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Sample records for amphibian metamorphosis assay

  1. Thyroid Histopathology Assessments for the Amphibian Metamorphosis Assay to Detect Thyroid-active Substances

    EPA Science Inventory

    In support of an Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Amphibian Metamorphosis Assay (AMA) Test Guideline for the detection of substances that interact with the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis, a document was developed that provides a standardized appro...

  2. The phylogeny of amphibian metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Reiss, John O

    2002-01-01

    Frogs have one of the most extreme metamorphoses among vertebrates. How did this metamorphosis evolve? By combining the methods previously proposed by Mabee and Humphries (1993) and Velhagen (1997), I develop a phylogenetic method suited for rigorous analysis of this question. In a preliminary analysis using 12 transformation sequence characters and 36 associated event sequence characters, all drawn from the osteology of the skull, the evolution of metamorphosis is traced on an assumed phylogeny. This phylogeny has lissamphibians (frogs, salamanders, and caecilians) monophyletic, with frogs the sister group of salamanders. Successive outgroups used are temnospondyls and discosauriscids, both of which are fossil groups for which ontogenetic data are available. In the reconstruction of character evolution, an unambiguous change (synapomorphy) along the branch leading to lissamphibians is a delay in the lengthening of the maxilla until metamorphosis, in accordance with my previous suggestion (Reiss, 1996). However, widening of the interpterygoid vacuity does not appear as a synapomophy of lissamphibians, due to variation in the character states in the outgroups. From a more theoretical perspective, the reconstructed evolution of amphibian metamorphosis involves examples of heterochrony, through the shift of ancestral premetamorphic events to the metamorphic period, caenogenesis, through the origin of new larval features, and terminal addition, through the origin of new adult features. Other changes don't readily fit these categories. This preliminary study provides evidence that metamorphic changes in frogs arose as further modifications of changes unique to lissamphibians, as well as a new method by which such questions can be examined. PMID:16351859

  3. Examination of an amphibian metamorphosis assay under an individual-separated exposure system using Silurana tropicalis tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Saka, Masahiro; Tada, Noriko; Kamata, Yoichi

    2012-12-01

    We examined the validity of an amphibian (Silurana tropicalis) metamorphosis assay (a 28-day semistatic test) under an individual-separated exposure system, where tadpoles were individually held in small glass beakers. We first conducted a comparative rearing experiment for 28 days between this exposure system and the traditional individual-grouped exposure system, both of which held 30 tadpoles (stages 49 and 50) in dechlorinated tap water (a control solution). The former system served to reduce interindividual variability in regard to three morphological measures (developmental stage, hind limb length, and total body length). Under this system, we tested thyroxine (T4, 1?g/L) and propylthiouracil (PTU, 75mg/L) for 28 days of exposure. The morphological data collected at 7-day intervals indicated that significant metamorphic acceleration and retardation were consistently induced in the tadpoles exposed to T4 and PTU, respectively. In addition, the thyroid glands of the tadpoles exposed to T4 and PTU clearly exhibited atrophy and hypertrophy accompanied with severe follicular cell hyperplasia, respectively. Our results are in agreement with the historical data generated from previous studies employing the traditional exposure system, thus indicating the validity of our alternative testing protocol. PMID:23067544

  4. An evaluation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid in the Amphibian Metamorphosis Assay and the Fish Short-Term Reproduction Assay.

