown in industrialised areas of the state should be discouraged. PMID:17092380

  4. Role of nitrate and nitrite in the induction of nitrite reductase in leaves of barley seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aslam, M.; Huffaker, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    The role of NO3- and NO2- in the induction of nitrite reductase (NiR) activity in detached leaves of 8-day-old barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) seedlings was investigated. Barley leaves contained 6 to 8 micromoles NO2-/gram fresh weight x hour of endogenous NiR activity when grown in N-free solutions. Supply of both NO2- and NO3- induced the enzyme activity above the endogenous levels (5 and 10 times, respectively at 10 millimolar NO2- and NO3- over a 24 hour period). In NO3(-)-supplied leaves, NiR induction occurred at an ambient NO3- concentration of as low as 0.05 millimolar; however, no NiR induction was found in leaves supplied with NO2- until the ambient NO2- concentration was 0.5 millimolar. Nitrate accumulated in NO2(-)-fed leaves. The amount of NO3- accumulating in NO2(-)-fed leaves induced similar levels of NiR as did equivalent amounts of NO3- accumulating in NO3(-)-fed leaves. Induction of NiR in NO2(-)-fed leaves was not seen until NO3- was detectable (30 nanomoles/gram fresh weight) in the leaves. The internal concentrations of NO3-, irrespective of N source, were highly correlated with the levels of NiR induced. When the reduction of NO3- to NO2- was inhibited by WO4(2-), the induction of NiR was inhibited only partially. The results indicate that in barley leaves in NiR is induced by NO3- directly, i.e. without being reduced to NO2-, and that absorbed NO2- induces the enzyme activity indirectly after being oxidized to NO3- within the leaf.

  5. A single channel for nitrate uptake, nitrite export and nitrite uptake by Escherichia coli NarU and a role for NirC in nitrite export and uptake.

    PubMed

    Jia, Wenjing; Tovell, Nicholas; Clegg, Stephanie; Trimmer, Mark; Cole, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Two related polytopic membrane proteins of the major facilitator family, NarK and NarU, catalyse nitrate uptake, nitrite export and nitrite uptake across the Escherichia coli cytoplasmic membrane by an unknown mechanism. A 12-helix model of NarU was constructed based upon six alkaline phosphatase and beta-galactosidase fusions to NarK and the predicted hydropathy for the NarK family. Fifteen residues conserved in the NarK-NarU protein family were substituted by site-directed mutagenesis, including four residues that are essential for nitrate uptake by Aspergillus nidulans: arginines Arg(87) and Arg(303) in helices 2 and 8, and two glycines in a nitrate signature motif. Despite the wide range of substitutions studied, in no case did mutation result in loss of one biochemical function without simultaneous loss of all other functions. A NarU+ NirC+ strain grew more rapidly and accumulated nitrite more rapidly than the isogenic NarU+ NirC(-) strain. Only the NirC+ strain consumed nitrite rapidly during the later stages of growth. Under conditions in which the rate of nitrite reduction was limited by the rate of nitrite uptake, NirC+ strains reduced nitrite up to 10 times more rapidly than isogenic NarU+ strains, indicating that both nitrite efflux and nitrite uptake are largely dependent on NirC. Isotope tracer experiments with [15N]nitrate and [14N]nitrite revealed that [15N]nitrite accumulated in the extracellular medium even when there was a net rate of nitrite uptake and reduction. We propose that NarU functions as a single channel for nitrate uptake and nitrite expulsion, either as a nitrate-nitrite antiporter, or more likely as a nitrate/H+ or nitrite/H+ channel. PMID:18691156

  6. Corrosion risk associated with microbial souring control using nitrate or nitrite.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Casey; Nemati, Mehdi; Jenneman, Gary; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2005-08-01

    Souring, the production of hydrogen sulfide by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in oil reservoirs, can be controlled through nitrate or nitrite addition. To assess the effects of this containment approach on corrosion, metal coupons were installed in up-flow packed-bed bioreactors fed with medium containing 8 mM sulfate and 25 mM lactate. Following inoculation with produced water to establish biogenic H(2)S production, some bioreactors were treated with 17.5 mM nitrate or up to 20 mM nitrite, eliminating souring. Corrosion rates were highest near the outlet of untreated bioreactors (up to 0.4 mm year(-1)). Nitrate (17.5 mM) eliminated sulfide but gave pitting corrosion near the inlet of the bioreactor, whereas a high nitrite dose (20 mM) completely eliminated microbial activity and associated corrosion. More gradual, step-wise addition of nitrite up to 20 mM resulted in the retention of microbial activity and localized pitting corrosion, especially near the bioreactor inlet. We conclude that: (1) SRB control by nitrate or nitrite reduction shifts the corrosion risk from the bioreactor outlet to the inlet (i.e. from production to injection wells) and (2) souring treatment by continuous addition of a high inhibitory nitrite dose is preferable from a corrosion-prevention point of view. PMID:15711941

  7. Sensitivity of nitrate aerosols to ammonia emissions and to nitrate chemistry: implications for present and future nitrate optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulot, F.; Ginoux, P.; Cooke, W. F.; Donner, L. J.; Fan, S.; Lin, M.-Y.; Mao, J.; Naik, V.; Horowitz, L. W.

    2016-02-01

    We update and evaluate the treatment of nitrate aerosols in the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) atmospheric model (AM3). Accounting for the radiative effects of nitrate aerosols generally improves the simulated aerosol optical depth, although nitrate concentrations at the surface are biased high. This bias can be reduced by increasing the deposition of nitrate to account for the near-surface volatilization of ammonium nitrate or by neglecting the heterogeneous production of nitric acid to account for the inhibition of N2O5 reactive uptake at high nitrate concentrations. Globally, uncertainties in these processes can impact the simulated nitrate optical depth by up to 25 %, much more than the impact of uncertainties in the seasonality of ammonia emissions (6 %) or in the uptake of nitric acid on dust (13 %). Our best estimate for fine nitrate optical depth at 550 nm in 2010 is 0.006 (0.005-0.008). In wintertime, nitrate aerosols are simulated to account for over 30 % of the aerosol optical depth over western Europe and North America. Simulated nitrate optical depth increases by less than 30 % (0.0061-0.010) in response to projected changes in anthropogenic emissions from 2010 to 2050 (e.g., -40 % for SO2 and +38 % for ammonia). This increase is primarily driven by greater concentrations of nitrate in the free troposphere, while surface nitrate concentrations decrease in the midlatitudes following lower concentrations of nitric acid. With the projected increase of ammonia emissions, we show that better constraints on the vertical distribution of ammonia (e.g., convective transport and biomass burning injection) and on the sources and sinks of nitric acid (e.g., heterogeneous reaction on dust) are needed to improve estimates of future nitrate optical depth.

  8. Diversity and Abundance of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaeal Nitrite Reductase (nirK) Genes in Estuarine Sediments of San Francisco Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reji, L.; Lee, J. A.; Damashek, J.; Francis, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    Nitrification, the microbially-mediated aerobic oxidation of ammonia to nitrate via nitrite, is an integral component of the global biogeochemical nitrogen cycle. The first and rate-limiting step of nitrification, ammonia oxidation, is carried out by two distinct microbial groups: ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA). Molecular ecological studies targeting the amoA gene have revealed the abundance and ubiquity of AOA in terrestrial as well as aquatic environments. In addition to the ammonia oxidation machinery that includes the amoA gene, AOA also encode a gene for copper-containing nitrite reductase (nirK). The distribution patterns and functional role of nirK in AOA remain mostly unknown; proposed functions include the indirect involvement in ammonia oxidation through the production of nitric oxide during nitrite reduction, and (2) nitrite detoxification. In the present study, the diversity and abundance of archaeal nirK genes in estuarine sediments were investigated using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, cloning and sequencing approaches. In sediment samples collected from the San Francisco Bay estuary, two archaeal nirK variants (AnirKa and AnirKb) were amplified using specific primer sets. Overall, AnirKa was observed to be significantly more abundant than AnirKb in the sediment samples, with variation in relative abundance spanning two to three orders of magnitude between sampling sites. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a number of unique archaeal nirK sequence types, as well as many that clustered with sequences from previous estuarine studies and cultured AOA isolates, such as Nitrosopumilus maritimus. This study yielded new insights into the diversity and abundance of archaeal nirK genes in estuarine sediments, and highlights the importance of further investigating the physiological role of this gene in AOA, as well as its suitability as a marker gene for studying AOA in the environment.

  9. Reverse polarity capillary zone electrophoresis analysis of nitrate and nitrite in natural water samples

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalf, S.G.

    1998-06-11

    This paper describes the application of reverse polarity capillary zone electrophoresis (RPCE) for rapid and accurate determination of nitrate and nitrite in natural water samples. Using hexamethonium bromide (HMB) as an electroosmotic flow modifier in a borate buffer at pH 9.2, the resolution of nitrate and nitrite was accomplished in less than 3 minutes. RPCE was compared with ion chromatographic (IC) and cadmium reduction flow injection analysis (Cd-FIA) methods which are the two most commonly used standard methods for the analysis of natural water samples for nitrate and nitrite. When compared with the ion chromatographic method for the determination of nitrate and nitrite, RPCE reduced analysis time, decreased detection limits by a factor of 10, cut laboratory wastes by more than two orders of magnitude, and eliminated interferences commonly associated with IC. When compared with the cadmium reduction method, RPCE had the advantage of simultaneous determination of nitrate and nitrite, could be used in the presence of various metallic ions that normally interfere in cadmium reduction, and decreased detection limits by a factor of 10.

  10. Reduction of nitrite and nitrate on nano-dimensioned FeS.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Alexander D; Smirnov, Alexander; Shumlas, Samantha L; Singireddy, Soujanya; DeCesare, Matthew; Schoonen, Martin A A; Strongin, Daniel R

    2013-10-01

    The reaction of nitrite (NO2(-)) and nitrate (NO3(-)) on nanometer-sized FeS particles was investigated in alkaline (initial pH = 10.3) solutions at reaction temperatures of 22, 70, and 120 °C using in situ attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and fluorescence spectroscopy that allowed an analysis of adsorbate complexation on the FeS and reaction product in the aqueous phase, respectively. ATR-FTIR showed that NO was a surface-bound intermediate on FeS during its exposure to NO2(-) at all three reaction temperatures. Ammonia/ammonium (NH3/NH4(+)) product was also produced when FeS was exposed to NO2(-) at the 70 °C and 120 °C reaction temperatures. Activation of NO3(-) to form surface-bound NO was experimentally observed to occur at 120 °C on FeS, but not at the lower reaction temperatures. Furthermore, NH3/NH4(+) product in the aqueous phase was only present during the reaction of FeS with NO3(-) at the highest temperature used in this study. PMID:23955667

  11. The nasFEDCBA operon for nitrate and nitrite assimilation in Klebsiella pneumoniae M5al.

    PubMed

    Lin, J T; Goldman, B S; Stewart, V

    1994-05-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae can use nitrate and nitrite as sole nitrogen sources through the nitrate assimilation pathway. We previously identified structural genes for assimilatory nitrate and nitrite reductases, nasA and nasB, respectively. We report here our further identification of four genes, nasFEDC, upstream of the nasBA genes. The nasFEDCBA genes probably form an operon. Mutational and complementation analyses indicated that both the nasC and nasA genes are required for nitrate assimilation. The predicted NASC protein is homologous to a variety of NADH-dependent oxidoreductases. Thus, the NASC protein probably mediates electron transfer from NADH to the NASA protein, which contains the active site for nitrate reduction. The deduced NASF, NASE, and NASD proteins are homologous to the NRTA, NRTB, and NRTD proteins, respectively, that are involved in nitrate uptake in Synechococcus sp. (T. Omata, X. Andriesse, and A. Hirano, Mol. Gen. Genet. 236:193-202, 1993). Mutational and complementation studies indicated that the nasD gene is required for nitrate but not nitrite assimilation. By analogy with the Synechococcus nrt genes, we propose that the nasFED genes are involved in nitrate transport in K. pneumoniae. PMID:8169203

  12. The nasFEDCBA operon for nitrate and nitrite assimilation in Klebsiella pneumoniae M5al.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, J T; Goldman, B S; Stewart, V

    1994-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae can use nitrate and nitrite as sole nitrogen sources through the nitrate assimilation pathway. We previously identified structural genes for assimilatory nitrate and nitrite reductases, nasA and nasB, respectively. We report here our further identification of four genes, nasFEDC, upstream of the nasBA genes. The nasFEDCBA genes probably form an operon. Mutational and complementation analyses indicated that both the nasC and nasA genes are required for nitrate assimilation. The predicted NASC protein is homologous to a variety of NADH-dependent oxidoreductases. Thus, the NASC protein probably mediates electron transfer from NADH to the NASA protein, which contains the active site for nitrate reduction. The deduced NASF, NASE, and NASD proteins are homologous to the NRTA, NRTB, and NRTD proteins, respectively, that are involved in nitrate uptake in Synechococcus sp. (T. Omata, X. Andriesse, and A. Hirano, Mol. Gen. Genet. 236:193-202, 1993). Mutational and complementation studies indicated that the nasD gene is required for nitrate but not nitrite assimilation. By analogy with the Synechococcus nrt genes, we propose that the nasFED genes are involved in nitrate transport in K. pneumoniae. PMID:8169203

  13. Six-electron reduction of nitrite to ammonia by cytochrome c nitrite reductase: insights from density functional theory studies.

    PubMed

    Bykov, Dmytro; Neese, Frank

    2015-10-01

    In this Forum Article, an extensive discussion of the mechanism of six-electron, seven-proton nitrite reduction by the cytochrome c nitrite reductase enzyme is presented. On the basis of previous studies, the entire mechanism is summarized and a unified picture of the most plausible sequence of elementary steps is presented. According to this scheme, the mechanism can be divided into five functional stages. The first phase of the reaction consists of substrate binding and N-O bond cleavage. Here His277 plays a crucial role as a proton donor. In this step, the N-O bond is cleaved heterolytically through double protonation of the substrate. The second phase of the mechanism consists of two proton-coupled electron-transfer events, leading to an HNO intermediate. The third phase involves the formation of hydroxylamine, where Arg114 provides the necessary proton for the reaction. The second N-O bond is cleaved in the fourth phase of the mechanism, again triggered by proton transfer from His277. The Tyr218 side chain governs the fifth and last phase of the mechanism. It consists of radical transfer and ammonia formation. Thus, this mechanism implies that all conserved active-site side chains work in a concerted way in order to achieve this complex chemical transformation from nitrite to ammonia. The Forum Article also provides a detailed discussion of the density functional theory based cluster model approach to bioinorganic reactivity. A variety of questions are considered: the resting state of enzyme and substrate binding modes, interaction with the metal site and with active-site side chains, electron- and proton-transfer events, substrate dissociation, etc. PMID:26237518

  14. Nitrate and nitrite-mediated transcription antitermination control of nasF (nitrate assimilation) operon expression in Klebsiella pheumoniae M5al.

    PubMed

    Lin, J T; Stewart, V

    1996-03-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae can use nitrate and nitrite as sole nitrogen sources during aerobic growth. Nitrate is converted through nitrite to ammonium by assimilatory nitrate and nitrite reductase, respectively. Enzymes required for nitrate assimilation are encoded by the nasFEDCBA operon of K. pneumoniae; nasF operon expression is subject to both general nitrogen control and pathway-specific nitrate/nitrite induction, mediated by the NtrC and NasR proteins, respectively. Sequence inspection revealed a presumptive sigmaN (sigma54)-dependent promoter as well as two presumptive upstream NtrC protein binding sites. Site-specific mutational and primer extension analyses confirmed the identity of the sigmaN-dependent promoter. Deletions removing the apparent NtrC protein binding sites greatly reduced NtrC-dependent regulation, indicating that these sites are involved in general nitrogen control. However, deletions removing most of the sequence upstream of the promoter had little effect on nitrate/nitrite regulation, suggesting that the nasF leader region is involved in nitrate/nitrite regulation. The 119 nucleotide long transcribed leader region contains an apparent factor-independent transcription terminator. Promoter replacement experiments demonstrated that the leader region is involved in nitrate/nitrite regulation of nasF operon expression. Deletions removing the transcription terminator structure resulted in a nitrate-blind constitutive phenotype, indicating that the transcription terminator structure serves a negative function. Other deletions, removing proximal portions of the leader region, resulted in an uninducible phenotype, indicating that this region serves a positive function. These results indicate that nitrate/nitrite regulation of nasF operon expression is determined by a transcription attenuation mechanism. We hypothesize that in the absence of nitrate or nitrite, the terminator structure abrogates transcription readthrough into the nasF operon. In the

  15. The reactivity of cesium nickel ferrocyanide towards nitrate and nitrite salts

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, L.L.; Scheele, R.D.

    1991-09-01

    Beginning in late 1988, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) began an experimental program at the request of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to investigate the effects of temperature on the oxidation reaction between synthetic nickel cesium ferrocyanide (FeCN) and nitrates and nitrites representative of materials present in some of the Hanford single-shell tanks (SSTs). After completing a preliminary series of experiments in 1988, the program was expanded to include five tasks to evaluate the effect of selected compositional and operational parameters on the reaction and explosion temperatures of FeCN and nitrate and/or nitrite mixtures. 10 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  16. [Influence of thermal processing and storage on the content of nitrates and nitrites in chosen vegetables from the Podlasie province].

    PubMed

    Roszczenko, A; Rogalska, J; Potapczuk, L; Kleczyńska, A

    2001-01-01

    The dangerous for health nitrate and nitrite can penetrate with food human organism for this reason in study the influence of thermal processing and storage on the level of these compounds in the vegetables was determined. The content of nitrates and nitrites was determined in such vegetables as carrot, parsley-root, celery and potatoes growing by farmers in the Podlasie province. Nitrates and nitrites were assessed in fresh and boiled vegetables as well as in the stock and in carrot juice. These compounds were also determined after storage of vegetables at +4 degrees C for 2 weeks and at -15 degrees C for 1 and 3 months. Nitrates and nitrites concentrations were assayed colorimetrically by the Griess method modified to food investigation. Boiling reduced nitrate content in the vegetables. Considerable part (about 50%) of these compounds passed into stock during boiling. Storage of these vegetables at +4 degrees C resulted in slight lowering of nitrate content in carrot and parsley-root and marked elevation in celery. Cold storage of vegetables through 1 and 3 months had no important influence on nitrate content. Boiling decreased the content of nitrites similarly as nitrates. Storage of the vegetables at +4 degrees C through 2 weeks led to an increase in nitrite content in carrot and parsley-root while in celery the content of nitrites was reduced. Storage of vegetables at -15 degrees C resulted in lowering content of nitrite. The study revealed that the vegetable-roots (carrot, parsley and celery) and potatoes cultivated in the Podlasie province as well as in the other provinces were excessively contaminated by nitrates and nitrites. Moreover, it has been shown that thermal processing such as boiling considerably reduced the content of nitrates and nitrites in these vegetables while freezing changed mainly nitrite content. PMID:11957780

  17. Structural basis for dynamic mechanism of nitrate/nitrite antiport by NarK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Masahiro; Takeda, Hironori; Kato, Hideaki E.; Doki, Shintaro; Ito, Koichi; Maturana, Andrés D.; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Nureki, Osamu

    2015-05-01

    NarK belongs to the nitrate/nitrite porter (NNP) family in the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) and plays a central role in nitrate uptake across the membrane in diverse organisms, including archaea, bacteria, fungi and plants. Although previous studies provided insight into the overall structure and the substrate recognition of NarK, its molecular mechanism, including the driving force for nitrate transport, remained elusive. Here we demonstrate that NarK is a nitrate/nitrite antiporter, using an in vitro reconstituted system. Furthermore, we present the high-resolution crystal structures of NarK from Escherichia coli in the nitrate-bound occluded, nitrate-bound inward-open and apo inward-open states. The integrated structural, functional and computational analyses reveal the nitrate/nitrite antiport mechanism of NarK, in which substrate recognition is coupled to the transport cycle by the concomitant movement of the transmembrane helices and the key tyrosine and arginine residues in the substrate-binding site.

  18. Structural basis for dynamic mechanism of nitrate/nitrite antiport by NarK

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Masahiro; Takeda, Hironori; Kato, Hideaki E.; Doki, Shintaro; Ito, Koichi; Maturana, Andrés D.; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Nureki, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    NarK belongs to the nitrate/nitrite porter (NNP) family in the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) and plays a central role in nitrate uptake across the membrane in diverse organisms, including archaea, bacteria, fungi and plants. Although previous studies provided insight into the overall structure and the substrate recognition of NarK, its molecular mechanism, including the driving force for nitrate transport, remained elusive. Here we demonstrate that NarK is a nitrate/nitrite antiporter, using an in vitro reconstituted system. Furthermore, we present the high-resolution crystal structures of NarK from Escherichia coli in the nitrate-bound occluded, nitrate-bound inward-open and apo inward-open states. The integrated structural, functional and computational analyses reveal the nitrate/nitrite antiport mechanism of NarK, in which substrate recognition is coupled to the transport cycle by the concomitant movement of the transmembrane helices and the key tyrosine and arginine residues in the substrate-binding site. PMID:25959928

  19. High sensitivity analysis of nitrite and nitrate in biological samples by capillary zone electrophoresis with transient isotachophoretic sample stacking.

    PubMed

    Szöko, Eva; Tábi, Tamás; Halász, Attila S; Pálfi, Melinda; Magyar, Kálmán

    2004-10-01

    Tissue level of nitrate and nitrite are established indicators of altered nitric oxide metabolism under various pathological conditions. Determination of these anions in biological samples, in the presence of high chloride concentration, using capillary zone electrophoresis suffers from poor detection sensitivity. Separation conditions providing excellent resolution and submicromolar detection sensitivity of nitrate and nitrite have been developed and validated. Simple sample preparation was applied that maintains nitrite stability in tissue extracts and at the same time allows transient isotachophoresis stacking of the analytes. Nitrate and nitrite concentrations in rat brain and liver tissue samples were determined in control and lipopolysaccharide treated animals. PMID:15532571

  20. Pancreatic Cancer and Exposure to Dietary Nitrate and Nitrite in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Aschebrook-Kilfoy, Briseis; Cross, Amanda J.; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z.; Schatzkin, Arthur; Hollenbeck, Albert R.; Sinha, Rashmi; Ward, Mary H.

    2011-01-01

    Nitrate and nitrite are precursors of N-nitroso compounds, which induce tumors of the pancreas in animals. The authors evaluated the relation of dietary nitrate and nitrite to pancreatic cancer risk in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. Nitrate and nitrite intakes were assessed at baseline using a 124-item food frequency questionnaire. During approximately 10 years of follow-up between 1995 and 2006, 1,728 incident pancreatic cancer cases were identified. There was no association between total nitrate or nitrite intake and pancreatic cancer in men or women. However, men in the highest quintile of summed nitrate/nitrite intake from processed meat had a nonsignificantly elevated risk of pancreatic cancer (hazard ratio = 1.18, 95% confidence interval: 0.95, 1.47; P-trend = 0.11). The authors observed a stronger increase in risk among men for nitrate/nitrite intake from processed meat at ages 12–13 years (highest quintile vs. lowest: hazard ratio = 1.32, 95% confidence interval: 0.99, 1.76; P-trend = 0.11), though the relation did not achieve statistical significance. The authors found no associations between adult or adolescent nitrate or nitrite intake from processed meats and pancreatic cancer among women. These results provide modest evidence that processed meat sources of dietary nitrate and nitrite may be associated with pancreatic cancer among men and provide no support for the hypothesis in women. PMID:21685410

  1. A Crp-Dependent Two-Component System Regulates Nitrate and Nitrite Respiration in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yangyang; Wang, Jixuan; Fu, Huihui; Zhou, Guangqi; Shi, Miaomiao; Gao, Haichun

    2012-01-01

    We have previously illustrated the nitrate/nitrite respiratory pathway of Shewanella oneidensis, which is renowned for its remarkable versatility in respiration. Here we investigated the systems regulating the pathway with a reliable approach which enables characterization of mutants impaired in nitrate/nitrite respiration by guaranteeing biomass. The S. oneidensis genome encodes an Escherichia coli NarQ/NarX homolog SO3981 and two E. coli NarP/NarL homologs SO1860 and SO3982. Results of physiological characterization and mutational analyses demonstrated that S. oneidensis possesses a single two-component system (TCS) for regulation of nitrate/nitrite respiration, consisting of the sensor kinase SO3981(NarQ) and the response regulator SO3982(NarP). The TCS directly controls the transcription of nap and nrfA (genes encoding nitrate and nitrite reductases, respectively) but regulates the former less tightly than the latter. Additionally, phosphorylation at residue 57 of SO3982 is essential for its DNA-binding capacity. At the global control level, Crp is found to regulate expression of narQP as well as nap and nrfA. In contrast to NarP-NarQ, Crp is more essential for nap rather than nrfA. PMID:23240049

  2. 21 CFR 170.60 - Nitrites and/or nitrates in curing premixes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... guanylate, hydrolysates of animal or plant origin (such as hydrolyzed vegetable protein), oleoresins of... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nitrites and/or nitrates in curing premixes. 170.60 Section 170.60 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  3. Anammox bacteria disguised as denitrifiers: nitrate reduction to dinitrogen gas via nitrite and ammonium.

    PubMed

    Kartal, Boran; Kuypers, Marcel M M; Lavik, Gaute; Schalk, Jos; Op den Camp, Huub J M; Jetten, Mike S M; Strous, Marc

    2007-03-01

    Anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria oxidize ammonium with nitrite and produce N(2). They reside in many natural ecosystems and contribute significantly to the cycling of marine nitrogen. Anammox bacteria generally live under ammonium limitation, and it was assumed that in nature anammox bacteria depend on other biochemical processes for ammonium. In this study we investigated the possibility of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium by anammox bacteria. Physically purified Kuenenia stuttgartiensis cells reduced (15)NO(3) (-) to (15)NH(4) (+) via (15)NO(2) (-) as the intermediate. This was followed by the anaerobic oxidation of the produced ammonium and nitrite. The overall end-product of this metabolism of anammox bacteria was (15)N(15)N dinitrogen gas. The nitrate reduction to nitrite proceeds at a rate of 0.3 +/- 0.02 fmol cell(-1) day(-1) (10% of the 'normal' anammox rate). A calcium-dependent cytochrome c protein with a high (305 mumol min(-1) mg protein(-1)) rate of nitrite reduction to ammonium was partially purified. We present evidence that dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium occurs in Benguela upwelling system at the same site where anammox bacteria were previously detected. This indicates that anammox bacteria could be mediating dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium in natural ecosystems. PMID:17298364

  4. Cardioprotective effects of inorganic nitrate/nitrite in chronic anthracycline cardiotoxicity: Comparison with dexrazoxane.

