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Sample records for amorphous silicon flat-panel

  1. Synchrotron applications of an amorphous silicon flat-panel detector.

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J. H.; Can Aydiner, C.; Almer, J.; Bernier, J.; Chapman, K. W.; Chupas, P. J.; Haeffner, D.; Kump, K.; Lee, P. L.; Lienert, U.; Miceli, A.; Vera, G.; LANL; GE Healthcare

    2008-01-01

    A GE Revolution 41RT flat-panel detector (GE 41RT) from GE Healthcare (GE) has been in operation at the Advanced Photon Source for over two years. The detector has an active area of 41 cm x 41 cm with 200 {micro}m x 200 {micro}m pixel size. The nominal working photon energy is around 80 keV. The physical set-up and utility software of the detector system are discussed in this article. The linearity of the detector response was measured at 80.7 keV. The memory effect of the detector element, called lag, was also measured at different exposure times and gain settings. The modulation transfer function was measured in terms of the line-spread function using a 25 {micro}m x 1 cm tungsten slit. The background (dark) signal, the signal that the detector will carry without exposure to X-rays, was measured at three different gain settings and with exposure times of 1 ms to 15 s. The radial geometric flatness of the sensor panel was measured using the diffraction pattern from a CeO{sub 2} powder standard. The large active area and fast data-capturing rate, i.e. 8 frames s{sup -1} in radiography mode, 30 frames s{sup -1} in fluoroscopy mode, make the GE 41RT one of a kind and very versatile in synchrotron diffraction. The loading behavior of a Cu/Nb multilayer material is used to demonstrate the use of the detector in a strain-stress experiment. Data from the measurement of various samples, amorphous SiO{sub 2} in particular, are presented to show the detector effectiveness in pair distribution function measurements.

  2. Synchrotron applications of an amorphous silicon flat-panel detector.

    PubMed

    Lee, John H; Aydiner, C Can; Almer, Jonathan; Bernier, Joel; Chapman, Karena W; Chupas, Peter J; Haeffner, Dean; Kump, Ken; Lee, Peter L; Lienert, Ulrich; Miceli, Antonino; Vera, German

    2008-09-01

    A GE Revolution 41RT flat-panel detector (GE 41RT) from GE Healthcare (GE) has been in operation at the Advanced Photon Source for over two years. The detector has an active area of 41 cm x 41 cm with 200 microm x 200 microm pixel size. The nominal working photon energy is around 80 keV. The physical set-up and utility software of the detector system are discussed in this article. The linearity of the detector response was measured at 80.7 keV. The memory effect of the detector element, called lag, was also measured at different exposure times and gain settings. The modulation transfer function was measured in terms of the line-spread function using a 25 microm x 1 cm tungsten slit. The background (dark) signal, the signal that the detector will carry without exposure to X-rays, was measured at three different gain settings and with exposure times of 1 ms to 15 s. The radial geometric flatness of the sensor panel was measured using the diffraction pattern from a CeO(2) powder standard. The large active area and fast data-capturing rate, i.e. 8 frames s(-1) in radiography mode, 30 frames s(-1) in fluoroscopy mode, make the GE 41RT one of a kind and very versatile in synchrotron diffraction. The loading behavior of a Cu/Nb multilayer material is used to demonstrate the use of the detector in a strain-stress experiment. Data from the measurement of various samples, amorphous SiO(2) in particular, are presented to show the detector effectiveness in pair distribution function measurements. PMID:18728319

  3. X-ray imaging with amorphous silicon active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Mohri, Youcef; Antonuk, Larry E.; Jee, Kyung-Wook; Maolinbay, Manat; Rong, Xiujiang; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Verma, Manav; Zhao, Qihua

    1997-07-01

    Recent advances in thin-film electronics technology have opened the way for the use of flat-panel imagers in a number of medical imaging applications. These novel imagers offer real time digital readout capabilities (˜30 frames per second), radiation hardness (>106cGy), large area (30×40 cm2) and compactness (˜1 cm). Such qualities make them strong candidates for the replacement of conventional x-ray imaging technologies such as film-screen and image intensifier systems. In this report, qualities and potential of amorphous silicon based active matrix flat-panel imagers are outlined for various applications such as radiation therapy, radiography, fluoroscopy and mammography.

  4. Calibration of an amorphous-silicon flat panel portal imager for exit-beam dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Josephine; Chuang, Cynthia F.; Morin, Olivier; Aubin, Michele; Pouliot, Jean

    2006-03-15

    Amorphous-silicon flat panel detectors are currently used to acquire digital portal images with excellent image quality for patient alignment before external beam radiation therapy. As a first step towards interpreting portal images acquired during treatment in terms of the actual dose delivered to the patient, a calibration method is developed to convert flat panel portal images to the equivalent water dose deposited in the detector plane and at a depth of 1.5 cm. The method is based on empirical convolution models of dose deposition in the flat panel detector and in water. A series of calibration experiments comparing the response of the flat panel imager and ion chamber measurements of dose in water determines the model parameters. Kernels derived from field size measurements account for the differences in the production and detection of scattered radiation in the two systems. The dissimilar response as a function of beam energy spectrum is characterized from measurements performed at various off-axis positions and for increasing attenuator thickness in the beam. The flat panel pixel inhomogeneity is corrected by comparing a large open field image with profiles measured in water. To verify the accuracy of the calibration method, calibrated flat panel profiles were compared with measured dose profiles for fields delivered through solid water slabs, a solid water phantom containing an air cavity, and an anthropomorphic head phantom. Open rectangular fields of various sizes and locations as well as a multileaf collimator-shaped field were delivered. For all but the smallest field centered about the central axis, the calibrated flat panel profiles matched the measured dose profiles with little or no systematic deviation and approximately 3% (two standard deviations) accuracy for the in-field region. The calibrated flat panel profiles for fields located off the central axis showed a small -1.7% systematic deviation from the measured profiles for the in-field region

  5. Signal, noise, and detective quantum efficiency of amorphous-silicon:hydrogen flat-panel imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siewerdsen, Jeffrey Harold

    Flat-panel imagers based upon the technology of thin-film amorphous silicon transistors and photodiodes are under investigation for a wide variety of medical imaging applications. This thesis presents quantitative empirical and theoretical investigations of the imaging performance of such imaging systems. Performance was evaluated in terms of imager signal size, spatial resolution, noise characteristics, and signal-to-noise ratio for a wide variety of imaging system configurations and exposure conditions relevant to medical imaging. A theoretical model based upon cascaded systems analysis allowed prediction of imager signal, noise, and detective quantum efficiency (DQE), and theoretical results were found to agree well with empirical measurements. The empirical and theoretical analyses yielded quantification of the performance of existing imager designs, allowed investigation of the potential performance of future flat-panel imaging systems, and provided a methodology for identifying optimal imager configurations for various applications and imaging tasks. There is every indication that flat-panel imagers could provide performance superior to that of existing clinical imaging technologies. For example, in general x-ray radiography, mammography, and radiotherapy portal imaging, such systems could provide DQE exceeding 60%, 80%, and 1.5%, respectively, approximately twice that of film-based systems. However, for applications involving very low exposures per image, e.g., real-time fluoroscopy, such systems may suffer from reduced signal-to-noise ratio. The analyses developed in this thesis provide an effective means of identifying strategies for improved imager performance and will facilitate the realization of optimized flat-panel imagers that physically achieve their maximum theoretical performance.

  6. Chacterization and application of a GE amorphous silicon flat panel detector in a synchrotron light source.

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J. H.; Miceli, A.; Almer, J.; Bernier, J.; Chapman, K.; Chupas, P.; Haeffner, D.; Lee, P. L.; Lienert, U.; Aydiner, C.; Vera, G.; Kump, K.; LANL; GE Healthcare

    2007-01-01

    Characterization, in the language of synchrotron radiation, was performed on a GE Revolution 41RT flat panel detector using the X-ray light source at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The detector has an active area of 41 x 41 cm{sup 2} with 200 x 200 {micro}m{sup 2} pixel size. The nominal working photon energy is around 80 keV. Modulation transfer function (MTF) was measured in terms of line spread function (LSF) using a 25 {micro}m x 1 cm tungsten slit. Memory effects of the detector elements, called lag, were also measured. The large area and fast data capturing rate - 8 fps in unbinned mode, 30 fps in binned or region of interest (ROI) mode - make the GE flat panel detector a unique and very versatile detector for synchrotron experiments. In particular, we present data from pair distribution function (PDF) measurements to demonstrate the special features of this detector.

  7. Finding an improved amorphous-silicon x-ray flat-panel detector configuration for the in-line geometry.

    PubMed

    Fast, M F; Teymurazyan, A; Pang, G; Oelfke, U; Rowlands, J A

    2013-04-01

    We have previously investigated the use of a conventional amorphous-silicon flat-panel detector (FPD) for intrafractional image guidance in the in-line geometry. In this configuration, the FPD is mounted between the patient and the treatment head, with the front of the FPD facing towards the patient. By geometrically separating signals from the diagnostic (kV) and treatment (MV) beams, it is possible to monitor the patient and treatment beam at the same time. In this study, we propose an FPD design based on existing technology with a 70% reduced up-stream areal density that is more suited to this new application. We have investigated our FPD model by means of a validated Monte Carlo simulation. Experimentally, simple rectangular fields were used to irradiate through the detector and observe the impact of removing detector components such as the support structure or the phosphor screen on the measured signal. The proposed FPD performs better than the conventional FPD: (i) attenuation of the MV beam is decreased by 60%; (ii) the MV signal is reduced by 20% for the primary MV field region which can avoid saturation of the FPD; and (iii) long range scatter from the MV into the kV region of the detector is greatly reduced. PMID:23478634

  8. High-energy and thermal-neutron imaging and modeling with an amorphous silicon flat-panel detector.

    PubMed

    Claytor, Thomas N; Taddeucci, Terry N; Hills, Charles R; Summa, Deborah A; Davis, Anthony W; McDonald, Thomas E; Schwab, Mark J

    2004-10-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) operates two spallation neutron sources dedicated to research in materials science, condensed-matter physics, and fundamental and applied nuclear physics. Prior to 1995, all thermal neutron radiography at Los Alamos was done on a beam port attached to the Omega West reactor, a small 8MW research reactor used primarily for radioisotope production and prompt and delayed neutron activation analysis. After the closure of this facility, two largely independent radiography development efforts were begun at LANSCE using moderated cold and thermal neutrons from the Target-1 source and high-energy neutrons from the Target-4 source. Investigations with cold and thermal neutrons employed a neutron converter and film, a scintillation screen and CCD camera system, and a new high-resolution amorphous silicon (a-Si) flat-panel detector system. Recent work with high-energy neutrons (En > 1 MeV) has involved storage-phosphor image plates. Some comparison high-energy images were obtained with both image plates and the a-Si panel and showed equivalent image quality for approximately equal exposure times. PMID:15246402

  9. Solid-state flat panel imager with avalanche amorphous selenium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuermann, James R.; Howansky, Adrian; Goldan, Amir H.; Tousignant, Olivier; Levéille, Sébastien; Tanioka, K.; Zhao, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Active matrix flat panel imagers (AMFPI) have become the dominant detector technology for digital radiography and fluoroscopy. For low dose imaging, electronic noise from the amorphous silicon thin film transistor (TFT) array degrades imaging performance. We have fabricated the first prototype solid-state AMFPI using a uniform layer of avalanche amorphous selenium (a-Se) photoconductor to amplify the signal to eliminate the effect of electronic noise. We have previously developed a large area solid-state avalanche a-Se sensor structure referred to as High Gain Avalanche Rushing Photoconductor (HARP) capable of achieving gains of 75. In this work we successfully deposited this HARP structure onto a 24 x 30 cm2 TFT array with a pixel pitch of 85 μm. An electric field (ESe) up to 105 Vμm-1 was applied across the a-Se layer without breakdown. Using the HARP layer as a direct detector, an X-ray avalanche gain of 15 +/- 3 was achieved at ESe = 105 Vμm-1. In indirect mode with a 150 μm thick structured CsI scintillator, an optical gain of 76 +/- 5 was measured at ESe = 105 Vμm-1. Image quality at low dose increases with the avalanche gain until the electronic noise is overcome at a constant exposure level of 0.76 mR. We demonstrate the success of a solid-state HARP X-ray imager as well as the largest active area HARP sensor to date.

  10. Design and feasibility of active matrix flat panel detector using avalanche amorphous selenium for protein crystallography.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Afrin; Reznik, Alla; Karim, Karim S; Rowlands, J A

    2008-10-01

    Protein crystallography is the most important technique for resolving the three-dimensional atomic structure of protein by measuring the intensity of its x-ray diffraction pattern. This work proposes a large area flat panel detector for protein crystallography based on direct conversion x-ray detection technique using avalanche amorphous selenium (a-Se) as the high gain photoconductor, and active matrix readout using amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin film transistors. The detector employs avalanche multiplication phenomenon of a-Se to make the detector sensitive to each incident x ray. The advantages of the proposed detector over the existing imaging plate and charge coupled device detectors are large area, high dynamic range coupled to single x-ray detection capability, fast readout, high spatial resolution, and inexpensive manufacturing process. The optimal detector design parameters (such as detector size, pixel size, and thickness of a-Se layer), and operating parameters (such as electric field across the a-Se layer) are determined based on the requirements for protein crystallography application. The performance of the detector is evaluated in terms of readout time (<1 s), dynamic range (approximately 10(5)), and sensitivity (approximately 1 x-ray photon), thus validating the detector's efficacy for protein crystallography. PMID:18975678

  11. Scan equalization digital radiography (SEDR) implemented with an amorphous selenium flat-panel detector: initial experience.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinming; Lai, Chao-Jen; Chen, Lingyun; Han, Tao; Zhong, Yuncheng; Shen, Youtao; Wang, Tianpeng; Shaw, Chris C

    2009-11-21

    It is well recognized in projection radiography that low-contrast detectability suffers in heavily attenuating regions due to excessively low x-ray fluence to the image receptor and higher noise levels. Exposure equalization can improve image quality by increasing the x-ray exposure to heavily attenuating regions, resulting in a more uniform distribution of exposure to the detector. Image quality is also expected to be improved by using the slot-scan geometry to reject scattered radiation effectively without degrading primary x-rays. This paper describes the design of a prototype scan equalization digital radiography (SEDR) system implemented with an amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin-film transistor (TFT) array-based flat-panel detector. With this system, slot-scan geometry with alternate line erasure and readout (ALER) technique was used to achieve scatter rejection. A seven-segment beam height modulator assembly was mounted onto the fore collimator to regulate exposure regionally for chest radiography. The beam modulator assembly, consisting of micro linear motors, lead screw cartridge with lead (Pb) beam blockers attached, position feedback sensors and motor driver circuitry, has been tested and found to have an acceptable response for exposure equalization in chest radiography. An anthropomorphic chest phantom was imaged in the posterior-anterior (PA) view under clinical conditions. Scatter component, primary x-rays, scatter-to-primary ratios (SPRs) and primary signal-to-noise ratios (PSNRs) were measured in the SEDR images to evaluate the rejection and redistribution of scattered radiation, and compared with those for conventional full-field imaging with and without anti-scatter grid methods. SPR reduction ratios (SPRRRs, defined as the differences between the non-grid full-field SPRs and the reduced SPRs divided by the former) yielded approximately 59% for the full-field imaging with grid and 82% for the SEDR technique in the lungs, and 77% for the full

  12. Amorphous and polycrystalline photoconductors for direct conversion flat panel x-ray image sensors.

    PubMed

    Kasap, Safa; Frey, Joel B; Belev, George; Tousignant, Olivier; Mani, Habib; Greenspan, Jonathan; Laperriere, Luc; Bubon, Oleksandr; Reznik, Alla; DeCrescenzo, Giovanni; Karim, Karim S; Rowlands, John A

    2011-01-01

    In the last ten to fifteen years there has been much research in using amorphous and polycrystalline semiconductors as x-ray photoconductors in various x-ray image sensor applications, most notably in flat panel x-ray imagers (FPXIs). We first outline the essential requirements for an ideal large area photoconductor for use in a FPXI, and discuss how some of the current amorphous and polycrystalline semiconductors fulfill these requirements. At present, only stabilized amorphous selenium (doped and alloyed a-Se) has been commercialized, and FPXIs based on a-Se are particularly suitable for mammography, operating at the ideal limit of high detective quantum efficiency (DQE). Further, these FPXIs can also be used in real-time, and have already been used in such applications as tomosynthesis. We discuss some of the important attributes of amorphous and polycrystalline x-ray photoconductors such as their large area deposition ability, charge collection efficiency, x-ray sensitivity, DQE, modulation transfer function (MTF) and the importance of the dark current. We show the importance of charge trapping in limiting not only the sensitivity but also the resolution of these detectors. Limitations on the maximum acceptable dark current and the corresponding charge collection efficiency jointly impose a practical constraint that many photoconductors fail to satisfy. We discuss the case of a-Se in which the dark current was brought down by three orders of magnitude by the use of special blocking layers to satisfy the dark current constraint. There are also a number of polycrystalline photoconductors, HgI(2) and PbO being good examples, that show potential for commercialization in the same way that multilayer stabilized a-Se x-ray photoconductors were developed for commercial applications. We highlight the unique nature of avalanche multiplication in a-Se and how it has led to the development of the commercial HARP video-tube. An all solid state version of the HARP has been

  13. Amorphous and Polycrystalline Photoconductors for Direct Conversion Flat Panel X-Ray Image Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Kasap, Safa; Frey, Joel B.; Belev, George; Tousignant, Olivier; Mani, Habib; Greenspan, Jonathan; Laperriere, Luc; Bubon, Oleksandr; Reznik, Alla; DeCrescenzo, Giovanni; Karim, Karim S.; Rowlands, John A.

    2011-01-01

    In the last ten to fifteen years there has been much research in using amorphous and polycrystalline semiconductors as x-ray photoconductors in various x-ray image sensor applications, most notably in flat panel x-ray imagers (FPXIs). We first outline the essential requirements for an ideal large area photoconductor for use in a FPXI, and discuss how some of the current amorphous and polycrystalline semiconductors fulfill these requirements. At present, only stabilized amorphous selenium (doped and alloyed a-Se) has been commercialized, and FPXIs based on a-Se are particularly suitable for mammography, operating at the ideal limit of high detective quantum efficiency (DQE). Further, these FPXIs can also be used in real-time, and have already been used in such applications as tomosynthesis. We discuss some of the important attributes of amorphous and polycrystalline x-ray photoconductors such as their large area deposition ability, charge collection efficiency, x-ray sensitivity, DQE, modulation transfer function (MTF) and the importance of the dark current. We show the importance of charge trapping in limiting not only the sensitivity but also the resolution of these detectors. Limitations on the maximum acceptable dark current and the corresponding charge collection efficiency jointly impose a practical constraint that many photoconductors fail to satisfy. We discuss the case of a-Se in which the dark current was brought down by three orders of magnitude by the use of special blocking layers to satisfy the dark current constraint. There are also a number of polycrystalline photoconductors, HgI2 and PbO being good examples, that show potential for commercialization in the same way that multilayer stabilized a-Se x-ray photoconductors were developed for commercial applications. We highlight the unique nature of avalanche multiplication in a-Se and how it has led to the development of the commercial HARP video-tube. An all solid state version of the HARP has been

  14. Imaging performance of amorphous selenium based flat-panel detectors for digital mammography: characterization of a small area prototype detector.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Ji, W G; Debrie, Anne; Rowlands, J A

    2003-02-01

    Our work is to investigate and understand the factors affecting the imaging performance of amorphous selenium (a-Se) flat-panel detectors for digital mammography. Both theoretical and experimental methods were developed to investigate the spatial frequency dependent detective quantum efficiency [DQE(f)] of a-Se flat-panel detectors for digital mammography. Since the K edge of a-Se is 12.66 keV and within the energy range of a mammographic spectrum, a theoretical model was developed based on cascaded linear system analysis with parallel processes to take into account the effect of K fluorescence on the modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and DQE(f) of the detector. This model was used to understand the performance of a small-area prototype detector with 85 microm pixel size. The presampling MTF, NPS, and DQE(f) of the prototype were measured, and compared to the theoretical calculation of the model. The calculation showed that K fluorescence accounted for a 15% reduction in the MTF at the Nyquist frequency (fNy) of the prototype detector, and the NPS at fNy was reduced to 89% of that at zero spatial frequency. The measurement of presampling MTF of the prototype detector revealed an additional source of blurring, which was attributed to charge trapping in the blocking layer at the interface between a-Se and the active matrix. This introduced a drop in both presampling MTF and NPS at high spatial frequency, and reduced aliasing in the NPS. As a result, the DQE(f) of the prototype detector at fNy approached 40% of that at zero spatial frequency. The measured and calculated DQE(f) using the linear system model have reasonable agreement, indicating that the factors controlling image quality in a-Se based mammographic detectors are fully understood, and the model can be used to further optimize detector imaging performance. PMID:12607843

  15. Metal-induced unilaterally crystallized polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistor technology and application to flat-panel displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zhiguo

    High quality flat-panel displays (FPD) typically use active-matrix (AM) addressing, with the optical state of each pixel controlled by one or more active devices such as amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin film transistors (TFT). The successful examples are portable computer and liquid-crystal television (LC-TV). A high level of system on panel (SoP) electronic integration is required for versatile and compact systems. Meanwhile, many self-emitting display technologies are developing fast, active matrix for self-emitting display is typically current driven. The a-Si TFTs suffer from limited current driving capability, polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) device technology is required. A new technology employing metal-induced unilaterally crystallization (MIUC) is presently reported. The device characteristics are obviously better than those in rapid-thermal annealed (RTA) and solid-phase crystallization (SPC) TFTs and the fabrication equipment is much cheaper than excimer laser crystallization (ELC) technology. The field effect mobility (muFE) of p- and n-channel MIUC TFTs is about 100cm2/Vs. Ion/I off is more than seven orders. Gate-induced leakage current in LT-MIUC poly-Si TFTs has been reduced by crystallization before heavy junction implantation to improve material quality and incorporating a gate-modulated lightly-doped drain (gamo-LDD) structure to reduce the electric field near the drain/channel junction region. At the same time, recrystallized (RC) MIUC TFT was researched with device characteristics improved. The 6.6cm 120 x 160 active matrix for OLED display is fabricated using LT-MIUC TFT technology on glass substrate. This display has the advantages of self-emitting, large intrinsic view angle and very fast response. At the same time, 6.6cm 120X160 AM-reflective twist nematic (RTN) display is fabricated using RC-MIUC TFT technology. This display is capable of producing 16 grade levels, 10:1 contrast and video image. The SOP display for AM-OLED were designed

  16. Amorphous selenium flat panel detectors for digital mammography: Validation of a NPWE model observer with CDMAM observer performance experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Segui, Jennifer A.; Zhao Wei

    2006-10-15

    Model observers have been developed which incorporate a specific imaging task, system performance, and human observer characteristics and can potentially overcome some of the limitations in using detective quantum efficiency for optimization and comparison of detectors. In this paper, a modified nonprewhitening matched filter (NPWE) model observer was developed and validated to predict object detectability for an amorphous selenium (a-Se) direct flat-panel imager (FPI) where aliasing is severe. A preclinical a-Se digital mammography FPI with 85 {mu}m pixel size was used in this investigation. Its physical imaging properties including modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum, and DQE were fully characterized. An observer performance study was conducted by imaging the CDMAM 3.4 contrast-detail phantom designed specifically for digital mammography and presenting these images to a panel of seven observers. X-ray attenuation and scatter due to the phantom were determined experimentally for use in development of the model observer. The observer study results were analyzed via threshold averaging and signal detection theory (SDT) based techniques to produce contrast-detail curves where threshold contrast is plotted as a function of disk diameter. Validity of the model was established using SDT analysis of the experimental data. The effect of aliasing on the detectability of small diameter disks was determined using the NPWE model observer. The signal spectrum was calculated using the presampling MTF of the detector with and without including the aliased terms. Our results indicate that the NPWE model based on Fourier domain parameters provides reasonable prediction of object detectability for the signal-known-exactly task in uniform image noise for a-Se direct FPI.

  17. Amorphous Diamond Flat Panel Displays - Final Report of ER-LTR CRADA project with SI Diamond Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Ager III, Joel W.

    1998-05-08

    The objective of this project was to determine why diamond-based films are unusually efficient electron emitters (field emission cathodes) at room temperature. Efficient cathodes based on diamond are being developed by SI Diamond Technology (SIDT) as components for bright, sunlight-readable, flat panel displays. When the project started, it was known that only a small fraction (<1%) of the cathode area is active in electron emission and that the emission sites themselves are sub-micron in size. The critical challenge of this project was to develop new microcharacterization methods capable of examining known emission sites. The research team used a combination of cathode emission imaging (developed at SIDT), micro-Raman spectroscopy (LBNL), and electron microscopy and spectroscopy (National Center for Electron Microscopy, LBNL) to examine the properties of known emission sites. The most significant accomplishment of the project was the development at LBNL of a very high resolution scanning probe that, for the first time, measured simultaneously the topography and electrical characteristics of single emission sites. The increased understanding of the emission mechanism helped SIDT to develop a new cathode material,''nano-diamond,'' which they have incorporated into their Field Emission Picture Element (FEPix) product. SIDT is developing large-format flat panel displays based on these picture elements that will be brighter and more efficient than existing outdoor displays such as Jumbotrons. The energy saving that will be realized if field emission displays are introduced commercially is in line with the energy conservation mission of DOE. The unique characterization tools developed in this project (particularly the new scanning microscopy method) are being used in ongoing BES-funded basic research.

  18. Medical imaging applications of amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Mireshghi, A.; Drewery, J.S.; Hong, W.S.; Jing, T.; Kaplan, S.N.; Lee, H.K.; Perez-Mendez, V.

    1994-07-01

    Two dimensional hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) pixel arrays are good candidates as flat-panel imagers for applications in medical imaging. Various performance characteristics of these imagers are reviewed and compared with currently used equipments. An important component in the a-Si:H imager is the scintillator screen. A new approach for fabrication of high resolution CsI(Tl) scintillator layers, appropriate for coupling to a-Si:H arrays, are presented. For nuclear medicine applications, a new a-Si:H based gamma camera is introduced and Monte Carlo simulation is used to evaluate its performance.

  19. Investigation of the effect of anode/filter materials on the dose and image quality of a digital mammography system based on an amorphous selenium flat panel detector.

    PubMed

    Baldelli, P; Phelan, N; Egan, G

    2010-04-01

    A comparison, in terms of image quality and glandular breast dose, was carried out between two similar digital mammography systems using amorphous selenium flat panel detectors. The two digital mammography systems currently available from Lorad-Hologic were compared. The original system utilises Mo/Mo and Mo/Rh as target/filter combinations, while the new system uses W/Rh and W/Ag. Images of multiple mammography phantoms with simulated compressed breast thicknesses of 4 cm, 5 cm and 6 cm and various glandular tissue equivalency were acquired under different spectral conditions. The contrast of five details, corresponding to five glandular compositions, was calculated and the ratio of the square of the contrast-to-noise ratio to the average glandular dose was used as a figure-of-merit (FOM) to compare results. For each phantom thickness and target/filter combination, there is an optimum voltage that maximises the FOM. Results show that the W/Rh combination is the best choice for all the detection tasks studied, but for thicknesses greater than 6 cm the W/Ag combination would probably be the best choice. In addition, the new system with W filter presents a better optimisation of the automatic exposure control in comparison with the original system with Mo filter. PMID:20019173

  20. Single-layer and dual-layer contrast-enhanced mammography using amorphous selenium flat panel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allec, N.; Abbaszadeh, S.; Karim, K. S.

    2011-09-01

    The accumulation of injected contrast agents allows the image enhancement of lesions through the use of contrast-enhanced mammography. In this technique, the combination of two acquired images is used to create an enhanced image. There exist several methods to acquire the images to be combined, which include dual energy subtraction using a single detection layer that suffers from motion artifacts due to patient motion between image acquisition. To mitigate motion artifacts, a detector composed of two layers may be used to simultaneously acquire the low and high energy images. In this work, we evaluate both of these methods using amorphous selenium as the detection material to find the system parameters (tube voltage, filtration, photoconductor thickness and relative intensity ratio) leading to the optimal performance. We then compare the performance of the two detectors under the variation of contrast agent concentration, tumor size and dose. The detectability was found to be most comparable at the lower end of the evaluated factors. The single-layer detector not only led to better contrast, due to its greater spectral separation capabilities, but also had lower quantum noise. The single-layer detector was found to have a greater detectability by a factor of 2.4 for a 2.5 mm radius tumor having a contrast agent concentration of 1.5 mg ml-1 in a 4.5 cm thick 50% glandular breast. The inclusion of motion artifacts in the comparison is part of ongoing research efforts.

  1. Quantitative comparison using generalized relative object detectability (G-ROD) metrics of an amorphous selenium detector with high resolution microangiographic fluoroscopes (MAF) and standard flat panel detectors (FPD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russ, M.; Shankar, A.; Jain, A.; Setlur Nagesh, S. V.; Ionita, C. N.; Scott, C.; Karim, K. S.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2016-03-01

    A novel amorphous selenium (a-Se) direct detector with CMOS readout has been designed, and relative detector performance investigated. The detector features include a 25μm pixel pitch, and 1000μm thick a-Se layer operating at 10V/μm bias field. A simulated detector DQE was determined, and used in comparative calculations of the Relative Object Detectability (ROD) family of prewhitening matched-filter (PWMF) observer and non-pre-whitening matched filter (NPWMF) observer model metrics to gauge a-Se detector performance against existing high resolution micro-angiographic fluoroscopic (MAF) detectors and a standard flat panel detector (FPD). The PWMF-ROD or ROD metric compares two x-ray imaging detectors in their relative abilities in imaging a given object by taking the integral over spatial frequencies of the Fourier transform of the detector DQE weighted by an object function, divided by the comparable integral for a different detector. The generalized-ROD (G-ROD) metric incorporates clinically relevant parameters (focal- spot size, magnification, and scatter) to show the degradation in imaging performance for detectors that are part of an imaging chain. Preliminary ROD calculations using simulated spheres as the object predicted superior imaging performance by the a-Se detector as compared to existing detectors. New PWMF-G-ROD and NPWMF-G-ROD results still indicate better performance by the a-Se detector in an imaging chain over all sphere sizes for various focal spot sizes and magnifications, although a-Se performance advantages were degraded by focal spot blurring. Nevertheless, the a-Se technology has great potential to provide break- through abilities such as visualization of fine details including of neuro-vascular perforator vessels and of small vascular devices.

