Science.gov

Sample records for ammonia recycle percolation

  1. PRETREATMENT AND FRACTIONATION OF CORN STOVER BY AMMONIA RECYCLE PERCOLATION PROCESS. (R831645)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Corn stover was pretreated with aqueous ammonia in a flow-through column reactor,
    a process termed as Ammonia Recycle Percolation (ARP). The aqueous ammonia causes
    swelling and efficient delignification of biomass at high temperatures. The ARP
    process solubilizes abou...

  2. Ammonia recycling enables sustainable operation of bioelectrochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ka Yu; Kaksonen, Anna H; Cord-Ruwisch, Ralf

    2013-09-01

    Ammonium (NH4(+)) migration across a cation exchange membrane is commonly observed during the operation of bioelectrochemical systems (BES). This often leads to anolyte acidification (pH <5.5) and complete inactivation of biofilm electroactivity. Without using conventional pH controls (dosage of alkali or pH buffers), the present study revealed that anodic biofilm activity (current) could be sustained if recycling of ammonia (NH3) was implemented. A simple gas-exchange apparatus was designed to enable continuous recycling of NH3 (released from the catholyte at pH >10) from the cathodic headspace to the acidified anolyte. Results indicated that current (110 mA or 688 Am(-3) net anodic chamber volume) was sustained as long as the NH3 recycling path was enabled, facilitating continuous anolyte neutralization with the recycled NH3. Since the microbial current enabled NH4(+) migration against a strong concentration gradient (~10-fold), a novel way of ammonia recovery from wastewaters could be envisaged. PMID:23774293

  3. Isolation of high quality lignin as a by-product from ammonia percolation pretreatment of poplar wood.

    PubMed

    Bouxin, Florent P; David Jackson, S; Jarvis, Michael C

    2014-06-01

    A two-step process combining percolation-mode ammonia pretreatment of poplar sawdust with mild organosolv purification of the extracted lignin produced high quality, high purity lignin in up to 31% yield and 50% recovery. The uncondensed fraction of the isolated lignin was up to 34%, close to that the native lignin (40%). Less lignin was recovered after pretreatment in batch mode, apparently due to condensation during the longer residence time of the solubilised lignin at elevated temperature. The lignin recovery was directly correlated with its molecular weight and its nitrogen content. Low nitrogen incorporation, observed at high ammonia concentration, may be explained by limited homolytic cleavage of β-O-4 bonds. Ammonia concentrations from 15% to 25% (w/w) gave similar results in terms of lignin structure, yield and recovery. PMID:24755321

  4. Improved methane fermentation of chicken manure via ammonia removal by biogas recycle.

    PubMed

    Abouelenien, Fatma; Fujiwara, Wataru; Namba, Yuzaburo; Kosseva, Maria; Nishio, Naomichi; Nakashimada, Yutaka

    2010-08-01

    This study demonstrates methane fermentation that was carried out along with ammonia striping to avoid ammonia accumulation that significantly inhibited methane production. Ammonia was successfully removed by means of recycling of biogas followed by gas washing in sulfuric acid to capture ammonia, when chicken manure was anaerobically digested for 4 days at 55 degrees C and at an initial pH of 8-9. By using this method, 80% of total nitrogen in chicken manure was converted to ammonia and 82% of the produced ammonia was removed. A bench scale reactor equipped with an ammonia-stripping unit for methane production from chicken manure was developed and operated in repeated batch mode. At an initial pH of 8 and at 55 degrees C, 195 and 157 ml g-VS(-1) of methane was successfully produced from the treated chicken manure and the mixture of treated chicken manure and raw chicken manure in the ratio of 1:1, respectively. In this method, ammonia concentration was maintained at a level lower than 2g-N kg-wet sludge(-1) in the reactor. PMID:20378337

  5. Amination of aryl halides with aqueous ammonia catalyzed by green recyclable poly(4-vinylpyridine)-supported copper iodide nanoparticles catalyst.

    PubMed

    Albadi, Jalal; Shiran, Jafar Abbasi; Mansournezhad, Azam

    2014-01-01

    In this research efficient procedure for the amination of aryl halides with aqueous ammonia in the presence of poly(4-vinylpyridine)-supported copper iodide nanoparticles catalyst is reported. A wide range of aryl halides including aryl iodides and aryl bromides are converted into the corresponding aniline derivatives. The experimental procedure with poly(4-vinylpyridine)-supported copper iodide nanoparticles catalyst is quite straightforward and it is recycled up to 3 consecutive runs by simple filtration. PMID:25551733

  6. Pretreatment of Biomass by Aqueous Ammonia for Bioethanol Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Gupta, Rajesh; Lee, Y. Y.

    The methods of pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass using aqueous ammonia are described. The main effect of ammonia treatment of biomass is delignification without significantly affecting the carbohydrate contents. It is a very effective pretreatment method especially for substrates that have low lignin contents such as agricultural residues and herbaceous feedstock. The ammonia-based pretreatment is well suited for simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation (SSCF) because the treated biomass retains cellulose as well as hemicellulose. It has been demonstrated that overall ethanol yield above 75% of the theoretical maximum on the basis of total carbohydrate is achievable from corn stover pretreated with aqueous ammonia by way of SSCF. There are two different types of pretreatment methods based on aqueous ammonia: (1) high severity, low contact time process (ammonia recycle percolation; ARP), (2) low severity, high treatment time process (soaking in aqueous ammonia; SAA). Both of these methods are described and discussed for their features and effectiveness.

  7. Ammonia

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Ammonia ; CASRN 7664 - 41 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects

  8. Process modeling of an advanced NH₃ abatement and recycling technology in the ammonia-based CO₂ capture process.

    PubMed

    Li, Kangkang; Yu, Hai; Tade, Moses; Feron, Paul; Yu, Jingwen; Wang, Shujuan

    2014-06-17

    An advanced NH3 abatement and recycling process that makes great use of the waste heat in flue gas was proposed to solve the problems of ammonia slip, NH3 makeup, and flue gas cooling in the ammonia-based CO2 capture process. The rigorous rate-based model, RateFrac in Aspen Plus, was thermodynamically and kinetically validated by experimental data from open literature and CSIRO pilot trials at Munmorah Power Station, Australia, respectively. After a thorough sensitivity analysis and process improvement, the NH3 recycling efficiency reached as high as 99.87%, and the NH3 exhaust concentration was only 15.4 ppmv. Most importantly, the energy consumption of the NH3 abatement and recycling system was only 59.34 kJ/kg CO2 of electricity. The evaluation of mass balance and temperature steady shows that this NH3 recovery process was technically effective and feasible. This process therefore is a promising prospect toward industrial application. PMID:24850444

  9. Recycling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinker, Barbara

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the range of benefits resulting from recycling efforts and projects. Presents information and data related to the recycling of metals, cans, paper, fans, and plastics. Suggestions for motivating and involving youth in recycling programs are also offered. (ML)

  10. Recycle

    SciTech Connect

    1988-10-01

    ;Contents: The Problem; What`s In Our Trash; Where Does Trash Go; Where Does Our Trash Go; The Solution; What Is Recycling; Why Should We Recycle; A National Goal of 25%; What Can We Recycle; What Do We Do With Our Recyclables.

  11. Recovery and removal of ammonia-nitrogen and phosphate from swine wastewater by internal recycling of struvite chlorination product.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haiming; Yang, Jiang; Li, Ding

    2014-11-01

    The recovery of the total orthophosphate (PT) and removal of the total ammonia-nitrogen (TAN) from swine wastewater were investigated through a combined technology of using bittern as the magnesium source in struvite precipitation along with internal recycling of the chlorination product of the recovered struvite. Results revealed that the PT recovery efficiency and the struvite purity was mainly depended on the wastewater pH and the Mg:PT molar ratio. Co-precipitations of Mg3(PO4)2, MgKPO4, Ca3(PO4)2, and Mg(OH)2 (pH>9) were confirmed to be responsible for the decrease in the purity of struvite. The decomposition of recovered struvite by sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) was feasible. The TAN concentration of the swine wastewater was decreased to 63mg/L by internal recycling of the chlorination decomposition product for seven cycles. An economic evaluation showed that 37% of the treatment cost of the proposed process could be saved as compared with struvite precipitation using pure chemicals. PMID:25265330

  12. Simultaneous determination of indoor ammonia pollution and its biological metabolite in the human body with a recyclable nanocrystalline lanthanide-functionalized MOF.

    PubMed

    Hao, Ji-Na; Yan, Bing

    2016-01-28

    A Eu(3+) post-functionalized metal-organic framework of nanosized Ga(OH)bpydc(Eu(3+)@Ga(OH)bpydc, ) with intense luminescence is synthesized and characterized. Luminescence measurements reveal that can detect ammonia gas selectively and sensitively among various indoor air pollutants. can simultaneously determine a biological ammonia metabolite (urinary urea) in the human body, which is a rare example of a luminescent sensor that can monitor pollutants in the environment and also detect their biological markers. Furthermore, exhibits appealing features including high selectivity and sensitivity, fast response, simple and quick regeneration, and excellent recyclability. PMID:26762851

  13. Recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Junya; Santorelli, Michael

    Recycling systems are classified into those employing typically three methods, and the progress of each method is described. In mechanical recycling, powders of phenolic materials are recovered via a mechanical process and reused as fillers or additives in virgin materials. The effects to flowability, curability, and mechanical properties of the materials are explained. In feedstock recycling, monomers, oligomers, or oils are recovered via chemical processes and reused as feedstock. Pyrolysis, solvolysis or hydrolysis, and supercritical or subcritical fluid technology will also be introduced. When using a subcritical fluid of phenol, the recycled material maintains excellent properties similar to the virgin material, and a demonstration plant has been constructed to carry out mass production development. In energy recovery, wastes of phenolic materials are used as an alternative solid fuel to coal because they are combustible and have good calorific value. Industrial wastes of these have been in practical use in a cement plant. Finally, it is suggested that the best recycling method should be selected according to the purpose or situation, because every recycling method has both strengths and weaknesses. Therefore, quantitative and objective evaluation methods in recycling are desirable and should be established.

  14. Simultaneous determination of indoor ammonia pollution and its biological metabolite in the human body with a recyclable nanocrystalline lanthanide-functionalized MOF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Ji-Na; Yan, Bing

    2016-01-01

    A Eu3+ post-functionalized metal-organic framework of nanosized Ga(OH)bpydc(Eu3+@Ga(OH)bpydc, 1a) with intense luminescence is synthesized and characterized. Luminescence measurements reveal that 1a can detect ammonia gas selectively and sensitively among various indoor air pollutants. 1a can simultaneously determine a biological ammonia metabolite (urinary urea) in the human body, which is a rare example of a luminescent sensor that can monitor pollutants in the environment and also detect their biological markers. Furthermore, 1a exhibits appealing features including high selectivity and sensitivity, fast response, simple and quick regeneration, and excellent recyclability.A Eu3+ post-functionalized metal-organic framework of nanosized Ga(OH)bpydc(Eu3+@Ga(OH)bpydc, 1a) with intense luminescence is synthesized and characterized. Luminescence measurements reveal that 1a can detect ammonia gas selectively and sensitively among various indoor air pollutants. 1a can simultaneously determine a biological ammonia metabolite (urinary urea) in the human body, which is a rare example of a luminescent sensor that can monitor pollutants in the environment and also detect their biological markers. Furthermore, 1a exhibits appealing features including high selectivity and sensitivity, fast response, simple and quick regeneration, and excellent recyclability. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental section; XPS spectra; N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms; ICP data; SEM image; PXRD patterns and other luminescence data. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06066d

  15. Advanced Life Support Water Recycling Technologies Case Studies: Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Removal and Direct Osmotic Concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Design for microgravity has traditionally not been well integrated early on into the development of advanced life support (ALS) technologies. NASA currently has a many ALS technologies that are currently being developed to high technology readiness levels but have not been formally evaluated for microgravity compatibility. Two examples of such technologies are the Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Removal Technology and the Direct Osmotic Concentration Technology. This presentation will cover the design of theses two systems and will identify potential microgravity issues.

  16. Multifractality in elastic percolation

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, A.; Roux, S.

    1988-11-01

    We present numerical results on the distribution of forces in the central-force percolation model at threshold in two dimensions. We conjecture a relation between the multifractal spectrum of scalar and vector percolation that we test for central-force percolation. This relation is in excellent agreement with out numerical data.

  17. Percolation on Sparse Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karrer, Brian; Newman, M. E. J.; Zdeborová, Lenka

    2014-11-01

    We study percolation on networks, which is used as a model of the resilience of networked systems such as the Internet to attack or failure and as a simple model of the spread of disease over human contact networks. We reformulate percolation as a message passing process and demonstrate how the resulting equations can be used to calculate, among other things, the size of the percolating cluster and the average cluster size. The calculations are exact for sparse networks when the number of short loops in the network is small, but even on networks with many short loops we find them to be highly accurate when compared with direct numerical simulations. By considering the fixed points of the message passing process, we also show that the percolation threshold on a network with few loops is given by the inverse of the leading eigenvalue of the so-called nonbacktracking matrix.

  18. Social percolation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, Sorin; Weisbuch, Gerard; de Arcangelis, Lucilla; Jan, Naeem; Stauffer, Dietrich

    2000-03-01

    We here relate the occurrence of extreme market shares, close to either 0 or 100%, in the media industry to a percolation phenomenon across the social network of customers. We further discuss the possibility of observing self-organized criticality when customers and cinema producers adjust their preferences and the quality of the produced films according to previous experience. Comprehensive computer simulations on square lattices do indeed exhibit self-organized criticality towards the usual percolation threshold and related scaling behaviour.

  19. Price percolation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanai, Yasuhiro; Abe, Keiji; Seki, Yoichi

    2015-06-01

    We propose a price percolation model to reproduce the price distribution of components used in industrial finished goods. The intent is to show, using the price percolation model and a component category as an example, that percolation behaviors, which exist in the matter system, the ecosystem, and human society, also exist in abstract, random phenomena satisfying the power law. First, we discretize the total potential demand for a component category, considering it a random field. Second, we assume that the discretized potential demand corresponding to a function of a finished good turns into actual demand if the difficulty of function realization is less than the maximum difficulty of the realization. The simulations using this model suggest that changes in a component category's price distribution are due to changes in the total potential demand corresponding to the lattice size and the maximum difficulty of realization, which is an occupation probability. The results are verified using electronic components' sales data.

  20. Percolative aspects in photoconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domes, H.; Leyrer, R.; Haarer, D.; Blumen, A.

    1987-09-01

    We present transient photocurrent measurements on samples containing a benztriazole derivative embedded in polycarbonate matrices and we obtain the effective carrier mobilities and their dependence on concentration. This dependence can be viewed in terms of a critical concentration pc and a critical exponent t¯. Our values of pc=0.1 and t¯=2.5 are similar to recent findings on continuum percolation. In contrast to simple percolation, the mobility is also field and temperature dependent, obeying a Poole-Frenkel behavior.

  1. Ammonia Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... changes in behavior and consciousness. Ammonia is a waste product naturally produced in the body. It primarily ... ammonia do not rule out hepatic encephalopathy . Other wastes can contribute to changes in mental function and ...

  2. Ammonia Process by Pressure Swing Adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Dr Felix Jegede

    2010-12-27

    The overall objective of the project is to design, develop and demonstrate a technically feasible and commercially viable system to produce ammonia along with recovery of the products by adsorption separation methods and significantly decrease the energy requirement in ammonia production. This is achieved through a significantly more efficient ammonia psa recovery system. The new ammonia recovery system receives the reactor effluents and achieves complete ammonia recovery, (which completely eliminates the energy intensive refrigeration and condensation system currently used in ammonia production). It also recovers the unused reactants and recycles them back to the reactor, free of potential reactor contaminants, and without the need for re-compression and re-heat of recycle stream thereby further saving more energy. The result is a significantly lower energy consumption, along with capital cost savings.

  3. Ammonia Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauer, Richard L. (Inventor); Akse, James R. (Inventor); Thompson, John O. (Inventor); Atwater, James E. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Ammonia monitor and method of use are disclosed. A continuous, real-time determination of the concentration of ammonia in an aqueous process stream is possible over a wide dynamic range of concentrations. No reagents are required because pH is controlled by an in-line solid-phase base. Ammonia is selectively transported across a membrane from the process stream to an analytical stream to an analytical stream under pH control. The specific electrical conductance of the analytical stream is measured and used to determine the concentration of ammonia.

  4. Percolation technique for galaxy clustering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klypin, Anatoly; Shandarin, Sergei F.

    1993-01-01

    We study percolation in mass and galaxy distributions obtained in 3D simulations of the CDM, C + HDM, and the power law (n = -1) models in the Omega = 1 universe. Percolation statistics is used here as a quantitative measure of the degree to which a mass or galaxy distribution is of a filamentary or cellular type. The very fast code used calculates the statistics of clusters along with the direct detection of percolation. We found that the two parameters mu(infinity), characterizing the size of the largest cluster, and mu-squared, characterizing the weighted mean size of all clusters excluding the largest one, are extremely useful for evaluating the percolation threshold. An advantage of using these parameters is their low sensitivity to boundary effects. We show that both the CDM and the C + HDM models are extremely filamentary both in mass and galaxy distribution. The percolation thresholds for the mass distributions are determined.

  5. Self Healing Percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scala, Antonio

    2015-03-01

    We introduce the concept of self-healing in the field of complex networks modelling; in particular, self-healing capabilities are implemented through distributed communication protocols that exploit redundant links to recover the connectivity of the system. Self-healing is a crucial in implementing the next generation of smart grids allowing to ensure a high quality of service to the users. We then map our self-healing procedure in a percolation problem and analyse the interplay between redundancies and topology in improving the resilience of networked infrastructures to multiple failures. We find exact results both for planar lattices and for random lattices, hinting the role of duality in the design of resilient networks. Finally, we introduce a cavity method approach to study the recovery of connectivity after damage in self-healing networks. CNR-PNR National Project ``Crisis-Lab,'' EU HOME/2013/CIPS/AG/4000005013 project CI2C and EU FET project MULTIPLEX nr.317532.

  6. Weak percolation on multiplex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, Gareth J.; Dorogovtsev, Sergey N.; Mendes, José F. F.; Cellai, Davide

    2014-04-01

    Bootstrap percolation is a simple but nontrivial model. It has applications in many areas of science and has been explored on random networks for several decades. In single-layer (simplex) networks, it has been recently observed that bootstrap percolation, which is defined as an incremental process, can be seen as the opposite of pruning percolation, where nodes are removed according to a connectivity rule. Here we propose models of both bootstrap and pruning percolation for multiplex networks. We collectively refer to these two models with the concept of "weak" percolation, to distinguish them from the somewhat classical concept of ordinary ("strong") percolation. While the two models coincide in simplex networks, we show that they decouple when considering multiplexes, giving rise to a wealth of critical phenomena. Our bootstrap model constitutes the simplest example of a contagion process on a multiplex network and has potential applications in critical infrastructure recovery and information security. Moreover, we show that our pruning percolation model may provide a way to diagnose missing layers in a multiplex network. Finally, our analytical approach allows us to calculate critical behavior and characterize critical clusters.

  7. Weak percolation on multiplex networks.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Gareth J; Dorogovtsev, Sergey N; Mendes, José F F; Cellai, Davide

    2014-04-01

    Bootstrap percolation is a simple but nontrivial model. It has applications in many areas of science and has been explored on random networks for several decades. In single-layer (simplex) networks, it has been recently observed that bootstrap percolation, which is defined as an incremental process, can be seen as the opposite of pruning percolation, where nodes are removed according to a connectivity rule. Here we propose models of both bootstrap and pruning percolation for multiplex networks. We collectively refer to these two models with the concept of "weak" percolation, to distinguish them from the somewhat classical concept of ordinary ("strong") percolation. While the two models coincide in simplex networks, we show that they decouple when considering multiplexes, giving rise to a wealth of critical phenomena. Our bootstrap model constitutes the simplest example of a contagion process on a multiplex network and has potential applications in critical infrastructure recovery and information security. Moreover, we show that our pruning percolation model may provide a way to diagnose missing layers in a multiplex network. Finally, our analytical approach allows us to calculate critical behavior and characterize critical clusters. PMID:24827287

  8. Process for manufacture of ammonia

    SciTech Connect

    Parrish, R.W.

    1986-06-10

    An improved process is described for making synthetic ammonia wherein a make-up synthesis gas is added to recycled unreacted gas from the catalytic conversion loop including the steps of introducing a volatile anti-icing compound into the hot make-up gas to vaporize the compound, cooling the gas and vaporized anti-icing compound to condense part of the anti-icing compound, separating the condensed anti-icing compound and dissolved impurities from the make-up gas. Further cooling the make-up gas to a temperature at which the remaining anti-icing compound condenses essentially completely, separating the condensing remaining anti-icing compound from the make-up gas, mixing the resulting make-up gas at the low temperature with liquid ammonia to saturate the make-up gas with ammonia, separating unvaporized liquid ammonia from the saturated make-up gas, mixing the saturated make-up gas with recycle and passing the mixed gases directly to the catalytic ammonia synthesis converter.

  9. Dimer covering and percolation frustration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haji-Akbari, Amir; Haji-Akbari, Nasim; Ziff, Robert M.

    2015-09-01

    Covering a graph or a lattice with nonoverlapping dimers is a problem that has received considerable interest in areas, such as discrete mathematics, statistical physics, chemistry, and materials science. Yet, the problem of percolation on dimer-covered lattices has received little attention. In particular, percolation on lattices that are fully covered by nonoverlapping dimers has not evidently been considered. Here, we propose a procedure for generating random dimer coverings of a given lattice. We then compute the bond percolation threshold on random and ordered coverings of the square and the triangular lattices on the remaining bonds connecting the dimers. We obtain pc=0.367 713 (2 ) and pc=0.235 340 (1 ) for random coverings of the square and the triangular lattices, respectively. We observe that the percolation frustration induced as a result of dimer covering is larger in the low-coordination-number square lattice. There is also no relationship between the existence of long-range order in a covering of the square lattice and its percolation threshold. In particular, an ordered covering of the square lattice, denoted by shifted covering in this paper, has an unusually low percolation threshold and is topologically identical to the triangular lattice. This is in contrast to the other ordered dimer coverings considered in this paper, which have higher percolation thresholds than the random covering. In the case of the triangular lattice, the percolation thresholds of the ordered and random coverings are very close, suggesting the lack of sensitivity of the percolation threshold to microscopic details of the covering in highly coordinated networks.

  10. Dimer covering and percolation frustration.

    PubMed

    Haji-Akbari, Amir; Haji-Akbari, Nasim; Ziff, Robert M

    2015-09-01

    Covering a graph or a lattice with nonoverlapping dimers is a problem that has received considerable interest in areas, such as discrete mathematics, statistical physics, chemistry, and materials science. Yet, the problem of percolation on dimer-covered lattices has received little attention. In particular, percolation on lattices that are fully covered by nonoverlapping dimers has not evidently been considered. Here, we propose a procedure for generating random dimer coverings of a given lattice. We then compute the bond percolation threshold on random and ordered coverings of the square and the triangular lattices on the remaining bonds connecting the dimers. We obtain p_{c}=0.367713(2) and p_{c}=0.235340(1) for random coverings of the square and the triangular lattices, respectively. We observe that the percolation frustration induced as a result of dimer covering is larger in the low-coordination-number square lattice. There is also no relationship between the existence of long-range order in a covering of the square lattice and its percolation threshold. In particular, an ordered covering of the square lattice, denoted by shifted covering in this paper, has an unusually low percolation threshold and is topologically identical to the triangular lattice. This is in contrast to the other ordered dimer coverings considered in this paper, which have higher percolation thresholds than the random covering. In the case of the triangular lattice, the percolation thresholds of the ordered and random coverings are very close, suggesting the lack of sensitivity of the percolation threshold to microscopic details of the covering in highly coordinated networks. PMID:26465453

  11. Explosive percolation: A numerical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radicchi, Filippo; Fortunato, Santo

    2010-03-01

    Percolation is one of the most studied processes in statistical physics. A recent paper by Achlioptas [Science 323, 1453 (2009)] showed that the percolation transition, which is usually continuous, becomes discontinuous (“explosive”) if links are added to the system according to special cooperative rules (Achlioptas processes). In this paper, we present a detailed numerical analysis of Achlioptas processes with product rule on various systems, including lattices, random networks á la Erdös-Rényi, and scale-free networks. In all cases, we recover the explosive transition by Achlioptas However, the explosive percolation transition is kind of hybrid as, despite the discontinuity of the order parameter at the threshold, one observes traces of analytical behavior such as power-law distributions of cluster sizes. In particular, for scale-free networks with degree exponent λ<3 , all relevant percolation variables display power-law scaling, just as in continuous second-order phase transitions.

  12. Recycling, Inc.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Amy

    1992-01-01

    Suggestions for creating a successful office recycling system are enumerated from start up plans to waste reduction and paper recycling. Contact information for recycling equipment, potential buyers of recycled materials, recycled products for purchase, and ideas for promotion and education of staff are included. (MCO)

  13. Recycling endosomes.

    PubMed

    Goldenring, James R

    2015-08-01

    The endosomal membrane recycling system represents a dynamic conduit for sorting and re-exporting internalized membrane constituents. The recycling system is composed of multiple tubulovesicular recycling pathways that likely confer distinct trafficking pathways for individual cargoes. In addition, elements of the recycling system are responsible for assembly and maintenance of apical membrane specializations including primary cilia and apical microvilli. The existence of multiple intersecting and diverging recycling tracks likely accounts for specificity in plasma membrane recycling trafficking. PMID:26022676

  14. Development of Vapor-Phase Catalytic Ammonia Removal System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Michael; Fisher, John; Kiss, Mark; Borchers, Bruce; Tleimat, Badawi; Tleimat, Maher; Quinn, Gregory; Fort, James; Nalette, Tim; Baker, Gale; Genovese, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    A report describes recent accomplishments of a continuing effort to develop the vapor-phase catalytic ammonia removal (VPCAR) process for recycling wastewater for consumption by humans aboard a spacecraft in transit to Mars.

  15. Recovery of hydrogen and ammonia from purge gas

    SciTech Connect

    Isalski, W.H.

    1981-05-12

    Ammonia and hydrogen values are recovered from the purge gas from an ammonia synthesis recycle stream by removing the ammonia from the purge gas by adsorption in an ammonia adsorber, thereafter separating the hydrogen by cryogenic partial condensation, the refrigeration for which is provided by expanding and evaporating the condensate, and recovering the ammonia from the adsorber by heating a part of the hydrogen and using it as the regenerating gas for the adsorber, the heat for heating the hydrogen preferably being provided by combusting a part of the evaporated condensate recovered from the cryogenic partial condensation.

  16. Clique percolation in random graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; Deng, Youjin; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2015-10-01

    As a generation of the classical percolation, clique percolation focuses on the connection of cliques in a graph, where the connection of two k cliques means that they share at least l percolation in Erdős-Rényi graphs, which gives not only the exact solutions of the critical point, but also the corresponding order parameter. Based on this, we prove theoretically that the fraction ψ of cliques in the giant clique cluster always makes a continuous phase transition as the classical percolation. However, the fraction ϕ of vertices in the giant clique cluster for l >1 makes a step-function-like discontinuous phase transition in the thermodynamic limit and a continuous phase transition for l =1 . More interesting, our analysis shows that at the critical point, the order parameter ϕc for l >1 is neither 0 nor 1, but a constant depending on k and l . All these theoretical findings are in agreement with the simulation results, which give theoretical support and clarification for previous simulation studies of clique percolation.

  17. Clique percolation in random graphs.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Deng, Youjin; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2015-10-01

    As a generation of the classical percolation, clique percolation focuses on the connection of cliques in a graph, where the connection of two k cliques means that they share at least lpercolation in Erdős-Rényi graphs, which gives not only the exact solutions of the critical point, but also the corresponding order parameter. Based on this, we prove theoretically that the fraction ψ of cliques in the giant clique cluster always makes a continuous phase transition as the classical percolation. However, the fraction ϕ of vertices in the giant clique cluster for l>1 makes a step-function-like discontinuous phase transition in the thermodynamic limit and a continuous phase transition for l=1. More interesting, our analysis shows that at the critical point, the order parameter ϕ(c) for l>1 is neither 0 nor 1, but a constant depending on k and l. All these theoretical findings are in agreement with the simulation results, which give theoretical support and clarification for previous simulation studies of clique percolation. PMID:26565177

  18. Clique Percolation in Random Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derényi, Imre; Palla, Gergely; Vicsek, Tamás

    2005-04-01

    The notion of k-clique percolation in random graphs is introduced, where k is the size of the complete subgraphs whose large scale organizations are analytically and numerically investigated. For the Erdős-Rényi graph of N vertices we obtain that the percolation transition of k-cliques takes place when the probability of two vertices being connected by an edge reaches the threshold pc(k)=[(k-1)N]-1/(k-1). At the transition point the scaling of the giant component with N is highly nontrivial and depends on k. We discuss why clique percolation is a novel and efficient approach to the identification of overlapping communities in large real networks.

  19. Clique percolation in random networks.

    PubMed

    Derényi, Imre; Palla, Gergely; Vicsek, Tamás

    2005-04-29

    The notion of k-clique percolation in random graphs is introduced, where k is the size of the complete subgraphs whose large scale organizations are analytically and numerically investigated. For the Erdos-Rényi graph of N vertices we obtain that the percolation transition of k-cliques takes place when the probability of two vertices being connected by an edge reaches the threshold p(c) (k) = [(k - 1)N](-1/(k - 1)). At the transition point the scaling of the giant component with N is highly nontrivial and depends on k. We discuss why clique percolation is a novel and efficient approach to the identification of overlapping communities in large real networks. PMID:15904198

  20. Ammonia Transport.

    PubMed

    Wingreen, Ned S

    2004-12-01

    This review reviews the ammonium/methylammonium transport (Amt) proteins of Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. The Amt proteins and their homologs, the methylammonium/ammonium permease proteins of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, constitute a distinct class of membrane-associated ammonia transporters. Members of the Amt family are found in archaea, bacteria, fungi, plants, and invertebrate animals. In E. coli and serovar Typhimurium, the Amt proteins are essential to maintain maximal growth at low concentrations of ammonia, the preferred nitrogen source. Soupene and coworkers showed that a mutant of E. coli with only the low-affinity glutamate dehydrogenase pathway for assimilation of ammonia, which therefore grows slowly at low ammonia concentrations, is not relieved of its growth defect by overexpression of AmtB. A recent study on an Amt protein from tomato concluded that it was a specific transporter for NH4+. A trimeric stoichiometry for AmtB is supported by the observation of a direct interaction between AmtB and the trimeric signal-transduction protein GlnK. In E. coli, GlnK has been observed to associate with the membrane in an AmtB-dependent fashion. Both GlnK and GlnB are sensors of nitrogen status. Their interaction with AmtB suggests a role for AmtB in nitrogen regulation. In summary, AmtB is a membrane-associated ammonia transporter that is important for growth at external concentrations of the uncharged species (NH3) below about 50 nM. The preponderance of evidence suggests that AmtB specifically transports the charged species (NH4+) and that this transport is passive and, hence, bidirectional. PMID:26443371

  1. Conversion of ammonia into hydrogen and nitrogen by reaction with a sulfided catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Matthews, Charles W.

    1977-01-01

    A method is provided for removing ammonia from the sour water stream of a coal gasification process. The basic steps comprise stripping the ammonia from the sour water; heating the stripped ammonia to a temperature from between 400.degree. to 1,000.degree. F; passing the gaseous ammonia through a reactor containing a sulfided catalyst to produce elemental hydrogen and nitrogen; and scrubbing the reaction product to obtain an ammonia-free gas. The residual equilibrium ammonia produced by the reactor is recycled into the stripper. The ammonia-free gas may be advantageously treated in a Claus process to recover elemental sulfur. Iron sulfide or cobalt molybdenum sulfide catalysts are used.

  2. Hanford recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, I.M.

    1996-09-01

    This paper is a study of the past and present recycling efforts on the Hanford site and options for future improvements in the recycling program. Until 1996, recycling goals were voluntarily set by the waste generators: this year, DOE has imposed goals for all its sites to accomplish by 1999. Hanford is presently meeting the voluntary site goals, but may not be able to meet all the new DOE goals without changes to the program. Most of these new DOE goals are recycling goals: * Reduce the generation of radioactive (low-level) waste from routine operations 50 percent through source reduction and recycling. * Reduce the generation of low-level mixed waste from routine operations 50 percent through source reduction and recycling. * Reduce the generation of hazardous waste from routine operations 50 percent through source reduction and recycling. * Recycle 33 percent of the sanitary waste from all operations. * Increase affirmative procurement of EPA-designated recycled items to 100 percent. The Hanford recycling program has made great strides-there has been a 98 percent increase in the amount of paper recycled since its inception in 1990. Hanford recycles paper, chemicals cardboard, tires, oil, batteries, rags, lead weights, fluorescent tubes, aerosol products, concrete, office furniture, computer software, drums, toner cartridges, and scrap metal. Many other items are recycled or reused by individual groups on a one time basis without a formal contract. Several contracts are closed-loop contracts which involve all parts of the recycle loop. Considerable savings are generated from recycling, and much more is possible with increased attention and improvements to this program. General methods for improving the recycling program to ensure that the new goals can be met are: a Contract and financial changes 0 Tracking database and methods improvements 0 Expanded recycling efforts. Specifically, the Hanford recycling program would be improved by: 0 Establishing one overall DOE recycling contract at the Hanford site and a central group to control the contract. 0 Using a BOA or MTS contract as a way to get proceeds from recycling back to site facilities to provide incentives for recycling. . Upgrading tracking mechanisms to track and recycle construction waste which is presently buried in onsite pits. . Establishing contract performance measures which hold each project accountable for specific waste reduction goals. * Recycling and reusing any material or equipment possible as buildings are dismantled.

  3. Refractory recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Oxnard, R.T. )

    1994-10-01

    Businesses are run by profit and opportunity. Businesses will not recycle or reduce waste unless it is profitable, mandatory or perceived to be either in the future. Pressure from investors, government, consumers and accountants will increase the importance of recycling of refractories. The history and trends of refractory recycling and a method for auditing waste is discussed in this article.

  4. Recycled roads

    SciTech Connect

    Tarricone, P.

    1993-04-01

    This article examines the efforts of various states in the USA to recycle waste materials in highway construction as fill and pavements. The topics of the article include recycling used tires whole, ground, and shredded, cost of recycling, wood fiber chips as fill material in embankments, and mining wastes used to construct embankments and as coarse aggregates in asphalt pavement.

  5. Percolation on correlated random networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agliari, E.; Cioli, C.; Guadagnini, E.

    2011-09-01

    We consider a class of random, weighted networks, obtained through a redefinition of patterns in an Hopfield-like model, and, by performing percolation processes, we get information about topology and resilience properties of the networks themselves. Given the weighted nature of the graphs, different kinds of bond percolation can be studied: stochastic (deleting links randomly) and deterministic (deleting links based on rank weights), each mimicking a different physical process. The evolution of the network is accordingly different, as evidenced by the behavior of the largest component size and of the distribution of cluster sizes. In particular, we can derive that weak ties are crucial in order to maintain the graph connected and that, when they are the most prone to failure, the giant component typically shrinks without abruptly breaking apart; these results have been recently evidenced in several kinds of social networks.

  6. Percolation in the canonical ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hao; Blöte, Henk W. J.; Deng, Youjin

    2012-12-01

    We study the bond percolation problem under the constraint that the total number of occupied bonds is fixed, so that the canonical ensemble applies. We show via an analytical approach that at criticality, the constraint can induce new finite-size corrections with exponent ycan = 2yt - d both in energy-like and magnetic quantities, where yt = 1/ν is the thermal renormalization exponent and d is the spatial dimension. Furthermore, we find that while most of the universal parameters remain unchanged, some universal amplitudes, like the excess cluster number, can be modified and become non-universal. We confirm these predictions by extensive Monte Carlo simulations of the two-dimensional percolation problem which has ycan = -1/2. This article is part of ‘Lattice models and integrability’, a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical in honour of F Y Wu's 80th birthday.

  7. Bond percolation in higher dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corwin, Eric I.; Stinchcombe, Robin; Thorpe, M. F.

    2013-07-01

    We collect results for bond percolation on various lattices from two to fourteen dimensions that, in the limit of large dimension d or number of neighbors z, smoothly approach a randomly diluted Erdős-Rényi graph. We include results on bond-diluted hypersphere packs in up to nine dimensions, which show the mean coordination, excess kurtosis, and skewness evolving smoothly with dimension towards the Erdős-Rényi limit.

  8. Percolation in dense storage arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, Scott; Wilcke, Winfried W.; Garner, Robert B.; Huels, Harald

    2002-11-01

    As computers and their accessories become smaller, cheaper, and faster the providers of news, retail sales, and other services we now take for granted on the Internet have met their increasing computing needs by putting more and more computers, hard disks, power supplies, and the data communications linking them to each other and to the rest of the wired world into ever smaller spaces. This has created a new and quite interesting percolation problem. It is no longer desirable to fix computers, storage or switchgear which fail in such a dense array. Attempts to repair things are all too likely to make problems worse. The alternative approach, letting units “fail in place”, be removed from service and routed around, means that a data communications environment will evolve with an underlying regular structure but a very high density of missing pieces. Some of the properties of this kind of network can be described within the existing paradigm of site or bond percolation on lattices, but other important questions have not been explored. I will discuss 3D arrays of hundreds to thousands of storage servers (something which it is quite feasible to build in the next few years), and show that bandwidth, but not percolation fraction or shortest path lengths, is the critical factor affected by the “fail in place” disorder. Redundancy strategies traditionally employed in storage systems may have to be revised. Novel approaches to routing information among the servers have been developed to minimize the impact.

  9. Electrical percolation of fibre mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Juan; Gordon, Stuart; Long, Hairu; Miao, Menghe

    2015-11-01

    In the development of conductive threads for wearable electronics, nonconductive cotton fibres and conductive stainless steel fibres are mixed to produce composite yarns at a wide range of stainless steel fibre weight fractions. The electrical resistance of the composite yarns is measured at different probe span lengths, ranging from 0.5 to 10 L ss ( L ss = 50 mm is the average length of stainless steel fibres). The percolation threshold and critical exponent are determined for each span length. The critical exponent followed a decreasing trend from 1.87 to 1.17 as the span length was increased. When the conductive fibre loading was expressed in terms of conductive fibre volume fraction, the percolation critical exponent showed a similar trend of change with probe span length. Such a dependence of percolation critical exponent on resistance probe span length has not been previously reported for conductive particle-filled polymer composites, probably because the probe span length used in resistance measurement is orders of magnitude larger than the dimension of the conductive fillers in the composites.

  10. Directed percolation with incubation times.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Dalmaroni, Andrea

    2006-07-01

    We introduce a model for directed percolation with a long-range temporal diffusion, while the spatial diffusion is kept short ranged. In an interpretation of directed percolation as an epidemic process, this non-Markovian modification can be understood as incubation times, which are distributed accordingly to a Lévy distribution. We argue that the best approach to find the effective action for this problem is through a generalization of the Cardy-Sugar method, adding the non-Markovian features into the geometrical properties of the lattice. We formulate a field theory for this problem and renormalize it up to one loop in a perturbative expansion. We solve the various technical difficulties that the integrations possess by means of an asymptotic analysis of the divergences. We show the absence of field renormalization at one-loop order, and we argue that this would be the case to all orders in perturbation theory. Consequently, in addition to the characteristic scaling relations of directed percolation, we find a scaling relation valid for the critical exponents of this theory. In this universality class, the critical exponents vary continuously with the Lévy parameter. PMID:16907076

  11. Roots at the percolation threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroener, Eva; Ahmed, Mutez Ali; Carminati, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    The rhizosphere is the layer of soil around the roots where complex and dynamic interactions between plants and soil affect the capacity of plants to take up water. The physical properties of the rhizosphere are affected by mucilage, a gel exuded by roots. Mucilage can absorb large volumes of water, but it becomes hydrophobic after drying. We use a percolation model to describe the rewetting of dry rhizosphere. We find that at a critical mucilage concentration the rhizosphere becomes impermeable. The critical mucilage concentration depends on the radius of the soil particle size. Capillary rise experiments with neutron radiography prove that for concentrations below the critical mucilage concentration water could easily cross the rhizosphere, while above the critical concentration water could no longer percolate through it. Our studies, together with former observations of water dynamics in the rhizosphere, suggest that the rhizosphere is near the percolation threshold, where small variations in mucilage concentration sensitively alter the soil hydraulic conductivity. Is mucilage exudation a plant mechanism to efficiently control the rhizosphere conductivity and the access to water?

  12. Percolation in real interdependent networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radicchi, Filippo

    2015-07-01

    The function of a real network depends not only on the reliability of its own components, but is affected also by the simultaneous operation of other real networks coupled with it. Whereas theoretical methods of direct applicability to real isolated networks exist, the frameworks developed so far in percolation theory for interdependent network layers are of little help in practical contexts, as they are suited only for special models in the limit of infinite size. Here, we introduce a set of heuristic equations that takes as inputs the adjacency matrices of the layers to draw the entire phase diagram for the interconnected network. We demonstrate that percolation transitions in interdependent networks can be understood by decomposing these systems into uncoupled graphs: the intersection among the layers, and the remainders of the layers. When the intersection dominates the remainders, an interconnected network undergoes a smooth percolation transition. Conversely, if the intersection is dominated by the contribution of the remainders, the transition becomes abrupt even in small networks. We provide examples of real systems that have developed interdependent networks sharing cores of `high quality’ edges to prevent catastrophic failures.

  13. Semi-directed percolation in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knežević, Dragica; Knežević, Milan

    2016-02-01

    We studied a model of semi-directed percolation on finite strips of the square and triangular lattices. Using the transfer-matrix method, combined with phenomenological renormalization group approach, we obtain good numerical estimates for critical probabilities and correlation lengths critical exponents. Our results confirm the conjecture that semi-directed percolation belongs to the universality class of the usual fully-directed percolation model.

  14. Optimal percolation of disordered segregated composites.

    PubMed

    Johner, Niklaus; Grimaldi, Claudio; Maeder, Thomas; Ryser, Peter

    2009-02-01

    We evaluate the percolation threshold values for a realistic model of continuum segregated systems, where random spherical inclusions forbid the percolating objects, modeled by hardcore spherical particles surrounded by penetrable shells, to occupy large regions inside the composite. We find that the percolation threshold is generally a nonmonotonous function of segregation, and that an optimal (i.e., minimum) critical concentration exists well before maximum segregation is reached. We interpret this feature as originating from a competition between reduced available volume effects and enhanced concentrations needed to ensure percolation in the highly segregated regime. The relevance with existing segregated materials is discussed. PMID:19391696

  15. Optimal percolation of disordered segregated composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johner, Niklaus; Grimaldi, Claudio; Maeder, Thomas; Ryser, Peter

    2009-02-01

    We evaluate the percolation threshold values for a realistic model of continuum segregated systems, where random spherical inclusions forbid the percolating objects, modeled by hardcore spherical particles surrounded by penetrable shells, to occupy large regions inside the composite. We find that the percolation threshold is generally a nonmonotonous function of segregation, and that an optimal (i.e., minimum) critical concentration exists well before maximum segregation is reached. We interpret this feature as originating from a competition between reduced available volume effects and enhanced concentrations needed to ensure percolation in the highly segregated regime. The relevance with existing segregated materials is discussed.

  16. Percolation in Living Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breskin, Ilan; Soriano, Jordi; Moses, Elisha; Tlusty, Tsvi

    2006-11-01

    We study living neural networks by measuring the neurons’ response to a global electrical stimulation. Neural connectivity is lowered by reducing the synaptic strength, chemically blocking neurotransmitter receptors. We use a graph-theoretic approach to show that the connectivity undergoes a percolation transition. This occurs as the giant component disintegrates, characterized by a power law with an exponent β≃0.65. β is independent of the balance between excitatory and inhibitory neurons and indicates that the degree distribution is Gaussian rather than scale free.

  17. Directed polymers versus directed percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpin-Healy, Timothy

    1998-10-01

    Universality plays a central role within the rubric of modern statistical mechanics, wherein an insightful continuum formulation rises above irrelevant microscopic details, capturing essential scaling behaviors. Nevertheless, occasions do arise where the lattice or another discrete aspect can constitute a formidable legacy. Directed polymers in random media, along with its close sibling, directed percolation, provide an intriguing case in point. Indeed, the deep blood relation between these two models may have sabotaged past efforts to fully characterize the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang universality class, to which the directed polymer belongs.

  18. Control and pollution prevention options for ammonia emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.

    1995-04-01

    In response to requests for guidance concerning technologies available for the control and prevention of ammonia emissions, the Control Technology Center (CTC) initiated a review of current and potential methods for ammonia emissions control. A review of various industries has identified significant sources of ammonia to be fertilizer production, coke production using the by-product recovery method, fossil fuel combustion, livestock management, and refrigeration using ammonia as a refrigerant. Control methods implemented by these sources include wet scrubbers, condensate strippers, recovery and recycle of exhaust streams, capture systems, and good maintenance practices. The report discusses each industry process identified above, concentrating on the sources of ammonia emissions and the controls and pollution prevention (P2) methods applied. Other industries may have minor ammonia emissions but they are not addressed in this report because neither control technologies nor P2 are applied.

  19. Bond Percolation on Multiplex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackett, A.; Cellai, D.; Gómez, S.; Arenas, A.; Gleeson, J. P.

    2016-04-01

    We present an analytical approach for bond percolation on multiplex networks and use it to determine the expected size of the giant connected component and the value of the critical bond occupation probability in these networks. We advocate the relevance of these tools to the modeling of multilayer robustness and contribute to the debate on whether any benefit is to be yielded from studying a full multiplex structure as opposed to its monoplex projection, especially in the seemingly irrelevant case of a bond occupation probability that does not depend on the layer. Although we find that in many cases the predictions of our theory for multiplex networks coincide with previously derived results for monoplex networks, we also uncover the remarkable result that for a certain class of multiplex networks, well described by our theory, new critical phenomena occur as multiple percolation phase transitions are present. We provide an instance of this phenomenon in a multiplex network constructed from London rail and European air transportation data sets.

  20. Bootstrap percolation on spatial networks.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jian; Zhou, Tao; Hu, Yanqing

    2015-01-01

    Bootstrap percolation is a general representation of some networked activation process, which has found applications in explaining many important social phenomena, such as the propagation of information. Inspired by some recent findings on spatial structure of online social networks, here we study bootstrap percolation on undirected spatial networks, with the probability density function of long-range links' lengths being a power law with tunable exponent. Setting the size of the giant active component as the order parameter, we find a parameter-dependent critical value for the power-law exponent, above which there is a double phase transition, mixed of a second-order phase transition and a hybrid phase transition with two varying critical points, otherwise there is only a second-order phase transition. We further find a parameter-independent critical value around -1, about which the two critical points for the double phase transition are almost constant. To our surprise, this critical value -1 is just equal or very close to the values of many real online social networks, including LiveJournal, HP Labs email network, Belgian mobile phone network, etc. This work helps us in better understanding the self-organization of spatial structure of online social networks, in terms of the effective function for information spreading. PMID:26423347

  1. Bootstrap percolation on spatial networks

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jian; Zhou, Tao; Hu, Yanqing

    2015-01-01

    Bootstrap percolation is a general representation of some networked activation process, which has found applications in explaining many important social phenomena, such as the propagation of information. Inspired by some recent findings on spatial structure of online social networks, here we study bootstrap percolation on undirected spatial networks, with the probability density function of long-range links’ lengths being a power law with tunable exponent. Setting the size of the giant active component as the order parameter, we find a parameter-dependent critical value for the power-law exponent, above which there is a double phase transition, mixed of a second-order phase transition and a hybrid phase transition with two varying critical points, otherwise there is only a second-order phase transition. We further find a parameter-independent critical value around −1, about which the two critical points for the double phase transition are almost constant. To our surprise, this critical value −1 is just equal or very close to the values of many real online social networks, including LiveJournal, HP Labs email network, Belgian mobile phone network, etc. This work helps us in better understanding the self-organization of spatial structure of online social networks, in terms of the effective function for information spreading. PMID:26423347

  2. Bootstrap percolation on spatial networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jian; Zhou, Tao; Hu, Yanqing

    2015-10-01

    Bootstrap percolation is a general representation of some networked activation process, which has found applications in explaining many important social phenomena, such as the propagation of information. Inspired by some recent findings on spatial structure of online social networks, here we study bootstrap percolation on undirected spatial networks, with the probability density function of long-range links’ lengths being a power law with tunable exponent. Setting the size of the giant active component as the order parameter, we find a parameter-dependent critical value for the power-law exponent, above which there is a double phase transition, mixed of a second-order phase transition and a hybrid phase transition with two varying critical points, otherwise there is only a second-order phase transition. We further find a parameter-independent critical value around -1, about which the two critical points for the double phase transition are almost constant. To our surprise, this critical value -1 is just equal or very close to the values of many real online social networks, including LiveJournal, HP Labs email network, Belgian mobile phone network, etc. This work helps us in better understanding the self-organization of spatial structure of online social networks, in terms of the effective function for information spreading.

  3. Rigidity percolation on aperiodic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losev, A.; Babalievski, F.

    We studied the rigidity percolation (RP) model for two-dimensional aperiodic (quasi-crystal) lattices. The RP thresholds (for bond dilution) were obtained for several aperiodic lattices via computer simulation using the “pebble game” algorithm. It was found that the (two rhombi) Penrose lattice is always floppy in view of the RP model. The same was found for the Ammann’s octagonal lattice and the Socolar’s dodecagonal lattice. In order to impose the percolation transition we used the so-called “ferro” modification of these aperiodic tilings. We studied as well the “pinwheel” tiling which has infinitely many orientations of edges. The obtained estimates for the modified Penrose, Ammann and Socolar lattices are respectively: pcP=0.836±0.002, pcA=0.769±0.002, pcS=0.938±0.001. The bond RP threshold of the pinwheel tiling was estimated to pc=0.69±0.01. It was found that these results are very close to the Maxwell (the mean-field like) approximation for them.

  4. Percolation in suspensions and de Gennes conjectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallier, Stany; Lemaire, Elisabeth; Peters, François; Lobry, Laurent

    2015-08-01

    Dense suspensions display complex flow properties, intermediate between solid and liquid. When sheared, a suspension self-organizes and forms particle clusters that are likely to percolate, possibly leading to significant changes in the overall behavior. Some theoretical conjectures on percolation in suspensions were proposed by de Gennes some 35 years ago. Although still used, they have not received any validations so far. In this Rapid Communication, we use three-dimensional detailed numerical simulations to understand the formation of percolation clusters and assess de Gennes conjectures. We found that sheared noncolloidal suspensions do show percolation clusters occurring at a critical volume fraction in the range 0.3-0.4 depending on the system size. Percolation clusters are roughly linear, extremely transient, and involve a limited number of particles. We have computed critical exponents and found that clusters can be described reasonably well by standard isotropic percolation theory. The only disagreement with de Gennes concerns the role of percolation clusters on rheology which is found to be weak. Our results eventually validate de Gennes conjectures and demonstrate the relevance of percolation concepts in suspension physics.

  5. Percolation in suspensions and de Gennes conjectures.

    PubMed

    Gallier, Stany; Lemaire, Elisabeth; Peters, François; Lobry, Laurent

    2015-08-01

    Dense suspensions display complex flow properties, intermediate between solid and liquid. When sheared, a suspension self-organizes and forms particle clusters that are likely to percolate, possibly leading to significant changes in the overall behavior. Some theoretical conjectures on percolation in suspensions were proposed by de Gennes some 35 years ago. Although still used, they have not received any validations so far. In this Rapid Communication, we use three-dimensional detailed numerical simulations to understand the formation of percolation clusters and assess de Gennes conjectures. We found that sheared noncolloidal suspensions do show percolation clusters occurring at a critical volume fraction in the range 0.3-0.4 depending on the system size. Percolation clusters are roughly linear, extremely transient, and involve a limited number of particles. We have computed critical exponents and found that clusters can be described reasonably well by standard isotropic percolation theory. The only disagreement with de Gennes concerns the role of percolation clusters on rheology which is found to be weak. Our results eventually validate de Gennes conjectures and demonstrate the relevance of percolation concepts in suspension physics. PMID:26382330

  6. Roots at the Percolation Threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroener, E.; Ahmed, M. A.; Kaestner, A.; Vontobel, P.; Zarebanadkouki, M.; Carminati, A.

