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Sample records for ampa receptor-lacking glutamatergic

  1. Impact of subanesthetic doses of ketamine on AMPA-mediated responses in rats: An in vivo electrophysiological study on monoaminergic and glutamatergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    El Iskandrani, Kareem S; Oosterhof, Chris A; Blier, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The rapid antidepressant action of a subanesthetic dose of ketamine in treatment-resistant patients represents the most striking recent breakthrough in the understanding of the antidepressant response. Evidence demonstrates tight interactions between the glutamatergic and monoaminergic systems. It is thus hypothesized that monoamine systems may play a role in the immediate/rapid effects of ketamine. In vivo electrophysiological recordings were carried in male rats following ketamine administration (10 and 25 mg/kg, i.p.) to first assess its effects on monoaminergic neuron firing. In a second series of experiments, the effects of ketamine administration on α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)- and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDA)-evoked responses in hippocampus CA3 pyramidal neurons were also investigated using micro-iontophoretic applications. Although acute (~2 hours) ketamine administration did not affect the mean firing activity of dorsal raphe serotonin and ventral tegmental area dopamine neurons, it did increase that of locus coeruleus norepinephrine neurons. In the latter brain region, while ketamine also enhanced bursting activity, it did increase population activity of dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area. These effects of ketamine were prevented by the prior administration of the AMPA receptor antagonist 2,3-dioxo-6-nitro-1,2,3,4-tetrahydrobenzo[f]quinoxaline-7-sulfonamide. An increase in AMPA-evoked response of CA3 pyramidal neurons was also observed 30 minutes following acute ketamine administration. The present findings suggest that acute ketamine administration produces a rapid enhancement of catecholaminergic neurons firing activity through an amplification of AMPA transmission. These effects may play a crucial role in the antidepressant effects of ketamine observed shortly following its infusion in depressed patients. PMID:25759403

  2. Nuclear respiratory factor 1 co-regulates AMPA glutamate receptor subunit 2 and cytochrome c oxidase : Tight coupling of glutamatergic transmission and energy metabolism in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, Shilpa S.; Liang, Huan Ling; Wong-Riley, Margaret T. T.

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal activity, especially of the excitatory glutamatergic type, is highly dependent on energy from the oxidative pathway. We hypothesized that the coupling existed at the transcriptional level by having the same transcription factor to regulate a marker of energy metabolism, cytochrome c oxidase (COX) and an important subunit of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) glutamate receptors, GluR2 (Gria2). Nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1) was a viable candidate because it regulates all COX subunits and potentially activates Gria2. By means of in silico analysis, electrophoretic mobility shift and supershift, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and promoter mutational assays, we found that NRF-1 functionally bound to Gria2 promoter. Silencing of NRF-1 with small interference RNA prevented the depolarization-stimulated up-regulation of Gria2 and COX, and over-expression of NRF-1 rescued neurons from TTX-induced down-regulation of Gria2 and COX transcripts. Thus, neuronal activity and energy metabolism are tightly coupled at the molecular level, and NRF-1 is a critical agent in this process. PMID:19166514

  3. NMDA and AMPA/kainate glutamatergic receptors in the prelimbic medial prefrontal cortex modulate the elaborated defensive behavior and innate fear-induced antinociception elicited by GABAA receptor blockade in the medial hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Renato Leonardo; Salgado-Rohner, Carlos José; Biagioni, Audrey Francisco; Medeiros, Priscila; Hallak, Jaime Eduardo Cecílio; Crippa, José Alexandre S; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the involvement of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole-4-proprionate (AMPA)/kainate receptors of the prelimbic (PL) division of the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) on the panic attack-like reactions evoked by γ-aminobutyric acid-A receptor blockade in the medial hypothalamus (MH). Rats were pretreated with NaCl 0.9%, LY235959 (NMDA receptor antagonist), and NBQX (AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist) in the PL at 3 different concentrations. Ten minutes later, the MH was treated with bicuculline, and the defensive responses were recorded for 10 min. The antagonism of NMDA receptors in the PL decreased the frequency and duration of all defensive behaviors evoked by the stimulation of the MH and reduced the innate fear-induced antinociception. However, the pretreatment of the PL cortex with NBQX was able to decrease only part of defensive responses and innate fear-induced antinociception. The present findings suggest that the NMDA-glutamatergic system of the PL is critically involved in panic-like responses and innate fear-induced antinociception and those AMPA/kainate receptors are also recruited during the elaboration of fear-induced antinociception and in panic attack-related response. The activation of the glutamatergic neurotransmission of PL division of the MPFC during the elaboration of oriented behavioral reactions elicited by the chemical stimulation of the MH recruits mainly NMDA receptors in comparison with AMPA/kainate receptors. PMID:23349224

  4. The antidepressant-like effects of glutamatergic drugs ketamine and AMPA receptor potentiator LY 451646 are preserved in bdnf⁺/⁻ heterozygous null mice.

    PubMed

    Lindholm, Jesse S O; Autio, Henri; Vesa, Liisa; Antila, Hanna; Lindemann, Lothar; Hoener, Marius C; Skolnick, Phil; Rantamäki, Tomi; Castrén, Eero

    2012-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that biogenic amine-based antidepressants act, at least in part, via regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling. Biogenic amine-based antidepressants increase BDNF synthesis and activate its signaling pathway through TrkB receptors. Moreover, the antidepressant-like effects of these molecules are abolished in BDNF deficient mice. Glutamate-based drugs, including the NMDA antagonist ketamine, and the AMPA receptor potentiator LY 451646, mimic the effects of antidepressants in preclinical tests with high predictive validity. In humans, a single intravenous dose of ketamine produces an antidepressant effect that is rapid, robust and persistent. In this study, we examined the role of BDNF in expression of the antidepressant-like effects of ketamine and an AMPA receptor potentiator (LY 451646) in the forced swim test (FST). Ketamine and LY 451646 produced antidepressant-like effects in the FST in mice at 45 min after a single injection, but no effects were observed one week after a single ketamine injection. As previously reported, the effects of imipramine in the forced swim test were blunted in heterozygous BDNF knockout (bdnf(+/-)) mice. However ketamine and LY 451646 produced similar antidepressant-like responses in wildtype and bdnf(+/-) mice. Neither ketamine nor LY 451646 significantly influenced the levels BDNF or TrkB phosphorylation in the hippocampus when assessed at 45 min or 7 days after the drug administration. These data demonstrate that under the conditions tested, neither ketamine nor the AMPA-potentiator LY 451656 activate BDNF signaling, but produce a characteristic antidepressant-like response in heterozygous bdnf(+/-) mice. These data indicate that unlike biogenic amine-based agents, BDNF signaling does not play a pivotal role in the antidepressant effects of glutamate-based compounds. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Anxiety and Depression'. PMID:21867718

  5. Calpain and the Glutamatergic Synapse

    PubMed Central

    Doshi, Shachee; Lynch, David R.

    2010-01-01

    Calpain is a ubiquitous protease found in different tissue types and in many organisms including mammals. It generally does not destroy its large variety of substrates, but more commonly disrupts their function. In neurons, many of its substrates become dysregulated as a result of cleavage of their regulatory domain by this protease, leading to altered signaling between cells. In glutamatergic synaptic transmission, direct targets of calpain include all of the major glutamate receptors: NMDA receptors, AMPA receptors and mGluR. By cleaving these receptors and associated intracellular proteins, calpain may regulate the physiology at glutamatergic synapses. As a result, calpain-mediated cleavage in neurons might not only be involved in pathological events like excitotoxicity, but may also have neuroprotective effects and roles in physiological synaptic transmission. PMID:19482714

  6. Activity Level-Dependent Synapse-Specific AMPA Receptor Trafficking Regulates Transmission Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, J. Julius

    2009-01-01

    Central glutamatergic synapses may express AMPA-sensitive glutamate receptors (AMPA-Rs) with distinct gating properties and exhibit different transmission dynamics, which are important for computing various synaptic inputs received at different populations of synapses. However, how glutamatergic synapses acquire AMPA-Rs with distinct kinetics to influence synaptic integration remains poorly understood. Here I report synapse-specific trafficking of distinct AMPA-Rs in rat cortical layer 4 stellate and layer 5 pyramidal neurons. The analysis indicates that in single layer 4 stellate neurons thalamocortical synapses generate faster synaptic responses than intracortical synapses. Moreover, GluR1-containing AMPA-Rs traffic selectively into intracortical synapses, and this process requires sensory experience-dependent activity and slows down transmission kinetics. GluR4-containing AMPA-Rs traffic more heavily into thalamocortical synapses than intracortical synapses, and this process requires spontaneous synaptic activity and speeds up transmission kinetics. GluR2-containing AMPA-Rs traffic equally into both thalamocortical and intracortical synapses, and this process requires no synaptic activity and resets transmission kinetics. Notably, synaptic trafficking of distinct AMPA-Rs differentially regulates synaptic integration. Thus, synapse-specific AMPA-R trafficking coarsely sets and synaptic activity finely tunes transmission kinetics and integration properties at different synapses in central neurons. PMID:19439609

  7. Assembly of AMPA receptors: mechanisms and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Quan; Salussolia, Catherine L; Wollmuth, Lonnie P

    2015-01-01

    AMPA receptors (AMPARs) play a critical role in excitatory glutamatergic neurotransmission. The number and subunit composition of AMPARs at synapses determines the dynamics of fast glutamatergic signalling. Functional AMPARs on the cell surface are tetramers. Thus tetrameric assembly of AMPARs represents a promising target for modulating AMPAR-mediated signalling in health and disease. Multiple structural domains within the receptor influence AMPAR assembly. In a proposed model for AMPAR assembly, the amino-terminal domain underlies the formation of a dimer pool. The transmembrane domain facilitates the formation and enhances the stability of the tetramer. The ligand-binding domain influences assembly through a process referred to as ‘domain swapping’. We propose that this core AMPAR assembly process could be regulated by neuronal signals and speculate on possible mechanisms for such regulation. PMID:25556786

  8. AMPA/NMDA cooperativity and integration during a single synaptic event.

    PubMed

    Di Maio, Vito; Ventriglia, Francesco; Santillo, Silvia

    2016-10-01

    Coexistence of AMPA and NMDA receptors in glutamatergic synapses leads to a cooperative effect that can be very complex. This effect is dependent on many parameters including the relative and absolute number of the two types of receptors and biophysical parameters that can vary among synapses of the same cell. Herein we simulate the AMPA/NMDA cooperativity by using different number of the two types of receptors and considering the effect of the spine resistance on the EPSC production. Our results show that the relative number of NMDA with respect to AMPA produces a different degree of cooperation which depends also on the spine resistance. PMID:27299885

  9. Mechanisms for Antagonistic Regulation of AMPA and NMDA-D1 Receptor Complexes at Postsynaptic Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumann, Johann; Scheler, Gabriele

    2004-01-01

    From the analysis of these pathways we conclude that postsynaptic processes that regulate synaptic transmission undergo significant cross-talk with respect to glutamatergic and neuromodulatory (dopamine) signals. The main hypothesis is that of a compensatory regulation, a competitive switch between the induction of increased AMPA conductance by CaMKII-dependent phosphorylation and reduced expression of PP2A, and increased D1 receptor sensitivity and expression by increased PKA, PP2A and decreased PP-1/calcineurin expression. Both types of plasticity are induced by NMDA receptor activation and increased internal calcium, they require different internal conditions to become expressed. Specifically we propose that AMPA regulation and D1 regulation are inversely coupled;The net result may be a bifurcation of synaptic state into predominantly AMPA or NMDA-D1 synapses. This could have functional consequences: stable connections for AMPA and conditional gating for NMDA-D1 synapses.

  10. Modulation of the glutamatergic transmission by Dopamine: a focus on Parkinson, Huntington and Addiction diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gardoni, Fabrizio; Bellone, Camilla

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) plays a major role in motor and cognitive functions as well as in reward processing by regulating glutamatergic inputs. In particular in the striatum the release of DA rapidly influences synaptic transmission modulating both AMPA and NMDA receptors. Several neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders, including Parkinson, Huntington and addiction-related diseases, manifest a dysregulation of glutamate and DA signaling. Here, we will focus our attention on the mechanisms underlying the modulation of the glutamatergic transmission by DA in striatal circuits. PMID:25784855

  11. VTA glutamatergic inputs to nucleus accumbens drive aversion by acting on GABAergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jia; Zhang, Shiliang; Wang, Hui-Ling; Barker, David J; Miranda-Barrientos, Jorge; Morales, Marisela

    2016-05-01

    The ventral tegmental area (VTA) is best known for its dopamine neurons, some of which project to nucleus accumbens (nAcc). However, the VTA also has glutamatergic neurons that project to nAcc. The function of the mesoaccumbens glutamatergic pathway remains unknown. Here we report that nAcc photoactivation of mesoaccumbens glutamatergic fibers promotes aversion. Although we found that these mesoaccumbens glutamatergic fibers lack GABA, the aversion evoked by their photoactivation depended on glutamate- and GABA-receptor signaling, and not on dopamine-receptor signaling. We found that mesoaccumbens glutamatergic fibers established multiple asymmetric synapses on single parvalbumin GABAergic interneurons and that nAcc photoactivation of these fibers drove AMPA-mediated cellular firing of parvalbumin GABAergic interneurons. These parvalbumin GABAergic interneurons in turn inhibited nAcc medium spiny output neurons, thereby controlling inhibitory neurotransmission in nAcc. To our knowledge, the mesoaccumbens glutamatergic pathway is the first glutamatergic input to nAcc shown to mediate aversion instead of reward, and the first pathway shown to establish excitatory synapses on nAcc parvalbumin GABAergic interneurons. PMID:27019014

  12. Glutamatergic Retinal Waves

    PubMed Central

    Kerschensteiner, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous activity patterns propagate through many parts of the developing nervous system and shape the wiring of emerging circuits. Prior to vision, waves of activity originating in the retina propagate through the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) of the thalamus to primary visual cortex (V1). Retinal waves have been shown to instruct the wiring of ganglion cell axons in LGN and of thalamocortical axons in V1 via correlation-based plasticity rules. Across species, retinal waves mature in three stereotypic stages (I–III), in which distinct circuit mechanisms give rise to unique activity patterns that serve specific functions in visual system refinement. Here, I review insights into the patterns, mechanisms, and functions of stage III retinal waves, which rely on glutamatergic signaling. As glutamatergic waves spread across the retina, neighboring ganglion cells with opposite light responses (ON vs. OFF) are activated sequentially. Recent studies identified lateral excitatory networks in the inner retina that generate and propagate glutamatergic waves, and vertical inhibitory networks that desynchronize the activity of ON and OFF cells in the wavefront. Stage III wave activity patterns may help segregate axons of ON and OFF ganglion cells in the LGN, and could contribute to the emergence of orientation selectivity in V1. PMID:27242446

  13. Glutamatergic neuroplasticity in cocaine addiction.

    PubMed

    Uys, Joachim D; Reissner, Kathryn J

    2011-01-01

    Neuroadaptations among glutamatergic projections within the mesocorticolimbic circuits engaged by drugs of abuse have been described since the 1990s. There is now substantial evidence that drugs of abuse lead to long-term changes in glutamatergic signaling and encompass multiple levels of analysis. For example, cocaine induces changes in extracellular glutamate concentrations and in synaptic glutamatergic transmission. In addition, glutamate receptors are required for the expression of cocaine-related behaviors, and long-term changes have been reported in the expression of proteins at glutamatergic synapses, in glutamate-related redox regulation of neurons, and in glutamatergic synaptic and structural plasticity following chronic exposure to cocaine. In this chapter, we will describe the neurocircuitry involved, and will summarize evidence for adaptations in glutamatergic neuroplasticity as a mechanism for cocaine addiction. Finally, we will discuss progress in the development of glutamate-mediated pharmacotherapies for the treatment of cocaine dependence. PMID:21199777

  14. Calcium permeable AMPA receptors and autoreceptors in external tufted cells of rat olfactory bulb

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jie; Lowe, Graeme

    2007-01-01

    Glomeruli are functional units of the olfactory bulb responsible for early processing of odor information encoded by single olfactory receptor genes. Glomerular neural circuitry includes numerous external tufted (ET) cells whose rhythmic burst firing may mediate synchronization of bulbar activity with the inhalation cycle. Bursting is entrained by glutamatergic input from olfactory nerve terminals, so specific properties of ionotropic glutamate receptors on ET cells are likely to be important determinants of olfactory processing. Particularly intriguing is recent evidence that α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) receptors of juxta-glomerular neurons may permeate calcium. This could provide a novel pathway for regulating ET cell signaling. We tested the hypothesis that ET cells express functional calcium-permeable AMPA receptors. In rat olfactory bulb slices, excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) in ET cells were evoked by olfactory nerve shock, and by uncaging glutamate. We found attenuation of AMPA/kainate EPSCs by 1-naphthyl acetyl-spermine (NAS), an open-channel blocker specific for calcium permeable AMPA receptors. Cyclothiazide strongly potentiated EPSCs, indicating a major contribution from AMPA receptors. The current-voltage (I-V) relation of uncaging EPSCs showed weak inward rectification which was lost after > ~ 10 min of whole-cell dialysis, and was absent in NAS. In kainate-stimulated slices, Co2+ ions permeated cells of the glomerular layer. Large AMPA EPSCs were accompanied by fluorescence signals in fluo-4 loaded cells, suggesting calcium permeation. Depolarizing pulses evoked slow tail currents with pharmacology consistent with involvement of calcium permeable AMPA autoreceptors. Tail currents were abolished by Cd2+ and NBQX, and were sensitive to NAS block. Glutamate autoreceptors were confirmed by uncaging intracellular calcium to evoke a large inward current. Our results provide evidence that calcium permeable AMPA

  15. Modulation of excitatory neurotransmission by neuronal/glial signalling molecules: interplay between purinergic and glutamatergic systems.

    PubMed

    Köles, László; Kató, Erzsébet; Hanuska, Adrienn; Zádori, Zoltán S; Al-Khrasani, Mahmoud; Zelles, Tibor; Rubini, Patrizia; Illes, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Glutamate is the main excitatory neurotransmitter of the central nervous system (CNS), released both from neurons and glial cells. Acting via ionotropic (NMDA, AMPA, kainate) and metabotropic glutamate receptors, it is critically involved in essential regulatory functions. Disturbances of glutamatergic neurotransmission can be detected in cognitive and neurodegenerative disorders. This paper summarizes the present knowledge on the modulation of glutamate-mediated responses in the CNS. Emphasis will be put on NMDA receptor channels, which are essential executive and integrative elements of the glutamatergic system. This receptor is crucial for proper functioning of neuronal circuits; its hypofunction or overactivation can result in neuronal disturbances and neurotoxicity. Somewhat surprisingly, NMDA receptors are not widely targeted by pharmacotherapy in clinics; their robust activation or inhibition seems to be desirable only in exceptional cases. However, their fine-tuning might provide a promising manipulation to optimize the activity of the glutamatergic system and to restore proper CNS function. This orchestration utilizes several neuromodulators. Besides the classical ones such as dopamine, novel candidates emerged in the last two decades. The purinergic system is a promising possibility to optimize the activity of the glutamatergic system. It exerts not only direct and indirect influences on NMDA receptors but, by modulating glutamatergic transmission, also plays an important role in glia-neuron communication. These purinergic functions will be illustrated mostly by depicting the modulatory role of the purinergic system on glutamatergic transmission in the prefrontal cortex, a CNS area important for attention, memory and learning. PMID:26542977

  16. AMPA experimental communications systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckerman, D.; Fass, S.; Keon, T.; Sielman, P.

    1982-01-01

    The program was conducted to demonstrate the satellite communication advantages of Adaptive Phased Array Technology. A laboratory based experiment was designed and implemented to demonstrate a low earth orbit satellite communications system. Using a 32 element, L-band phased array augmented with 4 sets of weights (2 for reception and 2 for transmission) a high speed digital processing system and operating against multiple user terminals and interferers, the AMPA system demonstrated: communications with austere user terminals, frequency reuse, communications in the face of interference, and geolocation. The program and experiment objectives are described, the system hardware and software/firmware are defined, and the test performed and the resultant test data are presented.

  17. Noradrenergic modulation of masseter muscle activity during natural rapid eye movement sleep requires glutamatergic signalling at the trigeminal motor nucleus.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Peter B; Mir, Saba; Peever, John H

    2014-08-15

    Noradrenergic neurotransmission in the brainstem is closely coupled to changes in muscle activity across the sleep-wake cycle, and noradrenaline is considered to be a key excitatory neuromodulator that reinforces the arousal-related stimulus on motoneurons to drive movement. However, it is unknown if α-1 noradrenoceptor activation increases motoneuron responsiveness to excitatory glutamate (AMPA) receptor-mediated inputs during natural behaviour. We studied the effects of noradrenaline on AMPA receptor-mediated motor activity at the motoneuron level in freely behaving rats, particularly during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, a period during which both AMPA receptor-triggered muscle twitches and periods of muscle quiescence in which AMPA drive is silent are exhibited. Male rats were subjected to electromyography and electroencephalography recording to monitor sleep and waking behaviour. The implantation of a cannula into the trigeminal motor nucleus of the brainstem allowed us to perfuse noradrenergic and glutamatergic drugs by reverse microdialysis, and thus to use masseter muscle activity as an index of motoneuronal output. We found that endogenous excitation of both α-1 noradrenoceptor and AMPA receptors during waking are coupled to motor activity; however, REM sleep exhibits an absence of endogenous α-1 noradrenoceptor activity. Importantly, exogenous α-1 noradrenoceptor stimulation cannot reverse the muscle twitch suppression induced by AMPA receptor blockade and nor can it elevate muscle activity during quiet REM, a phase when endogenous AMPA receptor activity is subthreshold. We conclude that the presence of an endogenous glutamatergic drive is necessary for noradrenaline to trigger muscle activity at the level of the motoneuron in an animal behaving naturally. PMID:24860176

  18. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor acutely inhibits AMPA-mediated currents in developing sensory relay neurons.

    PubMed

    Balkowiec, A; Kunze, D L; Katz, D M

    2000-03-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is expressed by many primary sensory neurons that no longer require neurotrophins for survival, indicating that BDNF may be used as a signaling molecule by the afferents themselves. Because many primary afferents also express glutamate, we investigated the possibility that BDNF modulates glutamatergic AMPA responses of newborn second-order sensory relay neurons. Perforated-patch, voltage-clamp recordings were made from dissociated neurons of the brainstem nucleus tractus solitarius (nTS), a region that receives massive primary afferent input from BDNF-containing neurons in the nodose and petrosal cranial sensory ganglia. Electrophysiological analysis was combined in some experiments with anterograde labeling of primary afferent terminals to specifically analyze responses of identified second-order neurons. Our data demonstrate that BDNF strongly inhibits AMPA-mediated currents in a large subset of nTS cells. Specifically, AMPA responses were either completely abolished or markedly inhibited by BDNF in 73% of postnatal day (P0) cells and in 82% of identified P5 second-order sensory relay neurons. This effect of BDNF is mimicked by NT-4, but not NGF, and blocked by the Trk tyrosine kinase inhibitor K252a, consistent with a requirement for TrkB receptor activation. Moreover, analysis of TrkB expression in culture revealed a close correlation between the percentage of nTS neurons in which BDNF inhibits AMPA currents and the percentage of neurons that exhibit TrkB immunoreactivity. These data document a previously undefined mechanism of acute modulation of AMPA responses by BDNF and indicate that BDNF may regulate glutamatergic transmission at primary afferent synapses. PMID:10684891

  19. Rewarding Effects of Optical Stimulation of Ventral Tegmental Area Glutamatergic Neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-Ling; Qi, Jia; Zhang, Shiliang; Wang, Huikun; Morales, Marisela

    2015-12-01

    Ventral tegmental area (VTA) neurons play roles in reward and aversion. The VTA has three major neuronal phenotypes: dopaminergic, GABAergic, and glutamatergic. VTA glutamatergic neurons--expressing vesicular glutamate transporter-2 (VGluT2)--project to limbic and cortical regions, but also excite neighboring dopaminergic neurons. Here, we test whether local photoactivation of VTA VGluT2 neurons expressing Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) under the VGluT2 promoter causes place preference and supports operant responding for the stimulation. By using a Cre-dependent viral vector, ChR2 (tethered to mCherry) was expressed in VTA glutamatergic neurons of VGluT2::Cre mice. The mCherry distribution was evaluated by immunolabeling. By confocal microscopy, we detected expression of mCherry in VTA cell bodies and local processes. In contrast, VGluT2 expression was restricted to varicosities, some of them coexpressing mCherry. By electron microscopy, we determined that mCherry-VGluT2 varicosities correspond to axon terminals, forming asymmetric synapses on neighboring dopaminergic neurons. These findings indicate that ChR2 was present in terminals containing glutamatergic synaptic vesicles and involved in local synaptic connections. Photoactivation of VTA slices from ChR2-expressing mice induced AMPA/NMDA receptor-dependent firing of dopaminergic neurons projecting to the nucleus accumbens. VTA photoactivation of ChR2-expressing mice reinforced instrumental behavior and established place preferences. VTA injections of AMPA or NMDA receptor antagonists blocked optical self-stimulation and place preference. These findings suggest a role in reward function for VTA glutamatergic neurons through local excitatory synapses on mesoaccumbens dopaminergic neurons. PMID:26631475

  20. Role of endocannabinoid and glutamatergic systems in DOI-induced head-twitch response in mice.

    PubMed

    Egashira, Nobuaki; Shirakawa, Atsunori; Okuno, Ryoko; Mishima, Kenichi; Iwasaki, Katsunori; Oishi, Ryozo; Fujiwara, Michihiro

    2011-07-01

    We previously reported that systemic administration of the endocannabinoid anandamide inhibited the head-twitches induced by the hallucinogenic drug 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine (DOI) in mice, which is mediated via the activation of 5-HT(2A) receptors. Endocannabinoid and glutamatergic systems have been suggested to modulate the function of 5-HT(2A) receptors. In the present study, we further investigated the role of endocannabinoid and glutamatergic systems in DOI-induced head-twitch response in mice. An anandamide transport inhibitor AM404 (0.3-3mg/kg, i.p.), a fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor URB597 (0.1-10mg/kg, i.p.), a glutamate release inhibitor riluzole (0.3 and 1mg/kg, i.p.), a natural glutamate analog l-glutamylethylamide (theanine, 1 and 3mg/kg, p.o.) and an α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) receptor antagonist NBQX (0.01-0.3mg/kg, i.p.) significantly inhibited DOI-induced head-twitch response. The AMPA receptor positive modulator aniracetam (30 or 100mg/kg, p.o.) reversed inhibition of head-twitch response by NBQX and URB597. These findings indicated that endocannabinoid and glutamatergic systems participate in the mechanism of action of DOI to induce head-twitch response. PMID:21504759

  1. Glutamatergic signaling at the vestibular hair cell calyx synapse.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Soroush G; Pyott, Sonja J; Yu, Zhou; Glowatzki, Elisabeth

    2014-10-29

    In the vestibular periphery a unique postsynaptic terminal, the calyx, completely covers the basolateral walls of type I hair cells and receives input from multiple ribbon synapses. To date, the functional role of this specialized synapse remains elusive. There is limited data supporting glutamatergic transmission, K(+) or H(+) accumulation in the synaptic cleft as mechanisms of transmission. Here the role of glutamatergic transmission at the calyx synapse is investigated. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from calyx endings were performed in an in vitro whole-tissue preparation of the rat vestibular crista, the sensory organ of the semicircular canals that sense head rotation. AMPA-mediated EPSCs showed an unusually wide range of decay time constants, from <5 to >500 ms. Decay time constants of EPSCs increased (or decreased) in the presence of a glutamate transporter blocker (or a competitive glutamate receptor blocker), suggesting a role for glutamate accumulation and spillover in synaptic transmission. Glutamate accumulation caused slow depolarizations of the postsynaptic membrane potentials, and thereby substantially increased calyx firing rates. Finally, antibody labelings showed that a high percentage of presynaptic ribbon release sites and postsynaptic glutamate receptors were not juxtaposed, favoring a role for spillover. These findings suggest a prominent role for glutamate spillover in integration of inputs and synaptic transmission in the vestibular periphery. We propose that similar to other brain areas, such as the cerebellum and hippocampus, glutamate spillover may play a role in gain control of calyx afferents and contribute to their high-pass properties. PMID:25355208

  2. Glutamatergic Targets for Enhancing Extinction Learning in Drug Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Cleva, R.M; Gass, J.T; Widholm, J.J; Olive, M.F

    2010-01-01

    The persistence of the motivational salience of drug-related environmental cues and contexts is one of the most problematic obstacles to successful treatment of drug addiction. Behavioral approaches to extinguishing the salience of drug-associated cues, such as cue exposure therapy, have generally produced disappointing results which have been attributed to, among other things, the context specificity of extinction and inadequate consolidation of extinction learning. Extinction of any behavior or conditioned response is a process of new and active learning, and increasing evidence suggests that glutamatergic neurotransmission, a key component of the neural plasticity that underlies normal learning and memory, is also involved in extinction learning. This review will summarize findings from both animal and human studies that suggest that pharmacological enhancement of glutamatergic neurotransmission facilitates extinction learning in the context of drug addiction. Pharmacological agents that have shown potential efficacy include NMDA partial agonists, mGluR5 receptor positive allosteric modulators, inhibitors of the GlyT1 glycine transporter, AMPA receptor potentiators, and activators of the cystine-glutamate exchanger. These classes of cognition-enhancing compounds could potentially serve as novel pharmacological adjuncts to cue exposure therapy to increase success rates in attenuating cue-induced drug craving and relapse. PMID:21629446

  3. Vitamin D3 supplementation increases insulin level by regulating altered IP3 and AMPA receptor expression in the pancreatic islets of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat.

    PubMed

    Jayanarayanan, Sadanandan; Anju, Thoppil R; Smijin, Soman; Paulose, Cheramadathikudiyil Skaria

    2015-10-01

    Pancreatic islets, particularly insulin-secreting β cells, share common characteristics with neurons. Glutamate is one of the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain and pancreas, and its action is mediated through glutamate receptors. In the present work, we analysed the role of vitamin D3 in the modulation of AMPA receptor subunit and their functional role in insulin release. Radio receptor binding study in diabetic rats showed a significant increase in AMPA receptor density. Insulin AMPA colabelling study showed an altered AMPA GluR2 and GluR4 subunit expression in the pancreatic beta cells. We also found lowered IP3 content and decreased IP3 receptor in pancreas of diabetic rats. The alterations in AMPA and IP3 receptor resulted in reduced cytosolic calcium level concentration, which further blocks Ca(2+)-mediated insulin release. Vitamin D3 supplementation restored the alteration in vitamin D receptor expression, AMPA receptor density and AMPA and IP3 receptor expression in the pancreatic islets that helps to restore the calcium-mediated insulin secretion. Our study reveals the antidiabetic property of vitamin D3 that is suggested to have therapeutic role through regulating glutamatergic function in diabetic rats. PMID:26054778

  4. KCC2 Gates Activity-Driven AMPA Receptor Traffic through Cofilin Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Chevy, Quentin; Heubl, Martin; Goutierre, Marie; Backer, Stéphanie; Moutkine, Imane; Eugène, Emmanuel; Bloch-Gallego, Evelyne; Lévi, Sabine; Poncer, Jean Christophe

    2015-12-01

    Expression of the neuronal K/Cl transporter KCC2 is tightly regulated throughout development and by both normal and pathological neuronal activity. Changes in KCC2 expression have often been associated with altered chloride homeostasis and GABA signaling. However, recent evidence supports a role of KCC2 in the development and function of glutamatergic synapses through mechanisms that remain poorly understood. Here we show that suppressing KCC2 expression in rat hippocampal neurons precludes long-term potentiation of glutamatergic synapses specifically by preventing activity-driven membrane delivery of AMPA receptors. This effect is independent of KCC2 transporter function and can be accounted for by increased Rac1/PAK- and LIMK-dependent cofilin phosphorylation and actin polymerization in dendritic spines. Our results demonstrate that KCC2 plays a critical role in the regulation of spine actin cytoskeleton and gates long-term plasticity at excitatory synapses in cortical neurons. PMID:26631461

  5. Role of nucleus accumbens glutamatergic plasticity in drug addiction

    PubMed Central

    Quintero, Gabriel C

    2013-01-01

    . Antagonism of the CP-AMPARs reduces cravings. It is necessary to pursue further exploration of the AMPA receptor subunit composition and variations at the level of the NAc for a better understanding of glutamatergic plastic changes. It is known that cocaine and morphine are able to induce changes in dendritic spine morphology by modifying actin cycling. These changes include an initial increase in spine head diameter and increases in AMPA receptor expression, followed by a second stage of spine head diameter retraction and reduction of the AMPA receptors’ expression in spines. Besides glutamate and dopamine, other factors, like brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), can influence NAc activity and induce changes in dendritic spine density. BDNF also induces drug-related behaviors like self-administration and relapse. Neither apoptosis nor neurogenesis plays a relevant role in the neurobiological processes subjacent to cocaine addiction in adults (rodent or human). Different therapeutic drugs like N-acetylcysteine (NAC), modafinil, acamprosate, and topiramate have been tested in preclinical and/or clinical models for alleviating drug relapse. Moreover, these therapeutic drugs target the glutamatergic circuitry between the PFC and the NAc. NAC and acamprosate have shown inconsistent results in clinical trials. Modafinil and topiramate have shown some success, but more clinical trials are necessary. Based on the current review findings, it could be recommendable to explore therapeutic approaches that include synergism between different drugs and neurotransmitter systems. The discrepancy in the results of some therapeutic drugs between preclinical versus clinical trials for alleviating relapse or drug dependence could be linked to the scarce exploration of preclinical models that mimic polydrug abuse patterns, for example, cocaine plus alcohol. At the clinical level, the pattern of polydrug consumption is a phenomenon of considerable frequency. Finally, as a complement at

  6. Role of nucleus accumbens glutamatergic plasticity in drug addiction.

    PubMed

    Quintero, Gabriel C

    2013-01-01

    . Antagonism of the CP-AMPARs reduces cravings. It is necessary to pursue further exploration of the AMPA receptor subunit composition and variations at the level of the NAc for a better understanding of glutamatergic plastic changes. It is known that cocaine and morphine are able to induce changes in dendritic spine morphology by modifying actin cycling. These changes include an initial increase in spine head diameter and increases in AMPA receptor expression, followed by a second stage of spine head diameter retraction and reduction of the AMPA receptors' expression in spines. Besides glutamate and dopamine, other factors, like brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), can influence NAc activity and induce changes in dendritic spine density. BDNF also induces drug-related behaviors like self-administration and relapse. Neither apoptosis nor neurogenesis plays a relevant role in the neurobiological processes subjacent to cocaine addiction in adults (rodent or human). Different therapeutic drugs like N-acetylcysteine (NAC), modafinil, acamprosate, and topiramate have been tested in preclinical and/or clinical models for alleviating drug relapse. Moreover, these therapeutic drugs target the glutamatergic circuitry between the PFC and the NAc. NAC and acamprosate have shown inconsistent results in clinical trials. Modafinil and topiramate have shown some success, but more clinical trials are necessary. Based on the current review findings, it could be recommendable to explore therapeutic approaches that include synergism between different drugs and neurotransmitter systems. The discrepancy in the results of some therapeutic drugs between preclinical versus clinical trials for alleviating relapse or drug dependence could be linked to the scarce exploration of preclinical models that mimic polydrug abuse patterns, for example, cocaine plus alcohol. At the clinical level, the pattern of polydrug consumption is a phenomenon of considerable frequency. Finally, as a complement at the

  7. Architecture of fully occupied GluA2 AMPA receptor-TARP complex elucidated by cryo-EM.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Chen, Shanshuang; Yoshioka, Craig; Baconguis, Isabelle; Gouaux, Eric

    2016-08-01

    Fast excitatory neurotransmission in the mammalian central nervous system is largely carried out by AMPA-sensitive ionotropic glutamate receptors. Localized within the postsynaptic density of glutamatergic spines, AMPA receptors are composed of heterotetrameric receptor assemblies associated with auxiliary subunits, the most common of which are transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs). The association of TARPs with AMPA receptors modulates receptor trafficking and the kinetics of receptor gating and pharmacology. Here we report the cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of the homomeric rat GluA2 AMPA receptor saturated with TARP γ2 subunits, which shows how the TARPs are arranged with four-fold symmetry around the ion channel domain and make extensive interactions with the M1, M2 and M4 transmembrane helices. Poised like partially opened ‘hands’ underneath the two-fold symmetric ligand-binding domain (LBD) 'clamshells', one pair of TARPs is juxtaposed near the LBD dimer interface, whereas the other pair is near the LBD dimer-dimer interface. The extracellular ‘domains’ of TARP are positioned to not only modulate LBD clamshell closure, but also affect conformational rearrangements of the LBD layer associated with receptor activation and desensitization, while the TARP transmembrane domains buttress the ion channel pore. PMID:27368053

  8. Specificity protein 4 (Sp4) regulates the transcription of AMPA receptor subunit GluA2 (Gria2).

    PubMed

    Priya, Anusha; Johar, Kaid; Nair, Bindu; Wong-Riley, Margaret T T

    2014-06-01

    The alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors are important glutamatergic receptors mediating fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the brain. The regulation of the four subunits of AMPA receptors, GluA1-4, is poorly understood. Excitatory synaptic transmission is highly energy-demanding, and this energy is derived mainly from the oxidative pathway. Recently, we found that specificity factor regulates all subunits of cytochrome c oxidase (COX), a critical energy-generating enzyme. COX is also regulated by nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1), which transcriptionally controls the Gria2 (GluA2) gene of AMPA receptors. The goal of the present study was to test our hypothesis that Sp-factors (Sp1, Sp3, and/or Sp4) also regulate AMPA subunit genes. If so, we wish to determine if Sp-factors and NRF-1 function via a complementary, concurrent and parallel, or a combination of complementary and concurrent/parallel mechanism. By means of multiple approaches, including electrophoretic mobility shift and supershift assays, chromatin immunoprecipitation, promoter mutations, real-time quantitative PCR, and western blot analysis, we found that Sp4, but not Sp1 or Sp3, regulates the Gria2, but not Gria1, 3, or 4, subunit gene of the AMPA receptor in a concurrent and parallel manner with NRF-1. Thus, Sp4 and NRF-1 both mediate the tight coupling between neuronal activity and energy metabolism at the transcriptional level. PMID:24576410

  9. Bipolar disorder: involvement of signaling cascades and AMPA receptor trafficking at synapses

    PubMed Central

    DU, JING; QUIROZ, JORGE; YUAN, PEIXIONG; ZARATE, CARLOS; MANJI, HUSSEINI K.

    2009-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that severe mood disorders are associated with impairment of structural plasticity and cellular resilience. Cumulative data demonstrate that mood stabilizers regulate intracellular signaling cascades, including protein kinase C (PKC), PKA, mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, glycogen synthase kinase 3-β (GSK3-β) and intracellular calcium, which are signaling pathways that regulate synaptic plasticity. In this context, it is noteworthy that a growing body of data indicates that the glutamatergic system, has a major role in neuronal plasticity and cellular resilience, might be involved in the pathophysiology and treatment of mood disorders. AMPA glutamate-receptor trafficking is important in synaptic plasticity and might play crucial roles in maintaining critical neuronal circuits associated with mood. Two clinically effective, structurally dissimilar, antimanic agents, lithium and valproate (VPA), down-regulate synaptic expression of AMPA receptor subunit GluR1 in hippocampus in chronically treated rats. This reduction in synaptic GluR1 by lithium and VPA is due to attenuated phosphorylation of GluR1 at a specific PKA site (residue 845 of GluR1), which is crucial for AMPA receptor insertion. By contrast, imipramine, which can provoke mania, increases synaptic expression of GluR1 in the hippocampus in vivo. Furthermore, there is ample evidence from preclinical and clinical research that the glutamatergic system is involved in the pathophysiology of mood disorders and that many of the somatic treatments used for mood disorders including antidepressants, mood stabilizers, atypical antipsychotic drugs and electroconvulsive therapy have both direct and indirect effects on the glutamatergic system. Given these findings, further research with medications that specifically affect the glutamatergic system is warranted. Recent studies in our lab have shown that riluzole, a FDA approved medicine that regulates the glutamatergic system, shows

  10. Stargazin is an AMPA receptor auxiliary subunit.

    PubMed

    Vandenberghe, Wim; Nicoll, Roger A; Bredt, David S

    2005-01-11

    AMPA (alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid) receptors mediate fast excitatory synaptic transmission in brain and underlie aspects of synaptic plasticity. Numerous AMPA receptor-binding proteins have been implicated in AMPA receptor trafficking and anchoring. However, the relative contributions of these proteins to the composition of native AMPA receptor complexes in brain remain uncertain. Here, we use blue native gel electrophoresis to analyze the composition of native AMPA receptor complexes in cerebellar extracts. We identify two receptor populations: a functional form that contains the transmembrane AMPA receptor-regulatory protein stargazin and an apo-form that lacks stargazin. Limited proteolysis confirms assembly of stargazin with a large proportion of native AMPA receptors. In contrast, other AMPA receptor-interacting proteins, such as synapse-associated protein 97, glutamate receptor-interacting protein 1, protein kinase Calpha binding protein, N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein, AP2, and protein 4.1N, do not show significant association with AMPA receptor complexes on native gels. These data identify stargazin as an auxiliary subunit for a neurotransmitter-gated ion channel. PMID:15630087

  11. The inhibitory input to mouse cerebellar Purkinje cells is reciprocally modulated by Bergmann glial P2Y1 and AMPA receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Ramona; Jahn, Hannah M; Courjaret, Raphael; Messemer, Nanette; Kirchhoff, Frank; Deitmer, Joachim W

    2016-07-01

    Synaptic transmission has been shown to be modulated by glial functions, but the modes of specific glial action may vary in different neural circuits. We have tested the hypothesis, if Bergmann GLIA (BG) are involved in shaping neuronal communication in the mouse cerebellar cortex, using acutely isolated cerebellar slices of wild-type (WT) and of glia-specific receptor knockout mice. Activation of P2Y1 receptors by ADP (100 µM) or glutamatergic receptors by AMPA (0.3 µM) resulted in a robust, reversible and repeatable rise of evoked inhibitory input in Purkinje cells by 80% and 150%, respectively. The ADP-induced response was suppressed by prior application of AMPA, and the AMPA-induced response was suppressed by prior application of ADP. Genetic deletion or pharmacological blockade of either receptor restored the response to the other receptor agonist. Both ADP and AMPA responses were sensitive to Rose Bengal, which blocks vesicular glutamate uptake, and to the NMDA receptor antagonist D-AP5. Our results provide strong evidence that activation of both ADP and AMPA receptors, located on BGs, results in the release of glutamate, which in turn activates inhibitory interneurons via NMDA-type glutamate receptors. This infers that BG cells, by means of metabotropic signaling via their AMPA and P2Y1 receptors, which mutually suppress each other, would interdependently contribute to the fine-tuning of Purkinje cell activity in the cerebellar cortex. GLIA 2016. GLIA 2016;64:1265-1280. PMID:27144942

  12. Synaptic commitment: developmentally regulated reciprocal changes in hippocampal granule cell NMDA and AMPA receptors over the lifespan.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhiyong; Krause, Michael; Rao, Geeta; McNaughton, Bruce L; Barnes, C A

    2008-06-01

    Synaptic transmission in hippocampal field CA1 is largely N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDA(R)) dependent during the early postnatal period. It becomes increasingly mediated by alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-proprionate (AMPA) receptors until an adult ratio of AMPA to NMDA receptors is achieved. It is shown here that increases in the AMPA receptor (AMPA(R))-mediated field potential response continue over the life span of the F-344 rat at the perforant path-granule cell synapse in the dentate gyrus. In contrast, the NMDA(R)-dependent component of the response decreases with age between 1 and 27 mo, leading to an increase of AMPA(R)/NMDA(R) ratio with age. One possible explanation of this age difference is that the AMPA(R)/NMDA(R) ratio can be modified by experience. To test the idea that the changed ratio is caused by the old rats' longer lives, an intensive 10-mo period of enrichment treatment was given to a group of animals, beginning at 3 mo of age. Compared with animals housed in standard cages, the enrichment treatment did not alter the glutamatergic response ratio measured with field potential recording methods. These data provide support for the conclusion that the observed change with age is developmentally regulated rather than experience dependent. Given the role of the NMDA(R) in synaptic plasticity, these changes suggest a progressive commitment of perforant path synapses to particular weights over the life span. One possible implication of this effect includes preservation of selected memories, ultimately at the expense of a reduced capacity to store new information. PMID:18417629

  13. Roles of the NMDA Receptor and EAAC1 Transporter in the Modulation of Extracellular Glutamate by Low and High Affinity AMPA Receptors in the Cerebellum in Vivo: Differential Alteration in Chronic Hyperammonemia.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Pastor, Andrea; Taoro, Lucas; Llansola, Marta; Felipo, Vicente

    2015-12-16

    The roles of high- and low-affinity AMPA receptors in modulating extracellular glutamate in the cerebellum remain unclear. Altered glutamatergic neurotransmission is involved in neurological alterations in hyperammonemia, which differently affects high- and low-affinity AMPA receptors. The aims were to assess by in vivo microdialysis (a) the effects of high- and low-affinity AMPA receptor activation on extracellular glutamate in the cerebellum; (b) whether chronic hyperammonemia alters extracellular glutamate modulation by high- and/or low-affinity AMPA receptors; and (c) the contribution of NMDA receptors and EAAC1 transporter to AMPA-induced changes in extracellular glutamate. In control rats, high affinity receptor activation does not affect extracellular glutamate but increases glutamate if NMDA receptors are blocked. Low affinity AMPA receptor activation increases transiently extracellular glutamate followed by reduction below basal levels and return to basal values. The reduction is associated with transient increased membrane expression of EAAC1 and is prevented by blocking NMDA receptors. Blocking NMDA receptors with MK-801 induces a transient increase in extracellular glutamate which is associated with reduced membrane expression of EAAC1 followed by increased membrane expression of the glutamate transporter GLT-1. Chronic hyperammonemia does not affect responses to activation of low affinity AMPA receptors. Activation of high affinity AMPA receptors increases extracellular glutamate in hyperammonemic rats by an NMDA receptor-dependent mechanism. In conclusion, these results show that there is a tightly controlled interplay between AMPA and NMDA receptors and an EAAC1 transporter in controlling extracellular glutamate. Hyperammonemia alters high- but not low-affinity AMPA receptors. PMID:26428532

  14. MODELING GLUTAMATERGIC SYNAPSES: INSIGHTS INTO MECHANISMS REGULATING SYNAPTIC EFFICACY

    PubMed Central

    BOUTEILLER, JEAN-MARIE C.; BAUDRY, MICHEL; ALLAM, SUSHMITA L.; GREGET, RENAUD J.; BISCHOFF, SERGE; BERGER, THEODORE W.