    PubMed

    Lenčová-Popelová, Olga; Jirkovský, Eduard; Jansová, Hana; Jirkovská-Vávrová, Anna; Vostatková-Tichotová, Lucie; Mazurová, Yvona; Adamcová, Michaela; Chládek, Jaroslav; Hroch, Miloš; Pokorná, Zuzana; Geršl, Vladimír; Šimůnek, Tomáš; Štěrba, Martin

    2016-02-01

    Dexrazoxane (DEX) is a clinically available cardioprotectant that reduces the toxicity induced by anthracycline (ANT) anticancer drugs; however, DEX is seldom used and its action is poorly understood. Inorganic nitrate/nitrite has shown promising results in myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury and recently in acute high-dose ANT cardiotoxicity. However, the utility of this approach for overcoming clinically more relevant chronic forms of cardiotoxicity remains elusive. Hence, in this study, the protective potential of inorganic nitrate and nitrite against chronic ANT cardiotoxicity was investigated, and the results were compared to those using DEX. Chronic cardiotoxicity was induced in rabbits with daunorubicin (DAU). Sodium nitrate (1g/L) was administered daily in drinking water, while sodium nitrite (0.15 or 5mg/kg) or DEX (60mg/kg) was administered parenterally before each DAU dose. Although oral nitrate induced a marked increase in plasma NOx, it showed no improvement in DAU-induced mortality, myocardial damage or heart failure. Instead, the higher nitrite dose reduced the incidence of end-stage cardiotoxicity, prevented related premature deaths and significantly ameliorated several molecular and cellular perturbations induced by DAU, particularly those concerning mitochondria. The latter result was also confirmed in vitro. Nevertheless, inorganic nitrite failed to prevent DAU-induced cardiac dysfunction and molecular remodeling in vivo and failed to overcome the cytotoxicity of DAU to cardiomyocytes in vitro. In contrast, DEX completely prevented all of the investigated molecular, cellular and functional perturbations that were induced by DAU. Our data suggest that the difference in cardioprotective efficacy between DEX and inorganic nitrite may be related to their different abilities to address a recently proposed upstream target for ANT in the heart - topoisomerase IIβ. PMID:26724189

  5. Using Salivary Nitrite and Nitrate Levels as a Biomarker for Drug-Induced Gingival Overgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Sukuroglu, Erkan; Güncü, Güliz N.; Kilinc, Kamer; Caglayan, Feriha

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Drug-induced gingival overgrowth has a multifactorial nature and the pathogenesis is still uncertain. It has been suggested that Nitric Oxide (NO) might play a role in the pathogenesis of drug-induced gingival overgrowth due to the contribution of NO to immune response and matrix degradation. NO levels in biological fluids have been used as a diagnostic biomarker in many diseases. The aim of this study is to determine whether NO levels in plasma, saliva, and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) can serve as a potential biomarker for the evaluation of drug-induced gingival overgrowth risk. Materials and Methods: A total of 104 patients, receiving cyclosporine A (n = 35), phenytoin (n = 25), nifedipine (n = 26), or diltiazem (n = 18) participated in the study. The amount of gingival overgrowth was evaluated with two indices and was given as percentage. Periodontal clinical parameters including plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), gingival bleeding time index (GBTI), and probing depth (PD) were also assessed. Saliva, GCF, and plasma samples were obtained from each participants. Nitrite and nitrate levels in saliva, GCF, and plasma were analyzed by Griess reagent. Results: Salivary nitrite and nitrate levels in responders were significantly higher than those in non-responders in only phenytoin group (p < 0.05). Nitrite and nitrate levels of gingival crevicular fluid and plasma did not significantly differ between responders and non-responders in all study groups (p > 0.05). Salivary nitrite levels exhibited a significant correlation with PD, GBTI, severity of gingival overgrowth (%GO), and GCF volume (p < 0.05). Additionally, a strong positive correlation was detected between saliva and plasma nitrate levels (p < 0.005). However, both nitrite and nitrate levels in GCF and plasma demonstrated no significant correlation with clinical parameters, GO severity, and GCF volume (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Salivary nitrite and nitrate levels could be used as periodontal disease

  6. Nitrate and nitrite ingestion and risk of ovarian cancer among postmenopausal women in Iowa.

    PubMed

    Inoue-Choi, Maki; Jones, Rena R; Anderson, Kristin E; Cantor, Kenneth P; Cerhan, James R; Krasner, Stuart; Robien, Kim; Weyer, Peter J; Ward, Mary H

    2015-07-01

    Nitrate and nitrite are precursors in the endogenous formation of N-nitroso compounds (NOC), potential human carcinogens. We evaluated the association of nitrate and nitrite ingestion with postmenopausal ovarian cancer risk in the Iowa Women's Health Study. Among 28,555 postmenopausal women, we identified 315 incident epithelial ovarian cancers from 1986 to 2010. Dietary nitrate and nitrite intakes were assessed at baseline using food frequency questionnaire data. Drinking water source at home was obtained in a 1989 follow-up survey. Nitrate-nitrogen (NO3 -N) and total trihalomethane (TTHM) levels for Iowa public water utilities were linked to residences and average levels were computed based on each woman's duration at the residence. We computed multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) using Cox proportional hazards regression. We tested interactions of nitrate with TTHMs and dietary factors known to influence NOC formation. Ovarian cancer risk was 2.03 times higher (CI = 1.22-3.38, ptrend  = 0.003) in the highest quartile (≥2.98 mg/L) compared with the lowest quartile (≤0.47 mg/L; reference) of NO3 -N in public water, regardless of TTHM levels. Risk among private well users was also elevated (HR = 1.53, CI = 0.93-2.54) compared with the same reference group. Associations were stronger when vitamin C intake was nitrate was inversely associated with ovarian cancer risk (ptrend  = 0.02); whereas, dietary nitrite from processed meats was positively associated with the risk (ptrend  = 0.04). Our findings indicate that high nitrate levels in public drinking water and private well use may increase ovarian cancer risk among postmenopausal women. PMID:25430487

  7. Nitrate and nitrite ingestion and risk of ovarian cancer among postmenopausal women in Iowa

    PubMed Central

    Inoue-Choi, Maki; Jones, Rena R.; Anderson, Kristin E.; Cantor, Kenneth P.; Cerhan, James R.; Krasner, Stuart; Robien, Kim; Weyer, Peter J.; Ward, Mary H.

    2014-01-01

    Nitrate and nitrite are precursors in the endogenous formation of N-nitroso compounds (NOC), potential human carcinogens. We evaluated the association of nitrate and nitrite ingestion with postmenopausal ovarian cancer risk in the Iowa Women’s Health Study. Among 28,555 postmenopausal women, we identified 315 incident epithelial ovarian cancers from 1986 to 2010. Dietary nitrate and nitrite intakes were assessed at baseline using food frequency questionnaire data. Drinking water source at home was obtained in a 1989 follow-up survey. Nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) and total trihalomethane (TTHM) levels for Iowa public water utilities were linked to residences and average levels were computed based on each woman’s duration at the residence. We computed multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) using Cox proportional hazards regression. We tested interactions of nitrate with TTHMs and dietary factors known to influence NOC formation. Ovarian cancer risk was 2.03 times higher (CI=1.22–3.38, ptrend=0.003) in the highest quartile (≥2.98 mg/L) compared with the lowest quartile (≤0.47 mg/L; reference) of NO3-N in public water, regardless of TTHM levels. Risk among private well users was also elevated (HR=1.53, CI=0.93–2.54) compared with the same reference group. Associations were stronger when vitamin C intake was nitrate was inversely associated with ovarian cancer risk (ptrend=0.02); whereas, dietary nitrite from processed meats was positively associated with the risk (ptrend=0.04). Our findings indicate that high nitrate levels in public drinking water and private well use may increase ovarian cancer risk among postmenopausal women. PMID:25430487

  8. Dietary Nitrates, Nitrites, and Nitrosamines Intake and the Risk of Gastric Cancer: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Song, Peng; Wu, Lei; Guan, Wenxian

    2015-12-01

    The potential associations between dietary consumption of nitrates, nitrites, and nitrosamines and gastric cancer risk have been investigated by several studies, but yielded inconclusive results. We conducted a meta-analysis to provide a quantitative assessment of their relationships. Relevant articles were identified by a systematic literature searching of PubMed and Embase databases prior to August 2015. Random-effects models were employed to pool the relative risks. A total of 22 articles consisting of 49 studies-19 studies for nitrates, 19 studies for nitrites, and 11 studies for N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA)-were included. The summary relative risk of stomach cancer for the highest categories, compared with the lowest, was 0.80 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.69-0.93) for dietary nitrates intake, 1.31 (95% CI, 1.13-1.52) for nitrites, and 1.34 (95% CI, 1.02-1.76) for NDMA (p for heterogeneity was 0.015, 0.013 and <0.001, respectively). The study type was found as the main source of heterogeneity for nitrates and nitrites. The heterogeneity for NDMA could not be eliminated completely through stratified analysis. Although significant associations were all observed in case-control studies, the cohort studies still showed a slight trend. The dose-response analysis indicated similar results as well. High nitrates intake was associated with a weak but statistically significant reduced risk of gastric cancer. Whereas increased consumption of nitrites and NDMA seemed to be risk factors for cancer. Due to the lack of uniformity for exposure assessment across studies, further prospective researches are warranted to verify these findings. PMID:26633477

  9. Determination of nitrate and nitrite in freshwaters using flow-injection with luminol chemiluminescence detection.

    PubMed

    Yaqoob, Mohammad; Folgado Biot, Beatriz; Nabi, Abdul; Worsfold, Paul J

    2012-01-01

    A simple and sensitive flow-injection (FI) method for the determination of nitrate and nitrite in natural waters, based on luminol chemiluminescence (CL) detection, is reported. Nitrate was reduced online to nitrite via a copperized cadmium (Cu-Cd) column and then reacted with acidic hydrogen peroxide to form peroxynitrous acid. CL emission was observed from the oxidation of luminol in an alkaline medium in the presence of the peroxynitrite anion. The limits of detection (S:N = 3) were 0.02 and 0.01 µg N/L, with sample throughputs of 40 and 90 /h for nitrate and nitrite, respectively. Calibration graphs were linear over the range 0.02-50 and 0.01-50 µg N/L [R2  = 0.9984 (n = 8) and R2  = 0.9965 (n = 7)] for nitrate and nitrite, respectively, with relative standard deviations (RSDs; n = 3) in the range 1.8-4.6%. The key chemical and physical variables (reagent concentrations, buffer pH, flow rates, sample volume, Cu-Cd reductor column length) were optimized and potential interferences investigated. The effect of cations [Ca(II), Mg(II), Co(II), Fe(II) and Cu(II)] was masked online with EDTA. Common anions (PO4(3-) , SO4(2-) and HCO3-) did not interfere at their maximum admissible concentrations in freshwaters. The effect of salinity on the luminol CL reaction with and without nitrate and nitrite (2 and 0.5 µg N/L, respectively) was also investigated. The method was successfully applied to freshwaters and the results obtained were in good agreement with those obtained by an automated segmented flow analyser reference method. PMID:23044772

  10. Dietary Nitrates, Nitrites, and Nitrosamines Intake and the Risk of Gastric Cancer: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Peng; Wu, Lei; Guan, Wenxian

    2015-01-01

    The potential associations between dietary consumption of nitrates, nitrites, and nitrosamines and gastric cancer risk have been investigated by several studies, but yielded inconclusive results. We conducted a meta-analysis to provide a quantitative assessment of their relationships. Relevant articles were identified by a systematic literature searching of PubMed and Embase databases prior to August 2015. Random-effects models were employed to pool the relative risks. A total of 22 articles consisting of 49 studies—19 studies for nitrates, 19 studies for nitrites, and 11 studies for N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA)—were included. The summary relative risk of stomach cancer for the highest categories, compared with the lowest, was 0.80 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.69–0.93) for dietary nitrates intake, 1.31 (95% CI, 1.13–1.52) for nitrites, and 1.34 (95% CI, 1.02–1.76) for NDMA (p for heterogeneity was 0.015, 0.013 and <0.001, respectively). The study type was found as the main source of heterogeneity for nitrates and nitrites. The heterogeneity for NDMA could not be eliminated completely through stratified analysis. Although significant associations were all observed in case-control studies, the cohort studies still showed a slight trend. The dose-response analysis indicated similar results as well. High nitrates intake was associated with a weak but statistically significant reduced risk of gastric cancer. Whereas increased consumption of nitrites and NDMA seemed to be risk factors for cancer. Due to the lack of uniformity for exposure assessment across studies, further prospective researches are warranted to verify these findings. PMID:26633477

  11. Chemoselective Nitration of Phenols with tert-Butyl Nitrite in Solution and on Solid Support

    PubMed Central

    Koley, Dipankar; Colón, Olvia C.; Savinov, Sergey N

    2009-01-01

    tert-Butyl nitrite was identified as a safe and chemoselective nitrating agent that provides preferentially mononitro derivatives of phenolic substrates in the presence of potentially competitive functional groups. On the basis of our control experiments, we propose that the reaction proceeds through the formation of O-nitrosyl intermediates prior to C-nitration via homolysis and oxidation. The reported nitration method is compatible with tyrosine-containing peptides on solid support in the synthesis of fluorogenic substrates for characterization of proteases. PMID:19697919

  12. Flow injection analysis of nitrate and nitrite in commercial baby foods.

    PubMed

    Chetty, Adrian A; Prasad, Surendra

    2016-04-15

    Commercial baby foods are an easy alternative to home-made meals especially for working parents in a nuclear family therefore it is imperative to determine the nitrate and nitrite content in commercially available baby foods varieties marketed in Fiji. A total of 108 baby food samples were analyzed for nitrate and nitrite using our standardized flow injection analysis (FIA) technique with colorimetric detection technique employing sulfanilamide and N-(1-naphthyl)ethylenediamine dihydrochloride as color reagents where the samples throughput was 38 h(-1). The commercial baby food varieties chosen comprised of vegetables, cereals, fruits and milk. The study shows that the nitrate content of the baby foods studied ranges from 2.10 to 220.67 mg kg(-1) whereas the nitrite content ranges from 0.44 to 3.67 mg kg(-1). Typical recoveries of spiked nitrate residues ranged from 92% to 106%. The study shows that the average nitrate content of commercially available baby foods in Fiji descends below the maximum level proposed by the European Union Legislation. PMID:26616981

  13. Colorimetric determination of nitrate plus nitrite in water by enzymatic reduction, automated discrete analyzer methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patton, Charles J.; Kryskalla, Jennifer R.

    2011-01-01

    In addition to operational details and performance benchmarks for these new DA-AtNaR2 nitrate + nitrite assays, this report also provides results of interference studies for common inorganic and organic matrix constituents at 1, 10, and 100 times their median concentrations in surface-water and groundwater samples submitted annually to the NWQL for nitrate + nitrite analyses. Paired t-test and Wilcoxon signed-rank statistical analyses of results determined by CFA-CdR methods and DA-AtNaR2 methods indicate that nitrate concentration differences between population means or sign ranks were either statistically equivalent to zero at the 95 percent confidence level (p ≥ 0.05) or analytically equivalent to zero-that is, when p < 0.05, concentration differences between population means or medians were less than MDLs.

  14. Macrophage synthesis of nitrite, nitrate, and N-nitrosamines: precursors and role of the respiratory burst

    SciTech Connect

    Iyengar, R.; Stuehr, D.J.; Marletta, M.A.

    1987-09-01

    The macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 when activated with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide and interferon-..gamma.. synthesized nitrite (NO/sub 2//sup -/) and nitrate (NO/sub 3//sup -/). Medium change after the activation showed that L-arginine was the only amino acid essential for this synthesis. D-Arginine would not substitute for L-arginine. Other analogues that could replace L-arginine were L-homoarginine, L-arginine methyl ester, L-arginamide, and the peptide L-arginyl-L-aspartate. L-Argininic acid, L-agmatine, L-ornithine, urea, L-citrulline, and ammonia were among the nonprecursors, while L-canavanine inhibited this L-arginine-derived NO/sub 2//sup -//NO/sub 3//sup -/ synthesis. When morpholine was added to the culture medium of the activated RAW 264.7 macrophages, N-nitrosation took place, generating N-nitrosomorpholine. GC/MS experiments using L-(guanido-/sup 15/N/sub 2/)arginine established that the NO/sub 2//sup -//NO/sub 3//sup -/ and the nitrosyl group of N-nitrosomorpholine were derived exclusively from one or both of the terminal guanido nitrogens of arginine. Chromatographic analysis showed that the other product of the L-arginine synthesis of NO/sub 2//sup -//NO/sub 3//sup -/ was L-citrulline. The role of the respiratory burst in NO/sub 2//sup -//NO/sub 3//sup -/ synthesis was examined using the macrophage cell lines J774.16 and J774 C3C. Both cell lines synthesized similar amounts of NO/sub 2//sup -//NO/sub 3//sup -/. However, J774 C3C cells do not produce superoxide and hence do not exhibit the respiratory burst. Additional experiments also ruled out the involvement of the respiratory burst in NO/sub 2//sup -//NO/sub 3//sup -/ synthesis.

  15. Simultaneous Nitrite/Nitrate Imagery at Millimeter Scale through the Water-Sediment Interface.

    PubMed

    Metzger, E; Thibault de Chanvalon, A; Cesbron, F; Barbe, A; Launeau, P; Jézéquel, D; Mouret, A

    2016-08-01

    The present study describes new procedures to obtain at millimeter resolution the spatial distribution of nitrite and nitrate in porewaters, combining diffusive equilibrium in thin films (DET), colorimetry and hyperspectral imagery. Nitrite distribution can be easily achieved by adapting the well-known colorimetric method from Griess (1879) and using a common flatbed scanner with a limit of detection about 1.7 μmol L(-1). Nitrate distribution can be obtained after reduction into nitrite by a vanadium chloride reagent. However, the concentration of vanadium chloride used in this protocol brings coloration with a wide spectral signature that creates interference only deconvolvable by imaging treatment from an entire visible spectrum for each pixel (spectral analysis). This can be achieved by hyperspectral imaging. The protocol retained in the present study allows obtaining a nitrite/nitrate image with micromolar limit of detection. The methods were applied in sediments from the Loire Estuary after different treatments and allowed to precisely describe two-dimensional millimeter features. The present technique adds to the combination of gel-colorimetry and hyperspectral imagery a very promising new application of wide interest for environmental issues in the context of early diagenesis and benthic fluxes. PMID:27351274

  16. [Nitrate and nitrite in prepared meals in relation to the nitrate concentration of drinking water (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Selenka, F; Brand, E

    1975-12-01

    The nitrate and nitrite content of prepared foods was investigated in four areas in Rhineland Palatinate. The nitrate content of the drinking water was different in each area, the first region always having less than 1 mg NO-3/litre, the second an average of 19.5 mg NO-3/litre, the third an average of 35.6 mg NO-3/litre and the fourth 130 mg NO-3/litre. The samples were restaurant food which had been served without previously informing the maker. They were separately analysed according to soup, meat and gravy, carbohydrate accompaniments, vegetables and salad. It was shown that, in the four areas (in the above order) an average of 46, 67, 45 and 65 mg NO-3/main meal was ingested, which corresponds to a ratio of 1:1.5:1:1.4. For nitrites, the figures were 1.4, 2.0, 1.5, and 2.8 mg NO-2/main meal, corresponding to a ratio of 1:1.4:1.1:2. The nitrate excess consumed by the population in the principal meals in areas with a drinking water concentration of 130 mg/1 is consequently only 1.4 times higher than in an area where the water supply is free from nitrate. Under the same conditions the nitrite content is doubled. However, the levels at 2 and 1 mg NO-2/kg are altogether very low and are not likely to be of any importance hygienically for the public at large. The concentrations of nitrate in potatoes and carbohydrate accompaniments (94 mg NO-3/kg), vegetables (99 mg NO-3/kg) and salads (109 mg NO-3/kg) show average levels which are double those of soups (50 mg NO-3/kg) and meat dishes (58 mg NO-3kg). An effect of the nitrate content of drinking water on these figures is only seen in soups and meat, an increase by a factor of 4 occurring between the area with nitrate-gree drinking water and the area with 130 mg NO-3/1). Contrary to expectation, the nitrite levels show the reverse relationship. They are highest in soups (4.7 mg NO-2/kg) and meat dishes (3.5 mg NO-2/kg) to salads (1.4 mg NO-3/kg). The values obtained may be considered representative for the average

  17. Synthesis of nano-structured polypyrrole/copper electrodes for nitrate and nitrite electroreduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phuong Thoa Nguyen, Thi; Thinh Nguyen, Viet; Nguyen Bui, Nhat; Do, Duong Kim Bao; Pham, Anh Minh

    2010-09-01

    Nanostructured polypyrrole film was synthesized onto a copper electrode in solutions of oxalic and salicylic acids and their buffers. The electrooxidation of pyrrole to form polypyrrole film and the electroreduction of nitrate and nitrite ions at synthesized Ppy modified copper electrodes (Ppy/Cu) in potassium chloride aqueous solutions were studied using chronoamperometry. The nanoporous structure of the synthesized Ppy films was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Nitrate and nitrite reduction were performed by an electrochemical method under potentiostatic conditions. The Ppy/Cu electrodes prepared in the oxalate buffer and salicylic acid solutions perform more stable catalytic activity for nitrate reduction; their service life is about ten times longer than that for the electrodes prepared in oxalic acid solution. After 20 h of electrolysis, the nitrite was reduced completely with 100% efficiency and the nitrate was reduced with 35% efficiency. Report submitted to the 5th International Workshop on Advanced Materials Science and Nanotechnology IWAMSN, Hanoi, 9–12 November 2010.

  18. Comparison of endogenous metabolism during long-term anaerobic starvation of nitrite/nitrate cultivated denitrifying phosphorus removal sludges.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yayi; Zhou, Shuai; Wang, Hong; Ye, Liu; Qin, Jian; Lin, Ximao

    2015-01-01

    Denitrifying phosphorus removal (DPR) by denitrifying phosphorus-accumulating organisms (DPAOs) is a promising approach for reducing energy and carbon usage. However, influent fluctuations or interruptions frequently expose the DPAOs biomass to starvation conditions, reducing biomass activity and amount, and ultimately degrading the performance of DPR. Therefore, a better understanding of the endogenous metabolism and recovery ability of DPAOs is urgently required. In the present study, anaerobic starvation (12 days) and recovery were investigated in nitrite- and nitrate-cultivated DPAOs at 20 ± 1 °C. The cell decay rates in nitrite-DPAOs sludges from the end of the anaerobic and aerobic phase were 0.008 day⁻¹ and 0.007 day⁻¹, respectively, being 64% and 68% lower than those of nitrate-DPAOs sludges. Nitrite-DPAOs sludges also recovered more rapidly than nitrate-DPAOs sludge after 12 days of starvation. The maintenance energy of nitrite-DPAOs sludges from the end of the anaerobic and aerobic phase were approximately 31% and 34% lower, respectively, than those of nitrate-DPAOs sludges. Glycogen and polyphosphate (poly-P) sequentially served as the main maintenance energy sources in both nitrite-and nitrate-DPAOs sludges. However, the transformation pathway of the intracellular polymers during starvation differed between them. Nitrate-DPAOs sludge used extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) (mainly polysaccharides) as an additional maintenance energy source during the first 3 days of starvation. During this phase, EPS appeared to contribute to 19-27% of the ATP production in nitrate-DPAOs, but considerably less to the cell maintenance of nitrite-DPAOs. The high resistance of nitrite-DPAOs to starvation might be attributable to frequent short-term starvation and exposure to toxic substances such as nitrite/free nitrous acids in the parent nitrite-fed reactor. The strong resistance of nitrite-DPAOs sludge to anaerobic starvation may be exploited in P removal

  19. Plasma nitrate plus nitrite changes during continuous intravenous infusion interleukin 2.

    PubMed Central

    Citterio, G.; Pellegatta, F.; Lucca, G. D.; Fragasso, G.; Scaglietti, U.; Pini, D.; Fortis, C.; Tresoldi, M.; Rugarli, C.

    1996-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), a biologically active mediator generated in many cell types by the enzyme NO synthase, may play an important role in cardiovascular toxicity that is frequently observed in cancer patients during intravenous (i.v.) interleukin 2 (IL-2) therapy. The induction of NO synthase and the production of NO seem to be involved in the pathogenesis of the vascular leakage syndrome, as well as in the regulation of myocardial contractility. In the present study, we evaluated the pattern of plasmatic NO changes during multiple cycles of continuous i.v. infusion (CIVI) of IL-2 in ten advanced cancer patients (five males, five females, median age 59 years, range 33-67 years; eight affected by renal cell cancer and two affected by malignant melanoma). The patients received IL-2 at 18 MIU m-2 day-1 (14 cycles) or 9 MIU m-2 day-1 (seven cycles) for 96 h, repeated every 3 weeks. Interferon alpha (IFN alpha) was also administered subcutaneously (s.c) during the 3 week interval between IL-2 cycles. For each cycle, plasma samples were collected before treatment (t0), 24 h (t1), 48 h (t2), 72 h (t3) and 96 h (t4) after the start of IL-2 infusion, and 24 h after the end of the cycle. NO concentration was determined spectrophotometrically by measuring the accumulation of both nitrite and nitrate (after reduction to nitrite). The following observations may be drawn from data analysis: (1) plasma nitrate + nitrite significantly raised during treatment (P = 0.0226 for t0 vs t3), but statistical significance was retained only when cycles administered with IL-2 18 MIU m-2 day-1 are considered (P = 0.0329 for t0 vs t3; P = 0.0354 for t0 vs t2 vs t4) (dose-dependent pattern); (2) during subsequent cycles a significant trend toward a progressive increase of plasma nitrate + nitrite levels, with increasing cumulative dose of IL-2, was observed (linear regression coefficient r = 0.62, P = 0.0141 for t0; r = 0.80, P = 0.0003 for t1; r = 0.62, P = 0.013 for t2; r = 0.69, P = 0.045 for

  20. Differential contributions of ammonia oxidizers and nitrite oxidizers to nitrification in four paddy soils

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Baozhan; Zhao, Jun; Guo, Zhiying; Ma, Jing; Xu, Hua; Jia, Zhongjun

    2015-01-01

    Rice paddy fields are characterized by regular flooding and nitrogen fertilization, but the functional importance of aerobic ammonia oxidizers and nitrite oxidizers under unique agricultural management is poorly understood. In this study, we report the differential contributions of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), bacteria (AOB) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) to nitrification in four paddy soils from different geographic regions (Zi-Yang (ZY), Jiang-Du (JD), Lei-Zhou (LZ) and Jia-Xing (JX)) that are representative of the rice ecosystems in China. In urea-amended microcosms, nitrification activity varied greatly with 11.9, 9.46, 3.03 and 1.43 μg NO3−-N g−1 dry weight of soil per day in the ZY, JD, LZ and JX soils, respectively, over the course of a 56-day incubation period. Real-time quantitative PCR of amoA genes and pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes revealed significant increases in the AOA population to various extents, suggesting that their relative contributions to ammonia oxidation activity decreased from ZY to JD to LZ. The opposite trend was observed for AOB, and the JX soil stimulated only the AOB populations. DNA-based stable-isotope probing further demonstrated that active AOA numerically outcompeted their bacterial counterparts by 37.0-, 10.5- and 1.91-fold in 13C-DNA from ZY, JD and LZ soils, respectively, whereas AOB, but not AOA, were labeled in the JX soil during active nitrification. NOB were labeled to a much greater extent than AOA and AOB, and the addition of acetylene completely abolished the assimilation of 13CO2 by nitrifying populations. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that archaeal ammonia oxidation was predominantly catalyzed by soil fosmid 29i4-related AOA within the soil group 1.1b lineage. Nitrosospira cluster 3-like AOB performed most bacterial ammonia oxidation in the ZY, LZ and JX soils, whereas the majority of the 13C-AOB in the JD soil was affiliated with the Nitrosomona communis lineage. The 13C-NOB was overwhelmingly

  1. Inorganic Nitrate Promotes the Browning of White Adipose Tissue through the Nitrate-Nitrite-Nitric Oxide Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Lee D; Ashmore, Tom; Kotwica, Aleksandra O; Murfitt, Steven A; Fernandez, Bernadette O; Feelisch, Martin; Griffin, Julian L

    2015-01-01

    Inorganic nitrate was once considered an oxidation end-product of nitric oxide metabolism with little biological activity. However, recent studies have demonstrated that dietary nitrate can modulate mitochondrial function in man and is effective in reversing features of the metabolic syndrome in mice. Using a combined histological, metabolomics, and transcriptional and protein analysis approach we mechanistically define that nitrate not only increases the expression of thermogenic genes in brown-adipose tissue but also induces the expression of brown adipocyte-specific genes and proteins in white adipose tissue, substantially increasing oxygen consumption and fatty acid β-oxidation in adipocytes. Nitrate induces these phenotypic changes through a mechanism distinct from known physiological small molecule activators of browning, the recently identified nitrate-nitrite-nitric oxide pathway. The nitrate-induced browning effect was enhanced in hypoxia, a serious co-morbidity affecting white adipose tissue in obese individuals, and corrected impaired brown adipocyte-specific gene expression in white adipose tissue in a murine model of obesity. Since resulting beige/brite cells exhibit anti-obesity and anti-diabetic effects, nitrate may be an effective means of inducing the browning response in adipose tissue to treat the metabolic syndrome. PMID:25249574

  2. Nitrite and nitrate content in meat products and estimated intake in Denmark from 1998 to 2006.

    PubMed

    Leth, T; Fagt, S; Nielsen, S; Andersen, R

    2008-10-01

    The content of nitrite and nitrate in cured meat products has been monitored in Denmark seven times between 1995 and 2006. The maximum permitted added amounts of sodium nitrite in Denmark (60 mg kg(-1) for most products up to 150 mg kg(-1) for special products) have not been exceeded, except for a few samples back in 2002. The intake, mean and intake distribution of sodium nitrite have been calculated from 1998 to 2006 with data from the Danish dietary survey conducted in 2000-02 on Danes from four to 75 years of age. The amounts used by industry have been relatively stable through the whole period with levels varying between 6 and 20 mg sodium nitrite kg(-1) with sausages, meat for open sandwiches and salami-type sausages being the greatest contributors. The mean intake of sodium nitrate was around 1 mg day(-1), which is very low compared with the total intake of 61 mg day(-1). The mean intake of sodium nitrite was 0.017 and 0.014, 0.009 and 0.008, and 0.007 and 0.003 mg kg(-1) body weight day(-1) for men and women in the age groups 4-5, 6-14 and 15-75 years, respectively, which was much lower than the acceptable daily intake (ADI) of 0.09 mg kg(-1) body weight day(-1). The 99th percentile for the group of 4-year-olds was 0.107 and 0.123 mg kg(-1) body weight day(-1) for boys and girls, respectively, and the 95th percentile was 0.057 and 0.073 mg kg(-1) body weight day(-1) for boys and girls, respectively, highest for the girls. With fewer than 100 boys and girls in the 4-5-year age group, only very few persons were responsible for the high intake. The conversion of nitrate to nitrite in the saliva and the degradation of nitrite during production and storage must also be considered when evaluating the intake of nitrite. PMID:18608491

  3. The napF and narG Nitrate Reductase Operons in Escherichia coli Are Differentially Expressed in Response to Submicromolar Concentrations of Nitrate but Not Nitrite

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Henian; Tseng, Ching-Ping; Gunsalus, Robert P.