    2014-12-01

    Much of the carbon assimilated by plants during photosynthesis is lost to the soil via rhizodepositions. One component of rhizopdeposition is mucilage, a hydrogel that dramatically alters the soil physical properties. Mucilage was assumed to explain unexpectedly low rhizosphere rewetting rates during irrigation (Carminati et al. 2010) and temporarily water repellency in the rhizosphere after severe drying (Moradi et al. 2012).Here, we present an experimental and theoretical study for the rewetting behaviour of a soil mixed with mucilage, which was used as an analogue of the rhizosphere. Our samples were made of two layers of untreated soils separated by a thin layer (ca. 1 mm) of soil treated with mucilage. We prepared soil columns of varying particle size, mucilage concentration and height of the middle layer above the water table. The dry soil columns were re-wetted by capillary rise from the bottom.The rewetting of the middle layer showed a distinct dual behavior. For mucilage concentrations lower than a certain threshold, water could cross the thin layer almost immediately after rewetting of bulk soil. At slightly higher mucilage concentrations, the thin layer was almost impermeable. The mucilage concentration at the threshold strongly depended on particle size: the smaller the particle size the larger the soil specific surface and the more mucilage was needed to cover the entire particle surface and to induce water repellency.We applied a classic pore network model to simulate the experimental observations. In the model a certain fraction of nodes were randomly disconnected to reproduce the effect of mucilage in temporarily blocking the flow. The percolation model could qualitatively reproduce well the threshold characteristics of the experiments. Our experiments, together with former observations of water dynamics in the rhizosphere, suggest that the rhizosphere is near the percolation threshold, where small variations in mucilage concentration sensitively alter the soil hydraulic conductivity. Is mucilage exudation a plant mechanism to efficiently control the rhizosphere conductivity and the access to water?

  7. Ideas: Recycling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chessin, Debby A.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Presents classroom ideas focusing on connections among mathematics, concern for the environment, and conservation of natural resources, including decomposition, water conservation, packaging materials, use of manufactured cans, and recycling. Includes reproducible student worksheets. (MKR)

  8. Percolation and Epidemic Thresholds in Clustered Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano, M. Ángeles; Boguñá, Marián

    2006-08-01

    We develop a theoretical approach to percolation in random clustered networks. We find that, although clustering in scale-free networks can strongly affect some percolation properties, such as the size and the resilience of the giant connected component, it cannot restore a finite percolation threshold. In turn, this implies the absence of an epidemic threshold in this class of networks, thus extending this result to a wide variety of real scale-free networks which shows a high level of transitivity. Our findings are in good agreement with numerical simulations.

  9. Rethinking Rice Preparation for Highly Efficient Removal of Inorganic Arsenic Using Percolating Cooking Water.

    PubMed

    Carey, Manus; Jiujin, Xiao; Gomes Farias, Júlia; Meharg, Andrew A

    2015-01-01

    A novel way of cooking rice to maximize the removal of the carcinogen inorganic arsenic (Asi) is presented here. In conventional rice cooking water and grain are in continuous contact, and it is known that the larger the water:rice cooking ratio, the more Asi removed by cooking, suggesting that the Asi in the grain is mobile in water. Experiments were designed where rice is cooked in a continual stream of percolating near boiling water, either low in Asi, or Asi free. This has the advantage of not only exposing grain to large volumes of cooking water, but also physically removes any Asi leached from the grain into the water receiving vessel. The relationship between cooking water volume and Asi removal in conventional rice cooking was demonstrated for the rice types under study. At a water-to-rice cooking ratio of 12:1, 57±5% of Asi could be removed, average of 6 wholegrain and 6 polished rice samples. Two types of percolating technology were tested, one where the cooking water was recycled through condensing boiling water steam and passing the freshly distilled hot water through the grain in a laboratory setting, and one where tap water was used to cook the rice held in an off-the-shelf coffee percolator in a domestic setting. Both approaches proved highly effective in removing Asi from the cooking rice, with up to 85% of Asi removed from individual rice types. For the recycled water experiment 59±8% and 69±10% of Asi was removed, on average, compared to uncooked rice for polished (n=27) and wholegrain (n=13) rice, respectively. For coffee percolation there was no difference between wholegrain and polished rice, and the effectiveness of Asi removal was 49±7% across 6 wholegrain and 6 polished rice samples. The manuscript explores the potential applications and further optimization of this percolating cooking water, high Asi removal, discovery. PMID:26200355

  10. Rethinking Rice Preparation for Highly Efficient Removal of Inorganic Arsenic Using Percolating Cooking Water

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Manus; Jiujin, Xiao; Gomes Farias, Júlia; Meharg, Andrew A.

    2015-01-01

    A novel way of cooking rice to maximize the removal of the carcinogen inorganic arsenic (Asi) is presented here. In conventional rice cooking water and grain are in continuous contact, and it is known that the larger the water:rice cooking ratio, the more Asi removed by cooking, suggesting that the Asi in the grain is mobile in water. Experiments were designed where rice is cooked in a continual stream of percolating near boiling water, either low in Asi, or Asi free. This has the advantage of not only exposing grain to large volumes of cooking water, but also physically removes any Asi leached from the grain into the water receiving vessel. The relationship between cooking water volume and Asi removal in conventional rice cooking was demonstrated for the rice types under study. At a water-to-rice cooking ratio of 12:1, 57±5% of Asi could be removed, average of 6 wholegrain and 6 polished rice samples. Two types of percolating technology were tested, one where the cooking water was recycled through condensing boiling water steam and passing the freshly distilled hot water through the grain in a laboratory setting, and one where tap water was used to cook the rice held in an off-the-shelf coffee percolator in a domestic setting. Both approaches proved highly effective in removing Asi from the cooking rice, with up to 85% of Asi removed from individual rice types. For the recycled water experiment 59±8% and 69±10% of Asi was removed, on average, compared to uncooked rice for polished (n=27) and wholegrain (n=13) rice, respectively. For coffee percolation there was no difference between wholegrain and polished rice, and the effectiveness of Asi removal was 49±7% across 6 wholegrain and 6 polished rice samples. The manuscript explores the potential applications and further optimization of this percolating cooking water, high Asi removal, discovery. PMID:26200355

  11. NBCe1 expression is required for normal renal ammonia metabolism.

    PubMed

    Handlogten, Mary E; Osis, Gunars; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Romero, Michael F; Verlander, Jill W; Weiner, I David

    2015-10-01

    The mechanisms regulating proximal tubule ammonia metabolism are incompletely understood. The present study addressed the role of the proximal tubule basolateral electrogenic Na(+)-coupled bicarbonate cotransporter (NBCe1; Slc4a4) in renal ammonia metabolism. We used mice with heterozygous and homozygous NBCe1 gene deletion and compared these mice with their wild-type littermates. Because homozygous NBCe1 gene deletion causes 100% mortality before day 25, we studied mice at day 8 (1 day). Both heterozygous and homozygous gene deletion caused a gene dose-related decrease in serum bicarbonate. The ability to lower urinary pH was intact, and even accentuated, with NBCe1 deletion. However, in contrast to the well-known effect of metabolic acidosis to increase urinary ammonia excretion, NBCe1 deletion caused a gene dose-related decrease in ammonia excretion. There was no identifiable change in proximal tubule structure by light microscopy. Examination of proteins involved in renal ammonia metabolism showed decreased expression of phosphate-dependent glutaminase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, key enzymes in proximal tubule ammonia generation, and increased expression of glutamine synthetase, which recycles intrarenal ammonia and regenerates glutamine. Expression of key proteins involved in ammonia transport outside of the proximal tubule (rhesus B glycoprotein and rhesus C glycoprotein) was not significantly changed by NBCe1 deletion. We conclude from these findings that NBCe1 expression is necessary for normal proximal tubule ammonia metabolism. PMID:26224717

  12. Short-time dynamics of percolation observables

    SciTech Connect

    Wanzeller, Wanderson G.; Mendes, Tereza; Krein, Gastao

    2006-11-15

    We consider the critical short-time evolution of magnetic and droplet-percolation order parameters for the Ising model in two and three dimensions, through Monte Carlo simulations with the (local) heat-bath method. We find qualitatively different dynamic behaviors for the two types of order parameters. More precisely, we find that the percolation order parameter does not have a power-law behavior as encountered for the magnetization, but develops a scale (related to the relaxation time to equilibrium) in the Monte Carlo time. We argue that this difference is due to the difficulty in forming large clusters at the early stages of the evolution. Our results show that, although the descriptions in terms of magnetic and percolation order parameters may be equivalent in the equilibrium regime, greater care must be taken to interpret percolation observables at short times. In particular, this concerns the attempts to describe the dynamics of the deconfinement phase transition in QCD using cluster observables.

  13. Coalescence and percolation in thin metal films

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, X.; Duxbury, P.M.; Jeffers, G.; Dubson, M.A. Center for Fundamental Materials Research, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824-1116 )

    1991-12-15

    Metals thermally evaporated onto warm insulating substrates evolve to the thin-film state via the morphological sequence: compact islands, elongated islands, percolation, hole filling, and finally the thin-film state. The coverage at which the metal percolates ({ital p}{sub {ital c}}) is often considerably higher than that predicted by percolation models, such as inverse swiss cheese or lattice percolation. Using a simple continuum model, we show that high-{ital p}{sub {ital c}}'s arise naturally in thin films that exhibit a crossover from full coalescence of islands at early stages of growth to partial coalescence at later stages. In this interrupted-coalescence model, full coalescence of islands occurs up to a critical island radius {ital R}{sub {ital c}}, after which islands overlap, but do not fully coalesce. We present the morphology of films and the critical area coverages generated by this model.

  14. Discrete scale invariance in supercritical percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Malte; Chen, Wei; Nagler, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Recently it has been demonstrated that the connectivity transition from microscopic connectivity to macroscopic connectedness, known as percolation, is generically announced by a cascade of microtransitions of the percolation order parameter (Chen et al 2014 Phys. Rev. Lett. 112 155701). Here we report the discovery of macrotransition cascades which follow percolation. The order parameter grows in discrete macroscopic steps with positions that can be randomly distributed even in the thermodynamic limit. These transition positions are, however, correlated and follow scaling laws which arise from discrete scale invariance (DSI) and non self-averaging, both traditionally unrelated to percolation. We reveal the DSI in ensemble measurements of these non self-averaging systems by rescaling of the individual realizations before averaging.

  15. Neuromorphic behavior in percolating nanoparticle films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fostner, Shawn; Brown, Simon A.

    2015-11-01

    We show that the complex connectivity of percolating networks of nanoparticles provides a natural solid-state system in which bottom-up assembly provides a route to realization of neuromorphic behavior. Below the percolation threshold the networks comprise groups of particles separated by tunnel gaps; an applied voltage causes atomic scale wires to form in the gaps, and we show that the avalanche of switching events that occurs is similar to potentiation in biological neural systems. We characterize the level of potentiation in the percolating system as a function of the surface coverage of nanoparticles and other experimentally relevant variables, and compare our results with those from biological systems. The complex percolating structure and the electric field driven switching mechanism provide several potential advantages in comparison to previously reported solid-state neuromorphic systems.

  16. A Percolation Model for Fracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, J. Q.; Turcotte, D. L.; Rundle, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    Developments in fracking technology have enabled the recovery of vast reserves of oil and gas; yet, there is very little publicly available scientific research on fracking. Traditional reservoir simulator models for fracking are computationally expensive, and require many hours on a supercomputer to simulate a single fracking treatment. We have developed a computationally inexpensive percolation model for fracking that can be used to understand the processes and risks associated with fracking. In our model, a fluid is injected from a single site and a network of fractures grows from the single site. The fracture network grows in bursts, the failure of a relatively strong bond followed by the failure of a series of relatively weak bonds. These bursts display similarities to micro seismic events observed during a fracking treatment. The bursts follow a power-law (Gutenburg-Richter) frequency-size distribution and have growth rates similar to observed earthquake moment rates. These are quantifiable features that can be compared to observed microseismicity to help understand the relationship between observed microseismicity and the underlying fracture network.

  17. Percolation of secret correlations in a network

    SciTech Connect

    Leverrier, Anthony; Garcia-Patron, Raul

    2011-09-15

    In this work, we explore the analogy between entanglement and secret classical correlations in the context of large networks--more precisely, the question of percolation of secret correlations in a network. It is known that entanglement percolation in quantum networks can display a highly nontrivial behavior depending on the topology of the network and on the presence of entanglement between the nodes. Here we show that this behavior, thought to be of a genuine quantum nature, also occurs in a classical context.

  18. Generalized epidemic process and tricritical dynamic percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, Hans-Karl; Müller, Martin; Stenull, Olaf

    2004-08-01

    The renowned general epidemic process describes the stochastic evolution of a population of individuals which are either susceptible, infected, or dead. A second order phase transition belonging to the universality class of dynamic isotropic percolation lies between the endemic and pandemic behavior of the process. We generalize the general epidemic process by introducing a fourth kind of individuals, viz., individuals which are weakened by the process but not yet infected. This weakening gives rise to a mechanism that introduces a global instability in the spreading of the process and therefore opens the possibility of a discontinuous transition in addition to the usual continuous percolation transition. The tricritical point separating the lines of first and second order transitions constitutes an independent universality class, namely, the universality class of tricritical dynamic isotropic percolation. Using renormalized field theory we work out a detailed scaling description of this universality class. We calculate the scaling exponents in an ɛ expansion below the upper critical dimension dc=5 for various observables describing tricritical percolation clusters and their spreading properties. In a remarkable contrast to the usual percolation transition, the exponents β and β' governing the two order parameters, viz., the mean density and the percolation probability, turn out to be different at the tricritical point. In addition to the scaling exponents we calculate for all our static and dynamic observables logarithmic corrections to the mean-field scaling behavior at dc=5 .

  19. Critical exponents of the explosive percolation transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa, R. A.; Dorogovtsev, S. N.; Goltsev, A. V.; Mendes, J. F. F.

    2014-04-01

    In a new type of percolation phase transition, which was observed in a set of nonequilibrium models, each new connection between vertices is chosen from a number of possibilities by an Achlioptas-like algorithm. This causes preferential merging of small components and delays the emergence of the percolation cluster. First simulations led to a conclusion that a percolation cluster in this irreversible process is born discontinuously, by a discontinuous phase transition, which results in the term "explosive percolation transition." We have shown that this transition is actually continuous (second order) though with an anomalously small critical exponent of the percolation cluster. Here we propose an efficient numerical method enabling us to find the critical exponents and other characteristics of this second-order transition for a representative set of explosive percolation models with different number of choices. The method is based on gluing together the numerical solutions of evolution equations for the cluster size distribution and power-law asymptotics. For each of the models, with high precision, we obtain critical exponents and the critical point.

  20. Critical exponents of the explosive percolation transition.

    PubMed

    da Costa, R A; Dorogovtsev, S N; Goltsev, A V; Mendes, J F F

    2014-04-01

    In a new type of percolation phase transition, which was observed in a set of nonequilibrium models, each new connection between vertices is chosen from a number of possibilities by an Achlioptas-like algorithm. This causes preferential merging of small components and delays the emergence of the percolation cluster. First simulations led to a conclusion that a percolation cluster in this irreversible process is born discontinuously, by a discontinuous phase transition, which results in the term "explosive percolation transition." We have shown that this transition is actually continuous (second order) though with an anomalously small critical exponent of the percolation cluster. Here we propose an efficient numerical method enabling us to find the critical exponents and other characteristics of this second-order transition for a representative set of explosive percolation models with different number of choices. The method is based on gluing together the numerical solutions of evolution equations for the cluster size distribution and power-law asymptotics. For each of the models, with high precision, we obtain critical exponents and the critical point. PMID:24827233

  1. Tire Recycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Cryopolymers, Inc. tapped NASA expertise to improve a process for recycling vehicle tires by converting shredded rubber into products that can be used in asphalt road beds, new tires, hoses, and other products. In conjunction with the Southern Technology Applications Center and Stennis Space Center, NASA expertise in cryogenic fuel-handling needed for launch vehicle and spacecraft operations was called upon to improve the recycling concept. Stennis advised Cryopolymers on the type of equipment required, as well as steps to reduce the amount of liquid nitrogen used in the process. They also guided the company to use more efficient ways to control system hardware. It is estimated that more than 300 million tires nationwide are produced per year. Cryopolymers expects to reach a production rate of 5,000 tires recycled per day.

  2. Toxicity of ammonia in pore-water and in the water column to freshwater benthic invertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteman, F.W.; Kahl, M.D.; Rau, D.M.; Balcer, M.D.; Ankley, G.T.

    1994-12-31

    Ammonia has been mentioned as both a primary toxicant and a factor that can produce false positive results in laboratory sediment tests using benthic invertebrates. This study developed a sediment dosing system that percolates an ammonia solution through sediment to achieve target porewater ammonia concentrations that remain stable over four and ten day spiked sediment tests. Ten day flow-through water-only tests and ten day spiked sediment tests were used to determine the toxicity of ammonia in the water column and in the sediment pore-water to the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus and the midge Chironomus tentans. Four-day tests were run with the amphipod Hyalella azteca. The relationship between water column ammonia toxicity and sediment pore-water ammonia toxicity is influenced by the organism`s association with the sediment. For Lumbriculus variegatus and Chironomus tentans that burrow into the sediment and are in direct contact with the porewater, the pore-water LC50 for ammonia is 30--40% higher than the water-only LC50 for each species. Hyalella azteca is epibenthic and avoids ammonia spiked sediment, thus ammonia in the water column is considerably more toxic than the pore-water ammonia with the porewater LC50 about 800% higher than the water only LC50.

  3. Application of percolation theory to microtomography of structured media: Percolation threshold, critical exponents, and upscaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jie; Regenauer-Lieb, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    Percolation theory provides a tool for linking microstructure and macroscopic material properties. In this paper, percolation theory is applied to the analysis of microtomographic images for the purpose of deriving scaling laws for upscaling of properties. We have tested the acquisition of quantities such as percolation threshold, crossover length, fractal dimension, and critical exponent of correlation length from microtomography. By inflating or deflating the target phase and percolation analysis, we can get a critical model and an estimation of the percolation threshold. The crossover length is determined from the critical model by numerical simulation. The fractal dimension can be obtained either from the critical model or from the relative size distribution of clusters. Local probabilities of percolation are used to extract the critical exponent of the correlation length. For near-isotropic samples such as sandstone and bread, the approach works very well. For strongly anisotropic samples, such as highly deformed rock (mylonite) and a tree branch, the percolation threshold and fractal dimension can be assessed with accuracy. However, the uncertainty of the correlation length makes it difficult to accurately extract its critical exponents. Therefore, this aspect of percolation theory cannot be reliably used for upscaling properties of strongly anisotropic media. Other methods of upscaling have to be used for such media.

  4. Percolation Centrality: Quantifying Graph-Theoretic Impact of Nodes during Percolation in Networks

    PubMed Central

    Piraveenan, Mahendra; Prokopenko, Mikhail; Hossain, Liaquat

    2013-01-01

    A number of centrality measures are available to determine the relative importance of a node in a complex network, and betweenness is prominent among them. However, the existing centrality measures are not adequate in network percolation scenarios (such as during infection transmission in a social network of individuals, spreading of computer viruses on computer networks, or transmission of disease over a network of towns) because they do not account for the changing percolation states of individual nodes. We propose a new measure, percolation centrality, that quantifies relative impact of nodes based on their topological connectivity, as well as their percolation states. The measure can be extended to include random walk based definitions, and its computational complexity is shown to be of the same order as that of betweenness centrality. We demonstrate the usage of percolation centrality by applying it to a canonical network as well as simulated and real world scale-free and random networks. PMID:23349699

  5. Percolation on hypergraphs with four-edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatib Damavandi, Ojan; Ziff, Robert M.

    2015-10-01

    We study percolation on self-dual hypergraphs that contain hyperedges with four bounding vertices, or ‘four-edges’, using three different generators, each containing bonds or sites with three distinct probabilities p, r, and t connecting the four vertices. We find explicit values of these probabilities that satisfy the self-duality conditions discussed by Bollobás and Riordan. This demonstrates that explicit solutions of the self-duality conditions can be found using generators containing bonds and sites with independent probabilities. These solutions also provide new examples of lattices where exact percolation critical points are known. One of the generators exhibits three distinct criticality solutions (p, r, t). We carry out Monte-Carlo simulations of two of the generators on two different hypergraphs to confirm the critical values. For the case of the hypergraph and uniform generator studied by Wierman et al, we also determine the threshold p = 0.441 374 ± 0.000 001, which falls within the tight bounds that they derived. Furthermore, we consider a generator in which all or none of the vertices can connect, and find a soluble inhomogeneous percolation system that interpolates between site percolation on the union-jack lattice and bond percolation on the square lattice.

  6. Information entropy of classical versus explosive percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, Tiago M.; Viswanathan, Gandhi M.; da Silva, Luciano R.

    2015-09-01

    We study the Shannon entropy of the cluster size distribution in classical as well as explosive percolation, in order to estimate the uncertainty in the sizes of randomly chosen clusters. At the critical point the cluster size distribution is a power-law, i.e. there are clusters of all sizes, so one expects the information entropy to attain a maximum. As expected, our results show that the entropy attains a maximum at this point for classical percolation. Surprisingly, for explosive percolation the maximum entropy does not match the critical point. Moreover, we show that it is possible to determine the critical point without using the conventional order parameter, just analysing the entropy's derivatives.

  7. Fluid leakage near the percolation threshold.

    PubMed

    Dapp, Wolf B; Müser, Martin H

    2016-01-01

    Percolation is a concept widely used in many fields of research and refers to the propagation of substances through porous media (e.g., coffee filtering), or the behaviour of complex networks (e.g., spreading of diseases). Percolation theory asserts that most percolative processes are universal, that is, the emergent powerlaws only depend on the general, statistical features of the macroscopic system, but not on specific details of the random realisation. In contrast, our computer simulations of the leakage through a seal-applying common assumptions of elasticity, contact mechanics, and fluid dynamics-show that the critical behaviour (how the flow ceases near the sealing point) solely depends on the microscopic details of the last constriction. It appears fundamentally impossible to accurately predict from statistical properties of the surfaces alone how strongly we have to tighten a water tap to make it stop dripping and also how it starts dripping once we loosen it again. PMID:26839261

  8. Percolation conductivity in hafnium sub-oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Islamov, D. R. Gritsenko, V. A.; Cheng, C. H.; Chin, A.

    2014-12-29

    In this study, we demonstrated experimentally that formation of chains and islands of oxygen vacancies in hafnium sub-oxides (HfO{sub x}, x < 2) leads to percolation charge transport in such dielectrics. Basing on the model of Éfros-Shklovskii percolation theory, good quantitative agreement between the experimental and theoretical data of current-voltage characteristics was achieved. Based on the percolation theory suggested model shows that hafnium sub-oxides consist of mixtures of metallic Hf nanoscale clusters of 1–2 nm distributed onto non-stoichiometric HfO{sub x}. It was shown that reported approach might describe low resistance state current-voltage characteristics of resistive memory elements based on HfO{sub x}.

  9. Fluid leakage near the percolation threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dapp, Wolf B.; Müser, Martin H.

    2016-02-01

    Percolation is a concept widely used in many fields of research and refers to the propagation of substances through porous media (e.g., coffee filtering), or the behaviour of complex networks (e.g., spreading of diseases). Percolation theory asserts that most percolative processes are universal, that is, the emergent powerlaws only depend on the general, statistical features of the macroscopic system, but not on specific details of the random realisation. In contrast, our computer simulations of the leakage through a seal—applying common assumptions of elasticity, contact mechanics, and fluid dynamics—show that the critical behaviour (how the flow ceases near the sealing point) solely depends on the microscopic details of the last constriction. It appears fundamentally impossible to accurately predict from statistical properties of the surfaces alone how strongly we have to tighten a water tap to make it stop dripping and also how it starts dripping once we loosen it again.

  10. Fluid leakage near the percolation threshold

    PubMed Central

    Dapp, Wolf B.; Müser, Martin H.

    2016-01-01

    Percolation is a concept widely used in many fields of research and refers to the propagation of substances through porous media (e.g., coffee filtering), or the behaviour of complex networks (e.g., spreading of diseases). Percolation theory asserts that most percolative processes are universal, that is, the emergent powerlaws only depend on the general, statistical features of the macroscopic system, but not on specific details of the random realisation. In contrast, our computer simulations of the leakage through a seal—applying common assumptions of elasticity, contact mechanics, and fluid dynamics—show that the critical behaviour (how the flow ceases near the sealing point) solely depends on the microscopic details of the last constriction. It appears fundamentally impossible to accurately predict from statistical properties of the surfaces alone how strongly we have to tighten a water tap to make it stop dripping and also how it starts dripping once we loosen it again. PMID:26839261

  11. Precipitation Recycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eltahir, Elfatih A. B.; Bras, Rafael L.

    1996-01-01

    The water cycle regulates and reflects natural variability in climate at the regional and global scales. Large-scale human activities that involve changes in land cover, such as tropical deforestation, are likely to modify climate through changes in the water cycle. In order to understand, and hopefully be able to predict, the extent of these potential global and regional changes, we need first to understand how the water cycle works. In the past, most of the research in hydrology focused on the land branch of the water cycle, with little attention given to the atmospheric branch. The study of precipitation recycling which is defined as the contribution of local evaporation to local precipitation, aims at understanding hydrologic processes in the atmospheric branch of the water cycle. Simply stated, any study on precipitation recycling is about how the atmospheric branch of the water cycle works, namely, what happens to water vapor molecules after they evaporate from the surface, and where will they precipitate?

  12. Percolation under noise: Detecting explosive percolation using the second-largest component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viles, Wes; Ginestet, Cedric E.; Tang, Ariana; Kramer, Mark A.; Kolaczyk, Eric D.

    2016-05-01

    We consider the problem of distinguishing between different rates of percolation under noise. A statistical model of percolation is constructed allowing for the birth and death of edges as well as the presence of noise in the observations. This graph-valued stochastic process is composed of a latent and an observed nonstationary process, where the observed graph process is corrupted by type-I and type-II errors. This produces a hidden Markov graph model. We show that for certain choices of parameters controlling the noise, the classical (Erdős-Rényi) percolation is visually indistinguishable from a more rapid form of percolation. In this setting, we compare two different criteria for discriminating between these two percolation models, based on the interquartile range (IQR) of the first component's size, and on the maximal size of the second-largest component. We show through data simulations that this second criterion outperforms the IQR of the first component's size, in terms of discriminatory power. The maximal size of the second component therefore provides a useful statistic for distinguishing between different rates of percolation, under physically motivated conditions for the birth and death of edges, and under noise. The potential application of the proposed criteria for the detection of clinically relevant percolation in the context of applied neuroscience is also discussed.

  13. Percolation threshold on planar Euclidean Gabriel graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norrenbrock, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    In the present article, numerical simulations have been performed to find the bond and site percolation thresholds on two-dimensional Gabriel graphs (GG) for Poisson point processes. GGs belong to the family of "proximity graphs" and are discussed, e.g., in context of the construction of backbones for wireless ad-hoc networks. Finite-size scaling analyses have been performed to find the critical points and critical exponents ν, β and γ. The critical exponents obtained this way verify that the associated universality class is that of standard 2D percolation.

  14. Method for forming ammonia

    DOEpatents

    Kong, Peter C.; Pink, Robert J.; Zuck, Larry D.

    2008-08-19

    A method for forming ammonia is disclosed and which includes the steps of forming a plasma; providing a source of metal particles, and supplying the metal particles to the plasma to form metal nitride particles; and providing a substance, and reacting the metal nitride particles with the substance to produce ammonia, and an oxide byproduct.

  15. Assessing Ammonia Treatment Options

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is the second of three articles to help water system operators understand ammonia and how to monitor and control its effects at the plant and in the distribution system. The first article (Opflow, April 2012) provided an overview of ammonia's chemistry, origins, and water sy...

  16. The distribution of ammonia and its photochemical products on Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atreya, S. K.; Donahue, T. M.; Kuhn, W. R.

    1977-01-01

    Altitude profiles of ammonia and its photochemical products are generated in the light of measurements of the Jovian temperature structure, eddy transport coefficient, improved chemical scheme, and rate constants. Realistic limits are placed on the concentration of hydrazine which may participate in the recycling of ammonia on Jupiter. The maximum hydrazine-ice production rate is calculated to be about 1.3 mg/sq m per Jovian day. The distribution of nitrogen gas is presented with and without supersaturation of hydrazine. The nitrogen mixing ratio near the ammonia cloud top is estimated to be in the range between 10 to the -9th and 10 to the -11th power. An appreciable latitudinal variation in the ammonia concentration is expected.

  17. Correlated Fractal Percolation and the Palis Conjecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekking, Michel; Don, Henk

    2010-04-01

    Let F 1 and F 2 be independent copies of one-dimensional correlated fractal percolation, with almost sure Hausdorff dimensions dim H( F 1) and dim H( F 2). Consider the following question: does dim H( F 1)+dim H( F 2)>1 imply that their algebraic difference F 1- F 2 will contain an interval? The well known Palis conjecture states that `generically' this should be true. Recent work by Kuijvenhoven and the first author (Dekking and Kuijvenhoven in J. Eur. Math. Soc., to appear) on random Cantor sets cannot answer this question as their condition on the joint survival distributions of the generating process is not satisfied by correlated fractal percolation. We develop a new condition which permits us to solve the problem, and we prove that the condition of Dekking and Kuijvenhoven (J. Eur. Math. Soc., to appear) implies our condition. Independently of this we give a solution to the critical case, yielding that a strong version of the Palis conjecture holds for fractal percolation and correlated fractal percolation: the algebraic difference contains an interval almost surely if and only if the sum of the Hausdorff dimensions of the random Cantor sets exceeds one.

  18. Crossover from isotropic to directed percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zongzheng; Yang, Ji; Ziff, Robert M.; Deng, Youjin

    2012-08-01

    We generalize the directed percolation (DP) model by relaxing the strict directionality of DP such that propagation can occur in either direction but with anisotropic probabilities. We denote the probabilities as p?=ppd and p?=p(1-pd), with p representing the average occupation probability and pd controlling the anisotropy. The Leath-Alexandrowicz method is used to grow a cluster from an active seed site. We call this model with two main growth directions biased directed percolation (BDP). Standard isotropic percolation (IP) and DP are the two limiting cases of the BDP model, corresponding to pd=1/2 and pd=0,1 respectively. In this work, besides IP and DP, we also consider the 1/2percolation thresholds of the BDP model for pd=0.6 and 0.8, and determine various critical exponents. These exponents are found to be consistent with those for standard DP. We also determine the renormalization exponent associated with the asymmetric perturbation due to pd-1/2?0 near IP, and confirm that such an asymmetric scaling field is relevant at IP.

  19. Mathematical Model of Ammonia Handling in the Rat Renal Medulla

    PubMed Central

    Noiret, Lorette; Baigent, Stephen; Jalan, Rajiv; Thomas, S. Randall

    2015-01-01

    The kidney is one of the main organs that produces ammonia and release it into the circulation. Under normal conditions, between 30 and 50% of the ammonia produced in the kidney is excreted in the urine, the rest being absorbed into the systemic circulation via the renal vein. In acidosis and in some pathological conditions, the proportion of urinary excretion can increase to 70% of the ammonia produced in the kidney. Mechanisms regulating the balance between urinary excretion and renal vein release are not fully understood. We developed a mathematical model that reflects current thinking about renal ammonia handling in order to investigate the role of each tubular segment and identify some of the components which might control this balance. The model treats the movements of water, sodium chloride, urea, NH3 and NH4+, and non-reabsorbable solute in an idealized renal medulla of the rat at steady state. A parameter study was performed to identify the transport parameters and microenvironmental conditions that most affect the rate of urinary ammonia excretion. Our results suggest that urinary ammonia excretion is mainly determined by those parameters that affect ammonia recycling in the loops of Henle. In particular, our results suggest a critical role for interstitial pH in the outer medulla and for luminal pH along the inner medullary collecting ducts. PMID:26280830

  20. Mathematical Model of Ammonia Handling in the Rat Renal Medulla.

    PubMed

    Noiret, Lorette; Baigent, Stephen; Jalan, Rajiv; Thomas, S Randall

    2015-01-01

    The kidney is one of the main organs that produces ammonia and release it into the circulation. Under normal conditions, between 30 and 50% of the ammonia produced in the kidney is excreted in the urine, the rest being absorbed into the systemic circulation via the renal vein. In acidosis and in some pathological conditions, the proportion of urinary excretion can increase to 70% of the ammonia produced in the kidney. Mechanisms regulating the balance between urinary excretion and renal vein release are not fully understood. We developed a mathematical model that reflects current thinking about renal ammonia handling in order to investigate the role of each tubular segment and identify some of the components which might control this balance. The model treats the movements of water, sodium chloride, urea, NH3 and [Formula: see text], and non-reabsorbable solute in an idealized renal medulla of the rat at steady state. A parameter study was performed to identify the transport parameters and microenvironmental conditions that most affect the rate of urinary ammonia excretion. Our results suggest that urinary ammonia excretion is mainly determined by those parameters that affect ammonia recycling in the loops of Henle. In particular, our results suggest a critical role for interstitial pH in the outer medulla and for luminal pH along the inner medullary collecting ducts. PMID:26280830

  1. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemkiewicz, Paul; Vandivort, Tamara; Pflughoeft-Hassett, Debra; Chugh, Y Paul; Hower, James

    2008-08-31

    Each year, over 100 million tons of solid byproducts are produced by coal-burning electric utilities in the United States. Annual production of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts continues to increase as the result of more stringent sulfur emission restrictions. In addition, stricter limits on NOx emissions mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act have resulted in utility burner/boiler modifications that frequently yield higher carbon concentrations in fly ash, which restricts the use of the ash as a cement replacement. Controlling ammonia in ash is also of concern. If newer, “clean coal” combustion and gasification technologies are adopted, their byproducts may also present a management challenge. The objective of the Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) is to develop and demonstrate technologies to address issues related to the recycling of byproducts associated with coal combustion processes. A goal of CBRC is that these technologies, by the year 2010, will lead to an overall ash utilization rate from the current 34% to 50% by such measures as increasing the current rate of FGD byproduct use and increasing in the number of uses considered “allowable” under state regulations. Another issue of interest to the CBRC would be to examine the environmental impact of both byproduct utilization and disposal. No byproduct utilization technology is likely to be adopted by industry unless it is more cost-effective than landfilling. Therefore, it is extremely important that the utility industry provide guidance to the R&D program. Government agencies and privatesector organizations that may be able to utilize these materials in the conduct of their missions should also provide input. The CBRC will serve as an effective vehicle for acquiring and maintaining guidance from these diverse organizations so that the proper balance in the R&D program is achieved.

  2. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    Each year, over 100 million tons of solid byproducts are produced by coal-burning electric utilities in the United States. Annual production of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts continues to increase as the result of more stringent sulfur emission restrictions. In addition, stricter limits on NOx emissions mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act have resulted in utility burner/boiler modifications that frequently yield higher carbon concentrations in fly ash, which restricts the use of the ash as a cement replacement. Controlling ammonia in ash is also of concern. If newer, 'clean coal' combustion and gasification technologies are adopted, their byproducts may also present a management challenge. The objective of the Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) is to develop and demonstrate technologies to address issues related to the recycling of byproducts associated with coal combustion processes. A goal of CBRC is that these technologies, by the year 2010, will lead to an overall ash utilization rate from the current 34% to 50% by such measures as increasing the current rate of FGD byproduct use and increasing in the number of uses considered 'allowable' under state regulations. Another issue of interest to the CBRC would be to examine the environmental impact of both byproduct utilization and disposal. No byproduct utilization technology is likely to be adopted by industry unless it is more cost-effective than landfilling. Therefore, it is extremely important that the utility industry provide guidance to the R&D program. Government agencies and private-sector organizations that may be able to utilize these materials in the conduct of their missions should also provide input. The CBRC will serve as an effective vehicle for acquiring and maintaining guidance from these diverse organizations so that the proper balance in the R&D program is achieved.

  3. Disinfection of secondary effluents by infiltration percolation.

    PubMed

    Makni, H

    2001-01-01

    Among the most attractive applications of reclaimed wastewater are: irrigation of public parks, sports fields, golf courses and market gardening. These uses require advanced wastewater treatment including disinfection. According to WHO guidelines (1989) and current rules and regulations in Tunisia, faecal coliform levels have to be reduced to < 10(3) or 10(2) CFU/100 mL. In Tunisia, most wastewater plants are only secondary treatment and, in order to meet health related regulations, the effluents need to be disinfected. However, it is usual for secondary effluents to need filtration prior to disinfection. Effectiveness of conventional disinfection processes, such as chlorination and UV radiation, are dependent upon the oxidation level and the levels of suspended solids of the treated water. Ozonation is relatively expensive and energy consuming. The consideration of the advantages and disadvantages of conventional techniques, their reliability, investment needs and operational costs will lead to the use of less sophisticated alternative techniques for certain facilities. Among alternative techniques, soil aquifer treatment and infiltration percolation through sand beds have been studied in Arizona, Israel, France, Spain and Morocco. Infiltration percolation plants have been intermittently fed with secondary or high quality primary effluents which percolated through 1.5-2 m unsaturated coarse sand and were recovered by under-drains. In such infiltration percolation facilities, microorganisms were eliminated through numerous physical, physicochemical and biological inter-related processes (mechanical filtration, adsorption and microbial degradation respectively). Efficiency of faecal coliform removal was dependent upon the water detention times in the filtering medium and on the oxidation of the filtered water. Effluents of Sfax town aerated ponds were infiltrated through 1.5 m deep sand columns in order to determine the performance of infiltration percolation in the polishing of secondary effluents. Elimination of bacteria (total and coliforms, faecal streptococci) and their relationship with the hydraulic load and the temperature were investigated. PMID:11464749

  4. Ammonia Leak Locator Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodge, Franklin T.; Wuest, Martin P.; Deffenbaugh, Danny M.

    1995-01-01

    The thermal control system of International Space Station Alpha will use liquid ammonia as the heat exchange fluid. It is expected that small leaks (of the order perhaps of one pound of ammonia per day) may develop in the lines transporting the ammonia to the various facilities as well as in the heat exchange equipment. Such leaks must be detected and located before the supply of ammonia becomes critically low. For that reason, NASA-JSC has a program underway to evaluate instruments that can detect and locate ultra-small concentrations of ammonia in a high vacuum environment. To be useful, the instrument must be portable and small enough that an astronaut can easily handle it during extravehicular activity. An additional complication in the design of the instrument is that the environment immediately surrounding ISSA will contain small concentrations of many other gases from venting of onboard experiments as well as from other kinds of leaks. These other vapors include water, cabin air, CO2, CO, argon, N2, and ethylene glycol. Altogether, this local environment might have a pressure of the order of 10(exp -7) to 10(exp -6) torr. Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) was contracted by NASA-JSC to provide support to NASA-JSC and its prime contractors in evaluating ammonia-location instruments and to make a preliminary trade study of the advantages and limitations of potential instruments. The present effort builds upon an earlier SwRI study to evaluate ammonia leak detection instruments [Jolly and Deffenbaugh]. The objectives of the present effort include: (1) Estimate the characteristics of representative ammonia leaks; (2) Evaluate the baseline instrument in the light of the estimated ammonia leak characteristics; (3) Propose alternative instrument concepts; and (4) Conduct a trade study of the proposed alternative concepts and recommend promising instruments. The baseline leak-location instrument selected by NASA-JSC was an ion gauge.

  5. Green Science: Revisiting Recycling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palliser, Janna

    2011-01-01

    Recycling has been around for a long time--people have reused materials and refashioned them into needed items for thousands of years. More recently, war efforts encouraged conservation and reuse of materials, and in the 1970s recycling got its official start when recycling centers were created. Now, curbside recycling programs and recycling

  6. Recycling Lesson Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Dept. of Environmental Resources, Harrisburg.

    This document contains lesson plans about recycling for teachers in grades K-12. Titles include: (1) "Waste--Where Does It Come From? Where Does It Go?" (2) "Litter Detectives," (3) "Classroom Paper Recycling," (4) "Recycling Survey," (5) "Disposal and Recycling Costs," (6) "Composting Project," (7) Used Motor Oil Recycling," (8) "Unwrapping…

  7. SOURCE ASSESSMENT: SYNTHETIC AMMONIA PRODUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a study of air emissions from the production of synthetic ammonia. In 1976, 90 synthetic ammonia plants in 30 states produced 15.2 million metric tons of anhydrous ammonia. Ammonia is synthesized by the reaction of nitrogen and hydrogen. Most plants produce h...

  8. Transport and percolation in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guanliang

    To design complex networks with optimal transport properties such as flow efficiency, we consider three approaches to understanding transport and percolation in complex networks. We analyze the effects of randomizing the strengths of connections, randomly adding long-range connections to regular lattices, and percolation of spatially constrained networks. Various real-world networks often have links that are differentiated in terms of their strength, intensity, or capacity. We study the distribution P(σ) of the equivalent conductance for Erdoḧs-Rényi (ER) and scale-free (SF) weighted resistor networks with N nodes, for which links are assigned with conductance σ i ≡ e-axi, where xi is a random variable with 0 < xi < 1. We find, both analytically and numerically, that P(σ) for ER networks exhibits two regimes: (i) For σ < e-apc, P(σ) is independent of N and scales as a power law P(σ) ˜ sk/a-1 . Here pc = 1/ is the critical percolation threshold of the network and is the average degree of the network. (ii) For σ > e -apc, P(σ) has strong N dependence and scales as P(σ) ˜ f(σ, apc/N1/3). Transport properties are greatly affected by the topology of networks. We investigate the transport problem in lattices with long-range connections and subject to a cost constraint, seeking design principles for optimal transport networks. Our network is built from a regular d-dimensional lattice to be improved by adding long-range connections with probability Pij ˜ r-aij , where rij is the lattice distance between site i and j. We introduce a cost constraint on the total length of the additional links and find optimal transport in the system for α = d + 1, established here for d = 1, 2 and 3 for regular lattices and df for fractals. Remarkably, this cost constraint approach remains optimal, regardless of the strategy used for transport, whether based on local or global knowledge of the network structure. To further understand the role that long-range connections play in optimizing the transport of complex systems, we study the percolation of spatially constrained networks. We now consider originally empty lattices embedded in d dimensions by adding long-range connections with the same power law probability p(r) ˜ r -α. We find that, for α ≤ d, the percolation transition belongs to the universality class of percolation in ER networks, while for α > 2d it belongs to the universality class of percolation in regular lattices (for one-dimensional linear chain, there is no percolation transition). However for d < α < 2d, the percolation properties show new intermediate behavior different from ER networks, with critical exponents that depend on α.

  9. Ammonia Release on ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macatangay, Ariel

    2009-01-01

    Crew: Approximately 53% metabolic load Product of protein metabolism Limit production of ammonia by external regulation NOT possbile Payloads Potential source Scientific experiments Thorough safety review ensures sufficient levels of containment

  10. Reactor for removing ammonia

    DOEpatents

    Luo, Weifang; Stewart, Kenneth D.

    2009-11-17

    Disclosed is a device for removing trace amounts of ammonia from a stream of gas, particularly hydrogen gas, prepared by a reformation apparatus. The apparatus is used to prevent PEM "poisoning" in a fuel cell receiving the incoming hydrogen stream.

  11. Ammonia and sediment toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Ogle, R.S.; Hansen, S.R.

    1994-12-31

    Ammonia toxicity to aquatic organisms has received considerable study, with most of these studies focusing on water column organisms. However, with the development and implementation of sediment (and pore water) toxicity tests, the toxicity of ammonia to benthic infauna and other sediment toxicity test organisms has become important, especially since sediment/porewater ammonia occurs at higher concentrations than in the water column. Unfortunately, there has been very little of this type information, especially for marine/estuarine organisms. This laboratory determined the toxicity of ammonia to three key marine/estuarine test organisms: the amphipod Eohaustorius estuarius, the bivalve Mytilus edulis, and the echinoderm Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. Because sediment/porewater pH can differ substantially from typical seawater pH, the toxicity evaluations covered a range of pH levels (6, 7, 8, and 9). Eohaustorius results indicate that while Total Ammonia increased in toxicity (measured as EC50) as pH increased (from 460 mg/L at pH 6, to 13 mg/L at pH 9), unionized ammonia toxicity decreased from 0.13 mg/L at pH 6 to 2.8 mg/L at pH 9. The amphipod was much less sensitive to ammonia than were the bivalve and echinoderm, with an unionized ammonia EC50 at pH 8 of 2.14 mg/L relative to 0.43 mg/L for the mussel and 0.13 mg/L for the purple urchin. These results are discussed with respect to design and interpretation of sediment toxicity test results, including an interpretation approach based on partitioning of Toxic Units (TU).

  12. Titan's Ammonia Feature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smythe, W.; Nelson, R.; Boryta, M.; Choukroun, M.

    2011-01-01

    NH3 has long been considered an important component in the formation and evolution of the outer planet satellites. NH3 is particularly important for Titan, since it may serve as the reservoir for atmospheric nitrogen. A brightening seen on Titan starting in 2004 may arise from a transient low-lying fog or surface coating of ammonia. The spectral shape suggests the ammonia is anhydrous, a molecule that hydrates quickly in the presence of water.

  13. Ammonia Clouds on Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for movie of Ammonia Ice Clouds on Jupiter

    In this movie, put together from false-color images taken by the New Horizons Ralph instrument as the spacecraft flew past Jupiter in early 2007, show ammonia clouds (appearing as bright blue areas) as they form and disperse over five successive Jupiter 'days.' Scientists noted how the larger cloud travels along with a small, local deep hole.

  14. Reversible first-order transition in Pauli percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksymenko, Mykola; Moessner, Roderich; Shtengel, Kirill

    2015-06-01

    Percolation plays an important role in fields and phenomena as diverse as the study of social networks, the dynamics of epidemics, the robustness of electricity grids, conduction in disordered media, and geometric properties in statistical physics. We analyze a new percolation problem in which the first-order nature of an equilibrium percolation transition can be established analytically and verified numerically. The rules for this site percolation model are physical and very simple, requiring only the introduction of a weight W (n )=n +1 for a cluster of size n . This establishes that a discontinuous percolation transition can occur with qualitatively more local interactions than in all currently considered examples of explosive percolation; and that, unlike these, it can be reversible. This greatly extends both the applicability of such percolation models in principle and their reach in practice.

  15. Bond and site percolation in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junfeng; Zhou, Zongzheng; Zhang, Wei; Garoni, Timothy M.; Deng, Youjin

    2013-05-01

    We simulate the bond and site percolation models on a simple-cubic lattice with linear sizes up to L=512, and estimate the percolation thresholds to be pc(bond)=0.24881182(10) and pc(site)=0.3116077(2). By performing extensive simulations at these estimated critical points, we then estimate the critical exponents 1/ν=1.1410(15), β/ν=0.47705(15), the leading correction exponent yi=-1.2(2), and the shortest-path exponent dmin=1.3756(3). Various universal amplitudes are also obtained, including wrapping probabilities, ratios associated with the cluster-size distribution, and the excess cluster number. We observe that the leading finite-size corrections in certain wrapping probabilities are governed by an exponent ≈-2, rather than yi≈-1.2.

  16. Percolation in the Rayleigh-Benard convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Hiroshi

    2006-11-01

    The divergence of the viscosity coefficient and the heat conductivity in the Rayleigh-Benard convection was found in the numerical calculation from 2004 to 2005[1-3]. The interpretation for this phenomenon from the viewpoint of physics is incomplete. The present author proposes a physical interpretation introducing the percolation theory[4]. The temperature difference region where the divergence of the viscosity coefficient occurs depends on the system size length. This system size dependency gives us an insight for the physics in the divergence of the viscosity coefficient in the Rayleigh-Benard convection. [1] H. Shibata, Momentum flux in Rayleigh-Benard convection, Physica A 333, 71-86(2004). [2] H. Shibata, Momentum flux in Rayleigh-Benard convection II, Physica A 345, 448-456(2005). [3] H. Shibata, Heat flux in Rayleigh-Benard convection, Physica A 352, 335-346(2005). [4] D. Stauffer, Introduction to Percolation Theory (Taylor & Francis, London, 1985).

  17. Abrupt percolation in small equilibrated networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsoukas, Themis

    2015-05-01

    Networks can exhibit an abrupt transition in the form of a spontaneous self-organization of a sizable fraction of the population into a giant component of connected members. This behavior has been demonstrated in random graphs under suppressive rules that passively or actively attempt to delay the formation of the giant cluster. We show that suppressive rules are not a necessary condition for a sharp transition at the percolation threshold. Rather, a finite system with aggressive tendency to form a giant cluster may exhibit an instability at the percolation threshold that is relieved through an abrupt and discontinuous transition to the stable branch. We develop the theory for a class of equilibrated networks that produce this behavior and find that the discontinuous jump is especially pronounced in small networks but disappears when the size of the system is infinite.

  18. Modified Invasion Percolation Models for Multiphase Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Karpyn, Zuleima

    2015-01-31

    This project extends current understanding and modeling capabilities of pore-scale multiphase flow physics in porous media. High-resolution X-ray computed tomography imaging experiments are used to investigate structural and surface properties of the medium that influence immiscible displacement. Using experimental and computational tools, we investigate the impact of wetting characteristics, as well as radial and axial loading conditions, on the development of percolation pathways, residual phase trapping and fluid-fluid interfacial areas.

  19. Cooperation percolation in spatial prisoner's dilemma game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Han-Xin; Rong, Zhihai; Wang, Wen-Xu

    2014-01-01

    The paradox of cooperation among selfish individuals still puzzles scientific communities. Although a large amount of evidence has demonstrated that the cooperator clusters in spatial games are effective in protecting the cooperators against the invasion of defectors, we continue to lack the condition for the formation of a giant cooperator cluster that ensures the prevalence of cooperation in a system. Here, we study the dynamical organization of the cooperator clusters in spatial prisoner's dilemma game to offer the condition for the dominance of cooperation, finding that a phase transition characterized by the emergence of a large spanning cooperator cluster occurs when the initial fraction of the cooperators exceeds a certain threshold. Interestingly, the phase transition belongs to different universality classes of percolation determined by the temptation to defect b. Specifically, on square lattices, 1 < b < 4/3 leads to a phase transition pertaining to the class of regular site percolation, whereas 3/2 < b < 2 gives rise to a phase transition subject to invasion percolation with trapping. Our findings offer a deeper understanding of cooperative behavior in nature and society.

  20. Biological semiconductor based on electrical percolation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Minghui; Bruck, Hugh Alan; Kostov, Yordan; Rasooly, Avraham

    2010-05-01

    We have developed a novel biological semiconductor (BSC) based on electrical percolation through a multilayer three-dimensional carbon nanotube-antibody bionanocomposite network, which can measure biological interactions directly and electronically. In electrical percolation, the passage of current through the conductive network is dependent upon the continuity of the network. Molecular interactions, such as binding of antigens to the antibodies, disrupt the network continuity causing increased resistance of the network. A BSC is fabricated by immobilizing a prefunctionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)-antibody bionanocomposite directly on a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) surface (also known as plexiglass or acrylic). We used the BSC for direct (label-free) electronic measurements of antibody-antigen binding, showing that, at slightly above the electrical percolation threshold of the network, binding of a specific antigen dramatically increases the electrical resistance. Using anti-staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) IgG as a "gate" and SEB as an "actuator", we demonstrated that the BSC was able to detect SEB at concentrations of 1 ng/mL. The new BSCs may permit assembly of multiple sensors on the same chip to create "biological central processing units (CPUs)" with multiple BSC elements, capable of processing and sorting out information on multiple analytes simultaneously. PMID:20361741

  1. Sequential algorithm for fast clique percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumpula, Jussi M.; Kivelä, Mikko; Kaski, Kimmo; Saramäki, Jari

    2008-08-01

    In complex network research clique percolation, introduced by Palla, Derényi, and Vicsek [Nature (London) 435, 814 (2005)], is a deterministic community detection method which allows for overlapping communities and is purely based on local topological properties of a network. Here we present a sequential clique percolation algorithm (SCP) to do fast community detection in weighted and unweighted networks, for cliques of a chosen size. This method is based on sequentially inserting the constituent links to the network and simultaneously keeping track of the emerging community structure. Unlike existing algorithms, the SCP method allows for detecting k -clique communities at multiple weight thresholds in a single run, and can simultaneously produce a dendrogram representation of hierarchical community structure. In sparse weighted networks, the SCP algorithm can also be used for implementing the weighted clique percolation method recently introduced by Farkas [New J. Phys. 9, 180 (2007)]. The computational time of the SCP algorithm scales linearly with the number of k -cliques in the network. As an example, the method is applied to a product association network, revealing its nested community structure.

  2. Percolation of networks with directed dependency links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Dunbiao; Yuan, Xin; Du, Minhui; Stanley, H. Eugene; Hu, Yanqing

    2016-04-01

    The self-consistent probabilistic approach has proven itself powerful in studying the percolation behavior of interdependent or multiplex networks without tracking the percolation process through each cascading step. In order to understand how directed dependency links impact criticality, we employ this approach to study the percolation properties of networks with both undirected connectivity links and directed dependency links. We find that when a random network with a given degree distribution undergoes a second-order phase transition, the critical point and the unstable regime surrounding the second-order phase transition regime are determined by the proportion of nodes that do not depend on any other nodes. Moreover, we also find that the triple point and the boundary between first- and second-order transitions are determined by the proportion of nodes that depend on no more than one node. This implies that it is maybe general for multiplex network systems, some important properties of phase transitions can be determined only by a few parameters. We illustrate our findings using Erdős-Rényi networks.