    2010-01-01

    The hippocampal formation is critically involved for the long-term storage of various forms of information, and it is widely believed that the phenomenon of long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic transmission is a molecular/cellular mechanism participating in memory formation. Although several high level models of hippocampal function have been developed, they do not incorporate detailed molecular information of the type necessary to understand the contribution of individual molecular events to the mechanisms underlying LTP and learning and memory. We are therefore developing new technological tools based on mathematical modeling and computer simulation of the molecular processes taking place in realistic biological networks to reach such an understanding. This article briefly summarizes the approach we are using and illustrates it by presenting data regarding the effects of changing the number of AMPA receptors on various features of glutamatergic transmission, including NMDA receptor-mediated responses and paired-pulse facilitation. We conclude by discussing the significance of these results and providing some ideas for future directions with this approach. PMID:18763719

  15. Cocaine facilitates glutamatergic transmission and activates lateral habenular neurons.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Wanhong; Chen, Lixin; Wang, Liwei; Ye, Jiang-Hong

    2013-07-01

    Cocaine administration can be both rewarding and aversive. While much effort has gone to investigating the rewarding effect, the mechanisms underlying cocaine-induced aversion remain murky. There is increasing evidence that the lateral habenula (LHb), a small epithalamic structure, plays a critical role in the aversive responses of many addictive drugs including cocaine. However, the effects of cocaine on LHb neurons are not well explored. Here we show that, in acute brain slices from rats, cocaine depolarized LHb neurons and accelerated their spontaneous firing. The AMPA and NMDA glutamate receptor antagonists, 6, 7-dinitroquinoxaline-2, 3-dione, DL-2-amino-5-phosphono-valeric acid, attenuated cocaine-induced acceleration. In addition, cocaine concentration-dependently enhanced glutamatergic excitation: enhanced the amplitude but reduced the paired pulse ratio of EPSCs elicited by electrical stimulations, and increased the frequency of spontaneous EPSCs in the absence and presence of tetrodotoxin. Dopamine and the agonists of dopamine D1 (SKF 38393) and D2 (quinpirole) receptors, as well as the dopamine transporter blocker (GBR12935), mimicked the effects of cocaine. Conversely, both D1 (SKF83566) and D2 (raclopride) antagonists substantially attenuated cocaine's effects on EPSCs and firing. Together, our results provide evidence that cocaine may act primarily via an increase in dopamine levels in the LHb that activates both D1 and D2 receptors. This leads to an increase in presynaptic glutamate release probability and LHb neuron activity. This may contribute to the aversive effect of cocaine observed in vivo. PMID:23347950

  16. Synaptic activity regulates AMPA receptor trafficking through different recycling pathways.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ning; Jeyifous, Okunola; Munro, Charlotte; Montgomery, Johanna M; Green, William N

    2015-01-01

    Changes in glutamatergic synaptic strength in brain are dependent on AMPA-type glutamate receptor (AMPAR) recycling, which is assumed to occur through a single local pathway. In this study, we present evidence that AMPAR recycling occurs through different pathways regulated by synaptic activity. Without synaptic stimulation, most AMPARs recycled in dynamin-independent endosomes containing the GTPase, Arf6. Few AMPARs recycled in dynamin-dependent endosomes labeled by transferrin receptors (TfRs). AMPAR recycling was blocked by alterations in the GTPase, TC10, which co-localized with Arf6 endosomes. TC10 mutants that reduced AMPAR recycling had no effect on increased AMPAR levels with long-term potentiation (LTP) and little effect on decreased AMPAR levels with long-term depression. However, internalized AMPAR levels in TfR-containing recycling endosomes increased after LTP, indicating increased AMPAR recycling through the dynamin-dependent pathway with synaptic plasticity. LTP-induced AMPAR endocytosis is inconsistent with local recycling as a source of increased surface receptors, suggesting AMPARs are trafficked from other sites. PMID:25970033

  17. Posttranslational regulation of AMPA receptor trafficking and function

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wei; Roche, Katherine W.

    2011-01-01

    In the mammalian central nervous system, the majority of fast excitatory synaptic transmission is mediated by glutamate acting on AMPA-type ionotropic glutamate receptors. The abundance of AMPA receptors at the synapse can be modulated through receptor trafficking, which dynamically regulates many fundamental brain functions, including learning and memory. Reversible posttranslational modifications, including phosphorylation, palmitoylation and ubiquitination of AMPA receptor subunits are important regulatory mechanisms for controlling synaptic AMPA receptor expression and function. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the study of AMPA receptor posttranslational modifications and discuss how these modifications regulate AMPA receptor trafficking and function at synapses. PMID:22000952

  18. Developmental Nicotine Exposure Alters AMPA Neurotransmission in the Hypoglossal Motor Nucleus and Pre-Bötzinger Complex of Neonatal Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Stuti J.; Pilarski, Jason Q.; Harrison, Caitlyn M.; Fregosi, Ralph F.

    2014-01-01

    Developmental nicotine exposure (DNE) impacts central respiratory control in neonates born to smoking mothers. We previously showed that DNE enhances the respiratory motor response to bath application of AMPA to the brainstem, although it was unclear which brainstem respiratory neurons mediated these effects (Pilarski and Fregosi, 2009). Here we examine how DNE influences AMPA-type glutamatergic neurotransmission in the pre-Bötzinger complex (pre-BötC) and the hypoglossal motor nucleus (XIIMN), which are neuronal populations located in the medulla that are necessary for normal breathing. Using rhythmic brainstem slices from neonatal rats, we microinjected AMPA into the pre-BötC or the XIIMN while recording from XII nerve rootlets (XIIn) as an index of respiratory motor output. DNE increased the duration of tonic activity and reduced rhythmic burst amplitude after AMPA microinjection into the XIIMN. Also, DNE led to an increase in respiratory burst frequency after AMPA injection into the pre-BötC. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of XII motoneurons showed that DNE increased motoneuron excitability but did not change inward currents. Immunohistochemical studies indicate that DNE reduced the expression of glutamate receptor subunits 2 and 3 (GluR2/3) in the XIIMN and the pre-BötC. Our data show that DNE alters AMPAergic synaptic transmission in both the XIIMN and pre-BötC, although the mechanism by which this occurs is unclear. We suggest that the DNE-induced reduction in GluR2/3 may represent an attempt to compensate for increased cell excitability, consistent with mechanisms underlying homeostatic plasticity. PMID:23392689

  19. The SOL-2/Neto auxiliary protein modulates the function of AMPA-subtype ionotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Mellem, Jerry E; Jensen, Michael; Brockie, Penelope J; Walker, Craig S; Hoerndli, Frédéric J; Hauth, Linda; Madsen, David M; Maricq, Andres V

    2012-09-01

    The neurotransmitter glutamate mediates excitatory synaptic transmission by gating ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs). AMPA receptors (AMPARs), a subtype of iGluR, are strongly implicated in synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory. We previously discovered two classes of AMPAR auxiliary proteins in C. elegans that modify receptor kinetics and thus change synaptic transmission. Here, we have identified another auxiliary protein, SOL-2, a CUB-domain protein that associates with both the related auxiliary subunit SOL-1 and with the GLR-1 AMPAR. In sol-2 mutants, behaviors dependent on glutamatergic transmission are disrupted, GLR-1-mediated currents are diminished, and GLR-1 desensitization and pharmacology are modified. Remarkably, a secreted variant of SOL-1 delivered in trans can rescue sol-1 mutants, and this rescue depends on in cis expression of SOL-2. Finally, we demonstrate that SOL-1 and SOL-2 have an ongoing role in the adult nervous system to control AMPAR-mediated currents. PMID:22958824

  20. AMPA receptor synaptic plasticity induced by psychostimulants: the past, present, and therapeutic future

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, M. Scott; Chen, Billy T.; Bonci, Antonello

    2010-01-01

    Experience-dependent plasticity at excitatory synapses of the mesocorticolimbic system is a fundamental brain mechanism that enables adaptation to an ever-changing environment. These synaptic responses are critical for the planning and execution of adaptive behaviors that maximize survival. The mesocorticolimbic system mediates procurement of positive reinforcers such as food and sex; however, drugs of abuse re-sculpt this crucial circuitry to promote compulsive drug-seeking behavior. This review will discuss the long-term changes in glutamatergic neurotransmission that occur within the mesolimbic system following cocaine exposure. In addition, we will examine how these long-lasting neuroadaptations may drive the pathology of psychostimulant addiction. Finally, we review clinical trials that highlight antagonists at excitatory AMPA receptors as promising targets against cocaine abuse. PMID:20624588

  1. DCP-LA stimulates AMPA receptor exocytosis through CaMKII activation due to PP-1 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Takeshi; Yaguchi, Takahiro; Nagata, Tetsu; Tanaka, Akito; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2009-10-01

    The linoleic acid derivative 8-[2-(2-pentyl-cyclopropylmethyl)-cyclopropyl]-octanoic acid (DCP-LA) activated Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) by inhibiting protein phosphatase-1 (PP-1). DCP-LA induced a transient huge facilitation of synaptic transmission monitored from the CA1 region of rat hippocampal slices, which was largely inhibited by the CaMKII inhibitor KN-93. DCP-LA potentiated kainate-evoked whole-cell membrane currents for Xenopus oocytes expressing alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors composed of the GluR1, GluR3, GluR1/GluR2, GluR1/GluR3, and GluR1/GluR2/GluR3 subunits, and the potentiation was significantly inhibited by KN-93. A similar potentiation was still found with mutant GluR1 (S831A) receptor lacking CaMKII phosphorylation site. The GluR1 and GluR2 subunits formed AMPA receptors in the rat hippocampus, and DCP-LA increased expression of both the subunits on the plasma membrane. The DCP-LA action was blocked by KN-93 and the exocytosis inhibitor botulinum toxin type A, but not by the endocytosis inhibitor phenylarsine oxide. DCP-LA, thus, appears to activate CaMKII through PP-1 inhibition, that stimulates AMPA receptor exocytosis to increase expression of the receptors on the plasma membrane, responsible for potentiate AMPA receptor responses and facilitation of hippocampal synaptic transmission. PMID:19492412

  2. NASA Adaptive Multibeam Phased Array (AMPA): An application study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittra, R.; Lee, S. W.; Gee, W.

    1982-01-01

    The proposed orbital geometry for the adaptive multibeam phased array (AMPA) communication system is reviewed and some of the system's capabilities and preliminary specifications are highlighted. Typical AMPA user link models and calculations are presented, the principal AMPA features are described, and the implementation of the system is demonstrated. System tradeoffs and requirements are discussed. Recommendations are included.

  3. Effect of VGLUT inhibitors on glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the rodent hippocampus and prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Neale, S A; Copeland, C S; Salt, T E

    2014-07-01

    Vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs) are known to be important in the uptake of glutamate into vesicles in the presynaptic terminal; thereby playing a role in synaptic function. VGLUT dysfunction has also been suggested in neurological and psychiatric disorders such as epilepsy and schizophrenia. A number of compounds have been identified as VGLUT inhibitors; however, little is known as to how these compounds affect synaptic transmission. We therefore investigated the effects of structurally unrelated VGLUT inhibitors on synaptic transmission in the rodent hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. In the CA1 and dentate gyrus regions of the in vitro slice preparation of mouse hippocampus, AMPA receptor-mediated field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) were evoked in response to Schaffer collateral/commissural pathway stimulation. Application of the VGLUT inhibitors Rose Bengal (RB), Congo Red (CR) or Chicago Sky Blue 6B (CB) resulted in a concentration-related reduction of fEPSP amplitudes. RB (30μM) or CB (300μM) also depressed NMDA receptor-mediated responses in the CA1 region. The naturally occurring kynurenine Xanthurenic Acid (XA) is reported to be a VGLUT inhibitor. We found XA attenuated both AMPA and NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission. The potency order of the VGLUT inhibitors was consistent with literature Ki values for VGLUT inhibition. Impaired glutamatergic neurotransmission is believed to contribute to schizophrenia, and VGLUTs have also been implicated in this disease. We therefore investigated the effect of VGLUT inhibition in the prefrontal cortex. Application of the VGLUT inhibitors RB or CB resulted in a concentration-dependent reduction in the amplitude of glutamate receptor-mediated fEPSPs recorded in layer V/VI in response to stimulation in the forceps minor. We conclude that VGLUT inhibitors can modulate glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the PFC and hippocampus. This could be important in the pathophysiology of nervous

  4. Glutamatergic system controls synchronization of spontaneous neuronal activity in the murine neonatal entorhinal cortex.

    PubMed

    Unichenko, Petr; Yang, Jeng-Wei; Luhmann, Heiko J; Kirischuk, Sergei

    2015-07-01

    Synchronized spontaneous neuronal activity is a characteristic feature of the developing brain. Rhythmic network discharges in the neonatal medial entorhinal cortex (mEC) in vitro depend on activation of ionotropic glutamate receptors, but spontaneously active neurons are required for their initiation. Field potential recordings revealed synchronized neuronal activity in the mEC in vivo developmentally earlier than in vitro. We suggested that not only ionotropic receptors, but also other components of the glutamatergic system modulate neuronal activity in the mEC. Ca(2+) imaging was used to record neuronal activity in neonatal murine brain slices. Two types of spontaneous events were distinguished: global synchronous discharges (synchronous activity) and asynchronously (not synchronized with global discharges) active cells (asynchronous activity). AMPA receptor blockade strongly reduced the frequency of synchronous discharges, while NMDA receptor inhibition was less effective. AMPA and NMDA receptor blockade or activation of group 2/3 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR2/3) completely suppressed synchronous discharges and increased the number of active cells. Blockade of glutamate transporters with DL-TBOA led to NMDA receptor-mediated hyper-synchronization of neuronal activity. Inhibition of NMDA receptors in the presence of DL-TBOA failed to restore synchronous discharges. The latter were partially reestablished only after blockade of mGluR2/3. We conclude that the glutamatergic system can influence neuronal activity via different receptors/mechanisms. As both NMDA and mGluR2/3 receptors have a high affinity for glutamate, changes in extracellular glutamate levels resulting for instance from glutamate transporter malfunction can balance neuronal activity in the mEC, affecting in turn synapse and network formation. PMID:25163767

  5. Nuclear respiratory factor 2 regulates the transcription of AMPA receptor subunit GluA2 (Gria2).

    PubMed

    Priya, Anusha; Johar, Kaid; Nair, Bindu; Wong-Riley, Margaret T T

    2014-12-01

    Neuronal activity is highly dependent on energy metabolism. Nuclear respiratory factor 2 (NRF-2) tightly couples neuronal activity and energy metabolism by transcriptionally co-regulating all 13 subunits of an important energy-generating enzyme, cytochrome c oxidase (COX), as well as critical subunits of excitatory NMDA receptors. AMPA receptors are another major class of excitatory glutamatergic receptors that mediate most of the fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the brain. They are heterotetrameric proteins composed of various combinations of GluA1-4 subunits, with GluA2 being the most common one. We have previously shown that GluA2 (Gria2) is transcriptionally regulated by nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1) and specificity protein 4 (Sp4), which also regulate all subunits of COX. However, it was not known if NRF-2 also couples neuronal activity and energy metabolism by regulating subunits of the AMPA receptors. By means of multiple approaches, including electrophoretic mobility shift and supershift assays, chromatin immunoprecipitation, promoter mutations, real-time quantitative PCR, and western blot analysis, NRF-2 was found to functionally regulate the expression of Gria2, but not of Gria1, Gria3, or Gria4 genes in neurons. By regulating the GluA2 subunit of the AMPA receptor, NRF-2 couples energy metabolism and neuronal activity at the transcriptional level through a concurrent and parallel mechanism with NRF-1 and Sp4. PMID:25245478

  6. Redefining the classification of AMPA-selective ionotropic glutamate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bowie, Derek

    2012-01-01

    Abstract AMPA-type ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) represent the major excitatory neurotransmitter receptor in the developing and adult vertebrate CNS. They are crucial for the normal hardwiring of glutamatergic circuits but also fine tune synaptic strength by cycling into and out of synapses during periods of sustained patterned activity or altered homeostasis. AMPARs are grouped into two functionally distinct tetrameric assemblies based on the inclusion or exclusion of the GluA2 receptor subunit. GluA2-containing receptors are thought to be the most abundant AMPAR in the CNS, typified by their small unitary events, Ca2+ impermeability and insensitivity to polyamine block. In contrast, GluA2-lacking AMPARs exhibit large unitary conductance, marked divalent permeability and nano- to micromolar polyamine affinity. Here, I review evidence for the existence of a third class of AMPAR which, though similarly Ca2+ permeable, is characterized by its near-insensitivity to internal and external channel block by polyamines. This novel class of AMPAR is most notably found at multivesicular release synapses found in the avian auditory brainstem and mammalian retina. Curiously, these synapses lack NMDA-type iGluRs, which are conventionally associated with controlling AMPAR insertion. The lack of NMDARs suggests that a different set of rules may govern AMPAR cycling at these synapses. AMPARs with similar functional profiles are also found on some glial cells suggesting they may have a more widespread distribution in the mammalian CNS. I conclude by noting that modest changes to the ion-permeation pathway might be sufficient to retain divalent permeability whilst eliminating polyamine sensitivity. Consequently, this emerging AMPAR subclass need not be assembled from novel subunits, yet to be cloned, but could simply occur by varying the stoichiometry of existing proteins. PMID:22106175

  7. MET Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Controls Dendritic Complexity, Spine Morphogenesis, and Glutamatergic Synapse Maturation in the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhongming; Levitt, Pat

    2014-01-01

    The MET receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK), implicated in risk for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and in functional and structural circuit integrity in humans, is a temporally and spatially regulated receptor enriched in dorsal pallial-derived structures during mouse forebrain development. Here we report that loss or gain of function of MET in vitro or in vivo leads to changes, opposite in nature, in dendritic complexity, spine morphogenesis, and the timing of glutamatergic synapse maturation onto hippocampus CA1 neurons. Consistent with the morphological and biochemical changes, deletion of Met in mutant mice results in precocious maturation of excitatory synapse, as indicated by a reduction of the proportion of silent synapses, a faster GluN2A subunit switch, and an enhanced acquisition of AMPA receptors at synaptic sites. Thus, MET-mediated signaling appears to serve as a mechanism for controlling the timing of neuronal growth and functional maturation. These studies suggest that mistimed maturation of glutamatergic synapses leads to the aberrant neural circuits that may be associated with ASD risk. PMID:25471559

  8. A Monte Carlo model reveals independent signaling at central glutamatergic synapses.

    PubMed Central

    Franks, Kevin M; Bartol, Thomas M; Sejnowski, Terrence J

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a biophysically realistic model of receptor activation at an idealized central glutamatergic synapse that uses Monte Carlo techniques to simulate the stochastic nature of transmission following release of a single synaptic vesicle. For the a synapse with 80 AMPA and 20 NMDA receptors, a single quantum, with 3000 glutamate molecules, opened approximately 3 NMDARs and 20 AMPARs. The number of open receptors varied directly with the total number of receptors, and the fraction of open receptors did not depend on the ratio of co-localized AMPARs and NMDARs. Variability decreased with increases in either total receptor number or quantal size, and differences between the variability of AMPAR and NMDAR responses were due solely to unequal numbers of receptors at the synapse. Despite NMDARs having a much higher affinity for glutamate than AMPARs, quantal release resulted in similar occupancy levels in both receptor types. Receptor activation increased with number of transmitter molecules released or total receptor number, whereas occupancy levels were only dependent on quantal size. Tortuous diffusion spaces reduced the extent of spillover and the activation of extrasynaptic receptors. These results support the conclusion that signaling is spatially independent within and between central glutamatergic synapses. PMID:12414671

  9. IL1RAPL1 Associated with Mental Retardation and Autism Regulates the Formation and Stabilization of Glutamatergic Synapses of Cortical Neurons through RhoA Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Takashi; Yoshida, Tomoyuki; Ra, Moonjin; Taguchi, Ryo; Mishina, Masayoshi

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-1 receptor accessory protein-like 1 (IL1RAPL1) is associated with X-linked mental retardation and autism spectrum disorder. We found that IL1RAPL1 regulates synapse formation of cortical neurons. To investigate how IL1RAPL1 controls synapse formation, we here screened IL1RAPL1-interacting proteins by affinity chromatography and mass spectroscopy. IL1RAPL1 interacted with Mcf2-like (Mcf2l), a Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor, through the cytoplasmic Toll/IL-1 receptor domain. Knockdown of endogenous Mcf2l and treatment with an inhibitor of Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK), the downstream kinase of RhoA, suppressed IL1RAPL1-induced excitatory synapse formation of cortical neurons. Furthermore, we found that the expression of IL1RAPL1 affected the turnover of AMPA receptor subunits. Insertion of GluA1-containing AMPA receptors to the cell surface was decreased, whereas that of AMPA receptors composed of GluA2/3 was enhanced. Mcf2l knockdown and ROCK inhibitor treatment diminished the IL1RAPL1-induced changes of AMPA receptor subunit insertions. Our results suggest that Mcf2l-RhoA-ROCK signaling pathway mediates IL1RAPL1-dependent formation and stabilization of glutamatergic synapses of cortical neurons. PMID:23785489

  10. Zinc in the Glutamatergic Theory of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Młyniec, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Depression is a serious psychiatric illness that affects millions of people worldwide. Weeks of antidepressant therapy are required to relieve depressive symptoms, and new drugs are still being extensively researched. The latest studies have shown that in depression, there is an imbalance between the main excitatory (glutamatergic) and inhibitory (GABAergic) systems. Administration of antagonists of the glutamatergic system, including zinc, has shown an antidepressant effect in preclinical as well as clinical studies. Zinc inhibits the NMDA receptor via its binding site located on one of its subunits. This is thought to be the main mechanism explaining the antidepressant properties of zinc. In the present review, a link between zinc and the glutamatergic system is discussed in the context of depressive disorder. PMID:26412070

  11. Optogenetic stimulation reveals distinct modulatory properties of thalamostriatal vs corticostriatal glutamatergic inputs to fast-spiking interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Sciamanna, Giuseppe; Ponterio, Giulia; Mandolesi, Georgia; Bonsi, Paola; Pisani, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Parvalbumin-containing fast-spiking interneurons (FSIs) exert a powerful feed-forward GABAergic inhibition on striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs), playing a critical role in timing striatal output. However, how glutamatergic inputs modulate their firing activity is still unexplored. Here, by means of a combined optogenetic and electrophysiological approach, we provide evidence for a differential modulation of cortico- vs thalamo-striatal synaptic inputs to FSIs in transgenic mice carrying light-gated ion channels channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) in glutamatergic fibers. Corticostriatal synapses show a postsynaptic facilitation, whereas thalamostriatal synapses present a postsynaptic depression. Moreover, thalamostriatal synapses exhibit more prominent AMPA-mediated currents than corticostriatal synapses, and an increased release probability. Furthermore, during current-evoked firing activity, simultaneous corticostriatal stimulation increases bursting activity. Conversely, thalamostriatal fiber activation shifts the canonical burst-pause activity to a more prolonged, regular firing pattern. However, this change in firing pattern was accompanied by a significant rise in the frequency of membrane potential oscillations. Notably, the responses to thalamic stimulation were fully abolished by blocking metabotropic glutamate 1 (mGlu1) receptor subtype, whereas both acetylcholine and dopamine receptor antagonists were ineffective. Our findings demonstrate that cortical and thalamic glutamatergic input differently modulate FSIs firing activity through specific intrinsic and synaptic properties, exerting a powerful influence on striatal outputs. PMID:26572101

  12. α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors Occur at Postsynaptic Densities of AMPA Receptor-Positive and -Negative Excitatory Synapses in Rat Sensory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Robert B.; Aoki, Chiye

    2010-01-01

    NMDA receptor (NMDAR) activation requires concurrent membrane depolarization, and glutamatergic synapses lacking AMPA receptors (AMPARs) are often considered “silent” in the absence of another source of membrane depolarization. During the second postnatal week, NMDA currents can be enhanced in rat auditory cortex through activation of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR). Electrophysiological results support a mainly presynaptic role for α7nAChR at these synapses. However, immunocytochemical evidence that α7nAChR is prevalent at postsynaptic sites of glutamatergic synapses in hippocampus and neocortex, along with emerging electrophysiological evidence for postsynaptic nicotinic currents in neocortex and hippocampus, has prompted speculation that α7nAChR allows for activation of NMDAR postsynaptically at synapses lacking AMPAR. Here we used dual immunolabeling and electron microscopy to examine the distribution of α7nAChR relative to AMPAR (GluR1, GluR2, and GluR3 subunits combined) at excitatory synapses in somatosensory cortex of adult and 1-week-old rats. α7nAChR occurred discretely over most of the thick postsynaptic densities in all cortical layers of both age groups. AMPAR immunoreactivity was also detectable at most synapses; its distribution was independent of that of α7nAChR. In both age groups, approximately one-quarter of asymmetrical synapses were α7nAChR positive and AMPAR negative. The variability of postsynaptic α7nAChR labeling density was greater at postnatal day (PD) 7 than in adulthood, and PD 7 neuropil contained a subset of small AMPA receptor-negative synapses with a high density of α7nAChR immunoreactivity. These observations support the idea that acetylcholine receptors can aid in activating glutamatergic synapses and work together with AMPA receptors to mediate postsynaptic excitation throughout life. PMID:12077196

  13. The function of glutamatergic synapses is not perturbed by severe knockdown of 4.1N and 4.1G expression.

    PubMed

    Wozny, Christian; Breustedt, Jörg; Wolk, Friederike; Varoqueaux, Frédérique; Boretius, Susann; Zivkovic, Aleksandar R; Neeb, Antje; Frahm, Jens; Schmitz, Dietmar; Brose, Nils; Ivanovic, Aleksandra

    2009-03-01

    AMPA-type glutamate receptors mediate fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the vertebrate brain. Their surface expression at synapses between neurons is regulated in an activity-dependent and activity-independent manner. The protein machinery that regulates synaptic targeting, anchoring and turnover of AMPA receptors consists of several types of specialized scaffolding proteins. The FERM domain scaffolding proteins 4.1G and 4.1N were previously suggested to act jointly in binding and regulating synaptic trafficking of the AMPA receptor subunits GluR1 and GluR4. To determine the functions of 4.1G and 4.1N in vivo, we generated a mutant mouse line that lacks 4.1G entirely and expresses 4.1N at 22% of wild-type levels. These mice had combined 4.1G and 4.1N protein expression in the hippocampus at 12% of wild-type levels (equivalent to 8-10% of combined GluR1 and GluR4 expression levels). They show a moderate reduction in synaptosomal expression levels of the AMPA receptor subunit GluR1 at 3 weeks of age, but no change in basic glutamatergic synaptic transmission and long-term potentiation in the hippocampus. Our study indicates that 4.1G and 4.1N do not have a crucial role in glutamatergic synaptic transmission and the induction and maintenance of long-term plastic changes in synaptic efficacy. PMID:19225127

  14. AMPA receptor desensitization is the determinant of AMPA receptor mediated excitotoxicity in purified retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Yong H; Mueller, Brett H; McGrady, Nolan R; Ma, Hai-Ying; Yorio, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    The ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGLuR) have been hypothesized to play a role in neuronal pathogenesis by mediating excitotoxic death. Previous studies on iGluR in the retina have focused on two broad classes of receptors: NMDA and non-NMDA receptors including the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic receptor (AMPAR) and kainate receptor. In this study, we examined the role of receptor desensitization on the specific excitotoxic effects of AMPAR activation on primary retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Purified rat RGCs were isolated from postnatal day 4-7 Sprague-Dawley rats. Calcium imaging was used to identify the functionality of the AMPARs and selectivity of the s-AMPA agonist. Phosphorylated CREB and ERK1/2 expression were performed following s-AMPA treatment. s-AMPA excitotoxicity was determined by JC-1 mitochondrial membrane depolarization assay, caspase 3/7 luciferase activity assay, immunoblot analysis for α-fodrin, and Live (calcein AM)/Dead (ethidium homodimer-1) assay. RGC cultures of 98% purity, lacking Iba1 and GFAP expression were used for the present studies. Isolated prenatal RGCs expressed calcium permeable AMPAR and s-AMPA (100 μM) treatment of cultured RGCs significantly increased phosphorylation of CREB but not that of ERK1/2. A prolonged (6 h) AMPAR activation in purified RGCs using s-AMPA (100 μM) did not depolarize the RGC mitochondrial membrane potential. In addition, treatment of cultured RGCs with s-AMPA, both in the presence and absence of trophic factors (BDNF and CNTF), did not increase caspase 3/7 activities or the cleavage of α-fodrin (neuronal apoptosis marker), as compared to untreated controls. Lastly, a significant increase in cell survival of RGCs was observed after s-AMPA treatment as compared to control untreated RGCs. However, preventing the desensitization of AMPAR with the treatment with either kainic acid (100 μM) or the combination of s-AMPA and cyclothiazide (50 μM) significantly reduced cell

  15. Superactivation of AMPA receptors by auxiliary proteins

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, Anna L.; Plested, Andrew J. R.

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate receptors form complexes in the brain with auxiliary proteins, which control their activity during fast synaptic transmission through a seemingly bewildering array of effects. Here we devise a way to isolate the activation of complexes using polyamines, which enables us to show that transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) exert their effects principally on the channel opening reaction. A thermodynamic argument suggests that because TARPs promote channel opening, receptor activation promotes AMPAR-TARP complexes into a superactive state with high open probability. A simple model based on this idea predicts all known effects of TARPs on AMPA receptor function. This model also predicts unexpected phenomena including massive potentiation in the absence of desensitization and supramaximal recovery that we subsequently detected in electrophysiological recordings. This transient positive feedback mechanism has implications for information processing in the brain, because it should allow activity-dependent facilitation of excitatory synaptic transmission through a postsynaptic mechanism. PMID:26744192

  16. Perampanel Inhibition of AMPA Receptor Currents in Cultured Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chao-Yin; Matt, Lucas; Hell, Johannes Wilhelm; Rogawski, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Perampanel is an aryl substituted 2-pyridone AMPA receptor antagonist that was recently approved as a treatment for epilepsy. The drug potently inhibits AMPA receptor responses but the mode of block has not been characterized. Here the action of perampanel on AMPA receptors was investigated by whole-cell voltage-clamp recording in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Perampanel caused a slow (τ∼1 s at 3 µM), concentration-dependent inhibition of AMPA receptor currents evoked by AMPA and kainate. The rates of block and unblock of AMPA receptor currents were 1.5×105 M−1 s−1 and 0.58 s−1, respectively. Perampanel did not affect NMDA receptor currents. The extent of block of non-desensitizing kainate-evoked currents (IC50, 0.56 µM) was similar at all kainate concentrations (3–100 µM), demonstrating a noncompetitive blocking action. Parampanel did not alter the trajectory of AMPA evoked currents indicating that it does not influence AMPA receptor desensitization. Perampanel is a selective negative allosteric AMPA receptor antagonist of high-affinity and slow blocking kinetics. PMID:25229608

  17. Glutamatergic Transmission: A Matter of Three

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Lozada, Zila; Ortega, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Glutamatergic transmission in the vertebrate brain requires the involvement of glia cells, in a continuous molecular dialogue. Glial glutamate receptors and transporters are key molecules that sense synaptic activity and by these means modify their physiology in the short and long term. Posttranslational modifications that regulate protein-protein interactions and modulate transmitter removal are triggered in glial cells by neuronal released glutamate. Moreover, glutamate signaling cascades in these cells are linked to transcriptional and translational control and are critically involved in the control of the so-called glutamate/glutamine shuttle and by these means in glutamatergic neurotransmission. In this contribution, we summarize our current understanding of the biochemical consequences of glutamate synaptic activity in their surrounding partners and dissect the molecular mechanisms that allow neurons to take control of glia physiology to ensure proper glutamate-mediated neuronal communication. PMID:26345375

  18. Overview of Glutamatergic Dysregulation in Central Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Miladinovic, Tanya; Nashed, Mina G.; Singh, Gurmit

    2015-01-01

    As the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system, glutamate plays a key role in many central pathologies, including gliomas, psychiatric, neurodevelopmental, and neurodegenerative disorders. Post-mortem and serological studies have implicated glutamatergic dysregulation in these pathologies, and pharmacological modulation of glutamate receptors and transporters has provided further validation for the involvement of glutamate. Furthermore, efforts from genetic, in vitro, and animal studies are actively elucidating the specific glutamatergic mechanisms that contribute to the aetiology of central pathologies. However, details regarding specific mechanisms remain sparse and progress in effectively modulating glutamate to alleviate symptoms or inhibit disease states has been relatively slow. In this report, we review what is currently known about glutamate signalling in central pathologies. We also discuss glutamate’s mediating role in comorbidities, specifically cancer-induced bone pain and depression. PMID:26569330

  19. AMPA Receptors as Therapeutic Targets for Neurological Disorders.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kevin; Goodman, Lucy; Fourie, Chantelle; Schenk, Susan; Leitch, Beulah; Montgomery, Johanna M

    2016-01-01

    Almost every neurological disease directly or indirectly affects synapse function in the brain. However, these diseases alter synapses through different mechanisms, ultimately resulting in altered synaptic transmission and/or plasticity. Glutamate is the major neurotransmitter that mediates excitatory synaptic transmission in the brain through activation of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate (AMPA) receptors. These receptors have therefore been identified as a target for the development of therapeutic treatments for neurological disorders including epilepsy, neurodegenerative diseases, autism, and drug addiction. The fact that AMPA receptors play a dominant role throughout the brain raises the significant challenge of selectively targeting only those regions affected by disease, and clinical trials have raised doubt regarding the feasibility of specifically targeting AMPA receptors for new therapeutic options. Benzamide compounds that act as positive allosteric AMPA receptor modulators, known as AMPAkines, can act on specific brain regions and were initially proposed to revolutionize the treatment of cognitive deficits associated with neurological disorders. Their therapeutic potential has since declined due to inconsistent results in clinical trials. However, recent advances in basic biomedical research are significantly increasing our knowledge of AMPA receptor structure, binding sites, and interactions with auxiliary proteins. In particular, the large complex of postsynaptic proteins that interact with AMPA receptor subunits have been shown to control AMPA receptor insertion, location, pharmacology, synaptic transmission, and plasticity. These proteins are now being considered as alternative therapeutic target sites for modulating AMPA receptors in neurological disorders. PMID:26920691

  20. TARP phosphorylation regulates synaptic AMPA receptors through lipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Sumioka, Akio; Yan, Dan; Tomita, Susumu

    2010-01-01

    Summary Neurons use neurotransmitters to communicate across synapses, constructing neural circuits in the brain. AMPA-type glutamate receptors are the predominant excitatory neurotransmitter receptors mediating fast synaptic transmission. AMPA receptors localize at synapses by forming protein complexes with transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) and PSD-95-like MAGUKs. Among the three classes of ionotropic glutamate receptors (AMPA-, NMDA, kainate-type), AMPA receptor activity is most regulatable by neuronal activity to adjust synaptic strength. Here, we mutated the prototypical TARP, stargazin, and found that TARP phosphorylation regulates synaptic AMPA receptor activity in vivo. We also found that stargazin interacts with negatively-charged lipid bilayers in its phosphorylation dependent manner, and that the lipid interaction inhibited stargazin binding to PSD-95. Cationic lipids dissociated stargazin from lipid bilayers and enhanced synaptic AMPA receptor activity in a stargazin phosphorylation-dependent manner. Thus, TARP phosphorylation plays a critical role in regulating AMPA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission via a lipid bilayer interaction. PMID:20547132

  1. Eugenol reduces acute pain in mice by modulating the glutamatergic and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) pathways.

    PubMed

    Dal Bó, Wladmir; Luiz, Ana Paula; Martins, Daniel F; Mazzardo-Martins, Leidiane; Santos, Adair R S

    2013-10-01

    Eugenol is utilized together with zinc oxide in odontological clinical for the cementation of temporary prostheses and the temporary restoration of teeth and cavities. This work explored the antinociceptive effects of the eugenol in different models of acute pain in mice and investigated its possible modulation of the inhibitory (opioid) and excitatory (glutamatergic and pro-inflammatory cytokines) pathways of nociceptive signaling. The administration of eugenol (3-300 mg/kg, p.o., 60 min or i.p., 30 min) inhibited 82 ± 10% and 90 ± 6% of the acetic acid-induced nociception, with ID₅₀ values of 51.3 and 50.2 mg/kg, respectively. In the glutamate test, eugenol (0.3-100 mg/kg, i.p.) reduced the response behavior by 62 ± 5% with an ID₅₀ of 5.6 mg/kg. In addition, the antinociceptive effect of eugenol (10 mg/kg, i.p.) in the glutamate test was prevented by the i.p. treatment for mice with naloxone. The pretreatment of mice with eugenol (10 mg/kg, i.p.) was able to inhibit the nociception induced by the intrathecal (i.t.) injection of glutamate (37 ± 9%), kainic (acid kainite) (41 ± 12%), α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) (55 ± 5%), and substance P (SP) (39 ± 8%). Furthermore, eugenol (10 mg/kg, i.p.) also inhibited biting induced by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, 65 ± 8%). These results extend our current knowledge of eugenol and confirm that it promotes significant antinociception against different mouse models of acute pain. The mechanism of action appears to involve the modulation of the opioid system and glutamatergic receptors (i.e., kainate and AMPA), and the inhibition of TNF-α. Thus, eugenol could represent an important compound in the treatment for acute pain. PMID:22775297

  2. Modulation of Glutamatergic Transmission by Sulfated Steroids: Role in Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, C. Fernando; Partridge, L. Donald; Mameli, Manuel; Meyer, Douglas A.

    2008-01-01

    It is well established that sulfated steroids regulate synaptic transmission by altering the function of postsynaptic neurotransmitter receptors. In recent years, evidence from several laboratories indicates that these agents also regulate glutamatergic synaptic transmission at the presynaptic level in an age-dependent manner. In developing neurons, pregnenolone sulfate (PREGS) increases the probability of glutamate release, as evidenced by an increase in the frequency of AMPA receptor-mediated miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents and a decrease in paired-pulse facilitation. In hippocampal slices from postnatal day 3–5 rats, this effect is mediated by an increase in Ca2+ levels in the axonal terminal that depends on presynaptic NMDA receptors. This is followed by delayed potentiation of postsynaptic AMPA receptor currents. Importantly, depolarization of postsynaptic neurons, inhibition of hydroxysteroid sulfatase activity and acute exposure to ethanol mimics the effect of exogenous PREGS application. This developmental form of synaptic plasticity cannot be observed in slices from rats older than postnatal day 6, when presynaptic NMDA receptors are no longer expressed in CA1 hippocampal region. Both in the CA1 hippocampal region and the dentate gyrus of more mature rats, PREGS, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and hydroxysteroid sulfatase inhibitors increase paired-pulse facilitation, without affecting basal glutamate release probability. This effect depends on activation of σ1-like receptors and Gi/o and involves a target in the release machinery that is downstream of residual Ca2+. These presynaptic actions of sulfated steroids could play important roles in physiological processes ranging from synapse maturation to learning and memory, as well as pathophysiological conditions such as fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. PMID:17597219

  3. Neuroligin 1 modulates striatal glutamatergic neurotransmission in a pathway and NMDAR subunit-specific manner

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa, Felipe; Xuan, Zhong; Liu, Shunan; Powell, Craig M.