    1999-01-01

    Escherichia coli synthesizes two biochemically distinct nitrate reductase enzymes, a membrane-bound enzyme encoded by the narGHJI operon and a periplasmic cytochrome c-linked nitrate reductase encoded by the napFDAGHBC operon. To address why the cell makes these two enzymes, continuous cell culture techniques were used to examine napF and narG gene expression in response to different concentrations of nitrate and/or nitrite. Expression of the napF-lacZ and narG-lacZ reporter fusions in strains grown at different steady-state levels of nitrate revealed that the two nitrate reductase operons are differentially expressed in a complementary pattern. The napF operon apparently encodes a “low-substrate-induced” reductase that is maximally expressed only at low levels of nitrate. Expression is suppressed under high-nitrate conditions. In contrast, the narGHJI operon is only weakly expressed at low nitrate levels but is maximally expressed when nitrate is elevated. The narGHJI operon is therefore a “high-substrate-induced” operon that somehow provides a second and distinct role in nitrate metabolism by the cell. Interestingly, nitrite, the end product of each enzyme, had only a minor effect on the expression of either operon. Finally, nitrate, but not nitrite, was essential for repression of napF gene expression. These studies reveal that nitrate rather than nitrite is the primary signal that controls the expression of these two nitrate reductase operons in a differential and complementary fashion. In light of these findings, prior models for the roles of nitrate and nitrite in control of narG and napF expression must be reconsidered. PMID:10464201

  4. Autotrophic denitrification of nitrate and nitrite using thiosulfate as an electron donor.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jinwook; Amin, Khurram; Kim, Seungjin; Yoon, Seungjoon; Kwon, Kiwook; Bae, Wookeun

    2014-07-01

    This study was carried out to determine the possibility of autotrophic denitritation using thiosulfate as an electron donor, compare the kinetics of autotrophic denitrification and denitritation, and to study the effects of pH and sulfur/nitrogen (S/N) ratio on the denitrification rate of nitrite. Both nitrate and nitrite were removed by autotrophic denitrification using thiosulfate as an electron donor at concentrations up to 800 mg-N/L. Denitrification required a S/N ratio of 5.1 for complete denitrification, but denitritation was complete at a S/N ratio of 2.5, which indicated an electron donor cost savings of 50%. Also, pH during denitrification decreased but increased with nitrite, implying additional alkalinity savings. Finally, the highest specific substrate utilization rate of nitrite was slightly higher than that of nitrate reduction, and biomass yield for denitrification was relatively higher than that of denitritation, showing less sludge production and resulting in lower sludge handling costs. PMID:24755301

  5. Simultaneous ammonia and nitrate removal in an airlift reactor using poly(butylene succinate) as carbon source and biofilm carrier.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Yun-Jie; Deng, Ya-Le; Guo, Xi-Shan; Timmons, Michael B; Lu, Hui-Feng; Han, Zhi-Ying; Ye, Zhang-Ying; Shi, Ming-Ming; Zhu, Song-Ming

    2016-09-01

    In this study, an airlift inner-loop sequencing batch reactor using poly(butylene succinate) as the biofilm carrier and carbon source was operated under an alternant aerobic/anoxic strategy for nitrogen removal in recirculating aquaculture system. The average TAN and nitrate removal rates of 47.35±15.62gNH4-Nm(-3)d(-1) and 0.64±0.14kgNO3-Nm(-3)d(-1) were achieved with no obvious nitrite accumulation (0.70±0.76mg/L) and the dissolved organic carbon in effluents was maintained at 148.38±39.06mg/L. Besides, the activities of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium and sulfate reduction activities were successfully inhibited. The proteome KEGG analysis illustrated that ammonia might be removed through heterotrophic nitrification, while the activities of nitrate and nitrite reductases were enhanced through aeration treatment. The microbial community analysis revealed that denitrifiers of Azoarcus and Simplicispira occupied the dominate abundance which accounted for the high nitrate removal performance. Overall, this study broadened our understanding of simultaneous nitrification and denitrification using biodegradable material as biofilm carrier. PMID:27343453

  6. Susceptibility of Clostridium difficile to the food preservatives sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate and sodium metabisulphite.

    PubMed

    Lim, Su-Chen; Foster, Niki F; Riley, Thomas V

    2016-02-01

    Clostridium difficile is an important enteric pathogen of humans and food animals. Recently it has been isolated from retail foods with prevalences up to 42%, prompting concern that contaminated foods may be one of the reasons for increased community-acquired C. difficile infection (CA-CDI). A number of studies have examined the prevalence of C. difficile in raw meats and fresh vegetables; however, fewer studies have examined the prevalence of C. difficile in ready-to-eat meat. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro susceptibility of 11 C. difficile isolates of food animal and retail food origins to food preservatives commonly used in ready-to-eat meats. The broth microdilution method was used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) for sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate and sodium metabisulphite against C. difficile. Checkerboard assays were used to investigate the combined effect of sodium nitrite and sodium nitrate, commonly used in combination in meats. Modal MIC values for sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate and sodium metabisulphite were 250 μg/ml, >4000 μg/ml and 1000 μg/ml, respectively. No bactericidal activity was observed for all three food preservatives. The checkerboard assays showed indifferent interaction between sodium nitrite and sodium nitrate. This study demonstrated that C. difficile can survive in the presence of food preservatives at concentrations higher than the current maximum permitted levels allowed in ready-to-eat meats. The possibility of retail ready-to-eat meats contaminated with C. difficile acting as a source of CDI needs to be investigated. PMID:26700884

  7. Industrial use of molten nitrate/nitrite salts

    SciTech Connect

    Carling, R.W.; Mar, R.W.

    1981-12-01

    Nitrate salts have been used for years as a high-temperature heat transfer medium in the chemical and metal industries. This experience is often cited as an argument for the use of these salts in large-scale solar energy systems. However, this industrial experience has not been well documented and a study was carried out to provide such information to the solar community and to determine the applicability of this data base. Seven different industrial plants were visited and the plant operators were interviewed with regard to operating history and experience. In all cases the molten salt systems operate without problems. However, it is not possible to apply the base of industrial experience directly to solar thermal energy applications because of differences in operating temperature, salt composition, alloys used, and thermal/mechanical conditions.

  8. Inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes using natural antimicrobials in no-nitrate-or-nitrite-added ham.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Gary A; Jackson-Davis, Armitra L; Niebuhr, Steven E; Xi, Yuan; Schrader, Kohl D; Sebranek, Joseph G; Dickson, James S

    2012-06-01

    Consumer demand for foods manufactured without the direct addition of chemical preservatives, such as sodium nitrite and organic acid salts, has resulted in a unique class of "naturally" cured meat products. Formulation with a natural nitrate source and nitrate-reducing bacteria results in naturally cured processed meats that possess traits similar to conventionally cured meats. However, previous research has shown that the naturally cured products are more susceptible to pathogen growth. This study evaluated Listeria monocytogenes growth on ham manufactured with natural curing methods and with commercially available clean-label antimicrobials (cultured sugar and vinegar blend; lemon, cherry, and vinegar powder blend) and assessed impacts on physicochemical characteristics of the product. Hams made with either of the antimicrobials supported L. monocytogenes growth similar to that in the traditionally cured control (P > 0.05). Hams made with prefermented celery juice powder had the lowest residual nitrite concentrations (P < 0.05), and when no antimicrobial was added, L. monocytogenes growth was similar to that of the uncured control (P > 0.05). Aside from residual nitrite and nitrate concentrations, few physicochemical differences were identified. These findings show that ham can be produced with natural curing methods and antimicrobials to provide similar L. monocytogenes inhibition and physicochemical traits as in traditionally cured ham. PMID:22691474

  9. Nitrite survival and nitrous oxide production of denitrifying phosphorus removal sludges in long-term nitrite/nitrate-fed sequencing batch reactors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yayi; Zhou, Shuai; Ye, Liu; Wang, Hong; Stephenson, Tom; Jiang, Xuxin

    2014-12-15

    Nitrite-based phosphorus (P) removal could be useful for innovative biological P removal systems where energy and carbon savings are a priority. However, using nitrite for denitrification may cause nitrous oxide (N2O) accumulation and emissions. A denitrifying nitrite-fed P removal system [Formula: see text] was successfully set up in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) and was run for 210 days. The maximum pulse addition of nitrite to [Formula: see text] was 11 mg NO2(-)-N/L in the bulk, and a total of 34 mg NO2(-)-N/L of nitrite was added over three additions. Fluorescent in situ hybridization results indicated that the P-accumulating organisms (PAOs) abundance was 75 ± 1.1% in [Formula: see text] , approximately 13.6% higher than that in a parallel P removal SBR using nitrate [Formula: see text] . Type II Accumulibacter (PAOII) (unable to use nitrate as an electron acceptor) was the main PAOs species in [Formula: see text] , contributing 72% to total PAOs. Compared with [Formula: see text] , [Formula: see text] biomass had enhanced nitrite/free nitrous acid (FNA) endurance, as demonstrated by its higher nitrite denitrification and P uptake rates. N2O accumulated temporarily in [Formula: see text] after each pulse of nitrite. Peak N2O concentrations in the bulk for [Formula: see text] were generally 6-11 times higher than that in [Formula: see text] ; these accumulations were rapidly denitrified to nitrogen gases. N2O concentration increased rapidly in nitrate-cultivated biomass when 5 or 10 mg NO2(-)-N/L per pulse was added. Whereas, N2O accumulation did not occur in nitrite-cultivated biomass until up to 30 mg NO2(-)-N/L per pulse was added. Long-term acclimation to nitrite and pulse addition of nitrite in [Formula: see text] reduced the risk of nitrite accumulation, and mitigated N2O accumulation and emissions from denitrifying P removal by nitrite. PMID:25261626

  10. Control of hydrogen sulfide production in oil fields by managing microbial communities through nitrate or nitrite addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, Casey R. J.

    Nitrate or nitrite injection into oil reservoirs during water flooding has the potential to control biological souring, the production of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Souring control is essential because sulfide is toxic, sulfide precipitates can plug reservoir formations, souring lowers crude oil value, and SRB induce corrosion. Nitrate and nitrite can stimulate heterotrophic nitrate- or nitrite-reducing bacteria (hNRB) and nitrate- or nitrite-reducing, sulfide oxidizing bacteria (NRSOB). Nitrite also inhibits SRB activity by blocking the sulfate reduction pathway. Continuous up-flow packed-bed bioreactors were inoculated with produced water from the Coleville oil field to establish sulfide-producing biofilms similar to those found in sour reservoirs. Nitrate or nitrite addition to bioreactors indicated that the dose required for hNRB or NR-SOB to control souring depended on the concentration of oil organics. Either mechanism mediates the net removal of oil organics (lactate) with nitrate or nitrite, with lower doses of nitrate required due to its greater oxidative power. Microbial community analysis by reverse sample genome probing (RSGP) revealed that NR-SOB mediated sulfide removal at low nitrate or nitrite concentrations when lactate was still available to SRB and the redox potential was low. At high nitrate doses hNRB oxidized lactate directly, produced nitrite and maintained a high redox potential, thus excluding SRB activity. Facultatively chemolithotrophic Campylobacter sp. strains were isolated from the bioreactors and incorporated into RSGP analyses, revealing their dominance in both NR-SOB- and hNRB-containing communities. The metabolic flexibility of these strains may confer a competitive advantage over obligate chemolithotrophs like Thiomicrospira sp. strain CVO or hNRB that do not have NR-SOB activity like newly isolated Thauera sp. and Rhodobacter sp. strains. A single high dose of nitrite resulted in immediate

  11. Ammonium sorption and ammonia inhibition of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria explain contrasting soil N2O production.

    PubMed

    Venterea, Rodney T; Clough, Timothy J; Coulter, Jeffrey A; Breuillin-Sessoms, Florence; Wang, Ping; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Better understanding of process controls over nitrous oxide (N2O) production in urine-impacted 'hot spots' and fertilizer bands is needed to improve mitigation strategies and emission models. Following amendment with bovine (Bos taurus) urine (Bu) or urea (Ur), we measured inorganic N, pH, N2O, and genes associated with nitrification in two soils ('L' and 'W') having similar texture, pH, C, and C/N ratio. Solution-phase ammonia (slNH3) was also calculated accounting for non-linear ammonium (NH4(+)) sorption capacities (ASC). Soil W displayed greater nitrification rates and nitrate (NO3(-)) levels than soil L, but was more resistant to nitrite (NO2(-)) accumulation and produced two to ten times less N2O than soil L. Genes associated with NO2(-) oxidation (nxrA) increased substantially in soil W but remained static in soil L. Soil NO2(-) was strongly correlated with N2O production, and cumulative (c-) slNH3 explained 87% of the variance in c-NO2(-). Differences between soils were explained by greater slNH3 in soil L which inhibited NO2(-) oxidization leading to greater NO2(-) levels and N2O production. This is the first study to correlate the dynamics of soil slNH3, NO2(-), N2O and nitrifier genes, and the first to show how ASC can regulate NO2(-) levels and N2O production. PMID:26179972

  12. Ammonium sorption and ammonia inhibition of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria explain contrasting soil N2O production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venterea, R. T.; Sadowsky, M.; Breuillin-Sessoms, F.; Wang, P.; Clough, T. J.; Coulter, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Better understanding of process controls over nitrous oxide (N2O) production in urine-impacted 'hot spots' and fertilizer bands is needed to improve mitigation strategies and emission models. Following amendment with bovine (Bos taurus) urine (Bu) or urea (Ur), we measured inorganic N, pH, N2O, and genes associated with nitrification in two soils ('L' and 'W') having similar texture, pH, C, and C/N ratio. Solution-phase ammonia (slNH3) was also calculated accounting for non-linear ammonium (NH4+) sorption capacities (ASC). Soil W displayed greater nitrification rates and nitrate (NO3-) levels than soil L, but was more resistant to nitrite (NO2-) accumulation and produced two to ten times less N2O than soil L. Genes associated with NO2- oxidation (nxrA) increased substantially in soil W but remained static in soil L. Soil NO2- was strongly correlated with N2O production, and cumulative (c-) slNH3 explained 87% of the variance in c-NO2-. Differences between soils were explained by greater slNH3 in soil L which inhibited NO2- oxidization leading to greater NO2- levels and N2O production. This is the first study to correlate the dynamics of soil slNH3, NO2-, N2O and nitrifier genes, and the first to show how ASC can regulate NO2- levels and N2O production.

  13. Ammonium sorption and ammonia inhibition of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria explain contrasting soil N2O production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venterea, Rodney T.; Clough, Timothy J.; Coulter, Jeffrey A.; Breuillin-Sessoms, Florence

    2015-07-01

    Better understanding of process controls over nitrous oxide (N2O) production in urine-impacted ‘hot spots’ and fertilizer bands is needed to improve mitigation strategies and emission models. Following amendment with bovine (Bos taurus) urine (Bu) or urea (Ur), we measured inorganic N, pH, N2O, and genes associated with nitrification in two soils (‘L’ and ‘W’) having similar texture, pH, C, and C/N ratio. Solution-phase ammonia (slNH3) was also calculated accounting for non-linear ammonium (NH4+) sorption capacities (ASC). Soil W displayed greater nitrification rates and nitrate (NO3-) levels than soil L, but was more resistant to nitrite (NO2-) accumulation and produced two to ten times less N2O than soil L. Genes associated with NO2- oxidation (nxrA) increased substantially in soil W but remained static in soil L. Soil NO2- was strongly correlated with N2O production, and cumulative (c-) slNH3 explained 87% of the variance in c-NO2-. Differences between soils were explained by greater slNH3 in soil L which inhibited NO2- oxidization leading to greater NO2- levels and N2O production. This is the first study to correlate the dynamics of soil slNH3, NO2-, N2O and nitrifier genes, and the first to show how ASC can regulate NO2- levels and N2O production.

  14. Development of a method to manufacture uncured, no-nitrate/nitrite-added whole muscle jerky.

    PubMed

    Sindelar, Jeffrey J; Terns, Matthew J; Meyn, Elizabeth; Boles, Jane A

    2010-10-01

    "Natural curing" is accomplished by use of vegetable juice/powder high in naturally occurring nitrates combined with a nitrate reducing starter culture to result in indirectly "cured" products. Since the starter culture used is not water soluble, making "naturally cured" whole muscle jerky with current manufacturing techniques has been found ineffective. The objective was to investigate processes for whole muscle beef jerky that might provide cured meat characteristics similar to those of a nitrite-added control. Treatments where jerky was placed in a barrier bag during incubation were found to be the least similar to the nitrite-added control. Jerky placed in a 40.6 degrees C smokehouse during incubation resulted in significantly more (P<0.05) converted cured pigment than the barrier bag treatments but less (P<0.05) than the control. The processing methods investigated to manufacture "naturally cured" whole muscle jerky in this study were ineffective in resulting in products similar to those cured with sodium nitrite. PMID:20510525

  15. NasFED proteins mediate assimilatory nitrate and nitrite transport in Klebsiella oxytoca (pneumoniae) M5al.

    PubMed

    Wu, Q; Stewart, V

    1998-03-01

    Klebsiella oxytoca can use nitrate and nitrite as sole nitrogen sources. The enzymes required for nitrate and nitrite assimilation are encoded by the nasFEDCBA operon. We report here the complete nasFED sequence. Sequence comparisons indicate that the nasFED genes encode components of a conventional periplasmic binding protein-dependent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein (NasF), a homodimeric intrinsic membrane protein (NasE), and a homodimeric ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein (NasD). The NasF protein and the related NrtA and CmpA proteins of cyanobacteria contain leader (signal) sequences with the double-arginine motif that is hypothesized to direct prefolded proteins to an alternate protein export pathway. The NasE protein and the related NrtB and CmpB proteins of cyanobacteria contain unusual variants of the EAA loop sequence that defines membrane-intrinsic proteins of ABC transporters. To characterize nitrate and nitrite transport, we constructed in-frame nonpolar deletions of the chromosomal nasFED genes. Growth tests coupled with nitrate and nitrite uptake assays revealed that the nasFED genes are essential for nitrate transport and participate in nitrite transport as well. Interestingly, the delta nasF strain exhibited leaky phenotypes, particularly at elevated nitrate concentrations, suggesting that the NasED proteins are not fully dependent on the NasF protein. PMID:9495773

  16. NasFED Proteins Mediate Assimilatory Nitrate and Nitrite Transport in Klebsiella oxytoca (pneumoniae) M5al

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qitu; Stewart, Valley

    1998-01-01

    Klebsiella oxytoca can use nitrate and nitrite as sole nitrogen sources. The enzymes required for nitrate and nitrite assimilation are encoded by the nasFEDCBA operon. We report here the complete nasFED sequence. Sequence comparisons indicate that the nasFED genes encode components of a conventional periplasmic binding protein-dependent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein (NasF), a homodimeric intrinsic membrane protein (NasE), and a homodimeric ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein (NasD). The NasF protein and the related NrtA and CmpA proteins of cyanobacteria contain leader (signal) sequences with the double-arginine motif that is hypothesized to direct prefolded proteins to an alternate protein export pathway. The NasE protein and the related NrtB and CmpB proteins of cyanobacteria contain unusual variants of the EAA loop sequence that defines membrane-intrinsic proteins of ABC transporters. To characterize nitrate and nitrite transport, we constructed in-frame nonpolar deletions of the chromosomal nasFED genes. Growth tests coupled with nitrate and nitrite uptake assays revealed that the nasFED genes are essential for nitrate transport and participate in nitrite transport as well. Interestingly, the ΔnasF strain exhibited leaky phenotypes, particularly at elevated nitrate concentrations, suggesting that the NasED proteins are not fully dependent on the NasF protein. PMID:9495773

  17. Nitrite

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nitrite ; CASRN 14797 - 65 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects

  18. A high-throughput assay format for determination of nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase enzyme activities

    SciTech Connect

    McNally, N.; Liu, Xiang Yang; Choudary, P.V.

    1997-01-01

    The authors describe a microplate-based high-throughput procedure for rapid assay of the enzyme activities of nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase, using extremely small volumes of reagents. The new procedure offers the advantages of rapidity, small sample size-nanoliter volumes, low cost, and a dramatic increase in the throughput sample number that can be analyzed simultaneously. Additional advantages can be accessed by using microplate reader application software packages that permit assigning a group type to the wells, recording of the data on exportable data files and exercising the option of using the kinetic or endpoint reading modes. The assay can also be used independently for detecting nitrite residues/contamination in environmental/food samples. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Dynamics of corrosion rates associated with nitrite or nitrate mediated control of souring under biological conditions simulating an oil reservoir.

    PubMed

    Rempel, C L; Evitts, R W; Nemati, M

    2006-10-01

    Representative microbial cultures from an oil reservoir and electrochemical techniques including potentiodynamic scan and linear polarization were used to investigate the time dependent corrosion rate associated with control of biogenic sulphide production through addition of nitrite, nitrate and a combination of nitrate-reducing, sulphide-oxidizing bacteria (NR-SOB) and nitrate. The addition of nitrate alone did not prevent the biogenic production of sulphide but the produced sulphide was eventually oxidized and removed from the system. The addition of nitrate and NR-SOB had a similar effect on oxidation and removal of sulphide present in the system. However, as the addition of nitrate and NR-SOB was performed towards the end of sulphide production phase, the assessment of immediate impact was not possible. The addition of nitrite inhibited the biogenic production of sulphide immediately and led to removal of sulphide through nitrite mediated chemical oxidation of sulphide. The real time corrosion rate measurement revealed that in all three cases an acceleration in the corrosion rate occurred during the oxidation and removal of sulphide. Amendments of nitrate and NR-SOB or nitrate alone both gave rise to localized corrosion in the form of pits, with the maximum observed corrosion rates of 0.72 and 1.4 mm year(-1), respectively. The addition of nitrite also accelerated the corrosion rate but the maximum corrosion rate observed following nitrite addition was 0.3 mm year(-1). Furthermore, in the presence of nitrite the extent of pitting was not as high as those observed with other control methods. PMID:16758172

  20. The study of abiotic reduction of nitrate and nitrite in Boom Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariën, A.; Bleyen, N.; Aerts, S.; Valcke, E.

    In Belgium, Boom Clay is studied as a reference host rock for the geological disposal of high-level and intermediate-level radioactive waste. Compatibility studies at the SCK•CEN aim at investigating a perturbation of the capacity of Boom Clay to retard the migration of radionuclides to the biosphere, after disposal of Eurobitum bituminized radioactive waste in the clay ( Valcke et al., 2009; Aertsens et al., 2009; Bleyen et al., 2010). One of the geo-chemical perturbations is the possible oxidation of Boom Clay by the large amounts of nitrate that will be released by Eurobitum. A more oxidised Boom Clay could have a lower reducing capacity towards redox sensitive radionuclides, possibly enhancing their migration. As the conditions in the Boom Clay formation around a disposal gallery for Eurobitum are far from optimal for the growth of prokaryotes (limited space in the far-field, high pH in the near-field, gamma radiation by the waste during the first ∼300 years (effect limited to the primary and secondary waste package)), the impact of microbially mediated reduction of nitrate and nitrite is unclear. Therefore, batch tests are performed at the SCK•CEN to study whether nitrate and nitrite can directly oxidise the main redoxactive components of Boom Clay (dissolved organic matter, kerogen, pyrite) without the mediation of prokaryotes. In a first series of batch tests, which are reported in this paper, the activity of denitrifying and nitrate reducing prokaryotes was inhibited by the addition of NaN 3. NaN 3 revealed to be an efficient inhibitor for these prokaryotes without affecting considerably the geochemistry of Boom Clay and/or Boom Clay pore water. Neither in batch tests with the Boom Clay slurries (with NaNO 3 (0.1 and 1 M) or NaNO 2 (0.1 M)) and with Boom Clay water (with 0.05 and 0.2 M NaNO 3) a pure chemical nitrate or nitrite reduction was observed after respectively 3, 7 and 17 weeks and 1 year (Boom Clay slurries) and about 2 years (Boom Clay

  1. Nitrite oxidation in the Namibian oxygen minimum zone

    PubMed Central

    Füssel, Jessika; Lam, Phyllis; Lavik, Gaute; Jensen, Marlene M; Holtappels, Moritz; Günter, Marcel; Kuypers, Marcel MM

    2012-01-01

    Nitrite oxidation is the second step of nitrification. It is the primary source of oceanic nitrate, the predominant form of bioavailable nitrogen in the ocean. Despite its obvious importance, nitrite oxidation has rarely been investigated in marine settings. We determined nitrite oxidation rates directly in 15N-incubation experiments and compared the rates with those of nitrate reduction to nitrite, ammonia oxidation, anammox, denitrification, as well as dissimilatory nitrate/nitrite reduction to ammonium in the Namibian oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). Nitrite oxidation (⩽372 nM NO2− d−1) was detected throughout the OMZ even when in situ oxygen concentrations were low to non-detectable. Nitrite oxidation rates often exceeded ammonia oxidation rates, whereas nitrate reduction served as an alternative and significant source of nitrite. Nitrite oxidation and anammox co-occurred in these oxygen-deficient waters, suggesting that nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) likely compete with anammox bacteria for nitrite when substrate availability became low. Among all of the known NOB genera targeted via catalyzed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization, only Nitrospina and Nitrococcus were detectable in the Namibian OMZ samples investigated. These NOB were abundant throughout the OMZ and contributed up to ∼9% of total microbial community. Our combined results reveal that a considerable fraction of the recently recycled nitrogen or reduced NO3− was re-oxidized back to NO3− via nitrite oxidation, instead of being lost from the system through the anammox or denitrification pathways. PMID:22170426

  2. Thyroid cancer risk and dietary nitrate and nitrite intake in the Shanghai Women’s Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Aschebrook-Kilfoy, Briseis; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Gao, Yu-Tang; Ji, Bu-Tian; Yang, Gong; Li, Hong Lan; Rothman, Nathaniel; Chow, Wong-Ho; Zheng, Wei; Ward, Mary H.

    2012-01-01

    Nitrate and nitrite are precursors in the endogenous formation of N-nitroso compounds and nitrate can disrupt thyroid homeostasis by inhibiting iodide uptake. We evaluated nitrate and nitrite intake and risk of thyroid cancer in the Shanghai Women’s Health Study that included 73,317 women, aged 40–70 years enrolled in 1996–2000. Dietary intake was assessed at baseline using a food frequency questionnaire. During approximately 11 years of follow-up, 164 incident thyroid cancer cases with complete dietary information were identified. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate relatives risks (RRs). We determined the nitrate and nitrite contents of foods using values from the published literature and focusing on regional values for Chinese foods. Nitrate intake was not associated with thyroid cancer risk (RRQ4 = 0.93; 95%CI: 0.42–2.07; p for trend = 0.40). Compared with the lowest quartile, women with the highest dietary nitrite intake had about a two-fold risk of thyroid cancer (RRQ4 = 2.05; 95%CI: 1.20–3.51;) but there was not a monotonic trend with increasing intake (p for trend= 0.36). The trend with increasing nitrite intake from animal sources was significant (p for trend = 0.02) and was stronger for nitrite from processed meats (RRQ4 = 1.96; 95%CI: 1.28–2.99; p for trend <0.01). Although we did not observe an association for nitrate as hypothesized, our results suggest that women consuming higher levels of nitrite from animal sources, particularly from processed meat, may have an increased risk of thyroid cancer. PMID:22674227

  3. Z-Selective Ruthenium Metathesis Catalysts: Comparison of Nitrate and Nitrite X-type Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Pribisko, Melanie A.; Ahmed, Tonia S.; Grubbs, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    Two new Ru-based metathesis catalysts, 3 and 4, have been synthesized for the purpose of comparing their catalytic properties to those of their cis-selective nitrate analogues, 1 and 2. Although catalysts 3 and 4 exhibited slower initiation rates than 1 and 2, they maintained high cis-selectivity in homodimerization and ring-opening metathesis polymerization reactions. Furthermore, the nitrite catalysts displayed higher cis-selectivity than 2 for ring-opening metathesis polymerizations, and 4 delivered higher yields of polymer. PMID:25484484

  4. Dissimilatory reduction of nitrate and nitrite in the bovine rumen: nitrous oxide production and effect of acetylene.

    PubMed Central

    Kaspar, H F; Tiedje, J M

    1981-01-01

    15N tracer methods and gas chromatography coupled to an electron capture detector were used to investigate dissimilatory reduction of nitrate and nitrite by the rumen microbiota of a fistulated cow. Ammonium was the only 15N-labeled end product of quantitative significance. Only traces of nitrous oxide were detected as a product of nitrate reduction; but in experiments with nitrite, up to 0.3% of the added nitrogen accumulated as nitrous oxide, but it was not further reduced. Furthermore, when 13NO3- was incubated with rumen microbiota virtually no [13N]N2 was produced. Acetylene partially inhibited the reduction of nitrite to ammonium as well as the formation of nitrous oxide. It is suggested that in the rumen ecosystem nitrous oxide is a byproduct of dissimilatory nitrite reduction to ammonium rather than a product of denitrification and that the latter process is absent from the rumen habitat. PMID:7224631

  5. Nitrite- and Nitrate-Dependent Methanotrophs - Environmental Detection and Relevance in Freshwater Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettwig, K. F.