  3. Reconstruction of flow topology and percolation scalings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakunin, Oleg

    2005-11-01

    The essential deviation of transport processes in turbulent fluids and plasma from the classical behavior leads to the necessity of search for new approaches and scaling laws [1]. A variety of turbulence forms requires not only special description methods, but also an analysis of general mechanisms for different turbulence types. One such mechanism is the percolation transport [1,2]. Its description is based on the idea of long-range correlations, borrowed from theory of phase transitions and critical phenomena. The present paper considers the influence of zonal flow and time-dependence effects on the passive scalar behavior in the framework of the percolation approach. It is suggested to modify the renormalization condition of the small parameter of percolation model in accordance with the additional external influences superimposed on the system [3-4]. This approach makes it possible to consider simultaneously both parameters: the characteristic drift velocity Ud and the characteristic perturbation frequency w. The effective diffusion coefficient Deff ˜ w^7/10 satisfactory describes the low-frequency region w in which the long-range correlation effects play a significant role. This scaling agrees well with the analogous expressions that describe low frequency regimes of transport [1,2]. [1] Isichenko M B 1992 Rev. Mod. Phys. 64 961 [2] Bakunin O G 2004 Reports on Progress in Physics 67 965 [3] Bakunin O G 2005 Physica A 345 1 [4] Bakunin O G 2005 J. Plasma Physics 71 756.

  4. Topology of a percolating soil pore network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capa-Morocho, M.; Ruiz-Ramos, M.; Hapca, S. M.; Houston, A.; Tarquis, A. M.

    2012-04-01

    A connectivity function defined by the 3D-Euler number, is a topological indicator and can be related to hydraulic properties (Vogel and Roth, 2001). This study aims to develop connectivity Euler indexes as indicators of the ability of soils for fluid percolation. The starting point was a 3D grey image acquired by X-ray computed tomography of a soil at bulk density of 1.2 mg cm-3. This image was used in the simulation of 40000 particles following a directed random walk algorithms with 7 binarization thresholds. These data consisted of 7 files containing the simulated end points of the 40000 random walks, obtained in Ruiz-Ramos et al. (2010). MATLAB software was used for computing the frequency matrix of the number of particles arriving at every end point of the random walks and their 3D representation. In a former work (Capa et al., 2011) a criteria for choosing the optimal threshold of grey value was identified: Final positions were divided in two subgroups, cg1 (positions with frequency of the number of particles received greater than the median) and cg2 (frequency lower or equal to median). Images with maximum difference between the Z coordinate of the center of gravity of both subgroups were selected as those with optimal threshold that reflects the major internal differences in soil structure that are relevant to percolation. According to this criterion, the optimal threshold for the soil with density 1.2 mg cm-3 was 24.Thresholds above and below the optimal (23 and 25) were also considered to confirm this selection; therefore the analysis were conducted for three files (1 image with 3 grey threshold values, which have different porosity). Additionally, three random matrix simulations with the same porosity than the selected binaries images were used to test the existence of pore connectivity as a consequence of a non-random soil structure. Therefore, 6 matrix were considered (three structured and three random) for this study. Random matrix presented a normal distribution of percolation speed contrary to the simulated percolation speed for structured soil images. For all of them, Minkowski functionals were calculated applying Ohser and Mucklich (2001) methodology. Interpretation of results in terms of soil percolation behavior of these soils will be derived.

  5. Multiple threshold percolation in polymer/filler composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQueen, Douglas H.; Jäger, Karl-Michael; Pelísková, Michaela

    2004-08-01

    Local variations in filler particle concentration and/or shape and orientation in static filler/polymer composites are modelled as distributions of percolation thresholds. The concentration variations can be due to insufficient mixing, formation of semicrystalline voids during cooling from the melt, shrinkage during polymer curing, flow during physical compression or the like. Irregular filler shapes, especially elongated shapes, reduce the percolation threshold; thus, natural variations in the shapes and orientations of filler particle aggregates lead to locally varying percolation thresholds. A distribution of percolation thresholds leads to an apparent average percolation threshold based on the conductivity below the mean percolation threshold. For filler concentrations above the apparent percolation threshold, the dielectric constant continues to increase before reaching a lowered peak value at the mean percolation threshold and then decreasing. This can explain some 'anomalous' published experimental results concerning the dielectric constant just above the percolation threshold. In the frequency plane, the percolation threshold distribution can lead to a slight reduction of the apparent critical exponents x and y of the frequency dependencies of the conductivity and relative dielectric constant, respectively. Our experimental results on ethylene butylacrylate copolymer/carbon black composites support the theory.

  6. Green Science: Revisiting Recycling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palliser, Janna

    2011-01-01

    Recycling has been around for a long time--people have reused materials and refashioned them into needed items for thousands of years. More recently, war efforts encouraged conservation and reuse of materials, and in the 1970s recycling got its official start when recycling centers were created. Now, curbside recycling programs and recycling…

  7. Continuum percolation of carbon nanotubes in polymeric and colloidal media

    PubMed Central

    Kyrylyuk, Andriy V.; van der Schoot, Paul

    2008-01-01

    We apply continuum connectedness percolation theory to realistic carbon nanotube systems and predict how bending flexibility, length polydispersity, and attractive interactions between them influence the percolation threshold, demonstrating that it can be used as a predictive tool for designing nanotube-based composite materials. We argue that the host matrix in which the nanotubes are dispersed controls this threshold through the interactions it induces between them during processing and through the degree of connectedness that must be set by the tunneling distance of electrons, at least in the context of conductivity percolation. This provides routes to manipulate the percolation threshold and the level of conductivity in the final product. We find that the percolation threshold of carbon nanotubes is very sensitive to the degree of connectedness, to the presence of small quantities of longer rods, and to very weak attractive interactions between them. Bending flexibility or tortuosity, on the other hand, has only a fairly weak impact on the percolation threshold. PMID:18550818

  8. Exploring percolative landscapes: Infinite cascades of geometric phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Timonin, P N; Chitov, Gennady Y

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of many kinetic processes in 1+1 (space-time) dimensions results in 2D directed percolative landscapes. The active phases of these models possess numerous hidden geometric orders characterized by various types of large-scale and/or coarse-grained percolative backbones that we define. For the patterns originated in the classical directed percolation (DP) and contact process we show from the Monte Carlo simulation data that these percolative backbones emerge at specific critical points as a result of continuous phase transitions. These geometric transitions belong to the DP universality class and their nonlocal order parameters are the capacities of corresponding backbones. The multitude of conceivable percolative backbones implies the existence of infinite cascades of such geometric transitions in the kinetic processes considered. We present simple arguments to support the conjecture that such cascades of transitions are a generic feature of percolation as well as of many other transitions with nonlocal order parameters. PMID:26871019

  9. Exploring percolative landscapes: Infinite cascades of geometric phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timonin, P. N.; Chitov, Gennady Y.

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of many kinetic processes in 1+1 (space-time) dimensions results in 2 D directed percolative landscapes. The active phases of these models possess numerous hidden geometric orders characterized by various types of large-scale and/or coarse-grained percolative backbones that we define. For the patterns originated in the classical directed percolation (DP) and contact process we show from the Monte Carlo simulation data that these percolative backbones emerge at specific critical points as a result of continuous phase transitions. These geometric transitions belong to the DP universality class and their nonlocal order parameters are the capacities of corresponding backbones. The multitude of conceivable percolative backbones implies the existence of infinite cascades of such geometric transitions in the kinetic processes considered. We present simple arguments to support the conjecture that such cascades of transitions are a generic feature of percolation as well as of many other transitions with nonlocal order parameters.

  10. Deformation-assisted fluid percolation in rock salt.

    PubMed

    Ghanbarzadeh, Soheil; Hesse, Marc A; Prodanović, Maša; Gardner, James E

    2015-11-27

    Deep geological storage sites for nuclear waste are commonly located in rock salt to ensure hydrological isolation from groundwater. The low permeability of static rock salt is due to a percolation threshold. However, deformation may be able to overcome this threshold and allow fluid flow. We confirm the percolation threshold in static experiments on synthetic salt samples with x-ray microtomography. We then analyze wells penetrating salt deposits in the Gulf of Mexico. The observed hydrocarbon distributions in rock salt require that percolation occurred at porosities considerably below the static threshold due to deformation-assisted percolation. Therefore, the design of nuclear waste repositories in salt should guard against deformation-driven fluid percolation. In general, static percolation thresholds may not always limit fluid flow in deforming environments. PMID:26612949

  11. Percolation in a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Catalyst Layer

    SciTech Connect

    Stacy, Stephen; Allen, Jeffrey

    2012-07-01

    Water management in the catalyst layers of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) is confronted by two issues, flooding and dry out, both of which result in improper functioning of the fuel cell and lead to poor performance and degradation. At the present time, the data that has been reported about water percolation and wettability within a fuel cell catalyst layer is limited. A method and apparatus for measuring the percolation pressure in the catalyst layer has been developed based upon an experimental apparatus used to test water percolation in porous transport layers (PTL). The experimental setup uses a pseudo Hele-Shaw type testing where samples are compressed and a fluid is injected into the sample. Testing the samples gives percolation pressure plots which show trends in increasing percolation pressure with an increase in flow rate. A decrease in pressure was seen as percolation occurred in one sample, however the pressure only had a rising effect in the other sample.

  12. Deformation-assisted fluid percolation in rock salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbarzadeh, Soheil; Hesse, Marc A.; Prodanović, Maša; Gardner, James E.

    2015-11-01

    Deep geological storage sites for nuclear waste are commonly located in rock salt to ensure hydrological isolation from groundwater. The low permeability of static rock salt is due to a percolation threshold. However, deformation may be able to overcome this threshold and allow fluid flow. We confirm the percolation threshold in static experiments on synthetic salt samples with x-ray microtomography. We then analyze wells penetrating salt deposits in the Gulf of Mexico. The observed hydrocarbon distributions in rock salt require that percolation occurred at porosities considerably below the static threshold due to deformation-assisted percolation. Therefore, the design of nuclear waste repositories in salt should guard against deformation-driven fluid percolation. In general, static percolation thresholds may not always limit fluid flow in deforming environments.

  13. Breaking of the site-bond percolation universality in networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radicchi, Filippo; Castellano, Claudio

    2015-12-01

    The stochastic addition of either vertices or connections in a network leads to the observation of the percolation transition, a structural change with the appearance of a connected component encompassing a finite fraction of the system. Percolation has always been regarded as a substrate-dependent but model-independent process, in the sense that the critical exponents of the transition are determined by the geometry of the system, but they are identical for the bond and site percolation models. Here, we report a violation of such assumption. We provide analytical and numerical evidence of a difference in the values of the critical exponents between the bond and site percolation models in networks with null percolation thresholds, such as scale-free graphs with diverging second moment of the degree distribution. We discuss possible implications of our results in real networks, and provide additional insights on the anomalous nature of the percolation transition with null threshold.

  14. Breaking of the site-bond percolation universality in networks

    PubMed Central

    Radicchi, Filippo; Castellano, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    The stochastic addition of either vertices or connections in a network leads to the observation of the percolation transition, a structural change with the appearance of a connected component encompassing a finite fraction of the system. Percolation has always been regarded as a substrate-dependent but model-independent process, in the sense that the critical exponents of the transition are determined by the geometry of the system, but they are identical for the bond and site percolation models. Here, we report a violation of such assumption. We provide analytical and numerical evidence of a difference in the values of the critical exponents between the bond and site percolation models in networks with null percolation thresholds, such as scale-free graphs with diverging second moment of the degree distribution. We discuss possible implications of our results in real networks, and provide additional insights on the anomalous nature of the percolation transition with null threshold. PMID:26667155

  15. The Chemistry of Liquid Ammonia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lagowski, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    The solvent and chemical properties of liquid ammonia are presented. In a certain sense, ammonia is a more versatile solvent than is water because of its ability to solubilize, without reaction, highly negative or reducing species. (Author/BB)

  16. The Ammonia-Soda Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tingle, M.

    1979-01-01

    This article is a condensed version of a commentary written to accompany a set of slides which describes the ammonia-soda process used by the ammonia-soda plant at Northwich of the United Kingdom. (HM)

  17. Liberation of ammonia by cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, J.W.

    1986-04-01

    Photoheterotrophic nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria release ammonia when treated with methionine sulfoximine (MSX) to inhibit nitrogen incorporation into protein. This released ammonia can be derived from recently fixed nitrogen (nitrogen atmosphere) or endogenous reserves (argon atmosphere). Anaerobic ammonia release requires light and is stimulated by the photosystem II herbicides DCMU and Atrazine, regardless of the source of ammonia. As much as one quarter of the total cellular nitrogen can be released as ammonia by cyanbacteria treated with MSX and DCMU under argon in light. Chromatography of cell extracts indicates that virtually all cellular proteins are degraded. DCMU and Atrazine, at very low concentration, inhibit sustained uptake of the ammonia analog /sup 14/C methylamine. These data indicate that the herbicides interrupt ammonia uptake and retention by the cells, and support a role for photosystem II in ammonia metabolism.

  18. Soil water percolation at different bulk densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Ramos, Margarita; Grinev, Dimitri; Del Valle, Daniel; Baveye, Philippe; María Tarquis, Ana

    2010-05-01

    Soil structure, and specifically bulk density, porosity and connectivity have strong influence on water transport in the soil. In this work we describe the percolation of a fluid particle through a soil simulating its movement through voxel-thick images of the soil, imposing a downwards movement as a fluid particle randomly delivered from the top of a soil image. From the simulation, porosity, frequency distribution of random walk time (expressed as number of simulation steps), and depth reached by random walks was obtained. This work extended the analysis presented in Ruiz-Ramos et al. (2009). An arable sandy loam soil was packed into polypropylene cylinders of 6 cm diameter and 5 cm high at five different bulk densities: 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5 and 1.6 Mgm-3. The image stacks of 260x260x260 with voxel-thick slices were generated from the 3D volumes by using VGStudioMax v.1.2.1. Simulation of the percolation was done applying a set of 5 to 7 threshold values based on the analysis of the histogram region corresponding to 5 voxels. From each image, corresponding to a bulk density, percolation speed distribution in depth was estimated from the simulation outputs. Consequences and relationships among density, grey threshold, porosity and connectivity were discussed. Obtained distributions did not fit to a normal equation, preventing from applying the Darcy's Laws for describing water movement on these soils. References Ruiz-Ramos M, del Valle D, Grinev D and Tarquis AM, 2009. Soil hydraulic behaviour at different bulk densities. Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 11, EGU2009-6234.

  19. Recent advances in percolation theory and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saberi, Abbas Ali

    2015-05-01

    Percolation is the simplest fundamental model in statistical mechanics that exhibits phase transitions signaled by the emergence of a giant connected component. Despite its very simple rules, percolation theory has successfully been applied to describe a large variety of natural, technological and social systems. Percolation models serve as important universality classes in critical phenomena characterized by a set of critical exponents which correspond to a rich fractal and scaling structure of their geometric features. We will first outline the basic features of the ordinary model. Over the years a variety of percolation models has been introduced some of which with completely different scaling and universal properties from the original model with either continuous or discontinuous transitions depending on the control parameter, dimensionality and the type of the underlying rules and networks. We will try to take a glimpse at a number of selective variations including Achlioptas process, half-restricted process and spanning cluster-avoiding process as examples of the so-called explosive percolation. We will also introduce non-self-averaging percolation and discuss correlated percolation and bootstrap percolation with special emphasis on their recent progress. Directed percolation process will be also discussed as a prototype of systems displaying a nonequilibrium phase transition into an absorbing state. In the past decade, after the invention of stochastic Löwner evolution (SLE) by Oded Schramm, two-dimensional (2D) percolation has become a central problem in probability theory leading to the two recent Fields medals. After a short review on SLE, we will provide an overview on existence of the scaling limit and conformal invariance of the critical percolation. We will also establish a connection with the magnetic models based on the percolation properties of the Fortuin-Kasteleyn and geometric spin clusters. As an application we will discuss how percolation theory leads to the reduction of the 3D criticality in a 3D Ising model to a 2D critical behavior. Another recent application is to apply percolation theory to study the properties of natural and artificial landscapes. We will review the statistical properties of the coastlines and watersheds and their relations with percolation. Their fractal structure and compatibility with the theory of SLE will also be discussed. The present mean sea level on Earth will be shown to coincide with the critical threshold in a percolation description of the global topography.

  20. Correction-to-scaling exponent for two-dimensional percolation

    SciTech Connect

    Ziff, Robert M.

    2011-02-15

    We show that the correction-to-scaling exponents in two-dimensional percolation are bounded by {Omega}{<=}72/91, {omega}=D{Omega}{<=}3/2, and {Delta}{sub 1}={nu}{omega}{<=}2, based upon Cardy's result for the crossing probability on an annulus. The upper bounds are consistent with many previous measurements of site percolation on square and triangular lattices and new measurements for bond percolation, suggesting that they are exact. They also agree with exponents for hulls proposed recently by Aharony and Asikainen, based upon results of den Nijs. A corrections scaling form evidently applicable to site percolation is also found.

  1. Modied invasion percolation model for fracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, J.; Turcotte, D. L.; Rundle, J. B.

    2013-12-01

    Recent developments in hydraulic fracturing (fracking) have enabled the recovery of large reserves of natural gas and oil. These developments include a change from low-volume, high-viscosity fluid injection to high-volume, low-viscosity injection. We consider new models of Invasion Percolation, (IP) which are models that were originally introduced to represent the injection of an invading fluid into a fluid filled porous medium. A primary difference between our model and the original model is the elimination of any unbroken bonds whose end sites are both filled with fluid. While the original model was found to have statistics nearly identical to traditional percolation, we find significant statistical differences. In particular, the distribution of broken bond strengths displays a strong roll-over near the critical point. Another difference between traditional percolation clusters and clusters generated using our model is the absence of internal loops. The modified growth rule prevents the formation of internal loops making the growing cluster ramified. Other ramified networks include drainage basins and DLA clusters. The study of drainage basins led to the development of Horton-Strahler and Tokunaga network statistics. We used both Horton-Strahler and Tokunaga network statistics to characterize simulated clusters using and found that the clusters generated by our model are statistically self-similar fractals. In addition to fractal clusters, IP also displays burst dynamics, in which the cluster extends rapidly through a spontaneous extension of percolating bonds. We define a burst to be a consecutive series of broken bonds whose strengths are all below a specified value. Using this definition of bursts we found good agreement with a power-law frequency-area distribution. Our model displays many of the characteristics of an energy landscape, and shows many similarities to DLA, neural networks, ecological landscapes, and the world wide web. We anticipate that this new class of models will have broad applicability to the study of instabilities in high dimensional complex networks, a topic of considerable interest across a wide array of fields.

  2. Epidemic Percolation Networks, Epidemic Outcomes, and Interventions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kenah, Eben; Miller, Joel C.

    2011-01-01

    Epidemic percolation networks (EPNs) are directed random networks that can be used to analyze stochastic “Susceptible-Infectious-Removed” (SIR) and “Susceptible-Exposed-Infectious-Removed” (SEIR) epidemic models, unifying and generalizing previous uses of networks and branching processes to analyze mass-action and network-based S(E)IR models. This paper explains the fundamental concepts underlying the definition and use of EPNs, using them to build intuition about the final outcomes of epidemics. We then show how EPNs provide a novel and useful perspective on the design of vaccination strategies.

  3. Directed Last Passage Percolation with Discontinuous Weights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calder, Jeff

    2015-02-01

    We prove that a directed last passage percolation model with discontinuous macroscopic (non-random) inhomogeneities has a continuum limit that corresponds to solving a Hamilton-Jacobi equation in the viscosity sense. This Hamilton-Jacobi equation is closely related to the conservation law for the hydrodynamic limit of the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process. We also prove convergence of a numerical scheme for the Hamilton-Jacobi equation and present an algorithm based on dynamic programming for finding the asymptotic shapes of maximal directed paths.

  4. Ammonia tank failure

    SciTech Connect

    Sweat, M.E.

    1983-04-01

    An ammonia tank failure at Hawkeye Chemical of Clinton, Iowa is discussed. The tank was a double-wall, 27,000 metric-ton tank built in 1968 and commissioned in December 1969. The paper presented covers the cause of the failure, repair, and procedural changes made to prevent recurrence of the failure. (JMT)

  5. Recycled Art: Create Puppets Using Recycled Objects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clearing, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Presents an activity from "Healthy Foods from Healthy Soils" for making puppets using recycled food packaging materials. Includes background information, materials, instructions, literature links, resources, and benchmarks. (NB)

  6. Recycle Used Oil on America Recycles Day.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Boyd W.

    2000-01-01

    Explains that motor oils can be reused and recycled. Educates students about environmental hazards and oil management and includes classroom activities. Addresses the National Science Education Standards. (YDS)

  7. Reionization through the lens of percolation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlanetto, Steven R.; Oh, S. Peng

    2016-04-01

    The reionization of intergalactic hydrogen has received intense theoretical scrutiny over the past two decades. Here, we approach the process formally as a percolation process and phase transition. Using semi-numeric simulations, we demonstrate that an infinitely large ionized region abruptly appears at an ionized fraction of xi ≈ 0.1 and quickly grows to encompass most of the ionized gas: by xi ˜ 0.3, nearly 90 per cent of the ionized material is part of this region. Throughout most of reionization, nearly all of the intergalactic medium is divided into just two regions, one ionized and one neutral, and both infinite in extent. We also show that the discrete ionized regions that exist before and near this transition point follow a near-power-law distribution in volume, with equal contributions to the total filling factor per logarithmic interval in size up to a sharp cutoff in volume. These qualities are generic to percolation processes, with the detailed behaviour a result of long-range correlations in the underlying density field. These insights will be crucial to understanding the distribution of ionized and neutral gas during reionization and provide precise meaning to the intuitive description of reionization as an `overlap' process.

  8. Percolation on bipartite scale-free networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooyberghs, H.; Van Schaeybroeck, B.; Indekeu, J. O.

    2010-08-01

    Recent studies introduced biased (degree-dependent) edge percolation as a model for failures in real-life systems. In this work, such process is applied to networks consisting of two types of nodes with edges running only between nodes of unlike type. Such bipartite graphs appear in many social networks, for instance in affiliation networks and in sexual-contact networks in which both types of nodes show the scale-free characteristic for the degree distribution. During the depreciation process, an edge between nodes with degrees k and q is retained with a probability proportional to (, where α is positive so that links between hubs are more prone to failure. The removal process is studied analytically by introducing a generating functions theory. We deduce exact self-consistent equations describing the system at a macroscopic level and discuss the percolation transition. Critical exponents are obtained by exploiting the Fortuin-Kasteleyn construction which provides a link between our model and a limit of the Potts model.

  9. Water percolation through a clayey vadose zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baram, S.; Kurtzman, D.; Dahan, O.

    2012-03-01

    SummaryHeavy clay soils are regarded as less permeable due to their low saturated hydraulic conductivities, and are perceived as safe for the construction of unlined or soil-lined waste lagoons. Water percolation dynamics through a smectite-dominated clayey vadose zone underlying a dairy waste lagoon, waste channel and their margins was investigated using three independent vadose-zone monitoring systems. The monitoring systems, hosting 22 TDR sensors, were used for continuous measurements of the temporal variation in vadose zone water-content profiles. Results from 4 years of continuous measurements showed quick rises in sediment water content following rain events and temporal wastewater overflows. The percolation pattern indicated dominance of preferential flow through a desiccation-crack network crossing the entire clay sediment layer (depth of 12 m). High water-propagation velocities (0.4-23.6 m h-1) were observed, indicating that the desiccation-crack network remains open and serves as a preferential flow pathway year-round, even at high sediment water content (˜0.50 m3 m-3). The natural formation of desiccation-crack networks at the margins of waste lagoons induces rapid infiltration of raw waste to deep sections of the vadose zone, bypassing the sediment's most biogeochemically active parts, and jeopardizing groundwater quality.

  10. Manifestation of percolation in high temperature superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poccia, Nicola; Lankhorst, Martijn; Golubov, Alexander A.

    2014-08-01

    Emergent advanced electronic and magnetic functionalities in novel materials appear in systems with a complex lattice structure. The key point is understanding the intrinsic effect of lattice fluctuations on the relevant electronic features in the range of 10-100 meV near the Fermi level in new materials which is needed to develop advanced quantum nano-devices. This requires the control of structural inhomogeneity at multiple scales. Here we report some of the known advances in the field of percolative superconductivity. The necessity of the review is based on the growing consensus that the lack of an understanding of high temperature superconductivity is due to the few information on lattice fluctuations. In particular they could control the pseudo-gap phase, the electronic duality of holes in Fermi arcs and electrons in small Fermi pockets, multiple condensates in different points of the k-space. Moreover the emerging lattice granularity in cuprates shifts the search for the superconducting mechanism from a homogeneous superconductivity to a percolative superconductivity, therefore it is the scope of this review to provide further data to this kind of research.

  11. Electron Percolation In Copper Infiltrated Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krcho, Stanislav

    2015-11-01

    The work describes the dependence of the electrical conductivity of carbon materials infiltrated with copper in a vacuum-pressure autoclave on copper concentration and on the effective pore radius of the carbon skeleton. In comparison with non-infiltrated material the electrical conductivity of copper infiltrated composite increased almost 500 times. If the composite contained less than 7.2 vol% of Cu, a linear dependence of the electrical conductivity upon cupper content was observed. If infiltrated carbon contained more than 7.2 vol% of Cu, the dependence was nonlinear - the curve could be described by a power formula (x - xc)t. This is a typical formula describing the electron percolation process in regions containing higher Cu fraction than the critical one. The maximum measured electrical conductivity was 396 × 104 Ω-1 m-1 for copper concentration 27.6 vol%. Experiments and analysis of the electrical conductivity showed that electron percolation occurred in carbon materials infiltrated by copper when the copper volume exceeded the critical concentration. The analysis also showed a sharp increase of electrical conductivity in composites with copper concentration higher than the threshold, where the effective radius of carbon skeleton pores decreased to 350 nanometres.

  12. Novel percolation transitions and coupled catastrophes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Souza, Raissa

    Collections of interdependent networks are at the core of modern society, spanning physical, biological and social systems. Simple mathematical models of the structure and function of networks can provide important insights into real-world systems, enhancing our ability to steer and control them. Here our focus is on abrupt changes in networks, due both to phase transitions and to jumping between bi-stable equilibria. We begin with an overview of novel classes of percolation phase transitions that result from repeated, small interventions intended to delay the transition. These new phenomena allow us to extend percolation approaches to modular networks, Brownian motion, and cluster growth dynamics. We then focus on abrupt transitions due to a system jumping between bi-stable equilibria, modeled as a cusp catastrophe in nonlinear dynamics. We show that when systems that each undergo a cusp catastrophe interact, we can observe a new phenomena of catastrophe-hopping leading to non-local cascading failures. Here an intermediate system facilitates the propagation of a sudden change or collapse, and we show that catastrophe hopping is consistent with the outbreak of protests observed during the Arab Spring of 2011.

  13. Explosive percolation transitions in growing networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, S. M.; Son, S.-W.; Kahng, B.

    2016-03-01

    Recent extensive studies of the explosive percolation (EP) model revealed that the EP transition is second order with an extremely small value of the critical exponent β associated with the order parameter. This result was obtained from static networks, in which the number of nodes in the system remains constant during the evolution of the network. However, explosive percolating behavior of the order parameter can be observed in social networks, which are often growing networks, where the number of nodes in the system increases as dynamics proceeds. However, extensive studies of the EP transition in such growing networks are still missing. Here we study the nature of the EP transition in growing networks by extending an existing growing network model to a general case in which m node candidates are picked up in the Achiloptas process. When m =2 , this model reduces to the existing model, which undergoes an infinite-order transition. We show that when m ≥3 , the transition becomes second order due to the suppression effect against the growth of large clusters. Using the rate-equation approach and performing numerical simulations, we also show that the exponent β decreases algebraically with increasing m , whereas it does exponentially in a corresponding static random network model. Finally, we find that the hyperscaling relations hold but in different forms.

  14. Compact directed percolation with movable partial reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickman, Ronald; ben-Avraham, Daniel

    2002-09-01

    We study a version of compact directed percolation (CDP) in one dimension in which occupation of a site for the first time requires that a 'mine' or an antiparticle be eliminated. This process is analogous to the variant of directed percolation with a long-time memory, proposed by Grassberger et al (1997 Phys. Rev. E 55 2488) in order to understand spreading at a critical point involving an infinite number of absorbing configurations. The problem is equivalent to that of a pair of random walkers in the presence of movable partial reflectors. The walkers, which are unbiased, start one lattice spacing apart and annihilate on their first contact. Each time one of the walkers tries to visit a new site, it is reflected (with probability r) back to its previous position, while the reflector is simultaneously pushed one step away from the walker. Iteration of the discrete-time evolution equation for the probability distribution yields the survival probability S(t). We find that S(t) ~ t-δ, with δ varying continuously between 1/2 and 1.160 as the reflection probability varies between 0 and 1.

  15. Recycling overview in Sweden

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-07-01

    This article discusses the recycling programs currently in use in Sweden. Recycling of newspapers, batteries, plastics are all mentioned in this report by the Swedish Association of Public Cleansing and Solid Waste Management.

  16. Recycling Research. Tracking Trash.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLago, Louise Furia

    1991-01-01

    An activity in which students research the effectiveness of recycling is presented. Students compare the types and amount of litter both before and after recycling is implemented. Directions for the activity and a sample data sheet are included. (KR)

  17. Charge percolation pathways guided by defects in quantum dot solids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingjie; Zherebetskyy, Danylo; Bronstein, Noah D; Barja, Sara; Lichtenstein, Leonid; Schuppisser, David; Wang, Lin-Wang; Alivisatos, A Paul; Salmeron, Miquel

    2015-05-13

    Charge hopping and percolation in quantum dot (QD) solids has been widely studied, but the microscopic nature of the percolation process is not understood or determined. Here we present the first imaging of the charge percolation pathways in two-dimensional PbS QD arrays using Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). We show that under dark conditions electrons percolate via in-gap states (IGS) instead of the conduction band, while holes percolate via valence band states. This novel transport behavior is explained by the electronic structure and energy level alignment of the individual QDs, which was measured by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). Chemical treatments with hydrazine can remove the IGS, resulting in an intrinsic defect-free semiconductor, as revealed by STS and surface potential spectroscopy. The control over IGS can guide the design of novel electronic devices with impurity conduction, and photodiodes with controlled doping. PMID:25844919

  18. Ammonia capture and flexible transformation of M-2(INA) (M=Cu, Co, Ni, Cd) series materials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yang; Li, Libo; Li, Jinping; Ouyang, Kun; Yang, Jiangfeng

    2016-04-01

    With the conflicting problems of pollution due to ammonia emissions and the demand for ammonia, we propose M-2(INA) (M=Cu, Co, Ni, Cd) (INA=isonicotinic acid), a series of materials that exhibit flexible conversion in ammonia adsorption. They can capture both wet and dry ammonia for recycling. The materials were obtained by dehydration of coordination materials M(INA)2(H2O)4 (M=Cu, Co, Ni, Cd) (150°C) at atmospheric pressure for 2h. M-2(INA) could reversibly transform to the stable coordination compounds M(INA)2(H2O)2(NH3)2 by adsorbing ammonia in the presence of moisture. The capacity for pure ammonia could reach 12-13mmol/g. Importantly, these materials could stably retain NH3 at a maximum temperature of 80°C and could regenerate below 150°C with no performance loss. PMID:26780590

  19. Ammonia abundances in comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyckoff, S.; Tegler, S.; Engel, L.

    The emission band strengths of the NH2 bands of Comets Halley, Hartley-Good, Thiele, and Borrelly were measured to determine the NH2 column densities for the comets. Production rates obtained using the Haser and vectorial models are in agreement within the observational errors, suggesting that a simple two-step decay model may be used to approximate the NH2 distribution in a comet's coma. Ammonia-to-water abundance ratios from 0.01 to 0.4 percent were found for the four comets. The ratio in Comet Halley is found to be Q(NH3)/Q(H2O) = 0.002 + or - 0.001. No significant difference in the ammonia abundance was found before or after perihelion in Comet Halley.

  20. Buying recycled helps market

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, G.

    1996-08-01

    The waste reduction and recycling program of Thousand Oaks, California is summarized. Descriptions of the program, market development for recycled products, business development, and economic development are provided. The emphasis of the program is on market development for recycled products. Procurement guidelines used by the city are reprinted in the paper.

  1. The Sustainability of Recycling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juniper, Christopher

    1993-01-01

    Describes the need for closing the business cycle in the recycling process. Discusses whether the government should mandate or the free market create uses for recycled products. Presents challenges associated with marketing recycled materials including what has been and what needs to be done to stimulate markets, encourage business, and balance…

  2. The Economics of Recycling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogert, Susan; Morris, Jeffrey

    1993-01-01

    Reports the findings of a study that documented 1992 costs of residential curbside recycling versus disposal systems in four Washington State cities: Seattle, Spokane, Bellingham, and Vancouver. Results indicated that recycling can be less expensive than disposal when the revenues obtained from selling recycled materials are considered. (MDH)

  3. Rethink, Rework, Recycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wrhen, Linda; DiSpezio, Michael A.

    1991-01-01

    Information about the recycling and reuse of plastics, aluminum, steel, glass, and newspapers is presented. The phases of recycling are described. An activity that allows students to separate recyclable materials is included. The objectives, a list of needed materials, and procedure are provided. (KR)

  4. European update on recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Birch, S.

    1993-10-01

    This article discusses the current status of recycling of automobiles in Europe based on a report compiled by Euromotor Reports and also discusses the move toward designing automobiles for disassembly to aid in the recycling process. Plastics and rubber are the emphasis of the report along with copper and aluminum. Problem areas in recycling or dismantling are also discussed.

  5. Micro ammonia sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Kubo, I.; Karube, I.; Moriizumi, T.

    1986-01-01

    A micro ammoniasensor, consisting of an ISFET covered with a dry membrane which is made from nonactin and substituted poly-..gamma..-methyl-L-glutamate (PMG) is described. The gate output voltage of the micro ammonia sensor increased with NH/sub 4/OH addition. The response time of the sensor was 2 min at 30/sup 0/C, and the sensor exhibited superior selectivity for NH/sub 4//sup +/ compared to a pH sensitive ISFET.

  6. Correlation effects in nanoparticle composites: Percolation, packing and tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Rupam

    Percolation is one of the most fundamental and far-reaching physical phenomena, with major implications in a vast variety of fields. The work described in this thesis aims to understand the role of percolation effects in various, seemingly unrelated phenomena, such as the dielectric permittivity of metal-insulator composites, tunneling percolation, and the relationship between percolation and filling factors. Specifically, we investigated 1) the very large enhancement of the dielectric permittivity of a composite metal -- insulator system, RuO2 - CaCu3Ti4O12 (CCTO) near the percolation threshold. For RuO2/CCTO composites, an increase in the real part of the dielectric permittivity (initially about 10 3-104 at 10 kHz) by approximately an order of magnitude is observed in the vicinity of the percolation threshold. 2) In the same system, apart from a classical percolation transition associated with the appearance of a continuous conductance path through RuO2 nanoparticles, at least two additional tunneling percolation transitions are detected. Such behavior is consistent with the recently emerged picture of a quantum conductivity staircase, which predicts several percolation tunneling thresholds in a system with a hierarchy of local tunneling conductance, due to various degrees of proximity of adjacent conducting particles distributed in an insulating matrix. 3) The filling factors of the composites of nanoparticles with different shapes have been studied as a function of volume fraction. Interestingly, like percolation, filling factors also obey critical power law behavior as a function of size ratio of constituent particles.

  7. Industrial ammonia gassing

    PubMed Central

    Walton, M.

    1973-01-01

    Walton, M. (1972).British Journal of Industrial Medicine,30, 78-86. Industrial ammonia gassing. Seven cases of ammonia gassing are described with follow-up for five years of the six survivors and the post-mortem findings of the fatal case. All the survivors attributed continuing symptoms to the gassing. The study failed to demonstrate permanent ill effects in the one case of mild exposure. Of the more serious cases one has stopped smoking and taken up physical training teaching. He now has above average lung function. Two serious cases who continued to smoke have the lung function abnormalities expected from their smoking. In the other two seriously exposed cases, who also continued to smoke, there is a persistent reduction in ventilation and gas transfer which seems to be due to the ammonia gassing. The post-mortem findings in the fatal case showed acute congestion and oedema of the mucosa of the respiratory tract, the bronchial walls being stripped of their lining epithelium and the alveoli stuffed with red blood cells and oedema fluid. Images PMID:4685304

  8. Percolation of localized attack on complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Shuai; Huang, Xuqing; Stanley, H. Eugene; Havlin, Shlomo

    2015-02-01

    The robustness of complex networks against node failure and malicious attack has been of interest for decades, while most of the research has focused on random attack or hub-targeted attack. In many real-world scenarios, however, attacks are neither random nor hub-targeted, but localized, where a group of neighboring nodes in a network are attacked and fail. In this paper we develop a percolation framework to analytically and numerically study the robustness of complex networks against such localized attack. In particular, we investigate this robustness in Erdős-Rényi networks, random-regular networks, and scale-free networks. Our results provide insight into how to better protect networks, enhance cybersecurity, and facilitate the design of more robust infrastructures.

  9. Clarification of the Bootstrap Percolation Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Gregorio, Paolo; Lawlor, Aonghus; Bradley, Phil; Dawson, Kenneth A.

    2004-07-01

    We study the onset of the bootstrap percolation transition as a model of generalized dynamical arrest. Our results apply to two dimensions, but there is no significant barrier to extending them to higher dimensionality. We develop a new importance-sampling procedure in simulation, based on rare events around “holes”, that enables us to access bootstrap lengths beyond those previously studied. By framing a new theory in terms of paths or processes that lead to emptying of the lattice we are able to develop systematic corrections to the existing theory and compare them to simulations. Thereby, for the first time in the literature, it is possible to obtain credible comparisons between theory and simulation in the accessible density range.

  10. Limited Path Percolation in Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Eduardo; Parshani, Roni; Cohen, Reuven; Carmi, Shai; Havlin, Shlomo

    2007-11-01

    We study the stability of network communication after removal of a fraction q=1-p of links under the assumption that communication is effective only if the shortest path between nodes i and j after removal is shorter than aℓij(a≥1) where ℓij is the shortest path before removal. For a large class of networks, we find analytically and numerically a new percolation transition at p˜c=(κ0-1)(1-a)/a, where κ0≡⟨k2⟩/⟨k⟩ and k is the node degree. Above p˜c, order N nodes can communicate within the limited path length aℓij, while below p˜c, Nδ (δ<1) nodes can communicate. We expect our results to influence network design, routing algorithms, and immunization strategies, where short paths are most relevant.

  11. Atmospheric dispersion of ammonia: an ammonia fog model

    SciTech Connect

    Kansa, E.J.; Rodean, H.C.; Chan, S.T.; Ermak, D.L.

    1983-01-01

    A simplification to the two-phase ammonia vapor-droplet fog problem has been implemented to study the dispersion of a spill of 40 tons of ammonia. We have circumvented the necessity of adding the partial differential equations for mass, momentum, and energy for the ammonia in the liquid phase by certain assumptions. It is assumed that the ammonia fog behaves as an ideal gas including the droplets. A temperature-dependent molecular weight was introduced to simulate the transition from a vapor-droplet cloud to a pure vapor cloud of ammonia. Likewise, the vaporization of ammonia was spread out over a temperature range. Mass, momentum, energy, and total ammonia is conserved rigorously. The observed features of the ammonia spill simulation have pointed out phenomena that could not be predicted in simpler calculations. Perhaps the most obvious feature is the cloud bifurcation due to the strength of the gravity current relative to the ambient wind. The gravity spreading of the denser ammonia fog significantly perturbs the unidirectional windfield in the vicinity of the spill, setting up complex eddy patterns in the cloud which are enhanced by ground heating and warm dry air entrainment. The lower concentrations appear to lift off by a buoyancy-induced flow. The ammonia cloud, rather than being cigar shaped as assumed in simpler models, ranges from pancake shaped to pear shaped, depending upon the ambient windfield. The fact that the ammonia cloud remains cold, very low, and wide is in qualitative agreement with some of the large-scale ammonia spill accidents. 14 figures.

  12. Recovery of ammonia nitrogen in livestock and industrial wastes using gas permeable membranes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New waste management methods are needed that can protect the environment and allow manure management to switch back to a recycling view of manure handling. We investigated the use of gas-permeable membranes as components of new processes to capture and recover the ammonia in the liquid manures or in...

  13. Multiple percolation tunneling staircase in metal-semiconductor nanoparticle composites

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, Rupam; Huang, Zhi-Feng; Nadgorny, Boris

    2014-10-27

    Multiple percolation transitions are observed in a binary system of RuO{sub 2}-CaCu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} metal-semiconductor nanoparticle composites near percolation thresholds. Apart from a classical percolation transition, associated with the appearance of a continuous conductance path through RuO{sub 2} metal oxide nanoparticles, at least two additional tunneling percolation transitions are detected in this composite system. Such behavior is consistent with the recently emerged picture of a quantum conductivity staircase, which predicts several percolation tunneling thresholds in a system with a hierarchy of local tunneling conductance, due to various degrees of proximity of adjacent conducting particles distributed in an insulating matrix. Here, we investigate a different type of percolation tunneling staircase, associated with a more complex conductive and insulating particle microstructure of two types of non-spherical constituents. As tunneling is strongly temperature dependent, we use variable temperature measurements to emphasize the hierarchical nature of consecutive tunneling transitions. The critical exponents corresponding to specific tunneling percolation thresholds are found to be nonuniversal and temperature dependent.

  14. Bronchiectasis following pulmonary ammonia burn

    SciTech Connect

    Hoeffler, H.B.; Schweppe, H.I.; Greenberg, S.D.

    1982-12-01

    Long-term follow-up of the pulmonary lesions of severe exposure to ammonia in humans has seldom been documented, and development of bronchiectasis continues to be of concern. We studied a previously healthy 30-year-old woman whose lungs at time of necropsy, three years after massive exposure to ammonia fumes, had extensive cylindrical and saccular bronchiectasis. We concluded that massive exposure to ammonia can lead to bronchiectasis. It is not known, however, whether the bronchiectasis resulted from chemical injury by ammonia or from a superimposed bacterial bronchitis.

  15. Percolation of core melts at lower mantle conditions

    PubMed

    Shannon; Agee

    1998-05-15

    Experiments at high pressure and temperature to determine the dihedral angle of core melts in lower mantle phases yielded a value of approximately 71 degrees for perovskite-dominated matrices. This angle, although greater than the 60 degrees required for completely efficient percolation, is considerably less than the angles observed in mineral matrices at upper mantle pressure-temperature conditions in experiments. In other words, molten iron alloy can flow much more easily in lower mantle mineralogies than in upper mantle mineralogies. Accordingly, although segregation of core material by melt percolation is probably not feasible in the upper mantle, core formation by percolation may be possible in the lower mantle. PMID:9582115

  16. Fractal atomic-level percolation in metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Chen, David Z; Shi, Crystal Y; An, Qi; Zeng, Qiaoshi; Mao, Wendy L; Goddard, William A; Greer, Julia R

    2015-09-18

    Metallic glasses are metallic alloys that exhibit exotic material properties. They may have fractal structures at the atomic level, but a physical mechanism for their organization without ordering has not been identified. We demonstrated a crossover between fractal short-range (<2 atomic diameters) and homogeneous long-range structures using in situ x-ray diffraction, tomography, and molecular dynamics simulations. A specific class of fractal, the percolation cluster, explains the structural details for several metallic-glass compositions. We postulate that atoms percolate in the liquid phase and that the percolating cluster becomes rigid at the glass transition temperature. PMID:26383945

  17. QUANTIFIED DETRIMENT OF AMMONIA TO BROILERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ammonia levels in broiler houses can reduce bird performance, increase susceptibility to disease and increase subsequent mortality. House management, season, humidity, stocking density, and litter properties influence ammonia concentrations. Though it is widely known that ammonia is detrimental to p...

  18. Highly conductive die attach adhesive from percolation control and its applications in light-emitting device thermal management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinfeng; Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Min; Yang, Chen; Sun, Hongye; Gao, Zhaoli; Yuen, Matthew M. F.; Yang, Shihe

    2013-01-01

    Herein, we reported on the study of percolation dynamics in thermoset-based die attach (DA) materials and its effect on percolation conductivity. Two types of percolation mechanism in thermoset based DA were discovered, i.e., the curing reaction-induced percolation and the physical aging-induced percolation. The former features in a fast percolation network growth rate, which is one order of magnitude higher than the latter. It is demonstrated that the percolation kinetics largely affects the apparent percolation conductivity under the traditional packaging conditions; and reaction-induced percolation allows ultrahigh efficiency in reaching the volume fraction-limiting percolation conductance, resulting in enhanced thermal performance of DA.

  19. Critical properties of loop percolation models with optimization constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, Frank O.; Rieger, Heiko

    2003-05-01

    We study loop percolation models in two and in three space dimensions, in which configurations of occupied bonds are forced to form a closed loop. We show that the uncorrelated occupation of elementary plaquettes of the square and the simple cubic lattice by elementary loops leads to a percolation transition that is in the same universality class as the conventional percolation. In contrast to this, an optimization constraint for the loop configurations, which then have to minimize a particular generic energy function, leads to a percolation transition that constitutes a universality class for which we report the critical exponents. Implication for the physics of solid-on-solid and vortex glass models are discussed.

  20. Tunable Percolation in Semiconducting Binary Polymer Nanoparticle Glasses.

    PubMed

    Renna, Lawrence A; Bag, Monojit; Gehan, Timothy S; Han, Xu; Lahti, Paul M; Maroudas, Dimitrios; Venkataraman, D

    2016-03-10

    Binary polymer nanoparticle glasses provide opportunities to realize the facile assembly of disparate components, with control over nanoscale and mesoscale domains, for the development of functional materials. This work demonstrates that tunable electrical percolation can be achieved through semiconducting/insulating polymer nanoparticle glasses by varying the relative percentages of equal-sized nanoparticle constituents of the binary assembly. Using time-of-flight charge carrier mobility measurements and conducting atomic force microscopy, we show that these systems exhibit power law scaling percolation behavior with percolation thresholds of ?24-30%. We develop a simple resistor network model, which can reproduce the experimental data, and can be used to predict percolation trends in binary polymer nanoparticle glasses. Finally, we analyze the cluster statistics of simulated binary nanoparticle glasses, and characterize them according to their predominant local motifs as (pi, p1-i)-connected networks that can be used as a supramolecular toolbox for rational material design based on polymer nanoparticles. PMID:26854924

  1. Two exactly soluble models of rigidity percolation.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, M F; Stinchcombe, R B

    2014-02-13

    We summarize results for two exactly soluble classes of bond-diluted models for rigidity percolation, which can serve as a benchmark for numerical and approximate methods. For bond dilution problems involving rigidity, the number of floppy modes F plays the role of a free energy. Both models involve pathological lattices with two-dimensional vector displacements. The first model involves hierarchical lattices where renormalization group calculations can be used to give exact solutions. Algebraic scaling transformations produce a transition of the second order, with an unstable critical point and associated scaling laws at a mean coordination =4.41, which is above the 'mean field' value =4 predicted by Maxwell constraint counting. The order parameter exponent associated with the spanning rigid cluster geometry is β=0.0775 and that associated with the divergence of the correlation length and the anomalous lattice dimension d is dν=3.533. The second model involves Bethe lattices where the rigidity transition is massively first order by a mean coordination =3.94 slightly below that predicted by Maxwell constraint counting. We show how a Maxwell equal area construction can be used to locate the first-order transition and how this result agrees with simulation results on larger random-bond lattices using the pebble game algorithm. PMID:24379428

  2. Two exactly soluble models of rigidity percolation

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, M. F.; Stinchcombe, R. B.

    2014-01-01

    We summarize results for two exactly soluble classes of bond-diluted models for rigidity percolation, which can serve as a benchmark for numerical and approximate methods. For bond dilution problems involving rigidity, the number of floppy modes F plays the role of a free energy. Both models involve pathological lattices with two-dimensional vector displacements. The first model involves hierarchical lattices where renormalization group calculations can be used to give exact solutions. Algebraic scaling transformations produce a transition of the second order, with an unstable critical point and associated scaling laws at a mean coordination 〈r〉=4.41, which is above the ‘mean field’ value 〈r〉=4 predicted by Maxwell constraint counting. The order parameter exponent associated with the spanning rigid cluster geometry is β=0.0775 and that associated with the divergence of the correlation length and the anomalous lattice dimension d is dν=3.533. The second model involves Bethe lattices where the rigidity transition is massively first order by a mean coordination 〈r〉=3.94 slightly below that predicted by Maxwell constraint counting. We show how a Maxwell equal area construction can be used to locate the first-order transition and how this result agrees with simulation results on larger random-bond lattices using the pebble game algorithm. PMID:24379428

  3. Sol-gel-derived percolative copper film

    SciTech Connect

    Szu Sungping Cheng, C.-L.

    2008-10-02

    Cu-SiO{sub 2} films were prepared by the sol-gel method. Two-dimensional fractal copper films were formed after the films were thermally treated in reducing atmosphere. dc resistances of the films decrease 12 orders of magnitude as the content of copper increases from 70 to 80 mol%. During the resistance measurement under argon atmosphere, samples showed a sharp increase or decrease of resistance at a transition temperature which is ascribed to the oxidation of Cu into CuO. The oxidation was also observed in the in situ high temperature X-ray diffraction under vacuum condition. The evolution of the morphology of the films was studied by scanning electron microscopy. As the content of copper increases, the forms of copper particles change from discrete to aggregate then to interconnecting. The coverage coefficients of the copper range from 23 to 55% and the fractal dimensions range from 1.65 to 1.77. The percolation thresholds for the coverage coefficient and the fractal dimension are about 33% and 1.71, respectively, which corresponds to the sample containing 72.5 mol% of Cu.

  4. Benchmarking survey for recycling.

    SciTech Connect

    Marley, Margie Charlotte; Mizner, Jack Harry

    2005-06-01

    This report describes the methodology, analysis and conclusions of a comparison survey of recycling programs at ten Department of Energy sites including Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). The goal of the survey was to compare SNL/NM's recycling performance with that of other federal facilities, and to identify activities and programs that could be implemented at SNL/NM to improve recycling performance.

  5. Process for removal of ammonia and acid gases from contaminated waters

    DOEpatents

    King, C. Judson; MacKenzie, Patricia D.

    1985-01-01

    Contaminating basic gases, i.e., ammonia, and acid gases, e.g., carbon dioxide, are removed from process waters or waste waters in a combined extraction and stripping process. Ammonia in the form of ammonium ion is extracted by an immiscible organic phase comprising a liquid cation exchange component, especially an organic phosphoric acid derivative, and preferably di-2-ethyl hexyl phosphoric acid, dissolved in an alkyl hydrocarbon, aryl hydrocarbon, higher alcohol, oxygenated hydrocarbon, halogenated hydrocarbon, and mixtures thereof. Concurrently, the acidic gaseous contaminants are stripped from the process or waste waters by stripping with steam, air, nitrogen, or the like. The liquid cation exchange component has the ammonia stripped therefrom by heating, and the component may be recycled to extract additional amounts of ammonia.

  6. Process for removal of ammonia and acid gases from contaminated waters

    DOEpatents

    King, C.J.; Mackenzie, P.D.

    1982-09-03

    Contaminating basic gases, i.e., ammonia and acid gases, e.g., carbon dioxide, are removed from process waters or waste waters in a combined extraction and stripping process. Ammonia in the form of ammonium ion is extracted by an immiscible organic phase comprising a liquid cation exchange component, especially an organic phosphoric acid derivative, and preferably di-2-ethyl hexyl phosphoric acid, dissolved in an alkyl hydrocarbon, aryl hydrocarbon, higher alcohol, oxygenated hydrocarbon, halogenated hydrocarbon, and mixtures thereof. Concurrently, the acidic gaseous contaminants are stripped from the process or waste waters by stripping with stream, air, nitrogen, or the like. The liquid cation exchange component has the ammonia stripped therefrom by heating, and the component may be recycled to extract additional amounts of ammonia.

  7. Percolation temperature and the ''instability'' of the effective potential

    SciTech Connect

    Arago de Carvalho, C.; Bazeia, D.; Eboli, O.J.P.; Marques, G.C.; da Silva, A.J.; Ventura, I.

    1985-03-15

    We show that in spontaneously broken lambdaphi/sup 4/ theory the percolation temperature coincides with the temperature at which the semiclassical (loop) expansion of the effective potential (free energy) of the system around a uniform field configuration fails. This allows us to extract the percolation temperature directly from the effective potential. The addition of fermions or gauge fields does not alter the result as long as they are weakly coupled to the scalars. The coincidence holds in the high-temperature limit.

  8. Social percolation and the influence of mass media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proykova, Ana; Stauffer, Dietrich

    2002-09-01

    In the marketing model of Solomon and Weisbuch, people buy a product only if their neighbours tell them of its quality, and if this quality is higher than their own quality expectations. Now we introduce additional information from the mass media, which is analogous to the ghost field in percolation theory. The mass media shift the percolative phase transition observed in the model, and decrease the time after which the stationary state is reached.

  9. Fiber Optic Distributed Temperature Sensing of Recharge Basin Percolation Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, M.; Allen, E. M.; Hutchinson, A.