    2015-01-01

    Together with its presynaptic partner Neurexin 1 (Nxn1), Neuroligin 1 (NL1) participates in synapse specification and synapse maintenance. We and others have shown that NL1 can also modulate glutamatergic synaptic function in the central nervous system of rodent models. These molecular/cellular changes can translate into altered animal behaviors that are thought to be analogous to symptomatology of neuropsychiatric disorders. For example, in dorsal striatum of NL1 deletion mice, we previously reported that the ratio N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) mediated synaptic currents to α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate receptor (AMPAR) mediated synaptic currents (NMDA/AMPA) is reduced in medium spiny neuron (MSNs). Importantly, this reduction in NMDA/AMPA ratio correlated with increased repetitive grooming. The striatum is the input nucleus of the basal ganglia (BG). Classical models of this circuitry imply that there are two principal pathways that render distinct and somewhat opposite striatal outputs critical to the function of these nuclei in modulating motor behavior. Thus, we set out to better characterize the effects of NL1 deletion on direct and indirect pathways of the dorsal striatum by genetically labeling MSNs participating in the direct and indirect pathways. We demonstrate that a decrease in NMDAR-mediated currents is limited to MSNs of the direct pathway. Furthermore, the decrease in NMDAR-mediated currents is largely due to a reduction in function of NMDARs containing the GluN2A subunit. In contrast, indirect pathway MSNs in NL1 knockout (KO) mice showed a reduction in the frequency of miniature excitatory neurotransmission not observed in the direct pathway. Thus, NL1 deletion differentially affects direct and indirect pathway MSNs in dorsal striatum. These findings have potential implications for striatal function in NL1 KO mice. PMID:26283958

  4. The neuronal K-Cl cotransporter KCC2 influences postsynaptic AMPA receptor content and lateral diffusion in dendritic spines

    PubMed Central

    Gauvain, Grégory; Chamma, Ingrid; Chevy, Quentin; Cabezas, Carolina; Irinopoulou, Theano; Bodrug, Natalia; Carnaud, Michèle; Lévi, Sabine; Poncer, Jean Christophe

    2011-01-01

    The K-Cl cotransporter KCC2 plays an essential role in neuronal chloride homeostasis, and thereby influences the efficacy and polarity of GABA signaling. Although KCC2 is expressed throughout the somatodendritic membrane, it is remarkably enriched in dendritic spines, which host most glutamatergic synapses in cortical neurons. KCC2 has been shown to influence spine morphogenesis and functional maturation in developing neurons, but its function in mature dendritic spines remains unknown. Here, we report that suppressing KCC2 expression decreases the efficacy of excitatory synapses in mature hippocampal neurons. This effect correlates with a reduced postsynaptic aggregation of GluR1-containing AMPA receptors and is mimicked by a dominant negative mutant of KCC2 interaction with cytoskeleton but not by pharmacological suppression of KCC2 function. Single-particle tracking experiments reveal that suppressing KCC2 increases lateral diffusion of the mobile fraction of AMPA receptor subunit GluR1 in spines but not in adjacent dendritic shafts. Increased diffusion was also observed for transmembrane but not membrane-anchored recombinant neuronal cell adhesion molecules. We suggest that KCC2, likely through interactions with the actin cytoskeleton, hinders transmembrane protein diffusion, and thereby contributes to their confinement within dendritic spines. PMID:21878564

  5. Loss of Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors in synapses of tonic firing substantia gelatinosa neurons in the chronic constriction injury model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yishen; Derkach, Victor A; Smith, Peter A

    2016-05-01

    Synapses transmitting nociceptive information in the spinal dorsal horn undergo enduring changes following peripheral nerve injury. Indeed, such injury alters the expression of the GluA2 subunit of glutamatergic AMPA receptors (AMPARs) in the substantia gelatinosa and this predicts altered channel conductance and calcium permeability, leading to an altered function of excitatory synapses. We therefore investigated the functional properties of synaptic AMPA receptors in rat substantia gelatinosa neurons following 10-20d chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve; a model of neuropathic pain. We measured their single-channel conductance and sensitivity to a blocker of calcium permeable AMPA receptors (CP-AMPARs), IEM1460 (50μM). In putative inhibitory, tonic firing neurons, CCI reduced the average single-channel conductance of synaptic AMPAR from 14.4±3.5pS (n=12) to 9.2±1.0pS (n=10, p<0.05). IEM1460 also more effectively antagonized evoked, spontaneous and miniature EPSCs in tonic neurons from sham operated animals than in those from animals that had been subjected to CCI. By contrast, CCI did not change the effectiveness of IEM1460 in delay firing neurons although average single channel conductance was increased from 7.6±1.2pS (n=11) to 12.2±1.5pS (n=10, p<0.01). CCI thus elicits plastic changes in a specific set of glutamatergic synapses of substantia gelatinosa due to subunit recomposition and loss of GluA2-lacking CP-AMPAR. These insights reveal a molecular mechanism of nerve injury acting at synapses of inhibitory neurons to reduce their drive and therefore inhibitory tone in the spinal cord, therefore contributing to the central sensitization associated with neuropathic pain. PMID:26948545

  6. The effects of AMPA blockade on the spectral profile of human early visual cortex recordings studied with non-invasive MEG.

    PubMed

    Muthukumaraswamy, Suresh D; Routley, Bethany; Droog, Wouter; Singh, Krish D; Hamandi, Khalid

    2016-08-01

    The generation of gamma-band (>30 Hz) cortical activity is thought to depend on the reciprocal connections of excitatory glutamatergic principal cells with inhibitory GABAergic interneurons. Both in vitro and in vivo animal studies have shown that blockade of glutamatergic α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors reduces the amplitude of gamma-band activity. In this registered report, we hypothesised that similar effects would be observed in humans following administration of perampanel, a first in class AMPA antagonist, used in the treatment of epilepsy. In a single-blind placebo-controlled crossover study, 20 healthy male participants completed two study days. On one day participants were given a 6 mg dose of perampanel and on the other an inactive placebo. magnetoencephalography (MEG) recordings of brain activity were taken before and two hours after drug administration, with activity in the visual cortex probed using a stimulation protocol known to induce gamma-band activity in the primary visual cortex. As hypothesised, our results indicated a decrease in gamma-band amplitudes following perampanel administration. The decreases in gamma-band amplitudes observed were temporally restricted to the early time-period of stimulus presentation (up to 400 msec) with no significant effects observed on early evoked responses or alpha rhythms. This suggests that the early time-window of induced visual gamma-band activity, thought to reflect input to the visual cortex from the lateral geniculate nucleus, is most sensitive to AMPA blocking drugs. PMID:27209006

  7. Expression of ionotropic glutamate receptors, AMPA, kainite and NMDA, in the pigeon retina.

    PubMed

    Atoji, Yasuro

    2015-07-01

    Glutamate is an excitatory neurotransmitter in the vertebrate retina. A previous study found vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (vGluT2) mRNA in the pigeon retina, suggesting that bipolar and ganglion cells are glutamatergic. The present study examined the localization of ionotropic glutamate receptors to identify receptor cells in the pigeon retina using in situ hybridization histochemistry. Nine subunits of AMPA receptor (GluA1, GluA2, GluA3, and GluA4), kainate receptor (GluK1, GluK2, and GluK4), and NMDA receptor (GluN1 and GluN2A) were found to be expressed in the inner nuclear layer (INL) and ganglion cell layers. GluA1, GluA2, GluA3, and GluA4 were primarily expressed in the inner half of INL, and the signal intensity was strong for GluA2, GluA3, and GluA4. GluK1 was intensely expressed in the outer half of INL, whereas GluK2 and GluK4 were mainly localized in the inner half of INL. GluN1 and GluN2A were moderately expressed in the inner half of INL. Horizontal cells expressed GluA3 and GluA4, and ganglion cells expressed all subunits examined. These results suggest that the glutamatergic neurotransmission in the pigeon retina is similar to that in mammals. PMID:25983186

  8. Dynamic Interaction of Stargazin-like TARPs with Cycling AMPA Receptors at Synapses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, Susumu; Fukata, Masaki; Nicoll, Roger A.; Bredt, David S.

    2004-03-01

    Activity-dependent plasticity in the brain arises in part from changes in the number of synaptic AMPA receptors. Synaptic trafficking of AMPA receptors is controlled by stargazin and homologous transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs). We found that TARPs were stable at the plasma membrane, whereas AMPA receptors were internalized in a glutamate-regulated manner. Interaction with AMPA receptors involved both extra- and intracellular determinants of TARPs. Upon binding to glutamate, AMPA receptors detached from TARPs. This did not require ion flux or intracellular second messengers. This allosteric mechanism for AMPA receptor dissociation from TARPs may participate in glutamate-mediated internalization of receptors in synaptic plasticity.

  9. Ongoing intrinsic synchronous activity is required for the functional maturation of CA3-CA1 glutamatergic synapses.

    PubMed

    Huupponen, Johanna; Molchanova, Svetlana M; Lauri, Sari E; Taira, Tomi

    2013-11-01

    Fine-tuning of synaptic connectivity during development is guided by intrinsic activity of the immature networks characteristically consisting of intermittent bursts of synchronous activity. However, the role of synchronous versus asynchronous activity in synapse maturation in the brain is unclear. Here, we have pharmacologically prevented generation of synchronous activity in the immature rat CA3-CA1 circuitry in a manner that preserves unitary activity. Long-term desynchronization of the network resulted in weakening of AMPA-receptor-mediated glutamatergic transmission in CA1 pyramidal cells. This weakening was dependent on protein phosphatases and mGluR activity, associated with an increase in the proportion of silent synapses and a decrease in the protein levels of GluA4 suggesting postsynaptic mechanisms of expression. The findings demonstrate that synchronous activity in the immature CA3-CA1 circuitry is critical for the induction and maintenance of glutamatergic synapses and underscores the importance of temporal activity patterns in shaping the synaptic circuitry during development. PMID:22941723

  10. What causes aberrant salience in schizophrenia? A role for impaired short-term habituation and the GRIA1 (GluA1) AMPA receptor subunit

    PubMed Central

    Barkus, C; Sanderson, DJ; Rawlins, JNP; Walton, ME; Harrison, PJ; Bannerman, DM

    2014-01-01

    The GRIA1 locus, encoding the GluA1 (also known as GluRA or GluR1) AMPA glutamate receptor subunit, shows genome-wide association to schizophrenia. As well as extending the evidence that glutamatergic abnormalities play a key role in the disorder, this finding draws attention to the behavioural phenotype of Gria1 knockout mice. These mice show deficits in short-term habituation. Importantly, under some conditions the attention being paid to a recently presented neutral stimulus can actually increase rather than decrease (sensitization). We propose that this mouse phenotype represents a cause of aberrant salience and, in turn, that aberrant salience (and the resulting positive symptoms) in schizophrenia may arise, at least in part, from a glutamatergic genetic predisposition and a deficit in short-term habituation. This proposal links an established risk gene with a psychological process central to psychosis, and is supported by findings of comparable deficits in short-term habituation in mice lacking the NMDAR receptor subunit Grin2a (which also shows association to schizophrenia). Since aberrant salience is primarily a dopaminergic phenomenon, the model supports the view that the dopaminergic abnormalities can be downstream of a glutamatergic aetiology. Finally, we suggest that, as illustrated here, the real value of genetically modified mice is not as ‘models of schizophrenia’, but as experimental tools which can link genomic discoveries with psychological processes, and help elucidate the underlying neural mechanisms. PMID:25224260

  11. Genetic analysis of glutamatergic function in Drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, B.A.; Kankel, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    Neurotransmitters are essential for communication between neurons and hence are vital in the overall integrative functioning of the nervous system. Previous work on acetylcholine metabolism in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has also raised the possibility that transmitter metabolism may play a prominent role in either the achievement or maintenance of the normal structure of the central nervous system in this species. Unfortunately, acetylcholine is rather poorly characterized as a neurotransmitter in Drosophila; consequently, we have begun an analysis of the role of glutamate (probably the best characterized transmitter in this organism) in the formation and/or maintenance of nervous system structure. We present here the results of a series of preliminary analyses. To suggest where glutamatergic function may be localized, an examination of the spatial distribution of high affinity (/sup 3/H)-glutamate binding sites are presented. We present the results of an analysis of the spatial and temporal distribution of enzymatic activities thought to be important in the regulation of transmitter-glutamate pools (i.e., glutamate oxaloacetic transaminase, glutaminase, and glutamate dehydrogenase). To begin to examine whether mutations in any of these functions are capable of affecting glutamatergic activity, we present the results of an initial genetic analysis of one enzymatic function, glutamate oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT), chosen because of its differential distribution within the adult central nervous system and musculature.

  12. Persistent histamine excitation of glutamatergic preoptic neurons.

    PubMed

    Tabarean, Iustin V

    2012-01-01

    Thermoregulatory neurons of the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) represent a target at which histamine modulates body temperature. The mechanism by which histamine excites a population of MnPO neurons is not known. In this study it was found that histamine activated a cationic inward current and increased the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, actions that had a transient component as well as a sustained one that lasted for tens of minutes after removal of the agonist. The sustained component was blocked by TRPC channel blockers. Single-cell reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed expression of TRPC1, TRPC5 and TRPC7 subunits in neurons excited by histamine. These studies also established the presence of transcripts for the glutamatergic marker Vglut2 and for the H1 histamine receptor in neurons excited by histamine. Intracellular application of antibodies directed against cytoplasmic sites of the TRPC1 or TRPC5 channel subunits decreased the histamine-induced inward current. The persistent inward current and elevation in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration could be reversed by activating the PKA pathway. This data reveal a novel mechanism by which histamine induces persistent excitation and sustained intracellular Ca(2+) elevation in glutamatergic MnPO neurons. PMID:23082195

  13. Persistent Histamine Excitation of Glutamatergic Preoptic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Tabarean, Iustin V.

    2012-01-01

    Thermoregulatory neurons of the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) represent a target at which histamine modulates body temperature. The mechanism by which histamine excites a population of MnPO neurons is not known. In this study it was found that histamine activated a cationic inward current and increased the intracellular Ca2+ concentration, actions that had a transient component as well as a sustained one that lasted for tens of minutes after removal of the agonist. The sustained component was blocked by TRPC channel blockers. Single-cell reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed expression of TRPC1, TRPC5 and TRPC7 subunits in neurons excited by histamine. These studies also established the presence of transcripts for the glutamatergic marker Vglut2 and for the H1 histamine receptor in neurons excited by histamine. Intracellular application of antibodies directed against cytoplasmic sites of the TRPC1 or TRPC5 channel subunits decreased the histamine-induced inward current. The persistent inward current and elevation in intracellular Ca2+ concentration could be reversed by activating the PKA pathway. This data reveal a novel mechanism by which histamine induces persistent excitation and sustained intracellular Ca2+ elevation in glutamatergic MnPO neurons. PMID:23082195

  14. Gestational nicotine exposure regulates expression of AMPA and NMDA receptors and their signaling apparatus in developing and adult rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Dávila-García, Martha I.; Yarl, Weonpo; Gondré-Lewis, Marjorie C.

    2011-01-01

    Untimely activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) by nicotine results in short- and long-term consequences on learning and behavior. In this study, the aim was to determine how prenatal nicotine exposure affects components of glutamatergic signaling in the hippocampus during postnatal development. We investigated regulation of both nAChRs and glutamate receptors for α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), from postnatal day (P) 1 to P63 after a temporally restricted exposure to saline or nicotine for 14 days in utero. We analyzed postsynaptic density components associated with AMPAR and NMDAR signaling: Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II α (CaMKIIα), Calmodulin (CaM), and postsynaptic density-95 (PSD95), as well as presynaptically localized synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP25). At P1, there was significantly heightened expression of AMPAR subunit GluR1 but not GluR2, and of NMDAR subunits NR1, NR2a and NR2d but not NR2b. NR2c was not detectable. At P1, the postsynaptic proteins CaMKIIα, CaM, and PSD95 were also significantly upregulated, together with presynaptic SNAP25. This enhanced expression of glutamate receptors and signaling proteins was concomitant with elevated levels of [3H] Epibatidine (EB) binding in prenatal nicotine-exposed hippocampus, indicating that α4β2 nAChR may influence glutamatergic function in the hippocampus at P1. By P14, neither [3H]EB binding nor the expression levels of subunits GluR1, GluR2, NR1, NR2a, NR2b, NR2c, or NR2d seemed changed with prenatal nicotine. However, CaMKIIα was significantly upregulated with nicotine treatment while CaM showed downregulation at P14. The effects of nicotine persisted in young adult brains at P63. They exhibited significantly downregulated GluR2, NR1, and NR2c expression levels in hippocampal homogenates and a considerably muted overall distribution of [3H]AMPA binding in areas CA1, CA2, CA3, and the dentate

  15. Synergistic Regulation of Glutamatergic Transmission by Serotonin and Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors in Prefrontal Cortical Neurons*

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Eunice Y.; Qin, Luye; Wei, Jing; Liu, Wenhua; Liu, Aiyi; Yan, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    The monoamine system in the prefrontal cortex has been implicated in various mental disorders and has been the major target of anxiolytics and antidepressants. Clinical studies show that serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) produce better therapeutic effects than single selective reuptake inhibitors, but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, we found that low dose SNRIs, by acting on 5-HT1A and α2-adrenergic receptors, synergistically reduced AMPA receptor (AMPAR)-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents and AMPAR surface expression in prefrontal cortex pyramidal neurons via a mechanism involving Rab5/dynamin-mediated endocytosis of AMPARs. The synergistic effect of SNRIs on AMPARs was blocked by inhibition of activator of G protein signaling 3, a G protein modulator that prevents reassociation of Gi protein α subunit and prolongs the βγ-mediated signaling pathway. Moreover, the depression of AMPAR-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents by SNRIs required p38 kinase activity, which was increased by 5-HT1A and α2-adrenergic receptor co-activation in an activator of G protein signaling 3-dependent manner. These results have revealed a potential mechanism for the synergy between the serotonin and norepinephrine systems in the regulation of glutamatergic transmission in cortical neurons. PMID:25056951

  16. Developing Medications Targeting Glutamatergic Dysfunction in Autism: Progress to Date

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Lawrence K.; Hardan, Antonio Y.

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacologic treatments targeting specific molecular mechanisms relevant for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are beginning to emerge in early drug development. This article reviews the evidence for the disruption of glutamatergic neurotransmission in animal models of social deficits and summarizes key pre-clinical and clinical efforts in developing pharmacologic interventions based on modulation of glutamatergic systems in individuals with ASD. Understanding the pathobiology of the glutamatergic system has led to the development of new investigational treatments for individuals with ASD. Specific examples of medications that modulate the glutamatergic system in preclinical and clinical studies are described. Finally, we will discuss the limitations of current strategies and future opportunities in developing medications targeting the glutamatergic system for treating individuals with ASD. PMID:26104862

  17. Distinct Structural Pathways Coordinate the Activation of AMPA Receptor-Auxiliary Subunit Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Dawe, G. Brent; Musgaard, Maria; Aurousseau, Mark R.P.; Nayeem, Naushaba; Green, Tim; Biggin, Philip C.; Bowie, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Summary Neurotransmitter-gated ion channels adopt different gating modes to fine-tune signaling at central synapses. At glutamatergic synapses, high and low activity of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) is observed when pore-forming subunits coassemble with or without auxiliary subunits, respectively. Whether a common structural pathway accounts for these different gating modes is unclear. Here, we identify two structural motifs that determine the time course of AMPAR channel activation. A network of electrostatic interactions at the apex of the AMPAR ligand-binding domain (LBD) is essential for gating by pore-forming subunits, whereas a conserved motif on the lower, D2 lobe of the LBD prolongs channel activity when auxiliary subunits are present. Accordingly, channel activity is almost entirely abolished by elimination of the electrostatic network but restored via auxiliary protein interactions at the D2 lobe. In summary, we propose that activation of native AMPAR complexes is coordinated by distinct structural pathways, favored by the association/dissociation of auxiliary subunits. PMID:26924438

  18. Distinct Structural Pathways Coordinate the Activation of AMPA Receptor-Auxiliary Subunit Complexes.

    PubMed

    Dawe, G Brent; Musgaard, Maria; Aurousseau, Mark R P; Nayeem, Naushaba; Green, Tim; Biggin, Philip C; Bowie, Derek

    2016-03-16

    Neurotransmitter-gated ion channels adopt different gating modes to fine-tune signaling at central synapses. At glutamatergic synapses, high and low activity of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) is observed when pore-forming subunits coassemble with or without auxiliary subunits, respectively. Whether a common structural pathway accounts for these different gating modes is unclear. Here, we identify two structural motifs that determine the time course of AMPAR channel activation. A network of electrostatic interactions at the apex of the AMPAR ligand-binding domain (LBD) is essential for gating by pore-forming subunits, whereas a conserved motif on the lower, D2 lobe of the LBD prolongs channel activity when auxiliary subunits are present. Accordingly, channel activity is almost entirely abolished by elimination of the electrostatic network but restored via auxiliary protein interactions at the D2 lobe. In summary, we propose that activation of native AMPAR complexes is coordinated by distinct structural pathways, favored by the association/dissociation of auxiliary subunits. PMID:26924438

  19. The Sorting Receptor SorCS1 Regulates Trafficking of Neurexin and AMPA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Savas, Jeffrey N.; Ribeiro, Luís F.; Wierda, Keimpe D.; Wright, Rebecca; DeNardo, Laura A.; Rice, Heather C.; Chamma, Ingrid; Wang, Yi-Zhi; Zemla, Roland; Lavallée-Adam, Mathieu; Vennekens, Kristel M.; O'Sullivan, Matthew L.; Antonios, Joseph K.; Hall, Elizabeth A.; Thoumine, Olivier; Attie, Alan D.; Ghosh, Anirvan; Yates, John R.; de Wit, Joris

    2015-01-01

    The formation, function, and plasticity of synapses require dynamic changes in synaptic receptor composition. Here we identify the sorting receptor SorCS1 as a key regulator of synaptic receptor trafficking. Four independent proteomic analyses identify the synaptic adhesion molecule neurexin and the AMPA glutamate receptor (AMPAR) as major proteins sorted by SorCS1. SorCS1 localizes to early and recycling endosomes and regulates neurexin and AMPAR surface trafficking. Surface proteome analysis of SorCS1-deficient neurons shows decreased surface levels of these, and additional, receptors. Quantitative in vivo analysis of SorCS1 knockout synaptic proteomes identifies SorCS1 as a global trafficking regulator and reveals decreased levels of receptors regulating adhesion and neurotransmission, including neurexins and AMPARs. Consequently, glutamatergic transmission at SorCS1–deficient synapses is reduced due to impaired AMPAR surface expression. SORCS1 mutations have been associated with autism and Alzheimer's disease, suggesting that perturbed receptor trafficking contributes to defects in synaptic composition and function underlying synaptopathies. PMID:26291160

  20. [Molecular mechanisms for AMPA receptor trafficking].

    PubMed

    Fukata, Masaki; Fukata, Yuko

    2008-06-01

    Finely tuned synaptic transmission in the brain provides the molecular basis for learning and memory. The misregulation of synaptic transmission is involved in the pathogenesis of various neurological disorders like epilepsy. AMPA-typed glutamate receptors (AMPARs) mediate the most prominent form of excitatory neurotransmission in the brain. Dynamic regulation of AMPARs is thought to be a primary mechanism for controlling synaptic strength. We have analyzed the molecular mechanism for AMPAR-trafficking and function by focusing on PSD-95, a major postsynaptic scaffolding protein. Here, we review the novel regulatory mechanisms of AMPARs by 1) the PSD-95 palmitoylating enzyme, which determines the position of PSD-95 at postsynapses, and 2) the epilepsy related ligand/receptor, LGI1/ADAM22, identified as the PSD-95-interacting protein. PMID:18646599

  1. Clathrin-Independent Trafficking of AMPA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Tigaret, Cezar M.; Mellor, Jack R.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane trafficking of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) is critical for neuronal function and plasticity. Although rapid forms of AMPAR internalization during long-term depression (LTD) require clathrin and dynamin, the mechanisms governing constitutive AMPAR turnover and internalization of AMPARs during slow homeostatic forms of synaptic plasticity remain unexplored. Here, we show that, in contrast to LTD, constitutive AMPAR internalization and homeostatic AMPAR downscaling in rat neurons do not require dynamin or clathrin function. Instead, constitutive AMPAR trafficking is blocked by a Rac1 inhibitor and is regulated by a dynamic nonstructural pool of F-actin. Our findings reveal a novel role for neuronal clathrin-independent endocytosis controlled by actin dynamics and suggest that the interplay between different modes of receptor endocytosis provides for segregation between distinct modes of neuronal plasticity. PMID:25810514

  2. Glutamatergic Neurons Induce Expression of Functional Glutamatergic Synapses in Primary Myotubes

    PubMed Central

    Ettorre, Michele; Lorenzetto, Erika; Laperchia, Claudia; Baiguera, Cristina; Branca, Caterina; Benarese, Manuela; Spano, PierFranco; Pizzi, Marina; Buffelli, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Background The functioning of the nervous system depends upon the specificity of its synaptic contacts. The mechanisms triggering the expression of the appropriate receptors on postsynaptic membrane and the role of the presynaptic partner in the differentiation of postsynaptic structures are little known. Methods and Findings To address these questions we cocultured murine primary muscle cells with several glutamatergic neurons, either cortical, cerebellar or hippocampal. Immunofluorescence and electrophysiology analyses revealed that functional excitatory synaptic contacts were formed between glutamatergic neurons and muscle cells. Moreover, immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence experiments showed that typical anchoring proteins of central excitatory synapses coimmunoprecipitate and colocalize with rapsyn, the acetylcholine receptor anchoring protein at the neuromuscular junction. Conclusions These results support an important role of the presynaptic partner in the induction and differentiation of the postsynaptic structures. PMID:22347480

  3. 3’-Deoxyadenosine (Cordycepin) Produces a Rapid and Robust Antidepressant Effect via Enhancing Prefrontal AMPA Receptor Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bai; Hou, Yangyang; Zhu, Ming; Bao, Hongkun; Nie, Jun; Zhang, Grace Y.; Shan, Liping; Yao, Yao; Du, Kai; Yang, Hongju; Li, Meizhang; Zheng, Bingrong; Xu, Xiufeng; Xiao, Chunjie; Du, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Background: The development of rapid and safe antidepressants for the treatment of major depression is in urgent demand. Converging evidence suggests that glutamatergic signaling seems to play important roles in the pathophysiology of depression. Methods: We studied the antidepressant effects of 3’-deoxyadenosine (3’-dA, Cordycepin) and the critical role of the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptor in male CD-1 mice via behavioral and biochemical experiments. After 3’-dA treatment, the phosphorylation and synaptic localization of the AMPA receptors GluR1 and GluR2 were determined in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus (HIP). The traditional antidepressant imipramine was applied as a positive control. Results: We found that an injection of 3’-dA led to a rapid and robust antidepressant effect, which was significantly faster and stronger than imipramine, after 45min in tail suspension and forced swim tests. This antidepressant effect remained after 5 days of treatment with 3’-dA. Unlike the psycho-stimulants, 3’-dA did not show a hyperactive effect in the open field test. After 45min or 5 days of treatment, 3’-dA enhanced GluR1 S845 phosphorylation in both the PFC and HIP. In addition, after 45min of treatment, 3’-dA significantly up-regulated GluR1 S845 phosphorylation and GluR1, but not GluR2 levels, at the synapses in the PFC. After 5 days of treatment, 3’-dA significantly enhanced GluR1 S845 phosphorylation and GluR1, but not GluR2, at the synapses in the PFC and HIP. Moreover, the AMPA-specific antagonist GYKI 52466 was able to block the rapid antidepressant effects of 3’-dA. Conclusion: This study identified 3’-dA as a novel rapid antidepressant with clinical potential and multiple beneficial mechanisms, particularly in regulating the prefrontal AMPA receptor signaling pathway. PMID:26443809

  4. Expression of Glutamatergic Genes in Healthy Humans across 16 Brain Regions; Altered Expression in the Hippocampus after Chronic Exposure to Alcohol or Cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Enoch, Mary-Anne; Rosser, Alexandra A.; Zhou, Zhifeng; Mash, Deborah C.; Yuan, Qiaoping; Goldman, David

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed global patterns of expression in genes related to glutamatergic neurotransmission (glutamatergic genes) in healthy human adult brain before determining the effects of chronic alcohol and cocaine exposure on gene expression in the hippocampus. RNA-Seq data from ‘BrainSpan’ was obtained across 16 brain regions from nine control adults. We also generated RNA-Seq data from postmortem hippocampus from eight alcoholics, eight cocaine addicts and eight controls. Expression analyses were undertaken of 28 genes encoding glutamate ionotropic (AMPA, kainate, NMDA) and metabotropic receptor subunits, together with glutamate transporters. The expression of each gene was fairly consistent across the brain with the exception of the cerebellum, the thalamic mediodorsal nucleus and the striatum. GRIN1, encoding the essential NMDA subunit, had the highest expression across all brain regions. Six factors accounted for 84% of the variance in global gene expression. GRIN2B (encoding GluN2B), was up-regulated in both alcoholics and cocaine addicts (FDR corrected p = 0.008). Alcoholics showed up-regulation of three genes relative to controls and cocaine addicts: GRIA4 (encoding GluA4), GRIK3 (GluR7) and GRM4 (mGluR4). Expression of both GRM3 (mGluR3) and GRIN2D (GluN2D) was up-regulated in alcoholics and down-regulated in cocaine addicts relative to controls. Glutamatergic genes are moderately to highly expressed throughout the brain. Six factors explain nearly all the variance in global gene expression. At least in the hippocampus, chronic alcohol use largely up-regulates glutamatergic genes. The NMDA GluN2B receptor subunit might be implicated in a common pathway to addiction, possibly in conjunction with the GABAB1 receptor subunit. PMID:25262781

  5. AMPA receptors in cerebellar granule cells during development in culture.

    PubMed

    Hack, N J; Sluiter, A A; Balázs, R

    1995-06-27

    The survival and maturation of differentiating cerebellar granule cells in culture are known to be promoted by excitatory amino acids (EAAs) which, however, compromise the survival of mature cells. In contrast to the trophic effect, the toxic effect of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxasolepropiate (AMPA) could only be elicited when the desensitisation of AMPA receptors was blocked, cyclothiazide being used in this study. Nevertheless, even under these conditions, toxicity induced by AMPA in contrast to kainate was, at 9 DIV, only half of the maximal toxicity attained by 13-16 DIV. Since cellular responses to AMPA depend so dramatically on the maturational stage of granule cells, we examined here whether this characteristic is related to developmental changes in AMPA receptor properties, which may result from changes in the subunit composition of the receptor. In contrast to toxicity, AMPA-induced 45Ca2+ influx (determined in the presence of cyclothiazide and the NMDA receptor blocker MK-801) reached a maximum already at 9 DIV. This also applied to a fraction of the 45Ca2+ uptake which persisted either after Cd2+ application or under Na(+)-free conditions and therefore presumably was mediated directly through AMPA receptor channels. Quantitative analysis of Western blots showed that the amounts of GluR4 and to a lesser extent GluR2/3/4c are substantial already at 2 DIV, remaining fairly constant until 9 DIV, followed by an increase by 16 DIV. However GluR1, which is hardly detectable in granule cells in vivo and is also low early in vitro, increased almost linearly with cultivation time.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7554232

  6. Metabotropic glutamatergic receptors and their ligands in drug addiction.

    PubMed

    Pomierny-Chamioło, Lucyna; Rup, Kinga; Pomierny, Bartosz; Niedzielska, Ewa; Kalivas, Peter W; Filip, Małgorzata

    2014-06-01

    Glutamatergic excitatory transmission is implicated in physiological and pathological conditions like learning, memory, neuronal plasticity and emotions, while glutamatergic abnormalities are reported in numerous neurological and psychiatric disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases, epilepsy, stroke, traumatic brain injury, depression, anxiety, schizophrenia and pain. Also, several lines of evidence have accumulated indicating a pivotal role for glutamatergic neurotransmission in mediating addictive behaviors. Among the proteins regulating glutamatergic transmission, the metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR) are being developed as pharmacological targets for treating many neuropsychiatric disorders, including drug addiction. In this review we describe the molecular structure of mGluRs and their distribution, physiology and pharmacology in the central nervous system, as well as their use as targets in preclinical studies of drug addiction. PMID:24362085

  7. Extensive phosphorylation of AMPA receptors in neurons.

    PubMed

    Diering, Graham H; Heo, Seok; Hussain, Natasha K; Liu, Bian; Huganir, Richard L

    2016-08-16

    Regulation of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) function is a fundamental mechanism controlling synaptic strength during long-term potentiation/depression and homeostatic scaling. AMPAR function and membrane trafficking is controlled by protein-protein interactions, as well as by posttranslational modifications. Phosphorylation of the GluA1 AMPAR subunit at S845 and S831 play especially important roles during synaptic plasticity. Recent controversy has emerged regarding the extent to which GluA1 phosphorylation may contribute to synaptic plasticity. Here we used a variety of methods to measure the population of phosphorylated GluA1-containing AMPARs in cultured primary neurons and mouse forebrain. Phosphorylated GluA1 represents large fractions from 12% to 50% of the total population under basal and stimulated conditions in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, a large fraction of synapses are positive for phospho-GluA1-containing AMPARs. Our results support the large body of research indicating a prominent role of GluA1 phosphorylation in synaptic plasticity. PMID:27482106

  8. Are AMPA receptor positive allosteric modulators potential pharmacotherapeutics for addiction?

    PubMed

    Watterson, Lucas R; Olive, M Foster

    2013-01-01

    Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors are a diverse class of compounds that increase fast excitatory transmission in the brain. AMPA PAMs have been shown to facilitate long-term potentiation, strengthen communication between various cortical and subcortical regions, and some of these compounds increase the production and release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in an activity-dependent manner. Through these mechanisms, AMPA PAMs have shown promise as broad spectrum pharmacotherapeutics in preclinical and clinical studies for various neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. In recent years, a small collection of preclinical animal studies has also shown that AMPA PAMs may have potential as pharmacotherapeutic adjuncts to extinction-based or cue-exposure therapies for the treatment of drug addiction. The present paper will review this preclinical literature, discuss novel data collected in our laboratory, and recommend future research directions for the possible development of AMPA PAMs as anti-addiction medications. PMID:24380895

  9. Are AMPA Receptor Positive Allosteric Modulators Potential Pharmacotherapeutics for Addiction?

    PubMed Central

    Watterson, Lucas R.; Olive, M. Foster

    2013-01-01

    Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors are a diverse class of compounds that increase fast excitatory transmission in the brain. AMPA PAMs have been shown to facilitate long-term potentiation, strengthen communication between various cortical and subcortical regions, and some of these compounds increase the production and release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in an activity-dependent manner. Through these mechanisms, AMPA PAMs have shown promise as broad spectrum pharmacotherapeutics in preclinical and clinical studies for various neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. In recent years, a small collection of preclinical animal studies has also shown that AMPA PAMs may have potential as pharmacotherapeutic adjuncts to extinction-based or cue-exposure therapies for the treatment of drug addiction. The present paper will review this preclinical literature, discuss novel data collected in our laboratory, and recommend future research directions for the possible development of AMPA PAMs as anti-addiction medications. PMID:24380895

  10. Differential vesicular sorting of AMPA and GABAA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yi; Chiu, Shu-Ling; Liu, Bian; Wu, Pei-Hsun; Delannoy, Michael; Lin, Da-Ting; Wirtz, Denis; Huganir, Richard L.

    2016-01-01

    In mature neurons AMPA receptors cluster at excitatory synapses primarily on dendritic spines, whereas GABAA receptors cluster at inhibitory synapses mainly on the soma and dendritic shafts. The molecular mechanisms underlying the precise sorting of these receptors remain unclear. By directly studying the constitutive exocytic vesicles of AMPA and GABAA receptors in vitro and in vivo, we demonstrate that they are initially sorted into different vesicles in the Golgi apparatus and inserted into distinct domains of the plasma membrane. These insertions are dependent on distinct Rab GTPases and SNARE complexes. The insertion of AMPA receptors requires SNAP25–syntaxin1A/B–VAMP2 complexes, whereas insertion of GABAA receptors relies on SNAP23–syntaxin1A/B–VAMP2 complexes. These SNARE complexes affect surface targeting of AMPA or GABAA receptors and synaptic transmission. Our studies reveal vesicular sorting mechanisms controlling the constitutive exocytosis of AMPA and GABAA receptors, which are critical for the regulation of excitatory and inhibitory responses in neurons. PMID:26839408

  11. Mechanism of Positive Allosteric Modulators Acting on AMPA Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Jin,R.; Clark, S.; Weeks, A.; Dudman, J.; Gouaux, E.; Partin, K.

    2005-01-01

    Ligand-gated ion channels involved in the modulation of synaptic strength are the AMPA, kainate, and NMDA glutamate receptors. Small molecules that potentiate AMPA receptor currents relieve cognitive deficits caused by neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and show promise in the treatment of depression. Previously, there has been limited understanding of the molecular mechanism of action for AMPA receptor potentiators. Here we present cocrystal structures of the glutamate receptor GluR2 S1S2 ligand-binding domain in complex with aniracetam [1-(4-methoxybenzoyl)-2-pyrrolidinone] or CX614 (pyrrolidino-1, 3-oxazino benzo-1, 4-dioxan-10-one), two AMPA receptor potentiators that preferentially slow AMPA receptor deactivation. Both potentiators bind within the dimer interface of the nondesensitized receptor at a common site located on the twofold axis of molecular symmetry. Importantly, the potentiator binding site is adjacent to the 'hinge' in the ligand-binding core 'clamshell' that undergoes conformational rearrangement after glutamate binding. Using rapid solution exchange, patch-clamp electrophysiology experiments, we show that point mutations of residues that interact with potentiators in the cocrystal disrupt potentiator function. We suggest that the potentiators slow deactivation by stabilizing the clamshell in its closed-cleft, glutamate-bound conformation.

  12. Chronic hyperammonemia, glutamatergic neurotransmission and neurological alterations.

    PubMed

    Llansola, Marta; Montoliu, Carmina; Cauli, Omar; Hernández-Rabaza, Vicente; Agustí, Ana; Cabrera-Pastor, Andrea; Giménez-Garzó, Carla; González-Usano, Alba; Felipo, Vicente

    2013-06-01

    This mini-review focus on our studies on alterations in glutamatergic neurotransmission and their role in neurological alterations in rat models of chronic hyperammonemia and hepatic encephalopathy (HE). Hyperammonemia impairs the glutamate-nitric oxide (NO)-cGMP pathway in cerebellum, which is responsible for reduced learning ability. We studied the underlying mechanisms and designed treatments to restore the pathway and learning. This was achieved by treatment with: phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, cGMP, anti-inflammatories (ibuprofen), p38 inhibitors or GABAA receptor antagonists (bicuculline). Hyperammonemia alters signal transduction associated to metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs). Hypokinesia in hyperammonemia and HE is due to increased extracellular glutamate and mGluR1 activation in substantia nigra; blocking this receptor restores motor activity. The motor responses to mGluRs activation in nucleus accumbens (NAcc) are altered in hyperammonemia and HE, with reduced dopamine and increased glutamate release. This leads to activation of different neuronal circuits and enhanced motor responses. These studies show that altered responses to activation of NMDA receptors and mGluRs play essential roles in cognitive and motor alterations in hyperammonemia and HE and provide new treatments restoring cognitive and motor function. PMID:23010935

  13. Lrp4 in astrocytes modulates glutamatergic transmission.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiang-Dong; Li, Lei; Liu, Fang; Huang, Zhi-Hui; Bean, Jonathan C; Jiao, Hui-Feng; Barik, Arnab; Kim, Seon-Myung; Wu, Haitao; Shen, Chengyong; Tian, Yun; Lin, Thiri W; Bates, Ryan; Sathyamurthy, Anupama; Chen, Yong-Jun; Yin, Dong-Min; Xiong, Lei; Lin, Hui-Ping; Hu, Jin-Xia; Li, Bao-Ming; Gao, Tian-Ming; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Mei, Lin

    2016-08-01

    Neurotransmission requires precise control of neurotransmitter release from axon terminals. This process is regulated by glial cells; however, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. We found that glutamate release in the brain was impaired in mice lacking low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (Lrp4), a protein that is critical for neuromuscular junction formation. Electrophysiological studies revealed compromised release probability in astrocyte-specific Lrp4 knockout mice. Lrp4 mutant astrocytes suppressed glutamatergic transmission by enhancing the release of ATP, whose level was elevated in the hippocampus of Lrp4 mutant mice. Consequently, the mutant mice were impaired in locomotor activity and spatial memory and were resistant to seizure induction. These impairments could be ameliorated by blocking the adenosine A1 receptor. The results reveal a critical role for Lrp4, in response to agrin, in modulating astrocytic ATP release and synaptic transmission. Our findings provide insight into the interaction between neurons and astrocytes for synaptic homeostasis and/or plasticity. PMID:27294513

  14. Alternative splicing of AMPA receptor subunits in the 6-OHDA-lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease and L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Kobylecki, Christopher; Crossman, Alan R; Ravenscroft, Paula

    2013-09-01

    Abnormal corticostriatal plasticity is a key mechanism of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID) in Parkinson's disease (PD). Antagonists at glutamatergic α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors, such as IEM 1460, reduce induction and expression of dyskinesia in rat and non-human primate models of PD. AMPA receptor function is regulated by post-transcriptional splicing of subunit mRNA to produce flip and flop isoforms, which may therefore influence corticostriatal plasticity. The aim of this work was to evaluate alterations in alternative splicing of striatal AMPA receptor subunits in the unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rat model of LID and PD. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received 12.5 μg 6-OHDA injections into the right medial forebrain bundle. In experiment 1, to assess acute dyskinesia, rats received L-DOPA/benserazide (6/15 mg/kg, i.p.) or vehicle for 21 days. In experiment 2, to assess dyskinesia priming, rats received vehicle, L-DOPA+vehicle or L-DOPA+IEM 1460 (3 mg/kg, i.p.) for 21 days. Animals were humanely killed 1h following final treatment in experiment 1, and 48 h following final treatment in experiment 2. Coronal sections of rostral striatum were processed for in situ hybridisation histochemistry, using oligonucleotide probes specific for the GluR1 and GluR2 subunits and their flip and flop isoforms. L-DOPA treatment increased GluR2-flip mRNA expression in the lesioned striatum of both groups; this was blocked by the Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptor antagonist IEM 1460. GluR1-flip expression was increased after 48 h drug washout but not in acute LID. There were no changes in expression of flop isoforms. Alternative splicing of AMPAR subunits contributes to abnormal striatal plasticity in the induction and expression of LID. Increases in GluR2-flip expression depend on activation of Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors, which are a potential target of anti-dyskinetic therapies. PMID:23360800

  15. Transferrin Receptor Controls AMPA Receptor Trafficking Efficiency and Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ke; Lei, Run; Li, Qiong; Wang, Xin-Xin; Wu, Qian; An, Peng; Zhang, Jianchao; Zhu, Minyan; Xu, Zhiheng; Hong, Yang; Wang, Fudi; Shen, Ying; Li, Hongchang; Li, Huashun

    2016-01-01

    Transferrin receptor (TFR) is an important iron transporter regulating iron homeostasis and has long been used as a marker for clathrin mediated endocytosis. However, little is known about its additional function other than iron transport in the development of central nervous system (CNS). Here we demonstrate that TFR functions as a regulator to control AMPA receptor trafficking efficiency and synaptic plasticity. The conditional knockout (KO) of TFR in neural progenitor cells causes mice to develop progressive epileptic seizure, and dramatically reduces basal synaptic transmission and long-term potentiation (LTP). We further demonstrate that TFR KO remarkably reduces the binding efficiency of GluR2 to AP2 and subsequently decreases AMPA receptor endocytosis and recycling. Thus, our study reveals that TFR functions as a novel regulator to control AMPA trafficking efficiency and synaptic plasticity. PMID:26880306

  16. Ganglioside Regulation of AMPA Receptor Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Prendergast, Jillian; Umanah, George K.E.; Yoo, Seung-Wan; Lagerlöf, Olof; Motari, Mary G.; Cole, Robert N.; Huganir, Richard L.; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.

    2014-01-01

    Gangliosides are major cell-surface determinants on all vertebrate neurons. Human congenital disorders of ganglioside biosynthesis invariably result in intellectual disability and are often associated with intractable seizures. To probe the mechanisms of ganglioside functions, affinity-captured ganglioside-binding proteins from rat cerebellar granule neurons were identified by quantitative proteomic mass spectrometry. Of the six proteins that bound selectively to the major brain ganglioside GT1b (GT1b:GM1 > 4; p < 10−4), three regulate neurotransmitter receptor trafficking: Thorase (ATPase family AAA domain-containing protein 1), soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF) attachment protein (γ-SNAP), and the transmembrane protein Nicalin. Thorase facilitates endocytosis of GluR2 subunit-containing AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) in an ATPase-dependent manner; its deletion in mice results in learning and memory deficits (J. Zhang et al., 2011b). GluR2-containing AMPARs did not bind GT1b, but bound specifically to another ganglioside, GM1. Addition of noncleavable ATP (ATPγS) significantly disrupted ganglioside binding, whereas it enhanced AMPAR association with Thorase, NSF, and Nicalin. Mutant mice lacking GT1b expressed markedly higher brain Thorase, whereas Thorase-null mice expressed higher GT1b. Treatment of cultured hippocampal neurons with sialidase, which cleaves GT1b (and other sialoglycans), resulted in a significant reduction in the size of surface GluR2 puncta. These data support a model in which GM1-bound GluR2-containing AMPARs are functionally segregated from GT1b-bound AMPAR-trafficking complexes. Release of ganglioside binding may enhance GluR2-containing AMPAR association with its trafficking complexes, increasing endocytosis. Disrupting ganglioside biosynthesis may result in reduced synaptic expression of GluR2-contianing AMPARs resulting in intellectual deficits and seizure susceptibility in mice and humans. PMID:25253868

  17. Glutamatergic substrates of drug addiction and alcoholism1

    PubMed Central

    Gass, Justin T.; Foster Olive, M.

