Science.gov

Sample records for ampa receptor internalization

  1. Dynamic Interaction of Stargazin-like TARPs with Cycling AMPA Receptors at Synapses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, Susumu; Fukata, Masaki; Nicoll, Roger A.; Bredt, David S.

    2004-03-01

    Activity-dependent plasticity in the brain arises in part from changes in the number of synaptic AMPA receptors. Synaptic trafficking of AMPA receptors is controlled by stargazin and homologous transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs). We found that TARPs were stable at the plasma membrane, whereas AMPA receptors were internalized in a glutamate-regulated manner. Interaction with AMPA receptors involved both extra- and intracellular determinants of TARPs. Upon binding to glutamate, AMPA receptors detached from TARPs. This did not require ion flux or intracellular second messengers. This allosteric mechanism for AMPA receptor dissociation from TARPs may participate in glutamate-mediated internalization of receptors in synaptic plasticity.

  2. Stargazin is an AMPA receptor auxiliary subunit.

    PubMed

    Vandenberghe, Wim; Nicoll, Roger A; Bredt, David S

    2005-01-11

    AMPA (alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid) receptors mediate fast excitatory synaptic transmission in brain and underlie aspects of synaptic plasticity. Numerous AMPA receptor-binding proteins have been implicated in AMPA receptor trafficking and anchoring. However, the relative contributions of these proteins to the composition of native AMPA receptor complexes in brain remain uncertain. Here, we use blue native gel electrophoresis to analyze the composition of native AMPA receptor complexes in cerebellar extracts. We identify two receptor populations: a functional form that contains the transmembrane AMPA receptor-regulatory protein stargazin and an apo-form that lacks stargazin. Limited proteolysis confirms assembly of stargazin with a large proportion of native AMPA receptors. In contrast, other AMPA receptor-interacting proteins, such as synapse-associated protein 97, glutamate receptor-interacting protein 1, protein kinase Calpha binding protein, N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein, AP2, and protein 4.1N, do not show significant association with AMPA receptor complexes on native gels. These data identify stargazin as an auxiliary subunit for a neurotransmitter-gated ion channel. PMID:15630087

  3. Differential regulation of AMPA receptor subunit trafficking by palmitoylation of two distinct sites.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takashi; Rumbaugh, Gavin; Huganir, Richard L

    2005-09-01

    Modification of AMPA receptor function is a major mechanism for the regulation of synaptic transmission and underlies several forms of synaptic plasticity. Post-translational palmitoylation is a reversible modification that regulates localization of many proteins. Here, we report that palmitoylation of the AMPA receptor regulates receptor trafficking. All AMPA receptor subunits are palmitoylated on two cysteine residues in their transmembrane domain (TMD) 2 and in their C-terminal region. Palmitoylation on TMD 2 is upregulated by the palmitoyl acyl transferase GODZ and leads to an accumulation of the receptor in the Golgi and a reduction of receptor surface expression. C-terminal palmitoylation decreases interaction of the AMPA receptor with the 4.1N protein and regulates AMPA- and NMDA-induced AMPA receptor internalization. Moreover, depalmitoylation of the receptor is regulated by activation of glutamate receptors. These data suggest that regulated palmitoylation of AMPA receptor subunits modulates receptor trafficking and may be important for synaptic plasticity. PMID:16129400

  4. Clathrin-Independent Trafficking of AMPA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Tigaret, Cezar M.; Mellor, Jack R.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane trafficking of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) is critical for neuronal function and plasticity. Although rapid forms of AMPAR internalization during long-term depression (LTD) require clathrin and dynamin, the mechanisms governing constitutive AMPAR turnover and internalization of AMPARs during slow homeostatic forms of synaptic plasticity remain unexplored. Here, we show that, in contrast to LTD, constitutive AMPAR internalization and homeostatic AMPAR downscaling in rat neurons do not require dynamin or clathrin function. Instead, constitutive AMPAR trafficking is blocked by a Rac1 inhibitor and is regulated by a dynamic nonstructural pool of F-actin. Our findings reveal a novel role for neuronal clathrin-independent endocytosis controlled by actin dynamics and suggest that the interplay between different modes of receptor endocytosis provides for segregation between distinct modes of neuronal plasticity. PMID:25810514

  5. Posttranslational regulation of AMPA receptor trafficking and function

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wei; Roche, Katherine W.

    2011-01-01

    In the mammalian central nervous system, the majority of fast excitatory synaptic transmission is mediated by glutamate acting on AMPA-type ionotropic glutamate receptors. The abundance of AMPA receptors at the synapse can be modulated through receptor trafficking, which dynamically regulates many fundamental brain functions, including learning and memory. Reversible posttranslational modifications, including phosphorylation, palmitoylation and ubiquitination of AMPA receptor subunits are important regulatory mechanisms for controlling synaptic AMPA receptor expression and function. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the study of AMPA receptor posttranslational modifications and discuss how these modifications regulate AMPA receptor trafficking and function at synapses. PMID:22000952

  6. Superactivation of AMPA receptors by auxiliary proteins

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, Anna L.; Plested, Andrew J. R.

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate receptors form complexes in the brain with auxiliary proteins, which control their activity during fast synaptic transmission through a seemingly bewildering array of effects. Here we devise a way to isolate the activation of complexes using polyamines, which enables us to show that transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) exert their effects principally on the channel opening reaction. A thermodynamic argument suggests that because TARPs promote channel opening, receptor activation promotes AMPAR-TARP complexes into a superactive state with high open probability. A simple model based on this idea predicts all known effects of TARPs on AMPA receptor function. This model also predicts unexpected phenomena including massive potentiation in the absence of desensitization and supramaximal recovery that we subsequently detected in electrophysiological recordings. This transient positive feedback mechanism has implications for information processing in the brain, because it should allow activity-dependent facilitation of excitatory synaptic transmission through a postsynaptic mechanism. PMID:26744192

  7. AMPA receptor desensitization is the determinant of AMPA receptor mediated excitotoxicity in purified retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Yong H; Mueller, Brett H; McGrady, Nolan R; Ma, Hai-Ying; Yorio, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    The ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGLuR) have been hypothesized to play a role in neuronal pathogenesis by mediating excitotoxic death. Previous studies on iGluR in the retina have focused on two broad classes of receptors: NMDA and non-NMDA receptors including the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic receptor (AMPAR) and kainate receptor. In this study, we examined the role of receptor desensitization on the specific excitotoxic effects of AMPAR activation on primary retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Purified rat RGCs were isolated from postnatal day 4-7 Sprague-Dawley rats. Calcium imaging was used to identify the functionality of the AMPARs and selectivity of the s-AMPA agonist. Phosphorylated CREB and ERK1/2 expression were performed following s-AMPA treatment. s-AMPA excitotoxicity was determined by JC-1 mitochondrial membrane depolarization assay, caspase 3/7 luciferase activity assay, immunoblot analysis for α-fodrin, and Live (calcein AM)/Dead (ethidium homodimer-1) assay. RGC cultures of 98% purity, lacking Iba1 and GFAP expression were used for the present studies. Isolated prenatal RGCs expressed calcium permeable AMPAR and s-AMPA (100 μM) treatment of cultured RGCs significantly increased phosphorylation of CREB but not that of ERK1/2. A prolonged (6 h) AMPAR activation in purified RGCs using s-AMPA (100 μM) did not depolarize the RGC mitochondrial membrane potential. In addition, treatment of cultured RGCs with s-AMPA, both in the presence and absence of trophic factors (BDNF and CNTF), did not increase caspase 3/7 activities or the cleavage of α-fodrin (neuronal apoptosis marker), as compared to untreated controls. Lastly, a significant increase in cell survival of RGCs was observed after s-AMPA treatment as compared to control untreated RGCs. However, preventing the desensitization of AMPAR with the treatment with either kainic acid (100 μM) or the combination of s-AMPA and cyclothiazide (50 μM) significantly reduced cell

  8. Perampanel Inhibition of AMPA Receptor Currents in Cultured Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chao-Yin; Matt, Lucas; Hell, Johannes Wilhelm; Rogawski, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Perampanel is an aryl substituted 2-pyridone AMPA receptor antagonist that was recently approved as a treatment for epilepsy. The drug potently inhibits AMPA receptor responses but the mode of block has not been characterized. Here the action of perampanel on AMPA receptors was investigated by whole-cell voltage-clamp recording in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Perampanel caused a slow (τ∼1 s at 3 µM), concentration-dependent inhibition of AMPA receptor currents evoked by AMPA and kainate. The rates of block and unblock of AMPA receptor currents were 1.5×105 M−1 s−1 and 0.58 s−1, respectively. Perampanel did not affect NMDA receptor currents. The extent of block of non-desensitizing kainate-evoked currents (IC50, 0.56 µM) was similar at all kainate concentrations (3–100 µM), demonstrating a noncompetitive blocking action. Parampanel did not alter the trajectory of AMPA evoked currents indicating that it does not influence AMPA receptor desensitization. Perampanel is a selective negative allosteric AMPA receptor antagonist of high-affinity and slow blocking kinetics. PMID:25229608

  9. AMPA Receptors as Therapeutic Targets for Neurological Disorders.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kevin; Goodman, Lucy; Fourie, Chantelle; Schenk, Susan; Leitch, Beulah; Montgomery, Johanna M

    2016-01-01

    Almost every neurological disease directly or indirectly affects synapse function in the brain. However, these diseases alter synapses through different mechanisms, ultimately resulting in altered synaptic transmission and/or plasticity. Glutamate is the major neurotransmitter that mediates excitatory synaptic transmission in the brain through activation of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate (AMPA) receptors. These receptors have therefore been identified as a target for the development of therapeutic treatments for neurological disorders including epilepsy, neurodegenerative diseases, autism, and drug addiction. The fact that AMPA receptors play a dominant role throughout the brain raises the significant challenge of selectively targeting only those regions affected by disease, and clinical trials have raised doubt regarding the feasibility of specifically targeting AMPA receptors for new therapeutic options. Benzamide compounds that act as positive allosteric AMPA receptor modulators, known as AMPAkines, can act on specific brain regions and were initially proposed to revolutionize the treatment of cognitive deficits associated with neurological disorders. Their therapeutic potential has since declined due to inconsistent results in clinical trials. However, recent advances in basic biomedical research are significantly increasing our knowledge of AMPA receptor structure, binding sites, and interactions with auxiliary proteins. In particular, the large complex of postsynaptic proteins that interact with AMPA receptor subunits have been shown to control AMPA receptor insertion, location, pharmacology, synaptic transmission, and plasticity. These proteins are now being considered as alternative therapeutic target sites for modulating AMPA receptors in neurological disorders. PMID:26920691

  10. TARP phosphorylation regulates synaptic AMPA receptors through lipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Sumioka, Akio; Yan, Dan; Tomita, Susumu

    2010-01-01

    Summary Neurons use neurotransmitters to communicate across synapses, constructing neural circuits in the brain. AMPA-type glutamate receptors are the predominant excitatory neurotransmitter receptors mediating fast synaptic transmission. AMPA receptors localize at synapses by forming protein complexes with transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) and PSD-95-like MAGUKs. Among the three classes of ionotropic glutamate receptors (AMPA-, NMDA, kainate-type), AMPA receptor activity is most regulatable by neuronal activity to adjust synaptic strength. Here, we mutated the prototypical TARP, stargazin, and found that TARP phosphorylation regulates synaptic AMPA receptor activity in vivo. We also found that stargazin interacts with negatively-charged lipid bilayers in its phosphorylation dependent manner, and that the lipid interaction inhibited stargazin binding to PSD-95. Cationic lipids dissociated stargazin from lipid bilayers and enhanced synaptic AMPA receptor activity in a stargazin phosphorylation-dependent manner. Thus, TARP phosphorylation plays a critical role in regulating AMPA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission via a lipid bilayer interaction. PMID:20547132

  11. Transferrin Receptor Controls AMPA Receptor Trafficking Efficiency and Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ke; Lei, Run; Li, Qiong; Wang, Xin-Xin; Wu, Qian; An, Peng; Zhang, Jianchao; Zhu, Minyan; Xu, Zhiheng; Hong, Yang; Wang, Fudi; Shen, Ying; Li, Hongchang; Li, Huashun

    2016-01-01

    Transferrin receptor (TFR) is an important iron transporter regulating iron homeostasis and has long been used as a marker for clathrin mediated endocytosis. However, little is known about its additional function other than iron transport in the development of central nervous system (CNS). Here we demonstrate that TFR functions as a regulator to control AMPA receptor trafficking efficiency and synaptic plasticity. The conditional knockout (KO) of TFR in neural progenitor cells causes mice to develop progressive epileptic seizure, and dramatically reduces basal synaptic transmission and long-term potentiation (LTP). We further demonstrate that TFR KO remarkably reduces the binding efficiency of GluR2 to AP2 and subsequently decreases AMPA receptor endocytosis and recycling. Thus, our study reveals that TFR functions as a novel regulator to control AMPA trafficking efficiency and synaptic plasticity. PMID:26880306

  12. Assembly of AMPA receptors: mechanisms and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Quan; Salussolia, Catherine L; Wollmuth, Lonnie P

    2015-01-01

    AMPA receptors (AMPARs) play a critical role in excitatory glutamatergic neurotransmission. The number and subunit composition of AMPARs at synapses determines the dynamics of fast glutamatergic signalling. Functional AMPARs on the cell surface are tetramers. Thus tetrameric assembly of AMPARs represents a promising target for modulating AMPAR-mediated signalling in health and disease. Multiple structural domains within the receptor influence AMPAR assembly. In a proposed model for AMPAR assembly, the amino-terminal domain underlies the formation of a dimer pool. The transmembrane domain facilitates the formation and enhances the stability of the tetramer. The ligand-binding domain influences assembly through a process referred to as ‘domain swapping’. We propose that this core AMPAR assembly process could be regulated by neuronal signals and speculate on possible mechanisms for such regulation. PMID:25556786

  13. [Molecular mechanisms for AMPA receptor trafficking].

    PubMed

    Fukata, Masaki; Fukata, Yuko

    2008-06-01

    Finely tuned synaptic transmission in the brain provides the molecular basis for learning and memory. The misregulation of synaptic transmission is involved in the pathogenesis of various neurological disorders like epilepsy. AMPA-typed glutamate receptors (AMPARs) mediate the most prominent form of excitatory neurotransmission in the brain. Dynamic regulation of AMPARs is thought to be a primary mechanism for controlling synaptic strength. We have analyzed the molecular mechanism for AMPAR-trafficking and function by focusing on PSD-95, a major postsynaptic scaffolding protein. Here, we review the novel regulatory mechanisms of AMPARs by 1) the PSD-95 palmitoylating enzyme, which determines the position of PSD-95 at postsynapses, and 2) the epilepsy related ligand/receptor, LGI1/ADAM22, identified as the PSD-95-interacting protein. PMID:18646599

  14. Mechanisms for Antagonistic Regulation of AMPA and NMDA-D1 Receptor Complexes at Postsynaptic Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumann, Johann; Scheler, Gabriele

    2004-01-01

    From the analysis of these pathways we conclude that postsynaptic processes that regulate synaptic transmission undergo significant cross-talk with respect to glutamatergic and neuromodulatory (dopamine) signals. The main hypothesis is that of a compensatory regulation, a competitive switch between the induction of increased AMPA conductance by CaMKII-dependent phosphorylation and reduced expression of PP2A, and increased D1 receptor sensitivity and expression by increased PKA, PP2A and decreased PP-1/calcineurin expression. Both types of plasticity are induced by NMDA receptor activation and increased internal calcium, they require different internal conditions to become expressed. Specifically we propose that AMPA regulation and D1 regulation are inversely coupled;The net result may be a bifurcation of synaptic state into predominantly AMPA or NMDA-D1 synapses. This could have functional consequences: stable connections for AMPA and conditional gating for NMDA-D1 synapses.

  15. Differential vesicular sorting of AMPA and GABAA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yi; Chiu, Shu-Ling; Liu, Bian; Wu, Pei-Hsun; Delannoy, Michael; Lin, Da-Ting; Wirtz, Denis; Huganir, Richard L.

    2016-01-01

    In mature neurons AMPA receptors cluster at excitatory synapses primarily on dendritic spines, whereas GABAA receptors cluster at inhibitory synapses mainly on the soma and dendritic shafts. The molecular mechanisms underlying the precise sorting of these receptors remain unclear. By directly studying the constitutive exocytic vesicles of AMPA and GABAA receptors in vitro and in vivo, we demonstrate that they are initially sorted into different vesicles in the Golgi apparatus and inserted into distinct domains of the plasma membrane. These insertions are dependent on distinct Rab GTPases and SNARE complexes. The insertion of AMPA receptors requires SNAP25–syntaxin1A/B–VAMP2 complexes, whereas insertion of GABAA receptors relies on SNAP23–syntaxin1A/B–VAMP2 complexes. These SNARE complexes affect surface targeting of AMPA or GABAA receptors and synaptic transmission. Our studies reveal vesicular sorting mechanisms controlling the constitutive exocytosis of AMPA and GABAA receptors, which are critical for the regulation of excitatory and inhibitory responses in neurons. PMID:26839408

  16. Mechanism of Positive Allosteric Modulators Acting on AMPA Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Jin,R.; Clark, S.; Weeks, A.; Dudman, J.; Gouaux, E.; Partin, K.

    2005-01-01

    Ligand-gated ion channels involved in the modulation of synaptic strength are the AMPA, kainate, and NMDA glutamate receptors. Small molecules that potentiate AMPA receptor currents relieve cognitive deficits caused by neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and show promise in the treatment of depression. Previously, there has been limited understanding of the molecular mechanism of action for AMPA receptor potentiators. Here we present cocrystal structures of the glutamate receptor GluR2 S1S2 ligand-binding domain in complex with aniracetam [1-(4-methoxybenzoyl)-2-pyrrolidinone] or CX614 (pyrrolidino-1, 3-oxazino benzo-1, 4-dioxan-10-one), two AMPA receptor potentiators that preferentially slow AMPA receptor deactivation. Both potentiators bind within the dimer interface of the nondesensitized receptor at a common site located on the twofold axis of molecular symmetry. Importantly, the potentiator binding site is adjacent to the 'hinge' in the ligand-binding core 'clamshell' that undergoes conformational rearrangement after glutamate binding. Using rapid solution exchange, patch-clamp electrophysiology experiments, we show that point mutations of residues that interact with potentiators in the cocrystal disrupt potentiator function. We suggest that the potentiators slow deactivation by stabilizing the clamshell in its closed-cleft, glutamate-bound conformation.

  17. Extensive phosphorylation of AMPA receptors in neurons.

    PubMed

    Diering, Graham H; Heo, Seok; Hussain, Natasha K; Liu, Bian; Huganir, Richard L

    2016-08-16

    Regulation of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) function is a fundamental mechanism controlling synaptic strength during long-term potentiation/depression and homeostatic scaling. AMPAR function and membrane trafficking is controlled by protein-protein interactions, as well as by posttranslational modifications. Phosphorylation of the GluA1 AMPAR subunit at S845 and S831 play especially important roles during synaptic plasticity. Recent controversy has emerged regarding the extent to which GluA1 phosphorylation may contribute to synaptic plasticity. Here we used a variety of methods to measure the population of phosphorylated GluA1-containing AMPARs in cultured primary neurons and mouse forebrain. Phosphorylated GluA1 represents large fractions from 12% to 50% of the total population under basal and stimulated conditions in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, a large fraction of synapses are positive for phospho-GluA1-containing AMPARs. Our results support the large body of research indicating a prominent role of GluA1 phosphorylation in synaptic plasticity. PMID:27482106

  18. Ganglioside Regulation of AMPA Receptor Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Prendergast, Jillian; Umanah, George K.E.; Yoo, Seung-Wan; Lagerlöf, Olof; Motari, Mary G.; Cole, Robert N.; Huganir, Richard L.; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.

    2014-01-01

    Gangliosides are major cell-surface determinants on all vertebrate neurons. Human congenital disorders of ganglioside biosynthesis invariably result in intellectual disability and are often associated with intractable seizures. To probe the mechanisms of ganglioside functions, affinity-captured ganglioside-binding proteins from rat cerebellar granule neurons were identified by quantitative proteomic mass spectrometry. Of the six proteins that bound selectively to the major brain ganglioside GT1b (GT1b:GM1 > 4; p < 10−4), three regulate neurotransmitter receptor trafficking: Thorase (ATPase family AAA domain-containing protein 1), soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF) attachment protein (γ-SNAP), and the transmembrane protein Nicalin. Thorase facilitates endocytosis of GluR2 subunit-containing AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) in an ATPase-dependent manner; its deletion in mice results in learning and memory deficits (J. Zhang et al., 2011b). GluR2-containing AMPARs did not bind GT1b, but bound specifically to another ganglioside, GM1. Addition of noncleavable ATP (ATPγS) significantly disrupted ganglioside binding, whereas it enhanced AMPAR association with Thorase, NSF, and Nicalin. Mutant mice lacking GT1b expressed markedly higher brain Thorase, whereas Thorase-null mice expressed higher GT1b. Treatment of cultured hippocampal neurons with sialidase, which cleaves GT1b (and other sialoglycans), resulted in a significant reduction in the size of surface GluR2 puncta. These data support a model in which GM1-bound GluR2-containing AMPARs are functionally segregated from GT1b-bound AMPAR-trafficking complexes. Release of ganglioside binding may enhance GluR2-containing AMPAR association with its trafficking complexes, increasing endocytosis. Disrupting ganglioside biosynthesis may result in reduced synaptic expression of GluR2-contianing AMPARs resulting in intellectual deficits and seizure susceptibility in mice and humans. PMID:25253868

  19. AMPA receptor signaling through BRAG2 and Arf6 critical for long-term synaptic depression.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Ralf; Berberich, Sven; Rathgeber, Louisa; Kolleker, Alexander; Köhr, Georg; Kornau, Hans-Christian

    2010-06-10

    Central nervous system synapses undergo activity-dependent alterations to support learning and memory. Long-term depression (LTD) reflects a sustained reduction of the synaptic AMPA receptor content based on targeted clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Here we report a current-independent form of AMPA receptor signaling, fundamental for LTD. We found that AMPA receptors directly interact via the GluA2 subunit with the synaptic protein BRAG2, which functions as a guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for the coat-recruitment GTPase Arf6. BRAG2-mediated catalysis, controlled by ligand-binding and tyrosine phosphorylation of GluA2, activates Arf6 to internalize synaptic AMPA receptors upon LTD induction. Furthermore, acute blockade of the GluA2-BRAG2 interaction and targeted deletion of BRAG2 in mature hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons prevents LTD in CA3-to-CA1 cell synapses, irrespective of the induction pathway. We conclude that BRAG2-mediated Arf6 activation triggered by AMPA receptors is the convergent step of different forms of LTD, thus providing an essential mechanism for the control of vesicle formation by endocytic cargo. PMID:20547133

  20. Pathogenic mechanism of an autism-associated neuroligin mutation involves altered AMPA-receptor trafficking.

    PubMed

    Chanda, S; Aoto, J; Lee, S-J; Wernig, M; Südhof, T C

    2016-02-01

    Neuroligins are postsynaptic cell-adhesion molecules that bind to presynaptic neurexins. Although the general synaptic role of neuroligins is undisputed, their specific functions at a synapse remain unclear, even controversial. Moreover, many neuroligin gene mutations were associated with autism, but the pathophysiological relevance of these mutations is often unknown, and their mechanisms of action uninvestigated. Here, we examine the synaptic effects of an autism-associated neuroligin-4 substitution (called R704C), which mutates a cytoplasmic arginine residue that is conserved in all neuroligins. We show that the R704C mutation, when introduced into neuroligin-3, enhances the interaction between neuroligin-3 and AMPA receptors, increases AMPA-receptor internalization and decreases postsynaptic AMPA-receptor levels. When introduced into neuroligin-4, conversely, the R704C mutation unexpectedly elevated AMPA-receptor-mediated synaptic responses. These results suggest a general functional link between neuroligins and AMPA receptors, indicate that both neuroligin-3 and -4 act at excitatory synapses but perform surprisingly distinct functions, and demonstrate that the R704C mutation significantly impairs the normal function of neuroligin-4, thereby validating its pathogenicity. PMID:25778475

  1. AMPA receptors in cerebellar granule cells during development in culture.

    PubMed

    Hack, N J; Sluiter, A A; Balázs, R

    1995-06-27

    The survival and maturation of differentiating cerebellar granule cells in culture are known to be promoted by excitatory amino acids (EAAs) which, however, compromise the survival of mature cells. In contrast to the trophic effect, the toxic effect of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxasolepropiate (AMPA) could only be elicited when the desensitisation of AMPA receptors was blocked, cyclothiazide being used in this study. Nevertheless, even under these conditions, toxicity induced by AMPA in contrast to kainate was, at 9 DIV, only half of the maximal toxicity attained by 13-16 DIV. Since cellular responses to AMPA depend so dramatically on the maturational stage of granule cells, we examined here whether this characteristic is related to developmental changes in AMPA receptor properties, which may result from changes in the subunit composition of the receptor. In contrast to toxicity, AMPA-induced 45Ca2+ influx (determined in the presence of cyclothiazide and the NMDA receptor blocker MK-801) reached a maximum already at 9 DIV. This also applied to a fraction of the 45Ca2+ uptake which persisted either after Cd2+ application or under Na(+)-free conditions and therefore presumably was mediated directly through AMPA receptor channels. Quantitative analysis of Western blots showed that the amounts of GluR4 and to a lesser extent GluR2/3/4c are substantial already at 2 DIV, remaining fairly constant until 9 DIV, followed by an increase by 16 DIV. However GluR1, which is hardly detectable in granule cells in vivo and is also low early in vitro, increased almost linearly with cultivation time.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7554232

  2. Cytosolic PLA2(alpha) activation in Purkinje neurons and its role in AMPA-receptor trafficking.

    PubMed

    Mashimo, Masato; Hirabayashi, Tetsuya; Murayama, Toshihiko; Shimizu, Takao

    2008-09-15

    Cytosolic phospholipase A(2)alpha (cPLA(2)alpha) selectively releases arachidonic acid from membrane phospholipids and has been proposed to be involved in the induction of long-term depression (LTD), a form of synaptic plasticity in the cerebellum. This enzyme requires two events for its full activation: Ca(2+)-dependent translocation from the cytosol to organelle membranes in order to access phospholipids as substrates, and phosphorylation by several kinases. However, the subcellular distribution and activation of cPLA(2)alpha in Purkinje cells and the role of arachidonic acid in cerebellar LTD have not been fully elucidated. In cultured Purkinje cells, stimulation of AMPA receptors, but not metabotropic glutamate receptors, triggered translocation of cPLA(2)alpha to the somatic and dendritic Golgi compartments. This translocation required Ca(2+) influx through P-type Ca(2+) channels. AMPA plus PMA, a chemical method for inducing LTD, released arachidonic acid via phosphorylation of cPLA(2)alpha. AMPA plus PMA induced a decrease in surface GluR2 for more than 2 hours. Interestingly, this reduction was occluded by a cPLA(2)alpha-specific inhibitor. Furthermore, PMA plus arachidonic acid caused the prolonged internalization of GluR2 without activating AMPA receptors. These results suggest that cPLA(2)alpha regulates the persistent decrease in the expression of AMPA receptors, underscoring the role of cPLA(2)alpha in cerebellar LTD. PMID:18713832

  3. Are AMPA receptor positive allosteric modulators potential pharmacotherapeutics for addiction?

    PubMed

    Watterson, Lucas R; Olive, M Foster

    2013-01-01

    Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors are a diverse class of compounds that increase fast excitatory transmission in the brain. AMPA PAMs have been shown to facilitate long-term potentiation, strengthen communication between various cortical and subcortical regions, and some of these compounds increase the production and release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in an activity-dependent manner. Through these mechanisms, AMPA PAMs have shown promise as broad spectrum pharmacotherapeutics in preclinical and clinical studies for various neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. In recent years, a small collection of preclinical animal studies has also shown that AMPA PAMs may have potential as pharmacotherapeutic adjuncts to extinction-based or cue-exposure therapies for the treatment of drug addiction. The present paper will review this preclinical literature, discuss novel data collected in our laboratory, and recommend future research directions for the possible development of AMPA PAMs as anti-addiction medications. PMID:24380895

  4. Are AMPA Receptor Positive Allosteric Modulators Potential Pharmacotherapeutics for Addiction?

    PubMed Central

    Watterson, Lucas R.; Olive, M. Foster

    2013-01-01

    Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors are a diverse class of compounds that increase fast excitatory transmission in the brain. AMPA PAMs have been shown to facilitate long-term potentiation, strengthen communication between various cortical and subcortical regions, and some of these compounds increase the production and release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in an activity-dependent manner. Through these mechanisms, AMPA PAMs have shown promise as broad spectrum pharmacotherapeutics in preclinical and clinical studies for various neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. In recent years, a small collection of preclinical animal studies has also shown that AMPA PAMs may have potential as pharmacotherapeutic adjuncts to extinction-based or cue-exposure therapies for the treatment of drug addiction. The present paper will review this preclinical literature, discuss novel data collected in our laboratory, and recommend future research directions for the possible development of AMPA PAMs as anti-addiction medications. PMID:24380895

  5. Synaptic activity regulates AMPA receptor trafficking through different recycling pathways.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ning; Jeyifous, Okunola; Munro, Charlotte; Montgomery, Johanna M; Green, William N

    2015-01-01

    Changes in glutamatergic synaptic strength in brain are dependent on AMPA-type glutamate receptor (AMPAR) recycling, which is assumed to occur through a single local pathway. In this study, we present evidence that AMPAR recycling occurs through different pathways regulated by synaptic activity. Without synaptic stimulation, most AMPARs recycled in dynamin-independent endosomes containing the GTPase, Arf6. Few AMPARs recycled in dynamin-dependent endosomes labeled by transferrin receptors (TfRs). AMPAR recycling was blocked by alterations in the GTPase, TC10, which co-localized with Arf6 endosomes. TC10 mutants that reduced AMPAR recycling had no effect on increased AMPAR levels with long-term potentiation (LTP) and little effect on decreased AMPAR levels with long-term depression. However, internalized AMPAR levels in TfR-containing recycling endosomes increased after LTP, indicating increased AMPAR recycling through the dynamin-dependent pathway with synaptic plasticity. LTP-induced AMPAR endocytosis is inconsistent with local recycling as a source of increased surface receptors, suggesting AMPARs are trafficked from other sites. PMID:25970033

  6. PACSIN1 regulates the dynamics of AMPA receptor trafficking.

    PubMed

    Widagdo, Jocelyn; Fang, Huaqiang; Jang, Se Eun; Anggono, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic trafficking of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) into and out of synapses plays an important role in synaptic plasticity. We previously reported that the protein kinase C and casein kinase II substrate in neurons (PACSIN) forms a complex with AMPARs through its interaction with the protein interacting with C-kinase 1 (PICK1) to regulate NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-induced AMPAR endocytosis and cerebellar long-term depression. However, the molecular mechanism by which PACSIN regulates the dynamics of AMPAR trafficking remains unclear. Using a pH-sensitive green fluorescent protein, pHluorin, tagged to the extracellular domain of the GluA2 subunit of AMPARs, we demonstrate dual roles for PACSIN1 in controlling the internalization and recycling of GluA2 after NMDAR activation. Structure and function analysis reveals a requirement for the PACSIN1 F-BAR and SH3 domains in controlling these NMDAR-dependent processes. Interestingly, the variable region, which binds to PICK1, is not essential for NMDAR-dependent GluA2 internalization and is required only for the correct recycling of AMPARs. These results indicate that PACSIN is a versatile membrane deformation protein that links the endocytic and recycling machineries essential for dynamic AMPAR trafficking in neurons. PMID:27488904

  7. PACSIN1 regulates the dynamics of AMPA receptor trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Widagdo, Jocelyn; Fang, Huaqiang; Jang, Se Eun; Anggono, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic trafficking of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) into and out of synapses plays an important role in synaptic plasticity. We previously reported that the protein kinase C and casein kinase II substrate in neurons (PACSIN) forms a complex with AMPARs through its interaction with the protein interacting with C-kinase 1 (PICK1) to regulate NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-induced AMPAR endocytosis and cerebellar long-term depression. However, the molecular mechanism by which PACSIN regulates the dynamics of AMPAR trafficking remains unclear. Using a pH-sensitive green fluorescent protein, pHluorin, tagged to the extracellular domain of the GluA2 subunit of AMPARs, we demonstrate dual roles for PACSIN1 in controlling the internalization and recycling of GluA2 after NMDAR activation. Structure and function analysis reveals a requirement for the PACSIN1 F-BAR and SH3 domains in controlling these NMDAR-dependent processes. Interestingly, the variable region, which binds to PICK1, is not essential for NMDAR-dependent GluA2 internalization and is required only for the correct recycling of AMPARs. These results indicate that PACSIN is a versatile membrane deformation protein that links the endocytic and recycling machineries essential for dynamic AMPAR trafficking in neurons. PMID:27488904

  8. Challenges for and current status of research into positive modulators of AMPA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Simon E; Bax, Benjamin D; Harries, Mark

    2010-01-01

    AMPA receptors consist of a family of hetero-oligomeric (tetrameric) receptors arising from four genes, each of which encodes a distinct receptor subunit (GluA1-4). Recombinant homo-tetrameric AMPA receptors, comprising four identical subunits, are functionally active and have been used in in vitro assays. However, the many different subunit permutations make possible the functional and anatomical diversity of AMPA receptors throughout the CNS. Furthermore, AMPA receptor subunit stoichiometry influences the biophysical and functional properties of the receptor. A number of chemically diverse positive modulators of AMPA receptor have been identified which potentiate AMPA receptor-mediated activity in vitro as well as improving cognitive performance in rodents and non-human primates with several being taken further in the clinic. This review article summarizes the current status in the research on positive allosteric modulation of AMPA receptors and outlines the challenges involved in identifying a chemically distinct series of AMPA receptor positive modulators, addressing the challenges created by the heterogeneity of the AMPA receptor populations and the development of structure-activity relationships driven by homomeric, recombinant systems on high-throughput platforms. We also review the role of X-ray crystallography in the selection and prioritization of targets for lead optimization for AMPA receptor positive modulators. PMID:20423333

  9. Amyloid-β-Induced Dysregulation of AMPA Receptor Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Guntupalli, Sumasri; Widagdo, Jocelyn; Anggono, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Evidence from neuropathological, genetic, animal model, and biochemical studies has indicated that the accumulation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) is associated with, and probably induces, profound neuronal changes in brain regions critical for memory and cognition in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). There is considerable evidence that synapses are particularly vulnerable to AD, establishing synaptic dysfunction as one of the earliest events in pathogenesis, prior to neuronal loss. It is clear that excessive Aβ levels can disrupt excitatory synaptic transmission and plasticity, mainly due to dysregulation of the AMPA and NMDA glutamate receptors in the brain. Importantly, AMPA receptors are the principal glutamate receptors that mediate fast excitatory neurotransmission. This is essential for synaptic plasticity, a cellular correlate of learning and memory, which are the cognitive functions that are most disrupted in AD. Here we review recent advances in the field and provide insights into the molecular mechanisms that underlie Aβ-induced dysfunction of AMPA receptor trafficking. This review focuses primarily on NMDA receptor- and metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated signaling. In particular, we highlight several mechanisms that underlie synaptic long-term depression as common signaling pathways that are hijacked by the neurotoxic effects of Aβ. PMID:27073700

  10. Amyloid-β-Induced Dysregulation of AMPA Receptor Trafficking.

    PubMed

    Guntupalli, Sumasri; Widagdo, Jocelyn; Anggono, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Evidence from neuropathological, genetic, animal model, and biochemical studies has indicated that the accumulation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) is associated with, and probably induces, profound neuronal changes in brain regions critical for memory and cognition in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). There is considerable evidence that synapses are particularly vulnerable to AD, establishing synaptic dysfunction as one of the earliest events in pathogenesis, prior to neuronal loss. It is clear that excessive Aβ levels can disrupt excitatory synaptic transmission and plasticity, mainly due to dysregulation of the AMPA and NMDA glutamate receptors in the brain. Importantly, AMPA receptors are the principal glutamate receptors that mediate fast excitatory neurotransmission. This is essential for synaptic plasticity, a cellular correlate of learning and memory, which are the cognitive functions that are most disrupted in AD. Here we review recent advances in the field and provide insights into the molecular mechanisms that underlie Aβ-induced dysfunction of AMPA receptor trafficking. This review focuses primarily on NMDA receptor- and metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated signaling. In particular, we highlight several mechanisms that underlie synaptic long-term depression as common signaling pathways that are hijacked by the neurotoxic effects of Aβ. PMID:27073700

  11. Redefining the classification of AMPA-selective ionotropic glutamate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bowie, Derek

    2012-01-01

    Abstract AMPA-type ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) represent the major excitatory neurotransmitter receptor in the developing and adult vertebrate CNS. They are crucial for the normal hardwiring of glutamatergic circuits but also fine tune synaptic strength by cycling into and out of synapses during periods of sustained patterned activity or altered homeostasis. AMPARs are grouped into two functionally distinct tetrameric assemblies based on the inclusion or exclusion of the GluA2 receptor subunit. GluA2-containing receptors are thought to be the most abundant AMPAR in the CNS, typified by their small unitary events, Ca2+ impermeability and insensitivity to polyamine block. In contrast, GluA2-lacking AMPARs exhibit large unitary conductance, marked divalent permeability and nano- to micromolar polyamine affinity. Here, I review evidence for the existence of a third class of AMPAR which, though similarly Ca2+ permeable, is characterized by its near-insensitivity to internal and external channel block by polyamines. This novel class of AMPAR is most notably found at multivesicular release synapses found in the avian auditory brainstem and mammalian retina. Curiously, these synapses lack NMDA-type iGluRs, which are conventionally associated with controlling AMPAR insertion. The lack of NMDARs suggests that a different set of rules may govern AMPAR cycling at these synapses. AMPARs with similar functional profiles are also found on some glial cells suggesting they may have a more widespread distribution in the mammalian CNS. I conclude by noting that modest changes to the ion-permeation pathway might be sufficient to retain divalent permeability whilst eliminating polyamine sensitivity. Consequently, this emerging AMPAR subclass need not be assembled from novel subunits, yet to be cloned, but could simply occur by varying the stoichiometry of existing proteins. PMID:22106175

  12. Stress Induces Pain Transition by Potentiation of AMPA Receptor Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Changsheng; Yang, Ya; Liu, Sufang; Fang, Huaqiang; Zhang, Yong; Furmanski, Orion; Skinner, John; Xing, Ying; Johns, Roger A.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic postsurgical pain is a serious issue in clinical practice. After surgery, patients experience ongoing pain or become sensitive to incident, normally nonpainful stimulation. The intensity and duration of postsurgical pain vary. However, it is unclear how the transition from acute to chronic pain occurs. Here we showed that social defeat stress enhanced plantar incision-induced AMPA receptor GluA1 phosphorylation at the Ser831 site in the spinal cord and greatly prolonged plantar incision-induced pain. Interestingly, targeted mutation of the GluA1 phosphorylation site Ser831 significantly inhibited stress-induced prolongation of incisional pain. In addition, stress hormones enhanced GluA1 phosphorylation and AMPA receptor-mediated electrical activity in the spinal cord. Subthreshold stimulation induced spinal long-term potentiation in GluA1 phosphomimetic mutant mice, but not in wild-type mice. Therefore, spinal AMPA receptor phosphorylation contributes to the mechanisms underlying stress-induced pain transition. PMID:25297100

  13. Unified quantitative model of AMPA receptor trafficking at synapses

    PubMed Central

    Czöndör, Katalin; Mondin, Magali; Garcia, Mikael; Heine, Martin; Frischknecht, Renato; Choquet, Daniel; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste; Thoumine, Olivier R.

    2012-01-01

    Trafficking of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) plays a key role in synaptic transmission. However, a general framework integrating the two major mechanisms regulating AMPAR delivery at postsynapses (i.e., surface diffusion and internal recycling) is lacking. To this aim, we built a model based on numerical trajectories of individual AMPARs, including free diffusion in the extrasynaptic space, confinement in the synapse, and trapping at the postsynaptic density (PSD) through reversible interactions with scaffold proteins. The AMPAR/scaffold kinetic rates were adjusted by comparing computer simulations to single-particle tracking and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments in primary neurons, in different conditions of synapse density and maturation. The model predicts that the steady-state AMPAR number at synapses is bidirectionally controlled by AMPAR/scaffold binding affinity and PSD size. To reveal the impact of recycling processes in basal conditions and upon synaptic potentiation or depression, spatially and temporally defined exocytic and endocytic events were introduced. The model predicts that local recycling of AMPARs close to the PSD, coupled to short-range surface diffusion, provides rapid control of AMPAR number at synapses. In contrast, because of long-range diffusion limitations, extrasynaptic recycling is intrinsically slower and less synapse-specific. Thus, by discriminating the relative contributions of AMPAR diffusion, trapping, and recycling events on spatial and temporal bases, this model provides unique insights on the dynamic regulation of synaptic strength. PMID:22331885

  14. Seizure control by decanoic acid through direct AMPA receptor inhibition.

    PubMed

    Chang, Pishan; Augustin, Katrin; Boddum, Kim; Williams, Sophie; Sun, Min; Terschak, John A; Hardege, Jörg D; Chen, Philip E; Walker, Matthew C; Williams, Robin S B

    2016-02-01

    The medium chain triglyceride ketogenic diet is an established treatment for drug-resistant epilepsy that increases plasma levels of decanoic acid and ketones. Recently, decanoic acid has been shown to provide seizure control in vivo, yet its mechanism of action remains unclear. Here we show that decanoic acid, but not the ketones β-hydroxybutryate or acetone, shows antiseizure activity in two acute ex vivo rat hippocampal slice models of epileptiform activity. To search for a mechanism of decanoic acid, we show it has a strong inhibitory effect on excitatory, but not inhibitory, neurotransmission in hippocampal slices. Using heterologous expression of excitatory ionotropic glutamate receptor AMPA subunits in Xenopus oocytes, we show that this effect is through direct AMPA receptor inhibition, a target shared by a recently introduced epilepsy treatment perampanel. Decanoic acid acts as a non-competitive antagonist at therapeutically relevant concentrations, in a voltage- and subunit-dependent manner, and this is sufficient to explain its antiseizure effects. This inhibitory effect is likely to be caused by binding to sites on the M3 helix of the AMPA-GluA2 transmembrane domain; independent from the binding site of perampanel. Together our results indicate that the direct inhibition of excitatory neurotransmission by decanoic acid in the brain contributes to the anti-convulsant effect of the medium chain triglyceride ketogenic diet. PMID:26608744

  15. Seizure control by decanoic acid through direct AMPA receptor inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Pishan; Augustin, Katrin; Boddum, Kim; Williams, Sophie; Sun, Min; Terschak, John A.; Hardege, Jörg D.; Chen, Philip E.

    2016-01-01

    See Rogawski (doi:10.1093/awv369) for a scientific commentary on this article.  The medium chain triglyceride ketogenic diet is an established treatment for drug-resistant epilepsy that increases plasma levels of decanoic acid and ketones. Recently, decanoic acid has been shown to provide seizure control in vivo, yet its mechanism of action remains unclear. Here we show that decanoic acid, but not the ketones β-hydroxybutryate or acetone, shows antiseizure activity in two acute ex vivo rat hippocampal slice models of epileptiform activity. To search for a mechanism of decanoic acid, we show it has a strong inhibitory effect on excitatory, but not inhibitory, neurotransmission in hippocampal slices. Using heterologous expression of excitatory ionotropic glutamate receptor AMPA subunits in Xenopus oocytes, we show that this effect is through direct AMPA receptor inhibition, a target shared by a recently introduced epilepsy treatment perampanel. Decanoic acid acts as a non-competitive antagonist at therapeutically relevant concentrations, in a voltage- and subunit-dependent manner, and this is sufficient to explain its antiseizure effects. This inhibitory effect is likely to be caused by binding to sites on the M3 helix of the AMPA-GluA2 transmembrane domain; independent from the binding site of perampanel. Together our results indicate that the direct inhibition of excitatory neurotransmission by decanoic acid in the brain contributes to the anti-convulsant effect of the medium chain triglyceride ketogenic diet. PMID:26608744

  16. Discovery of the First α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic Acid (AMPA) Receptor Antagonist Dependent upon Transmembrane AMPA Receptor Regulatory Protein (TARP) γ-8.

    PubMed

    Gardinier, Kevin M; Gernert, Douglas L; Porter, Warren J; Reel, Jon K; Ornstein, Paul L; Spinazze, Patrick; Stevens, F Craig; Hahn, Patric; Hollinshead, Sean P; Mayhugh, Daniel; Schkeryantz, Jeff; Khilevich, Albert; De Frutos, Oscar; Gleason, Scott D; Kato, Akihiko S; Luffer-Atlas, Debra; Desai, Prashant V; Swanson, Steven; Burris, Kevin D; Ding, Chunjin; Heinz, Beverly A; Need, Anne B; Barth, Vanessa N; Stephenson, Gregory A; Diseroad, Benjamin A; Woods, Tim A; Yu, Hong; Bredt, David; Witkin, Jeffrey M

    2016-05-26

    Transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) are a family of scaffolding proteins that regulate AMPA receptor trafficking and function. TARP γ-8 is one member of this family and is highly expressed within the hippocampus relative to the cerebellum. A selective TARP γ-8-dependent AMPA receptor antagonist (TDAA) is an innovative approach to modulate AMPA receptors in specific brain regions to potentially increase the therapeutic index relative to known non-TARP-dependent AMPA antagonists. We describe here, for the first time, the discovery of a noncompetitive AMPA receptor antagonist that is dependent on the presence of TARP γ-8. Three major iteration cycles were employed to improve upon potency, CYP1A2-dependent challenges, and in vivo clearance. An optimized molecule, compound (-)-25 (LY3130481), was fully protective against pentylenetetrazole-induced convulsions in rats without the motor impairment associated with non-TARP-dependent AMPA receptor antagonists. Compound (-)-25 could be utilized to provide proof of concept for antiepileptic efficacy with reduced motor side effects in patients. PMID:27067148

  17. Cochlear nucleus neurons redistribute synaptic AMPA and glycine receptors in response to monaural conductive hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Whiting, Brittany; Moiseff, Andrew; Rubio, María E.

    2009-01-01

    Neurons restore their function in response to external or internal perturbations and maintain neuronal or network stability through a homeostatic scaling mechanism. Homeostatic responses at synapses along the auditory system would be important for adaptation to normal and abnormal fluctuations in the sensory environment. We investigated at the electron microscopic level and after postembedding immunogold labeling whether projection neurons in the cochlear nucleus responded to modifications of auditory nerve activity. After unilaterally reducing the level of auditory inputs by ~ 20 dB by monaural earplugging, auditory nerve synapses on bushy cells somata and basal dendrites of fusiform cells of the ventral and dorsal cochlear nucleus, respectively, upregulated GluR3 AMPA receptor subunit, while inhibitory synapses decreased the expression of GlyRα1 subunit. These changes in expression levels were fully reversible once the earplug was removed, indicating that activity affects the trafficking of receptors at synapses. Excitatory synapses on apical dendrites of fusiform cells (parallel fibers) with different synaptic AMPA receptor subunit composition, were not affected by sound attenuation, as the expression levels of AMPA receptor subunits were the same as in normal hearing littermates. GlyRα1 subunit expression at inhibitory synapses on apical dendrites of fusiform cells was also found unaffected. Furthermore, fusiform and bushy cells of the contralateral side to the earplugging upregulated the GluR3 subunit at auditory nerve synapses. These results show that cochlear nucleus neurons innervated by the auditory nerve, are able to respond to small changes in sound levels by redistributing specific AMPA and glycine receptor subunits. PMID:19646510

  18. AMPA receptor antibodies in limbic encephalitis alter synaptic receptor location

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Meizan; Hughes, Ethan G.; Peng, Xiaoyu; Zhou, Lei; Gleichman, Amy J.; Shu, Huidy; Matà, Sabrina; Kremens, Daniel; Vitaliani, Roberta; Geschwind, Michael D.; Bataller, Luis; Kalb, Robert G.; Davis, Rebecca; Graus, Francesc; Lynch, David R.; Balice-Gordon, Rita; Dalmau, Josep

    2009-01-01

    Background Limbic encephalitis (LE) frequently associates with antibodies to cell surface antigens. Characterization of these antigens is important because it facilitates the diagnosis of those disorders that are treatment-responsive. We report a novel antigen of LE and the effect of patients' antibodies on neuronal cultures. Methods Clinical analysis of 10 patients with LE. Immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry were used to identify the antigens. HEK293 cells expressing the antigens were used in immunocytochemistry and ELISA. The effect of patients' antibodies on cultures of live rat hippocampal neurons was determined with confocal microscopy. Results Median age was 60 years (38-87); 9 were women. Seven had tumors of the lung, breast or thymus. Nine patients responded to immunotherapy or oncological therapy but neurologic relapses, without tumor recurrence, were frequent and influenced the long-term outcome. One untreated patient died of LE. All patients had antibodies against neuronal cell surface antigens that by immunoprecipitation were found to be the GluR1 and GluR2 subunits of the AMPA receptor (AMPAR). HEK293 cells expressing GluR1/2 reacted with all patients' sera or CSF, providing a diagnostic test for the disorder. Application of antibodies to cultures of neurons significantly decreased the number of GluR2-containing AMPAR clusters at synapses with a smaller decrease in overall AMPAR cluster density; these effects were reversed after antibody removal. Conclusions Antibodies to GluR1/2 associate with LE that is often paraneoplastic, treatment-responsive, and has a tendency to relapse. Our findings support an antibody-mediated pathogenesis in which patients' antibodies alter the synaptic localization and number of AMPAR. PMID:19338055

  19. Synaptic AMPA receptor composition in development, plasticity and disease.

    PubMed

    Henley, Jeremy M; Wilkinson, Kevin A

    2016-06-01

    AMPA receptors (AMPARs) are assemblies of four core subunits, GluA1-4, that mediate most fast excitatory neurotransmission. The component subunits determine the functional properties of AMPARs, and the prevailing view is that the subunit composition also determines AMPAR trafficking, which is dynamically regulated during development, synaptic plasticity and in response to neuronal stress in disease. Recently, the subunit dependence of AMPAR trafficking has been questioned, leading to a reappraisal of this field. In this Review, we discuss what is known, uncertain, conjectured and unknown about the roles of the individual subunits, and how they affect AMPAR assembly, trafficking and function under both normal and pathological conditions. PMID:27080385

  20. Regulation of AMPA Receptor Trafficking and Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Anggono, Victor; Huganir, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    AMPA receptors (AMPARs) mediate the majority of fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the brain. Dynamic changes in neuronal synaptic efficacy, termed synaptic plasticity, are thought to underlie information coding and storage in learning and memory. One major mechanism that regulates synaptic strength involves the tightly regulated trafficking of AMPARs into and out of synapses. The life cycle of AMPARs from their biosynthesis, membrane trafficking and synaptic targeting to their degradation are controlled by a series of orchestrated interactions with numerous intracellular regulatory proteins. Here we review recent progress made towards the understanding the regulation of AMPAR trafficking, focusing on the roles of several key intracellular AMPAR interacting proteins. PMID:22217700

  1. Routes, destinations and delays: recent advances in AMPA receptor trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Henley, Jeremy M.; Barker, Ellen A.; Glebov, Oleg O.

    2012-01-01

    Postsynaptic AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) mediate most fast excitatory synaptic transmission and are crucial for many aspects of brain function, including learning, memory and cognition. The number, synaptic localization and subunit composition of synaptic AMPARs are tightly regulated by network activity and by the history of activity at individual synapses. Furthermore, aberrant AMPAR trafficking is implicated in neurodegenerative diseases. AMPARs therefore represent a prime target for drug development and the mechanisms that control their synaptic delivery, retention and removal are the subject of extensive research. Here, we review recent findings that have provided new insights into AMPAR trafficking and that might lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:21420743

  2. Calcium-Permeable AMPA Receptors in the Retina

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, Jeffrey S.

    2011-01-01

    The retina transforms light entering the eye into a sophisticated neural representation of our visual world. Specialized synapses, cells, and circuits in the retina have evolved to encode luminance, contrast, motion, and other complex visual features. Although a great deal has been learned about the cellular morphology and circuitry that underlies this image processing, many of the synapses in the retina remain incompletely understood. For example, excitatory synapses in the retina feature the full panoply of glutamate receptors, but in most cases specific roles for different receptor subtypes are unclear. In this brief review, I will discuss recent progress toward understanding how Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors (CP-GluARs) contribute to synaptic transmission and newly discovered forms of synaptic plasticity in the retina. PMID:21991245

  3. Interaction with the unfolded protein response reveals a role for stargazin in biosynthetic AMPA receptor transport.

    PubMed

    Vandenberghe, Wim; Nicoll, Roger A; Bredt, David S

    2005-02-01

    The transmembrane protein stargazin enhances levels of functional AMPA receptors at the neuronal plasma membrane and at synapses. To clarify the mechanism for this effect, we studied trafficking of the AMPA receptor subunit glutamate receptor 1 (GluR1) in transfected COS7 cells. GluR1 expressed poorly on the surface of these cells and was primarily retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Stargazin expression strongly increased the surface fraction of GluR1. This effect was not reduced by a dominant-negative dynamin mutant, suggesting that stargazin does not inhibit AMPA receptor endocytosis. Interestingly, upregulation of ER chaperones as part of the unfolded protein response (UPR) both mimicked and occluded the effect of stargazin, suggesting a role for stargazin in ER processing of AMPA receptors. Consistent with this idea, we detected UPR induction in cerebellar granule cells lacking stargazin. Finally, residual AMPA receptor currents in stargazin-deficient neurons were suppressed by inhibition of the UPR. These findings uncover a role for stargazin in AMPA receptor trafficking through the early compartments of the biosynthetic pathway. Furthermore, they provide evidence for modulation of AMPA receptor trafficking by the UPR. PMID:15689545

  4. AMPA RECEPTOR POTENTIATORS: FROM DRUG DESIGN TO COGNITIVE ENHANCEMENT

    PubMed Central

    PARTIN, KATHRYN M.

    2014-01-01

    Positive allosteric modulators of ionotropic glutamate receptors have emerged as a target for treating cognitive impairment and neurodegeneration, but also mental illnesses such as major depressive disorder. The possibility of creating a new class of pharmaceutical agent to treat refractive mental health issues has compelled researchers to redouble their efforts to develop a safe, effective treatment for memory and cognition impairments. Coupled with the more robust research methodologies that have emerged, including more sophisticated high-throughput-screens, higher resolution structural biology techniques, and more focused assessment on pharmacokinetics, the development of positive modulators of AMPA receptors holds great promise. We describe recent approaches that improve our understanding of the basic physiology underlying memory and cognition, and their application towards promoting human health. PMID:25462292

  5. Activity Level-Dependent Synapse-Specific AMPA Receptor Trafficking Regulates Transmission Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, J. Julius

    2009-01-01

    Central glutamatergic synapses may express AMPA-sensitive glutamate receptors (AMPA-Rs) with distinct gating properties and exhibit different transmission dynamics, which are important for computing various synaptic inputs received at different populations of synapses. However, how glutamatergic synapses acquire AMPA-Rs with distinct kinetics to influence synaptic integration remains poorly understood. Here I report synapse-specific trafficking of distinct AMPA-Rs in rat cortical layer 4 stellate and layer 5 pyramidal neurons. The analysis indicates that in single layer 4 stellate neurons thalamocortical synapses generate faster synaptic responses than intracortical synapses. Moreover, GluR1-containing AMPA-Rs traffic selectively into intracortical synapses, and this process requires sensory experience-dependent activity and slows down transmission kinetics. GluR4-containing AMPA-Rs traffic more heavily into thalamocortical synapses than intracortical synapses, and this process requires spontaneous synaptic activity and speeds up transmission kinetics. GluR2-containing AMPA-Rs traffic equally into both thalamocortical and intracortical synapses, and this process requires no synaptic activity and resets transmission kinetics. Notably, synaptic trafficking of distinct AMPA-Rs differentially regulates synaptic integration. Thus, synapse-specific AMPA-R trafficking coarsely sets and synaptic activity finely tunes transmission kinetics and integration properties at different synapses in central neurons. PMID:19439609

  6. Structure and organization of heteromeric AMPA-type glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Herguedas, Beatriz; García-Nafría, Javier; Cais, Ondrej; Fernández-Leiro, Rafael; Krieger, James; Ho, Hinze; Greger, Ingo H

    2016-04-29

    AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs), which are central mediators of rapid neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity, predominantly exist as heteromers of the subunits GluA1 to GluA4. Here we report the first AMPAR heteromer structures, which deviate substantially from existing GluA2 homomer structures. Crystal structures of the GluA2/3 and GluA2/4 N-terminal domains reveal a novel compact conformation with an alternating arrangement of the four subunits around a central axis. This organization is confirmed by cysteine cross-linking in full-length receptors, and it permitted us to determine the structure of an intact GluA2/3 receptor by cryogenic electron microscopy. Two models in the ligand-free state, at resolutions of 8.25 and 10.3 angstroms, exhibit substantial vertical compression and close associations between domain layers, reminiscent of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. Model 1 resembles a resting state and model 2 a desensitized state, thus providing snapshots of gating transitions in the nominal absence of ligand. Our data reveal organizational features of heteromeric AMPARs and provide a framework to decipher AMPAR architecture and signaling. PMID:26966189

  7. Cyclin Y inhibits plasticity-induced AMPA receptor exocytosis and LTP

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eunsil; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Hur, Young-Na; Whitcomb, Daniel J.; Regan, Philip; Hong, Jung-Hwa; Kim, Hanna; Ho Suh, Young; Cho, Kwangwook; Park, Mikyoung

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin Y (CCNY) is a member of the cyclin protein family, known to regulate cell division in proliferating cells. Interestingly, CCNY is expressed in neurons that do not undergo cell division. Here, we report that CCNY negatively regulates long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic strength through inhibition of AMPA receptor trafficking. CCNY is enriched in postsynaptic fractions from rat forebrain and is localized adjacent to postsynaptic sites in dendritic spines in rat hippocampal neurons. Using live-cell imaging of a pH-sensitive AMPA receptor, we found that during LTP-inducing stimulation, CCNY inhibits AMPA receptor exocytosis in dendritic spines. Furthermore, CCNY abolishes LTP in hippocampal slices. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that CCNY inhibits plasticity-induced AMPA receptor delivery to synapses and thereby blocks LTP, identifying a novel function for CCNY in post-mitotic cells. PMID:26220330

  8. Calcium permeable AMPA receptors and autoreceptors in external tufted cells of rat olfactory bulb

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jie; Lowe, Graeme

    2007-01-01

    Glomeruli are functional units of the olfactory bulb responsible for early processing of odor information encoded by single olfactory receptor genes. Glomerular neural circuitry includes numerous external tufted (ET) cells whose rhythmic burst firing may mediate synchronization of bulbar activity with the inhalation cycle. Bursting is entrained by glutamatergic input from olfactory nerve terminals, so specific properties of ionotropic glutamate receptors on ET cells are likely to be important determinants of olfactory processing. Particularly intriguing is recent evidence that α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) receptors of juxta-glomerular neurons may permeate calcium. This could provide a novel pathway for regulating ET cell signaling. We tested the hypothesis that ET cells express functional calcium-permeable AMPA receptors. In rat olfactory bulb slices, excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) in ET cells were evoked by olfactory nerve shock, and by uncaging glutamate. We found attenuation of AMPA/kainate EPSCs by 1-naphthyl acetyl-spermine (NAS), an open-channel blocker specific for calcium permeable AMPA receptors. Cyclothiazide strongly potentiated EPSCs, indicating a major contribution from AMPA receptors. The current-voltage (I-V) relation of uncaging EPSCs showed weak inward rectification which was lost after > ~ 10 min of whole-cell dialysis, and was absent in NAS. In kainate-stimulated slices, Co2+ ions permeated cells of the glomerular layer. Large AMPA EPSCs were accompanied by fluorescence signals in fluo-4 loaded cells, suggesting calcium permeation. Depolarizing pulses evoked slow tail currents with pharmacology consistent with involvement of calcium permeable AMPA autoreceptors. Tail currents were abolished by Cd2+ and NBQX, and were sensitive to NAS block. Glutamate autoreceptors were confirmed by uncaging intracellular calcium to evoke a large inward current. Our results provide evidence that calcium permeable AMPA

  9. Reversible Palmitoylation Regulates Surface Stability of AMPA Receptors in the Nucleus Accumbens in Response to Cocaine in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Van Dolah, Dustin K.; Mao, Li-Min; Shaffer, Christopher; Guo, Ming-Lei; Fibuch, Eugene E.; Chu, Xiang-Ping; Buch, Shilpa; Wang, John Q.

    2010-01-01

    Background Palmitoylation is emerging as one of the most important posttranslational modifications of excitatory synaptic proteins in mammalian brain cells. As a reversible and regulatable modification sensitive to changing synaptic inputs, palmitoylation of ionotropic glutamate receptors contributes to not only the modulation of normal receptor and synaptic activities, but also the pathogenesis of various neuropsychiatric disorders. Here, we report that palmitoylation of the AMPA receptor is regulated by the psychostimulant, cocaine, and such regulation is involved in cocaine action. Methods We tested palmitoylation and surface expression of AMPA receptors in striatal neurons and psychomotor behavior in responses to cocaine in rats. Results All four AMPA receptor subunits (GluA1-4 or GluR1-4) are palmitoylated in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) of adult rats. Among them, GluA1 and GluA3 are preferentially upregulated in their palmitoylation levels by a systemic injection of cocaine. The upregulated GluA1 and 3 palmitoylation is a transient and reversible event. Consequently, it increases the susceptibility of surface-expressed GluA1 and 3 to internalization trafficking, leading to a temporal loss of surface receptor expression. Blockade of the regulated GluA1/3 palmitoylation with a palmitoylation inhibitor in the local NAc reverses the loss of surface GluA1/3. The inhibition of palmitoylation also concurrently sustains behavioral responsivity to cocaine. Conclusions Our data identify a novel drug-palmitoylation coupling in the center of limbic reward circuits. Through palmitoylating selective AMPA receptor subunits, cocaine activity-dependently regulates trafficking and subcellular localization of the receptor in NAc neurons and dynamically controls psychomotor sensitivity to the psychoactive drug in vivo. PMID:21216391

  10. P2X-mediated AMPA receptor internalization and synaptic depression is controlled by two CaMKII phosphorylation sites on GluA1 in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Pougnet, Johan-Till; Compans, Benjamin; Martinez, Audrey; Choquet, Daniel; Hosy, Eric; Boué-Grabot, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Plasticity at excitatory synapses can be induced either by synaptic release of glutamate or the release of gliotransmitters such as ATP. Recently, we showed that postsynaptic P2X2 receptors activated by ATP released from astrocytes downregulate synaptic AMPAR, providing a novel mechanism by which glial cells modulate synaptic activity. ATP- and lNMDA-induced depression in the CA1 region of the hippocampus are additive, suggesting distinct molecular pathways. AMPARs are homo-or hetero-tetramers composed of GluA1-A4. Here, we first show that P2X2-mediated AMPAR inhibition is dependent on the subunit composition of AMPAR. GluA3 homomers are insensitive and their presence in heteromers alters P2X-mediated inhibition. Using a mutational approach, we demonstrate that the two CaMKII phosphorylation sites S567 and S831 located in the cytoplasmic Loop1 and C-terminal tail of GluA1 subunits, respectively, are critical for P2X2-mediated AMPAR inhibition recorded from co-expressing Xenopus oocytes and removal of surface AMPAR at synapses of hippocampal neurons imaged by the super-resolution dSTORM technique. Finally, using phosphorylation site-specific antibodies, we show that P2X-induced depression in hippocampal slices produces a dephosphorylation of the GluA1 subunit at S567, contrary to NMDAR-mediated LTD. These findings indicate that GluA1 phosphorylation of S567 and S831 is critical for P2X2-mediated AMPAR internalization and ATP-driven synaptic depression. PMID:27624155

  11. GSG1L suppresses AMPA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission and uniquely modulates AMPA receptor kinetics in hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xinglong; Mao, Xia; Lussier, Marc P.; Hutchison, Mary Anne; Zhou, Liang; Hamra, F. Kent; Roche, Katherine W.; Lu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of AMPA receptor (AMPAR)-mediated synaptic transmission is a key mechanism for synaptic plasticity. In the brain, AMPARs assemble with a number of auxiliary subunits, including TARPs, CNIHs and CKAMP44, which are important for AMPAR forward trafficking to synapses. Here we report that the membrane protein GSG1L negatively regulates AMPAR-mediated synaptic transmission. Overexpression of GSG1L strongly suppresses, and GSG1L knockout (KO) enhances, AMPAR-mediated synaptic transmission. GSG1L-dependent regulation of AMPAR synaptic transmission relies on the first extracellular loop domain and its carboxyl-terminus. GSG1L also speeds up AMPAR deactivation and desensitization in hippocampal CA1 neurons, in contrast to the effects of TARPs and CNIHs. Furthermore, GSG1L association with AMPARs inhibits CNIH2-induced slowing of the receptors in heterologous cells. Finally, GSG1L KO rats have deficits in LTP and show behavioural abnormalities in object recognition tests. These data demonstrate that GSG1L represents a new class of auxiliary subunit with distinct functional properties for AMPARs. PMID:26932439

  12. Actin-dependent mechanisms in AMPA receptor trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, Jonathan G.

    2014-01-01

    The precise regulation of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) number and subtype at the synapse is crucial for the regulation of excitatory neurotransmission, synaptic plasticity and the consequent formation of appropriate neural circuits for learning and memory. AMPAR trafficking involves the dynamic processes of exocytosis, endocytosis and endosomal recycling, all of which involve the actin cytoskeleton. The actin cytoskeleton is highly dynamic and highly regulated by an abundance of actin-binding proteins and upstream signaling pathways that modulate actin polymerization and depolymerization. Actin dynamics generate forces that manipulate membranes in the process of vesicle biogenesis, and also for propelling vesicles through the cytoplasm to reach their destination. In addition, trafficking mechanisms exploit more stable aspects of the actin cytoskeleton by using actin-based motor proteins to traffic vesicular cargo along actin filaments. Numerous studies have shown that actin dynamics are critical for AMPAR localization and function. The identification of actin-binding proteins that physically interact with AMPAR subunits, and research into their mode of action is starting to shed light on the mechanisms involved. Such proteins either regulate actin dynamics to modulate mechanical forces exerted on AMPAR-containing membranes, or associate with actin filaments to target or transport AMPAR-containing vesicles to specific subcellular regions. In addition, actin-regulatory proteins that do not physically interact with AMPARs may influence AMPAR trafficking by regulating the local actin environment in the dendritic spine. PMID:25429259

  13. Contextual learning requires synaptic AMPA receptor delivery in the hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Mitsushima, Dai; Ishihara, Kouji; Sano, Akane; Kessels, Helmut W.; Takahashi, Takuya

    2011-01-01

    The hippocampus plays a central role in learning and memory. Although synaptic delivery of AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) contributes to experience-dependent synaptic strengthening, its role in hippocampus-dependent learning remains elusive. By combining viral-mediated in vivo gene delivery with in vitro patch-clamp recordings, we found that the inhibitory avoidance task, a hippocampus-dependent contextual fear-learning paradigm, delivered GluR1-containing AMPARs into CA3-CA1 synapses of the dorsal hippocampus. To block the synaptic delivery of endogenous AMPARs, we expressed a fragment of the GluR1-cytoplasmic tail (the 14-aa GluR1 membrane-proximal region with two serines mutated to phospho-mimicking aspartates: MPR-DD). MPR-DD prevented learning-driven synaptic AMPAR delivery in CA1 neurons. Bilateral expression of MPR-DD in the CA1 region of the rat impaired inhibitory avoidance learning, indicating that synaptic GluR1 trafficking in the CA1 region of the hippocampus is required for encoding contextual fear memories. The fraction of CA1 neurons that underwent synaptic strengthening positively correlated with the performance in the inhibitory avoidance fear memory task. These data suggest that the robustness of a contextual memory depends on the number of hippocampal neurons that participate in the encoding of a memory trace. PMID:21746893

  14. AMPA receptor regulation during synaptic plasticity in hippocampus and neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hey-Kyoung; Kirkwood, Alfredo

    2011-01-01

    Discovery of long-term potentiation (LTP) in the dentate gyrus of the rabbit hippocampus by Bliss and Lømo opened up a whole new field to study activity-dependent long-term synaptic modifications in the brain. Since then hippocampal synapses have been a key model system to study the mechanisms of different forms of synaptic plasticity. At least for the postsynaptic forms of LTP and long-term depression (LTD), regulation of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) has emerged as a key mechanism. While many of the synaptic plasticity mechanisms uncovered in at the hippocampal synapses apply to synapses across diverse brain regions, there are differences in the mechanisms that often reveal the specific functional requirements of the brain area under study. Here we will review AMPAR regulation underlying synaptic plasticity in hippocampus and neocortex. The main focus of this review will be placed on postsynaptic forms of synaptic plasticity that impinge on the regulation of AMPARs using hippocampal CA1 and primary sensory cortices as examples. And through the comparison, we will highlight the key similarities and functional differences between the two synapses. PMID:21856433

  15. Cornichons modify channel properties of recombinant and glial AMPA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Coombs, Ian D.; Soto, David; Zonouzi, Marzieh; Renzi, Massimiliano; Shelley, Chris; Farrant, Mark; Cull-Candy, Stuart G.

    2012-01-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors, which underlie a majority of excitatory synaptic transmission in the CNS, associate with transmembrane proteins that modify their intracellular trafficking and channel gating. For AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs), significant advances have been made in our understanding of their regulation by transmembrane AMPAR regulatory proteins (TARPs). Less is known about the functional influence of cornichons – unrelated AMPAR-interacting proteins, identified by proteomic analysis. Here we confirm that cornichon homologs 2 and 3 (CNIH-2 and CNIH-3), but not CNIH-1, slow the deactivation and desensitization of both GluA2-containing calcium-impermeable (CI-) and GluA2-lacking calcium-permeable (CP-) AMPARs expressed in tsA201 cells. CNIH-2 and -3 also enhanced the glutamate sensitivity, single-channel conductance and calcium permeability of CP-AMPARs, while decreasing their block by intracellular polyamines. We examined the potential effects of CNIHs on native AMPARs by recording from rat optic nerve oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs), known to express a significant population of CP-AMPARs. These glial cells exhibited surface labelling with an anti-CNIH-2/3 antibody. Two features of their AMPAR-mediated currents – the relative efficacy of the partial agonist kainate (IKA/IGlu ratio 0.4), and a greater than five-fold potentiation of kainate responses by cyclothiazide – suggest AMPAR association with CNIHs. Additionally, overexpression of CNIH-3 in OPCs markedly slowed AMPAR desensitization. Together, our experiments support the view that CNIHs are capable of altering key properties of AMPARs and suggest that they may do so in glia. PMID:22815494

  16. Stargazin regulates AMPA receptor trafficking through adaptor protein complexes during long-term depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Shinji; Kakegawa, Wataru; Budisantoso, Timotheus; Nomura, Toshihiro; Kohda, Kazuhisa; Yuzaki, Michisuke

    2013-11-01

    Long-term depression (LTD) underlies learning and memory in various brain regions. Although postsynaptic AMPA receptor trafficking mediates LTD, its underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely unclear. Here we show that stargazin, a transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory protein, forms a ternary complex with adaptor proteins AP-2 and AP-3A in hippocampal neurons, depending on its phosphorylation state. Inhibiting the stargazin-AP-2 interaction disrupts NMDA-induced AMPA receptor endocytosis, and inhibiting that of stargazin-AP-3A abrogates the late endosomal/lysosomal trafficking of AMPA receptors, thereby upregulating receptor recycling to the cell surface. Similarly, stargazin’s interaction with AP-2 or AP-3A is necessary for low-frequency stimulus-evoked LTD in CA1 hippocampal neurons. Thus, stargazin has a crucial role in NMDA-dependent LTD by regulating two trafficking pathways of AMPA receptors—transport from the cell surface to early endosomes and from early endosomes to late endosomes/lysosomes—through its sequential binding to AP-2 and AP-3A.

  17. AMPA receptor trafficking in inflammation-induced dorsal horn central sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Yuan-Xiang

    2012-01-01

    Activity-dependent postsynaptic receptor trafficking is critical for long-term synaptic plasticity in brain, but it is unclear whether this mechanism actually mediates spinal cord dorsal horn central sensitization (a specific form of synaptic plasticity) that is associated with persistent pain. Recent studies have shown that peripheral inflammation drives changes in AMPA receptor subunit trafficking in dorsal horn and that such changes contribute to the hypersensitivity that underlies persistent pain. Here, we review current evidence to illustrate how spinal cord AMPA receptors participate in dorsal horn central sensitization associated with persistent pain. Understanding these mechanisms may allow development of novel therapeutic strategies for treating persistent pain. PMID:22466122

  18. Subsynaptic AMPA Receptor Distribution Is Acutely Regulated by Actin-Driven Reorganization of the Postsynaptic Density

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Justin M.; Blanpied, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    AMPA receptors (AMPARs) mediate synaptic transmission and plasticity during learning, development, and disease. Mechanisms determining subsynaptic receptor position are poorly understood but are key determinants of quantal size. We used a series of live-cell, high-resolution imaging approaches to measure protein organization within single postsynaptic densities in rat hippocampal neurons. By photobleaching receptors in synapse subdomains, we found that most AMPARs do not freely diffuse within the synapse, indicating they are embedded in a matrix that determines their subsynaptic position. However, time lapse analysis revealed that synaptic AMPARs are continuously repositioned in concert with plasticity of this scaffold matrix rather than simply by free diffusion. Using a fluorescence correlation analysis, we found that across the lateral extent of single PSDs, component proteins were differentially distributed, and this distribution was continually adjusted by actin treadmilling. The C-terminal PDZ ligand of GluA1 did not regulate its mobility or distribution in the synapse. However, glutamate receptor activation promoted subsynaptic mobility. Strikingly, subsynaptic immobility of both AMPARs and scaffold molecules remained essentially intact even after loss of actin filaments. We conclude that receptors are actively repositioned at the synapse by treadmilling of the actin cytoskeleton, an influence which is transmitted only indirectly to receptors via the pliable and surprisingly dynamic internal structure of the PSD. PMID:22238102

  19. mTOR Is Essential for Corticosteroid Effects on Hippocampal AMPA Receptor Function and Fear Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xiong, Hui; Casse, Frédéric; Zhou, Yang; Zhou, Ming; Xiong, Zhi-Qi; Joëls, Marian; Martin, Stéphane; Krugers, Harm J.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoid hormones, via activation of their receptors, promote memory consolidation, but the exact underlying mechanisms remain elusive. We examined how corticosterone regulates AMPA receptors (AMPARs), which are crucial for synaptic plasticity and memory formation. Combining a live imaging fluorescent recovery after photobleaching approach…

  20. Mechanism-based design of 2,3-benzodiazepine inhibitors for AMPA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Li

    2015-01-01

    2,3-Benzodiazepine (2,3-BDZ) compounds represent a group of structurally diverse, small-molecule antagonists of (R, S)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (AMPA) receptors. Antagonists of AMPA receptors are drug candidates for potential treatment of a number of neurological disorders such as epilepsy, stroke and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). How to make better inhibitors, such as 2,3-BDZs, has been an enduring quest in drug discovery. Among a few available tools to address this specific question for making better 2,3-BDZs, perhaps the best one is to use mechanistic clues from studies of the existing antagonists to design and discover more selective and more potent antagonists. Here I review recent work in this area, and propose some ideas in the continuing effort of developing newer 2,3-BDZs for tighter control of AMPA receptor activities in vivo. PMID:26713266

  1. Diabetic hyperglycemia reduces Ca2+ permeability of extrasynaptic AMPA receptors in AII amacrine cells.

    PubMed

    Castilho, Áurea; Madsen, Eirik; Ambrósio, António F; Veruki, Margaret L; Hartveit, Espen

    2015-09-01

    There is increasing evidence that diabetic retinopathy is a primary neuropathological disorder that precedes the microvascular pathology associated with later stages of the disease. Recently, we found evidence for altered functional properties of synaptic α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors in A17, but not AII, amacrine cells in the mammalian retina, and the observed changes were consistent with an upregulation of the GluA2 subunit, a key determinant of functional properties of AMPA receptors, including Ca(2+) permeability and current-voltage (I-V) rectification properties. Here, we have investigated functional changes of extrasynaptic AMPA receptors in AII amacrine cells evoked by diabetes. With patch-clamp recording of nucleated patches from retinal slices, we measured Ca(2+) permeability and I-V rectification in rats with ∼3 wk of streptozotocin-induced diabetes and age-matched, noninjected controls. Under bi-ionic conditions (extracellular Ca(2+) concentration = 30 mM, intracellular Cs(+) concentration = 171 mM), the reversal potential (Erev) of AMPA-evoked currents indicated a significant reduction of Ca(2+) permeability in diabetic animals [Erev = -17.7 mV, relative permeability of Ca(2+) compared with Cs(+) (PCa/PCs) = 1.39] compared with normal animals (Erev = -7.7 mV, PCa/PCs = 2.35). Insulin treatment prevented the reduction of Ca(2+) permeability. I-V rectification was examined by calculating a rectification index (RI) as the ratio of the AMPA-evoked conductance at +40 and -60 mV. The degree of inward rectification in patches from diabetic animals (RI = 0.48) was significantly reduced compared with that in normal animals (RI = 0.30). These results suggest that diabetes evokes a change in the functional properties of extrasynaptic AMPA receptors of AII amacrine cells. These changes could be representative for extrasynaptic AMPA receptors elsewhere in AII amacrine cells and suggest that synaptic and extrasynaptic AMPA

  2. Enhanced AMPA receptor activity increases operant alcohol self-administration and cue-induced reinstatement.

    PubMed

    Cannady, Reginald; Fisher, Kristen R; Durant, Brandon; Besheer, Joyce; Hodge, Clyde W

    2013-01-01

    Long-term alcohol exposure produces neuroadaptations that contribute to the progression of alcohol abuse disorders. Chronic alcohol consumption results in strengthened excitatory neurotransmission and increased α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate receptors (AMPA) receptor signaling in animal models. However, the mechanistic role of enhanced AMPA receptor activity in alcohol-reinforcement and alcohol-seeking behavior remains unclear. This study examined the role of enhanced AMPA receptor function using the selective positive allosteric modulator, aniracetam, in modulating operant alcohol self-administration and cue-induced reinstatement. Male alcohol-preferring (P-) rats, trained to self-administer alcohol (15%, v/v) versus water were pre-treated with aniracetam to assess effects on maintenance of alcohol self-administration. To determine reinforcer specificity, P-rats were trained to self-administer sucrose (0.8%, w/v) versus water, and effects of aniracetam were tested. The role of aniracetam in modulating relapse of alcohol-seeking was assessed using a response contingent cue-induced reinstatement procedure in P-rats trained to self-administer 15% alcohol. Aniracetam pre-treatment significantly increased alcohol-reinforced responses relative to vehicle treatment. This increase was not attributed to aniracetam-induced hyperactivity as aniracetam pre-treatment did not alter locomotor activity. AMPA receptor involvement was confirmed because 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (AMPA receptor antagonist) blocked the aniracetam-induced increase in alcohol self-administration. Aniracetam did not alter sucrose-reinforced responses in sucrose-trained P-rats, suggesting that enhanced AMPA receptor activity is selective in modulating the reinforcing function of alcohol. Finally, aniracetam pre-treatment potentiated cue-induced reinstatement of alcohol-seeking behavior versus vehicle-treated P-rats. These data suggest that enhanced glutamate activity at AMPA

  3. Enhanced AMPA Receptor Function Promotes Cerebellar Long-Term Depression Rather than Potentiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Beugen, Boeke J.; Qiao, Xin; Simmons, Dana H.; De Zeeuw, Chris I.; Hansel, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Ampakines are allosteric modulators of AMPA receptors that facilitate hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) and learning, and have been considered for the treatment of cognition and memory deficits. Here, we show that the ampakine CX546 raises the amplitude and slows the decay time of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) at cerebellar…

  4. AMPA Receptor Endocytosis in Rat Perirhinal Cortex Underlies Retrieval of Object Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cazakoff, Brittany N.; Howland, John G.