    2014-12-01

    Infiltration (spreading) basins are a central component of managed aquifer and recovery operations around the world. The concept is simple. Water is percolated into an aquifer where it can be withdrawn at a later date. However, managing infiltration basins can be complicated by entrapped air in sediments, strata of low permeability, clogging of the recharge surface, and biological growth, among other factors. Understanding the dynamics of percolation in light of these complicating factors provides a basis for making management decisions that increase recharge efficiency. As an aid to understanding percolation dynamics, fiber optic distribute temperature sensing (DTS) was used to track heat as a tracer of water movement in an infiltration basin. The diurnal variation of temperature in the basin was sensed at depth. The time lag between the oscillating temperature signal at the surface and at depth indicated the velocity of water percolation. DTS fiber optic cables were installed horizontally along the basin and vertically in boreholes to measure percolation behavior. The horizontal cable was installed in trenches at 0.3 and 1 m depth, and the vertical cable was installed using direct push technology. The vertical cable was tightly wound to produce a factor of 10 increase in spatial resolution of temperature measurements. Temperature was thus measured every meter across the basin and every 10 cm to a depth of 10 m. Data from the trenched cable suggested homogeneous percolation across the basin, but infiltration rates were a function of stage indicating non-ideal percolation. Vertical temperature monitoring showed significant lateral flow in sediments underlying the basin both during saturation and operation of the basin. Deflections in the vertical temperature profile corresponded with fine grained layers identified in core samples indicating a transient perched water table condition. The three-dimensional flow in this relatively homogenous surficial geology calls into question the relevance of simple wetting models for predicting percolation behavior in infiltration basins.

  10. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    Ashlines: To promote and support the commercially viable and environmentally sound recycling of coal combustion byproducts for productive uses through scientific research, development, and field testing.

  11. Micelle Formation in Liquid Ammonia.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Joseph M; Atherton, John H; Page, Michael I

    2015-07-17

    Perfluorinated long chain alkyl amides aggregate in liquid ammonia with increasing concentration which reflects micelle-type formation based on changes in (19)F NMR chemical shifts. The critical micelle concentrations (cmc) decrease with increasing chain length and give Kleven parameters A = 0.18 and B = 0.19. The micelles catalyze the ammonolysis of esters in liquid ammonia. The corresponding perfluorinated long chain alkyl carboxylates form ion pairs in liquid ammonia, but the equilibrium dissociation constants indicate favorable interactions between the chains in addition to the electrostatic forces. These perfluorinated carboxylates form micelles in aqueous solution, and their cmc's generate a Kleven B-value = 0.52 compared with 0.30 for the analogous alkyl carboxylates. The differences in hydrophobicity of CH2 and CF2 units in water and liquid ammonia are discussed, as is the possible relevance to life forms in liquid ammonia. PMID:26076067

  12. Percolation model for selective dissolution of multi-component glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Kale, R.P.; Brinker, C.J.

    1995-03-01

    A percolation model is developed which accounts for most known features of the process of porous glass membrane preparation by selective dissolution of multi-component glasses. The model is founded within tile framework of the classical percolation theory, wherein the components of a glass are represented by random sites on a suitable lattice. Computer simulation is used to mirror the generation of a porous structure during the dissolution process, reproducing many of the features associated with the phenomenon. Simulation results evaluate the effect of the initial composition of the glass on the kinetics of the leaching process as well as the morphology of the generated porous structure. The percolation model establishes the porous structure as a percolating cluster of unreachable constituents in the glass. The simulation algorithm incorporates removal of both, the accessible leachable components in the glass as well as the independent clusters of unreachable components not attached to the percolating cluster. The dissolution process thus becomes limited by the conventional site percolation thresholds of the unreachable components (which restricts the formation of the porous network), as well as the leachable components (which restricts the accessibility of the solvating medium into the glass). The simulation results delineate the range of compositional variations for successful porous glass preparation and predict the variation of porosity, surface area, dissolution rates and effluent composition with initial composition and time. Results compared well with experimental studies and improved upon similar models attempted in die past.

  13. Phase Diagram of Inhomogeneous Percolation with a Defect Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliev, G. K.; Janse van Rensburg, E. J.; Madras, N.

    2015-01-01

    Let be the -dimensional hypercubic lattice and let be an -dimensional sublattice, with . We consider a model of inhomogeneous bond percolation on at densities and , in which edges in are open with probability , and edges in open with probability . We generalize several classical results of (homogeneous) bond percolation to this inhomogeneous model. The phase diagram of the model is presented, and it is shown that there is a subcritical regime for and (where is the critical probability for homogeneous percolation in ), a bulk supercritical regime for , and a surface supercritical regime for and . We show that is a strictly decreasing function for , with a jump discontinuity at . We extend the Aizenman-Barsky differential inequalities for homogeneous percolation to the inhomogeneous model and use them to prove that the susceptibility is finite inside the subcritical phase. We prove that the cluster size distribution decays exponentially in the subcritical phase, and sub-exponentially in the supercritical phases. For a model of lattice animals with a defect plane, the free energy is related to functions of the inhomogeneous percolation model, and we show how the percolation transition implies a non-analyticity in the free energy of the animal model. Finally, we present simulation estimates of the critical curve.

  14. Percolation in suspensions of hard nanoparticles: From spheres to needles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilling, Tanja; Miller, Mark A.; van der Schoot, Paul

    2015-09-01

    We investigate geometric percolation and scaling relations in suspensions of nanorods, covering the entire range of aspect ratios from spheres to extremely slender needles. A new version of connectedness percolation theory is introduced and tested against specialised Monte Carlo simulations. The theory accurately predicts percolation thresholds for aspect ratios of rod length to width as low as 10. The percolation threshold for rod-like particles of aspect ratios below 1000 deviates significantly from the inverse aspect ratio scaling prediction, thought to be valid in the limit of infinitely slender rods and often used as a rule of thumb for nanofibres in composite materials. Hence, most fibres that are currently used as fillers in composite materials cannot be regarded as practically infinitely slender for the purposes of percolation theory. Comparing percolation thresholds of hard rods and new benchmark results for ideal rods, we find that i) for large aspect ratios, they differ by a factor that is inversely proportional to the connectivity distance between the hard cores, and ii) they approach the slender rod limit differently.

  15. Renal Ammonia Metabolism and Transport

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, I. David; Verlander, Jill W.

    2015-01-01

    Renal ammonia metabolism and transport mediates a central role in acid-base homeostasis. In contrast to most renal solutes, the majority of renal ammonia excretion derives from intrarenal production, not from glomerular filtration. Renal ammoniagenesis predominantly results from glutamine metabolism, which produces 2 NH4+ and 2 HCO3− for each glutamine metabolized. The proximal tubule is the primary site for ammoniagenesis, but there is evidence for ammoniagenesis by most renal epithelial cells. Ammonia produced in the kidney is either excreted into the urine or returned to the systemic circulation through the renal veins. Ammonia excreted in the urine promotes acid excretion; ammonia returned to the systemic circulation is metabolized in the liver in a HCO3−-consuming process, resulting in no net benefit to acid-base homeostasis. Highly regulated ammonia transport by renal epithelial cells determines the proportion of ammonia excreted in the urine versus returned to the systemic circulation. The traditional paradigm of ammonia transport involving passive NH3 diffusion, protonation in the lumen and NH4+ trapping due to an inability to cross plasma membranes is being replaced by the recognition of limited plasma membrane NH3 permeability in combination with the presence of specific NH3-transporting and NH4+-transporting proteins in specific renal epithelial cells. Ammonia production and transport are regulated by a variety of factors, including extracellular pH and K+, and by several hormones, such as mineralocorticoids, glucocorticoids and angiotensin II. This coordinated process of regulated ammonia production and transport is critical for the effective maintenance of acid-base homeostasis. PMID:23720285

  16. Recovery and removal of nutrients from swine wastewater by using a novel integrated reactor for struvite decomposition and recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Haiming; Xiao, Dean; Liu, Jiahui; Hou, Li; Ding, Li

    2015-05-01

    In the present study, struvite decomposition was performed by air stripping for ammonia release and a novel integrated reactor was designed for the simultaneous removal and recovery of total ammonia-nitrogen (TAN) and total orthophosphate (PT) from swine wastewater by internal struvite recycling. Decomposition of struvite by air stripping was found to be feasible. Without supplementation with additional magnesium and phosphate sources, the removal ratio of TAN from synthetic wastewater was maintained at >80% by recycling of the struvite decomposition product formed under optimal conditions, six times. Continuous operation of the integrated reactor indicated that approximately 91% TAN and 97% PT in the swine wastewater could be removed and recovered by the proposed recycling process with the supplementation of bittern. Economic evaluation of the proposed system showed that struvite precipitation cost can be saved by approximately 54% by adopting the proposed recycling process in comparison with no recycling method.

  17. Recovery and removal of nutrients from swine wastewater by using a novel integrated reactor for struvite decomposition and recycling

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Haiming; Xiao, Dean; Liu, Jiahui; Hou, Li; Ding, Li

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, struvite decomposition was performed by air stripping for ammonia release and a novel integrated reactor was designed for the simultaneous removal and recovery of total ammonia-nitrogen (TAN) and total orthophosphate (PT) from swine wastewater by internal struvite recycling. Decomposition of struvite by air stripping was found to be feasible. Without supplementation with additional magnesium and phosphate sources, the removal ratio of TAN from synthetic wastewater was maintained at >80% by recycling of the struvite decomposition product formed under optimal conditions, six times. Continuous operation of the integrated reactor indicated that approximately 91% TAN and 97% PT in the swine wastewater could be removed and recovered by the proposed recycling process with the supplementation of bittern. Economic evaluation of the proposed system showed that struvite precipitation cost can be saved by approximately 54% by adopting the proposed recycling process in comparison with no recycling method. PMID:25960246

  18. Modeling of heat generation in ammonia-treated solid rocket propellant

    SciTech Connect

    Raun, R.L.; Isom, K.B.

    1995-06-01

    With the end of the Cold War, safe, environmentally sound separation, recycling, and disposal of ingredients in solid rocket propellants and munitions has become a national priority. One approach to demilitarize solid rocket propellants is treatment with ammonia. Ammonia extracts the oxidizers ammonium perchlorate and HMX, yielding a solid reside that is more suitable for incineration and less sensitive to impact and other modes of accidental initiation. Ammonia treatment of nitroglycerin-containing propellants is complicated by an exothermic reaction between ammonia and nitroglycerin. If not removed, the heat generated by this reaction can cause propellant ignition. To help design safe treatment processes, a model for the ammonia-propellant reaction was developed, which integrates transient energy and species conservation equations to simulate ammonia diffusion, heat generation, and heat flow in a propellant and in the solid residue resulting from ammonia treatment. It was calibrated using residue thickness and thermocouple data for one propellant. The calibrated model was used to predict conditions leading to ignition of thin propellant strips. The results agree well with experimental observations.

  19. Recycling at Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummins, William M.

    1988-01-01

    Outlines a Michigan summer camp's efforts to reduce solid waste disposal by recycling cardboard, tin, glass, aluminum, and plastic milk containers. Points out variables affecting the success of such efforts. Discusses Michigan state funding for the development of recycling programs. (SV)

  20. Wee Recyclers Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Natural Resources, Madison.

    Hands-on activities in this guide are designed to help preschool children (ages 3-5) understand that reducing, reusing, and recycling preserves natural resources and prolongs the life of landfills. Children sort, match and compare recyclable items and learn to separate some items by number and color. The 29 activities are divided into units that…

  1. AIRCRAFT INDUSTRY WASTEWATER RECYCLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The feasibility of recycling certain categories of water used in the manufacture of airplanes was demonstrated. Water in four categories was continuously recycled in 380-liter (100-gallon) treatment plants; chemical process rinse water, dye-penetrant crack-detection rinse water, ...

  2. Carbon dioxide recycling

    EPA Science Inventory

    The recycling of carbon dioxide to methanol and dimethyl ether is seen to offer a substantial route to renewable and environmentally carbon neutral fuels. One of the authors has championed the “Methanol Economy" in articles and a book. By recycling ambient CO2, the authors argue ...

  3. The Fermilab recycler ring

    SciTech Connect

    Martin Hu

    2001-07-24

    The Fermilab Recycler is a permanent magnet storage ring for the accumulation of antiprotons from the Antiproton Source, and the recovery and cooling of the antiprotons remaining at the end of a Tevatron store. It is an integral part of the Fermilab III luminosity upgrade. The following paper describes the design features, operational and commissioning status of the Recycler Ring.

  4. Carbon dioxide recycling

    EPA Science Inventory

    The recycling of carbon dioxide to methanol and dimethyl ether is seen to offer a substantial route to renewable and environmentally carbon neutral fuels. One of the authors has championed the Methanol Economy" in articles and a book. By recycling ambient CO2, the authors argue ...

  5. Design for aluminum recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This article describes the increasing use of aluminum in automobiles and the need to recycle to benefit further growth of aluminum applications by assuring an economical, high-quality source of metal. The article emphasizes that coordination of material specifications among designers can raise aluminum scrap value and facilitate recycling. Applications of aluminum in automobile construction are discussed.

  6. Ammonia Ice Clouds on Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The top cloud layer on Jupiter is thought to consist of ammonia ice, but most of that ammonia 'hides' from spectrometers. It does not absorb light in the same way ammonia does. To many scientists, this implies that ammonia churned up from lower layers of the atmosphere 'ages' in some way after it condenses, possibly by being covered with a photochemically generated hydrocarbon mixture. The New Horizons Linear Etalon Imaging Spectral Array (LEISA), the half of the Ralph instrument that is able to 'see' in infrared wavelengths that are absorbed by ammonia ice, spotted these clouds and watched them evolve over five Jupiter days (about 40 Earth hours). In these images, spectroscopically identified fresh ammonia clouds are shown in bright blue. The largest cloud appeared as a localized source on day 1, intensified and broadened on day 2, became more diffuse on days 3 and 4, and disappeared on day 5. The diffusion seemed to follow the movement of a dark spot along the boundary of the oval region. Because the source of this ammonia lies deeper than the cloud, images like these can tell scientists much about the dynamics and heat conduction in Jupiter's lower atmosphere.

  7. Advances in plastic recycling. Volume 1: Recycling of polyurethanes

    SciTech Connect

    Frisch, K.C.; Klempner, D.; Prentice, G.

    1999-07-01

    ``Recycling of Polyurethanes'', the first volume in the Advances in Plastics Recycling series, is focused on the physical and chemical recycling of polyurethanes, with attention given to energy conversion. A compilation of the present ongoing studies on recycling of urethane and, in general, isocyanate-based polymers, the focus is on thermosetting urethane polymers. Contents include: Recycling of Polyurethane Plastics in the European Automotive Industry; Present State of Polyurethane Recycling in Europe; Processing Overview of Bonded Polyurethane Foam; Mechanical Recycling of Polyurethane Scrap; Ecostream{trademark}--A Technology Beyond Recycling; Recycling of Flexible polyurethane Foam; General purpose Adhesives Prepared from Chemically Recycled Waste Rigid Polyurethane Foams; and Utilization of Isocyanate Binders in Recycling of Scrap Automotive Headliners.

  8. AQUEOUS AMMONIA EQUILIBRIUM - TABULATION OF PERCENT UN-IONIZED AMMONIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The percent of un-ionized ammonia as a function of pH and temperature in aqueous ammonia solutions of zero salinity is presented in tabular form over the following ranges: temperature 0.0 to 40.0 C in increments of 0.2 degree, and pH 5.00 to 12.00 in increments of 0.01 pH unit.

  9. ENGINEERING DESIGN CONFIGURATIONS FOR BIOLOGICAL AMMONIA REMOVAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many regions in the United States have excessive levels of nutrients including ammonia in their source waters. For example, farming and agricultural sources of ammonia in the Midwest contribute to relatively high levels of ammonia in many ground waters. Although ammonia in water ...

  10. Interaction between a percolation network and a cubic cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thovert, J.; Sangaré, D.; Mourzenko, V.; Adler, P. M.

    2012-12-01

    The intersection between a percolating network of fractures modeled as polygonal surfaces and a cubic cavity is important for the safe storage of wastes in a fractured medium. It is important that the cavities where the wastes are stored do not intersect the percolating network of fractures which may exist, or that these cavities do not enable a fracture network to percolate. Of course, these considerations are particularly important for nuclear wastes. The fractures are hexagons inscribed in a circle of radius R. The hexagons are uniformly distributed in space and isotropically oriented. Let N_{fr} be the number of fractures generated in a finite cubic unit cell Omega of size L^3. The fracture density is the number of fractures per unit volume. It is efficient to analyze the percolation properties of a network by using the dimensionless density rho ' which is the number of fractures per excluded volume. For hexagons, one has rho ' = 7.8 rho R^3. The percolation threshold rho '_c of networks is close to 2.3. More details are given in [1]. In addition, a cubic cavity C formed by six squares inscribed in a circle of radius R_s is generated with its center randomly located in Omega. The three dimensional lengths L, R, and R_s define two dimensionless lengths L' = L/R , R' _s = R_s/R which govern the problem together with rho'. Percolation properties are analyzed as detailed in [1]. Spatially periodic networks are generated with spatially periodic boundary conditions. For a given set of the three dimensionless parameters rho', R'_s and L', N independent networks are generated. In most cases, except for L'=40, N is equal to 500. Among these N networks, N_p percolate and N_{np} do not percolate. When a percolating cluster is obtained, the cavity intersects one or more fractures in N_{rc} realizations; in the same conditions, it does not intersect the cavity in N_{nrc} realizations. An additional case should be considered. When the network does not percolate, the network composed of the hexagons and of the six squares surrounding the cavity may percolate. Let us denote by N_{npc} the number of such events. These quantities and the corresponding probabilities were systematically calculated as functions of the three dimensionless parameters. An important quantity is the conditional probability Pi_c that the percolating cluster intersects the cavity when it exists. It could be extrapolated to an infinite cell size L'. This conditional probability is an increasing function of the fracture dimensionless density and of the dimensionless cavity size R' _s. The probability Pi that and object X intersects the fracture network with the density rho is given by the expression Pi=1-exp(- rho V) where V is the excluded volume for the object X and a fracture. This quantity is easily obtained for a cube. This prediction is shown to be in good agreement with the conditional probability Pi_c for large densities rho' or small R_s. However, it should be noted that these probabilities are not totally comparable because Pi is the probability for the intersection with the whole network and not with the percolation cluster only. Additional data will be presented and discussed. [1] Adler et al, Fractured porous media, Oxford U. Press, in press.

  11. Deep Percolation Rates in Closed Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martysevich, V.; Nachabe, M.

    2008-05-01

    Deep percolation or seepage is an important term of the water budget in closed basins that don't have surface water drainage features. In shallow water table environment of Florida, internal drainage of soil controls flooding. With recent rapid population growth and urban development in the state, a simple, field-based method is needed to estimate seepage rates and the impact of anthropogenic activity on the environment. In this study we instrumented five locations within Hillsborough County, Florida, with wells with pressure transducers measuring water level fluctuations at 1 minute resolution. For closed basins with lakes, evapotranspiration (ET) rates were determined using data from a weather station and Penman-Monteith FAO56 method, and then seepage rates were calculated from a water budget. The rates of ET were in the range of 0.3-0.4 cm/d and the seepage rates varied greatly depending on conditions specific to the site. The seepage rates found for the three surface water sites in this study were 1.0 cm/d for a manmade lake surrounded with dense vegetation, 0.2-0.6 cm/d for a natural lake located close to groundwater pumping site, and 0-0.3 for another natural lake with no groundwater pumping in the proximity. A methodology was introduced to calculate seepage rates into semi-confined aquifers, and the rates ranged between 0.3 and 0.4 cm/d in the two sites during the wet season and almost zero during the dry season when the head difference between the surficial and Floridan aquifers became too small. The results of the study indicate that simple and relatively inexpensive field methods can estimate seepage within a narrow range. Another important finding is the impact of the groundwater pumping on the surrounding environment. Further sensitivity studies on hydrological models that use seepage as one of the inputs may indicate that lower data collection resolution or simpler ET estimation methods are acceptable.

  12. Bounds for percolation thresholds on directed and undirected graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Kathleen; Pryadko, Leonid

    2015-03-01

    Percolation theory is an efficient approach to problems with strong disorder, e.g., in quantum or classical transport, composite materials, and diluted magnets. Recently, the growing role of big data in scientific and industrial applications has led to a renewed interest in graph theory as a tool for describing complex connections in various kinds of networks: social, biological, technological, etc. In particular, percolation on graphs has been used to describe internet stability, spread of contagious diseases and computer viruses; related models describe market crashes and viral spread in social networks. We consider site-dependent percolation on directed and undirected graphs, and present several exact bounds for location of the percolation transition in terms of the eigenvalues of matrices associated with graphs, including the adjacency matrix and the Hashimoto matrix used to enumerate non-backtracking walks. These bounds correspond t0 a mean field approximation and become asymptotically exact for graphs with no short cycles. We illustrate this convergence numerically by simulating percolation on several families of graphs with different cycle lengths. This research was supported in part by the NSF Grant PHY-1416578 and by the ARO Grant W911NF-11-1-0027.

  13. Dynamics of percolation phenomena in colloidal printing inks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniele, Michael Angelo-Anthony; Foguth, Alexandra L.; Rungta, Parul; Bandera, Iurii; Tsyalkovskyy, Volodymyr; Foulger, Stephen H.

    2010-02-01

    The conductivity of colloidal inks composed of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), 2-(4-tert-Butylphenyl)-5-(4-biphenylyl)- 1,3,4-oxadiazole (tPBD) or polystyrene-tPBD copolymerized colloids (PS-PBD) and carbon black (CB) were investigated to establish their percolation characteristics. The PS-PBD colloid supported inks (PEG/PS-PBD/CB) exhibited reduced percolation thresholds and enhanced conductivities above that of the individually carbon filled (PEG/CB) and small molecule blend (PEG/tPBD/CB) inks. Based on the DC conductivity analysis, the percolation threshold of the PEG/PS-PBD/CB composites was 3.6 vol%. The electrical resistivity of the PEG/PS-PBD/CB ink is lower than that of PEG/PBD/CB ink with the same CB content in the percolation region by 8 orders of magnitude. The percolation reduction was attributed to the heterogeneous dispersion of conductive filler aggregates "bridged" by PSPBD colloids. The aggregated dispersion of PS-PBD colloids in the ink matrix was characterized by photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL) which produced a red-shift at high concentrations, signaling the required proximity of PS-PBD colloids to form energy transfer complexes.

  14. Viscosity and thermal conductivity of stable graphite suspensions near percolation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lei; Wang, Jianjian; Marconnet, Amy M; Barbati, Alexander C; McKinley, Gareth H; Liu, Wei; Chen, Gang

    2015-01-14

    Nanofluids have received much attention in part due to the range of properties possible with different combinations of nanoparticles and base fluids. In this work, we measure the viscosity of suspensions of graphite particles in ethylene glycol as a function of the volume fraction, shear rate, and temperature below and above the percolation threshold. We also measure and contrast the trends observed in the viscosity with increasing volume fraction to the thermal conductivity behavior of the same suspensions: above the percolation threshold, the slope that describes the rate of thermal conductivity enhancement with concentration reduces compared to below the percolation threshold, whereas that of the viscosity enhancement increases. While the thermal conductivity enhancement is independent of temperature, the viscosity changes show a strong dependence on temperature and exhibit different trends with respect to the temperature at different shear rates above the percolation threshold. Interpretation of the experimental observations is provided within the framework of Stokesian dynamics simulations of the suspension microstructure and suggests that although diffusive contributions are not important for the observed thermal conductivity enhancement, they are important for understanding the variations in the viscosity with changes of temperature and shear rate above the percolation threshold. The experimental results can be collapsed to a single master curve through calculation of a single dimensionless parameter (a Péclet number based on the rotary diffusivity of the graphite particles). PMID:25469709

  15. Invasion percolation between two wells in continuous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang Bub

    2016-03-01

    Invasion percolation between two wells was studied in continuous media consisted of overlapping disks and spheres. The invasion percolation between injection and extraction wells occurs when a fluid injected through the injection well invades less pressurized neighboring pores until it reaches the extraction well. Attention was paid to whether the probability distribution of the invading mass m and the fractal dimension of the clusters of invaded pore particles remain similar to those of the lattice model. Our results indicated that the power α characterizing the probability distribution via P( m) ∝ m - α was considerably larger than that of the lattice model for a reduced volume density η = η c of pore particles, η c being the percolation critical density, and that it converged to the value for the lattice model for p e = 0 as η was increased, where p e is the pressure of an extraction site for the lattice model. The fractal dimension of the invaded clusters was found to be similar to that of the ordinary lattice percolation clusters generated at the percolation threshold. The scaling of the invaded clusters was also examined, and it held in both two and three dimensions.

  16. Two-dimensional percolation threshold in confined Si nanoparticle networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laube, J.; Gutsch, S.; Wang, D.; Kübel, C.; Zacharias, M.; Hiller, D.

    2016-01-01

    Non-percolating and percolating silicon quantum dot (QD) networks were investigated by plane-view energy filtered transmission electron microscopy (EF-TEM). The Si QD networks were prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition on free standing 5 nm Si3N4 membranes, followed by high temperature annealing. The percolation threshold from non-percolating to percolating networks is found to be in between a SiOx stoichiometry of SiO0.5 up to SiO0.7. Using the EF-TEM images, key structural parameters of the Si QD ensemble were extracted and compared, i.e., their size distribution, nearest neighbor distance, and circularity. Increasing the silicon excess within the SiOx layer results in an ensemble of closer spaced, less size-controlled, and less circular Si QDs that give rise to coupling effects. Furthermore, the influence of the structural parameters on the optical and electrical Si QD ensemble properties is discussed.

  17. Invasion percolation through minimum-weight spanning trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glantz, Roland; Hilpert, Markus

    2008-03-01

    Invasion percolation is often used to simulate capillary-dominated drainage and imbibition in pore networks. More than a decade ago it was observed that the part of a pore network that is involved in an invasion bond percolation is a minimum-weight spanning tree of the network, where the weights indicate resistances associated with the bonds. Thus, one can determine a minimum-weight spanning tree first and then run the invasion bond percolation on the minimum-weight spanning tree. The time complexities of the two steps are O(m?(m,n)) and O(n) , respectively, where m is the number of edges, n is the number of vertices, and ?(?,?) denotes the inverse Ackermann function. In this paper we (1) formulate the property of minimum-weight spanning trees that justifies the two-step approach to invasion bond percolation, (2) extend the two-step approach to invasion site percolation, and (3) further extend it to simulations of drainage (imbibition) that include trapping of the wetting (nonwetting) phase. In case of imbibition we also take snap-off into account. As a consequence, all these simulations can now be done in O(m?(m,n)) .

  18. Getter materials for cracking ammonia

    DOEpatents

    Boffito, Claudio; Baker, John D.

    1999-11-02

    A method is provided for cracking ammonia to produce hydrogen. The method includes the steps of passing ammonia over an ammonia-cracking catalyst which is an alloy including (1) alloys having the general formula Zr.sub.1-x Ti.sub.x M.sub.1 M.sub.2, wherein M.sub.1 and M.sub.2 are selected independently from the group consisting of Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni, and x is between about 0.0 and about 1.0 inclusive; and between about 20% and about 50% Al by weight. In another aspect, the method of the invention is used to provide methods for operating hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines and hydrogen fuel cells. In still another aspect, the present invention provides a hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engine and a hydrogen fuel cell including the above-described ammonia-cracking catalyst.

  19. Compatibility testing with anhydrous ammonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benner, Steve M.; Schweickart, Russell B.

    1992-01-01

    Anhydrous ammonia has been proposed as the working fluid for a number of two-phase thermal control systems to be used in future space applications, including the Space Station Freedom and the Earth Observing Station (EOS). The compatibility of ammonia with the components in these systems is a major concern due to the corrosive nature of the fluid. Compatibility of ammonia with stainless steel and some aluminum alloys is well documented; however, data on other materials potentially suitable for aerospace use is less common. This paper documents the compatibility testing of nine materials with both gaseous and liquid ammonia. The test procedures are presented along with the resulting measurement data. Tensile strength was the only mechanical property tested that indicated a significant material incompatibility.

  20. Ammonia and urea determination in water samples using amberlite XAD-7 to concentrate indophenol

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, P.; Sanchez, E.; Pons, A.; Palou, A.

    1986-03-01

    A modification of the indophenol method applied to the determination of ammonia and urea in the same sample is described. Indophenol, formed proportionally to the amount of ammonia available, is selectively concentrated in a single purification-concentration step, using simple and recyclable columns of Amberlite XAD-7 resin, thus increasing the method sensitivity. Its application to seawater samples is described. The procedure is applicable to analysis of large numbers of samples running simultaneously in routine studies and eliminates possible artifacts that may alter the precision and sensitivity of the method. 16 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

  1. Argon recovery from hydrogen depleted ammonia plant purge gas using a HARP Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamurthy, R.; Lerner, S.L.; Maclean, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    A number of ammonia plants employ membranes or cryogenic hydrogen recovery units to separate hydrogen contained in the purge gas for recycle to the ammonia synthesis loop. The resulting hydrogen depleted purge gas, which is usually used for fuel, is an attractive source of argon. This paper presents the novel features of a process which employs a combination of pressure swing adsorption (PSA) and cryogenic technology to separate the argon from this hydrogen depleted purge gas stream. This new proprietary Hybrid Argon Recovery Progress (HARP) plant is an effective alternative to a conventional all-cryogenic plant.

  2. Satellite Observations of Tropospheric Ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shephard, M. W.; Luo, M.; Rinsland, C. P.; Cady-Pereira, K. E.; Beer, R.; Pinder, R. W.; Henze, D.; Payne, V. H.; Clough, S.; Rodgers, C. D.; Osterman, G. B.; Bowman, K. W.; Worden, H. M.

    2008-12-01

    Global high-spectral resolution (0.06 cm-1) nadir measurements from TES-Aura enable the simultaneous retrieval of a number of tropospheric pollutants and trace gases in addition to the TES standard operationally retrieved products (e.g. carbon monoxide, ozone). Ammonia (NH3) is one of the additional species that can be retrieved in conjunction with the TES standard products, and is important for local, regional, and global tropospheric chemistry studies. Ammonia emissions contribute significantly to several well-known environmental problems, yet the magnitude and seasonal/spatial variability of the emissions are poorly constrained. In the atmosphere, an important fraction of fine particulate matter is composed of ammonium nitrate and ammonium sulfate. These particles are statistically associated with health impacts. When deposited to ecosystems in excess, nitrogen, including ammonia can cause nutrient imbalances, change in ecosystem species composition, eutrophication, algal blooms and hypoxia. Ammonia is also challenging to measure in-situ. Observations of surface concentrations are rare and are particularly sparse in North America. Satellite observations of ammonia are therefore highly desirable. We recently demonstrated that tropospheric ammonia is detectable in the TES spectra and presented some corresponding preliminary retrievals over a very limited range of conditions (Beer et al., 2008). Presented here are results that expand upon these initial TES ammonia retrievals in order to evaluate/validate the retrieval results utilizing in-situ surface observations (e.g. LADCO, CASTNet, EPA /NC State) and chemical models (e.g. GEOS-Chem and CMAQ). We also present retrievals over regions of interest that have the potential to help further understand air quality and the active nitrogen cycle. Beer, R., M. W. Shephard, S. S. Kulawik, S. A. Clough, A. Eldering, K. W. Bowman, S. P. Sander, B. M. Fisher, V. H. Payne, M. Luo, G. B. Osterman, and J. R. Worden, First satellite observations of lower tropospheric ammonia and methanol, Geophysical Res. Letters, 35, L09801, doi:10.1029/2008GL033642, 2008.

  3. Morphology-Driven High-Performance Polymer Transistor-based Ammonia Gas Sensor.

    PubMed

    Yu, Seong Hoon; Cho, Jangwhan; Sim, Kyu Min; Ha, Jae Un; Chung, Dae Sung

    2016-03-16

    Developing high-performance gas sensors based on polymer field-effect transistors (PFETs) requires enhancing gas-capture abilities of polymer semiconductors without compromising their high charge carrier mobility. In this work, cohesive energies of polymer semiconductors were tuned by strategically inserting buffer layers, which resulted in dramatically different semiconductor surface morphologies. Elucidating morphological and structural properties of polymer semiconductor films in conjunction with FET studies revealed that surface morphologies containing large two-dimensional crystalline domains were optimal for achieving high surface areas and creating percolation pathways for charge carriers. Ammonia molecules with electron lone pairs adsorbed on the surface of conjugated semiconductors can serve as efficient trapping centers, which negatively shift transfer curves for p-type PFETs. Therefore, morphology optimization of polymer semiconductors enhances their gas sensing abilities toward ammonia, leading to a facile method of manufacturing high-performance gas sensors. PMID:26927929

  4. Solvent recycle/recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Paffhausen, M.W.; Smith, D.L.; Ugaki, S.N.

    1990-09-01

    This report describes Phase I of the Solvent Recycle/Recovery Task of the DOE Chlorinated Solvent Substitution Program for the US Air Force by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, EG G Idaho, Inc., through the US Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office. The purpose of the task is to identify and test recovery and recycling technologies for proposed substitution solvents identified by the Biodegradable Solvent Substitution Program and the Alternative Solvents/Technologies for Paint Stripping Program with the overall objective of minimizing hazardous wastes. A literature search to identify recycle/recovery technologies and initial distillation studies has been conducted. 4 refs.

  5. Motivation recycling: pre-recycling case study in Minsk, Belarus.

    PubMed

    Miafodzyeva, Sviatlana; Brandt, Nils; Olsson, Monika

    2010-04-01

    Given the aim of motivating householders to behave in a recycling-friendly manner, there is a need to understand consumers' recycling behaviour. This paper documents and analyses acceptability and awareness of a pre-recycling society, through a survey carried out in the region of Minsk, Belarus. The results show a large number of people have no strong awareness about separate collection of household waste for recycling. By analysing the pre-recycling behaviour of Minsk citizens and substantive comparison with literature studies of a more mature recycling society such as Sweden, we indicate common sociodemographic variables for both cases and determine that these sociodemographic characteristics will directly influence recycling behaviour in countries like Belarus. It is also noted that the lack of recycling habit cannot directly predict subsequent recycling behaviour on the stage of implementation the recycling system. PMID:20124319

  6. Absorbing-state phase transitions on percolating lattices.

    PubMed

    Lee, Man Young; Vojta, Thomas

    2009-04-01

    We study nonequilibrium phase transitions of reaction-diffusion systems defined on randomly diluted lattices, focusing on the transition across the lattice percolation threshold. To develop a theory for this transition, we combine classical percolation theory with the properties of the supercritical nonequilibrium system on a finite-size cluster. In the case of the contact process, the interplay between geometric criticality due to percolation and dynamical fluctuations of the nonequilibrium system leads to a different universality class. The critical point is characterized by ultraslow activated dynamical scaling and accompanied by strong Griffiths singularities. To confirm the universality of this exotic scaling scenario we also study the generalized contact process with several (symmetric) absorbing states and we support our theory by extensive Monte Carlo simulations. PMID:19518178

  7. Fast and accurate database searches with MS-GF+Percolator.

    PubMed

    Granholm, Viktor; Kim, Sangtae; Navarro, José C F; Sjölund, Erik; Smith, Richard D; Käll, Lukas

    2014-02-01

    One can interpret fragmentation spectra stemming from peptides in mass-spectrometry-based proteomics experiments using so-called database search engines. Frequently, one also runs post-processors such as Percolator to assess the confidence, infer unique peptides, and increase the number of identifications. A recent search engine, MS-GF+, has shown promising results, due to a new and efficient scoring algorithm. However, MS-GF+ provides few statistical estimates about the peptide-spectrum matches, hence limiting the biological interpretation. Here, we enabled Percolator processing for MS-GF+ output and observed an increased number of identified peptides for a wide variety of data sets. In addition, Percolator directly reports p values and false discovery rate estimates, such as q values and posterior error probabilities, for peptide-spectrum matches, peptides, and proteins, functions that are useful for the whole proteomics community. PMID:24344789

  8. Connectivity percolation in suspensions of attractive square-well spherocylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Mohit; Meyer, Hugues; Schilling, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the connectivity percolation transition in suspensions of attractive square-well spherocylinders by means of Monte Carlo simulation and connectedness percolation theory. In the 1980s the percolation threshold of slender fibers has been predicted to scale as the fibers' inverse aspect ratio [Phys. Rev. B 30, 3933 (1984), 10.1103/PhysRevB.30.3933]. The main finding of our study is that the attractive spherocylinder system reaches this inverse scaling regime at much lower aspect ratios than found in suspensions of hard spherocylinders. We explain this difference by showing that third virial corrections of the pair connectedness functions, which are responsible for the deviation from the scaling regime, are less important for attractive potentials than for hard particles.

  9. Percolation crossing probabilities in hexagons: a numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, S. M.; Ziff, R. M.; Simmons, J. J. H.

    2015-01-01

    In a recent article (Simmons 2013 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 46 494015), the last author of this article used c = 0 logarithmic conformal field theory to predict crossing probability formulas for percolation clusters inside a hexagon with free boundary conditions. In the present article, we verify these predictions with high-precision computer simulations for equiangular hexagons with side lengths alternating from short to long. Our simulations generate percolation-cluster perimeters with hull walks on a triangular lattice inside a hexagon. Each sample comprises two hull walks, and the order in which these walks strike the bottom and upper left/right sides of the hexagon determines the crossing configuration of the percolation sample. We compare our numerical results with the predicted crossing probabilities, finding excellent agreement.

  10. Scaling behavior of explosive percolation on the square lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziff, Robert M.

    2010-11-01

    Clusters generated by the product-rule growth model of Achlioptas, D’Souza, and Spencer on a two-dimensional square lattice are shown to obey qualitatively different scaling behavior than standard (random growth) percolation. The threshold with unrestricted bond placement (allowing loops) is found precisely using several different criteria based on both moments and wrapping probabilities, yielding pc=0.526565±0.000005 , consistent with the recent result of Radicchi and Fortunato. The correlation-length exponent ν is found to be close to 1. The qualitative difference from regular percolation is shown dramatically in the behavior of the percolation probability P∞ (size of largest cluster), of the susceptibility, and of the second moment of finite clusters, where discontinuities appear at the threshold. The critical cluster-size distribution does not follow a consistent power law for the range of system sizes we study (L≤8192) but may approach a power law with τ>2 for larger L .

  11. Fast and accurate database searches with MS-GF+Percolator

    SciTech Connect

    Granholm, Viktor; Kim, Sangtae; Navarro, Jose' C.; Sjolund, Erik; Smith, Richard D.; Kall, Lukas

    2014-02-28

    To identify peptides and proteins from the large number of fragmentation spectra in mass spectrometrybased proteomics, researches commonly employ so called database search engines. Additionally, postprocessors like Percolator have been used on the results from such search engines, to assess confidence, infer peptides and generally increase the number of identifications. A recent search engine, MS-GF+, has previously been showed to out-perform these classical search engines in terms of the number of identified spectra. However, MS-GF+ generates only limited statistical estimates of the results, hence hampering the biological interpretation. Here, we enabled Percolator-processing for MS-GF+ output, and observed an increased number of identified peptides for a wide variety of datasets. In addition, Percolator directly reports false discovery rate estimates, such as q values and posterior error probabilities, as well as p values, for peptide-spectrum matches, peptides and proteins, functions useful for the whole proteomics community.

  12. Purification and Percolation Unexpected Phenomena in Nanotube Polymer Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptschke, P.; Hornbostel, B.; Roth, S.; Vohrer, U.; Dudkin, S. M.; Alig, I.

    2005-09-01

    SWNT were synthesized by arc-discharge methods. The as produced material was treated by different procedures in order to get purified SWNT. The treatments led to higher conductivity values as measured on bucky papers. The SWNT were incorporated into a polymer matrix of polycarbonate by melt mixing using a small scale compounder. The as produced SWNT material led to electrical percolation between 2 and 3wt%. Unexpectedly, the composites with the treated SWNT showed higher percolation concentrations. This is contradictory to theoretical expectations. These results would suggest that increasing the purity of SWNT does not lead automatically to lower percolation contents when dispersing SWNT in a molten polymer by shear mixing. During the purification the interactions between SWNT bundles might be increased, thus leading to a more agglomerated SWNT material which is more difficult to wet, infiltrate and disperse during the melt mixing procedure.

  13. Isolation of rat lung mast cells for purposes of one-week cultivation using novel Percoll variant Percoll PLUS.

    PubMed

    Kubrycht, J; Maxová, H; Nyč, O; Vajner, L; Novotná, J; Hezinová, A; Trnková, A; Vrablová, K; Vytášek, R; Valoušková, V

    2011-01-01

    Prolonged cultivation of separated rat lung mast cells (LMC) in vitro is necessary to better investigate a possible role of LMC in different stages of tissue remodeling induced by hypoxia. Rat lung mast cells (LMC) were separated using a protocol including an improved proteolytic extraction and two subsequent density gradient separations on Ficoll-Paque PLUS and a new generation of Percoll, i.e. Percoll PLUS. Instead of usual isotonic stock Percoll solution, an alternative "asymptotically isotonic" stock solution was more successful in our density separation of LMC on Percoll PLUS. Separated cells were cultivated for six days in media including stem cell factor, interleukins IL-3 and IL-6, and one of two alternative mixtures of antibiotics. These cultivations were performed without any contamination and with only rare changes in cell size and morphology. Model co-cultivation of two allogenic fractions of LMC often caused considerable rapid changes in cell morphology and size. In contrast to these observations no or rare morphological changes were found after cultivation under hypoxic conditions. In conclusions, we modified separation on Percoll PLUS to be widely used, altered LMC separation with respect to purposes of long-lasting cultivation and observed some model morphological changes of LMC. PMID:20533857

  14. Remodeling: Conversion, Renovation, Recycling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nation's Schools and Colleges, 1974

    1974-01-01

    Brief notes discuss recent developments such as converting gymnasiums to other uses; renovating buildings in a city university; and conversion of a streetcar barn into a university science center, using recycled materials. (JF)

  15. The Totem Pole Recycled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sewall, Susan Breyer

    1991-01-01

    Presents an activity that integrates science, environmental education, art, and social studies. Students identify and research an endangered species and construct a totem pole depicting the species using a recyclable material. (MDH)

  16. Recycle plastics into feedstocks

    SciTech Connect

    Kastner, H.; Kaminsky, W.

    1995-05-01

    Thermal cracking of mixed-plastics wastes with a fluidized-bed reactor can be a viable and cost-effective means to meet mandatory recycling laws. Strict worldwide environmental statutes require the hydrocarbon processing industry (HPI) to develop and implement product applications and technologies that reuse post-consumer mixed-plastics waste. Recycling or reuse of plastics waste has a broad definition. Recycling entails more than mechanical regranulation and remelting of polymers for film and molding applications. A European consortium of academia and refiners have investigated if it is possible and profitable to thermally crack plastics into feedstocks for refining and petrochemical applications. Development and demonstration of pyrolysis methods show promising possibilities of converting landfill garbage into valuable feedstocks such as ethylene, propylene, BTX, etc. Fluidized-bed reactor technologies offer HPI operators a possible avenue to meet recycling laws, conserve raw materials and yield a profit. The paper describes thermal cracking for feedstocks and pyrolysis of polyolefins.

  17. Fermilab recycler diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Martin Hu

    2001-07-24

    The Fermilab Recycler Ring is a permanent magnet storage ring for the storage and cooling of antiprotons. The following note describes the diagnostic tools currently available for commissioning, as well as the improvements and upgrades planned for the near future.

  18. A Practical Recycling Project . . .

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durant, Raymond H.; Mikuska, James M.

    1973-01-01

    Descirbes a school district's recycling program of aluminum lunch trays that are collected after their use. The trays are used as scrap metal in industrial education workshop and used for sand castings. (PS)

  19. Scaling Theory for Percolative Charge Transport in Disordered Molecular Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottaar, J.; Koster, L. J. A.; Coehoorn, R.; Bobbert, P. A.

    2011-09-01

    We present a scaling theory for charge transport in disordered molecular semiconductors that extends percolation theory by including bonds with conductances close to the percolating one in the random-resistor network representing charge hopping. A general and compact expression is given for the charge mobility for Miller-Abrahams and Marcus hopping on different lattices with Gaussian energy disorder, with parameters determined from numerically exact results. The charge-concentration dependence is universal. The model-specific temperature dependence can be used to distinguish between the hopping models.

  20. Percolation models for boiling and bubble growth in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Yortsos, Y.C.

    1991-05-01

    We analyze the liquid-to-vapor phase change in single-component fluids in porous media at low superheats. Conditions typical to steam injection in porous media are taken. We examine nucleation, phase equilibria and their stability, and the growth of vapor bubbles. Effects of pore structure are emphasized. It is shown that at low supersaturations, bubble growth can be described as a percolation process. In the absence of spatial gradients, macroscopic flow properties are calculated in terms of nucleation parameters. A modification of gradient percolation is also proposed in the case of spatial temperature gradients, when solid conduction predominates. 22 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Accurate and Sensitive Peptide Identification with Mascot Percolator

    PubMed Central

    Brosch, Markus; Yu, Lu; Hubbard, Tim; Choudhary, Jyoti

    2009-01-01

    Sound scoring methods for sequence database search algorithms such as Mascot and Sequest are essential for sensitive and accurate peptide and protein identifications from proteomic tandem mass spectrometry data. In this paper, we present a software package that interfaces Mascot with Percolator, a well performing machine learning method for rescoring database search results, and demonstrate it to be amenable for both low and high accuracy mass spectrometry data, outperforming all available Mascot scoring schemes as well as providing reliable significance measures. Mascot Percolator can be readily used as a stand alone tool or integrated into existing data analysis pipelines. PMID:19338334

  2. Mirrorless lasing from light emitters in percolating clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlak, Gennadiy; Rubo, Y. G.

    2015-07-01

    We describe the lasing effect in the three-dimensional percolation system, where the percolating cluster is filled by active media composed by light emitters excited noncoherently. We show that, due to the presence of a topologically nontrivial photonic structure, the stimulated emission is modified with respect to both conventional and random lasers. The time dynamics and spectra of the lasing output are studied numerically with finite-difference time-domain approach. The Fermat principle and Monte Carlo approach are applied to characterize the optimal optical path and interconnection between the radiating emitters. The spatial structure of the laser mode is found by a long-time FDTD simulation.

  3. Percolation approach to study connectivity in living neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soriano, Jordi; Breskin, Ilan; Moses, Elisha; Tlusty, Tsvi

    2007-02-01

    We study neural connectivity in cultures of rat hippocampal neurons. We measure the neurons' response to an electric stimulation for gradual lower connectivity, and characterize the size of the giant cluster in the network. The connectivity undergoes a percolation transition described by the critical exponent β ≃ 0.65. We use a theoretic approach based on bond—percolation on a graph to describe the process of disintegration of the network and extract its statistical properties. Together with numerical simulations we show that the connectivity in the neural culture is local, characterized by a gaussian degree distribution and not a power law one.

  4. Interaction between a percolation network and a cubic cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourzenko, Valeri; Adler, Pierre; Thovert, Jean Francois; Sangaré, Daouda

    2015-04-01

    The intersection between a percolating network of fractures modeled as polygons and a cubic cavity is important for the safe storage of wastes in a fractured medium. The cavities where the wastes are stored should not intersect the percolating network of fractures which may exist, or these cavities should not enable a fracture network to percolate. The fractures are hexagons inscribed in a circle of radius R which are uniformly distributed in space and isotropically oriented. Nfr is the number of fractures generated in a finite unit cell Omega of size L^3. The fracture density is conveniently represented by the dimensionless density rho ' which is the average number of intersections per fracture with the other fractures [1]. In addition, a cubic cavity C formed by six squares inscribed in a circle of radius Rs is randomly located in Omega. N spatially periodic networks are generated. Generally, N is equal to 500. Among these N networks, Np percolate and the cavity intersects one or more fractures in Nrc realizations; no fracture-cavity intersection occurs in Nnrc realizations. Moreover, when the network alone does not percolate (which occurs in Nnp realisations), the set composed by the hexagons and the cavity percolates Nnpc times. These quantities and the corresponding probabilities were systematically calculated as functions of L' = L/R , R' s = R_s/R and rho'. An important quantity is the conditional probability Pic that the percolating cluster intersects the cavity when it exists. It could be extrapolated to an infinite cell size L'. This conditional probability is an increasing function of rho' and of R' _s. The probability Pi that an object X intersects the fracture network with the density rho is given by the expression Pi=1-exp(- rho V) where V is the excluded volume for the object X and a fracture. This quantity is obtained for a cube. This prediction is in good agreement with the conditional probability Pic for large rho' or small R_s. However, Pi and Pic are not totally comparable because Pi is the probability for the intersection with the whole network and not with the percolation cluster only. Additional data will be presented and discussed.

  5. Anomalous Magnetotransport in Disordered Structures: Classical Edge-State Percolation.

    PubMed

    Schirmacher, Walter; Fuchs, Benedikt; Höfling, Felix; Franosch, Thomas

    2015-12-11

    By event-driven molecular dynamics simulations we investigate magnetotransport in a two-dimensional model with randomly distributed scatterers close to the field-induced localization transition. This transition is generated by percolating skipping orbits along the edges of obstacle clusters. The dynamic exponents differ significantly from those of the conventional transport problem on percolating systems, thus establishing a new dynamic universality class. This difference is tentatively attributed to a weak-link scenario, which emerges naturally due to barely overlapping edge trajectories. We make predictions for the frequency-dependent conductivity and discuss implications for active colloidal circle swimmers in a hetegogeneous environment. PMID:26705618

  6. Percolation transition in active neural networks with adaptive geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iudin, F. D.; Iudin, D. I.; Kazantsev, V. B.

    2015-02-01

    A mathematical model has been proposed for a neural network whose morphological structure varies dynamically depending on activity. This is the property of the so-called structural plasticity typical of developed neural systems of a brain. It has been shown that the spontaneous generation and propagation of a signal in such networks correspond to a percolation transition and the appearance of the connectivity component covering the entire system. Furthermore, adaptive change in the geometric structure of a network results in the clustering of cells and in the reduction of the effective percolation threshold, which corresponds to experimental neurobiological observations.

  7. Truncated Connectivities in a Highly Supercritical Anisotropic Percolation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couto, Rodrigo G.; de Lima, Bernardo N. B.; Sanchis, Rémy

    2013-12-01

    We consider an anisotropic bond percolation model on , with p=( p h , p v )∈[0,1]2, p v > p h , and declare each horizontal (respectively vertical) edge of to be open with probability p h (respectively p v ), and otherwise closed, independently of all other edges. Let with 0< x 1< x 2, and . It is natural to ask how the two point connectivity function behaves, and whether anisotropy in percolation probabilities implies the strict inequality . In this note we give an affirmative answer in the highly supercritical regime.

  8. Recycling of nonmetallics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amey, E.B.; Kelly, T.D.

    1996-01-01

    The first factor determining recyclability is the composition of the material itself. Metals, for example, can be reused with little or no loss in quality. Paper and rubber, by this criterion, are less recyclable. Each time paper is recycled, some cellulose fibers are broken. Shorter fibers can mean weaker paper of perceived lower quality and value. Vulcanizing is an irreversible chemical process that precludes recycling rubber in its original form. Both materials may be reused in other applications often of lower value than the original one. To be recyclable, the discarded material must have a collection infrastructure at the source of waste generation, at a central collection site, or at curbside. The recovered material must also have a market. If it is priced noncompetitively or no market exists, if it does not meet specifications, or if it requires special technology investments which cannot be recovered through future sales, the recovered material may be stockpiled or discarded rather than recycled. ?? 1996 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  9. MEASUREMENT OF AMMONIA RELEASE FROM SALTSTONE

    SciTech Connect

    Zamecnik, J; Alex Cozzi, A

    2009-01-15

    SRNL was requested by WSRC Waste Solidification Engineering to characterize the release of ammonia from saltstone curing at 95 C by performing experimental testing. These tests were performed with an MCU-type Tank 50H salt simulant containing 0, 50, and 200 mg/L ammonia. The testing program showed that above saltstone made from the 200 mg/L ammonia simulant, the vapor space ammonia concentration was about 2.7 mg/L vapor at 95 C. An upper 95% confidence value for this concentration was found to be 3.9 mg/L. Testing also showed that ammonia was chemically generated from curing saltstone at 95 C; the amount of ammonia generated was estimated to be equivalent to 121 mg/L additional ammonia in the salt solution feed. Even with chemical generation, the ammonia release from saltstone was found to be lower than its release from salt solution only with 200 mg/L ammonia.