    PubMed

    Coady, Katherine; Marino, Troy; Thomas, Johnson; Sosinski, Lindsay; Neal, Barbara; Hammond, Larry

    2013-04-01

    2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) was evaluated in both the Amphibian Metamorphosis Assay (AMA) and the Fish Short Term Reproduction Assay (FSTRA). In the AMA, tadpoles were exposed to mean measured 2,4-D concentrations of 0 (water control), 0.273, 3.24, 38.0 and 113 mg acid equivalents (ae)/L for either seven or 21 days. In the FSTRA, fathead minnows were exposed to mean measured 2,4-D concentrations of 0 (water control), 0.245, 3.14, 34.0, and 96.5 mg ae/L for 21 days. The respective concentrations of 2,4-D were not overtly toxic to either Xenopus laevis tadpoles or fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). In the AMA, there were no signs of either advanced or delayed development, asynchronous development, or significant histopathological effects of the thyroid gland among 2,4-D exposed tadpoles evaluated on either day seven or day 21 of the exposure. Therefore, following the AMA decision logic, 2,4-D is considered "likely thyroid inactive" in the AMA with a No Observable Effect Concentration (NOEC) of 113 mg ae 2,4-D/L. In the FSTRA, there were no significant differences between control and 2,4-D exposed fish in regard to fertility, wet weight, length, gonado-somatic indices, tubercle scores, or blood plasma concentrations of vitellogenin. Furthermore, there were no treatment-related histopathologic changes in the testes or ovaries in any 2,4-D exposed group. The only significant effect was a decrease in fecundity among fish exposed to 96.5 mg ae 2,4-D/L. The cause of the reduced fecundity at the highest concentration of 2,4-D tested in the assay was most likely due to a generalized stress response in the fish, and not due to a specific endocrine mode of action of 2,4-D. Based on fish reproduction, the NOEC in the FSTRA was 34.0 mg ae 2,4-D/L. PMID:23357564

  5. The Metamorphosis of Amphibian Toxicogenomics

    PubMed Central

    Helbing, Caren C.

    2012-01-01

    Amphibians are important vertebrates in toxicology often representing both aquatic and terrestrial forms within the life history of the same species. Of the thousands of species, only two have substantial genomics resources: the recently published genome of the Pipid, Xenopus (Silurana) tropicalis, and transcript information (and ongoing genome sequencing project) of Xenopus laevis. However, many more species representative of regional ecological niches and life strategies are used in toxicology worldwide. Since Xenopus species diverged from the most populous frog family, the Ranidae, ~200 million years ago, there are notable differences between them and the even more distant Caudates (salamanders) and Caecilians. These differences include genome size, gene composition, and extent of polyploidization. Application of toxicogenomics to amphibians requires the mobilization of resources and expertise to develop de novo sequence assemblies and analysis strategies for a broader range of amphibian species. The present mini-review will present the advances in toxicogenomics as pertains to amphibians with particular emphasis upon the development and use of genomic techniques (inclusive of transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics) and the challenges inherent therein. PMID:22435070

  6. The metamorphosis of amphibian toxicogenomics.

    PubMed

    Helbing, Caren C

    2012-01-01

    Amphibians are important vertebrates in toxicology often representing both aquatic and terrestrial forms within the life history of the same species. Of the thousands of species, only two have substantial genomics resources: the recently published genome of the Pipid, Xenopus (Silurana) tropicalis, and transcript information (and ongoing genome sequencing project) of Xenopus laevis. However, many more species representative of regional ecological niches and life strategies are used in toxicology worldwide. Since Xenopus species diverged from the most populous frog family, the Ranidae, ~200 million years ago, there are notable differences between them and the even more distant Caudates (salamanders) and Caecilians. These differences include genome size, gene composition, and extent of polyploidization. Application of toxicogenomics to amphibians requires the mobilization of resources and expertise to develop de novo sequence assemblies and analysis strategies for a broader range of amphibian species. The present mini-review will present the advances in toxicogenomics as pertains to amphibians with particular emphasis upon the development and use of genomic techniques (inclusive of transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics) and the challenges inherent therein. PMID:22435070

  7. Do effects of mercury in larval amphibians persist after metamorphosis?

    E-print Network

    Willson. J.D.

    Do effects of mercury in larval amphibians persist after metamorphosis? Brian D. Todd · John D the role of environmental contaminants in global amphibian declines, and evidence that post-metamorphic life stages contribute disproportionately to amphibian population dynamics, most studies in amphibian

  8. Do effects of mercury in larval amphibians persist after metamorphosis?

    E-print Network

    Hopkins, William A.