    2008-01-01

    The past two decades have witnessed a dramatic accumulation of evidence indicating that the excitatory amino acid glutamate plays an important role in drug addiction and alcoholism. The purpose of this review is to summarize findings on glutamatergic substrates of addiction, surveying data from both human and animal studies. The effects of various drugs of abuse on glutamatergic neurotransmission are discussed, as are the effects of pharmacological or genetic manipulation of various components of glutamate transmission on drug reinforcement, conditioned reward, extinction, and relapse-like behavior. In addition, glutamatergic agents that are currently in use or are undergoing testing in clinical trials for the treatment of addiction are discussed, including acamprosate, N-acetylcysteine, modafinil, topiramate, lamotrigine, gabapentin and mematine. All drugs of abuse appear to modulate glutamatergic transmission, albeit by different mechanisms, and this modulation of glutamate transmission is believed to result in long-lasting neuroplastic changes in the brain that may contribute to the perseveration of drug-seeking behavior and drug-associated memories. In general, attenuation of glutamatergic transmission reduces drug reward, reinforcement, and relapse-like behavior. On the other hand, potentiation of glutamatergic transmission appears to facilitate the extinction of drug-seeking behavior. However, attempts at identifying genetic polymorphisms in components of glutamate transmission in humans have yielded only a limited number of candidate genes that may serve as risk factors for the development of addiction. Nonetheless, manipulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission appears to be a promising avenue of research in developing improved therapeutic agents for the treatment of drug addiction and alcoholism. PMID:17706608

  18. Differential expression of postsynaptic NMDA and AMPA receptor subunits in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex of the flinders sensitive line rat model of depression.

    PubMed

    Treccani, Giulia; Gaarn du Jardin, Kristian; Wegener, Gregers; Müller, Heidi Kaastrup

    2016-11-01

    Glutamatergic abnormalities have recently been implicated in the pathophysiology of depression, and the ionotropic glutamate receptors in particular have been suggested as possible underlying molecular determinants. The Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rats constitute a validated model of depression with dysfunctional regulation of glutamate transmission relatively to their control strain Flinders Resistant Line (FRL). To gain insight into how signaling through glutamate receptors may be altered in the FSL rats, we investigated the expression and phosphorylation of AMPA and NMDA receptor subunits in an enriched postsynaptic fraction of the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Compared to the hippocampal postsynaptic fractions of FRL rats, FSL rats exhibited decreased and increased levels of the NMDA receptor subunits GluN2A and GluN2B, respectively, causing a lower ratio of GluN2A/GluN2B. The GluA2/GluA3 AMPA receptor subunit ratio was significantly decreased while the expression of the individual GluA1, GluA2, and GluA3 subunits were unaltered including phosphorylation levels of GluA1 at S831 and S845. There were no changes in the prefrontal cortex. These results support altered expression of postsynaptic glutamate receptors in the hippocampus of FSL rats, which may contribute to the depressive-like phenotype of these rats. PMID:27262028

  19. Reduced sensory stimulation alters the molecular make-up of glutamatergic hair cell synapses in the developing cochlea.

    PubMed

    Barclay, M; Constable, R; James, N R; Thorne, P R; Montgomery, J M

    2016-06-14

    Neural activity during early development is known to alter innervation pathways in the central and peripheral nervous systems. We sought to examine how reduced sound-induced sensory activity in the cochlea affected the consolidation of glutamatergic synapses between inner hair cells (IHC) and the primary auditory neurons as these synapses play a primary role in transmitting sound information to the brain. A unilateral conductive hearing loss was induced prior to the onset of sound-mediated stimulation of the sensory hair cells, by rupturing the tympanic membrane and dislocating the auditory ossicles in the left ear of P11 mice. Auditory brainstem responses at P15 and P21 showed a 40-50-dB increase in thresholds for frequencies 8-32kHz in the dislocated ear relative to the control ear. Immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy were subsequently used to examine the effect of this attenuation of sound stimulation on the expression of RIBEYE, which comprises the presynaptic ribbons, Shank-1, a postsynaptic scaffolding protein, and the GluA2/3 and 4 subunits of postsynaptic AMPA receptors. Our results show that dislocation did not alter the number of pre- or postsynaptic protein puncta. However, dislocation did increase the size of RIBEYE, GluA4, GluA2/3 and Shank-1 puncta, with postsynaptic changes preceding presynaptic changes. Our data suggest that a reduction in sound stimulation during auditory development induces plasticity in the molecular make-up of IHC glutamatergic synapses, but does not affect the number of these synapses. Up-regulation of synaptic proteins with sound attenuation may facilitate a compensatory increase in synaptic transmission due to the reduced sensory stimulation of the IHC. PMID:27012610

  20. A Shift in the Role of Glutamatergic Signaling in the Nucleus Accumbens Core with the Development of an Addicted Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Susan E.; Ramôa, Carolina; Garber, Garrett; Newman, Joshua; Toor, Shaun; Lynch, Wendy J.

    2014-01-01

    Background While dopamine signaling in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) plays a well-established role in motivating cocaine use in early “non-addicted” stages, recent evidence suggests that other signaling pathways may be critical once addiction has developed. Given the importance of glutamatergic signaling in the NAc for drug-seeking and relapse, here we examined its role in motivating cocaine self-administration under conditions known to produce either a “non-addicted” or an “addicted” phenotype. Methods Following acquisition, male and female Sprague Dawley rats were given either short access (3 fixed-ratio 1 sessions, 20 infusions/day) or extended 24-hr access (10 days; 4 trials/hr; up to 96 infusions/day) to cocaine. Following a 14-day abstinence period, motivation for cocaine was assessed under a progressive-ratio schedule, and once stable, the effects of intra-NAc infusions of the glutamate AMPA/KA receptor antagonist CNQX (0.0, 0.01, 0.03, 0.1 μg/side) were determined. As an additional measure for the development of an addicted phenotype, separate groups of rats were screened under an extinction/cue-induced reinstatement procedure following abstinence from short versus extended access self-administration. Results Motivation for cocaine and levels of extinction and reinstatement responding were markedly higher following extended versus short access self-administration confirming the development of an addicted phenotype in the extended access group. CNQX dose-dependently reduced motivation for cocaine in the extended access group, but was without effect in the short access group. Conclusions These results suggest that the role of glutamatergic signaling in the NAc, though not essential for motivating cocaine use in “non-addicted” stages, becomes critical once addiction has developed. PMID:24629536

  1. Coping with dehydration: sympathetic activation and regulation of glutamatergic transmission in the hypothalamic PVN.

    PubMed

    Bardgett, Megan E; Chen, Qing-Hui; Guo, Qing; Calderon, Alfredo S; Andrade, Mary Ann; Toney, Glenn M

    2014-06-01

    Autonomic and endocrine profiles of chronic hypertension and heart failure resemble those of acute dehydration. Importantly, all of these conditions are associated with exaggerated sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) driven by glutamatergic activation of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). Here, studies sought to gain insight into mechanisms of disease by determining the role of PVN ionotropic glutamate receptors in supporting SNA and mean arterial pressure (MAP) during dehydration and by elucidating mechanisms regulating receptor activity. Blockade of PVN N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors reduced (P < 0.01) renal SNA and MAP in urethane-chloralose-anesthetized dehydrated (DH) (48 h water deprivation) rats, but had no effect in euhydrated (EH) controls. Blockade of PVN α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors had no effect in either group. NMDA in PVN caused dose-dependent increases of renal SNA and MAP in both groups, but the maximum agonist evoked response (Emax) of the renal SNA response was greater (P < 0.05) in DH rats. The latter was not explained by increased PVN expression of NMDA receptor NR1 subunit protein, increased PVN neuronal excitability, or decreased brain water content. Interestingly, PVN injection of the pan-specific excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT) inhibitor DL-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartic acid produced smaller sympathoexcitatory and pressor responses in DH rats, which was associated with reduced glial expression of EAAT2 in PVN. Like chronic hypertension and heart failure, dehydration increases excitatory NMDA receptor tone in PVN. Reduced glial-mediated glutamate uptake was identified as a key contributing factor. Defective glutamate uptake in PVN could therefore be an important, but as yet unexplored, mechanism driving sympathetic hyperactivity in chronic cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24671240

  2. Diversity of Glutamatergic Synaptic Strength in Lateral Prefrontal versus Primary Visual Cortices in the Rhesus Monkey

    PubMed Central

    Luebke, Jennifer I.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding commonalities and differences in glutamatergic synaptic signaling is essential for understanding cortical functional diversity, especially in the highly complex primate brain. Previously, we have shown that spontaneous EPSCs differed markedly in layer 3 pyramidal neurons of two specialized cortical areas in the rhesus monkey, the high-order lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC) and the primary visual cortex (V1). Here, we used patch-clamp recordings and confocal and electron microscopy to determine whether these distinct synaptic responses are due to differences in firing rates of presynaptic neurons and/or in the features of presynaptic or postsynaptic entities. As with spontaneous EPSCs, TTX-insensitive (action potential-independent) miniature EPSCs exhibited significantly higher frequency, greater amplitude, and slower kinetics in LPFC compared with V1 neurons. Consistent with these physiological differences, LPFC neurons possessed higher densities of spines, and the mean width of large spines was greater compared with those on V1 neurons. Axospinous synapses in layers 2–3 of LPFC had larger postsynaptic density surface areas and a higher proportion of large perforated synapses compared with V1. Axonal boutons in LPFC were also larger in volume and contained ∼1.6× more vesicles than did those in V1. Further, LPFC had a higher density of AMPA GluR2 receptor labeling than V1. The properties of spines and synaptic currents of individual layer 3 pyramidal neurons measured here were significantly correlated, consistent with the idea that significantly more frequent and larger synaptic currents are likely due to more numerous, larger, and more powerful synapses in LPFC compared with V1. PMID:25568107

  3. Acute and chronic cocaine differentially alter the subcellular distribution of AMPA GluR1 subunits in region-specific neurons within the mouse ventral tegmental area

    PubMed Central

    Lane, D.A.; Jaferi, A.; Kreek, M.J.; Pickel, V.M.

    2010-01-01

    Cocaine administration increases AMPA GluR1 expression and receptor-mediated activation of the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Functionality is determined, however, by surface availability of these receptors in transmitter- and VTA-region-specific neurons, which may also be affected by cocaine. To test this hypothesis, we used electron microscopic immunolabeling of AMPA GluR1 subunits and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH; the enzyme needed for dopamine synthesis), in the cortical-associated parabrachial (PB) and in the limbic-associated paranigral (PN) VTA of adult male C57BL/6 mice receiving either a single injection (acute) or repeated escalating-doses for 14 days (chronic) of cocaine. Acute cocaine resulted in opposing VTA-region-specific changes in TH-containing dopaminergic dendrites. TH-labeled dendrites within the PB VTA showed increased cytoplasmic GluR1 immunogold particle density consistent with decreased AMPA receptor-mediated glutamatergic transmission. Conversely, TH-labeled dendrites within the PN VTA showed greater surface expression of GluR1 with increases in both synaptic and plasmalemmal GluR1 immunogold density after a single injection of cocaine. These changes diminished in both VTA subregions after chronic cocaine administration. In contrast, non-TH-containing (presumably GABAergic) dendrites showed VTA-region-specific changes only after repeated cocaine administration such that synaptic GluR1 decreased in the PB, but increased in the PN VTA. Taken together, these findings provide ultrastructural evidence suggesting that chronic cocaine not only reverses the respective depression and facilitation of mesocortical (PB) and mesolimbic (PN) dopaminergic neurons elicited by acute cocaine, but also differentially affects synaptic availability of these receptors in non-dopaminergic neurons of each region. These adaptations may contribute to increased cocaine seeking/relapse and decreased reward that is reported with chronic cocaine use. PMID:20553819

  4. NMDA and AMPA receptors contribute similarly to temporal processing in mammalian retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Stafford, Benjamin K; Manookin, Michael B; Singer, Joshua H; Demb, Jonathan B

    2014-01-01

    Postsynaptic AMPA- and NMDA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs, NMDARs) are commonly expressed at the same synapses. AMPARs are thought to mediate the majority of fast excitatory neurotransmission whereas NMDARs, with their relatively slower kinetics and higher Ca2+ permeability, are thought to mediate synaptic plasticity, especially in neural circuits devoted to learning and memory. In sensory neurons, however, the roles of AMPARs and NMDARs are less well understood. Here, we tested in the in vitro guinea pig retina whether AMPARs and NMDARs differentially support temporal contrast encoding by two ganglion cell types. In both OFF Alpha and Delta ganglion cells, contrast stimulation evoked an NMDAR-mediated response with a characteristic J-shaped I–V relationship. In OFF Delta cells, AMPAR- and NMDAR-mediated responses could be modulated at low frequencies but were suppressed during 10 Hz stimulation, when responses were instead shaped by synaptic inhibition. With inhibition blocked, both AMPAR- and NMDAR-mediated responses could be modulated at 10 Hz, indicating that NMDAR kinetics do not limit temporal encoding. In OFF Alpha cells, NMDAR-mediated responses followed stimuli at frequencies up to ∼18 Hz. In both cell types, NMDAR-mediated responses to contrast modulation at 9–18 Hz showed delays of <10 ms relative to AMPAR-mediated responses. Thus, NMDARs combine with AMPARs to encode rapidly modulated glutamate release, and NMDAR kinetics do not limit temporal coding by OFF Alpha and Delta ganglion cells substantially. Furthermore, glutamatergic transmission is differentially regulated across bipolar cell pathways: in some, release is suppressed at high temporal frequencies by presynaptic inhibition. PMID:25217374

  5. MAGI-1 modulates AMPA receptor synaptic localization and behavioral plasticity in response to prior experience.

    PubMed

    Emtage, Lesley; Chang, Howard; Tiver, Rebecca; Rongo, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    It is well established that the efficacy of synaptic connections can be rapidly modified by neural activity, yet how the environment and prior experience modulate such synaptic and behavioral plasticity is only beginning to be understood. Here we show in C. elegans that the broadly conserved scaffolding molecule MAGI-1 is required for the plasticity observed in a glutamatergic circuit. This mechanosensory circuit mediates reversals in locomotion in response to touch stimulation, and the AMPA-type receptor (AMPAR) subunits GLR-1 and GLR-2, which are required for reversal behavior, are localized to ventral cord synapses in this circuit. We find that animals modulate GLR-1 and GLR-2 localization in response to prior mechanosensory stimulation; a specific isoform of MAGI-1 (MAGI-1L) is critical for this modulation. We show that MAGI-1L interacts with AMPARs through the intracellular domain of the GLR-2 subunit, which is required for the modulation of AMPAR synaptic localization by mechanical stimulation. In addition, mutations that prevent the ubiquitination of GLR-1 prevent the decrease in AMPAR localization observed in previously stimulated magi-1 mutants. Finally, we find that previously-stimulated animals later habituate to subsequent mechanostimulation more rapidly compared to animals initially reared without mechanical stimulation; MAGI-1L, GLR-1, and GLR-2 are required for this change in habituation kinetics. Our findings demonstrate that prior experience can cause long-term alterations in both behavioral plasticity and AMPAR localization at synapses in an intact animal, and indicate a new, direct role for MAGI/S-SCAM proteins in modulating AMPAR localization and function in the wake of variable sensory experience. PMID:19242552

  6. Differential reelin-induced enhancement of NMDA and AMPA receptor activity in the adult hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Shenfeng; Zhao, Lisa F; Korwek, Kimberly M; Weeber, Edwin J

    2006-12-13

    The developmental lamination of the hippocampus and other cortical structures requires a signaling cascade initiated by reelin and its receptors, apoER2 (apolipoprotein E receptor 2) and VLDLR (very-low-density lipoprotein receptor). However, the functional significance of continued reelin expression in the postnatal brain remains poorly understood. Here, we show that reelin application to adult mice hippocampal slices leads to enhanced glutamatergic transmission mediated by NMDA receptors (NMDARs) and AMPA receptors (AMPARs) through distinct mechanisms. Application of recombinant reelin enhanced NMDAR-mediated currents through postsynaptic mechanisms, as revealed by the variance-mean analysis of synaptic NMDAR currents, assessment of spontaneous miniature events, and the levels of NMDAR subunits at synaptic surface. In comparison, nonstationary fluctuation analysis of miniature AMPAR currents and quantification of synaptic surface proteins revealed that reelin-induced enhancement of AMPAR responses was mediated by increased AMPAR numbers. Reelin enhancement of synaptic NMDAR currents was abolished when receptor-associated protein (RAP) or the Src inhibitor 4-amino-5-(4-methylphenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]-pyrimidine (PP1) was bath applied and was abrogated by including PP1 in the recording electrodes. In comparison, including RAP or an inactive PP1 analog PP3 in the recording electrode was without effect. Interestingly, the increased AMPAR response after reelin application was not blocked by PP1 but was blocked by the phosphoinositide-3' kinase (PI3K) inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002 [2-(4-morpholinyl)-8-phenyl-1(4H)-benzopyran-4-one hydrochloride]. Furthermore, reelin-induced, PI3K-dependent AMPAR surface insertion was also observed in cultured hippocampal neurons. Together, these results reveal a differential functional coupling of reelin signaling with NMDAR and AMPAR function and define a novel mechanism for controlling synaptic strength and plasticity

  7. Differential regulation of AMPA receptor subunit trafficking by palmitoylation of two distinct sites.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takashi; Rumbaugh, Gavin; Huganir, Richard L

    2005-09-01

    Modification of AMPA receptor function is a major mechanism for the regulation of synaptic transmission and underlies several forms of synaptic plasticity. Post-translational palmitoylation is a reversible modification that regulates localization of many proteins. Here, we report that palmitoylation of the AMPA receptor regulates receptor trafficking. All AMPA receptor subunits are palmitoylated on two cysteine residues in their transmembrane domain (TMD) 2 and in their C-terminal region. Palmitoylation on TMD 2 is upregulated by the palmitoyl acyl transferase GODZ and leads to an accumulation of the receptor in the Golgi and a reduction of receptor surface expression. C-terminal palmitoylation decreases interaction of the AMPA receptor with the 4.1N protein and regulates AMPA- and NMDA-induced AMPA receptor internalization. Moreover, depalmitoylation of the receptor is regulated by activation of glutamate receptors. These data suggest that regulated palmitoylation of AMPA receptor subunits modulates receptor trafficking and may be important for synaptic plasticity. PMID:16129400

  8. Flotillin-1 promotes formation of glutamatergic synapses in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Swanwick, Catherine Croft; Shapiro, Marietta E; Vicini, Stefano; Wenthold, Robert J

    2010-11-01

    Synapse malformation underlies numerous neurodevelopmental illnesses, including autism spectrum disorders. Here we identify the lipid raft protein flotillin-1 as a promoter of glutamatergic synapse formation. We cultured neurons from the hippocampus, a brain region important for learning and memory, and examined them at two weeks in vitro, a time period rich with synapse formation. Double-label immunocytochemistry of native flot-1 with glutamatergic and GABAergic synapse markers showed that flot-1 was preferentially colocalized with the glutamatergic presynaptic marker vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGLUT1), compared to the GABAergic presynaptic marker glutamic acid decarboxylase-65 (GAD-65). Triple-label immunocytochemistry of native flot-1, VGLUT1, and NR1, the obligatory subunit of NMDA receptors, indicates that Flot-1 was preferentially localized to synaptic rather than extrasynaptic NR1. Furthermore, electrophysiological results using whole-cell patch clamp showed that Flot-1 increased the frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) but not miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs), whereas amplitude and decay kinetics of either type of synaptic current was not affected. Corresponding immunocytochemical data confirmed that the number of glutamatergic synapses increased with flot-1 overexpression. Overall, our anatomical and physiological results show that flot-1 enhances the formation of glutamatergic synapses but not GABAergic synapses, suggesting that the role of flot-1 in neurodevelopmental disorders should be explored. PMID:20669324

  9. Glutamatergic Modulators: The Future of Treating Mood Disorders?

    PubMed Central

    Zarate, Carlos; Machado-Vieira, Rodrigo; Henter, Ioline; Ibrahim, Lobna; Diazgranados, Nancy; Salvadore, Giacomo

    2010-01-01

    Mood disorders such as bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder are common, chronic, and recurrent conditions affecting millions of individuals worldwide. Existing antidepressants and mood stabilizers used to treat these disorders are insufficient for many. Patients continue to have low remission rates, delayed onset of action, residual subsyndromal symptoms, and relapses. New therapeutic agents able to exert faster and sustained antidepressant or mood-stabilizing effects are urgently needed to treat these disorders. In this context, the glutamatergic system has been implicated in the pathophysiology of mood disorders in unique clinical and neurobiological ways. In addition to evidence confirming the role of the glutamatergic modulators riluzole and ketamine as proof-of-concept agents in this system, trials with diverse glutamatergic modulators are under way. Overall, this system holds considerable promise for developing the next generation of novel therapeutics for the treatment of bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder. PMID:20825266

  10. Cannabinoid-glutamate interactions in the regulation of food intake in neonatal layer- type chicks: role of glutamate NMDA and AMPA receptors.

    PubMed

    Keyshams, Negar; Zendehdel, Morteza; Babapour, Vahab; Baghbanzadeh, Ali

    2016-06-01

    The involvement of the endocannabinoid system in the brain functions is likely the conclusion of its capability to interact with specific neurotransmitters in several brain regions. The present study was designed to examine the role of the glutamatergic system on cannabinoid-induced hyperphagia in chicken. In this survey 10 experiments designed to investigate interaction of cannabinoidergic and glutamatergic systems on feeding behavior in neonatal chickens. In experiment 1, chicken were intracerebroventricular (ICV) injected with saline, 2-AG (2-Arachidonoylglycerol, 5.28 nmol, CB1 receptors agonist), MK-801(NMDA receptor antagonist, 15 nmol) and co-administration of 2-AG + MK-801. In experiment 2, injection of saline, 2-AG (5.28 nmol), CNQX) AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist, 390 nmol) and their combination (2-AG + CNQX) was done. In Experiment 3, injections were saline, 2-AG (5.28 nmol), AIDA)mGluR1 antagonist, 2 nmol) and 2-AG + AIDA. Experiments 4 and 5 were similar to experiment 3, except birds injected with LY341495 (mGLUR2 glutamate antagonist, 150 nmol) and UBP1112 (mGLUR3 glutamate antagonist, 2 nmol) instead of AIDA. Experiments 6-10 followed the procedure similar to experiments 1-5, except chickens received ICV injection of CB65 (CB2 receptor agonist, 3 nmol), instead of 2-AG. Then the cumulative food intake measured until 120 min post injection. According to the results, ICV injection of 2-AG and CB65 significantly increased food intake (P < 0.001). Co-injection of 2-AG and MK-801 significantly amplified hyperphagic effect of CB1 receptors agonist(P < 0.001). Moreover, co-administration of CB65 plus CNQX significantly increased CB65- induced hyperphagia in FD3 neonatal layer-type chickens (P < 0.001). These results suggest there is an interaction between endocannabinoids and glutamatergic systems via NMDA and AMPA receptors in feeding behavior of neonatal layer-type chickens. PMID:27000110

  11. Ketamine as the prototype glutamatergic antidepressant: pharmacodynamic actions, and a systematic review and meta-analysis of efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Caddy, Caroline; Giaroli, Giovanni; White, Thomas P.; Shergill, Sukhwinder S.

    2014-01-01

    The burden of depressive disorders and the frequent inadequacy of their current pharmacological treatments are well established. The anaesthetic and hallucinogenic drug ketamine has provoked much interest over the past decade or so as an extremely rapidly acting antidepressant that does not modify ‘classical’ monoaminergic receptors. Current evidence has shown several ways through which it might exert therapeutic antidepressant actions: blockade of glutamatergic NMDA receptors and relative upregulation of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) subtypes may alter cortical connectivity patterns; through intracellular changes in protein expression, including the proteins mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF); and alteration of intracellular signalling cascades. The clinical evidence demonstrates rapid improvements in mood and suicidal thinking in most participants, although study numbers have generally been small and many trials are unblinded and methodologically weak. There is a small body of work to suggest ketamine might also augment electroconvulsive therapy and potentially have a role as a surgical anaesthetic in depressed patients. A major problem is that the effects of ketamine appear temporary, disappearing after days to weeks (although longer benefits have been sustained in some), and attempts to circumvent this through pharmacological augmentation have been disappointing thus far. These exciting data are providing new insights into neurobiological models of depression, and potentially opening up a new class of antidepressants, but there are significant practical and ethical issues about any future mainstream clinical role it might have. PMID:24688759

  12. Involvement of AMPA receptor desensitization in short-term synaptic depression at the calyx of Held in developing rats

    PubMed Central

    Koike-Tani, Maki; Kanda, Takeshi; Saitoh, Naoto; Yamashita, Takayuki; Takahashi, Tomoyuki

    2008-01-01

    Paired-pulse facilitation (PPF) and depression (PPD) are forms of short-term plasticity that are generally thought to reflect changes in transmitter release probability. However, desensitization of postsynaptic AMPA receptors (AMPARs) significantly contributes to PPD at many glutamatergic synapses. To clarify the involvement of AMPAR desensitization in synaptic PPD, we compared PPD with AMPAR desensitization, induced by paired-pulse glutamate application in patches excised from postsynaptic cells at the calyx of Held synapse of developing rats. We found that AMPAR desensitization contributed significantly to PPD before the onset of hearing (P10–12), but that its contribution became negligible after hearing onset. During postnatal development (P7–21) the recovery of AMPARs from desensitization became faster. Concomitantly, glutamate sensitivity of AMPAR desensitization declined. Single-cell reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis indicated a developmental decline of GluR1 expression that correlated with speeding of the recovery of AMPARs from desensitization. Transmitter release probability declined during the second postnatal week (P7–14). Manipulation of the extracellular Ca2+/Mg2+ ratio, to match release probability at P7–8 and P13–15 synapses, revealed that the release probability is also an important factor determining the involvement of AMPAR desensitization in PPD. We conclude that the extent of involvement of AMPAR desensitization in short-term synaptic depression is determined by both pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms. PMID:18339695

  13. Activation of AMPA receptor in the infralimbic cortex facilitates extinction and attenuates the heroin-seeking behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weisheng; Wang, Yiqi; Sun, Anna; Zhou, Linyi; Xu, Wenjin; Zhu, Huaqiang; Zhuang, Dingding; Lai, Miaojun; Zhang, Fuqiang; Zhou, Wenhua; Liu, Huifen

    2016-01-26

    Infralimbic cortex (IL) is proposed to suppress cocaine seeking after extinction, but whether the IL regulates the extinction and reinstatement of heroin-seeking behavior is unknown. To address this issue, the male SD rats were trained to self-administer heroin under a FR1 schedule for consecutive 14 days, then the rats underwent 7 daily 2h extinction session in the operant chamber. The activation of IL by microinjection PEPA, an allosteric AMPA receptor potentiator into IL before each of extinction session facilitated the extinction responding after heroin self-administration, but did not alter the locomotor activity in an open field testing environment. Other rats were first trained under a FR1 schedule for heroin self-administration for 14 days, followed by 14 days of extinction training, and reinstatement of heroin-seeking induced by cues was measured for 2h. Intra-IL microinjecting of PEPA at 15min prior to test inhibited the reinstatement of heroin-seeking induced by cues. Moreover, the expression of GluR1 in the IL and NAc remarkably increased after treatment with PEPA during the reinstatement. These finding suggested that activation of glutamatergic projection from IL to NAc shell may be involved in the extinction and reinstatement of heroin-seeking. PMID:26639425

  14. Challenges for and current status of research into positive modulators of AMPA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Simon E; Bax, Benjamin D; Harries, Mark

    2010-01-01

    AMPA receptors consist of a family of hetero-oligomeric (tetrameric) receptors arising from four genes, each of which encodes a distinct receptor subunit (GluA1-4). Recombinant homo-tetrameric AMPA receptors, comprising four identical subunits, are functionally active and have been used in in vitro assays. However, the many different subunit permutations make possible the functional and anatomical diversity of AMPA receptors throughout the CNS. Furthermore, AMPA receptor subunit stoichiometry influences the biophysical and functional properties of the receptor. A number of chemically diverse positive modulators of AMPA receptor have been identified which potentiate AMPA receptor-mediated activity in vitro as well as improving cognitive performance in rodents and non-human primates with several being taken further in the clinic. This review article summarizes the current status in the research on positive allosteric modulation of AMPA receptors and outlines the challenges involved in identifying a chemically distinct series of AMPA receptor positive modulators, addressing the challenges created by the heterogeneity of the AMPA receptor populations and the development of structure-activity relationships driven by homomeric, recombinant systems on high-throughput platforms. We also review the role of X-ray crystallography in the selection and prioritization of targets for lead optimization for AMPA receptor positive modulators. PMID:20423333

  15. Reduced Anterior Cingulate Cortex Glutamatergic Concentrations in Childhood Major Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mirza, Yousha; Tang, Jennifer; Russell, Aileen; Banerjee, S. Preeya; Bhandari, Rashmi; Ivey, Jennifer; Rose, Michelle; Moore, Gregory J.; Rosenberg, David R.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To examine in vivo glutamatergic neurochemical alterations in the anterior cingulate cortex of children with major depressive disorder (MDD). Method: Single-voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic ([.sup.1]H-MRS) examinations of the anterior cingulate cortex were conducted in 13 psychotropic-naive children and adolescents with MDD…

  16. Glutamatergic synaptic plasticity in the mesocorticolimbic system in addiction

    PubMed Central

    van Huijstee, Aile N.; Mansvelder, Huibert D.

    2015-01-01

    Addictive drugs remodel the brain’s reward circuitry, the mesocorticolimbic dopamine (DA) system, by inducing widespread adaptations of glutamatergic synapses. This drug-induced synaptic plasticity is thought to contribute to both the development and the persistence of addiction. This review highlights the synaptic modifications that are induced by in vivo exposure to addictive drugs and describes how these drug-induced synaptic changes may contribute to the different components of addictive behavior, such as compulsive drug use despite negative consequences and relapse. Initially, exposure to an addictive drug induces synaptic changes in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). This drug-induced synaptic potentiation in the VTA subsequently triggers synaptic changes in downstream areas of the mesocorticolimbic system, such as the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and the prefrontal cortex (PFC), with further drug exposure. These glutamatergic synaptic alterations are then thought to mediate many of the behavioral symptoms that characterize addiction. The later stages of glutamatergic synaptic plasticity in the NAc and in particular in the PFC play a role in maintaining addiction and drive relapse to drug-taking induced by drug-associated cues. Remodeling of PFC glutamatergic circuits can persist into adulthood, causing a lasting vulnerability to relapse. We will discuss how these neurobiological changes produced by drugs of abuse may provide novel targets for potential treatment strategies for addiction. PMID:25653591

  17. Serotonin modulates glutamatergic transmission to neurons in the lateral habenula

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Guiqin; Zuo, Wanhong; Wu, Liangzhi; Li, Wenting; Wu, Wei; Bekker, Alex; Ye, Jiang-Hong

    2016-01-01

    The lateral habenula (LHb) is bilaterally connected with serotoninergic raphe nuclei, and expresses high density of serotonin receptors. However, actions of serotonin on the excitatory synaptic transmission to LHb neurons have not been thoroughly investigated. The LHb contains two anatomically and functionally distinct regions: lateral (LHbl) and medial (LHbm) divisions. We compared serotonin’s effects on glutamatergic transmission across the LHb in rat brains. Serotonin bi-directionally and differentially modulated glutamatergic transmission. Serotonin inhibited glutamatergic transmission in higher percentage of LHbl neurons but potentiated in higher percentage of LHbm neurons. Magnitude of potentiation was greater in LHbm than in LHbl. Type 2 and 3 serotonin receptor antagonists attenuated serotonin’s potentiation. The serotonin reuptake blocker, and the type 2 and 3 receptor agonists facilitated glutamatergic transmission in both LHbl and LHbm neurons. Thus, serotonin via activating its type 2, 3 receptors, increased glutamate release at nerve terminals in some LHb neurons. Our data demonstrated that serotonin affects both LHbm and LHbl. Serotonin might play an important role in processing information between the LHb and its downstream-targeted structures during decision-making. It may also contribute to a homeostatic balance underlying the neural circuitry between the LHb and raphe nuclei. PMID:27033153

  18. Targeting the Glutamatergic System to Treat Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, Daniel C.; Henter, Ioline D.; Zarate, Carlos A.

    2012-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a severe, debilitating medical illness that affects millions of individuals worldwide. The young age of onset and chronicity of the disorder has a significant impact on the long-term disability that affected individuals face. Most existing treatments have focused on the ‘monoamine hypothesis’ for rational design of compounds. However, patients continue to experience low remission rates, residual subsyndromal symptoms, relapses and overall functional impairment. In this context, growing evidence suggests that the glutamatergic system is uniquely central to the neurobiology and treatment of MDD. Here, we review data supporting the involvement of the glutamatergic system in the pathophysiology of MDD, and discuss the efficacy of glutamatergic agents as novel therapeutics. Preliminary clinical evidence has been promising, particularly with regard to the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist ketamine as a ‘proof-of-concept’ agent. The review also highlights potential molecular and inflammatory mechanisms that may contribute to the rapid antidepressant response seen with ketamine. Because existing pharmacological treatments for MDD are often insufficient for many patients, the next generation of treatments needs to be more effective, rapid acting and better tolerated than currently available medications. There is extant evidence that the glutamatergic system holds considerable promise for developing the next generation of novel and mechanistically distinct agents for the treatment of MDD. PMID:22731961

  19. Optogenetic Stimulation of Prefrontal Glutamatergic Neurons Enhances Recognition Memory

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Gareth R. I.; Stuart, Sarah A.; Roloff, Eva v. L.; Teschemacher, Anja G.; Warburton, E. Clea

    2016-01-01

    Finding effective cognitive enhancers is a major health challenge; however, modulating glutamatergic neurotransmission has the potential to enhance performance in recognition memory tasks. Previous studies using glutamate receptor antagonists have revealed that the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) plays a central role in associative recognition memory. The present study investigates short-term recognition memory using optogenetics to target glutamatergic neurons within the rodent mPFC specifically. Selective stimulation of glutamatergic neurons during the online maintenance of information enhanced associative recognition memory in normal animals. This cognitive enhancing effect was replicated by local infusions of the AMPAkine CX516, but not CX546, which differ in their effects on EPSPs. This suggests that enhancing the amplitude, but not the duration, of excitatory synaptic currents improves memory performance. Increasing glutamate release through infusions of the mGluR7 presynaptic receptor antagonist MMPIP had no effect on performance. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT These results provide new mechanistic information that could guide the targeting of future cognitive enhancers. Our work suggests that improved associative-recognition memory can be achieved by enhancing endogenous glutamatergic neuronal activity selectively using an optogenetic approach. We build on these observations to recapitulate this effect using drug treatments that enhance the amplitude of EPSPs; however, drugs that alter the duration of the EPSP or increase glutamate release lack efficacy. This suggests that both neural and temporal specificity are needed to achieve cognitive enhancement. PMID:27147648

  20. Role of glutamatergic system in nerve agent intoxication

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchet, G.; Lallement, G.; Carpentier, P.; De Groot, D.; Bodjarian, N.

    1993-05-13

    Our recent studies concerning soman-induced seizures mechanisms and subsequent brain damage are reviewed. (1) Seizure activity was associated with transient increases of extracellular concentrations of acetylcholine (ACh) and with long-lasting releases of glutamate (Glu) in all limbic areas studied. (2) Preventive intraseptal application of atropine abolished the hippocampal increases of extracellular AChi and Glu indicating a key role of septum in triggering seizure activity. (3) Early increases of hippocampal AMPA receptor binding occurred before activation of NMDA receptors. (4) Pretreatment with NBQX, an antagonist of AMPA receptor, prevented convulsions and brain damage even without atropine. In the same conditions, no protection was afforded by TCP, a non-competitive antagonist of the NMDA receptor. (5) On the contrary, in the presence of pyridostigmine and atropine, TCP blocked the seizures induced by 2 x LD50 of soman. The anticonvulsant potency of TCP was particularly obvious when administered curatively. (6) Mossy fibers sprouting takes place in the supragranular-molecular layers of rat hippocampus long after brain injury associated with abnormal neuronal excitability. (7) Altogether, it appears that an AMPA component is involved in combination with cholinergic mechanisms in initiating seizures. A subsequent and long-lasting recruitment of NMDA receptors is then essential in sustaining the seizures. New anticonvulsant and neuroprotective approaches using Glu antagonists against nerve agents intoxication are discussed.

  1. Stress Induces Pain Transition by Potentiation of AMPA Receptor Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Changsheng; Yang, Ya; Liu, Sufang; Fang, Huaqiang; Zhang, Yong; Furmanski, Orion; Skinner, John; Xing, Ying; Johns, Roger A.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic postsurgical pain is a serious issue in clinical practice. After surgery, patients experience ongoing pain or become sensitive to incident, normally nonpainful stimulation. The intensity and duration of postsurgical pain vary. However, it is unclear how the transition from acute to chronic pain occurs. Here we showed that social defeat stress enhanced plantar incision-induced AMPA receptor GluA1 phosphorylation at the Ser831 site in the spinal cord and greatly prolonged plantar incision-induced pain. Interestingly, targeted mutation of the GluA1 phosphorylation site Ser831 significantly inhibited stress-induced prolongation of incisional pain. In addition, stress hormones enhanced GluA1 phosphorylation and AMPA receptor-mediated electrical activity in the spinal cord. Subthreshold stimulation induced spinal long-term potentiation in GluA1 phosphomimetic mutant mice, but not in wild-type mice. Therefore, spinal AMPA receptor phosphorylation contributes to the mechanisms underlying stress-induced pain transition. PMID:25297100

  2. Seizure control by decanoic acid through direct AMPA receptor inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Pishan; Augustin, Katrin; Boddum, Kim; Williams, Sophie; Sun, Min; Terschak, John A.; Hardege, Jörg D.; Chen, Philip E.

    2016-01-01

    See Rogawski (doi:10.1093/awv369) for a scientific commentary on this article.  The medium chain triglyceride ketogenic diet is an established treatment for drug-resistant epilepsy that increases plasma levels of decanoic acid and ketones. Recently, decanoic acid has been shown to provide seizure control in vivo, yet its mechanism of action remains unclear. Here we show that decanoic acid, but not the ketones β-hydroxybutryate or acetone, shows antiseizure activity in two acute ex vivo rat hippocampal slice models of epileptiform activity. To search for a mechanism of decanoic acid, we show it has a strong inhibitory effect on excitatory, but not inhibitory, neurotransmission in hippocampal slices. Using heterologous expression of excitatory ionotropic glutamate receptor AMPA subunits in Xenopus oocytes, we show that this effect is through direct AMPA receptor inhibition, a target shared by a recently introduced epilepsy treatment perampanel. Decanoic acid acts as a non-competitive antagonist at therapeutically relevant concentrations, in a voltage- and subunit-dependent manner, and this is sufficient to explain its antiseizure effects. This inhibitory effect is likely to be caused by binding to sites on the M3 helix of the AMPA-GluA2 transmembrane domain; independent from the binding site of perampanel. Together our results indicate that the direct inhibition of excitatory neurotransmission by decanoic acid in the brain contributes to the anti-convulsant effect of the medium chain triglyceride ketogenic diet. PMID:26608744

  3. Seizure control by decanoic acid through direct AMPA receptor inhibition.

    PubMed

    Chang, Pishan; Augustin, Katrin; Boddum, Kim; Williams, Sophie; Sun, Min; Terschak, John A; Hardege, Jörg D; Chen, Philip E; Walker, Matthew C; Williams, Robin S B

    2016-02-01

    The medium chain triglyceride ketogenic diet is an established treatment for drug-resistant epilepsy that increases plasma levels of decanoic acid and ketones. Recently, decanoic acid has been shown to provide seizure control in vivo, yet its mechanism of action remains unclear. Here we show that decanoic acid, but not the ketones β-hydroxybutryate or acetone, shows antiseizure activity in two acute ex vivo rat hippocampal slice models of epileptiform activity. To search for a mechanism of decanoic acid, we show it has a strong inhibitory effect on excitatory, but not inhibitory, neurotransmission in hippocampal slices. Using heterologous expression of excitatory ionotropic glutamate receptor AMPA subunits in Xenopus oocytes, we show that this effect is through direct AMPA receptor inhibition, a target shared by a recently introduced epilepsy treatment perampanel. Decanoic acid acts as a non-competitive antagonist at therapeutically relevant concentrations, in a voltage- and subunit-dependent manner, and this is sufficient to explain its antiseizure effects. This inhibitory effect is likely to be caused by binding to sites on the M3 helix of the AMPA-GluA2 transmembrane domain; independent from the binding site of perampanel. Together our results indicate that the direct inhibition of excitatory neurotransmission by decanoic acid in the brain contributes to the anti-convulsant effect of the medium chain triglyceride ketogenic diet. PMID:26608744

  4. Amyloid-β-Induced Dysregulation of AMPA Receptor Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Guntupalli, Sumasri; Widagdo, Jocelyn; Anggono, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Evidence from neuropathological, genetic, animal model, and biochemical studies has indicated that the accumulation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) is associated with, and probably induces, profound neuronal changes in brain regions critical for memory and cognition in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). There is considerable evidence that synapses are particularly vulnerable to AD, establishing synaptic dysfunction as one of the earliest events in pathogenesis, prior to neuronal loss. It is clear that excessive Aβ levels can disrupt excitatory synaptic transmission and plasticity, mainly due to dysregulation of the AMPA and NMDA glutamate receptors in the brain. Importantly, AMPA receptors are the principal glutamate receptors that mediate fast excitatory neurotransmission. This is essential for synaptic plasticity, a cellular correlate of learning and memory, which are the cognitive functions that are most disrupted in AD. Here we review recent advances in the field and provide insights into the molecular mechanisms that underlie Aβ-induced dysfunction of AMPA receptor trafficking. This review focuses primarily on NMDA receptor- and metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated signaling. In particular, we highlight several mechanisms that underlie synaptic long-term depression as common signaling pathways that are hijacked by the neurotoxic effects of Aβ. PMID:27073700

  5. Amyloid-β-Induced Dysregulation of AMPA Receptor Trafficking.

    PubMed

    Guntupalli, Sumasri; Widagdo, Jocelyn; Anggono, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Evidence from neuropathological, genetic, animal model, and biochemical studies has indicated that the accumulation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) is associated with, and probably induces, profound neuronal changes in brain regions critical for memory and cognition in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). There is considerable evidence that synapses are particularly vulnerable to AD, establishing synaptic dysfunction as one of the earliest events in pathogenesis, prior to neuronal loss. It is clear that excessive Aβ levels can disrupt excitatory synaptic transmission and plasticity, mainly due to dysregulation of the AMPA and NMDA glutamate receptors in the brain. Importantly, AMPA receptors are the principal glutamate receptors that mediate fast excitatory neurotransmission. This is essential for synaptic plasticity, a cellular correlate of learning and memory, which are the cognitive functions that are most disrupted in AD. Here we review recent advances in the field and provide insights into the molecular mechanisms that underlie Aβ-induced dysfunction of AMPA receptor trafficking. This review focuses primarily on NMDA receptor- and metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated signaling. In particular, we highlight several mechanisms that underlie synaptic long-term depression as common signaling pathways that are hijacked by the neurotoxic effects of Aβ. PMID:27073700

  6. Prolonged activation of phospholipase D in Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing platelet-activating-factor receptor lacking cytoplasmic C-terminal tail.

    PubMed

    Liu, B; Nakashima, S; Adachi, T; Ito, Y; Takano, T; Shimizu, T; Nozawa, Y

    1997-10-01

    The mechanism and role of phospholipase D (PLD) activation by platelet-activating factor (PAF) were examined with Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing wild-type PAF receptor (WT-H cells) and truncated PAF receptor lacking the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail (D-H cells). Treatment of D-H cells with PAF resulted in the rapid formation of Ins(1,4,5)P3, which was followed by a sustained phase for more than 10 min. In these cells, PAF-induced PLD activation lasted for more than 20 min. In contrast, PLD activation in WT-H cells was transient. PAF stimulation caused the biphasic formation of 1,2-diacylglycerol (DG) in both types of cell. The first phase was rapid and transient, coinciding with the Ins(1,4,5)P3 peak. The second sustained phase of DG formation was attenuated by butanol, which produces phosphatidylbutanol at the expense of phosphatidic acid (PA) by transphosphatidylation activity of PLD, and by propranolol, a selective inhibitor for PA phosphohydrolase catalysing the conversion of PA into DG. The DG level returned nearly to basal at 20 min after PAF stimulation in WT-H cells, whereas in D-H cells the elevated DG level was sustained for more than 20 min. The profile of translocation of protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha) to membrane was similar to that of DG formation. In WT-H cells, PKCalpha was transiently associated with membranes and then returned to the cytosol. However, in D-H cells PKCalpha was rapidly translocated to and remained in membranes for more than 20 min. Butanol suppressed this sustained translocation of PKCalpha. Furthermore the mRNA levels of c-fos and c-jun by PAF in WT-H cells were much lower than those in D-H cells. Propranolol and butanol at concentrations that inhibited the formation of DG suppressed the PAF-induced mRNA expression of c-fos and c-jun. Taken together, the prolonged PLD activation in D-H cells confirmed a primary role for phospholipase C/PKC in PLD activation by PAF. Furthermore the results obtained here suggest that

  7. Discovery of the First α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic Acid (AMPA) Receptor Antagonist Dependent upon Transmembrane AMPA Receptor Regulatory Protein (TARP) γ-8.

    PubMed

    Gardinier, Kevin M; Gernert, Douglas L; Porter, Warren J; Reel, Jon K; Ornstein, Paul L; Spinazze, Patrick; Stevens, F Craig; Hahn, Patric; Hollinshead, Sean P; Mayhugh, Daniel; Schkeryantz, Jeff; Khilevich, Albert; De Frutos, Oscar; Gleason, Scott D; Kato, Akihiko S; Luffer-Atlas, Debra; Desai, Prashant V; Swanson, Steven; Burris, Kevin D; Ding, Chunjin; Heinz, Beverly A; Need, Anne B; Barth, Vanessa N; Stephenson, Gregory A; Diseroad, Benjamin A; Woods, Tim A; Yu, Hong; Bredt, David; Witkin, Jeffrey M

    2016-05-26

    Transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) are a family of scaffolding proteins that regulate AMPA receptor trafficking and function. TARP γ-8 is one member of this family and is highly expressed within the hippocampus relative to the cerebellum. A selective TARP γ-8-dependent AMPA receptor antagonist (TDAA) is an innovative approach to modulate AMPA receptors in specific brain regions to potentially increase the therapeutic index relative to known non-TARP-dependent AMPA antagonists. We describe here, for the first time, the discovery of a noncompetitive AMPA receptor antagonist that is dependent on the presence of TARP γ-8. Three major iteration cycles were employed to improve upon potency, CYP1A2-dependent challenges, and in vivo clearance. An optimized molecule, compound (-)-25 (LY3130481), was fully protective against pentylenetetrazole-induced convulsions in rats without the motor impairment associated with non-TARP-dependent AMPA receptor antagonists. Compound (-)-25 could be utilized to provide proof of concept for antiepileptic efficacy with reduced motor side effects in patients. PMID:27067148

  8. Glutamatergic and gabaergic neurotransmission and neuronal circuits in hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Cauli, Omar; Rodrigo, Regina; Llansola, Marta; Montoliu, Carmina; Monfort, Pilar; Piedrafita, Blanca; El Mlili, Nisrin; Boix, Jordi; Agustí, Ana; Felipo, Vicente

    2009-03-01

    Patients with hepatic encephalopathy (HE) may present different neurological alterations including impaired cognitive function and altered motor activity and coordination. HE may lead to coma and death. Many of these neurological alterations are the consequence of altered neurotransmission. Hyperammonemia is a main contributor to the alterations in neurotransmission and in neurological functions in HE. Both glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission are altered in animal models of HE. We review some of these alterations, especially those alterations in glutamatergic neurotransmission responsible for some specific neurological alterations in hyperammonemia and HE: the role 1) of excessive NMDA receptors activation in death induced by acute hyperammonemia; 2) of impaired function of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway, associated to NMDA receptors, in cognitive impairment in chronic HE; 3) of increased extracellular glutamate and activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors in substantia nigra in hypokinesia in chronic HE. The therapeutic implications are discussed. We also review the alterations in the function of the neuronal circuits between basal ganglia-thalamus-cortex modulating motor activity and the role of sequential alterations in glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission in these alterations. HE would be a consequence of altered neuronal communication due to alterations in general neurotransmission involving different neurotransmitter systems in different neurons. PMID:19085094

  9. Naturally occurring compounds affect glutamatergic neurotransmission in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Martini, Lucia Helena; Jung, Fernanda; Soares, Felix Antunes; Rotta, Liane Nanci; Vendite, Deusa Aparecida; Frizzo, Marcos Emilio dos Santos; Yunes, Rosendo A; Calixto, João Batista; Wofchuk, Susana; Souza, Diogo O

    2007-11-01

    Natural products, including those derived from plants, have largely contributed to the development of therapeutic drugs. Glutamate is the main excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system and it is also considered a nociceptive neurotransmitter, by acting on peripheral nervous system. For this reason, in this study we investigated the effects of the hydroalcoholic extracts from Drymis winteri (polygodial and drimanial), Phyllanthus (rutin and quercetine), Jathopha elliptica (jatrophone), Hedyosmum brasiliense (13HDS), Ocotea suaveolens (Tormentic acid), Protium kleinii (alphabeta-amyrin), Citrus paradise (naringin), soybean (genistein) and Crataeva nurvala (lupeol), described as having antinociceptive effects, on glutamatergic transmission parameters, such as [(3)H]glutamate binding, [(3)H]glutamate uptake by synaptic vesicles and astrocyte cultures, and synaptosomal [(3)H]glutamate release. All the glutamatergic parameters were affected by one or more of these compounds. Specifically, drimanial and polygodial presented more broad and profound effects, requiring more investigation on their mechanisms. The putative central side effects of these compounds, via the glutamatergic system, are discussed. PMID:17577666

  10. Reversal of novelty-induced hippocampal c-Fos expression in GluA1 subunit-deficient mice by chronic treatment targeting glutamatergic transmission.

    PubMed

    Maksimovic, Milica; Aitta-aho, Teemu; Korpi, Esa R

    2014-12-15

    Malfunction of glutamate transmission is implicated in several neuropsychiatric disorders. Gria1-/- mouse line with knocked-out GluA1 subunits of ionotropic AMPA glutamate receptor displays several behavioural features of schizoaffective disorder. Typically, these mice show hyperactivity provoked by environmental novelty, which is attenuated after 4-week treatment with the standard mood-stabilisers lithium and valproate and the mood-stabilising anticonvulsants topiramate and lamotrigine (Maksimovic, M., Vekovischeva, O.Y., Aitta-Aho, T., Korpi, E.R., 2014. Chronic treatment with mood-stabilizers attenuates abnormal hyperlocomotion of GluA1-subunit deficient mice. PloS One. 9, e100188). Here, we complement our study by treating these mice chronically with perampanel, a novel non-competitive antagonist of AMPA receptors, for 4 weeks at the dose of 60 mg/kg diet, and found reduced locomotor hyperactivity in the Gria1-/- animals, while not affecting the wild-type littermates. To study the cellular mechanism by which chronic treatments with glutamate-modulating mood-stabilizing drugs alleviate this hyperactivity, we used the immediate early gene c-Fos protein expression as a marker of neuronal activity in the brain. Chronic lithium, valproate and topiramate blunted the c-Fos expression especially in the dorsal hippocampus of the Gria1-/- mice, with all of them reducing the number of c-Fos-positive cells in the CA3 region and valproate and topiramate also in the dentate gyrus (DG). Lamotrigine and perampanel treatments had the same effect in the all CA1, CA3 and DG subfields of the dorsal hippocampus of Gria1-/- mice. The results suggest that abnormal (hippocampal) glutamatergic transmission underlies the hyperactive phenotype of the Gria1-/- mice in a novel environment, and based on the efficacies of the present chronic drug treatments, this mouse model may serve as a predictive tool for studying novel mood-stabilisers. PMID:25446922

  11. Role of ionotropic glutamatergic receptors and nitric oxide in the effects of flutriafol, a triazole fungicide, on the in vivo striatal dopamine release.

    PubMed

    Faro, Lilian R Ferreira; Alfonso, Miguel; Maués, Luis A L; Durán, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Flutriafol is a triazole fungicide that induces spontaneous and depolarization-stimulated release of dopamine from rat striatum, although the neurochemical mechanism by which this fungicide induces this effect is unknown. The purpose of the present work was to assess the implication of ionotropic glutamatergic receptors and nitric oxide (NO) production in the flutriafol-induced dopamine release from rat striatum. To this, we have used non-competitive antagonists of NMDA (dizocilpine, MK-801), and (AMPA)/kainate (6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione, CNQX) receptors, or nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors (Nomega-nitro-L-arginine -L-NARG - and 7-nitro-indazol - 7-NI), to study the striatal dopamine release induced by flutriafol. Intrastriatal infusion of 6 mM flutriafol increased the dopamine levels to 984 ± 141%, with respect to basal levels. Infusion of flutriafol (6 mM) in MK-801 (500 μM) or CNQX (500 μM) pretreated animals, increased striatal dopamine levels to 489 ± 74% and 477 ± 78%, with respect to basal levels, respectively, these increases being 50.3% and 51.5% smaller than those induced by flutriafol in non-pretreated animals. Infusion of flutriafol (6 mM) in L-NARG (1 mM) or 7-NI (100 μM) pretreated animals, increased the extracellular dopamine levels to 400 ± 88.5 and 479 ± 69.4%, with respect to basal levels, respectively, these increases being 59.3 and 51% smaller than those induced by flutriafol in non-pretreated animals. In summary, flutriafol appears to act, at least in part, through an overstimulation of NMDA receptors with possible NO production to induce dopamine release, and the administration of NMDA and AMPA/kainate receptor antagonists and NOS inhibitors protects against flutriafol-induced dopamine release from rat striatum. PMID:23208429

  12. The modulation by 5-HT of glutamatergic inputs from the raphe pallidus to rat hypoglossal motoneurones, in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Bouryi, Vitali A; Lewis, David I

    2003-01-01

    Decreases in the activity of 5-HT-containing caudal raphe neurones during sleep are thought to be partially responsible for the resultant disfacilitation of hypoglossal motoneurones. Whilst 5-HT has a direct excitatory action on hypoglossal motoneurones as a result of activation of 5-HT2 receptors, microinjection of 5-HT2 antagonists into the hypoglossal nucleus reduces motor activity to a much lesser extent compared to the suppression observed during sleep suggesting other transmitters co-localised in caudal raphe neurones may also be involved. The aim of the present study was therefore to characterise raphe pallidus inputs to hypoglossal motoneurones. Whole cell recordings were made from hypoglossal motoneurones in vitro. 5-HT evoked a direct membrane depolarisation (8.45 ± 3.8 mV, P < 0.001) and increase in cell input resistance (53 ± 40 %, P < 0.001) which was blocked by the 5-HT2 antagonist, ritanserin (2.40 ± 2.7 vs. 7.04 ± 4.6 mV). Stimulation within the raphe pallidus evoked a monosynaptic EPSC that was significantly reduced by the AMPA/kainateantagonist, NBQX (22.8 ± 16 % of control, P < 0.001). In contrast, the 5-HT2 antagonist, ritanserin, had no effect on the amplitude of these EPSCs (106 ± 31 % of control, P = n.s.). 5-HT reduced these EPSCs to 50.0 ± 13 % of control (P < 0.001), as did the 5-HT1A agonist, 8-OH-DPAT (52.5 ± 17 %, P < 0.001) and the 5-HT1B agonist, CP 93129 (40.6 ± 29 %, P < 0.01). 8-OH-DPAT and CP 93129 increased the paired pulse ratio (1.38 ± 0.27 to 1.91 ± 0.54, P < 0.05 & 1.27 ± 0.08 to 1.44 ± 0.13, P < 0.01 respectively) but had no effect on the postsynaptic glutamate response (99 ± 4.4 % and 100 ± 2.5 %, P = n.s.). They also increased the frequency (P < 0.001), but not the amplitude, of miniature glutamatergic EPSCs in hypoglossal motoneurones. These data demonstrate that raphe pallidus inputs to hypoglossal motoneurones are predominantly glutamatergic in nature, with 5-HT decreasing the release of glutamate from

  13. Regulation of AMPA Receptor Trafficking and Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Anggono, Victor; Huganir, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    AMPA receptors (AMPARs) mediate the majority of fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the brain. Dynamic changes in neuronal synaptic efficacy, termed synaptic plasticity, are thought to underlie information coding and storage in learning and memory. One major mechanism that regulates synaptic strength involves the tightly regulated trafficking of AMPARs into and out of synapses. The life cycle of AMPARs from their biosynthesis, membrane trafficking and synaptic targeting to their degradation are controlled by a series of orchestrated interactions with numerous intracellular regulatory proteins. Here we review recent progress made towards the understanding the regulation of AMPAR trafficking, focusing on the roles of several key intracellular AMPAR interacting proteins. PMID:22217700

  14. Routes, destinations and delays: recent advances in AMPA receptor trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Henley, Jeremy M.; Barker, Ellen A.; Glebov, Oleg O.

    2012-01-01

    Postsynaptic AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) mediate most fast excitatory synaptic transmission and are crucial for many aspects of brain function, including learning, memory and cognition. The number, synaptic localization and subunit composition of synaptic AMPARs are tightly regulated by network activity and by the history of activity at individual synapses. Furthermore, aberrant AMPAR trafficking is implicated in neurodegenerative diseases. AMPARs therefore represent a prime target for drug development and the mechanisms that control their synaptic delivery, retention and removal are the subject of extensive research. Here, we review recent findings that have provided new insights into AMPAR trafficking and that might lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:21420743

  15. Synaptic AMPA receptor composition in development, plasticity and disease.

    PubMed

    Henley, Jeremy M; Wilkinson, Kevin A

    2016-06-01

    AMPA receptors (AMPARs) are assemblies of four core subunits, GluA1-4, that mediate most fast excitatory neurotransmission. The component subunits determine the functional properties of AMPARs, and the prevailing view is that the subunit composition also determines AMPAR trafficking, which is dynamically regulated during development, synaptic plasticity and in response to neuronal stress in disease. Recently, the subunit dependence of AMPAR trafficking has been questioned, leading to a reappraisal of this field. In this Review, we discuss what is known, uncertain, conjectured and unknown about the roles of the individual subunits, and how they affect AMPAR assembly, trafficking and function under both normal and pathological conditions. PMID:27080385

  16. [Glutamatergic neurotransmitter system in regulation of the gastrointestinal tract motor activity].

    PubMed

    Alekseeva, E V; Popova, T S; Sal'nikov, P S

    2015-01-01

    The review include actual facts, demonstrating high probability of glutamatergic neurotransmitter system role in the regulation of the gastrointestinal tract motor activity. These facts suggest significant role of the glutamatergic neurotransmitter system dysfunction in forming motor activity disorders of the digestive tract, including in patients in critical condition. The analysis is based on results of multiple experimental and clinical researches of glutamic acid and other components of the glutamatergic neurotransmitter system in central nervous system and autonomic nervous system (with the accent on the enteral nervous system) in normal conditions and with functioning changes of the glutamatergic neurotransmitter system in case of inflammation, hupoxia, stress and in critical condition. PMID:26852608

  17. Target- and input-dependent organization of AMPA and NMDA receptors in synaptic connections of the cochlear nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, María E.; Fukazawa, Yugo; Kamasawa, Naomi; Clarkson, Cheryl; Molnár, Elek; Shigemoto, Ryuichi

    2014-01-01

    We examined the synaptic structure, quantity and distribution of AMPA- and NMDA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs and NMDARs, respectively) in rat cochlear nuclei by a highly sensitive freeze-fracture replica labeling technique. Four excitatory synapses formed by two distinct inputs, auditory nerve (AN) and parallel fibers (PF), on different cell types were analyzed. These excitatory synapse types included AN synapses on bushy cells (AN-BC synapses) and fusiform cells (AN-FC synapses) and PF synapses on FC (PF-FC synapses) and cartwheel cell spines (PF-CwC synapses). Immunogold labeling revealed differences in synaptic structure as well as AMPAR and NMDAR number and/or density in both AN and PF synapses, indicating a target-dependent organization. The immunogold receptor labeling also identified differences in the synaptic organization of FCs based on AN or PF connections, indicating an input-dependent organization in FCs. Among the four excitatory synapse types, the AN-BC synapses were the smallest and had the most densely packed IMPs, whereas the PF-CwC synapses were the largest and had sparsely-packed IMPs. All four synapse types showed positive correlations between the IMP-cluster area and the AMPAR number, indicating a common intra-synapse-type relationship for glutamatergic synapses. Immunogold particles for AMPARs were distributed over the entire area of individual AN synapses, PF synapses often showed synaptic areas devoid of labeling. The gold-labeling for NMDARs occurred in a mosaic fashion, with less positive correlations between the IMP-cluster area and the NMDAR number. Our observations reveal target- and input-dependent features in the structure, number, and organization of AMPARs and NMDARs in AN and PF synapses. PMID:25041792

  18. Episodic sucrose intake during food restriction increases synaptic abundance of AMPA receptors in nucleus accumbens and augments intake of sucrose following restoration of ad libitum feeding.

    PubMed

    Peng, X-X; Lister, A; Rabinowitsch, A; Kolaric, R; Cabeza de Vaca, S; Ziff, E B; Carr, K D

    2015-06-01

    Weight-loss dieting often leads to loss of control, rebound weight gain, and is a risk factor for binge pathology. Based on findings that food restriction (FR) upregulates sucrose-induced trafficking of glutamatergic AMPA receptors to the nucleus accumbens (NAc) postsynaptic density (PSD), this study was an initial test of the hypothesis that episodic "breakthrough" intake of forbidden food during dieting interacts with upregulated mechanisms of synaptic plasticity to increase reward-driven feeding. Ad libitum (AL) fed and FR subjects consumed a limited amount of 10% sucrose, or had access to water, every other day for 10 occasions. Beginning three weeks after return of FR rats to AL feeding, when 24-h chow intake and rate of body weight gain had normalized, subjects with a history of sucrose intake during FR consumed more sucrose during a four week intermittent access protocol than the two AL groups and the group that had access to water during FR. In an experiment that substituted noncontingent administration of d-amphetamine for sucrose, FR subjects displayed an enhanced locomotor response during active FR but a blunted response, relative to AL subjects, during recovery from FR. This result suggests that the enduring increase in sucrose consumption is unlikely to be explained by residual enhancing effects of FR on dopamine signaling. In a biochemical experiment which paralleled the sucrose behavioral experiment, rats with a history of sucrose intake during FR displayed increased abundance of pSer845-GluA1, GluA2, and GluA3 in the NAc PSD relative to rats with a history of FR without sucrose access and rats that had been AL throughout, whether they had a history of episodic sucrose intake or not. A history of FR, with or without a history of sucrose intake, was associated with increased abundance of GluA1. A terminal 15-min bout of sucrose intake produced a further increase in pSer845-GluA1 and GluA2 in subjects with a history of sucrose intake during FR

  19. Antidepressant Effects of AMPA and Ketamine Combination: Role of Hippocampal BDNF, Synapsin, and mTOR

    PubMed Central

    Akinfiresoye, Luli; Tizabi, Yousef

    2013-01-01

    Rationale A number of preclinical and clinical studies suggest ketamine, a glutamate NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptor antagonist, has a rapid and lasting antidepressant effect when administered either acutely or chronically. It has been postulated that this effect is due to stimulation of AMPA (alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl–4-isoxazolepropionic acid) receptors. Objective In this study, we tested whether AMPA alone has an antidepressant effect and if the combination of AMPA and ketamine provides added benefit in Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats, a putative animal model of depression. Results Chronic AMPA treatment resulted in a dose dependent antidepressant effect in both the forced swim test (FST) and sucrose preference test. Moreover, chronic administration (10–11d) of combinations of AMPA and ketamine, at doses that were ineffective on their own, resulted in a significant antidepressant effect. The behavioral effects were associated with increases in hippocampal brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), synapsin, and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Conclusion These findings are the first to provide evidence for an antidepressant effect of AMPA, and suggest the usefulness of AMPA-ketamine combination in treatment of depression. Furthermore, these effects appear to be associated with increases in markers of hippocampal neurogenesis and synaptogenesis, suggesting a mechanism of their action. PMID:23732839

  20. Interaction with the unfolded protein response reveals a role for stargazin in biosynthetic AMPA receptor transport.

    PubMed

    Vandenberghe, Wim; Nicoll, Roger A; Bredt, David S

    2005-02-01

    The transmembrane protein stargazin enhances levels of functional AMPA receptors at the neuronal plasma membrane and at synapses. To clarify the mechanism for this effect, we studied trafficking of the AMPA receptor subunit glutamate receptor 1 (GluR1) in transfected COS7 cells. GluR1 expressed poorly on the surface of these cells and was primarily retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Stargazin expression strongly increased the surface fraction of GluR1. This effect was not reduced by a dominant-negative dynamin mutant, suggesting that stargazin does not inhibit AMPA receptor endocytosis. Interestingly, upregulation of ER chaperones as part of the unfolded protein response (UPR) both mimicked and occluded the effect of stargazin, suggesting a role for stargazin in ER processing of AMPA receptors. Consistent with this idea, we detected UPR induction in cerebellar granule cells lacking stargazin. Finally, residual AMPA receptor currents in stargazin-deficient neurons were suppressed by inhibition of the UPR. These findings uncover a role for stargazin in AMPA receptor trafficking through the early compartments of the biosynthetic pathway. Furthermore, they provide evidence for modulation of AMPA receptor trafficking by the UPR. PMID:15689545

  1. Urban contributions of glyphosate and its degradate AMPA to streams in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolpin, D.W.; Thurman, E.M.; Lee, E.A.; Meyer, M.T.; Furlong, E.T.; Glassmeyer, S.T.

    2006-01-01

    Glyphosate is the most widely used herbicide in the world, being routinely applied to control weeds in both agricultural and urban settings. Microbial degradation of glyphosate produces aminomethyl phosphonic acid (AMPA). The high polarity and water-solubility of glyphosate and AMPA has, until recently, made their analysis in water samples problematic. Thus, compared to other herbicides (e.g. atrazine) there are relatively few studies on the environmental occurrence of glyphosate and AMPA. In 2002, treated effluent samples were collected from 10 wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) to study the occurrence of glyphosate and AMPA. Stream samples were collected upstream and downstream of the 10 WWTPs. Two reference streams were also sampled. The results document the apparent contribution of WWTP effluent to stream concentrations of glyphosate and AMPA, with roughly a two-fold increase in their frequencies of detection between stream samples collected upstream and those collected downstream of the WWTPs. Thus, urban use of glyphosate contributes to glyphosate and AMPA concentrations in streams in the United States. Overall, AMPA was detected much more frequently (67.5%) compared to glyphosate (17.5%).

  2. Glutamatergic treatment strategies for age-related memory disorders.

    PubMed

    Müller, W E; Scheuer, K; Stoll, S

    1994-01-01

    Age-related changes of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors have been found in cortical areas and in the hippocampus of many species. On the basis of a variety of experimental observations it has been suggested that the decrease of NMDA receptor density might be one of the causative factors of the cognitive decline with aging. Based on these findings several strategies have been developed to improve cognition by compensating the NMDA receptor deficits in aging. The most promising approaches are the indirect activation of glutamatergic neurotransmission by agonists of the glycine site or the restoration of the age-related deficit of receptor density by several nootropics. PMID:7997073

  3. Differential regulation of neurexin at glutamatergic and GABAergic synapses

    PubMed Central

    Pregno, Giulia; Frola, Elena; Graziano, Stefania; Patrizi, Annarita; Bussolino, Federico; Arese, Marco; Sassoè-Pognetto, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Neurexins (Nrxs) have emerged as potential determinants of synaptic specificity, but little is known about their localization at central synapses. Here we show that Nrxs have a remarkably selective localization at distinct types of glutamatergic synapses and we reveal an unexpected ontogenetic regulation of Nrx expression at GABAergic synapses. Our data indicate that synapses are specified by molecular interactions that involve both Nrx-dependent and Nrx-independent mechanisms. We propose that differences in the spatio-temporal profile of Nrx expression may contribute to specify the molecular identity of synapses. PMID:23576952

  4. Lateral Hypothalamic Area Glutamatergic Neurons and Their Projections to the Lateral Habenula Regulate Feeding and Reward

    PubMed Central

    Stamatakis, Alice M.; Van Swieten, Maaike; Basiri, Marcus L.; Blair, Grace A.; Kantak, Pranish

    2016-01-01

    The overconsumption of calorically dense, highly palatable foods is thought to be a major contributor to the worldwide obesity epidemic; however, the precise neural circuits that directly regulate hedonic feeding remain elusive. Here, we show that lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) glutamatergic neurons, and their projections to the lateral habenula (LHb), negatively regulate the consumption of palatable food. Genetic ablation of LHA glutamatergic neurons increased daily caloric intake and produced weight gain in mice that had access to a high-fat diet, while not altering general locomotor activity. Anterior LHA glutamatergic neurons send a functional glutamatergic projection to the LHb, a brain region involved in processing aversive stimuli and negative reward prediction outcomes. Pathway-specific, optogenetic stimulation of glutamatergic LHA-LHb circuit resulted in detectable glutamate-mediated EPSCs as well as GABA-mediated IPSCs, although the net effect of neurotransmitter release was to increase the firing of most LHb neurons. In vivo optogenetic inhibition of LHA-LHb glutamatergic fibers produced a real-time place preference, whereas optogenetic stimulation of LHA-LHb glutamatergic fibers had the opposite effect. Furthermore, optogenetic inhibition of LHA-LHb glutamatergic fibers acutely increased the consumption of a palatable liquid caloric reward. Collectively, these results demonstrate that LHA glutamatergic neurons are well situated to bidirectionally regulate feeding and potentially other behavioral states via their functional circuit connectivity with the LHb and potentially other brain regions. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In this study, we show that the genetic ablation of LHA glutamatergic neurons enhances caloric intake. Some of these LHA glutamatergic neurons project to the lateral habenula, a brain area important for generating behavioral avoidance. Optogenetic stimulation of this circuit has net excitatory effects on postsynaptic LHb neurons. This is the

  5. Glutamatergic Model Psychoses: Prediction Error, Learning, and Inference

    PubMed Central

    Corlett, Philip R; Honey, Garry D; Krystal, John H; Fletcher, Paul C

    2011-01-01

    Modulating glutamatergic neurotransmission induces alterations in conscious experience that mimic the symptoms of early psychotic illness. We review studies that use intravenous administration of ketamine, focusing on interindividual variability in the profundity of the ketamine experience. We will consider this individual variability within a hypothetical model of brain and cognitive function centered upon learning and inference. Within this model, the brains, neural systems, and even single neurons specify expectations about their inputs and responding to violations of those expectations with new learning that renders future inputs more predictable. We argue that ketamine temporarily deranges this ability by perturbing both the ways in which prior expectations are specified and the ways in which expectancy violations are signaled. We suggest that the former effect is predominantly mediated by NMDA blockade and the latter by augmented and inappropriate feedforward glutamatergic signaling. We suggest that the observed interindividual variability emerges from individual differences in neural circuits that normally underpin the learning and inference processes described. The exact source for that variability is uncertain, although it is likely to arise not only from genetic variation but also from subjects' previous experiences and prior learning. Furthermore, we argue that chronic, unlike acute, NMDA blockade alters the specification of expectancies more profoundly and permanently. Scrutinizing individual differences in the effects of acute and chronic ketamine administration in the context of the Bayesian brain model may generate new insights about the symptoms of psychosis; their underlying cognitive processes and neurocircuitry. PMID:20861831

  6. New medications for drug addiction hiding in glutamatergic neuroplasticity.

    PubMed

    Kalivas, P W; Volkow, N D

    2011-10-01

    The repeated use of drugs that directly or indirectly stimulate dopamine transmission carry addiction liability and produce enduring pathological changes in the brain circuitry that normally regulates adaptive behavioral responding to a changing environment. This circuitry is rich in glutamatergic projections, and addiction-related behaviors in animal models have been linked to impairments in excitatory synaptic plasticity. Among the best-characterized glutamatergic projection in this circuit is the prefrontal efferent to the nucleus accumbens. A variety of molecular adaptations have been identified in the prefrontal glutamate synapses in the accumbens, many of which are induced by different classes of addictive drugs. Based largely on work with cocaine, we hypothesize that the drug-induced adaptations impair synaptic plasticity in the cortico-accumbens projection, and thereby dysregulate the ability of addicts to control their drug-taking habits. Accordingly, we go on to describe the literature implicating the drug-induced changes in protein content or function that impinge upon synaptic plasticity and have been targeted in preclinical models of relapse and, in some cases, in pilot clinical trials. Based upon modeling drug-induced impairments in neuroplasticity in the cortico-accumbens pathway, we argue for a concerted effort to clinically evaluate the hypothesis that targeting glial and neuronal proteins regulating excitatory synaptic plasticity may prove beneficial in treating addiction. PMID:21519339

  7. Glutamatergic dysfunctioning in Alzheimer's disease and related therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Zádori, Dénes; Veres, Gábor; Szalárdy, Levente; Klivényi, Péter; Toldi, József; Vécsei, László

    2014-01-01

    The impairment of glutamatergic neurotransmission plays an important role in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The pathological process, which involves the production of amyloid-β peptides and hyperphosphorylated tau proteins, spreads over well-delineated neuroanatomical circuits. The gradual deterioration of proper synaptic functioning (via GluN2A-containing N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, NMDARs) and the development of excitotoxicity (via GluN2B-containing NMDARs) in these structures both accompany the disease pathogenesis. Although one of the most important therapeutic targets would be glutamate excitotoxicity, the application of conventional anti-glutamatergic agents could result in further deterioration of synaptic transmission and intolerable side-effects. With regard to NMDAR antagonists with tolerable side-effects, ion channel blockers with low affinity, glycine site agents, and specific antagonists of polyamine site and GluN2B subunit may come into play. However, in the mirror of experimental data, only the application of ion channel blockers with pronounced voltage dependency, low affinity, and rapid unblocking kinetics (e.g., memantine) and specific antagonists of the GluN2B subunit (e.g., ifenprodil and certain kynurenic acid amides) resulted in desirable symptom amelioration. Therefore we propose that these kinds of chemical agents may have therapeutic potential for present and future drug development. PMID:24670398

  8. New medications for drug addiction hiding in glutamatergic neuroplasticity

    PubMed Central

    Kalivas, PW; Volkow, ND

    2011-01-01

    The repeated use of drugs that directly or indirectly stimulate dopamine transmission carry addiction liability and produce enduring pathological changes in the brain circuitry that normally regulates adaptive behavioral responding to a changing environment. This circuitry is rich in glutamatergic projections, and addiction-related behaviors in animal models have been linked to impairments in excitatory synaptic plasticity. Among the best-characterized glutamatergic projection in this circuit is the prefrontal efferent to the nucleus accumbens. A variety of molecular adaptations have been identified in the prefrontal glutamate synapses in the accumbens, many of which are induced by different classes of addictive drugs. Based largely on work with cocaine, we hypothesize that the drug-induced adaptations impair synaptic plasticity in the cortico-accumbens projection, and thereby dysregulate the ability of addicts to control their drug-taking habits. Accordingly, we go on to describe the literature implicating the drug-induced changes in protein content or function that impinge upon synaptic plasticity and have been targeted in preclinical models of relapse and, in some cases, in pilot clinical trials. Based upon modeling drug-induced impairments in neuroplasticity in the cortico-accumbens pathway, we argue for a concerted effort to clinically evaluate the hypothesis that targeting glial and neuronal proteins regulating excitatory synaptic plasticity may prove beneficial in treating addiction. PMID:21519339

  9. Glia plasma membrane transporters: Key players in glutamatergic neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Flores-Méndez, Marco; Mendez-Flores, Orquidia G; Ortega, Arturo

    2016-09-01

    Glutamate, the main excitatory amino acid in the central nervous system, elicits its functions through the activation of specific membrane receptors that are expressed in neurons and glial cells. The re-cycling of this amino acid is carried out mostly through a continuous interplay between neurons and glia cells, given the fact that the removal of glutamate from the synaptic cleft depends mainly on glial glutamate transporters. Therefore, a functional and physical interaction between membrane transporters links glutamate uptake, transformation to glutamine and its release to the extra-synaptic space and its uptake to the pre-synaptic terminal. This sequence of events, best known as the glutamate/glutamine shuttle is central to glutamatergic transmission. In this sense, the uptake process triggers a complex series of biochemical cascades that modify the physiology of glial cells in the immediate, short and long term so as to be capable to take up, transform and release these amino acids in a regulated amount and in an appropriate time frame to sustain glutamatergic neurotransmission. Among the signaling cascades activated in glial cells by glutamate transporters, a sustained Na(+) and Ca(2+) influx, protein posttranslational modifications and gene expression regulation at the transcriptional and translational levels are present. Therefore, it is clear that the pivotal role of glial cells in the context of excitatory transmission has been constantly underestimated. PMID:27083407

  10. [The role of the glutamatergic system in alcohol addiction].

    PubMed

    Spanagel, R

    2003-07-01

    New animal models have been developed which mimic several aspects of alcoholism. These models provide the basis to study the neurobiological mechanisms of "addicted behaviour". At least two different neurobiological pathways which are involved in the development and maintenance of addicted behaviour have been identified. The first pathway involves the opioidergic system and probably the mesolimbic dopaminergic system and may induce alcohol craving and relapse due to the mood enhancing, positive reinforcing effects of alcohol consumption. A second pathway involves several components of the glutamatergic system (in particular NMDA receptors) and may induce alcohol craving and relapse by negative motivational states including withdrawal and stress. In particular conditioned withdrawal and stress-induced relapse are mediated by a hypertrophic glutamatergic system. Thus it has recently been shown that the NMDA receptor modulator acamprosate inhibits conditioned abstinence behaviour in rats. Although more systematic work is needed to fully define these different neurobiological pathways involved in addicted behaviour, preclinical studies have identified low affinity non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonists as a novel potential generation of anti-relapse compounds and clinical studies have already been initiated in order to test these compounds in alcoholic patients. PMID:12947541

  11. More sensitivity of cortical GABAergic neurons than glutamatergic neurons in response to acidosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hua; Li, Fang; Wang, Chunyan; Su, Zhiqiang

    2016-05-25

    Acidosis impairs brain functions. Neuron-specific mechanisms underlying acidosis-induced brain dysfunction remain elusive. We studied the sensitivity of cortical GABAergic neurons and glutamatergic neurons to acidosis by whole-cell recording in brain slices. The acidification to the neurons was induced by perfusing artificial cerebral spinal fluid with lower pH. This acidification impairs excitability and synaptic transmission in the glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons. Acidosis impairs spiking capacity in the GABAergic neurons more than in the glutamatergic neurons. Acidosis also strengthens glutamatergic synaptic transmission and attenuates GABAergic synaptic transmission on the GABAergic neurons more than the glutamatergic neurons, which results in the functional impairment of these GABAergic neurons. This acidosis-induced dysfunction predominantly in the cortical GABAergic neurons drives the homeostasis of neuronal networks toward overexcitation and exacerbates neuronal impairment. PMID:27116702

  12. Hippocampal Fast Glutamatergic Transmission Is Transiently Regulated by Corticosterone Pulsatility.

    PubMed

    Sarabdjitsingh, R Angela; Pasricha, Natasha; Smeets, Johanna A S; Kerkhofs, Amber; Mikasova, Lenka; Karst, Henk; Groc, Laurent; Joëls, Marian

    2016-01-01

    In recent years it has become clear that corticosteroid hormones (such as corticosterone) are released in ultradian pulses as a natural consequence of pituitary-adrenal interactions. All organs, including the brain, are thus exposed to pulsatile changes in corticosteroid hormone level, important to ensure full genomic responsiveness to stress-induced surges. However, corticosterone also changes neuronal excitability through rapid non-genomic pathways, particularly in the hippocampus. Potentially, background excitability of hippocampal neurons could thus be changed by pulsatile exposure to corticosteroids. It is currently unknown, though, how neuronal activity alters during a sequence of corticosterone pulses. To test this, hippocampal cells were exposed in vitro to four consecutive corticosterone pulses with a 60 min inter-pulse interval. During the pulses we examined four features of hippocampal signal transfer by the main excitatory transmitter glutamate-i.e., postsynaptic responses to spontaneous release of presynaptic vesicles, postsynaptic GluA2-AMPA receptor dynamics, basal (evoked) field responses, and synaptic plasticity, using a set of high resolution imaging and electrophysiological approaches. We show that the first pulse of corticosterone causes a transient increase in miniature EPSC frequency, AMPA receptor trafficking and synaptic plasticity, while basal evoked field responses are unaffected. This pattern is not maintained during subsequent applications: responses become more variable, attenuate or even reverse over time, albeit with different kinetics for the various experimental endpoints. This may indicate that the beneficial effect of ultradian pulses on transcriptional regulation in the hippocampus is not consistently accompanied by short-term perturbations in background excitability. In general, this could be interpreted as a means to keep hippocampal neurons responsive to incoming signals related to environmental challenges. PMID:26741493

  13. Hippocampal Fast Glutamatergic Transmission Is Transiently Regulated by Corticosterone Pulsatility

    PubMed Central

    Smeets, Johanna A. S.; Kerkhofs, Amber; Mikasova, Lenka; Karst, Henk; Groc, Laurent; Joëls, Marian

    2016-01-01

    In recent years it has become clear that corticosteroid hormones (such as corticosterone) are released in ultradian pulses as a natural consequence of pituitary-adrenal interactions. All organs, including the brain, are thus exposed to pulsatile changes in corticosteroid hormone level, important to ensure full genomic responsiveness to stress-induced surges. However, corticosterone also changes neuronal excitability through rapid non-genomic pathways, particularly in the hippocampus. Potentially, background excitability of hippocampal neurons could thus be changed by pulsatile exposure to corticosteroids. It is currently unknown, though, how neuronal activity alters during a sequence of corticosterone pulses. To test this, hippocampal cells were exposed in vitro to four consecutive corticosterone pulses with a 60 min inter-pulse interval. During the pulses we examined four features of hippocampal signal transfer by the main excitatory transmitter glutamate—i.e., postsynaptic responses to spontaneous release of presynaptic vesicles, postsynaptic GluA2-AMPA receptor dynamics, basal (evoked) field responses, and synaptic plasticity, using a set of high resolution imaging and electrophysiological approaches. We show that the first pulse of corticosterone causes a transient increase in miniature EPSC frequency, AMPA receptor trafficking and synaptic plasticity, while basal evoked field responses are unaffected. This pattern is not maintained during subsequent applications: responses become more variable, attenuate or even reverse over time, albeit with different kinetics for the various experimental endpoints. This may indicate that the beneficial effect of ultradian pulses on transcriptional regulation in the hippocampus is not consistently accompanied by short-term perturbations in background excitability. In general, this could be interpreted as a means to keep hippocampal neurons responsive to incoming signals related to environmental challenges. PMID:26741493

  14. Calcium-Permeable AMPA Receptors in the Retina

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, Jeffrey S.

    2011-01-01

    The retina transforms light entering the eye into a sophisticated neural representation of our visual world. Specialized synapses, cells, and circuits in the retina have evolved to encode luminance, contrast, motion, and other complex visual features. Although a great deal has been learned about the cellular morphology and circuitry that underlies this image processing, many of the synapses in the retina remain incompletely understood. For example, excitatory synapses in the retina feature the full panoply of glutamate receptors, but in most cases specific roles for different receptor subtypes are unclear. In this brief review, I will discuss recent progress toward understanding how Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors (CP-GluARs) contribute to synaptic transmission and newly discovered forms of synaptic plasticity in the retina. PMID:21991245

  15. AMPA RECEPTOR POTENTIATORS: FROM DRUG DESIGN TO COGNITIVE ENHANCEMENT

    PubMed Central

    PARTIN, KATHRYN M.

    2014-01-01

    Positive allosteric modulators of ionotropic glutamate receptors have emerged as a target for treating cognitive impairment and neurodegeneration, but also mental illnesses such as major depressive disorder. The possibility of creating a new class of pharmaceutical agent to treat refractive mental health issues has compelled researchers to redouble their efforts to develop a safe, effective treatment for memory and cognition impairments. Coupled with the more robust research methodologies that have emerged, including more sophisticated high-throughput-screens, higher resolution structural biology techniques, and more focused assessment on pharmacokinetics, the development of positive modulators of AMPA receptors holds great promise. We describe recent approaches that improve our understanding of the basic physiology underlying memory and cognition, and their application towards promoting human health. PMID:25462292

  16. Cyclin Y inhibits plasticity-induced AMPA receptor exocytosis and LTP

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eunsil; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Hur, Young-Na; Whitcomb, Daniel J.; Regan, Philip; Hong, Jung-Hwa; Kim, Hanna; Ho Suh, Young; Cho, Kwangwook; Park, Mikyoung

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin Y (CCNY) is a member of the cyclin protein family, known to regulate cell division in proliferating cells. Interestingly, CCNY is expressed in neurons that do not undergo cell division. Here, we report that CCNY negatively regulates long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic strength through inhibition of AMPA receptor trafficking. CCNY is enriched in postsynaptic fractions from rat forebrain and is localized adjacent to postsynaptic sites in dendritic spines in rat hippocampal neurons. Using live-cell imaging of a pH-sensitive AMPA receptor, we found that during LTP-inducing stimulation, CCNY inhibits AMPA receptor exocytosis in dendritic spines. Furthermore, CCNY abolishes LTP in hippocampal slices. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that CCNY inhibits plasticity-induced AMPA receptor delivery to synapses and thereby blocks LTP, identifying a novel function for CCNY in post-mitotic cells. PMID:26220330

  17. Toxicity of AMPA to the earthworm Eisenia andrei Bouché, 1972 in tropical artificial soil.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Anahí; Brown, George Gardner; Sautter, Klaus Dieter; de Oliveira, Cintia Mara Ribas; de Vasconcelos, Eliane Carvalho; Niva, Cintia Carla; Bartz, Marie Luise Carolina; Bedano, José Camilo

    2016-01-01

    Aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) - one of glyphosate's main metabolites - has been classified as persistent in soils, raising concern regarding the widespread use of glyphosate in agriculture and forestry. Glyphosate may have negative or neutral effects on soil biota, but no information is available on the toxicity of AMPA to soil invertebrates. Therefore our aim was to study the effect of AMPA on mortality and reproduction of the earthworm species Eisenia andrei using standard soil ecotoxicological methods (ISO). Field-relevant concentrations of AMPA had no significant effects on mortality in acute or chronic assays. Except at the highest concentration tested, a significant biomass loss was observed compared to controls in the chronic assay. The number of juveniles and cocoons increased with higher concentrations of AMPA applied, but their mean weights decreased. This mass loss indicates higher sensitivity of juveniles than adults to AMPA. Our results suggest that earthworms coming from parents grown in contaminated soils may have reduced growth, limiting their beneficial roles in key soil ecosystem functions. Nevertheless, further research is needed to better understand the mechanisms underlying the sublethal effects observed here. PMID:26792548

  18. Toxicity of AMPA to the earthworm Eisenia andrei Bouché, 1972 in tropical artificial soil

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez, Anahí; Brown, George Gardner; Sautter, Klaus Dieter; Ribas de Oliveira, Cintia Mara; de Vasconcelos, Eliane Carvalho; Niva, Cintia Carla; Bartz, Marie Luise Carolina; Bedano, José Camilo

    2016-01-01

    Aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) - one of glyphosate’s main metabolites - has been classified as persistent in soils, raising concern regarding the widespread use of glyphosate in agriculture and forestry. Glyphosate may have negative or neutral effects on soil biota, but no information is available on the toxicity of AMPA to soil invertebrates. Therefore our aim was to study the effect of AMPA on mortality and reproduction of the earthworm species Eisenia andrei using standard soil ecotoxicological methods (ISO). Field-relevant concentrations of AMPA had no significant effects on mortality in acute or chronic assays. Except at the highest concentration tested, a significant biomass loss was observed compared to controls in the chronic assay. The number of juveniles and cocoons increased with higher concentrations of AMPA applied, but their mean weights decreased. This mass loss indicates higher sensitivity of juveniles than adults to AMPA. Our results suggest that earthworms coming from parents grown in contaminated soils may have reduced growth, limiting their beneficial roles in key soil ecosystem functions. Nevertheless, further research is needed to better understand the mechanisms underlying the sublethal effects observed here. PMID:26792548

  19. Differential effects of glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) on photosynthesis and chlorophyll metabolism in willow plants.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Marcelo Pedrosa; Le Manac'h, Sarah Gingras; Maccario, Sophie; Labrecque, Michel; Lucotte, Marc; Juneau, Philippe

    2016-06-01

    We used a willow species (Salix miyabeana cultivar SX64) to examine the differential secondary-effects of glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA), the principal glyphosate by-product, on chlorophyll metabolism and photosynthesis. Willow plants were treated with different concentrations of glyphosate (equivalent to 0, 1.4, 2.1 and 2.8kgha(-1)) and AMPA (equivalent to 0, 0.28, 1.4 and 2.8kgha(-1)) and evaluations of pigment contents, chlorophyll fluorescence, and oxidative stress markers (hydrogen peroxide content and antioxidant enzyme activities) in leaves were performed after 12h of exposure. We observed that AMPA and glyphosate trigger different mechanisms leading to decreases in chlorophyll content and photosynthesis rates in willow plants. Both chemicals induced ROS accumulation in willow leaves although only glyphosate-induced oxidative damage through lipid peroxidation. By disturbing chlorophyll biosynthesis, AMPA induced decreases in chlorophyll contents, with consequent effects on photosynthesis. With glyphosate, ROS increases were higher than the ROS-sensitive threshold, provoking chlorophyll degradation (as seen by pheophytin accumulation) and invariable decreases in photosynthesis. Peroxide accumulation in both AMPA and glyphosate-treated plants was due to the inhibition of antioxidant enzyme activities. The different effects of glyphosate on chlorophyll contents and photosynthesis as described in the literature may be due to various glyphosate:AMPA ratios in those plants. PMID:27155486

  20. Glutamatergic postsynaptic block by Pamphobeteus spider venoms in crayfish.

    PubMed

    Araque, A; Ferreira, W; Lucas, S; Buño, W

    1992-01-31

    The effects of toxins from venom glands of two south american spiders (Pamphobeteus platyomma and P. soracabae) on glutamatergic excitatory synaptic transmission were studied in the neuromuscular junction of the opener muscle of crayfish. The toxins selectively and reversibly blocked both excitatory postsynaptic currents and potentials in a dose-dependent manner. They also reversibly abolished glutamate-induced postsynaptic membrane depolarization. They had no effect on resting postsynaptic membrane conductance nor on postsynaptic voltage-gated currents. The synaptic facilitation and the frequency of miniature postsynaptic potentials were unaffected by the toxins, indicating that presynaptic events were not modified. Picrotoxin, a selective antagonist of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor, did not modify toxin effects. We conclude that both toxins specifically block the postsynaptic glutamate receptor-channel complex. PMID:1319261

  1. Modulation of Synaptic Plasticity by Glutamatergic Gliotransmission: A Modeling Study

    PubMed Central

    De Pittà, Maurizio; Brunel, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Glutamatergic gliotransmission, that is, the release of glutamate from perisynaptic astrocyte processes in an activity-dependent manner, has emerged as a potentially crucial signaling pathway for regulation of synaptic plasticity, yet its modes of expression and function in vivo remain unclear. Here, we focus on two experimentally well-identified gliotransmitter pathways, (i) modulations of synaptic release and (ii) postsynaptic slow inward currents mediated by glutamate released from astrocytes, and investigate their possible functional relevance on synaptic plasticity in a biophysical model of an astrocyte-regulated synapse. Our model predicts that both pathways could profoundly affect both short- and long-term plasticity. In particular, activity-dependent glutamate release from astrocytes could dramatically change spike-timing-dependent plasticity, turning potentiation into depression (and vice versa) for the same induction protocol. PMID:27195153

  2. ABNORMAL GLUTAMATERGIC NEUROTRANSMISSION AND NEURONALGLIAL INTERACTIONS IN ACUTE MANIA

    PubMed Central

    Öngür, Dost; Jensen, J. Eric; Prescot, Andrew P.; Stork, Caitlin; Lundy, Miriam; Cohen, Bruce M.; Renshaw, Perry F.

    2008-01-01

    Background At excitatory synapses, glutamate released from neurons is taken up by glial cells and converted to glutamine, which is cycled back to neurons. Alterations in this system are believed to play a role in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder, but they have not been characterized in vivo. We examined the glutamine/glutamate ratio, and levels of other metabolites in acute mania and schizophrenia in this exploratory study. Methods Data were obtained from 2×2×2cm voxels in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and parieto-occipital cortex (POC) using 2-dimensional J-resolved proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 4 Tesla, and analyzed using LCModel. Fifteen bipolar disorder patients with acute mania and seventeen schizophrenia patients with acute psychosis were recruited from an inpatient unit; twenty one matched healthy controls were also studied. Glutamine/glutamate ratio and N-acetylaspartate, creatine, choline, and myo-inositol levels were evaluated in a repeated-measures design. Medication effects and relationship to demographic and clinical variables were analyzed. Results Glutamine/glutamate ratio was significantly higher in ACC and POC in bipolar disorder, but not schizophrenia, compared with healthy controls. N-acetylaspartate was significantly lower in the ACC in schizophrenia. Patients on and off lithium, anticonvulsants, or benzodiazepines had similar glutamine/glutamate ratios. Conclusions The elevated glutamine/glutamate ratio is consistent with glutamatergic overactivity and/or defective neuronal-glial coupling in acute mania, although medication effects cannot be ruled out. Abnormalities in glutamatergic neurotransmission and glial cell function in bipolar disorder may represent targets for novel therapeutic interventions. PMID:18602089

  3. Glutamatergic Neurometabolites during Early Abstinence from Chronic Methamphetamine Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Tobias, Marc C.; Hudkins, Matthew; London, Edythe D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The acute phase of abstinence from methamphetamine abuse is critical for rehabilitation success. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy has detected below-normal levels of glutamate+glutamine in anterior middle cingulate of chronic methamphetamine abusers during early abstinence, attributed to abstinence-induced downregulation of the glutamatergic systems in the brain. This study further explored this phenomenon. Methods: We measured glutamate+glutamine in additional cortical regions (midline posterior cingulate, midline precuneus, and bilateral inferior frontal cortex) putatively affected by methamphetamine. We examined the relationship between glutamate+glutamine in each region with duration of methamphetamine abuse as well as the depressive symptoms of early abstinence. Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging was acquired at 1.5 T from a methamphetamine group of 44 adults who had chronically abused methamphetamine and a control group of 23 age-, sex-, and tobacco smoking-matched healthy volunteers. Participants in the methamphetamine group were studied as inpatients during the first week of abstinence from the drug and were not receiving treatment. Results: In the methamphetamine group, small but significant (5–15%, P<.05) decrements (vs control) in glutamate+glutamine were observed in posterior cingulate, precuneus, and right inferior frontal cortex; glutamate+glutamine in posterior cingulate was negatively correlated (P<.05) with years of methamphetamine abuse. The Beck Depression Inventory score was negatively correlated (P<.005) with glutamate+glutamine in right inferior frontal cortex. Conclusions: Our findings support the idea that glutamatergic metabolism is downregulated in early abstinence in multiple cortical regions. The extent of downregulation may vary with length of abuse and may be associated with severity of depressive symptoms emergent in early recovery. PMID:25522400

  4. Inflammatory and Glutamatergic Homeostasis Are Involved in Successful Aging.

    PubMed

    Hascup, Erin R; Wang, Feiya; Kopchick, John J; Bartke, Andrzej

    2016-03-01

    Whole body studies using long-lived growth hormone receptor gene disrupted or knock out (GHR-KO) mice report global GH resistance, increased insulin sensitivity, reduced insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), and cognitive retention in old-age, however, little is known about the neurobiological status of these mice. The aim of this study was to determine if glutamatergic and inflammatory markers that are altered in aging and/or age-related diseases and disorders, are preserved in mice that experience increased healthspan. We examined messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression levels in the brain of 4- to 6-, 8- to 10-, and 20- to 22-month GHR-KO and normal aging control mice. In the hippocampus, glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) and anti-inflammatory nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB)-p50 were elevated in 8- to 10-month GHR-KO mice compared with age-matched controls. In the hypothalamus, NFκB-p50, NFκB-p65, IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R), glutamate/aspartate transporter (GLAST), and 2-amino-3-(5-methyl-3-oxo 2,3-dihydro-1,2 oxazol-4-yl) propanoic acid receptor subunit 1 (GluA1) were elevated in 8- to 10- and/or 20- to 22-month GHR-KO mice when comparing genotypes. Finally, interleukin 1-beta (IL-1β) mRNA was reduced in 4- to 6- and/or 8- to 10-month GHR-KO mice compared with normal littermates in all brain areas examined. These data support the importance of decreased brain inflammation in early adulthood and maintained homeostasis of the glutamatergic and inflammatory systems in extended longevity. PMID:25711529

  5. Glyphosate-Resistant and Conventional Canola (Brassica napus L.) Responses to Glyphosate and Aminomethylphosphonic Acid (AMPA) Treatment.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Elza Alves; Dayan, Franck E; Owens, Daniel K; Rimando, Agnes M; Duke, Stephen O

    2016-05-11

    Glyphosate-resistant (GR) canola contains two transgenes that impart resistance to the herbicide glyphosate: (1) the microbial glyphosate oxidase gene (gox) encoding the glyphosate oxidase enzyme (GOX) that metabolizes glyphosate to aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) and (2) cp4 that encodes a GR form of the glyphosate target enzyme 5-enolpyruvylshikimic acid-3-phosphate synthase. The objectives of this research were to determine the phytotoxicity of AMPA to canola, the relative metabolism of glyphosate to AMPA in GR and conventional non-GR (NGR) canola, and AMPA pool sizes in glyphosate-treated GR canola. AMPA applied at 1.0 kg ha(-1) was not phytotoxic to GR or NGR. At this AMPA application rate, NGR canola accumulated a higher concentration of AMPA in its tissues than GR canola. At rates of 1 and 3.33 kg ae ha(-1) of glyphosate, GR canola growth was stimulated. This stimulatory effect is similar to that of much lower doses of glyphosate on NGR canola. Both shikimate and AMPA accumulated in tissues of these glyphosate-treated plants. In a separate experiment in which young GR and NGR canola plants were treated with non-phytotoxic levels of [(14)C]-glyphosate, very little glyphosate was metabolized in NGR plants, whereas most of the glyphosate was metabolized to AMPA in GR plants at 7 days after application. Untreated leaves of GR plants accumulated only metabolites (mostly AMPA) of glyphosate, indicating that GOX activity is very high in the youngest leaves. These data indicate that more glyphosate is transformed to AMPA rapidly in GR canola and that the accumulated AMPA is not toxic to the canola plant. PMID:27092715

  6. Actin-dependent mechanisms in AMPA receptor trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, Jonathan G.

    2014-01-01

    The precise regulation of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) number and subtype at the synapse is crucial for the regulation of excitatory neurotransmission, synaptic plasticity and the consequent formation of appropriate neural circuits for learning and memory. AMPAR trafficking involves the dynamic processes of exocytosis, endocytosis and endosomal recycling, all of which involve the actin cytoskeleton. The actin cytoskeleton is highly dynamic and highly regulated by an abundance of actin-binding proteins and upstream signaling pathways that modulate actin polymerization and depolymerization. Actin dynamics generate forces that manipulate membranes in the process of vesicle biogenesis, and also for propelling vesicles through the cytoplasm to reach their destination. In addition, trafficking mechanisms exploit more stable aspects of the actin cytoskeleton by using actin-based motor proteins to traffic vesicular cargo along actin filaments. Numerous studies have shown that actin dynamics are critical for AMPAR localization and function. The identification of actin-binding proteins that physically interact with AMPAR subunits, and research into their mode of action is starting to shed light on the mechanisms involved. Such proteins either regulate actin dynamics to modulate mechanical forces exerted on AMPAR-containing membranes, or associate with actin filaments to target or transport AMPAR-containing vesicles to specific subcellular regions. In addition, actin-regulatory proteins that do not physically interact with AMPARs may influence AMPAR trafficking by regulating the local actin environment in the dendritic spine. PMID:25429259

  7. Unified quantitative model of AMPA receptor trafficking at synapses

    PubMed Central

    Czöndör, Katalin; Mondin, Magali; Garcia, Mikael; Heine, Martin; Frischknecht, Renato; Choquet, Daniel; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste; Thoumine, Olivier R.

    2012-01-01

    Trafficking of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) plays a key role in synaptic transmission. However, a general framework integrating the two major mechanisms regulating AMPAR delivery at postsynapses (i.e., surface diffusion and internal recycling) is lacking. To this aim, we built a model based on numerical trajectories of individual AMPARs, including free diffusion in the extrasynaptic space, confinement in the synapse, and trapping at the postsynaptic density (PSD) through reversible interactions with scaffold proteins. The AMPAR/scaffold kinetic rates were adjusted by comparing computer simulations to single-particle tracking and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments in primary neurons, in different conditions of synapse density and maturation. The model predicts that the steady-state AMPAR number at synapses is bidirectionally controlled by AMPAR/scaffold binding affinity and PSD size. To reveal the impact of recycling processes in basal conditions and upon synaptic potentiation or depression, spatially and temporally defined exocytic and endocytic events were introduced. The model predicts that local recycling of AMPARs close to the PSD, coupled to short-range surface diffusion, provides rapid control of AMPAR number at synapses. In contrast, because of long-range diffusion limitations, extrasynaptic recycling is intrinsically slower and less synapse-specific. Thus, by discriminating the relative contributions of AMPAR diffusion, trapping, and recycling events on spatial and temporal bases, this model provides unique insights on the dynamic regulation of synaptic strength. PMID:22331885

  8. Contextual learning requires synaptic AMPA receptor delivery in the hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Mitsushima, Dai; Ishihara, Kouji; Sano, Akane; Kessels, Helmut W.; Takahashi, Takuya

    2011-01-01

    The hippocampus plays a central role in learning and memory. Although synaptic delivery of AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) contributes to experience-dependent synaptic strengthening, its role in hippocampus-dependent learning remains elusive. By combining viral-mediated in vivo gene delivery with in vitro patch-clamp recordings, we found that the inhibitory avoidance task, a hippocampus-dependent contextual fear-learning paradigm, delivered GluR1-containing AMPARs into CA3-CA1 synapses of the dorsal hippocampus. To block the synaptic delivery of endogenous AMPARs, we expressed a fragment of the GluR1-cytoplasmic tail (the 14-aa GluR1 membrane-proximal region with two serines mutated to phospho-mimicking aspartates: MPR-DD). MPR-DD prevented learning-driven synaptic AMPAR delivery in CA1 neurons. Bilateral expression of MPR-DD in the CA1 region of the rat impaired inhibitory avoidance learning, indicating that synaptic GluR1 trafficking in the CA1 region of the hippocampus is required for encoding contextual fear memories. The fraction of CA1 neurons that underwent synaptic strengthening positively correlated with the performance in the inhibitory avoidance fear memory task. These data suggest that the robustness of a contextual memory depends on the number of hippocampal neurons that participate in the encoding of a memory trace. PMID:21746893

  9. AMPA receptor regulation during synaptic plasticity in hippocampus and neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hey-Kyoung; Kirkwood, Alfredo

    2011-01-01

    Discovery of long-term potentiation (LTP) in the dentate gyrus of the rabbit hippocampus by Bliss and Lømo opened up a whole new field to study activity-dependent long-term synaptic modifications in the brain. Since then hippocampal synapses have been a key model system to study the mechanisms of different forms of synaptic plasticity. At least for the postsynaptic forms of LTP and long-term depression (LTD), regulation of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) has emerged as a key mechanism. While many of the synaptic plasticity mechanisms uncovered in at the hippocampal synapses apply to synapses across diverse brain regions, there are differences in the mechanisms that often reveal the specific functional requirements of the brain area under study. Here we will review AMPAR regulation underlying synaptic plasticity in hippocampus and neocortex. The main focus of this review will be placed on postsynaptic forms of synaptic plasticity that impinge on the regulation of AMPARs using hippocampal CA1 and primary sensory cortices as examples. And through the comparison, we will highlight the key similarities and functional differences between the two synapses. PMID:21856433

  10. Structure and organization of heteromeric AMPA-type glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Herguedas, Beatriz; García-Nafría, Javier; Cais, Ondrej; Fernández-Leiro, Rafael; Krieger, James; Ho, Hinze; Greger, Ingo H

    2016-04-29

    AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs), which are central mediators of rapid neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity, predominantly exist as heteromers of the subunits GluA1 to GluA4. Here we report the first AMPAR heteromer structures, which deviate substantially from existing GluA2 homomer structures. Crystal structures of the GluA2/3 and GluA2/4 N-terminal domains reveal a novel compact conformation with an alternating arrangement of the four subunits around a central axis. This organization is confirmed by cysteine cross-linking in full-length receptors, and it permitted us to determine the structure of an intact GluA2/3 receptor by cryogenic electron microscopy. Two models in the ligand-free state, at resolutions of 8.25 and 10.3 angstroms, exhibit substantial vertical compression and close associations between domain layers, reminiscent of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. Model 1 resembles a resting state and model 2 a desensitized state, thus providing snapshots of gating transitions in the nominal absence of ligand. Our data reveal organizational features of heteromeric AMPARs and provide a framework to decipher AMPAR architecture and signaling. PMID:26966189

  11. PACSIN1 regulates the dynamics of AMPA receptor trafficking.

    PubMed

    Widagdo, Jocelyn; Fang, Huaqiang; Jang, Se Eun; Anggono, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic trafficking of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) into and out of synapses plays an important role in synaptic plasticity. We previously reported that the protein kinase C and casein kinase II substrate in neurons (PACSIN) forms a complex with AMPARs through its interaction with the protein interacting with C-kinase 1 (PICK1) to regulate NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-induced AMPAR endocytosis and cerebellar long-term depression. However, the molecular mechanism by which PACSIN regulates the dynamics of AMPAR trafficking remains unclear. Using a pH-sensitive green fluorescent protein, pHluorin, tagged to the extracellular domain of the GluA2 subunit of AMPARs, we demonstrate dual roles for PACSIN1 in controlling the internalization and recycling of GluA2 after NMDAR activation. Structure and function analysis reveals a requirement for the PACSIN1 F-BAR and SH3 domains in controlling these NMDAR-dependent processes. Interestingly, the variable region, which binds to PICK1, is not essential for NMDAR-dependent GluA2 internalization and is required only for the correct recycling of AMPARs. These results indicate that PACSIN is a versatile membrane deformation protein that links the endocytic and recycling machineries essential for dynamic AMPAR trafficking in neurons. PMID:27488904

  12. PACSIN1 regulates the dynamics of AMPA receptor trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Widagdo, Jocelyn; Fang, Huaqiang; Jang, Se Eun; Anggono, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic trafficking of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) into and out of synapses plays an important role in synaptic plasticity. We previously reported that the protein kinase C and casein kinase II substrate in neurons (PACSIN) forms a complex with AMPARs through its interaction with the protein interacting with C-kinase 1 (PICK1) to regulate NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-induced AMPAR endocytosis and cerebellar long-term depression. However, the molecular mechanism by which PACSIN regulates the dynamics of AMPAR trafficking remains unclear. Using a pH-sensitive green fluorescent protein, pHluorin, tagged to the extracellular domain of the GluA2 subunit of AMPARs, we demonstrate dual roles for PACSIN1 in controlling the internalization and recycling of GluA2 after NMDAR activation. Structure and function analysis reveals a requirement for the PACSIN1 F-BAR and SH3 domains in controlling these NMDAR-dependent processes. Interestingly, the variable region, which binds to PICK1, is not essential for NMDAR-dependent GluA2 internalization and is required only for the correct recycling of AMPARs. These results indicate that PACSIN is a versatile membrane deformation protein that links the endocytic and recycling machineries essential for dynamic AMPAR trafficking in neurons. PMID:27488904

  13. Pathogenic mechanism of an autism-associated neuroligin mutation involves altered AMPA-receptor trafficking.

    PubMed

    Chanda, S; Aoto, J; Lee, S-J; Wernig, M; Südhof, T C

    2016-02-01

    Neuroligins are postsynaptic cell-adhesion molecules that bind to presynaptic neurexins. Although the general synaptic role of neuroligins is undisputed, their specific functions at a synapse remain unclear, even controversial. Moreover, many neuroligin gene mutations were associated with autism, but the pathophysiological relevance of these mutations is often unknown, and their mechanisms of action uninvestigated. Here, we examine the synaptic effects of an autism-associated neuroligin-4 substitution (called R704C), which mutates a cytoplasmic arginine residue that is conserved in all neuroligins. We show that the R704C mutation, when introduced into neuroligin-3, enhances the interaction between neuroligin-3 and AMPA receptors, increases AMPA-receptor internalization and decreases postsynaptic AMPA-receptor levels. When introduced into neuroligin-4, conversely, the R704C mutation unexpectedly elevated AMPA-receptor-mediated synaptic responses. These results suggest a general functional link between neuroligins and AMPA receptors, indicate that both neuroligin-3 and -4 act at excitatory synapses but perform surprisingly distinct functions, and demonstrate that the R704C mutation significantly impairs the normal function of neuroligin-4, thereby validating its pathogenicity. PMID:25778475

  14. Cytosolic PLA2(alpha) activation in Purkinje neurons and its role in AMPA-receptor trafficking.

    PubMed

    Mashimo, Masato; Hirabayashi, Tetsuya; Murayama, Toshihiko; Shimizu, Takao

    2008-09-15

    Cytosolic phospholipase A(2)alpha (cPLA(2)alpha) selectively releases arachidonic acid from membrane phospholipids and has been proposed to be involved in the induction of long-term depression (LTD), a form of synaptic plasticity in the cerebellum. This enzyme requires two events for its full activation: Ca(2+)-dependent translocation from the cytosol to organelle membranes in order to access phospholipids as substrates, and phosphorylation by several kinases. However, the subcellular distribution and activation of cPLA(2)alpha in Purkinje cells and the role of arachidonic acid in cerebellar LTD have not been fully elucidated. In cultured Purkinje cells, stimulation of AMPA receptors, but not metabotropic glutamate receptors, triggered translocation of cPLA(2)alpha to the somatic and dendritic Golgi compartments. This translocation required Ca(2+) influx through P-type Ca(2+) channels. AMPA plus PMA, a chemical method for inducing LTD, released arachidonic acid via phosphorylation of cPLA(2)alpha. AMPA plus PMA induced a decrease in surface GluR2 for more than 2 hours. Interestingly, this reduction was occluded by a cPLA(2)alpha-specific inhibitor. Furthermore, PMA plus arachidonic acid caused the prolonged internalization of GluR2 without activating AMPA receptors. These results suggest that cPLA(2)alpha regulates the persistent decrease in the expression of AMPA receptors, underscoring the role of cPLA(2)alpha in cerebellar LTD. PMID:18713832

  15. Stargazin regulates AMPA receptor trafficking through adaptor protein complexes during long-term depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Shinji; Kakegawa, Wataru; Budisantoso, Timotheus; Nomura, Toshihiro; Kohda, Kazuhisa; Yuzaki, Michisuke

    2013-11-01

    Long-term depression (LTD) underlies learning and memory in various brain regions. Although postsynaptic AMPA receptor trafficking mediates LTD, its underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely unclear. Here we show that stargazin, a transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory protein, forms a ternary complex with adaptor proteins AP-2 and AP-3A in hippocampal neurons, depending on its phosphorylation state. Inhibiting the stargazin-AP-2 interaction disrupts NMDA-induced AMPA receptor endocytosis, and inhibiting that of stargazin-AP-3A abrogates the late endosomal/lysosomal trafficking of AMPA receptors, thereby upregulating receptor recycling to the cell surface. Similarly, stargazin’s interaction with AP-2 or AP-3A is necessary for low-frequency stimulus-evoked LTD in CA1 hippocampal neurons. Thus, stargazin has a crucial role in NMDA-dependent LTD by regulating two trafficking pathways of AMPA receptors—transport from the cell surface to early endosomes and from early endosomes to late endosomes/lysosomes—through its sequential binding to AP-2 and AP-3A.

  16. AMPA receptor signaling through BRAG2 and Arf6 critical for long-term synaptic depression.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Ralf; Berberich, Sven; Rathgeber, Louisa; Kolleker, Alexander; Köhr, Georg; Kornau, Hans-Christian

    2010-06-10

    Central nervous system synapses undergo activity-dependent alterations to support learning and memory. Long-term depression (LTD) reflects a sustained reduction of the synaptic AMPA receptor content based on targeted clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Here we report a current-independent form of AMPA receptor signaling, fundamental for LTD. We found that AMPA receptors directly interact via the GluA2 subunit with the synaptic protein BRAG2, which functions as a guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for the coat-recruitment GTPase Arf6. BRAG2-mediated catalysis, controlled by ligand-binding and tyrosine phosphorylation of GluA2, activates Arf6 to internalize synaptic AMPA receptors upon LTD induction. Furthermore, acute blockade of the GluA2-BRAG2 interaction and targeted deletion of BRAG2 in mature hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons prevents LTD in CA3-to-CA1 cell synapses, irrespective of the induction pathway. We conclude that BRAG2-mediated Arf6 activation triggered by AMPA receptors is the convergent step of different forms of LTD, thus providing an essential mechanism for the control of vesicle formation by endocytic cargo. PMID:20547133

  17. Short-term repeated corticosterone administration enhances glutamatergic but not GABAergic transmission in the rat motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Kula, Joanna; Blasiak, Anna; Czerw, Anna; Tylko, Grzegorz; Sowa, Joanna; Hess, Grzegorz

    2016-04-01

    It has been demonstrated that stress impairs performance of skilled reaching and walking tasks in rats due to the action of glucocorticoids involved in the stress response. Skilled reaching and walking are controlled by the primary motor cortex (M1); however, it is not known whether stress-related impairments in skilled motor tasks are related to functional and/or structural alterations within the M1. We studied the effects of single and repeated injections of corticosterone (twice daily for 7 days) on spontaneous excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs and sIPSCs) recorded from layer II/III pyramidal neurons in ex vivo slices of the M1, prepared 2 days after the last administration of the hormone. We also measured the density of dendritic spines on pyramidal cells and the protein levels of selected subunits of AMPA, NMDA, and GABAA receptors after repeated corticosterone administration. Repeatedly administered corticosterone induced an increase in the frequency but not in the amplitude of sEPSCs, while a single administration had no effect on the recorded excitatory currents. The frequency and amplitude of sIPSCs as well as the excitability of pyramidal cells were changed neither after single nor after repeated corticosterone administration. Treatment with corticosterone for 7 days did not modify the density of dendritic spines on pyramidal neurons. Corticosterone influenced neither the protein levels of GluA1, GluA2, GluN1, GluN2A, and GluN2B subunits of glutamate receptors nor those of α1, β2, and γ2 subunits of the GABAA receptor. The increase in sEPSCs frequency induced by repeated corticosterone administration faded out within 7 days. These data indicate that prolonged administration of exogenous corticosterone selectively and reversibly enhances glutamatergic, but not GABAergic transmission in the rat motor cortex. Our results suggest that corticosterone treatment results in an enhancement of spontaneous glutamate release from

  18. GSG1L suppresses AMPA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission and uniquely modulates AMPA receptor kinetics in hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xinglong; Mao, Xia; Lussier, Marc P.; Hutchison, Mary Anne; Zhou, Liang; Hamra, F. Kent; Roche, Katherine W.; Lu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of AMPA receptor (AMPAR)-mediated synaptic transmission is a key mechanism for synaptic plasticity. In the brain, AMPARs assemble with a number of auxiliary subunits, including TARPs, CNIHs and CKAMP44, which are important for AMPAR forward trafficking to synapses. Here we report that the membrane protein GSG1L negatively regulates AMPAR-mediated synaptic transmission. Overexpression of GSG1L strongly suppresses, and GSG1L knockout (KO) enhances, AMPAR-mediated synaptic transmission. GSG1L-dependent regulation of AMPAR synaptic transmission relies on the first extracellular loop domain and its carboxyl-terminus. GSG1L also speeds up AMPAR deactivation and desensitization in hippocampal CA1 neurons, in contrast to the effects of TARPs and CNIHs. Furthermore, GSG1L association with AMPARs inhibits CNIH2-induced slowing of the receptors in heterologous cells. Finally, GSG1L KO rats have deficits in LTP and show behavioural abnormalities in object recognition tests. These data demonstrate that GSG1L represents a new class of auxiliary subunit with distinct functional properties for AMPARs. PMID:26932439

  19. Anti-glutamatergic effect of riluzole: comparison with valproic acid.

    PubMed

    Kim, J-E; Kim, D-S; Kwak, S-E; Choi, H-C; Song, H-K; Choi, S-Y; Kwon, O-S; Kim, Y-I; Kang, T-C

    2007-06-15

    Riluzole, an anti-amyotrophic lateral sclerosis drug, known to decrease presynaptic glutamate release, is viewed as a candidate supplementary medication for epilepsy. In the present study, we compared the effects of riluzole and valproate (VPA) in the pilocarpine-induced limbic seizure model and in the gamma-hydroxybutyrate lactone (GBL)-induced absence seizure model. We applied immunohistochemical study for vesicular transporter 1 (VGLUT1) and extracellular recording in the rat dentate gyrus of both pilocarpine- and GBL-induced seizure models to measure effects of riluzole and VPA. Both VPA and riluzole treatments reduced VGLUT1 immunoreactivity. Riluzole treatment completely inhibited pre-ictal spikes and spike-wave discharges in the pilocarpine- and GBL-induced epilepsy models, whereas VPA partially inhibited these phenomena. In both seizure models, the anti-epileptic effects of VPA and riluzole are basically related to anti-glutamatergic (reducing field excitatory postsynaptic potential slope and excitability ratio), not GABAergic (paired-pulse inhibition) effect. Riluzole was more effective at reducing seizure activity in both epilepsy models than VPA. These results suggest that riluzole is a potential antiepileptic drug with activity against limbic seizure and absence seizure. PMID:17507170

  20. Mechanism-based design of 2,3-benzodiazepine inhibitors for AMPA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Li

    2015-01-01

    2,3-Benzodiazepine (2,3-BDZ) compounds represent a group of structurally diverse, small-molecule antagonists of (R, S)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (AMPA) receptors. Antagonists of AMPA receptors are drug candidates for potential treatment of a number of neurological disorders such as epilepsy, stroke and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). How to make better inhibitors, such as 2,3-BDZs, has been an enduring quest in drug discovery. Among a few available tools to address this specific question for making better 2,3-BDZs, perhaps the best one is to use mechanistic clues from studies of the existing antagonists to design and discover more selective and more potent antagonists. Here I review recent work in this area, and propose some ideas in the continuing effort of developing newer 2,3-BDZs for tighter control of AMPA receptor activities in vivo. PMID:26713266

  1. D-Serine and Serine Racemase Are Associated with PSD-95 and Glutamatergic Synapse Stability.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hong; Jacobi, Ariel A; Anderson, Stewart A; Lynch, David R

    2016-01-01

    D-serine is an endogenous coagonist at the glycine site of synaptic NMDA receptors (NMDARs), synthesized by serine racemase (SR) through conversion of L-serine. It is crucial for synaptic plasticity and is implicated in schizophrenia. Our previous studies demonstrated specific loss of SR, D-serine-responsive synaptic NMDARs, and glutamatergic synapses in cortical neurons lacking α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, which promotes glutamatergic synapse formation and maturation during development. We thus hypothesize that D-serine and SR (D-serine/SR) are associated with glutamatergic synaptic development. Using morphological and molecular studies in cortical neuronal cultures, we demonstrate that D-serine/SR are associated with PSD-95 and NMDARs in postsynaptic neurons and with glutamatergic synapse stability during synaptic development. Endogenous D-serine and SR colocalize with PSD-95, but not presynaptic vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGLUT1), in glutamatergic synapses of cultured cortical neurons. Low-density astrocytes in cortical neuronal cultures lack SR expression but contain enriched D-serine in large vesicle-like structures, suggesting possible synthesis of D-serine in postsynaptic neurons and storage in astrocytes. More interestingly, endogenous D-serine and SR colocalize with PSD-95 in the postsynaptic terminals of glutamatergic synapses during early and late synaptic development, implicating involvement of D-serine/SR in glutamatergic synaptic development. Exogenous application of D-serine enhances the interactions of SR with PSD-95 and NR1, and increases the number of VGLUT1- and PSD-95-positive glutamatergic synapses, suggesting that exogenous D-serine enhances postsynaptic SR/PSD-95 signaling and stabilizes glutamatergic synapses during cortical synaptic development. This is blocked by NMDAR antagonist 2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP5) and 7-chlorokynurenic acid (7-CK), a specific antagonist at the glycine site of NMDARs, demonstrating

  2. D-Serine and Serine Racemase Are Associated with PSD-95 and Glutamatergic Synapse Stability

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hong; Jacobi, Ariel A.; Anderson, Stewart A.; Lynch, David R.

    2016-01-01

    D-serine is an endogenous coagonist at the glycine site of synaptic NMDA receptors (NMDARs), synthesized by serine racemase (SR) through conversion of L-serine. It is crucial for synaptic plasticity and is implicated in schizophrenia. Our previous studies demonstrated specific loss of SR, D-serine-responsive synaptic NMDARs, and glutamatergic synapses in cortical neurons lacking α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, which promotes glutamatergic synapse formation and maturation during development. We thus hypothesize that D-serine and SR (D-serine/SR) are associated with glutamatergic synaptic development. Using morphological and molecular studies in cortical neuronal cultures, we demonstrate that D-serine/SR are associated with PSD-95 and NMDARs in postsynaptic neurons and with glutamatergic synapse stability during synaptic development. Endogenous D-serine and SR colocalize with PSD-95, but not presynaptic vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGLUT1), in glutamatergic synapses of cultured cortical neurons. Low-density astrocytes in cortical neuronal cultures lack SR expression but contain enriched D-serine in large vesicle-like structures, suggesting possible synthesis of D-serine in postsynaptic neurons and storage in astrocytes. More interestingly, endogenous D-serine and SR colocalize with PSD-95 in the postsynaptic terminals of glutamatergic synapses during early and late synaptic development, implicating involvement of D-serine/SR in glutamatergic synaptic development. Exogenous application of D-serine enhances the interactions of SR with PSD-95 and NR1, and increases the number of VGLUT1- and PSD-95-positive glutamatergic synapses, suggesting that exogenous D-serine enhances postsynaptic SR/PSD-95 signaling and stabilizes glutamatergic synapses during cortical synaptic development. This is blocked by NMDAR antagonist 2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP5) and 7-chlorokynurenic acid (7-CK), a specific antagonist at the glycine site of NMDARs, demonstrating

  3. Cornichons modify channel properties of recombinant and glial AMPA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Coombs, Ian D.; Soto, David; Zonouzi, Marzieh; Renzi, Massimiliano; Shelley, Chris; Farrant, Mark; Cull-Candy, Stuart G.

    2012-01-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors, which underlie a majority of excitatory synaptic transmission in the CNS, associate with transmembrane proteins that modify their intracellular trafficking and channel gating. For AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs), significant advances have been made in our understanding of their regulation by transmembrane AMPAR regulatory proteins (TARPs). Less is known about the functional influence of cornichons – unrelated AMPAR-interacting proteins, identified by proteomic analysis. Here we confirm that cornichon homologs 2 and 3 (CNIH-2 and CNIH-3), but not CNIH-1, slow the deactivation and desensitization of both GluA2-containing calcium-impermeable (CI-) and GluA2-lacking calcium-permeable (CP-) AMPARs expressed in tsA201 cells. CNIH-2 and -3 also enhanced the glutamate sensitivity, single-channel conductance and calcium permeability of CP-AMPARs, while decreasing their block by intracellular polyamines. We examined the potential effects of CNIHs on native AMPARs by recording from rat optic nerve oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs), known to express a significant population of CP-AMPARs. These glial cells exhibited surface labelling with an anti-CNIH-2/3 antibody. Two features of their AMPAR-mediated currents – the relative efficacy of the partial agonist kainate (IKA/IGlu ratio 0.4), and a greater than five-fold potentiation of kainate responses by cyclothiazide – suggest AMPAR association with CNIHs. Additionally, overexpression of CNIH-3 in OPCs markedly slowed AMPAR desensitization. Together, our experiments support the view that CNIHs are capable of altering key properties of AMPARs and suggest that they may do so in glia. PMID:22815494

  4. AMPA receptor antibodies in limbic encephalitis alter synaptic receptor location

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Meizan; Hughes, Ethan G.; Peng, Xiaoyu; Zhou, Lei; Gleichman, Amy J.; Shu, Huidy; Matà, Sabrina; Kremens, Daniel; Vitaliani, Roberta; Geschwind, Michael D.; Bataller, Luis; Kalb, Robert G.; Davis, Rebecca; Graus, Francesc; Lynch, David R.; Balice-Gordon, Rita; Dalmau, Josep

    2009-01-01

    Background Limbic encephalitis (LE) frequently associates with antibodies to cell surface antigens. Characterization of these antigens is important because it facilitates the diagnosis of those disorders that are treatment-responsive. We report a novel antigen of LE and the effect of patients' antibodies on neuronal cultures. Methods Clinical analysis of 10 patients with LE. Immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry were used to identify the antigens. HEK293 cells expressing the antigens were used in immunocytochemistry and ELISA. The effect of patients' antibodies on cultures of live rat hippocampal neurons was determined with confocal microscopy. Results Median age was 60 years (38-87); 9 were women. Seven had tumors of the lung, breast or thymus. Nine patients responded to immunotherapy or oncological therapy but neurologic relapses, without tumor recurrence, were frequent and influenced the long-term outcome. One untreated patient died of LE. All patients had antibodies against neuronal cell surface antigens that by immunoprecipitation were found to be the GluR1 and GluR2 subunits of the AMPA receptor (AMPAR). HEK293 cells expressing GluR1/2 reacted with all patients' sera or CSF, providing a diagnostic test for the disorder. Application of antibodies to cultures of neurons significantly decreased the number of GluR2-containing AMPAR clusters at synapses with a smaller decrease in overall AMPAR cluster density; these effects were reversed after antibody removal. Conclusions Antibodies to GluR1/2 associate with LE that is often paraneoplastic, treatment-responsive, and has a tendency to relapse. Our findings support an antibody-mediated pathogenesis in which patients' antibodies alter the synaptic localization and number of AMPAR. PMID:19338055

  5. AMPA receptor trafficking in inflammation-induced dorsal horn central sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Yuan-Xiang

    2012-01-01

    Activity-dependent postsynaptic receptor trafficking is critical for long-term synaptic plasticity in brain, but it is unclear whether this mechanism actually mediates spinal cord dorsal horn central sensitization (a specific form of synaptic plasticity) that is associated with persistent pain. Recent studies have shown that peripheral inflammation drives changes in AMPA receptor subunit trafficking in dorsal horn and that such changes contribute to the hypersensitivity that underlies persistent pain. Here, we review current evidence to illustrate how spinal cord AMPA receptors participate in dorsal horn central sensitization associated with persistent pain. Understanding these mechanisms may allow development of novel therapeutic strategies for treating persistent pain. PMID:22466122

  6. Diabetic hyperglycemia reduces Ca2+ permeability of extrasynaptic AMPA receptors in AII amacrine cells.

    PubMed

    Castilho, Áurea; Madsen, Eirik; Ambrósio, António F; Veruki, Margaret L; Hartveit, Espen

    2015-09-01

    There is increasing evidence that diabetic retinopathy is a primary neuropathological disorder that precedes the microvascular pathology associated with later stages of the disease. Recently, we found evidence for altered functional properties of synaptic α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors in A17, but not AII, amacrine cells in the mammalian retina, and the observed changes were consistent with an upregulation of the GluA2 subunit, a key determinant of functional properties of AMPA receptors, including Ca(2+) permeability and current-voltage (I-V) rectification properties. Here, we have investigated functional changes of extrasynaptic AMPA receptors in AII amacrine cells evoked by diabetes. With patch-clamp recording of nucleated patches from retinal slices, we measured Ca(2+) permeability and I-V rectification in rats with ∼3 wk of streptozotocin-induced diabetes and age-matched, noninjected controls. Under bi-ionic conditions (extracellular Ca(2+) concentration = 30 mM, intracellular Cs(+) concentration = 171 mM), the reversal potential (Erev) of AMPA-evoked currents indicated a significant reduction of Ca(2+) permeability in diabetic animals [Erev = -17.7 mV, relative permeability of Ca(2+) compared with Cs(+) (PCa/PCs) = 1.39] compared with normal animals (Erev = -7.7 mV, PCa/PCs = 2.35). Insulin treatment prevented the reduction of Ca(2+) permeability. I-V rectification was examined by calculating a rectification index (RI) as the ratio of the AMPA-evoked conductance at +40 and -60 mV. The degree of inward rectification in patches from diabetic animals (RI = 0.48) was significantly reduced compared with that in normal animals (RI = 0.30). These results suggest that diabetes evokes a change in the functional properties of extrasynaptic AMPA receptors of AII amacrine cells. These changes could be representative for extrasynaptic AMPA receptors elsewhere in AII amacrine cells and suggest that synaptic and extrasynaptic AMPA

  7. The Fate and Transport of Glyphosate and its Degradation Product, Aminomethylphosphonic Acid (AMPA), in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scribner, E.; Meyer, M. T.

    2006-05-01

    Since 2001, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has investigated the fate and transport of glyphosate and its degradation product, aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA), in surface water, and more recently in tile-drain flow, soil, and wet deposition. According to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sources, glyphosate is among the world's most widely used herbicides. In 2004, glyphosate usage estimates indicated that between 103 and 113 million pounds were applied annually to crops in the United States. The use of glyphosate over a wide geographic area suggests that this herbicide might be a potential concern for air, water, and soil quality as well as measured in high concentrations in streams; therefore, it is important to monitor its fate and transport in ground-water/surface-water systems. National, regional, and field-scale studies conducted by the USGS National Water-Quality Assessment and Toxic Substance Hydrology Programs have studied the fate and transport of glyphosate in overland flow, tile- drain flow, surface water, soil, and wet-deposition samples. The samples were analyzed for glyphosate and AMPA by using derivatization and online solid-phase extraction with liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) and LC/MS/MS methods developed by the USGS Organic Geochemistry Research Laboratory in Lawrence, Kansas. During spring, summer, and fall 2002 runoff periods in 50 Midwestern streams, glyphosate was detected at or above the 0.10 micrograms per liter detection limit in 35, 41, and 31 percent of samples, respectively. AMPA was detected in 53, 82, and 75 percent of samples, respectively. Results of 128 samples from a field study showed that glyphosate was transported as a narrow high- concentration pulse during the first period of runoff after application and that the concentration of glyphosate in runoff was greater than the concentration of AMPA. In tile-drain flow, glyphosate and AMPA were transported in a broad low-concentration pulse during these same

  8. The vesicular glutamate transporter-1 upstream promoter and first intron each support glutamatergic-specific expression in rat postrhinal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guo-rong; Li, Xu; Cao, Haiyan; Zhao, Hua; Geller, Alfred I.