  10. Mono-fermentation of chicken manure: ammonia inhibition and recirculation of the digestate.

    PubMed

    Nie, Hong; Jacobi, H Fabian; Strach, Katrin; Xu, Chunming; Zhou, Hongjun; Liebetrau, Jan

    2015-02-01

    The effects of ammonia concentration on the performance and stability of mono-fermentation of chicken manure were investigated in a lab-scale continuous stirred tank reactor at 40 C. Technical stripping was performed to remove ammonia from the liquid fraction of digestate, and the entire product was recycled to the fermenter to control ammonia concentration in the fermenter. Organic loading rate (OLR) of 5.3 gVS/(L d) was achieved with an average free ammonia nitrogen (FAN) concentration of 0.77 g/L and a specific gas yield of 0.39 L/gVS. When OLR was increased to 6.0 gVS/(L d), stable operation could be obtained with an average FAN concentration of 0.86 g/L and a specific gas yield of 0.27 L/gVS. Mono-fermentation of chicken manure was successfully carried out at high ammonia concentrations. Controlled recirculation of treated liquid fraction of digestate could be a solution in large-scale application for both: to avoid ammonia inhibition and minimize digestate. PMID:25266688

  11. Organic reactivity in liquid ammonia.

    PubMed

    Ji, Pengju; Atherton, John; Page, Michael I

    2012-08-14

    Liquid ammonia is a useful solvent for many organic reactions including aliphatic and aromatic nucleophilic substitution and metal-ion catalysed reactions. The acidity of acids is modified in liquid ammonia giving rise to differences from conventional solvents. The ionisation constants of phenols and carbon acids are the product of those for ion-pair formation and dissociation to the free ions. There is a linear relationship between the pK(a) of phenols and carbon acids in liquid ammonia and those in water of slope 1.68 and 0.7, respectively. Aminium ions exist in their unprotonated free base form in liquid ammonia. The rates of solvolysis and aminolysis by neutral amines of substituted benzyl chlorides in liquid ammonia show little or no dependence upon ring substituents, in stark contrast with the hydrolysis rates of substituted benzyl halides in water which vary 10(7) fold. However, the rates of the reaction of phenoxide ions and amine anions with 4-substituted benzyl chlorides gives a Hammett ρ = 1.1 and 0.93, respectively. The second order rate constants for the substitution of benzyl chlorides by neutral and anionic amines show a single Brønsted β(nuc) = 0.21 whereas those for substituted phenoxide ions generate a Brønsted β(nuc) = 0.40. The rates of aromatic nucleophilic substitution reactions in liquid ammonia are much faster than those in protic solvents indicating that liquid ammonia behaves like a typical dipolar aprotic solvent in its solvent effects on organic reactions. Nitrofluorobenzenes (NFB) readily undergo solvolysis in liquid ammonia but oxygen nucleophiles, such as alkoxide and phenoxide ions, displace the fluorine of 4-NFB in liquid ammonia to give the corresponding substitution product with little or no competing solvolysis product. The Brønsted β(nuc) for the reaction of 4-NFB with para-substituted phenoxides is 0.91, indicative that the decomposition of the Meisenheimer σ-intermediate is rate limiting. The aminolysis of 4-NFB occurs without general base catalysis by the amine and the second order rate constants generate a Brønsted β(nuc) of 0.36, which is also interpreted in terms of rate limiting breakdown of the Meisenheimer σ-intermediate. PMID:22538452

  12. Percolation thresholds on planar Euclidean relative-neighborhood graphs.

    PubMed

    Melchert, O

    2013-04-01

    In the present article, statistical properties regarding the topology and standard percolation on relative neighborhood graphs (RNGs) for planar sets of points, considering the Euclidean metric, are put under scrutiny. RNGs belong to the family of "proximity graphs"; i.e., their edgeset encodes proximity information regarding the close neighbors for the terminal nodes of a given edge. Therefore they are, e.g., discussed in the context of the construction of backbones for wireless ad hoc networks that guarantee connectedness of all underlying nodes. Here, by means of numerical simulations, we determine the asymptotic degree and diameter of RNGs and we estimate their bond and site percolation thresholds, which were previously conjectured to be nontrivial. We compare the results to regular 2D graphs for which the degree is close to that of the RNG. Finally, we deduce the common percolation critical exponents from the RNG data to verify that the associated universality class is that of standard 2D percolation. PMID:23679372

  13. Spin correlations in percolating networks with fractal geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, H.; Iwasa, K.; Fernandez-Baca, J.A.; Nicklow, R.M.

    1994-07-28

    Using neutron scattering techniques, the authors investigated the magnetic correlations in diluted antiferromagnets close to the percolation threshold in which the magnetic connectivity takes a fractal form. Recent experimental results concerning the self-similarity of the magnetic order, and magnetic excitations in two-dimensional Ising and three-dimensional Heisenberg antiferromagnets are presented.

  14. The persistent percolation of single-stream voids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falck, B.; Neyrinck, M. C.

    2015-07-01

    We study the nature of voids defined as single-stream regions that have not undergone shell-crossing. We use ORIGAMI to determine the cosmic web morphology of each dark matter particle in a suite of cosmological N-body simulations, which explicitly calculates whether a particle has crossed paths with others along multiple sets of axes and does not depend on a parameter or smoothing scale. The theoretical picture of voids is that of expanding underdensities with borders defined by shell-crossing. We find instead that locally underdense single-stream regions are not bounded on all sides by multi-stream regions, thus they percolate, filling the simulation volume; we show that the set of multi-stream particles also percolates. This percolation persists to high resolution, where the mass fraction of single-stream voids is low, because the volume fraction remains high; we speculate on the fraction of collapsed mass in the continuum limit of infinite resolution. By introducing a volume threshold parameter to define underdense void `cores', we create a catalogue of ORIGAMI voids which consist entirely of single-stream particles and measure their percolation properties, volume functions, and average densities.

  15. Beyond the locally treelike approximation for percolation on real networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radicchi, Filippo; Castellano, Claudio

    2016-03-01

    Theoretical attempts proposed so far to describe ordinary percolation processes on real-world networks rely on the locally treelike ansatz. Such an approximation, however, holds only to a limited extent, because real graphs are often characterized by high frequencies of short loops. We present here a theoretical framework able to overcome such a limitation for the case of site percolation. Our method is based on a message passing algorithm that discounts redundant paths along triangles in the graph. We systematically test the approach on 98 real-world graphs and on synthetic networks. We find excellent accuracy in the prediction of the whole percolation diagram, with significant improvement with respect to the prediction obtained under the locally treelike approximation. Residual discrepancies between theory and simulations do not depend on clustering and can be attributed to the presence of loops longer than three edges. We present also a method to account for clustering in bond percolation, but the improvement with respect to the method based on the treelike approximation is much less apparent.

  16. Percolation induced heat transfer in deep unsaturated zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, N.; LeCain, G.D.

    2003-01-01

    Subsurface temperature data from a borehole located in a desert wash were measured and used to delineate the conductive and advective heat transfer regimes, and to estimate the percolation quantity associated with the 1997-1998 El Ni??no precipitation. In an arid environment, conductive heat transfer dominates the variation of shallow subsurface temperature most of the time, except during sporadic precipitation periods. The subsurface time-varying temperature due to conductive heat transfer is highly correlated with the surface atmospheric temperature variation, whereas temperature variation due to advective heat transfer is strongly correlated with precipitation events. The advective heat transfer associated with precipitation and infiltration is the focus of this paper. Disruptions of the subsurface conductive temperature regime, associated with the 1997-1998 El Ni??no precipitation, were detected and used to quantify the percolation quantity. Modeling synthesis using a one-dimensional coupled heat and unsaturated flow model indicated that a percolation per unit area of 0.7 to 1.3 m height of water in two weeks during February 1998 was responsible for the observed temperature deviations down to a depth of 35.2 m. The reported study demonstrated quantitatively, for the first time, that the near surface temperature variation due to advective heat transfer can be significant at a depth greater than 10 m in unsaturated soils and can be used to infer the percolation amount in thick unsaturated soils.

  17. The Use of Percolating Filters in Teaching Ecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, N. F.

    1982-01-01

    Using percolating filters (components of sewage treatment process) reduces problems of organization, avoids damage to habitats, and provides a local study site for field work or rapid collection of biological material throughout the year. Component organisms are easily identified and the habitat can be studied as a simple or complex system.

  18. The Use of Percolating Filters in Teaching Ecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, N. F.

    1982-01-01

    Using percolating filters (components of sewage treatment process) reduces problems of organization, avoids damage to habitats, and provides a local study site for field work or rapid collection of biological material throughout the year. Component organisms are easily identified and the habitat can be studied as a simple or complex system.…

  19. A Simple Soil Percolation Test Device for Field Environmentalists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, William H.; Stark, Phillip E.

    1977-01-01

    A primary responsibility of field environmental health workers is evaluation of individual sewage disposal system sites. The authors of this article developed a practical, accurate, and inexpensive measurement device for obtaining reliable percolation test results. Directions for the construction and use of the device are detailed. Drawings…

  20. Surface Meltwater Percolation on the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rick, U. K.; Pfeffer, T.

    2006-12-01

    Downslope transport of surface meltwater in the accumulation zone of the Greenland Ice Sheet is poorly understood, although the location and timing of meltwater production is observed by a variety of remote sensing instruments. Meltwater generated at the surface may be partitioned into a fraction which percolates vertically, altering the hydrologic structure of the snow, and a fraction which travels downslope in the altered structure. The relative fraction of vertical vs. downslope movement depends on initial snow conditions and energy input, and evolves over the course of multiple years in warming conditions. On the Greenland Ice Sheet, the fraction of surface melt that moves downslope varies from zero at the top of the percolation facies to one near and below the equilibrium line altitude (ELA), and is important for determination of the surface mass balance of the ice sheet. Downslope meltwater movement is also a source for surface lakes and slush basins, and it is thought that these lakes and their associated hydraulic network are one source of englacial and subglacial water, which may cause acceleration of the ice sheet. Vertical model results show that multiple cycles of annual melt and refreeze must be considered when determining potential annual runoff, and that multi-year snowpack evolution has a large effect on the subsequent percolation of surface melt due to the energy conditions remaining in the snowpack following each winter. As average winter temperatures increase, meltwater is able to percolate deeper into the snowpack the following summer, resulting in denser snow layers. Conversely, increased accumulation inhibits surface melt from percolating into the snowpack and reaching older, denser layers upon which downslope flow is more likely to occur. The percolation of surface melt is less sensitive to summer conditions such as incoming solar radiation and the amount of melt produced, and increasing the length of summer has only a moderate effect on melt percolation. The model indicates that changes in summer conditions may be less effective than changes in winter conditions in influencing surface melt transport.

  1. Network representation of pore scale imagery for percolation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klise, K. A.; McKenna, S. A.; Read, E.; Karpyn, Z. T.; Celauro, J.

    2012-12-01

    Multiphase flow under capillary dominated flow regimes is driven by an intricate relationship between pore geometry, material and fluid properties. In this research, high-resolution micro-computed tomography (CT) imaging experiments are used to investigate structural and surface properties of bead packs, and how they influence percolation pathways. Coreflood experiments use a mix of hydrophilic and hydrophobic beads to track the influence of variable contact angle on capillary flow. While high-resolution CT images can render micron scale representation of the pore space, data must be upscaled to capture pore and pore throat geometry for use in percolation models. In this analysis, the pore space is upscaled into a network representation based on properties of the medial axis. Finding the medial axis using micron scale images is computationally expensive. Here, we compare the efficiency and accuracy of medial axes using erosion-based and watershed algorithms. The resulting network representation is defined as a ball-and-stick model which represents pores and pore throats. The ball-and-stick model can be further reduced by eliminating sections of the network that fall below a capillary pressure threshold. In a system of mixed hydrophilic and hydrophobic beads, capillary pressure can change significantly throughout the network based on the interaction between surface and fluid properties. The upscaled network representations are used in percolation models to estimate transport pathway. Current results use a basic percolation model that sequentially fills neighboring pores with the highest potential. Future work will expand the percolation model to include additional mechanics, such as trapping, vacating pores, and viscous fingering. Results from the coreflood experiments will be used to validate upscaling techniques and percolation models. Preliminary results show that the relative strength of water-wet and oil-wet surfaces has a significant impact on percolation. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  2. Percolation exponents and thresholds obtained from the nearly ideal continuum percolation system graphite-boron nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; McLachlan, D.S.

    1997-07-01

    Compressed disks made from graphite and, its mechanical but not electrical isomorph, boron nitride as well as graphite-boron nitride powders, undergoing compression, are nearly ideal continuum percolation systems, as the ratio of their conductivities is nearly 10{sup {minus}18} and the scatter of the experimental points near the critical volume fraction {phi}{sub c} is very small. The following measurements, with the characteristic exponent(s) in brackets, are made on some or all of the samples in (axial) and at right angles (radial) to the direction of compression, as a function of the volume fraction of graphite ({phi}); dc conductivity (s and t), dielectric constant (s), magnetoresistivity (t{sub {perpendicular}}), and noise power (K). The noise power is also measured as function of resistance (w) and volume (b{sup {prime}}). The {phi}{sub c}{close_quote}s obtained for all measurements are consistent and explicable. The results for the exponents are less well understood but, where possible, these results are compared with theoretical predictions and previous experiments. The reasons for the nonuniversality of t are clarified. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. Recycling of Reinforced Plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, R. D.; Collins, Andrew; Cooper, Duncan; Wingfield-Digby, Mark; Watts-Farmer, Archibald; Laurence, Anna; Patel, Kayur; Stevens, Mark; Watkins, Rhodri

    2014-02-01

    This work has shown is that it is possible to recycle continuous and short fibre reinforced thermosetting resins while keeping almost the whole of the original material, both fibres and matrix, within the recyclate. By splitting, crushing hot or cold, and hot forming, it is possible to create a recyclable material, which we designate a Remat, which can then be used to remanufacture other shapes, examples of plates and tubes being demonstrated. Not only can remanufacturing be done, but it has been shown that over 50 % of the original mechanical properties, such as the E modulus, tensile strength, and interlaminar shear strength, can be retained. Four different forms of composite were investigated, a random mat Glass Fibre Reinforced Plastic (GFRP) bathroom component and boat hull, woven glass and carbon fibre cloth impregnated with an epoxy resin, and unidirectional carbon fibre pre-preg. One of the main factors found to affect composite recyclability was the type of resin matrix used in the composite. Thermoset resins tested were shown to have a temperature range around the Glass Transition Temperature (Tg) where they exhibit ductile behaviour, hence aiding reforming of the material. The high-grade carbon fibre prepreg was found to be less easy to recycle than the woven of random fibre laminates. One method of remanufacturing was by heating the Remat to above its glass transition temperature, bending it to shape, and then cooling it. However, unless precautions are taken, the geometric form may revert. This does not happen with the crushed material.

  4. The abundance threshold for plague as a critical percolation phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Davis, S; Trapman, P; Leirs, H; Begon, M; Heesterbeek, J A P

    2008-07-31

    Percolation theory is most commonly associated with the slow flow of liquid through a porous medium, with applications to the physical sciences. Epidemiological applications have been anticipated for disease systems where the host is a plant or volume of soil, and hence is fixed in space. However, no natural examples have been reported. The central question of interest in percolation theory, the possibility of an infinite connected cluster, corresponds in infectious disease to a positive probability of an epidemic. Archived records of plague (infection with Yersinia pestis) in populations of great gerbils (Rhombomys opimus) in Kazakhstan have been used to show that epizootics only occur when more than about 0.33 of the burrow systems built by the host are occupied by family groups. The underlying mechanism for this abundance threshold is unknown. Here we present evidence that it is a percolation threshold, which arises from the difference in scale between the movements that transport infectious fleas between family groups and the vast size of contiguous landscapes colonized by gerbils. Conventional theory predicts that abundance thresholds for the spread of infectious disease arise when transmission between hosts is density dependent such that the basic reproduction number (R(0)) increases with abundance, attaining 1 at the threshold. Percolation thresholds, however, are separate, spatially explicit thresholds that indicate long-range connectivity in a system and do not coincide with R(0) = 1. Abundance thresholds are the theoretical basis for attempts to manage infectious disease by reducing the abundance of susceptibles, including vaccination and the culling of wildlife. This first natural example of a percolation threshold in a disease system invites a re-appraisal of other invasion thresholds, such as those for epidemic viral infections in African lions (Panthera leo), and of other disease systems such as bovine tuberculosis (caused by Mycobacterium bovis) in badgers (Meles meles). PMID:18668107

  5. Conductive paint-filled cement paste sensor for accelerated percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laflamme, Simon; Pinto, Irvin; Saleem, Hussam S.; Elkashef, Mohamed; Wang, Kejin; Cochran, Eric

    2015-04-01

    Cementitious-based strain sensors can be used as robust monitoring systems for civil engineering applications, such as road pavements and historic structures. To enable large-scale deployments, the fillers used in creating a conductive material must be inexpensive and easy to mix homogeneously. Carbon black (CB) particles constitute a promising filler due to their low cost and ease of dispersion. However, a relatively high quantity of these particles needs to be mixed with cement in order to reach the percolation threshold. Such level may influence the physical properties of the cementitious material itself, such as compressive and tensile strengths. In this paper, we investigate the possibility of utilizing a polymer to create conductive chains of CB more quickly than in a cementitious-only medium. This way, while the resulting material would have a higher conductivity, the percolation threshold would be reached with fewer CB particles. Building on the principle that the percolation threshold provides great sensing sensitivity, it would be possible to fabricate sensors using less conducting particles. We present results from a preliminary investigation comparing the utilization of a conductive paint fabricated from a poly-Styrene-co-Ethylene-co-Butylene-co-Styrene (SEBS) polymer matrix and CB, and CB-only as fillers to create cementitious sensors. Preliminary results show that the percolation threshold can be attained with significantly less CB using the SEBS+CB mix. Also, the study of the strain sensing properties indicates that the SEBS+CB sensor has a strain sensitivity comparable to the one of a CB-only cementitious sensor when comparing specimens fabricated at their respective percolation thresholds.

  6. Improved purification of Piscirickettsia salmonis using Percoll gradients.

    PubMed

    Yuksel, S A; Thompson, K D; Ellis, A E; Adams, A

    2006-08-01

    Viable preparations of intact Piscirickettsia salmonis, purified from host cell material, are necessary for studying characteristics associated with this bacterium. However, purification of the organism is difficult due to its obligate intracellular nature. A simple and effective method for isolating whole P. salmonis, which is quick and easy to perform, but still maintains the viability and antigenicity of the bacterium is described. P. salmonis was purified by differential pelleting and density gradient centrifugation using 30%, 40%, or 50% (v/v) Percoll gradients. Following fractionation, a band with a density of 1.056-1.080 was found to be composed entirely of rickettsiae, confirmed by fluorescent antibody technique (IFAT). Purity of the P. salmonis from different stages of the purification process was assessed by light and transmission electron microscopy, and the viability of yields determined from a plaque assay and a tissue culture infective dose (TCID(50) ml(-1)). P. salmonis recovered from the 30% Percoll gradient appeared to retain their intracellular structure better than P. salmonis obtained from the 40% and 50% Percoll gradients, and appeared to have a greater viability. Differences were seen between P. salmonis-infected CHSE-214 cells and purified P. salmonis when compared by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting, and less host cell contamination was present in preparations obtained from the 30% Percoll gradient. Finally ten different P. salmonis isolates obtained from three different geographical locations and four different fish species, were purified using the 30% Percoll gradient. When the morphology of these was compared by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), they appeared similar in size and appearance, although isolate R980769 was highly pleomorphic and isolate R-29 was larger than the other isolates examined. PMID:16434115

  7. Catalytic Organometallic Reactions of Ammonia

    PubMed Central

    Klinkenberg, Jessica L.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, ammonia had rarely succumbed to catalytic transformations with homogeneous catalysts, and the development of such reactions that are selective for the formation of single products under mild conditions has encountered numerous challenges. However, recently developed catalysts have allowed several classes of reactions to create products with nitrogen-containing functional groups from ammonia. These reactions include hydroaminomethylation, reductive amination, alkylation, allylic substitution, hydroamination, and cross-coupling. This Minireview describes examples of these processes and the factors that control catalyst activity and selectivity. PMID:20857466

  8. Who owns the recyclables

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, B.

    1994-05-01

    On March 31, the California Supreme Court decided the much awaited Rancho Mirage'' case (Waste Management of the Desert, Inc., and the City of Rancho Mirage v. Palm Springs Recycling Center, Inc.), and held that the California Integrated Waste Management Act of 1989 does not allow an exclusive franchise for the collection of recyclables not discarded by their owner.'' This ends a three-year slugfest between secondary materials processors in the state and municipalities and their franchised garbage haulers who also collect and process recyclables as part of their exclusive arrangement. Central to this nationally-watched litigation is a most fundamental question in waste management: at what point in time do articles in the solid waste stream become actual or potentially valuable secondary materials

  9. Scrap tire recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Lula, J.W.; Bohnert, G.W.

    1997-03-01

    As the automobile tire technology has grown and met the need for safer and more durable tires, stronger reinforcement and more chemically resistant rubber compounds have made recycling tires more difficult. In an effort to resolve this problem, techniques and equipment were developed to grind tires into small pieces, and new markets were sought to utilize the crumb rubber product streams from ground tires. Industrial combustion processes were modified to accept scrap tires as fuel. These efforts have been beneficial, steadily increasing the percentage of scrap tires recycled to about 10% in 1985, and reaching 72% in 1995. By the end of 1997, fully 100% of tires generated in the U.S. are expected to be recycled.

  10. Recycle of battery components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pemsler, J. P.; Spitz, R. A.

    The recycle disposal scenario for the batteries nickel/zinc, nickel/iron, zinc/chlorine, zinc/bromine, sodium/sulfur and lithium-aluminum/metal sulfide was considered. Flowsheets are presented which include disassembly, materials handling, melting or solubization, liquid/solid separations, purifications and waste handling. Material and energy balances are provided for all major streams and capital and operating costs for typical plant sizes are presented. Recycle is a a viable option in all cases. Recommendations are made for the best process options and for additional studies on the sodium/sulfur and lithium-aluminum/metal sulfide batteries.

  11. Ammonia emissions from cattle feeding operations.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ammonia is a colorless gas with an pungent odor that occurs naturally in trace amounts in the atmosphere, where it is the dominant base. Ammonia is produced during the decomposition of livestock manure. There is concern about atmospheric ammonia because of its potential effects on air quality, wat...

  12. 46 CFR 154.1760 - Liquid ammonia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Liquid ammonia. 154.1760 Section 154.1760 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR....1760 Liquid ammonia. The master shall ensure that no person sprays liquid ammonia into a cargo...

  13. 27 CFR 21.96 - Ammonia, aqueous.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ammonia, aqueous. 21.96 Section 21.96 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Ammonia, aqueous. (a) Alkalinity. Strongly alkaline to litmus. (b) Ammonia content. 27 to 30 percent...

  14. 46 CFR 154.1760 - Liquid ammonia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Liquid ammonia. 154.1760 Section 154.1760 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR....1760 Liquid ammonia. The master shall ensure that no person sprays liquid ammonia into a cargo...

  15. 27 CFR 21.96 - Ammonia, aqueous.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ammonia, aqueous. 21.96 Section 21.96 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Ammonia, aqueous. (a) Alkalinity. Strongly alkaline to litmus. (b) Ammonia content. 27 to 30 percent...

  16. 46 CFR 154.1760 - Liquid ammonia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Liquid ammonia. 154.1760 Section 154.1760 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR....1760 Liquid ammonia. The master shall ensure that no person sprays liquid ammonia into a cargo...

  17. 27 CFR 21.96 - Ammonia, aqueous.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ammonia, aqueous. 21.96 Section 21.96 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Ammonia, aqueous. (a) Alkalinity. Strongly alkaline to litmus. (b) Ammonia content. 27 to 30 percent...

  18. 27 CFR 21.96 - Ammonia, aqueous.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ammonia, aqueous. 21.96 Section 21.96 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Ammonia, aqueous. (a) Alkalinity. Strongly alkaline to litmus. (b) Ammonia content. 27 to 30 percent...

  19. 27 CFR 21.96 - Ammonia, aqueous.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ammonia, aqueous. 21.96 Section 21.96 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Ammonia, aqueous. (a) Alkalinity. Strongly alkaline to litmus. (b) Ammonia content. 27 to 30 percent...

  20. 46 CFR 154.1760 - Liquid ammonia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Liquid ammonia. 154.1760 Section 154.1760 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR....1760 Liquid ammonia. The master shall ensure that no person sprays liquid ammonia into a cargo...

  1. 46 CFR 154.1760 - Liquid ammonia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Liquid ammonia. 154.1760 Section 154.1760 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR....1760 Liquid ammonia. The master shall ensure that no person sprays liquid ammonia into a cargo...

  2. Glycopyrrolate in toxic exposure to ammonia gas.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, A; Mahi, S; Sharma, N; Singh, S

    2011-01-01

    Ammonia (NH(3)) is a highly water-soluble, colorless, irritant gas with a unique pungent odor. Liquid ammonia stored under high pressure is still widely used for refrigeration in cold stores used for storing grains. Severe toxicity may occur following accidental exposure. We report an interesting case of accidental exposure to ammonia treated with glycopyrrolate along with other supportive measures. PMID:21633586

  3. Hydrogen production using ammonia borane

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Charles W; Baker, R. Thomas; Semelsberger, Troy A; Shrestha, Roshan P

    2013-12-24

    Hydrogen ("H.sub.2") is produced when ammonia borane reacts with a catalyst complex of the formula L.sub.nM-X wherein M is a base metal such as iron, X is an anionic nitrogen- or phosphorus-based ligand or hydride, and L is a neutral ancillary ligand that is a neutral monodentate or polydentate ligand.

  4. Ammonia excretion by Azobacter chroococcum

    SciTech Connect

    Narula, N.; Lakshminarayana, K.; Tauro, P.

    1981-02-01

    In recent years, research has focused attention on the development of biological systems for nitrogen fixation. In this report, two strains of Azotobacter chroococcum are identified which can excrete as much as 45 mg ammonia/ml of the culture broth in a sucrose supplemented synthetic medium.

  5. Recycling Decisions and Green Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lave, Lester B.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Explores the facts and perceptions regarding recycling, what can be done to make products more environmentally compatible, and how to think about recycling decisions in a more helpful way. (Contains 39 references.) (MDH)

  6. Critical Behaviors and Universality Classes of Percolation Phase Transitions on Two-Dimensional Square Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yong; Yang, Zi-Qing; Zhang, Xin; Chen, Xiao-Song

    2015-08-01

    We have investigated both site and bond percolation on two-dimensional lattice under the random rule and the product rule respectively. With the random rule, sites or bonds are added randomly into the lattice. From two candidates picked randomly, the site or bond with the smaller size product of two connected clusters is added when the product rule is taken. Not only the size of the largest cluster but also its size jump are studied to characterize the universality class of percolation. The finite-size scaling forms of giant cluster size and size jump are proposed and used to determine the critical exponents of percolation from Monte Carlo data. It is found that the critical exponents of both size and size jump in random site percolation are equal to that in random bond percolation. With the random rule, site and bond percolation belong to the same universality class. We obtain the critical exponents of the site percolation under the product rule, which are different from that of both random percolation and the bond percolation under the product rule. The universality class of site percolation differs different from that of bond percolation when the product rule is used. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11121403

  7. How Inhomogeneous Site Percolation Works on Bethe Lattices: Theory and Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jingli; Zhang, Liying; Siegmund, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    Inhomogeneous percolation, for its closer relationship with real-life, can be more useful and reasonable than homogeneous percolation to illustrate the critical phenomena and dynamical behaviour of complex networks. However, due to its intricacy, the theoretical framework of inhomogeneous percolation is far from being complete and many challenging problems are still open. In this paper, we first investigate inhomogeneous site percolation on Bethe Lattices with two occupation probabilities, and then extend the result to percolation with m occupation probabilities. The critical behaviour of this inhomogeneous percolation is shown clearly by formulating the percolation probability with given occupation probability p, the critical occupation probability , and the average cluster size where p is subject to . Moreover, using the above theory, we discuss in detail the diffusion behaviour of an infectious disease (SARS) and present specific disease-control strategies in consideration of groups with different infection probabilities.

  8. How Inhomogeneous Site Percolation Works on Bethe Lattices: Theory and Application.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jingli; Zhang, Liying; Siegmund, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Inhomogeneous percolation, for its closer relationship with real-life, can be more useful and reasonable than homogeneous percolation to illustrate the critical phenomena and dynamical behaviour of complex networks. However, due to its intricacy, the theoretical framework of inhomogeneous percolation is far from being complete and many challenging problems are still open. In this paper, we first investigate inhomogeneous site percolation on Bethe Lattices with two occupation probabilities, and then extend the result to percolation with m occupation probabilities. The critical behaviour of this inhomogeneous percolation is shown clearly by formulating the percolation probability with given occupation probability p, the critical occupation probability , and the average cluster size where p is subject to . Moreover, using the above theory, we discuss in detail the diffusion behaviour of an infectious disease (SARS) and present specific disease-control strategies in consideration of groups with different infection probabilities. PMID:26926785

  9. How Inhomogeneous Site Percolation Works on Bethe Lattices: Theory and Application

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jingli; Zhang, Liying; Siegmund, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Inhomogeneous percolation, for its closer relationship with real-life, can be more useful and reasonable than homogeneous percolation to illustrate the critical phenomena and dynamical behaviour of complex networks. However, due to its intricacy, the theoretical framework of inhomogeneous percolation is far from being complete and many challenging problems are still open. In this paper, we first investigate inhomogeneous site percolation on Bethe Lattices with two occupation probabilities, and then extend the result to percolation with m occupation probabilities. The critical behaviour of this inhomogeneous percolation is shown clearly by formulating the percolation probability with given occupation probability p, the critical occupation probability , and the average cluster size where p is subject to . Moreover, using the above theory, we discuss in detail the diffusion behaviour of an infectious disease (SARS) and present specific disease-control strategies in consideration of groups with different infection probabilities. PMID:26926785

  10. The Recycle Team.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Roger; And Others

    This guide provides lessons that enable students to learn how important it is for each of us to take care of the environment by minimizing the problems caused by too much trash. In the 10 lessons included here, students and their families learn how they can be part of the solution by practicing source reduction and by reusing, recycling, and…

  11. Recycling, Rethinking, and Retraining.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, William E.

    The issues and problems confronted by a professor of literature when asked to teach a technical writing course for engineers are related in this paper. The first section of the paper explains how the professor was "recycled" from a teacher of literature to a professor of technical writing at his college. The second section describes some of the…

  12. Recycled Insect Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rule, Audrey C.; Meyer, Mary Ann

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an engaging activity in which high school students use a dichotomous key to guide the creation and classification of model insects from recycled plastic lids and containers. Besides teaching the use of a dichotomous key and the effect of evolutionary descent upon groupings of organisms, this activity focuses on an…

  13. Recycling Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallowell, Anne; And Others

    This study guide was designed to help teachers and students understand the problems surrounding solid wastes. It includes an overview of solid waste and recycling, a glossary, suggested activities and a list of resource publications, audiovisual materials and organizations. There are 19 activity suggestions included in this guide designed for use…

  14. Recycling for radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoare, Melvin

    2012-02-01

    Melvin Hoare, Steve Rawlings and the CUGA consortium look forward to the potential offered by recycling the ˜30 m class antennas at Goonhilly Earth Station in Cornwall, including a new deep-space tracking facility, research and training, and the possibility of enhancing the e-MERLIN array.

  15. Helium-Recycling Plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Joseph

    1996-01-01

    Proposed system recovers and stores helium gas for reuse. Maintains helium at 99.99-percent purity, preventing water vapor from atmosphere or lubricating oil from pumps from contaminating gas. System takes in gas at nearly constant low back pressure near atmospheric pressure; introduces little or no back pressure into source of helium. Concept also extended to recycling of other gases.

  16. Recycled Insect Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rule, Audrey C.; Meyer, Mary Ann

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an engaging activity in which high school students use a dichotomous key to guide the creation and classification of model insects from recycled plastic lids and containers. Besides teaching the use of a dichotomous key and the effect of evolutionary descent upon groupings of organisms, this activity focuses on an

  17. Computer Recycling Farm USA

    USGS conducted a study of plastic pollution at this rural US site in the Midwest.  The recycler was receiving computers from companies at a rate which greatly exceeded the capacity of the operation.  Approximately 50,000 computers remained outdoors on 15 acres for nearly a decade.  The site has sinc...

  18. RECYCLABILITY INDEX FOR AUTOMOBILES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The project's purpose is to create a rating system for the ecological impacts of vehicles at the end of their life based on recyclability, toxic material content, and ultimate disposal. Each year, 10-11 million vehicles are retired from service in the United States. The vehi...

  19. Fuels from Recycling Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tillman, David A.

    1975-01-01

    Three systems, operating at sufficient scale, produce fuels that may be alternatives to oil and gas. These three recycling systems are: Black Clawson Fiberclaim, Franklin, Ohio; Union Carbide, South Charleston, West Virginia; and Union Electric, St. Louis, Missouri. These produce a wet fuel, a pyrolytic gas, and a dry fuel, respectively. (BT)

  20. Recycling Behavior: A Multidimensional Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meneses, Gonzalo Diaz; Palacio, Asuncion Beerli

    2005-01-01

    This work centers on the study of consumer recycling roles to examine the sociodemographic and psychographic profile of the distribution of recycling tasks and roles within the household. With this aim in mind, an empirical work was carried out, the results of which suggest that recycling behavior is multidimensional and comprises the undertaking

  1. Recycling Behavior: A Multidimensional Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meneses, Gonzalo Diaz; Palacio, Asuncion Beerli

    2005-01-01

    This work centers on the study of consumer recycling roles to examine the sociodemographic and psychographic profile of the distribution of recycling tasks and roles within the household. With this aim in mind, an empirical work was carried out, the results of which suggest that recycling behavior is multidimensional and comprises the undertaking…

  2. Recycling of the #5 polymer.

    PubMed

    Xanthos, Marino

    2012-08-10

    Polypropylene (PP) is a widely used plastic with consumer applications ranging from food packaging to automotive parts, including car battery casings. To differentiate it from other recyclable plastics, it is designated as #5. Here, the factors contributing to PP recycling rates are briefly reviewed. Considerations include collection and separation efficiency, processing chemistry, and market dynamics for the products derived from recyclates. PMID:22879510

  3. Colloidal suspensions of C-particles: Entanglement, percolation and microrheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoell, Christian; Löwen, Hartmut

    2016-05-01

    We explore structural and dynamical behavior of concentrated colloidal suspensions made up by C-shape particles using Brownian dynamics computer simulations and theory. In particular, we focus on the entanglement process between nearby particles for almost closed C-shapes with a small opening angle. Depending on the opening angle and the particle concentration, there is a percolation transition for the cluster of entangled particles which shows the classical scaling characteristics. In a broad density range below the percolation threshold, we find a stretched exponential function for the dynamical decorrelation of the entanglement process. Finally, we study a setup typical in microrheology by dragging a single tagged particle with constant speed through the suspension. We measure the cluster connected to and dragged with this tagged particle. In agreement with a phenomenological theory, the size of the dragged cluster depends on the dragging direction and increases markedly with the dragging speed.

  4. Random geometric graph description of connectedness percolation in rod systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Avik P.; Grimaldi, Claudio

    2015-09-01

    The problem of continuum percolation in dispersions of rods is reformulated in terms of weighted random geometric graphs. Nodes (or sites or vertices) in the graph represent spatial locations occupied by the centers of the rods. The probability that an edge (or link) connects any randomly selected pair of nodes depends upon the rod volume fraction as well as the distribution over their sizes and shapes, and also upon quantities that characterize their state of dispersion (such as the orientational distribution function). We employ the observation that contributions from closed loops of connected rods are negligible in the limit of large aspect ratios to obtain percolation thresholds that are fully equivalent to those calculated within the second-virial approximation of the connectedness Ornstein-Zernike equation. Our formulation can account for effects due to interactions between the rods, and many-body features can be partially addressed by suitable choices for the edge probabilities.

  5. Percolation modeling of self-damaging of composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domanskyi, Sergii; Privman, Vladimir

    2014-07-01

    We propose the concept of autonomous self-damaging in “smart” composite materials, controlled by activation of added nanosize “damaging” capsules. Percolation-type modeling approach earlier applied to the related concept of self-healing materials, is used to investigate the behavior of the initial material's fatigue. We aim at achieving a relatively sharp drop in the material's integrity after some initial limited fatigue develops in the course of the sample's usage. Our theoretical study considers a two-dimensional lattice model and involves Monte Carlo simulations of the connectivity and conductance in the high-connectivity regime of percolation. We give several examples of local capsule-lattice and capsule-capsule activation rules and show that the desired self-damaging property can only be obtained with rather sophisticated “smart” material's response involving not just damaging but also healing capsules.

  6. The September 11 attack: A percolation of individual passive support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galam, S.

    2002-04-01

    A model to terrorism is presented using the theory of percolation. Terrorism power is related to the spontaneous formation of random backbones of people who are sympathetic to terrorism but without being directly involved in it. They just don't oppose in case they could. In the past such friendly-to-terrorism backbones have been always existing but were of finite size and localized to a given geographical area. The September 11 terrorist attack on the US has revealed for the first time the existence of a world wide spread extension. It is argued to have result from a sudden world percolation of otherwise unconnected and dormant world spread backbones of passive supporters. The associated strategic question is then to determine if collecting ground information could have predict and thus avoid such a transition. Our results show the answer is no, voiding the major criticism against intelligence services. To conclude the impact of military action is discussed.

  7. Simultaneous analysis of three-dimensional percolation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiao; Wang, Junfeng; Lv, Jian-Ping; Deng, Youjin

    2014-02-01

    We simulate the bond and site percolation models on several three-dimensional lattices, including the diamond, body-centered cubic, and face-centered cubic lattices. As on the simple-cubic lattice [ Phys. Rev. E, 2013, 87(5): 052107], it is observed that in comparison with dimensionless ratios based on cluster-size distribution, certain wrapping probabilities exhibit weaker finite-size corrections and are more sensitive to the deviation from percolation threshold p c , and thus provide a powerful means for determining p c . We analyze the numerical data of the wrapping probabilities simultaneously such that universal parameters are shared by the aforementioned models, and thus significantly improved estimates of p c are obtained.

  8. Percolation model of polydisperse composite solid propellant combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Kerstein, A.R.

    1987-07-01

    The composition dependence of the burn rate of polydisperse composite solid propellants is predicted by analyzing the least-time path of the burn front through the propellant. The predicted burn rate is the average burn rate along the least-time path divided by the tortuosity, or arc length per streamwise interval, of the least-time path. The tortuosity analysis is based on percolation theory. Aspects of percolation theory which are pertinent to the analysis are introduced in a self-contained Appendix. The model, which contains four adjustable parameters, is validated by comparison to measured burn rates for a suite of polydisperse ammonium perchlorate composites. The data correlations are found to be significantly better than for a three-parameter version of the model which omits tortuosity considerations.

  9. Colloidal suspensions of C-particles: Entanglement, percolation and microrheology.

    PubMed

    Hoell, Christian; Löwen, Hartmut

    2016-05-01

    We explore structural and dynamical behavior of concentrated colloidal suspensions made up by C-shape particles using Brownian dynamics computer simulations and theory. In particular, we focus on the entanglement process between nearby particles for almost closed C-shapes with a small opening angle. Depending on the opening angle and the particle concentration, there is a percolation transition for the cluster of entangled particles which shows the classical scaling characteristics. In a broad density range below the percolation threshold, we find a stretched exponential function for the dynamical decorrelation of the entanglement process. Finally, we study a setup typical in microrheology by dragging a single tagged particle with constant speed through the suspension. We measure the cluster connected to and dragged with this tagged particle. In agreement with a phenomenological theory, the size of the dragged cluster depends on the dragging direction and increases markedly with the dragging speed. PMID:27155650

  10. Price of anarchy is maximized at the percolation threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, Brian

    2015-05-01

    When many independent users try to route traffic through a network, the flow can easily become suboptimal as a consequence of congestion of the most efficient paths. The degree of this suboptimality is quantified by the so-called price of anarchy (POA), but so far there are no general rules for when to expect a large POA in a random network. Here I address this question by introducing a simple model of flow through a network with randomly placed congestible and incongestible links. I show that the POA is maximized precisely when the fraction of congestible links matches the percolation threshold of the lattice. Both the POA and the total cost demonstrate critical scaling near the percolation threshold.

  11. Quantum walk coherences on a dynamical percolation graph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elster, Fabian; Barkhofen, Sonja; Nitsche, Thomas; Novotný, Jaroslav; Gábris, Aurél; Jex, Igor; Silberhorn, Christine

    2015-08-01

    Coherent evolution governs the behaviour of all quantum systems, but in nature it is often subjected to influence of a classical environment. For analysing quantum transport phenomena quantum walks emerge as suitable model systems. In particular, quantum walks on percolation structures constitute an attractive platform for studying open system dynamics of random media. Here, we present an implementation of quantum walks differing from the previous experiments by achieving dynamical control of the underlying graph structure. We demonstrate the evolution of an optical time-multiplexed quantum walk over six double steps, revealing the intricate interplay between the internal and external degrees of freedom. The observation of clear non-Markovian signatures in the coin space testifies the high coherence of the implementation and the extraordinary degree of control of all system parameters. Our work is the proof-of-principle experiment of a quantum walk on a dynamical percolation graph, paving the way towards complex simulation of quantum transport in random media.

  12. Continuous percolation transition in suppressed random cluster growth model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Bappaditya; Santra, S. B.

    2016-05-01

    A new suppressed cluster growth model on 2D square lattice combining Hoshen-Kopelman and Leath approaches is studied here. The lattice sites are initially occupied randomly with probability (ρ). The empty perimeter sites of the clusters of occupied sites are grown with a cluster size dependent probability. The growth probability is then lowest for the largest cluster and highest for the smallest cluster. At the end of growth process all the cluster related quantities are estimated and they are found to display power law scaling as in percolation transition. However, the values of the critical exponents vary continuously with ρ, the initial seed concentration. At higher values of ρ, the model belongs the percolation universality class.

  13. Stochastic Loewner evolution relates anomalous diffusion and anisotropic percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Credidio, Heitor F.; Moreira, André A.; Herrmann, Hans J.; Andrade, José S.

    2016-04-01

    We disclose the origin of anisotropic percolation perimeters in terms of the stochastic Loewner evolution (SLE) process. Precisely, our results from extensive numerical simulations indicate that the perimeters of multilayered and directed percolation clusters at criticality are the scaling limits of the Loewner evolution of an anomalous Brownian motion, being superdiffusive and subdiffusive, respectively. The connection between anomalous diffusion and fractal anisotropy is further tested by using long-range power-law correlated time series (fractional Brownian motion) as the driving functions in the evolution process. The fact that the resulting traces are distinctively anisotropic corroborates our hypothesis. Under the conceptual framework of SLE, our study therefore reveals different perspectives for mathematical and physical interpretations of non-Markovian processes in terms of anisotropic paths at criticality and vice versa.

  14. Percolation threshold determines the optimal population density for public cooperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen; Szolnoki, Attila; Perc, Matjaž

    2012-03-01

    While worldwide census data provide statistical evidence that firmly link the population density with several indicators of social welfare, the precise mechanisms underlying these observations are largely unknown. Here we study the impact of population density on the evolution of public cooperation in structured populations and find that the optimal density is uniquely related to the percolation threshold of the host graph irrespective of its topological details. We explain our observations by showing that spatial reciprocity peaks in the vicinity of the percolation threshold, when the emergence of a giant cooperative cluster is hindered neither by vacancy nor by invading defectors, thus discovering an intuitive yet universal law that links the population density with social prosperity.

  15. Fire spread and percolation in polydisperse compartment structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zekri, N.; Zekri, L.; Lallemand, C.; Pizzo, Y.; Kaiss, A.; Clerc, J.-P.; Porterie, B.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we employ a cellular automata and percolation analysis to model fire spread in polydisperse amorphous massively multi-compartmented structures (e.g. naval vessels, high-rise buildings, warehouses, or nuclear plants). Various shapes and sizes of compartments are considered. Each compartment is composed of nc equal-size cells. It is found that increasing nc increases fingering and lacunarities of fire patterns, and subsequently front roughness. However, this also increases the probability of fire propagation throughout the system as the percolation threshold presents a power-law decrease with nc -1 for small values of nc. For large polydisperse compartments, the propagation/non propagation transition seems to be size-independent. A special emphasis is put on the dynamics of fire propagation. Further study is needed to evaluate network properties that should help in developing better strategies to reduce fire consequences.

  16. Fractal structure of equipotential curves on a continuum percolation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsutani, Shigeki; Shimosako, Yoshiyuki; Wang, Yunhong

    2012-12-01

    We numerically investigate the electric potential distribution over a two-dimensional continuum percolation model between the electrodes. The model consists of overlapped conductive particles on the background with an infinitesimal conductivity. Using the finite difference method, we solve the generalized Laplace equation and show that in the potential distribution, there appear quasi-equipotential clusters which approximately and locally have the same values as steps and stairs. Since the quasi-equipotential clusters have the fractal structure, we compute the fractal dimension of equipotential curves and its dependence on the volume fraction over [0,1]. The fractal dimension in [1.00, 1.246] has a peak at the percolation threshold pc.

  17. Mesoscale modeling of intergranular bubble percolation in nuclear fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millett, Paul C.; Tonks, Michael; Biner, S. B.

    2012-04-01

    Phase-field simulations are used to examine the variability of intergranular fission gas bubble growth and percolation on uranium dioxide grain boundaries on a mesoscopic length scale. Three key parameters are systematically varied in this study: the contact angle (or dihedral angle) defining the bubble shape, the initial bubble density on the grain boundary plane, and the ratio of the gas diffusivity on the grain boundary versus the grain interiors. The simulation results agree well with previous experimental data obtained for bubble densities and average bubble areas during coalescence events. Interestingly, the rate of percolation is found to be highly variable, with a large dependency on the contact angle and the initial bubble density and little-to-no dependency on the grain boundary gas diffusivity.

  18. A Cluster-Size Averaging Model for Strongly Discontinuous Percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Yuhei; Yamazaki, Yoshihiro

    2016-05-01

    We propose a network percolation model, called cut-off model, which exhibits strongly discontinuous transition by an averaging effect of cluster sizes. In this model, a randomly selected bond is added if the size of the cluster formed by the bond is less than a times of the mean cluster size. It is shown that the model is strongly discontinuous when a is a finite constant.

  19. Two-dimensional protonic percolation on lightly hydrated purple membrane

    PubMed Central

    Rupley, John A.; Siemankowski, Linda; Careri, Giorgio; Bruni, Fabio

    1988-01-01

    The capacitance and dielectric loss factor were measured for a sample of purple membrane of Halobacterium halobium as a function of hydration level (0.017 to >0.2 g of water/g of membrane) and frequency (10 kHz to 10 MHz). The capacitance and the derived conductivity show explosive growth above a threshold hydration level, hc ≈ 0.0456. The conductivity shows a deuterium isotope effect, H/2H = 1.38, in close agreement with expectation for a protonic process. The level hc is frequency independent and shows no deuterium isotope effect. These properties are analogous to those found for lysozyme in a related study. Protonic conduction for the purple membrane can be considered, as for lysozyme, within the framework of a percolation model. The critical exponent, t, which describes the conductivity of a percolative system near the threshold, has the value 1.23. This number is in close agreement with expectation from theory for a two-dimensional percolative process. The dielectric properties of the purple membrane are more complex than those of lysozyme, seen in the value of hc and in the frequency and hydration dependence of the loss factor. There appear to be preferred regions of proton conduction. The percolation model is based upon stochastic behavior of a system partially populated with conducting elements. This model suggests that ion transport in membranes and its control can be based on pathways formed of randomly connected conducting elements and that a fixed geometry (a proton wire) is not the only possible basis for a mechanism of conduction. PMID:16593999

  20. Transfer matrix computation of generalized critical polynomials in percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scullard, Christian R.; Lykke Jacobsen, Jesper

    2012-12-01

    Percolation thresholds have recently been studied by means of a graph polynomial PB(p), henceforth referred to as the critical polynomial, that may be defined on any periodic lattice. The polynomial depends on a finite subgraph B, called the basis, and the way in which the basis is tiled to form the lattice. The unique root of PB(p) in [0, 1] either gives the exact percolation threshold for the lattice, or provides an approximation that becomes more accurate with appropriately increasing size of B. Initially PB(p) was defined by a contraction-deletion identity, similar to that satisfied by the Tutte polynomial. Here, we give an alternative probabilistic definition of PB(p), which allows for much more efficient computations, by using the transfer matrix, than was previously possible with contraction-deletion. We present bond percolation polynomials for the (4, 82), kagome, and (3, 122) lattices for bases of up to respectively 96, 162 and 243 edges, much larger than the previous limit of 36 edges using contraction-deletion. We discuss in detail the role of the symmetries and the embedding of B. For the largest bases, we obtain the thresholds pc(4, 82) = 0.676 803 329…, pc(kagome) = 0.524 404 998…, pc(3, 122) = 0.740 420 798…, comparable to the best simulation results. We also show that the alternative definition of PB(p) can be applied to study site percolation problems. This article is part of ‘Lattice models and integrability’, a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical in honour of F Y Wu's 80th birthday.

  1. Cell Invasion in Collagen Scaffold Architectures Characterized by Percolation Theory.

    PubMed

    Ashworth, Jennifer C; Mehr, Marco; Buxton, Paul G; Best, Serena M; Cameron, Ruth E

    2015-06-24

    The relationship between biological scaffold interconnectivity and cell migration is an important but poorly understood factor in tissue regeneration. Here a scale-independent technique for characterization of collagen scaffold interconnectivity is presented, using a combination of X-ray microcomputed tomography and percolation theory. Confocal microscopy of connective tissue cells reveals this technique as highly relevant for determining the extent of cell invasion. PMID:25881025

  2. Cities and regions in Britain through hierarchical percolation.

    PubMed

    Arcaute, Elsa; Molinero, Carlos; Hatna, Erez; Murcio, Roberto; Vargas-Ruiz, Camilo; Masucci, A Paolo; Batty, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Urban systems present hierarchical structures at many different scales. These are observed as administrative regional delimitations which are the outcome of complex geographical, political and historical processes which leave almost indelible footprints on infrastructure such as the street network. In this work, we uncover a set of hierarchies in Britain at different scales using percolation theory on the street network and on its intersections which are the primary points of interaction and urban agglomeration. At the larger scales, the observed hierarchical structures can be interpreted as regional fractures of Britain, observed in various forms, from natural boundaries, such as National Parks, to regional divisions based on social class and wealth such as the well-known North-South divide. At smaller scales, cities are generated through recursive percolations on each of the emerging regional clusters. We examine the evolution of the morphology of the system as a whole, by measuring the fractal dimension of the clusters at each distance threshold in the percolation. We observe that this reaches a maximum plateau at a specific distance. The clusters defined at this distance threshold are in excellent correspondence with the boundaries of cities recovered from satellite images, and from previous methods using population density. PMID:27152211

  3. Scaling of clusters near discontinuous percolation transitions in hyperbolic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vijay; Boettcher, Stefan

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the onset of the discontinuous percolation transition in small-world hyperbolic networks by studying the systems-size scaling of the typical largest cluster approaching the transition, p ↗pc. To this end, we determine the average size of the largest cluster ˜NΨ (p) in the thermodynamic limit using real-space renormalization of cluster-generating functions for bond and site percolation in several models of hyperbolic networks that provide exact results. We determine that all our models conform to the recently predicted behavior regarding the growth of the largest cluster, which found diverging, albeit subextensive, clusters spanning the system with finite probability well below pc and at most quadratic corrections to unity in Ψ (p) for p ↗pc. Our study suggests a large universality in the cluster formation on small-world hyperbolic networks and the potential for an alternative mechanism in the cluster formation dynamics at the onset of discontinuous percolation transitions.

  4. Percolation and cooperation with mobile agents: Geometric and strategy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainstein, Mendeli H.; Brito, Carolina; Arenzon, Jeferson J.

    2014-08-01

    We study the conditions for persistent cooperation in an off-lattice model of mobile agents playing the Prisoner's Dilemma game with pure, unconditional strategies. Each agent has an exclusion radius rP, which accounts for the population viscosity, and an interaction radius rint, which defines the instantaneous contact network for the game dynamics. We show that, differently from the rP=0 case, the model with finite-sized agents presents a coexistence phase with both cooperators and defectors, besides the two absorbing phases, in which either cooperators or defectors dominate. We provide, in addition, a geometric interpretation of the transitions between phases. In analogy with lattice models, the geometric percolation of the contact network (i.e., irrespective of the strategy) enhances cooperation. More importantly, we show that the percolation of defectors is an essential condition for their survival. Differently from compact clusters of cooperators, isolated groups of defectors will eventually become extinct if not percolating, independently of their size.

  5. Onsite synthesis of thermally percolated nanocomposite for thermal interface material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obori, Masanao; Nita, Satoshi; Miura, Asuka; Shiomi, Junichiro

    2016-02-01

    To solve the problem of lack of thermal percolation in thermal interface materials (TIM), we propose a two-step synthesis method to realize thermally percolated nanofiber network in polymer matrix. First, by packing vapor grown carbon fibers (VGCFs) on top of aluminum heat sink and integrally sintering the whole material, the aluminum partially melts and connects the VGCF network, forming a continuous thermal path, i.e., realizing thermal percolation. Second, the pores in the hybrid network are filled by Silicone oil to obtain a polymer nanocomposite. The direct synthesis of VGCF-aluminum network on the heat sink (onsite synthesis) omits pasting process of the TIM, and thus, removes the restriction on the network morphology. By this onsite synthesis method, we reinforce thermal contact not only between the nanofibers but also between nanofibers and the heat sink. By testing the developed TIM for thermal contact to silicon surface, we demonstrate the potential to significantly reduce thermal contact resistance from what can be achieved by a conventional TIM.

  6. General and exact approach to percolation on random graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allard, Antoine; Hébert-Dufresne, Laurent; Young, Jean-Gabriel; Dubé, Louis J.