    Do effects of mercury in larval amphibians persist after metamorphosis? Brian D. Todd · John D in global amphibian declines, and evidence that post-metamorphic life stages contribute disproportionately to amphibian population dynamics, most studies in amphibian ecotoxicology focus on larval life stages. Studies

  9. Delayed metamorphosis of amphibian larvae facilitates Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis transmission and persistence

    E-print Network

    Carrascal, Luis M.

    1 Delayed metamorphosis of amphibian larvae facilitates Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis transmission long-lived larvae and chytridiomycosis Key Words: Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis; delayed metamorphosis

  10. Determinants of size at metamorphosis in an endangered amphibian and their projected effects on population stability

    E-print Network

    Shaffer, H. Bradley

    724 Determinants of size at metamorphosis in an endangered amphibian and their projected effects in their population dynamics. Through their effect on size at metamorphosis, factors in the pre- metamorphic that determine size at metamorphosis in pond-breeding amphibians, and to predict some of their downstream effects

  11. Effects of freshwater petroleum contamination on amphibian hatching and metamorphosis

    SciTech Connect

    Mahaney, P.A. . Dept. of Zoology)

    1994-02-01

    This study examined the effects of freshwater petroleum contamination on amphibian reproduction. The primary objectives were to assess the potential environmental and physiological impacts of runoff petroleum products on amphibians, using the green tree frog (Hyla cinerea) as a target species and engine crankcase oil as a contaminant. Egg hatching success, tadpole growth, and successful metamorphosis were measured in four concentrations of oil. The effects of oil on food source was also studied. Hatching success was not measurably influenced by the presence of oil. Tadpole and alga growth were negatively associated with the presence of oil. No tadpoles from the high concentration of oil treatments successfully metamorphosed.

  12. Amphibian metamorphosis has been used as a model system for investigating the performance consequences of rapid

    E-print Network

    Azizi, Manny

    Amphibian metamorphosis has been used as a model system for investigating the performance a significant effect on undulatory locomotion, these changes are independent of metamorphosis (Babcock and Blais, 1973) or metamorphosis (Worthington, 1971; Babcock and Blais, 2001). In this study, we will focus

  13. Transition of Chytrid Fungus Infection from Mouthparts to Hind Limbs During Amphibian Metamorphosis

    E-print Network

    Rohr, Jason

    Transition of Chytrid Fungus Infection from Mouthparts to Hind Limbs During Amphibian Metamorphosis Abstract: The chytrid fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), is implicated in worldwide amphibian amphibian species. We also do not have predictive functions for the abundance of Bd in mouthparts and limbs

  14. Visual implant elastomer mark retention through metamorphosis in amphibian larvae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grant, E.H.C.

    2008-01-01

    Questions in population ecology require the study of marked animals, and marks are assumed to be permanent and not overlooked by observers. I evaluated retention through metamorphosis of visual implant elastomer marks in larval salamanders and frogs and assessed error in observer identification of these marks. I found 1) individual marks were not retained in larval wood frogs (Rana sylvatica), whereas only small marks were likely to be retained in larval salamanders (Eurycea bislineata), and 2) observers did not always correctly identify marked animals. Evaluating the assumptions of marking protocols is important in the design phase of a study so that correct inference can be made about the population processes of interest. This guidance should be generally useful to the design of mark?recapture studies, with particular application to studies of larval amphibians.

  15. Visual implant elastomer mark retention through metamorphosis in amphibian larvae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grant, E.H.C.

