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Sample records for amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide

  1. Water-Soluble Thin Film Transistors and Circuits Based on Amorphous Indium-Gallium-Zinc Oxide

    E-print Network

    Rogers, John A.

    Water-Soluble Thin Film Transistors and Circuits Based on Amorphous Indium-Gallium-Zinc Oxide Sung for amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide (a-IGZO) thin film transistors (TFTs) comprised completely of water. INTRODUCTION Research in recent years has established amorphous indium- gallium-zinc oxide (a

  2. Mechanical properties of amorphous indium–gallium–zinc oxide thin films on compliant substrates for flexible optoelectronic devices

    E-print Network

    Mohammed, D. W.; Waddingham, R.; Flewitt, A. J.; Sierros, K. A.; Bowend, J.; Kukureka, S. N.

    2015-09-26

    Amorphous indium–gallium–zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin films were deposited using RF magnetron sputtering on polyethylene naphthalate (PEN) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) flexible substrates and their mechanical flexibility investigated using...

  3. Highly bendable characteristics of amorphous indium–gallium–zinc-oxide transistors embedded in a neutral plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chang Bum; Na, HyungIl; Yoo, Soon Sung; Park, Kwon-Shik

    2015-11-01

    The electromechanical response of an amorphous indium–gallium–zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistor (TFT) fabricated on a polyimide substrate was investigated as a function of the neutral axis location and strain history of the bending system. Here, we demonstrate the pronounced bending characteristics of a-IGZO TFTs and their backplane under extreme mechanical strain when they are embedded in a neutral plane (NP). After being subjected to tensile stress, the devices positioned near the NP were observed to function well against a cyclic bending stress of 2 mm radius with 100,000 times, while TFTs farther from the neutral surface exhibited modified electrical properties.

  4. Origin of deep subgap states in amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide: Chemically disordered coordination of oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Sallis, S.; Williams, D. S.; Butler, K. T.; Walsh, A.; Quackenbush, N. F.; Junda, M.; Podraza, N. J.; Fischer, D. A.; Woicik, J. C.; White, B. E.; Piper, L. F. J.

    2014-06-09

    The origin of the deep subgap states in amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO), whether intrinsic to the amorphous structure or not, has serious implications for the development of p-type transparent amorphous oxide semiconductors. We report that the deep subgap feature in a-IGZO originates from local variations in the oxygen coordination and not from oxygen vacancies. This is shown by the positive correlation between oxygen composition and subgap intensity as observed with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. We also demonstrate that the subgap feature is not intrinsic to the amorphous phase because the deep subgap feature can be removed by low-temperature annealing in a reducing environment. Atomistic calculations of a-IGZO reveal that the subgap state originates from certain oxygen environments associated with the disorder. Specifically, the subgap states originate from oxygen environments with a lower coordination number and/or a larger metal-oxygen separation.

  5. Amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide as electron transport layer in organic photodetectors

    SciTech Connect

    Arora, H.; Malinowski, P. E. Chasin, A.; Cheyns, D.; Steudel, S.; Schols, S.; Heremans, P.

    2015-04-06

    Amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) is demonstrated as an electron transport layer (ETL) in a high-performance organic photodetector (OPD). Dark current in the range of 10?nA/cm{sup 2} at a bias voltage of ?2?V and a high photoresponse in the visible spectrum were obtained in inverted OPDs with poly(3-hexylthiophene) and phenyl-C{sub 61}-butyric acid methyl ester active layer. The best results were obtained for the optimum a-IGZO thickness of 7.5?nm with specific detectivity of 3?×?10{sup 12} Jones at the wavelength of 550?nm. The performance of the best OPD devices using a-IGZO was shown to be comparable to state-of-the-art devices based on TiO{sub x} as ETL, with higher rectification achieved in reverse bias. Yield and reproducibility were also enhanced with a-IGZO, facilitating fabrication of large area OPDs. Furthermore, easier integration with IGZO-based readout backplanes can be envisioned, where the channel material can be used as photodiode buffer layer after additional treatment.

  6. Defect generation in amorphous-indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors by positive bias stress at elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Um, Jae Gwang; Mativenga, Mallory; Jang, Jin; Migliorato, Piero

    2014-04-07

    We report on the generation and characterization of a hump in the transfer characteristics of amorphous indium gallium zinc-oxide thin-film transistors by positive bias temperature stress. The hump depends strongly on the gate bias stress at 100?°C. Due to the hump, the positive shift of the transfer characteristic in deep depletion is always smaller that in accumulation. Since, the latter shift is twice the former, with very good correlation, we conclude that the effect is due to creation of a double acceptor, likely to be a cation vacancy. Our results indicate that these defects are located near the gate insulator/active layer interface, rather than in the bulk. Migration of donor defects from the interface towards the bulk may also occur under PBST at 100?°C.

  7. Electrical stress-induced instability of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide thin-film transistors under bipolar ac stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangwon; Jeon, Kichan; Park, Jun-Hyun; Kim, Sungchul; Kong, Dongsik; Kim, Dong Myong; Kim, Dae Hwan; Kim, Sangwook; Kim, Sunil; Hur, Jihyun; Park, Jae Chul; Song, Ihun; Kim, Chang Jung; Park, Youngsoo; Jung, U.-In

    2009-09-01

    Bipolar ac stress-induced instability of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors is comparatively investigated with that under a positive dc gate bias stress. While the positive dc gate bias stress-induced threshold voltage shift (?VT) is caused by the charge trapping into the interface/gate dielectric as reported in previous works, the dominant mechanism of the ac stress-induced ?VT is observed to be due to the increase in the acceptorlike deep states of the density of states (DOS) in the a-IGZO active layer. Furthermore, it is found that the variation of deep states in the DOS makes a parallel shift in the IDS-VGS curve with an insignificant change in the subthreshold slope, as well as the deformation of the CG-VG curves.

  8. Surface reactivity and oxygen migration in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide films annealed in humid atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Ken; Lee, Dong-Hee; Materials and Structures Laboratory , Tokyo Institute of Technology, Mailbox R3-4, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-0026 ; Sakaguchi, Isao; Haneda, Hajime; Nomura, Kenji; Kamiya, Toshio; Materials Research Center for Element Strategy , Mailbox S2-13, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-0026 ; Hosono, Hideo; Frontier Research Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Mailbox S2-13, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-0026; Materials Research Center for Element Strategy , Mailbox S2-13, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-0026 ; Ohashi, Naoki; Materials Research Center for Element Strategy , Mailbox S2-13, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-0026

    2013-11-11

    An isotope tracer study, i.e., {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O exchange using {sup 18}O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}{sup 18}O, was performed to determine how post-deposition annealing (PDA) affected surface reactivity and oxygen diffusivity of amorphous indium–gallium–zinc oxide (a-IGZO) films. The oxygen tracer diffusivity was very high in the bulk even at low temperatures, e.g., 200?°C, regardless of PDA and exchange conditions. In contrast, the isotope exchange rate, dominated by surface reactivity, was much lower for {sup 18}O{sub 2} than for H{sub 2}{sup 18}O. PDA in a humid atmosphere at 400?°C further suppressed the reactivity of O{sub 2} at the a-IGZO film surface, which is attributable to –OH-terminated surface formation.

  9. Improvement in gate bias stress instability of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide thin-film transistors using microwave irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, Kwang-Won; Cho, Won-Ju

    2014-11-24

    In this study, we evaluated the effects of microwave irradiation (MWI) post-deposition-annealing (PDA) treatment on the gate bias stress instability of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide thin-film transistors (a-IGZO TFTs) and compared the results with a conventional thermal annealing PDA treatment. The MWI-PDA-treated a-IGZO TFTs exhibited enhanced electrical performance as well as improved long-term stability with increasing microwave power. The positive turn-on voltage shift (?V{sub ON}) as a function of stress time with positive bias and varying temperature was precisely modeled on a stretched-exponential equation, suggesting that charge trapping is a dominant mechanism in the instability of MWI-PDA-treated a-IGZO TFTs. The characteristic trapping time and average effective barrier height for electron transport indicate that the MWI-PDA treatment effectively reduces the defects in a-IGZO TFTs, resulting in a superior resistance against gate bias stress.

  10. A transparent diode with high rectifying ratio using amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide/SiNx coupled junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Myung-Jea; Kim, Myeong-Ho; Choi, Duck-Kyun

    2015-08-01

    We introduce a transparent diode that shows both high rectifying ratio and low leakage current at process temperature below 250 °C. This device is clearly distinguished from all previous transparent diodes in that the rectifying behavior results from the junction between a semiconductor (amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide (a-IGZO)) and insulator (SiNx). We systematically study the properties of each junction within the device structure and demonstrate that the a-IGZO/SiNx junction is the source of the outstanding rectification. The electrical characteristics of this transparent diode are: 2.8 A/cm2 on-current density measured at -7 V; lower than 7.3 × 10-9 A/cm2 off-current density; 2.53 ideality factor; and high rectifying ratio of 108-109. Furthermore, the diode structure has a transmittance of over 80% across the visible light range. The operating principle of the indium-tin oxide (ITO)/a-IGZO/SiNx/ITO device was examined with an aid of the energy band diagram and we propose a preliminary model for the rectifying behavior. Finally, we suggest further directions for research on this transparent diode.

  11. Coplanar amorphous-indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin film transistor with He plasma treated heavily doped layer

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Ho-young; Lee, Bok-young; Lee, Young-jang; Lee, Jung-il; Yang, Myoung-su; Kang, In-byeong; Mativenga, Mallory; Jang, Jin

    2014-01-13

    We report thermally stable coplanar amorphous-indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs) with heavily doped n{sup +} a-IGZO source/drain regions. Doping is through He plasma treatment in which the resistivity of the a-IGZO decreases from 2.98 ??cm to 2.79?×?10{sup ?3} ??cm after treatment, and then it increases to 7.92?×?10{sup ?2} ??cm after annealing at 300?°C. From the analysis of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the concentration of oxygen vacancies in He plasma treated n{sup +}a-IGZO does not change much after thermal annealing at 300?°C, indicating thermally stable n{sup +} a-IGZO, even for TFTs with channel length L?=?4??m. Field-effect mobility of the coplanar a-IGZO TFTs with He plasma treatment changes from 10.7 to 9.2?cm{sup 2}/V?s after annealing at 300?°C, but the performance of the a-IGZO TFT with Ar or H{sub 2} plasma treatment degrades significantly after 300?°C annealing.

  12. Temperature-dependent bias-stress-induced electrical instability of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Hui-Min; Yu, Guang; Lu, Hai; Wu, Chen-Fei; Tang, Lan-Feng; Zhou, Dong; Ren, Fang-Fang; Zhang, Rong; Zheng, You-Liao; Huang, Xiao-Ming

    2015-07-01

    The time and temperature dependence of threshold voltage shift under positive-bias stress (PBS) and the following recovery process are investigated in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors. It is found that the time dependence of threshold voltage shift can be well described by a stretched exponential equation in which the time constant ? is found to be temperature dependent. Based on Arrhenius plots, an average effective energy barrier E?stress = 0.72 eV for the PBS process and an average effective energy barrier E?recovery = 0.58 eV for the recovery process are extracted respectively. A charge trapping/detrapping model is used to explain the threshold voltage shift in both the PBS and the recovery process. The influence of gate bias stress on transistor performance is one of the most critical issues for practical device development. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2011CB301900 and 2011CB922100) and the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, China

  13. Channel length dependence of negative-bias-illumination-stress in amorphous-indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Um, Jae Gwang; Mativenga, Mallory; Migliorato, Piero; Jang, Jin

    2015-06-01

    We have investigated the dependence of Negative-Bias-illumination-Stress (NBIS) upon channel length, in amorphous-indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs). The negative shift of the transfer characteristic associated with NBIS decreases for increasing channel length and is practically suppressed in devices with L = 100-?m. The effect is consistent with creation of donor defects, mainly in the channel regions adjacent to source and drain contacts. Excellent agreement with experiment has been obtained by an analytical treatment, approximating the distribution of donors in the active layer by a double exponential with characteristic length LD ˜ Ln ˜ 10-?m, the latter being the electron diffusion length. The model also shows that a device with a non-uniform doping distribution along the active layer is in all equivalent, at low drain voltages, to a device with the same doping averaged over the active layer length. These results highlight a new aspect of the NBIS mechanism, that is, the dependence of the effect upon the relative magnitude of photogenerated holes and electrons, which is controlled by the device potential/band profile. They may also provide the basis for device design solutions to minimize NBIS.

  14. Comparison of the electronic structure of amorphous versus crystalline indium gallium zinc oxide semiconductor: structure, tail states and strain effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jamblinne de Meux, A.; Pourtois, G.; Genoe, J.; Heremans, P.

    2015-11-01

    We study the evolution of the structural and electronic properties of crystalline indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO) upon amorphization by first-principles calculation. The bottom of the conduction band (BCB) is found to be constituted of a pseudo-band of molecular orbitals that resonate at the same energy on different atomic sites. They display a bonding character between the s orbitals of the metal sites and an anti-bonding character arising from the interaction between the oxygen and metal s orbitals. The energy level of the BCB shifts upon breaking of the crystal symmetry during the amorphization process, which may be attributed to the reduction of the coordination of the cationic centers. The top of the valence band (TVB) is constructed from anti-bonding oxygen p orbitals. In the amorphous state, they have random orientation, in contrast to the crystalline state. This results in the appearance of localized tail states in the forbidden gap above the TVB. Zinc is found to play a predominant role in the generation of these tail states, while gallium hinders their formation. Last, we study the dependence of the fundamental gap and effective mass of IGZO on mechanical strain. The variation of the gap under strain arises from the enhancement of the anti-bonding interaction in the BCB due to the modification of the length of the oxygen-metal bonds and/or to a variation of the cation coordination. This effect is less pronounced for the amorphous material compared to the crystalline material, making amorphous IGZO a semiconductor of choice for flexible electronics. Finally, the effective mass is found to increase upon strain, in contrast to regular materials. This counterintuitive variation is due to the reduction of the electrostatic shielding of the cationic centers by oxygen, leading to an increase of the overlaps between the metal orbitals at the origin of the delocalization of the BCB. For the range of strain typically met in flexible electronics, the induced variation in the effective mass is found to be negligible (less than 1%).

  15. Analysis of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistor contact metal

    E-print Network

    Kiani, Ahmed; Hasko, David G.; Milne, William I.; Flewitt, Andrew J.

    2013-04-15

    It is widely reported that threshold voltage and on-state current of amorphous indiumgallium- zinc-oxide bottom-gate thin-film transistors is strongly influenced by the choice of source/drain contact metal. Electrical characterisation of thin...

  16. Tunneling phenomenon of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin film transistors for flexible display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Teresa

    2015-09-01

    It is an importance to understand the contact mechanism at interfaces between dielectric and channel materials to improve the performance of thin film transistors. Oxide semiconductor has proposed as promising candidate for transparent flexible application, whose development requires greater understand and control of their electron contacts. The performance of IGZO/SiOC TFTs depended on properties of SiOC as a gate insulator. SiOC exhibited a range of systematic interface electronic structure that can be understood at the atomic scale to provide a comprehensive feature of Schottky barrier and Ohmic contacts. The conduction of TFTs prepared on low polar SiOC was progressed by the tunneling behavior. The ambipolar transfer characteristics in tunneling transistors were done by a spontaneous potential barrier of SiOC such as the Schottky barrier (SB) in a short range and Ohmic contact in a long range. TFTs on SiOC with Poole-Frenkel contact as high SB operated under the threshold voltage, and then became free from the threshold voltage shift. However, the TFTs on high polar SiOC with Ohmic contact in a short range was also showed the unipolar characteristics by the trapping behavior as well as instability owing to the operation at high drain bias voltage over the threshold voltage. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  17. Scaling characteristics of depletion type, fully transparent amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors and inverters following Ar plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Joonwoo; Jeong, Soon Moon; Jeong, Jaewook

    2015-11-01

    We fabricated depletion type, transparent amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs) and inverters with an Ar plasma treatment and analyzed their scaling characteristics with channel lengths ranging from 2 to 100 µm. The improvement of the field-effect mobility of a-IGZO TFTs is apparent only for short channel lengths. There is also an unexpected side effect of the Ar plasma treatment, which introduces back-channel interfacial states and induces a positive shift in the threshold voltage of a-IGZO TFTs. The resulting increase in the field-effect mobility and the positive shift in the threshold voltage of each TFT increase the differential gain up to 3 times and the positive shift in the transient point of the transparent inverters.

  18. Alumina nanoparticle/polymer nanocomposite dielectric for flexible amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide thin film transistors on plastic substrate with superior stability

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Hsin-Cheng; Pei, Zingway; Jian, Jyun-Ruri; Tzeng, Bo-Jie

    2014-07-21

    In this study, the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles were incorporated into polymer as a nono-composite dielectric for used in a flexible amorphous Indium-Gallium-Zinc Oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistor (TFT) on a polyethylene naphthalate substrate by solution process. The process temperature was well below 100?°C. The a-IGZO TFT exhibit a mobility of 5.13?cm{sup 2}/V s on the flexible substrate. After bending at a radius of 4?mm (strain?=?1.56%) for more than 100 times, the performance of this a-IGZO TFT was nearly unchanged. In addition, the electrical characteristics are less altered after positive gate bias stress at 10?V for 1500?s. Thus, this technology is suitable for use in flexible displays.

  19. Effects of low-temperature (120?°C) annealing on the carrier concentration and trap density in amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide thin film transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jae-sung; Piao, Mingxing; Jang, Ho-Kyun; Kim, Gyu-Tae; Oh, Byung Su; Joo, Min-Kyu; Ahn, Seung-Eon

    2014-12-28

    We report an investigation of the effects of low-temperature annealing on the electrical properties of amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to characterize the charge carrier concentration, which is related to the density of oxygen vacancies. The field-effect mobility was found to decrease as a function of the charge carrier concentration, owing to the presence of band-tail states. By employing the transmission line method, we show that the contact resistance did not significantly contribute to the changes in device performance after annealing. In addition, using low-frequency noise analyses, we found that the trap density decreased by a factor of 10 following annealing at 120?°C. The switching operation and on/off ratio of the a-IGZO TFTs improved considerably after low-temperature annealing.

  20. Reduction of defect formation in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin film transistors by N{sub 2}O plasma treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Jhu, Jhe-Ciou; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chang, Geng-Wei; Tai, Ya-Hsiang; Tsai, Wu-Wei; Chiang, Wen-Jen; Yan, Jing-Yi

    2013-11-28

    An abnormal sub-threshold leakage current is observed at high temperature in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin film transistors (a-IGZO TFTs). This phenomenon occurs due to a reduced number of defects in the device's a-IGZO active layer after the device has undergone N{sub 2}O plasma treatment. Experimental verification shows that the N{sub 2}O plasma treatment enhances the thin film bonding strength, thereby suppressing the formation of temperature-dependent holes, which are generated above 400?K by oxygen atoms leaving their original sites. The N{sub 2}O plasma treatment devices have better stability performance than as-fabricated devices. The results suggest that the density of defects for a-IGZO TFTs with N{sub 2}O plasma treatment is much lower than that in as-fabricated devices. The N{sub 2}O plasma treatment repairs the defects and suppresses temperature-dependent sub-threshold leakage current.

  1. Dual operation characteristics of resistance random access memory in indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin film transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jyun-Bao; Chen, Yu-Ting; Chu, Ann-Kuo; Chang, Ting-Chang; Huang, Jheng-Jie; Chen, Yu-Chun; Tseng, Hsueh-Chih; Sze, Simon M.

    2014-04-14

    In this study, indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin film transistors can be operated either as transistors or resistance random access memory devices. Before the forming process, current-voltage curve transfer characteristics are observed, and resistance switching characteristics are measured after a forming process. These resistance switching characteristics exhibit two behaviors, and are dominated by different mechanisms. The mode 1 resistance switching behavior is due to oxygen vacancies, while mode 2 is dominated by the formation of an oxygen-rich layer. Furthermore, an easy approach is proposed to reduce power consumption when using these resistance random access memory devices with the amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin film transistor.

  2. Remarkable changes in interface O vacancy and metal-oxide bonds in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors by long time annealing at 250?°C

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, Md Delwar Hossain; Um, Jae Gwang; Jang, Jin

    2014-12-08

    We have studied the effect of long time post-fabrication annealing on negative bias illumination stress (NBIS) of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film-transistors. Annealing for 100?h at 250?°C increased the field effect mobility from 14.7?cm{sup 2}/V s to 17.9?cm{sup 2}/V s and reduced the NBIS instability remarkably. Using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the oxygen vacancy and OH were found to exist at the interfaces of a-IGZO with top and bottom SiO{sub 2}. Long time annealing helps to decrease the vacancy concentration and increase the metal-oxygen bonds at the interfaces; this leads to increase in the free carrier concentrations in a-IGZO and field-effect mobility. X-ray reflectivity measurement indicated the increment of a-IGZO film density of 5.63?g cm{sup ?3} to 5.83?g cm{sup ?3} (3.4% increase) by 100?h annealing at 250?°C. The increase in film density reveals the decrease of O vacancy concentration and reduction of weak metal-oxygen bonds in a-IGZO, which substantially helps to improve the NBIS stability.

  3. Improvement of bias-stability in amorphous-indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors by using solution-processed Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} passivation

    SciTech Connect

    An, Sungjin; Mativenga, Mallory; Kim, Youngoo; Jang, Jin

    2014-08-04

    We demonstrate back channel improvement of back-channel-etch amorphous-indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors by using solution-processed yttrium oxide (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) passivation. Two different solvents, which are acetonitrile (35%)?+?ethylene glycol (65%), solvent A and deionized water, solvent B are investigated for the spin-on process of the Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} passivation—performed after patterning source/drain (S/D) Mo electrodes by a conventional HNO{sub 3}-based wet-etch process. Both solvents yield devices with good performance but those passivated by using solvent B exhibit better light and bias stability. Presence of yttrium at the a-IGZO back interface, where it occupies metal vacancy sites, is confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The passivation effect of yttrium is more significant when solvent A is used because of the existence of more metal vacancies, given that the alcohol (65% ethylene glycol) in solvent A may dissolve the metal oxide (a-IGZO) through the formation of alkoxides and water.

  4. Effect of direct current sputtering power on the behavior of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors under negative bias illumination stress: A combination of experimental analyses and device simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Jun Tae; Kim, Dong Myong; Choi, Sung-Jin; Kim, Dae Hwan E-mail: drlife@kookmin.ac.kr; Park, Jozeph; Ahn, Byung Du; Kim, Hyun-Suk E-mail: drlife@kookmin.ac.kr

    2015-03-23

    The effect of direct current sputtering power of indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (IGZO) on the performance and stability of the corresponding thin-film transistor devices was studied. The field effect mobility increases as the IGZO sputter power increases, at the expense of device reliability under negative bias illumination stress (NBIS). Device simulation based on the extracted sub-gap density of states indicates that the field effect mobility is improved as a result of the number of acceptor-like states decreasing. The degradation by NBIS is suggested to be induced by the formation of peroxides in IGZO rather than charge trapping.

  5. Effect of direct current sputtering power on the behavior of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors under negative bias illumination stress: A combination of experimental analyses and device simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Jun Tae; Park, Jozeph; Ahn, Byung Du; Kim, Dong Myong; Choi, Sung-Jin; Kim, Hyun-Suk; Kim, Dae Hwan

    2015-03-01

    The effect of direct current sputtering power of indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (IGZO) on the performance and stability of the corresponding thin-film transistor devices was studied. The field effect mobility increases as the IGZO sputter power increases, at the expense of device reliability under negative bias illumination stress (NBIS). Device simulation based on the extracted sub-gap density of states indicates that the field effect mobility is improved as a result of the number of acceptor-like states decreasing. The degradation by NBIS is suggested to be induced by the formation of peroxides in IGZO rather than charge trapping.

  6. Flexible indium-gallium-zinc-oxide Schottky diode operating beyond 2.45?GHz.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiawei; Li, Yunpeng; Zhang, Binglei; Wang, Hanbin; Xin, Qian; Song, Aimin

    2015-01-01

    Mechanically flexible mobile phones have been long anticipated due to the rapid development of thin-film electronics in the last couple of decades. However, to date, no such phone has been developed, largely due to a lack of flexible electronic components that are fast enough for the required wireless communications, in particular the speed-demanding front-end rectifiers. Here Schottky diodes based on amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (IGZO) are fabricated on flexible plastic substrates. Using suitable radio-frequency mesa structures, a range of IGZO thicknesses and diode sizes have been studied. The results have revealed an unexpected dependence of the diode speed on the IGZO thickness. The findings enable the best optimized flexible diodes to reach 6.3?GHz at zero bias, which is beyond the critical benchmark speed of 2.45?GHz to satisfy the principal frequency bands of smart phones such as those for cellular communication, Bluetooth, Wi-Fi and global satellite positioning. PMID:26138510

  7. Flexible indium-gallium-zinc-oxide Schottky diode operating beyond 2.45 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiawei; Li, Yunpeng; Zhang, Binglei; Wang, Hanbin; Xin, Qian; Song, Aimin

    2015-07-01

    Mechanically flexible mobile phones have been long anticipated due to the rapid development of thin-film electronics in the last couple of decades. However, to date, no such phone has been developed, largely due to a lack of flexible electronic components that are fast enough for the required wireless communications, in particular the speed-demanding front-end rectifiers. Here Schottky diodes based on amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (IGZO) are fabricated on flexible plastic substrates. Using suitable radio-frequency mesa structures, a range of IGZO thicknesses and diode sizes have been studied. The results have revealed an unexpected dependence of the diode speed on the IGZO thickness. The findings enable the best optimized flexible diodes to reach 6.3 GHz at zero bias, which is beyond the critical benchmark speed of 2.45 GHz to satisfy the principal frequency bands of smart phones such as those for cellular communication, Bluetooth, Wi-Fi and global satellite positioning.

  8. Recovery from ultraviolet-induced threshold voltage shift in indium gallium zinc oxide thin film transistors by positive gate bias

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, P.; Chen, T. P.; Li, X. D.; Wong, J. I.; Liu, Z.; Liu, Y.; Leong, K. C.

    2013-11-11

    The effect of short-duration ultraviolet (UV) exposure on the threshold voltage (V{sub th}) of amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide thin film transistors (TFTs) and its recovery characteristics were investigated. The V{sub th} exhibited a significant negative shift after UV exposure. The V{sub th} instability caused by UV illumination is attributed to the positive charge trapping in the dielectric layer and/or at the channel/dielectric interface. The illuminated devices showed a slow recovery in threshold voltage without external bias. However, an instant recovery can be achieved by the application of positive gate pulses, which is due to the elimination of the positive trapped charges as a result of the presence of a large amount of field-induced electrons in the interface region.

  9. In situ analyses on negative ions in the indium-gallium-zinc oxide sputtering process

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Junjun; Torigoshi, Yoshifumi; Shigesato, Yuzo

    2013-07-01

    The origin of negative ions in the dc magnetron sputtering process using a ceramic indium-gallium-zinc oxide target has been investigated by in situ analyses. The observed negative ions are mainly O{sup -} with energies corresponding to the target voltage, which originates from the target and barely from the reactive gas (O{sub 2}). Dissociation of ZnO{sup -}, GaO{sup -}, ZnO{sub 2}{sup -}, and GaO{sub 2}{sup -} radicals also contributes to the total negative ion flux. Furthermore, we find that some sputtering parameters, such as the type of sputtering gas (Ar or Kr), sputtering power, total gas pressure, and magnetic field strength at the target surface, can be used to control the energy distribution of the O{sup -} ion flux.

  10. Study of breakdown voltage of indium-gallium-zinc-oxide-based Schottky diode

    SciTech Connect

    Xin, Qian; Yan, Linlong; Luo, Yi; Song, Aimin

    2015-03-16

    In contrast to the intensive studies on thin-film transistors based on indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO), the research on IGZO-based diodes is still very limited, particularly on their behavior and stability under high bias voltages. Our experiments reveal a sensitive dependence of the breakdown voltage of IGZO Schottky diodes on the anode metal and the IGZO film thickness. Devices with an Au anode are found to breakdown easily at a reverse bias as low as ?2.5?V, while the devices with a Pd anode and a 200-nm, fully depleted IGZO layer have survived up to ?15?V. All diodes are fabricated by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering at room temperature without any thermal treatment, yet showing an ideality factor as low as 1.14, showing the possibility of achieving high-performance Schottky diodes on flexible plastic substrate.

  11. Examination of the ambient effects on the stability of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide thin film transistors using a laser-glass-sealing technology

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Kazuo; Takeda, Satoshi; Nomura, Kenji; Abe, Katsumi; Hosono, Hideo

    2014-09-29

    The effect of an ambient atmosphere with a positive bias constant current stress (CCS) and a negative bias illumination stress (NBIS) on the stability of amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O thin film transistors (TFTs) is examined by utilizing a glass-hermetic-sealant with a moisture permeability of less than 10{sup ?6} g/m{sup 2}?·?day. In the CCS test, the threshold voltage shift (?V{sub th}) was remarkably suppressed in the glass-sealed TFTs. The unsealed and resin-sealed TFTs exhibited large ?V{sub th} values. During the NBIS tests, the glass-sealed TFTs had almost the same negative ?V{sub th} as the unsealed and resin sealed TFTs. Among the different TFTs, no significant differences were observed in the threshold voltage, the subthreshold swing and the saturation mobility as a function of the photon energy. It is concluded that ambient molecules were the primary origin of the instability of the ?V{sub th}, induced by a CCS, but they were not related to the NBIS instability. The major role of the effective passivation layers in the NBIS test was not to simply block out the ambient effects, but to reduce the extra density of states at/near the surface of the back channel.

  12. Printed indium gallium zinc oxide transistors. Self-assembled nanodielectric effects on low-temperature combustion growth and carrier mobility.

    PubMed

    Everaerts, Ken; Zeng, Li; Hennek, Jonathan W; Camacho, Diana I; Jariwala, Deep; Bedzyk, Michael J; Hersam, Mark C; Marks, Tobin J

    2013-11-27

    Solution-processed amorphous oxide semiconductors (AOSs) are emerging as important electronic materials for displays and transparent electronics. We report here on the fabrication, microstructure, and performance characteristics of inkjet-printed, low-temperature combustion-processed, amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs) grown on solution-processed hafnia self-assembled nanodielectrics (Hf-SANDs). TFT performance for devices processed below 300 °C includes >4× enhancement in electron mobility (?FE) on Hf-SAND versus SiO2 or ALD-HfO2 gate dielectrics, while other metrics such as subthreshold swing (SS), current on:off ratio (ION:IOFF), threshold voltage (Vth), and gate leakage current (Ig) are unchanged or enhanced. Thus, low voltage IGZO/SAND TFT operation (<2 V) is possible with ION:IOFF = 10(7), SS = 125 mV/dec, near-zero Vth, and large electron mobility, ?FE(avg) = 20.6 ± 4.3 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), ?FE(max) = 50 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). Furthermore, X-ray diffraction analysis indicates that the 300 °C IGZO combustion processing leaves the underlying Hf-SAND microstructure and capacitance intact. This work establishes the compatibility and advantages of all-solution, low-temperature fabrication of inkjet-printed, combustion-derived high-mobility IGZO TFTs integrated with self-assembled hybrid organic-inorganic nanodielectrics. PMID:24187917

  13. Evaluation of Off-State Current Characteristics of Transistor Using Oxide Semiconductor Material, Indium-Gallium-Zinc Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Kiyoshi; Shionoiri, Yutaka; Sekine, Yusuke; Furutani, Kazuma; Hatano, Takehisa; Aoki, Taro; Sasaki, Miyuki; Tomatsu, Hiroyuki; Koyama, Jun; Yamazaki, Sunpei

    2012-02-01

    We measured a significantly low off-state current (135 yA/µm at 85 °C) of a metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) transistor using indium-gallium-zinc oxide (IGZO), which is an oxide semiconductor material. Note that “y” is 10-24. A transistor in which the hydrogen concentration in an IGZO film is lowered (5×1019 cm-3 or lower) was used. To estimate the minute current accurately, we established a measurement method in which changes in the amount of electrical charge are measured for a long time. Such extremely low off-state current characteristics show promise for new applications of IGZO transistors in memories.

  14. High stability mechanisms of quinary indium gallium zinc aluminum oxide multicomponent oxide films and thin film transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ching-Ting Lin, Yung-Hao; Lin, Jhong-Ham

    2015-01-28

    Quinary indium gallium zinc aluminum oxide (IGZAO) multicomponent oxide films were deposited using indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO) target and Al target by radio frequency magnetron cosputtering system. An extra carrier transport pathway could be provided by the 3?s orbitals of Al cations to improve the electrical properties of the IGZO films, and the oxygen instability could be stabilized by the strong Al-O bonds in the IGZAO films. The electron concentration change and the electron mobility change of the IGZAO films for aging time of 10 days under an air environment at 40?°C and 75% humidity were 20.1% and 2.4%, respectively. The experimental results verified the performance stability of the IGZAO films. Compared with the thin film transistors (TFTs) using conventional IGZO channel layer, in conducting the stability of TFTs with IGZAO channel layer, the transconductance g{sub m} change, threshold voltage V{sub T} change, and the subthreshold swing S value change under the same aging condition were improved to 7.9%, 10.5%, and 14.8%, respectively. Furthermore, the stable performances of the IGZAO TFTs were also verified by the positive gate bias stress. In this research, the quinary IGZAO multicomponent oxide films and that applied in TFTs were the first studied in the literature.

  15. Ohmic contact formation process on low n-type gallium arsenide (GaAs) using indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO)

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Seong-Uk; Jung, Woo-Shik; Lee, In-Yeal; Jung, Hyun-Wook; Kim, Gil-Ho; Park, Jin-Hong

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: • We propose a method to fabricate non-gold Ohmic contact on low n-type GaAs with IGZO. • 0.15 A/cm{sup 2} on-current and 1.5 on/off-current ratio are achieved in the junction. • InAs and InGaAs formed by this process decrease an electron barrier height. • Traps generated by diffused O atoms also induce a trap-assisted tunneling phenomenon. - Abstract: Here, an excellent non-gold Ohmic contact on low n-type GaAs is demonstrated by using indium gallium zinc oxide and investigating through time of flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, J–V measurement, and H [enthalpy], S [entropy], Cp [heat capacity] chemistry simulation. In is diffused through GaAs during annealing and reacts with As, forming InAs and InGaAs phases with lower energy bandgap. As a result, it decreases the electron barrier height, eventually increasing the reverse current. In addition, traps generated by diffused O atoms induce a trap-assisted tunneling phenomenon, increasing generation current and subsequently the reverse current. Therefore, an excellent Ohmic contact with 0.15 A/cm{sup 2} on-current density and 1.5 on/off-current ratio is achieved on n-type GaAs.

  16. Fourier spectrum based extraction of an equivalent trap state density in indium gallium zinc oxide transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Thakur, Bikash; Sambandan, Sanjiv; Lee, Sungsik; Nathan, Arokia; Ahnood, Arman; Jeon, Sanghun

    2014-05-19

    Segregating the dynamics of gate bias induced threshold voltage shift, and in particular, charge trapping in thin film transistors (TFTs) based on time constants provides insight into the different mechanisms underlying TFTs instability. In this Letter we develop a representation of the time constants and model the magnitude of charge trapped in the form of an equivalent density of created trap states. This representation is extracted from the Fourier spectrum of the dynamics of charge trapping. Using amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O TFTs as an example, the charge trapping was modeled within an energy range of ?E{sub t}? 0.3?eV and with a density of state distribution as D{sub t}(E{sub t?j})=D{sub t0}exp(??E{sub t}/kT)with D{sub t0}?=?5.02 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup ?2}?eV{sup ?1}. Such a model is useful for developing simulation tools for circuit design.

  17. Realization of write-once-read-many-times memory device with O2 plasma-treated indium gallium zinc oxide thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, P.; Chen, T. P.; Li, X. D.; Liu, Z.; Wong, J. I.; Liu, Y.; Leong, K. C.

    2014-01-01

    A write-once-read-many-times (WORM) memory devices based on O2 plasma-treated indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO) thin films has been demonstrated. The device has a simple Al/IGZO/Al structure. The device has a normally OFF state with a very high resistance (e.g., the resistance at 2 V is ˜109 ? for a device with the radius of 50 ?m) as a result of the O2 plasma treatment on the IGZO thin films. The device could be switched to an ON state with a low resistance (e.g., the resistance at 2 V is ˜103 ? for the radius of 50 ?m) by applying a voltage pulse (e.g., 10 V/1 ?s). The WORM device has good data-retention and reading-endurance capabilities.

  18. Realization of write-once-read-many-times memory device with O{sub 2} plasma-treated indium gallium zinc oxide thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, P. Chen, T. P. Li, X. D.; Wong, J. I.; Liu, Z.; Liu, Y.; Leong, K. C.

    2014-01-20

    A write-once-read-many-times (WORM) memory devices based on O{sub 2} plasma-treated indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO) thin films has been demonstrated. The device has a simple Al/IGZO/Al structure. The device has a normally OFF state with a very high resistance (e.g., the resistance at 2?V is ?10{sup 9} ? for a device with the radius of 50??m) as a result of the O{sub 2} plasma treatment on the IGZO thin films. The device could be switched to an ON state with a low resistance (e.g., the resistance at 2?V is ?10{sup 3} ? for the radius of 50??m) by applying a voltage pulse (e.g., 10?V/1??s). The WORM device has good data-retention and reading-endurance capabilities.

  19. Electrical characteristics and short-channel effect of c-axis aligned crystal indium gallium zinc oxide transistor with short channel length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Yoshiyuki; Matsuda, Shinpei; Matsubayashi, Daisuke; Suzawa, Hideomi; Sakakura, Masayuki; Hanaoka, Kazuya; Okazaki, Yutaka; Yamamoto, Tsutomu; Hondo, Suguru; Hamada, Takashi; Sasagawa, Shinya; Nagai, Masaharu; Hata, Yuki; Maruyama, Tetsunori; Yamamoto, Yoshitaka; Yamazaki, Shunpei

    2014-01-01

    A channel length of a c-axis aligned crystal indium gallium zinc oxide (CAAC-IGZO) transistor having low off-state current at a yA/µm level was decreased to 100 nm, and the electrical characteristics and short-channel effect of the CAAC-IGZO transistor were researched. As a result, we found that, in the CAAC-IGZO transistor with L = 100 nm, even with a gate insulator film having an equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) = 11 nm, an extremely small off-state current of 380 yA/µm at 85 °C is maintained, in addition channel length dependence of the electrical characteristics is hardly seen. Favorable values of characteristics of the CAAC-IGZO transistor can be obtained, such as subthreshold slope (SS) = 77 mV/dec, drain induced barrier lowering (DIBL) = 73 mV/V, threshold voltage (Vth) = 0.65 V, and on-state current (Ion) = 65 µA/µm. These results suggest the possibility that the CAAC-IGZO transistor can be applied to an LSI in a deep submicron region.

  20. Indium-gallium-zinc-oxide layer used to increase light transmittance efficiency of adhesive layer for stacked-type multijunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshidomi, Shinya; Kimura, Shunsuke; Hasumi, Masahiko; Sameshima, Toshiyuki

    2015-11-01

    We report the increase in transmittance efficiency of the intermediate layer for multijunction solar cells caused by the indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (IGZO) layer used as the antireflection layer. Si substrates coated with a 200-nm-thick IGZO layer with a refractive index of 1.85 were prepared. The resistivity of the IGZO layer was increased from 0.0069 (as-deposited) to 0.032 ? cm by heat treatment at 350 °C for 1 h to prevent free-carrier optical absorption. Samples with the Si/IGZO/adhesive/IGZO/Si structure were fabricated. The average transmissivity for wavelengths between 1200 and 1600 nm was 49%, which was close to 55% of single-crystal silicon substrates. A high effective transmittance efficiency of 89% was experimentally achieved. The numerical calculation showed in an effective transmittance efficiency of 99% for 170-nm-thick antireflection layers with a resistivity of 0.6 ? cm and a refractive index of 2.1.

  1. Ferroelectric switching of poly(vinylidene difluoride-trifluoroethylene) in metal-ferroelectric-semiconductor non-volatile memories with an amorphous oxide semiconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Gelinck, G. H.; Breemen, A. J. J. M. van; Cobb, B.

    2015-03-02

    Ferroelectric polarization switching of poly(vinylidene difluoride-trifluoroethylene) is investigated in different thin-film device structures, ranging from simple capacitors to dual-gate thin-film transistors (TFT). Indium gallium zinc oxide, a high mobility amorphous oxide material, is used as semiconductor. We find that the ferroelectric can be polarized in both directions in the metal-ferroelectric-semiconductor (MFS) structure and in the dual-gate TFT under certain biasing conditions, but not in the single-gate thin-film transistors. These results disprove the common belief that MFS structures serve as a good model system for ferroelectric polarization switching in thin-film transistors.

  2. Ferroelectric switching of poly(vinylidene difluoride-trifluoroethylene) in metal-ferroelectric-semiconductor non-volatile memories with an amorphous oxide semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelinck, G. H.; van Breemen, A. J. J. M.; Cobb, B.

    2015-03-01

    Ferroelectric polarization switching of poly(vinylidene difluoride-trifluoroethylene) is investigated in different thin-film device structures, ranging from simple capacitors to dual-gate thin-film transistors (TFT). Indium gallium zinc oxide, a high mobility amorphous oxide material, is used as semiconductor. We find that the ferroelectric can be polarized in both directions in the metal-ferroelectric-semiconductor (MFS) structure and in the dual-gate TFT under certain biasing conditions, but not in the single-gate thin-film transistors. These results disprove the common belief that MFS structures serve as a good model system for ferroelectric polarization switching in thin-film transistors.

  3. Effects of high-temperature thermal annealing on the electronic properties of In-Ga-Zn oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qin; Song, Zhong Xiao; Ma, Fei E-mail: liyhemail@gmail.com; Li, Yan Huai E-mail: liyhemail@gmail.com; Xu, Ke Wei

    2015-03-15

    Indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO) thin films were deposited by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering at room-temperature. Then, thermal annealing was conducted to improve the structural ordering. X-ray diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that the as-deposited IGZO thin films were amorphous and crystallization occurred at 800 and 950?°C. As a result of crystallization at high temperature, the carrier concentration and the Hall mobility of IGZO thin films were sharply increased, which could be ascribed to the increased oxygen vacancies and improved structural ordering of the thin films.

  4. Visible-light-induced instability in amorphous metal-oxide based TFTs for transparent electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Tae-Jun

    2014-10-15

    We investigate the origin of visible-light-induced instability in amorphous metal-oxide based thin film transistors (oxide-TFTs) for transparent electronics by exploring the shift in threshold voltage (V{sub th}). A large hysteresis window in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) TFTs possessing large optical band-gap (?3 eV) was observed in a visible-light illuminated condition whereas no hysteresis window was shown in a dark measuring condition. We also report the instability caused by photo irradiation and prolonged gate bias stress in oxide-TFTs. Larger V{sub th} shift was observed after photo-induced stress combined with a negative gate bias than the sum of that after only illumination stress and only negative gate bias stress. Such results can be explained by trapped charges at the interface of semiconductor/dielectric and/or in the gate dielectric which play a role in a screen effect on the electric field applied by gate voltage, for which we propose that the localized-states-assisted transitions by visible-light absorption can be responsible.

  5. Amorphous indium-tin-zinc oxide films deposited by magnetron sputtering with various reactive gases: Spatial distribution of thin film transistor performance

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Junjun; Torigoshi, Yoshifumi; Shigesato, Yuzo; Kawashima, Emi; Utsuno, Futoshi; Yano, Koki

    2015-01-12

    This work presents the spatial distribution of electrical characteristics of amorphous indium-tin-zinc oxide film (a-ITZO), and how they depend on the magnetron sputtering conditions using O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and N{sub 2}O as the reactive gases. Experimental results show that the electrical properties of the N{sub 2}O incorporated a-ITZO film has a weak dependence on the deposition location, which cannot be explained by the bombardment effect of high energy particles, and may be attributed to the difference in the spatial distribution of both the amount and the activity of the reactive gas reaching the substrate surface. The measurement for the performance of a-ITZO thin film transistor (TFT) also suggests that the electrical performance and device uniformity of a-ITZO TFTs can be improved significantly by the N{sub 2}O introduction into the deposition process, where the field mobility reach to 30.8 cm{sup 2} V{sup –1} s{sup –1}, which is approximately two times higher than that of the amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide TFT.

  6. RF Characteristics of Room-Temperature-Deposited, Small Gate Dimension Indium Zinc Oxide TFTs

    E-print Network

    Pearton, Stephen J.

    RF Characteristics of Room-Temperature-Deposited, Small Gate Dimension Indium Zinc Oxide TFTs Yu, North Carolina 27709, USA Depletion-mode indium zinc oxide channel thin film transistors TFTs with gate semiconductors such as zinc oxide, zinc tin oxide, indium gallium oxide, and indium gallium zinc tin oxide have

  7. Analysis of temperature-dependent electrical characteristics in amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O thin-film transistors using gated-four-probe measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Jaewook; Jun Lee, Gwang; Kim, Joonwoo; Moon Jeong, Soon; Kim, Jung-Hye

    2013-09-01

    We analyzed the temperature-dependent electrical characteristics of amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs) using a gated-four-probe method (GFP) with temperatures ranging from 93 to 373 K. The intrinsic field-effect mobility and source/drain parasitic resistance were separately extracted using the GFP method. We found that temperature-dependent transfer characteristics originated from the temperature-dependent intrinsic field-effect mobility of the a-IGZO TFTs. The parasitic resistance was also correlated with the intrinsic-field effect mobility, which decreases as the intrinsic field-effect mobility increases, indicating that access parasitic resistance originated from bulk regions rather than metal/semiconductor junction barrier is a key factor to determine the parasitic resistance of a-IGZO TFTs.

  8. Investigation on the negative bias illumination stress-induced instability of amorphous indium-tin-zinc-oxide thin film transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Jaeman; Kim, Dae Geun; Kim, Dong Myong; Choi, Sung-Jin; Kim, Dae Hwan E-mail: drlife@kookmin.ac.kr; Lim, Jun-Hyung; Lee, Je-Hun; Ahn, Byung Du E-mail: drlife@kookmin.ac.kr; Kim, Yong-Sung

    2014-10-13

    The quantitative analysis of mechanism on negative bias illumination stress (NBIS)-induced instability of amorphous indium-tin-zinc-oxide thin-film transistor (TFT) was suggested along with the effect of equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) of gate insulator. The analysis was implemented through combining the experimentally extracted density of subgap states and the device simulation. During NBIS, it was observed that the thicker EOT causes increase in both the shift of threshold voltage and the variation of subthreshold swing as well as the hump-like feature in a transfer curve. We found that the EOT-dependence of NBIS instability can be clearly explicated with the donor creation model, in which a larger amount of valence band tail states is transformed into either the ionized oxygen vacancy V{sub O}{sup 2+} or peroxide O{sub 2}{sup 2?} with the increase of EOT. It was also found that the V{sub O}{sup 2+}-related extrinsic factor accounts for 80%–92% of the total donor creation taking place in the valence band tail states while the rest is taken by the O{sub 2}{sup 2–} related intrinsic factor. The ratio of extrinsic factor compared to the total donor creation also increased with the increase of EOT, which could be explained by more prominent oxygen deficiency. The key founding of our work certainly represents that the established model should be considered very effective for analyzing the instability of the post-indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (IGZO) ZnO-based compound semiconductor TFTs with the mobility, which is much higher than those of a-IGZO TFTs.

  9. Low-Temperature Solution Processing of Amorphous Metal Oxide Semiconductors for High-Performance Thin-Film Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennek, Jonathan W.

    The growing field of large-area flexible electronics presents the need for amorphous materials with electrical performances superior to amorphous hydrogenated silicon (a-Si:H). Metal oxide semiconductors show great promise in thin film transistors (TFTs) due to their high electron mobility (micro, 1--100 cm2V-1s-1), mechanical flexibility, and electrical stability. However, most oxide semiconductor fabrication still relies on expensive, inflexible and energy intensive vacuum deposition methods. To overcome these limitations, my thesis work has focused on developing low-temperature solution processing routes to functional metal oxide materials. In Chapter 2, we demonstrate an optimized "ink" and printing process for inkjet patterning of amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) and investigate the effects of device structure on derived electron mobility. Bottom-gate top-contact (BGTC) TFTs are fabricated and shown to exhibit electron mobilities comparable to a-Si:H. Furthermore, a record micro of 2.5 cm 2V-1s-1 is demonstrated for bottom-gate bottom-contact (BGBC) TFTs. The mechanism underlying such impressive performance is investigated using transmission line techniques, and it is shown that the semiconductor-source/drain electrode interface contact resistance is nearly an order of magnitude lower for BGBC transistors versus BGTC devices. In Chapter 3, we report the implementation of amorphous indium yttrium oxide (a-IYO) as a TFT semiconductor for the first time. Amorphous and polycrystalline IYO films are grown via a low-temperature solution process utilizing exothermic "combustion" precursors. Precursor transformation and the IYO films are analyzed by DTA, TGA, XRD, AFM, XPS, and optical transmission, revealing efficient conversion to the metal-oxide lattice, and smooth, transparent films. a-IYO TFTs fabricated with a hybrid nanodielectric exhibit impressive electron mobilities of 7.3 cm2V-1s-1 (Tanneal = 300 °C) and 5.0 cm2V-1s -1 (Tanneal = 250 °C) for 2 V operation. Finally, Chapter 4 examines the role of the strong oxygen binding cation, known as the "oxygen getter" in quaternary metal oxide semiconductors. We present a systematic structural and electrical study of the carrier suppression role of gallium, scandium, yttrium, and lanthanum when introduced into IZO. We conclude that metal oxide lattice energy (HL) and metal ionic radius are the best predictors of the efficacy of an oxygen getter in IXZO and only Ga acts effectively in this role.

  10. A hybrid functional study of oxygen interstitial defects in amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Woo Hyun; Oh, Young Jun; Chang, Kee Joo

    2015-03-01

    Amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide (a-IGZO) semiconductors have attracted much attention because these materials are considered as the replacement of amorphous Si in high performance thin film transistors (TFTs). Although a-IGZO has been the subject of extensive studies due to its superior properties, problems such as threshold voltage shift main as obstacles for device applications. While O-vacancy defects were suggested to be responsible for the device instability under negative bias illumination stress (NBIS), there is no systematic study for the origin of instability under positive bias stress (PBS). In this work, we reveal the origin of PBS instability by performing hybrid density functional calculations for O interstitials in a-IGZO. The defect configuration of an O interstitial depends on its charge state. While an O-O dimer is stable in neutral state, it is easily broken by capturing eletrons, acting as an electron trap. Based on the results for the formation energy and transition level of an interstitial O, we propose that excess O atoms in a-IGZO are responsible for the PBS instability. This work is supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (2005-0093845) and KISTI Supercomputing Center (KSC-2014-C1-039).

  11. 60 IEEE ELECTRON DEVICE LETTERS, VOL. 34, NO. 1, JANUARY 2013 Self-Aligned IndiumGalliumZinc Oxide Thin-Film

    E-print Network

    silicon (p-Si) TFTs. The conventional a-Si TFTs, which are used as switching devices in active Kong Research Grants Council under Grant 614410. The review of this letter was arranged by Editor A annealing, which increase the sheet resistance of the S/D regions. Thus, thermal stability is a main issue

  12. Large-Scale Precise Printing of Ultrathin Sol-Gel Oxide Dielectrics for Directly Patterned Solution-Processed Metal Oxide Transistor Arrays.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won-June; Park, Won-Tae; Park, Sungjun; Sung, Sujin; Noh, Yong-Young; Yoon, Myung-Han

    2015-09-01

    Ultrathin and dense metal oxide gate di-electric layers are reported by a simple printing of AlOx and HfOx sol-gel precursors. Large-area printed indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO) thin-film transistor arrays, which exhibit mobilities >5 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and gate leakage current of 10(-9) A cm(-2) at a very low operation voltage of 2 V, are demonstrated by continuous simple bar-coated processes. PMID:26222338

  13. Novel Low Temperature Processing for Enhanced Properties of Ion Implanted Thin Films and Amorphous Mixed Oxide Thin Film Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vemuri, Rajitha

    This research emphasizes the use of low energy and low temperature post processing to improve the performance and lifetime of thin films and thin film transistors, by applying the fundamentals of interaction of materials with conductive heating and electromagnetic radiation. Single frequency microwave anneal is used to rapidly recrystallize the damage induced during ion implantation in Si substrates. Volumetric heating of the sample in the presence of the microwave field facilitates quick absorption of radiation to promote recrystallization at the amorphous-crystalline interface, apart from electrical activation of the dopants due to relocation to the substitutional sites. Structural and electrical characterization confirm recrystallization of heavily implanted Si within 40 seconds anneal time with minimum dopant diffusion compared to rapid thermal annealed samples. The use of microwave anneal to improve performance of multilayer thin film devices, e.g. thin film transistors (TFTs) requires extensive study of interaction of individual layers with electromagnetic radiation. This issue has been addressed by developing detail understanding of thin films and interfaces in TFTs by studying reliability and failure mechanisms upon extensive stress test. Electrical and ambient stresses such as illumination, thermal, and mechanical stresses are inflicted on the mixed oxide based thin film transistors, which are explored due to high mobilities of the mixed oxide (indium zinc oxide, indium gallium zinc oxide) channel layer material. Semiconductor parameter analyzer is employed to extract transfer characteristics, useful to derive mobility, subthreshold, and threshold voltage parameters of the transistors. Low temperature post processing anneals compatible with polymer substrates are performed in several ambients (oxygen, forming gas and vacuum) at 150 °C as a preliminary step. The analysis of the results pre and post low temperature anneals using device physics fundamentals assists in categorizing defects leading to failure/degradation as: oxygen vacancies, thermally activated defects within the bandgap, channel-dielectric interface defects, and acceptor-like or donor-like trap states. Microwave anneal has been confirmed to enhance the quality of thin films, however future work entails extending the use of electromagnetic radiation in controlled ambient to facilitate quick post fabrication anneal to improve the functionality and lifetime of these low temperature fabricated TFTs.

  14. Deep-level transient spectroscopy on an amorphous InGaZnO{sub 4} Schottky diode

    SciTech Connect

    Chasin, Adrian Bhoolokam, Ajay; Nag, Manoj; Genoe, Jan; Heremans, Paul; Simoen, Eddy; Gielen, Georges

    2014-02-24

    The first direct measurement is reported of the bulk density of deep states in amorphous IGZO (indium-gallium-zinc oxide) semiconductor by means of deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). The device under test is a Schottky diode of amorphous IGZO semiconductor on a palladium (Pd) Schottky-barrier electrode and with a molybdenum (Mo) Ohmic contact at the top. The DLTS technique allows to independently measure the energy and spatial distribution of subgap states in the IGZO thin film. The subgap trap concentration has a double exponential distribution as a function energy, with a value of ?10{sup 19}?cm{sup ?3}?eV{sup ?1} at the conduction band edge and a value of ?10{sup 17}?cm{sup ?3}?eV{sup ?1} at an energy of 0.55?eV below the conduction band. Such spectral distribution, however, is not uniform through the semiconductor film. The spatial distribution of subgap states correlates well with the background doping density distribution in the semiconductor, which increases towards the Ohmic Mo contact, suggesting that these two properties share the same physical origin.

  15. Influence of an anomalous dimension effect on thermal instability in amorphous-InGaZnO thin-film transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Kuan-Hsien; Chou, Wu-Ching E-mail: wuchingchou@mail.nctu.edu.tw; Chang, Ting-Chang E-mail: wuchingchou@mail.nctu.edu.tw; Chen, Hua-Mao; Tai, Ya-Hsiang; Tsai, Ming-Yen; Hung, Pei-Hua; Chu, Ann-Kuo; Wu, Ming-Siou; Hung, Yi-Syuan; Hsieh, Tien-Yu; Yeh, Bo-Liang

    2014-10-21

    This paper investigates abnormal dimension-dependent thermal instability in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors. Device dimension should theoretically have no effects on threshold voltage, except for in short channel devices. Unlike short channel drain-induced source barrier lowering effect, threshold voltage increases with increasing drain voltage. Furthermore, for devices with either a relatively large channel width or a short channel length, the output drain current decreases instead of saturating with an increase in drain voltage. Moreover, the wider the channel and the shorter the channel length, the larger the threshold voltage and output on-state current degradation that is observed. Because of the surrounding oxide and other thermal insulating material and the low thermal conductivity of the IGZO layer, the self-heating effect will be pronounced in wider/shorter channel length devices and those with a larger operating drain bias. To further clarify the physical mechanism, fast I{sub D}-V{sub G} and modulated peak/base pulse time I{sub D}-V{sub D} measurements are utilized to demonstrate the self-heating induced anomalous dimension-dependent threshold voltage variation and on-state current degradation.

  16. Sub-0.5 V Highly Stable Aqueous Salt Gated Metal Oxide Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sungjun; Lee, Seyeong; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Lee, Ilseop; Lee, Won-June; Kim, Sohee; Lee, Byung-Geun; Jang, Jae-Hyung; Yoon, Myung-Han

    2015-08-01

    Recently, growing interest in implantable bionics and biochemical sensors spurred the research for developing non-conventional electronics with excellent device characteristics at low operation voltages and prolonged device stability under physiological conditions. Herein, we report high-performance aqueous electrolyte-gated thin-film transistors using a sol-gel amorphous metal oxide semiconductor and aqueous electrolyte dielectrics based on small ionic salts. The proper selection of channel material (i.e., indium-gallium-zinc-oxide) and precautious passivation of non-channel areas enabled the development of simple but highly stable metal oxide transistors manifested by low operation voltages within 0.5?V, high transconductance of ~1.0?mS, large current on-off ratios over 107, and fast inverter responses up to several hundred hertz without device degradation even in physiologically-relevant ionic solutions. In conjunction with excellent transistor characteristics, investigation of the electrochemical nature of the metal oxide-electrolyte interface may contribute to the development of a viable bio-electronic platform directly interfacing with biological entities in vivo.