    2015-12-01

    We present a comprehensive and versatile theoretical framework to study site and bond percolation on clustered and correlated random graphs. Our contribution can be summarized in three main points. (i) We introduce a set of iterative equations that solve the exact distribution of the size and composition of components in finite-size quenched or random multitype graphs. (ii) We define a very general random graph ensemble that encompasses most of the models published to this day and also makes it possible to model structural properties not yet included in a theoretical framework. Site and bond percolation on this ensemble is solved exactly in the infinite-size limit using probability generating functions [i.e., the percolation threshold, the size, and the composition of the giant (extensive) and small components]. Several examples and applications are also provided. (iii) Our approach can be adapted to model interdependent graphs—whose most striking feature is the emergence of an extensive component via a discontinuous phase transition—in an equally general fashion. We show how a graph can successively undergo a continuous then a discontinuous phase transition, and preliminary results suggest that clustering increases the amplitude of the discontinuity at the transition.

  7. Analysis of Cavity Volumes in Proteins Using Percolation Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Sheridan; Jacobs, Donald; Farmer, Jenny

    Molecular packing is studied in a diverse set of globular proteins in their native state ranging in size from 34 to 839 residues An new algorithm has been developed that builds upon the classic Hoshen-Kopelman algorithm for site percolation combined with a local connection criterion that classifies empty space within a protein as a cavity when large enough to hold a spherical shaped probe of radius, R, otherwise a microvoid. Although microvoid cannot fit an object (e.g. molecule or ion) that is the size of the probe or larger, total microvoid volume is a major contribution to protein volume. Importantly, the cavity and microvoid classification depends on probe radius. As probe size decreases, less microvoid forms in favor of more cavities. As probe size is varied from large to small, many disconnected cavities merge to form a percolating path. For fixed probe size, microvoid, cavity and solvent accessible boundary volume properties reflect conformational fluctuations. These results are visualized on three-dimensional structures. Analysis of the cluster statistics within the framework of percolation theory suggests interconversion between microvoid and cavity pathways regulate the dynamics of solvent penetration during partial unfolding events important to protein function.

  8. The Fermi paradox: An approach based on percolation theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1993-01-01

    If even a very small fraction of the hundred billion stars in the galaxy are home to technological civilizations which colonize over interstellar distances, the entire galaxy could be completely colonized in a few million years. The absence of such extraterrestrial civilizations visiting Earth is the Fermi paradox. A model for interstellar colonization is proposed using the assumption that there is a maximum distance over which direct interstellar colonization is feasible. Due to the time lag involved in interstellar communications, it is assumed that an interstellar colony will rapidly develop a culture independent of the civilization that originally settled it. Any given colony will have a probability P of developing a colonizing civilization, and a probability (1-P) that it will develop a non-colonizing civilization. These assumptions lead to the colonization of the galaxy occuring as a percolation problem. In a percolation problem, there will be a critical value of percolation probability, P(sub c). For P less than P(sub c), colonization will always terminate after a finite number of colonies. Growth will occur in 'clusters', with the outside of each cluster consisting of non-colonizing civilizations. For P greater than P(sub c), small uncolonized voids will exist, bounded by non-colonizing civilizations. For P approximately = to P(sub c), arbitrarily large filled regions exist, and also arbitrarily large empty regions.

  9. Loopless nontrapping invasion-percolation model for fracking.

    PubMed

    Norris, J Quinn; Turcotte, Donald L; Rundle, John B

    2014-02-01

    Recent developments in hydraulic fracturing (fracking) have enabled the recovery of large quantities of natural gas and oil from old, low-permeability shales. These developments include a change from low-volume, high-viscosity fluid injection to high-volume, low-viscosity injection. The injected fluid introduces distributed damage that provides fracture permeability for the extraction of the gas and oil. In order to model this process, we utilize a loopless nontrapping invasion percolation previously introduced to model optimal polymers in a strongly disordered medium and for determining minimum energy spanning trees on a lattice. We performed numerical simulations on a two-dimensional square lattice and find significant differences from other percolation models. Additionally, we find that the growing fracture network satisfies both Horton-Strahler and Tokunaga network statistics. As with other invasion percolation models, our model displays burst dynamics, in which the cluster extends rapidly into a connected region. We introduce an alternative definition of bursts to be a consecutive series of opened bonds whose strengths are all below a specified value. Using this definition of bursts, we find good agreement with a power-law frequency-area distribution. These results are generally consistent with the observed distribution of microseismicity observed during a high-volume frack. PMID:25353434

  10. Loopless nontrapping invasion-percolation model for fracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, J. Quinn; Turcotte, Donald L.; Rundle, John B.

    2014-02-01

    Recent developments in hydraulic fracturing (fracking) have enabled the recovery of large quantities of natural gas and oil from old, low-permeability shales. These developments include a change from low-volume, high-viscosity fluid injection to high-volume, low-viscosity injection. The injected fluid introduces distributed damage that provides fracture permeability for the extraction of the gas and oil. In order to model this process, we utilize a loopless nontrapping invasion percolation previously introduced to model optimal polymers in a strongly disordered medium and for determining minimum energy spanning trees on a lattice. We performed numerical simulations on a two-dimensional square lattice and find significant differences from other percolation models. Additionally, we find that the growing fracture network satisfies both Horton-Strahler and Tokunaga network statistics. As with other invasion percolation models, our model displays burst dynamics, in which the cluster extends rapidly into a connected region. We introduce an alternative definition of bursts to be a consecutive series of opened bonds whose strengths are all below a specified value. Using this definition of bursts, we find good agreement with a power-law frequency-area distribution. These results are generally consistent with the observed distribution of microseismicity observed during a high-volume frack.

  11. Scaling behavior of explosive percolation on the square lattice.

    PubMed

    Ziff, Robert M

    2010-11-01

    Clusters generated by the product-rule growth model of Achlioptas, D'Souza, and Spencer on a two-dimensional square lattice are shown to obey qualitatively different scaling behavior than standard (random growth) percolation. The threshold with unrestricted bond placement (allowing loops) is found precisely using several different criteria based on both moments and wrapping probabilities, yielding p(c)=0.526 565 ± 0.000005, consistent with the recent result of Radicchi and Fortunato. The correlation-length exponent ν is found to be close to 1. The qualitative difference from regular percolation is shown dramatically in the behavior of the percolation probability P∞ (size of largest cluster), of the susceptibility, and of the second moment of finite clusters, where discontinuities appear at the threshold. The critical cluster-size distribution does not follow a consistent power law for the range of system sizes we study (L ≤ 8192) but may approach a power law with τ>2 for larger L . PMID:21230435

  12. Can percolation theory be applied to the stock market?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauffer, Dietrich

    1998-11-01

    The fluctuations of the stock market - the price changes per unit time - seem to deviate from Gaussians for short time steps. Power laws, exponentials, and multifractal descriptions have been offered to explain this short-time behavior. Microscopic models dealing with the decisions of single traders on the market have tried to reproduce this behavior. Possibly the simplest of these models is the herding approach of Cont and Bouchaud. Here a total of Nt traders cluster together randomly as in percolation theory. Each cluster randomly decides by buy or sell an amount proportional to its size, or not to trade. Monte Carlo simulations in two to seven dimensions at the percolation threshold depend on the number N of clusters trading within one time step. For N 1, the changes follow a power law; for 1 N Nt they are bell-shaped with power-law tails; for N Nt they crossover to a Gaussian. The correlations in the absolute value of the change decay slowly with time. Thus percolation not only describes the origin of life or the boiling of your breakfast egg, but also explains why we are not rich.

  13. Transport pathways within percolating pore space networks of granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vo, Kevin; Walker, David M.; Tordesillas, Antoinette

    2013-06-01

    Granular media can be regarded as a mixture of two components: grains and the material filling the voids or pores between the grains. Pore properties give rise to a range of applications such as modelling ground water flow, carbon capture and sequestration. The grains within a dense granular material respond to deformation (e.g., shearing or compression) by rearranging to create local zones of compression and zones of dilatation (i.e., regions of high pore space). Descriptions of the deformation are typically focused on analysis of the solid skeleton via topology of physical contact networks of grains but an alternative perspective is to consider network representations of the evolving anisotropic pore space. We demonstrate how to construct pore space networks that express the local size of voids about a grain through network edge weights. We investigate sectors of the loading history when a percolating giant component of the pore space network exists. At these states the grains are in a configuration more prone to the efficient transport of material (e.g., fluid flow, mineral/gas deposits). These pathways can be found through examination of the weighted shortest paths percolating the boundaries of the material. In particular, network weights biased towards large void space results in efficient percolating pathways traversing the shear band in the direction of principal stress within a 2D granular assembly subject to high strains.

  14. Fractal ideas and percolation scalings for turbulent transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakunin, Oleg

    2005-10-01

    The essential deviation of transport processes in turbulent fluids and plasma from the classical behavior leads to the necessity of search for new approaches and scaling laws [1]. A variety of turbulence forms requires not only special description methods, but also an analysis of general mechanisms for different turbulence types. One such mechanism is the percolation transport [1,2]. Its description is based on the idea of long-range correlations, borrowed from theory of phase transitions and critical phenomena. The present paper considers the influence of zonal flow and time-dependence effects on the passive scalar behavior in the framework of the percolation approach. It is suggested to modify the renormalization condition of the small parameter of percolation model in accordance with the additional external influences superimposed on the system [3-4]. This approach makes it possible to consider simultaneously both parameters: the characteristic drift velocity Ud and the characteristic perturbation frequency w. The effective diffusion coefficient Deff˜ w^7/10 satisfactory describes the low-frequency region w in which the long-range correlation effects play a significant role. This scaling agrees well with the analogous expressions that describe low frequency regimes of transport [1,2]. [1] Isichenko M B 1992 Rev. Mod. Phys. 64 961 [2] Bakunin O G 2004 Reports on Progress in Physics 67 965 [3] Bakunin O G 2005 Physica A 345 1 [4] Bakunin O G 2005 J. Plasma Physics 71 756.

  15. Cities and regions in Britain through hierarchical percolation

    PubMed Central

    Arcaute, Elsa; Molinero, Carlos; Hatna, Erez; Murcio, Roberto; Vargas-Ruiz, Camilo; Masucci, A. Paolo; Batty, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Urban systems present hierarchical structures at many different scales. These are observed as administrative regional delimitations which are the outcome of complex geographical, political and historical processes which leave almost indelible footprints on infrastructure such as the street network. In this work, we uncover a set of hierarchies in Britain at different scales using percolation theory on the street network and on its intersections which are the primary points of interaction and urban agglomeration. At the larger scales, the observed hierarchical structures can be interpreted as regional fractures of Britain, observed in various forms, from natural boundaries, such as National Parks, to regional divisions based on social class and wealth such as the well-known North–South divide. At smaller scales, cities are generated through recursive percolations on each of the emerging regional clusters. We examine the evolution of the morphology of the system as a whole, by measuring the fractal dimension of the clusters at each distance threshold in the percolation. We observe that this reaches a maximum plateau at a specific distance. The clusters defined at this distance threshold are in excellent correspondence with the boundaries of cities recovered from satellite images, and from previous methods using population density. PMID:27152211

  16. Ammonia health effects. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, B.L.; Ellis, H.V. III; Beall, C.M.; Baker, L.H.

    1981-09-01

    Health effects literature primarily related to inhalation exposures to ammonia was collected, evaluated, tabulated, and summarized. Approximately 200 documents were collected from computerized and manual literature searches covering the period 1886-1981. Pharmacologists and an M.D. epidemiologist rated the documents according to their applicability to the study and their methodology. The approximately 50 documents considered useful for deriving a range of concern for human exposure to ammonia from automotive emissions were tabulated. The 50 pages of tables detail the results of acute, repeated dose, and chronic testing of bats, mice, rats, guinea pigs, chickens, rabbits, cats, monkeys, dogs, turkeys, swine, and humans as well as human occupational and accidental studies. Most of the documents evaluated are described in an annotated bibliography.

  17. Ammonia abundances in four comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyckoff, S.; Tegler, S. C.; Engel, L.

    1991-02-01

    NH2 emission band strengths were measured in four comets and the NH2 column densities were determined in order to measure the ammonia content of the comets. The mean ammonia/water abundance ratio derived for the four comets is found to be 0.13 + or - 0.06 percent, with no significant variation among the comets. The uniformity of this abundance attests to a remarkable degree of chemical homogeneity over large scales in the comet-forming region of the primordial solar nebula, and contrasts with the CO abundance variations found previously in comets. The N2 and NH3 abundances indicate a condensation temperature in the range 20-160 K, consistent with virtually all comet formation hypotheses.

  18. Ammonia abundances in four comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wickoff, Susan; Tegler, Stephen C.; Engel, Lisa

    1991-01-01

    NH2 emission band strengths were measured in four comets and the NH2 column densities were determined in order to measure the ammonia content of the comets. The mean ammonia/water abundance ratio derived for the four comets is found to be 0.13 + or - 0.06 percent, with no significant variation among the comets. The uniformity of this abundance attests to a remarkable degree of chemical homogeneity over large scales in the comet-forming region of the primordial solar nebula, and contrasts with the CO abundance variations found previously in comets. The N2 and NH3 abundances indicate a condensation temperature in the range 20-160 K, consistent with virtually all comet formation hypotheses.

  19. Superionic water-ammonia mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bethkenhagen, M.; Cebulla, D.; Redmer, R.; Hamel, S.

    2014-12-01

    The interior of the Giant Planets Uranus and Neptune contains large amounts of water, ammonia and methane (referred to as planetary ices). Many observable properties of these planets, such as luminosity, gravitational moments and magnetic fields, are thought to be determined by the physical and chemical properties of matter within this ice layer. Hence, the phase diagrams, equations of state and structural properties of these materials and their respective mixtures are of great interest.Especially the phase diagrams of water and ammonia gained much attention since Cavazzoni et al. [1] proposed superionic phases for these materials, which are characterized by highly mobile hydrogen ions in a lattice of oxygen and nitrogen ions, respectively. For water, the influence of such a phase on the properties of the Giant Planets as well as on exoplanets has been discussed widely. [2,3] Nevertheless, it is an open question how the properties of such a water layer change when another compound, e.g., ammonia is introduced. Considering a 1:1 mixture, we have performed ab initio simulations based on density functional theory using the VASP code [4] heating up structures which we had found from evolutionary random structure search calculations with XtalOpt [5]. We propose possible superionic water-ammonia structures present up to several Mbar. Moreover, we investigate the equation of state and transport properties of this mixture such as diffusion coefficients in order to compare with the pure compounds. These results are essential to construct new interior models for Neptune-like planets.[1] C. Cavazzoni et al., Science 283, 44 (1999).[2] R. Redmer et al., Icarus 211, 798 (2011).[3] L. Zeng and D. Sasselov, ApJ 784, 96 (2014).[4] G. Kresse and J. Hafner, Phys. Rev. B 47, 558 (1993).[5] D. C. Lonie and E. Zurek, Comput. Phys. Commun. 182, 372 (2011).

  20. Fiber-Optic Ammonia Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Michael T.

    2003-01-01

    Reversible, colorimetric fiber-optic sensors are undergoing development for use in measuring concentrations of ammonia in air at levels relevant to human health [0 to 50 parts per million (ppm)]. A sensor of this type includes an optical fiber that has been modified by replacing a portion of its cladding with a polymer coat that contains a dye that reacts reversibly with ammonia and changes color when it does so. The change in color is measured as a change in the amount of light transmitted from one end of the fiber to the other. Responses are reversible and proportional to the concentration of ammonia over the range from 9 to 175 ppm and in some cases the range of reversibility extends up to 270 ppm. The characteristic time for the response of a sensor to rise from 10 to 90 percent of full scale is about 25 seconds. These sensors are fully operational in pure carbon dioxide and are not adversely affected by humidity. This work was done by Michael T. Carter

  1. Planar waveguide sensor of ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogoziński, Roman; Tyszkiewicz, Cuma; Karasiński, Paweł; Izydorczyk, Weronika

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the concept of forming ammonia sensor based on a planar waveguide structure. It is an amplitude sensor produced on the basis of the multimode waveguide. The technological base for this kind of structure is the ion exchange method and the sol-gel method. The planar multimode waveguide of channel type is produced in glass substrate (soda-lime glass of Menzel-Glaser company) by the selective Ag+↔Na+ ion exchange. On the surface of the glass substrate a porous (~40%) silica layer is produced by the sol-gel method. This layer is sensitized to the presence of ammonia in the surrounding atmosphere by impregnation with Bromocresol Purple (BCP) dye. Therefore it constitutes a sensor layer. Spectrophotometric tests carried out showed about 50% reduction of cross-transmission changes of such sensor layer for a wave λ=593 nm caused by the presence of 25% ammonia water vapor in its ambience. The radiation source used in this type of sensor structure is a light emitting diode LED. The gradient channel waveguide is designed for frontal connection (optical glue) with a standard multimode telecommunications waveguide 62.5/125μm.

  2. Fluorographene based Ultrasensitive Ammonia Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Tadi, Kiran Kumar; Pal, Shubhadeep; Narayanan, Tharangattu N.

    2016-01-01

    Single molecule detection using graphene can be brought by tuning the interactions via specific dopants. Electrostatic interaction between the most electronegative element fluorine (F) and hydrogen (H) is one of the strong interactions in hydrogen bonding, and here we report the selective binding of ammonia/ammonium with F in fluorographene (FG) resulting to a change in the impedance of the system. Very low limit of detection value of ~0.44 pM with linearity over wide range of concentrations (1 pM–0.1 μM) is achieved using the FG based impedance sensor, andthisscreen printed FG sensor works in both ionized (ammonium) and un-ionized ammonia sensing platforms. The interaction energies of FG and NH3/NH4+ are evaluated using density functional theory calculations and the interactions are mapped. Here FGs with two different amounts of fluorinecontents −~5 atomic% (C39H16F2) and ~24 atomic% (C39H16F12) - are theoretically and experimentally studied for selective, high sensitive and ultra-low level detection of ammonia. Fast responding, high sensitive, large area patternable FG based sensor platform demonstrated here can open new avenues for the development of point-of-care devices and clinical sensors. PMID:27142522

  3. COPPER CABLE RECYCLING TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Chelsea Hubbard

    2001-05-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) continually seeks safer and more cost-effective technologies for use in deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) of nuclear facilities. The Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA) of the DOE's Office of Science and Technology (OST) sponsors large-scale demonstration and deployment projects (LSDDPs). At these LSDDPs, developers and vendors of improved or innovative technologies showcase products that are potentially beneficial to the DOE's projects and to others in the D&D community. Benefits sought include decreased health and safety risks to personnel and the environment, increased productivity, and decreased costs of operation. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) generated a list of statements defining specific needs and problems where improved technology could be incorporated into ongoing D&D tasks. One such need is to reduce the volume of waste copper wire and cable generated by D&D. Deactivation and decommissioning activities of nuclear facilities generates hundreds of tons of contaminated copper cable, which are sent to radioactive waste disposal sites. The Copper Cable Recycling Technology separates the clean copper from contaminated insulation and dust materials in these cables. The recovered copper can then be reclaimed and, more importantly, landfill disposal volumes can be reduced. The existing baseline technology for disposing radioactively contaminated cables is to package the cables in wooden storage boxes and dispose of the cables in radioactive waste disposal sites. The Copper Cable Recycling Technology is applicable to facility decommissioning projects at many Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities and commercial nuclear power plants undergoing decommissioning activities. The INEEL Copper Cable Recycling Technology Demonstration investigated the effectiveness and efficiency to recycle 13.5 tons of copper cable. To determine the effectiveness of separating out radioactive contamination, the copper cable was coated with a surrogate contaminant. The demonstration took place at the Bonneville County Technology Center in Idaho Falls, Idaho.

  4. Graphene liquid crystal retarded percolation for new high-k materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jinkai; Luna, Alan; Neri, Wilfrid; Zakri, Cécile; Schilling, Tanja; Colin, Annie; Poulin, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    Graphene flakes with giant shape anisotropy are extensively used to establish connectedness electrical percolation in various heterogeneous systems. However, the percolation behaviour of graphene flakes has been recently predicted to be far more complicated than generally anticipated on the basis of excluded volume arguments. Here we confirm experimentally that graphene flakes self-assemble into nematic liquid crystals below the onset of percolation. The competition of percolation and liquid crystal transition provides a new route towards high-k materials. Indeed, near-percolated liquid-crystalline graphene-based composites display unprecedented dielectric properties with a dielectric constant improved by 260-fold increase as compared with the polymer matrix, while maintaining the loss tangent as low as 0.4. This performance is shown to depend on the structure of monodomains of graphene liquid-crystalline phases. Insights into how the liquid crystal phase transition interferes with percolation transition and thus alters the dielectric constant are discussed.

  5. Graphene liquid crystal retarded percolation for new high-k materials

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jinkai; Luna, Alan; Neri, Wilfrid; Zakri, Cécile; Schilling, Tanja; Colin, Annie; Poulin, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Graphene flakes with giant shape anisotropy are extensively used to establish connectedness electrical percolation in various heterogeneous systems. However, the percolation behaviour of graphene flakes has been recently predicted to be far more complicated than generally anticipated on the basis of excluded volume arguments. Here we confirm experimentally that graphene flakes self-assemble into nematic liquid crystals below the onset of percolation. The competition of percolation and liquid crystal transition provides a new route towards high-k materials. Indeed, near-percolated liquid-crystalline graphene-based composites display unprecedented dielectric properties with a dielectric constant improved by 260-fold increase as compared with the polymer matrix, while maintaining the loss tangent as low as 0.4. This performance is shown to depend on the structure of monodomains of graphene liquid-crystalline phases. Insights into how the liquid crystal phase transition interferes with percolation transition and thus alters the dielectric constant are discussed. PMID:26567720

  6. Graphene liquid crystal retarded percolation for new high-k materials.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jinkai; Luna, Alan; Neri, Wilfrid; Zakri, Cécile; Schilling, Tanja; Colin, Annie; Poulin, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Graphene flakes with giant shape anisotropy are extensively used to establish connectedness electrical percolation in various heterogeneous systems. However, the percolation behaviour of graphene flakes has been recently predicted to be far more complicated than generally anticipated on the basis of excluded volume arguments. Here we confirm experimentally that graphene flakes self-assemble into nematic liquid crystals below the onset of percolation. The competition of percolation and liquid crystal transition provides a new route towards high-k materials. Indeed, near-percolated liquid-crystalline graphene-based composites display unprecedented dielectric properties with a dielectric constant improved by 260-fold increase as compared with the polymer matrix, while maintaining the loss tangent as low as 0.4. This performance is shown to depend on the structure of monodomains of graphene liquid-crystalline phases. Insights into how the liquid crystal phase transition interferes with percolation transition and thus alters the dielectric constant are discussed. PMID:26567720

  7. Why recycle? A comparison of recycling motivations in four communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vining, Joanne; Linn, Nancy; Burdge, Rabel J.

    1992-11-01

    Four Illinois communities with different sociode-mographic compositions and at various stages of planning for solid waste management were surveyed to determine the influence of sociodemographic variables and planning stages on the factors that motivate recycling behavior. A factor analysis of importance ratings of reasons for recycling and for not recycling yielded five factors interpreted as altruism, personal inconvenience, social influences, economic incentives, and household storage. The four communities were shown to be significantly different in multivariate analyses of the five motivational factors. However, attempts to explain these community differences with regression analyses, which predicted the motivational factors with dummy codes for planning stages, a measure of self-reported recycling behavior, and sociodemographic measures were unsatisfactory. Contrary to expectation, the solid waste management planning stages of the cities (curbside pickup, recycling dropoff center, and planning in progress) contributed only very slightly to the prediction of motivational factors for recycling. Community differences were better explained by different underlying motivational structures among the four communities. Altruistic reasons for recycling (e.g., conserving resources) composed the only factor which was similar across the four communities. This factor was also perceived to be the most important reason for recycling by respondents from all four communities. The results of the study supported the notion that convenient, voluntary recycling programs that rely on environmental concern and conscience for motivation are useful approaches to reducing waste.

  8. On Site Percolation in Random Quadrangulations of the Half-Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Björnberg, Jakob E.; Stefánsson, Sigurdur Örn

    2015-07-01

    We study site percolation on uniform quadrangulations of the upper half plane. The main contribution is a method for applying Angel's peeling process, in particular for analyzing an evolving boundary condition during the peeling. Our method lets us obtain rigorous and explicit upper and lower bounds on the percolation threshold , and thus show in particular that . The method can be extended to site percolation on other half-planar maps with the domain Markov property.

  9. Polyaniline-based optical ammonia detector

    DOEpatents

    Duan, Yixiang; Jin, Zhe; Su, Yongxuan

    2002-01-01

    Electronic absorption spectroscopy of a polyaniline film deposited on a polyethylene surface by chemical oxidation of aniline monomer at room temperature was used to quantitatively detect ammonia gas. The present optical ammonia gas detector was found to have a response time of less than 15 s, a regeneration time of less than 2 min. at room temperature, and a detection limit of 1 ppm (v/v) for ammonia, with a linear dynamic range from 180 ppm to 18,000 ppm.

  10. Gut ammonia production and its modulation.

    PubMed

    Romero-Gómez, Manuel; Jover, María; Galán, J Jorge; Ruiz, A

    2009-03-01

    Systemic hyperammonemia has been largely found in patients with cirrhosis and hepatic encephalopathy, and ammonia plays a major role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. However, controversial points remain: a) the correlation between plasma ammonia levels and neurophysiological impairment. The lack of correlation between ammonia levels and grade of hepatic encephalopathy in some cases has been considered a weakness of the ammonia hypothesis, but new methods for ammonia measurements and the implication of systemic inflammation in the modulation of ammonia neurotoxicity could explain this gap; b) the source of ammonia production. Hyperammonemia has been considered as derived from urea breakdown by intestinal bacteria and the majority of treatments were targeted against bacteria-derived ammonia from the colon. However, some data suggest an important role for small intestine ammonia production: 1) the hyperammonemia after porto-caval shunted rats has been found similar in germ-free than in non-germ-free animals. 2) In cirrhotic patients the greatest hyperammonemia was found in portal drained viscera and derived mainly from glutamine deamination. 3) The amount of time required to increase of ammonia (less than one hour) after oral glutamine challenge supports a small intestine origin of the hyperammonemia. As the main source of ammonia in cirrhotics derives from portal drained viscera owing to glutamine deamidation, increased glutaminase activity in the intestine seems to be responsible for systemic hyperammonemia. Lastly, some genetic alterations in the glutaminase gene such as the haplotype TACC could modulate intestinal ammonia production and the risk of overt hepatic encephalopathy in cirrhotics. PMID:19067141

  11. 21 CFR 862.1065 - Ammonia test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ammonia test system. 862.1065 Section 862.1065....1065 Ammonia test system. (a) Identification. An ammonia test system is a device intended to measure ammonia levels in blood, serum, and plasma, Ammonia measurements are used in the diagnosis and...

  12. 21 CFR 862.1065 - Ammonia test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ammonia test system. 862.1065 Section 862.1065....1065 Ammonia test system. (a) Identification. An ammonia test system is a device intended to measure ammonia levels in blood, serum, and plasma, Ammonia measurements are used in the diagnosis and...

  13. 21 CFR 862.1065 - Ammonia test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ammonia test system. 862.1065 Section 862.1065....1065 Ammonia test system. (a) Identification. An ammonia test system is a device intended to measure ammonia levels in blood, serum, and plasma, Ammonia measurements are used in the diagnosis and...

  14. 21 CFR 862.1065 - Ammonia test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ammonia test system. 862.1065 Section 862.1065....1065 Ammonia test system. (a) Identification. An ammonia test system is a device intended to measure ammonia levels in blood, serum, and plasma, Ammonia measurements are used in the diagnosis and...

  15. 21 CFR 862.1065 - Ammonia test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ammonia test system. 862.1065 Section 862.1065....1065 Ammonia test system. (a) Identification. An ammonia test system is a device intended to measure ammonia levels in blood, serum, and plasma, Ammonia measurements are used in the diagnosis and...

  16. Reversible intercalation of ammonia molecules into a layered double hydroxide structure without exchanging nitrate counter-ions

    SciTech Connect

    Carbajal Arizaga, Gregorio Guadalupe; Wypych, Fernando; Castillon Barraza, Felipe; Contreras Lopez, Oscar Edel

    2010-10-15

    A zinc/aluminum LDH was precipitated with recycled ammonia from a chemical vapor deposition reaction. The LDH presented a crystalline phase with basal distance of 8.9 A, typical for nitrate-containing LDHs, and another phase with a basal distance of 13.9 A. Thermal treatment at 150 {sup o}C eliminated the phase with the bigger basal distance leaving only the anhydrous nitrate-intercalated LDH structure with 8.9 A. Intense N-H stretching modes in the FTIR spectra suggested that the expansion was due to intercalation of ammonia in the form of [NH{sub 4}(NH{sub 3}){sub n}]{sup +} species. When additional samples were precipitated with pure ammonia, the conventional LDH nitrate structure was obtained (8.9 A basal distance) at pH=7, as well as a pure crystalline phase with 13.9 A basal distance at pH=10 due to ammonia intercalation that can be removed by heating at 150 {sup o}C or by stirring in acetone, confirming a unusual sensu stricto intercalation process into a LDH without exchanging nitrate ions. - Graphical abstract: LDH-nitrate precipitated with ammonia expands the interlayer space if ammonia is bubbled up to pH 10. The basal distance decreased when the compound was heated at 150 {sup o}C or stirred in acetone. Nitrate ions are not exchanged.

  17. Architecture of idiotypic networks: percolation and scaling behavior.

    PubMed

    Brede, M; Behn, U

    2001-07-01

    We investigate a model where idiotypes (characterizing B lymphocytes and antibodies of an immune system) and anti-idiotypes are represented by complementary bit strings of a given length d allowing for a number of mismatches (matching rules). In this model, the vertices of the hypercube in dimension d represent the potential repertoire of idiotypes. A random set of (with probability p) occupied vertices corresponds to the expressed repertoire of idiotypes at a given moment. Vertices of this set linked by the above matching rules build random clusters. We give a structural and statistical characterization of these clusters, or in other words of the architecture of the idiotypic network. Increasing the probability p one finds at a critical p a percolation transition where for the first time a large connected graph occurs with probability 1. Increasing p further, there is a second transition above which the repertoire is complete in the sense that any newly introduced idiotype finds a complementary anti-idiotype. We introduce structural characteristics such as the mass distribution and the fragmentation rate for random clusters, and determine the scaling behavior of the cluster size distribution near the percolation transition, including finite size corrections. We find that slightly above the percolation transition the large connected cluster (the central part of the idiotypic network) consists typically of one highly connected part and a number of weakly connected constituents and coexists with a number of small, isolated clusters. This is in accordance with the picture of a central and a peripheral part of the idiotypic network and gives some support to idealized architectures of the central part used in recent dynamical mean field models. PMID:11461289

  18. Architecture of idiotypic networks: Percolation and scaling Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brede, Markus; Behn, Ulrich

    2001-07-01

    We investigate a model where idiotypes (characterizing B lymphocytes and antibodies of an immune system) and anti-idiotypes are represented by complementary bit strings of a given length d allowing for a number of mismatches (matching rules). In this model, the vertices of the hypercube in dimension d represent the potential repertoire of idiotypes. A random set of (with probability p) occupied vertices corresponds to the expressed repertoire of idiotypes at a given moment. Vertices of this set linked by the above matching rules build random clusters. We give a structural and statistical characterization of these clusters, or in other words of the architecture of the idiotypic network. Increasing the probability p one finds at a critical p a percolation transition where for the first time a large connected graph occurs with probability 1. Increasing p further, there is a second transition above which the repertoire is complete in the sense that any newly introduced idiotype finds a complementary anti-idiotype. We introduce structural characteristics such as the mass distribution and the fragmentation rate for random clusters, and determine the scaling behavior of the cluster size distribution near the percolation transition, including finite size corrections. We find that slightly above the percolation transition the large connected cluster (the central part of the idiotypic network) consists typically of one highly connected part and a number of weakly connected constituents and coexists with a number of small, isolated clusters. This is in accordance with the picture of a central and a peripheral part of the idiotypic network and gives some support to idealized architectures of the central part used in recent dynamical mean field models.

  19. Ammonia removal by sweep gas membrane distillation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zongli; Duong, Tuan; Hoang, Manh; Nguyen, Cuong; Bolto, Brian

    2009-04-01

    Wastewater containing low levels of ammonia (100 mg/L) has been simulated in experiments with sweep gas membrane distillation at pH 11.5. The effects of feed temperature, gas flow rate and feed flow rate on ammonia removal, permeate flux and selectivity were investigated. The feed temperature is a crucial operating factor, with increasing feed temperature increasing the permeate flux significantly, but reducing the selectivity. The best-performing conditions of highest temperature and fastest gas flow rate resulted in 97% removal of the ammonia, to give a treated water containing only 3.3 mg/L of ammonia. PMID:19195677

  20. Cylinder supplied ammonia scrubber testing in IDMS

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, D.P.

    1994-08-31

    This report summarizes the results of the off-line testing the Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) ammonia scrubbers using ammonia supplied from cylinders. Three additional tests with ammonia are planned to verify the data collected during off-line testing. Operation of the ammonia scrubber during IDMS SRAT and SME processing will be completed during the next IDMS run. The Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) scrubbers were successful in removing ammonia from the vapor stream to achieve ammonia vapor concentrations far below the 10 ppM vapor exit design basis. In most of the tests, the ammonia concentration in the vapor exit was lower than the detection limit of the analyzers so results are generally reported as <0.05 parts per million (ppM). During SRAT scrubber testing, the ammonia concentration was no higher than 2 ppM and during SME testing the ammonia concentration was no higher than 0.05 m.

  1. Percolation in spatial evolutionary prisoner's dilemma game on two-dimensional lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Woosik; Yook, Soon-Hyung; Kim, Yup

    2015-11-01

    We study the spatial evolutionary prisoner's dilemma game with updates of imitation max on triangular, hexagonal, and square lattices. We use the weak prisoner's dilemma game with a single parameter b . Due to the competition between the temptation value b and the coordination number z of the base lattice, a greater variety of percolation properties is expected to occur on the lattice with the larger z . From the numerical analysis, we find six different regimes on the triangular lattice (z =6 ). Regardless of the initial densities of cooperators and defectors, cooperators always percolate in the steady state in two regimes for small b . In these two regimes, defectors do not percolate. In two regimes for the intermediate value of b , both cooperators and defectors undergo percolation transitions. The defector always percolates in two regimes for large b . On the hexagonal lattice (z =3 ), there exist two distinctive regimes. For small b , both the cooperators and the defectors undergo percolation transitions while only defectors always percolate for large b . On the square lattice (z =4 ), there exist three regimes. Combining with the finite-size scaling analyses, we show that all the observed percolation transitions belong to the universality class of the random percolation. We also show how the detailed growth mechanism of cooperator and defector clusters decides each regime.

  2. Tight Lower Bound for Percolation Threshold on an Infinite Graph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Kathleen E.; Pryadko, Leonid P.

    2014-11-01

    We construct a tight lower bound for the site percolation threshold on an infinite graph, which becomes exact for an infinite tree. The bound is given by the inverse of the maximal eigenvalue of the Hashimoto matrix used to count nonbacktracking walks on the original graph. Our bound always exceeds the inverse spectral radius of the graph's adjacency matrix, and it is also generally tighter than the existing bound in terms of the maximum degree. We give a constructive proof for existence of such an eigenvalue in the case of a connected infinite quasitransitive graph, a graph-theoretic analog of a translationally invariant system.

  3. Percolation in insect nest networks: Evidence for optimal wiring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valverde, Sergi; Corominas-Murtra, Bernat; Perna, Andrea; Kuntz, Pascale; Theraulaz, Guy; Solé, Ricard V.

    2009-06-01

    Optimization has been shown to be a driving force for the evolution of some biological structures, such as neural maps in the brain or transport networks. Here we show that insect networks also display characteristic traits of optimality. By using a graph representation of the chamber organization of termite nests and a disordered lattice model, it is found that these spatial nests are close to a percolation threshold. This suggests that termites build efficient systems of galleries spanning most of the nest volume at low cost. The evolutionary consequences are outlined.

  4. Pathogen Mutation Modeled by Competition Between Site and Bond Percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hébert-Dufresne, Laurent; Patterson-Lomba, Oscar; Goerg, Georg M.; Althouse, Benjamin M.

    2013-03-01

    While disease propagation is a main focus of network science, its coevolution with treatment has yet to be studied in this framework. We present a mean-field and stochastic analysis of an epidemic model with antiviral administration and resistance development. We show how this model maps to a coevolutive competition between site and bond percolation featuring hysteresis and both second- and first-order phase transitions. The latter, whose existence on networks is a long-standing question, imply that a microscopic change in infection rate can lead to macroscopic jumps in expected epidemic size.

  5. Anomalous diffusion in percolating magnets with fractal geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Hironobu; Itoh, Shinichi; Adams, Mark A.

    1998-04-01

    High-resolution neutron inelastic experiments gave the first direct experimental evidence for anomalous spin diffusion in systems with fractal geometry. The diffusive motions of spins at high temperatures in the near-percolating 2D antiferromagnet, Rb2Co0.6Mg0.4F4, were observed. The scattering function integrated over momentum space in the paramagnetic phase reveals a long-tailed spectrum having the form of E-x superimposed on the Lorentzian line shape. This observation of a power-law decay function is compared with similar measurements on a pure compound Rb2CoF4.

  6. From damage percolation to crack nucleation through finite size criticality.

    PubMed

    Shekhawat, Ashivni; Zapperi, Stefano; Sethna, James P

    2013-05-01

    We present a unified theory of fracture in disordered brittle media that reconciles apparently conflicting results reported in the literature. Our renormalization group based approach yields a phase diagram in which the percolation fixed point, expected for infinite disorder, is unstable for finite disorder and flows to a zero-disorder nucleation-type fixed point, thus showing that fracture has a mixed first order and continuous character. In a region of intermediate disorder and finite system sizes, we predict a crossover with mean-field avalanche scaling. We discuss intriguing connections to other phenomena where critical scaling is only observed in finite size systems and disappears in the thermodynamic limit. PMID:23683218

  7. Evidence of percolative phenomena in a lecithin-based gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliotta, F.; Vasi, C.; Lechner, R. E.; Ruffle, B.

    2000-03-01

    The structure of the gel-phase, observed in a number of lecithin-in-oil microemulsions after addition of water, is the topic of a controversy actually taking place in the literature. In this paper, we will show how the dynamical properties of water confined in the inner core of the micelles, as investigated by QENS and INS, turn out to be inconsistent with the usually proposed model of entangled (not interconnected) polymer-like micelles. A percolated structure of branched cylindrical aggregates could agree with the presented data.

  8. On the genre-fication of music: a percolation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambiotte, R.; Ausloos, M.

    2006-03-01

    We analyze web-downloaded data on people sharing their music library. By attributing to each music group usual music genres (Rock, Pop ...), and analysing correlations between music groups of different genres with percolation-idea based methods, we probe the reality of these subdivisions and construct a music genre cartography, with a tree representation. We also discuss an alternative objective way to classify music, that is based on the complex structure of the groups audience. Finally, a link is drawn with the theory of hidden variables in complex networks.

  9. Algorithm for finding two-dimensional site percolation backbones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Wei-Guo; Tao, Ruibao

    2000-04-01

    We present an efficient algorithm for finding the current-carrying backbone in the planar site percolation model. It finds the backbone in speed to be almost four times as high as that of the old-fashioned Tarjan's depth-first-search algorithm. The scaling exponent (q/ν) (β/ν) of the probability that a site belongs to the backbone (the infinite cluster) is found to be 0.3647±0.0039 (0.1068±0.0013) and satisfy Chayes’ exponent inequality: 2 β⩽ q.

  10. Percolation, sliding, localization and relaxation in topologically closed circuits

    PubMed Central

    Hurowitz, Daniel; Cohen, Doron

    2016-01-01

    Considering a random walk in a random environment in a topologically closed circuit, we explore the implications of the percolation and sliding transitions for its relaxation modes. A complementary question regarding the “delocalization” of eigenstates of non-hermitian Hamiltonians has been addressed by Hatano, Nelson, and followers. But we show that for a conservative stochastic process the implied spectral properties are dramatically different. In particular we determine the threshold for under-damped relaxation, and observe “complexity saturation” as the bias is increased. PMID:26961586

  11. Emulsified industrial oils recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Gabris, T.

    1982-04-01

    The industrial lubricant market has been analyzed with emphasis on current and/or developing recycling and re-refining technologies. This task has been performed for the United States and other industrialized countries, specifically France, West Germany, Italy and Japan. Attention has been focused at emulsion-type fluids regardless of the industrial application involved. It was found that emulsion-type fluids in the United States represent a much higher percentage of the total fluids used than in other industrialized countries. While recycling is an active matter explored by the industry, re-refining is rather a result of other issues than the mere fact that oil can be regenerated from a used industrial emulsion. To extend the longevity of an emulsion is a logical step to keep expenses down by using the emulsion as long as possible. There is, however, another important factor influencing this issue: regulations governing the disposal of such fluids. The ecological question, the respect for nature and the natural balances, is often seen now as everybody's task. Regulations forbid dumping used emulsions in the environment without prior treatment of the water phase and separation of the oil phase. This is a costly procedure, so recycling is attractive since it postpones the problem. It is questionable whether re-refining of these emulsions - as a business - could stand on its own if these emulsions did not have to be taken apart for disposal purposes. Once the emulsion is separated into a water and an oil phase, however, re-refining of the oil does become economical.

  12. Recycler barrier RF buckets

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, C.M.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The Recycler Ring at Fermilab uses a barrier rf systems for all of its rf manipulations. In this paper, I will give an overview of historical perspective on barrier rf system, the longitudinal beam dynamics issues, aspects of rf linearization to produce long flat bunches and methods used for emittance measurements of the beam in the RR barrier rf buckets. Current rf manipulation schemes used for antiproton beam stacking and longitudinal momentum mining of the RR beam for the Tevatron collider operation are explained along with their importance in spectacular success of the Tevatron luminosity performance.

  13. PFC concentration and recycle

    SciTech Connect

    Tom, G.M.; McManus, J.; Knolle, W.; Stoll, I.

    1994-12-31

    The semiconductor industry uses PFC gases such as CF{sub 4} and C{sub 2}F{sub 6} as etchant and cleaning gases during plasma processes. The gases do not fully react within the reactor chamber. The unused gases enter the atmosphere through the process effluent. These gases have long persistence in the atmosphere and absorb infrared radiation. The PFC gases are, therefore, potential global warming gases. A method is described that will recover and recycle PFC gases. The method that the authors have employed to trap and concentrate the PFC gases is based on a dual bed adsorber. The adsorption material is activated carbon.

  14. Helium Removal and Recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Reiter, D.; Wiesen, S

    2004-03-15

    Removal of helium, the ash from the D-T-fusion reaction, from a burning plasma flame, is one of the critical issues for future thermonuclear burning plasma. Even in plasmas driven by additional heating to large Q-values this is a severe problem. Recombination of fuel and ash ions at plasma exposed surfaces, re-emission as neutral particles and subsequent pumping (''recycling'') provides, at least in principle, the mechanism to flush the plasma from its ash. However, plasma surface interaction has to be limited in order to protect vessel components from excessive thermal load, often a conflicting requirement.

  15. Saccharification of newspaper waste after ammonia fiber expansion or extractive ammonia.

    PubMed

    Montella, Salvatore; Balan, Venkatesh; da Costa Sousa, Leonardo; Gunawan, Christa; Giacobbe, Simona; Pepe, Olimpia; Faraco, Vincenza

    2016-03-01

    The lignocellulosic fractions of municipal solid waste (MSW) can be used as renewable resources due to the widespread availability, predictable and low pricing and suitability for most conversion technologies. In particular, after the typical paper recycling loop, the newspaper waste (NW) could be further valorized as feedstock in biorefinering industry since it still contains up to 70 % polysaccharides. In this study, two different physicochemical methods-ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX) and extractive ammonia (EA) were tested for the pretraetment of NW. Furthermore, based on the previously demonstrated ability of the recombinant enzymes endocellulase rCelStrep, α-L-arabinofuranosidase rPoAbf and its evolved variant rPoAbf F435Y/Y446F to improve the saccharification of different lignocellulosic pretreated biomasses (such as corn stover and Arundo donax), in this study these enzymes were tested for the hydrolysis of pretreated NW, with the aim of valorizing the lignocellulosic fractions of the MSW. In particular, a mixture of purified enzymes containing cellulases, xylanases and accessory hemicellulases, was chosen as reference mix and rCelStrep and rPoAbf or its variant were replaced to EGI and Larb. The results showed that these enzymatic mixes are not suitable for the hydrolysis of NW after AFEX or EA pretreatment. On the other hand, when the enzymes rCelStrep, rPoAbf and rPoAbf F435Y/Y446F were tested for their effect in hydrolysis of pretreated NW by addition to a commercial enzyme mixture, it was shown that the total polysaccharides conversion yield reached 37.32 % for AFEX pretreated NW by adding rPoAbf to the mix whilst the maximum sugars conversion yield for EA pretreated NW was achieved 40.80 % by adding rCelStrep. The maximum glucan conversion yield obtained (45.61 % for EA pretreated NW by adding rCelStrep to the commercial mix) is higher than or comparable to those reported in recent manuscripts adopting hydrolysis conditions similar to those used in this study. PMID:26936848

  16. Saccharification of newspaper waste after ammonia fiber expansion or extractive ammonia

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Montella, Salvatore; Balan, Venkatesh; da Costa Sousa, Leonardo; Gunawan, Christa; Giacobbe, Simona; Pepe, Olimpia; Faraco, Vincenza

    2016-03-02

    Here, the lignocellulosic fractions of municipal solid waste (MSW) can be used as renewable resources due to the widespread availability, predictable and low pricing and suitability for most conversion technologies. In particular, after the typical paper recycling loop, the newspaper waste (NW) could be further valorized as feedstock in biorefinering industry since it still contains up to 70 % polysaccharides. In this study, two different physicochemical methods— ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX) and extractive ammonia (EA) were tested for the pretraetment of NW. Furthermore, based on the previously demonstrated ability of the recombinant enzymes endocellulase rCelStrep, α-larabinofuranosidase rPoAbf and its evolvedmore » variant rPoAbf F435Y/Y446F to improve the saccharification of different lignocellulosic pretreated biomasses (such as corn stover and Arundo donax), in this study these enzymes were tested for the hydrolysis of pretreated NW, with the aim of valorizing the lignocellulosic fractions of the MSW. In particular, a mixture of purified enzymes containing cellulases, xylanases and accessory hemicellulases, was chosen as reference mix and rCelStrep and rPoAbf or its variant were replaced to EGI and Larb. The results showed that these enzymatic mixes are not suitable for the hydrolysis of NW after AFEX or EA pretreatment. On the other hand, when the enzymes rCelStrep, rPoAbf and rPoAbf F435Y/Y446F were tested for their effect in hydrolysis of pretreated NW by addition to a commercial enzyme mixture, it was shown that the total polysaccharides conversion yield reached 37.32 % for AFEX pretreated NW by adding rPoAbf to the mix whilst the maximum sugars conversion yield for EA pretreated NW was achieved 40.80 % by adding rCelStrep. The maximum glucan conversion yield obtained (45.61 % for EA pretreated NW by adding rCelStrep to the commercial mix) is higher than or comparable to those reported in recent manuscripts adopting hydrolysis conditions similar to those used in this study.« less

  17. Closing the Loop: Recycling and Buying Recycled Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Eleanor J.; Weltman, Eric

    1993-01-01

    Purchasing recycled paper should be part of every school's solid-waste reduction efforts. Public purchasing can stimulate demand for collected materials and encourage industry to produce recycled products. Schools can form buying consortiums to reduce costs. Schools can also practice source reduction of waste. Lists information resources. (MLF)

  18. Agglomerative percolation on the Bethe lattice and the triangular cactus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Huiseung; Yook, Soon-Hyung; Kim, Yup

    2013-08-01

    Agglomerative percolation (AP) on the Bethe lattice and the triangular cactus is studied to establish the exact mean-field theory for AP. Using the self-consistent simulation method based on the exact self-consistent equations, the order parameter P∞ and the average cluster size S are measured. From the measured P∞ and S, the critical exponents βk and γk for k = 2 and 3 are evaluated. Here, βk and γk are the critical exponents for P∞ and S when the growth of clusters spontaneously breaks the Zk symmetry of the k-partite graph. The obtained values are β2 = 1.79(3), γ2 = 0.88(1), β3 = 1.35(5) and γ3 = 0.94(2). By comparing these exponents with those for ordinary percolation (β∞ = 1 and γ∞ = 1), we also find β∞ < β3 < β2 and γ∞ > γ3 > γ2. These results quantitatively verify the conjecture that the AP model belongs to a new universality class if the Zk symmetry is broken spontaneously, and the new universality class depends on k.

  19. Accelerating Gas Adsorption on 3D Percolating Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Wen, Chenyu; Zhang, Youwei; Wu, Dongping; Zhang, Shi-Li; Qiu, Zhi-Jun

    2016-01-01

    In the field of electronic gas sensing, low-dimensional semiconductors such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) can offer high detection sensitivity owing to their unprecedentedly large surface-to-volume ratio. The sensitivity and responsivity can further improve by increasing their areal density. Here, an accelerated gas adsorption is demonstrated by exploiting volumetric effects via dispersion of SWCNTs into a percolating three-dimensional (3D) network in a semiconducting polymer. The resultant semiconducting composite film is evaluated as a sensing membrane in field effect transistor (FET) sensors. In order to attain reproducible characteristics of the FET sensors, a pulsed-gate-bias measurement technique is adopted to eliminate current hysteresis and drift of sensing baseline. The rate of gas adsorption follows the Langmuir-type isotherm as a function of gas concentration and scales with film thickness. This rate is up to 5 times higher in the composite than only with an SWCNT network in the transistor channel, which in turn results in a 7-fold shorter time constant of adsorption with the composite. The description of gas adsorption developed in the present work is generic for all semiconductors and the demonstrated composite with 3D percolating SWCNTs dispersed in functional polymer represents a promising new type of material for advanced gas sensors. PMID:26888337

  20. Accelerating Gas Adsorption on 3D Percolating Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Wen, Chenyu; Zhang, Youwei; Wu, Dongping; Zhang, Shi-Li; Qiu, Zhi-Jun

    2016-01-01

    In the field of electronic gas sensing, low-dimensional semiconductors such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) can offer high detection sensitivity owing to their unprecedentedly large surface-to-volume ratio. The sensitivity and responsivity can further improve by increasing their areal density. Here, an accelerated gas adsorption is demonstrated by exploiting volumetric effects via dispersion of SWCNTs into a percolating three-dimensional (3D) network in a semiconducting polymer. The resultant semiconducting composite film is evaluated as a sensing membrane in field effect transistor (FET) sensors. In order to attain reproducible characteristics of the FET sensors, a pulsed-gate-bias measurement technique is adopted to eliminate current hysteresis and drift of sensing baseline. The rate of gas adsorption follows the Langmuir-type isotherm as a function of gas concentration and scales with film thickness. This rate is up to 5 times higher in the composite than only with an SWCNT network in the transistor channel, which in turn results in a 7-fold shorter time constant of adsorption with the composite. The description of gas adsorption developed in the present work is generic for all semiconductors and the demonstrated composite with 3D percolating SWCNTs dispersed in functional polymer represents a promising new type of material for advanced gas sensors. PMID:26888337

  1. Short-range correlations in percolation at criticality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hao; Blte, Henk W. J.; Ziff, Robert M.; Deng, Youjin

    2014-10-01

    We derive the critical nearest-neighbor connectivity gn as 3/4, 3(7-9pctri)/4(5-4pctri), and 3(2+7pctri)/4(5-pctri) for bond percolation on the square, honeycomb, and triangular lattice, respectively, where pctri=2sin(?/18) is the percolation threshold for the triangular lattice, and confirm these values via Monte Carlo simulations. On the square lattice, we also numerically determine the critical next-nearest-neighbor connectivity as gnn=0.6875000(2), which confirms a conjecture by Mitra and Nienhuis [J. Stat. Mech. (2004) P10006, 10.1088/1742-5468/2004/10/P10006], implying the exact value gnn=11/16. We also determine the connectivity on a free surface as gnsurf=0.6250001(13) and conjecture that this value is exactly equal to 5/8. In addition, we find that at criticality, the connectivities depend on the linear finite size L as Lyt-d, and the associated specific-heat-like quantities Cn and Cnn scale as L2yt-dln(L /L0), where d is the lattice dimensionality, yt=1/? the thermal renormalization exponent, and L0 a nonuniversal constant. We provide an explanation of this logarithmic factor within the theoretical framework reported recently by Vasseur et al. [J. Stat. Mech. (2012) L07001, 10.1088/1742-5468/2012/07/L07001].