    2008-01-01

    Questions in population ecology require the study of marked animals, and marks are assumed to be permanent and not overlooked by observers. I evaluated retention through metamorphosis of visual implant elastomer marks in larval salamanders and frogs and assessed error in observer identification of these marks. I found 1) individual marks were not retained in larval wood frogs (Rana sylvatica), whereas only small marks were likely to be retained in larval salamanders (Eurycea bislineata), and 2) observers did not always correctly identify marked animals. Evaluating the assumptions of marking protocols is important in the design phase of a study so that correct inference can be made about the population processes of interest. This guidance should be generally useful to the design of mark-recapture studies, with particular application to studies of larval amphibians.

  16. Amphibian Metamorphosis: A Sensitive Life Stage to Chemical and Non-chemical Stressors

    EPA Science Inventory

    Amphibian metamorphosis is a dynamic period of post-embryonic development which transforms the larval anuran into the juvenile. The body structure is remodeled through a variety of processes which may be perturbed by exposure to chemicals as well as other environmental stressors....

  17. Metamorphosis of two amphibian species after chronic cadmium exposure in outdoor aquatic mesocosms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    James, S.M.; Little, E.E.; Semlitsch, R.D.

    2005-01-01

    Amphibian larvae at contaminated sites may experience an alteration of metamorphic traits and survival compared to amphibians in uncontaminated conditions. Effects of chronic cadmium (Cd) exposure on the metamorphosis of American toads (Bufo americanus) and southern leopard frogs (Rana sphenocephala) were determined. The two species were reared separately from shortly after hatching through metamorphosis in outdoor mesocosms (1,325-L polyethylene cattle tanks) that simulated natural ponds and enhanced environmental realism relative to the laboratory. Both species exhibited a decrease in survival with increasing initial nominal aqueous Cd concentration. Cadmium treatment did not influence mass at metamorphosis for either species when survival was included as a covariate, but increased the age at metamorphosis for the American toads. The whole body Cd content of metamorphs increased with aqueous Cd treatment level for both species, and the American toads tended to possess more elevated residues. Cadmium quickly partitioned out of the water column and accumulated in and altered the abundance of the tadpoles' diet. Cadmium-contaminated sites may produce fewer metamorphs, and those that survive will metamorphose later and contain Cd. Interspecific differences in the response variables illustrate the importance of testing multiple species when assessing risk. ?? 2005 SETAC.

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF AN AMPHIBIAN METAMORPHOSIS MODEL FOR DETECTING THYROID AXIS DISRUPTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metamorphosis in Xenopus laevis represents an elaborate process of post-embryonic development which is thyroid hormone (TH) dependent. The development of a functional thyroid axis and the responses of tissues to different TH concentrations are well defined in this species, provid...

  19. The evolution of amphibian metamorphosis: insights based on the transformation of the aortic arches of Pelobates fuscus (Anura)

    PubMed Central

    Kolesová, Hana; Lametschwandtner, Alois; Ro?ek, Zbyn?k

    2007-01-01

    In order to gain insights into how the aortic arches changed during the transition of vertebrates to land, transformations of the aortic arches during the metamorphosis of Pelobates fuscus were investigated and compared with data from the early development of a recent ganoid fish Amia calva and a primitive caudate amphibian Salamandrella keyserlingi. Although in larval Pelobates, as in other non-pipid anurans, the gill arches serve partly as a filter-feeding device, their aortic arches maintain the original piscine-like arrangement, except for the mandibular and hyoid aortic arches which were lost. As important pre-adaptations for breathing of atmospheric oxygen occur in larval Pelobates (which have well-developed, though non-respiratory lungs and pulmonary artery), transformation of aortic arches during metamorphosis is fast. The transformation involves disappearance of the ductus Botalli, which results in a complete shunting of blood into the lungs and skin, disappearance of the ductus caroticus, which results in shunting of blood into the head through the arteria carotis interna, and disappearance of arch V, which results in shunting blood to the body through arch IV (systemic arch). It is supposed that the branching pattern of the aortic arches of permanently water-dwelling piscine ancestors, of intermediate forms which occasionally left the water and of primitive tetrapods capable of spending longer periods of time on land had been the same as in the prematamorphic anuran larvae or in some metamorphosed caudates in which the ductus caroticus and ductus Botalli were not interrupted, and arch V was still complete. PMID:17367494

  20. Delayed metamorphosis of amphibian larvae facilitates Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis transmission and persistence.