    2011-01-01

    Mechanisms consistent with long-term depression in the perirhinal cortex (PRh) play a fundamental role in object recognition memory; however, whether AMPA receptor endocytosis is involved in distinct phases of recognition memory is not known. To address this question, we used local PRh infusions of the cell membrane-permeable Tat-GluA2[subscript…

  5. Involvement of AMPA receptors in the antidepressant-like effects of dextromethorphan in mice.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Linda; Matsumoto, Rae R

    2015-12-15

    Dextromethorphan (DM) is an antitussive with rapid acting antidepressant potential based on pharmacodynamic similarities to ketamine. Building upon our previous finding that DM produces antidepressant-like effects in the mouse forced swim test (FST), the present study aimed to establish the antidepressant-like actions of DM in the tail suspension test (TST), another well-established model predictive of antidepressant efficacy. Additionally, using the TST and FST, we investigated the role of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors in the antidepressant-like properties of DM because accumulating evidence suggests that AMPA receptors play an important role in the pathophysiology of depression and may contribute to the efficacy of antidepressant medications, including that of ketamine. We found that DM displays antidepressant-like effects in the TST similar to the conventional and fast acting antidepressants characterized by imipramine and ketamine, respectively. Moreover, decreasing the first-pass metabolism of DM by concomitant administration of quinidine (CYP2D6 inhibitor) potentiated antidepressant-like actions, implying DM itself has antidepressant efficacy. Finally, in both the TST and FST, pretreatment with the AMPA receptor antagonist NBQX (2,3-dioxo-6-nitro-1,2,3,4-tetrahydrobenzo[f]quinoxaline-7-sulfonamide) significantly attenuated the antidepressant-like behavior elicited by DM. Together, the data show that DM exerts antidepressant-like actions through AMPA receptors, further suggesting DM may act as a safe and effective fast acting antidepressant drug. PMID:25804358

  6. Long-term potentiation alters the modulator pharmacology of AMPA-type glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Lin, Bin; Brücher, Fernando A; Colgin, Laura Lee; Lynch, Gary

    2002-06-01

    Changes in the biophysical properties of AMPA-type glutamate receptors have been proposed to mediate the expression of long-term potentiation (LTP). The present study tested if, as predicted from this hypothesis, AMPA receptor modulators differentially affect potentiated versus control synaptic currents. Whole cell recordings were collected from CA1 pyramidal neurons in hippocampal slices from adult rats. Within-neuron comparisons were made of the excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) elicited by two separate groups of Schaffer-collateral/commissural synapses. LTP was induced by theta burst stimulation in one set of inputs; cyclothiazide (CTZ), a drug that acts on the desensitization kinetics of AMPA receptors, was infused 30 min later. The decay time constants of the potentiated EPSCs prior to drug infusion were slightly, but significantly, shorter than those of control EPSCs. CTZ slowed the decay of the EPSCs, as reported in prior studies, and did so to a significantly greater degree in the potentiated synapses. Additionally, infusion of CTZ resulted in significantly greater effects on amplitude in potentiated pathways as compared with control pathways. The interaction between LTP and CTZ was also obtained in a separate set of experiments in which GABA receptor antagonists were used to block inhibitory postsynaptic currents. Additionally, there was no significant change in paired-pulse facilitation in the presence of CTZ, indicating that presynaptic effects of the drug were negligible. These findings provide new evidence that LTP modifies AMPA receptor kinetics. Candidates for the changes responsible for the observed effects of LTP were evaluated using a model of AMPA receptor kinetics; a simple increase in the channel opening rate provided the most satisfactory match with the LTP data. PMID:12037181

  7. The Influence of Synaptic Size on AMPA Receptor Activation: A Monte Carlo Model

    PubMed Central

    Montes, Jesus; Peña, Jose M.; DeFelipe, Javier; Herreras, Oscar; Merchan-Perez, Angel

    2015-01-01

    Physiological and electron microscope studies have shown that synapses are functionally and morphologically heterogeneous and that variations in size of synaptic junctions are related to characteristics such as release probability and density of postsynaptic AMPA receptors. The present article focuses on how these morphological variations impact synaptic transmission. We based our study on Monte Carlo computational simulations of simplified model synapses whose morphological features have been extracted from hundreds of actual synaptic junctions reconstructed by three-dimensional electron microscopy. We have examined the effects that parameters such as synaptic size or density of AMPA receptors have on the number of receptors that open after release of a single synaptic vesicle. Our results indicate that the maximum number of receptors that will open after the release of a single synaptic vesicle may show a ten-fold variation in the whole population of synapses. When individual synapses are considered, there is also a stochastical variability that is maximal in small synapses with low numbers of receptors. The number of postsynaptic receptors and the size of the synaptic junction are the most influential parameters, while the packing density of receptors or the concentration of extrasynaptic transporters have little or no influence on the opening of AMPA receptors. PMID:26107874

  8. The influence of synaptic size on AMPA receptor activation: a Monte Carlo model.

    PubMed

    Montes, Jesus; Peña, Jose M; DeFelipe, Javier; Herreras, Oscar; Merchan-Perez, Angel

    2015-01-01

    Physiological and electron microscope studies have shown that synapses are functionally and morphologically heterogeneous and that variations in size of synaptic junctions are related to characteristics such as release probability and density of postsynaptic AMPA receptors. The present article focuses on how these morphological variations impact synaptic transmission. We based our study on Monte Carlo computational simulations of simplified model synapses whose morphological features have been extracted from hundreds of actual synaptic junctions reconstructed by three-dimensional electron microscopy. We have examined the effects that parameters such as synaptic size or density of AMPA receptors have on the number of receptors that open after release of a single synaptic vesicle. Our results indicate that the maximum number of receptors that will open after the release of a single synaptic vesicle may show a ten-fold variation in the whole population of synapses. When individual synapses are considered, there is also a stochastical variability that is maximal in small synapses with low numbers of receptors. The number of postsynaptic receptors and the size of the synaptic junction are the most influential parameters, while the packing density of receptors or the concentration of extrasynaptic transporters have little or no influence on the opening of AMPA receptors. PMID:26107874

  9. Calcium Binding to PICK1 is Essential for the Intracellular Retention of AMPA Receptors Underlying LTD

    PubMed Central

    Citri, Ami; Bhattacharyya, Samarjit; Ma, Cong; Morishita, Wade; Fang, Scarlett; Rizo, Josep; Malenka, Robert C.

    2010-01-01

    NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-dependent LTD in the hippocampus is mediated primarily by the calcium-dependent removal of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) from the postsynaptic density. The AMPAR-binding, PDZ and BAR domain containing protein PICK1 has been implicated in the regulation of AMPAR trafficking underlying several forms of synaptic plasticity. Using a strategy involving shRNA-mediated knockdown of PICK1 and its replacement with recombinant PICK1, we performed a detailed structure-function analysis of the role of PICK1 in hippocampal synaptic plasticity and the underlying NMDAR-induced AMPAR trafficking. We found that PICK1 is not necessary for maintenance of the basal synaptic complement of AMPARs or expression of either mGluR-LTD or NMDAR-dependent LTP. Rather, PICK1 function is specific to NMDAR-dependent LTD and the underlying AMPAR trafficking. Furthermore, while PICK1 does not regulate the initial phase of NMDAR-induced AMPAR endocytosis, it is required for intracellular retention of internalized AMPARs. Detailed biophysical analysis of an N-terminal acidic motif indicated that it is involved in intramolecular electrostatic interactions that are disrupted by calcium. Mutations that interfered with the calcium-induced structural changes in PICK1 precluded LTD and the underlying NMDAR-induced intracellular retention of AMPARs. These findings support a model whereby calcium-induced modification of PICK1 structure is critical for its function in the retention of internalized AMPARs that underlies the expression of hippocampal NMDAR-dependent LTD. PMID:21147983

  10. The Sorting Receptor SorCS1 Regulates Trafficking of Neurexin and AMPA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Savas, Jeffrey N.; Ribeiro, Luís F.; Wierda, Keimpe D.; Wright, Rebecca; DeNardo, Laura A.; Rice, Heather C.; Chamma, Ingrid; Wang, Yi-Zhi; Zemla, Roland; Lavallée-Adam, Mathieu; Vennekens, Kristel M.; O'Sullivan, Matthew L.; Antonios, Joseph K.; Hall, Elizabeth A.; Thoumine, Olivier; Attie, Alan D.; Ghosh, Anirvan; Yates, John R.; de Wit, Joris

    2015-01-01

    The formation, function, and plasticity of synapses require dynamic changes in synaptic receptor composition. Here we identify the sorting receptor SorCS1 as a key regulator of synaptic receptor trafficking. Four independent proteomic analyses identify the synaptic adhesion molecule neurexin and the AMPA glutamate receptor (AMPAR) as major proteins sorted by SorCS1. SorCS1 localizes to early and recycling endosomes and regulates neurexin and AMPAR surface trafficking. Surface proteome analysis of SorCS1-deficient neurons shows decreased surface levels of these, and additional, receptors. Quantitative in vivo analysis of SorCS1 knockout synaptic proteomes identifies SorCS1 as a global trafficking regulator and reveals decreased levels of receptors regulating adhesion and neurotransmission, including neurexins and AMPARs. Consequently, glutamatergic transmission at SorCS1–deficient synapses is reduced due to impaired AMPAR surface expression. SORCS1 mutations have been associated with autism and Alzheimer's disease, suggesting that perturbed receptor trafficking contributes to defects in synaptic composition and function underlying synaptopathies. PMID:26291160

  11. Targeting of GLUR4-containing AMPA receptors to synaptic sites during in vitro classical conditioning.

    PubMed

    Mokin, M; Keifer, J

    2004-01-01

    The synaptic delivery of GluR4-containing AMPA receptors during in vitro classical conditioning of a neural correlate of an eyeblink response was examined by fluorescence imaging of punctate staining for glutamate receptor subunits and the presynaptic marker synaptophysin. There was a significant increase in GluR4-containing AMPA receptors to synaptic sites after conditioning as determined by colocalization of GluR4 subunit puncta with synaptophysin. Moreover, the trafficking of these receptor subunits requires NMDA receptor activation as it was blocked by D,L-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (AP-5). In contrast, colocalization of NR1 subunits with synaptophysin was stable regardless of whether the preparations had undergone conditioning or had been treated by AP-5. The enhanced colocalization of GluR4 and synaptophysin was accompanied by an increase in both the total number and size of puncta for both proteins, suggesting greater synthesis and aggregation during conditioning. Western blot analysis confirmed upregulation of synaptophysin and GluR4 following conditioning. These data support the hypothesis that GluR4-containing AMPA receptors are delivered to synaptic sites during conditioning. Further, they suggest coordinate presynaptic and postsynaptic modifications during in vitro classical conditioning. PMID:15350635

  12. Signalling mechanism for somatostatin receptor 5-mediated suppression of AMPA responses in rat retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Deng, Qin-Qin; Sheng, Wen-Long; Zhang, Gong; Weng, Shi-Jun; Yang, Xiong-Li; Zhong, Yong-Mei

    2016-08-01

    Somatostatin (SRIF) is involved in a variety of physiological functions via the activation of five subtypes of specific receptors (sst1-5). Here, we investigated the effects of SRIF on AMPA receptor (AMPAR)-mediated currents (AMPA currents) in isolated rat retinal ganglion cells (GCs) using patch-clamp techniques. Immunofluorescence double labelling demonstrated the expression of sst5 in rat GCs. Consistent to this, whole cell AMPA currents of GCs were dose-dependently suppressed by SRIF, and the effect was reversed by the sst5 antagonist BIM-23056. Intracellular dialysis of GDP-β-S or pre-incubation with the Gi/o inhibitor pertussis toxin (PTX) abolished the SRIF effect. The SRIF effect was mimicked by the administration of either 8-Br-cAMP or forskolin, but was eliminated by the protein kinase A (PKA) antagonists H-89/KT5720/Rp-cAMP. Moreover, SRIF increased intracellular Ca(2+) levels and did not suppress the AMPA currents when GCs were infused with an intracellular Ca(2+)-free solution or in the presence of ryanodine receptor modulators caffeine/ryanodine. Furthermore, the SRIF effect was eliminated when the activity of calmodulin (CaM), calcineurin and protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) was blocked with W-7, FK-506 and okadaic acid, respectively. SRIF persisted to suppress the AMPA currents when cGMP-protein kinase G (PKG) and phosphatidylinositol (PI)-/phosphatidylcholine (PC)-phospholipase C (PLC) signalling pathways were blocked. In rat flat-mount retinas, SRIF suppressed AMPAR-mediated light-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (L-EPSCs) in GCs. We conclude that a distinct Gi/o/cAMP-PKA/ryanodine/Ca(2+)/CaM/calcineurin/PP1 signalling pathway comes into play due to the activation of sst5 to mediate the SRIF effect on GCs. PMID:26969240

  13. in Silico investigation of the structural requirements for the AMPA receptor antagonism by quinoxaline derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Faizul; Abugrain, Ismaiel Mohamed; Sanalla, Mohamed Hussin; Elnaas, Radwan Fatahalla; Rajab, Ibrahim Abdassalam Ibn

    2013-01-01

    Glutamate receptors have been implicated in various neurological disorders and their antagonism offers a suitable approach for the treatment of such disorders. The field of drug design and discovery aims to find best medicines to prevent, treat and cure diseases quickly and efficiently. In this regard, computational tools have helped medicinal chemists modify and optimize molecules to potent drug candidates with better pharmacokinetic profiles, and guiding biologists and pharmacologists to explore new disease genes as well as novel drug targets. In the present study, to understand the structural requirements for AMPA receptor antagonism, molecular docking study was performed on 41 structurally diverse antagonists based on quinoxaline nucleus. Lamarckian genetic algorithm methodology was employed for docking simulations using AutoDock 4.2 program. The results obtained signify that the molecular docking approach is reliable and produces a good correlation coefficient (r2 = 0.6) between experimental and docking predicted AMPA receptor antagonistic activity. The aromatic moiety of quinoxaline core has been proved to be vital for hydrophobic contacts exhibiting - interactions in docked conformations. However, polar moieties such as carboxylic group and 1,2,4-triazole moieties were noted to be sites for hydrophilic interactions in terms of hydrogen bonding with the receptor. These analyses can be exploited to design and develop novel AMPA receptor antagonists for the treatment of different neurological disorders. PMID:24250113

  14. Synergy of AMPA and NMDA Receptor Currents in Dopaminergic Neurons: A Modeling Study.

    PubMed

    Zakharov, Denis; Lapish, Christopher; Gutkin, Boris; Kuznetsov, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    Dopaminergic (DA) neurons display two modes of firing: low-frequency tonic and high-frequency bursts. The high frequency firing within the bursts is attributed to NMDA, but not AMPA receptor activation. In our models of the DA neuron, both biophysical and abstract, the NMDA receptor current can significantly increase their firing frequency, whereas the AMPA receptor current is not able to evoke high-frequency activity and usually suppresses firing. However, both currents are produced by glutamate receptors and, consequently, are often co-activated. Here we consider combined influence of AMPA and NMDA synaptic input in the models of the DA neuron. Different types of neuronal activity (resting state, low frequency, or high frequency firing) are observed depending on the conductance of the AMPAR and NMDAR currents. In two models, biophysical and reduced, we show that the firing frequency increases more effectively if both receptors are co-activated for certain parameter values. In particular, in the more quantitative biophysical model, the maximal frequency is 40% greater than that with NMDAR alone. The dynamical mechanism of such frequency growth is explained in the framework of phase space evolution using the reduced model. In short, both the AMPAR and NMDAR currents flatten the voltage nullcline, providing the frequency increase, whereas only NMDA prevents complete unfolding of the nullcline, providing robust firing. Thus, we confirm a major role of the NMDAR in generating high-frequency firing and conclude that AMPAR activation further significantly increases the frequency. PMID:27252643

  15. Synergy of AMPA and NMDA Receptor Currents in Dopaminergic Neurons: A Modeling Study

    PubMed Central

    Zakharov, Denis; Lapish, Christopher; Gutkin, Boris; Kuznetsov, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    Dopaminergic (DA) neurons display two modes of firing: low-frequency tonic and high-frequency bursts. The high frequency firing within the bursts is attributed to NMDA, but not AMPA receptor activation. In our models of the DA neuron, both biophysical and abstract, the NMDA receptor current can significantly increase their firing frequency, whereas the AMPA receptor current is not able to evoke high-frequency activity and usually suppresses firing. However, both currents are produced by glutamate receptors and, consequently, are often co-activated. Here we consider combined influence of AMPA and NMDA synaptic input in the models of the DA neuron. Different types of neuronal activity (resting state, low frequency, or high frequency firing) are observed depending on the conductance of the AMPAR and NMDAR currents. In two models, biophysical and reduced, we show that the firing frequency increases more effectively if both receptors are co-activated for certain parameter values. In particular, in the more quantitative biophysical model, the maximal frequency is 40% greater than that with NMDAR alone. The dynamical mechanism of such frequency growth is explained in the framework of phase space evolution using the reduced model. In short, both the AMPAR and NMDAR currents flatten the voltage nullcline, providing the frequency increase, whereas only NMDA prevents complete unfolding of the nullcline, providing robust firing. Thus, we confirm a major role of the NMDAR in generating high-frequency firing and conclude that AMPAR activation further significantly increases the frequency. PMID:27252643

  16. S-palmitoylation regulates AMPA receptors trafficking and function: a novel insight into synaptic regulation and therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jun; Wu, Pengfei; Wang, Fang; Chen, Jianguo

    2014-01-01

    Glutamate acting on AMPA-type ionotropic glutamate receptor (AMPAR) mediates the majority of fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the mammalian central nervous system. Dynamic regulation of AMPAR by post-translational modifications is one of the key elements that allow the nervous system to adapt to environment stimulations. S-palmitoylation, an important lipid modification by post-translational addition of a long-chain fatty acid to a cysteine residue, regulates AMPA receptor trafficking, which dynamically affects multiple fundamental brain functions, such as learning and memory. In vivo, S-palmitoylation is controlled by palmitoyl acyl transferases and palmitoyl thioesterases. In this review, we highlight advances in the mechanisms for dynamic AMPA receptors palmitoylation, and discuss how palmitoylation affects AMPA receptors function at synapses in recent years. Pharmacological regulation of S-palmitoylation may serve as a novel therapeutic strategy for neurobiological diseases. PMID:26579419

  17. Discovery and Characterization of AMPA Receptor Modulators Selective for TARP-γ8.

    PubMed

    Maher, Michael P; Wu, Nyantsz; Ravula, Suchitra; Ameriks, Michael K; Savall, Brad M; Liu, Changlu; Lord, Brian; Wyatt, Ryan M; Matta, Jose A; Dugovic, Christine; Yun, Sujin; Ver Donck, Luc; Steckler, Thomas; Wickenden, Alan D; Carruthers, Nicholas I; Lovenberg, Timothy W

    2016-05-01

    Members of the α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid (AMPA) subtype of ionotropic glutamate receptors mediate the majority of fast synaptic transmission within the mammalian brain and spinal cord, representing attractive targets for therapeutic intervention. Here, we describe novel AMPA receptor modulators that require the presence of the accessory protein CACNG8, also known as transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory protein γ8 (TARP-γ8). Using calcium flux, radioligand binding, and electrophysiological assays of wild-type and mutant forms of TARP-γ8, we demonstrate that these compounds possess a novel mechanism of action consistent with a partial disruption of the interaction between the TARP and the pore-forming subunit of the channel. One of the molecules, 5-[2-chloro-6-(trifluoromethoxy)phenyl]-1,3-dihydrobenzimidazol-2-one (JNJ-55511118), had excellent pharmacokinetic properties and achieved high receptor occupancy following oral administration. This molecule showed strong, dose-dependent inhibition of neurotransmission within the hippocampus, and a strong anticonvulsant effect. At high levels of receptor occupancy in rodent in vivo models, JNJ-55511118 showed a strong reduction in certain bands on electroencephalogram, transient hyperlocomotion, no motor impairment on rotarod, and a mild impairment in learning and memory. JNJ-55511118 is a novel tool for reversible AMPA receptor inhibition, particularly within the hippocampus, with potential therapeutic utility as an anticonvulsant or neuroprotectant. The existence of a molecule with this mechanism of action demonstrates the possibility of pharmacological targeting of accessory proteins, increasing the potential number of druggable targets. PMID:26989142

  18. The essential role of AMPA receptor GluR2 subunit RNA editing in the normal and diseased brain.

    PubMed

    Wright, Amanda; Vissel, Bryce

    2012-01-01

    α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors are comprised of different combinations of GluA1-GluA4 (also known asGluR1-GluR4 and GluR-A to GluR-D) subunits. The GluA2 subunit is subject to RNA editing by the ADAR2 enzyme, which converts a codon for glutamine (Gln; Q), present in the GluA2 gene, to a codon for arginine (Arg; R) found in the mRNA. AMPA receptors are calcium (Ca(2+))-permeable if they contain the unedited GluA2(Q) subunit or if they lack the GluA2 subunit. While most AMPA receptors in the brain contain the edited GluA2(R) subunit and are therefore Ca(2+)-impermeable, recent evidence suggests that Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors are important in synaptic plasticity, learning, and disease. Strong evidence supports the notion that Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors are usually GluA2-lacking AMPA receptors, with little evidence to date for a significant role of unedited GluA2 in normal brain function. However, recent detailed studies suggest that Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors containing unedited GluA2 do in fact occur in neurons and can contribute to excitotoxic cell loss, even where it was previously thought that there was no unedited GluA2.This review provides an update on the role of GluA2 RNA editing in the healthy and diseased brain and summarizes recent insights into the mechanisms that control this process. We suggest that further studies of the role of unedited GluA2 in normal brain function and disease are warranted, and that GluA2 editing should be considered as a possible contributing factor when Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors are observed. PMID:22514516

  19. Abnormally increased surface expression of AMPA receptors in the cerebellum, cortex and striatum of Cln3(-/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Attila D; Hof, Caitlin; Pearce, David A

    2015-10-21

    Mutations in the CLN3 gene cause a fatal neurodegenerative disorder, juvenile CLN3 disease. Exploring the cause of the motor coordination deficit in the Cln3(-/-) mouse model of the disease we have previously found that attenuation of AMPA receptor activity in 1-month-old Cln3(-/-) mice significantly improves their motor coordination [20]. To elucidate the mechanism of the abnormally increased AMPA receptor function in Cln3(-/-) mice, we examined the surface expression of AMPA receptors using surface cross-linking in brain slices from 1-month-old wild type (WT) and Cln3(-/-) mice. In surface cross-linked brain samples, Western blotting for AMPA receptor subunits revealed significantly increased surface levels of GluA1 and GluA2 in the cerebellum, and of GluA2 in the cortex and striatum of Cln3(-/-) mice as compared to WT mice. Expression levels of the GluA4 subunit were similar in the cerebellum of WT and Cln3(-/-) mice. While intracellular GluA1 levels in the WT and Cln3(-/-) cerebellum or cortex were similar, the intracellular expression of GluA1 in the Cln3(-/-) striatum was decreased to 56% of the WT level. Our results show a prominent increase in AMPA receptor surface expression in the brain of Cln3(-/-) mice and suggest that CLN3 is involved in the regulation of AMPA receptor surface expression. PMID:26375929

  20. Developmental Regulation of the Toxin Sensitivity of Ca2+ -Permeable AMPA Receptors in Cortical Glia

    PubMed Central

    Meucci, Olimpia; Fatatis, Alessandro; Holzwarth, James A.; Miller, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    We examined the properties of glutamate agonist-induced Ca2+ fluxes in cultured CG-4 and O-2A progenitor cells from rat cortex. Kainate-induced Ca2+ fluxes in these cells were found to be attributable to the activation of AMPA receptors. Thus, these fluxes were enhanced by cyclothiazide but not by concanavalin A and were blocked completely by GYKI-53655. We simultaneously examined kainate-induced Ca2+ entry and Na+ currents in these cells under voltage-clamp conditions. Both of these parameters were blocked by Joro spider toxin (JSTx) in undifferentiated cells. However, neither JSTx nor Argiotoxin 636 effectively blocked either parameter in cells differentiated into type II astrocytes. This change in toxin sensitivity occurred slowly over a period of several days. Similar results were obtained in Ca2+ -imaging studies. When cells were differentiated into oligodendrocytes, they showed an intermediate sensitivity to block by JSTx as assessed using imaging and voltage-clamp studies. Analysis of the expression of AMPA-receptor subunits showed an increase in the concentration of glutamate receptor-2 (GluR2) in CG-4 cells as they differentiated into type II astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. These results demonstrate that the AMPA receptors in cells of the O-2A lineage flux appreciable amounts of Ca2+ but may contain variable amounts of edited GluR2 subunits. PMID:8551336

  1. Architecture of fully occupied GluA2 AMPA receptor-TARP complex elucidated by cryo-EM.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Chen, Shanshuang; Yoshioka, Craig; Baconguis, Isabelle; Gouaux, Eric

    2016-08-01

    Fast excitatory neurotransmission in the mammalian central nervous system is largely carried out by AMPA-sensitive ionotropic glutamate receptors. Localized within the postsynaptic density of glutamatergic spines, AMPA receptors are composed of heterotetrameric receptor assemblies associated with auxiliary subunits, the most common of which are transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs). The association of TARPs with AMPA receptors modulates receptor trafficking and the kinetics of receptor gating and pharmacology. Here we report the cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of the homomeric rat GluA2 AMPA receptor saturated with TARP γ2 subunits, which shows how the TARPs are arranged with four-fold symmetry around the ion channel domain and make extensive interactions with the M1, M2 and M4 transmembrane helices. Poised like partially opened ‘hands’ underneath the two-fold symmetric ligand-binding domain (LBD) 'clamshells', one pair of TARPs is juxtaposed near the LBD dimer interface, whereas the other pair is near the LBD dimer-dimer interface. The extracellular ‘domains’ of TARP are positioned to not only modulate LBD clamshell closure, but also affect conformational rearrangements of the LBD layer associated with receptor activation and desensitization, while the TARP transmembrane domains buttress the ion channel pore. PMID:27368053

  2. Molecular determinants of NMDA receptor internalization.

    PubMed

    Roche, K W; Standley, S; McCallum, J; Dune Ly, C; Ehlers, M D; Wenthold, R J

    2001-08-01

    Although synaptic AMPA receptors have been shown to rapidly internalize, synaptic NMDA receptors are reported to be static. It is not certain whether NMDA receptor stability at synaptic sites is an inherent property of the receptor, or is due to stabilization by scaffolding proteins. In this study, we demonstrate that NMDA receptors are internalized in both heterologous cells and neurons, and we define an internalization motif, YEKL, on the distal C-terminus of NR2B. In addition, we show that the synaptic protein PSD-95 inhibits NR2B-mediated internalization, and that deletion of the PDZ-binding domain of NR2B increases internalization in neurons. This suggests an involvement for PSD-95 in NMDA receptor regulation and an explanation for NMDA receptor stability at synaptic sites. PMID:11477425

  3. X-ray structures of AMPA receptor-cone snail toxin complexes illuminate activation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Dürr, Katharina L; Gouaux, Eric

    2014-08-29

    AMPA-sensitive glutamate receptors are crucial to the structural and dynamic properties of the brain, to the development and function of the central nervous system, and to the treatment of neurological conditions from depression to cognitive impairment. However, the molecular principles underlying AMPA receptor activation have remained elusive. We determined multiple x-ray crystal structures of the GluA2 AMPA receptor in complex with a Conus striatus cone snail toxin, a positive allosteric modulator, and orthosteric agonists, at 3.8 to 4.1 angstrom resolution. We show how the toxin acts like a straightjacket on the ligand-binding domain (LBD) "gating ring," restraining the domains via both intra- and interdimer cross-links such that agonist-induced closure of the LBD "clamshells" is transduced into an irislike expansion of the gating ring. By structural analysis of activation-enhancing mutants, we show how the expansion of the LBD gating ring results in pulling forces on the M3 helices that, in turn, are coupled to ion channel gating. PMID:25103405

  4. Synapse-associated protein-97 isoform-specific regulation of surface AMPA receptors and synaptic function in cultured neurons.

    PubMed

    Rumbaugh, Gavin; Sia, Gek-Ming; Garner, Craig C; Huganir, Richard L

    2003-06-01

    Members of the synapse-associated protein-97 (SAP97) family of scaffold proteins have been implicated as central organizers of synaptic junctions to build macromolecular signaling complexes around specific postsynaptic neurotransmitter receptors. In this regard, SAP97 has been suggested to regulate the synaptic localization of glutamate receptor type 1 subunits of the AMPA-type glutamate receptors. To test this hypothesis directly, we assessed the effects of SAP97 overexpression on surface expression of synaptic AMPA receptors. We find that recombinant SAP97 not only becomes concentrated at synaptic junctions but also leads to an increase in synaptic AMPA receptors, spine enlargement, and an increase in miniature EPSC (mEPSC) frequency, indicating that SAP97 has both postsynaptic and presynaptic effects on synaptic transmission. Synaptic targeting of SAP97, increased surface AMPA receptors, and increased mEPSC frequency are dependent on the presence of specific alternatively spliced sequences in SAP97 that encode a protein 4.1 binding site. These results suggest that SAP97 can affect the synaptic recruitment of AMPA receptors and spine morphology and that these effects may be regulated by alternative splicing. PMID:12805297

  5. Group II Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Agonist LY379268 Regulates AMPA Receptor Trafficking in Prefrontal Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min-Juan; Li, Yan-Chun; Snyder, Melissa A.; Wang, Huaixing; Li, Feng; Gao, Wen-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Group II metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) agonists have emerged as potential treatment drugs for schizophrenia and other neurological disorders, whereas the mechanisms involved remain elusive. Here we examined the effects of LY379268 (LY37) on the expression and trafficking of the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate (AMPA) receptor subunits GluA1 and GluA2 in prefrontal neurons. We show that LY37 significantly increased the surface and total expression of both GluA1 and GluA2 subunits in cultured prefrontal neurons and in vivo. This effect was mimicked by the selective mGluR2 agonist LY395756 and was blocked by mGluR2/3 antagonist LY341495. Moreover, we found that both GluA1 and GluA2 subunits were colocalized with PSD95 but not synapsin I, suggesting a postsynaptic localization. Consistently, treatment with LY37 significantly increased the amplitude, but not frequency, of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents. Further, actinomycin-D blocked LY37's effects, suggesting a transcriptional regulation. In addition, application of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3β) inhibitor completely blocked LY37's effect on GluA2 surface expression, whereas GSK-3β inhibitor itself induced decreases in the surface and total protein levels of GluA1, but not GluA2 subunits. This suggests that GSK-3β differentially mediates GluA1 and GluA2 trafficking. Further, LY37 significantly increased the phosphorylation, but not total protein, of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2). Neither ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059 alone nor PD98059 combined with LY37 treatment induced changes in GluA1 or GluA2 surface expression or total protein levels. Our data thus suggest that mGluR2/3 agonist regulates postsynaptic AMPA receptors by affecting the synaptic trafficking of both GluA1 and GluA2 subunits and that the regulation is likely through ERK1/2 signaling in GluA1 and/or both ERK1/2 and GSK-3β signaling pathways in the GluA2 subunit. PMID:23593498

  6. Agmatine produces antidepressant-like effects by activating AMPA receptors and mTOR signaling.

    PubMed

    Neis, Vivian Binder; Moretti, Morgana; Bettio, Luis Eduardo B; Ribeiro, Camille M; Rosa, Priscila Batista; Gonçalves, Filipe Marques; Lopes, Mark William; Leal, Rodrigo Bainy; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S

    2016-06-01

    The activation of AMPA receptors and mTOR signaling has been reported as mechanisms underlying the antidepressant effects of fast-acting agents, specially the NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine. In the present study, oral administration of agmatine (0.1mg/kg), a neuromodulator that has been reported to modulate NMDA receptors, caused a significant reduction in the immobility time of mice submitted to the tail suspension test (TST), an effect prevented by the administration of DNQX (AMPA receptor antagonist, 2.5μg/site, i.c.v.), BDNF antibody (1μg/site, i.c.v.), K-252a (TrkB receptor antagonist, 1μg/site, i.c.v.), LY294002 (PI3K inhibitor, 10nmol/site, i.c.v.) or rapamycin (selective mTOR inhibitor, 0.2nmol/site, i.c.v.). Moreover, the administration of lithium chloride (non-selective GSK-3β inhibitor, 10mg/kg, p.o.) or AR-A014418 (selective GSK-3β inhibitor, 0.01μg/site, i.c.v.) in combination with a sub-effective dose of agmatine (0.0001mg/kg, p.o.) reduced the immobility time in the TST when compared with either drug alone. Furthermore, increased immunocontents of BDNF, PSD-95 and GluA1 were found in the prefrontal cortex of mice just 1h after agmatine administration. These results indicate that the antidepressant-like effect of agmatine in the TST may be dependent on the activation of AMPA and TrkB receptors, PI3K and mTOR signaling as well as inhibition of GSK-3β, and increase in synaptic proteins. The results contribute to elucidate the complex signaling pathways involved in the antidepressant effect of agmatine and reinforce the pivotal role of these molecular targets for antidepressant responses. PMID:27061850

  7. FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS OF A NOVEL POSITIVE ALLOSTERIC MODULATOR OF AMPA RECEPTORS DERIVED FROM A STRUCTURE-BASED DRUG DESIGN STRATEGY

    PubMed Central

    Harms, Jonathan E.; Benveniste, Morris; Maclean, John K. F.; Partin, Kathryn M.; Jamieson, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Positive allosteric modulators of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole-propionic acid (AMPA) receptors facilitate synaptic plasticity and can improve various forms of learning and memory. These modulators show promise as therapeutic agents for the treatment of neurological disorders such as schizophrenia, ADHD, and mental depression. Three classes of positive modulator, the benzamides, the thiadiazides, and the biarylsulfonamides differentially occupy a solvent accessible binding pocket at the interface between the two subunits that form the AMPA receptor ligand-binding pocket. Here, we describe the electrophysiological properties of a new chemotype derived from a structure-based drug design strategy (SBDD), which makes similar receptor interactions compared to previously reported classes of modulator. This pyrazole amide derivative, JAMI1001A, with a promising developability profile, efficaciously modulates AMPA receptor deactivation and desensitization of both flip and flop receptor isoforms. PMID:22735771

  8. Cisplatin induces neuronal activation and increases central AMPA and NMDA receptor subunit gene expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Holland, Ruby A; Leonard, John J; Kensey, Nicholas A; Hannikainen, Paavali A; De Jonghe, Bart C

    2014-09-01

    Although rats and mice do not vomit, these species are widely studied as models of energy balance and sickness behavior. Previous work has shown that rats exhibit similar neuroanatomical activation of brain and visceral afferent pathways following cisplatin chemotherapy compared to vomiting species. However, the neural response to cisplatin in mice is understudied. Here, food intake, body weight, and central c-Fos immunofluorescence were analyzed in the hindbrains of male C57BL/6 mice following IP saline or cisplatin (5mg/kg, and 20mg/kg doses). As glutamate receptor signaling is classically linked to inhibitory feeding pathways in the rodent, gene expression of selected α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) and N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor subunits were assessed in the dorsal vagal complex (DVC), parabrachial nucleus (PBN), amygdala, and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST). Our results show dose-dependent reductions in food intake and body weight following cisplatin treatment, as well as increases in cisplatin-induced c-Fos in the PBN and throughout the DVC. Quantitative PCR analysis shows cisplatin-induced increases in NMDA receptor subunit expression, particularly NR2B, in the DVC, PBN, BNST, and amygdala. In addition, upregulation of AMPA receptor subunits (GluA1 and/or GluA2) were observed in all regions examined except the amygdala. Taken together, these results suggest similar neural pathways mediating cisplatin effects in mice compared to other well-studied species, which are likely mediated by central upregulation of AMPA and NMDA receptors. PMID:24582677

  9. Specificity protein 4 (Sp4) regulates the transcription of AMPA receptor subunit GluA2 (Gria2).

    PubMed

    Priya, Anusha; Johar, Kaid; Nair, Bindu; Wong-Riley, Margaret T T

    2014-06-01

    The alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors are important glutamatergic receptors mediating fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the brain. The regulation of the four subunits of AMPA receptors, GluA1-4, is poorly understood. Excitatory synaptic transmission is highly energy-demanding, and this energy is derived mainly from the oxidative pathway. Recently, we found that specificity factor regulates all subunits of cytochrome c oxidase (COX), a critical energy-generating enzyme. COX is also regulated by nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1), which transcriptionally controls the Gria2 (GluA2) gene of AMPA receptors. The goal of the present study was to test our hypothesis that Sp-factors (Sp1, Sp3, and/or Sp4) also regulate AMPA subunit genes. If so, we wish to determine if Sp-factors and NRF-1 function via a complementary, concurrent and parallel, or a combination of complementary and concurrent/parallel mechanism. By means of multiple approaches, including electrophoretic mobility shift and supershift assays, chromatin immunoprecipitation, promoter mutations, real-time quantitative PCR, and western blot analysis, we found that Sp4, but not Sp1 or Sp3, regulates the Gria2, but not Gria1, 3, or 4, subunit gene of the AMPA receptor in a concurrent and parallel manner with NRF-1. Thus, Sp4 and NRF-1 both mediate the tight coupling between neuronal activity and energy metabolism at the transcriptional level. PMID:24576410

  10. Late-onset motoneuron disease caused by a functionally modified AMPA receptor subunit.

    PubMed

    Kuner, Rohini; Groom, Anthony J; Bresink, Iris; Kornau, Hans-Christian; Stefovska, Vanya; Müller, Gerald; Hartmann, Bettina; Tschauner, Karsten; Waibel, Stefan; Ludolph, Albert C; Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy; Seeburg, Peter H; Turski, Lechoslaw

    2005-04-19

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating disorder of the central nervous system in middle and old age that leads to progressive loss of spinal motoneurons. Transgenic mice overexpressing mutated human Cu(2+)/Zn(2+) superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) reproduce clinical features of the familial form of ALS. However, changes in SOD1 activity do not correlate with severity of motor decline in sporadic cases, indicating that targets unrelated to superoxide metabolism contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease. We show here that transgenic expression in mice of GluR-B(N)-containing L-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-proprionate (AMPA) receptors with increased Ca(2+) permeability leads to late-onset degeneration of neurons in the spinal cord and decline of motor functions. Neuronal death progresses over the entire lifespan but manifests clinically in late adulthood, resembling the course of a slow neurodegenerative disorder. Additional transgenic expression of mutated human SOD1 accelerates disease progression, aggravates the severity of motor decline, and decreases survival. These observations link persistently elevated Ca(2+) influx through AMPA channels with progressive motor decline and late-onset degeneration of spinal motoneurons, indicating that functionally altered AMPA channels may be causally related to pathogenesis of sporadic ALS in humans. PMID:15827116

  11. Late-onset motoneuron disease caused by a functionally modified AMPA receptor subunit

    PubMed Central

    Kuner, Rohini; Groom, Anthony J.; Bresink, Iris; Kornau, Hans-Christian; Stefovska, Vanya; Müller, Gerald; Hartmann, Bettina; Tschauner, Karsten; Waibel, Stefan; Ludolph, Albert C.; Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy; Seeburg, Peter H.; Turski, Lechoslaw

    2005-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating disorder of the central nervous system in middle and old age that leads to progressive loss of spinal motoneurons. Transgenic mice overexpressing mutated human Cu2+/Zn2+ superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) reproduce clinical features of the familial form of ALS. However, changes in SOD1 activity do not correlate with severity of motor decline in sporadic cases, indicating that targets unrelated to superoxide metabolism contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease. We show here that transgenic expression in mice of GluR-B(N)-containing l-α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-proprionate (AMPA) receptors with increased Ca2+ permeability leads to late-onset degeneration of neurons in the spinal cord and decline of motor functions. Neuronal death progresses over the entire lifespan but manifests clinically in late adulthood, resembling the course of a slow neurodegenerative disorder. Additional transgenic expression of mutated human SOD1 accelerates disease progression, aggravates the severity of motor decline, and decreases survival. These observations link persistently elevated Ca2+ influx through AMPA channels with progressive motor decline and late-onset degeneration of spinal motoneurons, indicating that functionally altered AMPA channels may be causally related to pathogenesis of sporadic ALS in humans. PMID:15827116

  12. Mechanisms of disease: motoneuron disease aggravated by transgenic expression of a functionally modified AMPA receptor subunit.

    PubMed

    Kuner, Rohini; Groom, Anthony J; Müller, Gerald; Kornau, Hans-Christian; Stefovska, Vanya; Bresink, Iris; Hartmann, Bettina; Tschauner, Karsten; Waibel, Stefan; Ludolph, Albert C; Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy; Seeburg, Peter H; Turski, Lechoslaw

    2005-08-01

    To reveal whether increased Ca2+ permeability of glutamate AMPA channels triggered by the transgene for GluR-B(N) induces decline in motor functions and neurodegeneration in the spinal cord, we evaluated growth, motor coordination, and spinal reflexes in transgenic GluR-B(N) and wild-type (wt) mice. To reveal whether the transgenic GluR-B(N) expression aggravates the course of motoneuron disease in SOD1 mice, we mated heterozygous GluR-B(N) and SOD1 [C57BL6Ico-TgN(hSOD1-G93A)1Gur] mice to generate double-transgenic progeny. The phenotypic sequelae in mice carrying mutations were evaluated by monitoring growth, motor coordination, and survival. Neuronal degeneration was assessed by morphological and stereological analysis of spinal cord and brain. We found that transgenic expression in mice of GluR-B(N)-containing glutamate AMPA receptors with increased Ca2+ permeability leads to a late-onset degeneration of neurons in the spinal cord and decline of motor functions. Neuronal death progressed over the entire life span, but manifested clinically in late adulthood, resembling the course of a slow neurodegenerative disorder. Additional transgenic expression of mutated human SOD1 accelerated disease progression, aggravated severity of motor decline, and decreased survival. These observations reveal that moderate, but persistently elevated Ca2+ influx via glutamate AMPA channels causes degeneration of spinal motoneurons and motor decline over the span of life. These features resemble the course of sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in humans and suggest that modified function of glutamate AMPA channels may be causally linked to pathogenesis of ALS. PMID:16179532

  13. The AMPA receptor subunit GluR1 regulates dendritic architecture of motor neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inglis, Fiona M.; Crockett, Richard; Korada, Sailaja; Abraham, Wickliffe C.; Hollmann, Michael; Kalb, Robert G.

    2002-01-01

    The morphology of the mature motor neuron dendritic arbor is determined by activity-dependent processes occurring during a critical period in early postnatal life. The abundance of the AMPA receptor subunit GluR1 in motor neurons is very high during this period and subsequently falls to a negligible level. To test the role of GluR1 in dendrite morphogenesis, we reintroduced GluR1 into rat motor neurons at the end of the critical period and quantitatively studied the effects on dendrite architecture. Two versions of GluR1 were studied that differed by the amino acid in the "Q/R" editing site. The amino acid occupying this site determines single-channel conductance, ionic permeability, and other essential electrophysiologic properties of the resulting receptor channels. We found large-scale remodeling of dendritic architectures in a manner depending on the amino acid occupying the Q/R editing site. Alterations in the distribution of dendritic arbor were not prevented by blocking NMDA receptors. These observations suggest that the expression of GluR1 in motor neurons modulates a component of the molecular substrate of activity-dependent dendrite morphogenesis. The control of these events relies on subunit-specific properties of AMPA receptors.

  14. A eukaryotic specific transmembrane segment is required for tetramerization in AMPA receptors.

    PubMed

    Salussolia, Catherine L; Gan, Quan; Kazi, Rashek; Singh, Puja; Allopenna, Janet; Furukawa, Hiro; Wollmuth, Lonnie P

    2013-06-01

    Most fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the nervous system is mediated by glutamate acting through ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs). iGluRs (AMPA, kainate, and NMDA receptor subtypes) are tetrameric assemblies, formed as a dimer of dimers. Still, the mechanism underlying tetramerization--the necessary step for the formation of functional receptors that can be inserted into the plasma membrane--is unknown. All eukaryotic compared to prokaryotic iGluR subunits have an additional transmembrane segment, the M4 segment, which positions the physiologically critical C-terminal domain on the cytoplasmic side of the membrane. AMPA receptor (AMPAR) subunits lacking M4 do not express on the plasma membrane. Here, we show that these constructs are retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, the major cellular compartment mediating protein oligomerization. Using approaches to assay the native oligomeric state of AMPAR subunits, we find that subunits lacking M4 or containing single amino acid substitutions along an "interacting" face of the M4 helix that block surface expression no longer tetramerize in either homomeric or heteromeric assemblies. In contrast, subunit dimerization appears to be largely intact. These experiments define the M4 segment as a unique functional unit in AMPARs that is required for the critical dimer-to-tetramer transition. PMID:23739980

  15. Basal Levels of AMPA Receptor GluA1 Subunit Phosphorylation at Threonine 840 and Serine 845 in Hippocampal Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babiec, Walter E.; Guglietta, Ryan; O'Dell, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Dephosphorylation of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) GluA1 subunits at two sites, serine 845 (S845) and threonine 840 (T840), is thought to be involved in NMDA receptor-dependent forms of long-term depression (LTD). Importantly, the notion that dephosphorylation of these sites contributes to LTD assumes that a significant fraction of GluA1 subunits are…

  16. Structural rearrangement of the intracellular domains during AMPA receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Zachariassen, Linda G; Katchan, Ljudmila; Jensen, Anna G; Pickering, Darryl S; Plested, Andrew J R; Kristensen, Anders S

    2016-07-01

    α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) are ligand-gated ion channels that mediate the majority of fast excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system. Despite recent advances in structural studies of AMPARs, information about the specific conformational changes that underlie receptor function is lacking. Here, we used single and dual insertion of GFP variants at various positions in AMPAR subunits to enable measurements of conformational changes using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in live cells. We produced dual CFP/YFP-tagged GluA2 subunit constructs that had normal activity and displayed intrareceptor FRET. We used fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) in live HEK293 cells to determine distinct steady-state FRET efficiencies in the presence of different ligands, suggesting a dynamic picture of the resting state. Patch-clamp fluorometry of the double- and single-insert constructs showed that both the intracellular C-terminal domain (CTD) and the loop region between the M1 and M2 helices move during activation and the CTD is detached from the membrane. Our time-resolved measurements revealed unexpectedly complex fluorescence changes within these intracellular domains, providing clues as to how posttranslational modifications and receptor function interact. PMID:27313205

  17. Restoring Light Sensitivity in Blind Retinae Using a Photochromic AMPA Receptor Agonist

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases can have many possible causes and are currently difficult to treat. As an alternative to therapies that require genetic manipulation or the implantation of electronic devices, photopharmacology has emerged as a viable approach to restore visual responses. Here, we present a new photopharmacological strategy that relies on a photoswitchable excitatory amino acid, ATA. This freely diffusible molecule selectively activates AMPA receptors in a light-dependent fashion. It primarily acts on amacrine and retinal ganglion cells, although a minor effect on bipolar cells has been observed. As such, it complements previous pharmacological approaches based on photochromic channel blockers and increases the potential of photopharmacology in vision restoration. PMID:26495755

  18. Odor Preference Learning and Memory Modify GluA1 Phosphorylation and GluA1 Distribution in the Neonate Rat Olfactory Bulb: Testing the AMPA Receptor Hypothesis in an Appetitive Learning Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cui, Wen; Darby-King, Andrea; Grimes, Matthew T.; Howland, John G.; Wang, Yu Tian; McLean, John H.; Harley, Carolyn W.

    2011-01-01

    An increase in synaptic AMPA receptors is hypothesized to mediate learning and memory. AMPA receptor increases have been reported in aversive learning models, although it is not clear if they are seen with memory maintenance. Here we examine AMPA receptor changes in a cAMP/PKA/CREB-dependent appetitive learning model: odor preference learning in…

  19. Facilitation of AMPA Receptor Synaptic Delivery as a Molecular Mechanism for Cognitive Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Puelles, Cristina; Pereda-Peréz, Inmaculada; Franco, Ana; Sandi, Carmen; Suárez, Luz M.; Solís, José M.; Alonso-Nanclares, Lidia; Martín, Eduardo D.; Merino-Serrais, Paula; Borcel, Erika; Li, Shizhong; Chen, Yongshuo; Gonzalez-Soriano, Juncal; Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth; DeFelipe, Javier; Esteban, José A.

    2012-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules and downstream growth factor-dependent signaling are critical for brain development and synaptic plasticity, and they have been linked to cognitive function in adult animals. We have previously developed a mimetic peptide (FGL) from the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) that enhances spatial learning and memory in rats. We have now investigated the cellular and molecular basis of this cognitive enhancement, using biochemical, morphological, electrophysiological, and behavioral analyses. We have found that FGL triggers a long-lasting enhancement of synaptic transmission in hippocampal CA1 neurons. This effect is mediated by a facilitated synaptic delivery of AMPA receptors, which is accompanied by enhanced NMDA receptor-dependent long-term potentiation (LTP). Both LTP and cognitive enhancement are mediated by an initial PKC activation, which is followed by persistent CaMKII activation. These results provide a mechanistic link between facilitation of AMPA receptor synaptic delivery and improved hippocampal-dependent learning, induced by a pharmacological cognitive enhancer. PMID:22363206

  20. AMPA receptors undergo channel arrest in the anoxic turtle cortex.

    PubMed

    Pamenter, Matthew Edward; Shin, Damian Seung-Ho; Buck, Leslie Thomas

    2008-02-01

    Without oxygen, all mammals suffer neuronal injury and excitotoxic cell death mediated by overactivation of the glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). The western painted turtle can survive anoxia for months, and downregulation of NMDAR activity is thought to be neuroprotective during anoxia. NMDAR activity is related to the activity of another glutamate receptor, the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid receptor (AMPAR). AMPAR blockade is neuroprotective against anoxic insult in mammals, but the role of AMPARs in the turtle's anoxia tolerance has not been investigated. To determine whether AMPAR activity changes during hypoxia or anoxia in the turtle cortex, whole cell AMPAR currents, AMPAR-mediated excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs), and excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) were measured. The effect of AMPAR blockade on normoxic and anoxic NMDAR currents was also examined. During 60 min of normoxia, evoked peak AMPAR currents and the frequencies and amplitudes of EPSPs and EPSCs did not change. During anoxic perfusion, evoked AMPAR peak currents decreased 59.2 +/- 5.5 and 60.2 +/- 3.5% at 20 and 40 min, respectively. EPSP frequency (EPSP(f)) and amplitude decreased 28.7 +/- 6.4% and 13.2 +/- 1.7%, respectively, and EPSC(f) and amplitude decreased 50.7 +/- 5.1% and 51.3 +/- 4.7%, respectively. In contrast, hypoxic (Po(2) = 5%) AMPAR peak currents were potentiated 56.6 +/- 20.5 and 54.6 +/- 15.8% at 20 and 40 min, respectively. All changes were reversed by reoxygenation. AMPAR currents and EPSPs were abolished by 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX). In neurons pretreated with CNQX, anoxic NMDAR currents were reversibly depressed by 49.8 +/- 7.9%. These data suggest that AMPARs may undergo channel arrest in the anoxic turtle cortex. PMID:18056983

  1. Postsynaptic Plasticity Triggered by Ca²⁺-Permeable AMPA Receptor Activation in Retinal Amacrine Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mean-Hwan; von Gersdorff, Henrique

    2016-02-01

    Amacrine cells are thought to be a major locus for mechanisms of light adaptation and contrast enhancement in the retina. However, the potential for plasticity in their AMPA receptor currents remains largely unknown. Using paired patch-clamp recordings between bipolar cell terminals and amacrine cells, we have simultaneously measured presynaptic membrane capacitance changes and EPSCs. Repetitive bipolar cell depolarizations, designed to maintain the same amount of exocytosis, nevertheless significantly potentiated evoked EPSCs in a subpopulation of amacrine cells. Likewise, repetitive iontophoresis (or puffs) of glutamate (or AMPA) onto the dendrites of amacrine cells also significantly potentiated evoked currents and [Ca(2+)]i rises. However, strong postsynaptic Ca(2+) buffering with BAPTA abolished the potentiation and selective antagonists of Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors also blocked the potentiation of AMPA-mediated currents. Together these results suggest that Ca(2+) influx via Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors can elicit a rapid form of postsynaptic plasticity in a subgroup of amacrine cell dendrites. PMID:26804991

  2. The SOL-2/Neto auxiliary protein modulates the function of AMPA-subtype ionotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Mellem, Jerry E; Jensen, Michael; Brockie, Penelope J; Walker, Craig S; Hoerndli, Frédéric J; Hauth, Linda; Madsen, David M; Maricq, Andres V

    2012-09-01

    The neurotransmitter glutamate mediates excitatory synaptic transmission by gating ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs). AMPA receptors (AMPARs), a subtype of iGluR, are strongly implicated in synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory. We previously discovered two classes of AMPAR auxiliary proteins in C. elegans that modify receptor kinetics and thus change synaptic transmission. Here, we have identified another auxiliary protein, SOL-2, a CUB-domain protein that associates with both the related auxiliary subunit SOL-1 and with the GLR-1 AMPAR. In sol-2 mutants, behaviors dependent on glutamatergic transmission are disrupted, GLR-1-mediated currents are diminished, and GLR-1 desensitization and pharmacology are modified. Remarkably, a secreted variant of SOL-1 delivered in trans can rescue sol-1 mutants, and this rescue depends on in cis expression of SOL-2. Finally, we demonstrate that SOL-1 and SOL-2 have an ongoing role in the adult nervous system to control AMPAR-mediated currents. PMID:22958824

  3. Concomitant manipulation of murine NMDA- and AMPA-receptors to produce pro-cognitive drug effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Vignisse, Julie; Steinbusch, Harry W M; Grigoriev, Vladimir; Bolkunov, Alexei; Proshin, Alexey; Bettendorff, Lucien; Bachurin, Sergey; Strekalova, Tatyana

    2014-02-01

    Bifunctional drug therapy targeting distinct receptor signalling systems can generate increased efficacy at lower concentrations compared to monofunctional therapy. Non-competitive blockade of the NMDA receptors or the potentiation of AMPA receptors is well documented to result in memory enhancement. Here, we compared the efficacy of the low-affinity NMDA receptor blocker memantine or the positive modulator of AMPA receptor QXX (in C57BL/6J at 1 or 5mg/kg, ip) with new derivatives of isothiourea (0.5-1 mg/kg, ip) that have bifunctional efficacy. Low-affinity NMDA blockade by these derivatives was achieved by introducing greater flexibility into the molecule, and AMPA receptor stimulation was produced by a sulfamide-containing derivative of isothiourea. Contextual learning was examined in a step-down avoidance task and extinction of contextual memory was studied in a fear-conditioning paradigm. Memantine enhanced contextual learning while QXX facilitated memory extinction; both drugs were effective at 5 mg/kg. The new derivative IPAC-5 elevated memory scores in both tasks at the dose 0.5 mg/kg and exhibited the lowest IC₅₀ values of NMDA receptor blockade and highest potency of AMPA receptor stimulation. Thus, among the new drugs tested, IPAC-5 replicated the properties of memantine and QXX in one administration with increased potency. Our data suggest that a concomitant manipulation of NMDA- and AMPA-receptors results in pro-cognitive effects and supports the concept bifunctional drug therapy as a promising strategy to replace monofunctional therapies with greater efficacy and improved compliance. PMID:23993168

  4. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) modulate AMPA receptor phosphorylation and cell-surface localization in concert with pain-related behavior

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Daniel Z.; Chung, Jin M.; Chung, Kyungsoon; Kang, Myoung-Goo

    2012-01-01

    Sensitization of dorsal horn neurons (DHNs) in the spinal cord is dependent on pain-related synaptic plasticity and causes persistent pain. The DHN sensitization is mediated by a signal transduction pathway initiated by the activation of NMDA receptors (NMDA-Rs). Recent studies have shown that elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and phosphorylation-dependent trafficking of GluA2 subunit of AMPA receptors (AMPA-Rs) are a part of the signaling pathway for DHN sensitization. However, the relationship between ROS and AMPA-R phosphorylation and trafficking is not known. Thus, this study investigated the effects of ROS scavengers on the phosphorylation and cell-surface localization of GluA1 and GluA2. Intrathecal NMDA- and intradermal capsaicin-induced hyperalgesic mice were used for this study since both pain models share the NMDA-R activation-dependent DHN sensitization in the spinal cord. Our behavioral, biochemical, and immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated that: 1) NMDA-R activation in vivo increased the phosphorylation of AMPA-Rs at GluA1 (S818, S831, and S845) and GluA2 (S880) subunits, 2) NMDA-R activation in vivo increased cell-surface localization of GluA1 but decreased that of GluA2, and 3) reduction of ROS levels by ROS scavengers PBN or TEMPOL reversed these changes in AMPA-Rs, as well as pain-related behavior. Given that AMPA-R trafficking to the cell surface and synapse is regulated by NMDA-R activation-dependent phosphorylation of GluA1 and GluA2, our study suggests that the ROS-dependent changes in the phosphorylation and cell-surface localization of AMPA-Rs are necessary for DHN sensitization and thus pain-related behavior. We further suggest that ROS reduction will ameliorate these molecular changes and pain. PMID:22770842

  5. Auxiliary Subunit GSG1L Acts to Suppress Calcium-Permeable AMPA Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    McGee, Thomas P.; Bats, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    AMPA-type glutamate receptors are ligand-gated cation channels responsible for a majority of the fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the brain. Their behavior and calcium permeability depends critically on their subunit composition and the identity of associated auxiliary proteins. Calcium-permeable AMPA receptors (CP-AMPARs) contribute to various forms of synaptic plasticity, and their dysfunction underlies a number of serious neurological conditions. For CP-AMPARs, the prototypical transmembrane AMPAR regulatory protein stargazin, which acts as an auxiliary subunit, enhances receptor function by increasing single-channel conductance, slowing channel gating, increasing calcium permeability, and relieving the voltage-dependent block by endogenous intracellular polyamines. We find that, in contrast, GSG1L, a transmembrane auxiliary protein identified recently as being part of the AMPAR proteome, acts to reduce the weighted mean single-channel conductance and calcium permeability of recombinant CP-AMPARs, while increasing polyamine-dependent rectification. To examine the effects of GSG1L on native AMPARs, we manipulated its expression in cerebellar and hippocampal neurons. Transfection of GSG1L into mouse cultured cerebellar stellate cells that lack this protein increased the inward rectification of mEPSCs. Conversely, shRNA-mediated knockdown of endogenous GSG1L in rat cultured hippocampal pyramidal neurons led to an increase in mEPSC amplitude and in the underlying weighted mean single-channel conductance, revealing that GSG1L acts to suppress current flow through native CP-AMPARs. Thus, our data suggest that GSG1L extends the functional repertoire of AMPAR auxiliary subunits, which can act not only to enhance but also diminish current flow through their associated AMPARs. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Calcium-permeable AMPA receptors (CP-AMPARs) are an important group of receptors for the neurotransmitter glutamate. These receptors contribute to various forms of

  6. AMPA receptor trafficking and the mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity and cognitive aging.

    PubMed

    Henley, Jeremy M; Wilkinson, Kevin A

    2013-03-01

    Even in healthy individuals there is an inexorable agerelated decline in cognitive function. This is due, in large part, to reduced synaptic plasticity caused by changes in the molecular composition of the postsynaptic membrane. AMPA receptors (AMPARs) are glutamate-gated cation channels that mediate the overwhelming majority of fast excitatory transmission in the brain. Changes in AMPAR number and/or function are a core feature of synaptic plasticity and age-related cognitive decline, AMPARs are highly dynamic proteins that are subject to highly controlled trafficking, recycling, and/or degradation and replacement. This active regulation of AMPAR synthesis, targeting, synaptic dwell time, and degradation is fundamentally important for memory formation and storage. Further, aberrant AMPAR trafficking and consequent detrimental changes in synapses are strongly implicated in many brain diseases, which represent a vast social and economic burden. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the molecular and cellular AMPA receptor trafficking events that control synaptic responsiveness and plasticity, and highlight what is known currently known about how these processes change with age and disease. PMID:23576886

  7. AMPA receptor trafficking and the mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity and cognitive aging

    PubMed Central

    Henley, Jeremy M.; Wilkinson, Kevin A.

    2013-01-01

    Even in healthy individuals there is an inexorable agerelated decline in cognitive function. This is due, in large part, to reduced synaptic plasticity caused by changes in the molecular composition of the postsynaptic membrane. AMPA receptors (AMPARs) are glutamate-gated cation channels that mediate the overwhelming majority of fast excitatory transmission in the brain. Changes in AMPAR number and/or function are a core feature of synaptic plasticity and age-related cognitive decline, AMPARs are highly dynamic proteins that are subject to highly controlled trafficking, recycling, and/or degradation and replacement. This active regulation of AMPAR synthesis, targeting, synaptic dwell time, and degradation is fundamentally important for memory formation and storage. Further, aberrant AMPAR trafficking and consequent detrimental changes in synapses are strongly implicated in many brain diseases, which represent a vast social and economic burden. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the molecular and cellular AMPA receptor trafficking events that control synaptic responsiveness and plasticity, and highlight what is known currently known about how these processes change with age and disease. PMID:23576886

  8. Estrous Cycle-Dependent Phasic Changes in the Stoichiometry of Hippocampal Synaptic AMPA Receptors in Rats.

    PubMed

    Tada, Hirobumi; Koide, Mayu; Ara, Wakana; Shibata, Yusuke; Funabashi, Toshiya; Suyama, Kumiko; Goto, Takahisa; Takahashi, Takuya

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive function can be affected by the estrous cycle. However, the effect of the estrous cycle on synaptic functions is poorly understood. Here we show that in female rats, inhibitory-avoidance (IA) task (hippocampus-dependent contextual fear-learning task) drives GluA2-lacking Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors (CP-AMPARs) into the hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses during all periods of the estrous cycle except the proestrous period, when estrogen levels are high. In addition, IA task failed to drive CP-AMPARs into the CA3-CA1 synapses of ovariectomized rats only when estrogen was present. Thus, changes in the stoichiometry of AMPA receptors during learning depend on estrogen levels. Furthermore, the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) after IA task was prevented during the proestrous period, while intact LTP is still expressed after IA task during other period of the estrous cycle. Consistent with this finding, rats conditioned by IA training failed to acquire hippocampus-dependent Y-maze task during the proestrous period. On the other hand, during other estrous period, rats were able to learn Y-maze task after IA conditioning. These results suggest that high estrogen levels prevent the IA learning-induced delivery of CP-AMPARs into hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses and limit synaptic plasticity after IA task, thus preventing the acquisition of additional learning. PMID:26121335

  9. Post-anesthesia AMPA receptor potentiation prevents anesthesia-induced learning and synaptic deficits.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lianyan; Cichon, Joseph; Ninan, Ipe; Yang, Guang

    2016-06-22

    Accumulating evidence has shown that repeated exposure to general anesthesia during critical stages of brain development results in long-lasting behavioral deficits later in life. To date, there has been no effective treatment to mitigate the neurotoxic effects of anesthesia on brain development. By performing calcium imaging in the mouse motor cortex, we show that ketamine anesthesia causes a marked and prolonged reduction in neuronal activity during the period of post-anesthesia recovery. Administration of the AMPAkine drug CX546 [1-(1,4-benzodioxan-6-ylcarbonyl)piperidine] to potentiate AMPA (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid) receptor activity during emergence from anesthesia in mice enhances neuronal activity and prevents long-term motor learning deficits induced by repeated neonatal anesthesia. In addition, we show that CX546 administration also ameliorates various synaptic deficits induced by anesthesia, including reductions in synaptic expression of NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate) and AMPA receptor subunits, motor training-evoked neuronal activity, and dendritic spine remodeling associated with motor learning. Together, our results indicate that pharmacologically enhancing neuronal activity during the post-anesthesia recovery period could effectively reduce the adverse effects of early-life anesthesia. PMID:27334260

  10. Vitamin D3 supplementation increases insulin level by regulating altered IP3 and AMPA receptor expression in the pancreatic islets of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat.

    PubMed

    Jayanarayanan, Sadanandan; Anju, Thoppil R; Smijin, Soman; Paulose, Cheramadathikudiyil Skaria

    2015-10-01

    Pancreatic islets, particularly insulin-secreting β cells, share common characteristics with neurons. Glutamate is one of the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain and pancreas, and its action is mediated through glutamate receptors. In the present work, we analysed the role of vitamin D3 in the modulation of AMPA receptor subunit and their functional role in insulin release. Radio receptor binding study in diabetic rats showed a significant increase in AMPA receptor density. Insulin AMPA colabelling study showed an altered AMPA GluR2 and GluR4 subunit expression in the pancreatic beta cells. We also found lowered IP3 content and decreased IP3 receptor in pancreas of diabetic rats. The alterations in AMPA and IP3 receptor resulted in reduced cytosolic calcium level concentration, which further blocks Ca(2+)-mediated insulin release. Vitamin D3 supplementation restored the alteration in vitamin D receptor expression, AMPA receptor density and AMPA and IP3 receptor expression in the pancreatic islets that helps to restore the calcium-mediated insulin secretion. Our study reveals the antidiabetic property of vitamin D3 that is suggested to have therapeutic role through regulating glutamatergic function in diabetic rats. PMID:26054778

  11. Synaptic commitment: developmentally regulated reciprocal changes in hippocampal granule cell NMDA and AMPA receptors over the lifespan.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhiyong; Krause, Michael; Rao, Geeta; McNaughton, Bruce L; Barnes, C A

    2008-06-01

    Synaptic transmission in hippocampal field CA1 is largely N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDA(R)) dependent during the early postnatal period. It becomes increasingly mediated by alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-proprionate (AMPA) receptors until an adult ratio of AMPA to NMDA receptors is achieved. It is shown here that increases in the AMPA receptor (AMPA(R))-mediated field potential response continue over the life span of the F-344 rat at the perforant path-granule cell synapse in the dentate gyrus. In contrast, the NMDA(R)-dependent component of the response decreases with age between 1 and 27 mo, leading to an increase of AMPA(R)/NMDA(R) ratio with age. One possible explanation of this age difference is that the AMPA(R)/NMDA(R) ratio can be modified by experience. To test the idea that the changed ratio is caused by the old rats' longer lives, an intensive 10-mo period of enrichment treatment was given to a group of animals, beginning at 3 mo of age. Compared with animals housed in standard cages, the enrichment treatment did not alter the glutamatergic response ratio measured with field potential recording methods. These data provide support for the conclusion that the observed change with age is developmentally regulated rather than experience dependent. Given the role of the NMDA(R) in synaptic plasticity, these changes suggest a progressive commitment of perforant path synapses to particular weights over the life span. One possible implication of this effect includes preservation of selected memories, ultimately at the expense of a reduced capacity to store new information. PMID:18417629

  12. Differential effects of chronic hyperammonemia on modulation of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway by metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 and low and high affinity AMPA receptors in cerebellum in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Pastor, Andrea; Llansola, Marta; Reznikov, Vitaliy; Boix, Jordi; Felipo, Vicente

    2012-07-01

    Previous studies show that chronic hyperammonemia impairs learning ability of rats by impairing the glutamate-nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic guanosine mono-phosphate (cGMP) pathway in cerebellum. Three types of glutamate receptors cooperate in modulating the NO-cGMP pathway: metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5), (RS)-α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) and N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors. The aim of this work was to assess whether hyperammonemia alters the modulation of this pathway by mGluR5 and AMPA receptors in cerebellum in vivo. The results support that in control rats: (1) low AMPA concentrations (0.1mM) activate nearly completely Ca(2+)-permeable (glutamate receptor subunit 2 (GluR2)-lacking) AMPA receptors and the NO-cGMP pathway; (2) higher AMPA concentrations (0.3 mM) also activate Ca(2+)-impermeable (GluR2-containing) AMPA receptors, leading to activation of NMDA receptors and of NO-cGMP pathway. Moreover, the data support that chronic hyperammonemia: (1) reduces glutamate release and activation of the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway by activation of mGluR5; (2) strongly reduces the direct activation by AMPA receptors of the NO-cGMP pathway, likely due to reduced entry of Ca(2+) through GluR2-lacking, high affinity AMPA receptors; (3) strongly increases the indirect activation of the NO-cGMP pathway by high affinity AMPA receptors, likely due to increased entry of Na(+) through GluR2-lacking AMPA receptors and NMDA receptors activation; (4) reduces the indirect activation of the NO-cGMP pathway by low affinity AMPA receptors, likely due to reduced activation of NMDA receptors. PMID:22521775

  13. The AMPA receptor antagonist perampanel robustly rescues amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) pathology in sporadic ALS model mice

    PubMed Central

    Akamatsu, Megumi; Yamashita, Takenari; Hirose, Naoki; Teramoto, Sayaka; Kwak, Shin

    2016-01-01

    Both TDP-43 pathology and failure of RNA editing of AMPA receptor subunit GluA2, are etiology-linked molecular abnormalities that concomitantly occur in the motor neurons of the majority of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). AR2 mice, in which an RNA editing enzyme adenosine deaminase acting on RNA 2 (ADAR2) is conditionally knocked out in the motor neurons, exhibit a progressive ALS phenotype with TDP-43 pathology in the motor neurons through a Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptor-mediated mechanism. Therefore, amelioration of the increased Ca2+ influx by AMPA receptor antagonists may be a potential ALS therapy. Here, we showed that orally administered perampanel, a selective, non-competitive AMPA receptor antagonist significantly prevented the progression of the ALS phenotype and normalized the TDP-43 pathology-associated death of motor neurons in the AR2 mice. Given that perampanel is an approved anti-epileptic drug, perampanel is a potential candidate ALS drug worthy of a clinical trial. PMID:27350567

  14. Deletion of the GluA1 AMPA Receptor Subunit Alters the Expression of Short-Term Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, David J.; Sprengel, Rolf; Seeburg, Peter H.; Bannerman, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Deletion of the GluA1 AMPA receptor subunit selectively impairs short-term memory for spatial locations. We further investigated this deficit by examining memory for discrete nonspatial visual stimuli in an operant chamber. Unconditioned suppression of magazine responding to visual stimuli was measured in wild-type and GluA1 knockout mice.…

  15. Identification of an ionotropic glutamate receptor AMPA1/GRIA1 polymorphism in crossbred beef cows differing in fertility

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A proposed functional polymorphism in the ionotropic glutamate receptor AMPA1 (GRIA1) has been reported to influence antral follicle numbers and fertility in cows. Repeat Breeder cows that fail to produce a calf in multiple seasons have been reported to have reduced numbers of small (1-3 mm) antral ...

  16. The AMPA receptor antagonist perampanel robustly rescues amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) pathology in sporadic ALS model mice.

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, Megumi; Yamashita, Takenari; Hirose, Naoki; Teramoto, Sayaka; Kwak, Shin

    2016-01-01

    Both TDP-43 pathology and failure of RNA editing of AMPA receptor subunit GluA2, are etiology-linked molecular abnormalities that concomitantly occur in the motor neurons of the majority of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). AR2 mice, in which an RNA editing enzyme adenosine deaminase acting on RNA 2 (ADAR2) is conditionally knocked out in the motor neurons, exhibit a progressive ALS phenotype with TDP-43 pathology in the motor neurons through a Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptor-mediated mechanism. Therefore, amelioration of the increased Ca(2+) influx by AMPA receptor antagonists may be a potential ALS therapy. Here, we showed that orally administered perampanel, a selective, non-competitive AMPA receptor antagonist significantly prevented the progression of the ALS phenotype and normalized the TDP-43 pathology-associated death of motor neurons in the AR2 mice. Given that perampanel is an approved anti-epileptic drug, perampanel is a potential candidate ALS drug worthy of a clinical trial. PMID:27350567

  17. Myelin Proteolipid Protein Complexes with αv Integrin and AMPA Receptors In Vivo and Regulates AMPA-Dependent Oligodendrocyte Progenitor Cell Migration through the Modulation of Cell-Surface GluR2 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Harlow, Danielle E.; Saul, Katherine E.; Komuro, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    In previous studies, stimulation of ionotropic AMPA/kainate glutamate receptors on cultured oligodendrocyte cells induced the formation of a signaling complex that includes the AMPA receptor, integrins, calcium-binding proteins, and, surprisingly, the myelin proteolipid protein (PLP). AMPA stimulation of cultured oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) also caused an increase in OPC migration. The current studies focused primarily on the formation of the PLP–αv integrin–AMPA receptor complex in vivo and whether complex formation impacts OPC migration in the brain. We found that in wild-type cerebellum, PLP associates with αv integrin and the calcium-impermeable GluR2 subunit of the AMPA receptor, but in mice lacking PLP, αv integrin did not associate with GluR2. Live imaging studies of OPC migration in ex vivo cerebellar slices demonstrated altered OPC migratory responses to neurotransmitter stimulation in the absence of PLP and GluR2 or when αv integrin levels were reduced. Chemotaxis assays of purified OPCs revealed that AMPA stimulation was neither attractive nor repulsive but clearly increased the migration rate of wild-type but not PLP null OPCs. AMPA receptor stimulation of wild-type OPCs caused decreased cell-surface expression of the GluR2 AMPA receptor subunit and increased intracellular Ca2+ signaling, whereas PLP null OPCs did not reduce GluR2 at the cell surface or increase Ca2+ signaling in response to AMPA treatment. Together, these studies demonstrate that PLP is critical for OPC responses to glutamate signaling and has important implications for OPC responses when levels of glutamate are high in the extracellular space, such as following demyelination. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT After demyelination, such as occurs in multiple sclerosis, remyelination of axons is often incomplete, leading to loss of neuronal function and clinical disability. Remyelination may fail because oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) do not completely migrate into

  18. Bipolar disorder: involvement of signaling cascades and AMPA receptor trafficking at synapses

    PubMed Central

    DU, JING; QUIROZ, JORGE; YUAN, PEIXIONG; ZARATE, CARLOS; MANJI, HUSSEINI K.

    2009-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that severe mood disorders are associated with impairment of structural plasticity and cellular resilience. Cumulative data demonstrate that mood stabilizers regulate intracellular signaling cascades, including protein kinase C (PKC), PKA, mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, glycogen synthase kinase 3-β (GSK3-β) and intracellular calcium, which are signaling pathways that regulate synaptic plasticity. In this context, it is noteworthy that a growing body of data indicates that the glutamatergic system, has a major role in neuronal plasticity and cellular resilience, might be involved in the pathophysiology and treatment of mood disorders. AMPA glutamate-receptor trafficking is important in synaptic plasticity and might play crucial roles in maintaining critical neuronal circuits associated with mood. Two clinically effective, structurally dissimilar, antimanic agents, lithium and valproate (VPA), down-regulate synaptic expression of AMPA receptor subunit GluR1 in hippocampus in chronically treated rats. This reduction in synaptic GluR1 by lithium and VPA is due to attenuated phosphorylation of GluR1 at a specific PKA site (residue 845 of GluR1), which is crucial for AMPA receptor insertion. By contrast, imipramine, which can provoke mania, increases synaptic expression of GluR1 in the hippocampus in vivo. Furthermore, there is ample evidence from preclinical and clinical research that the glutamatergic system is involved in the pathophysiology of mood disorders and that many of the somatic treatments used for mood disorders including antidepressants, mood stabilizers, atypical antipsychotic drugs and electroconvulsive therapy have both direct and indirect effects on the glutamatergic system. Given these findings, further research with medications that specifically affect the glutamatergic system is warranted. Recent studies in our lab have shown that riluzole, a FDA approved medicine that regulates the glutamatergic system, shows

  19. Domain Architecture of a Calcium-Permeable AMPA Receptor in a Ligand-Free Conformation

    PubMed Central

    Midgett, Charles R.; Gill, Avinash; Madden, Dean R.

    2012-01-01

    Ligand-gated ion channels couple the free energy of agonist binding to the gating of selective transmembrane ion pores, permitting cells to regulate ion flux in response to external chemical stimuli. However, the stereochemical mechanisms responsible for this coupling remain obscure. In the case of the ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs), the modular nature of receptor subunits has facilitated structural analysis of the N-terminal domain (NTD), and of multiple conformations of the ligand-binding domain (LBD). Recently, the crystallographic structure of an antagonist-bound form of the receptor was determined. However, disulfide trapping of this conformation blocks channel opening, suggesting that channel activation involves additional quaternary packing arrangements. To explore the conformational space available to iGluR channels, we report here a second, clearly distinct domain architecture of homotetrameric, calcium-permeable AMPA receptors, determined by single-particle electron microscopy of untagged and fluorescently tagged constructs in a ligand-free state. It reveals a novel packing of NTD dimers, and a separation of LBD dimers across a central vestibule. In this arrangement, which reconciles diverse functional observations, agonist-induced cleft closure across LBD dimers can be converted into a twisting motion that provides a basis for receptor activation. PMID:22232575

  20. X-ray structure, symmetry and mechanism of an AMPA-subtype glutamate receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolevsky, Alexander I.; Rosconi, Michael P.; Gouaux, Eric

    2010-02-02

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors mediate most excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system and function by opening a transmembrane ion channel upon binding of glutamate. Despite their crucial role in neurobiology, the architecture and atomic structure of an intact ionotropic glutamate receptor are unknown. Here we report the crystal structure of the {alpha}-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA)-sensitive, homotetrameric, rat GluA2 receptor at 3.6 {angstrom} resolution in complex with a competitive antagonist. The receptor harbours an overall axis of two-fold symmetry with the extracellular domains organized as pairs of local dimers and with the ion channel domain exhibiting four-fold symmetry. A symmetry mismatch between the extracellular and ion channel domains is mediated by two pairs of conformationally distinct subunits, A/C and B/D. Therefore, the stereochemical manner in which the A/C subunits are coupled to the ion channel gate is different from the B/D subunits. Guided by the GluA2 structure and site-directed cysteine mutagenesis, we suggest that GluN1 and GluN2A NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptors have a similar architecture, with subunits arranged in a 1-2-1-2 pattern. We exploit the GluA2 structure to develop mechanisms of ion channel activation, desensitization and inhibition by non-competitive antagonists and pore blockers.

  1. Roles of the NMDA Receptor and EAAC1 Transporter in the Modulation of Extracellular Glutamate by Low and High Affinity AMPA Receptors in the Cerebellum in Vivo: Differential Alteration in Chronic Hyperammonemia.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Pastor, Andrea; Taoro, Lucas; Llansola, Marta; Felipo, Vicente

    2015-12-16

    The roles of high- and low-affinity AMPA receptors in modulating extracellular glutamate in the cerebellum remain unclear. Altered glutamatergic neurotransmission is involved in neurological alterations in hyperammonemia, which differently affects high- and low-affinity AMPA receptors. The aims were to assess by in vivo microdialysis (a) the effects of high- and low-affinity AMPA receptor activation on extracellular glutamate in the cerebellum; (b) whether chronic hyperammonemia alters extracellular glutamate modulation by high- and/or low-affinity AMPA receptors; and (c) the contribution of NMDA receptors and EAAC1 transporter to AMPA-induced changes in extracellular glutamate. In control rats, high affinity receptor activation does not affect extracellular glutamate but increases glutamate if NMDA receptors are blocked. Low affinity AMPA receptor activation increases transiently extracellular glutamate followed by reduction below basal levels and return to basal values. The reduction is associated with transient increased membrane expression of EAAC1 and is prevented by blocking NMDA receptors. Blocking NMDA receptors with MK-801 induces a transient increase in extracellular glutamate which is associated with reduced membrane expression of EAAC1 followed by increased membrane expression of the glutamate transporter GLT-1. Chronic hyperammonemia does not affect responses to activation of low affinity AMPA receptors. Activation of high affinity AMPA receptors increases extracellular glutamate in hyperammonemic rats by an NMDA receptor-dependent mechanism. In conclusion, these results show that there is a tightly controlled interplay between AMPA and NMDA receptors and an EAAC1 transporter in controlling extracellular glutamate. Hyperammonemia alters high- but not low-affinity AMPA receptors. PMID:26428532

  2. The inhibitory input to mouse cerebellar Purkinje cells is reciprocally modulated by Bergmann glial P2Y1 and AMPA receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Ramona; Jahn, Hannah M; Courjaret, Raphael; Messemer, Nanette; Kirchhoff, Frank; Deitmer, Joachim W

    2016-07-01

    Synaptic transmission has been shown to be modulated by glial functions, but the modes of specific glial action may vary in different neural circuits. We have tested the hypothesis, if Bergmann GLIA (BG) are involved in shaping neuronal communication in the mouse cerebellar cortex, using acutely isolated cerebellar slices of wild-type (WT) and of glia-specific receptor knockout mice. Activation of P2Y1 receptors by ADP (100 µM) or glutamatergic receptors by AMPA (0.3 µM) resulted in a robust, reversible and repeatable rise of evoked inhibitory input in Purkinje cells by 80% and 150%, respectively. The ADP-induced response was suppressed by prior application of AMPA, and the AMPA-induced response was suppressed by prior application of ADP. Genetic deletion or pharmacological blockade of either receptor restored the response to the other receptor agonist. Both ADP and AMPA responses were sensitive to Rose Bengal, which blocks vesicular glutamate uptake, and to the NMDA receptor antagonist D-AP5. Our results provide strong evidence that activation of both ADP and AMPA receptors, located on BGs, results in the release of glutamate, which in turn activates inhibitory interneurons via NMDA-type glutamate receptors. This infers that BG cells, by means of metabotropic signaling via their AMPA and P2Y1 receptors, which mutually suppress each other, would interdependently contribute to the fine-tuning of Purkinje cell activity in the cerebellar cortex. GLIA 2016. GLIA 2016;64:1265-1280. PMID:27144942

  3. KCC2 Gates Activity-Driven AMPA Receptor Traffic through Cofilin Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Chevy, Quentin; Heubl, Martin; Goutierre, Marie; Backer, Stéphanie; Moutkine, Imane; Eugène, Emmanuel; Bloch-Gallego, Evelyne; Lévi, Sabine; Poncer, Jean Christophe

    2015-12-01

    Expression of the neuronal K/Cl transporter KCC2 is tightly regulated throughout development and by both normal and pathological neuronal activity. Changes in KCC2 expression have often been associated with altered chloride homeostasis and GABA signaling. However, recent evidence supports a role of KCC2 in the development and function of glutamatergic synapses through mechanisms that remain poorly understood. Here we show that suppressing KCC2 expression in rat hippocampal neurons precludes long-term potentiation of glutamatergic synapses specifically by preventing activity-driven membrane delivery of AMPA receptors. This effect is independent of KCC2 transporter function and can be accounted for by increased Rac1/PAK- and LIMK-dependent cofilin phosphorylation and actin polymerization in dendritic spines. Our results demonstrate that KCC2 plays a critical role in the regulation of spine actin cytoskeleton and gates long-term plasticity at excitatory synapses in cortical neurons. PMID:26631461

  4. Elucidation of AMPA receptor-stargazin complexes by cryo-electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Twomey, Edward C; Yelshanskaya, Maria V; Grassucci, Robert A; Frank, Joachim; Sobolevsky, Alexander I

    2016-07-01

    AMPA-subtype ionotropic glutamate receptors (AMPARs) mediate fast excitatory neurotransmission and contribute to high cognitive processes such as learning and memory. In the brain, AMPAR trafficking, gating, and pharmacology is tightly controlled by transmembrane AMPAR regulatory proteins (TARPs). Here, we used cryo-electron microscopy to elucidate the structural basis of AMPAR regulation by one of these auxiliary proteins, TARP γ2, or stargazin (STZ). Our structures illuminate the variable interaction stoichiometry of the AMPAR-TARP complex, with one or two TARP molecules binding one tetrameric AMPAR. Analysis of the AMPAR-STZ binding interfaces suggests that electrostatic interactions between the extracellular domains of AMPAR and STZ play an important role in modulating AMPAR function through contact surfaces that are conserved across AMPARs and TARPs. We propose a model explaining how TARPs stabilize the activated state of AMPARs and how the interactions between AMPARs and their auxiliary proteins control fast excitatory synaptic transmission. PMID:27365450

  5. Transport of AMPA receptors during long-term potentiation is impaired in rats with hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Monfort, Pilar; Piedrafita, Blanca; Felipo, Vicente

    2009-12-01

    Cognitive function is impaired in patients with hepatic encephalopathy. Learning ability is also impaired in rats with hepatic encephalopathy due to portacaval shunts. Long-term potentiation (LTP) in hippocampus, considered the basis of some forms of learning and memory, is impaired in rats with portacaval shunt. We analyzed the mechanisms by which LTP is impaired in these rats. In control rats, application of the tetanus to induce LTP increases phosphorylation of Thr286 of calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase II. This activates the kinase which phosphorylates the GluR1 subunit of AMPA receptors in Ser831 and induces its translocation to the post-synaptic densities. All these steps are completely prevented in rats with hepatic encephalopathy in which the tetanus does not induce phosphorylation of CaMKII or GluR1 nor translocation of this subunit to the post-synaptic membrane. This would explain the impairment in LTP in these rats. PMID:19450629

  6. AMPA receptor synaptic plasticity induced by psychostimulants: the past, present, and therapeutic future

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, M. Scott; Chen, Billy T.; Bonci, Antonello

    2010-01-01

    Experience-dependent plasticity at excitatory synapses of the mesocorticolimbic system is a fundamental brain mechanism that enables adaptation to an ever-changing environment. These synaptic responses are critical for the planning and execution of adaptive behaviors that maximize survival. The mesocorticolimbic system mediates procurement of positive reinforcers such as food and sex; however, drugs of abuse re-sculpt this crucial circuitry to promote compulsive drug-seeking behavior. This review will discuss the long-term changes in glutamatergic neurotransmission that occur within the mesolimbic system following cocaine exposure. In addition, we will examine how these long-lasting neuroadaptations may drive the pathology of psychostimulant addiction. Finally, we review clinical trials that highlight antagonists at excitatory AMPA receptors as promising targets against cocaine abuse. PMID:20624588

  7. Novel AMPA and kainate receptor antagonists containing the pyrazolo[1,5-c]quinazoline ring system: Synthesis and structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Varano, Flavia; Catarzi, Daniela; Colotta, Vittoria; Lenzi, Ombretta; Filacchioni, Guido; Galli, Alessandro; Costagli, Chiara

    2008-03-01

    This paper reports the synthesis and AMPA, Gly/NMDA, and KA receptor binding affinities of a new set of 1,9-disubstituted-8-chloro-pyrazolo[1,5-c]quinazoline-2-carboxylates 2-34. Binding data show that, in general, compounds 2-34 bind to the AMPA receptor with good affinity and selectivity. In particular, the obtained results indicate that the contemporary presence of a 1,2-dicarboxylic acid moiety and suitable benzo-substituents on the PQZ system is important to gain selective AMPA receptor antagonists. Moreover, this study shows that the presence of a 2-carboxybenzoylamino substituent at position-9 (compounds 33-34) is important for obtaining selective KA receptor antagonists. Some selected compounds were also tested for their functional antagonistic activity at both AMPA and NMDA receptor-ion channels. PMID:18063372

  8. The effect of AMPA receptor blockade on spatial information acquisition, consolidation and expression in juvenile rats.

    PubMed

    Tzakis, Nikolaos; Bosnic, Tim; Ritchie, Thomas; Dixon, Kaylyn; Holahan, Matthew R

    2016-09-01

    Improvement on spatial tasks in rats is observed during a late, postnatal developmental period (post-natal day (PND) 18 - PND 20). The developmental emergence of this spatial function occurs in conjunction with hippocampal connectivity changes and enhanced hippocampal-AMPA receptor-mediated synaptic responses. The current work investigated the effect of AMPAr blockade on the emergence and long-term storage of spatial information in juvenile rats and associated neural activity patterns in the dorsal hippocampus CA1 region. Male, Long Evans rats between the ages of PND 18 and PND 20 were systemically (i.p.) administered the AMPAr antagonist, NBQX, (0, 5 or 10mg/kg) every day prior to hidden platform water maze training (PND 18, 19 and 20), every day immediately post-training or immediately before the probe test (PND 41). NBQX administration prior to training prolonged latencies, pathlength and increased thigmotaxis during the acquisition phase. Administration of NBQX immediately posttraining had no effect on the day-to-day performance. When given a probe test 3weeks later, the saline group across all conditions spent more time in the target quadrant. Rats treated with pretraining 5mg NBQX dose showed a preference for the target quadrant while the posttraining and pretesting 5mg NBQX doses impaired the target quadrant preference. Groups injected with 10mg of NBQX pretraining, posttraining or pretesting did not show a preference for the target quadrant. c-Fos labeling in the CA1 reflected these differences in probe performance in that groups showing greater than chance dwell time in the target quadrant showed more c-Fos labeling in the CA1 region than groups that did not show a target quadrant preference. These findings provide support for the critical role of AMPA receptor-mediated function in the organization and long-term storage of spatial memories acquired during the juvenile period. PMID:27353718

  9. Modeling of slow glutamate diffusion and AMPA receptor activation in the cerebellar glomerulus.

    PubMed

    Saftenku, E E

    2005-06-01

    Synaptic conductances are influenced markedly by the geometry of the space surrounding the synapse since the transient glutamate concentration in the synaptic cleft is determined by this geometry. Our paper is an attempt to understand the reasons for slow glutamate diffusion in the cerebellar glomerulus, a structure situated around the enlarged mossy fiber terminal in the cerebellum and surrounded by a glial sheath. For this purpose, analytical expressions for glutamate diffusion in the glomerulus were considered in models with two-, three-, and fractional two-three-dimensional (2D-3D) geometry with an absorbing boundary. The time course of average glutamate concentration in the synaptic cleft of the mossy fiber-granule cell connection was calculated for both direct release of glutamate from the same synaptic unit, and for cumulative spillover of glutamate from neighboring release sites. Several kinetic schemes were examined, and the parameters of the diffusion models were estimated by identifying theoretical activation of AMPA receptors with direct release and spillover components of published experimental AMPA receptor-mediated EPSCs. For model selection, the correspondence of simulated paired-pulse ratio and EPSC increase after prevention of desensitization to experimental values were also taken into consideration. Our results suggest at least a 7- to 10-fold lower apparent diffusion coefficient of glutamate in the porous medium of the glomerulus than in water. The modeling of glutamate diffusion in the 2D-3D geometry gives the best fit of experimental EPSCs. We show that it could be only partly explained by normal diffusion of glutamate in the complex geometry of the glomerulus. We assume that anomalous diffusion of glutamate occurs in the glomerulus. A good match of experimental estimations and theoretical parameters, obtained in the simulations that use an approximation of anomalous diffusion by a solution for fractional Brownian motion, confirms our

  10. Tweaking Subtype Selectivity and Agonist Efficacy at (S)-2-Amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazol-4-yl)propionic acid (AMPA) Receptors in a Small Series of BnTetAMPA Analogues.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuang-Yan; Larsen, Younes; Navarrete, Cristina Vara; Jensen, Anders A; Nielsen, Birgitte; Al-Musaed, Ali; Frydenvang, Karla; Kastrup, Jette Sandholm; Pickering, Darryl S; Clausen, Rasmus Prætorius

    2016-03-10

    A series of analogues of the (S)-2-Amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazol-4-yl)propionic acid (AMPA) receptor agonist BnTetAMPA (5b) were synthesized and characterized pharmacologically in radioligand binding assays at native and cloned AMPA receptors and functionally by two-electrode voltage clamp electrophysiology at the four homomeric AMPA receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. The analogues 6 and 7 exhibit very different pharmacological profiles with binding affinity preference for the subtypes GluA1 and GluA3, respectively. X-ray crystal structures of three ligands (6, 7, and 8) in complex with the agonist binding domain (ABD) of GluA2 show that they induce full domain closure despite their low agonist efficacies. Trp767 in GluA2 ABD could be an important determinant for partial agonism of this compound series at AMPA receptors, since agonist efficacy also correlated with the location of the Trp767 side chain. PMID:26862980

  11. Involvement of adrenoceptors, dopamine receptors and AMPA receptors in antidepressant-like action of 7-O-ethylfangchinoline in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Zhao-fu; Cui, Xiang-yu; Cui, Su-ying; Yu, Bin; Zhang, Xue-qiong; Li, Sheng-jie; Cao, Qing; Huang, Yuan-li; Xu, Ya-ping; Song, Jin-zhi; Ding, Hui; Lin, Zhi-ge; Yang, Guang; Zhang, Yong-he

    2015-01-01

    Aim: 7-O-ethylfangchinoline (YH-200) is a bisbenzylisoquinoline derivative. The aim of this study was to investigate the antidepressant-like action and underlying mechanisms of YH-200 in mice. Methods: Mice were treated with YH-200 (15, 30, and 60 mg/kg, ig) or tetrandrine (30 and 60 mg/kg, ig) before conducting forced swimming test (FST), tail suspension test (TST), or open field test (OFT). Results: YH-200 (60 mg/kg) significantly decreased the immobility time in both FST and TST, and prolonged the latency to immobility in FST. YH-200 (60 mg/kg) was more potent than the natural bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid tetrandrine (60 mg/kg) in FST. Pretreatment with α1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin (1 mg/kg), β-adrenoceptor antagonist propranolol (2 mg/kg), dopamine D1/D5 receptor antagonist SCH23390 (0.05 mg/kg), dopamine D2/D3 receptor antagonist haloperidol (0.2 mg/kg) or AMPA receptor antagonist NBQX (10 mg/kg) prevented the antidepressant-like action of YH-200 (60 mg/kg) in FST. In contrast, pretreatment with α2 adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine (1 mg/kg) augmented the antidepressant-like action of YH-200 (30 mg/kg) in FST. Chronic administration of YH-200 (30 and 60 mg/kg for 14 d) did not produce drug tolerance; instead its antidepressant-like action was strengthened. Chronic administration of YH-200 did not affect the body weight of mice compared to control mice. Conclusion: YH-200 exerts its antidepressant-like action in mice via acting at multi-targets, including α1, α2 and β-adrenoceptors, D1/D5 and D2 /D3 receptors, as well as AMPA receptors. PMID:26238289

  12. The role of the AMPA receptor and 5-HT(3) receptor on aggressive behavior and depressive-like symptoms in chronic social isolation-reared mice.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Koh; Kurosawa, Natsuki; Seki, Kenjiro

    2016-01-01

    Chronic social isolation (SI)-reared mice exhibit aggressive and depressive-like behaviors. However, the pathophysiological changes caused by chronic SI remain unclear. The hypothalamus and amygdala have been suggested to be associated with the stress of SI. In addition to serotonin 3 (5-HT3) receptors, AMPA receptors have also been suggested to be involved in aggressive behavior and depressive-like symptoms in animals. Therefore, we examined whether chronic SI affects AMPA and 5-HT3 receptor expression levels in these regions. A Western blot analysis revealed that after four weeks of SI, mice exhibited up-regulated AMPA receptor subunit (GluR1, GluR2) protein levels in the amygdala and down-regulated hypothalamic 5-HT3 receptor protein levels. The AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist NBQX (10 mg/kg; i.p.) attenuated SI-induced depressive-like symptoms but not aggressive behavior. Intra-amygdalar infusions of the selective AMPA receptor agonist (S)-AMPA (10 μM) induced despair-like behavior, but not sucrose preference or aggressive behavior, in mice not reared in SI (naïve mice). Alternatively, treatment with the 5-HT3 receptor agonist SR57227A (3.0 mg/kg; i.p.) decreased aggression levels. In addition, intra-hypothalamic infusions of the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist ondansetron (3 μM) did not trigger aggressive behavior in naïve mice; however, the administration of ondansetron (0.3 mg/kg; i.p.) increased aggression levels in two-week SI mice, which rarely exhibited the aggressive behavior. Moreover, ondansetron did not affect the depressive-like symptoms of the SI mice. These results suggest that SI-induced up-regulation of GluR1 and GluR2 subunits protein levels in the amygdalar region and down-regulation of 5-HT3 receptor proteins level in the hypothalamic region are associated with the effect of AMPA receptor agonist and 5-HT3 receptor antagonist -induced aggressive behavior and depressive-like symptoms. PMID:26522741

  13. Reinforcement-Related Regulation of AMPA Glutamate Receptor Subunits in the Ventral Tegmental Area Enhances Motivation for Cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kwang Ho; Edwards, Scott; Graham, Danielle L.; Larson, Erin B.; Whisler, Kimberly N.; Simmons, Diana; Friedman, Allyson K.; Walsh, Jessica J.; Rahman, Zia; Monteggia, Lisa M.; Eisch, Amelia J.; Neve, Rachael L.; Nestler, Eric J.; Han, Ming-Hu; Self, David W.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic cocaine use produces numerous biological changes in brain, but relatively few are functionally associated with cocaine reinforcement. Here we show that daily intravenous cocaine self-administration, but not passive cocaine administration, induces dynamic up-regulation of the AMPA glutamate receptor subunits GluR1 and GluR2 in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) of rats. Increases in GluR1 protein and GluR1S845 phosphorylation are associated with increased GluR1 mRNA in self-administering animals, while increased GluR2 protein levels occurred despite substantial decreases in GluR2 mRNA. We investigated the functional significance of GluR1 up-regulation in the VTA on cocaine self-administration using localized viral-mediated gene transfer. Over-expression of GluR1WT in rat VTA primarily infected dopamine neurons (75%), and increased AMPA receptor-mediated membrane rectification in these neurons with AMPA application. Similar GluR1WT over-expression potentiated locomotor responses to intra-VTA AMPA, but not NMDA, infusions. In cocaine self-administering animals, over-expression of GluR1WT in the VTA markedly increased the motivation for cocaine injections on a progressive ratio schedule of cocaine reinforcement. In contrast, over-expression of protein kinase A-resistant GluR1S845A in the VTA reduced peak rates of cocaine self-administration on a fixed ratio reinforcement schedule. Neither viral vector altered sucrose self-administration, and over-expression of GluR1WT or GluR1S845A in the adjacent substantia nigra had no effect on cocaine self-administration. Taken together, these results suggest that dynamic regulation of AMPA receptors in the VTA during cocaine self-administration contributes to cocaine addiction by acting to facilitate subsequent cocaine use. PMID:21613507

  14. AMPA receptors serum-dependently mediate GABAA receptor alpha1 and alpha6 subunit down-regulation in cultured mouse cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Uusi-Oukari, Mikko; Kontturi, Leena-Stiina; Kallinen, Sampsa A; Salonen, Virpi

    2010-04-01

    Depolarization of cultured mouse cerebellar granule cells with potassium or kainate results in developmentally arrested state that includes down-regulation of GABA(A) receptor alpha1, alpha6 and beta2 subunit expression. These subunits are normally strongly expressed in cerebellar granule cells from second postnatal week throughout the adulthood. In the present study we demonstrate that selective activation of AMPA subtype of glutamate receptors down-regulates alpha1 and alpha6 subunit mRNA expression. Removal of AMPA agonist from culture medium restores expression of these subunits indicating reversibility of the down-regulation. In serum-free culture medium AMPA receptor activation did not down-regulate alpha1 or alpha6 subunit expression. Furthermore, the down-regulation was strongly attenuated when the cells were cultured in the presence of dialysed fetal calf serum. The results indicate that down-regulation of GABA(A) receptor alpha1 and alpha6 subunits by AMPA receptor activation is dependent on the presence of low molecular weight compounds present in fetal calf serum. In order to study mouse cerebellar granule cell maturation and/or regulation of GABA(A) receptor subunit expression in culture, the experiments should be performed in the absence of fetal calf serum. PMID:20170697

  15. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 modulates the nitric oxide-cGMP pathway in cerebellum in vivo through activation of AMPA receptors.

    PubMed

    Boix, Jordi; Llansola, Marta; Cabrera-Pastor, Andrea; Felipo, Vicente

    2011-04-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) modulate important processes in cerebellum including long-term depression, which also requires formation of nitric oxide (NO) and cGMP. Some reports suggest that mGluRs could modulate the NO-cGMP pathway in cerebellum. However this modulation has not been studied in detail. The aim of this work was to assess by microdialysis in freely moving rats whether activation of mGluR5 modulates the NO-cGMP pathway in cerebellum in vivo and to analyze the underlying mechanisms. We show that mGluR5 activation increases extracellular glutamate, citrulline and cGMP in cerebellum. Blocking NMDA receptors with MK-801 does not prevent any of these effects, indicating that NMDA receptors activation is not required. However in the presence of MK-801 the effects are more transient, returning faster to basal levels. Blocking AMPA receptors prevents the increase in citrulline and cGMP induced by mGluR5 activation, but not the increase in glutamate. The release of glutamate is prevented by tetrodotoxin but not by fluoroacetate, indicating that glutamate is released from neurons and not from astrocytes. Activation of AMPA receptors increases citrulline and cGMP. These data indicate that activation of mGluR5 induces an increase of extracellular glutamate which activates AMPA receptors, leading to activation of nitric oxide synthase and increased NO, which activates guanylate cyclase, increasing cGMP. The response mediated by AMPA receptors desensitize rapidly. Activation of AMPA receptors also induces a mild depolarization, allowing activation of NMDA receptors which prolongs the duration of the effect initiated by activation of AMPA receptors. These data support that the three types of glutamate receptors: mGluR5, AMPA and NMDA cooperate in the modulation of the grade and duration of activation of the NO-cGMP pathway in cerebellum in vivo. This pathway would modulate cerebellar processes such as long-term depression. PMID:21300123

  16. Nuclear respiratory factor 2 regulates the transcription of AMPA receptor subunit GluA2 (Gria2).

    PubMed

    Priya, Anusha; Johar, Kaid; Nair, Bindu; Wong-Riley, Margaret T T

    2014-12-01

    Neuronal activity is highly dependent on energy metabolism. Nuclear respiratory factor 2 (NRF-2) tightly couples neuronal activity and energy metabolism by transcriptionally co-regulating all 13 subunits of an important energy-generating enzyme, cytochrome c oxidase (COX), as well as critical subunits of excitatory NMDA receptors. AMPA receptors are another major class of excitatory glutamatergic receptors that mediate most of the fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the brain. They are heterotetrameric proteins composed of various combinations of GluA1-4 subunits, with GluA2 being the most common one. We have previously shown that GluA2 (Gria2) is transcriptionally regulated by nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1) and specificity protein 4 (Sp4), which also regulate all subunits of COX. However, it was not known if NRF-2 also couples neuronal activity and energy metabolism by regulating subunits of the AMPA receptors. By means of multiple approaches, including electrophoretic mobility shift and supershift assays, chromatin immunoprecipitation, promoter mutations, real-time quantitative PCR, and western blot analysis, NRF-2 was found to functionally regulate the expression of Gria2, but not of Gria1, Gria3, or Gria4 genes in neurons. By regulating the GluA2 subunit of the AMPA receptor, NRF-2 couples energy metabolism and neuronal activity at the transcriptional level through a concurrent and parallel mechanism with NRF-1 and Sp4. PMID:25245478

  17. DCP-LA stimulates AMPA receptor exocytosis through CaMKII activation due to PP-1 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Takeshi; Yaguchi, Takahiro; Nagata, Tetsu; Tanaka, Akito; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2009-10-01

    The linoleic acid derivative 8-[2-(2-pentyl-cyclopropylmethyl)-cyclopropyl]-octanoic acid (DCP-LA) activated Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) by inhibiting protein phosphatase-1 (PP-1). DCP-LA induced a transient huge facilitation of synaptic transmission monitored from the CA1 region of rat hippocampal slices, which was largely inhibited by the CaMKII inhibitor KN-93. DCP-LA potentiated kainate-evoked whole-cell membrane currents for Xenopus oocytes expressing alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors composed of the GluR1, GluR3, GluR1/GluR2, GluR1/GluR3, and GluR1/GluR2/GluR3 subunits, and the potentiation was significantly inhibited by KN-93. A similar potentiation was still found with mutant GluR1 (S831A) receptor lacking CaMKII phosphorylation site. The GluR1 and GluR2 subunits formed AMPA receptors in the rat hippocampus, and DCP-LA increased expression of both the subunits on the plasma membrane. The DCP-LA action was blocked by KN-93 and the exocytosis inhibitor botulinum toxin type A, but not by the endocytosis inhibitor phenylarsine oxide. DCP-LA, thus, appears to activate CaMKII through PP-1 inhibition, that stimulates AMPA receptor exocytosis to increase expression of the receptors on the plasma membrane, responsible for potentiate AMPA receptor responses and facilitation of hippocampal synaptic transmission. PMID:19492412

  18. Regulation of AMPA receptor GluR1 subunit surface expression by a 4. 1N-linked actin cytoskeletal association.

    PubMed

    Shen, L; Liang, F; Walensky, L D; Huganir, R L

    2000-11-01

    The synaptic localization, clustering, and immobilization of neurotransmitter receptors and ion channels play important roles in synapse formation and synaptic transmission. Although several proteins have been identified that interact with AMPA receptors and that may regulate their synaptic targeting, little is known about the interaction of AMPA receptors with the cytoskeleton. In studies examining the interaction of the AMPA receptor GluR1 subunit with neuronal proteins, we determined that GluR1 interacts with the 4.1G and 4.1N proteins, homologs of the erythrocyte membrane cytoskeletal protein 4.1. Using the yeast two-hybrid system and a heterologous cell system, we demonstrated that both 4.1G and 4.1N bind to a membrane proximal region of the GluR1 C terminus, and that a region within the C-terminal domain of 4.1G or 4.1N is sufficient to mediate the interaction. We also found that 4.1N can associate with GluR1 in vivo and colocalizes with AMPA receptors at excitatory synapses. Disruption of the interaction of GluR1 with 4.1N or disruption of actin filaments decreased the surface expression of GluR1 in heterologous cells. Moreover, disruption of actin filaments in cultured cortical neurons dramatically reduced the level of surface AMPA receptors. These results suggest that protein 4.1N may link AMPA receptors to the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:11050113

  19. Differential reelin-induced enhancement of NMDA and AMPA receptor activity in the adult hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Shenfeng; Zhao, Lisa F; Korwek, Kimberly M; Weeber, Edwin J

    2006-12-13

    The developmental lamination of the hippocampus and other cortical structures requires a signaling cascade initiated by reelin and its receptors, apoER2 (apolipoprotein E receptor 2) and VLDLR (very-low-density lipoprotein receptor). However, the functional significance of continued reelin expression in the postnatal brain remains poorly understood. Here, we show that reelin application to adult mice hippocampal slices leads to enhanced glutamatergic transmission mediated by NMDA receptors (NMDARs) and AMPA receptors (AMPARs) through distinct mechanisms. Application of recombinant reelin enhanced NMDAR-mediated currents through postsynaptic mechanisms, as revealed by the variance-mean analysis of synaptic NMDAR currents, assessment of spontaneous miniature events, and the levels of NMDAR subunits at synaptic surface. In comparison, nonstationary fluctuation analysis of miniature AMPAR currents and quantification of synaptic surface proteins revealed that reelin-induced enhancement of AMPAR responses was mediated by increased AMPAR numbers. Reelin enhancement of synaptic NMDAR currents was abolished when receptor-associated protein (RAP) or the Src inhibitor 4-amino-5-(4-methylphenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]-pyrimidine (PP1) was bath applied and was abrogated by including PP1 in the recording electrodes. In comparison, including RAP or an inactive PP1 analog PP3 in the recording electrode was without effect. Interestingly, the increased AMPAR response after reelin application was not blocked by PP1 but was blocked by the phosphoinositide-3' kinase (PI3K) inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002 [2-(4-morpholinyl)-8-phenyl-1(4H)-benzopyran-4-one hydrochloride]. Furthermore, reelin-induced, PI3K-dependent AMPAR surface insertion was also observed in cultured hippocampal neurons. Together, these results reveal a differential functional coupling of reelin signaling with NMDAR and AMPAR function and define a novel mechanism for controlling synaptic strength and plasticity

  20. Neuroprotective and anticonvulsant effects of EGIS-8332, a non-competitive AMPA receptor antagonist, in a range of animal models

    PubMed Central

    Gigler, G; Móricz, K; ágoston, M; Simó, A; Albert, M; Benedek, A; Kapus, G; Kertész, S; Vegh, M; Barkóczy, J; Markó, B; Szabó, G; Matucz, É; Gacsályi, I; Lévay, G; Hársing, L G; Szénási, G

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Blockade of AMPA (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid) receptors is a good treatment option for a variety of central nervous system disorders. The present study evaluated the neuroprotective and anticonvulsant effects of EGIS-8332, a non-competitive AMPA receptor antagonist, as a potential drug candidate. Experimental approach: AMPA antagonist effects of EGIS-8332 were measured using patch-clamp techniques. Neuroprotective and anticonvulsant effects of EGIS-8332 were evaluated in various experimental models, relative to those of GYKI 53405. Key results: EGIS-8332 inhibited AMPA currents in rat cerebellar Purkinje cells and inhibited the AMPA- and quisqualate-induced excitotoxicity in primary cultures of telencephalon neurons (IC50=5.1-9.0 μM), in vitro. Good anticonvulsant actions were obtained in maximal electroshock-, sound- and chemically-induced seizures (range of ED50=1.4-14.0 mg kg−1 i.p.) in mice. Four days after transient global cerebral ischaemia, EGIS-8332 decreased neuronal loss in the hippocampal CA1 area in gerbils and rats. EGIS-8332 dose-dependently reduced cerebral infarct size after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion in mice and rats (minimum effective dose=3 mg kg−1 i.p.). Side effects of EGIS-8332 emerged much above its pharmacologically active doses. A tendency for better efficacy of GYKI 53405 than that of EGIS-8332 was observed in anticonvulsant tests that reached statistical significance in few cases, while the contrary was perceived in cerebral ischaemia tests. Conclusions and implications: EGIS-8332 seems suitable for further development for the treatment of epilepsy, ischaemia and stroke based on its efficacy in a variety of experimental disease models, and on its low side effect potential. PMID:17603549

  1. Impaired Associative Fear Learning in Mice with Complete Loss or Haploinsufficiency of AMPA GluR1 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Feyder, Michael; Wiedholz, Lisa; Sprengel, Rolf; Holmes, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    There is compelling evidence that l-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate (AMPA) glutamate receptors containing the GluR1 subunit contribute to the molecular mechanisms associated with learning. AMPA GluR1 glutamate receptor knockout mice (KO) exhibit abnormal hippocampal and amygdala plasticity, and deficits on various assays for cognition including Pavlovian fear conditioning. Here we examined associative fear learning in mice with complete absence (KO) or partial loss (heterozygous mutant, HET) of GluR1 on multiple fear conditioning paradigms. After multi-trial delay or trace conditioning, KO displayed impaired tone and context fear recall relative to WT, whereas HET were normal. After one-trial delay conditioning, both KO and HET showed impaired tone and context recall. HET and KO showed normal nociceptive sensitivity in the hot plate and tail flick tests. These data demonstrate that the complete absence of GluR1 subunit-containing receptors prevents the formation of associative fear memories, while GluR1 haploinsufficiency is sufficient to impair one-trial fear learning. These findings support growing evidence of a major role for GluR1-containing AMPA receptors in amygdala-mediated forms of learning and memory. PMID:18958186

  2. Positive AMPA receptor modulation rapidly stimulates BDNF release and increases dendritic mRNA translation.

    PubMed

    Jourdi, Hussam; Hsu, Yu-Tien; Zhou, Miou; Qin, Qingyu; Bi, Xiaoning; Baudry, Michel

    2009-07-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) stimulates local dendritic mRNA translation and is involved in formation and consolidation of memory. 2H,3H,6aH-pyrrolidino[2'',1''-3',2']1,3-oxazino[6',5'-5,4]-benzo[e]1,4-dioxan-10-one (CX614), one of the best-studied positive AMPA receptor modulators (also known as ampakines), increases BDNF mRNA and protein and facilitates long-term potentiation (LTP) induction. Several other ampakines also improve performance in various behavioral and learning tasks. Since local dendritic protein synthesis has been implicated in LTP stabilization and in memory consolidation, this study investigated whether CX614 could influence synaptic plasticity by upregulating dendritic protein translation. CX614 treatment of primary neuronal cultures and acute hippocampal slices rapidly activated the translation machinery and increased local dendritic protein synthesis. CX614-induced activation of translation was blocked by K252a [(9S,10R,12R)-2,3,9,10,11,12-hexahydro-10-hydroxy-9-methyl-1-oxo-9,12-epoxy-1H-diindolo[1,2,3-fg:3',2',1'-kl]pyrrolo[3,4-i][1,6]benzodiazocine-10-carboxylic acid methyl ester], CNQX, APV, and TTX, and was inhibited in the presence of an extracellular BDNF scavenger, TrkB-Fc. The acute effect of CX614 on translation was mediated by increased BDNF release as demonstrated with a BDNF scavenging assay using TrkB-Fc during CX614 treatment of cultured primary neurons and was blocked by nifedipine, ryanodine, and lack of extracellular Ca(2+) in acute hippocampal slices. Finally, CX614, like BDNF, rapidly increased dendritic translation of an exogenous translation reporter. Together, our results demonstrate that positive modulation of AMPA receptors rapidly stimulates dendritic translation, an effect mediated by BDNF secretion and TrkB receptor activation. They also suggest that increased BDNF secretion and stimulation of local protein synthesis contribute to the effects of ampakines on synaptic plasticity. PMID:19587275

  3. Expression of ionotropic glutamate receptors, AMPA, kainite and NMDA, in the pigeon retina.

    PubMed

    Atoji, Yasuro

    2015-07-01

    Glutamate is an excitatory neurotransmitter in the vertebrate retina. A previous study found vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (vGluT2) mRNA in the pigeon retina, suggesting that bipolar and ganglion cells are glutamatergic. The present study examined the localization of ionotropic glutamate receptors to identify receptor cells in the pigeon retina using in situ hybridization histochemistry. Nine subunits of AMPA receptor (GluA1, GluA2, GluA3, and GluA4), kainate receptor (GluK1, GluK2, and GluK4), and NMDA receptor (GluN1 and GluN2A) were found to be expressed in the inner nuclear layer (INL) and ganglion cell layers. GluA1, GluA2, GluA3, and GluA4 were primarily expressed in the inner half of INL, and the signal intensity was strong for GluA2, GluA3, and GluA4. GluK1 was intensely expressed in the outer half of INL, whereas GluK2 and GluK4 were mainly localized in the inner half of INL. GluN1 and GluN2A were moderately expressed in the inner half of INL. Horizontal cells expressed GluA3 and GluA4, and ganglion cells expressed all subunits examined. These results suggest that the glutamatergic neurotransmission in the pigeon retina is similar to that in mammals. PMID:25983186

  4. Regulation of AMPA receptor subunit GluA1 surface expression by PAK3 phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Natasha K.; Thomas, Gareth M.; Luo, Junjie; Huganir, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    AMPA receptors (AMPARs) are the major excitatory receptors of the brain and are fundamental to synaptic plasticity, memory, and cognition. Dynamic recycling of AMPARs in neurons is regulated through several types of posttranslational modification, including phosphorylation. Here, we identify a previously unidentified signal transduction cascade that modulates phosphorylation of serine residue 863 (S863) in the GluA1 AMPAR subunit and controls surface trafficking of GluA1 in neurons. Activation of the EphR–Ephrin signal transduction pathway enhances S863 phosphorylation. Further, EphB2 can interact with Zizimin1, a guanine–nucleotide exchange factor that activates Cdc42 and stimulates S863 phosphorylation in neurons. Among the numerous targets downstream of Cdc42, we determined that the p21-activated kinase-3 (PAK3) phosphorylates S863 in vitro. Moreover, specific loss of PAK3 expression and pharmacological inhibition of PAK both disrupt activity-dependent phosphorylation of S863 in cortical neurons. EphB2, Cdc42, and PAKs are broadly capable of controlling dendritic spine formation and synaptic plasticity and are implicated in multiple cognitive disorders. Collectively, these data delineate a novel signal cascade regulating AMPAR trafficking that may contribute to the molecular mechanisms that govern learning and cognition. PMID:26460013

  5. Developmental origin dictates interneuron AMPA and NMDA receptor subunit composition and plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Matta, Jose A; Pelkey, Kenneth A; Craig, Michael T; Chittajallu, Ramesh; Jeffries, Brian W; McBain, Chris J

    2014-01-01

    Disrupted excitatory synapse maturation in GABAergic interneurons may promote neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. However, establishing developmental programs for nascent synapses in GABAergic cells is confounded by their sparsity, heterogeneity and late acquisition of subtype-defining characteristics. We investigated synaptic development in mouse interneurons targeting cells by lineage from medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) or caudal ganglionic eminence (CGE) progenitors. MGE-derived interneuron synapses were dominated by GluA2-lacking AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs), with little contribution from NMDA-type receptors (NMDARs) throughout development. In contrast, CGE-derived cell synapses had large NMDAR components and used GluA2-containing AMPARs. In neonates, both MGE- and CGE-derived interneurons expressed primarily GluN2B subunit–containing NMDARs, which most CGE-derived interneurons retained into adulthood. However, MGE-derived interneuron NMDARs underwent a GluN2B-to-GluN2A switch that could be triggered acutely with repetitive synaptic activity. Our findings establish ganglionic eminence–dependent rules for early synaptic integration programs of distinct interneuron cohorts, including parvalbumin- and cholecystokinin-expressing basket cells. PMID:23852113

  6. Reversal of aging-related emotional memory deficits by norepinephrine via regulating the stability of surface AMPA receptors.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yi; Zhou, Jun; Li, Ming-Xing; Wu, Peng-Fei; Hu, Zhuang-Li; Ni, Lan; Jin, You; Chen, Jian-Guo; Wang, Fang

    2015-04-01

    Aging-related emotional memory deficit is a well-known complication in Alzheimer's disease and normal aging. However, little is known about its molecular mechanism. To address this issue, we examined the role of norepinephrine (NE) and its relevant drug desipramine in the regulation of hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP), surface expression of AMPA receptor, and associative fear memory in rats. We found that there was a defective regulation of NE content and AMPA receptor trafficking during fear conditioning, which were accompanied by impaired emotional memory and LTP in aged rats. Furthermore, we also found that the exogenous upregulation of NE ameliorated the impairment of LTP and emotional memory via enhancing AMPA receptor trafficking in aged rats, and the downregulation of NE impaired LTP in adult rats. Finally, acute treatment with NE or desipramine rescued the impaired emotional memory in aged rats. These results imply a pivotal role for NE in synaptic plasticity and associative fear memory in aging rats and suggest that desipramine is a potential candidate for treating aging-related emotional memory deficit. PMID:25564942

  7. Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA and NMDA receptor channels in basket cells of rat hippocampal dentate gyrus.

    PubMed Central

    Koh, D S; Geiger, J R; Jonas, P; Sakmann, B

    1995-01-01

    1. Glutamate receptor (GluR) channels were studied in basket cells in the dentate gyrus of rat hippocampal slices. Basket cells were identified by their location, dendritic morphology and high frequency of action potentials generated during sustained current injection. 2. Dual-component currents were activated by fast application of glutamate to outside-out membrane patches isolated from basket cell somata (10 microM glycine, no external Mg2+). The fast component was selectively blocked by 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), the slow component by D-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (D-AP5). This suggests that the two components were mediated by alpha-amino-3- hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate receptor (AMPAR)/kainate receptor and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) channels, respectively. The mean ratio of the peak current of the NMDAR component to that of the AMPAR/kainate receptor component was 0.22 (1 ms pulses of 10 mM glutamate). 3. The AMPAR/kainate receptor component, which was studied in isolation in the presence of D-AP5, was identified as AMPAR mediated on the basis of the preferential activation by AMPA as compared with kainate, the weak desensitization of kainate-activated currents, the cross-desensitization between AMPA and kainate, and the reduction of desensitization by cyclothiazide. 4. Deactivation of basket cell AMPARs following 1 ms pulses of glutamate occurred with a time constant (tau) of 1.2 +/- 0.1 ms (mean +/- S.E.M.). During 100 ms glutamate pulses AMPARs desensitized with a tau of 3.7 +/- 0.2ms. 5. The peak current-voltage (I-V) relation of AMPAR-mediated currents in Na(+)-rich extracellular solution showed a reversal potential of -4.0 +/- 2.6 mV and was characterized by a a doubly rectifying shape. The conductance of single AMPAR channels was estimated as 22.6 +/- 1.6 pS using non-stationary fluctuation analysis. AMPARs expressed in hippocampal basket cells were highly Ca2+ permeable (PCa/PK = 1.79). 6. NMDARs in

  8. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) modulate AMPA receptor phosphorylation and cell-surface localization in concert with pain-related behavior.

    PubMed

    Lee, Daniel Z; Chung, Jin M; Chung, Kyungsoon; Kang, Myoung-Goo

    2012-09-01

    Sensitization of dorsal horn neurons (DHNs) in the spinal cord is dependent on pain-related synaptic plasticity and causes persistent pain. The DHN sensitization is mediated by a signal transduction pathway initiated by the activation of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDA-Rs). Recent studies have shown that elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and phosphorylation-dependent trafficking of GluA2 subunit of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate receptors (AMPA-Rs) are a part of the signaling pathway for DHN sensitization. However, the relationship between ROS and AMPA-R phosphorylation and trafficking is not known. Thus, this study investigated the effects of ROS scavengers on the phosphorylation and cell-surface localization of GluA1 and GluA2. Intrathecal NMDA- and intradermal capsaicin-induced hyperalgesic mice were used for this study since both pain models share the NMDA-R activation-dependent DHN sensitization in the spinal cord. Our behavioral, biochemical, and immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated that: 1) NMDA-R activation in vivo increased the phosphorylation of AMPA-Rs at GluA1 (S818, S831, and S845) and GluA2 (S880) subunits; 2) NMDA-R activation in vivo increased cell-surface localization of GluA1 but decreased that of GluA2; and 3) reduction of ROS levels by ROS scavengers PBN (N-tert-butyl-α-phenylnitrone) or TEMPOL (4-hydroxy-2, 2, 6, 6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl) reversed these changes in AMPA-Rs, as well as pain-related behavior. Given that AMPA-R trafficking to the cell surface and synapse is regulated by NMDA-R activation-dependent phosphorylation of GluA1 and GluA2, our study suggests that the ROS-dependent changes in the phosphorylation and cell-surface localization of AMPA-Rs are necessary for DHN sensitization and thus, pain-related behavior. We further suggest that ROS reduction will ameliorate these molecular changes and pain. PMID:22770842

  9. Shisa6 traps AMPA receptors at postsynaptic sites and prevents their desensitization during synaptic activity

    PubMed Central

    Klaassen, Remco V.; Stroeder, Jasper; Coussen, Françoise; Hafner, Anne-Sophie; Petersen, Jennifer D.; Renancio, Cedric; Schmitz, Leanne J. M.; Normand, Elisabeth; Lodder, Johannes C.; Rotaru, Diana C.; Rao-Ruiz, Priyanka; Spijker, Sabine; Mansvelder, Huibert D.; Choquet, Daniel; Smit, August B.

    2016-01-01

    Trafficking and biophysical properties of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) in the brain depend on interactions with associated proteins. We identify Shisa6, a single transmembrane protein, as a stable and directly interacting bona fide AMPAR auxiliary subunit. Shisa6 is enriched at hippocampal postsynaptic membranes and co-localizes with AMPARs. The Shisa6 C-terminus harbours a PDZ domain ligand that binds to PSD-95, constraining mobility of AMPARs in the plasma membrane and confining them to postsynaptic densities. Shisa6 expressed in HEK293 cells alters GluA1- and GluA2-mediated currents by prolonging decay times and decreasing the extent of AMPAR desensitization, while slowing the rate of recovery from desensitization. Using gene deletion, we show that Shisa6 increases rise and decay times of hippocampal CA1 miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs). Shisa6-containing AMPARs show prominent sustained currents, indicating protection from full desensitization. Accordingly, Shisa6 prevents synaptically trapped AMPARs from depression at high-frequency synaptic transmission. PMID:26931375

  10. Calcineurin Mediates Synaptic Scaling Via Synaptic Trafficking of Ca2+-Permeable AMPA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seonil; Ziff, Edward B.

    2014-01-01

    Homeostatic synaptic plasticity is a negative-feedback mechanism for compensating excessive excitation or inhibition of neuronal activity. When neuronal activity is chronically suppressed, neurons increase synaptic strength across all affected synapses via synaptic scaling. One mechanism for this change is alteration of synaptic AMPA receptor (AMPAR) accumulation. Although decreased intracellular Ca2+ levels caused by chronic inhibition of neuronal activity are believed to be an important trigger of synaptic scaling, the mechanism of Ca2+-mediated AMPAR-dependent synaptic scaling is not yet understood. Here, we use dissociated mouse cortical neurons and employ Ca2+ imaging, electrophysiological, cell biological, and biochemical approaches to describe a novel mechanism in which homeostasis of Ca2+ signaling modulates activity deprivation-induced synaptic scaling by three steps: (1) suppression of neuronal activity decreases somatic Ca2+ signals; (2) reduced activity of calcineurin, a Ca2+-dependent serine/threonine phosphatase, increases synaptic expression of Ca2+-permeable AMPARs (CPARs) by stabilizing GluA1 phosphorylation; and (3) Ca2+ influx via CPARs restores CREB phosphorylation as a homeostatic response by Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release from the ER. Therefore, we suggest that synaptic scaling not only maintains neuronal stability by increasing postsynaptic strength but also maintains nuclear Ca2+ signaling by synaptic expression of CPARs and ER Ca2+ propagation. PMID:24983627

  11. AMPA Receptor-Induced Local Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Signaling Mediates Motor Recovery after Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Clarkson, Andrew N.; Overman, Justine J.; Zhong, Sheng; Mueller, Rudolf; Lynch, Gary; Carmichael, S. Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of adult disability. Recovery after stroke shares similar molecular and cellular properties with learning and memory. A main component of learning-induced plasticity involves signaling through AMPA receptors (AMPARs). We systematically tested the role of AMPAR function in motor recovery in a mouse model of focal stroke. AMPAR function controls functional recovery beginning 5 d after the stroke. Positive allosteric modulators of AMPARs enhance recovery of limb control when administered after a delay from the stroke. Conversely, AMPAR antagonists impair motor recovery. The contributions of AMPARs to recovery are mediated by release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in periinfarct cortex, as blocking local BDNF function in periinfarct cortex blocks AMPAR-mediated recovery and prevents the normal pattern of motor recovery. In contrast to a delayed AMPAR role in motor recovery, early administration of AMPAR agonists after stroke increases stroke damage. These findings indicate that the role of glutamate signaling through the AMPAR changes over time in stroke: early potentiation of AMPAR signaling worsens stroke damage, whereas later potentiation of the same signaling system improves functional recovery. PMID:21389231

  12. Enhanced AMPA receptor function promotes cerebellar long-term depression rather than potentiation

    PubMed Central

    van Beugen, Boeke J.; Qiao, Xin; Simmons, Dana H.; De Zeeuw, Chris I.

    2014-01-01

    Ampakines are allosteric modulators of AMPA receptors that facilitate hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) and learning, and have been considered for the treatment of cognition and memory deficits. Here, we show that the ampakine CX546 raises the amplitude and slows the decay time of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) at cerebellar parallel fiber (PF) to Purkinje cell synapses, thus resembling CX546 effects described at hippocampal synapses. Using the fluorescent calcium indicator dye Oregon Green BAPTA-2 and an ultra-high-speed CCD camera, we also monitored calcium transients in Purkinje cell dendrites. In the presence of CX546 in the bath, PF-evoked calcium transients were enhanced and prolonged, suggesting that CX546 not only enhances synaptic transmission, but also boosts dendritic calcium signaling at cerebellar synapses. In contrast to previous observations in the hippocampus, however, CX546 applied during cerebellar recordings facilitates long-term depression (LTD) rather than LTP at PF synapses. These findings show that ampakines selectively modify the LTP–LTD balance depending on the brain area and type of synapse, and may provide tools for the targeted regulation of synaptic memories. PMID:25403454

  13. Distinct Structural Pathways Coordinate the Activation of AMPA Receptor-Auxiliary Subunit Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Dawe, G. Brent; Musgaard, Maria; Aurousseau, Mark R.P.; Nayeem, Naushaba; Green, Tim; Biggin, Philip C.; Bowie, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Summary Neurotransmitter-gated ion channels adopt different gating modes to fine-tune signaling at central synapses. At glutamatergic synapses, high and low activity of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) is observed when pore-forming subunits coassemble with or without auxiliary subunits, respectively. Whether a common structural pathway accounts for these different gating modes is unclear. Here, we identify two structural motifs that determine the time course of AMPAR channel activation. A network of electrostatic interactions at the apex of the AMPAR ligand-binding domain (LBD) is essential for gating by pore-forming subunits, whereas a conserved motif on the lower, D2 lobe of the LBD prolongs channel activity when auxiliary subunits are present. Accordingly, channel activity is almost entirely abolished by elimination of the electrostatic network but restored via auxiliary protein interactions at the D2 lobe. In summary, we propose that activation of native AMPAR complexes is coordinated by distinct structural pathways, favored by the association/dissociation of auxiliary subunits. PMID:26924438

  14. Regulation of AMPA receptor extrasynaptic insertion by 4.1N, phosphorylation and palmitoylation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Da-Ting; Makino, Yuichi; Sharma, Kamal; Hayashi, Takashi; Neve, Rachael; Takamiya, Kogo; Huganir, Richard L

    2009-07-01

    The insertion of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) into the plasma membrane is an important step in the synaptic delivery of AMPARs during the expression of synaptic plasticity. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating AMPAR insertion remain elusive. By directly visualizing individual insertion events of the AMPAR subunit GluR1 in rodents, we found that the protein 4.1N was required for activity-dependent GluR1 insertion. Protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation of the serine 816 (S816) and S818 residues of GluR1 enhanced 4.1N binding to GluR1 and facilitated GluR1 insertion. In addition, palmitoylation of GluR1 C811 residue modulated PKC phosphorylation and GluR1 insertion. Finally, disrupting 4.1N-dependent GluR1 insertion decreased surface expression of GluR1 and the expression of long-term potentiation. Our study uncovers a previously unknown mechanism that governs activity-dependent GluR1 trafficking, reveals an interaction between AMPAR palmitoylation and phosphorylation, and underscores the functional importance of 4.1N in AMPAR trafficking and synaptic plasticity. PMID:19503082

  15. AMPA receptor plasticity in the nucleus accumbens after repeated exposure to cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Marina E.; Ferrario, Carrie R.

    2010-01-01

    This review focuses on cocaine-induced postsynaptic plasticity in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) involving changes in AMPA receptor (AMPAR) transmission. First, fundamental properties of AMPAR in the NAc are reviewed. Then, we provide a detailed and critical analysis of literature demonstrating alterations in AMPAR transmission in association with behavioral sensitization to cocaine and cocaine self-administration. We conclude that cocaine exposure leads to changes in AMPAR transmission that depend on many factors including whether exposure is contingent or non-contingent, the duration of withdrawal, and whether extinction training has occurred. The relationship between changes in AMPAR transmission and responding to cocaine or cocaine-paired cues can also be affected by these variables. However, after prolonged withdrawal in the absence of extinction training, our findings and others lead us to propose that AMPAR transmission is enhanced, resulting in stronger responding to drug-paired cues. Finally, many results indicate that the state of synaptic transmission in the NAc after cocaine exposure is associated with impairment of AMPAR-dependent plasticity. This may contribute to a broad range of addiction-related behavioral changes. PMID:20109488

  16. Shisa6 traps AMPA receptors at postsynaptic sites and prevents their desensitization during synaptic activity.

    PubMed

    Klaassen, Remco V; Stroeder, Jasper; Coussen, Françoise; Hafner, Anne-Sophie; Petersen, Jennifer D; Renancio, Cedric; Schmitz, Leanne J M; Normand, Elisabeth; Lodder, Johannes C; Rotaru, Diana C; Rao-Ruiz, Priyanka; Spijker, Sabine; Mansvelder, Huibert D; Choquet, Daniel; Smit, August B

    2016-01-01

    Trafficking and biophysical properties of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) in the brain depend on interactions with associated proteins. We identify Shisa6, a single transmembrane protein, as a stable and directly interacting bona fide AMPAR auxiliary subunit. Shisa6 is enriched at hippocampal postsynaptic membranes and co-localizes with AMPARs. The Shisa6 C-terminus harbours a PDZ domain ligand that binds to PSD-95, constraining mobility of AMPARs in the plasma membrane and confining them to postsynaptic densities. Shisa6 expressed in HEK293 cells alters GluA1- and GluA2-mediated currents by prolonging decay times and decreasing the extent of AMPAR desensitization, while slowing the rate of recovery from desensitization. Using gene deletion, we show that Shisa6 increases rise and decay times of hippocampal CA1 miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs). Shisa6-containing AMPARs show prominent sustained currents, indicating protection from full desensitization. Accordingly, Shisa6 prevents synaptically trapped AMPARs from depression at high-frequency synaptic transmission. PMID:26931375

  17. Role of TARP interaction in S-SCAM-mediated regulation of AMPA receptors.

    PubMed

    Danielson, Eric; Metallo, Jacob; Lee, Sang H

    2012-01-01

    Scaffolding proteins are involved in the incorporation, anchoring, maintenance, and removal of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) at synapses, either through a direct interaction with AMPARs or via indirect association through auxiliary subunits of transmembrane AMPAR regulatory proteins (TARPs). Synaptic scaffolding molecule (S-SCAM) is a newly characterized member of the scaffolding proteins critical for the regulation and maintenance of AMPAR levels at synapses, and directly binds to TARPs through a PDZ interaction. However, the functional significance of S-SCAM-TARP interaction in the regulation of AMPARs has not been tested. Here we show that overexpression of the C-terminal peptide of TARP-γ2 fused to EGFP abolished the S-SCAM-mediated enhancement of surface GluA2 expression. Conversely, the deletion of the PDZ-5 domain of S-SCAM that binds TARPs greatly attenuated the S-SCAM-induced increase of surface GluA2 expression. In contrast, the deletion of the guanylate kinase domain of S-SCAM did not show a significant effect on the regulation of AMPARs. Together, these results suggest that S-SCAM is regulating AMPARs through TARPs. PMID:22878254

  18. Distinct Structural Pathways Coordinate the Activation of AMPA Receptor-Auxiliary Subunit Complexes.

    PubMed

    Dawe, G Brent; Musgaard, Maria; Aurousseau, Mark R P; Nayeem, Naushaba; Green, Tim; Biggin, Philip C; Bowie, Derek

    2016-03-16

    Neurotransmitter-gated ion channels adopt different gating modes to fine-tune signaling at central synapses. At glutamatergic synapses, high and low activity of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) is observed when pore-forming subunits coassemble with or without auxiliary subunits, respectively. Whether a common structural pathway accounts for these different gating modes is unclear. Here, we identify two structural motifs that determine the time course of AMPAR channel activation. A network of electrostatic interactions at the apex of the AMPAR ligand-binding domain (LBD) is essential for gating by pore-forming subunits, whereas a conserved motif on the lower, D2 lobe of the LBD prolongs channel activity when auxiliary subunits are present. Accordingly, channel activity is almost entirely abolished by elimination of the electrostatic network but restored via auxiliary protein interactions at the D2 lobe. In summary, we propose that activation of native AMPAR complexes is coordinated by distinct structural pathways, favored by the association/dissociation of auxiliary subunits. PMID:26924438

  19. PKCα is required for inflammation-induced trafficking of extrasynaptic AMPA receptors in tonically firing lamina II dorsal horn neurons during the maintenance of persistent inflammatory pain

    PubMed Central

    Kopach, Olga; Viatchenko-Karpinski, Viacheslav; Atianjoh, Fidelis E.; Belan, Pavel; Tao, Yuan-Xiang; Voitenko, Nana

    2012-01-01

    Persistent inflammation promotes internalization of synaptic GluR2-containing Ca2+-impermeable AMPA receptors (AMPARs) and insertion of GluR1-containing Ca2+-permeable AMPARs at extrasynaptic sites in dorsal horn neurons. Previously we have shown that internalization of synaptic GluR2-containing AMPARs requires an activation of spinal cord protein kinase C alpha (PKCα), but molecular mechanisms that underlie altered trafficking of extrasynaptic AMPARs are still unclear. By utilizing the antisence oligodeoxynucleotides that specifically knockdown PKCα, we have found that a decrease in dorsal horn PKCα expression prevents complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA)-induced increase in a functional expression of extrasynaptic Ca2+-permeable AMPARs in substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons of the rat spinal cord. This was manifested as an abolishment of augmented AMPA-induced currents and associated [Ca2+]i transients, and as a reverse of the current rectification 1 d post-CFA. These changes were observed specifically in SG neurons characterized by intrinsic tonic firing properties, but not in those exhibiting strong adaptation. Finally, dorsal horn PKCα knockdown produced anti-nociceptive effect on CFA-induced thermal and mechanical hypersensitivity during the maintenance period of inflammatory pain, indicating a role for PKCα in persistent inflammatory pain maintenance. Altogether, our results indicate that inflammation-induced trafficking of extrasynaptic Ca2+-permeable AMPARs in tonically firing SG neurons depends on PKCα, and suggest that this PKCα-dependent trafficking may contribute to the persistent inflammatory pain maintenance. PMID:23374940

  20. Adenosine A1 Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis of AMPA Receptors Contributes to Impairments in Long-Term Potentiation (LTP) in the Middle-Aged Rat Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhicheng; Stockwell, Jocelyn; Cayabyab, Francisco S

    2016-05-01

    Aging causes multiple changes in the mammalian brain, including changes in synaptic signaling. Previous reports have shown increased extracellular adenosine in the aging brain, and we recently reported that activation of adenosine A1 receptors (A1Rs) induces AMPA receptor (AMPAR) internalization in rat hippocampus. This study investigated whether aging-related changes in the rat hippocampus include altered surface expression of adenosine A1 and A2A receptors, and whether these changes correspond to changes in AMPAR surface expression and altered synaptic plasticity. We found reduced A1R surface expression in middle-aged rat hippocampus, and also reduced GluA1 and GluA2 AMPAR subunit surface expression. Using a chemically-induced LTP (cLTP) experimental protocol, we recorded fEPSPs in young (1 month old) and middle-aged (7-12 month old) rat hippocampal slices. There were significant impairments in cLTP in middle-aged slices, suggesting impaired synaptic plasticity. Since we previously showed that the A1R agonist N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) reduced both A1Rs and GluA2/GluA1 AMPARs, we hypothesized that the observed impaired synaptic plasticity in middle-aged brains is regulated by A1R-mediated AMPAR internalization by clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Following cLTP, we found a significant increase in GluA1 and GluA2 surface expression in young rats, which was blunted in middle-aged brains or in young brains pretreated with CPA. Blocking A1Rs with 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine or AMPAR endocytosis with either Tat-GluA2-3Y peptide or dynasore (dynamin inhibitor) similarly enhanced AMPAR surface expression following cLTP. These data suggest that age-dependent alteration in adenosine receptor expression contributes to increased AMPAR endocytosis and impaired synaptic plasticity in aged brains. PMID:26700433

  1. Molecular Dissection of the Interaction between the AMPA Receptor and Cornichon Homolog-3

    PubMed Central

    Shanks, Natalie F.; Cais, Ondrej; Maruo, Tomohiko; Savas, Jeffrey N.; Zaika, Elena I.; Azumaya, Caleigh M.; Yates, John R.; Greger, Ingo

    2014-01-01

    Cornichon homologs (CNIHs) are AMPA-type glutamate receptor (AMPAR) auxiliary subunits that modulate AMPAR ion channel function and trafficking. Mechanisms underlying this interaction and functional modulation of the receptor complex are currently unclear. Here, using proteins expressed from mouse and rat cDNA, we show that CNIH-3 forms a stable complex with tetrameric AMPARs and contributes to the transmembrane density in single-particle electron microscopy structures. Peptide array-based screening and in vitro mutagenesis identified two clusters of conserved membrane-proximal residues in CNIHs that contribute to AMPAR binding. Because CNIH-1 binds to AMPARs but modulates gating at a significantly lower magnitude compared with CNIH-3, these conserved residues mediate a direct interaction between AMPARs and CNIHs. In addition, residues in the extracellular loop of CNIH-2/3 absent in CNIH-1/4 are critical for both AMPAR interaction and gating modulation. On the AMPAR extracellular domains, the ligand-binding domain and possibly a stretch of linker, connecting the ligand-binding domain to the fourth membrane-spanning segment, is the principal contact point with the CNIH-3 extracellular loop. In contrast, the membrane-distal N-terminal domain is less involved in AMPAR gating modulation by CNIH-3 and AMPAR binding to CNIH-3. Collectively, our results identify conserved residues in the membrane-proximal region of CNIHs that contribute to AMPAR binding and an additional unique segment in the CNIH-2/3 extracellular loop required for both physical interaction and gating modulation of the AMPAR. Consistent with the dissociable properties of binding and gating modulation, we identified a mutant CNIH-3 that preserves AMPAR binding capability but has attenuated activity of gating modulation. PMID:25186755

  2. Dysregulation of AMPA receptor transmission in the nucleus accumbens in animal models of cocaine addiction

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Marina E.

    2014-01-01

    Plasticity of glutamate transmission in neuronal circuits involving the nucleus accumbens (NAc) is now recognized to play a critical role in cocaine addiction. NAc neurons are excited primarily by AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPAR) and this is required for cocaine seeking. This review will briefly describe AMPAR properties and trafficking, with a focus on studies in NAc neurons, and then consider mechanisms by which cocaine may alter AMPAR transmission. Two examples will be discussed that may be important in two different stages of addiction: learning about drugs and drug-related cues during the period of drug exposure, and persistent vulnerability to craving and relapse after abstinence is achieved. The first example is drawn from studies of cultured NAc neurons. Elevation of DA levels (as would occur following cocaine exposure) facilitates activity-dependent strengthening of excitatory synapses onto medium spiny neurons, the main cell type and projection neuron of the NAc. This occurs because activation of D1-class receptors primes AMPAR for synaptic insertion, creating a temporal window in which stimuli related to cocaine-taking are more efficacious at eliciting synaptic plasticity and thus being encoded into memory. The second example involves rat models of cocaine addiction. Cell surface and synaptic expression of AMPAR on NAc neurons is persistently increased after withdrawal from repeated cocaine exposure. We hypothesize that this increases the reactivity of NAc neurons to glutamate inputs from cortex and limbic structures, facilitating the ability of these inputs to trigger cocaine seeking and thus contributing to the persistent vulnerability to relapse that characterizes addiction. PMID:20361291

  3. AMPA receptor-mediated alterations of intracellular calcium homeostasis in rat cerebellar Purkinje cells in vitro: correlates to dark cell degeneration.

    PubMed

    Strahlendorf, J C; Brandon, T; Miles, R; Strahlendorf, H K

    1998-11-01

    In the rat cerebellar slice preparation in vitro, excessive DL-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA)-receptor activation elicits a characteristic type of excitotoxicity of Purkinje cells (PCs) known as dark cell degeneration (DCD). DCD models neurotoxicity of PCs and hippocampal pyramidal neurons in vivo following hyperexcitable states. The intent of this study was to: a) determine whether AMPA-induced neurotoxicity of PCs is correlated with temporally and spatially restricted rises in intracellular Ca2+ and b) whether GYKI 52466 and nominal external Ca2+, conditions that reduced expression of AMPA-elicited DCD, altered the induced Ca2+ patterns. Employing the Ca2+-sensitive dye Fluo-3 and a confocal laser scanning microscope, we evaluated changes in intracellular Ca2+ within PCs in a cerebellar slice preparation. AMPA application alone (30 microM for 30 min) caused a significant initial rise in perinuclear and cytoplasmic Ca2+ that returned to control levels during the latter part of the AMPA exposure period. Following removal of AMPA (expression period), perinuclear and cytoplasmic Ca2+ displayed a significant delayed rise peaking transiently 60 min after AMPA removal. The efficacy of GYKI 52466 and nominal external Ca2+ conditions to attenuate AMPA-induced DCD was correlated to reductions in AMPA-induced transient elevations in perinuclear and cytoplasmic Ca2+ levels during the expression phase and to a lesser extent during the exposure period. The present data suggest that during the expression phase, the delayed perinuclear and cytoplasmic Ca2+ transient may be the harbinger of impending loss of Ca2+ homeostasis and cell damage. PMID:9814545

  4. NMDA and AMPA receptors contribute similarly to temporal processing in mammalian retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Stafford, Benjamin K; Manookin, Michael B; Singer, Joshua H; Demb, Jonathan B

    2014-01-01

    Postsynaptic AMPA- and NMDA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs, NMDARs) are commonly expressed at the same synapses. AMPARs are thought to mediate the majority of fast excitatory neurotransmission whereas NMDARs, with their relatively slower kinetics and higher Ca2+ permeability, are thought to mediate synaptic plasticity, especially in neural circuits devoted to learning and memory. In sensory neurons, however, the roles of AMPARs and NMDARs are less well understood. Here, we tested in the in vitro guinea pig retina whether AMPARs and NMDARs differentially support temporal contrast encoding by two ganglion cell types. In both OFF Alpha and Delta ganglion cells, contrast stimulation evoked an NMDAR-mediated response with a characteristic J-shaped I–V relationship. In OFF Delta cells, AMPAR- and NMDAR-mediated responses could be modulated at low frequencies but were suppressed during 10 Hz stimulation, when responses were instead shaped by synaptic inhibition. With inhibition blocked, both AMPAR- and NMDAR-mediated responses could be modulated at 10 Hz, indicating that NMDAR kinetics do not limit temporal encoding. In OFF Alpha cells, NMDAR-mediated responses followed stimuli at frequencies up to ∼18 Hz. In both cell types, NMDAR-mediated responses to contrast modulation at 9–18 Hz showed delays of <10 ms relative to AMPAR-mediated responses. Thus, NMDARs combine with AMPARs to encode rapidly modulated glutamate release, and NMDAR kinetics do not limit temporal coding by OFF Alpha and Delta ganglion cells substantially. Furthermore, glutamatergic transmission is differentially regulated across bipolar cell pathways: in some, release is suppressed at high temporal frequencies by presynaptic inhibition. PMID:25217374

  5. MAGI-1 modulates AMPA receptor synaptic localization and behavioral plasticity in response to prior experience.

    PubMed

    Emtage, Lesley; Chang, Howard; Tiver, Rebecca; Rongo, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    It is well established that the efficacy of synaptic connections can be rapidly modified by neural activity, yet how the environment and prior experience modulate such synaptic and behavioral plasticity is only beginning to be understood. Here we show in C. elegans that the broadly conserved scaffolding molecule MAGI-1 is required for the plasticity observed in a glutamatergic circuit. This mechanosensory circuit mediates reversals in locomotion in response to touch stimulation, and the AMPA-type receptor (AMPAR) subunits GLR-1 and GLR-2, which are required for reversal behavior, are localized to ventral cord synapses in this circuit. We find that animals modulate GLR-1 and GLR-2 localization in response to prior mechanosensory stimulation; a specific isoform of MAGI-1 (MAGI-1L) is critical for this modulation. We show that MAGI-1L interacts with AMPARs through the intracellular domain of the GLR-2 subunit, which is required for the modulation of AMPAR synaptic localization by mechanical stimulation. In addition, mutations that prevent the ubiquitination of GLR-1 prevent the decrease in AMPAR localization observed in previously stimulated magi-1 mutants. Finally, we find that previously-stimulated animals later habituate to subsequent mechanostimulation more rapidly compared to animals initially reared without mechanical stimulation; MAGI-1L, GLR-1, and GLR-2 are required for this change in habituation kinetics. Our findings demonstrate that prior experience can cause long-term alterations in both behavioral plasticity and AMPAR localization at synapses in an intact animal, and indicate a new, direct role for MAGI/S-SCAM proteins in modulating AMPAR localization and function in the wake of variable sensory experience. PMID:19242552

  6. ANTIDEPRESSANT-LIKE EFFECTS OF LOW KETAMINE DOSE IS ASSOCIATED WITH INCREASED HIPPOCAMPAL AMPA/NMDA RECEPTOR DENSITY RATIO IN FEMALE WISTAR-KYOTO RATS

    PubMed Central

    Tizabi, Yousef; Bhatti, Babur H; Manaye, Kebreten F; Das, Jharna R; Akinfiresoye, Luli

    2012-01-01

    Preclinical as well as limited clinical studies indicate that ketamine, a non-competitive glutamate NMDA receptor antagonist, may exert a quick and prolonged antidepressant effect. It has been postulated that ketamine action is due to inhibition of NMDA and stimulation of AMPA receptors. Here, we sought to determine whether ketamine would exert antidepressant effects in Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats, a putative animal model of depression and whether this effect would be associated with changes in AMPA/NMDA receptor densities in the hippocampus. Adult female WKY rats and their control Wistar rats were subjected to acute and chronic ketamine doses and their locomotor activity (LMA) and immobility in the forced swim test (FST) were evaluated. Hippocampal AMPA and NMDA receptor densities were also measured following a chronic ketamine dose. Ketamine, both acutely (0.5–5.0 mg/kg ip) and chronically (0.5–2.5 mg/kg daily for 10 days) resulted in a dose-dependent and prolonged decrease in immobility in the FST in WKY rats only, suggesting an antidepressant-like effect in this model. Chronic treatment with an effective dose of ketamine also resulted in an increase in AMPA/NMDA receptor density ratio in the hippocampus of WKY rats. LMA was not affected by any ketamine treatment in either strain. These results indicate a rapid and lasting antidepressant-like effect of a low ketamine dose in WKY rat model of depression. Moreover, the increase in AMPA/NMDA receptor density in hippocampus could be a contributory factor to behavioral effects of ketamine. These findings suggest potential therapeutic benefit in simultaneous reduction of central NMDA and elevation of AMPA receptor function in treatment of depression. PMID:22521815

  7. Development of calcium-permeable AMPA receptors and their correlation with NMDA receptors in fast-spiking interneurons of rat prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huai-Xing; Gao, Wen-Jun

    2010-01-01

    Abnormal influx of Ca2+ is thought to contribute to the neuronal injury associated with a number of brain disorders, and Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors (CP-AMPARs) play a critical role in the pathological process. Despite the apparent vulnerability of fast-spiking (FS) interneurons in neurological disorders, little is known about the CP-AMPARs expressed by functionally identified FS interneurons in the developing prefrontal cortex (PFC). We investigated the development of inwardly rectifying AMPA receptor-mediated currents and their correlation with NMDA receptor-mediated currents in FS interneurons in the rat PFC. We found that 78% of the FS interneurons expressed a low rectification index, presumably Ca2+-permeable AMPARs, with only 22% exhibiting AMPARs with a high rectification index, probably Ca2+ impermeable (CI). FS interneurons with CP-AMPARs exhibited properties distinct from those expressing CI-AMPARs, although both displayed similar morphologies, passive membrane properties and AMPA currents at resting membrane potentials. The AMPA receptors also exhibited dramatic changes during cortical development with significantly more FS interneurons with CP-AMPARs and a clearly decreased rectification index during adolescence. In addition, FS interneurons with CP-AMPARs exhibited few or no NMDA currents, distinct frequency-dependent synaptic facilitation, and protracted maturation in short-term plasticity. These data suggest that CP-AMPARs in FS interneurons may play a critical role in neuronal integration and that their characteristic properties may make these cells particularly vulnerable to disruptive influences in the PFC, thus contributing to the onset of many psychiatric disorders. PMID:20547673

  8. Facilitation of AMPA receptor-mediated steady-state current by extrasynaptic NMDA receptors in supraoptic magnocellular neurosecretory cells.

    PubMed

    Pai, Yoon Hyoung; Lim, Chae Seong; Park, Kyung-Ah; Cho, Hyun Sil; Lee, Gyu-Seung; Shin, Yong Sup; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Jeon, Byeong Hwa; Yoon, Seok Hwa; Park, Jin Bong

    2016-07-01

    In addition to classical synaptic transmission, information is transmitted between cells via the activation of extrasynaptic receptors that generate persistent tonic current in the brain. While growing evidence supports the presence of tonic NMDA current (INMDA) generated by extrasynaptic NMDA receptors (eNMDARs), the functional significance of tonic INMDA in various brain regions remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that activation of eNMDARs that generate INMDA facilitates the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-proprionate receptor (AMPAR)-mediated steady-state current in supraoptic nucleus (SON) magnocellular neurosecretory cells (MNCs). In low-Mg(2+) artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF), glutamate induced an inward shift in Iho lding (IGLU) at a holding potential (Vholding) of -70 mV which was partly blocked by an AMPAR antagonist, NBQX. NBQX-sensitive IGLU was observed even in normal aCSF at Vholding of -40 mV or -20 mV. IGLU was completely abolished by pretreatment with an NMDAR blocker, AP5, under all tested conditions. AMPA induced a reproducible inward shift in Iholding (IAMPA) in SON MNCs. Pretreatment with AP5 attenuated IAMPA amplitudes to ~60% of the control levels in low-Mg(2+) aCSF, but not in normal aCSF at Vholding of -70 mV. IAMPA attenuation by AP5 was also prominent in normal aCSF at depolarized holding potentials. Memantine, an eNMDAR blocker, mimicked the AP5-induced IAMPA attenuation in SON MNCs. Finally, chronic dehydration did not affect IAMPA attenuation by AP5 in the neurons. These results suggest that tonic INMDA, mediated by eNMDAR, facilitates AMPAR function, changing the postsynaptic response to its agonists in normal and osmotically challenged SON MNCs. PMID:27382359

  9. Facilitation of AMPA receptor-mediated steady-state current by extrasynaptic NMDA receptors in supraoptic magnocellular neurosecretory cells

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Yoon Hyoung; Lim, Chae Seong; Park, Kyung-Ah; Cho, Hyun Sil; Lee, Gyu-Seung; Shin, Yong Sup; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Jeon, Byeong Hwa

    2016-01-01

    In addition to classical synaptic transmission, information is transmitted between cells via the activation of extrasynaptic receptors that generate persistent tonic current in the brain. While growing evidence supports the presence of tonic NMDA current (INMDA) generated by extrasynaptic NMDA receptors (eNMDARs), the functional significance of tonic INMDA in various brain regions remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that activation of eNMDARs that generate INMDA facilitates the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-proprionate receptor (AMPAR)-mediated steady-state current in supraoptic nucleus (SON) magnocellular neurosecretory cells (MNCs). In low-Mg2+ artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF), glutamate induced an inward shift in Iholding (IGLU) at a holding potential (Vholding) of –70 mV which was partly blocked by an AMPAR antagonist, NBQX. NBQX-sensitive IGLU was observed even in normal aCSF at Vholding of –40 mV or –20 mV. IGLU was completely abolished by pretreatment with an NMDAR blocker, AP5, under all tested conditions. AMPA induced a reproducible inward shift in Iholding (IAMPA) in SON MNCs. Pretreatment with AP5 attenuated IAMPA amplitudes to ~60% of the control levels in low-Mg2+ aCSF, but not in normal aCSF at Vholding of –70 mV. IAMPA attenuation by AP5 was also prominent in normal aCSF at depolarized holding potentials. Memantine, an eNMDAR blocker, mimicked the AP5-induced IAMPA attenuation in SON MNCs. Finally, chronic dehydration did not affect IAMPA attenuation by AP5 in the neurons. These results suggest that tonic INMDA, mediated by eNMDAR, facilitates AMPAR function, changing the postsynaptic response to its agonists in normal and osmotically challenged SON MNCs. PMID:27382359

  10. Antioxidant NAC and AMPA/KA receptor antagonist DNQX inhibited JNK3 activation following global ischemia in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hui; Zhang, Guangyi; Li, Hongchun; Zhang, Quanguang

    2003-06-01

    c-Jun N-terminal kinase-3 (JNK3), the only neural-specific isoform, may play an important role in excitotoxicity and neuronal injury. To analyze the variation of JNK3 activation, levels of phospho-JNK3 were measured at various time points of ischemia and selected time points of reperfusion, respectively. Our study illustrated that JNK3 was rapidly activated and translocated from cytosol to nucleus during ischemia. During reperfusion, two peaks of JNK3 activation occurred at 30 min and 3 days, respectively. To further define the mechanism of JNK3 activation, antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC), alpha-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)/kainate (KA) receptor antagonist 6,7-dinitro-quinoxaline-2,3(1H,4H)-dione (DNQX), N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist ketamine and L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel (L-VGCC) antagonist nifedipine were given to the rats 20 min prior to ischemia. The results showed that NAC obviously inhibited JNK3 activation during the early reperfusion, whereas DNQX preferably attenuated JNK3 activation during the latter reperfusion. Ketamine and nifedipine had no significant effects on JNK3 activation during reperfusion. Consequently, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and AMPA/KA receptor were closely associated with JNK3 activation following global ischemia. PMID:12767482

  11. 3’-Deoxyadenosine (Cordycepin) Produces a Rapid and Robust Antidepressant Effect via Enhancing Prefrontal AMPA Receptor Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bai; Hou, Yangyang; Zhu, Ming; Bao, Hongkun; Nie, Jun; Zhang, Grace Y.; Shan, Liping; Yao, Yao; Du, Kai; Yang, Hongju; Li, Meizhang; Zheng, Bingrong; Xu, Xiufeng; Xiao, Chunjie; Du, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Background: The development of rapid and safe antidepressants for the treatment of major depression is in urgent demand. Converging evidence suggests that glutamatergic signaling seems to play important roles in the pathophysiology of depression. Methods: We studied the antidepressant effects of 3’-deoxyadenosine (3’-dA, Cordycepin) and the critical role of the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptor in male CD-1 mice via behavioral and biochemical experiments. After 3’-dA treatment, the phosphorylation and synaptic localization of the AMPA receptors GluR1 and GluR2 were determined in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus (HIP). The traditional antidepressant imipramine was applied as a positive control. Results: We found that an injection of 3’-dA led to a rapid and robust antidepressant effect, which was significantly faster and stronger than imipramine, after 45min in tail suspension and forced swim tests. This antidepressant effect remained after 5 days of treatment with 3’-dA. Unlike the psycho-stimulants, 3’-dA did not show a hyperactive effect in the open field test. After 45min or 5 days of treatment, 3’-dA enhanced GluR1 S845 phosphorylation in both the PFC and HIP. In addition, after 45min of treatment, 3’-dA significantly up-regulated GluR1 S845 phosphorylation and GluR1, but not GluR2 levels, at the synapses in the PFC. After 5 days of treatment, 3’-dA significantly enhanced GluR1 S845 phosphorylation and GluR1, but not GluR2, at the synapses in the PFC and HIP. Moreover, the AMPA-specific antagonist GYKI 52466 was able to block the rapid antidepressant effects of 3’-dA. Conclusion: This study identified 3’-dA as a novel rapid antidepressant with clinical potential and multiple beneficial mechanisms, particularly in regulating the prefrontal AMPA receptor signaling pathway. PMID:26443809

  12. Inflammation alters trafficking of extrasynaptic AMPA receptors in tonically firing lamina II neurons of the rat spinal dorsal horn

    PubMed Central

    Kopach, Olga; Kao, Sheng-Chin; Petralia, Ronald S.; Belan, Pavel; Tao, Yuan-Xiang; Voitenko, Nana

    2011-01-01

    Peripheral inflammation alters AMPA receptor (AMPAR) subunit trafficking and increases AMPAR Ca2+ permeability at synapses of spinal dorsal horn neurons. However, it is unclear whether AMPAR trafficking at extrasynaptic sites of these neurons also changes under persistent inflammatory pain conditions. Using patch-clamp recording combined with Ca2+ imaging and cobalt staining, we found that, under normal conditions, an extrasynaptic pool of AMPARs in rat substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons of spinal dorsal horn predominantly consists of GluR2-containing Ca2+-impermeable receptors. Maintenance of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammation was associated with a marked enhancement of AMPA-induced currents and [Ca2+]i transients in SG neurons, while, as we previously showed, the amplitude of synaptically evoked AMPAR-mediated currents was not changed 24 h after CFA. These findings indicate that extrasynaptic AMPARs are upregulated and their Ca2+ permeability increases dramatically. This increase occurred in SG neurons characterized by intrinsic tonic firing properties, but not in those exhibited strong adaptation. This increase was also accompanied by an inward rectification of AMPA-induced currents and enhancement of sensitivity to a highly selective Ca2+-permeable AMPAR blocker, IEM-1460. Electron microcopy and biochemical assays additionally showed an increase in the amount of GluR1 at extrasynaptic membranes in dorsal horn neurons 24 h post-CFA. Taken together, our findings suggest that CFA-induced inflammation increases functional expression and proportion of extrasynaptic GluR1-containing Ca2+-permeable AMPARs in tonically firing excitatory dorsal horn neurons. We suggest that the altered extrasynaptic AMPAR trafficking might participate in the maintenance of persistent inflammatory pain. PMID:21282008

  13. Inflammation alters trafficking of extrasynaptic AMPA receptors in tonically firing lamina II neurons of the rat spinal dorsal horn.

    PubMed

    Kopach, Olga; Kao, Sheng-Chin; Petralia, Ronald S; Belan, Pavel; Tao, Yuan-Xiang; Voitenko, Nana

    2011-04-01

    Peripheral inflammation alters AMPA receptor (AMPAR) subunit trafficking and increases AMPAR Ca(2+) permeability at synapses of spinal dorsal horn neurons. However, it is unclear whether AMPAR trafficking at extrasynaptic sites of these neurons also changes under persistent inflammatory pain conditions. Using patch-clamp recording combined with Ca(2+) imaging and cobalt staining, we found that, under normal conditions, an extrasynaptic pool of AMPARs in rat substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons of spinal dorsal horn predominantly consists of GluR2-containing Ca(2+)-impermeable receptors. Maintenance of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammation was associated with a marked enhancement of AMPA-induced currents and [Ca(2+)](i) transients in SG neurons, while, as we previously showed, the amplitude of synaptically evoked AMPAR-mediated currents was not changed 24 h after CFA. These findings indicate that extrasynaptic AMPARs are upregulated and their Ca(2+) permeability increases dramatically. This increase occurred in SG neurons characterized by intrinsic tonic firing properties, but not in those exhibited strong adaptation. This increase was also accompanied by an inward rectification of AMPA-induced currents and enhancement of sensitivity to a highly selective Ca(2+)-permeable AMPAR blocker, IEM-1460. Electron microcopy and biochemical assays additionally showed an increase in the amount of GluR1 at extrasynaptic membranes in dorsal horn neurons 24h post-CFA. Taken together, our findings indicate that CFA-induced inflammation increases functional expression and proportion of extrasynaptic GluR1-containing Ca(2+)-permeable AMPARs in tonically firing excitatory dorsal horn neurons, suggesting that the altered extrasynaptic AMPAR trafficking might participate in the maintenance of persistent inflammatory pain. PMID:21282008

  14. NMDA receptors in preBötzinger complex neurons can drive respiratory rhythm independent of AMPA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Morgado-Valle, Consuelo; Feldman, Jack L

    2007-01-01

    The role of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) in generation and propagation of respiratory rhythm is well documented both in vivo and in vitro, whereas the functional significance of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) in preBötzinger complex (preBötC) neurons has not been explored. Here we examined the interactions between AMPARs and NMDARs during spontaneous respiratory rhythm generation in slices from neonatal rats in vitro. We tested the hypothesis that activation of NMDARs can drive respiratory rhythm in the absence of other excitatory drives. Blockade of NMDARs with dizocilpine hydrogen maleate (MK-801, 20 μm) had a negligible effect on respiratory rhythm and pattern under standard conditions in vitro, whereas blockade of AMPARs with NBQX (0.5 μm) completely abolished respiratory activity. Removal of extracellular Mg2+ to relieve the voltage-dependent block of NMDARs maintained respiratory rhythm without a significant effect on period, even in the presence of high NBQX concentrations (≤ 100 μm). Removal of Mg2+ increased inspiratory-modulated inward current peak (II) and charge (QI) in preBötC neurons voltage-clamped at −60 mV by 245% and 309%, respectively, with respect to basal values. We conclude that the normal AMPAR-mediated postsynaptic current underlying respiratory drive can be replaced by NMDAR-mediated postsynaptic current when the voltage-dependent Mg2+ block is removed. Under this condition, respiratory-related frequency is unaffected by changes in II, suggesting that the two can be independently regulated. PMID:17446224

  15. The neuronal K-Cl cotransporter KCC2 influences postsynaptic AMPA receptor content and lateral diffusion in dendritic spines

    PubMed Central

    Gauvain, Grégory; Chamma, Ingrid; Chevy, Quentin; Cabezas, Carolina; Irinopoulou, Theano; Bodrug, Natalia; Carnaud, Michèle; Lévi, Sabine; Poncer, Jean Christophe

    2011-01-01

    The K-Cl cotransporter KCC2 plays an essential role in neuronal chloride homeostasis, and thereby influences the efficacy and polarity of GABA signaling. Although KCC2 is expressed throughout the somatodendritic membrane, it is remarkably enriched in dendritic spines, which host most glutamatergic synapses in cortical neurons. KCC2 has been shown to influence spine morphogenesis and functional maturation in developing neurons, but its function in mature dendritic spines remains unknown. Here, we report that suppressing KCC2 expression decreases the efficacy of excitatory synapses in mature hippocampal neurons. This effect correlates with a reduced postsynaptic aggregation of GluR1-containing AMPA receptors and is mimicked by a dominant negative mutant of KCC2 interaction with cytoskeleton but not by pharmacological suppression of KCC2 function. Single-particle tracking experiments reveal that suppressing KCC2 increases lateral diffusion of the mobile fraction of AMPA receptor subunit GluR1 in spines but not in adjacent dendritic shafts. Increased diffusion was also observed for transmembrane but not membrane-anchored recombinant neuronal cell adhesion molecules. We suggest that KCC2, likely through interactions with the actin cytoskeleton, hinders transmembrane protein diffusion, and thereby contributes to their confinement within dendritic spines. PMID:21878564

  16. Deficiency of Lipoprotein Lipase in Neurons Decreases AMPA Receptor Phosphorylation and Leads to Neurobehavioral Abnormalities in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tian; Taussig, Matthew D.; DiPatrizio, Nicholas V.; Astarita, Giuseppe; Piomelli, Daniele; Bergman, Bryan C.; Dell’Acqua, Mark L.; Eckel, Robert H.; Wang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in lipid metabolism have been found in several neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) hydrolyzes triacylglycerides in lipoproteins and regulates lipid metabolism in multiple organs and tissues, including the central nervous system (CNS). Though many brain regions express LPL, the functions of this lipase in the CNS remain largely unknown. We developed mice with neuron-specific LPL deficiency that became obese on chow by 16 wks in homozygous mutant mice (NEXLPL-/-) and 10 mo in heterozygous mice (NEXLPL+/-). In the present study, we show that 21 mo NEXLPL+/- mice display substantial cognitive function decline including poorer learning and memory, and increased anxiety with no difference in general motor activities and exploratory behavior. These neurobehavioral abnormalities are associated with a reduction in the 2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazol-4-yl) propanoic acid (AMPA) receptor subunit GluA1 and its phosphorylation, without any alterations in amyloid β accumulation. Importantly, a marked deficit in omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in the hippocampus precedes the development of the neurobehavioral phenotype of NEXLPL+/- mice. And, a diet supplemented with n-3 PUFA can improve the learning and memory of NEXLPL+/- mice at both 10 mo and 21 mo of age. We interpret these findings to indicate that LPL regulates the availability of PUFA in the CNS and, this in turn, impacts the strength of synaptic plasticity in the brain of aging mice through the modification of AMPA receptor and its phosphorylation. PMID:26263173

  17. α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors Occur at Postsynaptic Densities of AMPA Receptor-Positive and -Negative Excitatory Synapses in Rat Sensory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Robert B.; Aoki, Chiye

    2010-01-01

    NMDA receptor (NMDAR) activation requires concurrent membrane depolarization, and glutamatergic synapses lacking AMPA receptors (AMPARs) are often considered “silent” in the absence of another source of membrane depolarization. During the second postnatal week, NMDA currents can be enhanced in rat auditory cortex through activation of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR). Electrophysiological results support a mainly presynaptic role for α7nAChR at these synapses. However, immunocytochemical evidence that α7nAChR is prevalent at postsynaptic sites of glutamatergic synapses in hippocampus and neocortex, along with emerging electrophysiological evidence for postsynaptic nicotinic currents in neocortex and hippocampus, has prompted speculation that α7nAChR allows for activation of NMDAR postsynaptically at synapses lacking AMPAR. Here we used dual immunolabeling and electron microscopy to examine the distribution of α7nAChR relative to AMPAR (GluR1, GluR2, and GluR3 subunits combined) at excitatory synapses in somatosensory cortex of adult and 1-week-old rats. α7nAChR occurred discretely over most of the thick postsynaptic densities in all cortical layers of both age groups. AMPAR immunoreactivity was also detectable at most synapses; its distribution was independent of that of α7nAChR. In both age groups, approximately one-quarter of asymmetrical synapses were α7nAChR positive and AMPAR negative. The variability of postsynaptic α7nAChR labeling density was greater at postnatal day (PD) 7 than in adulthood, and PD 7 neuropil contained a subset of small AMPA receptor-negative synapses with a high density of α7nAChR immunoreactivity. These observations support the idea that acetylcholine receptors can aid in activating glutamatergic synapses and work together with AMPA receptors to mediate postsynaptic excitation throughout life. PMID:12077196

  18. α/β-Hydrolase domain-containing 6 (ABHD6) negatively regulates the surface delivery and synaptic function of AMPA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Mengping; Zhang, Jian; Jia, Moye; Yang, Chaojuan; Pan, Yunlong; Li, Shuaiqi; Luo, Yiwen; Zheng, Junyuan; Ji, Jianguo; Chen, Jianguo; Hu, Xinli; Xiong, Jingwei; Shi, Yun; Zhang, Chen

    2016-01-01

    In the brain, AMPA-type glutamate receptors are major postsynaptic receptors at excitatory synapses that mediate fast neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity. α/β-Hydrolase domain-containing 6 (ABHD6), a monoacylglycerol lipase, was previously found to be a component of AMPA receptor macromolecular complexes, but its physiological significance in the function of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) has remained unclear. The present study shows that overexpression of ABHD6 in neurons drastically reduced excitatory neurotransmission mediated by AMPA but not by NMDA receptors at excitatory synapses. Inactivation of ABHD6 expression in neurons by either CRISPR/Cas9 or shRNA knockdown methods significantly increased excitatory neurotransmission at excitatory synapses. Interestingly, overexpression of ABHD6 reduced glutamate-induced currents and the surface expression of GluA1 in HEK293T cells expressing GluA1 and stargazin, suggesting a direct functional interaction between these two proteins. The C-terminal tail of GluA1 was required for the binding between of ABHD6 and GluA1. Mutagenesis analysis revealed a GFCLIPQ sequence in the GluA1 C terminus that was essential for the inhibitory effect of ABHD6. The hydrolase activity of ABHD6 was not required for the effects of ABHD6 on AMPAR function in either neurons or transfected HEK293T cells. Thus, these findings reveal a novel and unexpected mechanism governing AMPAR trafficking at synapses through ABHD6. PMID:27114538

  19. α/β-Hydrolase domain-containing 6 (ABHD6) negatively regulates the surface delivery and synaptic function of AMPA receptors.

    PubMed

    Wei, Mengping; Zhang, Jian; Jia, Moye; Yang, Chaojuan; Pan, Yunlong; Li, Shuaiqi; Luo, Yiwen; Zheng, Junyuan; Ji, Jianguo; Chen, Jianguo; Hu, Xinli; Xiong, Jingwei; Shi, Yun; Zhang, Chen

    2016-05-10

    In the brain, AMPA-type glutamate receptors are major postsynaptic receptors at excitatory synapses that mediate fast neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity. α/β-Hydrolase domain-containing 6 (ABHD6), a monoacylglycerol lipase, was previously found to be a component of AMPA receptor macromolecular complexes, but its physiological significance in the function of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) has remained unclear. The present study shows that overexpression of ABHD6 in neurons drastically reduced excitatory neurotransmission mediated by AMPA but not by NMDA receptors at excitatory synapses. Inactivation of ABHD6 expression in neurons by either CRISPR/Cas9 or shRNA knockdown methods significantly increased excitatory neurotransmission at excitatory synapses. Interestingly, overexpression of ABHD6 reduced glutamate-induced currents and the surface expression of GluA1 in HEK293T cells expressing GluA1 and stargazin, suggesting a direct functional interaction between these two proteins. The C-terminal tail of GluA1 was required for the binding between of ABHD6 and GluA1. Mutagenesis analysis revealed a GFCLIPQ sequence in the GluA1 C terminus that was essential for the inhibitory effect of ABHD6. The hydrolase activity of ABHD6 was not required for the effects of ABHD6 on AMPAR function in either neurons or transfected HEK293T cells. Thus, these findings reveal a novel and unexpected mechanism governing AMPAR trafficking at synapses through ABHD6. PMID:27114538

  20. Nogo Receptor Signaling Restricts Adult Neural Plasticity by Limiting Synaptic AMPA Receptor Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Jitsuki, Susumu; Nakajima, Waki; Takemoto, Kiwamu; Sano, Akane; Tada, Hirobumi; Takahashi-Jitsuki, Aoi; Takahashi, Takuya

    2016-01-01

    Experience-dependent plasticity is limited in the adult brain, and its molecular and cellular mechanisms are poorly understood. Removal of the myelin-inhibiting signaling protein, Nogo receptor (NgR1), restores adult neural plasticity. Here we found that, in NgR1-deficient mice, whisker experience-driven synaptic α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid receptor (AMPAR) insertion in the barrel cortex, which is normally complete by 2 weeks after birth, lasts into adulthood. In vivo live imaging by two-photon microscopy revealed more AMPAR on the surface of spines in the adult barrel cortex of NgR1-deficient than on those of wild-type (WT) mice. Furthermore, we observed that whisker stimulation produced new spines in the adult barrel cortex of mutant but not WT mice, and that the newly synthesized spines contained surface AMPAR. These results suggest that Nogo signaling limits plasticity by restricting synaptic AMPAR delivery in coordination with anatomical plasticity. PMID:26472557

  1. Autoantibodies to epilepsy-related LGI1 in limbic encephalitis neutralize LGI1-ADAM22 interaction and reduce synaptic AMPA receptors.

    PubMed

    Ohkawa, Toshika; Fukata, Yuko; Yamasaki, Miwako; Miyazaki, Taisuke; Yokoi, Norihiko; Takashima, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Masahiko; Watanabe, Osamu; Fukata, Masaki

    2013-11-13

    More than 30 mutations in LGI1, a secreted neuronal protein, have been reported with autosomal dominant lateral temporal lobe epilepsy (ADLTE). Although LGI1 haploinsufficiency is thought to cause ADLTE, the underlying molecular mechanism that results in abnormal brain excitability remains mysterious. Here, we focused on a mode of action of LGI1 autoantibodies associated with limbic encephalitis (LE), which is one of acquired epileptic disorders characterized by subacute onset of amnesia and seizures. We comprehensively screened human sera from patients with immune-mediated neurological disorders for LGI1 autoantibodies, which also uncovered novel autoantibodies against six cell surface antigens including DCC, DPP10, and ADAM23. Our developed ELISA arrays revealed a specific role for LGI1 antibodies in LE and concomitant involvement of multiple antibodies, including LGI1 antibodies in neuromyotonia, a peripheral nerve disorder. LGI1 antibodies associated with LE specifically inhibited the ligand-receptor interaction between LGI1 and ADAM22/23 by targeting the EPTP repeat domain of LGI1 and reversibly reduced synaptic AMPA receptor clusters in rat hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, we found that disruption of LGI1-ADAM22 interaction by soluble extracellular domain of ADAM22 was sufficient to reduce synaptic AMPA receptors in rat hippocampal neurons and that levels of AMPA receptor were greatly reduced in the hippocampal dentate gyrus in the epileptic LGI1 knock-out mouse. Therefore, either genetic or acquired loss of the LGI1-ADAM22 interaction reduces the AMPA receptor function, causing epileptic disorders. These results suggest that by finely regulating the synaptic AMPA receptors, the LGI1-ADAM22 interaction maintains physiological brain excitability throughout life. PMID:24227725

  2. Autoantibodies to Epilepsy-Related LGI1 in Limbic Encephalitis Neutralize LGI1-ADAM22 Interaction and Reduce Synaptic AMPA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ohkawa, Toshika; Fukata, Yuko; Yamasaki, Miwako; Miyazaki, Taisuke; Yokoi, Norihiko; Takashima, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Masahiko; Watanabe, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    More than 30 mutations in LGI1, a secreted neuronal protein, have been reported with autosomal dominant lateral temporal lobe epilepsy (ADLTE). Although LGI1 haploinsufficiency is thought to cause ADLTE, the underlying molecular mechanism that results in abnormal brain excitability remains mysterious. Here, we focused on a mode of action of LGI1 autoantibodies associated with limbic encephalitis (LE), which is one of acquired epileptic disorders characterized by subacute onset of amnesia and seizures. We comprehensively screened human sera from patients with immune-mediated neurological disorders for LGI1 autoantibodies, which also uncovered novel autoantibodies against six cell surface antigens including DCC, DPP10, and ADAM23. Our developed ELISA arrays revealed a specific role for LGI1 antibodies in LE and concomitant involvement of multiple antibodies, including LGI1 antibodies in neuromyotonia, a peripheral nerve disorder. LGI1 antibodies associated with LE specifically inhibited the ligand-receptor interaction between LGI1 and ADAM22/23 by targeting the EPTP repeat domain of LGI1 and reversibly reduced synaptic AMPA receptor clusters in rat hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, we found that disruption of LGI1-ADAM22 interaction by soluble extracellular domain of ADAM22 was sufficient to reduce synaptic AMPA receptors in rat hippocampal neurons and that levels of AMPA receptor were greatly reduced in the hippocampal dentate gyrus in the epileptic LGI1 knock-out mouse. Therefore, either genetic or acquired loss of the LGI1-ADAM22 interaction reduces the AMPA receptor function, causing epileptic disorders. These results suggest that by finely regulating the synaptic AMPA receptors, the LGI1-ADAM22 interaction maintains physiological brain excitability throughout life. PMID:24227725

  3. Regulation of AMPA Receptor Function by the Human Memory-Associated Gene KIBRA

    PubMed Central

    Makuch, Lauren; Volk, Lenora; Anggono, Victor; Johnson, Richard C.; Yu, Yilin; Duning, Kerstin; Kremerskothen, Joachim; Xia, Jun; Takamiya, Kogo; Huganir, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    KIBRA has recently been identified as a gene associated with human memory performance. Despite the elucidation of the role of KIBRA in several diverse processes in non-neuronal cells, the molecular function of KIBRA in neurons is unknown. We found that KIBRA directly binds to the protein interacting with C-kinase 1 (PICK1) and forms a complex with α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate receptors (AMPARs), the major excitatory neurotransmitter receptors in the brain. KIBRA knockdown accelerates the rate of AMPAR recycling following N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor induced internalization. Genetic deletion of KIBRA in mice impairs both long-term depression and long-term potentiation at hippocampal Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses. Moreover, KIBRA knockout mice have severe deficits in contextual fear learning and memory. These results indicate that KIBRA regulates higher brain function by regulating AMPAR trafficking and synaptic plasticity. PMID:21943600

  4. Delayed antagonism of AMPA/kainate receptors reduces long-term functional deficits resulting from spinal cord trauma.

    PubMed

    Wrathall, J R; Teng, Y D; Marriott, R

    1997-06-01

    Excitatory amino acid (EAA) receptors play a significant role in delayed neuronal death after ischemic and traumatic injury to the CNS. Focal microinjection experiments have demonstrated that 2,3-dihydro-6-nitro-7-sulfamoyl-benzo(f)quinoxaline (NBQX), a highly selective and potent antagonist of non-N-methyl-D-aspartate ionotropic EAA receptors, i.e., those preferring alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) or kainate, can reduce histopathology and functional deficits when administered at 15 min after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). Similarly, intravenous infusion of NBQX, beginning at 15 min postinjury (p.i.), results in a significant amelioration of the functional deficits produced by experimental SCI. However, if antagonists of AMPA/kainate receptors were to be used therapeutically for patients with SCI, administration would likely be delayed for several hours after injury. We therefore examined the effects of NBQX administered at 4 h after SCI on functional deficits and histopathology in a standardized rat model of contusive SCI. An incomplete SCI was produced in Sprague-Dawley rats at T8 with a weight-drop device (10 g x 2.5 cm). NBQX (15 nmol), or vehicle alone, was microinjected into the injury site 4 h later. Recovery of hind limb reflexes, postural control, and locomotor function was determined by a battery of behavioral tests performed for 8 weeks. Spinal cord tissue was then fixed by perfusion and used for morphometric and immunocytochemical analyses. Previous studies with acute NBQX treatment showed significant functional improvement by 1 week; the effects of delayed NBQX treatment on functional deficits were not discernible until 3-4 weeks after SCI. Thereafter, significant reductions in hindlimb deficits were demonstrated in two independent studies. The nature and magnitude of the reductions in chronic deficits were similar to those observed previously when NBQX was administered acutely at 15 min after SCI. Morphometric

  5. Histone Modification of Nedd4 Ubiquitin Ligase Controls the Loss of AMPA Receptors and Cognitive Impairment Induced by Repeated Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jing; Xiong, Zhe; Lee, Janine B.; Cheng, Jia; Duffney, Lara J.; Matas, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Stress and the major stress hormone corticosterone induce profound influences in the brain. Altered histone modification and transcriptional dysfunction have been implicated in stress-related mental disorders. We previously found that repeated stress caused an impairment of prefrontal cortex (PFC)-mediated cognitive functions by increasing the ubiquitination and degradation of AMPA-type glutamate receptors via a mechanism depending on the E3 ubiquitin ligase Nedd4. Here, we demonstrated that in PFC of repeatedly stressed rats, active glucocorticoid receptor had the increased binding to the glucocorticoid response element of histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) promoter, resulting in the upregulation of HDAC2. Inhibition or knock-down of HDAC2 blocked the stress-induced impairment of synaptic transmission, AMPAR expression, and recognition memory. Furthermore, we found that, in stressed animals, the HDAC2-dependent downregulation of histone methyltransferase Ehmt2 (G9a) led to the loss of repressive histone methylation at the Nedd4-1 promoter and the transcriptional activation of Nedd4. These results have provided an epigenetic mechanism and a potential treatment strategy for the detrimental effects of chronic stress. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Prolonged stress exposure can induce altered histone modification and transcriptional dysfunction, which may underlie the profound influence of stress in regulating brain functions. We report an important finding about the epigenetic mechanism controlling the detrimental effects of repeated stress on synaptic transmission and cognitive function. First, it has revealed the stress-induced alteration of key epigenetic regulators HDAC2 and Ehmt2, which determines the synaptic and behavioral effects of repeated stress. Second, it has uncovered the stress-induced histone modification of the target gene Nedd4, an E3 ligase that is critically involved in the ubiquitination and degradation of AMPA receptors and cognition. Third, it has provided

  6. Alterations in AMPA receptor subunits and TARPs in the rat nucleus accumbens related to the formation of Ca²⁺-permeable AMPA receptors during the incubation of cocaine craving.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, Carrie R; Loweth, Jessica A; Milovanovic, Mike; Ford, Kerstin A; Galiñanes, Gregorio L; Heng, Li-Jun; Tseng, Kuei Y; Wolf, Marina E

    2011-12-01

    Cue-induced cocaine seeking intensifies or incubates after withdrawal from extended access cocaine self-administration, a phenomenon termed incubation of cocaine craving. The expression of incubated craving is mediated by Ca²⁺-permeable AMPA receptors (CP-AMPARs) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Thus, CP-AMPARs are a potential target for therapeutic intervention, making it important to understand mechanisms that govern their accumulation. Here we used subcellular fractionation and biotinylation of NAc tissue to examine the abundance and distribution of AMPAR subunits, and GluA1 phosphorylation, in the incubation model. We also studied two transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs), γ-2 and γ-4. Our results, together with earlier findings, suggest that some of the new CP-AMPARs are synaptic. These are probably associated with γ-2, but they are loosely tethered to the PSD. Levels of GluA1 phosphorylated at serine 845 (pS845 GluA1) were significantly increased in biotinylated tissue and in an extrasynaptic membrane-enriched fraction. These results suggest that increased synaptic levels of CP-AMPARs may result in part from an increase in pS845 GluA1 in extrasynaptic membranes, given that S845 phosphorylation primes GluA1-containing AMPARs for synaptic insertion and extrasynaptic AMPARs supply the synapse. Some of the new extrasynaptic CP-AMPARs are likely associated with γ-4, rather than γ-2. The maintenance of CP-AMPARs in NAc synapses during withdrawal is accompanied by activation of CaMKII and ERK2 but not CaMKI. Overall, AMPAR plasticity in the incubation model shares some features with better described forms of synaptic plasticity, although the timing of the phenomenon and the persistence of related neuroadaptations are significantly different. PMID:21276808

  7. TARP-associated AMPA receptors display an increased maximum channel conductance and multiple kinetically distinct open states

    PubMed Central

    Shelley, Chris; Farrant, Mark; Cull-Candy, Stuart G

    2012-01-01

    Fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the CNS is mediated mainly by AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs), whose biophysical properties are dramatically modulated by the presence of transmembrane AMPAR regulatory proteins (TARPs). To help construct a kinetic model that will realistically describe native AMPAR/TARP function, we have examined the single-channel properties of homomeric GluA1 AMPARs in combination with the TARPs, γ-2, γ-4 and γ-5. In a saturating concentration of agonist, each of these AMPAR/TARP combinations gave rise to single-channel currents with multiple conductance levels that appeared intrinsic to the receptor-channel complex, and showed long-lived subconductance states. The open time and burst length distributions of the receptor complexes displayed multiple dwell-time components. In the case of γ-2- and γ-4-associated receptors, these distributions included a long-lived component lasting tens of milliseconds that was absent from both GluA1 alone and γ-5-associated receptors. The open time distributions for each conductance level required two dwell-time components, indicating that at each conductance level the channel occupies a minimum of two kinetically distinct open states. We have explored how these data place novel constraints on possible kinetic models of TARP-associated AMPARs that may be used to define AMPAR-mediated synaptic transmission. PMID:22988139

  8. Surface expression of GluR-D AMPA receptor is dependent on an interaction between its C-terminal domain and a 4.1 protein.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Sarah K; Cai, Chunlin; Mottershead, David G; Haapalahti, Jukka-Pekka; Keinänen, Kari

    2003-02-01

    Dynamic regulation of the number and activity of AMPA receptors is believed to underlie many forms of synaptic plasticity and is presumably mediated by specific protein-protein interactions involving the C-terminal domain of the receptor. Several proteins interacting with the C-terminal tails of the glutamate receptor (GluR)-A and GluR-B subunits have been identified and implicated in the regulation of endocytosis and exocytosis, clustering, and anchoring of AMPA receptors to the cytoskeleton. In contrast, little is known of the molecular interactions of the GluR-D subunit, or of the mechanisms regulating the traffic of GluR-D-containing AMPA receptors. We analyzed the subcellular localization of homomeric GluR-D receptors carrying C-terminal deletions in transfected human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells and in primary neurons by immunofluorescence microscopy and ELISA. A minimal requirement for a 14-residue cytoplasmic segment for the surface expression of homomeric GluR-D receptors was identified. Previously, a similar region in the GluR-A subunit was implicated in an interaction with 4.1 family proteins. Coimmunoprecipitation demonstrated that GluR-D associated with 4.1 protein(s) in both HEK293 cells and rat brain. Moreover, glutathione S-transferase pull-down experiments showed that the same 14-residue segment is critical for 4.1 binding to GluR-A and GluR-D. Point mutations within this segment dramatically decreased the surface expression of GluR-D in HEK293 cells, with a concomitant loss of the 4.1 interaction. Our findings demonstrate a novel molecular interaction for the GluR-D subunit and suggest that the association with the 4.1 family protein(s) plays an essential role in the transport to and stabilization of GluR-D-containing AMPA receptors at the cell surface. PMID:12574408

  9. GluA2-Containing AMPA Receptors Distinguish Ribbon-Associated from Ribbonless Afferent Contacts on Rat Cochlear Hair Cells.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Monedero, Rodrigo; Liu, Chang; Weisz, Catherine; Vyas, Pankhuri; Fuchs, Paul Albert; Glowatzki, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Mechanosensory hair cells release glutamate at ribbon synapses to excite postsynaptic afferent neurons, via AMPA-type ionotropic glutamate receptors (AMPARs). However, type II afferent neurons contacting outer hair cells in the mammalian cochlea were thought to differ in this respect, failing to show GluA immunolabeling and with many "ribbonless" afferent contacts. Here it is shown that antibodies to the AMPAR subunit GluA2 labeled afferent contacts below inner and outer hair cells in the rat cochlea, and that synaptic currents in type II afferents had AMPAR-specific pharmacology. Only half the postsynaptic densities of type II afferents that labeled for PSD-95, Shank, or Homer were associated with GluA2 immunopuncta or presynaptic ribbons, the "empty slots" corresponding to ribbonless contacts described previously. These results extend the universality of AMPAergic transmission by hair cells, and support the existence of silent afferent contacts. PMID:27257620

  10. Anti-AMPA-Receptor Encephalitis Presenting as a Rapid-Cycling Bipolar Disorder in a Young Woman with Turner Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Quaranta, Giuseppe; Maremmani, Angelo Giovanni Icro; Perugi, Giulio

    2015-01-01

    Background. Autoimmune encephalitis is a disorder characterised by the subacute onset of seizures, short-term memory loss, and psychiatric and behavioural symptoms. Initially, it was recognised as a paraneoplastic disorder, but recently a subgroup of patients without systemic cancer was identified. Case Description. We describe a 20-year-old woman with Turner syndrome presenting with a treatment-resistant rapid cycling bipolar disorder with cognitive impairment. She was diagnosed with anti-AMPA-receptor encephalitis. She showed marked improvement after starting memantine and valproic acid. Conclusion. This case description emphasises the importance of timely recognition of autoimmune limbic encephalitis in patients with psychiatric manifestations and a possible predisposition to autoimmune conditions, in order to rule out malignancy and to quickly initiate treatment. PMID:26495149

  11. Gestational nicotine exposure regulates expression of AMPA and NMDA receptors and their signaling apparatus in developing and adult rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Dávila-García, Martha I.; Yarl, Weonpo; Gondré-Lewis, Marjorie C.

    2011-01-01

    Untimely activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) by nicotine results in short- and long-term consequences on learning and behavior. In this study, the aim was to determine how prenatal nicotine exposure affects components of glutamatergic signaling in the hippocampus during postnatal development. We investigated regulation of both nAChRs and glutamate receptors for α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), from postnatal day (P) 1 to P63 after a temporally restricted exposure to saline or nicotine for 14 days in utero. We analyzed postsynaptic density components associated with AMPAR and NMDAR signaling: Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II α (CaMKIIα), Calmodulin (CaM), and postsynaptic density-95 (PSD95), as well as presynaptically localized synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP25). At P1, there was significantly heightened expression of AMPAR subunit GluR1 but not GluR2, and of NMDAR subunits NR1, NR2a and NR2d but not NR2b. NR2c was not detectable. At P1, the postsynaptic proteins CaMKIIα, CaM, and PSD95 were also significantly upregulated, together with presynaptic SNAP25. This enhanced expression of glutamate receptors and signaling proteins was concomitant with elevated levels of [3H] Epibatidine (EB) binding in prenatal nicotine-exposed hippocampus, indicating that α4β2 nAChR may influence glutamatergic function in the hippocampus at P1. By P14, neither [3H]EB binding nor the expression levels of subunits GluR1, GluR2, NR1, NR2a, NR2b, NR2c, or NR2d seemed changed with prenatal nicotine. However, CaMKIIα was significantly upregulated with nicotine treatment while CaM showed downregulation at P14. The effects of nicotine persisted in young adult brains at P63. They exhibited significantly downregulated GluR2, NR1, and NR2c expression levels in hippocampal homogenates and a considerably muted overall distribution of [3H]AMPA binding in areas CA1, CA2, CA3, and the dentate

  12. Protein tyrosine kinase regulates α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor trafficking induced by acute hypoxia in cultured brainstem neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Yu, L C; Li, Y C

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the modulation effect of protein tyrosine kinase on postsynaptic a-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor trafficking induced by acute hypoxia in cultured brainstem neurons. The cultured neurons were exposed to 1% O2 and the expression of AMPA receptor subunit GluR2 on the cell surface was significantly increased, while total GluR2 was not markedly changed. Furthermore, the hypoxia-induced increase in GluR2 expression on the cell surface was partially blocked by the protein tyrosine kinase membrane-permeable inhibitor genistein. In contrast, both the protein tyrosine kinase agonist nerve growth factor and protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor vanadate promoted the hypoxia-induced increase of GluR2 expression on cell surface. Moreover, GluR2 could be phosphorylated by tyrosine under normoxia and hypoxia conditions in vitro on brainstem neurons, and tyrosine phosphorylation of GluR2 was significantly stronger under hypoxia conditions. Our results indicate that acute hypoxia induces the AMPA receptor subunit GluR2 to rapidly migrate to the cell membrane to modify the strength of the synapse. This study indicates that tyrosine phosphorylation of the receptor is an important pathway regulating the rapid migration of GluR2 in the postsynaptic domain induced by hypoxia. PMID:27525851

  13. Membrane-tethered AKT kinase regulates basal synaptic transmission and early phase LTP expression by modulation of post-synaptic AMPA receptor level.

    PubMed

    Pen, Y; Borovok, N; Reichenstein, M; Sheinin, A; Michaelevski, I

    2016-09-01

    The serine/threonine kinase AKT/PKB plays a fundamental role in a wide variety of neuronal functions, including neuronal cell development, axonal growth, and synaptic plasticity. Multiple evidence link AKT signaling pathways to regulation of late phase long-term synaptic plasticity, synaptogenesis, and spinogenesis, as well as long-term memory formation. Nevertheless, the downstream effectors mediating the effects of AKT on early phase long-term potentiation (eLTP) are currently unknown. Here we report that using different regimes of pharmacological activation and inhibition of AKT activity in acute hippocampal slices, we found that AKT regulates the post-synaptic expression of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor (AMPA) receptors affecting solely the expression of eLTP, with no effect on its induction and maintenance. We further show that both maintenance of basal synaptic activity and expression of eLTP require plasma membrane tethering by activated AKT and that basal synaptic activity may be regulated via the direct effects of AKT1 on the expression level of post-synaptic AMPA receptors bypassing the canonical AKT signaling. Finally, we establish that eLTP expression requires the involvement of both the canonical AKT signaling pathways and the direct effect of AKT1 on AMPA receptor activity/expression in the post-synaptic membrane. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27068236

  14. The Prefrontal Dectin-1/AMPA Receptor Signaling Pathway Mediates The Robust and Prolonged Antidepressant Effect of Proteo-β-Glucan from Maitake.

    PubMed

    Bao, Hongkun; Ran, Pengzhan; Zhu, Ming; Sun, Lijuan; Li, Bai; Hou, Yangyang; Nie, Jun; Shan, Liping; Li, Hongliang; Zheng, Shangyong; Xu, Xiufeng; Xiao, Chunjie; Du, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Proteo-β-glucan from Maitake (PGM) is a strong immune regulator, and its receptor is called Dectin-1. Cumulative evidence suggests that AMPA receptors are important for the treatment of depression. Here, we report that PGM treatment leads to a significant antidepressant effect in the tail suspension test and forced swim test after sixty minutes of treatment in mice. After five consecutive days of PGM treatment, this antidepressant effect remained. PGM treatment did not show a hyperactive effect in the open field test. PGM significantly enhanced the expression of its receptor Dectin-1, as well as p-GluA1(S845) and GluA1, but not GluA2 or GluA3 in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) after five days of treatment. The Dectin-1 inhibitor Laminarin was able to block the antidepressant effect of PGM. At the synapses of PFC, PGM treatment significantly up-regulated the p-GluA1(S845), GluA1, GluA2, and GluA3 levels. Moreover, PGM's antidepressant effects and the increase of p-GluA1(S845)/GluA1 lasted for 3 days after stopping treatment. The AMPA-specific antagonist GYKI 52466 was able to block the antidepressant effect of PGM. This study identified PGM as a novel antidepressant with clinical potential and a new antidepressant mechanism for regulating prefrontal Dectin-1/AMPA receptor signalling. PMID:27329257

  15. The Prefrontal Dectin-1/AMPA Receptor Signaling Pathway Mediates The Robust and Prolonged Antidepressant Effect of Proteo-β-Glucan from Maitake

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Hongkun; Ran, Pengzhan; Zhu, Ming; Sun, Lijuan; Li, Bai; Hou, Yangyang; Nie, Jun; Shan, Liping; Li, Hongliang; Zheng, Shangyong; Xu, Xiufeng; Xiao, Chunjie; Du, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Proteo-β-glucan from Maitake (PGM) is a strong immune regulator, and its receptor is called Dectin-1. Cumulative evidence suggests that AMPA receptors are important for the treatment of depression. Here, we report that PGM treatment leads to a significant antidepressant effect in the tail suspension test and forced swim test after sixty minutes of treatment in mice. After five consecutive days of PGM treatment, this antidepressant effect remained. PGM treatment did not show a hyperactive effect in the open field test. PGM significantly enhanced the expression of its receptor Dectin-1, as well as p-GluA1(S845) and GluA1, but not GluA2 or GluA3 in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) after five days of treatment. The Dectin-1 inhibitor Laminarin was able to block the antidepressant effect of PGM. At the synapses of PFC, PGM treatment significantly up-regulated the p-GluA1(S845), GluA1, GluA2, and GluA3 levels. Moreover, PGM’s antidepressant effects and the increase of p-GluA1(S845)/GluA1 lasted for 3 days after stopping treatment. The AMPA-specific antagonist GYKI 52466 was able to block the antidepressant effect of PGM. This study identified PGM as a novel antidepressant with clinical potential and a new antidepressant mechanism for regulating prefrontal Dectin-1/AMPA receptor signalling. PMID:27329257

  16. In vivo synaptic scaling is mediated by GluA2-lacking AMPA receptors in the embryonic spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Bereguiain, Miguel Angel; Gonzalez-Islas, Carlos; Lindsly, Casie; Butler, Ellie; Hill, Atlantis Wilkins; Wenner, Peter

    2013-01-01

    When spiking activity within a network is perturbed for hours to days, compensatory changes in synaptic strength are triggered that are thought to be important for the homeostatic maintenance of network or cellular spiking activity. In one form of this homeostatic plasticity, called synaptic scaling, all of a cell’s AMPAergic miniature postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) are increased or decreased by some scaling factor. While synaptic scaling has been observed in a variety of systems, the mechanisms that underlie AMPAergic scaling have been controversial. Certain studies find that synaptic scaling is mediated by GluA2-lacking calcium permeable receptors (CP-AMPARs), while others have found that scaling is mediated by GluA2-containing calcium impermeable receptors (CI-AMPARs). Spontaneous network activity is observed in most developing circuits, and in the spinal cord this activity drives embryonic movements. Blocking spontaneous network activity in the chick embryo by infusing lidocaine in vivo triggers synaptic scaling in spinal motoneurons; here we show that AMPAergic scaling occurs through increases in mEPSC conductance that appear to be mediated by the insertion of GluA2-lacking AMPA receptors at the expense of GluA2-containing receptors. We have previously reported that in vivo blockade of GABAA transmission, at a developmental stage when GABA is excitatory, also triggered AMPAergic synaptic scaling. Here, we show that this form of AMPAergic scaling is also mediated by CP-AMPARs. These findings suggest that AMPAergic scaling triggered by blocking spiking activity or GABAA receptor transmission represent similar phenomenon, supporting the idea that activity-blockade triggers scaling by reducing GABAA transmission. PMID:23595738

  17. Discriminative stimulus effects of NMDA, AMPA and mGluR5 glutamate receptor ligands in methamphetamine-trained rats

    PubMed Central

    Wooters, Thomas E.; Dwoskin, Linda P.; Bardo, Michael T.

    2011-01-01

    Glutamate contributes to the reinforcing and stimulant effects of methamphetamine, yet its potential role in the interoceptive stimulus properties of methamphetamine is unknown. In the current study, adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained to discriminate methamphetamine (1.0 mg/kg, i.p.) from saline in a standard operant discrimination task. The effects of methamphetamine (0.1-1.0 mg/kg, i.p.), the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor channel blockers MK-801 (0.03-0.3 mg/kg, i.p.) and ketamine (1.0-10.0 mg/kg, i.p.), the low-affinity NMDA antagonist memantine (1.0-10 mg/kg, i.p.), the polyamine site NMDA receptor antagonist ifenprodil (1-10 mg/kg), the α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate (AMPA) receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX; 1-10 mg/kg, i.p.), and the metabotropic 5 (mGluR5) receptor antagonist 6-methyl-2-(phenylethynyl)pyridine (MPEP; 1-10 mg/kg) given alone were determined in substitution tests. The effects of MK-801 (0.03 and 0.1 mg/kg), ketamine (1.0 and 3.0 mg/kg), ifenprodil (5.6 mg/kg), CNQX (5.6 mg/kg) and MPEP (5.6 mg/kg) were also tested in combination with methamphetamine to assess for alterations in the methamphetamine cue. In substitution tests, none of the test drugs generalized to the methamphetamine cue. However, ketamine and ifenprodil produced significant leftward shifts in the methamphetamine dose-response curve; pretreatment with 3 mg/kg of ketamine, for example, decreased the ED50 value for methamphetamine by half. These results suggest that blockade of the NMDA receptor augments the interoceptive stimulus properties of methamphetamine. PMID:21836462

  18. Amyloid-β impairs, and ibuprofen restores, the cGMP pathway, synaptic expression of AMPA receptors and long-term potentiation in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Monfort, Pilar; Felipo, Vicente

    2010-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) rapidly impairs hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) and cognitive function in rats. We hypothesized that: a) Aβ-induced impairment of LTP would be due to impairment of the nitric oxide (NO)-cGMP pathway and AMPA receptor translocation; and b) treatment with the anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen would restore the NO-cGMP pathway and LTP. The aims of this work were to assess whether ibuprofen prevents and/or rescues Aβ-induced LTP impairments in hippocampal slices and to analyze the role of the altered NO-cGMP-protein kinase G pathway and AMPA receptor phosphorylation and synaptic expression in the mechanisms by which Aβ impairs and ibuprofen restores LTP. Aβ impairs tetanus-induced activation of guanylate cyclase and cGMP increase, preventing protein kinase G activation, phosphorylation of GluR1 in Ser845 and AMPA receptors translocation to synaptic membranes, which is responsible for LTP impairment by Aβ. Ibuprofen prevents LTP impairment by Aβ by restoring guanylate cyclase activation and increase in cGMP and, subsequently, activation of protein kinase G, phosphorylation of GluR1 in Ser845 and synaptic expression of AMPA receptors. Restoration of cGMP levels is enough to restore all this process as indicated by the fact that the cGMP analog 8-Br-cGMP also normalizes the function of this pathway and restores LTP in the presence of Aβ. These results indicate that Aβ impairs LTP by impairing the NO-cGMP pathway and that ibuprofen restores LTP by restoring this pathway. These data suggest that restoring cGMP levels may have therapeutic utility to improve cognitive function impaired by Aβ. PMID:20858955

  19. NBQX, a highly selective competitive antagonist of AMPA and KA ionotropic glutamate receptors, increases seizures and mortality following picornavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Libbey, Jane E; Hanak, Tyler J; Doty, Daniel J; Wilcox, Karen S; Fujinami, Robert S

    2016-06-01

    Seizures occur due to an imbalance between excitation and inhibition, with the balance tipping towards excitation, and glutamate is the predominant excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system of mammals. Since upregulation of expression and/or function of glutamate receptors can contribute to seizures we determined the effects of three antagonists, NBQX, GYKI-52466 and MK 801, of the various ionotropic glutamate receptors, AMPA, NMDA and KA, on acute seizure development in the Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV)-induced seizure model. We found that only NBQX had an effect on acute seizure development, resulting in a significantly higher number of mice experiencing seizures, an increase in the number of seizures per mouse, a greater cumulative seizure score per mouse and a significantly higher mortality rate among the mice. Although NBQX has previously been shown to be a potent anticonvulsant in animal seizure models, seizures induced by electrical stimulation, drug administration or as a result of genetic predisposition may differ greatly in terms of mechanism of seizure development from our virus-induced seizure model, which could explain the opposite, proconvulsant effect of NBQX observed in the TMEV-induced seizure model. PMID:27072529

  20. Alteration of AMPA Receptor-Mediated Synaptic Transmission by Alexa Fluor 488 and 594 in Cerebellar Stellate Cells.

    PubMed

    Maroteaux, Matthieu; Liu, Siqiong June

    2016-01-01

    The fluorescent dyes, Alexa Fluor 488 and 594 are commonly used to visualize dendritic structures and the localization of synapses, both of which are critical for the spatial and temporal integration of synaptic inputs. However, the effect of the dyes on synaptic transmission is not known. Here we investigated whether Alexa Fluor dyes alter the properties of synaptic currents mediated by two subtypes of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) at cerebellar stellate cell synapses. In naive mice, GluA2-lacking AMPAR-mediated synaptic currents displayed an inwardly rectifying current-voltage (I-V) relationship due to blockade by cytoplasmic spermine at depolarized potentials. We found that the inclusion of 100 µm Alexa Fluor dye, but not 10 µm, in the pipette solution led to a gradual increase in the amplitude of EPSCs at +40 mV and a change in the I-V relationship from inwardly rectifying to more linear. In mice exposed to an acute stress, AMPARs switched to GluA2-containing receptors, and 100 µm Alexa Fluor 594 did not alter the I-V relationship of synaptic currents. Therefore, a high concentration of Alexa Fluor dye changed the I-V relationship of EPSCs at GluA2-lacking AMPAR synapses. PMID:27280156

  1. Alteration of AMPA Receptor-Mediated Synaptic Transmission by Alexa Fluor 488 and 594 in Cerebellar Stellate Cells123

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The fluorescent dyes, Alexa Fluor 488 and 594 are commonly used to visualize dendritic structures and the localization of synapses, both of which are critical for the spatial and temporal integration of synaptic inputs. However, the effect of the dyes on synaptic transmission is not known. Here we investigated whether Alexa Fluor dyes alter the properties of synaptic currents mediated by two subtypes of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) at cerebellar stellate cell synapses. In naive mice, GluA2-lacking AMPAR-mediated synaptic currents displayed an inwardly rectifying current–voltage (I–V) relationship due to blockade by cytoplasmic spermine at depolarized potentials. We found that the inclusion of 100 µm Alexa Fluor dye, but not 10 µm, in the pipette solution led to a gradual increase in the amplitude of EPSCs at +40 mV and a change in the I–V relationship from inwardly rectifying to more linear. In mice exposed to an acute stress, AMPARs switched to GluA2-containing receptors, and 100 µm Alexa Fluor 594 did not alter the I–V relationship of synaptic currents. Therefore, a high concentration of Alexa Fluor dye changed the I–V relationship of EPSCs at GluA2-lacking AMPAR synapses. PMID:27280156

  2. Dynamic Regulation of N-Methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic Acid (AMPA) Receptors by Posttranslational Modifications.

    PubMed

    Lussier, Marc P; Sanz-Clemente, Antonio; Roche, Katherine W

    2015-11-27

    Many molecular mechanisms underlie the changes in synaptic glutamate receptor content that are required by neuronal networks to generate cellular correlates of learning and memory. During the last decade, posttranslational modifications have emerged as critical regulators of synaptic transmission and plasticity. Notably, phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and palmitoylation control the stability, trafficking, and synaptic expression of glutamate receptors in the central nervous system. In the current review, we will summarize some of the progress made by the neuroscience community regarding our understanding of phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and palmitoylation of the NMDA and AMPA subtypes of glutamate receptors. PMID:26453298

  3. Activation of AMPA receptor promotes TNF-α release via the ROS-cSrc-NFκB signaling cascade in RAW264.7 macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Xiu-Li; Ding, Fan; Li, Hui; Tan, Xiao-Qiu; Liu, Xiao; Cao, Ji-Min; Gao, Xue

    2015-05-29

    The relationship between glutamate signaling and inflammation has not been well defined. This study aimed to investigate the role of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) in the expression and release of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) from macrophages and the underlying mechanisms. A series of approaches, including confocal microscopy, immunofluorescency, flow cytometry, ELISA and Western blotting, were used to estimate the expression of AMPAR and downstream signaling molecules, TNF-α release and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in the macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells. The results demonstrated that AMPAR was expressed in RAW264.7 cells. AMPA significantly enhanced TNF-α release from RAW264.7 cells, and this effect was abolished by CNQX (AMPAR antagonist). AMPA also induced elevation of ROS production, phosphorylation of c-Src and activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB in RAW264.7 cells. Blocking c-Src by PP2, scavenging ROS by glutathione (GSH) or inhibiting NF-κB activation by pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) decreased TNF-α production from RAW264.7 cells. We concluded that AMPA promotes TNF-α release in RAW264.7 macrophages likely through the following signaling cascade: AMPAR activation → ROS generation → c-Src phosphorylation → NF-κB activation → TNF-α elevation. The study suggests that AMPAR may participate in macrophage activation and inflammation. - Highlights: • AMPAR is expressed in RAW264.7 macrophages and is upregulated by AMPA stimulation. • Activation of AMPAR stimulates TNF-α release in macrophages through the ROS-cSrc-NFκB signaling cascade. • Macrophage AMPAR signaling may play an important role in inflammation.

  4. Dopamine alters AMPA receptor synaptic expression and subunit composition in dopamine neurons of the ventral tegmental area cultured with prefrontal cortex neurons.

    PubMed

    Gao, Can; Wolf, Marina E

    2007-12-26

    Excitatory synapses onto dopamine (DA) neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) represent a critical site of psychostimulant-induced synaptic plasticity. This plasticity involves alterations in synaptic strength through AMPA receptor (AMPAR) redistribution. Here, we report an in vitro model for studying regulation of AMPAR trafficking in DA neurons under control conditions and after elevation of DA levels, mimicking cocaine exposure. We used cocultures containing rat VTA neurons and prefrontal cortex (PFC) neurons from enhanced cyan fluorescent protein-expressing mice. In VTA-PFC cocultures, D1 receptor activation (10 min) increased synaptic and nonsynaptic glutamate receptor subunit 1 (GluR1) and GluR2 surface expression on DA neurons. NMDA or AMPA receptor antagonists blocked this effect, and it was not observed in pure VTA cultures, suggesting that DA agonists acted on D1 receptors on PFC neurons, altering their excitatory transmission onto VTA DA neurons and, thus, influencing AMPARs. To mimic the longer elevation in extracellular DA levels produced by systemic cocaine, cocultures were incubated with DA for 1 h. Synaptic GluR1 was increased 24 h later, reminiscent of the increased AMPA/NMDA ratio at excitatory synapses onto VTA DA neurons 24 h after cocaine injection (Ungless et al., 2001). In contrast, GluR2 was unchanged. Analysis of colocalization of surface GluR1-3 labeling suggested that control DA neurons express a substantial number of GluR1/2, GluR2/3, and homomeric GluR1 receptors and that the increase in surface AMPARs 24 h after DA exposure may in part reflect increased GluR1/3-containing receptors. These results help define the cellular basis for plasticity underlying the development of behavioral sensitization. PMID:18160635

  5. Structural and Single-Channel Results Indicate that the Rates of Ligand Binding Domain Closing and Opening Directly Impact AMPA Receptor Gating

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang,W.; Cho, Y.; Lolis, E.; Howe, J.

    2008-01-01

    At most excitatory central synapses, glutamate is released from presynaptic terminals and binds to postsynaptic AMPA receptors, initiating a series of conformational changes that result in ion channel opening. Efficient transmission at these synapses requires that glutamate binding to AMPA receptors results in rapid and near-synchronous opening of postsynaptic receptor channels. In addition, if the information encoded in the frequency of action potential discharge is to be transmitted faithfully, glutamate must dissociate from the receptor quickly, enabling the synapse to discriminate presynaptic action potentials that are spaced closely in time. The current view is that the efficacy of agonists is directly related to the extent to which ligand binding results in closure of the binding domain. For glutamate to dissociate from the receptor, however, the binding domain must open. Previously, we showed that mutations in glutamate receptor subunit 2 that should destabilize the closed conformation not only sped deactivation but also altered the relative efficacy of glutamate and quisqualate. Here we present x-ray crystallographic and single-channel data that support the conclusions that binding domain closing necessarily precedes channel opening and that the kinetics of conformational changes at the level of the binding domain importantly influence ion channel gating. Our findings suggest that the stability of the closed-cleft conformation has been tuned during evolution so that glutamate dissociates from the receptor as rapidly as possible but remains an efficacious agonist.

  6. Alternative splicing of AMPA receptor subunits in the 6-OHDA-lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease and L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Kobylecki, Christopher; Crossman, Alan R; Ravenscroft, Paula

    2013-09-01

    Abnormal corticostriatal plasticity is a key mechanism of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID) in Parkinson's disease (PD). Antagonists at glutamatergic α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors, such as IEM 1460, reduce induction and expression of dyskinesia in rat and non-human primate models of PD. AMPA receptor function is regulated by post-transcriptional splicing of subunit mRNA to produce flip and flop isoforms, which may therefore influence corticostriatal plasticity. The aim of this work was to evaluate alterations in alternative splicing of striatal AMPA receptor subunits in the unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rat model of LID and PD. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received 12.5 μg 6-OHDA injections into the right medial forebrain bundle. In experiment 1, to assess acute dyskinesia, rats received L-DOPA/benserazide (6/15 mg/kg, i.p.) or vehicle for 21 days. In experiment 2, to assess dyskinesia priming, rats received vehicle, L-DOPA+vehicle or L-DOPA+IEM 1460 (3 mg/kg, i.p.) for 21 days. Animals were humanely killed 1h following final treatment in experiment 1, and 48 h following final treatment in experiment 2. Coronal sections of rostral striatum were processed for in situ hybridisation histochemistry, using oligonucleotide probes specific for the GluR1 and GluR2 subunits and their flip and flop isoforms. L-DOPA treatment increased GluR2-flip mRNA expression in the lesioned striatum of both groups; this was blocked by the Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptor antagonist IEM 1460. GluR1-flip expression was increased after 48 h drug washout but not in acute LID. There were no changes in expression of flop isoforms. Alternative splicing of AMPAR subunits contributes to abnormal striatal plasticity in the induction and expression of LID. Increases in GluR2-flip expression depend on activation of Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors, which are a potential target of anti-dyskinetic therapies. PMID:23360800

  7. The AMPA receptor antagonist perampanel in the adjunctive treatment of partial-onset seizures: clinical trial evidence and experience

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    More than 20 antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are currently available for the medical treatment of epilepsies. However, still about 30% of all epilepsies have a drug-resistant course. Even worse, in the case of some epilepsy syndromes, freedom from seizures is almost never achieved. Therefore, new treatment options are still necessary, especially if theoretical concepts such as a new mode of action offer new horizons. Perampanel is the first-in-class orally active, selective, noncompetitive antagonist of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors. The pharmacokinetic profile offers once-daily dosing in the evening as the best route of administration. According to the results of three pivotal placebo-controlled, double-blind phase III trials that investigated perampanel as an adjunctive AED in adult and adolescent patients from age 12 years who had ongoing focal epileptic seizures despite receiving one to three AEDs, perampanel has been widely licensed and introduced. Phase III trials showed superiority of adjunctive perampanel over placebo consistently in the range between 4 and 12 mg. Dizziness and somnolence were by far the leading adverse events. This review covers the clinical trial evidence but also clinical experience with perampanel after launch according to observational studies. PMID:25941541

  8. Involvement of AMPA receptor desensitization in short-term synaptic depression at the calyx of Held in developing rats

    PubMed Central

    Koike-Tani, Maki; Kanda, Takeshi; Saitoh, Naoto; Yamashita, Takayuki; Takahashi, Tomoyuki

    2008-01-01

    Paired-pulse facilitation (PPF) and depression (PPD) are forms of short-term plasticity that are generally thought to reflect changes in transmitter release probability. However, desensitization of postsynaptic AMPA receptors (AMPARs) significantly contributes to PPD at many glutamatergic synapses. To clarify the involvement of AMPAR desensitization in synaptic PPD, we compared PPD with AMPAR desensitization, induced by paired-pulse glutamate application in patches excised from postsynaptic cells at the calyx of Held synapse of developing rats. We found that AMPAR desensitization contributed significantly to PPD before the onset of hearing (P10–12), but that its contribution became negligible after hearing onset. During postnatal development (P7–21) the recovery of AMPARs from desensitization became faster. Concomitantly, glutamate sensitivity of AMPAR desensitization declined. Single-cell reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis indicated a developmental decline of GluR1 expression that correlated with speeding of the recovery of AMPARs from desensitization. Transmitter release probability declined during the second postnatal week (P7–14). Manipulation of the extracellular Ca2+/Mg2+ ratio, to match release probability at P7–8 and P13–15 synapses, revealed that the release probability is also an important factor determining the involvement of AMPAR desensitization in PPD. We conclude that the extent of involvement of AMPAR desensitization in short-term synaptic depression is determined by both pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms. PMID:18339695

  9. FUS regulates AMPA receptor function and FTLD/ALS-associated behaviour via GluA1 mRNA stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Udagawa, Tsuyoshi; Fujioka, Yusuke; Tanaka, Motoki; Honda, Daiyu; Yokoi, Satoshi; Riku, Yuichi; Ibi, Daisuke; Nagai, Taku; Yamada, Kiyofumi; Watanabe, Hirohisa; Katsuno, Masahisa; Inada, Toshifumi; Ohno, Kinji; Sokabe, Masahiro; Okado, Haruo; Ishigaki, Shinsuke; Sobue, Gen

    2015-01-01

    FUS is an RNA/DNA-binding protein involved in multiple steps of gene expression and is associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and fronto-temporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). However, the specific disease-causing and/or modifying mechanism mediated by FUS is largely unknown. Here we evaluate intrinsic roles of FUS on synaptic functions and animal behaviours. We find that FUS depletion downregulates GluA1, a subunit of AMPA receptor. FUS binds GluA1 mRNA in the vicinity of the 3′ terminus and controls poly (A) tail maintenance, thus regulating stability. GluA1 reduction upon FUS knockdown reduces miniature EPSC amplitude both in cultured neurons and in vivo. FUS knockdown in hippocampus attenuates dendritic spine maturation and causes behavioural aberrations including hyperactivity, disinhibition and social interaction defects, which are partly ameliorated by GluA1 reintroduction. These results highlight the pivotal role of FUS in regulating GluA1 mRNA stability, post-synaptic function and FTLD-like animal behaviours. PMID:25968143

  10. HPLC with fluorescence detection assay of perampanel, a novel AMPA receptor antagonist, in human plasma for clinical pharmacokinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Mano, Yuji; Takenaka, Osamu; Kusano, Kazutomi

    2015-10-01

    Perampanel (Fycompa®), a novel α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor antagonist, is registered for the adjunctive treatment of patients (aged ≥12 years) with refractory partial-onset seizures. To support therapeutic drug monitoring, a simple high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay with fluorescence detection was developed to determine perampanel concentrations in human plasma and validated to support clinical trials. Human plasma samples (1.0 mL) were processed by liquid extraction using diethyl ether, followed by chromatographic separation on a YMC Pack Pro C18 column (150 × 4.6 mm i.d., 5 µm) with isocratic elution of acetonitrile-water-acetic acid-sodium acetate (840:560:3:1.8, v/v/v/w) at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. Column eluent was monitored at excitation and emission wavelengths of 290 and 430 nm, respectively. The assay was linear (range 1.0-500 ng/mL) and this could be extended to 25 µg/mL by 50-fold dilution integrity. No endogenous peaks were detected in the elution of analytes in drug-free blank human plasma from six individuals and no interference was observed with co-medications tested. Intra- and inter-batch reproducibility studies demonstrated accuracy and precision within the acceptance criteria of bioanalytical guidelines. Validation data demonstrated that our assay is simple, selective, reproducible and suitable for therapeutic drug monitoring of perampanel. PMID:25828925

  11. Activation of AMPA receptor in the infralimbic cortex facilitates extinction and attenuates the heroin-seeking behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weisheng; Wang, Yiqi; Sun, Anna; Zhou, Linyi; Xu, Wenjin; Zhu, Huaqiang; Zhuang, Dingding; Lai, Miaojun; Zhang, Fuqiang; Zhou, Wenhua; Liu, Huifen

    2016-01-26

    Infralimbic cortex (IL) is proposed to suppress cocaine seeking after extinction, but whether the IL regulates the extinction and reinstatement of heroin-seeking behavior is unknown. To address this issue, the male SD rats were trained to self-administer heroin under a FR1 schedule for consecutive 14 days, then the rats underwent 7 daily 2h extinction session in the operant chamber. The activation of IL by microinjection PEPA, an allosteric AMPA receptor potentiator into IL before each of extinction session facilitated the extinction responding after heroin self-administration, but did not alter the locomotor activity in an open field testing environment. Other rats were first trained under a FR1 schedule for heroin self-administration for 14 days, followed by 14 days of extinction training, and reinstatement of heroin-seeking induced by cues was measured for 2h. Intra-IL microinjecting of PEPA at 15min prior to test inhibited the reinstatement of heroin-seeking induced by cues. Moreover, the expression of GluR1 in the IL and NAc remarkably increased after treatment with PEPA during the reinstatement. These finding suggested that activation of glutamatergic projection from IL to NAc shell may be involved in the extinction and reinstatement of heroin-seeking. PMID:26639425

  12. Activation of AMPA Receptors Mediates the Antidepressant Action of Deep Brain Stimulation of the Infralimbic Prefrontal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Sánchez, Laura; Castañé, Anna; Pérez-Caballero, Laura; Grifoll-Escoda, Marc; López-Gil, Xavier; Campa, Leticia; Galofré, Mireia; Berrocoso, Esther; Adell, Albert

    2016-06-01

    Although deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been used with success in treatment-resistant depression, little is known about its mechanism of action. We examined the antidepressant-like activity of short (1 h) DBS applied to the infralimbic prefrontal cortex in the forced swim test (FST) and the novelty-suppressed feeding test (NSFT). We also used in vivo microdialysis to evaluate the release of glutamate, γ-aminobutyric acid, serotonin, dopamine, and noradrenaline in the prefrontal cortex and c-Fos immunohistochemistry to determine the brain regions activated by DBS. One hour of DBS of the infralimbic prefrontal cortex has antidepressant-like effects in FST and NSFT, and increases prefrontal efflux of glutamate, which would activate AMPA receptors (AMPARs). This effect is specific of the infralimbic area since it is not observed after DBS of the prelimbic subregion. The activation of prefrontal AMPARs would result in a stimulation of prefrontal output to the brainstem, thus increasing serotonin, dopamine, and noradrenaline in the prefrontal cortex. Further, the activation of prefrontal AMPARs is necessary and sufficient condition for the antidepressant response of 1 h DBS. PMID:26088969

  13. Differential expression of postsynaptic NMDA and AMPA receptor subunits in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex of the flinders sensitive line rat model of depression.

    PubMed

    Treccani, Giulia; Gaarn du Jardin, Kristian; Wegener, Gregers; Müller, Heidi Kaastrup

    2016-11-01

    Glutamatergic abnormalities have recently been implicated in the pathophysiology of depression, and the ionotropic glutamate receptors in particular have been suggested as possible underlying molecular determinants. The Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rats constitute a validated model of depression with dysfunctional regulation of glutamate transmission relatively to their control strain Flinders Resistant Line (FRL). To gain insight into how signaling through glutamate receptors may be altered in the FSL rats, we investigated the expression and phosphorylation of AMPA and NMDA receptor subunits in an enriched postsynaptic fraction of the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Compared to the hippocampal postsynaptic fractions of FRL rats, FSL rats exhibited decreased and increased levels of the NMDA receptor subunits GluN2A and GluN2B, respectively, causing a lower ratio of GluN2A/GluN2B. The GluA2/GluA3 AMPA receptor subunit ratio was significantly decreased while the expression of the individual GluA1, GluA2, and GluA3 subunits were unaltered including phosphorylation levels of GluA1 at S831 and S845. There were no changes in the prefrontal cortex. These results support altered expression of postsynaptic glutamate receptors in the hippocampus of FSL rats, which may contribute to the depressive-like phenotype of these rats. PMID:27262028

  14. S-SCAM/MAGI-2 is an essential synaptic scaffolding molecule for the GluA2-containing maintenance pool of AMPA receptors.

    PubMed

    Danielson, Eric; Zhang, Nanyan; Metallo, Jacob; Kaleka, Kanwardeep; Shin, Seung Min; Gerges, Nashaat; Lee, Sang H

    2012-05-16

    Synaptic plasticity, the cellular basis of learning and memory, involves the dynamic trafficking of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) into and out of synapses. One of the remaining key unanswered aspects of AMPAR trafficking is the mechanism by which synaptic strength is preserved despite protein turnover. In particular, the identity of AMPAR scaffolding molecule(s) involved in the maintenance of GluA2-containing AMPARs is completely unknown. Here we report that the synaptic scaffolding molecule (S-SCAM; also called membrane-associated guanylate kinase inverted-2 and atrophin interacting protein-1) plays the critical role of maintaining synaptic strength. Increasing S-SCAM levels in rat hippocampal neurons led to specific increases in the surface AMPAR levels, enhanced AMPAR-mediated synaptic transmission, and enlargement of dendritic spines, without significantly effecting GluN levels or NMDA receptor (NMDAR) EPSC. Conversely, decreasing S-SCAM levels by RNA interference-mediated knockdown caused the loss of synaptic AMPARs, which was followed by a severe reduction in the dendritic spine density. Importantly, S-SCAM regulated synaptic AMPAR levels in a manner, dependent on GluA2 not GluA1, sensitive to N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein interaction, and independent of activity. Further, S-SCAM increased surface AMPAR levels in the absence of PSD-95, while PSD-95 was dependent on S-SCAM to increase surface AMPAR levels. Finally, S-SCAM overexpression hampered NMDA-induced internalization of AMPARs and prevented the induction of long term-depression, while S-SCAM knockdown did not. Together, these results suggest that S-SCAM is an essential AMPAR scaffolding molecule for the GluA2-containing pool of AMPARs, which are involved in the constitutive pathway of maintaining synaptic strength. PMID:22593065

  15. Target- and input-dependent organization of AMPA and NMDA receptors in synaptic connections of the cochlear nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, María E.; Fukazawa, Yugo; Kamasawa, Naomi; Clarkson, Cheryl; Molnár, Elek; Shigemoto, Ryuichi

    2014-01-01

    We examined the synaptic structure, quantity and distribution of AMPA- and NMDA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs and NMDARs, respectively) in rat cochlear nuclei by a highly sensitive freeze-fracture replica labeling technique. Four excitatory synapses formed by two distinct inputs, auditory nerve (AN) and parallel fibers (PF), on different cell types were analyzed. These excitatory synapse types included AN synapses on bushy cells (AN-BC synapses) and fusiform cells (AN-FC synapses) and PF synapses on FC (PF-FC synapses) and cartwheel cell spines (PF-CwC synapses). Immunogold labeling revealed differences in synaptic structure as well as AMPAR and NMDAR number and/or density in both AN and PF synapses, indicating a target-dependent organization. The immunogold receptor labeling also identified differences in the synaptic organization of FCs based on AN or PF connections, indicating an input-dependent organization in FCs. Among the four excitatory synapse types, the AN-BC synapses were the smallest and had the most densely packed IMPs, whereas the PF-CwC synapses were the largest and had sparsely-packed IMPs. All four synapse types showed positive correlations between the IMP-cluster area and the AMPAR number, indicating a common intra-synapse-type relationship for glutamatergic synapses. Immunogold particles for AMPARs were distributed over the entire area of individual AN synapses, PF synapses often showed synaptic areas devoid of labeling. The gold-labeling for NMDARs occurred in a mosaic fashion, with less positive correlations between the IMP-cluster area and the NMDAR number. Our observations reveal target- and input-dependent features in the structure, number, and organization of AMPARs and NMDARs in AN and PF synapses. PMID:25041792

  16. Calcium-Permeable AMPA Receptors Mediate the Induction of the Protein Kinase A-Dependent Component of Long-Term Potentiation in the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Park, Pojeong; Sanderson, Thomas M.; Amici, Mascia; Choi, Sun-Lim; Bortolotto, Zuner A.; Zhuo, Min

    2016-01-01

    Two forms of NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-dependent long-term potentiation (LTP) at hippocampal CA1 synapses can be distinguished based on their sensitivity to inhibitors of protein kinase A (PKA). The PKA-dependent form requires multiple episodes of high-frequency stimulation (HFS) or theta burst stimuli (TBS) with a spacing between episodes in the order of minutes. To investigate the mechanism by which spaced episodes induce the PKA-dependent form of LTP, we have compared, in interleaved experiments, spaced (s) and compressed (c) TBS protocols in the rat CA1 synapses. We find that LTP induced by sTBS, but not that induced by cTBS, involves the insertion of calcium-permeable (CP) AMPARs, as assessed using pharmacological and electrophysiological criteria. Furthermore, a single TBS when paired with rolipram [4-(3-(cyclopentyloxy)-4-methoxyphenyl)pyrrolidin-2-one], to activate PKA, generates an LTP that also involves the insertion of CP-AMPARs. These data demonstrate that the involvement of CP-AMPARs in LTP is critically determined by the timing of the induction trigger and is associated specifically with the PKA-dependent form of LTP. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Long-term potentiation is a family of synaptic mechanisms that are believed to be important for learning and memory. Two of the most extensively studied forms are triggered by the synaptic activation of NMDA receptors and expressed by changes in AMPA receptor function. They can be distinguished on the basis of their requirement for activation of a protein kinase, PKA. We show that the PKA-dependent form also involves the transient insertion of calcium-permeable AMPA receptors. These results have implications for relating synaptic plasticity to learning and memory and suggest a specific linkage between PKA activation and the rapid synaptic insertion of calcium-permeable AMPA receptors during long-term potentiation. PMID:26758849

  17. Inhibition by adenosine A2A receptors of NMDA but not AMPA currents in rat neostriatal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wirkner, Kerstin; Assmann, Heike; Köles, Laszlo; Gerevich, Zoltan; Franke, Heike; Nörenberg, Wolfgang; Boehm, Rudolf; Illes, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Whole-cell patch clamp experiments were used to investigate the transduction mechanism of adenosine A2A receptors in modulating N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced currents in rat striatal brain slices. The A2A receptor agonist 2-p-(2-carboxyethyl)phenethylamino-5′-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (CGS 21680) inhibited the NMDA, but not the (S)-α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) current in a subset of striatal neurons. Lucifer yellow-filled pipettes in combination with immunostaining of A2A receptors were used to identify CGS 21680-sensitive cells as typical medium spiny striatal neurons. Dibutyryl cyclic AMP and the protein kinase A activator Sp-cyclic AMPs, but not the protein kinase A inhibitors Rp-cyclic AMPS or PKI(14–24)amide abolished the inhibitory effect of CGS 21680. The phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122, but not the inactive structural analogue U-73343 also interfered with CGS 21680. The activation of protein kinase C by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate or the blockade of this enzyme by staurosporine did not alter the effect of CGS 21680. Heparin, an antagonist of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) and a more efficient buffering of intracellular Ca2+ by BAPTA instead of EGTA in the pipette solution, abolished the CGS 21680-induced inhibition. The calmodulin antagonist W-7 and cytochalasin B which enhances actin depolymerization also prevented the effect of CGS 21680; the calmodulin kinase II inhibitors CaM kinase II(281–309) and KN-93 but not the inactive structural analogue KN-92 were also effective. The calcineurin inhibitor deltamethrin did not interfere with CGS 21680. It is suggested that the transduction mechanism of A2A receptors to inhibit NMDA receptor channels is the phospholipase C/InsP3/calmodulin and calmodulin kinase II pathway. The adenylate cyclase/protein kinase A and phospholipase C/protein kinase C pathways do not appear to be involved. PMID:10807662

  18. GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors and AMPA receptors in medial prefrontal cortex are necessary for odor span in rats

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Don A.; Greba, Quentin; Howland, John G.

    2013-01-01

    Working memory is a type of short-term memory involved in the maintenance and manipulation of information essential for complex cognition. While memory span capacity has been extensively studied in humans as a measure of working memory, it has received considerably less attention in rodents. Our aim was to examine the role of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) glutamate receptors in odor span capacity using systemic injections or infusions of receptor antagonists into the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Long Evans rats were trained on a well-characterized odor span task (OST). Initially, rats were trained to dig for a food reward in sand followed by training on a non-match to sample discrimination using sand scented with household spices. The rats were then required to perform a serial delayed non-match to sample procedure which was their odor span. Systemic injection of the broad spectrum NMDA receptor antagonist 3-(2-Carboxypiperazin-4-yl)propyl-1-phosphonic acid (CPP) (10 mg/kg) or the GluN2B-selective antagonist Ro 25-6981 (10 mg/kg but not 6 mg/kg) significantly reduced odor span capacity. Infusions of the GluN2B- selective antagonist Ro 25-6981 (2.5 μg/hemisphere) into mPFC reduced span capacity, an effect that was nearly significant (p = 0.069). Infusions of the AMPA receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) (1.25 μg/hemisphere) into mPFC reduced span capacity and latency for the rats to make a choice in the task. These results demonstrate span capacity in rats depends on ionotropic glutamate receptor activation in the mPFC. Further understanding of the circuitry underlying span capacity may aid in the novel therapeutic drug development for persons with working memory impairments as a result of disorders such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:24348356

  19. NMDA and AMPA/kainate glutamatergic receptors in the prelimbic medial prefrontal cortex modulate the elaborated defensive behavior and innate fear-induced antinociception elicited by GABAA receptor blockade in the medial hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Renato Leonardo; Salgado-Rohner, Carlos José; Biagioni, Audrey Francisco; Medeiros, Priscila; Hallak, Jaime Eduardo Cecílio; Crippa, José Alexandre S; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the involvement of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole-4-proprionate (AMPA)/kainate receptors of the prelimbic (PL) division of the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) on the panic attack-like reactions evoked by γ-aminobutyric acid-A receptor blockade in the medial hypothalamus (MH). Rats were pretreated with NaCl 0.9%, LY235959 (NMDA receptor antagonist), and NBQX (AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist) in the PL at 3 different concentrations. Ten minutes later, the MH was treated with bicuculline, and the defensive responses were recorded for 10 min. The antagonism of NMDA receptors in the PL decreased the frequency and duration of all defensive behaviors evoked by the stimulation of the MH and reduced the innate fear-induced antinociception. However, the pretreatment of the PL cortex with NBQX was able to decrease only part of defensive responses and innate fear-induced antinociception. The present findings suggest that the NMDA-glutamatergic system of the PL is critically involved in panic-like responses and innate fear-induced antinociception and those AMPA/kainate receptors are also recruited during the elaboration of fear-induced antinociception and in panic attack-related response. The activation of the glutamatergic neurotransmission of PL division of the MPFC during the elaboration of oriented behavioral reactions elicited by the chemical stimulation of the MH recruits mainly NMDA receptors in comparison with AMPA/kainate receptors. PMID:23349224

  20. Involvement of AMPA/kainate and GABAA receptors in topiramate neuroprotective effects against methylphenidate abuse sequels involving oxidative stress and inflammation in rat isolated hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Motaghinejad, Majid; Motevalian, Manijeh

    2016-08-01

    Abuses of methylphenidate (MPH) as psychostimulant cause neural damage of brain cells. Neuroprotective properties of topiramate (TPM) have been indicated in several studies but its exact mechanism of action remains unclear. The current study evaluates protective role of various doses of TPM and its mechanism of action in MPH induced oxidative stress and inflammation. The neuroprotective effects of various doses of TPM against MPH induced oxidative stress and inflammation were evaluated and then the action of TPM was studied in presence of domoic acid (DOM), as AMPA/kainate receptor agonist and bicuculline (BIC) as GABAA receptor antagonist, in isolated rat hippocampus. Open Field Test (OFT) was used to investigate motor activity changes. Oxidative, antioxidant and inflammatory factors were measured in isolated hippocampus. TPM (70 and 100mg/kg) decreased MPH induced motor activity disturbances and inhibit MPH induced oxidative stress and inflammation. On the other hand pretreatment of animals with DOM or BIC, inhibit this effect of TPM and potentiate MPH induced motor activity disturbances and increased lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial oxidized form of glutathione (GSSG) level, interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in isolated hippocampal cells and decreased reduced form of glutathione (GSH) level, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activity. It seems that TPM can protect cells of hippocampus from oxidative stress and neuroinflammation and it could be partly by activation of GABAA receptor and inhibition of AMPA/kainite receptor. PMID:27105819

  1. AMPA and GABA(A/B) receptor subunit expression in the cuneate nucleus of adult squirrel monkeys during peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Mowery, Todd M; Kostylev, Polina V; Garraghty, Preston E

    2014-01-24

    The primate somatosensory neuroaxis provides an excellent model system with which to investigate adult neural plasticity. Here, we report immunohistochemical staining data for AMPA and GABAA/B receptor subunits in the cuneate nucleus of adult squirrel monkeys 1 and 5 months after median nerve compression. This method of nerve injury allowed the investigation of the way in which patterns of receptor correlates change during peripheral nerve regeneration. These results are compared to cortical data collected within the same animals. As observed in the cortex, the pattern of subunit staining in the brainstem 1 month after nerve compression suggests that the sensory deprived nucleus enters a state of reorganization. That is, the expression of GluR2/3 AMPA receptor subunits is significantly increased, while GABA α1 and GABABR1b receptor subunits are significantly decreased. Five months after nerve injury, the pattern of subunit expression is again very similar to that observed in the infragranular layers of cortex. At this later time we observe a significant increase in GluR2/3 and GABABR1a, with no change in GABAAα1, and a significant decrease in GABABR1b. Together these results suggest that during reorganization and recovery from injury the brainstem and cortex are governed by homogeneous mechanisms of plasticity. PMID:24315976

  2. Dynamics of the Ligand Binding Domain Layer during AMPA Receptor Activation.

    PubMed

    Baranovic, Jelena; Chebli, Miriam; Salazar, Hector; Carbone, Anna L; Faelber, Katja; Lau, Albert Y; Daumke, Oliver; Plested, Andrew J R

    2016-02-23

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors are postsynaptic tetrameric ligand-gated channels whose activity mediates fast excitatory transmission. Glutamate binding to clamshell-shaped ligand binding domains (LBDs) triggers opening of the integral ion channel, but how the four LBDs orchestrate receptor activation is unknown. Here, we present a high-resolution x-ray crystal structure displaying two tetrameric LBD arrangements fully bound to glutamate. Using a series of engineered metal ion trapping mutants, we showed that the more compact of the two assemblies corresponds to an arrangement populated during activation of full-length receptors. State-dependent cross-linking of the mutants identified zinc bridges between the canonical active LBD dimers that formed when the tetramer was either fully or partially bound by glutamate. These bridges also stabilized the resting state, consistent with the recently published full-length apo structure. Our results provide insight into the activation mechanism of glutamate receptors and the complex conformational space that the LBD layer can sample. PMID:26910426

  3. Molecular Mechanisms Contributing to TARP Regulation of Channel Conductance and Polyamine Block of Calcium-Permeable AMPA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Coombs, Ian D.; Gratacòs-Batlle, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Many properties of fast synaptic transmission in the brain are influenced by transmembrane AMPAR regulatory proteins (TARPs) that modulate the pharmacology and gating of AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs). Although much is known about TARP influence on AMPAR pharmacology and kinetics through their modulation of the extracellular ligand-binding domain (LBD), less is known about their regulation of the ion channel region. TARP-induced modifications in AMPAR channel behavior include increased single-channel conductance and weakened block of calcium-permeable AMPARs (CP-AMPARs) by endogenous intracellular polyamines. To investigate how TARPs modify ion flux and channel block, we examined the action of γ-2 (stargazin) on GluA1 and GluA4 CP-AMPARs. First, we compared the permeation of organic cations of different sizes. We found that γ-2 increased the permeability of several cations but not the estimated AMPAR pore size, suggesting that TARP-induced relief of polyamine block does not reflect altered pore diameter. Second, to determine whether residues in the TARP intracellular C-tail regulate polyamine block and channel conductance, we examined various γ-2 C-tail mutants. We identified the membrane proximal region of the C terminus as crucial for full TARP-attenuation of polyamine block, whereas complete deletion of the C-tail markedly enhanced the TARP-induced increase in channel conductance; thus, the TARP C-tail influences ion permeation. Third, we identified a site in the pore-lining region of the AMPAR, close to its Q/R site, that is crucial in determining the TARP-induced changes in single-channel conductance. This conserved residue represents a site of TARP action, independent of the AMPAR LBD. PMID:25164663

  4. AMPA receptor upregulation in the nucleus accumbens shell of cocaine-sensitized rats depends upon S-nitrosylation of stargazin

    PubMed Central

    Milovanovic, Mike; Park, Diana J.; West, Anthony R.; Snyder, Solomon H.; Wolf, Marina E.

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral sensitization to cocaine is associated with increased AMPA receptor (AMPAR) surface expression in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). This upregulation is withdrawal-dependent, as it is not detected on withdrawal day (WD) 1, but is observed on WD7–21. Its underlying mechanisms have not been clearly established. Nitric oxide (NO) regulates AMPAR trafficking in the brain by S-nitrosylation of the AMPAR auxiliary subunit, stargazin, leading to increased AMPAR surface expression. Our goal was to determine if stargazin S-nitrosylation contributes to AMPAR upregulation during sensitization. First, we measured stargazin S-nitrosylation in NAc core and shell subregions on WD14 after 8 daily injections of saline or 15mg/kg cocaine. Stargazin S-nitrosylation was markedly increased in NAc shell but not core. To determine if this is associated with AMPAR upregulation, rats received 8 cocaine or saline injections followed by twice-daily treatments with vehicle or the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME (50mg/kg) on WD1–6, the time when AMPAR upregulation is developing in cocaine-exposed rats. Cocaine/vehicle rats showed elevated stargazin and GluA1 surface expression on WD7 compared to saline/vehicle rats; the GluA1 increase was more robust in core, while stargazin increased more robustly in shell. These effects of cocaine were attenuated in shell but not core when cocaine injections were followed by L-NAME treatment on WD1–6. Together, these results indicate that elevated S-nitrosylation of stargazin contributes to AMPAR upregulation during sensitization selectively in the NAc shell. It is possible that AMPAR upregulation in core involves a different TARP, γ4, which also upregulates in the NAc of sensitized rats. PMID:24035918

  5. BDNF contributes to both rapid and homeostatic alterations in AMPA receptor surface expression in nucleus accumbens medium spiny neurons

    PubMed Central

    Reimers, Jeremy M.; Loweth, Jessica A.; Wolf, Marina E.

    2015-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a critical role in plasticity at glutamate synapses and the effects of repeated cocaine exposure. We recently showed that intracranial injection of BDNF into the rat nucleus accumbens (NAc), a key region for cocaine addiction, rapidly increases AMPA receptor (AMPAR) surface expression. To further characterize BDNF’s role in both rapid AMPAR trafficking and slower, homeostatic changes in AMPAR surface expression, we investigated the effects of acute (30 min) and long-term (24 h) treatment with BDNF on AMPAR distribution in NAc medium spiny neurons from postnatal rats co-cultured with mouse prefrontal cortex (PFC) neurons to restore excitatory inputs. Immunocytochemical studies showed that acute BDNF treatment increased cell surface GluA1 and GluA2 levels, as well as their co-localization, on NAc neurons. This effect of BDNF, confirmed using a protein crosslinking assay, was dependent on ERK but not AKT signaling. In contrast, long-term BDNF treatment decreased AMPAR surface expression on NAc neurons. Based on this latter result, we tested the hypothesis that BDNF plays a role in AMPAR “scaling down” in response to a prolonged increase in neuronal activity produced by bicuculline (24 h). Supporting this hypothesis, decreasing BDNF signaling with the extracellular BDNF scavenger TrkB-Fc prevented the scaling down of GluA1 and GluA2 surface levels in NAc neurons normally produced by bicuculline. In conclusion, BDNF exerts bidirectional effects on NAc AMPAR surface expression, depending on duration of exposure. Furthermore, BDNF’s involvement in synaptic scaling in the NAc differs from its previously described role in the visual cortex. PMID:24712995

  6. Inhibition of Spinal Ca2+-Permeable AMPA Receptors with Dicationic Compounds Alleviates Persistent Inflammatory Pain without Adverse Effects

    PubMed Central

    Kopach, Olga; Krotov, Volodymyr; Goncharenko, Julia; Voitenko, Nana

    2016-01-01

    Upregulation of Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors (CP-AMPARs) in the dorsal horn (DH) neurons of the spinal cord has been causally linked to the maintenance of persistent inflammatory pain. Therefore, inhibition of CP-AMPARs could potentially alleviate an, otherwise, poorly treatable chronic pain. However, a loss of CP-AMPARs could produce considerable side effects because of the crucial role of CP-AMPARs in synaptic plasticity. Here we have tested whether the inhibition of spinal CP-AMPARs with dicationic compounds, the open-channel antagonists acting in an activity-dependent manner, can relieve inflammatory pain without adverse effects being developed. Dicationic compounds, N1-(1-phenylcyclohexyl)pentane-1,5-diaminium bromide (IEM-1925) and 1-trimethylammonio-5-1-adamantane-methyl-ammoniopentane dibromide (IEM-1460) were applied intrathecally (i.t.) as a post-treatment for inflammatory pain in the model of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA)-induced long-lasting peripheral inflammation. The capability of dicationic compounds to ameliorate inflammatory pain was tested in rats in vivo using the Hargreaves, the von Frey and the open-field tests. Treatment with IEM-1460 or IEM-1925 resulted in profound alleviation of inflammatory pain. The pain relief appeared shortly after compound administration. The effects were concentration-dependent, displaying a high potency of dicationic compounds for alleviation of inflammatory hyperalgesia in the micromolar range, for both acute and long-lasting responses. The period of pain maintenance was shortened following treatment. Treatment with IEM-1460 or IEM-1925 changed neither thermal and mechanical basal sensitivities nor animal locomotion, suggesting that inhibition of CP-AMPARs with dicationic compounds does not give rise to detectable side effects. Thus, the ability of dicationic compounds to alleviate persistent inflammatory pain may provide new routes in the treatment of chronic pain. PMID:26973464

  7. Inhibition of Spinal Ca(2+)-Permeable AMPA Receptors with Dicationic Compounds Alleviates Persistent Inflammatory Pain without Adverse Effects.

    PubMed

    Kopach, Olga; Krotov, Volodymyr; Goncharenko, Julia; Voitenko, Nana

    2016-01-01

    Upregulation of Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors (CP-AMPARs) in the dorsal horn (DH) neurons of the spinal cord has been causally linked to the maintenance of persistent inflammatory pain. Therefore, inhibition of CP-AMPARs could potentially alleviate an, otherwise, poorly treatable chronic pain. However, a loss of CP-AMPARs could produce considerable side effects because of the crucial role of CP-AMPARs in synaptic plasticity. Here we have tested whether the inhibition of spinal CP-AMPARs with dicationic compounds, the open-channel antagonists acting in an activity-dependent manner, can relieve inflammatory pain without adverse effects being developed. Dicationic compounds, N1-(1-phenylcyclohexyl)pentane-1,5-diaminium bromide (IEM-1925) and 1-trimethylammonio-5-1-adamantane-methyl-ammoniopentane dibromide (IEM-1460) were applied intrathecally (i.t.) as a post-treatment for inflammatory pain in the model of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced long-lasting peripheral inflammation. The capability of dicationic compounds to ameliorate inflammatory pain was tested in rats in vivo using the Hargreaves, the von Frey and the open-field tests. Treatment with IEM-1460 or IEM-1925 resulted in profound alleviation of inflammatory pain. The pain relief appeared shortly after compound administration. The effects were concentration-dependent, displaying a high potency of dicationic compounds for alleviation of inflammatory hyperalgesia in the micromolar range, for both acute and long-lasting responses. The period of pain maintenance was shortened following treatment. Treatment with IEM-1460 or IEM-1925 changed neither thermal and mechanical basal sensitivities nor animal locomotion, suggesting that inhibition of CP-AMPARs with dicationic compounds does not give rise to detectable side effects. Thus, the ability of dicationic compounds to alleviate persistent inflammatory pain may provide new routes in the treatment of chronic pain. PMID:26973464

  8. Loss of Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors in synapses of tonic firing substantia gelatinosa neurons in the chronic constriction injury model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yishen; Derkach, Victor A; Smith, Peter A

    2016-05-01

    Synapses transmitting nociceptive information in the spinal dorsal horn undergo enduring changes following peripheral nerve injury. Indeed, such injury alters the expression of the GluA2 subunit of glutamatergic AMPA receptors (AMPARs) in the substantia gelatinosa and this predicts altered channel conductance and calcium permeability, leading to an altered function of excitatory synapses. We therefore investigated the functional properties of synaptic AMPA receptors in rat substantia gelatinosa neurons following 10-20d chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve; a model of neuropathic pain. We measured their single-channel conductance and sensitivity to a blocker of calcium permeable AMPA receptors (CP-AMPARs), IEM1460 (50μM). In putative inhibitory, tonic firing neurons, CCI reduced the average single-channel conductance of synaptic AMPAR from 14.4±3.5pS (n=12) to 9.2±1.0pS (n=10, p<0.05). IEM1460 also more effectively antagonized evoked, spontaneous and miniature EPSCs in tonic neurons from sham operated animals than in those from animals that had been subjected to CCI. By contrast, CCI did not change the effectiveness of IEM1460 in delay firing neurons although average single channel conductance was increased from 7.6±1.2pS (n=11) to 12.2±1.5pS (n=10, p<0.01). CCI thus elicits plastic changes in a specific set of glutamatergic synapses of substantia gelatinosa due to subunit recomposition and loss of GluA2-lacking CP-AMPAR. These insights reveal a molecular mechanism of nerve injury acting at synapses of inhibitory neurons to reduce their drive and therefore inhibitory tone in the spinal cord, therefore contributing to the central sensitization associated with neuropathic pain. PMID:26948545

  9. The antidepressant-like effects of glutamatergic drugs ketamine and AMPA receptor potentiator LY 451646 are preserved in bdnf⁺/⁻ heterozygous null mice.

    PubMed

    Lindholm, Jesse S O; Autio, Henri; Vesa, Liisa; Antila, Hanna; Lindemann, Lothar; Hoener, Marius C; Skolnick, Phil; Rantamäki, Tomi; Castrén, Eero

    2012-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that biogenic amine-based antidepressants act, at least in part, via regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling. Biogenic amine-based antidepressants increase BDNF synthesis and activate its signaling pathway through TrkB receptors. Moreover, the antidepressant-like effects of these molecules are abolished in BDNF deficient mice. Glutamate-based drugs, including the NMDA antagonist ketamine, and the AMPA receptor potentiator LY 451646, mimic the effects of antidepressants in preclinical tests with high predictive validity. In humans, a single intravenous dose of ketamine produces an antidepressant effect that is rapid, robust and persistent. In this study, we examined the role of BDNF in expression of the antidepressant-like effects of ketamine and an AMPA receptor potentiator (LY 451646) in the forced swim test (FST). Ketamine and LY 451646 produced antidepressant-like effects in the FST in mice at 45 min after a single injection, but no effects were observed one week after a single ketamine injection. As previously reported, the effects of imipramine in the forced swim test were blunted in heterozygous BDNF knockout (bdnf(+/-)) mice. However ketamine and LY 451646 produced similar antidepressant-like responses in wildtype and bdnf(+/-) mice. Neither ketamine nor LY 451646 significantly influenced the levels BDNF or TrkB phosphorylation in the hippocampus when assessed at 45 min or 7 days after the drug administration. These data demonstrate that under the conditions tested, neither ketamine nor the AMPA-potentiator LY 451656 activate BDNF signaling, but produce a characteristic antidepressant-like response in heterozygous bdnf(+/-) mice. These data indicate that unlike biogenic amine-based agents, BDNF signaling does not play a pivotal role in the antidepressant effects of glutamate-based compounds. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Anxiety and Depression'. PMID:21867718

  10. Differential neuronal and glial expression of GluR1 AMPA receptor subunit and the scaffolding proteins SAP97 and 4.1N during rat cerebellar development.

    PubMed

    Douyard, Jessica; Shen, Lei; Huganir, Richard L; Rubio, Maria E

    2007-05-01

    In neurons, AMPA glutamate receptors are developmentally regulated and selectively targeted to synaptic sites. Astroglial cells also express AMPA receptors, but their developmental pattern of expression and targeting mechanisms are unknown. In this study we investigated by immunocytochemistry at the light and electron microscopy level the expression of GluR1 and its scaffolding proteins SAP97 (synapse-associated protein) and 4.1N during cerebellar development. In cerebellar cortex the GluR1 AMPA receptor subunit is expressed exclusively in Bergmann glia in the adult rodent. Interestingly, we observed that GluR1 was expressed postsynaptically at the climbing fibers (CF) synapse at early ages during Purkinje cell dendritic growth and before the complete ensheathment of CF/Purkinje cell synapses by Bergmann glia. However, its expression changed from neurons to Bergmann glia once these glial cells had completed their enwrapping process. In contrast, GluR2/3 and GluR4 AMPAR subunits were stably expressed in both Purkinje cells (GluR2/3) and Bergmann glia (GluR4) throughout postnatal development. Our data indicate that GluR1 expression undergoes a developmental switch from neurons to glia and that this appears to correlate with the degree of Purkinje cell dendritic growth and their enwrapping by Bergmann glia. SAP97 and 4.1N were developmentally regulated in the same pattern as GluR1. Therefore, SAP97 and 4.1N may play a role in the transport and insertion of GluR1 at CF/Purkinje cell synapses during early ages and at Bergmann glia plasma membrane in the adult. The parallel fiber (PF)/Purkinje cell synapse contained GluR2/3 but lacked GluR1, SAP97, and 4.1N at the time of PF synaptogenesis. PMID:17335044

  11. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor acutely enhances tyrosine phosphorylation of the AMPA receptor subunit GluR1 via NMDA receptor-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kuo; Len, Guo-Wei; McAuliffe, Geoff; Ma, Chia; Tai, Jessica P; Xu, Fei; Black, Ira B

    2004-11-01

    Brain-derived growth factor (BDNF) acutely regulates synaptic transmission and modulates hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD), cellular models of plasticity associated with learning and memory. Our previous studies revealed that BDNF rapidly increases phosphorylation of NMDA receptor subunits NR1 and NR2B in the postsynaptic density (PSD), potentially linking receptor phosphorylation to synaptic plasticity. To further define molecular mechanisms governing BDNF actions, we examined tyrosine phosphorylation of GluR1, the most well-characterized subunit of AMPA receptors. Initially, we investigated synaptoneurosomes that contain intact pre- and postsynaptic elements. Incubation of synaptoneurosomes with BDNF for 5 min increased tyrosine phosphorylation of GluR1 in a dose-dependent manner, with a maximal, 4-fold enhancement at 10 ng/ml BDNF. NGF had no effects, suggesting the specificity of BDNF actions. Subsequently, we found that BDNF elicited a maximal, 2.5-fold increase in GluR1 phosphorylation in the PSD at 250 ng/ml BDNF within 5 min, suggesting that BDNF enhances the phosphorylation through postsynaptic mechanisms. Activation of trkB receptors was critical as k252-a, an inhibitor of trk receptor tyrosine kinase, blocked the BDNF-activated GluR1 phosphorylation. In addition, AP-5 and MK 801, NMDA receptor antagonists, blocked BDNF enhancement of phosphorylation in synaptoneurosomes or PSDs. Conversely, NMDA, the specific receptor agonist, evoked respective 3.8- and 2-fold increases in phosphorylation in synaptoneurosomes and PSDs within 5 min, mimicking the effects of BDNF. These findings raise the possibility that BDNF modulates GluR1 activity via changes in NMDA receptor function. Moreover, incubation of synaptoneurosomes or PSDs with BDNF and ifenprodil, a specific NR2B antagonist, reproduced the results of AP-5 and MK-801. Finally, coexposure of synaptoneurosomes or PSDs to BDNF and NMDA was not additive, suggesting that

  12. Evidence for a Specific Integrative Mechanism for Episodic Memory Mediated by AMPA/kainate Receptors in a Circuit Involving Medial Prefrontal Cortex and Hippocampal CA3 Region.

    PubMed

    de Souza Silva, Maria A; Huston, Joseph P; Wang, An-Li; Petri, David; Chao, Owen Yuan-Hsin

    2016-07-01

    We asked whether episodic-like memory requires neural mechanisms independent of those that mediate its component memories for "what," "when," and "where," and if neuronal connectivity between the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and the hippocampus (HPC) CA3 subregion is essential for episodic-like memory. Unilateral lesion of the mPFC was combined with unilateral lesion of the CA3 in the ipsi- or contralateral hemispheres in rats. Episodic-like memory was tested using a task, which assesses the integration of memories for "what, where, and when" concomitantly. Tests for novel object recognition (what), object place (where), and temporal order memory (when) were also applied. Bilateral disconnection of the mPFC-CA3 circuit by N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) lesions disrupted episodic-like memory, but left the component memories for object, place, and temporal order, per se, intact. Furthermore, unilateral NMDA lesion of the CA3 plus injection of (6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione) (CNQX) (AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist), but not AP-5 (NMDA receptor antagonist), into the contralateral mPFC also disrupted episodic-like memory, indicating the mPFC AMPA/kainate receptors as critical for this circuit. These results argue for a selective neural system that specifically subserves episodic memory, as it is not critically involved in the control of its component memories for object, place, and time. PMID:26048953

  13. Subthreshold receptive fields and baseline excitability of "silent" S1 callosal neurons in awake rabbits: contributions of AMPA/kainate and NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Swadlow, H A; Hicks, T P

    1997-07-01

    The contribution of NMDA and non-NMDA receptors to excitatory subthreshold receptive fields was examined in callosal efferent neurons (CC neurons) in primary somatosensory cortex of the fully awake rabbit. Only neurons showing no traditional (suprathreshold) receptive fields were examined. Subthreshold responses were examined by monitoring the thresholds of efferent neurons to juxtasomal current pulses (JSCPs) delivered through the recording microelectrode. Changes in threshold following a peripheral conditioning stimulus signify a subthreshold response. Using this method, excitatory postsynaptic potentials and inhibitory postsynaptic potentials are manifested as decreases and increases in JSCP threshold, respectively. NMDA and non-NMDA agonists and antagonists were administered iontophoretically via a multibarrel micropipette assembly attached to the recording/stimulating microelectrode. Receptor-selective doses of both AMPA/kainate and NMDA antagonists decreased the excitability of CC neurons in the absence of any peripheral stimulation. Threshold to JSCPs rose by a mean of 20% for both classes of antagonist. Despite the similar effects of NMDA and non-NMDA antagonists on baseline excitability, these antagonists had dramatically different effects on the subthreshold excitatory response to activation of the receptive field. Whereas receptor-selective doses of AMPA/kainate antagonists either eliminated or severely attenuated the subthreshold excitatory responses to peripheral stimulation, NMDA antagonists had little or no effect on the subthreshold evoked response. PMID:9262195

  14. Identification of an ionotropic glutamate receptor AMPA1/GRIA1 polymorphism in crossbred beef cows differing in fertility.

    PubMed

    Cushman, R A; Miles, J R; Rempel, L A; McDaneld, T G; Kuehn, L A; Chitko-McKown, C G; Nonneman, D; Echternkamp, S E

    2013-06-01

    A proposed functional polymorphism in the ionotropic glutamate receptor AMPA1 (GRIA1) has been reported to influence antral follicle numbers and fertility in cows. Repeat breeder cows that fail to produce a calf in multiple seasons have been reported to have reduced numbers of small (1 to 3 mm) antral follicles in their ovaries. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that this GRIA1 polymorphism was affecting antral follicle numbers in repeat breeder cows. Repeat breeder cows (n = 64) and control cows (n = 72) that had always produced a calf were housed in a dry lot and observed twice daily for behavioral estrus. Blood samples were collected, and cows were genotyped for this GRIA1 polymorphism and for a polymorphism in the GnRH receptor (GnRHR) that was proposed to influence age at puberty. On d 3 to 8 after estrus cows were slaughtered, and reproductive organs were collected to determine antral follicle count, ovary size, and uterine horn diameter. Repeat breeder cows were older at first calving than control cows (P = 0.006). The length (P = 0.03) and height (P = 0.02) of the ovary contralateral to the corpus luteum (CL) were greater in control cows than repeat breeder cows. The endometrial diameter in the horn ipsilateral to the CL was greater in the control cows than the repeat breeder cows. Repeat breeder cows had fewer small (1 to 5 mm) antral follicles than control cows (P = 0.003); however, there was no association between GRIA1 genotype and antral follicle number. The GnRHR polymorphism was associated with age at first calving because cows that were homozygous for the C allele had a greater age at first calving than heterozygous cows or cows that were homozygous for the T allele (P = 0.01). In the granulosa cells from small (1 to 5 mm) antral follicles, mRNA abundances of 2 markers of oocyte quality, anti-Müllerian hormone and pentraxin 3, did not differ between fertility groups (P ≥ 0.12). We conclude that this GRIA1 polymorphism exists in beef cows but

  15. Editing for an AMPA receptor subunit RNA in prefrontal cortex and striatum in Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease and schizophrenia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akbarian, S.; Smith, M. A.; Jones, E. G.; Bloom, F. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Animal studies and cell culture experiments demonstrated that posttranscriptional editing of the transcript of the GluR-2 gene, resulting in substitution of an arginine for glutamine in the second transmembrane region (TM II) of the expressed protein, is associated with a reduction in Ca2+ permeability of the receptor channel. Thus, disturbances in GluR-2 RNA editing with alteration of intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis could lead to neuronal dysfunction and even neuronal degeneration. The present study determined the proportions of edited and unedited GluR-2 RNA in the prefrontal cortex of brains from patients with Alzheimer's disease, in the striatum of brains from patients with Huntington's disease, and in the same areas of brains from age-matched schizophrenics and controls, by using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, restriction endonuclease digestion, gel electrophoresis and scintillation radiometry. In the prefrontal cortex of controls, < 0.1% of all GluR-2 RNA molecules were unedited and > 99.9% were edited; in the prefrontal cortex both of schizophrenics and of Alzheimer's patients approximately 1.0% of all GluR-2 RNA molecules were unedited and 99% were edited. In the striatum of controls and of schizophrenics, approximately 0.5% of GluR-2 RNA molecules were unedited and 99.5% were edited; in the striatum of Huntington's patients nearly 5.0% of GluR-2 RNA was unedited. In the prefrontal white matter of controls, approximately 7.0% of GluR-2 RNA was unedited. In the normal human prefrontal cortex and striatum, the large majority of GluR-2 RNA molecules contains a CGG codon for arginine in the TMII coding region; this implies that the corresponding AMPA receptors have a low Ca2+ permeability, as previously demonstrated for the rat brain. The process of GluR-2 RNA editing is compromised in a region-specific manner in schizophrenia, in Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's Chorea although in each of these disorders there is still a large excess of

  16. Activation of the sigma receptor 1 modulates AMPA receptor-mediated light-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents in rat retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei-Lei; Deng, Qin-Qin; Weng, Shi-Jun; Yang, Xiong-Li; Zhong, Yong-Mei

    2016-09-22

    Sigma receptor (σR), a unique receptor family, is classified into three subtypes: σR1, σR2 and σR3. It was previously shown that σR1 activation induced by 1μM SKF10047 (SKF) suppressed N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated responses of rat retinal ganglion cells (GCs) and the suppression was mediated by a distinct Ca(2+)-dependent phospholipase C (PLC)-protein kinase C (PKC) pathway. In the present work, using whole-cell patch-clamp techniques in rat retinal slice preparations, we further demonstrate that SKF of higher dosage (50μM) significantly suppressed AMPA receptor (AMPAR)-mediated light-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (L-EPSCs) of retinal ON-type GCs (ON GCs), and the effect was reversed by the σR1 antagonist BD1047, suggesting the involvement of σR1. The SKF (50μM) effect was unlikely due to a change in glutamate release from bipolar cells, as suggested by the unaltered paired-pulse ratio (PPR) of AMPAR-mediated EPSCs of ON GCs. SKF (50μM) did not change L-EPSCs of ON GCs when the G protein inhibitor GDP-β-S or the protein kinase G (PKG) inhibitor KT5823 was intracellularly infused. Calcium imaging further revealed that SKF (50μM) did not change intracellular calcium concentration in GCs and persisted to suppress L-EPSCs when intracellular calcium was chelated by BAPTA. The SKF (50μM) effect was intact when protein kinase A (PKA) and phosphatidylinostiol (PI)-PLC signaling pathways were both blocked. We conclude that the SKF (50μM) effect is Ca(2+)-independent, PKG-dependent, but not involving PKA, PI-PLC pathways. PMID:27373906

  17. A Computational Model for the AMPA Receptor Phosphorylation Master Switch Regulating Cerebellar Long-Term Depression

    PubMed Central

    Gallimore, Andrew R.; Aricescu, A. Radu; Yuzaki, Michisuke; Calinescu, Radu

    2016-01-01

    The expression of long-term depression (LTD) in cerebellar Purkinje cells results from the internalisation of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid receptors (AMPARs) from the postsynaptic membrane. This process is regulated by a complex signalling pathway involving sustained protein kinase C (PKC) activation, inhibition of serine/threonine phosphatase, and an active protein tyrosine phosphatase, PTPMEG. In addition, two AMPAR-interacting proteins–glutamate receptor-interacting protein (GRIP) and protein interacting with C kinase 1 (PICK1)–regulate the availability of AMPARs for trafficking between the postsynaptic membrane and the endosome. Here we present a new computational model of these overlapping signalling pathways. The model reveals how PTPMEG cooperates with PKC to drive LTD expression by facilitating the effect of PKC on the dissociation of AMPARs from GRIP and thus their availability for trafficking. Model simulations show that LTD expression is increased by serine/threonine phosphatase inhibition, and negatively regulated by Src-family tyrosine kinase activity, which restricts the dissociation of AMPARs from GRIP under basal conditions. We use the model to expose the dynamic balance between AMPAR internalisation and reinsertion, and the phosphorylation switch responsible for the perturbation of this balance and for the rapid plasticity initiation and regulation. Our model advances the understanding of PF-PC LTD regulation and induction, and provides a validated extensible platform for more detailed studies of this fundamental synaptic process. PMID:26807999

  18. A Computational Model for the AMPA Receptor Phosphorylation Master Switch Regulating Cerebellar Long-Term Depression.

    PubMed

    Gallimore, Andrew R; Aricescu, A Radu; Yuzaki, Michisuke; Calinescu, Radu

    2016-01-01

    The expression of long-term depression (LTD) in cerebellar Purkinje cells results from the internalisation of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid receptors (AMPARs) from the postsynaptic membrane. This process is regulated by a complex signalling pathway involving sustained protein kinase C (PKC) activation, inhibition of serine/threonine phosphatase, and an active protein tyrosine phosphatase, PTPMEG. In addition, two AMPAR-interacting proteins-glutamate receptor-interacting protein (GRIP) and protein interacting with C kinase 1 (PICK1)-regulate the availability of AMPARs for trafficking between the postsynaptic membrane and the endosome. Here we present a new computational model of these overlapping signalling pathways. The model reveals how PTPMEG cooperates with PKC to drive LTD expression by facilitating the effect of PKC on the dissociation of AMPARs from GRIP and thus their availability for trafficking. Model simulations show that LTD expression is increased by serine/threonine phosphatase inhibition, and negatively regulated by Src-family tyrosine kinase activity, which restricts the dissociation of AMPARs from GRIP under basal conditions. We use the model to expose the dynamic balance between AMPAR internalisation and reinsertion, and the phosphorylation switch responsible for the perturbation of this balance and for the rapid plasticity initiation and regulation. Our model advances the understanding of PF-PC LTD regulation and induction, and provides a validated extensible platform for more detailed studies of this fundamental synaptic process. PMID:26807999

  19. The role of AMPA receptors in postsynaptic mechanisms of synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Chater, Thomas E.; Goda, Yukiko

    2014-01-01

    In the mammalian central nervous system, excitatory glutamatergic synapses harness neurotransmission that is mediated by ion flow through α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs). AMPARs, which are enriched in the postsynaptic membrane on dendritic spines, are highly dynamic, and shuttle in and out of synapses in an activity-dependent manner. Changes in their number, subunit composition, phosphorylation state, and accessory proteins can all regulate AMPARs and thus modify synaptic strength and support cellular forms of learning. Furthermore, dysregulation of AMPAR plasticity has been implicated in various pathological states and has important consequences for mental health. Here we focus on the mechanisms that control AMPAR plasticity, drawing particularly from the extensive studies on hippocampal synapses, and highlight recent advances in the field along with considerations for future directions. PMID:25505875

  20. "Silent" Priming of Translation-Dependent LTP by [Beta]-Adrenergic Receptors Involves Phosphorylation and Recruitment of AMPA Receptors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenorio, Gustavo; Connor, Steven A.; Guevremont, Diane; Abraham, Wickliffe C.; Williams, Joanna; O'Dell, Thomas J.; Nguyen, Peter V.

    2010-01-01

    The capacity for long-term changes in synaptic efficacy can be altered by prior synaptic activity, a process known as "metaplasticity." Activation of receptors for modulatory neurotransmitters can trigger downstream signaling cascades that persist beyond initial receptor activation and may thus have metaplastic effects. Because activation of…

  1. Direct interactions between PSD-95 and stargazin control synaptic AMPA receptor number

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, Eric; Sizemore, Max; Karimzadegan, Siavash; Chen, Lu; Bredt, David S.; Nicoll, Roger A.

    2002-01-01

    Excitatory synapses in the brain exhibit a remarkable degree of functional plasticity, which largely reflects changes in the number of synaptic α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs). However, mechanisms involved in recruiting AMPARs to synapses are unknown. Here we use hippocampal slice cultures and biolistic gene transfections to study the targeting of AMPARs to synapses. We show that AMPARs are localized to synapses through direct binding of the first two PDZ domains of synaptic PSD-95 (postsynaptic density protein of 95 kDa) to the AMPAR-associated protein, stargazin. Increasing the level of synaptic PSD-95 recruits new AMPARs to synapses without changing the number of surface AMPARs. At the same time, we show that stargazin overexpression drastically increases the number of extra-synaptic AMPARs, but fails to alter synaptic currents if synaptic PSD-95 levels are kept constant. Finally, we make compensatory mutations to both PSD-95 and stargazin to demonstrate the central role of direct interactions between them in determining the number of synaptic AMPARs. PMID:12359873

  2. Regulation of AMPA receptor extrasynaptic insertion by 4.1N, phosphorylation and palmitoylation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Da–Ting; Makino, Yuichi; Sharma, Kamal; Hayashi, Takashi; Neve, Rachael; Takamiya, Kogo; Huganir, Richard L.

    2009-01-01

    The insertion of alpha–amino–3–hydroxy–5–methyl–4–isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) into the plasma membrane is a key step in synaptic delivery of AMPARs during the expression of synaptic plasticity. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating AMPAR insertion remain elusive. By directly visualizing individual insertion events of the AMPAR subunit GluR1, we demonstrate that Protein 4.1N is required for activity dependent GluR1 insertion. PKC phosphorylation of GluR1 S816 and S818 residues enhances 4.1N binding to GluR1, and facilitates GluR1 insertion. In addition, palmitoylation of GluR1 C811 residue modulates PKC phosphorylation and GluR1 insertion. Finally, disrupting 4.1N dependent GluR1 insertion decreases surface expression of GluR1 and the expression of long–term potentiation (LTP). Our study uncovers a novel mechanism that governs activity dependent GluR1 trafficking, reveals an interesting interplay between AMPAR palmitoylation and phosphorylation, and underscores the functional significance of the 4.1N protein in AMPAR trafficking and synaptic plasticity. PMID:19503082

  3. Enhanced Odor Discrimination and Impaired Olfactory Memory by Spatially Controlled Switch of AMPA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Genetic perturbations of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate receptors (AMPARs) are widely used to dissect molecular mechanisms of sensory coding, learning, and memory. In this study, we investigated the role of Ca2+-permeable AMPARs in olfactory behavior. AMPAR modification was obtained by depletion of the GluR-B subunit or expression of unedited GluR-B(Q), both leading to increased Ca2+ permeability of AMPARs. Mice with this functional AMPAR switch, specifically in forebrain, showed enhanced olfactory discrimination and more rapid learning in a go/no-go operant conditioning task. Olfactory memory, however, was dramatically impaired. GluR-B depletion in forebrain was ectopically variable (“mosaic”) among individuals and strongly correlated with decreased olfactory memory in hippocampus and cortex. Accordingly, memory was rescued by transgenic GluR-B expression restricted to piriform cortex and hippocampus, while enhanced odor discrimination was independent of both GluR-B variability and transgenic GluR-B expression. Thus, correlated differences in behavior and levels of GluR-B expression allowed a mechanistic and spatial dissection of olfactory learning, discrimination, and memory capabilities. PMID:16216087

  4. A Role for Calcium-Permeable AMPA Receptors in Synaptic Plasticity and Learning

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Erin E.; Abdipranoto, Andrea; Thangthaeng, Nopporn; Jacobs, Nate; Saab, Faysal; Tonegawa, Susumu; Heinemann, Stephen F.; O'Dell, Thomas J.; Fanselow, Michael S.; Vissel, Bryce

    2010-01-01

    A central concept in the field of learning and memory is that NMDARs are essential for synaptic plasticity and memory formation. Surprisingly then, multiple studies have found that behavioral experience can reduce or eliminate the contribution of these receptors to learning. The cellular mechanisms that mediate learning in the absence of NMDAR activation are currently unknown. To address this issue, we examined the contribution of Ca2+-permeable AMPARs to learning and plasticity in the hippocampus. Mutant mice were engineered with a conditional genetic deletion of GluR2 in the CA1 region of the hippocampus (GluR2-cKO mice). Electrophysiology experiments in these animals revealed a novel form of long-term potentiation (LTP) that was independent of NMDARs and mediated by GluR2-lacking Ca2+-permeable AMPARs. Behavioral analyses found that GluR2-cKO mice were impaired on multiple hippocampus-dependent learning tasks that required NMDAR activation. This suggests that AMPAR-mediated LTP interferes with NMDAR-dependent plasticity. In contrast, NMDAR-independent learning was normal in knockout mice and required the activation of Ca2+-permeable AMPARs. These results suggest that GluR2-lacking AMPARs play a functional and previously unidentified role in learning; they appear to mediate changes in synaptic strength that occur after plasticity has been established by NMDARs. PMID:20927382

  5. Developmental switch in the kinase dependency of long-term potentiation depends on expression of GluA4 subunit-containing AMPA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Luchkina, Natalia V.; Huupponen, Johanna; Clarke, Vernon R. J.; Coleman, Sarah K.; Keinänen, Kari; Taira, Tomi; Lauri, Sari E.

    2014-01-01

    The AMPA-receptor subunit GluA4 is expressed transiently in CA1 pyramidal neurons at the time synaptic connectivity is forming, but its physiological significance is unknown. Here we show that GluA4 expression is sufficient to alter the signaling requirements of long-term potentiation (LTP) and can fully explain the switch in the LTP kinase dependency from PKA to Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II during synapse maturation. At immature synapses, activation of PKA leads to a robust potentiation of AMPA-receptor function via the mobilization of GluA4. Analysis of GluA4-deficient mice indicates that this mechanism is critical for neonatal PKA-dependent LTP. Furthermore, lentiviral expression of GluA4 in CA1 neurons conferred a PKA-dependent synaptic potentiation and LTP regardless of the developmental stage. Thus, GluA4 defines the signaling requirements for LTP and silent synapse activation during a critical period of synapse development. PMID:24599589

  6. Mapping the Interaction Sites between AMPA Receptors and TARPs Reveals a Role for the Receptor N-Terminal Domain in Channel Gating

    PubMed Central

    Cais, Ondrej; Herguedas, Beatriz; Krol, Karolina; Cull-Candy, Stuart G.; Farrant, Mark; Greger, Ingo H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) mediate fast neurotransmission at excitatory synapses. The extent and fidelity of postsynaptic depolarization triggered by AMPAR activation are shaped by AMPAR auxiliary subunits, including the transmembrane AMPAR regulatory proteins (TARPs). TARPs profoundly influence gating, an effect thought to be mediated by an interaction with the AMPAR ion channel and ligand binding domain (LBD). Here, we show that the distal N-terminal domain (NTD) contributes to TARP modulation. Alterations in the NTD-LBD linker result in TARP-dependent and TARP-selective changes in AMPAR gating. Using peptide arrays, we identify a TARP interaction region on the NTD and define the path of TARP contacts along the LBD surface. Moreover, we map key binding sites on the TARP itself and show that mutation of these residues mediates gating modulation. Our data reveal a TARP-dependent allosteric role for the AMPAR NTD and suggest that TARP binding triggers a drastic reorganization of the AMPAR complex. PMID:25373908

  7. Changes of AMPA receptor properties in the neocortex and hippocampus following pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus in rats.

    PubMed

    Malkin, Sergey L; Amakhin, Dmitry V; Veniaminova, Ekaterina A; Kim, Kira Kh; Zubareva, Olga E; Magazanik, Lev G; Zaitsev, Aleksey V

    2016-07-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common type of epilepsy in humans. The lithium-pilocarpine model in rodents reproduces some of the main features of human TLE. Three-week-old Wistar rats were used in this study. The changes in AMPA receptor subunit composition were investigated in several brain areas, including the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), the temporal cortex (TC), and the dorsal (DH) and ventral hippocampus (VH) during the first week following pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (PILO-induced SE). In the hippocampus, GluA1 and GluA2 mRNA expression slightly decreased after PILO-induced SE and returned to the initial level on the seventh day. We did not detect any significant changes in mRNA expression of the GluA1 and GluA2 subunits in the TC, whereas in the mPFC we observed a significant increase of GluA1 mRNA expression on the third day and a decrease in GluA2 mRNA expression during the entire first week. Accordingly, the GluA1/GluA2 expression ratio increased in the mPFC, and the functional properties of the pyramidal cell excitatory synapses were disturbed. Using whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings, we found that on the third day following PILO-induced SE, isolated mPFC pyramidal neurons showed an inwardly rectifying current-voltage relation of kainate-evoked currents, suggesting the presence of GluA2-lacking calcium-permeable AMPARs (CP-AMPARs). IEM-1460, a selective antagonist of CP-AMPARs, significantly reduced the amplitude of evoked EPSC in pyramidal neurons from mPFC slices on the first and third days, but not on the seventh day. The antagonist had no effects on EPSC amplitude in slices from control animals. Thus, our data demonstrate that PILO-induced SE affects subunit composition of AMPARs in different brain areas, including the mPFC. SE induces transient (up to few days) incorporation of CP-AMPARs in the excitatory synapses of mPFC pyramidal neurons, which may disrupt normal circuitry functions. PMID:27109923

  8. Methylphenidate amplifies long-term potentiation in rat hippocampus CA1 area involving the insertion of AMPA receptors by activation of β-adrenergic and D1/D5 receptors.

    PubMed

    Rozas, C; Carvallo, C; Contreras, D; Carreño, M; Ugarte, G; Delgado, R; Zeise, M L; Morales, B

    2015-12-01

    Methylphenidate (MPH, Ritalin©) is widely used in the treatment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and recently as a drug of abuse. Although the effect of MPH has been studied in brain regions such as striatum and prefrontal cortex (PFC), the hippocampus has received relatively little attention. It is known that MPH increases the TBS-dependent Long Term Potentiation (LTP) in the CA1 area. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in this process are still unknown. Using field potential recordings and western blot analysis in rat hippocampal slices of young rats, we found that acute application of MPH enhances LTP in CA3-CA1 synapses in a dose-dependent manner with an EC50 of 73.44±6.32 nM. Using specific antagonists and paired-pulse facilitation protocols, we observed that the MPH-dependent increase of LTP involves not only β-adrenergic receptors activation but also post-synaptic D1/D5 dopamine receptors. The inhibition of PKA with PKI, suppressed the facilitation of LTP induced by MPH consistent with an involvement of the adenyl cyclase-cAMP-PKA dependent cascade downstream of the activation of D1/D5 receptors. In addition, samples of CA1 areas taken from slices potentiated with MPH presented an increase in the phosphorylation of the Ser845 residue of the GluA1 subunit of AMPA receptors compared to control slices. This effect was reverted by SCH23390, antagonist of D1/D5 receptors, and PKI. Moreover, we found an increase of surface-associated functional AMPA receptors. We propose that MPH increases TBS-dependent LTP in CA3-CA1 synapses through a polysynaptic mechanism involving activation of β-adrenergic and D1/D5 dopaminergic receptors and promoting the trafficking and insertion of functional AMPA receptors to the plasma membrane. PMID:26165920

  9. Differential role of AMPA receptors in mouse tests of antidepressant and anxiolytic action.

    PubMed

    Andreasen, Jesper T; Fitzpatrick, Ciaran M; Larsen, Maria; Skovgaard, Lars; Nielsen, Simon D; Clausen, Rasmus P; Troelsen, Karin; Pickering, Darryl S

    2015-03-19

    Depression and anxiety often co-occur, and conventional monoamine-facilitating antidepressants show efficacy against symptoms in both disorders. Rodent studies indicate that antidepressant effects of monoamine-based antidepressants involve increased α-amino-3-hydroxy-5- methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid glutamate receptor (AMPAR) neurotransmission, and positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) at AMPARs produced antidepressant-like effects in rodents. While this suggests that increased AMPAR-mediated neurotransmission is beneficial in depression management, preclinical studies addressing AMPARs in relation to anxiety have given ambiguous results with both anxiolytic-like and anxiogenic-like effects observed after AMPAR blockade. This study systematically compared the effects of the AMPAR potentiator LY451646 and the AMPAR antagonist GYKI-53655 on depression-related behaviour using the mouse forced swim (FST) and tail suspension tests (TST), and anxiety-related behaviour using the elevated zero maze (EZM), marble burying (MB) and novelty-induced hypophagia (NIH) tests. The serotonin-selective antidepressant citalopram was included for comparison. Due to the importance of AMPARs in learning and memory we also tested if GYKI-53655 disrupted performance in the V-maze test for attention-dependent behaviour, and the social transmission of food preference (STFP) test of long-term memory. LY451646 (3 mg/kg) showed an antidepressant-like profile in the FST and TST, and GYKI-53655 (≥ 5 mg/kg) had a depressogenic-like effect in the TST but no effect in the FST. Conversely, GYKI-53655 produced marked anxiolytic-like effects in the EZM (≥ 2.5 mg/kg), MBT (≥ 2.5 mg/kg), and NIH tests (≥ 5 mg/kg), while LY451646 (≥ 3 mg/kg) increased anxiety-like behaviour in the EZM. Citalopram showed an antidepressant-like effect in the FST (≥ 10 mg/kg), but not TST, an anxiolytic-like effect in the EZM (≥ 3 mg/kg) and MB test (≥ 2.5 mg/kg), and an anxiogenic-like effect in the NIH

  10. Structural investigation of the 7-chloro-3-hydroxy-1H-quinazoline-2,4-dione scaffold to obtain AMPA and kainate receptor selective antagonists. Synthesis, pharmacological, and molecular modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Colotta, Vittoria; Catarzi, Daniela; Varano, Flavia; Lenzi, Ombretta; Filacchioni, Guido; Costagli, Chiara; Galli, Alessandro; Ghelardini, Carla; Galeotti, Nicoletta; Gratteri, Paola; Sgrignani, Jacopo; Deflorian, Francesca; Moro, Stefano

    2006-10-01

    In this paper, the study of new 7-chloro-3-hydroxy-1H-quinazoline-2,4-dione derivatives, designed as AMPA and kainate (KA) receptor antagonists, is reported. Some derivatives bear different carboxy-containing alkyl chains on the 3-hydroxy group, while various heterocyclic rings or amide moieties are present at the 6-position of other compounds. Binding data at Gly/NMDA, AMPA, and high-affinity KA receptors showed that the presence of the free 3-hydroxy group is of paramount importance for a good affinity at all three investigated receptors, while introduction of some 6-heterocyclic moieties yielded AMPA-selective antagonists. The most significant result was the finding of the 6-(2-carboxybenzoylamino)-3-hydroxy-1H-quinazolin-2,4-dione 12, which possesses good affinity for high-affinity and low-affinity KA receptors (Ki=0.62 microM and 1.6 microM, respectively), as well as good selectivity. To rationalize the trend of affinities of the reported derivatives, an intensive molecular modeling study was carried out by docking compounds to models of the Gly/NMDA, AMPA, and KA receptors. PMID:17004715

  11. TNF-α triggers rapid membrane insertion of Ca(2+) permeable AMPA receptors into adult motor neurons and enhances their susceptibility to slow excitotoxic injury.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hong Z; Hsu, Cheng-I; Yu, Stephen; Rao, Shyam D; Sorkin, Linda S; Weiss, John H

    2012-12-01

    Excitotoxicity (caused by over-activation of glutamate receptors) and inflammation both contribute to motor neuron (MN) damage in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and other diseases of the spinal cord. Microglial and astrocytic activation in these conditions results in release of inflammatory mediators, including the cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). TNF-α has complex effects on neurons, one of which is to trigger rapid membrane insertion of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) type glutamate receptors, and in some cases, specific insertion of GluA2 lacking, Ca(2+) permeable AMPA receptors (Ca-perm AMPAr). In the present study, we use a histochemical stain based upon kainate stimulated uptake of cobalt ions ("Co(2+) labeling") to provide the first direct demonstration of the presence of substantial numbers of Ca-perm AMPAr in ventral horn MNs of adult rats under basal conditions. We further find that TNF-α exposure causes a rapid increase in the numbers of these receptors, via a phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K) and protein kinase A (PKA) dependent mechanism. Finally, to assess the relevance of TNF-α to slow excitotoxic MN injury, we made use of organotypic spinal cord slice cultures. Co(2+) labeling revealed that MNs in these cultures possess Ca-perm AMPAr. Addition of either a low level of TNF-α, or of the glutamate uptake blocker, trans-pyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylic acid (PDC) to the cultures for 48 h resulted in little MN injury. However, when combined, TNF-α+PDC caused considerable MN degeneration, which was blocked by the AMPA/kainate receptor blocker, 2,3-Dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoylbenzo (F) quinoxaline (NBQX), or the Ca-perm AMPAr selective blocker, 1-naphthyl acetylspermine (NASPM). Thus, these data support the idea that prolonged TNF-α elevation, as may be induced by glial activation, acts in part by increasing the numbers of Ca-perm AMPAr on MNs to enhance injurious excitotoxic effects of deficient

  12. Interactions between N-Ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor and GluA2 contribute to effects of glucocorticoid hormones on AMPA receptor function in the rodent hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Hui; Cassé, Frédéric; Zhou, Ming; Xiong, Zhi-Qi; Joels, Marian; Martin, Stéphane; Krugers, Harm J

    2016-07-01

    Glucocorticoid hormones, via activation of their receptors, promote memory consolidation, but the exact underlying mechanisms remain elusive. We examined how corticosterone regulates AMPA receptor (AMPAR) availability in the synapse, which is important for synaptic plasticity and memory formation. Peptides which specifically block the interaction between N-Ethylmaleimide-Sensitive Factor (NSF) and the AMPAR-subunit GluA2 prevented the increase in synaptic transmission and surface expression of AMPARs known to occur after corticosterone application to hippocampal neurons. Combining a live imaging Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) approach with the use of the pH-sensitive GFP-AMPAR tagging revealed that this NSF/GluA2 interaction was also essential for the increase of the mobile fraction and reduction of the diffusion of AMPARs after treating hippocampal neurons with corticosterone. We conclude that the interaction between NSF and GluA2 contributes to the effects of corticosterone on AMPAR function. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26766634

  13. Enhanced Long-Term and Impaired Short-Term Spatial Memory in GluA1 AMPA Receptor Subunit Knockout Mice: Evidence for a Dual-Process Memory Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, David J.; Good, Mark A.; Skelton, Kathryn; Sprengel, Rolf; Seeburg, Peter H.; Rawlins, J. Nicholas P.; Bannerman, David M.

    2009-01-01

    The GluA1 AMPA receptor subunit is a key mediator of hippocampal synaptic plasticity and is especially important for a rapidly-induced, short-lasting form of potentiation. GluA1 gene deletion impairs hippocampus-dependent, spatial working memory, but spares hippocampus-dependent spatial reference memory. These findings may reflect the necessity of…

  14. Episodic sucrose intake during food restriction increases synaptic abundance of AMPA receptors in nucleus accumbens and augments intake of sucrose following restoration of ad libitum feeding.

    PubMed

    Peng, X-X; Lister, A; Rabinowitsch, A; Kolaric, R; Cabeza de Vaca, S; Ziff, E B; Carr, K D

    2015-06-01

    Weight-loss dieting often leads to loss of control, rebound weight gain, and is a risk factor for binge pathology. Based on findings that food restriction (FR) upregulates sucrose-induced trafficking of glutamatergic AMPA receptors to the nucleus accumbens (NAc) postsynaptic density (PSD), this study was an initial test of the hypothesis that episodic "breakthrough" intake of forbidden food during dieting interacts with upregulated mechanisms of synaptic plasticity to increase reward-driven feeding. Ad libitum (AL) fed and FR subjects consumed a limited amount of 10% sucrose, or had access to water, every other day for 10 occasions. Beginning three weeks after return of FR rats to AL feeding, when 24-h chow intake and rate of body weight gain had normalized, subjects with a history of sucrose intake during FR consumed more sucrose during a four week intermittent access protocol than the two AL groups and the group that had access to water during FR. In an experiment that substituted noncontingent administration of d-amphetamine for sucrose, FR subjects displayed an enhanced locomotor response during active FR but a blunted response, relative to AL subjects, during recovery from FR. This result suggests that the enduring increase in sucrose consumption is unlikely to be explained by residual enhancing effects of FR on dopamine signaling. In a biochemical experiment which paralleled the sucrose behavioral experiment, rats with a history of sucrose intake during FR displayed increased abundance of pSer845-GluA1, GluA2, and GluA3 in the NAc PSD relative to rats with a history of FR without sucrose access and rats that had been AL throughout, whether they had a history of episodic sucrose intake or not. A history of FR, with or without a history of sucrose intake, was associated with increased abundance of GluA1. A terminal 15-min bout of sucrose intake produced a further increase in pSer845-GluA1 and GluA2 in subjects with a history of sucrose intake during FR

  15. The density of AMPA receptors activated by a transmitter quantum at the climbing fibre-Purkinje cell synapse in immature rats

    PubMed Central

    Momiyama, Akiko; Silver, R Angus; Häusser, Michael; Notomi, Takuya; Wu, Yue; Shigemoto, Ryuichi; Cull-Candy, Stuart G

    2003-01-01

    We aimed to estimate the number of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) bound by the quantal transmitter packet, their single-channel conductance and their density in the postsynaptic membrane at cerebellar Purkinje cell synapses. The synaptic and extrasynaptic AMPARs were examined in Purkinje cells in 2- to 4-day-old rats, when they receive synaptic inputs solely from climbing fibres (CFs). Evoked CF EPSCs and whole-cell AMPA currents displayed roughly linear current-voltage relationships, consistent with the presence of GluR2 subunits in synaptic and extrasynaptic AMPARs. The mean quantal size, estimated from the miniature EPSCs (MEPSCs), was ∼300 pS. Peak-scaled non-stationary fluctuation analysis of spontaneous EPSCs and MEPSCs gave a weighted-mean synaptic channel conductance of ∼5 pS (∼7 pS when corrected for filtering). By applying non-stationary fluctuation analysis to extrasynaptic currents activated by brief glutamate pulses (5 mm), we also obtained a small single-channel conductance estimate for extrasynaptic AMPARs (∼11 pS). This approach allowed us to obtain a maximum open probability (Po,max) value for the extrasynaptic receptors (Po,max = 0.72). Directly resolved extrasynaptic channel openings in the continued presence of glutamate exhibited clear multiple-conductance levels. The mean area of the postsynaptic density (PSD) of these synapses was 0.074 μm2, measured by reconstructing electron-microscopic (EM) serial sections. Postembedding immunogold labelling by anti-GluR2/3 antibody revealed that AMPARs are localised in PSDs. From these data and by simulating error factors, we estimate that at least 66 AMPARs are bound by a quantal transmitter packet at CF-Purkinje cell synapses, and the receptors are packed at a minimum density of ∼900 μm−2 in the postsynaptic membrane. PMID:12665613

  16. Mechanism of Inhibition of the GluA2 AMPA Receptor Channel Opening by Talampanel and Its Enantiomer: The Stereochemistry of the 4-Methyl Group on the Diazepine Ring of 2,3-Benzodiazepine Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Stereoselectivity of 2,3-benzodiazepine compounds provides a unique way for the design of stereoisomers as more selective and more potent inhibitors as drug candidates for treatment of the neurological diseases involving excessive activity of AMPA receptors. Here we investigate a pair of enantiomers known as Talampanel and its (+) counterpart about their mechanism of inhibition and selectivity toward four AMPA receptor subunits or GluA1–4. We show that Talampanel is the eutomer with the endismic ratio being 14 for the closed-channel and 10 for the open-channel state of GluA2. Kinetic evidence supports that Talampanel is a noncompetitive inhibitor and it binds to the same site for those 2,3-benzodiazepine compounds with the C-4 methyl group on the diazepine ring. This site, which we term as the “M” site, recognizes preferentially those 2,3-benzodiazepine compounds with the C-4 methyl group being in the R configuration, as in the chemical structure of Talampanel. Given that Talampanel inhibits GluA1 and GluA2, but is virtually ineffective on the GluA3 and GluA4 AMPA receptor subunits, we hypothesize that the “M” site(s) on GluA1 and GluA2 to which Talampanel binds is different from that on GluA3 and GluA4. If the molecular properties of the AMPA receptors and Talampanel are used for selecting an inhibitor as a single drug candidate for controlling the activity of all AMPA receptors in vivo, Talampanel is not ideal. Our results further suggest that addition of longer acyl groups to the N-3 position should produce more potent 2,3-benzodiazepine inhibitors for the “M” site. PMID:23402301

  17. GluA2-Containing AMPA Receptors Distinguish Ribbon-Associated from Ribbonless Afferent Contacts on Rat Cochlear Hair Cells123

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Monedero, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Mechanosensory hair cells release glutamate at ribbon synapses to excite postsynaptic afferent neurons, via AMPA-type ionotropic glutamate receptors (AMPARs). However, type II afferent neurons contacting outer hair cells in the mammalian cochlea were thought to differ in this respect, failing to show GluA immunolabeling and with many “ribbonless” afferent contacts. Here it is shown that antibodies to the AMPAR subunit GluA2 labeled afferent contacts below inner and outer hair cells in the rat cochlea, and that synaptic currents in type II afferents had AMPAR-specific pharmacology. Only half the postsynaptic densities of type II afferents that labeled for PSD-95, Shank, or Homer were associated with GluA2 immunopuncta or presynaptic ribbons, the “empty slots” corresponding to ribbonless contacts described previously. These results extend the universality of AMPAergic transmission by hair cells, and support the existence of silent afferent contacts. PMID:27257620

  18. Chemokine receptor internalization and intracellular trafficking.

    PubMed

    Neel, Nicole F; Schutyser, Evemie; Sai, Jiqing; Fan, Guo-Huang; Richmond, Ann

    2005-12-01

    The internalization and intracellular trafficking of chemokine receptors have important implications for the cellular responses elicited by chemokine receptors. The major pathway by which chemokine receptors internalize is the clathrin-mediated pathway, but some receptors may utilize lipid rafts/caveolae-dependent internalization routes. This review discusses the current knowledge and controversies regarding these two different routes of endocytosis. The functional consequences of internalization and the regulation of chemokine receptor recycling will also be addressed. Modifications of chemokine receptors, such as palmitoylation, ubiquitination, glycosylation, and sulfation, may also impact trafficking, chemotaxis and signaling. Finally, this review will cover the internalization and trafficking of viral and decoy chemokine receptors. PMID:15998596

  19. Role of bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and amygdala AMPA receptors in the development and expression of context conditioning and sensitization of startle by prior shock

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Michael

    2013-01-01

    A core symptom of post-traumatic stress disorder is hyper-arousal—manifest in part by increases in the amplitude of the acoustic startle reflex. Gewirtz et al. (Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry 22:625–648, 1998) found that, in rats, persistent shock-induced startle increases were prevented by pre-test electrolytic lesions of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST). We used reversible inactivation to determine if similar effects reflect actions on (a) BNST neurons themselves versus fibers-of-passage, (b) the development versus expression of such increases, and (c) associative fear versus non-associative sensitization. Twenty-four hours after the last of three shock sessions, startle was markedly enhanced when rats were tested in a non-shock context. These increases decayed over the course of several days. Decay was unaffected by context exposure, and elevated startle was restored when rats were tested for the first time in the original shock context. Thus, both associative and non-associative components could be measured under different conditions. Pre-test intra-BNST infusions of the AMPA receptor antagonist NBQX (3 μg/side) blocked the non-associative (as did infusions into the basolateral amygdala) but not the associative component, whereas pre-shock infusions disrupted both. NBQX did not affect baseline startle or shock reactivity. These results indicate that AMPA receptors in or very near to the BNST are critical for the expression and development of non-associative shock-induced startle sensitization, and also for context fear conditioning, but not context fear expression. More generally, they suggest that treatments targeting the BNST may be clinically useful for treating trauma-related hyper-arousal and perhaps for retarding its development. PMID:23934654

  20. Differential glutamate AMPA-receptor plasticity in subpopulations of VTA neurons in the presence or absence of residual cocaine: Implications for the development of addiction

    PubMed Central

    Lane, D.A.; Reed, B.; Kreek, M.J.; Pickel, V.M.

    2011-01-01

    Cocaine-induced plasticity of mesocorticolimbic dopamine (DA) neurons, originating in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), persists in the absence of cocaine and may contribute to both drug-craving and relapse. Glutamate AMPA receptors (AMPARs) in these neurons are implicated in this plasticity. However, there is no ultrastructural evidence that the absence of cocaine following repeated administrations affects the critical surface/synaptic availability of AMPAR GluR1 subunits in either DA or non-DA, putative GABAergic neurons within the VTA. To assess this, we used electron microscopic immunolabeling in the VTA of adult male mice sacrificed at 30 minutes or 72 hours after receiving the final of six (15 mg/kg) cocaine injections, a dosing paradigm that resulted in development of locomotor sensitization. At each time point, both cocaine- and saline-injected mice showed AMPAR GluR1 immunogold labeling in somatodendritic profiles, many of which contained immunoperoxidase labeling for the DA-synthesizing enzyme, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). At 30 minutes after the last injection, when cocaine was systemically present, only the non-TH labeled dendrites showed a significant increase in the synaptic/plasmalemmal density of GluR1 immunogold particles. At 72 hours, when systemic cocaine was depleted, synaptic GluR1 labeling was greatly enhanced in TH-containing dendrites throughout the VTA and in non-TH dendrites of the limbic-associated paranigral VTA. Our results demonstrate that systemic cocaine produces GluR1 trafficking specifically in non-DA neurons of the VTA, which may subsequently contribute to the abstinent-induced enhancement of AMPA receptor synaptic transmission in mesocorticolimbic DA neurons leading to heightened drug seeking behavior. PMID:21215761

  1. Cannabinoid-glutamate interactions in the regulation of food intake in neonatal layer- type chicks: role of glutamate NMDA and AMPA receptors.

    PubMed

    Keyshams, Negar; Zendehdel, Morteza; Babapour, Vahab; Baghbanzadeh, Ali

    2016-06-01

    The involvement of the endocannabinoid system in the brain functions is likely the conclusion of its capability to interact with specific neurotransmitters in several brain regions. The present study was designed to examine the role of the glutamatergic system on cannabinoid-induced hyperphagia in chicken. In this survey 10 experiments designed to investigate interaction of cannabinoidergic and glutamatergic systems on feeding behavior in neonatal chickens. In experiment 1, chicken were intracerebroventricular (ICV) injected with saline, 2-AG (2-Arachidonoylglycerol, 5.28 nmol, CB1 receptors agonist), MK-801(NMDA receptor antagonist, 15 nmol) and co-administration of 2-AG + MK-801. In experiment 2, injection of saline, 2-AG (5.28 nmol), CNQX) AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist, 390 nmol) and their combination (2-AG + CNQX) was done. In Experiment 3, injections were saline, 2-AG (5.28 nmol), AIDA)mGluR1 antagonist, 2 nmol) and 2-AG + AIDA. Experiments 4 and 5 were similar to experiment 3, except birds injected with LY341495 (mGLUR2 glutamate antagonist, 150 nmol) and UBP1112 (mGLUR3 glutamate antagonist, 2 nmol) instead of AIDA. Experiments 6-10 followed the procedure similar to experiments 1-5, except chickens received ICV injection of CB65 (CB2 receptor agonist, 3 nmol), instead of 2-AG. Then the cumulative food intake measured until 120 min post injection. According to the results, ICV injection of 2-AG and CB65 significantly increased food intake (P < 0.001). Co-injection of 2-AG and MK-801 significantly amplified hyperphagic effect of CB1 receptors agonist(P < 0.001). Moreover, co-administration of CB65 plus CNQX significantly increased CB65- induced hyperphagia in FD3 neonatal layer-type chickens (P < 0.001). These results suggest there is an interaction between endocannabinoids and glutamatergic systems via NMDA and AMPA receptors in feeding behavior of neonatal layer-type chickens. PMID:27000110

  2. Cellular Plasticity Induced by Anti–α-Amino-3-Hydroxy-5-Methyl-4-Isoxazolepropionic Acid (AMPA) Receptor Encephalitis Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xiaoyu; Hughes, Ethan G; Moscato, Emilia H; Parsons, Thomas D; Dalmau, Josep; Balice-Gordon, Rita J

    2015-01-01

    Objective Autoimmune-mediated anti–α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor (AMPAR) encephalitis is a severe but treatment-responsive disorder with prominent short-term memory loss and seizures. The mechanisms by which patient antibodies affect synapses and neurons leading to symptoms are poorly understood. Methods The effects of patient antibodies on cultures of live rat hippocampal neurons were determined with immunostaining, Western blot, and electrophysiological analyses. Results We show that patient antibodies cause a selective decrease in the total surface amount and synaptic localization of GluA1- and GluA2-containing AMPARs, regardless of receptor subunit binding specificity, through increased internalization and degradation of surface AMPAR clusters. In contrast, patient antibodies do not alter the density of excitatory synapses, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) clusters, or cell viability. Commercially available AMPAR antibodies directed against extracellular epitopes do not result in a loss of surface and synaptic receptor clusters, suggesting specific effects of patient antibodies. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings of spontaneous miniature postsynaptic currents show that patient antibodies decrease AMPAR-mediated currents, but not NMDAR-mediated currents. Interestingly, several functional properties of neurons are also altered: inhibitory synaptic currents and vesicular γ-aminobutyric acid transporter (vGAT) staining intensity decrease, whereas the intrinsic excitability of neurons and short-interval firing increase. Interpretation These results establish that antibodies from patients with anti-AMPAR encephalitis selectively eliminate surface and synaptic AMPARs, resulting in a homeostatic decrease in inhibitory synaptic transmission and increased intrinsic excitability, which may contribute to the memory deficits and epilepsy that are prominent in patients with this disorder. PMID:25369168

  3. Synaptic targeting of AMPA receptors is regulated by a CaMKII site in the first intracellular loop of GluA1

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wei; Isozaki, Kaname; Roche, Katherine W.; Nicoll, Roger A.

    2010-01-01

    The accumulation of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) at synapses is essential for excitatory synaptic transmission. However, the mechanisms underlying synaptic targeting of AMPARs remain elusive. We have now used a molecular replacement approach on an AMPAR-null background to investigate the targeting mechanisms necessary for regulating AMPAR trafficking in the hippocampus. Although there is an extensive literature on the role of the GluA1 C-tail in AMPAR trafficking, there is no effect of overexpressing the C-tail on basal transmission. Instead, we found that the first intracellular loop domain (Loop1) of GluA1, a previously overlooked region within AMPARs, is critical for receptor targeting to synapses, but not for delivery of receptors to the plasma membrane. We also identified a CaMKII phosphorylation site (S567) in the GluA1 Loop1, which is phosphorylated in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we show that S567 is a key residue that regulates Loop1-mediated AMPAR trafficking. Thus, our study reveals a unique mechanism for targeting AMPARs to synapses to mediate synaptic transmission. PMID:21135237

  4. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel 9-heteroaryl substituted 7-chloro-4,5-dihydro-4-oxo-1,2,4-triazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline-2-carboxylates (TQX) as (R,S)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazol-4-yl)propionic acid (AMPA) receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Catarzi, Daniela; Colotta, Vittoria; Varano, Flavia; Filacchioni, Guido; Gratteri, Paola; Sgrignani, Jacopo; Galli, Alessandro; Costagli, Chiara

    2008-08-01

    In this paper, we report a study on some new 4,5-dihydro-4-oxo-1,2,4-triazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline-2-carboxylate derivatives (TQXs), bearing a nitrogen-containing heterocycle at position-9, and designed as (R,S)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazol-4-yl)propionic acid (AMPA) receptor antagonists. These compounds ensue from the structural modification of previously reported 8-heteroaryl-TQXs which were endowed with high affinity and selectivity for the AMPA receptor. All the newly synthesized compounds were biologically evaluated for their binding at the AMPA receptor. Gly/N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) and kainic acid (KA) high-affinity binding assays were performed to assess the selectivity of the reported derivatives toward the AMPA receptor. This study produced some new TQXs which are less potent than the reference compounds, and endowed with a mixed AMPA and Gly/NMDA receptor binding affinity. To rationalize the experimental findings, a molecular modeling study was performed by docking some TQX derivatives to the AMPA receptor model. PMID:18670107

  5. A case of autism with an interstitial deletion on 4q leading to hemizygosity for genes encoding for glutamine and glycine neurotransmitter receptor sub-units (AMPA 2, GLRA3, GLRB) and neuropeptide receptors NPY1R, NPY5R

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Subhadra; Woodroffe, Abigail; Flodman, Pamela L; Mays, Lee Z; Hanouni, Mona; Modahl, Charlotte B; Steinberg-Epstein, Robin; Bocian, Maureen E; Spence, M Anne; Smith, Moyra

    2004-01-01

    Background Autism is a pervasive developmental disorder characterized by a triad of deficits: qualitative impairments in social interactions, communication deficits, and repetitive and stereotyped patterns of behavior. Although autism is etiologically heterogeneous, family and twin studies have established a definite genetic basis. The inheritance of idiopathic autism is presumed to be complex, with many genes involved; environmental factors are also possibly contributory. The analysis of chromosome abnormalities associated with autism contributes greatly to the identification of autism candidate genes. Case presentation We describe a child with autistic disorder and an interstitial deletion on chromosome 4q. This child first presented at 12 months of age with developmental delay and minor dysmorphic features. At 4 years of age a diagnosis of Pervasive Developmental Disorder was made. At 11 years of age he met diagnostic criteria for autism. Cytogenetic studies revealed a chromosome 4q deletion. The karyotype was 46, XY del 4 (q31.3-q33). Here we report the clinical phenotype of the child and the molecular characterization of the deletion using molecular cytogenetic techniques and analysis of polymorphic markers. These studies revealed a 19 megabase deletion spanning 4q32 to 4q34. Analysis of existing polymorphic markers and new markers developed in this study revealed that the deletion arose on a paternally derived chromosome. To date 33 genes of known or inferred function are deleted as a consequence of the deletion. Among these are the AMPA 2 gene that encodes the glutamate receptor GluR2 sub-unit, GLRA3 and GLRB genes that encode glycine receptor subunits and neuropeptide Y receptor genes NPY1R and NPY5R. Conclusions The deletion in this autistic subject serves to highlight specific autism candidate genes. He is hemizygous for AMPA 2, GLRA3, GLRB, NPY1R and NPY5R. GluR2 is the major determinant of AMPA receptor structure. Glutamate receptors maintain structural

  6. Glutamate Stimulates Local Protein Synthesis in the Axons of Rat Cortical Neurons by Activating α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic Acid (AMPA) Receptors and Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Wei-Lun; Chung, Hui-Wen; Wu, Chih-Yueh; Wu, Huei-Ing; Lee, Yu-Tao; Chen, En-Chan; Fang, Weilun; Chang, Yen-Chung

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate is the principal excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian CNS. By analyzing the metabolic incorporation of azidohomoalanine, a methionine analogue, in newly synthesized proteins, we find that glutamate treatments up-regulate protein translation not only in intact rat cortical neurons in culture but also in the axons emitting from cortical neurons before making synapses with target cells. The process by which glutamate stimulates local translation in axons begins with the binding of glutamate to the ionotropic AMPA receptors and metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 and members of group 2 metabotropic glutamate receptors on the plasma membrane. Subsequently, the activated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway and the rise in Ca2+, resulting from Ca2+ influxes through calcium-permeable AMPA receptors, voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, and transient receptor potential canonical channels, in axons stimulate the local translation machinery. For comparison, the enhancement effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) on the local protein synthesis in cortical axons were also studied. The results indicate that Ca2+ influxes via transient receptor potential canonical channels and activated the mTOR pathway in axons also mediate BDNF stimulation to local protein synthesis. However, glutamate- and BDNF-induced enhancements of translation in axons exhibit different kinetics. Moreover, Ca2+ and mTOR signaling appear to play roles carrying different weights, respectively, in transducing glutamate- and BDNF-induced enhancements of axonal translation. Thus, our results indicate that exposure to transient increases of glutamate and more lasting increases of BDNF would stimulate local protein synthesis in migrating axons en route to their targets in the developing brain. PMID:26134564

  7. O-GlcNAcylation of AMPA Receptor GluA2 Is Associated with a Novel Form of Long-Term Depression at Hippocampal Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Erica W.; Wang, Kai; Nelson, Amy R.; Bredemann, Teruko M.; Fraser, Kyle B.; Clinton, Sarah M.; Puckett, Rosemary; Marchase, Richard B.; Chatham, John C.

    2014-01-01

    Serine phosphorylation of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) subunits GluA1 and GluA2 modulates AMPAR trafficking during long-term changes in strength of hippocampal excitatory transmission required for normal learning and memory. The post-translational addition and removal of O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) also occurs on serine residues. This, together with the high expression of the enzymes O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) and β-N-acetylglucosamindase (O-GlcNAcase), suggests a potential role for O-GlcNAcylation in modifying synaptic efficacy and cognition. Furthermore, because key synaptic proteins are O-GlcNAcylated, this modification may be as important to brain function as phosphorylation, yet its physiological significance remains unknown. We report that acutely increasing O-GlcNAcylation in Sprague Dawley rat hippocampal slices induces an NMDA receptor and protein kinase C-independent long-term depression (LTD) at hippocampal CA3–CA1 synapses (O-GcNAc LTD). This LTD requires AMPAR GluA2 subunits, which we demonstrate are O-GlcNAcylated. Increasing O-GlcNAcylation interferes with long-term potentiation, and in hippocampal behavioral assays, it prevents novel object recognition and placement without affecting contextual fear conditioning. Our findings provide evidence that O-GlcNAcylation dynamically modulates hippocampal synaptic function and learning and memory, and suggest that altered O-GlcNAc levels could underlie cognitive dysfunction in neurological diseases. PMID:24381264

  8. What causes aberrant salience in schizophrenia? A role for impaired short-term habituation and the GRIA1 (GluA1) AMPA receptor subunit

    PubMed Central

    Barkus, C; Sanderson, DJ; Rawlins, JNP; Walton, ME; Harrison, PJ; Bannerman, DM

    2014-01-01

    The GRIA1 locus, encoding the GluA1 (also known as GluRA or GluR1) AMPA glutamate receptor subunit, shows genome-wide association to schizophrenia. As well as extending the evidence that glutamatergic abnormalities play a key role in the disorder, this finding draws attention to the behavioural phenotype of Gria1 knockout mice. These mice show deficits in short-term habituation. Importantly, under some conditions the attention being paid to a recently presented neutral stimulus can actually increase rather than decrease (sensitization). We propose that this mouse phenotype represents a cause of aberrant salience and, in turn, that aberrant salience (and the resulting positive symptoms) in schizophrenia may arise, at least in part, from a glutamatergic genetic predisposition and a deficit in short-term habituation. This proposal links an established risk gene with a psychological process central to psychosis, and is supported by findings of comparable deficits in short-term habituation in mice lacking the NMDAR receptor subunit Grin2a (which also shows association to schizophrenia). Since aberrant salience is primarily a dopaminergic phenomenon, the model supports the view that the dopaminergic abnormalities can be downstream of a glutamatergic aetiology. Finally, we suggest that, as illustrated here, the real value of genetically modified mice is not as ‘models of schizophrenia’, but as experimental tools which can link genomic discoveries with psychological processes, and help elucidate the underlying neural mechanisms. PMID:25224260

  9. Excitatory synapses are stronger in the hippocampus of Rett syndrome mice due to altered synaptic trafficking of AMPA-type glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Xu, Xin; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2016-03-15

    Deficits in long-term potentiation (LTP) at central excitatory synapses are thought to contribute to cognitive impairments in neurodevelopmental disorders associated with intellectual disability and autism. Using the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (Mecp2) knockout (KO) mouse model of Rett syndrome, we show that naïve excitatory synapses onto hippocampal pyramidal neurons of symptomatic mice have all of the hallmarks of potentiated synapses. Stronger Mecp2 KO synapses failed to undergo LTP after either theta-burst afferent stimulation or pairing afferent stimulation with postsynaptic depolarization. On the other hand, basal synaptic strength and LTP were not affected in slices from younger presymptomatic Mecp2 KO mice. Furthermore, spine synapses in pyramidal neurons from symptomatic Mecp2 KO are larger and do not grow in size or incorporate GluA1 subunits after electrical or chemical LTP. Our data suggest that LTP is occluded in Mecp2 KO mice by already potentiated synapses. The higher surface levels of GluA1-containing receptors are consistent with altered expression levels of proteins involved in AMPA receptor trafficking, suggesting previously unidentified targets for therapeutic intervention for Rett syndrome and other MECP2-related disorders. PMID:26929363

  10. Dimensions and ion selectivity of recombinant AMPA and kainate receptor channels and their dependence on Q/R site residues.

    PubMed Central

    Burnashev, N; Villarroel, A; Sakmann, B

    1996-01-01

    1. Recombinant alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate receptor (AMPAR) subunits (GluR-A or GluR-B) and kainate receptor (KAR) subunit (GluR-6) in their unedited (Q)- and edited (R)-forms were expressed in HEK 293 cells. To estimate the dimensions of the narrow portion of these channels, biionic reversal potentials for organic cations of different mean diameters were determined with Cs+ as the internal reference ion. 2. Homomeric channels assembled from Q-form subunits were cation selective. The relation between the relative permeability and the mean size of different organic cations suggests that the diameter of the narrow portion of Q-form channels is approximately 0.78 nm for AMPAR and 0.75 nm for KAR channels. 3. Homomeric channels assembled from R-form subunits were permeant for anions and cations. When probed with CsC1 gradients the relative chloride permeability (PC1/PCs) was estimated as 0.14 for GluR-B(R) and 0.74 for GluR-6(R)-subunit channels. The permeability versus mean size relation for large cations measured with the weakly permeant F- as anion, indicates that for the R-form KAR channels the apparent pore diameter is close to 0.76 nm. 4. Heteromeric AMPAR and KAR channels co-assembled from Q- and R-form subunits were cation selective. The diameter of the narrow portion of these channels is estimated to be in the range between 0.70 and 0.74 nm. 5. The results indicated that the diameters of the narrow portion of AMPAR and KAR channels of different subunit composition and of widely different ion selectivity are comparable. Therefore, the differences in the anion versus cation selectivity, in Ca2+ permeability and in channel conductance are likely to be determined by the difference in charge density of the channel. PMID:8910205

  11. Joint CP-AMPA and group I mGlu receptor activation is required for synaptic plasticity in dentate gyrus fast-spiking interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Hainmüller, Thomas; Krieglstein, Kerstin; Kulik, Akos; Bartos, Marlene

    2014-01-01

    Hippocampal principal cell (PC) assemblies provide the brain with a mnemonic representation of space. It is assumed that the formation of cell assemblies is supported by long-lasting modification of glutamatergic synapses onto perisomatic inhibitory interneurons (PIIs), which provide powerful feedback inhibition to neuronal networks. Repetitive activation of dentate gyrus PIIs by excitatory mossy fiber (MF) inputs induces Hebbian long-term potentiation (LTP). In contrast, long-term depression (LTD) emerges in the absence of PII activity. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity in PIIs. Here, we examined the role of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors 1 and 5 (mGluRs1/5) in inducing plastic changes at MF-PII synapses. We found that mGluRs1/5 are located perisynaptically and that pharmacological block of mGluR1 or mGluR5 abolished MF-LTP. In contrast, their exogenous activation was insufficient to induce MF-LTP but cleared MF-LTD. No LTP could be elicited in PIIs loaded with blockers of G protein signaling and Ca2+-dependent PKC. Two-photon imaging revealed that the intracellular Ca2+ rise necessary for MF-LTP was largely mediated by Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors (CP-AMPARs), but less by NMDA receptors or mGluRs1/5. Thus, our data indicate that fast Ca2+ signaling via CP-AMPARs and slow G protein-mediated signaling via mGluRs1/5 converge to a PKC-dependent molecular pathway to induce Hebbian MF-LTP. We further propose that Hebbian activation of mGluRs1/5 gates PIIs into a “readiness mode” to promote MF-LTP, which, in turn, will support timed PII recruitment, thereby assisting in PC assembly formation. PMID:25161282

  12. Nuclear respiratory factor 1 co-regulates AMPA glutamate receptor subunit 2 and cytochrome c oxidase : Tight coupling of glutamatergic transmission and energy metabolism in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, Shilpa S.; Liang, Huan Ling; Wong-Riley, Margaret T. T.

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal activity, especially of the excitatory glutamatergic type, is highly dependent on energy from the oxidative pathway. We hypothesized that the coupling existed at the transcriptional level by having the same transcription factor to regulate a marker of energy metabolism, cytochrome c oxidase (COX) and an important subunit of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) glutamate receptors, GluR2 (Gria2). Nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1) was a viable candidate because it regulates all COX subunits and potentially activates Gria2. By means of in silico analysis, electrophoretic mobility shift and supershift, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and promoter mutational assays, we found that NRF-1 functionally bound to Gria2 promoter. Silencing of NRF-1 with small interference RNA prevented the depolarization-stimulated up-regulation of Gria2 and COX, and over-expression of NRF-1 rescued neurons from TTX-induced down-regulation of Gria2 and COX transcripts. Thus, neuronal activity and energy metabolism are tightly coupled at the molecular level, and NRF-1 is a critical agent in this process. PMID:19166514

  13. β-Amyloid Impairs AMPA Receptor Trafficking and Function by Reducing Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II Synaptic Distribution*

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Zhenglin; Liu, Wenhua; Yan, Zhen

    2009-01-01

    A fundamental feature of Alzheimer disease (AD) is the accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ), a peptide generated from the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Emerging evidence suggests that soluble Aβ oligomers adversely affect synaptic function, which leads to cognitive failure associated with AD. The Aβ-induced synaptic dysfunction has been attributed to the synaptic removal of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) receptors (AMPARs); however, it is unclear how Aβ induces the loss of AMPARs at the synapses. In this study we have examined the potential involvement of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), a signaling molecule critical for AMPAR trafficking and function. We found that the synaptic pool of CaMKII was significantly decreased in cortical neurons from APP transgenic mice, and the density of CaMKII clusters at synapses was significantly reduced by Aβ oligomer treatment. In parallel, the surface expression of GluR1 subunit as well as AMPAR-mediated synaptic response and ionic current was selectively decreased in APP transgenic mice and Aβ-treated cultures. Moreover, the reducing effect of Aβ on AMPAR current density was mimicked and occluded by knockdown of CaMKII and blocked by overexpression of CaMKII. These results suggest that the Aβ-induced change in CaMKII subcellular distribution may underlie the removal of AMPARs from synaptic membrane by Aβ. PMID:19240035

  14. Ischemia-induced synaptic plasticity drives sustained expression of calcium-permeable AMPA receptors in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Dias, Raquel B; Rombo, Diogo M; Ribeiro, Joaquim A; Sebastião, Ana M

    2013-02-01

    Long lasting enhancement of synaptic transmission can be triggered by brief bursts of afferent stimulation, underlying long-term potentiation (LTP), and also by brief ischemia in a process known as i-LTP. The extent to which LTP and i-LTP rely on comparable cellular mechanisms remains unclear. Under physiological conditions, LTP induction drives transient expression of calcium-permeable AMPARs (CP-AMPARs) at synapses, whose ability to undergo plasticity is primed by endogenous activation of adenosine A(2A) receptors (A(2A)Rs). The present work thus addressed the contribution of CP-AMPARs and A(2A)Rs to i-LTP, which was induced in rat hippocampal slices by brief (10 min) oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD). The amplitude of afferent-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) recorded from CA1 pyramidal neurons was decreased during OGD but gradually recovered toward values significantly above (157 ± 17%) the baseline (100%) 40-50 min after re-oxygenation. This i-LTP was precluded by CP-AMPAR blockade (internal spermine (500 μM) or extracellular NASPM (20 μM) application) as well as by A(2A)R blockade with a selective antagonist (SCH 58261, 100 nM). OGD prompted sustained (>70 min) facilitation of mEPSC amplitude and frequency, and decreased mEPSC decay time, all of which were prevented by SCH 58261 (100 nM). The ability of NASPM (20 μM) to acutely inhibit EPSCs 1 h after OGD, but not in control conditions nor in OGD-challenged slices when in the presence of SCH 58261 (100 nM), further supports sustained CP-AMPAR recruitment by i-LTP in an A(2A)R-dependent way. We propose that although i-LTP may initially mimic LTP, failure of auto-regulated CP-AMPAR removal from synapses could constitute an early divergent event between these forms of plasticity. PMID:23041538

  15. PSD-95 family MAGUKs are essential for anchoring AMPA and NMDA receptor complexes at the postsynaptic density

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaobing; Levy, Jonathan M.; Hou, Austin; Winters, Christine; Azzam, Rita; Sousa, Alioscka A.; Leapman, Richard D.; Nicoll, Roger A.; Reese, Thomas S.

    2015-01-01

    The postsynaptic density (PSD)-95 family of membrane-associated guanylate kinases (MAGUKs) are major scaffolding proteins at the PSD in glutamatergic excitatory synapses, where they maintain and modulate synaptic strength. How MAGUKs underlie synaptic strength at the molecular level is still not well understood. Here, we explore the structural and functional roles of MAGUKs at hippocampal excitatory synapses by simultaneous knocking down PSD-95, PSD-93, and synapse-associated protein (SAP)102 and combining electrophysiology and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) tomography imaging to analyze the resulting changes. Acute MAGUK knockdown greatly reduces synaptic transmission mediated by α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate receptors (AMPARs) and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs). This knockdown leads to a significant rise in the number of silent synapses, diminishes the size of PSDs without changes in pre- or postsynaptic membrane, and depletes the number of membrane-associated PSD-95–like vertical filaments and transmembrane structures, identified as AMPARs and NMDARs by EM tomography. The differential distribution of these receptor-like structures and dependence of their abundance on PSD size matches that of AMPARs and NMDARs in the hippocampal synapses. The loss of these structures following MAGUK knockdown tracks the reduction in postsynaptic AMPAR and NMDAR transmission, confirming the structural identities of these two types of receptors. These results demonstrate that MAGUKs are required for anchoring both types of glutamate receptors at the PSD and are consistent with a structural model where MAGUKs, corresponding to membrane-associated vertical filaments, are the essential structural proteins that anchor and organize both types of glutamate receptors and govern the overall molecular organization of the PSD. PMID:26604311

  16. AMPA Receptor Phosphorylation and Synaptic Colocalization on Motor Neurons Drive Maladaptive Plasticity below Complete Spinal Cord Injury1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Stuck, Ellen D.; Irvine, Karen-Amanda; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Clinical spinal cord injury (SCI) is accompanied by comorbid peripheral injury in 47% of patients. Human and animal modeling data have shown that painful peripheral injuries undermine long-term recovery of locomotion through unknown mechanisms. Peripheral nociceptive stimuli induce maladaptive synaptic plasticity in dorsal horn sensory systems through AMPA receptor (AMPAR) phosphorylation and trafficking to synapses. Here we test whether ventral horn motor neurons in rats demonstrate similar experience-dependent maladaptive plasticity below a complete SCI in vivo. Quantitative biochemistry demonstrated that intermittent nociceptive stimulation (INS) rapidly and selectively increases AMPAR subunit GluA1 serine 831 phosphorylation and localization to synapses in the injured spinal cord, while reducing synaptic GluA2. These changes predict motor dysfunction in the absence of cell death signaling, suggesting an opportunity for therapeutic reversal. Automated confocal time-course analysis of lumbar ventral horn motor neurons confirmed a time-dependent increase in synaptic GluA1 with concurrent decrease in synaptic GluA2. Optical fractionation of neuronal plasma membranes revealed GluA2 removal from extrasynaptic sites on motor neurons early after INS followed by removal from synapses 2 h later. As GluA2-lacking AMPARs are canonical calcium-permeable AMPARs (CP-AMPARs), their stimulus- and time-dependent insertion provides a therapeutic target for limiting calcium-dependent dynamic maladaptive plasticity after SCI. Confirming this, a selective CP-AMPAR antagonist protected against INS-induced maladaptive spinal plasticity, restoring adaptive motor responses on a sensorimotor spinal training task. These findings highlight the critical involvement of AMPARs in experience-dependent spinal cord plasticity after injury and provide a pharmacologically targetable synaptic mechanism by which early postinjury experience shapes motor plasticity. PMID:26668821

  17. Calcium permeable AMPA receptor-dependent long lasting plasticity of intrinsic excitability in fast spiking interneurons of the dentate gyrus decreases inhibition in the granule cell layer.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Debanjan; Sikdar, Sujit Kumar

    2015-03-01

    The local fast-spiking interneurons (FSINs) are considered to be crucial for the generation, maintenance, and modulation of neuronal network oscillations especially in the gamma frequency band. Gamma frequency oscillations have been associated with different aspects of behavior. But the prolonged effects of gamma frequency synaptic activity on the FSINs remain elusive. Using whole cell current clamp patch recordings, we observed a sustained decrease of intrinsic excitability in the FSINs of the dentate gyrus (DG) following repetitive stimulations of the mossy fibers at 30 Hz (gamma bursts). Surprisingly, the granule cells (GCs) did not express intrinsic plastic changes upon similar synaptic excitation of their apical dendritic inputs. Interestingly, pairing the gamma bursts with membrane hyperpolarization accentuated the plasticity in FSINs following the induction protocol, while the plasticity attenuated following gamma bursts paired with membrane depolarization. Paired pulse ratio measurement of the synaptic responses did not show significant changes during the experiments. However, the induction protocols were accompanied with postsynaptic calcium rise in FSINs. Interestingly, the maximum and the minimum increase occurred during gamma bursts with membrane hyperpolarization and depolarization respectively. Including a selective blocker of calcium-permeable AMPA receptors (CP-AMPARs) in the bath; significantly attenuated the calcium rise and blocked the membrane potential dependence of the calcium rise in the FSINs, suggesting their involvement in the observed phenomenon. Chelation of intracellular calcium, blocking HCN channel conductance or blocking CP-AMPARs during the experiment forbade the long lasting expression of the plasticity. Simultaneous dual patch recordings from FSINs and synaptically connected putative GCs confirmed the decreased inhibition in the GCs accompanying the decreased intrinsic excitability in the FSINs. Experimentally constrained network

  18. Differences in AMPA and GABAA/B receptor subunit expression between the chronically reorganized cortex and brainstem of adult squirrel monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Mowery, Todd M.; Sarin, Rohini M.; Kostylev, Polina V; Garraghty, Preston E.

    2015-01-01

    The primate somatosensory neuraxis provides a highly translational model system with which to investigate adult neural plasticity. Here, we report immunohistochemical staining data for AMPA and GABAA/B receptor subunits of area 3b cortex and cuneate nucleus of adult squirrel monkeys one to five years after median and ulnar nerve transection. In Area 3B cortex, the expression of GluR1 AMPAR subunits in reorganized regions are significantly increased, while the expression of GluR2/3 AMPAR subunits are not. GABAA α1 subunit expression in the reorganized region is not significantly different from control regions. Presynaptic GABABR1a subunit expression was also not significantly different between reorganized and control regions, while postsynaptic GABABR1b subunit expression was significantly decreased. In the cuneate nucleus of the brainstem, the expression of GluR1 AMPAR subunits in reorganized regions was not significantly different, while GluR2/3 AMPAR subunit expression was significantly elevated. GABAA α1 subunit expression in the reorganized region was significantly decreased. Presynaptic GABABR1a subunit expression was not significantly different, while postsynaptic GABABR1b subunit expression was significantly decreased. When subunit expression is compared, brainstem and cortical patterns diverge over longer periods of recovery. Persistent patterns of change in the cortex are stable by 1 year. Alternatively, subunit expression in the cuneate nucleus one to five years after nerve injury is similar to that seen 1 month after a reorganizing injury. This suggests that cortical plasticity continues to change over many months as receptive field reorganization occurs, while brainstem plasticity obtains a level of stable persistence by one month. PMID:25791620

  19. α4α6β2* Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Activation on Ventral Tegmental Area Dopamine Neurons Is Sufficient to Stimulate a Depolarizing Conductance and Enhance Surface AMPA Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Engle, Staci E.; Shih, Pei-Yu; McIntosh, J. Michael

    2013-01-01

    Tobacco addiction is a serious threat to public health in the United States and abroad, and development of new therapeutic approaches is a major priority. Nicotine activates and/or desensitizes nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) throughout the brain. nAChRs in ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons are crucial for the rewarding and reinforcing properties of nicotine in rodents, suggesting that they may be key mediators of nicotine’s action in humans. However, it is unknown which nAChR subtypes are sufficient to activate these neurons. To test the hypothesis that nAChRs containing α6 subunits are sufficient to activate VTA DA neurons, we studied mice expressing hypersensitive, gain-of-function α6 nAChRs (α6L9′S mice). In voltage-clamp recordings in brain slices from adult mice, 100 nM nicotine was sufficient to elicit inward currents in VTA DA neurons via α6β2* nAChRs. In addition, we found that low concentrations of nicotine could act selectively through α6β2* nAChRs to enhance the function of 2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazol-4-yl)propanoic acid (AMPA) receptors on the surface of these cells. In contrast, α6β2* activation did not enhance N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor function. Finally, AMPA receptor (AMPAR) function was not similarly enhanced in brain slices from α6L9′S mice lacking α4 nAChR subunits, suggesting that α4α6β2* nAChRs are important for enhancing AMPAR function in VTA DA neurons. Together, these data suggest that activation of α4α6β2* nAChRs in VTA DA neurons is sufficient to support the initiation of cellular changes that play a role in addiction to nicotine. α4α6β2* nAChRs may be a promising target for future smoking cessation pharmacotherapy. PMID:23788655

  20. Integrated Multiscale Modeling of the Nervous System: Predicting Changes in Hippocampal Network Activity by a Positive AMPA Receptor Modulator

    PubMed Central

    Allam, Sushmita L.; Hu, Eric Y.; Greget, Renaud; Ambert, Nicolas; Keller, Anne Florence; Bischoff, Serge; Baudry, Michel; Berger, Theodore W.

    2012-01-01

    One of the fundamental characteristics of the brain is its hierarchical organization. Scales in both space and time that must be considered when integrating across hierarchies of the nervous system are sufficiently great as to have impeded the development of routine multilevel modeling methodologies. Complex molecular interactions at the level of receptors and channels regulate activity at the level of neurons; interactions between multiple populations of neurons ultimately give rise to complex neural systems function and behavior. This spatial complexity takes place in the context of a composite temporal integration of multiple, different events unfolding at the millisecond, second, minute, hour, and longer time scales. In this study, we present a multiscale modeling methodology that integrates synaptic models into single neuron, and multineuron, network models. We have applied this approach to the specific problem of how changes at the level of kinetic parameters of a receptor-channel model are translated into changes in the temporal firing pattern of a single neuron, and ultimately, changes in the spatiotemporal activity of a network of neurons. These results demonstrate how this powerful methodology can be applied to understand the effects of a given local process within multiple hierarchical levels of the nervous system. PMID:21642035

  1. Internalization and desensitization of adenosine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Klaasse, Elisabeth C.; de Grip, Willem J.; Beukers, Margot W.

    2007-01-01

    Until now, more than 800 distinct G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been identified in the human genome. The four subtypes of the adenosine receptor (A1, A2A, A2B and A3 receptor) belong to this large family of GPCRs that represent the most widely targeted pharmacological protein class. Since adenosine receptors are widespread throughout the body and involved in a variety of physiological processes and diseases, there is great interest in understanding how the different subtypes are regulated, as a basis for designing therapeutic drugs that either avoid or make use of this regulation. The major GPCR regulatory pathway involves phosphorylation of activated receptors by G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs), a process that is followed by binding of arrestin proteins. This prevents receptors from activating downstream heterotrimeric G protein pathways, but at the same time allows activation of arrestin-dependent signalling pathways. Upon agonist treatment, adenosine receptor subtypes are differently regulated. For instance, the A1Rs are not (readily) phosphorylated and internalize slowly, showing a typical half-life of several hours, whereas the A2AR and A2BR undergo much faster downregulation, usually shorter than 1 h. The A3R is subject to even faster downregulation, often a matter of minutes. The fast desensitization of the A3R after agonist exposure may be therapeutically equivalent to antagonist occupancy of the receptor. This review describes the process of desensitization and internalization of the different adenosine subtypes in cell systems, tissues and in vivo studies. In addition, molecular mechanisms involved in adenosine receptor desensitization are discussed. PMID:18368531

  2. Influence of early life status epilepticus on the developmental expression profile of the GluA2 subunit of AMPA receptors.

    PubMed

    Szczurowska, E; Ergang, P; Kubová, H; Druga, R; Salaj, M; Mareš, P

    2016-09-01

    AMPA receptors (AMPARs) are responsible for fast excitatory neurotransmission, and their prolonged activation can result in the generation and spread of epileptic seizures. At early stages of postnatal development, the majority of AMPARs are permeable to both Na(+) and Ca(2+) ions. This permeability, which increases neuronal excitability, is due to the lack of the GluA2 subunit, encoded by the GRIA2A gene, and/or the presence of an unedited GluA2 subunit Q/R site (glutamine instead of arginine). Lithium chloride- and pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (LiCl/Pilo-SE) in rodents represents a model of severe seizures that result in development of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). The aim of this study was to determine how LiCl/Pilo-SE induced early in life (at postnatal day 12; P12) alters normal expression of the GRIA2A gene and GluA2 protein. SE was interrupted by an injection of paraldehyde (Para). Control groups were 1) naïve animals, and 2) siblings of SE rats receiving only LiCl and paraldehyde (LiCl/Para). The expression profile of GRIA2A mRNA was determined via qPCR, and GluA2 protein levels were measured by western blotting. The analysis was performed at 3h (protein levels), and then 3-, 6-, 13-, and 60days, following LiCl/Pilo-SE or LiCl/Para injection (i.e. at P12, P15, P18, P25, P72 respectively). Six different brain regions were analyzed: frontal (CXFR), parietal (CXPAR), and occipital (CXOC) cortex, dorsal (HD) and ventral (HV) hippocampus, and thalamus (TH). There was a significant increase in GRIA2A mRNA expression in the CXFR, CXPAR, and CXOC of P18 SE animals. In CXFR and HD, increased expression of GluA2 AMPAR subunit protein was detected, as well as a surge in GRIA2A mRNA and GluA2 protein expression especially at P18. In HD the surge was detected not only during development (P18), but also later in life (P72). Since high levels of GluA2 can be neuroprotective (by decreasing Ca(2+) permeability), our data suggest that the neocortex and dorsal

  3. AMPA/NMDA cooperativity and integration during a single synaptic event.

    PubMed

    Di Maio, Vito; Ventriglia, Francesco; Santillo, Silvia

    2016-10-01

    Coexistence of AMPA and NMDA receptors in glutamatergic synapses leads to a cooperative effect that can be very complex. This effect is dependent on many parameters including the relative and absolute number of the two types of receptors and biophysical parameters that can vary among synapses of the same cell. Herein we simulate the AMPA/NMDA cooperativity by using different number of the two types of receptors and considering the effect of the spine resistance on the EPSC production. Our results show that the relative number of NMDA with respect to AMPA produces a different degree of cooperation which depends also on the spine resistance. PMID:27299885

  4. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor activation of CaM-kinase kinase via transient receptor potential canonical channels induces the translation and synaptic incorporation of GluA1-containing calcium-permeable AMPA receptors.

    PubMed

    Fortin, Dale A; Srivastava, Taasin; Dwarakanath, Diya; Pierre, Philippe; Nygaard, Sean; Derkach, Victor A; Soderling, Thomas R

    2012-06-13

    Glutamatergic synapses in early postnatal development transiently express calcium-permeable AMPA receptors (CP-AMPARs). Although these GluA2-lacking receptors are essential and are elevated in response to brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), little is known regarding molecular mechanisms that govern their expression and synaptic insertion. Here we show that BDNF-induced GluA1 translation in rat primary hippocampal neurons requires the activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) via calcium calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase (CaMKK). Specifically, BDNF-mediated phosphorylation of threonine 308 (T308) in AKT, a known substrate of CaMKK and an upstream activator of mTOR-dependent translation, was prevented by (1) pharmacological inhibition of CaMKK with STO-609, (2) overexpression of a dominant-negative CaMKK, or (3) short hairpin-mediated knockdown of CaMKK. GluA1 surface expression induced by BDNF, as assessed by immunocytochemistry using an extracellular N-terminal GluA1 antibody or by surface biotinylation, was impaired following knockdown of CaMKK or treatment with STO-609. Activation of CaMKK by BDNF requires transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels as SKF-96365, but not the NMDA receptor antagonist d-APV, prevented BDNF-induced GluA1 surface expression as well as phosphorylation of CaMKI, AKT(T308), and mTOR. Using siRNA we confirmed the involvement of TRPC5 and TRPC6 subunits in BDNF-induced AKT(T308) phosphorylation. The BDNF-induced increase in mEPSC was blocked by IEM-1460, a selected antagonist of CP-AMPARs, as well as by the specific repression of acute GluA1 translation via siRNA to GluA1 but not GluA2. Together these data support the conclusion that newly synthesized GluA1 subunits, induced by BDNF, are readily incorporated into synapses where they enhance the expression of CP-AMPARs and synaptic strength. PMID:22699894

  5. AMPA experimental communications systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckerman, D.; Fass, S.; Keon, T.; Sielman, P.

    1982-01-01

    The program was conducted to demonstrate the satellite communication advantages of Adaptive Phased Array Technology. A laboratory based experiment was designed and implemented to demonstrate a low earth orbit satellite communications system. Using a 32 element, L-band phased array augmented with 4 sets of weights (2 for reception and 2 for transmission) a high speed digital processing system and operating against multiple user terminals and interferers, the AMPA system demonstrated: communications with austere user terminals, frequency reuse, communications in the face of interference, and geolocation. The program and experiment objectives are described, the system hardware and software/firmware are defined, and the test performed and the resultant test data are presented.

  6. AMPA Receptor–mTOR Activation is Required for the Antidepressant-Like Effects of Sarcosine during the Forced Swim Test in Rats: Insertion of AMPA Receptor may Play a Role

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kuang-Ti; Tsai, Mang-Hung; Wu, Ching-Hsiang; Jou, Ming-Jia; Wei, I-Hua; Huang, Chih-Chia

    2015-01-01

    Sarcosine, an endogenous amino acid, is a competitive inhibitor of the type I glycine transporter and an N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) coagonist. Recently, we found that sarcosine, an NMDAR enhancer, can improve depression-related behaviors in rodents and humans. This result differs from previous studies, which have reported antidepressant effects of NMDAR antagonists. The mechanisms underlying the therapeutic response of sarcosine remain unknown. This study examines the role of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate receptor (AMPAR) activation, which are involved in the antidepressant-like effects of several glutamatergic system modulators. The effects of sarcosine in a forced swim test (FST) and the expression levels of phosphorylated mTOR signaling proteins were examined in the absence or presence of mTOR and AMPAR inhibitors. In addition, the influence of sarcosine on AMPAR trafficking was determined by analyzing the phosphorylation of AMPAR subunit GluR1 at the PKA site (often considered an indicator for GluR1 membrane insertion in neurons). A single injection of sarcosine exhibited antidepressant-like effects in rats in the FST and rapidly activated the mTOR signaling pathway, which were significantly blocked by mTOR inhibitor rapamycin or the AMPAR inhibitor 2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoyl-benzo(f)quinoxaline (NBQX) pretreatment. Moreover, NBQX pretreatment eliminated the ability of sarcosine to stimulate the phosphorylated mTOR signaling proteins. Furthermore, GluR1 phosphorylation at its PKA site was significantly increased after an acute in vivo sarcosine treatment. The results demonstrated that sarcosine exerts antidepressant-like effects by enhancing AMPAR–mTOR signaling pathway activity and facilitating AMPAR membrane insertion. Highlights – A single injection of sarcosine rapidly exerted antidepressant-like effects with a concomitant increase in the activation of the mammalian

  7. Antidepressant Effects of AMPA and Ketamine Combination: Role of Hippocampal BDNF, Synapsin, and mTOR

    PubMed Central

    Akinfiresoye, Luli; Tizabi, Yousef

    2013-01-01

    Rationale A number of preclinical and clinical studies suggest ketamine, a glutamate NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptor antagonist, has a rapid and lasting antidepressant effect when administered either acutely or chronically. It has been postulated that this effect is due to stimulation of AMPA (alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl–4-isoxazolepropionic acid) receptors. Objective In this study, we tested whether AMPA alone has an antidepressant effect and if the combination of AMPA and ketamine provides added benefit in Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats, a putative animal model of depression. Results Chronic AMPA treatment resulted in a dose dependent antidepressant effect in both the forced swim test (FST) and sucrose preference test. Moreover, chronic administration (10–11d) of combinations of AMPA and ketamine, at doses that were ineffective on their own, resulted in a significant antidepressant effect. The behavioral effects were associated with increases in hippocampal brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), synapsin, and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Conclusion These findings are the first to provide evidence for an antidepressant effect of AMPA, and suggest the usefulness of AMPA-ketamine combination in treatment of depression. Furthermore, these effects appear to be associated with increases in markers of hippocampal neurogenesis and synaptogenesis, suggesting a mechanism of their action. PMID:23732839

  8. Radiosynthesis and preliminary PET evaluation of (18)F-labeled 2-(1-(3-fluorophenyl)-2-oxo-5-(pyrimidin-2-yl)-1,2-dihydropyridin-3-yl)benzonitrile for imaging AMPA receptors.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Gengyang; Jones, Graham B; Vasdev, Neil; Liang, Steven H

    2016-10-01

    To prompt the development of (18)F-labeled positron emission tomography (PET) tracers for the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor, we have prepared (18)F-labeled 2-(1-(3-fluorophenyl)-2-oxo-5-(pyrimidin-2-yl)-1,2-dihydropyridin-3-yl)benzonitrile ([(18)F]8). The radiosynthesis was achieved by a one-pot two-step method that utilized a spirocyclic hypervalent iodine(III) mediated radiofluorination to prepare the (18)F-labeled 1-bromo-3-fluorobenzene ([(18)F]15) intermediate with K(18)F. A subsequent copper(I) iodide mediated coupling reaction was carried out with 2-(2-oxo-5-(pyrimidin-2-yl)-1,2-dihydropyridin-3-yl)benzonitrile (10) to [(18)F]8 in 10±2% uncorrected radiochemical yield relative to starting (18)F-fluoride with >99% radiochemical purity and 29.6±7.4Gbq/μmol specific activity at the time of injection. PET imaging studies with the title radiotracer in normal mice demonstrated good brain uptake (peak standardized uptake value (SUV)=2.3±0.1) and warrants further in vivo validation. PMID:27546294

  9. Alterations in Hippocampal Oxidative Stress, Expression of AMPA Receptor GluR2 Subunit and Associated Spatial Memory Loss by Bacopa monnieri Extract (CDRI-08) in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Surya P.; Singh, Hemant K.; Prasad, S.

    2015-01-01

    Bacopa monnieri extract has been implicated in the recovery of memory impairments due to various neurological disorders in animal models and humans. However, the precise molecular mechanism of the role of CDRI-08, a well characterized fraction of Bacopa monnieri extract, in recovery of the diabetes mellitus-induced memory impairments is not known. Here, we demonstrate that DM2 mice treated orally with lower dose of CDRI-08 (50- or 100 mg/kg BW) is able to significantly enhance spatial memory in STZ-DM2 mice and this is correlated with a significant decline in oxidative stress and up regulation of the AMPA receptor GluR2 subunit gene expression in the hippocampus. Treatment of DM2 mice with its higher dose (150 mg/kg BW or above) shows anti-diabetic effect in addition to its ability to recover the spatial memory impairment by reversing the DM2-induced elevated oxidative stress and decreased GluR2 subunit expression near to their values in normal and CDRI-08 treated control mice. Our results provide evidences towards molecular basis of the memory enhancing and anti diabetic role of the Bacopa monnieri extract in STZ-induced DM2 mice, which may have therapeutic implications. PMID:26161865

  10. AMPA/Kainate, NMDA, and Dopamine D1 Receptor Function in the Nucleus Accumbens Core: A Context-Limited Role in the Encoding and Consolidation of Instrumental Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Pepe J.; Andrzejewski, Matthew E.; Sadeghian, Kenneth; Panksepp, Jules B.; Kelley, Ann E.

    2005-01-01

    Neural integration of glutamate- and dopamine-coded signals within the nucleus accumbens (NAc) is a fundamental process governing cellular plasticity underlying reward-related learning. Intra-NAc core blockade of NMDA or D1 receptors in rats impairs instrumental learning (lever-pressing for sugar pellets), but it is not known during which phase of…

  11. Novel Regulation of the Synthesis of α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic Acid (AMPA) Receptor Subunit GluA1 by Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 1C (CPT1C) in the Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Fadó, Rut; Soto, David; Miñano-Molina, Alfredo J; Pozo, Macarena; Carrasco, Patricia; Yefimenko, Natalia; Rodríguez-Álvarez, José; Casals, Núria

    2015-10-16

    The regulation of AMPA-type receptor (AMPAR) abundance in the postsynaptic membrane is an important mechanism involved in learning and memory formation. Recent data suggest that one of the constituents of the AMPAR complex is carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C (CPT1C), a brain-specific isoform located in the endoplasmic reticulum of neurons. Previous results had demonstrated that CPT1C deficiency disrupted spine maturation in hippocampal neurons and impaired spatial learning, but the role of CPT1C in AMPAR physiology had remained mostly unknown. In the present study, we show that CPT1C binds GluA1 and GluA2 and that the three proteins have the same expression profile during neuronal maturation. Moreover, in hippocampal neurons of CPT1C KO mice, AMPAR-mediated miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents and synaptic levels of AMPAR subunits GluA1 and GluA2 are significantly reduced. We show that AMPAR expression is dependent on CPT1C levels because total protein levels of GluA1 and GluA2 are decreased in CPT1C KO neurons and are increased in CPT1C-overexpressing neurons, whereas other synaptic proteins remain unaltered. Notably, mRNA levels of AMPARs remained unchanged in those cultures, indicating that CPT1C is post-transcriptionally involved. We demonstrate that CPT1C is directly involved in the de novo synthesis of GluA1 and not in protein degradation. Moreover, in CPT1C KO cultured neurons, GluA1 synthesis after chemical long term depression was clearly diminished, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor treatment was unable to phosphorylate the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and stimulate GluA1 protein synthesis. These data newly identify CPT1C as a regulator of AMPAR translation efficiency and therefore also synaptic function in the hippocampus. PMID:26338711

  12. Ethanol directly depresses AMPA and NMDA glutamate currents in spinal cord motor neurons independent of actions on GABAA or glycine receptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, M Y; Rampil, I J; Kendig, J J

    1999-07-01

    Ethanol is a general anesthetic agent as defined by abolition of movement in response to noxious stimulation. This anesthetic endpoint is due to spinal anesthetic actions. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that ethanol acts directly on motor neurons to inhibit excitatory synaptic transmission at glutamate receptors. Whole cell recordings were made in visually identified motor neurons in spinal cord slices from 14- to 23-day-old rats. Currents were evoked by stimulating a dorsal root fragment or by brief pulses of glutamate. Ethanol at general anesthetic concentrations (50-200 mM) depressed both responses. Ethanol also depressed glutamate-evoked responses in the presence of tetrodotoxin (300 nM), showing that its actions are postsynaptic. Block of inhibitory gamma-aminobutyric acidA and glycine receptors by bicuculline (50 microM) and strychnine (5 microM), respectively, did not significantly reduce the effects of ethanol on glutamate currents. Ethanol also depressed glutamate-evoked currents when the inhibitory receptors were blocked and either D, L-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (40 microM) or 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione disodium (10 microM) were applied to block N-methyl-D-aspartate or alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid/kainate receptors, respectively. The results show that ethanol exerts direct depressant effects on both alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid and N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate currents in motor neurons. Enhancement of gamma-aminobutyric acidA and glycine inhibition is not required for this effect. Direct depression of glutamatergic excitatory transmission by a postsynaptic action on motor neurons thus may contribute to general anesthesia as defined by immobility in response to a noxious stimulus. PMID:10381800

  13. Postsynaptic VAMP/Synaptobrevin Facilitates Differential Vesicle Trafficking of GluA1 and GluA2 AMPA Receptor Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Suleman; Davanger, Svend

    2015-01-01

    Vertebrate organisms adapt to a continuously changing environment by regulating the strength of synaptic connections between brain cells. Excitatory synapses are believed to increase their strength by vesicular insertion of transmitter glutamate receptors into the postsynaptic plasma membrane. These vesicles, however, have never been demonstrated or characterized. For the first time, we show the presence of small vesicles in postsynaptic spines, often closely adjacent to the plasma membrane and PSD (postsynaptic density). We demonstrate that they harbor vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 (VAMP2/synaptobrevin-2) and glutamate receptor subunit 1 (GluA1). Disrupting VAMP2 by tetanus toxin treatment reduces the concentration of GluA1 in the postsynaptic plasma membrane. GluA1/VAMP2-containing vesicles, but not GluA2/VAMP2-vesicles, are concentrated in postsynaptic spines relative to dendrites. Our results indicate that small postsynaptic vesicles containing GluA1 are inserted directly into the spine plasma membrane through a VAMP2-dependent mechanism. PMID:26488171

  14. Synthesis and Pharmacology of Mono-, Di-, and Trialkyl-Substituted 7-Chloro-3,4-dihydro-2H-1,2,4-benzothiadiazine 1,1-Dioxides Combined with X-ray Structure Analysis to Understand the Unexpected Structure-Activity Relationship at AMPA Receptors.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Anja Probst; Francotte, Pierre; Frydenvang, Karla; Tapken, Daniel; Goffin, Eric; Fraikin, Pierre; Caignard, Daniel-Henri; Lestage, Pierre; Danober, Laurence; Pirotte, Bernard; Kastrup, Jette Sandholm

    2016-03-16

    Positive allosteric modulators of 2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazol-4-yl)propionic acid (AMPA)-type ionotropic glutamate receptors are promising compounds for treatment of neurological disorders, for example, Alzheimer's disease. Here, we report synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of a series of mono-, di-, or trialkyl-substituted 7-chloro-3,4-dihydro-2H-1,2,4-benzothiadiazine 1,1-dioxides, comprising in total 16 new modulators. The trisubstituted compounds 7b, 7d, and 7e revealed potent activity (EC2× = 2.7-4.3 μM; concentration of compound responsible for a 2-fold increase of the AMPA mediated response) as AMPA receptor potentiators in an in vitro cellular fluorescence assay (FLIPR). The 4-cyclopropyl compound 7f was found to be considerably less potent (EC2× = 60 μM), in contrast to previously described 4-monoalkyl-substituted benzothiadiazine dioxides for which the cyclopropyl group constitutes the best choice of substituent. 7b was subjected to X-ray structural analysis in complex with the GluA2 ligand-binding domain. We propose an explanation of the unexpected structure-activity relationship of this new series of mono-, di-, and trialkyl-substituted 1,2,4-benzothiadiazine 1,1-dioxide compounds. The methyl substituent in the 3-position directs the binding mode of the 1,2,4-benzothiadiazine 1,1-dioxide (BTD) scaffold. When a methyl substituent is present in the 3-position of the BTD, additional methyl substituents in both the 2- and 4-positions increase potency, whereas introduction of a 4-cyclopropyl group does not enhance potency of 2,3,4-alkyl-substituted BTDs. A hydrogen bond donor in the 2-position of the BTD is not necessary for modulator potency. PMID:26771108

  15. How Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors, the kinase PKA, and the phosphatase PP2B are intertwined in synaptic LTP and LTD.

    PubMed

    Hell, Johannes W

    2016-01-01

    Both synaptic long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) are thought to be critical for memory formation. Dell'Acqua and co-workers now demonstrate that transient postsynaptic incorporation of Ca(2+)-permeable (CP) α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) is required for LTD in the exemplary hippocampal CA1 region in 2-week-old mice. Mechanistically, LTD depends on AKAP150-anchored protein kinase A (PKA) to promote the initial functional recruitment of CP-AMPARs during LTD induction and on AKAP150-anchored protein phosphatase 2B (PP2B) to trigger their subsequent removal as part of the lasting depression of synaptic transmission. PMID:27117250

  16. Enhanced long term potentiation and decreased AMPA receptor desensitization in the acute period following a single kainate induced early life seizure.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Heather; Bernard, Paul B; Castano, Anna M; Benke, Tim A

    2016-03-01

    Neonatal seizures are associated with long term disabilities including epilepsy and cognitive deficits. Using a neonatal seizure rat model that does not develop epilepsy, but develops a phenotype consistent with other models of intellectual disability (ID) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD), we sought to isolate the acute effects of a single episode of early life seizure on hippocampal CA1 synaptic development and plasticity. We have previously shown chronic changes in glutamatergic synapses, loss of long term potentiation (LTP) and enhanced long term depression (LTD), in the adult male rat ~50days following kainic acid (KA) induced early life seizure (KA-ELS) in post-natal (P) 7day old male Sprague-Dawley rats. In the present work, we examined the electrophysiological properties and expression levels of glutamate receptors in the acute period, 2 and 7days, post KA-ELS. Our results show for the first time enhanced LTP 7days after KA-ELS, but no change 2days post KA-ELS. Additionally, we report that ionotropic α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole-propionic acid type glutamate receptor (AMPAR) desensitization is decreased in the same time frame, with no changes in AMPAR expression, phosphorylation, or membrane insertion. Inappropriate enhancement of the synaptic connections in the acute period after the seizure could alter the normal patterning of synaptic development in the hippocampus during this critical period and contribute to learning deficits. Thus, this study demonstrates a novel mechanism by which KA-ELS alters early network properties that potentially lead to adverse outcomes. PMID:26706598

  17. L-glutamate Receptor In Paramecium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal-Martínez, Juan; Ortega-Soto, Arturo

    2004-09-01

    Behavioral, electrophysiological and biochemical experiments were performed in order to establish the presence of a glutamate receptor in the ciliate Paramecium. It was found that an AMPA/KA receptor is functionally expressed in Paramecium and that this receptor is immunologically and fillogenetically related to the AMPA/KA receptor present in vertebrates.

  18. Age-Dependent Modifications of AMPA Receptor Subunit Expression Levels and Related Cognitive Effects in 3xTg-AD Mice.

    PubMed

    Cantanelli, Pamela; Sperduti, Samantha; Ciavardelli, Domenico; Stuppia, Liborio; Gatta, Valentina; Sensi, Stefano Luca

    2014-01-01

    GluA1, GluA2, GluA3, and GluA4 are the constitutive subunits of amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs), the major mediators of fast excitatory transmission in the mammalian central nervous system. Most AMPARs are Ca(2+)-impermeable because of the presence of the GluA2 subunit. GluA2 mRNA undergoes an editing process that results in a Q-R substitution, a key factor in the regulation of AMPAR Ca(2+)-permeability. AMPARs lacking GluA2 or containing the unedited subunit are permeable to Ca(2+) and Zn(2+). The phenomenon physiologically modulates synaptic plasticity while, in pathologic conditions, leads to increased vulnerability to excitotoxic neuronal death. Given the importance of these subunits, we have therefore evaluated possible associations between changes in expression levels of AMPAR subunits and development of cognitive deficits in 3xTg-AD mice, a widely investigated transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). With quantitative real-time PCR analysis, we assayed hippocampal mRNA expression levels of GluA1-4 subunits occurring in young [3 months of age (m.o.a.)] and old (12 m.o.a) Tg-AD mice and made comparisons with levels found in age-matched wild type (WT) mice. Efficiency of GluA2 RNA editing was also analyzed. All animals were cognitively tested for learning short- and long-term spatial memory with the Morris Water Maze (MWM) navigation task. 3xTg-AD mice showed age-dependent decreases of mRNA levels for all the AMPAR subunits, with the exception of GluA2. Editing remained fully efficient with aging in 3xTg-AD and WT mice. A one-to-one correlation analysis between MWM performances and GluA1-4 mRNA expression profiles showed negative correlations between GluA2 levels and MWM performances in young 3xTg-AD mice. On the contrary, positive correlations between GluA2 mRNA and MWM performances were found in young WT mice. Our data suggest that increases of AMPARs that contain GluA1, GluA3, and GluA4 subunits may help in

  19. Age-Dependent Modifications of AMPA Receptor Subunit Expression Levels and Related Cognitive Effects in 3xTg-AD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cantanelli, Pamela; Sperduti, Samantha; Ciavardelli, Domenico; Stuppia, Liborio; Gatta, Valentina; Sensi, Stefano Luca

    2014-01-01

    GluA1, GluA2, GluA3, and GluA4 are the constitutive subunits of amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs), the major mediators of fast excitatory transmission in the mammalian central nervous system. Most AMPARs are Ca2+-impermeable because of the presence of the GluA2 subunit. GluA2 mRNA undergoes an editing process that results in a Q–R substitution, a key factor in the regulation of AMPAR Ca2+-permeability. AMPARs lacking GluA2 or containing the unedited subunit are permeable to Ca2+ and Zn2+. The phenomenon physiologically modulates synaptic plasticity while, in pathologic conditions, leads to increased vulnerability to excitotoxic neuronal death. Given the importance of these subunits, we have therefore evaluated possible associations between changes in expression levels of AMPAR subunits and development of cognitive deficits in 3xTg-AD mice, a widely investigated transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). With quantitative real-time PCR analysis, we assayed hippocampal mRNA expression levels of GluA1–4 subunits occurring in young [3 months of age (m.o.a.)] and old (12 m.o.a) Tg-AD mice and made comparisons with levels found in age-matched wild type (WT) mice. Efficiency of GluA2 RNA editing was also analyzed. All animals were cognitively tested for learning short- and long-term spatial memory with the Morris Water Maze (MWM) navigation task. 3xTg-AD mice showed age-dependent decreases of mRNA levels for all the AMPAR subunits, with the exception of GluA2. Editing remained fully efficient with aging in 3xTg-AD and WT mice. A one-to-one correlation analysis between MWM performances and GluA1–4 mRNA expression profiles showed negative correlations between GluA2 levels and MWM performances in young 3xTg-AD mice. On the contrary, positive correlations between GluA2 mRNA and MWM performances were found in young WT mice. Our data suggest that increases of AMPARs that contain GluA1, GluA3, and GluA4 subunits may help in

  20. Arrestin Scaffolds NHERF1 to the P2Y12 Receptor to Regulate Receptor Internalization*

    PubMed Central

    Nisar, Shaista P.; Cunningham, Margaret; Saxena, Kunal; Pope, Robert J.; Kelly, Eamonn; Mundell, Stuart J.

    2012-01-01

    We have recently shown in a patient with mild bleeding that the PDZ-binding motif of the platelet G protein-coupled P2Y12 receptor (P2Y12R) is required for effective receptor traffic in human platelets. In this study we show for the first time that the PDZ motif-binding protein NHERF1 exerts a major role in potentiating G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) internalization. NHERF1 interacts with the C-tail of the P2Y12R and unlike many other GPCRs, NHERF1 interaction is required for effective P2Y12R internalization. In vitro and prior to agonist stimulation P2Y12R/NHERF1 interaction requires the intact PDZ binding motif of this receptor. Interestingly on receptor stimulation NHERF1 no longer interacts directly with the receptor but instead binds to the receptor via the endocytic scaffolding protein arrestin. These findings suggest a novel model by which arrestin can serve as an adaptor to promote NHERF1 interaction with a GPCR to facilitate effective NHERF1-dependent receptor internalization. PMID:22610101

  1. Arrestin scaffolds NHERF1 to the P2Y12 receptor to regulate receptor internalization.

    PubMed

    Nisar, Shaista P; Cunningham, Margaret; Saxena, Kunal; Pope, Robert J; Kelly, Eamonn; Mundell, Stuart J

    2012-07-13

    We have recently shown in a patient with mild bleeding that the PDZ-binding motif of the platelet G protein-coupled P2Y(12) receptor (P2Y(12)R) is required for effective receptor traffic in human platelets. In this study we show for the first time that the PDZ motif-binding protein NHERF1 exerts a major role in potentiating G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) internalization. NHERF1 interacts with the C-tail of the P2Y(12)R and unlike many other GPCRs, NHERF1 interaction is required for effective P2Y(12)R internalization. In vitro and prior to agonist stimulation P2Y(12)R/NHERF1 interaction requires the intact PDZ binding motif of this receptor. Interestingly on receptor stimulation NHERF1 no longer interacts directly with the receptor but instead binds to the receptor via the endocytic scaffolding protein arrestin. These findings suggest a novel model by which arrestin can serve as an adaptor to promote NHERF1 interaction with a GPCR to facilitate effective NHERF1-dependent receptor internalization. PMID:22610101

  2. 7-Chloro-5-(furan-3-yl)-3-methyl-4H-benzo[e][1,2,4]thiadiazine 1,1-Dioxide as Positive Allosteric Modulator of α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic Acid (AMPA) Receptor. The End of the Unsaturated-Inactive Paradigm?

    PubMed

    Citti, Cinzia; Battisti, Umberto M; Cannazza, Giuseppe; Jozwiak, Krzysztof; Stasiak, Natalia; Puja, Giulia; Ravazzini, Federica; Ciccarella, Giuseppe; Braghiroli, Daniela; Parenti, Carlo; Troisi, Luigino; Zoli, Michele

    2016-02-17

    5-Arylbenzothiadiazine type compounds acting as positive allosteric modulators of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor (AMPA-PAMs) have received particular attention in the past decade for their nootropic activity and lack of the excitotoxic side effects of direct agonists. Recently, our research group has published the synthesis and biological activity of 7-chloro-5-(3-furanyl)-3-methyl-3,4-dihydro-2H-1,2,4-benzothiadiazine 1,1-dioxide (1), one of the most active benzothiadiazine-derived AMPA-PAMs in vitro to date. However, 1 exists as two stereolabile enantiomers, which rapidly racemize in physiological conditions, and only one isomer is responsible for the pharmacological activity. In the present work, experiments carried out with rat liver microsomes show that 1 is converted by hepatic cytochrome P450 to the corresponding unsaturated derivative 2 and to the corresponding pharmacologically inactive benzenesulfonamide 3. Surprisingly, patch-clamp experiments reveal that 2 displays an activity comparable to that of the parent compound. Molecular modeling studies were performed to rationalize these results. Furthermore, mice cerebral microdialysis studies suggest that 2 is able to cross the blood-brain barrier and increases acetylcholine and serotonin levels in the hippocampus. The experimental data disclose that the achiral hepatic metabolite 2 possesses the same pharmacological activity of its parent compound 1 but with an enhanced chemical and stereochemical stability, as well as an improved pharmacokinetic profile compared with 1. PMID:26580317

  3. Proteomic Analysis of α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole Propionate Receptor Complexes*

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Myoung-Goo; Nuriya, Mutsuo; Guo, Yurong; Martindale, Kevin D.; Lee, Daniel Z.; Huganir, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    The AMPA receptor (AMPA-R) is a major excitatory neurotransmitter receptor in the brain. Identifying and characterizing the neuronal proteins interacting with AMPA-Rs have provided important information about the molecular mechanisms underlying synaptic transmission and plasticity. In this study, to identify more AMPA-R interactors in vivo, we performed proteomic analyses of AMPA-R complexes from the brain. AMPA-R complexes were isolated from the brain through various combinations of biochemical techniques for solubilization, enrichment, and immunoprecipitation. Mass spectrometry analyses of these isolated complexes identified several novel components of the AMPA-R complexes as well as some previously identified components. The identification of these novel components helps to further define the complex mechanisms involved in the regulation of AMPA receptor function and synaptic plasticity. PMID:22753414

  4. Nonprofessional Phagocytic Cell Receptors Involved in Staphylococcus aureus Internalization

    PubMed Central

    Alva-Murillo, Nayeli; López-Meza, Joel Edmundo

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a successful human and animal pathogen. The majority of infections caused by this pathogen are life threatening, primarily because S. aureus has developed multiple evasion strategies, possesses intracellular persistence for long periods, and targets the skin and soft tissues. Therefore, it is very important to understand the mechanisms employed by S. aureus to colonize and proliferate in these cells. The aim of this review is to describe the recent discoveries concerning the host receptors of nonprofessional phagocytes involved in S. aureus internalization. Most of the knowledge related to the interaction of S. aureus with its host cells has been described in professional phagocytic cells such as macrophages. Here, we showed that in nonprofessional phagocytes the α5β1 integrin host receptor, chaperons, and the scavenger receptor CD36 are the main receptors employed during S. aureus internalization. The characterization and identification of new bacterial effectors and the host cell receptors involved will undoubtedly lead to new discoveries with beneficial purposes. PMID:24826382

  5. Glutamate receptor antibodies in neurological diseases: anti-AMPA-GluR3 antibodies, anti-NMDA-NR1 antibodies, anti-NMDA-NR2A/B antibodies, anti-mGluR1 antibodies or anti-mGluR5 antibodies are present in subpopulations of patients with either: epilepsy, encephalitis, cerebellar ataxia, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and neuropsychiatric SLE, Sjogren's syndrome, schizophrenia, mania or stroke. These autoimmune anti-glutamate receptor antibodies can bind neurons in few brain regions, activate glutamate receptors, decrease glutamate receptor's expression, impair glutamate-induced signaling and function, activate blood brain barrier endothelial cells, kill neurons, damage the brain, induce behavioral/psychiatric/cognitive abnormalities and ataxia in animal models, and can be removed or silenced in some patients by immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Levite, Mia

    2014-08-01

    pathological effects: they activate glutamate/AMPA receptors, kill neurons by 'Excitotoxicity', and/or by complement activation modulated by complement regulatory proteins, cause multiple brain damage, aggravate chemoconvulsant-induced seizures, and also induce behavioral/motor impairments. Some patients with 'Autoimmune Epilepsy' that have anti-AMPA-GluR3B antibodies respond well (although sometimes transiently) to immunotherapy, and thanks to that have reduced seizures and overall improved neurological functions. (2) Anti-NMDA-NR1 antibodies are present in patients with autoimmune 'Anti-NMDA-receptor Encephalitis'. In humans, in animal models and in vitro the anti-NMDA-NR1 antibodies can be very pathogenic since they can cause a pronounced decrease of surface NMDA receptors expressed in hippocampal neurons, and also decrease the cluster density and synaptic localization of the NMDA receptors. The anti-NMDA-NR1 antibodies induce these effects by crosslinking and internalization of the NMDA receptors. Such changes can impair glutamate signaling via the NMDA receptors and lead to various neuronal/behavior/cognitive/psychiatric abnormalities. Anti-NMDA-NR1 antibodies are frequently present in high levels in the CSF of the patients with 'Anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis' due to their intrathecal production. Many patients with 'Anti-NMDA receptor Encephalitis' respond well to several modes of immunotherapy. (3) Anti-NMDA-NR2A/B antibodies are present in a substantial number of patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) with or without neuropsychiatric problems. The exact percentage of SLE patients having anti-NMDA-NR2A/B antibodies varies in different studies from 14 to 35%, and in one study such antibodies were found in 81% of patients with diffuse 'Neuropshychiatric SLE', and in 44% of patients with focal 'Neuropshychiatric SLE'. Anti-NMDA-NR2A/B antibodies are also present in subpopulations of patients with Epilepsy of several types, Encephalitis of several types (e

  6. Rapid internalization of the insulin receptor in rat hepatoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Backer, J.M.; White, M.F.; Kahn, C.R.

    1987-05-01

    The authors have studied the internalization of the insulin receptor (IR) in rat hepatoma cells (Fao). The cells were surface-iodinated at 4C, stimulated with insulin at 37C, and then cooled rapidly, trypsinized at 4C and solubilized. The IR was immunoprecipitated with a specific antibody, and internalization of the IR was assessed by the appearance of trypsin-resistant bands on SDS-PAGE. Insulin induced the internalization of surface receptors with a t 1/2 of 9-10 mins; cells not exposed to insulin internalized less than 20% of the IR during 1 h at 37C. Further experiments demonstrated that the accumulation of trypsin-resistant IR paralleled a loss of receptor from the cell surface. Insulin-stimulated cells were chilled and iodinated at 4C, followed by solubilization, immunoprecipitation and SDS-PAGE; alternatively, insulin-stimulated cells were chilled, surface-bound ligand removed by washing the cells at pH 4.2, and specific ( SVI)insulin binding measured at 4C. Both techniques confirmed the disappearance of IR from the cell surface at rates comparable to the insulin-stimulated internalization described above. The total amount of phosphotyrosine-containing IR, as assessed by immunoprecipitation with an anti-phosphotyrosine antibody, remained constant during this time interval, suggesting that active kinase is translocated into the cell. In summary, the authors data indicate that insulin binding increases the rate of IR internalization of Fao cells. This relocation may facilitate the interaction of the activated tyrosine kinase in the IR with intracellular substrates, thus transmitting the insulin signal to metabolic pathways.

  7. Analysis of receptor tyrosine kinase internalization using flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Hill, Kristen S; Elferink, Lisa A

    2008-01-01

    The internalization of activated receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) by endocytosis and their subsequent down regulation in lysosomes plays a critical role in regulating the duration and intensity of downstream signaling events. Uncoupling of the RTK cMet from ligand-induced degradation was recently shown to correlate with sustained receptor signaling and increased cell tumorigenicity, suggesting that the corruption of these endocytic mechanisms could contribute to increased cMet signaling in metastatic cancers. To understand how cMet signaling for normal cell growth is controlled by endocytosis and how these mechanisms are dysregulated in metastatic cancers, we developed flow cytometry-based assays to examine cMet internalization. PMID:19066037

  8. NASA Adaptive Multibeam Phased Array (AMPA): An application study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittra, R.; Lee, S. W.; Gee, W.

    1982-01-01

    The proposed orbital geometry for the adaptive multibeam phased array (AMPA) communication system is reviewed and some of the system's capabilities and preliminary specifications are highlighted. Typical AMPA user link models and calculations are presented, the principal AMPA features are described, and the implementation of the system is demonstrated. System tradeoffs and requirements are discussed. Recommendations are included.

  9. Internalization and molecular interactions of human CD21 receptor.

    PubMed

    Tessier, Jacques; Cuvillier, Armelle; Glaudet, Florence; Khamlichi, Ahmed Amine

    2007-03-01

    The human CD21 is a receptor for cleavage fragments of the third complement component and for Epstein-Barr virus. Previous mutational studies showed that the cytoplasmic domain of CD21 is absolutely required for internalization of either ligand. With the exception of CD19, CD81, Leu-13 and CD35 that can form a complex with CD21 at the cell surface, no other partner that interacts with the hCD21 transmembrane or the cytoplasmic domain was identified. We investigated the internalization capacity of hCD21 tail mutants in the absence of B cell receptor cross-linking by using stable murine B cell transfectants. We provide evidence that at least two internalization motifs are activated when hCD21 binds a monoclonal antibody. In order to identify the cellular proteins that interact with the hCD21 transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains, we combined a mutational mapping with a two-hybrid system approach both in yeast and in mammalian cells. We identified four novel partners that are involved in intracellular trafficking, sorting or cytoskeleton remodeling and we mapped the hCD21 transmembrane and tail subdomains they interact with. We discuss the potential physiological significance of these findings in the context of hCD21 internalization and intracellular trafficking. PMID:17118449

  10. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor acutely inhibits AMPA-mediated currents in developing sensory relay neurons.

    PubMed

    Balkowiec, A; Kunze, D L; Katz, D M

    2000-03-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is expressed by many primary sensory neurons that no longer require neurotrophins for survival, indicating that BDNF may be used as a signaling molecule by the afferents themselves. Because many primary afferents also express glutamate, we investigated the possibility that BDNF modulates glutamatergic AMPA responses of newborn second-order sensory relay neurons. Perforated-patch, voltage-clamp recordings were made from dissociated neurons of the brainstem nucleus tractus solitarius (nTS), a region that receives massive primary afferent input from BDNF-containing neurons in the nodose and petrosal cranial sensory ganglia. Electrophysiological analysis was combined in some experiments with anterograde labeling of primary afferent terminals to specifically analyze responses of identified second-order neurons. Our data demonstrate that BDNF strongly inhibits AMPA-mediated currents in a large subset of nTS cells. Specifically, AMPA responses were either completely abolished or markedly inhibited by BDNF in 73% of postnatal day (P0) cells and in 82% of identified P5 second-order sensory relay neurons. This effect of BDNF is mimicked by NT-4, but not NGF, and blocked by the Trk tyrosine kinase inhibitor K252a, consistent with a requirement for TrkB receptor activation. Moreover, analysis of TrkB expression in culture revealed a close correlation between the percentage of nTS neurons in which BDNF inhibits AMPA currents and the percentage of neurons that exhibit TrkB immunoreactivity. These data document a previously undefined mechanism of acute modulation of AMPA responses by BDNF and indicate that BDNF may regulate glutamatergic transmission at primary afferent synapses. PMID:10684891

  11. Collagenase-3 binds to a specific receptor and requires the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein for internalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmina, O. Y.; Walling, H. W.; Fiacco, G. J.; Freije, J. M.; Lopez-Otin, C.; Jeffrey, J. J.; Partridge, N. C.

    1999-01-01

    We have previously identified a specific receptor for collagenase-3 that mediates the binding, internalization, and degradation of this ligand in UMR 106-01 rat osteoblastic osteosarcoma cells. In the present study, we show that collagenase-3 binding is calcium-dependent and occurs in a variety of cell types, including osteoblastic and fibroblastic cells. We also present evidence supporting a two-step mechanism of collagenase-3 binding and internalization involving both a specific collagenase-3 receptor and the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein. Ligand blot analysis shows that (125)I-collagenase-3 binds specifically to two proteins ( approximately 170 kDa and approximately 600 kDa) present in UMR 106-01 cells. Western blotting identified the 600-kDa protein as the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein. Our data suggest that the 170-kDa protein is a specific collagenase-3 receptor. Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-null mouse embryo fibroblasts bind but fail to internalize collagenase-3, whereas UMR 106-01 and wild-type mouse embryo fibroblasts bind and internalize collagenase-3. Internalization, but not binding, is inhibited by the 39-kDa receptor-associated protein. We conclude that the internalization of collagenase-3 requires the participation of the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein and propose a model in which the cell surface interaction of this ligand requires a sequential contribution from two receptors, with the collagenase-3 receptor acting as a high affinity primary binding site and the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein mediating internalization.

  12. Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Quantification of Receptor Pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ye

    2015-01-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy has been widely used as a single molecule imaging technique to study various fundamental aspects of cell biology, owing to its ability to selectively excite a very thin fluorescent volume immediately above the substrate on which the cells are grown. However, TIRF microscopy has found little use in high content screening due to its complexity in instrumental setup and experimental procedures. Inspired by the recent demonstration of label-free evanescent wave biosensors for cell phenotypic profiling and drug screening with high throughput, we had hypothesized and demonstrated that TIRF imaging is also amenable to receptor pharmacology profiling. This paper reviews key considerations and recent applications of TIRF imaging for pharmacology profiling. PMID:25922915

  13. Rapid internalization and recycling of the human neuropeptide Y Y(1) receptor.

    PubMed

    Gicquiaux, Hervé; Lecat, Sandra; Gaire, Mireille; Dieterlen, Alain; Mély, Yves; Takeda, Kenneth; Bucher, Bernard; Galzi, Jean-Luc

    2002-02-22

    Desensitization of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) involves receptor phosphorylation and reduction in the number of receptors at the cell surface. The neuropeptide Y (NPY) Y(1) receptor undergoes fast desensitization. We examined agonist-induced signaling and internalization using NPY Y(1) receptors fused to green fluorescent protein (EGFP). When expressed in HEK293 cells, EGFP-hNPY Y(1) receptors were localized at the plasma membrane, desensitized rapidly as assessed using calcium responses, and had similar properties compared to hNPY Y(1) receptors. Upon agonist challenge, the EGFP signal decreased rapidly (t(1/2) = 107 +/- 3 s) followed by a slow recovery. This decrease was blocked by BIBP3226, a Y(1) receptor antagonist, or by pertussis toxin, in agreement with Y(1) receptor activation. Internalization of EGFP-hNPY Y(1) receptors to acidic endosomal compartments likely accounts for the decrease in the EGFP signal, being absent after pretreatment with monensin. Concanavalin A and hypertonic sucrose, which inhibit clathrin-mediated endocytosis, blocked the decrease in fluorescence. After agonist, intracellular EGFP signals were punctate and co-localized with transferrin-Texas Red, a marker of clathrin-associated internalization and recycling, but not with LysoTracker Red, a lysosomal pathway marker, supporting receptor trafficking to recycling endosomes rather than the late endosomal/lysosomal pathway. Pulse-chase experiments revealed no receptor degradation after internalization. The slow recovery of fluorescence was unaffected by cycloheximide or actinomycin D, indicating that de novo synthesis of receptors was not limiting. Use of a multicompartment model to fit our fluorescence data allows simultaneous determination of internalization and recycling rate constants. We propose that rapid internalization of receptors via the clathrin-coated pits recycling pathway may largely account for the rapid desensitization of NPY Y(1) receptors. PMID:11741903

  14. Engineered G protein coupled receptors reveal independent regulation of internalization, desensitization and acute signaling

    PubMed Central

    Scearce-Levie, Kimberly; Lieberman, Michael D; Elliott, Heather H; Conklin, Bruce R

    2005-01-01

    Background The physiological regulation of G protein-coupled receptors, through desensitization and internalization, modulates the length of the receptor signal and may influence the development of tolerance and dependence in response to chronic drug treatment. To explore the importance of receptor regulation, we engineered a series of Gi-coupled receptors that differ in signal length, degree of agonist-induced internalization, and ability to induce adenylyl cyclase superactivation. All of these receptors, based on the kappa opioid receptor, were modified to be receptors activated solely by synthetic ligands (RASSLs). This modification allows us to compare receptors that have the same ligands and effectors, but differ only in desensitization and internalization. Results Removal of phosphorylation sites in the C-terminus of the RASSL resulted in a mutant that was resistant to internalization and less prone to desensitization. Replacement of the C-terminus of the RASSL with the corresponding portion of the mu opioid receptor eliminated the induction of AC superactivation, without disrupting agonist-induced desensitization or internalization. Surprisingly, removal of phosphorylation sites from this chimera resulted in a receptor that is constitutively internalized, even in the absence of agonist. However, the receptor still signals and desensitizes in response to agonist, indicating normal G-protein coupling and partial membrane expression. Conclusions These studies reveal that internalization, desensitization and adenylyl cyclase superactivation, all processes that decrease chronic Gi-receptor signals, are independently regulated. Furthermore, specific mutations can radically alter superactivation or internalization without affecting the efficacy of acute Gi signaling. These mutant RASSLs will be useful for further elucidating the temporal dynamics of the signaling of G protein-coupled receptors in vitro and in vivo. PMID:15707483

  15. Combined sodium ion sensitivity in agonist binding and internalization of vasopressin V1b receptors.

    PubMed

    Koshimizu, Taka-Aki; Kashiwazaki, Aki; Taniguchi, Junichi

    2016-01-01

    Reducing Na(+) in the extracellular environment may lead to two beneficial effects for increasing agonist binding to cell surface G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs): reduction of Na(+)-mediated binding block and reduce of receptor internalization. However, such combined effects have not been explored. We used Chinese Hamster Ovary cells expressing vasopressin V1b receptors as a model to explore Na(+) sensitivity in agonist binding and receptor internalization. Under basal conditions, a large fraction of V1b receptors is located intracellularly, and a small fraction is in the plasma membrane. Decreases in external Na(+) increased cell surface [(3)H]AVP binding and decreased receptor internalization. Substitution of Na(+) by Cs(+) or NH4(+) inhibited agonist binding. To suppress receptor internalization, the concentration of NaCl, but not of CsCl, had to be less than 50 mM, due to the high sensitivity of the internalization machinery to Na(+) over Cs(+). Iso-osmotic supplementation of glucose or NH4Cl maintained internalization of the V1b receptor, even in a low-NaCl environment. Moreover, iodide ions, which acted as a counter anion, inhibited V1b agonist binding. In summary, we found external ionic conditions that could increase the presence of high-affinity state receptors at the cell surface with minimum internalization during agonist stimulations. PMID:27138239

  16. Combined sodium ion sensitivity in agonist binding and internalization of vasopressin V1b receptors

    PubMed Central

    Koshimizu, Taka-aki; Kashiwazaki, Aki; Taniguchi, Junichi

    2016-01-01

    Reducing Na+ in the extracellular environment may lead to two beneficial effects for increasing agonist binding to cell surface G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs): reduction of Na+-mediated binding block and reduce of receptor internalization. However, such combined effects have not been explored. We used Chinese Hamster Ovary cells expressing vasopressin V1b receptors as a model to explore Na+ sensitivity in agonist binding and receptor internalization. Under basal conditions, a large fraction of V1b receptors is located intracellularly, and a small fraction is in the plasma membrane. Decreases in external Na+ increased cell surface [3H]AVP binding and decreased receptor internalization. Substitution of Na+ by Cs+ or NH4+ inhibited agonist binding. To suppress receptor internalization, the concentration of NaCl, but not of CsCl, had to be less than 50 mM, due to the high sensitivity of the internalization machinery to Na+ over Cs+. Iso-osmotic supplementation of glucose or NH4Cl maintained internalization of the V1b receptor, even in a low-NaCl environment. Moreover, iodide ions, which acted as a counter anion, inhibited V1b agonist binding. In summary, we found external ionic conditions that could increase the presence of high-affinity state receptors at the cell surface with minimum internalization during agonist stimulations. PMID:27138239

  17. In Vivo Techniques to Investigate the Internalization Profile of Opioid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Amynah A.; Tawfik, Vivianne L.; Laboy, Alycia F.; Scherrer, Grégory

    2015-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) regulate a remarkable diversity of biological functions, and are thus often targeted for drug therapies. Receptor internalization is commonly observed following agonist binding and activation. Receptor trafficking events have been well characterized in cell systems, but the in vivo significance of GPCR internalization is still poorly understood. To address this issue, we have developed an innovative knock-in mouse model, where an opioid receptor is directly visible in vivo. These knockin mice express functional fluorescent delta opioid receptors (DOR-eGFP) in place of the endogenous receptor, and these receptors are expressed at physiological levels within their native environment. DOR-eGFP mice have proven to be an extraordinary tool in studying receptor neuroanatomy, real-time receptor trafficking in live neurons, and in vivo receptor internalization. We have used this animal model to determine the relationship between receptor trafficking in neurons and receptor function at a behavioral level. Here, we describe in detail the construction and characterization of this knockin mouse. We also outline how to use these mice to examine the behavioral consequences of agonist-specific trafficking at the delta opioid receptor. These techniques are potentially applicable to any GPCR, and highlight the powerful nature of this imaging tool. PMID:25293318

  18. Impact of D2 Receptor Internalization on Binding Affinity of Neuroimaging Radiotracers

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ningning; Guo, Wen; Kralikova, Michaela; Jiang, Man; Schieren, Ira; Narendran, Raj; Slifstein, Mark; Abi-Dargham, Anissa; Laruelle, Marc; Javitch, Jonathan A; Rayport, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Synaptic dopamine (DA) levels seem to affect the in vivo binding of many D2 receptor radioligands. Thus, release of endogenous DA induced by the administration of amphetamine decreases ligand binding, whereas DA depletion increases binding. This is generally thought to be due to competition between endogenous DA and the radioligands for D2 receptors. However, the temporal discrepancy between amphetamine-induced increases in DA as measured by microdialysis, which last on the order of 2 h, and the prolonged decrease in ligand binding, which lasts up to a day, has suggested that agonist-induced D2 receptor internalization may contribute to the sustained decrease in D2 receptor-binding potential seen following a DA surge. To test this hypothesis, we developed an in vitro system showing robust agonist-induced D2 receptor internalization following treatment with the agonist quinpirole. Human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells were stably co-transfected with human D2 receptor, G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 and arrestin 3. Agonist-induced D2 receptor internalization was demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry, and radioligand competition binding. The binding of seven D2 antagonists and four agonists to the surface and internalized receptors was measured in intact cells. All the imaging ligands bound with high affinity to both surface and internalized D2 receptors. Affinity of most of the ligands to internalized receptors was modestly lower, indicating that internalization would reduce the binding potential measured in imaging studies carried out with these ligands. However, between-ligand differences in the magnitude of the internalization-associated affinity shift only partly accounted for the data obtained in neuroimaging experiments, suggesting the involvement of mechanisms beyond competition and internalization. PMID:19956086

  19. Monitoring ligand-mediated internalization of G protein-coupled receptor as a novel pharmacological approach.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, Shin'ichi; Setoguchi, Shingo; Hirasawa, Akira; Tsujimoto, Gozoh

    2006-12-01

    Agonist activation of a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) results in the redistribution of the receptor protein away from the cell surface into internal cellular compartments through a process of endocytosis known as internalization. Visualization of receptor internalization has become experimentally practicable by using fluorescent reagents such as green fluorescent protein (GFP). In this study, we examined whether the ligand-mediated internalization of a GPCR can be exploited for pharmacological evaluations. We acquired fluorescent images of cells expressing GFP-labeled GPCRs and evaluated the ligand-mediated internalization quantitatively by image processing. Using beta2-adrenoceptor and vasopressin V1a receptor as model GPCRs that couple to Gs and Gq, respectively, we first examined whether these GFP-tagged GPCRs exhibited appropriate pharmacology. The rank order of receptor internalization potency for a variety of agonists and antagonists specific to each receptor corresponded well with that previously observed in ligand binding studies. In addition to chemical ligand-induced internalization, this cell-based fluorescence imaging system successfully monitored the internalization of the proton-sensing GPCR TDAG8, and that of the free fatty acid-sensitive GPCR GPR120. The results show that monitoring receptor internalization can be a useful approach for pharmacological characterization of GPCRs and in fishing for ligands of orphan GPCRs. PMID:16978657

  20. Characterization of the single transmembrane domain of human receptor activity-modifying protein 3 in adrenomedullin receptor internalization

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwasako, Kenji; Kitamura, Kazuo; Nagata, Sayaka; Nozaki, Naomi; Kato, Johji

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RAMP3 mediates CLR internalization much less effectively than does RAMP2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The RAMP3 TMD participates in the negative regulation of CLR/RAMP3 internalization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new strategy of promoting internalization and resensitization of the receptor was found. -- Abstract: Two receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMP2 and RAMP3) enable calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) to function as two heterodimeric receptors (CLR/RAMP2 and CLR/RAMP3) for adrenomedullin (AM), a potent cardiovascular protective peptide. Following AM stimulation, both receptors undergo rapid internalization through a clathrin-dependent pathway, after which CLR/RAMP3, but not CLR/RAMP2, can be recycled to the cell surface for resensitization. However, human (h)RAMP3 mediates CLR internalization much less efficiently than does hRAMP2. Therefore, the molecular basis of the single transmembrane domain (TMD) and the intracellular domain of hRAMP3 during AM receptor internalization was investigated by transiently transfecting various RAMP chimeras and mutants into HEK-293 cells stably expressing hCLR. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that substituting the RAMP3 TMD with that of RAMP2 markedly enhanced AM-induced internalization of CLR. However, this replacement did not enhance the cell surface expression of CLR, [{sup 125}I]AM binding affinity or AM-induced cAMP response. More detailed analyses showed that substituting the Thr{sup 130}-Val{sup 131} sequence in the RAMP3 TMD with the corresponding sequence (Ile{sup 157}-Pro{sup 158}) from RAMP2 significantly enhanced AM-mediated CLR internalization. In contrast, substituting the RAMP3 target sequence with Ala{sup 130}-Ala{sup 131} did not significantly affect CLR internalization. Thus, the RAMP3 TMD participates in the negative regulation of CLR/RAMP3 internalization, and the aforementioned introduction of the Ile-Pro sequence into the RAMP3 TMD may be a

  1. The HPV16 E6 Oncoprotein Causes Prolonged Receptor Protein Tyrosine Kinase Signaling and Enhances Internalization of Phosphorylated Receptor Species

    PubMed Central

    Spangle, Jennifer M.; Munger, Karl

    2013-01-01

    The high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 proteins are consistently expressed in HPV-associated lesions and cancers. HPV16 E6 sustains the activity of the mTORC1 and mTORC2 signaling cascades under conditions of growth factor deprivation. Here we report that HPV16 E6 activated mTORC1 by enhanced signaling through receptor protein tyrosine kinases, including epidermal growth factor receptor and insulin receptor and insulin-like growth factor receptors. This is evidenced by sustained signaling through these receptors for several hours after growth factor withdrawal. HPV16 E6 increased the internalization of activated receptor species, and the signaling adaptor protein GRB2 was shown to be critical for HPV16 E6 mediated enhanced EGFR internalization and mTORC1 activation. As a consequence of receptor protein kinase mediated mTORC1 activation, HPV16 E6 expression increased cellular migration of primary human epithelial cells. This study identifies a previously unappreciated mechanism by which HPV E6 proteins perturb host-signaling pathways presumably to sustain protein synthesis during the viral life cycle that may also contribute to cellular transforming activities of high-risk HPV E6 proteins. PMID:23516367

  2. Ubiquitin-dependent trafficking and turnover of ionotropic glutamate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Goo, Marisa S.; Scudder, Samantha L.; Patrick, Gentry N.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in synaptic strength underlie the basis of learning and memory and are controlled, in part, by the insertion or removal of AMPA-type glutamate receptors at the postsynaptic membrane of excitatory synapses. Once internalized, these receptors may be recycled back to the plasma membrane by subunit-specific interactions with other proteins or by post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation. Alternatively, these receptors may be targeted for destruction by multiple degradation pathways in the cell. Ubiquitination, another post-translational modification, has recently emerged as a key signal that regulates the recycling and trafficking of glutamate receptors. In this review, we will discuss recent findings on the role of ubiquitination in the trafficking and turnover of ionotropic glutamate receptors and plasticity of excitatory synapses. PMID:26528125

  3. Developmental Nicotine Exposure Alters AMPA Neurotransmission in the Hypoglossal Motor Nucleus and Pre-Bötzinger Complex of Neonatal Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Stuti J.; Pilarski, Jason Q.; Harrison, Caitlyn M.; Fregosi, Ralph F.

    2014-01-01

    Developmental nicotine exposure (DNE) impacts central respiratory control in neonates born to smoking mothers. We previously showed that DNE enhances the respiratory motor response to bath application of AMPA to the brainstem, although it was unclear which brainstem respiratory neurons mediated these effects (Pilarski and Fregosi, 2009). Here we examine how DNE influences AMPA-type glutamatergic neurotransmission in the pre-Bötzinger complex (pre-BötC) and the hypoglossal motor nucleus (XIIMN), which are neuronal populations located in the medulla that are necessary for normal breathing. Using rhythmic brainstem slices from neonatal rats, we microinjected AMPA into the pre-BötC or the XIIMN while recording from XII nerve rootlets (XIIn) as an index of respiratory motor output. DNE increased the duration of tonic activity and reduced rhythmic burst amplitude after AMPA microinjection into the XIIMN. Also, DNE led to an increase in respiratory burst frequency after AMPA injection into the pre-BötC. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of XII motoneurons showed that DNE increased motoneuron excitability but did not change inward currents. Immunohistochemical studies indicate that DNE reduced the expression of glutamate receptor subunits 2 and 3 (GluR2/3) in the XIIMN and the pre-BötC. Our data show that DNE alters AMPAergic synaptic transmission in both the XIIMN and pre-BötC, although the mechanism by which this occurs is unclear. We suggest that the DNE-induced reduction in GluR2/3 may represent an attempt to compensate for increased cell excitability, consistent with mechanisms underlying homeostatic plasticity. PMID:23392689

  4. Roles of regulated internalization in the polarization of cell surface receptors

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Wei; Cao, Youfang; Ismael, Amber; Stone, David

    2016-01-01

    Cell polarization, the generation of cellular asymmetries, is a fundamental biological process. Polarity of different molecules can arise through several mechanisms. Among these, internalization has been shown to play an important role in the polarization of cell surface receptors. The internalization of cell surface receptors can be upregulated upon ligand binding. Additional regulatory mechanism can downregulate the internalization process. Here we describe a general model, which incorporates these two opposing processes, to study the role of internalization in the establishment of cell polarity. We find that the competition between these two processes is sufficient to induce receptor polarization. Our results show that regulated internalization provides additional regulation on polarization as well. In addition, we discuss applications of our model to the yeast system, which shows the capability and potential of the model. PMID:25570171

  5. Down-regulation of insulin receptors is related to insulin internalization

    SciTech Connect

    Geiger, D.; Carpentier, J.L.; Gorden, P.; Orci, L. )

    1989-11-01

    In the present study, we have tested the influence of inhibition of endocytosis by hypertonic medium on the regulation of cell surface insulin receptors. We show that active internalization of {sup 125}I-insulin is markedly inhibited by hypertonic media and that, in parallel, cell surface invaginations are significantly diminished. These two events are accompanied by a marked inhibition of cell surface insulin receptor down-regulation. These data provide further strong evidence that receptor-mediated endocytosis is the major mechanism by which insulin receptors are regulated at the surface of target cells.

  6. Allosteric modulation of M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor internalization and subcellular trafficking.

    PubMed

    Yeatman, Holly R; Lane, J Robert; Choy, Kwok Ho Christopher; Lambert, Nevin A; Sexton, Patrick M; Christopoulos, Arthur; Canals, Meritxell

    2014-05-30

    Allosteric modulators are an attractive approach to achieve receptor subtype-selective targeting of G protein-coupled receptors. Benzyl quinolone carboxylic acid (BQCA) is an unprecedented example of a highly selective positive allosteric modulator of the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR). However, despite favorable pharmacological characteristics of BQCA in vitro and in vivo, there is limited evidence of the impact of allosteric modulation on receptor regulatory mechanisms such as β-arrestin recruitment or receptor internalization and endocytic trafficking. In the present study we investigated the impact of BQCA on M1 mAChR regulation. We show that BQCA potentiates agonist-induced β-arrestin recruitment to M1 mAChRs. Using a bioluminescence resonance energy transfer approach to monitor intracellular trafficking of M1 mAChRs, we show that once internalized, M1 mAChRs traffic to early endosomes, recycling endosomes and late endosomes. We also show that BQCA potentiates agonist-induced subcellular trafficking. M1 mAChR internalization is both β-arrestin and G protein-dependent, with the third intracellular loop playing an important role in the dynamics of β-arrestin recruitment. As the global effect of receptor activation ultimately depends on the levels of receptor expression at the cell surface, these results illustrate the need to extend the characterization of novel allosteric modulators of G protein-coupled receptors to encapsulate the consequences of chronic exposure to this family of ligands. PMID:24753247

  7. Propranolol Restricts the Mobility of Single EGF-Receptors on the Cell Surface before Their Internalization

    PubMed Central

    Otero, Carolina; Linke, Max; Sanchez, Paula; González, Alfonso; Schaap, Iwan A. T.

    2013-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor is involved in morphogenesis, proliferation and cell migration. Its up-regulation during tumorigenesis makes this receptor an interesting therapeutic target. In the absence of the ligand, the inhibition of phosphatidic acid phosphohydrolase activity by propranolol treatment leads to internalization of empty/inactive receptors. The molecular events involved in this endocytosis remain unknown. Here, we quantified the effects of propranolol on the mobility of single quantum-dot labelled receptors before the actual internalization took place. The single receptors showed a clear stop-and-go motion; their diffusive tracks were continuously interrupted by sub-second stalling events, presumably caused by transient clustering. In the presence of propranolol we found that: i) the diffusion rate reduced by 22 %, which indicates an increase in drag of the receptor. Atomic force microscopy measurements did not show an increase of the effective membrane tension, such that clustering of the receptor remains the likely mechanism for its reduced mobility. ii) The receptor got frequently stalled for longer periods of multiple seconds, which may signal the first step of the internalization process. PMID:24349439

  8. Only high-affinity receptors for interleukin 2 mediate internalization of ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Weissman, A.M.; Harford, J.B.; Svetlik, P.B.; Leonard, W.L.; Depper, J.M.; Waldmann, T.A.; Greene, W.C.; Klausner, R.D.

    1986-03-01

    Interleukin 2 (IL-2) receptors are expressed on activated T cells and in select T-cell leukemias. Recently, it has been demonstrated that at least two classes of receptor for IL-2 exist with markedly different affinities for ligand. All known biological actions of IL-2 have been correlated with occupancy of high-affinity sites; the function of the low-affinity sites remains unknown. Receptor-mediated endocytosis is the primary means of internalization of cell-surface receptors and their ligands. The internalization of IL-2 bound to high- and low-affinity receptor sites was studied in a human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-infected human T-cell leukemia cell line and in a cloned murine cytotoxic T-cell line (CTLL). Internalization of IL-2 occurred only when bound to high-affinity sites. In addition, an anti-receptor antibody (anti-Tac), which binds equally well to high- and low-affinity sites, demonstrated no detectable internalization. The implications of these findings as they relate to IL-2 receptor structure and function are discussed.

  9. Variant ionotropic glutamate receptors as chemosensory receptors in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Benton, Richard; Vannice, Kirsten S.; Gomez-Diaz, Carolina; Vosshall, Leslie B.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) mediate neuronal communication at synapses throughout vertebrate and invertebrate nervous systems. We have characterized a novel family of iGluR-related genes in Drosophila, which we name Ionotropic Receptors (IRs). These receptors do not belong to the well-described Kainate, AMPA, or NMDA classes of iGluRs, and have divergent ligand-binding domains that lack their characteristic glutamate-interacting residues. IRs are expressed in a combinatorial fashion in sensory neurons that respond to many distinct odors but do not express either insect odorant receptors (ORs) or gustatory receptors (GRs). IR proteins accumulate in sensory dendrites and not at synapses. Mis-expression of IRs induces novel odor responses in ectopic neurons. Together, these results lead us to propose that the IRs comprise a novel family of chemosensory receptors. Conservation of IR/iGluR-related proteins in bacteria, plants, and animals suggests that this receptor family represents an evolutionarily ancient mechanism for sensing both internal and external chemical cues. PMID:19135896

  10. Tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor is not required for receptor internalization: studies in 2,4-dinitrophenol-treated cells

    SciTech Connect

    Backer, J.M.; Kahn, C.R.; White, M.F.

    1989-05-01

    The relation between insulin-stimulated autophosphorylation of the insulin receptor and internalization of the receptor was studied in Fao rat hepatoma cells. Treatment of Fao cells with 2,4-dinitrophenol for 45 min depleted cellular ATP by 80% and equally inhibited insulin-stimulated receptor autophosphorylation, as determined by immunoprecipitation of surface-iodinated or (/sup 32/P)phosphate-labeled cells with anti-phosphotyrosine antibody. In contrast, internalization of the insulin receptor and internalization and degradation of /sup 125/I-labeled insulin by 2,4-dinitrophenol-treated cells were normal. These data show that autophosphorylation of the insulin receptor is not required for the receptor-mediated internalization of insulin in Fao cells and suggest that insulin receptor recycling is independent of autophosphorylation.

  11. NMDA receptor contributions to visual contrast coding

    PubMed Central

    Manookin, Michael B.; Weick, Michael; Stafford, Benjamin K.; Demb, Jonathan B.

    2010-01-01

    Summary In the retina, it is not well understood how visual processing depends on AMPA- and NMDA-type glutamate receptors. Here, we investigated how these receptors contribute to contrast coding in identified guinea pig ganglion cell types, in vitro. NMDA-mediated responses were negligible in ON α cells but substantial in OFF α and δ cells. OFF δ cell NMDA receptors were composed of GluN2B subunits. Using a novel deconvolution method, we determined the individual contributions of AMPA, NMDA and inhibitory currents to light responses of each cell type. OFF α and δ cells used NMDA receptors for encoding either the full contrast range (α), including near-threshold responses, or only a high range (δ). However, contrast sensitivity depended substantially on NMDA receptors only in OFF α cells. NMDA receptors contribute to visual contrast coding in a cell-type specific manner. Certain cell types generate excitatory responses using primarily AMPA receptors or disinhibition. PMID:20670835

  12. The F-BAR Protein PACSIN2 Regulates Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Internalization

    PubMed Central

    de Kreuk, Bart-Jan; Anthony, Eloise C.; Geerts, Dirk; Hordijk, Peter L.

    2012-01-01

    Signaling via growth factor receptors, including the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor, is key to various cellular processes, such as proliferation, cell survival, and cell migration. In a variety of human diseases such as cancer, aberrant expression and activation of growth factor receptors can lead to disturbed signaling. Intracellular trafficking is crucial for proper signaling of growth factor receptors. As a result, the level of cell surface expression of growth factor receptors is an important determinant for the outcome of downstream signaling. BAR domain-containing proteins represent an important family of proteins that regulate membrane dynamics. In this study, we identify a novel role for the F-BAR protein PACSIN2 in the regulation of EGF receptor signaling. We show that internalized EGF as well as the (activated) EGF receptor translocated to PACSIN2-positive endosomes. Furthermore, loss of PACSIN2 increased plasma membrane expression of the EGF receptor in resting cells and increased EGF-induced phosphorylation of the EGF receptor. As a consequence, EGF-induced activation of Erk and Akt as well as cell proliferation were enhanced in PACSIN2-depleted cells. In conclusion, this study identifies a novel role for the F-BAR-domain protein PACSIN2 in regulating EGF receptor surface levels and EGF-induced downstream signaling. PMID:23129763

  13. Discovery of Regulators of Receptor Internalization with High-Throughput Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Tapia, Phillip H.; Fisher, Gregory W.; Simons, Peter C.; Strouse, J. Jacob; Foutz, Terry; Waggoner, Alan S.; Jarvik, Jonathan; Sklar, Larry A.

    2012-01-01

    We developed a platform combining fluorogen-activating protein (FAP) technology with high-throughput flow cytometry to detect real-time protein trafficking to and from the plasma membrane in living cells. The hybrid platform facilitates drug discovery for trafficking receptors such as G protein-coupled receptors and was validated with the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) system. When a chemical library containing ∼1200 off-patent drugs was screened against cells expressing FAP-tagged β2ARs, all 33 known β2AR-active ligands in the library were successfully identified, together with a number of compounds that might regulate receptor internalization in a nontraditional manner. Results indicated that the platform identified ligands of target proteins regardless of the associated signaling pathway; therefore, this approach presents opportunities to search for biased receptor modulators and is suitable for screening of multiplexed targets for improved efficiency. The results revealed that ligands may be biased with respect to the rate or duration of receptor internalization and that receptor internalization may be independent of activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. PMID:22767611

  14. Cardiac β2-Adrenergic Receptor Phosphorylation at Ser355/356 Regulates Receptor Internalization and Functional Resensitization.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaofang; Gu, Xuejiang; Zhao, Ru; Zheng, Qingqing; Li, Lan; Yang, Wenbing; Ding, Lu; Xue, Feng; Fan, Junming; Gong, Yongsheng; Wang, Yongyu

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that β2-adrenergic receptors (β2ARs) can be phosphorylated by G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) and protein kinase A (PKA), affecting β2AR internalization and desensitization. However, the exact physiological function of β2ARs in cardiomyocytes is unknown. In this study, we showed that neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes had different contraction and internalization responses to sustained or repeated, transient agonist stimulation. Specifically, short-time stimulation (10 min) with epinephrine or norepinephrine increased the cardiomyocyte contraction rate, reaching a maximum at 5 min, followed by a slow decline. When the agonist was re-added after a 60-min wash-out period, the increase in the cardiomyocyte contraction rate was similar to the initial response. In contrast, when cardiomyocytes were exposed continuously to epinephrine or norepinephrine for 60 min, the second agonist stimulation did not increase the contraction response. These results indicated that continuous β2AR stimulation caused functional desensitization. Phosphorylation of β2ARs at serine (Ser)355/356 GRK phosphorylation sites, but not at Ser345/346 PKA phosphorylation sites increased with continuous epinephrine stimulation for 60 min. Accordingly, β2AR internalization increased. Interestingly, β2AR internalization was blocked by mutations at the GRK phosphorylation sites, but not by mutations at the PKA phosphorylation sites. Furthermore, inhibition of β2AR dephosphorylation by okadaic acid, a phosphatase 2A inhibitor, impaired the recovery of internalized β2ARs and reduced the cardiomyocyte contraction rate in response to epinephrine. Finally, epinephrine treatment induced the physical interaction of β-arrestin with internalized β2ARs in cardiomyocytes. Together, these data revealed the essential role of the Ser355/356 phosphorylation status of β2ARs in regulating receptor internalization and physiological resensitization in neonatal

  15. Cardiac β2-Adrenergic Receptor Phosphorylation at Ser355/356 Regulates Receptor Internalization and Functional Resensitization

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ru; Zheng, Qingqing; Li, Lan; Yang, Wenbing; Ding, Lu; Xue, Feng; Fan, Junming; Gong, Yongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that β2-adrenergic receptors (β2ARs) can be phosphorylated by G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) and protein kinase A (PKA), affecting β2AR internalization and desensitization. However, the exact physiological function of β2ARs in cardiomyocytes is unknown. In this study, we showed that neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes had different contraction and internalization responses to sustained or repeated, transient agonist stimulation. Specifically, short-time stimulation (10 min) with epinephrine or norepinephrine increased the cardiomyocyte contraction rate, reaching a maximum at 5 min, followed by a slow decline. When the agonist was re-added after a 60-min wash-out period, the increase in the cardiomyocyte contraction rate was similar to the initial response. In contrast, when cardiomyocytes were exposed continuously to epinephrine or norepinephrine for 60 min, the second agonist stimulation did not increase the contraction response. These results indicated that continuous β2AR stimulation caused functional desensitization. Phosphorylation of β2ARs at serine (Ser)355/356 GRK phosphorylation sites, but not at Ser345/346 PKA phosphorylation sites increased with continuous epinephrine stimulation for 60 min. Accordingly, β2AR internalization increased. Interestingly, β2AR internalization was blocked by mutations at the GRK phosphorylation sites, but not by mutations at the PKA phosphorylation sites. Furthermore, inhibition of β2AR dephosphorylation by okadaic acid, a phosphatase 2A inhibitor, impaired the recovery of internalized β2ARs and reduced the cardiomyocyte contraction rate in response to epinephrine. Finally, epinephrine treatment induced the physical interaction of β-arrestin with internalized β2ARs in cardiomyocytes. Together, these data revealed the essential role of the Ser355/356 phosphorylation status of β2ARs in regulating receptor internalization and physiological resensitization in neonatal

  16. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCVIII. Histamine Receptors.

    PubMed

    Panula, Pertti; Chazot, Paul L; Cowart, Marlon; Gutzmer, Ralf; Leurs, Rob; Liu, Wai L S; Stark, Holger; Thurmond, Robin L; Haas, Helmut L

    2015-07-01

    Histamine is a developmentally highly conserved autacoid found in most vertebrate tissues. Its physiological functions are mediated by four 7-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors (H1R, H2R, H3R, H4R) that are all targets of pharmacological intervention. The receptors display molecular heterogeneity and constitutive activity. H1R antagonists are long known antiallergic and sedating drugs, whereas the H2R was identified in the 1970s and led to the development of H2R-antagonists that revolutionized stomach ulcer treatment. The crystal structure of ligand-bound H1R has rendered it possible to design new ligands with novel properties. The H3R is an autoreceptor and heteroreceptor providing negative feedback on histaminergic and inhibition on other neurons. A block of these actions promotes waking. The H4R occurs on immuncompetent cells and the development of anti-inflammatory drugs is anticipated. PMID:26084539

  17. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCVIII. Histamine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Chazot, Paul L.; Cowart, Marlon; Gutzmer, Ralf; Leurs, Rob; Liu, Wai L. S.; Stark, Holger; Thurmond, Robin L.; Haas, Helmut L.

    2015-01-01

    Histamine is a developmentally highly conserved autacoid found in most vertebrate tissues. Its physiological functions are mediated by four 7-transmembrane G protein–coupled receptors (H1R, H2R, H3R, H4R) that are all targets of pharmacological intervention. The receptors display molecular heterogeneity and constitutive activity. H1R antagonists are long known antiallergic and sedating drugs, whereas the H2R was identified in the 1970s and led to the development of H2R-antagonists that revolutionized stomach ulcer treatment. The crystal structure of ligand-bound H1R has rendered it possible to design new ligands with novel properties. The H3R is an autoreceptor and heteroreceptor providing negative feedback on histaminergic and inhibition on other neurons. A block of these actions promotes waking. The H4R occurs on immuncompetent cells and the development of anti-inflammatory drugs is anticipated. PMID:26084539

  18. Internalization mechanism of neuropeptide Y bound to its Y1 receptor investigated by high resolution microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempf, Noémie; Didier, Pascal; Postupalenko, Viktoriia; Bucher, Bernard; Mély, Yves

    2015-06-01

    The neuropeptide Y (NPY) plays numerous biological roles that are mediated by a family of G-protein-coupled receptors. Among the latter, the NPY Y1 subtype receptor undergoes a rapid desensitization following agonist exposure. This desensitization was suggested to result from a rapid clathrin-dependent internalization of Y1 and its recycling at the plasma membrane via sorting/early endosomes (SE/EE) and recycling endosomes (RE). Herein, to validate and quantitatively consolidate the mechanism of NPY internalization, we quantitatively investigated the NPY-induced internalization of the Y1 receptor by direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM), a super-resolution imaging technique that can resolve EE and SE, which are below the resolution limit of conventional optical microscopes. Using Cy5-labeled NPY, we could monitor with time the internalization and recycling of NPY on HEK293 cells stably expressing eGFP-labeled Y1 receptors. Furthermore, by discriminating the SE/EE from the larger RE by their sizes and monitoring these two populations as a function of time, we could firmly consolidate the kinetic model describing the internalization mechanism of the Y1 receptors as the basis for their rapid desensitization following agonist exposure.

  19. Sources and Input Pathways of Glyphosate and its Degradation Product AMPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischofberger, S.; Hanke, I.; Wittmer, I.; Singer, H.; Stamm, C.

    2009-04-01

    Despite being the pesticide used in the largest quantities worldwide, the environmental relevance of glyphosate has been considered low for many years. Reasons for this assessment were the observations that glyphosate degrades quickly into its degradation product AMPA and that it sorbs strongly to soil particles. Hence, little losses to water bodies had been expected. Research during the last few years however contradicts this expectation. Although glyphosate is a dominant pesticide used in agriculture, recent studies on other pesticides revealed that urban sources may play a significant role for water quality. Therefore this study compares glyphosate input into streams from agricultural and urban sources. For that purpose, a catchment of an area of 25 km2 was selected. It has by about 12'000 inhabitants and about 15 % of the area is used as arable land. Four sampling sites were selected in the river system in order to reflect different urban and agricultural sources. Additionally, we sampled a combined sewer overflow, a rain sewer and the outflow of a waste water treatment plant. At each site discharge was measured continuously from March to November 2007. During 16 rain events samples were taken by automatic devices at a high temporal resolution. To analyze the concentration of glyphosate and its degradation product AMPA, the samples were derivatized with FMOC-Cl at low pH conditions and then filtrated. The solid phase extraction was conducted with Strata-X sorbent cartridge. Glyphosate and AMPA were detected with API 4000 after the chromatography with X bridge column C18. To assure the data quality, interne standards of Glyphosate and AMPA were added to every sample. The limit of detection and quantification for glyphosate and AMPA are bellow 1ng/l. We analyzed two rain events at a high resolution for all stations and several events at the outlet of the catchment. We measured high glyphosate concentration in urban and agriculture dominated catchments with up to

  20. Microplate-compatible total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy for receptor pharmacology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Minghan; Zaytseva, Natalya V.; Wu, Qi; Li, Min; Fang, Ye

    2013-05-01

    We report the use of total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy for analyzing receptor pharmacology and the development of a microplate-compatible TIRF imaging system. Using stably expressed green fluorescence protein tagged β2-adrenergic receptor as the reporter, we found that the activation of different receptors results in distinct kinetic signatures of the TIRF intensity of cells. These TIRF signatures closely resemble the characteristics of their respective label-free dynamic mass redistribution signals in the same cells. This suggests that TIRF in microplate can be used for profiling and screening drugs.

  1. Comparing analgesia and μ-opioid receptor internalization produced by intrathecal enkephalin

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenling; Song, Bingbing; Lao, Lijun; Pérez, Orlando A.; Kim, Woojae; Marvizón, Juan Carlos G.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Opioid receptors in the spinal cord produce strong analgesia, but the mechanisms controlling their activation by endogenous opioids remain unclear. We have previously shown in spinal cord slices that peptidases preclude μ-opioid receptor (MOR) internalization by opioids. Our present goals were to investigate whether enkephalin-induced analgesia is also precluded by peptidases, and whether it is mediated by MORs or δ-opioid receptors (DORs). Tail-flick analgesia and MOR internalization were measured in rats injected intrathecally with Leu-enkephalin and peptidase inhibitors. Without peptidase inhibitors, Leu-enkephalin produced neither analgesia nor MOR internalization at doses up to 100 nmol, whereas with peptidase inhibitors it produced analgesia at 0.3 nmol and MOR internalization at 1 nmol. Leu-enkephalin was ten times more potent to produce analgesia than to produce MOR internalization, suggesting that DORs were involved. Selective MOR or DOR antagonists completely blocked the analgesia elicited by 0.3 nmol Leu-enkephalin (a dose that produced little MOR internalization), indicating that it involved these two receptors, possibly by an additive or synergistic interaction. The selective MOR agonist endomorphin-2 produced analgesia even in the presence of a DOR antagonist, but at doses substantially higher than Leu-enkephalin. Unlike Leu-enkephalin, endomorphin-2 had the same potencies to induce analgesia and MOR internalization. We concluded that low doses of enkephalins produce analgesia by activating both MORs and DORs. Analgesia can also be produced exclusively by MORs at higher agonist doses. Since peptidases prevent the activation of spinal opioid receptors by enkephalins, the coincident release of opioids and endogenous peptidase inhibitors may be required for analgesia. PMID:17845806

  2. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCIII. The parathyroid hormone receptors--family B G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Gardella, Thomas J; Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The type-1 parathyroid hormone receptor (PTHR1) is a family B G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that mediates the actions of two polypeptide ligands; parathyroid hormone (PTH), an endocrine hormone that regulates the levels of calcium and inorganic phosphate in the blood by acting on bone and kidney, and PTH-related protein (PTHrP), a paracrine-factor that regulates cell differentiation and proliferation programs in developing bone and other tissues. The type-2 parathyroid hormone receptor (PTHR2) binds a peptide ligand, called tuberoinfundibular peptide-39 (TIP39), and while the biologic role of the PTHR2/TIP39 system is not as defined as that of the PTHR1, it likely plays a role in the central nervous system as well as in spermatogenesis. Mechanisms of action at these receptors have been explored through a variety of pharmacological and biochemical approaches, and the data obtained support a basic "two-site" mode of ligand binding now thought to be used by each of the family B peptide hormone GPCRs. Recent crystallographic studies on the family B GPCRs are providing new insights that help to further refine the specifics of the overall receptor architecture and modes of ligand docking. One intriguing pharmacological finding for the PTHR1 is that it can form surprisingly stable complexes with certain PTH/PTHrP ligand analogs and thereby mediate markedly prolonged cell signaling responses that persist even when the bulk of the complexes are found in internalized vesicles. The PTHR1 thus appears to be able to activate the Gα(s)/cAMP pathway not only from the plasma membrane but also from the endosomal domain. The cumulative findings could have an impact on efforts to develop new drug therapies for the PTH receptors. PMID:25713287

  3. Persistent cAMP Signaling by Internalized LH Receptors in Ovarian Follicles.

    PubMed

    Lyga, Sandra; Volpe, Silvia; Werthmann, Ruth C; Götz, Konrad; Sungkaworn, Titiwat; Lohse, Martin J; Calebiro, Davide

    2016-04-01

    A crucial event in female reproduction occurs at midcycle, when a LH peak induces the final maturation of ovarian follicles. LH signals via a G protein-coupled receptor selectively expressed in the outermost follicular cell layers. However, how LH signals are relayed inside these cells and finally to the oocyte is incompletely understood. Here, we monitored LH signaling in intact ovarian follicles of transgenic mice expressing a fluorescent cAMP sensor. We found that LH stimulation induces 2 phases of cAMP signaling in all cell layers surrounding the oocyte. Interfering with LH receptor internalization abolished the second, persistent cAMP phase and partially inhibited oocyte meiosis resumption. These data suggest that persistent cAMP signals from internalized LH receptors contribute to transmitting LH effects inside follicle cells and ultimately to the oocyte. Thus, this study indicates that the recently proposed paradigm of cAMP signaling by internalized G protein-coupled receptors is implicated in receptor function and is physiologically relevant. PMID:26828746

  4. Stoichiometry and phosphoisotypes of hippocampal AMPA type glutamate receptor phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Hosokawa, Tomohisa; Mitsushima, Dai; Kaneko, Rina; Hayashi, Yasunori

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY It has been proposed that the AMPAR phosphorylation regulates trafficking and channel activity, thereby playing an important role in synaptic plasticity. However, the actual stoichiometry of phosphorylation, information critical to understand the role of phosphorylation, is not known because of the lack of appropriate techniques for measurement. Here, using Phos-tag SDS-PAGE, we estimated the proportion of phosphorylated AMPAR subunit GluA1. The level of phosphorylated GluA1 at S831 and S845, two major sites implicated in AMPAR regulation, is almost negligible. Less than 1% of GluA1 is phosphorylated at S831 and less than 0.1% at S845. Considering the number of AMPAR at each synapse, the majority of synapses do not contain any phosphorylated AMPAR. Also, we did not see evidence of GluA1 dually phosphorylated at S831 and S845. Neuronal stimulation and learning increased phosphorylation but the proportion was still low. Our results impel us to reconsider the mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity. PMID:25533481

  5. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. LXXVII. Kisspeptin Receptor Nomenclature, Distribution, and Function

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Helen R.; Maguire, Janet J.; Colledge, William H.

    2010-01-01

    Kisspeptins are members of the Arg-Phe amide family of peptides, which have been identified as endogenous ligands for a G-protein-coupled receptor encoded by a gene originally called GPR54 (also known as AXOR12 or hOT7T175). After this pairing, the gene has been renamed KISS1R. The International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology Committee on Receptor Nomenclature and Drug Classification recommends that the official name for the receptor is the kisspeptin receptor to follow the convention of naming the receptor protein after the endogenous ligand. The endogenous ligand was initially called metastin, after its role as a metastasis suppressor, and is now referred to as kisspeptin-54 (KP-54), a C-terminally amidated 54-amino acid peptide cleaved from the 145-amino acid gene product. Shorter C-terminal cleavage fragments [KP-14, KP-13 and KP-10 (the smallest active fragment)] are also biologically active. Both receptor and peptide are widely expressed in human, rat, and mouse; the receptor sequence shares more than 80% homology in these species. Activation of the kisspeptin receptor by kisspeptin is via coupling to Gq/11 and the phospholipase C pathway, causing Ca2+ mobilization. Mutations in the KISS1R gene result in hypogonadotropic hypogonadotropism, and targeted disruption of Kiss1r in mice reproduces this phenotype, which led to the discovery of the remarkable ability of the kisspeptin receptor to act as a molecular switch for puberty. In addition to regulating the reproductive axis, the kisspeptin receptor is also implicated in cancer, placentation, diabetes, and the cardiovascular system. PMID:21079036

  6. Phosphorylation and Internalization of Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptors LPA1, LPA2, and LPA3

    PubMed Central

    Alcántara-Hernández, Rocío; Hernández-Méndez, Aurelio; Campos-Martínez, Gisselle A.; Meizoso-Huesca, Aldo; García-Sáinz, J. Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    Results The lysophosphatidic acid receptors LPA1, LPA2, and LPA3 were individually expressed in C9 cells and their signaling and regulation were studied. Agonist-activation increases intracellular calcium concentration in a concentration-dependent fashion. Phorbol myristate acetate markedly inhibited LPA1- and LPA3-mediated effect, whereas that mediated by LPA2 was only partially diminished; the actions of the phorbol ester were inhibited by bisindolylmaleimide I and by overnight incubation with the protein kinase C activator, which leads to down regulation of this protein kinase. Homologous desensitization was also observed for the three LPA receptors studied, with that of LPA2 receptors being consistently of lesser magnitude; neither inhibition nor down-regulation of protein kinase C exerted any effect on homologous desensitization. Activation of LPA1–3 receptors induced ERK 1/2 phosphorylation; this effect was markedly attenuated by inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase activity, suggesting growth factor receptor transactivation in this effect. Lysophosphatidic acid and phorbol myristate acetate were able to induce LPA1–3 phosphorylation, in time- and concentration-dependent fashions. It was also clearly observed that agonists and protein kinase C activation induced internalization of these receptors. Phosphorylation of the LPA2 subtype required larger concentrations of these agents and its internalization was less intense than that of the other subtypes. Conclusion Our data show that these three LPA receptors are phosphoproteins whose phosphorylation state is modulated by agonist-stimulation and protein kinase C-activation and that differences in regulation and cellular localization exist, among the subtypes. PMID:26473723

  7. Desensitization and internalization of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1a following activation of heterologous Gq/11-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Mundell, Stuart J; Pula, Giordano; McIlhinney, R A Jeffrey; Roberts, Peter J; Kelly, Eamonn

    2004-06-15

    In this study we characterized the heterologous desensitization and internalization of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1) splice variants mGluR1a and mGluR1b following activation of endogenous G(q/11)-coupled receptors in HEK293 cells. Agonist activation of M1 muscarinic acetylcholine or P2Y1 purinergic receptors triggered the PKC- and CaMKII-dependent internalization of mGluR1a. In co-immunoprecipitation studies, both glutamate and carbachol increased the association of GRK2 with mGluR1a. Co-addition of the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor GF109203X and the Ca(2+) calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) inhibitor KN-93 blocked the ability of glutamate and carbachol to increase the association of GRK2 with mGluR1a. Glutamate also increased the association of GRK2 with mGluR1b, whereas carbachol did not. However, unlike mGluR1a, glutamate-stimulated association of GRK2 with mGluR1b was not reduced by PKC/CaMKII inhibition. Pretreatment of cells expressing mGluR1a or mGluR1b with carbachol rapidly desensitized subsequent glutamate-stimulated inositol phosphate accumulation. The carbachol-induced heterologous desensitization and internalization of mGluR1a was blocked by LY367385, an mGluR1a antagonist with inverse agonist activity. Furthermore, LY367385 blocked the ability of carbachol to increase the association of GRK2 with mGluR1a. On the other hand, LY367385 had no effect on the carbachol-induced desensitization and internalization of the nonconstitutively active mGluR1b splice variant. These results demonstrate that the internalization of mGluR1a, triggered homologously by glutamate or heterologously by carbachol, is PKC/CaMKII-, GRK2-, arrestin-, and clathrin-dependent and that PKC/CaMKII activation appears to be necessary for GRK2 to associate with mGluR1a. Furthermore, the heterologous desensitization of mGluR1a is dependent upon the splice variant being in an active conformation. PMID:15182196

  8. Real-time imaging of Mu opioid receptors by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Roman-Vendrell, Cristina; Yudowski, Guillermo Ariel

    2016-01-01

    Receptor trafficking and signaling are intimately linked, especially in the Mu opioid receptor (MOR) where ligand dependent endocytosis and recycling have been associated to opioid tolerance and dependence. Ligands of the Mu opioid receptor (MOR) can induce receptor endocytosis and recycling within minutes of exposure in heterologous systems and cultured neurons. Endocytosis removes desensitized receptors after their activation from the plasma membrane, while recycling promotes resensitization by delivering functional receptors to the cell surface. These rapid mechanisms can escape traditional analytical methods where only snapshots are obtained from highly dynamic events. Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy is a powerful tool that can be used to investigate, in real-time, surface trafficking events at the single molecule level. The restricted excitation of fluorophores located at or near the plasma membrane in combination with high sensitivity quantitative cameras, makes it possible to record and analyze individual endocytic and recycling event in real time. In this chapter, we describe a TIRF microscopy protocol to investigate in real time, the ligand dependent MOR trafficking in Human Embryonic Kidney 293 cells and dissociated striatal neuronal cultures. This approach can provide unique spatio-temporal resolution to understand the fundamental events controlling MOR trafficking at the plasma membrane. PMID:25293317

  9. The 37kDa/67kDa Laminin Receptor acts as a receptor for Aβ42 internalization

    PubMed Central

    Da Costa Dias, Bianca; Jovanovic, Katarina; Gonsalves, Danielle; Moodley, Kiashanee; Reusch, Uwe; Knackmuss, Stefan; Weinberg, Marc S.; Little, Melvyn; Weiss, Stefan F. T.

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal loss is a major neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The associations between soluble Aβ oligomers and cellular components cause this neurotoxicity. The 37 kDa/67 kDa laminin receptor (LRP/LR) has recently been implicated in Aβ pathogenesis. In this study the mechanism underlying the pathological role of LRP/LR was elucidated. Försters Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) revealed that LRP/LR and Aβ form a biologically relevant interaction. The ability of LRP/LR to form stable associations with endogenously shed Aβ was confirmed by pull down assays and Aβ-ELISAs. Antibody blockade of this association significantly lowered Aβ42 induced apoptosis. Furthermore, antibody blockade and shRNA mediated downregulation of LRP/LR significantly hampered Aβ42 internalization. These results suggest that LRP/LR is a receptor for Aβ42 internalization, mediating its endocytosis and contributing to the cytotoxicity of the neuropeptide by facilitating intra-cellular Aβ42 accumulation. These findings recommend anti-LRP/LR specific antibodies and shRNAs as potential therapeutic tools for AD treatment. PMID:24990253

  10. Fluorophore assisted light inactivation (FALI) of recombinant 5-HT3A receptor constitutive internalization and function

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Russell A.; Luo, Guoxiang; Davis, Margaret I.; Hales, Tim G.; Lovinger, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins and molecules are now widely used to tag and visualize proteins resulting in an improved understanding of protein trafficking, localization, and function. In addition, fluorescent tags have also been used to inactivate protein function in a spatially and temporally-defined manner, using a technique known as fluorophore-assisted light inactivation (FALI) or chromophore-assisted light inactivation (CALI). In this study we tagged the serotonin3 A subunit with the α-bungarotoxin binding sequence (BBS) and subsequently labeled 5-HT3A/BBS receptors with fluorescently conjugated α-bungarotoxin in live cells. We show that 5-HT3A/BBS receptors are constitutively internalized in the absence of an agonist and internalization as well as receptor function are inhibited by fluorescence. The fluorescence-induced disruption of function and internalization was reduced with oxygen radical scavengers suggesting the involvement of reactive oxygen species, implicating the FALI process. Furthermore, these data suggest that intense illumination during live-cell microscopy may result in inadvertent FALI and inhibition of protein trafficking. PMID:21338684

  11. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. LXXIII. Nomenclature for the Formyl Peptide Receptor (FPR) Family

    PubMed Central

    YE, RICHARD D.; BOULAY, FRANÇOIS; WANG, JI MING; DAHLGREN, CLAES; GERARD, CRAIG; PARMENTIER, MARC; SERHAN, CHARLES N.; MURPHY, PHILIP M.

    2009-01-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are a small group of seven-transmembrane domain, G protein-coupled receptors that are expressed mainly by mammalian phagocytic leukocytes and are known to be important in host defense and inflammation. The three human FPRs (FPR1, FPR2/ALX, and FPR3) share significant sequence homology and are encoded by clustered genes. Collectively, these receptors bind an extraordinarily numerous and structurally diverse group of agonistic ligands, including N-formyl and nonformyl peptides of different composition, that chemoattract and activate phagocytes. N-formyl peptides, which are encoded in nature only by bacterial and mitochondrial genes and result from obligatory initiation of bacterial and mitochondrial protein synthesis with N-formylmethionine, is the only ligand class common to all three human receptors. Surprisingly, the endogenous anti-inflammatory peptide annexin 1 and its N-terminal fragments also bind human FPR1 and FPR2/ALX, and the anti-inflammatory eicosanoid lipoxin A4 is an agonist at FPR2/ALX. In comparison, fewer agonists have been identified for FPR3, the third member in this receptor family. Structural and functional studies of the FPRs have produced important information for understanding the general pharmacological principles governing all leukocyte chemoattractant receptors. This article aims to provide an overview of the discovery and pharmacological characterization of FPRs, to introduce an International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology (IUPHAR)-recommended nomenclature, and to discuss unmet challenges, including the mechanisms used by these receptors to bind diverse ligands and mediate different biological functions. PMID:19498085

  12. Quantitative measurement of cell membrane receptor internalization by the nanoluciferase reporter: Using the G protein-coupled receptor RXFP3 as a model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Song, Ge; Shao, Xiao-Xia; Liu, Ya-Li; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2015-02-01

    Nanoluciferase (NanoLuc) is a newly developed small luciferase reporter with the brightest bioluminescence to date. In the present work, we developed NanoLuc as a sensitive bioluminescent reporter to measure quantitatively the internalization of cell membrane receptors, based on the pH dependence of the reporter activity. The G protein-coupled receptor RXFP3, the cognate receptor of relaxin-3/INSL7, was used as a model receptor. We first generated stable HEK293T cells that inducibly coexpressed a C-terminally NanoLuc-tagged human RXFP3 and a C-terminally enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-tagged human RXFP3. The C-terminal EGFP-tag and NanoLuc-tag had no detrimental effects on the ligand-binding potency and intracellular trafficking of RXFP3. Based on the fluorescence of the tagged EGFP reporter, the ligand-induced RXFP3 internalization was visualized directly under a fluorescence microscope. Based on the bioluminescence of the tagged NanoLuc reporter, the ligand-induced RXFP3 internalization was measured quantitatively by a convenient bioluminescent assay. Coexpression of an EGFP-tagged inactive [E141R]RXFP3 had no detrimental effect on the ligand-binding potency and ligand-induced internalization of the NanoLuc-tagged wild-type RXFP3, suggesting that the mutant RXFP3 and wild-type RXFP3 worked independently. The present bioluminescent internalization assay could be extended to other G protein-coupled receptors and other cell membrane receptors to study ligand-receptor and receptor-receptor interactions. PMID:25434927

  13. Modulation of ionotropic glutamate receptor function by vertebrate galectins

    PubMed Central

    Copits, Bryan A; Vernon, Claire G; Sakai, Ryuichi; Swanson, Geoffrey T

    2014-01-01

    AMPA and kainate receptors are glutamate-gated ion channels whose function is known to be altered by a variety of plant oligosaccharide-binding proteins, or lectins, but the physiological relevance of this activity has been uncertain because no lectins with analogous allosteric modulatory effects have been identified in animals. We report here that members of the prototype galectin family, which are β-galactoside-binding lectins, exhibit subunit-specific allosteric modulation of desensitization of recombinant homomeric and heteromeric AMPA and kainate receptors. Galectin modulation of GluK2 kainate receptors was dependent upon complex oligosaccharide processing of N-glycosylation sites in the amino-terminal domain and downstream linker region. The sensitivity of GluA4 AMPA receptors to human galectin-1 could be enhanced by supplementation of culture media with uridine and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), precursors for the hexosamine pathway that supplies UDP-GlcNAc for synthesis of complex oligosaccharides. Neuronal kainate receptors in dorsal root ganglia were sensitive to galectin modulation, whereas AMPA receptors in cultured hippocampal neurons were insensitive, which could be a reflection of differential N-glycan processing or receptor subunit selectivity. Because glycan content of integral proteins can be modified dynamically, we postulate that physiological or pathological conditions in the CNS could arise in which galectins alter excitatory neurotransmission or neuronal excitability through their actions on AMPA or kainate receptors. PMID:24614744

  14. Chemoreceptors of crustaceans: similarities to receptors for neuroactive substances in internal tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Carr, W E; Ache, B W; Gleeson, R A

    1987-01-01

    A description is given of crustacean chemosensory systems and the neurophysiological procedures used to study them. Their response properties and tuning characteristics are discussed. A review is then provided of specific crustacean chemoreceptors that are stimulated selectively by either purine nucleotides, taurine, glutamate, or glycine, all of which have neuroactive properties in internal tissues. Two distinctly different types of purinergic chemoreceptors occur on the antennules of the spiny lobster. P1-like chemoreceptors have a potency sequence of AMP greater than ADP greater than ATP greater than adenosine and show a strict structural requirement for the ribose phosphate moiety. P2-like chemoreceptors have a potency sequence of ATP greater than ADP greater than AMP or adenosine and show a broad sensitivity to nucleotide triphosphates with modifications in both the purine and ribose phosphate moieties. Sensilla containing the dendrites of chemosensory neurons also possess an ectonucleotidase(s) that inactivates excitatory nucleotides to yield adenosine which is subsequently internalized by a sensillar uptake system. Narrowly tuned taurinergic chemoreceptors are present on both the antennules and legs of lobsters. Although taurine itself is the most effective stimulant, the taurine analogs hypotaurine and beta-alanine are also very excitatory. Structure-activity studies indicate these chemoreceptors have marked similarities to taurine-sensitive systems in internal tissues of vertebrates. By contrast, comparative studies of glutamatergic chemoreceptors on the legs of lobsters indicate response spectra different from those of the glutamate receptors in lobster neuromuscular junctions and the three classes of excitatory amino acid receptors identified internally in vertebrates. Crustacean chemoreceptors for glycine, ecdysteroids, and pyridine are also described. The hypothesis that receptors for internal neuroactive agents may have originally evolved as external

  15. Neonatal Fc Receptor Mediates Internalization of Fc in Transfected Human Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Goebl, Nancy A.; Babbey, Clifford M.; Datta-Mannan, Amita; Witcher, Derrick R.; Wroblewski, Victor J.

    2008-01-01

    The neonatal Fc receptor, FcRn mediates an endocytic salvage pathway that prevents degradation of IgG, thus contributing to the homeostasis of circulating IgG. Based on the low affinity of IgG for FcRn at neutral pH, internalization of IgG by endothelial cells is generally believed to occur via fluid-phase endocytosis. To investigate the role of FcRn in IgG internalization, we used quantitative confocal microscopy to characterize internalization of fluorescent Fc molecules by HULEC-5A lung microvascular endothelia transfected with GFP fusion proteins of human or mouse FcRn. In these studies, cells transfected with FcRn accumulated significantly more intracellular Fc than untransfected cells. Internalization of FcRn-binding forms of Fc was proportional to FcRn expression level, was enriched relative to dextran internalization in proportion to FcRn expression level, and was blocked by incubation with excess unlabeled Fc. Because we were unable to detect either surface expression of FcRn or surface binding of Fc, these results suggest that FcRn-dependent internalization of Fc may occur through sequestration of Fc by FcRn in early endosomes. These studies indicate that FcRn-dependent internalization of IgG may be important not only in cells taking up IgG from an extracellular acidic space, but also in endothelial cells participating in homeostatic regulation of circulating IgG levels. PMID:18843053

  16. CPG2 Recruits Endophilin B2 to the Cytoskeleton for Activity-Dependent Endocytosis of Synaptic Glutamate Receptors.

    PubMed

    Loebrich, Sven; Benoit, Marc Robert; Konopka, Jaclyn Aleksandra; Cottrell, Jeffrey Richard; Gibson, Joanne; Nedivi, Elly

    2016-02-01

    Internalization of glutamate receptors at the postsynaptic membrane via clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) is a key mechanism for regulating synaptic strength. A role for the F-actin cytoskeleton in CME is well established, and recently, PKA-dependent association of candidate plasticity gene 2 (CPG2) with the spine-cytoskeleton has been shown to mediate synaptic glutamate receptor internalization. Yet, how the endocytic machinery is physically coupled to the actin cytoskeleton to facilitate glutamate receptor internalization has not been demonstrated. Moreover, there has been no distinction of endocytic-machinery components that are specific to activity-dependent versus constitutive glutamate receptor internalization. Here, we show that CPG2, through a direct physical interaction, recruits endophilin B2 (EndoB2) to F-actin, thus anchoring the endocytic machinery to the spine cytoskeleton and facilitating glutamate receptor internalization. Regulation of CPG2 binding to the actin cytoskeleton by protein kinase A directly impacts recruitment of EndoB2 and clathrin. Specific disruption of EndoB2 or the CPG2-EndoB2 interaction impairs activity-dependent, but not constitutive, internalization of both NMDA- and AMPA-type glutamate receptors. These results demonstrate that, through direct interactions with F-actin and EndoB2, CPG2 physically bridges the spine cytoskeleton and the endocytic machinery, and this tripartite association is critical specifically for activity-dependent CME of synaptic glutamate receptors. PMID:26776730

  17. Internalization of gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptors (GnRHRs): does arrestin binding to the C-terminal tail target GnRHRs for dynamin-dependent internalization?

    PubMed

    Hislop, James N; Caunt, Christopher J; Sedgley, Kathleen R; Kelly, Eammon; Mundell, Stuart; Green, Lisa D; McArdle, Craig A

    2005-08-01

    Activation of seven-transmembrane receptors is typically followed by desensitization and arrestin-dependent internalization via vesicles that are pinched off by a dynamin collar. Arrestins also scaffold Src, which mediates dynamin-dependent internalization of beta2-adrenergic receptors. Type I mammalian gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptors (GnRHRs) do not rapidly desensitize or internalize (characteristics attributed to their unique lack of C-terminal tails) whereas non-mammalian GnRHRs (that have C-terminal tails) are rapidly internalized and desensitized. Moreover, internalization of Xenopus (X) GnRHRs is dynamin-dependent whereas that of human (h) GnRHRs is not, raising the possibility that binding of arrestin to the C-terminal tails of GnRHRs targets them to the dynamin-dependent internalization pathway. To test this we have compared wild-type GnRHRs with chimeric receptors (XGnRHR C-terminal tail added to the hGnRHR alone (h.XtGnRHR) or with exchange of the third intracellular loops (h.Xl.XtGnRHR)). We show that adding the XGnRHR C-terminal tail facilitates arrestin- and dynamin-dependent internalization as well as arrestin/green fluorescent protein translocation, but Src (or mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular-signal-regulated kinase kinase) inhibition does not slow internalization, and h.XtGnRHR internalization is slower than that of the hGnRHR. Moreover, arrestin expression increased XGnRHR internalization even when dynamin was inhibited and h.Xl.XtGnRHR underwent rapid arrestin-dependent internalization without signaling to G(q/11). Thus, although the C-terminal tail can direct GnRHRs for arrestin- and dynamin-dependent internalization, this effect is not dependent on Src activation and arrestin can also facilitate dynamin-independent internalization. PMID:16087731

  18. Ligand-mediated autophosphorylation activity of the epidermal growth factor receptor during internalization

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, W.H.; Cameron, P.H.; Doherty, J.J. II; Posner, B.I.; Bergeron, J.J. )

    1989-12-01

    The association of EGF with its receptor in endosomes isolated from rat liver homogenates was assessed biochemically by polyethylene glycol precipitation and morphologically by electron microscope radioautography. The proportion of receptor-bound ligand in endosomes at 15 min after the injection of doses of 0.1 and 1 microgram EGF/100 g body weight was 57%. This value increased to 77% for the dose of 10 micrograms EGF injected. Quantitative electron microscope radioautography carried out on endosomes isolated at 15 min after the injection of 10 micrograms 125I-EGF demonstrated that most radiolabel was over the endosomal periphery thereby indicating that ligand-receptor complexes were in the bounding membrane but not in intraluminal vesicles of the content. EGF receptor autophosphorylation activity during internalization was evaluated in plasmalemma and endosome fractions. This activity was markedly but transiently reduced on the cell surface shortly after the administration of saturating doses of EGF. The same activity, however, was augmented and prolonged in endosomes for up to 30 min after EGF injection. The transient desensitization of cell surface activity was not due to prior in vivo phosphorylation since receptor dephosphorylation in vitro failed to restore autophosphorylation activity. Transient desensitization of cell surface autophosphorylation activity coincided with a diminished capacity for endocytosis of 125I-EGF with endocytosis returning to normal after the restoration of cell surface autophosphorylation activity. The inhibition of cell surface autophosphorylation activity and the activation of endosomal autophosphorylation activity coincident with downregulation suggest that EGF receptor traffic is governed by ligand-regulated phosphorylation activity.

  19. Differential Expression of AMPA Subunits Induced by NMDA Intrahippocampal Injection in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Fachim, Helene A.; Pereira, Adriana C.; Iyomasa-Pilon, Melina M.; Rosa, Maria L. N. M.

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate is involved in excitotoxic mechanisms by interacting with different receptors. Such interactions result in neuronal death associated with several neurodegenerative disorders of the central nervous system (CNS). The aim of this work was to study the time course of changes in the expression of GluR1 and GluR2 subunits of glutamate amino-acid-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazol-4-propionic acid (AMPA) receptors in rat hippocampus induced by NMDA intrahippocampal injection. Rats were submitted to stereotaxic surgery for NMDA or saline (control) microinjection into dorsal hippocampus and the parameters were evaluated 24 h, 1, 2, and 4 weeks after injection. The extension and efficacy of the NMDA-induced injury were evaluated by Morris water maze (MWM) behavioral test and Nissl staining. The expression of GluR1 and GluR2 receptors, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and neuronal marker (NeuN) was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. It was observed the impairment of learning and memory functions, loss of neuronal cells, and glial proliferation in CA1 area of NMDA compared with control groups, confirming the injury efficacy. In addition, NMDA injection induced distinct changes in GluR1 and GluR2 expression over the time. In conclusion, such changes may be related to the complex mechanism triggered in response to NMDA injection resulting in a local injury and in the activation of neuronal plasticity. PMID:26912994

  20. Internalized insulin-receptor complexes are unidirectionally translocated to chloroquine-sensitive degradative sites. Dependence on metabolic energy

    SciTech Connect

    Berhanu, P.

    1988-04-25

    Insulin receptors on the surface of isolated rat adipocytes were photoaffinity labeled at 12 degrees C with the iodinated photoreactive insulin analogue, 125I-B2 (2-nitro-4-azidophenylacetyl)-des-PheB1-insulin, and the pathways in the intracellular processing of the labeled receptors were studied at 37 degrees C. During 37 degrees C incubations, the labeled 440-kDa insulin receptors were continuously internalized (as assessed by trypsin inaccessibility) and degraded such that up to 50% of the initially labeled receptors were lost by 120 min. Metabolic poisons (0.125-0.75 mM 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP) and 1-10 mM NaF), which led to dose-dependent depletion of adipocyte ATP pools, inhibited receptor loss, and caused up to 3-fold increase in intracellular receptor accumulation. This effect was due to inhibition of intracellular receptor degradation, and there was no apparent effect of the metabolic poisons on initial internalization of the receptors. Following maximal intracellular accumulation of labeled insulin receptors in the presence of NaF or DNP, removal of these agents resulted in a subsequent, time-dependent degradation of the accumulated receptors. However, when the lysosomotropic agent, chloroquine (0.2 mM), was added immediately following removal of the metabolic poisons, further degradation of the intracellularly accumulated receptors was prevented, suggesting that the chloroquine-sensitive degradation of insulin receptors occurs distal to the site of inhibition by NaF or DNP. To confirm this, maximal intracellular accumulation of labeled receptors was first allowed to occur in the presence of chloroquine and the cells were then washed and reincubated in chloroquine-free media in the absence or presence of NaF or DNP. Under these conditions, degradation of the intracellularly accumulated receptors continued to occur, and NaF or DNP failed to block the degradation.

  1. Nicotine recruits glutamate receptors to postsynaptic sites.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jing-Jing; Lozada, Adrian F; Gou, Chen-Yu; Xu, Jing; Chen, Yuan; Berg, Darwin K

    2015-09-01

    Cholinergic neurons project throughout the nervous system and activate nicotinic receptors to modulate synaptic function in ways that shape higher order brain function. The acute effects of nicotinic signaling on long-term synaptic plasticity have been well-characterized. Less well understood is how chronic exposure to low levels of nicotine, such as those encountered by habitual smokers, can alter neural connections to promote addiction and other lasting behavioral effects. We show here that chronic exposure of hippocampal neurons in culture to low levels of nicotine recruits AMPA and NMDA receptors to the cell surface and sequesters them at postsynaptic sites. The receptors include GluA2-containing AMPA receptors, which are responsible for most of the excitatory postsynaptic current mediated by AMPA receptors on the neurons, and include NMDA receptors containing GluN1 and GluN2B subunits. Moreover, we find that the nicotine treatment also increases expression of the presynaptic component synapsin 1 and arranges it in puncta juxtaposed to the additional AMPA and NMDA receptor puncta, suggestive of increases in synaptic contacts. Consistent with increased synaptic input, we find that the nicotine treatment leads to an increase in the excitatory postsynaptic currents mediated by AMPA and NMDA receptors. Further, the increases skew the ratio of excitatory-to-inhibitory input that the cell receives, and this holds both for pyramidal neurons and inhibitory neurons in the hippocampal CA1 region. The GluN2B-containing NMDA receptor redistribution at synapses is associated with a significant increase in GluN2B phosphorylation at Tyr1472, a site known to prevent GluN2B endocytosis. These results suggest that chronic exposure to low levels of nicotine not only alters functional connections but also is likely to change excitability levels across networks. Further, it may increase the propensity for synaptic plasticity, given the increase in synaptic NMDA receptors. PMID

  2. Impact of subanesthetic doses of ketamine on AMPA-mediated responses in rats: An in vivo electrophysiological study on monoaminergic and glutamatergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    El Iskandrani, Kareem S; Oosterhof, Chris A; Blier, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The rapid antidepressant action of a subanesthetic dose of ketamine in treatment-resistant patients represents the most striking recent breakthrough in the understanding of the antidepressant response. Evidence demonstrates tight interactions between the glutamatergic and monoaminergic systems. It is thus hypothesized that monoamine systems may play a role in the immediate/rapid effects of ketamine. In vivo electrophysiological recordings were carried in male rats following ketamine administration (10 and 25 mg/kg, i.p.) to first assess its effects on monoaminergic neuron firing. In a second series of experiments, the effects of ketamine administration on α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)- and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDA)-evoked responses in hippocampus CA3 pyramidal neurons were also investigated using micro-iontophoretic applications. Although acute (~2 hours) ketamine administration did not affect the mean firing activity of dorsal raphe serotonin and ventral tegmental area dopamine neurons, it did increase that of locus coeruleus norepinephrine neurons. In the latter brain region, while ketamine also enhanced bursting activity, it did increase population activity of dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area. These effects of ketamine were prevented by the prior administration of the AMPA receptor antagonist 2,3-dioxo-6-nitro-1,2,3,4-tetrahydrobenzo[f]quinoxaline-7-sulfonamide. An increase in AMPA-evoked response of CA3 pyramidal neurons was also observed 30 minutes following acute ketamine administration. The present findings suggest that acute ketamine administration produces a rapid enhancement of catecholaminergic neurons firing activity through an amplification of AMPA transmission. These effects may play a crucial role in the antidepressant effects of ketamine observed shortly following its infusion in depressed patients. PMID:25759403

  3. [Differences in dynamics of insulin and insulin-like growth I (IGF-I) receptors internalization in isolated rat hepatocytes].

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    Insulin and IGF-I are two related peptides performing in the mammalian body functionally different roles of the metabolic and growth hormones, respectively. Internalization of the insulin-receptor complex (IRC) is the most important chain of mechanism of the action of hormone. To elucidate differences in the main stages of internalization of the two related hormones, the internalization dynamics of 125I-insulin and 125I-IGF-I was traced in isolated rat hepatocytes at 37 and 12 degrees C. There were established marked differences in the process of internalization of labeled hormones, which is stimulated by insulin and IGF-I. At 37 degrees C the insulin-stimulated internalization, unlike the process initiated by IGF-I, did not reach the maximal level for 1 h of incubation. However, essential differences in the internalization course of these two related peptide were obvious at the temperature of 12 degrees C. The internalization level of insulin receptors at 12 degrees C decreased by one third in spite of a significant increase of the insulin receptor binding on the hepatocytes plasma membrane. At 12 degrees C a slight decrease of the proportion of intracellular 125I-IGF-I correlated with a decrease in the 125I-IGF-I binding to receptors on the cell membrane. Internalization of IGF-I receptors was not affected by low temperature, as neither its level, nor the rate changed at 12 degrees C. The paradoxical decrease of the insulin-stimulated internalization at low temperature seems to represent a peculiar "inhibition mechanism" of immersion of IRC into the cell, which leads to accumulation of the complexes on the cell surface and possibly to a readjustment of the insulin biological activity. The resistance of internalization of the IGF-I receptor to cold seems to be related to the more ancient origin of this mechanism in the poikilothermal vertebrates. PMID:25509050

  4. [Differences in dynamics of insulin and insulin-like growth I (IGF-I) receptors internalization in isolated rat hepatocytes].

    PubMed

    Kolychev, A P; Ternovskaya, E E; Arsenieva, A V; Shapkina, E V

    2013-01-01

    Insulin and IGF-I are two related peptides performing in the mammalian body functionally different roles of the metabolic and growth hormones, respectively. Internalization of the insulin-receptor complex (IRC) is the most important chain of mechanism of the action of hormone. To elucidate differences in the main stages of internalization of the two related hormones, the internalization dynamics of 125I-insulin and 125I-IGF-I was traced in isolated rat hepatocytes at 37 and 12 degrees C. There were established marked differences in the process of internalization of labeled hormones, which is stimulated by insulin and IGF-I. At 37 degrees C the insulin-stimulated internalization, unlike the process initiated by IGF-I, did not reach the maximal level for 1 h of incubation. However, essential differences in the internalization course of these two related peptide were obvious at the temperature of 12 degrees C. The internalization level of insulin receptors at 12 degrees C decreased by one third in spite of a significant increase of the insulin receptor binding on the hepatocytes plasma membrane. At 12 degrees C a slight decrease of the proportion of intracellular 125I-IGF-I correlated with a decrease in the 125I-IGF-I binding to receptors on the cell membrane. Internalization of IGF-I receptors was not affected by low temperature, as neither its level, nor the rate changed at 12 degrees C. The paradoxical decrease of the insulin-stimulated internalization at low temperature seems to represent a peculiar "inhibition mechanism" of immersion of IRC into the cell, which leads to accumulation of the complexes on the cell surface and possibly to a readjustment of the insulin biological activity. The resistance of internalization of the IGF-I receptor to cold seems to be related to the more ancient origin of this mechanism in the poikilothermal vertebrates. PMID:25490849

  5. Agonist-Activated Bombyx Corazonin Receptor Is Internalized via an Arrestin-Dependent and Clathrin-Independent Pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jingwen; Shen, Zhangfei; Jiang, Xue; Yang, Huipeng; Huang, Haishan; Jin, Lili; Chen, Yajie; Shi, Liangen; Zhou, Naiming

    2016-07-19

    Agonist-induced internalization plays a key role in the tight regulation of the extent and duration of G protein-coupled receptor signaling. Previously, we have shown that the Bombyx corazonin receptor (BmCrzR) activates both Gαq- and Gαs-dependent signaling cascades. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of the internalization and desensitization of BmCrzR remain to be elucidated. Here, vectors for expressing BmCrzR fused with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) at the C-terminal end were used to further characterize BmCrzR internalization. We found that the BmCrzR heterologously expressed in HEK-293 and BmN cells was rapidly internalized from the plasma membrane into the cytoplasm in a concentration- and time-dependent manner via a β-arrestin (Kurtz)-dependent and clathrin-independent pathway in response to agonist challenge. While most of the internalized receptors were recycled to the cell surface via early endosomes, some others were transported to lysosomes for degradation. Assays using RNA interference revealed that both GRK2 and GRK5 were essentially involved in the regulation of BmCrzR phosphorylation and internalization. Further investigations indicated that the identified cluster of Ser/Thr residues ((411)TSS(413)) was responsible for GRK-mediated phosphorylation and internalization. This is the first detailed investigation of the internalization and trafficking of Bombyx corazonin receptors. PMID:27348044

  6. International Union of Pharmacology. LXXXIX. Update on the Extended Family of Chemokine Receptors and Introducing a New Nomenclature for Atypical Chemokine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bachelerie, Francoise; Ben-Baruch, Adit; Burkhardt, Amanda M.; Combadiere, Christophe; Farber, Joshua M.; Graham, Gerard J.; Horuk, Richard; Sparre-Ulrich, Alexander Hovard; Locati, Massimo; Luster, Andrew D.; Mantovani, Alberto; Matsushima, Kouji; Nibbs, Robert; Nomiyama, Hisayuki; Power, Christine A.; Proudfoot, Amanda E. I.; Rosenkilde, Mette M.; Rot, Antal; Sozzani, Silvano; Thelen, Marcus; Yoshie, Osamu; Zlotnik, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Sixteen years ago, the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Pharmacology approved a system for naming human seven-transmembrane (7TM) G protein-coupled chemokine receptors, the large family of leukocyte chemoattractant receptors that regulates immune system development and function, in large part by mediating leukocyte trafficking. This was announced in Pharmacological Reviews in a major overview of the first decade of research in this field [Murphy PM, Baggiolini M, Charo IF, Hébert CA, Horuk R, Matsushima K, Miller LH, Oppenheim JJ, and Power CA (2000) Pharmacol Rev 52:145–176]. Since then, several new receptors have been discovered, and major advances have been made for the others in many areas, including structural biology, signal transduction mechanisms, biology, and pharmacology. New and diverse roles have been identified in infection, immunity, inflammation, development, cancer, and other areas. The first two drugs acting at chemokine receptors have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), maraviroc targeting CCR5 in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS, and plerixafor targeting CXCR4 for stem cell mobilization for transplantation in cancer, and other candidates are now undergoing pivotal clinical trials for diverse disease indications. In addition, a subfamily of atypical chemokine receptors has emerged that may signal through arrestins instead of G proteins to act as chemokine scavengers, and many microbial and invertebrate G protein-coupled chemokine receptors and soluble chemokine-binding proteins have been described. Here, we review this extended family of chemokine receptors and chemokine-binding proteins at the basic, translational, and clinical levels, including an update on drug development. We also introduce a new nomenclature for atypical chemokine receptors with the stem ACKR (atypical chemokine receptor) approved by the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Pharmacology and the Human

  7. The Chemokine Receptor CCR1 Is Constitutively Active, Which Leads to G Protein-independent, β-Arrestin-mediated Internalization*

    PubMed Central

    Gilliland, C. Taylor; Salanga, Catherina L.; Kawamura, Tetsuya; Trejo, JoAnn; Handel, Tracy M.

    2013-01-01

    Activation of G protein-coupled receptors by their associated ligands has been extensively studied, and increasing structural information about the molecular mechanisms underlying ligand-dependent receptor activation is beginning to emerge with the recent expansion in GPCR crystal structures. However, some GPCRs are also able to adopt active conformations in the absence of agonist binding that result in the initiation of signal transduction and receptor down-modulation. In this report, we show that the CC-type chemokine receptor 1 (CCR1) exhibits significant constitutive activity leading to a variety of cellular responses. CCR1 expression is sufficient to induce inhibition of cAMP formation, increased F-actin content, and basal migration of human and murine leukocytes. The constitutive activity leads to basal phosphorylation of the receptor, recruitment of β-arrestin-2, and subsequent receptor internalization. CCR1 concurrently engages Gαi and β-arrestin-2 in a multiprotein complex, which may be accommodated by homo-oligomerization or receptor clustering. The data suggest the presence of two functional states for CCR1; whereas receptor coupled to Gαi functions as a canonical GPCR, albeit with high constitutive activity, the CCR1·β-arrestin-2 complex is required for G protein-independent constitutive receptor internalization. The pertussis toxin-insensitive uptake of chemokine by the receptor suggests that the CCR1·β-arrestin-2 complex may be related to a potential scavenging function of the receptor, which may be important for maintenance of chemokine gradients and receptor responsiveness in complex fields of chemokines during inflammation. PMID:24056371

  8. SGIP1 alters internalization and modulates signaling of activated cannabinoid receptor 1 in a biased manner.

    PubMed

    Hájková, Alena; Techlovská, Šárka; Dvořáková, Michaela; Chambers, Jayne Nicole; Kumpošt, Jiří; Hubálková, Pavla; Prezeau, Laurent; Blahos, Jaroslav

    2016-08-01

    Many diseases of the nervous system are accompanied by alterations in synaptic functions. Synaptic plasticity mediated by the endogenous cannabinoid system involves the activation of the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R). The principles of CB1R signaling must be understood in detail for its therapeutic exploration. We detected the Src homology 3-domain growth factor receptor-bound 2-like (endophilin) interacting protein 1 (SGIP1) as a novel CB1R partner. SGIP1 is functionally linked to clathrin-mediated endocytosis and its overexpression in animals leads to an energy regulation imbalance resulting in obesity. We report that SGIP1 prevents the endocytosis of activated CB1R and that it alters signaling via the CB1R in a biased manner. CB1R mediated G-protein activation is selectively influenced by SGIP1, β-arrestin associated signaling is changed profoundly, most likely as a consequence of the prevention of the receptor's internalization elicited by SGIP1. PMID:26970018

  9. Morphine-induced internalization of the L83I mutant of the rat μ-opioid receptor

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, A E; Oldfield, S; Krasel, C; Mundell, S J; Henderson, G; Kelly, E

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Naturally occurring single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within GPCRs can result in alterations in various pharmacological parameters. Understanding the regulation and function of endocytic trafficking of the μ-opioid receptor (MOP receptor) is of great importance given its implication in the development of opioid tolerance. This study has compared the agonist-dependent trafficking and signalling of L83I, the rat orthologue of a naturally occurring variant of the MOP receptor. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Cell surface elisa, confocal microscopy and immunoprecipitation assays were used to characterize the trafficking properties of the MOP-L83I variant in comparison with the wild-type receptor in HEK 293 cells. Functional assays were used to compare the ability of the L83I variant to signal to several downstream pathways. KEY RESULTS Morphine-induced internalization of the L83I MOP receptor was markedly increased in comparison with the wild-type receptor. The altered trafficking of this variant was found to be specific to morphine and was both G-protein receptor kinase- and dynamin-dependent. The enhanced internalization of L83I variant in response to morphine was not due to increased phosphorylation of serine 375, arrestin association or an increased ability to signal. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These results suggest that morphine promotes a specific conformation of the L83I variant that makes it more liable to internalize in response to morphine, unlike the wild-type receptor that undergoes significantly less morphine-stimulated internalization, providing an example of a ligand-selective biased receptor. The presence of this SNP within an individual may consequently affect the development of tolerance and analgesic responses. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24697554

  10. Internal receptors in insect appendages project directly into a special brain neuropile

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The great majority of afferent neurons of insect legs project into their segmental ganglion. Intersegmental projections are rare and are only formed by sense organs associated with the basal joints of the legs. Such intersegmental projections never ascend as far as the brain and they form extensive ramifications within thoracic ganglia. A few afferents of chordotonal organs of the subcoxal joints ascend as far as the suboesophageal ganglion. Results We describe novel afferent neurons in distal segments of locust legs that project directly into the brain without forming ramifications in other ganglia. In the brain, the fibres terminate with characteristic terminals in a small neuropile previously named the superficial ventral inferior protocerebrum. The somata of these neurons are located in the tibiae and tarsi of all legs and they are located within branches of peripheral nerves, or closely associated with such branches. They are not associated with any accessory structures such as tendons or connective tissue strands as typical for insect internal mechanoreceptors such as chordotonal organs or stretch receptors. Morphologically they show great similarity to certain insect infrared receptors. We could not observe projections into the superficial ventral inferior protocerebrum after staining mandibular or labial nerves, but we confirm previous studies that showed projections into the same brain neuropile after staining maxillary and antennal nerves, indicating that most likely similar neurons are present in these appendages also. Conclusion Because of their location deep within the lumen of appendages the function of these neurons as infrared receptors is unlikely. Their projection pattern and other morphological features indicate that the neurons convey information about an internal physiological parameter directly into a special brain neuropile. We discuss their possible function as thermoreceptors. PMID:24015902

  11. Structural/functional relationships between internal and external MSH receptors: modulation of expression in Cloudman melanoma cells by UVB radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, A.K.; Orlow, S.J.; Bolognia, J.L.; Pawelek, J.M. )

    1991-04-01

    Expression of internal receptors for MSH is an important criterion for responsiveness to MSH by Cloudman melanoma cells. Here, we show that internal and external receptors for MSH are of identical molecular weights (50-53 kDa) and share common antigenic determinants, indicating a structural relationship between the 2 populations of molecules. The internal receptors co-purified with a sub-cellular fraction highly enriched for small vesicles, many of which were coated. Ultraviolet B light (UVB) acted synergistically with MSH to increase tyrosinase activity and melanin content of cultured Cloudman melanoma cells, consistent with previous findings in the skin of mice and guinea pigs. Preceding the rise in tyrosinase activity in cultured cells, UVB elicited a decrease in internal MSH binding sites and a concomitant increase in external sites. The time frame for the UVB effects on MSH receptors and melanogenesis, 48 hours, was similar to that for a response to solar radiation in humans. Together, the results indicate a key role for MSH receptors in the induction of melanogenesis by UVB and suggest a potential mechanism of action for UVB: redistribution of MSH receptors with a resultant increase in cellular responsiveness to MSH.

  12. Evidence that Subanesthetic Doses of Ketamine Cause Sustained Disruptions of NMDA and AMPA-Mediated Frontoparietal Connectivity in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Alexander D.; Jackson, Laura E.; Hall, Judith; Moran, Rosalyn; Saxena, Neeraj

    2015-01-01

    Following the discovery of the antidepressant properties of ketamine, there has been a recent resurgence in the interest in this NMDA receptor antagonist. Although detailed animal models of the molecular mechanisms underlying ketamine's effects have emerged, there are few MEG/EEG studies examining the acute subanesthetic effects of ketamine infusion in man. We recorded 275 channel MEG in two experiments (n = 25 human males) examining the effects of subanesthetic ketamine infusion. MEG power spectra revealed a rich set of significant oscillatory changes compared with placebo sessions, including decreases in occipital, parietal, and anterior cingulate alpha power, increases in medial frontal theta power, and increases in parietal and cingulate cortex high gamma power. Each of these spectral effects demonstrated their own set of temporal dynamics. Dynamic causal modeling of frontoparietal connectivity changes with ketamine indicated a decrease in NMDA and AMPA-mediated frontal-to-parietal connectivity. AMPA-mediated connectivity changes were sustained for up to 50 min after ketamine infusion had ceased, by which time perceptual distortions were absent. The results also indicated a decrease in gain of parietal pyramidal cells, which was correlated with participants' self-reports of blissful state. Based on these results, we suggest that the antidepressant effects of ketamine may depend on its ability to change the balance of frontoparietal connectivity patterns. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In this paper, we found that subanesthetic doses of ketamine, similar to those used in antidepressant studies, increase anterior theta and gamma power but decrease posterior theta, delta, and alpha power, as revealed by magnetoencephalographic recordings. Dynamic causal modeling of frontoparietal connectivity changes with ketamine indicated a decrease in NMDA and AMPA-mediated frontal-to-parietal connectivity. AMPA-mediated connectivity changes were sustained for up to 50 min after

  13. Region- and age-dependent reductions of hippocampal long-term potentiation and NMDA to AMPA ratio in a genetic model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Tozzi, Alessandro; Sclip, Alessandra; Tantucci, Michela; de Iure, Antonio; Ghiglieri, Veronica; Costa, Cinzia; Di Filippo, Massimiliano; Borsello, Tiziana; Calabresi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    To characterize the mechanisms underlying region- and age-dependent hippocampal synaptic dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease, we used transgenic CRND8 mice, expressing the Swedish-Indiana APP mutation. In 2-month-old mice, no β-amyloid plaques deposition, but the presence of soluble oligomers, were found in CA1 area but not in dentate gyrus (DG). At this age, long-term potentiation (LTP) was reduced selectively in CA1. In 6-month-old mice, the presence of soluble oligomers was accompanied by accumulation of β-amyloid plaques and decreased LTP in CA1 and DG regions. In both regions, the loss of LTP was linked to reduced N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) to alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) current ratio. The acetylcholine-esterase inhibitor, neostigmine rescued LTP in CA1 area at early stage of the disease but not after plaques deposition. Conversely, the NMDA receptor antagonist memantine restored LTP selectively in DG at later stages of the disease. Both these effects were associated with a normalization of the NMDA to AMPA ratio. The association between the recovery of LTP and the normalization of the NMDA to AMPA ratio provides information on new possible therapeutic strategies in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25104560

  14. Water quality of the main tributaries of the Paraná Basin: glyphosate and AMPA in surface water and bottom sediments.

    PubMed

    Ronco, A E; Marino, D J G; Abelando, M; Almada, P; Apartin, C D

    2016-08-01

    The Paraná River, the sixth largest in the world, is the receptor of pollution loads from tributaries traversing urban and industrialized areas plus agricultural expanses, particularly so in the river's middle and lower reaches along the Argentine sector. In the present study, we analyzed and discussed the main water quality parameters, sediment compositions, and content of the herbicide glyphosate plus its metabolite aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) in water and sediments. Samples were obtained from distal positions in the principal tributaries of the Paraná and the main watercourse during surveys conducted in 2011 and 2012 to monitor the basin. Only 15 % of the water samples contained detectable concentrations of glyphosate at an average concentration of 0.60 μg/L, while no detectable levels of AMPA were observed. The herbicide and metabolite were primarily present in sediments of the middle and lower stretch's tributaries, there occurring at a respective average of 37 and 17 % in samples. The mean detectable concentrations measured were 742 and 521 μg/kg at mean, maximum, and minimum glyphosate/AMPA ratios of 2.76, 7.80, and 0.06, respectively. The detection of both compounds was correlated with the presence of sulfides and copper in the sediment matrix. PMID:27395359

  15. Acute and chronic cocaine differentially alter the subcellular distribution of AMPA GluR1 subunits in region-specific neurons within the mouse ventral tegmental area

    PubMed Central

    Lane, D.A.; Jaferi, A.; Kreek, M.J.; Pickel, V.M.

    2010-01-01

    Cocaine administration increases AMPA GluR1 expression and receptor-mediated activation of the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Functionality is determined, however, by surface availability of these receptors in transmitter- and VTA-region-specific neurons, which may also be affected by cocaine. To test this hypothesis, we used electron microscopic immunolabeling of AMPA GluR1 subunits and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH; the enzyme needed for dopamine synthesis), in the cortical-associated parabrachial (PB) and in the limbic-associated paranigral (PN) VTA of adult male C57BL/6 mice receiving either a single injection (acute) or repeated escalating-doses for 14 days (chronic) of cocaine. Acute cocaine resulted in opposing VTA-region-specific changes in TH-containing dopaminergic dendrites. TH-labeled dendrites within the PB VTA showed increased cytoplasmic GluR1 immunogold particle density consistent with decreased AMPA receptor-mediated glutamatergic transmission. Conversely, TH-labeled dendrites within the PN VTA showed greater surface expression of GluR1 with increases in both synaptic and plasmalemmal GluR1 immunogold density after a single injection of cocaine. These changes diminished in both VTA subregions after chronic cocaine administration. In contrast, non-TH-containing (presumably GABAergic) dendrites showed VTA-region-specific changes only after repeated cocaine administration such that synaptic GluR1 decreased in the PB, but increased in the PN VTA. Taken together, these findings provide ultrastructural evidence suggesting that chronic cocaine not only reverses the respective depression and facilitation of mesocortical (PB) and mesolimbic (PN) dopaminergic neurons elicited by acute cocaine, but also differentially affects synaptic availability of these receptors in non-dopaminergic neurons of each region. These adaptations may contribute to increased cocaine seeking/relapse and decreased reward that is reported with chronic cocaine use. PMID:20553819

  16. Methylation of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Gene Promoter in Preschoolers: Links With Internalizing Behavior Problems.

    PubMed

    Parade, Stephanie H; Ridout, Kathryn K; Seifer, Ronald; Armstrong, David A; Marsit, Carmen J; McWilliams, Melissa A; Tyrka, Audrey R

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that early adversity is linked to methylation of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene, NR3C1, which is a key regulator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Yet no prior work has considered the contribution of methylation of NR3C1 to emerging behavior problems and psychopathology in childhood. This study examined the links between methylation of NR3C1 and behavior problems in preschoolers. Data were drawn from a sample of preschoolers with early adversity (n = 171). Children ranged in age from 3 to 5 years, were racially and ethnically diverse, and nearly all qualified for public assistance. Seventy-one children had child welfare documentation of moderate to severe maltreatment in the past 6 months. Structured record review and interviews in the home were used to assess early adversity. Parents reported on child internalizing and externalizing behavior problems. Methylation of NR3C1 at exons 1D , 1F , and 1H were measured via sodium bisulfite pyrosequencing from saliva DNA. Methylation of NR3C1 at exons 1D and 1F was positively associated with internalizing (r = .21, p < .01 and r = .23, p < .01, respectively), but not externalizing, behavior problems. Furthermore, NR3C1 methylation mediated effects of early adversity on internalizing behavior problems. These results suggest that methylation of NR3C1 contributes to psychopathology in young children, and NR3C1 methylation from saliva DNA is salient to behavioral outcomes. PMID:26822445

  17. Interleukin-1-induced gene expression requires the membrane-raft-dependent internalization of the interleukin-1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Windheim, Mark

    2016-10-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) binding to its receptor triggers signaling events at the plasma membrane that are essential but not sufficient for the induction of the IL-1-dependent gene expression. In addition, the ligand-induced endocytosis of the IL-1 receptor and signaling events that are initiated after the internalization of the IL-1 receptor presumably involving signaling endosomes are critical for the IL-1-induced gene expression. In this study, we investigate the role of membrane domains, commonly denoted as lipid rafts, in the IL-1-induced signal transduction. We demonstrate that the internalization of the IL-1 receptor depends on the integrity of lipid rafts and that the disruption of lipid rafts strongly reduces the IL-1-induced gene expression. Interestingly, the IL-1-dependent signaling events activated at the plasma membrane are not influenced by the disruption of lipid rafts suggesting that IL-1 signaling is initiated in a non-raft domain of the plasma membrane. Subsequently, the IL-1 receptor is translocated to lipid rafts where receptor endocytosis occurs to enable the internalization-dependent IL-1 signaling to activate the IL-1-induced gene expression. PMID:27327966

  18. Endocytic Adaptor Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Substrate 15 (Eps15) Is Involved in the Trafficking of Ubiquitinated α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic Acid Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Amy; Man, Heng-Ye

    2014-01-01

    AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) play a critical role in mediating fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the brain. Alterations in receptor expression, distribution, and trafficking have been shown to underlie synaptic plasticity and higher brain functions, including learning and memory, as well as brain dysfunctions such as drug addiction and psychological disorders. Therefore, it is essential to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that regulate AMPAR dynamics. We have shown previously that mammalian AMPARs are subject to posttranslational modification by ubiquitin, with AMPAR ubiquitination enhancing receptor internalization and reducing AMPAR cell surface expression. Here we report a crucial role for epidermal growth factor receptor substrate 15 (Eps15), an endocytic adaptor, in ubiquitination-dependent AMPAR internalization. We find that suppression or overexpression of Eps15 results in changes in AMPAR surface expression. Eps15 interacts with AMPARs, which requires Nedd4-mediated GluA1 ubiquitination and the ubiquitin-interacting motif of Eps15. Importantly, we find that Eps15 plays an important role in AMPAR internalization. Knockdown of Eps15 suppresses the internalization of GluA1 but not the mutant GluA1 that lacks ubiquitination sites, indicating a role of Eps15 for the internalization of ubiquitinated AMPARs. These results reveal a novel molecular mechanism employed specifically for the trafficking of the ubiquitin-modified AMPARs. PMID:25023288

  19. Ionotropic glutamate receptors mediate OFF responses in light-adapted ON bipolar cells

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Ji-Jie; Gao, Fan; Wu, Samuel M.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that photoreceptor synaptic inputs to depolarizing bipolar cells (DBCs or ON bipolar cells) are mediated by mGluR6 receptors and those to hyperpolarizing bipolar cells (HBCs or OFF bipolar cells) are mediated by AMPA/kainate receptors. Here we show that in addition to mGluR6 receptors which mediate the sign-inverting, depolarizing light responses, subpopulations of cone-dominated and rod/cone mixed DBCs use GluR4 AMPA receptors to generate a transient sign-preserving OFF response under light adapted conditions. These AMPA receptors are located at the basal junctions postsynaptic to rods and they are silent under dark-adapted conditions, as tonic glutamate release in darkness desensitizes these receptors. Light adaptation enhances rod-cone coupling and thus allows cone photocurrents with an abrupt OFF depolarization to enter the rods. The abrupt rod depolarization triggers glutamate activation of unoccupied AMPA receptors, resulting in a transient OFF response in DBCs. It has been widely accepted that the DNQX-sensitive, OFF transient responses in retinal amacrine cells and ganglion cells are mediated exclusively by HBCs. Our results suggests that this view needs revision as AMPA receptors in subpopulations of DBCs are likely to significantly contribute to the DNQX-sensitive OFF transient responses in light-adapted third- and higher-order visual neurons. PMID:22842089

  20. Receptor Crosslinking: A General Method to Trigger Internalization and Lysosomal Targeting of Therapeutic Receptor:Ligand Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Moody, Paul R; Sayers, Edward J; Magnusson, Johannes P; Alexander, Cameron; Borri, Paola; Watson, Peter; Jones, Arwyn T

    2015-01-01

    A major unmet clinical need is a universal method for subcellular targeting of bioactive molecules to lysosomes. Delivery to this organelle enables either degradation of oncogenic receptors that are overexpressed in cancers, or release of prodrugs from antibody–drug conjugates. Here, we describe a general method that uses receptor crosslinking to trigger endocytosis and subsequently redirect trafficking of receptor:cargo complexes from their expected route, to lysosomes. By incubation of plasma membrane receptors with biotinylated cargo and subsequent addition of streptavidin to crosslink receptor:cargo–biotin complexes, we achieved rapid and selective lysosomal targeting of transferrin, an anti-MHC class I antibody, and the clinically approved anti-Her2 antibody trastuzumab. These three protein ligands each target a receptor with a distinct cellular function and intracellular trafficking profile. Importantly, we confirmed that crosslinking of trastuzumab increased lysosomal degradation of its cognate oncogenic receptor Her2 in breast cancer cell lines SKBR3 and BT474. These data suggest that crosslinking could be exploited for a wide range of target receptors, for navigating therapeutics through the endolysosomal pathway, for significant therapeutic benefit. PMID:26412588

  1. Urban contributions of glyphosate and its degradate AMPA to streams in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolpin, D.W.; Thurman, E.M.; Lee, E.A.; Meyer, M.T.; Furlong, E.T.; Glassmeyer, S.T.

    2006-01-01

    Glyphosate is the most widely used herbicide in the world, being routinely applied to control weeds in both agricultural and urban settings. Microbial degradation of glyphosate produces aminomethyl phosphonic acid (AMPA). The high polarity and water-solubility of glyphosate and AMPA has, until recently, made their analysis in water samples problematic. Thus, compared to other herbicides (e.g. atrazine) there are relatively few studies on the environmental occurrence of glyphosate and AMPA. In 2002, treated effluent samples were collected from 10 wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) to study the occurrence of glyphosate and AMPA. Stream samples were collected upstream and downstream of the 10 WWTPs. Two reference streams were also sampled. The results document the apparent contribution of WWTP effluent to stream concentrations of glyphosate and AMPA, with roughly a two-fold increase in their frequencies of detection between stream samples collected upstream and those collected downstream of the WWTPs. Thus, urban use of glyphosate contributes to glyphosate and AMPA concentrations in streams in the United States. Overall, AMPA was detected much more frequently (67.5%) compared to glyphosate (17.5%).

  2. Lupus risk variants in the PXK locus alter B-cell receptor internalization.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, Samuel E; Foley, Corinne; Lu, Xiaoming; Patel, Zubin H; Zoller, Erin E; Magnusen, Albert F; Williams, Adrienne H; Ziegler, Julie T; Comeau, Mary E; Marion, Miranda C; Glenn, Stuart B; Adler, Adam; Shen, Nan; Nath, Swapan; Stevens, Anne M; Freedman, Barry I; Tsao, Betty P; Jacob, Chaim O; Kamen, Diane L; Brown, Elizabeth E; Gilkeson, Gary S; Alarcón, Graciela S; Reveille, John D; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; James, Judith A; Moser, Kathy L; Criswell, Lindsey A; Vilá, Luis M; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E; Petri, Michelle; Scofield, R Hal; Kimberly, Robert P; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Binjoo, Young; Choi, Jeongim; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Boackle, Susan A; Vyse, Timothy J; Guthridge, Joel M; Namjou, Bahram; Gaffney, Patrick M; Langefeld, Carl D; Kaufman, Kenneth M; Kelly, Jennifer A; Harley, Isaac T W; Harley, John B; Kottyan, Leah C

    2014-01-01

    Genome wide association studies have identified variants in PXK that confer risk for humoral autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE or lupus), rheumatoid arthritis and more recently systemic sclerosis. While PXK is involved in trafficking of epidermal growth factor Receptor (EGFR) in COS-7 cells, mechanisms linking PXK to lupus pathophysiology have remained undefined. In an effort to uncover the mechanism at this locus that increases lupus-risk, we undertook a fine-mapping analysis in a large multi-ancestral study of lupus patients and controls. We define a large (257kb) common haplotype marking a single causal variant that confers lupus risk detected only in European ancestral populations and spans the promoter through the 3' UTR of PXK. The strongest association was found at rs6445972 with P < 4.62 × 10(-10), OR 0.81 (0.75-0.86). Using stepwise logistic regression analysis, we demonstrate that one signal drives the genetic association in the region. Bayesian analysis confirms our results, identifying a 95% credible set consisting of 172 variants spanning 202 kb. Functionally, we found that PXK operates on the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR); we confirmed that PXK influenced the rate of BCR internalization. Furthermore, we demonstrate that individuals carrying the risk haplotype exhibited a decreased rate of BCR internalization, a process known to impact B cell survival and cell fate. Taken together, these data define a new candidate mechanism for the genetic association of variants around PXK with lupus risk and highlight the regulation of intracellular trafficking as a genetically regulated pathway mediating human autoimmunity. PMID:25620976

  3. In vivo (/sup 3/H)spiperone binding: evidence for accumulation in corpus striatum by agonist-mediated receptor internalization

    SciTech Connect

    Chugani, D.C.; Ackermann, R.F.; Phelps, M.E.

    1988-06-01

    The processes of receptor internalization and recycling have been well-documented for receptors for hormones, growth factors, lysosomal enzymes, and cellular substrates. Evidence also exists that these processes also occur for beta-adrenergic, muscarinic cholinergic, and delta-opiate receptors in frog erythrocytes or cultured nervous tissue. In this study, evidence is presented that agonist-mediated receptor internalization and recycling occurs at the dopamine receptor in rat corpus striatum. First, the in vivo binding of the dopamine antagonist (3H)spiperone was increased by both electrical stimulation and pharmacologically induced increases of dopamine release. Conversely, depletion of dopamine with reserpine decreased in vivo (3H)spiperone binding, but the same reserpine treatment did not alter its in vitro binding. Second, the rate of dissociation of (3H)spiperone from microsomal membranes prepared from rat striatum following in vivo binding was fivefold slower than its dissociation following in vitro equilibrium binding. Mild detergent treatment, employed to disrupt endocytic vesicle membranes, increased the rate of dissociation of in vivo bound (3H)spiperone from microsomal membranes to values not significantly different from its in vitro bound dissociation rate. Third, treatment of rats with chloroquine, a drug that prevents receptor recycling but not internalization, prior to (3H)spiperone injection resulted in a selective increase of in vivo (3H)spiperone binding in the light microsome membranes. The existence of mechanisms that rapidly alter the number of neurotransmitter receptors at synapses provides dynamic regulation of receptors in response to varied acute stimulation states.

  4. Intranasally Administered Neuropeptide S (NPS) Exerts Anxiolytic Effects Following Internalization Into NPS Receptor-Expressing Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ionescu, Irina A; Dine, Julien; Yen, Yi-Chun; Buell, Dominik R; Herrmann, Leonie; Holsboer, Florian; Eder, Matthias; Landgraf, Rainer; Schmidt, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    Experiments in rodents revealed neuropeptide S (NPS) to constitute a potential novel treatment option for anxiety diseases such as panic and post-traumatic stress disorder. However, both its cerebral target sites and the molecular underpinnings of NPS-mediated effects still remain elusive. By administration of fluorophore-conjugated NPS, we pinpointed NPS target neurons in distinct regions throughout the entire brain. We demonstrated their functional relevance in the hippocampus. In the CA1 region, NPS modulates synaptic transmission and plasticity. NPS is taken up into NPS receptor-expressing neurons by internalization of the receptor–ligand complex as we confirmed by subsequent cell culture studies. Furthermore, we tracked internalization of intranasally applied NPS at the single-neuron level and additionally demonstrate that it is delivered into the mouse brain without losing its anxiolytic properties. Finally, we show that NPS differentially modulates the expression of proteins of the glutamatergic system involved inter alia in synaptic plasticity. These results not only enlighten the path of NPS in the brain, but also establish a non-invasive method for NPS administration in mice, thus strongly encouraging translation into a novel therapeutic approach for pathological anxiety in humans. PMID:22278093

  5. Agonist-independent internalization of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1a is arrestin- and clathrin-dependent and is suppressed by receptor inverse agonists.

    PubMed

    Pula, Giordano; Mundell, Stuart J; Roberts, Peter J; Kelly, Eamonn

    2004-05-01

    Three group I mGluR antagonists CPCCOEt, LY367385 and BAY36-7620, were analyzed for their effect on cell surface expression of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1a and 1b. All three antagonists inhibited glutamate-induced internalization of mGluR1a and mGluR1b. However, when added alone, either LY367385 or BAY36-7620 increased the cell surface expression of mGluR1a but not mGluR1b. Both LY367385 and BAY36-7620 displayed inverse agonist activity as judged by their ability to inhibit basal inositol phosphate accumulation in cells expressing the constitutively active mGluR1a. Interestingly, mGluR1a but not mGluR1b was constitutively internalized in HEK293 cells and both LY367385 and BAY36-7620 inhibited the constitutive internalization of this splice variant. Furthermore, coexpression of dominant negative mutant constructs of arrestin-2 [arrestin-2-(319-418)] or Eps15 [Eps15(E Delta 95-295)] increased cell surface expression of mGluR1a and blocked constitutive receptor internalization. In the presence of these dominant negative mutants, incubation of cells with LY367385 and BAY36-7620 produced no further increase in cell surface expression of mGluR1a. Taken together, these results suggest that the constitutive activity of mGluR1a triggers the internalization of the receptor through an arrestin- and clathrin-dependent pathway, and that inverse agonists increase the cell surface expression of mGluR1a by promoting an inactive form of mGluR1a, which does not undergo constitutive internalization. PMID:15140199

  6. Formation and dissociation of M1 muscarinic receptor dimers seen by total internal reflection fluorescence imaging of single molecules.

    PubMed

    Hern, Jonathan A; Baig, Asma H; Mashanov, Gregory I; Birdsall, Berry; Corrie, John E T; Lazareno, Sebastian; Molloy, Justin E; Birdsall, Nigel J M

    2010-02-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest family of transmembrane signaling proteins in the human genome. Events in the GPCR signaling cascade have been well characterized, but the receptor composition and its membrane distribution are still generally unknown. Although there is evidence that some members of the GPCR superfamily exist as constitutive dimers or higher oligomers, interpretation of the results has been disputed, and recent studies indicate that monomeric GPCRs may also be functional. Because there is controversy within the field, to address the issue we have used total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) in living cells to visualize thousands of individual molecules of a model GPCR, the M(1) muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. By tracking the position of individual receptors over time, their mobility, clustering, and dimerization kinetics could be directly determined with a resolution of approximately 30 ms and approximately 20 nm. In isolated CHO cells, receptors are randomly distributed over the plasma membrane. At any given time, approximately 30% of the receptor molecules exist as dimers, and we found no evidence for higher oligomers. Two-color TIRFM established the dynamic nature of dimer formation with M(1) receptors undergoing interconversion between monomers and dimers on the timescale of seconds. PMID:20133736

  7. Formation and dissociation of M1 muscarinic receptor dimers seen by total internal reflection fluorescence imaging of single molecules

    PubMed Central

    Hern, Jonathan A.; Baig, Asma H.; Mashanov, Gregory I.; Birdsall, Berry; Corrie, John E. T.; Lazareno, Sebastian; Molloy, Justin E.; Birdsall, Nigel J. M.

    2010-01-01

    G-protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest family of transmembrane signaling proteins in the human genome. Events in the GPCR signaling cascade have been well characterized, but the receptor composition and its membrane distribution are still generally unknown. Although there is evidence that some members of the GPCR superfamily exist as constitutive dimers or higher oligomers, interpretation of the results has been disputed, and recent studies indicate that monomeric GPCRs may also be functional. Because there is controversy within the field, to address the issue we have used total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) in living cells to visualize thousands of individual molecules of a model GPCR, the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. By tracking the position of individual receptors over time, their mobility, clustering, and dimerization kinetics could be directly determined with a resolution of ~30 ms and ~20 nm. In isolated CHO cells, receptors are randomly distributed over the plasma membrane. At any given time, ~30% of the receptor molecules exist as dimers, and we found no evidence for higher oligomers. Two-color TIRFM established the dynamic nature of dimer formation with M1 receptors undergoing interconversion between monomers and dimers on the timescale of seconds. PMID:20133736

  8. Prolactin receptor-mediated internalization of imaging agents detects epithelial ovarian cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaram, Karthik M.

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) has the highest mortality rate of all gynecologic malignant tumors. Diagnosis of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) presents two main challenges. The first challenge is detecting low volume (< 1 g) and early stage (≤ stage II) masses to prevent rapid progression to late stages and ultimately death. The second challenge is differentiating malignant from benign tissue to avoid costly and invasive surgeries (19.5 surgeries are required to find 1 cancer even with multiple screenings). First-line diagnostic tests such as ultrasound and serum marker tests (e.g. CA-125) aid in diagnosis but they lack the sensitivity and specificity required to overcome both challenges. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a second-line diagnostic aided by gadolinium based contrast agents (CAs), offers higher resolution pictures for classifying indeterminate ovarian masses. But as currently practiced, MRI still lacks the sensitivity and specificity required to alter patient outcomes. In this work we develop a new paradigm for EOC diagnosis that targets the prolactin receptor (PRLR) - a cell surface tyrosine kinase receptor that is over-expressed in moderate to high levels on > 98% of epithelial ovarian cancers. Upon binding of native ligands to PRLR, the ligand:PRLR complex is internalized by cells. By conjugating gadolinium-chelates, molecules normally used as contrast agents diagnostically, to human placental lactogen (hPL), a native ligand of PRLR, we show that MRI becomes highly sensitive and specific for detecting PRLR (+) tumors in a nude mouse model of EOC. We further establish the adaptability of this approach for fluorescence-based imaging techniques using an hPL conjugated Cy5.5 dye. We conclude that molecular imaging of PRLR with hPL-conjugated imaging agents can address the current challenges that limit EOC diagnosis.

  9. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCIV. Adhesion G Protein–Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Aust, Gabriela; Araç, Demet; Engel, Felix B.; Formstone, Caroline; Fredriksson, Robert; Hall, Randy A.; Harty, Breanne L.; Kirchhoff, Christiane; Knapp, Barbara; Krishnan, Arunkumar; Liebscher, Ines; Lin, Hsi-Hsien; Martinelli, David C.; Monk, Kelly R.; Peeters, Miriam C.; Piao, Xianhua; Prömel, Simone; Schöneberg, Torsten; Schwartz, Thue W.; Singer, Kathleen; Stacey, Martin; Ushkaryov, Yuri A.; Vallon, Mario; Wolfrum, Uwe; Wright, Mathew W.; Xu, Lei; Langenhan, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    The Adhesion family forms a large branch of the pharmacologically important superfamily of G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs). As Adhesion GPCRs increasingly receive attention from a wide spectrum of biomedical fields, the Adhesion GPCR Consortium, together with the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology Committee on Receptor Nomenclature and Drug Classification, proposes a unified nomenclature for Adhesion GPCRs. The new names have ADGR as common dominator followed by a letter and a number to denote each subfamily and subtype, respectively. The new names, with old and alternative names within parentheses, are: ADGRA1 (GPR123), ADGRA2 (GPR124), ADGRA3 (GPR125), ADGRB1 (BAI1), ADGRB2 (BAI2), ADGRB3 (BAI3), ADGRC1 (CELSR1), ADGRC2 (CELSR2), ADGRC3 (CELSR3), ADGRD1 (GPR133), ADGRD2 (GPR144), ADGRE1 (EMR1, F4/80), ADGRE2 (EMR2), ADGRE3 (EMR3), ADGRE4 (EMR4), ADGRE5 (CD97), ADGRF1 (GPR110), ADGRF2 (GPR111), ADGRF3 (GPR113), ADGRF4 (GPR115), ADGRF5 (GPR116, Ig-Hepta), ADGRG1 (GPR56), ADGRG2 (GPR64, HE6), ADGRG3 (GPR97), ADGRG4 (GPR112), ADGRG5 (GPR114), ADGRG6 (GPR126), ADGRG7 (GPR128), ADGRL1 (latrophilin-1, CIRL-1, CL1), ADGRL2 (latrophilin-2, CIRL-2, CL2), ADGRL3 (latrophilin-3, CIRL-3, CL3), ADGRL4 (ELTD1, ETL), and ADGRV1 (VLGR1, GPR98). This review covers all major biologic aspects of Adhesion GPCRs, including evolutionary origins, interaction partners, signaling, expression, physiologic functions, and therapeutic potential. PMID:25713288

  10. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCIV. Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Hamann, Jörg; Aust, Gabriela; Araç, Demet; Engel, Felix B; Formstone, Caroline; Fredriksson, Robert; Hall, Randy A; Harty, Breanne L; Kirchhoff, Christiane; Knapp, Barbara; Krishnan, Arunkumar; Liebscher, Ines; Lin, Hsi-Hsien; Martinelli, David C; Monk, Kelly R; Peeters, Miriam C; Piao, Xianhua; Prömel, Simone; Schöneberg, Torsten; Schwartz, Thue W; Singer, Kathleen; Stacey, Martin; Ushkaryov, Yuri A; Vallon, Mario; Wolfrum, Uwe; Wright, Mathew W; Xu, Lei; Langenhan, Tobias; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2015-01-01

    The Adhesion family forms a large branch of the pharmacologically important superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). As Adhesion GPCRs increasingly receive attention from a wide spectrum of biomedical fields, the Adhesion GPCR Consortium, together with the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology Committee on Receptor Nomenclature and Drug Classification, proposes a unified nomenclature for Adhesion GPCRs. The new names have ADGR as common dominator followed by a letter and a number to denote each subfamily and subtype, respectively. The new names, with old and alternative names within parentheses, are: ADGRA1 (GPR123), ADGRA2 (GPR124), ADGRA3 (GPR125), ADGRB1 (BAI1), ADGRB2 (BAI2), ADGRB3 (BAI3), ADGRC1 (CELSR1), ADGRC2 (CELSR2), ADGRC3 (CELSR3), ADGRD1 (GPR133), ADGRD2 (GPR144), ADGRE1 (EMR1, F4/80), ADGRE2 (EMR2), ADGRE3 (EMR3), ADGRE4 (EMR4), ADGRE5 (CD97), ADGRF1 (GPR110), ADGRF2 (GPR111), ADGRF3 (GPR113), ADGRF4 (GPR115), ADGRF5 (GPR116, Ig-Hepta), ADGRG1 (GPR56), ADGRG2 (GPR64, HE6), ADGRG3 (GPR97), ADGRG4 (GPR112), ADGRG5 (GPR114), ADGRG6 (GPR126), ADGRG7 (GPR128), ADGRL1 (latrophilin-1, CIRL-1, CL1), ADGRL2 (latrophilin-2, CIRL-2, CL2), ADGRL3 (latrophilin-3, CIRL-3, CL3), ADGRL4 (ELTD1, ETL), and ADGRV1 (VLGR1, GPR98). This review covers all major biologic aspects of Adhesion GPCRs, including evolutionary origins, interaction partners, signaling, expression, physiologic functions, and therapeutic potential. PMID:25713288

  11. A study of the oligomeric state of the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid-preferring glutamate receptors in the synaptic junctions of porcine brain.

    PubMed

    Wu, T Y; Liu, C I; Chang, Y C

    1996-11-01

    The number of the subunits in an alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)-preferring L-glutamate receptor in the synaptic junctions of porcine brain was investigated in this study. Upon incubation of the synaptic junctions with three cross-linking regents, dimethyl adipimidate (DMA), dimethyl suberimidate (DMS) and N-succinimidyl-(4-azidophenyl)-1,3'-dithiopropionate (SADP), AMPA receptor subunits in higher-molecular-mass aggregates were detected by immunoblotting. These aggregates migrated as proteins of approx. 200, 300 and 400 kDa. The number and identity of the subunits in a solubilized AMPA receptor were also investigated here. Two samples, W1 and W2, enriched in AMPA receptors were prepared from synaptic junctions by a combination of detergent-solubilization, anion-exchange chromatography and wheatgerm agglutinin affinity chromatography. Hydrodynamic behaviour analyses revealed that the majority of the AMPA receptors in either one of these samples were asymmetrical detergent-surrounded particles with a protein mass around 350 kDa. SDS/PAGE analysis revealed that the majority of AMPA receptors in the W1 sample were comprised of dimers of 106 kDa subunits which were covalently linked by disulphide bonds. Cross-linking these receptors with SADP yielded a new band of approx. 400 kDa. The results obtained here, either from the studies of AMPA receptors embedding in synaptic junctions or from those of detergent-solubilized and partially purified receptors, suggest that AMPA receptors contain a basic core structure comprising of four 106 kDa subunits. PMID:8920974

  12. A study of the oligomeric state of the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid-preferring glutamate receptors in the synaptic junctions of porcine brain.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, T Y; Liu, C I; Chang, Y C

    1996-01-01

    The number of the subunits in an alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)-preferring L-glutamate receptor in the synaptic junctions of porcine brain was investigated in this study. Upon incubation of the synaptic junctions with three cross-linking regents, dimethyl adipimidate (DMA), dimethyl suberimidate (DMS) and N-succinimidyl-(4-azidophenyl)-1,3'-dithiopropionate (SADP), AMPA receptor subunits in higher-molecular-mass aggregates were detected by immunoblotting. These aggregates migrated as proteins of approx. 200, 300 and 400 kDa. The number and identity of the subunits in a solubilized AMPA receptor were also investigated here. Two samples, W1 and W2, enriched in AMPA receptors were prepared from synaptic junctions by a combination of detergent-solubilization, anion-exchange chromatography and wheatgerm agglutinin affinity chromatography. Hydrodynamic behaviour analyses revealed that the majority of the AMPA receptors in either one of these samples were asymmetrical detergent-surrounded particles with a protein mass around 350 kDa. SDS/PAGE analysis revealed that the majority of AMPA receptors in the W1 sample were comprised of dimers of 106 kDa subunits which were covalently linked by disulphide bonds. Cross-linking these receptors with SADP yielded a new band of approx. 400 kDa. The results obtained here, either from the studies of AMPA receptors embedding in synaptic junctions or from those of detergent-solubilized and partially purified receptors, suggest that AMPA receptors contain a basic core structure comprising of four 106 kDa subunits. PMID:8920974

  13. Internalization and desensitization of the oxytocin receptor is inhibited by Dynamin and clathrin mutants in human embryonic kidney 293 cells.

    PubMed

    Smith, M P; Ayad, V J; Mundell, S J; McArdle, C A; Kelly, E; López Bernal, A

    2006-02-01

    Oxytocin (OT) has long been used as an uterotonic during labor management in women, and yet responses to OT infusion remain variable and unpredictable among patients. The investigation of oxytocin receptor (OTR) regulation will benefit labor management, because the clinical practice of continuous iv infusion of OT is not optimal. As with other G protein-coupled receptors, it is likely that the OTR internalizes and/or desensitizes upon continuous agonist exposure. The mechanisms by which this might occur, however, are unclear. Here we explore OTR internalization and desensitization in human embryonic kidney cells by utilizing inhibitors of heterologous second messenger systems and recently available mutant cDNA constructs. We report rapid and extensive internalization and desensitization of the OTR upon agonist exposure. Internalization was unaffected by inhibitors of protein kinase C or Ca(2+) calmodulin-dependant kinase II but was significantly reduced after transfection with dominant-negative mutant cDNAs of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2, beta-Arrestin2, Dynamin, and Eps15 (a component of clathrin-coated pits). Moreover, desensitization of the OTR, measured by a calcium mobilization assay, was also inhibited by the aforementioned cDNA constructs. Thus, our data demonstrate, for the first time, the importance of the classical clathrin-mediated pathway during agonist-induced OTR internalization and desensitization. PMID:16179383

  14. Testing NMDA receptor block as a therapeutic strategy for reducing ischaemic damage to CNS white matter.

    PubMed

    Bakiri, Yamina; Hamilton, Nicola B; Káradóttir, Ragnhildur; Attwell, David

    2008-01-15

    Damage to oligodendrocytes caused by glutamate release contributes to mental or physical handicap in periventricular leukomalacia, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, and stroke, and has been attributed to activation of AMPA/kainate receptors. However, glutamate also activates unusual NMDA receptors in oligodendrocytes, which can generate an ion influx even at the resting potential in a physiological [Mg2+]. Here, we show that the clinically licensed NMDA receptor antagonist memantine blocks oligodendrocyte NMDA receptors at concentrations achieved therapeutically. Simulated ischaemia released glutamate which activated NMDA receptors, as well as AMPA/kainate receptors, on mature and precursor oligodendrocytes. Although blocking AMPA/kainate receptors alone during ischaemia had no effect, combining memantine with an AMPA/kainate receptor blocker, or applying the NMDA blocker MK-801 alone, improved recovery of the action potential in myelinated axons after the ischaemia. These data suggest NMDA receptor blockers as a potentially useful treatment for some white matter diseases and define conditions under which these blockers may be useful therapeutically. Our results highlight the importance of developing new antagonists selective for oligodendrocyte NMDA receptors based on their difference in subunit structure from most neuronal NMDA receptors. PMID:18046734

  15. Flumazenil decreases surface expression of α4β2δ GABAA receptors by increasing the rate of receptor internalization.

    PubMed

    Kuver, Aarti; Smith, Sheryl S

    2016-01-01

    Increases in expression of α4βδ GABAA receptors (GABARs), triggered by fluctuations in the neurosteroid THP (3α-OH-5α[β]-pregnan-20-one), are associated with changes in mood and cognition. We tested whether α4βδ trafficking and surface expression would be altered by in vitro exposure to flumazenil, a benzodiazepine ligand which reduces α4βδ expression in vivo. We first determined that flumazenil (100 nM-100 μM, IC50=∼1 μM) acted as a negative modulator, reducing GABA (10 μM)-gated current in the presence of 100 nM THP (to increase receptor efficacy), assessed with whole cell patch clamp recordings of recombinant α4β2δ expressed in HEK-293 cells. Surface expression of recombinant α4β2δ receptors was detected using a 3XFLAG reporter at the C-terminus of α4 (α4F) using confocal immunocytochemical techniques following 48 h exposure of cells to GABA (10 μM)+THP (100 nM). Flumazenil (10 μM) decreased surface expression of α4F by ∼60%, while increasing its intracellular accumulation, after 48 h. Reduced surface expression of α4β2δ after flumazenil treatment was confirmed by decreases in the current responses to 100 nM of the GABA agonist gaboxadol. Flumazenil-induced decreases in surface expression of α4β2δ were prevented by the dynamin blocker, dynasore, and by leupeptin, which blocks lysosomal enzymes, suggesting that flumazenil is acting to increase endocytosis and lysosomal degradation of the receptor. Flumazenil increased the rate of receptor removal from the cell surface by 2-fold, assessed using botulinum toxin B to block insertion of new receptors. These findings may suggest new therapeutic strategies for regulation of α4β2δ expression using flumazenil. PMID:26592470

  16. Toxicity of AMPA to the earthworm Eisenia andrei Bouché, 1972 in tropical artificial soil.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Anahí; Brown, George Gardner; Sautter, Klaus Dieter; de Oliveira, Cintia Mara Ribas; de Vasconcelos, Eliane Carvalho; Niva, Cintia Carla; Bartz, Marie Luise Carolina; Bedano, José Camilo

    2016-01-01

    Aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) - one of glyphosate's main metabolites - has been classified as persistent in soils, raising concern regarding the widespread use of glyphosate in agriculture and forestry. Glyphosate may have negative or neutral effects on soil biota, but no information is available on the toxicity of AMPA to soil invertebrates. Therefore our aim was to study the effect of AMPA on mortality and reproduction of the earthworm species Eisenia andrei using standard soil ecotoxicological methods (ISO). Field-relevant concentrations of AMPA had no significant effects on mortality in acute or chronic assays. Except at the highest concentration tested, a significant biomass loss was observed compared to controls in the chronic assay. The number of juveniles and cocoons increased with higher concentrations of AMPA applied, but their mean weights decreased. This mass loss indicates higher sensitivity of juveniles than adults to AMPA. Our results suggest that earthworms coming from parents grown in contaminated soils may have reduced growth, limiting their beneficial roles in key soil ecosystem functions. Nevertheless, further research is needed to better understand the mechanisms underlying the sublethal effects observed here. PMID:26792548

  17. Toxicity of AMPA to the earthworm Eisenia andrei Bouché, 1972 in tropical artificial soil

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez, Anahí; Brown, George Gardner; Sautter, Klaus Dieter; Ribas de Oliveira, Cintia Mara; de Vasconcelos, Eliane Carvalho; Niva, Cintia Carla; Bartz, Marie Luise Carolina; Bedano, José Camilo

    2016-01-01

    Aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) - one of glyphosate’s main metabolites - has been classified as persistent in soils, raising concern regarding the widespread use of glyphosate in agriculture and forestry. Glyphosate may have negative or neutral effects on soil biota, but no information is available on the toxicity of AMPA to soil invertebrates. Therefore our aim was to study the effect of AMPA on mortality and reproduction of the earthworm species Eisenia andrei using standard soil ecotoxicological methods (ISO). Field-relevant concentrations of AMPA had no significant effects on mortality in acute or chronic assays. Except at the highest concentration tested, a significant biomass loss was observed compared to controls in the chronic assay. The number of juveniles and cocoons increased with higher concentrations of AMPA applied, but their mean weights decreased. This mass loss indicates higher sensitivity of juveniles than adults to AMPA. Our results suggest that earthworms coming from parents grown in contaminated soils may have reduced growth, limiting their beneficial roles in key soil ecosystem functions. Nevertheless, further research is needed to better understand the mechanisms underlying the sublethal effects observed here. PMID:26792548

  18. Differential effects of glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) on photosynthesis and chlorophyll metabolism in willow plants.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Marcelo Pedrosa; Le Manac'h, Sarah Gingras; Maccario, Sophie; Labrecque, Michel; Lucotte, Marc; Juneau, Philippe

    2016-06-01

    We used a willow species (Salix miyabeana cultivar SX64) to examine the differential secondary-effects of glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA), the principal glyphosate by-product, on chlorophyll metabolism and photosynthesis. Willow plants were treated with different concentrations of glyphosate (equivalent to 0, 1.4, 2.1 and 2.8kgha(-1)) and AMPA (equivalent to 0, 0.28, 1.4 and 2.8kgha(-1)) and evaluations of pigment contents, chlorophyll fluorescence, and oxidative stress markers (hydrogen peroxide content and antioxidant enzyme activities) in leaves were performed after 12h of exposure. We observed that AMPA and glyphosate trigger different mechanisms leading to decreases in chlorophyll content and photosynthesis rates in willow plants. Both chemicals induced ROS accumulation in willow leaves although only glyphosate-induced oxidative damage through lipid peroxidation. By disturbing chlorophyll biosynthesis, AMPA induced decreases in chlorophyll contents, with consequent effects on photosynthesis. With glyphosate, ROS increases were higher than the ROS-sensitive threshold, provoking chlorophyll degradation (as seen by pheophytin accumulation) and invariable decreases in photosynthesis. Peroxide accumulation in both AMPA and glyphosate-treated plants was due to the inhibition of antioxidant enzyme activities. The different effects of glyphosate on chlorophyll contents and photosynthesis as described in the literature may be due to various glyphosate:AMPA ratios in those plants. PMID:27155486

  19. Internalization and trafficking of guanylyl (guanylate) cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor A is regulated by an acidic tyrosine-based cytoplasmic motif GDAY

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Kailash N.; Nguyen, Huong T.; Garg, Renu; Khurana, Madan L.; Fink, Jude

    2004-01-01

    We have identified a GDAY motif in the C-terminal domain of guanylyl cyclase (guanylate cyclase)/NPRA (natriuretic peptide receptor A) sequence, which serves a dual role as an internalization signal and a recycling signal. To delineate the role of the GDAY motif in receptor internalization and sequestration, we mutated Gly920, Asp921 and Tyr923 to alanine residues (GDAY/AAAA) in the NPRA cDNA sequence. The cDNAs encoding wild-type and mutant receptors were transfected in HEK-293 cells (human embryonic kidney 293 cells). The internalization studies of ligand–receptor complexes revealed that endocytosis of 125I-ANP by HEK-293 cells expressing G920A, Y923A or GDAY/AAAA mutant receptor was decreased by almost 50% (P<0.001) when compared with cells expressing the wild-type receptor. However, the effect of D921A mutation on receptor internalization was minimal. Ligand-mediated down-regulation of G920A, Y923A and GDAY/AAAA mutant receptors was decreased by 35–40% when compared with wild-type NPRA. Subsequently, the recycling of internalized D921A and GDAY/AAAA mutant receptors from the intracellular pool was decreased by more than 40±4% when compared with wild-type NPRA. Recycling of G920A and Y923A mutant receptors was also decreased, but to a significantly lesser extent compared with the D921A or GDAY/AAAA mutant receptors. We conclude that the Gly920 and Tyr923 residues within the GDAY consensus motif are necessary for internalization, and that residue Asp921 is important for recycling of NPRA. The current results provide new evidence for a dual role of the GDAY sequence motif in ligand-mediated internalization, recycling and down-regulation of a single-transmembrane receptor protein NPRA. PMID:15574117

  20. Contractile effects of intracellularly administered angiotensin II are partially dependent on membrane receptors internalization in isolated rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Petrescu, G; Costuleanu, M; Slătineanu, S M; Foia, L; Costuleanu, N; Costuleanu, A

    2001-01-01

    In the present study we used the isolated rat aorta as a model to characterize the modulation of contractile effects of extra- and intracellularly administered angiotensin II by dithiothreitol (DTT) and hyperosmotic sucrose. DTT inactivation of AT1 receptor as well as disruption of the clathrin-coated pits by hyperosmotic sucrose significantly inhibited the contraction induced by intracellularly administered AII. We suggest that these intracellular effects of angiotensin peptides are associated with AT1 receptor activation/internalization and may thus be part of the mechanism of angiotensin peptides direct contractile effects in the vascular smooth muscle. PMID:12092224

  1. Involvement of PRMT1 in hnRNPQ activation and internalization of insulin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Iwasaki, Hiroaki

    2008-07-25

    Insulin signaling in skeletal L6 myotubes is known to be affected by arginine methylation catalyzed by protein N-arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1), however, the mechanism by which this occurs has not yet been defined. This study aimed to determine the exact substrate involved in the methylation and regulating insulin signaling in cells. Insulin enhanced arginine methylation of a 66-kDa protein (p66) concomitant with translocation of PRMT1 to the membrane fraction. Peptide mass fingerprinting identified p66 as a heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein, hnRNPQ that was bound to and methylated by PRMT1. Pharmacological inhibition of methylation (MTA) and small interfering RNA against PRMT1 (PRMT1-siRNA) attenuated insulin-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of hnRNPQ and insulin receptor (IR), and the interaction between hnRNPQ and IR. MTA, PRMT1-siRNA, and hnRNPQ-siRNA inhibited internalization of IR in the same manner. These data suggest that the PRMT1-mediated methylation of hnRNPQ is implicated in IR trafficking and insulin signaling in skeletal L6 myotubes.

  2. Processing of receptor-bound somatostatin: internalization and degradation by pancreatic acini

    SciTech Connect

    Viguerie, N.; Esteve, J.P.; Susini, C.; Vaysse, N.; Ribet, A.

    1987-04-01

    The authors have previously demonstrated the presence of specific binding sites for somatostatin on plasma membranes from pancreatic acinar cells. In the present study they attempted to characterize the fate of receptor-bound /sup 125/I-(Tyr/sup 11/)somatostatin. Internalization of somatostatin was rapid (reaching a plateau at 20% of the cell-associated specific radioactivity) and temperature dependent. To follow the processing of bound somatostatin, acini were incubated with /sup 125/I-(Tyr/sup 11/)somatostatin at 5/sup 0/C during 16 h then, after washing, incubated at 37/sup 0/C for 90 min in fresh medium. Surface-bound somatostatin decreased rapidly, whereas radioactivity increased in the cell interior and the incubation medium. Intracellular and membrane-bound radioactivity was mainly intact /sup 125/I-(Tyr/sup 11/)somatostatin. Degradation occurred at the plasma membrane level and led to iodotyrosine production. After 15 min of incubation, 15% of the initially surface-bound /sup 125/I-(Tyr/sup 11/)somatostatin was compartmentalized within the cell, mainly in the microsomal fraction. After 30 min, a significant increase in radioactivity appeared in the nuclear fraction. These results indicate that the major part of somatostatin cellular degradation takes place at the plasma membrane level. Within the cell, somatostatin is routed to the nucleus via particular fractions sedimenting with microsomal vesicles.

  3. The Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor: A Key Bridging Molecule of External and Internal Chemical Signals

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jijing; Feng, Yu; Fu, Hualing; Xie, Heidi Qunhui; Jiang, Joy Xiaosong; Zhao, Bin

    2015-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a highly evolutionary conserved, ligand-activated transcription factor that is best known to mediate the toxicities of dioxins and dioxin-like compounds. Phenotype of AhR-null mice, together with the recent discovery of a variety of endogenous and plant-derived ligands, point to the integral roles of AhR in normal cell physiology, in addition to its roles in sensing the environmental chemicals. Here, we summarize the current knowledge about AhR signaling pathways, its ligands and AhR-mediated effects on cell specialization, host defense and detoxification. AhR-mediated health effects particularly in liver, immune, and nervous systems, as well as in tumorgenesis are discussed. Dioxin-initiated embryotoxicity and immunosuppressive effects in fish and birds are reviewed. Recent data demonstrate that AhR is a convergence point of multiple signaling pathways that inform the cell of its external and internal environments. As such, AhR pathway is a promising potential target for therapeutics targeting nervous, liver, and autoimmune diseases through AhR ligand-mediated interventions and other perturbations of AhR signaling. Additionally, using available laboratory data obtained on animal models, AhR-centered adverse outcome pathway analysis is useful in reexamining known and potential adverse outcomes of specific or mixed compounds on wildlife. PMID:26079192

  4. The human insulin receptor mRNA contains a functional internal ribosome entry segment

    PubMed Central

    Spriggs, Keith A.; Cobbold, Laura C.; Ridley, Simon H.; Coldwell, Mark; Bottley, Andrew; Bushell, Martin; Willis, Anne E.; Siddle, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Regulation of mRNA translation is an important mechanism determining the level of expression of proteins in eukaryotic cells. Translation is most commonly initiated by cap-dependent scanning, but many eukaryotic mRNAs contain internal ribosome entry segments (IRESs), providing an alternative means of initiation capable of independent regulation. Here, we show by using dicistronic luciferase reporter vectors that the 5′-UTR of the mRNA encoding human insulin receptor (hIR) contains a functional IRES. RNAi-mediated knockdown showed that the protein PTB was required for maximum IRES activity. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays confirmed that PTB1, PTB2 and nPTB, but not unr or PTB4, bound to hIR mRNA, and deletion mapping implicated a CCU motif 448 nt upstream of the initiator AUG in PTB binding. The IR-IRES was functional in a number of cell lines, and most active in cells of neuronal origin, as assessed by luciferase reporter assays. The IRES was more active in confluent than sub-confluent cells, but activity did not change during differentiation of 3T3-L1 fibroblasts to adipocytes. IRES activity was stimulated by insulin in sub-confluent cells. The IRES may function to maintain expression of IR protein in tissues such as the brain where mRNA translation by cap-dependent scanning is less effective. PMID:19654240

  5. Glyphosate-Resistant and Conventional Canola (Brassica napus L.) Responses to Glyphosate and Aminomethylphosphonic Acid (AMPA) Treatment.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Elza Alves; Dayan, Franck E; Owens, Daniel K; Rimando, Agnes M; Duke, Stephen O

    2016-05-11

    Glyphosate-resistant (GR) canola contains two transgenes that impart resistance to the herbicide glyphosate: (1) the microbial glyphosate oxidase gene (gox) encoding the glyphosate oxidase enzyme (GOX) that metabolizes glyphosate to aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) and (2) cp4 that encodes a GR form of the glyphosate target enzyme 5-enolpyruvylshikimic acid-3-phosphate synthase. The objectives of this research were to determine the phytotoxicity of AMPA to canola, the relative metabolism of glyphosate to AMPA in GR and conventional non-GR (NGR) canola, and AMPA pool sizes in glyphosate-treated GR canola. AMPA applied at 1.0 kg ha(-1) was not phytotoxic to GR or NGR. At this AMPA application rate, NGR canola accumulated a higher concentration of AMPA in its tissues than GR canola. At rates of 1 and 3.33 kg ae ha(-1) of glyphosate, GR canola growth was stimulated. This stimulatory effect is similar to that of much lower doses of glyphosate on NGR canola. Both shikimate and AMPA accumulated in tissues of these glyphosate-treated plants. In a separate experiment in which young GR and NGR canola plants were treated with non-phytotoxic levels of [(14)C]-glyphosate, very little glyphosate was metabolized in NGR plants, whereas most of the glyphosate was metabolized to AMPA in GR plants at 7 days after application. Untreated leaves of GR plants accumulated only metabolites (mostly AMPA) of glyphosate, indicating that GOX activity is very high in the youngest leaves. These data indicate that more glyphosate is transformed to AMPA rapidly in GR canola and that the accumulated AMPA is not toxic to the canola plant. PMID:27092715

  6. Paradoxical proepileptic response to NMDA receptor blockade linked to cortical interneuron defect in stargazer mice.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Atul; Nahm, Walter K; Noebels, Jeffrey L

    2013-01-01

    Paradoxical seizure exacerbation by anti-epileptic medication is a well-known clinical phenomenon in epilepsy, but the cellular mechanisms remain unclear. One possibility is enhanced network disinhibition by unintended suppression of inhibitory interneurons. We investigated this hypothesis in the stargazer mouse model of absence epilepsy, which bears a mutation in stargazin, an AMPA receptor trafficking protein. If AMPA signaling onto inhibitory GABAergic neurons is impaired, their activation by glutamate depends critically upon NMDA receptors. Indeed, we find that stargazer seizures are exacerbated by NMDA receptor blockade with CPP (3-[(R)-2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl]-prop-2-enyl-1-phosphonic acid) and MK-801, whereas other genetic absence epilepsy models are sensitive to these antagonists. To determine how an AMPA receptor trafficking defect could lead to paradoxical network activation, we analyzed stargazin and AMPA receptor localization and found that stargazin is detected exclusively in parvalbumin-positive (PV (+)) fast-spiking interneurons in somatosensory cortex, where it is co-expressed with the AMPA receptor subunit GluA4. PV (+) cortical interneurons in stargazer show a near twofold decrease in the dendrite:soma GluA4 expression ratio compared to wild-type (WT) littermates. We explored the functional consequence of this trafficking defect on network excitability in neocortical slices. Both NMDA receptor antagonists suppressed 0 Mg (2) (+)-induced network discharges in WT but augmented bursting in stargazer cortex. Interneurons mediate this paradoxical response, since the difference between genotypes was masked by GABA receptor blockade. Our findings provide a cellular locus for AMPA receptor-dependent signaling defects in stargazer cortex and define an interneuron-dependent mechanism for paradoxical seizure exacerbation in absence epilepsy. PMID:24065886

  7. TrkB activation by 7, 8-dihydroxyflavone increases synapse AMPA subunits and ameliorates spatial memory deficits in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lei; Tian, Mi; Zhao, Hong-Yun; Xu, Qian-Qian; Huang, Yu-Ming; Si, Qun-Cao; Tian, Qing; Wu, Qing-Ming; Hu, Xia-Min; Sun, Li-Bo; McClintock, Shawn M; Zeng, Yan

    2016-02-01

    We recently demonstrated that activation of tyrosine receptor kinase B (TrkB) by 7, 8-dihydroxyflavone (7, 8-DHF), the selective TrkB agonist, increased surface alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid (AMPA) receptors (AMPARs) AMPA receptor subunit GluR1 (GluA1) subunit expression at the synapses of Fragile X Syndrome mutant mice. This present study investigated the effects of 7, 8-DHF on both memory function and synapse structure in relation to the synapse protein level of AMPARs in the Tg2576 Alzheimer's disease (AD) mouse model. The study found that chronic oral administration of 7, 8-DHF significantly improved spatial memory and minimized dendrite loss in the hippocampus of Tg2576 mice. A key feature of 7, 8-DHF action was the increased expression of both GluA1 and GluA2 at synapses. Interestingly, 7, 8-DHF had no effect on the attenuation of amyloid precursor protein or Aβ exhibiting in the Tg2576 AD brains, yet it activated the phosphorylation of TrkB receptors and its downstream signals including CaMKII, Akt, Erk1/2, and cAMP-response element-binding protein. Importantly, cyclotraxin B (a TrkB inhibitor), U0126 (a Ras-ERK pathway inhibitor), Wortmannin (an Akt phosphorylation inhibitor), and KN-93 (a CaMKII inhibitor) counteracted the enhanced expression and phosphorylation of AMPAR subunits induced by 7, 8-DHF. Collectively, our results demonstrated that 7, 8-DHF acted on TrkB and resolved learning and memory impairments in the absence of reduced amyloid in amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice partially through improved synaptic structure and enhanced synaptic AMPARs. The findings suggest that the application of 7, 8-DHF may be a promising new approach to improve cognitive abilities in AD. We provided extensive data demonstrating that 7, 8-dihydroflavone, the TrkB agonist, improved Tg2576 mice spatial memory. This improvement is correlated with a reversion to normal values of GluA1 and GluA2 AMPA receptor subunits and dendritic

  8. Deletion of the distal COOH-terminus of the A2B adenosine receptor switches internalization to an arrestin- and clathrin-independent pathway and inhibits recycling

    PubMed Central

    Mundell, SJ; Matharu, A-L; Nisar, S; Palmer, TM; Benovic, JL; Kelly, E

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: We have investigated the effect of deletions of a postsynaptic density, disc large and zo-1 protein (PDZ) motif at the end of the COOH-terminus of the rat A2B adenosine receptor on intracellular trafficking following long-term exposure to the agonist 5′-(N-ethylcarboxamido)-adenosine. Experimental approach: The trafficking of the wild type A2B adenosine receptor and deletion mutants expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells was studied using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in combination with immunofluorescence microscopy. Key results: The wild type A2B adenosine receptor and deletion mutants were all extensively internalized following prolonged treatment with NECA. The intracellular compartment through which the Gln325-stop receptor mutant, which lacks the Type II PDZ motif found in the wild type receptor initially trafficked was not the same as the wild type receptor. Expression of dominant negative mutants of arrestin-2, dynamin or Eps-15 inhibited internalization of wild type and Leu330-stop receptors, whereas only dominant negative mutant dynamin inhibited agonist-induced internalization of Gln325-stop, Ser326-stop and Phe328-stop receptors. Following internalization, the wild type A2B adenosine receptor recycled rapidly to the cell surface, whereas the Gln325-stop receptor did not recycle. Conclusions and implications: Deletion of the COOH-terminus of the A2B adenosine receptor beyond Leu330 switches internalization from an arrestin- and clathrin-dependent pathway to one that is dynamin dependent but arrestin and clathrin independent. The presence of a Type II PDZ motif appears to be essential for arrestin- and clathrin-dependent internalization, as well as recycling of the A2B adenosine receptor following prolonged agonist addition. PMID:20128803

  9. c-Src-mediated phosphorylation of AP-2 reveals a general mechanism for receptors internalizing through the clathrin pathway.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Brandon; Simaan, May; Lee, Mi-Hye; Luttrell, Louis M; Laporte, Stéphane A

    2009-01-01

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis is a complex process regulated at many different levels. We showed previously that activation of the angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R), which belongs to the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family, leads to c-Src-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of beta2-adaptin, a subunit of the clathrin adaptor AP-2. The phosphorylation of beta2-adaptin on tyrosine residue 737 (Y737) negatively regulates its interaction with betaarrestin, another important clathrin adaptor for GPCR internalization. Here we sought to determine whether AP-2 phosphorylation represents a general mechanism for different receptors internalizing through the clathrin pathway. Using a specifically designed antibody against the phosphorylated form of Y737 on beta2-adaptin, we demonstrate that this residue is phosphorylated by AT1R in different cell types like HEK293, COS-7 and vascular smooth muscle cells. Using RNA interference approaches, we reveal that this agonist-mediated event is both betaarrestin- and c-Src-dependent, and that it occurs at the plasma membrane in clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs). We further show that this is not only a common event employed by other GPCRs like the beta2-adrenergic, vasopressin V2, bradykinin type 2, platelet-activating factor and endothelin A receptors but that the epidermal growth factor receptor is capable of eliciting the phosphorylation of AP-2 in CCVs. Our results imply that tyrosine phosphorylation of Y737 on beta2-adaptin is a common regulatory mechanism employed by different receptors undergoing clathrin-dependent endocytosis, and suggest a wider function for this event than originally anticipated. PMID:18938240

  10. The Effect of Glutamate Receptor Agonists on Mouse Retinal Astrocyte [Ca2+]i

    PubMed Central

    Blandford, Stephanie N.

    2016-01-01

    Calcium-imaging techniques were used to determine if mouse retinal astrocytes in situ respond to agonists of ionotropic (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid, AMPA; N-methyl-D-aspartate, NMDA) and metabotropic (S-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine, DHPG; trans-1-amino-1,3-cyclopentanedicarboxylic acid, ACPD) glutamate receptors. In most cases we found no evidence that retinal astrocyte intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i) increased in response to these glutamate agonists. The one exception was AMPA that increased [Ca2+]i in some, but not all, mouse retinal astrocytes in situ. However, AMPA did not increase [Ca2+]i in mouse retinal astrocytes in vitro, suggesting that the effect of AMPA in situ may be indirect. PMID:27413752

  11. Increased expression of the collagen internalization receptor uPARAP/Endo180 in the stroma of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Sulek, Jay; Wagenaar-Miller, Rebecca A; Shireman, Jessica; Molinolo, Alfredo; Madsen, Daniel H; Engelholm, Lars H; Behrendt, Niels; Bugge, Thomas H

    2007-04-01

    Local growth, invasion, and metastasis of malignancies of the head and neck involve extensive degradation and remodeling of the underlying, collagen-rich connective tissue. Urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-associated protein (uPARAP)/Endo180 is an endocytic receptor recently shown to play a critical role in the uptake and intracellular degradation of collagen by mesenchymal cells. As a step toward determining the putative function of uPARAP/Endo180 in head and neck cancer progression, we used immunohistochemistry to determine the expression of this collagen internalization receptor in 112 human squamous cell carcinomas and 19 normal or tumor-adjacent head and neck tissue samples from the tongue, gingiva, cheek, tonsils, palate, floor of mouth, larynx, maxillary sinus, upper jaw, nasopharynx/nasal cavity, and lymph nodes. Specificity of detection was verified by staining of serial sections with two different monoclonal antibodies against two non-overlapping epitopes on uPARAP/Endo180 and by the use of isotype-matched non-immune antibodies. uPARAP/Endo180 expression was observed in stromal fibroblast-like, vimentin-positive cells. Furthermore, expression of the collagen internalization receptor was increased in tumor stroma compared with tumor-adjacent connective tissue or normal submucosal connective tissue and was most prominent in poorly differentiated tumors. These data suggest that uPARAP/Endo180 participates in the connective tissue destruction during head and neck squamous cell carcinoma progression by mediating cellular uptake and lysosomal degradation of collagen. PMID:17189524

  12. Ephrinb1 and Ephrinb2 Are Associated with Interleukin-7 Receptor α and Retard Its Internalization from the Cell Surface*

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hongyu; Wu, Zenghui; Qi, Shijie; Jin, Wei; Han, Bing; Wu, Jiangping

    2011-01-01

    IL-7 plays vital roles in thymocyte development, T cell homeostasis, and the survival of these cells. IL-7 receptor α (IL-7Rα) on thymocytes and T cells is rapidly internalized upon IL-7 ligation. Ephrins (Efns) are cell surface molecules and ligands of the largest receptor kinase family, Eph kinases. We discovered that T cell-specific double gene knock-out (dKO) of Efnb1 and Efnb2 in mice led to reduced IL-7Rα expression in thymocytes and T cells, and that IL-7Rα down-regulation was accelerated in dKO CD4 cells upon IL-7 treatment. On the other hand, Efnb1 and Efnb2 overexpression on T cell lymphoma EL4 cells retarded IL-7Rα down-regulation. dKO T cells manifested compromised STAT5 activation and homeostatic proliferation, an IL-7-dependent process. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer and immunoprecipitation demonstrated that Efnb1 and Efnb2 interacted physically with IL-7Rα. Such interaction likely retarded IL-7Rα internalization, as Efnb1 and Efnb2 were not internalized. Therefore, we revealed a novel function of Efnb1 and Efnb2 in stabilizing IL-7Rα expression at the post-translational level, and a previously unknown modus operandi of Efnbs in the regulation of expression of other vital cell surface receptors. PMID:22069310

  13. The effects of AMPA blockade on the spectral profile of human early visual cortex recordings studied with non-invasive MEG.

    PubMed

    Muthukumaraswamy, Suresh D; Routley, Bethany; Droog, Wouter; Singh, Krish D; Hamandi, Khalid

    2016-08-01

    The generation of gamma-band (>30 Hz) cortical activity is thought to depend on the reciprocal connections of excitatory glutamatergic principal cells with inhibitory GABAergic interneurons. Both in vitro and in vivo animal studies have shown that blockade of glutamatergic α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors reduces the amplitude of gamma-band activity. In this registered report, we hypothesised that similar effects would be observed in humans following administration of perampanel, a first in class AMPA antagonist, used in the treatment of epilepsy. In a single-blind placebo-controlled crossover study, 20 healthy male participants completed two study days. On one day participants were given a 6 mg dose of perampanel and on the other an inactive placebo. magnetoencephalography (MEG) recordings of brain activity were taken before and two hours after drug administration, with activity in the visual cortex probed using a stimulation protocol known to induce gamma-band activity in the primary visual cortex. As hypothesised, our results indicated a decrease in gamma-band amplitudes following perampanel administration. The decreases in gamma-band amplitudes observed were temporally restricted to the early time-period of stimulus presentation (up to 400 msec) with no significant effects observed on early evoked responses or alpha rhythms. This suggests that the early time-window of induced visual gamma-band activity, thought to reflect input to the visual cortex from the lateral geniculate nucleus, is most sensitive to AMPA blocking drugs. PMID:27209006

  14. A negative feedback loop controls NMDA receptor function in cortical interneurons via neuregulin 2/ErbB4 signalling

    PubMed Central

    Vullhorst, Detlef; Mitchell, Robert M.; Keating, Carolyn; Roychowdhury, Swagata; Karavanova, Irina; Tao-Cheng, Jung-Hwa; Buonanno, Andres

    2015-01-01

    The neuregulin receptor ErbB4 is an important modulator of GABAergic interneurons and neural network synchronization. However, little is known about the endogenous ligands that engage ErbB4, the neural processes that activate them or their direct downstream targets. Here we demonstrate, in cultured neurons and in acute slices, that the NMDA receptor is both effector and target of neuregulin 2 (NRG2)/ErbB4 signalling in cortical interneurons. Interneurons co-express ErbB4 and NRG2, and pro-NRG2 accumulates on cell bodies atop subsurface cisternae. NMDA receptor activation rapidly triggers shedding of the signalling-competent NRG2 extracellular domain. In turn, NRG2 promotes ErbB4 association with GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors, followed by rapid internalization of surface receptors and potent downregulation of NMDA but not AMPA receptor currents. These effects occur selectively in ErbB4-positive interneurons and not in ErbB4-negative pyramidal neurons. Our findings reveal an intimate reciprocal relationship between ErbB4 and NMDA receptors with possible implications for the modulation of cortical microcircuits associated with cognitive deficits in psychiatric disorders. PMID:26027736

  15. A role of ADAR2 and RNA editing of glutamate receptors in mood disorders and schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pre-mRNAs of 2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazol-4-yl)-propanoic acid (AMPA)/kainate glutamate receptors undergo post-transcriptional modification known as RNA editing that is mediated by adenosine deaminase acting on RNA type 2 (ADAR2). This modification alters the amino acid sequence and function of the receptor. Glutamatergic signaling has been suggested to have a role in mood disorders and schizophrenia, but it is unknown whether altered RNA editing of AMPA/kainate receptors has pathophysiological significance in these mental disorders. In this study, we found that ADAR2 expression tended to be decreased in the postmortem brains of patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Results Decreased ADAR2 expression was significantly correlated with decreased editing of the R/G sites of AMPA receptors. In heterozygous Adar2 knockout mice (Adar2+/− mice), editing of the R/G sites of AMPA receptors was decreased. Adar2+/− mice showed a tendency of increased activity in the open-field test and a tendency of resistance to immobility in the forced swimming test. They also showed enhanced amphetamine-induced hyperactivity. There was no significant difference in amphetamine-induced hyperactivity between Adar2+/− and wild type mice after the treatment with an AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist, 2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoyl-benzo[f]quinoxaline. Conclusions These findings collectively suggest that altered RNA editing efficiency of AMPA receptors due to down-regulation of ADAR2 has a possible role in the pathophysiology of mental disorders. PMID:24443933

  16. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCIII. The Parathyroid Hormone Receptors—Family B G Protein–Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The type-1 parathyroid hormone receptor (PTHR1) is a family B G protein–coupled receptor (GPCR) that mediates the actions of two polypeptide ligands; parathyroid hormone (PTH), an endocrine hormone that regulates the levels of calcium and inorganic phosphate in the blood by acting on bone and kidney, and PTH-related protein (PTHrP), a paracrine-factor that regulates cell differentiation and proliferation programs in developing bone and other tissues. The type-2 parathyroid hormone receptor (PTHR2) binds a peptide ligand, called tuberoinfundibular peptide-39 (TIP39), and while the biologic role of the PTHR2/TIP39 system is not as defined as that of the PTHR1, it likely plays a role in the central nervous system as well as in spermatogenesis. Mechanisms of action at these receptors have been explored through a variety of pharmacological and biochemical approaches, and the data obtained support a basic “two-site” mode of ligand binding now thought to be used by each of the family B peptide hormone GPCRs. Recent crystallographic studies on the family B GPCRs are providing new insights that help to further refine the specifics of the overall receptor architecture and modes of ligand docking. One intriguing pharmacological finding for the PTHR1 is that it can form surprisingly stable complexes with certain PTH/PTHrP ligand analogs and thereby mediate markedly prolonged cell signaling responses that persist even when the bulk of the complexes are found in internalized vesicles. The PTHR1 thus appears to be able to activate the Gαs/cAMP pathway not only from the plasma membrane but also from the endosomal domain. The cumulative findings could have an impact on efforts to develop new drug therapies for the PTH receptors. PMID:25713287

  17. Identification of specific sites in the third intracellular loop and carboxyl terminus of the Bombyx mori PBAN receptor crucial for ligand-induced internalization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sex pheromone production in most moths is mediated by the pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide receptor (PBANR). Similar to other rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors, the silkmoth Bombyx mori PBANR (BmPBANR) undergoes agonist-induced internalization. Despite interest in developing...

  18. Preferred recycling pathway by internalized PGE2 EP4 receptor following agonist stimulation in cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons contributes to enhanced EP4 receptor sensitivity.

    PubMed

    St-Jacques, Bruno; Ma, Weiya

    2016-06-21

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a well-known pain mediator abundantly produced in injured tissues, sensitizes nociceptive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons (nociceptors) through its four EP receptors (EP1-4). Our prior study showed that PGE2 or EP4 agonist stimulates EP4 externalization and this event was not only suppressed by the inhibitor of anterograde export, but also by the recycling inhibitor (St-Jacques and Ma, 2013). These data suggest that EP4 recycling also contributes to agonist-enhanced EP4 surface abundance. In the current study, we tested this hypothesis using antibody-feeding-based internalization assay, recycling assay and FITC-PGE2 binding assay. We observed that selective EP4 agonist 1-hydroxy-PGE1 (1-OH-PGE1) or CAY10850 time- and concentration-dependently increased EP4 internalization in cultured DRG neuron. Internalized EP4 was predominantly localized in the early endosomes and recycling endosomes, but rarely in the late endosomes and lysosomes. These observations were confirmed by FITC-PGE2 binding assay. We further revealed that 1-OH-PGE1 or CAY10850 time- and concentration-dependently increased EP4 recycling. Double exposures to 1-OH-PGE1 induced a greater increase in calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) release than a single exposure or vehicle exposure, an event blocked by pre-treatment with the recycling inhibitor monensin. Our data suggest that EP4 recycling contributes to agonist-induced cell surface abundance and consequently enhanced receptor sensitivity. Facilitating EP4 externalization and recycling is a novel mechanism underlying PGE2-induced nociceptor sensitization. PMID:27060485

  19. Functional Insights from Glutamate Receptor Ion Channel Structures

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Janesh; Mayer, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    X-ray crystal structures for the soluble amino terminal and ligand binding domains of glutamate receptor ion channels, combined with a 3.6 Å resolution structure of the full length AMPA receptor GluA2 homotetramer, provide unique insights into the mechanisms of iGluR assembly and function. Increasingly sophisticated biochemical, computational and electrophysiological experiments are beginning to reveal the mechanism of action of partial agonists, and yield new models for the mechanism of action of allosteric modulators. Newly identified NMDA receptor ligands acting at novel sites offer hope for development of subtype selective modulators. Many issues remain unsolved, including the role of the ATD in AMPA receptor signaling, and the mechanisms by which auxiliary proteins regulate receptor activity. The structural basis for ion permeation and ion channel block also remain areas of uncertainty, and despite substantial progress, molecular dynamics simulations have yet to reveal how binding of glutamate opens the ion channel pore. PMID:22974439

  20. Direct demonstration of insulin receptor internalization. A quantitative electron microscopic study of covalently bound /sup 125/I-photoreactive insulin incubated with isolated hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Gorden, P.; Carpentier, J.L.; Moule, M.L.; Yip, C.C.; Orci, L.

    1982-07-01

    When /sup 125/I-insulin is incubated with isolated rodent hepatocytes at 37 degrees C, the ligand initially binds to the plasma membrane of the cell and is subsequently internalized by adsorptive endocytosis. To confirm directly that the insulin receptor is internalized with the ligand, we covalently linked photoreactive /sup 125/I-N sigma B29 (azidobenzoyl) insulin to its specific hepatocyte receptor and followed its fate by quantitative electron microscopic autoradiography. We found that the covalently linked photoreactive insulin is internalized by the cell in fashion analogous to the internalization of ordinary /sup 125/I-insulin, indicating that, at least under these conditions, the insulin receptor is internalized with the ligand.

  1. The Fate and Transport of Glyphosate and its Degradation Product, Aminomethylphosphonic Acid (AMPA), in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scribner, E.; Meyer, M. T.

    2006-05-01

    Since 2001, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has investigated the fate and transport of glyphosate and its degradation product, aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA), in surface water, and more recently in tile-drain flow, soil, and wet deposition. According to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sources, glyphosate is among the world's most widely used herbicides. In 2004, glyphosate usage estimates indicated that between 103 and 113 million pounds were applied annually to crops in the United States. The use of glyphosate over a wide geographic area suggests that this herbicide might be a potential concern for air, water, and soil quality as well as measured in high concentrations in streams; therefore, it is important to monitor its fate and transport in ground-water/surface-water systems. National, regional, and field-scale studies conducted by the USGS National Water-Quality Assessment and Toxic Substance Hydrology Programs have studied the fate and transport of glyphosate in overland flow, tile- drain flow, surface water, soil, and wet-deposition samples. The samples were analyzed for glyphosate and AMPA by using derivatization and online solid-phase extraction with liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) and LC/MS/MS methods developed by the USGS Organic Geochemistry Research Laboratory in Lawrence, Kansas. During spring, summer, and fall 2002 runoff periods in 50 Midwestern streams, glyphosate was detected at or above the 0.10 micrograms per liter detection limit in 35, 41, and 31 percent of samples, respectively. AMPA was detected in 53, 82, and 75 percent of samples, respectively. Results of 128 samples from a field study showed that glyphosate was transported as a narrow high- concentration pulse during the first period of runoff after application and that the concentration of glyphosate in runoff was greater than the concentration of AMPA. In tile-drain flow, glyphosate and AMPA were transported in a broad low-concentration pulse during these same

  2. Quantitative analysis of G-protein-coupled receptor internalization using DnaE intein-based assay.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bin; Chen, Linjie; Zhang, Yaping; Shi, Ying; Zhou, Naiming

    2016-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), the largest family of cell surface receptors, are involved in many physiological processes. They represent highly important therapeutic targets for drug discovery. Currently, there are numerous cell-based assays developed for the pharmacological profiling of GPCRs and the identification of novel agonists and antagonists. However, the development of new, faster, easier, and more cost-effective approaches to detect GPCR activity remains highly desirable. β-arrestin-dependent internalization has been demonstrated to be a common mechanism for most GPCRs. Here we describe a novel assay for quantitative analysis of GPCR internalization based on DnaE intein-mediated reconstitution of fragmented Renilla luciferase or Firefly luciferase when activated GPCRs interact with β-arrestin2 or Rab5. Further validation, using functionally divergent GPCRs, showed that EC50 values obtained for the known agonists and antagonists were in close agreement with the results of previous reports. This suggests that this assay is sensitive enough to permit quantification of GPCR internalization. Compared with conventional assays, this novel assay system is cost-effective, rapid, and easy to manipulate. These advantages may allow this assay to be used universally as a functional cell-based system for GPCR characterization and in the screening process of drug discovery. PMID:26928549

  3. N-METHYL-d-ASPARTATE RECEPTORS AND LARGE CONDUCTANCE CALCIUM-SENSITIVE POTASSIUM CHANNELS INHIBIT THE RELEASE OF OPIOID PEPTIDES THAT INDUCE μ-OPIOID RECEPTOR INTERNALIZATION IN THE RAT SPINAL CORD

    PubMed Central

    SONG, B.; MARVIZÓN, J. C. G.

    2006-01-01

    Endogenous opioids in the spinal cord play an important role in nociception, but the mechanisms that control their release are poorly understood. To simultaneously detect all opioids able to activate the μ-opioid receptor, we measured μ-opioid receptor internalization in rat spinal cord slices stimulated electrically or chemically to evoke opioid release. Electrical stimulation of the dorsal horn in the presence of peptidase inhibitors produced μ-opioid receptor internalization in half of the μ-opioid receptor neurons. This internalization was rapidly abolished by N-methyl-d-aspartate (IC50=2 μM), and N-methyl-d-aspartate antagonists prevented this effect. μ-Opioid receptor internalization evoked by high K+ or veratridine was also inhibited by N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor activation. N-methyl-d-aspartate did not affect μ-opioid receptor internalization induced by exogenous endomorphins, confirming that the effect of N-methyl-d-aspartate was on opioid release. We hypothesized that this inhibition was mediated by large conductance Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels BK(Ca2+). Indeed, inhibition by N-methyl-d-aspartate was prevented by tetraethylammonium and by the selective BK(Ca2+) blockers paxilline, penitrem A and verruculogen. Paxilline did not increase μ-opioid receptor internalization in the absence of N-methyl-d-aspartate, indicating that it does not produce an increase in opioid release unrelated to the inhibition by N-methyl-d-aspartate. The BK(Ca2+) involved appears to be a subtype with slow association kinetics for iberiotoxin, which was effective only with long incubations. The BK(Ca2+) opener NS-1619 also inhibited the evoked μ-opioid receptor internalization, and iberiotoxin prevented this effect. We concluded that Ca2+ influx through N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors causes the opening of BK(Ca2+) and hyperpolarization in opioid-containing dorsal horn neurons, resulting in the inhibition of opioid release. Since μ-opioid receptors in the dorsal horn

  4. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and large conductance calcium-sensitive potassium channels inhibit the release of opioid peptides that induce mu-opioid receptor internalization in the rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Song, B; Marvizón, J C G

    2005-01-01

    Endogenous opioids in the spinal cord play an important role in nociception, but the mechanisms that control their release are poorly understood. To simultaneously detect all opioids able to activate the mu-opioid receptor, we measured mu-opioid receptor internalization in rat spinal cord slices stimulated electrically or chemically to evoke opioid release. Electrical stimulation of the dorsal horn in the presence of peptidase inhibitors produced mu-opioid receptor internalization in half of the mu-opioid receptor neurons. This internalization was rapidly abolished by N-methyl-D-aspartate (IC50=2 microM), and N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonists prevented this effect. mu-Opioid receptor internalization evoked by high K+ or veratridine was also inhibited by N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation. N-methyl-D-aspartate did not affect mu-opioid receptor internalization induced by exogenous endomorphins, confirming that the effect of N-methyl-D-aspartate was on opioid release. We hypothesized that this inhibition was mediated by large conductance Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels BK(Ca2+). Indeed, inhibition by N-methyl-D-aspartate was prevented by tetraethylammonium and by the selective BK(Ca2+) blockers paxilline, penitrem A and verruculogen. Paxilline did not increase mu-opioid receptor internalization in the absence of N-methyl-D-aspartate, indicating that it does not produce an increase in opioid release unrelated to the inhibition by N-methyl-d-aspartate. The BK(Ca2+) involved appears to be a subtype with slow association kinetics for iberiotoxin, which was effective only with long incubations. The BK(Ca2+) opener NS-1619 also inhibited the evoked mu-opioid receptor internalization, and iberiotoxin prevented this effect. We concluded that Ca2+ influx through N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors causes the opening of BK(Ca2+) and hyperpolarization in opioid-containing dorsal horn neurons, resulting in the inhibition of opioid release. Since mu-opioid receptors in the dorsal horn

  5. Epidermal growth factor receptors destined for the nucleus are internalized via a clathrin-dependent pathway

    SciTech Connect

    De Angelis Campos, Ana Carolina; Rodrigues, Michele Angela; Andrade, Carolina de; Miranda de Goes, Alfredo; Nathanson, Michael H.; Gomes, Dawidson A.

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} EGF and its receptor translocates to the nucleus in liver cells. {yields} Real time imaging shows that EGF moves to the nucleus. {yields} EGF moves with its receptor to the nucleus. {yields} Dynamin and clathrin are necessary for EGFR nuclear translocation. -- Abstract: The epidermal growth factor (EGF) transduces its actions via the EGF receptor (EGFR), which can traffic from the plasma membrane to either the cytoplasm or the nucleus. However, the mechanism by which EGFR reaches the nucleus is unclear. To investigate these questions, liver cells were analyzed by immunoblot of cell fractions, confocal immunofluorescence and real time confocal imaging. Cell fractionation studies showed that EGFR was detectable in the nucleus after EGF stimulation with a peak in nuclear receptor after 10 min. Movement of EGFR to the nucleus was confirmed by confocal immunofluorescence and labeled EGF moved with the receptor to the nucleus. Small interference RNA (siRNA) was used to knockdown clathrin in order to assess the first endocytic steps of EGFR nuclear translocation in liver cells. A mutant dynamin (dynamin K44A) was also used to determine the pathways for this traffic. Movement of labeled EGF or EGFR to the nucleus depended upon dynamin and clathrin. This identifies the pathway that mediates the first steps for EGFR nuclear translocation in liver cells.

  6. Comparison of the kinetics and extent of muscarinic M1-M5receptor internalization, recycling and downregulation in Chinese Hamster Ovary cells

    PubMed Central

    Thangaraju, Arunkumar; Sawyer, Gregory W.

    2010-01-01

    We characterized agonist-induced internalization, recycling and downregulation of each muscarinic receptor subtype (M1 – M5) stably expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The radioligands [3H]QNB and [3H]NMS were used to measure the total and plasma membrane populations of muscarinic receptors, respectively. Following carbachol treatment (1 mM), the rank orders for the rate of carbachol-induced internalization of the muscarinic subtypes were M2 > M4 = M5 > M3 = M1, respectively. Unlike the M2 receptor, M1, M3, M4 and M5 receptors recycled back to the plasma membrane after one-hour carbachol treatment. The receptor downregulation elicited to 24-hour carbachol treatment was similar for M2, M3, M4 and M5 receptors, whereas that for the M1 receptor was greater. Our results indicate that there are subtype-specific differences in the rate and extent of agonist-induced muscarinic receptor internalization, recycling and downregulation in CHO cells. PMID:21044619

  7. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. LXXXVIII. G Protein-Coupled Receptor List: Recommendations for New Pairings with Cognate Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Stephen P. H.; Sharman, Joanna L.; Pawson, Adam J.; Benson, Helen E.; Monaghan, Amy E.; Liew, Wen Chiy; Mpamhanga, Chidochangu P.; Bonner, Tom I.; Neubig, Richard R.; Pin, Jean Philippe; Spedding, Michael; Harmar, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    In 2005, the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology Committee on Receptor Nomenclature and Drug Classification (NC-IUPHAR) published a catalog of all of the human gene sequences known or predicted to encode G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), excluding sensory receptors. This review updates the list of orphan GPCRs and describes the criteria used by NC-IUPHAR to recommend the pairing of an orphan receptor with its cognate ligand(s). The following recommendations are made for new receptor names based on 11 pairings for class A GPCRs: hydroxycarboxylic acid receptors [HCA1 (GPR81) with lactate, HCA2 (GPR109A) with 3-hydroxybutyric acid, HCA3 (GPR109B) with 3-hydroxyoctanoic acid]; lysophosphatidic acid receptors [LPA4 (GPR23), LPA5 (GPR92), LPA6 (P2Y5)]; free fatty acid receptors [FFA4 (GPR120) with omega-3 fatty acids]; chemerin receptor (CMKLR1; ChemR23) with chemerin; CXCR7 (CMKOR1) with chemokines CXCL12 (SDF-1) and CXCL11 (ITAC); succinate receptor (SUCNR1) with succinate; and oxoglutarate receptor [OXGR1 with 2-oxoglutarate]. Pairings are highlighted for an additional 30 receptors in class A where further input is needed from the scientific community to validate these findings. Fifty-seven human class A receptors (excluding pseudogenes) are still considered orphans; information has been provided where there is a significant phenotype in genetically modified animals. In class B, six pairings have been reported by a single publication, with 28 (excluding pseudogenes) still classified as orphans. Seven orphan receptors remain in class C, with one pairing described by a single paper. The objective is to stimulate research into confirming pairings of orphan receptors where there is currently limited information and to identify cognate ligands for the remaining GPCRs. Further information can be found on the IUPHAR Database website (http://www.iuphar-db.org). PMID:23686350

  8. Cryptococcus neoformans Is Internalized by Receptor-Mediated or ‘Triggered’ Phagocytosis, Dependent on Actin Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Caroline Rezende; Seabra, Sergio Henrique; de Souza, Wanderley; Rozental, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Cryptococcosis by the encapsulated yeast Cryptococcus neoformans affects mostly immunocompromised individuals and is a frequent neurological complication in AIDS patients. Recent studies support the idea that intracellular survival of Cryptococcus yeast cells is important for the pathogenesis of cryptococcosis. However, the initial steps of Cryptococcus internalization by host cells remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate the mechanism of Cryptococcus neoformans phagocytosis by peritoneal macrophages using confocal and electron microscopy techniques, as well as flow cytometry quantification, evaluating the importance of fungal capsule production and of host cell cytoskeletal elements for fungal phagocytosis. Electron microscopy analyses revealed that capsular and acapsular strains of C. neoformans are internalized by macrophages via both ‘zipper’ (receptor-mediated) and ‘trigger’ (membrane ruffle-dependent) phagocytosis mechanisms. Actin filaments surrounded phagosomes of capsular and acapsular yeasts, and the actin depolymerizing drugs cytochalasin D and latrunculin B inhibited yeast internalization and actin recruitment to the phagosome area. In contrast, nocodazole and paclitaxel, inhibitors of microtubule dynamics decreased internalization but did not prevent actin recruitment to the site of phagocytosis. Our results show that different uptake mechanisms, dependent on both actin and tubulin dynamics occur during yeast internalization by macrophages, and that capsule production does not affect the mode of Cryptococcus uptake by host cells. PMID:24586631

  9. [TOLL-LIKE RECEPTORS IN COSMONAUT'S PERIPHERAL BLOOD CELLS AFTER LONG-DURATION MISSIONS TO THE INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION].

    PubMed

    Berendeeva, T A; Ponomarev, S A; Antropova, E N; Rykova, M P

    2015-01-01

    Studies of Toll-like receptors (TLR) in 20 cosmonauts-members of long-duration (124-199-day) missions to the International space station evidenced changes in relative and absolute counts of peripheral blood monocytes with TLR2, TLR4 and TLR6 on the surface, expression of TLR2 and TLR6 genes, and genes of molecules involved in the TLR signaling pathway and TLR-related NF-KB-, JNK/p38- and IRF pathways on the day of return to Earth. The observed changes displayed individual variability. PMID:26934790

  10. 7, 8-Dihydroxyflavone induces synapse expression of AMPA GluA1 and ameliorates cognitive and spine abnormalities in a mouse model of fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tian, Mi; Zeng, Yan; Hu, Yilan; Yuan, Xiuxue; Liu, Shumin; Li, Jie; Lu, Pan; Sun, Yao; Gao, Lei; Fu, Daan; Li, Yi; Wang, Shasha; McClintock, Shawn M

    2015-02-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is characterized by immature dendritic spine architectures and cognitive impairment. 7, 8-Dihydroxyflavone (7, 8-DHF) has recently been identified as a high affinity tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB) agonist. The purpose of this paper was to examine the utility of 7, 8-DHF as an effective pharmacotherapeutic agent that targets dendritic pathology and cognitive impairments in FXS mutant. We synthesized pharmacologic, behavioral, and biochemical approaches to examine the effects of 7, 8-DHF on spatial and fear memory functions, and morphological spine abnormalities in fragile X mental retardation 1 (Fmr1) gene knock-out mice. The study found that 4 weeks of treatment with 7, 8-DHF improved spatial and fear memory, and ameliorated morphological spine abnormalities including the number and elongation of spines in the hippocampus and amygdala. Further mechanism analysis revealed that 7, 8-DHF enhanced the expression of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) GluA1 receptor, but reduced the normal levels of GluA2 at the synapses in Fmr1. Potentially related to drug-induced changes in AMPA receptor subunits, 7, 8-DHF at the synapses led to phosphorylation of specific serine sites on subunits Ser818 and Ser813 of GluA1, and Ser880 of GluA2, as well as phosphorylation of TrkB, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, and protein kinase C. However, 7, 8-DHF neither affected behavioral performance nor increased TrkB phosphorylation in WT mice, which suggested that it had FXS-specific correcting effect. Altogether, these results demonstrated that 7, 8-DHF improved learning and memory, and reduced abnormalities in spine morphology, thus providing a potential pharmacotherapeutic strategy for FXS. PMID:25229717

  11. G Protein Beta 5 Is Targeted to D2-Dopamine Receptor-Containing Biochemical Compartments and Blocks Dopamine-Dependent Receptor Internalization

    PubMed Central

    Octeau, J. Christopher; Schrader, Joseph M.; Masuho, Ikuo; Sharma, Meenakshi; Aiudi, Christopher; Chen, Ching-Kang; Kovoor, Abraham; Celver, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    G beta 5 (Gbeta5, Gβ5) is a unique G protein β subunit that is thought to be expressed as an obligate heterodimer with R7 regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins instead of with G gamma (Gγ) subunits. We found that D2-dopamine receptor (D2R) coexpression enhances the expression of Gβ5, but not that of the G beta 1 (Gβ1) subunit, in HEK293 cells, and that the enhancement of expression occurs through a stabilization of Gβ5 protein. We had previously demonstrated that the vast majority of D2R either expressed endogenously in the brain or exogenously in cell lines segregates into detergent-resistant biochemical fractions. We report that when expressed alone in HEK293 cells, Gβ5 is highly soluble, but is retargeted to the detergent-resistant fraction after D2R coexpression. Furthermore, an in-cell biotin transfer proximity assay indicated that D2R and Gβ5 segregating into the detergent-resistant fraction specifically interacted in intact living cell membranes. Dopamine-induced D2R internalization was blocked by coexpression of Gβ5, but not Gβ1. However, the same Gβ5 coexpression levels had no effect on agonist-induced internalization of the mu opioid receptor (MOR), cell surface D2R levels, dopamine-mediated recruitment of β-arrestin to D2R, the amplitude of D2R-G protein coupling, or the deactivation kinetics of D2R-activated G protein signals. The latter data suggest that the interactions between D2R and Gβ5 are not mediated by endogenously expressed R7 RGS proteins. PMID:25162404

  12. G protein beta 5 is targeted to D2-dopamine receptor-containing biochemical compartments and blocks dopamine-dependent receptor internalization.

    PubMed

    Octeau, J Christopher; Schrader, Joseph M; Masuho, Ikuo; Sharma, Meenakshi; Aiudi, Christopher; Chen, Ching-Kang; Kovoor, Abraham; Celver, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    G beta 5 (Gbeta5, Gβ5) is a unique G protein β subunit that is thought to be expressed as an obligate heterodimer with R7 regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins instead of with G gamma (Gγ) subunits. We found that D2-dopamine receptor (D2R) coexpression enhances the expression of Gβ5, but not that of the G beta 1 (Gβ1) subunit, in HEK293 cells, and that the enhancement of expression occurs through a stabilization of Gβ5 protein. We had previously demonstrated that the vast majority of D2R either expressed endogenously in the brain or exogenously in cell lines segregates into detergent-resistant biochemical fractions. We report that when expressed alone in HEK293 cells, Gβ5 is highly soluble, but is retargeted to the detergent-resistant fraction after D2R coexpression. Furthermore, an in-cell biotin transfer proximity assay indicated that D2R and Gβ5 segregating into the detergent-resistant fraction specifically interacted in intact living cell membranes. Dopamine-induced D2R internalization was blocked by coexpression of Gβ5, but not Gβ1. However, the same Gβ5 coexpression levels had no effect on agonist-induced internalization of the mu opioid receptor (MOR), cell surface D2R levels, dopamine-mediated recruitment of β-arrestin to D2R, the amplitude of D2R-G protein coupling, or the deactivation kinetics of D2R-activated G protein signals. The latter data suggest that the interactions between D2R and Gβ5 are not mediated by endogenously expressed R7 RGS proteins. PMID:25162404

  13. Increased Neuronal Expression of Neurokinin-1 Receptor and Stimulus-Evoked Internalization of the Receptor in the Rostral Ventromedial Medulla of the Rat after Peripheral Inflammatory Injury1

    PubMed Central

    Hamity, Marta V.; Walder, Roxanne Y.; Hammond, Donna L.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined possible mechanisms by which Substance P (Sub P) assumes a pronociceptive role in the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) under conditions of peripheral inflammatory injury, in this case produced by intraplantar (ipl) injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA). In saline- and CFA-treated rats, neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1R) immunoreactivity was localized to neurons in the RVM. Four days after ipl injection of CFA, the number of NK1R immunoreactive neurons in the RVM was increased by 30%, and there was a concomitant increase in NK1R immunoreactive processes in CFA-treated rats. Although NK1R immunoreactivity was increased, tachykinin-1 receptor (Tacr1) mRNA was not increased in the RVM of CFA-treated rats. To assess changes in Sub P release, the number of RVM neurons that exhibited NK1R internalization was examined in saline- and CFA-treated rats following noxious heat stimulation of the hind paws. Only CFA-treated rats that experienced noxious heat stimulation exhibited a significant increase in the number of neurons showing NK1R internalization. These data suggest that tonic Sub P release is not increased as a simple consequence of peripheral inflammation, but that phasic or evoked release of Sub P in the RVM is increased in response to noxious peripheral stimulation in a persistent inflammatory state. These data support the proposal that an upregulation of the NK1R in the RVM, as well as enhanced release of Sub P following noxious stimulation underlie the pronociceptive role of Sub P under conditions of persistent inflammatory injury. PMID:24639151

  14. Methylation of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Gene Promoter in Preschoolers: Links with Internalizing Behavior Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parade, Stephanie H.; Ridout, Kathryn K.; Seifer, Ronald; Armstrong, David A.; Marsit, Carmen J.; McWilliams, Melissa A.; Tyrka, Audrey R.

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that early adversity is linked to methylation of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene, "NR3C1," which is a key regulator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Yet no prior work has considered the contribution of methylation of "NR3C1" to emerging behavior problems and psychopathology in…

  15. Hepatitis C Virus Induces Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Activation via CD81 Binding for Viral Internalization and Entry

    PubMed Central

    Diao, Jingyu; Pantua, Homer; Ngu, Hai; Komuves, Laszlo; Diehl, Lauri; Schaefer, Gabriele

    2012-01-01

    While epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been shown to be important in the entry process for multiple viruses, including hepatitis C virus (HCV), the molecular mechanisms by which EGFR facilitates HCV entry are not well understood. Using the infectious cell culture HCV model (HCVcc), we demonstrate that the binding of HCVcc particles to human hepatocyte cells induces EGFR activation that is dependent on interactions between HCV and CD81 but not claudin 1. EGFR activation can also be induced by antibody mediated cross-linking of CD81. In addition, EGFR ligands that enhance the kinetics of HCV entry induce EGFR internalization and colocalization with CD81. While EGFR kinase inhibitors inhibit HCV infection primarily by preventing EGFR endocytosis, antibodies that block EGFR ligand binding or inhibitors of EGFR downstream signaling have no effect on HCV entry. These data demonstrate that EGFR internalization is critical for HCV entry and identify a hitherto-unknown association between CD81 and EGFR. PMID:22855500<