  2. Accelerating Gas Adsorption on 3D Percolating Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Wen, Chenyu; Zhang, Youwei; Wu, Dongping; Zhang, Shi-Li; Qiu, Zhi-Jun

    2016-02-01

    In the field of electronic gas sensing, low-dimensional semiconductors such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) can offer high detection sensitivity owing to their unprecedentedly large surface-to-volume ratio. The sensitivity and responsivity can further improve by increasing their areal density. Here, an accelerated gas adsorption is demonstrated by exploiting volumetric effects via dispersion of SWCNTs into a percolating three-dimensional (3D) network in a semiconducting polymer. The resultant semiconducting composite film is evaluated as a sensing membrane in field effect transistor (FET) sensors. In order to attain reproducible characteristics of the FET sensors, a pulsed-gate-bias measurement technique is adopted to eliminate current hysteresis and drift of sensing baseline. The rate of gas adsorption follows the Langmuir-type isotherm as a function of gas concentration and scales with film thickness. This rate is up to 5 times higher in the composite than only with an SWCNT network in the transistor channel, which in turn results in a 7-fold shorter time constant of adsorption with the composite. The description of gas adsorption developed in the present work is generic for all semiconductors and the demonstrated composite with 3D percolating SWCNTs dispersed in functional polymer represents a promising new type of material for advanced gas sensors.

  3. Percolation transition in dynamical traffic network with evolving critical bottlenecks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Daqing; Fu, Bowen; Wang, Yunpeng; Lu, Guangquan; Berezin, Yehiel; Stanley, H. Eugene; Havlin, Shlomo

    2015-01-01

    A critical phenomenon is an intrinsic feature of traffic dynamics, during which transition between isolated local flows and global flows occurs. However, very little attention has been given to the question of how the local flows in the roads are organized collectively into a global city flow. Here we characterize this organization process of traffic as “traffic percolation,” where the giant cluster of local flows disintegrates when the second largest cluster reaches its maximum. We find in real-time data of city road traffic that global traffic is dynamically composed of clusters of local flows, which are connected by bottleneck links. This organization evolves during a day with different bottleneck links appearing in different hours, but similar in the same hours in different days. A small improvement of critical bottleneck roads is found to benefit significantly the global traffic, providing a method to improve city traffic with low cost. Our results may provide insights on the relation between traffic dynamics and percolation, which can be useful for efficient transportation, epidemic control, and emergency evacuation. PMID:25552558

  4. Ultralow percolation threshold in aerogel and cryogel templated composites.

    PubMed

    Irin, Fahmida; Das, Sriya; Atore, Francis O; Green, Micah J

    2013-09-10

    We demonstrate a novel concept for preparing percolating composites with ultralow filler content by utilizing nanofiller-loaded aerogel and cryogels as a conductive template. This concept is investigated for several porous systems, including resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF), silica, and polyacrylamide (PAM) gels, and both graphene and carbon nanotubes are utilized as nanofiller. In each case, a stable, aqueous nanofiller dispersion is mixed with a sol-gel precursor and polymerized to form a hydrogel, which can then be converted to an aerogel by critical point drying or cryogel by freeze-drying. Epoxy resin is infused into the pores of the gels by capillary action without disrupting the monolithic structure. We show that conductive graphene/epoxy composites are formed with a very low graphene loading; a percolation threshold as low as 0.012 vol % is obtained for graphene-RF cryogel/epoxy composite. This is the lowest reported threshold of any graphene-based nanocomposites. Similar values are achieved in other aerogel and nanofiller systems, which demonstrates the versatility of this method. PMID:23927050

  5. Rubber elasticity for percolation network consisting of Gaussian chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Kengo; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Sakai, Takamasa; Shibayama, Mitsuhiro

    2015-11-01

    A theory describing the elastic modulus for percolation networks of Gaussian chains on general lattices such as square and cubic lattices is proposed and its validity is examined with simulation and mechanical experiments on well-defined polymer networks. The theory was developed by generalizing the effective medium approximation (EMA) for Hookian spring network to Gaussian chain networks. From EMA theory, we found that the ratio of the elastic modulus at p, G to that at p = 1, G0, must be equal to G/G0 = (p - 2/f)/(1 - 2/f) if the position of sites can be determined so as to meet the force balance, where p is the degree of cross-linking reaction. However, the EMA prediction cannot be applicable near its percolation threshold because EMA is a mean field theory. Thus, we combine real-space renormalization and EMA and propose a theory called real-space renormalized EMA, i.e., REMA. The elastic modulus predicted by REMA is in excellent agreement with the results of simulations and experiments of near-ideal diamond lattice gels.

  6. Rubber elasticity for percolation network consisting of Gaussian chains.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Kengo; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Sakai, Takamasa; Shibayama, Mitsuhiro

    2015-11-14

    A theory describing the elastic modulus for percolation networks of Gaussian chains on general lattices such as square and cubic lattices is proposed and its validity is examined with simulation and mechanical experiments on well-defined polymer networks. The theory was developed by generalizing the effective medium approximation (EMA) for Hookian spring network to Gaussian chain networks. From EMA theory, we found that the ratio of the elastic modulus at p, G to that at p = 1, G0, must be equal to G/G0 = (p - 2/f)/(1 - 2/f) if the position of sites can be determined so as to meet the force balance, where p is the degree of cross-linking reaction. However, the EMA prediction cannot be applicable near its percolation threshold because EMA is a mean field theory. Thus, we combine real-space renormalization and EMA and propose a theory called real-space renormalized EMA, i.e., REMA. The elastic modulus predicted by REMA is in excellent agreement with the results of simulations and experiments of near-ideal diamond lattice gels. PMID:26567682

  7. Rubber Elasticity for percolation network consisting of Gaussian Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Kengo; Shibayama, Mitsuhiro; Sakai, Takamasa

    A theory describing the elastic modulus for percolation networks of Gaussian chains on general lattices such as square and cubic lattices is proposed and its validity is examined with simulation and mechanical experiments on well-defined polymer networks. The theory was developed by generalizing the effective medium approximation for Hookian spring network (EMA) to Gaussian chain networks. From EMA theory, we found that the ratio of the elastic modulus at p, G to that at p = 1 ,G0, must be equal to G /G0 = (p - 2 / f) / (1 - 2 / f) if the position of sites can be determined so as to meet the force balance, where p is the degree of cross-linking reaction. However, the EMA prediction cannot be applicable near its percolation threshold because EMA is a mean field theory. Thus, we combine real-space renormalization and EMA, and propose a theory called real-space renormalized EMA, i.e., REMA. The elastic modulus predicted by REMA is in excellent agreement with the results of simulations and experiments of near-ideal diamond lattice gels.

  8. Percolation behavior of tritiated water into a soil packed bed

    SciTech Connect

    Honda, T.; Katayama, K.; Uehara, K.; Fukada, S.; Takeishi, T.

    2015-03-15

    A large amount of cooling water is used in a D-T fusion reactor. The cooling water will contain tritium with high concentration because tritium can permeate metal walls at high temperature easily. A development of tritium handling technology for confining tritiated water in the fusion facility is an important issue. In addition, it is also important to understand tritium behavior in environment assuming severe accidents. In this study, percolation experiments of tritiated water in soil packed bed were carried out and tritium behavior in soil was discussed. Six soil samples were collected in Hakozaki campus of Kyushu University. These particle densities were of the same degree as that of general soils and moisture contents were related to BET surface area. For two soil samples used in the percolation experiment of tritiated water, saturated hydraulic conductivity agreed well with the estimating value by Creager. Tritium retention ratio in the soil packed bed was larger than water retention. This is considered to be due to an effect of tritium sorption on the surface of soil particles. The isotope exchange capacity estimated by assuming that H/T ratio of supplied tritiated water and H/T ratio of surface water of soil particle was equal was comparable to that on cement paste and mortar which were obtained by exposure of tritiated water vapor. (authors)

  9. Electron percolation in realistic models of carbon nanotube networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoneau, Louis-Philippe; Villeneuve, Jérémie; Rochefort, Alain

    2015-09-01

    The influence of penetrable and curved carbon nanotubes (CNT) on the charge percolation in three-dimensional disordered CNT networks have been studied with Monte-Carlo simulations. By considering carbon nanotubes as solid objects but where the overlap between their electron cloud can be controlled, we observed that the structural characteristics of networks containing lower aspect ratio CNT are highly sensitive to the degree of penetration between crossed nanotubes. Following our efficient strategy to displace CNT to different positions to create more realistic statistical models, we conclude that the connectivity between objects increases with the hard-core/soft-shell radii ratio. In contrast, the presence of curved CNT in the random networks leads to an increasing percolation threshold and to a decreasing electrical conductivity at saturation. The waviness of CNT decreases the effective distance between the nanotube extremities, hence reducing their connectivity and degrading their electrical properties. We present the results of our simulation in terms of thickness of the CNT network from which simple structural parameters such as the volume fraction or the carbon nanotube density can be accurately evaluated with our more realistic models.

  10. Quantum walk coherences on a dynamical percolation graph

    PubMed Central

    Elster, Fabian; Barkhofen, Sonja; Nitsche, Thomas; Novotný, Jaroslav; Gábris, Aurél; Jex, Igor; Silberhorn, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Coherent evolution governs the behaviour of all quantum systems, but in nature it is often subjected to influence of a classical environment. For analysing quantum transport phenomena quantum walks emerge as suitable model systems. In particular, quantum walks on percolation structures constitute an attractive platform for studying open system dynamics of random media. Here, we present an implementation of quantum walks differing from the previous experiments by achieving dynamical control of the underlying graph structure. We demonstrate the evolution of an optical time-multiplexed quantum walk over six double steps, revealing the intricate interplay between the internal and external degrees of freedom. The observation of clear non-Markovian signatures in the coin space testifies the high coherence of the implementation and the extraordinary degree of control of all system parameters. Our work is the proof-of-principle experiment of a quantum walk on a dynamical percolation graph, paving the way towards complex simulation of quantum transport in random media. PMID:26311434

  11. Percolation transition in dynamical traffic network with evolving critical bottlenecks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Daqing

    A critical phenomenon is an intrinsic feature of traffic dynamics, during which transition between isolated local flows and global flows occurs. However, very little attention has been given to the question of how the local flows in the roads are organized collectively into a global city flow. Here we characterize this organization process of traffic as ``traffic percolation,'' where the giant cluster of local flows disintegrates when the second largest cluster reaches its maximum. We find in real-time data of city road traffic that global traffic is dynamically composed of clusters of local flows, which are connected by bottleneck links. This organization evolves during a day with different bottleneck links appearing in different hours, but similar in the same hours in different days. A small improvement of critical bottleneck roads is found to benefit significantly the global traffic, providing a method to improve city traffic with low cost. Our results may provide insights on the relation between traffic dynamics and percolation, which can be useful for efficient transportation, epidemic control, and emergency evacuation.

  12. Electrostatic trapping of ammonia molecules

    PubMed

    Bethlem; Berden; Crompvoets; Jongma; van Roij AJ; Meijer

    2000-08-01

    The ability to cool and slow atoms with light for subsequent trapping allows investigations of the properties and interactions of the trapped atoms in unprecedented detail. By contrast, the complex structure of molecules prohibits this type of manipulation, but magnetic trapping of calcium hydride molecules thermalized in ultra-cold buffer gas and optical trapping of caesium dimers generated from ultra-cold caesium atoms have been reported. However, these methods depend on the target molecules being paramagnetic or able to form through the association of atoms amenable to laser cooling, respectively, thus restricting the range of species that can be studied. Here we describe the slowing of an adiabatically cooled beam of deuterated ammonia molecules by time-varying inhomogeneous electric fields and subsequent loading into an electrostatic trap. We are able to trap state-selected ammonia molecules with a density of 10(6) cm(-3) in a volume of 0.25 cm3 at temperatures below 0.35 K. We observe pronounced density oscillations caused by the rapid switching of the electric fields during loading of the trap. Our findings illustrate that polar molecules can be efficiently cooled and trapped, thus providing an opportunity to study collisions and collective quantum effects in a wide range of ultra-cold molecular systems. PMID:10952305

  13. Study of an ammonia-based wet scrubbing process in a continuous flow system

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, James X.; Lee, Anita S.; Kitchin, John R.; Nulwala, Hunaid B.; Luebke, David R.; Damodaran, Krishnan

    2013-01-01

    A continuous gas and liquid flow, regenerative scrubbing process for CO{sub 2} capture was demonstrated at the bench-scale level. An aqueous ammonia-based solution captures CO{sub 2} from simulated flue gas in an absorber and releases a nearly pure stream of CO{sub 2} in the regenerator. After the regeneration, the solution of ammonium compounds is recycled to the absorber. The design of a continuous flow unit was based on earlier exploratory results from a semi-batch reactor, where a CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2} simulated flue gas mixture flowed through a well-mixed batch of ammonia-based solution. During the semi-batch tests, the solution was cycled between absorption and regeneration steps to measure the carrying capacity of the solution at various initial ammonia concentrations and temperatures. Consequentially, a series of tests were conducted on the continuous unit to observe the effect of various parameters on CO{sub 2} removal efficiency and regenerator effectiveness within the flow system. The parameters that were studied included absorber temperature, regenerator temperature, initial NH{sub 3} concentration, simulated flue gas flow rate, liquid solvent inventory in the flow system, and height of the packed-bed absorber. From this testing and subsequent testing, ammonia losses from both the absorption and regeneration steps were quantified, and attempts were made to maintain steady state during operations. Implications of experimental results with respect to process design are discussed.

  14. Ammonia emissions from land application of manures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ammonia volatilization can be a major nitrogen (N) loss process for surface-applied manures. There is concern that current manure management practices are contributing to ammonia losses in the Mid-Atlantic region with subsequent reductions in air quality and increases in N losses to streams and est...

  15. Measuring ammonia from space: limits and possibilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cady-Pereira, K. E.; Pinder, R. W.; Walker, J. T.; Bash, J. O.; Luo, M.; Henze, D. K.; Shephard, M. W.; Zhu, J.; Rinsland, C.

    2010-12-01

    Ammonia (NH3) is an important component in local, regional, and global tropospheric chemistry. Ammonia contributes significantly to several well-known environmental problems: excess deposition in terrestrial ecosystems can lead to soil acidification and loss of plant diversity, while in coastal ecosystems, it can cause eutrophication, algal blooms, and loss of fish and shellfish. In the atmosphere NH3 can combine with sulfates and nitric acid to form ammonium nitrate and ammonium sulfate, which constitute a substantial fraction of fine particulate matter (PM2.5). Nevertheless, there is great uncertainty in the magnitude and in the spatial/seasonal variability of ammonia concentrations and emissions. Retrievals of ammonia from spectra obtained from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) flying on the AURA satellite have the potential of significantly increasing our knowledge of the spatial and temporal variability of ammonia and of providing constraints on ammonia emissions through the use of inverse models at both the regional and global scales. We will present an updated evaluation of the TES ammonia retrievals using sensitivity studies, simulations, and in situ observations. We will demonstrate TES’ capability to discern spatial gradients and temporal variability in ammonia concentrations, with results from the TES transects over the Central Valley and North Carolina, as well as monthly means from TES global surveys. We will also show an example of using TES NH3 measurements to constrain surface emissions over North America.

  16. Ammonia and hydrogen sulfide removal using biochar

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reducing ammonia and hydrogen sulfide emissions from livestock facilities is an important issue for many communities and livestock producers. Ammonia has been regarded as odorous, precursor for particulate matter (PM), and contributed to livestock mortality. Hydrogen sulfide is highly toxic at elev...

  17. CHRONIC TOXICITY OF AMMONIA OF RAINBOW TROUT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chronic effects of ammonia to rainbow trout Salmo gairdneri were studied in a laboratory test conducted over a 5-year period. Fish were tested at five concentrations over the range 0.01-0.07 mg/liter un-ionized ammonia; the mean pH of the test water was 7.7, and the mean temp...

  18. METHODOLOGY AND INSTRUMENTATION TO MEASURE GASEOUS AMMONIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methodology for the time integrated collection and analysis of atmospheric ammonia was developed. Ammonia is primarily measured because it can react with SOx to produce ammonium sulfate. Since SOx is one of the principle air pollutants, it is important to determine its atmospheri...

  19. Method for releasing hydrogen from ammonia borane

    DOEpatents

    Varma, Arvind; Diwan, Moiz; Shafirovich, Evgeny; Hwang, Hyun-Tae; Al-Kukhun, Ahmad

    2013-02-19

    A method of releasing hydrogen from ammonia borane is disclosed. The method comprises heating an aqueous ammonia borane solution to between about 80-135.degree. C. at between about 14.7 and 200 pounds per square inch absolute (psia) to release hydrogen by hydrothermolysis.

  20. Regeneration of ammonia borane from polyborazylene

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, Andrew; Gordon, John C; Ott, Kevin C; Burrell, Anthony K

    2013-02-05

    Method of producing ammonia borane, comprising providing a reagent comprising a dehydrogenated material in a suitable solvent; and combining the reagent with a reducing agent comprising hydrazine, a hydrazine derivative, or combinations thereof, in a reaction which produces a mixture comprising ammonia borane.

  1. Poultry litter moisture management to reduce ammonia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ammonia generation in poultry houses results from the natural breakdown of litter (bedding material mixed with deposits of feces, feathers, spilled feed and water). Good management practices can reduce ammonia concentrations in poultry houses. This factsheet relates findings from a recent publicat...

  2. Critical litter moisture maximizes ammonia generation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The natural breakdown of litter (bedding material mixed with deposits of feces, feathers, spilled feed and water) generates ammonia in poultry houses. Good management practices can reduce ammonia concentrations in poultry houses. Findings from a recent publication indicate there is a critical litt...

  3. Ammonia Production Using Pressure Swing Adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    2009-02-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose overall objective is to develop and demonstrate a technically feasible and commercially viable system that integrates reaction to produce ammonia along with recovery of the products by adsorption separation methods and significantly decrease the energy requirement in ammonia production.

  4. Evaluation of ammonia emissions from broiler litter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ammonia emissions from poultry litter results in air pollution and can cause high levels of ammonia in poultry houses, which negatively impacts bird performance. The objectives of this study were to: (1) conduct a nitrogen (N) mass balance in broiler houses by measuring the N inputs (bedding, chick...

  5. AMMONIA: POSSIBLE USE FOR PRESERVING FISH.

    PubMed

    SUBRAHMANYAN, V; LAHIRY, N L; MOORJANI, M N; BALAKRISHNANNAIR, R; KRISHNASWAMY, M A

    1963-10-11

    Eviscerated oil sardines (Sardinella longiceps) that have been treated with ammonia can be stored at a temperature of 25 degrees to 30 degrees C for more than 2 months without deterioration of their nutritive value. There is no measurable residue of ammonia in the final product. PMID:14057369

  6. Ammonia Solubility in High Concentration Salt Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    HEDENGREN, D.C.

    2000-02-01

    Solubility data for ammonia in water and various dilute solutions are abundant in the literature. However, there is a noticeable lack of ammonia solubility data for high salt, basic solutions of various mixtures of salts including those found in many of the Hanford Washington underground waste tanks. As a result, models based on solubility data for dilute salt solutions have been used to extrapolate to high salt solutions. These significant extrapolations need to be checked against actual laboratory data. Some indirect vapor measurements have been made. A more direct approach is to determine the ratio of solubility of ammonia in water to its solubility in high salt solutions. In various experiments, pairs of solutions, one of which is water and the other a high salt solution, are allowed to come to equilibrium with a common ammonia vapor pressure. The ratio of concentrations of ammonia in the two solutions is equal to the ratio of the respective ammonia solubilities (Henry's Law constants) at a given temperature. This information can then be used to refine the models that predict vapor space compositions of ammonia. Ammonia at Hanford is of concern because of its toxicity in the environment and its contribution to the flammability of vapor space gas mixtures in waste tanks.

  7. Recycling Study Guide [Resource Packet].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Natural Resources, Madison.

    This resource packet contains six documents developed by the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources in order to help teachers infuse the environmental education topics of recycling and solid waste into social studies, art, English, health, mathematics, science, and environmental education classes. "Recycling Study Guide" contains 19 activities…

  8. TOMATO CLEANING AND WATER RECYCLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A full-scale dump tank water recycle system was developed and demonstrated. A false bottom-ejector transport system removed soil from the water. Clarified water was either recycled back to the dump tank or discharged to the sewer. A vacuum belt was developed for dewatering the mu...

  9. The Dynamic Earth: Recycling Naturally!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldston, M. Jenice; Allison, Elizabeth; Fowler, Lisa; Glaze, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    This article begins with a thought-provoking question: What do you think of when you hear the term "recycle?" Many think about paper, glass, aluminum cans, landfills, and reducing waste by reusing some of these materials. How many of us ever consider the way the systems of Earth dynamically recycle its materials? In the following…

  10. Garbage project on recycling behavior

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, R.H.; Hughes, W.W.; Rathje, W.L.

    1982-02-01

    Results are presented of a study undertaken to determine the factors which are most effective in motivating different socio-economic groups to change their recycling behaviors and participate in recycling programs. Four types of data were collected and analyzed in Tucson: (1) purchase data from local recyclers, (2) traditional interview-survey data on recycling behavior, (3) long-term and short-term household refuse data, and (4) combined interview-garbage data. Findings reveal that disposal patterns for newspapers and aluminum cans are tuse data, and (4) combined interview-garbage data. Findings reveal that disposal patterns for newspapers and aluminum cans are the same across census tracts with significantly different socio-economic characteristics. Further, analysis of interview and garbage data matched by household reaffirm that what people say about recycling and how they dispose of recyclable materials are two different things. Thus, interview reports of newspaper recycling correlate with higher income informants, but their interview reports do not correlate with what is thrown into their garbage cans. Money is concluded to be the most powerful incentive toward recycling.

  11. Recycling Solid Waste in Chattanooga

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vredeveld, Ruth; Martin, Robin

    1973-01-01

    Students undertook a group project in collaboration with city officials to study garbage types in the community and possibilities of recycling solid wastes. Data collected from various sources revealed that public attitude was favorable for recycling efforts and that it was feasible economically. (PS)

  12. Training Governments to Buy Recycled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Richard

    1995-01-01

    Describes a program developed by the Northeast Maryland Waste Disposal Authority to teach government buyers how to buy recycled materials. The program consists of a hands-on training seminar and a manual that offers step-by-step instructions for setting up a buy-recycled purchasing program. (LZ)

  13. The Dynamic Earth: Recycling Naturally!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldston, M. Jenice; Allison, Elizabeth; Fowler, Lisa; Glaze, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    This article begins with a thought-provoking question: What do you think of when you hear the term "recycle?" Many think about paper, glass, aluminum cans, landfills, and reducing waste by reusing some of these materials. How many of us ever consider the way the systems of Earth dynamically recycle its materials? In the following

  14. Information Sources on Rural Recycling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Notess, Greg; Kuske, Jodee

    1992-01-01

    Provides resources for rural recycling operations with the principle aim of assisting rural government officials, planners, residents, and educators to encourage recycling as an integral part of an individual's or community's solid waste management plan. Sources range from bibliographies, directories, and government documents to case studies. (49…

  15. Automotive aluminum recycling in 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This article examines the aluminium recycling industry's ability to handle effectively the increased amounts of automotive aluminium scrap resulting from increased amounts of wrought and cast aluminium alloys in automobile manufacturing. This study takes a system-wide view of both volume and composition aspects of automotive aluminium recycling.

  16. Clinical utility of breath ammonia for evaluation of ammonia physiology in healthy and cirrhotic adults

    PubMed Central

    Spacek, Lisa A; Mudalel, Matthew; Tittel, Frank; Risby, Terence H; Solga, Steven F

    2016-01-01

    Blood ammonia is routinely used in clinical settings to assess systemic ammonia in hepatic encephalopathy and urea cycle disorders. Despite its drawbacks, blood measurement is often used as a comparator in breath studies because it is a standard clinical test. We sought to evaluate sources of measurement error and potential clinical utility of breath ammonia compared to blood ammonia. We measured breath ammonia in real time by quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectrometry and blood ammonia in 10 healthy and 10 cirrhotic participants. Each participant contributed 5 breath samples and blood for ammonia measurement within 1 h. We calculated the coefficient of variation (CV) for 5 breath ammonia values, reported medians of healthy and cirrhotic participants, and used scatterplots to display breath and blood ammonia. For healthy participants, mean age was 22 years (±4), 70% were men, and body mass index (BMI) was 27 (±5). For cirrhotic participants, mean age was 61 years (±8), 60% were men, and BMI was 31 (±7). Median blood ammonia for healthy participants was within normal range, 10 μmol L−1 (interquartile range (IQR), 3–18) versus 46 μmol L−1 (IQR, 23–66) for cirrhotic participants. Median breath ammonia was 379 pmol mL−1 CO2 (IQR, 265–765) for healthy versus 350 pmol mL−1 CO2 (IQR, 180–1013) for cirrhotic participants. CV was 17 ± 6%. There remains an important unmet need in the evaluation of systemic ammonia, and breath measurement continues to demonstrate promise to fulfill this need. Given the many differences between breath and blood ammonia measurement, we examined biological explanations for our findings in healthy and cirrhotic participants. We conclude that based upon these preliminary data breath may offer clinically important information this is not provided by blood ammonia. PMID:26658550

  17. Market Volatility and the Distribution of Mean Cluster Sizes for Percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauffer, Dietrich

    The tail of the distribution for the ``mean cluster size'' (susceptibility) at the site percolation threshold is found by Monte Carlo simulations to be exponential. Similar distributions might be expected for the market volatility, if stock price fluctuations are described by Cont-Bouchaud percolation.

  18. A delay of percolation time in carbon-black-filled conductive polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guozhang; Asai, Shigeo; Zhang, Cheng; Miura, Tadashi; Sumita, Masao

    2000-08-01

    This work attempts to determine how percolation at an equilibrium state is correlated to percolation under experimental conditions. The dynamic process of forming conductive networks in carbon-black (CB)-filled poly(methyl methacrylate) composites was investigated by real-time tracing the time dependence of electrical resistivity during isothermal treatments. It was observed that the dynamic percolation curves maintains the same shape and shift to a shorter percolation time with increasing annealing temperature and filler concentration. An Arrhenius plot of the shift factor against the annealing temperature shows a linear relationship, irrespective of the filler concentration, and the activation energy of the percolation time is close to the activation energy of the zero-shear-rate viscosity of the polymer matrix. Furthermore, an increase in the thermodynamic interactions between CB and the polymer matrix causes a large reduction in polymer mobility, resulting in an increase in the percolation time. These results lead to the conclusion that percolation is delayed by the bulk mobility of polymer layers surrounding CB particles. An experimental approach for determination of the retardation time is proposed based on theoretical analysis of the dynamic movement of the carbon particles. It is suggested that the difference in the kinetic history with respect to percolation among different composite systems can be eliminated by normalizing the experimental conditions to the same value of retardation time.

  19. A dynamical network model for percolation problems in performance assessment of radioactive waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Takase, Hiroyasu; Inagaki, M.; Impey, M.D.; Grindrod, P.

    1995-12-31

    A semi-analytical model for percolation problems, called the Dynamical Network Model, is developed. Because of its semi-analytic nature, the model is more efficient than the existing numerical techniques especially for three dimensional problems and, thus, can be used to a wide range of percolation-like problems in performance assessment of radioactive waste disposal.

  20. Is recycling worth the trouble

    SciTech Connect

    Boltz, C.M.

    1995-03-01

    A panel of waste industry experts met recently at a Washington, DC, conference to discuss and debate the costs, benefits, and economics of recycling solid waste. The nearly unanimous conclusion from some of the speakers--that recycling, as it is implemented today, has costs that far outweigh its benefits--is evidence of a growing backlash among solid waste officials against a recycling movement they feel has been grossly over-inflated by environmental groups as a solution to a non-existent problem known as the garbage crisis. The public should not place such a strong emphasis on recycling as a cure-all for environmental problems, according to the panel of four waste management policy analysts at The State of Garbage'' session held in mid-January at the 1995 US/Canadian Federation Solid Waste Management Conference. Moreover, some panel members said, recycling should take place only if it makes economic sense.

  1. Technology for more profitable recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Lamarre, L. )

    1992-03-01

    Recycling has been part of the US heritage for more than a century. But in contrast to the country's earliest recycling - which was pursued simply because it made good money - today's movement is fueled primarily by environmental concerns. One result of this change in motivation is that modern recycling isn't always profitable. Sometimes the supply of collected materials far exceeds the demand, and with some substances even minor contamination can prohibit reuse. Now advanced technologies, including a number of electricity-based processes, are helping overcome market barriers. While technology alone can't solve all the problems of the recycling industry, researchers are confident that technological advancements will help pave the way to more profitable recycling.

  2. Urban water recycling.

    PubMed

    Asano, T

    2005-01-01

    Increasing urbanization has resulted in an uneven distribution of population, industries, and water in urban areas; thus, imposing unprecedented pressures on water supplies and water pollution control. These pressures are exacerbated during the periods of drought and climatic uncertainties. The purpose of this paper is to summarize emergence of water reclamation, recycling and reuse as a vital component of sustainable water resources in the context of integrated water resources management in urban and rural areas. Water quality requirements and health and public acceptance issues related to water reuse are also discussed. Reclaimed water is a locally controllable water resource that exists right at the doorstep of the urban environment, where water is needed the most and priced the highest. Closing the water cycle loop not only is technically feasible in agriculture, industries, and municipalities but also makes economic sense. Society no longer has the luxury of using water only once. PMID:16007932

  3. Estimation of percolation flux from borehole temperature data at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

    PubMed

    Bodvarsson, G S; Kwicklis, E; Shan, C; Wu, Y S

    2003-01-01

    Temperature data from the unsaturated zone (UZ) at Yucca Mountain are analyzed to estimate percolation-flux rates and overall heat flux. A multilayer, one-dimensional analytical solution is presented for determining percolation flux from temperature data. Case studies have shown that the analytical solution agrees very well with results from the numerical code, TOUGH2. The results of the analysis yield percolation fluxes in the range from 0 to 20 mm/year for most of the deep boreholes. This range is in good agreement with the results of infiltration studies at Yucca Mountain. Percolation flux for the shallower boreholes, however, cannot be accurately determined from temperature data alone because large gas flow in the shallow system alters the temperature profiles. Percolation-flux estimates for boreholes located near or intersecting major faults are significantly higher than those for other boreholes. These estimates may be affected by gas flow in the faults. PMID:12714282

  4. Percolation and lasing in real 3D crystals with inhomogeneous distributed random pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlak, Gennadiy; Calderón-Segura, Yessica

    2014-11-01

    We systematically study the percolation phase transition in real 3D crystals where not only the state of pores but also their radius r and displacement s are random valued numbers. The mean values R= and S= emerge as additional spatial scales in such an extended network. This leads to variations of the threshold (critical) percolation probability pC and the percolation order parameter P that become to be the intricate functions of R and S. Our numerical simulations have shown that in such extended system the incipient spanning cluster can arise even for situations where for simple periodical system the percolation does not exist. We analyzed the validity of the nearest neighbor's approximation and found that such approximation is not valid for materials with large dispersivity of pores. The lasing of nanoemitters incorporated in such percolating spanning cluster is studied too. This effect can open interesting perspectives in modern nano- and micro-information technologies.

  5. Percolation-like phase transitions in network models of protein dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Jeffrey K.; Pande, Vijay S.

    2015-06-01

    In broad terms, percolation theory describes the conditions under which clusters of nodes are fully connected in a random network. A percolation phase transition occurs when, as edges are added to a network, its largest connected cluster abruptly jumps from insignificance to complete dominance. In this article, we apply percolation theory to meticulously constructed networks of protein folding dynamics called Markov state models. As rare fluctuations are systematically repressed (or reintroduced), we observe percolation-like phase transitions in protein folding networks: whole sets of conformational states switch from nearly complete isolation to complete connectivity in a rapid fashion. We analyze the general and critical properties of these phase transitions in seven protein systems and discuss how closely dynamics on protein folding landscapes relate to percolation on random lattices.

  6. Factors influencing households' participation in recycling.

    PubMed

    Vicente, Paula; Reis, Elizabeth

    2008-04-01

    The success of a recycling programme depends on the active and sustained participation of citizens in the correct separation and collection of recyclable waste. An effective study of strategies aimed at augmenting people's involvement in recycling involves understanding which factors influence the decision to co-operate with a recycling programme. This research investigates the influence of attitudes, incentives, presence of children in household and information through direct media, on households' participation in recycling. The results suggest that positive attitudes toward recycling and information are important factors in explaining recycling participation. Some guidelines that may be considered in future communication and intervention strategies designed to promote recycling participation are discussed. PMID:18578153

  7. Regeneration of ammonia borane spent fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, Andrew David; Davis, Benjamin L; Gordon, John C

    2009-01-01

    A necessary target in realizing a hydrogen (H{sub 2}) economy, especially for the transportation sector, is its storage for controlled delivery, presumably to an energy producing fuel cell. In this vein, the U.S. Department of Energy's Centers of Excellence (CoE) in Hydrogen Storage have pursued different methodologies, including metal hydrides, chemical hydrides, and sorbents, for the expressed purpose of supplanting gasoline's current > 300 mile driving range. Chemical H{sub 2} storage has been dominated by one appealing material, ammonia borane (H{sub 3}N-BH{sub 3}, AB), due to its high gravimetric capacity of H{sub 2} (19.6 wt %) and low molecular weight (30.7 g mol{sup -1}). In addition, AB has both hydridic and protic moieties, yielding a material from which H{sub 2} can be readily released in contrast to the loss of H{sub 2} from C{sub 2}H{sub 6} which is substantially endothermic. As such, a number of publications have described H{sub 2} release from amine boranes, yielding various rates depending on the method applied. The viability of any chemical H{sub 2} storage system is critically dependent on efficient recyclability, but reports on the latter subject are sparse, invoke the use of high energy reducing agents, and suffer from low yields. Our group is currently engaged in trying to find and fully demonstrate an energy efficient regeneration process for the spent fuel from H{sub 2} depleted AB with a minimum number of steps. Although spent fuel composition depends on the dehydrogenation method, we have focused our efforts on the spent fuel resulting from metal-based catalysis, which has thus far shown the most promise. Metal-based catalysts have produced the fastest rates for a single equivalent of H{sub 2} released from AB and up to 2.5 equiv. of H{sub 2} can be produced within 2 hours. While ongoing work is being carried out to tailor the composition of spent AB fuel, a method has been developed for regenerating the predominant product, polyborazylene (PB) which can be obtained readily from the decomposition of borazine or from nickel carbene catalyst dehydrogenation. In this cycle, the PB is digested with benzenedithiol to yield two products which can both be converted to AB using Bu{sub 3}SnH and BU{sub 2}SnH{sub 2} as reductants. However, in a real world situation the process becomes more complicated for several reasons. Bu{sub 2}SnH{sub 2} is thermally unstable and therefore not viable in a process scale operation. This has led to the development of Bu{sub 3}SnH as the sole reductant although this requires an additional amine exchange step in order to facilitate the reduction to an amine-borane which can then be converted to AB. The tin by-products also need to be recycled in order to maximize the overall energy efficiency and therefore minimize the overall cost of the process. In addition, on an industrial scale, the mass of the tin reductant generates significant cost due to the manipulation of the relatively large quantities involved so reducing the mass at this stage would be of vast significance. We will discuss further developments made to the tin recycle component of the cycle (including methods to minimize tin usage) and investigate new methods of reduction of the digested products, primarily focusing on lighter reductants, including lighter analogs of Bu{sub 2}SnH{sub 2} and Bu{sub 3}SnH. These advances will have a significant impact on the cost of production and therefore the viability of AB as a fuel. Minimization of tin reagents and their recycle will contribute to reduction of the overall cost of AB regeneration and all stages of AB regeneration have been demonstrated.

  8. Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Michael T.; Harper, Lynn D. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Reduction (VPCAR) teststand and the results of an experimental program designed to evaluate the potential of the technology as a water purification process. In the experimental program the technology is evaluated based upon product water purity, water recovery rate, and power consumption. The experimental work demonstrates that the technology produces high purity product water and attains high water recovery rates at a relatively high specific power consumption. The experimental program was conducted in 3 phases. In phase I an Igepon(TM) soap and water mixture was used to evaluate the performance of an innovative Wiped-Film Rotating-Disk evaporator and associated demister. In phase II a phenol-water solution was used to evaluate the performance of the high temperature catalytic oxidation reactor. In phase III a urine analog was used to evaluate the performance of the combined distillation/oxidation functions of the processor.

  9. Performance Testing of the Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Removal Engineering Development Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Michael; Tleimat, Maher; Nalette, Tim; Quinn, Gregory

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the results of performance testing of the Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Removal (VPCAR) technology. The VPCAR technology is currently being developed by NASA as a Mars transit vehicle water recycling system. NASA has recently completed-a grant-to develop a next generation VPCAR system. This grant concluded with the shipment of the final deliverable to NASA on 8/31/03. This paper presents the results of mass, power, volume, and acoustic measurements for the delivered system. Product water purity analysis for a Mars transit mission and a simulated planetary base wastewater ersatz are also provided.

  10. Tuning and Freezing Disorder in Photonic Crystals using Percolation Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, Ian B.; Abedzadeh, Navid; Kay, Theresa M.; Shneidman, Anna V.; Cranshaw, Derek J.; Lončar, Marko; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Although common in biological systems, synthetic self-assembly routes to complex 3D photonic structures with tailored degrees of disorder remain elusive. Here we show how liquids can be used to finely control disorder in porous 3D photonic crystals, leading to complex and hierarchical geometries. In these optofluidic crystals, dynamically tunable disorder is superimposed onto the periodic optical structure through partial wetting or evaporation. In both cases, macroscopic symmetry breaking is driven by subtle sub-wavelength variations in the pore geometry. These variations direct site-selective infiltration of liquids through capillary interactions. Incorporating cross-linkable resins into our liquids, we developed methods to freeze in place the filling patterns at arbitrary degrees of partial wetting and intermediate stages of drying. These percolation lithography techniques produced permanent photonic structures with adjustable disorder. By coupling strong changes in optical properties to subtle differences in fluid behavior, optofluidic crystals may also prove useful in rapid analysis of liquids.

  11. Scaling, percolation and coarsening in epitaxial thin film growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Family, Fereydoon

    The results of recent theoretical and simulational studies of submonolayer and multilayer homoepitaxial growth is discussed. In the submonolayer regime, the results provide a quantitative explanation for the variation of the island density, critical island size island morphology and size distribution and island coalescence and percolation as a function of temperature and deposition rate. In multilayer growth, a realistic model for homoepitaxial growth on fcc and bcc lattices is presented which takes into account the correct crystal structure. The effects of instabilities which lead to mound formation and coarsening are discussed. An accurate prediction of the observed mound angle for Fe/Fe(1 0 0) deposition is obtained analytically and by kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. The general dependence of the mound angle, and mound coarsening behavior on temperature, deposition rate, and strength of the step barrier in bcc(1 0 0) and fcc(1 0 0) growth is also presented and compared with recent experiments.

  12. Hybrid Percolation Transition in Cluster Merging Processes: Continuously Varying Exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Y. S.; Lee, J. S.; Herrmann, H. J.; Kahng, B.

    2016-01-01

    Consider growing a network, in which every new connection is made between two disconnected nodes. At least one node is chosen randomly from a subset consisting of g fraction of the entire population in the smallest clusters. Here we show that this simple strategy for improving connection exhibits a more unusual phase transition, namely a hybrid percolation transition exhibiting the properties of both first-order and second-order phase transitions. The cluster size distribution of finite clusters at a transition point exhibits power-law behavior with a continuously varying exponent τ in the range 2 <τ (g )≤2.5 . This pattern reveals a necessary condition for a hybrid transition in cluster aggregation processes, which is comparable to the power-law behavior of the avalanche size distribution arising in models with link-deleting processes in interdependent networks.

  13. Percolation-based precursors of transitions in dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Mendez, Victor Manuel; Eguiluz, Victor M.; Ramasco, Jose J.; Hernandez-Garcia, Emilio

    2015-04-01

    Transitions in complex dynamical systems are ubiquitous in nature. Finding leading indicators in such systems is a fundamental task in many areas of science, such as financial markets, the extinction of species or climate change studies. Here we propose a new framework to study systems close to a bifurcation point by analyzing topological properties, based on clusters and percolation, of functional networks defined from the time series. The use of networks allows us for a global parametrization of the system going far beyond simple two-point relations (classical correlations). The generality and versatility of the cluster-based method to forecast transitions is shown in two different kinds of data. In one hand, three theoretical dynamical systems displaying very different transitions and crossovers were used as a test bed. On the other hand, we have used the field of surface air temperature in the NINO 3.4 zone. In this new approach, critical transitions are identified before they occur.

  14. Field-induced percolation of polar nanoregions in relaxor ferroelectrics.

    PubMed

    Prosandeev, S; Wang, Dawei; Akbarzadeh, A R; Dkhil, B; Bellaiche, L

    2013-05-17

    A first-principles-based effective Hamiltonian is used to investigate low-temperature properties of Ba(Zr,Ti)O(3) relaxor ferroelectrics under an increasing dc electric field. This system progressively develops an electric polarization that is highly nonlinear with the dc field. This development leads to a maximum of the static dielectric response at a critical field, E(th), and involves four different field regimes. Each of these regimes is associated with its own behavior of polar nanoregions, such as shrinking, flipping, and elongation of dipoles or change in morphology. The clusters propagating inside the whole sample, with dipoles being parallel to the field direction, begin to form at precisely the E(th) critical field. Such a result, and further analysis we perform, therefore, reveal that field-induced percolation of polar nanoregions is the driving mechanism for the transition from the relaxor to ferroelectric state. PMID:25167451

  15. Tuning and Freezing Disorder in Photonic Crystals using Percolation Lithography

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Ian B.; Abedzadeh, Navid; Kay, Theresa M.; Shneidman, Anna V.; Cranshaw, Derek J.; Lončar, Marko; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Although common in biological systems, synthetic self-assembly routes to complex 3D photonic structures with tailored degrees of disorder remain elusive. Here we show how liquids can be used to finely control disorder in porous 3D photonic crystals, leading to complex and hierarchical geometries. In these optofluidic crystals, dynamically tunable disorder is superimposed onto the periodic optical structure through partial wetting or evaporation. In both cases, macroscopic symmetry breaking is driven by subtle sub-wavelength variations in the pore geometry. These variations direct site-selective infiltration of liquids through capillary interactions. Incorporating cross-linkable resins into our liquids, we developed methods to freeze in place the filling patterns at arbitrary degrees of partial wetting and intermediate stages of drying. These percolation lithography techniques produced permanent photonic structures with adjustable disorder. By coupling strong changes in optical properties to subtle differences in fluid behavior, optofluidic crystals may also prove useful in rapid analysis of liquids. PMID:26790372

  16. Note: Percolation in two-dimensional flexible chains systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawłowska, Monika; Żerko, Szymon; Sikorski, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    The structure of a two-dimensional film formed by adsorbed polymer chains was studied by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The polymer chains were represented by linear sequences of lattice beads and positions of these beads were restricted to vertices of a two-dimensional square lattice. Two different Monte Carlo methods were employed to determine the properties of the model system. The first was the random sequential adsorption (RSA) and the second one was based on Monte Carlo simulations with a Verdier-Stockmayer sampling algorithm. The methodology concerning the determination of the percolation thresholds for an infinite chain system was discussed. The influence of the chain length on both thresholds was presented and discussed. It was shown that the RSA method gave considerably lower thresholds for longer chains. This behavior can be explained by a different pool of chain conformations used in the calculations in both methods under consideration.

  17. Immunization strategy based on the critical node in percolation transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Wei, Bo; Wang, Zhen; Deng, Yong

    2015-11-01

    The problem of finding a better immunization strategy for controlling the spreading of the epidemic with limited resources has attracted much attention since its great theoretical significance and wide application. In this letter, we propose a novel and successful targeted immunization strategy based on percolation transition. Our strategy repeatedly looks for the critical nodes for immunizing. The critical node, which leads to the emergence of the giant connected component as the degree threshold increases, is determined when the maximal second-largest connected component disappears. To test the effectiveness of the proposed method, we conduct the experiments on several artificial networks and real-world networks. The results show that the proposed method outperforms the degree centrality strategy, the betweenness centrality strategy and the adaptive degree centrality strategy with 18% to 50% fewer immunized nodes for same amount of immunization.

  18. Percolation and permeability of fracture networks in Excavated Damaged Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourzenko, V.; Thovert, J.; Adler, P. M.

    2012-12-01

    Generally, the excavation process of a gallery generates fractures in its immediate vicinity. The corresponding zone which is called the Excavated Damaged Zone (EDZ), has a larger permeability than the intact surrounding medium. The properties of the EDZ are attracting more and more attention because of their potential importance in repositories of nuclear wastes. The EDZ which is induced by the excavation process may create along the galleries of the repositories a high permeability zone which could directly connect the storage area with the ground surface. Therefore, the studies of its properties are of crucial importance for applications such as the storage of nuclear wastes. Field observations (such as the ones which have been systematically performed at Mont Terri by [1, 2]) suggest that the fracture density is an exponentially decreasing function of the distance to the wall with a characteristic length of about 0.5 m and that the fracture orientation is anisotropic (most fractures are subparallel to the tunnel walls) and well approximated by a Fisher law whose pole is orthogonal to the wall. Numerical samples are generated according to these prescriptions. Their percolation status and hydraulic transmissivity can be calculated by the numerical codes which are detailed in [3]. Percolation is determined by a pseudo diffusion algorithm. Flow determination necessitates the meshing of the fracture networks and the discretisation of the Darcy equation by a finite volume technique; the resulting linear system is solved by a conjugate gradient algorithm. Only the flow properties of the EDZ along the directions which are parallel to the wall are of interest when a pressure gradient parallel to the wall is applied. The transmissivity T which relates the total flow rate per unit width Q along the wall through the whole EDZ to the pressure gradient grad p, is defined by Q = - T grad p/mu where mu is the fluid viscosity. The percolation status and hydraulic transmissivity are systematically determined for a wide range of decay lengths and anisotropy parameters. They can be modeled by comparison with anisotropic fracture networks with a constant density. A heuristic power-law model is proposed which accurately describes the results for the percolation threshold over the whole investigated range of heterogeneity and anisotropy. Then, the data for the EDZ transmissivity are presented. A simple parallel flow model is introduced. The flow properties of the EDZ vary with the distance z from the wall. However, the macroscopic pressure gradient does not depend on z, and the flow lines are in average parallel to the wall. Hence, the overall transmissivity is tentatively estimated by a parallel flow model, where a layer at depth z behaves as a fractured medium with uniform properties corresponding to the state at this position in the EDZ. It yields an explicit analytical expression for the transmissivity as a function of the heterogeneity and anisotropy parameters, and it successfully accounts for all the numerical data. Graphical tools are provided from which first estimates can be quickly and easily obtained. [1] Bossart P. et al, Eng. Geol., vol. 66, 19-38 (2002). [2] Thovert J.-F. et al, Eng. Geol., 117, 39-51 (2011). [3] Adler P.M. et al, Fractured porous media, Oxford U. Press, in press.

  19. Percolation approach to glassy dynamics with continuously broken ergodicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arenzon, Jeferson J.; Coniglio, Antonio; Fierro, Annalisa; Sellitto, Mauro

    2014-08-01

    We show that the relaxation dynamics near a glass transition with continuous ergodicity breaking can be endowed with a geometric interpretation based on percolation theory. At the mean-field level this approach is consistent with the mode-coupling theory (MCT) of type-A liquid-glass transitions and allows one to disentangle the universal and nonuniversal contributions to MCT relaxation exponents. Scaling predictions for the time correlation function are successfully tested in the F12 schematic model and facilitated spin systems on a Bethe lattice. Our approach immediately suggests the extension of MCT scaling laws to finite spatial dimensions and yields predictions for dynamic relaxation exponents below an upper critical dimension of 6.

  20. Directed percolation phase transition to sustained turbulence in Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemoult, Grégoire; Shi, Liang; Avila, Kerstin; Jalikop, Shreyas V.; Avila, Marc; Hof, Björn

    2016-03-01

    Turbulence is one of the most frequently encountered non-equilibrium phenomena in nature, yet characterizing the transition that gives rise to turbulence in basic shear flows has remained an elusive task. Although, in recent studies, critical points marking the onset of sustained turbulence have been determined for several such flows, the physical nature of the transition could not be fully explained. In extensive experimental and computational studies we show for the example of Couette flow that the onset of turbulence is a second-order phase transition and falls into the directed percolation universality class. Consequently, the complex laminar-turbulent patterns distinctive for the onset of turbulence in shear flows result from short-range interactions of turbulent domains and are characterized by universal critical exponents. More generally, our study demonstrates that even high-dimensional systems far from equilibrium such as turbulence exhibit universality at onset and that here the collective dynamics obeys simple rules.

  1. Environmentally acceptable recycling in Europe

    SciTech Connect

    King, J.F.

    1995-12-31

    The modern concept of ecologically sound recycling is to ensure, as far as possible, effective use or reuse of all materials arising during the production of a component, and also the component itself at the end of its useful life. The recycling circle is well established for widely used metals such as iron and steel, aluminium and zinc. However, for magnesium, although recycled secondary scrap was a major input into magnesium casting production in the 1950`s recycling of this type of material back to components is currently almost nonexistent. The current rapid growth in use of magnesium die castings by the automotive industry will eventually result in a significant growth in availability of secondary magnesium scrap, which will present new challenges and opportunities to the skillful recyclers. However this has not yet happened, and the major preoccupation of most recyclers is to satisfy the demands of the growing die-casting industry, balancing the triple requirements of: (1) recycling or disposing of all products arising from the die-casting operation at a price, or cost, perceived as fair by the die caster; (2) satisfying our public demands to safeguard the environment in terms of emissions, effluents and disposal to land fill; and (3) establishing and maintaining a viable business activity while satisfying (1) and (2). It is to this area that the remainder of this paper is dedicated.

  2. Ammonia synthesis using magnetic induction method (MIM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puspitasari, P.; Razak, J. Abd; Yahya, N.

    2012-09-01

    The most challenging issues for ammonia synthesis is to get the high yield. New approach of ammonia synthesis by using Magnetic Induction Method (MIM) and the Helmholtz Coils has been proposed. The ammonia detection was done by using Kjeldahl Method and FTIR. The system was designed by using Autocad software. The magnetic field of MIM was vary from 100mT-200mT and the magnetic field for the Helmholtz coils was 14mT. The FTIR result shows that ammonia has been successfully formed at stretching peaks 1097,1119,1162,1236, 1377, and 1464 cm-1. UV-VIS result shows the ammonia bond at 195nm of wavelength. The ammonia yield was increase to 244.72μmole/g.h by using the MIM and six pairs of Helmholtz coils. Therefore this new method will be a new promising method to achieve the high yield ammonia at ambient condition (at 25δC and 1atm), under the Magnetic Induction Method (MIM).

  3. Low-cost anodes for ammonia electrooxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selverston, Steven M.

    This research focused on the development of low-cost electrodes for the electrochemical oxidation of ammonia to nitrogen, a reaction that has possible applications in hydrogen generation, direct ammonia fuel cells, water treatment, and sensors. Statistical design of experiments was used to help develop an efficient and scalable process for electrodeposition of platinum with a specific electrochemical surface area of over 25 m2 /g. Catalyst surface area and activity were evaluated using cyclic voltammetry, and the material microstructure and morphology were investigated using x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The synthesized electrodes were found to be active toward the ammonia electrooxidation reaction, particularly when supporting electrolyte was added. However, supporting electrolyte was not required in order to oxidize the ammonia. As proof of concept, a homemade direct ammonia fuel cell employing a commercial anion exchange membrane was tested at room temperature with gravity-fed fuel and without supporting electrolyte. At room temperature, with passive reactant supply and using dissolved oxygen at the cathode, the cell produced about one quarter the power of a direct methanol fuel cell that used active transport of humidified oxygen and preheated (50 C) methanol. With continued development of the membrane, cathode and membrane electrode assembly, the passive direct ammonia fuel cell using anion exchange membrane could have performance similar to the equivalent direct methanol fuel cell, and it could benefit from many advantages of ammonia over methanol such as lower cost, higher energy density, and reduced greenhouse gas emissions.

  4. From Earth to Space: Application of Biological Treatment for the Removal of Ammonia from Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickering, Karen; Adam, Niklas; White, Dawn; Ghosh, Amlan; Seidel, Chad

    2014-01-01

    Managing ammonia is often a challenge in both drinking water and wastewater treatment facilities. Ammonia is unregulated in drinking water, but its presence may result in numerous water quality issues in the distribution system such as loss of residual disinfectant, nitrification, and corrosion. Ammonia concentrations need to be managed in wastewater effluent to sustain the health of receiving water bodies. Biological treatment involves the microbiological oxidation of ammonia to nitrate through a two-step process. While nitrification is common in the environment, and nitrifying bacteria can grow rapidly on filtration media, appropriate conditions, such as the presence of dissolved oxygen and required nutrients, need to be established. This presentation will highlight results from two ongoing research programs - one at NASA's Johnson Space Center, and the other at a drinking water facility in California. Both programs are designed to demonstrate nitrification through biological treatment. The objective of NASA's research is to be able to recycle wastewater to potable water for spaceflight missions. To this end, a biological water processor (BWP) has been integrated with a forward osmosis secondary treatment system (FOST). Bacteria mineralize organic carbon to carbon dioxide as well as ammonia-nitrogen present in the wastewater to nitrogen gas, through a combination of nitrification and denitrification. The effluent from the BWP system is low in organic contaminants, but high in total dissolved solids. The FOST system, integrated downstream of the BWP, removes dissolved solids through a combination of concentration-driven forward osmosis and pressure driven reverse osmosis. The integrated system testing planned for this year is expected to produce water that requires only a polishing step to meet potable water requirements for spaceflight. The pilot study in California is being conducted on Golden State Water Company's Yukon wells that have hydrogen sulfide odor, color, total organic carbon, bromide, iron and manganese in addition to ammonia. A treatment evaluation, conducted in 2011, recommended the testing of biological oxidation filtration for the removal of ammonia and production of biologically stable water. An 8-month pilot testing program was conducted to develop and optimize key design and operational variables. Steadystate operational data was collected to demonstrate long-term performance and inform California Department of Public Health permitting of the full-scale process. As ammonia continues to present challenges to water and wastewater systems, innovative strategies such as biological treatment can be applied to successfully manage it. This presentation will discuss application of cutting-age research being conducted by NASA that will bridge existing information gaps, and benefit municipal utilities.

  5. From Earth to Space: Application of Biological Treatment for the Removal of Ammonia from Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, Amlan; Seidel, Chad; Adam, Niklas; Pickering, Karen; White, Dawn

    2014-01-01

    Managing ammonia is often a challenge in both drinking water and wastewater treatment facilities. Ammonia is unregulated in drinking water, but its presence may result in numerous water quality issues in the distribution system such as loss of residual disinfectant, nitrification, and corrosion. Ammonia concentrations need to be managed in wastewater effluent to sustain the health of receiving water bodies. Biological treatment involves the microbiological oxidation of ammonia to nitrate through a two-step process. While nitrification is common in the environment, and nitrifying bacteria can grow rapidly on filtration media, appropriate conditions, such as the presence of dissolved oxygen and required nutrients, need to be established. This presentation will highlight results from two ongoing research programs - one at NASA's Johnson Space Center, and the other at a drinking water facility in California. Both programs are designed to demonstrate nitrification through biological treatment. The objective of NASA's research is to be able to recycle wastewater to potable water for spaceflight mission. To this end, a biological water processor (BWP) has been integrated with a forward osmosis secondary treatment system (FOST). Bacteria mineralize organic carbon to carbon dioxide as well as ammonia-nitrogen present in the wastewater to nitrogen gas, through a combination of nitrification and denitrification. The effluent from the BWP system is low in organic contaminants, but high in total dissolved solids. The FOST system, integrated downstream of the BWP, removes dissolved solids through a combination of concentration-driven forward osmosis and pressure driven reverse osmosis. The integrated system testing planned for this year is expected to produce water that requires only a polishing step to meet potable water requirements for spaceflight. The pilot study in California is being conducted on Golden State Water Company's Yukon wellsthat have hydrogen sulfide odor, color, total organic carbon, bromide, iron and manganese in addition to ammonia. A treatment evaluation, conducted in 2011, recommended the testing of biological oxidation filtration for the removal of ammonia and production of biologically stable water. A 8-month pilot testing program was conducted to develop and optimize key design and operational variables. Steadystate operational data was collected to demonstrate long-term performance and inform California Department of Public Health permitting of the full-scale process. As ammonia continues to present challenges to water and wastewater systems, innovative strategies such as biological treatment can be applied to successfully manage it. This presentation will discuss application of cutting-age research being conducted by NASA that will bridge existing information gaps, and benefit municipal utilities.

  6. Plastics recycling: challenges and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Hopewell, Jefferson; Dvorak, Robert; Kosior, Edward

    2009-01-01

    Plastics are inexpensive, lightweight and durable materials, which can readily be moulded into a variety of products that find use in a wide range of applications. As a consequence, the production of plastics has increased markedly over the last 60 years. However, current levels of their usage and disposal generate several environmental problems. Around 4 per cent of world oil and gas production, a non-renewable resource, is used as feedstock for plastics and a further 3–4% is expended to provide energy for their manufacture. A major portion of plastic produced each year is used to make disposable items of packaging or other short-lived products that are discarded within a year of manufacture. These two observations alone indicate that our current use of plastics is not sustainable. In addition, because of the durability of the polymers involved, substantial quantities of discarded end-of-life plastics are accumulating as debris in landfills and in natural habitats worldwide. Recycling is one of the most important actions currently available to reduce these impacts and represents one of the most dynamic areas in the plastics industry today. Recycling provides opportunities to reduce oil usage, carbon dioxide emissions and the quantities of waste requiring disposal. Here, we briefly set recycling into context against other waste-reduction strategies, namely reduction in material use through downgauging or product reuse, the use of alternative biodegradable materials and energy recovery as fuel. While plastics have been recycled since the 1970s, the quantities that are recycled vary geographically, according to plastic type and application. Recycling of packaging materials has seen rapid expansion over the last decades in a number of countries. Advances in technologies and systems for the collection, sorting and reprocessing of recyclable plastics are creating new opportunities for recycling, and with the combined actions of the public, industry and governments it may be possible to divert the majority of plastic waste from landfills to recycling over the next decades. PMID:19528059

  7. Plastics recycling: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Hopewell, Jefferson; Dvorak, Robert; Kosior, Edward

    2009-07-27

    Plastics are inexpensive, lightweight and durable materials, which can readily be moulded into a variety of products that find use in a wide range of applications. As a consequence, the production of plastics has increased markedly over the last 60 years. However, current levels of their usage and disposal generate several environmental problems. Around 4 per cent of world oil and gas production, a non-renewable resource, is used as feedstock for plastics and a further 3-4% is expended to provide energy for their manufacture. A major portion of plastic produced each year is used to make disposable items of packaging or other short-lived products that are discarded within a year of manufacture. These two observations alone indicate that our current use of plastics is not sustainable. In addition, because of the durability of the polymers involved, substantial quantities of discarded end-of-life plastics are accumulating as debris in landfills and in natural habitats worldwide. Recycling is one of the most important actions currently available to reduce these impacts and represents one of the most dynamic areas in the plastics industry today. Recycling provides opportunities to reduce oil usage, carbon dioxide emissions and the quantities of waste requiring disposal. Here, we briefly set recycling into context against other waste-reduction strategies, namely reduction in material use through downgauging or product reuse, the use of alternative biodegradable materials and energy recovery as fuel. While plastics have been recycled since the 1970s, the quantities that are recycled vary geographically, according to plastic type and application. Recycling of packaging materials has seen rapid expansion over the last decades in a number of countries. Advances in technologies and systems for the collection, sorting and reprocessing of recyclable plastics are creating new opportunities for recycling, and with the combined actions of the public, industry and governments it may be possible to divert the majority of plastic waste from landfills to recycling over the next decades. PMID:19528059

  8. Coal liquefaction with preasphaltene recycle

    DOEpatents

    Weimer, Robert F.; Miller, Robert N.

    1986-01-01

    A coal liquefaction system is disclosed with a novel preasphaltene recycle from a supercritical extraction unit to the slurry mix tank wherein the recycle stream contains at least 90% preasphaltenes (benzene insoluble, pyridine soluble organics) with other residual materials such as unconverted coal and ash. This subject process results in the production of asphaltene materials which can be subjected to hydrotreating to acquire a substitute for No. 6 fuel oil. The preasphaltene-predominant recycle reduces the hydrogen consumption for a process where asphaltene material is being sought.

  9. Superalloy recycling 1976-1986

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papp, John F.

    The primary changes in the U.S. superalloy recycling industry since 1976 have been the introduction of superalloy scrap as a material supply source and increased use of closed-loop recycling agreements among forger-scrap processor-alloy producer-engine manufacturing groups. In addition, Inconel 718 has become the preeminent superalloy since 1976. Of the 55 million lbs of superalloy scrap processed in 1986, about 70 percent was recycled into the same superalloy, 20 percent was downgraded, and 10 percent was sold to refineries; about 92 percent went to domestic buyers, and the remainder was exported.

  10. Recycling and Life Cycle Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sujit

    2010-01-01

    This chapter addresses recycling and life cycle considerations related to the growing use of lightweight materials in vehicles. The chapter first addresses the benefit of a life cycle perspective in materials choice, and the role that recycling plays in reducing energy inputs and environmental impacts in a vehicle s life cycle. Some limitations of life cycle analysis and results of several vehicle- and fleet-level assessments are drawn from published studies. With emphasis on lightweight materials such as aluminum, magnesium, and polymer composites, the status of the existing recycling infrastructure and technological challenges being faced by the industry also are discussed.

  11. Seasonal variations of the effect of temperature on lethal and sublethal toxicities of ammonia for three common freshwater shredders.

    PubMed

    Dehedin, Arnaud; Piscart, Christophe; Marmonier, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    In a context of global change, increases in temperature and in ammonia concentration should strongly affect the crustaceans of wetlands. We experimentally examined, at three different seasons (i.e. winter, spring, and summer), the effect of temperature (12, 18, and 24°C) on the lethal (survival rates) and sublethal (oxygen consumption) toxicity of unionized ammonia (NH(3)) on the amphipods Gammarus pulex and Gammarus roeselii and the isopod Asellus aquaticus. Our results demonstrate (1) a gradient of increasing tolerance and survival from G. roeselii to G. pulex and A. aquaticus, (2) an increasing toxicity of ammonia with temperature, and (3) a strong seasonal variation of the tolerance to ammonia, with a higher tolerance of individuals in winter than in summer. However, the sub-lethal effect of ammonia on the oxygen consumption rate was species dependant and changed according to temperature or season. Global change and resulting variations in crustacean densities will potentially affect the ecosystem functioning (e.g. organic matter recycling). PMID:22910696

  12. EVALUATION AND MANAGEMENT OF AMMONIA EMISSIONS FROM POULTRY LITTER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ammonia volatilization from poultry litter results in high levels of ammonia in poultry facilities, which negatively impacts bird performance and worker health. Ammonia emissions from the houses also cause atmospheric ammonia contamination. Although there is a tremendous concern about these emissio...

  13. Two-Dimensional Continuum Percolation Threshold for Diffusing Particles of Nonzero Radius

    PubMed Central

    Saxton, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Lateral diffusion in the plasma membrane is obstructed by proteins bound to the cytoskeleton. The most important parameter describing obstructed diffusion is the percolation threshold. The thresholds are well known for point tracers, but for tracers of nonzero radius, the threshold depends on the excluded area, not just the obstacle concentration. Here thresholds are obtained for circular obstacles on the continuum. Random obstacle configurations are generated by Brownian dynamics or Monte Carlo methods, the obstacles are immobilized, and the percolation threshold is obtained by solving a bond percolation problem on the Voronoi diagram of the obstacles. The percolation threshold is expressed as the diameter of the largest tracer that can cross a set of immobile obstacles at a prescribed number density. For random overlapping obstacles, the results agree with the known analytical solution quantitatively. When the obstacles are soft disks with a 1/r12 repulsion, the percolating diameter is ∼20% lower than for overlapping obstacles. A percolation model predicts that the threshold is highly sensitive to the tracer radius. To our knowledge, such a strong dependence has so far not been reported for the plasma membrane, suggesting that percolation is not the factor controlling lateral diffusion. A definitive experiment is proposed. PMID:20816061

  14. Percolation through leaf litter: What happens during rainfall events of varying intensity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkerley, David

    2015-06-01

    Simulated rainfall experiments with a layer of eucalypt leaf litter showed that the flux of percolate emerging from the layer was influenced by the intensity profile of the incident rainfall. Experiments involved several different fixed rainfall intensities, and also seven different temporal patterns of changing intensity (event profiles). The event profiles all had a mean intensity of 10 mm/h and the same 30 min duration, but included intensity bursts or peaks of up to 100 mm/h early or late within the event, as well as events with multiple intensity peaks. The litter percolate flux associated with early rainfall intensity peaks was typically attenuated by nearly 50% in comparison with the intensity of the incident rainfall. In contrast, percolate flux from late rainfall peaks was often magnified, in some cases by up to 360%. Even under rainfall of constant intensity, the percolate flux exhibits fluctuations of about ±25% of the mean flux. In most cases, peaks in percolate flux lagged peaks in the incident rainfall by 4-5 min. The potential importance of diminished or enlarged litter percolate fluxes is their effect on water partitioning and the potential for lateral flow within and beneath litter layers, especially if the peaks in percolate flux exceed local soil infiltrability.

  15. Range effect on percolation threshold and structural properties for short-range attractive spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jiachen; Xu, Limei; Song, Fan

    2015-01-01

    Percolation or aggregation in colloidal system is important in many fields of science and technology. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we study the percolation behavior for systems consisting of spheres interacting with short-range square-well (SRSW) which mimic colloidal particles, with different interaction ranges. We specifically focus on how the interaction range affects the percolation thresholds in the supercritical region. We find that the contact percolation boundaries are strongly dependent on the interaction ranges of SRSW, especially away from the liquid-liquid critical point. However, varying the interaction ranges of SRSW does not affect much the structure along percolation boundaries especially for low packing fractions. For instance, along the percolation boundary, distributions of coordination number show convergence, and distributions of cluster size are universal for different interaction ranges considered. In addition, either the bond percolation boundaries or isolines of average bond coordination number collapse to those for Baxter sticky model on phase diagram, which confirms the extended law of corresponding states.

  16. Percolation, phase separation, and gelation in fluids and mixtures of spheres and rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadrich, Ryan; Schweizer, Kenneth S.

    2011-12-01

    The relationship between kinetic arrest, connectivity percolation, structure and phase separation in protein, nanoparticle, and colloidal suspensions is a rich and complex problem. Using a combination of integral equation theory, connectivity percolation methods, naïve mode coupling theory, and the activated dynamics nonlinear Langevin equation approach, we study this problem for isotropic one-component fluids of spheres and variable aspect ratio rigid rods, and also percolation in rod-sphere mixtures. The key control parameters are interparticle attraction strength and its (short) spatial range, total packing fraction, and mixture composition. For spherical particles, formation of a homogeneous one-phase kinetically stable and percolated physical gel is predicted to be possible, but depends on non-universal factors. On the other hand, the dynamic crossover to activated dynamics and physical bond formation, which signals discrete cluster formation below the percolation threshold, almost always occurs in the one phase region. Rods more easily gel in the homogeneous isotropic regime, but whether a percolation or kinetic arrest boundary is reached first upon increasing interparticle attraction depends sensitively on packing fraction, rod aspect ratio and attraction range. Overall, the connectivity percolation threshold is much more sensitive to attraction range than either the kinetic arrest or phase separation boundaries. Our results appear to be qualitatively consistent with recent experiments on polymer-colloid depletion systems and brush mediated attractive nanoparticle suspensions.

  17. Progress reported in PET recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-06-01

    The Goodyear Polyester Division has demonstrated its ability to break down polyethylene terephthalate (PET) from recycled plastic soft drink bottles and remanufacture the material into PET suitable for containers. Most people are familiar with PET in the form of lightweight, shatter resistant beverage bottles. About 20 percent of these beverage containers currently are being recycled. The recycled PET is currently used in many applications such as carpeting, pillow stuffing, sleeping bag filling, insulation for water heaters and non-food containers. This is the first step of Goodyear's increased efforts to recycle PET from containers into a material suitable for food packing. The project is extremely complex, involving sophisticated understanding of the chemical reactions involved, PET production and the technology testing protocols necessary to design a process that addresses all the technical, safety, and regulatory concerns. The research conducted so far indicated that additional processing beyond simply cleaning the shredded material, called flake, will be required to assure a quality polymer.

  18. Molecular Modeling at Plastic Recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinelli, Laura; Sinesi, Sabino; Toaldo, Alessio Baron; Fermeglia, Maurizio; Posocco, Paola; Szczurek, Tomasz; Kozlowski, Marek

    2007-04-01

    The possibility to model the new materials from recycled, post industrial polymer rejects by molecular modeling methods was investigated by comparison of the results obtained from the simulation process and the experiments.

  19. Ship recycling and marine pollution.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yen-Chiang; Wang, Nannan; Durak, Onur Sabri

    2010-09-01

    This paper discusses the historical background, structure and enforcement of the '2009 Hong Kong International Convention on the Safe and Environmentally Sound Recycling of Ships.' the 2009 Hong Kong Convention establishes control and enforcement instruments related to ship recycling, determining the control rights of Port States and the obligations of Flag States, Parties and recycling facilities under its jurisdiction. The Convention also controls the communication and exchange of information procedures, establishes a reporting system to be used upon the completion of recycling, and outlines an auditing system for detecting violations. The Convention, however, also contains some deficiencies. This paper concludes these deficiencies will eventually influence the final acceptance of this Convention by the international community. PMID:20594562

  20. Plutonium Multiple Recycling In PWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Nigon, Jean-Louis; Lenain, Richard; Zaetta, Alain

    2002-07-01

    Reprocessing and recycling open the road to a sustainable management of nuclear materials and an environment friendly management of nuclear waste. However, long or very long term recycling implies fast neutron reactors. High burn-ups of irradiated standard UO{sub 2} fuel as well as recycling of plutonium fuel in thermal reactors lead to a 'degradation' of plutonium that means a low fissile content, which is hardly compatible with recycling in LWRs. Thus the question of plutonium management has been raised; although there are some limitations, a truly large variety of options do exist; no one of the presently selected ways of plutonium management is a dead end road. Among these various options, some are fully compatible with the existing reactors and may be considered for the mid term future; they offer a competitive management of plutonium during the transition from thermal to fast reactors. (authors)

  1. New approaches to recycling tires

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, R.

    1991-03-01

    Steel-belted radial tires are potentially one of the most recyclable products created by modern industry, although the potential has been barely tapped. Discarded tires pile up at an astonishing rate each year - 234 million in the US and 26 million passenger tire equivalents in Canada. They represent a mother lode of raw material waiting for modern day miners to transform them into recycled rubber, steel, fiber and energy. The tremendous increase in use of steel belted radials since the early 1970s has complicated their recyclability compared to the bias ply tire, but it has also accomplished waste reduction by tripling tire service life. Part one of this report describes processes being developed to convert tires to crumb rubber, as well as some potential uses of recycled rubber. Part two, to appear next month, will examine such uses as rubberized athletic tracks and highway asphalt.

  2. Recycled plastics for food packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Thorsheim, H.R.; Armstrong, D.J.

    1993-08-01

    There is a strong movement in this country to decrease the amount of waste produced and to use resources more efficiently. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is interested in helping to resolve the solid waste problem. The FDA supports recycling and the broader societal goal of diverting material from the solid waste stream, when it is consistent with the statutory responsibilities to protect the public health. The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) mandates that the FDA review the impact of new food-packaging materials on the environment. Currently, no regulations have been issued for the use of recycled polymers in contact with food. Plastics are permeable, and the possibility that a contaminant such as a pesticide or motor oil might be absorbed by a plastic container and remain in the resin after recycling is very real. The paper discusses FDA policy and research to ensure that recycled plastics are safe for food-contact use.

  3. Operating A Recycling Program: A Citizen's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulligan, Kevin; Powell, Jerry

    Presented are recycling program alternatives, procedures for handling and marketing recyclable materials, and suggestions for financing and publicizing a recycling operation. This publication offers a general overview of the possibilities and potential pitfalls of recycling efforts, thereby serving as a catalyst and guide for organizations wishing…

  4. 16 CFR 260.12 - Recyclable claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... established recycling program for reuse or use in manufacturing or assembling another item. (b) Marketers... the availability of recycling programs and collection sites to consumers. (1) When recycling..., means at least 60 percent. (2) When recycling facilities are available to less than a...

  5. You're a "What"? Recycling Coordinator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torpey, Elka Maria

    2011-01-01

    Recycling coordinators supervise curbside and dropoff recycling programs for municipal governments or private firms. Today, recycling is mandatory in many communities. And advancements in collection and processing methods have helped to increase the quantity of materials for which the recycling coordinator is responsible. In some communities,…

  6. 16 CFR 260.12 - Recyclable claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... established recycling program for reuse or use in manufacturing or assembling another item. (b) Marketers... the availability of recycling programs and collection sites to consumers. (1) When recycling..., means at least 60 percent. (2) When recycling facilities are available to less than a...

  7. The Three Rs: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Activities, 1991

    1991-01-01

    A student hand-out for a recycling unit defines the terms reduce, recycle, and reuse as they relate to solid waste management. Presents the characteristics of recyclable items such as yard wastes, metals, glass, and paper. Lists organizations through which more information about recycling can be obtained. (MCO)

  8. Percolation phase diagrams for multi-phase models built on the overlapping sphere model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garboczi, E. J.

    2016-01-01

    The overlapping sphere (OS) percolation model gives a two-phase microstructure (matrix plus inclusions) that is useful for testing composite material ideas and other applications, as well as serving as a paradigm of overlapping object percolation and phase transitions. Real materials often have more than two phases, so it is of interest to extend the applicability of the OS model. A flexible variant of the OS model can be constructed by randomly assigning the spheres different phase labels, according to a uniform probability distribution, as they are inserted one by one into the matrix. The resulting three or more phase models can have different amounts of percolating and non-percolating phases, depending on the volume fraction of each phase and the total OS volume fraction. A three-dimensional digital image approach is used to approximately map out the percolation phase diagram of such models, explicitly up to four phases (one matrix plus three spherical inclusion phases) and implicitly for N > 4 phases. For the three phase model, it was found that a single OS sub-phase has a percolation threshold that ranges from about a volume fraction of 0.16, when the matrix volume fraction is about 0.01, to about 0.30, at a matrix volume fraction of about 0.7. The approximate analytical dependence of this sub-phase percolation threshold on the defining model parameters serves to guide the building of the percolation phase diagram for the N-phase model, and is used to determine the maximum value of N(N = 6) at which all N phases can be simultaneously percolated.

  9. Ammonia measurement with a pH electrode in the ammonia/urea-SCR process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kröcher, Oliver; Elsener, Martin

    2007-03-01

    The selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides with ammonia (ammonia SCR) and urea (urea SCR), respectively, is a widespread process to clean flue and diesel exhaust gases due to its simplicity and efficiency. The main challenge of the process is to minimize the ammonia emissions downstream of the SCR catalyst. We found that ammonia emissions of >10 ppm can reliably be detected with a simple pH electrode in the presence of CO2, SOx, NOx, and moderately weak organic acids. 10-20 ppm of ammonia in the exhaust gas are sufficient to neutralize the acids and to increase the pH value from 3 to 6. On this basis a continuous measuring method for ammonia was developed, which was used to control the dosage of urea in the SCR process. While keeping the ammonia emissions after the SCR catalyst at 5-30 ppm an average NOx removal efficiency (DeNOx) of >95% were achieved at a diesel test rig. The method can also be applied for exhaust gases with higher acid contents, if a basic pre-filter is added adsorbing the acidic exhaust components. Compared to water as absorption solution, more precise ammonia measurements are possible, if a 0.1 M NH4Cl absorption solution is applied, whose pH value is changing as a Nernst function of the ammonia concentration.

  10. Transport at the Recycling Endosome

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Victor W.; Prekeris, Rytis

    2010-01-01

    Summary The recycling endosome (RE) has long been considered as a sub-compartment of the early endosome that recycles internalized cargoes to the plasma membrane. The RE is now appreciated to participate in a more complex set of intracellular itineraries. Key cargo molecules and transport factors that act in these pathways are being identified. These advancements are beginning to reveal complexities in pathways involving the RE, and also suggest ways of further delineating functional domains of this compartment. PMID:20541925

  11. Ammonia Affects Astroglial Proliferation in Culture

    PubMed Central

    Bodega, Guillermo; Segura, Berta; Ciordia, Sergio; Mena, María del Carmen; López-Fernández, Luis Andrés; García, María Isabel; Trabado, Isabel; Suárez, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Primary cultures of rat astroglial cells were exposed to 1, 3 and 5 mM NH4Cl for up to 10 days. Dose- and time-dependent reductions in cell numbers were seen, plus an increase in the proportion of cells in the S phase. The DNA content was reduced in the treated cells, and BrdU incorporation diminished. However, neither ammonia nor ammonia plus glutamine had any effect on DNA polymerase activity. iTRAQ analysis showed that exposure to ammonia induced a significant reduction in histone and heterochromatin protein 1 expression. A reduction in cell viability was also noted. The ammonia-induced reduction of proliferative activity in these cultured astroglial cells seems to be due to a delay in the completion of the S phase provoked by the inhibition of chromatin protein synthesis. PMID:26421615

  12. INVESTIGATION OF THE ORION RESEARCH AMMONIA MONITOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Orion Research ammonia monitor was investigated using the Orion specifications and environmental considerations as a guide. Laboratory tests under controlled environmental conditions showed the electronic stability (drift) to be well within + or - 10 percent of reading over t...

  13. DEVELOPMENT AND SELECTION OF AMMONIA EMISSION FACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report compiles recent literature on ammonia (NH') emission factors for application in the United States. ost of the recent research supports acid deposition studies in the European community (specifically, the Netherlands, Great Britain, and Scandinavia) but some research h...

  14. Recycling incineration: Evaluating the choices

    SciTech Connect

    Denison, R.A.; Ruston, J.

    1993-01-01

    Conflicts between proponents of municipal solid waste incineration and advocates of recycling have escalated with efforts to reduce the volume of waste that ends up in landfills. Central to this debate is competition for materials that are both combustible and recyclable. Environmental and economic concerns also play a major role. This book, produced by the Environmental Defense Fund, compares recycling and incineration. It is intended for citizens, government officials, and business people who want to help resolve the solid-waste crisis.' The book is divided into three parts: recycling and incineration; health and environmental risk of incineration; and planning, public participation, and environmental review requirements. The book does an excellent job of discussing the benefits of recycling and the pitfalls of incineration. It provides helpful information for identifying questions that should be raised about incineration, but it does not raise similar queries about recycling. There is much worthwhile information here, but the book would be more useful if it identified critical issues for all waste reduction and management options.

  15. Scrap computer recycling in Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.H.; Chang, S.L.; Wang, K.M.; Wen, L.C.

    1999-07-01

    It is estimated that approximately 700,000 scrap personal computers will be generated each year in Taiwan. The disposal of such a huge amount of scrap computers presents a difficult task for the island due to the scarcity of landfills and incineration facilities available locally. Also, the hazardous materials contained in the scrap computers may cause serious pollution to the environment, if they are not properly disposed. Thus, EPA of Taiwan has declared scrap personal computers as a producer responsibility recycling product on July 1997 to mandate that the manufacturers, importers and sellers of personal computers have to recover and recycle their scrap computers properly. Beginning on June 1, 1998, a scrap computer recycling plan is officially implemented on the island. Under this plan, consumers can deliver their unwanted personal computers to the designated collection points to receive reward money. Currently, only six items are mandated to be recycled in this recycling plan. They are notebooks, monitor and the hard disk, power supply, printed circuit board and shell of the main frame of the personal computer. This paper presents the current scrap computer recycling system in Taiwan.

  16. Interlocking-induced stiffness in stochastically microcracked materials beyond the transport percolation threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picu, R. C.; Pal, A.; Lupulescu, M. V.

    2016-04-01

    We study the mechanical behavior of two-dimensional, stochastically microcracked continua in the range of crack densities close to, and above, the transport percolation threshold. We show that these materials retain stiffness up to crack densities much larger than the transport percolation threshold due to topological interlocking of sample subdomains. Even with a linear constitutive law for the continuum, the mechanical behavior becomes nonlinear in the range of crack densities bounded by the transport and stiffness percolation thresholds. The effect is due to the fractal nature of the fragmentation process and is not linked to the roughness of individual cracks.

  17. A precise determination of the void percolation threshold for two distributions of overlapping spheres

    SciTech Connect

    RINTOUL,MARK DANIEL

    2000-01-25

    The void percolation threshold is calculated for a distribution of overlapping spheres with equal radii, and for a binary sized distribution of overlapping spheres, where half of the spheres have radii twice as large as the other half. Using systems much larger than previous work, the authors determine a much more precise value for the percolation thresholds and correlation length exponent. The values for the percolation thresholds are shown to be significantly different, in contrast with previous, less precise works that speculated that the threshold might be universal with respect to sphere size distribution.

  18. Correlated Percolation, Fractal Structures, and Scale-Invariant Distribution of Clusters in Natural Images

    PubMed Central

    Saremi, Saeed; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2016-01-01

    Natural images are scale invariant with structures at all length scales. We formulated a geometric view of scale invariance in natural images using percolation theory, which describes the behavior of connected clusters on graphs. We map images to the percolation model by defining clusters on a binary representation for images. We show that critical percolating structures emerge in natural images and study their scaling properties by identifying fractal dimensions and exponents for the scale-invariant distributions of clusters. This formulation leads to a method for identifying clusters in images from underlying structures as a starting point for image segmentation. PMID:26415153

  19. A site-percolation threshold for the diamond lattice with diatomic substitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holloway, H.

    1988-01-01

    A Monte Carlo analysis is made of site percolation on a diamond lattice occupied by a mixture of monatomic and diatomic constituents that is generated by an algorithm simulating the results of random incorporation during growth. This system models some features of the alloys of Ge with group III-V semiconductors. Extrapolation to infinite sample size gives percolation thresholds of 0.35 for both the diatomic and the monatomic constituent of the alloy. This is significantly less than the threshold value of 0.43 for percolation on a simply substituted diamond lattice.

  20. Dimensional percolation of sheared nano-rod dispersions and consequences for highly anisotropic property tensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forest, M. Gregory; Zheng, Xiaoyu; Zhou, Ruhai; Vaia, Richard

    2008-03-01

    The Doi-Hess theory for flowing nano-rod dispersion yields orientational probability distribution functions for the nano-particle phase in flow-processed thin films. These numerical databases for variable shear rate, particle aspect ratio and volume fraction are then combined with a Monte Carlo algorithm to populate sheared dispersions. Nano-rod cluster statistics are then computed to determine percolation thresholds, which yield transitions from zero to one, two and three dimensional percolating paths. Finally, effective property enhancements are computed which include standard volume-averaged homogenization and percolation cluster statistics.

  1. Dynamic signature for the equilibrium percolation threshold of attractive colloidal fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anekal, Samartha G.; Bahukudumbi, Pradipkumar; Bevan, Michael A.

    2006-02-01

    Short-time self-diffusivities, DSS , are computed for attractive colloidal fluids with van der Waals potentials to identify their percolation threshold and a previously unexplained dynamic transition. Our results show a discontinuous change in the slope of DSS vs temperature as the percolation threshold is crossed. Because DSS depends only on multibody hydrodynamic interactions, the percolation threshold of attractive colloidal fluids is shown to correspond to a transition in a dynamic property consistent with the linear viscoelastic measurements of Woutersen , J. Chem. Phys. 101, 542 (1994).

  2. Dynamic signature for the equilibrium percolation threshold of attractive colloidal fluids.

    PubMed

    Anekal, Samartha G; Bahukudumbi, Pradipkumar; Bevan, Michael A

    2006-02-01

    Short-time self-diffusivities, D(S)S, are computed for attractive colloidal fluids with van der Waals potentials to identify their percolation threshold and a previously unexplained dynamic transition. Our results show a discontinuous change in the slope of D(S)S vs temperature as the percolation threshold is crossed. Because D(S)S depends only on multibody hydrodynamic interactions, the percolation threshold of attractive colloidal fluids is shown to correspond to a transition in a dynamic property consistent with the linear viscoelastic measurements of Woutersen et al., J. Chem. Phys. 101, 542 (1994). PMID:16605313

  3. Correlated Percolation, Fractal Structures, and Scale-Invariant Distribution of Clusters in Natural Images.

    PubMed

    Saremi, Saeed; Sejnowski, Terrence J

    2016-05-01

    Natural images are scale invariant with structures at all length scales.We formulated a geometric view of scale invariance in natural images using percolation theory, which describes the behavior of connected clusters on graphs.We map images to the percolation model by defining clusters on a binary representation for images. We show that critical percolating structures emerge in natural images and study their scaling properties by identifying fractal dimensions and exponents for the scale-invariant distributions of clusters. This formulation leads to a method for identifying clusters in images from underlying structures as a starting point for image segmentation. PMID:26415153

  4. Plasma Ammonia Levels in Newborns with Asphyxia

    PubMed Central

    KHALESSI, Nasrin; KHOSRAVI, Nastaran; MIRJAFARI, Maryam; AFSHARKHAS, Ladan

    2016-01-01

    Objective Perinatal asphyxia may result in hypoxic damage in various body organs, especially in the central nervous system. It could induce cascade of biochemical events leading to the cell death and metabolic changes, eventually may increase plasma ammonia levels. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of hyperammonemia in neonates with asphyxia and to find the relationship between ammonia levels and severity of asphyxia. Material & Methods In this cross-sectional study, we included 100 neonates with perinatal asphyxia in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of Ali-Asghar Hospital, Iran University of Medical Science, Tehran, Iran in 2010-2011. All full term patients diagnosed of asphyxia were enrolled. The relationship between plasma ammonia levels and sex, gestational age, birth weight and severity of asphyxia were determined. Data were analyzed using SPSS software. Results Fifty six percent of neonates were male. The mean gestational age was 38.0± 1.2 wk. Mean plasma ammonia level was 222 ± 100 μg/dl and 20% of the neonates had hyperammonemia. It was not associated with gender, gestational age, birth weight, and asphyxia severity. Six patients died and mean plasma ammonia levels was 206±122 μg/dl. In this group, there was no significant relation between plasma ammonia levels and severity of asphyxia. No significant different was seen between plasma ammonia in dead and lived neonates. Conclusion According to high prevalence of hyperammonemia in neonatal asphyxia, measurement of plasma ammonia levels, is suggested to improve management of asphyxia. PMID:27057187

  5. Corrosion inhibitor for aqueous ammonia absorption system

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, B.A.; Whitlow, E.P.

    1998-09-22

    A method is described for inhibiting corrosion and the formation of hydrogen and thus improving absorption in an ammonia/water absorption refrigeration, air conditioning or heat pump system by maintaining the hydroxyl ion concentration of the aqueous ammonia working fluid within a selected range under anaerobic conditions at temperatures up to 425 F. This hydroxyl ion concentration is maintained by introducing to the aqueous ammonia working fluid an inhibitor in an amount effective to produce a hydroxyl ion concentration corresponding to a normality of the inhibitor relative to the water content ranging from about 0.015 N to about 0.2 N at 25 C. Also, working fluids for inhibiting the corrosion of carbon steel and resulting hydrogen formation and improving absorption in an ammonia/water absorption system under anaerobic conditions at up to 425 F. The working fluids may be aqueous solutions of ammonia and a strong base or aqueous solutions of ammonia, a strong base, and a specified buffer. 5 figs.

  6. Corrosion inhibitor for aqueous ammonia absorption system

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Benjamin A.; Whitlow, Eugene P.

    1998-09-22

    A method of inhibiting corrosion and the formation of hydrogen and thus improving absorption in an ammonia/water absorption refrigeration, air conditioning or heat pump system by maintaining the hydroxyl ion concentration of the aqueous ammonia working fluid within a selected range under anaerobic conditions at temperatures up to 425.degree. F. This hydroxyl ion concentration is maintained by introducing to the aqueous ammonia working fluid an inhibitor in an amount effective to produce a hydroxyl ion concentration corresponding to a normality of the inhibitor relative to the water content ranging from about 0.015 N to about 0.2 N at 25.degree. C. Also, working fluids for inhibiting the corrosion of carbon steel and resulting hydrogen formation and improving absorption in an ammonia/water absorption system under anaerobic conditions at up to 425.degree. F. The working fluids may be aqueous solutions of ammonia and a strong base or aqueous solutions of ammonia, a strong base, and a specified buffer.

  7. Ammonia chemistry in a flameless jet

    SciTech Connect

    Zieba, Mariusz; Schuster, Anja; Scheffknecht, Guenter; Brink, Anders; Hupa, Mikko

    2009-10-15

    In this paper, the nitrogen chemistry in an ammonia (NH{sub 3}) doped flameless jet is investigated using a kinetic reactor network model. The reactor network model is used to explain the main differences in ammonia chemistry for methane (CH{sub 4})-containing fuels and methane-free fuels. The chemical pathways of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) formation and destruction are identified using rate-of-production analysis. The results show that in the case of natural gas, ammonia reacts relatively late at fuel lean condition leading to high NO{sub x} emissions. In the pre-ignition zone, the ammonia chemistry is blocked due to the absence of free radicals which are consumed by methane-methyl radical (CH{sub 3}) conversion. In the case of methane-free gas, the ammonia reacted very rapidly and complete decomposition was reached in the fuel rich region of the jet. In this case the necessary radicals for the ammonia conversion are generated from hydrogen (H{sub 2}) oxidation. (author)

  8. On the robustness of the ammonia thermometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maret, S.; Faure, A.; Scifoni, E.; Wiesenfeld, L.

    2009-10-01

    Ammonia inversion lines are often used as probes of the physical conditions in the dense interstellar medium. The excitation temperature between the first two para-metastable (rotational) levels is an excellent probe of the gas kinetic temperature. However, the calibration of this ammonia thermometer depends on the accuracy of the collisional rates with H2. Here, we present new collisional rates for ortho- and para-NH3 colliding with para-H2(J = 0), and investigate the effects of these new rates on the excitation of ammonia. Scattering calculations employ a new, high-accuracy, potential energy surface computed at the coupled-cluster CCSD(T) level with a basis set extrapolation procedure. Rates are obtained for all transitions involving ammonia levels with J <= 3 and for kinetic temperatures in the range 5-100 K. We find that the calibration curve of the ammonia thermometer - which relates the observed excitation temperature between the first two para-metastable levels to the gas kinetic temperature - does not change significantly when these new rates are used. Thus, the calibration of ammonia thermometer appears to be robust. Effects of the new rates on the excitation temperature of inversion and rotation-inversion transitions are also found to be small.

  9. Microecology of Blastomyces dermatitidis: the ammonia hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Baumgardner, Dennis J

    2009-11-01

    The precise microecology of Blastomyces dermatitidis is unknown, but the fungus has been associated with nitrogenous waste products and rapidly changing environmental conditions. Ammonia accumulates in certain microenvironments, is toxic to most fungi, but may not be identified in processed soil samples. Ammonia tolerance of B. dermatitidis was investigated with two strains recovered in Wisconsin, one from a dog and the other from an environmental source. The samples were grown on phosphate and HEPES buffered agar media supplemented with mineral salts, low (1 g/l) and high (20 g/l) dextrose and increasing amounts of ammonium sulfate, at pH 7-8.2, in gas-impermeable bags at 20 degrees C. Moderate mold growth and sporulation of the strains were observed at low glucose concentration and calculated ammonia concentrations of 4.2 mmol/l when plates were inoculated with either mold or yeast forms. Three recent B. dermatitidis human clinical isolates also exhibited similar growth on this media, and 4/5 strains tolerated ammonia concentrations of 42-62 mmol/l. Growth of virtually all soil fungi from 206 aqueous slurries of fresh and frozen soil from the northern USA and Canada was inhibited at ammonia concentrations of 2.1-4.2 mmol/l. The ability of B. dermatitidis to survive and grow in organic carbon-poor, high ammonia microenvironments may be important to the competitive success of this fungus. These findings may have implications for other dimorphic fungi. PMID:19888807

  10. Analysis of Ammonia Toxicity in Landfill Leachates

    PubMed Central

    Osada, Takuya; Nemoto, Keisuke; Nakanishi, Hiroki; Hatano, Ayumi; Shoji, Ryo; Naruoka, Tomohiro; Yamada, Masato

    2011-01-01

    Toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) phase I manipulations and toxicity test with D. magna were conducted on leachates from an industrial waste landfill site in Japan. Physicochemical analysis detected heavy metals at concentrations insufficient to account for the observed acute toxicity. The graduated pH and aeration manipulations identified the prominent toxicity of ammonia. Based on joint toxicity with additive effects of unionized ammonia and ammonium ions, the unionized ammonia toxicity (LC50,NH3(aq)) was calculated as 3.3 ppm, and the toxicity of ammonium ions (LC50,NH4+) was calculated as 222 ppm. Then, the contribution of ammonia toxicity in the landfill leachate toxicity was calculated as 58.7 vol% of the total toxicity in the landfill leachate. Other specific toxicants masked by ammonia's toxicity were detected. Contribution rate of the toxicants other than by ammonia was 41.3 vol% of the total toxicity of the landfill leachate. PMID:23724289

  11. Recycling steel. Conducting a waste audit.

    PubMed

    Crawford, G

    1996-01-01

    This is the second in a series of three articles regarding steel can recycling from foodservice operations of healthcare facilities. This article highlights the basic methods of recycling steel cans, and includes information on conducting a waste audit and negotiating with a hauler regarding the benefits of recycling. The previous article discussed how steel is recycled across the country. The next article will convey a case history of actual foodservice recycling practice from a healthcare facility. PMID:10157569

  12. Universal scaling of the formation factor in porous media derived by combining percolation and effective medium theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbarian, Behzad; Hunt, Allen G.; Ewing, Robert P.; Skinner, Thomas E.

    2014-06-01

    The porosity dependence of the formation factor for geologic media is examined from the perspective of universal scaling laws from percolation and effective medium theories. Over much of the range of observed porosity, the expected percolation scaling is observed, but the values of the numerical prefactor do not conform to the simple predictions from percolation theory. Combining effective medium and percolation theories produces a numerical prefactor whose value depends on both the threshold porosity and the porosity above which the formation factor crosses from percolation to effective medium scaling. This change allows extraction of a numerical value of the prefactor, which is reasonably close to experimental values. Subsequent evaluation of the porosity dependence of the formation factor shows that difficulties in prior comparisons of theory and experiment are largely removed when percolation scaling is allowed to transition to effective medium scaling far above the percolation threshold.

  13. Novel Regenerated Solvent Extraction Processes for the Recovery of Carboxylic Acids or Ammonia from Aqueous Solutions Part II. Recovery of Ammonia from Sour Waters

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, L.J.; King, C.J.

    1990-03-01

    Two novel regenerated solvent extraction processes are examined. The first process has the potential to reduce the energy costs inherent in the recovery of low-volatility carboxylic acids from dilute aqueous solutions. The second process has the potential for reducing the energy costs required for separate recovery of ammonia and acid gases (e.g. CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S) from industrial sour waters. The recovery of carboxylic acids from dilute aqueous solution can be achieved by extraction with tertiary amines. An approach for regeneration and product recovery from such extracts is to back-extract the carboxylic acid with a water-soluble, volatile tertiary amine, such as trimethylamine. The resulting trimethylammonium carboxylate solution can be concentrated and thermally decomposed, yielding the product acid and the volatile amine for recycle. Experimental work was performed with lactic acid, SUCCiOlC acid, and fumaric acid. Equilibrium data show near-stoichiometric recovery of the carboxylic acids from an organic solution of Alamine 336 into aqueous solutions of trimethylamine. For fumaric and succinic acids, partial evaporation of the aqueous back extract decomposes the carboxylate and yields the acid product in crystalline form. The decomposition of aqueous solutions of trimethylammonium lactates was not carried out to completion, due to the high water solubility of lactic acid and the tendency of the acid to self-associate. The separate recovery of ammonia and acid gases from sour waters can be achieved by combining steam-stripping of the acid gases with simultaneous removal of ammonia by extraction with a liquid cation exchanger. The use of di-2,4,4-trimethylpentyl phosphinic acid as the liquid cation exchanger is explored in this work. Batch extraction experiments were carried out to measure the equilibrium distribution ratio of ammonia between an aqueous buffer solution and an organic solution of the phosphinic acid (0.2N) in Norpar 12. The concentration-based distribution ratios increase from 0.11 to 0.46 as the aqueous phase pH increases from 7.18 to 8.15. Regeneration of the organic extractant solution was carried out by stripping at elevated temperatures to remove the ammonia, with 99% recovery of the ammonia being obtained at 125 C.

  14. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    The Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) program was developed as a focused program to remove and/or minimize the barriers for effective management of over 123 million tons of coal combustion byproducts (CCBs) annually generated in the USA. At the time of launching the CBRC in 1998, about 25% of CCBs were beneficially utilized while the remaining was disposed in on-site or off-site landfills. During the ten (10) year tenure of CBRC (1998-2008), after a critical review, 52 projects were funded nationwide. By region, the East, Midwest, and West had 21, 18, and 13 projects funded, respectively. Almost all projects were cooperative projects involving industry, government, and academia. The CBRC projects, to a large extent, successfully addressed the problems of large-scale utilization of CCBs. A few projects, such as the two Eastern Region projects that addressed the use of fly ash in foundry applications, might be thought of as a somewhat smaller application in comparison to construction and agricultural uses, but as a novel niche use, they set the stage to draw interest that fly ash substitution for Portland cement might not attract. With consideration of the large increase in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum in response to EPA regulations, agricultural uses of FGD gypsum hold promise for large-scale uses of a product currently directed to the (currently stagnant) home construction market. Outstanding achievements of the program are: (1) The CBRC successfully enhanced professional expertise in the area of CCBs throughout the nation. The enhanced capacity continues to provide technology and information transfer expertise to industry and regulatory agencies. (2) Several technologies were developed that can be used immediately. These include: (a) Use of CCBs for road base and sub-base applications; (b) full-depth, in situ stabilization of gravel roads or highway/pavement construction recycled materials; and (c) fired bricks containing up to 30%-40% F-fly ash. Some developed technologies have similar potential in the longer term. (3) Laboratory studies have been completed that indicate that much higher amounts of fly ash could be added in cement-concrete applications under some circumstances. This could significantly increase use of fly ash in cement-concrete applications. (4) A study of the long-term environmental effects of structural fills in a surface mine in Indiana was completed. This study has provided much sought after data for permitting large-volume management options in both beneficial as well as non-beneficial use settings. (5) The impact of CBRC on CCBs utilization trends is difficult to quantify. However it is fair to say that the CBRC program had a significant positive impact on increased utilization of CCBs in every region of the USA. Today, the overall utilization of CCBs is over 43%. (6) CBRC-developed knowledge base led to a large number of other projects completed with support from other sources of funding. (7) CBRC research has also had a large impact on CCBs management across the globe. Information transfer activities and visitors from leading coal producing countries such as South Africa, Australia, England, India, China, Poland, Czech Republic and Japan are truly noteworthy. (8) Overall, the CBRC has been a truly successful, cooperative research program. It has brought together researchers, industry, government, and regulators to deal with a major problem facing the USA and other coal producing countries in the world.

  15. Rethinking Recycling in Arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelemen, P.; Behn, M. D.; Jagoutz, O.

    2012-12-01

    Hacker et al EPSL 2011 and Behn et al Nature Geosci 2011 investigated pathways for return of buoyant, subducted material to arc crust. These include (1) diapirs rising into the hot mantle wedge, with extensive melts adding a component to arc magmas, (2) flow of material back up a relatively cold "subduction channel", adding solids to the lower crust and small-degree partial melts to the upper crust, (3) flow from the forearc along the base of arc crust, and (4) imbrication of forearc material into arc crust. These processes add felsic, incompatible-element-rich components to arc crust. The flux of incompatible elements such as Th in arc lavas, thought to be mainly recycled from subducted sediments, is > sediment subduction flux. There are large uncertainties: arc crustal growth rates are imprecise; young, primitive arc lavas may not be representative of magmatic flux into arc crust; sediment subduction flux may have varied. Nevertheless, this result is found for all arcs examined, using recently published growth rates. Perhaps arc growth rates that include subduction erosion are systematically overestimated. Instead or in addition, maybe significant Th comes from material other than sediments. Here, we consider the implications of pathways 1-4 for arc growth rates and incompatible element enrichment, in the context of subduction erosion and arc-arc collision. Subducting arc lithologies can become separated, with only felsic components returned to arc crust. Buoyant lithologies are mobile in viscous instabilities at > 700-800°C. Whereas thin layers such as sediments may become mobile all at once, instabilities may periodically strip the hottest parts from the top of thick buoyant layers, replacing them with hot mantle. In arc-arc collision, the top of a subducting plate starts at about 0°C on the seafloor, so heating is slow. In subduction erosion, forearc material in the subducting package can be > 200°C before erosion so buoyant lithologies reach 700-800°C faster, and in larger volumes at a given time. Subduction erosion rarely, if ever, transports significant amounts of buoyant material deep into the convecting mantle. Because buoyant material can remain part of the crust, it may often be a mistake to add all of the eroded material to the observed arc volume to derive crustal growth rates. Buoyancy instabilities during subduction erosion or arc-arc collision will accumulate felsic arc crust. For example, > 50% of Aleutian arc lavas and exposed plutons are more buoyant than mantle peridotite at 700-800°C, 3-4 GPa. The buoyant material has an average of 60-62 wt% SiO2, molar Mg/(Mg+Fe) 0.4-0.5, and trace elements identical to bulk continental crust, though western Aleutian lavas have the most depleted Sr, Nd and Pb isotope ratios of all arc lavas worldwide. In general, density sorting of arc lithologies, and subsequent partial melting as buoyant rocks rise through the mantle wedge or along a subduction channel, could lead to a kind of double and triple distillation. Incompatible elements such as Th would be enriched in arc crust, retaining correlations with isotopic indicators of a recycled sediment component, while Th-poor, dense, mafic lavas and lower crustal cumulates return to the convecting mantle.

  16. Biogeochemical Recycling on Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimoto, R.; Stewart, B.; Khaing, H.; Tatro, D. P.

    2006-12-01

    Trace elements are recycled on sea-salt particles that are produced and later re-deposited in the surface ocean. This recycling process involves aluminum, iron, and other elements commonly associated with mineral dust. Non-crustal Al can amount to as much as ~ 30% of the total aerosol Al at Bermuda, but this occurs only during a few months of the year when the dust concentrations and deposition rates are low. Simple model calculations suggest that ~15 to 20% of the total Al dry deposition during December and January can be attributed to recycled sea salt, but when dust concentrations are higher, recycling accounts for only ~ 1% of the Al dry deposition. Non-crustal/non-sea salt (NC/NSS) sources account for > 70% of the aerosol Sb, Se, V, and Zn, but differences in the dry deposition velocities for particles of different sizes are such that the amount of Sb and Se recycled on sea spray approaches or exceeds their new inputs to the open ocean from dust and the NC/NSS sources. More recently, recycling on aerosol particles has been found to occur in other environments, including the deserts in the southwestern USA. In this case, the recycling of radionuclides released during nuclear weapons tests many years ago occurs via the resuspension of contaminated soil particles. Studies conducted near Carlsbad, NM have shown that the temporal variability in ^{239,240}Pu and ^{241}Am activities tracks that of Al, a mineral dust indictor, in aerosol samples. Analyses of soil samples from various sites have shown that plutonium is released from the particles by chemical procedures developed for removing iron oxides from mineral particles; this implies that the dust/plutonium relationship is mediated by iron oxides.

  17. Different thresholds of bond percolation in scale-free networks with identical degree sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhongzhi; Zhou, Shuigeng; Zou, Tao; Chen, Lichao; Guan, Jihong

    2009-03-01

    Generally, the threshold of percolation in complex networks depends on the underlying structural characterization. However, what topological property plays a predominant role is still unknown, despite the speculation of some authors that degree distribution is a key ingredient. The purpose of this paper is to show that power-law degree distribution itself is not sufficient to characterize the threshold of bond percolation in scale-free networks. To achieve this goal, we first propose a family of scale-free networks with the same degree sequence and obtain by analytical or numerical means several topological features of the networks. Then, by making use of the renormalization-group technique we determine the threshold of bond percolation in our networks. We find an existence of nonzero thresholds and demonstrate that these thresholds can be quite different, which implies that power-law degree distribution does not suffice to characterize the percolation threshold in scale-free networks.

  18. Effect of Percolation on the Cubic Susceptibility of Metal Nanoparticle Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.; Bender, Matthew W.; Boyd, Robert W.

    1998-01-01

    Generalized two-dimensional and three-dimensional Maxwell Garnett and Bruggeman geometries reveal that a sign reversal in the cubic susceptibility occurs for metal nanoparticle composites near the percolation threshold.

  19. Influence of spontaneous percolation on apparent mass at the bottom of a Janssen granular column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chand, Ram; Ali Khaskheli, Murad; Qadir, Abdul; Sandali, Yahya; Shi, Qingfan

    2014-01-01

    The effect of spontaneous percolation on apparent mass at the bottom of granular assemblies has been investigated experimentally. Bi-layered arrangements of two types of granules which differ in size are poured in a vertical silo. In this configuration, the smaller grains are layered at the top of larger grains in order to realize percolation. Contrary to the description that apparent mass decreases for denser granular packing [L. Vanel, E. Clement, Pressure screening and fluctuations at the bottom of a granular column, Eur. Phys. J. B 11 (1999) 525-533], we find that apparent mass increases due to the increase in packing density by spontaneous percolation. This behavior may be the consequence of the development of a stronger force network in bigger particles after percolation is achieved. Furthermore, due to inhomogeneous force chains in grains, we find that the value of the product of the friction coefficient by the Janssen coefficient decreases with the increasing of saturation mass.

  20. Percolative behavior of transport properties in granular high-Tc superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Bellingeri, E.; Eggenhoeffner, R. ); Masini, R. )

    1993-12-01

    A new model based on percolative computation directly performed for an array system of Josephson junctions is reported. The number of percolative paths is obtained and the total critical current of the model system is estimated from 2D and 3D arrays at selected values of external magnetic field. The evolution of the critical current distribution of the junctions at increasing magnetic field is studied in view of the relevance in percolative path calculations and compared with the experimental distribution obtained from I-V characteristics. Percolative simulation results are shown to reproduce more satisfactory experimental critical current behavior in external magnetic fields, obtained in highly porous thick YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7[minus]x] films electrophoretically deposited than mere statistical averages. 22 refs., 6 figs.