    PubMed

    Medina, Daniel; Garner, Trenton W J; Carrascal, Luis María; Bosch, Jaime

    2015-12-01

    Highly virulent pathogens that cause host population declines confront the risk of fade-out, but if pathogen transmission dynamics are age-structured, pathogens can persist. Among other features of amphibian biology, variable larval developmental rates generate age-structured larval populations, which in theory can facilitate pathogen persistence. We investigated this possibility empirically in a population of Salamandra salamandra in Spain affected by Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) at breeding sites that lacked alternative amphibian hosts. None of the adults presented infection by Bd. However, for the larvae, while environmental heterogeneity was the most important predictor of infection, the effect on infection dynamics was mediated by transmission from overwintered larvae to new larval recruits, which occurred only in permanent larval habitats. We suggest that interannual Bd maintenance in a host population that experiences mass mortality associated with infection can occur without an environmental reservoir or direct involvement of an alternative host in our study system. However the 2 aquatic habitat types that support intraspecific reservoirs, permanent streams and ponds, are not ideal habitats for long-term Bd maintenance, either due to poor transmission probability or low host survival, respectively. While intraspecific pathogen maintenance due to larval plasticity might be possible at our study sites, this transmission pattern is not without significant risk to the pathogen. The availability of alternative hosts nearby does indicate that permanent Bd fade-out is unlikely. PMID:26648101

  1. Amphibians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Describes some of the characteristics of amphibians. Contains teaching activities ranging from a "frog sing-along" to lessons on amphibian adaptations, and night hikes to identify frog calls. Includes reproducible handouts to be used with the activities, and a quiz. (TW)

  2. Amphibia-Reptilia 34 (2013): 151-162 A non-invasive water-borne hormone assay for amphibians

    E-print Network

    Gabor, Caitlin - Department of Biology, Texas State University

    2013-01-01

    of Biology, Population and Conservation Biology Program, Texas State University-San Marcos, TX 78666Amphibia-Reptilia 34 (2013): 151-162 A non-invasive water-borne hormone assay for amphibians have been implicated in the rapid decline of amphibians. Disturbances, such as disease and poor water

  3. PROGRESS TOWARDS DEVELOPMENT OF AN AMPHIBIAN-BASED THYROID SCREENING ASSAY USING XENOPUS LAEVIS: ORGANISMAL AND THYROIDAL RESPONSES TO THE MODEL COMPOUNDS 6-PROPYLTHIOURACIL, METHIMAZOLE, AND THYROXINE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The data presented in this manuscript specifically addresses the development and standardization needs associated with an amphibian thyroid axis screening assay. A protocol for an amphibian growth and reproduction test has been requested by the Office of Science Council and Polic...

  4. Evolution of Life Cycles in Early Amphibians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoch, Rainer R.

    2009-05-01

    Many modern amphibians have biphasic life cycles with aquatic larvae and terrestrial adults. The central questions are how and when this complicated ontogeny was established, and what is known about the lives of amphibians in the Paleozoic. Fossil evidence has accumulated that sheds light on the life histories of early amphibians, the origin of metamorphosis, and the transition to a fully terrestrial existence. The majority of early amphibians were aquatic or amphibious and underwent only gradual ontogenetic changes. Developmental plasticity played a major role in some taxa but was restricted to minor modification of ontogeny. In the Permo-Carboniferous dissorophoids, a condensation of crucial ontogenetic steps into a short phase (metamorphosis) is observed. It is likely that the origin of both metamorphosis and neoteny falls within these taxa. Fossil evidence also reveals the sequence of evolutionary changes: apparently, the ontogenetic change in feeding, not the transition to a terrestrial existence per se, made a drastic metamorphosis necessary.