  17. Sub-0.5 V Highly Stable Aqueous Salt Gated Metal Oxide Electronics.

    PubMed

    Park, Sungjun; Lee, SeYeong; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Lee, Ilseop; Lee, Won-June; Kim, Sohee; Lee, Byung-Geun; Jang, Jae-Hyung; Yoon, Myung-Han

    2015-01-01

    Recently, growing interest in implantable bionics and biochemical sensors spurred the research for developing non-conventional electronics with excellent device characteristics at low operation voltages and prolonged device stability under physiological conditions. Herein, we report high-performance aqueous electrolyte-gated thin-film transistors using a sol-gel amorphous metal oxide semiconductor and aqueous electrolyte dielectrics based on small ionic salts. The proper selection of channel material (i.e., indium-gallium-zinc-oxide) and precautious passivation of non-channel areas enabled the development of simple but highly stable metal oxide transistors manifested by low operation voltages within 0.5 V, high transconductance of ~1.0 mS, large current on-off ratios over 10(7), and fast inverter responses up to several hundred hertz without device degradation even in physiologically-relevant ionic solutions. In conjunction with excellent transistor characteristics, investigation of the electrochemical nature of the metal oxide-electrolyte interface may contribute to the development of a viable bio-electronic platform directly interfacing with biological entities in vivo. PMID:26271456

  18. Sub-0.5 V Highly Stable Aqueous Salt Gated Metal Oxide Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sungjun; Lee, SeYeong; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Lee, Ilseop; Lee, Won-June; Kim, Sohee; Lee, Byung-Geun; Jang, Jae-Hyung; Yoon, Myung-Han

    2015-01-01

    Recently, growing interest in implantable bionics and biochemical sensors spurred the research for developing non-conventional electronics with excellent device characteristics at low operation voltages and prolonged device stability under physiological conditions. Herein, we report high-performance aqueous electrolyte-gated thin-film transistors using a sol-gel amorphous metal oxide semiconductor and aqueous electrolyte dielectrics based on small ionic salts. The proper selection of channel material (i.e., indium-gallium-zinc-oxide) and precautious passivation of non-channel areas enabled the development of simple but highly stable metal oxide transistors manifested by low operation voltages within 0.5?V, high transconductance of ~1.0?mS, large current on-off ratios over 107, and fast inverter responses up to several hundred hertz without device degradation even in physiologically-relevant ionic solutions. In conjunction with excellent transistor characteristics, investigation of the electrochemical nature of the metal oxide-electrolyte interface may contribute to the development of a viable bio-electronic platform directly interfacing with biological entities in vivo. PMID:26271456

  19. High Performance, Low Temperature Solution-Processed Barium and Strontium Doped Oxide Thin Film Transistors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Amorphous mixed metal oxides are emerging as high performance semiconductors for thin film transistor (TFT) applications, with indium gallium zinc oxide, InGaZnO (IGZO), being one of the most widely studied and best performing systems. Here, we investigate alkaline earth (barium or strontium) doped InBa(Sr)ZnO as alternative, semiconducting channel layers and compare their performance of the electrical stress stability with IGZO. In films fabricated by solution-processing from metal alkoxide precursors and annealed to 450 °C we achieve high field-effect electron mobility up to 26 cm2 V–1 s–1. We show that it is possible to solution-process these materials at low process temperature (225–200 °C yielding mobilities up to 4.4 cm2 V–1 s–1) and demonstrate a facile “ink-on-demand” process for these materials which utilizes the alcoholysis reaction of alkyl metal precursors to negate the need for complex synthesis and purification protocols. Electrical bias stress measurements which can serve as a figure of merit for performance stability for a TFT device reveal Sr- and Ba-doped semiconductors to exhibit enhanced electrical stability and reduced threshold voltage shift compared to IGZO irrespective of the process temperature and preparation method. This enhancement in stability can be attributed to the higher Gibbs energy of oxidation of barium and strontium compared to gallium. PMID:24511184

  20. High Performance, Low Temperature Solution-Processed Barium and Strontium Doped Oxide Thin Film Transistors.

    PubMed

    Banger, Kulbinder K; Peterson, Rebecca L; Mori, Kiyotaka; Yamashita, Yoshihisa; Leedham, Timothy; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2014-01-28

    Amorphous mixed metal oxides are emerging as high performance semiconductors for thin film transistor (TFT) applications, with indium gallium zinc oxide, InGaZnO (IGZO), being one of the most widely studied and best performing systems. Here, we investigate alkaline earth (barium or strontium) doped InBa(Sr)ZnO as alternative, semiconducting channel layers and compare their performance of the electrical stress stability with IGZO. In films fabricated by solution-processing from metal alkoxide precursors and annealed to 450 °C we achieve high field-effect electron mobility up to 26 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). We show that it is possible to solution-process these materials at low process temperature (225-200 °C yielding mobilities up to 4.4 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) and demonstrate a facile "ink-on-demand" process for these materials which utilizes the alcoholysis reaction of alkyl metal precursors to negate the need for complex synthesis and purification protocols. Electrical bias stress measurements which can serve as a figure of merit for performance stability for a TFT device reveal Sr- and Ba-doped semiconductors to exhibit enhanced electrical stability and reduced threshold voltage shift compared to IGZO irrespective of the process temperature and preparation method. This enhancement in stability can be attributed to the higher Gibbs energy of oxidation of barium and strontium compared to gallium. PMID:24511184

  1. Spray-combustion synthesis: Efficient solution route to high-performance oxide transistors

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xinge; Smith, Jeremy; Zhou, Nanjia; Zeng, Li; Guo, Peijun; Xia, Yu; Alvarez, Ana; Aghion, Stefano; Lin, Hui; Yu, Junsheng; Chang, Robert P. H.; Bedzyk, Michael J.; Ferragut, Rafael; Marks, Tobin J.; Facchetti, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Metal-oxide (MO) semiconductors have emerged as enabling materials for next generation thin-film electronics owing to their high carrier mobilities, even in the amorphous state, large-area uniformity, low cost, and optical transparency, which are applicable to flat-panel displays, flexible circuitry, and photovoltaic cells. Impressive progress in solution-processed MO electronics has been achieved using methodologies such as sol gel, deep-UV irradiation, preformed nanostructures, and combustion synthesis. Nevertheless, because of incomplete lattice condensation and film densification, high-quality solution-processed MO films having technologically relevant thicknesses achievable in a single step have yet to be shown. Here, we report a low-temperature, thickness-controlled coating process to create high-performance, solution-processed MO electronics: spray-combustion synthesis (SCS). We also report for the first time, to our knowledge, indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (IGZO) transistors having densification, nanoporosity, electron mobility, trap densities, bias stability, and film transport approaching those of sputtered films and compatible with conventional fabrication (FAB) operations. PMID:25733848

  2. Spray-combustion synthesis: efficient solution route to high-performance oxide transistors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xinge; Smith, Jeremy; Zhou, Nanjia; Zeng, Li; Guo, Peijun; Xia, Yu; Alvarez, Ana; Aghion, Stefano; Lin, Hui; Yu, Junsheng; Chang, Robert P H; Bedzyk, Michael J; Ferragut, Rafael; Marks, Tobin J; Facchetti, Antonio

    2015-03-17

    Metal-oxide (MO) semiconductors have emerged as enabling materials for next generation thin-film electronics owing to their high carrier mobilities, even in the amorphous state, large-area uniformity, low cost, and optical transparency, which are applicable to flat-panel displays, flexible circuitry, and photovoltaic cells. Impressive progress in solution-processed MO electronics has been achieved using methodologies such as sol gel, deep-UV irradiation, preformed nanostructures, and combustion synthesis. Nevertheless, because of incomplete lattice condensation and film densification, high-quality solution-processed MO films having technologically relevant thicknesses achievable in a single step have yet to be shown. Here, we report a low-temperature, thickness-controlled coating process to create high-performance, solution-processed MO electronics: spray-combustion synthesis (SCS). We also report for the first time, to our knowledge, indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (IGZO) transistors having densification, nanoporosity, electron mobility, trap densities, bias stability, and film transport approaching those of sputtered films and compatible with conventional fabrication (FAB) operations. PMID:25733848

  3. Control of threshold voltage in ZnO-based oxide thin film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jin-Seong; Jeong, Jae Kyeong; Mo, Yeon-Gon; Kim, Hye Dong; Kim, Chang-Jung

    2008-07-01

    We investigated the feasibility of controlling the threshold voltage (Vth) by adjusting the thickness of the active layer (tactive) rather than by conventional chemical doping in indium-gallium-zinc oxide (IGZO) transistors with an inverted staggered structure. The value of Vth of the IGZO transistor was linearly modulated from -15.3±1.6to-0.1±0.21V by reducing tactive without any significant change in the field-effect mobility (?FE), subthreshold gate swing, or Ion/off ratio. The free electron density extracted from the relationship between tactive and Vth was 1.9×1017cm-3, which was consistent with the value of 1.5×1017cm-3 obtained from the C-V measurement for the 30-nm-thick IGZO films. The slight increase in the ?FE with increasing tactive, which was in contradiction with the behavior of the corresponding amorphous Si transistor, was explained by the anomalous behavior of the source/drain contact resistance.

  4. Facile Routes To Improve Performance of Solution-Processed Amorphous Metal Oxide Thin Film Transistors by Water Vapor Annealing.

    PubMed

    Park, Won-Tae; Son, Inyoung; Park, Hyun-Woo; Chung, Kwun-Bum; Xu, Yong; Lee, Taegweon; Noh, Yong-Young

    2015-06-24

    Here, we report on a simple and high-rate oxidization method for producing solution-based compound mixtures of indium zinc oxide (IZO) and indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO) metal-oxide semiconductors (MOS) for thin-film transistor (TFT) applications. One of the issues for solution-based MOS fabrication is how to sufficiently oxidize the precursor in order to achieve high performance. As the oxidation rate of solution processing is lower than vacuum-based deposition such as sputtering, devices using solution-processed MOS exhibit relatively poorer performance. Therefore, we propose a method to prepare the metal-oxide precursor upon exposure to saturated water vapor in a closed volume for increasing the oxidization efficiency without requiring additional oxidizing agent. We found that the hydroxide rate of the MOS film exposed to water vapor is lower than when unexposed (?18%). Hence, we successfully fabricated oxide TFTs with high electron mobility (27.9 cm(2)/V·s) and established a rapid process (annealing at 400 °C for 5 min) that is much shorter than the conventional as-deposited long-duration annealing (at 400 °C for 1 h) whose corresponding mobility is even lower (19.2 cm(2)/V·s). PMID:26043206

  5. David Adler Lectureship Award in the Field of Materials Physics Talk: Novel Nitride and Oxide Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearton, Stephen

    2011-03-01

    Recent progress in development of GaN-based transistors for gas and bio-sensing applications and amorphous IGZO layers for use thin film transistors (TFTs)on flexible substrates, including paper,will be presented. For the detection of gases such as hydrogen, the gateless GaN transistors are typically coated with a catalyst metal such as Pd or Pt to increase the detection sensitivity at room temperature. Functionalizing the surface with oxides, polymers and nitrides is also useful in enhancing the detection sensitivity for gases and ionic solutions.The use of enzymes or adsorbed antibody layers on the semiconductor surface leads to highly specific detection of a broad range of antigens of interest in the medical and security fields. We give examples of recent work showing sensitive detection of glucose, lactic acid, prostate cancer and breast cancer markers and the integration of the sensors with wireless data transmission systems to achieve robust, portable sensors. The amorphous transparent conducting oxide InZnGaO4 (IGZO) is attracting attention because of its high electron mobility (10-50 cm2.V-1.sec-1), high transparency in the visible region of the spectrum and its ability to be deposited with a wide range of conductivities.This raises the possibility of making low-cost electronics on a very wide range of arbitrary surfaces, including paper and plastics. N-type oxides such as zinc oxide, zinc tin oxide, indium gallium oxide, and indium gallium zinc tin oxide (IGZO) exhibit surprisingly high carrier mobilities even for amorphous films deposited at 300K. This has been explained by the fact that the conduction in these materials is predominantly through non-directional s orbitals which are less affected by disorder than the directional sp3 orbitals which control electron transport in Si. Examples of progress and discussion of remaining obstacles to use of IGZO TFTs will be presented Work performed in collaboration with Fan Ren.

  6. Facile encapsulation of oxide based thin film transistors by atomic layer deposition based on ozone.

    PubMed

    Fakhri, Morteza; Babin, Nikolai; Behrendt, Andreas; Jakob, Timo; Görrn, Patrick; Riedl, Thomas

    2013-05-28

    A simplified encapsulation strategy for metal-oxide based TFTs, using ozone instead of water as an oxygen source in a low-temperature ALD process is demonstrated. Thereby, the threshold voltage remains unaltered and the hysteresis is permanently reduced. Costly energy- and time-consuming post-treatment processes can be avoided. This concept is widely applicable to various encapsulation materials (e.g., Al2 O3 , TiO2 , ZrO2 ) and metal-oxide channel semiconductors (e.g., zinc-tin-oxide (ZTO), indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (IGZO)). PMID:23592395

  7. The effect of annealing temperature on the stability of gallium tin zinc oxide thin film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Ngoc; McCall, Briana; Alston, Robert; Collis, Ward; Iyer, Shanthi

    2015-10-01

    With the growing need for large area display technology and the push for a faster and cheaper alternative to the current amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) as the active channel layer for pixel-driven thin film transistors (TFTs) display applications, gallium tin zinc oxide (GSZO) has shown to be a promising candidate due to the similar electronic configuration of Sn4+ and In3+. In this work TFTs of GSZO sputtered films with only a few atomic % of Ga and Sn have been fabricated. A systematic and detailed comparison has been made of the properties of the GSZO films annealed at two temperatures: 140 °C and 450 °C. The electrical and optical stabilities of the respective devices have been studied to gain more insight into the degradation mechanism and are correlated with the initial TFT performance prior to the application of stress. Post deposition annealing at 450 °C of the films in air was found to lead to a higher atomic concentration of Sn4+ in these films and a superior quality of the film, as attested by the higher film density and less surface and interface roughness in comparison to the lower annealed temperature device. These result in significantly reduced shallow and deep interface traps with improved performance of the device exhibiting VON of -3.5 V, ION/IOFF of 108, field-effect mobility (?FE) of 4.46 cm2 V-1s-1, and sub-threshold swing of 0.38 V dec-1. The device is stable under both electrical and optical bias for wavelengths of 550 nm and above. Thus, this work demonstrates GSZO-based TFTs as a promising viable option to the IGZO TFTs by further tailoring the film composition and relevant processing temperatures.

  8. Modulation of aqueous precursor solution temperature for the fabrication of high-performance metal oxide thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Keun Ho; Park, Jee Ho; Yoo, Young Bum; Han, Sun Woong; Jong Lee, Se; Baik, Hong Koo

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we present a simple process for the fabrication of aqueous-solution-processed metal oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs) via the manipulation of precursor solution temperature. Indium oxide TFTs fabricated from a solution of indium nitrate at 4 °C exhibited the highest mobility of 2.73 cm2/(V·s) at an annealing temperature of 200 °C. When the temperature of the metal oxide precursor solution is 4 °C, metal cations within the solution can be fully surrounded by H2O molecules owing to the high dielectric constant of H2O at low temperatures. These metal complexes are advantageous for the conversion of metal oxides via thermally driven hydrolysis and condensation processes due to their high potential energies. The same techniques have been applied successfully with high-order metal oxides including indium zinc oxide, indium gallium oxide, and indium gallium zinc oxide.

  9. Multi-oxide active layer deposition using Applied Materials Pivot array coater for high-mobility metal oxide TFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyun Chan; Scheer, Evelyn; Witting, Karin; Hanika, Markus; Bender, Marcus; Hsu, Hao Chien; Yim, Dong Kil

    2015-11-01

    By controlling a thin indium tin oxide (ITO), indium zinc oxide interface layer between gate insulator and indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO), the thin-film transistor (TFT) performance can reach higher mobility as conventional IGZO as well as superior stability. For large-area display application, Applied Materials static PVD array coater (Applied Materials GmbH & Co. KG, Alzenau, Germany) using rotary targets has been developed to enable uniform thin layer deposition in display industry. Unique magnet motion parameter optimization in Pivot sputtering coater is shown to provide very uniform thin ITO layer to reach TFT performance with high mobility, not only on small scale, but also on Gen8.5 (2500 × 2200 mm glass size) production system.

  10. Multi-oxide active layer deposition using Applied Materials Pivot array coater for high-mobility metal oxide TFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyun Chan; Scheer, Evelyn; Witting, Karin; Hanika, Markus; Bender, Marcus; Hsu, Hao Chien; Yim, Dong Kil

    2015-09-01

    By controlling a thin indium tin oxide (ITO), indium zinc oxide interface layer between gate insulator and indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO), the thin-film transistor (TFT) performance can reach higher mobility as conventional IGZO as well as superior stability. For large-area display application, Applied Materials static PVD array coater (Applied Materials GmbH & Co. KG, Alzenau, Germany) using rotary targets has been developed to enable uniform thin layer deposition in display industry. Unique magnet motion parameter optimization in Pivot sputtering coater is shown to provide very uniform thin ITO layer to reach TFT performance with high mobility, not only on small scale, but also on Gen8.5 (2500 × 2200 mm glass size) production system.

  11. The effect of nitrous oxide plasma treatment on the bias temperature stress of metal oxide thin film transistors with high mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Wei-Hao; Fang, Shao-Wei; Lu, Chia-Yang; Chuang, Hung-Yang; Chang, Fan-Wei; Lin, Guan-Yu; Chen, Tsu-Wei; Ma, Kang-Hung; Chen, Hong-Syu; Chen, Teng-Ke; Chen, Yu-Hung; Lee, Jen-Yu; Shih, Tsung-Hsiang; Ting, Hung-Che; Chen, Chia-Yu; Lin, Yu-Hsin; Hong, Hong-Jye

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the effects of nitrous oxide plasma treatment on the negative bias temperature stress of indium tin zinc oxide (ITZO) and indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO) thin film transistors (TFTs) were reported. ITZO TFTs were more suitable for the back channel etched-type device structure because they could withstand both Al- and Cu-acid damage. The initial threshold voltage range could be controlled to within 1 V. The root cause of poor negative bias temperature stress for ITZO was likely due to a higher mobility (?3.3 times) and more carbon related contamination bonds (?5.9 times) relative to IGZO. Finally, 65? active-matrix organic light-emitting diode televisions using the ITZO and IGZO TFTs were fabricated.

  12. High-density carrier-accumulated and electrically stable oxide thin-film transistors from ion-gel gate dielectric

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Mami N.; Ishikawa, Yasuaki; Miwa, Kazumoto; Okada, Hiromi; Uraoka, Yukiharu; Ono, Shimpei

    2015-01-01

    The use of indium–gallium–zinc oxide (IGZO) has paved the way for high-resolution uniform displays or integrated circuits with transparent and flexible devices. However, achieving highly reliable devices that use IGZO for low-temperature processes remains a technological challenge. We propose the use of IGZO thin-film transistors (TFTs) with an ionic-liquid gate dielectric in order to achieve high-density carrier-accumulated IGZO TFTs with high reliability, and we discuss a distinctive mechanism for the degradation of this organic–inorganic hybrid device under long-term electrical stress. Our results demonstrated that an ionic liquid or gel gate dielectric provides highly reliable and low-voltage operation with IGZO TFTs. Furthermore, high-density carrier accumulation helps improve the TFT characteristics and reliability, and it is highly relevant to the electronic phase control of oxide materials and the degradation mechanism for organic–inorganic hybrid devices. PMID:26677773

  13. High-density carrier-accumulated and electrically stable oxide thin-film transistors from ion-gel gate dielectric.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Mami N; Ishikawa, Yasuaki; Miwa, Kazumoto; Okada, Hiromi; Uraoka, Yukiharu; Ono, Shimpei

    2015-01-01

    The use of indium-gallium-zinc oxide (IGZO) has paved the way for high-resolution uniform displays or integrated circuits with transparent and flexible devices. However, achieving highly reliable devices that use IGZO for low-temperature processes remains a technological challenge. We propose the use of IGZO thin-film transistors (TFTs) with an ionic-liquid gate dielectric in order to achieve high-density carrier-accumulated IGZO TFTs with high reliability, and we discuss a distinctive mechanism for the degradation of this organic-inorganic hybrid device under long-term electrical stress. Our results demonstrated that an ionic liquid or gel gate dielectric provides highly reliable and low-voltage operation with IGZO TFTs. Furthermore, high-density carrier accumulation helps improve the TFT characteristics and reliability, and it is highly relevant to the electronic phase control of oxide materials and the degradation mechanism for organic-inorganic hybrid devices. PMID:26677773

  14. Origin of major donor states in In–Ga–Zn oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Nakashima, Motoki; Oota, Masashi; Ishihara, Noritaka; Nonaka, Yusuke; Hirohashi, Takuya; Takahashi, Masahiro; Yamazaki, Shunpei; Obonai, Toshimitsu; Hosaka, Yasuharu; Koezuka, Junichi

    2014-12-07

    To clarify the origin of the major donor states in indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO), we report measurement results and an analysis of several physical properties of IGZO thin films. Specifically, the concentration of H atoms and O vacancies (V{sub O}), carrier concentration, and conductivity are investigated by hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, thermal desorption spectroscopy, and Hall effect measurements. The results of these experiments suggest that the origin of major donor states is H occupancy of V{sub O} sites. Furthermore, we use first-principles calculations to investigate the influence of the coexistence of V{sub O} and H in crystalline InGaO{sub 3}(ZnO){sub m} (m?=?1). The results indicate that when H is trapped in V{sub O}, a stable complex is created that serves as a shallow-level donor.

  15. Light-induced hysteresis and recovery behaviors in photochemically activated solution-processed metal-oxide thin-film transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, Jeong-Wan; Park, Sung Kyu E-mail: skpark@cau.ac.kr; Kim, Yong-Hoon E-mail: skpark@cau.ac.kr

    2014-07-28

    In this report, photo-induced hysteresis, threshold voltage (V{sub T}) shift, and recovery behaviors in photochemically activated solution-processed indium-gallium-zinc oxide (IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs) are investigated. It was observed that a white light illumination caused negative V{sub T} shift along with creation of clockwise hysteresis in electrical characteristics which can be attributed to photo-generated doubly ionized oxygen vacancies at the semiconductor/gate dielectric interface. More importantly, the photochemically activated IGZO TFTs showed much reduced overall V{sub T} shift compared to thermally annealed TFTs. Reduced number of donor-like interface states creation under light illumination and more facile neutralization of ionized oxygen vacancies by electron capture under positive gate potential are claimed to be the origin of the less V{sub T} shift in photochemically activated TFTs.

  16. High performance, transparent a-IGZO TFTs on a flexible thin glass substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gwang Jun; Kim, Joonwoo; Kim, Jung-Hye; Jeong, Soon Moon; Jang, Jae Eun; Jeong, Jaewook

    2014-03-01

    We investigated electrical properties of transparent amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs) with amorphous indium zinc oxide (a-IZO) transparent electrodes on a flexble thin glass substrate. The TFTs show a high field-effect mobility, a good subthreshold slope and a high on/off ratio owing to the high temperature thermal annealing process which cannot be applied to typical transparent polymer-based flexible substrates. Bias stress instability tests applying tensile stress concurrently with the bending radius of up to 40 mm indicated that mechanically and electrically stable a-IGZO TFTs can be fabricated on the transparent thin glass substrate.

  17. The Structure and Properties of Amorphous Indium Oxide

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A series of In2O3 thin films, ranging from X-ray diffraction amorphous to highly crystalline, were grown on amorphous silica substrates using pulsed laser deposition by varying the film growth temperature. The amorphous-to-crystalline transition and the structure of amorphous In2O3 were investigated by grazing angle X-ray diffraction (GIXRD), Hall transport measurement, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), electron diffraction, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), and ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) liquid-quench simulation. On the basis of excellent agreement between the EXAFS and MD results, a model of the amorphous oxide structure as a network of InOx polyhedra was constructed. Mechanisms for the transport properties observed in the crystalline, amorphous-to-crystalline, and amorphous deposition regions are presented, highlighting a unique structure–property relationship. PMID:25678743

  18. Amorphous copper tungsten oxide with tunable band gaps

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Le; Shet, Sudhakar; Tang Houwen; Wang Heli; Yan Yanfa; Turner, John; Al-Jassim, Mowafak; Ahn, Kwang-soon

    2010-08-15

    We report on the synthesis of amorphous copper tungsten oxide thin films with tunable band gaps. The thin films are synthesized by the magnetron cosputtering method. We find that due to the amorphous nature, the Cu-to-W ratio in the films can be varied without the limit of the solubility (or phase separation) under appropriate conditions. As a result, the band gap and conductivity type of the films can be tuned by controlling the film composition. Unfortunately, the amorphous copper tungsten oxides are not stable in aqueous solution and are not suitable for the application of photoelectrochemical splitting of water. Nonetheless, it provides an alternative approach to search for transition metal oxides with tunable band gaps.

  19. Amorphous tin-cadmium oxide films and the production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Li, Xiaonan; Gessert, Timothy A

    2013-10-29

    A tin-cadmium oxide film having an amorphous structure and a ratio of tin atoms to cadmium atoms of between 1:1 and 3:1. The tin-cadmium oxide film may have an optical band gap of between 2.7 eV and 3.35 eV. The film may also have a charge carrier concentration of between 1.times.10.sup.20 cm.sup.-3 and 2.times.10.sup.20 cm.sup.-3. The tin cadmium oxide film may also exhibit a Hall mobility of between 40 cm.sup.2V.sup.-1 s.sup.-1 and 60 cm.sup.2V.sup.-1 s.sup.-1. Also disclosed is a method of producing an amorphous tin-cadmium oxide film as described and devices using same.

  20. Natural realgar and amorphous AsS oxidation kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lengke, Maggy F.; Tempel, Regina N.

    2003-03-01

    The oxidation rates of natural realgar and amorphous synthetic AsS by dissolved oxygen were evaluated using mixed flow reactors at pH 7.2 to 8.8 and dissolved oxygen contents of 5.9 to 16.5 ppm over a temperature range of 25 to 40°C. The ratios of As/S are stoichiometric for all amorphous AsS oxidation experiments except for two experiments conducted at pH ˜8.8. In these experiments, stoichiometric ratios of As/S were only observed in the early stages of AsS (am) oxidation whereas lower As/S ratios were observed during steady state. For realgar oxidation experiments, the As/S ratio is less than the stoichiometric ratio of realgar, ranging between 0.61 and 0.71. This nonstoichiometric release of As and S to solution indicates that realgar oxidation is more selective for S after the rates of oxidation become constant. All measured oxidation rates at 25°C can be described within experimental uncertainties as follows: Table 1

  1. Absorption of ac fields in amorphous indium-oxide films

    SciTech Connect

    Ovadyahu, Z.

    2014-08-20

    Absorption data from applied ac fields in Anderson-localized amorphous indium-oxide (In{sub x}O) films are shown to be frequency and disorder dependent. The absorption shows a roll-off at a frequency which is much lower than the electron-electron scattering rate of the material when it is in the diffusive regime. This is interpreted as evidence for discreteness of the energy spectrum of the deeply localized regime. This is consistent with recent many-body localization scenarios. As the metal-insulator transition is approached, the absorption shifts to higher frequencies. Comparing with the previously obtained results on the crystalline version of indium-oxide (In{sub 2}O{sub 3?x}) implies a considerably higher inelastic electron-phonon scattering rate in the amorphous material. The range over which the absorption versus frequency decreases may indicate that a wide distribution of localization length is a common feature in these systems.

  2. Tungsten oxide nanowires grown on amorphous-like tungsten films.

    PubMed

    Dellasega, D; Pietralunga, S M; Pezzoli, A; Russo, V; Nasi, L; Conti, C; Vahid, M J; Tagliaferri, A; Passoni, M

    2015-09-11

    Tungsten oxide nanowires have been synthesized by vacuum annealing in the range 500-710 °C from amorphous-like tungsten films, deposited on a Si(100) substrate by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) in the presence of a He background pressure. The oxygen required for the nanowires formation is already adsorbed in the W matrix before annealing, its amount depending on deposition parameters. Nanowire crystalline phase and stoichiometry depend on annealing temperature, ranging from W18O49-Magneli phase to monoclinic WO3. Sufficiently long annealing induces the formation of micrometer-long nanowires, up to 3.6 ?m with an aspect ratio up to 90. Oxide nanowire growth appears to be triggered by the crystallization of the underlying amorphous W film, promoting their synthesis at low temperatures. PMID:26292084

  3. Tungsten oxide nanowires grown on amorphous-like tungsten films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellasega, D.; Pietralunga, S. M.; Pezzoli, A.; Russo, V.; Nasi, L.; Conti, C.; Vahid, M. J.; Tagliaferri, A.; Passoni, M.

    2015-09-01

    Tungsten oxide nanowires have been synthesized by vacuum annealing in the range 500-710 °C from amorphous-like tungsten films, deposited on a Si(100) substrate by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) in the presence of a He background pressure. The oxygen required for the nanowires formation is already adsorbed in the W matrix before annealing, its amount depending on deposition parameters. Nanowire crystalline phase and stoichiometry depend on annealing temperature, ranging from W18O49-Magneli phase to monoclinic WO3. Sufficiently long annealing induces the formation of micrometer-long nanowires, up to 3.6 ?m with an aspect ratio up to 90. Oxide nanowire growth appears to be triggered by the crystallization of the underlying amorphous W film, promoting their synthesis at low temperatures.

  4. Highly Transparent, Visible-Light Photodetector Based on Oxide Semiconductors and Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Shin, Seung Won; Lee, Kwang-Ho; Park, Jin-Seong; Kang, Seong Jun

    2015-09-01

    Highly transparent phototransistors that can detect visible light have been fabricated by combining indium-gallium-zinc oxide (IGZO) and quantum dots (QDs). A wide-band-gap IGZO film was used as a transparent semiconducting channel, while small-band-gap QDs were adopted to absorb and convert visible light to an electrical signal. Typical IGZO thin-film transistors (TFTs) did not show a photocurrent with illumination of visible light. However, IGZO TFTs decorated with QDs showed enhanced photocurrent upon exposure to visible light. The device showed a responsivity of 1.35×10(4) A/W and an external quantum efficiency of 2.59×10(4) under illumination by a 635 nm laser. The origin of the increased photocurrent in the visible light was the small band gap of the QDs combined with the transparent IGZO films. Therefore, transparent phototransistors based on IGZO and QDs were fabricated and characterized in detail. The result is relevant for the development of highly transparent photodetectors that can detect visible light. PMID:26293387

  5. Ambient atmosphere-processable, printable Cu electrodes for flexible device applications: structural welding on a millisecond timescale of surface oxide-free Cu nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sang-Jin; Jo, Yejin; Lee, Eun Jung; Lee, Sun Sook; Kang, Young Hun; Jeon, Hye-Ji; Cho, Song Yun; Park, Jin-Seong; Seo, Yeong-Hui; Ryu, Beyong-Hwan; Choi, Youngmin; Jeong, Sunho

    2015-03-01

    Recently, various functional devices based on printing technologies have been of paramount interest, owing to their characteristic processing advantages along with excellent device performance. In particular, printable metallic electrodes have drawn attention in a variety of optoelectronic applications; however, research into printable metallic nanoparticles has been limited mainly to the case of an environmentally stable Ag phase. Despite its earth-abundance and highly conductive nature, the Cu phase, to date, has not been exploited as an ambient atmosphere-processable, printable material due to its critical oxidation problem in air. In this study, we demonstrate a facile route for generating highly conductive, flexible Cu electrodes in air by introducing the well-optimized photonic sintering at a time frame of 10(-3) s, at which the photon energy, rather than conventional thermal energy, is instantly provided. It is elucidated here how the surface oxide-free, printed Cu particulate films undergo chemical structural/microstructural evolution depending on the instantly irradiated photon energy, and a successful demonstration is provided of large-area, flexible, printed Cu conductors on various substrates, including polyimide (PI), polyethersulfone (PES), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), and paper. The applicability of the resulting printed Cu electrodes is evaluated via implementation into both flexible capacitor devices and indium-gallium-zinc oxide (IGZO) flexible thin-film transistors. PMID:25626472

  6. Transparent amorphous zinc oxide thin films for NLO applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawadzka, A.; P?óciennik, P.; Strzelecki, J.; Sahraoui, B.

    2014-11-01

    This review focuses on the growth and optical properties of amorphous zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films. A high quality ZnO films fabricated by dip-coating (sol-gel) method were grown on quartz and glass substrates at temperature equal to 350 K. The amorphous nature of the films was verified by X-ray diffraction. Atomic Force Microscopy was used to evaluate the surface morphology of the films. The optical characteristics of amorphous thin films have been investigated in the spectral range 190-1100 nm. Measurement of the polarized optical properties was shows a high transmissivity (80-99%) and low absorptivity (<5%) in the visible and near infrared regions at different angles of incidence. Linear optical properties were investigated by classic and Time-Resolved Photoluminescence (TRPL) measurements. Photoluminescence spectrum exhibits a strong ultraviolet emission while the visible emission is very weak. An innovative TRPL technique has enabled the measurement of the photoluminescence decay time as a function of temperature. TRPL measurements reveal a multiexponential decay behavior typical for amorphous thin films. Second and third harmonic generation measurements were performed by means of the rotational Maker fringe technique using Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm in picosecond regime for investigations of the nonlinear optical properties. The obtained values of second and third order nonlinear susceptibilities were found to be high enough for the potential applications in the optical switching devices based on refractive index changes. Presented spectra confirm high structural and optical quality of the investigated zinc oxide thin films.

  7. Transparent conducting oxides (TCO's) for amorphous silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegedus, Steven; Liang, Haifan; Gordon, Roy G.

    1996-01-01

    The stability of various textured tin oxide and zinc oxide transparent conductors was evaluated against annealing in air, in vacuum or exposed to hydrogen plasma. Only fluorine-doped zinc oxide deposited by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) had stable electrical and optical properties under all conditions. Thin layers of ZnO or TiO2 greatly improved the plasma resistance of SnO2. A new TCO material, niobium-doped titanium dioxide (TiO2:Nb) was able to withstand hydrogen plasmas with only slight increases in its optical absorption and conductivity. Composite TCO's consisting of glass/SnO2:F/TiO2:Nb were shown to provide good electrical contact to amorphous silicon solar cells.

  8. Bacterial adhesion on amorphous and crystalline metal oxide coatings.

    PubMed

    Almaguer-Flores, Argelia; Silva-Bermudez, Phaedra; Galicia, Rey; Rodil, Sandra E

    2015-12-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the influence of surface properties (surface energy, composition and topography) of biocompatible materials on the adhesion of cells/bacteria on solid substrates; however, few have provided information about the effect of the atomic arrangement or crystallinity. Using magnetron sputtering deposition, we produced amorphous and crystalline TiO2 and ZrO2 coatings with controlled micro and nanoscale morphology. The effect of the structure on the physical-chemical surface properties was carefully analyzed. Then, we studied how these parameters affect the adhesion of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Our findings demonstrated that the nano-topography and the surface energy were significantly influenced by the coating structure. Bacterial adhesion at micro-rough (2.6 ?m) surfaces was independent of the surface composition and structure, contrary to the observation in sub-micron (0.5 ?m) rough surfaces, where the crystalline oxides (TiO2>ZrO2) surfaces exhibited higher numbers of attached bacteria. Particularly, crystalline TiO2, which presented a predominant acidic nature, was more attractive for the adhesion of the negatively charged bacteria. The information provided by this study, where surface modifications are introduced by means of the deposition of amorphous or crystalline oxide coatings, offers a route for the rational design of implant surfaces to control or inhibit bacterial adhesion. PMID:26354243

  9. Ultrathin amorphous zinc-tin-oxide buffer layer for enhancing heterojunction interface quality in metal-oxide solar cells

    E-print Network

    Heo, Jaeyeong

    We demonstrate a tunable electron-blocking layer to enhance the performance of an Earth-abundant metal-oxide solar-cell material. A 5 nm thick amorphous ternary metal-oxide buffer layer reduces interface recombination, ...

  10. Ion beam mixing of marker layers into amorphous aluminum oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, E.A.; Nastasi, M.

    1993-10-01

    Thin layers of various marker species embedded in amorphous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were ion beam mixed with 210 keV Ar in a temperature range of {minus}166C--790C. All of the metal markers (Ag, Fe, and Zr) were found to mix only to a ballistic level. The oxide markers studied were Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and ZrO{sub 2}. Thermally assisted ion mixing was seen, in decreasing amounts, in Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. No thermally assisted ion beam mixing was observed for ZrO{sub 2} or the metal markers.

  11. Better than crystalline: amorphous vanadium oxide for sodium-ion batteries

    E-print Network

    Cao, Guozhong

    Better than crystalline: amorphous vanadium oxide for sodium-ion batteries E. Uchaker, Y. Z. Zheng for Na-ion batteries show similar or slightly lower specic capacity and redox potential than when used, S. Li, S. L. Candelaria, S. Hu and G. Z. Cao* Amorphous and nanocrystalline vanadium pentoxide (V2O5

  12. Phosphate and Organic Acids as Competing Sorbates on Amorphous Aluminum Oxide. (3791)

    E-print Network

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Phosphate and Organic Acids as Competing Sorbates on Amorphous Aluminum Oxide. (3791) Authors: K that organics (i.e. oxalic acid), readily present in PL, play in P retention under varying pH conditions

  13. Characterization of magnetoimpedance on polycrystalline and amorphous chromium oxides bilayered thin films

    E-print Network

    Huang, Jung-Chun

    Characterization of magnetoimpedance on polycrystalline and amorphous chromium oxides bilayered chromium dioxide (CrO2) is one of the technologically important transition-metal oxides, which is widely AND RESULTS In this study, the chromium oxide thin films were pre- pared by the chemical vapor deposition

  14. Probing of 2 dimensional confinement-induced structural transitions in amorphous oxide thin film

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung Keun; Ahn, Chi Won

    2014-01-01

    Whereas the atomic structure of surface of crystals is known to be distinct from that of bulk, experimental evidence for thickness-induced structural transitions in amorphous oxides is lacking. We report the NMR result for amorphous alumina with varying thickness from bulk up to 5?nm, revealing the nature of structural transitions near amorphous oxide surfaces/interfaces. The coordination environments in the confined amorphous alumina thin film are distinct from those of bulk, highlighted by a decrease in the fractions of high-energy clusters (and thus the degree of disorder) with thickness. The result implies that a wide range of variations in amorphous structures may be identified by controlling its dimensionality. PMID:24569515

  15. Electrically conducting ternary amorphous fully oxidized materials and their application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giauque, Pierre (Inventor); Nicolet, Marc (Inventor); Gasser, Stefan M. (Inventor); Kolawa, Elzbieta A. (Inventor); Cherry, Hillary (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Electrically active devices are formed using a special conducting material of the form Tm--Ox mixed with SiO2 where the materials are immiscible. The immiscible materials are forced together by using high energy process to form an amorphous phase of the two materials. The amorphous combination of the two materials is electrically conducting but forms an effective barrier.

  16. Probing the role of Ga in amorphous conducting oxides through local structure studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffitt, Stephanie; Zhu, Qimin; Ma, Qing; Buchholz, Donald; Chang, Robert; Mason, Thomas; Marks, Tobin; Bedzyk, Michael

    2015-03-01

    The study of amorphous (a-) conducting oxides is an emerging field. The lack of grain boundaries, smooth surfaces, and low temperature deposition position these materials as ideal candidates for large area applications and flexible electronics. Most impressively, these materials maintain high electron mobility in the amorphous state. These benefits have led the recent commercialization of a-IGZO (Ga and Zn doped indium oxide) as a replacement for a-Si as the channel layer of thin film transistors in display technology. Despite this success, fundamental understanding of structure-property relationships is still lacking and must be improved to guide further development of amorphous conducting oxides. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is one of the few tools that can be used to probe the structure of amorphous materials. Amorphous indium oxide doped with Ga (a-IGO) is a model system to help develop the role of dopants in amorphous oxides. An in depth XAS study was carried out to determine inter-atomic distances, coordination numbers, and structural disorder parameters as a function of Ga doping level. The correlation between XAS-derived structural features and the dopant-dependent evolution of both electrical properties and thermal stability of a-IGO will be discussed. This work is supported by the NSF MRSEC Program No. DMR1121262.

  17. Remarkably stable amorphous metal oxide grown on Zr-Cu-Be metallic glass.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ka Ram; Kim, Chang Eun; Yun, Young Su; Kim, Won Tae; Soon, Aloysius; Kim, Do Hyang

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the role of an aliovalent dopant upon stabilizing the amorphous oxide film. We added beryllium into the Zr50Cu50 metallic glass system, and found that the amorphous oxide layer of Be-rich phase can be stabilized even at elevated temperature above Tg of the glass matrix. The thermal stability of the amorphous oxide layer is substantially enhanced due to Be addition. As confirmed by high-temperature cross-section HR-TEM, fully disordered Be-added amorphous layer is observed, while the rapid crystallization is observed without Be. To understand the role of Be, we employed ab-initio molecular dynamics to compare the mobility of ions with/without Be dopant, and propose a disordered model where Be dopant occupies Zr vacancy and induces structural disorder to the amorphous phase. We find that the oxygen mobility is slightly suppressed due to Be dopant, and Be mobility is unexpectedly lower than that of oxygen, which we attribute to the aliovalent nature of Be dopant whose diffusion always accompany multiple counter-diffusion of other ions. Here, we explain the origin of superior thermal stability of amorphous oxide film in terms of enhanced structural disorder and suppressed ionic mobility due to the aliovalent dopant. PMID:26658671

  18. Remarkably stable amorphous metal oxide grown on Zr-Cu-Be metallic glass

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ka Ram; Kim, Chang Eun; Yun, Young Su; Kim, Won Tae; Soon, Aloysius; Kim, Do Hyang

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the role of an aliovalent dopant upon stabilizing the amorphous oxide film. We added beryllium into the Zr50Cu50 metallic glass system, and found that the amorphous oxide layer of Be-rich phase can be stabilized even at elevated temperature above Tg of the glass matrix. The thermal stability of the amorphous oxide layer is substantially enhanced due to Be addition. As confirmed by high-temperature cross-section HR-TEM, fully disordered Be-added amorphous layer is observed, while the rapid crystallization is observed without Be. To understand the role of Be, we employed ab-initio molecular dynamics to compare the mobility of ions with/without Be dopant, and propose a disordered model where Be dopant occupies Zr vacancy and induces structural disorder to the amorphous phase. We find that the oxygen mobility is slightly suppressed due to Be dopant, and Be mobility is unexpectedly lower than that of oxygen, which we attribute to the aliovalent nature of Be dopant whose diffusion always accompany multiple counter-diffusion of other ions. Here, we explain the origin of superior thermal stability of amorphous oxide film in terms of enhanced structural disorder and suppressed ionic mobility due to the aliovalent dopant. PMID:26658671

  19. Investigating the degradation behavior caused by charge trapping effect under DC and AC gate-bias stress for InGaZnO thin film transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Te-Chih; Chang, Ting-Chang; Hsieh, Tien-Yu; Lu, Wei-Siang; Jian, Fu-Yen; Tsai, Chih-Tsung; Huang, Sheng-Yao; Lin, Chia-Sheng

    2011-07-01

    This letter investigates the degradation mechanism of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide thin-film transistors under gate-bias stress. The larger Vt shift under positive AC gate-bias stress when compared to DC operation indicates that an extra electron trapping mechanism occurs during rising/falling time during the AC pulse period. In contrast, the degradation behavior under illuminated negative gate-bias stress exhibits the opposite degradation tendency. Since electron and hole trapping are the dominant degradation mechanisms under positive and illuminated negative gate-bias stress, respectively, the different degradation tendencies under AC/DC operation can be attributed to the different trapping efficiency of electrons and holes.

  20. Plasma treatment effect on charge carrier concentrations and surface traps in a-InGaZnO thin-film transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jae-Sung; Xing Piao, Ming; Jang, Ho-Kyun; Kim, Gyu-Tae; Joo, Min-Kyu; Ahn, Seung-Eon; Choi, Yong-Hee

    2014-03-21

    Various plasma treatment effects such as oxygen (O{sub 2}), nitrogen (N{sub 2}), and argon (Ar) on amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide thin-film transistors (a-IGZO TFTs) are investigated. To study oxygen stoichiometry in a-IGZO TFTs with respect to various plasma environments, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was employed. The results showed that oxygen vacancies were reduced by O{sub 2} and N{sub 2} plasmas while they were increased after Ar plasma treatment. Additionally, the effects of plasma treatment on trap distribution in bulk and surface channels were explored by means of low-frequency noise analysis. Details of the mechanisms used for generating and restoring traps on the surface and bulk channel are presented.

  1. The effects of buffer layers on the performance and stability of flexible InGaZnO thin film transistors on polyimide substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Ok, Kyung-Chul; Park, Jin-Seong E-mail: jsparklime@hanyang.ac.kr; Ko Park, Sang-Hee; Kim, H. E-mail: jsparklime@hanyang.ac.kr; Hwang, Chi-Sun; Soo Shin, Hyun; Bae, Jonguk

    2014-02-10

    We demonstrated the fabrication of flexible amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs) on high-temperature polyimide (PI) substrates, which were debonded from the carrier glass after TFT fabrication. The application of appropriate buffer layers on the PI substrates affected the TFT performance and stability. The adoption of the SiN{sub x}/AlO{sub x} buffer layers as water and hydrogen diffusion barriers significantly improved the device performance and stability against the thermal annealing and negative bias stress, compared to single SiN{sub x} or SiO{sub x} buffer layers. The substrates could be bent down to a radius of curvature of 15?mm and the devices remained normally functional.

  2. Performance regeneration of InGaZnO transistors with ultra-thin channels

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Binglei; Li, He; Zhang, Xijian E-mail: songam@sdu.edu.cn; Luo, Yi; Wang, Qingpu; Song, Aimin E-mail: songam@sdu.edu.cn

    2015-03-02

    Thin-film transistors (TFTs) based on ultra-thin amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) semiconductors down to 4?nm were studied motivated by the increasing cost of indium. At and below 5?nm, it was found that the field-effect mobility was severely degraded, the threshold voltage increased, and the output characteristics became abnormal showing no saturated current. By encapsulating a layer of polymethyl methacrylate on the IGZO TFTs, the performance of the 5-nm-thick device was effectively recovered. The devices also showed much higher on/off ratios, improved hysteresis, and normal output characteristic curves as compared with devices not encapsulated. The stability of the encapsulated devices was also studied over a four month period.

  3. Amorphous Ni-Co Binary Oxide with Hierarchical Porous Structure for Electrochemical Capacitors.

    PubMed

    Long, Chao; Zheng, Mingtao; Xiao, Yong; Lei, Bingfu; Dong, Hanwu; Zhang, Haoran; Hu, Hang; Liu, Yingliang

    2015-11-11

    A simple and outstanding approach is provided to fabricate amorphous structure Ni-Co binary oxide as supercapacitors electrode materials. We can easily obtain porous Ni-Co oxides composite materials via chemical bath deposition and subsequent calcination without any template or complicate operation procedures. The amorphous porous Ni-Co binary oxide exhibits brilliant electrochemical performance: first, the peculiar porous structure can effectively transport electrolytes and shorten the ion diffusion path; second, binary composition and amorphous character introduce more surface defects for redox reactions. It shows a high specific capacitance up to 1607 F g(-1) and can be cycled for 2000 cycles with 91% capacitance retention. In addition, the asymmetric supercapacitor delivers superior energy density of 28 W h kg(-1), and the maximum power density of 3064 W kg(-1) with a high energy density of 10 W h kg(-1). PMID:26099689

  4. Long-range structural correlations in amorphous ternary In-based oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanal, Rabi; Medvedeva, Julia

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, there is an increasing shift towards the use of oxide semiconductor materials in their amorphous form owing to several technological advantages and the fact that amorphous oxides exhibit similar or even superior properties than their crystalline counterparts. In this work we have systemically investigated the effect of chemical composition and oxygen stoichiometry on the local and long-range structure of ternary amorphous oxides, namely In-X-O with X =Sn, Zn, Ga, Cd, Ge, Sc, Y, or La, by means of ab-initio molecular dynamics. The results reveal that the local MO structure remains nearly intact upon amorphization and exhibit weak dependence on the composition. In marked contrast, the structural characteristics of the metal-metal shell, namely, the M-M distances and M-O-M angles that determine how MO polyhedra are connected into a network, are affected by the presence of X. Complex interplay between several factors such as the cation ionic size, metal-oxygen bond strength, as well as the natural preference for edge, corner, or face-sharing between the MO polyhedra, leads to a correlated behavior in the long-range structure. These findings highlight the mechanisms of the amorphous structure formation as well as the species of the carrier transport in these oxides.

  5. Ambient atmosphere-processable, printable Cu electrodes for flexible device applications: structural welding on a millisecond timescale of surface oxide-free Cu nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Sang-Jin; Jo, Yejin; Lee, Eun Jung; Lee, Sun Sook; Kang, Young Hun; Jeon, Hye-Ji; Cho, Song Yun; Park, Jin-Seong; Seo, Yeong-Hui; Ryu, Beyong-Hwan; Choi, Youngmin; Jeong, Sunho

    2015-02-01

    Recently, various functional devices based on printing technologies have been of paramount interest, owing to their characteristic processing advantages along with excellent device performance. In particular, printable metallic electrodes have drawn attention in a variety of optoelectronic applications; however, research into printable metallic nanoparticles has been limited mainly to the case of an environmentally stable Ag phase. Despite its earth-abundance and highly conductive nature, the Cu phase, to date, has not been exploited as an ambient atmosphere-processable, printable material due to its critical oxidation problem in air. In this study, we demonstrate a facile route for generating highly conductive, flexible Cu electrodes in air by introducing the well-optimized photonic sintering at a time frame of 10-3 s, at which the photon energy, rather than conventional thermal energy, is instantly provided. It is elucidated here how the surface oxide-free, printed Cu particulate films undergo chemical structural/microstructural evolution depending on the instantly irradiated photon energy, and a successful demonstration is provided of large-area, flexible, printed Cu conductors on various substrates, including polyimide (PI), polyethersulfone (PES), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), and paper. The applicability of the resulting printed Cu electrodes is evaluated via implementation into both flexible capacitor devices and indium-gallium-zinc oxide (IGZO) flexible thin-film transistors.Recently, various functional devices based on printing technologies have been of paramount interest, owing to their characteristic processing advantages along with excellent device performance. In particular, printable metallic electrodes have drawn attention in a variety of optoelectronic applications; however, research into printable metallic nanoparticles has been limited mainly to the case of an environmentally stable Ag phase. Despite its earth-abundance and highly conductive nature, the Cu phase, to date, has not been exploited as an ambient atmosphere-processable, printable material due to its critical oxidation problem in air. In this study, we demonstrate a facile route for generating highly conductive, flexible Cu electrodes in air by introducing the well-optimized photonic sintering at a time frame of 10-3 s, at which the photon energy, rather than conventional thermal energy, is instantly provided. It is elucidated here how the surface oxide-free, printed Cu particulate films undergo chemical structural/microstructural evolution depending on the instantly irradiated photon energy, and a successful demonstration is provided of large-area, flexible, printed Cu conductors on various substrates, including polyimide (PI), polyethersulfone (PES), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), and paper. The applicability of the resulting printed Cu electrodes is evaluated via implementation into both flexible capacitor devices and indium-gallium-zinc oxide (IGZO) flexible thin-film transistors. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: X-ray diffraction results and the XPS Cu 2p3/2 spectrum for Cu nanoparticles, resistivity evolution in thermally treated Cu films, the energy dose and intensity of flash lamps used in this study, SEM images of Cu films photo-sintered at 3.0 kV for 1.5 ms, resistivity evolution in photo-sintered, drop-casted Cu films, the XPS O 1s spectrum of Cu films photo-sintered at 2.5 kV for 1.5 ms, adhesion test results for photo-sintered Cu films. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr06816e

  6. Influence of synthesis conditions on the electrochemical properties of nanostructured amorphous manganese oxide cryogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jingsi; Xu, Jun John

    Amorphous manganese oxides have received increasing attention in recent years as intercalation cathodes for rechargeable lithium batteries. The sol-gel method is a versatile method for achieving nanostructured amorphous oxides. In this paper, two different sol-gel routes are investigated, where nanostructured amorphous manganese oxide cryogels are obtained via freeze drying Mn(IV) oxide hydrogels formed in situ. In one route the hydrogels are formed by reaction between a solution of sodium permanganate and a solution of disodium fumarate, and in the other route by reaction between a solution of sodium permanganate and solid fumaric acid. Highly homogeneous monolithic manganese oxide hydrogels are obtained from both synthesis routes with precursor concentrations between 0.1 and 0.2 M. The freeze drying method proves to be an efficient method for obtaining nanostructured amorphous manganese oxide cryogels out of the hydrogels. Depending on the synthesis conditions of the hydrogels, the resultant cryogels can yield very high specific capacities for lithium intercalation and excellent rate performance. The cryogel with the best performance exhibits 289 mAh/g at a C/100 rate and 174 mAh/g at a 2 C rate. Strong dependence of electrochemical properties of the cryogels on the synthesis conditions of the parent hydrogels has been observed. The different electrochemical properties are believed to be due to different surface areas and local structures of the cryogels derived from hydrogels synthesized under different conditions. This strong dependence gives rise to the possibility of achieving promising intercalation materials through tailoring the surface area and the local structure of amorphous manganese oxides by adjusting sol-gel synthesis conditions.

  7. Carbon-Incorporated Amorphous Indium Zinc Oxide Thin-Film Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthiban, S.; Park, K.; Kim, H.-J.; Yang, S.; Kwon, J.-Y.

    2014-11-01

    We propose the use of amorphous-carbon indium zinc oxide (a-CIZO) as a channel material for thin-film transistor (TFT) fabrication. This study chose a carbon dopant as a carrier suppressor and strong oxygen binder in amorphous-indium zinc oxide (a-IZO) channel material. a-CIZO thin films were deposited using radiofrequency (RF) sputtering and postannealed at 150°C. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that the film remained amorphous even after postannealing. The a-CIZO TFT postannealed at 150°C exhibited saturation field-effect mobility of 16.5 cm2 V-1 s-1 and on-off current ratio of ˜4.3 × 107.

  8. Oxygen close-packed structure in amorphous indium zinc oxide thin films.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, Tatsuya; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Masuno, Atsunobu; Kita, Koji; Utsuno, Futoshi

    2010-09-20

    Amorphous indium zinc oxide (IZO) thin film structures of varying amounts of Zn content were investigated using X-ray diffraction measurements and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The characteristic amorphous structure having high oxygen coordination number and edge-shared polyhedra were confirmed using both techniques. Detailed analysis of the structural model revealed that the oxygen close-packed structure was almost realized in the nanometer range. It was also found that the number of Zn ions occupying the tetrahedral site of the oxygen close-packed structure increased with increasing ZnO content although In ions occupied the octahedral site. We conclude that the amorphous structure stability of the indium zinc oxide thin films is enhanced by the existence of Zn ions in the tetrahedral site, which block In ions in the octahedral site ordering similar to that in an In(2)O(3) crystal. PMID:20735017

  9. Intrinsic stress evolution during amorphous oxide film growth on Al surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Flötotto, D. Wang, Z. M.; Jeurgens, L. P. H.; Mittemeijer, E. J.

    2014-03-03

    The intrinsic stress evolution during formation of ultrathin amorphous oxide films on Al(111) and Al(100) surfaces by thermal oxidation at room temperature was investigated in real-time by in-situ substrate curvature measurements and detailed atomic-scale microstructural analyses. During thickening of the oxide a considerable amount of growth stresses is generated in, remarkably even amorphous, ultrathin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films. The surface orientation-dependent stress evolutions during O adsorption on the bare Al surfaces and during subsequent oxide-film growth can be interpreted as a result of (i) adsorption-induced surface stress changes and (ii) competing processes of free volume generation and structural relaxation, respectively.

  10. Electrical and optical properties of sputtered amorphous vanadium oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Podraza, N. J.; Gauntt, B. D.; Motyka, M. A.; Horn, M. W.; Dickey, E. C.

    2012-04-01

    Amorphous vanadium oxide (VO{sub x}) is a component found in composite nanocrystalline VO{sub x} thin films. These types of composite films are used as thermistors in pulsed biased uncooled infrared imaging devices when containing face centered cubic vanadium monoxide phase crystallites, and substantial fractions of amorphous material in the composite are necessary to optimize device electrical properties. Similarly, optoelectronic devices exploiting the metal-to-semiconductor transition contain the room-temperature monoclinic or high-temperature (>68 deg. C) rutile vanadium dioxide phase. Thin films of VO{sub x} exhibiting the metal-to-semiconductor transition are typically polycrystalline or nanocrystalline, implying that significant amounts of disordered, amorphous material is present at grain boundaries or surrounding the crystallites and can impact the overall optical or electronic properties of the film. The performance of thin film material for either application depends on both the nature of the crystalline and amorphous components, and in this work we seek to isolate and study amorphous VO{sub x}. VO{sub x} thin films were deposited by pulsed dc reactive magnetron sputtering to produce amorphous materials with oxygen contents {>=}2, which were characterized electrically by temperature dependent current-voltage measurements and optically characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometry. Film resistivity, thermal activation energy, and complex dielectric function spectra from 0.75 to 6.0 eV were used to identify the impact of microstructural variations including composition and density.

  11. Model for determination of mid-gap states in amorphous metal oxides from thin film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubel, S.; Chabinyc, M. L.

    2013-06-01

    The electronic density of states in metal oxide semiconductors like amorphous zinc oxide (a-ZnO) and its ternary and quaternary oxide alloys with indium, gallium, tin, or aluminum are different from amorphous silicon, or disordered materials such as pentacene, or P3HT. Many ZnO based semiconductors exhibit a steep decaying density of acceptor tail states (trap DOS) and a Fermi level (EF) close to the conduction band energy (EC). Considering thin film transistor (TFT) operation in accumulation mode, the quasi Fermi level for electrons (Eq) moves even closer to EC. Classic analytic TFT simulations use the simplification EC-EF> `several'kT and cannot reproduce exponential tail states with a characteristic energy smaller than 1/2 kT. We demonstrate an analytic model for tail and deep acceptor states, valid for all amorphous metal oxides and include the effect of trap assisted hopping instead of simpler percolation or mobility edge models, to account for the observed field dependent mobility.

  12. Amorphous alumina oxidation protective coatings for Zircaloy based on a compositional gradient layer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang Tae

    Waterside corrosion of the Zircaloy cladding encasing the uranium oxide pellets is one of the primary factors limiting high "burn up" of nuclear fuel in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). High "burn up" can significantly impact plant safety and economics. Amorphous aluminum oxide coatings with aluminum-based compositional gradient layers (CGLs) were fabricated to develop ceramic coating corrosion protection systems for Zircaloy. Aluminum films were deposited on Zircaloy substrates by electron-beam evaporation, and two-step heat treatments were performed at near the melting temperature of aluminum. Amorphous alumina coatings by rf magnetron sputtering were overcoated on the CGL structures. Morphological and compositional studies were completed using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE SEM), energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX), and auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The AES depth profiles of the annealed coatings showed that gradient compositions of Al, Zr, and O were obtained. Glancing angle x-ray diffraction (GAXRD) analysis showed that a variety of intermetallic and oxide phases (such as Al3Zr, Al2Zr3, Al2O3, ZrO2 and Zr3O) were formed in the coatings during processing. The intermetallic layers improved the adhesion property of the alumina overcoating to Zircaloy substrate, and functioned as oxidation resistant layers. In spite of the successful construction of the compositional gradient layer system with a good adhesion and thermal stability, and the report about the stability of pure alumina and amorphous ceramics in hydrothermal conditions, the amorphous alumina coatings in our study were not stable under nuclear reactor conditions of subcritical water at 350°C and 20.1 MPa (3000 psi). We investigated the behavior of amorphous alumina thin films deposited on Zircaloy substrates in the near-supercritical water. When the coatings were exposed to the subcritical conditions, hydrothermally grown well-faceted crystallite formation was observed. Surface morphology and composition were characterized by FE SEM, AES and EDX. The crystallites were identified to be aluminum hydroxide, boehmite (gamma-AlOOH) by XRD spectra, peak shift in x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. We hypothesized the mechanism of the boehmite formation as the dissolution of amorphous alumina and the reprecipitation of boehmite during the cooling process.

  13. Band gap structure modification of amorphous anodic Al oxide film by Ti-alloying

    SciTech Connect

    Canulescu, S. Schou, J.; Rechendorff, K.; Pleth Nielsen, L.; Borca, C. N.; Jones, N. C.; Hoffmann, S. V.; Bordo, K.; Ambat, R.

    2014-03-24

    The band structure of pure and Ti-alloyed anodic aluminum oxide has been examined as a function of Ti concentration varying from 2 to 20 at.?%. The band gap energy of Ti-alloyed anodic Al oxide decreases with increasing Ti concentration. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals that Ti atoms are not located in a TiO{sub 2} unit in the oxide layer, but rather in a mixed Ti-Al oxide layer. The optical band gap energy of the anodic oxide layers was determined by vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy in the energy range from 4.1 to 9.2?eV (300–135?nm). The results indicate that amorphous anodic Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} has a direct band gap of 7.3?eV, which is about ?1.4?eV lower than its crystalline counterpart (single-crystal Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}). Upon Ti-alloying, extra bands appear within the band gap of amorphous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, mainly caused by Ti 3d orbitals localized at the Ti site.

  14. Development of Pinhole-Free Amorphous Aluminum Oxide Protective Layers for Biomedical Device Applications

    PubMed Central

    Litvinov, Julia; Wang, Yi-Ju; George, Jinnie; Chinwangso, Pawilai; Brankovic, Stanko; Willson, Richard C.; Litvinov, Dmitri

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes synthesis of ultrathin pinhole-free insulating aluminum oxide layers for electronic device protection in corrosive liquid environments, such as phosphate buffered saline (PBS) or clinical fluids, to enable emerging biomedical applications such as biomolecular sensors. A pinhole-free 25-nm thick amorphous aluminum oxide layer has been achieved using ultra-high vacuum DC magnetron reactive sputtering of aluminum in oxygen/argon plasma followed by oxygen plasma post-processing. Deposition parameters were optimized to achieve the best corrosion protection of lithographically defined device structures. Electrochemical deposition of copper through the aluminum oxide layers was used to detect the presence (or absence) of pinholes. FTIR, XPS, and spectroscopic ellipsometry were used to characterize the material properties of the protective layers. Electrical resistance of the copper device structures protected by the aluminum oxide layers and exposed to a PBS solution was used as a metric to evaluate the long-term stability of these device structures. PMID:23682201

  15. Inverted polymer solar cells with amorphous indium zinc oxide as the electron-collecting electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Cheun, Hyeunseok; Kim, Jungbae; Zhou, Yinhua; Fang, Yunnan; Dindar, Amir; Shim, Jae Won; Fuentes-Hernandez, Canek; Sandhage, Kenneth H.; Kippelen, Bernard

    2010-09-17

    We report on the fabrication and performance of polymer-based inverted solar cells utilizing amorphous indium zinc oxide (a-IZO) as the electron-collecting electrode. Amorphous IZO films of 200 nm thickness were deposited by room temperature sputtering in a high-purity argon atmosphere. The films possessed a high optical transmittance in the visible region (? 80%), a low resistivity (3.3 × 10-4 ?cm), a low surface roughness (root mean square = 0.68 nm), and a low work function (4.46 ± 0.02 eV). Inverted solar cells with the structure a-IZO/P3HT: PCBM/PEDOT:PSS/Ag exhibited a power conversion efficiency of 3% estimated for AM 1.5G, 100 mW/cm2 illumination.

  16. Inverted polymer solar cells with amorphous indium zinc oxide as the electron-collecting electrode.

    PubMed

    Cheun, Hyeunseok; Kim, Jungbae; Zhou, Yinhua; Fang, Yunnan; Dindar, Amir; Shim, Jaewon; Fuentes-Hernandez, Canek; Sandhage, Kenneth H; Kippelen, Bernard

    2010-11-01

    We report on the fabrication and performance of polymer-based inverted solar cells utilizing amorphous indium zinc oxide (a-IZO) as the electron-collecting electrode. Amorphous IZO films of 200 nm thickness were deposited by room temperature sputtering in a high-purity argon atmosphere. The films possessed a high optical transmittance in the visible region (? 80%), a low resistivity (3.3 × 10?? ?cm), a low surface roughness (root mean square = 0.68 nm), and a low work function (4.46 ± 0.02 eV). Inverted solar cells with the structure a-IZO/P3HT: PCBM/PEDOT:PSS/Ag exhibited a power conversion efficiency of 3% estimated for AM 1.5G, 100 mW/cm² illumination. PMID:21165082

  17. Transparent conducting oxides (TCO{close_quote}s) for amorphous silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hegedus, S.; Liang, H.; Gordon, R.G.

    1996-01-01

    The stability of various textured tin oxide and zinc oxide transparent conductors was evaluated against annealing in air, in vacuum or exposed to hydrogen plasma. Only fluorine-doped zinc oxide deposited by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) had stable electrical and optical properties under all conditions. Thin layers of ZnO or TiO{sub 2} greatly improved the plasma resistance of SnO{sub 2}. A new TCO material, niobium-doped titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}:Nb) was able to withstand hydrogen plasmas with only slight increases in its optical absorption and conductivity. Composite TCO{close_quote}s consisting of glass/SnO{sub 2}:F/TiO{sub 2}:Nb were shown to provide good electrical contact to amorphous silicon solar cells. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Room-temperature fabrication of transparent flexible thin-film transistors using amorphous oxide semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Kenji; Ohta, Hiromichi; Takagi, Akihiro; Kamiya, Toshio; Hirano, Masahiro; Hosono, Hideo

    2004-11-25

    Transparent electronic devices formed on flexible substrates are expected to meet emerging technological demands where silicon-based electronics cannot provide a solution. Examples of active flexible applications include paper displays and wearable computers. So far, mainly flexible devices based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and organic semiconductors have been investigated. However, the performance of these devices has been insufficient for use as transistors in practical computers and current-driven organic light-emitting diode displays. Fabricating high-performance devices is challenging, owing to a trade-off between processing temperature and device performance. Here, we propose to solve this problem by using a novel semiconducting material--namely, a transparent amorphous oxide semiconductor from the In-Ga-Zn-O system (a-IGZO)--for the active channel in transparent thin-film transistors (TTFTs). The a-IGZO is deposited on polyethylene terephthalate at room temperature and exhibits Hall effect mobilities exceeding 10 cm2 V(-1) s(-1), which is an order of magnitude larger than for hydrogenated amorphous silicon. TTFTs fabricated on polyethylene terephthalate sheets exhibit saturation mobilities of 6-9 cm2 V(-1) s(-1), and device characteristics are stable during repetitive bending of the TTFT sheet. PMID:15565150

  19. Hydrogen plasma treatment for improved conductivity in amorphous aluminum doped zinc tin oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Morales-Masis, M. Ding, L.; Dauzou, F.; Jeangros, Q.; Hessler-Wyser, A.; Nicolay, S.; Ballif, C.

    2014-09-01

    Improving the conductivity of earth-abundant transparent conductive oxides (TCOs) remains an important challenge that will facilitate the replacement of indium-based TCOs. Here, we show that a hydrogen (H{sub 2})-plasma post-deposition treatment improves the conductivity of amorphous aluminum-doped zinc tin oxide while retaining its low optical absorption. We found that the H{sub 2}-plasma treatment performed at a substrate temperature of 50?°C reduces the resistivity of the films by 57% and increases the absorptance by only 2%. Additionally, the low substrate temperature delays the known formation of tin particles with the plasma and it allows the application of the process to temperature-sensitive substrates.

  20. Significant improvement in electronic properties of transparent amorphous indium zinc oxide through yttrium doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jian; Yu, Zhigen; Huang, Yanhua; Xia, Yijie; Lai, Weng Soon; Gong, Hao

    2014-04-01

    One big challenge in transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) is to achieve high conductivity and mobility at a low processing temperature. Although optimized conductivity has been achieved in indium zinc oxide (IZO) without doping, it is still interesting to find whether doping can improve conductivity of IZO further. In this paper, we report a low processing temperature achievement of high conductivity and mobility of IZO through yttrium (Y) doping. We found that with different Y doping levels, room temperature fabricated amorphous IZO (a-IZO) samples can be controlled to exhibit either metallic or semiconductor characteristics. Y2O3 is demonstrated to be an effective doping source to achieve conductivity 300% higher than the non-doped IZO sample. Anomalously improved mobility of certain Y2O3-doped IZO samples compared with the non-doped IZO sample is found and analyzed. Besides, a low-temperature resistivity anomaly (semiconductor metal transition) phenomenon is observed and discussed.

  1. Enhancing the Performance of Amorphous-Silicon Photoanodes for Photoelectrocatalytic Water Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Qin, Wei; Wang, Nan; Yao, Tingting; Wang, Shubo; Wang, Hui; Cao, Yuexian; Liu, Shengzhong Frank; Li, Can

    2015-12-01

    Herein, hydrogenated amorphous Si (a-Si:H) covered with a thin layer of CoOx is applied as photoanode for PEC water splitting. The thin layer of CoOx effectively protects a-Si:H from the corrosive electrolyte and quantitative oxidation of water to oxygen was observed. A high applied bias photon-to-current efficiency of 2.34?% was achieved using an intrinsic absorber and an additional p-type layer. This work shows that a-Si:H with a sandwich-like structure, in which each layer has its own functionality, can be applied as an efficient and stable photoanode for PEC water oxidation. PMID:26554346

  2. Amorphous Vanadium Oxide/Carbon Composite Positive Electrode for Rechargeable Aluminum Battery.

    PubMed

    Chiku, Masanobu; Takeda, Hiroki; Matsumura, Shota; Higuchi, Eiji; Inoue, Hiroshi

    2015-11-11

    Amorphous vanadium oxide/carbon composite (V2O5/C) was first applied to the positive electrode active material for rechargeable aluminum batteries. Electrochemical properties of V2O5/C were investigated by cyclic voltammetry and charge-discharge tests. Reversible reduction/oxidation peaks were observed for the V2O5/C electrode and the rechargeable aluminum cell showed the maximum discharge capacity over 200 mAh g(-1) in the first discharging. The XPS analyses after discharging and the following charging exhibited that the redox of vanadium ion in the V2O5/C active material occurred during discharging and charging, and the average valence of V changed between 4.14 and 4.85. PMID:26489385

  3. Optimizing amorphous indium zinc oxide film growth for low residual stress and high electrical conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mukesh; Sigdel, A. K.; Gennett, T.; Berry, J. J.; Perkins, J. D.; Ginley, D. S.; Packard, C. E.

    2013-10-01

    With recent advances in flexible electronics, there is a growing need for transparent conductors with optimum conductivity tailored to the application and nearly zero residual stress to ensure mechanical reliability. Within amorphous transparent conducting oxide (TCO) systems, a variety of sputter growth parameters have been shown to separately impact film stress and optoelectronic properties due to the complex nature of the deposition process. We apply a statistical design of experiments (DOE) approach to identify growth parameter-material property relationships in amorphous indium zinc oxide (a-IZO) thin films and observed large, compressive residual stresses in films grown under conditions typically used for the deposition of highly conductive samples. Power, growth pressure, oxygen partial pressure, and RF power ratio (RF/(RF + DC)) were varied according to a full-factorial test matrix and each film was characterized. The resulting regression model and analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed significant contributions to the residual stress from individual growth parameters as well as interactions of different growth parameters, but no conditions were found within the initial growth space that simultaneously produced low residual stress and high electrical conductivity. Extrapolation of the model results to lower oxygen partial pressures, combined with prior knowledge of conductivity-growth parameter relationships in the IZO system, allowed the selection of two promising growth conditions that were both empirically verified to achieve nearly zero residual stress and electrical conductivities >1480 S/cm. This work shows that a-IZO can be simultaneously optimized for high conductivity and low residual stress.

  4. Novel Iron-based ternary amorphous oxide semiconductor with very high transparency, electronic conductivity, and mobility

    PubMed Central

    Malasi, A.; Taz, H.; Farah, A.; Patel, M.; Lawrie, B.; Pooser, R.; Baddorf, A.; Duscher, G.; Kalyanaraman, R.

    2015-01-01

    Here we report that ternary metal oxides of type (Me)2O3 with the primary metal (Me) constituent being Fe (66 atomic (at.) %) along with the two Lanthanide elements Tb (10 at.%) and Dy (24 at.%) can show excellent semiconducting transport properties. Thin films prepared by pulsed laser deposition at room temperature followed by ambient oxidation showed very high electronic conductivity (>5?×?104?S/m) and Hall mobility (>30?cm2/V-s). These films had an amorphous microstructure which was stable to at least 500?°C and large optical transparency with a direct band gap of 2.85?±?0.14?eV. This material shows emergent semiconducting behavior with significantly higher conductivity and mobility than the constituent insulating oxides. Since these results demonstrate a new way to modify the behaviors of transition metal oxides made from unfilled d- and/or f-subshells, a new class of functional transparent conducting oxide materials could be envisioned. PMID:26670421

  5. Thermal Transport in Graphene Oxide – From Ballistic Extreme to Amorphous Limit

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Xin; Wu, Xufei; Zhang, Teng; Go, David B.; Luo, Tengfei

    2014-01-01

    Graphene oxide is being used in energy, optical, electronic and sensor devices due to its unique properties. However, unlike its counterpart – graphene – the thermal transport properties of graphene oxide remain unknown. In this work, we use large-scale molecular dynamics simulations with reactive potentials to systematically study the role of oxygen adatoms on the thermal transport in graphene oxide. For pristine graphene, highly ballistic thermal transport is observed. As the oxygen coverage increases, the thermal conductivity is significantly reduced. An oxygen coverage of 5% can reduce the graphene thermal conductivity by ~90% and a coverage of 20% lower it to ~8.8?W/mK. This value is even lower than the calculated amorphous limit (~11.6?W/mK for graphene), which is usually regarded as the minimal possible thermal conductivity of a solid. Analyses show that the large reduction in thermal conductivity is due to the significantly enhanced phonon scattering induced by the oxygen defects which introduce dramatic structural deformations. These results provide important insight to the thermal transport physics in graphene oxide and offer valuable information for the design of graphene oxide-based materials and devices. PMID:24468660

  6. Novel Iron-based ternary amorphous oxide semiconductor with very high transparency, electronic conductivity, and mobility.

    PubMed

    Malasi, A; Taz, H; Farah, A; Patel, M; Lawrie, B; Pooser, R; Baddorf, A; Duscher, G; Kalyanaraman, R

    2015-01-01

    Here we report that ternary metal oxides of type (Me)2O3 with the primary metal (Me) constituent being Fe (66 atomic (at.) %) along with the two Lanthanide elements Tb (10 at.%) and Dy (24 at.%) can show excellent semiconducting transport properties. Thin films prepared by pulsed laser deposition at room temperature followed by ambient oxidation showed very high electronic conductivity (>5?×?10(4)?S/m) and Hall mobility (>30?cm(2)/V-s). These films had an amorphous microstructure which was stable to at least 500?°C and large optical transparency with a direct band gap of 2.85?±?0.14?eV. This material shows emergent semiconducting behavior with significantly higher conductivity and mobility than the constituent insulating oxides. Since these results demonstrate a new way to modify the behaviors of transition metal oxides made from unfilled d- and/or f-subshells, a new class of functional transparent conducting oxide materials could be envisioned. PMID:26670421

  7. Contact resistance improvement using interfacial silver nanoparticles in amorphous indium-zinc-oxide thin film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Rui; He, Jian; Song, Yang; Li, Wei; Zaslavsky, A.; Paine, D. C.

    2014-09-01

    We describe an approach to reduce the contact resistance at compositional conducting/semiconducting indium-zinc-oxide (IZO) homojunctions used for contacts in thin film transistors (TFTs). By introducing silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) at the homojunction interface between the conducting IZO electrodes and the amorphous IZO channel, we reduce the specific contact resistance, obtained by transmission line model measurements, down to ˜10-2 ? cm2, ˜3 orders of magnitude lower than either NP-free homojunction contacts or solid Ag metal contacts. The resulting back-gated TFTs with Ag NP contacts exhibit good field effect mobility of ˜27 cm2/V s and an on/off ratio >107. We attribute the improved contact resistance to electric field concentration by the Ag NPs.

  8. Self-aligned coplanar amorphous indium zinc oxide thin-film transistors with high performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jae Chul; Lee, Ho-Nyeon

    2015-01-01

    Self-aligned coplanar amorphous indium zinc oxide thin-film transistors (a-IZO TFTs) were fabricated. The a-IZO TFTs had a field-effect mobility of ?FE = 24.4 cm2 V-1 s-1, a subthreshold slope of 180 mV/dec, and an on/off ratio of 109. As the channel length decreased, the threshold voltage VTH shifted to more negative voltages, and ?FE increased due to the diffused carriers from the contact regions. The intrinsic field-effect mobility was estimated to be 15.05 cm2 V-1 s-1 in the linear mode and 13.28 cm2 V-1 s-1 in saturation mode. Under positive/negative bias-temperature-illumination stress, the shift in VTH was less than ±0.7 V after 11,000 s.

  9. Exchange bias effect in partially oxidized amorphous Fe-Ni-B based metallic glass nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Thomas, S; Pookat, G; Nair, S S; Daniel, M; Dymerska, B; Liebig, A; Al-Harthi, S H; Ramanujan, R V; Anantharaman, M R; Fidler, J; Albrecht, M

    2012-06-27

    The magnetic properties of amorphous Fe-Ni-B based metallic glass nanostructures were investigated. The nanostructures underwent a spin-glass transition at temperatures below 100 K and revealed an irreversible temperature following the linear de Almeida-Thouless dependence. When the nanostructures were cooled below 25 K in a magnetic field, they exhibited an exchange bias effect with enhanced coercivity. The observed onset of exchange bias is associated with the coexistence of the spin-glass phase along with the appearance of another spin-glass phase formed by oxidation of the structurally disordered surface layer, displaying a distinct training effect and cooling field dependence. The latter showed a maximum in exchange bias field and coercivity, which is probably due to competing multiple equivalent spin configurations at the boundary between the two spin-glass phases. PMID:22634874

  10. Improved Stability Of Amorphous Zinc Tin Oxide Thin Film Transistors Using Molecular Passivation

    SciTech Connect

    Rajachidambaram, Meena Suhanya; Pandey, Archana; Vilayur Ganapathy, Subramanian; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Herman, Gregory S.

    2013-10-21

    The role of back channel surface chemistry on amorphous zinc tin oxide (ZTO) bottom gate thin film transistors (TFT) have been characterized by positive bias-stress measurements and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Positive bias-stress turn-on voltage shifts for ZTO-TFTs were significantly reduced by passivation of back channel surfaces with self-assembled monolayers of n-hexylphosphonic acid (n-HPA) when compared to ZTO-TFTs with no passivation. These results indicate that adsorption of molecular species on exposed back channel of ZTO-TFTs strongly influence observed turn-on voltage shifts, as opposed to charge injection into the dielectric or trapping due to oxygen vacancies.

  11. Permanent optical doping of amorphous metal oxide semiconductors by deep ultraviolet irradiation at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Hyungtak; Cho, Young-Je; Bobade, Santosh M.; Park, Kyoung-Youn; Choi, Duck-Kyun; Kim, Jinwoo; Lee, Jaegab

    2010-05-31

    We report an investigation of two photon ultraviolet (UV) irradiation induced permanent n-type doping of amorphous InGaZnO (a-IGZO) at room temperature. The photoinduced excess electrons were donated to change the Fermi-level to a conduction band edge under the UV irradiation, owing to the hole scavenging process at the oxide interface. The use of optically n-doped a-IGZO channel increased the carrier density to approx10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} from the background level of 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}, as well as the comprehensive enhancement upon UV irradiation of a-IGZO thin film transistor parameters, such as an on-off current ratio at approx10{sup 8} and field-effect mobility at 22.7 cm{sup 2}/V s.

  12. Contact resistance improvement using interfacial silver nanoparticles in amorphous indium-zinc-oxide thin film transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Rui; He, Jian; Song, Yang; Li, Wei; Zaslavsky, A.; Paine, D. C.

    2014-09-01

    We describe an approach to reduce the contact resistance at compositional conducting/semiconducting indium-zinc-oxide (IZO) homojunctions used for contacts in thin film transistors (TFTs). By introducing silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) at the homojunction interface between the conducting IZO electrodes and the amorphous IZO channel, we reduce the specific contact resistance, obtained by transmission line model measurements, down to ?10{sup ?2?}??cm{sup 2}, ?3 orders of magnitude lower than either NP-free homojunction contacts or solid Ag metal contacts. The resulting back-gated TFTs with Ag NP contacts exhibit good field effect mobility of ?27?cm{sup 2}/V?s and an on/off ratio >10{sup 7}. We attribute the improved contact resistance to electric field concentration by the Ag NPs.

  13. Significant electrical control of amorphous oxide thin film transistors by an ultrathin Ti surface polarity modifier

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Byungsu; Choi, Yonghyuk; Shin, Seokyoon; Jeon, Heeyoung; Seo, Hyungtak; Jeon, Hyeongtag

    2014-01-27

    We demonstrate an enhanced electrical stability through a Ti oxide (TiO{sub x}) layer on the amorphous InGaZnO (a-IGZO) back-channel; this layer acts as a surface polarity modifier. Ultrathin Ti deposited on the a-IGZO existed as a TiO{sub x} thin film, resulting in oxygen cross-binding with a-IGZO surface. The electrical properties of a-IGZO thin film transistors (TFTs) with TiO{sub x} depend on the surface polarity change and electronic band structure evolution. This result indicates that TiO{sub x} on the back-channel serves as not only a passivation layer protecting the channel from ambient molecules or process variables but also a control layer of TFT device parameters.

  14. A novel composite material based on antimony(III) oxide and amorphous silica

    SciTech Connect

    Zemnukhova, Ludmila A.; Panasenko, Alexander E.

    2013-05-01

    The composite material nSb?O?·mSiO?·xH?O was prepared by hydrolysis of SbCl? and Na?SiO? in an aqueous medium. It has been shown that the composition of the material is influenced by the ratio of the initial components and the acidity of the reaction medium. The morphology of the material particles and its specific surface area have been determined. The thermal and optic properties were also investigated. - Graphical abstract: Novel composite material containing amorphous silica and crystal antimony(III) oxide has been synthesized by hydrolysis of SbCl? and Na?SiO? in an aqueous medium. Highlights: • The composite material nSb?O?·mSiO?·xH?O was prepared in an aqueous medium. • The composition of the material is controllable by a synthesis conditions. • The morphology of the material and its optic properties have been determined.

  15. Identification of the native defect doping mechanism in amorphous indium zinc oxide thin films studied using ultra high pressure oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sunghwan; Paine, David C.

    2013-02-01

    The mechanism of native defect doping in amorphous In-Zn-O (a-IZO) has not previously been established but is likely associated with native oxygen defect doping. We have used high pressure oxidation and defect equilibrium analysis to show a -1/6 power dependence of carrier density on oxygen fugacity in a-IZO. This dependency is predicted for oxygen vacancy-like donor defects. Extrapolation of equilibrium constants established at high pressures to atmospheric pressure reveals that the equilibrium carrier density in a-IZO at 200 °C is higher (>1020/cm3) than typical as-deposited channel carrier densities (<1017/cm3). This is consistent with observed increases in channel carrier density and negative threshold voltage shift in annealed a-IZO thin film transistor devices.

  16. Carrier Transport at Metal/Amorphous Hafnium-Indium-Zinc Oxide Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seoungjun; Gil, Youngun; Choi, Youngran; Kim, Kyoung-Kook; Yun, Hyung Joong; Son, Byoungchul; Choi, Chel-Jong; Kim, Hyunsoo

    2015-10-14

    In this paper, the carrier transport mechanism at the metal/amorphous hafnium-indium-zinc oxide (a-HIZO) interface was investigated. The contact properties were found to be predominantly affected by the degree of interfacial reaction between the metals and a-HIZO; that is, a higher tendency to form metal oxide phases leads to excellent Ohmic contact via tunneling, which is associated with the generated donor-like oxygen vacancies. In this case, the Schottky-Mott theory is not applicable. Meanwhile, metals that do not form interfacial metal oxide, such as Pd, follow the Schottky-Mott theory, which results in rectifying Schottky behavior. The Schottky characteristics of the Pd contact to a-HIZO can be explained in terms of the barrier inhomogeneity model, which yields a mean barrier height of 1.40 eV and a standard deviation of 0.14 eV. The work function of a-HIZO could therefore be estimated as 3.7 eV, which is in good agreement with the ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (3.68 eV). Our findings will be useful for establishing a strategy to form Ohmic or Schottky contacts to a-HIZO films, which will be essential for fabricating reliable high-performance electronic devices. PMID:26411354

  17. Widely bandgap tunable amorphous Cd-Ga-O oxide semiconductors exhibiting electron mobilities ?10 cm2 V-1 s-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagi, Hiroshi; Sato, Chiyuki; Kimura, Yota; Suzuki, Issei; Omata, Takahisa; Kamiya, Toshio; Hosono, Hideo

    2015-02-01

    Amorphous oxide semiconductors exhibit large electron mobilities; however, their bandgaps are either too large for solar cells or too small for deep ultraviolet applications depending on the materials system. Herein, we demonstrate that amorphous Cd-Ga-O semiconductors display bandgaps covering the entire 2.5-4.3 eV region while maintaining large electron mobilities ?10 cm2 V-1 s-1. The band alignment diagram obtained by ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy and the bandgap values reveal that these semiconductors form type-II heterojunctions with p-type Cu2O, which is suitable for solar cells and solar-blind ultraviolet sensors.

  18. Atomic layer deposited zinc tin oxide channel for amorphous oxide thin film transistors

    E-print Network

    stability and uniformity over large area devices unlike poly-silicon-based devices. Zinc tin oxide (ZTO the possibility of selective deposition only on some areas while avoiding dep- osition on other areas for deposition on the increasingly large display panels planned for the next generation. In order to achieve

  19. Quantitative analysis of amorphous indium zinc oxide thin films synthesized by Combinatorial Pulsed Laser Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axente, E.; Socol, G.; Beldjilali, S. A.; Mercadier, L.; Luculescu, C. R.; Trinca, L. M.; Galca, A. C.; Pantelica, D.; Ionescu, P.; Becherescu, N.; Hermann, J.; Craciun, V.

    2014-10-01

    The use of amorphous and transparent oxides is a key for the development of new thin film transistors and displays. Recently, indium zinc oxide (IZO) was shown to exhibit high transparency in the visible range, low resistivity, and high mobility. Since the properties and the cost of these films depend on the In/(In + Zn) values, the measurement of this ratio is paramount for future developments and applications. We report on accurate analysis of the elemental composition of IZO thin films synthesized using a Combinatorial Pulsed Laser Deposition technique. The monitoring of the thin films elemental composition by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy was chosen in view of further in situ and real-time technological developments and process control during IZO fabrication. Our analytical approach is based on plasma modeling, the recorded spectra being then compared to the spectral radiance computed for plasmas in local thermal equilibrium. The cation fractions measured were compared to values obtained by complementary measurements using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. Spectroscopic ellipsometry assisted the scientific discussion. A good agreement between methods was found, independently of the relative fraction of indium and zinc that varied from about 65 to 90 and 35 to 10 at%, respectively, and the measurement uncertainties associated to each analytical method.

  20. Amorphous cobalt potassium phosphate microclusters as efficient photoelectrochemical water oxidation catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ye; Zhao, Chunsong; Dai, Xuezeng; Lin, Hong; Cui, Bai; Li, Jianbao

    2013-12-01

    A novel amorphous cobalt potassium phosphate hydrate compound (KCoPO4·H2O) is identified to be active photocatalyst for oxygen evolution reaction (OER) to facilitate hydrogen generation from water photolysis. It has been synthesized through a facile and cost-effective solution-based precipitation method using earth-abundant materials. Its highly porous structure and large surface areas are found to be responsible for the excellent electrochemical performance featuring a low OER onset at ˜550 mVSCE and high current density in alkaline condition. Unlike traditional cobalt-based spinel oxides (Co3O4, NiCo2O4) and phosphate (Co-Pi, Co(PO3)2) electrocatalysts, with proper energy band alignment for light-assisted water oxidation, cobalt potassium phosphate hydrate also exhibits robust visible-light response, generating a photocurrent density of ˜200 ?A cm-2 at 0.7 VSCE. This catalyst could thus be considered as a promising candidate to perform photoelectrochemical water splitting.

  1. Physico-chemical studies of cuprous oxide (Cu2O) nanoparticles coated on amorphous carbon nanotubes (?-CNTs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johan, Mohd Rafie; Meriam Suhaimy, Syazwan Hanani; Yusof, Yusliza

    2014-01-01

    Amorphous carbon nanotubes (?-CNTs) were synthesized by a chemical reaction between ferrocene and ammonium chloride at a temperature (?250 °C) in an air furnace. As- synthesized ?-CNTs were purified with deionized water and hydrochloric acid. A purified ?-CNTs were hybridized with cuprous oxide nanoparticles (Cu2O) through a simple chemical process. Morphology of the samples was analyzed with field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra showed the attachment of acidic functional groups onto the surface of ?-CNTs and the formation of hybridized ?-CNTs-Cu2O. Raman spectra reveal the amorphous nature of the carbon. X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern confirmed the amorphous phase of the carbon and the formation of Cu2O crystalline phase. The coating of Cu2O was confirmed by FESEM, TEM, and XRD. Optical absorption of the samples has also been investigated and the quantum confinement effect was illustrated in the absorption spectra.

  2. Codoping of zinc and tungsten for practical high-performance amorphous indium-based oxide thin film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kizu, Takio; Mitoma, Nobuhiko; Miyanaga, Miki; Awata, Hideaki; Nabatame, Toshihide; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito

    2015-09-01

    Using practical high-density sputtering targets, we investigated the effect of Zn and W codoping on the thermal stability of the amorphous film and the electrical characteristics in thin film transistors. zinc oxide is a potentially conductive component while W oxide is an oxygen vacancy suppressor in oxide films. The oxygen vacancy from In-O and Zn-O was suppressed by the W additive because of the high oxygen bond dissociation energy. With controlled codoping of W and Zn, we demonstrated a high mobility with a maximum mobility of 40 cm2/V s with good stability under a negative bias stress in InWZnO thin film transistors.

  3. Lithium Storage in Microstructures of Amorphous Mixed-Valence Vanadium Oxide as Anode Materials.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Di; Zheng, Lirong; Xiao, Ying; Wang, Xia; Cao, Minhua

    2015-07-01

    Constructing three-dimensional (3?D) nanostructures with excellent structural stability is an important approach for realizing high-rate capability and a high capacity of the electrode materials in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). Herein, we report the synthesis of hydrangea-like amorphous mixed-valence VOx microspheres (a-VOx MSs) through a facile solvothermal method followed by controlled calcination. The resultant hydrangea-like a-VOx MSs are composed of intercrossed nanosheets and, thus, construct a 3?D network structure. Upon evaluation as an anode material for LIBs, the a-VOx MSs show excellent lithium-storage performance in terms of high capacity, good rate capability, and long-term stability upon extended cycling. Specifically, they exhibit very stable cycling behavior with a highly reversible capacity of 1050?mA?h?g(-1) at a rate of 0.1?A?g(-1) after 140?cycles. They also show excellent rate capability, with a capacity of 390?mA?h?g(-1) at a rate as high as 10?A?g(-1) . Detailed investigations on the morphological and structural changes of the a-VOx MSs upon cycling demonstrated that the a-VOx MSs went through modification of the local V?O coordinations accompanied with the formation of a higher oxidation state of V, but still with an amorphous state throughout the whole discharge/charge process. Moreover, the a-VOx MSs can buffer huge volumetric changes during the insertion/extraction process, and at the same time they remain intact even after 200?cycles of the charge/discharge process. Thus, these microspheres may be a promising anode material for LIBs. PMID:26018759

  4. In situ study of the crystallization from amorphous to cubic zirconium oxide : rieetveld and reverse monte carlo analyses.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, F.; Chupas, P. J.; Lui, S. L. A.; Hanson, J. C.; Caliebe, W. A.; Lee, P. L.; Chan, S.-W.; X-Ray Science Division; Columbia Univ.; State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook; BNL

    2007-01-01

    The amorphous-to-cubic (a-c) crystallization of nanoZrO{sub 2} in a reducing environment was studied by synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Rietveld analysis was performed to study the changes in crystallite size and lattice parameter as the cubic phase emerged. The pair distribution function (PDF) was obtained from the Fourier transformation of the normalized XRD patterns. A reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) simulation was applied to provide details of the local structure during the crystallization process as well as to calculate partial PDFs of Zr-Zr and Zr-O during the crystallization. The number of Zr's next-nearest neighbors of Zr remains 12, whereas the number of O's as nearest neighbors of Zr increases from 6.7 to 7.3 as the material evolves from an amorphous into a cubic structure, suggesting the persistence of a high concentration of oxygen vacancies. These simulated atomic structures show that the local structure of the amorphous phase bears resemblance to the short-range arrangement of cubic ZrO{sub 2}, consistent with the results of X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) at Zr L{sub II} and L{sub III}. The amorphous-to-crystalline phase transformation is affected by the environment. Under an oxidizing condition, the amorphous phase crystallizes directly to tetragonal and subsequently to monoclinic zirconia.

  5. In situ Study of the Crystallization from Amorphous to Cubic Zirconium Oxide: Rietveld and Reverse Monte Carlo Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang,F.; Chupas, P.; Lui, S.; Hanson, J.; Caliebe, W.; Lee, P.; Chan, S.

    2007-01-01

    The amorphous-to-cubic (a-c) crystallization of nanoZrO{sub 2} in a reducing environment was studied by synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Rietveld analysis was performed to study the changes in crystallite size and lattice parameter as the cubic phase emerged. The pair distribution function (PDF) was obtained from the Fourier transformation of the normalized XRD patterns. A reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) simulation was applied to provide details of the local structure during the crystallization process as well as to calculate partial PDFs of Zr-Zr and Zr-O during the crystallization. The number of Zr's next-nearest neighbors of Zr remains 12, whereas the number of O's as nearest neighbors of Zr increases from 6.7 to 7.3 as the material evolves from an amorphous into a cubic structure, suggesting the persistence of a high concentration of oxygen vacancies. These simulated atomic structures show that the local structure of the amorphous phase bears resemblance to the short-range arrangement of cubic ZrO2, consistent with the results of X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) at Zr L{sub II} and L{sub III}. The amorphous-to-crystalline phase transformation is affected by the environment. Under an oxidizing condition, the amorphous phase crystallizes directly to tetragonal and subsequently to monoclinic zirconia.

  6. Controllable film densification and interface flatness for high-performance amorphous indium oxide based thin film transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Ou-Yang, Wei E-mail: TSUKAGOSHI.Kazuhito@nims.go.jp; Mitoma, Nobuhiko; Kizu, Takio; Gao, Xu; Lin, Meng-Fang; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito E-mail: TSUKAGOSHI.Kazuhito@nims.go.jp; Nabatame, Toshihide

    2014-10-20

    To avoid the problem of air sensitive and wet-etched Zn and/or Ga contained amorphous oxide transistors, we propose an alternative amorphous semiconductor of indium silicon tungsten oxide as the channel material for thin film transistors. In this study, we employ the material to reveal the relation between the active thin film and the transistor performance with aid of x-ray reflectivity study. By adjusting the pre-annealing temperature, we find that the film densification and interface flatness between the film and gate insulator are crucial for achieving controllable high-performance transistors. The material and findings in the study are believed helpful for realizing controllable high-performance stable transistors.

  7. X-ray absorption spectroscopy elucidates the impact of structural disorder on electron mobility in amorphous zinc-tin-oxide thin films

    E-print Network

    Siah, Sin Cheng

    We investigate the correlation between the atomic structures of amorphous zinc-tin-oxide (a-ZTO) thin films grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) and their electronic transport properties. We perform synchrotron-based ...

  8. Long-term research in Japan: amorphous metals, metal oxide varistors, high-power semiconductors and superconducting generators

    SciTech Connect

    Hane, G.J.; Yorozu, M.; Sogabe, T.; Suzuki, S.

    1985-04-01

    The review revealed that significant activity is under way in the research of amorphous metals, but that little fundamental work is being pursued on metal oxide varistors and high-power semiconductors. Also, the investigation of long-term research program plans for superconducting generators reveals that activity is at a low level, pending the recommendations of a study currently being conducted through Japan's Central Electric Power Council.

  9. Amorphous oxide alloys as interfacial layers with broadly tunable electronic structures for organic photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Nanjia; Kim, Myung-Gil; Loser, Stephen; Smith, Jeremy; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Guo, Xugang; Song, Charles; Jin, Hosub; Chen, Zhihua; Yoon, Seok Min; Freeman, Arthur J; Chang, Robert P H; Facchetti, Antonio; Marks, Tobin J

    2015-06-30

    In diverse classes of organic optoelectronic devices, controlling charge injection, extraction, and blocking across organic semiconductor-inorganic electrode interfaces is crucial for enhancing quantum efficiency and output voltage. To this end, the strategy of inserting engineered interfacial layers (IFLs) between electrical contacts and organic semiconductors has significantly advanced organic light-emitting diode and organic thin film transistor performance. For organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices, an electronically flexible IFL design strategy to incrementally tune energy level matching between the inorganic electrode system and the organic photoactive components without varying the surface chemistry would permit OPV cells to adapt to ever-changing generations of photoactive materials. Here we report the implementation of chemically/environmentally robust, low-temperature solution-processed amorphous transparent semiconducting oxide alloys, In-Ga-O and Ga-Zn-Sn-O, as IFLs for inverted OPVs. Continuous variation of the IFL compositions tunes the conduction band minima over a broad range, affording optimized OPV power conversion efficiencies for multiple classes of organic active layer materials and establishing clear correlations between IFL/photoactive layer energetics and device performance. PMID:26080437

  10. Hydrogen evolution from a copper(I) oxide photocathode coated with an amorphous molybdenum sulphide catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-Guio, Carlos G.; Tilley, S. David; Vrubel, Heron; Grätzel, Michael; Hu, Xile

    2014-01-01

    Concerns over climate change resulting from accumulation of anthropogenic carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and the uncertainty in the amount of recoverable fossil fuel reserves are driving forces for the development of renewable, carbon-neutral energy technologies. A promising clean solution is photoelectrochemical water splitting to produce hydrogen using abundant solar energy. Here we present a simple and scalable technique for the deposition of amorphous molybdenum sulphide films as hydrogen evolution catalyst onto protected copper(I) oxide films. The efficient extraction of excited electrons by the conformal catalyst film leads to photocurrents of up to -5.7mAcm-2 at 0V versus the reversible hydrogen electrode (pH 1.0) under simulated AM 1.5 solar illumination. Furthermore, the photocathode exhibits enhanced stability under acidic environments, whereas photocathodes with platinum nanoparticles as catalyst deactivate more rapidly under identical conditions. The work demonstrates the potential of earth-abundant light-harvesting material and catalysts for solar hydrogen production.

  11. Hydrogen evolution from a copper(I) oxide photocathode coated with an amorphous molybdenum sulphide catalyst.

    PubMed

    Morales-Guio, Carlos G; Tilley, S David; Vrubel, Heron; Grätzel, Michael; Hu, Xile

    2014-01-01

    Concerns over climate change resulting from accumulation of anthropogenic carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and the uncertainty in the amount of recoverable fossil fuel reserves are driving forces for the development of renewable, carbon-neutral energy technologies. A promising clean solution is photoelectrochemical water splitting to produce hydrogen using abundant solar energy. Here we present a simple and scalable technique for the deposition of amorphous molybdenum sulphide films as hydrogen evolution catalyst onto protected copper(I) oxide films. The efficient extraction of excited electrons by the conformal catalyst film leads to photocurrents of up to -5.7?mA?cm(-2) at 0?V versus the reversible hydrogen electrode (pH 1.0) under simulated AM 1.5 solar illumination. Furthermore, the photocathode exhibits enhanced stability under acidic environments, whereas photocathodes with platinum nanoparticles as catalyst deactivate more rapidly under identical conditions. The work demonstrates the potential of earth-abundant light-harvesting material and catalysts for solar hydrogen production. PMID:24402352

  12. Amorphous oxide alloys as interfacial layers with broadly tunable electronic structures for organic photovoltaic cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Nanjia; Kim, Myung-Gil; Loser, Stephen; Smith, Jeremy; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Guo, Xugang; Song, Charles; Jin, Hosub; Chen, Zhihua; Yoon, Seok Min; Freeman, Arthur J.; Chang, Robert P. H.; Facchetti, Antonio; Marks, Tobin J.

    2015-01-01

    In diverse classes of organic optoelectronic devices, controlling charge injection, extraction, and blocking across organic semiconductor–inorganic electrode interfaces is crucial for enhancing quantum efficiency and output voltage. To this end, the strategy of inserting engineered interfacial layers (IFLs) between electrical contacts and organic semiconductors has significantly advanced organic light-emitting diode and organic thin film transistor performance. For organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices, an electronically flexible IFL design strategy to incrementally tune energy level matching between the inorganic electrode system and the organic photoactive components without varying the surface chemistry would permit OPV cells to adapt to ever-changing generations of photoactive materials. Here we report the implementation of chemically/environmentally robust, low-temperature solution-processed amorphous transparent semiconducting oxide alloys, In-Ga-O and Ga-Zn-Sn-O, as IFLs for inverted OPVs. Continuous variation of the IFL compositions tunes the conduction band minima over a broad range, affording optimized OPV power conversion efficiencies for multiple classes of organic active layer materials and establishing clear correlations between IFL/photoactive layer energetics and device performance. PMID:26080437

  13. The Structure and Properties of Amorphous Indium Oxide D. Bruce Buchholz,

    E-print Network

    Medvedeva, Julia E.

    , an estimated 30-40% of all flat panel displays employed an amorphous TCO material.6 Amorphous TCOs and TOSs (a molecular dynamics (MD) liquid-quench simulation. On the basis of excellent agreement between the EXAFS-TCOs and c-TOSs, their properties are also affected by factors related to the crystal structure such as grain

  14. Oxygen partial pressure influence on the character of InGaZnO thin films grown by PLD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yi; Wang, Li

    2012-11-01

    The amorphous oxide semiconductors (AOSs) are promising for emerging large-area optoelectronic applications because of capability of large-area, uniform deposition at low temperatures such as room temperature (RT). Indium-gallium-zinc oxide (InGaZnO) thin film is a promising amorphous semiconductors material in thin film transistors (TFT) for its excellent electrical properties. In our work, the InGaZnO thin films are fabricated on the SiO2 glass using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) in the oxygen partial pressure altered from 1 to 10 Pa at RT. The targets were prepared by mixing Ga2O3, In2O3, and ZnO powder at a mol ratio of 1: 7: 2 before the solid-state reactions in a tube furnace at the atmospheric pressure. The targets were irradiated by an Nd:YAG laser(355nm). Finally, we have three films of 270nm, 230nm, 190nm thick for 1Pa, 5Pa, 10Pa oxygen partial pressure. The product thin films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), Hall-effect investigation. The comparative study demonstrated the character changes of the structure and electronic transport properties, which is probably occurred as a fact of the different oxygen partial pressure used in the PLD.

  15. Widespread oxidized and hydrated amorphous silicates in CR chondrites matrices: Implications for alteration conditions and H2 degassing of asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Guillou, Corentin; Changela, Hitesh G.; Brearley, Adrian J.

    2015-06-01

    The CR chondrites carry one of the most pristine records of the solar nebula materials that accreted to form planetesimals. They have experienced very variable degrees of aqueous alteration, ranging from incipient alteration in their matrices to the complete hydration of all of their components. In order to constrain their chemical alteration pathways and the conditions of alteration, we have investigated the mineralogy and Fe oxidation state of silicates in the matrices of 8 CR chondrites, from type 3 to type 1. Fe-L edge X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) was performed on matrix FIB sections using synchrotron-based scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). The Fe3+ / ? Fe ratio of submicron silicate particles was obtained and coordinated with TEM observations. In all the least altered CR chondrites (QUE 99177, EET 87770, EET 92042, LAP 02342, GRA 95229 and Renazzo), we find that the matrices consist of abundant submicron Fe-rich hydrated amorphous silicate grains, mixed with nanometer-sized phyllosilicates. The Fe3+ / ? Fe ratios of both amorphous and nanocrystalline regions are very high with values ranging from 68 to 78%. In the most altered samples (Al Rais and GRO 95577), fine-grained phyllosilicates also have a high Fe3+ / ? Fe ratio (around 70%), whereas the coarse, micrometer-sized phyllosilicates are less oxidized (down to 55%) and have a lower iron content. These observations suggest the following sequence: submicron Fe2+-amorphous silicate particles were the building blocks of CR matrices; after accretion they were quickly hydrated and oxidized, leading to a metastable, amorphous gel-like phase. Nucleation and growth of crystalline phyllosilicates was kinetically-limited in most type 3 and 2 CRs, but increased as alteration became more extensive in Al Rais and GRO 95577. The decreasing Fe3+ / ? Fe ratio is interpreted as a result of the transfer of Fe3+ from silicates to oxides during growth, while aqueous alteration progressed (higher temperature, longer duration, change of fluid composition). In a fully closed system, equilibrium thermodynamics suggest that the water to rock ratios, typically assumed to be low (<1) for chondrites, should primarily control the iron valency of the silicates and predict a lower Fe3+ / ? Fe ratio. Such a high Fe3+ / ? Fe value could be accounted for, however, if the system was partially open, at least with respect to H2 (and other gases as well). Rapid degassing of the fluid would have favored more oxidizing fluid conditions. Recently proposed scenarios involving some degree of water D/H increase through Rayleigh isotopic fractionation are supported by these results.

  16. Electrical and optical characteristics of Co-sputtered amorphous Ce-doped indium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Ja Hyun; Kang, Tae Sung; Kim, Tae Yoon; Hong, Jin Pyo

    2013-02-01

    We report the electrical and the optical characteristics of amorphous cerium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-CIZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs) as a function of the cerium content inside the a-CIZO channel layers. The a-CIZO films were systematically prepared by using a co-sputtering method with a combination of RF-sputtered indium-zinc-oxide (IZO) at a fixed power of 50 W and cerium-oxide (CeO2) at powers from 15 to 30 W. The Ce content in the CIZO layers increased with increasing RF power on the CeO2 target. The a-CIZO TFT at the optimum power of 15 W exhibited a mobility of 2.5 cm2/Vsec, a threshold voltage ( V T ) of 0.22 V, ?V T shifts of less than 5.2 V under negative bias stress, and a Ion/Ioff ratio of 2.40 × 1010.

  17. Modeling the adsorption of mercury(II) on (hydr)oxides. 2: {alpha}-FeOOH (goethite) and amorphous silica

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnissel-Gissinger, P.; Alnot, M.; Ehrhardt, J.J.; Lickes, J.P.; Behra, P.

    1999-07-15

    The surface complexation model is used to describe sorption experiments of inorganic mercury(II) in the presence of an amorphous silica, Aerosil 200, or an iron (hydr)oxide, the goethite {alpha}-FeOOH (Bayferrox 910). In the simulations, one assumes the formation of a monodentate surface complex {triple_bond}S{single_bond}OHgOH and {triple_bond}S{single_bond}OHgCl, when chlorides are present in solution. Participation of the complex {triple_bond}S{single_bond}OHgCl has been especially evidenced. Comparisons with other data from the literature have been made to investigate the influence of the nature of the oxide on the mechanism of mercury(II) adsorption. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to characterize the surface of the (hydr)oxides prior to adsorption and to observe when possible the mercury surface compounds.

  18. Metal-insulator transitions in IZO, IGZO, and ITZO films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makise, Kazumasa; Hidaka, Kazuya; Ezaki, Syohei; Asano, Takayuki; Shinozaki, Bunju; Tomai, Shigekazu; Yano, Koki; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we measured the low-temperature resistivity of amorphous two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) indium-zinc oxide, indium-gallium-zinc oxide, and indium-tin-zinc oxide films with a wide range of carrier densities. To determine their critical characteristics at the metal-insulator transition (MIT), we used the Ioffe-Regel criterion. We found that the MIT occurs in a narrow range between k F ? = 0.13 and k F ? = 0.25, where k F and ? are the Fermi wave number and electron mean free path, respectively. For films in the insulating region, we analyzed ? ( T ) using a procedure proposed by Zabrodskii and Zinov'eva. This analysis confirmed the occurrence of Mott and Efros-Shklovskii (ES) variable-range hopping. The materials studied show crossover behavior from exp(TMott/T)1/4 or exp(TMott/T)1/3 for Mott hopping conduction to exp(TES/T)1/2 for ES hopping conduction with decreasing temperature. For both 2D and 3D materials, we found that the relationship between TMott and TES satisfies TES ? TMott2/3.

  19. Metal-insulator transitions in IZO, IGZO, and ITZO films

    SciTech Connect

    Makise, Kazumasa; Hidaka, Kazuya; Ezaki, Syohei; Asano, Takayuki; Shinozaki, Bunju; Tomai, Shigekazu; Yano, Koki; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2014-10-21

    In this study, we measured the low-temperature resistivity of amorphous two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) indium-zinc oxide, indium-gallium-zinc oxide, and indium-tin-zinc oxide films with a wide range of carrier densities. To determine their critical characteristics at the metal-insulator transition (MIT), we used the Ioffe–Regel criterion. We found that the MIT occurs in a narrow range between k{sub F}??=0.13 and k{sub F}??=0.25, where k{sub F} and ? are the Fermi wave number and electron mean free path, respectively. For films in the insulating region, we analyzed ?(T) using a procedure proposed by Zabrodskii and Zinov'eva. This analysis confirmed the occurrence of Mott and Efros–Shklovskii (ES) variable-range hopping. The materials studied show crossover behavior from exp(T{sub Mott}/T){sup 1/4} or exp(T{sub Mott}/T){sup 1/3} for Mott hopping conduction to exp(T{sub ES}/T){sup 1/2} for ES hopping conduction with decreasing temperature. For both 2D and 3D materials, we found that the relationship between T{sub Mott} and T{sub ES} satisfies T{sub ES}?T{sub Mott}{sup 2/3}.

  20. Detection of Amorphous Silica in Air-Oxidized Ti[subscript 3]SiC[subscript 2] at 500?1000°C by NMR and SIMS

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, Wei Kong; Low, I.M.; Hanna, J.V.

    2010-11-12

    The use of secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to detect the existence of amorphous silica in Ti{sub 3}SiC{sub 2} oxidised at 500-1000 C is described. The formation of an amorphous SiO{sub 2} layer and its growth in thickness with temperature was monitored using dynamic SIMS. Results of NMR and TEM verify for the first time the direct evidence of amorphous silica formation during the oxidation of Ti{sub 3}SiC{sub 2} at {le}1000 C.

  1. Dispersion and interaction of graphene oxide in amorphous and semi-crystalline nano-composites: a PALS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, Frans H. J.; Arza, Carlos R.

    2015-06-01

    The influence of dispersion and interaction of Graphene Oxide (GO) in semicrystalline Polyhydroxy butyrate (PHB) and glassy amorphous Poly(tBP-oda) is explored by Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS). The ortho-Positronium lifetimes which represent the main free volume hole size of both polymers are mainly affected by the large differences in internal stresses built up by the shrinkage of the polymers during their preparation, restricted by the platelet structure of GO. The ortho-Positronium intensities, which represent the ortho-Positronium formation probabilities, suggest a strong dependency of on the dispersion of the nano-particles and their aspect ratio.

  2. Amorphous GeOx-Coated Reduced Graphene Oxide Balls with Sandwich Structure for Long-Life Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seung Ho; Jung, Kyeong Youl; Kang, Yun Chan

    2015-07-01

    Amorphous GeOx-coated reduced graphene oxide (rGO) balls with sandwich structure are prepared via a spray-pyrolysis process using polystyrene (PS) nanobeads as sacrificial templates. This sandwich structure is formed by uniformly coating the exterior and interior of few-layer rGO with amorphous GeOx layers. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis reveals a Ge:O stoichiometry ratio of 1:1.7. The amorphous GeOx-coated rGO balls with sandwich structure have low charge-transfer resistance and fast Li(+)-ion diffusion rate. For example, at a current density of 2 A g(-1), the GeOx-coated rGO balls with sandwich and filled structures and the commercial GeO2 powders exhibit initial charge capacities of 795, 651, and 634 mA h g(-1), respectively; the corresponding 700th-cycle charge capacities are 758, 579, and 361 mA h g(-1). In addition, at a current density of 5 A g(-1), the rGO balls with sandwich structure have a 1600th-cycle reversible charge capacity of 629 mA h g(-1) and a corresponding capacity retention of 90.7%, as measured from the maximum reversible capacity at the 100th cycle. PMID:26047208

  3. Effects of amorphous silica coating on cerium oxide nanoparticles induced pulmonary responses

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jane; Mercer, Robert R.; Barger, Mark; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Cohen, Joel M.; Demokritou, Philip; Castranova, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Recently cerium compounds have been used in a variety of consumer products, including diesel fuel additives, to increase fuel combustion efficiency and decrease diesel soot emissions. However, cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles have been detected in the exhaust, which raises a health concern. Previous studies have shown that exposure of rats to nanoscale CeO2 by intratracheal instillation (IT) induces sustained pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis. In the present study, male Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to CeO2 or CeO2 coated with a nano layer of amorphous SiO2 (aSiO2/CeO2) by a single IT and sacrificed at various times post-exposure to assess potential protective effects of the aSiO2 coating. The first acellular bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and BAL cells were collected and analyzed from all exposed animals. At the low dose (0.15 mg/kg), CeO2 but not aSiO2/CeO2 exposure induced inflammation. However, at the higher doses, both particles induced a dose-related inflammation, cytotoxicity, inflammatory cytokines, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, and tissue inhibitor of MMP at 1 day post-exposure. Morphological analysis of lung showed an increased inflammation, surfactant and collagen fibers after CeO2 (high dose at 3.5 mg/kg) treatment at 28 days post-exposure. aSiO2 coating significantly reduced CeO2-induced inflammatory responses in the airspace and appeared to attenuate phospholipidosis and fibrosis. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis showed Ce and phosphorous (P) in all particle-exposed lungs, whereas Si was only detected in aSiO2/CeO2-exposed lungs up to 3 days after exposure, suggesting that aSiO2 dissolved off the CeO2 core, and some of the CeO2 was transformed to CePO4 with time. These results demonstrate that aSiO2 coating reduce CeO2-induced inflammation, phospholipidosis and fibrosis. PMID:26210349

  4. Effects of amorphous silica coating on cerium oxide nanoparticles induced pulmonary responses.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jane; Mercer, Robert R; Barger, Mark; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Cohen, Joel M; Demokritou, Philip; Castranova, Vincent

    2015-10-01

    Recently cerium compounds have been used in a variety of consumer products, including diesel fuel additives, to increase fuel combustion efficiency and decrease diesel soot emissions. However, cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles have been detected in the exhaust, which raises a health concern. Previous studies have shown that exposure of rats to nanoscale CeO2 by intratracheal instillation (IT) induces sustained pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis. In the present study, male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to CeO2 or CeO2 coated with a nano layer of amorphous SiO2 (aSiO2/CeO2) by a single IT and sacrificed at various times post-exposure to assess potential protective effects of the aSiO2 coating. The first acellular bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and BAL cells were collected and analyzed from all exposed animals. At the low dose (0.15mg/kg), CeO2 but not aSiO2/CeO2 exposure induced inflammation. However, at the higher doses, both particles induced a dose-related inflammation, cytotoxicity, inflammatory cytokines, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, and tissue inhibitor of MMP at 1day post-exposure. Morphological analysis of lung showed an increased inflammation, surfactant and collagen fibers after CeO2 (high dose at 3.5mg/kg) treatment at 28days post-exposure. aSiO2 coating significantly reduced CeO2-induced inflammatory responses in the airspace and appeared to attenuate phospholipidosis and fibrosis. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis showed Ce and phosphorous (P) in all particle-exposed lungs, whereas Si was only detected in aSiO2/CeO2-exposed lungs up to 3days after exposure, suggesting that aSiO2 dissolved off the CeO2 core, and some of the CeO2 was transformed to CePO4 with time. These results demonstrate that aSiO2 coating reduce CeO2-induced inflammation, phospholipidosis and fibrosis. PMID:26210349

  5. Amorphous iron-(hydr) oxide networks at liquid/vapor interfaces: In situ X-ray scattering and spectroscopy studies

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W.; Pleasants, J.; Bu, W.; Park, R.Y.; Kuzmenko, I.; Vaknin, D.

    2012-06-23

    Surface sensitive X-ray reflectivity (XR), fluorescence (XF), and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD) experiments were conducted to determine the accumulation of ferric iron Fe (III) or ferrous iron Fe (II) under dihexadecyl phosphate (DHDP) or arachidic acid (AA) Langmuir monolayers at liquid/vapor interfaces. Analysis of the X-ray reflectivity and fluorescence data of monolayers on the aqueous subphases containing FeCl3 indicates remarkably high levels of surface-bound Fe (III) in number of Fe3þ ions per molecule (DHDP or AA) that exceed the amount necessary to neutralize a hypothetically completely deprotonated monolayer (DHDP or AA). These results suggest that nano-scale iron (hydr) oxide complexes (oxides, hydroxides or oxyhydroxides) bind to the headgroups and effectively overcompensate the maximum possible charges at the interface. The lack of evidence of in-plane ordering in GIXD measurements and strong effects on the surface-pressure versus molecular area isotherms indicate that an amorphous network of iron (hydr) oxide complexes contiguous to the headgroups is formed. Similar experiments with FeCl2 generally resulted with the oxidation of Fe (II)–Fe (III) which consequently leads to ferric Fe (III) complexes binding albeit with less iron at the interface. Controlling the oxidation of Fe (II) changes the nature and amount of binding significantly. The implications to biomineralization of iron (hydr) oxides are briefly discussed.

  6. Role of Hydrophobicity in Adhesion of the Dissimilatory Fe(III)-Reducing Bacterium Shewanella alga to Amorphous Fe(III) Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Caccavo, F.; Schamberger, P. C.; Keiding, K.; Nielsen, P. H.

    1997-01-01

    The mechanisms by which the dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Shewanella alga adheres to amorphous Fe(III) oxide were examined through comparative analysis of S. alga BrY and an adhesion-deficient strain of this species, S. alga RAD20. Approximately 100% of S. alga BrY cells typically adhered to amorphous Fe(III) oxide, while less than 50% of S. alga RAD20 cells adhered. Bulk chemical analysis, isoelectric point analysis, and cell surface analysis by time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis demonstrated that the surfaces of S. alga BrY cells were predominantly protein but that the surfaces of S. alga RAD20 cells were predominantly exopolysaccharide. Physicochemical analyses and hydrophobic interaction assays demonstrated that S. alga BrY cells were more hydrophobic than S. alga RAD20 cells. This study represents the first quantitative analysis of the adhesion of a dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium to amorphous Fe(III) oxide, and the results collectively suggest that hydrophobic interactions are a factor in controlling the adhesion of this bacterium to amorphous Fe(III) oxide. Despite having a reduced ability to adhere, S. alga RAD20 reduced Fe(III) oxide at a rate identical to that of S. alga BrY. This result contrasts with results of previous studies by demonstrating that irreversible cell adhesion is not requisite for microbial reduction of amorphous Fe(III) oxide. These results suggest that the interaction between dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria and amorphous Fe(III) oxide is more complex than previously believed. PMID:16535706

  7. Amorphous TiO2-coated reduced graphene oxide hybrid nanostructures for polymer composites with low dielectric loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Wangshu; Zhang, Yihe; Yu, Li; Lv, Fengzhu; Liu, Leipeng; Zhang, Qian; An, Qi

    2015-10-01

    Nanocomposite of poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) incorporated with titanium dioxide-modified reduced graphene oxide sheets (rGO-TiO2/PVDF-HFP) was prepared by in situ assembling TiO2 on graphene oxide (GO), and its dielectric properties were carefully characterized. The GO layers were completely coated with amorphous TiO2. The dielectric permittivity increased stably as rGO-TiO2 content increased, and the loss was low at low frequencies. TiO2 inter-layer acted as an inter-particle barrier to prevent direct contact of rGO, which provided a new simple way for tuning the dielectric properties of polymer composites with low dielectric loss by controlling the structure of fillers.

  8. Amorphous Transparent Conducting Oxides (TCOs) Deposited at T 100<= ..deg.. C (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, J.; van Hest, M.; Teplin, C.; Alleman, J.; Dabney, M.; Gedvilas, L.; Keyes, B.; To, B.; Ginley D.

    2006-05-01

    The summary of this report is that amorphous InZnO (a-IZO) is a very versatile TCO with: (1) low process temperatures ({approx} 100 C); (2) easy to make by sputtering; (3) excellent optical and electronic properties; (4) very smooth etchable films; and (5) remarkable thermal processing stability.

  9. Preparation and properties of amorphous titania-coated zinc oxide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Liao Minhung . E-mail: liaomh@mail.tit.edu.tw; Hsu, C.-H.; Chen, D.-H. . E-mail: chendh@mail.ncku.edu.tw

    2006-07-15

    Amorphous TiO{sub 2}-coated ZnO nanoparticles were prepared by the solvothermal synthesis of ZnO nanoparticles in ethanol and the followed by sol-gel coating of TiO{sub 2} nanolayer. The analyses of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that the resultant ZnO nanoparticles were hexagonal with a wurtzite structure and a mean diameter of about 60 nm. Also, after TiO{sub 2} coating, the TEM images clearly indicated the darker ZnO nanoparticles being surrounded by the lighter amorphous TiO{sub 2} layers. The zeta potential analysis revealed the pH dependence of zeta potentials for ZnO nanoparticles shifted completely to that for TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles after TiO{sub 2} coating, confirming the formation of core-shell structure and suggesting the coating of TiO{sub 2} was achieved via the adhesion of the hydrolyzed species Ti-O{sup -} to the positively charged surface of ZnO nanoparticles. Furthermore, the analyses of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectra were also conducted to confirm that amorphous TiO{sub 2} were indeed coated on the surface of ZnO nanoparticles. In addition, the analyses of ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) and photoluminescence (PL) spectra revealed that the absorbance of amorphous TiO{sub 2}-coated ZnO nanoparticles at 375 nm gradually decreased with an increase in the Ti/Zn molar ratio and the time for TiO{sub 2} coating, and the emission intensity of ZnO cores could be significantly enhanced by the amorphous TiO{sub 2} shell. - Graphical abstract: Amorphous titania-coated ZnO nanoparticles with a core-shell structure were prepared. It was found that the emission intensity of ZnO cores could be significantly enhanced by the amorphous TiO{sub 2} shell.

  10. Wireless thin film transistor based on micro magnetic induction coupling antenna.

    PubMed

    Jun, Byoung Ok; Lee, Gwang Jun; Kang, Jong Gu; Kim, Seunguk; Choi, Ji-Woong; Cha, Seung Nam; Sohn, Jung Inn; Jang, Jae Eun

    2015-01-01

    A wireless thin film transistor (TFT) structure in which a source/drain or a gate is connected directly to a micro antenna to receive or transmit signals or power can be an important building block, acting as an electrical switch, a rectifier or an amplifier, for various electronics as well as microelectronics, since it allows simple connection with other devices, unlike conventional wire connections. An amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (?-IGZO) TFT with magnetic antenna structure was fabricated and studied for this purpose. To enhance the induction coupling efficiency while maintaining the same small antenna size, a magnetic core structure consisting of Ni and nanowires was formed under the antenna. With the micro-antenna connected to a source/drain or a gate of the TFT, working electrical signals were well controlled. The results demonstrated the device as an alternative solution to existing wire connections which cause a number of problems in various fields such as flexible/wearable devices, body implanted devices, micro/nano robots, and sensors for the 'internet of things' (IoT). PMID:26691929

  11. Controlled Microwave Processing of IGZO Thin Films for Improved Optical and Electrical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhar, Aritra; Alford, T. L.

    2015-07-01

    Amorphous indium gallium zinc oxides (IGZO) of 100 nm thickness were deposited onto glass substrates by sputtering at room temperature. The films were subsequently annealed in air, vacuum, forming gas and O2 environments by both conventional and microwave methods. The optical and electrical properties of the as-deposited and annealed samples were measured and compared. It was seen that microwave annealing had a dual advantage of reduced time and lower temperature compared to conventional annealing. The optical and electrical properties of the IGZO thin films were measured by UV-Visible spectrophotometry, Hall measurement and four-point probe analyses, respectively. On microwave anneals of 4 min at 200°C, the resistivity of IGZO thin films was lowered to 4.45 and 4.24 × 10-3 ?-cm in vacuum and forming gas, respectively. However in conventional annealing at 400°C, it took 24 h to reach 4.5 and 4.2 × 10-3 ?-cm in vacuum and forming gas, respectively. The average transmittance of IGZO improved from 80% to almost 86% for microwave annealing.

  12. Wireless thin film transistor based on micro magnetic induction coupling antenna

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Byoung Ok; Lee, Gwang Jun; Kang, Jong Gu; Kim, Seunguk; Choi, Ji-Woong; Cha, Seung Nam; Sohn, Jung Inn; Jang, Jae Eun

    2015-01-01

    A wireless thin film transistor (TFT) structure in which a source/drain or a gate is connected directly to a micro antenna to receive or transmit signals or power can be an important building block, acting as an electrical switch, a rectifier or an amplifier, for various electronics as well as microelectronics, since it allows simple connection with other devices, unlike conventional wire connections. An amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (?-IGZO) TFT with magnetic antenna structure was fabricated and studied for this purpose. To enhance the induction coupling efficiency while maintaining the same small antenna size, a magnetic core structure consisting of Ni and nanowires was formed under the antenna. With the micro-antenna connected to a source/drain or a gate of the TFT, working electrical signals were well controlled. The results demonstrated the device as an alternative solution to existing wire connections which cause a number of problems in various fields such as flexible/wearable devices, body implanted devices, micro/nano robots, and sensors for the ‘internet of things’ (IoT). PMID:26691929

  13. Effects of defect creation on bidirectional behavior with hump characteristics of InGaZnO TFTs under bias and thermal stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Hwarim; Song, Hyunsoo; Jeong, Jaewook; Hong, Yewon; Hong, Yongtaek

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the hump characteristics of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide thin-film transistors. The device showed a field effect mobility of 24.3 cm2 V-1 s-1, a threshold voltage (Vth) of 4.8 V, and a subthreshold swing of 120 mV/dec. Under positive gate bias stress, Vth showed bidirectional shift with a hump. Vth was positively and negatively shifted in the above-threshold and subthreshold regions, respectively. At high temperatures, Vth was more positively shifted without bidirectional shift. Under simultaneous drain bias stress (VDS,stress), the hump was maintained. However, the bidirectional shift was not observed with an increasing VDS,stress. The hump and positive shift are related to the defect creation of the shallow donor-like and deep-level acceptor-like states, respectively. We performed a two-dimensional device simulation to further investigate this phenomenon. By varying the peak values of the Gaussian shallow donor-like and deep acceptor-like states, we qualitatively confirmed the relationship between the two states and transfer curve changes.

  14. Amorphous Indium-Zinc-Oxide Transparent Conductors for Thin Film PV: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, J.; Gennett, T.; Galante, M.; Gillaspie, D.; Ginley, D.

    2011-07-01

    Amorphous InZnO's (a-IZO) basic PV applicability has now been demonstrated in prototype CIGS, Si Heterojunction (SiHJ) and organic photovoltaics (OPV). However, to move beyond initial demonstration devices, improved TCO properties and processibility of the a-IZO films are needed. Here, RF-superimposed DC sputtering was used to improve the reliable deposition of a-IZO with conductivity > 3000 S/cm.

  15. Development of Liquid Crystal Display Panel Integrated with Drivers Using Amorphous In-Ga-Zn-Oxide Thin Film Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osada, Takeshi; Akimoto, Kengo; Sato, Takehisa; Ikeda, Masataka; Tsubuku, Masashi; Sakata, Junichiro; Koyama, Jun; Serikawa, Tadashi; Yamazaki, Shunpei

    2010-03-01

    We designed, prototyped, and evaluated a liquid crystal panel integrated with a gate driver and a source driver using amorphous In-Ga-Zn-oxide thin film transistors (TFTs). Using bottom-gate bottom-contact (BGBC) thin film transistors, superior characteristics could be obtained. We obtained TFT characteristics with little variation even when the thickness of the gate insulator (GI) film was reduced owing to etching of source/drain (S/D) wiring, which is a typical process for the BGBC TFT. Moreover, a favorable ON-state current was obtained even when an In-Ga-Zn-oxide layer was formed over the S/D electrode. Since the upper portion of the In-Ga-Zn-oxide layer is not etched, the BGBC structure is predicted to be effective in thinning the In-Ga-Zn-oxide layer in the future. Upon evaluation, we found that the prototyped liquid crystal panel integrated with the gate and source drivers using the TFTs with improved characteristics had stable drive.

  16. Creation and Control of Two-Dimensional Electron Gas Using Al-Based Amorphous Oxides/SrTiO3 Heterostructures Grown by Atomic

    E-print Network

    remarkably, amorphous YAlO3 (YAO) and Al2O3 layers, which are not polar-perovskite-structured oxides, can,16 Strontium titanate is well-known as a high-k dielectric (bulk dielectric constant of 300) with a bandgap random access memory (DRAM). Strontium titanate has a cubic perovskite structure with a lattice constant

  17. High-performance amorphous gallium indium zinc oxide thin-film transistors through N{sub 2}O plasma passivation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jaechul; Kim, Sangwook; Kim, Changjung; Kim, Sunil; Song, Ihun; Yin, Huaxiang; Kim, Kyoung-Kok; Lee, Sunghoon; Hong, Kiha; Park, Youngsoo; Lee, Jaecheol; Jung, Jaekwan; Lee, Eunha; Kwon, Kee-Won

    2008-08-04

    Amorphous-gallium-indium-zinc-oxide (a-GIZO) thin filmtransistors (TFTs) are fabricated without annealing, using processes and equipment for conventional a-Si:H TFTs. It has been very difficult to obtain sound TFT characteristics, because the a-GIZO active layer becomes conductive after dry etching the Mo source/drain electrode and depositing the a-SiO{sub 2} passivation layer. To prevent such damages, N{sub 2}O plasma is applied to the back surface of the a-GIZO channel layer before a-SiO{sub 2} deposition. N{sub 2}O plasma-treated a-GIZO TFTs exhibit excellent electrical properties: a field effect mobility of 37 cm{sup 2}/V s, a threshold voltage of 0.1 V, a subthreshold swing of 0.25 V/decade, and an I{sub on/off} ratio of 7.

  18. Amorphous polymeric anode materials from poly(acrylic acid) and tin(II) oxide for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroyuki; Nakanishi, Shinji; Iba, Hideki; Itoh, Takahito

    2015-02-01

    The reaction of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and tin oxide (II) (SnO) provides an amorphous product (PSnA), which was found to be a promising precursor of an anode material for lithium ion batteries. The anode electrode composed of PSnA as the active material and polyimide as the binder showed a better cycling performance than the anode electrode using SnO as the active material. It is considered that the organic polymer chain present in PSnA might act as a buffer to the volume change in the active material during the charge-discharge cycles. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) results of the electrode after delithiation revealed that nano-sized cubic tin (?-Sn) and tetragonal tin (?-Sn) particles are formed in the active material. Therefore, it is concluded that these nano-sized tin particles in the polymer matrix were effective for the storage and release of Li ions.

  19. Low-temperature synthetic route based on the amorphous nature of giant species for preparation of lower valence oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eda, Kazuo; Kunotani, Fumiko; Uchiyama, Noriki

    2005-05-01

    We examined low-temperature synthetic route based on the amorphous nature of giant species to succeed to prepare Cs blue bronze (Cs 0.3MoO 3), which has never obtained by usual high-temperature methods, at ca. 680 K. Solid solutions (K 1-xRb x) 0.28MoO 3 and (Li 1-xNa x) 0.9Mo 6O 17 were also obtained at lower temperatures (ca. 670 K). For the latter system consisting of non-isostructural end members, Li 0.9Mo 6O 17-structure type solid solution was formed even when 0.25oxides Ln2Mo 3O 9 ( Ln=La, Gd) were obtained, but not as single phases.

  20. Flexible amorphous oxide thin-film transistors on polyimide substrate for AMOLED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhiping; Li, Min; Xu, Miao; Zou, Jianhua; Gao, Zhuo; Pang, Jiawei; Guo, Ying; Zhou, Lei; Wang, Chunfu; Fu, Dong; Peng, Junbiao; Wang, Lei; Cao, Yong

    2014-10-01

    We report a flexible amorphous Lanthanide doped In-Zn-O (IZO) thin-film transistor (TFT) backplane on polyimide (PI) substrate. In order to de-bond the PI film from the glass carrier easily after the flexible AMOLED process, a special inorganic film is deposited on the glass before the PI film is coated. The TFT exhibited a field-effect mobility of 6.97 cm2V-1 s-1, a subthreshold swing of 0.248 V dec-1, and an Ion/Ioff ratio of 5.19×107, which is sufficient to drive the OLEDs.

  1. Magnesium-Aluminum-Zirconium Oxide Amorphous Ternary Composite: A Dense and Stable Optical Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sahoo, N. K.; Shapiro, A. P.

    1998-01-01

    In the present work, the process parameter dependent optical and structural properties of MgO-Al(2)O(3)-ZrO(2) ternary mixed-composite material have been investigated. Optical properties were derived from spectrophotometric measurements. The surface morphology, grain size distributions, crystallographic phases and process dependent material composition of films have been investigated through the use of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction analysis and Energy Dispersive X- ray (EDX) analysis. EDX analysis made evident the correlation between the optical constants and the process dependent compositions in the films. It is possible to achieve environmentally stable amorphous films with high packing density under certain optimized process conditions.

  2. Comparison of amorphous iridium water-oxidation electrocatalysts prepared from soluble precursors.

    PubMed

    Blakemore, James D; Schley, Nathan D; Kushner-Lenhoff, Maxwell N; Winter, Andrew M; D'Souza, Francis; Crabtree, Robert H; Brudvig, Gary W

    2012-07-16

    Electrodeposition of iridium oxide layers from soluble precursors provides a route to active thin-layer electrocatalysts for use on water-oxidizing anodes. Certain organometallic half-sandwich aqua complexes of iridium form stable and highly active oxide films upon electrochemical oxidation in aqueous solution. The catalyst films appear as blue layers on the anode when sufficiently thick, and most closely resemble hydrous iridium(III,IV) oxide by voltammetry. The deposition rate and cyclic voltammetric response of the electrodeposited material depend on whether the precursor complex contains a pentamethylcyclopentadieneyl (Cp*) or cyclopentadienyl ligand (Cp), and do not match, in either case, iridium oxide anodes prepared from non-organometallic precursors. Here, we survey our organometallic precursors, iridium hydroxide, and pre-formed iridium oxide nanoparticles. From electrochemical quartz crystal nanobalance (EQCN) studies, we find differences in the rate of electrodeposition of catalyst layers from the two half-sandwich precursors; however, the resulting layers operate as water-oxidizing anodes with indistinguishable overpotentials and H/D isotope effects. Furthermore, using the mass data collected by EQCN and not otherwise available, we show that the electrodeposited materials are excellent catalysts for the water-oxidation reaction, showing maximum turnover frequencies greater than 0.5 mol O(2) (mol iridium)(-1) s(-1) and quantitative conversion of current to product dioxygen. Importantly, these anodes maintain their high activity and robustness at very low iridium loadings. Our organometallic precursors contrast with pre-formed iridium oxide nanoparticles, which form an unstable electrodeposited material that is not stably adherent to the anode surface at even moderately oxidizing potentials. PMID:22725667

  3. Oxyanion induced variations in domain structure for amorphous cobalt oxide oxygen evolving catalysts, resolved by X-ray pair distribution function analysis.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Gihan; Kokhan, Oleksandr; Han, Ali; Chapman, Karena W; Chupas, Peter J; Du, Pingwu; Tiede, David M

    2015-12-01

    Amorphous thin film oxygen evolving catalysts, OECs, of first-row transition metals show promise to serve as self-assembling photoanode materials in solar-driven, photoelectrochemical `artificial leaf' devices. This report demonstrates the ability to use high-energy X-ray scattering and atomic pair distribution function analysis, PDF, to resolve structure in amorphous metal oxide catalyst films. The analysis is applied here to resolve domain structure differences induced by oxyanion substitution during the electrochemical assembly of amorphous cobalt oxide catalyst films, Co-OEC. PDF patterns for Co-OEC films formed using phosphate, Pi, methylphosphate, MPi, and borate, Bi, electrolyte buffers show that the resulting domains vary in size following the sequence Pi < MPi < Bi. The increases in domain size for CoMPi and CoBi were found to be correlated with increases in the contributions from bilayer and trilayer stacked domains having structures intermediate between those of the LiCoOO and CoO(OH) mineral forms. The lattice structures and offset stacking of adjacent layers in the partially stacked CoMPi and CoBi domains were best matched to those in the LiCoOO layered structure. The results demonstrate the ability of PDF analysis to elucidate features of domain size, structure, defect content and mesoscale organization for amorphous metal oxide catalysts that are not readily accessed by other X-ray techniques. PDF structure analysis is shown to provide a way to characterize domain structures in different forms of amorphous oxide catalysts, and hence provide an opportunity to investigate correlations between domain structure and catalytic activity. PMID:26634728

  4. Oxyanion induced variations in domain structure for amorphous cobalt oxide oxygen evolving catalysts, resolved by X-ray pair distribution function analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Gihan; Kokhan, Oleksandr; Han, Ali; Chapman, Karena W.; Chupas, Peter J.; Du, Pingwu; Tiede, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Amorphous thin film oxygen evolving catalysts, OECs, of first-row transition metals show promise to serve as self-assembling photoanode materials in solar-driven, photoelectrochemical ‘artificial leaf’ devices. This report demonstrates the ability to use high-energy X-ray scattering and atomic pair distribution function analysis, PDF, to resolve structure in amorphous metal oxide catalyst films. The analysis is applied here to resolve domain structure differences induced by oxyanion substitution during the electrochemical assembly of amorphous cobalt oxide catalyst films, Co-OEC. PDF patterns for Co-OEC films formed using phosphate, Pi, methylphosphate, MPi, and borate, Bi, electrolyte buffers show that the resulting domains vary in size following the sequence Pi < MPi < Bi. The increases in domain size for CoMPi and CoBi were found to be correlated with increases in the contributions from bilayer and trilayer stacked domains having structures intermediate between those of the LiCoOO and CoO(OH) mineral forms. The lattice structures and offset stacking of adjacent layers in the partially stacked CoMPi and CoBi domains were best matched to those in the LiCoOO layered structure. The results demonstrate the ability of PDF analysis to elucidate features of domain size, structure, defect content and mesoscale organization for amorphous metal oxide catalysts that are not readily accessed by other X-ray techniques. PDF structure analysis is shown to provide a way to characterize domain structures in different forms of amorphous oxide catalysts, and hence provide an opportunity to investigate correlations between domain structure and catalytic activity. PMID:26634728

  5. Atomistic Texture of Amorphous Manganese Oxides for Electrochemical Water Splitting Revealed by Ab Initio Calculations Combined with X-ray Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mattioli, Giuseppe; Zaharieva, Ivelina; Dau, Holger; Guidoni, Leonardo

    2015-08-19

    Amorphous transition-metal (hydr)oxides are considered as the most promising catalysts that promote the oxidation of water to molecular oxygen, protons, and "energized" electrons, and, in turn, as fundamental parts of "artificial leaves" that can be exploited for large scale generation of chemical fuels (e.g., hydrogen) directly from sunlight. We present here a joint theoretical-experimental investigation of electrodeposited amorphous manganese oxides with different catalytic activities toward water oxidation (MnCats). Combining the information content of X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements with the predictive power of ab initio calculations based on density functional theory, we have been able to identify the essential structural and electronic properties of MnCats. We have elucidated (i) the localization and structural connection of Mn(II), Mn(III), and Mn(IV) ions in such amorphous oxides and (ii) the distribution of protons at the MnCat/water interface. Our calculations result in realistic 3D models of the MnCat atomistic texture, formed by the interconnection of small planar Mn-oxo sheets cross-linked through different kinds of defective Mn atoms, isolated or arranged in closed cubane-like units. Essential for the catalytic activity is the presence of undercoordinated Mn(III)O5 units located at the boundary of the amorphous network, where they are ready to act as hole traps that trigger the oxidation of neighboring water molecules when the catalyst is exposed to an external positive potential. The present validation of a sound 3D model of MnCat improves the accuracy of XAFS fits and opens the way for the development of mechanistic schemes of its functioning beyond a speculative level. PMID:26226190

  6. Oxidation behavior of amorphous metallic Ni{sub 3}(SbTe{sub 3}){sub 2} compound

    SciTech Connect

    Jun, Jong-Ho; Jung, Jin-Seung . E-mail: jjscm@kangnung.ac.kr; Oh, Seung-Lim; Kim, Yong-Rok; Lee, Sung-Han; O'Connor, Charles J.

    2006-03-09

    Amorphous Ni{sub 3}(SbTe{sub 3}){sub 2} compound was prepared from a metathesis between Zintl phase K{sub 3}SbTe{sub 3} and NiBr{sub 2} in solution and its oxidation behavior was investigated in the temperature range of 200-700 deg. C in air. To characterize the sample, thermogravimetry (TG), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive analysis by X-ray (EDAX) analyses were performed and electrical conductivity was measured as a function of temperature in the range of 25-800 deg. C in air. The specimen showed a metallic conducting-like behavior below 585 deg. C while a semiconducting-like behavior above 585 deg. C. At a first oxidation step of Ni{sub 3}(SbTe{sub 3}){sub 2} below 500 deg. C, TeO{sub 2} phase is formed. Above 500 deg. C, NiO phase is formed, then some NiO reacts with TeO{sub 2} to form NiTeO{sub 3} and NiSb{sub 2}O{sub 6} is simultaneously formed. Above 700 deg. C, NiTeO{sub 3} is further reacted with TeO{sub 2} to form NiTe{sub 2}O{sub 5}. Both NiTeO{sub 3} and NiTe{sub 2}O{sub 5} are decomposed above 774 deg. C.

  7. Light induced instability mechanism in amorphous InGaZn oxide semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, John; Guo, Yuzheng

    2014-04-21

    A model of the negative bias illumination stress instability in InGaZn oxide is presented, based on the photo-excitation of electrons from oxygen interstitials. The O interstitials are present to compensate hydrogen donors. The O interstitials are found to spontaneously form in O-rich conditions for Fermi energies at the conduction band edge, much more easily that in related oxides. The excited electrons give rise to a persistent photoconductivity due to an energy barrier to recombination. The formation energy of the O interstitials varies with their separation from the H donors, which leads to a voltage stress dependence on the compensation.

  8. Structure, Morphology, and Optical Properties of Amorphous and Nanocrystalline Gallium Oxide Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S. Sampath; Rubio, E. J.; Noor-A-Alam, M.; Martinez, G.; Manandhar, Sandeep; Shutthanandan, V.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Ramana, C.V.

    2013-02-15

    Ga2O3 thin films were produced by sputter deposition by varying the substrate temperature (Ts) in a wide range (Ts=25-800 oC). The structural characteristics and optical properties of Ga2O3 films were evaluated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and spectrophotometric measurements. The effect of growth temperature is significant on the chemistry, crystal structure and morphology of Ga2O3 films. XRD and SEM analyses indicate that the Ga2O3 films grown at lower temperatures were amorphous while those grown at Ts?500 oC were nanocrystalline. RBS measurements indicate the well-maintained stoichiometry of Ga2O3 films at Ts=300-700 oC. The spectral transmission of the films increased with increasing temperature. The band gap of the films varied from 4.96 eV to 5.17 eV for a variation in Ts in the range 25-800 oC. A relationship between microstructure and optical property is discussed.

  9. Strain-induced transformation of amorphous spherical precipitates into platelets: Application to oxide particles in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Voronkov, V. V.; Falster, R.

    2001-06-01

    The spherical shape of an amorphous precipitate becomes unstable if the combination P{sup 2}R of precipitate radius R and pressure P exceeds some critical value. This critical value was found to be about 4.44 G{sigma}, where G is the matrix shear modulus and {sigma} is the specific energy of the precipitate/matrix interface. Once this instability criterion is fulfilled, the initially spherical particle will reduce the total free energy (the sum of strain energy and the surface energy) by becoming a thin oblate spheroid (effectively, a platelet). The actual pressure P in the course of oxygen precipitation in silicon is controlled by a high self-interstitial supersaturation caused by emission of self-interstitials by growing precipitates. The duration of annealing necessary to reach the stage of collapse of spheres into platelets is calculated as a function of temperature and the precipitate density. Calculated results are compatible with the experimentally observed annealing conditions for platelet formation. Another important example of sphere to platelet transformation is microdefect formation in vacancy-type silicon. In this case a large negative value of P is sufficient to induce collapse. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  10. Resistive Switching Behavior in Amorphous Aluminum Oxide Film Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Xiao-Tong; Zhu, Hui-Chao; Cai, Hai-Tao; Zhang, Jia-Qi; Wang, Xiao-Jiao

    2014-07-01

    The repeatable bipolar resistive switching phenomenon is observed in amorphous Al2O3 prepared by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition on ITO glass, with ITO as the bottom electrode and Ag as the top electrode. The crystal structure, morphology, composition and optical properties of Al2O3 thin films are investigated by x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and ultraviolet-visible-infrared spectroscopy, respectively. The electronic character of Ag/Al2O3/ITO structure is tested by an Agilent B1500A. The device shows a typical bipolar resistive switching behavior under the dc voltage sweep mode at room temperature. The variation ratio between HRS and LRS is larger than nearly three orders of magnitude, which indicates the good potential of this structure in future resistive random access memory (ReRAM) applications. Based on the conductive filament model, the high electric field is considered the main reason for the resistive switching according to our measurements.

  11. On the structural development during ultrathin amorphous Al2O3 film growth on Al(111) and Al(100) surfaces by thermal oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flötotto, D.; Wang, Z. M.; Mittemeijer, E. J.

    2015-03-01

    The structural developments during growth of ultrathin amorphous Al2O3 film on bare Al(100) and Al(111) surfaces, by dry thermal oxidation in the oxygen partial pressure range of 1 × 10- 5-1.0 Pa at 300 K, were investigated as function of the oxide-film thickness by (local) chemical state analysis using angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in combination with low electron energy diffraction and cross-sectional high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The effect of the dielectric discontinuity, at the interfaces of the surficial Al2O3 film has been determined quantitatively and has been subtracted from the observed chemical shifts of the core level photoelectron binding energies as well as from the observed Auger transition kinetic energies. It is revealed that ultrathin amorphous Al2O3 films on the Al(111) and Al(100) surfaces experience remarkably different structural developments upon growth.

  12. In situ X-Ray Absorption Spectro-Electrochemical Study of Amorphous Tin-Based Composite Oxide Material

    SciTech Connect

    Mansour, A. N.; Mukerjee, S.; Yang, X. Q.; McBreen, J.

    1998-11-01

    We have measured the XAFS spectra of a sample of tin-based composite oxide (TCO) material with a nominal composition of Sn{sub 1.0}B{sub 0.56}P{sub 0.40}Al{sub 0.42}O{sub 3.47} during the discharge and charge cycles in an ''in situ'' configuration. Our results confirm the amorphous nature of TCO and show that Sn in TCO is coordinated with 3 oxygen atoms at a distance of 2.12 {angstrom}. Upon discharging, initially, Li interacts with the electrochemically active Sn-O center forming metallic Sn in the form of clusters containing just a few atoms. Upon further discharge, Li alloys with Sn forming initially highly dispersed forms of Li{sub 2}Sn{sub 5} and/or LiSn and then Li{sub 7}Sn{sub 3}, Li{sub 5}Sn{sub 2}, Li{sub 13}Sn{sub 5}, or Li{sub 7}Sn{sub 2}. The true nature of the formed alloys could be significantly different from that of the corresponding crystalline phases. Upon charging, metallic Sn is produced with a Sn-Sn distance intermediate to those of gray and white Sn.

  13. Photo-induced oxidation and amorphization of trigonal tellurium: A means to engineer hybrid nanostructures and explore glass structure under spatial confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Vasileiadis, Thomas; Yannopoulos, Spyros N.

    2014-09-14

    Controlled photo-induced oxidation and amorphization of elemental trigonal tellurium are achieved by laser irradiation at optical wavelengths. These processes are monitored in situ by time-resolved Raman scattering and ex situ by electron microscopies. Ultrathin TeO? films form on Te surfaces, as a result of irradiation, with an interface layer of amorphous Te intervening between them. It is shown that irradiation, apart from enabling the controllable transformation of bulk Te to one-dimensional nanostructures, such as Te nanotubes and hybrid core-Te/sheath-TeO? nanowires, causes also a series of light-driven (athermal) phase transitions involving the crystallization of the amorphous TeO? layers and its transformation to a multiplicity of crystalline phases including the ?-, ?-, and ?-TeO? crystalline phases. The kinetics of the above photo-induced processes is investigated by Raman scattering at various laser fluences revealing exponential and non-exponential kinetics at low and high fluence, respectively. In addition, the formation of ultrathin (less than 10 nm) layers of amorphous TeO? offers the possibility to explore structural transitions in 2D glasses by observing changes in the short- and medium-range structural order induced by spatial confinement.

  14. Widely bandgap tunable amorphous Cd–Ga–O oxide semiconductors exhibiting electron mobilities ?10?cm{sup 2?}V{sup ?1?}s{sup ?1}

    SciTech Connect

    Yanagi, Hiroshi; Sato, Chiyuki; Kimura, Yota; Suzuki, Issei; Omata, Takahisa; Kamiya, Toshio; Hosono, Hideo

    2015-02-23

    Amorphous oxide semiconductors exhibit large electron mobilities; however, their bandgaps are either too large for solar cells or too small for deep ultraviolet applications depending on the materials system. Herein, we demonstrate that amorphous Cd–Ga–O semiconductors display bandgaps covering the entire 2.5–4.3?eV region while maintaining large electron mobilities ?10?cm{sup 2?}V{sup ?1?}s{sup ?1}. The band alignment diagram obtained by ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy and the bandgap values reveal that these semiconductors form type-II heterojunctions with p-type Cu{sub 2}O, which is suitable for solar cells and solar-blind ultraviolet sensors.

  15. Electric charging/discharging characteristics of super capacitor, using de-alloying and anodic oxidized Ti-Ni-Si amorphous alloy ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuhara, Mikio; Sugawara, Kazuyuki

    2014-05-01

    Charging/discharging behaviors of de-alloyed and anodic oxidized Ti-Ni-Si amorphous alloy ribbons were measured as a function of current between 10 pA and 100 mA, using galvanostatic charge/discharging method. In sharp contrast to conventional electric double layer capacitor (EDLC), discharging behaviors for voltage under constant currents of 1, 10 and 100 mA after 1.8 ks charging at 100 mA show parabolic decrease, demonstrating direct electric storage without solvents. The supercapacitors, devices that store electric charge on their amorphous TiO2-x surfaces that contain many 70-nm sized cavities, show the Ragone plot which locates at lower energy density region near the 2nd cells, and RC constant of 800 s (at 1 mHz), which is 157,000 times larger than that (5 ms) in EDLC.

  16. Electric charging/discharging characteristics of super capacitor, using de-alloying and anodic oxidized Ti-Ni-Si amorphous alloy ribbons.

    PubMed

    Fukuhara, Mikio; Sugawara, Kazuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Charging/discharging behaviors of de-alloyed and anodic oxidized Ti-Ni-Si amorphous alloy ribbons were measured as a function of current between 10 pA and 100 mA, using galvanostatic charge/discharging method. In sharp contrast to conventional electric double layer capacitor (EDLC), discharging behaviors for voltage under constant currents of 1, 10 and 100 mA after 1.8 ks charging at 100 mA show parabolic decrease, demonstrating direct electric storage without solvents. The supercapacitors, devices that store electric charge on their amorphous TiO2-x surfaces that contain many 70-nm sized cavities, show the Ragone plot which locates at lower energy density region near the 2nd cells, and RC constant of 800 s (at 1 mHz), which is 157,000 times larger than that (5 ms) in EDLC. PMID:24959106

  17. Nitrogen plasma treatment of fluorine-doped tin oxide for enhancement of photo-carrier collection in amorphous Si solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Baik, Seung Jae; Lim, Koeng Su

    2011-04-15

    Nitrogen plasma treatment was performed on fluorine-doped tin oxide (SnO{sub 2}:F) front electrodes, and its impact on the performance of pin type amorphous Si (a-Si) solar cells was investigated. Nitrogen plasma treatment reverses the surface band bending of SnO{sub 2}:F from accumulation to depletion, thus in turn reversing the band bending of the p type amorphous silicon carbide (p-a-SiC) window layer. The reversal of band bending leads to the collection of carriers generated in p-a-SiC, and quantum efficiency in the short wavelength regime is thereby enhanced. On the other hand, surface depletion of SnO{sub 2}:F causes a reduction of the diode built-in voltage and increased series resistance, which could degrade the open circuit voltage (Voc) and fill factor (FF), the degradation of which is strongly affected by the deposition time of p-a-SiC.

  18. X-ray absorption spectroscopy elucidates the impact of structural disorder on electron mobility in amorphous zinc-tin-oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Siah, Sin Cheng E-mail: buonassisi@mit.edu; Lee, Yun Seog; Buonassisi, Tonio E-mail: buonassisi@mit.edu; Lee, Sang Woon; Gordon, Roy G.; Heo, Jaeyeong; Shibata, Tomohiro; Segre, Carlo U.

    2014-06-16

    We investigate the correlation between the atomic structures of amorphous zinc-tin-oxide (a-ZTO) thin films grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) and their electronic transport properties. We perform synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the K-edges of Zn and Sn with varying [Zn]/[Sn] compositions in a-ZTO thin films. In extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements, signal attenuation from higher-order shells confirms the amorphous structure of a-ZTO thin films. Both quantitative EXAFS modeling and X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) reveal that structural disorder around Zn atoms increases with increasing [Sn]. Field- and Hall-effect mobilities are observed to decrease with increasing structural disorder around Zn atoms, suggesting that the degradation in electron mobility may be correlated with structural changes.

  19. Monochromatic light-assisted erasing effects of In-Ga-Zn-O thin film transistor memory with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Zn-doped Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} stacks

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Sun; Zhang, Wen-Peng; Cui, Xing-Mei; Ding, Shi-Jin Sun, Qing-Qing; Zhang, Wei

    2014-03-10

    We studied how electrical erasing of indium gallium zinc oxide-thin-film-transistor memory was improved by adding concurrent irradiation with monochromatic light (ML). At fixed gate bias, irradiating at wavelengths of ?500?nm increased the erasing window (?V{sub th-e}) significantly: At a gate bias of ?20?V and an erasing time of 5?min, ML irradiation at 400?nm increased ?V{sub th-e} from 0.29 to 3.21?V. ?V{sub th-e} increased incrementally with gate bias, erasing time, and ML power density, particularly at short ML wavelengths. Analyzing our experimental results, we discuss the underlying erasure mechanisms.

  20. Amorphous Computing

    E-print Network

    Abelson, Hal

    2007-01-01

    The goal of amorphous computing is to identify organizationalprinciples and create programming technologies for obtainingintentional, pre-specified behavior from the cooperation of myriadunreliable parts that are arranged ...

  1. RF sputtering deposited a-IGZO films for LCD alignment layer application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, G. M.; Liu, C. Y.; Sahoo, A. K.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) inorganic films were deposited at a fixed oblique angle using radio-frequency sputtering on indium tin oxide (ITO) glass as alternative alignment layer for liquid crystal displays. A series of experiments have been carried out to reveal the physical characteristics of the a-IGZO films, such as optical transmittance, X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The special treatment a-IGZO films were used to fabricate liquid crystal (LC) cells and investigate the performances of these cells. Pretilt angles were measured with anti-parallel LC cells and voltage-transmittance (V-T) curve, contrast ratio, and response time were evaluated with optically compensated bend (OCB) LC cells. The electro-optical characteristics of the aligned homogenous LCs, and OCB mode cells based on the a-IGZO alignment layer were compared to those based on rubbing processed polyimide (PI). The results showed that the average transmittance in the visible wavelength range was higher than 90% for the a-IGZO alignment layer. The LC pretilt angle has been determined at about 6°. The evaluted cell critical voltage at maximum transmittance was 1.8 V, lower than the control cell using PI alignment layer. The OCB cell rise time and fall time were 1.55 ms and 3.49 ms, respectivly. A very quick response time of 5.04 ms has thus been achived. In addition, the study of V-T characteristics suggested higher contrast ratio for LCD display applications.

  2. Large-scale complementary macroelectronics using hybrid integration of carbon nanotubes and IGZO thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Haitian; Cao, Yu; Zhang, Jialu; Zhou, Chongwu

    2014-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes and metal oxide semiconductors have emerged as important materials for p-type and n-type thin-film transistors, respectively; however, realizing sophisticated macroelectronics operating in complementary mode has been challenging due to the difficulty in making n-type carbon nanotube transistors and p-type metal oxide transistors. Here we report a hybrid integration of p-type carbon nanotube and n-type indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors to achieve large-scale (>1,000 transistors for 501-stage ring oscillators) complementary macroelectronic circuits on both rigid and flexible substrates. This approach of hybrid integration allows us to combine the strength of p-type carbon nanotube and n-type indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors, and offers high device yield and low device variation. Based on this approach, we report the successful demonstration of various logic gates (inverter, NAND and NOR gates), ring oscillators (from 51 stages to 501 stages) and dynamic logic circuits (dynamic inverter, NAND and NOR gates).

  3. Self-aligned top-gate amorphous indium zinc oxide thin-film transistors exceeding low-temperature poly-Si transistor performance.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Chul; Lee, Ho-Nyeon; Im, Seongil

    2013-08-14

    Thin-film transistor (TFT) is a key component of active-matrix flat-panel displays (AMFPDs). These days, the low-temperature poly silicon (LTPS) TFTs are to match with advanced AMFPDs such as the active matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) display, because of their high mobility for fast pixel switching. However, the manufacturing process of LTPS TFT is quite complicated, costly, and scale-limited. Amorphous oxide semiconductor (AOS) TFT technology is another candidate, which is as simple as that of conventioanl amorphous (a)-Si TFTs in fabrication but provides much superior device performances to those of a-Si TFTs. Hence, various AOSs have been compared with LTPS for active channel layer of the advanced TFTs, but have always been found to be relatively inferior to LTPS. In the present work, we clear the persistent inferiority, innovating the device performaces of a-IZO TFT by adopting a self-aligned coplanar top-gate structure and modifying the surface of a-IZO material. Herein, we demonstrate a high-performance simple-processed a-IZO TFT with mobility of ?157 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), SS of ?190 mV dec(-1), and good bias/photostabilities, which overall surpass the performances of high-cost LTPS TFTs. PMID:23823486

  4. Light-extraction enhancement in GaN-based light-emitting diodes using grade-refractive-index amorphous titanium oxide films with porous structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Day-Shan; Lin, Tan-Wei; Huang, Bing-Wen; Juang, Fuh-Shyang; Lei, Po-Hsun; Hu, Chen-Ze

    2009-04-01

    Amorphous titanium oxide (a-TiOx:OH) films prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition at 200 and 25 °C are in turn deposited onto the GaN-based light-emitting diode (LED) to enhance the associated light extraction efficiency. The refractive index, porosity, and photocatalytic effect of the deposited films are correlated strongly with the deposition temperatures. The efficiency is enhanced by a factor of ˜1.31 over that of the uncoated LEDs and exhibited an excellent photocatalytic property after an external UV light irradiation. The increase in the light extraction is related to the reduction in the Fresnel transmission loss and the enhancement of the light scattering into the escape cone by using the graded-refractive-index a-TiOx:OH film with porous structures.

  5. Valence band offset in heterojunctions between crystalline silicon and amorphous silicon (sub)oxides (a-SiO{sub x}:H, 0 < x < 2)

    SciTech Connect

    Liebhaber, M.; Mews, M.; Schulze, T. F.; Korte, L. Rech, B.; Lips, K.

    2015-01-19

    The heterojunction between amorphous silicon (sub)oxides (a-SiO{sub x}:H, 0?4?eV for the a-SiO{sub 2}/c-Si interface, while the electronic quality of the heterointerface deteriorates. High-bandgap a-SiO{sub x}:H is therefore unsuitable for the hole contact in heterojunction solar cells, due to electronic transport hindrance resulting from the large ?E{sub V}. Our method is readily applicable to other heterojunctions.

  6. Characteristics of micro-quantity Sn addition to amorphous indium-zinc-oxide thin films deposited by using DC magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Doyeong; Kim, Minje; Song, Pungkeun

    2015-09-01

    Sn-microdoped indium-zinc-oxide (IZO) films were deposited on glass and polyimide (PI) substrates by using DC magnetron sputtering with single targets with Sn concentrations of 0, 800, and 2000 ppm. The films with a thickness of 50 nm were deposited at room temperature (RT) and then post-annealed at different temperatures (RT-220 °C) in air or vacuum for 1 h. The 800-ppm Sn-doped IZO films post-annealed at 220 °C in vacuum exhibited a relatively low resistivity (3.957 × 10-4 ?·cm) and showed a high transmittance at 550 nm. The transmittance and the resistivity changes induced by post-annealing were similar to those of non-Sn-doped films. Moreover, the mechanical properties were also highly advantageous. Sn-microdoping of amorphous IZO thin films improves their electrical properties and prevents degradation of their mechanical and optical properties at sufficient doping levels.

  7. Crystalline/amorphous tungsten oxide core/shell hierarchical structures and their synergistic effect for optical modulation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, D; Xie, D; Shi, F; Wang, D H; Ge, X; Xia, X H; Wang, X L; Gu, C D; Tu, J P

    2015-12-15

    High-performance electrochromic films with large color contrast and fast switching speed are of great importance for developing advanced smart windows. In this work, crystalline/amorphous WO3 core/shell (c-WO3@a-WO3) nanowire arrays rationally are synthesized by combining hydrothermal and electrodeposition methods. The 1D c-WO3@a-WO3 core/shell hierarchical structures show a synergistic effect for the enhancement of optical modulation, especially in the infrared (IR) region. By optimizing the electrodeposition time of 400s, the core/shell array exhibits a significant optical modulation (70.3% at 750nm, 42.0% at 2000nm and 51.4% at 10?m), fast switching speed (3.5s and 4.8s), high coloration efficiency (43.2cm(2)C(-1) at 750nm) and excellent cycling performance (68.5% after 3000 cycles). The crystalline/amorphous nanostructured film can provide an alternative way for developing high-performance electrochromic materials. PMID:26321573

  8. Enhancement on photocatalytic activity of an amorphous titanium oxide film with nano-textured surface by selective-fluorination etching process

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, Pin-Chun; Huang, Cheng-Hao; Chen, Tai-Hong; Lai, Li-Wen; Lu, Yi-Shan; Liu, Day-Shan

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • The amorphous TiO{sub x} film surface was modified via selective fluorination etching process. • The resulting nano-textured surface markedly enriched the specific surface area and surface acidity. • The photocatalytic activity was comparable to an annealed TiO{sub x} film with anatase structure. - Abstract: A selective-fluorination etching process achieved by an UV light pre-irradiation and the subsequently fluorination etching was developed to enhance the photocatalytic activity of a low-temperature deposited amorphous titanium oxide (a-TiO{sub x}) film. Textured surface on the a-TiO{sub x} films formed by this process were investigated using atomic force microscope and field emission scanning electron microscope. Evidence of the fluorine ions introduced into the a-TiO{sub x} films was examined using Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The etching thickness of the a-TiO{sub x} film was found to be deeply relevant to the film pre-irradiated by the UV light. An a-TiO{sub x} film with nano-textured surface, which was favorable to enlarge the specific surface area, thus was obtainable from the notable etching selectivity of the film pre-irradiated by UV light through a nano-sized mask. In addition, the surface acidity of the a-TiO{sub x} film was enhanced by the formation of the Ti-F chemical bonds originating from the fluorination etching process, which also was functional to facilitate the production of surface OH free radicals. Accordingly, the resulting fluorinated a-TiO{sub x} film with nano-textured surface performed a quality photocatalytic activity comparable to that of the high-temperature achieved TiO{sub x} film with anatase structures.

  9. Controlled aluminum-induced crystallization of an amorphous silicon thin film by using an oxide-layer diffusion barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Ji-Hyun; Kwak, Hyunmin; Kwon, Myeung Hoi

    2014-03-01

    Aluminum-induced crystallization (AIC) of amorphous silicon with an Al2O3 diffusion barrier was investigated for controlling Si crystallization and preventing layer exchange during the annealing process. An Al2O3 layer was deposited between the a-Si and the Al films (a-Si/Al2O3/Al/Glass) and was blasted with an air spray gun with alumina beads to form diffusion channels between the Si and the Al layers. During the annealing process, small grain Si x Al seeds were formed at the channels. Then, the Al2O3 diffusion barrier was restructured to close the channels and prevent further diffusion of Al atoms into the a-Si layer. A polycrystalline Si film with (111), (220) and (311) crystallization peaks in the X-ray diffraction pattern was formed by annealing at 560 °C in a conventional furnace. That film showed a p-type semiconducting behavior with good crystallinity and a large grain size of up to 14.8 µm. No layer conversion occurred between the Si and the Al layers, which had been the fundamental obstacle to the applications in the crystallization of a-Si films by using the AIC method.

  10. High-mobility material research for thin-film transistor with amorphous thallium-zinc-tin oxide semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, Katsushi; Lee, Dong-Hee; Kang, Iljoon; Jeong, Chang-Oh; Ishikawa, Yasuaki; Kong, Hyang-Shik

    2015-10-01

    The applicability of thallium-zinc-tin oxide (TlZnSnO) as a channel material for a thin-film transistor (TFT) was investigated by first-principles simulation and cosputtering experiment with XZnSnO (X = Al, Ga or In). The electron effective mass (m*) of Tl0.4ZnSnO was simulated to be ˜0.153, which is much smaller than that of In0.4ZnSnO (0.246). An In0.4ZnSnO TFT exhibited a mobility (?) of 32.0 cm2 V-1 s-1 in the experiment; therefore, the Tl0.4ZnSnO TFT was expected to have a higher mobility of approximately 50 cm2 V-1 s-1 following the relation (? ? 1/m*). Moreover, the Tl-related oxide semiconductor would provide better TFT stability because its oxide vacancy is more stable than that of an In-related oxide semiconductor.

  11. Electronic Structure of Low-Temperature Solution-Processed Amorphous Metal Oxide Semiconductors for Thin-Film Transistor Applications

    E-print Network

    Socratous, Josephine; Banger, Kulbinder K.; Vaynzof, Yana; Sadhanala, Aditya; Brown, Adam D.; Sepe, Alessandro; Steiner, Ullrich; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2015-02-18

    The electronic structure of low temperature, solution-processed indium–zinc oxide thin-film transistors is complex and remains insufficiently understood. As commonly observed, high device performance with mobility >1 cm2 V?1 s?1 is achievable after...

  12. Electronic Structure of Low-Temperature Solution-Processed Amorphous Metal Oxide Semiconductors for Thin-Film Transistor Applications

    PubMed Central

    Socratous, Josephine; Banger, Kulbinder K; Vaynzof, Yana; Sadhanala, Aditya; Brown, Adam D; Sepe, Alessandro; Steiner, Ullrich; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2015-01-01

    The electronic structure of low temperature, solution-processed indium–zinc oxide thin-film transistors is complex and remains insufficiently understood. As commonly observed, high device performance with mobility >1 cm2 V?1 s?1 is achievable after annealing in air above typically 250 °C but performance decreases rapidly when annealing temperatures ?200 °C are used. Here, the electronic structure of low temperature, solution-processed oxide thin films as a function of annealing temperature and environment using a combination of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, and photothermal deflection spectroscopy is investigated. The drop-off in performance at temperatures ?200 °C to incomplete conversion of metal hydroxide species into the fully coordinated oxide is attributed. The effect of an additional vacuum annealing step, which is beneficial if performed for short times at low temperatures, but leads to catastrophic device failure if performed at too high temperatures or for too long is also investigated. Evidence is found that during vacuum annealing, the workfunction increases and a large concentration of sub-bandgap defect states (re)appears. These results demonstrate that good devices can only be achieved in low temperature, solution-processed oxides if a significant concentration of acceptor states below the conduction band minimum is compensated or passivated by shallow hydrogen and oxygen vacancy-induced donor levels. PMID:26190964

  13. The silicon/zinc oxide interface in amorphous silicon-based thin-film solar cells: Understanding an empirically optimized contact

    SciTech Connect

    Gerlach, D.; Wilks, R. G.; Wimmer, M.; Felix, R.; Gorgoi, M.; Lips, K.; Rech, B.; Wippler, D.; Mueck, A.; Meier, M.; Huepkes, J.; Lozac'h, M.; Ueda, S.; Sumiya, M.; Yoshikawa, H.; Kobayashi, K.; Baer, M.

    2013-07-08

    The electronic structure of the interface between the boron-doped oxygenated amorphous silicon 'window layer' (a-SiO{sub x}:H(B)) and aluminum-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Al) was investigated using hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and compared to that of the boron-doped microcrystalline silicon ({mu}c-Si:H(B))/ZnO:Al interface. The corresponding valence band offsets have been determined to be (-2.87 {+-} 0.27) eV and (-3.37 {+-} 0.27) eV, respectively. A lower tunnel junction barrier height at the {mu}c-Si:H(B)/ZnO:Al interface compared to that at the a-SiO{sub x}:H(B)/ZnO:Al interface is found and linked to the higher device performances in cells where a {mu}c-Si:H(B) buffer between the a-Si:H p-i-n absorber stack and the ZnO:Al contact is employed.

  14. Damage-free back channel wet-etch process in amorphous indium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors using a carbon-nanofilm barrier layer.

    PubMed

    Luo, Dongxiang; Zhao, Mingjie; Xu, Miao; Li, Min; Chen, Zikai; Wang, Lang; Zou, Jianhua; Tao, Hong; Wang, Lei; Peng, Junbiao

    2014-07-23

    Amorphous indium-zinc-oxide thin film transistors (IZO-TFTs) with damage-free back channel wet-etch (BCE) process were investigated. A carbon (C) nanofilm was inserted into the interface between IZO layer and source/drain (S/D) electrodes as a barrier layer. Transmittance electron microscope images revealed that the 3 nm-thick C nanofilm exhibited a good corrosion resistance to a commonly used H3PO4-based etchant and could be easily eliminated. The TFT device with a 3 nm-thick C barrier layer showed a saturated field effect mobility of 14.4 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), a subthreshold swing of 0.21 V/decade, an on-to-off current ratio of 8.3 × 10(10), and a threshold voltage of 2.0 V. The favorable electrical performance of this kind of IZO-TFTs was due to the protection of the inserted C to IZO layer in the back-channel-etch process. Moreover, the low contact resistance of the devices was proved to be due to the graphitization of the C nanofilms after annealing. In addition, the hysteresis and thermal stress testing confirmed that the usage of C barrier nanofilms is an effective method to fabricate the damage-free BCE-type devices with high reliability. PMID:24969359

  15. Using amorphous manganese oxide for remediation of smelter-polluted soils: a pH-dependent long-term stability study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettler, Vojtech; Tomasova, Zdenka; Komarek, Michael; Mihaljevic, Martin; Sebek, Ondrej

    2015-04-01

    In soil systems, manganese (Mn) oxides are commonly found to be powerful sorbents of metals and metalloids and are thus potentially useful in soil remediation. A novel amorphous manganese oxide (AMO) and a Pb smelter-polluted agricultural soil amended with the AMO and incubated for 2 and 6 months were subjected to a pH-static leaching procedure (pH = 3 - 8) to verify the chemical stabilization effect on metals and metalloids. The AMO stability in pure water was pH-dependent with the highest Mn release at pH 3 (47% dissolved) and the lowest at pH 8 (0.14% dissolved). Secondary rhodochrosite (MnCO3) was formed at the AMO surfaces at pH > 5. The AMO dissolved significantly less after 6 months of incubation. Sequential extraction analysis indicated that "labile" fraction of As, Pb and Sb in soil significantly decreased after AMO amendment. The pH-static experiments indicated that no effect on leaching was observed for Cd and Zn after AMO treatments, whereas the leaching of As, Cu, Pb and Sb decreased down to 20%, 35%, 7% and 11% of the control, respectively. The remediation efficiency was more pronounced under acidic conditions and the time of incubation generally led to increased retention of the targeted contaminants. The AMO was found to be a promising agent for the chemical stabilization of polluted soils and other in situ applications need to be evaluated. This study was supported by the Czech Science Foundation (GA?R 15-07117S).

  16. Ultra-flexible, "invisible" thin-film transistors enabled by amorphous metal oxide/polymer channel layer blends.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xinge; Zeng, Li; Zhou, Nanjia; Guo, Peijun; Shi, Fengyuan; Buchholz, Donald B; Ma, Q; Yu, Junsheng; Dravid, Vinayak P; Chang, Robert P H; Bedzyk, Michael; Marks, Tobin J; Facchetti, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Ultra-flexible and transparent metal oxide transistors are developed by doping In2 O3 films with poly(vinylphenole) (PVP). By adjusting the In2 O3 :PVP weight ratio, crystallization is frustrated, and conducting pathways for efficient charge transport are maintained. In2 O3 :5%PVP-based transistors exhibit mobilities approaching 11 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) before, and retain up to ca. 90% performance after 100 bending/relaxing cycles at a radius of 10 mm. PMID:25712894

  17. Transparent conducting oxide contacts for n-i-p and p-i-n amorphous silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hegedus, S.S.; Buchanan, W.A.; Eser, E.; Phillips, J.E.; Shafarman, W.N. |

    1997-02-01

    We investigate the effect of sputtered transparent conducting oxide (TCO) contacts on the device performance of ss/n-i-p/TCO and glass/SnO {sub 2}/p-i-n/TCO/Ag solar cells. TCO materials ITO and ZnO are compared, and found to have very similar transparency at the same sheet resistance. Sputtering ZnO with O{sub 2} in the Ar reduces FF for ss/n-i-p/ZnO devices, compared to sputtering without O{sub 2}. This is attributed to an interface not bulk effect. Sputtering ITO with O{sub 2} on the same devices increases J{sub SC} due to higher ITO transparency, compared to sputtering without O{sub 2} , but has no effect on FF. Based on curvature in the J(V) curve around V{sub OC}, the ZnO/p layer contact appears to be non-ohmic. For p-i-n/TCO/Ag devices, {mu}c-Si n-layers have much higher V{sub OC}, J{sub SC}, and FF for all variations of TCO/Ag back reflectors compared to an a-Si n-layer. Devices with ITO/Ag have lower V{sub OC} and J{sub SC} compared to devices with ZnO/Ag. Sputtering ZnO with O{sub 2} has no detrimental effect on devices with {mu}c-Si n-layers but severely reduces FF in devices with a-Si n-layers. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Dc Conduction Mechanisms in Amorphous Thin Films of Mixed Oxides In2O3-SnO2 System Deposited by Co-Evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar, M.; Siddiqi, S. A.; Ghauri, I. M.

    A discussion of dc conduction mechanisms in thermally co-evaporated amorphous thin films of Al-In2O3-SnO2-Al structure is presented. Composition (in molar %), film thickness, substrate temperature, and post deposition annealing have profound effects on the electrical properties of the films. The effects of temperature on the I-V characteristics and electrical conductivity of Al-In2O3-SnO2-Al structure are also reported. The values of dielectric constants estimated by capacitance measurements suggest that high-field conduction mechanism is predominantly of Poole-Frenkel type. At low temperature and low field the electron hopping process dominates but at higher temperature the conduction takes place by transport in the extended states (free-band conduction). The transition from hopping to free band conduction is due to overlapping of localized levels and the free band. The increase in the formation of ionized donors with increase in temperature during electrical measurements indicates that electronic part of the conductivity is higher than the ionic part. The initial increase in conductivity with increase in Sn content in In2O3 lattice is caused by the Sn atom substitution of In atom, giving out one extra electron. The decrease in electrical conductivity above the critical Sn content (10 mol % SnO2) is caused by the defects formed by Sn atoms, which act as carrier traps rather than electron donors. The increase in electrical conductivity with film thickness is caused by the increase in free carriers density, which is generated by oxygen vacancy acting as two electrons donor. The increase in conductivity with substrate temperature and annealing is due either to the severe deficiency of oxygen, which deteriorates the film properties and reduces the mobility of the carriers or to the diffusion of Sn atoms from interstitial locations into the In cation sites and formation of indium species of lower valence state so that the In3+ oxidation state may be changed to the In2+ oxidation state.

  19. The effect of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} addition on the crystallization of amorphous TiO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} mixed oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Mao Dongsen Lu Guanzhong

    2007-02-15

    The effect of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} addition on the crystallization of amorphous TiO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} mixed oxide was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG/DTA). TiO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} mixed oxide was prepared by co-precipitation method with aqueous ammonia as the precipitation reagent. Boric acid was used as a source of boria, and boria contents varied from 2 to 20 wt%. The results indicate that the addition of small amount of boria (<8 wt%) hinders the crystallization of amorphous TiO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} into a crystalline ZrTiO{sub 4} compound, while a larger amount of boria ({>=}8 wt%) promotes the crystallization process. FT-IR spectroscopy and {sup 11}B MAS NMR results show that tetrahedral borate species predominate at low boria loading, and trigonal borate species increase with increasing boria loading. Thus it is concluded that highly dispersed tetrahedral BO{sub 4} units delay, while a build-up of trigonal BO{sub 3} promote, the crystallization of amorphous TiO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} to form ZrTiO{sub 4} crystals. - Graphical abstract: The addition of small amount of boria (<8 wt%) hinders the crystallization of amorphous TiO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} into a crystalline ZrTiO{sub 4} compound, while the larger amount of boria ({>=}8 wt%) promotes the crystallization process.

  20. Low-temperature photo-activated inorganic electron transport layers for flexible inverted polymer solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Wook; Lee, Soo-Hyoung; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Park, Sung Kyu

    2014-09-01

    A simple and versatile route of forming sol-gel-derived metal oxide n-type electron transport layers (ETLs) for flexible inverted polymer solar cells (PSCs) is proposed using low-temperature photochemical activation process. The photochemical activation, which is induced by deep ultraviolet irradiation on sol-gel films, allows formation of metal oxide n-type ETLs such as zinc oxide (ZnO) and indium gallium zinc oxide films at a low temperature. Compared to poly(3-hexylthiophene)/phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester inverted PSCs with thermally annealed ZnO ETLs (optimized efficiency of 3.26 ± 0.03 %), the inverted PSCs with photo-activated ZnO ETLs showed an improved efficiency of 3.60 ± 0.02 %. The enhanced photovoltaic property is attributed to efficient charge collection from low overall series resistance and high surface area-to-geometric area ratio by the photo-activated ZnO ETLs.

  1. Amorphous metal composites

    DOEpatents

    Byrne, Martin A. (Troy, NY); Lupinski, John H. (Scotia, NY)

    1984-01-01

    An improved amorphous metal composite and process of making the composite. The amorphous metal composite comprises amorphous metal (e.g. iron) and a low molecular weight thermosetting polymer binder. The process comprises placing an amorphous metal in particulate form and a thermosetting polymer binder powder into a container, mixing these materials, and applying heat and pressure to convert the mixture into an amorphous metal composite.

  2. Fully transparent and rollable electronics.

    PubMed

    Mativenga, Mallory; Geng, Di; Kim, Byungsoon; Jang, Jin

    2015-01-28

    Major obstacles toward the manufacture of transparent and flexible display screens include the difficulty of finding transparent and flexible semiconductors and electrodes, temperature restrictions of flexible plastic substrates, and bulging or warping of the flexible electronics during processing. Here we report the fabrication and performance of fully transparent and rollable thin-film transistor (TFT) circuits for display applications. The TFTs employ an amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide semiconductor (with optical band gap of 3.1 eV) and amorphous indium-zinc oxide transparent conductive electrodes, and are built on 15-?m-thick solution-processed colorless polyimide (CPI), resulting in optical transmittance >70% in the visible range. As the CPI supports processing temperatures >300 °C, TFT performance on plastic is similar to that on glass, with typical field-effect mobility, turn-on voltage, and subthreshold voltage swing of 12.7 ± 0.5 cm(2)/V·s, -1.7 ± 0.2 V, and 160 ± 29 mV/dec, respectively. There is no significant degradation after rolling the TFTs 100 times on a cylinder with a radius of 4 mm or when shift registers, each consisting of 40 TFTs, are operated while bent to a radius of 2 mm. For handling purposes, carrier glass is used during fabrication, together with a very thin (?1 nm) solution-processed carbon nanotube (CNT)/graphene oxide (GO) backbone that is first spin-coated on the glass to decrease adhesion of the CPI to the glass; peel strength of the CPI from glass decreases from 0.43 to 0.10 N/cm, which eases the process of detachment performed after device fabrication. Given that the CNT/GO remains embedded under the CPI after detachment, it minimizes wrinkling and decreases the substrate's tensile elongation from 8.0% to 4.6%. Device performance is also stable under electrostatic discharge exposures up to 10 kV, as electrostatic charge can be released via the conducting CNTs. PMID:25526282

  3. Highly spectrum-selective ultraviolet photodetector based on p-NiO/n-IGZO thin film heterojunction structure.

    PubMed

    Li, H K; Chen, T P; Hu, S G; Li, X D; Liu, Y; Lee, P S; Wang, X P; Li, H Y; Lo, G Q

    2015-10-19

    Ultraviolet photodetector with p-n heterojunction is fabricated by magnetron sputtering deposition of n-type indium gallium zinc oxide (n-IGZO) and p-type nickel oxide (p-NiO) thin films on ITO glass. The performance of the photodetector is largely affected by the conductivity of the p-NiO thin film, which can be controlled by varying the oxygen partial pressure during the deposition of the p-NiO thin film. A highly spectrum-selective ultraviolet photodetector has been achieved with the p-NiO layer with a high conductivity. The results can be explained in terms of the "optically-filtering" function of the NiO layer. PMID:26480430

  4. Light Response of Top Gate InGaZnO Thin Film Transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang-Hee Ko; Ryu, Minki; Yoon, Sung Min; Yang, Shinhyuk; Hwang, Chi-Sun; Jeon, Jae-Hong; Kim, Kyounghwan

    2011-03-01

    The light stability of top gate indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO) thin film transistor (TFT) has been investigated under gate bias and constant current stress to explore the possibility of active matrix display applications. While the halogen lamp irradiation onto the device under positive gate bias stress caused just -0.18 V of threshold voltage shift (?Vth), it resulted in -15.1 V shift under negative gate bias stress. When the white light extracted from the halogen lamp of 100 µW/cm2 power illuminated the device under constant current stress, operation voltage shifted just -0.05 V for 21 h. The result shows good promise for the application of highly stable IGZO TFT to active matrix organic light emitting diodes (AMOLEDs).

  5. Rapid preparation of solution-processed InGaZnO thin films by microwave annealing and photoirradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheong, Heajeong; Ogura, Shintaro; Ushijima, Hirobumi; Yoshida, Manabu; Fukuda, Nobuko; Uemura, Sei

    2015-06-01

    We fabricated solution-processed indium-gallium-zinc oxide (IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs) by microwave (MW) annealing an IGZO precursor film followed by irradiating with vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light. MW annealing allows more rapid heating of the precursor film than conventional annealing processes using a hot plate or electric oven and promotes the crystallization of IGZO. VUV irradiation was used to reduce the duration and temperature of the post-annealing step. Consequently, the IGZO TFTs fabricated through MW annealing for 5 min and VUV irradiation for 1 min exhibited an on/off current ratio of 108 and a field-effect mobility of 0.3 cm2 V-1 s-1. These results indicate that MW annealing and photoirradiation is an effective combination for annealing solution processed IGZO precursor films to prepare the semiconductor layers of TFTs.

  6. Improvement of electrical performance of InGaZnO/HfSiO TFTs with 248-nm excimer laser annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hau-Yuan; Wang, Shui-Jinn; Wu, Chien-Hung; Lu, Chien-Yuan

    2014-09-01

    The influence of 248-nm KrF excimer laser annealing (ELA) with energy density between 0 and 400 mJ/cm2 on the electrical behavior of indium gallium zinc oxide (InGaZnO) thin-film transistors (TFTs) is investigated. The experimental results show that the saturation mobility and subthreshold swing are improved from 12.4 cm2/Vs and 100 mV/dec without ELA to 17.8 cm2/Vs and 75 mV/dec, respectively, by applying a 300 mJ/cm2 laser pulse after the source/drain deposition, while maintaining an almost unchanged turn-off voltage. Such improvements are attributed to the increase in the oxygen vacancies and reduction in the bulk traps in the InGaZnO channel.

  7. Theory of amorphous ices

    PubMed Central

    Limmer, David T.; Chandler, David

    2014-01-01

    We derive a phase diagram for amorphous solids and liquid supercooled water and explain why the amorphous solids of water exist in several different forms. Application of large-deviation theory allows us to prepare such phases in computer simulations. Along with nonequilibrium transitions between the ergodic liquid and two distinct amorphous solids, we establish coexistence between these two amorphous solids. The phase diagram we predict includes a nonequilibrium triple point where two amorphous phases and the liquid coexist. Whereas the amorphous solids are long-lived and slowly aging glasses, their melting can lead quickly to the formation of crystalline ice. Further, melting of the higher density amorphous solid at low pressures takes place in steps, transitioning to the lower-density glass before accessing a nonequilibrium liquid from which ice coarsens. PMID:24858957

  8. Uranium incorporation into amorphous silica.

    PubMed

    Massey, Michael S; Lezama-Pacheco, Juan S; Nelson, Joey M; Fendorf, Scott; Maher, Kate

    2014-01-01

    High concentrations of uranium are commonly observed in naturally occurring amorphous silica (including opal) deposits, suggesting that incorporation of U into amorphous silica may represent a natural attenuation mechanism and promising strategy for U remediation. However, the stability of uranium in opaline silicates, determined in part by the binding mechanism for U, is an important factor in its long-term fate. U may bind directly to the opaline silicate matrix, or to materials such as iron (hydr)oxides that are subsequently occluded within the opal. Here, we examine the coordination environment of U within opaline silica to elucidate incorporation mechanisms. Precipitates (with and without ferrihydrite inclusions) were synthesized from U-bearing sodium metasilicate solutions, buffered at pH ? 5.6. Natural and synthetic solids were analyzed with X-ray absorption spectroscopy and a suite of other techniques. In synthetic amorphous silica, U was coordinated by silicate in a double corner-sharing coordination geometry (Si at ? 3.8-3.9 Å) and a small amount of uranyl and silicate in a bidentate, mononuclear (edge-sharing) coordination (Si at ? 3.1-3.2 Å, U at ? 3.8-3.9 Å). In iron-bearing synthetic solids, U was adsorbed to iron (hydr)oxide, but the coordination environment also contained silicate in both edge-sharing and corner-sharing coordination. Uranium local coordination in synthetic solids is similar to that of natural U-bearing opals that retain U for millions of years. The stability and extent of U incorporation into opaline and amorphous silica represents a long-term repository for U that may provide an alternative strategy for remediation of U contamination. PMID:24984107

  9. Comparison of structural and electrical properties of Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Lu{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} gate dielectrics for ?-InGaZnO thin-film transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Tung-Ming Chen, Ching-Hung; Her, Jim-Long; Koyama, Keiichi

    2014-11-21

    We compared the structural properties and electrical characteristics of high-? Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Lu{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} gate dielectrics for amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide (?-InGaZnO) thin-film transistor (TFT) applications. The Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3} film has a strong Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3} (400) peak in the X-ray diffraction pattern, while the Lu{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} sample shows a relatively weak Lu{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} (102) peak. Atomic force microscopy reveals that the Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3} dielectric exhibits a rougher surface (about three times) than Lu{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} one. In X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, we found that the intensity of the O 1s peak corresponding to Lu(OH){sub x} for Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3} film was higher than that of Lu{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} film. Furthermore, compared with the Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3} dielectric, the ?-InGaZnO TFT using the Lu{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} gate dielectric exhibited a lower threshold voltage (from 0.43 to 0.25?V), a higher I{sub on}/I{sub off} current ratio (from 3.5?×?10{sup 6} to 1.3?×?10{sup 8}), a smaller subthreshold swing (from 276 to 130?mV/decade), and a larger field-effect mobility (from 14.5 to 24.4?cm{sup 2}/V s). These results are probably due to the incorporation of TiO{sub x} into the Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3} film to form a Lu{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} structure featuring a smooth surface, a low moisture absorption, a high dielectric constant, and a low interface state density at the oxide/channel interface. Furthermore, the stability of Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Lu{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} ?-InGaZnO TFTs was investigated under positive gate-bias stress (PGBS) and negative gate-bias stress (NGBS). The threshold voltage of the TFT performed under NGBS is more degradation than that under PGBS. This behavior may be attributed to the electron charge trapping at the dielectric–channel interface under PGBS, whereas the oxygen vacancies occurred in the InGaZnO under NGBS.

  10. Performance enhancement of n-channel inversion type In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor using ex situ deposited thin amorphous silicon layer

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnet, A. M.; Hinkle, C. L.; Jivani, M. N.; Chapman, R. A.; Pollack, G. P.; Wallace, R. M.; Vogel, E. M.

    2008-09-22

    Significant enhancement in metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) transport characteristics is achieved with In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As (x=0.53, x=0.20) channel material using ex situ plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposited amorphous Si layer. In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As MOSFETs (L=2 {mu}m, V{sub gs}-V{sub t}=2.0 V) with Si interlayer show a maximum drain current of 290 mA/mm (x=0.53) and 2 {mu}A/mm (x=0.20), which are much higher compared to devices without a Si interlayer. However, charge pumping measurements show a lower average interface state density near the intrinsic Fermi level for devices without the silicon interlayer indicating that a reduction in the midgap interface state density is not responsible for the improved transport characteristics.

  11. Tritium in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Sidhu, L.S.; Kosteski, T.; O`Leary, S.K.; Gaspari, F.; Zukotynski, S.; Kherani, N.P.; Shmadya, W.

    1996-12-31

    Preliminary results on infrared and luminescence measurements of tritium incorporated amorphous silicon are reported. Tritium is an unstable isotope that readily substitutes hydrogen in the amorphous silicon network. Due to its greater mass, bonded tritium is found to introduce new stretching modes in the infrared spectrum. Inelastic collisions between the beta particles, produced as a result of tritium decay, and the amorphous silicon network, results in the generation of excess electron-hole pairs. Radiative recombination of these carriers is observed.

  12. Nanocrystal dispersed amorphous alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perepezko, John H. (Inventor); Allen, Donald R. (Inventor); Foley, James C. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Compositions and methods for obtaining nanocrystal dispersed amorphous alloys are described. A composition includes an amorphous matrix forming element (e.g., Al or Fe); at least one transition metal element; and at least one crystallizing agent that is insoluble in the resulting amorphous matrix. During devitrification, the crystallizing agent causes the formation of a high density nanocrystal dispersion. The compositions and methods provide advantages in that materials with superior properties are provided.

  13. Testing of flexible InGaZnO-based thin-film transistors under mechanical strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Münzenrieder, N. S.; Cherenack, K. H.; Tröster, G.

    2011-08-01

    Thin-film transistors (TFTs) fabricated on flexible plastic substrates are an integral part of future flexible large-area electronic devices like displays and smart textiles. Devices for such applications require stable electrical performance under electrical stress and also during applied mechanical stress induced by bending of the flexible substrate. Mechanical stress can be tensile or compressive strain depending on whether the TFT is located outside or inside of the bending plane. Especially the impact of compressive bending on TFT performance is hard to measure, because the device is covered with the substrate in this case. We present a method which allows us to continuously measure the electrical performance parameters of amorphous Indium-Gallium-Zinc Oxide (a-IGZO) based TFTs exposed to arbitrary compressive and tensile bending radii. To measure the influence of strain on a TFT it is attached and electrically connected to a flexible carrier foil, which afterwards is fastened to two plates in our bending tester. The bending radius can be adjusted by changing the distance between these plates. Thus it is possible to apply bending radii in the range between a totally flat substrate and ?1 mm, corresponding to a strain of ?3.5%. The tested bottom-gate TFTs are especially designed for use with our bending tester and fabricated on 50 ?m thick flexible Kapton® E polyimide substrates. To show the different application areas of our bending method we characterized our TFTs while they are bent to different tensile and compressive bending radii. These measurements show that the field effect mobilities and threshold voltages of the tested a-IGZO TFTs are nearly, but not absolutely, stable under applied strain, compared to the initial values the mobilities shift by ?3.5% in the tensile case and ?-1.5% in the compressive one, at a bending radius of 8 mm. We also measured the influence of repeated bending (2500 cycles over ?70 h), where a shift of the performance parameters can be observed, too. The saturation mobility of the flat device decreases by 4.5%, and the threshold voltage raises 0.1 V. These results show that it is possible to characterize the influence of different kinds of bending on flexible thin-film devices in a very reliable way with one experimental setup.

  14. Osseointegration of bioactive microarc oxidized amorphous phase/TiO2 nanocrystals composited coatings on titanium after implantation into rabbit tibia.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Rui; Wei, Daqing; Yang, Haoyue; Cheng, Su; Feng, Wei; Li, Baoqiang; Wang, Yaming; Jia, Dechang; Zhou, Yu

    2014-05-01

    The amorphous phase/TiO2 nanocrystals (APTN) composited coatings were prepared on Ti implants for biomedical applications. The Ti implants without and with the APTN composited coatings both do not cause any adverse effects after implantation into the rabbit tibia. The osseointegration of Ti implants after covering the APTN coatings is improved pronouncedly, greatly increasing the interface bonding strength between the implants and newly formed bones. In addition, it is interesting that the newly formed bone tissues appear in the micro-pores of the APTN coatings, promoting the interface bonding between the implants and new bones by the mechanical interlock. Moreover, the Ti implant with the APTN coatings formed at higher applied voltage exhibit higher shear strength and displacement during the pushing out experiment probably due to its better osseointegration. PMID:24481533

  15. Innovative solid oxide fuel cells based on BaIn0.3Ti0.7O2.85 electrolyte and La2Mo2O9 amorphous reduced phase as anode material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buvat, Gaëtan; Quarez, Eric; Joubert, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    This article presents elaboration of electrolyte-supported solid oxide fuel cells based on the oxide ion conductor BaIn0.3Ti0.7O2.85 (BIT07) as electrolyte, the amorphous reduced phase of La2Mo2O9 (La2Mo2O7-y) as anode which presents a mixed ionic and electronic conduction in low pO2 and La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3-? (LSCF) as cathode. Electrode materials have been deposited by screen-printing on BIT07 substrate. In order to avoid chemical reactivity between BIT07 and La2Mo2O9, a thin layer of Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95 (CGO) has been used. Electrochemical performance of the single cell has been characterized by I-V measurements and impedance spectroscopy. Encouraging performance of 40 mW cm-2 at 700 °C is obtained with a thick electrolyte layer. Finally, ageing test of the cell at 700 °C during 800 h has been done with a low rate of performance loss of 4.4 × 10-3% h-1. No degradation of the electrolyte material is reported and stability of the anode material after operating the fuel cell is discussed.

  16. Electronic origin of the conductivity imbalance between covalent and ionic amorphous semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Hui-Xiong; Wei, Su-Huai; Li, Shu-Shen; Li, Jingbo; Walsh, Aron

    2013-03-01

    Amorphous semiconductors are known to give rise to greatly reduced conductivity relative to their crystalline counterparts, which makes the recent development of amorphous oxide semiconductors with high electron mobility unexpected. Using first-principles molecular dynamics and electronic structure simulations, we have analyzed the electronic and optical properties of covalent and ionic oxide amorphous semiconductors. We observe that in covalent systems, amorphization introduces deep defect states inside the gap, resulting in a substantial deterioration of electrical conductivity. In contrast, in ionic systems, such as the transparent conducting oxide ZnO, amorphization does not create deep carrier-recombination centers, so the oxides still exhibit good conductivity and visible transparency relative to the crystalline phases. The origin of the conductivity imbalance between covalent and ionic amorphous semiconductors can be explained using a band coupling mechanism.

  17. Superior radiation tolerant materials: Amorphous silicon oxycarbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastasi, Michael; Su, Qing; Price, Lloyd; Colón Santana, Juan A.; Chen, Tianyi; Balerio, Robert; Shao, Lin

    2015-06-01

    We studied the radiation tolerance of amorphous silicon oxycarbide (SiOC) alloys by combining ion irradiation, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The amorphous SiOC alloys thin films were grown via co-sputtering from SiO2 and SiC (amorphous phase) targets either on a surface oxidized Si (100) substrate or on a sodium chloride substrate. By controlling the sputtering rate of each target, SiOC alloys with different compositions (1:2, 1:1, 2:1 ratios) were obtained. These alloys were irradiated by 100 keV He+ ions at both room temperature and 600 °C with damage levels ranging from 1 to 20 displacements per atom (dpa). TEM characterization shows no sign of crystallization, void formation or segregation in all irradiated samples. Our findings suggest that SiOC alloys are a class of promising radiation-tolerant materials.

  18. Fabrication of solution-processed amorphous indium zinc oxide thin-film transistors at low temperatures using deep-UV irradiation under wet conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jee Ho; Chae, Soo Sang; Yoo, Young Bum; Lee, Ji Hoon; Lee, Tae Il; Baik, Hong Koo

    2014-03-01

    We fabricated solution-processed indium zinc oxide (IZO) thin film transistors (TFTs) at annealing temperatures as low as 250 °C using deep UV (DUV) irradiation in water vapor medium. The DUV light decomposed the carbon compounds in the IZO films, and the hydroxyl radicals generated when water vapor reacted with ozone effectively oxidized the films. These phenomena were confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Finally, we fabricated DUV-treated IZO TFTs in water-vapor medium at 250 °C with a mobility of 1.2 cm2/Vs and an on/off current ratio of 2.66 × 106.

  19. Hydrogen in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Peercy, P. S.

    1980-01-01

    The structural aspects of amorphous silicon and the role of hydrogen in this structure are reviewed with emphasis on ion implantation studies. In amorphous silicon produced by Si ion implantation of crystalline silicon, the material reconstructs into a metastable amorphous structure which has optical and electrical properties qualitatively similar to the corresponding properties in high-purity evaporated amorphous silicon. Hydrogen studies further indicate that these structures will accomodate less than or equal to 5 at.% hydrogen and this hydrogen is bonded predominantly in a monohydride (SiH/sub 1/) site. Larger hydrogen concentrations than this can be achieved under certain conditions, but the excess hydrogen may be attributed to defects and voids in the material. Similarly, glow discharge or sputter deposited amorphous silicon has more desirable electrical and optical properties when the material is prepared with low hydrogen concentration and monohydride bonding. Results of structural studies and hydrogen incorporation in amorphous silicon were discussed relative to the different models proposed for amorphous silicon.

  20. Ferromagnetic bulk amorphous alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Akihisa; Takeuchi, Akira; Zhang, T.

    1998-07-01

    This article reviews the authors recent results on the development of ferromagnetic bulk amorphous alloys prepared by casting processes. The multicomponent Fe-(Al,Ga)-(P,C,B,Si) alloys are amorphized in the bulk form with diameters up to 2 mm, and the temperature interval of the supercooled liquid region before crystallization is in the range of 50 to 67 K. These bulk amorphous alloys exhibit good soft magnetic properties, i.e., high B{sub s} of 1.1 to 1.2 T, low H{sub c} of 2 to 6 A/m, and high {mu}{sub e} of about 7,000 at 1 kHz. The Nd-Fe-Al and Pr-Fe-Al bulk amorphous alloys are also produced in the diameter range of up to 12 mm by the copper mold casting process and exhibit rather good hard magnetic properties, i.e., B{sub r} of about 0.1 T, high H{sub c} of 300 to 400 kA/m, and rather high (JH){sub max} of 13 to 20 kJ/m{sup 3}. The crystallization causes the disappearance of the hard magnetic properties. Furthermore, the melt-spun Nd-Fe-Al and Pr-Fe-Al alloy ribbons exhibit soft-type magnetic properties. Consequently, the hard magnetic properties are concluded to be obtained only for the bulk amorphous alloys. The Nd- and Pr-based bulk amorphous alloys can be regarded as a new type of clustered amorphous material, and the control of the clustered amorphous structure is expected to enable the appearance of novel functional properties which cannot be obtained for an ordinary amorphous structure.

  1. Amorphous Medium Language

    E-print Network

    Beal, Jacob

    Programming reliable behavior on a large mesh network composed of unreliable parts is difficult. Amorphous Medium Language addresses this problem by abstracting robustness and networking issues away from the programmer via ...

  2. Amorphous diamond films

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, S.

    1998-06-09

    Amorphous diamond films having a significant reduction in intrinsic stress are prepared by biasing a substrate to be coated and depositing carbon ions thereon under controlled temperature conditions. 1 fig.

  3. Amorphous metal alloy

    DOEpatents

    Wang, R.; Merz, M.D.

    1980-04-09

    Amorphous metal alloys of the iron-chromium and nickel-chromium type have excellent corrosion resistance and high temperature stability and are suitable for use as a protective coating on less corrosion resistant substrates. The alloys are stabilized in the amorphous state by one or more elements of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The alloy is preferably prepared by sputter deposition.

  4. Nanopillar arrays of amorphous carbon nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sai Krishna, Katla; Pavan Kumar, B. V. V. S.; Eswaramoorthy, Muthusamy

    2011-07-01

    Nanopillar arrays of amorphous carbon nitride have been prepared using anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane as a template. The amine groups present on the surface of these nanopillars were exploited for functionalization with oleic acid in order to stabilize the nanostructure at the aqueous-organic interface and also for the immobilization of metal nanoparticles and protein. These immobilised nanoparticles were found to have good catalytic activity.

  5. Formation of amorphous materials

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, William L. (Pasadena, CA); Schwarz, Ricardo B. (Westmont, IL)

    1986-01-01

    Metastable amorphous or fine crystalline materials are formed by solid state reactions by diffusion of a metallic component into a solid compound or by diffusion of a gas into an intermetallic compound. The invention can be practiced on layers of metals deposited on an amorphous substrate or by intermixing powders with nucleating seed granules. All that is required is that the diffusion of the first component into the second component be much faster than the self-diffusion of the first component. The method is practiced at a temperature below the temperature at which the amorphous phase transforms into one or more crystalline phases and near or below the temperature at which the ratio of the rate of diffusion of the first component to the rate of self-diffusion is at least 10.sup.4. This anomalous diffusion criteria is found in many binary, tertiary and higher ordered systems of alloys and appears to be found in all alloy systems that form amorphous materials by rapid quenching. The method of the invention can totally convert much larger dimensional materials to amorphous materials in practical periods of several hours or less.

  6. Crystalline amorphous semiconductor superlattice.

    PubMed

    Chong, T C; Shi, L P; Wei, X Q; Zhao, R; Lee, H K; Yang, P; Du, A Y

    2008-04-01

    A new class of superlattice, crystalline amorphous superlattice (CASL), by alternatively depositing two semiconductor materials, is proposed. CASL displays three states depending on the component materials' phase: both polycrystalline phases, both amorphous phases, and one polycrystalline phase while another amorphous phase. Using materials capable of reversible phase transition, CASL can demonstrate reversibility among three states. GeTe/Sb(2)Te(3) CASL has been synthesized and proved by x-ray reflectometry and TEM results. The reversible transition among three states induced by electrical and laser pulse was observed. The changes in the optical absorption edge, electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity, and crystallization temperature as a function of layer thickness are interpreted as quantum or nanoeffects. The unique properties of CASL enable the design of materials with specific properties. PMID:18517969

  7. Structural Amorphous Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z. P.; Liu, C. T.; Thompson, J. R.; Porter, W. D.

    2004-06-01

    Recent advancement in bulk metallic glasses, whose properties are usually superior to their crystalline counterparts, has stimulated great interest in fabricating bulk amorphous steels. While a great deal of effort has been devoted to this field, the fabrication of structural amorphous steels with large cross sections has remained an alchemist’s dream because of the limited glass-forming ability (GFA) of these materials. Here we report the discovery of structural amorphous steels that can be cast into glasses with large cross-section sizes using conventional drop-casting methods. These new steels showed interesting physical, magnetic, and mechanical properties, along with high thermal stability. The underlying mechanisms for the superior GFA of these materials are discussed.

  8. Enhanced photo-Fenton degradation of rhodamine B using graphene oxide-amorphous FePO? as effective and stable heterogeneous catalyst.

    PubMed

    Guo, Sheng; Zhang, Gaoke; Yu, Jimmy C

    2015-06-15

    A series of graphene oxide (GO)-FePO4 composites with different GO weight ratios (2.5%, 5%, 10%, w/w) were prepared using a simple precipitation process and were firstly used as heterogeneous photo-Fenton catalysts. FESEM images prove the loose structure of the 5GO-FePO4 composite. UV-vis analysis demonstrates that the introduction of GO could enhance solar energy utilization of the composites. Under visible light irradiation, the degradation rate of rhodamine B (RhB) by the 5GO-FePO4 composite was 2.87 times more than that by the pure FePO4 in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The composite was highly effective for the degradation of RhB in a wide pH range of 2.18-10.40 with negligible iron leaching. Moreover, the composite still showed high catalytic activity after six cycles, which makes it a promising heterogeneous catalyst for wastewater treatment. The introduction of GO promotes the photo-Fenton reaction of GO-FePO4 via three roles: offering more active sites, increasing adsorption capacity and accelerating the Fe(3+)/Fe(2+) cycle by improving the utilization of solar energy. Our work may provide new insights for the development of new effective heterogeneous photo-Fenton catalyst. PMID:25768888

  9. Pulsed direct flame deposition and thermal annealing of transparent amorphous indium zinc oxide films as active layers in field effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Kilian, Daniel; Polster, Sebastian; Vogeler, Isabell; Jank, Michael P M; Frey, Lothar; Peukert, Wolfgang

    2014-08-13

    Indium-zinc oxide (IZO) films were deposited via flame spray pyrolysis (FSP) by pulsewise shooting a Si/SiO2 substrate directly into the combustion area of the flame. Based on UV-vis measurements of thin-films deposited on glass substrates, the optimal deposition parameters with respect to low haze values and film thicknesses of around 100 nm were determined. Thermal annealing of the deposited films at temperatures between 300 and 700 °C was carried out and staggered bottom gate thin-film transistors (TFT) were fabricated. The thin films were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, and room-temperature photoluminescence measurements. The outcome of these investigations lead to two major requirements in order to implement a working TFT: (i) organic residues from the deposition process need to be removed and (ii) the net free charge carrier concentration has to be minimized by controlling the trap states in the semiconductor. The optimal annealing temperature was 300 °C as both requirements are fulfilled best in this case. This leads to field effect transistors with a low hysteresis, a saturation mobility of ?Sat = 0.1 cm(2)/(V s), a threshold voltage of Vth = -18.9 V, and an Ion/Ioff ratio on the order of 10(7). Depending on thermal treatment, the defect density changes significantly strongly influencing the transfer characteristics of the device. PMID:25029269

  10. Amorphous silicon photovoltaic devices

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.; Lin, Guang H.; Ganguly, Gautam

    2004-08-31

    This invention is a photovoltaic device comprising an intrinsic or i-layer of amorphous silicon and where the photovoltaic device is more efficient at converting light energy to electric energy at high operating temperatures than at low operating temperatures. The photovoltaic devices of this invention are suitable for use in high temperature operating environments.

  11. Nickel induced crystallization of amorphous silicon thin films Zhonghe Jin,a)

    E-print Network

    Kwok, Hoi S.

    Nickel induced crystallization of amorphous silicon thin films Zhonghe Jin,a) Gururaj A. Bhat 1997; accepted for publication 7 April 1998 Nickel Ni induced crystallization of amorphous silicon (a concentration peak was found to exist at the interface of the crystallized Si and the buried oxide. It was found

  12. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A. (Palo Alto, CA); Perez-Mendez, Victor (Berkeley, CA); Kaplan, Selig N. (El Cerrito, CA)

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification.

  13. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1992-11-17

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification. 13 figs.

  14. Criteria of amorphous solidification

    E-print Network

    Haim Diamant

    2014-06-10

    A different perspective on the long-standing problem of amorphous solidification is offered, based on an alternative definition of a solid as a porous medium. General, model-free results are obtained concerning the growing dynamic length accompanying solidification and its relation to the growing relaxation time. Criteria are derived for the dynamic length to diverge and for its divergence to entail the arrest of particle motion.

  15. Torque magnetometry of an amorphous-alumina/strontium-titanate interface

    E-print Network

    Lee, S. W.

    We report torque magnetometry measurements of an oxide heterostructure consisting of an amorphous Al[subscript 2]O[subscript 3] thin film grown on a crystalline SrTiO[subscript 3] substrate (a-AO/STO) by atomic layer ...

  16. Programming an Amorphous Computational Medium

    E-print Network

    Beal, Jacob

    Amorphous computing considers the problem of controllingmillions of spatially distributed unreliable devices which communicateonly with nearby neighbors. To program such a system, we need a highleveldescription language ...

  17. Amorphous molybdenum silicon superconducting thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosworth, D.; Sahonta, S.-L.; Hadfield, R. H.; Barber, Z. H.

    2015-08-01

    Amorphous superconductors have become attractive candidate materials for superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors due to their ease of growth, homogeneity and competitive superconducting properties. To date the majority of devices have been fabricated using WxSi1-x, though other amorphous superconductors such as molybdenum silicide (MoxSi1-x) offer increased transition temperature. This study focuses on the properties of MoSi thin films grown by magnetron sputtering. We examine how the composition and growth conditions affect film properties. For 100 nm film thickness, we report that the superconducting transition temperature (Tc) reaches a maximum of 7.6 K at a composition of Mo83Si17. The transition temperature and amorphous character can be improved by cooling of the substrate during growth which inhibits formation of a crystalline phase. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy studies confirm the absence of long range order. We observe that for a range of 6 common substrates (silicon, thermally oxidized silicon, R- and C-plane sapphire, x-plane lithium niobate and quartz), there is no variation in superconducting transition temperature, making MoSi an excellent candidate material for SNSPDs.

  18. Amorphous Silicon Microbolometer Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syllaios, A. J.; Schimert, T. R.; Gooch, R. W.; McCardel, W. L.; Tregilgas, J. H.; Ritchey, B. A.

    2003-10-01

    An emerging application of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (?-Si:H) thin films is in infrared detection and imaging technologies. Amorphous silicon is used for detection of optical radiation from the UV-VIS to the IR spectral range. For detection in the infrared ?-Si:H thin film microbolometer detector structures^1,2 are used. Ultra-thin ( ˜2000 Å?-SiNx:H/?-Si:H/?-SiNx:H membranes with low thermal mass suspended over silicon readout integrated circuits are built using RF plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) and surface micromachining. The microbolometers form quarter-wave resonant cavity structures to enhance IR absorptance. To ensure high thermal isolation the microbolometer arrays are vacuum packaged using wafer level vacuum packaging. Among the ?-Si:H material properties affecting the design and performance of microbolometer detectors are electrical resistivity and its temperature coefficient, and thermal and mechanical properties. IR cameras with 120x160 ?-Si:H bolometer pixel arrays operating at ambient temperature are now in production. Non-imaging applications are multi-channel detectors for gas sensing. [1] A. J. Syllaios, et al., MRS Symp. Proc. 609, A14.4.1-6(2001). [2] E. Mottin, et al., SPIE Proc. 4369, 250-6(2001).

  19. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A. (Palo Alto, CA); Mendez, Victor P. (Berkeley, CA); Kaplan, Selig N. (El Cerrito, CA)

    1988-01-01

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation.

  20. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Mendez, V.P.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1988-11-15

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. 15 figs.

  1. Compensated amorphous silicon solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E. (Yardley, PA)

    1980-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell incorporates a region of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon fabricated by a glow discharge wherein said intrinsic region is compensated by P-type dopants in an amount sufficient to reduce the space charge density of said region under illumination to about zero.

  2. Molecular dynamics in amorphous ergocalciferol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Sahra; Thayyil, M. Shahin; Capaccioli, S.

    2014-04-01

    While developing new pharmaceutical products based on drug substances in their amorphous form, the molecular mobility of amorphous active ingredients have to be characterized in detail. The molecular mobility in the supercooled liquid and glassy states of ergocalciferol is studied using broadband dielectric spectroscopy over wide frequency and temperature ranges. Dielectric studies revealed a number of relaxation process of different molecular origin.

  3. Stability of n-i-p amorphous silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staebler, D. L.; Crandall, R. S.; Williams, R.

    1981-11-01

    Unencapsulated, amorphous silicon indium tin oxide/n-i-p/stainless-steel solar cells were tested for stability. All cells have excellent shelf life. Changes occur during exposure to light, but can be controlled by the deposition conditions of the amorphous silicon. The changes are due to trapping and recombination of optically generated carriers in the i layer, and are reversibly annealed out above 175 C. Preliminary life tests on two relatively stable cells showed a small initial drop to 5%, followed by a weak logarithmic decay that predicts only about 20% further decrease in efficiency after 20 years in sunlight. Work is continuing on improving the efficiency and stability of these cells.

  4. Adsorption of selenium by amorphous iron oxyhydroxide and manganese dioxide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balistrieri, L.S.; Chao, T.T.

    1990-01-01

    This work compares and models the adsorption of selenium and other anions on a neutral to alkaline surface (amorphous iron oxyhydroxide) and an acidic surface (manganese dioxide). Selenium adsorption on these oxides is examined as a function of pH, particle concentration, oxidation state, and competing anion concentration in order to assess how these factors might influence the mobility of selenium in the environment. The data indicate that 1. 1) amorphous iron oxyhydroxide has a greater affinity for selenium than manganese dioxide, 2. 2) selenite [Se(IV)] adsorption increases with decreasing pH and increasing particle concentration and is stronger than selenate [Se(VI)] adsorption on both oxides, and 3. 3) selenate does not adsorb on manganese dioxide. The relative affinity of selenate and selenite for the oxides and the lack of adsorption of selenate on a strongly acidic surface suggests that selenate forms outer-sphere complexes while selenite forms inner-sphere complexes with the surfaces. The data also indicate that the competition sequence of other anions with respect to selenite adsorption at pH 7.0 is phosphate > silicate > molybdate > fluoride > sulfate on amorphous iron oxyhydroxide and molybdate ??? phosphate > silicate > fluoride > sulfate on manganese dioxide. The adsorption of phosphate, molybdate, and silicate on these oxides as a function of pH indicates that the competition sequences reflect the relative affinities of these anions for the surfaces. The Triple Layer surface complexation model is used to provide a quantitative description of these observations and to assess the importance of surface site heterogeneity on anion adsorption. The modeling results suggest that selenite forms binuclear, innersphere complexes with amorphous iron oxyhydroxide and monodentate, inner-sphere complexes with manganese dioxide and that selenate forms outer-sphere, monodentate complexes with amorphous iron oxyhydroxide. The heterogeneity of the oxide surface sites is reflected in decreasing equilibrium constants for selenite with increasing adsorption density and both experimental observations and modeling results suggest that manganese dioxide has fewer sites of higher energy for selenite adsorption than amorphous iron oxyhydroxide. Modeling and interpreting the adsorption of phosphate, molybdate, and silicate on the oxides are made difficult by the lack of constraint in choosing surface species and the fact that equally good fits can be obtained with different surface species. Finally, predictions of anion competition using the model results from single adsorbate systems are not very successful because the model does not account for surface site heterogeneity. Selenite adsorption data from a multi-adsorbate system could be fit if the equilibrium constant for selenite is decreased with increasing anion adsorption density. ?? 1990.

  5. Plasticity of amorphous carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Lautz, Julian; Moseler, Michael; Pastewka, Lars

    2014-03-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to probe the plastic response of representative bulk volumes of amorphous carbon at densities from 2.0 g cm-3 to 3.3 g cm-3 in simple and triaxial shear. After an initial elastic response the samples yield with only little strain hardening or softening. Individual plastic events in this network forming glass are strikingly similar to those observed for bulk metallic glasses: We find that plasticity is carried by fundamental rearrangements of regions of around 100 atoms, the shear transformation zone. In the simple shear geometry, those events coalesce to form a shear-band on longer time scales. During plastic deformation, the material changes its hybridization by transforming sp3 carbon atoms to sp2. We provide evidence that this transformation of the structural state occurs before the material yields, hence weakening the material. This work was supported by the European Commission (Marie-Curie IOF 272619).

  6. Bulk amorphous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, R.B.; Archuleta, J.I.; Sickafus, K.E.

    1998-12-01

    This is the final report for a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this work was to develop the competency for the synthesis of novel bulk amorphous alloys. The authors researched their synthesis methods and alloy properties, including thermal stability, mechanical, and transport properties. The project also addressed the development of vanadium-spinel alloys for structural applications in hostile environments, the measurement of elastic constants and thermal expansion in single-crystal TiAl from 300 to 750 K, the measurement of elastic constants in gallium nitride, and a study of the shock-induced martensitic transformations in NiTi alloys.

  7. Containerless processing of amorphous ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, J. K. Richard; Krishnan, Shankar; Schiffman, Robert A.; Nordine, Paul C.

    1990-01-01

    The absence of gravity allows containerless processing of materials which could not otherwise be processed. High melting point, hard materials such as borides, nitrides, and refractory metals are usually brittle in their crystalline form. The absence of dislocations in amorphous materials frequently endows them with flexibility and toughness. Systematic studies of the properties of many amorphous materials have not been carried out. The requirements for their production is that they can be processed in a controlled way without container interaction. Containerless processing in microgravity could permit the control necessary to produce amorphous forms of hard materials.

  8. Fabrication of amorphous diamond films

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, S.

    1995-12-12

    Amorphous diamond films having a significant reduction in intrinsic stress are prepared by biasing a substrate to be coated and depositing carbon ions thereon under controlled temperature conditions. 1 fig.

  9. Biologically formed mesoporous amorphous silica.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Martin; Keding, Ralf; Höche, Thomas; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2009-02-25

    Mesoporous crystalline silica has attracted the attention of scientists due to its extraordinary functionalities. In particular, substantial progress has been made in the synthesis of mesoporous crystalline silica using biomimetic approaches under ambient conditions. However, the biomimetic synthesis of mesoporous amorphous silica has not been well studied so far. Here we show that amorphous silica can be synthesized in aqueous solution under ambient conditions via biological catalysis. The high purity amorphous silica is obtained as spicules (average diameter: 15.6 microm) that are cemented through junctions, thereby forming the skeleton of the freshwater sponge Cauxi. We discover that such amorphous spicules themselves contain mesopores. This opens a potential avenue to develop highly durable mesoporous membranes at room temperature. We also describe the macro- and microstructural features, the mechanism of biological precipitation, and the properties of the Cauxi skeleton. PMID:19199622

  10. Complex Amorphous Dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    van Dover, Robert Bruce

    2014-11-22

    This work focused on synthesizing a wide range of oxides containing two or more metals, and measuring their properties. Many simple metal oxides such as zirconium oxide, have been extensively studied in the past. We developed a technique in which we create a large number of compositions simultaneously and examine their behavior to understand trends and identify high performance materials. Superior performance generally comes in the form of increased responsiveness; in the materials we have studied this may mean more electrical charge for a given voltage in a capacitor, faster switching for a given drive in a transistor, more current for a given voltage in an ionic conductor, or more current for a given illumination in a solar cell. Some of the materials we have identified may find use in decreasing the power needed to operate integrated circuits, other materials could be useful for solar power or other forms of energy conversion.

  11. Amorphous metal alloy and composite

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Rong (Richland, WA); Merz, Martin D. (Richland, WA)

    1985-01-01

    Amorphous metal alloys of the iron-chromium and nickel-chromium type have excellent corrosion resistance and high temperature stability and are suitable for use as a protective coating on less corrosion resistant substrates. The alloys are stabilized in the amorphous state by one or more elements of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The alloy is preferably prepared by sputter deposition.

  12. Amorphous ruthenium nanoparticles for enhanced electrochemical water splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tee, Si Yin; Lee, Coryl Jing Jun; Safari Dinachali, Saman; Lai, Szu Cheng; Williams, Evan Laurence; Luo, He-Kuan; Chi, Dongzhi; Hor, T. S. Andy; Han, Ming-Yong

    2015-10-01

    This paper demonstrates an optimized fabrication of amorphous Ru nanoparticles through annealing at various temperatures ranging from 150 to 700 °C, which are used as water oxidation catalyst for effective electrochemical water splitting under a low overpotential of less than 300 mV. The amorphous Ru nanoparticles with short-range ordered structure exhibit an optimal and stable electrocatalytic activity after annealing at 250 °C. Interestingly, a small quantity of such Ru nanoparticles in a thin film on fluorine-doped tin oxide glass is also effectively driven by a conventional crystalline silicon solar cell that has excellent capability for harvesting visible light. Remarkably, it achieves an overall solar-to-hydrogen efficiency of 11.3% in acidic electrolyte.

  13. Buried oxide layer in silicon

    DOEpatents

    Sadana, Devendra Kumar (Pleasantville, NY); Holland, Orin Wayne (Lenoir, TN)

    2001-01-01

    A process for forming Silicon-On-Insulator is described incorporating the steps of ion implantation of oxygen into a silicon substrate at elevated temperature, ion implanting oxygen at a temperature below 200.degree. C. at a lower dose to form an amorphous silicon layer, and annealing steps to form a mixture of defective single crystal silicon and polycrystalline silicon or polycrystalline silicon alone and then silicon oxide from the amorphous silicon layer to form a continuous silicon oxide layer below the surface of the silicon substrate to provide an isolated superficial layer of silicon. The invention overcomes the problem of buried isolated islands of silicon oxide forming a discontinuous buried oxide layer.

  14. Nanostructures having crystalline and amorphous phases

    DOEpatents

    Mao, Samuel S; Chen, Xiaobo

    2015-04-28

    The present invention includes a nanostructure, a method of making thereof, and a method of photocatalysis. In one embodiment, the nanostructure includes a crystalline phase and an amorphous phase in contact with the crystalline phase. Each of the crystalline and amorphous phases has at least one dimension on a nanometer scale. In another embodiment, the nanostructure includes a nanoparticle comprising a crystalline phase and an amorphous phase. The amorphous phase is in a selected amount. In another embodiment, the nanostructure includes crystalline titanium dioxide and amorphous titanium dioxide in contact with the crystalline titanium dioxide. Each of the crystalline and amorphous titanium dioxide has at least one dimension on a nanometer scale.

  15. Amorphous-diamond electron emitter

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, Steven (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01

    An electron emitter comprising a textured silicon wafer overcoated with a thin (200 .ANG.) layer of nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (a:D-N), which lowers the field below 20 volts/micrometer have been demonstrated using this emitter compared to uncoated or diamond coated emitters wherein the emission is at fields of nearly 60 volts/micrometer. The silicon/nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (Si/a:D-N) emitter may be produced by overcoating a textured silicon wafer with amorphous-diamond (a:D) in a nitrogen atmosphere using a filtered cathodic-arc system. The enhanced performance of the Si/a:D-N emitter lowers the voltages required to the point where field-emission displays are practical. Thus, this emitter can be used, for example, in flat-panel emission displays (FEDs), and cold-cathode vacuum electronics.

  16. Annealing studies of amorphous alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Wiley, J.D.; Perepezko, J.H.; Nordman, J.E.

    1983-04-01

    Amorphous films of the alloys Ni-Nb, Ni-Mo, Mo-Si, and W-Si were sputter deposited on single-crystal semiconductor substrates. One-hour crystallization temperatures of the films were determined to within +-25/sup 0/C by annealing and x-ray diffraction measurements. Interdiffusion between Au or Cu overlayers and the amorphous films were studied by annealing combined with Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) profiling, and by Rutherford Backscatter (RBS) analysis. Supplementary measurements used to study structural relaxation and crystallization included resistivity as a function of temperature; DTA and DSC; and electron microscopy.

  17. Microstructure and surface chemistry of amorphous alloys important to their friction and wear behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to examine the microstructure and surface chemistry of amorphous alloys, and their effects on tribological behavior. The results indicate that the surface oxide layers present on amorphous alloys are effective in providing low friction and a protective film against wear in air. Clustering and crystallization in amorphous alloys can be enhanced as a result of plastic flow during the sliding process at a low sliding velocity, at room temperature. Clusters or crystallines with sizes to 150 nm and a diffused honeycomb-shaped structure are produced on the wear surface. Temperature effects lead to drastic changes in surface chemistry and friction behavior of the alloys at temperatures to 750 C. Contaminants can come from the bulk of the alloys to the surface upon heating and impart to the surface oxides at 350 C and boron nitride above 500 C. The oxides increase friction while the boron nitride reduces friction drastically in vacuum.

  18. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-11-01

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. Our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment.

  19. Mechanics of amorphous polymers and polymer gels

    E-print Network

    Chester, Shawn Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Many applications of amorphous polymers require a thermo-mechanically coupled large-deformation elasto-viscoplasticity theory which models the strain rate and temperature dependent response of amorphous polymeric materials ...

  20. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-01-01

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. Our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment. PMID:26563908

  1. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T; Lograsso, Thomas A; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-01-01

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. Our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment. PMID:26563908

  2. Deep ultraviolet laser direct write for patterning sol-gel InGaZnO semiconducting micro/nanowires and improving field-effect mobility

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hung-Cheng; Stehlin, Fabrice; Soppera, Olivier; Zan, Hsiao-Wen; Li, Chang-Hung; Wieder, Fernand; Ponche, Arnaud; Berling, Dominique; Yeh, Bo-Hung; Wang, Kuan-Hsun

    2015-01-01

    Deep-UV (DUV) laser was used to directly write indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (IGZO) precursor solution and form micro and nanoscale patterns. The directional DUV laser beam avoids the substrate heating and suppresses the diffraction effect. A IGZO precursor solution was also developed to fulfill the requirements for direct photopatterning and for achieving semi-conducting properties with thermal annealing at moderate temperature. The DUV-induced crosslinking of the starting material allows direct write of semi-conducting channels in thin-film transistors but also it improves the field-effect mobility and surface roughness. Material analysis has been carried out by XPS, FTIR, spectroscopic ellipsometry and AFM and the effect of DUV on the final material structure is discussed. The DUV irradiation step results in photolysis and a partial condensation of the inorganic network that freezes the sol-gel layer in a homogeneous distribution, lowering possibilities of thermally induced reorganization at the atomic scale. Laser irradiation allows high-resolution photopatterning and high-enough field-effect mobility, which enables the easy fabrication of oxide nanowires for applications in solar cell, display, flexible electronics, and biomedical sensors. PMID:26014902

  3. Optical absorption in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    O`Leary, S.K.; Zukotynski, S.; Perz, J.M.; Sidhu, L.S.

    1996-12-31

    The role that disorder plays in shaping the form of the optical absorption spectrum of hydrogenated amorphous silicon is investigated. Disorder leads to a redistribution of states, which both reduces the Tauc gap and broadens the absorption tail. The observed relationship between the Tauc gap and the breadth of the absorption tail is thus explained.

  4. Microstructure and Wear Behavior of Laser Clad Multi-layered Fe-based Amorphous Coatings on Steel Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Tanaji; Alavi, S. Habib; Biswas, Sourabh; Harimkar, Sandip P.

    2015-12-01

    Single and multi-layered (with two and three layers) coatings of Fe48Cr15Mo14Y2C15B6 amorphous alloy were applied to AISI 1018 steel substrates via laser cladding. XRD analysis indicated partial retention of the amorphous phase along with the formation of oxide and carbide phases. Cross-sectional SEM micrographs revealed relatively sound coatings laser clad with single layer of amorphous alloy; however, cracks and voids were observed in the two and three layered amorphous coatings. The specimens with single and two layered amorphous coatings exhibited surface hardness of about 650 VHN while the hardness of the specimens with three layered amorphous coatings (~1100 VHN) nearly equaled the hardness of previously reported sintered amorphous alloys of similar compositions. The ball-on-disc wear analysis demonstrated a reverse trend wherein the single and two layered amorphous coatings exhibited lower weight loss during the wear test cycle due to superior surface soundness while the three layered amorphous coatings showed aggravated wear due to internal voids and cracks.

  5. Exothermic Chemical Reactions Can Drive Nonthermal Crystallization of Amorphous Silicate Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaito, Chihiro; Miyazaki, Yu; Kumamoto, Akihito; Kimura, Yuki

    2007-09-01

    To explain how cometary silicates crystallize yet still preserve volatile interstellar ices in their parent comets, we experimentally demonstrate the possibility of chemical-reaction-driven crystallization, which is called nonthermal crystallization, using laboratory-synthesized amorphous Mg-bearing silicate grains. Analog silicate grains ~50-100 nm in diameter covered with a carbonaceous layer consisting of amorphous carbon, CH 4, and other organics to a thickness of ~10-30 nm were used as models. The analog silicate grains crystallized via the direct flow of surface reaction energy, which is produced by the graphitization of the carbonaceous layer due to oxidation at room temperature in air, into the silicates. The experimental results imply that amorphous silicates are transformed into crystalline silicates as the grains leave the comet's surface, rather than as the comet was accreted 4.5 billion years ago. Thus, primordial ices and amorphous silicate grains are predicted to reside in most comets until they approach the Sun.

  6. Amorphous molybdenum sulfides as hydrogen evolution catalysts.

    PubMed

    Morales-Guio, Carlos G; Hu, Xile

    2014-08-19

    Providing energy for a population projected to reach 9 billion people within the middle of this century is one of the most pressing societal issues. Burning fossil fuels at a rate and scale that satisfy our near-term demand will irreversibly damage the living environment. Among the various sources of alternative and CO2-emission-free energies, the sun is the only source that is capable of providing enough energy for the whole world. Sunlight energy, however, is intermittent and requires an efficient storage mechanism. Sunlight-driven water splitting to make hydrogen is widely considered as one of the most attractive methods for solar energy storage. Water splitting needs a hydrogen evolution catalyst to accelerate the rate of hydrogen production and to lower the energy loss in this process. Precious metals such as Pt are superior catalysts, but they are too expensive and scarce for large-scale applications. In this Account, we summarize our recent research on the preparation, characterization, and application of amorphous molybdenum sulfide catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction. The catalysts can be synthesized by electrochemical deposition under ambient conditions from readily available and inexpensive precursors. The catalytic activity is among the highest for nonprecious catalysts. For example, at a loading of 0.2 mg/cm(2), the optimal catalyst delivers a current density of 10 mA/cm(2) at an overpotential of 160 mV. The growth mechanism of the electrochemically deposited film catalysts was revealed by an electrochemical quartz microcrystal balance study. While different electrochemical deposition methods produce films with different initial compositions, the active catalysts are the same and are identified as a "MoS(2+x)" species. The activity of the film catalysts can be further promoted by divalent Fe, Co, and Ni ions, and the origins of the promotional effects have been probed. Highly active amorphous molybdenum sulfide particles can also be prepared from simple wet-chemical routes. Electron transport is sometimes slow in the particle catalysts, and an impedance model has been established to identify this slow electron transport. Finally, the amorphous molybdenum sulfide film catalyst has been integrated onto a copper(I) oxide photocathode for photoelectrochemical hydrogen evolution. The conformal catalyst efficiently extracts the excited electrons to give an impressive photocurrent density of -5.7 mA/cm(2) at 0 V vs RHE. The catalyst also confers good stability. PMID:25065612

  7. Intrinsic delay of permeable base transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wenchao; Guo, Jing; So, Franky

    2014-07-28

    Permeable base transistors (PBTs) fabricated by vacuum deposition or solution process have the advantages of easy fabrication and low power operation and are a promising device structure for flexible electronics. Intrinsic delay of PBT, which characterizes the speed of the transistor, is investigated by solving the three-dimensional Poisson equation and drift-diffusion equation self-consistently using finite element method. Decreasing the emitter thickness lowers the intrinsic delay by improving on-current, and a thinner base is also preferred for low intrinsic delay because of fewer carriers in the base region at off-state. The intrinsic delay exponentially decreases as the emitter contact Schottky barrier height decreases, and it linearly depends on the carrier mobility. With an optimized emitter contact barrier height and device geometry, a sub-nano-second intrinsic delay can be achieved with a carrier mobility of ?10?cm{sup 2}/V/s obtainable in solution processed indium gallium zinc oxide, which indicates the potential of solution processed PBTs for GHz operations.

  8. Effect of annealing temperature on structural and electrical properties of high-? YbTixOy gate dielectrics for InGaZnO thin film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Tung-Ming; Chen, Fa-Hsyang; Hung, Meng-Ning

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the effect of annealing temperature on the structural properties and electrical characteristics of high-? YbTixOy gate dielectrics for indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs). X-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to study the structural, chemical and morphological features, respectively, of these dielectric films annealed at 200, 300 and 400 °C. The YbTixOy IGZO TFT that had been annealed at 400 °C exhibited better electrical characteristics, such as a small threshold voltage of 0.53 V, a large field-effect mobility of 19.1 cm2 V-1 s-1, a high Ion/Ioff ratio of 2.8 × 107, and a low subthreshold swing of 176 mV dec.-1, relative to those of the systems that had been subjected to other annealing conditions. This result suggests that YbTixOy dielectric possesses a higher dielectric constant as well as lower oxygen vacancies (or defects) in the film. In addition, the instability of YbTixOy IGZO TFT was studied under positive gate-bias stress and negative gate-bias stress conditions.

  9. Amorphous metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Thomas D; Cheetham, Anthony K

    2014-05-20

    Crystalline metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are porous frameworks comprising an infinite array of metal nodes connected by organic linkers. The number of novel MOF structures reported per year is now in excess of 6000, despite significant increases in the complexity of both component units and molecular networks. Their regularly repeating structures give rise to chemically variable porous architectures, which have been studied extensively due to their sorption and separation potential. More recently, catalytic applications have been proposed that make use of their chemical tunability, while reports of negative linear compressibility and negative thermal expansion have further expanded interest in the field. Amorphous metal-organic frameworks (aMOFs) retain the basic building blocks and connectivity of their crystalline counterparts, though they lack any long-range periodic order. Aperiodic arrangements of atoms result in their X-ray diffraction patterns being dominated by broad "humps" caused by diffuse scattering and thus they are largely indistinguishable from one another. Amorphous MOFs offer many exciting opportunities for practical application, either as novel functional materials themselves or facilitating other processes, though the domain is largely unexplored (total aMOF reported structures amounting to under 30). Specifically, the use of crystalline MOFs to detect harmful guest species before subsequent stress-induced collapse and guest immobilization is of considerable interest, while functional luminescent and optically active glass-like materials may also be prepared in this manner. The ion transporting capacity of crystalline MOFs might be improved during partial structural collapse, while there are possibilities of preparing superstrong glasses and hybrid liquids during thermal amorphization. The tuning of release times of MOF drug delivery vehicles by partial structural collapse may be possible, and aMOFs are often more mechanically robust than crystalline materials, which is of importance for industrial applications. In this Account, we describe the preparation of aMOFs by introduction of disorder into their parent crystalline frameworks through heating, pressure (both hydrostatic and nonhydrostatic), and ball-milling. The main method of characterizing these amorphous materials (analysis of the pair distribution function) is summarized, alongside complementary techniques such as Raman spectroscopy. Detailed investigations into their properties (both chemical and mechanical) are compiled and compared with those of crystalline MOFs, while the impact of the field on the processing techniques used for crystalline MOF powders is also assessed. Crucially, the benefits amorphization may bring to existing proposed MOF applications are detailed, alongside the possibilities and research directions afforded by the combination of the unique properties of the amorphous domain with the versatility of MOF chemistry. PMID:24707980

  10. X-ray Diffraction Techniques for Structural Determination of Amorphous Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Saw, C K; Lian, T; Day, S D; Farmer, J C

    2006-10-16

    Prevention of corrosion is a vital goal for the Department of Defense when billions of dollars are spent every year. Corrosion resistant materials have applications in all sort of military vehicles, and more importantly in naval vessels and submarines which come in contact with the seawater. An important application of the corrosion resistant material is in the radioactive waste disposable field where the vessels or containers are expected to hold the radioactive toxic materials for thousands of years to surpass the half life of the radiation. It has been known that corrosion resistance can be improved by the used of structurally designed materials in the amorphous state where the atoms are arranged in a non-periodic conditions, even though, some local chemical short range ordering may occur in the amorphous arrangement. On the other hand, the final material can also be elementally tailored to specific application. This work documents in details the characterization effort for the amorphous materials using x-ray diffraction technique as part of the High Performance Corrosion-Resistant Material--Structural Amorphous Metal (HPCRM-SAM) program here at LLNL. The samples are in the form of powders, ribbons and coatings deposited onto parts. Some brief theoretical background is given in order to interpret the results, instrumentation will also be described. The results suggest that the formation of amorphous phase in the metal alloys powders greatly depends on the processing conditions. In most of the powders, especially lot No.06, the result indicates that the materials are amorphous with a very small amount of iron boron alloy. In the ribbon samples, all the samples and of different compositions as well are observed to be amorphous. In most cases, starting from an amorphous powder sample, the coatings are also observed to be amorphous with a small amount of iron oxide, probably due to exposure to air during the thermal spraying process.

  11. Charge transport in gap structures based on amorphous Al2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, T. M.; Castro, R. A.; Khanin, S. D.

    2015-11-01

    The charge transport in amorphous layers of oxide of aluminum Al2O3 in the temperature range T=223-273K is studied. It was found the existence of hopping conduction mechanism in studied layers. The values of dispersion parameter s and activation energy EA are determined.

  12. Optimization of Conductivity and Transparency in Amorphous In-Zn-O Transparent Conductors: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, J.; Berry, J.; van Hest, M.; Alleman, J.; Dabney, M.; Gedvilas, L.; Ginley, D. S.; Leenheer, A.; O'Hayre, R.

    2008-05-01

    Amorphous mixed metal oxide TCOs are of increasing interest due to the excellent opto-electronic properties and smoothness (RRMS < 0.5 nm) obtained for sputtered films deposited at less than 100 ..deg..C. Here, we have investigated the combined materials phase space of oxygen stoichiometry and metals composition (In:Zn ratio) and made two key discoveries.

  13. High-efficiency visible photoluminescence from amorphous silicon nanoparticles embedded in silicon nitride

    E-print Network

    Zexian, Cao

    High-efficiency visible photoluminescence from amorphous silicon nanoparticles embedded in silicon 29 August 2003 Confinement of silicon nanoparticles in silicon nitride instead of an oxide matrix. We report in this letter the production of high-density up to 4.0 1012 /cm2 from micrographs silicon

  14. Narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Madan, A.; Mahan, A.H.

    1985-01-10

    Disclosed is a narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductor comprising an alloy of amorphous silicon and a band gap narrowing element selected from the group consisting of Sn, Ge, and Pb, with an electron donor dopant selected from the group consisting of P, As, Sb, Bi and N. The process for producing the narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductor comprises the steps of forming an alloy comprising amorphous silicon and at least one of the aforesaid band gap narrowing elements in amount sufficient to narrow the band gap of the silicon semiconductor alloy below that of amorphous silicon, and also utilizing sufficient amounts of the aforesaid electron donor dopant to maintain the amorphous silicon alloy as an n-type semiconductor.

  15. Porous amorphous carbon models from periodic Gaussian chains of amorphous polymers

    E-print Network

    Powles, Rebecca

    Porous amorphous carbon models from periodic Gaussian chains of amorphous polymers Amit Kumar, Raul. Keywords: Porous carbon; Pyrolysis; Molecular simulation; Transport properties; Microstructure 1 carbons using Monte Carlo simulations in the canonical ensemble. The simulation method used follows

  16. Laterally inherently thin amorphous-crystalline silicon heterojunction photovoltaic cell

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, Zahidur R. Kherani, Nazir P.

    2014-12-29

    This article reports on an amorphous-crystalline silicon heterojunction photovoltaic cell concept wherein the heterojunction regions are laterally narrow and distributed amidst a backdrop of well-passivated crystalline silicon surface. The localized amorphous-crystalline silicon heterojunctions consisting of the laterally thin emitter and back-surface field regions are precisely aligned under the metal grid-lines and bus-bars while the remaining crystalline silicon surface is passivated using the recently proposed facile grown native oxide–plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposited silicon nitride passivation scheme. The proposed cell concept mitigates parasitic optical absorption losses by relegating amorphous silicon to beneath the shadowed metallized regions and by using optically transparent passivation layer. A photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 13.6% is obtained for an untextured proof-of-concept cell illuminated under AM 1.5 global spectrum; the specific cell performance parameters are V{sub OC} of 666?mV, J{sub SC} of 29.5?mA-cm{sup ?2}, and fill-factor of 69.3%. Reduced parasitic absorption, predominantly in the shorter wavelength range, is confirmed with external quantum efficiency measurement.

  17. XRD Technique: A way to disseminate structural changes in iron-based amorphous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Saw, C K; Lian, T; Day, D; Farmer, J

    2007-05-24

    Prevention of corrosion is a vital goal for the Department of Defense when billions of dollars are spent every year. Corrosion resistant materials have applications in all sort of military vehicles, and more importantly in naval vessels and submarines which come in contact with the seawater. It is known that corrosion resistance property can be improved by the used of structurally designed materials in the amorphous state where the atoms are arranged in a non-periodic fashion and specific atoms, tailored to the required properties can be interjected into the matrix for specific application. The XRD techniques reported here is to demonstrate the optimal conditions for characterization of these materials. The samples, which normally contain different compositions of Fe, Cr, B, Mo, Y, Mn, Si and W, are in the form of powders, ribbons and coatings. These results will be compared for the different forms of the sample which appears to correlate to the cooling rate during sample processing. In most cases, the materials are amorphous or amorphous with very small amount of crystallinity. In the ribbon samples for different compositions we observed that the materials are essentially amorphous. In most cases, starting from an amorphous powder sample, the coatings are also observed to be amorphous with a small amount of iron oxide on the surface, probably due to exposure to air.

  18. Oxygenated amorphous carbon for resistive memory applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santini, Claudia A.; Sebastian, Abu; Marchiori, Chiara; Jonnalagadda, Vara Prasad; Dellmann, Laurent; Koelmans, Wabe W.; Rossell, Marta D.; Rossel, Christophe P.; Eleftheriou, Evangelos

    2015-10-01

    Carbon-based electronics is a promising alternative to traditional silicon-based electronics as it could enable faster, smaller and cheaper transistors, interconnects and memory devices. However, the development of carbon-based memory devices has been hampered either by the complex fabrication methods of crystalline carbon allotropes or by poor performance. Here we present an oxygenated amorphous carbon (a-COx) produced by physical vapour deposition that has several properties in common with graphite oxide. Moreover, its simple fabrication method ensures excellent reproducibility and tuning of its properties. Memory devices based on a-COx exhibit outstanding non-volatile resistive memory performance, such as switching times on the order of 10 ns and cycling endurance in excess of 104 times. A detailed investigation of the pristine, SET and RESET states indicates a switching mechanism based on the electrochemical redox reaction of carbon. These results suggest that a-COx could play a key role in non-volatile memory technology and carbon-based electronics.

  19. Oxygenated amorphous carbon for resistive memory applications.

    PubMed

    Santini, Claudia A; Sebastian, Abu; Marchiori, Chiara; Jonnalagadda, Vara Prasad; Dellmann, Laurent; Koelmans, Wabe W; Rossell, Marta D; Rossel, Christophe P; Eleftheriou, Evangelos

    2015-01-01

    Carbon-based electronics is a promising alternative to traditional silicon-based electronics as it could enable faster, smaller and cheaper transistors, interconnects and memory devices. However, the development of carbon-based memory devices has been hampered either by the complex fabrication methods of crystalline carbon allotropes or by poor performance. Here we present an oxygenated amorphous carbon (a-COx) produced by physical vapour deposition that has several properties in common with graphite oxide. Moreover, its simple fabrication method ensures excellent reproducibility and tuning of its properties. Memory devices based on a-COx exhibit outstanding non-volatile resistive memory performance, such as switching times on the order of 10?ns and cycling endurance in excess of 10(4) times. A detailed investigation of the pristine, SET and RESET states indicates a switching mechanism based on the electrochemical redox reaction of carbon. These results suggest that a-COx could play a key role in non-volatile memory technology and carbon-based electronics. PMID:26494026

  20. Deng & Schiff, Amorphous Silicon Based Solar Cells rev. 7/30/2002, Page 1 Amorphous Silicon Based Solar Cells

    E-print Network

    Deng, Xunming

    Deng & Schiff, Amorphous Silicon Based Solar Cells rev. 7/30/2002, Page 1 Amorphous Silicon Based Solar Cells Xunming Deng and Eric A. Schiff Table of Contents 1 Overview 3 1.1 Amorphous Silicon: The First Bipolar Amorphous Semiconductor 3 1.2 Designs for Amorphous Silicon Solar Cells: A Guided Tour 6

  1. Models for Amorphous Calcium Carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Sourabh

    Many species e.g. sea urchin form amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) precursor phases that subsequently transform into crystalline CaCO3. It is certainly possible that the biogenic ACC might have more than 10 wt% Mg and ˜3 wt% of water. The structure of ACC and the mechanisms by which it transforms to crystalline phase are still poorly understood. In this dissertation our goal is to determine an atomic structure model that is consistent with diffraction and IR measurements of ACC. For this purpose a calcite supercell with 24 formula units, containing 120 atoms, was constructed. Various configurations with substitution of Ca by 6 Mg ions (6 wt.%) and insertion of 3-5 H 2O molecules (2.25-3.75 wt.%) in the interstitial positions of the supercell, were relaxed using a robust density function code VASP. The most noticeable effects were the tilts of CO3 groups and the distortion of Ca sub-lattice, especially in the hydrated case. The distributions of Ca-Ca nearest neighbor distance and CO3 tilts were extracted from various configurations. The same methods were also applied to aragonite. Sampling from the calculated distortion distributions, we built models for amorphous calcite/aragonite of size ˜ 1700 nm3 based on a multi-scale modeling scheme. We used these models to generate diffraction patterns and profiles with our diffraction code. We found that the induced distortions were not enough to generate a diffraction profile typical of an amorphous material. We then studied the diffraction profiles from several nano-crystallites as recent studies suggest that ACC might be a random array of nano-cryatallites. It was found that the generated diffraction profile from a nano-crystallite of size ˜ 2 nm3 is similar to that from the ACC.

  2. Preparation of amorphous sulfide sieves

    DOEpatents

    Siadati, Mohammad H.; Alonso, Gabriel; Chianelli, Russell R.

    2006-11-07

    The present invention involves methods and compositions for synthesizing catalysts/porous materials. In some embodiments, the resulting materials are amorphous sulfide sieves that can be mass-produced for a variety of uses. In some embodiments, methods of the invention concern any suitable precursor (such as thiomolybdate salt) that is exposed to a high pressure pre-compaction, if need be. For instance, in some cases the final bulk shape (but highly porous) may be same as the original bulk shape. The compacted/uncompacted precursor is then subjected to an open-flow hot isostatic pressing, which causes the precursor to decompose and convert to a highly porous material/catalyst.

  3. Inelastic scattering from amorphous solids

    SciTech Connect

    Price, D.L.

    1985-08-01

    The potential of inelastic neutron scattering techniques for surveying various aspects of the dynamics of amorphous solids is briefly reviewed. The recent use of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source to provide detailed information on the optical vibrations of glasses is discussed in more detail. The density of states represents an averaged quantity which gives information about the general characteristics of the structure and bonding. More extensive information can be obtained by studying the detailed wavevector dependence of the dynamic structure factor. 15 refs., 7 figs.

  4. Laser surface treatment of amorphous metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katakam, Shravana K.

    Amorphous materials are used as soft magnetic materials and also as surface coatings to improve the surface properties. Furthermore, the nanocrystalline materials derived from their amorphous precursors show superior soft magnetic properties than amorphous counter parts for transformer core applications. In the present work, laser based processing of amorphous materials will be presented. Conventionally, the nanocrystalline materials are synthesized by furnace heat treatment of amorphous precursors. Fe-based amorphous/nanocrystalline materials due to their low cost and superior magnetic properties are the most widely used soft magnetic materials. However, achieving nanocrystalline microstructure in Fe-Si-B ternary system becomes very difficult owing its rapid growth rate at higher temperatures and sluggish diffusion at low temperature annealing. Hence, nanocrystallization in this system is achieved by using alloying additions (Cu and Nb) in the ternary Fe-Si-B system. Thus, increasing the cost and also resulting in reduction of saturation magnetization. laser processing technique is used to achieve extremely fine nanocrystalline microstructure in Fe-Si-B amorphous precursor. Microstructure-magnetic Property-laser processing co-relationship has been established for Fe-Si-B ternary system using analytical techniques. Laser processing improved the magnetic properties with significant increase in saturation magnetization and near zero coercivity values. Amorphous materials exhibit excellent corrosion resistance by virtue of their atomic structure. Fe-based amorphous materials are economical and due to their ease of processing are of potential interest to synthesize as coatings materials for wear and corrosion resistance applications. Fe-Cr-Mo-Y-C-B amorphous system was used to develop thick coatings on 4130 Steel substrate and the corrosion resistance of the amorphous coatings was improved. It is also shown that the mode of corrosion depends on the laser processing conditions. The microstructure evolution and the corrosion mechanisms operating are evaluated using post processing and post corrosion analysis.

  5. Fluorination of amorphous thin-film materials with xenon fluoride

    DOEpatents

    Weil, Raoul B. (Haifa, IL)

    1988-01-01

    A method is disclosed for producing fluorine-containing amorphous semiconductor material, preferably comprising amorphous silicon. The method includes depositing amorphous thin-film material onto a substrate while introducing xenon fluoride during the film deposition process.

  6. Fluorination of amorphous thin-film materials with xenon fluoride

    DOEpatents

    Weil, R.B.

    1987-05-01

    A method is disclosed for producing fluorine-containing amorphous semiconductor material, preferably comprising amorphous silicon. The method includes depositing amorphous thin-film material onto a substrate while introducing xenon fluoride during the film deposition process.

  7. Ductile crystalline–amorphous nanolaminates

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yinmin; Li, Ju; Hamza, Alex V.; Barbee, Troy W.

    2007-01-01

    It is known that the room-temperature plastic deformation of bulk metallic glasses is compromised by strain softening and shear localization, resulting in near-zero tensile ductility. The incorporation of metallic glasses into engineering materials, therefore, is often accompanied by complete brittleness or an apparent loss of useful tensile ductility. Here we report the observation of an exceptional tensile ductility in crystalline copper/copper–zirconium glass nanolaminates. These nanocrystalline–amorphous nanolaminates exhibit a high flow stress of 1.09 ± 0.02 GPa, a nearly elastic-perfectly plastic behavior without necking, and a tensile elongation to failure of 13.8 ± 1.7%, which is six to eight times higher than that typically observed in conventional crystalline–crystalline nanolaminates (<2%) and most other nanocrystalline materials. Transmission electron microscopy and atomistic simulations demonstrate that shear banding instability no longer afflicts the 5- to 10-nm-thick nanolaminate glassy layers during tensile deformation, which also act as high-capacity sinks for dislocations, enabling absorption of free volume and free energy transported by the dislocations; the amorphous–crystal interfaces exhibit unique inelastic shear (slip) transfer characteristics, fundamentally different from those of grain boundaries. Nanoscale metallic glass layers therefore may offer great benefits in engineering the plasticity of crystalline materials and opening new avenues for improving their strength and ductility. PMID:17592136

  8. Glass forming ranges of amorphous alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, R.B.

    1988-01-01

    Two main methods of synthesis of amorphous metallic alloys are based on the rapid solidification of molten alloys and on isothermal solid state reactions between pure metals. We discuss recent calculations for the glass forming range for both techniques and we compare the predicted homogeneity ranges of the amorphous phase with experiments. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Method of making amorphous metal composites

    DOEpatents

    Byrne, Martin A. (Troy, NY); Lupinski, John H. (Scotia, NY)

    1982-01-01

    The process comprises placing an amorphous metal in particulate form and a low molecular weight (e.g., 1000-5000) thermosetting polymer binder powder into a container, mixing these materials, and applying heat and pressure to convert the mixture into an amorphous metal composite.

  10. Formation of Nanocrystalline Germanium via Oxidation of Si?.??Ge?.?? for Memory Device Applications

    E-print Network

    Kan, Eric Win Hong

    In this work, we studied the possibility of synthesizing nanocrystalline germanium (Ge) via dry and wet oxidation of both amorphous and polycrystalline Si?.??Ge?.?? films. In dry oxidation, Ge was rejected from the growing ...

  11. Compensated amorphous-silicon solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Devaud, G.

    1982-06-21

    An amorphous silicon solar cell including an electrically conductive substrate, a layer of glow discharge deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon having regions of differing conductivity with at least one region of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The layer of hydrogenated amorphous silicon has opposed first and second major surfaces where the first major surface contacts the elecrically conductive substrate and an electrode for electrically contacting the second major surface. The intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon region is deposited in a glow discharge with an atmosphere which includes not less than about 0.02 atom percent mono-atomic boron. An improved N.I.P. solar cell is disclosed using a BF/sub 3/ doped intrinsic layer.

  12. Solid-state diffusion in amorphous zirconolite

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, C.; Dove, M. T.; Trachenko, K.; Zarkadoula, E.; Todorov, I. T.; Geisler, T.; Brazhkin, V. V.

    2014-11-14

    We discuss how structural disorder and amorphization affect solid-state diffusion, and consider zirconolite as a currently important case study. By performing extensive molecular dynamics simulations, we disentangle the effects of amorphization and density, and show that a profound increase of solid-state diffusion takes place as a result of amorphization. Importantly, this can take place at the same density as in the crystal, representing an interesting general insight regarding solid-state diffusion. We find that decreasing the density in the amorphous system increases pre-factors of diffusion constants, but does not change the activation energy in the density range considered. We also find that atomic species in zirconolite are affected differently by amorphization and density change. Our microscopic insights are relevant for understanding how solid-state diffusion changes due to disorder and for building predictive models of operation of materials to be used to encapsulate nuclear waste.

  13. Modeling selenate adsorption behavior on oxides, clay minerals, and soils using the triple layer model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Selenate adsorption behavior was investigated on amorphous aluminum oxide, amorphous iron oxide, goethite, clay minerals: kaolinites, montmorillonites, illite, and 18 soil samples from Hawaii, and the Southwestern and the Midwestern regions of the US as a function of solution pH. Selenate adsorpti...

  14. Molecular dynamics study of the mechanical loss in amorphous pure and doped silica.

    PubMed

    Hamdan, Rashid; Trinastic, Jonathan P; Cheng, H P

    2014-08-01

    Gravitational wave detectors and other precision measurement devices are limited by the thermal noise in the oxide coatings on the mirrors of such devices. We have investigated the mechanical loss in amorphous oxides by calculating the internal friction using classical, atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. We have implemented the trajectory bisection method and the non-local ridge method in the DL-POLY molecular dynamics simulation software to carry out those calculations. These methods have been used to locate the local potential energy minima that a system visits during a molecular dynamics trajectory and the transition state between any two consecutive minima. Using the numerically calculated barrier height distributions, barrier asymmetry distributions, relaxation times, and deformation potentials, we have calculated the internal friction of pure amorphous silica and silica mixed with other oxides. The results for silica compare well with experiment. Finally, we use the numerical calculations to comment on the validity of previously used theoretical assumptions. PMID:25106591

  15. Research on stable, high-efficiency amorphous silicon multijunction modules

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, M.; DelCueto, J.: Kampas, F.; Xi, J. )

    1993-02-01

    This report describes results from the first phase of a three-phase contract for the development of stable, high-efficiency, same-band-gap, amorphous silicon (a-Si) multijunction photovoltaic (PV) modules. The program involved improving the properties of individual layers of semiconductor and non-semiconductor materials and small-area single-junction and multijunction devices, as well as the multijunction modules. The semiconductor materials research was performed on a-Si p, i, and n layers, and on microcrystalline silicon n layers. These were deposited using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The non-semiconductor materials studied were tin oxide, for use as a transparent-conducting-oxide (TCO), and zinc oxide, for use as a back reflector and as a buffer layer between the TCO and the semiconductor layers. Tin oxide was deposited using atmospheric-pressure chemical vapor deposition. Zinc oxide was deposited using magnetron sputtering. The research indicated that the major challenge in the fabrication of a-Si multijunction PV modules is the contact between the two p-i-n cells. A structure that has low optical absorption but that also facilitates the recombination of electrons from the first p-i-n structure with holes from the second p-i-n structure is required. Non-semiconductor layers and a-Si semiconductor layers were tested without achieving the desired result.

  16. Locomotion of Amorphous Surface Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Arthur T. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An amorphous robot includes a compartmented bladder containing fluid, a valve assembly, and an outer layer encapsulating the bladder and valve assembly. The valve assembly draws fluid from a compartment(s) and discharges the drawn fluid into a designated compartment to displace the designated compartment with respect to the surface. Another embodiment includes elements each having a variable property, an outer layer that encapsulates the elements, and a control unit. The control unit energizes a designated element to change its variable property, thereby moving the designated element. The elements may be electromagnetic spheres with a variable polarity or shape memory polymers with changing shape and/or size. Yet another embodiment includes an elongated flexible tube filled with ferrofluid, a moveable electromagnet, an actuator, and a control unit. The control unit energizes the electromagnet and moves the electromagnet via the actuator to magnetize the ferrofluid and lengthen the flexible tube.

  17. Opposite correlations between cation disordering and amorphization resistance in spinels versus pyrochlores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uberuaga, Blas Pedro; Tang, Ming; Jiang, Chao; Valdez, James A.; Smith, Roger; Wang, Yongqiang; Sickafus, Kurt E.

    2015-10-01

    Understanding and predicting radiation damage evolution in complex materials is crucial for developing next-generation nuclear energy sources. Here, using a combination of ion beam irradiation, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, we show that, contrary to the behaviour observed in pyrochlores, the amorphization resistance of spinel compounds correlates directly with the energy to disorder the structure. Using a combination of atomistic simulation techniques, we ascribe this behaviour to structural defects on the cation sublattice that are present in spinel but not in pyrochlore. Specifically, because of these structural defects, there are kinetic pathways for the relaxation of disorder in spinel that are absent in pyrochlore. This leads to a direct correlation between amorphization resistance and disordering energetics in spinel, the opposite of that observed in pyrochlores. These results provide new insight into the origins of amorphization resistance in complex oxides beyond fluorite derivatives.

  18. Opposite correlations between cation disordering and amorphization resistance in spinels versus pyrochlores.

    PubMed

    Uberuaga, Blas Pedro; Tang, Ming; Jiang, Chao; Valdez, James A; Smith, Roger; Wang, Yongqiang; Sickafus, Kurt E

    2015-01-01

    Understanding and predicting radiation damage evolution in complex materials is crucial for developing next-generation nuclear energy sources. Here, using a combination of ion beam irradiation, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, we show that, contrary to the behaviour observed in pyrochlores, the amorphization resistance of spinel compounds correlates directly with the energy to disorder the structure. Using a combination of atomistic simulation techniques, we ascribe this behaviour to structural defects on the cation sublattice that are present in spinel but not in pyrochlore. Specifically, because of these structural defects, there are kinetic pathways for the relaxation of disorder in spinel that are absent in pyrochlore. This leads to a direct correlation between amorphization resistance and disordering energetics in spinel, the opposite of that observed in pyrochlores. These results provide new insight into the origins of amorphization resistance in complex oxides beyond fluorite derivatives. PMID:26510750

  19. Near-infrared–driven decomposition of metal precursors yields amorphous electrocatalytic films

    PubMed Central

    Salvatore, Danielle A.; Dettelbach, Kevan E.; Hudkins, Jesse R.; Berlinguette, Curtis P.

    2015-01-01

    Amorphous metal-based films lacking long-range atomic order have found utility in applications ranging from electronics applications to heterogeneous catalysis. Notwithstanding, there is a limited set of fabrication methods available for making amorphous films, particularly in the absence of a conducting substrate. We introduce herein a scalable preparative method for accessing oxidized and reduced phases of amorphous films that involves the efficient decomposition of molecular precursors, including simple metal salts, by exposure to near-infrared (NIR) radiation. The NIR-driven decomposition process provides sufficient localized heating to trigger the liberation of the ligand from solution-deposited precursors on substrates, but insufficient thermal energy to form crystalline phases. This method provides access to state-of-the-art electrocatalyst films, as demonstrated herein for the electrolysis of water, and extends the scope of usable substrates to include nonconducting and temperature-sensitive platforms. PMID:26601148

  20. Opposite correlations between cation disordering and amorphization resistance in spinels versus pyrochlores

    PubMed Central

    Uberuaga, Blas Pedro; Tang, Ming; Jiang, Chao; Valdez, James A.; Smith, Roger; Wang, Yongqiang; Sickafus, Kurt E.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding and predicting radiation damage evolution in complex materials is crucial for developing next-generation nuclear energy sources. Here, using a combination of ion beam irradiation, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, we show that, contrary to the behaviour observed in pyrochlores, the amorphization resistance of spinel compounds correlates directly with the energy to disorder the structure. Using a combination of atomistic simulation techniques, we ascribe this behaviour to structural defects on the cation sublattice that are present in spinel but not in pyrochlore. Specifically, because of these structural defects, there are kinetic pathways for the relaxation of disorder in spinel that are absent in pyrochlore. This leads to a direct correlation between amorphization resistance and disordering energetics in spinel, the opposite of that observed in pyrochlores. These results provide new insight into the origins of amorphization resistance in complex oxides beyond fluorite derivatives. PMID:26510750

  1. Amorphous metal alloys produced by mechanical alloying

    SciTech Connect

    Tiainen, T.J.; Schwarz, R.B.

    1989-01-01

    Mechanical alloying is a powder metallurgy method used in commercial production of high temperature superalloys. Under specific conditions, mechanical alloying allows the synthesis of amorphous metal alloys from mixtures of pure metal powders or from the powders of intermetallic compounds. Because the amorphizing transformation during mechanical alloying is a solid state reaction, most of the difficulties related to the amorphization by rapid solidification of melts can be avoided. Mechanical alloying allows the synthesis of amorphous alloys from metals with high melting temperatures and the resulting alloys have interesting properties such as high hardness and high crystallization temperatures. We used mechanical alloying for the synthesis of amorphous alloys in the binary alloy systems Nl-Sn, Nb-Si and Al-Hf. The amorphous alloy powders were characterized by x-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, scanning and transmission electron microscopy and hardness measurements. Produced alloys were compacted by hot pressing and the obtained compacts were characterized by x-ray diffraction, density and hardness measurements and by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The results of the amorphization and compaction studies are presented and discussed together with the characteristics of the mechanical alloying process. 15 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Amorphous alloys for brazing copper based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ?erban, V. A.; Codrean, C.; U?u, D.; Opri?, C.

    2009-01-01

    Silver based alloys are used widely when brazing copper based alloys. Due to its high cost, researchers try to obtain silver free brazing alloys, in the shape of amorphous structure ribbons, avoiding thus the formation of intermetallic compounds that diminish its ductility and plasticity. In this paper, the authors present their results in trying to obtain brazing alloys from the Cu-Zn-Ni-P family, ribbon shaped with amorphous structure, using the melt spinning method. The amorphous character of the processed alloy is emphasized by X-Ray diffraction, and the brazed joints made with the alloy were submitted to metallographic analysis and shearing tests.

  3. Understanding the Structure of Amorphous Thin Film Hafnia - Final Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Miranda, Andre

    2015-08-27

    Hafnium Oxide (HfO2) amorphous thin films are being used as gate oxides in transistors because of their high dielectric constant (?) over Silicon Dioxide. The present study looks to find the atomic structure of HfO2 thin films which hasn’t been done with the technique of this study. In this study, two HfO2 samples were studied. One sample was made with thermal atomic layer deposition (ALD) on top of a Chromium and Gold layer on a silicon wafer. The second sample was made with plasma ALD on top of a Chromium and Gold layer on a Silicon wafer. Both films were deposited at a thickness of 50nm. To obtain atomic structure information, Grazing Incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) was carried out on the HfO2 samples. Because of this, absorption, footprint, polarization, and dead time corrections were applied to the scattering intensity data collected. The scattering curves displayed a difference in structure between the ALD processes. The plasma ALD sample showed the broad peak characteristic of an amorphous structure whereas the thermal ALD sample showed an amorphous structure with characteristics of crystalline materials. This appears to suggest that the thermal process results in a mostly amorphous material with crystallites within. Further, the scattering intensity data was used to calculate a pair distribution function (PDF) to show more atomic structure. The PDF showed atom distances in the plasma ALD sample had structure up to 10 Å, while the thermal ALD sample showed the same structure below 10 Å. This structure that shows up below 10 Å matches the bond distances of HfO2 published in literature. The PDF for the thermal ALD sample also showed peaks up to 20 Å, suggesting repeating atomic spacing outside the HfO2 molecule in the sample. This appears to suggest that there is some crystalline structure within the thermal ALD sample.

  4. Amorphization and reduction of thermal conductivity in porous silicon by irradiation with swift heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newby, Pascal J.; Canut, Bruno; Bluet, Jean-Marie; Gomès, Séverine; Isaiev, Mykola; Burbelo, Roman; Termentzidis, Konstantinos; Chantrenne, Patrice; Fréchette, Luc G.; Lysenko, Vladimir

    2013-07-01

    In this article, we demonstrate that the thermal conductivity of nanostructured porous silicon is reduced by amorphization and also that this amorphous phase in porous silicon can be created by swift (high-energy) heavy ion irradiation. Porous silicon samples with 41%-75% porosity are irradiated with 110 MeV uranium ions at six different fluences. Structural characterisation by micro-Raman spectroscopy and SEM imaging show that swift heavy ion irradiation causes the creation of an amorphous phase in porous Si but without suppressing its porous structure. We demonstrate that the amorphization of porous silicon is caused by electronic-regime interactions, which is the first time such an effect is obtained in crystalline silicon with single-ion species. Furthermore, the impact on the thermal conductivity of porous silicon is studied by micro-Raman spectroscopy and scanning thermal microscopy. The creation of an amorphous phase in porous silicon leads to a reduction of its thermal conductivity, up to a factor of 3 compared to the non-irradiated sample. Therefore, this technique could be used to enhance the thermal insulation properties of porous Si. Finally, we show that this treatment can be combined with pre-oxidation at 300 °C, which is known to lower the thermal conductivity of porous Si, in order to obtain an even greater reduction.

  5. Amorphization of cobalt monoxide nanocrystals and related explosive gas sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L. H.; Xiao, J.; Yang, G. W.

    2015-10-01

    Amorphous nanomaterials have attracted attention due to their excellent performances, highly comparable to their crystalline counterparts. Sensor materials with amorphous phases are usually evaluated to be unsuitable for sensors because of poor performance. As a matter of fact, amorphous nanomaterials have rather unique sensor behaviors. Here, we report the amorphousization of cobalt monoxide (CoO) nanocrystals driven by a unique process involved in laser ablation in liquid (LAL). We also established that a fast and nonequilibrium process created by LAL results in the amorphousization of nanocrystals. The as-prepared amorphous CoO (a-CoO) nanoflakes possess a high aspect ratio, which showed good sensing of explosive gases. The fabricated gas sensor can detect CO and H2 at levels as low as 5 and 10 ppm, respectively, at 100 °C. The performance characteristics of this sensor, including high sensitivity, low working temperature, and low detection limit, are superior to those of sensors made with crystalline phase oxides. Meanwhile, a temperature-dependent p-n transition was observed in the sensor’s response to CO, suggesting that the sensing properties can be tailored by changing the carrier type, thus tuning the selectivity of sensors to different gases. These findings demonstrate the potential applications of amorphous nanomaterials as gas sensor components.

  6. Amorphization and reduction of thermal conductivity in porous silicon by irradiation with swift heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, Pascal J.; Canut, Bruno; Bluet, Jean-Marie; Lysenko, Vladimir; Gomes, Severine; Isaiev, Mykola; Burbelo, Roman; Chantrenne, Patrice; Frechette, Luc G.

    2013-07-07

    In this article, we demonstrate that the thermal conductivity of nanostructured porous silicon is reduced by amorphization and also that this amorphous phase in porous silicon can be created by swift (high-energy) heavy ion irradiation. Porous silicon samples with 41%-75% porosity are irradiated with 110 MeV uranium ions at six different fluences. Structural characterisation by micro-Raman spectroscopy and SEM imaging show that swift heavy ion irradiation causes the creation of an amorphous phase in porous Si but without suppressing its porous structure. We demonstrate that the amorphization of porous silicon is caused by electronic-regime interactions, which is the first time such an effect is obtained in crystalline silicon with single-ion species. Furthermore, the impact on the thermal conductivity of porous silicon is studied by micro-Raman spectroscopy and scanning thermal microscopy. The creation of an amorphous phase in porous silicon leads to a reduction of its thermal conductivity, up to a factor of 3 compared to the non-irradiated sample. Therefore, this technique could be used to enhance the thermal insulation properties of porous Si. Finally, we show that this treatment can be combined with pre-oxidation at 300 Degree-Sign C, which is known to lower the thermal conductivity of porous Si, in order to obtain an even greater reduction.

  7. Amorphization of cobalt monoxide nanocrystals and related explosive gas sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Li, L H; Xiao, J; Yang, G W

    2015-10-16

    Amorphous nanomaterials have attracted attention due to their excellent performances, highly comparable to their crystalline counterparts. Sensor materials with amorphous phases are usually evaluated to be unsuitable for sensors because of poor performance. As a matter of fact, amorphous nanomaterials have rather unique sensor behaviors. Here, we report the amorphousization of cobalt monoxide (CoO) nanocrystals driven by a unique process involved in laser ablation in liquid (LAL). We also established that a fast and nonequilibrium process created by LAL results in the amorphousization of nanocrystals. The as-prepared amorphous CoO (a-CoO) nanoflakes possess a high aspect ratio, which showed good sensing of explosive gases. The fabricated gas sensor can detect CO and H2 at levels as low as 5 and 10 ppm, respectively, at 100 °C. The performance characteristics of this sensor, including high sensitivity, low working temperature, and low detection limit, are superior to those of sensors made with crystalline phase oxides. Meanwhile, a temperature-dependent p-n transition was observed in the sensor's response to CO, suggesting that the sensing properties can be tailored by changing the carrier type, thus tuning the selectivity of sensors to different gases. These findings demonstrate the potential applications of amorphous nanomaterials as gas sensor components. PMID:26392266

  8. Origin of ferromagnetism enhancement in bi-layer chromium-doped indium zinc oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, C. Y.

    2012-08-06

    This work demonstrates that by controlling the rapid thermal annealing temperature, amorphous chromium-doped indium zinc oxide films develop an amorphous-crystalline bi-layer structure and show magnetization up to {approx}30 emu/cm{sup 3}. The crystalline layer arises from significant out-diffusion of Zn from surfaces, leading to a large difference in the Zn:In ratio in amorphous and crystalline layers. Doped Cr ions in amorphous and crystalline layers form different valence configurations, creating a charge reservoir which transfers electrons through amorphous-crystalline interfaces and in turn enhances ferromagnetism.

  9. Corrosion resistant amorphous metals and methods of forming corrosion resistant amorphous metals

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, Joseph C.; Wong, Frank M.G.; Haslam, Jeffery J.; Yang, Nancy; Lavernia, Enrique J.; Blue, Craig A.; Graeve, Olivia A.; Bayles, Robert; Perepezko, John H.; Kaufman, Larry; Schoenung, Julie; Ajdelsztajn, Leo

    2014-07-15

    A system for coating a surface comprises providing a source of amorphous metal, providing ceramic particles, and applying the amorphous metal and the ceramic particles to the surface by a spray. The coating comprises a composite material made of amorphous metal that contains one or more of the following elements in the specified range of composition: yttrium (.gtoreq.1 atomic %), chromium (14 to 18 atomic %), molybdenum (.gtoreq.7 atomic %), tungsten (.gtoreq.1 atomic %), boron (.ltoreq.5 atomic %), or carbon (.gtoreq.4 atomic %).

  10. Corrosion resistant amorphous metals and methods of forming corrosion resistant amorphous metals

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph C. (Tracy, CA); Wong, Frank M. G. (Livermore, CA); Haslam, Jeffery J. (Livermore, CA); Yang, Nancy (Lafayette, CA); Lavernia, Enrique J. (Davis, CA); Blue, Craig A. (Knoxville, TN); Graeve, Olivia A. (Reno, NV); Bayles, Robert (Annandale, VA); Perepezko, John H. (Madison, WI); Kaufman, Larry (Brookline, MA); Schoenung, Julie (Davis, CA); Ajdelsztajn, Leo (Walnut Creek, CA)

    2009-11-17

    A system for coating a surface comprises providing a source of amorphous metal, providing ceramic particles, and applying the amorphous metal and the ceramic particles to the surface by a spray. The coating comprises a composite material made of amorphous metal that contains one or more of the following elements in the specified range of composition: yttrium (.gtoreq.1 atomic %), chromium (14 to 18 atomic %), molybdenum (.gtoreq.7 atomic %), tungsten (.gtoreq.1 atomic %), boron (.ltoreq.5 atomic %), or carbon (.gtoreq.4 atomic %).

  11. The microscope structures of amorphous phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olego, D. J.; Baumann, J. A.; Schachter, R.

    1985-03-01

    The microscopic structures of thin films of amorphous phosphorus have been investigated by Raman scattering. The thin films were deposited by vacuum evaporation at substrate temperatures T s between 300 and 510K. The Raman spectra of the films were compared with vibrational spectra of different allotropes of phosphorus: orthohombic black P, bulk amorphous red P and Hittorf's P. The structure of the films with T s ? 300K is built up of double layers similar to those of orthorhombic black P. For T s?510K the thin films have a structure similar to bulk amorphous red P based on the pentagonal tubes of Hittorf's P. A continuous transformation from one structure to the other is indicated by the Raman spectra of the films at intermediate T s. The Raman measurements support early determinations of the structures of amorphous phosphorus inferred from radial distribution functions.

  12. Modelling morphogenesis as an amorphous computation

    E-print Network

    Bhattacharyya, Arnab

    2006-01-01

    This thesis presents a programming-language viewpoint for morphogenesis, the process of shape formation during embryological development. We model morphogenesis as a self-organizing, self-repairing amorphous computation ...

  13. Solar system ice - Amorphous or crystalline?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smoluchowski, R.

    1983-01-01

    The meteoritic bombardment of icy surfaces is discussed, focusing on the formation of amorphous ice and its thermal, mechanical, and optical properties. A numerical code has been developed for evaluating the ratio of the volume of the melted and vaporized ice target to the volume of the projectile that has impacted the surface and left a crater. However, water will only vaporize with impact speeds over 4 to 6 km/sec, and subsequent condensation into ice below 150 K will produce amorphous ice. A denser form of amorphous ice exists below 10 K, with the transition into a crystalline form occurring above 150 K. Maximum impact velocities have been defined for all major bodies in the solar system, with the finding that crystalline ice will form in the crater while amorphous ice will form on the ejecta. The amount of each is dependent on the ratio of solidified water to condensed water vapor and on the fraction of solid ejecta.

  14. Stability of Amorphous Structures with Voids

    E-print Network

    Charanbir kaur; Shankar P. Das

    2001-03-21

    We incorporate the role of free volume in the density function of the amorphous structure and study its effects on the stability of such structures. The Density Functional Theory is used to explore this ``Free Volume Model'' of the supercooled structures. The Free energy minimization is carried out using the void concentration as a variational parameter. A critical value of this concentration exists corresponding to the Free energy minima of the amorphous structure. An increase in the stability is observed due to the inclusion of voids in the density structure. This study is conducted for both the weakly and highly localized amorphous structures. The free volume concentration shows a power law decrease with density for the weakly localized states and a linear decrease for the highly localized amorphous structures.

  15. LASER TRANSFERRED HYDROUS RUTHENIUM OXIDE ELECTRODES FOR MICRO-ULTRACAPACITORS

    E-print Network

    Arnold, Craig B.

    LASER TRANSFERRED HYDROUS RUTHENIUM OXIDE ELECTRODES FOR MICRO-ULTRACAPACITORS Craig B Hydrous ruthenium oxide (RuO2 ·0.5 H2O) electrodes have been deposited un- der ambient conditions using). Amorphous hydrous ruthenium oxide (RuO2 · x H2O) is an ideal electrode material for a micro

  16. Reversible amorphization and the catalytically active state of crystalline Co3O4 during oxygen evolution.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Arno; Martinez-Moreno, Elias; Teschner, Detre; Chernev, Petko; Gliech, Manuel; de Araújo, Jorge Ferreira; Reier, Tobias; Dau, Holger; Strasser, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Water splitting catalysed by earth-abundant materials is pivotal for global-scale production of non-fossil fuels, yet our understanding of the active catalyst structure and reactivity is still insufficient. Here we report on the structurally reversible evolution of crystalline Co3O4 electrocatalysts during oxygen evolution reaction identified using advanced in situ X-ray techniques. At electrode potentials facilitating oxygen evolution, a sub-nanometre shell of the Co3O4 is transformed into an X-ray amorphous CoOx(OH)y which comprises di-?-oxo-bridged Co(3+/4+) ions. Unlike irreversible amorphizations, here, the formation of the catalytically-active layer is reversed by re-crystallization upon return to non-catalytic electrode conditions. The Co3O4 material thus combines the stability advantages of a controlled, stable crystalline material with high catalytic activity, thanks to the structural flexibility of its active amorphous oxides. We propose that crystalline oxides may be tailored for generating reactive amorphous surface layers at catalytic potentials, just to return to their stable crystalline state under rest conditions. PMID:26456525

  17. From amorphous to crystalline silicon nanoclusters: structural effects on exciton properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrero-González, L. J.; Nunes, L. A. O.; Guimarães, F. E. G.; Wojcik, J.; Mascher, P.; Gennaro, A. M.; Tirado, M.; Comedi, D.

    2011-12-01

    Synchrotron x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and electron spin resonance (ESR) experiments were performed to determine, in combination with Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction (XRD) data from previous reports, the structure and paramagnetic defect status of Si-nanoclusters (ncls) at various intermediate formation stages in Si-rich Si oxide films having different Si concentrations (y = 0.36-0.42 in SiyO1-y), fabricated by electron cyclotron resonance plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition and isochronally (2 h) annealed at various temperatures (Ta = 900-1100?°C) under either Ar or (Ar + 5%H2) atmospheres. The corresponding emission properties were studied by stationary and time dependent photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy in correlation with the structural and defect properties. To explain the experimental data, we propose crystallization by nucleation within already existing amorphous Si-ncls as the mechanism for the formation of the Si nanocrystals in the oxide matrix. The cluster-size dependent partial crystallization of Si-ncls at intermediate Ta can be qualitatively understood in terms of a ‘crystalline core-amorphous shell’ Si-ncl model. The amorphous shell, which is invisible in most diffraction and electron microscopy experiments, is found to have an important impact on light emission. As the crystalline core grows at the expense of a thinning amorphous shell with increasing Ta, the PL undergoes a transition from a regime dominated by disorder-induced effects to a situation where quantum confinement of excitons prevails.

  18. Properties of Amorphous Carbon Microspheres Synthesised by Palm Oil-CVD Method

    SciTech Connect

    Zobir, S. A. M.; Zainal, Z.; Sarijo, S. H.; Rusop, M.

    2011-03-30

    Amorphous carbon microspheres were synthesized using a dual-furnace chemical vapour deposition method at 800-1000 deg. C. Palm oil-based cooking oil (PO) and zinc nitrate solution was used as a carbon source and catalyst precursor, respectively with PO to zinc nitrate ratio of 30:20 (v/v) and a silicon wafer as the sample target. Regular microsphere shape of the amorphous carbons was obtained and a uniform microsphere structure improved as the carbonization temperature increased from 800 to 1000 deg. C. At 800 deg. C, no regular microspheres were formed but more uniform structure is observed at 900 deg. C. Generally the microspheres size is uniform when the heating temperature was increased to 1000 deg. C, but the presence of mixed sizes can still be observed. X-ray diffraction patterns show the presence of oxide of carbon, ZnO phase together with Zn oxalate phase. Raman spectra show two broad peaks characteristic to amorphous carbon at 1344 and 1582 cm{sup -1} for the D and G bands, respectively. These bands become more prominent as the preparation temperature increased from 800 to 1000 deg. C. This is in agreement with the formation of amorphous carbon microspheres as shown by the FESEM study and other Zn-based phases as a result of the oxidation process of the palm oil as the carbon source and the zinc nitrate as the catalyst precursor, respectively.

  19. Reversible amorphization and the catalytically active state of crystalline Co3O4 during oxygen evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, Arno; Martinez-Moreno, Elias; Teschner, Detre; Chernev, Petko; Gliech, Manuel; de Araújo, Jorge Ferreira; Reier, Tobias; Dau, Holger; Strasser, Peter

    2015-10-01

    Water splitting catalysed by earth-abundant materials is pivotal for global-scale production of non-fossil fuels, yet our understanding of the active catalyst structure and reactivity is still insufficient. Here we report on the structurally reversible evolution of crystalline Co3O4 electrocatalysts during oxygen evolution reaction identified using advanced in situ X-ray techniques. At electrode potentials facilitating oxygen evolution, a sub-nanometre shell of the Co3O4 is transformed into an X-ray amorphous CoOx(OH)y which comprises di-?-oxo-bridged Co3+/4+ ions. Unlike irreversible amorphizations, here, the formation of the catalytically-active layer is reversed by re-crystallization upon return to non-catalytic electrode conditions. The Co3O4 material thus combines the stability advantages of a controlled, stable crystalline material with high catalytic activity, thanks to the structural flexibility of its active amorphous oxides. We propose that crystalline oxides may be tailored for generating reactive amorphous surface layers at catalytic potentials, just to return to their stable crystalline state under rest conditions.

  20. Reversible amorphization and the catalytically active state of crystalline Co3O4 during oxygen evolution

    PubMed Central

    Bergmann, Arno; Martinez-Moreno, Elias; Teschner, Detre; Chernev, Petko; Gliech, Manuel; de Araújo, Jorge Ferreira; Reier, Tobias; Dau, Holger; Strasser, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Water splitting catalysed by earth-abundant materials is pivotal for global-scale production of non-fossil fuels, yet our understanding of the active catalyst structure and reactivity is still insufficient. Here we report on the structurally reversible evolution of crystalline Co3O4 electrocatalysts during oxygen evolution reaction identified using advanced in situ X-ray techniques. At electrode potentials facilitating oxygen evolution, a sub-nanometre shell of the Co3O4 is transformed into an X-ray amorphous CoOx(OH)y which comprises di-?-oxo-bridged Co3+/4+ ions. Unlike irreversible amorphizations, here, the formation of the catalytically-active layer is reversed by re-crystallization upon return to non-catalytic electrode conditions. The Co3O4 material thus combines the stability advantages of a controlled, stable crystalline material with high catalytic activity, thanks to the structural flexibility of its active amorphous oxides. We propose that crystalline oxides may be tailored for generating reactive amorphous surface layers at catalytic potentials, just to return to their stable crystalline state under rest conditions. PMID:26456525

  1. Amorphous Phases on the Surface of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rampe, E. B.; Morris, R. V.; Ruff, S. W.; Horgan, B.; Dehouck, E.; Achilles, C. N.; Ming, D. W.; Bish, D. L.; Chipera, S. J.

    2014-01-01

    Both primary (volcanic/impact glasses) and secondary (opal/silica, allophane, hisingerite, npOx, S-bearing) amorphous phases appear to be major components of martian surface materials based on orbital and in-situ measurements. A key observation is that whereas regional/global scale amorphous components include altered glass and npOx, local scale amorphous phases include hydrated silica/opal. This suggests widespread alteration at low water-to-rock ratios, perhaps due to snow/ice melt with variable pH, and localized alteration at high water-to-rock ratios. Orbital and in-situ measurements of the regional/global amorphous component on Mars suggests that it is made up of at least three phases: npOx, amorphous silicate (likely altered glass), and an amorphous S-bearing phase. Fundamental questions regarding the composition and the formation of the regional/global amorphous component(s) still remain: Do the phases form locally or have they been homogenized through aeolian activity and derived from the global dust? Is the parent glass volcanic, impact, or both? Are the phases separate or intimately mixed (e.g., as in palagonite)? When did the amorphous phases form? To address the question of source (local and/or global), we need to look for variations in the different phases within the amorphous component through continued modeling of the chemical composition of the amorphous phases in samples from Gale using CheMin and APXS data. If we find variations (e.g., a lack of or enrichment in amorphous silicate in some samples), this may imply a local source for some phases. Furthermore, the chemical composition of the weathering products may give insight into the formation mechanisms of the parent glass (e.g., impact glasses contain higher Al and lower Si [30], so we might expect allophane as a weathering product of impact glass). To address the question of whether these phases are separate or intimately mixed, we need to do laboratory studies of naturally altered samples made up of mixed phases (e.g., palagonite) and synthetic single phases to determine their short-range order structures and calculate their XRD patterns to use in models of CheMin data. Finally, to address the timing of the alteration, we need to study rocks on the martian surface of different ages that may contain glass (volcanic or impact) with MSL and future rovers to better understand how glass alters on the martian surface, if that alteration mechanism is universal, and if alteration spans across long periods of time or if there is a time past which unaltered glass remains.

  2. Surface smoothing effect of an amorphous thin film deposited by atomic layer deposition on a surface with nano-sized roughness

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, W. S. Wan, X.; Xu, Y.; Wong, H.; Zhang, J.; Luo, J. K.; Institute of Renewable Energy and Environment Technology, Bolton University, Deane Road, Bolton BL3 5 AB

    2014-02-15

    Previously, Lau (one of the authors) pointed out that the deposition of an amorphous thin film by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on a substrate with nano-sized roughness probably has a surface smoothing effect. In this letter, polycrystalline zinc oxide deposited by ALD onto a smooth substrate was used as a substrate with nano-sized roughness. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) were used to demonstrate that an amorphous aluminum oxide thin film deposited by ALD can reduce the surface roughness of a polycrystalline zinc oxide coated substrate.

  3. Amorphous silica nanoparticles impair vascular homeostasis and induce systemic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Nemmar, Abderrahim; Albarwani, Sulayma; Beegam, Sumaya; Yuvaraju, Priya; Yasin, Javed; Attoub, Samir; Ali, Badreldin H

    2014-01-01

    Amorphous silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) are being used in biomedical, pharmaceutical, and many other industrial applications entailing human exposure. However, their potential vascular and systemic pathophysiologic effects are not fully understood. Here, we investigated the acute (24 hours) systemic toxicity of intraperitoneally administered 50 nm and 500 nm SiNPs in mice (0.5 mg/kg). Both sizes of SiNPs induced a platelet proaggregatory effect in pial venules and increased plasma concentration of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. Elevated plasma levels of von Willebrand factor and fibrinogen and a decrease in the number of circulating platelets were only seen following the administration of 50 nm SiNPs. The direct addition of SiNPs to untreated mouse blood significantly induced in vitro platelet aggregation in a dose-dependent fashion, and these effects were more pronounced with 50 nm SiNPs. Both sizes of SiNPs increased lactate dehydrogenase activity and interleukin 1? concentration. However, tumor necrosis factor ? concentration was only increased after the administration of 50 nm SiNPs. Nevertheless, plasma markers of oxidative stress, including 8-isoprostane, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, catalase, and glutathione S-transferase, were not affected by SiNPs. The in vitro exposure of human umbilical vein endothelial cells to SiNPs showed a reduced cellular viability, and more potency was seen with 50 nm SiNPs. Both sizes of SiNPs caused a decrease in endothelium-dependent relaxation of isolated small mesenteric arteries. We conclude that amorphous SiNPs cause systemic inflammation and coagulation events, and alter vascular reactivity. Overall, the effects observed with 50 nm SiNPs were more pronounced than those with 500 nm SiNPs. These findings provide new insight into the deleterious effect of amorphous SiNPs on vascular homeostasis. PMID:24936130

  4. Super adsorption capability from amorphousization of metal oxide nanoparticles for dye removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L. H.; Xiao, J.; Liu, P.; Yang, G. W.

    2015-03-01

    Transitional metal oxide nanoparticles as advanced environment and energy materials require very well absorption performance to apply in practice. Although most metal oxides are based on crystalline, high activities can also be achieved with amorphous phases. Here, we reported the adsorption behavior and mechanism of methyl blue (MB) on the amorphous transitional metal oxide (Fe, Co and Ni oxides) nanoparticles, and we demonstrated that the amorphousization of transitional metal oxide (Fe, Co and Ni oxides) nanoparticles driven by a novel process involving laser irradiation in liquid can create a super adsorption capability for MB, and the maximum adsorption capacity of the fabricated NiO amorphous nanostructure reaches up to 10584.6 mgg-1, the largest value reported to date for all MB adsorbents. The proof-of-principle investigation of NiO amorphous nanophase demonstrated the broad applicability of this methodology for obtaining new super dyes adsorbents.

  5. Super adsorption capability from amorphousization of metal oxide nanoparticles for dye removal

    PubMed Central

    Li, L. H.; Xiao, J.; Liu, P.; Yang, G. W.

    2015-01-01

    Transitional metal oxide nanoparticles as advanced environment and energy materials require very well absorption performance to apply in practice. Although most metal oxides are based on crystalline, high activities can also be achieved with amorphous phases. Here, we reported the adsorption behavior and mechanism of methyl blue (MB) on the amorphous transitional metal oxide (Fe, Co and Ni oxides) nanoparticles, and we demonstrated that the amorphousization of transitional metal oxide (Fe, Co and Ni oxides) nanoparticles driven by a novel process involving laser irradiation in liquid can create a super adsorption capability for MB, and the maximum adsorption capacity of the fabricated NiO amorphous nanostructure reaches up to 10584.6?mgg?1, the largest value reported to date for all MB adsorbents. The proof-of-principle investigation of NiO amorphous nanophase demonstrated the broad applicability of this methodology for obtaining new super dyes adsorbents. PMID:25761448

  6. The XRD Amorphous Component in John Klein Drill Fines at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Richard V.; Ming,, Douglas W.; Blake, David; Vaniman, David; Bish, David L; Chipera, Steve; Downs, Robert; Morrison, Shaunna; Gellert, Ralf; Campbell, Iain; Treiman, Alan H.; Achilles, Cherie; Bristow, Thomas; Crisp, Joy A.; McAdam, Amy; Archer, Paul Douglas; Sutter, Brad; Rampe, Elizabeth B.

    2013-01-01

    Drill fines of mudstone (targets John Klein and Cumberland) from the Sheepbed unit at Yel-lowknife Bay were analyzed by MSL payload elements including the Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin), APXS (Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer), and Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instruments. CheMin XRD results show a variety of crystalline phases including feldspar, pyroxene, olivine, oxides, oxyhydroxides, sulfates, sulfides, a tri-octahedral smectite, and XRD amorphous material. The drill fines are distinctly different from corresponding analyses of the global soil (target Rocknest) in that the mudstone samples contained detectable phyllosilicate. Here we focus on John Klein and combine CheMin and APXS data to calculate the chemical composition and concentration of the amorphous component. The chemical composition of the amorphous plus smectite component for John Klein was calculated by subtracting the abundance-weighted chemical composition of the individual XRD crystalline components from the bulk composition of John Kline as measured by APXS. The chemical composition of individual crystalline components was determined either by stoichiometry (e.g., hematite and magnetite) or from their unit cell parameters (e.g., feldspar, olivine, and pyroxene). The chemical composition of the amorphous + smectite component (approx 71 wt.% of bulk sample) and bulk chemical composition are similar. In order to calculate the chemical composition of the amorphous component, a chemical composition for the tri-octahedral smectite must be assumed. We selected two tri-octahedral smectites with very different MgO/(FeO + Fe2O3) ratios (34 and 1.3 for SapCa1 and Griffithite, respectively). Relative to bulk sample, the concentration of amorphous and smectite components are 40 and 29 wt.% for SapCa1 and 33 and 36 wt.% for Griffithite. The amount of smectite was calculated by requiring the MgO concentration to be approx 0 wt.% in the amorphous component. Griffithite is the preferred smectite because the position of its 021 diffraction peak is similar to that reported for John Klein. In both cases, the amorphous component has low SiO2 and MgO and high FeO + Fe2O3, P2O5, and SO3 concentrations relative to bulk sample. The chemical composition of the bulk drill fines and XRD crystalline, smectite, and amorphous components implies alteration of an initially basaltic material under near neutral conditions (not acid sulfate), with the sulfate incorporated later as veins of CaSO4 injected into the mudstone.

  7. Template confined synthesis of amorphous carbon nanotubes and its confocal Raman microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Maity, Supratim; Roychowdhury, Tuhin; Chattopadhyay, Kalyan Kumar

    2014-04-24

    Amorphous carbon nanotubes (aCNTs) were synthesized by AAO (anodic aluminum oxide) template at a temperature 500 °C in nitrogen atmosphere using the citric acid as a carbon source without the help of any catalyst particles. Morphological analysis of the as prepared samples was carried out by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). Confocal Raman imaging has been studied and an attempt has been made to find out the graphitic (sp{sup 2}) and disordered phase of the CNTs.

  8. Hydrogen transport in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, W.B.; Tsai, C.C. )

    1992-03-15

    The diffusive transport of hydrogen is used to investigate H trapping in hydrogen-depleted amorphous Si ({ital a}-Si) samples and to determine a rough H-diffusion density of states. The diffusion profiles show clear evidence of deep traps separated from shallow traps, and the results are well explained by a simple division of the H states into deep traps, shallow traps, and transport states. The concentration of deep traps is about (0.8--2){times}10{sup 20} cm{sup {minus}3}, of which about 30% can be identified with dangling bonds. The energy of the deep traps is at least 1.9 eV below the transport states. The diffusion is dispersive with a power-law time dependence and can be characterized by an exponential distribution of hopping barriers with a width of roughly 0.09 eV. The shallow traps are identified with clustered H pairs which determine the H chemical potential at high H concentrations. The results are compared with calculations and other recent ideas on H bonding energetics. The results are consistent with a range of possibilities. One extreme is the case in which H is predominately bonded on void surfaces and the transport energy is substantially different in {ital a}-Si than in crystalline Si ({ital c}-Si); the other extreme is the case in which H predominately resides in platelet structures and the transport energy is roughly the same as in {ital c}-Si. The actual case depends on the deposition conditions.

  9. Method of forming buried oxide layers in silicon

    DOEpatents

    Sadana, Devendra Kumar (Pleasantville, NY); Holland, Orin Wayne (Lenoir City, TN)

    2000-01-01

    A process for forming Silicon-On-Insulator is described incorporating the steps of ion implantation of oxygen into a silicon substrate at elevated temperature, ion implanting oxygen at a temperature below 200.degree. C. at a lower dose to form an amorphous silicon layer, and annealing steps to form a mixture of defective single crystal silicon and polycrystalline silicon or polycrystalline silicon alone and then silicon oxide from the amorphous silicon layer to form a continuous silicon oxide layer below the surface of the silicon substrate to provide an isolated superficial layer of silicon. The invention overcomes the problem of buried isolated islands of silicon oxide forming a discontinuous buried oxide layer.

  10. Studies on activated carbon capacitor materials loaded with different amounts of ruthenium oxide

    E-print Network

    Popov, Branko N.

    Studies on activated carbon capacitor materials loaded with different amounts of ruthenium oxide M Received 5 August 2000; accepted 29 August 2000 Abstract Ruthenium oxide±carbon composites with different reserved. Keywords: Carbon; Ruthenium oxide; Temperature treatment; Composites; Amorphous Ru oxide

  11. Constraints on abundance, composition, and nature of X-ray amorphous components of soils and rocks at Gale crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehouck, Erwin; McLennan, Scott M.; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Cousin, Agnès.

    2014-12-01

    X-ray diffraction patterns of the three samples analyzed by Curiosity's Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instrument during the first year of the Mars Science Laboratory mission—the Rocknest sand, and the John Klein and Cumberland drill fines, both extracted from the Sheepbed mudstone—show evidence for a significant amorphous component of unclear origin. We developed a mass balance calculation program that determines the range of possible chemical compositions of the crystalline and amorphous components of these samples within the uncertainties of mineral abundances derived from CheMin data. In turn, the chemistry constrains the minimum abundance of amorphous component required to have realistic compositions (all oxides ? 0 wt %): 21-22 wt % for Rocknest and 15-20 wt % for Cumberland, in good agreement with estimates derived from the diffraction patterns (~27 and ~31 wt %, respectively). Despite obvious differences between the Rocknest sand and the Sheepbed mudstone, the amorphous components of the two sites are chemically very similar, having comparable concentrations of SiO2, TiO2, Al2O3, Cr2O3, FeOT, CaO, Na2O, K2O, and P2O5. MgO tends to be lower in Rocknest, although it may also be comparable between the two samples depending on the exact composition of the smectite in Sheepbed. The only unambiguous difference is the SO3 content, which is always higher in Rocknest. The observed similarity suggests that the two amorphous components share a common origin or formation process. The individual phases possibly present within the amorphous components include: volcanic (or impact) glass, hisingerite (or silica + ferrihydrite), amorphous sulfates (or adsorbed SO42-), and nanophase ferric oxides.

  12. Amorphous silicon detectors in positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Conti, M. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA ); Perez-Mendez, V. )

    1989-12-01

    The physics of the detection process is studied and the performances of different Positron Emission Tomography (PET) system are evaluated by theoretical calculation and/or Monte Carlo Simulation (using the EGS code) in this paper, whose table of contents can be summarized as follows: a brief introduction to amorphous silicon detectors and some useful equation is presented; a Tantalum/Amorphous Silicon PET project is studied and the efficiency of the systems is studied by Monte Carlo Simulation; two similar CsI/Amorphous Silicon PET projects are presented and their efficiency and spatial resolution are studied by Monte Carlo Simulation, light yield and time characteristics of the scintillation light are discussed for different scintillators; some experimental result on light yield measurements are presented; a Xenon/Amorphous Silicon PET is presented, the physical mechanism of scintillation in Xenon is explained, a theoretical estimation of total light yield in Xenon and the resulting efficiency is discussed altogether with some consideration of the time resolution of the system; the amorphous silicon integrated electronics is presented, total noise and time resolution are evaluated in each of our applications; the merit parameters {epsilon}{sup 2}{tau}'s are evaluated and compared with other PET systems and conclusions are drawn; and a complete reference list for Xenon scintillation light physics and its applications is presented altogether with the listing of the developed simulation programs.

  13. [Amorphous form in pharmaceutical technological research].

    PubMed

    Mártha, Csaba; Jójártné, Laczkovich Orsolya; Szabóné, Révész Piroska

    2011-01-01

    Detecting and analysing of the amorphous phase are increasingly important in pharmaceutical technology. The amorphous or glassy state has a several advantages and disadvantages. The amorphous form can be applied in deliberate amorphization, when active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) is formulated in glassy state, or this form can appear accidentally during formulation or storage. The aim of this study was to characterize glass-forming properties of 13 different materials. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) was used as an analytical technique and T(g) and T(m) values were determined. The equation of T(g)/T(m) (K/K) was applied to determine the glass-forming tendencies. We made 2 groups of investigated substances. The first group was that we could not amorphized: tenoxicam, mannitol, niflumic acid, theophyllin and lidocain. The second group contains materials, which could be prepared in glassy form. This group can be divided into 2 sub-groups: poor-glass formers and good-glass formers. Poor-glass formers are following: meloxicam, ibuprofen and piroxicam. Good-glass formers are lacidipine, gemfibrosil, sorbitol, loratadine, chlorhexidine and clopidogrel hydrogensulfate. PMID:21595304

  14. SURVIVAL OF AMORPHOUS WATER ICE ON CENTAURS

    SciTech Connect

    Guilbert-Lepoutre, Aurelie

    2012-10-01

    Centaurs are believed to be Kuiper Belt objects in transition between Jupiter and Neptune before possibly becoming Jupiter family comets. Some indirect observational evidence is consistent with the presence of amorphous water ice in Centaurs. Some of them also display a cometary activity, probably triggered by the crystallization of the amorphous water ice, as suggested by Jewitt and this work. Indeed, we investigate the survival of amorphous water ice against crystallization, using a fully three-dimensional thermal evolution model. Simulations are performed for varying heliocentric distances and obliquities. They suggest that crystallization can be triggered as far as 16 AU, though amorphous ice can survive beyond 10 AU. The phase transition is an efficient source of outgassing up to 10-12 AU, which is broadly consistent with the observations of the active Centaurs. The most extreme case is 167P/CINEOS, which barely crystallizes in our simulations. However, amorphous ice can be preserved inside Centaurs in many heliocentric distance-obliquity combinations, below a {approx}5-10 m crystallized crust. We also find that outgassing due to crystallization cannot be sustained for a time longer than 10{sup 4}-10{sup 4} years, leading to the hypothesis that active Centaurs might have recently suffered from orbital changes. This could be supported by both observations (although limited) and dynamical studies.

  15. Understanding Thermal Conductivity in Amorphous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kommandur, Sampath; Yee, Shannon

    2014-03-01

    Current energy technologies such as thermoelectrics, photovoltaics, and LEDs make extensive use of amorphous materials and are limited by heat transfer. Device improvements necessitate a better understanding of the thermal conductivity in amorphous materials. While there are basic theories that capture the trends in thermal conductivity of a select set of amorphous materials, a general framework is needed to explain the fundamental transport of heat in all amorphous materials. One empirical theory that has been successful at describing the thermal conductivity in some materials is the k-min model, however, assumptions in that model limit its generalizability. Another theory defines the existence of propagons, diffusons, and locons, which constitute vibrational modes that carry heat. Our work first presents a summary of literature on the thermal conductivity in amorphous materials and then compares those theories to a breadth of experimental data. Based upon those results, a generic model is proposed that is widely applicable with the ultimate goal of this work being to describe the temperature dependent thermal conductivity of polymers. -/abstract- Sampath Kommandur and Shannon K. Yee 21.1.1: Thermoelectric Phenomena, Materials, Devices, and Applications (GER

  16. Amorphous Silicon Based Neutron Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Liwei

    2004-12-12

    Various large-scale neutron sources already build or to be constructed, are important for materials research and life science research. For all these neutron sources, neutron detectors are very important aspect. However, there is a lack of a high-performance and low-cost neutron beam monitor that provides time and temporal resolution. The objective of this SBIR Phase I research, collaboratively performed by Midwest Optoelectronics, LLC (MWOE), the University of Toledo (UT) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), is to demonstrate the feasibility for amorphous silicon based neutron beam monitors that are pixilated, reliable, durable, fully packaged, and fabricated with high yield using low-cost method. During the Phase I effort, work as been focused in the following areas: 1) Deposition of high quality, low-defect-density, low-stress a-Si films using very high frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (VHF PECVD) at high deposition rate and with low device shunting; 2) Fabrication of Si/SiO2/metal/p/i/n/metal/n/i/p/metal/SiO2/ device for the detection of alpha particles which are daughter particles of neutrons through appropriate nuclear reactions; and 3) Testing of various devices fabricated for alpha and neutron detection; As the main results: · High quality, low-defect-density, low-stress a-Si films have been successfully deposited using VHF PECVD on various low-cost substrates; · Various single-junction and double junction detector devices have been fabricated; · The detector devices fabricated have been systematically tested and analyzed. · Some of the fabricated devices are found to successfully detect alpha particles. Further research is required to bring this Phase I work beyond the feasibility demonstration toward the final prototype devices. The success of this project will lead to a high-performance, low-cost, X-Y pixilated neutron beam monitor that could be used in all of the neutron facilities worldwide. In addition, the technologies developed here could be used to develop X-ray and neutron monitors that could be used in the future for security checks at the airports and other critical facilities. The project would lead to devices that could significantly enhance the performance of multi-billion dollar neutron source facilities in the US and bring our nation to the forefront of neutron beam sciences and technologies which have enormous impact to materials, life science and military research and applications.

  17. Amorphous Diamond MEMS and Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    SULLIVAN, JOHN P.; FRIEDMANN, THOMAS A.; ASHBY, CAROL I.; DE BOER, MAARTEN P.; SCHUBERT, W. KENT; SHUL, RANDY J.; HOHLFELDER, ROBERT J.; LAVAN, D.A.

    2002-06-01

    This report describes a new microsystems technology for the creation of microsensors and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) using stress-free amorphous diamond (aD) films. Stress-free aD is a new material that has mechanical properties close to that of crystalline diamond, and the material is particularly promising for the development of high sensitivity microsensors and rugged and reliable MEMS. Some of the unique properties of aD include the ability to easily tailor film stress from compressive to slightly tensile, hardness and stiffness 80-90% that of crystalline diamond, very high wear resistance, a hydrophobic surface, extreme chemical inertness, chemical compatibility with silicon, controllable electrical conductivity from insulating to conducting, and biocompatibility. A variety of MEMS structures were fabricated from this material and evaluated. These structures included electrostatically-actuated comb drives, micro-tensile test structures, singly- and doubly-clamped beams, and friction and wear test structures. It was found that surface micromachined MEMS could be fabricated in this material easily and that the hydrophobic surface of the film enabled the release of structures without the need for special drying procedures or the use of applied hydrophobic coatings. Measurements using these structures revealed that aD has a Young's modulus of {approx}650 GPa, a tensile fracture strength of 8 GPa, and a fracture toughness of 8 MPa{center_dot}m {sup 1/2}. These results suggest that this material may be suitable in applications where stiction or wear is an issue. Flexural plate wave (FPW) microsensors were also fabricated from aD. These devices use membranes of aD as thin as {approx}100 nm. The performance of the aD FPW sensors was evaluated for the detection of volatile organic compounds using ethyl cellulose as the sensor coating. For comparable membrane thicknesses, the aD sensors showed better performance than silicon nitride based sensors. Greater than one order of magnitude increase in chemical sensitivity is expected through the use of ultra-thin aD membranes in the FPW sensor. The discoveries and development of the aD microsystems technology that were made in this project have led to new research projects in the areas of aD bioMEMS and aD radio frequency MEMS.

  18. Amorphous and microcrystalline silicon technology -- 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Schropp, R.; Branz, H.M.; Shimizu, Isamu; Wagner, S.; Hack, M.

    1999-08-01

    Although this new volume from MRS is the 16th in a long-standing and successful series, the focus is no longer limited to hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). The distinction between short- and medium-range order, and between homogeneous and heterogeneous semiconductor materials, is indeed too difficult to maintain. Instead, the volume covers amorphous and microcrystalline silicon from materials physics to new applications. Papers from a joint session with a symposium on ``Flat-Panel Display Materials and Large-Area Processes`` are included. The volume also features special focused sessions on heterogeneous materials, color sensors and radiation imaging, and parameter extraction and device modeling. Topics include: amorphous and polycrystalline thin-film transistors; solar cells; color and X-ray sensors, novel devices, luminescence and sensitization; device modeling and parameter extraction; growth, alloys and clathrates; metastability, hydrogen, atomic and electronic structure; defects and charge transport; and heterogeneous silicon--formation, properties and devices. It includes 152 papers.

  19. Synthesis and photocurrent of amorphous boron nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Liehui; Lei, Sidong; Hart, Amelia H. C.; Gao, Guanhui; Jafry, Huma; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M.

    2014-08-01

    Although theoretically feasible, synthesis of boron nanostructures is challenging due to the highly reactive nature, high melting and boiling points of boron. We have developed a thermal vapor transfer approach to synthesizing amorphous boron nanowire using a solid boron source. The amorphous nature and chemical composition of boron nanowires were characterized by high resolution transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, and electron energy loss spectroscopy. Optical properties and photoconduction of boron nanowires have not yet been reported. In our investigation, the amorphous boron nanowire showed much better optical and electrical properties than previously reported photo-response of crystalline boron nanobelts. When excited by a blue LED, the photo/dark current ratio (I/I0) is 1.5 and time constants in the order of tens of seconds. I/I0 is 1.17 using a green light.

  20. Nanocrystalline silicon/amorphous silicon dioxide superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Fauchet, P.M.; Tsybeskov, L.; Zacharias, M.; Hirschman, K.

    1998-12-31

    Thin layers made of densely packed silicon nanocrystals sandwiched between amorphous silicon dioxide layers have been manufactured and characterized. An amorphous silicon/amorphous silicon dioxide superlattice is first grown by CVD or RF sputtering. The a-Si layers are recrystallized in a two-step procedure (nucleation + growth) for form layers of nearly identical nanocrystals whose diameter is given by the initial a-Si layer thickness. The recrystallization is monitored using a variety of techniques, including TEM, X-Ray, Raman, and luminescence spectroscopies. When the a-Si layer thickness decreases (from 25 nm to 2.5 nm) or the a-SiO{sub 2} layer thickness increases (from 1.5 nm to 6 nm), the recrystallization temperature increases dramatically compared to that of a single a-Si film. The removal of the a-Si tissue present between the nanocrystals, the passivation of the nanocrystals, and their doping are discussed.

  1. Amorphous metallic films in silicon metallization systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    So, F.; Kolawa, E.; Nicolet, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    Diffusion barrier research was focussed on lowering the chemical reactivity of amorphous thin films on silicon. An additional area of concern is the reaction with metal overlays such as aluminum, silver, and gold. Gold was included to allow for technology transfer to gallium arsenide PV cells. Amorphous tungsten nitride films have shown much promise. Stability to annealing temperatures of 700, 800, and 550 C were achieved for overlays of silver, gold, and aluminum, respectively. The lower results for aluminum were not surprising because there is an eutectic that can form at a lower temperature. It seems that titanium and zirconium will remove the nitrogen from a tungsten nitride amorphous film and render it unstable. Other variables of research interest were substrate bias and base pressure during sputtering.

  2. Short range order in amorphous polycondensates

    SciTech Connect

    Lamers, C.; Richter, D.; Schweika, W.; Batoulis, J.; Sommer, K.; Cable, J.W.; Shapiro, S.M.

    1992-12-01

    The static coherent structure factors S(Q) of the polymer glass Bisphenol-A-Polycarbonate and its chemical variation Bisphenol-A- Polyctherkctone- both in differently deuterated versions- have been measured by spin polarized neutron scattering. The method of spin polarization analysis provided an experimental separation of coherent and incoherent scattering and a reliable intensity calibration. Results are compared to structure factors calculated for model structures which were obtained by ``amorphous cell`` computer simulations. In general reasonable agreement is found between experiment and simulation; however, certain discrepancies hint at an insufficient structural relaxation in the amorphous cell method. 15 refs, 1 fig, 1 tab.

  3. Ion bombardment and disorder in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Sidhu, L.S.; Gaspari, F.; Zukotynski, S.

    1997-07-01

    The effect of ion bombardment during growth on the structural and optical properties of amorphous silicon are presented. Two series of films were deposited under electrically grounded and positively biased substrate conditions. The biased samples displayed lower growth rates and increased hydrogen content relative to grounded counterparts. The film structure was examined using Raman spectroscopy. The transverse optic like phonon band position was used as a parameter to characterize network order. Biased samples displayed an increased order of the amorphous network relative to grounded samples. Furthermore, biased samples exhibited a larger optical gap. These results are correlated and attributed to reduced ion bombardment effects.

  4. Cooling of hot electrons in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Vanderhaghen, R.; Hulin, D.; Cuzeau, S.; White, J.O.

    1997-07-01

    Measurements of the cooling rate of hot carriers in amorphous silicon are made with a two-pump, one-probe technique. The experiment is simulated with a rate-equation model describing the energy transfer between a population of hot carriers and the lattice. An energy transfer rate proportional to the temperature difference is found to be consistent with the experimental data while an energy transfer independent of the temperature difference is not. This contrasts with the situation in crystalline silicon. The measured cooling rates are sufficient to explain the difficulty in observing avalanche effects in amorphous silicon.

  5. Thermal conductivity of sputtered amorphous Ge films

    SciTech Connect

    Zhan, Tianzhuo; Xu, Yibin; Goto, Masahiro; Tanaka, Yoshihisa; Kato, Ryozo; Sasaki, Michiko; Kagawa, Yutaka

    2014-02-15

    We measured the thermal conductivity of amorphous Ge films prepared by magnetron sputtering. The thermal conductivity was significantly higher than the value predicted by the minimum thermal conductivity model and increased with deposition temperature. We found that variations in sound velocity and Ge film density were not the main factors in the high thermal conductivity. Fast Fourier transform patterns of transmission electron micrographs revealed that short-range order in the Ge films was responsible for their high thermal conductivity. The results provide experimental evidences to understand the underlying nature of the variation of phonon mean free path in amorphous solids.

  6. Intense violet and blue light emission from Si nanowires fabricated via solid-liquid-solid growth from amorphous Si films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Peipei; Li, Yanli; Cai, Hua; Yang, Xu; Li, Hui; Sun, Jian; Xu, Ning; Wu, Jiada

    2015-08-01

    Violet and blue luminescent Si nanowires were fabricated by annealing an amorphous Si film on a Ni-coated Si substrate via solid-liquid-solid growth. The fabricated Si nanowires have an average diameter of 50 nm. The wire stem is composed of a crystalline Si core of several nanometers and an amorphous oxide sheath. The Si nanowires are capable of emitting strong violet and blue luminescence in the spectral region ranging from 380 to 500 nm, which has a very short decay time of tens of nanoseconds, and is remarkably different in spectral region and luminescence time from the luminescence emitted by Si nanocrystals.

  7. Crystallization of Amorphous Forsterite Promoted by Water Vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, D.; Tachibana, S.

    2015-07-01

    We found that crystallization of amorphous forsterite is promoted in the presence of water vapor, implying that water vapor may act as a catalyst for crystallization of amorphous silicates in protoplanetary disks.

  8. Remarkable Thermal Stability of Amorphous In-Zn-O Transparent Conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, M. P.; Readey, D. W.; van Hest, M. F. A. M.; Teplin, C. W.; Alleman, J. L.; Dabney, M. S.; Gedvilas, L. M.; Keyes, B. M.; To, B.; Perkins, J. D.; Ginley, D. S.

    2008-10-01

    Transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) are increasingly critical components in photovoltaic cells, low-e windows, flat panel displays, electrochromic devices, and flexible electronics. The conventional TCOs, such as Sn-doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3}, are crystalline single phase materials. Here, we report on In-Zn-O (IZO), a compositionally tunable amorphous TCO with some significantly improved properties. Compositionally graded thin film samples were deposited by co-sputtering from separate In{sub 2}O{sub 3} and ZnO targets onto glass substrates at 100 C. For the metals composition range of 55-84 cation% indium, the as-deposited IZO thin films are amorphous, smooth (R{sub RMS} < 0.4 nm), conductive ({sigma} {approx} 3000 {Omega}{sup -1} {center_dot} cm{sup -1}), and transparent in the visible (T{sub Vis} > 90%). Furthermore, the amorphous IZO thin films demonstrate remarkable functional and structural stability with respect to heating up to 600 C in either air or argon. Hence, though not completely understood at present, these amorphous materials constitute a new class of fundamentally interesting and technologically important high performance transparent conductors.

  9. Swift heavy ion irradiation-induced amorphization of La2Ti2O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sulgiye; Lang, Maik; Tracy, Cameron L.; Zhang, Jiaming; Zhang, Fuxiang; Trautmann, Christina; Kluth, Patrick; Rodriguez, Matias D.; Ewing, Rodney C.

    2014-05-01

    Polycrystalline La2Ti2O7 powders have been irradiated with 2.0 GeV 181Ta ions up to a fluence of 1 × 1013 ions/cm2. Radiation-induced structural modifications were analyzed using synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction (XRD), small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). An increase in the amorphous fraction as a function of fluence was revealed by XRD and Raman analyses and is evidenced by the reduction in intensity of the sharp Bragg maxima from the crystalline regions. Concurrently, diffraction maxima and vibrational absorption bands broaden with the increasing amorphous fraction. The cross-section for the crystalline-to-amorphous transformation (ion tracks) was determined by quantitative analysis of XRD patterns yielding a track diameter of d = 7.2 ± 0.9 nm. Slightly larger track diameters were obtained directly from TEM images (d = 10.6 ± 0.8 nm) and SAXS analysis (d = 10.6 ± 0.3 nm). High-resolution TEM images revealed that single tracks are entirely amorphous without any outer crystalline, disordered shell as found in pyrochlore oxides of the same stoichiometry. The large ratio of ionic radii of the A- and B-site cations (rA/rB = 1.94) means that disordering over the A- and B-sites is energetically unfavorable.

  10. Excimer laser induced oxidation of ion-implanted silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Fogarassy, E.; White, C.W.; Slaoui, A.; Fuchs, C.; Siffert, P.; Pennycook, S.J.

    1988-10-31

    We have investigated laser-induced oxidation of ion-implanted Si using a repetitively pulsed ArF laser, working at low-energy density (100--500 mJ/cm/sup 2/). Oxidation is observed at energy densities between the melt threshold and that required for epitaxial recrystallization of the amorphous layer. At these energy densities, oxidation is not observed on virgin silicon. The factors that influence the oxidation process are discussed.

  11. Robustness of amorphous silicon during the initial lithiation/ delithiation cycle

    E-print Network

    Cui, Yi

    on the electrochemical lithiation of amorphous silicon nanoparticles shows that amorphous silicon is more fracture resistant than crystalline silicon during lithiation. Nanoparticles of amorphous silicon can be lithiated and the underlying nickel substrate. For larger diameter pillars, the initiated interfacial crack is driven upward

  12. Amorphous Silicon TFT Instabilities in OLED Driver Circuit Applications

    E-print Network

    Petta, Jason

    Amorphous Silicon TFT Instabilities in OLED Driver Circuit Applications Lars Johanson 3 August 2004 #12;OLED Applications image from http://www.universaldisplay.com #12;Amorphous Silicon Thin Film Transistors · Transistor = electrical switch #12;Amorphous Silicon Thin Film Transistors #12;Threshold Voltage

  13. Plasma deposition of amorphous metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Hays, Auda K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1986-01-01

    Amorphous metal alloy coatings are plasma-deposited by dissociation of vapors of organometallic compounds and metalloid hydrides in the presence of a reducing gas, using a glow discharge. Tetracarbonylnickel, phosphine, and hydrogen constitute a typical reaction mixture of the invention, yielding a NiPC alloy.

  14. The Electronic Structure of Amorphous Carbon Nanodots.

    PubMed

    Margraf, Johannes T; Strauss, Volker; Guldi, Dirk M; Clark, Timothy

    2015-06-18

    We have studied hydrogen-passivated amorphous carbon nanostructures with semiempirical molecular orbital theory in order to provide an understanding of the factors that affect their electronic properties. Amorphous structures were first constructed using periodic calculations in a melt/quench protocol. Pure periodic amorphous carbon structures and their counterparts doped with nitrogen and/or oxygen feature large electronic band gaps. Surprisingly, descriptors such as the elemental composition and the number of sp(3)-atoms only influence the electronic structure weakly. Instead, the exact topology of the sp(2)-network in terms of effective conjugation defines the band gap. Amorphous carbon nanodots of different structures and sizes were cut out of the periodic structures. Our calculations predict the occurrence of localized electronic surface states, which give rise to interesting effects such as amphoteric reactivity and predicted optical band gaps in the near-UV/visible range. Optical and electronic gaps display a dependence on particle size similar to that of inorganic colloidal quantum dots. PMID:25731776

  15. Athermal nonlinear elastic constants of amorphous solids.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Smarajit; Lerner, Edan; Procaccia, Itamar

    2010-08-01

    We derive expressions for the lowest nonlinear elastic constants of amorphous solids in athermal conditions (up to third order), in terms of the interaction potential between the constituent particles. The effect of these constants cannot be disregarded when amorphous solids undergo instabilities such as plastic flow or fracture in the athermal limit; in such situations the elastic response increases enormously, bringing the system much beyond the linear regime. We demonstrate that the existing theory of thermal nonlinear elastic constants converges to our expressions in the limit of zero temperature. We motivate the calculation by discussing two examples in which these nonlinear elastic constants play a crucial role in the context of elastoplasticity of amorphous solids. The first example is the plasticity-induced memory that is typical to amorphous solids (giving rise to the Bauschinger effect). The second example is how to predict the next plastic event from knowledge of the nonlinear elastic constants. Using the results of our calculations we derive a simple differential equation for the lowest eigenvalue of the Hessian matrix in the external strain near mechanical instabilities; this equation predicts how the eigenvalue vanishes at the mechanical instability and the value of the strain where the mechanical instability takes place. PMID:20866874

  16. High resolution amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Kaplan, S.N.; Perez-Mendez, V.

    1992-05-26

    A radiation detector employing amorphous Si:H cells in an array with each detector cell having at least three contiguous layers (n-type, intrinsic, p-type), positioned between two electrodes to which a bias voltage is applied. An energy conversion layer atop the silicon cells intercepts incident radiation and converts radiation energy to light energy of a wavelength to which the silicon cells are responsive. A read-out device, positioned proximate to each detector element in an array allows each such element to be interrogated independently to determine whether radiation has been detected in that cell. The energy conversion material may be a layer of luminescent material having a columnar structure. In one embodiment a column of luminescent material detects the passage therethrough of radiation to be detected and directs a light beam signal to an adjacent a-Si:H film so that detection may be confined to one or more such cells in the array. One or both electrodes may have a comb structure, and the teeth of each electrode comb may be interdigitated for capacitance reduction. The amorphous Si:H film may be replaced by an amorphous Si:Ge:H film in which up to 40 percent of the amorphous material is Ge. Two dimensional arrays may be used in X-ray imaging, CT scanning, crystallography, high energy physics beam tracking, nuclear medicine cameras and autoradiography. 18 figs.

  17. Metal electrode for amorphous silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Richard (Princeton, NJ)

    1983-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell having an N-type region wherein the contact to the N-type region is composed of a material having a work function of about 3.7 electron volts or less. Suitable materials include strontium, barium and magnesium and rare earth metals such as gadolinium and yttrium.

  18. Amorphous molybdenum silicon superconducting thin films

    E-print Network

    Bosworth, D.; Sahonta, S.-L.; Hadfield, R. H.; Barber, Z. H.

    2015-08-04

    fabricated using WxSi1-x, though other amorphous superconductors such as molybdenum silicide (MoxSi1-x) offer increased transition temperature. This study focuses on the properties of MoSi thin films grown by magnetron sputtering. We examine how...

  19. High resolution amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A. (Palo Alto, CA); Kaplan, Selig N. (El Cerrito, CA); Perez-Mendez, Victor (Berkeley, CA)

    1992-01-01

    A radiation detector employing amorphous Si:H cells in an array with each detector cell having at least three contiguous layers (n type, intrinsic, p type), positioned between two electrodes to which a bias voltage is applied. An energy conversion layer atop the silicon cells intercepts incident radiation and converts radiation energy to light energy of a wavelength to which the silicon cells are responsive. A read-out device, positioned proximate to each detector element in an array allows each such element to be interrogated independently to determine whether radiation has been detected in that cell. The energy conversion material may be a layer of luminescent material having a columnar structure. In one embodiment a column of luminescent material detects the passage therethrough of radiation to be detected and directs a light beam signal to an adjacent a-Si:H film so that detection may be confined to one or more such cells in the array. One or both electrodes may have a comb structure, and the teeth of each electrode comb may be interdigitated for capacitance reduction. The amorphous Si:H film may be replaced by an amorphous Si:Ge:H film in which up to 40 percent of the amorphous material is Ge. Two dimensional arrays may be used in X-ray imaging, CT scanning, crystallography, high energy physics beam tracking, nuclear medicine cameras and autoradiography.

  20. Distributed Amorphous Ramp Construction in Unstructured

    E-print Network

    Napp, Nils

    of a construction robot. The robot was remote controlled to build a ramp using amorphous foam depositions. Inset building materials that interface with an irregular environment. We would like to endow scalable robot for autonomous robotic construction focus on assembling pre-fabricated building materials and cannot accommodate

  1. 139Plastic flow in amorphous covalent solids and nanoceramics with amorphous intergranular layers 2009 Advanced Study Center Co. Ltd.

    E-print Network

    Ovid'ko Ilya A.

    . The authors [21-23] have concluded that the regions of liquid-like material are the carriers of plastic flow139Plastic flow in amorphous covalent solids and nanoceramics with amorphous intergranular layers.Yu. Gutkin, e-mail: gutkin@def.ipme.ru PLASTIC FLOW IN AMORPHOUS COVALENT SOLIDS AND NANOCERAMICS

  2. Characterization of amorphous In{sub 2}O{sub 3}: An ab initio molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Aliano, Antonio; Catellani, Alessandra; Cicero, Giancarlo

    2011-11-21

    In this work, we report on the structural and electronic properties of amorphous In{sub 2}O{sub 3} obtained with ab initio molecular dynamics. Our results show crystal-like short range InO{sub 6} polyhedra having average In-O distance consistent with x-ray spectroscopy data. Structural disorder yields band tailing and localized states, which are responsible of a strong reduction of the electronic gap. Most importantly, the appearance of a peculiar O-O bond imparts n-type character to the amorphous compound and provides contribution for interpreting spectroscopic measurements on indium based oxidized systems. Our findings portray characteristic features to attribute transparent semiconductive properties to amorphous In{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  3. Defect-induced solid state amorphization of molecular crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Lei; Carvajal, Teresa; Koslowski, Marisol

    2012-04-01

    We investigate the process of mechanically induced amorphization in small molecule organic crystals under extensive deformation. In this work, we develop a model that describes the amorphization of molecular crystals, in which the plastic response is calculated with a phase field dislocation dynamics theory in four materials: acetaminophen, sucrose, ?-indomethacin, and aspirin. The model is able to predict the fraction of amorphous material generated in single crystals for a given applied stress. Our results show that ?-indomethacin and sucrose demonstrate large volume fractions of amorphous material after sufficient plastic deformation, while smaller amorphous volume fractions are predicted in acetaminophen and aspirin, in agreement with experimental observation.

  4. Oxidation Protection of Porous Reaction-Bonded Silicon Nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, D. S.

    1994-01-01

    Oxidation kinetics of both as-fabricated and coated reaction-bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) were studied at 900 and 1000 C with thermogravimetry. Uncoated RBSN exhibited internal oxidation and parabolic kinetics. An amorphous Si-C-O coating provided the greatest degree of protection to oxygen, with a small linear weight loss observed. Linear weight gains were measured on samples with an amorphous Si-N-C coating. Chemically vapor deposited (CVD) Si3N4 coated RBSN exhibited parabolic kinetics, and the coating cracked severely. A continuous-SiC-fiber-reinforced RBSN composite was also coated with the Si-C-O material, but no substantial oxidation protection was observed.

  5. Non-crosslinked, amorphous, block copolymer electrolyte for batteries

    DOEpatents

    Mayes, Anne M.; Ceder, Gerbrand; Chiang, Yet-Ming; Sadoway, Donald R.; Aydinol, Mehmet K.; Soo, Philip P.; Jang, Young-Il; Huang, Biying

    2006-04-11

    Solid battery components are provided. A block copolymeric electrolyte is non-crosslinked and non-glassy through the entire range of typical battery service temperatures, that is, through the entire range of at least from about 0.degree. C. to about 70.degree. C. The chains of which the copolymer is made each include at least one ionically-conductive block and at least one second block immiscible with the ionically-conductive block. The chains form an amorphous association and are arranged in an ordered nanostructure including a continuous matrix of amorphous ionically-conductive domains and amorphous second domains that are immiscible with the ionically-conductive domains. A compound is provided that has a formula of Li.sub.xM.sub.yN.sub.zO.sub.2. M and N are each metal atoms or a main group elements, and x, y and z are each numbers from about 0 to about 1. y and z are chosen such that a formal charge on the M.sub.yN.sub.z portion of the compound is (4-x). In certain embodiments, these compounds are used in the cathodes of rechargeable batteries. The present invention also includes methods of predicting the potential utility of metal dichalgogenide compounds for use in lithium intercalation compounds. It also provides methods for processing lithium intercalation oxides with the structure and compositional homogeneity necessary to realize the increased formation energies of said compounds. An article is made of a dimensionally-stable, interpenetrating microstructure of a first phase including a first component and a second phase, immiscible with the first phase, including a second component. The first and second phases define interphase boundaries between them, and at least one particle is positioned between a first phase and a second phase at an interphase boundary. When the first and second phases are electronically-conductive and ionically-conductive polymers, respectively, and the particles are ion host particles, the arrangement is an electrode of a battery.

  6. Mechanical properties of graphene oxides Lizhao Liu,ab

    E-print Network

    Simons, Jack

    , including the Young's modulus and intrinsic strength, of graphene oxides are investigated by first. For the ordered graphene oxides, the Young's modulus is found to vary from 380 to 470 GPa as the coverage of oxygen groups changes, respectively. The corresponding variations in the Young's modulus of the amorphous

  7. Thermally stable crystalline mesoporous metal oxides with substantially uniform pores

    DOEpatents

    Wiesner, Ulrich; Orilall, Mahendra Christopher; Lee, Jinwoo; DiSalvo, Jr., Francis J

    2015-01-27

    Highly crystalline metal oxide-carbon composites, as precursors to thermally stable mesoporous metal oxides, are coated with a layer of amorphous carbon. Using a `one-pot` method, highly crystalline metal oxide-carbon composites are converted to thermally stable mesoporous metal oxides, having highly crystalline mesopore walls, without causing the concomitant collapse of the mesostructure. The `one-pot` method uses block copolymers with an sp or sp 2 hybridized carbon containing hydrophobic block as structure directing agents which converts to a sturdy, amorphous carbon material under appropriate heating conditions, providing an in-situ rigid support which maintains the pores of the oxides intact while crystallizing at temperatures as high as 1000 deg C. A highly crystalline metal oxide-carbon composite can be heated to produce a thermally stable mesoporous metal oxide consisting of a single polymorph.

  8. Amorphous Carbon: State of the Art - Proceedings of the 1st International Specialist Meeting on Amorphous Carbon (smac '97)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, S. R. P.; Robertson, J.; Milne, W. I.; Amaratunga, G. A. J.

    1998-05-01

    The Table of Contents for the full book PDF is as follows: * Preface * GROWTH AND STRUCTURE * The Structure of Tetrahedral Amorphous Carbon * Growth of DLC Films and Related Structure and Properties * Deposition Mechanism of Diamond-Like Carbon * Relaxation of sp3 Bonds in Hydrogen Free Carbon Films During Growth * MODELLING * Correlations Between Microstructure and Electronic Properties in Amorphous Carbon Based Materials * Review of Monte Carlo Simulations of Diamondlike Amorphous Carbon: Bulk, Surface, and Interface Structural Properties * DEPOSITION * Preparation of Disordered Amorphous and Partially Ordered Nano Clustered Carbon Films by Arc Deposition: A Critical Review * Plasma Deposition of Diamond-Like Carbon in an ECR-RF Discharge * Deposition of Amorphous Hydrogenated Carbon-Nitrogen Films by PECVD Using Several Hydrocarbon / Nitrogen Containing Gas Mixtures * ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE * 'Defects' and Their Detection in a-C and a-C:H * Valence Band and Gap State Spectroscopy of Amorphous Carbon by Photoelectron Emission Techniques * Photoluminescence Spectroscopy: A Probe for Inhomogeneous Structure in Polymer-Like Amorphous Carbon * Raman Characterization of Amorphous and Nanocrystalline sp3 Bonded Structures * Ultraviolet Raman Spectroscopy of Tetrahedral Amorphous Carbon Thin Films * Excitation Energy Dependent Raman and Photoluminescence Spectra of Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon * MECHANICAL PROPERTIES * Pulsed Laser Deposited a-C: Growth, Structure and Mechanical Properties * Mechanical Properties of Laser-Assisted Deposited Amorphous Carbon Films * Mechanical and Morphology Study on Tetrahedral Amorphous Carbon Films * Time-Dependent Changes in the Mechanical Properties of Diamond-Like Carbon Films * ELECTRONIC PROPERTIES * Electronic Transport in Amorphous Carbon * Electronic Properties of Undoped/Doped Tetrahedral Amorphous Carbon * The Inclusion of Graphitic Nanoparticles in Semiconducting Amorphous Carbon to Enhance Electronic Transport Properties * FIELD EMISSION * Carbon Cathode Requirements and Emission Characterization for Low-Voltage Field Emission Displays * Electron Field Emission from Carbon Films * Electron Field Emission from Carbon Thin Films

  9. Crystalline-Amorphous Silicon Nanocomposites with Reduced Thermal Conductivity for Bulk Thermoelectrics.

    PubMed

    Miura, Asuka; Zhou, Shu; Nozaki, Tomohiro; Shiomi, Junichiro

    2015-06-24

    Responding to the need for thermoelectric materials with high efficiency in both conversion and cost, we developed a nanostructured bulk silicon thermoelectric materials by sintering silicon crystal quantum dots of several nanometers in diameters synthesized by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The material consists of hybrid structures of nanograins of crystalline silicon and amorphous silicon oxide. The percolated nanocrystalline region gives rise to high power factor with the high doping concentration realized by PECVD, and the binding amorphous region reduces thermal conductivity. Consequently, the nondimensional figure of merit reaches 0.39 at 600 °C, equivalent to the best reported value for silicon thermoelectrics. The thermal conductivity of the densely packed material is as low as 5 W m(-1) K(-1) in a wide temperature range from room temperature to 1000 °C, which is beneficial not only for the conversion efficiency but also for material cost by requiring less material to establish certain temperature gradient. PMID:26046688

  10. Direct tunneling through high-? amorphous HfO{sub 2}: Effects of chemical modification

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yin Yu, Zhizhou; Zahid, Ferdows; Wang, Jian; Liu, Lei; Zhu, Yu; Guo, Hong

    2014-07-14

    We report first principles modeling of quantum tunneling through amorphous HfO{sub 2} dielectric layer of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) nanostructures in the form of n-Si/HfO{sub 2}/Al. In particular, we predict that chemically modifying the amorphous HfO{sub 2} barrier by doping N and Al atoms in the middle region—far from the two interfaces of the MOS structure—can reduce the gate-to-channel tunnel leakage by more than one order of magnitude. Several other types of modification are found to enhance tunneling or induce substantial band bending in the Si, both are not desired from leakage point of view. By analyzing transmission coefficients and projected density of states, the microscopic physics of electron traversing the tunnel barrier with or without impurity atoms in the high-? dielectric is revealed.

  11. Crystallization of amorphous silicon by self-propagation of nanoengineered thermites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Maruf; Subramanian, Senthil; Bhattacharya, Shantanu; Gao, Yuanfang; Apperson, Steve; Shende, Rajesh; Guha, Suchi; Arif, Mohammad; Bai, Mengjun; Gangopadhyay, Keshab; Gangopadhyay, Shubhra

    2007-03-01

    Crystallization of amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin film occurred by the self-propagation of copper oxide/aluminum thermite nanocomposites. Amorphous Si films were prepared on glass at a temperature of 250°C by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The platinum heater was patterned on the edge of the substrate and the CuO /Al nanoengineered thermite was spin coated on the substrate that connects the heater and the a-Si film. A voltage source was used to ignite the thermites followed by a piranha solution (4:1 of H2SO4:H2O2) etch for the removal of residual products of thermite reaction. Raman spectroscopy was used to confirm the crystallization of a-Si.

  12. Graphene as a transparent electrode for amorphous silicon-based solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaianella, F.; Rosolen, G.; Maes, B.

    2015-06-01

    The properties of graphene in terms of transparency and conductivity make it an ideal candidate to replace indium tin oxide (ITO) in a transparent conducting electrode. However, graphene is not always as good as ITO for some applications, due to a non-negligible absorption. For amorphous silicon photovoltaics, we have identified a useful case with a graphene-silica front electrode that improves upon ITO. For both electrode technologies, we simulate the weighted absorption in the active layer of planar amorphous silicon-based solar cells with a silver back-reflector. The graphene device shows a significantly increased absorbance compared to ITO-based cells for a large range of silicon thicknesses (34.4% versus 30.9% for a 300 nm thick silicon layer), and this result persists over a wide range of incidence angles.

  13. Research Articles Potential for Microbial Oxidation

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Clark M.

    ­340. 1. Introduction Iron is the fourth most abundant element in Earth's crust and is found in twoResearch Articles Potential for Microbial Oxidation of Ferrous Iron in Basaltic Glass Mai Yia Xiong, Evgenya S. Shelobolina, and Eric E. Roden Abstract Basaltic glass (BG) is an amorphous ferrous iron [Fe

  14. Oxidation of ultrathin GaSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beechem, Thomas E.; Kowalski, Brian M.; Brumbach, Michael T.; McDonald, Anthony E.; Spataru, Catalin D.; Howell, Stephen W.; Ohta, Taisuke; Pask, Jesse A.; Kalugin, Nikolai G.

    2015-10-01

    Oxidation of exfoliated gallium selenide (GaSe) is investigated through Raman, photoluminescence, Auger, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. Photoluminescence and Raman intensity reductions associated with spectral features of GaSe are shown to coincide with the emergence of signatures emanating from the by-products of the oxidation reaction, namely, Ga2Se3 and amorphous Se. Photoinduced oxidation is initiated over a portion of a flake highlighting the potential for laser based patterning of two-dimensional heterostructures via selective oxidation.

  15. Reversibility and criticality in amorphous solids.

    PubMed

    Regev, Ido; Weber, John; Reichhardt, Charles; Dahmen, Karin A; Lookman, Turab

    2015-01-01

    The physical processes governing the onset of yield, where a material changes its shape permanently under external deformation, are not yet understood for amorphous solids that are intrinsically disordered. Here, using molecular dynamics simulations and mean-field theory, we show that at a critical strain amplitude the sizes of clusters of atoms undergoing cooperative rearrangements of displacements (avalanches) diverges. We compare this non-equilibrium critical behaviour to the prevailing concept of a 'front depinning' transition that has been used to describe steady-state avalanche behaviour in different materials. We explain why a depinning-like process can result in a transition from periodic to chaotic behaviour and why chaotic motion is not possible in pinned systems. These findings suggest that, at least for highly jammed amorphous systems, the irreversibility transition may be a side effect of depinning that occurs in systems where the disorder is not quenched. PMID:26564783

  16. Bonding defects in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Lucovsky, G.; Yang, H.

    1996-12-31

    A mechanism for charged-carrier-trapping-induced defect metastability in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and in hydrogenated amorphous silicon alloys containing relatively high concentrations of oxygen and/or nitrogen atoms (a-Si:X:H, X = O or N) is described. The experimental results that identified this defect metastability mechanism were (i) differences in the Staebler-Wronski effect in a-Si:H and a-Si:N:H alloys prepared from N{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} source gases by remote plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition, and (ii) differences in defect generation at N-atom terminated Si-SiO{sub 2} interfaces prepared from NH{sub 3} and N{sub 2}O.

  17. Disappearance and Creation of Constrained Amorphous Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebe, Peggy; Lu, Sharon X.

    1997-03-01

    We report observation of the disappearance and recreation of rigid, or constrained, amorphous phase by sequential thermal annealing. Tempera- ture modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC) is used to study the glass transition and lower melting endotherm after annealing. Cold crystallization of poly(phenylene sulfide), PPS, at a temperature just above Tg creates an initial large fraction of rigid amorphous phase (RAP). Brief, rapid annealing to a higher temperature causes RAP almost to disappear completely. Subsequent reannealing at the original lower temperature restores RAP to its original value. At the same time that RAP is being removed, Tg decreases; when RAP is restored, Tg also returns to its initial value. The crystal fraction remains unaffected by the annealing sequence.

  18. Interferometric Diffraction from Amorphous Double Films.

    PubMed

    Rezikyan, Aram; Belcourt, James A; Treacy, Michael M J

    2015-10-01

    We explore the interference fringes that arise in diffraction patterns from double-layer amorphous samples where there is a substantial separation, up to about a micron, between two overlapping thin films. This interferometric diffraction geometry, where both waves have interacted with the specimen, reveals phase gradients within microdiffraction patterns. The rapid fading of the observed fringes as the magnitude of the diffraction vector increases confirms that displacement decoherence is strong in high-energy electron scattering from amorphous samples. The fading of fringes with increasing layer separation indicates an effective illumination coherence length of about 225 nm, which is consistent with the value of 270 nm expected for the heated Schottky field emitter source. A small reduction in measured coherence length is expected because of the additional energy spread induced in the beam after it passes through the first layer. PMID:26428440

  19. Reversibility and criticality in amorphous solids

    PubMed Central

    Regev, Ido; Weber, John; Reichhardt, Charles; Dahmen, Karin A.; Lookman, Turab

    2015-01-01

    The physical processes governing the onset of yield, where a material changes its shape permanently under external deformation, are not yet understood for amorphous solids that are intrinsically disordered. Here, using molecular dynamics simulations and mean-field theory, we show that at a critical strain amplitude the sizes of clusters of atoms undergoing cooperative rearrangements of displacements (avalanches) diverges. We compare this non-equilibrium critical behaviour to the prevailing concept of a ‘front depinning' transition that has been used to describe steady-state avalanche behaviour in different materials. We explain why a depinning-like process can result in a transition from periodic to chaotic behaviour and why chaotic motion is not possible in pinned systems. These findings suggest that, at least for highly jammed amorphous systems, the irreversibility transition may be a side effect of depinning that occurs in systems where the disorder is not quenched. PMID:26564783

  20. Reversibility and criticality in amorphous solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regev, Ido; Weber, John; Reichhardt, Charles; Dahmen, Karin A.; Lookman, Turab

    2015-11-01

    The physical processes governing the onset of yield, where a material changes its shape permanently under external deformation, are not yet understood for amorphous solids that are intrinsically disordered. Here, using molecular dynamics simulations and mean-field theory, we show that at a critical strain amplitude the sizes of clusters of atoms undergoing cooperative rearrangements of displacements (avalanches) diverges. We compare this non-equilibrium critical behaviour to the prevailing concept of a `front depinning' transition that has been used to describe steady-state avalanche behaviour in different materials. We explain why a depinning-like process can result in a transition from periodic to chaotic behaviour and why chaotic motion is not possible in pinned systems. These findings suggest that, at least for highly jammed amorphous systems, the irreversibility transition may be a side effect of depinning that occurs in systems where the disorder is not quenched.

  1. Germanium detector passivated with hydrogenated amorphous germanium

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, William L. (Walnut Creek, CA); Haller, Eugene E. (Berkeley, CA)

    1986-01-01

    Passivation of predominantly crystalline semiconductor devices (12) is provided for by a surface coating (21) of sputtered hydrogenated amorphous semiconductor material. Passivation of a radiation detector germanium diode, for example, is realized by sputtering a coating (21) of amorphous germanium onto the etched and quenched diode surface (11) in a low pressure atmosphere of hydrogen and argon. Unlike prior germanium diode semiconductor devices (12), which must be maintained in vacuum at cryogenic temperatures to avoid deterioration, a diode processed in the described manner may be stored in air at room temperature or otherwise exposed to a variety of environmental conditions. The coating (21) compensates for pre-existing undesirable surface states as well as protecting the semiconductor device (12) against future impregnation with impurities.

  2. Wear Resistant Amorphous and Nanocomposite Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Racek, O

    2008-03-26

    Glass forming materials (critical cooling rate <10{sup 4}K.s{sup -1}) are promising for their high corrosion and wear resistance. During rapid cooling, the materials form an amorphous structure that transforms to nanocrystalline during a process of devitrification. High hardness (HV 1690) can be achieved through a controlled crystallization. Thermal spray process has been used to apply coatings, which preserves the amorphous/nanocomposite structure due to a high cooling rate of the feedstock particles during the impact on a substrate. Wear properties have been studied with respect to process conditions and feedstock material properties. Application specific properties such as sliding wear resistance have been correlated with laboratory tests based on instrumented indentation and scratch tests.

  3. Synthesis of new amorphous metallic spin glasses

    DOEpatents

    Haushalter, R.C.

    1985-02-11

    Disclosed are: amorphous metallic precipitates having the formula (M/sub 1/)/sub a/(M/sub 2/)/sub b/ wherein M/sub 1/ is at least one transition metal, M/sub 2/ is at least one main group metal and the integers ''a'' and ''b'' provide stoichiometric balance; the precipitates having a degree of local order characteristic of chemical compounds from the precipitation process and useful electrical and mechanical properties.

  4. Design Requirements for Amorphous Piezoelectric Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ounaies, Z.; Young, J. A.; Harrison, J. S.

    1999-01-01

    An overview of the piezoelectric activity in amorphous piezoelectric polymers is presented. The criteria required to render a polymer piezoelectric are discussed. Although piezoelectricity is a coupling between mechanical and electrical properties, most research has concentrated on the electrical properties of potentially piezoelectric polymers. In this work, we present comparative mechanical data as a function of temperature and offer a summary of polarization and electromechanical properties for each of the polymers considered.

  5. Characterization of Amorphous and Co-Amorphous Simvastatin Formulations Prepared by Spray Drying.

    PubMed

    Craye, Goedele; Löbmann, Korbinian; Grohganz, Holger; Rades, Thomas; Laitinen, Riikka

    2015-01-01

    In this study, spray drying from aqueous solutions, using the surface-active agent sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) as a solubilizer, was explored as a production method for co-amorphous simvastatin-lysine (SVS-LYS) at 1:1 molar mixtures, which previously have been observed to form a co-amorphous mixture upon ball milling. In addition, a spray-dried formulation of SVS without LYS was prepared. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) revealed that SLS coated the SVS and SVS-LYS particles upon spray drying. X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) showed that in the spray-dried formulations the remaining crystallinity originated from SLS only. The best dissolution properties and a "spring and parachute" effect were found for SVS spray-dried from a 5% SLS solution without LYS. Despite the presence of at least partially crystalline SLS in the mixtures, all the studied formulations were able to significantly extend the stability of amorphous SVS compared to previous co-amorphous formulations of SVS. The best stability (at least 12 months in dry conditions) was observed when SLS was spray-dried with SVS (and LYS). In conclusion, spray drying of SVS and LYS from aqueous surfactant solutions was able to produce formulations with improved physical stability for amorphous SVS. PMID:26633346

  6. Multiple cell photoresponsive amorphous alloys and devices

    SciTech Connect

    Ovshinsky, S.R.; Adler, D.

    1990-01-02

    This patent describes an improved photoresponsive tandem multiple solar cell device. The device comprising: at least a first and second superimposed cell of various materials. The first cell being formed of a silicon alloy material. The second cell including an amorphous silicon alloy semiconductor cell body having an active photoresponsive region in which radiation can impinge to produce charge carriers, the amorphous cell body including at least one density of states reducing element. The element being fluorine. The amorphous cell body further including a band gap adjusting element therein at least in the photoresponsive region to enhance the radiation absorption thereof, the adjusting element being germanium: the second cell being a multi-layer body having deposited semiconductor layers of opposite (p and n) conductivity type; and the first cell being formed with the second cell in substantially direct Junction contact therebetween. The first and second cells designed to generate substantially matched currents from each cell from a light source directed through the first cell and into the second cell.

  7. Formation of iron disilicide on amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlesand, U.; Östling, M.; Bodén, K.

    1991-11-01

    Thin films of iron disilicide, ?-FeSi 2 were formed on both amorphous silicon and on crystalline silicon. The ?-phase is reported to be semiconducting with a direct band-gap of about 0.85-0.89 eV. This phase is known to form via a nucleation-controlled growth process on crystalline silicon and as a consequence a rather rough silicon/silicide interface is usually formed. In order to improve the interface a bilayer structure of amorphous silicon and iron was sequentially deposited on Czochralski <111> silicon in an e-gun evaporation system. Secondary ion mass spectrometry profiling (SIMS) and scanning electron micrographs revealed an improvement of the interface sharpness. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and X-ray diffractiometry showed ?-FeSi 2 formation already at 525°C. It was also observed that the silicide growth was diffusion-controlled, similar to what has been reported for example in the formation of NiSi 2 for the reaction of nickel on amorphous silicon. The kinetics of the FeSi 2 formation in the temperature range 525-625°C was studied by RBS and the activation energy was found to be 1.5 ± 0.1 eV.

  8. Phase transitions in biogenic amorphous calcium carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yutao

    Geological calcium carbonate exists in both crystalline phases and amorphous phases. Compared with crystalline calcium carbonate, such as calcite, aragonite and vaterite, the amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is unstable. Unlike geological calcium carbonate crystals, crystalline sea urchin spicules (99.9 wt % calcium carbonate and 0.1 wt % proteins) do not present facets. To explain this property, crystal formation via amorphous precursors was proposed in theory. And previous research reported experimental evidence of ACC on the surface of forming sea urchin spicules. By using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM), we studied cross-sections of fresh sea urchin spicules at different stages (36h, 48h and 72h after fertilization) and observed the transition sequence of three mineral phases: hydrated ACC ? dehydrated ACC ? biogenic calcite. In addition, we unexpectedly found hydrated ACC nanoparticles that are surrounded by biogenic calcite. This observation indicates the dehydration from hydrated ACC to dehydrated ACC is inhibited, resulting in stabilization of hydrated ACC nanoparticles. We thought that the dehydration was inhibited by protein matrix components occluded within the biomineral, and we designed an in vitro assay to test the hypothesis. By utilizing XANES-PEEM, we found that SM50, the most abundant occluded matrix protein in sea urchin spicules, has the function to stabilize hydrated ACC in vitro.

  9. Shock induced crystallization of amorphous Nickel powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherukara, Mathew; Strachan, Alejandro

    2015-06-01

    Recent experimental work has shown the efficacy of amorphous Ni/crystalline Al composites as energetic materials, with flame velocities twice that of a comparable crystalline Ni/crystalline Al system. Of further interest is the recrystallization mechanisms in the pure amorphous Ni powders, both thermally induced and mechanically induced. We present large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of shock-induced recrystallization in loosely packed amorphous Nickel powders. We study the time dependent nucleation and growth processes by holding the shocked samples at the induced pressures and temperatures for extended periods following the passage of the shock (up to 6 ns). We find that the nanostructure of the recrystallized Ni and time scales of recrystallization are dependent on the piston velocity. At low piston velocities, nucleation events are rare, leading to long incubation times and a relatively coarse nanostructure. At higher piston velocities, local variations in temperature due to jetting phenomena and void collapse, give rise to multiple nucleation events on time scales comparable to the passage of the shock wave, leading to the formation of a fine-grained nanostructure. Interestingly, we observe that the nucleation and growth process occurs in two steps, with the first nuclei crystallizing into the BCC structure, before evolving over time into the expected FCC structure. U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency, HDTRA1-10-1-0119 (Program Manager Suhithi Peiris).

  10. Process to produce silicon carbide fibers using a controlled concentration of boron oxide vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnard, Thomas Duncan (Inventor); Lipowitz, Jonathan (Inventor); Nguyen, Kimmai Thi (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A process for producing polycrystalline silicon carbide includes heating an amorphous ceramic fiber that contains silicon and carbon in an environment containing boron oxide vapor. The boron oxide vapor is produced in situ by the reaction of a boron containing material such as boron carbide and an oxidizing agent such as carbon dioxide, and the amount of boron oxide vapor can be controlled by varying the amount and rate of addition of the oxidizing agent.

  11. Process to produce silicon carbide fibers using a controlled concentration of boron oxide vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnard, Thomas Duncan (Inventor); Lipowitz, Jonathan (Inventor); Nguyen, Kimmai Thi (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A process for producing polycrystalline silicon carbide by heating an amorphous ceramic fiber that contains silicon and carbon in an environment containing boron oxide vapor. The boron oxide vapor is produced in situ by the reaction of a boron containing material such as boron carbide and an oxidizing agent such as carbon dioxide, and the amount of boron oxide vapor can be controlled by varying the amount and rate of addition of the oxidizing agent.

  12. Synthesis, characterization, and catalytic properties of micro-mesoporous, amorphous titanosilicate catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Keshavaraja, A.; Ramaswamy, V.; Soni, H.S.

    1995-12-01

    Titanosilicates, synthesized under ambient conditions in the absence of nitrogenated organic bases, exhibit (i) an amorphous nature (XRD, electron diffraction, TEM); (ii) a bimodal, narrow pore size distribution with pore widths around 0.8 and 3.6 nm, respectively, and surface areas of about 500-700 m{sup 2}g{sup -1} (BET); (iii) absorption bands at 960 cm{sup -1} (IR) and 220 nm (UV), respectively; (iv) a radial electron density distribution pattern indicating the presence of isolated TiO{sub 4} units in a silica matrix; and (v) catalytic activity and selectivity comparable to crystalline TS-1 (MFI) in the oxidation (with aqueous H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) of benzene, toluene, and phenol. Unlike other solid catalysts known so far, these amorphous titanosilicates provide a higher yield of catechol than hydroquinone in the oxidation of phenol. In contrast to TS-1 or TS-2 (MEL), the oxyfunctionalization of the side chain in toluene is more predominant than the aromatic ring hydroxylation indicating a radical mechanism of oxidation. 29 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Formation of amorphous silicon by light ion damage

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, Y.C.

    1985-12-01

    Amorphization by implantation of boron ions (which is the lightest element generally used in I.C. fabrication processes) has been systematically studied for various temperatures, various voltages and various dose rates. Based on theoretical considerations and experimental results, a new amorphization model for light and intermediate mass ion damage is proposed consisting of two stages. The role of interstitial type point defects or clusters in amorphization is emphasized. Due to the higher mobility of interstitials out-diffusion to the surface particularly during amorphization with low energy can be significant. From a review of the idealized amorphous structure, diinterstitial-divacancy pairs are suggested to be the embryos of amorphous zones formed during room temperature implantation. The stacking fault loops found in specimens implanted with boron at room temperature are considered to be the origin of secondary defects formed during annealing.

  14. Amorphous-silicon module hot-spot testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, C. C.

    1985-06-01

    Hot spot heating occurs when cell short-circuit current is lower than string operating current. Amorphous cell hot spot are tested to develop the techniques required for performing reverse bias testing of amorphous cells. Also, to quantify the response of amorphous cells to reverse biasing. Guidelines are developed from testing for reducing hot spot susceptibility of amorphous modules and to develop a qualification test for hot spot testing of amorphous modules. It is concluded that amorphous cells undergo hot spot heating similarly to crystalline cells. Comparison of results obtained with submodules versus actual modules indicate heating levels lower in actual modules. Module design must address hot spot testing and hot spot qualification test conducted on modules showed no instabilities and minor cell erosion.

  15. Oxidation-assisted ductility of aluminium nanowires.

    PubMed

    Sen, Fatih G; Alpas, Ahmet T; van Duin, Adri C T; Qi, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Oxidation can drastically change mechanical properties of nanostructures that typically have large surface-to-volume ratios. However, the underlying mechanisms describing the effect oxidation has on the mechanical properties of nanostructures have yet to be characterized. Here we use reactive molecular dynamics and show that the oxidation enhances the aluminium nanowire ductility, and the oxide shell exhibits superplastic behaviour. The oxide shell decreases the aluminium dislocation nucleation stress by increasing the activation volume and the number of nucleation sites. Superplasticity of the amorphous oxide shell is due to viscous flow as a result of healing of the broken aluminium-oxygen bonds by oxygen diffusion, below a critical strain rate. The interplay between the strain rate and oxidation rate is not only essential for designing nanodevices in ambient environments, but also controls interface properties in large-scale deformation processes. PMID:24887649

  16. Oxidation-assisted ductility of aluminium nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Fatih G.; Alpas, Ahmet T.; van Duin, Adri C. T.; Qi, Yue

    2014-06-01

    Oxidation can drastically change mechanical properties of nanostructures that typically have large surface-to-volume ratios. However, the underlying mechanisms describing the effect oxidation has on the mechanical properties of nanostructures have yet to be characterized. Here we use reactive molecular dynamics and show that the oxidation enhances the aluminium nanowire ductility, and the oxide shell exhibits superplastic behaviour. The oxide shell decreases the aluminium dislocation nucleation stress by increasing the activation volume and the number of nucleation sites. Superplasticity of the amorphous oxide shell is due to viscous flow as a result of healing of the broken aluminium-oxygen bonds by oxygen diffusion, below a critical strain rate. The interplay between the strain rate and oxidation rate is not only essential for designing nanodevices in ambient environments, but also controls interface properties in large-scale deformation processes.

  17. Molecular Dynamic Simulation of Disorder Induced Amorphization in Pyrochlore

    SciTech Connect

    Chartier, Alain; Meis, Constantin; Crocombette, J.-P.; Weber, William J.; Corrales, Louis R.

    2005-01-21

    The defect accumulation of amorphization has been studied for the La2Zr2O7 pyrochlore by means of classical molecular dynamic simulations. Present calculations show that the accumulation of cation Frenkel pairs is the main driving parameter for the amorphization process, while the oxygen atoms simply rearrange around cations. Under Frenkel pair accumulation, the structure follows the pyrochlore-amorphous sequence. Present results consequently provide atomic-level interpretation to previous experimental irradiation observations of the two-step phase transitions.

  18. Fundamental considerations of the efficiency of amorphous solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hack, M.; Guha, S.

    1984-08-01

    Using a computer simulation, we have calculated the dependence of efficiency of both single junction and tandem amorphous solar cells on the band gap of the active layers. We have also developed a simple expression to relate the open-circuit voltage of an amorphous solar cell to the ratio of the photoconductivity to dark conductivity of the intrinsic layer. This provides a powerful diagnostic tool for the evaluation of low band-gap amorphous materials.

  19. Lateral solid-phase epitaxy of oxide thin films on glass substrate seeded with oxide nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Taira, Kenji; Hirose, Yasushi; Nakao, Shoichiro; Yamada, Naoomi; Kogure, Toshihiro; Shibata, Tatsuo; Sasaki, Takayoshi; Hasegawa, Tetsuya

    2014-06-24

    We developed a technique to fabricate oxide thin films with uniaxially controlled crystallographic orientation and lateral size of more than micrometers on amorphous substrates. This technique is lateral solid-phase epitaxy, where epitaxial crystallization of amorphous precursor is seeded with ultrathin oxide nanosheets sparsely (?10% coverage) deposited on the substrate. Transparent conducting Nb-doped anatase TiO2 thin films were fabricated on glass substrates by this technique. Perfect (001) orientation and large grains with lateral sizes up to 10 ?m were confirmed by X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and electron beam backscattering diffraction measurements. As a consequence of these features, the obtained film exhibited excellent electrical transport properties comparable to those of epitaxial thin films on single-crystalline substrates. This technique is a versatile method for fabricating high-quality oxide thin films other than anatase TiO2 and would increase the possible applications of oxide-based thin film devices. PMID:24867286

  20. Amorphous silica nanoparticles aggregate human platelets: potential implications for vascular homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Corbalan, J Jose; Medina, Carlos; Jacoby, Adam; Malinski, Tadeusz; Radomski, Marek W

    2012-01-01

    Background Amorphous silica nanoparticles (SiNP) can be used in medical technologies and other industries leading to human exposure. However, an increased number of studies indicate that this exposure may result in cardiovascular inflammation and damage. A high ratio of nitric oxide to peroxynitrite concentrations ([NO]/[ONOO?]) is crucial for cardiovascular homeostasis and platelet hemostasis. Therefore, we studied the influence of SiNP on the platelet [NO]/[ONOO?] balance and platelet aggregation. Methods Nanoparticle–platelet interaction was examined using transmission electron microscopy. Electrochemical nanosensors were used to measure the levels of NO and ONOO? released by platelets upon nanoparticle stimulation. Platelet aggregation was studied using light aggregometry, flow cytometry, and phase contrast microscopy. Results Amorphous SiNP induced NO release from platelets followed by a massive stimulation of ONOO? leading to an unfavorably low [NO]/[ONOO?] ratio. In addition, SiNP induced an upregulation of selectin P expression and glycoprotein IIb/IIIa activation on the platelet surface membrane, and led to platelet aggregation via adenosine diphosphate and matrix metalloproteinase 2-dependent mechanisms. Importantly, all the effects on platelet aggregation were inversely proportional to nanoparticle size. Conclusions The exposure of platelets to amorphous SiNP induces a critically low [NO]/[ONOO?] ratio leading to platelet aggregation. These findings provide new insights into the pharmacological profile of SiNP in platelets. PMID:22334785

  1. Water Clustering on Nanostructured Iron Oxide Films

    SciTech Connect

    Merte, L. R.; Bechstein, Ralf; Peng, Guowen; Rieboldt, Felix; Farberow, Carrie A.; Zeuthen, Helene; Knudsen, Jan; Laegsgaard, E.; Wendt, Stefen; Mavrikakis, Manos; Besenbacher, Fleming

    2014-06-30

    The adhesion of water to solid surfaces is characterized by the tendency to balance competing molecule–molecule and molecule–surface interactions. Hydroxyl groups form strong hydrogen bonds to water molecules and are known to substantially influence the wetting behaviour of oxide surfaces, but it is not well-understood how these hydroxyl groups and their distribution on a surface affect the molecular-scale structure at the interface. Here we report a study of water clustering on a moire´-structured iron oxide thin film with a controlled density of hydroxyl groups. While large amorphous monolayer islands form on the are film, the hydroxylated iron oxide film acts as a hydrophilic nanotemplate, causing the formation of a regular array of ice-like hexameric nanoclusters. The formation of this ordered phase is localized at the nanometre scale; with increasing water coverage, ordered and amorphous water are found to coexist at adjacent hydroxylated and hydroxyl-free domains of the moire´ structure.

  2. Optimization of transparent and reflecting electrodes for amorphous silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, R. G.; Proscia, J.; Gustin, K.; Chapple-Sokol, J.; Strickler, D.; McCurdy, R.

    1988-06-01

    In this research, hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films were deposited by an inexpensive, thermally induced, atmospheric-pressure chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. High-quality films were grown at 300 A, more than two orders of magnitude faster than those produced by conventional glow discharge. Sources of uncontrolled oxygen, boron, phosphorus, and carbon contamination were identified and eliminated. The efficiency of a-Si solar cells can be increased by using rough, rather than smooth, tin oxide as the front-surface transparent electrode, because the rough tin oxide-silicon interface increases the absorption of red light (light trapping) and reduces the reflection loss of light across the whole spectrum. We produced, by CVD, rough tin oxide films from tetramethyltin. Cells grown on the rough films have higher efficiencies than those grown on smooth tin oxide. We also used a precursor tin compound (dimethyltin dichloride) that is less costly and less hazardous than others. Rough films can be grown from dimethyltin dichloride more than three times faster than from tetramethyltin. To combine the CVD processes we need a layer that prevents the tin oxide layer from being attacked by the silicon, such as a barrier layer of titanium oxide, which seems to be effective.

  3. Medical imaging applications of amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Mireshghi, A.; Drewery, J.S.; Hong, W.S.; Jing, T.; Kaplan, S.N.; Lee, H.K.; Perez-Mendez, V.

    1994-07-01

    Two dimensional hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) pixel arrays are good candidates as flat-panel imagers for applications in medical imaging. Various performance characteristics of these imagers are reviewed and compared with currently used equipments. An important component in the a-Si:H imager is the scintillator screen. A new approach for fabrication of high resolution CsI(Tl) scintillator layers, appropriate for coupling to a-Si:H arrays, are presented. For nuclear medicine applications, a new a-Si:H based gamma camera is introduced and Monte Carlo simulation is used to evaluate its performance.

  4. Subtleties of capacitance transients in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, R.S.; Lips, K.

    1996-12-31

    Using junction capacitance methods, the authors describe the effect of contacts on charge emission transients in n-type hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The results demonstrate some of the difficulties encountered in observing and interpreting anomalous temperature independent emission transients (slow relaxation). In this paper, the authors present additional data and reconcile the absence of anomalous emission transients in some cases with a discussion of the dynamics of depletion width filling. The authors show that the transient capacitance response of Schottky structure is not only related to the contact configuration but is connected to the rate of charge injection into the depletion region.

  5. Deuterium in crystalline and amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Borzi, R.; Ma, H.; Fedders, P.A.; Leopold, D.J.; Norberg, R.E.; Boyce, J.B.; Johnson, N.M.; Ready, S.E.; Walker, J.

    1997-07-01

    The authors report deuteron magnetic resonance (DMR) measurements on aged deuterium-implanted single crystal n-type silicon and comparisons with amorphous silicon spectra. The sample film was prepared six years ago by deuteration from a-D{sub 2} plasma and evaluated by a variety of experimental methods. Deuterium has been evolving with time and the present DMR signal shows a smaller deuteron population. A doublet from Si-D configurations along (111) has decreased more than have central molecular DMR components, which include 47 and 12 kHz FWHM gaussians. Transient DMR magnetization recoveries indicate spin lattice relaxation to para-D{sub 2} relaxation centers.

  6. On the crystallization of amorphous germanium films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelman, F.; Komem, Y.; Bendayan, M.; Beserman, R.

    1993-06-01

    The incubation time for crystallization of amorphous Ge (a-Ge) films, deposited by e-gun, was studied as a function of temperature between 150 and 500°C by means of both in situ transmission electron microscopy and Raman scattering spectroscopy. The temperature dependence of t0 follows an Arrhenius curve with an activation energy of 2.0 eV for free-sustained a-Ge films. In the case where the a-Ge films were on Si 3N 4 substrate, the activation energy of the incubation process was 1.3 eV.