    2011-01-01

    Multiple applications of direct gene transfer into neurons require restricting expression to glutamatergic neurons, or specific subclasses of glutamatergic neurons. Thus, it is desirable to develop and analyze promoters that support glutamatergic-specific expression. The three vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs) are found in different populations of neurons, and VGLUT1 is the predominant VGLUT in the neocortex, hippocampus, and cerebellar cortex. We previously reported on a plasmid (amplicon) Herpes Simplex Virus vector that contains a VGLUT1 promoter. This vector supports long-term expression in VGLUT1-containing glutamatergic neurons in rat postrhinal (POR) cortex, but does not support expression in VGLUT2-containing glutamatergic neurons in the ventral medial hypothalamus. This VGLUT1 promoter contains both the VGLUT1 upstream promoter and the VGLUT1 first intron. In this study, we begin to isolate and analyze the glutamatergic-specific regulatory elements in this VGLUT1 promoter. We show that the VGLUT1 upstream promoter and first intron each support glutamatergic-specific expression. We isolated a small, basal VGLUT1 promoter that does not support glutamatergic-specific expression. Next, we fused either the VGLUT1 upstream promoter or the first intron to this basal promoter. The VGLUT1 upstream promoter or the first intron, fused to the basal promoter, each supported glutamatergic-specific expression in POR cortex. PMID:21172319

  9. Glutamatergic Neurotransmission Links Sensitivity to Volatile Anesthetics with Mitochondrial Function.

    PubMed

    Zimin, Pavel I; Woods, Christian B; Quintana, Albert; Ramirez, Jan-Marino; Morgan, Philip G; Sedensky, Margaret M

    2016-08-22

    An enigma of modern medicine has persisted for over 150 years. The mechanisms by which volatile anesthetics (VAs) produce their effects (loss of consciousness, analgesia, amnesia, and immobility) remain an unsolved mystery. Many attractive putative molecular targets have failed to produce a significant effect when genetically tested in whole-animal models [1-3]. However, mitochondrial defects increase VA sensitivity in diverse organisms from nematodes to humans [4-6]. Ndufs4 knockout (KO) mice lack a subunit of mitochondrial complex I and are strikingly hypersensitive to VAs yet resistant to the intravenous anesthetic ketamine [7]. The change in VA sensitivity is the largest reported for a mammal. Limiting NDUFS4 loss to a subset of glutamatergic neurons recapitulates the VA hypersensitivity of Ndufs4(KO) mice, while loss in GABAergic or cholinergic neurons does not. Baseline electrophysiologic function of CA1 pyramidal neurons does not differ between Ndufs4(KO) and control mice. Isoflurane concentrations that anesthetize only Ndufs4(KO) mice (0.6%) decreased the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) only in Ndufs4(KO) CA1 neurons, while concentrations effective in control mice (1.2%) decreased sEPSC frequencies in both control and Ndufs4(KO) CA1 pyramidal cells. Spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) were not differentially affected between genotypes. The effects of isoflurane were similar on evoked field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) and paired pulse facilitation (PPF) in KO and control hippocampal slices. We propose that CA1 presynaptic excitatory neurotransmission is hypersensitive to isoflurane in Ndufs4(KO) mice due to the inhibition of pre-existing reduced complex I function, reaching a critical reduction that can no longer meet metabolic demands. PMID:27498564

  10. Blockade of glutamatergic and GABAergic receptor channels by trimethyltin chloride

    PubMed Central

    Krüger, Katharina; Diepgrond, Victoria; Ahnefeld, Maria; Wackerbeck, Christina; Madeja, Michael; Binding, Norbert; Musshoff, Ulrich

    2005-01-01

    Organotin compounds such as trimethyltin chloride (TMT) are among the most toxic of the organometallics. As their main target for toxicity is the central nervous system, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of TMT on receptor channels involved in various processes of synaptic transmission. The Xenopus oocyte expression system was chosen for direct assessment of TMT effects on voltage-operated potassium channels and glutamatergic and GABAergic receptors, and hippocampal slices from rat brain for analyzing TMT effects on identified synaptic sites. TMT was found to be ineffective, at 100 μmol l−1, against several potassium- and sodium-operated ion channel functions as well as the metabotropic glutamate receptor. The functions of the ionotropic glutamate and the GABAA receptor channels were inhibited by TMT in micromolar concentrations. Thus, at a maximum concentration of 100 μmol l−1, around 20–30% of the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid and GABAA receptor-mediated ion currents and 35% of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated ion currents were blocked. In the hippocampal slice model, the inhibitory effects of TMT were much stronger than expected from the results on the ion channels. Bath application of TMT significantly reduced the amplitudes of evoked excitatory postsynaptic field potentials in a concentration-dependent and nonreversible manner.  Induction of long-term potentiation, recorded from the CA1 dendritic region, was inhibited by TMT and failed completely at a concentration of 10 μmol l−1. In general, TMT affects the excitatory and inhibitory synaptic processes in a receptor specific manner and is able to disturb the activity within a neuronal network. PMID:15655511

  11. ACUTE ETHANOL SUPPRESSES GLUTAMATERGIC NEUROTRANSMISSION THROUGH ENDOCANNABINOIDS IN HIPPOCAMPAL NEURONS

    PubMed Central

    Basavarajappa, Balapal S.; Ninan, Ipe; Arancio, Ottavio

    2008-01-01

    Ethanol exposure during fetal development is a leading cause of long-term cognitive impairments. Studies suggest that ethanol exposure have deleterious effects on the hippocampus, a brain region that is important for learning and memory. Ethanol exerts its effects, in part, via alterations in glutamatergic neurotransmission, which is critical for the maturation of neuronal circuits during development. The current literature strongly supports the growing evidence that ethanol inhibits glutamate release in the neonatal CA1 hippocampal region. However, the exact molecular mechanism responsible for this effect is not well understood. In this study, we show that ethanol enhances endocannabinoid (EC) levels in cultured hippocampal neurons, possibly through calcium pathways. Acute ethanol depresses miniature postsynaptic current (mEPSC) frequencies without affecting their amplitude. This suggests that ethanol inhibits glutamate release. The CB1 receptors (CB1Rs) present on presynaptic neurons are not altered by acute ethanol. The CB1R antagonist SR 141716A reverses ethanol-induced depression of mEPSC frequency. Drugs that are known to enhance the in vivo function of ECs occlude ethanol effects on mEPSC frequency. Chelation of postsynaptic calcium by EGTA antagonizes ethanol-induced depression of mEPSC frequency. The activation of CB1R with the selective agonist WIN55,212-2 also suppresses the mEPSC frequency. This WIN55,212-2 effect is similar to the ethanol effects and is reversed by SR141716A. In addition, tetani-induced excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) are depressed by acute ethanol. SR141716A significantly reverses ethanol effects on evoked EPSC amplitude in a dual recording preparation. These observations, taken together, suggest the participation of ECs as retrograde messengers in the ethanol-induced depression of synaptic activities. PMID:18796007

  12. Joint CP-AMPA and group I mGlu receptor activation is required for synaptic plasticity in dentate gyrus fast-spiking interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Hainmüller, Thomas; Krieglstein, Kerstin; Kulik, Akos; Bartos, Marlene

    2014-01-01

    Hippocampal principal cell (PC) assemblies provide the brain with a mnemonic representation of space. It is assumed that the formation of cell assemblies is supported by long-lasting modification of glutamatergic synapses onto perisomatic inhibitory interneurons (PIIs), which provide powerful feedback inhibition to neuronal networks. Repetitive activation of dentate gyrus PIIs by excitatory mossy fiber (MF) inputs induces Hebbian long-term potentiation (LTP). In contrast, long-term depression (LTD) emerges in the absence of PII activity. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity in PIIs. Here, we examined the role of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors 1 and 5 (mGluRs1/5) in inducing plastic changes at MF-PII synapses. We found that mGluRs1/5 are located perisynaptically and that pharmacological block of mGluR1 or mGluR5 abolished MF-LTP. In contrast, their exogenous activation was insufficient to induce MF-LTP but cleared MF-LTD. No LTP could be elicited in PIIs loaded with blockers of G protein signaling and Ca2+-dependent PKC. Two-photon imaging revealed that the intracellular Ca2+ rise necessary for MF-LTP was largely mediated by Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors (CP-AMPARs), but less by NMDA receptors or mGluRs1/5. Thus, our data indicate that fast Ca2+ signaling via CP-AMPARs and slow G protein-mediated signaling via mGluRs1/5 converge to a PKC-dependent molecular pathway to induce Hebbian MF-LTP. We further propose that Hebbian activation of mGluRs1/5 gates PIIs into a “readiness mode” to promote MF-LTP, which, in turn, will support timed PII recruitment, thereby assisting in PC assembly formation. PMID:25161282

  13. AMPA receptors undergo channel arrest in the anoxic turtle cortex.

    PubMed

    Pamenter, Matthew Edward; Shin, Damian Seung-Ho; Buck, Leslie Thomas

    2008-02-01

    Without oxygen, all mammals suffer neuronal injury and excitotoxic cell death mediated by overactivation of the glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). The western painted turtle can survive anoxia for months, and downregulation of NMDAR activity is thought to be neuroprotective during anoxia. NMDAR activity is related to the activity of another glutamate receptor, the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid receptor (AMPAR). AMPAR blockade is neuroprotective against anoxic insult in mammals, but the role of AMPARs in the turtle's anoxia tolerance has not been investigated. To determine whether AMPAR activity changes during hypoxia or anoxia in the turtle cortex, whole cell AMPAR currents, AMPAR-mediated excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs), and excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) were measured. The effect of AMPAR blockade on normoxic and anoxic NMDAR currents was also examined. During 60 min of normoxia, evoked peak AMPAR currents and the frequencies and amplitudes of EPSPs and EPSCs did not change. During anoxic perfusion, evoked AMPAR peak currents decreased 59.2 +/- 5.5 and 60.2 +/- 3.5% at 20 and 40 min, respectively. EPSP frequency (EPSP(f)) and amplitude decreased 28.7 +/- 6.4% and 13.2 +/- 1.7%, respectively, and EPSC(f) and amplitude decreased 50.7 +/- 5.1% and 51.3 +/- 4.7%, respectively. In contrast, hypoxic (Po(2) = 5%) AMPAR peak currents were potentiated 56.6 +/- 20.5 and 54.6 +/- 15.8% at 20 and 40 min, respectively. All changes were reversed by reoxygenation. AMPAR currents and EPSPs were abolished by 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX). In neurons pretreated with CNQX, anoxic NMDAR currents were reversibly depressed by 49.8 +/- 7.9%. These data suggest that AMPARs may undergo channel arrest in the anoxic turtle cortex. PMID:18056983

  14. Amygdalar glutamatergic neuronal systems play a key role on the hibernating state of hamsters

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Excitatory transmitting mechanisms are proving to play a critical role on neuronal homeostasis conditions of facultative hibernators such as the Syrian golden hamster. Indeed works have shown that the glutamatergic system of the main olfactory brain station (amygdala) is capable of controlling thermoregulatory responses, which are considered vital for the different hibernating states. In the present study the role of amygdalar glutamatergic circuits on non-hibernating (NHIB) and hibernating (HIB) hamsters were assessed on drinking stimuli and subsequently compared to expression variations of some glutamatergic subtype mRNA levels in limbic areas. For this study the two major glutamatergic antagonists and namely that of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), 3-(+)-2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl-propyl-1-phosphonate (CPP) plus that of the acid α-amine-3-hydroxy-5-metil-4-isoxazol-propionic receptor (AMPAR) site, cyano-7-nitro-quinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) were infused into the basolateral amygdala nucleus. Attempts were made to establish the type of effects evoked by amygdalar glutamatergic cross-talking processes during drinking stimuli, a response that may corroborate their major role at least during some stages of this physiological activity in hibernators. Results From the behavioral results it appears that the two glutamatergic compounds exerted distinct effects. In the first case local infusion of basolateral complexes (BLA) with NMDAR antagonist caused very great (p < 0.001) drinking rhythms while moderately increased feeding (p < 0.05) responses during arousal with respect to moderately increased drinking levels in euthermics. Conversely, treatment with CNQX did not modify drinking rhythms and so animals spent more time executing exploratory behaviors. These same antagonists accounted for altered glutamatergic transcription activities as displayed by greatly reduced GluR1, NR1 and GluR2 levels in hippocampus, ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMN) and

  15. Morphological changes of glutamatergic synapses in animal models of Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Villalba, Rosa M.; Mathai, Abraham; Smith, Yoland

    2015-01-01

    The striatum and the subthalamic nucleus (STN) are the main entry doors for extrinsic inputs to reach the basal ganglia (BG) circuitry. The cerebral cortex, thalamus and brainstem are the key sources of glutamatergic inputs to these nuclei. There is anatomical, functional and neurochemical evidence that glutamatergic neurotransmission is altered in the striatum and STN of animal models of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and that these changes may contribute to aberrant network neuronal activity in the BG-thalamocortical circuitry. Postmortem studies of animal models and PD patients have revealed significant pathology of glutamatergic synapses, dendritic spines and microcircuits in the striatum of parkinsonians. More recent findings have also demonstrated a significant breakdown of the glutamatergic corticosubthalamic system in parkinsonian monkeys. In this review, we will discuss evidence for synaptic glutamatergic dysfunction and pathology of cortical and thalamic inputs to the striatum and STN in models of PD. The potential functional implication of these alterations on synaptic integration, processing and transmission of extrinsic information through the BG circuits will be considered. Finally, the significance of these pathological changes in the pathophysiology of motor and non-motor symptoms in PD will be examined. PMID:26441550

  16. Gephyrin expression and clustering affects the size of glutamatergic synaptic contacts

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wendou; De Blas, Angel L.

    2009-01-01

    We have recently shown that disrupting the expression and postsynaptic clustering of gephyrin in cultured hippocampal pyramidal cells, by either gephyrin RNAi (RNA interference) or overexpression of a dominant negative gephyrin-EGFP fusion protein, leads to decreased number of postsynaptic gephyrin and GABAA receptor clusters and to reduced GABAergic innervation of these cells. On the other hand, increasing gephyrin expression led to a small increase in the number of gephyrin and GABAA receptor clusters and to little or no effect on GABAergic innervation. We are now reporting that altering gephyrin expression and clustering affects the size but not the density of glutamatergic synaptic contacts. Knocking down gephyrin with gephyrin RNAi, or preventing gephyrin clustering by overexpression of the dominant negative gephyrin-EGFP fusion protein, leads to larger postsynaptic PSD-95 clusters and larger presynaptic glutamatergic terminals. On the other hand, overexpression of gephyrin leads to slightly smaller PSD-95 clusters and presynaptic glutamatergic terminals. The change in size of PSD-95 clusters were accompanied by a parallel change in the size of NR2-NMDA receptor clusters. It is concluded that the levels of expression and clustering of gephyrin, a protein that concentrates at the postsynaptic complex of the inhibitory synapses, not only has homotypic effects on GABAergic synaptic contacts, but also has heterotypic effects on glutamatergic synaptic contacts. We are proposing that gephyrin is a counterpart of the postsynaptic glutamatergic scaffold protein PSD-95 in regulating the number and/or size of the excitatory and inhibitory synaptic contacts. PMID:18199120

  17. Interplay between glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission alterations in cognitive and motor impairment in minimal hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Llansola, Marta; Montoliu, Carmina; Agusti, Ana; Hernandez-Rabaza, Vicente; Cabrera-Pastor, Andrea; Gomez-Gimenez, Belen; Malaguarnera, Michele; Dadsetan, Sherry; Belghiti, Majedeline; Garcia-Garcia, Raquel; Balzano, Tiziano; Taoro, Lucas; Felipo, Vicente

    2015-09-01

    The cognitive and motor alterations in hepatic encephalopathy (HE) are the final result of altered neurotransmission and communication between neurons in neuronal networks and circuits. Different neurotransmitter systems cooperate to modulate cognitive and motor function, with a main role for glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission in different brain areas and neuronal circuits. There is an interplay between glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission alterations in cognitive and motor impairment in HE. This interplay may occur: (a) in different brain areas involved in specific neuronal circuits; (b) in the same brain area through cross-modulation of glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission. We will summarize some examples of the (1) interplay between glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission alterations in different areas in the basal ganglia-thalamus-cortex circuit in the motor alterations in minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE); (2) interplay between glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission alterations in cerebellum in the impairment of cognitive function in MHE through altered function of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway. We will also comment the therapeutic implications of the above studies and the utility of modulators of glutamate and GABA receptors to restore cognitive and motor function in rats with hyperammonemia and hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:25447766

  18. Enhanced AMPA Receptor Function Promotes Cerebellar Long-Term Depression Rather than Potentiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Beugen, Boeke J.; Qiao, Xin; Simmons, Dana H.; De Zeeuw, Chris I.; Hansel, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Ampakines are allosteric modulators of AMPA receptors that facilitate hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) and learning, and have been considered for the treatment of cognition and memory deficits. Here, we show that the ampakine CX546 raises the amplitude and slows the decay time of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) at cerebellar…

  19. AMPA Receptor Endocytosis in Rat Perirhinal Cortex Underlies Retrieval of Object Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cazakoff, Brittany N.; Howland, John G.

    2011-01-01

    Mechanisms consistent with long-term depression in the perirhinal cortex (PRh) play a fundamental role in object recognition memory; however, whether AMPA receptor endocytosis is involved in distinct phases of recognition memory is not known. To address this question, we used local PRh infusions of the cell membrane-permeable Tat-GluA2[subscript…

  20. Involvement of AMPA receptors in the antidepressant-like effects of dextromethorphan in mice.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Linda; Matsumoto, Rae R

    2015-12-15

    Dextromethorphan (DM) is an antitussive with rapid acting antidepressant potential based on pharmacodynamic similarities to ketamine. Building upon our previous finding that DM produces antidepressant-like effects in the mouse forced swim test (FST), the present study aimed to establish the antidepressant-like actions of DM in the tail suspension test (TST), another well-established model predictive of antidepressant efficacy. Additionally, using the TST and FST, we investigated the role of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors in the antidepressant-like properties of DM because accumulating evidence suggests that AMPA receptors play an important role in the pathophysiology of depression and may contribute to the efficacy of antidepressant medications, including that of ketamine. We found that DM displays antidepressant-like effects in the TST similar to the conventional and fast acting antidepressants characterized by imipramine and ketamine, respectively. Moreover, decreasing the first-pass metabolism of DM by concomitant administration of quinidine (CYP2D6 inhibitor) potentiated antidepressant-like actions, implying DM itself has antidepressant efficacy. Finally, in both the TST and FST, pretreatment with the AMPA receptor antagonist NBQX (2,3-dioxo-6-nitro-1,2,3,4-tetrahydrobenzo[f]quinoxaline-7-sulfonamide) significantly attenuated the antidepressant-like behavior elicited by DM. Together, the data show that DM exerts antidepressant-like actions through AMPA receptors, further suggesting DM may act as a safe and effective fast acting antidepressant drug. PMID:25804358

  1. URBAN CONTRIBUTIONS OF GLYSPHOSATE AND ITS DEGRADATE AMPA TO STREAMS IN THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Glyphosate is the most widely used herbicide in the world, being routinely applied to control weeds in both agricultural and urban settings. Microbial degradation of glyphosate produces aminomethyl phosphonic acid (AMPA). The high polarity and water-solubility of glyphosate and A...

  2. Glyphosate and AMPA adsorption in soils: laboratory experiments and pedotransfer rules.

    PubMed

    Sidoli, Pauline; Baran, Nicole; Angulo-Jaramillo, Rafael

    2016-03-01

    Adsorption of the herbicide glyphosate and its main metabolite AMPA (aminomethylphosphonic acid) was investigated on 17 different agricultural soils. Batch equilibration adsorption data are shown by Freundlich adsorption isotherms. Glyphosate adsorption is clearly affected by equilibration concentrations, but the nonlinear AMPA adsorption isotherms indicate saturation of the adsorption sites with increasing equilibrium concentrations. pHCaCl2 (i.e. experimental pH) is the major parameter governing glyphosate and AMPA adsorption in soils. However, considering pHCaCl2 values, available phosphate amount, and amorphous iron and aluminium oxide contents by using a nonlinear multiple regression equation, obtains the most accurate and powerful pedotransfer rule for predicting the adsorption constants for these two molecules. As amorphous iron and aluminium oxide contents in soil are not systematically determined, we also propose a pedotransfer rule with two variables-pHCaCl2 values and available phosphate amount-that remains acceptable for both molecules. Moreover, the use of the commonly measured pHwater or pHKCl values gives less accurate results compared to pHCaCl2 measurements. To our knowledge, this study is the first AMPA adsorption characterization for a significant number of temperate climate soils. PMID:26581693

  3. mTOR Is Essential for Corticosteroid Effects on Hippocampal AMPA Receptor Function and Fear Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xiong, Hui; Casse, Frédéric; Zhou, Yang; Zhou, Ming; Xiong, Zhi-Qi; Joëls, Marian; Martin, Stéphane; Krugers, Harm J.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoid hormones, via activation of their receptors, promote memory consolidation, but the exact underlying mechanisms remain elusive. We examined how corticosterone regulates AMPA receptors (AMPARs), which are crucial for synaptic plasticity and memory formation. Combining a live imaging fluorescent recovery after photobleaching approach…

  4. Glyphosate-resistant and conventional canola (Brassica napus L.)responses to glyphosate and AMPA treatment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glyphosate-resistant (GR) canola expresses two transgenes: 1) the microbial glyphosate oxidase gene (gox) encoding the glyphosate oxidase enzyme (GOX) that metabolizes glyphosate to aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) and 2) cp4 that encodes a GR form of the glyphosate target enzyme 5-enolpyruvylshiki...

  5. Enhanced AMPA receptor activity increases operant alcohol self-administration and cue-induced reinstatement.

    PubMed

    Cannady, Reginald; Fisher, Kristen R; Durant, Brandon; Besheer, Joyce; Hodge, Clyde W

    2013-01-01

    Long-term alcohol exposure produces neuroadaptations that contribute to the progression of alcohol abuse disorders. Chronic alcohol consumption results in strengthened excitatory neurotransmission and increased α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate receptors (AMPA) receptor signaling in animal models. However, the mechanistic role of enhanced AMPA receptor activity in alcohol-reinforcement and alcohol-seeking behavior remains unclear. This study examined the role of enhanced AMPA receptor function using the selective positive allosteric modulator, aniracetam, in modulating operant alcohol self-administration and cue-induced reinstatement. Male alcohol-preferring (P-) rats, trained to self-administer alcohol (15%, v/v) versus water were pre-treated with aniracetam to assess effects on maintenance of alcohol self-administration. To determine reinforcer specificity, P-rats were trained to self-administer sucrose (0.8%, w/v) versus water, and effects of aniracetam were tested. The role of aniracetam in modulating relapse of alcohol-seeking was assessed using a response contingent cue-induced reinstatement procedure in P-rats trained to self-administer 15% alcohol. Aniracetam pre-treatment significantly increased alcohol-reinforced responses relative to vehicle treatment. This increase was not attributed to aniracetam-induced hyperactivity as aniracetam pre-treatment did not alter locomotor activity. AMPA receptor involvement was confirmed because 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (AMPA receptor antagonist) blocked the aniracetam-induced increase in alcohol self-administration. Aniracetam did not alter sucrose-reinforced responses in sucrose-trained P-rats, suggesting that enhanced AMPA receptor activity is selective in modulating the reinforcing function of alcohol. Finally, aniracetam pre-treatment potentiated cue-induced reinstatement of alcohol-seeking behavior versus vehicle-treated P-rats. These data suggest that enhanced glutamate activity at AMPA

  6. Occurrence of glyphosate and AMPA in an agricultural watershed from the southeastern region of Argentina.

    PubMed

    Lupi, Leonardo; Miglioranza, Karina S B; Aparicio, Virginia C; Marino, Damian; Bedmar, Francisco; Wunderlin, Daniel A

    2015-12-01

    Glyphosate (GLY) and AMPA concentrations were determined in sandy soil profiles, during pre- and post-application events in two agricultural soybean fields (S1 and S2). Streamwater and sediment samples were also analyzed. Post-application sampling was carried out one month later from the event. Concentrations of GLY+AMPA in surface soils (0-5 cm depth) during pre-application period showed values 20-fold higher (0.093-0.163 μg/g d.w.) than control area (0.005 μg/g d.w.). After application event soils showed markedly higher pesticide concentrations. A predominance of AMPA (80%) was observed in S1 (early application), while 34% in S2 for surface soils. GLY+AMPA concentrations decreased with depth and correlated strongly with organic carbon (r between 0.74 and 0.88, p<0.05) and pH (r between -0.81 and -0.76, p<0.001). The slight enrichment of pesticides observed from 25 cm depth to deeper layer, in addition to the alkaline pH along the profile, is of high concern about groundwater contamination. Sediments from pre-application period showed relatively lower pesticide levels (0.0053-0.0263 μg/g d.w.) than surface soil with a predominance of glyphosate, indicating a limited degradation. Levels of contaminants (mainly AMPA) in streamwater (ND-0.5 ng/mL) denote the low persistence of these compounds. However, a direct relationship in AMPA concentration was observed between sediment and streamwater. Despite the known relatively short half-life of glyphosate in soils, GLY+AMPA occurrence is registered in almost all matrices at different sampling times (pre- and post-application events). The physicochemical characteristics (organic carbon, texture, pH) and structure of soils and sediment in addition to the time elapsed from application determined the behavior of these contaminants in the environment. As a whole, the results warn us about vertical transport trough soil profile with the possibility of reaching groundwater. PMID:26254069

  7. Glutamatergic Neurometabolites in Clozapine-Responsive and -Resistant Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Meghan Elizabeth; Anderson, Valerie Margaret; Pillai, Avinesh; Kydd, Robert R.

    2015-01-01

    scaled to creatine in the putamen may represent a marker of response to clozapine. Future studies should investigate glutamatergic anomalies prior to clozapine initiation and following successful treatment. PMID:25603859

  8. Long-term potentiation alters the modulator pharmacology of AMPA-type glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Lin, Bin; Brücher, Fernando A; Colgin, Laura Lee; Lynch, Gary

    2002-06-01

    Changes in the biophysical properties of AMPA-type glutamate receptors have been proposed to mediate the expression of long-term potentiation (LTP). The present study tested if, as predicted from this hypothesis, AMPA receptor modulators differentially affect potentiated versus control synaptic currents. Whole cell recordings were collected from CA1 pyramidal neurons in hippocampal slices from adult rats. Within-neuron comparisons were made of the excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) elicited by two separate groups of Schaffer-collateral/commissural synapses. LTP was induced by theta burst stimulation in one set of inputs; cyclothiazide (CTZ), a drug that acts on the desensitization kinetics of AMPA receptors, was infused 30 min later. The decay time constants of the potentiated EPSCs prior to drug infusion were slightly, but significantly, shorter than those of control EPSCs. CTZ slowed the decay of the EPSCs, as reported in prior studies, and did so to a significantly greater degree in the potentiated synapses. Additionally, infusion of CTZ resulted in significantly greater effects on amplitude in potentiated pathways as compared with control pathways. The interaction between LTP and CTZ was also obtained in a separate set of experiments in which GABA receptor antagonists were used to block inhibitory postsynaptic currents. Additionally, there was no significant change in paired-pulse facilitation in the presence of CTZ, indicating that presynaptic effects of the drug were negligible. These findings provide new evidence that LTP modifies AMPA receptor kinetics. Candidates for the changes responsible for the observed effects of LTP were evaluated using a model of AMPA receptor kinetics; a simple increase in the channel opening rate provided the most satisfactory match with the LTP data. PMID:12037181

  9. Signalling mechanism for somatostatin receptor 5-mediated suppression of AMPA responses in rat retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Deng, Qin-Qin; Sheng, Wen-Long; Zhang, Gong; Weng, Shi-Jun; Yang, Xiong-Li; Zhong, Yong-Mei

    2016-08-01

    Somatostatin (SRIF) is involved in a variety of physiological functions via the activation of five subtypes of specific receptors (sst1-5). Here, we investigated the effects of SRIF on AMPA receptor (AMPAR)-mediated currents (AMPA currents) in isolated rat retinal ganglion cells (GCs) using patch-clamp techniques. Immunofluorescence double labelling demonstrated the expression of sst5 in rat GCs. Consistent to this, whole cell AMPA currents of GCs were dose-dependently suppressed by SRIF, and the effect was reversed by the sst5 antagonist BIM-23056. Intracellular dialysis of GDP-β-S or pre-incubation with the Gi/o inhibitor pertussis toxin (PTX) abolished the SRIF effect. The SRIF effect was mimicked by the administration of either 8-Br-cAMP or forskolin, but was eliminated by the protein kinase A (PKA) antagonists H-89/KT5720/Rp-cAMP. Moreover, SRIF increased intracellular Ca(2+) levels and did not suppress the AMPA currents when GCs were infused with an intracellular Ca(2+)-free solution or in the presence of ryanodine receptor modulators caffeine/ryanodine. Furthermore, the SRIF effect was eliminated when the activity of calmodulin (CaM), calcineurin and protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) was blocked with W-7, FK-506 and okadaic acid, respectively. SRIF persisted to suppress the AMPA currents when cGMP-protein kinase G (PKG) and phosphatidylinositol (PI)-/phosphatidylcholine (PC)-phospholipase C (PLC) signalling pathways were blocked. In rat flat-mount retinas, SRIF suppressed AMPAR-mediated light-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (L-EPSCs) in GCs. We conclude that a distinct Gi/o/cAMP-PKA/ryanodine/Ca(2+)/CaM/calcineurin/PP1 signalling pathway comes into play due to the activation of sst5 to mediate the SRIF effect on GCs. PMID:26969240

  10. S-palmitoylation regulates AMPA receptors trafficking and function: a novel insight into synaptic regulation and therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jun; Wu, Pengfei; Wang, Fang; Chen, Jianguo

    2014-01-01

    Glutamate acting on AMPA-type ionotropic glutamate receptor (AMPAR) mediates the majority of fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the mammalian central nervous system. Dynamic regulation of AMPAR by post-translational modifications is one of the key elements that allow the nervous system to adapt to environment stimulations. S-palmitoylation, an important lipid modification by post-translational addition of a long-chain fatty acid to a cysteine residue, regulates AMPA receptor trafficking, which dynamically affects multiple fundamental brain functions, such as learning and memory. In vivo, S-palmitoylation is controlled by palmitoyl acyl transferases and palmitoyl thioesterases. In this review, we highlight advances in the mechanisms for dynamic AMPA receptors palmitoylation, and discuss how palmitoylation affects AMPA receptors function at synapses in recent years. Pharmacological regulation of S-palmitoylation may serve as a novel therapeutic strategy for neurobiological diseases. PMID:26579419

  11. The essential role of AMPA receptor GluR2 subunit RNA editing in the normal and diseased brain.

    PubMed

    Wright, Amanda; Vissel, Bryce

    2012-01-01

    α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors are comprised of different combinations of GluA1-GluA4 (also known asGluR1-GluR4 and GluR-A to GluR-D) subunits. The GluA2 subunit is subject to RNA editing by the ADAR2 enzyme, which converts a codon for glutamine (Gln; Q), present in the GluA2 gene, to a codon for arginine (Arg; R) found in the mRNA. AMPA receptors are calcium (Ca(2+))-permeable if they contain the unedited GluA2(Q) subunit or if they lack the GluA2 subunit. While most AMPA receptors in the brain contain the edited GluA2(R) subunit and are therefore Ca(2+)-impermeable, recent evidence suggests that Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors are important in synaptic plasticity, learning, and disease. Strong evidence supports the notion that Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors are usually GluA2-lacking AMPA receptors, with little evidence to date for a significant role of unedited GluA2 in normal brain function. However, recent detailed studies suggest that Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors containing unedited GluA2 do in fact occur in neurons and can contribute to excitotoxic cell loss, even where it was previously thought that there was no unedited GluA2.This review provides an update on the role of GluA2 RNA editing in the healthy and diseased brain and summarizes recent insights into the mechanisms that control this process. We suggest that further studies of the role of unedited GluA2 in normal brain function and disease are warranted, and that GluA2 editing should be considered as a possible contributing factor when Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors are observed. PMID:22514516

  12. Reduced Anterior Cingulate Glutamatergic Concentrations in Childhood Ocd and Major Depression Versus Healthy Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, David R.; Mirza, Yousha; Russell, Aileen; Tang, Jennifer; Smith, Janet M.; Banerjee, Preeya S.; Bhandari, Rashmi; Rose, Michelle; Ivey, Jennifer; Boyd, Courtney; Moore, Gregory J.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To examine in vivo glutamatergic neurochemical alterations in the anterior cingulate cortex of pediatric patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) without major depressive disorder (MDD) versus pediatric patients with MDD without OCD and healthy controls. Method: Single-voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic examinations…

  13. Brainstem Origins of Glutamatergic Innervation of the Rat Hypothalamic Paraventricular Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Dana R.; Edwards, Monica R.; Ulrich-Lai, Yvonne M.; Herman, James P.; Cullinan, William E.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence document a role for glutamatergic input to the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVH) in stress-induced activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis. However, the neuro-anatomical origins of the glutamatergic input have yet to be definitively determined. We have previously shown that vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGLUT2) is the predominant VGLUT isoform expressed in the basal forebrain and brainstem, including PVH-projecting regions, and that the PVH is preferentially innervated by VGLUT2-immunoreactive terminals/boutons. The present study employed a dual-labeling approach, combining immunolabeling for a retrograde tract tracer, Fluoro-Gold (FG), with in situ hybridization for VGLUT2 mRNA, to map the brainstem and caudal forebrain distribution of glutamatergic PVH-projecting neurons. The present report presents evidence for substantial dual labeling in the periaqueductal gray, caudal portions of the zona incerta and subparafascicular nucleus, and the lateral parabrachial nucleus. The current data also suggest that relatively few PVH-projecting neurons in ascending raphe nuclei, nucleus of the solitary tract, or ventrolateral medulla are VGLUT2 positive. The data reveal multiple brainstem origins of glutamatergic input to PVH that are positioned to play a role in transducing a diverse range of stressful stimuli. PMID:22247025

  14. Glutamatergic Effects of Divalproex in Adolescents with Mania: A Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strawn, Jeffrey R.; Patel, Nick C.; Chu, Wen-Jang; Lee, Jing-Huei; Adler, Caleb M.; Kim, Mi Jung; Bryan, Holly S.; Alfieri, David C.; Welge, Jeffrey A.; Blom, Thomas J.; Nandagopal, Jayasree J.; Strakowski, Stephen M.; DelBello, Melissa P.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This study used proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ([superscript 1]H MRS) to evaluate the in vivo effects of extended-release divalproex sodium on the glutamatergic system in adolescents with bipolar disorder, and to identify baseline neurochemical predictors of clinical remission. Method: Adolescents with bipolar disorder who were…

  15. Abnormally increased surface expression of AMPA receptors in the cerebellum, cortex and striatum of Cln3(-/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Attila D; Hof, Caitlin; Pearce, David A

    2015-10-21

    Mutations in the CLN3 gene cause a fatal neurodegenerative disorder, juvenile CLN3 disease. Exploring the cause of the motor coordination deficit in the Cln3(-/-) mouse model of the disease we have previously found that attenuation of AMPA receptor activity in 1-month-old Cln3(-/-) mice significantly improves their motor coordination [20]. To elucidate the mechanism of the abnormally increased AMPA receptor function in Cln3(-/-) mice, we examined the surface expression of AMPA receptors using surface cross-linking in brain slices from 1-month-old wild type (WT) and Cln3(-/-) mice. In surface cross-linked brain samples, Western blotting for AMPA receptor subunits revealed significantly increased surface levels of GluA1 and GluA2 in the cerebellum, and of GluA2 in the cortex and striatum of Cln3(-/-) mice as compared to WT mice. Expression levels of the GluA4 subunit were similar in the cerebellum of WT and Cln3(-/-) mice. While intracellular GluA1 levels in the WT and Cln3(-/-) cerebellum or cortex were similar, the intracellular expression of GluA1 in the Cln3(-/-) striatum was decreased to 56% of the WT level. Our results show a prominent increase in AMPA receptor surface expression in the brain of Cln3(-/-) mice and suggest that CLN3 is involved in the regulation of AMPA receptor surface expression. PMID:26375929

  16. Myelin Proteolipid Protein Complexes with αv Integrin and AMPA Receptors In Vivo and Regulates AMPA-Dependent Oligodendrocyte Progenitor Cell Migration through the Modulation of Cell-Surface GluR2 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Harlow, Danielle E.; Saul, Katherine E.; Komuro, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    In previous studies, stimulation of ionotropic AMPA/kainate glutamate receptors on cultured oligodendrocyte cells induced the formation of a signaling complex that includes the AMPA receptor, integrins, calcium-binding proteins, and, surprisingly, the myelin proteolipid protein (PLP). AMPA stimulation of cultured oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) also caused an increase in OPC migration. The current studies focused primarily on the formation of the PLP–αv integrin–AMPA receptor complex in vivo and whether complex formation impacts OPC migration in the brain. We found that in wild-type cerebellum, PLP associates with αv integrin and the calcium-impermeable GluR2 subunit of the AMPA receptor, but in mice lacking PLP, αv integrin did not associate with GluR2. Live imaging studies of OPC migration in ex vivo cerebellar slices demonstrated altered OPC migratory responses to neurotransmitter stimulation in the absence of PLP and GluR2 or when αv integrin levels were reduced. Chemotaxis assays of purified OPCs revealed that AMPA stimulation was neither attractive nor repulsive but clearly increased the migration rate of wild-type but not PLP null OPCs. AMPA receptor stimulation of wild-type OPCs caused decreased cell-surface expression of the GluR2 AMPA receptor subunit and increased intracellular Ca2+ signaling, whereas PLP null OPCs did not reduce GluR2 at the cell surface or increase Ca2+ signaling in response to AMPA treatment. Together, these studies demonstrate that PLP is critical for OPC responses to glutamate signaling and has important implications for OPC responses when levels of glutamate are high in the extracellular space, such as following demyelination. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT After demyelination, such as occurs in multiple sclerosis, remyelination of axons is often incomplete, leading to loss of neuronal function and clinical disability. Remyelination may fail because oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) do not completely migrate into

  17. Jun-B expression in Purkinje cells by conjunctive stimulation of climbing fibre and AMPA.

    PubMed

    Yamamori, T; Mikawa, S; Kado, R

    1995-03-27

    Co-application of alpha-amino-3-hydro-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate (AMPA) and 8-bromo cGMP (8-Br-cGMP) which cause long-term desensitization also induces c-Fos and Jun-B expression in Purkinje cells of cerebellar slices [Nakazawa K, Karachot L, Nakabeppu Y et al. NeuroReport 4, 1275-1278 (1993)]. Here, we report an increased local induction of Jun-B immunoreactivity in Purkinje cells in vivo when electrical stimulation of the inferior olive nucleus (IOn) was conjunctively applied with AMPA on the vermis. The present data further supports the idea that conjunctive heterosynaptic inputs to cerebellar Purkinje cells can trigger active gene transcription thus possibly contributing to cerebellar long-term plasticity. They also demonstrate that Jun-B may be a useful transcriptional marker to study cerebellar coincidence phenomena. PMID:7541656

  18. Mechanisms of disease: motoneuron disease aggravated by transgenic expression of a functionally modified AMPA receptor subunit.

    PubMed

    Kuner, Rohini; Groom, Anthony J; Müller, Gerald; Kornau, Hans-Christian; Stefovska, Vanya; Bresink, Iris; Hartmann, Bettina; Tschauner, Karsten; Waibel, Stefan; Ludolph, Albert C; Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy; Seeburg, Peter H; Turski, Lechoslaw

    2005-08-01

    To reveal whether increased Ca2+ permeability of glutamate AMPA channels triggered by the transgene for GluR-B(N) induces decline in motor functions and neurodegeneration in the spinal cord, we evaluated growth, motor coordination, and spinal reflexes in transgenic GluR-B(N) and wild-type (wt) mice. To reveal whether the transgenic GluR-B(N) expression aggravates the course of motoneuron disease in SOD1 mice, we mated heterozygous GluR-B(N) and SOD1 [C57BL6Ico-TgN(hSOD1-G93A)1Gur] mice to generate double-transgenic progeny. The phenotypic sequelae in mice carrying mutations were evaluated by monitoring growth, motor coordination, and survival. Neuronal degeneration was assessed by morphological and stereological analysis of spinal cord and brain. We found that transgenic expression in mice of GluR-B(N)-containing glutamate AMPA receptors with increased Ca2+ permeability leads to a late-onset degeneration of neurons in the spinal cord and decline of motor functions. Neuronal death progressed over the entire life span, but manifested clinically in late adulthood, resembling the course of a slow neurodegenerative disorder. Additional transgenic expression of mutated human SOD1 accelerated disease progression, aggravated severity of motor decline, and decreased survival. These observations reveal that moderate, but persistently elevated Ca2+ influx via glutamate AMPA channels causes degeneration of spinal motoneurons and motor decline over the span of life. These features resemble the course of sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in humans and suggest that modified function of glutamate AMPA channels may be causally linked to pathogenesis of ALS. PMID:16179532

  19. Discovery and Characterization of AMPA Receptor Modulators Selective for TARP-γ8.

    PubMed

    Maher, Michael P; Wu, Nyantsz; Ravula, Suchitra; Ameriks, Michael K; Savall, Brad M; Liu, Changlu; Lord, Brian; Wyatt, Ryan M; Matta, Jose A; Dugovic, Christine; Yun, Sujin; Ver Donck, Luc; Steckler, Thomas; Wickenden, Alan D; Carruthers, Nicholas I; Lovenberg, Timothy W

    2016-05-01

    Members of the α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid (AMPA) subtype of ionotropic glutamate receptors mediate the majority of fast synaptic transmission within the mammalian brain and spinal cord, representing attractive targets for therapeutic intervention. Here, we describe novel AMPA receptor modulators that require the presence of the accessory protein CACNG8, also known as transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory protein γ8 (TARP-γ8). Using calcium flux, radioligand binding, and electrophysiological assays of wild-type and mutant forms of TARP-γ8, we demonstrate that these compounds possess a novel mechanism of action consistent with a partial disruption of the interaction between the TARP and the pore-forming subunit of the channel. One of the molecules, 5-[2-chloro-6-(trifluoromethoxy)phenyl]-1,3-dihydrobenzimidazol-2-one (JNJ-55511118), had excellent pharmacokinetic properties and achieved high receptor occupancy following oral administration. This molecule showed strong, dose-dependent inhibition of neurotransmission within the hippocampus, and a strong anticonvulsant effect. At high levels of receptor occupancy in rodent in vivo models, JNJ-55511118 showed a strong reduction in certain bands on electroencephalogram, transient hyperlocomotion, no motor impairment on rotarod, and a mild impairment in learning and memory. JNJ-55511118 is a novel tool for reversible AMPA receptor inhibition, particularly within the hippocampus, with potential therapeutic utility as an anticonvulsant or neuroprotectant. The existence of a molecule with this mechanism of action demonstrates the possibility of pharmacological targeting of accessory proteins, increasing the potential number of druggable targets. PMID:26989142

  20. Cochlear nucleus neurons redistribute synaptic AMPA and glycine receptors in response to monaural conductive hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Whiting, Brittany; Moiseff, Andrew; Rubio, María E.

    2009-01-01

    Neurons restore their function in response to external or internal perturbations and maintain neuronal or network stability through a homeostatic scaling mechanism. Homeostatic responses at synapses along the auditory system would be important for adaptation to normal and abnormal fluctuations in the sensory environment. We investigated at the electron microscopic level and after postembedding immunogold labeling whether projection neurons in the cochlear nucleus responded to modifications of auditory nerve activity. After unilaterally reducing the level of auditory inputs by ~ 20 dB by monaural earplugging, auditory nerve synapses on bushy cells somata and basal dendrites of fusiform cells of the ventral and dorsal cochlear nucleus, respectively, upregulated GluR3 AMPA receptor subunit, while inhibitory synapses decreased the expression of GlyRα1 subunit. These changes in expression levels were fully reversible once the earplug was removed, indicating that activity affects the trafficking of receptors at synapses. Excitatory synapses on apical dendrites of fusiform cells (parallel fibers) with different synaptic AMPA receptor subunit composition, were not affected by sound attenuation, as the expression levels of AMPA receptor subunits were the same as in normal hearing littermates. GlyRα1 subunit expression at inhibitory synapses on apical dendrites of fusiform cells was also found unaffected. Furthermore, fusiform and bushy cells of the contralateral side to the earplugging upregulated the GluR3 subunit at auditory nerve synapses. These results show that cochlear nucleus neurons innervated by the auditory nerve, are able to respond to small changes in sound levels by redistributing specific AMPA and glycine receptor subunits. PMID:19646510

  1. Glyphosate and AMPA contents in sediments produced by wind erosion of agricultural soils in Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparicio, Virginia; Aimar, Silvia; De Gerónimo, Eduardo; Buschiazzo, Daniel; Mendez, Mariano; Costa, José Luis

    2014-05-01

    Wind erosion of soils is an important event in arid and semiarid regions of Argentina. The magnitude of wind erosion occurring under different management practices is relatively well known in this region but less information is available on the quality of the eroded material. Considering that the intensification of agriculture may increase the concentrations of substances in the eroded material, producing potential negative effects on the environment, we analyzed the amount of glyphosate and AMPA in sediments produced by wind erosion of agricultural soils of Argentina. Wind eroded materials were collected by means of BSNE samplers in two loess sites of the semiarid region of Argentina: Chaco and La Pampa. Samples were collected from 1 ha square fields at 13.5, 50 and 150 cm height. Results showed that at higher heights the concentrations of glyphosate and AMPA were mostly higher. The glyphosate concentration was more variable and higher in Chaco (0.66 to 313 µg kg-1) than in La Pampa (4.17 to 114 µg kg-1). These results may be due to the higher use of herbicides in Chaco, where the predominant crops are soybeans and corn, produced under no-tillage. Under these conditions the use of glyphosate for weeds control is a common practice. Conversely, AMPA concentrations were higher in La Pampa (13.1 to 101.3 µg kg-1) than in Chaco (1.3 to 83 µg kg-1). These preliminary results show high concentrations of glyphosate and AMPA in wind eroded materials of agricultural soils of Argentina. More research is needed to confirm these high concentrations in other conditions in order to detect the temporal and spatial distribution patterns of the herbicide.