  5. Plasticity of the duration of metamorphosis in the African clawed toad

    E-print Network

    Gray, Matthew

    Plasticity of the duration of metamorphosis in the African clawed toad P. T. Walsh, J. R. Downie, such as amphibians, selection is thought to have minimized the duration of metamorphosis, because this is the stage risk associated with prolonging metamorphosis is presumed to have selected for a duration as short

  6. Metamorphosis Metaphora

    E-print Network

    Barton, Rebecca Rose

    2011-04-25

    , both in literary and visual symbolism, can aptly describe the changes, conditions, and stages of life. "Metamorphosis Metaphora" is an exhibition that embodies these ideas and also acts as a reflection of recent personal experiences....

  7. Geometric Metamorphosis

    PubMed Central

    Niethammer, Marc; Hart, Gabriel L.; Pace, Danielle F.; Vespa, Paul M.; Irimia, Andrei; Van Horn, John D.; Aylward, Stephen R.

    2013-01-01

    Standard image registration methods do not account for changes in image appearance. Hence, metamorphosis approaches have been developed which jointly estimate a space deformation and a change in image appearance to construct a spatio-temporal trajectory smoothly transforming a source to a target image. For standard metamorphosis, geometric changes are not explicitly modeled. We propose a geometric metamorphosis formulation, which explains changes in image appearance by a global deformation, a deformation of a geometric model, and an image composition model. This work is motivated by the clinical challenge of predicting the long-term effects of traumatic brain injuries based on time-series images. This work is also applicable to the quantification of tumor progression (e.g., estimating its infiltrating and displacing components) and predicting chronic blood perfusion changes after stroke. We demonstrate the utility of the method using simulated data as well as scans from a clinical traumatic brain injury patient. PMID:21995083

  8. A Role for Taiman in Insect Metamorphosis Jesus Lozano1

    E-print Network

    Belles, Xavier

    A Role for Taiman in Insect Metamorphosis Jesus Lozano1 , Takumi Kayukawa2 , Tetsuro Shinoda2 containing IN-1 are involved in transducing the JH signal that represses metamorphosis. Reporter assays indicate that Tai is involved in the molecular mechanisms that repress metamorphosis, at least in B

  9. THYROID AXIS INHIBITION IN XENOPUS LAEVIS: DEVELOPMENT OF AN AMPHIBIAN-BASED SCREENING ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    In response to the initial EDSTAC recommendations, research was conducted on the development of a Xenopus laevis based tail resorption assay for evaluating thyroid axis disruption. These experiments highlighted key limitations associated with relying on tail resorption as a measu...

  10. metamorphosis superintegrable systems

    E-print Network

    Ciocan-Fontanine, Ionut

    Coupling constant metamorphosis and nth order symmetries for superintegrable systems with a survey constant metamorphosis andnth order symmetries for superintegrable systems -- p. 1/51 #12; Superintegrable of superintegrable system. Coupling constant metamorphosis andnth order symmetries for superintegrable systems -- p