  7. Magnetron-Sputtered Amorphous Metallic Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, A. P.; Mehra, M.; Khanna, S. K.

    1985-01-01

    Amorphous coatings of refractory metal/metalloid-based alloys deposited by magnetron sputtering provide extraordinary hardness and wear resistance. Sputtering target fabricated by thoroughly mixing powders of tungsten, rhenium, and boron in stated proportions and pressing at 1,200 degrees C and 3,000 lb/in. to second power (21 MPa). Substrate lightly etched by sputtering before deposition, then maintained at bias of - 500 V during initial stages of film growth while target material sputtered onto it. Argon gas at pressure used as carrier gas for sputter deposition. Coatings dense, pinhole-free, extremely smooth, and significantly resistant to chemical corrosion in acidic and neutral aqueous environments.

  8. Amorphous solidification in polymer-platelet nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Salaniwal, Sumeet; Kumar, Sanat K; Douglas, Jack F

    2002-12-16

    Computer simulations are used to understand the molecular basis of the rheology changes in polymer melts when loaded with platelet filler particles, specifically when the polymer and nanofiller interact attractively. With decreasing temperature, there is increasing aggregation between chains and filler and an increase in the polymer matrix structural relaxation time. These lifetimes are predicted to diverge at an extrapolated temperature, which we identify with the emergence of an amorphous solid state. Our findings suggest that filled polymers are phenomenologically similar to solutions of associating polymers and to supercooled liquids near their glass transition. PMID:12484924

  9. Electrical Resistivity of Amorphous fe and Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziauddin Ahmed, A. Z.; Bhuiyan, G. M.; Alam, M. S.; Rana, M. M.; Rashid, R. I. M. A.

    We have calculated the electrical resistivity of amorphous transition metals Fe and Ni by using the Diffraction model as proposed by Ziman. The electron-ion interaction is described by a local model pseudopotential, and the static structure factors are taken from the experiment. The d-band effect, a characteristic of the transition metals, is accounted for through the sp-d hybridization effect. Agreement of the calculated results with the available experimental data is found to be remarkably good for both systems.

  10. Long-term oxidization and phase transition of InN nanotextures

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The long-term (6 months) oxidization of hcp-InN (wurtzite, InN-w) nanostructures (crystalline/amorphous) synthesized on Si [100] substrates is analyzed. The densely packed layers of InN-w nanostructures (5-40 nm) are shown to be oxidized by atmospheric oxygen via the formation of an intermediate amorphous In-Ox-Ny (indium oxynitride) phase to a final bi-phase hcp-InN/bcc-In2O3 nanotexture. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy and selected area electron diffraction are used to identify amorphous In-Ox-Ny oxynitride phase. When the oxidized area exceeds the critical size of 5 nm, the amorphous In-Ox-Ny phase eventually undergoes phase transition via a slow chemical reaction of atomic oxygen with the indium atoms, forming a single bcc In2O3 phase. PMID:21711908

  11. Vanadium oxide thin film with improved sheet resistance uniformity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Généreux, Francis; Provençal, Francis; Tremblay, Bruno; Boucher, Marc-André; Julien, Christian; Alain, Christine

    2014-06-01

    This paper reports on the deposition of vanadium oxide thin films with sheet resistance uniformity better than 2.5% over a 150 mm wafer. The resistance uniformity within the array is estimated to be less than 1%, which is comparable with the value reported for amorphous silicon-based microbolometer arrays. In addition, this paper also shows that the resistivity of vanadium oxide, like amorphous silicon, can be modeled by Arrhenius' equation. This result is expected to significantly ease the computation of the correction table required for TEC-less operation of VOx-based microbolometer arrays.

  12. The future of amorphous silicon photovoltaic technology

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, R.; Luft, W.

    1995-06-01

    Amorphous silicon modules are commercially available. They are the first truly commercial thin-film photovoltaic (PV) devices. Well-defined production processes over very large areas (>1 m{sup 2}) have been implemented. There are few environmental issues during manufacturing, deployment in the field, or with the eventual disposal of the modules. Manufacturing safety issues are well characterized and controllable. The highest measured initial efficiency to date is 13.7% for a small triple-stacked cell and the highest stabilized module efficiency is 10%. There is a consensus among researchers, that in order to achieve a 15% stabilized efficiency, a triple-junction amorphous silicon structure is required. Fundamental improvements in alloys are needed for higher efficiencies. This is being pursued through the DOE/NREL Thin-Film Partnership Program. Cost reductions through improved manufacturing processes are being pursued under the National Renewable Energy Laboratory/US Department of Energy (NREL/DOE)-sponsored research in manufacturing technology (PVMaT). Much of the work in designing a-Si devices is a result of trying to compensate for the Staebler-Wronski effect. Some new deposition techniques hold promise because they have produced materials with lower stabilized defect densities. However, none has yet produced a high efficiency device and shown it to be more stable than those from standard glow discharge deposited material.

  13. Structural Characteristics of Synthetic Amorphous Calcium Carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, F. Marc; MacDonald, Jason; Feng, Jian; Phillips, Brian L.; Ehm, Lars; Tarabrella, Cathy; Parise, John B.; Reeder, Richard J.

    2008-08-06

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is an important phase involved in calcification by a wide variety of invertebrate organisms and is of technological interest in the development of functional materials. Despite widespread scientific interest in this phase a full characterization of structure is lacking. This is mainly due to its metastability and difficulties in evaluating structure using conventional structure determination methods. Here we present new findings from the application of two techniques, pair distribution function analysis and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, which provide new insight to structural aspects of synthetic ACC. Several important results have emerged from this study of ACC formed in vitro using two common preparation methods: (1) ACC exhibits no structural coherence over distances > 15 {angstrom} and is truly amorphous; (2) most of the hydrogen in ACC is present as structural H{sub 2}O, about half of which undergoes restricted motion on the millisecond time scale near room temperature; (3) the short- and intermediate-range structure of ACC shows no distinct match to any known structure in the calcium carbonate system; and (4) most of the carbonate in ACC is monodentate making it distinctly different from monohydrocalcite. Although the structure of synthetic ACC is still not fully understood, the results presented provide an important baseline for future experiments evaluating biogenic ACC and samples containing certain additives that may play a role in stabilization of ACC, crystallization kinetics, and final polymorph selection.

  14. Ferromagnetism of nanostructured zinc oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straumal, B. B.; Mazilkin, A. A.; Protasova, S. G.; Straumal, P. B.; Myatiev, A. A.; Schütz, G.; Goering, E.; Baretzky, B.

    2012-12-01

    The paper presents a review of the causes of the occurrence of ferromagnetic properties in zinc oxide. It is shown that ferromagnetism only occurs in polycrystals at a fairly high density of grain boundaries. The critical grain size is about 20 nm for pure ZnO and over 1000 nm for zinc oxide doped with manganese. The solubility of manganese and cobalt in zinc oxide increases considerably with diminishing grain size. Even at the critical grain size, the ferromagnetic properties depend significantly on the film texture and the structure of intercrystalline amorphous layers.

  15. Atomistic modeling of amorphous polystyrene: Prediction of mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raaska, T.; Niemelä, S.; Sundholm, F.

    1995-04-01

    Molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics simulations have been used to predict the mechanical properties of amorphous polystyrene. After constructing a model for amorphous, dense material, static structure deformation and stepwise loading constant stress molecular dynamics were used to predict the elastic constants. Calculated values for Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, bulk modulus and shear modulus are reported as a function of chain tacticity.

  16. Latent ion tracks in amorphous silicon T. Bierschenk,1,

    E-print Network

    Nordlund, Kai

    Latent ion tracks in amorphous silicon T. Bierschenk,1, R. Giulian,1, B. Afra,1 M.D. Rodriguez,1 (Dated: November 11, 2013) Abstract We present experimental evidence for the formation of ion tracks in amorphous Si induced by swift heavy ion irradiation. An underlying core-shell structure consistent

  17. Method for improving the stability of amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Branz, Howard M.

    2004-03-30

    A method of producing a metastable degradation resistant amorphous hydrogenated silicon film is provided, which comprises the steps of growing a hydrogenated amorphous silicon film, the film having an exposed surface, illuminating the surface using an essentially blue or ultraviolet light to form high densities of a light induced defect near the surface, and etching the surface to remove the defect.

  18. Superlattice doped layers for amorphous silicon photovoltaic cells

    DOEpatents

    Arya, Rajeewa R. (Doylestown, PA)

    1988-01-12

    Superlattice doped layers for amorphous silicon photovoltaic cells comprise a plurality of first and second lattices of amorphous silicon alternatingly formed on one another. Each of the first lattices has a first optical bandgap and each of the second lattices has a second optical bandgap different from the first optical bandgap. A method of fabricating the superlattice doped layers also is disclosed.

  19. AMORPHOUS SILICON-BASED MINIMODULES WITH SILICONE ELASTOMER ENCAPSULATION

    E-print Network

    Deng, Xunming

    AMORPHOUS SILICON-BASED MINIMODULES WITH SILICONE ELASTOMER ENCAPSULATION Aarohi Vijh 1 fabricated one and two cell, amorphous silicon based mini-modules encapsulated with a modern silicone. This yellowing upon exposure to UV light is a characteristic of most carbon-based polymers. Silicon

  20. Amorphous Silicon as Semiconductor Material for High Resolution LAPS

    E-print Network

    Moritz, Werner

    Amorphous Silicon as Semiconductor Material for High Resolution LAPS Werner Moritz1 , Tatsuo-insulator- semiconductor (MIS) structures based on amorphous silicon (a-Si) prepared as a thin layer on transparent glass Adressable Potentimetric sensors electrode metal solution thin film under investigation SiO2 silicon metal

  1. Optical conductivity of amorphous Ta and beta-Ta films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nestell, J. E., Jr.; Scoles, K. J.; Christy, R. W.

    1982-01-01

    Tantalum films evaporated in high vacuum onto liquid-nitrogen-cooled substrates had an amorphous structure that persisted even after warming to room temperature. The optical conductivity (as well as the dc conductivity) of the amorphous films differed significantly from that of the bcc films.

  2. Pressure-induced transformations in amorphous silicon: A computational study

    SciTech Connect

    Garcez, K. M. S.; Antonelli, A.

    2014-02-14

    We study the transformations between amorphous phases of Si through molecular simulations using the environment dependent interatomic potential (EDIP) for Si. Our results show that upon pressure, the material undergoes a transformation from the low density amorphous (LDA) Si to the high density amorphous (HDA) Si. This transformation can be reversed by decompressing the material. This process, however, exhibits clear hysteresis, suggesting that the transformation LDA ? HDA is first-order like. The HDA phase is predominantly five-fold coordinated, whereas the LDA phase is the normal tetrahedrally bonded amorphous Si. The HDA phase at 400?K and 20?GPa was submitted to an isobaric annealing up to 800?K, resulting in a denser amorphous phase, which is structurally distinct from the HDA phase. Our results also show that the atomic volume and structure of this new amorphous phase are identical to those of the glass obtained by an isobaric quenching of the liquid in equilibrium at 2000?K and 20 GPa down to 400?K. The similarities between our results and those for amorphous ices suggest that this new phase is the very high density amorphous Si.

  3. Quantifying Nanoscale Order in Amorphous Materials via Fluctuation Electron Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogle, Stephanie Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Fluctuation electron microscopy (FEM) has been used to study the nanoscale order in various amorphous materials. The method is explicitly sensitive to 3- and 4-body atomic correlation functions in amorphous materials; this is sufficient to establish the existence of structural order on the nanoscale, even when the radial distribution function…

  4. Free suspension processing of oxides to form amorphous oxide materials, appendix B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wouch, G.

    1973-01-01

    The processing of yttria, zirconia, and alumina under weightless conditions is discussed. The process consists of levitation or position control, heating and melting, superheating, and supercooling. The use of arc imaging furnaces, lasers, induction heating, microwave, and electron beam methods are analyzed to show the advantages and disadvantages of each.

  5. Preferred orientations of laterally grown silicon films over amorphous substrates using the vapor–liquid–solid technique

    SciTech Connect

    LeBoeuf, J. L. Brodusch, N.; Gauvin, R.; Quitoriano, N. J.

    2014-12-28

    A novel method has been optimized so that adhesion layers are no longer needed to reliably deposit patterned gold structures on amorphous substrates. Using this technique allows for the fabrication of amorphous oxide templates known as micro-crucibles, which confine a vapor–liquid–solid (VLS) catalyst of nominally pure gold to a specific geometry. Within these confined templates of amorphous materials, faceted silicon crystals have been grown laterally. The novel deposition technique, which enables the nominally pure gold catalyst, involves the undercutting of an initial chromium adhesion layer. Using electron backscatter diffraction it was found that silicon nucleated in these micro-crucibles were 30% single crystals, 45% potentially twinned crystals and 25% polycrystals for the experimental conditions used. Single, potentially twinned, and polycrystals all had an aversion to growth with the (1 0 0) surface parallel to the amorphous substrate. Closer analysis of grain boundaries of potentially twinned and polycrystalline samples revealed that the overwhelming majority of them were of the 60° ?3 coherent twin boundary type. The large amount of coherent twin boundaries present in the grown, two-dimensional silicon crystals suggest that lateral VLS growth occurs very close to thermodynamic equilibrium. It is suggested that free energy fluctuations during growth or cooling, and impurities were the causes for this twinning.

  6. Characterization of amorphous multilayered ZnO-SnO{sub 2} heterostructure thin films and their field effect electronic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Su-Jae Hwang, Chi-Sun; Pi, Jae-Eun; Yang, Jong-Heon; Oh, Himchan; Cho, Sung Haeng; Cho, Kyoung-Ik; Chu, Hye Yong

    2014-11-17

    Multilayered ZnO-SnO{sub 2} heterostructure thin films were produced using pulsed laser ablation of pie-shaped ZnO-SnO{sub 2} oxides target, and their structural and field effect electronic transport properties were investigated as a function of the thickness of the ZnO and SnO{sub 2} layers. The films have an amorphous multilayered heterostructure composed of the periodic stacking of the ZnO and SnO{sub 2} layers. The field effect electronic properties of amorphous multilayered ZnO-SnO{sub 2} heterostructure thin film transistors (TFTs) are highly dependent on the thickness of the ZnO and SnO{sub 2} layers. The highest electron mobility of 37?cm{sup 2}/V s, a low subthreshold swing of a 0.19?V/decade, a threshold voltage of 0.13?V, and a high drain current on-to-off ratio of ?10{sup 10} obtained for the amorphous multilayered ZnO(1.5?nm)-SnO{sub 2}(1.5?nm) heterostructure TFTs. These results are presumed to be due to the unique electronic structure of an amorphous multilayered ZnO-SnO{sub 2} heterostructure film consisting of ZnO, SnO{sub 2}, and ZnO-SnO{sub 2} interface layers.

  7. Preferred orientations of laterally grown silicon films over amorphous substrates using the vapor-liquid-solid technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeBoeuf, J. L.; Brodusch, N.; Gauvin, R.; Quitoriano, N. J.

    2014-12-01

    A novel method has been optimized so that adhesion layers are no longer needed to reliably deposit patterned gold structures on amorphous substrates. Using this technique allows for the fabrication of amorphous oxide templates known as micro-crucibles, which confine a vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) catalyst of nominally pure gold to a specific geometry. Within these confined templates of amorphous materials, faceted silicon crystals have been grown laterally. The novel deposition technique, which enables the nominally pure gold catalyst, involves the undercutting of an initial chromium adhesion layer. Using electron backscatter diffraction it was found that silicon nucleated in these micro-crucibles were 30% single crystals, 45% potentially twinned crystals and 25% polycrystals for the experimental conditions used. Single, potentially twinned, and polycrystals all had an aversion to growth with the {1 0 0} surface parallel to the amorphous substrate. Closer analysis of grain boundaries of potentially twinned and polycrystalline samples revealed that the overwhelming majority of them were of the 60° ?3 coherent twin boundary type. The large amount of coherent twin boundaries present in the grown, two-dimensional silicon crystals suggest that lateral VLS growth occurs very close to thermodynamic equilibrium. It is suggested that free energy fluctuations during growth or cooling, and impurities were the causes for this twinning.

  8. Structural, electronic, and dynamical properties of amorphous gallium arsenide: a comparison between two topological models

    E-print Network

    Lewis, Laurent J.

    Structural, electronic, and dynamical properties of amorphous gallium arsenide: a comparison of amorphous gallium arsenide. Using the recently­proposed ``activation­ relaxation technique'' and empirical

  9. Direct-patterned optical waveguides on amorphous silicon films

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, Steve; Bond, Tiziana C.; Bond, Steven W.; Pocha, Michael D.; Hau-Riege, Stefan

    2005-08-02

    An optical waveguide structure is formed by embedding a core material within a medium of lower refractive index, i.e. the cladding. The optical index of refraction of amorphous silicon (a-Si) and polycrystalline silicon (p-Si), in the wavelength range between about 1.2 and about 1.6 micrometers, differ by up to about 20%, with the amorphous phase having the larger index. Spatially selective laser crystallization of amorphous silicon provides a mechanism for controlling the spatial variation of the refractive index and for surrounding the amorphous regions with crystalline material. In cases where an amorphous silicon film is interposed between layers of low refractive index, for example, a structure comprised of a SiO.sub.2 substrate, a Si film and an SiO.sub.2 film, the formation of guided wave structures is particularly simple.

  10. Salt Fog Testing Iron-Based Amorphous Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, Raul B.; Aprigliano, Louis F.; Day, S. Daniel; Farmer, Joseph C.

    2007-07-01

    Iron-based amorphous alloys are hard and highly corrosion resistant, which make them desirable for salt water and other applications. These alloys can be produced as powder and can be deposited as coatings on any surface that needs to be protected from the environment. It was of interest to examine the behavior of these amorphous alloys in the standard salt-fog testing ASTM B 117. Three different amorphous coating compositions were deposited on 316L SS coupons and exposed for many cycles of the salt fog test. Other common engineering alloys such as 1018 carbon steel, 316L SS and Hastelloy C-22 were also tested together with the amorphous coatings. Results show that amorphous coatings are resistant to rusting in salt fog. Partial devitrification may be responsible for isolated rust spots in one of the coatings. (authors)

  11. Fabrication and Characterization of Amorphous/Nanocrystalline Thin Film Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, Benjamin S.

    Combining the absorption abilities of amorphous silicon and the electron transport capabilities of crystalline silicon would be a great advantage to not only solar cells but other semiconductor devices. In this work composite films were created using molecular beam epitaxy and electron beam deposition interchangeably as a method to create metallic precursors. Aluminum induced crystallization techniques were used to convert an amorphous silicon film with a capping layer of aluminum nanodots into a film composed of a mixture of amorphous silicon and nanocrystalline silicon. This layer was grown into the amorphous layer by cannibalizing a portion of the amorphous silicon material during the aluminum induced crystallization. Characterization was performed on films and metallic precursors utilizing SEM, TEM, ellipsometry and spectrophotometer.

  12. Experimental evidence of homonuclear bonds in amorphous GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Ishimaru, Dr. Manabu; Zhang, Yanwen; Wang, Xuemei; Chu, Wei-Kan; Weber, William J

    2011-01-01

    Although GaN is an important semiconductor material, its amorphous structures are not well understood. Currently, theoretical atomistic structural models which contradict each other, are proposed for the chemical short-range order of amorphous GaN: one characterizes amorphous GaN networks as highly chemically ordered, consisting of heteronuclear Ga-N atomic bonds; and the other predicts the existence of a large number of homonuclear bonds within the first coordination shell. In the present study, we examine amorphous structures of GaN via radial distribution functions obtained by electron diffraction techniques. The experimental results demonstrate that amorphous GaN networks consist of heterononuclear Ga-N bonds, as well as homonuclear Ga-Ga and N-N bonds.

  13. Parametrized dielectric functions of amorphous GeSn alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Costa, Vijay Richard; Wang, Wei; Schmidt, Daniel; Yeo, Yee-Chia

    2015-09-01

    We obtained the complex dielectric function of amorphous Ge1-xSnx (0 ? x ? 0.07) alloys using spectroscopic ellipsometry from 0.4 to 4.5 eV. Amorphous GeSn films were formed by room-temperature implantation of phosphorus into crystalline GeSn alloys grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The optical response of amorphous GeSn alloys is similar to amorphous Ge and can be parametrized using a Kramers-Kronig consistent Cody-Lorentz dispersion model. The parametric model was extended to account for the dielectric functions of amorphous Ge0.75Sn0.25 and Ge0.50Sn0.50 alloys from literature. The compositional dependence of band gap energy Eg and parameters associated with the Lorentzian oscillator have been determined. The behavior of these parameters with varying x can be understood in terms of the alloying effect of Sn on Ge.

  14. Moringa coagulant as a stabilizer for amorphous solids: Part I.

    PubMed

    Bhende, Santosh; Jadhav, Namdeo

    2012-06-01

    Stabilization of amorphous state is a focal area for formulators to reap benefits related with solubility and consequently bioavailability of poorly soluble drugs. In the present work, an attempt has been made to explore the potential of moringa coagulant as an amorphous state stabilizer by investigating its role in stabilization of spray-dried (amorphous) ibuprofen, meloxicam and felodipine. Thermal studies like glass forming ability, glass transition temperature, hot stage microscopy and DSC were carried out for understanding thermodynamic stabilization of drugs. PXRD and dissolution studies were performed to support contribution of moringa coagulant. Studies showed that hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions between drug and moringa coagulant are responsible for amorphous state stabilization as explored by ATR-FTIR and molecular docking. Especially, H-bonding was found to be predominant mechanism for drug stabilization. Therein, arginine (basic amino acid in coagulant) exhibited various interactions and played important role in stabilization of aforesaid amorphous drugs. PMID:22359158

  15. Atomistic simulation of damage accumulation and amorphization in Ge

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez-Selles, Jose L. Martin-Bragado, Ignacio; Claverie, Alain; Benistant, Francis

    2015-02-07

    Damage accumulation and amorphization mechanisms by means of ion implantation in Ge are studied using Kinetic Monte Carlo and Binary Collision Approximation techniques. Such mechanisms are investigated through different stages of damage accumulation taking place in the implantation process: from point defect generation and cluster formation up to full amorphization of Ge layers. We propose a damage concentration amorphization threshold for Ge of ?1.3?×?10{sup 22}?cm{sup ?3} which is independent on the implantation conditions. Recombination energy barriers depending on amorphous pocket sizes are provided. This leads to an explanation of the reported distinct behavior of the damage generated by different ions. We have also observed that the dissolution of clusters plays an important role for relatively high temperatures and fluences. The model is able to explain and predict different damage generation regimes, amount of generated damage, and extension of amorphous layers in Ge for different ions and implantation conditions.

  16. External field-assisted solution synthesis and selectively catalytic properties of amorphous iron nanoplatelets

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Jianguo; Yan, Gongqin; Wang, Wei; Liu, Jun

    2012-03-07

    This work describes an easy and flexible approach for the synthesis of 2D nanostructures by external composite field-induced self-assembly. Amorphous iron nanoplatelets with a large aspect ratio were prepared by reducing a concentrated FeSO4 solution with NaBH4 without any templates or surfactants under a magnetic field and a shear field, and characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Based on the morphological dependence of the resultant iron nanostructures on the kinetic parameters such as reactant concentration, reaction temperature, external fields as well as reaction time, etc., a novel conceivable formation mechanism of the iron nanoplatelets was substantiated to be a self-assembly of concentrated iron nuclei induced by the synergistic effect of both a magnetic field and a shear field. Due to the amorphous nature and shape anisotropy, the as-synthesized iron nanoplatelets exhibit quite different magnetic properties with an enhanced coercivity of >220 Oe from isotropic iron nanoparticles. In the oxidation of cyclohexane with hydrogen peroxide as a 'green' oxidant, the as-obtained amorphous iron nanoplatelets show a conversion more than 84% and a complete selectivity for cyclohexanol and cyclohexanone due to the unique structure. Moreover, their catalytic performances are strongly influenced by their morphology, and the iron atoms located on the faces tend to catalyze the formation of cyclohexanol while those on the sides tend to catalyze the formation of cyclohexanone. The external composite field-induced solution synthesis reported here can be readily explored for fabricating other 2D magnetic nanoplatelets, and the resulting iron nanoplatelets are promising for a number of applications such as high efficient selective catalysis, energy, environment fields and so forth.

  17. Characteristics of amorphous kerogens fractionated from terrigenous sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Noriyuki

    1984-02-01

    A preliminary attempt to fractionate amorphous kerogens from terrigenous bulk kerogen by a benzene-water two phase partition method under acidic condition was made. Microscopic observation revealed that amorphous kerogens and structured kerogens were fractionated effectively by this method. Characteristics of the amorphous and structured kerogens fractionated by this method were examined by some chemical analyses and compared with those of the bulk kerogen and humic acid isolated from the same rock sample (Haizume Formation, Pleistocene, Japan). The elemental and infrared (IR) analyses showed that the amorphous kerogen fraction had the highest atomic H/C ratio and the lowest atomic N/C ratio and was the richest in aliphatic structures and carbonyl and carboxyl functional groups. Quantities of fatty acids from the saponification products of each geopolymer were in agreement with the results of elemental and IR analyses. Distribution of the fatty acids was suggestive that more animal lipids participate in the formation of amorphous kerogens because of the abundance of relatively lower molecular weight fatty acids (such as C 16 and C 18 acids) in saponification products of amorphous kerogens. On the other hand, although the amorphous kerogen fraction tends to be rich in aliphatic structures compared with bulk kerogen of the same rock samples, van Krevelen plots of elemental compositions of kerogens from the core samples (Nishiyama Oil Field, Tertiary, Japan) reveal that the amorphous kerogen fraction is not necessarily characterized by markedly high atomic H/C ratio. This was attributed to the oxic environment of deposition and the abundance of biodegraded terrestrial amorphous organic matter in the amorphous kerogen fraction used in this work.

  18. High-Density Amorphous Ice, the Frost on Interstellar Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenniskens, P.; Blake, D. F.; Wilson, M. A.; Pohorille, A.

    1995-01-01

    Most water ice in the universe is in a form which does not occur naturally on Earth and of which only minimal amounts have been made in the laboratory. We have encountered this 'high-density amorphous ice' in electron diffraction experiments of low-temperature (T less than 30 K) vapor-deposited water and have subsequently modeled its structure using molecular dynamics simulations. The characteristic feature of high-density amorphous ice is the presence of 'interstitial' oxygen pair distances between 3 and 4 A. However, we find that the structure is best described as a collapsed lattice of the more familiar low-density amorphous form. These distortions are frozen in at temperatures below 38 K because, we propose, it requires the breaking of one hydrogen bond, on average, per molecule to relieve the strain and to restructure the lattice to that of low-density amorphous ice. Several features of astrophysical ice analogs studied in laboratory experiments are readily explained by the structural transition from high-density amorphous ice into low-density amorphous ice. Changes in the shape of the 3.07 gm water band, trapping efficiency of CO, CO loss, changes in the CO band structure, and the recombination of radicals induced by low-temperature UV photolysis all covary with structural changes that occur in the ice during this amorphous to amorphous transition. While the 3.07 micrometers ice band in various astronomical environments can be modeled with spectra of simple mixtures of amorphous and crystalline forms, the contribution of the high-density amorphous form nearly always dominates.

  19. High Catalytic Activity of Amorphous Ir-Pi for Oxygen Evolution Reaction.

    PubMed

    Irshad, Ahamed; Munichandraiah, Nookala

    2015-07-29

    Large-scale production of hydrogen gas by water electrolysis is hindered by the sluggish kinetics of oxygen evolution reaction (OER) at the anode. The development of a highly active and stable catalyst for OER is a challenging task. Electrochemically prepared amorphous metal-based catalysts have gained wide attention after the recent discovery of a cobalt-phosphate (Co-Pi) catalyst. Herein, an amorphous iridium-phosphate (Ir-Pi) is investigated as an oxygen evolution catalyst. The catalyst is prepared by the anodic polarization of carbon paper electrodes in neutral phosphate buffer solutions containing IrCl3. The Ir-Pi film deposited on the substrate has significant amounts of phosphate and Ir centers in an oxidation state higher than +4. Phosphate plays a significant role in the deposition of the catalyst and also in its activity toward OER. The onset potential of OER on the Ir-Pi is about 150 mV lower in comparison with the Co-Pi under identical experimental conditions. Thus, Ir-Pi is a promising catalyst for electrochemical oxidation of water. PMID:26132593

  20. Silica nanoparticles on front glass for efficiency enhancement in superstrate-type amorphous silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sonali; Banerjee, Chandan; Kundu, Avra; Dey, Prasenjit; Saha, Hiranmay; Datta, Swapan K.

    2013-10-01

    Antireflective coating on front glass of superstrate-type single junction amorphous silicon solar cells (SCs) has been applied using highly monodispersed and stable silica nanoparticles (NPs). The silica NPs having 300 nm diameter were synthesized by Stober technique where the size of the NPs was controlled by varying the alcohol medium. The synthesized silica NPs were analysed by dynamic light scattering technique and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The NPs were spin coated on glass side of fluorinated tin oxide (SnO2: F) coated glass superstrate and optimization of the concentration of the colloidal solution, spin speed and number of coated layers was done to achieve minimum reflection characteristics. An estimation of the distribution of the NPs for different optimization parameters has been done using field-emission scanning electron microscopy. Subsequently, the transparent conducting oxide coated glass with the layer having the minimum reflectance is used for fabrication of amorphous silicon SC. Electrical analysis of the fabricated cell indicates an improvement of 6.5% in short-circuit current density from a reference of 12.40 mA cm-2 while the open circuit voltage and the fill factor remains unaltered. A realistic optical model has also been proposed to gain an insight into the system.

  1. Electrochemical treatment of domestic wastewater using boron-doped diamond and nanostructured amorphous carbon electrodes.

    PubMed

    Daghrir, Rimeh; Drogui, Patrick; Tshibangu, Joel; Delegan, Nazar; El Khakani, My Ali

    2014-05-01

    The performance of the electrochemical oxidation process for efficient treatment of domestic wastewater loaded with organic matter was studied. The process was firstly evaluated in terms of its capability of producing an oxidant agent (H2O2) using amorphous carbon (or carbon felt) as cathode, whereas Ti/BDD electrode was used as anode. Relatively high concentrations of H2O2 (0.064 mM) was produced after 90 min of electrolysis time, at 4.0 A of current intensity and using amorphous carbon at the cathode. Factorial design and central composite design methodologies were successively used to define the optimal operating conditions to reach maximum removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and color. Current intensity and electrolysis time were found to influence the removal of COD and color. The contribution of current intensity on the removal of COD and color was around 59.1 and 58.8%, respectively, whereas the contribution of treatment time on the removal of COD and color was around 23.2 and 22.9%, respectively. The electrochemical treatment applied under 3.0 A of current intensity, during 120 min of electrolysis time and using Ti/BDD as anode, was found to be the optimal operating condition in terms of cost/effectiveness. Under these optimal conditions, the average removal rates of COD and color were 78.9?±?2 and 85.5?±?2 %, whereas 70% of total organic carbon removal was achieved. PMID:24493133

  2. Structural relaxation of vacancies in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, E.; Lee, Y.H.; Chen, C.; Pang, T.

    1997-07-01

    The authors have studied the structural relaxation of vacancies in amorphous silicon (a-Si) using a tight-binding molecular-dynamics method. The most significant difference between vacancies in a-Si and those in crystalline silicon (c-Si) is that the deep gap states do not show up in a-Si. This difference is explained through the unusual behavior of the structural relaxation near the vacancies in a-Si, which enhances the sp{sup 2} + p bonding near the band edges. They have also observed that the vacancies do not migrate below 450 K although some of them can still be annihilated, particularly at high defect density due to large structural relaxation.

  3. Tailored magnetic anisotropy in an amorphous trilayer

    SciTech Connect

    Fu Yu; Barsukov, I.; Spasova, M.; Lindner, J.; Meckenstock, R.; Farle, M.; Raanaei, H.; Hjoervarsson, B.

    2011-06-01

    An amorphous Co{sub 68}Fe{sub 24}Zr{sub 8}(3 nm)/Al{sub 70}Zr{sub 30}(3 nm)/Co{sub 68}Fe{sub 24}Zr{sub 8}(3 nm) trilayer system has been investigated using in-plane and out-of-plane angular dependent ferromagnetic resonance at different frequencies. The in-plane magnetic anisotropy is uniaxial, retaining its value of (2.9 {+-} 0.1) x 10{sup 3} J/m{sup 3} for each magnetic layer, whereas its direction was tailored independently in an arbitrary manner by applying an external magnetic field during the film deposition. The perpendicular anisotropy constant, supposed to reflect the interface quality, is nearly identical for both layers. Furthermore, the magnetic layers act independently upon each other due to the absence of interlayer coupling.

  4. Bulk amorphous steels based on Fe alloys

    DOEpatents

    Lu, ZhaoPing; Liu, Chain T.

    2006-05-30

    A bulk amorphous alloy has the approximate composition: Fe.sub.(100-a-b-c-d-e)Y.sub.aMn.sub.bT.sub.cM.sub.dX.sub.e wherein: T includes at least one of the group consisting of: Ni, Cu, Cr and Co; M includes at least one of the group consisting of W, Mo, Nb, Ta, Al and Ti; X includes at least one of the group consisting of Co, Ni and Cr; a is an atomic percentage, and a<5; b is an atomic percentage, and b.ltoreq.25; c is an atomic percentage, and c.ltoreq.25; d is an atomic percentage, and d.ltoreq.25; and e is an atomic percentage, and 5.ltoreq.e.ltoreq.30.

  5. Polarization Stability of Amorphous Piezoelectric Polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, C.; Ounaies, Z.; Su, J.; Smith, J. G., Jr.; Harrison, J. S.

    2000-01-01

    Amorphous polyimides containing polar functional groups have been synthesized and investigated for potential use as high temperature piezoelectric sensors. The thermal stability of the piezoelectric effect of one polyimide was evaluated as a function of various curing and poling conditions under dynamic and static thermal stimuli. First, the polymer samples were thermally cycled under strain by systematically increasing the maximum temperature from 50 C to 200 C while the piezoelectric strain coefficient was being measured. Second, the samples were isothermally aged at an elevated temperature in air, and the isothermal decay of the remanent polarization was measured at room temperature as a function of time. Both conventional and corona poling methods were evaluated. This material exhibited good thermal stability of the piezoelectric properties up to 100 C.

  6. Amorphous-silicon-based uncooled microbolometer IRFPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedel, Corrinne; Martin, Jean-Luc; Ouvrier-Buffet, Jean-Louis; Tissot, Jean-Luc; Vilain, Michel; Yon, Jean-Jacques

    1999-07-01

    LETI LIR has been involved in Amorphous Silicon uncooled microbolometer development for a few years. This paper reports recent progress that have been carried out both in technological and product field. Due to the very particular features of LETI LIR technology, large fill factor, high thermal insulation, associated with small thermal time constant, can be achieved, resulting in a large detector responsivity. In addition, pulsed bias has been introduced showing performance improvement in terms of power consumption, reliability, faster thermal response. A model has been developed which accounts for these improvements. Electro-thermal results obtained from an IRCMOS 256 X 64, 47 micrometers detector sizes, laboratory prototype show that NETD less than 50 mK at f/1 can be obtained even at a high video scanning rate, that is compatible with micro scanning techniques.

  7. Castable Amorphous Metal Mirrors and Mirror Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmann, Douglas C.; Davis, Gregory L.; Agnes, Gregory S.; Shapiro, Andrew A.

    2013-01-01

    A revolutionary way to produce a mirror and mirror assembly is to cast the entire part at once from a metal alloy that combines all of the desired features into the final part: optical smoothness, curvature, flexures, tabs, isogrids, low CTE, and toughness. In this work, it has been demonstrated that castable mirrors are possible using bulk metallic glasses (BMGs, also called amorphous metals) and BMG matrix composites (BMGMCs). These novel alloys have all of the desired mechanical and thermal properties to fabricate an entire mirror assembly without machining, bonding, brazing, welding, or epoxy. BMGs are multi-component metal alloys that have been cooled in such a manner as to avoid crystallization leading to an amorphous (non-crystalline) microstructure. This lack of crystal structure and the fact that these alloys are glasses, leads to a wide assortment of mechanical and thermal properties that are unlike those observed in crystalline metals. Among these are high yield strength, carbide-like hardness, low melting temperatures (making them castable like aluminum), a thermoplastic processing region (for improving smoothness), low stiffness, high strength-to-weight ratios, relatively low CTE, density similar to titanium alloys, high elasticity and ultra-smooth cast parts (as low as 0.2-nm surface roughness has been demonstrated in cast BMGs). BMGMCs are composite alloys that consist of a BMG matrix with crystalline dendrites embedded throughout. BMGMCs are used to overcome the typically brittle failure observed in monolithic BMGs by adding a soft phase that arrests the formation of cracks in the BMG matrix. In some cases, BMGMCs offer superior castability, toughness, and fatigue resistance, if not as good a surface finish as BMGs. This work has demonstrated that BMGs and BMGMCs can be cast into prototype mirrors and mirror assemblies without difficulty.

  8. Use of amorphous silicon for deep-UV masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fields, Charles H.; Oldham, William G.; Bojko, Richard J.

    1993-08-01

    We explore the use of amorphous silicon as an alternative to chrome for deep UV masks. The primary advantage is that patterns may be dry etched. As masks' feature sizes continue to shrink, this dry etch capability of amorphous silicon can be a significant factor. Amorphous silicon has a further advantage of high absorbtivity over the 190 - 350 nm region. We have characterized the reflectivity and absorption of amorphous silicon, polysilicon, and chrome in the deep UV range from 190 nm to 365 nm. The optical properties of amorphous and polysilicon are very similar, but the superior homogeneity of amorphous silicon for etching suggests it as the preferred form. The absorbtivity of silicon exceeds that of chrome in this region (by about 20%); consequently a 700 A film is adequate to insure transmission of less than .01%. We have examined both optical and e-beam mask making processes. The amorphous silicon is deposited on quartz blanks by means of LPCVD. After removing the backside film, the pattern is transferred to the silicon using e-beam or optical exposure. The pattern is then developed by a dry plasma etch.

  9. The Potential for Hot Carrier Collection from an Amorphous Semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Reuben; Kiriluk, Kristin; Fields, Jeremy; Simonds, Brian; Miller, Levi; Pai, Yu-Pan; Su, Tining; Yan, Baojie; Yang, Jeffrey; Guha, Subhendu; Madan, Arun; Taylor, Craig

    2012-02-01

    The quest for clean, inexpensive sources of energy has produced intense interest in low-cost methods for dramatically increasing the efficiencies of solar cells. One such method is to collect carriers before they lose energy to heat. Here we present strong evidence for such hot carrier transfer in an unlikely place, between the amorphous and crystalline regions of nanocrystalline Si. Nanocrystalline Si is a thin film photovoltaic material formed of Si nanocrystallites imbedded in a hydrogenated amorphous Si matrix. Using a combination of photoluminescence quenching and electron spin resonance measurements as a function of nanocrystalline fraction, we observe clear evidence that above a critical fraction carriers excited in the amorphous region transfer to the nanocrystals rather than relaxing to band tail states of the amorphous silicon matrix. The average nanocrystallite spacing is consistent with estimates of the distance hot carriers can transfer in amorphous silicon before thermalization. This result has implications that extend from improving the stability of amorphous silicon under optical illumination to the development of a new paradigm in solar cell design using nanostructured amorphous absorbers.

  10. Rate of H2 formation on amorphous grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smoluchowski, R.

    1981-01-01

    The rate of formation of molecular hydrogen from hydrogen atoms adsorbed on amorphous grains taken to represent interstellar dust grains is analyzed. Following a brief review of the structure and thermodynamics of amorphous grains and the evidence that interstellar grains are indeed amorphous, consideration is given to the mechanism of formation of H2 molecules by the impact of H atoms on grains with adsorbed H atoms, and it is concluded that on amorphous grains, molecule formation will only occur if H atoms are adsorbed within a distance on the order of 10 A of each other. Rates of H2 formation on single crystal and polycrystalline grains are then calculated and compared with those for amorphous grains, and it is shown that, except for certain temperatures and high H atom densities, the rates of H2 formation on polycrystalline and amorphous grains are up to a few orders of magnitude lower than on single crystals. The results suggest that amorphous grains will lead to H2 clouds with irregular and sharply delineated features in contrast to the more uniform clouds formed on crystalline grains.

  11. An infrared and luminescence study of tritiated amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Sidhu, L.S.; Kosteski, T.; Kherani, N.P.; Gaspari, F.; Zukotynski, S.; Shmayda, W.

    1997-07-01

    Tritium has been incorporated into amorphous silicon. Infrared spectroscopy shows new infrared vibration modes due to silicon-tritium (Si-T) bonds in the amorphous silicon network. Si-T vibration frequencies are related to Si-H vibration frequencies by simple mass relationships. Inelastic collisions of {beta} particles, produced as a result of tritium decay, with the amorphous silicon network results in the generation of electron-hole pairs. Radiative recombination of these carriers is observed. Dangling bonds associated with the tritium decay reduce luminescence efficiency.

  12. Photoemission studies of amorphous silicon induced by P + ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petö, G.; Kanski, J.

    1995-12-01

    An amorphous Si layer was formed on a Si (1 0 0) surface by P + implantation at 80 keV. This layer was investigated by means of photoelectron spectroscopy. The resulting spectra are different from earlier spectra on amorphous Si prepared by e-gun evaporation or cathode sputtering. The differences consist of a decreased intensity in the spectral region corresponding to p-states, and appearace of new states at higher binding energy. Qualitativity similar results have been reported for Sb implanted amorphous Ge and the modification seems to be due to the changed short range order.

  13. Dissolution and analysis of amorphous silica in marine sediments.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eggimann, D.W.; Manheim, F. T.; Betzer, P.R.

    1980-01-01

    The analytical estimation of amorphous silica in selected Atlantic and Antarctic Ocean sediments, the U.S.G.S. standard marine mud (MAG-1), A.A.P.G. clays, and samples from cultures of a marine diatom, Hemidiscus, has been examined. Our values for amorphous silica-rich circum-Antarctic sediments are equal to or greater than literature values, whereas our values for a set of amorphous silica-poor sediments from a transect of the N. Atlantic at 11oN, after appropriate correction for silica released from clays, are significantly lower than previous estimates from the same region. -from Authors

  14. Amorphous Silicates in Primitive Meteoritic Materials: Acfer 094 and IDPs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Messenger, S.; Walker, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    The abundance of presolar grains is one measure of the primitive nature of meteoritic materials. Presolar silicates are abundant in meteorites whose matrices are dominated by amorphous silicates such as the unique carbonaceous chondrite Acfer 094. Presolar silicates are even more abundant in chondritic-porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs). Amorphous silicates in the form of GEMS (glass with embedded metal and sulfides) grains are a major component of CP IDPs. We are studying amorphous silicates in Acfer 094 matrix in order to determine whether they are related to the GEMS grains in CPIDPs

  15. Pressure-induced amorphization in orthorhombic Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}: An intrinsic character of crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Quanjun; Zhang, Huafang; Cheng, Benyuan; Liu, Ran; Liu, Bo; Zou, Bo; Cui, Tian; Liu, Bingbing; Liu, Jing; Chen, Zhiqiang

    2014-05-21

    The phase transition of orthorhombic Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} was investigated by in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. The orthorhombic phase transforms into an amorphous form completely at 24.7?GPa. A bulk modulus B{sub 0}?=?139 (9) GPa for the orthorhombic Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} is derived from the P-V data. We suggest that the pressure-induced amorphization (PIA) in Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} can be attributed to the unstability of the a axis under high pressure leads to the connections of polyhedral breaking down and even triggers disorder of the whole crystal frame. These results demonstrate that the PIA is an intrinsic character of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} which depends on its orthorhombic crystal structure rather than nanosize effects. This study provides a new kind of bulk material for investigating PIA in metal oxides.

  16. 22.5% efficient silicon heterojunction solar cell with molybdenum oxide hole collector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissbühler, Jonas; Werner, Jérémie; Martin de Nicolas, Silvia; Barraud, Loris; Hessler-Wyser, Aïcha; Despeisse, Matthieu; Nicolay, Sylvain; Tomasi, Andrea; Niesen, Bjoern; De Wolf, Stefaan; Ballif, Christophe

    2015-08-01

    Substituting the doped amorphous silicon films at the front of silicon heterojunction solar cells with wide-bandgap transition metal oxides can mitigate parasitic light absorption losses. This was recently proven by replacing p-type amorphous silicon with molybdenum oxide films. In this article, we evidence that annealing above 130 °C—often needed for the curing of printed metal contacts—detrimentally impacts hole collection of such devices. We circumvent this issue by using electrodeposited copper front metallization and demonstrate a silicon heterojunction solar cell with molybdenum oxide hole collector, featuring a fill factor value higher than 80% and certified energy conversion efficiency of 22.5%.

  17. Oxidation of carbynes: Signatures in infrared spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Cinquanta, E. E-mail: p.rudolf@rug.nl; Manini, N.; Caramella, L.; Onida, G.; Ravagnan, L.; Milani, P.; Rudolf, P. E-mail: p.rudolf@rug.nl

    2014-06-28

    We report and solidly interpret the infrared spectrum of both pristine and oxidized carbynes embedded in a pure-carbon matrix. The spectra probe separately the effects of oxidation on sp- and on sp{sup 2}-hybridized carbon, and provide information on the stability of the different structures in an oxidizing atmosphere. The final products are mostly short end-oxidized carbynes anchored with a double bond to sp{sup 2} fragments, plus an oxidized sp{sup 2} amorphous matrix. Our results have important implications for the realization of carbyne-based nano-electronics devices and highlight the active participation of carbynes in astrochemical reactions where they act as carbon source for the promotion of more complex organic species.

  18. Lucky drift impact ionization in amorphous semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasap, Safa; Rowlands, J. A.; Baranovskii, S. D.; Tanioka, Kenkichi

    2004-08-01

    The review of avalanche multiplication experiments clearly confirms the existence of the impact ionization effect in this class of semiconductors. The semilogarithmic plot of the impact ionization coefficient (?) versus the reciprocal field (1/F) for holes in a-Se and electrons in a-Se and a-Si :H places the avalanche multiplication phenomena in amorphous semiconductors at much higher fields than those typically reported for crystalline semiconductors with comparable bandgaps. Furthermore, in contrast to well established concepts for crystalline semiconductors, the impact ionization coefficient in a-Se increases with increasing temperature. The McKenzie and Burt [S. McKenzie and M. G. Burt, J. Phys. C 19, 1959 (1986)] version of Ridley's lucky drift (LD) model [B. K. Ridley, J. Phys. C 16, 3373 (1988)] has been applied to impact ionization coefficient versus field data for holes and electrons in a-Se and electrons in a-Si :H. We have extracted the electron impact ionization coefficient versus field (?e vs F) data for a-Si :H from the multiplication versus F and photocurrent versus F data recently reported by M. Akiyama, M. Hanada, H. Takao, K. Sawada, and M. Ishida, Jpn. J. Appl. Phys.41, 2552 (2002). Provided that one accepts the basic assumption of the Ridley LD model that the momentum relaxation rate is faster than the energy relaxation rate, the model can satisfactorily account for impact ionization in amorphous semiconductors even with ionizing excitation across the bandgap, EI=Eg. If ? is the mean free path associated with momentum relaxing collisions and ?E is the energy relaxation length associated with energy relaxing collisions, than the LD model requires ?E>?. The application of the LD model with energy and field independent ?E to a-Se leads to ionization threshold energies EI that are quite small, less than Eg/2, and requires the possible but improbable ionization of localized states. By making ?E=?E(E ,F) energy and field dependent, we were able to obtain excellent fits to ? vs 1/F data for both holes and electrons in a-Se for both EI=Eg/2 and EI=Eg. In the former case, one expects occupied localized states at EF(=Eg/2) to be ionized and in the second case, one expects excitation across the bandgap. We propose that ionization excitation to localized tail states very close to the transport band can explain the thermally activated ? since the release time for the observed activation energies is much shorter than the typical transit times at avalanche fields. For the a-Se case, EI=Eg?2eV leads to the following conclusions: (a) For holes, ?E has negligibly little field dependence but increases with energy. At the ionization threshold energy ?E˜4nm. (b) For electrons, ?E increases with energy and the field with ?E˜2nm at the ionization threshold and at impact ionization fields. For electron impact ionization in a-Si :H, the data can be readily interpreted in terms of near bandgap ionization EI=Eg and a ?E that decreases with increasing field, and having very little energy dependence. The energy relaxation length has opposite tendencies in a-Se and a-Si :H, which probably reflects the distinctly different types of behavior of hot carriers in the transport band in these two amorphous semiconductors.

  19. ADSORPTION OF TRACE METALS BY HYDROUS FERRIC OXIDE IN SEAWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The adsorption of trace metals by amorphous hydrous ferric oxide in seawater is studied with reference to simple model systems designed to isolate the factors which may have an effect on the isotherms. Results show that the complex system behaves in a remarkably simple way and th...

  20. New electrochromism isotherm in anodic iridium oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beni, G.; Shay, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    We show that there are two distinct electrochromic processes in anodic iridium oxide films. The measured isotherms for both processes have simple theoretical forms dominated by internal entropy changes of noninteracting particles. Such isotherms have never before been observed for amorphous films.

  1. Polymer geometry and Li+ conduction in poly(ethylene oxide)

    E-print Network

    Averbuch, Amir

    Polymer geometry and Li+ conduction in poly(ethylene oxide) L. Gitelman a , M. Israeli b, , A: Lithium battery Polymer molecule Brownian motion Simulation Conductivity PEO a b s t r a c t We study of the amorphous PE structure is increased by mechanical stretching due to the unraveling of loops in the polymer

  2. Arsenate Adsorption On Ruthenium Oxides: A Spectroscopic And Kinetic Investigation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenate adsorption on amorphous (RuO2•1.1H2O) and crystalline (RuO2) ruthenium oxides was evaluated using spectroscopic and kinetic methods to elucidate the adsorption mechanism. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) was ...

  3. Low-temperature high-mobility amorphous IZO for silicon heterojunction solar cells

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Morales-Masis, Monica; Martin De Nicolas, Silvia; Holovsky, Jakub; De Wolf, Stefaan; Ballif, Christophe

    2015-07-13

    Parasitic absorption in the transparent conductive oxide (TCO) front electrode is one of the limitations of silicon heterojunction (SHJ) solar cells efficiency. To avoid such absorption while retaining high conductivity, TCOs with high electron mobility are preferred over those with high carrier density. Here, we demonstrate improved SHJ solar cell efficiencies by applying high-mobility amorphous indium zinc oxide (a-IZO) as the front TCO. We sputtered a-IZO at low substrate temperature and low power density and investigated the optical and electrical properties, as well as subband tail formation-quantified by the Urbach energy (EU)-as a function of the sputtering oxygen partial pressure.more »We obtain an EU as low as 128 meV for films with the highest Hall mobility of 60 cm2/Vs. When comparing the performance of a-IZO films with indium tin oxide (ITO) and hydrogenated indium oxide (IO:H), we find that IO:H (115 cm2/Vs) exhibits a similar EU of 130 meV, while ITO (25 cm2/Vs) presents a much larger EU of up to 270 meV. The high film quality, indicated by the low EU, the high mobility, and low free carrier absorption of the developed a-IZO electrodes, result in a significant current improvement, achieving conversion efficiencies over 21.5%, outperforming those with standard ITO.« less

  4. Theory and simulation of amorphous organic electronic devices

    E-print Network

    Madigan, Conor (Conor Francis), 1978-

    2006-01-01

    The electronic properties of amorphous organic thin films are of great interest due to their application in devices such as light emitting devices, solar cells, photodetectors, and lasers. Compared to conventional inorganic ...

  5. Hole-mobility-limiting atomic structures in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    E-print Network

    Buonassisi, Tonio

    Low hole mobility currently limits the efficiency of amorphous silicon photovoltaic devices. We explore three possible phenomena contributing to this low mobility: coordination defects, self-trapping ionization displacement ...

  6. Constitutive equations and failure criteria for amorphous polymeric solids

    E-print Network

    Gearing, Brian P. (Brian Paul), 1972-

    2002-01-01

    Anand & Gurtin (2002) have recently developed a continuum theory for the elastic-viscoplastic deformation of amorphous solids. Their theory is motivated by and builds on the work of Parks, Argon, Boyce, Arruda, and their ...

  7. Enhanced Corrosion Resistance of Iron-Based Amorphous Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R B; Day, S D; Lian, T; Aprigliano, L F; Hailey, P D; Farmer, J C

    2007-02-18

    Iron-based amorphous alloys possess enhanced hardness and are highly resistant to corrosion, which make them desirable for wear applications in corrosive environments. It was of interest to examine the behavior of amorphous alloys during anodic polarization in concentrated salt solutions and in the salt-fog testing. Results from the testing of one amorphous material (SAM2X5) both in ribbon form and as an applied coating are reported here. Cyclic polarization tests were performed on SAM2X5 ribbon as well as on other nuclear engineering materials. SAM2X5 showed the highest resistance to localized corrosion in 5 M CaCl{sub 2} solution at 105 C. Salt fog tests of 316L SS and Alloy 22 coupons coated with amorphous SAM2X5 powder showed resistance to rusting. Partial devitrification may be responsible for isolated pinpoint rust spots in some coatings.

  8. Atomistic simulations of radiation damage in amorphous metal alloys

    E-print Network

    Baumer, Richard E. (Richard Edward)

    2013-01-01

    While numerous fundamental studies have characterized the atomic-level radiation response mechanisms in irradiated crystalline alloys, comparatively little is known regarding the mechanisms of radiation damage in amorphous ...

  9. Origins of Structural Hole Traps in Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon

    E-print Network

    Johlin, Eric Carl

    The inherently disordered nature of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) obscures the influence of atomic features on the trapping of holes. To address this, we have created a set of over two thousand ab initio structures ...

  10. The specific heat of pure and hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    E-print Network

    Queen, Daniel Robert

    2011-01-01

    solids,” Journal of Low Temperature Physics, vol. 7, no. 3-in vitreous silica at low temperatures,” Physics Letters A,Low-temperature thermal conductivity and acoustic attenuation in amorphous solids,” Reviews of Modern Physics,

  11. Annealed high-density amorphous ice under pressure

    E-print Network

    Loss, Daniel

    the minimum crystallization temperature, experimental tests have instead used low- and high-density amorphous recognized as unusual for at least 300 years, and striking anomalies can be seen in the isothermal

  12. Amorphous phase formation in plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings.

    PubMed

    Gross, K A; Berndt, C C; Herman, H

    1998-03-01

    The amorphous phase content of air plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings is dependent upon spraying and deposition conditions. X-ray diffraction and optical microscopy were used to investigate the influence of spray parameters on the formation of the amorphous phase. Results show three factors which most influence the formation of the amorphous phase: dehydroxylation of the molten particle during flight, the cooling rate as it impinges onto the metal substrate, and the substrate temperature. Crystalline regions were identified as unmelted particles and elongated recrystallized areas. Amorphous phase regions vary throughout the coating but are more commonly found at the coating-substrate interface, i.e., the regions decrease toward the surface of the coating. Such an inhomogeneous distribution of phase content is expected to affect the clinical process of bone deposition, and therefore successful implant fixation. PMID:9468049

  13. Structural origins of intrinsic stress in amorphous silicon thin films

    E-print Network

    Johlin, Eric Carl

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) refers to a broad class of atomic configurations, sharing a lack of long-range order, but varying significantly in material properties, including optical constants, porosity, hydrogen ...

  14. Environmental Testing of Iron-Based Amorphous Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebak, Raul B.; Daniel Day, S.; Lian, Tiangan; Hailey, Phillip D.; Farmer, Joseph C.

    2008-02-01

    Iron (Fe)-based amorphous alloys possess enhanced hardness and are highly resistant to corrosion, which make them desirable for wear applications in corrosive environments. It was of interest to examine the behavior of amorphous alloys during anodic polarization in concentrated salt solutions and in the salt-fog testing. Results from the testing of one amorphous material (SAM2X5) both in ribbon form and as an applied coating are reported here. Cyclic polarization tests were performed on SAM2X5 ribbon as well as on other nuclear engineering materials. SAM2X5 showed the highest resistance to localized corrosion in 5 M CaCl2 solution at 105 °C. Salt fog tests of 316L SS and alloy 22 coupons coated with amorphous SAM2X5 powder showed resistance to rusting. Partial devitrification may be responsible for isolated pinpoint rust spots in some coatings.

  15. Crystalline-amorphous interfaces in Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Maria K.; Greeley, Jeffrey; CenterElectrical Energy Storage, Doe Energy Frontier Research Center Collaboration

    2011-03-01

    Amorphous and crystalline materials are associated with fast ionic transport and long term structural stability, respectively, both desirable properties in lithium ion battery materials. It is therefore no surprise that amorphous-crystalline interfaces are ubiquitous in Li-ion batteries. Using first principles density functional theory (DFT), and primarily Si as an example, we study models of crystalline-amorphous interfaces in Li-ion batteries. We will discuss the structure of such an interface and its energetic and mechanical effects on lithium insertion, as well as the kinetics of Li ion transport near and across the interface. The mechanism of solid state amorphization will also be discussed. Work funded by Center for Electrical Energy Storage, DOE Energy Frontier Research Center.

  16. Fabrication of amorphous metal matrix composites by severe plastic deformation 

    E-print Network

    Mathaudhu, Suveen Nigel

    2006-10-30

    which promote bonding between particles and b) to determine by what mechanisms the plasticity is enhanced in bulk amorphous metal matrix composites consolidated by ECAE. To accomplish the objectives BAM and AMMCs were produced via ECAE consolidation...

  17. Understanding and improving hole transport in hydrogenated amorphous silicon photovoltaics

    E-print Network

    Johlin, Eric (Eric Carl)

    2014-01-01

    While hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells have been studied extensively for the previous four decades, the low performance of the devices is still not well understood. The poor efficiency (below 10%, even ...

  18. GHz-rate optical parametric amplifier in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ke-Yao; Foster, Amy C.

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate optical parametric amplification operating at GHz-rates at telecommunications wavelengths using a hydrogenated amorphous silicon waveguide through the nonlinear optical process of four-wave mixing. We investigate how the parametric amplification scales with repetition rate. The ability to achieve amplification at GHz-repetition rates shows hydrogenated amorphous silicon’s potential for telecommunication applications and a GHz-rate optical parametric oscillator.

  19. Pressure-Induced Amorphization in Stuffed Derivatives of Quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H.; Zhao, Y.; Zhang, J.; Hickmott, D. D.; Wang, L.; Wang, Y.; Nishiyama, N.

    2006-12-01

    We have studied phase stability of three quartz-related phases, Mg0.5AlSiO4, Mg0.25Li0.5AlSiO4 and LiAlSiO4 (?-eucryptite), at high pressures and/or temperatures using the multi-anvil press technique in conjunction with synchrotron X-ray diffraction. These phases can be considered as structural derivatives of quartz in which half the Si^{4+} cations are replaced by Al3+, and the charge is balanced by incorporation of Mg2+ and/or Li+ into the structural channels. With increasing pressure, the stuffed quartz phases gradually lost their crystallinity and became completely X-ray amorphous at 12-17 GPa. The amorphization processes were similar to that of quartz, but they reached completion at much lower pressures (quartz becomes amorphous at ~30 GPa). Moreover, these phases exhibited the so-called "structural memory" behavior, i.e., when they were partially amorphized, they reverted back to their original crystalline states after pressure release. Upon heating at high pressures, the partially or completely amorphous phases transformed into their corresponding stable polymorphs or phase assemblages. Thus the occurrence of pressure-induced amorphization in these quartz- derivatives is related to the kinetic hindrance to their transformations to the thermodynamically stable phases. Further, as observed in pure silica, the densities of these amorphous states may be higher than those allowed in the stuffed-quartz structures, thereby driving the amorphization processes at high pressures.

  20. Electrical resistivity of amorphous simple metals at moderately low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasny, Yu. P.; Krawczyk, J.; Kovalenko, N. P.; Shvets, V. T.

    1999-09-01

    The dependence of electrical resistivity ?( T) on temperature T in a region of moderate temperatures is considered for amorphous simple metals. It is shown within the Faber-Ziman theory that the ratio [ ?( T)- ?(0)]/ T2 has a maximum in the temperature region 10 K? T?100 K The theory is illustrated by numerical calculations performed for hard-sphere models of amorphous Mg and Zn.