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Sample records for amorphous silicon carbide

  1. Structural relaxation of amorphous silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Ishimaru, Manabu; Bae, In-Tae; Hirotsu, Yoshihiko; Matsumura, Syo; Sickafus, Kurt E

    2002-07-29

    We have examined amorphous structures of silicon carbide (SiC) using both transmission electron microscopy and a molecular-dynamics approach. Radial distribution functions revealed that amorphous SiC contains not only heteronuclear (Si-C) bonds but also homonuclear (Si-Si and C-C) bonds. The ratio of heteronuclear to homonuclear bonds was found to change upon annealing, suggesting that structural relaxation of the amorphous SiC occurred. Good agreement was obtained between the simulated and experimentally measured radial distribution functions. PMID:12144449

  2. Neutron irradiation induced amorphization of silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, L.L.; Hay, J.C.

    1998-09-01

    This paper provides the first known observation of silicon carbide fully amorphized under neutron irradiation. Both high purity single crystal hcp and high purity, highly faulted (cubic) chemically vapor deposited (CVD) SiC were irradiated at approximately 60 C to a total fast neutron fluence of 2.6 {times} 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2}. Amorphization was seen in both materials, as evidenced by TEM, electron diffraction, and x-ray diffraction techniques. Physical properties for the amorphized single crystal material are reported including large changes in density ({minus}10.8%), elastic modulus as measured using a nanoindentation technique ({minus}45%), hardness as measured by nanoindentation ({minus}45%), and standard Vickers hardness ({minus}24%). Similar property changes are observed for the critical temperature for amorphization at this neutron dose and flux, above which amorphization is not possible, is estimated to be greater than 130 C.

  3. Amorphization of Silicon Carbide by Carbon Displacement

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ram; Gao, Fei; Weber, William J.

    2004-05-10

    We have used molecular dynamics simulations to examine the possibility of amorphizing silicon carbide (SiC) by exclusively displacing C atoms. At a defect generation corresponding to 0.2 displacements per atom, the enthalpy surpasses the level of melt-quenched SiC, the density decreases by about 15%, and the radial distribution function shows a lack of long-range order. Prior to amorphization, the surviving defects are mainly C Frenkel pairs (67%), but Si Frenkel pairs (18%) and anti-site defects (15%) are also present. The results indicate that SiC can be amorphized by C sublattice displacements. Chemical short-range disorder, arising mainly from interstitial production, plays a significant role in the amorphization.

  4. Tunable plasticity in amorphous silicon carbide films.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Yusuke; Kim, Namjun; King, Sean W; Bielefeld, Jeff; Stebbins, Jonathan F; Dauskardt, Reinhold H

    2013-08-28

    Plasticity plays a crucial role in the mechanical behavior of engineering materials. For instance, energy dissipation during plastic deformation is vital to the sufficient fracture resistance of engineering materials. Thus, the lack of plasticity in brittle hybrid organic-inorganic glasses (hybrid glasses) often results in a low fracture resistance and has been a significant challenge for their integration and applications. Here, we demonstrate that hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide films, a class of hybrid glasses, can exhibit a plasticity that is even tunable by controlling their molecular structure and thereby leads to an increased and adjustable fracture resistance in the films. We decouple the plasticity contribution from the fracture resistance of the films by estimating the "work-of-fracture" using a mean-field approach, which provides some insight into a potential connection between the onset of plasticity in the films and the well-known rigidity percolation threshold. PMID:23876200

  5. Amorphous silicon carbide films prepared using vaporized silicon ink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Takashi; Shen, Zhongrong; Takagishi, Hideyuki; Ohdaira, Keisuke; Shimoda, Tatsuya

    2014-03-01

    The deposition of wide-band-gap silicon films using nonvacuum processes rather than conventional vacuum processes is of substantial interest because it may reduce cost. Herein, we present the optical and electrical properties of p-type hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H) films prepared using a nonvacuum process in a simple chamber with a vaporized silicon ink consisting of cyclopentasilane, cyclohexene, and decaborane. The incorporation of carbon into the silicon network induced by the addition of cyclohexene to the silicon ink resulted in an increase in the optical band gap (Eg) of films from 1.56 to 2.11 eV. The conductivity of films with Eg < 1.9 eV is comparable to that of conventional a-SiC:H films prepared using a vacuum process, while the films with Eg > 1.9 eV show lower conductivity than expected because of the incorporation of excess carbon without the formation of Si-C bonds.

  6. Amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers for crystalline-silicon-based heterojunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Boccard, Mathieu; Holman, Zachary C.

    2015-08-14

    Amorphous silicon enables the fabrication of very high-efficiency crystalline-silicon-based solar cells due to its combination of excellent passivation of the crystalline silicon surface and permeability to electrical charges. Yet, amongst other limitations, the passivation it provides degrades upon high-temperature processes, limiting possible post-deposition fabrication possibilities (e.g., forcing the use of low-temperature silver pastes). We investigate the potential use of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers to sidestep this issue. The passivation obtained using device-relevant stacks of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide with various carbon contents and doped amorphous silicon are evaluated, and their stability upon annealing assessed, amorphous silicon carbide being shown to surpass amorphous silicon for temperatures above 300 °C. We demonstrate open-circuit voltage values over 700 mV for complete cells, and an improved temperature stability for the open-circuit voltage. Transport of electrons and holes across the hetero-interface is studied with complete cells having amorphous silicon carbide either on the hole-extracting side or on the electron-extracting side, and a better transport of holes than of electrons is shown. Also, due to slightly improved transparency, complete solar cells using an amorphous silicon carbide passivation layer on the hole-collecting side are demonstrated to show slightly better performances even prior to annealing than obtained with a standard amorphous silicon layer.

  7. Amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers for crystalline-silicon-based heterojunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Boccard, Mathieu; Holman, Zachary C.

    2015-08-14

    With this study, amorphous silicon enables the fabrication of very high-efficiency crystalline-silicon-based solar cells due to its combination of excellent passivation of the crystalline silicon surface and permeability to electrical charges. Yet, amongst other limitations, the passivation it provides degrades upon high-temperature processes, limiting possible post-deposition fabrication possibilities (e.g., forcing the use of low-temperature silver pastes). We investigate the potential use of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers to sidestep this issue. The passivation obtained using device-relevant stacks of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide with various carbon contents and doped amorphous silicon are evaluated, and their stability upon annealing assessed, amorphous silicon carbide being shown to surpass amorphous silicon for temperatures above 300°C. We demonstrate open-circuit voltage values over 700 mV for complete cells, and an improved temperature stability for the open-circuit voltage. Transport of electrons and holes across the hetero-interface is studied with complete cells having amorphous silicon carbide either on the hole-extracting side or on the electron-extracting side, and a better transport of holes than of electrons is shown. Also, due to slightly improved transparency, complete solar cells using an amorphous silicon carbide passivation layer on the hole-collecting side are demonstrated to show slightly better performances even prior to annealing than obtained with a standard amorphous silicon layer.

  8. Amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers for crystalline-silicon-based heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccard, Mathieu; Holman, Zachary C.

    2015-08-01

    Amorphous silicon enables the fabrication of very high-efficiency crystalline-silicon-based solar cells due to its combination of excellent passivation of the crystalline silicon surface and permeability to electrical charges. Yet, amongst other limitations, the passivation it provides degrades upon high-temperature processes, limiting possible post-deposition fabrication possibilities (e.g., forcing the use of low-temperature silver pastes). We investigate the potential use of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers to sidestep this issue. The passivation obtained using device-relevant stacks of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide with various carbon contents and doped amorphous silicon are evaluated, and their stability upon annealing assessed, amorphous silicon carbide being shown to surpass amorphous silicon for temperatures above 300 °C. We demonstrate open-circuit voltage values over 700 mV for complete cells, and an improved temperature stability for the open-circuit voltage. Transport of electrons and holes across the hetero-interface is studied with complete cells having amorphous silicon carbide either on the hole-extracting side or on the electron-extracting side, and a better transport of holes than of electrons is shown. Also, due to slightly improved transparency, complete solar cells using an amorphous silicon carbide passivation layer on the hole-collecting side are demonstrated to show slightly better performances even prior to annealing than obtained with a standard amorphous silicon layer.

  9. Amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers for crystalline-silicon-based heterojunction solar cells

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Boccard, Mathieu; Holman, Zachary C.

    2015-08-14

    With this study, amorphous silicon enables the fabrication of very high-efficiency crystalline-silicon-based solar cells due to its combination of excellent passivation of the crystalline silicon surface and permeability to electrical charges. Yet, amongst other limitations, the passivation it provides degrades upon high-temperature processes, limiting possible post-deposition fabrication possibilities (e.g., forcing the use of low-temperature silver pastes). We investigate the potential use of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers to sidestep this issue. The passivation obtained using device-relevant stacks of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide with various carbon contents and doped amorphous silicon are evaluated, and their stability upon annealing assessed, amorphousmore » silicon carbide being shown to surpass amorphous silicon for temperatures above 300°C. We demonstrate open-circuit voltage values over 700 mV for complete cells, and an improved temperature stability for the open-circuit voltage. Transport of electrons and holes across the hetero-interface is studied with complete cells having amorphous silicon carbide either on the hole-extracting side or on the electron-extracting side, and a better transport of holes than of electrons is shown. Also, due to slightly improved transparency, complete solar cells using an amorphous silicon carbide passivation layer on the hole-collecting side are demonstrated to show slightly better performances even prior to annealing than obtained with a standard amorphous silicon layer.« less

  10. Amorphous silicon carbide coatings for extreme ultraviolet optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kortright, J. B.; Windt, David L.

    1988-01-01

    Amorphous silicon carbide films formed by sputtering techniques are shown to have high reflectance in the extreme ultraviolet spectral region. X-ray scattering verifies that the atomic arrangements in these films are amorphous, while Auger electron spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy show that the films have composition close to stoichiometric SiC, although slightly C-rich, with low impurity levels. Reflectance vs incidence angle measurements from 24 to 1216 A were used to derive optical constants of this material, which are presented here. Additionally, the measured extreme ultraviolet efficiency of a diffraction grating overcoated with sputtered amorphous silicon carbide is presented, demonstrating the feasibility of using these films as coatings for EUV optics.

  11. Nanoindentation-induced amorphization in silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szlufarska, Izabela; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    2004-07-01

    The nanoindentation-induced amorphization in SiC is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. The load-displacement response shows an elastic shoulder followed by a plastic regime consisting of a series of load drops. Analyses of bond angles, local pressure, and shear stress, and shortest-path rings show that these drops are related to dislocation activities under the indenter. We show that amorphization is driven by coalescence of dislocation loops and that there is a strong correlation between load-displacement response and ring distribution.

  12. Threshold irradiation dose for amorphization of silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, L.L.; Zinkle, S.J.

    1997-04-01

    The amorphization of silicon carbide due to ion and electron irradiation is reviewed with emphasis on the temperature-dependent critical dose for amorphization. The effect of ion mass and energy on the threshold dose for amorphization is summarized, showing only a weak dependence near room temperature. Results are presented for 0.56 MeV silicon ions implanted into single crystal 6H-SiC as a function of temperature and ion dose. From this, the critical dose for amorphization is found as a function of temperature at depths well separated from the implanted ion region. Results are compared with published data generated using electrons and xenon ions as the irradiating species. High resolution TEM analysis is presented for the Si ion series showing the evolution of elongated amorphous islands oriented such that their major axis is parallel to the free surface. This suggests that surface of strain effects may be influencing the apparent amorphization threshold. Finally, a model for the temperature threshold for amorphization is described using the Si ion irradiation flux and the fitted interstitial migration energy which was found to be {approximately}0.56 eV. This model successfully explains the difference in the temperature-dependent amorphization behavior of SiC irradiated with 0.56 MeV silicon ions at 1 x 10{sup {minus}3} dpa/s and with fission neutrons irradiated at 1 x 10{sup {minus}6} dpa/s irradiated to 15 dpa in the temperature range of {approximately}340 {+-} 10K.

  13. Amorphization and defect recombination in ion implanted silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Grimaldi, M.G.; Calcagno, L.; Musumeci, P.; Frangis, N.; Van Landuyt, J.

    1997-06-01

    The damage produced in silicon carbide single crystals by ion implantation was investigated by Rutherford backscattering channeling and transmission electron microscopy techniques. Implantations were performed at liquid nitrogen and at room temperatures with several ions to examine the effect of the ion mass and of the substrate temperature on the damaging process. The damage accumulation is approximately linear with fluence until amorphization occurs when the elastic energy density deposited by the ions overcomes a critical value. The critical energy density for amorphization depends on the substrate temperature and is greatest at 300 K indicating that defects recombination occurs already at room temperature. Formation of extended defects never occurred and point defects and uncollapsed clusters of point defects were found before amorphization even in the case of light ion implantation. The atomic displacement energy has been estimated to be {approximately}12 eV/atom from the analysis of the damage process in dilute collision cascades. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Grain boundary resistance to amorphization of nanocrystalline silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dong; Gao, Fei; Liu, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Under the C displacement condition, we have used molecular dynamics simulation to examine the effects of grain boundaries (GBs) on the amorphization of nanocrystalline silicon carbide (nc-SiC) by point defect accumulation. The results show that the interstitials are preferentially absorbed and accumulated at GBs that provide the sinks for defect annihilation at low doses, but also driving force to initiate amorphization in the nc-SiC at higher doses. The majority of surviving defects are C interstitials, as either C-Si or C-C dumbbells. The concentration of defect clusters increases with increasing dose, and their distributions are mainly observed along the GBs. Especially these small clusters can subsequently coalesce and form amorphous domains at the GBs during the accumulation of carbon defects. A comparison between displacement amorphized nc-SiC and melt-quenched single crystal SiC shows the similar topological features. At a dose of 0.55 displacements per atom (dpa), the pair correlation function lacks long range order, demonstrating that the nc-SiC is fully amorphilized. PMID:26558694

  15. Grain boundary resistance to amorphization of nanocrystalline silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dong; Gao, Fei; Liu, Bo

    2015-11-01

    Under the C displacement condition, we have used molecular dynamics simulation to examine the effects of grain boundaries (GBs) on the amorphization of nanocrystalline silicon carbide (nc-SiC) by point defect accumulation. The results show that the interstitials are preferentially absorbed and accumulated at GBs that provide the sinks for defect annihilation at low doses, but also driving force to initiate amorphization in the nc-SiC at higher doses. The majority of surviving defects are C interstitials, as either C-Si or C-C dumbbells. The concentration of defect clusters increases with increasing dose, and their distributions are mainly observed along the GBs. Especially these small clusters can subsequently coalesce and form amorphous domains at the GBs during the accumulation of carbon defects. A comparison between displacement amorphized nc-SiC and melt-quenched single crystal SiC shows the similar topological features. At a dose of 0.55 displacements per atom (dpa), the pair correlation function lacks long range order, demonstrating that the nc-SiC is fully amorphilized.

  16. Grain boundary resistance to amorphization of nanocrystalline silicon carbide

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dong; Gao, Fei; Liu, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Under the C displacement condition, we have used molecular dynamics simulation to examine the effects of grain boundaries (GBs) on the amorphization of nanocrystalline silicon carbide (nc-SiC) by point defect accumulation. The results show that the interstitials are preferentially absorbed and accumulated at GBs that provide the sinks for defect annihilation at low doses, but also driving force to initiate amorphization in the nc-SiC at higher doses. The majority of surviving defects are C interstitials, as either C-Si or C-C dumbbells. The concentration of defect clusters increases with increasing dose, and their distributions are mainly observed along the GBs. Especially these small clusters can subsequently coalesce and form amorphous domains at the GBs during the accumulation of carbon defects. A comparison between displacement amorphized nc-SiC and melt-quenched single crystal SiC shows the similar topological features. At a dose of 0.55 displacements per atom (dpa), the pair correlation function lacks long range order, demonstrating that the nc-SiC is fully amorphilized. PMID:26558694

  17. Multi-band silicon quantum dots embedded in an amorphous matrix of silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Chang, Geng-rong; Ma, Fei; Ma, Da-yan; Xu, Ke-wei

    2010-11-19

    Silicon quantum dots embedded in an amorphous matrix of silicon carbide were realized by a magnetron co-sputtering process and post-annealing. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, glancing x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize the chemical composition and the microstructural properties. The results show that the sizes and size distribution of silicon quantum dots can be tuned by changing the annealing atmosphere and the atom ratio of silicon and carbon in the matrix. A physicochemical mechanism is proposed to demonstrate this formation process. Photoluminescence measurements indicate a multi-band configuration due to the quantum confinement effect of silicon quantum dots with different sizes. The PL spectra are further widened as a result of the existence of amorphous silicon quantum dots. This multi-band configuration would be extremely advantageous in improving the photoelectric conversion efficiency of photovoltaic solar cells. PMID:20975214

  18. Growth and Characterization of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon and Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Carbide with Liquid Organometallic Sources.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaughan, Kevin David

    The growth and characterization of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and hydrogenated amorphous silicon -carbon (rm a-rm Si _{1-X}C_{X}: H) alloys employing liquid organometallic sources are described. N -type a-Si:H films were grown using a mixture of silane and tertiarybutylphosphine (TBP-rm C_4H _9P_2) vapor in a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system. Impurity levels from parts per million to about 5 at. % phosphorus have been incorporated into the film with this method. Tertiarybutylphosphine is less toxic and less pyrophoric than phosphine which is usually used in n-type doping of a-Si:H films. Optical and electronic properties were characterized by room temperature as well as temperature dependent dark conductivity, photothermal deflection spectroscopy, infrared vibrational spectroscopy, electron spin resonance, and electron microprobe analysis. The gross doping properties of a-Si:H doped with TBP are the same as those obtained with phosphine. The experimental results are compared with the predictions of several models that describe the chemical equilibrium between active dopants and deep defects. A pronounced decrease in the effects of doping, such as an increase in the activation energy of electrical conductivity and an decrease in the conductivity of the sample, were seen in heavily doped films (TBP/SiH _4> 0.5%), perhaps influenced by the increased carbon and/or phosphorus concentrations. Amorphous silicon-carbide alloys have been grown by the plasma decomposition of ditertiarybutylsilane ( rm DTBS-rm SiH_2(C _4H_9)_2). The optical bandgaps, which varied from 2.2 to 3.3 eV, are strongly dependent upon the deposition conditions. The carbon concentrations in these films varied from 60 to 95 at. %. The optical band-edge is very broad compared to that which is found in a-Si:H and this breadth is essentially independent of the deposition conditions. The plasma decomposition of admixtures of DTBS and silane has produced rm a- rm Si_{1-X

  19. On electronic structure of polymer-derived amorphous silicon carbide ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kewei; Li, Xuqin; Ma, Baisheng; Wang, Yiguang; Zhang, Ligong; An, Linan

    2014-06-01

    The electronic structure of polymer-derived amorphous silicon carbide ceramics was studied by combining measurements of temperature-dependent conductivity and optical absorption. By comparing the experimental results to theoretical models, electronic structure was constructed for a carbon-rich amorphous silicon carbide, which revealed several unique features, such as deep defect energy level, wide band-tail band, and overlap between the band-tail band and defect level. These unique features were discussed in terms of the microstructure of the material and used to explain the electric behavior.

  20. Controlled growth of nanocrystalline silicon within amorphous silicon carbide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kole, Arindam; Chaudhuri, Partha

    2014-04-01

    Controlled formation of nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) within hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H) thin films has been demonstrated by a rf (13.56 MHz) plasma chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) method at a low deposition temperature of 200°C by regulating the deposition pressure (Pr) between 26.7 Pa and 133.3 Pa. Evolution of the size and the crystalline silicon volume fraction within the a-SiC:H matrix has been studied by XRD, Raman and HRTEM. The study reveals that at Pr of 26.7 Pa there are mostly isolated grains of nc-Si within the a-SiC:H matrix with average size of 4.5 nm. With increase of Pr the isolated nc-Si grains coalesce more and more giving rise to larger size connected nc-Si islands which appear as microcrystalline silicon in the Raman spectra. As a result net isolated nc-Si volume fraction decreases while the total crystalline silicon volume fraction increases.

  1. Toughening thin-film structures with ceramic-like amorphous silicon carbide films.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Yusuke; Ryu, Ill; King, Sean W; Bielefeld, Jeff; Dauskardt, Reinhold H

    2014-01-29

    A significant improvement of adhesion in thin-film structures is demonstrated using embedded ceramic-like amorphous silicon carbide films (a-SiC:H films). a-SiC:H films exhibit plasticity at the nanoscale and outstanding chemical and thermal stability unlike most materials. The multi-functionality and the ease of processing of the films have potential to offer a new toughening strategy for reliability of nanoscale device structures. PMID:23894055

  2. Direct observations of thermally induced structural changes in amorphous silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Ishimaru, Manabu; Hirata, Akihiko; Naito, Muneyuki; Bae, In-Tae; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2008-08-01

    Thermally induced structural relaxation in amorphous silicon carbide (SiC) has been examined by means of in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The amorphous SiC was prepared by high-energy ion-beam-irradiation into a single crystalline 4H-SiC substrate. Cross-sectional TEM observations and electron energy-loss spectroscopy measurements revealed that thermal annealing induces a remarkable volume reduction, so-called densification, of amorphous SiC. From radial distribution function analyses using electron diffraction, notable changes associated with structural relaxation were observed in chemical short-range order. On the basis of the alteration of chemical short-range order, we discuss the origin of thermally induced densification in amorphous SiC.

  3. Investigation of hydrogen plasma treatment for reducing defects in silicon quantum dot superlattice structure with amorphous silicon carbide matrix.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shigeru; Kurokawa, Yasuyoshi; Miyajima, Shinsuke; Konagai, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the effects of hydrogen plasma treatment (HPT) on the properties of silicon quantum dot superlattice films. Hydrogen introduced in the films efficiently passivates silicon and carbon dangling bonds at a treatment temperature of approximately 400°C. The total dangling bond density decreases from 1.1 × 1019 cm-3 to 3.7 × 1017 cm-3, which is comparable to the defect density of typical hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide films. A damaged layer is found to form on the surface by HPT; this layer can be easily removed by reactive ion etching. PMID:24521208

  4. Investigation of hydrogen plasma treatment for reducing defects in silicon quantum dot superlattice structure with amorphous silicon carbide matrix

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the effects of hydrogen plasma treatment (HPT) on the properties of silicon quantum dot superlattice films. Hydrogen introduced in the films efficiently passivates silicon and carbon dangling bonds at a treatment temperature of approximately 400°C. The total dangling bond density decreases from 1.1 × 1019 cm-3 to 3.7 × 1017 cm-3, which is comparable to the defect density of typical hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide films. A damaged layer is found to form on the surface by HPT; this layer can be easily removed by reactive ion etching. PMID:24521208

  5. Investigation of hydrogen plasma treatment for reducing defects in silicon quantum dot superlattice structure with amorphous silicon carbide matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Shigeru; Kurokawa, Yasuyoshi; Miyajima, Shinsuke; Konagai, Makoto

    2014-02-01

    We investigate the effects of hydrogen plasma treatment (HPT) on the properties of silicon quantum dot superlattice films. Hydrogen introduced in the films efficiently passivates silicon and carbon dangling bonds at a treatment temperature of approximately 400°C. The total dangling bond density decreases from 1.1 × 1019 cm-3 to 3.7 × 1017 cm-3, which is comparable to the defect density of typical hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide films. A damaged layer is found to form on the surface by HPT; this layer can be easily removed by reactive ion etching.

  6. Atomistic modeling of amorphous silicon carbide using a bond-order potential

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ram; Gao, Fei; Weber, William J.

    2007-02-16

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed with a Brenner-type bond-order potential to study the melting of silicon carbide (SiC), the structure of amorphous SiC produced by quenching from the melt, and the evolution of the amorphous state after isochronal annealing at elevated temperatures. The simulations reveal that SiC melts above 3700 K with an enthalpy of fusion of about 0.6 eV/atom. The density of the quenched liquid is about 2820 kg/m3, in excellent agreement with the experimental value for SiC amorphized by neutron irradiation. In addition to the loss of long-range order, the quenched liquid shows short-range disorder as measured by the C homonuclear bond ratio. Upon annealing, there is partial recovery of shortrange order.

  7. Charging/discharging behavior and mechanism of silicon quantum dots embedded in amorphous silicon carbide films

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Xixing; Zeng, Xiangbin Zheng, Wenjun; Liao, Wugang; Feng, Feng

    2015-01-14

    The charging/discharging behavior of Si quantum dots (QDs) embedded in amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC{sub x}) was investigated based on the Al/insulating layer/Si QDs embedded in a-SiC{sub x}/SiO{sub 2}/p-Si (metal-insulator-quantum dots-oxide-silicon) multilayer structure by capacitance-voltage (C-V) and conductance-voltage (G-V) measurements. Transmission electron microscopy and Raman scattering spectroscopy measurements reveal the microstructure and distribution of Si QDs. The occurrence and shift of conductance peaks indicate the carrier transfer and the charging/discharging behavior of Si QDs. The multilayer structure shows a large memory window of 5.2 eV at ±8 V sweeping voltage. Analysis of the C-V and G-V results allows a quantification of the Coulomb charging energy and the trapped charge density associated with the charging/discharging behavior. It is found that the memory window is related to the size effect, and Si QDs with large size or low Coulomb charging energy can trap two or more electrons by changing the charging voltage. Meanwhile, the estimated lower potential barrier height between Si QD and a-SiC{sub x}, and the lower Coulomb charging energy of Si QDs could enhance the charging and discharging effect of Si QDs and lead to an enlarged memory window. Further studies of the charging/discharging mechanism of Si QDs embedded in a-SiC{sub x} can promote the application of Si QDs in low-power consumption semiconductor memory devices.

  8. Charging/discharging behavior and mechanism of silicon quantum dots embedded in amorphous silicon carbide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xixing; Zeng, Xiangbin; Zheng, Wenjun; Liao, Wugang; Feng, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The charging/discharging behavior of Si quantum dots (QDs) embedded in amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiCx) was investigated based on the Al/insulating layer/Si QDs embedded in a-SiCx/SiO2/p-Si (metal-insulator-quantum dots-oxide-silicon) multilayer structure by capacitance-voltage (C-V) and conductance-voltage (G-V) measurements. Transmission electron microscopy and Raman scattering spectroscopy measurements reveal the microstructure and distribution of Si QDs. The occurrence and shift of conductance peaks indicate the carrier transfer and the charging/discharging behavior of Si QDs. The multilayer structure shows a large memory window of 5.2 eV at ±8 V sweeping voltage. Analysis of the C-V and G-V results allows a quantification of the Coulomb charging energy and the trapped charge density associated with the charging/discharging behavior. It is found that the memory window is related to the size effect, and Si QDs with large size or low Coulomb charging energy can trap two or more electrons by changing the charging voltage. Meanwhile, the estimated lower potential barrier height between Si QD and a-SiCx, and the lower Coulomb charging energy of Si QDs could enhance the charging and discharging effect of Si QDs and lead to an enlarged memory window. Further studies of the charging/discharging mechanism of Si QDs embedded in a-SiCx can promote the application of Si QDs in low-power consumption semiconductor memory devices.

  9. Irradiation-induced defect clustering and amorphization in silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, William J.; Gao, Fei

    2010-12-01

    Previous computer simulations of multiple 10 keV Si cascades in 3C-SiC demonstrated that many damage-state properties exhibit relatively smooth, but noticeably different, dose dependencies. Recent analysis of these archived damage-state properties reveals more complex relationships between system energy, swelling, energy per defect, relative disorder, elastic modulus and elastic constant, C11. These relationships provide evidence for the onset of defect clustering and amorphization processes, both of which appear to be driven by local energy and elastic instabilities from the accumulation of defects. The results provide guidance on experimental approaches to reveal the onset of these processes.

  10. Irradiation-induced defect clustering and amorphization in silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, William J; Gao, Fei

    2010-01-01

    Previous computer simulations of multiple 10 keV Si cascades in 3C-SiC demonstrated that many damage-state properties exhibit relatively smooth, but noticeably different, dose dependencies. A more recent analysis of these damage-state properties, which includes additional data at low and intermediate doses, reveals more complex relationships between system energy, swelling, energy per defect, relative disorder, elastic modulus and elastic constant, C11. These relationships provide evidence for the onset of both defect clustering and solid-state amorphization, which appear to be driven by local energy and elastic instabilities from the accumulation of defects. The results provide guidance on experimental approaches to reveal the onset of these processes.

  11. Amorphous Silicon Carbide Passivating Layers to Enable Higher Processing Temperature in Crystalline Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Boccard, Mathieu; Holman, Zachary

    2015-04-06

    "Very efficient crystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cells have been demonstrated when thin layers of intrinsic and doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) are used for passivation and carrier selectivity in a heterojunction device. One limitation of this device structure is the (parasitic) absorption in the front passivation/collection a-Si:H layers; another is the degradation of the a-Si:H-based passivation upon temperature, limiting the post-processes to approximately 200°C thus restricting the contacting possibilities and potential tandem device fabrication. To alleviate these two limitations, we explore the potential of amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H), a widely studied material in use in standard a-Si:H thin-film solar cells, which is known for its wider bandgap, increased hydrogen content and stronger hydrogen bonding compared to a-Si:H. We study the surface passivation of solar-grade textured n-type c-Si wafers for symmetrical stacks of 10-nm-thick intrinsic a-SiC:H with various carbon content followed by either p-doped or n-doped a-Si:H (referred to as i/p or i/n stacks). For both doping types, passivation (assessed through carrier lifetime measurements) is degraded by increasing the carbon content in the intrinsic a-SiC:H layer. Yet, this hierarchy is reversed after annealing at 350°C or more due to drastic passivation improvements upon annealing when an a-SiC:H layer is used. After annealing at 350°C, lifetimes of 0.4 ms and 2.0 ms are reported for i/p and i/n stacks, respectively, when using an intrinsic a-SiC:H layer with approximately 10% of carbon (initial lifetimes of 0.3 ms and 0.1 ms, respectively, corresponding to a 30% and 20-fold increase, respectively). For stacks of pure a-Si:H material the lifetimes degrade from 1.2 ms and 2.0 ms for i/p and i/n stacks, respectively, to less than 0.1 ms and 1.1 ms (12-fold and 2-fold decrease, respectively). For complete solar cells using pure a-Si:H i/p and i/n stacks, the open-circuit voltage (Voc

  12. Plasma deposition of amorphous silicon carbide thin films irradiated with neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huran, J.; Bohacek, P.; Kucera, M.; Kleinova, A.; Sasinkova, V.; IEE SAS, Bratislava, Slovakia Team; Polymer Institute, SAS, Bratislava, Slovakia Team; Institute of Chemistry, SAS, Bratislava, Slovakia Team

    2015-09-01

    Amorphous silicon carbide and N-doped silicon carbide thin films were deposited on P-type Si(100) wafer by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) technology using silane, methane, ammonium and argon gases. The concentration of elements in the films was determined by RBS and ERDA method. Chemical compositions were analyzed by FTIR spectroscopy. Photoluminescence properties were studied by photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). Irradiation of samples with various neutron fluencies was performed at room temperature. The films contain silicon, carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and small amount of oxygen. From the IR spectra, the films contained Si-C, Si-H, C-H, Si-N, N-H and Si-O bonds. No significance effect on the IR spectra after neutron irradiation was observed. PL spectroscopy results of films showed decreasing PL intensity after neutron irradiation and PL intensity decreased with increased neutron fluencies. The measured current of the prepared structures increased after irradiation with neutrons and rise up with neutron fluencies.

  13. Direct visualization of photoinduced glassy dynamics on the amorphous silicon carbide surface by STM movies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Duc; Nienhaus, Lea; Haasch, Richard T.; Lyding, Joseph; Gruebele, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Glassy dynamics can be controlled by light irradiation. Sub- and above-bandgap irradiation cause numerous phenomena in glasses including photorelaxation, photoexpansion, photodarkening and pohtoinduced fluidity. We used scanning tunneling microscopy to study surface glassy dynamics of amorphous silicon carbide irradiated with above- bandgap 532 nm light. Surface clusters of ~ 4-5 glass forming unit in diameter hop mostly in a two-state fashion, both without and with irradiation. Upon irradiation, the average surface hopping activity increases by a factor of 3. A very long (~1 day) movie of individual clusters with varying laser power density provides direct evidence for photoinduced enhanced hopping on the glass surfaces. We propose two mechanisms: heating and electronic for the photoenhanced surface dynamics.

  14. Charge transport and activation energy of amorphous silicon carbide thin film on quartz at elevated temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinh, Toan; Viet Dao, Dzung; Phan, Hoang-Phuong; Wang, Li; Qamar, Afzaal; Nguyen, Nam-Trung; Tanner, Philip; Rybachuk, Maksym

    2015-06-01

    We report on the temperature dependence of the charge transport and activation energy of amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC) thin films grown on quartz by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition. The electrical conductivity as characterized by the Arrhenius rule was found to vary distinctly under two activation energy thresholds of 150 and 205 meV, corresponding to temperature ranges of 300 to 450 K and 450 to 580 K, respectively. The a-SiC/quartz system displayed a high temperature coefficient of resistance ranging from -4,000 to -16,000 ppm/K, demonstrating a strong feasibility of using this material for highly sensitive thermal sensing applications.

  15. Synthesis of amorphous silicon carbide nanoparticles in a low temperature low pressure plasma reactor.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hongfei; Gerbec, Jeffrey A; Sushchikh, Michael; McFarland, Eric W

    2008-08-13

    Commercial scale production of silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticles smaller than 10 nm remains a significant challenge. In this paper, a microwave plasma reactor and appropriate reaction conditions have been developed for the synthesis of amorphous SiC nanoparticles. This continuous gas phase process is amenable to large scale production use and utilizes the decomposition of tetramethylsilane (TMS) for both the silicon and the carbon source. The influence of synthesis parameters on the product characteristics was investigated. The as-prepared SiC particles with sizes between 4 and 6 nm were obtained from the TMS precursor in a plasma operated at low temperature and low precursor partial pressure (0.001-0.02 Torr) using argon as the carrier gas (3 Torr). The carbon:silicon ratio was tuned by the addition of hydrogen and characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The reaction mechanism of SiC nanoparticle formation in the microwave plasma was investigated by mass spectroscopy of the gaseous products. PMID:21828814

  16. Experimental and ab initio study of enhanced resistance to amorphization of nanocrystalline silicon carbide under electron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamison, Laura; Zheng, Ming-Jie; Shannon, Steve; Allen, Todd; Morgan, Dane; Szlufarska, Izabela

    2014-02-01

    The crystalline-to-amorphous transition in nanocrystalline silicon carbide (ncSiC) has been studied using 1.25 MeV electron irradiation. When compared to literature values for single crystal silicon carbide under electron irradiation, an increase in the dose to amorphization (DTA) was observed, indicative of an increase in radiation resistance. Factors that contribute to this improvement are grain refinement, grain texture, and a high density of stacking faults (SFs) in this sample of ncSiC. To test the effect of SFs on the DTA, density functional theory simulations were conducted. It was found that SFs reduced the energy barriers for both Si interstitial migration and the rate-limiting defect recovery reaction, which may explain the increased DTA.

  17. Direct Transformation of Amorphous Silicon Carbide into Graphene under Low Temperature and Ambient Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Tao; Lv, Haifeng; He, Daping; Pan, Mu; Mu, Shichun

    2013-01-01

    A large-scale availability of the graphene is critical to the successful application of graphene-based electronic devices. The growth of epitaxial graphene (EG) on insulating silicon carbide (SiC) surfaces has opened a new promising route for large-scale high-quality graphene production. However, two key obstacles to epitaxial growth are extremely high requirements for almost perfectly ordered crystal SiC and harsh process conditions. Here, we report that the amorphous SiC (a-Si1−xCx) nano-shell (nano-film) can be directly transformed into graphene by using chlorination method under very mild reaction conditions of relative low temperature (800°C) and the ambient pressure in chlorine (Cl2) atmosphere. Therefore, our finding, the direct transformation of a-Si1−xCx into graphene under much milder condition, will open a door to apply this new method to the large-scale production of graphene at low costs. PMID:23359349

  18. Direct Transformation of Amorphous Silicon Carbide into Graphene under Low Temperature and Ambient Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Tao; Lv, Haifeng; He, Daping; Pan, Mu; Mu, Shichun

    2013-01-01

    A large-scale availability of the graphene is critical to the successful application of graphene-based electronic devices. The growth of epitaxial graphene (EG) on insulating silicon carbide (SiC) surfaces has opened a new promising route for large-scale high-quality graphene production. However, two key obstacles to epitaxial growth are extremely high requirements for almost perfectly ordered crystal SiC and harsh process conditions. Here, we report that the amorphous SiC (a-Si1-xCx) nano-shell (nano-film) can be directly transformed into graphene by using chlorination method under very mild reaction conditions of relative low temperature (800°C) and the ambient pressure in chlorine (Cl2) atmosphere. Therefore, our finding, the direct transformation of a-Si1-xCx into graphene under much milder condition, will open a door to apply this new method to the large-scale production of graphene at low costs.

  19. Direct transformation of amorphous silicon carbide into graphene under low temperature and ambient pressure.

    PubMed

    Peng, Tao; Lv, Haifeng; He, Daping; Pan, Mu; Mu, Shichun

    2013-01-01

    A large-scale availability of the graphene is critical to the successful application of graphene-based electronic devices. The growth of epitaxial graphene (EG) on insulating silicon carbide (SiC) surfaces has opened a new promising route for large-scale high-quality graphene production. However, two key obstacles to epitaxial growth are extremely high requirements for almost perfectly ordered crystal SiC and harsh process conditions. Here, we report that the amorphous SiC (a-Si(1-x)C(x)) nano-shell (nano-film) can be directly transformed into graphene by using chlorination method under very mild reaction conditions of relative low temperature (800°C) and the ambient pressure in chlorine (Cl(2)) atmosphere. Therefore, our finding, the direct transformation of a-Si(1-x)C(x) into graphene under much milder condition, will open a door to apply this new method to the large-scale production of graphene at low costs. PMID:23359349

  20. Moisture-assisted cracking and atomistic crack path meandering in oxidized hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Yusuke; King, Sean W.; Oliver, Mark; Dauskardt, Reinhold H.

    2013-02-01

    Moisture-assisted cracking of silica-derived materials results from a stress-enhanced reaction between water molecules and moisture-sensitive SiOSi bonds at the crack tip. We report the moisture-assisted cracking of oxidized hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide films (a-SiCO:H) consisting of both moisture-sensitive SiOSi bonds and moisture-insensitive bonds. The sensitivity of the films to moisture-assisted cracking was observed to increase with the SiOSi bond density, ρSiOSi. This sensitivity was correlated with the number of SiOSi bonds ruptured, NSiOSi, through an atomistic kinetic fracture model. By comparing these correlated NSiOSi values with those estimated by a planar crack model, we demonstrated that at the atomistic scale the crack path meanders three-dimensionally so as to intercept the most SiOSi bonds. This atomistic crack path meandering was verified by a computational method based on graph theory and molecular dynamics. Our findings could provide a basis for better understanding of moisture-assisted cracking in materials consisting of other types of moisture-sensitive and moisture-insensitive bonds.

  1. In vivo Characterization of Amorphous Silicon Carbide As a Biomaterial for Chronic Neural Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Knaack, Gretchen L; McHail, Daniel G; Borda, German; Koo, Beomseo; Peixoto, Nathalia; Cogan, Stuart F; Dumas, Theodore C; Pancrazio, Joseph J

    2016-01-01

    Implantable microelectrode arrays (MEAs) offer clinical promise for prosthetic devices by enabling restoration of communication and control of artificial limbs. While proof-of-concept recordings from MEAs have been promising, work in animal models demonstrates that the obtained signals degrade over time. Both material robustness and tissue response are acknowledged to have a role in device lifetime. Amorphous Silicon carbide (a-SiC), a robust material that is corrosion resistant, has emerged as an alternative encapsulation layer for implantable devices. We systematically examined the impact of a-SiC coating on Si probes by immunohistochemical characterization of key markers implicated in tissue-device response. After implantation, we performed device capture immunohistochemical labeling of neurons, astrocytes, and activated microglia/macrophages after 4 and 8 weeks of implantation. Neuron loss and microglia activation were similar between Si and a-SiC coated probes, while tissue implanted with a-SiC displayed a reduction in astrocytes adjacent to the probe. These results suggest that a-SiC has a similar biocompatibility profile as Si, and may be suitable for implantable MEA applications as a hermetic coating to prevent material degradation. PMID:27445672

  2. In vivo Characterization of Amorphous Silicon Carbide As a Biomaterial for Chronic Neural Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Knaack, Gretchen L.; McHail, Daniel G.; Borda, German; Koo, Beomseo; Peixoto, Nathalia; Cogan, Stuart F.; Dumas, Theodore C.; Pancrazio, Joseph J.

    2016-01-01

    Implantable microelectrode arrays (MEAs) offer clinical promise for prosthetic devices by enabling restoration of communication and control of artificial limbs. While proof-of-concept recordings from MEAs have been promising, work in animal models demonstrates that the obtained signals degrade over time. Both material robustness and tissue response are acknowledged to have a role in device lifetime. Amorphous Silicon carbide (a-SiC), a robust material that is corrosion resistant, has emerged as an alternative encapsulation layer for implantable devices. We systematically examined the impact of a-SiC coating on Si probes by immunohistochemical characterization of key markers implicated in tissue-device response. After implantation, we performed device capture immunohistochemical labeling of neurons, astrocytes, and activated microglia/macrophages after 4 and 8 weeks of implantation. Neuron loss and microglia activation were similar between Si and a-SiC coated probes, while tissue implanted with a-SiC displayed a reduction in astrocytes adjacent to the probe. These results suggest that a-SiC has a similar biocompatibility profile as Si, and may be suitable for implantable MEA applications as a hermetic coating to prevent material degradation. PMID:27445672

  3. Atomistic modeling of amorphous silicon carbide: an approximate first-principles study in constrained solution space.

    PubMed

    Atta-Fynn, Raymond; Biswas, Parthapratim

    2009-07-01

    Localized basis ab initio molecular dynamics simulation within the density functional framework has been used to generate realistic configurations of amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC). Our approach consists of constructing a set of smart initial configurations that conform to essential geometrical and structural aspects of the materials obtained from experimental data, which is subsequently driven via a first-principles force field to obtain the best solution in a reduced solution space. A combination of a priori information (primarily structural and topological) along with the ab initio optimization of the total energy makes it possible to model a large system size (1000 atoms) without compromising the quantum mechanical accuracy of the force field to describe the complex bonding chemistry of Si and C. The structural, electronic and vibrational properties of the models have been studied and compared to existing theoretical models and available data from experiments. We demonstrate that the approach is capable of producing large, realistic configurations of a-SiC from first-principles simulation that display its excellent structural and electronic properties. Our study reveals the presence of predominant short range order in the material originating from heteronuclear Si-C bonds with a coordination defect concentration as small as 5% and a chemical disorder parameter of about 8%. PMID:21828477

  4. Fabrication of Amorphous Silicon Carbide Films from Decomposition of Tetramethylsilane using ECR plasma of Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, H.; Onitsuka, S.; Gappa, R.; Saitoh, H.; Roacho, R.; Pannell, K. H.; Suzuki, T.; Niibe, M.; Kanda, K.

    2013-06-01

    Mechanically-hard hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiCx:H) films were formed from the decomposition of Si(CH3)4 using the electron-cyclotron resonance plasma flow of Ar. An external radio-frequency (RF) voltage was applied to the substrate with the negative self-bias voltage (-VRF) of 0-100 V. Compositional analysis was made with a combination of Rutherford backscattering and elastic recoil detection analysis. The C/Si ratios of films were 2.2-2.7. Film hardness was measured with a nano-indentation testing equipment. Chemical bonding was analyzed using carbon-K near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (C-K NEXAFS) spectroscopy using an accelerator NewSUBARU. The peak-fitting analysis of the C-K NEXAFS spectra yielded the sp2/(sp2+sp3) ratios, being fully correlated with film hardness. With supported by the IR and Raman spectroscopic measurements, the change of the chemical structure induced by -VRF was discussed.

  5. Photoluminescence properties and crystallization of silicon quantum dots in hydrogenated amorphous Si-rich silicon carbide films

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Guozhi; Zeng, Xiangbin Wen, Xixin; Liao, Wugang

    2014-04-28

    Silicon quantum dots (QDs) embedded in hydrogenated amorphous Si-rich silicon carbide (α-SiC:H) thin films were realized by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition process and post-annealing. Fluorescence spectroscopy was used to characterize the room-temperature photoluminescence properties. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to analyze the element compositions and bonding configurations. Ultraviolet visible spectroscopy, Raman scattering, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy were used to display the microstructural properties. Photoluminescence measurements reveal that there are six emission sub-bands, which behave in different ways. The peak wavelengths of sub-bands P1, P2, P3, and P6 are pinned at about 425.0, 437.3, 465.0, and 591.0 nm, respectively. Other two sub-bands, P4 is red-shifted from 494.6 to 512.4 nm and P5 from 570.2 to 587.8 nm with temperature increasing from 600 to 900 °C. But then are both blue-shifted, P4 to 500.2 nm and P5 to 573.8 nm from 900 to 1200 °C. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis shows that the samples are in Si-rich nature, Si-O and Si-N bonds consumed some silicon atoms. The structure characterization displays that a separation between silicon phase and SiC phase happened; amorphous and crystalline silicon QDs synthesized with increasing the annealing temperature. P1, P2, P3, and P6 sub-bands are explained in terms of defect-related emission, while P4 and P5 sub-bands are explained in terms of quantum confinement effect. A correlation between the peak wavelength shift, as well as the integral intensity of the spectrum and crystallization of silicon QDs is supposed. These results help clarify the probable luminescence mechanisms and provide the possibility to optimize the optical properties of silicon QDs in Si-rich α-SiC: H materials.

  6. Photoluminescence properties and crystallization of silicon quantum dots in hydrogenated amorphous Si-rich silicon carbide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Guozhi; Zeng, Xiangbin; Wen, Xixin; Liao, Wugang

    2014-04-01

    Silicon quantum dots (QDs) embedded in hydrogenated amorphous Si-rich silicon carbide (α-SiC:H) thin films were realized by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition process and post-annealing. Fluorescence spectroscopy was used to characterize the room-temperature photoluminescence properties. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to analyze the element compositions and bonding configurations. Ultraviolet visible spectroscopy, Raman scattering, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy were used to display the microstructural properties. Photoluminescence measurements reveal that there are six emission sub-bands, which behave in different ways. The peak wavelengths of sub-bands P1, P2, P3, and P6 are pinned at about 425.0, 437.3, 465.0, and 591.0 nm, respectively. Other two sub-bands, P4 is red-shifted from 494.6 to 512.4 nm and P5 from 570.2 to 587.8 nm with temperature increasing from 600 to 900 °C. But then are both blue-shifted, P4 to 500.2 nm and P5 to 573.8 nm from 900 to 1200 °C. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis shows that the samples are in Si-rich nature, Si-O and Si-N bonds consumed some silicon atoms. The structure characterization displays that a separation between silicon phase and SiC phase happened; amorphous and crystalline silicon QDs synthesized with increasing the annealing temperature. P1, P2, P3, and P6 sub-bands are explained in terms of defect-related emission, while P4 and P5 sub-bands are explained in terms of quantum confinement effect. A correlation between the peak wavelength shift, as well as the integral intensity of the spectrum and crystallization of silicon QDs is supposed. These results help clarify the probable luminescence mechanisms and provide the possibility to optimize the optical properties of silicon QDs in Si-rich α-SiC: H materials.

  7. Structure-Property Relationships in Polymer Derived Amorphous/Nano-Crystalline Silicon Carbide for Nuclear Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Zunjarrao, Suraj C.; Singh, Abhishek K.; Singh, Raman P.

    2006-07-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is a promising candidate for several applications in nuclear reactors owing to its high thermal conductivity, high melting temperature, good chemical stability, and resistance to swelling under heavy ion bombardment. However, fabricating SiC by traditional powder processing route generally requires very high temperatures for pressureless sintering. Polymer derived ceramic materials offer unique advantages such as ability to fabricate net shaped components, incorporate reinforcements and relatively low processing temperatures. Furthermore, for SiC based ceramics fabricated using polymer infiltration process (PIP), the microstructure can be tailored by controlling the processing parameters, to get an amorphous, nanocrystalline or crystalline SiC. In this work, fabrication of polymer derived amorphous and nano-grained SiC is presented and its application as an in-core material is explored. Monolithic SiC samples are fabricated by controlled pyrolysis of allyl-hydrido-poly-carbo-silane (AHPCS) under inert atmosphere. Chemical changes, phase transformations and microstructural changes occurring during the pyrolysis process are studied as a function of the processing temperature. Polymer cross-linking and polymer to ceramic conversion is studied using infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) are performed to monitor the mass loss and phase change as a function of temperature. X-ray diffraction studies are done to study the intermediate phases and microstructural changes. Variation in density is carefully monitored as a function of processing temperature. Owing to shrinkage and gas evolution during pyrolysis, precursor derived ceramics are inherently porous and composite fabrication typically involves repeated cycles of polymer re-infiltration and pyrolysis. However, there is a limit to the densification that can be achieved by this method and porosity in the final materials presents

  8. Diamond-silicon carbide composite

    DOEpatents

    Qian, Jiang; Zhao, Yusheng

    2006-06-13

    Fully dense, diamond-silicon carbide composites are prepared from ball-milled microcrystalline diamond/amorphous silicon powder mixture. The ball-milled powder is sintered (P=5–8 GPa, T=1400K–2300K) to form composites having high fracture toughness. A composite made at 5 GPa/1673K had a measured fracture toughness of 12 MPa.dot.m1/2. By contrast, liquid infiltration of silicon into diamond powder at 5 GPa/1673K produces a composite with higher hardness but lower fracture toughness. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra indicate that amorphous silicon is partially transformed into nanocrystalline silicon at 5 GPa/873K, and nanocrystalline silicon carbide forms at higher temperatures.

  9. The Synthesis and Structural Properties of Crystalline Silicon Quantum Dots upon Thermal Annealing of Hydrogenated Amorphous Si-Rich Silicon Carbide Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Guozhi; Zeng, Xiangbin; Li, Xianghu

    2016-05-01

    Silicon quantum dots (QDs) embedded in non-stoichiometric hydrogenated silicon carbide (SiC:H) thin films have been successfully synthesized by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition and post-annealing. The chemical composition analyses have been carried out by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The bonding configurations have been deduced from Fourier transform infrared absorption measurements (FTIR). The evolution of microstructure with temperature has been characterized by glancing incident x-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman diffraction spectroscopy. XPS and FTIR show that it is in Si-rich feature and there are a few hydrogenated silicon clusters in the as-grown sample. XRD and Raman diffraction spectroscopy show that it is in amorphous for the as-grown sample, while crystalline silicon QDs have been synthesized in the 900°C annealed sample. Silicon atoms precipitation from the SiC matrix or silicon phase transition from amorphous SiC is enhanced with annealing temperature increase. The average sizes of silicon QDs are about 5.1 nm and 5.6 nm, the number densities are as high as 1.7 × 1012 cm-2 and 3.2 × 1012 cm-2, and the crystalline volume fractions are about 58.3% and 61.3% for the 900°C and 1050°C annealed samples, respectively. These structural properties analyses provide an understanding about the synthesis of silicon QDs upon thermal annealing for applications in next generation optoelectronic and photovoltaic devices.

  10. The Synthesis and Structural Properties of Crystalline Silicon Quantum Dots upon Thermal Annealing of Hydrogenated Amorphous Si-Rich Silicon Carbide Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Guozhi; Zeng, Xiangbin; Li, Xianghu

    2016-08-01

    Silicon quantum dots (QDs) embedded in non-stoichiometric hydrogenated silicon carbide (SiC:H) thin films have been successfully synthesized by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition and post-annealing. The chemical composition analyses have been carried out by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The bonding configurations have been deduced from Fourier transform infrared absorption measurements (FTIR). The evolution of microstructure with temperature has been characterized by glancing incident x-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman diffraction spectroscopy. XPS and FTIR show that it is in Si-rich feature and there are a few hydrogenated silicon clusters in the as-grown sample. XRD and Raman diffraction spectroscopy show that it is in amorphous for the as-grown sample, while crystalline silicon QDs have been synthesized in the 900°C annealed sample. Silicon atoms precipitation from the SiC matrix or silicon phase transition from amorphous SiC is enhanced with annealing temperature increase. The average sizes of silicon QDs are about 5.1 nm and 5.6 nm, the number densities are as high as 1.7 × 1012 cm-2 and 3.2 × 1012 cm-2, and the crystalline volume fractions are about 58.3% and 61.3% for the 900°C and 1050°C annealed samples, respectively. These structural properties analyses provide an understanding about the synthesis of silicon QDs upon thermal annealing for applications in next generation optoelectronic and photovoltaic devices.

  11. Fabrication of hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide films by decomposition of hexamethyldisilane with microwave discharge flow of Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Haruhiko; Kumakura, Motoki; Suzuki, Tsuneo; Niibe, Masahito; Kanda, Kazuhiro; Saitoh, Hidetoshi

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide films have been fabricated by the decomposition of hexamethyldisilane with a microwave discharge flow of Ar. Mechanically hard films were obtained by applying radio-frequency (RF) bias voltages to the substrate. The atomic compositions of the films were analyzed by a combination of Rutherford backscattering and elastic recoil detection, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy. The chemical structure was analyzed by carbon-K near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, high-resolution XPS, and Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy. The structural changes upon the application of RF bias were investigated, and the concentration of O atoms near the film surface was found to play a key role in the mechanical hardness of the present films.

  12. Silicon carbide ceramic production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, K.; Shinohara, N.

    1984-01-01

    A method to produce sintered silicon carbide ceramics in which powdery carbonaceous components with a dispersant are mixed with silicon carbide powder, shaped as required with or without drying, and fired in nonoxidation atmosphere is described. Carbon black is used as the carbonaceous component.

  13. An environment-dependent interatomic potential for silicon carbide: calculation of bulk properties, high-pressure phases, point and extended defects, and amorphous structures.

    PubMed

    Lucas, G; Bertolus, M; Pizzagalli, L

    2010-01-27

    An interatomic potential has been developed to describe interactions in silicon, carbon and silicon carbide, based on the environment-dependent interatomic potential (EDIP) (Bazant et al 1997 Phys. Rev. B 56 8542). The functional form of the original EDIP has been generalized and two sets of parameters have been proposed. Tests with these two potentials have been performed for many properties of SiC, including bulk properties, high-pressure phases, point and extended defects, and amorphous structures. One parameter set allows us to keep the original EDIP formulation for silicon, and is shown to be well suited for modelling irradiation-induced effects in silicon carbide, with a very good description of point defects and of the disordered phase. The other set, including a new parametrization for silicon, has been shown to be efficient for modelling point and extended defects, as well as high-pressure phases. PMID:21386297

  14. Microstructures of the silicon carbide nanowires obtained by annealing the mechanically-alloyed amorphous powders

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Pengfei Li, Xinli

    2015-07-15

    Silicon, graphite and boron nitride powders were mechanically alloyed for 40 h in argon. The as-milled powders were annealed at 1700 °C in nitrogen for 30 min. The annealed powders are covered by a thick layer of gray–green SiC nanowires, which are 300 nm to 1000 nm in diameter and several hundred microns in length. Trace iron in the raw powders acts as a catalyst, promoting the V–L–S process. It follows that the actual substances contributing to the growth of the SiC nanowires may be silicon, graphite and the metal impurities in the raw powders. The results from HRTEM and XRD reveal that the products contain both straight α/β-SiC nanowires and nodular α/β-SiC nanochains. It is interestingly found that 6H–SiC coexists with 3C–SiC in one nodular nanowire. This novel structure may introduce periodic potential field along the longitudinal direction of the nanowires, and may find applications in the highly integrated optoelectronic devices. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • SiC nanowires were prepared by annealing the mechanically alloyed amorphous powders. • SiC nanowires are 300 nm to 1000 nm in diameter and several hundred microns in length. • The products contain both straight α/β-SiC nanowires and nodular α/β-SiC nanochains. • Trace Fe in the raw powders acts as a catalyst, promoting the V–L–S process. • 6H–SiC coexists with 3C–SiC in one nodular SiC nanowire.

  15. Improved toughness of silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    Impact energy absorbing layers (EALs) comprised of partially densified silicon carbide were formed in situ on fully sinterable silicon carbide substrates. After final sintering, duplex silicon carbide structures resulted which were comprised of a fully sintered, high density silicon carbide substrate or core, overlayed with an EAL of partially sintered silicon carbide integrally bonded to its core member. Thermal cycling tests proved such structures to be moderately resistant to oxidation and highly resistant to thermal shock stresses. The strength of the developed structures in some cases exceeded but essentially it remained the same as the fully sintered silicon carbide without the EAL. Ballistic impact tests indicated that substantial improvements in the toughness of sintered silicon carbide were achieved by the use of the partially densified silicon carbide EALs.

  16. Stabilization of boron carbide via silicon doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, J. E.; Bhakhri, V.; Hao, R.; Prior, T. J.; Scheler, T.; Gregoryanz, E.; Chhowalla, M.; Giulani, F.

    2015-01-01

    Boron carbide is one of the lightest and hardest ceramics, but its applications are limited by its poor stability against a partial phase separation into separate boron and carbon. Phase separation is observed under high non-hydrostatic stress (both static and dynamic), resulting in amorphization. The phase separation is thought to occur in just one of the many naturally occurring polytypes in the material, and this raises the possibility of doping the boron carbide to eliminate this polytype. In this work, we have synthesized boron carbide doped with silicon. We have conducted a series of characterizations (transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction) on pure and silicon-doped boron carbide following static compression to 50 GPa non-hydrostatic pressure. We find that the level of amorphization under static non-hydrostatic pressure is drastically reduced by the silicon doping.

  17. Structural evolutions in polymer-derived carbon-rich amorphous silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kewei; Ma, Baisheng; Li, Xuqin; Wang, Yiguang; An, Linan

    2015-01-29

    The detailed structural evolutions in polycarbosilane-derived carbon-rich amorphous SiC were investigated semiquantitatively by combining experimental and analytical methods. It is revealed that the material is comprised of a Si-containing matrix phase and a free-carbon phase. The matrix phase is amorphous, comprised of SiC4 tetrahedra, SiCxOx-4 tetrahedra, and Si-C-C-Si/Si-C-H defects. With increasing pyrolysis temperature, the amorphous matrix becomes more ordered, accompanied by a transition from SiC2O2 to SiCO3. The transition was completed at 1250 °C, where the matrix phase started to crystallize by forming a small amount of β-SiC. The free-carbon phase was comprised of carbon nanoclusters and C-dangling bonds. Increasing pyrolysis temperature led to the transition of the free carbon from amorphous carbon to nanocrystalline graphite. The size of the carbon clusters decreased first and then increased, while the C-dangling bond content decreased continuously. The growth of carbon clusters was attributed to Ostwald ripening and described using a two-dimensional grain growth model. The calculated activation energy suggested that the decrease in C-dangling bonds is directly related to the lateral growth of the carbon clusters. PMID:25490064

  18. Silicon carbide thyristor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmond, John A. (Inventor); Palmour, John W. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The SiC thyristor has a substrate, an anode, a drift region, a gate, and a cathode. The substrate, the anode, the drift region, the gate, and the cathode are each preferably formed of silicon carbide. The substrate is formed of silicon carbide having one conductivity type and the anode or the cathode, depending on the embodiment, is formed adjacent the substrate and has the same conductivity type as the substrate. A drift region of silicon carbide is formed adjacent the anode or cathode and has an opposite conductivity type as the anode or cathode. A gate is formed adjacent the drift region or the cathode, also depending on the embodiment, and has an opposite conductivity type as the drift region or the cathode. An anode or cathode, again depending on the embodiment, is formed adjacent the gate or drift region and has an opposite conductivity type than the gate.

  19. Excimer laser crystallization of amorphous silicon carbide produced by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedler, A.; Urban, S.; Falk, F.; Hobert, H.; Wesch, W.

    2003-01-01

    4H-SiC was implanted with 100-250 keV Ge + and Xe + ions and doses of 1×10 14 to 1×10 16 cm -2 at room temperature in order to produce 40-200 nm thick amorphous surface layers. The samples were irradiated with 1-50,000 pulses of a KrF excimer laser (248 nm wavelength, 30 ns pulse duration) using fluences of 150-900 mJ/cm 2 to investigate the crystallization process as a function of the laser parameters. Crystallization as well as redistribution of the impurity atoms were analyzed by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and infrared reflection measurements. Phase transitions occurring during the irradiation were studied by means of time-resolved reflectivity measurements. In order to explain the observed phase transitions numerical analysis was performed by solving the inhomogeneous heat flow equation using the parameters of the corresponding phases. In this work, we give a consistent description of the experimental results by the numerical simulations for the given laser setup. Depending on the amorphous layer thickness, melting, solidification, and crystallization of the amorphous phase can be effectively controlled by both the laser fluence and the number of laser pulses.

  20. Development of a corrosion-resistant amorphous silicon carbide photoelectrode for solar-to-hydrogen photovoltaic/photoelectrochemical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matulionis, Ilvydas; Zhu, Feng; Hu, Jian; Deutsch, Todd; Kunrath, Augusto; Miller, Eric; Marsen, Bjorn; Madan, Arun

    2008-08-01

    Photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting at a semiconductor-electrolyte interface using sunlight is of considerable interest as it offers a clean approach to hydrogen production. PEC cells require semiconductor photoelectrode materials fulfilling a number of important requirements, such as band-edge alignment, corrosion resistance to electrolyte, and adequate current generation. We report the development of RF-PECVD-deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H) photoelectrodes with improved durability, which, when combined with a-Si:H tandem photovoltaic devices, should produce hydrogen directly from water under sunlight. The a-SiC:H is commonly grown with a bandgap in excess of 2.0 eV and completes the PEC device by providing contact with the electrolyte, proper band-edge alignment, and acts as a buffer for the a-Si:H tandem structure. Effects of the pH of electrolyte, type of substrates, and a platinum nanoparticle coating on the durability of a-SiC photoelectrodes will be presented. From these studies we surmise that corrosion or damage mechanism occurring on a-SiC:H layer could be divided into different aspects of physical and chemical. From the physical point of view, defects associated with spikes in textured TCO substrates, roughness of stainless steel, or other sources of pinholes may initiate delamination as confirmed by SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy) and EDS (Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy) studies. Chemically, the production of hydrogen involves reactions that may etch the electrode, especially when physical defects are involved. We observe that reducing the acidity of the electrolyte (increasing the pH from 0 to 2) significantly reduces corrosion while the useful photocurrent output of the a-SiC:H p/i structure is unaffected.

  1. Silicon nitride/silicon carbide composite powders

    DOEpatents

    Dunmead, Stephen D.; Weimer, Alan W.; Carroll, Daniel F.; Eisman, Glenn A.; Cochran, Gene A.; Susnitzky, David W.; Beaman, Donald R.; Nilsen, Kevin J.

    1996-06-11

    Prepare silicon nitride-silicon carbide composite powders by carbothermal reduction of crystalline silica powder, carbon powder and, optionally, crystalline silicon nitride powder. The crystalline silicon carbide portion of the composite powders has a mean number diameter less than about 700 nanometers and contains nitrogen. The composite powders may be used to prepare sintered ceramic bodies and self-reinforced silicon nitride ceramic bodies.

  2. Silicon carbide reinforced silicon carbide composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, Sai-Kwing (Inventor); Calandra, Salvatore J. (Inventor); Ohnsorg, Roger W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    This invention relates to a process comprising the steps of: a) providing a fiber preform comprising a non-oxide ceramic fiber with at least one coating, the coating comprising a coating element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, aluminum and titanium, and the fiber having a degradation temperature of between 1400.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C., b) impregnating the preform with a slurry comprising silicon carbide particles and between 0.1 wt % and 3 wt % added carbon c) providing a cover mix comprising: i) an alloy comprising a metallic infiltrant and the coating element, and ii) a resin, d) placing the cover mix on at least a portion of the surface of the porous silicon carbide body, e) heating the cover mix to a temperature between 1410.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C. to melt the alloy, and f) infiltrating the fiber preform with the melted alloy for a time period of between 15 minutes and 240 minutes, to produce a ceramic fiber reinforced ceramic composite.

  3. Far-infrared absorption measurements of graphite, amorphous carbon, and silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, T.; Nakada, Y.; Kamijo, F.; Sakata, A.

    The mass absorption coefficients of graphite (G), amorphous-carbon (AC), and SiC grains at 25-250 microns are determined experimentally at room temperature and applied to the interpretation of published IR observations of IRC+10216. Absorption measurements are obtained using a single-beam grating spectrometer with a Goley-cell detector by a polyethylene-powder-tablet technique. The results are presented in a table and graphs. The mass absorption constants (in sq cm/g) are calculated as 642 for G, 281 for AC produced in Ar, 93.9 for AC produced in H2, and 19.6 for SiC; power-law relationships to wavelength, with indices of -2.18, 0.60, -0.59, and -1.37 (respectively) are established. AC is found to be the most likely constituent of the IRC+10216 dust cloud, permitting the dust mass to be estimated as 0.0001 solar mass.

  4. Composition Comprising Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehregany, Mehran (Inventor); Zorman, Christian A. (Inventor); Fu, Xiao-An (Inventor); Dunning, Jeremy L. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method of depositing a ceramic film, particularly a silicon carbide film, on a substrate is disclosed in which the residual stress, residual stress gradient, and resistivity are controlled. Also disclosed are substrates having a deposited film with these controlled properties and devices, particularly MEMS and NEMS devices, having substrates with films having these properties.

  5. Diamond-silicon carbide composite and method

    DOEpatents

    Zhao, Yusheng

    2011-06-14

    Uniformly dense, diamond-silicon carbide composites having high hardness, high fracture toughness, and high thermal stability are prepared by consolidating a powder mixture of diamond and amorphous silicon. A composite made at 5 GPa/1673K had a measured fracture toughness of 12 MPam.sup.1/2. By contrast, liquid infiltration of silicon into diamond powder at 5 GPa/1673K produces a composite with higher hardness but lower fracture toughness.

  6. Improved toughness of silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    Several techniques were employed to apply or otherwise form porous layers of various materials on the surface of hot-pressed silicon carbide ceramic. From mechanical properties measurements and studies, it was concluded that although porous layers could be applied to the silicon carbide ceramic, sufficient damage was done to the silicon carbide surface by the processing required so as to drastically reduce its mechanical strength. It was further concluded that there was little promise of success in forming an effective energy absorbing layer on the surface of already densified silicon carbide ceramic that would have the mechanical strength of the untreated or unsurfaced material. Using a process for the pressureless sintering of silicon carbide powders it was discovered that porous layers of silicon carbide could be formed on a dense, strong silicon carbide substrate in a single consolidation process.

  7. Amorphous to crystalline phase transition in pulsed laser deposited silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabbal, M.; Said, A.; Hannoun, E.; Christidis, T.

    2007-06-01

    SiC thin films were grown on Si (1 0 0) substrates by excimer laser ablation of a SiC target in vacuum. The effect of deposition temperature (up to 950 °C), post-deposition annealing and laser energy on the nanostructure, bonding and crystalline properties of the films was studied, in order to elucidate their transition from an amorphous to a crystalline phase. Infra-red spectroscopy shows that growth at temperatures greater than 600 °C produces layers with increasingly uniform environment of the Si-C bonds, while the appearance of large crystallites is detected, by X-ray diffraction, at 800 °C. Electron paramagnetic resonance confirms the presence of clustered paramagnetic centers within the sp 2 carbon domains. Increasing deposition temperature leads to a decrease of the spin density and to a temperature-dependent component of the EPR linewidth induced by spin hopping. For films grown below 650 °C, post-deposition annealing at 1100 °C reduces the spin density as a result of a more uniform Si-C nanostructure, though large scale crystallization is not observed. For greater deposition temperatures, annealing leads to little changes in the bonding properties, but suppresses the temperature dependent component of the EPR linewidth. These findings are explained by a relaxation of the stress in the layers, through the annealing of the bond angle disorder that inhibits spin hopping processes.

  8. Modified silicon carbide whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, T.N.; Lindemer, T.B.

    1991-05-21

    Silicon carbide whisker-reinforced ceramic composites are fabricated in a highly reproducible manner by beneficating the surfaces of the silicon carbide whiskers prior to their usage in the ceramic composites. The silicon carbide whiskers which contain considerable concentrations of surface oxides and other impurities which interact with the ceramic composite material to form a chemical bond are significantly reduced so that only a relatively weak chemical bond is formed between the whisker and the ceramic material. Thus, when the whiskers interact with a crack propagating into the composite the crack is diverted or deflected along the whisker-matrix interface due to the weak chemical bonding so as to deter the crack propagation through the composite. The depletion of the oxygen-containing compounds and other impurities on the whisker surfaces and near surface region is effected by heat treating the whiskers in a suitable oxygen sparging atmosphere at elevated temperatures. Additionally, a sedimentation technique may be utilized to remove whiskers which suffer structural and physical anomalies which render them undesirable for use in the composite. Also, a layer of carbon may be provided on the surface of the whiskers to further inhibit chemical bonding of the whiskers to the ceramic composite material.

  9. Modified silicon carbide whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, Terry N.; Lindemer, Terrence B.

    1991-01-01

    Silicon carbide whisker-reinforced ceramic composites are fabricated in a highly reproducible manner by beneficating the surfaces of the silicon carbide whiskers prior to their usage in the ceramic composites. The silicon carbide whiskers which contain considerable concentrations of surface oxides and other impurities which interact with the ceramic composite material to form a chemical bond are significantly reduced so that only a relatively weak chemical bond is formed between the whisker and the ceramic material. Thus, when the whiskers interact with a crack propagating into the composite the crack is diverted or deflected along the whisker-matrix interface due to the weak chemical bonding so as to deter the crack propagation through the composite. The depletion of the oxygen-containing compounds and other impurities on the whisker surfaces and near surface region is effected by heat treating the whiskers in a suitable oxygen sparaging atmosphere at elevated temperatures. Additionally, a sedimentation technique may be utilized to remove whiskers which suffer structural and physical anomalies which render them undesirable for use in the composite. Also, a layer of carbon may be provided on the surface of the whiskers to further inhibit chemical bonding of the whiskers to the ceramic composite material.

  10. Comparison of silicon oxide and silicon carbide absorber materials in silicon thin-film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walder, Cordula; Kellermann, Martin; Wendler, Elke; Rensberg, Jura; von Maydell, Karsten; Agert, Carsten

    2015-02-01

    Since solar energy conversion by photovoltaics is most efficient for photon energies at the bandgap of the absorbing material the idea of combining absorber layers with different bandgaps in a multijunction cell has become popular. In silicon thin-film photovoltaics a multijunction stack with more than two subcells requires a high bandgap amorphous silicon alloy top cell absorber to achieve an optimal bandgap combination. We address the question whether amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H) or amorphous silicon oxide (a-SiO:H) is more suited for this type of top cell absorber. Our single cell results show a better performance of amorphous silicon carbide with respect to fill factor and especially open circuit voltage at equivalent Tauc bandgaps. The microstructure factor of single layers indicates less void structure in amorphous silicon carbide than in amorphous silicon oxide. Yet photoconductivity of silicon oxide films seems to be higher which could be explained by the material being not truly intrinsic. On the other hand better cell performance of amorphous silicon carbide absorber layers might be connected to better hole transport in the cell.

  11. Hydrogen in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Peercy, P. S.

    1980-01-01

    The structural aspects of amorphous silicon and the role of hydrogen in this structure are reviewed with emphasis on ion implantation studies. In amorphous silicon produced by Si ion implantation of crystalline silicon, the material reconstructs into a metastable amorphous structure which has optical and electrical properties qualitatively similar to the corresponding properties in high-purity evaporated amorphous silicon. Hydrogen studies further indicate that these structures will accomodate less than or equal to 5 at.% hydrogen and this hydrogen is bonded predominantly in a monohydride (SiH/sub 1/) site. Larger hydrogen concentrations than this can be achieved under certain conditions, but the excess hydrogen may be attributed to defects and voids in the material. Similarly, glow discharge or sputter deposited amorphous silicon has more desirable electrical and optical properties when the material is prepared with low hydrogen concentration and monohydride bonding. Results of structural studies and hydrogen incorporation in amorphous silicon were discussed relative to the different models proposed for amorphous silicon.

  12. Silicon carbide sewing thread

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawko, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Composite flexible multilayer insulation systems (MLI) were evaluated for thermal performance and compared with currently used fibrous silica (baseline) insulation system. The systems described are multilayer insulations consisting of alternating layers of metal foil and scrim ceramic cloth or vacuum metallized polymeric films quilted together using ceramic thread. A silicon carbide thread for use in the quilting and the method of making it are also described. These systems provide lightweight thermal insulation for a variety of uses, particularly on the surface of aerospace vehicles subject to very high temperatures during flight.

  13. Silicon Carbide Electronic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, P. G.

    2001-01-01

    The status of emerging silicon carbide (SiC) widebandgap semiconductor electronics technology is briefly surveyed. SiC-based electronic devices and circuits are being developed for use in high-temperature, high-power, and/or high-radiation conditions under which conventional semiconductors cannot function. Projected performance benefits of SiC electronics are briefly illustrated for several applications. However, most of these operational benefits of SiC have yet to be realized in actual systems, primarily owing to the fact that the growth techniques of SiC crystals are relatively immature and device fabrication technologies are not yet sufficiently developed to the degree required for widespread, reliable commercial use. Key crystal growth and device fabrication issues that limit the performance and capability of high-temperature and/or high-power SiC electronics are identified. The electrical and material quality differences between emerging SiC and mature silicon electronics technology are highlighted.

  14. Wide band-gap, fairly conductive p-type hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide films prepared by direct photolysis; solar cell application

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, A.; Kenne, J.; Konagai, M.; Takahashi, K.

    1985-02-01

    Wide optical band-gap (2.0--2.3 eV) undoped and boron-doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H) films have been prepared by both direct photo and rf glow discharge (GD plasma) decomposition of pure methylsilanes or acetylene and disilane gas mixtures. The photochemically prepared p-type films showed higher dark conductivities and lower activation energies. For an optical band gap of 2.0 eV a high conductivity of 7.0 x 10/sup -5/ (S cm/sup -1/) and a low activation energy of 0.33 eV have been measured. The first trial of these wide band-gap, fairly conductive films as a window layer in a p-i-n solar cell showed the high conversion efficiency of 9.46% under AM1 insolation.

  15. Hydrogen-silicon carbide interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckel, Andrew J.; Jacobson, Nathan S.; Misra, Ajay K.; Humphrey, Donald L.

    1989-01-01

    A study of the thermochemistry and kinetics of hydrogen environmental attack of silicon carbide was conducted for temperatures in the range from 1100 C to 1400 C. Thermodynamic maps based on the parameters of pressure and oxygen/moisture content were constructed. With increasing moisture levels, four distinct regions of attack were identified. Each region is defined by the thermodynamically stable solid phases. The theoretically stable solid phases of Region 1 are silicon carbide and silicon. Experimental evidence is provided to support this thermodynamic prediction. Silicon carbide is the single stable solid phase in Region 2. Active attack of the silicon carbide in this region occurs by the formation of gases of SiO, CO, CH4, SiH4, and SiH. Analysis of the kinetics of reaction for Region 2 at 1300 C show the attack of the silicon carbide to be controlled by gas phase diffusion of H2O to the sample. Silicon carbide and silica are the stable phases common to Regions 3 and 4. These two regions are characterized by the passive oxidation of silicon carbide and formation of a protective silica layer.

  16. Hydrogen-silicon carbide interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckel, Andrew J.; Misra, Ajay K.; Humphrey, Donald L.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1990-01-01

    A study of the thermochemistry and kinetics of hydrogen environmental attack of silicon carbide was conducted for temperatures in the range from 1100 C to 1400 C. Thermodynamics maps based on the parameters of pressure and oxygen/moisture content were constructed. With increasing moisture levels, four distinct regions of attack were identified. Each region is defined by the thermodynamically stable solid phases. The theoretically stable solid phases of region 1 are silicon carbide and silicon. Experimental evidence is provided to support this thermodynamic prediction. Silicone carbide is the single stable solid phase in region 2. Active attack of the silicon carbide in this region occurs by the formation of gases of SiO, CO, CH4, SiH4 and SiH. Analyses of the kinetics of reaction for region 2 at 1300 C show the attack of the silicon carbide to be controlled by gas phase diffusion of H2O to the sample. Silicon carbide and silica are the stable phases common to regions 3 and 4. These two regions are characterized by the passive oxidation of silicon carbide and formation of a protective silica layer.

  17. Effects of Ammonia Plasma Treatment on the Electrical Properties of Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition Amorphous Hydrogenated Silicon Carbide Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan-Way; Chen, Chia-Fu

    2002-09-01

    Amorphous hydrogenated silicon carbide (a-SiC:H) films were deposited from a mixture of silane and methane gases using the plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process. The properties of the film, following ammonia plasma treatment, are reported. A lower silane flow rate reduces the refractive index, but increases the carbon content and the optical band gap. Increasing the carbon concentration of the a-SiC:H films reduces the dielectric constant. The films were treated with ammonia plasma for various treatment periods. The original film has a smooth surface with a roughness of 0.231 nm, but increasing the ammonia plasma treatment period gradually roughens the surface. The chemical bonding nature of the a-SiC:H films with higher silicon content was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Various nitrogen ionization species reacted with Si to promote the formation of silicon nitride. As a result, although the dielectric constant of the a-SiC:H films increased slightly, the leakage current density declined as the ammonia plasma treatment time increased.

  18. The growth of cubic silicon carbide on a compliant substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Sharanda; Soward, Ida

    1995-01-01

    Research has shown that silicon carbide grown on silicon and 6H silicon carbide has problems associated with these substrates. This is because silicon and silicon carbide has a 20% lattice mismatch and cubic silicon carbide has not been successfully achieved on 6H silicon carbide. We are investigating the growth of silicon carbide on a compliant substrate in order to grow defect free silicon carbide. This compliant substrate consists of silicon/silicon dioxide with 1200 A of single crystal silicon on the top layer. We are using this compliant substrate because there is a possibility that the silicon dioxide layer and the carbonized layer will allow the silicon lattice to shrink or expand to match the lattice of the silicon carbide. This would improve the electrical properties of the film for the use of device fabrication. When trying to grow silicon carbide, we observed amorphous film. To investigate, we examined the process step by step using RHEED. RHEED data showed that each step was amorphous. We found that just by heating the substrate in the presence of hydrogen it changed the crystal structure. When heated to 1000 C for 2 minutes, RHEED showed that there was an amorphous layer on the surface. We also heated the substrate to 900 C for 2 minutes and RHEED data showed that there was a deterioration of the single crystalline structure. We assumed that the presence of oxygen was coming from the sides of the silicon dioxide layer. Therefore, we evaporated 2500 A of silicon to all four edges of the wafer to try to enclose the oxygen. When heating the evaporated wafer to 900 C the RHEED data showed single crystalline structure however at 1000 C the RHEED data showed deterioration of the single crystalline structure. We conclude that the substrate itself is temperature dependent and that the oxygen was coming from the sides of the silicon dioxide layer. We propose to evaporate more silicon on the edges of the wafer to eliminate the escape of oxygen. this will allow

  19. Characterization of amorphous silicon carbide and silicon carbonitride thin films synthesized by polymer-source chemical vapor deposition. Mechanical structural and metal-interface properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awad, Yousef

    Amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC) and silicon carbonitride thin films have been deposited onto a variety of substrates by Polymer-Source Chemical Vapor Deposition (PS-CVD). The interfacial interaction between the a-SiC films and several substrates including silicon, SiO2, Si3N 4, Cr, Ti and refractory metal-coated silicon has been studied. The effect of thermal annealing on the structural and mechanical properties of the prepared films has been discussed in detail. The composition and bonding states are uniquely characterized with respect to the nitrogen atomic percentage introduced into the a-SiCN:H films. Capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements were systematically used to evaluate the impurity level of the deposited a-SiC films. The chemical bonding of the films was systematically examined by means of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). In addition, elastic recoil detection (ERD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) techniques were used to determine the elemental composition of the films and of their interface with substrates, while X-ray reflectivity measurements (XRR) were used to account for the film density. Spectral deconvolution was used to extract the individual components of the FTIR and XPS spectra. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were also employed to characterize the surface morphology of the films. In addition, their mechanical properties [(hardness (H) and Young's modulus (E)] were investigated by using the nanoindentation technique. The impurity levels of the a-SiC films were found to be clearly correlated with the nature of the underlying substrates. The Pt-Rh and TiN-coated Si substrates were shown to lead to the lowest impurity level (˜ 1x10 13 cm-3) in the PS-CVD grown a-SiC films, while Cr and Ti-coated Si substrates induced much higher impurity concentrations. Such high impurity levels were shown to be a consequence of a strong metallic diffusion of the metallic species (Cr or Ti). In

  20. Amorphous silicon photovoltaic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, David E.; Lin, Guang H.; Ganguly, Gautam

    2004-08-31

    This invention is a photovoltaic device comprising an intrinsic or i-layer of amorphous silicon and where the photovoltaic device is more efficient at converting light energy to electric energy at high operating temperatures than at low operating temperatures. The photovoltaic devices of this invention are suitable for use in high temperature operating environments.

  1. Investigations on silicon/amorphous-carbon and silicon/nanocrystalline palladium/ amorphous-carbon interfaces.

    PubMed

    Roy, M; Sengupta, P; Tyagi, A K; Kale, G B

    2008-08-01

    Our previous work revealed that significant enhancement in sp3-carbon content of amorphous carbon films could be achieved when grown on nanocrystalline palladium interlayer as compared to those grown on bare silicon substrates. To find out why, the nature of interface formed in both the cases has been investigated using Electron Probe Micro Analysis (EPMA) technique. It has been found that a reactive interface in the form of silicon carbide and/silicon oxy-carbide is formed at the interface of silicon/amorphous-carbon films, while palladium remains primarily in its native form at the interface of nanocrystalline palladium/amorphous-carbon films. However, there can be traces of dissolved oxygen within the metallic layer as well. The study has been corroborated further from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies. PMID:19049221

  2. Utilization of amorphous silicon carbide (a-Si:C:H) as a resistive layer in gas microstrip detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, W.S.; Cho, H.S.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Gong, W.G.

    1995-04-01

    Thin semiconducting films of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and its carbon alloy (a-Si:C:H) were applied to gas microstrip detectors in order to control gain instabilities due to charges on the substrate. Thin ({approximately}100nm) layers of a-Si:H or p-doped a-Si:C:H were placed either over or under the electrodes using the plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) technique to provide the substrate with a suitable surface conductivity. By changing the carbon content and boron doping density, the sheet resistance of the a-Si:C:H coating could be successfully controlled in the range of 10{sup 12} {approximately} 10{sup 17} {Omega}/{four_gradient}, and the light sensitivity, which causes the resistivity to vary with ambient light conditions, was minimized. An avalanche gain of 5000 and energy resolution of 20% FWHM were achieved and the gain remained constant over a week of operation. A-Si:C:H film is an attractive alternative to ion-implanted or semiconducting glass due to the wide range of resistivities possible and the feasibility of making deposits over a large area at low cost.

  3. Utilization of amorphous silicon carbide (a-Si:C:H) as a resistive layer in gas microstrip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, W. S.; Cho, H. S.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Gong, W. G.

    1995-04-01

    Thin semiconducting films of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and its carbon alloy (a-Si:C:H) were applied to gas microstrip detectors in order to control gain instabilities due to charges on the substrate. Thin (approximately 100nm) layers of a-Si:H or p-doped a-Si:C:H were placed either over or under the electrodes using the plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) technique to provide the substrate with a suitable surface conductivity. By changing the carbon content and boron doping density, the sheet resistance of the a-Si:C:H coating could be successfully controlled in the range of 10(exp 12) to approximately 10(exp 17) Omega/(four gradient), and the light sensitivity, which causes the resistivity to vary with ambient light conditions, was minimized. An avalanche gain of 5000 and energy resolution of 20% FWHM were achieved and the gain remained constant over a week of operation. A-Si:C:H film is an attractive alternative to ion-implanted or semiconducting glass due to the wide range of resistivities possible and the feasibility of making deposits over a large area at low cost.

  4. High-Q silicon carbide photonic-crystal cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jonathan Y.; Lu, Xiyuan; Lin, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate one-dimensional photonic-crystal nanobeam cavities in amorphous silicon carbide. The fundamental mode exhibits intrinsic optical quality factor as high as 7.69 × 104 with mode volume ˜ 0.60 ( λ / n ) 3 at wavelength 1.5 μm. A corresponding Purcell factor value of ˜104 is the highest reported to date in silicon carbide optical cavities. The device exhibits great potential for integrated nonlinear photonics and cavity nano-optomechanics.

  5. Silicon Carbide Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Andrew Trunek has focused on supporting the Sic team through the growth of Sic crystals, making observations and conducting research that meets the collective needs and requirements of the team while fulfilling program commitments. Cancellation of the Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) program has had a significant negative impact on resources and research goals. This report highlights advancements and achievements made with this cooperative agreement over the past year. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) continues to make advances in silicon carbide (SiC) research during the past year. Step free surfaces were used as substrates for the deposition of GaN epilayers that yielded very low dislocation densities. Defect free 3C- SiC was successfully nucleated on step free mesas and test diodes were fabricated. Web growth techniques were used to increase the usable surface area of dislocation free SiC by approximately equal to 40%. The greatest advancement has been attained on stepped surfaces of SiC. A metrology standard was developed using high temperature etching techniques titled "Nanometer Step Height Standard". This development culminated in being recognized for a 2004 R&D100 award and the process to produce the steps received a NASA Space Act award.

  6. Palladium interaction with silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentile, M.; Xiao, P.; Abram, T.

    2015-07-01

    In this work the palladium interaction with silicon carbide is investigated by means of complementary analytical techniques such as thermogravimetry (TG), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Thermoscans were carried out on pellets of palladium, α-SiC and β-SiC high purity powders in the temperature range comprised between 293 K and 1773 K, in order to study the effect of temperature on the palladium-silicon carbide reaction. Thermoscans of α-SiC pellets containing 5 at.%Pd show that during differential calorimetry scans three exothermic peaks occurred at 773 K, 1144 K and 1615 K, while thermoscans of β-SiC pellets containing 3 at.%Pd and 5 at.%Pd do not show peaks. For the pellet α-SiC-5 at.%Pd XRD spectra reveal that the first peak is associated with the formation of Pd3Si and SiO2 phases, while the second peak and the third peak are correlated with the formation of Pd2Si phase and the active oxidation of silicon carbide respectively. Thermogravimetry scans show weight gain and weight loss peaks due to the SiO2 phase formation and the active oxidation. Additionally XPS fittings reveal the development of SiCxOy phase during the first exothermic peak up to the temperature of 873 K. The experimental data reveals that alpha silicon carbide is attacked by palladium at lower temperatures than beta silicon carbide and the reaction mechanism between silicon carbide and palladium is strongly affected by silicon carbide oxidation.

  7. Porous silicon carbide (SIC) semiconductor device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shor, Joseph S. (Inventor); Kurtz, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Porous silicon carbide is fabricated according to techniques which result in a significant portion of nanocrystallites within the material in a sub 10 nanometer regime. There is described techniques for passivating porous silicon carbide which result in the fabrication of optoelectronic devices which exhibit brighter blue luminescence and exhibit improved qualities. Based on certain of the techniques described porous silicon carbide is used as a sacrificial layer for the patterning of silicon carbide. Porous silicon carbide is then removed from the bulk substrate by oxidation and other methods. The techniques described employ a two-step process which is used to pattern bulk silicon carbide where selected areas of the wafer are then made porous and then the porous layer is subsequently removed. The process to form porous silicon carbide exhibits dopant selectivity and a two-step etching procedure is implemented for silicon carbide multilayers.

  8. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1992-11-17

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification. 13 figs.

  9. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Perez-Mendez, Victor; Kaplan, Selig N.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification.

  10. Diamond-Silicon Carbide Composite And Method For Preparation Thereof

    DOEpatents

    Qian, Jiang; Zhao, Yusheng

    2005-09-06

    Fully dense, diamond-silicon carbide composites are prepared from ball-milled microcrystalline diamond/amorphous silicon powder mixture. The ball-milled powder is sintered (P=5-8 GPa, T=1400K-2300K) to form composites having high fracture toughness. A composite made at 5 GPa/1673K had a measured fracture toughness of 12 MPa.multidot.m.sup.1/2. By contrast, liquid infiltration of silicon into diamond powder at 5 GPa/1673K produces a composite with higher hardness but lower fracture toughness. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra indicate that amorphous silicon is partially transformed into nanocrystalline silicon at 5 GPa/873K, and nanocrystalline silicon carbide forms at higher temperatures.

  11. Anisotropic Tribological Properties of Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    The anisotropic friction, deformation and fracture behavior of single crystal silicon carbide surfaces were investigated in two categories. The categories were called adhesive and abrasive wear processes, respectively. In the adhesive wear process, the adhesion, friction and wear of silicon carbide were markedly dependent on crystallographic orientation. The force to reestablish the shearing fracture of adhesive bond at the interface between silicon carbide and metal was the lowest in the preferred orientation of silicon carbide slip system. The fracturing of silicon carbide occurred near the adhesive bond to metal and it was due to primary cleavages of both prismatic (10(-1)0) and basal (0001) planes.

  12. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Mendez, V.P.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1988-11-15

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. 15 figs.

  13. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Mendez, Victor P.; Kaplan, Selig N.

    1988-01-01

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation.

  14. Ultrasonic characterization of microwave joined silicon carbide/silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    House, M.B.; Day, P.S.

    1997-05-01

    High frequency (50--150 MHz), ultrasonic immersion testing has been used to characterize the surface and interfacial joint conditions of microwave bonded, monolithic silicon carbide (SiC) materials. The high resolution ultrasonic C-scan images point to damage accumulation after thermal cycling. Image processing was used to study the effects of the thermal cycling on waveform shape, amplitude and distribution. Such information is useful for concurrently engineering material fabrication processes and suitable nondestructive test procedures.

  15. Compensated amorphous silicon solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Devaud, Genevieve

    1983-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell including an electrically conductive substrate, a layer of glow discharge deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon over said substrate and having regions of differing conductivity with at least one region of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The layer of hydrogenated amorphous silicon has opposed first and second major surfaces where the first major surface contacts the electrically conductive substrate and an electrode for electrically contacting the second major surface. The intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon region is deposited in a glow discharge with an atmosphere which includes not less than about 0.02 atom percent mono-atomic boron. An improved N.I.P. solar cell is disclosed using a BF.sub.3 doped intrinsic layer.

  16. Silicon carbide semiconductor technology for high temperature and radiation environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matus, Lawrence G.

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs on silicon carbide semiconductor technology and its potential for enabling electronic devices to function in high temperature and high radiation environments are presented. Topics covered include silicon carbide; sublimation growth of 6H-SiC boules; SiC chemical vapor deposition reaction system; 6H silicon carbide p-n junction diode; silicon carbide MOSFET; and silicon carbide JFET radiation response.

  17. Silicon carbide fibers and articles including same

    DOEpatents

    Garnier, John E; Griffith, George W

    2015-01-27

    Methods of producing silicon carbide fibers. The method comprises reacting a continuous carbon fiber material and a silicon-containing gas in a reaction chamber at a temperature ranging from approximately 1500.degree. C. to approximately 2000.degree. C. A partial pressure of oxygen in the reaction chamber is maintained at less than approximately 1.01.times.10.sup.2 Pascal to produce continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers. Continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers and articles formed from the continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers are also disclosed.

  18. Methods for producing silicon carbide fibers

    DOEpatents

    Garnier, John E.; Griffith, George W.

    2016-03-01

    Methods of producing silicon carbide fibers. The method comprises reacting a continuous carbon fiber material and a silicon-containing gas in a reaction chamber at a temperature ranging from approximately 1500.degree. C. to approximately 2000.degree. C. A partial pressure of oxygen in the reaction chamber is maintained at less than approximately 1.01.times.10.sup.2 Pascal to produce continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers. Continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers and articles formed from the continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers are also disclosed.

  19. Perspective on photovoltaic amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Luft, W.; Stafford, B.; von Roedern, B.

    1992-05-01

    Amorphous silicon is a thin film option that has the potential for a cost-effective product for large-scale utility photovoltaics application. The initial efficiencies for single-junction and multijunction amorphous silicon cells and modules have increased significantly over the past 10 years. The emphasis of research and development has changed to stabilized efficiency, especially that of multijunction modules. NREL has measured 6.3%--7.2% stabilized amorphous silicon module efficiencies for US products, and 8.1% stable efficiencies have been reported by Fuji Electric. This represents a significant increase over the stabilized efficiencies of modules manufactured only a few years ago. An increasing portion of the amorphous silicon US government funding is now for manufacturing technology development to reduce cost. The funding for amorphous silicon for photovoltaics by Japan over the last 5 years has been about 50% greater than that in the United State, and by Germany in the last 2--3 years more than twice that of the US Amorphous silicon is the only thin-film technology that is selling large-area commercial modules. The cost for amorphous silicon modules is now in the $4.50 range; it is a strong function of plant production capacity and is expected to be reduced to $1.00--1.50/W{sub p} for plants with 10 MW/year capacities. 10 refs.

  20. Perspective on photovoltaic amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Luft, W.; Stafford, B.; von Roedern, B. )

    1992-12-01

    Amorphous silicon is a thin film option that has the potential for a cost-effective product for large-scale utility photovoltaics application. The initial efficiencies for single-junction and multijunction amorphous silicon cells and modules have increased significantly over the past 10 years. The emphasis of research and development has changed to stabilized efficiency, especially that of multijunction modules. NREL has measured 6.3%--7.2% stabilized amorphous silicon module efficiencies for U.S. products, and 8.1% stable efficiencies have been reported by Fuji Electric. This represents a significant increase over the stabilized efficiencies of modules manufactured only a few years ago. An increasing portion of the amorphous silicon U.S. government funding is now for manufacturing technology development to reduce cost. The funding for amorphous silicon for photovoltaics by Japan over the last 5 years has been about 50% greater than that in the United States, and by Germany in the last 2--3 years more than twice that of the U.S. Amorphous silicon is the only thin-film technology that is selling large-area commercial modules. The cost for amorphous silicon modules is now in the $4.50 range; it is a strong function of plant production capacity and is expected to be reduced to $1.00--1.50/W[sub [ital p

  1. Pulsed energy synthesis and doping of silicon carbide

    DOEpatents

    Truher, J.B.; Kaschmitter, J.L.; Thompson, J.B.; Sigmon, T.W.

    1995-06-20

    A method for producing beta silicon carbide thin films by co-depositing thin films of amorphous silicon and carbon onto a substrate is disclosed, whereafter the films are irradiated by exposure to a pulsed energy source (e.g. excimer laser) to cause formation of the beta-SiC compound. Doped beta-SiC may be produced by introducing dopant gases during irradiation. Single layers up to a thickness of 0.5-1 micron have been produced, with thicker layers being produced by multiple processing steps. Since the electron transport properties of beta silicon carbide over a wide temperature range of 27--730 C is better than these properties of alpha silicon carbide, they have wide application, such as in high temperature semiconductors, including HETEROJUNCTION-junction bipolar transistors and power devices, as well as in high bandgap solar arrays, ultra-hard coatings, light emitting diodes, sensors, etc.

  2. Pulsed energy synthesis and doping of silicon carbide

    DOEpatents

    Truher, Joel B.; Kaschmitter, James L.; Thompson, Jesse B.; Sigmon, Thomas W.

    1995-01-01

    A method for producing beta silicon carbide thin films by co-depositing thin films of amorphous silicon and carbon onto a substrate, whereafter the films are irradiated by exposure to a pulsed energy source (e.g. excimer laser) to cause formation of the beta-SiC compound. Doped beta-SiC may be produced by introducing dopant gases during irradiation. Single layers up to a thickness of 0.5-1 micron have been produced, with thicker layers being produced by multiple processing steps. Since the electron transport properties of beta silicon carbide over a wide temperature range of 27.degree.-730.degree. C. is better than these properties of alpha silicon carbide, they have wide application, such as in high temperature semiconductors, including hetero-junction bipolar transistors and power devices, as well as in high bandgap solar arrays, ultra-hard coatings, light emitting diodes, sensors, etc.

  3. Method for producing silicon nitride/silicon carbide composite

    DOEpatents

    Dunmead, Stephen D.; Weimer, Alan W.; Carroll, Daniel F.; Eisman, Glenn A.; Cochran, Gene A.; Susnitzky, David W.; Beaman, Donald R.; Nilsen, Kevin J.

    1996-07-23

    Silicon carbide/silicon nitride composites are prepared by carbothermal reduction of crystalline silica powder, carbon powder and optionally crsytalline silicon nitride powder. The crystalline silicon carbide portion of the composite has a mean number diameter less than about 700 nanometers and contains nitrogen.

  4. Process for producing amorphous and crystalline silicon nitride

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, P.E.D.; Pugar, E.A.

    1985-11-12

    A process for producing amorphous or crystalline silicon nitride is disclosed which comprises reacting silicon disulfide ammonia gas at elevated temperature. In a preferred embodiment silicon disulfide in the form of whiskers'' or needles is heated at temperature ranging from about 900 C to about 1,200 C to produce silicon nitride which retains the whisker or needle morphological characteristics of the silicon disulfide. Silicon carbide, e.g. in the form of whiskers, also can be prepared by reacting substituted ammonia, e.g. methylamine, or a hydrocarbon containing active hydrogen-containing groups, such as ethylene, with silicon disulfide, at elevated temperature, e.g. 900 C. 6 figs.

  5. Process for producing amorphous and crystalline silicon nitride

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, Peter E. D.; Pugar, Eloise A.

    1985-01-01

    A process for producing amorphous or crystalline silicon nitride is disclosed which comprises reacting silicon disulfide ammonia gas at elevated temperature. In a preferred embodiment silicon disulfide in the form of "whiskers" or needles is heated at temperature ranging from about 900.degree. C. to about 1200.degree. C. to produce silicon nitride which retains the whisker or needle morphological characteristics of the silicon disulfide. Silicon carbide, e.g. in the form of whiskers, also can be prepared by reacting substituted ammonia, e.g. methylamine, or a hydrocarbon containing active hydrogen-containing groups, such as ethylene, with silicon disulfide, at elevated temperature, e.g. 900.degree. C.

  6. Polytype distribution in circumstellar silicon carbide.

    SciTech Connect

    Daulton, T. L.; Bernatowicz, T. J.; Lewis, R. S.; Messenger, S.; Stadermann, F. J.; Amari, S.; Materials Science Division; Naval Research Lab.; Washington Univ.; Univ. of Chicago

    2002-06-07

    The inferred crystallographic class of circumstellar silicon carbide based on astronomical infrared spectra is controversial. We have directly determined the polytype distribution of circumstellar SiC from transmission electron microscopy of presolar silicon carbide from the Murchison carbonaceous meteorite. Only two polytypes (of a possible several hundred) were observed: cubic 3C and hexagonal 2H silicon carbide and their intergrowths. We conclude that this structural simplicity is a direct consequence of the low pressures in circumstellar outflows and the corresponding low silicon carbide condensation temperatures.

  7. Polytype distribution in circumstellar silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Daulton, T L; Bernatowicz, T J; Lewis, R S; Messenger, S; Stadermann, F J; Amari, S

    2002-06-01

    The inferred crystallographic class of circumstellar silicon carbide based on astronomical infrared spectra is controversial. We have directly determined the polytype distribution of circumstellar SiC from transmission electron microscopy of presolar silicon carbide from the Murchison carbonaceous meteorite. Only two polytypes (of a possible several hundred) were observed: cubic 3C and hexagonal 2H silicon carbide and their intergrowths. We conclude that this structural simplicity is a direct consequence of the low pressures in circumstellar outflows and the corresponding low silicon carbide condensation temperatures. PMID:12052956

  8. High-Q silicon carbide photonic-crystal cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jonathan Y.; Lu, Xiyuan; Lin, Qiang

    2015-01-26

    We demonstrate one-dimensional photonic-crystal nanobeam cavities in amorphous silicon carbide. The fundamental mode exhibits intrinsic optical quality factor as high as 7.69 × 10{sup 4} with mode volume ∼0.60(λ/n){sup 3} at wavelength 1.5 μm. A corresponding Purcell factor value of ∼10{sup 4} is the highest reported to date in silicon carbide optical cavities. The device exhibits great potential for integrated nonlinear photonics and cavity nano-optomechanics.

  9. Silicon Carbide Nanotube Synthesized

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lienhard, Michael A.; Larkin, David J.

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have generated a great deal of scientific and commercial interest because of the countless envisioned applications that stem from their extraordinary materials properties. Included among these properties are high mechanical strength (tensile and modulus), high thermal conductivity, and electrical properties that make different forms of single-walled CNTs either conducting or semiconducting, and therefore, suitable for making ultraminiature, high-performance CNT-based electronics, sensors, and actuators. Among the limitations for CNTs is their inability to survive in high-temperature, harsh-environment applications. Silicon carbon nanotubes (SiCNTs) are being developed for their superior material properties under such conditions. For example, SiC is stable in regards to oxidation in air to temperatures exceeding 1000 C, whereas carbon-based materials are limited to 600 C. The high-temperature stability of SiCNTs is envisioned to enable high-temperature, harsh-environment nanofiber- and nanotube-reinforced ceramics. In addition, single-crystal SiC-based semiconductors are being developed for hightemperature, high-power electronics, and by analogy to CNTs with silicon semiconductors, SiCNTs with single-crystal SiC-based semiconductors may allow high-temperature harsh-environment nanoelectronics, nanosensors, and nanoactuators to be realized. Another challenge in CNT development is the difficulty of chemically modifying the tube walls, which are composed of chemically stable graphene sheets. The chemical substitution of the CNTs walls will be necessary for nanotube self-assembly and biological- and chemical-sensing applications. SiCNTs are expected to have a different multiple-bilayer wall structure, allowing the surface Si atoms to be functionalized readily with molecules that will allow SiCNTs to undergo self-assembly and be compatible with a variety of materials (for biotechnology applications and high-performance fiber-reinforced ceramics).

  10. Process for making silicon carbide reinforced silicon carbide composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, Sai-Kwing (Inventor); Calandra, Salavatore J. (Inventor); Ohnsorg, Roger W. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A process comprising the steps of: a) providing a fiber preform comprising a non-oxide ceramic fiber with at least one coating, the coating comprising a coating element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, aluminum and titanium, and the fiber having a degradation temperature of between 1400.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C., b) impregnating the preform with a slurry comprising silicon carbide particles and between 0.1 wt % and 3 wt % added carbon c) providing a cover mix comprising: i) an alloy comprising a metallic infiltrant and the coating element, and ii) a resin, d) placing the cover mix on at least a portion of the surface of the porous silicon carbide body, e) heating the cover mix to a temperature between 1410.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C. to melt the alloy, and f) infiltrating the fiber preform with the melted alloy for a time period of between 15 minutes and 240 minutes, to produce a ceramic fiber reinforced ceramic composite.

  11. Silicon carbide nanowires synthesized with phenolic resin and silicon powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hongsheng; Shi, Limin; Li, Ziqiang; Tang, Chunhe

    2009-02-01

    Large-scale silicon carbide nanowires with the lengths up to several millimeters were synthesized by a coat-mix, moulding, carbonization, and high-temperature sintering process, using silicon powder and phenolic resin as the starting materials. Ordinary SiC nanowires, bamboo-like SiC nanowires, and spindle SiC nanochains are found in the fabricated samples. The ordinary SiC nanowire is a single-crystal SiC phase with a fringe spacing of 0.252 nm along the [1 1 1] growth direction. Both of the bamboo-like SiC nanowires and spindle SiC nanochains exhibit uniform periodic structures. The bamboo-like SiC nanowires consist of amorphous stem and single-crystal knots, while the spindle SiC nanochains consist of uniform spindles which grow uniformly on the entire nanowires.

  12. A study of silicon carbide synthesis from waste serpentine.

    PubMed

    Cheng, T W; Hsu, C W

    2006-06-01

    There are 60000 tons of serpentine wastes produced in year 2004 in Taiwan. This is due to the well-developed joints in the serpentine ore body as well as the stringent requirements of the particle size and chemical composition of serpentine by iron making company. The waste also creates considerable environmental problems. The purpose of this study is reutilization of waste serpentine to produce a high value silica powder after acid leaching. These siliceous microstructure products obtained from serpentine would be responsible for high reactivity and characteristic molecular sieving effect. In this study, the amorphous silica powder was then synthesized to silicon carbide with the C/SiO(2) molar ratio of 3. The experiment results show that silicon carbide can be synthesized in 1550 degrees C. The formed silicon carbide was whisker beta type SiC which can be used as raw materials for industry. PMID:16405956

  13. Damage kinetics in silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickup, I. M.; Barker, A. K.

    1998-07-01

    Three silicon carbides of similar density and grain size but manufactured via different routes (reaction bonded, pressureless sintered and pressure assisted densification) have been investigated. High speed photography in conjunction with Hopkinson pressure bar compression tests has revealed that not only does the manufacturing route confer a significant difference in failure kinetics but also modifies the phenomenology of failure. Plate impact experiments using lateral and longitudinal manganin stress gauges have been used to study shear strength behaviour of damaged material. Failure waves have been observed in all three materials and characteristically different damaged material shear strength relationships with pressure have been observed.

  14. Preparation of silicon carbide fibers

    DOEpatents

    Wei, G.C.

    1983-10-12

    Silicon carbide fibers suitable for use in the fabrication of dense, high-strength, high-toughness SiC composites or as thermal insulating materials in oxidizing environments are fabricated by a new, simplified method wherein a mixture of short-length rayon fibers and colloidal silica is homogenized in a water slurry. Water is removed from the mixture by drying in air at 120/sup 0/C and the fibers are carbonized by (pyrolysis) heating the mixture to 800 to 1000/sup 0/C in argon. The mixture is subsequently reacted at 1550 to 1900/sup 0/C in argon to yield pure ..beta..-SiC fibers.

  15. Nitride-bonded silicon carbide composite filter

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, B.N.; DiPietro, S.G.

    1995-12-01

    The objective of this program is to develop and demonstrate an advanced hot gas filter, using ceramic component technology, with enhanced durability to provide increased resistance to thermal fatigue and crack propagation. The material is silicon carbide fiber reinforced nitride bonded silicon carbide.

  16. Material properties of silicon and silicon carbide foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacoby, Marc T.; Goodman, William A.

    2005-08-01

    Silicon and silicon carbide foams provide the lightweighting element for Schafer Corporation's silicon and silicon carbide lightweight mirror systems (SLMSTM and SiC-SLMSTM). SLMSTM and SiC-SLMSTM provide the enabling technology for manufacturing lightweight, athermal optical sub-assemblies and instruments. Silicon and silicon carbide foam samples were manufactured and tested under a Schafer-funded Internal Research and Development program in various configurations to obtain mechanical and thermal property data. The results of the mechanical tests that are reported in this paper include Young's modulus, compression strength, tensile strength, Poisson's ratio and vibrational damping. The results of the thermal tests include thermal conductivity and coefficient of thermal expansion.

  17. Colloidal characterization of ultrafine silicon carbide and silicon nitride powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitman, Pamela K.; Feke, Donald L.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of various powder treatment strategies on the colloid chemistry of aqueous dispersions of silicon carbide and silicon nitride are examined using a surface titration methodology. Pretreatments are used to differentiate between the true surface chemistry of the powders and artifacts resulting from exposure history. Silicon nitride powders require more extensive pretreatment to reveal consistent surface chemistry than do silicon carbide powders. As measured by titration, the degree of proton adsorption from the suspending fluid by pretreated silicon nitride and silicon carbide powders can both be made similar to that of silica.

  18. Plasma Deposition of Amorphous Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calcote, H. F.

    1982-01-01

    Strongly adhering films of silicon are deposited directly on such materials as Pyrex and Vycor (or equivalent materials) and aluminum by a non-equilibrium plasma jet. Amorphous silicon films are formed by decomposition of silicon tetrachloride or trichlorosilane in the plasma. Plasma-jet technique can also be used to deposit an adherent silicon film on aluminum from silane and to dope such films with phosphorus. Ability to deposit silicon films on such readily available, inexpensive substrates could eventually lead to lower cost photovoltaic cells.

  19. Homogeneous nanocrystalline cubic silicon carbide films prepared by inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qijin; Xu, S; Long, Jidong; Huang, Shiyong; Guo, Jun

    2007-11-21

    Silicon carbide films with different carbon concentrations x(C) have been synthesized by inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition from a SiH(4)/CH(4)/H(2) gas mixture at a low substrate temperature of 500 °C. The characteristics of the films were studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. Our experimental results show that, at x(C) = 49 at.%, the film is made up of homogeneous nanocrystalline cubic silicon carbide without any phase of silicon, graphite, or diamond crystallites/clusters. The average size of SiC crystallites is approximately 6 nm. At a lower value of x(C), polycrystalline silicon and amorphous silicon carbide coexist in the films. At a higher value of x(C), amorphous carbon and silicon carbide coexist in the films. PMID:21730481

  20. Fabrication and characterization of silicon quantum dots in Si-rich silicon carbide films.

    PubMed

    Chang, Geng-Rong; Ma, Fei; Ma, Dayan; Xu, Kewei

    2011-12-01

    Amorphous Si-rich silicon carbide films were prepared by magnetron co-sputtering and subsequently annealed at 900-1100 degrees C. After annealing at 1100 degrees C, this configuration of silicon quantum dots embedded in amorphous silicon carbide formed. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to study the chemical modulation of the films. The formation and orientation of silicon quantum dots were characterized by glancing angle X-ray diffraction, which shows that the ratio of silicon and carbon significantly influences the species of quantum dots. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy investigations directly demonstrated that the formation of silicon quantum dots is heavily dependent on the annealing temperatures and the ratio of silicon and carbide. Only the temperature of about 1100 degrees C is enough for the formation of high-density and small-size silicon quantum dots due to phase separation and thermal crystallization. Deconvolution of the first order Raman spectra shows the existence of a lower frequency peak in the range 500-505 cm(-1) corresponding to silicon quantum dots with different atom ratio of silicon and carbon. PMID:22409005

  1. Anisotropic tribological properties of silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of crystallographic orientation on the tribological properties of single-crystal silicon carbide surfaces in contact with various solids are investigated for adhesive and abrasive wear processes. In the adhesive wear process, the adhesion and wear of silicon carbide is found to be markedly dependent on crystallographic orientation. The force resisting shearing fracture of the adhesive bonds at the interface is lower in preferred crystallographic direction of slip. In the abrasive wear process, the 1 0 -1 0 direction on the basal plane of silicon carbide exhibits the lowest coefficient of friction and the greatest resistance to abrasion.

  2. Converted silicon carbide technology developments for optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duston, Christopher; Woestman, Ken; Vargas, Hugo; deBlonk, Brett

    2007-09-01

    Silicon carbide structures fabricated by converting near-net-shape graphite preforms via Chemical Vapor Conversion (CVC) phase reaction have long provided improved performance components for electronics processing. In recent years, this same technology has been applied to the fabrication of simple and lightweighted mirrors and is moving into optical bench applications. To support the expanded applications, Poco has further evaluated the material properties of SUPERSiC® silicon carbide, developed technologies to mount silicon carbide mirrors on benches of similar and dissimilar materials, and fabricated complex monolithic geometries using in situ conversion bonding of mating graphite components. Overviews of each of these areas will be presented.

  3. Manufacture of silicon carbide using solar energy

    DOEpatents

    Glatzmaier, Gregory C.

    1992-01-01

    A method is described for producing silicon carbide particles using solar energy. The method is efficient and avoids the need for use of electrical energy to heat the reactants. Finely divided silica and carbon are admixed and placed in a solar-heated reaction chamber for a time sufficient to cause a reaction between the ingredients to form silicon carbide of very small particle size. No grinding of silicon carbide is required to obtain small particles. The method may be carried out as a batch process or as a continuous process.

  4. Improved consolidation of silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, M. R.; Millard, M. L.

    1986-01-01

    Alpha silicon carbide powder was consolidated by both dry and wet methods. Dry pressing in a double acting steel die yielded sintered test bars with an average flexural strength of 235.6 MPa with a critical flaw size of approximately 100 micro m. An aqueous slurry pressing technique produced sintered test bars with an average flexural strength of 440.8 MPa with a critical flaw size of approximately 25 micro m. Image analysis revealed a reduction in both pore area and pore size distribution in the slurry pressed sintered test bars. The improvements in the slurry pressed material properties are discussed in terms of reduced agglomeration and improved particle packing during consolidation.

  5. In situ-grown hexagonal silicon nanocrystals in silicon carbide-based films

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Silicon nanocrystals (Si-NCs) were grown in situ in carbide-based film using a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition method. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy indicates that these nanocrystallites were embedded in an amorphous silicon carbide-based matrix. Electron diffraction pattern analyses revealed that the crystallites have a hexagonal-wurtzite silicon phase structure. The peak position of the photoluminescence can be controlled within a wavelength of 500 to 650 nm by adjusting the flow rate of the silane gas. We suggest that this phenomenon is attributed to the quantum confinement effect of hexagonal Si-NCs in silicon carbide-based film with a change in the sizes and emission states of the NCs. PMID:23171576

  6. In situ-grown hexagonal silicon nanocrystals in silicon carbide-based films.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Youb; Huh, Chul; Park, Nae-Man; Choi, Cheol-Jong; Suemitsu, Maki

    2012-01-01

    Silicon nanocrystals (Si-NCs) were grown in situ in carbide-based film using a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition method. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy indicates that these nanocrystallites were embedded in an amorphous silicon carbide-based matrix. Electron diffraction pattern analyses revealed that the crystallites have a hexagonal-wurtzite silicon phase structure. The peak position of the photoluminescence can be controlled within a wavelength of 500 to 650 nm by adjusting the flow rate of the silane gas. We suggest that this phenomenon is attributed to the quantum confinement effect of hexagonal Si-NCs in silicon carbide-based film with a change in the sizes and emission states of the NCs. PMID:23171576

  7. Synthesis of silicon carbide at room temperature from colloidal suspensions of silicon dioxide and carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukalin, D. A.; Tuchin, A. V.; Kulikova, T. V.; Bityutskaya, L. A.

    2015-11-01

    Experimental and theoretical approaches were used for the investigation of mechanisms and conditions of self-organized nanostructures formation in the drying drop of the mixture of colloidal suspensions of nanoscale amorphous silicon dioxide and carbon nanotubes. The formation of rodlike structures with diameter 250-300nm and length ∼4pm was revealed. The diffraction analysis of the obtained nanostructures showed the formation of the silicon carbide phase at room temperature.

  8. Tandem junction amorphous silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Hanak, Joseph J.

    1981-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell has an active body with two or a series of layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon arranged in a tandem stacked configuration with one optical path and electrically interconnected by a tunnel junction. The layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon arranged in tandem configuration can have the same bandgap or differing bandgaps.

  9. Silicon carbide material sintered bodies manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, K.; Shinohara, N.

    1984-01-01

    A method is described for producing a high density silicon carbide sintering substance which contains aluminum oxide. The sintering is done in CO gas atmosphere, which is kept at 2 to 20 atmospheric pressures.

  10. Silicon Carbide Transistor For Detecting Hydrocarbon Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, Virgil B.; Ryan, Margaret A.; Williams, Roger M.

    1996-01-01

    Proposed silicon carbide variable-potential insulated-gate field-effect transistor specially designed for use in measuring concentrations of hydrocarbon gases. Devices like this prove useful numerous automotive, industrial, aeronautical, and environmental monitoring applications.

  11. Production and characterization of nanostructured silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallis, Kendra Lee

    Nanostructured materials continue to attract attention because of their new and interesting properties, which are very different from their macrostructured equivalents. Since the size of grain and surface differs, a better understanding of the microstructure, the mechanism of formation, and methods of controlling surface properties is necessary. In this study, nanostructured silicon carbide has been produced from the solid-solid reaction of a mixture of silicon nanopowder and carbon multiwalled nanotubes (MWNT) sintered by induction. A study of the reaction rate at different temperatures has yielded a value for the activation energy of 254 +/- 36 kJ/mol, and has led to the conclusion that the reaction is diffusion-controlled. A second method produced pure silicon carbide nanowires using a procedure which kept the solid reactants, silicon powder and MWNT, separated while sintering at a constant temperature of 1200°C. Silicon in the vapor-phase reacted at the surface of the MWNTs followed by diffusion of both precursors through the product phase boundary. The reaction time was varied, and a morphological study has been done describing changes in shape and size as a function of time. The initial reaction produced a layer of SiC providing the outer shell of coaxial structures with carbon nanotubes inside. As Si and C diffused through the product phase to react at the interface, the tube became filled with SiC to form solid SiC nanowires, and the outer diameter of the nanowires grew continuously as reaction time increased. After long sintering times, growth continued in two dimensions, fusing nanowires together into planar structures. In addition, the precursor form of carbon was varied, and nanowires produced by two different types of nanotubes have been studied. The produced SiC nanowires show cubic crystal structure. After a few hours of sintering, stacking faults began to occur inside the wires, and the frequency of occurrence of the stacking faults increased as

  12. Whatever happened to silicon carbide. [semiconductor devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, R. B.

    1981-01-01

    The progress made in silicon carbide semiconductor devices in the 1955 to 1975 time frame is examined and reasons are given for the present lack of interest in the material. Its physical and chemical properties and methods of preparation are discussed. Fabrication techniques and the characteristics of silicon carbide devices are reviewed. It is concluded that a combination of economic factors and the lack of progress in fabrication techniques leaves no viable market for SiC devices in the near future.

  13. Synthesis and Photoluminescence Property of Silicon Carbide Nanowires Via Carbothermic Reduction of Silica

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Silicon carbide nanowires have been synthesized at 1400 °C by carbothermic reduction of silica with bamboo carbon under normal atmosphere pressure without metallic catalyst. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the silicon carbide nanowires. The results show that the silicon carbide nanowires have a core–shell structure and grow along <111> direction. The diameter of silicon carbide nanowires is about 50–200 nm and the length from tens to hundreds of micrometers. The vapor–solid mechanism is proposed to elucidate the growth process. The photoluminescence of the synthesized silicon carbide nanowires shows significant blueshifts, which is resulted from the existence of oxygen defects in amorphous layer and the special rough core–shell interface. PMID:20651911

  14. Synthesis and Photoluminescence Property of Silicon Carbide Nanowires Via Carbothermic Reduction of Silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xiaogang; Ma, Wenhui; Zhou, Yang; Liu, Dachun; Yang, Bin; Dai, Yongnian

    2010-01-01

    Silicon carbide nanowires have been synthesized at 1400 °C by carbothermic reduction of silica with bamboo carbon under normal atmosphere pressure without metallic catalyst. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the silicon carbide nanowires. The results show that the silicon carbide nanowires have a core-shell structure and grow along <111> direction. The diameter of silicon carbide nanowires is about 50-200 nm and the length from tens to hundreds of micrometers. The vapor-solid mechanism is proposed to elucidate the growth process. The photoluminescence of the synthesized silicon carbide nanowires shows significant blueshifts, which is resulted from the existence of oxygen defects in amorphous layer and the special rough core-shell interface.

  15. Synthesis and Photoluminescence Property of Silicon Carbide Nanowires Via Carbothermic Reduction of Silica.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaogang; Ma, Wenhui; Zhou, Yang; Liu, Dachun; Yang, Bin; Dai, Yongnian

    2009-01-01

    Silicon carbide nanowires have been synthesized at 1400 degrees C by carbothermic reduction of silica with bamboo carbon under normal atmosphere pressure without metallic catalyst. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the silicon carbide nanowires. The results show that the silicon carbide nanowires have a core-shell structure and grow along <111> direction. The diameter of silicon carbide nanowires is about 50-200 nm and the length from tens to hundreds of micrometers. The vapor-solid mechanism is proposed to elucidate the growth process. The photoluminescence of the synthesized silicon carbide nanowires shows significant blueshifts, which is resulted from the existence of oxygen defects in amorphous layer and the special rough core-shell interface. PMID:20651911

  16. Subsurface damage of single crystalline silicon carbide in nanoindentation tests.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jiwang; Gai, Xiaohui; Harada, Hirofumi

    2010-11-01

    The response of single crystalline silicon carbide (SiC) to a Berkovich nanoindenter was investigated by examining the indents using a transmission electron microscope and the selected area electron diffraction technique. It was found that the depth of indentation-induced subsurface damage was far larger than the indentation depth, and the damaging mechanism of SiC was distinctly different from that of single crystalline silicon. For silicon, a broad amorphous region is formed underneath the indenter after unloading; for SiC, however, no amorphous phase was detected. Instead, a polycrystalline structure with a grain size of ten nanometer level was identified directly under the indenter tip. Micro cracks, basal plane dislocations and possible cross slips were also found around the indent. These finding provide useful information for ultraprecision manufacturing of SiC wafers. PMID:21138038

  17. Silicon Carbide Solar Cells Investigated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.

    2001-01-01

    The semiconductor silicon carbide (SiC) has long been known for its outstanding resistance to harsh environments (e.g., thermal stability, radiation resistance, and dielectric strength). However, the ability to produce device-quality material is severely limited by the inherent crystalline defects associated with this material and their associated electronic effects. Much progress has been made recently in the understanding and control of these defects and in the improved processing of this material. Because of this work, it may be possible to produce SiC-based solar cells for environments with high temperatures, light intensities, and radiation, such as those experienced by solar probes. Electronics and sensors based on SiC can operate in hostile environments where conventional silicon-based electronics (limited to 350 C) cannot function. Development of this material will enable large performance enhancements and size reductions for a wide variety of systems--such as high-frequency devices, high-power devices, microwave switching devices, and high-temperature electronics. These applications would supply more energy-efficient public electric power distribution and electric vehicles, more powerful microwave electronics for radar and communications, and better sensors and controls for cleaner-burning, more fuel-efficient jet aircraft and automobile engines. The 6H-SiC polytype is a promising wide-bandgap (Eg = 3.0 eV) semiconductor for photovoltaic applications in harsh solar environments that involve high-temperature and high-radiation conditions. The advantages of this material for this application lie in its extremely large breakdown field strength, high thermal conductivity, good electron saturation drift velocity, and stable electrical performance at temperatures as high as 600 C. This behavior makes it an attractive photovoltaic solar cell material for devices that can operate within three solar radii of the Sun.

  18. Process to produce silicon carbide fibers using a controlled concentration of boron oxide vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnard, Thomas Duncan (Inventor); Lipowitz, Jonathan (Inventor); Nguyen, Kimmai Thi (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A process for producing polycrystalline silicon carbide by heating an amorphous ceramic fiber that contains silicon and carbon in an environment containing boron oxide vapor. The boron oxide vapor is produced in situ by the reaction of a boron containing material such as boron carbide and an oxidizing agent such as carbon dioxide, and the amount of boron oxide vapor can be controlled by varying the amount and rate of addition of the oxidizing agent.

  19. Process to produce silicon carbide fibers using a controlled concentration of boron oxide vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnard, Thomas Duncan (Inventor); Lipowitz, Jonathan (Inventor); Nguyen, Kimmai Thi (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A process for producing polycrystalline silicon carbide includes heating an amorphous ceramic fiber that contains silicon and carbon in an environment containing boron oxide vapor. The boron oxide vapor is produced in situ by the reaction of a boron containing material such as boron carbide and an oxidizing agent such as carbon dioxide, and the amount of boron oxide vapor can be controlled by varying the amount and rate of addition of the oxidizing agent.

  20. Direct plasmadynamic synthesis of ultradisperse silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivkov, A. A.; Nikitin, D. S.; Pak, A. Ya.; Rakhmatullin, I. A.

    2013-01-01

    Ultradisperse cubic silicon carbide (β-SiC) has been obtained by direct plasmadynamic synthesis in pulsed supersonic carbon-silicon plasma jet incident on a copper obstacle in argon atmosphere. The powdered product has a high content of β-SiC in the form of single crystals with average size of about 100 nm and nearly perfect crystallographic habit.

  1. Exoelectron analysis of amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekhtyar, Yu. D.; Vinyarskaya, Yu. A.

    1994-04-01

    The method based on registration of photothermostimulated exoelectron emission (PTSE) is used in the proposed new field of investigating the structural defects in amorphous silicon (a-Si). This method can be achieved if the sample under investigation is simultaneously heated and illuminated by ultraviolet light. The mechanism of PTSE from a-Si has been studied in the case of a hydrogenized amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) film grown by glow discharge method. The electronic properties and annealing of defects were analyzed in the study. It has been shown from the results that the PTSE from a-Si:H takes place as a prethreshold single-photon external photoeffect. The exoemission spectroscopy of a-Si:H was shown to be capable in the study of thermally and optically stimulated changes in the electronic structure of defects, their annealing, as well as diffusion of atomic particles, such as hydrogen.

  2. Initial results and long-term clinical follow-up of an amorphous hydrogenated silicon-carbide-coated stent in daily practice.

    PubMed

    Hanekamp, Clara EE; Bonnier, Hans JRM; Michels, Rolf H; Peels, Kathinka H; Heijmen, Eric PCM; Hagen Ev, Eduard van; Koolen, Jacques J

    1998-01-01

    The hemocompatibility and biocompatibility of a stent are determined by the physical and electrochemical properties of the stent surface. The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility, safety and efficacy of implantation of a stent coated with silicon carbide. Baseline characteristics were collected prospectively. The occurrence of cardiac adverse events and the angina score were assessed at clinical follow-up. A total of 193 Tensum stents were implanted in 174 patients. In hospital, one patient experienced stent thrombosis and in 6% of the patients a creatinine kinase elevation to 240 U/l or more occurred. Long-term follow-up was performed in 172 patients, with a mean follow-up of 454 +/- 181 days. Ninety-seven per cent were still alive, 15% had undergone target-vessel revascularization, and 2% had angiographic restenosis and were treated with medication only. Seventy-one per cent of the patients were free of anginal complaints, and 20% had anginal complaints in Canadian Cardiac Society class I or II. The Tensum coronary stent showed to be a safe and efficacious device in this study, with a high primary success rate and favorable long-term clinical followup. PMID:12623396

  3. Narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Madan, A.; Mahan, A.H.

    1985-01-10

    Disclosed is a narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductor comprising an alloy of amorphous silicon and a band gap narrowing element selected from the group consisting of Sn, Ge, and Pb, with an electron donor dopant selected from the group consisting of P, As, Sb, Bi and N. The process for producing the narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductor comprises the steps of forming an alloy comprising amorphous silicon and at least one of the aforesaid band gap narrowing elements in amount sufficient to narrow the band gap of the silicon semiconductor alloy below that of amorphous silicon, and also utilizing sufficient amounts of the aforesaid electron donor dopant to maintain the amorphous silicon alloy as an n-type semiconductor.

  4. Silicon carbide sintered body manufactured from silicon carbide powder containing boron, silicon and carbonaceous additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanaka, Hidehiko

    1987-01-01

    A silicon carbide powder of a 5-micron grain size is mixed with 0.15 to 0.60 wt% mixture of a boron compound, i.e., boric acid, boron carbide (B4C), silicon boride (SiB4 or SiB6), aluminum boride, etc., and an aluminum compound, i.e., aluminum, aluminum oxide, aluminum hydroxide, aluminum carbide, etc., or aluminum boride (AlB2) alone, in such a proportion that the boron/aluminum atomic ratio in the sintered body becomes 0.05 to 0.25 wt% and 0.05 to 0.40 wt%, respectively, together with a carbonaceous additive to supply enough carbon to convert oxygen accompanying raw materials and additives into carbon monoxide.

  5. Method of fabricating porous silicon carbide (SiC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shor, Joseph S. (Inventor); Kurtz, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Porous silicon carbide is fabricated according to techniques which result in a significant portion of nanocrystallites within the material in a sub 10 nanometer regime. There is described techniques for passivating porous silicon carbide which result in the fabrication of optoelectronic devices which exhibit brighter blue luminescence and exhibit improved qualities. Based on certain of the techniques described porous silicon carbide is used as a sacrificial layer for the patterning of silicon carbide. Porous silicon carbide is then removed from the bulk substrate by oxidation and other methods. The techniques described employ a two-step process which is used to pattern bulk silicon carbide where selected areas of the wafer are then made porous and then the porous layer is subsequently removed. The process to form porous silicon carbide exhibits dopant selectivity and a two-step etching procedure is implemented for silicon carbide multilayers.

  6. Amorphous-silicon cell reliability testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathrop, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    The work on reliability testing of solar cells is discussed. Results are given on initial temperature and humidity tests of amorphous silicon devices. Calibration and measurement procedures for amorphous and crystalline cells are given. Temperature stress levels are diagrammed.

  7. Joining of silicon carbide composites for fusion energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewinsohn, C. A.; Singh, M.; Shibayama, T.; Hinoki, T.; Ando, M.; Katoh, Y.; Kohyama, A.

    2000-12-01

    Joining of silicon carbide based materials has been recognized as one of the enabling technologies for the successful utilization of ceramic components in fusion energy systems. Sintered silicon carbide (Hexoloy SA) and silicon carbide (Hi-Nicalon™) fiber reinforced silicon carbide matrix composites have been joined using reaction forming/bonding based joining technologies. The room- and high-temperature mechanical properties and fractography of ceramic joints have been reported.

  8. Deposition method for producing silicon carbide high-temperature semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, George C.; Rohatgi, Naresh K.

    1987-01-01

    An improved deposition method for producing silicon carbide high-temperature semiconductor material comprising placing a semiconductor substrate composed of silicon carbide in a fluidized bed silicon carbide deposition reactor, fluidizing the bed particles by hydrogen gas in a mildly bubbling mode through a gas distributor and heating the substrate at temperatures around 1200.degree.-1500.degree. C. thereby depositing a layer of silicon carbide on the semiconductor substrate.

  9. Continuous method of producing silicon carbide fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnard, Thomas Duncan (Inventor); Nguyen, Kimmai Thi (Inventor); Rabe, James Alan (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    This invention pertains to a method for production of polycrystalline ceramic fibers from silicon oxycarbide (SiCO) ceramic fibers wherein the method comprises heating an amorphous ceramic fiber containing silicon and carbon in an inert environment comprising a boron oxide and carbon monoxide at a temperature sufficient to convert the amorphous ceramic fiber to a polycrystalline ceramic fiber. By having carbon monoxide present during the heating of the ceramic fiber, it is possible to achieve higher production rates on a continuous process.

  10. Joining of porous silicon carbide bodies

    DOEpatents

    Bates, Carl H.; Couhig, John T.; Pelletier, Paul J.

    1990-05-01

    A method of joining two porous bodies of silicon carbide is disclosed. It entails utilizing an aqueous slip of a similar silicon carbide as was used to form the porous bodies, including the sintering aids, and a binder to initially join the porous bodies together. Then the composite structure is subjected to cold isostatic pressing to form a joint having good handling strength. Then the composite structure is subjected to pressureless sintering to form the final strong bond. Optionally, after the sintering the structure is subjected to hot isostatic pressing to further improve the joint and densify the structure. The result is a composite structure in which the joint is almost indistinguishable from the silicon carbide pieces which it joins.

  11. Varying potential silicon carbide gas sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, Virgil B. (Inventor); Ryan, Margaret A. (Inventor); Williams, Roger M. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A hydrocarbon gas detection device operates by dissociating or electro-chemically oxidizing hydrocarbons adsorbed to a silicon carbide detection layer. Dissociation or oxidation are driven by a varying potential applied to the detection layer. Different hydrocarbon species undergo reaction at different applied potentials so that the device is able to discriminate among various hydrocarbon species. The device can operate at temperatures between 100.degree. C. and at least 650.degree. C., allowing hydrocarbon detection in hot exhaust gases. The dissociation reaction is detected either as a change in a capacitor or, preferably, as a change of current flow through an FET which incorporates the silicon carbide detection layers. The silicon carbide detection layer can be augmented with a pad of catalytic material which provides a signal without an applied potential. Comparisons between the catalytically produced signal and the varying potential produced signal may further help identify the hydrocarbon present.

  12. Silicon carbide, an emerging high temperature semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matus, Lawrence G.; Powell, J. Anthony

    In recent years, the aerospace propulsion and space power communities have expressed a growing need for electronic devices that are capable of sustained high temperature operation. Applications for high temperature electronic devices include development instrumentation within engines, engine control, and condition monitoring systems, and power conditioning and control systems for space platforms and satellites. Other earth-based applications include deep-well drilling instrumentation, nuclear reactor instrumentation and control, and automotive sensors. To meet the needs of these applications, the High Temperature Electronics Program at the Lewis Research Center is developing silicon carbide (SiC) as a high temperature semiconductor material. Research is focussed on developing the crystal growth, characterization, and device fabrication technologies necessary to produce a family of silicon carbide electronic devices and integrated sensors. The progress made in developing silicon carbide is presented, and the challenges that lie ahead are discussed.

  13. Silicon carbide, an emerging high temperature semiconductor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matus, Lawrence G.; Powell, J. Anthony

    1991-01-01

    In recent years, the aerospace propulsion and space power communities have expressed a growing need for electronic devices that are capable of sustained high temperature operation. Applications for high temperature electronic devices include development instrumentation within engines, engine control, and condition monitoring systems, and power conditioning and control systems for space platforms and satellites. Other earth-based applications include deep-well drilling instrumentation, nuclear reactor instrumentation and control, and automotive sensors. To meet the needs of these applications, the High Temperature Electronics Program at the Lewis Research Center is developing silicon carbide (SiC) as a high temperature semiconductor material. Research is focussed on developing the crystal growth, characterization, and device fabrication technologies necessary to produce a family of silicon carbide electronic devices and integrated sensors. The progress made in developing silicon carbide is presented, and the challenges that lie ahead are discussed.

  14. Amorphous silicon solar cell allowing infrared transmission

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.

    1979-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell with a layer of high index of refraction material or a series of layers having high and low indices of refraction material deposited upon a transparent substrate to reflect light of energies greater than the bandgap energy of the amorphous silicon back into the solar cell and transmit solar radiation having an energy less than the bandgap energy of the amorphous silicon.

  15. Liquid phase sintering of silicon carbide

    DOEpatents

    Cutler, R.A.; Virkar, A.V.; Hurford, A.C.

    1989-05-09

    Liquid phase sintering is used to densify silicon carbide based ceramics using a compound comprising a rare earth oxide and aluminum oxide to form liquids at temperatures in excess of 1,600 C. The resulting sintered ceramic body has a density greater than 95% of its theoretical density and hardness in excess of 23 GPa. Boron and carbon are not needed to promote densification and silicon carbide powder with an average particle size of greater than one micron can be densified via the liquid phase process. The sintered ceramic bodies made by the present invention are fine grained and have secondary phases resulting from the liquid phase. 4 figs.

  16. On the sintering of silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gugel, E.

    1986-01-01

    This document deals with the sintering of silicon carbide using pressureless sintering. This technique makes it possible to sinter a primarily covalent material to usable densities up to over 98% thD without having to use a high amount of sinter additives as is the case with other non-oxide ceramic materials. The process takes place rapidly, and it is also possible to produce relatively thick-walled structural parts without major problems. This sheds more light on the true characteristics of silicon carbide in one structural part, since there is no second or nearly no second phase. Heat pressing has improved stability.

  17. Liquid phase sintering of silicon carbide

    DOEpatents

    Cutler, Raymond A.; Virkar, Anil V.; Hurford, Andrew C.

    1989-01-01

    Liquid phase sintering is used to densify silicon carbide based ceramics using a compound comprising a rare earth oxide and aluminum oxide to form liquids at temperatures in excess of 1600.degree. C. The resulting sintered ceramic body has a density greater than 95% of its theoretical density and hardness in excess of 23 GPa. Boron and carbon are not needed to promote densification and silicon carbide powder with an average particle size of greater than one micron can be densified via the liquid phase process. The sintered ceramic bodies made by the present invention are fine grained and have secondary phases resulting from the liquid phase.

  18. Studies of hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, S G; Carlos, W E

    1984-07-01

    This report discusses the results of probing the defect structure and bonding of hydrogenated amorphous silicon films using both nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron spin resonance (ESR). The doping efficiency of boron in a-Si:H was found to be less than 1%, with 90% of the boron in a threefold coordinated state. On the other hand, phosphorus NMR chemical shift measurements yielded a ration of threefold to fourfold P sites of roughly 4 to 1. Various resonance lines were observed in heavily boron- and phosphorus-doped films and a-SiC:H alloys. These lines were attributed to band tail states on twofold coordinated silicon. In a-SiC:H films, a strong resonance was attributed to dangling bonds on carbon atoms. ESR measurements on low-pressure chemical-vapor-deposited (LPCVD) a-Si:H were performed on samples. The defect density in the bulk of the films was 10/sup 17//cc with a factor of 3 increase at the surface of the sample. The ESR spectrum of LPCVD-prepared films was not affected by prolonged exposure to strong light. Microcrystalline silicon samples were also examined. The phosphorus-doped films showed a strong signal from the crystalline material and no resonance from the amorphous matrix. This shows that phosphorus is incorporated in the crystals and is active as a dopant. No signal was recorded from the boron-doped films.

  19. Tough silicon nitride matrix composites using Textron silicon carbide monofilaments

    SciTech Connect

    Foulds, W.; Lecostaouec, J.F.; Landry, C.; Dipietro, S.; Vasilos, T.

    1989-10-01

    The use of Textron SCS silicon carbide monofilament fibers as a reinforcement for silicon nitride is described. Samples were processed by both chemical vapor infiltration and hot pressing. Mechanical tests were performed in flexure, tension, and in shear. A ballistic test demonstrated high velocity impact toughness. 5 refs.

  20. Design considerations and experimental analysis for silicon carbide power rectifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khemka, V.; Patel, R.; Chow, T. P.; Gutmann, R. J.

    1999-10-01

    In this paper we present the investigation of properties of silicon carbide power rectifiers, in particular Schottky, PiN and advanced hybrid power rectifiers such as the trench MOS barrier Schottky rectifier. Analysis of the forward, reverse and switching experimental characteristics are presented and these silicon carbide rectifiers are compared to silicon devices. Silicon carbide Schottky rectifiers are attractive for applications requiring blocking voltage in excess of 100 V as the use of Si is precluded by its large specific on-resistance. Analysis of power dissipation indicates that silicon carbide Schottky rectifiers offer significant improvement over silicon counterparts. Silicon carbide junction rectifiers, on the other hand, are superior to silicon counterparts only for blocking voltage greater than 2000 V. Performance of acceptor (boron) and donor (phosphorus) implanted experimental silicon carbide junction rectifiers are presented and compared. Some of the recent developments in silicon carbide rectifiers have been described and compared with theory and our experimental results. The well established silicon rectifiers theory are often inadequate to describe the characteristics of the experimental silicon carbide junction rectifiers and appropriate generalization of these theories are presented. Experimental trench MOS barrier Schottky rectifiers (TMBS) have demonstrated significant improvement in leakage current compared to planar Schottky devices. Performance of current state-of-the-art silicon carbide rectifiers are far from theoretical predictions. Availability of high-quality silicon carbide crystals is crucial to successful realization of these performance projections.

  1. Shock-Induced Localized Amorphization in Boron Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mingwei; McCauley, James W.; Hemker, Kevin J.

    2003-03-01

    High-resolution electron microscope observations of shock-loaded boron carbide have revealed the formation of nanoscale intragranular amorphous bands that occur parallel to specific crystallographic planes and contiguously with apparent cleaved fracture surfaces. This damage mechanism explains the measured, but not previously understood, decrease in the ballistic performance of boron carbide at high impact rates and pressures. The formation of these amorphous bands is also an example of how shock loading can result in the synthesis of novel structures and materials with substantially altered properties.

  2. Tribological properties of sintered polycrystalline and single crystal silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.; Srinivasan, M.

    1982-01-01

    Tribological studies and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses were conducted with sintered polycrystalline and single crystal silicon carbide surfaces in sliding contact with iron at various temperatures to 1500 C in a vacuum of 30 nPa. The results indicate that there is a significant temperature influence on both the friction properties and the surface chemistry of silicon carbide. The main contaminants on the as received sintered polycrystalline silicon carbide surfaces are adsorbed carbon, oxygen, graphite, and silicon dioxide. The surface revealed a low coefficient of friction. This is due to the presence of the graphite on the surface. At temperatures of 400 to 600 C graphite and copious amount of silicon dioxide were observed on the polycrystalline silicon carbide surface in addition to silicon carbide. At 800 C, the amount of the silicon dioxide decreased rapidly and the silicon carbide type silicon and carbon peaks were at a maximum intensity in the XPS spectra. The coefficients of friction were high in the temperature range 400 to 800 C. Small amounts of carbon and oxygen contaminants were observed on the as received single crystal silicon carbide surface below 250 C. Silicon carbide type silicon and carbon peaks were seen on the silicon carbide in addition to very small amount of graphite and silicon dioxide at temperatures of 450 to 800 C.

  3. PWR cores with silicon carbide cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Dobisesky, J. P.; Carpenter, D.; Pilat, E.; Kazimi, M. S.

    2012-07-01

    The feasibility of using silicon carbide rather than Zircaloy cladding, to reach higher power levels and higher discharge burnups in PWRs has been evaluated. A preliminary fuel design using fuel rods with the same dimensions as in the Westinghouse Robust Fuel Assembly but with fuel pellets having 10 vol% central void has been adopted to mitigate the higher fuel temperatures that occur due to the lower thermal conductivity of the silicon carbide and to the persistence of the open clad-pellet gap over most of the fuel life. With this modified fuel design, it is possible to achieve 18 month cycles that meet present-day operating constraints on peaking factor, boron concentration, reactivity coefficients and shutdown margin, while allowing batch average discharge burnups up to 80 MWD/kgU and peak rod burnups up to 100 MWD/kgU. Power uprates of 10% and possibly 20% also appear feasible. For non-uprated cores, the silicon carbide-clad fuel has a clear advantage that increases with increasing discharge burnup. Even for comparable discharge burnups, there is a savings in enriched uranium. Control rod configuration modifications may be required to meet the shutdown margin criterion for the 20% up-rate. Silicon carbide's ability to sustain higher burnups than Zircaloy also allows the design of a licensable two year cycle with only 96 fresh assemblies, avoiding the enriched uranium penalty incurred with use of larger batch sizes due to their excessive leakage. (authors)

  4. High Q silicon carbide microdisk resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Xiyuan; Lee, Jonathan Y.; Feng, Philip X.-L.; Lin, Qiang

    2014-05-05

    We demonstrate a silicon carbide (SiC) microdisk resonator with optical Q up to 5.12 × 10{sup 4}. The high optical quality, together with the diversity of whispering-gallery modes and the tunability of external coupling, renders SiC microdisk a promising platform for integrated quantum photonics applications.

  5. Ceramic Fabric Coated With Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riccitiello, S. R.; Smith, M.; Goldstein, H.; Zimmerman, N.

    1988-01-01

    Material used as high-temperature shell. Ceramic fabric coated with silicon carbide (SiC) serves as tough, heat-resistant covering for other refractory materials. Developed to protect reusable insulating tiles on advanced space transportation systems. New covering makes protective glaze unnecessary. Used on furnace bricks or on insulation for engines.

  6. Structure and bonding in amorphous iron carbide thin films.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Andrej; Jansson, Ulf; Lu, Jun; Hultman, Lars; Magnuson, Martin

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the amorphous structure, chemical bonding, and electrical properties of magnetron sputtered Fe(1-xCx) (0.21 ⩽ x ⩽ 0.72) thin films. X-ray, electron diffraction and transmission electron microscopy show that the Fe(1-xCx) films are amorphous nanocomposites, consisting of a two-phase domain structure with Fe-rich carbidic FeC(y), and a carbon-rich matrix. Pair distribution function analysis indicates a close-range order similar to those of crystalline Fe(3)C carbides in all films with additional graphene-like structures at high carbon content (71.8 at% C). From x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements, we find that the amorphous carbidic phase has a composition of 15-25 at% carbon that slightly increases with total carbon content. X-ray absorption spectra exhibit an increasing number of unoccupied 3d states and a decreasing number of C 2p states as a function of carbon content. These changes signify a systematic redistribution in orbital occupation due to charge-transfer effects at the domain-size-dependent carbide/matrix interfaces. The four-point probe resistivity of the Fe(1-xCx) films increases exponentially with carbon content from ∼200 μΩ cm (x = 0.21) to ∼1200 μΩ cm (x = 0.72), and is found to depend on the total carbon content rather than the composition of the carbide. Our findings open new possibilities for modifying the resistivity of amorphous thin film coatings based on transition metal carbides through the control of amorphous domain structures. PMID:25567721

  7. Reliable Breakdown Obtained in Silicon Carbide Rectifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.

    1997-01-01

    The High Temperature Integrated Electronics and Sensor (HTIES) Program at the NASA Lewis Research Center is currently developing silicon carbide (SiC) for use in harsh conditions where silicon, the semiconductor used in nearly all of today's electronics, cannot function. Silicon carbide's demonstrated ability to function under extreme high-temperature, high-power, and/or high-radiation conditions will enable significant improvements to a far-ranging variety of applications and systems. These range from improved high-voltage switching for energy savings in public electric power distribution and electric vehicles, to more powerful microwave electronics for radar and cellular communications, to sensor and controls for cleaner-burning, more fuel-efficient jet aircraft and automobile engines.

  8. Method of producing hydrogenated amorphous silicon film

    DOEpatents

    Wiesmann, Harold J.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to hydrogenated amorphous silicon produced by thermally decomposing silane (SiH.sub.4) or other gases comprising H and Si, from a tungsten or carbon foil heated to a temperature of about 1400.degree.-1600.degree. C., in a vacuum of about 10.sup.-6 to 19.sup.-4 torr, to form a gaseous mixture of atomic hydrogen and atomic silicon, and depositing said gaseos mixture onto a substrate independent of and outside said source of thermal decomposition, to form hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The presence of an ammonia atmosphere in the vacuum chamber enhances the photoconductivity of the hydrogenated amorphous silicon film.

  9. Coaxial nanocable: silicon carbide and silicon oxide sheathed with boron nitride and carbon

    PubMed

    Zhang; Suenaga; Colliex; Iijima

    1998-08-14

    Multielement nanotubes comprising multiple phases, with diameters of a few tens of nanometers and lengths up to 50 micrometers, were successfully synthesized by means of reactive laser ablation. The experimentally determined structure consists of a beta-phase silicon carbide core, an amorphous silicon oxide intermediate layer, and graphitic outer shells made of boron nitride and carbon layers separated in the radial direction. The structure resembles a coaxial nanocable with a semiconductor-insulator-metal (or semiconductor-insulator-semiconductor) geometry and suggests applications in nanoscale electronic devices that take advantage of this self-organization mechanism for multielement nanotube formation. PMID:9703508

  10. Surface chemistry and friction behavior of the silicon carbide (0001) surface at temperatures to 1500 deg C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopy analyses and friction studies were conducted with a silicon carbide (0001) surface in contact with iron at various temperatures to 1200 or 1500 C in a vacuum of 10 to the minus 8th power Pa. The results indicate that there is a significant temperature influence on both the surface chemistry and friction properties of silicon carbide. The principal contaminant of adsorbed amorphous carbon on the silicon carbide surface in the as received state is removed by simply heating to 400 C. Above 400 C, graphite and carbide type carbine are the primary species on the silicon carbide surface, in addition to silicon. The coefficients of friction of polycrystalline iron sliding against a single crystal silicon carbide (0001) surface were high at temperatures to 800 C. Similar coefficients of friction were obtained at room temperature after the silicon carbide was preheated at various temperatures up 800 C. When the friction experiments were conducted above 800 C or when the specimens were preheated to above 800 C, the coefficients of friction were dramatically lower. At 800 C the silicon and carbide type carbon are at a maximum intensity in the XPS spectra. With increasing temperature above 800 C, the concentration of the graphite increases rapidly on the surface, whereas those of the carbide type carbon and silicon decrease rapidly.

  11. Novel fabrication of silicon carbide based ceramics for nuclear applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Abhishek Kumar

    Advances in nuclear reactor technology and the use of gas-cooled fast reactors require the development of new materials that can operate at the higher temperatures expected in these systems. These materials include refractory alloys based on Nb, Zr, Ta, Mo, W, and Re; ceramics and composites such as SiC--SiCf; carbon--carbon composites; and advanced coatings. Besides the ability to handle higher expected temperatures, effective heat transfer between reactor components is necessary for improved efficiency. Improving thermal conductivity of the fuel can lower the center-line temperature and, thereby, enhance power production capabilities and reduce the risk of premature fuel pellet failure. Crystalline silicon carbide has superior characteristics as a structural material from the viewpoint of its thermal and mechanical properties, thermal shock resistance, chemical stability, and low radioactivation. Therefore, there have been many efforts to develop SiC based composites in various forms for use in advanced energy systems. In recent years, with the development of high yield preceramic precursors, the polymer infiltration and pyrolysis (PIP) method has aroused interest for the fabrication of ceramic based materials, for various applications ranging from disc brakes to nuclear reactor fuels. The pyrolysis of preceramic polymers allow new types of ceramic materials to be processed at relatively low temperatures. The raw materials are element-organic polymers whose composition and architecture can be tailored and varied. The primary focus of this study is to use a pyrolysis based process to fabricate a host of novel silicon carbide-metal carbide or oxide composites, and to synthesize new materials based on mixed-metal silicocarbides that cannot be processed using conventional techniques. Allylhydridopolycarbosilane (AHPCS), which is an organometal polymer, was used as the precursor for silicon carbide. Inert gas pyrolysis of AHPCS produces near-stoichiometric amorphous

  12. Tests Of Amorphous-Silicon Photovoltaic Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Ronald G., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Progress in identification of strengths and weaknesses of amorphous-silicon technology detailed. Report describes achievements in testing reliability of solar-power modules made of amorphous-silicon photovoltaic cells. Based on investigation of modules made by U.S. manufacturers. Modules subjected to field tests, to accelerated-aging tests in laboratory, and to standard sequence of qualification tests developed for modules of crystalline-silicon cells.

  13. Mechanical Properties of Nanoceramic Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojo, Ipidapo; Abunaemeh, Malek; Smith, Cydale; Muntele, Claudiu; Ila, Daryush

    2009-03-01

    Generation IV nuclear reactors will use the TRISO fuels, a type of micro fuel particle. It consists of a fuel kernel coated with four layers of isotropic material. One of the materials considered for these layers is silicon carbide ceramic. This lightweight material can maintain chemical and dimensional stability in adverse environments at very high temperatures up to 3000 C, and it is chemically inert. It is widely used as a semiconductor material in electronics because of its high thermo conductivity, high electric field break down strength, and high maximum current density, which makes it more desirable than silicon. Silicon carbide has a very low coefficient of thermal expansion and has no phase transition that would discontinue its thermal expansion. At the Center for Irradiation of Materials (C.I.M.) we are developing a new fabrication process for nanopowdered silicon carbide for TRISO fuel coating purposes. We also study the mechanical properties of the material produced. Among the different test being performed are particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) an Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS). The mechanical properties of interest are hardness (measured by Vickers Hardness machine), toughness (measured by the Anstis equation, KIC= 1.6 x 10-2(E/H)^1/2(P/C0^3/2, where P=load, C0=crack length, E=Young's modulus and H=Vickers Hardness), tensile strength and flexural strength (measured by a three point bend test). Results will be presented during the meeting.

  14. Genesis Silicon Carbide Concentrator Target 60003 Preliminary Ellipsometry Mapping Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calaway, M. J.; Rodriquez, M. C.; Stansbery, E. K.

    2007-01-01

    The Genesis concentrator was custom designed to focus solar wind ions primarily for terrestrial isotopic analysis of O-17/O-16 and O-18/O-16 to +/-1%, N-15/N-14 to +/-1%, and secondarily to conduct elemental and isotopic analysis of Li, Be, and B. The circular 6.2 cm diameter concentrator target holder was comprised of four quadrants of highly pure semiconductor materials that included one amorphous diamond-like carbon, one C-13 diamond, and two silicon carbide (SiC). The amorphous diamond-like carbon quadrant was fractured upon impact at Utah Test and Training Range (UTTR), but the remaining three quadrants survived fully intact and all four quadrants hold an important collection of solar wind. The quadrants were removed from the target holder at NASA Johnso n Space Center Genesis Curation Laboratory in April 2005, and have been housed in stainless steel containers under continual nitrogen purge since time of disintegration. In preparation for allocation of a silicon carbide target for oxygen isotope analyses at UCLA, the two SiC targets were photographed for preliminary inspection of macro particle contamination from the hard non-nominal landing as well as characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometry to evaluate thin film contamination. This report is focused on Genesis SiC target sample number 60003.

  15. Making a Silicon-Nitride/Silicon-Carbide Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, R. T.

    1987-01-01

    Hot pressing and nitriding produce strong fiber/matrix material. Fabrication method developed for processing strong and tough silicon-based ceramic composite material, SiC/RBSN, which consists of reaction-bonded Si3N4 (RBSN) reinforced by continuous-length, high-modulus, high strength silicon carbide (SiC) fibers prepared by chemical-vapor deposition method. Increased toughness and ultimate strength of SiC/RBSN composite makes it potential structural material for advanced heat engines.

  16. Low blow Charpy impact of silicon carbides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abe, H.; Chandan, H. C.; Bradt, R. C.

    1978-01-01

    The room-temperature impact resistance of several commercial silicon carbides was examined using an instrumented pendulum-type machine and Charpy-type specimens. Energy balance compliance methods and fracture toughness approaches, both applicable to other ceramics, were used for analysis. The results illustrate the importance of separating the machine and the specimen energy contributions and confirm the equivalence of KIc and KId. The material's impact energy was simply the specimen's stored elastic strain energy at fracture.

  17. Producing Silicon Carbide for Semiconductor Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, G. C.; Rohatgi, N. K.

    1986-01-01

    Processes proposed for production of SiC crystals for use in semiconductors operating at temperatures as high as 900 degrees C. Combination of new processes produce silicon carbide chips containing epitaxial layers. Chips of SiC first grown on porous carbon matrices, then placed in fluidized bed, where additional layer of SiC grows. Processes combined to yield complete process. Liquid crystallization process used to make SiC particles or chips for fluidized-bed process.

  18. Acoustic microscopy of silicon carbide materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khandelwal, P. K.; Heitman, P. W.; Yuhas, D.; Vorres, C. L.

    1982-01-01

    It is shown that scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM) is able to detect such fracture-controlling flaws in dense silicon carbide materials as surface voids, whose diameter-by-depth size is a minimum of 75 by 17 microns in reaction-bonded SiC and 68 by 25 microns in alpha-SiC. Surface conditions such as pitting, which have been found to limit the discernibility of drilled holes, become important when pit and drilled hole sizes become comparable.

  19. Mechanical properties of Silicon Carbide Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkhateeb, Abdullah; Zhang, Daqing; McIlroy, David; Aston, David Eric

    2004-05-01

    Silicon carbide nanowires could be potentially useful for high strength materials which lead to the interest in understanding their mechanical properties. In this report we use the digital pulse force microscopy to analyze the mechanical properties of SiC nanowires .Stiffness and adhesion images of SiC nanowires on silicon grating were obtained and calibrated force-distance curves were plotted along the wire which spans on a 1.5 micron trench. Moreover, spring constant and Young's modules have been calculated from the linear part of the force-distance curves.

  20. Microwave joining of silicon carbide using several different approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Silberglitt, R. ); Black, W.M.; Sa'adaldin, H.S. . Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering); Katz, J.D. )

    1992-01-01

    Microwave joining of sintered silicon carbide, both to itself and reaction bonded silicon carbide, has been accomplished in a single-mode rectangular resonant cavity. Several approaches using different interlayer materials were employed to join sintered silicon carbide. Effective joining of reaction bonded silicon carbide to itself and sintered silicon carbide was accomplished without the use of any interlayer material in the single-mode resonant cavity as well as in a multi-mode oven. Specimens cut from 3/8'' diameter-rods were joined in the single-mode cavity, whereas a variety of arbitrary shapes and larger specimens (of reaction bonded silicon carbide) were joined in the multi-mode oven.

  1. Microwave joining of silicon carbide using several different approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Silberglitt, R.; Black, W.M.; Sa`adaldin, H.S.; Katz, J.D.

    1992-07-01

    Microwave joining of sintered silicon carbide, both to itself and reaction bonded silicon carbide, has been accomplished in a single-mode rectangular resonant cavity. Several approaches using different interlayer materials were employed to join sintered silicon carbide. Effective joining of reaction bonded silicon carbide to itself and sintered silicon carbide was accomplished without the use of any interlayer material in the single-mode resonant cavity as well as in a multi-mode oven. Specimens cut from 3/8`` diameter-rods were joined in the single-mode cavity, whereas a variety of arbitrary shapes and larger specimens (of reaction bonded silicon carbide) were joined in the multi-mode oven.

  2. Friction and deformation behavior of single-crystal silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    Friction and deformation studies were conducted with single-crystal silicon carbide in sliding contact with diamond. When the radius of curvature of the spherical diamond rider was large (0.3), deformation of silicon carbide was primarily elastic. Under these conditions the friction coefficient was low and did not show a dependence on the silicon carbide orientation. Further, there was no detectable cracking of the silicon carbide surfaces. When smaller radii of curvature of the spherical diamond riders (0.15 and 0.02 mm) or a conical diamond rider was used, plastic grooving occured and the silicon carbide exhibited anisotropic friction and deformation behavior. Under these conditions the friction coefficient depended on load. Anisotropic friction and deformation of the basal plane of silicon carbide was controlled by the slip system. 10101120and cleavage of1010.

  3. Microresonators with Q-factors over a million from highly stressed epitaxial silicon carbide on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kermany, Atieh R.; Brawley, George; Mishra, Neeraj; Sheridan, Eoin; Bowen, Warwick P.; Iacopi, Francesca

    2014-02-01

    We utilize the excellent mechanical properties of epitaxial silicon carbide (SiC) on silicon plus the capability of tuning its residual stress within a large tensile range to fabricate microstrings with fundamental resonant frequencies (f0) of several hundred kHz and mechanical quality factors (Q) of over a million. The fabrication of the perfect-clamped string structures proceeds through simple silicon surface micromachining processes. The resulting f × Q product in vacuum is equal or higher as compared to state-of-the-art amorphous silicon nitride microresonators. We demonstrate that as the residual epitaxial SiC stress is doubled, the f × Q product for the fundamental mode of the strings shows a four-fold increase.

  4. Silicon carbide-silicon composite having improved oxidation resistance and method of making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luthra, Krishan Lal (Inventor); Wang, Hongyu (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A Silicon carbide-silicon matrix composite having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures in dry or water-containing environments is provided. A method is given for sealing matrix cracks in situ in melt infiltrated silicon carbide-silicon matrix composites. The composite cracks are sealed by the addition of various additives, such as boron compounds, into the melt infiltrated silicon carbide-silicon matrix.

  5. Method of making silicon carbide-silicon composite having improved oxidation resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luthra, Krishan Lal (Inventor); Wang, Hongyu (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A Silicon carbide-silicon matrix composite having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures in dry or water-containing environments is provided. A method is given for sealing matrix cracks in situ in melt infiltrated silicon carbide-silicon matrix composites. The composite cracks are sealed by the addition of various additives, such as boron compounds, into the melt infiltrated silicon carbide-silicon matrix.

  6. Optical waveguide formed by cubic silicon carbide on sapphire substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Xiao; Wongchotigul, Kobchat; Spencer, Michael G.

    1991-01-01

    Optical confinement in beta silicon carbide (beta-SiC) thin films on sapphire substrate is demonstrated. Measurements are performed on waveguides formed by the mechanical transfer of thin beta-SiC films to sapphire. Recent results of epitaxial films of SiC on sapphire substrates attest to the technological viability of optoelectronic devices made from silicon carbide. Far-field mode patterns are shown. It is believed that this is the first step in validating a silicon carbide optoelectronic technology.

  7. Effect of Heat Treatment on Silicon Carbide Based Joining Materials for Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Lewinsohn, Charles A.; Jones, Russell H.; Nozawa, T.; Kotani, M.; Kishimoto, H.; Katoh, Y.; Kohyama, A.

    2001-10-01

    Two general approaches to obtaining silicon carbide-based joint materials were used. The first method relies on reactions between silicon and carbon to form silicon carbide, or to bond silicon carbide powders together. The second method consists of pyrolysing a polycarbosilane polymer to yield an amorphous, covalently bonded material. In order to assess the long-term durability of the joint materials, various heat treatments were performed and the effects on the mechanical properties of the joints were measured. Although the joints derived from the polycarbosilane polymer were not the strongest, the value of strength measured was not affected by heat treatment. On the other hand, the value of the strength of the reaction-based joints was affected by heat treatment, indicating the presence of residual stresses or unreacted material subsequent to processing. Further investigation of reaction-based joining should consist of detailed microscopic studies; however, continued study of joints derived from polymers is also warranted.

  8. Colloidal characterization of silicon nitride and silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feke, Donald L.

    1986-01-01

    The colloidal behavior of aqueous ceramic slips strongly affects the forming and sintering behavior and the ultimate mechanical strength of the final ceramic product. The colloidal behavior of these materials, which is dominated by electrical interactions between the particles, is complex due to the strong interaction of the solids with the processing fluids. A surface titration methodology, modified to account for this interaction, was developed and used to provide fundamental insights into the interfacial chemistry of these systems. Various powder pretreatment strategies were explored to differentiate between true surface chemistry and artifacts due to exposure history. The colloidal behavior of both silicon nitride and carbide is dominated by silanol groups on the powder surfaces. However, the colloid chemistry of silicon nitride is apparently influenced by an additional amine group. With the proper powder treatments, silicon nitride and carbide powder can be made to appear colloidally equivalent. The impact of these results on processing control will be discussed.

  9. Silicon nitride/silicon carbide composite densified materials prepared using composite powders

    DOEpatents

    Dunmead, S.D.; Weimer, A.W.; Carroll, D.F.; Eisman, G.A.; Cochran, G.A.; Susnitzky, D.W.; Beaman, D.R.; Nilsen, K.J.

    1997-07-01

    Prepare silicon nitride-silicon carbide composite powders by carbothermal reduction of crystalline silica powder, carbon powder and, optionally, crystalline silicon nitride powder. The crystalline silicon carbide portion of the composite powders has a mean number diameter less than about 700 nanometers and contains nitrogen. The composite powders may be used to prepare sintered ceramic bodies and self-reinforced silicon nitride ceramic bodies.

  10. Electron tunnelling into amorphous germanium and silicon.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, C. W.; Clark, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    Measurements of tunnel conductance versus bias, capacitance versus bias, and internal photoemission were made in the systems aluminum-oxide-amorphous germanium and aluminium-oxide-amorphous silicon. A function was extracted which expresses the deviation of these systems from the aluminium-oxide-aluminium system.

  11. Microstructure evolution and energy band alignment at the interface of a Si-rich amorphous silicon carbide/c-Si heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xixing; Zeng, Xiangbin; Liao, Wugang; Wen, Yangyang; Chen, Xiaoxiao

    2015-11-01

    The microstructure evolution of Si-rich amorphous a-SiC:H films obtained under different annealing conditions was investigated by x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The influence of its microstructure on the energy band alignment at a Si-rich a-SiC:H/n-type c-Si hetero-interface was analyzed by ultraviolet visible transmission spectroscopy and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. The results revealed that the as-deposited Si-rich a-SiC:H film was mainly in an amorphous state. After annealing, Si and SiC quantum dots (QDs) formed, and the crystallinity of the QDs and the proportion of SiC QDs increased with increasing the annealing time at the same annealing temperature. It is found that the energy band alignment at the hetero-interface was influenced by the crystallinity of the films, the sizes of the QDs, and the relative proportion of Si to SiC QDs in a-SiC:H films. Moreover, the contact potential at the hetero-interface decreased with the improved crystallinity of the QDs in a-SiC:H film. The determination of energy band alignment at the Si-rich a-SiC:H/c-Si hetero-interface is beneficial to understanding the carrier transport behavior and designing hetero-structure devices.

  12. Amorphous silicon-tellurium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shufflebotham, P. K.; Card, H. C.; Kao, K. C.; Thanailakis, A.

    1986-09-01

    Amorphous silicon-tellurium alloy thin films were fabricated by coevaporation over the composition range of 0-82 at. % Te. The electronic and optical properties of these films were systematically investigated over this same range of composition. The optical gap of these films was found to decrease monotonically with increasing Te content. Conduction near room temperature was due to extended state conduction, while variable range hopping dominated below 250 K. The incorporation of Te in concentrations of less than 1 at. % was found to produce an increase in the density of localized states at the Fermi level and a decrease in the activation energy. This was attributed to the Te being incorporated as a substitutional, fourfold coordinated, double donor in a-Si. At approximately 60 at. % Te, a decrease in the density of localized states at the Fermi level, and an increase in the activation energy and photoresponse was indicated. This was attributed to the possible formation of a less defective a-Si:Te compound.

  13. Evolution of defects in silicon carbide implanted with helium ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chonghong; Song, Yin; Yang, Yitao; Zhou, Chunlan; Wei, Long; Ma, Hongji

    2014-05-01

    Effects of accumulation of radiation damage in silicon carbide are important concerns for the use of silicon carbide in advanced nuclear energy systems. In the present work lattice damage in silicon carbide crystal (4H type) implanted with 100 keV 4He+ ions was investigated with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in channeling geometry (RBS/c) and positron beam Doppler broadening spectrometry (PBDB). Helium implantation was performed at the specimen temperature of 510 K to avoid amorphization of the SiC crystal. Fluences of helium ions were selected to be in the range from 1 × 1016 to 3 × 1016 ions cm-2, around the dose threshold for the formation of observable helium bubbles under transmission electron microscopes (TEM). The RBS/c measurements show distinctly different annealing behavior of displaced Si atoms at doses below or above the threshold for helium bubble formation. The RBS/c yield in the peak damage region of the specimen implanted to 3 × 1016 He-ions cm-2 shows an increase on the subsequently thermal annealing above 873 K, which is readily ascribed to the extra displacement of Si atoms due to helium bubble growth. The RBS/c yield in the specimen implanted to a lower ion fluence of 1.5 × 1016 He-ions cm-2 decreases monotonously on annealing from ambient temperatures up to 1273 K. The PBDB measurements supply evidence of clustering of vacancies at temperatures from 510 to 1173 K, and dissociation of vacancy clusters above 1273 K. The similarity of annealing behavior in PBDB profiles for helium implantation to 1 × 1016 and 3 × 1016 ions cm-2 is ascribed to the saturation of trapping of positrons in vacancy type defects in the damaged layers in the specimens helium-implanted to the two dose levels.

  14. Silicon carbide/SRBSN composites

    SciTech Connect

    Razzell, A.G.; Lewis, M.H.

    1991-08-01

    Ceramic matrix composites have been produced using unidirectionally aligned Textron SCS-6 fibers in a sintered reaction bonded silicon nitride (SRBSN) matrix. A tape casting technique was used to produce a prepreg sheet that could be cut and stacked to form a layup. Sintering aids were MgO, Al2O3, and Y2O3 either singly or in combination, final sintering being carried out under pressure at temperatures up to 1750 C. The three-point bend strength of the material varied between 448 and 513 MPa and showed no variation with oxidation time at 1000 C up to 25 hours. Interfacial shear strength measured by indentation was 4 MPa; some samples had a reaction layer at the interface and a shear strength of greater than MPa. Within sections 6 mm from exposed fiber ends, the interfacial carbon layers were partially removed, and the interfacial shear strength was reduced with increasing oxidation time. 4 refs.

  15. Ultrafine alumina coated silicon carbide particles for alumina-silicon carbide nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Warrier, K.G.K.; Hareesh, U.S.; Damodaran, A.D.

    1996-12-31

    Aluminum oxide, toughened by fine and uniform dispersion of silicon carbide particles has been found to possess interesting high temperature properties of high toughness and strength. Recent reports suggest that the finer the silicon carbide size, the better would be the fracture toughness. By addition of as few as 5 vol% submicron SiC particles strengthened Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} from 350 MPa to 1 GPa, with toughness as high as 4.7 Mpa m{sup {1/2}}. The mechanism of such high extent of fracture toughness has been investigated to be due to crack deflection and microcracking introduced by thermal expansion mismatch between particles and matrix grains, although the real contributions from the silicon carbide nanoparticles are still under investigation. In all these cases the primary requirement for most effective composite is the fine, uniform size of the particles and their homogeneous dispersion in the alumina matrix. Usual methods adopted for the preparation of composites such as physical mixing of alumina and silicon carbide particles often result in localized agglomerations and inhomogeneity making the composite inferior in properties.

  16. Atomic-scale disproportionation in amorphous silicon monoxide.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Akihiko; Kohara, Shinji; Asada, Toshihiro; Arao, Masazumi; Yogi, Chihiro; Imai, Hideto; Tan, Yongwen; Fujita, Takeshi; Chen, Mingwei

    2016-01-01

    Solid silicon monoxide is an amorphous material which has been commercialized for many functional applications. However, the amorphous structure of silicon monoxide is a long-standing question because of the uncommon valence state of silicon in the oxide. It has been deduced that amorphous silicon monoxide undergoes an unusual disproportionation by forming silicon- and silicon-dioxide-like regions. Nevertheless, the direct experimental observation is still missing. Here we report the amorphous structure characterized by angstrom-beam electron diffraction, supplemented by synchrotron X-ray scattering and computer simulations. In addition to the theoretically predicted amorphous silicon and silicon-dioxide clusters, suboxide-type tetrahedral coordinates are detected by angstrom-beam electron diffraction at silicon/silicon-dioxide interfaces, which provides compelling experimental evidence on the atomic-scale disproportionation of amorphous silicon monoxide. Eventually we develop a heterostructure model of the disproportionated silicon monoxide which well explains the distinctive structure and properties of the amorphous material. PMID:27172815

  17. Atomic-scale disproportionation in amorphous silicon monoxide

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Akihiko; Kohara, Shinji; Asada, Toshihiro; Arao, Masazumi; Yogi, Chihiro; Imai, Hideto; Tan, Yongwen; Fujita, Takeshi; Chen, Mingwei

    2016-01-01

    Solid silicon monoxide is an amorphous material which has been commercialized for many functional applications. However, the amorphous structure of silicon monoxide is a long-standing question because of the uncommon valence state of silicon in the oxide. It has been deduced that amorphous silicon monoxide undergoes an unusual disproportionation by forming silicon- and silicon-dioxide-like regions. Nevertheless, the direct experimental observation is still missing. Here we report the amorphous structure characterized by angstrom-beam electron diffraction, supplemented by synchrotron X-ray scattering and computer simulations. In addition to the theoretically predicted amorphous silicon and silicon-dioxide clusters, suboxide-type tetrahedral coordinates are detected by angstrom-beam electron diffraction at silicon/silicon-dioxide interfaces, which provides compelling experimental evidence on the atomic-scale disproportionation of amorphous silicon monoxide. Eventually we develop a heterostructure model of the disproportionated silicon monoxide which well explains the distinctive structure and properties of the amorphous material. PMID:27172815

  18. Atomic-scale disproportionation in amorphous silicon monoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Akihiko; Kohara, Shinji; Asada, Toshihiro; Arao, Masazumi; Yogi, Chihiro; Imai, Hideto; Tan, Yongwen; Fujita, Takeshi; Chen, Mingwei

    2016-05-01

    Solid silicon monoxide is an amorphous material which has been commercialized for many functional applications. However, the amorphous structure of silicon monoxide is a long-standing question because of the uncommon valence state of silicon in the oxide. It has been deduced that amorphous silicon monoxide undergoes an unusual disproportionation by forming silicon- and silicon-dioxide-like regions. Nevertheless, the direct experimental observation is still missing. Here we report the amorphous structure characterized by angstrom-beam electron diffraction, supplemented by synchrotron X-ray scattering and computer simulations. In addition to the theoretically predicted amorphous silicon and silicon-dioxide clusters, suboxide-type tetrahedral coordinates are detected by angstrom-beam electron diffraction at silicon/silicon-dioxide interfaces, which provides compelling experimental evidence on the atomic-scale disproportionation of amorphous silicon monoxide. Eventually we develop a heterostructure model of the disproportionated silicon monoxide which well explains the distinctive structure and properties of the amorphous material.

  19. Influence of radiation damage on krypton diffusion in silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedland, E.; Hlatshwayo, T. T.; van der Berg, N. G.; Mabena, M. C.

    2015-07-01

    Diffusion of krypton in poly and single crystalline silicon carbide is investigated and compared with the previously obtained results for xenon, which pointed to a different diffusion mechanism than observed for chemically active elements. For this purpose 360 keV krypton ions were implanted in commercial 6H-SiC and CVD-SiC wafers at room temperature, 350 °C and 600 °C. Width broadening of the implantation profiles and krypton retention during isochronal and isothermal annealing up to temperatures of 1400 °C was determined by RBS-analysis, whilst in the case of 6H-SiC damage profiles were simultaneously obtained by α-particle channeling. Little diffusion and no krypton loss was detected in the initially amorphized and eventually recrystallized surface layer of cold implanted 6H-SiC during annealing up to 1200 °C. Above that temperature thermal etching of the implanted surface became increasingly important. No diffusion or krypton loss is detected in the hot implanted 6H-SiC samples during annealing up to 1400 °C. Radiation damage dependent grain boundary diffusion is observed at 1300 °C in CVD-SiC. The results seem to indicate, that the chemically inert noble gas atoms do not form defect-impurity complexes, which strongly influence the diffusion behavior of other diffusors in silicon carbide.

  20. Cooling of hot electrons in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Vanderhaghen, R.; Hulin, D.; Cuzeau, S.; White, J.O.

    1997-07-01

    Measurements of the cooling rate of hot carriers in amorphous silicon are made with a two-pump, one-probe technique. The experiment is simulated with a rate-equation model describing the energy transfer between a population of hot carriers and the lattice. An energy transfer rate proportional to the temperature difference is found to be consistent with the experimental data while an energy transfer independent of the temperature difference is not. This contrasts with the situation in crystalline silicon. The measured cooling rates are sufficient to explain the difficulty in observing avalanche effects in amorphous silicon.

  1. Excess carbon in silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, X; Oxley, Mark P.; Puzyrev, Y; Tuttle, B R; Duscher, Gerd; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2010-01-01

    The application of SiC in electronic devices is currently hindered by low carrier mobility at the SiC/SiO{sub 2} interfaces. Recently, it was reported that 4H-SiC/SiO{sub 2} interfaces might have a transition layer on the SiC substrate side with C/Si ratio as high as 1.2, suggesting that carbon is injected into the SiC substrate during oxidation or other processing steps. We report finite-temperature quantum molecular dynamics simulations that explore the behavior of excess carbon in SiC. For SiC with 20% excess carbon, we find that, over short time ({approx} 24 ps), carbon atoms bond to each other and form various complexes, while the silicon lattice is largely unperturbed. These results, however, suggest that at macroscopic times scale, C segregation is likely to occur; therefore a transition layer with 20% extra carbon would not be stable. For a dilute distribution of excess carbon, we explore the pairing of carbon interstitials and show that the formation of dicarbon interstitial cluster is kinetically very favorable, which suggests that isolated carbon clusters may exist inside SiC substrate.

  2. Improved silicon carbide for advanced heat engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, T. J.; Winterbottom, W. L.

    1986-01-01

    Work performed to develop silicon carbide materials of high strength and to form components of complex shape and high reliability is described. A beta-SiC powder and binder system was adapted to the injection molding process and procedures and process parameters developed capable of providing a sintered silicon carbide material with improved properties. The initial effort has been to characterize the baseline precursor materials (beta silicon carbide powder and boron and carbon sintering aids), develop mixing and injection molding procedures for fabricating test bars, and characterize the properties of the sintered materials. Parallel studies of various mixing, dewaxing, and sintering procedures have been carried out in order to distinguish process routes for improving material properties. A total of 276 MOR bars of the baseline material have been molded, and 122 bars have been fully processed to a sinter density of approximately 95 percent. The material has a mean MOR room temperature strength of 43.31 ksi (299 MPa), a Weibull characteristic strength of 45.8 ksi (315 MPa), and a Weibull modulus of 8.0. Mean values of the MOR strengths at 1000, 1200, and 14000 C are 41.4, 43.2, and 47.2 ksi, respectively. Strength controlling flaws in this material were found to consist of regions of high porosity and were attributed to agglomerates originating in the initial mixing procedures. The mean stress rupture lift at 1400 C of five samples tested at 172 MPa (25 ksi) stress was 62 hours and at 207 MPa (30 ksi) stress was 14 hours. New fluid mixing techniques have been developed which significantly reduce flaw size and improve the strength of the material. Initial MOR tests indicate the strength of the fluid-mixed material exceeds the baseline property by more than 33 percent.

  3. Process for forming silicon carbide films and microcomponents

    DOEpatents

    Hamza, A.V.; Balooch, M.; Moalem, M.

    1999-01-19

    Silicon carbide films and microcomponents are grown on silicon substrates at surface temperatures between 900 K and 1700 K via C{sub 60} precursors in a hydrogen-free environment. Selective crystalline silicon carbide growth can be achieved on patterned silicon-silicon oxide samples. Patterned SiC films are produced by making use of the high reaction probability of C{sub 60} with silicon at surface temperatures greater than 900 K and the negligible reaction probability for C{sub 60} on silicon dioxide at surface temperatures less than 1250 K. 5 figs.

  4. Process for forming silicon carbide films and microcomponents

    DOEpatents

    Hamza, Alex V.; Balooch, Mehdi; Moalem, Mehran

    1999-01-01

    Silicon carbide films and microcomponents are grown on silicon substrates at surface temperatures between 900 K and 1700 K via C.sub.60 precursors in a hydrogen-free environment. Selective crystalline silicon carbide growth can be achieved on patterned silicon-silicon oxide samples. Patterned SiC films are produced by making use of the high reaction probability of C.sub.60 with silicon at surface temperatures greater than 900 K and the negligible reaction probability for C.sub.60 on silicon dioxide at surface temperatures less than 1250 K.

  5. Critically coupled surface phonon-polariton excitation in silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Neuner, Burton; Korobkin, Dmitriy; Fietz, Chris; Carole, Davy; Ferro, Gabriel; Shvets, Gennady

    2009-09-01

    We observe critical coupling to surface phonon-polaritons in silicon carbide by attenuated total reflection of mid-IR radiation. Reflectance measurements demonstrate critical coupling by a double scan of wavelength and incidence angle. Critical coupling occurs when prism coupling loss is equal to losses in silicon carbide and the substrate, resulting in maximal electric field enhancement. PMID:19724526

  6. Molybdenum disilicide composites reinforced with zirconia and silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, J.J.

    1992-12-31

    This patent pertains to compositions consisting essentially of molybdenum disilicide, silicon carbide, and a zirconium oxide component. The silicon carbide used in the compositions is in whisker or powder form. The zirconium oxide component is pure zirconia or partially stabilized zirconia or fully stabilized zirconia. Fabrication, fracture toughness, and bend strength are covered.

  7. Molybdenum disilicide composites reinforced with zirconia and silicon carbide

    DOEpatents

    Petrovic, J.J.

    1995-01-17

    Compositions are disclosed consisting essentially of molybdenum disilicide, silicon carbide, and a zirconium oxide component. The silicon carbide used in the compositions is in whisker or powder form. The zirconium oxide component is pure zirconia or partially stabilized zirconia or fully stabilized zirconia.

  8. Molybdenum disilicide composites reinforced with zirconia and silicon carbide

    DOEpatents

    Petrovic, John J.

    1995-01-01

    Compositions consisting essentially of molybdenum disilicide, silicon carbide, and a zirconium oxide component. The silicon carbide used in the compositions is in whisker or powder form. The zirconium oxide component is pure zirconia or partially stabilized zirconia or fully stabilized zirconia.

  9. An investigation on gamma attenuation behaviour of titanium diboride reinforced boron carbide-silicon carbide composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyuk, Bulent; Beril Tugrul, A.

    2014-04-01

    In this study, titanium diboride (TiB2) reinforced boron carbide-silicon carbide composites were investigated against Cs-137 and Co-60 gamma radioisotope sources. The composite materials include 70% boron carbide (B4C) and 30% silicon carbide (SiC) by volume. Titanium diboride was reinforced to boron carbide-silicon carbide composites as additive 2% and 4% by volume. Average particle sizes were 3.851 µm and 170 nm for titanium diboride which were reinforced to the boron carbide silicon carbide composites. In the experiments the gamma transmission technique was used to investigate the gamma attenuation properties of the composite materials. Linear and mass attenuation coefficients of the samples were determined. Theoretical mass attenuation coefficients were calculated from XCOM computer code. The experimental results and theoretical results were compared and evaluated with each other. It could be said that increasing the titanium diboride ratio causes higher linear attenuation values against Cs-137 and Co-60 gamma radioisotope sources. In addition decreasing the titanium diboride particle size also increases the linear and mass attenuation properties of the titanium diboride reinforced boron carbide-silicon carbide composites.

  10. Infrared Kerr measurements on ferromagnetic silicon and silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jungryeol; Mukherjee, Alok; Arik, Mumtaz Murat; Cerne, John; Liu, Yu; Zhou, Shengqiang; Böttger, Roman; Song, Bo; Wang, Gang

    We measure the infrared (100-1000 meV) Kerr angle in ferromagnetic silicon and silicon carbide. The samples were either neutron irradiated or aluminum doped to induce ferromagnetic behavior. The samples are studied in the 10-300K temperature range at magnetic fields up to 7T. We also explore the dependence of the magneto-optical signal on samples with different irradiation exposure levels. This study provides new information on the optical, magnetic, and electronic properties of these materials. Work supported by NSF-DMR1410599 and the Helmholtz Postdoctoral Program PD-146.

  11. Silicon carbide - Progress in crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. Anthony

    1987-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of two processes for producing large-area high-quality single crystals of SiC is described: (1) a modified Lely process for the growth of the alpha polytypes (e.g., 6H SiC) initially developed by Tairov and Tsvetkov (1978, 1981) and Ziegler et al. (1983), and (2) a process for the epitaxial growth of the beta polytype on single-crystal silicon or other substrates. Growth of large-area cubic SiC on Si is described together with growth of defect-free beta-SiC films on alpha-6H SiC crystals and TiC lattice. Semiconducting qualities of silicon carbide crystals grown by various techniques are discussed.

  12. Silicon Carbide Nanotube Oxidation at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahlborg, Nadia; Zhu, Dongming

    2012-01-01

    Silicon Carbide Nanotubes (SiCNTs) have high mechanical strength and also have many potential functional applications. In this study, SiCNTs were investigated for use in strengthening high temperature silicate and oxide materials for high performance ceramic nanocomposites and environmental barrier coating bond coats. The high · temperature oxidation behavior of the nanotubes was of particular interest. The SiCNTs were synthesized by a direct reactive conversion process of multiwall carbon nanotubes and silicon at high temperature. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was used to study the oxidation kinetics of SiCNTs at temperatures ranging from 800degC to1300degC. The specific oxidation mechanisms were also investigated.

  13. An overview of silicon carbide device technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.; Matus, Lawrence G.

    1992-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of silicon carbide (SiC) as a semiconductor is briefly reviewed. This material shows great promise towards providing electronic devices that can operate under the high-temperature, high-radiation, and/or high-power conditions where current semiconductor technologies fail. High quality single crystal wafers have become available, and techniques for growing high quality epilayers have been refined to the point where experimental SiC devices and circuits can be developed. The prototype diodes and transistors that have been produced to date show encouraging characteristics, but by the same token they also exhibit some device-related problems that are not unlike those faced in the early days of silicon technology development. Although these problems will not prevent the implementation of some useful circuits, the performance and operating regime of SiC electronics will be limited until these device-related issues are solved.

  14. Reaction bonded silicon carbide gimbaled pointing mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robichaud, J.; Akerstrom, A.; Frey, S.; Crompton, D.; Cucchiaro, P.; Deveau, G.; Peters, M.; Mason, S.; Ullathorne, C.

    2007-09-01

    A Silicon Carbide (SiC) based wide field of view Pointing Mirror Assembly (PMA) has been developed to provide two axis line-of-sight control for a fixed, space based imaging sensor. Thermal modeling has been completed in order to project the excellent thermal stability anticipated from the SiC PMA, and closed loop servo testing of the hardware has been conducted in order to quantify the bandwidth associated with line-of-sight control. In addition to the system level testing the SiC mirror substrate itself has been tested for thermal stability. We also report on results obtained with a novel polishing technique which has been applied in order to allow optical finishing of the two-phased Reaction Bonded (RB) SiC mirror substrate without the need for Silicon or SiC claddings.

  15. Amorphous silicon detectors in positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Conti, M. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA ); Perez-Mendez, V. )

    1989-12-01

    The physics of the detection process is studied and the performances of different Positron Emission Tomography (PET) system are evaluated by theoretical calculation and/or Monte Carlo Simulation (using the EGS code) in this paper, whose table of contents can be summarized as follows: a brief introduction to amorphous silicon detectors and some useful equation is presented; a Tantalum/Amorphous Silicon PET project is studied and the efficiency of the systems is studied by Monte Carlo Simulation; two similar CsI/Amorphous Silicon PET projects are presented and their efficiency and spatial resolution are studied by Monte Carlo Simulation, light yield and time characteristics of the scintillation light are discussed for different scintillators; some experimental result on light yield measurements are presented; a Xenon/Amorphous Silicon PET is presented, the physical mechanism of scintillation in Xenon is explained, a theoretical estimation of total light yield in Xenon and the resulting efficiency is discussed altogether with some consideration of the time resolution of the system; the amorphous silicon integrated electronics is presented, total noise and time resolution are evaluated in each of our applications; the merit parameters {epsilon}{sup 2}{tau}'s are evaluated and compared with other PET systems and conclusions are drawn; and a complete reference list for Xenon scintillation light physics and its applications is presented altogether with the listing of the developed simulation programs.

  16. Converting a carbon preform object to a silicon carbide object

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, Harry (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A process for converting in depth a carbon or graphite preform object to a silicon carbide object, silicon carbide/silicon object, silicon carbide/carbon-core object, or a silicon carbide/silicon/carbon-core object, by contacting it with silicon liquid and vapor over various lengths of contact time in a reaction chamber. In the process, a stream comprised of a silicon-containing precursor material in gaseous phase below the decomposition temperature of said gas and a coreactant, carrier or diluent gas such as hydrogen is passed through a hole within a high emissivity, thin, insulating septum into the reaction chamber above the melting point of silicon. The thin septum has one face below the decomposition temperature of the gas and an opposite face exposed to the reaction chamber. Thus, the precursor gas is decomposed directly to silicon in the reaction chamber. Any stream of decomposition gas and any unreacted precursor gas from the reaction chamber is removed. A carbon or graphite preform object placed in the reaction chamber is contacted with the silicon. The carbon or graphite preform object is recovered from the reactor chamber after it has been converted to a desired silicon carbide, silicon and carbon composition.

  17. Improved silicon carbide for advanced heat engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, Thomas J.

    1988-01-01

    This is the third annual technical report for the program entitled, Improved Silicon Carbide for Advanced Heat Engines, for the period February 16, 1987 to February 15, 1988. The objective of the original program was the development of high strength, high reliability silicon carbide parts with complex shapes suitable for use in advanced heat engines. Injection molding is the forming method selected for the program because it is capable of forming complex parts adaptable for mass production on an economically sound basis. The goals of the revised program are to reach a Weibull characteristic strength of 550 MPa (80 ksi) and a Weibull modulus of 16 for bars tested in 4-point loading. Two tasks are discussed: Task 1 which involves materials and process improvements, and Task 2 which is a MOR bar matrix to improve strength and reliability. Many statistically designed experiments were completed under task 1 which improved the composition of the batches, the mixing of the powders, the sinter and anneal cycles. The best results were obtained by an attritor mixing process which yielded strengths in excess of 550 MPa (80 ksi) and an individual Weibull modulus of 16.8 for a 9-sample group. Strengths measured at 1200 and 1400 C were equal to the room temperature strength. Annealing of machined test bars significantly improved the strength. Molding yields were measured and flaw distributions were observed to follow a Poisson process. The second iteration of the Task 2 matrix experiment is described.

  18. Improved silicon carbide for advanced heat engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, Thomas J.

    1987-01-01

    This is the second annual technical report entitled, Improved Silicon Carbide for Advanced Heat Engines, and includes work performed during the period February 16, 1986 to February 15, 1987. The program is conducted for NASA under contract NAS3-24384. The objective is the development of high strength, high reliability silicon carbide parts with complex shapes suitable for use in advanced heat engines. The fabrication methods used are to be adaptable for mass production of such parts on an economically sound basis. Injection molding is the forming method selected. This objective is to be accomplished in a two-phase program: (1) to achieve a 20 percent improvement in strength and a 100 percent increase in Weibull modulus of the baseline material; and (2) to produce a complex shaped part, a gas turbine rotor, for example, with the improved mechanical properties attained in the first phase. Eight tasks are included in the first phase covering the characterization of the properties of a baseline material, the improvement of those properties and the fabrication of complex shaped parts. Activities during the first contract year concentrated on two of these areas: fabrication and characterization of the baseline material (Task 1) and improvement of material and processes (Task 7). Activities during the second contract year included an MOR bar matrix study to improve mechanical properties (Task 2), materials and process improvements (Task 7), and a Ford-funded task to mold a turbocharger rotor with an improved material (Task 8).

  19. Improved silicon carbide for advanced heat engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, Thomas J.; Mangels, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    The development of silicon carbide materials of high strength was initiated and components of complex shape and high reliability were formed. The approach was to adapt a beta-SiC powder and binder system to the injection molding process and to develop procedures and process parameters capable of providing a sintered silicon carbide material with improved properties. The initial effort was to characterize the baseline precursor materials, develop mixing and injection molding procedures for fabricating test bars, and characterize the properties of the sintered materials. Parallel studies of various mixing, dewaxing, and sintering procedures were performed in order to distinguish process routes for improving material properties. A total of 276 modulus-of-rupture (MOR) bars of the baseline material was molded, and 122 bars were fully processed to a sinter density of approximately 95 percent. Fluid mixing techniques were developed which significantly reduced flaw size and improved the strength of the material. Initial MOR tests indicated that strength of the fluid-mixed material exceeds the baseline property by more than 33 percent. the baseline property by more than 33 percent.

  20. Dispersion aspects of silicon carbide gelcasting

    SciTech Connect

    Bleier, A.

    1991-09-01

    The principal objective of this research was to increase the solid loading of silicon carbide (SiC) powder, in an appropriate liquid medium, to a level that is useful for gelcasting technology. A number of factors that determine the maximum concentration of silicon carbide that can be incorporated into a pourable ceramic suspension have been identified. The pH of the system is the most critical processing parameter. Its proper adjustment (pH 11 to 13) allows SiC concentrations exceeding 50%, based on volume, to be routinely achieved without the use of additional dispersing agents. The particle size of SiC was also found to affect the maximum, attainable concentration. The surface area of the powder and the presence of free carbon in the powder, though not significantly influencing the suspension properties, determine the concentration of initiator required to induce polymerization and gelation. SiC specimens have been gelcast for powders in the size range of 0.8 to 8.5 {mu}m; the powders employed contain either {approximately} 0 or 19% carbon by weight. Finally, the generation of bubbles, typically encountered by the use of ammonia to adjust pH has been circumvented by the use of tetramethylammonium hydroxide.

  1. Development of silicon carbide composites for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, L.L. )

    1993-08-01

    The use of silicon carbide composites for structural materials is of growing interest in the fusion community. However, radiation effects in these materials are virtually unexplored, and the general state of ceramic matrix composites for nonnuclear applications is still in its infancy. Research into the radiation response of the most popular silicon carbide composite, namely, the chemically vapor-deposited (CVD) SiC-carbon-Nicalon fiber system is discussed. Three areas of interest are the stability of the fiber and matrix materials, the stability of the fiber-matrix interface, and the true activation of these [open quotes]reduced activity[close quotes] materials. Two methods are presented that quantitatively measure the effect of radiation on fiber and matrix elastic modulus as well as the fiber-matrix interfacial strength. The results of these studies show that the factor limiting the radiation performance of the CVD SiC-carbon-Nicalon system is degradation of the Nicalon fiber, which leads to a weakened carbon interface. The activity of these composites is significantly higher than expected and is dominated by impurity isotopes. 52 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Silicon Carbide: The Problem with Laboratory Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speck, A. K.; Hofmeister, A. M.; Barlow, M. J.

    2000-03-01

    The interpretation of astronomical observations of infrared (IR) silicon carbide (SiC) features in the spectra of carbon stars have revealed discrepancies between the work of astronomers and that of meteoriticists. The silicon carbide observed around carbon stars has been attributed to one type of SiC (α) while meteoritic samples believed to have formed around such stars are of another type of SiC (β). The key to solving this problem has been to understand the sources of laboratory data used by astronomers in order to interpret the IR spectra. Through comparison of thin film IR absorption spectra and spectra taken using finely ground samples dispersed in potassium bromide (KBr) pellets we show that the previously invoked ``KBr matrix-correction'' is unnecessary for powder dispersions obtained from very fine grain sizes of SiC. Comparison of our data and previous measurements show that dust around carbon stars is β-SiC, consistent with laboratory studies of presolar grains in meteorites. The implications of these findings affect twenty years of work. The IR spectroscopic laboratory data used by astronomers to identify dust species in space must be carefully scrutinized to ensure that the KBr correction is not responsible for further misattributions of minerals in astronomical dust features.

  3. Amorphous Silicon Based Neutron Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Liwei

    2004-12-12

    Various large-scale neutron sources already build or to be constructed, are important for materials research and life science research. For all these neutron sources, neutron detectors are very important aspect. However, there is a lack of a high-performance and low-cost neutron beam monitor that provides time and temporal resolution. The objective of this SBIR Phase I research, collaboratively performed by Midwest Optoelectronics, LLC (MWOE), the University of Toledo (UT) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), is to demonstrate the feasibility for amorphous silicon based neutron beam monitors that are pixilated, reliable, durable, fully packaged, and fabricated with high yield using low-cost method. During the Phase I effort, work as been focused in the following areas: 1) Deposition of high quality, low-defect-density, low-stress a-Si films using very high frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (VHF PECVD) at high deposition rate and with low device shunting; 2) Fabrication of Si/SiO2/metal/p/i/n/metal/n/i/p/metal/SiO2/ device for the detection of alpha particles which are daughter particles of neutrons through appropriate nuclear reactions; and 3) Testing of various devices fabricated for alpha and neutron detection; As the main results: · High quality, low-defect-density, low-stress a-Si films have been successfully deposited using VHF PECVD on various low-cost substrates; · Various single-junction and double junction detector devices have been fabricated; · The detector devices fabricated have been systematically tested and analyzed. · Some of the fabricated devices are found to successfully detect alpha particles. Further research is required to bring this Phase I work beyond the feasibility demonstration toward the final prototype devices. The success of this project will lead to a high-performance, low-cost, X-Y pixilated neutron beam monitor that could be used in all of the neutron facilities worldwide. In addition, the technologies

  4. Transverse and longitudinal vibrations in amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltukov, Y. M.; Fusco, C.; Tanguy, A.; Parshin, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    We show that harmonic vibrations in amorphous silicon can be decomposed to transverse and longitudinal components in all frequency range even in the absence of the well defined wave vector q. For this purpose we define the transverse component of the eigenvector with given ω as a component, which does not change the volumes of Voronoi cells around atoms. The longitudinal component is the remaining orthogonal component. We have found the longitudinal and transverse components of the vibrational density of states for numerical model of amorphous silicon. The vibrations are mostly transverse below 7 THz and above 15 THz. In the frequency interval in between the vibrations have a longitudinal nature. Just this sudden transformation of vibrations at 7 THz from almost transverse to almost longitudinal ones explains the prominent peak in the diffusivity of the amorphous silicon just above 7 THz.

  5. Inverted amorphous silicon solar cell utilizing cermet layers

    DOEpatents

    Hanak, Joseph J.

    1979-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell incorporating a transparent high work function metal cermet incident to solar radiation and a thick film cermet contacting the amorphous silicon opposite to said incident surface.

  6. Amorphous metallic films in silicon metallization systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolet, M. A.; Kattelus, H.; So, F.

    1984-01-01

    The general objective was to determine the potential of amorphous metallic thin films as a means of improving the stability of metallic contacts to a silicon substrate. The specific objective pursued was to determine the role of nitrogen in the formation and the resulting properties of amorphous thin-film diffusion barriers. Amorphous metallic films are attractive as diffusion barriers because of the low atomic diffusivity in these materials. Previous investigations revealed that in meeting this condition alone, good diffusion barriers are not necessarily obtained, because amorphous films can react with an adjacent medium (e.g., Si, Al) before they recrystallize. In the case of a silicon single-crystalline substrate, correlation exists between the temperature at which an amorphous metallic binary thin film reacts and the temperatures at which the films made of the same two metallic elements react individually. Amorphous binary films made of Zr and W were investigated. Both react with Si individually only at elevated temperatures. It was confirmed that such films react with Si only above 700 C when annealed in vacuum for 30 min. Amorphous W-N films were also investigated. They are more stable as barriers between Al and Si than polycrystalline W. Nitrogen effectively prevents the W-Al reaction that sets in at 500 C with polycrystalline W.

  7. Oxidation kinetics of coated silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (SiC/SiC)

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, D.S.

    1994-12-31

    Silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (SiC/SiC) was exposed for 100 hours to dry, flowing oxygen. Oxidation kinetics were determined via thermogravimetric analysis at 981{degrees}, 1204{degrees} and 1316{degrees}C (1800{degrees}, 2200{degrees} and 2400{degrees}F). The effectiveness of three external coating systems applied for oxidation protection is discussed. In all cases, weight gains were observed, and the pyrolytic carbon interface layer remained intact. A CVD SiC external coating is the most promising due to low oxidation kinetics resulting from solid silica formation. A borosilicate glass was observed on the surface of two of the materials that have boron-containing coatings.

  8. Direct microwave joining of reaction bonded silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Black, W.M.; Silberglitt, R.

    1992-08-01

    A single-mode rectangular resonant cavity operating at 2.45 GHz was used to join, without any interlayer or applied pressure, specimens of reaction bonded silicon carbide. Specimens of 0.95 cm diameter and 0.5 cm height were joined at temperatures 1400-1450 C in 10 to 15 minutes. Specimens of arbitrary shapes and practical sizes were joined in a commercially available 900 watt multi-mode oven with hybrid heating. The joined specimens were sectioned and examined. The joint was not detectable even by scanning electron microscope observation. On heating silicon bleeds out of reaction bonded silicon carbide. The apparent density of the heated reaction bonded silicon carbide was 3.01 gm/cc as compared to 3.05 gm/cc for the as received material. However, the only difference in microstructure was some grain growth of the microwave heated reaction bonded silicon carbide, compared to the as received material. 10 refs.

  9. Predicting Two-Dimensional Silicon Carbide Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhiming; Zhang, Zhuhua; Kutana, Alex; Yakobson, Boris I

    2015-10-27

    Intrinsic semimetallicity of graphene and silicene largely limits their applications in functional devices. Mixing carbon and silicon atoms to form two-dimensional (2D) silicon carbide (SixC1-x) sheets is promising to overcome this issue. Using first-principles calculations combined with the cluster expansion method, we perform a comprehensive study on the thermodynamic stability and electronic properties of 2D SixC1-x monolayers with 0 ≤ x ≤ 1. Upon varying the silicon concentration, the 2D SixC1-x presents two distinct structural phases, a homogeneous phase with well dispersed Si (or C) atoms and an in-plane hybrid phase rich in SiC domains. While the in-plane hybrid structure shows uniform semiconducting properties with widely tunable band gap from 0 to 2.87 eV due to quantum confinement effect imposed by the SiC domains, the homogeneous structures can be semiconducting or remain semimetallic depending on a superlattice vector which dictates whether the sublattice symmetry is topologically broken. Moreover, we reveal a universal rule for describing the electronic properties of the homogeneous SixC1-x structures. These findings suggest that the 2D SixC1-x monolayers may present a new "family" of 2D materials, with a rich variety of properties for applications in electronics and optoelectronics. PMID:26394207

  10. New Amorphous Silicon Alloy Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapur, Mridula N.

    1990-01-01

    The properties of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) have been modified by alloying with Al, Ga and S respectively. The Al and Ga alloys are in effect quaternary alloys as they were fabricated in a carbon-rich discharge. The alloys were prepared by the plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (PACVD) method. This method has several advantages, the major one being the relatively low defect densities of the resulting materials. The PACVD system used to grow the alloy films was designed and constructed in the laboratory. It was first tested with known (a-Si:H and a-Si:As:H) materials. Thus, it was established that device quality alloy films could be grown with the home-made PACVD setup. The chemical composition of the alloys was characterized by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The homogeneous nature of hydrogen distribution in the alloys was established by SIMS depth profile analysis. A quantitative analysis of the bulk elemental content was carried out by EPMA. The analysis indicated that the alloying element was incorporated in the films more efficiently at low input gas concentrations than at the higher concentrations. A topological model was proposed to explain the observed behavior. The optical energy gap of the alloys could be varied in the 0.90 to 1.92 eV range. The Al and Ga alloys were low band gap materials, whereas alloying with S had the effect of widening the energy gap. It was observed that although the Si-Al and Si-Ga alloys contained significant amounts of C and H, the magnitude of the energy gap was determined by the metallic component. The various trends in optical properties could be related to the binding characteristics of the respective alloy systems. A quantitative explanation of the results was provided by White's tight binding model. The dark conductivity-temperature dependence of the alloys was examined. A linear dependence was observed for the Al and Ga systems. Electronic conduction in

  11. Separation of Nuclear Fuel Surrogates from Silicon Carbide Inert Matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Ronald Baney

    2008-12-15

    The objective of this project has been to identify a process for separating transuranic species from silicon carbide (SiC). Silicon carbide has become one of the prime candidates for the matrix in inert matrix fuels, (IMF) being designed to reduce plutonium inventories and the long half-lives actinides through transmutation since complete reaction is not practical it become necessary to separate the non-transmuted materials from the silicon carbide matrix for ultimate reprocessing. This work reports a method for that required process.l

  12. Electronic Structure Studies of Amorphous Hydrogenated Boron Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sky Driver, M.; Sandstrom, Joseph; Boyko, Teak; Moewes, Alexander; Caruso, Anthony

    2010-03-01

    Boron carbide is a technologically relevant material with importance in voltaic transduction. However, the local physical, chemical and electronic structure of low temperature deposited thin films of amorphous boron carbide is far from understood, hindering its progress in application. X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopies (XAS/XES) were applied to thin films of B4C and B5C:Hx to study the near Fermi edge structure; the films were prepared by RF magnetron sputtering and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) and were thermally treated after deposition from 400 to 800 C. XES spectra indicate a physical structure transition from amorphous to nanocrystalline at 700 C, a much lower temperature than expected from traditional physical vapor deposition or flash annealing temperatures reported. These structural differences are of significant interest to transport measurements and will be discussed as a correlation. Further, x-ray and ultraviolet photoemission were also collected as a compliment to XES/XAS and will be discussed in the context of understanding the local intra vs. intermolecular electronic structure of these boron-rich molecular based solids.

  13. Method of preparing silicon carbide particles dispersed in an electrolytic bath for composite electroplating of metals

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Yu-Min; Wang, Jih-Wen; Liue, Chun-Ying; Yeh, Shinn-Horng

    1994-01-01

    A method for preparing silicon carbide particles dispersed in an electrolytic bath for composite electroplating of metals includes the steps of washing the silicon carbide particles with an organic solvent; washing the silicon carbide particles with an inorganic acid; grinding the silicon carbide particles; and heating the silicon carbide particles in a nickel-containing solution at a boiling temperature for a predetermined period of time.

  14. Novel Silicon Carbide Detector for Active Inspections

    SciTech Connect

    F. H. Ruddy; J.G. Seidel; R.W. Flammang

    2007-03-01

    The need to address increasingly challenging inspection requirements (such as large volume objects, very fast inspection throughputs, potentially significant shielding, etc.) for such items as nuclear materials and explosives will require the use of active interrogation technologies. While these active technologies can successfully address these challenges by inducing unique, temporal signatures, the inspection environment will also induce overall “background signals” that can be orders of magnitude larger than the induced signatures. Detectors that can successfully operate in these types of customized, inspection environments (pulsed and continuous) and successfully extract induced signature data are clearly needed and will effectively define the limitations of any active inspection system. A novel silicon carbide detector is now being investigated to successfully address both neutron- and photon/bremsstrahlung-type inspection applications. While this paper describes this detector and highlights efforts related to neutron inspection, it will focus on its neutron and gamma-ray/photon detection performance in neutron- and bremssstrahlung-type inspection applications.

  15. Comparison Measurements of Silicon Carbide Temperature Monitors

    SciTech Connect

    J. L. Rempe; K. G. Condie; D. L. Knudson; L. L. Snead

    2010-06-01

    As part of the efforts initiated through the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) program to make Silicon Carbide (SiC) temperature monitors available, a capability was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to complete post-irradiation evaluations of these monitors. INL selected the resistance measurement approach for detecting peak irradiation temperature from SiC temperature monitors. To demonstrate this new capability, comparison measurements were completed by INL and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on identical samples subjected to identical irradiation conditions. Results reported in this paper indicate that the resistance measurement approach can yield similar peak irradiation temperatures if appropriate equipment is used and appropriate procedures are followed.

  16. Nanoporous Silicon Carbide for Nanoelectromechanical Systems Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hossain, T.; Khan, F.; Adesida, I.; Bohn, P.; Rittenhouse, T.; Lienhard, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    A major goal of this project is to produce porous silicon carbide (PSiC) via an electroless process for eventual utilization in nanoscale sensing platforms. Results in the literature have shown a variety of porous morphologies in SiC produced in anodic cells. Therefore, predictability and reproducibility of porous structures are initial concerns. This work has concentrated on producing morphologies of known porosity, with particular attention paid toward producing the extremely high surface areas required for a porous flow sensor. We have conducted a parametric study of electroless etching conditions and characteristics of the resulting physical nanostructure and also investigated the relationship between morphology and materials properties. Further, we have investigated bulk etching of SiC using both photo-electrochemical etching and inductively-coupled-plasma reactive ion etching techniques.

  17. Silicon carbide mirrors for high power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Takacs, P. Z.

    1981-11-01

    The advent of synchrotron radiation (SR) sources and high energy lasers (HEL) in recent years has brought about the need for optical materials that can withstand the harsh operating conditions in such devices. SR mirrors must be ultra-high vacuum compatible, must withstand intense x-ray irradiation without surface damage, must maintain surface figure under thermal loading and must be capable of being polished to an extremely smooth surface finish. Chemical vapor deposited (CVD) silicon carbide in combination with sintered substrate material meets these requirements and offers additional benefits as well. It is an extremely hard material and offers the possibility of being cleaned and recoated many times without degradation of the surface finish, thereby prolonging the lifetime of expensive optical components. It is an extremely strong material and offers the possibility of weight reduction over conventional mirror materials.

  18. Chemical Mechanical Polishing of Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. Anthony; Pirouz

    1999-01-01

    The High Temperature Integrated Electronics and Sensors (HTIES) team at the NASA Lewis Research Center is developing silicon carbide (SiC) as an enabling electronic technology for many aerospace applications. The Lewis team is focusing on the chemical vapor deposition of the thin, single-crystal SiC films from which devices are fabricated. These films, which are deposited (i.e., epitaxially "grown") on commercial wafers, must consist of a single crystal with very few structural defects so that the derived devices perform satisfactorily and reliably. Working in collaboration (NASA grant) with Professor Pirouz of Case Western Reserve University, we developed a chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP) technique for removing the subsurface polishing damage prior to epitaxial growth of the single-crystal SiC films.

  19. Temperature-dependent reflectivity of silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Daniel

    1992-01-01

    The spectral reflectivity of a commercial silicon carbide (SiC) ceramic surface was measured at wavelengths from 2.5 to 14.5 microns and at temperatures ranging from 358 to 520 K using a NASA-developed multiwavelength pyrometer. The SiC surface reflectivity was low at the short wavelengths, decreasing to almost zero at 10 microns, then increasing rapidly to a maximum at approximately 12.5 microns, and decreasing gradually thereafter. The reflectivity maximum increased in magnitude with increasing surface temperature. The wavelength and temperature dependence can be explained in terms of the classical dispersion theory of crystals and the Lorentz electron theory. Electronic transitions between the donor state and the conduction band states were responsible for the dispersion. The concentration of the donor state in SiC was determined to be approximately 4 x 10 exp 18 and its ionization energy was determined to be approximately 71 meV.

  20. Stored energy in irradiated silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, L.L.; Burchell, T.D.

    1997-04-01

    This report presents a short review of the phenomenon of Wigner stored energy release from irradiated graphite and discusses it in relation to neutron irradiation of silicon carbide. A single published work in the area of stored energy release in SiC is reviewed and the results are discussed. It appears from this previous work that because the combination of the comparatively high specific heat of SiC and distribution in activation energies for recombining defects, the stored energy release of SiC should only be a problem at temperatures lower than those considered for fusion devices. The conclusion of this preliminary review is that the stored energy release in SiC will not be sufficient to cause catastrophic heating in fusion reactor components, though further study would be desirable.

  1. Method of producing silicon carbide articles

    DOEpatents

    Milewski, John V.

    1985-01-01

    A method of producing articles comprising reaction-bonded silicon carbide (SiC) and graphite (and/or carbon) is given. The process converts the graphite (and/or carbon) in situ to SiC, thus providing the capability of economically obtaining articles made up wholly or partially of SiC having any size and shape in which graphite (and/or carbon) can be found or made. When the produced articles are made of an inner graphite (and/or carbon) substrate to which SiC is reaction bonded, these articles distinguish SiC-coated graphite articles found in the prior art by the feature of a strong bond having a gradual (as opposed to a sharply defined) interface which extends over a distance of mils. A method for forming SiC whisker-reinforced ceramic matrices is also given. The whisker-reinforced articles comprise SiC whiskers which substantially retain their structural integrity.

  2. Development of a silicon carbide sewing thread

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawko, Paul M.; Vasudev, Anand

    1989-01-01

    A silicon carbide (SiC) sewing thread has been designed which consists of a two-ply yarn in a 122 turns-per-meter-twist construction. Two processing aids in thread construction were evaluated. Prototype blankets were sewn using an SiC thread prepared either with polytetrafluoroethylene sizing or with an overwrap of rayon/dacron service yarn. The rayon/dacron-wrapped SiC thread was stronger, as shown by higher break-strength retention and less damage to the outer-mold-line fabric. This thread enables thermal protection system articles to be sewn or joined, or have perimeter close-out of assembled parts when using SiC fabric for high-temperature applications.

  3. Quantitative Ultrasound Characterization of Silicon Carbide Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portune, A. R.; Haber, R. A.

    2010-02-01

    Silicon carbide mirrors were characterized using several qualitative and quantitative nondestructive ultrasound techniques in order to determine the most efficient method for rapid performance evaluations. Ultrasound testing was performed in immersion using both phased array and single transducer systems in pulse-echo configuration. C-scan images of top and bottom surface reflected signal peak amplitudes were used to qualitatively locate and identify homogeneity variations within the mirror materials. Quantitative analysis of normalized amplitude histograms revealed significant differences in homogeneity estimations between phased array and single transducer test methods. Acoustic spectroscopy over the 10-33 MHz regime identified bulk microstructural differences between high and low amplitude regions in the samples. While ultrasound phased array performed well at rapidly locating surface and subsurface heterogeneities, it could not match the resolution and clarity of single transducer C-scan images or the insight of acoustic spectroscopy analyses.

  4. Metal electrode for amorphous silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Richard

    1983-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell having an N-type region wherein the contact to the N-type region is composed of a material having a work function of about 3.7 electron volts or less. Suitable materials include strontium, barium and magnesium and rare earth metals such as gadolinium and yttrium.

  5. Fabricating amorphous silicon solar cells by varying the temperature _of the substrate during deposition of the amorphous silicon layer

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.

    1982-01-01

    An improved process for fabricating amorphous silicon solar cells in which the temperature of the substrate is varied during the deposition of the amorphous silicon layer is described. Solar cells manufactured in accordance with this process are shown to have increased efficiencies and fill factors when compared to solar cells manufactured with a constant substrate temperature during deposition of the amorphous silicon layer.

  6. A review of oxide, silicon nitride, and silicon carbide brazing

    SciTech Connect

    Santella, M.L.; Moorhead, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    There is growing interest in using ceramics for structural applications, many of which require the fabrication of components with complicated shapes. Normal ceramic processing methods restrict the shapes into which these materials can be produced, but ceramic joining technology can be used to overcome many of these limitations, and also offers the possibility for improving the reliability of ceramic components. One method of joining ceramics is by brazing. The metallic alloys used for bonding must wet and adhere to the ceramic surfaces without excessive reaction. Alumina, partially stabilized zirconia, and silicon nitride have high ionic character to their chemical bonds and are difficult to wet. Alloys for brazing these materials must be formulated to overcome this problem. Silicon carbide, which has some metallic characteristics, reacts excessively with many alloys, and forms joints of low mechanical strength. The brazing characteristics of these three types of ceramics, and residual stresses in ceramic-to-metal joints are briefly discussed.

  7. Conventional and Microwave Joining of Silicon Carbide Using Displacement Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kingsley, J.; Yiin, T.; Barmatz, M.

    1995-01-01

    Microwave heating was used to join Silicon Carbide rods using a thin TiC /Si tape interlayer . Microwaves quickly heated the rods and tape to temperatures where solid-state displacement reactions between TiC and Si occurred.

  8. Silicon carbide materials for high duty seal applications

    SciTech Connect

    Berroth, K.E. )

    1990-12-01

    Properties, fabrication, and high-duty applications of silicon carbide grades are discussed. The two types of silicon carbide, i.e., reaction-bonded and sintered, are considered. The potential for adhesion and the lack of dry running abilities lead to a variety of microstructures. For reaction-bonded silicon carbide, the microstructure can be a tool for optimization of the tribological behavior. Besides the high corrosion resistance of the material, its thermal conductivity is excellent. Grain sizes of about 40-50 microns are used in high-duty applications. Reaction-bonded silicon carbide with residual content of carbon graphite has improved tribological/hydrodynamic characteristics and performs well in sealing hard faces.

  9. Process for preparing fine grain silicon carbide powder

    DOEpatents

    Wei, G.C.

    Method of producing fine-grain silicon carbide powder comprises combining methyltrimethoxysilane with a solution of phenolic resin, acetone and water or sugar and water, gelling the resulting mixture, and then drying and heating the obtained gel.

  10. Silicon carbide for high-temperature heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penty, R. A.; Bjerklie, J. W.

    1982-02-01

    It is noted that ceramic heat exchangers are now being used industrially in low-pressure applications, such as recuperators and air preheaters, and that serious consideration is being given to using ceramic materials for high-pressure heat exchangers. The principal advantage of using ceramic heat exchangers in the candidate applications is the potential for higher temperature service or increased life over that obtainable with metallic exchangers. Silicon carbide-based materials are now in service in many areas. The use of low-pressure ceramic recuperators constructed of silicon carbide has demonstrated fuel savings exceeding 40% in high-temperature industrial furnaces. At a material temperature of 1375 C, the demonstrated lifetime of some silicon carbide tubes is 12 to 15 months. The availability of silicon carbide materials is discussed, together with properties required for designing reliable heat exchangers. Attention is also given to the usual failure mode encountered in the field.

  11. Tribological properties of silicon carbide in metal removal process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    This paper reviews material properties of adhesion, friction and wear of single-crystal silicon carbide in contact with metals and alloys involved in a metal removal process such as grinding. The tribological properties in the metal removal processes are divided into properties which remove metal by adhesion between sliding surfaces, and metal removal by silicon carbide sliding against a metal, indenting it, and plowing a series of grooves or furrows. The paper also deals with fracture and deformation characteristics of the silicon carbide surface; the adhesion, friction and metal transfer to silicon carbide is related to the relative chemical activity of the metals. Atomic size and content of alloying elements play a dominant role in controlling adhesion and friction properties of alloys. The friction and abrasive wear decrease as the shear strength of the bulk metal increases.

  12. Crystalline to amorphous transformation in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Cheruvu, S.M.

    1982-09-01

    In the present investigation, an attempt was made to understand the fundamental mechanism of crystalline-to-amorphous transformation in arsenic implanted silicon using high resolution electron microscopy. A comparison of the gradual disappearance of simulated lattice fringes with increasing Frenkel pair concentration with the experimental observation of sharp interfaces between crystalline and amorphous regions was carried out leading to the conclusion that when the defect concentration reaches a critical value, the crystal does relax to an amorphous state. Optical diffraction experiments using atomic models also supported this hypothesis. Both crystalline and amorphous zones were found to co-exist with sharp interfaces at the atomic level. Growth of the amorphous fraction depends on the temperature, dose rate and the mass of the implanted ion. Preliminary results of high energy electron irradiation experiments at 1.2 MeV also suggested that clustering of point defects occurs near room temperature. An observation in a high resolution image of a small amorphous zone centered at the core of a dislocation is presented as evidence that the nucleation of an amorphous phase is heterogeneous in nature involving clustering or segregation of point defects near existing defects.

  13. Single-Event Effects in Silicon Carbide Power Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Casey, Megan C.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Ikpe, Stanley; Topper, Alyson D.; Wilcox, Edward P.; Kim, Hak; Phan, Anthony M.

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes the NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging Program Silicon Carbide Power Device Subtask efforts in FY15. Benefits of SiC are described and example NASA Programs and Projects desiring this technology are given. The current status of the radiation tolerance of silicon carbide power devices is given and paths forward in the effort to develop heavy-ion single-event effect hardened devices indicated.

  14. Tribological properties of silicon carbide in metal removal process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    Material properties are considered as they relate to adhesion, friction, and wear of single crystal silicon carbide in contact with metals and alloys that are likely to be involved in a metal removal process such as grinding. Metal removal from adhesion between sliding surfaces in contact and metal removal as a result of the silicon carbide sliding against a metal, indenting into it, and plowing a series of grooves or furrows are discussed. Fracture and deformation characteristics of the silicon carbide surface are also covered. The adhesion, friction, and metal transfer to silicon carbide is related to the relative chemical activity of the metals. The more active the metal, the higher the adhesion and friction, and the greater the metal transfer to silicon carbide. Atomic size and content of alloying elements play a dominant role in controlling adhesion, friction, and abrasive wear properties of alloys. The friction and abrasive wear (metal removal) decrease linearly as the shear strength of the bulk metal increases. They decrease as the solute to solvent atomic radius ratio increases or decreases linearly from unity, and with an increase of solute content. The surface fracture of silicon carbide is due to cleavages of 0001, 10(-1)0, and/or 11(-2)0 planes.

  15. Thermal properties of wood-derived silicon carbide and copper-silicon carbide composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappecena, Kristen E.

    Wood-derived ceramics and composites have been of interest in recent years due to their unique microstructures, which lead to tailorable properties. The porosity and pore size distribution of each wood type is different, which yields variations in properties in the resultant materials. The thermal properties of silicon carbide ceramics and copper-silicon carbide composites derived from wood were studied as a function of their pore structures. Wood was pyrolyzed at temperatures ranging from 300-2400°C to yield porous carbon. The progression toward long-range order was studied as a function of pyrolyzation temperature. Biomorphic silicon carbide (bioSiC) is a porous ceramic material resulting from silicon melt infiltration of these porous carbon materials. BioSiC has potential applicability in many high temperature environments, particularly those in which rapid temperature changes occur. To understand the behavior of bioSiC at elevated temperatures, the thermal and thermo-mechanical properties were studied. The thermal conductivity of bioSiC from five precursors was determined using flash diffusivity at temperatures up to 1100°C. Thermal conductivity results varied with porosity, temperature and orientation, and decreased from 42-13 W/mK for porosities of 43-69%, respectively, at room temperature. The results were compared with to object-oriented finite-element analysis (OOF). OOF was also used to model and understand the heat-flow paths through the complex bioSiC microstructures. The thermal shock resistance of bioSiC was also studied, and no bioSiC sample was found to fail catastrophically after up to five thermal shock cycles from 1400°C to room temperature oil. Copper-silicon carbide composites have potential uses in thermal management applications due to the high thermal conductivity of each phase. Cu-bioSiC composites were created by electrodeposition of copper into bioSiC pores. The detrimental Cu-SiC reaction was avoided by using this room temperature

  16. Polymeric synthesis of silicon carbide with microwaves.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Juan; Urueta, Luis; Valdez, Zarel

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work is conducting polymeric synthesis with microwaves for producing beta-SiC. A polymeric precursor was prepared by means of hydrolysis and condensation reactions from pheniltrimethoxysilane, water, methanol, ammonium hydroxide and chloride acid. The precursor was placed into a quartz tube in vacuum; pyrolysis was carried out conventionally in a tube furnace, and by microwaves at 2.45 GHz in a multimode cavity. Conventional tests took place in a scheme where temperature was up to 1500 degrees C for 120 minutes. Microwave heating rate was not controlled and tests lasted 60 and 90 minutes, temperature was around 900 degrees C. Products of the pyrolysis were analyzed by means of x-ray diffraction; in the microwave case the diffraction patterns showed a strong background of either very fine particles or amorphous material, then infrared spectroscopy was also employed for confirming carbon bonds. In both processes beta-SiC was found as the only produced carbide. PMID:17645205

  17. Ion bombardment and disorder in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Sidhu, L.S.; Gaspari, F.; Zukotynski, S.

    1997-07-01

    The effect of ion bombardment during growth on the structural and optical properties of amorphous silicon are presented. Two series of films were deposited under electrically grounded and positively biased substrate conditions. The biased samples displayed lower growth rates and increased hydrogen content relative to grounded counterparts. The film structure was examined using Raman spectroscopy. The transverse optic like phonon band position was used as a parameter to characterize network order. Biased samples displayed an increased order of the amorphous network relative to grounded samples. Furthermore, biased samples exhibited a larger optical gap. These results are correlated and attributed to reduced ion bombardment effects.

  18. Friction and wear behavior of single-crystal silicon carbide in contact with titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with single crystal silicon carbide in sliding contact with titanium. Results indicate that the friction coefficient is greater in vacuum than in argon and that this is due to the greater adhesion or adhesive transfer in vacuum. Thin films of silicon carbide transferred to titanium also adhered to silicon carbide both in argon at atmospheric pressure and in high vacuum. Cohesive bonds fractured on both the silicon carbide and titanium surfaces. The wear debris of silicon carbide created by fracture plowed the silicon carbide surface in a plastic manner. The friction characteristics of titanium in contact with silicon carbide were sensitive to the surface roughness of silicon carbide, and the friction coefficients were higher for a rough surface of silicon carbide than for a smooth one. The difference in friction results was due to plastic deformation (plowing of titanium).

  19. The Local Physical Structure of Amorphous Boron Carbide Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paquette, M. M.; Li, Wenjing; Driver, M. S.; Oyler, N. A.; Caruso, A. N.

    2011-03-01

    Thin-film amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide (a-B5 C:Hx) and technical boron carbide (B4 C:Cy) are important materials in next-generation solid-state neutron detectors and refractory electronics. Optimizing the electrical carrier transport and electronic structure of these films for the stated applications has been severely hindered by: (1) their lack of long-range periodicity; (2) the ability of boron-rich solids to form complex polyhedra; and, (3) the possibility that carbon atoms incorporate into the polyhedral structures in an intraicosahedral fashion or that they bridge polyhedral structures in an intericosahedral fashion. The use of traditional spectroscopies that are sensitive to local coordination environment have been inadequate in the determination of the local physical structure because of either poor resolution or very low interaction cross sections. However, magic spinning angle (MAS) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR), does have the signal-to-noise and rigor to extract the local physical coordination structure of these materials, despite the challenges associated with deltahedra-based structures. This poster will describe the progress and challenges in structure determination through a comparison of unknown samples to known calibration standards using MAS techniques, in the context of furthering the general understanding of the electronic structure of a-B5 C:Hx and B4 C:Cy thin films.

  20. Silicon nano-carbide in strengthening and ceramic technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudneva, V. V.; Galevsky, G. V.; Kozyrev, N. A.

    2015-09-01

    Technological advantages and conditions of new quality assurance of coatings and products, provided by silicon nano-carbide, have been ascertained in the course of composite electrodeposition of coatings, structural ceramics patterning, and surface hardening of steels via electro-explosive alloying. Silicon nano-carbide has been recommended to be used as a component of wear and corrosion resistant chromium carbide electrodeposited coatings, which can be operated at high temperatures and used for strengthening tools and equipment including those with a complex microrelief of functional surfaces. Silicon nano-carbide as a component of composite “silicon carbide - boron - carbon” can be applied to produce ceramic half products via solid phase sintering in argon under pressure of 0.1 MPa and temperature 2273 K. Application of silicon nano-carbide in technology of tool steel surface hardening via electroexplosive alloying ensures obtaining of a high micro-hard, wear and heat resistant shielding layer which is about 20 μm deep.

  1. Deuterium in crystalline and amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Borzi, R.; Ma, H.; Fedders, P.A.; Leopold, D.J.; Norberg, R.E.; Boyce, J.B.; Johnson, N.M.; Ready, S.E.; Walker, J.

    1997-07-01

    The authors report deuteron magnetic resonance (DMR) measurements on aged deuterium-implanted single crystal n-type silicon and comparisons with amorphous silicon spectra. The sample film was prepared six years ago by deuteration from a-D{sub 2} plasma and evaluated by a variety of experimental methods. Deuterium has been evolving with time and the present DMR signal shows a smaller deuteron population. A doublet from Si-D configurations along (111) has decreased more than have central molecular DMR components, which include 47 and 12 kHz FWHM gaussians. Transient DMR magnetization recoveries indicate spin lattice relaxation to para-D{sub 2} relaxation centers.

  2. Mechanism for hydrogen diffusion in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, R.; Li, Q.; Pan, B.C.; Yoon, Y.

    1998-01-01

    Tight-binding molecular-dynamics calculations reveal a mechanism for hydrogen diffusion in hydrogenated amorphous silicon. Hydrogen diffuses through the network by successively bonding with nearby silicons and breaking their Si{endash}Si bonds. The diffusing hydrogen carries with it a newly created dangling bond. These intermediate transporting states are densely populated in the network, have lower energies than H at the center of stretched Si{endash}Si bonds, and can play a crucial role in hydrogen diffusion. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. Self-Diffusion in Amorphous Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauß, Florian; Dörrer, Lars; Geue, Thomas; Stahn, Jochen; Koutsioubas, Alexandros; Mattauch, Stefan; Schmidt, Harald

    2016-01-01

    The present Letter reports on self-diffusion in amorphous silicon. Experiments were done on 29Si/natSi heterostructures using neutron reflectometry and secondary ion mass spectrometry. The diffusivities follow the Arrhenius law in the temperature range between 550 and 700 °C with an activation energy of (4.4 ±0.3 ) eV . In comparison with single crystalline silicon the diffusivities are tremendously higher by 5 orders of magnitude at about 700 °C , which can be interpreted as the consequence of a high diffusion entropy.

  4. Self-Diffusion in Amorphous Silicon.

    PubMed

    Strauß, Florian; Dörrer, Lars; Geue, Thomas; Stahn, Jochen; Koutsioubas, Alexandros; Mattauch, Stefan; Schmidt, Harald

    2016-01-15

    The present Letter reports on self-diffusion in amorphous silicon. Experiments were done on ^{29}Si/^{nat}Si heterostructures using neutron reflectometry and secondary ion mass spectrometry. The diffusivities follow the Arrhenius law in the temperature range between 550 and 700 °C with an activation energy of (4.4±0.3)  eV. In comparison with single crystalline silicon the diffusivities are tremendously higher by 5 orders of magnitude at about 700 °C, which can be interpreted as the consequence of a high diffusion entropy. PMID:26824552

  5. Dynamical models of hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousseau, Normand; Lewis, Laurent J.

    1991-04-01

    The results of our molecular-dynamics simulation of bulk hydrogenated amorphous silicon using empirical potentials are presented. More specifically, we discuss a dynamical procedure for incorporating hydrogen into a pure amorphous silicon matrix, which is derived from the concept of floating bonds put forward by Pantelides [Phys. Rev. Lett. 57, 2979 (1986)]. The structures resulting from this model are compared with those obtained with use of a static approach recently developed by us. This method exhibits considerable improvement over the previous one and, in particular, unambiguously reveals the strain-relieving role of hydrogen. While the former model leads to substantial overcoordination, the present one results in almost perfect tetrahedral bonding, with an average coordination number Z=4.03, the lowest value ever achieved using a Stillinger-Weber potential. The simulations are also used to calculate the vibrational densities of states, which are found to be in good accord with corresponding neutron-scattering measurements.

  6. Process for coating an object with silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, Harry (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A process for coating a carbon or graphite object with silicon carbide by contacting it with silicon liquid and vapor over various lengths of contact time. In the process, a stream of silicon-containing precursor material in gaseous phase below the decomposition temperature of said gas and a co-reactant, carrier or diluent gas such as hydrogen is passed through a hole within a high emissivity, thin, insulating septum into a reaction chamber above the melting point of silicon. The thin septum has one face below the decomposition temperature of the gas and an opposite face exposed to the reaction chamber. The precursor gas is decomposed directly to silicon in the reaction chamber. A stream of any decomposition gas and any unreacted precursor gas from said reaction chamber is removed. The object within the reaction chamber is then contacted with silicon, and recovered after it has been coated with silicon carbide.

  7. Aluminum-silicon eutectic alloy improves electrical and mechanical contact to silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shier, J. S.

    1970-01-01

    Alloy contact layer is made at relatively low temperature and has good wetting characteristics. Contacts adhere well to silicon carbide surface, penetrating about 300 to 500 angstroms into it. Contacts are ohmic on p-type silicon carbide and blocking on n-type.

  8. Amorphous metallic films in silicon metallization systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    So, F.; Kolawa, E.; Nicolet, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    Diffusion barrier research was focussed on lowering the chemical reactivity of amorphous thin films on silicon. An additional area of concern is the reaction with metal overlays such as aluminum, silver, and gold. Gold was included to allow for technology transfer to gallium arsenide PV cells. Amorphous tungsten nitride films have shown much promise. Stability to annealing temperatures of 700, 800, and 550 C were achieved for overlays of silver, gold, and aluminum, respectively. The lower results for aluminum were not surprising because there is an eutectic that can form at a lower temperature. It seems that titanium and zirconium will remove the nitrogen from a tungsten nitride amorphous film and render it unstable. Other variables of research interest were substrate bias and base pressure during sputtering.

  9. High resolution amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Kaplan, S.N.; Perez-Mendez, V.

    1992-05-26

    A radiation detector employing amorphous Si:H cells in an array with each detector cell having at least three contiguous layers (n-type, intrinsic, p-type), positioned between two electrodes to which a bias voltage is applied. An energy conversion layer atop the silicon cells intercepts incident radiation and converts radiation energy to light energy of a wavelength to which the silicon cells are responsive. A read-out device, positioned proximate to each detector element in an array allows each such element to be interrogated independently to determine whether radiation has been detected in that cell. The energy conversion material may be a layer of luminescent material having a columnar structure. In one embodiment a column of luminescent material detects the passage therethrough of radiation to be detected and directs a light beam signal to an adjacent a-Si:H film so that detection may be confined to one or more such cells in the array. One or both electrodes may have a comb structure, and the teeth of each electrode comb may be interdigitated for capacitance reduction. The amorphous Si:H film may be replaced by an amorphous Si:Ge:H film in which up to 40 percent of the amorphous material is Ge. Two dimensional arrays may be used in X-ray imaging, CT scanning, crystallography, high energy physics beam tracking, nuclear medicine cameras and autoradiography. 18 figs.

  10. High resolution amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Kaplan, Selig N.; Perez-Mendez, Victor

    1992-01-01

    A radiation detector employing amorphous Si:H cells in an array with each detector cell having at least three contiguous layers (n type, intrinsic, p type), positioned between two electrodes to which a bias voltage is applied. An energy conversion layer atop the silicon cells intercepts incident radiation and converts radiation energy to light energy of a wavelength to which the silicon cells are responsive. A read-out device, positioned proximate to each detector element in an array allows each such element to be interrogated independently to determine whether radiation has been detected in that cell. The energy conversion material may be a layer of luminescent material having a columnar structure. In one embodiment a column of luminescent material detects the passage therethrough of radiation to be detected and directs a light beam signal to an adjacent a-Si:H film so that detection may be confined to one or more such cells in the array. One or both electrodes may have a comb structure, and the teeth of each electrode comb may be interdigitated for capacitance reduction. The amorphous Si:H film may be replaced by an amorphous Si:Ge:H film in which up to 40 percent of the amorphous material is Ge. Two dimensional arrays may be used in X-ray imaging, CT scanning, crystallography, high energy physics beam tracking, nuclear medicine cameras and autoradiography.

  11. Palladium Implanted Silicon Carbide for Hydrogen Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muntele, C. I.; Ila, D.; Zimmerman, R. L.; Muntele, L.; Poker, D. B.; Hensley, D. K.; Larkin, David (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Silicon carbide is intended for use in fabrication of high-temperature, efficient hydrogen sensors. Traditionally, when a palladium coating is applied on the exposed surface of SiC, the chemical reaction between palladium and hydrogen produces a detectable change in the surface chemical potential. We have produced both a palladium coated SiC as well as a palladium, ion implanted SiC sensor. The palladium implantation was done at 500 C into the Si face of 6H, N-type SiC at various energies, and at various fluences. Then, we measured the hydrogen sensitivity response of each fabricated sensor by exposing them to hydrogen while monitoring the current flow across the p-n junction(s), with respect to time. The sensitivity of each sensor was measured at temperatures between 27 and 300 C. The response of the SiC sensors produced by Pd implantation has revealed a completely different behaviour than the SiC sensors produced by Pd deposition. In the Pd-deposited SiC sensors as well as in the ones reported in the literature, the current rises in the presence of hydrogen at room temperature as well as at elevated temperatures. In the case of Pd-implanted SiC sensors, the current decreases in the presence of hydrogen whenever the temperature is raised above 100 C. We will present the details and conclusions from the results obtained during this meeting.

  12. Improved silicon carbide for advanced heat engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, Thomas J.

    1989-01-01

    The development of high strength, high reliability silicon carbide parts with complex shapes suitable for use in advanced heat engines is studied. Injection molding was the forming method selected for the program because it is capable of forming complex parts adaptable for mass production on an economically sound basis. The goals were to reach a Weibull characteristic strength of 550 MPa (80 ksi) and a Weibull modulus of 16 for bars tested in four-point loading. Statistically designed experiments were performed throughout the program and a fluid mixing process employing an attritor mixer was developed. Compositional improvements in the amounts and sources of boron and carbon used and a pressureless sintering cycle were developed which provided samples of about 99 percent of theoretical density. Strengths were found to improve significantly by annealing in air. Strengths in excess of 550 MPa (80 ksi) with Weibull modulus of about 9 were obtained. Further improvements in Weibull modulus to about 16 were realized by proof testing. This is an increase of 86 percent in strength and 100 percent in Weibull modulus over the baseline data generated at the beginning of the program. Molding yields were improved and flaw distributions were observed to follow a Poisson process. Magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were found to be useful in characterizing the SiC powder and the sintered samples. Turbocharger rotors were molded and examined as an indication of the moldability of the mixes which were developed in this program.

  13. Material testing of silicon carbide mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witkin, David B.; Palusinski, Iwona A.

    2009-08-01

    The Aerospace Corporation is developing a space qualification method for silicon carbide optical systems that covers material verification through system development. One of the initial efforts has been to establish testing protocols for material properties. Three different tests have been performed to determine mechanical properties of SiC: modulus of rupture, equibiaxial flexural strength and fracture toughness. Testing materials and methods have been in accordance with the respective ASTM standards. Material from four vendors has been tested to date, as part of the MISSE flight program and other programs. Data analysis has focused on the types of issues that are important when building actual components- statistical modeling of test results, understanding batch-to-batch or other source material variations, and relating mechanical properties to microstructures. Mechanical properties are needed as inputs to design trade studies and development and analysis of proof tests, and to confirm or understand the results of non-destructive evaluations of the source materials. Measuring these properties using standardized tests on a statistically valid number of samples is intended to increase confidence for purchasers of SiC spacecraft components that materials and structures will perform as intended at the highest level of reliability.

  14. Casimir forces from conductive silicon carbide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedighi, M.; Svetovoy, V. B.; Broer, W. H.; Palasantzas, G.

    2014-05-01

    Samples of conductive silicon carbide (SiC), which is a promising material due to its excellent properties for devices operating in severe environments, were characterized with the atomic force microscope for roughness, and the optical properties were measured with ellipsometry in a wide range of frequencies. The samples show significant far-infrared absorption due to concentration of charge carriers and a sharp surface phonon-polariton peak. The Casimir interaction of SiC with different materials is calculated and discussed. As a result of the infrared structure and beyond to low frequencies, the Casimir force for SiC-SiC and SiC-Au approaches very slowly the limit of ideal metals, while it saturates significantly below this limit if interaction with insulators takes place (SiC-SiO2). At short separations (<10 nm) analysis of the van der Waals force yielded Hamaker constants for SiC-SiC interactions lower but comparable to those of metals, which is of significance to adhesion and surface assembly processes. Finally, bifurcation analysis of microelectromechanical system actuation indicated that SiC can enhance the regime of stable equilibria against stiction.

  15. Thermal equation of state of silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuejian; Liu, Zhi T. Y.; Khare, Sanjay V.; Collins, Sean Andrew; Zhang, Jianzhong; Wang, Liping; Zhao, Yusheng

    2016-02-01

    A large volume press coupled with in-situ energy-dispersive synchrotron X-ray was used to probe the change of silicon carbide (SiC) under high pressure and temperature (P-T) up to 8.1 GPa and 1100 K. The obtained pressure-volume-temperature data were fitted to a modified high-T Birch-Murnaghan equation of state, yielding values of a series of thermo-elastic parameters, such as the ambient bulk modulus KTo = 237(2) GPa, temperature derivative of the bulk modulus at a constant pressure (∂K/∂T)P = -0.037(4) GPa K-1, volumetric thermal expansivity α(0, T) = a + bT with a = 5.77(1) × 10-6 K-1 and b = 1.36(2) × 10-8 K-2, and pressure derivative of the thermal expansion at a constant temperature (∂α/∂P)T = 6.53 ± 0.64 × 10-7 K-1 GPa-1. Furthermore, we found the temperature derivative of the bulk modulus at a constant volume, (∂KT/∂T)V, equal to -0.028(4) GPa K-1 by using a thermal pressure approach. In addition, the elastic properties of SiC were determined by density functional theory through the calculation of Helmholtz free energy. The computed results generally agree well with the experimentally determined values.

  16. Methods for producing silicon carbide architectural preforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiCarlo, James A. (Inventor); Yun, Hee (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Methods are disclosed for producing architectural preforms and high-temperature composite structures containing high-strength ceramic fibers with reduced preforming stresses within each fiber, with an in-situ grown coating on each fiber surface, with reduced boron within the bulk of each fiber, and with improved tensile creep and rupture resistance properties for each fiber. The methods include the steps of preparing an original sample of a preform formed from a pre-selected high-strength silicon carbide ceramic fiber type, placing the original sample in a processing furnace under a pre-selected preforming stress state and thermally treating the sample in the processing furnace at a pre-selected processing temperature and hold time in a processing gas having a pre-selected composition, pressure, and flow rate. For the high-temperature composite structures, the method includes additional steps of depositing a thin interphase coating on the surface of each fiber and forming a ceramic or carbon-based matrix within the sample.

  17. Irradiation creep of advanced silicon carbide fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, R.; Youngblood, G. E.

    2000-12-01

    The bend stress relaxation (BSR) method was applied to study irradiation enhanced creep (IEC) of small diameter silicon carbide (SiC) fibers after 10 MeV proton irradiation. A first series of tests was conducted on Sylramic™ fibers irradiated at 600°C with average bending stresses of 400 and 667 MPa and for irradiation doses smaller than 0.04 dpa. The BSR results are compared to previously obtained torsional creep test results for the Textron SCS-6™ type SiC fibers by calculating the tensile equivalents for both testing methods. For the Sylramic fibers, the creep constant κ=4.7×10-6 Mpa-1 dpa-1, was a factor of 6 smaller than the κ-value determined for SCS-6 fibers at 600°C. In contrast, for T<900°C the κ-value determined by R.J. Price [Nucl. Technol. 35 (1977) 320] for high purity monolithic β-Si after 7.7 dpa neutron irradiation was only 0.4×10-6 MPa-1 dpa-1.

  18. Casimir force measurements from silicon carbide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedighi, M.; Svetovoy, V. B.; Palasantzas, G.

    2016-02-01

    Using an atomic force microscope we performed measurements of the Casimir force between a gold- coated (Au) microsphere and doped silicon carbide (SiC) samples. The last of these is a promising material for devices operating under severe environments. The roughness of the interacting surfaces was measured to obtain information for the minimum separation distance upon contact. Ellipsometry data for both systems were used to extract optical properties needed for the calculation of the Casimir force via the Lifshitz theory and for comparison to the experiment. Special attention is devoted to the separation of the electrostatic contribution to the measured total force. Our measurements demonstrate large contact potential V0(≈0.67 V ) , and a relatively small density of charges trapped in SiC. Knowledge of both Casimir and electrostatic forces between interacting materials is not only important from the fundamental point of view, but also for device applications involving actuating components at separations of less than 200 nm where surface forces play dominant role.

  19. Silicon Carbide Technologies for Lightweighted Aerospace Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matson, L.; Chen, M.; Deblonk, B.; Palusinski, I.

    The use of monolithic glass and beryllium to produce lightweighted aerospace mirror systems has reached its limits due to the long lead times, high processing costs, environmental effects and launch load/weight requirements. New material solutions and manufacturing processes are required to meet DoD's directed energy weapons, reconnaissance/surveillance, and secured communications needs. Over the past several years the Air Force, MDA, and NASA has focused their efforts on the fabrication, lightweighting, and scale-up of numerous silicon carbide (SiC) based materials. It is anticipated that SiC can be utilized for most applications from cryogenic to high temperatures. This talk will focus on describing the SOA for these (near term) SiC technology solutions for making mirror structural substrates, figuring and finishing technologies being investigated to reduce cost time and cost, and non-destructive evaluation methods being investigated to help eliminate risk. Mirror structural substrates made out of advanced engineered materials (far term solutions) such as composites, foams, and microsphere arrays for ultra lightweighting will also be briefly discussed.

  20. Bright Single Photon Emitter in Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lienhard, Benjamin; Schroeder, Tim; Mouradian, Sara; Dolde, Florian; Trong Tran, Toan; Aharonovich, Igor; Englund, Dirk

    Efficient, on-demand, and robust single photon emitters are of central importance to many areas of quantum information processing. Over the past 10 years, color centers in solids have emerged as excellent single photon emitters. Color centers in diamond are among the most intensively studied single photon emitters, but recently silicon carbide (SiC) has also been demonstrated to be an excellent host material. In contrast to diamond, SiC is a technologically important material that is widely used in optoelectronics, high power electronics, and microelectromechanical systems. It is commercially available in sizes up to 6 inches and processes for device engineering are well developed. We report on a visible-spectrum single photon emitter in 4H-SiC. The emitter is photostable at both room and low temperatures, and it enables 2 million photons/second from unpatterned bulk SiC. We observe two classes of orthogonally polarized emitters, each of which has parallel absorption and emission dipole orientations. Low temperature measurements reveal a narrow zero phonon line with linewidth < 0.1 nm that accounts for more than 30% of the total photoluminescence spectrum. To our knowledge, this SiC color emitter is the brightest stable room-temperature single photon emitter ever observed.

  1. Rapid thermal annealing and crystallization mechanisms study of silicon nanocrystal in silicon carbide matrix

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a positive effect of rapid thermal annealing (RTA) technique has been researched and compared with conventional furnace annealing for Si nanocrystalline in silicon carbide (SiC) matrix system. Amorphous Si-rich SiC layer has been deposited by co-sputtering in different Si concentrations (50 to approximately 80 v%). Si nanocrystals (Si-NC) containing different grain sizes have been fabricated within the SiC matrix under two different annealing conditions: furnace annealing and RTA both at 1,100°C. HRTEM image clearly reveals both Si and SiC-NC formed in the films. Much better "degree of crystallization" of Si-NC can be achieved in RTA than furnace annealing from the research of GIXRD and Raman analysis, especially in high-Si-concentration situation. Differences from the two annealing procedures and the crystallization mechanism have been discussed based on the experimental results. PMID:21711625

  2. Rapid thermal annealing and crystallization mechanisms study of silicon nanocrystal in silicon carbide matrix.

    PubMed

    Wan, Zhenyu; Huang, Shujuan; Green, Martin A; Conibeer, Gavin

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a positive effect of rapid thermal annealing (RTA) technique has been researched and compared with conventional furnace annealing for Si nanocrystalline in silicon carbide (SiC) matrix system. Amorphous Si-rich SiC layer has been deposited by co-sputtering in different Si concentrations (50 to approximately 80 v%). Si nanocrystals (Si-NC) containing different grain sizes have been fabricated within the SiC matrix under two different annealing conditions: furnace annealing and RTA both at 1,100°C. HRTEM image clearly reveals both Si and SiC-NC formed in the films. Much better "degree of crystallization" of Si-NC can be achieved in RTA than furnace annealing from the research of GIXRD and Raman analysis, especially in high-Si-concentration situation. Differences from the two annealing procedures and the crystallization mechanism have been discussed based on the experimental results. PMID:21711625

  3. The diffusion bonding of silicon carbide and boron carbide using refractory metals

    SciTech Connect

    Cockeram, B.V.

    1999-10-01

    Joining is an enabling technology for the application of structural ceramics at high temperatures. Metal foil diffusion bonding is a simple process for joining silicon carbide or boron carbide by solid-state, diffusive conversion of the metal foil into carbide and silicide compounds that produce bonding. Metal diffusion bonding trials were performed using thin foils (5 {micro}m to 100 {micro}m) of refractory metals (niobium, titanium, tungsten, and molybdenum) with plates of silicon carbide (both {alpha}-SiC and {beta}-SiC) or boron carbide that were lapped flat prior to bonding. The influence of bonding temperature, bonding pressure, and foil thickness on bond quality was determined from metallographic inspection of the bonds. The microstructure and phases in the joint region of the diffusion bonds were evaluated using SEM, microprobe, and AES analysis. The use of molybdenum foil appeared to result in the highest quality bond of the metal foils evaluated for the diffusion bonding of silicon carbide and boron carbide. Bonding pressure appeared to have little influence on bond quality. The use of a thinner metal foil improved the bond quality. The microstructure of the bond region produced with either the {alpha}-SiC and {beta}-SiC polytypes were similar.

  4. Method for forming fibrous silicon carbide insulating material

    DOEpatents

    Wei, George C.

    1984-01-01

    A method whereby silicon carbide-bonded SiC fiber composites are prepared from carbon-bonded C fiber composites is disclosed. Carbon-bonded C fiber composite material is treated with gaseous silicon monoxide generated from the reaction of a mixture of colloidal silica and carbon black at an elevated temperature in an argon atmosphere. The carbon in the carbon bond and fiber is thus chemically converted to SiC resulting in a silicon carbide-bonded SiC fiber composite that can be used for fabricating dense, high-strength high-toughness SiC composites or as thermal insulating materials in oxidizing environments.

  5. Method for forming fibrous silicon carbide insulating material

    DOEpatents

    Wei, G.C.

    1983-10-12

    A method whereby silicon carbide-bonded SiC fiber composites are prepared from carbon-bonded C fiber composites is disclosed. Carbon-bonded C fiber composite material is treated with gaseous silicon monoxide generated from the reaction of a mixture of colloidal silica and carbon black at an elevated temperature in an argon atmosphere. The carbon in the carbon bond and fiber is thus chemically converted to SiC resulting in a silicon carbide-bonded SiC fiber composite that can be used for fabricating dense, high-strength high-toughness SiC composites or as thermal insulating materials in oxidizing environments.

  6. Surface Figure Measurement of Silicon Carbide Mirrors at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, Peter; Mink, Ronald G.; Chambers, John; Robinson, F. David; Content, David; Davila, Pamela

    2005-01-01

    The surface figure of a developmental silicon carbide mirror, cooled to 87 K and then 20 K within a cryostat, was measured with unusually high precision at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The concave spherical mirror, with a radius of 600 mm and a clear aperture of 150 mm, was fabricated of sintered silicon carbide. The mirror was mounted to an interface plate representative of an optical bench, made of the material Cesic@, a composite of silicon, carbon, and silicon carbide. The change in optical surface figure as the mirror and interface plate cooled from room temperature to 20 K was 3.7 nm rms, with a standard uncertainty of 0.23 nm in the rms statistic. Both the cryo-change figure and the uncertainty are among the lowest such figures yet published. This report describes the facilities, experimental methods, and uncertainty analysis of the measurements.

  7. Occurrence of airborne silicon carbide fibers during industrial production of silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Bye, E; Eduard, W; Gjønnes, J; Sørbrøden, E

    1985-04-01

    Airborne dust from the production of silicon carbide has been analyzed for particle morphology and composition. Fibers of alpha silicon carbide were identified by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with selected area electron diffraction techniques (SAED). Micrographs taken at high magnification revealed several stacking periods along the fiber axis, and one or more of the polytypes 2H, 4H, or 6H could be distinguished. Preliminary investigations applying SEM showed that 80% of the fibers had diameters of less than 0.5 micron and a length greater than 5 micron. Fiber concentrations were examined by the counting of stationary and personal samples in an optical phase contrast microscope. The fiber levels in the three plants investigated were low and less than 1 fiber/cc of air (10(6) fibers/m3). Dust samples from the handling of raw material, including recycled material, contained up to 5 fibers/cc (5 X 10(6) fibers/m3). PMID:4001899

  8. Interface reactions between silicon carbide and interlayers in silicon carbide copper metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köck, T.; Brendel, A.; Bolt, H.

    2007-05-01

    Novel copper matrix composites reinforced with silicon carbide fibres are considered as a new generation of heat sink materials for the divertor of future fusion reactors. The divertor is exposed to intense particle bombardment and heat loads of up to 15 MW m-2. This component consists of the plasma-facing material which is bonded to the actively cooled heat sink. Due to its high thermal conductivity of about 400 W m-1 K-1 copper is a promising material for the heat sink. To increase the mechanical properties of copper at working temperature (823 K), silicon carbide fibres with a diameter of 140 μm are used to reinforce the interface area between the plasma-facing material and the heat sink. Push-out tests show that the adhesion between SiC fibre and Cu matrix without any interlayer is very low. To increase the fibre-matrix bonding the fibres are coated with Cr and W with a thickness of 300-400 nm before Cu deposition by magnetron sputtering. Push-out tests on these modified fibres show a significant increase in adhesion compared to the fibres without interlayer. XRD investigations after a heat treatment at 923 K show a chromium carbide (Cr23C6, Cr3C2) formation and the absence of chromium silicides. In the case of a W interlayer a W2C formation is detected and also no tungsten silicides. Single-fibre tensile tests were performed to investigate the influence of the reaction zone on the ultimate tensile strength of the fibres. The ultimate tensile strength for fibres without interlayer remains constant at about 2200 MPa after annealing at 923 K. The fibres with chromium and tungsten interlayers, respectively, show a decrease of about 30% of the ultimate tensile strength after the heat treatment at 923 K.

  9. Low Power Phase Change Memory using Silicon Carbide as a Heater Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, M. S.; Yin, Y.; Hosaka, S.; Mohammed, Z.; Alip, R. I.

    2015-11-01

    The amorphous to crystalline transition of germanium-antimony-tellurium (GST) using two types heating element was investigated. With separate heater structure, simulation was done using COMSOL Multiphysic 5.0. Silicon carbide (SiC) and Titanium Sitride (TiSi3) has been selected as a heater and differences of them have been studied. The voltage boundary is 0.905V and temperature of the memory layer is 463K when using SIC as a heater. While the voltage boundary and temperature of memory layer when using TiSi3 are 1.103 V and 459K respectively. Based on the result of a simulation, the suitable material of heater layer for separate heater structure is Silicon carbide (SiC) compared with Titanium Sitride (TiSi3).

  10. Microwave versus conventional sintering of silicon carbide tiles

    SciTech Connect

    Kass, M.D.; Caughman, J.B.O.; Forrester, S.C.; Akerman, A.

    1997-05-07

    Silicon carbide is being evaluated as an armor material because of its lightweight, high-hardness, and excellent armor efficiency. However, one of the problems associated with silicon carbide is the high cost associated with achieving fully dense tiles. Full density requires either hot pressing and sintering or reaction bonding. Past efforts have shown that hot pressed tiles have a higher armor efficiency than those produced by reaction bonded sintering. An earlier stuy showed that the acoustic properties of fully-dense silicon carbide tiles were enhanced through the use of post-sintered microwave heat treatments. One of the least expensive forming techniques is to isostatically press-and-sinter. In this study, the authors have used microwave energy to densify silicon carbide green bodies. Microwave sintering has been demonstrated to be a very quick way to sinter ceramics such as alumina to exceptionally high densities. Previous work has shown that microwave post treatment of fully-dense reaction bonded silicon carbide tiles significantly improves the acoustic properties of the tiles. These properties include Poisson`s ratio, Young`s modulus, shear modulus, and bulk modulus.

  11. Joining of silicon carbide with a cordierite glass-ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Perham, T.J.; De Jonghe, L.C. |; MoberlyChan, W.J. ||

    1999-02-01

    A method for the joining of silicon carbide using a cordierite glass-ceramic has been developed. Cordierite, with glass-ceramic processing, remains amorphous and wets the SiC substrate to form a strong bond when rapidly fired. Subsequent heat treatment crystallizes a multiphase interlayer with a matching bulk thermal expansion coefficient (CTE). A benchtop tape casting method for depositing joining precursor films of varying thickness is described. The wetting characteristics of cordierite on SiC that are pertinent to the joining process are shown to be highly sensitive to processing atmosphere. Doping with a fluoride ion flux can lower the peak processing temperature without significantly altering the crystallization path. The effect of interlayer thickness is observed by monitoring indentation crack paths and with 4-point bending tests. Controlling the degree of crystallinity is shown to tailor the mismatches in thermal expansion coefficient and elastic moduli to produce joints of high strength ({sigma}{sub F} > 500 MPa). Characterization is accomplished with XRD, SEM, and TEM.

  12. Influence of radiation damage on xenon diffusion in silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedland, E.; Gärtner, K.; Hlatshwayo, T. T.; van der Berg, N. G.; Thabethe, T. T.

    2014-08-01

    Diffusion of xenon in poly and single crystalline silicon carbide and the possible influence of radiation damage on it are investigated. For this purpose 360 keV xenon ions were implanted in commercial 6H-SiC and CVD-SiC wafers at room temperature, 350 °C and 600 °C. Width broadening of the implantation profiles and xenon retention during isochronal and isothermal annealing up to temperatures of 1500 °C was determined by RBS-analysis, whilst in the case of 6H-SiC damage profiles were simultaneously obtained by α-particle channelling. No diffusion or xenon loss was detected in the initially amorphized and eventually recrystallized surface layer of cold implanted 6H-SiC during annealing up to 1200 °C. Above that temperature serious erosion of the implanted surface occurred, which made any analysis impossible. No diffusion or xenon loss is detected in the hot implanted 6H-SiC samples during annealing up to 1400 °C. Radiation damage dependent grain boundary diffusion is observed at 1300 °C in CVD-SiC.

  13. Silicon Carbide Diodes Performance Characterization and Comparison With Silicon Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebron-Velilla, Ramon C.; Schwarze, Gene E.; Trapp, Scott

    2003-01-01

    Commercially available silicon carbide (SiC) Schottky diodes from different manufacturers were electrically tested and characterized at room temperature. Performed electrical tests include steady state forward and reverse I-V curves, as well as switching transient tests performed with the diodes operating in a hard switch dc-to-dc buck converter. The same tests were performed in current state of the art silicon (Si) and gallium arsenide (GaAs) Schottky and pn junction devices for evaluation and comparison purposes. The SiC devices tested have a voltage rating of 200, 300, and 600 V. The comparison parameters are forward voltage drop at rated current, reverse current at rated voltage and peak reverse recovery currents in the dc to dc converter. Test results show that steady state characteristics of the tested SiC devices are not superior to the best available Si Schottky and ultra fast pn junction devices. Transient tests reveal that the tested SiC Schottky devices exhibit superior transient behavior. This is more evident at the 300 and 600 V rating where SiC Schottky devices showed drastically lower reverse recovery currents than Si ultra fast pn diodes of similar rating.

  14. Amorphous silicon/polycrystalline thin film solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ullal, H.S.

    1991-03-13

    An improved photovoltaic solar cell is described including a p-type amorphous silicon layer, intrinsic amorphous silicon, and an n-type polycrystalline semiconductor such as cadmium sulfide, cadmium zinc sulfide, zinc selenide, gallium phosphide, and gallium nitride. The polycrystalline semiconductor has an energy bandgap greater than that of the amorphous silicon. The solar cell can be provided as a single-junction device or a multijunction device.

  15. Palladium-defect complexes in diamond and silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abiona, A. A.; Kemp, W.; Timmers, H.; Bharuth-Ram, K.

    2015-04-01

    Time Differential Perturbed Angular Correlations (TDPAC) studies, supported by Density Functional Theory (DFT) modelling, have shown that palladium atoms in silicon and germanium pair with vacancies. Building on these results, here we present DFT predictions and some tentative TDPAC results on palladium-defect complexes and site locations of palladium impurities in diamond and silicon carbide. For both diamond and silicon carbide, the DFT calculations predict that a split-vacancy V-PdBI-V complex is favoured, with the palladium atom on a bond-centred interstitial site having a nearest-neighbour semi-vacancy on either side. Consistent with experimental results, this configuration is also assigned to palladium complexes in silicon and germanium. For silicon carbide, the DFT modelling predicts furthermore that a palladium atom in replacing a carbon atom moves to a bond-centred interstitial site and pairs with a silicon vacancy to form a complex that is more stable than that of a palladium atom which replaces a silicon atom and then moves to a bond-centred interstitial site pairings with a carbon vacancy. These two competing alternatives differ by 8.94 eV. The favourable pairing with a silicon vacancy is also supported independently by TRIM Monte Carlo calculations, which predict that more silicon vacancies than carbon vacancies are created during heavy ion. implantation.

  16. Amorphous molybdenum silicon superconducting thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Bosworth, D. Sahonta, S.-L.; Barber, Z. H.; Hadfield, R. H.

    2015-08-15

    Amorphous superconductors have become attractive candidate materials for superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors due to their ease of growth, homogeneity and competitive superconducting properties. To date the majority of devices have been fabricated using W{sub x}Si{sub 1−x}, though other amorphous superconductors such as molybdenum silicide (Mo{sub x}Si{sub 1−x}) offer increased transition temperature. This study focuses on the properties of MoSi thin films grown by magnetron sputtering. We examine how the composition and growth conditions affect film properties. For 100 nm film thickness, we report that the superconducting transition temperature (Tc) reaches a maximum of 7.6 K at a composition of Mo{sub 83}Si{sub 17}. The transition temperature and amorphous character can be improved by cooling of the substrate during growth which inhibits formation of a crystalline phase. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy studies confirm the absence of long range order. We observe that for a range of 6 common substrates (silicon, thermally oxidized silicon, R- and C-plane sapphire, x-plane lithium niobate and quartz), there is no variation in superconducting transition temperature, making MoSi an excellent candidate material for SNSPDs.

  17. Three dimensional amorphous silicon/microcrystalline silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Kaschmitter, James L.

    1996-01-01

    Three dimensional deep contact amorphous silicon/microcrystalline silicon (a-Si/.mu.c-Si) solar cells which use deep (high aspect ratio) p and n contacts to create high electric fields within the carrier collection volume material of the cell. The deep contacts are fabricated using repetitive pulsed laser doping so as to create the high aspect p and n contacts. By the provision of the deep contacts which penetrate the electric field deep into the material where the high strength of the field can collect many of the carriers, thereby resulting in a high efficiency solar cell.

  18. Three dimensional amorphous silicon/microcrystalline silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1996-07-23

    Three dimensional deep contact amorphous silicon/microcrystalline silicon (a-Si/{micro}c-Si) solar cells are disclosed which use deep (high aspect ratio) p and n contacts to create high electric fields within the carrier collection volume material of the cell. The deep contacts are fabricated using repetitive pulsed laser doping so as to create the high aspect p and n contacts. By the provision of the deep contacts which penetrate the electric field deep into the material where the high strength of the field can collect many of the carriers, thereby resulting in a high efficiency solar cell. 4 figs.

  19. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon-germanium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Luft, W.

    1988-02-01

    This report describes the effects of the germanium fraction in hydrogenated amorphous silicon-germanium alloys on various parameters, especially those that are indicators of film quality, and the impact of deposition methods, feedgas mixtures, and other deposition parameters on a SiGe:H and a-SiGe:H:F film characteristics and quality. Literature data show the relationship between germanium content, hydrogen content, deposition method (various glow discharges and CVD), feedgas lmixture, and other parameters and properties, such as optical band gap, dark and photoconductivities, photosensitivity, activation energy, Urbach parameter, and spin density. Some of these are convenient quality indicators; another is the absence of microstructure. Examining RF glow discharge with both a diode and triode geometry, DC proximity glow discharge, microwave glow discharge, and photo-CVD, using gas mixtures such as hydrogen-diluted and undiluted mixtures of silane/germane, disilane/germane, silane/germaniumtetrafluoride, and others, it was observed that hydrogen dilution (or inert gas dilution) is essential in achieving high photosensitivity in silicon-germanium alloys (in contradistinction to amorphous hydrogenated silicon). Hydrogen dilution results in a higher photosensitivity than do undiluted gas mixtures. 81 refs., 42 figs., 7 tabs.

  20. Processing, texture and mechanical properties of sintered silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landfermann, H.; Hausner, H.

    1988-01-01

    With regard to its favorable properties, in particular those shown at high temperatures, silicon carbide is of great interest for applications related to the construction of engines and turbines. Thus, silicon carbide could replace heat-resisting alloys with the objective to achieve a further increase in operational temperature. The present investigation is concerned with approaches which can provide silicon carbide material with suitable properties for the intended applications, taking into account the relations between characteristics of the raw material, material composition, sinter conditions, and results of the sintering process. The effects of density and texture formation on the mechanical properties are studied. It is found that a dense material with a fine-grained microstructure provides optimal mechanical properties, while any deviation from this ideal condition can lead to a considerable deterioration with respect to the material properties.

  1. Characterization of silicon carbide coatings on Zircaloy-4 substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Olayyan, Yousif Abdullah

    The lifetime of light water reactor (LWR) fuels is limited by the corrosion and degradation of Zircaloy cladding in the high temperature and high pressure operating conditions. As the thickness of the oxide layer increases, stresses build up in the oxide layer due to density differences between the oxide and the zirconium metal which lead to degradation and spallation of the oxide layer. The main objective of this research is to form protective coatings on the Zircaloy clad to prevent or at least slow the oxidation which can allow higher burnup of the fuel resulting in major benefits in plant safety and economics. Silicon carbide was identified as a candidate protective coating to reduce the corrosion and degradation of Zircaloy cladding. Silicon carbide coatings were deposited on Zircaloy substrates using plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (PE-CVD) and were found to be amorphous as determined by X-ray analysis. Since the adhesion of the films to the substrate was the most important property of a coating, scratch tests were used to assess the adhesion. The effects of different parameters on the test results including residual stresses, plastic deformation and friction between the stylus and the surface are discussed. Critical loads, characterized by continuous delamination of the SiC coatings deposited on Zircaloy-4, occurred at 0.5--2.5 N. The experimental results indicated that all SiC coatings used in this project, without exception, showed an adhesive failure when tested by scratch and indentation tests. Plastic deformation of the substrate due to compressive stresses induced by the scratch stylus caused flaking of the films at the interface, which was attributed to the low interfacial toughness. The effects of film thickness and substrate surface treatment on the quality and adhesion of SiC coatings were studied in detail. Thick films (5mum) exhibited extensive cracking. The scratch tests indicated higher adhesion with intermediate substrate surface

  2. Solar silicon from directional solidification of MG silicon produced via the silicon carbide route

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rustioni, M.; Margadonna, D.; Pirazzi, R.; Pizzini, S.

    1986-01-01

    A process of metallurgical grade (MG) silicon production is presented which appears particularly suitable for photovoltaic (PV) applications. The MG silicon is prepared in a 240 KVA, three electrode submerged arc furnace, starting from high grade quartz and high purity silicon carbide. The silicon smelted from the arc furnace was shown to be sufficiently pure to be directionally solidified to 10 to 15 kg. After grinding and acid leaching, had a material yield larger than 90%. With a MG silicon feedstock containing 3 ppmw B, 290 ppmw Fe, 190 ppmw Ti, and 170 ppmw Al, blended with 50% of off grade electronic grade (EG) silicon to reconduct the boron content to a concentration acceptable for solar cell fabrication, the 99% of deep level impurities were concentrated in the last 5% of the ingot. Quite remarkably this material has OCV values higher tham 540 mV and no appreciable shorts due to SiC particles.

  3. Liquid-phase reaction-bonding of silicon carbide using alloyed silicon-molybdenum melts

    SciTech Connect

    Messner, R.P.; Chiang, Y.M. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1990-05-01

    The authors have investigated reaction-forming of silicon carbide by the infiltration of carbonaceous preforms using alloyed silicon melts, in order to synthesize composite materials free of the residual silicon phase that has previously limited mechanical properties and upper use temperatures. In this approach, rejection of the alloying component(s) from the primary silicon carbide phase into the remaining melt results in the formation of a secondary refractory phase, such as a silicide, in place of residual free silicon. Experiments conducted in the Si-Mo melt system show that relatively dense ({gt}90%) silicon carbide-molybdenum silicide materials free of residual silicon and residual carbon can be obtained. A model for reactive infiltration based on time-dependent permeabilities is proposed. Processing variables important for control of the reaction rate relative to the infiltration rate, and associated processing flaws, are discussed.

  4. The Active Oxidation of Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Myers, Dwight L.

    2009-01-01

    The high temperature oxidation of silicon carbide occurs in two very different modes. Passive oxidation forms a protective oxide film which limits further attack of the SiC: SiC(s) + 3/2 O2(g) = SiO2(s) + CO(g) Active oxidation forms a volatile oxide and may lead to extensive attack of the SiC: SiC(s) + O2(g) = SiO(g) + CO(g) Generally passive oxidation occurs at higher oxidant pressures and active oxidation occurs at lower oxidant pressures and elevated temperatures. Active oxidation is a concern for reentry, where the flight trajectory involves the latter conditions. Thus the transition points and rates of active oxidation are a major concern. Passive/active transitions have been studied by a number of investigators. An examination of the literature indicates many questions remain regarding the effect of impurity, the hysteresis of the transition (i.e. the difference between active-to-passive and passive-toactive), and the effect of total pressure. In this study we systematically investigate each of these effects. Experiments were done in both an alumina furnace tube and a quartz furnace tube. It is known that alumina tubes release impurities such as sodium and increase the kinetics in the passive region [1]. We have observed that the active-to-passive transition occurs at a lower oxygen pressure when the experiment is conducted in alumina tubes and the resultant passive silica scale contains sodium. Thus the tests in this study are conducted in quartz tubes. The hysteresis of the transition has been discussed in the detail in the original theoretical treatise of this problem for pure silicon by Wagner [2], yet there is little mention of it in subsequent literature. Essentially Wagner points out that the active-to-passive transition is governed by the criterion for a stable Si/SiO2 equilibria and the passive-to-active transition is governed by the decomposition of the SiO2 film. A series of experiments were conducted for active-to-passive and passive

  5. Radiation resistance studies of amorphous silicon films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodyard, James R.; Payson, J. Scott

    1989-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films were irradiated with 2.00 MeV helium ions using fluences ranging from 1E11 to 1E15 cm(-2). The films were characterized using photothermal deflection spectroscopy and photoconductivity measurements. The investigations show that the radiation introduces sub-band-gap states 1.35 eV below the conduction band and the states increase supralinearly with fluence. Photoconductivity measurements suggest the density of states above the Fermi energy is not changing drastically with fluence.

  6. Medical imaging applications of amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Mireshghi, A.; Drewery, J.S.; Hong, W.S.; Jing, T.; Kaplan, S.N.; Lee, H.K.; Perez-Mendez, V.

    1994-07-01

    Two dimensional hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) pixel arrays are good candidates as flat-panel imagers for applications in medical imaging. Various performance characteristics of these imagers are reviewed and compared with currently used equipments. An important component in the a-Si:H imager is the scintillator screen. A new approach for fabrication of high resolution CsI(Tl) scintillator layers, appropriate for coupling to a-Si:H arrays, are presented. For nuclear medicine applications, a new a-Si:H based gamma camera is introduced and Monte Carlo simulation is used to evaluate its performance.

  7. Role of silicon dangling bonds in the electronic properties of epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Ridene, Mohamed; Kha, Calvin S; Flipse, Cees F J

    2016-03-29

    In this paper, we study the electronic properties of epitaxial graphene (EG) on silicon carbide by means of ab initio calculations based on the local spin density approximation + U method taking into account the Coulomb interaction between Si localized electrons. We show that this interaction is not completely suppressed but is screened by carbon layers grown on-top of silicon carbide. This finding leads to a good qualitative understanding of the experimental results reported on EG on silicon carbide. Our results highlight the presence of the Si localized states and might explain the anomalous Hanle curve and the high values of spin relaxation time in EG. PMID:26891244

  8. Role of silicon dangling bonds in the electronic properties of epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridene, Mohamed; Kha, Calvin S.; Flipse, Cees F. J.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we study the electronic properties of epitaxial graphene (EG) on silicon carbide by means of ab initio calculations based on the local spin density approximation + U method taking into account the Coulomb interaction between Si localized electrons. We show that this interaction is not completely suppressed but is screened by carbon layers grown on-top of silicon carbide. This finding leads to a good qualitative understanding of the experimental results reported on EG on silicon carbide. Our results highlight the presence of the Si localized states and might explain the anomalous Hanle curve and the high values of spin relaxation time in EG.

  9. Electronic states in epitaxial graphene fabricated on silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Davydov, S. Yu.

    2011-08-15

    An analytical expression for the density of states of a graphene monolayer interacting with a silicon carbide surface (epitaxial graphene) is derived. The density of states of silicon carbide is described within the Haldane-Anderson model. It is shown that the graphene-substrate interaction results in a narrow gap of {approx}0.01-0.06 eV in the density of states of graphene. The graphene atom charge is estimated; it is shown that the charge transfer from the substrate is {approx}10{sup -3}-10{sup -2}e per graphene atom.

  10. Flaw imaging and ultrasonic techniques for characterizing sintered silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baaklini, George Y.; Abel, Phillip B.

    1987-01-01

    The capabilities were investigated of projection microfocus x-radiography, ultrasonic velocity and attenuation, and reflection scanning acoustic microscopy for characterizing silicon carbide specimens. Silicon carbide batches covered a range of densities and different microstructural characteristics. Room temperature, four point flexural strength tests were conducted. Fractography was used to identify types, sizes, and locations of fracture origins. Fracture toughness values were calculated from fracture strength and flaw characterization data. Detection capabilities of radiography and acoustic microscopy for fracture-causing flaws were evaluated. Applicability of ultrasonics for verifying material strength and toughness was examined.

  11. Radiographic and ultrasonic characterization of sintered silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baaklini, G. Y.; Abel, P. B.

    1988-01-01

    The capabilities were investigated of projection microfocus X-radiography, ultrasonic velocity and attenuation, and reflection scanning acoustic microscopy for characterizing silicon carbide specimens. Silicon carbide batches covered a range of densities and different microstructural characteristics. Room temperature, four point flexural strength tests were conducted. Fractography was used to identify types, sizes, and locations of fracture origins. Fracture toughness values were calculated from fracture strength and flaw characterization data. Detection capabilities of radiography and acoustic microscopy for fracture-causing flaws were evaluated. Applicability of ultrasonics for verifying material strength and toughness was examined.

  12. Structural relaxation of vacancies in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, E.; Lee, Y.H.; Chen, C.; Pang, T.

    1997-07-01

    The authors have studied the structural relaxation of vacancies in amorphous silicon (a-Si) using a tight-binding molecular-dynamics method. The most significant difference between vacancies in a-Si and those in crystalline silicon (c-Si) is that the deep gap states do not show up in a-Si. This difference is explained through the unusual behavior of the structural relaxation near the vacancies in a-Si, which enhances the sp{sup 2} + p bonding near the band edges. They have also observed that the vacancies do not migrate below 450 K although some of them can still be annihilated, particularly at high defect density due to large structural relaxation.

  13. Kinetics and mechanisms of primary and steady state creep in B- and Al-containing alpha silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Robert F.; Carter, Calvin H., Jr.

    1989-07-01

    The steady state creep behavior of a number of high temperature structural ceramics has been measured and the results analyzed to determine the controlling mechanism. Pure polycrystalline silicon carbide, devoid of sintering aids, creeps by dislocation motion and climb. Silicon carbide containing B- and Al- sintering aids, creeps by grain boundary sliding controlled by diffusion mechanisms (grain boundary diffusion - Coble creep - below 1920 K; lattice diffusion - Nabarro-Herring creep-above 1920 K). The difference in behavior is attributed to the high concentration of vacancies accompanying impurity substitution in the sintered silicon carbide. Experimental measurements of grain boundary sliding offsets on polycrystalline silicon carbide have shown that the primary, transient, creep stage in this material is primarily due to plastic strain within the grains, and that the secondary, steady state, creep stage is primarily due to grain boundary sliding between the grains. The creep of a single crystal and polycrystalline niobium carbide in the 1570 to 1850 K range is controlled by dislocation glide and climb. The creep of hot pressed silicon nitrate and mullite in the 1470 to 1800 K range is controlled by grain boundary sliding due to the amorphous phase present as a consequence of Y2O3 and Al2O3 sintering aids.

  14. Preparation and characterization of hydrogenated amorphous germanium and hydrogenated amorphous germanium carbide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hai-Sheng

    1989-02-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous germanium (a-Ge:H) and germanium carbide (a-Ge(1-x)Cx:H) films were prepared by rf sputtering of a polycrystalline Ge target in a vacuum approximately 4 x 10 to the 7th Torr at various rf power 50 less than or equal to P less than or equal to 600 W (0.27 to 3.3 W/sq cm), target-substrate distance 1 less than or equal to d less than or equal to 7 minutes, varying partial pressures of Ar, H2, and C3H8, and flow rates f. The vibrational and opto-electronic properties such as infrared (IR) absorption, optical gap, electron-spin-resonance (ESR) signals, and conductivities vary with deposition conditions. The photoconductivity sigma sub ph, in particular, was carefully monitored as a function of the deposition conditions to optimize it.

  15. Silicon carbide alloys: Research reports in materials science

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson, M.M.

    1986-01-01

    The book draws from work done on other silicon materials, silicon nitrides and sialons, to emphasize the importance of the SiC system. A comprehensive treatment of non-oxide silicon ceramics, this work is of special interest to researchers involved in ceramics, materials science, and high-temperature technology. This book covers the alloys of silicon carbide with aluminum nitride. Crystallography and experimental methods including sample preparation, furnace methods, X-ray and electron diffraction, optical and electron microscopy and chemical analysis are covered.

  16. Characterization of oxide scales thermally formed on single-crystal silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Chayasombat, B; Kato, T; Hirayama, T; Tokunaga, T; Sasaki, K; Kuroda, K

    2010-08-01

    Microstructures of oxide scales thermally formed on single-crystal silicon carbide were investigated using transmission electron microscopy. The oxide scales were formed on the Si-face of 6H-SiC at 1273-1473 K in dry oxygen. Spherical patterns were observed on the surfaces of the oxidized samples by an optical microscope in some regions. In these regions, cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations show that the oxide scale was divided into two layers; the upper layer (surface side) was composed of crystalline silica, and the lower layer on the silicon carbide substrate was amorphous silica, while the oxide scales in the surroundings of the patterns were composed of only amorphous silica. The oxidation activation energy in the amorphous silica layer of the Si-face of 6H-SiC was found to be 408 kJ/mol by the evolution of thickness directly measured from the cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy and TEM images. PMID:20554755

  17. Endurance Tests Of Amorphous-Silicon Photovoltaic Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Ronald G., Jr.; Sugimura, Russell S.

    1989-01-01

    Failure mechanisms in high-power service studied. Report discusses factors affecting endurance of amorphous-silicon solar cells. Based on field tests and accelerated aging of photovoltaic modules. Concludes that aggressive research needed if amorphous-silicon modules to attain 10-year life - value U.S. Department of Energy established as goal for photovoltaic modules in commercial energy-generating plants.

  18. Method for improving the stability of amorphous silicon

    DOEpatents

    Branz, Howard M.

    2004-03-30

    A method of producing a metastable degradation resistant amorphous hydrogenated silicon film is provided, which comprises the steps of growing a hydrogenated amorphous silicon film, the film having an exposed surface, illuminating the surface using an essentially blue or ultraviolet light to form high densities of a light induced defect near the surface, and etching the surface to remove the defect.

  19. Superlattice doped layers for amorphous silicon photovoltaic cells

    DOEpatents

    Arya, Rajeewa R.

    1988-01-12

    Superlattice doped layers for amorphous silicon photovoltaic cells comprise a plurality of first and second lattices of amorphous silicon alternatingly formed on one another. Each of the first lattices has a first optical bandgap and each of the second lattices has a second optical bandgap different from the first optical bandgap. A method of fabricating the superlattice doped layers also is disclosed.

  20. Processing and mechanical properties of silicon nitride/silicon carbide ceramic nanocomposites derived from polymer precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasch, Matthew Jeremy

    Creep deformation of silicon nitride and silicon carbide ceramics is dominated by a solution-precipitation process through the glassy interface phase at grain boundary regions, which is formed by the reaction of oxide additives with the silicon oxide surface layer of the ceramic powder particles during liquid phase sintering. The ultimate approach to increase the creep resistance of these materials is to decrease the oxide content at the grain boundaries, rendering the solution-precipitation process non-effective. This research presents a new method of enhancing the creep properties of silicon nitride/silicon carbide composites by forming micro-nano and nano-nano microstructures during sintering. Starting from amorphous Si-C-N powders of micrometric size particles, powders were consolidated in three ways: (1) Consolidation of pyrolyzed powders without additives, (2) Electric Field Assisted Sintering (EFAS) of pyrolyzed powders with and without additives and (3) High pressure sintering. In all three cases, nanocomposites with varied grain size were achieved. High temperature mechanical creep testing was performed on the samples sintered by EFAS. Creep rates ranged from 1 x 10-8/s to 1 x 10-11/s depending on method in which powders were prepared and total oxide additive amount. For samples with high oxide contents the stress exponent was found to be n ˜ 2 with an activation energy of Q ˜ 600kJ/mol*K, indicating the typical solution precipitation process of deformation. But for the nano-nano composites sintered with little to none oxide additive, the stress exponent was found to be n ˜ 1 with and activation energy of Q ˜ 200kJ/mol*K, hinting at a diffusion controlled mechanism of creep deformation. For the nano-nano composites sintered without oxide additives, oxygen was found in the microstructure. However, oxygen contamination was found to distribute at grain boundary regions especially triple junctions. It is suggested that this highly dispersed distribution of

  1. Effect of carbon and boron on the high-temperature oxidation of silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Fergus, J.W.; Worrel, W.L.

    1995-07-01

    Silicon carbide has good oxidation resistance, due to the formation of a protective silica layer. Although amorphous silica is an excellent oxygen barrier, it is very sensitive to impurity elements, which affect its viscosity, oxygen diffusivity,a nd crystallization kinetics. This paper compares the oxidation rates of CVD SiC, sintered {alpha}-SiC, and CVD SiC-coated graphite in 1 atm oxygen at 1,500 C to determine the effects of small additions of boron and carbon. the formation of bubbles in the silica scale formed on sintered {alpha}-Sic in oxygen between 1,230 and 1,550 C is also discussed.

  2. Study of sintering temperature on the structure of silicon carbide membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadighzadeh, A.; Mashayekhan, Sh.; Nedaie, B.; Ghorashi, A. H.

    2014-09-01

    Study of the microstructure of silicon carbide (SiC) membrane as a function of sintering temperature and the percentage amount of additive kaolin is the outcome of the experimental fabrications presented in this paper. The SEM micrographs are used to investigate the impact of above parameters on the porosity of membrane. The experimental results show that the rise in the temperature causes more sintering of powder particles, growing granules, augmentation of the number of pores and consequently increasing the total porosity of membrane. Using XRD analyses, it is found that SiC amorphous phase is highly sensitive to the temperature and its crystallization physically grows with temperature increase.

  3. Optical Kerr nonlinearity in a high-Q silicon carbide microresonator.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiyuan; Lee, Jonathan Y; Rogers, Steven; Lin, Qiang

    2014-12-15

    We demonstrate a high-Q amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC) microresonator with optical Q as high as 1.3 × 10(5). The high optical quality allows us to characterize the third-order nonlinear susceptibility of a-SiC. The Kerr nonlinearity is measured to be n2 = (5.9 ± 0.7) × 10(−15) cm(2)/W in the telecom band around 1550 nm. The strong Kerr nonlinearity and high optical quality render a-SiC microresonators a promising platform for integrated nonlinear photonics. PMID:25607031

  4. Processing of uranium oxide and silicon carbide based fuel using polymer infiltration and pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Abhishek K.; Zunjarrao, Suraj C.; Singh, Raman P.

    2008-09-01

    Ceramic composite pellets consisting of uranium oxide, UO 2, contained within a silicon carbide matrix, were fabricated using a novel processing technique based on polymer infiltration and pyrolysis (PIP). In this process, particles of depleted uranium oxide, in the form of U 3O 8, were dispersed in liquid allylhydridopolycarbosilane (AHPCS), and subjected to pyrolysis up to 900 °C under a continuous flow of ultra high purity argon. The pyrolysis of AHPCS, at these temperatures, produced near-stoichiometric amorphous silicon carbide ( a-SiC). Multiple polymer infiltration and pyrolysis (PIP) cycles were performed to minimize open porosity and densify the silicon carbide matrix. Analytical characterization was conducted to investigate chemical interaction between U 3O 8 and SiC. It was observed that U 3O 8 reacted with AHPCS during the very first pyrolysis cycle, and was converted to UO 2. As a result, final composition of the material consisted of UO 2 particles contained in an a-SiC matrix. The physical and mechanical properties were also quantified. It is shown that this processing scheme promotes uniform distribution of uranium fuel source along with a high ceramic yield of the parent matrix.

  5. The development of silicon carbide-based power electronics devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Richard H.; Perkins, John F.

    1995-01-01

    In 1989 Westinghouse created an internally funded initiative to develop silicon carbide materials and device technology for a variety of potential commercial and military applications. Westinghouse saw silicon carbide as having the potential for dual use. For space applications, size and weight reductions could be achieved, together with increased reliability. Terrestrially, uses in harsh-temperature environments would be enabled. Theoretically, the physical and electrical properties of silicon carbide were highly promising for high-power, high-temperature, radiation-hardened electronics. However, bulk material with the requisite electronic qualities was not available, and the methods needed to produce a silicon carbide wafer—to fabricate high-quality devices—and to transition these technologies into a commercial product were considered to be a high-risk investment. It was recognized that through a collaborative effort, the CCDS could provide scientific expertise in several areas, thus reducing this risk. These included modeling of structures, electrical contacts, dielectrics, and epitaxial growth. This collaboration has been very successful, with developed technologies being transferred to Westinghouse.

  6. Silicon carbide and other films and method of deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehregany, Mehran (Inventor); Zorman, Christian A. (Inventor); Fu, Xiao-An (Inventor); Dunning, Jeremy (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method of depositing a ceramic film, particularly a silicon carbide film, on a substrate is disclosed in which the residual stress, residual stress gradient, and resistivity are controlled. Also disclosed are substrates having a deposited film with these controlled properties and devices, particularly MEMS and NEMS devices, having substrates with films having these properties.

  7. Mechanical properties of some silicon carbide reinforced aluminum composites

    SciTech Connect

    Tsangarakis, N.; Andrews, B.O.; Cavallaro, C.

    1987-05-01

    The mechanical properties of several particulate and continuous fiber silicon carbide-reinforced aluminum composites were examined. The tensile strength of a 47 percent silicon carbide fiber unidirectionally-reinforced aluminum composite was 1273 and 76 MPa parallel and normal to the fiber direction, respectively. The tensile strength of (0 deg/90 deg) 4s and (0/sub 2/90/0)s composites were 629 and 864 MPa, respectively. The tensile properties of a 30 percent silicon carbide particulate reinforced aluminum were found to depend on the chemistry of the metal matrix. The endurance limits of the fiber and the particulate reinforced aluminum were at the most 55 percent and 33 percent of the respective tensile strengths. The fracture toughness of the fiber reinforced composite varied with specimen width, while that of the particulate reinforced composite was 21-29 MPa sq rt m. The fatigue crack growth rate in the latter composite decreased with material thickness. There were indications that the fatigue crack growth rate in the silicon carbide particulate reinforced aluminum may be independent of variations in the chemistry of the metal matrix. 6 references.

  8. Nuclear breeder reactor fuel element with silicon carbide getter

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, David W.; Karnesky, Richard A.

    1987-01-01

    An improved cesium getter 28 is provided in a breeder reactor fuel element or pin in the form of an extended surface area, low density element formed in one embodiment as a helically wound foil 30 located with silicon carbide, and located at the upper end of the fertile material upper blanket 20.

  9. Silicon carbide and other films and method of deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehregany, Mehran (Inventor); Zorman, Christian A. (Inventor); Fu, Xiao-An (Inventor); Dunning, Jeremy L. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method of depositing a ceramic film, particularly a silicon carbide film, on a substrate is disclosed in which the residual stress, residual stress gradient, and resistivity are controlled. Also disclosed are substrates having a deposited film with these controlled properties and devices, particularly MEMS and NEMS devices, having substrates with films having these properties.

  10. Sintered silicon carbide molded body and method for its production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omori, M.; Sendai, M.; Ohira, K.

    1984-01-01

    Sintered silicon carbide shapes are described. They are produced by using a composition containing an oxide of at least one element chosen from the group: Li, Be, Mg, Si, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, Nb, Mo, Ba, Tc, Ta, W and Th as a supplement to known sintering aids.

  11. Improved epitaxial process for fabricating silicon carbide semiconductor devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, H. A.; Powell, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    Process of growing expitaxial silicon carbide (SiC) layers on SiC substrates so that epitaxial growth is perpendicular to c-axis by chemical vapor deposition process at temperatures of 1590 to 1660 K minimizes variations in stacking sequence and problems associated with high temperatures.

  12. An infrared and luminescence study of tritiated amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Sidhu, L.S.; Kosteski, T.; Kherani, N.P.; Gaspari, F.; Zukotynski, S.; Shmayda, W.

    1997-07-01

    Tritium has been incorporated into amorphous silicon. Infrared spectroscopy shows new infrared vibration modes due to silicon-tritium (Si-T) bonds in the amorphous silicon network. Si-T vibration frequencies are related to Si-H vibration frequencies by simple mass relationships. Inelastic collisions of {beta} particles, produced as a result of tritium decay, with the amorphous silicon network results in the generation of electron-hole pairs. Radiative recombination of these carriers is observed. Dangling bonds associated with the tritium decay reduce luminescence efficiency.

  13. Room-temperature near-infrared silicon carbide nanocrystalline emitters based on optically aligned spin defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzha, A.; Fuchs, F.; Tarakina, N. V.; Simin, D.; Trupke, M.; Soltamov, V. A.; Mokhov, E. N.; Baranov, P. G.; Dyakonov, V.; Krueger, A.; Astakhov, G. V.

    2014-12-01

    Bulk silicon carbide (SiC) is a very promising material system for bio-applications and quantum sensing. However, its optical activity lies beyond the near infrared spectral window for in-vivo imaging and fiber communications due to a large forbidden energy gap. Here, we report the fabrication of SiC nanocrystals and isolation of different nanocrystal fractions ranged from 600 nm down to 60 nm in size. The structural analysis reveals further fragmentation of the smallest nanocrystals into ca. 10-nm-size clusters of high crystalline quality, separated by amorphization areas. We use neutron irradiation to create silicon vacancies, demonstrating near infrared photoluminescence. Finally, we detect room-temperature spin resonances of these silicon vacancies hosted in SiC nanocrystals. This opens intriguing perspectives to use them not only as in-vivo luminescent markers but also as magnetic field and temperature sensors, allowing for monitoring various physical, chemical, and biological processes.

  14. Room-temperature near-infrared silicon carbide nanocrystalline emitters based on optically aligned spin defects

    SciTech Connect

    Muzha, A.; Fuchs, F.; Simin, D.; Astakhov, G. V.; Tarakina, N. V.; Trupke, M.; Soltamov, V. A.; Mokhov, E. N.; Baranov, P. G.; Dyakonov, V.; and others

    2014-12-15

    Bulk silicon carbide (SiC) is a very promising material system for bio-applications and quantum sensing. However, its optical activity lies beyond the near infrared spectral window for in-vivo imaging and fiber communications due to a large forbidden energy gap. Here, we report the fabrication of SiC nanocrystals and isolation of different nanocrystal fractions ranged from 600 nm down to 60 nm in size. The structural analysis reveals further fragmentation of the smallest nanocrystals into ca. 10-nm-size clusters of high crystalline quality, separated by amorphization areas. We use neutron irradiation to create silicon vacancies, demonstrating near infrared photoluminescence. Finally, we detect room-temperature spin resonances of these silicon vacancies hosted in SiC nanocrystals. This opens intriguing perspectives to use them not only as in-vivo luminescent markers but also as magnetic field and temperature sensors, allowing for monitoring various physical, chemical, and biological processes.

  15. Analytical and experimental evaluation of joining silicon carbide to silicon carbide and silicon nitride to silicon nitride for advanced heat engine applications, phase 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundberg, G. J.; Vartabedian, A. M.; Wade, J. A.; White, C. S.

    1994-10-01

    The purpose of joining, Phase 2 was to develop joining technologies for HIP'ed Si3N4 with 4wt% Y2O3 (NCX-5101) and for a siliconized SiC (NT230) for various geometries including: butt joins, curved joins and shaft to disk joins. In addition, more extensive mechanical characterization of silicon nitride joins to enhance the predictive capabilities of the analytical/numerical models for structural components in advanced heat engines was provided. Mechanical evaluation were performed by: flexure strength at 22 C and 1,370 C, stress rupture at 1,370 C, high temperature creep, 22 C tensile testing and spin tests. While the silicon nitride joins were produced with sufficient integrity for many applications, the lower join strength would limit its use in the more severe structural applications. Thus, the silicon carbide join quality was deemed unsatisfactory to advance to more complex, curved geometries. The silicon carbide joining methods covered within this contract, although not entirely successful, have emphasized the need to focus future efforts upon ways to obtain a homogeneous, well sintered parent/join interface prior to siliconization. In conclusion, the improved definition of the silicon carbide joining problem obtained by efforts during this contract have provided avenues for future work that could successfully obtain heat engine quality joins.

  16. Analytical and experimental evaluation of joining silicon carbide to silicon carbide and silicon nitride to silicon nitride for advanced heat engine applications Phase 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sundberg, G.J.; Vartabedian, A.M.; Wade, J.A.; White, C.S.

    1994-10-01

    The purpose of joining, Phase 2 was to develop joining technologies for HIP`ed Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} with 4wt% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (NCX-5101) and for a siliconized SiC (NT230) for various geometries including: butt joins, curved joins and shaft to disk joins. In addition, more extensive mechanical characterization of silicon nitride joins to enhance the predictive capabilities of the analytical/numerical models for structural components in advanced heat engines was provided. Mechanical evaluation were performed by: flexure strength at 22 C and 1,370 C, stress rupture at 1,370 C, high temperature creep, 22 C tensile testing and spin tests. While the silicon nitride joins were produced with sufficient integrity for many applications, the lower join strength would limit its use in the more severe structural applications. Thus, the silicon carbide join quality was deemed unsatisfactory to advance to more complex, curved geometries. The silicon carbide joining methods covered within this contract, although not entirely successful, have emphasized the need to focus future efforts upon ways to obtain a homogeneous, well sintered parent/join interface prior to siliconization. In conclusion, the improved definition of the silicon carbide joining problem obtained by efforts during this contract have provided avenues for future work that could successfully obtain heat engine quality joins.

  17. Amorphous silicon bolometer for fire/rescue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francisco, Glenn L.

    2001-03-01

    Thermal imaging sensors have completely changed the way the world views fire and rescue applications. Recently, in the uncooled infrared camera and microbolometer detector areas, major strides have been made in manufacturing personal fire and rescue sensors. A family of new amorphous silicon microbolometers are being produced utilizing low cost, low weight, ultra low power, small size, high volume vacuum packaged silicon wafer-level focal plane array technologies. These bolometers contain no choppers or thermoelectric coolers, require no manual calibration and use readily available commercial off-the-shelf components. Manufacturing and packaging discoveries have allowed infrared sensitive silicon arrays to be produced with the same methods that have driven the rapidly advancing digital wireless telecommunications industries. Fire and rescue professionals are now able to conduct minimum time thermal imaging penetration, surveillance, detection, recognition, rescue and egress while maintaining situational awareness in a manner consistent with the modern technological applications. The purpose of this paper is to describe an uncooled micro bolometer infrared camera approach for meeting fire/rescue wants, needs and requirements, with application of recent technology advancements. This paper also details advances in bolometric focal plane arrays, optical and circuit card technologies, while providing a glimpse into the future of micro sensor growth. Technical barriers are addressed in light of constraints and lessons learned around this technology.

  18. Fabrication and properties of silicon carbide nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Hyun Woo

    2008-12-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC), with excellent electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties, is a promising material candidate for future devices such as high-temperature electronics and super-strong lightweight structures. Combined with superior intrinsic properties, the nanomaterials of SiC show further advantages thanks to nanoscale effects. This thesis reports the growth mechanism, the self-integration, and the friction of SiC nanowires. The study involves nanowires fabrication using thermal evaporation, structure characterization using electron microscopy, friction measurement, and theoretical modeling. The study on nanowire growth mechanism requires understanding of the surfaces and interfaces of nanowire crystal. The catalyzed growth of SiC nanowires involves interfaces between source vapor, catalytic liquid, and nanowire solid. Our experimental observation includes the periodical twinning in a faceted SiC nanowire and three stage structure transitions during the growth. The proposed theoretical model shows that such phenomenon is the result of surface energy minimization process during the catalytic growth. Surface interactions also exist between nanowires, leading to their self-integration. Our parametric growth study reveals novel self-integration of SiC-SiO 2 core-shell nanowires as a result of SiO2 joining. Attraction between nanowires through van der Waals force and enhanced SiO2 diffusion at high temperature transform individual nanowires to the integrated nanojunctions, nanocables, and finally nanowebs. We also show that such joining process becomes effective either during growth or by annealing. The solid friction is a result of the interaction between two solid surfaces, and it depends on the adhesion and the deformation of two contacting solids among other factors. Having strong adhesion as shown from gecko foot-hairs, nanostructured materials should also have strong friction; this study is the first to investigate friction of nanostructures under

  19. Silicon carbide high temperature thermoelectric flow sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Man I.

    Current high temperature flow measurement devices are bulky, expensive and have slow response time. Therefore, there has been increasing demand for developing a flow sensor that has high temperature capability yet is small in size, fast in response time, and low in cost through mass fabrication. In this thesis, a high temperature flow sensor utilizing micromachining and microfabrication technology has been designed, simulated, fabricated, packaged and tested. This micro flow sensor is developed based on heavily-nitrogen-doped polycrystalline silicon carbide (n-SiC) thin film, a high temperature semiconductor well known for its mechanical robustness and chemical inertness in high temperatures and harsh environments. The small thermal mass and wide operating temperature range provide an excellent platform for a flow sensor operating with the thermal sensing principle. The n-SiC thermoelectric flow sensor prototype developed here is based on the calorimetric sensing mechanism. The sensor has a n-SiC heater for thermal marker creation, an upstream and a downstream n-SiC/p-Si thermopile for flow sensing, and a n-SiC thermistor for ambient temperature monitoring. This device is packaged in a stainless steel enclosure with a bypass channel. The tested flow range is between 0 to 20,000 sccm. The flow sensor has demonstrated high temperature capability and mechanical robustness up to 450 °C on a hotplate at zero flow condition, and up to 300 °C in a heated flow stream. The device has a response time of 8 ms. Maximum power consumption is 96 mW when operated at 8 mA (12 V) and 45 mW when operated at 5 mA (9V), with a sensor warm-up time less than 1 minute. In addition, the thermoelectric properties of n-SiC have been thoroughly studied through the characterization of the electrical resistivity, the Seebeck coefficient and the thermal conductivity of n-SiC thin film. The 0.93 microm-thick, n-SiC thin film utilized in the thermoelectric flow sensor has an electrical

  20. Characterization and adsorption modeling of silicon carbide-derived carbons.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T X; Bae, J-S; Bhatia, S K

    2009-02-17

    We present characterization results of silicon carbide-derived carbons (Si-CDCs) prepared from both nano- and micron-sized betaSiC particles by oxidation in pure chlorine atmosphere at various synthesis temperatures (600-1000 degrees C). Subsequently, the adsorption modeling study of simple gases (CH4 and CO2) in these Si-CDC samples for a wide range of pressures and temperatures using our Finite Wall Thickness model [Nguyen, T. X.; Bhatia, S. K. Langmuir 2004, 20, 3532] was also carried out. In general, characterization results showed that the core of Si-CDC particles contains predominantly amorphous material while minor graphitization was also observed on the surface of these particles for all the investigated synthesis temperatures (600-1000 degrees C). Furthermore, postsynthetic heat treatment at 1000 degrees C for 3 days, as well as particle size of precursor (betaSiC) were shown to have slight impact on the graphitization. In spite of the highly disordered nature of Si-CDC samples, the adsorption modeling results revealed that the Finite Wall Thickness model provides reasonably good prediction of experimental adsorption data of CO2 and CH4 in all the investigated Si-CDC samples at the temperatures of 273 K, 313 K, and 333 K for a wide range of pressure up to 200 bar. Furthermore, the impact of the difference in molecular size and geometry between analysis and probing gases on the prediction of the experimental adsorption isotherm in a disordered carbon using the slit-pore model is also found. Finally, the correlation between compressibility of the Si-CDC samples under high pressure adsorption and their synthesis temperature was deduced from the adsorption modeling. PMID:19123908

  1. The addition of silicon carbide to surrogate nuclear fuel kernels made by the internal gelation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, R. D.; Hunn, J. D.; Birdwell, J. F.; Lindemer, T. B.; Collins, J. L.

    2010-06-01

    The US Department of Energy plans to use the internal gelation process to make tristructural isotropic (TRISO)-coated transuranic (TRU) fuel particles. The focus of this work is to develop TRU fuel kernels with high crush strengths, good ellipticity, and adequately dispersed silicon carbide (SiC). The submicron SiC particles in the TRU kernels are to serve as getters for excess oxygen and to potentially sequester palladium, rhodium, and ruthenium, which could damage the coatings during irradiation. Zirconium oxide microspheres stabilized with yttrium were used as surrogates because zirconium and TRU microspheres from the internal gelation process are amorphous and encounter similar processing problems. The hardness of SiC required modifications to the experimental system that was used to make uranium carbide kernels. Suitable processing conditions and equipment changes were identified so that the SiC could be homogeneously dispersed in gel spheres for subsequent calcination into strong spherical kernels.

  2. Selective-area laser deposition (SALD) Joining of silicon carbide with silicon carbide filler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Shay Llewellyn

    Selective Area Laser Deposition (SALD) is a gas-phase, solid freeform fabrication (SFF) process that utilizes a laser-driven, pyrolytic gas reaction to form a desired solid product. This solid product only forms in the heated zone of the laser beam and thus can be selectively deposited by control of the laser position. SALD Joining employs the SALD method to accomplish 'welding' of ceramic structures together. The solid reaction product serves as a filler material to bond the two parts. The challenges involved with ceramic joining center around the lack of a liquid phase, little plastic deformation and diffusivity and poor surface wetting for many ceramic materials. Due to these properties, traditional metal welding procedures cannot be applied to ceramics. Most alternative ceramic welding techniques use some form of a metal addition to overcome these material limitations. However, the metal possesses a lower ultimate use temperature than the ceramic substrate and therefore it decreases the temperature range over which the joined part can be safely used. SALD Joining enjoys several advantages over these ceramic welding procedures. The solid filler material chemistry can be tailored to match the type of ceramic substrate and therefore fabricate monolithic joints. The SALD filler material bonds directly to the substrate and the joined structure is made in a one step process, without any post-processing. The research documented in this dissertation focused on SALD Joining of silicon carbide structures with silicon carbide filler material. A historical progression of gas-phase SFF research and a literature review of the most prominent ceramic joining techniques are provided. A variety of SiC substrates were examined, as were various conditions of gas precursor pressures and mixtures, laser beam scan speed and joint configuration. The SALD material was characterized for composition and structure by x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and nuclear magnetic

  3. Theoretical studies of amorphous silicon and hydrogenated amorphous silicon with molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, I.

    1991-12-20

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si) and hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) have been studied with molecular dynamics simulations. The structural, vibrational, and electronic properties of these materials have been studied with computer-generated structural models and compare well with experimental observations. The stability of a-si and a-Si:H have been studied with the aim of understanding microscopic mechanisms underlying light-induced degradation in a-Si:H (the Staebler-Wronski effect). With a view to understanding thin film growth processes, a-Si films have been generated with molecular dynamics simulations by simulating the deposition of Si-clusters on a Si(111) substrate. A new two- and three-body interatomic potential for Si-H interactions has been developed. The structural properties of a-Si:H networks are in good agreement with experimental measurements. The presence of H atoms reduces strain and disorder relative to networks without H.

  4. Method of fabricating silicon carbide coatings on graphite surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Varacalle, Jr., Dominic J.; Herman, Herbert; Burchell, Timothy D.

    1994-01-01

    The vacuum plasma spray process produces well-bonded, dense, stress-free coatings for a variety of materials on a wide range of substrates. The process is used in many industries to provide for the excellent wear, corrosion resistance, and high temperature behavior of the fabricated coatings. In this application, silicon metal is deposited on graphite. This invention discloses the optimum processing parameters for as-sprayed coating qualities. The method also discloses the effect of thermal cycling on silicon samples in an inert helium atmosphere at about 1600.degree.C. which transforms the coating to silicon carbide.

  5. Method of fabricating silicon carbide coatings on graphite surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Varacalle, D.J. Jr.; Herman, H.; Burchell, T.D.

    1994-07-26

    The vacuum plasma spray process produces well-bonded, dense, stress-free coatings for a variety of materials on a wide range of substrates. The process is used in many industries to provide for the excellent wear, corrosion resistance, and high temperature behavior of the fabricated coatings. In this application, silicon metal is deposited on graphite. This invention discloses the optimum processing parameters for as-sprayed coating qualities. The method also discloses the effect of thermal cycling on silicon samples in an inert helium atmosphere at about 1,600 C which transforms the coating to silicon carbide. 3 figs.

  6. Protective coating for alumina-silicon carbide whisker composites

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, Terry N.

    1989-01-01

    Ceramic composites formed of an alumina matrix reinforced with silicon carbide whiskers homogenously dispersed therein are provided with a protective coating for preventing fracture strength degradation of the composite by oxidation during exposure to high temperatures in oxygen-containing atmospheres. The coating prevents oxidation of the silicon carbide whiskers within the matrix by sealing off the exterior of the matrix so as to prevent oxygen transport into the interior of the matrix. The coating is formed of mullite or mullite plus silicon oxide and alumina and is formed in place by heating the composite in air to a temperature greater than 1200.degree. C. This coating is less than about 100 microns thick and adequately protects the underlying composite from fracture strength degradation due to oxidation.

  7. Diffusion Bonding of Silicon Carbide Ceramics using Titanium Interlayers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay; Shpargel, Tarah P.; Kiser, James D.

    2006-01-01

    Robust joining approaches for silicon carbide ceramics are critically needed to fabricate leak free joints with high temperature mechanical capability. In this study, titanium foils and physical vapor deposited (PVD) titanium coatings were used to form diffusion bonds between SiC ceramics using hot pressing. Silicon carbide substrate materials used for bonding include sintered SiC and two types of CVD SiC. Microscopy results show the formation of well adhered diffusion bonds. The bond strengths as determined from pull tests are on the order of several ksi, which is much higher than required for a proposed application. Microprobe results show the distribution of silicon, carbon, titanium, and other minor elements across the diffusion bond. Compositions of several phases formed in the joint region were identified. Potential issues of material compatibility and optimal bond formation will also be discussed.

  8. Ambient to high-temperature fracture toughness and cyclic fatigue behavior in Al-containing silicon carbide ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, R.; Kruzic, J.J.; Zhang, X.F.; De Jonghe, L.C.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2003-08-01

    A series of in situ toughened, A1, B and C containing, silicon carbide ceramics (ABC-SiC) has been examined with A1 contents varying from 3 to 7 wt percent. With increasing A1 additions, the grain morphology in the as-processed microstructures varied from elongated to bimodal to equiaxed, with a change in the nature of the grain-boundary film from amorphous to partially crystalline to fully crystalline.

  9. Catastrophic degradation of the interface of epitaxial silicon carbide on silicon at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradeepkumar, Aiswarya; Mishra, Neeraj; Kermany, Atieh Ranjbar; Boeckl, John J.; Hellerstedt, Jack; Fuhrer, Michael S.; Iacopi, Francesca

    2016-07-01

    Epitaxial cubic silicon carbide on silicon is of high potential technological relevance for the integration of a wide range of applications and materials with silicon technologies, such as micro electro mechanical systems, wide-bandgap electronics, and graphene. The hetero-epitaxial system engenders mechanical stresses at least up to a GPa, pressures making it extremely challenging to maintain the integrity of the silicon carbide/silicon interface. In this work, we investigate the stability of said interface and we find that high temperature annealing leads to a loss of integrity. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis shows a morphologically degraded SiC/Si interface, while mechanical stress measurements indicate considerable relaxation of the interfacial stress. From an electrical point of view, the diode behaviour of the initial p-Si/n-SiC junction is catastrophically lost due to considerable inter-diffusion of atoms and charges across the interface upon annealing. Temperature dependent transport measurements confirm a severe electrical shorting of the epitaxial silicon carbide to the underlying substrate, indicating vast predominance of the silicon carriers in lateral transport above 25 K. This finding has crucial consequences on the integration of epitaxial silicon carbide on silicon and its potential applications.

  10. SILICON CARBIDE CERAMICS FOR COMPACT HEAT EXCHANGERS

    SciTech Connect

    DR. DENNIS NAGLE; DR. DAJIE ZHANG

    2009-03-26

    Silicon carbide (SiC) materials are prime candidates for high temperature heat exchangers for next generation nuclear reactors due to their refractory nature and high thermal conductivity at elevated temperatures. This research has focused on demonstrating the potential of liquid silicon infiltration (LSI) for making SiC to achieve this goal. The major advantage of this method over other ceramic processing techniques is the enhanced capability of making high dense, high purity SiC materials in complex net shapes. For successful formation of net shape SiC using LSI techniques, the carbon preform reactivity and pore structure must be controlled to allow the complete infiltration of the porous carbon structure which allows complete conversion of the carbon to SiC. We have established a procedure for achieving desirable carbon properties by using carbon precursors consisting of two readily available high purity organic materials, crystalline cellulose and phenolic resin. Phenolic resin yields a glassy carbon with low chemical reactivity and porosity while the cellulose carbon is highly reactive and porous. By adjusting the ratio of these two materials in the precursor mixtures, the properties of the carbons produced can be controlled. We have identified the most favorable carbon precursor composition to be a cellulose resin mass ratio of 6:4 for LSI formation of SiC. The optimum reaction conditions are a temperature of 1800 C, a pressure of 0.5 Torr of argon, and a time of 120 minutes. The fully dense net shape SiC material produced has a density of 2.96 g cm{sup -3} (about 92% of pure SiC) and a SiC volume fraction of over 0.82. Kinetics of the LSI SiC formation process was studied by optical microscopy and quantitative digital image analysis. This study identified six reaction stages and provided important understanding of the process. Although the thermal conductivity of pure SiC at elevated temperatures is very high, thermal conductivities of most commercial Si

  11. Amorphous Silicon Display Backplanes on Plastic Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Striakhilev, Denis; Nathan, Arokia; Vygranenko, Yuri; Servati, Peyman; Lee, Czang-Ho; Sazonov, Andrei

    2006-12-01

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin-film transistor (TFT) backplanes are very promising for active-matrix organic light-emitting diode displays (AMOLEDs) on plastic. The technology benefits from a large manufacturing base, simple fabrication process, and low production cost. The concern lies in the instability of the TFTs threshold voltage (VT) and its low device mobility. Although VT-instability can be compensated by means of advanced multi-transistor pixel circuits, the lifetime of the display is still dependent on the TFT process quality and bias conditions. A-Si TFTs with field-effect mobility of 1.1 cm2/V · s and pixel driver circuits have been fabricated on plastic substrates at 150 °C. The circuits are characterized in terms of current drive capability and long-term stability of operation. The results demonstrate sufficient and stable current delivery and the ability of the backplane on plastic to meet AMOLED requirements.

  12. Radiation resistance studies of amorphous silicon films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Payson, J. Scott; Woodyard, James R.

    1988-01-01

    A study of hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films irradiated with 2.00 MeV helium ions using fluences ranging from 1E11 to 1E15/sq cm is presented. The films were characterized using photothermal deflection spectroscopy, transmission and reflection spectroscopy, and photoconductivity and annealing measurements. Large changes were observed in the subband-gap optical absorption for energies between 0.9 and 1.7 eV. The steady-state photoconductivity showed decreases of almost five orders of magnitude for a fluence of 1E15/sq cm, but the slope of the intensity dependence of the photoconductivity remained almost constant for all fluences. Substantial annealing occurs even at room temperature, and for temperatures greater than 448 K the damage is completely annealed. The data are analyzed to describe the defects and the density of states function.

  13. Short range atomic migration in amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauß, F.; Jerliu, B.; Geue, T.; Stahn, J.; Schmidt, H.

    2016-05-01

    Experiments on self-diffusion in amorphous silicon between 400 and 500 °C are presented, which were carried out by neutron reflectometry in combination with 29Si/natSi isotope multilayers. Short range diffusion is detected on a length scale of about 2 nm, while long range diffusion is absent. Diffusivities are in the order of 10-19-10-20 m2/s and decrease with increasing annealing time, reaching an undetectable low value for long annealing times. This behavior is strongly correlated to structural relaxation and can be explained as a result of point defect annihilation. Diffusivities for short annealing times of 60 s follow the Arrhenius law with an activation enthalpy of (0.74 ± 0.21) eV, which is interpreted as the activation enthalpy of Si migration.

  14. Amorphous Silicon-Carbon Nanostructure Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schriver, Maria; Regan, Will; Loster, Matthias; Zettl, Alex

    2011-03-01

    Taking advantage of the ability to fabricate large area graphene and carbon nanotube networks (buckypaper), we produce Schottky junction solar cells using undoped hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films and nanostructured carbon films. These films are useful as solar cell materials due their combination of optical transparency and conductance. In our cells, they behave both as a transparent conductor and as an active charge separating layer. We demonstrate a reliable photovoltaic effect in these devices with a high open circuit voltage of 390mV in buckypaper devices. We investigate the unique interface properties which result in an unusual J-V curve shape and optimize fabrication processes for improved solar conversion efficiency. These devices hold promise as a scalable solar cell made from earth abundant materials and without toxic and expensive doping processes.

  15. Direct-patterned optical waveguides on amorphous silicon films

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, Steve; Bond, Tiziana C.; Bond, Steven W.; Pocha, Michael D.; Hau-Riege, Stefan

    2005-08-02

    An optical waveguide structure is formed by embedding a core material within a medium of lower refractive index, i.e. the cladding. The optical index of refraction of amorphous silicon (a-Si) and polycrystalline silicon (p-Si), in the wavelength range between about 1.2 and about 1.6 micrometers, differ by up to about 20%, with the amorphous phase having the larger index. Spatially selective laser crystallization of amorphous silicon provides a mechanism for controlling the spatial variation of the refractive index and for surrounding the amorphous regions with crystalline material. In cases where an amorphous silicon film is interposed between layers of low refractive index, for example, a structure comprised of a SiO.sub.2 substrate, a Si film and an SiO.sub.2 film, the formation of guided wave structures is particularly simple.

  16. Growth of silicon carbide crystals on a seed while pulling silicon crystals from a melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszek, T. F.; Schwuttke, G. H. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A saturated solution of silicon and an element such as carbon having a segregation coefficient less than unity is formed by placing a solid piece of carbon in a body of molten silicon having a temperature differential decreasing toward the surface. A silicon carbide seed crystal is disposed on a holder beneath the surface of the molten silicon. As a rod or ribbon of silicon is slowly pulled from the melt, a supersaturated solution of carbon in silicon is formed in the vicinity of the seed crystal. Excess carbon is emitted from the solution in the form of silicon carbide which crystallizes on the seed crystal held in the cool region of the melt.

  17. STATUS OF HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR IRRADIATION OF SILICON CARBIDE/SILICON CARBIDE JOINTS

    SciTech Connect

    Katoh, Yutai; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Kiggans, Jim; Cetiner, Nesrin; McDuffee, Joel

    2014-09-01

    Development of silicon carbide (SiC) joints that retain adequate structural and functional properties in the anticipated service conditions is a critical milestone toward establishment of advanced SiC composite technology for the accident-tolerant light water reactor (LWR) fuels and core structures. Neutron irradiation is among the most critical factors that define the harsh service condition of LWR fuel during the normal operation. The overarching goal of the present joining and irradiation studies is to establish technologies for joining SiC-based materials for use as the LWR fuel cladding. The purpose of this work is to fabricate SiC joint specimens, characterize those joints in an unirradiated condition, and prepare rabbit capsules for neutron irradiation study on the fabricated specimens in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Torsional shear test specimens of chemically vapor-deposited SiC were prepared by seven different joining methods either at Oak Ridge National Laboratory or by industrial partners. The joint test specimens were characterized for shear strength and microstructures in an unirradiated condition. Rabbit irradiation capsules were designed and fabricated for neutron irradiation of these joint specimens at an LWR-relevant temperature. These rabbit capsules, already started irradiation in HFIR, are scheduled to complete irradiation to an LWR-relevant dose level in early 2015.

  18. RF Sputtering for preparing substantially pure amorphous silicon monohydride

    DOEpatents

    Jeffrey, Frank R.; Shanks, Howard R.

    1982-10-12

    A process for controlling the dihydride and monohydride bond densities in hydrogenated amorphous silicon produced by reactive rf sputtering of an amorphous silicon target. There is provided a chamber with an amorphous silicon target and a substrate therein with the substrate and the target positioned such that when rf power is applied to the target the substrate is in contact with the sputtering plasma produced thereby. Hydrogen and argon are fed to the chamber and the pressure is reduced in the chamber to a value sufficient to maintain a sputtering plasma therein, and then rf power is applied to the silicon target to provide a power density in the range of from about 7 watts per square inch to about 22 watts per square inch to sputter an amorphous silicon hydride onto the substrate, the dihydride bond density decreasing with an increase in the rf power density. Substantially pure monohydride films may be produced.

  19. Extreme service packaging for silicon carbide electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinel, Maxime Jean-Francois

    Electronic devices based on silicon carbide (SiC) represent a good choice for a variety of new high temperature, high power electronic applications. Moreover, SiC ceramics have great potentials for use in harsh environments. Nevertheless, many technical challenges still need to be addressed, including high temperature stability. Results obtained on several levels in the development of a SiC-based package are presented. The sealing of ceramic packages is generally accomplished using specialty glasses. Several commercial glasses were tested in view of their application as glass sealants. The reactions between SiC and certain oxides present in the glasses were responsible for the formation of CO gas. Selection criteria were developed based on thermodynamic calculations. This approach provides valuable information in tailoring suitable glasses. The oxidation of SiC in air results in the formation of silica that does not prove to be protective above about 1800 K because of interfacial reactions with its SiC substrate. The oxidation of both single crystal and polycrystalline SiC, between 973 and 2053 K, resulted in the formation of quartz, cristobalite or tridymite, which are the stable crystalline polymorphs of silica at ambient pressure. The polymorphs were pure SiO2, and contamination of the oxide scales from the oxidizing environment did not occur. The only variable affecting the occurrence of a specific polymorph was the oxidation temperature. Cristobalite was formed at temperatures ≥ 1673 K, tridymite between 1073 and 1573 K, while quartz formed at 973 K. Cristobalite was observed to grow in a spherulitic fashion from amorphous silica. This was not the case for tridymite and quartz, which appeared to grow as oriented crystalline films. The presence of a thin layer of silicon oxycarbide was detected at the SiC/SiO 2 interface. Formation of reliable and homogeneous interconnects can be a critical issue for demanding applications. The approach that was undertaken to

  20. Analytical and Experimental Evaluation of Joining Silicon Carbide to Silicon Carbide and Silicon Nitride to Silicon Nitride for Advanced Heat Engine Applications Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Sundberg, G.J.

    1994-01-01

    Techniques were developed to produce reliable silicon nitride to silicon nitride (NCX-5101) curved joins which were used to manufacture spin test specimens as a proof of concept to simulate parts such as a simple rotor. Specimens were machined from the curved joins to measure the following properties of the join interlayer: tensile strength, shear strength, 22 C flexure strength and 1370 C flexure strength. In parallel, extensive silicon nitride tensile creep evaluation of planar butt joins provided a sufficient data base to develop models with accurate predictive capability for different geometries. Analytical models applied satisfactorily to the silicon nitride joins were Norton's Law for creep strain, a modified Norton's Law internal variable model and the Monkman-Grant relationship for failure modeling. The Theta Projection method was less successful. Attempts were also made to develop planar butt joins of siliconized silicon carbide (NT230).

  1. Development of a continuous spinning process for producing silicon carbide - silicon nitride precursor fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    An apparatus was designed for the continuous production of silicon carbide - silicon nitride precursor fibers. The precursor polymer can be fiberized, crosslined and pyrolyzed. The product is a metallic black fiber with the composition of the type C sub x Si sub y n sub z. Little, other than the tensile strength and modulus of elasticity, is known of the physical properties.

  2. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of cubic silicon carbide. Patent Application

    SciTech Connect

    Addamiano, A.

    1985-07-02

    This invention relates to the growth of cubic silicon carbide crystals. More specifically, this invention relates to the growth of cubic silicon carbide by Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD). One object of the present invention is to provide a novel method for the production of cubic SiC for high temperature electronic devices. Another object of the present invention is to provide a novel method for the production of highly pure, single crystal cubic SiC that is duplicable. Another object of the present invention is to provide a novel method for the production of large-area single-crystal wafers of cubic SiC. These and other objects of the present invention can be achieved by a method for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of cubic Silicon Carbide (SiC) comprising the steps of etching silicon substrated having one mechanically polished face; depositing a thin buffer layer of cubic SiC formed by reaction between a heated Si substrate and a H2-C3H8 gas mixuture; and depositing SiC on the buffer layer at high temperature using H2+C3HY+SiH4 mixture.

  3. Novel silicon carbide/polypyrrole composites; preparation and physicochemical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Omastova, Maria . E-mail: upolmaom@savba.sk; Boukerma, Kada; Chehimi, Mohamed M.; Trchova, Miroslava

    2005-05-18

    Novel silicon carbide/polypyrrole (SiC/PPy) conducting composites were prepared using silicon carbide as inorganic substrate. The surface modification of SiC was performed in aqueous solution by oxidative polymerization of pyrrole using ferric chloride as oxidant. Elemental analysis was used to determine the mass loading of polypyrrole in the SiC/PPy composites. Scanning electron microscopy showed the surface modification of SiC by PPy. PPy in composites was confirmed by the presence of PPy bands in the infrared spectra of SiC/PPy containing various amounts of conducting polymer. The conductivity of SiC/PPy composites depends on PPy content on the surface. The composite containing 35 wt.% PPy showed conductivity about 2 S cm{sup -1}, which is in the same range as the conductivity of pure polypyrrole powder prepared under the same conditions using the same oxidant. PPy in the composites was clearly detected by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements by its N1s and Cl2p peaks. High resolution scans of the C1s regions distinguished between silicon carbide and polypyrrole carbons. The fraction of polypyrrole at the composite surface was estimated from the silicon and nitrogen levels. The combination of XPS and conductivity measurements suggests that the surface of the SiC/PPy composites is polypyrrole-rich for a conducting polymer mass loading of at least 12.6 wt.%.

  4. A model of silicon carbide chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Allendorf, M.D.; Kee, R.J. )

    1991-03-01

    This paper presents a model describing the interacting gas phase and surface chemistry present during the steady-state chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of silicon carbide (SiC). In this work, the authors treat the case of steady-state deposition of SiC from silane (SiH{sub 4}) and propane (C{sub 3}H{sub 8}) mixtures in hydrogen carrier gas at one atmosphere pressure. Epitaxial deposition is assumed to occur on a pre-existing epitaxial silicon carbide crystal. Pyrolysis of SiH{sub 4} and C{sub 3}H{sub 8} is modeled by 83 elementary gas-phase reactions. A set of 36 reactions of gas- phase species with the surface is used to simulate the deposition process. Rates for the gas/surface reactions were obtained from experimental measurements of sticking coefficients in the literature and theoretical estimates. The authors' results represent the first simulation of a silicon carbide deposition process that includes detailed description of both the gas phase and surface reactions. The chemical reaction mechanism is also combined with a model of a rotating disk reactor (RDR), which is a convenient way to study the interaction of chemical reactions with fluid mechanics. Transport of species from the gas to the surface is accounted for using multicomponent transport properties. Predictions of deposition rates as a function of susceptor temperature, disk rotation rate, and reactant partial pressure are presented. In addition, velocity, temperature, and concentration profiles normal to the heated disk for 41 gas-phase species are determined using reactor conditions typical of epitaxial silicon carbide deposition on silicon substrates.

  5. Formation of boron nitride coatings on silicon carbide fibers using trimethylborate vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Mengjiao; Zhou, Tong; He, Jing; Chen, Lifu

    2016-09-01

    High quality boron nitride (BN) coatings have been grown on silicon carbide (SiC) fibers by carbothermal nitridation and at atmospheric pressure. SiC fibers were first treated in chlorine gas to form CDC (carbide-derived carbon) film on the fiber surface. The CDC-coated SiC fibers were then reacted with trimethylborate vapor and ammonia vapor at high temperature, forming BN coatings by carbothermal reduction. The FT-IR, XPS, XRD, SEM, TEM and AES were used to investigate the formation of the obtained coatings. It has been found that the obtained coatings are composed of phase mixture of h-BN and amorphous carbon, very uniform in thickness, have smooth surface and adhere well with the SiC fiber substrates. The BN-coated SiC fibers retain ∼80% strength of the as-received SiC fibers and show an obvious interfacial debonding and fiber pullout in the SiCf/SiOC composites. This method may be useful for the large scale production of high quality BN coating on silicon carbide fiber.

  6. Field testing of pressureless sintered silicon carbide for choke trim

    SciTech Connect

    Regitz, A.; Keene, K.

    1983-01-01

    Until recently, tungsten carbide has been the most erosion resistant material in use for choke stem tips and seats. An increase in the number of wells that produce sand has led to a need for an improved material that will maintain its integrity significantly longer, when exposed to high velocity sand. During the last two years, FMC Wellhead Equipment Division's R and D Engineering Department has been conducting field tests of pressureless sintered silicon carbide (herein called SiC) used as trim for chokes. The test results have been very encouraging. SiC appears to have wear resistance two to three times better than tungsten carbide. The main problems encountered have been the brittleness of the material and the difficulty in attaching a SiC tip to the steel choke stem.

  7. Revised activation estimates for silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Heinisch, H.L.; Cheng, E.T.; Mann, F.M.

    1996-10-01

    Recent progress in nuclear data development for fusion energy systems includes a reevaluation of neutron activation cross sections for silicon and aluminum. Activation calculations using the newly compiled Fusion Evaluated Nuclear Data Library result in calculated levels of {sup 26}Al in irradiated silicon that are about an order of magnitude lower than the earlier calculated values. Thus, according to the latest internationally accepted nuclear data, SiC is much more attractive as a low activation material, even in first wall applications.

  8. Preparation and characterization of hydrogenated amorphous germanium and hydrogenated amorphous germanium carbide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hai-Sheng

    1989-02-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous germanium (a-Ge:H) and germanium carbide (a-Ge/sub 1-x/C/sub x/:H) films were prepared by rf sputtering of a polycrystalline Ge target in a vacuum /approximately/ 4 /times/ 10/sup /minus/7/ Torr at various rf power 50 less than or equal to P less than or equal to 600 W (0. 27-3.3 W/cm/sup 2/), target-substrate distance 1 less than or equal to d less than or equal to 7'', varying partial pressures of Ar, H/sub 2/, and C/sub 3/H/sub 8/, and flow rates f. The vibrational and opto-electronic properties such as infrared (IR) absorption, optical gap, electron-spin-resonance (ESR) signals, and conductivities vary with deposition conditions. The photoconductivity sigma/sub ph/, in particular, was carefully monitored as a function of the deposition conditions to optimize it. 96 refs., 49 figs., 7 tabs.

  9. Preparation and characterization of hydrogenated amorphous germanium and hydrogenated amorphous germanium-carbide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, H.S.

    1988-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous germanium (a-Ge:H) and germanium carbide (a-Ge{sub 1{minus}x}C{sub x}:H) films were prepared by rf sputtering of a polycrystalline Ge target in a vacuum {approximately}4 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} Torr at various rf power, target-substrate distance, varying partial pressures of Ar, H{sub 2}, and C{sub 3}H{sub 8}, and flow rates. The vibrational and opto-electronic properties such as infrared (IR) absorption, optical gap, electron-spin-resonance (ESR) signals, and conductivities vary with deposition conditions. The photoconductivity, in particular, was carefully monitored as a function of the deposition conditions to optimize it. The concentration of Ge-H bonds and the optical gap generally decrease as P is increased. Results of annealing showed the enhanced segregation effect of Ge-C bonds {ge} 300{degree}C. The evolution of bonded hydrogen with temperature is studied. Deposition rates of a-Ge:H films are estimated and compared. The thermalization curve for a Ge target is constructed. Deposition rate was found to decrease exponentially with increasing target-substrate distances to decrease with increasing partial pressures of H{sub 2} and C{sub 3}H{sub 8} and increasing flow rates. Hydrogen incorporation markedly increased photoconductivity.

  10. A tough, thermally conductive silicon carbide composite with high strength up to 1600 degreesC in Air

    PubMed

    Ishikawa; Kajii; Matsunaga; Hogami; Kohtoku; Nagasawa

    1998-11-13

    A sintered silicon carbide fiber-bonded ceramic, which consists of a highly ordered, close-packed structure of very fine hexagonal columnar fibers with a thin interfacial carbon layer between fibers, was synthesized by hot-pressing plied sheets of an amorphous silicon-aluminum-carbon-oxygen fiber prepared from an organosilicon polymer. The interior of the fiber element was composed of sintered beta-silicon carbide crystal without an obvious second phase at the grain boundary and triple points. This material showed high strength (over 600 megapascals in longitudinal direction), fibrous fracture behavior, excellent high-temperature properties (up to 1600 degreesC in air), and high thermal conductivity (even at temperatures over 1000 degreesC). PMID:9812889

  11. Processing of reaction-bonded silicon carbide without residual silicon phase

    SciTech Connect

    Messner, R.P.; Chiang, Y.M.

    1988-08-01

    Reaction-bonded silicon carbide free of the residual silicon phase that has previously limited upper use temperatures and mechanical properties has been synthesized by the infiltration of carbonaceous preforms using alloyed silicon melts. In this approach, rejection of the alloying components from the primary reacted silicon carbide phase into the remaining liquid forms a secondary refractory silicide, in a potentially broad and controllable range of volume fractions. Dense SiC-MoSi/sub 2/ materials free of residual silicon and residual carbon have been synthesized. In addition to a fully-infiltrated monolith, surface coatings on a carbon body have been synthesized by control of processing parameters. In each, the absence of free silicon and incorporation of the secondary phase is expected to improve mechanical properties. 14 references.

  12. Comparison of the surface charge behavior of commercial silicon nitride and silicon carbide powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitman, Pamela K.; Feke, Donald L.

    1988-01-01

    The adsorption and desorption of protons from aqueous solution onto the surfaces of a variety of commercial silicon carbide and silicon nitride powders has been examined using a surface titration methodology. This method provides information on some colloidal characteristics, such as the point of zero charge (pzc) and the variation of proton adsorption with dispersion pH, useful for the prediction of optimal ceramic-processing conditions. Qualitatively, the magnitude of the proton adsorption from solution reveals small differences among all of the materials studied. However, the results show that the pzc for the various silicon nitride powders is affected by the powder synthesis route. Complementary investigations have shown that milling can also act to shift the pzc exhibited by silicon nitride powder. Also, studies of the role of the electrolyte in the development of surface charge have indicated no evidence of specific adsorption of ammonium ion on either silicon nitride or silicon carbide powders.

  13. Temperature dependence of hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cell performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riesen, Y.; Stuckelberger, M.; Haug, F.-J.; Ballif, C.; Wyrsch, N.

    2016-01-01

    Thin-film hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar (a-Si:H) cells are known to have better temperature coefficients than crystalline silicon cells. To investigate whether a-Si:H cells that are optimized for standard conditions (STC) also have the highest energy yield, we measured the temperature and irradiance dependence of the maximum power output (Pmpp), the fill factor (FF), the short-circuit current density (Jsc), and the open-circuit voltage (Voc) for four series of cells fabricated with different deposition conditions. The parameters varied during plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PE-CVD) were the power and frequency of the PE-CVD generator, the hydrogen-to-silane dilution during deposition of the intrinsic absorber layer (i-layer), and the thicknesses of the a-Si:H i-layer and p-type hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide layer. The results show that the temperature coefficient of the Voc generally varies linearly with the Voc value. The Jsc increases linearly with temperature mainly due to temperature-induced bandgap reduction and reduced recombination. The FF temperature dependence is not linear and reaches a maximum at temperatures between 15 °C and 80 °C. Numerical simulations show that this behavior is due to a more positive space-charge induced by the photogenerated holes in the p-layer and to a recombination decrease with temperature. Due to the FF(T) behavior, the Pmpp (T) curves also have a maximum, but at a lower temperature. Moreover, for most series, the cells with the highest power output at STC also have the best energy yield. However, the Pmpp (T) curves of two cells with different i-layer thicknesses cross each other in the operating cell temperature range, indicating that the cell with the highest power output could, for instance, have a lower energy yield than the other cell. A simple energy-yield simulation for the light-soaked and annealed states shows that for Neuchâtel (Switzerland) the best cell at STC also has the best energy

  14. Crystallization of amorphous silicon thin films deposited by PECVD on nickel-metalized porous silicon

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Porous silicon layers were elaborated by electrochemical etching of heavily doped p-type silicon substrates. Metallization of porous silicon was carried out by immersion of substrates in diluted aqueous solution of nickel. Amorphous silicon thin films were deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition on metalized porous layers. Deposited amorphous thin films were crystallized under vacuum at 750°C. Obtained results from structural, optical, and electrical characterizations show that thermal annealing of amorphous silicon deposited on Ni-metalized porous silicon leads to an enhancement in the crystalline quality and physical properties of the silicon thin films. The improvement in the quality of the film is due to the crystallization of the amorphous film during annealing. This simple and easy method can be used to produce silicon thin films with high quality suitable for thin film solar cell applications. PMID:22901341

  15. Crystallization of amorphous silicon thin films deposited by PECVD on nickel-metalized porous silicon.

    PubMed

    Ben Slama, Sonia; Hajji, Messaoud; Ezzaouia, Hatem

    2012-01-01

    Porous silicon layers were elaborated by electrochemical etching of heavily doped p-type silicon substrates. Metallization of porous silicon was carried out by immersion of substrates in diluted aqueous solution of nickel. Amorphous silicon thin films were deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition on metalized porous layers. Deposited amorphous thin films were crystallized under vacuum at 750°C. Obtained results from structural, optical, and electrical characterizations show that thermal annealing of amorphous silicon deposited on Ni-metalized porous silicon leads to an enhancement in the crystalline quality and physical properties of the silicon thin films. The improvement in the quality of the film is due to the crystallization of the amorphous film during annealing. This simple and easy method can be used to produce silicon thin films with high quality suitable for thin film solar cell applications. PMID:22901341

  16. Friction, deformation and fracture of single-crystal silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    Friction experiments were conducted with hemispherical and conical diamond riders sliding on the basal plane of silicon carbide. The results indicate that, when deformation is primarily elastic, the friction does not depend on crystallographic orientation and there is no detectable fracture or cracking. When, however, plastic deformation occurs, silicon carbide exhibits anisotropic friction and deformation behavior. Surface fracture crack patterns surrounding wear tracks are observed to be of three types. The crack-geometries of two types are generally independent of orientation, the third crack, however, depends on the orientation. All surface cracks extend into subsurface. Anisotropic friction, deformation and fracture on the basal plane are primarily controlled by the slip system and cleavage.

  17. Diffusion Bonding of Silicon Carbide for MEMS-LDI Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay; Shpargel, Tarah P.; Kiser, J. Douglas

    2007-01-01

    A robust joining approach is critically needed for a Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems-Lean Direct Injector (MEMS-LDI) application which requires leak free joints with high temperature mechanical capability. Diffusion bonding is well suited for the MEMS-LDI application. Diffusion bonds were fabricated using titanium interlayers between silicon carbide substrates during hot pressing. The interlayers consisted of either alloyed titanium foil or physically vapor deposited (PVD) titanium coatings. Microscopy shows that well adhered, crack free diffusion bonds are formed under optimal conditions. Under less than optimal conditions, microcracks are present in the bond layer due to the formation of intermetallic phases. Electron microprobe analysis was used to identify the reaction formed phases in the diffusion bond. Various compatibility issues among the phases in the interlayer and substrate are discussed. Also, the effects of temperature, pressure, time, silicon carbide substrate type, and type of titanium interlayer and thickness on the microstructure and composition of joints are discussed.

  18. [beta]-silicon carbide protective coating and method for fabricating same

    DOEpatents

    Carey, P.G.; Thompson, J.B.

    1994-11-01

    A polycrystalline beta-silicon carbide film or coating and method for forming same on components, such as the top of solar cells, to act as an extremely hard protective surface, and as an anti-reflective coating are disclosed. This is achieved by DC magnetron co-sputtering of amorphous silicon and carbon to form a SiC thin film onto a surface, such as a solar cell. The thin film is then irradiated by a pulsed energy source, such as an excimer laser, to synthesize the poly- or [mu]c-SiC film on the surface and produce [beta]-SiC. While the method of this invention has primary application in solar cell manufacturing, it has application wherever there is a requirement for an extremely hard surface. 3 figs.

  19. .beta.-silicon carbide protective coating and method for fabricating same

    DOEpatents

    Carey, Paul G.; Thompson, Jesse B.

    1994-01-01

    A polycrystalline beta-silicon carbide film or coating and method for forming same on components, such as the top of solar cells, to act as an extremely hard protective surface, and as an anti-reflective coating. This is achieved by DC magnetron co-sputtering of amorphous silicon and carbon to form a SiC thin film onto a surface, such as a solar cell. The thin film is then irradiated by a pulsed energy source, such as an excimer laser, to synthesize the poly- or .mu.c-SiC film on the surface and produce .beta.--SiC. While the method of this invention has primary application in solar cell manufacturing, it has application wherever there is a requirement for an extremely hard surface.

  20. Photo-electronic properties of CVD amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salau, Akinola Muritala

    1983-12-01

    D.c. conductivity, thermoelectric power and photoconductivity of amorphous silicon films prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) have been measured as functions of operating and annealing temperatures. Several interpretations of the results obtained have been suggested.

  1. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon films prepared by glow discharge of disilane

    SciTech Connect

    Wiesmann, H.J. )

    1990-01-01

    This report describes the results of an investigation of the properties of hydrogenated amorphous silicon films and the efficiency of amorphous silicon solar cells deposited from disilane at rates of 1.5 nanometers/second or greater. The study was divided into two parts, investigation of basic materials properties of hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films and the fabrication of glass-P-I-N-metal solar cells. The thin film materials properties investigated included the dark conductivity, photoconductivity, dihydride/monohydride concentration ratio, activation energy, and mobility-lifetime product. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells were fabricated with an intrinsic layer which was deposited at 1.5 nanometers/second. The absolute and reverse bias quantum yields were measured and solar cell efficiencies of 5% were achieved. Attempts to increase the efficiency by reverse bias annealing are also reported. 7 refs., 27 figs.

  2. Thermal properties of amorphous/crystalline silicon superlattices.

    PubMed

    France-Lanord, Arthur; Merabia, Samy; Albaret, Tristan; Lacroix, David; Termentzidis, Konstantinos

    2014-09-01

    Thermal transport properties of crystalline/amorphous silicon superlattices using molecular dynamics are investigated. We show that the cross-plane conductivity of the superlattices is very low and close to the conductivity of bulk amorphous silicon even for amorphous layers as thin as ≃ 6 Å. The cross-plane thermal conductivity weakly increases with temperature which is associated with a decrease of the Kapitza resistance with temperature at the crystalline/amorphous interface. This property is further investigated considering the spatial analysis of the phonon density of states in domains close to the interface. Interestingly, the crystalline/amorphous superlattices are shown to display large thermal anisotropy, according to the characteristic sizes of elaborated structures. These last results suggest that the thermal conductivity of crystalline/amorphous superlattices can be phonon engineered, providing new directions for nanostructured thermoelectrics and anisotropic materials in thermal transport. PMID:25105883

  3. Optical nonlinearities in high-confinement silicon carbide waveguides.

    PubMed

    Cardenas, Jaime; Yu, Mengjie; Okawachi, Yoshitomo; Poitras, Carl B; Lau, Ryan K W; Dutt, Avik; Gaeta, Alexander L; Lipson, Michal

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate strong nonlinearities of n2=8.6±1.1×10(-15)  cm2 W(-1) in single-crystal silicon carbide (SiC) at a wavelength of 2360 nm. We use a high-confinement SiC waveguide fabricated based on a high-temperature smart-cut process. PMID:26368731

  4. Anodic etching of p-type cubic silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, G. L.; Fekade, K.; Wongchotigul, K.

    1992-01-01

    p-Type cubic silicon carbide was anodically etched using an electrolyte of HF:HCl:H2O. The etching depth was determined versus time with a fixed current density of 96.4 mA/sq cm. It was found that the etching was very smooth and very uniform. An etch rate of 22.7 nm/s was obtained in a 1:1:50 HF:HCl:H2O electrolyte.

  5. Electron spin decoherence in silicon carbide nuclear spin bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li-Ping

    In this paper, we study the electron spin decoherence of single defects in silicon carbide (SiC) nuclear spin bath. We find that, although the natural abundance of 29Si (4.7 counter-intuitive result, is the suppression of heteronuclear-spin flip-flop process in finite magnetic field. Our results show that electron spin of defect centers in SiC are excellent candidates for solid state spin qubit in quantum information processing.

  6. Microstructure and properties of IN SITU toughened silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    De Jonghe, Lutgard C.; Ritchie, Robert O.; Zhang, Xiao Feng

    2003-05-01

    A silicon carbide with a fracture toughness as high as 9.1 MPa.m1/2 has been developed by hot pressing b-SiC powder with aluminum, boron, and carbon additions (ABC-SiC). Central in this material development has been systematic transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and mechanical characterizations. In particular, atomic-resolution electron microscopy and nanoprobe composition quantification were combined in analyzing grain boundary structure and nanoscale structural features.

  7. Synthesis of multifilament silicon carbide fibers by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Revankar, Vithal; Hlavacek, Vladimir

    1991-01-01

    A process for development of clean silicon carbide fiber with a small diameter and high reliability is presented. An experimental evaluation of operating conditions for SiC fibers of good mechanical properties and devising an efficient technique which will prevent welding together of individual filaments are discussed. The thermodynamic analysis of a different precursor system was analyzed vigorously. Thermodynamically optimum conditions for stoichiometric SiC deposit were obtained.

  8. Assessment of exposure to quartz, cristobalite and silicon carbide fibres (whiskers) in a silicon carbide plant.

    PubMed

    Dion, Chantal; Dufresne, André; Jacob, Marcel; Perrault, Guy

    2005-06-01

    The main objective of the present paper is to report on the concentration of silicon carbide (SiC) fibres, crystalline silica and respirable dust in a Canadian SiC production plant and to compare the results with earlier investigations. The second objective is to tentatively explain the differences in concentration of the fibrogenic substances between different countries. The assessment of SiC fibres, dusts, respirable quartz and cristobalite was performed according to standard procedures. The highest 8 h time-weighted average concentrations of fibres were found among the crusher and backhoe attendants and the carboselectors with an arithmetic mean of 0.63 fibres ml(-1) for the former group and 0.51 fibres ml(-1) for the latter group. The results of respirable SiC fibres in the Canadian plant were lower than in the Norwegian and Italian industries. Most of the 8 h time-weighted average concentrations for quartz were less than or around the limit of detection of 0.01 mg m(-3). The maximum 8 h time-weighted average concentration for quartz was found among the carboselectors (0.157 mg m(-3)), followed by the labourers (0.032 mg m(-3)). Similarly, most of the 8 h time-weighted average cristobalite measurements were less than the limit of detection of 0.01 mg m(-3) except for the carboselectors where it was found to be 0.044 mg m(-3). The assessment of the Italian occupational settings exposure demonstrated elevated quartz concentrations, while cristobalite was absent. The authors have concluded that the investigations that were performed in the last two decades in this field by researchers from different countries seem to support that SiC fibres (whiskers) constitute a major airborne health hazard. PMID:15650014

  9. Reaction kinetics of nanostructured silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallis, K. L.; Patyk, J. K.; Zerda, T. W.

    2008-08-01

    SiC nanowires were produced from carbon nanotubes and silicon by two different methods at high temperature. X-ray powder diffraction was used to determine SiC concentration. The reaction rate using the Avrami-Erofeev method was determined for samples sintered at temperatures ranging from 1313 to 1823 K. The activation energy was found to be (254 ± 36) kJ mol-1. The limiting factor in SiC formation is diffusion of silicon and carbon atoms through the produced layer of SiC.

  10. Process for preparing fine grain silicon carbide powder

    DOEpatents

    Wei, G.C.

    Finely divided silicon carbide powder is obtained by mixing colloidal silica and unreacted phenolic resin in either acetone or methanol, evaporating solvent from the obtained solution to form a gel, drying and calcining the gel to polymerize the phenolic resin therein, pyrolyzing the dried and calcined gel at a temperature in the range of 500 to 1000/sup 0/C, and reacting silicon and carbon in the pyrolyzed gel at a temperature in the range of 1550 to 1700/sup 0/C to form the powder.

  11. Ceramic composites reinforced with modified silicon carbide whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, Terry N.; Lindemer, Terrence B.

    1990-01-01

    Silicon carbide whisker-reinforced ceramic composites are fabricated in a highly reproducible manner by beneficating the surfaces of the silicon carbide whiskers prior to their usage in the ceramic composites. The silicon carbide whiskers which contain considerable concentrations of surface oxides and other impurities which interact with the ceramic composite material to form a chemical bond are significantly reduced so that only a relatively weak chemical bond is formed between the whisker and the ceramic material. Thus, when the whiskers interact with a crack propagating into the composite the crack is diverted or deflected along the whisker-matrix interface due to the weak chemical bonding so as to deter the crack propagation through the composite. The depletion of the oxygen-containing compounds and other impurities on the whisker surfaces and near surface region is effected by heat treating the whiskers in a suitable oxygen sparaging atmosphere at elevated temperatures. Additionally, a sedimentation technique may be utilized to remove whiskers which suffer structural and physical anomalies which render them undesirable for use in the composite. Also, a layer of carbon may be provided on the surface of the whiskers to further inhibit chemical bonding of the whiskers to the ceramic composite material.

  12. Barrier properties of nano silicon carbide designed chitosan nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Gopal C; Dash, Satyabrata; Swain, Sarat K

    2015-12-10

    Nano silicon carbide (SiC) designed chitosan nanocomposites were prepared by solution technique. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used for studying structural interaction of nano silicon carbide (SiC) with chitosan. The morphology of chitosan/SiC nanocomposites was investigated by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), and high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). The thermal stability of chitosan was substantially increased due to incorporation of stable silicon carbide nanopowder. The oxygen permeability of chitosan/SiC nanocomposites was reduced by three folds as compared to the virgin chitosan. The chemical resistance properties of chitosan were enhanced due to the incorporation of nano SiC. The biodegradability was investigated using sludge water. The tensile strength of chitosan/SiC nanocomposites was increased with increasing percentage of SiC. The substantial reduction in oxygen barrier properties in combination with increased thermal stability, tensile strength and chemical resistance properties; the synthesized nanocomposite may be suitable for packaging applications. PMID:26428100

  13. CVD silicon carbide characterization. Final report, August 1992-October 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, G.A.; Iden, D.

    1994-08-01

    Chemically vapor deposited (CVD) silicon carbide is a candidate material for high quality ground and space-based mirror substrates and high quality reflective optics. Statistically valid material property data has not been available, however, to make durability and lifetime predictions for such optics. The primary purpose of this study was to determine the Weibull and slow crack growth parameters for CVD silicon carbide. Specimens were cut from various locations in a 25 mm thick, 50 cm diameter piece of SiC to analyze bulk material property homogeneity. Flexural strength was measured using a four-point bend technique. In addition to mechanical testing for strength, hardness, and fracture toughness, the material crystallography and microstructure were studied. Thermal expansion, thermal diffusivity, specific heat, optical absorption, and infrared reflectivity measurements were also conducted. Raman spectroscopy was used to check for any residual stress. Test results show this CVD silicon carbide is a high-purity, homogeneous, fine-grained substrate material with very good mechanical, optical, and thermal properties.

  14. Silicon Carbide Mounts for Fabry-Perot Interferometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindemann, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Etalon mounts for tunable Fabry- Perot interferometers can now be fabricated from reaction-bonded silicon carbide structural components. These mounts are rigid, lightweight, and thermally stable. The fabrication of these mounts involves the exploitation of post-casting capabilities that (1) enable creation of monolithic structures having reduced (in comparison with prior such structures) degrees of material inhomogeneity and (2) reduce the need for fastening hardware and accommodations. Such silicon carbide mounts could be used to make lightweight Fabry-Perot interferometers or could be modified for use as general lightweight optical mounts. Heretofore, tunable Fabry-Perot interferometer structures, including mounting hardware, have been made from the low-thermal-expansion material Invar (a nickel/iron alloy) in order to obtain the thermal stability required for spectroscopic applications for which such interferometers are typically designed. However, the high mass density of Invar structures is disadvantageous in applications in which there are requirements to minimize mass. Silicon carbide etalon mounts have been incorporated into a tunable Fabry-Perot interferometer of a prior design that originally called for Invar structural components. The strength, thermal stability, and survivability of the interferometer as thus modified are similar to those of the interferometer as originally designed, but the mass of the modified interferometer is significantly less than the mass of the original version.

  15. Bonding and Integration Technologies for Silicon Carbide Based Injector Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay

    2008-01-01

    Advanced ceramic bonding and integration technologies play a critical role in the fabrication and application of silicon carbide based components for a number of aerospace and ground based applications. One such application is a lean direct injector for a turbine engine to achieve low NOx emissions. Ceramic to ceramic diffusion bonding and ceramic to metal brazing technologies are being developed for this injector application. For the diffusion bonding, titanium interlayers (PVD and foils) were used to aid in the joining of silicon carbide (SiC) substrates. The influence of such variables as surface finish, interlayer thickness (10, 20, and 50 microns), processing time and temperature, and cooling rates were investigated. Microprobe analysis was used to identify the phases in the bonded region. For bonds that were not fully reacted an intermediate phase, Ti5Si3Cx, formed that is thermally incompatible in its thermal expansion and caused thermal stresses and cracking during the processing cool-down. Thinner titanium interlayers and/or longer processing times resulted in stable and compatible phases that did not contribute to microcracking and resulted in an optimized microstructure. Tensile tests on the joined materials resulted in strengths of 13-28 MPa depending on the SiC substrate material. Non-destructive evaluation using ultrasonic immersion showed well formed bonds. For the joining technology of brazing Kovar fuel tubes to silicon carbide, preliminary development of the joining approach has begun. Various technical issues and requirements for the injector application are addressed.

  16. The Development of Silicon Carbide Based Hydrogen and Hydrocarbon Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Chung-Chiun

    1994-01-01

    Silicon carbide is a high temperature electronic material. Its potential for development of chemical sensors in a high temperature environment has not been explored. The objective of this study is to use silicon carbide as the substrate material for the construction of chemical sensors for high temperature applications. Sensors for the detection of hydrogen and hydrocarbon are developed in this program under the auspices of Lewis Research Center, NASA. Metal-semiconductor or metal-insulator-semiconductor structures are used in this development. Specifically, using palladium-silicon carbide Schottky diodes as gas sensors in the temperature range of 100 to 400 C are designed, fabricated and assessed. The effect of heat treatment on the Pd-SiC Schottky diode is examined. Operation of the sensors at 400 C demonstrate sensitivity of the sensor to hydrogen and hydrocarbons. Substantial progress has been made in this study and we believe that the Pd-SiC Schottky diode has potential as a hydrogen and hydrocarbon sensor over a wide range of temperatures. However, the long term stability and operational life of the sensor need to be assessed. This aspect is an important part of our future continuing investigation.

  17. Visible-blind ultraviolet photodetectors on porous silicon carbide substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Naderi, N.; Hashim, M.R.

    2013-06-01

    Highlights: • Highly reliable UV detectors are fabricated on porous silicon carbide substrates. • The optical properties of samples are enhanced by increasing the current density. • The optimized sample exhibits enhanced sensitivity to the incident UV radiation. - Abstract: Highly reliable visible-blind ultraviolet (UV) photodetectors were successfully fabricated on porous silicon carbide (PSC) substrates. High responsivity and high photoconductive gain were observed in a metal–semiconductor–metal ultraviolet photodetector that was fabricated on an optimized PSC substrate. The PSC samples were prepared via the UV-assisted photo-electrochemical etching of an n-type hexagonal silicon carbide (6H-SiC) substrate using different etching current densities. The optical results showed that the current density is an outstanding etching parameter that controls the porosity and uniformity of PSC substrates. A highly porous substrate was synthesized using a suitable etching current density to enhance its light absorption, thereby improving the sensitivity of UV detector with this substrate. The electrical characteristics of fabricated devices on optimized PSC substrates exhibited enhanced sensitivity and responsivity to the incident radiation.

  18. Method for removing oxide contamination from silicon carbide powders

    DOEpatents

    Brynestad, J.; Bamberger, C.E.

    1984-08-01

    The described invention is directed to a method for removing oxide contamination in the form of oxygen-containing compounds such as SiO/sub 2/ and B/sub 2/O/sub 3/ from a charge of finely divided silicon carbide. The silicon carbide charge is contacted with a stream of hydrogen fluoride mixed with an inert gas carrier such as argon at a temperature in the range of about 200/sup 0/ to 650/sup 0/C. The oxides in the charge react with the heated hydrogen fluoride to form volatile gaseous fluorides such as SiF/sub 4/ and BF/sub 3/ which pass through the charge along with unreacted hydrogen fluoride and the carrier gas. Any residual gaseous reaction products and hydrogen fluoride remaining in the charge are removed by contacting the charge with the stream of inert gas which also cools the powder to room temperature. The removal of the oxygen contamination by practicing the present method provides silicon carbide powders with desirable pressing and sintering characteristics. 1 tab.

  19. Large isotopic anomalies of Si, C, N and noble gases in interstellar silicon carbide from the Murray meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinner, E.; Ming, T.; Anders, E.

    1987-12-01

    Primitive meteorites contain several noble gas components with anomalous isotopic compositions which imply that they - and their solid 'carrier' phases - are of exotic, pre-solar origin. The authors found that minor fractions of the Murray meteorite contain two minerals not previously seen in meteorites: silicon carbide and an amorphous Si-O phase. They report ion microprobe analyses of these phases which reveal very large isotopic anomalies in silicon, nitrogen and carbon, exceeding the highest anomalies previously measured by factors of up to ≡50. It is concluded that these phases are circumstellar grains from carbon-rich stars, whose chemical inertness allowed them to survive in exceptionally well-preserved form.

  20. Extreme-Environment Silicon-Carbide (SiC) Wireless Sensor Suite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Phase II objectives: Develop an integrated silicon-carbide wireless sensor suite capable of in situ measurements of critical characteristics of NTP engine; Compose silicon-carbide wireless sensor suite of: Extreme-environment sensors center, Dedicated high-temperature (450 deg C) silicon-carbide electronics that provide power and signal conditioning capabilities as well as radio frequency modulation and wireless data transmission capabilities center, An onboard energy harvesting system as a power source.

  1. Light management and efficient carrier generation with a highly transparent window layer for a multijunction amorphous silicon solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iftiquar, Sk Md; Lee, Jeong Chul; Lee, Jieun; Kim, Youngkuk; Jang, Juyeon; Lee, Yeun-Jung; Yi, Junsin

    2013-01-01

    P-layer of a p-i-n type amorphous silicon solar cell helps in creating a built-in electric field inside the cell; it also contributes to parasitic absorption loss of incident light. Here, we report optimization of these two characteristic contributions of the p-layer of the cell. We used a highly transparent p-type hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (p-a-Si1-xCx:H) window layer in an amorphous silicon solar cell. With the increased transparency of the p-type layer, the solar cell showed an improvement in short-circuit current density by 17%, along with improvement in blue response of its external quantum efficiency, although further thinner p-layer showed lower open-circuit voltage. Such a cell shows low light-induced degradation and a promise to be used in high-efficiency multijunction solar cell.

  2. Graphitized silicon carbide microbeams: wafer-level, self-aligned graphene on silicon wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunning, Benjamin V.; Ahmed, Mohsin; Mishra, Neeraj; Ranjbar Kermany, Atieh; Wood, Barry; Iacopi, Francesca

    2014-08-01

    Currently proven methods that are used to obtain devices with high-quality graphene on silicon wafers involve the transfer of graphene flakes from a growth substrate, resulting in fundamental limitations for large-scale device fabrication. Moreover, the complex three-dimensional structures of interest for microelectromechanical and nanoelectromechanical systems are hardly compatible with such transfer processes. Here, we introduce a methodology for obtaining thousands of microbeams, made of graphitized silicon carbide on silicon, through a site-selective and wafer-scale approach. A Ni-Cu alloy catalyst mediates a self-aligned graphitization on prepatterned SiC microstructures at a temperature that is compatible with silicon technologies. The graphene nanocoating leads to a dramatically enhanced electrical conductivity, which elevates this approach to an ideal method for the replacement of conductive metal films in silicon carbide-based MEMS and NEMS devices.

  3. Graphitized silicon carbide microbeams: wafer-level, self-aligned graphene on silicon wafers.

    PubMed

    Cunning, Benjamin V; Ahmed, Mohsin; Mishra, Neeraj; Kermany, Atieh Ranjbar; Wood, Barry; Iacopi, Francesca

    2014-08-15

    Currently proven methods that are used to obtain devices with high-quality graphene on silicon wafers involve the transfer of graphene flakes from a growth substrate, resulting in fundamental limitations for large-scale device fabrication. Moreover, the complex three-dimensional structures of interest for microelectromechanical and nanoelectromechanical systems are hardly compatible with such transfer processes. Here, we introduce a methodology for obtaining thousands of microbeams, made of graphitized silicon carbide on silicon, through a site-selective and wafer-scale approach. A Ni-Cu alloy catalyst mediates a self-aligned graphitization on prepatterned SiC microstructures at a temperature that is compatible with silicon technologies. The graphene nanocoating leads to a dramatically enhanced electrical conductivity, which elevates this approach to an ideal method for the replacement of conductive metal films in silicon carbide-based MEMS and NEMS devices. PMID:25053702

  4. Electronic structure and chemical bonding of amorphous chromium carbide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnuson, Martin; Andersson, Matilda; Lu, Jun; Hultman, Lars; Jansson, Ulf

    2012-06-01

    The microstructure, electronic structure and chemical bonding of chromium carbide thin films with different carbon contents have been investigated with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy and soft x-ray absorption-emission spectroscopies. Most of the films can be described as amorphous nanocomposites with non-crystalline CrCx in an amorphous carbon matrix. At high carbon contents, graphene-like structures are formed in the amorphous carbon matrix. At 47 at.% carbon content, randomly oriented nanocrystallites are formed creating a complex microstructure of three components. The soft x-ray absorption-emission study shows additional peak structures exhibiting non-octahedral coordination and bonding.

  5. Amorphous Silicon: Flexible Backplane and Display Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, Kalluri R.

    Advances in the science and technology of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H, also referred to as a-Si) and the associated devices including thin-film transistors (TFT) during the past three decades have had a profound impact on the development and commercialization of major applications such as thin-film solar cells, digital image scanners and X-ray imagers and active matrix liquid crystal displays (AMLCDs). Particularly, during approximately the past 15 years, a-Si TFT-based flat panel AMLCDs have been a huge commercial success. a-Si TFT-LCD has enabled the note book PCs, and is now rapidly replacing the venerable CRT in the desktop monitor and home TV applications. a-Si TFT-LCD is now the dominant technology in use for applications ranging from small displays such as in mobile phones to large displays such as in home TV, as well-specialized applications such as industrial and avionics displays.

  6. Affordable Fabrication and Properties of Silicon Carbide-Based Interpenetrating Phase Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Mrityunjay

    1998-01-01

    An affordable processing technique for the fabrication of silicon carbide-based interpenetrating phase composites (IPCs) is presented. This process consists of the production of microporous carbon preforms and subsequent infiltration with liquid silicon or silicon-refractory metal alloys. The microporous preforms are made by the pyrolysis of a polymerized resin mixture for which methods to control pore volume and pore size have been established. The process gives good control of microstructure and morphology of silicon carbide-based composite materials. Room and high temperature mechanical properties (flexural strength, compressive strength, and flexural creep) of low and high silicon-silicon carbide composites will be discussed.

  7. A study of the effect of grain size on the ballistic performance of silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, C.F.

    1995-03-01

    The depth of penetration method was used to ballistically evaluate the performance of silicon carbide as a function of grain size. The hot-pressed silicon carbide was backed by 4340 steel Rc = 35 and impacted by tungsten heavy metal projectiles of L/D = 4 at velocities of 1.6 and 1/75 km/s. The hot-pressed silicon carbide was also compared with reaction-sintered silicon carbide of identical thickness in the current study. Results are compared with data previously reported by others.

  8. Silicon heterojunction solar cell and crystallization of amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Meijun

    The rapid growth of photovoltaics in the past decade brings on the soaring price and demand for crystalline silicon. Hence it becomes necessary and also profitable to develop solar cells with over 20% efficiency, using thin (˜100mum) silicon wafers. In this respect, diffused junction cells are not the best choice, since the inescapable heating in the diffusion process not only makes it hard to handle thin wafers, but also reduces carriers' bulk lifetime and impairs the crystal quality of the substrate, which could lower cell efficiency. An alternative is the heterojunction cells, such as amorphous silicon/crystalline silicon heterojunction (SHJ) solar cell, where the emitter layer can be grown at low temperature (<200°C). In first part of this dissertation, I will introduce our work on front-junction SHJ solar cell, including the importance of intrinsic buffer layer; the discussion on the often observed anomalous "S"-shaped J-V curve (low fill factor) by using band diagram analysis; the surface passivation quality of intrinsic buffer and its relationship to the performance of front-junction SHJ cells. Although the a-Si:H is found to help to achieve high efficiency in c-Si heterojuntion solar cells, it also absorbs short wavelength (<600 nm) light, leading to non-ideal blue response and lower short circuit currents (JSC) in the front-junction SHJ cells. Considering this, heterojunction with both a-Si:H emitter and base contact on the back side in an interdigitated pattern, i.e. interdigitated back contact silicon heterojunction (IBC-SHJ) solar cell, is developed. This dissertation will show our progress in developing IBC-SHJ solar cells, including the structure design; device fabrication and characterization; two dimensional simulation by using simulator Sentaurus Device; some special features of IBC-SHJ solar cells; and performance of IBC-SHJ cells without and with back surface buffer layers. Another trend for solar cell industry is thin film solar cells, since

  9. Mechanism for amorphization of boron carbide B4C under uniaxial compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryal, Sitaram; Rulis, Paul; Ching, W. Y.

    2011-11-01

    Boron carbide undergoes an amorphization transition under high-velocity impacts, causing it to suffer a catastrophic loss in strength. The failure mechanism is not clear and this limits the ways to improve its resistance to impact. To help uncover the failure mechanism, we used ab initio methods to carry out large-scale uniaxial compression simulations on two polytypes of stoichiometric boron carbide (B4C), B11C-CBC, and B12-CCC, where B11C or B12 is the 12-atom icosahedron and CBC or CCC is the three-atom chain. The simulations were performed on large supercells of 180 atoms. Our results indicate that the B11C-CBC (B12-CCC) polytype becomes amorphous at a uniaxial strain s = 0.23 (0.22) and with a maximum stress of 168 (151) GPa. In both cases, the amorphous state is the consequence of structural collapse associated with the bending of the three-atom chain. Careful analysis of the structures after amorphization shows that the B11C and B12 icosahedra are highly distorted but still identifiable. Calculations of the elastic coefficients (Cij) at different uniaxial strains indicate that both polytypes may collapse under a much smaller shear strain (stress) than the uniaxial strain (stress). On the other hand, separate simulations of both models under hydrostatic compression up to a pressure of 180 GPa show no signs of amorphization, in agreement with experimental observation. The amorphized nature of both models is confirmed by detailed analysis of the evolution of the radial pair distribution function, total density of states, and distribution of effective charges on atoms. The electronic structure and bonding of the boron carbide structures before and after amorphization are calculated to further elucidate the mechanism of amorphization and to help form the proper rationalization of experimental observations.

  10. Mechanism for amorphization of boron carbide B{sub 4}C under uniaxial compression

    SciTech Connect

    Aryal, Sitaram; Rulis, Paul; Ching, W. Y.

    2011-11-01

    Boron carbide undergoes an amorphization transition under high-velocity impacts, causing it to suffer a catastrophic loss in strength. The failure mechanism is not clear and this limits the ways to improve its resistance to impact. To help uncover the failure mechanism, we used ab initio methods to carry out large-scale uniaxial compression simulations on two polytypes of stoichiometric boron carbide (B{sub 4}C), B{sub 11}C-CBC, and B{sub 12}-CCC, where B{sub 11}C or B{sub 12} is the 12-atom icosahedron and CBC or CCC is the three-atom chain. The simulations were performed on large supercells of 180 atoms. Our results indicate that the B{sub 11}C-CBC (B{sub 12}-CCC) polytype becomes amorphous at a uniaxial strain s = 0.23 (0.22) and with a maximum stress of 168 (151) GPa. In both cases, the amorphous state is the consequence of structural collapse associated with the bending of the three-atom chain. Careful analysis of the structures after amorphization shows that the B{sub 11}C and B{sub 12} icosahedra are highly distorted but still identifiable. Calculations of the elastic coefficients (C{sub ij}) at different uniaxial strains indicate that both polytypes may collapse under a much smaller shear strain (stress) than the uniaxial strain (stress). On the other hand, separate simulations of both models under hydrostatic compression up to a pressure of 180 GPa show no signs of amorphization, in agreement with experimental observation. The amorphized nature of both models is confirmed by detailed analysis of the evolution of the radial pair distribution function, total density of states, and distribution of effective charges on atoms. The electronic structure and bonding of the boron carbide structures before and after amorphization are calculated to further elucidate the mechanism of amorphization and to help form the proper rationalization of experimental observations.

  11. Optical constants of silicon carbide deposited with emerging PVD techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaco, Gianni; Suman, M.; Pelizzo, M. G.; Nicolosi, P.

    2009-05-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is an attractive material for EUV and soft X-ray optics. CVD-deposited silicon carbide (deposited at 1400° C on Si substrate) is the best reflective material in the whole EUV interval (with about the 48% of reflectance at 121.6 nm). Despite of this, SiC thin films deposited with PVD techniques, such as magnetron sputtering, on silicon substrate, do not have the same performances and they undergo to a degradation with time, probably because of some stoichiometry reason (carbon rich). Depositing stable SiC with PVD techniques is crucial in building ML's, like Si/SiC and SiC/Mg for soft X-ray applications (such space telescope and photolithography). We deposited some preliminary samples using the Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) and the Pulsed Electron Deposition (PED) techniques achieving a good reflectance in the whole EUV range (27% at near normal incidence at 121.6 nn) on a silicon substrate. The higher energy involved in these deposition processes could lead to a film with a stoichiometry much closer to the target one. The reflectivity of the deposited films has been measured at the BEAR beamline of the ELETTRA synchrotron in Trieste (Italy; the optical constants retrieved at six wavelength from 121.6 nm down to 5 nm.

  12. Nanoscale engineering of radiation tolerant silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanwen; Ishimaru, Manabu; Varga, Tamas; Oda, Takuji; Hardiman, Chris; Xue, Haizhou; Katoh, Yutai; Shannon, Steven; Weber, William J

    2012-10-14

    Radiation tolerance is determined by how effectively the microstructure can remove point defects produced by irradiation. Engineered nanocrystalline SiC with a high-density of stacking faults (SFs) has significantly enhanced recombination of interstitials and vacancies, leading to self-healing of irradiation-induced defects. While single crystal SiC readily undergoes an irradiation-induced crystalline to amorphous transformation at room temperature, the nano-engineered SiC with a high-density of SFs exhibits more than an order of magnitude increase in radiation resistance. Molecular dynamics simulations of collision cascades show that the nano-layered SFs lead to enhanced mobility of interstitial Si atoms. The remarkable radiation resistance in the nano-engineered SiC is attributed to the high-density of SFs within nano-sized grain structures that significantly enhance point defect annihilation. PMID:22948711

  13. Exposure to Fibres, Crystalline Silica, Silicon Carbide and Sulphur Dioxide in the Norwegian Silicon Carbide Industry

    PubMed Central

    Føreland, S.; Bye, E.; Bakke, B.; Eduard, W.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess personal exposure to fibres, crystalline silica, silicon carbide (SiC) and sulphur dioxide in the Norwegian SiC industry. Methods: Approximately 720 fibre samples, 720 respirable dust samples and 1400 total dust samples were collected from randomly chosen workers from the furnace, processing and maintenance departments in all three Norwegian SiC plants. The respirable dust samples were analysed for quartz, cristobalite and non-fibrous SiC content. Approximately 240 sulphur dioxide samples were collected from workers in the furnace department. Results: The sorting operators from all plants, control room and cleaning operators in Plant A and charger, charger/mix and payloader operators in Plant C had a geometric mean (GM) of fibre exposure above the Norwegian occupational exposure limit (OEL) (0.1 fibre cm−3). The cleaner operators in Plant A had the highest GM exposure to respirable quartz (20 μg m−3). The charger/mix operators in Plant C had the highest GM exposure to respirable cristobalite (38 μg m−3) and the refinery crusher operators in Plant A had the highest GM exposure to non-fibrous SiC (0.65 mg m−3). Exposure to the crystalline silica and non-fibrous SiC was generally low and between 0.4 and 2.1% of the measurements exceeded the OELs. The cleaner operators in Plant A had the highest GM exposure to respirable dust (1.3 mg m−3) and total dust (21 mg m−3). GM exposures for respirable dust above the Norwegian SiC industry-specific OEL of 0.5 mg m−3 were also found for refinery crusher operators in all plants and mix, charger, charger/mix and sorting operators in Plant C. Only 4% of the total dust measurements exceeded the OEL for nuisance dust of (10 mg m−3). Exposure to sulphur dioxide was generally low. However, peaks in the range of 10–100 p.p.m. were observed for control room and crane operators in Plants A and B and for charger and charger/mix operators in Plant C. Conclusion: Workers in

  14. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon deposited by ion-beam sputtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, V. E.; Henin, N.; Tu, C.-W.; Tavakolian, H.; Sites, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon films 1/2 to 1 micron thick were deposited on metal and glass substrates using ion-beam sputtering techniques. The 800 eV, 2 mA/sq cm beam was a mixture of argon and hydrogen ions. The argon sputtered silicon from a pure (7.6 cm) single crystal wafer, while the hydrogen combined with the sputtered material during the deposition. Hydrogen to argon pressure ratios and substrate temperatures were varied to minimize the defect state density in the amorphous silicon. Characterization was done by electrical resistivity, index of refraction and optical absorption of the films.

  15. Electrical characteristics of amorphous iron-tungsten contacts on silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finetti, M.; Pan, E. T.-S.; Nicolet, M.-A.; Suni, I.

    1983-01-01

    The electrical characteristics of amorphous Fe-W contacts have been determined on both p-type and n-type silicon. The amorphous films were obtained by cosputtering from a composite target. Contact resistivities of 1 x 10 to the -7th and 2.8 x 10 to the -6th were measured on n(+) and p(+) silicon, respectively. These values remain constant after thermal treatment up to at least 500 C. A barrier height of 0.61 V was measured on n-type silicon.

  16. Gas-phase formation of silicon carbides, oxides, and sulphides from atomic silicon ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohme, Diethard K.; Wlodek, Stanislaw; Fox, Arnold

    1989-01-01

    A systematic experimental study of the kinetics and mechanisms of the chemical reactions in the gas phase between ground-state Si(+)2p and a variety of astrophysical molecules. The aim of this study is to identify the reactions which trigger the formation of chemical bonds between silicon and carbon, oxygen and sulphur, and the chemical pathways which lead to further molecular growth. Such knowledge is valuable in the identification of new extraterrestrial silicon-bearing molecules and for an assessment of the gas-phase transition from atomic silicon to silicon carbide and silicate grain particles in carbon-rich and oxygen-rich astrophysical environments.

  17. Exciton Resonances in Novel Silicon Carbide Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burggraf, Larry; Duan, Xiaofeng

    2015-05-01

    A revolutionary technology transformation from electronics to excitionics for faster signal processing and computing will be advantaged by coherent exciton transfer at room temperature. The key feature required of exciton components for this technology is efficient and coherent transfer of long-lived excitons. We report theoretical investigations of optical properties of SiC materials having potential for high-temperature excitonics. Using Car-Parinello simulated annealing and DFT we identified low-energy SiC molecular structures. The closo-Si12C12 isomer, the most stable 12-12 isomer below 1100 C, has potential to make self-assembled chains and 2-D nanostructures to construct exciton components. Using TDDFT, we calculated the optical properties of the isomer as well as oligomers and 2-D crystal formed from the isomer as the monomer unit. This molecule has large optical oscillator strength in the visible. Its high-energy and low-energy transitions (1.15 eV and 2.56 eV) are nearly pure one-electron silicon-to-carbon transitions, while an intermediate energy transition (1.28 eV) is a nearly pure carbon-to-silicon one-electron charge transfer. These results are useful to describe resonant, coherent transfer of dark excitons in the nanostructures. Research supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  18. The magnetic and hyperfine properties of iron in silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elzain, M.; Al-Harthi, S. H.; Gismelseed, A.; Al-Rawas, A.; Yousif, A.; Widatallah, H.; Al-Barwani, M.

    2014-04-01

    The magnetic and hyperfine properties of iron impurities in 3C- and 6H- silicon-carbide are calculated using the abinitio method of full-potential linear-augmented-plane-waves. The iron atoms are introduced at substitutional carbon, Fe C , and silicon, Fe Si , sites as well as at the tetrahedral interstitial sites with four nearest neighbours carbon atoms, Fe I (C), and four nearest neighbours silicon atoms, Fe I (Si). The effect of introducing vacancies at the neighbours of these sites is also studied. Fe atoms with complete neighbors substituted at Si or C sites are found to be nonmagnetic, while Fe atoms at interstitial sites are magnetic. Introduction of a vacancy at a neighboring site reverse the picture.

  19. Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition in Nanoconfined Silicon Carbide.

    PubMed

    Wu, Weikang; Zhang, Leining; Liu, Sida; Ren, Hongru; Zhou, Xuyan; Li, Hui

    2016-03-01

    We report theoretical evidence of a liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) in liquid silicon carbide under nanoslit confinement. The LLPT is characterized by layering transitions induced by confinement and pressure, accompanying the rapid change in density. During the layering transition, the proportional distribution of tetracoordinated and pentacoordinated structures exhibits remarkable change. The tricoordinated structures lead to the microphase separation between silicon (with the dominant tricoordinated, tetracoordinated, and pentacoordinated structures) and carbon (with the dominant tricoordinated structures) in the layer close to the walls. A strong layer separation between silicon atoms and carbon atoms is induced by strong wall-liquid forces. Importantly, the pressure confinement phase diagram with negative slopes for LLPT lines indicates that, under high pressure, the LLPT is mainly confinement-induced, but under low pressure, it becomes dominantly pressure-induced. PMID:26859609

  20. Determination of hydrogen density of states in amorphous silicon using fractional evolution experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, A.J.; Jackson, W.B.; Gland, J.L.

    1997-07-01

    Hydrogen plays an important role in the electronic behavior, structure and stability of amorphous silicon films. Therefore, determination of the hydrogen density of states (DOS) and correlation of the hydrogen DOS with the electronic film properties are important research goals. The authors have developed a novel method for determination of hydrogen DOS in silicon films, based on fractional evolution experiments. Fractional evolution experiments are performed by subjecting a silicon film to a series of linear, alternating heating and cooling ramps, while monitoring the hydrogen evolution rate. The fractional evolution data can be analyzed using two complementary methods, the fixed frequency factor approach and Arrhenius analysis. Using a rigorous, mean-field evolution model, they demonstrate the applicability of the two approaches to obtaining the hydrogen DOS in silicon films. They further validate both methods by analyzing experimental fractional evolution data for an amorphous silicon carbide film. Both types of analysis yield a similar double peaked density of states for the a-Si:C:H:D film.

  1. Silicon Carbide Emitter Turn-Off Thyristor

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Jun; Wang, Gangyao; Li, Jun; Huang, Alex Q.; Melcher, Jerry; Atcitty, Stan

    2008-01-01

    A novel MOS-conmore » trolled SiC thyristor device, the SiC emitter turn-off thyristor (ETO) is a promising technology for future high-voltage switching applications because it integrates the excellent current conduction capability of a SiC thyristor with a simple MOS-control interface. Through unity-gain turn-off, the SiC ETO also achieves excellent Safe Operation Area (SOA) and faster switching speeds than silicon ETOs. The world's first 4.5-kV SiC ETO prototype shows a forward voltage drop of 4.26 V at 26.5  A / cm 2 current density at room and elevated temperatures. Tested in an inductive circuit with a 2.5 kV DC link voltage and a 9.56-A load current, the SiC ETO shows a fast turn-off time of 1.63 microseconds and a low 9.88 mJ turn-off energy. The low switching loss indicates that the SiC ETO could operate at about 4 kHz if 100  W / cm 2 conduction and the 100  W / cm 2 turn-off losses can be removed by the thermal management system. This frequency capability is about 4 times higher than 4.5-kV-class silicon power devices. The preliminary demonstration shows that the SiC ETO is a promising candidate for high-frequency, high-voltage power conversion applications, and additional developments to optimize the device for higher voltage (>5 kV) and higher frequency (10 kHz) are needed.« less

  2. Method for silicon carbide production by reacting silica with hydrocarbon gas

    DOEpatents

    Glatzmaier, G.C.

    1994-06-28

    A method is described for producing silicon carbide particles using a silicon source material and a hydrocarbon. The method is efficient and is characterized by high yield. Finely divided silicon source material is contacted with hydrocarbon at a temperature of 400 C to 1000 C where the hydrocarbon pyrolyzes and coats the particles with carbon. The particles are then heated to 1100 C to 1600 C to cause a reaction between the ingredients to form silicon carbide of very small particle size. No grinding of silicon carbide is required to obtain small particles. The method may be carried out as a batch process or as a continuous process. 5 figures.

  3. Method for silicon carbide production by reacting silica with hydrocarbon gas

    DOEpatents

    Glatzmaier, Gregory C.

    1994-01-01

    A method is described for producing silicon carbide particles using a silicon source material and a hydrocarbon. The method is efficient and is characterized by high yield. Finely divided silicon source material is contacted with hydrocarbon at a temperature of 400.degree. C. to 1000.degree. C. where the hydrocarbon pyrolyzes and coats the particles with carbon. The particles are then heated to 1100.degree. C. to 1600.degree. C. to cause a reaction between the ingredients to form silicon carbide of very small particle size. No grinding of silicon carbide is required to obtain small particles. The method may be carried out as a batch process or as a continuous process.

  4. Amorphous and microcrystalline silicon technology--1997. Materials Research Society symposium proceedings, Volume 467

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, S.; Hack, M.; Schiff, E.A.; Schropp, R.; Shimizu, I.

    1997-07-01

    This book was divided into the following parts: Staebler-Wronski and Fundamental Defect Studies in Amorphous Silicon; The Story of Hydrogen in Amorphous Silicon; Photoelectric Properties of Amorphous Silicon; Deposition and Properties of Microcrystalline Silicon; Deposition Studies for Amorphous Silicon and Related Materials; Solar Cells; Thin-Film Transistors; and Sensors and Novel Device Concepts. Separate abstracts were prepared for most of the papers in the volume.

  5. Microstructural analysis of silicon carbide monofilaments.

    PubMed

    Shatwell, R. A.; Dyos, K. L.; Prentice, C.; Ward, Y.; Young, R. J.

    2001-02-01

    In the development of monofilaments, a good understanding of the process/property relationships is essential. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a powerful tool but too slow and expensive to be used routinely. Alternative, cheaper techniques have therefore been investigated. The microstructures of three SiC monofilaments (DERA Sigma SM1140+, Textron SCS-6 and Ultra-SCS) and some experimental samples were studied using a combination of TEM, electron microprobe analysis, Raman microprobe analysis, thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). It was found that the Raman technique was complementary to TEM and easily identified the presence of amorphous C and Si. These could not be seen by electron or X-ray diffraction techniques. DSC indicated the presence of free Si in the DERA Sigma SM1140+ monofilament by a distinctive peak at approximately 1400 degrees C. TGA showed the reaction of monofilament components with gaseous species. The Textron SCS-6 and Ultra species lost weight as C was oxidized to gaseous CO. By contrast, the Sigma monofilament gained weight from formation of SiO2 from the free Si. The separations of the transverse optical phonon peaks in the Raman spectra were correlated with the density of stacking faults in the SiC crystallites. This was similar in all monofilaments. Analysis of the polarization of the Raman scattering gave information on the orientation of crystallites. The crystallites in SM1140+ and SCS-6 were orientated predominantly with the <111> parallel to the radius. Preliminary interpretation of the polarized Raman scattering from Ultra-SCS indicated more than one orientation of crystallite. One possibility was a mixture of <111> and <110> directions parallel to the radius. PMID:11207920

  6. Microstructural Evolution of Chloride-Cleaned Silicon Carbide Aluminum Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeosun, S. O.; Akpan, E. I.; Gbenebor, O. P.; Balogun, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    This study examines the synergy between reinforcement surface modifications on the evolution of microstructures of AA6011-silicon carbide particle (SiCp) composites in multidirectional solidification. Silicon carbide particles (SiCp) were cleaned with ammonium chloride, tin(II) chloride, sodium chloride, and palladium(II) chloride and used as reinforcement to cast AA6011-SiCp composites by applying the stir casting method. A scanning electron microscope and x-ray diffractometer were used to investigate the morphology and phases present, respectively, in the composite material. Results show that wetting agents were effective as they inhibited the formation of Al4C3 in all modified composites. The modified SiCp was found to have varying effects on the morphology, dendrite arm size and direction, size and configuration of AlFeSi, and the amount of eutectic silicon depending on the concentration of the reagent and cleaning time. The highest effect was shown by the use of 40 g/L of tin(II) chloride. The composites had short dendritic arms, good interfacial interaction, and only a few crystals of AlFeSi.

  7. Utility-Scale Silicon Carbide Semiconductor: Monolithic Silicon Carbide Anode Switched Thyristor for Medium Voltage Power Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-01

    ADEPT Project: GeneSiC is developing an advanced silicon-carbide (SiC)-based semiconductor called an anode-switched thyristor. This low-cost, compact SiC semiconductor conducts higher levels of electrical energy with better precision than traditional silicon semiconductors. This efficiency will enable a dramatic reduction in the size, weight, and volume of the power converters and electronic devices it's used in.GeneSiC is developing its SiC-based semiconductor for utility-scale power converters. Traditional silicon semiconductors can't process the high voltages that utility-scale power distribution requires, and they must be stacked in complicated circuits that require bulky insulation and cooling hardware. GeneSiC's semiconductors are well suited for high-power applications like large-scale renewable wind and solar energy installations.

  8. Silicon Carbide and Uranium Oxide Based Composite Fuel Preparation Using Polymer Infiltration and Pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Abhishek K.; Zunjarrao, Suraj C.; Singh, Raman P.

    2006-07-01

    Ceramic composite pellets consisting of uranium oxide, U{sub 3}O{sub 8}, particles in a silicon carbide matrix are fabricated using a novel processing technique based on polymer infiltration and pyrolysis (PIP). In this process, spherical particles of depleted uranium oxide, in the form of U{sub 3}O{sub 8}, are dispersed in liquid allyl-hydrido-poly-carbo-silane (AHPCS), and subjected to pyrolysis up to 900 deg. C under a continuous flow of ultra high purity (UHP) argon. Pyrolysis of AHPCS produces near-stoichiometric amorphous SiC at 900 deg. C. Multiple polymer infiltration and pyrolysis (PIP) cycles are required to minimize open porosity and densify the silicon carbide matrix, in order to enhance the mechanical strength of the material. Structural characterization is carried out after first pyrolysis to investigate chemical interaction between U{sub 3}O{sub 8} and SiC. The physical and mechanical properties are also quantified, and it is shown that this processing scheme promotes uniform distribution of uranium fuel source along with a high ceramic yield of the parent matrix. Furthermore, the processing technique involves lower energy requirements than conventional sintering processes currently in practice. (authors)

  9. Study of Nitrogen Concentration in Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Yan, Cheng-Feng; Kong, Hai-Kuan; Chen, Jian-Jun; Xin, Jun; Shi, Er-Wei; Yang, Jian-Hua

    2013-06-01

    This work focused on studying the nitrogen concentration ( C N) in SiC. The variations of C N in the synthesis of SiC powder as well as the transport during SiC crystal growth have been investigated for broad ranges of temperature and Ar pressure. Before SiC crystal growth, SiC powders were synthesized from high-purity silicon and carbon powders. The concentrations of nitrogen, free C, and free Si in the as-prepared powders were all measured. C N in the SiC source powder decreased with increasing temperature and decreasing Ar pressure, whereas it did not show a remarkable trend with the molar ratio of free Si to free C. SiC crystal was then grown by the physical vapor transport (PVT) technique using the as-prepared powder. The distribution of C N in the remaining material indirectly indicated the temperature field of crystal growth. In addition, compared with introducing N2 during SiC crystal growth, doping with nitrogen during synthesis of the SiC source powder might be a better method to control C N in SiC crystals.

  10. Light-induced Voc increase and decrease in high-efficiency amorphous silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuckelberger, M.; Riesen, Y.; Despeisse, M.; Schüttauf, J.-W.; Haug, F.-J.; Ballif, C.

    2014-09-01

    High-efficiency amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells were deposited with different thicknesses of the p-type amorphous silicon carbide layer on substrates of varying roughness. We observed a light-induced open-circuit voltage (Voc) increase upon light soaking for thin p-layers, but a decrease for thick p-layers. Further, the Voc increase is enhanced with increasing substrate roughness. After correction of the p-layer thickness for the increased surface area of rough substrates, we can exclude varying the effective p-layer thickness as the cause of the substrate roughness dependence. Instead, we explain the observations by an increase of the dangling-bond density in both the p-layer—causing a Voc increase—and in the intrinsic absorber layer, causing a Voc decrease. We present a mechanism for the light-induced increase and decrease, justified by the investigation of light-induced changes of the p-layer and supported by Advanced Semiconductor Analysis simulation. We conclude that a shift of the electron quasi-Fermi level towards the conduction band is the reason for the observed Voc enhancements, and poor amorphous silicon quality on rough substrates enhances this effect.

  11. Irradiation and annealing of p-type silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, Alexander A.; Bogdanova, Elena V.; Grigor'eva, Maria V.; Lebedev, Sergey P.; Kozlovski, Vitaly V.

    2014-02-21

    The development of the technology of semiconductor devices based on silicon carbide and the beginning of their industrial manufacture have made increasingly topical studies of the radiation hardness of this material on the one hand and of the proton irradiation to form high-receptivity regions on the other hand. This paper reports on a study of the carrier removal rate (V{sub d}) in p-6H-SiC under irradiation with 8 MeV protons and of the conductivity restoration in radiation- compensated epitaxial layers of various p-type silicon carbide polytypes. V{sub d} was determined by analysis of capacitance-voltage characteristics and from results of Hall effect measurements. It was found that the complete compensation of samples with the initial value of Na - Nd ≈ 1.5 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup −3} occurs at an irradiation dose of ∼1.1 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2}. It is shown that specific features of the sublimation layer SiC (compared to CVD layers) are clearly manifested upon the gamma and electron irradiation and are hardly noticeable under the proton and neutron irradiation. It was also found that the radiation-induced compensation of SiC is retained after its annealing at ≤1000°C. The conductivity is almost completely restored at T ≥ 1200°C. This character of annealing of the radiation compensation is independent of a silicon carbide polytype and the starting doping level of the epitaxial layer. The complete annealing temperatures considerably exceed the working temperatures of SiC-based devices. It is shown that the radiation compensation is a promising method in the technology of high-temperature devices based on SiC.

  12. Net shape fabrication of Alpha Silicon Carbide turbine components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storm, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    Development of Alpha Silicon Carbide components by net shape fabrication techniques has continued in conjunction with several turbine engine programs. Progress in injection molding of simple parts has been extended to much larger components. Turbine rotors fabricated by a one piece molding have been successfully spin tested above design speeds. Static components weighing up to 4.5 kg and 33 cc in diameter have also been produced using this technique. Use of sintering fixtures significantly improves dimensional control. A new Si-SiC composite material has also been developed with average strengths up to 1000 MPa (150 ksi) at 1200 C.

  13. Deuteron irradiation creep of chemically vapor deposited silicon carbide fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, R.

    1998-03-01

    Irradiation creep tests were conducted on Textron SCS-6 silicon carbide (SiC) fibers during irradiation with 14 MeV deuterons at 450 and 600°C. The fibers are produced by a CVD procedure; their microstructure may therefore be representative for the matrix of a SiC composite. There is a significant radiation induced increase in creep deformation. Both quantities, irradiation creep strain and creep rate, are higher at 450°C than at 600°C for doses <0.07 dpa.

  14. Temperature Induced Voltage Offset Drifts in Silicon Carbide Pressure Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okojie, Robert S.; Lukco, Dorothy; Nguyen, Vu; Savrun, Ender

    2012-01-01

    We report the reduction of transient drifts in the zero pressure offset voltage in silicon carbide (SiC) pressure sensors when operating at 600 C. The previously observed maximum drift of +/- 10 mV of the reference offset voltage at 600 C was reduced to within +/- 5 mV. The offset voltage drifts and bridge resistance changes over time at test temperature are explained in terms of the microstructure and phase changes occurring within the contact metallization, as analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy. The results have helped to identify the upper temperature reliable operational limit of this particular metallization scheme to be 605 C.

  15. Scanning acoustic microscopy of SCS-6 silicon carbide fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Sathish, S.; Cantrell, J.H.; Yost, W.T.

    1996-01-01

    Scanning acoustic microscopy of SCS-6 silicon carbide fiber reveals large radial variations in acoustic reflectivity associated with the chemical composition and microstructure of a given fiber region. Rayleigh wave fringe patterns observed in each of five subregions are used to calculate the average Young modulus of that subregion. The Young modulus is found to increase monotonically from 40 GPa in the carbon core to a value of 413 GPa in the stoichiometric SiC region. The effective Young modulus of the fiber as a whole is estimated from the moduli of the individual regions and it is compared with mechanical measurements reported in the literature.

  16. Harsh Environment Silicon Carbide Sensor Technology for Geothermal Instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Pisano, Albert P.

    2013-04-26

    This project utilizes Silicon Carbide (SiC) materials platform to fabricate advanced sensors to be used as high-temperature downhole instrumentation for the DOE’s Geothermal Technologies Program on Enhanced Geothermal Systems. The scope of the proposed research is to 1) develop a SiC pressure sensor that can operate in harsh supercritical conditions, 2) develop a SiC temperature sensor that can operate in harsh supercritical conditions, 3) develop a bonding process for adhering SiC sensor die to well casing couplers, and 4) perform experimental exposure testing of sensor materials and the sensor devices.

  17. The Oxidation of CVD Silicon Carbide in Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Nguyen, QuynchGiao N.

    1997-01-01

    Chemically-vapor-deposited silicon carbide (CVD SiC) was oxidized in carbon dioxide (CO2) at temperatures of 1200-1400 C for times between 100 and 500 hours at several gas flow rates. Oxidation weight gains were monitored by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and were found to be very small and independent of temperature. Possible rate limiting kinetic laws are discussed. Oxidation of SiC by CO2 is negligible compared to the rates measured for other oxidants typically found in combustion environments: oxygen and water vapor.

  18. Improved Silicon Carbide Crystals Grown From Atomically Flat Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is demonstrating that atomically flat (i.e., step-free) silicon carbide (SiC) surfaces are ideal for realizing greatly improved wide bandgap semiconductor films with lower crystal defect densities. Further development of these improved films could eventually enable harsh-environment electronics beneficial to jet engine and other aerospace and automotive applications, as well as much more efficient and compact power distribution and control. The technique demonstrated could also improve blue-light lasers and light-emitting-diode displays.

  19. Dynamic consolidation of aluminum-silicon carbide composites

    SciTech Connect

    Rabin, B.H.; Korth, G.E.; Williamson, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    Dynamic consolidation was investigated as a potential method for producing P/M metal matrix composites. In this study, 2124 aluminum powders were mixed with silicon carbide particulate and consolidated using explosives. Numerical simulations were performed to provide insight into the consolidation process and to aid in the selection of experimental conditions. The microstructure of the as-consolidated product was dependent upon processing variables. Careful control of the shock parameters allowed full density, crack free composites to be achieved in cylindrical geometries. Although full density was obtained, low fracture strengths suggested a lack of interparticle bonding, probably resulting from the limited ability to redistribute surface oxides during consolidation. 10 refs., 9 figs.

  20. Simple processing method for high-strength silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurst, Janet B.; Dutta, Sunil

    1987-01-01

    Silicon carbide test bars were made by a simple wet-processing technique. The pressure casting method used the same equipment as conventional dry-pressing, but with a modified die. This casting technique was employed in order to produce test bars with improved strength and smaller fracture flaws than produced by dry-pressing. This was accomplished by eliminating pore clusters which were present in dry-pressed specimens and identified as a common source of failure in SiC MOR test bars.

  1. PROPERTIES OF DEFECTS AND IMPLANTS IN Mg+ IMPLANTED SILICON CARBIDE

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Weilin; Zhu, Zihua; Varga, Tamas; Bowden, Mark E.; Manandhar, Sandeep; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wang, Yongqiang

    2013-09-25

    As a candidate material for fusion reactor designs, silicon carbide (SiC) under high-energy neutron irradiation undergoes atomic displacement damage and transmutation reactions that create magnesium as one of the major metallic products. The presence of Mg and lattice disorder in SiC is expected to affect structural stability and degrade thermo-mechanical properties that could limit SiC lifetime for service. We have initiated a combined experimental and computational study that uses Mg+ ion implantation and multiscale modeling to investigate the structural and chemical effects in Mg implanted SiC and explore possible property degradation mechanisms.

  2. Heat transfer to a silicon carbide/water nanofluid.

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, W.; France , D. M.; Smith, D. S.; Singh, D.; Timofeeva, E. V.; Routbort, J. L.; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago

    2009-07-01

    Heat transfer experiments were performed with a water-based nanofluid containing 170-nm silicon carbide particles at a 3.7% volume concentration and having potential commercial viability. Heat transfer coefficients for the nanofluid are presented for Reynolds numbers ranging from 3300 to 13,000 and are compared to the base fluid water on the bases of constant Reynolds number, constant velocity, and constant pumping power. Results were also compared to predictions from standard liquid correlations and a recently altered nanofluid correlation. The slip mechanisms of Brownian diffusion and thermophoresis postulated in the altered correlation were investigated in a series of heating and cooling experiments.

  3. Method of enhanced lithiation of doped silicon carbide via high temperature annealing in an inert atmosphere

    DOEpatents

    Hersam, Mark C.; Lipson, Albert L.; Bandyopadhyay, Sudeshna; Karmel, Hunter J; Bedzyk, Michael J

    2014-05-27

    A method for enhancing the lithium-ion capacity of a doped silicon carbide is disclosed. The method utilizes heat treating the silicon carbide in an inert atmosphere. Also disclosed are anodes for lithium-ion batteries prepared by the method.

  4. Demonstration of Minimally Machined Honeycomb Silicon Carbide Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, William

    2012-01-01

    Honeycomb silicon carbide composite mirrors are made from a carbon fiber preform that is molded into a honeycomb shape using a rigid mold. The carbon fiber honeycomb is densified by using polymer infiltration pyrolysis, or through a reaction with liquid silicon. A chemical vapor deposit, or chemical vapor composite (CVC), process is used to deposit a polishable silicon or silicon carbide cladding on the honeycomb structure. Alternatively, the cladding may be replaced by a freestanding, replicated CVC SiC facesheet that is bonded to the honeycomb. The resulting carbon fiber-reinforced silicon carbide honeycomb structure is a ceramic matrix composite material with high stiffness and mechanical strength, high thermal conductivity, and low CTE (coefficient of thermal expansion). This innovation enables rapid, inexpensive manufacturing. The web thickness of the new material is less than 1 millimeter, and core geometries tailored. These parameters are based on precursor carbon-carbon honeycomb material made and patented by Ultracor. It is estimated at the time of this reporting that the HoneySiC(Trademark) will have a net production cost on the order of $38,000 per square meter. This includes an Ultracor raw material cost of about $97,000 per square meter, and a Trex silicon carbide deposition cost of $27,000 per square meter. Even at double this price, HoneySiC would beat NASA's goal of $100,000 per square meter. Cost savings are estimated to be 40 to 100 times that of current mirror technologies. The organic, rich prepreg material has a density of 56 kilograms per cubic meter. A charred carbon-carbon panel (volatile organics burnt off) has a density of 270 kilograms per cubic meter. Therefore, it is estimated that a HoneySiC panel would have a density of no more than 900 kilograms per cubic meter, which is about half that of beryllium and about onethird the density of bulk silicon carbide. It is also estimated that larger mirrors could be produced in a matter of weeks

  5. Silicon threshold displacement energy determined by photoluminescence in electron-irradiated cubic silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Lefevre, Jeremie; Esnouf, Stephane; Petite, Guillaume; Costantini, Jean-Marc

    2009-01-15

    In view of the potential use of silicon carbide (SiC) in the nuclear industry, it is of major interest to understand point defect formation in this material. This work is a contribution to the determination of the silicon threshold displacement energy in the cubic polytype of SiC using electron irradiations with increasing energies from 275 to 680 keV. The photoluminescence signal of the silicon vacancy was related to the number of displacements per atom in the silicon sublattice. This quantity was calculated taking into account the energy loss and angular dispersion of electrons in the target. A best fit of experimental data was obtained for a displacement cross section using a threshold displacement energy of 25 eV along the [100] lattice direction. We checked the relevance of this result by comparing the experimental concentration of silicon single vacancies measured by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy with the theoretical number of displaced silicon atoms.

  6. Silicon carbide for mirrors by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novi, A.; Taglioni, G.; Novella, L.; Citterio, O.; Ghigo, M.

    2004-06-01

    A new technology is under development to grow layers of amorphous Silicon Carbide in vacuum at temperatures below 200°C by PE-CVD technology. The layers can be used either to improve the surface quality of mirror substrates, as a polishable cladding coating, or to form self-sustaining thin mirrors in SiC. The former application is useful in particular for the coating of some varieties of SiC materials that are not well polishable or that have high residual porosity, thus obtaining good CTE matching with the substrates. The latter application is very promising to get ultra-thin mirrors by replica, by growing layers of some tenths of millimetre on an optically polished master. The paper presents the preliminary results obtained with the two mentioned possible uses of the PE-CVD SiC process.

  7. Experimental investigation on material migration phenomena in micro-EDM of reaction-bonded silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, Pay Jun; Yan, Jiwang; Kuriyagawa, Tsunemoto

    2013-07-01

    Material migration between tool electrode and workpiece material in micro electrical discharge machining of reaction-bonded silicon carbide was experimentally investigated. The microstructural changes of workpiece and tungsten tool electrode were examined using scanning electron microscopy, cross sectional transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray under various voltage, capacitance and carbon nanofibre concentration in the dielectric fluid. Results show that tungsten is deposited intensively inside the discharge-induced craters on the RB-SiC surface as amorphous structure forming micro particles, and on flat surface region as a thin interdiffusion layer of poly-crystalline structure. Deposition of carbon element on tool electrode was detected, indicating possible material migration to the tool electrode from workpiece material, carbon nanofibres and dielectric oil. Material deposition rate was found to be strongly affected by workpiece surface roughness, voltage and capacitance of the electrical discharge circuit. Carbon nanofibre addition in the dielectric at a suitable concentration significantly reduced the material deposition rate.

  8. Modeling and simulation of boron-doped nanocrystalline silicon carbide thin film by a field theory.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Liming; Chen, Youping; Lee, James D

    2009-02-01

    This paper presents the application of a multiscale field theory in modeling and simulation of boron-doped nanocrystalline silicon carbide (B-SiC). The multiscale field theory was briefly introduced. Based on the field theory, numerical simulations show that intergranular glassy amorphous films (IGFs) and nano-sized pores exist in triple junctions of the grains for nanocrystalline B-SiC. Residual tensile stress in the SiC grains and compressive stress on the grain boundaries (GBs) were observed. Under tensile loading, it has been found that mechanical response of 5 wt% boron-SiC exhibits five characteristic regimes. Deformation mechanism at atomic scale has been revealed. Tensile strength and Young's modulus of nanocrystalline SiC were accurately reproduced. PMID:19441448

  9. Epitaxy of silicon carbide on silicon: Micromorphological analysis of growth surface evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikhgasan, Ramazanov; Ştefan, Ţălu; Dinara, Sobola; Sebastian, Stach; Guseyn, Ramazanov

    2015-10-01

    The main purpose of our research was the study of evolution of silicon carbide films on silicon by micromorphological analysis. Surface micromorphologies of Silicon Carbide epilayers with two different thicknesses were compared by means of fractal geometry. Silicon Carbide films were prepared on Si substrates by magnetron sputtering of polycrystalline target SiC in Ar atmosphere (99.999% purity). Synthesis of qualitative SiC/Si templates solves the questions of large diameter SiC single-crystal wafers formation. This technology decreases financial expenditure and provides integration of SiC into silicon technology. These hybrid substrates with buffer layer of high oriented SiC are useful for growth of both wide band gap materials (SiC, AlN, GaN) and graphene. The main problem of SiC heteroepitaxy on Si (1 1 1) is the large difference (∼20%) of the lattice parameters. Fractal analysis of surface morphology of heteroepitaxial films could help to understand the films growth mechanisms. The 3D (three-dimensional) surfaces revealed a fractal structure at the nanometer scale. The fractal dimension (D) provided global quantitative values that characterize the scale properties of surface geometry.

  10. Latent ion tracks in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Bierschenk, Thomas; Giulian, Raquel; Afra, Boshra; Rodriguez, Matias D; Schauries, D; Mudie, Stephen; Pakarinen, Olli H; Djurabekova, Flyura; Nordlund, Kai; Osmani, Orkhan; Medvedev, Nikita; Rethfield, Baerbel; Ridgway, Mark C; Kluth, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    We present experimental evidence for the formation of ion tracks in amorphous Si induced by swift heavy ion irradiation. An underlying core-shell structure consistent with remnants of a high density liquid structure was revealed by small-angle x-ray scattering and molecular dynamics simulations. Ion track dimensions dier for as-implanted and relaxed Si as attributed to dierent microstructures and melting temperatures. The identication and characterisation of ion tracks in amorphous Si yields new insight into mechanisms of damage formation due to swift heavy ion irradiation in amorphous semiconductors.

  11. Phase equilibrium in the formation of silicon carbide by topochemical conversion of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukushkin, S. A.; Osipov, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    Methods of linear algebra were used to find a basis of independent chemical reactions in the topochemical conversion of silicon into silicon carbide by the reaction with carbon monoxide. The pressure-flow phase diagram was calculated from this basis, describing the composition of the solid phase for a particular design of vacuum furnace. It was demonstrated that to grow pure silicon carbide, it is necessary to ensure the pressure of carbon monoxide less than a certain value and its flow more than a certain value, depending on the temperature of the process. The elastic fields around vacancies formed were considered for the first time in calculating the topochemical reaction. It was shown that the anisotropy of these fields in a cubic crystal increases the constant of the main reaction approximately fourfold.

  12. Surface wave accelerator based on silicon carbide: theoretical study

    SciTech Connect

    Kalmykov, S.; Korobkin, D.; Neuner, B.; Shvets, G.

    2009-01-22

    Compact near-field solid-state accelerating structure powered by a carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) laser is considered. The accelerating luminous transverse magnetic mode is excited in a few-micron wide evacuated planar channel between two silicon carbide (SiC) films grown on silicon (Si) wafers. Laser coupling to this mode is accomplished through the properly designed Si gratings. Operating wavelength is dictated by the frequency-dependent dielectric permittivity of SiC and the channel width. The geometric loss factor {kappa} of the accelerating mode is computed. It is found that the unwanted excitation of the guided modes in Si wafers reduces the laser coupling efficiency and increases the fields inside the Si wafer.

  13. Epitaxial Growth and Characterization of Silicon Carbide Films

    SciTech Connect

    Dhanaraj,G.; Dudley, M.; Chen, Y.; Ragothamachar, B.; Wu, B.; Zhang, H.

    2006-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) epitaxial layers have been grown in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system designed and fabricated in our laboratory. Silicon tetrachloride-propane as well as silane-propane were used as precursor gases. The hot zone was designed based on simulation by using numerical modeling. Growth rates up to 200 {mu}m could be achieved. A new growth-assisted hydrogen etching was developed to show the distribution of the micropipes present in the substrate. Higher growth rate was observed on off-axis (0 0 0 1) 4 H SiC compared to the on-axis (0 0 0 1) wafer and growth mechanism was explained.

  14. Electromechanical computing at 500 degrees C with silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Lee, Te-Hao; Bhunia, Swarup; Mehregany, Mehran

    2010-09-10

    Logic circuits capable of operating at high temperatures can alleviate expensive heat-sinking and thermal-management requirements of modern electronics and are enabling for advanced propulsion systems. Replacing existing complementary metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors with silicon carbide (SiC) nanoelectromechanical system (NEMS) switches is a promising approach for low-power, high-performance logic operation at temperatures higher than 300 degrees C, beyond the capability of conventional silicon technology. These switches are capable of achieving virtually zero off-state current, microwave operating frequencies, radiation hardness, and nanoscale dimensions. Here, we report a microfabricated electromechanical inverter with SiC complementary NEMS switches capable of operating at 500 degrees C with ultralow leakage current. PMID:20829479

  15. Porous silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shor, Joseph S. (Inventor); Kurtz, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A semiconductor device employs at least one layer of semiconducting porous silicon carbide (SiC). The porous SiC layer has a monocrystalline structure wherein the pore sizes, shapes, and spacing are determined by the processing conditions. In one embodiment, the semiconductor device is a p-n junction diode in which a layer of n-type SiC is positioned on a p-type layer of SiC, with the p-type layer positioned on a layer of silicon dioxide. Because of the UV luminescent properties of the semiconducting porous SiC layer, it may also be utilized for other devices such as LEDs and optoelectronic devices.

  16. Silicon Carbide-Based Hydrogen and Hydrocarbon Gas Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Chen, Liang-Yu; Knight, D.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, Q. H.R

    1995-01-01

    Hydrogen and hydrocarbon detection in aeronautical applications is important for reasons of safety and emissions control. The use of silicon carbide as a semiconductor in a metal-semiconductor or metal-insulator-semiconductor structure opens opportunities to measure hydrogen and hydrocarbons in high temperature environments beyond the capabilities of silicon-based devices. The purpose of this paper is to explore the response and stability of Pd-SiC Schottky diodes as gas sensors in the temperature range from 100 to 400 C. The effect of heat treating on the diode properties as measured at 100 C is explored. Subsequent operation at 400 C demonstrates the diodes' sensitivity to hydrogen and hydrocarbons. It is concluded that the Pd-SiC Schottky diode has potential as a hydrogen and hydrocarbon sensor over a wide range of temperatures but further studies are necessary to determine the diodes' long term stability.

  17. DECODING THE MESSAGE FROM METEORITIC STARDUST SILICON CARBIDE GRAINS

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Karen M.; Lugaro, Maria; Gibson, Brad K.; Pilkington, Kate E-mail: karen.michelle.lewis@gmail.com E-mail: kpilkington@uclan.ac.uk

    2013-05-01

    Micron-sized stardust grains that originated in ancient stars are recovered from meteorites and analyzed using high-resolution mass spectrometry. The most widely studied type of stardust is silicon carbide (SiC). Thousands of these grains have been analyzed with high precision for their Si isotopic composition. Here we show that the distribution of the Si isotopic composition of the vast majority of stardust SiC grains carries the imprints of a spread in the age-metallicity distribution of their parent stars and of a power-law increase of the relative formation efficiency of SiC dust with the metallicity. This result offers a solution for the long-standing problem of silicon in stardust SiC grains, confirms the necessity of coupling chemistry and dynamics in simulations of the chemical evolution of our Galaxy, and constrains the modeling of dust condensation in stellar winds as a function of the metallicity.

  18. Silicon Carbide Sensors and Electronics for Harsh Environment Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Laura J.

    2007-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor has been studied for electronic and sensing applications in extreme environment (high temperature, extreme vibration, harsh chemical media, and high radiation) that is beyond the capability of conventional semiconductors such as silicon. This is due to its near inert chemistry, superior thermomechanical and electronic properties that include high breakdown voltage and wide bandgap. An overview of SiC sensors and electronics work ongoing at NASA Glenn Research Center (NASA GRC) will be presented. The main focus will be two technologies currently being investigated: 1) harsh environment SiC pressure transducers and 2) high temperature SiC electronics. Work highlighted will include the design, fabrication, and application of SiC sensors and electronics, with recent advancements in state-of-the-art discussed as well. These combined technologies are studied for the goal of developing advanced capabilities for measurement and control of aeropropulsion systems, as well as enhancing tools for exploration systems.

  19. Decoding the Message from Meteoritic Stardust Silicon Carbide Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Karen M.; Lugaro, Maria; Gibson, Brad K.; Pilkington, Kate

    2013-05-01

    Micron-sized stardust grains that originated in ancient stars are recovered from meteorites and analyzed using high-resolution mass spectrometry. The most widely studied type of stardust is silicon carbide (SiC). Thousands of these grains have been analyzed with high precision for their Si isotopic composition. Here we show that the distribution of the Si isotopic composition of the vast majority of stardust SiC grains carries the imprints of a spread in the age-metallicity distribution of their parent stars and of a power-law increase of the relative formation efficiency of SiC dust with the metallicity. This result offers a solution for the long-standing problem of silicon in stardust SiC grains, confirms the necessity of coupling chemistry and dynamics in simulations of the chemical evolution of our Galaxy, and constrains the modeling of dust condensation in stellar winds as a function of the metallicity.

  20. Recent improvements in amorphous silicon-based multijunction modules

    SciTech Connect

    Arya, R.R.; Bennett, M.; Yang, L.; Newton, J.; Li, Y.M.; Maley, N.; Fieselmann, B.; Chen, L.F.; Rajan, K.; Wilczynski, A.; Wood, G. )

    1994-06-30

    Advances in intrinsic amorphous silicon and in amorphous silicon carbon alloys have resulted in thin single junction devices with V[sub oc]'s over 1.0 volts and excellent stability with both i-layer materials. Incorporation of improved a-Si:H i-layers and thin microcrystalline n-layers in a-Si/a-Si/a-SiGe triple junction modules has resulted in large area triple junction modules with initial efficiencies as high as 11.35%. These modules exhibit a degradation of [similar to]20% after 1000 hours of light-soaking resulting in [similar to]9% stable modules.

  1. Amorphous silicon alloy-based roof integrated photovoltaic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nath, P.; Vogeli, C.; Singh, A.; Call, J.

    1994-12-31

    A roll-to-roll process is used to deposit tandem amorphous silicon alloy solar cell onto thin (0.005 inch) stainless steel substrate. Using this solar cell material, the authors have designed and fabricated a photovoltaic (PV) module which can be integrated into building roofs. The module is fabricated by laminating the large area amorphous silicon on stainless steel solar cell material onto a 0.03 inch thick coated galvanized steel support plate. The module is then formed in such a way to allow installation as a batten and seam roofing system. This paper describes the fabrication and installation details of such PV systems.

  2. Transmissive metallic contact for amorphous silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Madan, A.

    1984-11-29

    A transmissive metallic contact for amorphous silicon semiconductors includes a thin layer of metal, such as aluminum or other low work function metal, coated on the amorphous silicon with an antireflective layer coated on the metal. A transparent substrate, such as glass, is positioned on the light reflective layer. The metallic layer is preferably thin enough to transmit at least 50% of light incident thereon, yet thick enough to conduct electricity. The antireflection layer is preferably a transparent material that has a refractive index in the range of 1.8 to 2.2 and is approximately 550A to 600A thick.

  3. Towards new binary compounds: Synthesis of amorphous phosphorus carbide by pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, Judy N.; May, Paul W.; Allan, Neil L.; Hallam, Keith R.; Claeyssens, Frederik; Fuge, Gareth M.; Ruda, Michelle; Heard, Peter J.

    2013-02-15

    We have recently undertaken comprehensive computational studies predicting possible crystal structures of the as yet unknown phosphorus carbide as a function of composition. In this work, we report the synthesis of amorphous phosphorus-carbon films by pulsed laser deposition. The local bonding environments of carbon and phosphorus in the synthesised materials have been analysed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy; we have found strong evidence for the formation of direct P-C bonding and hence phosphorus carbide. There is a good agreement between the bonding environments found in this phosphorus carbide material and those predicted in the computational work. In particular, the local bonding environments are consistent with those found in the {beta}-InS-like structures that we predict to be low in energy for phosphorus:carbon ratios between 0.25 and 1. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have synthesised amorphous phosphorus-carbon films by pulsed laser deposition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results indicate formation of direct P-C bonds and hence phosphorus carbide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Local bonding environments are consistent with those in predicted structures.

  4. Photonic Crystal Cavities in Cubic (3C) Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radulaski, Marina; Babinec, Thomas; Buckley, Sonia; Rundquist, Armand; Provine, J.; Alassaad, Kassem; Ferro, Gabriel; Vuckovic, Jelena

    2014-03-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) combines many of the outstanding material properties of other well-known optical and quantum optical materials, including strong optical nonlinearity, high Young's modulus, and a host of optically-active crystalline defects, in a single CMOS-compatible platform. For many applications in classical and quantum information processing, the material properties of the cubic silicon carbide polytype (3C-SiC) in particular are advantageous. We therefore present the design, fabrication, and characterization of high quality factor and small mode volume planar photonic crystal cavities in cubic 3C-SiC thin films (200 nm). We demonstrate cavity resonances across the infrared telecommunications band, with wavelengths from 1.25 - 1.6 μm. Finally, we highlight our progress developing higher Q/V nanobeam cavities, as well as extending this optical cavity platform towards integration with SiC color centers. PECASE Grant ECCS-10 25811, NSF Grant ECS-9731293, Stanford Graduate Fellowship, National Science Graduate Fellowship.

  5. Ion beam figuring of CVD silicon carbide mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gailly, P.; Collette, J.-P.; Frenette, K. Fleury; Jamar, C.

    2004-06-01

    Optical and structural elements made of silicon carbide are increasingly found in space instruments. Chemical vapor deposited silicon carbide (CVD-SiC) is used as a reflective coating on SiC optics in reason of its good behavior under polishing. The advantage of applying ion beam figuring (IBF) to CVD-SiC over other surface figure-improving techniques is discussed herein. The results of an IBF sequence performed at the Centre Spatial de Liège on a 100 mm CVD-SiC mirror are reported. The process allowed to reduce the mirror surface errors from 243 nm to 13 nm rms. Beside the surface figure, roughness is another critical feature to consider in order to preserve the optical quality of CVD-SiC. Thus, experiments focusing on the evolution of roughness were performed in various ion beam etching conditions. The roughness of samples etched at different depths down to 3 μm was determined with an optical profilometer. These measurements emphasize the importance of selecting the right combination of gas and beam energy to keep roughness at a low level. Kaufman-type ion sources are generally used to perform IBF but the performance of an end-Hall ion source in figuring CVD-SiC mirrors was also evaluated in this study. In order to do so, ion beam etching profiles obtained with the end-Hall source on CVD-SiC were measured and used as a basis for IBF simulations.

  6. Cavity-Enhanced Measurements of Defect Spins in Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calusine, Greg; Politi, Alberto; Awschalom, David D.

    2016-07-01

    The identification of new solid-state defect-qubit candidates in widely used semiconductors has the potential to enable the use of nanofabricated devices for enhanced qubit measurement and control operations. In particular, the recent discovery of optically active spin states in silicon carbide thin films offers a scalable route for incorporating defect qubits into on-chip photonic devices. Here, we demonstrate the use of 3C silicon carbide photonic crystal cavities for enhanced excitation of color-center defect spin ensembles in order to increase measured photoluminescence signal count rates, optically detected magnetic-resonance signal intensities, and optical spin initialization rates. We observe an up to a factor of 30 increase in the photoluminescence and optically detected magnetic-resonance signals from Ky5 color centers excited by cavity-resonant excitation and increase the rate of ground-state spin initialization by approximately a factor of 2. Furthermore, we show that the 705-fold reduction in excitation mode volume and enhanced excitation and collection efficiencies provided by the structures can be used to overcome inhomogenous broadening in order to facilitate the study of defect-qubit subensemble properties. These results highlight some of the benefits that nanofabricated devices offer for engineering the local photonic environment of color-center defect qubits to enable applications in quantum information and sensing.

  7. High-strength silicon carbides by hot isostatic pressing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, Sunil

    1988-01-01

    Silicon carbide has strong potential for heat engine hardware and other high-temperature applications because of its low density, good strength, high oxidation resistance, and good high-temperature creep resistance. Hot isostatic pressing (HIP) was used for producing alpha and beta silicon carbide (SiC) bodies with near-theoretical density, ultrafine grain size, and high strength at processing temperatures of 1900 to 2000 C. The HIPed materials exhibited ultrafine grain size. Furthermore, no phase transformation from beta to alpha was observed in HIPed beta-SiC. Both materials exhibited very high average flexural strength. It was also shown that alpha-SiC bodies without any sintering aids, when HIPed to high final density, can exhibit very high strength. Fracture toughness K (sub C) values were determined to be 3.6 to 4.0 MPa m (sup 1/2) for HIPed alpha-SiC and 3.7 to 4.1 MPa m (sup 1/2) for HIPed beta-SiC. In the HIPed specimens strength-controlling flaws were typically surface related. In spite of improvements in material properties such as strength and fracture toughness by elimination of the larger strength-limiting flaws and by grain size refinement, HIPing has no effect on the Weibull modulus.

  8. High-strength silicon carbides by hot isostatic pressing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, Sunil

    1989-01-01

    Silicon carbide has strong potential for heat engine hardware and other high-temperature applications because of its low density, good strength, high oxidation resistance, and good high-temperature creep resistance. Hot isostatic pressing (HIP) was used for producing alpha and beta silicon carbide (SiC) bodies with near-theoretical density, ultrafine grain size, and high strength at processing temperatures of 1900 to 2000 C. The HIPed materials exhibited ultrafine grain size. Furthermore, no phase transformation from beta to alpha was observed in HIPed beta-SiC. Both materials exhibited very high average flexural strength. It was also shown that alpha-SiC bodies without any sintering aids, when HIPed to high final density, can exhibit very high strength. Fracture toughness K (sub C) values were determined to be 3.6 to 4.0 MPa m (sup 1/2) for HIPed alpha-SiC and 3.7 to 4.1 MPa m (sup 1/2) for HIPed beta-SiC. In the HIPed specimens strength-controlling flaws were typically surface related. In spite of improvements in material properties such as strength and fracture toughness by elimination of the larger strength-limiting flaws and by grain size refinement, HIPing has no effect on the Weibull modulus.

  9. High Input Voltage, Silicon Carbide Power Processing Unit Performance Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozak, Karin E.; Pinero, Luis R.; Scheidegger, Robert J.; Aulisio, Michael V.; Gonzalez, Marcelo C.; Birchenough, Arthur G.

    2015-01-01

    A silicon carbide brassboard power processing unit has been developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The power processing unit operates from two sources: a nominal 300 Volt high voltage input bus and a nominal 28 Volt low voltage input bus. The design of the power processing unit includes four low voltage, low power auxiliary supplies, and two parallel 7.5 kilowatt (kW) discharge power supplies that are capable of providing up to 15 kilowatts of total power at 300 to 500 Volts (V) to the thruster. Additionally, the unit contains a housekeeping supply, high voltage input filter, low voltage input filter, and master control board, such that the complete brassboard unit is capable of operating a 12.5 kilowatt Hall effect thruster. The performance of the unit was characterized under both ambient and thermal vacuum test conditions, and the results demonstrate exceptional performance with full power efficiencies exceeding 97%. The unit was also tested with a 12.5kW Hall effect thruster to verify compatibility and output filter specifications. With space-qualified silicon carbide or similar high voltage, high efficiency power devices, this would provide a design solution to address the need for high power electric propulsion systems.

  10. High Input Voltage, Silicon Carbide Power Processing Unit Performance Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozak, Karin E.; Pinero, Luis R.; Scheidegger, Robert J.; Aulisio, Michael V.; Gonzalez, Marcelo C.; Birchenough, Arthur G.

    2015-01-01

    A silicon carbide brassboard power processing unit has been developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The power processing unit operates from two sources - a nominal 300-Volt high voltage input bus and a nominal 28-Volt low voltage input bus. The design of the power processing unit includes four low voltage, low power supplies that provide power to the thruster auxiliary supplies, and two parallel 7.5 kilowatt power supplies that are capable of providing up to 15 kilowatts of total power at 300-Volts to 500-Volts to the thruster discharge supply. Additionally, the unit contains a housekeeping supply, high voltage input filter, low voltage input filter, and master control board, such that the complete brassboard unit is capable of operating a 12.5 kilowatt Hall Effect Thruster. The performance of unit was characterized under both ambient and thermal vacuum test conditions, and the results demonstrate the exceptional performance with full power efficiencies exceeding 97. With a space-qualified silicon carbide or similar high voltage, high efficiency power device, this design could evolve into a flight design for future missions that require high power electric propulsion systems.

  11. Development of the SOFIA silicon carbide secondary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruit, Michel; Antoine, Pascal; Varin, Jean-Luc; Bittner, Hermann; Erdmann, Matthias

    2003-02-01

    The SOFIA telescope is ajoint NASA-DLR project for a 2.5 m airborne Stratospheric Observatory for IR Astronomy to be flown in a specially adapted Boeing 747 SP plane, Kayser-Threde being resopinsible for the development of the Telescope Optics. The φ 352 mm Secondary Mirror is mounted ona chopping mechanism to allow avoidance of background noise during IR observations. Stiffness associated to lightness is a major demand for such a mirror to achieve high frequency chopping. This leads to select SIlicon Carbide for the mirror blank. Its development has been run by the ASTRIUM/BOOSTEC joint venture SiCSPACE, taking full benefit of the instrinsic properties of the BOOSTEC SiC-100 sintered material, associated to qualified processes specifically developed for space borne mirrors by ASTRIUM. Achieved performances include a low mass of 1.97 kg, a very high stiffness with a first resonant frequency of 1865 Hz and a measured optical surface accuracy of 39 nm rms, using Ion Beam Figuring. It is proposed here to present the major design features of the SOFIA Secondary Mirror, highlighting the main advantages of using Silicon Carbide, the main steps of its development and the achieved optomechanical performances of the developed mirror.

  12. Fatigue behavior of continuous fiber silicon-carbide-aluminum composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Wallis, R. R.

    1984-01-01

    Four lay-ups of continuous fiber silicon carbide (SCS2) fiber/aluminum matrix composites were tested to assess fatigue mechanisms including stiffness loss when cycled below their respective fatigue limits. The lay-ups were 0 (sub 8), 0(sub 2)/ + or - 45 (sub 2s), 0/90 (sub 2s),and 0/ + or 45/90 (subs). The data were compared with predictions from the author's previously published shakedown model which predicts fatigue-induced stiffness loss in metal matrix composites. A fifth lay-up, + or - 45 (sub 2s), was tested to compare shakedown and fatigue limits. The particular batch of silicon-carbide fibers tested in this program had a somewhat lower modulus (340 GPa) than expected and displayed poor bonding to the aluminum matrix. Good agreement was obtained between the stiffness loss model and the test data. The fatigue damage below the fatigue limit was primarily in the form of matrix cracking. The fatigue limit corresponded to the laminate shakedown for the + or - 45 (sub 2s) laminate.

  13. Displacement damage in silicon carbide irradiated in fission reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinisch, H. L.; Greenwood, L. R.; Weber, W. J.; Williford, R. E.

    2004-05-01

    Calculations are performed for displacement damage in SiC due to irradiation in the neutron environments of various types of nuclear reactors using the best available models and nuclear data. The displacement damage calculations use recently developed damage functions for SiC that are based on extensive molecular dynamics simulations of displacement events. Displacements per atom (DPA) cross sections for SiC have been calculated as a function of neutron energy, and they are presented here in tabular form to facilitate their use as the standard measure of displacement damage for irradiated SiC. DPA cross sections averaged over the neutron energy spectrum are calculated for neutron spectra in the cores of typical commercial reactors and in the test sample irradiation regions of several materials test reactors used in both past and present irradiation testing. Particular attention is focused on a next-generation high-temperature gas-cooled pebble bed reactor, for which the high-temperature properties of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide composites are well suited. Calculated transmutations and activation levels in a pebble bed reactor are compared to those in other reactors.

  14. Oxidation Behavior of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Silicon Carbide Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valentin, Victor M.

    1995-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced Silicon Carbide (C-SiC) composites offer high strength at high temperatures and good oxidation resistance. However, these composites present some matrix microcracks which allow the path of oxygen to the fiber. The aim of this research was to study the effectiveness of a new Silicon Carbide (SiC) coating developed by DUPONT-LANXIDE to enhance the oxidation resistance of C-SiC composites. A thermogravimetric analysis was used to determine the oxidation rate of the samples at different temperatures and pressures. The Dupont coat proved to be a good protection for the SiC matrix at temperatures lower than 1240 C at low and high pressures. On the other hand, at temperatures above 1340 C the Dupont coat did not seem to give good protection to the composite fiber and matrix. Even though some results of the tests have been discussed, because of time restraints, only a small portion of the desired tests could be completed. Therefore, no major conclusions or results about the effectiveness of the coat are available at this time.

  15. Preparation and uses of amorphous boron carbide coated substrates

    DOEpatents

    Riley, Robert E.; Newkirk, Lawrence R.; Valencia, Flavio A.

    1981-09-01

    Cloth is coated at a temperature below about 1000.degree. C. with amorphous boron-carbon deposits in a process which provides a substantially uniform coating on all the filaments making up each yarn fiber bundle of the cloth. The coated cloths can be used in the as-deposited condition for example as wear surfaces where high hardness values are needed; or multiple layers of coated cloths can be hot-pressed to form billets useful for example in fusion reactor wall armor. Also provided is a method of controlling the atom ratio of B:C of boron-carbon deposits onto any of a variety of substrates, including cloths.

  16. Preparation and uses of amorphous boron carbide coated substrates

    DOEpatents

    Riley, R.E.; Newkirk, L.R.; Valencia, F.A.; Wallace, T.C.

    1979-12-05

    Cloth is coated at a temperature below about 1000/sup 0/C with amorphous boron-carbon deposits in a process which provides a substantially uniform coating on all the filaments making up each yarn fiber bundle of the cloth. The coated cloths can be used in the as-deposited condition for example as wear surfaces where high hardness values are needed; or multiple layers of coated cloths can be hot-pressed to form billets useful for example in fusion reactor wall armor. Also provided is a method of controlling the atom ratio of B:C of boron-carbon deposits onto any of a variety of substrates, including cloths.

  17. Preparation and uses of amorphous boron carbide coated substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Newkirk, L.R.; Riley, R.E.; Valencia, F.A.; Wallace, T.C.

    1981-09-01

    Cloth is coated at a temperature below about 1000* C. With amorphous boron-carbon deposits in a process which provides a substantially uniform coating on all the filaments making up each yarn fiber bundle of the cloth. The coated cloths can be used in the as-deposited condition for example as wear surfaces where high hardness values are needed; or multiple layers of coated cloths can be hot-pressed to form billets useful for example in fusion reactor wall armor. Also provided is a method of controlling the atom ratio of b:c of boron-carbon deposits onto any of a variety of substrates, including cloths.

  18. Solution-processed amorphous silicon surface passivation layers

    SciTech Connect

    Mews, Mathias Sontheimer, Tobias; Korte, Lars; Rech, Bernd; Mader, Christoph; Traut, Stephan; Wunnicke, Odo

    2014-09-22

    Amorphous silicon thin films, fabricated by thermal conversion of neopentasilane, were used to passivate crystalline silicon surfaces. The conversion is investigated using X-ray and constant-final-state-yield photoelectron spectroscopy, and minority charge carrier lifetime spectroscopy. Liquid processed amorphous silicon exhibits high Urbach energies from 90 to 120 meV and 200 meV lower optical band gaps than material prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Applying a hydrogen plasma treatment, a minority charge carrier lifetime of 1.37 ms at an injection level of 10{sup 15}/cm{sup 3} enabling an implied open circuit voltage of 724 mV was achieved, demonstrating excellent silicon surface passivation.

  19. Proposed planar-type amorphous-silicon MOS transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Y.; Matsumura, M.

    1985-10-01

    Novel planar-type amorphous-silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor transistors have been proposed and their features have been demonstrated. The gate insulator of silicon-dioxide grown inside the original amorphous silicon layer makes transistor characteristics highly stable. The source and drain of micro-crystal silicon make the fabrication process simple and the parasitic elements small. The on-current of the prototype transistor was extrapolated to decrease to one-half of its initial value 10 billion years after the application of dc bias. The on-off current ratio was about a million and no voltage offset was observed. The field-effect mobility was 0.6 sq cm Vs.

  20. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited silicon carbide as an implantable dielectric coating.

    PubMed

    Cogan, Stuart F; Edell, David J; Guzelian, Andrew A; Ping Liu, Ying; Edell, Robyn

    2003-12-01

    Amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC) films, deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), have been evaluated as insulating coatings for implantable microelectrodes. The a-SiC was deposited on platinum or iridium wire for measurement of electrical leakage through the coating in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS, pH 7.4). Low leakage currents of <10(-11) A were observed over a +/-5-V bias. The electronic resistivity of a-SiC was 3 x 10(13) Omega-cm. Dissolution rates of a-SiC in PBS at 37 and 90 degrees C were determined from changes in infrared absorption band intensities and compared with those of silicon nitride formed by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD). Dissolution rates of LPCVD silicon nitride were 2 nm/h and 0.4 nm/day at 90 and 37 degrees C, respectively, while a-SiC had a dissolution rate of 0.1 nm/h at 90 degrees C and no measurable dissolution at 37 degrees C. Biocompatibility was assessed by implanting a-SiC-coated quartz discs in the subcutaneous space of the New Zealand White rabbit. Histological evaluation showed no chronic inflammatory response and capsule thickness was comparable to silicone or uncoated quartz controls. Amorphous SiC-coated microelectrodes were implanted in the parietal cortex for periods up to 150 days and the cortical response evaluated by histological evaluation of neuronal viability at the implant site. The a-SiC was more stable in physiological saline than LPCVD Si(3)N(4) and well tolerated in the cortex. PMID:14613234

  1. Applications of Silicon Carbide for High Temperature Electronics and Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, Virgil B.

    1995-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is a wide bandgap material that shows great promise in high-power and high temperature electronics applications because of its high thermal conductivity and high breakdown electrical field. The excellent physical and electronic properties of SiC allows the fabrication of devices that can operate at higher temperatures and power levels than devices produced from either silicon or GaAs. Although modern electronics depends primarily upon silicon based devices, this material is not capable of handling may special requirements. Devices which operate at high speeds, at high power levels and are to be used in extreme environments at high temperatures and high radiation levels need other materials with wider bandgaps than that of silicon. Many space and terrestrial applications also have a requirement for wide bandgap materials. SiC also has great potential for high power and frequency operation due to a high saturated drift velocity. The wide bandgap allows for unique optoelectronic applications, that include blue light emitting diodes and ultraviolet photodetectors. New areas involving gas sensing and telecommunications offer significant promise. Overall, the properties of SiC make it one of the best prospects for extending the capabilities and operational regimes of the current semiconductor device technology.

  2. Development of refractory armored silicon carbide by infrared transient liquid phase processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinoki, Tatsuya; Snead, Lance L.; Blue, Craig A.

    2005-12-01

    Tungsten (W) and molybdenum (Mo) were coated on silicon carbide (SiC) for use as a refractory armor using a high power plasma arc lamp at powers up to 23.5 MW/m 2 in an argon flow environment. Both tungsten powder and molybdenum powder melted and formed coating layers on silicon carbide within a few seconds. The effect of substrate pre-treatment (vapor deposition of titanium (Ti) and tungsten, and annealing) and sample heating conditions on microstructure of the coating and coating/substrate interface were investigated. The microstructure was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy (OM). The mechanical properties of the coated materials were evaluated by four-point flexural tests. A strong tungsten coating was successfully applied to the silicon carbide substrate. Tungsten vapor deposition and pre-heating at 5.2 MW/m 2 made for a refractory layer containing no cracks propagating into the silicon carbide substrate. The tungsten coating was formed without the thick reaction layer. For this study, small tungsten carbide grains were observed adjacent to the interface in all conditions. In addition, relatively large, widely scattered tungsten carbide grains and a eutectic structure of tungsten and silicon were observed through the thickness in the coatings formed at lower powers and longer heating times. The strength of the silicon carbide substrate was somewhat decreased as a result of the processing. Vapor deposition of tungsten prior to powder coating helped prevent this degradation. In contrast, molybdenum coating was more challenging than tungsten coating due to the larger coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch as compared to tungsten and silicon carbide. From this work it is concluded that refractory armoring of silicon carbide by Infrared Transient Liquid Phase Processing is possible. The tungsten armored silicon carbide samples proved uniform, strong, and capable of withstanding thermal fatigue testing.

  3. Laterally inherently thin amorphous-crystalline silicon heterojunction photovoltaic cell

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, Zahidur R. Kherani, Nazir P.

    2014-12-29

    This article reports on an amorphous-crystalline silicon heterojunction photovoltaic cell concept wherein the heterojunction regions are laterally narrow and distributed amidst a backdrop of well-passivated crystalline silicon surface. The localized amorphous-crystalline silicon heterojunctions consisting of the laterally thin emitter and back-surface field regions are precisely aligned under the metal grid-lines and bus-bars while the remaining crystalline silicon surface is passivated using the recently proposed facile grown native oxide–plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposited silicon nitride passivation scheme. The proposed cell concept mitigates parasitic optical absorption losses by relegating amorphous silicon to beneath the shadowed metallized regions and by using optically transparent passivation layer. A photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 13.6% is obtained for an untextured proof-of-concept cell illuminated under AM 1.5 global spectrum; the specific cell performance parameters are V{sub OC} of 666 mV, J{sub SC} of 29.5 mA-cm{sup −2}, and fill-factor of 69.3%. Reduced parasitic absorption, predominantly in the shorter wavelength range, is confirmed with external quantum efficiency measurement.

  4. Laterally inherently thin amorphous-crystalline silicon heterojunction photovoltaic cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Zahidur R.; Kherani, Nazir P.

    2014-12-01

    This article reports on an amorphous-crystalline silicon heterojunction photovoltaic cell concept wherein the heterojunction regions are laterally narrow and distributed amidst a backdrop of well-passivated crystalline silicon surface. The localized amorphous-crystalline silicon heterojunctions consisting of the laterally thin emitter and back-surface field regions are precisely aligned under the metal grid-lines and bus-bars while the remaining crystalline silicon surface is passivated using the recently proposed facile grown native oxide-plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposited silicon nitride passivation scheme. The proposed cell concept mitigates parasitic optical absorption losses by relegating amorphous silicon to beneath the shadowed metallized regions and by using optically transparent passivation layer. A photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 13.6% is obtained for an untextured proof-of-concept cell illuminated under AM 1.5 global spectrum; the specific cell performance parameters are VOC of 666 mV, JSC of 29.5 mA-cm-2, and fill-factor of 69.3%. Reduced parasitic absorption, predominantly in the shorter wavelength range, is confirmed with external quantum efficiency measurement.

  5. Meteoritic silicon carbide and its stellar sources - Implications for galactic chemical evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, Tang; Anders, Edward; Hoppe, Peter; Zinner, Ernst

    1989-01-01

    Interstellar silicon carbide grains in meteorites provide a novel means for studying the carbon-star population of about 5 x 10 to the 9th years ago. Their C-12/C-13 ratios differ greatly from the solar value but resemble those of present-day csrbon stars, implying little change in the galactic C-13 inventory. Isotope data on nitrogen and silicon suggest that the silicon carbide grains come mainly from red giants, with small contributions from novae.

  6. Toxicity in vitro of some silicon carbides and silicon nitrides: whiskers and powders.

    PubMed

    Svensson, I; Artursson, E; Leanderson, P; Berglind, R; Lindgren, F

    1997-03-01

    The objectives of this work were to investigate the toxicity of silicon carbide whiskers and powders and silicon nitride whiskers and powders and to compare their toxicity with the toxicity of crocidolite. The effects studied were inhibition of the cloning efficiency of V79 cells, formation of DNA strand breaks by means of a nick translation assay, formation of oxygen radicals in three different assays, and the ability to stimulate neutrophils to produce hydroxyl radicals. All materials showed concentration-dependent inhibition of the cloning efficiency of V79 cells. The inhibition by the most toxic whiskers was in the same order of magnitude as that of crocidolite. Milled whiskers and powders were less toxic than the whiskers. There was a high DNA breaking potential for crocidolite and four of the silicon carbide whiskers and a rather low one for the other materials. Formation of hydroxyl radicals was found for crocidolite and one of the silicon carbide whiskers. In the neutrophil activation test, there was a great variation in the different materials' abilities to activate neutrophils. There was also a good correlation between chemiluminescence and H2O2 formation. The highest activation was found in neutrophils exposed to two of the silicon carbide whiskers and one milled whisker. The conclusion of the investigation is that some of the ceramic materials studied had damaging biological effects comparable to or greater than those of crocidolite. The results from the investigation clearly imply that caution is needed in the introduction of new ceramic fiber materials, so that the correct precautions and protective devices are used in order to avoid harm to the personnel handling the material. PMID:9055957

  7. A simple method for the synthesis of silicon carbide nanorods.

    PubMed

    Kholmanov, I N; Kharlamov, A; Barborini, E; Lenardi, C; Li Bassi, A; Bottani, C E; Ducati, C; Maffi, S; Kirillova, N V; Milani, P

    2002-10-01

    SiC nanorods were synthesized by a reaction at a temperature of 1200 degrees C, under an argon gas atmosphere, from silicon and amorphous carbon powders mixed by ball milling. The reaction product, which contain SiC nanorods and nanoparticles, has been characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The synthesized nanorods are more than 1 micron long with a mean diameter of about 10-30 nm. The nanorods possess a well-defined crystalline structure with a thin layer of amorphous SiO2 on the surface. Raman shifts of SiC nanorods and the role of structural defects are discussed. PMID:12908277

  8. Stability and rheology of dispersions of silicon nitride and silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feke, Donald L.

    1987-01-01

    The relationship between the surface and colloid chemistry of commercial ultra-fine silicon carbide and silicon nitride powders was examined by a variety of standard characterization techniques and by methodologies especially developed for ceramic dispersions. These include electrokinetic measurement, surface titration, and surface spectroscopies. The effects of powder pretreatment and modification strategies, which can be utilized to augment control of processing characteristics, were monitored with these technologies. Both silicon carbide and nitride were found to exhibit silica-like surface chemistries, but silicon nitride powders possess an additional amine surface functionality. Colloidal characteristics of the various nitride powders in aqueous suspension is believed to be highly dependent on the relative amounts of the two types of surface groups, which in turn is determined by the powder synthesis route. The differences in the apparent colloidal characteristics for silicon nitride powders cannot be attributed to the specific absorption of ammonium ions. Development of a model for the prediction of double-layer characteristics of materials with a hybrid site interface facilitated understanding and prediction of the behavior of both surface charge and surface potential for these materials. The utility of the model in application to silicon nitride powders was demonstrated.

  9. [Synergetic effects of silicon carbide and molecular sieve loaded catalyst on microwave assisted catalytic oxidation of toluene].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Hui; Bo, Long-Li; Liu, Hai-Nan; Zhang, Hao; Sun, Jian-Yu; Yang, Li; Cai, Li-Dong

    2013-06-01

    Molecular sieve loaded catalyst was prepared by impregnation method, microwave-absorbing material silicon carbide and the catalyst were investigated for catalytic oxidation of toluene by microwave irradiation. Research work examined effects of silicon carbide and molecular sieve loading Cu-V catalyst's mixture ratio as well as mixed approach changes on degradation of toluene, and characteristics of catalyst were measured through scanning electron microscope, specific surface area test and X-ray diffraction analysis. The result showed that the fixed bed reactor had advantages of both thermal storage property and low-temperature catalytic oxidation when 20% silicon carbide was filled at the bottom of the reactor, and this could effectively improve the utilization of microwave energy as well as catalytic oxidation efficiency of toluene. Under microwave power of 75 W and 47 W, complete-combustion temperatures of molecular sieve loaded Cu-V catalyst and Cu-V-Ce catalyst to toluene were 325 degrees C and 160 degrees C, respectively. Characteristics of the catalysts showed that mixture of rare-earth element Ce increased the dispersion of active components in the surface of catalyst, micropore structure of catalyst effectively guaranteed high adsorption capacity for toluene, while amorphous phase of Cu and V oxides increased the activity of catalyst greatly. PMID:23947020

  10. Electronic structure and chemical bonding of amorphous chromium carbide thin films.

    PubMed

    Magnuson, Martin; Andersson, Matilda; Lu, Jun; Hultman, Lars; Jansson, Ulf

    2012-06-01

    The microstructure, electronic structure and chemical bonding of chromium carbide thin films with different carbon contents have been investigated with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy and soft x-ray absorption-emission spectroscopies. Most of the films can be described as amorphous nanocomposites with non-crystalline CrC(x) in an amorphous carbon matrix. At high carbon contents, graphene-like structures are formed in the amorphous carbon matrix. At 47 at.% carbon content, randomly oriented nanocrystallites are formed creating a complex microstructure of three components. The soft x-ray absorption-emission study shows additional peak structures exhibiting non-octahedral coordination and bonding. PMID:22553115

  11. Surface passivation of heavily boron or phosphorus doped crystalline silicon utilizing amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carstens, K.; Dahlinger, M.

    2016-05-01

    Excellent surface passivation of heavily boron or phosphorus doped crystalline silicon is presented utilizing undoped hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). For passivating boron doped crystalline silicon surfaces, amorphous silicon needs to be deposited at low temperatures 150°C ≤Tdep≤200°C , leading to a high bandgap. In contrast, low bandgap amorphous silicon causes an inferior surface passivation of highly boron doped crystalline silicon. Boron doping in crystalline silicon leads to a shift of the Fermi energy towards the valence band maximum in the undoped a-Si:H. A simulation, implementing dangling bond defects according to the defect pool model, shows this shift in the undoped a-Si:H passivation to be more pronounced if the a-Si:H has a lower bandgap. Hence, the inferior passivation of boron doped surfaces with low bandgap amorphous silicon stems from a lower silicon-hydrogen bond energy due to this shift of the Fermi energy. Hydrogen effusion and ellipsometry measurements support our interpretation.

  12. Long-term stability of amorphous-silicon modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) program of developing qualification tests necessary for amorphous silicon modules, including appropriate accelerated environmental tests reveal degradation due to illumination. Data were given which showed the results of temperature-controlled field tests and accelerated tests in an environmental chamber.

  13. Integral bypass diodes in an amorphous silicon alloy photovoltaic module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanak, J. J.; Flaisher, H.

    1991-01-01

    Thin-film, tandem-junction, amorphous silicon (a-Si) photovoltaic modules were constructed in which a part of the a-Si alloy cell material is used to form bypass protection diodes. This integral design circumvents the need for incorporating external, conventional diodes, thus simplifying the manufacturing process and reducing module weight.

  14. Photocurrent images of amorphous-silicon solar-cell modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Q.; Shumka, A.; Trask, J.

    1985-01-01

    Results obtained in applying the unique characteristics of the solar cell laser scanner to investigate the defects and quality of amorphous silicon cells are presented. It is concluded that solar cell laser scanners can be effectively used to nondestructively test not only active defects but also the cell quality and integrity of electrical contacts.

  15. Performance of amorphous silicon photovoltaic systems, 1985--1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-04-01

    This report discusses the performance of commercial amorphous silicon modules used in photovoltaic power systems from 1985 through 1989. Topics discussed include initial degradation, reliability, durability, and effects of temperature and solar irradiance on peak power and energy production. 6 refs., 18 figs.

  16. Growth of silicon quantum dots by oxidation of the silicon nanocrystals embedded within silicon carbide matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Kole, Arindam; Chaudhuri, Partha

    2014-10-15

    A moderately low temperature (≤800 °C) thermal processing technique has been described for the growth of the silicon quantum dots (Si-QD) within microcrystalline silicon carbide (μc-SiC:H) dielectric thin films deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) process. The nanocrystalline silicon grains (nc-Si) present in the as deposited films were initially enhanced by aluminium induced crystallization (AIC) method in vacuum at a temperature of T{sub v} = 525 °C. The samples were then stepwise annealed at different temperatures T{sub a} in air ambient. Analysis of the films by FTIR and XPS reveal a rearrangement of the μc-SiC:H network has taken place with a significant surface oxidation of the nc-Si domains upon annealing in air. The nc-Si grain size (D{sub XRD}) as calculated from the XRD peak widths using Scherrer formula was found to decrease from 7 nm to 4 nm with increase in T{sub a} from 250 °C to 800 °C. A core shell like structure with the nc-Si as the core and the surface oxide layer as the shell can clearly describe the situation. The results indicate that with the increase of the annealing temperature in air the oxide shell layer becomes thicker and the nc-Si cores become smaller until their size reduced to the order of the Si-QDs. Quantum confinement effect due to the SiO covered nc-Si grains of size about 4 nm resulted in a photoluminescence peak due to the Si QDs with peak energy at 1.8 eV.

  17. Ion-assisted recrystallization of amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priolo, F.; Spinella, C.; La Ferla, A.; Rimini, E.; Ferla, G.

    1989-12-01

    Our recent work on ion-beam-assisted epitaxial growth of amorphous Si layers on single crystal substrates is reviewed. The planar motion of the crystal-amorphous interface was monitored in situ, during irradiations, by transient reflectivity measurements. This technique allows the measurement of the ion-induced growth rate with a very high precision. We have observed that this growth rate scales linearly with the number of displacements produced at the crystal-amorphous interface by the impinging ions. Moreover the regrowth onto <100> oriented substrates is a factor of ≈ 4 faster with respect to that on <111> substrates. Impurities dissolved in the amorphous layer influence the kinetics of recrystallization. For instance, dopants such as As, B and P enhance the ion-induced growth rate while oxygen has the opposite effect. The dependence of the rate on impurity concentration is however less strong with respect to pure thermal annealing. For instance, an oxygen concentration of 1 × 1021 / cm3 decreases the ion-induced growth rate by a factor of ≈ 3; this same concentration would have decreased the rate of pure thermal annealing by more than 4 orders of magnitude. The reduced effects of oxygen during ion-beam crystallization allow the regrowth of deposited Si layers despite the presence of a high interfacial oxygen content. The process is investigated in detail and its possible application to the microelectronic technology is discussed.

  18. Wear of single-crystal silicon carbide in contact with various metals in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted in vacuum with single crystal silicon carbide (0001) surface in contact with transition metals (tungsten, iron, rhodium, nickel, titanium, and cobalt), copper, and aluminum. The hexagon shaped cracking and fracturing of silicon carbide that occurred is believed to be due to cleavages of both the prismatic and basal planes. The silicon carbide wear debris, which was produced by brittle fracture, slides or rolls on both the metal and silicon carbide and produces grooves and indentations on these surfaces. The wear scars of aluminum and titanium, which have much stronger chemical affinity for silicon and carbon, are generally rougher than those of the other metals. Fracturing and cracking along the grain boundary of rhodium and tungsten were observed. These may be primarily due to the greater shear moduli of the metals.

  19. Reaction-Based SiC Materials for Joining Silicon Carbide Composites for Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Lewinsohn, Charles A.; Jones, Russell H.; Singh, M.; Serizawa, H.; Katoh, Y.; Kohyama, A.

    2000-09-01

    The fabrication of large or complex silicon carbide-fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (SiC/SiC) components for fusion energy systems requires a method to assemble smaller components that are limited in size by manufacturing constraints. Previous analysis indicates that silicon carbide should be considered as candidate joint materials. Two methods to obtain SiC joints rely on a reaction between silicon and carbon to produce silicon carbide. This report summarizes preliminary mechanical properties of joints formed by these two methods. The methods appear to provide similar mechanical properties. Both the test methods and materials are preliminary in design and require further optimization. In an effort to determine how the mechanical test data is influenced by the test methodology and specimen size, plans for detailed finite element modeling (FEM) are presented.

  20. Silicon-Carbide Power MOSFET Performance in High Efficiency Boost Power Processing Unit for Extreme Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ikpe, Stanley A.; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Carr, Gregory A.; Hunter, Don; Ludwig, Lawrence L.; Wood, William; Del Castillo, Linda Y.; Fitzpatrick, Fred; Chen, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Silicon-Carbide device technology has generated much interest in recent years. With superior thermal performance, power ratings and potential switching frequencies over its Silicon counterpart, Silicon-Carbide offers a greater possibility for high powered switching applications in extreme environment. In particular, Silicon-Carbide Metal-Oxide- Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistors' (MOSFETs) maturing process technology has produced a plethora of commercially available power dense, low on-state resistance devices capable of switching at high frequencies. A novel hard-switched power processing unit (PPU) is implemented utilizing Silicon-Carbide power devices. Accelerated life data is captured and assessed in conjunction with a damage accumulation model of gate oxide and drain-source junction lifetime to evaluate potential system performance at high temperature environments.