  11. Carotid labyrinth of amphibians.

    PubMed

    Kusakabe, Tatsumi

    2002-11-01

    The amphibian carotid labyrinth is a characteristic maze-like vascular expansion at the bifurcation of the common carotid artery into the internal and external carotid arteries. The carotid labyrinths of anurans are spherical and those of urodeles are oblong. In the intervascular stroma of both anuran and urodelan carotid labyrinths, the glomus cells (type I cells, chief cells) are distributed singly or in clusters between connective tissue cells and smooth muscle cells. In fluorescence histochemistry, the glomus cells emit intense fluorescence for biogenic monoamines. In fine structure, the glomus cells are characterized by a number of dense-cored vesicles in their cytoplasm. The glomus cells have long, thin cytoplasmic processes, some of which are closely associated with smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, and pericytes. Afferent, efferent, and reciprocal synapses are found on the glomus cells. The morphogenesis of the carotid labyrinth starts in the larvae at the point where the carotid arch descends to the internal gills. Through the early stages of larval development, the slightly expanded region of the external carotid artery becomes closely connected with the carotid arch. By the end of the foot stage, the expanded region becomes globular, and at the final stage of metamorphosis the carotid labyrinth is close to its adult form. In fine structure, the glomus cells appear as early as the initial stage of larval development. At the middle stages of development, the number of dense-cored vesicles increases remarkably. Distinct afferent synapses are found in juveniles, although efferent synapses can be seen during metamorphosis. The carotid labyrinth is innervated by nerve fibers containing several kinds of regulatory neuropeptides. Double-immunolabeling in combination with a multiple dye filter system demonstrates the coexistence of two different neuropeptides. The amphibian carotid labyrinth has been electrophysiologically confirmed to have arterial chemo- and baroreceptor functions analogous to those of the mammalian carotid body and carotid sinus. The ultrastructural characteristics of the glomus cells during and after metamorphosis suggest that the glomus cells contribute to the chemoreception after metamorphosis. The three-dimensional fine structure of vascular corrosion casts suggests that the amphibian carotid labyrinth has the appropriate architecture for controlling vascular tone and the findings throughout metamorphosis reveal that the vascular regulatory function begins at an early stage of metamorphosis. In addition, immunohistochemical studies suggest that the vascular regulation in the carotid labyrinth is under peptidergic innervation. Thus, the multiple functions of the carotid labyrinth underline the importance of this relatively small organ for maintenance of homeostasis and appropriate blood supply to the cephalic region. PMID:12384965

  12. ACY: February 22, 2005 Metamorphosis

    E-print Network

    Pittendrigh, Barry

    © ACY: February 22, 2005 Metamorphosis Think Ahead Time: enough to have appropriate stages that this process is called metamorphosis: change of form. 3. Students will be able to state that there are three types of metamorphosis: without metamorphosis, incomplete metamorphosis, and complete metamorphosis. 4

  13. ELASTICITY ANALYSIS OF AMPHIBIAN LIFE HISTORIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    By comparing life history parameters (e.g., age at metamorphosis, age at sexual maturation, egg number, longevity) and phenology of different species, we gain valuable insight into why growth rates differ across populations. Although the demography of most amphibians is lacking, ...

  14. Volumebased threedimensional metamorphosis using

    E-print Network

    Drummond, Tom

    Volume­based three­dimensional metamorphosis using region correspondence G.M. Treece, R.W. Prager Street Cambridge CB2 1PZ England E­mail: gmt11,rwp,ahg@eng.cam.ac.uk #12; Abstract The metamorphosis­dimensional (3­D) metamorphosis, where a surface is transformed into another surface. One approach

  15. Biomonitoring of the genotoxic potential of aqueous extracts of soils and bottom ash resulting from municipal solid waste incineration, using the comet and micronucleus tests on amphibian (Xenopus laevis) larvae and bacterial assays (Mutatox and Ames tests).

    PubMed

    Mouchet, F; Gauthier, L; Mailhes, C; Jourdain, M J; Ferrier, V; Triffault, G; Devaux, A

    2006-02-15

    The management of contaminated soils and wastes is a matter of considerable human concern. The present study evaluates the genotoxic potential of aqueous extracts of two soils (leachates) and of bottom ash resulting from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWIBA percolate), using amphibian larvae (Xenopus laevis). Soil A was contaminated by residues of solvents and metals and Soil B by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and metals. MSWIBA was predominantly contaminated by metals. Two genotoxic endpoints were analysed in circulating erythrocytes taken from larvae: clastogenic and/or aneugenic effects (micronucleus induction) after 12 days of exposure and DNA-strand-breaking potency (comet assay) after 1 and 12 days of exposure. In addition, in vitro bacterial assays (Mutatox and Ames tests) were carried out and the results were compared with those of the amphibian test. Physicochemical analyses were also taken into account. Results obtained with the amphibians established the genotoxicity of the aqueous extracts and the comet assay revealed that they were genotoxic from the first day of exposure. The latter test could thus be considered as a genotoxicity-screening tool. Although genotoxicity persisted after 12 days' exposure, DNA damage decreased overall between days 1 and 12 in the MSWIBA percolate, in contrast to the soil leachates. Bacterial tests detected genotoxicity only for the leachate of soil A (Mutatox). The results confirm the ecotoxicological relevance of the amphibian model and underscore the importance of bioassays, as a complement to physico-chemical data, for risk evaluation. PMID:16442436