    2014-12-01

    Humans continue to have an enormous impact on global C and N cycles. While a clear stimulation of methane emissions through human activities is evident, the role of also increasingly released nitrogenous compounds as electron acceptors for microbial methane oxidation is not well constrained. We have developed diverse methods for environmental detection of nitrate(NO3-)- and - predominantly - nitrite(NO2-)-dependent methanotrophs, which have been applied to several freshwater environments. In contrast to most metabolically flexible heterotrophic denitrifiers, the microorganisms responsible for methane-dependent nitrate/nitrite reduction seem to be specialized to use methane only, grow slowly and employ pathways different from each other and from model organisms, which necessitate new approaches for the assessment of their environmental relevance. Nitrite-dependent methane oxidation is carried out by bacteria of the NC10 phylum, whereas nitrate-dependent methane oxidizers are close relatives of methanogenic archaea and sulfate-dependent anaerobic methanotrophs (ANME-2). Laboratory enrichment cultures of the nitrite-reducing methanotroph Methylomirabilis oxyfera (NC10 phylum) have formed the basis for its genetic and physiological characterization and the development of several independent methods for its sensitive detection. M. oxyfera differs from all known microorganisms by encoding an incomplete denitrification pathway, in which the last 2 steps, the reduction of NO via N2O to N2, apparently is replaced by the dismutation of NO to N2 and O2. The intracellularly produced O2 is used for methane oxidation via a methane monooxygenase, analogously to the phylogenetically unrelated proteobacterial methanotrophs. But unlike in proteobacteria, C is not assimilated from methane, but rather CO2, with important consequences for the interpretation of environmental isotope labelling studies. In addition, M. oxyfera is characterized by a distinct PLFA profile, including

  6. Hydrogen Bonding Networks Tune Proton-Coupled Redox Steps during the Enzymatic Six-Electron Conversion of Nitrite to Ammonia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Multielectron multiproton reactions play an important role in both biological systems and chemical reactions involved in energy storage and manipulation. A key strategy employed by nature in achieving such complex chemistry is the use of proton-coupled redox steps. Cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR) catalyzes the six-electron seven-proton reduction of nitrite to ammonia. While a catalytic mechanism for ccNiR has been proposed on the basis of studies combining computation and crystallography, there have been few studies directly addressing the nature of the proton-coupled events that are predicted to occur along the nitrite reduction pathway. Here we use protein film voltammetry to directly interrogate the proton-coupled steps that occur during nitrite reduction by ccNiR. We find that conversion of nitrite to ammonia by ccNiR adsorbed to graphite electrodes is defined by two distinct phases; one is proton-coupled, and the other is not. Mutation of key active site residues (H257, R103, and Y206) modulates these phases and specifically alters the properties of the detected proton-dependent step but does not inhibit the ability of ccNiR to conduct the full reduction of nitrite to ammonia. We conclude that the active site residues examined are responsible for tuning the protonation steps that occur during catalysis, likely through an extensive hydrogen bonding network, but are not necessarily required for the reaction to proceed. These results provide important insight into how enzymes can specifically tune proton- and electron transfer steps to achieve high turnover numbers in a physiological pH range. PMID:25137350

  7. Plasma arginine and urinary nitrate and nitrite excretion in bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Heckmann, M; Kreuder, J; Riechers, K; Tsikas, D; Boedeker, R-H; Reiss, I; Gortner, L

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to determine whether preterm infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and signs of increased pulmonary artery pressure have a deficiency of plasma arginine (ARG) and systemic nitric oxide (NO) synthesis. Plasma amino acid concentrations, Doppler pulmonary systolic time intervals (ratio of acceleration time and ejection time corrected for heart rate: AT/ET(C)) and urinary nitrate and nitrite concentrations were determined at the 28th day postnatal age and at 36 weeks postmenstrual age in 73 preterm infants less than 30 weeks gestational age. The AT/ET(C) ratios were significantly lower in infants with BPD (n = 32) compared to controls. However, total amino acid concentrations, ARG intake as well as plasma ARG concentrations were not different between groups (median (interquartile-range) micromol/l): control: 58 (42.5-75.5) and 54.5 (42-71) at day 28 and 36 weeks; BPD: 54.5 (31.5-70.5) and 43 (35-62), respectively. Urinary nitrate and nitrite concentrations, were not different between groups at day 28, but significantly higher in infants with BPD at 36 weeks (p = 0.014). In conclusion, plasma ARG concentrations and systemic NO synthesis were not deficient in preterm infants with BPD and signs of elevated pulmonary artery pressure. PMID:14671435

  8. Correlation of plasma nitrite/nitrate levels and inducible nitric oxide gene expression among women with cervical abnormalities and cancer.

    PubMed

    Sowjanya, A Pavani; Rao, Meera; Vedantham, Haripriya; Kalpana, Basany; Poli, Usha Rani; Marks, Morgan A; Sujatha, M

    2016-01-30

    Cervical cancer is caused by infection with high risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV). Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), a soluble factor involved in chronic inflammation, may modulate cervical cancer risk among HPV infected women. The aim of the study was to measure and correlate plasma nitrite/nitrate levels with tissue specific expression of iNOS mRNA among women with different grades of cervical lesions and cervical cancer. Tissue biopsy and plasma specimens were collected from 120 women with cervical neoplasia or cancer (ASCUS, LSIL, HSIL and invasive cancer) and 35 women without cervical abnormalities. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA from biopsy and plasma nitrite/nitrate levels of the same study subjects were measured. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis was performed on the promoter region and Ser608Leu (rs2297518) in exon 16 of the iNOS gene. Differences in iNOS gene expression and plasma nitrite/nitrate levels were compared across disease stage using linear and logistic regression analysis. Compared to normal controls, women diagnosed with HSIL or invasive cancer had a significantly higher concentration of plasma nitrite/nitrate and a higher median fold-change in iNOS mRNA gene expression. Genotyping of the promoter region showed three different variations: A pentanucleotide repeat (CCTTT) n, -1026T > G (rs2779249) and a novel variant -1153T > A. These variants were associated with increased levels of plasma nitrite/nitrate across all disease stages. The higher expression of iNOS mRNA and plasma nitrite/nitrate among women with pre-cancerous lesions suggests a role for nitric oxide in the natural history of cervical cancer. PMID:26435258

  9. Effect of Nitrite and Nitrate Concentrations on the Performance of AFB-MFC Enriched with High-Strength Synthetic Wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jian-sheng; Yang, Ping; Li, Chong-ming; Guo, Yong; Lai, Bo; Wang, Ye; Feng, Li; Zhang, Yun

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the effect of nitrite and nitrate on the performance of microbial fuel cell, a system combining an anaerobic fluidized bed (AFB) and a microbial fuel cell (MFC) was employed for high-strength nitrogen-containing synthetic wastewater treatment. Before this study, the AFB-MFC had been used to treat high-strength organic wastewater for about one year in a continuous flow mode. The results showed that when the concentrations of nitrite nitrogen and nitrate nitrogen were increased from 1700 mg/L to 4045 mg/L and 545 mg/L to 1427 mg/L, respectively, the nitrite nitrogen and nitrate nitrogen removal efficiencies were both above 99%; the COD removal efficiency went up from 60.00% to 88.95%; the voltage was about 375 ± 15 mV while the power density was at 70 ± 5 mW/m2. However, when the concentrations of nitrite nitrogen and nitrate nitrogen were above 4045 mg/L and 1427 mg/L, respectively, the removal of nitrite nitrogen, nitrate nitrogen, COD, voltage, and power density were decreased to be 86%, 88%, 77%, 180 mV, and 17 mW/m2 when nitrite nitrogen and nitrate nitrogen were increased to 4265 mg/L and 1661 mg/L. In addition, the composition of biogas generated in the anode chamber was analyzed by a gas chromatograph. Nitrogen gas, methane, and carbon dioxide were obtained. The results indicated that denitrification happened in anode chamber. PMID:26495144

  10. Gastric S-nitrosothiol formation drives the antihypertensive effects of oral sodium nitrite and nitrate in a rat model of renovascular hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Lucas C; Amaral, Jefferson H; Ferreira, Graziele C; Portella, Rafael L; Ceron, Carla S; Montenegro, Marcelo F; Toledo, Jose Carlos; Tanus-Santos, Jose E

    2015-10-01

    Many effects of nitrite and nitrate are attributed to increased circulating concentrations of nitrite, ultimately converted into nitric oxide (NO(•)) in the circulation or in tissues by mechanisms associated with nitrite reductase activity. However, nitrite generates NO(•) , nitrous anhydride, and other nitrosating species at low pH, and these reactions promote S-nitrosothiol formation when nitrites are in the stomach. We hypothesized that the antihypertensive effects of orally administered nitrite or nitrate involve the formation of S-nitrosothiols, and that those effects depend on gastric pH. The chronic effects of oral nitrite or nitrate were studied in two-kidney, one-clip (2K1C) hypertensive rats treated with omeprazole (or vehicle). Oral nitrite lowered blood pressure and increased plasma S-nitrosothiol concentrations independently of circulating nitrite levels. Increasing gastric pH with omeprazole did not affect the increases in plasma nitrite and nitrate levels found after treatment with nitrite. However, treatment with omeprazole severely attenuated the increases in plasma S-nitrosothiol concentrations and completely blunted the antihypertensive effects of nitrite. Confirming these findings, very similar results were found with oral nitrate. To further confirm the role of gastric S-nitrosothiol formation, we studied the effects of oral nitrite in hypertensive rats treated with the glutathione synthase inhibitor buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) to induce partial thiol depletion. BSO treatment attenuated the increases in S-nitrosothiol concentrations and antihypertensive effects of oral nitrite. These data show that gastric S-nitrosothiol formation drives the antihypertensive effects of oral nitrite or nitrate and has major implications, particularly to patients taking proton pump inhibitors. PMID:26159506

  11. Isolated and combined exposure to ammonia and nitrite in giant freshwater pawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii): effects on the oxidative stress, antioxidant enzymatic activities and apoptosis in haemocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yufan; Ye, Chaoxia; Wang, Anli; Zhu, Xuan; Chen, Changhong; Xian, Jianan; Sun, Zhenzhu

    2015-10-01

    The residual contaminators such as ammonia and nitrite are widely considered as relevant sources of aquatic environmental pollutants, posing a great threat to shrimp survival. To study the toxicological effects of ammonia and nitrite exposure on the innate immune response in invertebrates, we investigated the oxidative stress and apoptosis in haemocytes of freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) under isolated and combined exposure to ammonia and nitrite in order to provide useful information about adult prawn immune responses. M. rosenbergii (13.44 ± 2.75 g) were exposed to 0, 5, and 25 mg/L total ammonia-N (TAN) and 0, 5, and 20 mg/L nitrite-N for 24 h. All ammonia concentrations were combined with all nitrite concentrations, making a total of nine treatments studied. Following the exposure treatment, antioxidant enzyme activity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, nitric oxide (NO) generation, and apoptotic cell ratio of haemocytes were measured using flow cytometry. Results indicated that ROS generation was sensitive to the combined effect of ammonia and nitrite, which subsequently affected the Cu-Zn SOD activity. In addition, CAT showed the highest activity at 5 mg/L TAN while GPx decreased at 5 mg/L TAN and returned towards baseline at 25 mg/L. NO generation synchronized with the apoptotic cell ratio in haemocytes, indicating that NO production was closely associated with programmed cell death. Both NO production and apoptotic ratios significantly decreased following 25 mg/L TAN, which may be due to the antagonistic regulation of NO and GPx. We hypothesized that the toxicological effect of nitrite exhibited less change in physiological changes compared to that of ammonia, because of the high tolerance to nitrite exposure in mature M. rosenbergii and/or the competitive effects of chloride ions. Taken together, these results showed that ammonia and nitrite caused a series of combined oxidative stress and apoptosis in M. rosenbergi, but further

  12. Ammonium sorption and ammonia inhibition of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria explain contrasting soil N2O production

    PubMed Central

    Venterea, Rodney T.; Clough, Timothy J.; Coulter, Jeffrey A.; Breuillin-Sessoms, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Better understanding of process controls over nitrous oxide (N2O) production in urine-impacted ‘hot spots’ and fertilizer bands is needed to improve mitigation strategies and emission models. Following amendment with bovine (Bos taurus) urine (Bu) or urea (Ur), we measured inorganic N, pH, N2O, and genes associated with nitrification in two soils (‘L’ and ‘W’) having similar texture, pH, C, and C/N ratio. Solution-phase ammonia (slNH3) was also calculated accounting for non-linear ammonium (NH4+) sorption capacities (ASC). Soil W displayed greater nitrification rates and nitrate (NO3−) levels than soil L, but was more resistant to nitrite (NO2−) accumulation and produced two to ten times less N2O than soil L. Genes associated with NO2− oxidation (nxrA) increased substantially in soil W but remained static in soil L. Soil NO2− was strongly correlated with N2O production, and cumulative (c-) slNH3 explained 87% of the variance in c-NO2−. Differences between soils were explained by greater slNH3 in soil L which inhibited NO2− oxidization leading to greater NO2− levels and N2O production. This is the first study to correlate the dynamics of soil slNH3, NO2−, N2O and nitrifier genes, and the first to show how ASC can regulate NO2− levels and N2O production. PMID:26179972

  13. Determination of nitrate and nitrite in Hanford defense waste(HDW) by reverse polarity capillary zone electrophoresis (RPCE)method

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalf, S.G.

    1998-06-10

    This paper describes the first application of reverse polarity capillary zone electrophoresis (RPCE) for rapid and accurate determination of nitrate and nitrite in Hanford Defense Waste (HDW). The method development was carried out by using Synthetic Hanford Waste (SHW), followed by the analysis of 4 real HDW samples. Hexamethonium bromide (HMB) was used as electroosmotic flow modifier in borate buffer at pH 9.2 to decrease the electroosmotic flow (EOF) in order to enhance the speed of analysis and the resolution of nitrate and nitrite in high ionic strength HDW samples. The application of this capillary zone electrophoresis method, when compared with ion chromatography for two major components of HDW, nitrate and nitrite slightly reduced analysis time, eliminated most pre-analysis handling of the highly radioactive sample, and cut analysis wastes by more than 2 orders of magnitude. The analysis of real HDW samples that were validated by using sample spikes showed a concentration range of 1.03 to 1.42 M for both nitrate. The migration times of the real HDW and the spiked HDW samples were within a precision of less than 3% relative standard deviation. The selectivity ratio test used for peak confirmation of the spiked samples was within 96% of the real sample. Method reliability was tested by spiking the matrix with 72.4 mM nitrate and nitrite. Recoveries for these spiked samples were 93-103%.

  14. Effect of omeprazole on intragastric bacterial counts, nitrates, nitrites, and N-nitroso compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Verdu, E; Viani, F; Armstrong, D; Fraser, R; Siegrist, H H; Pignatelli, B; Idström, J P; Cederberg, C; Blum, A L; Fried, M

    1994-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that profound inhibition of gastric acid secretion may increase exposure to potentially carcinogenic N-nitroso compounds. The aim of this study was to find out if the proton pump inhibitor omeprazole (20 mg daily) is associated with increased concentrations of potentially carcinogenic N-nitroso compounds in gastric juice. The volume of gastric contents, number of bacteria, and concentrations of nitrates, nitrites, and N-nitroso compounds was determined in gastric aspirates obtained after an overnight fast in 14 healthy volunteers (7M:7F) after one week of treatment with placebo, and one and two weeks' treatment with omeprazole. Median bacterial concentrations were 1.0 x 10(4) (range 5.0 x 10(3)-5.0 x 10(6)) colony forming units (CFU)/ml after one weeks' treatment with placebo and increased significantly to 4.0 x 10(5) (0-3.3 x 10(7)) CFU/ml after two weeks' treatment with omeprazole (p < 0.05). A similar increase was seen in the concentration of nitrate reducing bacteria. There was no difference in the volume of gastric aspirates after treatment with omeprazole when compared with placebo (65 (29-155) ml v 42 (19-194) ml). The concentration of N-nitroso compounds was 0.13 (0-1.0) mumol/l after two weeks of omeprazole, which was not significantly different from that seen with placebo (0.15 (0-0.61) mumol/l). There was also no increase in the concentrations of nitrates or nitrites. It is concluded that omeprazole (20 mg once daily) for two weeks in healthy volunteers is associated with gastric bacterial proliferation but does not increase concentrations of N-nitroso compounds. PMID:8174980

  15. Successful application of nitritation/anammox to wastewater with elevated organic carbon to ammonia ratios.

    PubMed

    Jenni, Sarina; Vlaeminck, Siegfried E; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Udert, Kai M

    2014-02-01

    The nitritation/anammox process has been mainly applied to high-strength nitrogenous wastewaters with very low biodegradable organic carbon content (<0.5 g COD∙g N(-1)). However, several wastewaters have biodegradable organic carbon to nitrogen (COD/N) ratios between 0.5 and 1.7 g COD∙g N(-1) and thus, contain elevated amounts of organic carbon but not enough for heterotrophic denitrification. In this study, the influence of elevated COD/N ratios was studied on a nitritation/anammox process with suspended sludge. In a step-wise manner, the influent COD/N ratio was increased to 1.4 g COD∙g N(-1) by supplementing digester supernatant with acetate. The increasing availability of COD led to an increase of the nitrogen removal efficiency from around 85% with pure digester supernatant to >95% with added acetate while the nitrogen elimination rate stayed constant (275 ± 40 mg N∙L(-1)∙d(-1)). Anammox activity and abundance of anammox bacteria (AMX) were strongly correlated, and with increasing influent COD/N ratio both decreased steadily. At the same time, heterotrophic denitrification with nitrite and the activity of ammonia oxidising bacteria (AOB) gradually increased. Simultaneously, the sludge retention time (SRT) decreased significantly with increasing COD loading to about 15 d and reached critical values for the slowly growing AMX. When the SRT was increased by reducing biomass loss with the effluent, AMX activity and abundance started to rise again, while the AOB activity remained unaltered. Fluorescent in-situ hybridisation (FISH) showed that the initial AMX community shifted within only 40 d from a mixed AMX community to "Candidatus Brocadia fulgida" as the dominant AMX type with an influent COD/N ratio of 0.8 g COD∙g N(-1) and higher. "Ca. Brocadia fulgida" is known to oxidise acetate, and its ability to outcompete other types of AMX indicates that AMX participated in acetate oxidation. In a later phase, glucose was added to the influent

  16. Epithelial ovarian cancer and exposure to dietary nitrate and nitrite in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Aschebrook-Kilfoy, Briseis; Ward, Mary H.; Gierach, Gretchen L.; Schatzkin, Arthur; Hollenbeck, Albert R.; Sinha, Rashmi; Cross, Amanda J.

    2012-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a leading cause of cancer death among women in the United States and it has the highest mortality rate of all gynecologic cancers. Internationally, there is a five-fold variation in incidence and mortality of ovarian cancer, which suggests a role for environmental factors, including diet. Nitrate and nitrite are found in various food items and they are precursors of N-nitroso compounds, which are known carcinogens in animal models. We evaluated dietary nitrate and nitrite intake and epithelial ovarian cancer in the National Institutes of Health (NIH)-AARP Diet and Health Study, including 151 316 women aged 50–71 years at the time of the baseline questionnaire in 1995–1996. The nitrate and nitrite intake was assessed using a 124-item validated food frequency questionnaire. Through 31 December 2006, 709 incident epithelial ovarian cancer cases with complete dietary information were identified. Using Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), women in the highest intake quintile of dietary nitrate had a 31% increased risk (95% CI: 1.01–1.68) of epithelial ovarian cancer, compared with those in the lowest intake quintile. Although there was no association for total dietary nitrite, those in the highest intake category of animal sources of nitrite had a 34% increased risk (95% CI: 1.05–1.69) of ovarian cancer. There were no clear differences in risk by histologic subtype of ovarian cancer. Our findings suggest that a role of dietary nitrate and nitrite in ovarian cancer risk should be followed in other large cohort studies. PMID:21934624

  17. Urinary nitrite/nitrate ratio measured by isotope-dilution LC-MS/MS as a tool to screen for urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Chao, Mu-Rong; Shih, Ying-Ming; Hsu, Yu-Wen; Liu, Hung-Hsin; Chang, Yuan-Jhe; Lin, Bo-Huei; Hu, Chiung-Wen

    2016-04-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the most common type of nosocomial infection. Traditionally, the presence of white blood cells and microorganisms in the urine provides objective evidence for UTI diagnosis. Here, we describe the use of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to measure the nitrite and nitrate levels in urine and investigate the potential of this method for UTI diagnosis. LC-MS/MS analysis was performed in positive electrospray ionization mode. After adding (15)N-labeled internal standards and derivatizing with 2,3-diaminonaphthalene (DAN), the urinary nitrite content was directly analyzed by LC-MS/MS, whereas the urinary nitrate was first reduced to nitrite before derivatization and LC-MS/MS analysis. The derivatization of nitrite and enzymatic reduction of nitrate were optimized. This method was then applied to 241 healthy subjects and 73 UTI patients. Optimization tests revealed that 1 mL of crude urine required at least 6.25 μmol of DAN to completely derivatize nitrite and 2.5 U of nitrate reductase to completely reduce nitrate to nitrite. Urinary analysis showed that the urinary concentration of nitrite and the nitrite/nitrate ratio were higher in UTI patients than in healthy subjects. Compared with the dipstick-based urinary nitrite test and using LC-MS/MS to determine the nitrite concentration (sensitivity: 23-25%), the nitrite/nitrate ratio was significantly more sensitive (95%) and exhibited a satisfactory specificity (91%) in the screening of UTIs. Taken together, the nitrite/nitrate ratio, which reflects the reducing ability of pathogenic bacteria, could be a better method for the diagnosis of UTIs that is not subject to variations in urine specimen quality. PMID:26829019

  18. Effects of Nitrite, Chlorate, and Chlorite on Nitrate Uptake and Nitrate Reductase Activity 1

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqi, M. Yaeesh; King, Bryan J.; Glass, Anthony D. M.

    1992-01-01

    Effects of NO2−, ClO3−, and ClO2− on the induction of nitrate transport and nitrate reductase activity (NRA) as well as their effects on NO3− influx into roots of intact barley (Hordeum vulgare cv Klondike) seedlings were investigated. A 24-h pretreatment with 0.1 mol m−3 NO2− fully induced NO3− transport but failed to induce NRA. Similar pretreatments with ClO3− and ClO2− induced neither NO3− transport nor NRA. Net ClO3− uptake was induced by NO3− but not by ClO3− itself, indicating that NO3− and ClO3− transport occur via the NO3− carrier. At the uptake step, NO2− and ClO2− strongly inhibited NO3− influx; the former exhibited classical competitive kinetics, whereas the latter exhibited complex mixed-type kinetics. ClO3− proved to be a weak inhibitor of NO3− influx (Ki = 16 mol m−3) in a noncompetitive manner. The implications of these findings are discussed in the context of the suitability of these NO3− analogs as screening agents for the isolation of mutants defective in NO3− transport. PMID:16653041

  19. Dissociation Enthalpies of Chloride Adducts of Nitrate and Nitrite Explosives Determined by Ion Mobility Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rajapakse, Maneeshin Y; Fowler, Peter E; Eiceman, Gary A; Stone, John A

    2016-02-11

    The kinetics for thermal dissociations of the chloride adducts of the nitrate explosives 1,3-dinitroglycerin (1,3-NG), 1,2-dinitroglycerin (1,2-NG), the nitrite explosive 3,4-dinitrotoluene (3,4-DNT), and the explosive taggant 2,3-dimethyl-2,3-dinitrobutane (DMNB) have been studied by atmospheric pressure ion mobility spectrometry. Both 1,3-NG·Cl(-) and1,2-NG·Cl(-) decompose in a gas-phase SN2 reaction in which Cl(-) displaces NO3(-) while 3,4-DNT·Cl(-) and DMNB·Cl(-) decompose by loss of Cl(-). The determined activation energy (kJ mol(-1)) and pre-exponential factor (s(-1)) values for the dissociations respectively are 1,3-NG·Cl(-), 86 ± 2 and 2.2 × 10(12); 1,2-NG·Cl(-), 97 ± 2 and 3.5 × 10(12); 3,4-DNT·Cl(-), 81 ± 2 and 4.8 × 10(13); and DMNB·Cl(-), 68 ± 2 and 9.7 × 10(11). Calculations by density functional theory show the structures of the nitrate ester adducts involve three hydrogen bonds: one from the hydroxyl group and the other two from the two nitrated carbons. The relative Cl(-) dissociation energies of the nitrates together with the previously reported smaller value for glycerol trinitrate and the calculated highest value for glycerol 1-mononitrate are explicable in terms of the number of hydroxyl hydrogen bond participants. The theoretical enthalpy changes for the nitrate ester displacement reactions are in agreement with those derived from the experimental activation energies but considerably higher for the nitro compounds. PMID:26777731

  20. Development of a cost-effective method for nitrate and nitrite determination in leafy plants and nitrate and nitrite contents of some green leafy vegetables grown in the Aegean region of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ozdestan, Ozgül; Uren, Ali

    2010-05-12

    An accurate, fast, easily applicable, and cost-effective method for the determination of nitrate and nitrite was developed. This method was much more reliable than the cadmium column reduction method, which is a tedious and time-consuming procedure and not easily applicable. The principle of the method was reduction of nitrate to nitrite with cadmium acetate solution and zinc powder and then treatment with Griess reagent. Recovery of the method changed from 92.9 to 102.8%, and detection limit was found as 31.4 mg/kg. Coefficient of variation was 3.16% for intraday precision. Nitrate and nitrite contents of 10 types of leafy vegetables native to the Aegean region of Turkey were determined. Wild radish, chicory, fennel, blessed thistle, blue mallow, and chard were analyzed for the first time. Nitrate contents were found between 354.8 mg/kg for iceberg lettuce and 4653 mg/kg for wild radish. Tested vegetables contained <26.33 mg/kg nitrite. PMID:20384339

  1. Denitrification of high concentrations of nitrites and nitrates in synthetic medium with different sources of organic carbon. III. Methanol.

    PubMed

    Błaszczyk, M; Gałka, E; Sakowicz, E; Mycielski, R

    1985-01-01

    The denitrification of nitrites and nitrates (1000 mg N/l) in medium containing methanol as a source of organic carbon was studied. Continuous cultures of mixed population of autochtonic microflora from bottom sludge of nitrogenous wastewater reservoir were set up in a chemostat-type column and packed bed reactor. The efficiency of denitrification of nitrates in packed bed reactor was 506.7 mg N/l/h whereas denitrification of nitrites was from 8.7 to 16.0 mg N/l/h depending on the granulation of the filing material. In the latter case 83% nitrogen was removed from the medium. One of the factors causing low efficiency of denitrification of nitrites is excessive alkalization of the medium in the bed. The use of a three-step bed with adjusted pH resulted in complete denitrification of nitrites with efficiency 60 mg N/l/h. The bacteria inside the bed were dominated by Paracoccus denitrificans and by Pseudomonas aeruginosa when nitrates were present. The sensitivity of P. denitrificans to high concentrations of nitrites seems to be the second factor contributing to low efficiency of denitrification with methanol as organic substrate. PMID:2412408

  2. Achieving nitritation at low temperatures using free ammonia inhibition on Nitrobacter and real-time control in an SBR treating landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hongwei; Peng, Yongzhen; Wang, Shuying; Ma, Juan

    2015-04-01

    Free ammonia (FA) inhibition on nitrite-oxidized bacteria (NOB) and real-time control are used to achieve nitrogen removal from landfill leachate via nitrite pathway at low temperatures in sequencing batch reactor. The inhibition of FA on NOB activity during the aerobic period was prolonged using real-time control. The degree of nitrite accumulation was monitored along with variations of the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and NOB population using fluorescence in situ hybridization techniques. It is demonstrated that the end-point of ammonia oxidization is detected from the on-line measured dissolved oxygen, oxidization-reduction potential, and pH signals, which could avoid the loss the FA inhibition on NOB caused by excess aeration. At low temperature (13.0-17.6°C), the level of nitrite pathway rapidly increased from 19.8% to 90%, suggesting that nitritation was successfully started up at low temperature by applying syntrophic association of the FA inhibition and real-time control, and then this high level of nitrite pathway was stably maintained for as long as 233 days. Mechanism analysis shows that the establishment of nitritation was primarily the result of predominant ammonia-oxidizing bacteria developed in the nitrifying bacteria population compared to NOB. This was mainly due to a gradual reduction of nitrite amount that is available to provide energy for the growth of NOB, eventually leading to the elimination of NOB from the bacterial clusters in sequencing batch reactor sludge system. PMID:25872722

  3. Effect of chlorine demand on the ammonia breakpoint curve: model development, validation with nitrite, and application to municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Chen, W L; Jensen, J N

    2001-01-01

    Chlorine added during wastewater disinfection may be consumed through reactions with chlorine-demanding chemical species. In this study, a mechanistically based kinetic model for chlorine demand in the presence of ammonia was developed and validated with laboratory studies on ammonia-nitrite systems, and then applied to breakpoint curves obtained with wastewater samples. The model is a modification of kinetic models for chlorine-ammonia systems to include hypochlorous acid-demand and monochloramine-demand reactions. The model accurately describes both laboratory-generated breakpoint curves with added nitrite and literature data. In a plant thought to be undergoing partial nitrification, breakpoint curves were consistent with high chlorine demand (i.e., small initial slopes and large doses to achieve the total chlorine maximum and breakpoint). A simplified kinetic model was also developed. Chlorine demand calculated from the simplified model was similar to chlorine demand from plant data. The simplified model was used to generate operating guidelines to calculate chlorine doses needed to overcome demand from nitrite or other sources. PMID:11833766

  4. Transcriptomic analysis of Staphylococcus xylosus in the presence of nitrate and nitrite in meat reveals its response to nitrosative stress

    PubMed Central

    Vermassen, Aurore; de la Foye, Anne; Loux, Valentin; Talon, Régine; Leroy, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus xylosus is one of the major starter cultures used for meat fermentation because of its crucial role in the reduction of nitrate to nitrite which contributes to color and flavor development. Despite longstanding use of these additives, their impact on the physiology of S. xylosus has not yet been explored. We present the first in situ global gene expression profile of S. xylosus in meat supplemented with nitrate and nitrite at the levels used in the meat industry. More than 600 genes of S. xylosus were differentially expressed at 24 or 72 h of incubation. They represent more than 20% of the total genes and let us to suppose that addition of nitrate and nitrite to meat leads to a global change in gene expression. This profile revealed that S. xylosus is subject to nitrosative stress caused by reactive nitrogen species (RNS) generated from nitrate and nitrite. To overcome this stress, S. xylosus has developed several oxidative stress resistance mechanisms, such as modulation of the expression of several genes involved in iron homeostasis and in antioxidant defense. Most of which belong to the Fur and PerR regulons, respectively. S. xylosus has also counteracted this stress by developing DNA and protein repair. Furthermore, it has adapted its metabolic response—carbon and nitrogen metabolism, energy production and cell wall biogenesis—to the alterations produced by nitrosative stress. PMID:25566208

  5. Formation of zinc protoporphyrin IX in Parma-like ham without nitrate or nitrite.

    PubMed

    Wakamatsu, Jun-ichi; Uemura, Juichi; Odagiri, Hiroko; Okui, Jun; Hayashi, Nobutaka; Hioki, Shoji; Nishimura, Takanori; Hattori, Akihito

    2009-04-01

    Zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZPP) is a characteristic red pigment in meat products that are manufactured without the addition of a curing agent such as nitrate or nitrite. To examine the effects of impurities such as mineral components in sea salt on the formation of ZPP, we manufactured Parmatype dry-cured hams that were salted with refined salt or sea salt and examined the involvement of oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) in the formation of ZPP. The content of ZPP was increased drastically after 40 weeks. Microscopic observation showed strong fluorescence caused by ZPP muscle fiber after 40 weeks. Conversely, heme content varied considerably during processing. ORP increased during processing. However, there was no obvious difference between ham salted with refined salt and that salted with sea salt. Therefore, it was concluded that impurities in sea salt were not involved in the formation of ZPP. PMID:20163591

  6. Nitrogen-13-labeled nitrite and nitrate: distribution and metabolism after intratracheal administration

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, N.J.; Krohn, K.A.; Mathis, C.A.; Chasko, J.H.; Geiger, K.R.; Gregor, M.E.; Peek, N.F.

    1981-04-03

    Radioactive nitrogen-13 from nitrite (NO/sub 2//sup -/) or nitrate (NO/sub 3//sup -/) administered intratracheally or intravenously without added carrier to mice or rabbits was distributed evenly throughout most organs and tissues regardless of the entry route or the anion administered. Nitrogen-13 from both anions was distributed uniformly between plasma and blood cells. Rapid in vivo oxidation of NO/sub 2//sup -/ to NO/sub 3//sup -/ at concentrations of 2 to 3 nanomoles per liter in blood was found. No reduction of /sup 13/NO/sub 3//sup -/ to /sup 13/NO/sub 2//sup -/ was observed. A mechanistic hypothesis invoking oxidation of /sup 13/NO/sub 2//sup -/ by a catalase-hydrogen peroxide complex accounts for the results.

  7. [Nitrate and nitrite levels in daily food rations of children from the rural Puławy regions].

    PubMed

    Bilczuk, L; Gowin, A; Ebertowska, Z; Mach, H

    1991-01-01

    In the region of Puławy where the operation of the Nitrogen-Compound Manufacturing Plant has lead to an increase in nitrogen compound emission to the environment, nitrate and nitrite contents in daily food rations of children were determined. Daily food rations of children aged 8-9 and 12-13 years were collected from individual farms in four villages situated in the vicinity of the Nitrogen Plant, as well as--for control--from individual farms in Janowiec, a village distant from this Plant. Nitrate and nitrite contents were assayed in 300 daily food rations taken in spring and autumn. Nitrate was reduced to nitrite on a cadmium column whereupon it was determined colorimetrically using sulphanilic acid and N-1-napthyl-ethylenediamine. It was found that in the group of younger children as many as 70%, on the average, of the examined food rations displayed nitrate contents exceeding the admissible levels. In the group of the 12-13 years old children, the percentage of daily food rations whose nitrate content exceeded the admissible level was lower, averaging ca. 30% of all rations examined. The percentage of the daily food rations in which the nitrite content was higher than admissible level was closely similar in both groups of children, averaging ca. 30% of all rations examined. Food rations collected in spring, as compared with those taken in autumn, contained significantly greater amount of nitrate. In both periods of studies, nitrate contents were greater in the food rations from the farms situated near the Nitrogen Plant than in the food rations from farms in Janowiec.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1803441

  8. Development of estimates of dietary nitrates, nitrites, and nitrosamines for use with the short willet food frequency questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Griesenbeck, John S; Steck, Michelle D; Huber, John C; Sharkey, Joseph R; Rene, Antonio A; Brender, Jean D

    2009-01-01

    Background Studies have suggested that nitrates, nitrites, and nitrosamines have an etiologic role in adverse pregnancy outcomes and chronic diseases such as cancer. Although an extensive body of literature exists on estimates of these compounds in foods, the extant data varies in quality, quantified estimates, and relevance. Methods We developed estimates of nitrates, nitrites, and nitrosamines for food items listed in the Short Willet Food Frequency Questionnaire (WFFQ) as adapted for use in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study. Multiple reference databases were searched for published literature reflecting nitrate, nitrite, and nitrosamine values in foods. Relevant published literature was reviewed; only publications reporting results for items listed on the WFFQ were selected for inclusion. The references selected were prioritized according to relevance to the U.S. population. Results Based on our estimates, vegetable products contain the highest levels of nitrate, contributing as much as 189 mg/serving. Meat and bean products contain the highest levels of nitrites with values up to 1.84 mg/serving. Alcohol, meat and dairy products contain the highest values of nitrosamines with a maximum value of 0.531 μg/serving. The estimates of dietary nitrates, nitrites, and nitrosamines generated in this study are based on the published values currently available. Conclusion To our knowledge, these are the only estimates specifically designed for use with the adapted WFFQ and generated to represent food items available to the U.S. population. The estimates provided may be useful in other research studies, specifically in those exploring the relation between exposure to these compounds in foods and adverse health outcomes. PMID:19348679

  9. Comparative induction of nitrate reductase by nitrate and nitrite in barley leaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aslam, M.; Rosichan, J. L.; Huffaker, R. C.

    1987-01-01

    The comparative induction of nitrate reductase (NR) by ambient NO3- and NO2- as a function of influx, reduction (as NR was induced) and accumulation in detached leaves of 8-day-old barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) seedlings was determined. The dynamic interaction of NO3- influx, reduction and accumulation on NR induction was shown. The activity of NR, as it was induced, influenced its further induction by affecting the internal concentration of NO3-. As the ambient concentration of NO3- increased, the relative influences imposed by influx and reduction on NO3- accumulation changed with influx becoming a more predominant regulant. Significant levels of NO3- accumulated in NO2(-)-fed leaves. When the leaves were supplied cycloheximide or tungstate along with NO2-, about 60% more NO3- accumulated in the leaves than in the absence of the inhibitors. In NO3(-)-supplied leaves NR induction was observed at an ambient concentration of as low as 0.02 mM. No NR induction occurred in leaves supplied with NO2- until the ambient NO2- concentration was 0.5 mM. In fact, NR induction from NO2- solutions was not seen until NO3- was detected in the leaves. The amount of NO3- accumulating in NO2(-)-fed leaves induced similar levels of NR as did equivalent amounts of NO3- accumulating from NO3(-)-fed leaves. In all cases the internal concentration of NO3-, but not NO2-, was highly correlated with the amount of NR induced. The evidence indicated that NO3- was a more likely inducer of NR than was NO2-.

  10. Low disturbance manure incorporation effects on ammonia and nitrate losses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ammonia volatilization represents a major mechanism of nitrogen (N) loss from land-applied manure and is an air quality concern. A field study was conducted to assess ammonia emissions related to manure application method in central Pennsylvania on a Hagerstown soil (Fine, mixed semiactive, mesic Ty...

  11. Dietary nitrate and nitrite intake and risk of colorectal cancer in the Shanghai Women’s Health Study

    PubMed Central

    DellaValle, Curt T.; Xiao, Qian; Yang, Gong; Shu, Xiao Ou; Aschebrook-Kilfoy, Briseis; Zheng, Wei; Li, Hong Lan; Ji, Bu-Tian; Rothman, Nathaniel; Chow, Wong-Ho; Gao, Yu-Tang; Ward, Mary H.

    2014-01-01

    Nitrate and nitrite are precursors of endogenously formed N-nitroso compounds (NOC), known animal carcinogens. Nitrosation reactions forming NOCs can be inhibited by vitamin C and other antioxidants. We prospectively investigated the association between dietary nitrate and nitrite intake and risk of colorectal cancer in the Shanghai Women’s Health Study, a cohort of 73,118 women ages 40 to 70 residing in Shanghai. We evaluated effect modification by factors that affect endogenous formation of NOCs: vitamin C (at or above/below median) and red meat intake (at or above/below median). Nitrate, nitrite and other dietary intakes were estimated from a 77-item food frequency questionnaire administered at baseline. Over a mean of 11 years of follow-up, we identified 619 colorectal cancer cases (n=383, colon; n=236, rectum). Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using Cox proportional hazard regression. Overall, nitrate intake was not associated with colorectal cancer risk (HR = 1.08; 95% CI: 0.73–1.59). However, among women with vitamin C intake below the median (83.9 mg/day) and hence higher potential exposure to NOCs, risk of colorectal cancer increased with increasing quintiles of nitrate intake (highest vs. lowest quintile HR = 2.45; 95% CI: 1.15–5.18; p-trend = 0.02). There was no association among women with higher vitamin C intake. We found no association between nitrite intake and risk of colorectal cancer overall or by intake level of vitamin C. Our findings suggest that high dietary nitrate intake among subgroups expected to have higher exposure to endogenously-formed NOCs increases risk of colorectal cancer. PMID:24242755

  12. Coupling Between and Among Ammonia Oxidizers and Nitrite Oxidizers in Grassland Mesocosms Submitted to Elevated CO2 and Nitrogen Supply.

    PubMed

    Simonin, Marie; Le Roux, Xavier; Poly, Franck; Lerondelle, Catherine; Hungate, Bruce A; Nunan, Naoise; Niboyet, Audrey

    2015-10-01

    Many studies have assessed the responses of soil microbial functional groups to increases in atmospheric CO2 or N deposition alone and more rarely in combination. However, the effects of elevated CO2 and N on the (de)coupling between different microbial functional groups (e.g., different groups of nitrifiers) have been barely studied, despite potential consequences for ecosystem functioning. Here, we investigated the short-term combined effects of elevated CO2 and N supply on the abundances of the four main microbial groups involved in soil nitrification: ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (belonging to the genera Nitrobacter and Nitrospira) in grassland mesocosms. AOB and AOA abundances responded differently to the treatments: N addition increased AOB abundance, but did not alter AOA abundance. Nitrobacter and Nitrospira abundances also showed contrasted responses to the treatments: N addition increased Nitrobacter abundance, but decreased Nitrospira abundance. Our results support the idea of a niche differentiation between AOB and AOA, and between Nitrobacter and Nitrospira. AOB and Nitrobacter were both promoted at high N and C conditions (and low soil water content for Nitrobacter), while AOA and Nitrospira were favored at low N and C conditions (and high soil water content for Nitrospira). In addition, Nitrobacter abundance was positively correlated to AOB abundance and Nitrospira abundance to AOA abundance. Our results suggest that the couplings between ammonia and nitrite oxidizers are influenced by soil N availability. Multiple environmental changes may thus elicit rapid and contrasted responses between and among the soil ammonia and nitrite oxidizers due to their different ecological requirements. PMID:25877793

  13. Induction of the Nitrate Assimilation nirA Operon and Protein-Protein Interactions in the Maturation of Nitrate and Nitrite Reductases in the Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Frías, José E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nitrate is widely used as a nitrogen source by cyanobacteria, in which the nitrate assimilation structural genes frequently constitute the so-called nirA operon. This operon contains the genes encoding nitrite reductase (nirA), a nitrate/nitrite transporter (frequently an ABC-type transporter; nrtABCD), and nitrate reductase (narB). In the model filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, which can fix N2 in specialized cells termed heterocysts, the nirA operon is expressed at high levels only in media containing nitrate or nitrite and lacking ammonium, a preferred nitrogen source. Here we examined the genes downstream of the nirA operon in Anabaena and found that a small open reading frame of unknown function, alr0613, can be cotranscribed with the operon. The next gene in the genome, alr0614 (narM), showed an expression pattern similar to that of the nirA operon, implying correlated expression of narM and the operon. A mutant of narM with an insertion mutation failed to produce nitrate reductase activity, consistent with the idea that NarM is required for the maturation of NarB. Both narM and narB mutants were impaired in the nitrate-dependent induction of the nirA operon, suggesting that nitrite is an inducer of the operon in Anabaena. It has previously been shown that the nitrite reductase protein NirA requires NirB, a protein likely involved in protein-protein interactions, to attain maximum activity. Bacterial two-hybrid analysis confirmed possible NirA-NirB and NarB-NarM interactions, suggesting that the development of both nitrite reductase and nitrate reductase activities in cyanobacteria involves physical interaction of the corresponding enzymes with their cognate partners, NirB and NarM, respectively. IMPORTANCE Nitrate is an important source of nitrogen for many microorganisms that is utilized through the nitrate assimilation system, which includes nitrate/nitrite membrane transporters and the nitrate and nitrite reductases. Many

  14. A study on the toxigenesis by Clostridium botulinum in nitrate and nitrite-reduced dry fermented sausages.

    PubMed

    Hospital, Xavier F; Hierro, Eva; Stringer, Sandra; Fernández, Manuela

    2016-02-01

    Nitrite has been traditionally used to control Clostridium botulinum in cured meat products. However, in the case of dry fermented sausages, environmental factors such as pH, aw and the competitive microbiota may exert a more relevant role than nitrite in the inhibition of the growth and toxin production by C. botulinum. In this challenge test study, two varieties of Mediterranean dry sausages (salchichón and fuet) were inoculated with spores of C. botulinum Group I (proteolytic) and C. botulinum Group II (nonproteolytic). Sausages were prepared with 150 mg/kg of NaNO3 and 150 mg/kg of NaNO2 (maximum ingoing amounts allowed by the European Union regulation), with a 25% and 50% reduction, and without nitrate/nitrite. The initial pH in both products was 5.6, and decreased to values below 5.0 in salchichón and to 5.2 in fuet. Lactic acid bacteria counts reached 8-9 log cfu/g after fermentation. The aw decreased from initial values of 0.96 to about 0.88-0.90 at the end of ripening. Botulinum neurotoxin was not detected in any of the sausages, including those manufactured without nitrate and nitrite. Despite the environmental conditions were within the range for germination and growth of C. botulinum Group I during the first 8 days of the ripening process in fuet and 10-12 days in salchichón, acidity, aw and incubation temperature combined to inhibit the production of toxin, independently of the concentration of curing agents. Although decreasing or even removing nitrate/nitrite from the formula did not compromise safety regarding C. botulinum in the conditions tested in this study, their antimicrobial role should not be underestimated in the case that other hurdles could fail or other ripening conditions were used, and also considering the effect of nitrite on other pathogens. PMID:26619314

  15. Identification and structure of the nasR gene encoding a nitrate- and nitrite-responsive positive regulator of nasFEDCBA (nitrate assimilation) operon expression in Klebsiella pneumoniae M5al.

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, B S; Lin, J T; Stewart, V

    1994-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae can use nitrate and nitrite as sole nitrogen sources through the nitrate assimilatory pathway. The structural genes for assimilatory nitrate and nitrite reductases together with genes necessary for nitrate transport form an operon, nasFEDCBA. Expression of the nasF operon is regulated both by general nitrogen control and also by nitrate or nitrite induction. We have identified a gene, nasR, that is necessary for nitrate and nitrite induction. The nasR gene, located immediately upstream of the nasFEDCBA operon, encodes a 44-kDa protein. The NasR protein shares carboxyl-terminal sequence similarity with the AmiR protein of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the positive regulator of amiE (aliphatic amidase) gene expression. In addition, we present evidence that the nasF operon is not autogenously regulated. Images PMID:8051020

  16. Identification and structure of the nasR gene encoding a nitrate- and nitrite-responsive positive regulator of nasFEDCBA (nitrate assimilation) operon expression in Klebsiella pneumoniae M5al.

    PubMed

    Goldman, B S; Lin, J T; Stewart, V

    1994-08-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae can use nitrate and nitrite as sole nitrogen sources through the nitrate assimilatory pathway. The structural genes for assimilatory nitrate and nitrite reductases together with genes necessary for nitrate transport form an operon, nasFEDCBA. Expression of the nasF operon is regulated both by general nitrogen control and also by nitrate or nitrite induction. We have identified a gene, nasR, that is necessary for nitrate and nitrite induction. The nasR gene, located immediately upstream of the nasFEDCBA operon, encodes a 44-kDa protein. The NasR protein shares carboxyl-terminal sequence similarity with the AmiR protein of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the positive regulator of amiE (aliphatic amidase) gene expression. In addition, we present evidence that the nasF operon is not autogenously regulated. PMID:8051020

  17. Nitrate denitrification with nitrite or nitrous oxide as intermediate products: Stoichiometry, kinetics and dynamics of stable isotope signatures.

    PubMed

    Vavilin, V A; Rytov, S V

    2015-09-01

    A kinetic analysis of nitrate denitrification by a single or two species of denitrifying bacteria with glucose or ethanol as a carbon source and nitrite or nitrous oxide as intermediate products was performed using experimental data published earlier (Menyailo and Hungate, 2006; Vidal-Gavilan et al., 2013). Modified Monod kinetics was used in the dynamic biological model. The special equations were added to the common dynamic biological model to describe how isotopic fractionation between N species changes. In contrast to the generally assumed first-order kinetics, in this paper, the traditional Rayleigh equation describing stable nitrogen and oxygen isotope fractionation in nitrate was derived from the dynamic isotopic equations for any type of kinetics. In accordance with the model, in Vidal-Gavilan's experiments, the maximum specific rate of nitrate reduction was proved to be less for ethanol compared to glucose. Conversely, the maximum specific rate of nitrite reduction was proved to be much less for glucose compared to ethanol. Thus, the intermediate nitrite concentration was negligible for the ethanol experiment, while it was significant for the glucose experiment. In Menyailo's and Hungate's experiments, the low value of maximum specific rate of nitrous oxide reduction gives high intermediate value of nitrous oxide concentration. The model showed that the dynamics of nitrogen and oxygen isotope signatures are responding to the biological dynamics. Two microbial species instead of single denitrifying bacteria are proved to be more adequate to describe the total process of nitrate denitrification to dinitrogen. PMID:25989520

  18. Response of nitrite accumulation and microbial community to free ammonia and dissolved oxygen treatment of high ammonium wastewater.

    PubMed

    Sui, Qianwen; Liu, Chong; Zhang, Junya; Dong, Hongmin; Zhu, Zhiping; Wang, Yi

    2016-05-01

    The effects of free ammonia (FA) and dissolved oxygen (DO) on nitrite accumulation in the treatment of high ammonium wastewater and on the evolution of the microbial community were investigated. Under high DO conditions (3.75 ± 0.49 mg/L), FA as high as 10.61 ± 2.89 mg NH3/L maintained stable nitrite accumulation rate (NAR) of 84 % with NH4 (+)-N load of 2.05 kg N/(m(3) day) at sludge retention time (SRT) of 15-18 days. After 56 days of operation, Proteobacteria and Nitrosomonas were the dominant phylum and genus, respectively; Nitrosomonas increased from 21.14 to 54.57 %. By contrast, under relative low DO and low FA, nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) were nearly eliminated (NOB/AOB of 0; ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB)), and NAR of 94 % was achieved with lower NH4 (+)-N load of 0.48 kg N/(m(3) day). DO correlated with AOB and NOB abundance, and FA decreased NOB activity and the NOB/AOB ratio. In conclusion, high FA and high DO conditions are optimal for efficient nitrite accumulation. PMID:26743659

  19. The chemistry, waste form development, and properties of the Nitrate to Ammonia and Ceramic (NAC) process

    SciTech Connect

    Mattus, A.J.; Lee, D.D.; Youngblood, E.L.; Walker, J.F. Jr.; Tiegs, T.N.

    1994-06-01

    A process for the conversion of alkaline, aqueous nitrate wastes to ammonia gas at low temperature, based upon the use of the active metal reductant aluminum, has been developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The process is also well suited for the removal of low-level waste (LLW) radioelements and hazardous metals which report to the solid, alumina-based by-product. ne chemistry of the interaction of aluminum powders with nitrate, and other waste stream metals is presented.

  20. Long-term effect of linseed plus nitrate fed to dairy cows on enteric methane emission and nitrate and nitrite residuals in milk.

    PubMed

    Guyader, J; Doreau, M; Morgavi, D P; Gérard, C; Loncke, C; Martin, C

    2016-07-01

    A previous study showed the additive methane (CH4)-mitigating effect of nitrate and linseed fed to non-lactating cows. Before practical application, the use of this new strategy in dairy cows requires further investigation in terms of persistency of methanogenesis reduction and absence of residuals in milk products. The objective of this experiment was to study the long-term effect of linseed plus nitrate on enteric CH4 emission and performance in dairy cows. We also assessed the effect of this feeding strategy on the presence of nitrate residuals in milk products, total tract digestibility, nitrogen (N) balance and rumen fermentation. A total of 16 lactating Holstein cows were allocated to two groups in a randomised design conducted in parallel for 17 weeks. Diets were on a dry matter (DM) basis: (1) control (54% maize silage, 6% hay and 40% concentrate; CON) or (2) control plus 3.5% added fat from linseed and 1.8% nitrate (LIN+NIT). Diets were equivalent in terms of CP (16%), starch (28%) and NDF (33%), and were offered twice daily. Cows were fed ad libitum, except during weeks 5, 16 and 17 in which feed was restricted to 95% of dry matter intake (DMI) to ensure complete consumption of meals during measurement periods. Milk production and DMI were measured weekly. Nitrate and nitrite concentrations in milk and milk products were determined monthly. Daily CH4 emission was quantified in open circuit respiration chambers (weeks 5 and 16). Total tract apparent digestibility, N balance and rumen fermentation parameters were determined in week 17. Daily DMI tended to be lower with LIN+NIT from week 4 to 16 (-5.1 kg/day on average). The LIN+NIT diet decreased milk production during 6 non-consecutive weeks (-2.5 kg/day on average). Nitrate or nitrite residuals were not detected in milk and associated products. The LIN+NIT diet reduced CH4 emission to a similar extent at the beginning and end of the trial (-47%, g/day; -30%, g/kg DMI; -33%, g/kg fat- and protein

  1. A high fat diet induces sex-specific differences in hepatic lipid metabolism and nitrite/nitrate in rats.

    PubMed

    Stanimirovic, Julijana; Obradovic, Milan; Jovanovic, Aleksandra; Sudar-Milovanovic, Emina; Zafirovic, Sonja; Pitt, Samantha J; Stewart, Alan J; Isenovic, Esma R

    2016-04-01

    Men and women differ substantially with regard to the severity of insulin resistance (IR) but the underlying mechanism(s) of how this occurs is poorly characterized. We investigated whether a high fat (HF) diet resulted in sex-specific differences in nitrite/nitrate production and lipid metabolism and whether these variances may contribute to altered obesity-induced IR. Male and female Wistar rats were fed a standard laboratory diet or a HF diet for 10 weeks. The level of plasma nitrite/nitrate, as well as free fatty acid (FFA), in both plasma and liver lysates were assessed. The levels of inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase (iNOS), p65 subunit of NFκB, total and phosphorylated forms of Akt, mTOR and PDK-1 in lysates, and the levels of glucose transporter 2 (Glut-2) and fatty acid translocase/cluster of differentiation 36 (FAT/CD36) in plasma membrane fractions of liver were assessed. HF-fed male rats exhibited a significant increase in plasma nitrite/nitrate, and hepatic FFA and FAT/CD36 levels compared with controls. They also displayed a relative decrease in iNOS and Glut-2 levels in the liver. Phosphorylation of Akt (at Ser(473) and Thr(308)), mTOR and PDK-1 was also reduced. HF-fed female rats exhibited increased levels of NFκB-p65 in liver compared with controls, while levels of Glut-2, FAT/CD36 and Akt phosphorylation at Thr(308) and PDK-1 were decreased. Our results reveal that altered lipid and glucose metabolism in obesity, lead to altered iNOS expression and nitrite/nitrate production. It is likely that this mechanism contributes to sex-specific differences in the development of IR. PMID:26924725

  2. Detection of nitrite and nitrate ions in water by graphene oxide as a potential fluorescence sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Ing Hua; Sundari, Rita; Lintang, Hendrik O.; Yuliati, Leny

    2016-02-01

    In this study, graphene oxide (GO) was used as a new fluorescence sensor for detection of nitrite (NO2-) and nitrate (NO3-) ions. The GO was synthesized via an improved Hummers’ method, and the properties of GO were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The XRD pattern showed the presence of (002) plane at 2θ of 9.5o while the FTIR spectrum showed the presence of C-OH, C=O, C=C, C-O chemical bonds in the GO. The layer structure of the GO was confirmed from the TEM image. The sensing performance of the GO for NO2- and NO3- was evaluated by monitoring the emission sites of the GO at 567 nm, which was corresponded to the oxygen functional groups. Fluorescence quenching was observed, suggesting that the GO interacted well with both NO2- and NO3- ions. The linear Stern-Volmer plots were obtained in the concentration range of 1-10 mM, indicating the potential ability of the GO as the fluorescence sensor. The quenching constants for the detections of NO2- and NO3- were 4.8 × 10-2 and 1.2 × 10-2 mM-1, respectively, suggesting that the GO has greater sensitivity towards the NO2- than the NO3- ion.

  3. Effects of simulated microgravity on arterial nitric oxide synthase and nitrate and nitrite content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Jin; Kahwaji, Chadi I.; Ni, Zhenmin; Vaziri, Nosratola D.; Purdy, Ralph E.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the alterations in nitric oxide synthase (NOS) expression and nitrate and nitrite (NOx) content of different arteries from simulated microgravity rats. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to either a control group or simulated microgravity group. For simulating microgravity, animals were subjected to hindlimb unweighting (HU) for 20 days. Different arterial tissues were removed for determination of NOS expression and NOx. Western blotting was used to measure endothelial NOS (eNOS) and inducible NOS (iNOS) protein content. Total concentrations of NOx, stable metabolites of nitric oxide, were determined by the chemiluminescence method. Compared with controls, isolated vessels from simulated microgravity rats showed a significant increase in both eNOS and iNOS expression in carotid arteries and thoracic aorta and a significant decrease in eNOS and iNOS expression of mesenteric arteries. The eNOS and iNOS content of cerebral arteries, as well as that of femoral arteries, showed no differences between the two groups. Concerning NOx, vessels from HU rats showed an increase in cerebral arteries, a decrease in mesenteric arteries, and no change in carotid artery, femoral artery and thoracic aorta. These data indicated that there were differential alterations in NOS expression and NOx of different arteries after hindlimb unweighting. We suggest that these changes might represent both localized adaptations to differential body fluid redistribution and other factors independent of hemodynamic shifts during simulated microgravity.

  4. Comparative bioavailability of ammonium, nitrate, nitrite and urea to typically harmful cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Li, Jihua; Zhang, Jibiao; Huang, Wei; Kong, Fanlong; Li, Yue; Xi, Min; Zheng, Zheng

    2016-09-15

    Phosphorus is generally considered as the prime limiting nutrient responsible for cyanobacterial blooms. However, recent research is drawing attention to the importance of bioavailable nitrogen (N) in freshwater eutrophication. This study investigated the bioavailability of NO3(-)-N, NO2(-)-N, NH4(+)-N and Urea-N under different concentrations of 1.2, 3.6 and 6.0mgL(-1) to Microcystis aeruginosa. Overall, Urea-N ranked the first in promoting M. aeruginosa growth, followed by NO3(-)-N and NO2(-)-N. However, the algal growth cultured in NH4(+)-N was depressed under test N levels. The bioavailability of N to M. aeruginosa was seriously influenced by both N forms and N concentrations (p<0.01). Total N concentrations in Urea-N treatment decreased the fastest, which were corresponding with the μ values of M. aeruginosa. The high enzymic activities of nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase and glutamine synthetase indicated that the decomposition process for urea is effective, which contributed in N assimilation and utilization in M. aeruginosa cells. PMID:27357916

  5. A stepwise reduction in plasma and salivary nitrite with increasing strengths of mouthwash following a dietary nitrate load.

    PubMed

    Woessner, Mary; Smoliga, James M; Tarzia, Brendan; Stabler, Thomas; Van Bruggen, Mitch; Allen, Jason D

    2016-04-01

    Nitric Oxide (NO) bioavailability is essential for vascular health. Dietary supplementation with inorganic nitrate, which is abundant in vegetables and roots, has been identified as an effective means of increasing vascular NO bioavailability. Recent studies have shown a reduction in resting blood pressures in both normotensive and hypertensive subjects following ingestion of inorganic nitrate. Oral bacteria play a key role in this process and the use of strong antibacterial mouthwash rinses can disable this mechanism. Hence, mouthwash usage, a $1.4 billion market in the US, may potentially be detrimental to cardiovascular health. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of different strengths of commercially available mouthwash products on salivary and plasma nitrate and nitrite concentrations following 8.4 mmol inorganic nitrate load (beetroot juice). Specifically, we examined the effects of Listerine antiseptic mouthwash, Cepacol antibacterial mouthwash, and Chlorhexidine mouthwash versus control (water). Twelve apparently healthy normotensive males (36 ± 11 yrs) completed four testing visits in a randomized order, separated by one week. Testing consisted of blood pressure (BP), and saliva and venous blood collection at baseline and each hour for 4 h. Following baseline-testing participants consumed 140 ml of beet juice and then 15 min later gargled with 5 mL of assigned mouthwash. Testing and mouthwash rinse was repeated every hour for 4 h. Linear mixed effects models, followed by pairwise comparisons where appropriate, were used to determine the influence of treatment and time on plasma and saliva nitrate and nitrite, and BP. Plasma and salivary nitrate increased above baseline (time effect) for all conditions (p ≤ 0.01). There were time (p ≤ 0.01), treatment (p ≤ 0.01), and interaction (p ≤ 0.05) effects for plasma and salivary nitrite. There was a treatment effect on systolic BP (p ≤ 0.05). Further examination revealed a

  6. Nitrate and ammonia as nitrogen sources for deep subsurface microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Kutvonen, Heini; Rajala, Pauliina; Carpén, Leena; Bomberg, Malin

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the N-utilizing bacterial community in anoxic brackish groundwater of the low and intermediate level nuclear waste repository cave in Olkiluoto, Finland, at 100 m depth using 15N-based stable isotope probing (SIP) and enrichment with 14∕15N-ammonium or 14∕15N-nitrate complemented with methane. Twenty-eight days of incubation at 12°C increased the concentration of bacterial 16S rRNA and nitrate reductase (narG) gene copies in the substrate amended microcosms simultaneously with a radical drop in the overall bacterial diversity and OTU richness. Hydrogenophaga/Malikia were enriched in all substrate amended microcosms and Methylobacter in the ammonium and ammonium+methane supplemented microcosms. Sulfuricurvum was especially abundant in the nitrate+methane treatment and the unamended incubation control. Membrane-bound nitrate reductase genes (narG) from Polarimonas sp. were detected in the original groundwater, while Burkholderia, Methylibium, and Pseudomonas narG genes were enriched due to substrate supplements. Identified amoA genes belonged to Nitrosomonas sp. 15N-SIP revealed that Burkholderiales and Rhizobiales clades belonging to the minority groups in the original groundwater used 15N from ammonium and nitrate as N source indicating an important ecological function of these bacteria, despite their low number, in the groundwater N cycle in Olkiluoto bedrock system. PMID:26528251

  7. Nitrate and ammonia as nitrogen sources for deep subsurface microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Kutvonen, Heini; Rajala, Pauliina; Carpén, Leena; Bomberg, Malin

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the N-utilizing bacterial community in anoxic brackish groundwater of the low and intermediate level nuclear waste repository cave in Olkiluoto, Finland, at 100 m depth using (15)N-based stable isotope probing (SIP) and enrichment with (14∕15)N-ammonium or (14∕15)N-nitrate complemented with methane. Twenty-eight days of incubation at 12°C increased the concentration of bacterial 16S rRNA and nitrate reductase (narG) gene copies in the substrate amended microcosms simultaneously with a radical drop in the overall bacterial diversity and OTU richness. Hydrogenophaga/Malikia were enriched in all substrate amended microcosms and Methylobacter in the ammonium and ammonium+methane supplemented microcosms. Sulfuricurvum was especially abundant in the nitrate+methane treatment and the unamended incubation control. Membrane-bound nitrate reductase genes (narG) from Polarimonas sp. were detected in the original groundwater, while Burkholderia, Methylibium, and Pseudomonas narG genes were enriched due to substrate supplements. Identified amoA genes belonged to Nitrosomonas sp. (15)N-SIP revealed that Burkholderiales and Rhizobiales clades belonging to the minority groups in the original groundwater used (15)N from ammonium and nitrate as N source indicating an important ecological function of these bacteria, despite their low number, in the groundwater N cycle in Olkiluoto bedrock system. PMID:26528251

  8. Nitrogen removal via nitrite from municipal landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lina; Peng, Chengyao; Zhang, Shujun; Peng, Yongzhen

    2009-01-01

    A system consisting of a two-stage up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB), an anoxic/aerobic (A/O) reactor and a sequencing batch reactor (SBR), was used to treat landfill leachate. During operation, denitrification and methanogenesis took place simultaneously in the first stage UASB, and the effluent chemical oxygen demand (COD) was further removed in the second stage UASB. Then the denitrification of nitrite and nitrate in the returned sludge by using the residual COD was accomplished in the A/O reactor, and ammonia was removed via nitrite in it. Last but not least, the residual ammonia was removed in SBR as well as nitrite and nitrate which were produced by nitrification. The results over 120 d (60 d for phase I and 60 d for phase II) were as follows: when the total nitrogen (TN) concentration of influent leachate was about 2500 mg/L and the ammonia nitrogen concentration was about 2000 mg/L, the short-cut nitrification with 85%-90% nitrite accumulation was achieved stably in the A/O reactor. The TN and ammonia nitrogen removal efficiencies of the system were 98% and 97%, respectively. The residual ammonia, nitrite and nitrate produced during nitrification in the A/O reactor could be washed out almost completely in SBR. The TN and ammonia nitrogen concentrations of final effluent were about 39 mg/L and 12 mg/L, respectively. PMID:20108678

  9. The Determination of Nitrate and Nitrite in Human Urine and Blood by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography and Cloud-Point Extraction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiao; Wang, Jun; Yang, Yaling; Lu, Yunhui

    2015-08-01

    A simple efficient and practical separation/preconcentration coupled with HPLC method for the determination nitrate and low concentrations of nitrite in human urine and blood was investigated. The method is based on precolumn derivatization using the Griess reaction and cloud-point extraction (CPE) of nitrite anion and direct determination of nitrate using its UV absorbance by ion-pair HPLC. The chromatographic process with detection at two wavelengths (510 and 220 nm) allows the determination of nitrite and nitrate. Decolorization and protein precipitation of urine and blood was applied to overcome the interference of matrix and enhance the sensitivity. The method was validated for linearity, accuracy and precision. Under the optimum conditions, the linear range of nitrite from 10 to 1,000 ng/mL and nitrate from 0.1 to 10 µg/mL. Product recoveries ranged from 92.4 to 99.9%. The limits of detection were 1 ng/mL and 0.1 µg/mL for nitrite and nitrate, respectively. Therefore, the technique was simple and reliable, with potential application in biological sample analysis of nitrate and nitrite. PMID:25616990

  10. Spatial Interaction of Archaeal Ammonia-Oxidizers and Nitrite-Oxidizing Bacteria in an Unfertilized Grassland Soil

    PubMed Central

    Stempfhuber, Barbara; Richter-Heitmann, Tim; Regan, Kathleen M.; Kölbl, Angelika; Wüst, Pia K.; Marhan, Sven; Sikorski, Johannes; Overmann, Jörg; Friedrich, Michael W.; Kandeler, Ellen; Schloter, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Interrelated successive transformation steps of nitrification are performed by distinct microbial groups – the ammonia-oxidizers, comprising ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB), and nitrite-oxidizers such as Nitrobacter and Nitrospira, which are the dominant genera in the investigated soils. Hence, not only their presence and activity in the investigated habitat is required for nitrification, but also their temporal and spatial interactions. To demonstrate the interdependence of both groups and to address factors promoting putative niche differentiation within each group, temporal and spatial changes in nitrifying organisms were monitored in an unfertilized grassland site over an entire vegetation period at the plot scale of 10 m2. Nitrifying organisms were assessed by measuring the abundance of marker genes (amoA for AOA and AOB, nxrA for Nitrobacter, 16S rRNA gene for Nitrospira) selected for the respective sub-processes. A positive correlation between numerically dominant AOA and Nitrospira, and their co-occurrence at the same spatial scale in August and October, suggests that the nitrification process is predominantly performed by these groups and is restricted to a limited timeframe. Amongst nitrite-oxidizers, niche differentiation was evident in observed seasonally varying patterns of co-occurrence and spatial separation. While their distributions were most likely driven by substrate concentrations, oxygen availability may also have played a role under substrate-limited conditions. Phylogenetic analysis revealed temporal shifts in Nitrospira community composition with an increasing relative abundance of OTU03 assigned to sublineage V from August onward, indicating its important role in nitrite oxidation. PMID:26834718

  11. Precursor/product studies of macrophage synthesis of nitrite, nitrate and N-nitrosamines

    SciTech Connect

    Iyengar, R.; Marletta, M.A.

    1987-05-01

    Previous experiments showed that nitrite, nitrate and N-nitrosamine synthesis was carried out by both stimulated macrophages (M phi) and a number of M phi cell lines. Here the authors report the precursor to NO/sub 2//sup -/, NO/sub 3//sup -/, and the source of the nitrosating agent. Previous kinetic studies established a time lag for NO/sub 2//sup -//NO/sub 3//sup -/ synthesis during which protein synthesis required for product formation occurred. Medium change after the protein synthesis phase showed that L-arginine was the only amino acid essential for the synthesis. Other precursors were homoarginine, arginine methyl ester, arginine infinity-hydroxamate, argininamide and the peptide arginine-aspartate. Glutamine, citrulline, ornithine, hydroxylamine and D-arginine were among some of the non-precursors. Canavanine though not a precursor inhibited arginine-derived NO/sub 2/-/NO/sub 3//sup -/ synthesis while D-arginine had no effect. When /sup 15/N-arginine (guanido-/sup 15/N/sub 2/, 95%) was used, GC/MS results showed that all the NO/sub 2//sup -//NO/sub 3//sup -/ synthesized was derived exclusively from these two guanido nitrogens. Similar labeling experiments carried out in the presence of morpholine showed that the isotopic enrichment of N-nitrosomorpholine was the same as that of NO/sub 2//sup -//NO/sub 3//sup -/ synthesized, suggesting that the nitrosating agent is a common intermediate. In conclusion, NO/sub 2//sup -//NO/sub 3//sup -/ and N-nitrosomorpholine synthesis by stimulated macrophages is derived specifically from the two guanido nitrogens of arginine.

  12. Automated determination of nitrate plus nitrite in aqueous samples with flow injection analysis using vanadium (III) chloride as reductant.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu; Lin, Kunning; Chen, Nengwang; Yuan, Dongxing; Ma, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Determination of nitrate in aqueous samples is an important analytical objective for environmental monitoring and assessment. Here we report the first automatic flow injection analysis (FIA) of nitrate (plus nitrite) using VCl3 as reductant instead of the well-known but toxic cadmium column for reducing nitrate to nitrite. The reduced nitrate plus the nitrite originally present in the sample react with the Griess reagent (sulfanilamide and N-1-naphthylethylenediamine dihydrochloride) under acidic condition. The resulting pink azo dye can be detected at 540 nm. The Griess reagent and VCl3 are used as a single mixed reagent solution to simplify the system. The various parameters of the FIA procedure including reagent composition, temperature, volume of the injection loop, and flow rate were carefully investigated and optimized via univariate experimental design. Under the optimized conditions, the linear range and detection limit of this method are 0-100 µM (R(2)=0.9995) and 0.1 µM, respectively. The targeted analytical range can be easily extended to higher concentrations by selecting alternative detection wavelengths or increasing flow rate. The FIA system provides a sample throughput of 20 h(-1), which is much higher than that of previously reported manual methods based on the same chemistry. National reference solutions and different kinds of aqueous samples were analyzed with our method as well as the cadmium column reduction method. The results from our method agree well with both the certified value and the results from the cadmium column reduction method (no significant difference with P=0.95). The spiked recovery varies from 89% to 108% for samples with different matrices, showing insignificant matrix interference in this method. PMID:26695325

  13. Oxidation of Fe(II)-EDTA by nitrite and by two nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing Acidovorax strains.

    PubMed

    Klueglein, N; Picardal, F; Zedda, M; Zwiener, C; Kappler, A

    2015-03-01

    The enzymatic oxidation of Fe(II) by nitrate-reducing bacteria was first suggested about two decades ago. It has since been found that most strains are mixotrophic and need an additional organic co-substrate for complete and prolonged Fe(II) oxidation. Research during the last few years has tried to determine to what extent the observed Fe(II) oxidation is driven enzymatically, or abiotically by nitrite produced during heterotrophic denitrification. A recent study reported that nitrite was not able to oxidize Fe(II)-EDTA abiotically, but the addition of the mixotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizer, Acidovorax sp. strain 2AN, led to Fe(II) oxidation (Chakraborty & Picardal, 2013). This, along with other results of that study, was used to argue that Fe(II) oxidation in strain 2AN was enzymatically catalyzed. However, the absence of abiotic Fe(II)-EDTA oxidation by nitrite reported in that study contrasts with previously published data. We have repeated the abiotic and biotic experiments and observed rapid abiotic oxidation of Fe(II)-EDTA by nitrite, resulting in the formation of Fe(III)-EDTA and the green Fe(II)-EDTA-NO complex. Additionally, we found that cultivating the Acidovorax strains BoFeN1 and 2AN with 10 mM nitrate, 5 mm acetate, and approximately 10 mM Fe(II)-EDTA resulted only in incomplete Fe(II)-EDTA oxidation of 47-71%. Cultures of strain BoFeN1 turned green (due to the presence of Fe(II)-EDTA-NO) and the green color persisted over the course of the experiments, whereas strain 2AN was able to further oxidize the Fe(II)-EDTA-NO complex. Our work shows that the two used Acidovorax strains behave very differently in their ability to deal with toxic effects of Fe-EDTA species and the further reduction of the Fe(II)-EDTA-NO nitrosyl complex. Although the enzymatic oxidation of Fe(II) cannot be ruled out, this study underlines the importance of nitrite in nitrate-reducing Fe(II)- and Fe(II)-EDTA-oxidizing cultures and demonstrates that Fe(II)-EDTA cannot

  14. Intracellular Conversion of Environmental Nitrate and Nitrite to Nitric Oxide with Resulting Developmental Toxicity to the Crustacean Daphnia magna

    PubMed Central

    Hannas, Bethany R.; Das, Parikshit C.; Li, Hong; LeBlanc, Gerald A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Nitrate and nitrite (jointly referred to herein as NOx) are ubiquitous environmental contaminants to which aquatic organisms are at particularly high risk of exposure. We tested the hypothesis that NOx undergo intracellular conversion to the potent signaling molecule nitric oxide resulting in the disruption of endocrine-regulated processes. Methodology/Principal Findings These experiments were performed with insect cells (Drosophila S2) and whole organisms Daphnia magna. We first evaluated the ability of cells to convert nitrate (NO3−) and nitrite (NO2−) to nitric oxide using amperometric real-time nitric oxide detection. Both NO3− and NO2− were converted to nitric oxide in a substrate concentration-dependent manner. Further, nitric oxide trapping and fluorescent visualization studies revealed that perinatal daphnids readily convert NO2− to nitric oxide. Next, daphnids were continuously exposed to concentrations of the nitric oxide-donor sodium nitroprusside (positive control) and to concentrations of NO3− and NO2−. All three compounds interfered with normal embryo development and reduced daphnid fecundity. Developmental abnormalities were characteristic of those elicited by compounds that interfere with ecdysteroid signaling. However, no compelling evidence was generated to indicate that nitric oxide reduced ecdysteroid titers. Conclusions/Significance Results demonstrate that nitrite elicits developmental and reproductive toxicity at environmentally relevant concentrations due likely to its intracellular conversion to nitric oxide. PMID:20805993

  15. 21 CFR 181.34 - Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. 181.34... nitrite and potassium nitrite. Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite are subject to prior sanctions issued... without sodium or potassium nitrate, in the curing of red meat and poultry products....

  16. Ammonia-oxidizing archaea and nitrite-oxidizing nitrospiras in the biofilter of a shrimp recirculating aquaculture system.

    PubMed

    Brown, Monisha N; Briones, Aurelio; Diana, James; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2013-01-01

    This study analysed the nitrifier community in the biofilter of a zero discharge, recirculating aquaculture system (RAS) for the production of marine shrimp in a low density (low ammonium production) system. The ammonia-oxidizing populations were examined by targeting 16S rRNA and amoA genes of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA). The nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) were investigated by targeting the 16S rRNA gene. Archaeal amoA genes were more abundant in all compartments of the RAS than bacterial amoA genes. Analysis of bacterial and archaeal amoA gene sequences revealed that most ammonia oxidizers were related to Nitrosomonas marina and Nitrosopumilus maritimus. The NOB detected were related to Nitrospira marina and Nitrospira moscoviensis, and Nitrospira marina-type NOB were more abundant than N. moscoviensis-type NOB. Water quality and biofilm attachment media played a role in the competitiveness of AOA over AOB and Nitrospira marina-over N. moscoviensis-type NOB. PMID:22775980

  17. Percentile Distributions of Median Nitrite Plus Nitrate as Nitrogen, Total Nitrogen, and Total Phosphorus Concentrations in Oklahoma Streams, 1973-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haggard, Brian E.; Masoner, Jason R.; Becker, Carol J.

    2003-01-01

    Nutrients are one of the primary causes of water-quality impairments in streams, lakes, reservoirs, and estuaries in the United States. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has developed regional-based nutrient criteria using ecoregions to protect streams in the United States from impairment. However, nutrient criteria were based on nutrient concentrations measured in large aggregated nutrient ecoregions with little relevance to local environmental conditions in states. The Oklahoma Water Resources Board is using a dichotomous process known as Use Support Assessment Protocols to define nutrient criteria in Oklahoma streams. The Oklahoma Water Resources Board is modifying the Use Support Assessment Protocols to reflect nutrient informa-tion and environmental characteristics relevant to Oklahoma streams, while considering nutrient information grouped by geographic regions based on level III ecoregions and state boundaries. Percentile distributions of median nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen, total nitrogen, and total phosphorous concentrations were calculated from 563 sites in Oklahoma and 4 sites in Arkansas near the Oklahoma and Arkansas border to facilitate development of nutrient criteria for Oklahoma streams. Sites were grouped into four geographic regions and were categorized into eight stream categories by stream slope and stream order. The 50th percentiles of median nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen, total nitrogen, and total phosphorus concentrations were greater in the Ozark Highland ecoregion and were less in the Ouachita Mountains ecoregion when compared to other geographic areas used to group sites. The 50th percentiles of median concentrations of nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen, total nitrogen, and total phosphorus were least in first, second, and third order streams. The 50th percentiles of median nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen, total nitrogen and total phosphorus concentrations in the Ozark Highland and Ouachita Mountains ecoregions were least in

  18. Nitrite and nitrate formation on model NOx storage materials: on the influence of particle size and composition.

    PubMed

    Desikusumastuti, A; Qin, Z; Happel, M; Staudt, T; Lykhach, Y; Laurin, M; Rohr, F; Shaikhutdinov, S; Libuda, J

    2009-04-14

    A well-defined model-catalyst approach has been utilized to study the formation and decomposition of nitrite and nitrate species on a model NO(x) storage material. The model system comprises BaAl(2x)O(1+3x) particles of different size and stoichiometry, prepared under ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) conditions on Al(2)O(3)/NiAl(110). Adsorption and reaction of NO(2) has been investigated by molecular beam (MB) methods and time-resolved IR reflection absorption spectroscopy (TR-IRAS) in combination with structural characterization by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The growth behavior and chemical composition of the BaAl(2x)O(1+3x) particles has been investigated previously. In this work we focus on the effect of particle size and stoichiometry on the reaction with NO(2). Particles of different size and of different Ba(2+) : Al(3+) surface ion ratio are prepared by varying the preparation conditions. It is shown that at 300 K the reaction mechanism is independent of particle size and composition, involving initial nitrite formation and subsequent transformation of nitrites into surface nitrates. The coordination geometry of the surface nitrates, however, changes characteristically with particle size. For small BaAl(2x)O(1+3x) particles high temperature (800 K) oxygen treatment gives rise to particle ripening, which has a minor effect on the NO(2) uptake behavior, however. STM shows that the morphology of the particle system is largely conserved during NO(2) exposure at 300 K. The reaction is limited to the formation of surface nitrites and nitrates, which are characterized by low thermal stability and completely decompose below 500 K. As no further sintering occurs before decomposition, NO(2) uptake and release is a fully reversible process. For large BaAl(2x)O(1+3x) particles, aggregates with different Ba(2+) : Al(3+) surface ion ratio were prepared. It was shown that the stoichiometry has a major effect on the kinetics of NO(2) uptake. For barium

  19. Incubation of curing brines for the production of ready-to-eat, uncured, no-nitrite-or-nitrate-added, ground, cooked and sliced ham.

    PubMed

    Krause, B L; Sebranek, J G; Rust, R E; Mendonca, A

    2011-12-01

    Salt concentration, vegetable juice powder (VJP) concentration and temperature were investigated to determine necessary conditions for incubation of curing brines including VJP and a starter culture containing Staphylococcus carnosus prior to production of naturally cured, no-nitrate/nitrite-added meat products. Subsequently, incubated brines were utilized to produce no-nitrate/nitrite-added sliced ham in which quality characteristics and residual nitrite concentrations were measured to determine feasibility of brine incubation for nitrate conversion prior to injection. Two ham treatments (one with VJP and starter culture; one with pre-converted VJP) and a nitrite-added control were used. No differences (P>0.05) were found for color in the VJP treatments. Control sliced ham was redder after 42 days of storage, retaining significantly (P<0.05) greater a* (redness) than either of the VJP treatments. Residual nitrite concentration was greater (P<0.05) in the control hams during the first week of storage. While the nitrite-added control retained greater red color and initially had more residual nitrite than the VJP treatments, the two VJP treatments did not differ from each other. PMID:21664056

  20. THE NONLINEAR RESPONSE OF NITRATE REPLACEMENT THAT MITIGATES SULFATE REDUCTIONS: THE GAS RATIO AS AN INDICATOR AND SENSITIVITY TO ERRORS IN TOTAL AMMONIA AND TOTAL NITRATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The poster presents an assessment, using the CMAQ air quality model, showing the inorganic gas ratio (the ratio of free ammonia to total nitrate) can function as a screening indicator of the winter replacement of sulfate by nitrate when sulfate is reduced. It also presents an as...

  1. Potential Role of Nitrite for Abiotic Fe(II) Oxidation and Cell Encrustation during Nitrate Reduction by Denitrifying Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Klueglein, Nicole; Zeitvogel, Fabian; Stierhof, York-Dieter; Floetenmeyer, Matthias; Konhauser, Kurt O.; Obst, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms have been observed to oxidize Fe(II) at neutral pH under anoxic and microoxic conditions. While most of the mixotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria become encrusted with Fe(III)-rich minerals, photoautotrophic and microaerophilic Fe(II) oxidizers avoid cell encrustation. The Fe(II) oxidation mechanisms and the reasons for encrustation remain largely unresolved. Here we used cultivation-based methods and electron microscopy to compare two previously described nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers ( Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1 and Pseudogulbenkiania sp. strain 2002) and two heterotrophic nitrate reducers (Paracoccus denitrificans ATCC 19367 and P. denitrificans Pd 1222). All four strains oxidized ∼8 mM Fe(II) within 5 days in the presence of 5 mM acetate and accumulated nitrite (maximum concentrations of 0.8 to 1.0 mM) in the culture media. Iron(III) minerals, mainly goethite, formed and precipitated extracellularly in close proximity to the cell surface. Interestingly, mineral formation was also observed within the periplasm and cytoplasm; intracellular mineralization is expected to be physiologically disadvantageous, yet acetate consumption continued to be observed even at an advanced stage of Fe(II) oxidation. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) were detected by lectin staining with fluorescence microscopy, particularly in the presence of Fe(II), suggesting that EPS production is a response to Fe(II) toxicity or a strategy to decrease encrustation. Based on the data presented here, we propose a nitrite-driven, indirect mechanism of cell encrustation whereby nitrite forms during heterotrophic denitrification and abiotically oxidizes Fe(II). This work adds to the known assemblage of Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria in nature and complicates our ability to delineate microbial Fe(II) oxidation in ancient microbes preserved as fossils in the geological record. PMID:24271182

  2. Reflectance spectroscopy of low atomic weight and Na-rich minerals: Borates, hydroxides, nitrates, nitrites, and peroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloutis, E.; Berg, B.; Mann, P.; Applin, D.

    2016-01-01

    We have measured reflectance spectra (0.35-20 μm) of a suite of minerals and synthetic compounds that contain low-Z (⩽Na) elements as the major cation and/or the major anion in oxides/oxyhydroxides, and are relevant to planetary geology and astrobiology. The suite comprises Na-borates, Na-, K-, Ca-hydroxides, nitrates, nitrites, and peroxides. Na-borate spectra exhibit B-O fundamental vibrations between 7 and 14 μm, and overtones/combinations of these bands in the 1.55, 1.75, 2.15, and 2.25 μm regions. Na-, K-, and Ca-hydroxide reflectance spectra are characterized by OH and metal-OH fundamental vibrations near 3, 8, and 18 μm, and a number of overtone and combination absorption bands at shorter wavelengths, and a characteristic metal-OH band near 2.35 μm. The nitrate and nitrite spectra exhibit fundamental N-O vibrations in the 7-14 μm region and numerous combinations and overtones that are still detectable to as low as ∼1.8 μm. Na-peroxide is largely spectrally featureless below 24 μm, making its detection problematic, while H-peroxide has many OH-related absorption features below 2.5 μm that differ in position from those of H2O ice and liquid. The results of this study indicate that the borates, hydroxides, nitrates, nitrite, and hydrogen peroxide can all be uniquely identified using characteristic absorption features that are present below 2.5 μm. However, some of these features are weak, and their detectability will depend on the types and abundances of any accessory phases that may be present.

  3. Exogenous nitrate attenuates nitrite toxicity to anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (anammox) bacteria.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangbin; Vilcherrez, David; Carvajal-Arroyo, Jose Maria; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A

    2016-02-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria (anammox) can be severely inhibited by one of its main substrates, nitrite (NO2(-)). At present, there is limited information on the processes by which anammox bacteria are able to tolerate toxic NO2(-). Intracellular consumption or electrochemically driven (transmembrane proton motive force) NO2(-) export are considered the main mechanisms of NO2(-) detoxification. In this work, we evaluated the potential of exogenous nitrate (NO3(-)) on relieving NO2(-) toxicity, putatively facilitated by NarK, a NO3(-)/NO2(-) transporter encoded in the anammox genome. The relative contribution of NO3(-) to NO2(-) detoxification was found to be pH dependent. Exposure of anammox cells to NO2(-) in absence of their electron donating substrate, ammonium (NH4(+)), causes NO2(-) stress. At pH 6.7 and 7.0, the activity of NO2(-) stressed cells was respectively 0 and 27% of the non-stressed control activity (NO2(-) and NH4(+) fed simultaneously). Exogenous NO3(-) addition caused the recovery to 42% and 80% of the control activity at pH 6.7 and 7.0, respectively. The recovery of the activity of NO2(-) stressed cells improved with increasing NO3(-) concentration, the maximum recovery being achieved at 0.85 mM. The NO3(-) pre-incubation time is less significant at pH 7.0 than at pH 6.7 due to a more severe NO2(-) toxicity at lower pH. Additionally, NO3(-) caused almost complete attenuation of NO2(-) toxicity in cells exposed to the proton gradient disruptor carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone at pH 7.5, providing evidence that the NO3(-) attenuation is independent of the proton motive force. The absence of a measurable NO3(-) consumption (or NO3(-) dependent N2 production) during the batch tests leaves NO3(-) dependent active transport of NO2(-) as the only plausible explanation for the relief of NO2(-) inhibition. We suggest that anammox cells can use a secondary transport system facilitated by exogenous NO3(-) to alleviate NO2(-) toxicity. PMID

  4. Nitrate and nitrite anion concentration in the intact cerebral cortex of preterm and nearterm fetal sheep: indirect index of in vivo nitric oxide formation.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, J D; Zeballos, G A; Penning, D H; Kimura, K A; Atkins, B; Brien, J F

    1998-04-01

    Pregnant sheep with a microdialysis probe implanted in the fetal cerebral cortex were used to determine if nitrate and nitrite anions (nitrate/nitrite) could be quantitated in the microdialysate as an indirect index of in vivo nitric oxide formation. Pregnant ewes (term, about 147 days) were surgically instrumented at gestational day (GD) 90 (n = 3; preterm) and GD 121 (n = 3; nearterm). Three days later, following an overnight probe equilibration period, five dialysate samples were collected continuously on ice at 1-h intervals (infusion rate of 1 (microl/min). The nitrate/nitrite concentration was determined by reducing a 10-microl aliquot of each dialysate fraction with hot acidic vanadium followed by chemiluminescence quantitation of the nitric oxide product. The lower limit of quantitative sensitivity of the method is 25 picomoles. Nitrate/nitrite concentration was 16.6+/-7.3 microM for the preterm fetus and 19.7+/-1.9 microM for the nearterm fetus. The data demonstrate that nitrate/nitrite, as an index of in vivo nitric oxide formation, can be quantitated in microdialysate samples collected from the intact fetal sheep cerebral cortex. PMID:9741385

  5. Ammonia from iron(II) reduction of nitrite and the Strecker synthesis: do iron(II) and cyanide interfere with each other?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, D. P.; Lerner, N.

    1998-01-01

    The question of whether the production of ammonia, from the reduction of nitrite by iron(II), is compatible with its use in the Strecker synthesis of amino acids, or whether the iron and the cyanide needed for the Strecker synthesis interfere with each other, is addressed. Results show that the presence of iron(II) appears to have little, or no, effect on the Strecker synthesis. The presence of cyanide does interfere with reduction of nitrite, but the reduction proceeds at cyanide/iron ratios of less than 4:1. At ratios of about 2:1 and less there is only a small effect. The reduction of nitrite and the Strecker can be combined to proceed in each other's presence, to yield glycine from a mixture of nitrite, Fe+2, formaldehyde, and cyanide.

  6. Nitrate reduction by organotrophic Anammox bacteria in a nitritation/anammox granular sludge and a moving bed biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Mari K H; Yang, Jingjing; Kleerebezem, Robbert; Plaza, Elzbieta; Trela, Jozef; Hultman, Bengt; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2012-06-01

    The effects of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) on nitrogen removal and microbial community structure in nitritation/anammox process were compared within a granular sludge reactor and a moving bed biofilm reactor. Nitrate productions in both systems were lower by 40-68% in comparison with expected nitrate production. Expected sludge production on VFAs was estimated to be 67-77% higher if heterotrophs were the main acetate degraders suggesting that Anammox bacteria used its organotrophic capability and successfully competed with general heterotrophs for organic carbon, which led to a reduced sludge production. FISH measurements showed a population consisting of mainly Anammox and AOB in both reactors and oxygen uptake rate (OUR) tests also confirmed that flocculent biomass consisted of a minor proportion of heterotrophs with a large proportion of AOBs. The dominant Anammox bacterium was Candidatus "Brocadia fulgida" with a minor fraction of Candidatus "Anammoxoglobus propionicus", both known to be capable of oxidizing VFAs. PMID:22520220

  7. Reversible intercalation of ammonia molecules into a layered double hydroxide structure without exchanging nitrate counter-ions

    SciTech Connect

    Carbajal Arizaga, Gregorio Guadalupe; Wypych, Fernando; Castillon Barraza, Felipe; Contreras Lopez, Oscar Edel

    2010-10-15

    A zinc/aluminum LDH was precipitated with recycled ammonia from a chemical vapor deposition reaction. The LDH presented a crystalline phase with basal distance of 8.9 A, typical for nitrate-containing LDHs, and another phase with a basal distance of 13.9 A. Thermal treatment at 150 {sup o}C eliminated the phase with the bigger basal distance leaving only the anhydrous nitrate-intercalated LDH structure with 8.9 A. Intense N-H stretching modes in the FTIR spectra suggested that the expansion was due to intercalation of ammonia in the form of [NH{sub 4}(NH{sub 3}){sub n}]{sup +} species. When additional samples were precipitated with pure ammonia, the conventional LDH nitrate structure was obtained (8.9 A basal distance) at pH=7, as well as a pure crystalline phase with 13.9 A basal distance at pH=10 due to ammonia intercalation that can be removed by heating at 150 {sup o}C or by stirring in acetone, confirming a unusual sensu stricto intercalation process into a LDH without exchanging nitrate ions. - Graphical abstract: LDH-nitrate precipitated with ammonia expands the interlayer space if ammonia is bubbled up to pH 10. The basal distance decreased when the compound was heated at 150 {sup o}C or stirred in acetone. Nitrate ions are not exchanged.

  8. Thermal fluids for CSP systems: Alkaline nitrates/nitrites thermodynamics modelling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tizzoni, A. C.; Sau, S.; Corsaro, N.; Giaconia, A.; D'Ottavi, C.; Licoccia, S.

    2016-05-01

    Molten salt (MS) mixtures are used for the transport (HTF-heat transfer fluid) and storage of heat (HSM-heat storage material) in Concentration Solar Plants (CSP). In general, alkaline and earth-alkaline nitrate/nitrite mixtures are employed. Along with its upper stability temperature, the melting point (liquidus point) of a MS mixture is one of the main parameters which defines its usefulness as a HTF and HSM medium. As a result, we would like to develop a predictive model which will allow us to forecast freezing points for different MS mixture compositions; thus circumventing the need to determine experimentally the phase diagram for each MS mixture. To model ternary/quaternary phase diagram, parameters for the binary subsystems are to be determined, which is the purpose of the concerned work. In a binary system with components A and B, in phase equilibrium conditions (e.g. liquid and solid) the chemical potentials (partial molar Gibbs energy) for each component in each phase are equal. For an ideal solution it is possible to calculate the mixing (A+B) Gibbs energy:ΔG = ΔH - TΔS = RT(xAlnxA + xBlnxB) In case of non-ideal solid/liquid mixtures, such as the nitrates/nitrites compositions investigated in this work, the actual value will differ from the ideal one by an amount defined as the "mixing" (mix) Gibbs free energy. If the resulting mixtures is assumed, as indicated in the previous literature, to follow a "regular solution" model, where all the non-ideality is considered included in the enthalpy of mixing value and considering, for instance, the A component:Δ G ≡0 =(Δ HA-T Δ SA)+(ΔH¯ m i x AL-T ΔS¯ m i x AL)-(ΔH¯ m i x AS-T ΔS¯ m i x AS)where the molar partial amounts can be calculated from the total value by the Gibbs Duhem equation: (ΔH¯m i x AL=ΔHm i x-XB Ld/Δ Hm i x d XB L ) L;(ΔH¯m i x AS=ΔHm i x-XB Sd/Δ Hm i x d XB S ) S and, in general, it is possible to express the mixing enthalpy for solids and liquids as a function of the mol

  9. Nitrate and ammonia contaminations in drinking water and the affecting factors in Hailun, northeast China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xinfeng; Chen, Liding; Zhang, Haiping

    2013-03-01

    Drinking water samples (N = 228) from domestic tube wells (DTWs) and seven samples from public water supply wells (PWSWs) were collected and tested in Hailun, northeast China. The percentage of samples with nitrate and ammonia concentrations above the maximum acceptable concentration of nitrate, 10 mg N/L, and the maximum ensure concentration of ammonia, 1.5 mg/L, for the DTWs were significantly higher than for the PWSWs. Of the DTWs, an important observation was that the occurrence of groundwater nitrate contamination was directly related to well tube material with different joint pathways. Nitrate in seamless-tube wells was lower statistically significantly than those in multiple-section-tube wells (p < .001). Furthermore, well depth and hydrogeological setting might have some impacts on nitrogen contamination and the major sources of inorganic nitrogen contamination may be nitrogenous chemical fertilizer. Therefore, PWSWs built for all families are the best way to ensure the drinking water safety in villages. For DTWs it is necessary to use seamless tubes and to dig deep enough according to the depth of groundwater level. Improving the efficiency of chemical fertilizer use would also reduce the risk of groundwater contamination. PMID:23505772

  10. A low-temperature process for the denitration of Hanford single-shell tank, nitrate-based waste utilizing the nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC) or nitrate to ammonia and glass (NAG) process: Phase 2 report

    SciTech Connect

    Mattus, A.J.; Walker, J.F. Jr.; Youngblood, E.L.; Farr, L.L.; Lee, D.D.; Dillow, T.A.; Tiegs, T.N.

    1994-12-01

    Continuing benchtop studies using Hanford single-shell tank (SST) simulants and actual Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) low-level waste (LLW), employing a new denitration process for converting nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC), have conclusively shown that between 85 and 99% of the nitrate can be readily converted to gaseous ammonia. In this process, aluminum powders can be used to convert alkaline, nitrate-based supernate to ammonia and an aluminum oxide-sodium aluminate-based solid. The process may be able to use contaminated aluminum scrap metal from DOE sites to effect the conversion. The final, nitrate-free ceramic product can be pressed and sintered like other ceramics or silica and/or fluxing agents can be added to form a glassy ceramic or a flowable glass product. Based upon the starting volumes of 6.2 and 3.1 M sodium nitrate solution, volume reductions of 50 to 70% were obtained for the waste form produced. Sintered pellets produced from supernate from Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVSTs) have been leached in accordance with the 16.1 leach test for the radioelements {sup 85}Sr and {sup 137}Cs. Despite lengthy counting times, {sup 85}Sr could not be detected in the leachates. {sup 137}Cs was only slightly above background and corresponded to a leach index of 12.2 to 13.7 after 8 months of leaching. Leach testing of unsintered and sintered reactor product spiked with hazardous metals proved that both sintered and unsintered product passed the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) test. Design of the equipment and flowsheet for a pilot demonstration-scale system to prove the nitrate destruction portion of the NAC process and product formation is under way.

  11. Preliminary safe-handling experiments on a mixture of cesium nickel ferrocyanide and equimolar sodium nitrate/nitrite

    SciTech Connect

    Scheele, R.D. ); Cady, H.H. )

    1992-01-01

    As part of the Hanford Site's evaluation of the potential hazards associated with the storage of ferrocyanide wastes generated when ferrocyanide was used to scavenge radiocesium from waste supernates in the 1950s, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) subcontracted with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to perform a series of sensitivity tests. These test supplement PNL's thermal sensitivity testing results on the reactivity of cesium nickel ferrocyanide (Cs{sub 2}NiFe(CN){sub 6}) and nitrates and nitrites (Burger and Schelle 1991). LANL used a selected set of their standard tests to determine the sensitivity of a mixture of Cs{sub 2}NiFe(CN){sub 6} (FECN-1) and equimolar sodium nitrate and nitrite oxidant to nonthermal and thermal stimuli. The stoichiometric ratio of oxidant to Cs{sub 2}NiFe(CN){sub 6} in the tested mixture FECN-1 was 1.1:1. The appendix presents the results of the LANL testing of the sensitivity of FECN-1 to initiation by mechanical impact, spark, friction, and various thermal conditions. In addition to the sensitivity testing, LANL used an Accelerating Rate Calorimeter (ARC) to estimate the behavior of large batches of the mixture.

  12. Preliminary safe-handling experiments on a mixture of cesium nickel ferrocyanide and equimolar sodium nitrate/nitrite

    SciTech Connect

    Scheele, R.D.; Cady, H.H.

    1992-01-01

    As part of the Hanford Site`s evaluation of the potential hazards associated with the storage of ferrocyanide wastes generated when ferrocyanide was used to scavenge radiocesium from waste supernates in the 1950s, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) subcontracted with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to perform a series of sensitivity tests. These test supplement PNL`s thermal sensitivity testing results on the reactivity of cesium nickel ferrocyanide (Cs{sub 2}NiFe(CN){sub 6}) and nitrates and nitrites (Burger and Schelle 1991). LANL used a selected set of their standard tests to determine the sensitivity of a mixture of Cs{sub 2}NiFe(CN){sub 6} (FECN-1) and equimolar sodium nitrate and nitrite oxidant to nonthermal and thermal stimuli. The stoichiometric ratio of oxidant to Cs{sub 2}NiFe(CN){sub 6} in the tested mixture FECN-1 was 1.1:1. The appendix presents the results of the LANL testing of the sensitivity of FECN-1 to initiation by mechanical impact, spark, friction, and various thermal conditions. In addition to the sensitivity testing, LANL used an Accelerating Rate Calorimeter (ARC) to estimate the behavior of large batches of the mixture.

  13. [Abundance and Community Composition of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea in Two Completely Autotrophic Nitrogen Removal over Nitrite Systems].

    PubMed

    Gao, Jing-feng; Li, Ting; Zhang, Shu-jun; Fan, Xiao-yan; Pan, Kai-ling; Ma, Qian; Yuan, Ya-lin

    2015-08-01

    Ammonia oxidation is the first and rate-limiting step of nitrification, which was thought to be only performed by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). In recent years, ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) was also confirmed to take part in ammonia oxidation. The diversity and abundance of AOA have been investigated in various environments, however, little is known regarding the AOA in the completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite (CANON) wastewater treatment process. In this study, the abundance and diversity of AOA were investigated in the biofilm and flocculent activated sludge collected in a lab-scale (L) CANON system and a pilot-scale (P) CANON systems, respectively. The quantitative real time PCR (qPCR) was applied to investigate the abundance of AOA and the diversity of AOA was determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), cloning and sequencing. The qPCR results showed that the average abundance of AOA amoA gene of L and P was 2.42 x 10(6) copies x g(-1) dry sludge and 6.51 x 10(6) copies x g(-1) dry sludge, respectively. The abundance of AOA in biofilm was 10.1-14.1 times higher than that in flocculent activated sludge. For P system, the abundance of AOA in flocculent activated sludge was 1.8 times higher than that in biofilm. The results indicated that the abundance of AOA might be affected by different sludge morphology. The diversity of AOA in P system was extremely limited, only one OTU was observed, which was classified into Nitrosopumilus subcluster 5.2. The diversity of AOA in L system was higher, eight OTUs were observed, which were classified into five genera: Nitrososphaera subcluster 9, subcluster 8.1, subcluster 4.1, subcluster 1.1 and Nitrosopumilus subcluster 5.2. The diversity and abundance of AOA were different in CANON systems with different sludge morphology. AOA may play an important role in ammonia oxidation in CANON system. PMID:26592025

  14. Maternal characteristics associated with the dietary intake of nitrates, nitrites, and nitrosamines in women of child-bearing age: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Multiple N-nitroso compounds have been observed in animal studies to be both mutagenic and teratogenic. Human exposure to N-nitroso compounds and their precursors, nitrates and nitrites, can occur through exogenous sources, such as diet, drinking water, occupation, or environmental exposures, and through endogenous exposures resulting from the formation of N-nitroso compounds in the body. Very little information is available on intake of nitrates, nitrites, and nitrosamines and factors related to increased consumption of these compounds. Methods Using survey and dietary intake information from control women (with deliveries of live births without major congenital malformations during 1997-2004) who participated in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study (NBDPS), we examined the relation between various maternal characteristics and intake of nitrates, nitrites, and nitrosamines from dietary sources. Estimated intake of these compounds was obtained from the Willet Food Frequency Questionnaire as adapted for the NBDPS. Multinomial logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the consumption of these compounds by self-reported race/ethnicity and other maternal characteristics. Results Median intake per day for nitrates, nitrites, total nitrites (nitrites + 5% nitrates), and nitrosamines was estimated at 40.48 mg, 1.53 mg, 3.69 mg, and 0.472 μg respectively. With the lowest quartile of intake as the referent category and controlling for daily caloric intake, factors predicting intake of these compounds included maternal race/ethnicity, education, body mass index, household income, area of residence, folate intake, and percent of daily calories from dietary fat. Non-Hispanic White participants were less likely to consume nitrates, nitrites, and total nitrites per day, but more likely to consume dietary nitrosamines than other participants that participated in the NBDPS. Primary food sources of these

  15. Development of a simple method for the determination of nitrite and nitrate in groundwater by high-resolution continuum source electrothermal molecular absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Brandao, Geovani C; Matos, Geraldo D; Pereira, Raimundo N; Ferreira, Sergio L C

    2014-01-01

    In this work, it was developed a method for the determination of nitrite and nitrate in groundwater by high-resolution continuum source electrothermal molecular absorption spectrometry of NO produced by thermal decomposition of nitrate in a graphite furnace. The NO line at 215.360 nm was used for all analytical measurements and the signal obtained by integrated absorbance of three pixels. A volume of 20 μL of standard solution or groundwater sample was injected into graphite furnace and 5 μL of a 1% (m/v) Ca solution was co-injected as chemical modifier. The pyrolisis and vaporization temperatures established were of 150 and 1300°C, respectively. Under these conditions, it was observed a difference of thermal stability among the two nitrogen species in the presence of hydrochloric acid co-injected. While that the nitrite signal was totally suppressed, nitrate signal remained nearly stable. This way, nitrogen can be quantified only as nitrate. The addition of hydrogen peroxide provided the oxidation of nitrite to nitrate, which allowed the total quantification of the species and nitrite obtained by difference. A volume of 5 μL of 0.3% (v/v) hydrochloric acid was co-injected for the elimination of nitrite, whereas that hydrogen peroxide in the concentration of 0.75% (v/v) was added to samples or standards for the oxidation of nitrite to nitrate. Analytical curve was established using standard solution of nitrate. The method described has limits of detection and quantification of 0.10 and 0.33 μg mL(-1) of nitrogen, respectively. The precision, estimated as relative standard deviation (RSD), was of 7.5 and 3.8% (n=10) for groundwater samples containing nitrate-N concentrations of 1.9 and 15.2 μg mL(-1), respectively. The proposed method was applied to the analysis of 10 groundwater samples and the results were compared with those obtained by ion chromatography method. In all samples analyzed, the concentration of nitrite-N was always below of the limit of

  16. Investigation of reduction and tolerance capability of lactic acid bacteria isolated from kimchi against nitrate and nitrite in fermented sausage condition.

    PubMed

    Paik, Hyun-Dong; Lee, Joo-Yeon

    2014-08-01

    Lactobacillus brevis KGR3111, Lactobacillus curvatus KGR 2103, Lactobacillus plantarum KGR 5105, and Lactobacillus sakei KGR 4108 isolated from kimchi were investigated for their potential to be used as starter culture for fermented sausages with the capability to reduce and tolerate nitrate/nitrite. The reduction capability of tested strains for nitrate was not dramatic. All tested strains, however, showed the capability to produce nitrite reductase with the reduction amount of 58.46-75.80 mg/l of NO(2)(-). L. brevis and L. plantarum showed nitrate tolerance with the highest number of 8.71 log cfu/ml and 8.81 log cfu/ml, and L. brevis and L. sakei exhibited nitrite tolerance with the highest number of 8.24 log cfu/ml and 8.25 log cfu/ml, respectively. As a result, L. brevis, L. plantarum, and L. sakei isolated from kimchi showed a tolerance against nitrate or nitrite with a good nitrite reduction capability, indicating the satisfaction of one of the selection criteria to be used as starter culture for fermented sausages. PMID:24821591

  17. Members of the NPF3 transporter subfamily encode pathogen-inducible nitrate/nitrite transporters in grapevine and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Pike, Sharon; Gao, Fei; Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Sang Hee; Schachtman, Daniel P; Gassmann, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Vitis vinifera, the major grapevine species cultivated for wine production, is very susceptible to Erysiphe necator, the causal agent of powdery mildew (PM). This obligate biotrophic fungal pathogen attacks both leaf and berry, greatly affecting yield and quality. To investigate possible mechanisms of nutrient acquisition by successful biotrophs, we characterized a candidate NITRATE TRANSPORTER1/PEPTIDE TRANSPORTER FAMILY (NPF, formerly NRT1/PTR) member, grapevine NFP3.2, that was up-regulated in E. necator-inoculated susceptible V. vinifera Cabernet Sauvignon leaves, but not in resistant V. aestivalis Norton. Expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes and two-electrode voltage clamp measurements showed that VvNPF3.2 is a low-affinity transporter for both nitrate and nitrite and displays characteristics of NPF members from other plants. We also cloned the Arabidopsis ortholog, AtNPF3.1, and showed that AtNPF3.1 similarly transported nitrate and nitrite with low affinity. With an Arabidopsis triple mutant that is susceptible to E. necator, we found that AtNPF3.1 is up-regulated in the leaves of infected Arabidopsis similarly to VvNPF3.2 in susceptible grapevine leaves. Expression of the reporter β-glucuronidase (GUS) driven by the promoter of VvNPF3.2 or AtNPF3.1 in Arabidopsis indicated that both transporters are expressed in vascular tissue, with expression in major and minor veins, respectively. Interestingly, the promoter of VvNPF3.2 allowed induced expression of GUS in minor veins in PM-infected leaves. Our experiments lay the groundwork for investigating the manipulation of host nutrient distribution by biotrophic pathogens and characterizing physiological variables in the pathogenesis of this difficult to study grapevine disease. PMID:24259683

  18. Nitrite in feed: From Animal health to human health

    SciTech Connect

    Cockburn, Andrew; Brambilla, Gianfranco; Fernández, Maria-Luisa; Arcella, Davide; Peteghem, Carlos van; Dorne, Jean-Lou

    2013-08-01

    Nitrite is widely consumed from the diet by animals and humans. However the largest contribution to exposure results from the in vivo conversion of exogenously derived nitrate to nitrite. Because of its potential to cause to methaemoglobin (MetHb) formation at excessive levels of intake, nitrite is regulated in feed and water as an undesirable substance. Forages and contaminated water have been shown to contain high levels of nitrate and represent the largest contributor to nitrite exposure for food-producing animals. Interspecies differences in sensitivity to nitrite intoxication principally result from physiological and anatomical differences in nitrite handling. In the case of livestock both pigs and cattle are relatively susceptible. With pigs this is due to a combination of low levels of bacterial nitrite reductase and hence potential to reduce nitrite to ammonia as well as reduced capacity to detoxify MetHb back to haemoglobin (Hb) due to intrinsically low levels of MetHb reductase. In cattle the sensitivity is due to the potential for high dietary intake and high levels of rumen conversion of nitrate to nitrite, and an adaptable gut flora which at normal loadings shunts nitrite to ammonia for biosynthesis. However when this escape mechanism gets overloaded, nitrite builds up and can enter the blood stream resulting in methemoglobinemia. Looking at livestock case histories reported in the literature no-observed-effect levels of 3.3 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) per day for nitrite in pigs and cattle were estimated and related to the total daily nitrite intake that would result from complete feed at the EU maximum permissible level. This resulted in margins of safety of 9-fold and 5-fold for pigs and cattle, respectively. Recognising that the bulkiness of animal feed limits their consumption, these margins in conjunction with good agricultural practise were considered satisfactory for the protection of livestock health. A human health risk assessment was also

  19. Nitrite in feed: from animal health to human health.

    PubMed

    Cockburn, Andrew; Brambilla, Gianfranco; Fernández, Maria-Luisa; Arcella, Davide; Bordajandi, Luisa R; Cottrill, Bruce; van Peteghem, Carlos; Dorne, Jean-Lou

    2013-08-01

    Nitrite is widely consumed from the diet by animals and humans. However the largest contribution to exposure results from the in vivo conversion of exogenously derived nitrate to nitrite. Because of its potential to cause to methaemoglobin (MetHb) formation at excessive levels of intake, nitrite is regulated in feed and water as an undesirable substance. Forages and contaminated water have been shown to contain high levels of nitrate and represent the largest contributor to nitrite exposure for food-producing animals. Interspecies differences in sensitivity to nitrite intoxication principally result from physiological and anatomical differences in nitrite handling. In the case of livestock both pigs and cattle are relatively susceptible. With pigs this is due to a combination of low levels of bacterial nitrite reductase and hence potential to reduce nitrite to ammonia as well as reduced capacity to detoxify MetHb back to haemoglobin (Hb) due to intrinsically low levels of MetHb reductase. In cattle the sensitivity is due to the potential for high dietary intake and high levels of rumen conversion of nitrate to nitrite, and an adaptable gut flora which at normal loadings shunts nitrite to ammonia for biosynthesis. However when this escape mechanism gets overloaded, nitrite builds up and can enter the blood stream resulting in methemoglobinemia. Looking at livestock case histories reported in the literature no-observed-effect levels of 3.3mg/kg body weight (b.w.) per day for nitrite in pigs and cattle were estimated and related to the total daily nitrite intake that would result from complete feed at the EU maximum permissible level. This resulted in margins of safety of 9-fold and 5-fold for pigs and cattle, respectively. Recognising that the bulkiness of animal feed limits their consumption, these margins in conjunction with good agricultural practise were considered satisfactory for the protection of livestock health. A human health risk assessment was also

  20. 21 CFR 181.34 - Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. 181.34...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.34 Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. Sodium nitrite and potassium... fixatives and preservative agents, with or without sodium or potassium nitrate, in the curing of red...

  1. 21 CFR 181.34 - Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. 181.34...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.34 Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. Sodium nitrite and potassium... fixatives and preservative agents, with or without sodium or potassium nitrate, in the curing of red...

  2. 21 CFR 181.34 - Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. 181.34...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.34 Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. Sodium nitrite and potassium... fixatives and preservative agents, with or without sodium or potassium nitrate, in the curing of red...

  3. 21 CFR 181.34 - Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. 181.34...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.34 Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. Sodium nitrite and potassium... fixatives and preservative agents, with or without sodium or potassium nitrate, in the curing of red...

  4. Effect of various sources of organic carbon and high nitrite and nitrate concentrations on the selection of denitrifying bacteria. II. Continuous cultures in packed bed reactors.

    PubMed

    Błaszczyk, M

    1983-01-01

    The effect of different organic compounds, nitrites and nitrates at the concentration of 1,000 mg N/l on the quantitative and strain-specific selection of denitrifying bacteria was determined in anaerobic packed bed reactors. Both the source of carbon and nitrogen form influenced strain specificity and the frequency of occurrence of denitrifying bacteria. The frequency of denitrifying bacteria within packed bed reactor ranged in different media from 11% (glucose and nitrates) to 100% (methanol and ethanol with nitrates). A single species selection was observed in the presence of nitrites within packed bed reactor: Pseudomonas aeruginosa in medium with acetate. Pseudomonas stutzeri in medium with ethanol, Pseudomonas mendocina in medium with methanol and Pseudomonas fluorescens in medium with glucose. When nitrates were present in packed bed reactor, the dominating bacteria were: P. stutzeri in medium with acetate, P. fluorescens in medium with ethanol, Paracoccus denitrificans in medium with methanol and Alcaligenes faecalis in medium with glucose. PMID:6194668

  5. Diagnostic Role of Salivary and GCF Nitrite, Nitrate and Nitric Oxide to Distinguish Healthy Periodontium from Gingivitis and Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Poorsattar Bejeh-Mir, Arash; Parsian, Hadi; Akbari Khoram, Maryam; Ghasemi, Nafiseh; Bijani, Ali; Khosravi-Samani, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis of subclinical and early stage clinical periodontal dysfunction could prevent from further socioeconomic burden. The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic applicability of nitric oxide and its end-metabolites in periodontal tissue health and disease. Forty-two patients were enrolled and divided into three groups according to gingivitis (GI) and clinical attachment level (CAL) indices: a healthy group (GI<1, CAL<1), b: gingivitis (GI>1, CAL>1) and c: periodontitis (CAL>1) with 14 patients in each group. Unstimulated saliva and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) were collected. Samples were evaluated for nitrite, nitrate and total nitric oxide contents with the ELISA method. In addition, CAL, GI, plaque index (PI), decay, missing, filling (DMFT) and bleeding index (BI) scores were also recorded. Except for GCF nitrite content (P= 0.89), there was an increasing trend for measured biomarkers in both saliva and GCF (Periodontitis> gingivitis> healthy periodontium, P< 0.05). Data remained stable after simultaneous adjustment for DMFT and BI scores as confounding factors. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, cut point and p- value were as the followings: GCF nitrate (0.71, 0.11, 0.29,0.43, 4.97, P= 0.04), nitric oxide GCF ( 0.64, 0.18, 0.28, 0.5, 10.12, P= 0.04), nitrite saliva (0.93, 0.96,0.93,0.96,123.48, P< 0.001), salivary nitrate (0.93, 0.96, 0.93, 0.96, 123.6, P< 0.001), salivary nitric oxide (0.93, 0.96, 0.93, 0.96, 246.65, P <0.001). Our results revealed that NO plays an important role in the process of destruction of periodontal tissues. Within the limitation of our study, detecting NO biomarker and its end metabolites in saliva is of more value to assess the periodontal health comparing to GCF. PMID:25317400

  6. Monitoring of nitrite, nitrate, chloride and sulfate in environmental samples using electrophoresis microchips coupled with contactless conductivity detection.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Camilla Benevides; Moreira, Roger Cardoso; de Oliveira Tavares, Maria Gizelda; Coltro, Wendell K T

    2016-01-15

    This report describes the development of an analytical methodology on microchip electrophoresis (ME) devices coupled with capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection (C(4)D) to monitor inorganic anions in environmental samples. The buffer composition as well as detection operating parameters were optimized to achieve the best separation selectivity and detector sensitivity, respectively. Electrophoretic separations of Cl(-), NO3(-), SO4(2-) and NO2(-) were successfully performed within 60s using a running buffer composed of 30mmol L(-1) latic acid and 15mmol L(-1)l-histidine (His). The best detectability levels were found applying a sinusoidal wave with 1100-kHz-frequency and 60-Vpp amplitude. Quantitative analyzes of inorganic anions were carried out in the presence of Cr2O7(2-) ion as internal standard (IS), which ensured great repeatability in terms of migration times (<1%) and peak areas (6.2-7.6%) for thirty consecutive injections. The analytical performance revealed a linear behavior for concentration ranges between 0-120μmol L(-1) (Cl(-), NO2(-) and NO3(-)) and 0-60μmol L(-1) (SO4(2-)) and limits of detection (LODs) varying from 2.0 to 4.9μmol L(-1). The concentration levels of anionic species were determined in aquarium, river and biofertilizer samples with recovery values between 91% and 105%. The nitrification steps associated with conversion of ammonium to nitrite followed by the conversion of nitrite to nitrate were successfully monitored in a simulated environment without fishes during a period of twelve weeks. Lastly, the monitoring of anionic species was carried out during eight weeks in an aquarium environment containing ten fishes from Danio rerio (Ciprynidae). The recorded data revealed the absence of nitrite and a gradual increase on the ammonium and nitrate concentration levels during eight weeks, thus suggesting the direct conversion of ammonium to nitrate. Based on the data herein reported, the proposed analytical methodology

  7. Ammonia from Iron(II) Reduction of Nitrite and the Strecker Synthesis: Do Iron(II) and Cyanide Interfere with Each Other?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, David P.; Lerner, Narcinda; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The question of whether the production of ammonia, from the reduction of nitrite by iron(II), is compatible with its use in the Strecker synthesis of amino acids, or whether the iron and the cyanide needed for the Strecker synthesis interfere with each other, is addressed. Results show that the presence of iron(II) appears to have little, or no, affect on the Strecker synthesis. The presence of cyanide does interfere with reduction of nitrite, but the reduction proceeds at cyanide/iron ratios of less than 4:1. At ratios of about 2:1 and less there is only a small effect. The two reactions can be combined to proceed in each other's presence, forming glycine from nitrite, Fe(+2), formaldehyde, and cyanide.

  8. Rheological properties of the product slurry of the Nitrate to Ammonia and Ceramic (NAC) process

    SciTech Connect

    Muguercia, I.; Yang, G.; Ebadian, M.A.; Lee, D.D.; Mattus, A.J.; Hunt, R.D.

    1995-03-01

    The Nitrate to Ammonia and Ceramic (NAC) process is an innovative technology for immobilizing the liquid from Low Level radioactive Waste (LLW). An experimental study was conducted to measure the rheological properties of the pipe flow of the NAC product slurry. Test results indicate that the NAC product slurry has a profound rheological behavior. At low solids concentration, the slurry exhibits a typical dilatant fluid (or shear thinning)fluid. The transition from dilatant fluid to pseudo-plastic fluid will occur at between 25% to 30% solids concentration in temperature ranges of 50--80{degree}C. Correlation equations are developed based on the test data.

  9. Selection of Crop Varieties for Efficient Production Using Urea, Ammonia, Nitrite, and Nitrate in Celss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffaker, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    The presence of NO2(-) in the external solution increased the overall efficiency of the mixed N sources by cereal leaves. The NH4(+) in the substrate solution decreased the efficiency of NO3(-) reduction, while NO3(-) in the substrate solution increased the efficiency of NH4(+) assimilation.

  10. Nitrate/nitrite chemistry in NaNO/sub 3/-KNO/sub 3/ melts

    SciTech Connect

    Nissen, D.A.; Meeker, D.E.

    1983-03-02

    By chemical analysis of samples taken under carefully controlled conditions, we have been able to show that the only reaction of any consequence that takes place in the equimolar binary NaNO/sub 3/-KNO/sub 3/ system over the temperature range 500-600/sup 0/C is represented by NO/sub 3//sup -/ ..-->..reverse arrow NO/sub 2//sup -/ + 1/2O/sub 2/. Over this temperature range there is no evidence of the formation of any anionic oxygen species such as oxide, peroxide, or superoxide at concentrations greater than 10/sup -5/ mol/kg. Equilibrium constants for the above reaction have been determined over the temperature range 500-600/sup 0/C. The standard free energy for this reaction (..delta..G/sup 0/ (kcal/mol) = 23000 + 20.6T) has been derived from the experimental data and is in good agreement with similar results for the single salts. A study of the kinetics of the oxidation of nitrite showed the rate of that reaction to be overall second order, first order with respect to both nitrite and oxygen. The rate constants have been measured from 400 to 500/sup 0/C, and from their temperature dependence the activation energy for the oxidation of nitrite was calculated: 26.4 kcal/mol.

  11. Occurrence of herbicides, nitrite plus nitrate, and selected trace elements in ground water from northwestern and northeastern Missouri, July 1991 and 1992

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilkison, Donald H.; Maley, Randall D.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey and the Missouri Department of Health collected water samples for analysis of nitrite plus nitrate and herbicides from rural domestic wells in northwestern and northeastern Missouri in 1991 and 1992. In July 1991, samples were collected from 130 wells in Caldwell, Clinton, Daviess, Gentry, and Nodaway Counties in northwestern Missouri. Nitrite plus nitrate concentrations as nitrogen ranged from less than 0.05 to 63 milligrams per liter. Nitrite plus nitrate concentrations exceeded the State drinking-water standard of 10 milligrams per liter in water samples from 28 wells. One or more of the herbicides--alachlor, atrazine, cyanazine; metribuzin, metolachlor, and trifluralin--were detected at concentrations greater than or equal to 0.05 micrograms per liter in 19 samples. Atrazine was detected in water samples from 16 wells. In July 1992, water samples were collected from 147 wells in Audrain, Clark, Lewis, Monroe, Scotland, and Shelby Counties in northeastern Missouri. Nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen concentrations in samples ranged from less than 0.05 to 60 milligrams per liter and exceeded 10 milligrams per liter in samples from 28 wells. One or more of the herbicides-alachlor, atrazine, cyanazine, metribuzin, and metolachlor-were detected at concentrations greater than 0.10 microgram per liter in water samples from 19 of the wells sampled. Atrazine was detected in water from 18 wells.

  12. Development and validation of an ionic chromatography method for the determination of nitrate, nitrite and chloride in meat.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Moreno, Cristina; Perez, Isabel Viera; Urbano, Ana M

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop the validation of a method for the analysis of certain preservatives in meat and to obtain a suitable Certified Reference Material (CRM) to achieve this task. The preservatives studied were NO3(-), NO2(-) and Cl(-) as they serve as important antimicrobial agents in meat to inhibit the growth of bacteria spoilage. The meat samples were prepared using a treatment that allowed the production of a known CRM concentration that is highly homogeneous and stable in time. The matrix effects were also studied to evaluate the influence on the analytical signal for the ions of interest, showing that the matrix influence does not affect the final result. An assessment of the signal variation in time was carried out for the ions. In this regard, although the chloride and nitrate signal remained stable for the duration of the study, the nitrite signal decreased appreciably with time. A mathematical treatment of the data gave a stable nitrite signal, obtaining a method suitable for the validation of these anions in meat. A statistical study was needed for the validation of the method, where the precision, accuracy, uncertainty and other mathematical parameters were evaluated obtaining satisfactory results. PMID:26471608

  13. A sub-minute CZE method to determine nitrate and nitrite in meat products: An alternative for routine analysis.

    PubMed

    Della Betta, Fabiana; Pereira, Lais Morilla; Siqueira, Mariana Araújo; Valese, Andressa Camargo; Daguer, Heitor; Fett, Roseane; Vitali, Luciano; Costa, Ana Carolina Oliveira

    2016-09-01

    A sub-minute capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) method was optimized and a simple sample preparation procedure based on the extraction of the analytes with water and sodium tetraborate was developed for the simultaneous determination of nitrate and nitrite levels in meat products. The background electrolyte (BGE) was composed of 20mmolL(-1) perchloric acid and 65mmolL(-1) β-alanine at pH3.83. Thiocyanate was used as the internal standard. The proposed method was validated and the uncertainty estimated according to Eurachem guidelines. The run time was only 30s, allowing analyzing more than 25samples/h, the good analytical performance confirms the suitability of the method for the analysis of meat products. One sample presented residual nitrite levels above the limit established by MERCOSUL legislation (150mgkg(-1)). The use of a fast method in association with a simple sample preparation step means that this procedure represents a possible alternative to fulfill the demand for high throughput in routine laboratory analysis. PMID:27132205

  14. Fungal ammonia fermentation, a novel metabolic mechanism that couples the dissimilatory and assimilatory pathways of both nitrate and ethanol. Role of acetyl CoA synthetase in anaerobic ATP synthesis.

    PubMed

    Takasaki, Kazuto; Shoun, Hirofumi; Yamaguchi, Masashi; Takeo, Kanji; Nakamura, Akira; Hoshino, Takayuki; Takaya, Naoki

    2004-03-26

    Fungal ammonia fermentation is a novel dissimilatory metabolic mechanism that supplies energy under anoxic conditions. The fungus Fusarium oxysporum reduces nitrate to ammonium and simultaneously oxidizes ethanol to acetate to generate ATP (Zhou, Z., Takaya, N., Nakamura, A., Yamaguchi, M., Takeo, K., and Shoun, H. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 1892-1896). We identified the Aspergillus nidulans genes involved in ammonia fermentation by analyzing fungal mutants. The results showed that assimilatory nitrate and nitrite reductases (the gene products of niaD and niiA) were essential for reducing nitrate and for anaerobic cell growth during ammonia fermentation. We also found that ethanol oxidation is coupled with nitrate reduction and catalyzed by alcohol dehydrogenase, coenzyme A (CoA)-acylating aldehyde dehydrogenase, and acetyl-CoA synthetase (Acs). This is similar to the mechanism suggested in F. oxysporum except A. nidulans uses Acs to produce ATP instead of the ADP-dependent acetate kinase of F. oxysporum. The production of Acs requires a functional facA gene that encodes Acs and that is involved in ethanol assimilation and other metabolic processes. We purified the gene product of facA (FacA) from the fungus to show that the fungus acetylates FacA on its lysine residue(s) specifically under conditions of ammonia fermentation to regulate its substrate affinity. Acetylated FacA had higher affinity for acetyl-CoA than for acetate, whereas non-acetylated FacA had more affinity for acetate. Thus, the acetylated variant of the FacA protein is responsible for ATP synthesis during fungal ammonia fermentation. These results showed that the fungus ferments ammonium via coupled dissimilatory and assimilatory mechanisms. PMID:14722082

  15. nasST, two genes involved in the induction of the assimilatory nitrite-nitrate reductase operon (nasAB) of Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, J C; Ramos, F; Ortner, L; Tortolero, M

    1995-11-01

    An operon including two new genes (nasS and nasT) has been defined, cloned and sequenced. The deduced NASS protein is homologous to NRTA from Synechococcus sp. and to NASF from Klebsiella pneumoniae, two proteins involved in nitrate uptake. The predicted NAST polypeptide is homologous to the regulator proteins of the two-component regulatory systems. NASS plays a negative regulatory role in the synthesis of the nitrate and nitrite reductase. NAST is required for the expression of the nitrite-nitrate reductase operon (nasAB). Expression of the nasST operon is not under the control of the NTR system and is not regulated by the nitrogen source. A Phi(nasA-lacZ) fusion has been used to analyse expression of the nasAB operon in three different genetic backgrounds with altered nitrate reductase activity. Beta-galactosidase activity in two of them was independent of nitrate but in a mutant unable to reduce nitrate, nas-4, it was normally induced by nitrate. PMID:8748040

  16. Seasonal variation in denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia process rates and corresponding key functional genes along an estuarine nitrate gradient

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Cindy J.; Dong, Liang F.; Wilson, John; Stott, Andrew; Osborn, A. Mark; Nedwell, David B.

    2015-01-01

    This research investigated spatial-temporal variation in benthic bacterial community structure, rates of denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) processes and abundances of corresponding genes and transcripts at three sites—the estuary-head, mid-estuary and the estuary mouth (EM) along the nitrate gradient of the Colne estuary over an annual cycle. Denitrification rates declined down the estuary, while DNRA rates were higher at the estuary head and middle than the EM. In four out of the six 2-monthly time-points, rates of DNRA were greater than denitrification at each site. Abundance of gene markers for nitrate-reduction (nitrate reductase narG and napA), denitrification (nitrite reductase nirS) and DNRA (DNRA nitrite reductase nrfA) declined along the estuary with significant relationships between denitrification and nirS abundance, and DNRA and nrfA abundance. Spatially, rates of denitrification, DNRA and corresponding functional gene abundances decreased along the estuary. However, temporal correlations between rate processes and functional gene and transcript abundances were not observed. PMID:26082763

  17. Purification and characterization of assimilatory nitrite reductase from Candida utilis.

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, S; Shaila, M S; Rao, G R

    1996-01-01

    Nitrate assimilation in many plants, algae, yeasts and bacteria is mediated by two enzymes, nitrate reductase (EC 1.6.6.2) and nitrite reductase (EC 1.7.7.1). They catalyse the stepwise reduction of nitrate to nitrite and nitrite to ammonia respectively. The nitrite reductase from an industrially important yeast, Candida utilis, has been purified to homogeneity. Purified nitrite reductase is a heterodimer and the molecular masses of the two subunits are 58 and 66 kDa. The native enzyme exhibits a molecular mass of 126 kDa as analysed by gel filtration. The identify of the two subunits of nitrite reductase was confirmed by immunoblotting using antibody for Cucurbita pepo leaf nitrite reductase. The presence of two different sized transcripts coding for the two subunits was confirmed by (a) in vitro translation of mRNA from nitrate-induced C. utilis followed by immunoprecipitation of the in vitro translated products with heterologous nitrite reductase antibody and (b) Northern-blot analysis. The 66 kDa subunit is acidic in nature which is probably due to its phosphorylated status. The enzyme is stable over a range of temperatures. Both subunits can catalyse nitrite reduction, and the reconstituted enzyme, at a higher protein concentration, shows an activity similar to that of the purified enzyme. Each of these subunits has been shown to contain a few unique peptides in addition to a large number of common peptides. Reduced Methyl Viologen has been found to be as effective an electron donor as NADPH in the catalytic process, a phenomenon not commonly seen for nitrite reductases from other systems. PMID:8694757

  18. Dairy Slurry Application Method Effects on Ammonia Emission and Nitrate Leaching in No-till Corn Silage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To reduce odors and conserve dairy slurry nitrogen (N) for subsequent crop use, various slurry application techniques have been tested. Reductions in ammonia (NH3) emissions through slurry incorporation or other soil management techniques may, however, increase nitrate (NO3) leaching. Possible trade...

  19. Effects of dietary protein concentration on ammonia volatilization, nitrate leaching, and plant nitrogen uptake from dairy manure applied to lysimeters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This lysimeter experiment was designed to investigate the effects of dietary crude protein (CP) concentration on nitrate-N (NO3-N) and ammonia (NH3) losses from dairy manure applied to soil and manure N use for plant growth. Lactating dairy cows were fed diets with 16.7 (HighCP) or 14.8% (LowCP) cru...

  20. Nitrite in organ protection

    PubMed Central

    Rassaf, Tienush; Ferdinandy, Peter; Schulz, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, the nitrate-nitrite-nitric oxide pathway has emerged to therapeutical importance. Modulation of endogenous nitrate and nitrite levels with the subsequent S-nitros(yl)ation of the downstream signalling cascade open the way for novel cytoprotective strategies. In the following, we summarize the actual literature and give a short overview on the potential of nitrite in organ protection. PMID:23826831

  1. Inhabitancy of active Nitrosopumilus-like ammonia-oxidizing archaea and Nitrospira nitrite-oxidizing bacteria in the sponge Theonella swinhoei

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Guofang; Sun, Wei; Zhang, Fengli; Karthik, Loganathan; Li, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Nitrification directly contributes to the ammonia removal in sponges, and it plays an indispensable role in sponge-mediated nitrogen cycle. Previous studies have demonstrated genomic evidences of nitrifying lineages in the sponge Theonella swinhoei. However, little is known about the transcriptional activity of nitrifying community in this sponge. In this study, combined DNA- and transcript-based analyses were performed to reveal the composition and transcriptional activity of the nitrifiers in T. swinhoei from the South China Sea. Transcriptional activity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) in this sponge were confirmed by targeting their nitrifying genes,16S rRNA genes and their transcripts. Phylogenetic analysis coupled with RDP rRNA classification indicated that archaeal 16S rRNA genes, amoA (the subunit of ammonia monooxygenase) genes and their transcripts were closely related to Nitrosopumilus-like AOA; whereas nitrifying bacterial 16S rRNA genes, nxrB (the subunit of nitrite oxidoreductase) genes and their transcripts were closely related to Nitrospira NOB. Quantitative assessment demonstrated relative higher abundances of nitrifying genes and transcripts of Nitrosopumilus-like AOA than those of Nitrospira NOB in this sponge. This study illustrated the transcriptional potentials of Nitrosopumilus-like archaea and Nitrospira bacteria that would predominantly contribute to the nitrification functionality in the South China Sea T. swinhoei. PMID:27113140

  2. Inhabitancy of active Nitrosopumilus-like ammonia-oxidizing archaea and Nitrospira nitrite-oxidizing bacteria in the sponge Theonella swinhoei.

    PubMed

    Feng, Guofang; Sun, Wei; Zhang, Fengli; Karthik, Loganathan; Li, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Nitrification directly contributes to the ammonia removal in sponges, and it plays an indispensable role in sponge-mediated nitrogen cycle. Previous studies have demonstrated genomic evidences of nitrifying lineages in the sponge Theonella swinhoei. However, little is known about the transcriptional activity of nitrifying community in this sponge. In this study, combined DNA- and transcript-based analyses were performed to reveal the composition and transcriptional activity of the nitrifiers in T. swinhoei from the South China Sea. Transcriptional activity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) in this sponge were confirmed by targeting their nitrifying genes,16S rRNA genes and their transcripts. Phylogenetic analysis coupled with RDP rRNA classification indicated that archaeal 16S rRNA genes, amoA (the subunit of ammonia monooxygenase) genes and their transcripts were closely related to Nitrosopumilus-like AOA; whereas nitrifying bacterial 16S rRNA genes, nxrB (the subunit of nitrite oxidoreductase) genes and their transcripts were closely related to Nitrospira NOB. Quantitative assessment demonstrated relative higher abundances of nitrifying genes and transcripts of Nitrosopumilus-like AOA than those of Nitrospira NOB in this sponge. This study illustrated the transcriptional potentials of Nitrosopumilus-like archaea and Nitrospira bacteria that would predominantly contribute to the nitrification functionality in the South China Sea T. swinhoei. PMID:27113140

  3. Low-disturbance manure incorporation effects on ammonia and nitrate loss.

    PubMed

    Dell, Curtis J; Kleinman, Peter J A; Schmidt, John P; Beegle, Douglas B

    2012-01-01

    Low-disturbance manure application methods can provide the benefits of manure incorporation, including reducing ammonia (NH3) emissions, in production systems where tillage is not possible. However, incorporation can exacerbate nitrate (NO3⁻) leaching. We sought to assess the trade-offs in NH3 and NO3⁻ losses caused by alternative manure application methods. Dairy slurry (2006-2007) and liquid swine manure (2008-2009) were applied to no-till corn by (i) shallow (<10 cm) disk injection, (ii) surface banding with soil aeration, (iii) broadcasting, and (iv) broadcasting with tillage incorporation. Ammonia emissions were monitored for 72 h after application using ventilated chambers and passive diffusion samplers, and NO3⁻ leaching to 80 cm was monitored with buried column lysimeters. The greatest NH3 emissions occurred with broadcasting (35-63 kg NH3-N ha⁻), and the lowest emissions were from unamended soil (<1 kg NH-N ha⁻¹). Injection decreased NH-N emissions by 91 to 99% compared with broadcasting and resulted in lower emissions than tillage incorporation 1 h after broadcasting. Ammonia-nitrogen emissions from banding manure with aeration were inconsistent between years, averaging 0 to 71% that of broadcasting. Annual NO3⁻ leaching losses were small (<25 kg NO3-N ha⁻¹) and similar between treatments, except for the first winter when NO3⁻ leaching was fivefold greater with injection. Because NO3⁻ leaching with injection was substantially lower over subsequent seasons, we hypothesize that the elevated losses during the first winter were through preferential flow paths inadvertently created during lysimeter installation. Overall, shallow disk injection yielded the lowest NH3 emissions without consistently increasing NO3⁻ leaching, whereas manure banding with soil aeration conserved inconsistent amounts of N. PMID:22565274

  4. Organic tank safety project: Preliminary results of energetics and thermal behavior studies of model organic nitrate and/or nitrite mixtures and a simulated organic waste

    SciTech Connect

    Scheele, R.D.; Sell, R.L.; Sobolik, J.L.; Burger, L.L.

    1995-08-01

    As a result of years of production and recovery of nuclear defense materials and subsequent waste management at the Hanford Site, organic-bearing radioactive high-level wastes (HLW) are currently stored in large (up to 3. ML) single-shell storage tanks (SSTs). Because these wastes contain both fuels (organics) and the oxidants nitrate and nitrite, rapid energetic reactions at certain conditions could occur. In support of Westinghouse Hanford Company`s (WHC) efforts to ensure continued safe storage of these organic- and oxidant-bearing wastes and to define the conditions necessary for reactions to occur, we measured the thermal sensitivities and thermochemical and thermokinetic properties of mixtures of selected organics and sodium nitrate and/or nitrite and a simulated Hanford organic-bearing waste using thermoanalytical technologies. These thermoanalytical technologies are used by chemical reactivity hazards evaluation organizations within the chemical industry to assess chemical reaction hazards.

  5. Fluidic Automation of Nitrate and Nitrite Bioassays in Whole Blood by Dissolvable-Film Based Centrifugo-Pneumatic Actuation

    PubMed Central

    Nwankire, Charles E.; Chan, Di-Sien S.; Gaughran, Jennifer; Burger, Robert; Gorkin, Robert; Ducrée, Jens

    2013-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the full centrifugal microfluidic integration and automation of all liquid handling steps of a 7-step fluorescence-linked immunosorbent assay (FLISA) for quantifying nitrate and nitrite levels in whole blood within about 15 min. The assay protocol encompasses the extraction of metered plasma, the controlled release of sample and reagents (enzymes, co-factors and fluorescent labels), and incubation and detection steps. Flow control is implemented by a rotationally actuated dissolvable film (DF) valving scheme. In the valves, the burst pressure is primarily determined by the radial position, geometry and volume of the valve chamber and its inlet channel and can thus be individually tuned over an extraordinarily wide range of equivalent spin rates between 1,000 RPM and 5,500 RPM. Furthermore, the vapour barrier properties of the DF valves are investigated in this paper in order to further show the potential for commercially relevant on-board storage of liquid reagents during shelf-life of bioanalytical, ready-to-use discs. PMID:24064595

  6. Nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, glutamine synthetase, and glutamate synthase expression and activity in response to different nitrogen sources in nitrogen-starved wheat seedlings.

    PubMed

    Balotf, Sadegh; Kavoosi, Gholamreza; Kholdebarin, Bahman

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the expression and activity of nitrate reductase (NR, EC 1.7.1.1), nitrite reductase (NiR, EC 1.7.2.2), glutamine synthetase (GS, EC 6.3.1.2), and glutamate synthase (GOGAT, EC 1.4.7.1) in response to potassium nitrate, ammonium chloride, and ammonium nitrate in nitrogen-starved wheat seedlings. Plants were grown in standard nutrient solution for 17 days and then subjected to nitrogen starvation for 7 days. The starved plants were supplied with potassium nitrate ammonium nitrate and ammonium chloride (50 mM) for 4 days and the leaves were harvested. The relative expression of NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT as well as the enzyme activities were investigated. Nitrogen starvation caused a significant decrease both in transcript levels and in NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT activities. Potassium nitrate and ammonium nitrate treatments restored NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT expressions and activities. Ammonium chloride increased only the expressions and activities of GS and GOGAT in a dose-dependent manner. The results of our study highlight the differential effects between the type and the amount of nitrogen salts on NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT activities in wheat seedlings while potassium nitrate being more effective. PMID:25676153

  7. Involvement of NarK1 and NarK2 Proteins in Transport of Nitrate and Nitrite in the Denitrifying Bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vandana; Noriega, Chris E.; Rowe, John J.

    2006-01-01

    Two transmembrane proteins were tentatively classified as NarK1 and NarK2 in the Pseudomonas genome project and hypothesized to play an important physiological role in nitrate/nitrite transport in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The narK1 and narK2 genes are located in a cluster along with the structural genes for the nitrate reductase complex. Our studies indicate that the transcription of all these genes is initiated from a single promoter and that the gene complex narK1K2GHJI constitutes an operon. Utilizing an isogenic narK1 mutant, a narK2 mutant, and a narK1K2 double mutant, we explored their effect on growth under denitrifying conditions. While the ΔnarK1::Gm mutant was only slightly affected in its ability to grow under denitrification conditions, both the ΔnarK2::Gm and ΔnarK1K2::Gm mutants were found to be severely restricted in nitrate-dependent, anaerobic growth. All three strains demonstrated wild-type levels of nitrate reductase activity. Nitrate uptake by whole-cell suspensions demonstrated both the ΔnarK2::Gm and ΔnarK1K2::Gm mutants to have very low yet different nitrate uptake rates, while the ΔnarK1::Gm mutant exhibited wild-type levels of nitrate uptake. Finally, Escherichia coli narK rescued both the ΔnarK2::Gm and ΔnarK1K2::Gm mutants with respect to anaerobic respiratory growth. Our results indicate that only the NarK2 protein is required as a nitrate/nitrite transporter by Pseudomonas aeruginosa under denitrifying conditions. PMID:16391109

  8. A new method for the determination of the nitrogen content of nitrocellulose based on the molar ratio of nitrite-to-nitrate ions released after alkaline hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Alinat, Elodie; Delaunay, Nathalie; Archer, Xavier; Mallet, Jean-Maurice; Gareil, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    A new method was proposed to determine the nitrogen content of nitrocelluloses (NCs). It is based on the finding of a linear relationship between the nitrogen content and the molar ratio of nitrite-to-nitrate ions released after alkaline hydrolysis. Capillary electrophoresis was used to monitor the concentration of nitrite and nitrate ions. The influences of hydrolysis time and molar mass of NC on the molar ratio of nitrite-to-nitrate ions were investigated, and new insights into the understanding of the alkaline denitration mechanism of NCs, underlying this analytical strategy is provided. The method was then tested successfully with various explosive and non-explosive NC-containing samples such as various daily products and smokeless gunpowders. Inherently to its principle exploiting a concentration ratio, this method shows very good repeatability in the determination of nitrogen content in real samples with relative standard deviation (n = 3) inferior to 1.5%, and also provides very significant advantages with respect to sample extraction, analysis time (1h for alkaline hydrolysis, 3 min for electrophoretic separation), which was about 5 times shorter than for the classical Devarda's method, currently used in industry, and safety conditions (no need for preliminary drying NC samples, mild hydrolysis conditions with 1M sodium hydroxide for 1h at 60 °C). PMID:25562808

  9. Role of nitrite in the induction of nitrate reductase activity in barley leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Aslam, M.; Huffaker, R.C.

    1986-04-01

    High levels of nitrate reductase activity (NRA) were induced in detached leaves of 8-day-old barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) seedlings when supplied with NO/sub 2//sup -/ in the induction solutions. At similar N flux, the level of the enzyme activity induced by NO/sub 2//sup -/ was about one-half of that induced by NO/sub 3//sup -/. Significant levels of NO/sub 3//sup -/ accumulated in NO/sub 2//sup -/-fed leaves. Traces of NO/sub 3//sup -/ (0.6%) were detected in solutions of reagent grade KNO/sub 2/. However, the amount of NO/sub 3//sup -/ absorbed from the NO/sub 2//sup -/ solutions was only one-tenth of that accumulated in the leaves during the induction period, showing the actual conversion of NO/sub 2//sup -/ to NO/sub 3//sup -/ within the leaf. When the NO/sub 3//sup -/ concentrations in the NO/sub 2//sup -/-fed leaves were plotted against NRA, a highly positive correlation was obtained. The results suggest that NO/sub 2//sup -/ induces NRA indirectly after being oxidized to NO/sub 3//sup -/ within the leaf.

  10. Nitrate, nitrite and nitric oxide reductases: from the last universal common ancestor to modern bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Torres, Andrés; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2016-02-01

    The electrochemical gradient that ensues from the enzymatic activity of cytochromes such as nitrate reductase, nitric oxide reductase, and quinol oxidase contributes to the bioenergetics of the bacterial cell. Reduction of nitrogen oxides by bacterial pathogens can, however, be uncoupled from proton translocation and biosynthesis of ATP or NH4(+), but still linked to quinol and NADH oxidation. Ancestral nitric oxide reductases, as well as cytochrome c oxidases and quinol bo oxidases evolved from the former, are capable of binding and detoxifying nitric oxide to nitrous oxide. The NO-metabolizing activity associated with these cytochromes can be a sizable source of antinitrosative defense in bacteria during their associations with host cells. Nitrosylation of terminal cytochromes arrests respiration, reprograms bacterial metabolism, stimulates antioxidant defenses and alters antibiotic cytotoxicity. Collectively, the bioenergetics and regulation of redox homeostasis that accompanies the utilization of nitrogen oxides and detoxification of nitric oxide by cytochromes of the electron transport chain increases fitness of many Gram-positive and -negative pathogens during their associations with invertebrate and vertebrate hosts. PMID:26426528