  2. The Influence of Synaptic Size on AMPA Receptor Activation: A Monte Carlo Model

    PubMed Central

    Montes, Jesus; Peña, Jose M.; DeFelipe, Javier; Herreras, Oscar; Merchan-Perez, Angel

    2015-01-01

    Physiological and electron microscope studies have shown that synapses are functionally and morphologically heterogeneous and that variations in size of synaptic junctions are related to characteristics such as release probability and density of postsynaptic AMPA receptors. The present article focuses on how these morphological variations impact synaptic transmission. We based our study on Monte Carlo computational simulations of simplified model synapses whose morphological features have been extracted from hundreds of actual synaptic junctions reconstructed by three-dimensional electron microscopy. We have examined the effects that parameters such as synaptic size or density of AMPA receptors have on the number of receptors that open after release of a single synaptic vesicle. Our results indicate that the maximum number of receptors that will open after the release of a single synaptic vesicle may show a ten-fold variation in the whole population of synapses. When individual synapses are considered, there is also a stochastical variability that is maximal in small synapses with low numbers of receptors. The number of postsynaptic receptors and the size of the synaptic junction are the most influential parameters, while the packing density of receptors or the concentration of extrasynaptic transporters have little or no influence on the opening of AMPA receptors. PMID:26107874

  3. The influence of synaptic size on AMPA receptor activation: a Monte Carlo model.

    PubMed

    Montes, Jesus; Peña, Jose M; DeFelipe, Javier; Herreras, Oscar; Merchan-Perez, Angel

    2015-01-01

    Physiological and electron microscope studies have shown that synapses are functionally and morphologically heterogeneous and that variations in size of synaptic junctions are related to characteristics such as release probability and density of postsynaptic AMPA receptors. The present article focuses on how these morphological variations impact synaptic transmission. We based our study on Monte Carlo computational simulations of simplified model synapses whose morphological features have been extracted from hundreds of actual synaptic junctions reconstructed by three-dimensional electron microscopy. We have examined the effects that parameters such as synaptic size or density of AMPA receptors have on the number of receptors that open after release of a single synaptic vesicle. Our results indicate that the maximum number of receptors that will open after the release of a single synaptic vesicle may show a ten-fold variation in the whole population of synapses. When individual synapses are considered, there is also a stochastical variability that is maximal in small synapses with low numbers of receptors. The number of postsynaptic receptors and the size of the synaptic junction are the most influential parameters, while the packing density of receptors or the concentration of extrasynaptic transporters have little or no influence on the opening of AMPA receptors. PMID:26107874

  4. Synergy of AMPA and NMDA Receptor Currents in Dopaminergic Neurons: A Modeling Study.

    PubMed

    Zakharov, Denis; Lapish, Christopher; Gutkin, Boris; Kuznetsov, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    Dopaminergic (DA) neurons display two modes of firing: low-frequency tonic and high-frequency bursts. The high frequency firing within the bursts is attributed to NMDA, but not AMPA receptor activation. In our models of the DA neuron, both biophysical and abstract, the NMDA receptor current can significantly increase their firing frequency, whereas the AMPA receptor current is not able to evoke high-frequency activity and usually suppresses firing. However, both currents are produced by glutamate receptors and, consequently, are often co-activated. Here we consider combined influence of AMPA and NMDA synaptic input in the models of the DA neuron. Different types of neuronal activity (resting state, low frequency, or high frequency firing) are observed depending on the conductance of the AMPAR and NMDAR currents. In two models, biophysical and reduced, we show that the firing frequency increases more effectively if both receptors are co-activated for certain parameter values. In particular, in the more quantitative biophysical model, the maximal frequency is 40% greater than that with NMDAR alone. The dynamical mechanism of such frequency growth is explained in the framework of phase space evolution using the reduced model. In short, both the AMPAR and NMDAR currents flatten the voltage nullcline, providing the frequency increase, whereas only NMDA prevents complete unfolding of the nullcline, providing robust firing. Thus, we confirm a major role of the NMDAR in generating high-frequency firing and conclude that AMPAR activation further significantly increases the frequency. PMID:27252643

  5. Synergy of AMPA and NMDA Receptor Currents in Dopaminergic Neurons: A Modeling Study

    PubMed Central

    Zakharov, Denis; Lapish, Christopher; Gutkin, Boris; Kuznetsov, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    Dopaminergic (DA) neurons display two modes of firing: low-frequency tonic and high-frequency bursts. The high frequency firing within the bursts is attributed to NMDA, but not AMPA receptor activation. In our models of the DA neuron, both biophysical and abstract, the NMDA receptor current can significantly increase their firing frequency, whereas the AMPA receptor current is not able to evoke high-frequency activity and usually suppresses firing. However, both currents are produced by glutamate receptors and, consequently, are often co-activated. Here we consider combined influence of AMPA and NMDA synaptic input in the models of the DA neuron. Different types of neuronal activity (resting state, low frequency, or high frequency firing) are observed depending on the conductance of the AMPAR and NMDAR currents. In two models, biophysical and reduced, we show that the firing frequency increases more effectively if both receptors are co-activated for certain parameter values. In particular, in the more quantitative biophysical model, the maximal frequency is 40% greater than that with NMDAR alone. The dynamical mechanism of such frequency growth is explained in the framework of phase space evolution using the reduced model. In short, both the AMPAR and NMDAR currents flatten the voltage nullcline, providing the frequency increase, whereas only NMDA prevents complete unfolding of the nullcline, providing robust firing. Thus, we confirm a major role of the NMDAR in generating high-frequency firing and conclude that AMPAR activation further significantly increases the frequency. PMID:27252643

  6. Late-onset motoneuron disease caused by a functionally modified AMPA receptor subunit.

    PubMed

    Kuner, Rohini; Groom, Anthony J; Bresink, Iris; Kornau, Hans-Christian; Stefovska, Vanya; Müller, Gerald; Hartmann, Bettina; Tschauner, Karsten; Waibel, Stefan; Ludolph, Albert C; Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy; Seeburg, Peter H; Turski, Lechoslaw

    2005-04-19

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating disorder of the central nervous system in middle and old age that leads to progressive loss of spinal motoneurons. Transgenic mice overexpressing mutated human Cu(2+)/Zn(2+) superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) reproduce clinical features of the familial form of ALS. However, changes in SOD1 activity do not correlate with severity of motor decline in sporadic cases, indicating that targets unrelated to superoxide metabolism contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease. We show here that transgenic expression in mice of GluR-B(N)-containing L-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-proprionate (AMPA) receptors with increased Ca(2+) permeability leads to late-onset degeneration of neurons in the spinal cord and decline of motor functions. Neuronal death progresses over the entire lifespan but manifests clinically in late adulthood, resembling the course of a slow neurodegenerative disorder. Additional transgenic expression of mutated human SOD1 accelerates disease progression, aggravates the severity of motor decline, and decreases survival. These observations link persistently elevated Ca(2+) influx through AMPA channels with progressive motor decline and late-onset degeneration of spinal motoneurons, indicating that functionally altered AMPA channels may be causally related to pathogenesis of sporadic ALS in humans. PMID:15827116

  7. Late-onset motoneuron disease caused by a functionally modified AMPA receptor subunit

    PubMed Central

    Kuner, Rohini; Groom, Anthony J.; Bresink, Iris; Kornau, Hans-Christian; Stefovska, Vanya; Müller, Gerald; Hartmann, Bettina; Tschauner, Karsten; Waibel, Stefan; Ludolph, Albert C.; Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy; Seeburg, Peter H.; Turski, Lechoslaw

    2005-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating disorder of the central nervous system in middle and old age that leads to progressive loss of spinal motoneurons. Transgenic mice overexpressing mutated human Cu2+/Zn2+ superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) reproduce clinical features of the familial form of ALS. However, changes in SOD1 activity do not correlate with severity of motor decline in sporadic cases, indicating that targets unrelated to superoxide metabolism contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease. We show here that transgenic expression in mice of GluR-B(N)-containing l-α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-proprionate (AMPA) receptors with increased Ca2+ permeability leads to late-onset degeneration of neurons in the spinal cord and decline of motor functions. Neuronal death progresses over the entire lifespan but manifests clinically in late adulthood, resembling the course of a slow neurodegenerative disorder. Additional transgenic expression of mutated human SOD1 accelerates disease progression, aggravates the severity of motor decline, and decreases survival. These observations link persistently elevated Ca2+ influx through AMPA channels with progressive motor decline and late-onset degeneration of spinal motoneurons, indicating that functionally altered AMPA channels may be causally related to pathogenesis of sporadic ALS in humans. PMID:15827116

  8. X-ray structures of AMPA receptor-cone snail toxin complexes illuminate activation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Dürr, Katharina L; Gouaux, Eric

    2014-08-29

    AMPA-sensitive glutamate receptors are crucial to the structural and dynamic properties of the brain, to the development and function of the central nervous system, and to the treatment of neurological conditions from depression to cognitive impairment. However, the molecular principles underlying AMPA receptor activation have remained elusive. We determined multiple x-ray crystal structures of the GluA2 AMPA receptor in complex with a Conus striatus cone snail toxin, a positive allosteric modulator, and orthosteric agonists, at 3.8 to 4.1 angstrom resolution. We show how the toxin acts like a straightjacket on the ligand-binding domain (LBD) "gating ring," restraining the domains via both intra- and interdimer cross-links such that agonist-induced closure of the LBD "clamshells" is transduced into an irislike expansion of the gating ring. By structural analysis of activation-enhancing mutants, we show how the expansion of the LBD gating ring results in pulling forces on the M3 helices that, in turn, are coupled to ion channel gating. PMID:25103405

  9. in Silico investigation of the structural requirements for the AMPA receptor antagonism by quinoxaline derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Faizul; Abugrain, Ismaiel Mohamed; Sanalla, Mohamed Hussin; Elnaas, Radwan Fatahalla; Rajab, Ibrahim Abdassalam Ibn

    2013-01-01

    Glutamate receptors have been implicated in various neurological disorders and their antagonism offers a suitable approach for the treatment of such disorders. The field of drug design and discovery aims to find best medicines to prevent, treat and cure diseases quickly and efficiently. In this regard, computational tools have helped medicinal chemists modify and optimize molecules to potent drug candidates with better pharmacokinetic profiles, and guiding biologists and pharmacologists to explore new disease genes as well as novel drug targets. In the present study, to understand the structural requirements for AMPA receptor antagonism, molecular docking study was performed on 41 structurally diverse antagonists based on quinoxaline nucleus. Lamarckian genetic algorithm methodology was employed for docking simulations using AutoDock 4.2 program. The results obtained signify that the molecular docking approach is reliable and produces a good correlation coefficient (r2 = 0.6) between experimental and docking predicted AMPA receptor antagonistic activity. The aromatic moiety of quinoxaline core has been proved to be vital for hydrophobic contacts exhibiting - interactions in docked conformations. However, polar moieties such as carboxylic group and 1,2,4-triazole moieties were noted to be sites for hydrophilic interactions in terms of hydrogen bonding with the receptor. These analyses can be exploited to design and develop novel AMPA receptor antagonists for the treatment of different neurological disorders. PMID:24250113

  10. Targeting of GLUR4-containing AMPA receptors to synaptic sites during in vitro classical conditioning.

    PubMed

    Mokin, M; Keifer, J

    2004-01-01

    The synaptic delivery of GluR4-containing AMPA receptors during in vitro classical conditioning of a neural correlate of an eyeblink response was examined by fluorescence imaging of punctate staining for glutamate receptor subunits and the presynaptic marker synaptophysin. There was a significant increase in GluR4-containing AMPA receptors to synaptic sites after conditioning as determined by colocalization of GluR4 subunit puncta with synaptophysin. Moreover, the trafficking of these receptor subunits requires NMDA receptor activation as it was blocked by D,L-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (AP-5). In contrast, colocalization of NR1 subunits with synaptophysin was stable regardless of whether the preparations had undergone conditioning or had been treated by AP-5. The enhanced colocalization of GluR4 and synaptophysin was accompanied by an increase in both the total number and size of puncta for both proteins, suggesting greater synthesis and aggregation during conditioning. Western blot analysis confirmed upregulation of synaptophysin and GluR4 following conditioning. These data support the hypothesis that GluR4-containing AMPA receptors are delivered to synaptic sites during conditioning. Further, they suggest coordinate presynaptic and postsynaptic modifications during in vitro classical conditioning. PMID:15350635

  11. Developmental Regulation of the Toxin Sensitivity of Ca2+ -Permeable AMPA Receptors in Cortical Glia

    PubMed Central

    Meucci, Olimpia; Fatatis, Alessandro; Holzwarth, James A.; Miller, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    We examined the properties of glutamate agonist-induced Ca2+ fluxes in cultured CG-4 and O-2A progenitor cells from rat cortex. Kainate-induced Ca2+ fluxes in these cells were found to be attributable to the activation of AMPA receptors. Thus, these fluxes were enhanced by cyclothiazide but not by concanavalin A and were blocked completely by GYKI-53655. We simultaneously examined kainate-induced Ca2+ entry and Na+ currents in these cells under voltage-clamp conditions. Both of these parameters were blocked by Joro spider toxin (JSTx) in undifferentiated cells. However, neither JSTx nor Argiotoxin 636 effectively blocked either parameter in cells differentiated into type II astrocytes. This change in toxin sensitivity occurred slowly over a period of several days. Similar results were obtained in Ca2+ -imaging studies. When cells were differentiated into oligodendrocytes, they showed an intermediate sensitivity to block by JSTx as assessed using imaging and voltage-clamp studies. Analysis of the expression of AMPA-receptor subunits showed an increase in the concentration of glutamate receptor-2 (GluR2) in CG-4 cells as they differentiated into type II astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. These results demonstrate that the AMPA receptors in cells of the O-2A lineage flux appreciable amounts of Ca2+ but may contain variable amounts of edited GluR2 subunits. PMID:8551336

  12. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) modulate AMPA receptor phosphorylation and cell-surface localization in concert with pain-related behavior

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Daniel Z.; Chung, Jin M.; Chung, Kyungsoon; Kang, Myoung-Goo

    2012-01-01

    Sensitization of dorsal horn neurons (DHNs) in the spinal cord is dependent on pain-related synaptic plasticity and causes persistent pain. The DHN sensitization is mediated by a signal transduction pathway initiated by the activation of NMDA receptors (NMDA-Rs). Recent studies have shown that elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and phosphorylation-dependent trafficking of GluA2 subunit of AMPA receptors (AMPA-Rs) are a part of the signaling pathway for DHN sensitization. However, the relationship between ROS and AMPA-R phosphorylation and trafficking is not known. Thus, this study investigated the effects of ROS scavengers on the phosphorylation and cell-surface localization of GluA1 and GluA2. Intrathecal NMDA- and intradermal capsaicin-induced hyperalgesic mice were used for this study since both pain models share the NMDA-R activation-dependent DHN sensitization in the spinal cord. Our behavioral, biochemical, and immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated that: 1) NMDA-R activation in vivo increased the phosphorylation of AMPA-Rs at GluA1 (S818, S831, and S845) and GluA2 (S880) subunits, 2) NMDA-R activation in vivo increased cell-surface localization of GluA1 but decreased that of GluA2, and 3) reduction of ROS levels by ROS scavengers PBN or TEMPOL reversed these changes in AMPA-Rs, as well as pain-related behavior. Given that AMPA-R trafficking to the cell surface and synapse is regulated by NMDA-R activation-dependent phosphorylation of GluA1 and GluA2, our study suggests that the ROS-dependent changes in the phosphorylation and cell-surface localization of AMPA-Rs are necessary for DHN sensitization and thus pain-related behavior. We further suggest that ROS reduction will ameliorate these molecular changes and pain. PMID:22770842

  13. Functional Connectome Analysis of Dopamine Neuron Glutamatergic Connections in Forebrain Regions

    PubMed Central

    Mingote, Susana; Chuhma, Nao; Kusnoor, Sheila V.; Field, Bianca; Deutch, Ariel Y.

    2015-01-01

    In the ventral tegmental area (VTA), a subpopulation of dopamine neurons express vesicular glutamate transporter 2 and make glutamatergic connections to nucleus accumbens (NAc) and olfactory tubercle (OT) neurons. However, their glutamatergic connections across the forebrain have not been explored systematically. To visualize dopamine neuron forebrain projections and to enable photostimulation of their axons independent of transmitter status, we virally transfected VTA neurons with channelrhodopsin-2 fused to enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (ChR2-EYFP) and used DATIREScre mice to restrict expression to dopamine neurons. ChR2-EYFP-expressing neurons almost invariably stained for tyrosine hydroxylase, identifying them as dopaminergic. Dopamine neuron axons visualized by ChR2-EYFP fluorescence projected most densely to the striatum, moderately to the amygdala and entorhinal cortex (ERC), sparsely to prefrontal and cingulate cortices, and rarely to the hippocampus. Guided by ChR2-EYFP fluorescence, we recorded systematically from putative principal neurons in target areas and determined the incidence and strength of glutamatergic connections by activating all dopamine neuron terminals impinging on recorded neurons with wide-field photostimulation. This revealed strong glutamatergic connections in the NAc, OT, and ERC; moderate strength connections in the central amygdala; and weak connections in the cingulate cortex. No glutamatergic connections were found in the dorsal striatum, hippocampus, basolateral amygdala, or prefrontal cortex. These results indicate that VTA dopamine neurons elicit widespread, but regionally distinct, glutamatergic signals in the forebrain and begin to define the dopamine neuron excitatory functional connectome. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Dopamine neurons are important for the control of motivated behavior and are involved in the pathophysiology of several major neuropsychiatric disorders. Recent studies have shown that some ventral midbrain

  14. Sources and Input Pathways of Glyphosate and its Degradation Product AMPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischofberger, S.; Hanke, I.; Wittmer, I.; Singer, H.; Stamm, C.

    2009-04-01

    Despite being the pesticide used in the largest quantities worldwide, the environmental relevance of glyphosate has been considered low for many years. Reasons for this assessment were the observations that glyphosate degrades quickly into its degradation product AMPA and that it sorbs strongly to soil particles. Hence, little losses to water bodies had been expected. Research during the last few years however contradicts this expectation. Although glyphosate is a dominant pesticide used in agriculture, recent studies on other pesticides revealed that urban sources may play a significant role for water quality. Therefore this study compares glyphosate input into streams from agricultural and urban sources. For that purpose, a catchment of an area of 25 km2 was selected. It has by about 12'000 inhabitants and about 15 % of the area is used as arable land. Four sampling sites were selected in the river system in order to reflect different urban and agricultural sources. Additionally, we sampled a combined sewer overflow, a rain sewer and the outflow of a waste water treatment plant. At each site discharge was measured continuously from March to November 2007. During 16 rain events samples were taken by automatic devices at a high temporal resolution. To analyze the concentration of glyphosate and its degradation product AMPA, the samples were derivatized with FMOC-Cl at low pH conditions and then filtrated. The solid phase extraction was conducted with Strata-X sorbent cartridge. Glyphosate and AMPA were detected with API 4000 after the chromatography with X bridge column C18. To assure the data quality, interne standards of Glyphosate and AMPA were added to every sample. The limit of detection and quantification for glyphosate and AMPA are bellow 1ng/l. We analyzed two rain events at a high resolution for all stations and several events at the outlet of the catchment. We measured high glyphosate concentration in urban and agriculture dominated catchments with up to

  15. Tweaking Subtype Selectivity and Agonist Efficacy at (S)-2-Amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazol-4-yl)propionic acid (AMPA) Receptors in a Small Series of BnTetAMPA Analogues.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuang-Yan; Larsen, Younes; Navarrete, Cristina Vara; Jensen, Anders A; Nielsen, Birgitte; Al-Musaed, Ali; Frydenvang, Karla; Kastrup, Jette Sandholm; Pickering, Darryl S; Clausen, Rasmus Prætorius

    2016-03-10

    A series of analogues of the (S)-2-Amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazol-4-yl)propionic acid (AMPA) receptor agonist BnTetAMPA (5b) were synthesized and characterized pharmacologically in radioligand binding assays at native and cloned AMPA receptors and functionally by two-electrode voltage clamp electrophysiology at the four homomeric AMPA receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. The analogues 6 and 7 exhibit very different pharmacological profiles with binding affinity preference for the subtypes GluA1 and GluA3, respectively. X-ray crystal structures of three ligands (6, 7, and 8) in complex with the agonist binding domain (ABD) of GluA2 show that they induce full domain closure despite their low agonist efficacies. Trp767 in GluA2 ABD could be an important determinant for partial agonism of this compound series at AMPA receptors, since agonist efficacy also correlated with the location of the Trp767 side chain. PMID:26862980

  16. Proteomic screening of glutamatergic mouse brain synaptosomes isolated by fluorescence activated sorting

    PubMed Central

    Biesemann, Christoph; Grønborg, Mads; Luquet, Elisa; Wichert, Sven P; Bernard, Véronique; Bungers, Simon R; Cooper, Ben; Varoqueaux, Frédérique; Li, Liyi; Byrne, Jennifer A; Urlaub, Henning; Jahn, Olaf; Brose, Nils; Herzog, Etienne

    2014-01-01

    For decades, neuroscientists have used enriched preparations of synaptic particles called synaptosomes to study synapse function. However, the interpretation of corresponding data is problematic as synaptosome preparations contain multiple types of synapses and non-synaptic neuronal and glial contaminants. We established a novel Fluorescence Activated Synaptosome Sorting (FASS) method that substantially improves conventional synaptosome enrichment protocols and enables high-resolution biochemical analyses of specific synapse subpopulations. Employing knock-in mice with fluorescent glutamatergic synapses, we show that FASS isolates intact ultrapure synaptosomes composed of a resealed presynaptic terminal and a postsynaptic density as assessed by light and electron microscopy. FASS synaptosomes contain bona fide glutamatergic synapse proteins but are almost devoid of other synapse types and extrasynaptic or glial contaminants. We identified 163 enriched proteins in FASS samples, of which FXYD6 and Tpd52 were validated as new synaptic proteins. FASS purification thus enables high-resolution biochemical analyses of specific synapse subpopulations in health and disease. PMID:24413018

  17. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Expression Is Restricted to Subsets of Excitatory Pyramidal Glutamatergic Neurons.

    PubMed

    Louessard, Morgane; Lacroix, Alexandre; Martineau, Magalie; Mondielli, Gregoire; Montagne, Axel; Lesept, Flavie; Lambolez, Bertrand; Cauli, Bruno; Mothet, Jean-Pierre; Vivien, Denis; Maubert, Eric

    2016-09-01

    Although the extracellular serine protease tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is involved in pathophysiological processes such as learning and memory, anxiety, epilepsy, stroke, and Alzheimer's disease, information about its regional, cellular, and subcellular distribution in vivo is lacking. In the present study, we observed, in healthy mice and rats, the presence of tPA in endothelial cells, oligodendrocytes, mastocytes, and ependymocytes, but not in pericytes, microglial cells, and astrocytes. Moreover, blockage of the axo-dendritic transport unmasked tPA expression in neurons of cortical and hippocampal areas. Interestingly, combined electrophysiological recordings, single-cell reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and immunohistological analyses revealed that the presence of tPA is restricted to subsets of excitatory pyramidal glutamatergic neurons. We further evidenced that tPA is stored in synaptobrevin-2-positive glutamatergic synaptic vesicles. Based on all these data, we propose the existence of tPA-ergic neurons in the mature brain. PMID:26377106

  18. ADAR-mediated RNA editing suppresses sleep by acting as a brake on glutamatergic synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, J. E.; Paluch, J.; Dickman, D. K.; Joiner, W. J.

    2016-01-01

    It has been postulated that synaptic potentiation during waking is offset by a homoeostatic reduction in net synaptic strength during sleep. However, molecular mechanisms to support such a process are lacking. Here we demonstrate that deficiencies in the RNA-editing gene Adar increase sleep due to synaptic dysfunction in glutamatergic neurons in Drosophila. Specifically, the vesicular glutamate transporter is upregulated, leading to over-activation of NMDA receptors, and the reserve pool of glutamatergic synaptic vesicles is selectively expanded in Adar mutants. Collectively these changes lead to sustained neurotransmitter release under conditions that would otherwise result in synaptic depression. We propose that a shift in the balance from synaptic depression towards synaptic potentiation in sleep-promoting neurons underlies the increased sleep pressure of Adar-deficient animals. Our findings provide a plausible molecular mechanism linking sleep and synaptic plasticity. PMID:26813350

  19. Synapse-associated protein-97 isoform-specific regulation of surface AMPA receptors and synaptic function in cultured neurons.

    PubMed

    Rumbaugh, Gavin; Sia, Gek-Ming; Garner, Craig C; Huganir, Richard L

    2003-06-01

    Members of the synapse-associated protein-97 (SAP97) family of scaffold proteins have been implicated as central organizers of synaptic junctions to build macromolecular signaling complexes around specific postsynaptic neurotransmitter receptors. In this regard, SAP97 has been suggested to regulate the synaptic localization of glutamate receptor type 1 subunits of the AMPA-type glutamate receptors. To test this hypothesis directly, we assessed the effects of SAP97 overexpression on surface expression of synaptic AMPA receptors. We find that recombinant SAP97 not only becomes concentrated at synaptic junctions but also leads to an increase in synaptic AMPA receptors, spine enlargement, and an increase in miniature EPSC (mEPSC) frequency, indicating that SAP97 has both postsynaptic and presynaptic effects on synaptic transmission. Synaptic targeting of SAP97, increased surface AMPA receptors, and increased mEPSC frequency are dependent on the presence of specific alternatively spliced sequences in SAP97 that encode a protein 4.1 binding site. These results suggest that SAP97 can affect the synaptic recruitment of AMPA receptors and spine morphology and that these effects may be regulated by alternative splicing. PMID:12805297

  20. Postsynaptic Plasticity Triggered by Ca²⁺-Permeable AMPA Receptor Activation in Retinal Amacrine Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mean-Hwan; von Gersdorff, Henrique

    2016-02-01

    Amacrine cells are thought to be a major locus for mechanisms of light adaptation and contrast enhancement in the retina. However, the potential for plasticity in their AMPA receptor currents remains largely unknown. Using paired patch-clamp recordings between bipolar cell terminals and amacrine cells, we have simultaneously measured presynaptic membrane capacitance changes and EPSCs. Repetitive bipolar cell depolarizations, designed to maintain the same amount of exocytosis, nevertheless significantly potentiated evoked EPSCs in a subpopulation of amacrine cells. Likewise, repetitive iontophoresis (or puffs) of glutamate (or AMPA) onto the dendrites of amacrine cells also significantly potentiated evoked currents and [Ca(2+)]i rises. However, strong postsynaptic Ca(2+) buffering with BAPTA abolished the potentiation and selective antagonists of Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors also blocked the potentiation of AMPA-mediated currents. Together these results suggest that Ca(2+) influx via Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors can elicit a rapid form of postsynaptic plasticity in a subgroup of amacrine cell dendrites. PMID:26804991

  1. Glutamatergic Signaling from the Parabrachial Nucleus Plays a Critical Role in Hypercapnic Arousal

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, S.; Pedersen, N. P.; Yokota, S.; Hur, E.E.; Fuller, P. M.; Lazarus, M.; Chamberlin, N.L.; Saper, C.B.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms of arousal from apneas during sleep in patients suffering from obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are not well understood. However, respiratory chemosensory pathways converge on the parabrachial nucleus (PB), which sends glutamatergic projections to a variety of forebrain structures critical to arousal including the basal forebrain, lateral hypothalamus, midline thalamus, and cerebral cortex. We tested the role of glutamatergic signaling in this pathway by developing an animal model for repetitive CO2 arousals (RCA) and investigating the effect of deleting the gene for the vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (Vglut2) from neurons in the PB. We used mice with lox P sequences flanking exon2 of the Vglut2 gene, in which adeno-associated viral vectors containing genes encoding Cre recombinase and green fluorescent protein were microinjected into the PB to permanently and selectively disrupt Vglut2 expression while labeling the affected neurons. We recorded sleep in these mice and then investigated the arousals during RCA. Vglut2 deletions that included the external lateral and lateral crescent subdivisions of the lateral PB more than doubled the latency to arousal and resulted in failure to arouse by 30 s in over 30% of trials. By contrast, deletions that involved the medial PB subdivision had minimal effects on arousal during hypercapnia but instead increased NREM sleep by about 43% during the dark period, and increased delta power in the EEG during NREM sleep by about 50%. Our results suggest that glutamatergic neurons in the lateral PB are necessary for arousals from sleep in response to CO2, while medial PB glutamatergic neurons play an important role in promoting spontaneous waking. PMID:23637157

  2. Water deprivation activates a glutamatergic projection from the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus to the rostral ventrolateral medulla

    PubMed Central

    Stocker, Sean D.; Simmons, Johnny R.; Toney, Glenn M.; Guyenet, Patrice G.

    2010-01-01

    Elevated sympathetic outflow contributes to the maintenance of blood pressure in water-deprived rats. The neural circuitry underlying this response may involve activation of a pathway from the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVH) to the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). We sought to determine whether the PVH-RVLM projection activated by water deprivation is glutamatergic and/or contains vasopressin- or oxytocin-neurophysins. Vesicular glutamate transporter2 (VGLUT2) mRNA was detected by in situ hybridization in the majority of PVH neurons retrogradely labeled from the ipsilateral RVLM with cholera-toxin subunit B (CTB; 85% on average with regional differences). Very few RVLM-projecting PVH neurons were immunoreactive for oxytocin- or vasopressin-associated neurophysin. Injection of biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) into the PVH produced clusters of BDA-positive nerve terminals within the ipsilateral RVLM that were immunoreactive (ir) for the VGLUT2 protein. Some of these terminals made close appositions with tyrosine-hydroxylase-ir dendrites (presumptive C1 cells). In water-deprived rats (n=4), numerous VGLUT2 mRNA-positive PVH neurons retrogradely labeled from the ipsilateral RVLM with CTB were c-Fos-ir (16–40% depending on PVH region). In marked contrast, few glutamatergic, RVLM-projecting PVH neurons were c-Fos-ir in control rats (n=3; 0–3% depending on PVH region). Most (94 ± 4%) RVLM-projecting PVH neurons activated by water deprivation contained VGLUT2 mRNA. In summary, the majority of PVH neurons that innervate the RVLM are glutamatergic and this population includes the neurons that are activated by water deprivation. One mechanism by which water deprivation may increase the sympathetic outflow is the activation of a glutamatergic pathway from the PVH to the RVLM. PMID:16374796

  3. Differential Control of Cocaine Self-Administration by GABAergic and Glutamatergic CB1 Cannabinoid Receptors.

    PubMed

    Martín-García, Elena; Bourgoin, Lucie; Cathala, Adeline; Kasanetz, Fernando; Mondesir, Miguel; Gutiérrez-Rodriguez, Ana; Reguero, Leire; Fiancette, Jean-François; Grandes, Pedro; Spampinato, Umberto; Maldonado, Rafael; Piazza, Pier Vincenzo; Marsicano, Giovanni; Deroche-Gamonet, Véronique

    2016-08-01

    The type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) modulates numerous neurobehavioral processes and is therefore explored as a target for the treatment of several mental and neurological diseases. However, previous studies have investigated CB1 by targeting it globally, regardless of its two main neuronal localizations on glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons. In the context of cocaine addiction this lack of selectivity is critical since glutamatergic and GABAergic neuronal transmission is involved in different aspects of the disease. To determine whether CB1 exerts different control on cocaine seeking according to its two main neuronal localizations, we used mutant mice with deleted CB1 in cortical glutamatergic neurons (Glu-CB1) or in forebrain GABAergic neurons (GABA-CB1). In Glu-CB1, gene deletion concerns the dorsal telencephalon, including neocortex, paleocortex, archicortex, hippocampal formation and the cortical portions of the amygdala. In GABA-CB1, it concerns several cortical and non-cortical areas including the dorsal striatum, nucleus accumbens, thalamic, and hypothalamic nuclei. We tested complementary components of cocaine self-administration, separating the influence of primary and conditioned effects. Mechanisms underlying each phenotype were explored using in vivo microdialysis and ex vivo electrophysiology. We show that CB1 expression in forebrain GABAergic neurons controls mouse sensitivity to cocaine, while CB1 expression in cortical glutamatergic neurons controls associative learning processes. In accordance, in the nucleus accumbens, GABA-CB1 receptors control cocaine-induced dopamine release and Glu-CB1 receptors control AMPAR/NMDAR ratio; a marker of synaptic plasticity. Our findings demonstrate a critical distinction of the altered balance of Glu-CB1 and GABA-CB1 activity that could participate in the vulnerability to cocaine abuse and addiction. Moreover, these novel insights advance our understanding of CB1 neuropathophysiology. PMID:26612422

  4. Efficient derivation of cortical glutamatergic neurons from human pluripotent stem cells: a model system to study neurotoxicity in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Vazin, Tandis; Ball, K Aurelia; Lu, Hui; Park, Hyungju; Ataeijannati, Yasaman; Head-Gordon, Teresa; Poo, Mu-ming; Schaffer, David V

    2014-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is among the most prevalent forms of dementia affecting the aging population, and pharmacological therapies to date have not been successful in preventing disease progression. Future therapeutic efforts may benefit from the development of models that enable basic investigation of early disease pathology. In particular, disease-relevant models based on human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) may be promising approaches to assess the impact of neurotoxic agents in AD on specific neuronal populations and thereby facilitate the development of novel interventions to avert early disease mechanisms. We implemented an efficient paradigm to convert hPSCs into enriched populations of cortical glutamatergic neurons emerging from dorsal forebrain neural progenitors, aided by modulating Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling. Since AD is generally known to be toxic to glutamatergic circuits, we exposed glutamatergic neurons derived from hESCs to an oligomeric pre-fibrillar forms of Aβ known as "globulomers", which have shown strong correlation with the level of cognitive deficits in AD. Administration of such Aβ oligomers yielded signs of the disease, including cell culture age-dependent binding of Aβ and cell death in the glutamatergic populations. Furthermore, consistent with previous findings in postmortem human AD brain, Aβ-induced toxicity was selective for glutamatergic rather than GABAeric neurons present in our cultures. This in vitro model of cortical glutamatergic neurons thus offers a system for future mechanistic investigation and therapeutic development for AD pathology using human cell types specifically affected by this disease. PMID:24055772

  5. Glutamatergic Monopolar Interneurons Provide a Novel Pathway of Excitation in the Mouse Retina.

    PubMed

    Della Santina, Luca; Kuo, Sidney P; Yoshimatsu, Takeshi; Okawa, Haruhisa; Suzuki, Sachihiro C; Hoon, Mrinalini; Tsuboyama, Kotaro; Rieke, Fred; Wong, Rachel O L

    2016-08-01

    Excitatory and inhibitory neurons in the CNS are distinguished by several features, including morphology, transmitter content, and synapse architecture [1]. Such distinctions are exemplified in the vertebrate retina. Retinal bipolar cells are polarized glutamatergic neurons receiving direct photoreceptor input, whereas amacrine cells are usually monopolar inhibitory interneurons with synapses almost exclusively in the inner retina [2]. Bipolar but not amacrine cell synapses have presynaptic ribbon-like structures at their transmitter release sites. We identified a monopolar interneuron in the mouse retina that resembles amacrine cells morphologically but is glutamatergic and, unexpectedly, makes ribbon synapses. These glutamatergic monopolar interneurons (GluMIs) do not receive direct photoreceptor input, and their light responses are strongly shaped by both ON and OFF pathway-derived inhibitory input. GluMIs contact and make almost as many synapses as type 2 OFF bipolar cells onto OFF-sustained A-type (AOFF-S) retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). However, GluMIs and type 2 OFF bipolar cells possess functionally distinct light-driven responses and may therefore mediate separate components of the excitatory synaptic input to AOFF-S RGCs. The identification of GluMIs thus unveils a novel cellular component of excitatory circuits in the vertebrate retina, underscoring the complexity in defining cell types even in this well-characterized region of the CNS. PMID:27426514

  6. Plasticity-Related Gene 1 Affects Mouse Barrel Cortex Function via Strengthening of Glutamatergic Thalamocortical Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Unichenko, Petr; Kirischuk, Sergei; Yang, Jenq-Wei; Baumgart, Jan; Roskoden, Thomas; Schneider, Patrick; Sommer, Angela; Horta, Guilherme; Radyushkin, Konstantin; Nitsch, Robert; Vogt, Johannes; Luhmann, Heiko J.

    2016-01-01

    Plasticity-related gene-1 (PRG-1) is a brain-specific protein that modulates glutamatergic synaptic transmission. Here we investigated the functional role of PRG-1 in adolescent and adult mouse barrel cortex both in vitro and in vivo. Compared with wild-type (WT) animals, PRG-1-deficient (KO) mice showed specific behavioral deficits in tests assessing sensorimotor integration and whisker-based sensory discrimination as shown in the beam balance/walking test and sandpaper tactile discrimination test, respectively. At P25-31, spontaneous network activity in the barrel cortex in vivo was higher in KO mice compared with WT littermates, but not at P16-19. At P16-19, sensory evoked cortical responses in vivo elicited by single whisker stimulation were comparable in KO and WT mice. In contrast, at P25-31 evoked responses were smaller in amplitude and longer in duration in WT animals, whereas KO mice revealed no such developmental changes. In thalamocortical slices from KO mice, spontaneous activity was increased already at P16-19, and glutamatergic thalamocortical inputs to Layer 4 spiny stellate neurons were potentiated. We conclude that genetic ablation of PRG-1 modulates already at P16-19 spontaneous and evoked excitability of the barrel cortex, including enhancement of thalamocortical glutamatergic inputs to Layer 4, which distorts sensory processing in adulthood. PMID:26980613

  7. Elucidating the Role of AII Amacrine Cells in Glutamatergic Retinal Waves

    PubMed Central

    Firl, Alana; Ke, Jiang-Bin; Zhang, Lei; Fuerst, Peter G.; Singer, Joshua H.

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous retinal activity mediated by glutamatergic neurotransmission—so-called “Stage 3” retinal waves—drives anti-correlated spiking in ON and OFF RGCs during the second week of postnatal development of the mouse. In the mature retina, the activity of a retinal interneuron called the AII amacrine cell is responsible for anti-correlated spiking in ON and OFF α-RGCs. In mature AIIs, membrane hyperpolarization elicits bursting behavior. Here, we postulated that bursting in AIIs underlies the initiation of glutamatergic retinal waves. We tested this hypothesis by using two-photon calcium imaging of spontaneous activity in populations of retinal neurons and by making whole-cell recordings from individual AIIs and α-RGCs in in vitro preparations of mouse retina. We found that AIIs participated in retinal waves, and that their activity was correlated with that of ON α-RGCs and anti-correlated with that of OFF α-RGCs. Though immature AIIs lacked the complement of membrane conductances necessary to generate bursting, pharmacological activation of the M-current, a conductance that modulates bursting in mature AIIs, blocked retinal wave generation. Interestingly, blockade of the pacemaker conductance Ih, a conductance absent in AIIs but present in both ON and OFF cone bipolar cells, caused a dramatic loss of spatial coherence of spontaneous activity. We conclude that during glutamatergic waves, AIIs act to coordinate and propagate activity generated by BCs rather than to initiate spontaneous activity. PMID:25632142

  8. A novel transient glutamatergic population migrating from the pallial-subpallial boundary contributes to neocortical development.

    PubMed

    Teissier, Anne; Griveau, Amélie; Vigier, Lisa; Piolot, Tristan; Borello, Ugo; Pierani, Alessandra

    2010-08-01

    The generation of a precise number of neural cells and the determination of their laminar fate are tightly controlled processes during development of the cerebral cortex. Using genetic tracing in mice, we have identified a population of glutamatergic neurons generated by Dbx1-expressing progenitors at the pallial-subpallial boundary predominantly at embryonic day 12.5 (E12.5) and subsequent to Cajal-Retzius cells. We show that these neurons migrate tangentially to populate the cortical plate (CP) at all rostrocaudal and mediolateral levels by E14.5. At birth, they homogeneously populate cortical areas and represent <5% of cortical cells. However, they are distributed into neocortical layers according to their birthdates and express the corresponding markers of glutamatergic differentiation (Tbr1, ER81, Cux2, Ctip2). Notably, this population dies massively by apoptosis at the completion of corticogenesis and represents 50% of dying neurons in the postnatal day 0 cortex. Specific genetic ablation of these transient Dbx1-derived CP neurons leads to a 20% decrease in neocortical cell numbers in perinatal animals. Our results show that a previously unidentified transient population of glutamatergic neurons migrates from extraneocortical regions over long distance from their generation site and participates in neocortical radial growth in a non-cell-autonomous manner. PMID:20685999

  9. Plasticity-Related Gene 1 Affects Mouse Barrel Cortex Function via Strengthening of Glutamatergic Thalamocortical Transmission.

    PubMed

    Unichenko, Petr; Kirischuk, Sergei; Yang, Jenq-Wei; Baumgart, Jan; Roskoden, Thomas; Schneider, Patrick; Sommer, Angela; Horta, Guilherme; Radyushkin, Konstantin; Nitsch, Robert; Vogt, Johannes; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2016-07-01

    Plasticity-related gene-1 (PRG-1) is a brain-specific protein that modulates glutamatergic synaptic transmission. Here we investigated the functional role of PRG-1 in adolescent and adult mouse barrel cortex both in vitro and in vivo. Compared with wild-type (WT) animals, PRG-1-deficient (KO) mice showed specific behavioral deficits in tests assessing sensorimotor integration and whisker-based sensory discrimination as shown in the beam balance/walking test and sandpaper tactile discrimination test, respectively. At P25-31, spontaneous network activity in the barrel cortex in vivo was higher in KO mice compared with WT littermates, but not at P16-19. At P16-19, sensory evoked cortical responses in vivo elicited by single whisker stimulation were comparable in KO and WT mice. In contrast, at P25-31 evoked responses were smaller in amplitude and longer in duration in WT animals, whereas KO mice revealed no such developmental changes. In thalamocortical slices from KO mice, spontaneous activity was increased already at P16-19, and glutamatergic thalamocortical inputs to Layer 4 spiny stellate neurons were potentiated. We conclude that genetic ablation of PRG-1 modulates already at P16-19 spontaneous and evoked excitability of the barrel cortex, including enhancement of thalamocortical glutamatergic inputs to Layer 4, which distorts sensory processing in adulthood. PMID:26980613

  10. Odor Preference Learning and Memory Modify GluA1 Phosphorylation and GluA1 Distribution in the Neonate Rat Olfactory Bulb: Testing the AMPA Receptor Hypothesis in an Appetitive Learning Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cui, Wen; Darby-King, Andrea; Grimes, Matthew T.; Howland, John G.; Wang, Yu Tian; McLean, John H.; Harley, Carolyn W.

    2011-01-01

    An increase in synaptic AMPA receptors is hypothesized to mediate learning and memory. AMPA receptor increases have been reported in aversive learning models, although it is not clear if they are seen with memory maintenance. Here we examine AMPA receptor changes in a cAMP/PKA/CREB-dependent appetitive learning model: odor preference learning in…