  2. TU-F-18C-02: Increasing Amorphous Selenium Thickness in Direct Conversion Flat-Panel Imagers for Contrast-Enhanced Dual-Energy Breast Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Scaduto, DA; Hu, Y-H; Zhao, W

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Contrast-enhanced (CE) breast imaging using iodinated contrast agents requires imaging with x-ray spectra at energies greater than those used in mammography. Optimizing amorphous selenium (a-Se) flat panel imagers (FPI) for this higher energy range may increase lesion conspicuity. Methods: We compare imaging performance of a conventional FPI with 200 μm a-Se conversion layer to a prototype FPI with 300 μm a-Se layer. Both detectors are evaluated in a Siemens MAMMOMAT Inspiration prototype digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) system using low-energy (W/Rh 28 kVp) and high-energy (W/Cu 49 kVp) x-ray spectra. Detectability of iodinated lesions in dual-energy images is evaluated using an iodine contrast phantom. Effects of beam obliquity are investigated in projection and reconstructed images using different reconstruction methods. The ideal observer signal-to-noise ratio is used as a figure-of-merit to predict the optimal a-Se thickness for CE lesion detectability without compromising conventional full-field digital mammography (FFDM) and DBT performance. Results: Increasing a-Se thickness from 200 μm to 300 μm preserves imaging performance at typical mammographic energies (e.g. W/Rh 28 kVp), and improves the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) for high energy (W/Cu 49 kVp) by 30%. While the more penetrating high-energy x-ray photons increase geometric blur due to beam obliquity in the FPI with thicker a-Se layer, the effect on lesion detectability in FBP reconstructions is negligible due to the reconstruction filters employed. Ideal observer SNR for CE objects shows improvements in in-plane detectability with increasing a-Se thicknesses, though small lesion detectability begins to degrade in oblique projections for a-Se thickness above 500 μm. Conclusion: Increasing a-Se thickness in direct conversion FPI from 200 μm to 300 μm improves lesion detectability in CE breast imaging with virtually no cost to conventional FFDM and DBT. This work was partially

  3. Development and evaluation of a portable amorphous silicon flat-panel x-ray detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Minoru; Mochizuki, Chiori; Kameshima, Toshio; Yamazaki, Tatsuya; Court, Laurence; Hayashida, Shinsuke; Morishita, Masakazu; Ohta, Shin-ichi

    2001-06-01

    The design, development and evaluation of a portable x-ray detector are described. The completed detector has a pixel pitch of 100 micrometers , an active imaging area of 22.5 x 27.5 cm2 (9 x 11 inch2), package outer dimensions of 32.5 x 32.5 cm2, a thickness of only 20 mm, and a weight of around 2.8 kg. A number of significant advances in the design and production processes were needed to produce such a compact detector with such a small pixel pitch, while maintaining the image quality achieved a current detector (CXDI-22) which has a 160 mm pixel pitch. These include the development of a low power readout IC, advances in detector packaging design, concentrating on lightweight and strong components, and redesign of the pixel structure to improve the fill-factor. A comparison is made of the imaging characteristics of this new detector with the CXDI-22 detector, and it is shown that the new detector demonstrates improved CTF, and NEQ. The new detector is also shown to demonstrate superior performance in a contrast-detail phantom evaluation. This new detector should be useful for limb and joint examinations as it offers high spatial resolution, combined with the same freedom in positioning provided by conventional screen-film cassettes.

  4. Microgap flat panel display

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, C.R.

    1998-12-08

    A microgap flat panel display is disclosed which includes a thin gas-filled display tube that utilizes switched X-Y ``pixel`` strips to trigger electron avalanches and activate a phosphor at a given location on a display screen. The panel utilizes the principal of electron multiplication in a gas subjected to a high electric field to provide sufficient electron current to activate standard luminescent phosphors located on an anode. The X-Y conductive strips of a few micron widths may for example, be deposited on opposite sides of a thin insulating substrate, or on one side of the adjacent substrates and function as a cathode. The X-Y strips are separated from the anode by a gap filled with a suitable gas. Electrical bias is selectively switched onto X and Y strips to activate a ``pixel`` in the region where these strips overlap. A small amount of a long-lived radioisotope is used to initiate an electron avalanche in the overlap region when bias is applied. The avalanche travels through the gas filled gap and activates a luminescent phosphor of a selected color. The bias is adjusted to give a proportional electron multiplication to control brightness for given pixel. 6 figs.

  5. Microgap flat panel display

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, Craig R.

    1998-01-01

    A microgap flat panel display which includes a thin gas-filled display tube that utilizes switched X-Y "pixel" strips to trigger electron avalanches and activate a phosphor at a given location on a display screen. The panel utilizes the principal of electron multiplication in a gas subjected to a high electric field to provide sufficient electron current to activate standard luminescent phosphors located on an anode. The X-Y conductive strips of a few micron widths may for example, be deposited on opposite sides of a thin insulating substrate, or on one side of the adjacent substrates and function as a cathode. The X-Y strips are separated from the anode by a gap filled with a suitable gas. Electrical bias is selectively switched onto X and Y strips to activate a "pixel" in the region where these strips overlap. A small amount of a long-lived radioisotope is used to initiate an electron avalanche in the overlap region when bias is applied. The avalanche travels through the gas filled gap and activates a luminescent phosphor of a selected color. The bias is adjusted to give a proportional electron multiplication to control brightness for given pixel.

  6. Hydrogen in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Peercy, P. S.

    1980-01-01

    The structural aspects of amorphous silicon and the role of hydrogen in this structure are reviewed with emphasis on ion implantation studies. In amorphous silicon produced by Si ion implantation of crystalline silicon, the material reconstructs into a metastable amorphous structure which has optical and electrical properties qualitatively similar to the corresponding properties in high-purity evaporated amorphous silicon. Hydrogen studies further indicate that these structures will accomodate less than or equal to 5 at.% hydrogen and this hydrogen is bonded predominantly in a monohydride (SiH/sub 1/) site. Larger hydrogen concentrations than this can be achieved under certain conditions, but the excess hydrogen may be attributed to defects and voids in the material. Similarly, glow discharge or sputter deposited amorphous silicon has more desirable electrical and optical properties when the material is prepared with low hydrogen concentration and monohydride bonding. Results of structural studies and hydrogen incorporation in amorphous silicon were discussed relative to the different models proposed for amorphous silicon.

  7. Investigations of a flat-panel detector for quality assurance measurements in ion beam therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Bernadette; Telsemeyer, Julia; Huber, Lucas; Ackermann, Benjamin; Jäkel, Oliver; Martišíková, Mária

    2012-01-01

    Increased accuracy in radiation delivery to a patient provided by scanning particle beams leads to high demands on quality assurance (QA). To meet the requirements, an extensive quality assurance programme has been implemented at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center. Currently, high-resolution radiographic films are used for beam spot position measurements and homogeneity measurements for scanned fields. However, given that using this film type is time and equipment demanding, considerations have been made to replace the radiographic films in QA by another appropriate device. In this study, the suitability of the flat-panel detector RID 256 L based on amorphous silicon was investigated as an alternative method. The currently used radiographic films were taken as a reference. Investigations were carried out for proton and carbon ion beams. The detectors were irradiated simultaneously to allow for a direct comparison. The beam parameters (e.g. energy, focus, position) currently used in the daily QA procedures were applied. Evaluation of the measurements was performed using newly implemented automatic routines. The results for the flat-panel detector were compared to the standard radiographic films. Additionally, a field with intentionally decreased homogeneity was applied to test the detector's sensitivities toward possible incorrect scan parameters. For the beam position analyses, the flat-panel detector results showed good agreement with radiographic films. For both detector types, deviations between measured and planned spot distances were found to be below 1% (1 mm). In homogeneously irradiated fields, the flat-panel detector showed a better dose response homogeneity than the currently used radiographic film. Furthermore, the flat-panel detector is sensitive to field irregularities. The flat-panel detector was found to be an adequate replacement for the radiographic film in QA measurements. In addition, it saves time and equipment because no post

  8. Amorphous silicon photovoltaic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, David E.; Lin, Guang H.; Ganguly, Gautam

    2004-08-31

    This invention is a photovoltaic device comprising an intrinsic or i-layer of amorphous silicon and where the photovoltaic device is more efficient at converting light energy to electric energy at high operating temperatures than at low operating temperatures. The photovoltaic devices of this invention are suitable for use in high temperature operating environments.

  9. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1992-11-17

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification. 13 figs.

  10. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Perez-Mendez, Victor; Kaplan, Selig N.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification.

  11. Flat panel planar optic display

    SciTech Connect

    Veligdan, J.T.

    1994-11-01

    A prototype 10 inch flat panel Planar Optic Display, (POD), screen has been constructed and tested. This display screen is comprised of hundreds of planar optic class sheets bonded together with a cladding layer between each sheet where each glass sheet represents a vertical line of resolution. The display is 9 inches wide by 5 inches high and approximately 1 inch thick. A 3 milliwatt HeNe laser is used as the illumination source and a vector scanning technique is employed.

  12. Amorphous Silicon: Flexible Backplane and Display Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, Kalluri R.

    Advances in the science and technology of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H, also referred to as a-Si) and the associated devices including thin-film transistors (TFT) during the past three decades have had a profound impact on the development and commercialization of major applications such as thin-film solar cells, digital image scanners and X-ray imagers and active matrix liquid crystal displays (AMLCDs). Particularly, during approximately the past 15 years, a-Si TFT-based flat panel AMLCDs have been a huge commercial success. a-Si TFT-LCD has enabled the note book PCs, and is now rapidly replacing the venerable CRT in the desktop monitor and home TV applications. a-Si TFT-LCD is now the dominant technology in use for applications ranging from small displays such as in mobile phones to large displays such as in home TV, as well-specialized applications such as industrial and avionics displays.

  13. Flat-panel electronic displays: a triumph of physics, chemistry and engineering.

    PubMed

    Hilsum, Cyril

    2010-03-13

    This paper describes the history and science behind the development of modern flat-panel displays, and assesses future trends. Electronic displays are an important feature of modern life. For many years the cathode ray tube, an engineering marvel, was universal, but its shape was cumbersome and its operating voltage too high. The need for a flat-panel display, working at a low voltage, became imperative, and much research has been applied to this need. Any versatile flat-panel display will exploit an electro-optical effect, a transparent conductor and an addressing system to deliver data locally. The first need is to convert an electrical signal into a visible change. Two methods are available, the first giving emission of light, the second modulating ambient illumination. The most useful light-emitting media are semiconductors, historically exploiting III-V or II-VI compounds, but more recently organic or polymer semiconductors. Another possible effect uses gas plasma discharges. The modulating, or subtractive, effects that have been studied include liquid crystals, electrophoresis, electrowetting and electrochromism. A transparent conductor makes it possible to apply a voltage to an extended area while observing the results. The design is a compromise, since the free electrons that carry current also absorb light. The first materials used were metals, but some semiconductors, when heavily doped, give a better balance, with high transmission for a low resistance. Delivering data unambiguously to a million or so picture elements across the display area is no easy task. The preferred solution is an amorphous silicon thin-film transistor deposited at each cross-point in an X-Y matrix. Success in these endeavours has led to many applications for flat-panel displays, including television, flexible displays, electronic paper, electronic books and advertising signs. PMID:20123746

  14. Flat-panel electronic displays: a triumph of physics, chemistry and engineering

    PubMed Central

    Hilsum, Cyril

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the history and science behind the development of modern flat-panel displays, and assesses future trends. Electronic displays are an important feature of modern life. For many years the cathode ray tube, an engineering marvel, was universal, but its shape was cumbersome and its operating voltage too high. The need for a flat-panel display, working at a low voltage, became imperative, and much research has been applied to this need. Any versatile flat-panel display will exploit an electro-optical effect, a transparent conductor and an addressing system to deliver data locally. The first need is to convert an electrical signal into a visible change. Two methods are available, the first giving emission of light, the second modulating ambient illumination. The most useful light-emitting media are semiconductors, historically exploiting III–V or II–VI compounds, but more recently organic or polymer semiconductors. Another possible effect uses gas plasma discharges. The modulating, or subtractive, effects that have been studied include liquid crystals, electrophoresis, electrowetting and electrochromism. A transparent conductor makes it possible to apply a voltage to an extended area while observing the results. The design is a compromise, since the free electrons that carry current also absorb light. The first materials used were metals, but some semiconductors, when heavily doped, give a better balance, with high transmission for a low resistance. Delivering data unambiguously to a million or so picture elements across the display area is no easy task. The preferred solution is an amorphous silicon thin-film transistor deposited at each cross-point in an X–Y matrix. Success in these endeavours has led to many applications for flat-panel displays, including television, flexible displays, electronic paper, electronic books and advertising signs. PMID:20123746

  15. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Mendez, V.P.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1988-11-15

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. 15 figs.

  16. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Mendez, Victor P.; Kaplan, Selig N.

    1988-01-01

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation.

  17. Compensated amorphous silicon solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Devaud, Genevieve

    1983-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell including an electrically conductive substrate, a layer of glow discharge deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon over said substrate and having regions of differing conductivity with at least one region of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The layer of hydrogenated amorphous silicon has opposed first and second major surfaces where the first major surface contacts the electrically conductive substrate and an electrode for electrically contacting the second major surface. The intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon region is deposited in a glow discharge with an atmosphere which includes not less than about 0.02 atom percent mono-atomic boron. An improved N.I.P. solar cell is disclosed using a BF.sub.3 doped intrinsic layer.

  18. Laser illuminated flat panel display

    SciTech Connect

    Veligdan, J.T.

    1995-12-31

    A 10 inch laser illuminated flat panel Planar Optic Display (POD) screen has been constructed and tested. This POD screen technology is an entirely new concept in display technology. Although the initial display is flat and made of glass, this technology lends itself to applications where a plastic display might be wrapped around the viewer. The display screen is comprised of hundreds of planar optical waveguides where each glass waveguide represents a vertical line of resolution. A black cladding layer, having a lower index of refraction, is placed between each waveguide layer. Since the cladding makes the screen surface black, the contrast is high. The prototype display is 9 inches wide by 5 inches high and approximately I inch thick. A 3 milliwatt HeNe laser is used as the illumination source and a vector scanning technique is employed.

  19. Perspective on photovoltaic amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Luft, W.; Stafford, B.; von Roedern, B.

    1992-05-01

    Amorphous silicon is a thin film option that has the potential for a cost-effective product for large-scale utility photovoltaics application. The initial efficiencies for single-junction and multijunction amorphous silicon cells and modules have increased significantly over the past 10 years. The emphasis of research and development has changed to stabilized efficiency, especially that of multijunction modules. NREL has measured 6.3%--7.2% stabilized amorphous silicon module efficiencies for US products, and 8.1% stable efficiencies have been reported by Fuji Electric. This represents a significant increase over the stabilized efficiencies of modules manufactured only a few years ago. An increasing portion of the amorphous silicon US government funding is now for manufacturing technology development to reduce cost. The funding for amorphous silicon for photovoltaics by Japan over the last 5 years has been about 50% greater than that in the United State, and by Germany in the last 2--3 years more than twice that of the US Amorphous silicon is the only thin-film technology that is selling large-area commercial modules. The cost for amorphous silicon modules is now in the $4.50 range; it is a strong function of plant production capacity and is expected to be reduced to $1.00--1.50/W{sub p} for plants with 10 MW/year capacities. 10 refs.

  20. Perspective on photovoltaic amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Luft, W.; Stafford, B.; von Roedern, B. )

    1992-12-01

    Amorphous silicon is a thin film option that has the potential for a cost-effective product for large-scale utility photovoltaics application. The initial efficiencies for single-junction and multijunction amorphous silicon cells and modules have increased significantly over the past 10 years. The emphasis of research and development has changed to stabilized efficiency, especially that of multijunction modules. NREL has measured 6.3%--7.2% stabilized amorphous silicon module efficiencies for U.S. products, and 8.1% stable efficiencies have been reported by Fuji Electric. This represents a significant increase over the stabilized efficiencies of modules manufactured only a few years ago. An increasing portion of the amorphous silicon U.S. government funding is now for manufacturing technology development to reduce cost. The funding for amorphous silicon for photovoltaics by Japan over the last 5 years has been about 50% greater than that in the United States, and by Germany in the last 2--3 years more than twice that of the U.S. Amorphous silicon is the only thin-film technology that is selling large-area commercial modules. The cost for amorphous silicon modules is now in the $4.50 range; it is a strong function of plant production capacity and is expected to be reduced to $1.00--1.50/W[sub [ital p

  1. Demonstration model circuit panel for silicon-on-insulator microelectronics and flat-panel 1994 LDRD final report 94-FS-041

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, A.

    1995-09-01

    Crystalline silicon wafers are frontside bonded to glass substrates. The silicon substrate is removed and thin films of silicon remain on the insulating substrates. The performance of devices formed in the thin films before bonding are compared with those after bonding.

  2. Plasma Deposition of Amorphous Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calcote, H. F.

    1982-01-01

    Strongly adhering films of silicon are deposited directly on such materials as Pyrex and Vycor (or equivalent materials) and aluminum by a non-equilibrium plasma jet. Amorphous silicon films are formed by decomposition of silicon tetrachloride or trichlorosilane in the plasma. Plasma-jet technique can also be used to deposit an adherent silicon film on aluminum from silane and to dope such films with phosphorus. Ability to deposit silicon films on such readily available, inexpensive substrates could eventually lead to lower cost photovoltaic cells.

  3. Flat panel ferroelectric electron emission display system

    DOEpatents

    Sampayan, S.E.; Orvis, W.J.; Caporaso, G.J.; Wieskamp, T.F.

    1996-04-16

    A device is disclosed which can produce a bright, raster scanned or non-raster scanned image from a flat panel. Unlike many flat panel technologies, this device does not require ambient light or auxiliary illumination for viewing the image. Rather, this device relies on electrons emitted from a ferroelectric emitter impinging on a phosphor. This device takes advantage of a new electron emitter technology which emits electrons with significant kinetic energy and beam current density. 6 figs.

  4. Flat panel ferroelectric electron emission display system

    DOEpatents

    Sampayan, Stephen E.; Orvis, William J.; Caporaso, George J.; Wieskamp, Ted F.

    1996-01-01

    A device which can produce a bright, raster scanned or non-raster scanned image from a flat panel. Unlike many flat panel technologies, this device does not require ambient light or auxiliary illumination for viewing the image. Rather, this device relies on electrons emitted from a ferroelectric emitter impinging on a phosphor. This device takes advantage of a new electron emitter technology which emits electrons with significant kinetic energy and beam current density.

  5. Tandem junction amorphous silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Hanak, Joseph J.

    1981-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell has an active body with two or a series of layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon arranged in a tandem stacked configuration with one optical path and electrically interconnected by a tunnel junction. The layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon arranged in tandem configuration can have the same bandgap or differing bandgaps.

  6. Low Scatter, High Kilovolt, A-Si Flat Panel X-Ray Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Peter D.; Claytor, Thomas N.; Berry, Phillip C.; Hills, Charles R.; Keating, Scott C.; Phillips, David H.; Setoodeh, Shariar

    2009-03-01

    We have been using amorphous silicon (a-Si) flat panel detectors in high energy (>400 kV) cone beam computed tomography (CT) applications for a number of years. We have found that these detectors have a significant amount of internal scatter that degrades the accuracy of attenuation images. The scatter errors cause cupping and streaking artifacts that are practically indistinguishable from beam hardening artifacts. Residual artifacts remain after beam hardening correction and over correction increases noise in CT reconstructions. Another important limitation of existing detectors is that they have a high failure rate, especially when operating at megavolt x-ray energies even with a well collimated beam. Due to the limitations of the current detectors, we decided to design a detector specifically for high energies that has significantly reduced scatter. In collaboration with IMTEC, we have built a prototype amorphous silicon flat panel detector that has both improved imaging response and increased lifetime. LANL's contribution is the "transparent panel concept" (patent pending), in which structures in the x-ray beam path are either eliminated or made as transparent to x-rays as practical (low atomic number and low areal density). This reduces scatter, makes attenuation measurements more accurate, improves the ability to make corrections for beam hardening, and increases signal to noise ratio in DR images and CT reconstructions. IMTEC's contribution is an improved shielding design that will increase the lifetime of the panel. Preliminary results showing the dramatic reduction in self scatter from the panel will be presented as well as the effect of this improvement on CT images.

  7. LOW SCATTER, HIGH KILOVOLT, A-SI FLAT PANEL X-RAY DETECTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Peter D.; Claytor, Thomas N.; Berry, Phillip C.; Hills, Charles R.; Keating, Scott C.; Phillips, David H.; Setoodeh, Shariar

    2009-03-03

    We have been using amorphous silicon (a-Si) flat panel detectors in high energy (>400 kV) cone beam computed tomography (CT) applications for a number of years. We have found that these detectors have a significant amount of internal scatter that degrades the accuracy of attenuation images. The scatter errors cause cupping and streaking artifacts that are practically indistinguishable from beam hardening artifacts. Residual artifacts remain after beam hardening correction and over correction increases noise in CT reconstructions. Another important limitation of existing detectors is that they have a high failure rate, especially when operating at megavolt x-ray energies even with a well collimated beam. Due to the limitations of the current detectors, we decided to design a detector specifically for high energies that has significantly reduced scatter. In collaboration with IMTEC, we have built a prototype amorphous silicon flat panel detector that has both improved imaging response and increased lifetime. LANL's contribution is the ''transparent panel concept''(patent pending), in which structures in the x-ray beam path are either eliminated or made as transparent to x-rays as practical (low atomic number and low areal density). This reduces scatter, makes attenuation measurements more accurate, improves the ability to make corrections for beam hardening, and increases signal to noise ratio in DR images and CT reconstructions. IMTEC's contribution is an improved shielding design that will increase the lifetime of the panel. Preliminary results showing the dramatic reduction in self scatter from the panel will be presented as well as the effect of this improvement on CT images.

  8. Exoelectron analysis of amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekhtyar, Yu. D.; Vinyarskaya, Yu. A.

    1994-04-01

    The method based on registration of photothermostimulated exoelectron emission (PTSE) is used in the proposed new field of investigating the structural defects in amorphous silicon (a-Si). This method can be achieved if the sample under investigation is simultaneously heated and illuminated by ultraviolet light. The mechanism of PTSE from a-Si has been studied in the case of a hydrogenized amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) film grown by glow discharge method. The electronic properties and annealing of defects were analyzed in the study. It has been shown from the results that the PTSE from a-Si:H takes place as a prethreshold single-photon external photoeffect. The exoemission spectroscopy of a-Si:H was shown to be capable in the study of thermally and optically stimulated changes in the electronic structure of defects, their annealing, as well as diffusion of atomic particles, such as hydrogen.

  9. Flat panel displays in an underwater cockpit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sola, Kenneth E.

    1999-08-01

    This paper reports on a highly unusual application of flat panel displays in a cockpit. The cockpit is found in a mini- submarine of the Advanced SEAL Delivery System (ASDS), a state-of-the-art military platform designed to deliver U.S. Navy SEALs, and other special forces, to their mission locations. For security reasons, the presentation details are intentionally kept minimal.

  10. Flat panels in future ground combat vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurd, Eric D.; Forest, Coryne A.

    1996-05-01

    The efforts of the design team for the Crewman's Associate Advanced Technology Demonstration (CA ATD) and its use of advanced display concepts is discussed. This team has the responsibility of identifying future technologies with the potential for maximizing human- machine interaction for incorporation into future crew station designs for ground combat vehicles. The design process utilizes extensive user involvement in all stages. This is critical to developing systems that have complex functions, yet are simple to maintain and operate. Described are the needs which have driven the U.S. Army towards the use of flat panels. Ultimately, the army is looking at smaller, lighter, more deployable ground combat vehicles. This goal is driving individual components to have characteristics such as low weight, low power usage, and reduced volume while maintaining ruggedness and functionality. The potential applications for flat panels in ground vehicles is also discussed. The army is looking at applications for out-the-window views (virtual periscopes), multi-functional displays, and head mounted displays to accomplish its goals of designing better crew interfaces. The army's requirements in regards to the technologies that must be developed and supported by flat panel displays are also discussed in this section. In conclusion, future projections of the use of flat panels for the Crewman's Associate ATD will be outlined. Projections will be made in terms of physical numbers and promising technologies that fulfill the goals of the CAATD and achieve the approval of the user community.

  11. Advantages of using flat-panel LCD for projection displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dean C.

    1995-04-01

    came from silicon wafer processing, they are limited to small sizes as in Integrated Circuits. Polysilicon needs relative high temperature for active matrix processing. The usual non-alkali LCD glass substrates can not withstand such high temperature. As a result, polysilicon is also limited to small sizes. However, they can be used in Projection Displays with enlargement for comfort viewing. It is our hope some of these flat panel LCD technologies will be developed into the high end Projection Displays such as HIgh Definition Television, Multimedia or Interactive Video Communication, Entertainment and Presentation Systems of the future.

  12. Narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Madan, A.; Mahan, A.H.

    1985-01-10

    Disclosed is a narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductor comprising an alloy of amorphous silicon and a band gap narrowing element selected from the group consisting of Sn, Ge, and Pb, with an electron donor dopant selected from the group consisting of P, As, Sb, Bi and N. The process for producing the narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductor comprises the steps of forming an alloy comprising amorphous silicon and at least one of the aforesaid band gap narrowing elements in amount sufficient to narrow the band gap of the silicon semiconductor alloy below that of amorphous silicon, and also utilizing sufficient amounts of the aforesaid electron donor dopant to maintain the amorphous silicon alloy as an n-type semiconductor.

  13. Amorphous-silicon cell reliability testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathrop, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    The work on reliability testing of solar cells is discussed. Results are given on initial temperature and humidity tests of amorphous silicon devices. Calibration and measurement procedures for amorphous and crystalline cells are given. Temperature stress levels are diagrammed.

  14. Amorphous silicon solar cell allowing infrared transmission

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.

    1979-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell with a layer of high index of refraction material or a series of layers having high and low indices of refraction material deposited upon a transparent substrate to reflect light of energies greater than the bandgap energy of the amorphous silicon back into the solar cell and transmit solar radiation having an energy less than the bandgap energy of the amorphous silicon.

  15. Studies of hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, S G; Carlos, W E

    1984-07-01

    This report discusses the results of probing the defect structure and bonding of hydrogenated amorphous silicon films using both nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron spin resonance (ESR). The doping efficiency of boron in a-Si:H was found to be less than 1%, with 90% of the boron in a threefold coordinated state. On the other hand, phosphorus NMR chemical shift measurements yielded a ration of threefold to fourfold P sites of roughly 4 to 1. Various resonance lines were observed in heavily boron- and phosphorus-doped films and a-SiC:H alloys. These lines were attributed to band tail states on twofold coordinated silicon. In a-SiC:H films, a strong resonance was attributed to dangling bonds on carbon atoms. ESR measurements on low-pressure chemical-vapor-deposited (LPCVD) a-Si:H were performed on samples. The defect density in the bulk of the films was 10/sup 17//cc with a factor of 3 increase at the surface of the sample. The ESR spectrum of LPCVD-prepared films was not affected by prolonged exposure to strong light. Microcrystalline silicon samples were also examined. The phosphorus-doped films showed a strong signal from the crystalline material and no resonance from the amorphous matrix. This shows that phosphorus is incorporated in the crystals and is active as a dopant. No signal was recorded from the boron-doped films.

  16. Method of producing hydrogenated amorphous silicon film

    DOEpatents

    Wiesmann, Harold J.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to hydrogenated amorphous silicon produced by thermally decomposing silane (SiH.sub.4) or other gases comprising H and Si, from a tungsten or carbon foil heated to a temperature of about 1400.degree.-1600.degree. C., in a vacuum of about 10.sup.-6 to 19.sup.-4 torr, to form a gaseous mixture of atomic hydrogen and atomic silicon, and depositing said gaseos mixture onto a substrate independent of and outside said source of thermal decomposition, to form hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The presence of an ammonia atmosphere in the vacuum chamber enhances the photoconductivity of the hydrogenated amorphous silicon film.

  17. Performance of advanced a-Si/CsI-based flat-panel x-ray detectors for mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albagli, Douglas; Hudspeth, Heather; Possin, George E.; Lee, Ji Ung; Granfors, Paul R.; Giambattista, Brian W.

    2003-06-01

    The GE Senographe 2000D, the first full field digital mammography system based on amorphous Silicon (a-Si) flat panel arrays and a Cesium-Iodide (CsI) scintillator, has been in clinical use for several years. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate and quantify improvements in the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) for both typical screening and ultra-low exposure levels for this technology platform. A new figure of merit, the electronic noise factor, is introduced to explicitly quantify the influence of the electronic noise, conversion factor, modulation transfer function (MTF), and pixel pitch towards the reduction of DQE at low exposure levels. Methods to improve the DQE through an optimization of both the flat panel design and the scintillator deposition process are discussed. The results show a substantial improvement in the DQE(f) at all frequencies and demonstrate the potential for DQE(0) to exceed 80%. The combination of high DQE at ultra low exposures and the inherent fast read-out capability makes this technology platform ideal for both current clinical procedures and advanced applications that may use multiple projections (tomosynthesis) or contrast media to enhance digital mammography.

  18. Tests Of Amorphous-Silicon Photovoltaic Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Ronald G., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Progress in identification of strengths and weaknesses of amorphous-silicon technology detailed. Report describes achievements in testing reliability of solar-power modules made of amorphous-silicon photovoltaic cells. Based on investigation of modules made by U.S. manufacturers. Modules subjected to field tests, to accelerated-aging tests in laboratory, and to standard sequence of qualification tests developed for modules of crystalline-silicon cells.

  19. Design and image quality results from volumetric CT with a flat-panel imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, William; Basu, Samit; Edic, Peter M.; Johnson, Mark; Pfoh, Armin H.; Rao, Ramakrishna; Ren, Baorui

    2001-06-01

    Preliminary MTF and LCD results obtained on several volumetric computed tomography (VCT) systems, employing amorphous flat panel technology, are presented. Constructed around 20-cm x 20-cm, 200-mm pitch amorphous silicon x-ray detectors, the prototypes use standard vascular or CT x-ray sources. Data were obtained from closed-gantry, benchtop and C-arm-based topologies, over a full 360 degrees of rotation about the target object. The field of view of the devices is approximately 15 cm, with a magnification of 1.25-1.5, providing isotropic resolution at isocenter of 133-160 mm. Acquisitions have been reconstructed using the FDK algorithm, modified by motion corrections also developed by GE. Image quality data were obtained using both industry standard and custom resolution phantoms as targets. Scanner output is compared on a projection and reconstruction basis against analogous output from a dedicated simulation package, also developed at GE. Measured MTF performance is indicative of a significant advance in isotropic image resolution over commercially available systems. LCD results have been obtained, using industry standard phantoms, spanning a contrast range of 0.3-1%. Both MTF and LCD measurements agree with simulated data.