  16. Interactive shape metamorphosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, David T.; State, Andrei; Banks, David

    1994-01-01

    A technique for controlled metamorphosis between surfaces in 3-space is described. Well-understood techniques to produce shape metamorphosis between models in a 2D parametric space is applied. The user selects morphable features interactively, and the morphing process executes in real time on a high-performance graphics multicomputer.

  17. Geometric Metamorphosis Marc Niethammer12

    E-print Network

    Welch, Greg

    Geometric Metamorphosis Marc Niethammer12 , Gabriel L. Hart3 , Danielle F. Pace3 , Paul M. Vespa5, metamorphosis approaches have been developed which jointly estimate a space deformation and a change in image. For standard metamorphosis, geometric changes are not explicitly modeled. We propose a geometric metamorphosis

  18. THYROID AXIS INHIBITION IN XENOPUS LAEVIS: DEVELOPMENT OF AN AMPHIBIAN-BASED SCREENING ASSAY FOR THYROID DISRUPTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    In response to the initial EDSTAC recommendations, research was conducted on the development of a Xenopus laevis based tail resorption assay for evaluating thyroid axis disruption. These experiments highlighted key limitations associated with reliance on tail resorption as a meas...

  19. Metamorphosis in solitary ascidians.

    PubMed

    Karaiskou, Anthi; Swalla, Billie J; Sasakura, Yasunori; Chambon, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Embryonic and postembryonic development in ascidians have been studied for over a century, but it is only in the last 10 years that the complex molecular network involved in coordinating postlarval development and metamorphosis has started to emerge. In most ascidians, the transition from the larval to the sessile juvenile/adult stage, or metamorphosis, requires a combination of environmental and endogenous signals and is characterized by coordinated global morphogenetic changes that are initiated by the adhesion of the larvae. Cloney was the first to describe cellular events of ascidians' metamorphosis in 1978 and only recently elements of the molecular regulation of this crucial developmental step have been revealed. This review aims to present a thorough view of this crucial developmental step by combining recent molecular data to the already established cellular events. PMID:25250532

  20. Effects of the amphibian chytrid fungus and four insecticides on Pacific treefrogs (Pseudacris regilla)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kleinhez, Peter; Boone, Michelle D.; Fellers, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Chemical contamination may influence host-pathogen interactions, which has implications for amphibian population declines. We examined the effects of four insecticides alone or as a mixture on development and metamorphosis of Pacific Treefrogs (Pseudacris regilla) in the presence or absence of the amphibian chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis [Bd]). Bd exposure had a negative impact on tadpole activity, survival to metamorphosis, time to metamorphosis, and time of tail absorption (with a marginally negative effect on mass at metamorphosis); however, no individuals tested positive for Bd at metamorphosis. The presence of sublethal concentrations of insecticides alone or in a mixture did not impact Pacific Treefrog activity as tadpoles, survival to metamorphosis, or time and size to metamorphosis. Insecticide exposure did not influence the effect of Bd exposure. Our study did not support our prediction that effects of Bd would be greater in the presence of expected environmental concentrations of insecticide(s), but it did show that Bd had negative effects on responses at metamorphosis that could reduce the quality of juveniles recruited into the population.

  1. Effects of an insecticide on amphibians in large-scale experimental ponds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boone, M.D.; Semlitsch, R.D.; