Science.gov

Sample records for amorphous titanium dioxide

  1. An amorphous titanium dioxide metal insulator metal selector device for resistive random access memory crossbar arrays with tunable voltage margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortese, Simone; Khiat, Ali; Carta, Daniela; Light, Mark E.; Prodromakis, Themistoklis

    2016-01-01

    Resistive random access memory (ReRAM) crossbar arrays have become one of the most promising candidates for next-generation non volatile memories. To become a mature technology, the sneak path current issue must be solved without compromising all the advantages that crossbars offer in terms of electrical performances and fabrication complexity. Here, we present a highly integrable access device based on nickel and sub-stoichiometric amorphous titanium dioxide (TiO2-x), in a metal insulator metal crossbar structure. The high voltage margin of 3 V, amongst the highest reported for monolayer selector devices, and the good current density of 104 A/cm2 make it suitable to sustain ReRAM read and write operations, effectively tackling sneak currents in crossbars without compromising fabrication complexity in a 1 Selector 1 Resistor (1S1R) architecture. Furthermore, the voltage margin is found to be tunable by an annealing step without affecting the device's characteristics.

  2. Insertion energetics of lithium, sodium, and magnesium in crystalline and amorphous titanium dioxide: A comparative first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legrain, Fleur; Malyi, Oleksandr; Manzhos, Sergei

    2015-03-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has been proposed as a potential electrode material for lithium, sodium, and magnesium ion batteries. Among the phases of TiO2, anatase, rutile, and (B)-TiO2 are the most commonly used phases for electrochemical storage, while the amorphous phase has also been shown to be a promising candidate. We present a comparative density functional theory study of the insertion energetics of Li, Na, and Mg into anatase, rutile, and (B)-TiO2, as well as into the amorphous phase. Our results show that among the crystalline phases, (B)-TiO2 provides the strongest binding between TiO2 and the inserted Li/Na/Mg atom. We also find that for all Li, Na, and Mg, the amorphous phase provides insertion sites well-dispersed in energies, with a lowest energy site more thermodynamically favorable than insertion sites in the crystalline phases. We also obtain the localized Ti3+ states together with the formation of the defect states in the band gap, which are induced by the insertion, at the GGA level of theory (without the Hubbard correction).

  3. Opportunities in the electrowinning of molten titanium from titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Vuuren, D. S.; Engelbrecht, A. D.; Hadley, T. D.

    2005-10-01

    The value chain of titanium products shows that the difference between the cost of titanium ingot and titanium dioxide is about 9/kg titanium. In contrast, the price of aluminum, which is produced in a similar way, is only about 1.7/kg. Electrowinning of molten titanium from titanium dioxide is therefore believed to have significant potential to reduce the cost of titanium products. The process is hampered by the high operating temperatures and sophisticated materials of construction required; the high affinity of titanium for carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen; and physical and chemical properties of the different titanium oxide species when reducing titanium from Ti4+ to metallic titanium.

  4. 21 CFR 73.2575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.2575 Section 73.2575 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive titanium dioxide shall conform in identity and specifications to the...

  5. 21 CFR 73.3126 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.3126 Section 73.3126 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3126 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive titanium dioxide (CAS Reg. No. 13463-67-7), Color Index No. 77891,...

  6. 40 CFR 180.1195 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Titanium dioxide. 180.1195 Section 180.1195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS... Titanium dioxide. Titanium dioxide (CAS Reg. No. 13463-67-7) is exempted from the requirement of...

  7. 21 CFR 73.3126 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.3126 Section 73.3126 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3126 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive titanium dioxide (CAS Reg. No. 13463-67-7), Color Index No. 77891,...

  8. 21 CFR 73.3126 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.3126 Section 73.3126 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3126 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive titanium dioxide (CAS Reg. No. 13463-67-7), Color Index No. 77891,...

  9. 21 CFR 73.2575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.2575 Section 73.2575 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive titanium dioxide shall conform in identity and specifications to the...

  10. 21 CFR 73.3126 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.3126 Section 73.3126 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3126 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive titanium dioxide (CAS Reg. No. 13463-67-7), Color Index No. 77891,...

  11. 21 CFR 73.2575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.2575 Section 73.2575 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive titanium dioxide shall conform in identity and specifications to the...

  12. 21 CFR 73.1575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.1575 Section 73.1575 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications. (1) The color additive titanium dioxide shall conform in identity and specifications to the...

  13. 21 CFR 73.1575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.1575 Section 73.1575 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications. (1) The color additive titanium dioxide shall conform in identity and specifications to the...

  14. 21 CFR 73.1575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.1575 Section 73.1575 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications. (1) The color additive titanium dioxide shall conform in identity and specifications to the...

  15. 21 CFR 73.1575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.1575 Section 73.1575 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications. (1) The color additive titanium dioxide shall conform in identity and specifications to the...

  16. 40 CFR 180.1195 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Titanium dioxide. 180.1195 Section 180.1195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS... Titanium dioxide. Titanium dioxide (CAS Reg. No. 13463-67-7) is exempted from the requirement of...

  17. 40 CFR 180.1195 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Titanium dioxide. 180.1195 Section 180.1195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS... Titanium dioxide. Titanium dioxide is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance for residues in or...

  18. 21 CFR 73.2575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.2575 Section 73.2575 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive titanium dioxide shall conform in identity and specifications to the...

  19. 40 CFR 180.1195 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Titanium dioxide. 180.1195 Section 180.1195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS... Titanium dioxide. Titanium dioxide is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance for residues in or...

  20. 40 CFR 180.1195 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Titanium dioxide. 180.1195 Section 180.1195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS... Titanium dioxide. Titanium dioxide is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance for residues in or...

  1. 21 CFR 73.3126 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.3126 Section 73.3126 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3126 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive titanium dioxide (CAS Reg. No. 13463-67-7), Color Index No. 77891,...

  2. 21 CFR 73.1575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.1575 Section 73.1575 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications. (1) The color additive titanium dioxide shall conform in identity and specifications to the...

  3. 21 CFR 73.2575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.2575 Section 73.2575 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive titanium dioxide shall conform in identity and specifications to the...

  4. 21 CFR 73.575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... hydrochloric acid. (c) Uses and restrictions. The color additive titanium dioxide may be safely used for..., not more than 0.3 percent. Acid soluble substances, not more than 0.5 percent. TiO2, not less than...

  5. 21 CFR 73.575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... hydrochloric acid. (c) Uses and restrictions. The color additive titanium dioxide may be safely used for..., not more than 0.3 percent. Acid soluble substances, not more than 0.5 percent. TiO2, not less than...

  6. 21 CFR 73.575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... hydrochloric acid. (c) Uses and restrictions. The color additive titanium dioxide may be safely used for..., not more than 0.3 percent. Acid soluble substances, not more than 0.5 percent. TiO2, not less than...

  7. 21 CFR 73.575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... hydrochloric acid. (c) Uses and restrictions. The color additive titanium dioxide may be safely used for..., not more than 0.3 percent. Acid soluble substances, not more than 0.5 percent. TiO2, not less than...

  8. 21 CFR 73.575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... hydrochloric acid. (c) Uses and restrictions. The color additive titanium dioxide may be safely used for..., not more than 0.3 percent. Acid soluble substances, not more than 0.5 percent. TiO2, not less than...

  9. Influence Of Carboxymethyl Cellulose For The Transport Of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles In Clean Silica And Mineral-Coated Sands

    EPA Science Inventory

    The transport properties of titanium dioxide (anatase polymorph) nanoparticles encapsulated by carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) were evaluated as a function of changes in the solute chemical properties in clean quartz, amorphous aluminum and iron hydroxide-coated sands. While prist...

  10. Genotoxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Yan, Jian; Li, Yan

    2014-03-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO(2)-NPs, <100 nm) are increasingly being used in pharmaceuticals and cosmetics due to the unique properties derived from their small sizes. However, their large surface-area to mass ratio and high redox potential may negatively impact human health and the environment. TiO(2)-NPs can cause inflammation, pulmonary damage, fibrosis, and lung tumors and they are possibly carcinogenic to humans. Because cancer is a disease involving mutation, there are a large number of studies on the genotoxicity of TiO(2)-NPs. In this article, we review the results that have been reported in the literature, with a focus on data generated from the standard genotoxicity assays. The data include genotoxicity results from the Ames test, in vitro and in vivo Comet assay, in vitro and in vivo micronucleus assay, sister chromatid exchange assay, mammalian cell hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase gene assay, the wing somatic mutation and recombination assay, and the mouse phosphatidylinositol glycan, class A gene assay. Inconsistent results have been found in these assays, with both positive and negative responses being reported. The in vitro systems for assessing the genotoxicity of TiO(2)-NPs have generated a greater number of positive results than the in vivo systems, and tests for DNA and chromosome damage have produced more positive results than the assays measuring gene mutation. Nearly all tests for measuring the mutagenicity of TiO(2)-NPs were negative. The current data indicate that the genotoxicity of TiO(2)-NPs is mediated mainly through the generation of oxidative stress in cells. PMID:24673907

  11. Chemistry of titanium dioxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormick, John

    With increasing energy costs, government regulations, and an expanding population, alternative low-cost methods for the treatment of waste air and water have shown renewed interest. The utilization of solar energy to promote catalytic reactions, including photodegradation of pollutants, is an attractive and well-established field of research. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles are the most widely employed catalyst material in photocatalytic studies. Owing to its high surface area and electronic structure, the anatase phase of TiO 2 is an excellent photocatalyst. However, a detailed understanding of the physical, chemical, and electronic properties of TiO2 that influence the photocatalytic reaction rate does not exist. One goal of this work is the determination of how the degradation rate over TiO2 nanoparticle is influenced by the particle size. To meet this goal, detailed analysis of the particles was carried out using standard catalytic techniques combined with infrared spectroscopy to probe the decomposition of an organic probe molecule, formic acid. It was shown using infrared spectroscopy that the size of the particle does influence the rate of photodegradation. However for particles as small as five nanometers, the increased rate could be described by accounting for the increased surface area of the particles. Novel synthesis conditions for the synthesis of high purity particles is required to develop a better understanding of how the size can influence the particle's catalytic properties. Combustion synthesis serves as an attractive method for the synthesis of high purity TiO2 nanoparticles. The high temperatures present in a combustion flame promotes the decomposition of organometallic precursors and subsequent synthesis of metal oxide nanoparticles. Numerous synthesis conditions can influence the product powder. This research investigated some of these conditions for the synthesis of TiO2 nanoparticles. Additionally the thermal properties of TiO2 nanoparticles

  12. Array of titanium dioxide nanostructures for solar energy utilization

    DOEpatents

    Qiu, Xiaofeng; Parans Paranthaman, Mariappan; Chi, Miaofang; Ivanov, Ilia N; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2014-12-30

    An array of titanium dioxide nanostructures for solar energy utilization includes a plurality of nanotubes, each nanotube including an outer layer coaxial with an inner layer, where the inner layer comprises p-type titanium dioxide and the outer layer comprises n-type titanium dioxide. An interface between the inner layer and the outer layer defines a p-n junction.

  13. Photohole Induced Corrosion of Titanium Dioxide: Mechanism and Solutions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Ling, Yichuan; Wang, Gongming; Liu, Tianyu; Wang, Fuxin; Zhai, Teng; Tong, Yexiang; Li, Yat

    2015-10-14

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has been extensively investigated as photoanode for water oxidation, as it is believed to be one of the most stable photoanode materials. Yet, we surprisingly found that TiO2 photoanodes (rutile nanowire, anatase nanotube, and P25 nanoparticle film) suffered from substantial photocurrent decay in neutral (Na2SO4) as well as basic (KOH) electrolyte solution. Photoelectrochemical measurements togehter with electron microscopy studies performed on rutile TiO2 nanowire photoanode show that the photocurrent decay is due to photohole induced corrosion, which competes with water oxidation reaction. Further studies reveal that photocurrent decay profile in neutral and basic solutions are fundamentally different. Notably, the structural reconstruction of nanowire surface occurs simultaneously with the corrosion of TiO2 in KOH solution resulting in the formation of an amorphous layer of titanium hydroxide, which slows down the photocorrosion. Based on this discovery, we demonstrate that the photoelectrochemical stability of TiO2 photoanode can be significantly improved by intentionally coating an amorphous layer of titanium hydroxide on the nanowire surface. The pretreated TiO2 photaonode exhibits an excellent photocurrent retention rate of 97% after testing in KOH solution for 72 h, while in comparison the untreated sample lost 10-20% of photocurrent in 12 h under the same measurement conditions. This work provides new insights in understanding of the photoelectrochemical stability of bare TiO2 photoanodes. PMID:26426759

  14. Method for synthesis of titanium dioxide nanotubes using ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Jun; Luo, Huimin; Dai, Sheng

    2013-11-19

    The invention is directed to a method for producing titanium dioxide nanotubes, the method comprising anodizing titanium metal in contact with an electrolytic medium containing an ionic liquid. The invention is also directed to the resulting titanium dioxide nanotubes, as well as devices incorporating the nanotubes, such as photovoltaic devices, hydrogen generation devices, and hydrogen detection devices.

  15. Adsorption of octylamine on titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siwińska, Daria; Kołodziejczak-Radzimska, Agnieszka; Krysztafkiewicz, Andrzej; Jesionowski, Teofil

    2009-05-01

    Processes of adsorption and desorption of a model active substance (octylamine) on the surface of unmodified titanium dioxide (E 171) have been performed. The effects of concentration of octylamine and time of the process on the character of adsorption have been studied and the efficiency of the adsorption/desorption has been determined. The samples obtained have been studied by X-ray diffraction. The nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms, particle size distribution and absorption capacities of water, dibutyl phthalate and paraffin oil have been determined. The efficiency of octylamine adsorption on the surface of the titanium dioxide has been found positively correlated with the concentration of octylamine in the initial solution. The desorption of octylamine has decreased with increasing concentration of this compound adsorbed. For octylamine in low concentrations the physical adsorption has been found to dominate, which is desirable when using TiO 2 in the production of pharmaceuticals.

  16. Amorphous Alloy Surpasses Steel and Titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    In the same way that the inventions of steel in the 1800s and plastic in the 1900s sparked revolutions for industry, a new class of amorphous alloys is poised to redefine materials science as we know it in the 21st century. Welcome to the 3rd Revolution, otherwise known as the era of Liquidmetal(R) alloys, where metals behave similar to plastics but possess more than twice the strength of high performance titanium. Liquidmetal alloys were conceived in 1992, as a result of a project funded by the California Institute of Technology (CalTech), NASA, and the U.S. Department of Energy, to study the fundamentals of metallic alloys in an undercooled liquid state, for the development of new aerospace materials. Furthermore, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center contributed to the development of the alloys by subjecting the materials to testing in its Electrostatic Levitator, a special instrument that is capable of suspending an object in midair so that researchers can heat and cool it in a containerless environment free from contaminants that could otherwise spoil the experiment.

  17. Ag-doped titanium dioxide gas sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaei Sheini, Navid; Rohani, Mahsa

    2016-03-01

    Titanium dioxide has been utilized for the fabrication of oxygen sensitive ceramic bodies. In this work, disk-shaped TiO2 pellets are fabricated by the sintering of the press- formed anatase powder at 1000°C. Two silver contacts are printed on one of the top base of each sample. Silver wire segments are connected to the printed electrodes. It is shown that the gradual diffusion of silver into titanium dioxide from the electrodes profoundly affects the resistive properties of the ceramic samples. SEM, XRD and EDAX analyses are carried out to determine the position of the silver diffused in the structure. At 35°C, before silver diffusion, the electrical resistance of the device decreases ten times in response to the presence of 3000 ppm ethanol contamination. Sensitivity (Rair/Rgas) to reducing gases is severely affected by the silver doping level in the titanium dioxide. The progress of silver diffusion continuously decreases the sensitivity till it become less than one. Further progress in silver diffusion brings the devices to the condition at which the resistance increases at the presents of reducing gases. In this condition, inverse sensitivities (Rgas/Rair) as large as 103 are demonstrated.

  18. Magnetic susceptibility of tetragonal titanium dioxide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Pankey, T.; Grant, F.A.

    1960-01-01

    Careful measurements have been made of the magnetic susceptibility of the rutile and anatase crystalline forms of titanium dioxide. The magnetic susceptibility of a single crystal of high-purity rutile was found to be (0.067??0.0015)??10-6 emu per gram, and was temperature-independent from 55??to 372??K. Difficulty was encountered in obtaining a good value of the magnetic susceptibility of anatase because of impurities. However, a value of 0.02??10-6 emu per gram was obtained as a maximum value for anatase powder. A discussion is given for the different values obtained for anatase and rutile. ?? 1960 The American Physical Society.

  19. Titanium dioxide slot waveguides for visible wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Häyrinen, Markus; Roussey, Matthieu; Säynätjoki, Antti; Kuittinen, Markku; Honkanen, Seppo

    2015-04-01

    We present the first, to our knowledge, experimental demonstration of a titanium dioxide slot waveguide operating in the visible range of light. Ring resonators based on slot waveguides were designed, fabricated, and characterized for λ≃650  nm. The fabrication method includes atomic layer deposition, electron beam lithography, and reactive ion etching. The required narrow slot widths of a few tens of nanometers were achieved by using a conformal atomic layer re-coating technique. This unique feature-size-reduction technique was applied after the final etching step. PMID:25967172

  20. Cathodic electrodeposition of nanocrystalline titanium dioxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Natarajan, C.; Nogami, G.

    1996-05-01

    A new technique for depositing nanocrystalline titanium dioxide thin films on electronically conducting glass was developed. This technique is a two-stage process: (i) cathodic electrodeposition of titanium oxyhydroxide gel film from aqueous solution containing a Ti precursor and (ii) subsequent heat-treatment of this gel film results in the formation of titanium dioxide film. The deposition potential may have a considerable effect on the formation of nanocrystalline film. The nanocrystalline titanium dioxide film shows reversible electrochromism in lithium-ion-containing organic electrolyte. The coloration and bleaching throughout the visible and near-IR range can be switched on and off within a few seconds.

  1. Nanostructures having crystalline and amorphous phases

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Samuel S; Chen, Xiaobo

    2015-04-28

    The present invention includes a nanostructure, a method of making thereof, and a method of photocatalysis. In one embodiment, the nanostructure includes a crystalline phase and an amorphous phase in contact with the crystalline phase. Each of the crystalline and amorphous phases has at least one dimension on a nanometer scale. In another embodiment, the nanostructure includes a nanoparticle comprising a crystalline phase and an amorphous phase. The amorphous phase is in a selected amount. In another embodiment, the nanostructure includes crystalline titanium dioxide and amorphous titanium dioxide in contact with the crystalline titanium dioxide. Each of the crystalline and amorphous titanium dioxide has at least one dimension on a nanometer scale.

  2. Silver Doped Titanium Dioxide Humidity Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooshiar Zare, Ali; Mohammadi, Somayye

    2011-02-01

    The effect of silver doping on the sensitivity, dynamic range and the response time of a titanium dioxide-based resistive humidity sensor is studied. Sample pallets were prepared by sintering the dry pressed samples at 900°C in air. Silver was added to the ceramic raw material in the form of AgNO3 which was decomposed during the sintering process. Large area silver electrodes were deposited on the sintered disks by paste printing. The resistance and the response time of the various pallets containing different additive levels were measured at relative humidity range of 4-100%. Silver doping, substantially increased the sensitivity to the ambient humidity. Moreover, it resulted in faster responses; the response time of the silver added pallets were about four times shorter than the pure ones.

  3. Mesoporous titanium dioxide coating for metallic implants.

    PubMed

    Xia, Wei; Grandfield, Kathryn; Hoess, Andreas; Ballo, Ahmed; Cai, Yanling; Engqvist, Håkan

    2012-01-01

    A bioactive mesoporous titanium dioxide (MT) coating for surface drug delivery has been investigated to develop a multifunctional implant coating, offering quick bone bonding and biological stability. An evaporation induced self-assembly (EISA) method was used to prepare a mesoporous titanium dioxide coating of the anatase phase with BET surface area of 172 m(2)/g and average pore diameter of 4.3 nm. Adhesion tests using the scratch method and an in situ screw-in/screw-out technique confirm that the MT coating bonds tightly with the metallic substrate, even after removal from bone. Because of its high surface area, the bioactivity of the MT coating is much better than that of a dense TiO(2) coating of the same composition. Quick formation of hydroxyapatite (HA) in vitro can be related to enhance bonding with bone. The uptake of antibiotics by the MT coating reached 13.4 mg/cm(3) within a 24 h loading process. A sustained release behavior has been obtained with a weak initial burst. By using Cephalothin as a model drug, drug loaded MT coating exhibits a sufficient antibacterial effect on the material surface, and within millimeters from material surface, against E.coli. Additionally, the coated and drug loaded surfaces showed no cytotoxic effect on cell cultures of the osteoblastic cell line MG-63. In conclusion, this study describes a novel, biocompatiblemesoporous implant coating, which has the ability to induce HA formation and could be used as a surface drug-delivery system. PMID:21954047

  4. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles cause genotoxicity in human lung epithelial cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of engineered nanoparticles in consumer products is steadily increasing. However, the health effects of exposure to these nanoparticles are not thoroughly understood. This study investigated the genotoxicity of six titanium dioxide and two cerium oxide nanoparticles of va...

  5. Correlation of lattice distortion with photocatalytic activity of titanium dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xia; Shui Miao Li Rongsheng; Song Yue

    2008-08-04

    The photocatalytic activity of titanium dioxide dispersions on X-3B pigment degradation has been investigated. A variety of factors that would influence the photocatalytic activity such as crystallite size, lattice distortion, and anatase content are discussed in detail. It is found that lattice distortion is the most important one among these factors and is expected to inhibit the hole and electron pair recombination. It determines, to some extent, the photocatalytic efficiency of titanium dioxide dispersions.

  6. Synthesis and characterization of nano-manganese dioxide and titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peddi, Sasya

    Nano sized manganese dioxide was synthesized using hydrothermal and co-precipitation methods by the reduction of hydrogen peroxide and potassium permanganate in respective methods. The co-precipitation method of synthesis was expanded to synthesize nano sized Titanium Dioxide. Characterization of the synthesized material was carried out by Elemental Analysis, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA), Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA), Infra Red Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). SEM analysis showed that the MnO2 prepared by hydrothermal method is made of spherical nanoparticles with sizes ranging from 15 nm--30 nm and the MnO2 prepared by co-precipitation method showed nanospheres of 20 nm--100 nm with several nano disks incorporated in these sphere of about 5 nm--50 nm in diameter. X-ray revealed that the MnO2 prepared by hydrothermal shows two different transitions from amorphous MnO2 to crystalline Mn2O3 and Mn2O3- Mn2O 3 Bixbyte with substantial amount of unreacted PVP in it, which is lost when heated to higher temperatures which are supported by data from DTA and TGA. In co-precipitation only one transition is observed that is from amorphous MnO2 to crystalline Mn2O3 Bixbyte and traces of unreacted PVP. Titanium Dioxide synthesized using PVP led to uniform spherical nano particles of 20 nm--100 nm with some unreacted PVP. X-Ray analysis shows one transition from amorphous TiO2 to crystalline TiO 2 Anatase. The TiO2 prepared without PVP is poorly crystalline to X-rays and identified as Brookite when heated to higher temperature. The SEM micrographs of TiO2 without PVP did not show any uniformity in particle size and shape distribution and lost homogeneity. The results from our study suggest that the clean, uniform and homogeneous nanoparticles can be prepared using a simple, room temperature, non-expensive co-precipitation method using PVP.

  7. Dichloromethane photodegradation using titanium catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Tanguay, J.F.; Suib, S.L.; Coughlin, R.W. )

    1989-06-01

    The use of titanium dioxide and titanium aluminosilicates in the photocatalytic destruction of chlorinated hydrocarbons is investigated. Titanium-exchanged clays, titanium-pillared clays, and titanium dioxide in the amorphous, anatase, and rutile forms are used to photocatalytically degrade dichloromethane to hydrochloric acid and carbon dioxide. Bentonite clays pillared by titanium dioxide are observed to be more catalytically active than titanium-exchanged clays. Clays pillared by titanium aluminum polymeric cations display about the same catalytic activity as that of titanium-exchanged clays. The rutile form of titanium dioxide is the most active catalyst studied for the dichloromethane degradation reaction. The anatase form of titanium dioxide supported on carbon felt was also used as a catalyst. This material is about five times more active than titanium dioxide-pillared clays. Degradation of dichloromethane using any of these catalysts can be enhanced by oxygen enrichment of the reaction solution or by preirradiating the catalyst with light.

  8. Cytotoxicity of titanium and silicon dioxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Stefanie; Münzer, Simon; Behrens, Peter; Scheper, Thomas; Bahnemann, Detlef; Kasper, Cornelia

    2009-05-01

    Different TiO2 and SiO2 nanoparticles have been tested concerning their toxicity on selected mammalian cell lines. Various powders and suspensions, all of which consist of titanium or silicon dioxide nanoparticles have been examined. These particles differ in the crystal structure, the size and the BET-surface area. There was also a classification in fixed particles and in particles easily accessible in solution. With focus on the possible adsorption of the nanoparticles into the human organism, via skin and via respiratory tract, the effects on fibroblasts (NIH-3T3) and on a human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cell line were examined. Additionally, the particles were tested with HEP-G2 cells, which are often used as model cell line for biocompatibility tests, and PC-12 cells, a rat adrenal pheochromocytoma cell line. The viability of the cells was examined by the MTT-test. The viability results were found to partly depend on the type of cells used. The experimental results show that the adhesion of the cells on the different powders strongly depends on the type of cell lines as well as on the type of powder. It was found that the lower viability of some cells on the powder coatings is not only caused by a cytotoxicity effect of the powders, but is also due to a lower adhesion of the cells on the particle surfaces. Furthermore, it could be shown that the physical properties of the powders cannot be easily correlated to any observed biological effect. While some powders show a significant suppression of the cell growth, others with similar physical properties indicate no toxic effect.

  9. Processing, microstructure, and mechanical behavior of titanium dioxide nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Grant Alan

    Titanium dioxide nanotubes are of considerable interest for use in hydrogen generation, solar cells, chemical sensors, and bioactive coatings. In this study, nanotube coatings were fabricated on a Ti substrate via anodic oxidation. A novel hierarchical coating consisting of nanotubes (˜50 nm diameter) on the nano-scale and large pores/pits (˜1-20 mum) on the micro-scale was developed. This coating has potential for use as a bioactive coating on Ti bone implants. The mechanisms for nanotube formation and microscopic pitting were discussed. Microstructure characterization was conducted using scanning electron microscopy, focused ion beam, transmission electron microscopy, and image analysis. The effect of processing variables (i.e. time, temperature, pH) on nanotube characteristics (i.e. diameter, wall thickness, length) and hierarchical structure (i.e. pit/pore size and density) was studied. Anodization time was found to affect nanotube length and microscopic pit size and density. Lowering the electrolyte pH decreased the nanotube length and microscopic pit density. Increasing electrolyte temperature decreased nanotube length and increased pit/pore density. Anodization time, pH, and temperature, showed little effect on nanotube diameter or wall thickness. Microscopic pitting in the nanotube coating was found to occur above grain boundaries in the Ti substrate and above Ti grains with (0001) orientation. It was discovered that neighboring nanotubes are connected by ridges on the tube walls and an incoherent interface is formed between crystalline Ti and amorphous titanium dioxide. The influence of Ti substrate orientation on the growth kinetics and nanotube morphology was examined. Ti grains with surface orientations near (0001) experience retarded nanotube growth compared to (xxx0) orientations. This orientation dependence is likely related to differences in atomic density. Conventional nanoindentation and interfacial force microscopy (IFM), was employed to probe

  10. Biological Activity of Mesoporous Dendrimer-Coated Titanium Dioxide: Insight on the Role of the Surface-Interface Composition and the Framework Crystallinity.

    PubMed

    Milowska, Katarzyna; Rybczyńska, Aneta; Mosiolek, Joanna; Durdyn, Joanna; Szewczyk, Eligia M; Katir, Nadia; Brahmi, Younes; Majoral, Jean-Pierre; Bousmina, Mosto; Bryszewska, Maria; El Kadib, Abdelkrim

    2015-09-16

    Hitherto, the field of nanomedicine has been overwhelmingly dominated by the use of mesoporous organosilicas compared to their metal oxide congeners. Despite their remarkable reactivity, titanium oxide-based materials have been seldom evaluated and little knowledge has been gained with respect to their "structure-biological activity" relationship. Herein, a fruitful association of phosphorus dendrimers (both "ammonium-terminated" and "phosphonate-terminated") and titanium dioxide has been performed by means of the sol-gel process, resulting in mesoporous dendrimer-coated nanosized crystalline titanium dioxide. A similar organo-coating has been reproduced using single branch-mimicking dendrimers that allow isolation of an amorphous titanium dioxide. The impact of these materials on red blood cells was evaluated by studying cell hemolysis. Next, their cytotoxicity toward B14 Chinese fibroblasts and their antimicrobial activity were also investigated. Based on their variants (cationic versus anionic terminal groups and amorphous versus crystalline titanium dioxide phase), better understanding of the role of the surface-interface composition and the nature of the framework has been gained. No noticeable discrimination was observed for amorphous and crystalline material. In contrast, hemolysis and cytotoxicity were found to be sensitive to the nature of the interface composition, with the ammonium-terminated dendrimer-coated titanium dioxide being the most hemolytic and cytotoxic material. This surface-functionalization opens the door for creating a new synergistic machineries mechanism at the cellular level and seems promising for tailoring the biological activity of nanosized organic-inorganic hybrid materials. PMID:26305597

  11. Instrument comparison for Aerosolized Titanium Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranpara, Anand

    Recent toxicological studies have shown that the surface area of ultrafine particles (UFP i.e., particles with diameters less than 0.1 micrometer) has a stronger correlation with adverse health effects than does mass of these particles. Ultrafine titanium dioxide (TiO2) particles are widely used in industry, and their use is associated with adverse health outcomes, such as micro vascular dysfunctions and pulmonary damages. The primary aim of this experimental study was to compare a variety of laboratory and industrial hygiene (IH) field study instruments all measuring the same aerosolized TiO2. The study also observed intra-instrument variability between measurements made by two apparently identical devices of the same type of instrument placed side-by-side. The types of instruments studied were (1) DustTrak(TM) DRX, (2) Personal Data RAMs(TM) (PDR), (3) GRIMM, (4) Diffusion charger (DC) and (5) Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS). Two devices of each of the four IH field study instrument types were used to measure six levels of mass concentration of fine and ultrafine TiO2 aerosols in controlled chamber tests. Metrics evaluated included real-time mass, active surface area and number/geometric surface area distributions, and off-line gravimetric mass and morphology on filters. DustTrak(TM) DRXs and PDRs were used for mass concentration measurements. DCs were used for active surface area concentration measurements. GRIMMs were used for number concentration measurements. SMPS was used for inter-instrument comparisons of surface area and number concentrations. The results indicated that two apparently identical devices of each DRX and PDR were statistically not different with each other for all the trials of both the sizes of powder (p < 5%). Mean difference between mass concentrations measured by two DustTrak DRX devices was smaller than that measured by two PDR devices. DustTrak DRX measurements were closer to the reference method, gravimetric mass concentration

  12. Photoluminescence of nanocrystalline titanium dioxide films loaded with silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preclíková, Jana; Galář, Pavel; Trojánek, František; Rezek, Bohuslav; Němcová, Yvonne; Malý, Petr

    2011-04-01

    We report on a systematic study of the photoluminescence properties of nanocrystalline titanium dioxide films loaded with silver nanoparticles under various ambient conditions: in the temperature interval of 10 to 300 K, under different values of ambient air pressure (5 to 105 Pa), and under visible light irradiation that causes the photochromic transformation of the film. Our results enable us to follow the electron transfer from titanium dioxide into silver nanoparticles and to observe the oxidation of silver nanoparticles during the photochromic transformation. We propose a microscopic model explaining the behavior of extinction and photoluminescence of the Ag-TiO2 film under different values of ambient air pressure.

  13. 40 CFR 415.220 - Applicability; description of the titanium dioxide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... titanium dioxide production subcategory. 415.220 Section 415.220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Titanium Dioxide Production Subcategory § 415.220 Applicability; description of the titanium dioxide production subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges to waters of the United...

  14. 40 CFR 415.220 - Applicability; description of the titanium dioxide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... titanium dioxide production subcategory. 415.220 Section 415.220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Titanium Dioxide Production Subcategory § 415.220 Applicability; description of the titanium dioxide production subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges to waters of the United...

  15. 40 CFR 415.220 - Applicability; description of the titanium dioxide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... titanium dioxide production subcategory. 415.220 Section 415.220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Titanium Dioxide Production Subcategory § 415.220 Applicability; description of the titanium dioxide production subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges to waters of the United...

  16. 40 CFR 415.220 - Applicability; description of the titanium dioxide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... titanium dioxide production subcategory. 415.220 Section 415.220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Titanium Dioxide Production Subcategory § 415.220 Applicability; description of the titanium dioxide production subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges to waters of the United...

  17. 40 CFR 415.220 - Applicability; description of the titanium dioxide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... titanium dioxide production subcategory. 415.220 Section 415.220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Titanium Dioxide Production Subcategory § 415.220 Applicability; description of the titanium dioxide production subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges to waters of the United...

  18. Adsorption of selenium by amorphous iron oxyhydroxide and manganese dioxide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balistrieri, L.S.; Chao, T.T.

    1990-01-01

    This work compares and models the adsorption of selenium and other anions on a neutral to alkaline surface (amorphous iron oxyhydroxide) and an acidic surface (manganese dioxide). Selenium adsorption on these oxides is examined as a function of pH, particle concentration, oxidation state, and competing anion concentration in order to assess how these factors might influence the mobility of selenium in the environment. The data indicate that 1. 1) amorphous iron oxyhydroxide has a greater affinity for selenium than manganese dioxide, 2. 2) selenite [Se(IV)] adsorption increases with decreasing pH and increasing particle concentration and is stronger than selenate [Se(VI)] adsorption on both oxides, and 3. 3) selenate does not adsorb on manganese dioxide. The relative affinity of selenate and selenite for the oxides and the lack of adsorption of selenate on a strongly acidic surface suggests that selenate forms outer-sphere complexes while selenite forms inner-sphere complexes with the surfaces. The data also indicate that the competition sequence of other anions with respect to selenite adsorption at pH 7.0 is phosphate > silicate > molybdate > fluoride > sulfate on amorphous iron oxyhydroxide and molybdate ??? phosphate > silicate > fluoride > sulfate on manganese dioxide. The adsorption of phosphate, molybdate, and silicate on these oxides as a function of pH indicates that the competition sequences reflect the relative affinities of these anions for the surfaces. The Triple Layer surface complexation model is used to provide a quantitative description of these observations and to assess the importance of surface site heterogeneity on anion adsorption. The modeling results suggest that selenite forms binuclear, innersphere complexes with amorphous iron oxyhydroxide and monodentate, inner-sphere complexes with manganese dioxide and that selenate forms outer-sphere, monodentate complexes with amorphous iron oxyhydroxide. The heterogeneity of the oxide surface sites

  19. Inactivation of Escherichia coli by titanium dioxide photocatalytic oxidation.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Titanium dioxide in the anatase crystalline form was used as a photocatalyst to generate hydroxyl radicals in a flowthrough water reactor. Experiments were performed on pure cultures of Escherichia coli in dechlorinated tap water and a surface water sample to evaluate the disinfe...

  20. Photocatalytic oxidation mechanism of alkanes in contact with titanium dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Formenti, M.; Juillet, F.; Teichner, S. J.

    1977-01-01

    Isobutane was photooxidized on titanium dioxide between -16 and +180 C in tertiary butanol and acetone. The formation of tertiary butanol preceded the formation of acetone. Above 20 C the latter compound became clearly predominant. The reaction kinetics obeyed a steady state model of oxygen chemisorption with the involvement of isobutane in the physisorbed phase.

  1. Nanomaterial Case Studies: Nanoscale Titanium Dioxide (External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This draft document presents two case studies of nanoscale titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) used (1) to remove arsenic from drinking water and (2) as an active ingredient in topical sunscreen. The draft case studies are organized around a comprehensive environmental asses...

  2. Ultra-rapid photocatalytic activity of Azadirachta indica engineered colloidal titanium dioxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankar, Renu; Rizwana, Kadarmohideen; Shivashangari, Kanchi Subramanian; Ravikumar, Vilwanathan

    2015-08-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles were effectively synthesized from aqueous leaf extract of Azadirachta indica under pH and temperature-dependent condition. 5 mM titanium isopropoxide solution worked as a primary source for the synthesis of titanium dioxide nanoparticles. The green synthesized titanium dioxide nanoparticles were confirmed by UV-Vis spectroscopy. Fourier transform infrared spectrum of synthesized titanium dioxide nanoparticles authorized the presence of bioactive compounds in the leaf extract, which may play a role as capping and reducing agent. The high-resolution scanning electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering analyses results showed the interconnected spherical in shape titanium dioxide nanoparticles having a mean particle size of 124 nm and a zeta potential of -24 mV. Besides, the colloidal titanium dioxide nanoparticles energetically degrade the industrially harmful methyl red dye under bright sunlight.

  3. Silica and titanium dioxide nanoparticles cause pregnancy complications in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Kohei; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Higashisaka, Kazuma; Mimura, Kazuya; Morishita, Yuki; Nozaki, Masatoshi; Yoshida, Tokuyuki; Ogura, Toshinobu; Nabeshi, Hiromi; Nagano, Kazuya; Abe, Yasuhiro; Kamada, Haruhiko; Monobe, Youko; Imazawa, Takayoshi; Aoshima, Hisae; Shishido, Kiyoshi; Kawai, Yuichi; Mayumi, Tadanori; Tsunoda, Shin-Ichi; Itoh, Norio; Yoshikawa, Tomoaki; Yanagihara, Itaru; Saito, Shigeru; Tsutsumi, Yasuo

    2011-05-01

    The increasing use of nanomaterials has raised concerns about their potential risks to human health. Recent studies have shown that nanoparticles can cross the placenta barrier in pregnant mice and cause neurotoxicity in their offspring, but a more detailed understanding of the effects of nanoparticles on pregnant animals remains elusive. Here, we show that silica and titanium dioxide nanoparticles with diameters of 70 nm and 35 nm, respectively, can cause pregnancy complications when injected intravenously into pregnant mice. The silica and titanium dioxide nanoparticles were found in the placenta, fetal liver and fetal brain. Mice treated with these nanoparticles had smaller uteri and smaller fetuses than untreated controls. Fullerene molecules and larger (300 and 1,000 nm) silica particles did not induce these complications. These detrimental effects are linked to structural and functional abnormalities in the placenta on the maternal side, and are abolished when the surfaces of the silica nanoparticles are modified with carboxyl and amine groups.

  4. Electrical transport and thermometry of electroformed titanium dioxide memristive switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghetti, Julien; Strukov, Dmitri B.; Pickett, Matthew D.; Yang, J. Joshua; Stewart, Duncan R.; Williams, R. Stanley

    2009-12-01

    We investigated the electrical transport of electroformed titanium dioxide memristive switches from liquid helium to room temperatures in order to better understand their internal states. After electroforming, we observed a continuous transition between two distinct limiting behaviors: a nearly Ohmic "ON"-state and an "OFF"-state characterized by conduction through a barrier. We interpret our data in terms of a model in which the electroforming step creates a conducting channel that does not completely bridge the metal contacts on the titanium dioxide film. The switching then occurs as a result of voltage-induced changes in the oxygen vacancy concentration in the gap between the tip of the channel and the adjacent metal contact. We used the metallic resistivity of the conduction channel as an in situ thermometer to measure the local device temperature, thus revealing an important implicit state variable.

  5. Oxidation of Tyrosine-Phosphopeptides by Titanium Dioxide Photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Ruokolainen, Miina; Ollikainen, Elisa; Sikanen, Tiina; Kotiaho, Tapio; Kostiainen, Risto

    2016-06-22

    Protein phosphorylation has a key role in cell regulation. Oxidation of proteins, in turn, is related to many diseases and to aging, but the effects of phosphorylation on the oxidation of proteins and peptides have been rarely studied. The aim of this study was to examine the mechanistic effect of phosphorylation on peptide oxidation induced by titanium dioxide photocatalysis. The effect of phosphorylation was compared between nonphosphorylated and tyrosine phosphorylated peptides using electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. We observed that tyrosine was the most preferentially oxidized amino acid, but the oxidation reaction was significantly inhibited by its phosphorylation. The study also shows that titanium dioxide photocatalysis provides a fast and easy method to study oxidation reactions of biomolecules, such as peptides. PMID:27268440

  6. Titanium dioxide, single-walled carbon nanotube composites

    DOEpatents

    Yao, Yuan; Li, Gonghu; Gray, Kimberly; Lueptow, Richard M.

    2015-07-14

    The present invention provides titanium dioxide/single-walled carbon nanotube composites (TiO.sub.2/SWCNTs), articles of manufacture, and methods of making and using such composites. In certain embodiments, the present invention provides membrane filters and ceramic articles that are coated with TiO.sub.2/SWCNT composite material. In other embodiments, the present invention provides methods of using TiO.sub.2/SWCNT composite material to purify a sample, such as a water or air sample.

  7. Milestones in Functional Titanium Dioxide Thermal Spray Coatings: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardon, M.; Guilemany, J. M.

    2014-04-01

    Titanium dioxide has been the most investigated metal oxide due to its outstanding performance in a wide range of applications, chemical stability and low cost. Coating processes that can produce surfaces based on this material have been deeply studied. Nevertheless, the necessity of coating large areas by means of rapid manufacturing processes renders laboratory-scale techniques unsuitable, leading to a noteworthy interest from the thermal spray (TS) community in the development of significant intellectual property and a large number of scientific publications. This review unravels the relationship between titanium dioxide and TS technologies with the aim of providing detailed information related to the most significant achievements, lack of knowhow, and performance of TS TiO2 functional coatings in photocatalytic, biomedical, and other applications. The influence of thermally activated techniques such as atmospheric plasma spray and high-velocity oxygen fuel spray on TiO2 feedstock based on powders and suspensions is revised; the influence of spraying parameters on the microstructural and compositional changes and the final active behavior of the coating have been analyzed. Recent findings on titanium dioxide coatings deposited by cold gas spray and the capacity of this technology to prevent loss of the nanostructured anatase metastable phase are also reviewed.

  8. Grafting Strategy to Develop Single Site Titanium on an Amorphous Silica Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Capel-Sanchez, M.; Blanco-Brieva, G; Campos-Martin, J; de Frutos, M; Wen, W; Rodriguez, J; Fierro, J

    2009-01-01

    Titanium/silica systems were prepared by grafting a titanium alkoxide (titanium isopropoxide and titanium (triethanolaminate) isopropoxide) precursor onto amorphous silica. The grafting process, which consisted of the hydrolysis of the Ti precursor by the hydroxyl groups on the silica surface, yielded samples containing Ti-loadings of 1-1.6 wt %. The as synthesized and calcined TiO2-SiO2 samples were characterized by UV-vis, FTIR, XPS, and XANES spectroscopic techniques. These systems were tested in the liquid-phase epoxidation of oct-1-ene with hydrogen peroxide reaction. Spectroscopic data indicated that titanium anchoring takes place by reaction between the alkoxide precursor and surface OH groups of the silica substrate. The nature of surface titanium species generated by chemical grafting depends largely on the titanium precursor employed. Thus, the titanium isopropoxide precursor yields tetrahedrally coordinated polymeric titanium species, which give rise to a low-efficiency catalyst. However, if an atrane precursor (titanium (triethanolaminate) isopropoxide) is employed, isolated titanium species are obtained. The fact that these species remain isolated even after calcination is due to the protective effect of the triethanolaminate ligand that avoids titanium polymerization. These differences in the titanium environment have a pivotal role in the performance of these systems in the epoxidation of alkenes with hydrogen peroxide.

  9. Titanium Dioxide Volatility in High Temperature Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, QynhGiao N.

    2008-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) containing materials are of high interest to the aerospace industry due to its high temperature capability, strength, and light weight. As with most metals an exterior oxide layer naturally exists in environments that contain oxygen (i.e. air). At high temperatures, water vapor plays a key role in the volatility of materials including oxide surfaces. This study will evaluate cold pressed titanium dioxide (TiO2) powder pellets at a temperature range of 1400 C - 1200 C in water containing environments to determine the volatile hydroxyl species using the transpiration method. The water content ranged from 0-76 mole% and the oxygen content range was 0-100 mole % during the 20-250 hour exposure times. Preliminary results indicate that oxygen is not a key contributor at these temperatures and the following reaction is the primary volatile equation for all three temperatures: TiO2 (s) + H2O (g) = TiO(OH)2 (g).

  10. Light-induced chemical vapour deposition painting with titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halary-Wagner, E.; Bret, T.; Hoffmann, P.

    2003-03-01

    Light-induced chemical vapour deposits of titanium dioxide are obtained from titanium tetra-isopropoxide (TTIP) in an oxygen and nitrogen atmosphere with a long pulse (250 ns) 308 nm XeCl excimer laser using a mask projection set-up. The demonstrated advantages of this technique are: (i) selective area deposition, (ii) precise control of the deposited thickness and (iii) low temperature deposition, enabling to use a wide range of substrates. A revolving mask system enables, in a single reactor load, to deposit shapes of controlled heights, which overlap to build up a complex pattern. Interferential multi-coloured deposits are achieved, and the process limitations (available colours and resolution) are discussed.

  11. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles in Food and Personal Care Products

    PubMed Central

    Weir, Alex; Westerhoff, Paul; Fabricius, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Titanium dioxide is a common additive in many food, personal care, and other consumer products used by people, which after use can enter the sewage system, and subsequently enter the environment as treated effluent discharged to surface waters or biosolids applied to agricultural land, incinerated wastes, or landfill solids. This study quantifies the amount of titanium in common food products, derives estimates of human exposure to dietary (nano-) TiO2, and discusses the impact of the nanoscale fraction of TiO2 entering the environment. The foods with the highest content of TiO2 included candies, sweets and chewing gums. Among personal care products, toothpastes and select sunscreens contained 1% to >10% titanium by weight. While some other crèmes contained titanium, despite being colored white, most shampoos, deodorants, and shaving creams contained the lowest levels of titanium (<0.01 μg/mg). For several high-consumption pharmaceuticals, the titanium content ranged from below the instrument detection limit (0.0001 μg Ti/mg) to a high of 0.014 μg Ti/mg. Electron microscopy and stability testing of food-grade TiO2 (E171) suggests that approximately 36% of the particles are less than 100 nm in at least one dimension and that it readily disperses in water as fairly stable colloids. However, filtration of water solubilized consumer products and personal care products indicated that less than 5% of the titanium was able to pass through 0.45 or 0.7 μm pores. Two white paints contained 110 μg Ti/mg while three sealants (i.e., prime coat paint) contained less titanium (25 to 40 μg Ti/mg). This research showed that while many white-colored products contained titanium, it was not a prerequisite. Although several of these product classes contained low amounts of titanium, their widespread use and disposal down the drain and eventually to WWTPs deserves attention. A Monte Carlo human exposure analysis to TiO2 through foods identified children as having the highest

  12. Titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, G.J.

    1997-01-01

    The article contains a summary of factors pertinent to titanium use. Geology and exploitation, production processes, global production, titanium dioxide and alloy applications, and the titanium market are reviewed. Potential applications outlined are for oil and gas equipment and for the automotive industry. Titanium alloys were selected for drilling risers for North Sea oil and gas drilling platforms due to a high strength-to-weight ratio and corrosion resistance. These properties also make titanium alloys attractive for auto parts, although the cost is currently prohibitive.

  13. Doped titanium dioxide nanocrystalline powders with high photocatalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, A.L.; Jumas, J.-C.; Costa, F.M.

    2009-07-15

    Doped titanium dioxide nanopowders (M:TiO{sub 2}; M=Fe, Co, Nb, Sb) with anatase structure were successfully synthesized through an hydrothermal route preceded by a precipitation doping step. Structural and morphological characterizations were performed by powder XRD and TEM. Thermodynamic stability studies allowed to conclude that the anatase structure is highly stable for all doped TiO{sub 2} prepared compounds. The photocatalytic efficiency of the synthesized nanopowders was tested and the results showed an appreciable enhancement in the photoactivity of the Sb:TiO{sub 2} and Nb:TiO{sub 2}, whereas no photocatalytic activity was detected for the Fe:TiO{sub 2} and Co:TiO{sub 2} nanopowders. These results were correlated to the doping ions oxidation states, determined by Moessbauer spectroscopy and magnetization data. - Graphical abstract: Doped titanium dioxide nanopowders (M:TiO{sub 2}; M=Fe, Co, Nb, Sb) with highly stable anatase structure were successfully synthesized through an hydrothermal route. The photocatalytic efficiencies of the synthesized nanopowders were tested and the results show an appreciable enhancement in the photoactivity of the Sb:TiO{sub 2} and Nb:TiO{sub 2}.

  14. Control of the Synthesis of Submicron Titanium Dioxide Particles in a Continuous Plasma-Chemical Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aul'chenko, S. M.; Kartaev, V.

    2015-11-01

    A simulation of the formation and growth of titanium dioxide particles in the working zone of a plasma-chemical reactor has been performed. The possibility of use of the premixing of reagents (titanium tetrachloride and oxygen) outside the reactor for increasing the yield of the final product was investigated. Calculations of the formation and growth of titanium dioxide particles were performed for different values of parameters of the physical and mathematical model of the process.

  15. Highly reliable spin-coated titanium dioxide dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Sandip; Kumar, Arvind; Rao, K. S. R. Koteswara; Venkataraman, V.

    2016-05-01

    Dielectric degradation as low as 0.3 % has been observed for a highly reliable Titanium dioxide (TiO2) film after constant voltage stressing (CVS) with - 4 V for 105 second at room temperature (300 K). The film was fabricated by sol -gel spin - coating method on a lightly doped p-Si (~1015 cm-3) substrate. The equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) is 7 nm with a dielectric constant 33 (at 1 MHz). Metal - Oxide - Semiconductor (MOS) capacitors have been fabricated with an optimum annealing temperature of 800°C for one hour in a preheated furnace. The dielectric degradation is annealing temperature dependent. A degradation of 1.4 %, 1.2 % and 1.1 % has been observed for 400°C, 600°C and 1000°C temperature annealed MOS respectively. The dielectric degradation increases below or above the optimum temperature of annealing.

  16. Solar cell enhancement using metallic nanoparticles embedded in titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, Max A.; Allen, Kenneth W.; Fiddy, Michael A.

    2015-02-01

    In this work we model the effects of depositing gold nanospheres of varying radii and spatial separations onto a 500nm film of silicon in an effort to couple more light into silicon through the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of the nanoparticles. To further enhance the field at the interface, we study the effect of embedding the spheres within the dielectrics air, NBK7, and titanium dioxide (TiO2). The modeling is done through finite element analysis via COMSOL over the radiation spectrum (0.4μm 1.5μm) of the sun. A positive size dependency of the light coupled into silicon and the radii of the spheres is found and analyzed. Use of dielectrics greater than air, NBK7 and TiO2, results in greater field enhancement at the silicon interface.

  17. Titanium dioxide nanoswords with highly reactive, photocatalytic facets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosnowchik, Brian D.; Chiamori, Heather C.; Ding, Yong; Ha, Jong-Yoon; Wang, Zhong Lin; Lin, Liwei

    2010-12-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is one of the most widely studied and important materials for catalysis, photovoltaics, and surface science applications, but the ability to consistently control the relative exposure of higher surface energy facets during synthesis remains challenging. Here, we present the repeatable synthesis of highly reactive, rutile {001} or {101} facets on broad, sword-shaped TiO2 nanostructures rapidly synthesized in minutes. Growth occurs along planes of lower surface energy, repeatedly yielding nanostructures with large, high energy facets. The quantitative photocatalytic reactivity of the nanoswords, demonstrated by the photoreduction of silver, is over an order of magnitude higher than reference low energy TiO2{110} substrates. Therefore, the higher surface energy dominated TiO2 nanoswords are ideal structures for characterizing the physicochemical properties of rutile TiO2, and may be used to enhance a variety of catalytic, optical, and clean-technology applications.

  18. Gold cluster/titanium dioxide heterojunction photovoltaic cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Eiji; Kogo, Atsushi; Sakai, Nobuyuki; Tatsuma, Tetsu

    2014-08-01

    Metal clusters have recently been applied as photosensitizers to wet-type photovoltaic cells. However, there are some practical issues including instability of the clusters in a liquid phase and leakage of electrolyte. To address these issues, we fabricated a heterojunction photovoltaic cell with solid-state layers of glutathione-protected Au25 clusters and titanium dioxide (TiO2). The ITO/TiO2/Au25/Au cell responded to visible and near infrared light even at 900 nm. Short-circuit photocurrent was ˜14 μA cm-2 and open-circuit photovoltage was 0.53 V under a xenon lamp (>480 nm, 75 mW cm-2).

  19. Chemical vapour deposition of nitrogen-doped titanium dioxide thin films.

    PubMed

    Alexandrov, S E; Baryshnikova, M V; Filatov, L A; Shahmin, A L; Andreeva, V D

    2011-09-01

    Nitrogen-doped titanium dioxide is often considered as a promising nanomaterial for photocatalytic applications. Here we report the first results of a study of APCVD of N-doped TiO2 thin films prepared with the use of ammonia as a source of nitrogen and titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) as a source of Ti and O atoms. The obtained films were analyzed with X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, and ellipsometry. It was found that the film growth rate in the TTIP-NH3-Ar reaction system varied insignificantly with substrate temperature in the range of 450,..., 750 degrees C and did not exceed 4.4 nm/min. Yellow and orange layers with nitrogen content of about 7.6% were formed at the deposition temperature higher than 600 degrees C. The results of the structure analysis of the deposited films showed that addition of ammonia led to stabilization of the amorphous phase in the films. The effect of ammonia on optical and photocatalytic properties was also considered. PMID:22097568

  20. Sonochemical fabrication of fluorinated mesoporous titanium dioxide microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Changlin; Yu, Jimmy C.; Chan Mui

    2009-05-15

    A sonochemical-hydrothermal method for preparing fluorinated mesoporous TiO{sub 2} microspheres was developed. Formation of mesoporous TiO{sub 2} and doping of fluorine was achieved by sonication and then hydrothermal treatment of a solution containing titanium isopropoxide, template, and sodium fluoride. The as-synthesized TiO{sub 2} microspheres were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier translation infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy, photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL), and BET surface areas. The P123 template was removed completely during the hydrothermal and washing steps, which was different from the conventional calcination treatment. The as- synthesized TiO{sub 2} microspheres had good crystallinity and high stability. Results from the photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB) showed that fluorination could remarkably improve the photocatalytic activity of titanium dioxide. - Graphical abstract: A novel method for preparing fluorinated mesoporous TiO{sub 2} microspheres was developed by a combined ultrasonic and hydrothermal treatment. The fluorinated TiO{sub 2} microspheres show high crystallinity, stability and enhanced photocatalytic activity.

  1. Physical properties of epoxy resin/titanium dioxide nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Polyzos, Georgios; Tuncer, Enis; Sauers, Isidor; More, Karren Leslie

    2011-01-01

    A polymeric nanocomposite system (nanodielectric) was fabricated, and its mechanical properties were determined. The fabricated nanocomposite was composed of low concentrations of monodispersed titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles and an epoxy resin specially designed for cryogenic applications. The monodispersed TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were synthesized in an aqueous solution of titanium chloride and polyethylene glycol and subsequently dispersed in a commercial-grade epoxy resin (Araldite{reg_sign} 5808). Nanocomposite thin sheets were prepared at several weight fractions of TiO{sub 2}. The morphology of the composites, determined by transmission electron microscopy, showed that the nanoparticles aggregated to form particle clusters. The influence of thermal processing and the effect of filler dispersion on the structure-property relationships were identified by differential scanning calorimetry and dynamic mechanical analysis at a broad range of temperatures. The effect of the aggregates on the electrical insulation properties was determined by dielectric breakdown measurements. The optical properties of the nanocomposites and their potential use as filters in the ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) range were determined by UV-vis spectroscopy.

  2. Deformation-Induced Amorphization of Copper-Titanium Intermetallics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askenazy, Philip Douglas

    Two methods of inducing amorphization in Cu-Ti intermetallic compounds by mechanical means have been investigated. Ingots of compositions Cu_{35}Ti _{65} and Cu_ {33.3}Ti_{66.7} were rapidly quenched into ribbons. The microstructure consisted largely of microcrystals in an amorphous matrix, which were either quenched in or grown by annealing. The ribbons were cold-rolled, which reduced their effective thickness by a factor of about 8. The status of the intermetallic compound CuTi_2 was monitored by x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The crystals were found to amorphize as rolling progressed. This behavior was not reproduced in polycrystalline samples that had no amorphous matrix present initially. The presence of the amorphous phase is thus necessary for amorphization of the crystal: it eliminates the need to nucleate the new glass, and it prevents the ribbon from disintegrating at high deformation stages. It may also change the deformation mechanism that occurs in the crystals, retarding the onset of amorphization. Diffuse scattering in close-packed directions is similar to that seen in electron irradiation experiments. It is postulated that the chemical disorder present in antiphase boundaries caused by deformation raises the free energy of the crystal higher than that of the amorphous phase. Ingots of the same compound were worn against each other in a custom-built wear apparatus. The design eliminates iron contamination of the wear sample and requires relatively small quantities of material. Alteration of the surface structure was monitored by plane-view and cross -sectional TEM. Larger subsurface crystals exhibit diffuse scattering, similar to that found in the rolled samples. A wide range of grain sizes was observed, due to the inhomogeneous nature of the wear process. An unusual phase was observed at the surface, consisting of a nanometer-scale mixture of aligned nanocrystalline regions and disordered areas. Some amorphous phase is

  3. Formation of titanium monoxide (001) single-crystalline thin film induced by ion bombardment of titanium dioxide (110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabón, B. M.; Beltrán, J. I.; Sánchez-Santolino, G.; Palacio, I.; López-Sánchez, J.; Rubio-Zuazo, J.; Rojo, J. M.; Ferrer, P.; Mascaraque, A.; Muñoz, M. C.; Varela, M.; Castro, G. R.; de La Fuente, O. Rodríguez

    2015-02-01

    A plethora of technological applications justify why titanium dioxide is probably the most studied oxide, and an optimal exploitation of its properties quite frequently requires a controlled modification of the surface. Low-energy ion bombardment is one of the most extended techniques for this purpose and has been recently used in titanium oxides, among other applications, to favour resistive switching mechanisms or to form transparent conductive layers. Surfaces modified in this way are frequently described as reduced and defective, with a high density of oxygen vacancies. Here we show, at variance with this view, that high ion doses on rutile titanium dioxide (110) induce its transformation into a nanometric and single-crystalline titanium monoxide (001) thin film with rocksalt structure. The discovery of this ability may pave the way to new technical applications of ion bombardment not previously reported, which can be used to fabricate heterostructures and interfaces.

  4. Rapid reduction of titanium dioxide nano-particles by reduction with a calcium reductant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Yoshida, Masumi; Matsuura, Shiki; Natsui, Shungo; Tsuji, Etsuji; Habazaki, Hiroki; Suzuki, Ryosuke O.

    2014-09-01

    Micro-, submicron-, and nano-scale titanium dioxide particles were reduced by reduction with a metallic calcium reductant in calcium chloride molten salt at 1173 K, and the reduction mechanism of the oxides by the calcium reductant was explored. These oxide particles, metallic calcium as a reducing agent, and calcium chloride as a molten salt were placed in a titanium crucible and heated under an argon atmosphere. Titanium dioxide was reduced to metallic titanium through a calcium titanate and lower titanium oxide, and the materials were sintered together to form a micro-porous titanium structure in molten salt at high temperature. The reduction rate of titanium dioxide was observed to increase with decreasing particle size; accordingly, the residual oxygen content in the reduced titanium decreases. The obtained micro-porous titanium appeared dark gray in color because of its low surface reflection. Micro-porous metallic titanium with a low oxygen content (0.42 wt%) and a large surface area (1.794 m2 g-1) can be successfully obtained by reduction under optimal conditions.

  5. Titanium-based zeolitic imidazolate framework for chemical fixation of carbon dioxide

    EPA Science Inventory

    A titanium-based zeolitic imidazolate framework (Ti-ZIF) with high surface area and porous morphology was synthesized and itsefficacy was demonstrated in the synthesis of cyclic carbonates from epoxides and carbon dioxide.

  6. Measurements of respirable dust and nanoparticle concentrations in a titanium dioxide pigment production factory.

    PubMed

    Huang, Cheng-Hsiung; Tai, Chih-Yuan; Huang, Cheng-Yu; Tsai, Chuen-Jinn; Chen, Chun-Wan; Chang, Cheng-Ping; Shih, Tung-Sheng

    2010-08-01

    This study compared respirable dust and nanoparticle concentrations measured by different sampling devices at a titanium dioxide pigment factory. Respirable particle mass concentrations, nanoparticle concentrations, particle size distribution and particle metallic content were measured at different sampling locations. The sampling results of the Multi-orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI) showed that the particle size distribution at this titanium dioxide production factory fell in the range of 1-10 mu m. Generally, the higher levels of the respirable particle mass concentrations and nanoparticle number concentrations were near the packing site of the pigment titanium dioxide production factory. Metal analysis results revealed that the titanium dioxide concentrations in respirable dust and nanoparticles were within the limits specified by National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). During sampling, particle metallic content analysis is essential for identifying the source of particles and for measuring respirable dust and nanoparticle concentrations. PMID:20623401

  7. Titanium dioxide thin film deposited on flexible substrate by multi-jet electrospraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Daihong; Yi, Wuming; Cao, Zhoubin; Gu, Wenhua

    2015-10-01

    Titanium dioxide thin film plays an important role in thin film solar cells, and has promising future in everyday applications including air cleaning and self-cleaning glass. With the concepts of flexible solar cells and wearable devices being more and more popular, there is increasing interest to coat titanium dioxide thin films on flexible substrates, such as aluminum foils. Many methods have been used to fabricate titanium dioxide thin films, such as dip-coating, spin coating, aerosol spray, plasma-assisted coating, electrospraying, and so on. Among them, electrospraying is especially suitable for thin film deposition on flexible substrates. This work reports fabrication of dense and uniform titanium dioxide thin films on glass as well as flexible aluminum foil using multi-jet electrospraying technique.

  8. Facile hydrothermal preparation of titanium dioxide decorated reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Betty Yea Sze; Huang, Nay Ming; An’amt, Mohd Nor; Marlinda, Abdul Rahman; Norazriena, Yusoff; Muhamad, Muhamad Rasat; Harrison, Ian; Lim, Hong Ngee; Chia, Chin Hua

    2012-01-01

    A simple single-stage approach, based on the hydrothermal technique, has been introduced to synthesize reduced graphene oxide/titanium dioxide nanocomposites. The titanium dioxide nanoparticles are formed at the same time as the graphene oxide is reduced to graphene. The triethanolamine used in the process has two roles. It acts as a reducing agent for the graphene oxide as well as a capping agent, allowing the formation of titanium dioxide nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution (~20 nm). Transmission electron micrographs show that the nanoparticles are uniformly distributed on the reduced graphene oxide nanosheet. Thermogravimetric analysis shows the nanocomposites have an enhanced thermal stability over the original components. The potential applications for this technology were demonstrated by the use of a reduced graphene oxide/titanium dioxide nanocomposite-modified glassy carbon electrode, which enhanced the electrochemical performance compared to a conventional glassy carbon electrode when interacting with mercury(II) ions in potassium chloride electrolyte. PMID:22848166

  9. Study on titanium foil coated with partial reduction titanium dioxide as bipolar lead-acid battery's substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Xiaoshi; Wang, Dianlong; Tang, Shenzhi; Zhu, Junsheng; Guo, Chenfeng

    2014-12-01

    Pure titanium foil cannot be directly as the substrate for the bipolar lead-acid battery due to its surface oxidized into titanium dioxide in the cell cycle. The poor electronic conductivity of titanium dioxide will increase substrate's ohmic resistance and can affect the cell's electrochemical performances. In this paper, titanium foil's surface is coated with a lay of partial reduction titanium dioxide (TiO2-x) which has excellent chemical stability and high electronic conductivity by means of sol-gel method. Through XRD, SEM and four-probe test, it shows that the modified titanium's surface has the most superior crystal structure and morphology and the highest electronic conductivity in the sintering temperature of 800 °C. We subsequently assemble bipolar lead-acid batteries with Ti coated by TiO2-x as the substrate material. The batteries are discovered that when charged and discharged in 3.5 V-4.84 V at 0.5C the voltage between the charge and discharge voltage platform is 0.3 V, and the initial discharge specific capacity can reach 80 mAh g-1. When the current rate is up to 1C and 2C, the initial discharge specific capacity is 70 mAh g-1and 60 mAh g-1. After 100 cycles, the initial specific capacity only decreases 12.5%.

  10. Liquid-solid transition of water confined in nanoporous titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xin; Wang, Qiang; Sun, Gang; Li, Chenxi; Hu, Lin

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we performed differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) experiments to investigate the phase transition temperature and the molar enthalpy of the absorbed water confined in porous titanium dioxide. The porous titanium dioxide with three different pore size distribution and different filling fraction of the absorbed water were examined. We found that both the pore size of the examined samples and the filling fraction of the absorbed water affected the water’s phase transition temperature and its molar enthalpy.

  11. Photoinduced Electron Accumulation of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Modified Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, Hirokazu; Sakamoto, Kensho; Kurashina, Masaru; Kanezaki, Eiji

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (Nps) were prepared by the hydrolysis of titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) in 2-propanol with different water contents (0.5 vol% to 7.2 vol%) at 45 °C. The diameter of the Nps was estimated to be 1.5±0.5 nm (L-TiO2) and 3.0±0.6 nm (S-TiO2) from the onset wavelength in the absorption spectra and by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A modified Pt electrode with a three-layered sandwich structure was prepared; the outermost and innermost layers were composed of S-TiO2 and L-TiO2, respectively, and the middle layer contained 1, 1'-dimethyl-4,4'-bipyridyl (MV2+)/Nafion®. Irradiation by a 500 W superhigh-pressure mercury lamp produced electrons in the conduction band of TiO2. An anodic current was observed after turning off the light. The mechanism by which anodic current is generated after turning off the radiation involves the reduction of MV2+ to MV+. by photogenerated electrons on the Nps and the diffusion of MV+. in the middle layer. After turning off the irradiation, MV+. transferred an electron to the Pt electrode via holes in the innermost layer or the conduction band of S-TiO2 coincidentally localized on the Pt electrode, resulting in the generation of the anodic current. The generation of MV+. was confirmed by the absorption spectra of MV+.. As a sacrificial reagent, 2-propanol (0.1 M) was used.

  12. A novel volumetric method for quantitation of titanium dioxide in cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young So; Kim, Boo-Min; Park, Sang-Chul; Jeong, Hye-Jin; Chang, Ih Seop

    2006-01-01

    Nowadays there are many sun-protection cosmetics incorporating organic or inorganic UV filters as active ingredients. Chemically stable inorganic sunscreen agents, usually metal oxides, are widely employed in high-SPF (sun protection factor) products. Titanium dioxide is one of the most frequently used inorganic UV filters. It has been used as a pigment for a long period of cosmetic history. With the development of micronization techniques, it has become possible to incorporate titanium dioxide in sunscreen formulations without the previous whitening effect, and hence its use in cosmetics has become an important research topic. However, there are very few works related to quantitation of titanium dioxide in sunscreen products. In this research, we analyzed the amounts of titanium dioxide in sunscreen cosmetics by adapting redox titration, reduction of Ti(IV) to Ti(III), and reoxidation to Ti(IV). After calcification of other organic ingredients of cosmetics, titanium dioxide is dissolved by hot sulfuric acid. The dissolved Ti(IV) is reduced to Ti(III) by adding metallic aluminum. The reduced Ti(III) is titrated against a standard oxidizing agent, Fe(III) (ammonium iron(III) sulfate), with potassium thiocyanate as an indicator. In order to test the accuracy and applicability of the proposed method, we analyzed the amounts of titanium dioxide in four types of sunscreen cosmetics, namely cream, make-up base, foundation, and powder, after adding known amounts of titanium dioxide (1 approximately 25 w/w%). The percentages of titanium dioxide recovered in the four types of formulations were in the range between 96% and 105%. We also analyzed seven commercial cosmetic products labeled with titanium dioxide as an ingredient and compared the results with those obtained from ICP-AES (inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry), one of the most powerful atomic analysis techniques. The results showed that the titrated amounts were well in accord with the analyzed

  13. Electrohydrodynamic processing and characterisation of titanium dioxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahalingam, Suntharavathanan

    The research in this thesis demonstrates a novel electrohydrodynamic preparation of titanium dioxide (TiC>2) films. In this process, a liquid breaks up into spray droplets under influence of an electric field. This process is influenced by many factors properties of the liquid - surface tension, electrical conductivity, relative permittivity, viscosity, density and liquid flow rate and applied voltage. This technique has unique advantage like simple set-up and economical way to formulate the films. Many modes of processing were identified by drawing the mode-selection map for various applied voltage and flow rate using a titania sol. For a fixed flow rate, changing the applied voltage changed the processing mode. For a fixed applied voltage, changing the flow rate changed the shape of the liquid filament at the end of the needle. The stable cone-jet mode processing produced a near mono-disperse of droplets. The stable cone-jet processing of TiC>2 films showed anatase phase and converted to rutile phase at higher annealing temperature. The morphological characterisation revealed the dense and crack free surfaces of the TiC>2 films. The dielectric constant of the electrohydrodynamically processed TiC>2 films was 7. The increase in annealing temperature reduced the dielectric constant of the films. The leakage current density of the films was improved by post deposition annealing. The optical characterisation of the films showed a good transparency in the visible light region. The transmission in the visible range varied between 70-90%. The annealing temperature influenced the transmittance of the films. The energy bandgap is -3.50 eV for indirect transition. The larger coverage area nitrogen doped titanium dioxide films were obtained by using a metal clamped needle - ground electrode set-up for the first time. Metal clamping the needle lowered the stable cone-jet operating voltage window. The nitrogen doping in TiC>2 films retarded the phase formation however, showed

  14. Silicon-Doped Titanium Dioxide Nanotubes Promoted Bone Formation on Titanium Implants.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xijiang; Wang, Tao; Qian, Shi; Liu, Xuanyong; Sun, Junying; Li, Bin

    2016-01-01

    While titanium (Ti) implants have been extensively used in orthopaedic and dental applications, the intrinsic bioinertness of untreated Ti surface usually results in insufficient osseointegration irrespective of the excellent biocompatibility and mechanical properties of it. In this study, we prepared surface modified Ti substrates in which silicon (Si) was doped into the titanium dioxide (TiO₂) nanotubes on Ti surface using plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) technology. Compared to TiO₂ nanotubes and Ti alone, Si-doped TiO₂ nanotubes significantly enhanced the expression of genes related to osteogenic differentiation, including Col-I, ALP, Runx2, OCN, and OPN, in mouse pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and deposition of mineral matrix. In vivo, the pull-out mechanical tests after two weeks of implantation in rat femur showed that Si-doped TiO₂ nanotubes improved implant fixation strength by 18% and 54% compared to TiO₂-NT and Ti implants, respectively. Together, findings from this study indicate that Si-doped TiO₂ nanotubes promoted the osteogenic differentiation of osteoblastic cells and improved bone-Ti integration. Therefore, they may have considerable potential for the bioactive surface modification of Ti implants. PMID:26927080

  15. Silicon-Doped Titanium Dioxide Nanotubes Promoted Bone Formation on Titanium Implants

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xijiang; Wang, Tao; Qian, Shi; Liu, Xuanyong; Sun, Junying; Li, Bin

    2016-01-01

    While titanium (Ti) implants have been extensively used in orthopaedic and dental applications, the intrinsic bioinertness of untreated Ti surface usually results in insufficient osseointegration irrespective of the excellent biocompatibility and mechanical properties of it. In this study, we prepared surface modified Ti substrates in which silicon (Si) was doped into the titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotubes on Ti surface using plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) technology. Compared to TiO2 nanotubes and Ti alone, Si-doped TiO2 nanotubes significantly enhanced the expression of genes related to osteogenic differentiation, including Col-I, ALP, Runx2, OCN, and OPN, in mouse pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and deposition of mineral matrix. In vivo, the pull-out mechanical tests after two weeks of implantation in rat femur showed that Si-doped TiO2 nanotubes improved implant fixation strength by 18% and 54% compared to TiO2-NT and Ti implants, respectively. Together, findings from this study indicate that Si-doped TiO2 nanotubes promoted the osteogenic differentiation of osteoblastic cells and improved bone-Ti integration. Therefore, they may have considerable potential for the bioactive surface modification of Ti implants. PMID:26927080

  16. Laser Processing of Fe-Based Bulk Amorphous Alloy Coatings on Titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahasrabudhe, Himanshu; Dittrick, Stanley A.; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2013-11-01

    Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS™), a solid freeform fabrication technique, was employed for the processing of Fe-based bulk amorphous alloy (Fe BAA) powder on titanium. One and two layers of the Fe BAA were deposited with the same processing parameters. SEM and XRD analyses of the Fe BAA coatings revealed the retention of the feedstock powder's amorphous nature. The mixing of the feedstock powder in the titanium substrate was very small. A crystalline-amorphous composite microstructure evolved from the laser processing in all types of coatings. The coatings were further laser remelted. The amorphous character was found to increase and the crystallites were found to grow during remelting. The Fe BAA coatings showed higher hardness and smaller wear volume compared to the Ti substrate. A further increase in these properties was observed after laser remelting treatment. During the wear testing in NaCl solution, Ti substrate showed intergranular corrosion, whereas the Fe BAA coatings showed signs of low and localized fretting corrosion in a saline environment. Our results demonstrate that using LENS™, amorphous coatings can be deposited on metallic substrates.

  17. INDUSTRIAL EFFLUENT TREATMENT USING IONIZING RADIATION COMBINED TO TITANIUM DIOXIDE

    SciTech Connect

    Duarte, C.L.; Oikawa, H.; Mori, M.N.; Sampa, M.H.O.

    2004-10-04

    The Advanced Oxidation Process (AOP) with OH radicals are the most efficient to mineralize organic compounds, and there are various methods to generate OH radicals as the use of ozone, hydrogen peroxide and ultra-violet radiation and ionizing radiation. The irradiation of aqueous solutions with high-energy electrons results in the excitation and ionizing of the molecules and rapid (10{sup -14} - 10{sup -9} s) formation of reactive intermediates. These reactive species will react with organic compounds present in industrial effluent inducing their decomposition. Titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) catalyzed photoreaction is used to remove a wide range of pollutants in air and water media, combined to UV/VIS light, FeO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, but as far as known there is no report on the combination with ionizing radiation. In some recent studies, the removal of organic pollutants in industrial effluent, such as Benzene, Toluene, and Xylene from petroleum production using ionizing radiation was investigated. It has been ob served that none of the methods can be used individually in wastewater treatment applications with good economics and high degree of energy efficiency. In the present work, the efficiency of ionizing radiation in presence of TiO{sub 2} to treat industrial effluent was evaluated. The main aim to combine these technologies is to improve the efficiency for very hard effluents and to reduce the processing cost for future implementation to large-scale design.

  18. Titanium-dioxide nanotube p-n homojunction diode

    SciTech Connect

    Alivov, Yahya E-mail: pnagpal@colorado.edu; Ding, Yuchen; Singh, Vivek; Nagpal, Prashant E-mail: pnagpal@colorado.edu

    2014-12-29

    Application of semiconductors in functional optoelectronic devices requires precise control over their doping and formation of junction between p- and n-doped semiconductors. While doped thin films have led to several semiconductor devices, need for high-surface area nanostructured devices for photovoltaic, photoelectrochemical, and photocatalytic applications has been hindered by lack of desired doping in nanostructures. Here, we show titanium-dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanotubes doped with nitrogen (N) and niobium (Nb) as acceptors and donors, respectively, and formation of TiO{sub 2} nanotubes p-n homojunction. This TiO{sub 2}:N/TiO{sub 2}:Nb homojunction showed distinct diode-like behaviour with rectification ratio of 1115 at ±5 V and exhibited good photoresponse for ultraviolet light (λ = 365 nm) with sensitivity of 0.19 A/W at reverse bias of −5 V. These results can have important implications for development of nanostructured metal-oxide solar-cells, photodiodes, LED's, photocatalysts, and photoelectrochemical devices.

  19. Biosensing applications of titanium dioxide coated graphene modified disposable electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kuralay, Filiz; Tunç, Selma; Bozduman, Ferhat; Oksuz, Lutfi; Oksuz, Aysegul Uygun

    2016-11-01

    In the present work, preparation of titanium dioxide coated graphene (TiO2/graphene) and the use of this nanocomposite modified electrode for electrochemical biosensing applications were detailed. The nanocomposite was prepared with radio frequency (rf) rotating plasma method which serves homogeneous distribution of TiO2 onto graphene. TiO2/graphene was characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Then, this nanocomposite was dissolved in phosphate buffer solution (pH 7.4) and modified onto disposable pencil graphite electrode (PGE) by dip coating for the investigation of the biosensing properties of the prepared electrode. TiO2/graphene modified PGE was characterized with SEM, EDS and cyclic voltammetry (CV). The sensor properties of the obtained surface were examined for DNA and DNA-drug interaction. The detection limit was calculated as 1.25mgL(-1) (n=3) for double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). RSD% was calculated as 2.4% for three successive determinations at 5mgL(-1) dsDNA concentration. Enhanced results were obtained compared to the ones obtained with graphene and unmodified (bare) electrodes. PMID:27591620

  20. Kinetics of photocatalytic oxidation of organic solutes over titanium dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, R.W.

    1988-06-01

    The kinetics of photooxidation to CO/sub 2/ of 22 organic solutes over a UV illuminated film of Degussa P25 titanium dioxide have been studied over a 100-fold concentration range for each solute, generally from about 1 to 100 mg/liter. The dependence of the photooxidation rate on concentration obeyed a simple two-coefficient Langmuir expression for each solute. The coefficients reflecting the degree of adsorption on the TiO/sub 2/ and the limiting rate at high concentrations enable the prediction of photocatalytic rates in any TiO/sub 2/-based photoreactor of a similar type once a reference rate has been determined for one of the solutes. A reaction mechanism is proposed for the oxidation of aromatic compounds involving peroxyhydroxycyclohexadienyl- and mucondialdehyde-type compounds as important intermediates. The solutes studied were benzoic acid, salicylic acid, phenol, biphthalate, 2-chlorophenol, 4-chlorophenol, monochlorobenzene, nitrobenzene, methanol, ethanol, n-propanol, 2-propanol, acetone, ethyl acetate, acetic acid, formic acid, sucrose, 2-naphthol, umbelliferone, chloroform, trichloroethylene, and dichloroethane.

  1. Characterization of titanium dioxide: Factors affecting photocatalytic performance

    SciTech Connect

    Presley, R.W.

    1995-06-01

    Titanium dioxide is being evaluated as a photocatalyst in the destruction of contaminants in aqueous waste streams. Commercial samples of TiO{sub 2} powder have been obtained for base line studies of the photocatalytic destruction of salicylic acid standards. These commercial samples have been prepared by flame hydrolysis and aerosol or spray pyrolysis. Additional samples of TiO{sub 2} have been prepared in house by precipitation from TiCl{sub 4} in aqueous solution, some with the addition of dopants. X-ray powder diffraction data analysis indicates the predominate phase of these commercial and prepared powders to be anatase. A minor amount of the rutile crystalline phase of TiO{sub 2} was observed at various levels in some of these catalysts. The broadness of the x-ray diffraction bands varied among the samples analyzed and indicated the primary particle size to be within the 500 to 1,000 angstrom range with the product produced in house having the smallest crystallite size. Experiments were then performed to assess the photocatalytic performance of these various types of catalyst in the destruction of 30 ppm salicylic acid in deionized water.

  2. Phosphopeptide enrichment using offline titanium dioxide columns for phosphoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Yu, Li-Rong; Veenstra, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Identification of phosphoproteins or phosphopeptides as cancer biomarkers is an emerging field in phosphoproteomics. Owing to the low stoichiometric nature of protein phosphorylation, phosphoproteins or phosphopeptides must be enriched prior to downstream mass spectrometry analysis. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has been prevalently used to enrich phosphopeptides from complex proteome samples due to its high affinity for phosphopeptides, and the method is straightforward. In this protocol, an offline phosphopeptide enrichment procedure using TiO2 columns is described. Peptides from a proteome lysate are loaded onto a TiO2 column in an acidic environment, followed by column washing with aqueous, organic, and ammonium glutamate (NH4Glu) buffers at acidic conditions. Phosphopeptides are eluted using an ammonia solution at high pH. Use of NH4Glu significantly reduces nonspecific bindings while a high recovery rate (84 %) of phosphopeptides is retained. The method is optimized for large-scale phosphoproteomic analysis and phosphoprotein biomarker discovery starting from sub-milligram or milligrams of proteome samples. PMID:23625397

  3. Titanium-dioxide nanotube p-n homojunction diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alivov, Yahya; Ding, Yuchen; Singh, Vivek; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-12-01

    Application of semiconductors in functional optoelectronic devices requires precise control over their doping and formation of junction between p- and n-doped semiconductors. While doped thin films have led to several semiconductor devices, need for high-surface area nanostructured devices for photovoltaic, photoelectrochemical, and photocatalytic applications has been hindered by lack of desired doping in nanostructures. Here, we show titanium-dioxide (TiO2) nanotubes doped with nitrogen (N) and niobium (Nb) as acceptors and donors, respectively, and formation of TiO2 nanotubes p-n homojunction. This TiO2:N/TiO2:Nb homojunction showed distinct diode-like behaviour with rectification ratio of 1115 at ±5 V and exhibited good photoresponse for ultraviolet light (λ = 365 nm) with sensitivity of 0.19 A/W at reverse bias of -5 V. These results can have important implications for development of nanostructured metal-oxide solar-cells, photodiodes, LED's, photocatalysts, and photoelectrochemical devices.

  4. Photoemission Fingerprints for Structural Identification of Titanium Dioxide Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Borghetti, Patrizia; Meriggio, Elisa; Rousse, Gwenaëlle; Cabailh, Gregory; Lazzari, Rémi; Jupille, Jacques

    2016-08-18

    The wealth of properties of titanium dioxide relies on its various polymorphs and on their mixtures coupled with a sensitivity to crystallographic orientations. It is therefore pivotal to set out methods that allow surface structural identification. We demonstrate herein the ability of photoemission spectroscopy to provide Ti LMV (V = valence) Auger templates to quantitatively analyze TiO2 polymorphs. The Ti LMV decay reflects Ti 4sp-O 2p hybridizations that are intrinsic properties of TiO2 phases and orientations. Ti LMV templates collected on rutile (110), anatase (101), and (100) single crystals allow for the quantitative analysis of mixed nanosized powders, which bridges the gap between surfaces of reference and complex materials. As a test bed, the anatase/rutile P25 is studied both as received and during the anatase-to-rutile transformation upon annealing. The agreement with X-ray diffraction measurements proves the reliability of the Auger analysis and highlights its ability to detect surface orientations. PMID:27453254

  5. Characterization of electroforming-free titanium dioxide memristors

    PubMed Central

    Strachan, John Paul; Yang, J Joshua; Montoro, L A; Ospina, C A; Kilcoyne, A L D; Medeiros-Ribeiro, Gilberto

    2013-01-01

    Summary Metal–insulator–metal (MIM) structures based on titanium dioxide have demonstrated reversible and non-volatile resistance-switching behavior and have been identified with the concept of the memristor. Microphysical studies suggest that the development of sub-oxide phases in the material drives the resistance changes. The creation of these phases, however, has a number of negative effects such as requiring an elevated voltage, increasing the device-to-device variability, damaging the electrodes due to oxygen evolution, and ultimately limiting the device lifetime. In this work we show that the deliberate inclusion of a sub-oxide layer in the MIM structure maintains the favorable switching properties of the device, while eliminating many of the negative effects. Electrical and microphysical characterization of the resulting structures was performed, utilizing X-ray and electron spectroscopy and microscopy. In contrast to structures which are not engineered with a sub-oxide layer, we observed dramatically reduced microphysical changes after electrical operation. PMID:23946916

  6. Toxicological Characteristics of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticle in Rats.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xuhong; Xie, Yanxin; Wu, Jianru; Tang, Meng; Wang, Bei

    2015-02-01

    In an effort to examine liver, heart and kidney injury, immune response, and other physiological effect in rats caused by intratracheal instillation of nano titanium dioxide (TiO2) for 28 days, we assessed T lymphocytes counts, hematological indices, biochemical parameters, cytokines assay and histopathological changes in nano TiO2 treated rats. Indeed, rats treated with nano TiO2 displayed a reduction in body weight and coefficients of the hearts. Edema and loose cytoplasm on liver cells were found in nano groups. The results showed that a statistically significant increased in the BUN, HTC and AST levels than those in control group. Our data suggested that the immunologically competent cells of CD3+, CD4+, and CD8+ caused by nano TiO2 32 mg/kg group were significantly lower than control group. The ratio of CD4+ to CD8+ from the nano 32 mg/kg group was significantly increased and showed a disturbance of cellular immune function. But ELISA analysis showed that no significant changes in IFN-γ and IL-4 were observed throughout the experimental period in this study. PMID:26353623

  7. Digital Printing of Titanium Dioxide for Dye Sensitized Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cherrington, Ruth; Wood, Benjamin Michael; Salaoru, Iulia; Goodship, Vannessa

    2016-01-01

    Silicon solar cell manufacturing is an expensive and high energy consuming process. In contrast, dye sensitized solar cell production is less environmentally damaging with lower processing temperatures presenting a viable and low cost alternative to conventional production. This paper further enhances these environmental credentials by evaluating the digital printing and therefore additive production route for these cells. This is achieved here by investigating the formation and performance of a metal oxide photoelectrode using nanoparticle sized titanium dioxide. An ink-jettable material was formulated, characterized and printed with a piezoelectric inkjet head to produce a 2.6 µm thick layer. The resultant printed layer was fabricated into a functioning cell with an active area of 0.25 cm2 and a power conversion efficiency of 3.5%. The binder-free formulation resulted in a reduced processing temperature of 250 °C, compatible with flexible polyamide substrates which are stable up to temperatures of 350 ˚C. The authors are continuing to develop this process route by investigating inkjet printing of other layers within dye sensitized solar cells. PMID:27166761

  8. Investigation of titanium dioxide nanoparticles toxicity and uptake by plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larue, C.; Khodja, H.; Herlin-Boime, N.; Brisset, F.; Flank, A. M.; Fayard, B.; Chaillou, S.; Carrière, M.

    2011-07-01

    Nanoparticles (NP) are introduced in a growing number of commercial products and their production may lead to their release in the environment. Plants may be a potential entry point for NP in the food chain. Up to now, results describing NP phytotoxical effects and plant accumulation are scarce and contradictory. To increase knowledge on titanium dioxide NP (TiO2-NPs) accumulation and impact on plants, we designed a study on three plant species, namely wheat (Triticum aestivum), oilseed rape (Brassica napus) and Arabidopsis thaliana. These plants were exposed in hydroponics to a panel of well-characterized TiO2-NPs, with diameters ranging from 12 to 140 nm, either anatase or rutile. Their accumulation in plant tissues is currently being assessed by complementary imaging techniques: scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), micro-X-ray fluorescence (SR-μ-XRF) imaging and micro-particle induced X-ray emission (μ-PIXE) imaging. Moreover, the impact of TiO2-NP exposure on germination rate, root elongation, dry biomass and evapotranspiration is evaluated. Preliminary results are presented here, with data collected on wheat plants exposed to 12 nm and 25 nm anatase TiO2-NPs. These results show that TiO2-NPs are taken up by plants, and do not significantly alter their germination and root elongation. These results underline the necessity of deeper evaluation of nanoparticle ecotoxicity, and particularly on their interaction with plants.

  9. Digital Printing of Titanium Dioxide for Dye Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Cherrington, Ruth; Wood, Benjamin Michael; Salaoru, Iulia; Goodship, Vannessa

    2016-01-01

    Silicon solar cell manufacturing is an expensive and high energy consuming process. In contrast, dye sensitized solar cell production is less environmentally damaging with lower processing temperatures presenting a viable and low cost alternative to conventional production. This paper further enhances these environmental credentials by evaluating the digital printing and therefore additive production route for these cells. This is achieved here by investigating the formation and performance of a metal oxide photoelectrode using nanoparticle sized titanium dioxide. An ink-jettable material was formulated, characterized and printed with a piezoelectric inkjet head to produce a 2.6 µm thick layer. The resultant printed layer was fabricated into a functioning cell with an active area of 0.25 cm(2) and a power conversion efficiency of 3.5%. The binder-free formulation resulted in a reduced processing temperature of 250 °C, compatible with flexible polyamide substrates which are stable up to temperatures of 350 ˚C. The authors are continuing to develop this process route by investigating inkjet printing of other layers within dye sensitized solar cells. PMID:27166761

  10. Carbon-coated rutile titanium dioxide derived from titanium-metal organic framework with enhanced sodium storage behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Guoqiang; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Chao; Huang, Zhaodong; Li, Simin; Liao, Hanxiao; Wang, Jufeng; Ji, Xiaobo

    2016-09-01

    Carbon-coated rutile titanium dioxide (CRT) was fabricated through an in-situ pyrolysis of titanium-based metal organic framework (Ti8O8(OH)4[O2CC6H4CO2]6) crystals. Benefiting from the Tisbnd Osbnd C skeleton structure of titanium-based metal organic framework, the CRT possesses abundant channels and micro/mesopores with the diameters ranging from 1.06 to 4.14 nm, shows larger specific surface area (245 m2 g-1) and better electronic conductivity compared with pure titanium dioxide (12.8 m2 g-1). When applied as anode material for sodium-ion batteries, the CRT electrode exhibits a high cycling performance with a reversible capacity of ∼175 mAh g-1 at 0.5 C-rate after 200 cycles, and obtains an excellent rate capability of ∼70 mAh g-1 after 2000 cycles even at a specific current of 3360 mA g-1(20 C-rate). The outstanding rate capability can be attributed to the carbon-coated structure, which may effectively prevent aggregation of the titanium dioxide nanoparticles, accelerate the mass transfer of Na+ and speed up the charge transfer rate. Considering these advantages of this particular framework structure, the CRT can serve as an alternative anode material for the industrial application of SIBs.

  11. The photocatalytic and cytotoxic effects of titanium dioxide particles used in sunscreen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampaul, Ashti

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles are used in sunscreens to reflect UV radiation from the skin. However, titanium dioxide as anatase and rutile crystal forms is a well-known photocatalyst. The nanoparticles are surface coated with inert inorganic oxides such as silica and alumina or organics such as organosilanes or silicone polymers and more recently, have been doped with manganese oxide. These modifications to the titanium dioxide particles are purported to prevent the production of harmful reactive oxygen species. A range of sunscreens was tested with crystal form and modification type identified via XRD, Raman Spectroscopy, XPS and SSNMR. The particle modification and crystal form determined whether the particles were inert or rapidly degraded methylene blue dye, and killed or protected cultured human epithelium cells. Novel solid state Electron Paramagnetic Resonance analysis showed that the greatest amount of superoxide anions was formed during UVA irradiation of the mixed anatase and rutile crystal forms coated with an organosilane. These particles also degraded methylene blue at a similar rate to Degussa P25, a standard uncoated titanium dioxide powder and produced an increase in UVA induced apoptosis of human keratinocytes. Double Stranded Breaks were observed extensively in cells exposed to UVA irradiated mixed anatase and rutile titanium dioxide with organosilane. A new apoptotic-like cell death mechanism may have been recognised during the UVA irradiation of animal and human cells in the presence of titanium dioxide. This research concludes that mixed anatase and rutile crystal forms of titanium dioxide coated with organosilane or dimethicone may not be safe to use in sunscreen lotions. A less harmful alternative for sunscreen formulations is the manganese doped rutile particles or the alumina coated rutile powders, both of which exhibited a protective effect on cultured epithelial cells.

  12. Low-loss titanium dioxide waveguides and resonators using a dielectric lift-off fabrication process.

    PubMed

    Evans, Christopher C; Liu, Chengyu; Suntivich, Jin

    2015-05-01

    We present a bi-layer lift-off fabrication approach to create low-loss amorphous titanium dioxide (TiO2) integrated optical waveguides and resonators for visible and near-infrared applications. This approach achieves single-mode waveguide losses as low as 7.5 dB/cm around 633 nm and 1.2 dB/cm around 1550 nm, a factor of 4 improvement over previous reports, without the need to optimize etching conditions. Depositing a secondary 260-nm TiO2 layer can reduce losses further, with the optimized process yielding micro-ring resonators with loaded quality factors as high as 1.5 × 10(5) around 1550 nm and 1.6×10(5) around 780 nm. These losses render our TiO2 devices suitable for visible and telecommunications applications; in addition, the simplicity of this lift-off approach is broadly applicable to other novel material platforms, particularly using near-visible wavelengths. PMID:25969212

  13. Titanium dioxide induced inflammation in the small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Carolina Maciel; de Azevedo, Walter Mendes; Dagli, Maria Lucia Zaidan; Toma, Sérgio Hiroshi; Leite, André Zonetti de Arruda; Lordello, Maria Laura; Nishitokukado, Iêda; Ortiz-Agostinho, Carmen Lúcia; Duarte, Maria Irma Seixas; Ferreira, Marcelo Alves; Sipahi, Aytan Miranda

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPTiO2) and microparticles (MPTiO2) on the inflammatory response in the small intestine of mice. METHODS: Bl 57/6 male mice received distilled water suspensions containing TiO2 (100 mg/kg body weight) as NPTiO2 (66 nm), or MPTiO2 (260 nm) by gavage for 10 d, once a day; the control group received only distilled water. At the end of the treatment the duodenum, jejunum and ileum were extracted for assessment of cytokines, inflammatory cells and titanium content. The cytokines interleukin (IL)-1b, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13, IL-17, IL-23, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), intracellular interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in segments of jejunum and ileum (mucosa and underlying muscular tissue). CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, natural killer cells, and dendritic cells were evaluated in duodenum, jejunum and ileum samples fixed in 10% formalin by immunohistochemistry. The titanium content was determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. RESULTS: We found increased levels of T CD4+ cells (cells/mm2) in duodenum: NP 1240 ± 139.4, MP 1070 ± 154.7 vs 458 ± 50.39 (P < 0.01); jejunum: NP 908.4 ± 130.3, MP 813.8 ± 103.8 vs 526.6 ± 61.43 (P < 0.05); and ileum: NP 818.60 ± 123.0, MP 640.1 ± 32.75 vs 466.9 ± 22.4 (P < 0.05). In comparison to the control group, the groups receiving TiO2 showed a statistically significant increase in the levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-12, IL-4, IL-23, TNF-α, IFN-γ and TGF-β. The cytokine production was more pronounced in the ileum (mean ± SE): IL-12: NP 33.98 ± 11.76, MP 74.11 ± 25.65 vs 19.06 ± 3.92 (P < 0.05); IL-4: NP 17.36 ± 9.96, MP 22.94 ± 7.47 vs 2.19 ± 0.65 (P < 0.05); IL-23: NP 157.20 ± 75.80, MP 134.50 ± 38.31 vs 22.34 ± 5.81 (P < 0.05); TNFα: NP 3.71 ± 1.33, MP 5.44 ± 1.67 vs 0.99 ± 019 (P < 0.05); IFNγ: NP 15.85 ± 9

  14. Trojan-Like Internalization of Anatase Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles by Human Osteoblast Cells.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, A R; Gemini-Piperni, S; Travassos, R; Lemgruber, L; Silva, R C; Rossi, A L; Farina, M; Anselme, K; Shokuhfar, T; Shahbazian-Yassar, R; Borojevic, R; Rocha, L A; Werckmann, J; Granjeiro, J M

    2016-01-01

    Dentistry and orthopedics are undergoing a revolution in order to provide more reliable, comfortable and long-lasting implants to patients. Titanium (Ti) and titanium alloys have been used in dental implants and total hip arthroplasty due to their excellent biocompatibility. However, Ti-based implants in human body suffer surface degradation (corrosion and wear) resulting in the release of metallic ions and solid wear debris (mainly titanium dioxide) leading to peri-implant inflammatory reactions. Unfortunately, our current understanding of the biological interactions with titanium dioxide nanoparticles is still very limited. Taking this into consideration, this study focuses on the internalization of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on primary bone cells, exploring the events occurring at the nano-bio interface. For the first time, we report the selective binding of calcium (Ca), phosphorous (P) and proteins from cell culture medium to anatase nanoparticles that are extremely important for nanoparticle internalization and bone cells survival. In the intricate biological environment, anatase nanoparticles form bio-complexes (mixture of proteins and ions) which act as a kind of 'Trojan-horse' internalization by cells. Furthermore, anatase nanoparticles-induced modifications on cell behavior (viability and internalization) could be understand in detail. The results presented in this report can inspire new strategies for the use of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in several regeneration therapies. PMID:27021687

  15. Trojan-Like Internalization of Anatase Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles by Human Osteoblast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, A. R.; Gemini-Piperni, S.; Travassos, R.; Lemgruber, L.; C. Silva, R.; Rossi, A. L.; Farina, M.; Anselme, K.; Shokuhfar, T.; Shahbazian-Yassar, R.; Borojevic, R.; Rocha, L. A.; Werckmann, J.; Granjeiro, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Dentistry and orthopedics are undergoing a revolution in order to provide more reliable, comfortable and long-lasting implants to patients. Titanium (Ti) and titanium alloys have been used in dental implants and total hip arthroplasty due to their excellent biocompatibility. However, Ti-based implants in human body suffer surface degradation (corrosion and wear) resulting in the release of metallic ions and solid wear debris (mainly titanium dioxide) leading to peri-implant inflammatory reactions. Unfortunately, our current understanding of the biological interactions with titanium dioxide nanoparticles is still very limited. Taking this into consideration, this study focuses on the internalization of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on primary bone cells, exploring the events occurring at the nano-bio interface. For the first time, we report the selective binding of calcium (Ca), phosphorous (P) and proteins from cell culture medium to anatase nanoparticles that are extremely important for nanoparticle internalization and bone cells survival. In the intricate biological environment, anatase nanoparticles form bio-complexes (mixture of proteins and ions) which act as a kind of ‘Trojan-horse’ internalization by cells. Furthermore, anatase nanoparticles-induced modifications on cell behavior (viability and internalization) could be understand in detail. The results presented in this report can inspire new strategies for the use of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in several regeneration therapies. PMID:27021687

  16. Trojan-Like Internalization of Anatase Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles by Human Osteoblast Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, A. R.; Gemini-Piperni, S.; Travassos, R.; Lemgruber, L.; C. Silva, R.; Rossi, A. L.; Farina, M.; Anselme, K.; Shokuhfar, T.; Shahbazian-Yassar, R.; Borojevic, R.; Rocha, L. A.; Werckmann, J.; Granjeiro, J. M.

    2016-03-01

    Dentistry and orthopedics are undergoing a revolution in order to provide more reliable, comfortable and long-lasting implants to patients. Titanium (Ti) and titanium alloys have been used in dental implants and total hip arthroplasty due to their excellent biocompatibility. However, Ti-based implants in human body suffer surface degradation (corrosion and wear) resulting in the release of metallic ions and solid wear debris (mainly titanium dioxide) leading to peri-implant inflammatory reactions. Unfortunately, our current understanding of the biological interactions with titanium dioxide nanoparticles is still very limited. Taking this into consideration, this study focuses on the internalization of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on primary bone cells, exploring the events occurring at the nano-bio interface. For the first time, we report the selective binding of calcium (Ca), phosphorous (P) and proteins from cell culture medium to anatase nanoparticles that are extremely important for nanoparticle internalization and bone cells survival. In the intricate biological environment, anatase nanoparticles form bio-complexes (mixture of proteins and ions) which act as a kind of ‘Trojan-horse’ internalization by cells. Furthermore, anatase nanoparticles-induced modifications on cell behavior (viability and internalization) could be understand in detail. The results presented in this report can inspire new strategies for the use of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in several regeneration therapies.

  17. A review on potential neurotoxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Bin; Liu, Jia; Feng, Xiaoli; Wei, Limin; Shao, Longquan

    2015-08-01

    As the rapid development of nanotechnology in the past three decades, titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs), for their peculiar physicochemical properties, are widely applied in consumer products, food additives, cosmetics, drug carriers, and so on. However, little is known about their potential exposure and neurotoxic effects. Once NPs are unintentionally exposed to human beings, they could be absorbed, and then accumulated in the brain regions by passing through the blood-brain barrier (BBB) or through the nose-to-brain pathway, potentially leading to dysfunctions of central nerve system (CNS). Besides, NPs may affect the brain development of embryo by crossing the placental barrier. A few in vivo and in vitro researches have demonstrated that the morphology and function of neuronal or glial cells could be impaired by TiO2 NPs which might induce cell necrosis. Cellular components, such as mitochondrial, lysosome, and cytoskeleton, could also be influenced as well. The recognition ability, spatial memory, and learning ability of TiO2 NPs-treated rodents were significantly impaired, which meant that accumulation of TiO2 NPs in the brain could lead to neurodegeneration. However, conclusions obtained from those studies were not consistent with each other as researchers may choose different experimental parameters, including administration ways, dosage, size, and crystal structure of TiO2 NPs. Therefore, in order to fully understand the potential risks of TiO2 NPs to brain health, figure out research areas where further studies are required, and improve its bio-safety for applications in the near future, how TiO2 NPs interact with the brain is investigated in this review by summarizing the current researches on neurotoxicity induced by TiO2 NPs.

  18. Titanium dioxide in our everyday life; is it safe?

    PubMed Central

    Skocaj, Matej; Filipic, Metka; Petkovic, Jana; Novak, Sasa

    2011-01-01

    Background Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is considered as an inert and safe material and has been used in many applications for decades. However, with the development of nanotechnologies TiO2 nanoparticles, with numerous novel and useful properties, are increasingly manufactured and used. Therefore increased human and environmental exposure can be expected, which has put TiO2 nanoparticles under toxicological scrutiny. Mechanistic toxicological studies show that TiO2 nanoparticles predominantly cause adverse effects via induction of oxidative stress resulting in cell damage, genotoxicity, inflammation, immune response etc. The extent and type of damage strongly depends on physical and chemical characteristics of TiO2 nanoparticles, which govern their bioavailability and reactivity. Based on the experimental evidence from animal inhalation studies TiO2 nanoparticles are classified as “possible carcinogenic to humans” by the International Agency for Research on Cancer and as occupational carcinogen by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. The studies on dermal exposure to TiO2 nanoparticles, which is in humans substantial through the use of sunscreens, generally indicate negligible transdermal penetration; however data are needed on long-term exposure and potential adverse effects of photo-oxidation products. Although TiO2 is permitted as an additive (E171) in food and pharmaceutical products we do not have reliable data on its absorption, distribution, excretion and toxicity on oral exposure. TiO2 may also enter environment, and while it exerts low acute toxicity to aquatic organisms, upon long-term exposure it induces a range of sub-lethal effects. Conclusions Until relevant toxicological and human exposure data that would enable reliable risk assessment are obtained, TiO2 nanoparticles should be used with great care. PMID:22933961

  19. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles: a review of current toxicological data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) are manufactured worldwide in large quantities for use in a wide range of applications. TiO2 NPs possess different physicochemical properties compared to their fine particle (FP) analogs, which might alter their bioactivity. Most of the literature cited here has focused on the respiratory system, showing the importance of inhalation as the primary route for TiO2 NP exposure in the workplace. TiO2 NPs may translocate to systemic organs from the lung and gastrointestinal tract (GIT) although the rate of translocation appears low. There have also been studies focusing on other potential routes of human exposure. Oral exposure mainly occurs through food products containing TiO2 NP-additives. Most dermal exposure studies, whether in vivo or in vitro, report that TiO2 NPs do not penetrate the stratum corneum (SC). In the field of nanomedicine, intravenous injection can deliver TiO2 nanoparticulate carriers directly into the human body. Upon intravenous exposure, TiO2 NPs can induce pathological lesions of the liver, spleen, kidneys, and brain. We have also shown here that most of these effects may be due to the use of very high doses of TiO2 NPs. There is also an enormous lack of epidemiological data regarding TiO2 NPs in spite of its increased production and use. However, long-term inhalation studies in rats have reported lung tumors. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the toxicology of TiO2 NPs and points out areas where further information is needed. PMID:23587290

  20. Surface characteristics and photoactivity of silver-modified palygorskite clays coated with nanosized titanium dioxide particles

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Difang . E-mail: zdf6910@163.com; Zhou Jie; Liu Ning

    2007-03-15

    This paper presents the results of a study in which nanosized titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) crystal particles were coated onto the surface of palygorskite fibrous clay which had been modified by silver ions using titanium tetrachloride as a precursor. Coated TiO{sub 2} particles with the anatase structure were formed after calcining at 400 deg. C for 2 h in air. Various analytical techniques were used to characterize the surface properties of titanium dioxide particles on the palygorskite. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses showed that TiO{sub 2} particles were supported on the surface of the palygorskite clays and their size was in the range of 3-6 nm. The titanium oxide coatings were found to be very active for the photocatalytic decomposition of methylene blue.

  1. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticle Humidity Microsensors Integrated with Circuitry on-a-Chip

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yu-Chih; Dai, Ching-Liang; Hsu, Cheng-Chih

    2014-01-01

    A humidity microsensor integrated with a readout circuit on-a-chip fabricated using the commercial 0.18 μm CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) process was presented. The integrated sensor chip consists of a humidity sensor and a readout circuit. The humidity sensor is composed of a sensitive film and interdigitated electrodes. The sensitive film is titanium dioxide prepared by the sol-gel method. The titanium dioxide is coated on the interdigitated electrodes. The humidity sensor requires a post-process to remove the sacrificial layer and to coat the titanium dioxide. The resistance of the sensor changes as the sensitive film absorbs or desorbs vapor. The readout circuit is employed to convert the resistance variation of the sensor into the output voltage. The experimental results show that the integrated humidity sensor has a sensitivity of 4.5 mV/RH% (relative humidity) at room temperature. PMID:24594612

  2. Deposition and characterization of titanium dioxide and hafnium dioxide thin films for high dielectric applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Meeyoung

    The industry's demand for higher integrated circuit density and performance has forced the gate dielectric layer thickness to decrease rapidly. The use of conventional SiO2 films as gate oxide is reaching its limit due to the rapid increase in tunneling current. Therefore, a need for a high dielectric material to produce large oxide capacitance and low leakage current has emerged. Metal-oxides such as titanium dioxide (TiO2) and hafnium dioxide (HfO2) are attractive candidates for gate dielectrics due to their electrical and physical properties suitable for high dielectric applications. MOCVD of TiO2 using titanium isopropoxide (TTIP) precursor on p-type Si(100) has been studied. Insertion of a TiO x buffer layer, formed by depositing metallic Ti followed by oxidation, at the TiO2/Si interface has reduced the carbon contamination in the TiO2 film. Elemental Ti films, analyzed by in-situ AES, were found to grow according to Stranski-Krastanov mode on Si(100). Carbon-free, stoichiometric TiO2 films were successfully produced on Si(100) without any parasitic SiO2 layers at the TiO 2/Si interface. Electron-beam deposition of HfO2 films on Si(100) has also been investigated in this work. HfO2 films are formed by depositing elemental Hf on Si(100) and then oxidizing it either in O2 or O 3. XPS results reveal that with oxidation Hf(4f) peak shifts +3.45eV with 02 and +3.65eV with O3 oxidation. LEED and AFM studies show that the initially ordered crystalline Hf becomes disordered after oxidation. The thermodynamic stability of HfO2 films on Si has been studied using a unique test-bed structure of Hf/O3/Si. Post-Oxidation of Layer Deposition (POLD) has been employed to produce HfO2 films with a desired thickness. XPS results indicate that stoichiometric HfO 2 films were successfully produced using the POLD process. The investigation of the growth and thin film properties of TiO 2 and HfO2 using oxygen and ozone has laid a foundation for the application of these metal

  3. Peroxide-modified titanium dioxide: a chemical analog of putative Martian soil oxidants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, R. C.; Zent, A. P.

    1999-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide chemisorbed on titanium dioxide (peroxide-modified titanium dioxide) is investigated as a chemical analog to the putative soil oxidants responsible for the chemical reactivity seen in the Viking biology experiments. When peroxide-modified titanium dioxide (anatase) was exposed to a solution similar to the Viking labeled release (LR) experiment organic medium, CO2 gas was released into the sample cell headspace. Storage of these samples at 10 degrees C for 48 hr prior to exposure to organics resulted in a positive response while storage for 7 days did not. In the Viking LR experiment, storage of the Martian surface samples for 2 sols (approximately 49 hr) resulted in a positive response while storage for 141 sols essentially eliminated the initial rapid release of CO2. Heating the peroxide-modified titanium dioxide to 50 degrees C prior to exposure to organics resulted in a negative response. This is similar to, but not identical to, the Viking samples where heating to approximately 46 degrees C diminished the response by 54-80% and heating to 51.5 apparently eliminated the response. When exposed to water vapor, the peroxide-modified titanium dioxide samples release O2 in a manner similar to the release seen in the Viking gas exchange experiment (GEx). Reactivity is retained upon heating at 50 degrees C for three hours, distinguishing this active agent from the one responsible for the release of CO2 from aqueous organics. The release of CO2 by the peroxide-modified titanium dioxide is attributed to the decomposition of organics by outer-sphere peroxide complexes associated with surface hydroxyl groups, while the release of O2 upon humidification is attributed to more stable inner-sphere peroxide complexes associated with Ti4+ cations. Heating the peroxide-modified titanium dioxide to 145 degrees C inhibited the release of O2, while in the Viking experiments heating to this temperature diminished but did not eliminated the response. Although the

  4. Shape-Related Toxicity of Titanium Dioxide Nanofibres

    PubMed Central

    Allegri, Manfredi; Bianchi, Massimiliano G.; Chiu, Martina; Varet, Julia; Costa, Anna L.; Ortelli, Simona; Blosi, Magda; Bussolati, Ovidio; Poland, Craig A.; Bergamaschi, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanofibres are a novel fibrous nanomaterial with increasing applications in a variety of fields. While the biological effects of TiO2 nanoparticles have been extensively studied, the toxicological characterization of TiO2 nanofibres is far from being complete. In this study, we evaluated the toxicity of commercially available anatase TiO2 nanofibres using TiO2 nanoparticles (NP) and crocidolite asbestos as non-fibrous or fibrous benchmark materials. The evaluated endpoints were cell viability, haemolysis, macrophage activation, trans-epithelial electrical resistance (an indicator of the epithelial barrier competence), ROS production and oxidative stress as well as the morphology of exposed cells. The results showed that TiO2 nanofibres caused a cell-specific, dose-dependent decrease of cell viability, with larger effects on alveolar epithelial cells than on macrophages. The observed effects were comparable to those of crocidolite, while TiO2 NP did not decrease cell viability. TiO2 nanofibres were also found endowed with a marked haemolytic activity, at levels significantly higher than those observed with TiO2 nanoparticles or crocidolite. Moreover, TiO2 nanofibres and crocidolite, but not TiO2 nanoparticles, caused a significant decrease of the trans-epithelial electrical resistance of airway cell monolayers. SEM images demonstrated that the interaction with nanofibres and crocidolite caused cell shape perturbation with the longest fibres incompletely or not phagocytosed. The expression of several pro-inflammatory markers, such as NO production and the induction of Nos2 and Ptgs2, was significantly increased by TiO2 nanofibres, as well as by TiO2 nanoparticles and crocidolite. This study indicates that TiO2 nanofibres had significant toxic effects and, for most endpoints with the exception of pro-inflammatory changes, are more bio-active than TiO2 nanoparticles, showing the relevance of shape in determining the toxicity of nanomaterials

  5. Surface Charge and Ion Sorption Properties of Titanium Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridley, M. K.; Machesky, M. L.; Wesolowski, D. J.; Finnegan, M. P.; Palmer, D. A.

    2001-12-01

    The interaction of submicron metal oxide particles with natural aqueous solutions results in the hydroxylation of surface sites, which impart a pH-dependent surface charge. The charged submicron particles influence processes such as nanoparticle assembly and alteration, crystal growth rates and morphologies, colloid flocculation, and contaminant transport. The surface charge and ion sorption properties of metal-oxide particles may be studied by potentiometric titrations, using hydrogen-electrode concentration-cells or traditional glass electrodes and an autotitrator. These techniques have been used to quantify the adsorption of various ions (Na+, Rb+, Ca2+, Sr2+, Cl-) on rutile, at ionic strengths up to 1.0 molality and temperatures to 250° C. The crystalline rutile used in these studies is less than 400 nm in diameter, has a BET surface area of 17 m2/g, and the 110 and 100 faces predominate. The negative surface charge of the rutile was enhanced by increasing temperature, increasing ionic strength, and decreasing the ionic radii of the electrolyte cation. Moreover, the addition of a divalent cation significantly enhances the negative charge of the rutile surface. These data have been rationalized with the MUSIC model of Hiemestra and van Riemsdijk, and a Basic Stern layer description of the electric double layer (EDL). Model fitting of the experimental data provides binding constants for the adsorbed counterions and divalent cations, and capacitance values as well as corresponding electrical potential values of the binding planes. Recently, new studies have been initiated to determine particle size affects on the proton induced surface charge and ion sorption properties of titanium dioxide. In these studies, anatase with a BET surface area of 40 and 100 m2/g (primary particle sizes of 40 and 10 nm, respectively) is being investigated. The complexity of both the experimental and modeling procedures increases with decreasing particle size. For example, the fine

  6. Shape-Related Toxicity of Titanium Dioxide Nanofibres.

    PubMed

    Allegri, Manfredi; Bianchi, Massimiliano G; Chiu, Martina; Varet, Julia; Costa, Anna L; Ortelli, Simona; Blosi, Magda; Bussolati, Ovidio; Poland, Craig A; Bergamaschi, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanofibres are a novel fibrous nanomaterial with increasing applications in a variety of fields. While the biological effects of TiO2 nanoparticles have been extensively studied, the toxicological characterization of TiO2 nanofibres is far from being complete. In this study, we evaluated the toxicity of commercially available anatase TiO2 nanofibres using TiO2 nanoparticles (NP) and crocidolite asbestos as non-fibrous or fibrous benchmark materials. The evaluated endpoints were cell viability, haemolysis, macrophage activation, trans-epithelial electrical resistance (an indicator of the epithelial barrier competence), ROS production and oxidative stress as well as the morphology of exposed cells. The results showed that TiO2 nanofibres caused a cell-specific, dose-dependent decrease of cell viability, with larger effects on alveolar epithelial cells than on macrophages. The observed effects were comparable to those of crocidolite, while TiO2 NP did not decrease cell viability. TiO2 nanofibres were also found endowed with a marked haemolytic activity, at levels significantly higher than those observed with TiO2 nanoparticles or crocidolite. Moreover, TiO2 nanofibres and crocidolite, but not TiO2 nanoparticles, caused a significant decrease of the trans-epithelial electrical resistance of airway cell monolayers. SEM images demonstrated that the interaction with nanofibres and crocidolite caused cell shape perturbation with the longest fibres incompletely or not phagocytosed. The expression of several pro-inflammatory markers, such as NO production and the induction of Nos2 and Ptgs2, was significantly increased by TiO2 nanofibres, as well as by TiO2 nanoparticles and crocidolite. This study indicates that TiO2 nanofibres had significant toxic effects and, for most endpoints with the exception of pro-inflammatory changes, are more bio-active than TiO2 nanoparticles, showing the relevance of shape in determining the toxicity of nanomaterials

  7. Phototoxic effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on Daphnia magna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfield, Charles M.

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NP) are one of the most abundantly utilized nanomaterials in the world. Studies have demonstrated the mechanism of acute toxicity in TiO2-NP to be the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to oxidative stress and mortality in exposed organisms. It has also been demonstrated that the anatase crystalline conformation is capable of catalyzing the cleavage of water molecules to further increase the concentration of ROS in the presence of ultraviolet radiation. This photoenhanced toxicity significantly lowers the toxicity threshold of TiO2-NP to environmentally relevant concentrations (ppb). The goal of this study was to determine whether dietary uptake and accumulation of TiO2-NP in the aquatic filter feeder Daphnia magna resulted in photoenhanced toxicity. D. magna and S. caprincornatum were exposed to aqueous solutions of 20ppm and 200ppm TiO2-NP for 24hrs and then transferred to clean moderately hard water. Samples were taken at various time points, dried, and TiO 2 quantified using ICP-MS. Toxicity assays were run on D. magna using three TiO2-NP (20ppm, 200ppm) exposure protocols and two ultraviolet radiation treatments. The first exposure group was exposed to aqueous solutions of TiO2-NP for the duration of the test. The second exposure group was exposed to TiO2-NP for an hour and then transferred to clean water. The third exposure group was fed S. capricornatum that had been allowed to adsorb TiO2-NP. All samples were then placed in an outdoor UV exposure system and exposed to either full spectrum sunlight (with UV) or filtered sunlight (no UV). Here we show that TiO2 uptake peaked at one hour of exposure likely due to sedimentation of the particles out of suspension, thus decreasing bioavailability for the duration of the test. Interestingly, when D. magna were moved to clean water, aqueous concentrations of TiO2 increase as a result of depuration from the gut tract. Data also suggests these excreted particles

  8. Photocatalytic production of hydrogen from fixed titanium dioxide thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okoye, Njideka Helen

    This thesis is focused on further developing of an efficient method for the photocatalytic hydrogen production. The research aimed to use thin films deposited with TiO2 and doped with Pt in order to substitute slurry solutions that are currently being used. A new depositing experimental approach to manufacture the thin films was proposed and tested for both physical properties and chemical reactivity. Therefore, the experiment was designed into two parts: The first part was on the manufacturing and the physical characterization of titanium dioxide deposited on glass surfaces and the second part was focused on the ability of the thin film to produce hydrogen. For the second part, a photochemical reactor vessel was used to properly place the glass slides to UV-irradiation. This was yielded by a mercury lamp located at the centre of the reactor. The thesis is organized into five different chapters including introduction, literature review, characterization of TiO2 coated surface, experimental design and hydrogen production, finally conclusive observations and future work. Hydrogen production by photodecomposition of water into H2 and O2 has a very low efficiency due to rapid reverse reaction and, as mentioned above, it usually requires a slurry type of solution. This needs additional processing steps such as filtration and recycling of particles. Therefore, it is important to develop an efficient process for hydrogen production. TiO2 coated surfaces could be an excellent technological alternative. In this study, a sol-gel method was used to produce a transparent TiO 2 thin film which was deposited on a glass substrate by using a new coating technique introduced in this work for H2 production. The TiO2 deposited film on a glass substrate by using the spraying method of coating was characterized for physical analysis (surface characteristics, size of nanoparticles and distribution, etc.) by using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Transmission

  9. Identification of Plant Growth-Promoting Bacteria Using Titanium Dioxide Photocatalysis-Assisted Photoacoustic Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordillo-Delgado, F.; Marín, E.; Calderón, A.

    2013-09-01

    The effect of titanium dioxide photocatalysis against bacteria that are dangerous for human health has been investigated in the past, suggesting the possibility of using a specific behavior for each microorganism during this process for its discrimination. In this study, the behavior of some plants’ growth promoting bacteria ( Burkholderia unamae (Strain MTI 641), Acetobacter diazotrophicus (Strain PAl 5T), A. diazotrophicus (Strain CFN-Cf 52), and B. unamae (Strain TATl-371)) interacting with light and bactericidal titanium dioxide films have been analyzed using the photoacoustic technique. The monitoring of these interactions shows particular characteristics that could serve for identifying these species.

  10. Surface characterisation and electrochemical behaviour of porous titanium dioxide coated 316L stainless steel for orthopaedic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarajan, S.; Rajendran, N.

    2009-01-01

    Porous titanium dioxide was coated on surgical grade 316L stainless steel (SS) and its role on the corrosion protection and enhanced biocompatibility of the materials was studied. X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) were carried out to characterise the surface morphology and also to understand the structure of the as synthesised coating on the substrates. The corrosion behaviour of titanium dioxide coated samples in simulated body fluid was evaluated using polarisation and impedance spectroscopy studies. The results reveal that the titanium dioxide coated 316L SS exhibit a higher corrosion resistance than the uncoated 316L SS. The titanium dioxide coated surface is porous, uniform and also it acts as a barrier layer to metallic substrate and the porous titanium dioxide coating induces the formation of hydroxyapatite layer on the metal surface.

  11. Optical property degradation of titanium dioxide micro- and nanopowders under irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, M. M.; Li, Chundong; Neshchimenko, V. V.

    2014-08-01

    Diffuse reflection spectra and absorption spectra of titanium dioxide (anatase) micro- and nanopowders induced by exposure to 100 keV protons and electrons were analyzed at wavelengths between 250 and 2500 nm. It is established that the radiation stability of the nanopowders is higher than the micropowders in the absorption region λ > 500 nm for proton and electron exposure. This effect is caused by the high concentration of radiation defects in micropowders, which is associated with defects of interstitial titanium ions (Tiirad rad rad , Tiirad rad rad rad ), titanium vacancies (VTi⁗, VTi‴ ) and oxygen vacancies VOX.

  12. On the response of mouse peritoneal macrophages to titanium dioxide pigments in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Nuuja, I.J.; Arstila, A.U.

    1982-10-01

    Acid phosphatase activity and cell morphology were followed using mouse peritoneal macrophages as a toxicity test model in vitro. The cells were given titanium dioxide (TiO/sub 2/) and five titanium pigments with different coating materials in 100 ..mu..g/ml of culture medium. The cell reactions were studied from 1 to 17 days. Titanium particles inhibited the acid phosphatase activity of the cells compared to controls. In comparison to untreated cells the activity of this enzyme increased in most groups studied, being highest in the control cells (2-3.5 times) after 7 days. The titanium pigments did not cause the drastic alterations in these cells as seen with quartz and asbestos particles, but the titanium pigments were not harmless to the mouse peritoneal macrophages with the doses and culture times used.

  13. Titanium Isopropoxide Precursor Volume Consumption as a Function of Temperature for Titanium Dioxide Thin Films Grown by Atomic Layer Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantin, Costel

    2012-02-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) offers tremendous opportunities for controlling material synthesis on an atomic level and for creating nanolayers with unique new functionalities. ALD is a chemical gas phase thin film deposition method based on alternating surface reactions that employs two or more precursors. ALD is often used for growth of high k dielectric constant oxide films. Titanium dioxide material have a k value of 80, and a band gap of ˜ 3 eV, and due to strong oxidizing properties thin films coated on construction materials and glass have fog proof, and self cleaning properties. Our ALD reactor employs liquid Titanium Isopropoxide [TiOCH(CH3)24] as a metal precursor and distilled H2O as an oxygen source to grow thin films of titanium dioxide [TiO2] on silicon [Si], gallium nitride [GaN], and Aluminium foil [Al-foil] substrates. Titanium Isopropoxide exhibit a vapor pressure surge above 40^o C and we report the volume precursor consumption as a function of precursor temperature and thin film thickness for ALD grown TiO2 on Si, GaN, and Al-foil substrates. We will also present dielectric constants of the TiO2 thin films measured with a variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometer.

  14. In Vitro Phototoxicity and Hazard Identification of Nano-scale Titanium Dioxide

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nano-titanium dioxide (nano-Ti02) catalyzes many reactions under UV radiation and is hypothesized to cause phototoxicity. A human-derived line of retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19) was treated with six different samples of nano-Ti02 and exposed to UVA radiation. The Ti02 ...

  15. Supporting nanomaterial risk assessment by case studies of nano-titanium dioxide using comprehensive environmental assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Here we describe a comprehensive environmental assessment (CEA) approach for two case studies of nano-titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) in real world applications: water treatment and sunscreen. CEA combines a product life cycle framework with the risk assessment paradigm.

  16. Toxicity Assessment of Six Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles in Human Epidermal Keratinocytes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicity Assessment of Six Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles in Human Epidermal Keratinocytes Nanoparticle uptake in cells may be an important determinant of their potential cytotoxic and inflammatory effects. Six commercial TiO2 NP (A=Alfa Aesar,10nm, A*=Alfa Aesar 32nm, B=P25 27...

  17. Impact of natural organic matter on particle behavior and phototoxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to their inherent phototoxicity and inevitable environmental release, titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) are increasingly studied in the field of aquatic toxicology. One of the particular interests is the interactions between nano-TiO2 and natural organic matter (NOM)...

  18. Polymorph-dependent titanium dioxide nanoparticle dissolution in acidic and alkali digestions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multiple polymorphs (anatase, brookite and rutile) of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs) with variable structures were quantified in environmental matrices via microwave-based hydrofluoric (HF) and nitric (HNO3) mixed acid digestion and muffle furnace (MF)-based potassium ...

  19. Selective recovery of arsenic from aqueous solutions with hydrated titanium dioxide. Report of investigations/1983

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, B.W.; Martin, D.A.

    1983-04-01

    Bureau of Mines research to recover arsenic from mining industry waste material and process streams is reported. Batch and column approaches were investigated for adsorbing arsenic from acid leach solutions and ion-exchange eluate solutions with hydrated titanium dioxide granules.

  20. Effect of Coating and Packaging Materials on Photocatalytic and Antimicrobial Activities of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Food safety or foodborne pathogen contamination is a major concern in food industry. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is a photocatalyst and can inactivate a wide spectrum of microorganisms under UV illumination. There is significant interest in the development of TiO2-coated or –incorporated food packaging ...

  1. NOVEL EMBEDDED CERAMIC ELECTRODE SYSTEM TO ACTIVATE NANOSTRUCTURED TITANIUM DIOXIDE FOR DEGRADATION OF MTBE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A novel reactor combining a flame-deposited nanostructured titanium dioxide film and a set of embedded ceramic electrodes was designed, developed and tested for degradation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in water. On applying a voltage to the ceramic electrodes, a surface coro...

  2. Photocatalytic ROS production and phototoxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles is dependent on solar UV radiation spectrum

    EPA Science Inventory

    Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) and its consequent phototoxicity to Daphnia magna were measured under different solar UV radiation spectrum by applying a series of optical filters in a solar simulator. Removing UVB (280-32...

  3. Biotemplated synthesis of anatase titanium dioxide nanoparticles via lignocellulosic waste material.

    PubMed

    Ramimoghadam, Donya; Bagheri, Samira; Abd Hamid, Sharifah Bee

    2014-01-01

    Anatase titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs) were synthesized by sol-gel method using rice straw as a soft biotemplate. Rice straw, as a lignocellulosic waste material, is a biomass feedstock which is globally produced in high rate and could be utilized in an innovative approach to manufacture a value-added product. Rice straw as a reliable biotemplate has been used in the sol-gel method to synthesize ultrasmall sizes of TiO2-NPs with high potential application in photocatalysis. The physicochemical properties of titanium dioxide nanoparticles were investigated by a number of techniques such as X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), ultraviolet visible spectra (UV-Vis), and surface area and pore size analysis. All results consensually confirmed that particle sizes of synthesized titanium dioxide were template-dependent, representing decrease in the nanoparticles sizes with increase of biotemplate concentration. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles as small as 13.0 ± 3.3 nm were obtained under our experimental conditions. Additionally, surface area and porosity of synthesized TiO2-NPs have been enhanced by increasing rice straw amount which results in surface modification of nanoparticles and potential application in photocatalysis. PMID:25126547

  4. GAS PHASE SELECTIVE PHOTOXIDATION OF ALCOHOLS USING LIGHT-ACTIVATED TITANIUM DIOXIDE AND MOLECULAR OXYGEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas Phase Selective Oxidation of Alcohols Using Light-Activated Titanium Dioxide and Molecular Oxygen

    Gas phase selective oxidations of various primary and secondary alcohols are studied in an indigenously built stainless steel up-flow photochemical reactor using ultravi...

  5. Biotemplated Synthesis of Anatase Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles via Lignocellulosic Waste Material

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, Samira; Abd Hamid, Sharifah Bee

    2014-01-01

    Anatase titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs) were synthesized by sol-gel method using rice straw as a soft biotemplate. Rice straw, as a lignocellulosic waste material, is a biomass feedstock which is globally produced in high rate and could be utilized in an innovative approach to manufacture a value-added product. Rice straw as a reliable biotemplate has been used in the sol-gel method to synthesize ultrasmall sizes of TiO2-NPs with high potential application in photocatalysis. The physicochemical properties of titanium dioxide nanoparticles were investigated by a number of techniques such as X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), ultraviolet visible spectra (UV-Vis), and surface area and pore size analysis. All results consensually confirmed that particle sizes of synthesized titanium dioxide were template-dependent, representing decrease in the nanoparticles sizes with increase of biotemplate concentration. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles as small as 13.0 ± 3.3 nm were obtained under our experimental conditions. Additionally, surface area and porosity of synthesized TiO2-NPs have been enhanced by increasing rice straw amount which results in surface modification of nanoparticles and potential application in photocatalysis. PMID:25126547

  6. Phenotypic and genomic responses to titanium dioxide and cerium oxide nanoparticles in Arabidopsis germinants

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of exposure to two nanoparticles (NPs) -titanium dioxide (nano-titania) and cerium oxide (nano-ceria) at 500 mg NPs L-1 on gene expression and growth in Arabidopsis thaliana germinants were studied using microarrays and phenotype studies. After 12 days post treatment,...

  7. Electrical Properties of a Thermoplastic Polyurethane Filled with Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Polyzos, Georgios; Tuncer, Enis; Koerner, Hilmar; Kidder, Michelle; Vaia, Richard; Sauers, Isidor; James, David Randy; Ellis, Alvin R

    2010-01-01

    In this study we report a nanodielectric system composed of pre-synthesized nanoparticles embedded in an elastomer. Nanoparticles of titanium dioxide were synthesized in an aqueous solution of titanium chloride and polyethylene glycol. The nanoparticles were blended in a twin screw extruder with a thermoplastic, polyurethane (Morthane PS455-203), to form nanodielectrics at three different weight fractions of titanium dioxide. Impedance spectroscopy was employed to study polymer dynamics and the influence of nanoparticles on relaxation. The segmental relaxation associated with the glass transition of the polyurethane matrix, and the local relaxations associated with short range motions of polar groups were investigated at wide ranges of frequency (20 Hz-1 MHz) and temperature (300-20 K). The dielectric breakdown strength of the nanodielectrics was also measured to characterize their insulating properties and their potential for use in high voltage applications.

  8. Light-induced degradation of perfluorocarboxylic acids in the presence of titanium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Dillert, Ralf; Bahnemann, Detlef; Hidaka, Hisao

    2007-03-01

    The UV-photon-induced degradation of heptafluorobutanoic acid was investigated in acidic aqueous solutions in the presence of titanium dioxide. Heptafluorobutanoic acid could be degraded with this photocatalyst in a light-induced reaction generating carbon dioxide and fluoride anions. Carbon dioxide evolution in a significant amount occurred only in the presence of molecular oxygen and the photocatalyst. The light-induced degradation of trifluoroacetic acid, pentafluoropropanoic acid, nonafluorobutanoic acid, pentadecafluorooctanoic acid, nonafluorobutanesulfonic acid, and heptadecafluorooctanesulfonic acid in the presence of titanium dioxide was also studied. The perfluorocarboxylic acids under investigation are degraded to generate CO(2) and fluoride anions while both perfluorinated sulfonic acids are persistent under the experimental conditions employed in this study. For all compounds photonic efficiencies of the mineralization reaction were estimated to be smaller than 1x10(-5). To increase the photocatalytic activity mixed systems containing homogeneous phosphotungstic acid and heterogeneous titanium dioxide catalysts were also investigated. In the mixtures of these two photocatalysts, the formation rate of CO(2) increased with illumination time. PMID:17126882

  9. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Structure of densified amorphous germanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micoulaut, Matthieu

    2004-03-01

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the structure of densified germanium dioxide (GeO2). It is found that the coordination number of germanium changes with increasing density (pressure) while pressure released systems exhibit only a marked angular change in local structure as compared to the virgin system. The structural modification with pressure appears to be stepwise and gradually affects long-range (through the reduction of the long-range correlations as seen from the shift of the first sharp diffraction peak), intermediate-range (by angular reduction) and finally short-range structure (by tetrahedron distortion).

  10. Monolithic co-aerogels of carbon/titanium dioxide as three dimensional nanostructured electrodes for energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sungwoo; Cai, Yue; Cheng, Yingwen; Varanasi, C. V.; Liu, Jie

    2012-11-01

    Conductive fillers, such as amorphous carbon, carbon nanotube and graphene etc., are generally mixed with nanostructured metal oxide materials to improve the performance of electrode materials in energy storage devices. However, the conductive framework that provides path for electric conduction does not normally form a well-connected and robust 3-D network to ensure optimized ions transport. Here, we report a convenient, inexpensive and scalable method for synthesizing hybrid carbon and titanium dioxide co-gels and co-aerogels to improve the electrochemical capacity by combining both the lithium insertion and the surface storage mechanisms in Li ion batteries (LIBs) anodes. A monolithic piece of a hybrid C/TiO2 co-aerogel can be directly used as an active electrode without the addition of binders, such as polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF). As a result, the performance of LIB anodes using the hybrid co-aerogel is significantly improved over current LIBs based on carbon/titanium oxide composites. The reversible discharge capacity was stabilized at ˜400 mAh g-1 at a 168 mA g-1 scan rate and an operating voltage between 3.0 and 0.05 V vs. Li+/Li with excellent cyclic capacity retention. This approach, however, is not limited to only C/TiO2 system but can be extended to other metal oxides to form co-gels with carbon to improve their potential use in numerous electrochemical, photocatalytic, and photoelectronic devices.

  11. Prediction of Failure Due to Thermal Aging, Corrosion and Environmental Fracture in Amorphous and Titanium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C

    2003-04-15

    DARPA is exploring a number of advanced materials for military applications, including amorphous metals and titanium-based alloys. Equipment made from these materials can undergo degradation due to thermal aging, uniform corrosion, pitting, crevice corrosion, denting, stress corrosion cracking, corrosion fatigue, hydrogen induced cracking and microbial influenced corrosion. Amorphous alloys have exceptional resistance to corrosion, due in part to the absence of grain boundaries, but can undergo crystallization and other phase instabilities during heating and welding. Titanium alloys are extremely corrosion resistant due to the formation of a tenacious passive film of titanium oxide, but is prone to hydrogen absorption in crevices, and hydrogen induced cracking after hydrogen absorption. Accurate predictions of equipment reliability, necessary for strategic planning, requires integrated models that account for all relevant modes of attack, and that can make probabilistic predictions. Once developed, model parameters must be determined experimentally, and the validity of models must be established through careful laboratory and field tests. Such validation testing requires state-of-the-art surface analytical techniques, as well as electrochemical and fracture mechanics tests. The interaction between those processes that perturb the local environment on a surface and those that alter metallurgical condition must be integrated in predictive models. The material and environment come together to drive various modes of corrosive attack (Figure 1). Models must be supported through comprehensive materials testing capabilities. Such capabilities are available at LLNL and include: the Long Term Corrosion Test Facility (LTCTF) where large numbers of standard samples can be exposed to realistic test media at several temperature levels; a reverse DC machine that can be used to monitor the propagation of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in situ; and banks of potentiostats with

  12. Analysis of metal surfaces coated with europium-doped titanium dioxide by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Głogocka, Daria; Noculak, Agnieszka; Pucińska, Joanna; Jopek, Wojciech; Podbielska, Halina; Langner, Marek; Przybyło, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    The surface passivation with titanium sol-gel coatings is a frequently used technique to control the adsorption of selected biological macromolecules and to reduce the exposure of the bulk material to biological matter. Due to the increasing number of new coating-preparation methods and new gel compositions with various types of additives, the quality and homogeneity determination of the surface covering is a critical factor affecting performance of any implanted material. While coating thickness is easy to determine, the homogeneity of the surface distribution of coating materials requires more elaborate methodologies. In the paper, the laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) based method, capable to quantitate the homogeneity and uniformity of the europium in titanium dioxide sol-gel coatings on stainless steel surfaces prepared with two different procedures: spin-coating and dip-coating, is presented. The emission intensity of titanium has been used to determine the coating thickness whereas the relative values of europium and titanium emission intensities provide data on the coating homogeneity. The obtained results show that the spin-coating technique provides better surface coverage with titanium dioxide. However, when the surface coating compositions were compared the dip-coating technique was more reliable. PMID:26687457

  13. Morphological and structural characterization of a titanium dioxide system

    SciTech Connect

    Alemany, L.J.; Banares, M.A.; Pardo, E.; Martin-Jimenez, F.; Blasco, J.M.

    2000-03-01

    TiO{sub 2} was prepared by the homogeneous hydrolysis precipitation method from titanium tetraisopropoxide. The decrease of surface area observed with the thermal treatment can be related to the growth of crystallites, and there is good correlation between the surface area and the mean crystallite dimension. The coexistence of the three different crystalline TiO{sub 2} phases is clearly evidenced by the XRD and FT-Raman measurements.

  14. Effect of chromium and phosphorus on the physical properties of iron and titanium-based amorphous metallic alloy films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Distefano, S.; Rameshan, R.; Fitzgerald, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    Amorphous iron and titanium-based alloys containing various amounts of chromium, phosphorus, and boron exhibit high corrosion resistance. Some physical properties of Fe and Ti-based metallic alloy films deposited on a glass substrate by a dc-magnetron sputtering technique are reported. The films were characterized using differential scanning calorimetry, stress analysis, SEM, XRD, SIMS, electron microprobe, and potentiodynamic polarization techniques.

  15. Discovery of reversible photochromism in titanium dioxide using photoacoustic spectroscopy. Implications for the investigation of light-induced charge-separation and surface redox processes in titanium dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Highfield, J.G.; Graetzel, M.

    1988-01-28

    Utilizing a conventional photoacoustic spectrometer in a pump-probe arrangement, band-gap excitation of powdered titanium dioxide in a moist, oxygen-free atmosphere results in a strong photochromic response, characteristic of small polaron formation. The reactivity and remarkable lifetime of such excited species are demonstrated in their subsequent dark reduction of methylviologen. Results from two independent methods indicate carrier densities in the range 10/sup 19/-10/sup 20/ cm/sup -3/. Electron-hole recombination follows first-order kinetics, suggesting that detrapping of surface-trapped holes is rate controlling. The presence of water vapor delays the recombination process, extending decay constants from seconds to minutes.

  16. Characterization of anodized titanium for hydrometallurgical applications—Evidence for the reduction of cupric on titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Alfantazi, Akram; Asselin, Edouard

    2013-10-01

    Anodic oxide films (AOFs) were potentiostatically formed on commercially pure titanium in 0.5 M sulfuric acid solutions at various anodizing voltages (up to 80 V) at room temperature. The subject of this study was the corrosion resistance of the AOFs in synthetic copper sulfide leaching solutions containing 30 g L-1 sulfuric acid as well as 12 g L-1 Cl-, 15 g L-1 Cu2+ and 1 g L-1 Fe3+. Open circuit potential (OCP) measurement, linear polarization resistance (LPR) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were used to study the corrosion response of the AOFs in copper sulfide leaching solutions up to 85 °C. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to investigate the morphology of the AOFs before and after 12 h of immersion at 85 °C. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to examine the surface chemistry of the AOFs after immersion. OCP measurements showed that the final failure of the AOFs occurred in 2 h in de-aerated 30 g L-1 H2SO4 and 12 g L-1 Cl- solutions at 85 °C. Both LPR and EIS results showed a significant increase in the corrosion resistance of the anodized titanium versus that of freshly polished titanium. Electrochemical results were confirmed by SEM analysis, where the AOF formed at 80 V lead to the best improvement in corrosion resistance. XPS measurements revealed that Cu2+ was reduced to Cu or Cu+ within the titanium oxide film. It was further confirmed that the presence of leaching oxidants would inhibit the reduction of Cu2+ on titanium dioxide in chloride containing copper sulfide leaching solutions.

  17. Optical constants of amorphous, transparent titanium-doped tungsten oxide thin films.

    PubMed

    Ramana, C V; Baghmar, Gaurav; Rubio, Ernesto J; Hernandez, Manuel J

    2013-06-12

    We report on the optical constants and their dispersion profiles determined from spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) analysis of the 20%-titanium (Ti) doped of tungsten oxide (WO3) thin films grown by sputter-deposition. The Ti-doped WO3 films grown in a wide range of temperatures (25-500 °C) are amorphous and optically transparent. SE data indicates that there is no significant interdiffusion at the film-substrate interface for a W-Ti oxide film growth of ~90 nm. The index refraction (n) at λ = 550 nm vary in the range of 2.17-2.31 with a gradual increase in growth temperature. A correlation between the growth conditions and optical constants is discussed. PMID:23682744

  18. Monoparticulate layers of titanium dioxide nanocrystallites with controllable interparticle distances

    SciTech Connect

    Kotov, N.A.; Meldrum, F.C.; Fendler, J.H. )

    1994-09-08

    The arrested hydrolysis of titanium tetraisopropoxide by millimolar concentrations of water in a mixture of chloroform and 1-propanol in the presence of hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide and tetramethylammonium hydroxide resulted in the formation of stable dispersions (sols) of nanocrystalline (18-22 A diameter) TiO[sub 2]. Spreading the sols on water surfaces in a Langmuir film balance produced monoparticulate TiO[sub 2] films. Heat treatment of a given sol prior to dispersion on the aqueous subphase resulted in nanocrystalline monoparticulate TiO[sub 2] films with reduced interparticulate distances. 14 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Chloride metallurgy: PGM recovery and titanium dioxide production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puvvada, G. V. K.; Sridhar, R.; Lakshmanan, V. I.

    2003-08-01

    This paper examines in detail the thermodynamics and application of chloride metallurgy for the extraction of precious metals, such as gold and silver, and platinum-group metals. The advantages with regard to the solubilities of metal ion species and their reduction potentials in chloride media are discussed with examples. The use of chloride media for the extraction of platinum-group metals from spent autocatalysts and for the production of high-purity pigment-grade TiO2 and titanium metal from ilmenite feed stocks is discussed in the case studies provided.

  20. Photocatalytic oxidation mechanism of isobutane in contact with titanium dioxide (TiO2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Formenti, M.; Juillet, F.; Teichner, S. J.

    1977-01-01

    The photocatalytic oxidation of isobutane to acetone in the presence of irradiated ultraviolet irradiated titanium dioxide was found to occur in several steps. Insertion of an oxygen atom onto the tertiary carbon transforming the isobutane into tertiary butanol occurred first. This step implied the photonic formation of the 02- species and its reaction with positive holes. The tertiary butanol was then dehydrated to isobutene which is oxidized acetone and carbon dioxide. Insertion of an oxygen atom onto the primary carbon led to isobutanal after oxidation to the alcohol. An analogous reaction scheme was proposed for all alkanes.

  1. Selective growth of palladium and titanium dioxide nanostructures inside carbon nanotube membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hevia, Samuel; Homm, Pía; Cortes, Andrea; Núñez, Verónica; Contreras, Claudia; Vera, Jenniffer; Segura, Rodrigo

    2012-06-01

    Hybrid nanostructured arrays based on carbon nanotubes (CNT) and palladium or titanium dioxide materials have been synthesized using self-supported and silicon-supported anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) as nanoporous template. It is well demonstrated that carbon nanotubes can be grown using these membranes and hydrocarbon precursors that decompose at temperatures closer to 600°C without the use of a metal catalyst. In this process, carbonic fragments condensate to form stacked graphitic sheets, which adopt the shape of the pores, yielding from these moulds' multi-walled carbon nanotubes. After this process, the ends of the tubes remain open and accessible to other substances, whereas the outer walls are protected by the alumina. Taking advantage of this fact, we have performed the synthesis of palladium and titanium dioxide nanostructures selectively inside carbon nanotubes using these CNT-AAO membranes as nanoreactors.

  2. Titanium dioxide encapsulation of supported Ag nanoparticles on the porous silica bead for increased photocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui; Deng, Lu; Sun, Chaochao; Li, Junqi; Zhu, Zhenfeng

    2015-01-01

    A new synthetic strategy has been developed to encapsulate Ag nanoparticles in heterogeneous catalysts to prevent their dropping and sintering. Ag nanoparticles with diameters about 5-10 nm were first supported on the porous silica bead. These were then covered with a fresh layer of titanium dioxide with the thickness about 5 nm. SEM and TEM images were used to confirm the success of each synthesis step, and the photocatalytic activity of the as-synthesized samples was evaluated by photocatalytic decolorization of Rhodamine B (Rh B) aqueous solution at ambient temperature under both UV and visible light irradiation. The resulting titanium dioxide encapsulated Ag nanoparticles exhibited an enhanced photocatalytic activity under both UV and visible light irradiation, this can be attributed to effective charge separation and light harvesting of the plasmonic silver nanoparticles decoration, even the reducing of the exciton recombination rate caused by the small grain size of anatase TiO2 nanocrystals.

  3. Defective titanium dioxide single crystals exposed by high-energy {001} facets for efficient oxygen reduction

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Dan-Ni; Gong, Li; Zhang, Ai-Yong; Zhang, Xing; Chen, Jie-Jie; Mu, Yang; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-01-01

    The cathodic material plays an essential role in oxygen reduction reaction for energy conversion and storage systems. Titanium dioxide, as a semiconductor material, is usually not recognized as an efficient oxygen reduction electrocatalyst owning to its low conductivity and poor reactivity. Here we demonstrate that nano-structured titanium dioxide, self-doped by oxygen vacancies and selectively exposed with the high-energy {001} facets, exhibits a surprisingly competitive oxygen reduction activity, excellent durability and superior tolerance to methanol. Combining the electrochemical tests with density-functional calculations, we elucidate the defect-centred oxygen reduction reaction mechanism for the superiority of the reductive {001}-TiO2−x nanocrystals. Our findings may provide an opportunity to develop a simple, efficient, cost-effective and promising catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction in energy conversion and storage technologies. PMID:26493365

  4. Defective titanium dioxide single crystals exposed by high-energy {001} facets for efficient oxygen reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Dan-Ni; Gong, Li; Zhang, Ai-Yong; Zhang, Xing; Chen, Jie-Jie; Mu, Yang; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-10-01

    The cathodic material plays an essential role in oxygen reduction reaction for energy conversion and storage systems. Titanium dioxide, as a semiconductor material, is usually not recognized as an efficient oxygen reduction electrocatalyst owning to its low conductivity and poor reactivity. Here we demonstrate that nano-structured titanium dioxide, self-doped by oxygen vacancies and selectively exposed with the high-energy {001} facets, exhibits a surprisingly competitive oxygen reduction activity, excellent durability and superior tolerance to methanol. Combining the electrochemical tests with density-functional calculations, we elucidate the defect-centred oxygen reduction reaction mechanism for the superiority of the reductive {001}-TiO2-x nanocrystals. Our findings may provide an opportunity to develop a simple, efficient, cost-effective and promising catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction in energy conversion and storage technologies.

  5. Selective growth of palladium and titanium dioxide nanostructures inside carbon nanotube membranes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Hybrid nanostructured arrays based on carbon nanotubes (CNT) and palladium or titanium dioxide materials have been synthesized using self-supported and silicon-supported anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) as nanoporous template. It is well demonstrated that carbon nanotubes can be grown using these membranes and hydrocarbon precursors that decompose at temperatures closer to 600°C without the use of a metal catalyst. In this process, carbonic fragments condensate to form stacked graphitic sheets, which adopt the shape of the pores, yielding from these moulds' multi-walled carbon nanotubes. After this process, the ends of the tubes remain open and accessible to other substances, whereas the outer walls are protected by the alumina. Taking advantage of this fact, we have performed the synthesis of palladium and titanium dioxide nanostructures selectively inside carbon nanotubes using these CNT-AAO membranes as nanoreactors. PMID:22731888

  6. Influence of alumina and titanium dioxide coatings on abrasive wear resistance of AISI 1045 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A.; Remolina, A.; Marulanda, J.

    2016-02-01

    This project aims to compare the behaviour of an AISI 1045 steel's abrasive wear resistance when is covered with aluminium oxide (Al2O3) or Titanium dioxide (TiO2), of nanometric size, using the technique of thermal hot spray, which allows to directly project the suspension particles on the used substrate. The tests are performed based on the ASTM G65-04 standard (Standard Test Method for Measuring Abrasion Using the Dry Sand/Rubber Apparatus). The results show that the amount of, lost material increases linearly with the travelled distance; also determined that the thermal treatment of hardening-tempering and the alumina and titanium dioxide coatings decrease in average a 12.9, 39.6 and 29.3% respectively the volume of released material during abrasive wear test.

  7. Human lung epithelial cell A549 proteome data after treatment with titanium dioxide and carbon black.

    PubMed

    Vuong, Ngoc Q; Goegan, Patrick; Mohottalage, Susantha; Breznan, Dalibor; Ariganello, Marianne; Williams, Andrew; Elisma, Fred; Karthikeyan, Subramanian; Vincent, Renaud; Kumarathasan, Premkumari

    2016-09-01

    Here, we have described the dataset relevant to the A549 cellular proteome changes after exposure to either titanium dioxide or carbon black particles as compared to the non-exposed controls, "Proteomic changes in human lung epithelial cells (A549) in response to carbon black and titanium dioxide exposures" (Vuong et al., 2016) [1]. Detailed methodologies on the separation of cellular proteins by 2D-GE and the subsequent mass spectrometry analyses using MALDI-TOF-TOF-MS are documented. Particle exposure-specific protein expression changes were measured via 2D-GE spot volume analysis. Protein identification was done by querying mass spectrometry data against SwissProt and RefSeq protein databases using Mascot search engine. Two-way ANOVA analysis data provided information on statistically significant A549 protein expression changes associated with particle exposures. PMID:27508218

  8. An investigation of adhesive/adherend and fiber/matrix interactions. Part A: Surface characterization of titanium dioxide, titantium and titanium 6% Al to 4% V powders: Interaction with water, hydrogen chloride and polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siriwardane, R. V.; Wightman, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    The titanium dioxide surface is discussed. Polymer adhesive are also discussed. Titanium powders are considered. Characterization techniques are also considered. Interactions with polymers, water vapor, and HCl are reported. Adsorbents are characterized.

  9. Tribological properties, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of magnetron sputtered titanium-amorphous carbon coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhandapani, Vishnu Shankar; Subbiah, Ramesh; Thangavel, Elangovan; Arumugam, Madhankumar; Park, Kwideok; Gasem, Zuhair M.; Veeraragavan, Veeravazhuthi; Kim, Dae-Eun

    2016-05-01

    Amorphous carbon incorporated with titanium (a-C:Ti) was coated on 316L stainless steel (SS) by magnetron sputtering technique to attain superior tribological properties, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. The morphology, topography and functional groups of the nanostructured a-C:Ti coatings in various concentrations were analyzed using atomic force microscopy (AFM), Raman, X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Raman and XPS analyses confirmed the increase in sp2 bonds with increasing titanium content in the a-C matrix. TEM analysis confirmed the composite nature of the coating and the presence of nanostructured TiC for Ti content of 2.33 at.%. This coating showed superior tribological properties compared to the other a-C:Ti coatings. Furthermore, electrochemical corrosion studies were performed against stimulated body fluid medium in which all the a-C:Ti coatings showed improved corrosion resistance than the pure a-C coating. Preosteoblasts proliferation and viability on the specimens were tested and the results showed that a-C:Ti coatings with relatively high Ti (3.77 at.%) content had better biocompatibility. Based on the results of this work, highly durable coatings with good biocompatibility could be achieved by incorporation of optimum amount of Ti in a-C coatings deposited on SS by magnetron sputtering technique.

  10. Antimicrobial polymers - The antibacterial effect of photoactivated nano titanium dioxide polymer composites

    SciTech Connect

    Huppmann, T. Leonhardt, S. E-mail: erhard.krampe@tum.de; Krampe, E. E-mail: erhard.krampe@tum.de; Wintermantel, E.; Yatsenko, S. Radovanovic, I. E-mail: m.bastian@skz.de; Bastian, M. E-mail: m.bastian@skz.de

    2014-05-15

    To obtain a polymer with antimicrobial properties for medical and sanitary applications nanoscale titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) particles have been incorporated into a medical grade polypropylene (PP) matrix with various filler contents (0 wt %, 2 wt %, 10 wt % and 15 wt %). The standard application of TiO{sub 2} for antimicrobial efficacy is to deposit a thin TiO{sub 2} coating on the surface. In contrast to the common way of applying a coating, TiO{sub 2} particles were applied into the bulk polymer. With this design we want to ensure antimicrobial properties even after application of impact effects that could lead to surface defects. The filler material (Aeroxide® TiO{sub 2} P25, Evonik) was applied via melt compounding and the compounding parameters were optimized with respect to nanoscale titanium dioxide. In a next step the effect of UV-irradiation on the compounds concerning their photocatalytic activity, which is related to the titanium dioxide amount, was investigated. The photocatalytic effect of TiO{sub 2}-PP-composites was analyzed by contact angle measurement, by methylene blue testing and by evaluation of inactivation potential for Escherichia coli (E.coli) bacteria. The dependence of antimicrobial activity on the filler content was evaluated, and on the basis of different titanium dioxide fractions adequate amounts of additives within the compounds were discussed. Specimens displayed a higher photocatalytic and also antimicrobial activity and lower contact angles with increasing titania content. The results suggest that the presence of titania embedded in the PP matrix leads to a surface change and a photocatalytic effect with bacteria killing result.

  11. Amorphous alumina thin films deposited on titanium: Interfacial chemistry and thermal oxidation barrier properties

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Baggetto, Loic; Charvillat, Cedric; Thebault, Yannick; Esvan, Jerome; Lafont, Marie-Christine; Scheid, Emmanuel; Veith, Gabriel M.; Vahlas, Constantin

    2015-12-02

    Ti/Al2O3 bilayer stacks are used as model systems to investigate the role of atomic layer deposition (ALD) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) to prepare 30-180 nm thick amorphous alumina films as protective barriers for the medium temperature oxidation (500-600⁰C) of titanium, which is employed in aeronautic applications. X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with selected area electron diffraction (SAED), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results show that the films produced from the direct liquid injection (DLI) CVD of aluminum tri-isopropoxide (ATI) are poor oxygen barriers. The films processed using the ALD of trimethylaluminum (TMA) show good barrier properties butmore » an extensive intermixing with Ti which subsequently oxidizes. In contrast, the films prepared from dimethyl aluminum isopropoxide (DMAI) by CVD are excellent oxygen barriers and show little intermixing with Ti. Overall, these measurements correlate the effect of the alumina coating thickness, morphology, and stoichiometry resulting from the preparation method to the oxidation barrier properties, and show that compact and stoichiometric amorphous alumina films offer superior barrier properties.« less

  12. Amorphous alumina thin films deposited on titanium: Interfacial chemistry and thermal oxidation barrier properties

    SciTech Connect

    Baggetto, Loic; Charvillat, Cedric; Thebault, Yannick; Esvan, Jerome; Lafont, Marie-Christine; Scheid, Emmanuel; Veith, Gabriel M.; Vahlas, Constantin

    2015-12-02

    Ti/Al2O3 bilayer stacks are used as model systems to investigate the role of atomic layer deposition (ALD) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) to prepare 30-180 nm thick amorphous alumina films as protective barriers for the medium temperature oxidation (500-600⁰C) of titanium, which is employed in aeronautic applications. X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with selected area electron diffraction (SAED), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results show that the films produced from the direct liquid injection (DLI) CVD of aluminum tri-isopropoxide (ATI) are poor oxygen barriers. The films processed using the ALD of trimethylaluminum (TMA) show good barrier properties but an extensive intermixing with Ti which subsequently oxidizes. In contrast, the films prepared from dimethyl aluminum isopropoxide (DMAI) by CVD are excellent oxygen barriers and show little intermixing with Ti. Overall, these measurements correlate the effect of the alumina coating thickness, morphology, and stoichiometry resulting from the preparation method to the oxidation barrier properties, and show that compact and stoichiometric amorphous alumina films offer superior barrier properties.

  13. Exposure to Titanium Dioxide Nanomaterials Provokes Inflammation of an in Vitro Human Immune Construct

    PubMed Central

    Schanen, Brian C.; Karakoti, Ajay S.; Seal, Sudipta; Drake, Donald R.; Warren, William L.; Self, William T.

    2011-01-01

    Nanoparticle technology is undergoing significant expansion largely because of the potential of nanoparticles as biomaterials, drug delivery vehicles, cancer therapeutics, and immunopotentiators. Incorporation of nanoparticle technologies for in vivo applications increases the urgency to characterize nanomaterial immunogenicity. This study explores titanium dioxide, one of the most widely manufactured nanomaterials, synthesized into its three most common nanoarchitectures: anatase (7–10 nm), rutile (15–20 nm), and nanotube (10–15 nm diameters, 70–150 nm length). The fully human autologous MIMIC immunological construct has been utilized as a predictive, nonanimal alternative to diagnose nanoparticle immunogenicity. Cumulatively, treatment with titanium dioxide nanoparticles in the MIMIC system led to elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines and increased maturation and expression of costimulatory molecules on dendritic cells. Additionally, these treatments effectively primed activation and proliferation of naïve CD4+ T cells in comparison to dendritic cells treated with micrometer-sized (>1 μm) titanium dioxide, characteristic of an in vivo inflammatory response. PMID:19769402

  14. High Anatase Rate Titanium Dioxide Coating Deposition by Low Power Microwave Plasma Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redza, Ahmad; Kondo, Toshiki; Yasui, Toshiaki; Fukumoto, Masahiro

    2016-02-01

    Titanium dioxide is a promising photocatalyst material because of the magnificent properties of this material where it is able to remove the air pollution substance and the deodorizing function. Generally, the deposition method of a titanium dioxide coating is carried out by an organic system binder but the powerful photocatalytic reaction will degrades the binder. Therefore, thermal spray is considered to be the alternative method but this method will induce crystallization transformation of titanium dioxide from anatase phase with high photocatalytic activity to rutile phase with low photocatalyst which caused by high heat input. Since our microwave plasma spraying device is operable at low power comparing with conventional high power plasma spray, the reduce effect of the heat input onto the particles at the time of spraying can be achieved and coating deposition with high rate of anatase phase is expected. Therefore, in this research, the coating deposition by controlling the heat input into the spray particle which can be resulted in high rate of anatase phase with high photocatalytic activity was conducted. By controlled condition, coating with optimum anatase rate of 83% is able to be fabricated by this method.

  15. Photocatalytic aptitude of titanium dioxide impregnated chitosan beads for the reduction of Cr(VI).

    PubMed

    Hasmath Farzana, M; Meenakshi, Sankaran

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the photo-reduction of heavy metal Cr(VI) in aqueous solution using titanium dioxide impregnated chitosan beads (TCB) in the presence of UV irradiation. The synergistic role of TCB results in excellent photocatalytic behavior. The reduction of Cr(VI) by the TCB is mainly due to adsorption coupled photocatalytic reduction mechanism. The characterization of TCB was made by Fourier transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectral studies, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Energy Dispersive Analysis of X-ray (EDAX) and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) studies. The kinetics of photo-reduction of Cr(VI) is explained on the basis of Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism. A comparative study on the percentage removal of chromium using chitosan (CS), titanium dioxide (TiO2) and titanium dioxide impregnated chitosan beads (TCB) in the presence of UV irradiation at 60 min of contact time have been found to be 19.4%, 54.8% and 91.4% respectively. Effects of experimental parameters such as irradiation time, dose, pH, initial concentration, and co-ions were optimized for Cr(VI) removal. Suitability of TCB at field condition was tested with a sample taken from a nearby industrial area. PMID:25277118

  16. Self-assembled monolayers and titanium dioxide: From surface patterning to potential applications

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Summary The ability to control the properties of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) attached to solid surfaces and the rare photocatalytic properties of titanium dioxide provide a rationale for the study of systems comprising both. Such systems can be realized in the form of SAMs grown on TiO2 or, in a complementary manner, as TiO2 grown on SAMs. Accordingly, the current status of knowledge regarding SAMs on TiO2 is described. Photocatalytic phenomena that are of specific relevance to SAMs, such as remote degradation, and cases where SAMs were used to study photocatalytic phenomena, are discussed as well. Mastering of micro-patterning is a key issue en route to a successful assimilation of a variety of titanium dioxide based devices. Accordingly, particular attention is given to the description of a variety of methods and techniques aimed at utilizing the photocatalytic properties of titanium dioxide for patterning. Reports on a variety of applications are discussed. These examples, representing the areas of photovoltaics, microelectronics, microelectromechanics, photocatalysis, corrosion prevention and even biomedicine should be regarded as appetizers paving the way for further studies to be performed. PMID:22259769

  17. Direct growth of carbon nanotubes onto titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dechakiatkrai, Chonlada; Chen, Jun; Lynam, Carol; Wetchakul, Natda; Phanichphant, Sukon; Wallace, Gordon G

    2009-02-01

    Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were successfully deposited on a TiO2 nanoparticle film via thermal chemical vapour deposition (CVD) using iron(III) as the catalyst, which was loaded into the titanium isopropoxide precursor solution. The properties of the TiO2/MWNTs nanocomposite was characterized using Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), 4-point probe conductivity measurements and cyclic voltammetry. Preliminary investigations on this TiO2/MWNTs nanocomposite as an anode material for Li-ion batteries shows a high reversible capacity of 268 mAh g(-1) with improved cycling stability compared with a mechanically blended composite. PMID:19441430

  18. Synthesis of Titanium Dioxide by Microwave Plasma Torch.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ta-Chin; Chen, Hua-Wei; Lin, Sheng-Kai

    2015-04-01

    In this study, TiO2 nanoparticles were synthesized from titanium tetraisopropanol (TTIP) using a microwave plasma torch (MPT) and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermogravimetry analysis (TGA). The visible light photocatalysis was studied by the decomposition of methylene blue. MB present in the aqueous solution could be almost completely (> 70%) decomposed within about 720 min of reaction time under visible light irradiation. This is due to the carbon-compounds on the surface of TiO2 (TiOC) corresponding to the results of FTIR. Furthermore, a decrease in recombination between the electron and hole was induced by the existence of TiOC. PMID:26353500

  19. Subchronic exposure of titanium dioxide nanoparticles to hairless rat skin.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Koji; Yamada, Nanako; Yoshida, Yuichi; Yamamoto, Osamu

    2013-04-01

    The evaluation of the biological effects of industrial nanoparticles on the skin is necessary for their risk assessment. To clarify the influence of TiO2 nanoparticles on the skin, we carried out a subchronic exposure study of TiO2 nanoparticles to hairless rat skin. W/O emulsion containing 10 wt% TiO2 nanoparticles and control emulsion was applied to the dorsal skin of Hairless Wistar Yagi rats once a day for a maximum period of 56 consecutive days. After 2, 4 and 8 weeks, skin samples were taken from the exposed skin area. Histopathologically, the particles were only located in the stratum corneum layer of epidermis and follicular epithelium. Focal parakeratosis and spongiosis were observed in the epidermis. Transmission electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX) analysis failed to show TiO2 nanoparticles in the viable skin areas. There was no evidence of TiO2 penetration in the viable skin areas. In addition, titanium contents in several organs were determined using inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. Increased titanium concentration was detected in lung samples of the TiO2 emulsion-treated groups after 8 weeks. It was most likely that the presence of TiO2 in the lungs was not caused by direct absorption of nanoparticles from the skin but was due to rats inhaling the nanoparticle. We did not find any obvious evidences of nano-TiO2 particle skin penetration using several morphological methods after the subchronic exposure. We believe that the influence of subchronic exposure of TiO2 is not significant based on our study. PMID:23528214

  20. Enhanced photocatalytic activity of titanium dioxide by nut shell carbon.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaoliang; Wang, Sheng; Dong, Xuebin; Zhang, Qiaoxin

    2009-08-15

    Nut shell carbon (NSC)-nanotitanium dioxide (TiO(2)) composites were prepared by sol-gel method. Photocatalytic activity on degradation of dye Rhodamine B was studied. X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area, pore size distribution, ultraviolet-vis light absorption spectrum, and photoluminescence spectrum were carried out to characterize the composite catalyst. The results indicated that the photocatalytic activity of NSC-nano-TiO(2) composites was much higher than P25 (Degussa). NSC could greatly absorb the organic substance and oxygen of solution because of its large surface area. PMID:19200653

  1. Microstructural characterization of a fumed titanium dioxide photocatalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Datye, A.K.; Huang, Min; Riegel, G.; Bolton, J.R.

    1995-02-15

    The authors present observations of a fumed titania photocatalyst using high resolution TEM and X-ray diffraction. The catalyst was observed as-received and after being used for photocatalytic destruction of salicylic acid. The characterization results suggest that the photocatalyst consists of individual single crystal particles of the rutile and anatase phases of titania; no amorphous titania particles could be identified conclusively. The authors also did not detect any particles of anatase that were covered by a layer of rutile, as proposed previously by Bickley et al. No changes were seen in the titania after it was used for photocatalysis of salicylic acid at pH 6 for short times (less than 1 hr).

  2. Optimizing the photocatalytic properties and the synergistic effects of graphene and nano titanium dioxide immobilized on cotton fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, Loghman; Yazdanshenas, Mohammad Esmail; Khajavi, Ramin; Rashidi, Abosaeed; Mirjalili, Mohammad

    2015-03-01

    A new facile route based on cotton fabric coated with graphene/titanium dioxide nanocomposite is reported to produce photo-active cellulose textiles. A thin layer of graphene oxide has been produced on cotton fabrics by a dip-dry process. The graphene oxide-coated cotton fabrics were then immersed in titanium trichloride aqueous solution to yield a fabric coated with graphene/titanium dioxide nanocomposite. The photo-activity efficiency of the coated fabrics was tested by degradation of methylene blue in aqueous solution under UV and sunlight irradiations. To obtain the optimum condition, the response surface methodology (RSM) through the central composite design was applied and the role of both graphene oxide and titanium trichloride concentrations on photo-activity efficiency was investigated. The physicochemical properties of the prepared samples has been characterized by a series of techniques, including Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The effect of the application of graphene/titanium dioxide nanocomposite on the physical properties of the cotton fabric, such as tensile strength, bending rigidity and crease recovery angle has been analyzed. Other characteristics of treated fabrics such as antibacterial, antifungal and cytotoxicity were also investigated. Cotton fabric coated with optimum concentrations of graphene oxide and titanium trichloride obtained significant photo-activity efficiency under UV and sunlight irradiations. Moreover, the graphene/titanium dioxide nanocomposite coated cotton samples proved low toxicity and possessed excellent antibacterial and antifungal activities.

  3. Titanium Dioxide as a Catalyst Support in Heterogeneous Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, Samira; Muhd Julkapli, Nurhidayatullaili; Bee Abd Hamid, Sharifah

    2014-01-01

    The lack of stability is a challenge for most heterogeneous catalysts. During operations, the agglomeration of particles may block the active sites of the catalyst, which is believed to contribute to its instability. Recently, titanium oxide (TiO2) was introduced as an alternative support material for heterogeneous catalyst due to the effect of its high surface area stabilizing the catalysts in its mesoporous structure. TiO2 supported metal catalysts have attracted interest due to TiO2 nanoparticles high activity for various reduction and oxidation reactions at low pressures and temperatures. Furthermore, TiO2 was found to be a good metal oxide catalyst support due to the strong metal support interaction, chemical stability, and acid-base property. The aforementioned properties make heterogeneous TiO2 supported catalysts show a high potential in photocatalyst-related applications, electrodes for wet solar cells, synthesis of fine chemicals, and others. This review focuses on TiO2 as a support material for heterogeneous catalysts and its potential applications. PMID:25383380

  4. Titanium Dioxide Nanofibers and Microparticles Containing Nickel Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, Faheem A.; Macossay, Javier; Kanjwal, Muzafar A.; Abdal-hay, Abdalla; Tantry, Mudasir A.; Kim, Hern

    2013-01-01

    The present study reports on the introduction of various nanocatalysts containing nickel (Ni) nanoparticles (NPs) embedded within TiO2 nanofibers and TiO2 microparticles. Typically, a sol-gel consisting of titanium isopropoxide and Ni NPs was prepared to produce TiO2 nanofibers by the electrospinning process. Similarly, TiO2 microparticles containing Ni were prepared using a sol-gel syntheses process. The resultant structures were studied by SEM analyses, which confirmed well-obtained nanofibers and microparticles. Further, the XRD results demonstrated the crystalline feature of both TiO2 and Ni in the obtained composites. Internal morphology of prepared nanofibers and microparticles containing Ni NPs was characterized by TEM, which demonstrated characteristic structures with good dispersion of Ni NPs. In addition, the prepared structures were studied as a model for hydrogen production applications. The catalytic activity of the prepared materials was studied by in situ hydrolysis of NaBH4, which indicated that the nanofibers containing Ni NPs can lead to produce higher amounts of hydrogen when compared to other microparticles, also reported in this paper. Overall, these results confirm the potential use of these materials in hydrogen production systems. PMID:24436780

  5. Hydrothermal growth and characterization of titanium dioxide nanostructures for use in dye sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorge, Judith D.

    As the world's energy needs continue to grow, next generation photovoltaic cells are in high demand because they offer the possibility of an inexpensive alternative to current energy production techniques. Dye sensitized solar cells (DSSC's), utilize common materials and low cost commercialization techniques, which make them a compelling choice for research in this area. This research focuses on the titanium dioxide coating, which transfers electrons from the photoactive dye to the electrode. 3-4% efficient DSSC's using doctor bladed titanium dioxide coatings with a specific surface area of 55-60m2/g have been demonstrated in our laboratory. To enhance the efficiency of these cells, both the surface area and the electron conduction of the titania layer must be optimized. This has been done by utilizing high aspect ratio nanoparticles of titania instead of mesoporous layers formed with spherical particles. Anodization of titanium metal or anodic alumina membrane templating are common ways to produce nanorods, but involve complex processes leading toward expensive commercialization. This research instead focuses on the hydrothermal growth of nanofibrous titania on a titanium metal substrate, removing the need for dispersion and deposition procedures as well as using a low temperature processing method. Depending upon the formulation utilized, a variety of structures can be produced, from thick carpets of nanofiber strands to large platelets. The composition and morphology of the products have been characterized with respect to the growth conditions using electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction. The compositional analysis is used to investigate the complicated reaction mechanisms in the system. Coatings of titania nanotubes were then tested in the DSSC's, as were those with the titanium metal substrate acting as the photo anode. Modeling the geometric parameters of the different pore structures of the coatings helps us to understand

  6. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles increase inflammatory responses in vascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sung Gu; Newsome, Bradley; Hennig, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease that remains the leading cause of death in the United States. Numerous risk factors for endothelial cell inflammation and the development of atherosclerosis have been identified, including inhalation of ultrafine particles. Recently, engineered nanoparticles (NPs) such as titanium (TiO2) NPs have attracted much attention due to their wide range of applications. However, there are also great concerns surrounding potential adverse health effects in vascular systems. Although TiO2 NPs are known to induce oxidative stress and inflammation, the associated signaling pathways have not been well studied. The focus of this work, therefore, deals with examination of the cellular signaling pathways responsible for TiO2 NP-induced endothelial oxidative stress and inflammation. In this study, primary vascular endothelial cells were treated with TiO2 NPs for 2–16 h at concentrations of 0–50 µg/mL. TiO2 NP exposure increased cellular oxidative stress and DNA binding of NF-κB. Further, phosphorylation of Akt, ERK, JNK and p38 was increased in cells exposed to TiO2 NPs. TiO2 NPs also significantly increased induction of mRNA and protein levels of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and mRNA levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). Pretreatment with inhibitors for NF-κB (pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate), oxidative stress (epigallocatechin gallate and apocynin), Akt (LY294002), ERK (PD98059), JNK (SP600125) and p38 (SB203580) significantly attenuated TiO2 NP-induced MCP-1 and VCAM-1 gene expression, as well as activation of NF-κB. These data indicate that TiO2 NPs can induce endothelial inflammatory responses via redox-sensitive cellular signaling pathways. PMID:23380242

  7. Disinfection of titanium dioxide nanotubes using super-oxidized water decrease bacterial viability without disrupting osteoblast behavior.

    PubMed

    Beltrán-Partida, Ernesto; Valdez-Salas, Benjamín; Escamilla, Alan; Curiel, Mario; Valdez-Salas, Ernesto; Nedev, Nicola; Bastidas, Jose M

    2016-03-01

    Amorphous titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotubes (NTs) on Ti6Al4V alloy were synthesized by anodization using a commercially available super-oxidized water (SOW). The NT surfaces were sterilized by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation and disinfected using SOW. The adhesion and cellular morphology of pig periosteal osteoblast (PPO) cells and the behavior of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) cultured on the sterilized and disinfected surfaces were investigated. A non-anodized Ti6Al4V disc sterilized by UV irradiation (without SOW) was used as control. The results of this study reveal that the adhesion, morphology and filopodia development of PPO cells in NTs are dramatically improved, suggesting that SOW cleaning may not disrupt the benefits obtained by NTs. Significantly decreased bacterial viability in NTs after cleaning with SOW and comparing with non-cleaned NTs was seen. The results suggest that UV and SOW could be a recommendable method for implant sterilization and disinfection without altering osteoblast behavior while decreasing bacterial viability. PMID:26706527

  8. Tunable top-down fabrication and functional surface coating of single-crystal titanium dioxide nanostructures and nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ha, Seungkyu; Janissen, Richard; Ussembayev, Yera Ye; van Oene, Maarten M; Solano, Belen; Dekker, Nynke H

    2016-05-19

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is a key component of diverse optical and electronic applications that exploit its exceptional material properties. In particular, the use of TiO2 in its single-crystalline phase can offer substantial advantages over its amorphous and polycrystalline phases for existing and yet-to-be-developed applications. However, the implementation of single-crystal TiO2 has been hampered by challenges in its fabrication and subsequent surface functionalization. Here, we introduce a novel top-down approach that allows for batch fabrication of uniform high-aspect-ratio single-crystal TiO2 nanostructures with targeted sidewall profiles. We complement our fabrication approach with a functionalization strategy that achieves dense, uniform, and area-selective coating with a variety of biomolecules. This allows us to fabricate single-crystal rutile TiO2 nanocylinders tethered with individual DNA molecules for use as force- and torque-transducers in an optical torque wrench. These developments provide the means for increased exploitation of the superior material properties of single-crystal TiO2 at the nanoscale. PMID:27160731

  9. Preparation of platinum modified titanium dioxide nanoparticles with the use of laser ablation in water.

    PubMed

    Siuzdak, K; Sawczak, M; Klein, M; Nowaczyk, G; Jurga, S; Cenian, A

    2014-08-01

    We report on the preparation method of nanocrystalline titanium dioxide modified with platinum by using nanosecond laser ablation in liquid (LAL). Titania in the form of anatase crystals has been prepared in a two-stage process. Initially, irradiation by laser beam of a titanium metal plate fixed in a glass container filled with deionized water was conducted. After that, the ablation process was continued, with the use of a platinum target placed in a freshly obtained titania colloid. In this work, characterization of the obtained nanoparticles, based on spectroscopic techniques--Raman, X-ray photoelectron and UV-vis reflectance spectroscopy--is given. High resolution transmission electron microscopy was used to describe particle morphology. On the basis of photocatalytic studies we observed the rate of degradation process of methylene blue (MB) (a model organic pollution) in the presence of Pt modified titania in comparison to pure TiO2--as a reference case. Physical and chemical mechanisms of the formation of platinum modified titania are also discussed here. Stable colloidal suspensions containing Pt modified titanium dioxide crystalline anatase particles show an almost perfect spherical shape with diameters ranging from 5 to 30 nm. The TiO2 nanoparticles decorated with platinum exhibit much higher (up to 30%) photocatalytic activity towards the degradation of MB under UV illumination than pure titania. PMID:24937772

  10. Synthesis, characterization and application of iodine modified titanium dioxide in phototcatalytical reactions under visible light irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagwasi, Segomotso; Tian, Baozhu; Chen, Feng; Zhang, Jinlong

    2012-02-01

    Iodine doped titanium dioxide has been successfully prepared by simple hydrolysis of tetrabutyl titanate in the presence of iodic acid. The adopted method allowed for the production of spherical iodine doped titaniun dioxide nanoparticles with varied amount of iodine content. Analysis by X-ray diffraction, Raman, transmission electron microscopy as well as UV-vis DRS revealed that titanium dioxide nanostructures were doped with iodine which existed in two different valence states I5+ and I-. The iodine in the form of I5+ is believed to have doped into the lattice whereas I- was well dispersed on the surface of TiO2 probably as iodine adducts hence rendering it to be highly absorbing in visible light region. The I-TiO2 exhibited improved photocatalytic activity toward degradation of acid orange 7 (AO7), methyl orange (MO) and 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) under visible light over the pristine TiO2 prepared by the same method. High catalytic properties are attributed to iodine doping which led to high specific surface area, absorption in visible region as well as alleviation of charge carrier recombination. The most probable route undertaken in the degradation of AO7 is through indirect oxidation by the hydroxyl radicals.

  11. Binding of plasma proteins to titanium dioxide nanotubes with different diameters.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Mukta; Flašker, Ajda; Lokar, Maruša; Mrak-Poljšak, Katjuša; Mazare, Anca; Artenjak, Andrej; Čučnik, Saša; Kralj, Slavko; Velikonja, Aljaž; Schmuki, Patrik; Kralj-Iglič, Veronika; Sodin-Semrl, Snezna; Iglič, Aleš

    2015-01-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys are considered to be one of the most applicable materials in medical devices because of their suitable properties, most importantly high corrosion resistance and the specific combination of strength with biocompatibility. In order to improve the biocompatibility of titanium surfaces, the current report initially focuses on specifying the topography of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotubes (NTs) by electrochemical anodization. The zeta potential (ζ-potential) of NTs showed a negative value and confirmed the agreement between the measured and theoretically predicted dependence of ζ-potential on salt concentration, whereby the absolute value of ζ-potential diminished with increasing salt concentrations. We investigated binding of various plasma proteins with different sizes and charges using the bicinchoninic acid assay and immunofluorescence microscopy. Results showed effective and comparatively higher protein binding to NTs with 100 nm diameters (compared to 50 or 15 nm). We also showed a dose-dependent effect of serum amyloid A protein binding to NTs. These results and theoretical calculations of total available surface area for binding of proteins indicate that the largest surface area (also considering the NT lengths) is available for 100 nm NTs, with decreasing surface area for 50 and 15 nm NTs. These current investigations will have an impact on increasing the binding ability of biomedical devices in the body leading to increased durability of biomedical devices. PMID:25733829

  12. Binding of plasma proteins to titanium dioxide nanotubes with different diameters

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Mukta; Flašker, Ajda; Lokar, Maruša; Mrak-Poljšak, Katjuša; Mazare, Anca; Artenjak, Andrej; Čučnik, Saša; Kralj, Slavko; Velikonja, Aljaž; Schmuki, Patrik; Kralj-Iglič, Veronika; Sodin-Semrl, Snezna; Iglič, Aleš

    2015-01-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys are considered to be one of the most applicable materials in medical devices because of their suitable properties, most importantly high corrosion resistance and the specific combination of strength with biocompatibility. In order to improve the biocompatibility of titanium surfaces, the current report initially focuses on specifying the topography of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotubes (NTs) by electrochemical anodization. The zeta potential (ζ-potential) of NTs showed a negative value and confirmed the agreement between the measured and theoretically predicted dependence of ζ-potential on salt concentration, whereby the absolute value of ζ-potential diminished with increasing salt concentrations. We investigated binding of various plasma proteins with different sizes and charges using the bicinchoninic acid assay and immunofluorescence microscopy. Results showed effective and comparatively higher protein binding to NTs with 100 nm diameters (compared to 50 or 15 nm). We also showed a dose-dependent effect of serum amyloid A protein binding to NTs. These results and theoretical calculations of total available surface area for binding of proteins indicate that the largest surface area (also considering the NT lengths) is available for 100 nm NTs, with decreasing surface area for 50 and 15 nm NTs. These current investigations will have an impact on increasing the binding ability of biomedical devices in the body leading to increased durability of biomedical devices. PMID:25733829

  13. Optical and morphological properties of sol gel derived titanium dioxide films

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, A. B.; Sharma, S. K.; M, Vishwas; Rao, K. Narasimha

    2015-08-28

    Titanium oxide (Titania) thin films were synthesized on different substrates via the sol-gel dip-coating method using alkoxide solution. Some selected samples were also prepared with different percentage of Lead (Pb). The influence of Pb addition in precursor sol on the optical properties of titanium dioxide thin films was studied. The optical transmittance in the visible region has increased with increase in weight percentage of lead. The refractive index was slightly decreased with Pb addition. Crystallization of these coatings was achieved through thermal annealing at temperatures above 400 °C. The structural properties and surface morphology of the crystallized coatings were studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy. Increase in average grain size from 250 nm to 350 nm with increase in Pb concentration is observed. Films were appeared to more coarse with increase in Pb addition. An increase in Pb addition resulted increase in average roughness from 12 nm to 25 nm.

  14. Titanium Dioxide Coating Prepared by Use of a Suspension-Solution Plasma-Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Lingzhong; Coyle, Thomas W.; Chien, Ken; Pershin, Larry; Li, Tiegang; Golozar, Mehdi

    2015-08-01

    Titanium dioxide coatings were prepared from titanium isopropoxide solution containing nano TiO2 particles by use of a plasma-spray process. The effects of stand-off distance on coating composition and microstructure were investigated and compared with those for pure solution precursor and a water-based suspension of TiO2. The results showed that the anatase content of the coating increased with increasing stand-off distance and the rate of deposition decreased with increasing spray distance. Anatase nanoparticles in solution were incorporated into the coatings without phase transformation whereas most of the TiO2 in the precursor solution was transformed into rutile. The microstructure of preserved anatase particles bound by rutile improved the efficiency of deposition of the coating. The amount of anatase phase can be adjusted by variation of the ratio of solution to added anatase TiO2 nanoparticles.

  15. Arsenic sorption onto titanium dioxide, granular ferric hydroxide and activated alumina: batch and dynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Lescano, Maia R; Passalía, Claudio; Zalazar, Cristina S; Brandi, Rodolfo J

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate and compare the efficiencies of three different adsorbents for arsenic (As) removal from water: titanium dioxide (TiO2), granular ferric hydroxide (GFH) and activated alumina (AA). Equilibrium experiments for dissolved arsenite and arsenate were carried out through batch tests. Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models were adopted and their parameters were estimated by non-linear regressions. In addition, dynamic experiments were performed in mini fixed bed columns and breakthrough curves were obtained for each combination of sorbate/adsorbent. Experimental results obtained by column assays were compared with predictions of well-known breakthrough models (Bohart-Adams and Clark). Results indicate that As(V) is more easily adsorbed than As(III) for AA and GFH, while TiO2 has a similar behavior for both species. The titanium-based material is the most efficient adsorbent to carry out the process, followed by the GFH. PMID:25723069

  16. Synthesis of nano-titanium dioxide by sol-gel route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaler, Vandana; Duchaniya, R. K.; Pandel, U.

    2016-04-01

    Nanosized titanium dioxide powder was synthesised via sol-gel route by hydrolysis of titanium tetraisopropoxide with ethanol and water mixture in high acidic medium. The synthesized nanopowder was further characterized by X-ray Diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, and Ultraviolet Visible Spectroscopy in order to determine size, morphology and crystalline structure of the material. The synthesis of nano-TiO2 powder in anatase phase was realized by XRD. The optical studies of nano-TiO2 powder was carried out by UV-Vis spectroscopy and band gap was calculated as 3.5eV, The SEM results with EDAX confirmed that prepared nano-TiO2 particles were in nanometer range with irregular morphology. The FTIR analysis showed that only desired functional groups were present in sample. These nano-TiO2 particles have applications in solar cells, chemical sensors and paints, which are thrust areas these days.

  17. A hybrid density functional study on the electron and hole trap states in anatase titanium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takenori; Ohno, Takahisa

    2012-01-14

    We present a theoretical study on electron and hole trap states in the bulk and (001) surface of anatase titanium dioxide using screened hybrid density functional calculations. In both the bulk and surface, calculations suggest that the neutral and ionized oxygen vacancies are possible electron traps. The doubly ionized oxygen vacancy is the most stable in the bulk, and is a candidate for a shallow donor in colorless anatase crystals. The hole trap states are localized at oxygen anions in both the bulk and surface. The self-trapped electron centered at a titanium cation cannot be produced in the bulk, but can be formed at the surface. The electron trap level at the surface oxygen vacancy is consistent with observations by photoelectron spectroscopy. The optical absorptions and luminescence in UV-irradiated anatase nanoparticles are found to come from the surface self-trapped hole and the surface oxygen vacancy. PMID:22127526

  18. Possibilities of surface coating for thermal insulation. [zirconium dioxide, titanium dioxide, and zircon coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poeschel, E.; Weisser, G.

    1979-01-01

    Calculations performed for pulsating heat sources indicate a relatively thin (200-1000 micron) coating can lower temperature both inside and on the surface of a construction material. Various coating materials (including zirconium dioxide) are discussed, together with possible thermic stresses and ways to deal with the latter.

  19. Determination of photocatalytic activity in amorphous and crystalline titanium oxide films prepared using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Cheng-Yang; Chiang, Bo-Sheng; Chang, Springfield; Liu, Day-Shan

    2011-01-01

    Hydro-oxygenated amorphous titanium oxide (a-TiO x:OH) films were prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using precursors of titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) and oxygen. The influences of chemical states and crystal quality on the photocatalytic activity were systematically investigated in the as-deposited and post-annealed films. The degree of the photocatalytic activity was deeply correlated with the porosity related to the hydroxyl (OH) groups in the as-deposited amorphous film. The crystallized anatase structures was observed from the 200 °C-deposited a-TiO x:OH film after a post-annealing treatment at 400 °C. The photocatalytic activity related to the film with anatase structure was markedly superior to that of an amorphous film with porous structures. The larger the crystal size of the anatase structure, the higher the photocatalytic activity obtained. At elevated annealed temperatures, the inferior anatase structure due to the crystalline transformation led to a low photocatalytic activity. It was concluded that the photocatalytic activity of an amorphous TiO x film prepared using PECVD was determined by the porosity originating from the functional OH groups in the film, whereas the crystalline quality of anatase phase in the annealed poly-TiO x film was crucial to the photocatalytic activity.

  20. Examining the efficiency of muffle furnance-induced alkaline hydrolysis in determining the titanium content of environmental samples containing engineered titanium dioxide particles

    EPA Science Inventory

    A novel muffle furnace (MF)-based potassium hydroxide (KOH) fusion digestion technique was developed and its comparative digestion and dissolution efficacy for different titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs)/environmental matrices was evaluated. Digestion of different enviro...

  1. Fabrication of titanium dioxide nanotube arrays using organic electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoriya, Sorachon

    to ~2 microm. In comparison to DMSO electrolyte, the electrochemical anodization rates are relatively slower in DEG electrolyte; as a result, the nanotube length is typically less than 10 microm. Pore size of nanotubes grown in DEG has been extended from 150 nm up to approximately 400 nm. The approach to pore widening could be achieved by using a specific condition of low HF concentration and prolonged anodization time. The study of evolution of nanotubes grown in DEG electrolytes showed that a fibrous layer was formed in the early growth stages and then was chemically and gradually removed after a long duration, leaving behind the nanotubes with large pore size. In DEG electrolyte, the closer spacing between Ti and Pt electrodes resulted in the larger nanotube morphological parameters due to the enhanced electrode kinetics facilitating the electrode reactions. Furthermore, this dissertation showed possibilities to crystallize the titania nanotube array films at room temperature via anodization in either DMSO or DEG electrolytes. The partially crystallized films could be achieved specifically in the optimum slow growth process conditions. Due to partial crystallization of the as-anodized samples, the high temperature annealing study revealed that the temperatures of phase transformation are 260 ºC and 430°C for respectively amorphous to anatase and anatase to rutile, which are accounted as the lowest phase transformation temperatures reported to date (2010). Finally, the photoelectrochemical properties of the DMSO fabricated nanotubes were investigated. The maximum photocurrent density of ~ 11 mA cm--2 was achieved by using the 46-microm long nanotube array sample with completely open pores, and photoconversion efficiencies of 5.425 % (+/- 0.087) (under UV light) and 0.197 % (+/- 0.001) (under solar spectrum AM 1.5) have been demonstrated. Biomedical applications of the DEG fabricated nanotube arrays films such as blood clotting, hemocompatibility, and drug

  2. Optical properties and radiation stability of submicro- and nanopowders titanium dioxide measured in situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, M. M.; Neshchimenko, V. V.; Yuryev, S. A.

    2016-04-01

    This study carried out an in situ and external investigation on the reflective spectra of micro- and nanopowders titanium dioxide before and after irradiation by 30 keV electrons. The particle sizes range from 60-240 nm. It was established that the decrease in the particle size leads to an increase in intrinsic defects. The particles with intrinsic defects are then transformed into absorption centers during irradiation as a result of optical degradation of TiO2 powders. High radiation stability has particle sizes range from 80-160 nm.

  3. Tunneling Desorption of Single Hydrogen on the Surface of Titanium Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Minato, Taketoshi; Kajita, Seiji; Pang, Chi-Lun; Asao, Naoki; Yamamoto, Yoshinori; Nakayama, Takashi; Kawai, Maki; Kim, Yousoo

    2015-07-28

    We investigated the reaction mechanism of the desorption of single hydrogen from a titanium dioxide surface excited by the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Analysis of the desorption yield, in combination with theoretical calculations, indicates the crucial role played by the applied electric field. Instead of facilitating desorption by reducing the barrier height, the applied electric field causes a reduction in the barrier width, which, when coupled with the electron excitation induced by the STM tip, leads to the tunneling desorption of the hydrogen. A significant reduction in the desorption yield was observed when deuterium was used instead of hydrogen, providing further support for the tunneling-desorption mechanism. PMID:26158720

  4. Investigation of the Effects of MIR-FELIrradiation on the Photoluminescence of Titanium Dioxides

    SciTech Connect

    Sonobe, T.; Hachiya, K.; Bakr, M.; Yoshida, K.; Higashimura, K.; Kinjo, R.; Kii, T.; Masuda, K.; Ohgaki, H.

    2010-02-03

    A mid-infrared free electron laser (MIR-FEL: 5 {mu}m-20 {mu}m) facility (KU-FEL: Kyoto University Free Electron Laser) has been constructed in Institute of Advanced Energy Kyoto University, and first laser saturation at 13.2 {mu}m was achieved in May 2008. Currently, we have started to develop the application of MIR-FEL in the field of energy and material science. This study aimed at investigating the feasibility for the development of new evaluation technique of electron-phonon interaction in metal oxides by MIR-FEL. A preliminary result of electrical and optical properties of titanium dioxides was presented.

  5. Titanium dioxide nanofiber-cotton targets for efficient multi-keV x-ray generation

    SciTech Connect

    Tanabe, Minoru; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Nagai, Keiji; Yamamoto, Norimasa; Mima, Kunioki; Gu, Zhong-Ze; Pan, Chao; Girard, Frederic; Primout, Michel; Villette, Bruno; Brebion, Didier; Fournier, Kevin B.; Fujishima, Akira

    2008-08-04

    Multi-keV x-ray generation from low-density (27{+-}7 mg/cm{sup 3}) nanofiber-cotton targets composed of titanium dioxide has been investigated. The cotton targets were heated volumetrically and supersonically to a peak electron temperature of 2.3 keV, which is optimal to yield Ti K-shell x rays. Considerable enhancement of conversion efficiency [(3.7{+-}0.5)%] from incident laser energy into Ti K-shell x rays (4-6 keV band) was attained in comparison with that [(1.4{+-}0.9)%] for a planar Ti-foil target.

  6. Interdigitated electrode (IDE) based on titanium dioxide (TiO2) thin films for biosensor application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordin, N.; Hashim, U.; Azizah, N.

    2016-07-01

    Sensor is the device that can detect and produce output or response that comes from any input from the physical environment. In this study, sensor is developed by simple photolithography process to create a small IDE device. The device is coated with Titanium Dioxide (TiO2) to give the positive result in detection. The result shows the device with coating stabilized at 2.46×10-10 compare to device without TiO2 which only at 2.24×10-10. IDE device is reusable and can use many times for different kind of detection.

  7. Nanocrystalline titanium dioxide and magnesium oxide in vitro dermal absorption in human skin.

    PubMed

    van der Merwe, Deon; Tawde, Snehal; Pickrell, John A; Erickson, Larry E

    2009-01-01

    The dermal absorption potential of a nanocrystalline magnesium oxide (MgO) and titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) mixture in dermatomed human skin was assessed in vitro using Bronaugh-type flow-through diffusion cells. Nanocrystalline material was applied to the skin surface at a dose rate of 50 mg/cm(2) as a dry powder, as a water suspension, and as a water/surfactant (sodium lauryl sulfate) suspension, for 8 hours. Dermal absorption of nanocrystalline MgO and TiO(2) through human skin with intact, functional stratum corneum was not detectable under the conditions of this experiment. PMID:19514931

  8. Titanium dioxide in pyroclastic layers from volcanoes in the cascade range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czamanske, G.K.; Porter, S.C.

    1965-01-01

    Rapid determinations of titanium dioxide have been made by x-ray emission techniques to evaluate the potentiality of using the TiO2 content of samples for checking field correlations and assisting in identification of pyroclastic units from Cascade volcanoes. Preliminary data suggest that the two most wide-spread units have characteristic ranges of TiO2 content and that other, less extensive layers have ranges which, though characteristic, often overlap the ranges of the more widespread layers. Relative to fresh samples, weathered samples from B and C soil horizons are enriched in TiO 2.

  9. ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF TITANIUM DIOXIDE NANOPARTICLE FILLED EPOXY RESIN COMPOSITES

    SciTech Connect

    Polizos, G.; Tuncer, E.; Sauers, I.; James, D. R.; Ellis, A. R.; More, K. L.

    2010-01-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles were synthesized in an aqueous solution. They were dispersed into an epoxy polymer matrix (commercially available under the trade name Araldite 5808) using a planetary mixer. Nanocomposite materials were prepared with several weight loadings of nanoparticles In this work we Investigate the effects of the particle agglomeration on the mechanical and electrical properties of the composites. The structure of the composites was probed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). For investigating the mechanical properties, a dynamical mechanical analysis (DMA) was employed. The dielectric breakdown strength and the impedance response were also measured in order to characterize the insulating properties of the nanocomposites and their potential use in high voltage applications.

  10. Aggregation of Rhodamine 6G in titanium dioxide nanolayers and bulk xerogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewkowicz, Aneta; Synak, Anna; Bojarski, Piotr; Grobelna, Beata; Karczewski, Jakub; Jankowski, Dawid; Mahlik, Sebastian

    2014-08-01

    Nanolayers and bulk xerogels of Rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) in titanium dioxide (Rh6G/TiO2) were prepared using the sol-gel method. The spectroscopic and structural properties of these two types of hybrid matrices were studied as a function of dye concentration. In both cases absorption, fluorescence and time resolved emission spectra show the formation of fluorescent aggregates. The observed stronger changes in characteristics of bulk xerogels can be explained not only by the formation of aggregates but also by different structure of both materials.

  11. Electrical and Mechanical Properties of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticle Filled Epoxy Resin Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polizos, G.; Tuncer, E.; Sauers, I.; James, D. R.; Ellis, A. R.; More, K. L.

    2010-04-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles were synthesized in an aqueous solution. They were dispersed into an epoxy polymer matrix (commercially available under the trade name Araldite 5808) using a planetary mixer. Nanocomposite materials were prepared with several weight loadings of nanoparticles. In this work we investigate the effects of the particle agglomeration on the mechanical and electrical properties of the composites. The structure of the composites was probed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). For investigating the mechanical properties, a dynamical mechanical analysis (DMA) was employed. The dielectric breakdown strength and the impedance response were also measured in order to characterize the insulating properties of the nanocomposites and their potential use in high voltage applications.

  12. Relaxation of photogenerated carriers in the anatase form of crystalline titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Chihiro; Wada, Akio

    2005-01-01

    Relaxation of photo-generated carriers in anatase form of crystalline titanium dioxide has ben studied by the photoconductivity measurement. Illumination of anatase crystal with UV light at 300 K has found to induce persistent enhancement in conductivity over 3000 seconds. The magnitude of the induced change is 4000 times greater than that measured in rutile crystal in the same experimental condition. The decay of the persistent photoconductivity after the termination of the UV illumination was characterized by the stretched exponential function. The excitation spectrum measurement revealed that the persistent conductivity characterized by the stretched-exponential relaxation was induced by super-band-gap excitation.

  13. Photoconductivity of an inorganic/organic composite containing dye-sensitized nanocrystalline titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocher, M.; Däubler, T. K.; Harth, E.; Scherf, U.; Gügel, A.; Neher, D.

    1998-02-01

    The photophysical properties of solid films of an inorganic/organic composite composed of dye-sensitized nanocrystalline titanium dioxide (TiO2) particles, a conjugated polymer, and a [60] fullerene derivative have been investigated. Large charge collection efficiencies of up to 10% at a field of only 10 V/μm were observed. The photoaction spectrum of the composite is interpreted in terms of three major contributions: a weak photocurrent due to the absorption of photons by the polymer, photogeneration of charges involving the fullerene, and a broad region below the onset of the polymer absorption which involves photophysical processes in the dye-loaded TiO2 nanoparticles.

  14. Electron and hole trap distribution and transport in titanium dioxide nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercado, Candy Cadang

    Titanium dioxide functions as an electron transport medium in dye sensitized solar cells. Nanotubular anatase titanium dioxide is expected to be a better photoanode because of the direct path of the electrons from injection to the working electrode due to the ordered nanotube walls. However, the performance of titanium dioxide nanotube-based solar cells lags behind the nanoparticulate-based. In this work, the crystallographic and defect properties of titanium dioxide nanotubes are examined with spectroscopic and materials characterization techniques in order to understand its electrical properties. Defects in the crystal structure lead to trap states within the bandgap which either assist or hinder electron collection. Shallow traps, those within the range of kT from the conduction band help in increasing the density of states thus increasing conduction. Deep traps capture the electrons and increase the probability of recombination with the oxidized form of the electrolyte. To probe these intra-band states, intra-band photoluminescence spectroscopy was used. Nanotube photoluminescence consists of three types of emission at approximate peak positions of 425 nm (2.9 eV), 550 nm (2.2 eV), and 650 nm (1.9 eV), which are attributed to recombination of the following nature: exciton, mobile electrons to trapped holes, and mobile holes to trapped electrons, respectively. These defects are similar to that found in nanoparticulate anatase. Although the nature of the defects is the same, the emission intensity in nanotubes is lower than nanoparticles. However, comparison with single nanotube photoluminescence revealed that quenching in "bulk" array is caused by significant charge transport in the lateral direction (between neighboring nanotubes). The orientation of the nanotube wall length is parallel (with slight angular deviations) to the c-axis direction of the unit cell as shown by electron backscatter diffraction. This leads to exposed planes of (100), (110), and (101

  15. Ammonia sensing using lossy mode resonances in a tapered optical fibre coated with porphyrin-incorporated titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Divya; Mullaney, Kevin; Korposh, Serhiy; James, Stephen W.; Lee, Seung-Woo; Tatam, Ralph P.

    2016-05-01

    The development of an ammonia sensor, formed by the deposition of a functionalised titanium dioxide film onto a tapered optical fibre is presented. The titanium dioxide coating allows the coupling of light from the fundamental core mode to a lossy mode supported by the coating, thus creating lossy mode resonance (LMR) in the transmission spectrum. The porphyrin compound that was used to functionalise the coating was removed from the titanium dioxide coating upon exposure to ammonia, causing a change in the refractive index of the coating and a concomitant shift in the central wavelength of the lossy mode resonance. Concentrations of ammonia as small as 1ppm was detected with a response time of less than 1min.

  16. Mutagenicity testing of condensates of smoke from titanium dioxide/hexachloroethane and zinc/hexachloroethane pyrotechnic mixtures.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, N; Fängmark, I; Häggqvist, I; Karlsson, B; Rittfeldt, L; Marchner, H

    1991-05-01

    Condensates of smoke from titanium dioxide/hexachloroethane and zinc/hexachloroethane pyrotechnic mixtures were investigated for their potential to produce genetic damage in the tester strains TA98, TA100, TA1535 and TA1537 of Salmonella typhimurium and in the mouse bone marrow micronucleus assay. Both smoke condensates contained several chlorinated hydrocarbons among which tetrachloroethylene, hexachloroethane, hexachlorobutadiene and hexachlorobenzene were identified by GC/MS. Condensate of smoke from titanium dioxide/hexachloroethane showed a dose-related positive response in the Salmonella assay with strains TA98 and TA100 in the absence of metabolic activation from rat liver S9 fraction. Both smoke condensates were negative in the micronucleus assay but produced a small but significant depression of erythropoietic activity. The results indicate that smoke condensate from titanium dioxide/hexachloroethane mixtures contains unidentified compound(s) that may be considered mutagenic in the Salmonella assay. PMID:2027339

  17. The effect of doping titanium dioxide nanoparticles on phase transformation, photocatalytic activity and anti-bacterial properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzby, Scott Edward

    Nanosized titanium dioxide has a variety of important applications in everyday life including a photocatalyst for pollution remediation, photovoltaic devices, sunscreen, etc. This study focuses on the various properties of titanium dioxide nanoparticles doped with various cation and anion species. Samples were produced by various methods including metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), plasma assisted metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (PA-MOCVD) and sol-gel. Numerous techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electron microscopy both scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) were used for physical characterization. Photocatalytic properties were determined by the oxidation of methylene blue dye and 2-chlorophenol in water as well as gaseous formic acid with results analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and ultra violet - visible spectroscopy (UV-VIS). For the purpose of enhancement of the photocatalytic activity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles, the effect of anion doping and the anatase-rutile phase ratio were studied. Although anatase, rutile and mixed crystallite phases all show some degree of activity in photocatalytic reactions, these results show that anatase is better suited for the degradation of organic compounds in an aqueous medium any advantage in photocatalytic activity gained through the enhancement in optical response from the smaller band gap by addition of rutile was overcome by the negatives associated with the rutile phase. Furthermore substitutional nitrogen doping showed significant improvement in UV photocatalysis as well as allowing for visible light activation of the catalyst. Further studies on the phase transitions in titanium dioxide nanoparticles were carried out by synthesizing various cation doped samples by sol-gel. Analysis of the phases by XRD showed an inverse relationship between dopant size and rutile percentage

  18. Effect of doping on the photocatalytic, electronic and mechanical properties of sol-gel titanium dioxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtoglu, Murat

    Heterogeneous photocatalysis has been an active research area over the last decade as a promising solution for energy generation and environmental problems which has led to promising applications from air and water purification systems, self-cleaning and self-sterilizing surfaces to solar cells and hydrogen production from water dissociation reaction. Titanium dioxide (TiO2), an abundant material with a high photocatalytic efficiency and chemical stability, is undoubtedly the most widely studied and used among all photocatalytic materials. Although titanium dioxide has been used in powder form, its immobilized form (film) is necessary from practical application standpoint. However, there are several shortcomings of titanium dioxide films that need to be addressed to realize a wide range of successful applications: lack of visible light activity, poisoning of the catalytic performance by the substrate and the low surface area compared to powder forms. In addition, mechanical properties of such films have not been investigated thoroughly, which may be critical when abrasion and weathering resistance are necessary. To address each of these issues, a systematic experimental and theoretical investigation of doping titanium dioxide films with a variety of elements were conducted. Utilizing theoretical calculations to filter elements for experimental studies as well as interpretation of the experimental results, several dopant or dopant combinations were found to remedy some of the issues of photocatalytic titanium dioxide films. Doping with 32 metals, nitrogen and 11 metal-nitrogen combinations are investigated theoretically and the results are used as guideline for the experimental studies. Particular attention is given to certain metal dopants such as Cr, V, Mo, Ta and Ga not just because of their relatively modest cost but also their non-toxicity and wide availability of their compatible compounds for sol-gel synthesis. While metal-dopants improved the overall

  19. Phenol Photocatalytic Degradation by Advanced Oxidation Process under Ultraviolet Radiation Using Titanium Dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Nickheslat, Ali; Amin, Mohammad Mehdi; Izanloo, Hassan; Fatehizadeh, Ali; Mousavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Background. The main objective of this study was to examine the photocatalytic degradation of phenol from laboratory samples and petrochemical industries wastewater under UV radiation by using nanoparticles of titanium dioxide coated on the inner and outer quartz glass tubes. Method. The first stage of this study was conducted to stabilize the titanium dioxide nanoparticles in anatase crystal phase, using dip-coating sol-gel method on the inner and outer surfaces of quartz glass tubes. The effect of important parameters including initial phenol concentration, TiO2 catalyst dose, duration of UV radiation, pH of solution, and contact time was investigated. Results. In the dip-coat lining stage, the produced nanoparticles with anatase crystalline structure have the average particle size of 30 nm and are uniformly distributed over the tube surface. The removal efficiency of phenol was increased with the descending of the solution pH and initial phenol concentration and rising of the contact time. Conclusion. Results showed that the light easily passes through four layers of coating (about 105 nm). The highest removal efficiency of phenol with photocatalytic UV/TiO2 process was 50% at initial phenol concentration of 30 mg/L, solution pH of 3, and 300 min contact time. The comparison of synthetic solution and petrochemical wastewater showed that at same conditions the phenol removal efficiency was equal. PMID:23710198

  20. Synthesis and characterization of copper ions surface-doped titanium dioxide nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Li Haibin Duan Xuechen; Liu Guocong; Li Lili

    2008-08-04

    Copper ions surface-doped titanium dioxide nanotubes were prepared via an assembly process based on the reactions between Cu(NH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}NH{sub 2}){sub 2}(OH){sub 2} and hydroxide radicals on the surface of TiO{sub 2} nanotubes, followed by the heat treatment in air at 723 K. The as-prepared samples were characterized with infrared spectroscopy (IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and fluorescence spectroscopy (FL). The photocatalytic activity of the copper ions surface-doped titanium dioxide nanotubes was investigated by photodegradation of Rhodamine B. The results showed that copper ions were successfully introduced onto the surface of TiO{sub 2} nanotubes. And two kinds of copper species of Cu(I) and Cu(II) were found on TiO{sub 2} surface. Copper ions act as electron trappers facilitating the separation of electrons and holes on the surface of TiO{sub 2} nanotubes, which allows more efficiency for the photodegradation of Rhodamine B.

  1. Surface character and membranolytic activity of rutile and anatase: two titanium dioxide polymorphs.

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, R P; Langer, A M; Weisman, I; Herson, G B

    1987-01-01

    Biological studies of two titanium dioxide polymorphs, rutile and anatase, have produced conflicting results. Generally, the in vivo and in vitro methods used to evaluate pneumoconiotic dusts have shown the polymorphs to be inert, but occasionally both minerals have been reported to produce effects consistent with biologically active minerals. Many of these reports failed to specify which polymorph was used experimentally. While this limited the value of the data, the problem was further compounded by the variation in the surface properties of each polymorph depending on whether the specimen was a naturally occurring mineral or was made synthetically. Five naturally occurring and 11 synthetically produced titanium dioxide specimens were studied. The physical characterisation of each specimen entailed the determination of the polymorph type(s) by continuous scan x ray diffraction and the size distribution by transmission electron microscopy. The ability of each specimen to lyse erythrocytes was determined and compared with quartz. Only two, both synthetic rutiles, were found to be active. The hydrogen bonding ability of the surfaces of these rutiles were compared with inert rutile and quartz. The binding properties of the active rutile have been found to be consistent with those properties associated with biologically active quartz. The surface properties of rutile are the determinants of its activity. Because natural and synthetic rutiles possess different surface properties, they display different activities. Images PMID:3676122

  2. Hydrothermal synthesis and characterization of titanium dioxide nanotubes as novel lithium adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Moazeni, Maryam; Hajipour, Hengameh; Askari, Masoud; Nusheh, Mohammad

    2015-01-15

    The ion exchange process is a promising method for lithium extraction from brine and seawater having low concentrations of this element. To achieve this goal, it is vital to use an effective adsorbent with maximum lithium adsorption potential together with a stable structure during extraction and insertion of the ions. In this study, titanium dioxide and then lithium titanate spinel with nanotube morphology was synthesized via a simple two-step hydrothermal process. The produced Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12} spinel ternary oxide nanotube with about 70 nm diameter was then treated with dilute acidic solution in order to prepare an adsorbent suitable for lithium adsorption from local brine. Morphological and phase analysis of the obtained nanostructured samples were done by using transmission and scanning electron microscopes along with X-ray diffraction. Lithium ion exchange capacity of this adsorbent was finally evaluated by means of adsorption isotherm. The results showed titanium dioxide adsorbent could recover 39.43 mg/g of the lithium present in 120 mg/L of lithium solution.

  3. Electrospray deposition of titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Halimi, Siti Umairah Bakar, Noor Fitrah Abu Ismail, Siti Norazian Hashib, Syafiza Abd; Naim, M. Nazli

    2014-02-24

    Deposition of titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles was conducted by using eletrospray method. 0.05wt% of titanium dioxide suspension was prepared and characterized by using Malvern Zetasizer prior to the experiment. From Zetasizer results, stable suspension condition was obtained which is at pH 2 with zeta potential value of ±29.0 mV. In this electrospraying, the suspension was pumped at flowrate of 5 ml/hr by using syringe pump. The input voltage of 2.1 kV was applied at the nozzle tip and counter electrode. Electrosprayed particles were collected on the grounded aluminium plate substrate which was placed at 10–20 cm from counter electrode. Particles were then characterized using FESEM and average size of electrosprayed particles obtained. Initial droplet size was calculated by scaling law and compared with FE-SEM results in order to prove droplet fission occur during electrospray. Due to the results obtained, as the working distance increase from 10–20 cm the deposited TiO{sub 2} droplet size decrease from 247–116 nm to show droplet fission occur during the experiment.

  4. Reactive oxygen species produced upon photoexcitation of sunscreens containing titanium dioxide (an EPR study).

    PubMed

    Brezová, Vlasta; Gabcová, Sona; Dvoranová, Dana; Stasko, Andrej

    2005-05-13

    Commercial sunscreen products containing titanium dioxide were irradiated with lambda>300 nm and the formation of oxygen- (.OH, O2.-/.OOH) and carbon-centered radicals was monitored by EPR spectroscopy and spin trapping technique using 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide, alpha-phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone (PBN), alpha-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-tert-butylnitrone as spin traps, and free nitroxide radical 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine N-oxyl. The photoinduced production of singlet oxygen was shown by 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-piperidine. The generation of reactive oxygen radical species upon irradiation of sunscreens significantly depends on their composition, as the additives present (antioxidants, radical-scavengers, solvents) can transform the reactive radicals formed to less harmful products. The continuous in situ irradiation of titanium dioxide powder, recommended for cosmetic application, investigated in different solvents (water, dimethyl sulfoxide, isopropyl myristate) resulted in the generation of oxygen-centered reactive radical species (superoxide anion radical, hydroxyl and alkoxyl radicals). PMID:15878117

  5. Selective growth of titanium dioxide by low-temperature chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Reinke, Michael; Kuzminykh, Yury; Hoffmann, Patrik

    2015-05-13

    A key factor in engineering integrated optical devices such as electro-optic switches or waveguides is the patterning of thin films into specific geometries. In particular for functional oxides, etching processes are usually developed to a much lower extent than for silicon or silicon dioxide; therefore, selective area deposition techniques are of high interest for these materials. We report the selective area deposition of titanium dioxide using titanium isopropoxide and water in a high-vacuum chemical vapor deposition (HV-CVD) process at a substrate temperature of 225 °C. Here—contrary to conventional thermal CVD processes—only hydrolysis of the precursor on the surface drives the film growth as the thermal energy is not sufficient to thermally decompose the precursor. Local modification of the substrate surface energy by perfluoroalkylsilanization leads to a reduced surface residence time of the precursors and, consequently, to lower reaction rate and a prolonged incubation period before nucleation occurs, hence, enabling selective area growth. We discuss the dependence of the incubation time and the selectivity of the deposition process on the presence of the perfluoroalkylsilanization layer and on the precursor impinging rates—with selectivity, we refer to the difference of desired material deposition, before nucleation occurs in the undesired regions. The highest measured selectivity reached (99 ± 5) nm, a factor of 3 superior than previously reported in an atomic layer deposition process using the same chemistry. Furthermore, resolution of the obtained patterns will be discussed and illustrated. PMID:25901661

  6. Enhanced photoactivity of graphene/titanium dioxide nanotubes for removal of Acetaminophen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Hong; Liang, Xiao; Zhang, Qian; Chang, Chang-Tang

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen is commonly used as an antipyretic or analgesics agent and poses threat to human health. In this research, TiO2 and graphite oxide were used as precursors of titanium dioxide nanotubes and graphene respectively. Titanium dioxide nanotube and graphene (GR-TNT) nanocomposites were synthesized through a hydrothermal method. FT-IR, UV-Vis, XRD, and TGA were used to characterize the catalysts. The acetaminophen degradation rate can reach up to 96% under UV light irradiation for 3 h and with the 5% GR-TNT dosage of 0.1 g L-1. Further experiments were done to probe the mechanism of the photocatalytic reaction catalyzed by the GR-TNT composite. EDTA (hole scavengers) and t-BuOH (radical scavengers) were used to detect the main active oxidative species in the system. The results showed that the holes are the main oxidation species in the photocatalytic process. This study provides a new prospect for acetaminophen degradation by using high efficiency catalysts.

  7. Effects of Nano-Titanium Dioxide on Freshwater Algal Population Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kulacki, Konrad J.; Cardinale, Bradley J.

    2012-01-01

    To make predictions about the possible effects of nanomaterials across environments and taxa, toxicity testing must incorporate not only a variety of organisms and endpoints, but also an understanding of the mechanisms that underlie nanoparticle toxicity. Here, we report the results of a laboratory experiment in which we examined how titanium dioxide nanoparticles impact the population dynamics and production of biomass across a range of freshwater algae. We exposed 10 of the most common species of North American freshwater pelagic algae (phytoplankton) to five increasing concentrations of n-TiO2 (ranging from controls to 300 mg n-TiO2 L−1). We then examined the effects of n-TiO2 on the population growth rates and biomass production of each algal species over a period of 25 days. On average, increasing concentrations of n-TiO2 had no significant effects on algal growth rates (p = 0.376), even though there was considerable species-specific variation in responses. In contrast, exposure to n-TiO2 tended to increase maximum biomass achieved by species in culture (p = 0.06). Results suggest that titanium dioxide nanoparticles could influence certain aspects of population growth of freshwater phytoplankton, though effects are unlikely at environmentally relevant concentrations. PMID:23071735

  8. Titanium dioxide antireflection coating for silicon solar cells by spray deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, W.; Tracy, E.

    1980-01-01

    A high-speed production process is described for depositing a single-layer, quarter-wavelength thick antireflection coating of titanium dioxide on metal-patterned single-crystal silicon solar cells for terrestrial applications. Controlled atomization spraying of an organotitanium solution was selected as the most cost-effective method of film deposition using commercial automated equipment. The optimal composition consists of titanium isopropoxide as the titanium source, n-butyl acetate as the diluent solvent, sec-butanol as the leveling agent, and 2-ethyl-1-hexanol to render the material uniformly depositable. Application of the process to the coating of circular, large-diameter solar cells with either screen-printed silver metallization or with vacuum-evaporated Ti/Pd/Ag metallization showed increases of over 40% in the electrical conversion efficiency. Optical characteristics, corrosion resistance, and several other important properties of the spray-deposited film are reported. Experimental evidence indicates a wide tolerance in the coating thickness upon the overall efficiency of the cell. Considerations pertaining to the optimization of AR coatings in general are discussed, and a comprehensive critical survey of the literature is presented.

  9. Tissue distribution and elimination after oral and intravenous administration of different titanium dioxide nanoparticles in rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to obtain kinetic data that can be used in human risk assessment of titanium dioxide nanomaterials. Methods Tissue distribution and blood kinetics of various titanium dioxide nanoparticles (NM-100, NM-101, NM-102, NM-103, and NM-104), which differ with respect to primary particle size, crystalline form and hydrophobicity, were investigated in rats up to 90 days post-exposure after oral and intravenous administration of a single or five repeated doses. Results For the oral study, liver, spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes were selected as target tissues for titanium (Ti) analysis. Ti-levels in liver and spleen were above the detection limit only in some rats. Titanium could be detected at low levels in mesenteric lymph nodes. These results indicate that some minor absorption occurs in the gastrointestinal tract, but to a very limited extent. Both after single and repeated intravenous (IV) exposure, titanium rapidly distributed from the systemic circulation to all tissues evaluated (i.e. liver, spleen, kidney, lung, heart, brain, thymus, reproductive organs). Liver was identified as the main target tissue, followed by spleen and lung. Total recovery (expressed as % of nominal dose) for all four tested nanomaterials measured 24 h after single or repeated exposure ranged from 64-95% or 59-108% for male or female animals, respectively. During the 90 days post-exposure period, some decrease in Ti-levels was observed (mainly for NM-100 and NM-102) with a maximum relative decrease of 26%. This was also confirmed by the results of the kinetic analysis which revealed that for each of the investigated tissues the half-lifes were considerable (range 28–650 days, depending on the TiO2-particle and tissue investigated). Minor differences in kinetic profile were observed between the various particles, though these could not be clearly related to differences in primary particle size or hydrophobicity. Some indications were observed for an

  10. Hydrogen-induced rupture of strained Si─O bonds in amorphous silicon dioxide.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, Al-Moatasem; Watkins, Matthew B; Grasser, Tibor; Afanas'ev, Valery V; Shluger, Alexander L

    2015-03-20

    Using ab initio modeling we demonstrate that H atoms can break strained Si─O bonds in continuous amorphous silicon dioxide (a-SiO(2)) networks, resulting in a new defect consisting of a threefold-coordinated Si atom with an unpaired electron facing a hydroxyl group, adding to the density of dangling bond defects, such as E' centers. The energy barriers to form this defect from interstitial H atoms range between 0.5 and 1.3 eV. This discovery of unexpected reactivity of atomic hydrogen may have significant implications for our understanding of processes in silica glass and nanoscaled silica, e.g., in porous low-permittivity insulators, and strained variants of a-SiO(2). PMID:25839289

  11. Risk assessment of amorphous silicon dioxide nanoparticles in a glass cleaner formulation

    PubMed Central

    Scheel, Julia; Karsten, Stefan; Stelter, Norbert; Wind, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    Since nanomaterials are a heterogeneous group of substances used in various applications, risk assessment needs to be done on a case-by-case basis. Here the authors assess the risk (hazard and exposure) of a glass cleaner with synthetic amorphous silicon dioxide (SAS) nanoparticles during production and consumer use (spray application). As the colloidal material used is similar to previously investigated SAS, the hazard profile was considered to be comparable. Overall, SAS has a low toxicity. Worker exposure was analysed to be well controlled. The particle size distribution indicated that the aerosol droplets were in a size range not expected to reach the alveoli. Predictive modelling was used to approximate external exposure concentrations. Consumer and environmental exposure were estimated conservatively and were not of concern. It was concluded based on the available weight-of-evidence that the production and application of the glass cleaner is safe for humans and the environment under intended use conditions. PMID:22548260

  12. The Infrared Spectra and Absorption Intensities of Amorphous Ices: Methane and Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerakines, Perry A.; Hudson, Reggie L.; Loeffler, Mark J.

    2015-11-01

    Our research group is carrying out new IR measurements of icy solids relevant to the outer solar system and the interstellar medium, with an emphasis on amorphous and crystalline ices below ~70 K. Our goal is to add to the relatively meager literature on this subject and to provide electronic versions of state-of-the-art data, since the abundances of such molecules cannot be deduced without accurate reference spectra and IR band strengths. In the past year, we have focused on two of the simplest and most abundant components of icy bodies in the solar system - methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2). Infrared spectra from ˜ 4500 to 500 cm-1 have been measured for each of these molecules in μm-thick films at temperatures from 10 to 70 K. All known amorphous and crystalline phases have been reproduced and, for some, presented for the first time. We also report measurements of the index of refraction at 670 nm and the mass densities for each ice phase. Comparisons are made to earlier work where possible. Electronic versions of our new results are available at http://science.gsfc.nasa.gov/691/cosmicice/ constants.html.

  13. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticle Penetration into the Skin and Effects on HaCaT Cells

    PubMed Central

    Crosera, Matteo; Prodi, Andrea; Mauro, Marcella; Pelin, Marco; Florio, Chiara; Bellomo, Francesca; Adami, Gianpiero; Apostoli, Pietro; De Palma, Giuseppe; Bovenzi, Massimo; Campanini, Marco; Larese Filon, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2NPs) suspensions (concentration 1.0 g/L) in synthetic sweat solution were applied on Franz cells for 24 h using intact and needle-abraded human skin. Titanium content into skin and receiving phases was determined. Cytotoxicity (MTT, AlamarBlue® and propidium iodide, PI, uptake assays) was evaluated on HaCat keratinocytes after 24 h, 48 h, and seven days of exposure. After 24 h of exposure, no titanium was detectable in receiving solutions for both intact and damaged skin. Titanium was found in the epidermal layer after 24 h of exposure (0.47 ± 0.33 μg/cm2) while in the dermal layer, the concentration was below the limit of detection. Damaged skin, in its whole, has shown a similar concentration (0.53 ± 0.26 μg/cm2). Cytotoxicity studies on HaCaT cells demonstrated that TiO2NPs induced cytotoxic effects only at very high concentrations, reducing cell viability after seven days of exposure with EC50s of 8.8 × 10−4 M (MTT assay), 3.8 × 10−5 M (AlamarBlue® assay), and 7.6 × 10−4 M (PI uptake, index of a necrotic cell death). Our study demonstrated that TiO2NPs cannot permeate intact and damaged skin and can be found only in the stratum corneum and epidermis. Moreover, the low cytotoxic effect observed on human HaCaT keratinocytes suggests that these nano-compounds have a potential toxic effect at the skin level only after long-term exposure. PMID:26262634

  14. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticle Penetration into the Skin and Effects on HaCaT Cells.

    PubMed

    Crosera, Matteo; Prodi, Andrea; Mauro, Marcella; Pelin, Marco; Florio, Chiara; Bellomo, Francesca; Adami, Gianpiero; Apostoli, Pietro; De Palma, Giuseppe; Bovenzi, Massimo; Campanini, Marco; Filon, Francesca Larese

    2015-08-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2NPs) suspensions (concentration 1.0 g/L) in synthetic sweat solution were applied on Franz cells for 24 h using intact and needle-abraded human skin. Titanium content into skin and receiving phases was determined. Cytotoxicity (MTT, AlamarBlue(®) and propidium iodide, PI, uptake assays) was evaluated on HaCat keratinocytes after 24 h, 48 h, and seven days of exposure. After 24 h of exposure, no titanium was detectable in receiving solutions for both intact and damaged skin. Titanium was found in the epidermal layer after 24 h of exposure (0.47 ± 0.33 μg/cm(2)) while in the dermal layer, the concentration was below the limit of detection. Damaged skin, in its whole, has shown a similar concentration (0.53 ± 0.26 μg/cm(2)). Cytotoxicity studies on HaCaT cells demonstrated that TiO2NPs induced cytotoxic effects only at very high concentrations, reducing cell viability after seven days of exposure with EC50s of 8.8 × 10(-4) M (MTT assay), 3.8 × 10(-5) M (AlamarBlue(®) assay), and 7.6 × 10(-4) M (PI uptake, index of a necrotic cell death). Our study demonstrated that TiO2NPs cannot permeate intact and damaged skin and can be found only in the stratum corneum and epidermis. Moreover, the low cytotoxic effect observed on human HaCaT keratinocytes suggests that these nano-compounds have a potential toxic effect at the skin level only after long-term exposure. PMID:26262634

  15. Tunable top-down fabrication and functional surface coating of single-crystal titanium dioxide nanostructures and nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Seungkyu; Janissen, Richard; Ussembayev, Yera Ye.; van Oene, Maarten M.; Solano, Belen; Dekker, Nynke H.

    2016-05-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is a key component of diverse optical and electronic applications that exploit its exceptional material properties. In particular, the use of TiO2 in its single-crystalline phase can offer substantial advantages over its amorphous and polycrystalline phases for existing and yet-to-be-developed applications. However, the implementation of single-crystal TiO2 has been hampered by challenges in its fabrication and subsequent surface functionalization. Here, we introduce a novel top-down approach that allows for batch fabrication of uniform high-aspect-ratio single-crystal TiO2 nanostructures with targeted sidewall profiles. We complement our fabrication approach with a functionalization strategy that achieves dense, uniform, and area-selective coating with a variety of biomolecules. This allows us to fabricate single-crystal rutile TiO2 nanocylinders tethered with individual DNA molecules for use as force- and torque-transducers in an optical torque wrench. These developments provide the means for increased exploitation of the superior material properties of single-crystal TiO2 at the nanoscale.Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is a key component of diverse optical and electronic applications that exploit its exceptional material properties. In particular, the use of TiO2 in its single-crystalline phase can offer substantial advantages over its amorphous and polycrystalline phases for existing and yet-to-be-developed applications. However, the implementation of single-crystal TiO2 has been hampered by challenges in its fabrication and subsequent surface functionalization. Here, we introduce a novel top-down approach that allows for batch fabrication of uniform high-aspect-ratio single-crystal TiO2 nanostructures with targeted sidewall profiles. We complement our fabrication approach with a functionalization strategy that achieves dense, uniform, and area-selective coating with a variety of biomolecules. This allows us to fabricate single-crystal rutile

  16. Effect of Treatment Media on the Agglomeration of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles: Impact on Genotoxicity, Cellular Interaction, and Cell Cycle

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT The widespread use of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles in consumer products increases the probability of exposure to humans and the environment. Although TiO2 nanoparticles have been shown to induce DNA damage (comet assay) and chromosome damage (micronucleus ass...

  17. Germination and early plant development of ten plant species exposed to titanium dioxide and cerium oxide nanoparticles

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ten agronomic plant species were exposed to different concentrations of nano titanium dioxide (nTiO2) or nano cerium oxide (nCeO2) (0, 250, 500 and 1000 mg/L) to examine potential effects on germination and early seedling development. We modified a standard test protocol develop...

  18. Effects of Material Properties on Sedimentation and Aggregation of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles of Anatase and Rutile in the Aqueous Phase

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study investigated the sedimentation and aggregation kinetics of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles with varying material properties (i.e., crystallinity, morphology, and chemical compositions). Used in the study were various types of commercially available TiO2 nanoparti...

  19. CYTOTOXICITY AND PHOTOTOXICITY OF TITANIUM AND CERIUM DIOXIDE NANOPARTICLES IN HUMAN KERATINOCYTE HaCaT CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The skin is a potential exposure site to metal oxide nanoparticles because of their use in commercial products such as sunscreens and potential release into the environment. This study assessed cytotoxicity and phototoxicity of titanium dioxide (size range 22 to 214 nm) and ceri...

  20. Development of silver/titanium dioxide/chitosan adipate nanocomposite as an antibacterial coating for fruit storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel nanocomposite of silver/titanium dioxide/chitosan adipate (Ag/TiO2/CS) was developed through photochemical reduction using a chitosan adipate template. Chitosan served as a reducing agent for the metal ions, and anchored metal ions by forming Ag–N coordination bonds and electrostatic attract...

  1. Atomic layer deposited titanium dioxide coatings on KD-II silicon carbide fibers and their characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shiyi; Wang, Jun; Wang, Hao

    2016-03-01

    To provide oxidation protection and/or to act as an interfacial coating, titanium oxide (TiO2) coatings were deposited on KD-II SiC fibers by employing atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique with tetrakis(dimethylamido)titanium (TDMAT) and water (H2O) as precursors. The average deposition rate was about 0.08 nm per cycle, and the prepared coatings were smooth, uniform and conformal, shielding the fibers entirely. The as-deposited coatings were amorphous regardless of the coating thickness, and changed to anatase and rutile crystal phase after annealing at 600 °C and 1000 °C, respectively. The oxidation measurement suggests that the TiO2 coating enhanced the oxidation resistance of SiC fibers obviously. SiC fibers coated with a 70-nm-thick TiO2 layer retained a relatively high tensile strength of 1.66 GPa even after exposition to air at 1400 °C for 1 h, and thick silica layer was not observed. In contrast, uncoated SiC fibers were oxidized dramatically through the same oxidation treatment, covered with a macro-cracked thick silica film, and the tensile strength was not measurable due to interfilament adhesion. The above results indicate that TiO2 films deposited by ALD are a promising oxidation resistance coating for SiC fibers.

  2. Product selectivity of visible-light photocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide using titanium dioxide doped by different nitrogen-sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaoguo; Huang, Zhengfeng; Cheng, Xudong; Wang, Qingli; Chen, Yi; Dong, Peimei; Zhang, Xiwen

    2015-11-01

    The influence of nitrogen-source on the photocatalytic properties of nitrogen-doped titanium dioxide is herein first investigated from the perspective of the chemical bond form of the nitrogen element in the nitrogen-source. The definitive role of groups such as Nsbnd N from the nitrogen-source on the surface of as-prepared samples in the selectivity of the dominant product of photocatalytic reduction is demonstrated. Well-crystallized one-dimensional Nsbnd TiO2 nanorod arrays with a preferred orientation of the rutile (3 1 0) facet are manufactured via a hydrothermal treatment using hydrazine and ammonia variously as the source of nitrogen. Significant selectivity of the dominant reduced products has been exhibited for Nsbnd TiO2 prepared from different nitrogen-sources in carbon dioxide photocatalytic reduction under visible light illumination. CH4 is the main product with N2H4-doped Nsbnd TiO2, while CO is the main product with NH3-doped Nsbnd TiO2, which can be attributed to the existence of the reducing Nsbnd N groups in the N2H4-doped Nsbnd TiO2 surfaces after the hydrothermal treatment. Compared with the approaches previously reported, the facile one-step route utilized here accomplishes the fabrication of Nsbnd TiO2 possessing visible-light activity and attainment of selectivity of dominant photocatalytic reduction product simultaneously by choosing a nitrogen-source with appropriate chemical bond form, which provides a completely new approach to understanding the effects of doping treatment on photocatalytic properties.

  3. Copper and cerium co-doped titanium dioxide on catalytic photo reduction of carbon dioxide with water: Experimental and theoretical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Dongmei; Bi, Ye; Kan, Wei; Zhang, Ning; Hong, Sanguo

    2011-05-01

    The catalytic activities of copper and cerium co-doped titanium dioxide were studied experimentally and theoretically in the synthesis of methanol by the photo reduction of carbon dioxide with water firstly. Photo catalysts copper and cerium co-doped titanium dioxide were prepared via the equivalent-volume incipient wetness impregnation method. The catalysts were characterized by XRD, Raman, BET, and electrochemistry analyses. The catalytic properties were determined in the synthesis of methanol from CO 2 in the aqueous solution. The experimental results suggested that Cu/Ce-TiO 2 catalysts obviously enhanced the efficiency of the photocatalytic reduction of CO 2. The methanol yield could reach up to 180.3 μmol/g-cat rapidly. The different effects of copper and cerium on the surface of titanium dioxide have been calculated at the Becke's three-parameter hybrid exchange functional together with the Lee-Yang-Parr correlation functional (B3LYP) level. Our results revealed that Ce atoms affect the reaction more profoundly than Cu atoms do. Ce atoms activated H 2O and CO 2 molecules, while Cu atoms act as the channel of photoelectrons in real time and prevent the recombination of electrons and holes.

  4. Anemia and genotoxicity induced by sub-chronic intragastric treatment of rats with titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Grissa, Intissar; Elghoul, Jaber; Ezzi, Lobna; Chakroun, Sana; Kerkeni, Emna; Hassine, Mohsen; El Mir, Lassaad; Mehdi, Meriem; Ben Cheikh, Hassen; Haouas, Zohra

    2015-12-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) are widely used for their whiteness and opacity. We investigated the hematological effects and genotoxicity of anatase TiO2 NPs following sub-chronic oral gavage treatment. TiO2-NPs were characterized by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Wistar rats were treated with anatase TiO2 NPs by intragastric administration for 60 days. Hematological analysis showed a significant decrease in RBC and HCT and a significant increase in MCV, PLT, MPV and WBC at higher doses. Furthermore, abnormally shaped red cells, sometimes containing micronuclei, and hyper-segmented neutrophil nuclei were observed with TiO2 NPs treatment. The micronucleus test revealed damage to chromosomes in rat bone marrow at 100 and 200mg/kg bw; the comet assay showed significant DNA damage at the same doses. PMID:26653980

  5. Examination of Ostwald ripening in the photocatalytic growth of silver nanoparticles on titanium dioxide coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piwoński, Ireneusz; Spilarewicz-Stanek, Kaja; Kisielewska, Aneta; Kądzioła, Kinga; Cichomski, Michał; Ginter, Joanna

    2016-06-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were grown on the surface of titanium dioxide coating (TiO2) using a photochemical method. The size and number of AgNPs were monitored using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) after 20, 30, 180 and 300 s of UV illumination. It was found that for short illumination times (20 s) a significant number of small nanoparticles were grown. However, after an additional 10 s of illumination, small nanoparticles were subject to decomposition and the released Ag+ ions were utilized for the growth of the existing larger nanoparticles, causing an increase in their dimensions. The observed results indicate that the nucleation and further growth of AgNPs proceed according to Ostwald ripening. For longer illumination times (180, 300 s) a coalescence of closely located particles was observed.

  6. Electrophoretic deposition of titanium dioxide films on copper in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Laamari, M; Ben Youssef, A; Bousselmi, L

    2016-01-01

    Electrophoretic deposition was used to produce titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanostructured films on copper substrate in aqueous media for photocatalytic application. Polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) with a weight rate from 0 to 15% was added to TiO2 P25 suspension in order to enhance film adhesion. The films were characterized by X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, contact angle measurement, nanoindentation, scratch test and photoluminescence. The photocatalytic activity of the films was tested with amido black 10B under UV irradiation. The results indicated that the morphology and the mechanical properties of films depended on the added PVP amount. Scratch test showed that adhesion strength rose with increased PVP amount. The photocatalytic activity indicated that TiO2 film synthesized with 13% PVP had the highest efficiency. PMID:27438247

  7. Characterization of adsorption and electronic excited states of quercetin on titanium dioxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdyb, Agata; Krawczyk, Stanisław

    2016-03-01

    Adsorption of quercetin on colloidal titanium dioxide nanoparticles in ethanol and its excited-state electronic structure were investigated by means of electronic and vibrational spectroscopies. The changes in electronic charge redistribution as reflected by the dipole moment difference, ∆μ, between the ground and excited electronic states were measured with electroabsorption spectroscopy and analyzed using results of TD DFT computations. Adsorption of quercetin causes a red shift of its absorption spectrum. Raman spectra of quercetin analyzed with reference to analogous data for morin indicate binding of quercetin through the hydroxy groups of the catechol moiety. The difference dipole moment, which is 5.5 D in free quercetin, increases to 11.8 D in opposite direction in adsorbed quercetin, and is associated with charge-transfer to the Ti atom. The computed transition energy, intensity, vector Δμ and molecular orbitals involved in the electronic transition at different molecular configurations indicate a bidentate chelating mode of binding of quercetin.

  8. Acute and subchronic toxicity analysis of surface modified paclitaxel attached hydroxyapatite and titanium dioxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Venkatasubbu, Gopinath Devanand; Ramasamy, S; Gaddam, Pramod Reddy; Kumar, J

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles are widely used for targeted drug delivery applications. Surface modification with appropriate polymer and ligands is carried out to target the drug to the affected area. Toxicity analysis is carried out to evaluate the safety of the surface modified nanoparticles. In this study, paclitaxel attached, folic acid functionalized, polyethylene glycol modified hydroxyapatite and titanium dioxide nanoparticles were used for targeted drug delivery system. The toxicological behavior of the system was studied in vivo in rats and mice. Acute and subchronic studies were carried out. Biochemical, hematological, and histopathological analysis was also done. There were no significant alterations in the biochemical parameters at a low dosage. There was a small change in alkaline phosphatase (ALP) level at a high dosage. The results indicate a safe toxicological profile. PMID:26491315

  9. Modified nanoporous titanium dioxide as a novel carrier for enzyme immobilization.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lingtian; Wu, Shanshan; Xu, Zheng; Qiu, Yibin; Li, Sha; Xu, Hong

    2016-06-15

    ε-Poly-L-lysine (EPL)-modified mesoporous titanium dioxide (M-TiO2) was assembled through the electrostatic attraction between EPL and M-TiO2. Through modification, the M-TiO2 surface tends to form multilayered and complex architectures, which can be used as artificial matrices to change the microenvironment of carriers for enzyme immobilization. The modified M-TiO2 was characterized through scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, zeta potential analysis, and thermogravimetric analysis. All of the immobilized enzymes with negative charges display strong storage stability, thermal stability, and good reusability. Results indicate that EPL can self-assemble onto the surface of M-TiO2 and form a considerable number of active coatings. Our results also demonstrate that this simple and novel method can be potentially used to immobilize negatively charged enzymes for biosensor applications. PMID:26807519

  10. Antibacterial properties of poly(quaternary ammonium) modified gold and titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wan, Weijie; Yeow, John T W

    2012-06-01

    We report excellent antibacterial effect induced by amine-functionalized gold and titanium dioxide nanoparticles without external excitations. The idea originates from the excellent antibacterial property of quaternary ammonium salts. The effects of poly(quaternary ammonium) and polyacrylate sodium functional groups as nanoparticle surfactants are compared to show that poly(quaternary ammonium) functional groups are the main cause of the induced antibacterial effect. 99.999% of E. coli can be destructed in 10 minutes by simply mixing bacteria with nanoparticle dispersions. The effect of nanoparticle concentrations on the antibacterial property is evaluated. Time required to significantly suppress bacteria growth is studied. The result indicates that the excellent antibacterial property can be introduced to any nanomaterials by using poly(quaternary ammonium) functional groups as surfactants. The engineered nanoparticles can find enormous applications such as self-cleaning surfaces, waste water treatment, Lab-on-a-Chip devices and many more. PMID:22905506