  20. Ultrasonic scanner for radial and flat panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, R. L.; Hill, E. K. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An ultrasonic scanning mechanism is described that scans panels of honeycomb construction or with welded seams. It incorporates a device which by simple adjustment is adapted to scan either a flat panel or a radial panel. The supporting structure takes the form of a pair of spaced rails. An immersion tank is positioned between the rails and below their level. A work holder is mounted in the tank and is adapted to hold the flat or radial panel. A traveling bridge is movable along the rails and a carriage is mounted on the bridge.

  1. Experimental verification of ion range calculation in a treatment planning system using a flat-panel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telsemeyer, Julia; Ackermann, Benjamin; Ecker, Swantje; Jäkel, Oliver; Martišíková, Mária

    2014-07-01

    Heavy ion-beam therapy is a highly precise radiation therapy exploiting the characteristic interaction of ions with matter. The steep dose gradient of the Bragg curve allows the irradiation of targets with high-dose and a narrow dose penumbra around the target, in contrast to photon irradiation. This, however, makes heavy ion-beam therapy very sensitive to minor changes in the range calculation of the treatment planning system, as it has a direct influence on the outcome of the treatment. Our previous study has shown that ion radiography with an amorphous silicon flat-panel detector allows the measurement of the water equivalent thickness (WET) of an imaging object with good accuracy and high spatial resolution. In this study, the developed imaging technique is used to measure the WET distribution of a patient-like phantom, and these results are compared to the WET calculation of the treatment planning system. To do so, a measured two-dimensional map of the WET of an anthropomorphic phantom was compared to WET distributions based on x-ray computed tomography images as used in the treatment planning system. It was found that the WET maps agree well in the overall shape and two-dimensional distribution of WET values. Quantitatively, the ratio of the two-dimensional WET maps shows a mean of 1.004 with a standard deviation of 0.022. Differences were found to be concentrated at high WET gradients. This could be explained by the Bragg-peak degradation, which is measured in detail by ion radiography with the flat-panel detector, but is not taken into account in the treatment planning system. Excluding pixels exhibiting significant Bragg-peak degradation, the mean value of the ratio was found to be 1.000 with a standard deviation of 0.012. Employment of the amorphous silicon flat-panel detector for WET measurements allows us to detect uncertainties of the WET determination in the treatment planning process. This makes the investigated technique a very helpful tool to study

  2. Electron tunnelling into amorphous germanium and silicon.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, C. W.; Clark, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    Measurements of tunnel conductance versus bias, capacitance versus bias, and internal photoemission were made in the systems aluminum-oxide-amorphous germanium and aluminium-oxide-amorphous silicon. A function was extracted which expresses the deviation of these systems from the aluminium-oxide-aluminium system.

  3. ELECTROLUMINESCENT MATERIAL FOR FLAT PANEL DISPLAY

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.B.

    2000-11-13

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was to develop a new-generation electroluminescent (EL) material for flat panel displays and related applications by using unique and complementary research capabilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and OSRAM Sylvania, Inc. The goal was to produce an EL material with a luminance 10 times greater than conventional EL phosphors. An EL material with this increased luminance would have immediate applications for flat panel display devices (e.g., backlighting for liquid-crystal diodes) and for EL lamp technology. OSRAM Sylvania proposed that increased EL phosphor luminance could be obtained by creating composite EL materials capable of alignment under an applied electric field and capable of concentrating the applied electric field. Oak Ridge National Laboratory used pulsed laser deposition as a method for making these composite EL materials. The materials were evaluated for electroluminescence at laboratory facilities at OSRAM Sylvania, Inc. Many composite structures were thus made and evaluated, and it was observed that a composite structure based on alternating layers of a ferroelectric and a phosphor yielded electroluminescence. An enabling step that was not initially proposed but was conceived during the cooperative effort was found to be crucial to the success of the composite structure. The CRADA period expired before we were able to make quantitative measurements of the luminance and efficiency of the composite EL material. Future cooperative work, outside the scope of the CRADA, will focus on making these measurements and will result in the production of a prototype composite EL device.

  4. Amorphous silicon-tellurium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shufflebotham, P. K.; Card, H. C.; Kao, K. C.; Thanailakis, A.

    1986-09-01

    Amorphous silicon-tellurium alloy thin films were fabricated by coevaporation over the composition range of 0-82 at. % Te. The electronic and optical properties of these films were systematically investigated over this same range of composition. The optical gap of these films was found to decrease monotonically with increasing Te content. Conduction near room temperature was due to extended state conduction, while variable range hopping dominated below 250 K. The incorporation of Te in concentrations of less than 1 at. % was found to produce an increase in the density of localized states at the Fermi level and a decrease in the activation energy. This was attributed to the Te being incorporated as a substitutional, fourfold coordinated, double donor in a-Si. At approximately 60 at. % Te, a decrease in the density of localized states at the Fermi level, and an increase in the activation energy and photoresponse was indicated. This was attributed to the possible formation of a less defective a-Si:Te compound.

  5. Solid-state, flat-panel, digital radiography detectors and their physical imaging characteristics.

    PubMed

    Cowen, A R; Kengyelics, S M; Davies, A G

    2008-05-01

    Solid-state, digital radiography (DR) detectors, designed specifically for standard projection radiography, emerged just before the turn of the millennium. This new generation of digital image detector comprises a thin layer of x-ray absorptive material combined with an electronic active matrix array fabricated in a thin film of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). DR detectors can offer both efficient (low-dose) x-ray image acquisition plus on-line readout of the latent image as electronic data. To date, solid-state, flat-panel, DR detectors have come in two principal designs, the indirect-conversion (x-ray scintillator-based) and the direct-conversion (x-ray photoconductor-based) types. This review describes the underlying principles and enabling technologies exploited by these designs of detector, and evaluates their physical imaging characteristics, comparing performance both against each other and computed radiography (CR). In standard projection radiography indirect conversion DR detectors currently offer superior physical image quality and dose efficiency compared with direct conversion DR and modern point-scan CR. These conclusions have been confirmed in the findings of clinical evaluations of DR detectors. Future trends in solid-state DR detector technologies are also briefly considered. Salient innovations include WiFi-enabled, portable DR detectors, improvements in x-ray absorber layers and developments in alternative electronic media to a-Si:H. PMID:18374710

  6. Atomic-scale disproportionation in amorphous silicon monoxide

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Akihiko; Kohara, Shinji; Asada, Toshihiro; Arao, Masazumi; Yogi, Chihiro; Imai, Hideto; Tan, Yongwen; Fujita, Takeshi; Chen, Mingwei

    2016-01-01

    Solid silicon monoxide is an amorphous material which has been commercialized for many functional applications. However, the amorphous structure of silicon monoxide is a long-standing question because of the uncommon valence state of silicon in the oxide. It has been deduced that amorphous silicon monoxide undergoes an unusual disproportionation by forming silicon- and silicon-dioxide-like regions. Nevertheless, the direct experimental observation is still missing. Here we report the amorphous structure characterized by angstrom-beam electron diffraction, supplemented by synchrotron X-ray scattering and computer simulations. In addition to the theoretically predicted amorphous silicon and silicon-dioxide clusters, suboxide-type tetrahedral coordinates are detected by angstrom-beam electron diffraction at silicon/silicon-dioxide interfaces, which provides compelling experimental evidence on the atomic-scale disproportionation of amorphous silicon monoxide. Eventually we develop a heterostructure model of the disproportionated silicon monoxide which well explains the distinctive structure and properties of the amorphous material. PMID:27172815

  7. Atomic-scale disproportionation in amorphous silicon monoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Akihiko; Kohara, Shinji; Asada, Toshihiro; Arao, Masazumi; Yogi, Chihiro; Imai, Hideto; Tan, Yongwen; Fujita, Takeshi; Chen, Mingwei

    2016-05-01

    Solid silicon monoxide is an amorphous material which has been commercialized for many functional applications. However, the amorphous structure of silicon monoxide is a long-standing question because of the uncommon valence state of silicon in the oxide. It has been deduced that amorphous silicon monoxide undergoes an unusual disproportionation by forming silicon- and silicon-dioxide-like regions. Nevertheless, the direct experimental observation is still missing. Here we report the amorphous structure characterized by angstrom-beam electron diffraction, supplemented by synchrotron X-ray scattering and computer simulations. In addition to the theoretically predicted amorphous silicon and silicon-dioxide clusters, suboxide-type tetrahedral coordinates are detected by angstrom-beam electron diffraction at silicon/silicon-dioxide interfaces, which provides compelling experimental evidence on the atomic-scale disproportionation of amorphous silicon monoxide. Eventually we develop a heterostructure model of the disproportionated silicon monoxide which well explains the distinctive structure and properties of the amorphous material.

  8. Atomic-scale disproportionation in amorphous silicon monoxide.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Akihiko; Kohara, Shinji; Asada, Toshihiro; Arao, Masazumi; Yogi, Chihiro; Imai, Hideto; Tan, Yongwen; Fujita, Takeshi; Chen, Mingwei

    2016-01-01

    Solid silicon monoxide is an amorphous material which has been commercialized for many functional applications. However, the amorphous structure of silicon monoxide is a long-standing question because of the uncommon valence state of silicon in the oxide. It has been deduced that amorphous silicon monoxide undergoes an unusual disproportionation by forming silicon- and silicon-dioxide-like regions. Nevertheless, the direct experimental observation is still missing. Here we report the amorphous structure characterized by angstrom-beam electron diffraction, supplemented by synchrotron X-ray scattering and computer simulations. In addition to the theoretically predicted amorphous silicon and silicon-dioxide clusters, suboxide-type tetrahedral coordinates are detected by angstrom-beam electron diffraction at silicon/silicon-dioxide interfaces, which provides compelling experimental evidence on the atomic-scale disproportionation of amorphous silicon monoxide. Eventually we develop a heterostructure model of the disproportionated silicon monoxide which well explains the distinctive structure and properties of the amorphous material. PMID:27172815

  9. Cooling of hot electrons in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Vanderhaghen, R.; Hulin, D.; Cuzeau, S.; White, J.O.

    1997-07-01

    Measurements of the cooling rate of hot carriers in amorphous silicon are made with a two-pump, one-probe technique. The experiment is simulated with a rate-equation model describing the energy transfer between a population of hot carriers and the lattice. An energy transfer rate proportional to the temperature difference is found to be consistent with the experimental data while an energy transfer independent of the temperature difference is not. This contrasts with the situation in crystalline silicon. The measured cooling rates are sufficient to explain the difficulty in observing avalanche effects in amorphous silicon.

  10. Amorphous silicon detectors in positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Conti, M. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA ); Perez-Mendez, V. )

    1989-12-01

    The physics of the detection process is studied and the performances of different Positron Emission Tomography (PET) system are evaluated by theoretical calculation and/or Monte Carlo Simulation (using the EGS code) in this paper, whose table of contents can be summarized as follows: a brief introduction to amorphous silicon detectors and some useful equation is presented; a Tantalum/Amorphous Silicon PET project is studied and the efficiency of the systems is studied by Monte Carlo Simulation; two similar CsI/Amorphous Silicon PET projects are presented and their efficiency and spatial resolution are studied by Monte Carlo Simulation, light yield and time characteristics of the scintillation light are discussed for different scintillators; some experimental result on light yield measurements are presented; a Xenon/Amorphous Silicon PET is presented, the physical mechanism of scintillation in Xenon is explained, a theoretical estimation of total light yield in Xenon and the resulting efficiency is discussed altogether with some consideration of the time resolution of the system; the amorphous silicon integrated electronics is presented, total noise and time resolution are evaluated in each of our applications; the merit parameters {epsilon}{sup 2}{tau}'s are evaluated and compared with other PET systems and conclusions are drawn; and a complete reference list for Xenon scintillation light physics and its applications is presented altogether with the listing of the developed simulation programs.

  11. Amorphous Silicon Based Neutron Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Liwei

    2004-12-12

    Various large-scale neutron sources already build or to be constructed, are important for materials research and life science research. For all these neutron sources, neutron detectors are very important aspect. However, there is a lack of a high-performance and low-cost neutron beam monitor that provides time and temporal resolution. The objective of this SBIR Phase I research, collaboratively performed by Midwest Optoelectronics, LLC (MWOE), the University of Toledo (UT) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), is to demonstrate the feasibility for amorphous silicon based neutron beam monitors that are pixilated, reliable, durable, fully packaged, and fabricated with high yield using low-cost method. During the Phase I effort, work as been focused in the following areas: 1) Deposition of high quality, low-defect-density, low-stress a-Si films using very high frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (VHF PECVD) at high deposition rate and with low device shunting; 2) Fabrication of Si/SiO2/metal/p/i/n/metal/n/i/p/metal/SiO2/ device for the detection of alpha particles which are daughter particles of neutrons through appropriate nuclear reactions; and 3) Testing of various devices fabricated for alpha and neutron detection; As the main results: · High quality, low-defect-density, low-stress a-Si films have been successfully deposited using VHF PECVD on various low-cost substrates; · Various single-junction and double junction detector devices have been fabricated; · The detector devices fabricated have been systematically tested and analyzed. · Some of the fabricated devices are found to successfully detect alpha particles. Further research is required to bring this Phase I work beyond the feasibility demonstration toward the final prototype devices. The success of this project will lead to a high-performance, low-cost, X-Y pixilated neutron beam monitor that could be used in all of the neutron facilities worldwide. In addition, the technologies

  12. Design and performance characteristics of a digital flat-panel computed tomography system.

    PubMed

    Ross, William; Cody, Dianna D; Hazle, John D

    2006-06-01

    Computed tomography (CT) applications continue to expand, and they require faster data acquisition speeds and improved spatial resolution. Achieving isotropic resolution, by means of cubic voxels, in combination with longitudinal coverage beyond 20 mm would represent a substantial advance in clinical CT because few commercially available scanners are capable of this at present. To achieve this goal, a prototype CT system incorporating a movable array of 20 cm X 20 cm, 200-microm-pitch amorphous silicon flat-panel x-ray detectors and a conventional CT x-ray source was constructed at the General Electric Global Research Center and performance tested at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. The device was designed for preclinical imaging applications and has a scan field of 13 to 33 cm, with a magnification of 1.5. Image quality performance measurements, such as spatial and contrast resolutions, were obtained using both industry standard and custom phantoms. Spatial resolution, quantified by the system's modulation transfer function, indicated improvement by a factor of 2.5 to 5 in isotropic spatial resolution over current commercially available systems, with 10% modulation transfer function modulations at frequencies from 19 to 31 lp/cm. Low-contrast detectability results were obtained from industry-standard phantoms and were comprised of embedded contrast regions of 0.3%, 0.5%, and 1.0% over areas of several mm2. Performance was sufficient to easily distinguish 1.0% contrast regions down to 2 mm in diameter relative to the background. On the basis of scans of specialized hydroxyapatite phantoms, the system response is extremely linear (R2=0.990) in bone-equivalent density regimens. Standard CT dose index CTDI100 and CTDIw measurements were also conducted to assess dose delivery using a 16-cm-CTDI phantom and a 120 kV 120 mAs scan technique. The CTDIw ranged from 30 mGy (one-panel mode) to 113 mGy (two-panel mode) for this system. Lastly, several in

  13. Design and performance characteristics of a digital flat-panel computed tomography system

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, William; Cody, Dianna D.; Hazle, John D.

    2006-06-15

    Computed tomography (CT) applications continue to expand, and they require faster data acquisition speeds and improved spatial resolution. Achieving isotropic resolution, by means of cubic voxels, in combination with longitudinal coverage beyond 20 mm would represent a substantial advance in clinical CT because few commercially available scanners are capable of this at present. To achieve this goal, a prototype CT system incorporating a movable array of 20 cmx20 cm, 200-{mu}m-pitch amorphous silicon flat-panel x-ray detectors and a conventional CT x-ray source was constructed at the General Electric Global Research Center and performance tested at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. The device was designed for preclinical imaging applications and has a scan field of 13 to 33 cm, with a magnification of 1.5. Image quality performance measurements, such as spatial and contrast resolutions, were obtained using both industry standard and custom phantoms. Spatial resolution, quantified by the system's modulation transfer function, indicated improvement by a factor of 2.5 to 5 in isotropic spatial resolution over current commercially available systems, with 10% modulation transfer function modulations at frequencies from 19 to 31 lp/cm. Low-contrast detectability results were obtained from industry-standard phantoms and were comprised of embedded contrast regions of 0.3%, 0.5%, and 1.0% over areas of several mm{sup 2}. Performance was sufficient to easily distinguish 1.0% contrast regions down to 2 mm in diameter relative to the background. On the basis of scans of specialized hydroxyapatite phantoms, the system response is extremely linear (R{sup 2}=0.990) in bone-equivalent density regimens. Standard CT dose index CTDI{sub 100} and CTDI{sub W} measurements were also conducted to assess dose delivery using a 16-cm-CTDI phantom and a 120 kV 120 mAs scan technique. The CTDI{sub W} ranged from 30 mGy (one-panel mode) to 113 mGy (two-panel mode) for this

  14. Transverse and longitudinal vibrations in amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltukov, Y. M.; Fusco, C.; Tanguy, A.; Parshin, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    We show that harmonic vibrations in amorphous silicon can be decomposed to transverse and longitudinal components in all frequency range even in the absence of the well defined wave vector q. For this purpose we define the transverse component of the eigenvector with given ω as a component, which does not change the volumes of Voronoi cells around atoms. The longitudinal component is the remaining orthogonal component. We have found the longitudinal and transverse components of the vibrational density of states for numerical model of amorphous silicon. The vibrations are mostly transverse below 7 THz and above 15 THz. In the frequency interval in between the vibrations have a longitudinal nature. Just this sudden transformation of vibrations at 7 THz from almost transverse to almost longitudinal ones explains the prominent peak in the diffusivity of the amorphous silicon just above 7 THz.

  15. Neutron irradiation induced amorphization of silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, L.L.; Hay, J.C.

    1998-09-01

    This paper provides the first known observation of silicon carbide fully amorphized under neutron irradiation. Both high purity single crystal hcp and high purity, highly faulted (cubic) chemically vapor deposited (CVD) SiC were irradiated at approximately 60 C to a total fast neutron fluence of 2.6 {times} 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2}. Amorphization was seen in both materials, as evidenced by TEM, electron diffraction, and x-ray diffraction techniques. Physical properties for the amorphized single crystal material are reported including large changes in density ({minus}10.8%), elastic modulus as measured using a nanoindentation technique ({minus}45%), hardness as measured by nanoindentation ({minus}45%), and standard Vickers hardness ({minus}24%). Similar property changes are observed for the critical temperature for amorphization at this neutron dose and flux, above which amorphization is not possible, is estimated to be greater than 130 C.

  16. Structural relaxation of amorphous silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Ishimaru, Manabu; Bae, In-Tae; Hirotsu, Yoshihiko; Matsumura, Syo; Sickafus, Kurt E

    2002-07-29

    We have examined amorphous structures of silicon carbide (SiC) using both transmission electron microscopy and a molecular-dynamics approach. Radial distribution functions revealed that amorphous SiC contains not only heteronuclear (Si-C) bonds but also homonuclear (Si-Si and C-C) bonds. The ratio of heteronuclear to homonuclear bonds was found to change upon annealing, suggesting that structural relaxation of the amorphous SiC occurred. Good agreement was obtained between the simulated and experimentally measured radial distribution functions. PMID:12144449

  17. Inverted amorphous silicon solar cell utilizing cermet layers

    DOEpatents

    Hanak, Joseph J.

    1979-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell incorporating a transparent high work function metal cermet incident to solar radiation and a thick film cermet contacting the amorphous silicon opposite to said incident surface.

  18. Amorphous metallic films in silicon metallization systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolet, M. A.; Kattelus, H.; So, F.

    1984-01-01

    The general objective was to determine the potential of amorphous metallic thin films as a means of improving the stability of metallic contacts to a silicon substrate. The specific objective pursued was to determine the role of nitrogen in the formation and the resulting properties of amorphous thin-film diffusion barriers. Amorphous metallic films are attractive as diffusion barriers because of the low atomic diffusivity in these materials. Previous investigations revealed that in meeting this condition alone, good diffusion barriers are not necessarily obtained, because amorphous films can react with an adjacent medium (e.g., Si, Al) before they recrystallize. In the case of a silicon single-crystalline substrate, correlation exists between the temperature at which an amorphous metallic binary thin film reacts and the temperatures at which the films made of the same two metallic elements react individually. Amorphous binary films made of Zr and W were investigated. Both react with Si individually only at elevated temperatures. It was confirmed that such films react with Si only above 700 C when annealed in vacuum for 30 min. Amorphous W-N films were also investigated. They are more stable as barriers between Al and Si than polycrystalline W. Nitrogen effectively prevents the W-Al reaction that sets in at 500 C with polycrystalline W.

  19. New Amorphous Silicon Alloy Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapur, Mridula N.

    1990-01-01

    The properties of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) have been modified by alloying with Al, Ga and S respectively. The Al and Ga alloys are in effect quaternary alloys as they were fabricated in a carbon-rich discharge. The alloys were prepared by the plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (PACVD) method. This method has several advantages, the major one being the relatively low defect densities of the resulting materials. The PACVD system used to grow the alloy films was designed and constructed in the laboratory. It was first tested with known (a-Si:H and a-Si:As:H) materials. Thus, it was established that device quality alloy films could be grown with the home-made PACVD setup. The chemical composition of the alloys was characterized by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The homogeneous nature of hydrogen distribution in the alloys was established by SIMS depth profile analysis. A quantitative analysis of the bulk elemental content was carried out by EPMA. The analysis indicated that the alloying element was incorporated in the films more efficiently at low input gas concentrations than at the higher concentrations. A topological model was proposed to explain the observed behavior. The optical energy gap of the alloys could be varied in the 0.90 to 1.92 eV range. The Al and Ga alloys were low band gap materials, whereas alloying with S had the effect of widening the energy gap. It was observed that although the Si-Al and Si-Ga alloys contained significant amounts of C and H, the magnitude of the energy gap was determined by the metallic component. The various trends in optical properties could be related to the binding characteristics of the respective alloy systems. A quantitative explanation of the results was provided by White's tight binding model. The dark conductivity-temperature dependence of the alloys was examined. A linear dependence was observed for the Al and Ga systems. Electronic conduction in

  20. [Flat Panel Detector Philips introduced and its system direction].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shinichi

    2002-01-01

    We introduced digital X-ray diagnostic systems with Flat panel detector both in general X-ray systems and in Angiography systems. Our introduced Flat Panel Detector has the latest technology and has Cesium Iodide (CsI) that absorbs X-ray energy and generates visible light. Detected light signals make digital X-ray images. CsI is the most important material because its absorption rate of X-ray influences the strength of output digital signal. The purpose in this paper is checking that is latest Flat Panel Detector pulls out enough capability CsI has. Especially the thickness of CsI relates to X-ray absorption. X-ray absorption rate depended on the thickness of CsI was calculated by using simulated X-ray model and the future direction of Flat Panel Detector system was discussed. PMID:12766268

  1. Metal electrode for amorphous silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Richard

    1983-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell having an N-type region wherein the contact to the N-type region is composed of a material having a work function of about 3.7 electron volts or less. Suitable materials include strontium, barium and magnesium and rare earth metals such as gadolinium and yttrium.

  2. Fabricating amorphous silicon solar cells by varying the temperature _of the substrate during deposition of the amorphous silicon layer

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.

    1982-01-01

    An improved process for fabricating amorphous silicon solar cells in which the temperature of the substrate is varied during the deposition of the amorphous silicon layer is described. Solar cells manufactured in accordance with this process are shown to have increased efficiencies and fill factors when compared to solar cells manufactured with a constant substrate temperature during deposition of the amorphous silicon layer.

  3. Amorphization of Silicon Carbide by Carbon Displacement

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ram; Gao, Fei; Weber, William J.

    2004-05-10

    We have used molecular dynamics simulations to examine the possibility of amorphizing silicon carbide (SiC) by exclusively displacing C atoms. At a defect generation corresponding to 0.2 displacements per atom, the enthalpy surpasses the level of melt-quenched SiC, the density decreases by about 15%, and the radial distribution function shows a lack of long-range order. Prior to amorphization, the surviving defects are mainly C Frenkel pairs (67%), but Si Frenkel pairs (18%) and anti-site defects (15%) are also present. The results indicate that SiC can be amorphized by C sublattice displacements. Chemical short-range disorder, arising mainly from interstitial production, plays a significant role in the amorphization.

  4. Crystalline to amorphous transformation in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Cheruvu, S.M.

    1982-09-01

    In the present investigation, an attempt was made to understand the fundamental mechanism of crystalline-to-amorphous transformation in arsenic implanted silicon using high resolution electron microscopy. A comparison of the gradual disappearance of simulated lattice fringes with increasing Frenkel pair concentration with the experimental observation of sharp interfaces between crystalline and amorphous regions was carried out leading to the conclusion that when the defect concentration reaches a critical value, the crystal does relax to an amorphous state. Optical diffraction experiments using atomic models also supported this hypothesis. Both crystalline and amorphous zones were found to co-exist with sharp interfaces at the atomic level. Growth of the amorphous fraction depends on the temperature, dose rate and the mass of the implanted ion. Preliminary results of high energy electron irradiation experiments at 1.2 MeV also suggested that clustering of point defects occurs near room temperature. An observation in a high resolution image of a small amorphous zone centered at the core of a dislocation is presented as evidence that the nucleation of an amorphous phase is heterogeneous in nature involving clustering or segregation of point defects near existing defects.

  5. Thermal and Cold Neutron Computed Tomography at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center Using an Amorphous Silicon Detector Array

    SciTech Connect

    Claytor, T.N.; Schwab, M.J.; Farnum, E.H.; McDonald, T.E.; Summa, D.A.; Sheats, M.J.; Stupin, D.M.; Sievers, W.L.

    1998-07-19

    The use of the EG and G-Heimann RTM 128 or dpiX FS20 amorphous silicon (a-Si) detector array for thermal neutron radiography/computed tomography has proven to be a quick and efficient means of producing high quality digital radiographic images. The resolution, although not as good as film, is about 750 pm with the RTM and 127 pm with the dpiX array with a dynamic range in excess of 2,800. In many respects using an amorphous silicon detector is an improvement over other techniques such as imaging with a CCD camera, using a storage phosphor plate or film radiography. Unlike a CCD camera, which is highly susceptible to radiation damage, a-Si detectors can be placed in the beam directly behind the object under examination and do not require any special optics or turning mirrors. The amorphous silicon detector also allows enough data to be acquired to construct a digital image in just a few seconds (minimum gate time 40 ms) whereas film or storage plate exposures can take many minutes and then need to be digitized with a scanner. The flat panel can therefore acquire a complete 3D computed tomography data set in just a few tens of minutes. While a-Si detectors have been proposed for use in imaging neutron beams, this is the first reported implementation of such a detector for neutron imaging.

  6. Ion bombardment and disorder in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Sidhu, L.S.; Gaspari, F.; Zukotynski, S.

    1997-07-01

    The effect of ion bombardment during growth on the structural and optical properties of amorphous silicon are presented. Two series of films were deposited under electrically grounded and positively biased substrate conditions. The biased samples displayed lower growth rates and increased hydrogen content relative to grounded counterparts. The film structure was examined using Raman spectroscopy. The transverse optic like phonon band position was used as a parameter to characterize network order. Biased samples displayed an increased order of the amorphous network relative to grounded samples. Furthermore, biased samples exhibited a larger optical gap. These results are correlated and attributed to reduced ion bombardment effects.

  7. Investigations on silicon/amorphous-carbon and silicon/nanocrystalline palladium/ amorphous-carbon interfaces.

    PubMed

    Roy, M; Sengupta, P; Tyagi, A K; Kale, G B

    2008-08-01

    Our previous work revealed that significant enhancement in sp3-carbon content of amorphous carbon films could be achieved when grown on nanocrystalline palladium interlayer as compared to those grown on bare silicon substrates. To find out why, the nature of interface formed in both the cases has been investigated using Electron Probe Micro Analysis (EPMA) technique. It has been found that a reactive interface in the form of silicon carbide and/silicon oxy-carbide is formed at the interface of silicon/amorphous-carbon films, while palladium remains primarily in its native form at the interface of nanocrystalline palladium/amorphous-carbon films. However, there can be traces of dissolved oxygen within the metallic layer as well. The study has been corroborated further from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies. PMID:19049221

  8. Three-dimensional IMRT verification with a flat-panel EPID.

    PubMed

    Steciw, S; Warkentin, B; Rathee, S; Fallone, B G

    2005-02-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) pretreatment verification procedure has been developed based on the measurement of two-dimensional (2D) primary fluence profiles using an amorphous silicon flat-panel electronic portal imaging device (EPID). As described in our previous work, fluence profiles are extracted from EPID images by deconvolution with kernels that represent signal spread in the EPID due to radiation and optical scattering. The deconvolution kernels are derived using Monte Carlo simulations of dose deposition in the EPID and empirical fitting methods, for both 6 and 15 MV photon energies. In our new 3D verification technique, 2D fluence modulation profiles for each IMRT field in a treatment are used as input to a treatment planning system (TPS), which then generates 3D doses. Verification is accomplished by comparing this new EPID-based 3D dose distribution to the planned dose distribution calculated by the TPS. Thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) point dose measurements for an IMRT treatment of an anthropomorphic phantom were in good agreement with the EPID-based 3D doses; in contrast, the planned dose under-predicts the TLD measurement in a high-gradient region by approximately 16%. Similarly, large discrepancies between EPID-based and TPS doses were also evident in dose profiles of small fields incident on a water phantom. These results suggest that our 3D EPID-based method is effective in quantifying relevant uncertainties in the dose calculations of our TPS for IMRT treatments. For three clinical head and neck cancer IMRT treatment plans, our TPS was found to underestimate the mean EPID-based doses in the critical structures of the spinal cord and the parotids by approximately 4 Gy (11%-14%). According to radiobiological modeling calculations that were performed, such underestimates can potentially lead to clinically significant underpredictions of normal tissue complication rates. PMID:15789607

  9. Image quality assessment of a pre-clinical flat-panel volumetric micro-CT scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Louise Y.; Lee, Ting-Yim; Holdsworth, David W.

    2006-03-01

    Small animal imaging has recently become an area of increased interest because more human diseases can be modeled in transgenic and knockout rodents. Current micro-CT systems are capable of achieving spatial resolution on the order of 10 μm, giving highly detailed anatomical information. However, the speed of data acquisition of these systems is relatively slow, when compared with clinical CT systems. Dynamic CT perfusion imaging has proven to be a powerful tool clinically in detecting and diagnosing cancer, stroke, pulmonary and ischemic heart diseases. In order to perform this technique in mice and rats, quantitative CT images must be acquired at a rate of at least 1 Hz. Recently, a research pre-clinical CT scanner (eXplore Ultra, GE Healthcare) has been designed specifically for dynamic perfusion imaging in small animals. Using an amorphous silicon flat-panel detector and a clinical slip-ring gantry, this system is capable of acquiring volumetric image data at a rate of 1 Hz, with in-plane resolution of 150 μm, while covering the entire thoracic region of a mouse or whole organs of a rat. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the principal imaging performance of the micro-CT system, in terms of spatial resolution, image uniformity, linearity, dose and voxel noise for the feasibility of imaging mice and rats. Our investigations show that 3D images can be obtained with a limiting spatial resolution of 2.7 line pairs per mm and noise of 42 HU, using an acquisition interval of 8 seconds at an entrance dose of 6.4 cGy.

  10. The use of modern electronic flat panel devices for image guided radiation therapy:. Image quality comparison, intra fraction motion monitoring and quality assurance applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nill, S.; Stützel, J.; Häring, P.; Oelfke, U.

    2008-06-01

    With modern radiotherapy delivery techniques like intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) it is possible to delivery a more conformal dose distribution to the tumor while better sparing the organs at risk (OAR) compared to 3D conventional radiation therapy. Due to the theoretically high dose conformity achievable it is very important to know the exact position of the target volume during the treatment. With more and more modern linear accelerators equipped with imaging devices this is now almost possible. These imaging devices are using energies between 120kV and 6MV and therefore different detector systems are used but the vast majority is using amorphous silicon flat panel devices with different scintilator screens and build up materials. The technical details and the image quality of these systems are discussed and first results of the comparison are presented. In addition new methods to deal with motion management and quality assurance procedures are shortly discussed.

  11. Self-Diffusion in Amorphous Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauß, Florian; Dörrer, Lars; Geue, Thomas; Stahn, Jochen; Koutsioubas, Alexandros; Mattauch, Stefan; Schmidt, Harald

    2016-01-01

    The present Letter reports on self-diffusion in amorphous silicon. Experiments were done on 29Si/natSi heterostructures using neutron reflectometry and secondary ion mass spectrometry. The diffusivities follow the Arrhenius law in the temperature range between 550 and 700 °C with an activation energy of (4.4 ±0.3 ) eV . In comparison with single crystalline silicon the diffusivities are tremendously higher by 5 orders of magnitude at about 700 °C , which can be interpreted as the consequence of a high diffusion entropy.

  12. Deuterium in crystalline and amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Borzi, R.; Ma, H.; Fedders, P.A.; Leopold, D.J.; Norberg, R.E.; Boyce, J.B.; Johnson, N.M.; Ready, S.E.; Walker, J.

    1997-07-01

    The authors report deuteron magnetic resonance (DMR) measurements on aged deuterium-implanted single crystal n-type silicon and comparisons with amorphous silicon spectra. The sample film was prepared six years ago by deuteration from a-D{sub 2} plasma and evaluated by a variety of experimental methods. Deuterium has been evolving with time and the present DMR signal shows a smaller deuteron population. A doublet from Si-D configurations along (111) has decreased more than have central molecular DMR components, which include 47 and 12 kHz FWHM gaussians. Transient DMR magnetization recoveries indicate spin lattice relaxation to para-D{sub 2} relaxation centers.

  13. Mechanism for hydrogen diffusion in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, R.; Li, Q.; Pan, B.C.; Yoon, Y.

    1998-01-01

    Tight-binding molecular-dynamics calculations reveal a mechanism for hydrogen diffusion in hydrogenated amorphous silicon. Hydrogen diffuses through the network by successively bonding with nearby silicons and breaking their Si{endash}Si bonds. The diffusing hydrogen carries with it a newly created dangling bond. These intermediate transporting states are densely populated in the network, have lower energies than H at the center of stretched Si{endash}Si bonds, and can play a crucial role in hydrogen diffusion. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  14. Self-Diffusion in Amorphous Silicon.

    PubMed

    Strauß, Florian; Dörrer, Lars; Geue, Thomas; Stahn, Jochen; Koutsioubas, Alexandros; Mattauch, Stefan; Schmidt, Harald

    2016-01-15

    The present Letter reports on self-diffusion in amorphous silicon. Experiments were done on ^{29}Si/^{nat}Si heterostructures using neutron reflectometry and secondary ion mass spectrometry. The diffusivities follow the Arrhenius law in the temperature range between 550 and 700 °C with an activation energy of (4.4±0.3)  eV. In comparison with single crystalline silicon the diffusivities are tremendously higher by 5 orders of magnitude at about 700 °C, which can be interpreted as the consequence of a high diffusion entropy. PMID:26824552

  15. Dynamical models of hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousseau, Normand; Lewis, Laurent J.

    1991-04-01

    The results of our molecular-dynamics simulation of bulk hydrogenated amorphous silicon using empirical potentials are presented. More specifically, we discuss a dynamical procedure for incorporating hydrogen into a pure amorphous silicon matrix, which is derived from the concept of floating bonds put forward by Pantelides [Phys. Rev. Lett. 57, 2979 (1986)]. The structures resulting from this model are compared with those obtained with use of a static approach recently developed by us. This method exhibits considerable improvement over the previous one and, in particular, unambiguously reveals the strain-relieving role of hydrogen. While the former model leads to substantial overcoordination, the present one results in almost perfect tetrahedral bonding, with an average coordination number Z=4.03, the lowest value ever achieved using a Stillinger-Weber potential. The simulations are also used to calculate the vibrational densities of states, which are found to be in good accord with corresponding neutron-scattering measurements.

  16. Amorphous metallic films in silicon metallization systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    So, F.; Kolawa, E.; Nicolet, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    Diffusion barrier research was focussed on lowering the chemical reactivity of amorphous thin films on silicon. An additional area of concern is the reaction with metal overlays such as aluminum, silver, and gold. Gold was included to allow for technology transfer to gallium arsenide PV cells. Amorphous tungsten nitride films have shown much promise. Stability to annealing temperatures of 700, 800, and 550 C were achieved for overlays of silver, gold, and aluminum, respectively. The lower results for aluminum were not surprising because there is an eutectic that can form at a lower temperature. It seems that titanium and zirconium will remove the nitrogen from a tungsten nitride amorphous film and render it unstable. Other variables of research interest were substrate bias and base pressure during sputtering.

  17. High resolution amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Kaplan, S.N.; Perez-Mendez, V.

    1992-05-26

    A radiation detector employing amorphous Si:H cells in an array with each detector cell having at least three contiguous layers (n-type, intrinsic, p-type), positioned between two electrodes to which a bias voltage is applied. An energy conversion layer atop the silicon cells intercepts incident radiation and converts radiation energy to light energy of a wavelength to which the silicon cells are responsive. A read-out device, positioned proximate to each detector element in an array allows each such element to be interrogated independently to determine whether radiation has been detected in that cell. The energy conversion material may be a layer of luminescent material having a columnar structure. In one embodiment a column of luminescent material detects the passage therethrough of radiation to be detected and directs a light beam signal to an adjacent a-Si:H film so that detection may be confined to one or more such cells in the array. One or both electrodes may have a comb structure, and the teeth of each electrode comb may be interdigitated for capacitance reduction. The amorphous Si:H film may be replaced by an amorphous Si:Ge:H film in which up to 40 percent of the amorphous material is Ge. Two dimensional arrays may be used in X-ray imaging, CT scanning, crystallography, high energy physics beam tracking, nuclear medicine cameras and autoradiography. 18 figs.

  18. High resolution amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Kaplan, Selig N.; Perez-Mendez, Victor

    1992-01-01

    A radiation detector employing amorphous Si:H cells in an array with each detector cell having at least three contiguous layers (n type, intrinsic, p type), positioned between two electrodes to which a bias voltage is applied. An energy conversion layer atop the silicon cells intercepts incident radiation and converts radiation energy to light energy of a wavelength to which the silicon cells are responsive. A read-out device, positioned proximate to each detector element in an array allows each such element to be interrogated independently to determine whether radiation has been detected in that cell. The energy conversion material may be a layer of luminescent material having a columnar structure. In one embodiment a column of luminescent material detects the passage therethrough of radiation to be detected and directs a light beam signal to an adjacent a-Si:H film so that detection may be confined to one or more such cells in the array. One or both electrodes may have a comb structure, and the teeth of each electrode comb may be interdigitated for capacitance reduction. The amorphous Si:H film may be replaced by an amorphous Si:Ge:H film in which up to 40 percent of the amorphous material is Ge. Two dimensional arrays may be used in X-ray imaging, CT scanning, crystallography, high energy physics beam tracking, nuclear medicine cameras and autoradiography.

  19. Amorphous silicon/polycrystalline thin film solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ullal, H.S.

    1991-03-13

    An improved photovoltaic solar cell is described including a p-type amorphous silicon layer, intrinsic amorphous silicon, and an n-type polycrystalline semiconductor such as cadmium sulfide, cadmium zinc sulfide, zinc selenide, gallium phosphide, and gallium nitride. The polycrystalline semiconductor has an energy bandgap greater than that of the amorphous silicon. The solar cell can be provided as a single-junction device or a multijunction device.

  20. Amorphous molybdenum silicon superconducting thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Bosworth, D. Sahonta, S.-L.; Barber, Z. H.; Hadfield, R. H.

    2015-08-15

    Amorphous superconductors have become attractive candidate materials for superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors due to their ease of growth, homogeneity and competitive superconducting properties. To date the majority of devices have been fabricated using W{sub x}Si{sub 1−x}, though other amorphous superconductors such as molybdenum silicide (Mo{sub x}Si{sub 1−x}) offer increased transition temperature. This study focuses on the properties of MoSi thin films grown by magnetron sputtering. We examine how the composition and growth conditions affect film properties. For 100 nm film thickness, we report that the superconducting transition temperature (Tc) reaches a maximum of 7.6 K at a composition of Mo{sub 83}Si{sub 17}. The transition temperature and amorphous character can be improved by cooling of the substrate during growth which inhibits formation of a crystalline phase. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy studies confirm the absence of long range order. We observe that for a range of 6 common substrates (silicon, thermally oxidized silicon, R- and C-plane sapphire, x-plane lithium niobate and quartz), there is no variation in superconducting transition temperature, making MoSi an excellent candidate material for SNSPDs.

  1. Three dimensional amorphous silicon/microcrystalline silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Kaschmitter, James L.

    1996-01-01

    Three dimensional deep contact amorphous silicon/microcrystalline silicon (a-Si/.mu.c-Si) solar cells which use deep (high aspect ratio) p and n contacts to create high electric fields within the carrier collection volume material of the cell. The deep contacts are fabricated using repetitive pulsed laser doping so as to create the high aspect p and n contacts. By the provision of the deep contacts which penetrate the electric field deep into the material where the high strength of the field can collect many of the carriers, thereby resulting in a high efficiency solar cell.

  2. Three dimensional amorphous silicon/microcrystalline silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1996-07-23

    Three dimensional deep contact amorphous silicon/microcrystalline silicon (a-Si/{micro}c-Si) solar cells are disclosed which use deep (high aspect ratio) p and n contacts to create high electric fields within the carrier collection volume material of the cell. The deep contacts are fabricated using repetitive pulsed laser doping so as to create the high aspect p and n contacts. By the provision of the deep contacts which penetrate the electric field deep into the material where the high strength of the field can collect many of the carriers, thereby resulting in a high efficiency solar cell. 4 figs.

  3. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon-germanium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Luft, W.

    1988-02-01

    This report describes the effects of the germanium fraction in hydrogenated amorphous silicon-germanium alloys on various parameters, especially those that are indicators of film quality, and the impact of deposition methods, feedgas mixtures, and other deposition parameters on a SiGe:H and a-SiGe:H:F film characteristics and quality. Literature data show the relationship between germanium content, hydrogen content, deposition method (various glow discharges and CVD), feedgas lmixture, and other parameters and properties, such as optical band gap, dark and photoconductivities, photosensitivity, activation energy, Urbach parameter, and spin density. Some of these are convenient quality indicators; another is the absence of microstructure. Examining RF glow discharge with both a diode and triode geometry, DC proximity glow discharge, microwave glow discharge, and photo-CVD, using gas mixtures such as hydrogen-diluted and undiluted mixtures of silane/germane, disilane/germane, silane/germaniumtetrafluoride, and others, it was observed that hydrogen dilution (or inert gas dilution) is essential in achieving high photosensitivity in silicon-germanium alloys (in contradistinction to amorphous hydrogenated silicon). Hydrogen dilution results in a higher photosensitivity than do undiluted gas mixtures. 81 refs., 42 figs., 7 tabs.

  4. Performance of a novel 43-cm x 43-cm flat-panel detector with CsI:Tl scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Tatsuya; Tamura, Tomoyuki; Nokita, Makoto; Okada, Satoshi; Hayashida, Shinsuke; Ogawa, Yoshihiro

    2004-05-01

    We have developed a novel flat-panel detector with CsI:Tl scintillator. The detector consists of a single piece 43cm x 43cm amorphous silicon thin-film transistor (TFT) array with MIS (metal-insulator-semiconductor) photoelectric converter having a pixel pitch of 160μm coated with a needle-like crystal CsI:Tl scintillator. Signal chain was totally revised from current detector utilizing an innovative sensor technology. The novel detector and current detector were equipped to a digital radiography system allowing a quantitative and comparative study. Results show that the novel detector has a linear response covering the radiographic exposure range. It has a moderate modulation transfer function (MTF) sufficient to the radiography tasks and effective to suppress the aliasing. The detective quantum efficiency (DQE) was almost twice than the current detector. The result of contrast-detail phantom exposed with a 1/2x dose level is equivalent to that of current detector with a 1x dose level. These results show that performance of novel detector is superior to and expected to reduce the patient dose in half than current detector due to higher DQE and innovative sensor technology.

  5. Development of CT and 3D-CT Using Flat Panel Detector Based Real-Time Digital Radiography System

    SciTech Connect

    Ravindran, V. R.; Sreelakshmi, C.; Vibin

    2008-09-26

    The application of Digital Radiography in the Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) of space vehicle components is a recent development in India. A Real-time DR system based on amorphous silicon Flat Panel Detector has been developed for the NDE of solid rocket motors at Rocket Propellant Plant of VSSC in a few years back. The technique has been successfully established for the nondestructive evaluation of solid rocket motors. The DR images recorded for a few solid rocket specimens are presented in the paper. The Real-time DR system is capable of generating sufficient digital X-ray image data with object rotation for the CT image reconstruction. In this paper the indigenous development of CT imaging based on the Realtime DR system for solid rocket motor is presented. Studies are also carried out to generate 3D-CT image from a set of adjacent CT images of the rocket motor. The capability of revealing the spatial location and characterisation of defect is demonstrated by the CT and 3D-CT images generated.

  6. Flat panel display development activities at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    DiBello, E.G.; Worobey, W.; Burchett, S.; Hareland, W.; Felter, T.; Mays, B.

    1994-12-31

    The flat panel display development activities underway at Sandia National Laboratories are described. Research is being conducted in the areas of glass substrates, phosphors, large area processes, and electron emissions. Projects are focused on improving process yield, developing large area processes, and using modeling techniques to predict design performance.

  7. Radiation resistance studies of amorphous silicon films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodyard, James R.; Payson, J. Scott

    1989-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films were irradiated with 2.00 MeV helium ions using fluences ranging from 1E11 to 1E15 cm(-2). The films were characterized using photothermal deflection spectroscopy and photoconductivity measurements. The investigations show that the radiation introduces sub-band-gap states 1.35 eV below the conduction band and the states increase supralinearly with fluence. Photoconductivity measurements suggest the density of states above the Fermi energy is not changing drastically with fluence.

  8. Structural relaxation of vacancies in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, E.; Lee, Y.H.; Chen, C.; Pang, T.

    1997-07-01

    The authors have studied the structural relaxation of vacancies in amorphous silicon (a-Si) using a tight-binding molecular-dynamics method. The most significant difference between vacancies in a-Si and those in crystalline silicon (c-Si) is that the deep gap states do not show up in a-Si. This difference is explained through the unusual behavior of the structural relaxation near the vacancies in a-Si, which enhances the sp{sup 2} + p bonding near the band edges. They have also observed that the vacancies do not migrate below 450 K although some of them can still be annihilated, particularly at high defect density due to large structural relaxation.

  9. Active pixel and photon counting imagers based on poly-Si TFTs: rewriting the rule book on large area flat panel x-ray devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonuk, Larry E.; Koniczek, Martin; El-Mohri, Youcef; Zhao, Qihua

    2009-02-01

    The near-ubiquity of large area, active matrix, flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs) in medical x-ray imaging applications is a testament to the usefulness and adaptability of the relatively simple concept of array pixels based on a single amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) TFT coupled to a pixel storage capacitor. Interestingly, the fundamental advantages of a-Si:H thin film electronics (including compatibility with very large area processing, high radiation damage resistance, and continued development driven by interest in mainstream consumer products) are shared by the rapidly advancing technology of polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) TFTs. Moreover, the far higher mobilities of poly-Si TFTs, compared to those of a- Si:H, facilitate the creation of faster and more complex circuits than are possible with a-Si:H TFTs, leading to the possibility of new classes of large area, flat panel imagers. Given recent progress in the development of initial poly-Si imager prototypes, the creation of increasingly sophisticated active pixel arrays offering pixel-level amplification, variable gain, very high frame rates, and excellent signal-to-noise performance under all fluoroscopic and radiographic conditions (including very low exposures and high spatial frequencies), appears within reach. In addition, it is conceivable that the properties of poly-Si TFTs could allow the development of large area imagers providing single xray photon counting capabilities. In this article, the factors driving the possible realization of clinically practical active pixel and photon counting imagers based on poly-Si TFTs are described and simple calculational estimates related to photon counting imagers are presented. Finally, the prospect for future development of such imagers is discussed.

  10. Superlattice doped layers for amorphous silicon photovoltaic cells

    DOEpatents

    Arya, Rajeewa R.

    1988-01-12

    Superlattice doped layers for amorphous silicon photovoltaic cells comprise a plurality of first and second lattices of amorphous silicon alternatingly formed on one another. Each of the first lattices has a first optical bandgap and each of the second lattices has a second optical bandgap different from the first optical bandgap. A method of fabricating the superlattice doped layers also is disclosed.

  11. Endurance Tests Of Amorphous-Silicon Photovoltaic Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Ronald G., Jr.; Sugimura, Russell S.

    1989-01-01

    Failure mechanisms in high-power service studied. Report discusses factors affecting endurance of amorphous-silicon solar cells. Based on field tests and accelerated aging of photovoltaic modules. Concludes that aggressive research needed if amorphous-silicon modules to attain 10-year life - value U.S. Department of Energy established as goal for photovoltaic modules in commercial energy-generating plants.

  12. Method for improving the stability of amorphous silicon

    DOEpatents

    Branz, Howard M.

    2004-03-30

    A method of producing a metastable degradation resistant amorphous hydrogenated silicon film is provided, which comprises the steps of growing a hydrogenated amorphous silicon film, the film having an exposed surface, illuminating the surface using an essentially blue or ultraviolet light to form high densities of a light induced defect near the surface, and etching the surface to remove the defect.

  13. An infrared and luminescence study of tritiated amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Sidhu, L.S.; Kosteski, T.; Kherani, N.P.; Gaspari, F.; Zukotynski, S.; Shmayda, W.

    1997-07-01

    Tritium has been incorporated into amorphous silicon. Infrared spectroscopy shows new infrared vibration modes due to silicon-tritium (Si-T) bonds in the amorphous silicon network. Si-T vibration frequencies are related to Si-H vibration frequencies by simple mass relationships. Inelastic collisions of {beta} particles, produced as a result of tritium decay, with the amorphous silicon network results in the generation of electron-hole pairs. Radiative recombination of these carriers is observed. Dangling bonds associated with the tritium decay reduce luminescence efficiency.

  14. Amorphous silicon carbide films prepared using vaporized silicon ink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Takashi; Shen, Zhongrong; Takagishi, Hideyuki; Ohdaira, Keisuke; Shimoda, Tatsuya

    2014-03-01

    The deposition of wide-band-gap silicon films using nonvacuum processes rather than conventional vacuum processes is of substantial interest because it may reduce cost. Herein, we present the optical and electrical properties of p-type hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H) films prepared using a nonvacuum process in a simple chamber with a vaporized silicon ink consisting of cyclopentasilane, cyclohexene, and decaborane. The incorporation of carbon into the silicon network induced by the addition of cyclohexene to the silicon ink resulted in an increase in the optical band gap (Eg) of films from 1.56 to 2.11 eV. The conductivity of films with Eg < 1.9 eV is comparable to that of conventional a-SiC:H films prepared using a vacuum process, while the films with Eg > 1.9 eV show lower conductivity than expected because of the incorporation of excess carbon without the formation of Si-C bonds.

  15. Amorphous silicon bolometer for fire/rescue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francisco, Glenn L.

    2001-03-01

    Thermal imaging sensors have completely changed the way the world views fire and rescue applications. Recently, in the uncooled infrared camera and microbolometer detector areas, major strides have been made in manufacturing personal fire and rescue sensors. A family of new amorphous silicon microbolometers are being produced utilizing low cost, low weight, ultra low power, small size, high volume vacuum packaged silicon wafer-level focal plane array technologies. These bolometers contain no choppers or thermoelectric coolers, require no manual calibration and use readily available commercial off-the-shelf components. Manufacturing and packaging discoveries have allowed infrared sensitive silicon arrays to be produced with the same methods that have driven the rapidly advancing digital wireless telecommunications industries. Fire and rescue professionals are now able to conduct minimum time thermal imaging penetration, surveillance, detection, recognition, rescue and egress while maintaining situational awareness in a manner consistent with the modern technological applications. The purpose of this paper is to describe an uncooled micro bolometer infrared camera approach for meeting fire/rescue wants, needs and requirements, with application of recent technology advancements. This paper also details advances in bolometric focal plane arrays, optical and circuit card technologies, while providing a glimpse into the future of micro sensor growth. Technical barriers are addressed in light of constraints and lessons learned around this technology.

  16. Flat panel planar optic display. Revision 4/95

    SciTech Connect

    Veligdan, J.T.

    1995-05-01

    A prototype 10 inch flat panel Planar Optic display, (POD), screen has been constructed and tested. This display screen is comprised of hundreds of planar optic glass sheets bonded together with a cladding layer between each sheet where each glass sheet represents a vertical line of resolution. The display is 9 inches wide by 5 inches high and approximately 1 inch thick. A 3 milliwatt HeNe laser is used as the illumination source and a vector scanning technique is employed.

  17. Diffractive flat panel solar concentrators of a novel design.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Ties M; de Boer, Dick K G; Bastiaansen, Cees W M

    2016-07-11

    A novel design for a flat panel solar concentrator is presented which is based on a light guide with a grating applied on top that diffracts light into total internal reflection. By combining geometrical and diffractive optics the geometrical concentration ratio is optimized according to the principles of nonimaging optics, while the thickness of the device is minimized due to the use of total internal reflection. PMID:27410900

  18. Theoretical studies of amorphous silicon and hydrogenated amorphous silicon with molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, I.

    1991-12-20

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si) and hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) have been studied with molecular dynamics simulations. The structural, vibrational, and electronic properties of these materials have been studied with computer-generated structural models and compare well with experimental observations. The stability of a-si and a-Si:H have been studied with the aim of understanding microscopic mechanisms underlying light-induced degradation in a-Si:H (the Staebler-Wronski effect). With a view to understanding thin film growth processes, a-Si films have been generated with molecular dynamics simulations by simulating the deposition of Si-clusters on a Si(111) substrate. A new two- and three-body interatomic potential for Si-H interactions has been developed. The structural properties of a-Si:H networks are in good agreement with experimental measurements. The presence of H atoms reduces strain and disorder relative to networks without H.

  19. [Flat-panel detector technology -State-of-the-art and future prospects-].

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Tatsuya

    2002-01-01

    A flat-panel detector (FPD) is a long-awaited technology to implement the digital X-ray imaging technology into the radiological department. This paper describes the state-of-the-art technology and future prospects on the FPD technology. State-of-the-art technology was reviewed taking the CXDI series as an example. Several FPD-based systems have been introduced into the Japanese market since CXDI-11 opened it in November 1998. Accompanying CXDI-C2 for control, CXDI-22 for table position and CXDI-31 for portable, the CXDI series fulfills the requirement of the radiography room being a fully digitalized room. The FPD on the CXDI series is comprised of a scintillator (Gd(2)O(2)S:Tb(3+)) as a primary sensor in which the X-ray is captured and an amorphous silicon detector (LANMIT) as a secondary sensor in which the fluorescent light is detected. Since the scintillator is identical to that of the screen-film systems, it can be said as proven, durable and chemically stable and it is expected to produce the same image quality as the screen-film systems. CXDI-31, a portable FPD-based system, was developed targeting thinner dimensions, lightweight, durability and high spatial resolution. Thoroughly re-designing the mechanical structure and reducing the power consumption at the readout IC realized thinner dimensions. Introducing the portable note PC technologies successfully combined lightweight with durability. Improving the sensor process and re-designing the layout made the sensor high resolution without compromising the signal-to-noise ratio. Future prospects were overviewed in the aspect of technology and applications. Sensitivity, spatial resolution, frame rate and portability were described as the upcoming technology. Increasing gain and reducing noise will realize higher sensitivity, especially by adopting the PbI(2), HgI(2) or such photoconductor materials as the primary sensor. Pixelized amplifier will also achieve higher sensitivity. Layered sensor designed such

  20. Amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers for crystalline-silicon-based heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccard, Mathieu; Holman, Zachary C.

    2015-08-01

    Amorphous silicon enables the fabrication of very high-efficiency crystalline-silicon-based solar cells due to its combination of excellent passivation of the crystalline silicon surface and permeability to electrical charges. Yet, amongst other limitations, the passivation it provides degrades upon high-temperature processes, limiting possible post-deposition fabrication possibilities (e.g., forcing the use of low-temperature silver pastes). We investigate the potential use of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers to sidestep this issue. The passivation obtained using device-relevant stacks of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide with various carbon contents and doped amorphous silicon are evaluated, and their stability upon annealing assessed, amorphous silicon carbide being shown to surpass amorphous silicon for temperatures above 300 °C. We demonstrate open-circuit voltage values over 700 mV for complete cells, and an improved temperature stability for the open-circuit voltage. Transport of electrons and holes across the hetero-interface is studied with complete cells having amorphous silicon carbide either on the hole-extracting side or on the electron-extracting side, and a better transport of holes than of electrons is shown. Also, due to slightly improved transparency, complete solar cells using an amorphous silicon carbide passivation layer on the hole-collecting side are demonstrated to show slightly better performances even prior to annealing than obtained with a standard amorphous silicon layer.

  1. Amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers for crystalline-silicon-based heterojunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Boccard, Mathieu; Holman, Zachary C.

    2015-08-14

    With this study, amorphous silicon enables the fabrication of very high-efficiency crystalline-silicon-based solar cells due to its combination of excellent passivation of the crystalline silicon surface and permeability to electrical charges. Yet, amongst other limitations, the passivation it provides degrades upon high-temperature processes, limiting possible post-deposition fabrication possibilities (e.g., forcing the use of low-temperature silver pastes). We investigate the potential use of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers to sidestep this issue. The passivation obtained using device-relevant stacks of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide with various carbon contents and doped amorphous silicon are evaluated, and their stability upon annealing assessed, amorphous silicon carbide being shown to surpass amorphous silicon for temperatures above 300°C. We demonstrate open-circuit voltage values over 700 mV for complete cells, and an improved temperature stability for the open-circuit voltage. Transport of electrons and holes across the hetero-interface is studied with complete cells having amorphous silicon carbide either on the hole-extracting side or on the electron-extracting side, and a better transport of holes than of electrons is shown. Also, due to slightly improved transparency, complete solar cells using an amorphous silicon carbide passivation layer on the hole-collecting side are demonstrated to show slightly better performances even prior to annealing than obtained with a standard amorphous silicon layer.

  2. Amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers for crystalline-silicon-based heterojunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Boccard, Mathieu; Holman, Zachary C.

    2015-08-14

    Amorphous silicon enables the fabrication of very high-efficiency crystalline-silicon-based solar cells due to its combination of excellent passivation of the crystalline silicon surface and permeability to electrical charges. Yet, amongst other limitations, the passivation it provides degrades upon high-temperature processes, limiting possible post-deposition fabrication possibilities (e.g., forcing the use of low-temperature silver pastes). We investigate the potential use of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers to sidestep this issue. The passivation obtained using device-relevant stacks of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide with various carbon contents and doped amorphous silicon are evaluated, and their stability upon annealing assessed, amorphous silicon carbide being shown to surpass amorphous silicon for temperatures above 300 °C. We demonstrate open-circuit voltage values over 700 mV for complete cells, and an improved temperature stability for the open-circuit voltage. Transport of electrons and holes across the hetero-interface is studied with complete cells having amorphous silicon carbide either on the hole-extracting side or on the electron-extracting side, and a better transport of holes than of electrons is shown. Also, due to slightly improved transparency, complete solar cells using an amorphous silicon carbide passivation layer on the hole-collecting side are demonstrated to show slightly better performances even prior to annealing than obtained with a standard amorphous silicon layer.

  3. Indirect flat-panel detector with avalanche gain: fundamental feasibility investigation for SHARP-AMFPI (scintillator HARP active matrix flat panel imager).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Li, Dan; Reznik, Alla; Lui, B J M; Hunt, D C; Rowlands, J A; Ohkawa, Yuji; Tanioka, Kenkichi

    2005-09-01

    An indirect flat-panel imager (FPI) with avalanche gain is being investigated for low-dose x-ray imaging. It is made by optically coupling a structured x-ray scintillator CsI(Tl) to an amorphous selenium (a-Se) avalanche photoconductor called HARP (high-gain avalanche rushing photoconductor). The final electronic image is read out using an active matrix array of thin film transistors (TFT). We call the proposed detector SHARP-AMFPI (scintillator HARP active matrix flat panel imager). The advantage of the SHARP-AMFPI is its programmable gain, which can be turned on during low dose fluoroscopy to overcome electronic noise, and turned off during high dose radiography to avoid pixel saturation. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the important design considerations for SHARP-AMFPI such as avalanche gain, which depends on both the thickness d(Se) and the applied electric field E(Se) of the HARP layer. To determine the optimal design parameter and operational conditions for HARP, we measured the E(Se) dependence of both avalanche gain and optical quantum efficiency of an 8 microm HARP layer. The results were used in a physical model of HARP as well as a linear cascaded model of the FPI to determine the following x-ray imaging properties in both the avalanche and nonavalanche modes as a function of E(Se): (1) total gain (which is the product of avalanche gain and optical quantum efficiency); (2) linearity; (3) dynamic range; (4) gain nonuniformity resulting from thickness nonuniformity; and (5) effects of direct x-ray interaction in HARP. Our results showed that a HARP layer thickness of 8 microm can provide adequate avalanche gain and sufficient dynamic range for x-ray imaging applications to permit quantum limited operation over the range of exposures needed for radiography and fluoroscopy. PMID:16266110

  4. Indirect flat-panel detector with avalanche gain: Fundamental feasibility investigation for SHARP-AMFPI (scintillator HARP active matrix flat panel imager)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Wei; Li Dan; Reznik, Alla; Lui, B.J.M.; Hunt, D.C.; Rowlands, J.A.; Ohkawa, Yuji; Tanioka, Kenkichi

    2005-09-15

    An indirect flat-panel imager (FPI) with avalanche gain is being investigated for low-dose x-ray imaging. It is made by optically coupling a structured x-ray scintillator CsI(Tl) to an amorphous selenium (a-Se) avalanche photoconductor called HARP (high-gain avalanche rushing photoconductor). The final electronic image is read out using an active matrix array of thin film transistors (TFT). We call the proposed detector SHARP-AMFPI (scintillator HARP active matrix flat panel imager). The advantage of the SHARP-AMFPI is its programmable gain, which can be turned on during low dose fluoroscopy to overcome electronic noise, and turned off during high dose radiography to avoid pixel saturation. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the important design considerations for SHARP-AMFPI such as avalanche gain, which depends on both the thickness d{sub Se} and the applied electric field E{sub Se} of the HARP layer. To determine the optimal design parameter and operational conditions for HARP, we measured the E{sub Se} dependence of both avalanche gain and optical quantum efficiency of an 8 {mu}m HARP layer. The results were used in a physical model of HARP as well as a linear cascaded model of the FPI to determine the following x-ray imaging properties in both the avalanche and nonavalanche modes as a function of E{sub Se}: (1) total gain (which is the product of avalanche gain and optical quantum efficiency); (2) linearity; (3) dynamic range; (4) gain nonuniformity resulting from thickness nonuniformity; and (5) effects of direct x-ray interaction in HARP. Our results showed that a HARP layer thickness of 8 {mu}m can provide adequate avalanche gain and sufficient dynamic range for x-ray imaging applications to permit quantum limited operation over the range of exposures needed for radiography and fluoroscopy.

  5. Tunable plasticity in amorphous silicon carbide films.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Yusuke; Kim, Namjun; King, Sean W; Bielefeld, Jeff; Stebbins, Jonathan F; Dauskardt, Reinhold H

    2013-08-28

    Plasticity plays a crucial role in the mechanical behavior of engineering materials. For instance, energy dissipation during plastic deformation is vital to the sufficient fracture resistance of engineering materials. Thus, the lack of plasticity in brittle hybrid organic-inorganic glasses (hybrid glasses) often results in a low fracture resistance and has been a significant challenge for their integration and applications. Here, we demonstrate that hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide films, a class of hybrid glasses, can exhibit a plasticity that is even tunable by controlling their molecular structure and thereby leads to an increased and adjustable fracture resistance in the films. We decouple the plasticity contribution from the fracture resistance of the films by estimating the "work-of-fracture" using a mean-field approach, which provides some insight into a potential connection between the onset of plasticity in the films and the well-known rigidity percolation threshold. PMID:23876200

  6. Short range atomic migration in amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauß, F.; Jerliu, B.; Geue, T.; Stahn, J.; Schmidt, H.

    2016-05-01

    Experiments on self-diffusion in amorphous silicon between 400 and 500 °C are presented, which were carried out by neutron reflectometry in combination with 29Si/natSi isotope multilayers. Short range diffusion is detected on a length scale of about 2 nm, while long range diffusion is absent. Diffusivities are in the order of 10-19-10-20 m2/s and decrease with increasing annealing time, reaching an undetectable low value for long annealing times. This behavior is strongly correlated to structural relaxation and can be explained as a result of point defect annihilation. Diffusivities for short annealing times of 60 s follow the Arrhenius law with an activation enthalpy of (0.74 ± 0.21) eV, which is interpreted as the activation enthalpy of Si migration.

  7. Amorphous Silicon-Carbon Nanostructure Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schriver, Maria; Regan, Will; Loster, Matthias; Zettl, Alex

    2011-03-01

    Taking advantage of the ability to fabricate large area graphene and carbon nanotube networks (buckypaper), we produce Schottky junction solar cells using undoped hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films and nanostructured carbon films. These films are useful as solar cell materials due their combination of optical transparency and conductance. In our cells, they behave both as a transparent conductor and as an active charge separating layer. We demonstrate a reliable photovoltaic effect in these devices with a high open circuit voltage of 390mV in buckypaper devices. We investigate the unique interface properties which result in an unusual J-V curve shape and optimize fabrication processes for improved solar conversion efficiency. These devices hold promise as a scalable solar cell made from earth abundant materials and without toxic and expensive doping processes.

  8. Amorphous Silicon Display Backplanes on Plastic Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Striakhilev, Denis; Nathan, Arokia; Vygranenko, Yuri; Servati, Peyman; Lee, Czang-Ho; Sazonov, Andrei

    2006-12-01

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin-film transistor (TFT) backplanes are very promising for active-matrix organic light-emitting diode displays (AMOLEDs) on plastic. The technology benefits from a large manufacturing base, simple fabrication process, and low production cost. The concern lies in the instability of the TFTs threshold voltage (VT) and its low device mobility. Although VT-instability can be compensated by means of advanced multi-transistor pixel circuits, the lifetime of the display is still dependent on the TFT process quality and bias conditions. A-Si TFTs with field-effect mobility of 1.1 cm2/V · s and pixel driver circuits have been fabricated on plastic substrates at 150 °C. The circuits are characterized in terms of current drive capability and long-term stability of operation. The results demonstrate sufficient and stable current delivery and the ability of the backplane on plastic to meet AMOLED requirements.

  9. Radiation resistance studies of amorphous silicon films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Payson, J. Scott; Woodyard, James R.

    1988-01-01

    A study of hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films irradiated with 2.00 MeV helium ions using fluences ranging from 1E11 to 1E15/sq cm is presented. The films were characterized using photothermal deflection spectroscopy, transmission and reflection spectroscopy, and photoconductivity and annealing measurements. Large changes were observed in the subband-gap optical absorption for energies between 0.9 and 1.7 eV. The steady-state photoconductivity showed decreases of almost five orders of magnitude for a fluence of 1E15/sq cm, but the slope of the intensity dependence of the photoconductivity remained almost constant for all fluences. Substantial annealing occurs even at room temperature, and for temperatures greater than 448 K the damage is completely annealed. The data are analyzed to describe the defects and the density of states function.

  10. Direct-patterned optical waveguides on amorphous silicon films

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, Steve; Bond, Tiziana C.; Bond, Steven W.; Pocha, Michael D.; Hau-Riege, Stefan

    2005-08-02

    An optical waveguide structure is formed by embedding a core material within a medium of lower refractive index, i.e. the cladding. The optical index of refraction of amorphous silicon (a-Si) and polycrystalline silicon (p-Si), in the wavelength range between about 1.2 and about 1.6 micrometers, differ by up to about 20%, with the amorphous phase having the larger index. Spatially selective laser crystallization of amorphous silicon provides a mechanism for controlling the spatial variation of the refractive index and for surrounding the amorphous regions with crystalline material. In cases where an amorphous silicon film is interposed between layers of low refractive index, for example, a structure comprised of a SiO.sub.2 substrate, a Si film and an SiO.sub.2 film, the formation of guided wave structures is particularly simple.

  11. RF Sputtering for preparing substantially pure amorphous silicon monohydride

    DOEpatents

    Jeffrey, Frank R.; Shanks, Howard R.

    1982-10-12

    A process for controlling the dihydride and monohydride bond densities in hydrogenated amorphous silicon produced by reactive rf sputtering of an amorphous silicon target. There is provided a chamber with an amorphous silicon target and a substrate therein with the substrate and the target positioned such that when rf power is applied to the target the substrate is in contact with the sputtering plasma produced thereby. Hydrogen and argon are fed to the chamber and the pressure is reduced in the chamber to a value sufficient to maintain a sputtering plasma therein, and then rf power is applied to the silicon target to provide a power density in the range of from about 7 watts per square inch to about 22 watts per square inch to sputter an amorphous silicon hydride onto the substrate, the dihydride bond density decreasing with an increase in the rf power density. Substantially pure monohydride films may be produced.

  12. Amorphous-diamond electron emitter

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, Steven

    2001-01-01

    An electron emitter comprising a textured silicon wafer overcoated with a thin (200 .ANG.) layer of nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (a:D-N), which lowers the field below 20 volts/micrometer have been demonstrated using this emitter compared to uncoated or diamond coated emitters wherein the emission is at fields of nearly 60 volts/micrometer. The silicon/nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (Si/a:D-N) emitter may be produced by overcoating a textured silicon wafer with amorphous-diamond (a:D) in a nitrogen atmosphere using a filtered cathodic-arc system. The enhanced performance of the Si/a:D-N emitter lowers the voltages required to the point where field-emission displays are practical. Thus, this emitter can be used, for example, in flat-panel emission displays (FEDs), and cold-cathode vacuum electronics.

  13. Amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers for crystalline-silicon-based heterojunction solar cells

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Boccard, Mathieu; Holman, Zachary C.

    2015-08-14

    With this study, amorphous silicon enables the fabrication of very high-efficiency crystalline-silicon-based solar cells due to its combination of excellent passivation of the crystalline silicon surface and permeability to electrical charges. Yet, amongst other limitations, the passivation it provides degrades upon high-temperature processes, limiting possible post-deposition fabrication possibilities (e.g., forcing the use of low-temperature silver pastes). We investigate the potential use of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers to sidestep this issue. The passivation obtained using device-relevant stacks of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide with various carbon contents and doped amorphous silicon are evaluated, and their stability upon annealing assessed, amorphousmore » silicon carbide being shown to surpass amorphous silicon for temperatures above 300°C. We demonstrate open-circuit voltage values over 700 mV for complete cells, and an improved temperature stability for the open-circuit voltage. Transport of electrons and holes across the hetero-interface is studied with complete cells having amorphous silicon carbide either on the hole-extracting side or on the electron-extracting side, and a better transport of holes than of electrons is shown. Also, due to slightly improved transparency, complete solar cells using an amorphous silicon carbide passivation layer on the hole-collecting side are demonstrated to show slightly better performances even prior to annealing than obtained with a standard amorphous silicon layer.« less

  14. Process for producing amorphous and crystalline silicon nitride

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, P.E.D.; Pugar, E.A.

    1985-11-12

    A process for producing amorphous or crystalline silicon nitride is disclosed which comprises reacting silicon disulfide ammonia gas at elevated temperature. In a preferred embodiment silicon disulfide in the form of whiskers'' or needles is heated at temperature ranging from about 900 C to about 1,200 C to produce silicon nitride which retains the whisker or needle morphological characteristics of the silicon disulfide. Silicon carbide, e.g. in the form of whiskers, also can be prepared by reacting substituted ammonia, e.g. methylamine, or a hydrocarbon containing active hydrogen-containing groups, such as ethylene, with silicon disulfide, at elevated temperature, e.g. 900 C. 6 figs.

  15. Process for producing amorphous and crystalline silicon nitride

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, Peter E. D.; Pugar, Eloise A.

    1985-01-01

    A process for producing amorphous or crystalline silicon nitride is disclosed which comprises reacting silicon disulfide ammonia gas at elevated temperature. In a preferred embodiment silicon disulfide in the form of "whiskers" or needles is heated at temperature ranging from about 900.degree. C. to about 1200.degree. C. to produce silicon nitride which retains the whisker or needle morphological characteristics of the silicon disulfide. Silicon carbide, e.g. in the form of whiskers, also can be prepared by reacting substituted ammonia, e.g. methylamine, or a hydrocarbon containing active hydrogen-containing groups, such as ethylene, with silicon disulfide, at elevated temperature, e.g. 900.degree. C.

  16. A real-time flat-panel X-ray pixel imaging system for low-dose medical diagnostics and craniofacial applications.

    PubMed

    Chapuy, S; Dimcovski, D; Dimcovski, Z; Grigoriev, E; Grob, E; Ligier, Y; Pachoud, M; Riondel, F; Rüfenacht, D; Sayegh, C; Terrier, F; Valley, J F; Verdun, F R

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate on-line performance of a real-time digital imaging system based on amorphous silicon technology and to compare it with conventional film-screen equipment. The digital detecting imager consists of (1) a converter, which transforms the energy of the incident X rays into light; (2) a real-time digital detecting system, capable of producing as many as 10 pictures per second using a large-area pixel matrix (20 x 20 cm2) based on solid-state amorphous silicon sensor technology with a pitch of 400 microns; and (3) appropriate computer tools for control, real-time image treatment, data representation, and off-line analysis. Different phantoms were used for qualitative comparison with the conventional film-screen technique, with images obtained with both systems at the normal dose (used as a reference), as well as with dose reduction by a factor of 10 to 100. Basic image quality parameters evaluated showed that the response of the detector is linear in a wide range of entrance air kerma; the dynamic range is higher compared with the conventional film-screen combination; the spatial resolution is 1.25 lp per millimeter, as expected from the pixel size; and good image quality is ensured at doses substantially lower than for the film-screen technique. The flat-panel X-ray imager based on amorphous silicon technology implemented in standard radiographic equipment permits acquisition of real-time images in radiology (as many as 10 images per second) of diagnostic quality with a marked reduction of dose (as much as 100 times) and better contrast compared with the standard film technique. Preliminary results obtained with a 100-micron pitch imager based on the same technology show better quality but a less substantial dose reduction. Applications in craniofacial surgery look promising. PMID:11314093

  17. Crystallization of amorphous silicon thin films deposited by PECVD on nickel-metalized porous silicon

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Porous silicon layers were elaborated by electrochemical etching of heavily doped p-type silicon substrates. Metallization of porous silicon was carried out by immersion of substrates in diluted aqueous solution of nickel. Amorphous silicon thin films were deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition on metalized porous layers. Deposited amorphous thin films were crystallized under vacuum at 750°C. Obtained results from structural, optical, and electrical characterizations show that thermal annealing of amorphous silicon deposited on Ni-metalized porous silicon leads to an enhancement in the crystalline quality and physical properties of the silicon thin films. The improvement in the quality of the film is due to the crystallization of the amorphous film during annealing. This simple and easy method can be used to produce silicon thin films with high quality suitable for thin film solar cell applications. PMID:22901341

  18. Crystallization of amorphous silicon thin films deposited by PECVD on nickel-metalized porous silicon.

    PubMed

    Ben Slama, Sonia; Hajji, Messaoud; Ezzaouia, Hatem

    2012-01-01

    Porous silicon layers were elaborated by electrochemical etching of heavily doped p-type silicon substrates. Metallization of porous silicon was carried out by immersion of substrates in diluted aqueous solution of nickel. Amorphous silicon thin films were deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition on metalized porous layers. Deposited amorphous thin films were crystallized under vacuum at 750°C. Obtained results from structural, optical, and electrical characterizations show that thermal annealing of amorphous silicon deposited on Ni-metalized porous silicon leads to an enhancement in the crystalline quality and physical properties of the silicon thin films. The improvement in the quality of the film is due to the crystallization of the amorphous film during annealing. This simple and easy method can be used to produce silicon thin films with high quality suitable for thin film solar cell applications. PMID:22901341

  19. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon films prepared by glow discharge of disilane

    SciTech Connect

    Wiesmann, H.J. )

    1990-01-01

    This report describes the results of an investigation of the properties of hydrogenated amorphous silicon films and the efficiency of amorphous silicon solar cells deposited from disilane at rates of 1.5 nanometers/second or greater. The study was divided into two parts, investigation of basic materials properties of hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films and the fabrication of glass-P-I-N-metal solar cells. The thin film materials properties investigated included the dark conductivity, photoconductivity, dihydride/monohydride concentration ratio, activation energy, and mobility-lifetime product. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells were fabricated with an intrinsic layer which was deposited at 1.5 nanometers/second. The absolute and reverse bias quantum yields were measured and solar cell efficiencies of 5% were achieved. Attempts to increase the efficiency by reverse bias annealing are also reported. 7 refs., 27 figs.

  20. Photo-electronic properties of CVD amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salau, Akinola Muritala

    1983-12-01

    D.c. conductivity, thermoelectric power and photoconductivity of amorphous silicon films prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) have been measured as functions of operating and annealing temperatures. Several interpretations of the results obtained have been suggested.

  1. Thermal properties of amorphous/crystalline silicon superlattices.

    PubMed

    France-Lanord, Arthur; Merabia, Samy; Albaret, Tristan; Lacroix, David; Termentzidis, Konstantinos

    2014-09-01

    Thermal transport properties of crystalline/amorphous silicon superlattices using molecular dynamics are investigated. We show that the cross-plane conductivity of the superlattices is very low and close to the conductivity of bulk amorphous silicon even for amorphous layers as thin as ≃ 6 Å. The cross-plane thermal conductivity weakly increases with temperature which is associated with a decrease of the Kapitza resistance with temperature at the crystalline/amorphous interface. This property is further investigated considering the spatial analysis of the phonon density of states in domains close to the interface. Interestingly, the crystalline/amorphous superlattices are shown to display large thermal anisotropy, according to the characteristic sizes of elaborated structures. These last results suggest that the thermal conductivity of crystalline/amorphous superlattices can be phonon engineered, providing new directions for nanostructured thermoelectrics and anisotropic materials in thermal transport. PMID:25105883

  2. Determination of the detective quantum efficiency of a prototype, megavoltage indirect detection, active matrix flat-panel imager.

    PubMed

    El-Mohri, Y; Jee, K W; Antonuk, L E; Maolinbay, M; Zhao, Q

    2001-12-01

    After years of aggressive development, active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs) have recently become commercially available for radiotherapy imaging. In this paper we report on a comprehensive evaluation of the signal and noise performance of a large-area prototype AMFPI specifically developed for this application. The imager is based on an array of 512 x 512 pixels incorporating amorphous silicon photodiodes and thin-film transistors offering a 26 x 26 cm2 active area at a pixel pitch of 508 microm. This indirect detection array was coupled to various x-ray converters consisting of a commercial phosphor screen (Lanex Fast B, Lanex Regular, or Lanex Fine) and a 1 mm thick copper plate. Performance of the imager in terms of measured sensitivity, modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectra (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) is reported at beam energies of 6 and 15 MV and at doses of 1 and 2 monitor units (MU). In addition, calculations of system performance (NPS, DQE) based on cascaded-system formalism were reported and compared to empirical results. In these calculations, the Swank factor and spatial energy distributions of secondary electrons within the converter were modeled by means of EGS4 Monte Carlo simulations. Measured MTFs of the system show a weak dependence on screen type (i.e., thickness), which is partially due to the spreading of secondary radiation. Measured DQE was found to be independent of dose for the Fast B screen, implying that the imager is input-quantum-limited at 1 MU, even at an extended source-to-detector distance of 200 cm. The maximum DQE obtained is around 1%--a limit imposed by the low detection efficiency of the converter. For thinner phosphor screens, the DQE is lower due to their lower detection efficiencies. Finally, for the Fast B screen, good agreement between calculated and measured DQE was observed. PMID:11797959

  3. Silicon heterojunction solar cell and crystallization of amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Meijun

    The rapid growth of photovoltaics in the past decade brings on the soaring price and demand for crystalline silicon. Hence it becomes necessary and also profitable to develop solar cells with over 20% efficiency, using thin (˜100mum) silicon wafers. In this respect, diffused junction cells are not the best choice, since the inescapable heating in the diffusion process not only makes it hard to handle thin wafers, but also reduces carriers' bulk lifetime and impairs the crystal quality of the substrate, which could lower cell efficiency. An alternative is the heterojunction cells, such as amorphous silicon/crystalline silicon heterojunction (SHJ) solar cell, where the emitter layer can be grown at low temperature (<200°C). In first part of this dissertation, I will introduce our work on front-junction SHJ solar cell, including the importance of intrinsic buffer layer; the discussion on the often observed anomalous "S"-shaped J-V curve (low fill factor) by using band diagram analysis; the surface passivation quality of intrinsic buffer and its relationship to the performance of front-junction SHJ cells. Although the a-Si:H is found to help to achieve high efficiency in c-Si heterojuntion solar cells, it also absorbs short wavelength (<600 nm) light, leading to non-ideal blue response and lower short circuit currents (JSC) in the front-junction SHJ cells. Considering this, heterojunction with both a-Si:H emitter and base contact on the back side in an interdigitated pattern, i.e. interdigitated back contact silicon heterojunction (IBC-SHJ) solar cell, is developed. This dissertation will show our progress in developing IBC-SHJ solar cells, including the structure design; device fabrication and characterization; two dimensional simulation by using simulator Sentaurus Device; some special features of IBC-SHJ solar cells; and performance of IBC-SHJ cells without and with back surface buffer layers. Another trend for solar cell industry is thin film solar cells, since

  4. Electrical characteristics of amorphous iron-tungsten contacts on silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finetti, M.; Pan, E. T.-S.; Nicolet, M.-A.; Suni, I.

    1983-01-01

    The electrical characteristics of amorphous Fe-W contacts have been determined on both p-type and n-type silicon. The amorphous films were obtained by cosputtering from a composite target. Contact resistivities of 1 x 10 to the -7th and 2.8 x 10 to the -6th were measured on n(+) and p(+) silicon, respectively. These values remain constant after thermal treatment up to at least 500 C. A barrier height of 0.61 V was measured on n-type silicon.

  5. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon deposited by ion-beam sputtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, V. E.; Henin, N.; Tu, C.-W.; Tavakolian, H.; Sites, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon films 1/2 to 1 micron thick were deposited on metal and glass substrates using ion-beam sputtering techniques. The 800 eV, 2 mA/sq cm beam was a mixture of argon and hydrogen ions. The argon sputtered silicon from a pure (7.6 cm) single crystal wafer, while the hydrogen combined with the sputtered material during the deposition. Hydrogen to argon pressure ratios and substrate temperatures were varied to minimize the defect state density in the amorphous silicon. Characterization was done by electrical resistivity, index of refraction and optical absorption of the films.

  6. Direct-conversion flat-panel imager with avalanche gain: feasibility investigation for HARP-AMFPI.

    PubMed

    Wronski, M M; Rowlands, J A

    2008-12-01

    The authors are investigating the concept of a direct-conversion flat-panel imager with avalanche gain for low-dose x-ray imaging. It consists of an amorphous selenium (a-Se) photoconductor partitioned into a thick drift region for x-ray-to-charge conversion and a relatively thin region called high-gain avalanche rushing photoconductor (HARP) in which the charge undergoes avalanche multiplication. An active matrix of thin film transistors is used to read out the electronic image. The authors call the proposed imager HARP active matrix flat panel imager (HARP-AMFPI). The key advantages of HARP-AMFPI are its high spatial resolution, owing to the direct-conversion a-Se layer, and its programmable avalanche gain, which can be enabled during low dose fluoroscopy to overcome electronic noise and disabled during high dose radiography to prevent saturation of the detector elements. This article investigates key design considerations for HARP-AMFPI. The effects of electronic noise on the imaging performance of HARP-AMFPI were modeled theoretically and system parameters were optimized for radiography and fluoroscopy. The following imager properties were determined as a function of avalanche gain: (1) the spatial frequency dependent detective quantum efficiency; (2) fill factor; (3) dynamic range and linearity; and (4) gain nonuniformities resulting from electric field strength nonuniformities. The authors results showed that avalanche gains of 5 and 20 enable x-ray quantum noise limited performance throughout the entire exposure range in radiography and fluoroscopy, respectively. It was shown that HARP-AMFPI can provide the required gain while maintaining a 100% effective fill factor and a piecewise dynamic range over five orders of magnitude (10(-7)-10(-2) R/frame). The authors have also shown that imaging performance is not significantly affected by the following: electric field strength nonuniformities, avalanche noise for x-ray energies above 1 keV and direct interaction

  7. Direct-conversion flat-panel imager with avalanche gain: Feasibility investigation for HARP-AMFPI

    SciTech Connect

    Wronski, M. M.; Rowlands, J. A.

    2008-12-15

    The authors are investigating the concept of a direct-conversion flat-panel imager with avalanche gain for low-dose x-ray imaging. It consists of an amorphous selenium (a-Se) photoconductor partitioned into a thick drift region for x-ray-to-charge conversion and a relatively thin region called high-gain avalanche rushing photoconductor (HARP) in which the charge undergoes avalanche multiplication. An active matrix of thin film transistors is used to read out the electronic image. The authors call the proposed imager HARP active matrix flat panel imager (HARP-AMFPI). The key advantages of HARP-AMFPI are its high spatial resolution, owing to the direct-conversion a-Se layer, and its programmable avalanche gain, which can be enabled during low dose fluoroscopy to overcome electronic noise and disabled during high dose radiography to prevent saturation of the detector elements. This article investigates key design considerations for HARP-AMFPI. The effects of electronic noise on the imaging performance of HARP-AMFPI were modeled theoretically and system parameters were optimized for radiography and fluoroscopy. The following imager properties were determined as a function of avalanche gain: (1) the spatial frequency dependent detective quantum efficiency; (2) fill factor; (3) dynamic range and linearity; and (4) gain nonuniformities resulting from electric field strength nonuniformities. The authors results showed that avalanche gains of 5 and 20 enable x-ray quantum noise limited performance throughout the entire exposure range in radiography and fluoroscopy, respectively. It was shown that HARP-AMFPI can provide the required gain while maintaining a 100% effective fill factor and a piecewise dynamic range over five orders of magnitude (10{sup -7}-10{sup -2} R/frame). The authors have also shown that imaging performance is not significantly affected by the following: electric field strength nonuniformities, avalanche noise for x-ray energies above 1 keV and direct

  8. Direct-conversion flat-panel imager with avalanche gain: Feasibility investigation for HARP-AMFPI

    PubMed Central

    Wronski, M. M.; Rowlands, J. A.

    2008-01-01

    The authors are investigating the concept of a direct-conversion flat-panel imager with avalanche gain for low-dose x-ray imaging. It consists of an amorphous selenium (a-Se) photoconductor partitioned into a thick drift region for x-ray-to-charge conversion and a relatively thin region called high-gain avalanche rushing photoconductor (HARP) in which the charge undergoes avalanche multiplication. An active matrix of thin film transistors is used to read out the electronic image. The authors call the proposed imager HARP active matrix flat panel imager (HARP-AMFPI). The key advantages of HARP-AMFPI are its high spatial resolution, owing to the direct-conversion a-Se layer, and its programmable avalanche gain, which can be enabled during low dose fluoroscopy to overcome electronic noise and disabled during high dose radiography to prevent saturation of the detector elements. This article investigates key design considerations for HARP-AMFPI. The effects of electronic noise on the imaging performance of HARP-AMFPI were modeled theoretically and system parameters were optimized for radiography and fluoroscopy. The following imager properties were determined as a function of avalanche gain: (1) the spatial frequency dependent detective quantum efficiency; (2) fill factor; (3) dynamic range and linearity; and (4) gain nonuniformities resulting from electric field strength nonuniformities. The authors results showed that avalanche gains of 5 and 20 enable x-ray quantum noise limited performance throughout the entire exposure range in radiography and fluoroscopy, respectively. It was shown that HARP-AMFPI can provide the required gain while maintaining a 100% effective fill factor and a piecewise dynamic range over five orders of magnitude (10−7–10−2 R∕frame). The authors have also shown that imaging performance is not significantly affected by the following: electric field strength nonuniformities, avalanche noise for x-ray energies above 1 keV and direct

  9. Amorphous and microcrystalline silicon technology--1997. Materials Research Society symposium proceedings, Volume 467

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, S.; Hack, M.; Schiff, E.A.; Schropp, R.; Shimizu, I.

    1997-07-01

    This book was divided into the following parts: Staebler-Wronski and Fundamental Defect Studies in Amorphous Silicon; The Story of Hydrogen in Amorphous Silicon; Photoelectric Properties of Amorphous Silicon; Deposition and Properties of Microcrystalline Silicon; Deposition Studies for Amorphous Silicon and Related Materials; Solar Cells; Thin-Film Transistors; and Sensors and Novel Device Concepts. Separate abstracts were prepared for most of the papers in the volume.

  10. Advances in infrastructure support for flat panel display manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardsley, James N.; Ciesinski, Michael F.; Pinnel, M. Robert

    1997-07-01

    The success of the US display industry, both in providing high-performance displays for the US Department of Defense at reasonable cost and in capturing a significant share of the global civilian market, depends on maintaining technological leadership and on building efficient manufacturing capabilities. The US Display Consortium (USDC) was set up in 1993 by the US Government and private industry to guide the development of the infrastructure needed to support the manufacturing of flat panel displays. This mainly involves the supply of equipment and materials, but also includes the formation of partnerships and the training of a skilled labor force. Examples are given of successful development projects, some involving USDC participation, others through independent efforts of its member companies. These examples show that US-based companies can achieve leadership positions in this young and rapidly growing global market.

  11. Improving the diversity of manufacturing electroluminescent flat panel displays

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, T.S.; Samuels, J.A.; Smith, D.C.

    1995-09-01

    Crystalline calcium thiogallate with a cerium dopant has been deposited by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) at temperatures below 600{degrees}C on a low cost glass substrate. An EL luminance of 1.05 fL was observed 40 volts above threshold at 60 Hz. This is more than an order of magnitude improvement over earlier crystalline-as-deposited thiogallate materials. These results pave the way for the use of MOCVD as a potential method for processing full color thin-film electroluminescent (TFEL) flat panel displays. The formation of the CaGa{sub 2}S{sub 4}:Ce phosphor requires precise control over a number of deposition parameters including flow rates, substrate temperature, and reactor pressure. The influence of these parameters will be discussed in terms of structure, uniformity, and TFEL device performance.

  12. A novel compact gamma camera based on flat panel PMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, R.; Pellegrini, R.; Cinti, M. N.; Trotta, C.; Trotta, G.; Scafè, R.; Betti, M.; Cusanno, F.; Montani, Livia; Iurlaro, Giorgia; Garibaldi, F.; Del Guerra, A.

    2003-11-01

    Over the last ten years the strong technological advances in position sensitive detectors have encouraged the scientific community to develop dedicated imagers for new diagnostic techniques in the field of isotope functional imaging. The main feature of the new detectors is the compactness that allows suitable detection geometry fitting the body anatomy. Position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMTs) have been showing very good features with continuous improvement. In 1997 a novel gamma camera was proposed based on a closely packed array of second generation 1 in PSPMTs. The main advantage is the potentially unlimited detection area but with the disadvantage of a relatively large non-active area (30%). The Hamamatsu H8500 Flat Panel PMT represents the last generation of PSPMT. Its extreme compactness allows array assembly with an improved effective area up to 97%. This paper, evaluates the potential improvement of imaging performances of a gamma camera based on the new PSPMT, compared with the two previous generation PSPMTs. To this aim the factors affecting the gamma camera final response, like PSPMT gain anode variation and position resolution, are analyzed and related to the uniformity counting response, energy resolution, position linearity, detection efficiency and intrinsic spatial resolution. The results show that uniformity of pulse height response seems to be the main parameter that provides the best imaging performances. Furthermore an extreme identification of pixels seems to be not effective to a full correction of image uniformity counting and gain response. However, considering the present technological limits, Flat Panel PSPMTs could be the best trade off between gamma camera imaging performances, compactness and large detection area.

  13. Diffractive optics for compact flat panel displays. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, D.; DeLong, K.

    1997-04-29

    Three years ago LLNL developed a practical method to dramatically reduce the chromatic aberration in single element diffractive imaging lenses. High efficiency, achromatic imaging lenses have been fabricated for human vision correction. This LDRD supported research in applying our new methods to develop a unique, diffraction-based optical interface with solid state, microelectronic imaging devices. Advances in microelectronics have led to smaller, more efficient components for optical systems. There have, however, been no equivalent advances in the imaging optics associated with these devices. The goal of this project was to replace the bulky, refractive optics in typical head-mounted displays with micro-thin diffractive optics to directly image flat-panel displays into the eye. To visualize the system think of the lenses of someone`s eyeglasses becoming flat-panel displays. To realize this embodiment, we needed to solve the problems of large chromatic aberrations and low efficiency that are associated with diffraction. We have developed a graceful tradeoff between chromatic aberrations and the diffractive optic thickness. It turns out that by doubling the thickness of a micro-thin diffractive lens we obtain nearly a two-times improvement in chromatic performance. Since the human eye will tolerate one diopter of chromatic aberration, we are able to achieve an achromatic image with a diffractive lens that is only 20 microns thick, versus 3 mm thickness for the comparable refractive lens. Molds for the diffractive lenses are diamond turned with sub-micron accuracy; the final lenses are cast from these molds using various polymers. We thus retain both the micro- thin nature of the diffractive optics and the achromatic image quality of refractive optics. During the first year of funding we successfully extended our earlier technology from 1 cm diameter optics required for vision applications up to the 5 cm diameter optics required for this application. 3 refs., 6 figs.

  14. EMI investigation and modeling of a flat panel display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinde, Satyajeet

    It is often important to carry out EMI analysis in the design phase of an electronic product to predict the radiated emissions. An EMI analysis is important to predict if the product complies with the FCC regulations as well as to gain an understanding of the noise coupling and radiation mechanisms. EMI analysis and prediction of radiated emissions in electronic products that have an electrically large chassis, pose a challenge due to the presence of multiple resonant structures and noise-coupling mechanisms. The study focusses on the investigation of the main noise coupling mechanisms, the approach and methods used for the modeling of a flat panel display. Full-wave simulation models are a powerful tool for the prediction of radiated emissions and the visualization of coupling paths within the product. The first part deals with the measurement of radiated emissions from the display under standard test conditions and the identification of the main noise sources using near-field scanning. The contribution of the chassis components - frame, back cover and the back panel, to the radiated emission is analyzed using shielding measurements. Noise coupling from the main board, flex cables, display driver boards and the display is analyzed from measurements. The second part deals with the full-wave modeling of the components - main board, flex cables, chassis and the display driver boards. The modeling approach is demonstrated by highlighting some of the challenges in modeling larger structures having many details. The simulation model contains the main components of the TV that contribute to far-field radiation. The full-wave modeling is done using the CST Microwave Studio. Two sets of simulation models are described - the common mode models and the complete models. The use of the common mode models for the identification of the resonant structures is demonstrated. The far-field radiated emissions along with the coupling mechanism within the flat panel display can be

  15. Amorphous silicon thin film transistor active-matrix organic light-emitting diode displays fabricated on flexible substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Jonathan A.

    Organic light-emitting diode (OLED) displays are of immense interest because they have several advantages over liquid crystal displays, the current dominant flat panel display technology. OLED displays are emissive and therefore are brighter, have a larger viewing angle, and do not require backlights and filters, allowing thinner, lighter, and more power efficient displays. The goal of this work was to advance the state-of-the-art in active-matrix OLED display technology. First, hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin film transistor (TFT) active-matrix OLED pixels and arrays were designed and fabricated on glass substrates. The devices operated at low voltages and demonstrated that lower performance TFTs could be utilized in active-matrix OLED displays, possibly allowing lower cost processing and the use of polymeric substrates. Attempts at designing more control into the display at the pixel level were also made. Bistable (one bit gray scale) active-matrix OLED pixels and arrays were designed and fabricated. Such pixels could be used in novel applications and eventually help reduce the bandwidth requirements in high-resolution and large-area displays. Finally, a-Si:H TFT active-matrix OLED pixels and arrays were fabricated on a polymeric substrate. Displays fabricated on a polymeric substrates would be lightweight; flexible, more rugged, and potentially less expensive to fabricate. Many of the difficulties associated with fabricating active-matrix backplanes on flexible substrates were studied and addressed.

  16. Growth and Characterization of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon and Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Carbide with Liquid Organometallic Sources.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaughan, Kevin David

    The growth and characterization of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and hydrogenated amorphous silicon -carbon (rm a-rm Si _{1-X}C_{X}: H) alloys employing liquid organometallic sources are described. N -type a-Si:H films were grown using a mixture of silane and tertiarybutylphosphine (TBP-rm C_4H _9P_2) vapor in a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system. Impurity levels from parts per million to about 5 at. % phosphorus have been incorporated into the film with this method. Tertiarybutylphosphine is less toxic and less pyrophoric than phosphine which is usually used in n-type doping of a-Si:H films. Optical and electronic properties were characterized by room temperature as well as temperature dependent dark conductivity, photothermal deflection spectroscopy, infrared vibrational spectroscopy, electron spin resonance, and electron microprobe analysis. The gross doping properties of a-Si:H doped with TBP are the same as those obtained with phosphine. The experimental results are compared with the predictions of several models that describe the chemical equilibrium between active dopants and deep defects. A pronounced decrease in the effects of doping, such as an increase in the activation energy of electrical conductivity and an decrease in the conductivity of the sample, were seen in heavily doped films (TBP/SiH _4> 0.5%), perhaps influenced by the increased carbon and/or phosphorus concentrations. Amorphous silicon-carbide alloys have been grown by the plasma decomposition of ditertiarybutylsilane ( rm DTBS-rm SiH_2(C _4H_9)_2). The optical bandgaps, which varied from 2.2 to 3.3 eV, are strongly dependent upon the deposition conditions. The carbon concentrations in these films varied from 60 to 95 at. %. The optical band-edge is very broad compared to that which is found in a-Si:H and this breadth is essentially independent of the deposition conditions. The plasma decomposition of admixtures of DTBS and silane has produced rm a- rm Si_{1-X

  17. Performance of a volumetric CT scanner based upon a flat-panel imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffray, David A.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Drake, Douglas G.

    1999-05-01

    To characterize the performance of a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging system based upon an indirect- detection, amorphous silicon flat-panel imager (FPI). Tomographic images obtained using the FPI are presented, and the signal and noise characteristics of reconstructed images are quantified. Specifically, the spatial uniformity, CT linearity, contrast performance, noise characteristics, spatial resolution, and soft-tissue visualization are examined. Finally, the performance of the FPI-based CT system is discussed in relation to existing clinical technologies. A table-top measurements system was constructed to allow investigation of FPI performance in CBCT within a precisely controlled and reproducible geometry. The FPI incorporates a 512 X 512 active matrix array of a-Si:H thin-film transistors and photodiodes in combination with an overlying (133 mg/cm2 Gd2O2S:Tb) phosphor. The commercially available prototype FPI has a pixel pitch of 400 micrometer, a fill factor of approximately 80%, can be read at a maximum frame rate of 5 fps, and provides 16 bit digitization. Mounted upon an optical bench are the x-ray tube (in a rigid support frame), the object to be imaged (upon a precision rotation/translation table), and the FPI (mounted upon a precision translation table). The entire setup is directed under computer control, and volumetric imaging is accomplished by rotating the object incrementally over 360 degrees, delivering a radiographic x-ray pulse (e.g., 100 - 130 kVp, approximately 0.1 - 10 mAs), and acquiring a projection image at each increment. Prior to reconstruction, dark and flood- field corrections are applied to account for stationary nonuniformities in detector response and dark current. Tomographic images are reconstructed from the projections using the Feldkamp filtered back-projection algorithm for CBCT. The linearity of the CBCT system was compared to that of a commercial scanner (Philips SR-7000) using materials ranging in CT number from

  18. Latent ion tracks in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Bierschenk, Thomas; Giulian, Raquel; Afra, Boshra; Rodriguez, Matias D; Schauries, D; Mudie, Stephen; Pakarinen, Olli H; Djurabekova, Flyura; Nordlund, Kai; Osmani, Orkhan; Medvedev, Nikita; Rethfield, Baerbel; Ridgway, Mark C; Kluth, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    We present experimental evidence for the formation of ion tracks in amorphous Si induced by swift heavy ion irradiation. An underlying core-shell structure consistent with remnants of a high density liquid structure was revealed by small-angle x-ray scattering and molecular dynamics simulations. Ion track dimensions dier for as-implanted and relaxed Si as attributed to dierent microstructures and melting temperatures. The identication and characterisation of ion tracks in amorphous Si yields new insight into mechanisms of damage formation due to swift heavy ion irradiation in amorphous semiconductors.

  19. A 25 kW solar photovoltaic flat panel power supply for an electrodialysis water desalination unit in New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, J. R.; Crutcher, J. L.

    1980-06-01

    The stand-alone system consists of a flat panel array employing silicon ribbon solar cells, used in conjunction with a lead-acid battery bank. Electrodialysis is an energy-conservative process for the desalination of water, in which ions are transferred from one solution through a membrane into another solution by imposition of a direct electrical current. The system design is intended to be prototypical of part of the drinking water supply for a remote village. The specific task of this system is to aid in the restoration of an aquifer following a uranium leaching operation.

  20. Transmissive metallic contact for amorphous silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Madan, A.

    1984-11-29

    A transmissive metallic contact for amorphous silicon semiconductors includes a thin layer of metal, such as aluminum or other low work function metal, coated on the amorphous silicon with an antireflective layer coated on the metal. A transparent substrate, such as glass, is positioned on the light reflective layer. The metallic layer is preferably thin enough to transmit at least 50% of light incident thereon, yet thick enough to conduct electricity. The antireflection layer is preferably a transparent material that has a refractive index in the range of 1.8 to 2.2 and is approximately 550A to 600A thick.

  1. Recent improvements in amorphous silicon-based multijunction modules

    SciTech Connect

    Arya, R.R.; Bennett, M.; Yang, L.; Newton, J.; Li, Y.M.; Maley, N.; Fieselmann, B.; Chen, L.F.; Rajan, K.; Wilczynski, A.; Wood, G. )

    1994-06-30

    Advances in intrinsic amorphous silicon and in amorphous silicon carbon alloys have resulted in thin single junction devices with V[sub oc]'s over 1.0 volts and excellent stability with both i-layer materials. Incorporation of improved a-Si:H i-layers and thin microcrystalline n-layers in a-Si/a-Si/a-SiGe triple junction modules has resulted in large area triple junction modules with initial efficiencies as high as 11.35%. These modules exhibit a degradation of [similar to]20% after 1000 hours of light-soaking resulting in [similar to]9% stable modules.

  2. Amorphous silicon alloy-based roof integrated photovoltaic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nath, P.; Vogeli, C.; Singh, A.; Call, J.

    1994-12-31

    A roll-to-roll process is used to deposit tandem amorphous silicon alloy solar cell onto thin (0.005 inch) stainless steel substrate. Using this solar cell material, the authors have designed and fabricated a photovoltaic (PV) module which can be integrated into building roofs. The module is fabricated by laminating the large area amorphous silicon on stainless steel solar cell material onto a 0.03 inch thick coated galvanized steel support plate. The module is then formed in such a way to allow installation as a batten and seam roofing system. This paper describes the fabrication and installation details of such PV systems.

  3. Multiple-Flat-Panel System Displays Multidimensional Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gundo, Daniel; Levit, Creon; Henze, Christopher; Sandstrom, Timothy; Ellsworth, David; Green, Bryan; Joly, Arthur

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Ames hyperwall is a display system designed to facilitate the visualization of sets of multivariate and multidimensional data like those generated in complex engineering and scientific computations. The hyperwall includes a 77 matrix of computer-driven flat-panel video display units, each presenting an image of 1,280 1,024 pixels. The term hyperwall reflects the fact that this system is a more capable successor to prior computer-driven multiple-flat-panel display systems known by names that include the generic term powerwall and the trade names PowerWall and Powerwall. Each of the 49 flat-panel displays is driven by a rack-mounted, dual-central-processing- unit, workstation-class personal computer equipped with a hig-hperformance graphical-display circuit card and with a hard-disk drive having a storage capacity of 100 GB. Each such computer is a slave node in a master/ slave computing/data-communication system (see Figure 1). The computer that acts as the master node is similar to the slave-node computers, except that it runs the master portion of the system software and is equipped with a keyboard and mouse for control by a human operator. The system utilizes commercially available master/slave software along with custom software that enables the human controller to interact simultaneously with any number of selected slave nodes. In a powerwall, a single rendering task is spread across multiple processors and then the multiple outputs are tiled into one seamless super-display. It must be noted that the hyperwall concept subsumes the powerwall concept in that a single scene could be rendered as a mosaic image on the hyperwall. However, the hyperwall offers a wider set of capabilities to serve a different purpose: The hyperwall concept is one of (1) simultaneously displaying multiple different but related images, and (2) providing means for composing and controlling such sets of images. In place of elaborate software or hardware crossbar switches, the

  4. Solution-processed amorphous silicon surface passivation layers

    SciTech Connect

    Mews, Mathias Sontheimer, Tobias; Korte, Lars; Rech, Bernd; Mader, Christoph; Traut, Stephan; Wunnicke, Odo

    2014-09-22

    Amorphous silicon thin films, fabricated by thermal conversion of neopentasilane, were used to passivate crystalline silicon surfaces. The conversion is investigated using X-ray and constant-final-state-yield photoelectron spectroscopy, and minority charge carrier lifetime spectroscopy. Liquid processed amorphous silicon exhibits high Urbach energies from 90 to 120 meV and 200 meV lower optical band gaps than material prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Applying a hydrogen plasma treatment, a minority charge carrier lifetime of 1.37 ms at an injection level of 10{sup 15}/cm{sup 3} enabling an implied open circuit voltage of 724 mV was achieved, demonstrating excellent silicon surface passivation.

  5. Proposed planar-type amorphous-silicon MOS transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Y.; Matsumura, M.

    1985-10-01

    Novel planar-type amorphous-silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor transistors have been proposed and their features have been demonstrated. The gate insulator of silicon-dioxide grown inside the original amorphous silicon layer makes transistor characteristics highly stable. The source and drain of micro-crystal silicon make the fabrication process simple and the parasitic elements small. The on-current of the prototype transistor was extrapolated to decrease to one-half of its initial value 10 billion years after the application of dc bias. The on-off current ratio was about a million and no voltage offset was observed. The field-effect mobility was 0.6 sq cm Vs.

  6. Threshold irradiation dose for amorphization of silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, L.L.; Zinkle, S.J.

    1997-04-01

    The amorphization of silicon carbide due to ion and electron irradiation is reviewed with emphasis on the temperature-dependent critical dose for amorphization. The effect of ion mass and energy on the threshold dose for amorphization is summarized, showing only a weak dependence near room temperature. Results are presented for 0.56 MeV silicon ions implanted into single crystal 6H-SiC as a function of temperature and ion dose. From this, the critical dose for amorphization is found as a function of temperature at depths well separated from the implanted ion region. Results are compared with published data generated using electrons and xenon ions as the irradiating species. High resolution TEM analysis is presented for the Si ion series showing the evolution of elongated amorphous islands oriented such that their major axis is parallel to the free surface. This suggests that surface of strain effects may be influencing the apparent amorphization threshold. Finally, a model for the temperature threshold for amorphization is described using the Si ion irradiation flux and the fitted interstitial migration energy which was found to be {approximately}0.56 eV. This model successfully explains the difference in the temperature-dependent amorphization behavior of SiC irradiated with 0.56 MeV silicon ions at 1 x 10{sup {minus}3} dpa/s and with fission neutrons irradiated at 1 x 10{sup {minus}6} dpa/s irradiated to 15 dpa in the temperature range of {approximately}340 {+-} 10K.

  7. Laterally inherently thin amorphous-crystalline silicon heterojunction photovoltaic cell

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, Zahidur R. Kherani, Nazir P.

    2014-12-29

    This article reports on an amorphous-crystalline silicon heterojunction photovoltaic cell concept wherein the heterojunction regions are laterally narrow and distributed amidst a backdrop of well-passivated crystalline silicon surface. The localized amorphous-crystalline silicon heterojunctions consisting of the laterally thin emitter and back-surface field regions are precisely aligned under the metal grid-lines and bus-bars while the remaining crystalline silicon surface is passivated using the recently proposed facile grown native oxide–plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposited silicon nitride passivation scheme. The proposed cell concept mitigates parasitic optical absorption losses by relegating amorphous silicon to beneath the shadowed metallized regions and by using optically transparent passivation layer. A photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 13.6% is obtained for an untextured proof-of-concept cell illuminated under AM 1.5 global spectrum; the specific cell performance parameters are V{sub OC} of 666 mV, J{sub SC} of 29.5 mA-cm{sup −2}, and fill-factor of 69.3%. Reduced parasitic absorption, predominantly in the shorter wavelength range, is confirmed with external quantum efficiency measurement.

  8. Laterally inherently thin amorphous-crystalline silicon heterojunction photovoltaic cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Zahidur R.; Kherani, Nazir P.

    2014-12-01

    This article reports on an amorphous-crystalline silicon heterojunction photovoltaic cell concept wherein the heterojunction regions are laterally narrow and distributed amidst a backdrop of well-passivated crystalline silicon surface. The localized amorphous-crystalline silicon heterojunctions consisting of the laterally thin emitter and back-surface field regions are precisely aligned under the metal grid-lines and bus-bars while the remaining crystalline silicon surface is passivated using the recently proposed facile grown native oxide-plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposited silicon nitride passivation scheme. The proposed cell concept mitigates parasitic optical absorption losses by relegating amorphous silicon to beneath the shadowed metallized regions and by using optically transparent passivation layer. A photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 13.6% is obtained for an untextured proof-of-concept cell illuminated under AM 1.5 global spectrum; the specific cell performance parameters are VOC of 666 mV, JSC of 29.5 mA-cm-2, and fill-factor of 69.3%. Reduced parasitic absorption, predominantly in the shorter wavelength range, is confirmed with external quantum efficiency measurement.

  9. Cryogenic flat-panel gas-gap heat switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanapalli, S.; Keijzer, R.; Buitelaar, P.; ter Brake, H. J. M.

    2016-09-01

    A compact additive manufactured flat-panel gas-gap heat switch operating at cryogenic temperature is reported in this paper. A guarded-hot-plate apparatus has been developed to measure the thermal conductance of the heat switch with the heat sink temperature in the range of 100-180 K. The apparatus is cooled by a two-stage GM cooler and the temperature is controlled with a heater and a braided copper wire connection. A thermal guard is mounted on the hot side of the device to confine the heat flow axially through the sample. A gas handling system allows testing the device with different gas pressures in the heat switch. Experiments are performed at various heat sink temperatures, by varying gas pressure in the gas-gap and with helium, hydrogen and nitrogen gas. The measured off-conductance with a heat sink temperature of 115 K and the hot plate at 120 K is 0.134 W/K, the on-conductance with helium and hydrogen gases at the same temperatures is 4.80 W/K and 4.71 W/K, respectively. This results in an on/off conductance ratio of 37 ± 7 and 35 ± 6 for helium and hydrogen respectively. The experimental results matches fairly well with the predicted heat conductance at cryogenic temperatures.

  10. Review of flat panel display programs and defense applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnade, Bruce; Schulze, Raymond; Henderson, Girardeau L.; Hopper, Darrel G.

    1997-07-01

    Flat panel display research has comprised a substantial portion of the national investment in new technology for economic and national security for the past nine years. These investments have ben made principally via several Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) programs, known collectively as the continuing High Definition Systems Program, and the Office of the Secretary of Defense Production Act Title III Program. Using input from the Army, Navy, and Air Force to focus research and identify insertion opportunities, DARPA and the Title III Program Office have made investments to develop the national technology base and manufacturing infrastructure necessary to meet the twin challenge of providing affordable displays in current systems and enabling the DoD strategy of winning future conflicts by getting more information to all participants during the battle. These research programs are reviewed and opportunities for applications are described. Future technology development, transfer, and transition requirements are identified. Strategy and vision are documented to assist the identification of areas meriting further consideration.

  11. Sarnoff JND Vision Model for Flat-Panel Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brill, Michael H.; Lubin, Jeffrey

    1998-01-01

    This document describes adaptation of the basic Sarnoff JND Vision Model created in response to the NASA/ARPA need for a general-purpose model to predict the perceived image quality attained by flat-panel displays. The JND model predicts the perceptual ratings that humans will assign to a degraded color-image sequence relative to its nondegraded counterpart. Substantial flexibility is incorporated into this version of the model so it may be used to model displays at the sub-pixel and sub-frame level. To model a display (e.g., an LCD), the input-image data can be sampled at many times the pixel resolution and at many times the digital frame rate. The first stage of the model downsamples each sequence in time and in space to physiologically reasonable rates, but with minimum interpolative artifacts and aliasing. Luma and chroma parts of the model generate (through multi-resolution pyramid representation) a map of differences-between test and reference called the JND map, from which a summary rating predictor is derived. The latest model extensions have done well in calibration against psychophysical data and against image-rating data given a CRT-based front-end. THe software was delivered to NASA Ames and is being integrated with LCD display models at that facility,

  12. Nanoindentation-induced amorphization in silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szlufarska, Izabela; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    2004-07-01

    The nanoindentation-induced amorphization in SiC is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. The load-displacement response shows an elastic shoulder followed by a plastic regime consisting of a series of load drops. Analyses of bond angles, local pressure, and shear stress, and shortest-path rings show that these drops are related to dislocation activities under the indenter. We show that amorphization is driven by coalescence of dislocation loops and that there is a strong correlation between load-displacement response and ring distribution.

  13. Surface passivation of heavily boron or phosphorus doped crystalline silicon utilizing amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carstens, K.; Dahlinger, M.

    2016-05-01

    Excellent surface passivation of heavily boron or phosphorus doped crystalline silicon is presented utilizing undoped hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). For passivating boron doped crystalline silicon surfaces, amorphous silicon needs to be deposited at low temperatures 150°C ≤Tdep≤200°C , leading to a high bandgap. In contrast, low bandgap amorphous silicon causes an inferior surface passivation of highly boron doped crystalline silicon. Boron doping in crystalline silicon leads to a shift of the Fermi energy towards the valence band maximum in the undoped a-Si:H. A simulation, implementing dangling bond defects according to the defect pool model, shows this shift in the undoped a-Si:H passivation to be more pronounced if the a-Si:H has a lower bandgap. Hence, the inferior passivation of boron doped surfaces with low bandgap amorphous silicon stems from a lower silicon-hydrogen bond energy due to this shift of the Fermi energy. Hydrogen effusion and ellipsometry measurements support our interpretation.

  14. Performance of amorphous silicon photovoltaic systems, 1985--1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-04-01

    This report discusses the performance of commercial amorphous silicon modules used in photovoltaic power systems from 1985 through 1989. Topics discussed include initial degradation, reliability, durability, and effects of temperature and solar irradiance on peak power and energy production. 6 refs., 18 figs.

  15. Long-term stability of amorphous-silicon modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) program of developing qualification tests necessary for amorphous silicon modules, including appropriate accelerated environmental tests reveal degradation due to illumination. Data were given which showed the results of temperature-controlled field tests and accelerated tests in an environmental chamber.

  16. Integral bypass diodes in an amorphous silicon alloy photovoltaic module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanak, J. J.; Flaisher, H.

    1991-01-01

    Thin-film, tandem-junction, amorphous silicon (a-Si) photovoltaic modules were constructed in which a part of the a-Si alloy cell material is used to form bypass protection diodes. This integral design circumvents the need for incorporating external, conventional diodes, thus simplifying the manufacturing process and reducing module weight.

  17. Photocurrent images of amorphous-silicon solar-cell modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Q.; Shumka, A.; Trask, J.

    1985-01-01

    Results obtained in applying the unique characteristics of the solar cell laser scanner to investigate the defects and quality of amorphous silicon cells are presented. It is concluded that solar cell laser scanners can be effectively used to nondestructively test not only active defects but also the cell quality and integrity of electrical contacts.

  18. Amorphous silicon carbide coatings for extreme ultraviolet optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kortright, J. B.; Windt, David L.

    1988-01-01

    Amorphous silicon carbide films formed by sputtering techniques are shown to have high reflectance in the extreme ultraviolet spectral region. X-ray scattering verifies that the atomic arrangements in these films are amorphous, while Auger electron spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy show that the films have composition close to stoichiometric SiC, although slightly C-rich, with low impurity levels. Reflectance vs incidence angle measurements from 24 to 1216 A were used to derive optical constants of this material, which are presented here. Additionally, the measured extreme ultraviolet efficiency of a diffraction grating overcoated with sputtered amorphous silicon carbide is presented, demonstrating the feasibility of using these films as coatings for EUV optics.

  19. Ion-assisted recrystallization of amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priolo, F.; Spinella, C.; La Ferla, A.; Rimini, E.; Ferla, G.

    1989-12-01

    Our recent work on ion-beam-assisted epitaxial growth of amorphous Si layers on single crystal substrates is reviewed. The planar motion of the crystal-amorphous interface was monitored in situ, during irradiations, by transient reflectivity measurements. This technique allows the measurement of the ion-induced growth rate with a very high precision. We have observed that this growth rate scales linearly with the number of displacements produced at the crystal-amorphous interface by the impinging ions. Moreover the regrowth onto <100> oriented substrates is a factor of ≈ 4 faster with respect to that on <111> substrates. Impurities dissolved in the amorphous layer influence the kinetics of recrystallization. For instance, dopants such as As, B and P enhance the ion-induced growth rate while oxygen has the opposite effect. The dependence of the rate on impurity concentration is however less strong with respect to pure thermal annealing. For instance, an oxygen concentration of 1 × 1021 / cm3 decreases the ion-induced growth rate by a factor of ≈ 3; this same concentration would have decreased the rate of pure thermal annealing by more than 4 orders of magnitude. The reduced effects of oxygen during ion-beam crystallization allow the regrowth of deposited Si layers despite the presence of a high interfacial oxygen content. The process is investigated in detail and its possible application to the microelectronic technology is discussed.

  20. An alternate line erasure and readout (ALER) method for implementing slot-scan imaging technique with a flat-panel detector--initial experiences.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinming; Shaw, Chris C; Altunbas, Mustafa C; Wang, Tianpeng

    2006-04-01

    This paper describes and demonstrates an electronic collimation method, referred to as the alternate line erasure and readout (ALER) technique, for implementing slot-scan digital radiography technique with an amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin-film transistor (TFT) array based flat-panel detector. An amorphus selenium (a-Se) flat-panel detector was modified to implement the ALER technique for slot-scan imaging. A stepping-motor driven fore-collimator was mounted in front of an X-ray tube to generate a scanning X-ray fan beam. The scanning speed and magnification were adjusted to synchronize the fan beam motion with the image line readout rate. The image lines on the leading and trailing edges of the fan beam were tracked and alternately reset and read out, respectively. The former operation resulted in the erasure of the scatter signals accumulated in the leading edge image line prior to the arrival of the fan beam. The latter operation resulted in the acquisition of fan beam exposure data integrated in the trailing edge image line right after the fan beam passed. To demonstrate the scatter rejection capability of this technique, an anthropomorphic chest phantom was placed in PA position and scanned at a speed of 576 lines (8.0 cm)/s at 117 kVp and 32 mA. A tungsten bar is placed at the entrance side of the chest phantom to measure the scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR), scatter reduction factor (SRF), and contrast-to-noise ratio degradation factor (CNRDF) in the slot-scan images to evaluate the effectiveness of scatter rejection and the resultant improvement of image quality. SPR and CNRDF in the open-field images were also measured and used as the reference for comparison. A scatter reduction by 86.4 to 95.4% across lower lung and heart regions has been observed with slot-scan imaging. The CNRs have been found to be improved by a factor of 2 in the mediastinum areas over the open-field image as well. PMID:16608064

  1. Hydrogen-free amorphous silicon with no tunneling states.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Queen, Daniel R; Metcalf, Thomas H; Karel, Julie E; Hellman, Frances

    2014-07-11

    The ubiquitous low-energy excitations, known as two-level tunneling systems (TLSs), are one of the universal phenomena of amorphous solids. Low temperature elastic measurements show that e-beam amorphous silicon (a-Si) contains a variable density of TLSs which diminishes as the growth temperature reaches 400 °C. Structural analyses show that these a-Si films become denser and more structurally ordered. We conclude that the enhanced surface energetics at a high growth temperature improved the amorphous structural network of e-beam a-Si and removed TLSs. This work obviates the role hydrogen was previously thought to play in removing TLSs in the hydrogenated form of a-Si and suggests it is possible to prepare "perfect" amorphous solids with "crystal-like" properties for applications. PMID:25062205

  2. Deposition of device quality low H content, amorphous silicon films

    DOEpatents

    Mahan, A.H.; Carapella, J.C.; Gallagher, A.C.

    1995-03-14

    A high quality, low hydrogen content, hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) film is deposited by passing a stream of silane gas (SiH{sub 4}) over a high temperature, 2,000 C, tungsten (W) filament in the proximity of a high temperature, 400 C, substrate within a low pressure, 8 mTorr, deposition chamber. The silane gas is decomposed into atomic hydrogen and silicon, which in turn collides preferably not more than 20--30 times before being deposited on the hot substrate. The hydrogenated amorphous silicon films thus produced have only about one atomic percent hydrogen, yet have device quality electrical, chemical, and structural properties, despite this lowered hydrogen content. 7 figs.

  3. Deposition of device quality low H content, amorphous silicon films

    DOEpatents

    Mahan, Archie H.; Carapella, Jeffrey C.; Gallagher, Alan C.

    1995-01-01

    A high quality, low hydrogen content, hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) film is deposited by passing a stream of silane gas (SiH.sub.4) over a high temperature, 2000.degree. C., tungsten (W) filament in the proximity of a high temperature, 400.degree. C., substrate within a low pressure, 8 mTorr, deposition chamber. The silane gas is decomposed into atomic hydrogen and silicon, which in turn collides preferably not more than 20-30 times before being deposited on the hot substrate. The hydrogenated amorphous silicon films thus produced have only about one atomic percent hydrogen, yet have device quality electrical, chemical, and structural properties, despite this lowered hydrogen content.

  4. Heat-Induced Agglomeration of Amorphous Silicon Nanoparticles Toward the Formation of Silicon Thin Film.

    PubMed

    Jang, Bo Yun; Kim, Ja Young; Seo, Gyeongju; Shin, Chae-Ho; Ko, Chang Hyun

    2016-01-01

    The thermal behavior of silicon nanoparticles (Si NPs) was investigated for the preparation of silicon thin film using a solution process. TEM analysis of Si NPs, synthesized by inductively coupled plasma, revealed that the micro-structure of the Si NPs was amorphous and that the Si NPs had melted and merged at a comparatively low temperature (~750 °C) considering bulk melting temperature of silicon (1414 °C). A silicon ink solution was prepared by dispersing amorphous Si NPs in propylene glycol (PG). It was then coated onto a silicon wafer and a quartz plate to form a thin film. These films were annealed in a vacuum or in an N₂ environment to increase their film density. N2 annealing at 800 °C and 1000 °C induced the crystallization of the amorphous thin film. An elemental analysis by the SIMS depth profile showed that N₂annealing at 1000 °C for 180 min drastically reduced the concentrations of carbon and oxygen inside the silicon thin film. These results indicate that silicon ink prepared using amorphous Si NPs in PG can serve as a proper means of preparing silicon thin film via solution process. PMID:27398566

  5. Focal spot measurements using a digital flat panel detector

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Amit; Panse, A.; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Rudin, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Focal spot size is one of the crucial factors that affect the image quality of any x-ray imaging system. It is, therefore, important to measure the focal spot size accurately. In the past, pinhole and slit measurements of x-ray focal spots were obtained using direct exposure film. At present, digital detectors are replacing film in medical imaging so that, although focal spot measurements can be made quickly with such detectors, one must be careful to account for the generally poorer spatial resolution of the detector and the limited usable magnification. For this study, the focal spots of a diagnostic x-ray tube were measured with a 10-μm pinhole using a 194-μm pixel flat panel detector (FPD). The two-dimensional MTF, measured with the Noise Response (NR) Method was used for the correction for the detector blurring. The resulting focal spot sizes based on the FWTM (Full Width at Tenth Maxima) were compared with those obtained with a very high resolution detector with 8-μm pixels. This study demonstrates the possible effect of detector blurring on the focal spot size measurements with digital detectors with poor resolution and the improvement obtained by deconvolution. Additionally, using the NR method for measuring the two-dimensional MTF, any non-isotropies in detector resolution can be accurately corrected for, enabling routine measurement of non-isotropic x-ray focal spots. This work presents a simple, accurate and quick quality assurance procedure for measurements of both digital detector properties and x-ray focal spot size and distribution in modern x-ray imaging systems. PMID:25302004

  6. Heat Transfar Properties of Flat-Panel Evacuated Porous Insrlators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneno, Hirosyi; Yamamoto, Ryoichi

    Flat Panel evacuated porous insulators have been produced by filling powder or fiber (such as perlite powder, diatomaceous earth powder, silica aerogel powder, g lass fiber and ceramic fiber) in film-like laminated plastic container and by evacuating to form vacuum in it is interior. Heat transfer properties of these evacuated insulators have been studied under various conditions (such as particle diameter, surface area, packing density, solid volume fraction and void dimension). The apparent mean thermal conductivity has been measured for the boundary surface temperature at cold face temperature 13°C and hot face temperature 35°. The effect of air pressure ranging from 1 Pa to one atomosphere (105 Pa) was examined. The results were as follows. (1) For each powder the apparent mean thermal conductivity decreases with decreasing residual air pressure, and at very low pressure bellow 1 -103 Pa the conductivity becomes indeqendent of pressure. The thermal conductivity at 1.3Pa is 0.0053 W/mK for perlite powder, 0.0048W/mK for diatomaceous earth powder, 0.0043 W/mK for silica aerogel powder and 0.0029W/mK for glass fiber. (2) With decreasing particle size, the apparent mean thermal conductivity is constant independent of residual air pressure in higher pressure region. It is that void dimension continues to decrease with particle size and the mean free path of air becomes comparable with void dimension. (3) In the range of minor solid volume fraction, the apparent mean thermal conductivity at very low precreases with decreasing particle size. This shows the thermal contact resistance of the solid particle increases with decreasing particle size.

  7. Motion-compensated defect interpolation for flat-panel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aach, Til; Barth, Erhardt; Mayntz, Claudia

    2004-05-01

    One advantage of flat-panel X-ray detectors is the immediate availability of the acquired images for display. Current limitations in large-area active-matrix manufacturing technology, however, require that the images read out from such detectors be processed to correct for inactive pixels. In static radiographs, these defects can only be interpolated by spatial filtering. Moving X-ray image modalities, such as fluoroscopy or cine-angiography, permit to use temporal information as well. This paper describes interframe defect interpolation algorithms based on motion compensation and filtering. Assuming the locations of the defects to be known, we fill in the defective areas from past frames, where the missing information was visible due to motion. The motion estimator is based on regularized block matching, with speedup obtained by successive elimination and related measures. To avoid the motion estimator locking on to static defects, these are cut out of each block during matching. Once motion is estimated, three methods are available for defect interpolation: direct filling-in by the motion-compensated predecessor, filling-in by a 3D-multilevel median filtered value, and spatiotemporal mean filtering. Results are shown for noisy fluoroscopy sequences acquired in clinical routine with varying amounts of motion and simulated defects up to six lines wide. They show that the 3D-multilevel median filter appears as the method of choice since it causes the least blur of the interpolated data, is robust with respect to motion estimation errors and works even in non-moving areas.

  8. Multi-band silicon quantum dots embedded in an amorphous matrix of silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Chang, Geng-rong; Ma, Fei; Ma, Da-yan; Xu, Ke-wei

    2010-11-19

    Silicon quantum dots embedded in an amorphous matrix of silicon carbide were realized by a magnetron co-sputtering process and post-annealing. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, glancing x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize the chemical composition and the microstructural properties. The results show that the sizes and size distribution of silicon quantum dots can be tuned by changing the annealing atmosphere and the atom ratio of silicon and carbon in the matrix. A physicochemical mechanism is proposed to demonstrate this formation process. Photoluminescence measurements indicate a multi-band configuration due to the quantum confinement effect of silicon quantum dots with different sizes. The PL spectra are further widened as a result of the existence of amorphous silicon quantum dots. This multi-band configuration would be extremely advantageous in improving the photoelectric conversion efficiency of photovoltaic solar cells. PMID:20975214

  9. Lag measurement in an a-Se active matrix flat-panel imager.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, C; Stanescu, T; Rathee, S; Fallone, B G

    2004-05-01

    Lag and residual contrast have been quantified in an amorphous selenium (a-Se) active-matrix flat-panel imager (AMFPI) as a function of frame time, kilovoltage (kV) and megavoltage (MV) x-ray photon energies and amount of radiation incident on the detector. The AMFPI contains a 200 microm thick a-Se layer deposited on a thin film transistor (TFT) array of size 8.7 cm x 8.7 cm with an 85-microm pixel pitch. For all energies, the lag (signal normalized to the signal due to exposure) for the first (n = 1) and second (n = 2) frame after exposure ranges from 0.45% to 0.91% and from 0.29% to 0.51%, respectively. The amount of lag was determined to be a function of the time after the x-ray exposure irrespective of frame time or the magnitude of exposure. The lag for MV photon energies was slightly less than that for kV photon energies. The residual contrast for all energies studied ranges from 0.41% to 0.75% and from 0.219% to 0.41% for the n = 1 and n = 2 frames, respectively. These results show that lag and residual contrast in kV and MV radiographic applications are always less than 1% for the detection system used and only depend on the time after x-ray exposure. PMID:15191310

  10. Plasma Deposition of Doped Amorphous Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calcote, H. F.

    1985-01-01

    Pair of reports present further experimental details of investigation of plasma deposition of films of phosphorous-doped amosphous silicon. Probe measurements of electrical resistance of deposited films indicated films not uniform. In general, it appeared that resistance decreased with film thickness.

  11. Light-induced metastable structural changes in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Fritzsche, H.

    1996-09-01

    Light-induced defects (LID) in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and its alloys limit the ultimate efficiency of solar panels made with these materials. This paper reviews a variety of attempts to find the origin of and to eliminate the processes that give rise to LIDs. These attempts include novel deposition processes and the reduction of impurities. Material improvements achieved over the past decade are associated more with the material`s microstructure than with eliminating LIDs. We conclude that metastable LIDs are a natural by-product of structural changes which are generally associated with non-radiative electron-hole recombination in amorphous semiconductors.

  12. Research on stable, high-efficiency amorphous silicon multijunction modules

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, P.K.; Brown, S.; Hollingsworth, R.; Shen, D.S.; del Cueto, J.; Iwanicko, E.; Marshall, C.; DeHart, C.; Mentor, D.; Benson, A.; Matovich, C.; Sandwisch, J. )

    1991-04-01

    This report describes a contract to produce multijunction modules based entirely on amorphous silicon alloys, the modules having an aperture area of at least 900 cm{sup 2} and a stable, reproducible conversion efficiency of at least 6.5% after 600 hours of light exposure (air mass 1.5) at 50{degrees} C. The work focussed on (1) producing opto-electronic-grade amorphous silicon material for band gaps of about 1.7 and 1.9 eV by changing the hydrogen content in the film bonded to the silicon, (2) studying and obtaining data on the light stability of single-junction p-i-n solar cells with gaps of about 1.7 and 1.9 eV, and (3) analyzing losses in a silicon/silicon multijunction cell. We report new results on an indium tin oxide (ITO)/silver back contact and the deposition of granular tin oxide by atmospheric-pressure chemical vapor deposition. Progress toward module fabrication at the end of six months has been good, with the demonstration of 5.4% initial efficiency in a silicon/silicon multijunction submodule with an aperture area of 4620 cm{sup 2} and incorporating devices with 2nd-junction i-layer thicknesses of about 3500 {angstrom}. We also demonstrated a single-junction silicon submodule with an aperture area of 4620 cm{sup 2}, a thickness of about 3500 {angstrom}, and an initial efficiency of 6.5%. 4 refs., 39 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Use of Tritium in the Study of defects in Amorphous Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Costea, S.; Pisana, S.; Kherani, N.P.; Gaspari, F.; Kosteski, T.; Shmayda, W.T.; Zukotynski, S.

    2005-11-28

    Hydrogen is known to strongly affect the physical properties of amorphous semiconductors. Indeed hydrogen is introduced during the growth of amorphous silicon films, used in active matrix displays and solar cells, to passivate silicon dangling bonds and to relax the lattice thereby reducing the density of states in the energy gap by several orders of magnitude and giving rise to device grade material. Ideally, hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is a continuous covalently bonded random network of silicon-silicon and silicon-hydrogen atoms, with the predominant nearest neighbour environment similar to that of crystalline silicon.

  14. The reliability and stability of multijunction amorphous silicon PV modules

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, D.E.

    1995-11-01

    Solarex is developing a manufacturing process for the commercial production of 8 ft{sup 2} multijunction amorphous silicon (a-Si) PV modules starting in 1996. The device structure used in these multijunction modules is: glass/textured tin oxide/p-i-n/p-i-n/ZnO/Al/EVA/Tedlar where the back junction of the tandem structure contains an amorphous silicon germanium alloy. As an interim step, 4 ft{sup 2} multijunction modules have been fabricated in a pilot production mode over the last several months. The distribution of initial conversion efficiencies for an engineering run of 67 modules (4 ft{sup 2}) is shown. Measurements recently performed at NREL indicate that the actual efficiencies are about 5% higher than those shown, and thus exhibit an average initial conversion efficiency of about 9.5%. The data indicates that the process is relatively robust since there were no modules with initial efficiencies less than 7.5%.

  15. Amorphous silicon based large format uncooled FPA microbolometer technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimert, T.; Brady, J.; Fagan, T.; Taylor, M.; McCardel, W.; Gooch, R.; Ajmera, S.; Hanson, C.; Syllaios, A. J.

    2008-04-01

    This paper presents recent developments in next generation microbolometer Focal Plane Array (FPA) technology at L-3 Communications Infrared Products (L-3 CIP). Infrared detector technology at L-3 CIP is based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and amorphous silicon germanium(a-SiGe:H). Large format high performance, fast, and compact IR FPAs are enabled by a low thermal mass pixel design; favorable material properties; an advanced ROIC design; and wafer level packaging. Currently at L-3 CIP, 17 micron pixel FPA array technology including 320x240, 640 x 480 and 1024 x768 arrays is under development. Applications of these FPAs range from low power microsensors to high resolution near-megapixel imager systems.

  16. Electrochemical degradation of amorphous-silicon photovoltaic modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mon, G. R.; Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Techniques of module electrochemical corrosion research, developed during reliability studies of crystalline-silicon modules (C-Si), have been applied to this new investigation into amorphous-silicon (a-Si) module reliability. Amorphous-Si cells, encapsulated in the polymers polyvinyl butyral (PVB) and ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA), were exposed for more than 1200 hours in a controlled 85 C/85 percent RH environment, with a constant 500 volts applied between the cells and an aluminum frame. Plotting power output reduction versus charge transferred reveals that about 50 percent a-Si cell failures can be expected with the passage of 0.1 to 1.0 Coulomb/cm of cell-frame edge length; this threshold is somewhat less than that determined for C-Si modules.

  17. Spherical silicon photonic microcavities: From amorphous to polycrystalline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenollosa, R.; Garín, M.; Meseguer, F.

    2016-06-01

    Shaping silicon as a spherical object is not an obvious task, especially when the object size is in the micrometer range. This has the important consequence of transforming bare silicon material in a microcavity, so it is able to confine light efficiently. Here, we have explored the inside volume of such microcavities, both in their amorphous and in their polycrystalline versions. The synthesis method, which is based on chemical vapor deposition, causes amorphous microspheres to have a high content of hydrogen that produces an onionlike distributed porous core when the microspheres are crystallized by a fast annealing regime. This substantially influences the resonant modes. However, a slow crystallization regime does not yield pores, and produces higher-quality-factor resonances that could be fitted to the Mie theory. This allows the establishment of a procedure for obtaining size calibration standards with relative errors of the order of 0.1%.

  18. Flat panel displays for ubiquitous product applications and related impurity doping technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Toshiharu

    2006-06-01

    Various kinds of flat panel displays such as liquid crystal displays (LCDs), plasma display panels and organic light emitting diode (OLED) displays are briefly evaluated from the perspective of applicability to ubiquitous products. It is clarified that the LCDs and OLED displays are suitable for realizing mobile electronic products with a high quality display, since these displays can use active devices on the backplanes to form active matrix displays and can integrate peripheral circuits of the displays and functional circuits of mobile electronics for a ubiquitous era. It is clarified further that the low temperature polycrystalline silicon (LTPS) thin film transistor (TFT) is the most promising active device for the backplane of such active matrix displays because the LTPS TFT has the possibility to enhance its performance without raising the cost. The low temperature poly-Si TFT fabrication process is introduced, and its key technologies such as crystallization, gate oxide formation, and impurity doping are surveyed. As the property of polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) influences not only the TFT performance itself but also the efficiency of impurity doping and the integrity of the gate oxide, the crystallinity of the poly-Si is reviewed. After that, the history of the development and the state of the art in impurity doping technology and its issues are addressed in detail. Finally, foreseeing the application of LTPS TFT, the realization of OLED displays, and the progress of LTPS TFT for integrating higher functional circuits for ubiquitous applications, the requirements for impurity doping in such progress are addressed. In particular, the single grain silicon technology and the scaling down of the TFT size, which are thought to be highly effective to enhance the performance of TFTs, and issues of impurity doping technology relating to them are discussed.

  19. Amorphous-silicon thin-film heterojunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cretella, M. C.; Gregory, J. A.; Sandstrom, D. B.; Paul, W.

    1981-01-01

    The investigation of amorphous silicon materials at MTSEC has had two major thrusts: (1) to improve the amorphous material, i.e., obtain a low state density in the gap, improve the carrier collection depth and diminish non-radiative recombinations; and (2) to attempt to understand and improve on the limitations of the junction devices while evaluating the amorphous silicon materials. In the first of these efforts, the investigation has continued to examine the modifications to the a-Si(H) network by alloying silicon with other group IVA elements, either in binary or ternary compositions, and/or by replacing the hydrogenation for defect compensation with a combination of hydrogenation and alkylation or hydrogenation and halogenation. The doped junction layers are being examined in an attempt to determine the limiting characteristics of the junctions in solar cell devices of these amorphous materials. Amorphous alloys of Si-Ge, Si-C, Si-Sn were prepared as well as ternary compositions of Si-Ge-C and Si-Sn-C. In addition, Na vapor was added to the gas feed to deposit a-Si(Na, H) films, and to prepare Si-Sn, fluoride was added along with the tin by vapor additions of SnF/sub 4/ to the gas feed. The optical properties of these materials were measured, and structural and compositional information was obtained from the IR vibrational spectra using the scanning electron microscope and from analyses using scanning Auger microscopy. Electrical measurements have included the dark conductivity and the photo conductivity under room fluorescent light and at AM1 conditions. With alloys that displayed promising photoconductive properties n-i-p devices were prepared to assess the solar cell properties. Details are presented. (WHK)

  20. Advances and opportunities in the amorphous silicon research field

    SciTech Connect

    Sabisky, E.; Wallace, W.; Mikhall, A.; Mahan, H.; Tsuo, S.

    1984-05-01

    The amorphous materials and thin-film solar cells program was initiated by the US Department of Energy in 1978 and then transferred to the Solar Energy Research Institute. The aim of the present DOE/SERI program is to achieve 5-year DOE research goals by addressing photovoltaic research in single-junction amorphous thin films as well as the most promising option in high-efficiency, multijunction solar cells. Multiyear subcontract awards initiated in 1983 were designed to demonstrate a stable, small-area, p-i-n solar cell of at least 12% (AMI) efficiency, a stable submodule of at least 8% (AMI) efficiency, a stable submodule of at least 8% (AMI) efficiency (total area, 1000 cm/sup 2/), and a proof-of-concept multijunction amorphous silicon alloy thin-film solar cell that will lead to achieving an 18% efficiency goal in 1988.

  1. Amorphization and defect recombination in ion implanted silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Grimaldi, M.G.; Calcagno, L.; Musumeci, P.; Frangis, N.; Van Landuyt, J.

    1997-06-01

    The damage produced in silicon carbide single crystals by ion implantation was investigated by Rutherford backscattering channeling and transmission electron microscopy techniques. Implantations were performed at liquid nitrogen and at room temperatures with several ions to examine the effect of the ion mass and of the substrate temperature on the damaging process. The damage accumulation is approximately linear with fluence until amorphization occurs when the elastic energy density deposited by the ions overcomes a critical value. The critical energy density for amorphization depends on the substrate temperature and is greatest at 300 K indicating that defects recombination occurs already at room temperature. Formation of extended defects never occurred and point defects and uncollapsed clusters of point defects were found before amorphization even in the case of light ion implantation. The atomic displacement energy has been estimated to be {approximately}12 eV/atom from the analysis of the damage process in dilute collision cascades. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Electron trapping in amorphous silicon: A quantum molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Lin H.; Kalia, R.K.; Vashishta, P.

    1990-12-01

    Quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations provide the real-time dynamics of electrons and ions through numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schrodinger and Newton equations, respectively. Using the QMD approach we have investigated the localization behavior of an excess electron in amorphous silicon at finite temperatures. For time scales on the order of a few picoseconds, we find the excess electron is localized inside a void of radius {approximately}3 {Angstrom} at finite temperatures. 12 refs.

  3. Charged particle detectors made from thin layers of amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Morel, J.R.

    1986-05-01

    A series of experiments was conducted to determine the feasibility of using hydrogenated amorphous silicon (..cap alpha..-Si:H) as solid state thin film charged particle detectors. /sup 241/Am alphas were successfully detected with ..cap alpha..-Si:H devices. The measurements and results of these experiments are presented. The problems encountered and changes in the fabrication of the detectors that may improve the performance are discussed.

  4. Corrosion In Amorphous-Silicon Solar Cells And Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mon, Gordon R.; Wen, Liang-Chi; Ross, Ronald G., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Paper reports on corrosion in amorphous-silicon solar cells and modules. Based on field and laboratory tests, discusses causes of corrosion, ways of mitigating effects, and consequences for modules already in field. Suggests sealing of edges as way of reducing entry of moisture. Cell-free perimeters or sacrificial electrodes suggested to mitigate effects of sorbed moisture. Development of truly watertight module proves to be more cost-effective than attempting to mitigate effects of moisture.

  5. Optically induced conductivity changes in amorphous silicon: A historical perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Staebler, D.L.

    1997-07-01

    A historical perspective of the discovery of optically induced changes in amorphous silicon is presented in this paper from my personal point of view. It includes the story of how Chris Wronski and the author discovered the effect, the key elements in the R and D environment that lead to the quick realization that the effect was reversible and reproducible, how the research environment supported the rapid publication of their first paper, and a brief look at the effect from today's perspective.

  6. Advances in amorphous silicon alloy multijunction cells and modules

    SciTech Connect

    Guha, S.; Yang, J.; Banerjee, A.; Glatfelter, T.; Hoffman, K.; Xu, X.

    1996-01-01

    We discuss the research directions taken to improve the stable efficiency of amorphous silicon alloy multijunction modules. Use of hydrogen dilution during deposition has resulted in improvement of initial efficiency and stability of the component cells in the triple-junction structure. An innovative laser-interconnected module design has resulted in the reduction of optical and electrical losses in the module down to 1{percent}. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Detection of charged particles in amorphous silicon layers

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, S.N.; Morel, J.R.; Mulera, T.A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Schnurmacher, G.; Street, R.A.

    1985-10-01

    The successful development of radiation detectors made from amorphous silicon could offer the possibility for relatively easy construction of large area position-sensitive detectors. We have conducted a series of measurements with prototype detectors, on signals derived from alpha particles. The measurement results are compared with simple model calculations, and projections are made of potential applications in high-energy and nuclear physics. 4 refs., 7 figs.

  8. Enhanced Multiple Exciton Generation in Amorphous Silicon Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryjevski, Andrei; Mihaylov, Deyan; Kilin, Dmitri

    2015-03-01

    Multiple exciton generation (MEG) in nm-sized hydrogen-passivated silicon nanowires (NWs), and quasi two-dimensional nanofilms depends strongly on the degree of the core structural disorder as shown by the many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) calculations based on the DFT simulations. Here, we use the HSE exchange correlation functional. In MBPT, we work to the 2nd order in the electron-photon coupling and in the approximate screened Coulomb interaction. We also include the effect of excitons for which we solve Bethe-Salpeter Equation. We calculate quantum efficiency (QE), the average number of excitons created by a single absorbed photon, in 3D arrays of Si29H36 quantum dots, NWs, and quasi 2D silicon nanofilms, all with both crystalline and amorphous core structures. Efficient MEG with QE of 1.3 up to 1.8 at the photon energy of about 3Eg , where Eg is the gap, is predicted in these nanoparticles except for the crystalline NW and film where QE ~= 1 . MEG in the amorphous nanoparticles is enhanced by the electron localization due to structural disorder. The exciton effects significantly red-shift QE (Ephoton) curves. Nanometer-sized amorphous silicon NWs and films are predicted to have effective MEG within the solar spectrum range. We acknowledge NSF support (CHE-1413614) for method development.

  9. Femtosecond studies of plasma formation in crystalline and amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuett, Waldemar; Esser, Anton; Seibert, Klaus; Lemmer, Uli; Kurz, Heinrich

    1990-08-01

    Transient pump-probe reflectivity measurements are performed on crystalline and amorphous Silicon samples with 50 fs optical pulses at 2 eV. The excited carrier densities range from 1017cm3 up to a few 1021cm3. In both cases the reflectivity signal is dominated by a Drude-like carrier response. Crystalline Silicon shows a distinct subpicosecond feature due to the cooling of the optically excited hot carriers with a time constant of 200-300 fs. Diffusion and Auger-recombination come into play at higher carrier densities. A superlinear increase of instant reflectivity signal with excitation fluence is due to two-photon absorption (TPA) with a TPA-coeffiecient f:37+-5 cm/GW. In amorphous Silicon the TPA process is not observable. The recovery of the induced negative reflectivity changes is dominated by trapping into bandtail and defect states at lower carrier densities. At higher densities a non-radiative recombination process dominates the relaxation of free carriers in both materials. Comparison with crystalline Silicon clearly demonstrates the enhancement of the Auger-recombination process in disordered materials by more than an order of magnitude.

  10. Empirical and theoretical investigation of the noise performance of indirect detection, active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs) for diagnostic radiology.

    PubMed

    Siewerdsen, J H; Antonuk, L E; el-Mohri, Y; Yorkston, J; Huang, W; Boudry, J M; Cunningham, I A

    1997-01-01

    Noise properties of active matrix, flat-panel imagers under conditions relevant to diagnostic radiology are investigated. These studies focus on imagers based upon arrays with pixels incorporating a discrete photodiode coupled to a thin-film transistor, both fabricated from hydrogenated amorphous silicon. These optically sensitive arrays are operated with an overlying x-ray converter to allow indirect detection of incident x rays. External electronics, including gate driver circuits and preamplification circuits, are also required to operate the arrays. A theoretical model describing the signal and noise transfer properties of the imagers under conditions relevant to diagnostic radiography, fluoroscopy, and mammography is developed. This frequency-dependent model is based upon a cascaded systems analysis wherein the imager is conceptually divided into a series of stages having intrinsic gain and spreading properties. Predictions from the model are compared with x-ray sensitivity and noise measurements obtained from individual pixels from an imager with a pixel format of 1536 x 1920 pixels at a pixel pitch of 127 microns. The model is shown to be in excellent agreement with measurements obtained with diagnostic x rays using various phosphor screens. The model is used to explore the potential performance of existing and hypothetical imagers for application in radiography, fluoroscopy, and mammography as a function of exposure, additive noise, and fill factor. These theoretical predictions suggest that imagers of this general design incorporating a CsI: Tl intensifying screen can be optimized to provide detective quantum efficiency (DQE) superior to existing screen-film and storage phosphor systems for general radiography and mammography. For fluoroscopy, the model predicts that with further optimization of a-Si:H imagers, DQE performance approaching that of the best x-ray image intensifier systems may be possible. The results of this analysis suggest strategies for

  11. Improved method of preparing p-i-n junctions in amorphous silicon semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Madan, A.

    1984-12-10

    A method of preparing p/sup +/-i-n/sup +/ junctions for amorphous silicon semiconductors includes depositing amorphous silicon on a thin layer of trivalent material, such as aluminum, indium, or gallium at a temperature in the range of 200/sup 0/C to 250/sup 0/C. At this temperature, the layer of trivalent material diffuses into the amorphous silicon to form a graded p/sup +/-i junction. A layer of n-type doped material is then deposited onto the intrinsic amorphous silicon layer in a conventional manner to finish forming the p/sup +/-i-n/sup +/ junction.

  12. Electron-beam-induced information storage in hydrogenated amorphous silicon devices

    DOEpatents

    Yacobi, B.G.

    1985-03-18

    A method for recording and storing information in a hydrogenated amorphous silicon device, comprising: depositing hydrogenated amorphous silicon on a substrate to form a charge collection device; and generating defects in the hydrogenated amorphous silicon device, wherein the defects act as recombination centers that reduce the lifetime of carriers, thereby reducing charge collection efficiency and thus in the charge collection mode of scanning probe instruments, regions of the hydrogenated amorphous silicon device that contain the defects appear darker in comparison to regions of the device that do not contain the defects, leading to a contrast formation for pattern recognition and information storage.

  13. The U.S. and Japanese amorphous silicon technology programs A comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimada, K.

    1984-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy/Solar Energy Research Institute Amorphous Silicon (a-Si) Solar Cell Program performs R&D on thin-film hydrogenated amorphous silicon for eventual development of stable amorphous silicon cells with 12 percent efficiency by 1988. The Amorphous Silicon Solar Cell Program in Japan is sponsored by the Sunshine Project to develop an alternate energy technology. While the objectives of both programs are to eventually develop a-Si photovoltaic modules and arrays that would produce electricity to compete with utility electricity cost, the U.S. program approach is research oriented and the Japanese is development oriented.

  14. 360-degree three-dimensional flat panel display using holographic optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabu, Hirofumi; Takeuchi, Yusuke; Yoshimoto, Kayo; Takahashi, Hideya; Yamada, Kenji

    2015-03-01

    We proposed the 360-degree 3D display system which is composed of a flat panel display, a light control film, and holographic optical element (HOE). The HOE is a diffraction grating which is made by holography technique. HOE lens can be produced on the thin polygonal glass plate. The light control film and HOE lenses are used to control the direction of light from the flat panel display in our system. The size of proposed system depends on the size of the flat panel display is because other parts of proposed system are thin and placed on the screen of the flat panel display. HOE lenses and a light control film are used to control lights from multiple pixels of a flat panel display to multiple viewpoints. To display large 3D images and to increase viewpoints, we divided parallax images into striped images and distributed them on the display for multiple viewpoints. Therefore, observers can see the large 3D image around the system. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed system, we made the experimental system. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed system, we constructed the part of the proposed system. The experimental system is composed of the liquid crystal display (LCD), prototype HOE lenses, and light control films. We confirmed that experimental system can display two images to different viewpoints. This paper describes the configuration of the proposed system, and also describes the experimental result.

  15. Grain boundary resistance to amorphization of nanocrystalline silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dong; Gao, Fei; Liu, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Under the C displacement condition, we have used molecular dynamics simulation to examine the effects of grain boundaries (GBs) on the amorphization of nanocrystalline silicon carbide (nc-SiC) by point defect accumulation. The results show that the interstitials are preferentially absorbed and accumulated at GBs that provide the sinks for defect annihilation at low doses, but also driving force to initiate amorphization in the nc-SiC at higher doses. The majority of surviving defects are C interstitials, as either C-Si or C-C dumbbells. The concentration of defect clusters increases with increasing dose, and their distributions are mainly observed along the GBs. Especially these small clusters can subsequently coalesce and form amorphous domains at the GBs during the accumulation of carbon defects. A comparison between displacement amorphized nc-SiC and melt-quenched single crystal SiC shows the similar topological features. At a dose of 0.55 displacements per atom (dpa), the pair correlation function lacks long range order, demonstrating that the nc-SiC is fully amorphilized. PMID:26558694

  16. Grain boundary resistance to amorphization of nanocrystalline silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dong; Gao, Fei; Liu, Bo

    2015-11-01

    Under the C displacement condition, we have used molecular dynamics simulation to examine the effects of grain boundaries (GBs) on the amorphization of nanocrystalline silicon carbide (nc-SiC) by point defect accumulation. The results show that the interstitials are preferentially absorbed and accumulated at GBs that provide the sinks for defect annihilation at low doses, but also driving force to initiate amorphization in the nc-SiC at higher doses. The majority of surviving defects are C interstitials, as either C-Si or C-C dumbbells. The concentration of defect clusters increases with increasing dose, and their distributions are mainly observed along the GBs. Especially these small clusters can subsequently coalesce and form amorphous domains at the GBs during the accumulation of carbon defects. A comparison between displacement amorphized nc-SiC and melt-quenched single crystal SiC shows the similar topological features. At a dose of 0.55 displacements per atom (dpa), the pair correlation function lacks long range order, demonstrating that the nc-SiC is fully amorphilized.

  17. Grain boundary resistance to amorphization of nanocrystalline silicon carbide

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dong; Gao, Fei; Liu, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Under the C displacement condition, we have used molecular dynamics simulation to examine the effects of grain boundaries (GBs) on the amorphization of nanocrystalline silicon carbide (nc-SiC) by point defect accumulation. The results show that the interstitials are preferentially absorbed and accumulated at GBs that provide the sinks for defect annihilation at low doses, but also driving force to initiate amorphization in the nc-SiC at higher doses. The majority of surviving defects are C interstitials, as either C-Si or C-C dumbbells. The concentration of defect clusters increases with increasing dose, and their distributions are mainly observed along the GBs. Especially these small clusters can subsequently coalesce and form amorphous domains at the GBs during the accumulation of carbon defects. A comparison between displacement amorphized nc-SiC and melt-quenched single crystal SiC shows the similar topological features. At a dose of 0.55 displacements per atom (dpa), the pair correlation function lacks long range order, demonstrating that the nc-SiC is fully amorphilized. PMID:26558694

  18. Amorphous silicon technology improvement at CEA-LETI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottin, Eric; Bain, Astrid; Castelein, Pierre; Ouvrier-Buffet, Jean-Louis; Tissot, Jean-Luc; Yon, Jean-Jacques; Chatard, Jean-Pierre

    2002-05-01

    The emergence of uncooled infrared detectors has opened new opportunities for IR imaging both for military and civil applications. Infrared imaging sensors that operate without cryogenic cooling have the potential to provide the military or civilian users with infrared vision capabilities packaged in a camera of extremely small size, weight and power. Uncooled infrared sensor technology has advanced rapidly in the past few years. Higher performance sensors, electronics integration at the sensor, and new concepts for signal processing are generating advanced infrared focal plane arrays. This would significantly reduce the cost and accelerate the implementation of sensors for applications such as surveillance or predictive maintenance. We present the uncooled infrared detector operation principle and the development at CEA/LETI from the 256 x 64 with a pitch of 50 micrometers to the 320 x 240 with a pitch of 35 micrometers . LETI has been involved in Amorphous Silicon uncooled microbolometer development since 1992. This silicon IR detection is now well mastered and matured so that industrial transfer of LETI technology was performed in 2000 towards Sofradir. Industrial production of 320 x 240 microbolometer array with 45micrometers pitch is then started. After a description of the technology and the methodology for reliability enhancement, we present the readout circuit architectures designs and its evolution from the 256 x 64 array to the different version of 320 x 240 arrays. Electro-optical results obtained from these IRCMOS are presented. NEDT close to 30 mK is now obtained with our standard microbolometer amorphous silicon technology.

  19. Enhanced electrochemical etching of ion irradiated silicon by localized amorphization

    SciTech Connect

    Dang, Z. Y.; Breese, M. B. H.; Lin, Y.; Tok, E. S.; Vittone, E.

    2014-05-12

    A tailored distribution of ion induced defects in p-type silicon allows subsequent electrochemical anodization to be modified in various ways. Here we describe how a low level of lattice amorphization induced by ion irradiation influences anodization. First, it superposes a chemical etching effect, which is observable at high fluences as a reduced height of a micromachined component. Second, at lower fluences, it greatly enhances electrochemical anodization by allowing a hole diffusion current to flow to the exposed surface. We present an anodization model, which explains all observed effects produced by light ions such as helium and heavy ions such as cesium over a wide range of fluences and irradiation geometries.

  20. Ultralight amorphous silicon alloy photovoltaic modules for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanak, J. J.; Chen, Englade; Fulton, C.; Myatt, A.; Woodyard, J. R.

    1987-01-01

    Ultralight and ultrathin, flexible, rollup monolithic PV modules have been developed consisting of multijunction, amorphous silicon alloys for either terrestrial or aerospace applications. The rate of progress in increasing conversion efficiency of stable multijunction and multigap PV cells indicates that arrays of these modules can be available for NASA's high power systems in the 1990's. Because of the extremely light module weight and the highly automated process of manufacture, the monolithic a-Si alloy arrays are expected to be strongly competitive with other systems for use in NASA's space station or in other large aerospace applications.

  1. Radiation damage and annealing of amorphous silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byvik, C. E.; Slemp, W. S.; Smith, B. T.; Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1984-01-01

    Amorphous silicon solar cells were irradiated with 1 MeV electrons at the Space Environmental Effects Laboratory of the NASA Langley Research Center. The cells accumulated a total fluence of 10 to the 14th, 10 to the 15th, and 10 to the 16th electrons per square centimeter and exhibited increasing degradation with each irradiation. This degradation was tracked by evaluating the I-V curves for AM0 illumination and the relative spectral response. The observed radiation damage was reversed following an anneal of the cells under vacuum at 200 C for 2 hours.

  2. Progress in amorphous silicon multijunction research at solarex

    SciTech Connect

    Arya, R.R.; Carlson, D.E.; Yang, L.; Chen, L.F.; Willing, F.; Rajan, K.; Jansen, K.; Poplawski, C.; Bradley, D.; Wood, G.

    1997-02-01

    Large strides have been made at Solarex inadvancing amorphous silicon multijunction technology to a maturity level where large-area commercial modules are technically and economically viable. Tandem junction modules (4ft{sup 2}) have been demonstrated with average stabilized efficiency of 8{percent}. While maintaining stabilized efficiency the a-Si alloy deposition time has been reduced by 28{percent} and the material usage reduced by 38{percent}. Progress has also been made in understanding and improving ZnO front contact and stability. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Progress in amorphous silicon PV technology: An update

    SciTech Connect

    Luft, W.; Branz, H.M.; Dalal, V.L.; Hegedus, S.S.; Schiff, E.A.

    1995-07-01

    To reach the 15% stabilized efficiency goal for amorphous silicon (a-Si) modules by the year 2005, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has established four research teams. The teams -- with members from industry, universities, and NREL -- have been in operation for 2.5 years now. Consensus has been reached that a triple-junction a-Si structure is needed to reach the efficiency goal. Performance parameter goals for the overall structure and the three component cells have been formulated. All four teams have generated their own development plans. Individual team progress relative to the plans is reported.

  4. Structural properties of amorphous silicon produced by electron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yamasaki, J.; Takeda, S.

    1999-07-01

    The structural properties of the amorphous Si (a-Si), which was created from crystalline silicon by 2 MeV electron irradiation at low temperatures about 25 K, are examined in detail by means of transmission electron microscopy and transmission electron diffraction. The peak positions in the radial distribution function (RDF) of the a-Si correspond well to those of a-Si fabricated by other techniques. The electron-irradiation-induced a-Si returns to crystalline Si after annealing at 550 C.

  5. Enhanced electrochemical etching of ion irradiated silicon by localized amorphization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Z. Y.; Breese, M. B. H.; Lin, Y.; Tok, E. S.; Vittone, E.

    2014-05-01

    A tailored distribution of ion induced defects in p-type silicon allows subsequent electrochemical anodization to be modified in various ways. Here we describe how a low level of lattice amorphization induced by ion irradiation influences anodization. First, it superposes a chemical etching effect, which is observable at high fluences as a reduced height of a micromachined component. Second, at lower fluences, it greatly enhances electrochemical anodization by allowing a hole diffusion current to flow to the exposed surface. We present an anodization model, which explains all observed effects produced by light ions such as helium and heavy ions such as cesium over a wide range of fluences and irradiation geometries.

  6. Diffusion length measurements of thin amorphous silicon layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Heuvel, J. C.; van Oort, R. C.; Geerts, M. J.

    1989-02-01

    A new method for the analysis of diffusion length measurements by the Surface Photovoltage (SPV) method is presented. It takes into account the effect of the reflection of light from the back contact in thin layers and the effect of a finite bandwidth of the used interference filters. The model was found to agree with experiments on thin amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) layers. It is shown that in the region were these effects are negligible this method is equivalent to the standard method.

  7. Improvement of illumination uniformity for LED flat panel light by using micro-secondary lens array.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hsiao-Wen; Lin, Bor-Shyh

    2012-11-01

    LED flat panel light is an innovative lighting product in recent years. However, current flat panel light products still contain some drawbacks, such as narrow lighting areas and hot spots. In this study, a micro-secondary lens array technique was proposed and applied for the design of the light guide surface to improve the illumination uniformity. By using the micro-secondary lens array, the candela distribution of the LED flat panel light can be adjusted to similar to batwing distribution to improve the illumination uniformity. The experimental results show that the enhancement of the floor illumination uniformity is about 61%, and that of the wall illumination uniformity is about 20.5%. PMID:23187654

  8. Improvement of illumination uniformity for LED flat panel light by using micro-secondary lens array.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hsiao-Wen; Lin, Bor-Shyh

    2012-11-01

    LED flat panel light is an innovative lighting product in recent years. However, current flat panel light products still contain some drawbacks, such as narrow lighting areas and hot spots. In this study, a micro-secondary lens array technique was proposed and applied for the design of the light guide surface to improve the illumination uniformity. By using the micro-secondary lens array, the candela distribution of the LED flat panel light can be adjusted to similar to batwing distribution to improve the illumination uniformity. The experimental results show that the enhancement of the floor illumination uniformity is about 61%, and that of the wall illumination uniformity is about 20.5%. PMID:23326825

  9. Flat-panel see-through three-dimensional display based on integral imaging.

    PubMed

    Takaki, Yasuhiro; Yamaguchi, Yuta

    2015-04-15

    This study proposes a technique to construct a flat-panel see-through three-dimensional (3D) display based on integral imaging. This display consists of multiple lens arrays, a transparent flat-panel display, and a light-blocking wall (LBW). Rays behind the display are reconstructed in front of it by combination of the lens arrays and the LBW to provide the see-through function. The combination of one of the lens arrays and the transparent flat-panel display produces full-parallax 3D images, which are superimposed on background images. The experimental system is constructed to verify the proposed technique. The see-through and superposition capabilities of the experimental system are demonstrated. PMID:25872096

  10. Athermal shear-transformation-zone theory of amorphous plastic deformation. II. Analysis of simulated amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchbinder, Eran; Langer, J. S.; Procaccia, Itamar

    2007-03-01

    In the preceding paper, we developed an athermal shear-transformation-zone (STZ) theory of amorphous plasticity. Here we use this theory in an analysis of numerical simulations of plasticity in amorphous silicon by Demkowicz and Argon (DA). In addition to bulk mechanical properties, those authors observed internal features of their deforming system that challenge our theory in important ways. We propose a quasithermodynamic interpretation of their observations in which the effective disorder temperature, generated by mechanical deformation well below the glass temperature, governs the behavior of other state variables that fall in and out of equilibrium with it. Our analysis points to a limitation of either the step-strain procedure used by DA in their simulations, or the STZ theory in its ability to describe rapid transients in stress-strain curves, or perhaps to both. Once we allow for this limitation, we are able to bring our theoretical predictions into accurate agreement with the simulations.

  11. Chemical vapor deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon from disilane

    SciTech Connect

    Bogaert, R.J.; Russell, T.W.F.; Klein, M.T. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Rocheleau, R.E.; Baron, B.N. . Inst. of Energy Conversion)

    1989-10-01

    The authors describe hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin films deposited at growth rates of 1 to 30 A/s by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from disilane source gas at 24 torr total pressure in a tubular reactor. The effects of substrate temperature and gas holding time (flow rate) on film growth rate and effluent gas composition were measured at temperatures ranging from 360{sup 0} to 485{sup 0}C and gas holding times from 3 to 62s. Effluent gases determined by gas chromatography included silane, disilane and other higher order silanes. A chemical reaction engineering model, based on a silylene (SiH/sub 2/) insertion gas phase reaction network and film growth from both SiH/sub 2/ and high molecular weight silicon species, Si/sub n/H/sub 2n/, was developed. The model predictions were in good agreement with experimentally determined growth rates and effluent gas compositions.

  12. Chemical vapor deposition of boron-doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis F.B. Jr.; Delahoy, A.E.

    1985-07-15

    Deposition conditions and film properties for a variety of boron-doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon films and silicon-carbon films produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) are discussed. Deposition gases include monosilane, disilane, trisilane, and acetylene. Two types of optically wide band-gap p layers are obtained. One of these window p layers (without carbon) has been extensively tested in photovoltaic devices. Remarkably, this p layer can be deposited between about 200 to 300 /sup 0/C. A typical open circuit voltage in an all CVD p-i-n device is 0.70--0.72 V, and in a hybrid device where the i and n layers are deposited by glow discharge, 0.8--0.83 V.

  13. Lithium concentration dependent structure and mechanics of amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitinamaluwa, H. S.; Wang, M. C.; Will, G.; Senadeera, W.; Zhang, S.; Yan, C.

    2016-06-01

    A better understanding of lithium-silicon alloying mechanisms and associated mechanical behavior is essential for the design of Si-based electrodes for Li-ion batteries. Unfortunately, the relationship between the dynamic mechanical response and microstructure evolution during lithiation and delithiation has not been well understood. We use molecular dynamic simulations to investigate lithiated amorphous silicon with a focus to the evolution of its microstructure, phase composition, and stress generation. The results show that the formation of LixSi alloy phase is via different mechanisms, depending on Li concentration. In these alloy phases, the increase in Li concentration results in reduction of modulus of elasticity and fracture strength but increase in ductility in tension. For a LixSi system with uniform Li distribution, volume change induced stress is well below the fracture strength in tension.

  14. Optical absorption of ion-beam sputtered amorphous silicon coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinlechner, Jessica; Martin, Iain W.; Bassiri, Riccardo; Bell, Angus; Fejer, Martin M.; Hough, Jim; Markosyan, Ashot; Route, Roger K.; Rowan, Sheila; Tornasi, Zeno

    2016-03-01

    Low mechanical loss at low temperatures and a high index of refraction should make silicon optimally suited for thermal noise reduction in highly reflective mirror coatings for gravitational wave detectors. However, due to high optical absorption, amorphous silicon (aSi) is unsuitable for being used as a direct high-index coating material to replace tantala. A possible solution is a multimaterial design, which enables exploitation of the excellent mechanical properties of aSi in the lower coating layers. The possible number of aSi layers increases with absorption reduction. In this work, the optimum heat treatment temperature of aSi deposited via ion-beam sputtering was investigated and found to be 450 °C . For this temperature, the absorption after deposition of a single layer of aSi at 1064 nm and 1550 nm was reduced by more than 80%.

  15. Super multi-view display with a lower resolution flat-panel display.

    PubMed

    Takaki, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Kosuke; Nakamura, Junya

    2011-02-28

    A lenticular-type super multi-view (SMV) display normally requires an ultra high-resolution flat-panel display. To reduce this resolution requirement, two or more views are generated around each eye with an interval smaller than the pupil diameter. Cylindrical lenses constituting a lenticular lens project a group of pixels of the flat-panel display to generate a group of viewing zones. Pixel groups generating left and right viewing zones through the same cylindrical lens are partitioned to separate the two zones. The left and right pixel groups for different cylindrical lenses are interlaced horizontally. A prototype SMV display is demonstrated. PMID:21369242

  16. Amorphous silicon-carbon alloys and amorphous carbon from direct methane and ethylene activation by ECR

    SciTech Connect

    Conde, J.P.; Chu, V.; Giorgis, F.; Pirri, C.F.; Arekat, S.

    1997-07-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon-carbon alloys are prepared using electron-cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Hydrogen is introduced into the source resonance cavity as an excitation gas. Silane is introduced in the main chamber in the vicinity of the plasma stream, whereas the carbon source gases, methane or ethylene, are introduced either with the silane or with the hydrogen as excitation gases. The effect of the type of carbon-source gas, excitation gas mixture and silane-to-carbon source gas flow ratio on the deposition rate, bandgap, subgap density of states, spin density and hydrogen evolution are studied.

  17. Chemical vapor deposition of amorphous silicon films from disilane

    SciTech Connect

    Bogaert, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Amorphous silicon films for fabrication of solar cells have been deposited by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from disilane (Si/sub 2/H/sub 6/) using a tubular flow reactor. A mathematical description for the CVD reactor was developed and solved by a numerical procedure. The proposed chemical reaction network for the model is based on silylene (SiH/sub 2/) insertion in the gas phase and film growth from SiH/sub 2/ and silicon polymers (Si/sub n/N/sub 2n/, n approx. 10). Estimates of the rate constants have been obtained for trisilane decomposition, silicon polymer formation, and polymer dehydrogenation. The silane unimolecular decomposition rate constants were corrected for pressure effects. The model behavior is compared to the experimental results over the range of conditions: reactor temperature (360 to 485/sup 0/C), pressures (2 to 48 torr), and gas holding time (1 to 70 s). Within the above range of conditions, film growth rate varies from 0.01 to 30 A/s. Results indicate that silicon polymers are the main film precursors for gas holding times greater than 3 s. Film growth by silylene only becomes important at short holding times, large inert gas dilution, and positions near the beginning of the reactor hot zone.

  18. Hydrogen structures in heavily hydrogenated crystalline and amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, W.G.; Franz, A.; Chabal, Y.; Weldon, M.K.; Jin, H.C.; Abelson, J.R.

    1998-12-31

    The hydrogen binding energy distribution and IR spectra of hydrogen platelets in c-Si have been measured and compared to H in other forms of silicon including hydrogenated polycrystalline and amorphous Si. The binding distribution for platelet containing samples, determined using H evolution, exhibits two peaks: a bulk peak at 1.8--1.9 eV below the transport barrier, and a second possibly surface related peak 1.8--1.9 eV below the surface evolution barrier. The bulk peak grows at 250 C and is consistent with calculated energies for platelet structures. The same two evolution peaks are found in hydrogenated polycrystalline Si and amorphous silicon. The IR spectra for heavily hydrogenated c-Si are dominated by the stretching modes at 2076 and 2128 cm{sup {minus}1}. Most surprisingly there appears to be a strong mode at 856 cm{sup {minus}1} which is associated with a deformation mode of SiH{sub 3}. Even more surprising, this SiH{sub 3} 856 cm{sup {minus}1} mode remains until 550 C indicating that the SiH{sub 3} containing structures are rather stable.

  19. Geometric photovoltaics applied to amorphous silicon thin film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, Timothy

    Geometrically generalized analytical expressions for device transport are derived from first principles for a photovoltaic junction. Subsequently, conventional planar and unconventional coaxial and hemispherical photovoltaic architectures are applied to detail the device physics of the junction based on their respective geometry. For the conventional planar cell, the one-dimensional transport equations governing carrier dynamics are recovered. For the unconventional coaxial and hemispherical junction designs, new multi-dimensional transport equations are revealed. Physical effects such as carrier generation and recombination are compared for each cell architecture, providing insight as to how non-planar junctions may potentially enable greater energy conversion efficiencies. Numerical simulations are performed for arrays of vertically aligned, nanostructured coaxial and hemispherical amorphous silicon solar cells and results are compared to those from simulations performed for the standard planar junction. Results indicate that fundamental physical changes in the spatial dependence of the energy band profile across the intrinsic region of an amorphous silicon p-i-n junction manifest as an increase in recombination current for non-planar photovoltaic architectures. Despite an increase in recombination current, however, the coaxial architecture still appears to be able to surpass the efficiency predicted for the planar geometry, due to the geometry of the junction leading to a decoupling of optics and electronics.

  20. Anharmonicity Rise the Thermal Conductivity in Amorphous Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Wei; Henry, Asegun

    We recently proposed a new method called Direct Green-Kubo Modal Analysis (GKMA) method, which has been shown to calculate the thermal conductivity (TC) of several amorphous materials accurately. A-F method has been widely used for amorphous materials. However, researchers have found out that it failed on several different materials. The missing component of A-F method is the harmonic approximation and considering only the interactions of modes with similar frequencies, which neglect interactions of modes with large frequency difference. On the contrary, GKMA method, which is based on molecular dynamics, intrinsically includes all types of phonon interactions. In GKMA method, each mode's TC comes from both mode self-correlations (autocorrelations) and mode-mode correlations (crosscorrelations). We have demonstrated that the GKMA predicted TC of a-Si from Tersoff potential is in excellent agreement with one of experimental results. In this work, we will present the GKMA applications on a-Si using multiple potentials and gives us more insight of the effect of anharmonicity on the TC of amorphous silicon. This research was supported Intel grant AGMT DTD 1-15-13 and computational resources by NSF supported XSEDE resources under allocations DMR130105 and TG- PHY130049.

  1. Electrical characteristics of amorphous molybdenum-nickel contacts to silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kung, K. T.-Y.; Nicolet, M.-A.; Suni, I.

    1984-01-01

    The electrical characteristics of sputtered, amorphous Mo-Ni contacts have been measured on both p- and n-type Si, as functions of composition (30, 54, and 58 at. percent Mo). The contact resistivity on both p(+) and n(+) Si is in the 0.00000 ohm sq cm range. The barrier height for as-deposited samples varies between phi-bp = 0.47-0.42 V on p-type Si and between phi-bn = 0.63-0.68 V on n-type Si, as the composition of the amorphous layer goes from Ni-rich to Mo-rich. The sum phi-bp + phi-bn always equals 1.12 V, within experimental error. After thermal treatment at 500 C for 1/2 h, the contact resistivity changes by a factor of two or less, while the barrier height changes by at most approximately 0.05 V. In light of these results, the amorphous Mo-Ni film makes good ohmic contacts to silicon.

  2. Theory of structural transformation in lithiated amorphous silicon.

    PubMed

    Cubuk, Ekin D; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2014-07-01

    Determining structural transformations in amorphous solids is challenging due to the paucity of structural signatures. The effect of the transitions on the properties of the solid can be significant and important for applications. Moreover, such transitions may not be discernible in the behavior of the total energy or the volume of the solid as a function of the variables that identify its phases. These issues arise in the context of lithiation of amorphous silicon (a-Si), a promising anode material for high-energy density batteries based on lithium ions. Recent experiments suggest the surprising result that the lithiation of a-Si is a two-phase process. Here, we present first-principles calculations of the structure of a-Si at different lithiation levels. Through a detailed analysis of the short and medium-range properties of the amorphous network, using Voronoi-Delaunay methods and ring statistics, we show that a-LixSi has a fundamentally different structure below and above a lithiation level corresponding to x ∼ 2. PMID:24911996

  3. High Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Films and Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    He, Rongrui; Day, Todd D; Sparks, Justin R; Sullivan, Nichole F; Badding, John V

    2016-07-01

    Thin films of hydrogenated amorphous silicon can be produced at MPa pressures from silane without the use of plasma at temperatures as low as 345 °C. High pressure chemical vapor deposition may open a new way to low cost deposition of amorphous silicon solar cells and other thin film structures over very large areas in very compact, simple reactors. PMID:27174318

  4. Sputtered pin amorphous silicon semi-conductor device and method therefor

    DOEpatents

    Moustakas, Theodore D.; Friedman, Robert A.

    1983-11-22

    A high efficiency amorphous silicon PIN semi-conductor device is constructed by the sequential sputtering of N, I and P layers of amorphous silicon and at least one semi-transparent ohmic electrode. A method of construction produces a PIN device, exhibiting enhanced physical integrity and facilitates ease of construction in a singular vacuum system and vacuum pump down procedure.

  5. Highly featured amorphous silicon nanorod arrays for high-performance lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Soleimani-Amiri, Samaneh; Safiabadi Tali, Seied Ali; Azimi, Soheil; Sanaee, Zeinab; Mohajerzadeh, Shamsoddin

    2014-11-10

    High aspect-ratio vertical structures of amorphous silicon have been realized using hydrogen-assisted low-density plasma reactive ion etching. Amorphous silicon layers with the thicknesses ranging from 0.5 to 10 μm were deposited using radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique. Standard photolithography and nanosphere colloidal lithography were employed to realize ultra-small features of the amorphous silicon. The performance of the patterned amorphous silicon structures as a lithium-ion battery electrode was investigated using galvanostatic charge-discharge tests. The patterned structures showed a superior Li-ion battery performance compared to planar amorphous silicon. Such structures are suitable for high current Li-ion battery applications such as electric vehicles.

  6. Electron-beam-induced information storage in hydrogenated amorphous silicon device

    DOEpatents

    Yacobi, Ben G.

    1986-01-01

    A method for recording and storing information in a hydrogenated amorphous silicon device, comprising: depositing hydrogenated amorphous silicon on a substrate to form a charge-collection device; and generating defects in the hydrogenated amorphous silicon device, wherein the defects act as recombination centers that reduce the lifetime of carriers, thereby reducing charge-collection efficiency; and thus in the charge-collection mode of scanning probe instruments, regions of the hydrogenated amorphous silicon device that contain the defects appear darker in comparison to regions of the device that do not contain the defects, leading to a contrast formation for pattern recognition and information storage, in the device, which darkened areas can be restored to their original charge-collection efficiency by heating the hydrogenated amorphous silicon to a temperature of about 100.degree. C. to 250.degree. C. for a sufficient period of time to provide for such restoration.

  7. Analysis of a free-running synchronization artifact correction for MV-imaging with aSi:H flat panels

    SciTech Connect

    Mooslechner, Michaela; Mitterlechner, Bernhard; Weichenberger, Harald; Sedlmayer, Felix; Deutschmann, Heinz; Huber, Stefan

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Solid state flat panel electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) are widely used for megavolt (MV) photon imaging applications in radiotherapy. In addition to their original purpose in patient position verification, they are convenient to use in quality assurance and dosimetry to verify beam geometry and dose deposition or to perform linear accelerator (linac) calibration procedures. However, native image frames from amorphous silicon (aSi:H) detectors show a range of artifacts which have to be eliminated by proper correction algorithms. When a panel is operated in free-running frame acquisition mode, moving vertical stripes (periodic synchronization artifacts) are a disturbing feature in image frames. Especially for applications in volumetric intensity modulated arc therapy (VMAT) or motion tracking, the synchronization (sync) artifacts are the limiting factor for potential and accuracy since they become even worse at higher frame rates and at lower dose rates, i.e., linac pulse repetition frequencies (PRFs). Methods: The authors introduced a synchronization correction method which is based on a theoretical model describing the interferences of the panel's readout clocking with the linac's dose pulsing. Depending on the applied PRF, a certain number of dose pulses is captured per frame which is readout columnwise, sequentially. The interference of the PRF with the panel readout is responsible for the period and the different gray value levels of the sync stripes, which can be calculated analytically. Sync artifacts can then be eliminated multiplicatively in precorrected frames without additional information about radiation pulse timing. Results: For the analysis, three aSi:H EPIDs of various types were investigated with 6 and 15 MV photon beams at varying PRFs of 25, 50, 100, 200, and 400 pulses per second. Applying the sync correction at panels with gadolinium oxysulfide scintillators improved single frame flood field image quality drastically

  8. Mechanism of the growth of amorphous and microcrystalline silicon from silicon tetrafluoride and hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Y.; Chen, J.; Campbell, I. H.; Fauchet, P. M.; Wagner, S.

    1990-02-01

    We study the growth of amorphous (a-Si:H,F) and of microcrystalline (μc-Si) silicon over trench patterns in crystalline silicon substrates. We vary the conditions of the SiF4-H2 glow discharge from deposition to etching. All deposited films form lips at the trench mouth and are uniformly thick on the trench walls. Therefore, surface diffusion is not important. The results of a Monte Carlo simulation suggest that film growth is governed by a single growth species with a low (˜0.2) sticking coefficient, in combination with a highly reactive etching species.

  9. 76 FR 9360 - In the Matter of Certain Flat Panel Digital Televisions and Components Thereof; Notice of a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-17

    ... August 19, 2010, based on a complaint filed by Vizio, Inc. of Irvine, California. 75 FR 51285-86 (August... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Flat Panel Digital Televisions and Components Thereof; Notice of a... within the United States after importation of certain flat panel digital televisions and...

  10. High Performance Molybdenum Disulfide Amorphous Silicon Heterojunction Photodetector

    PubMed Central

    Esmaeili-Rad, Mohammad R.; Salahuddin, Sayeef

    2013-01-01

    One important use of layered semiconductors such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) could be in making novel heterojunction devices leading to functionalities unachievable using conventional semiconductors. Here we demonstrate a metal-semiconductor-metal heterojunction photodetector, made of MoS2 and amorphous silicon (a-Si), with rise and fall times of about 0.3 ms. The transient response does not show persistent (residual) photoconductivity, unlike conventional a-Si devices where it may last 3–5 ms, thus making this heterojunction roughly 10X faster. A photoresponsivity of 210 mA/W is measured at green light, the wavelength used in commercial imaging systems, which is 2−4X larger than that of a-Si and best reported MoS2 devices. The device could find applications in large area electronics, such as biomedical imaging, where a fast response is critical. PMID:23907598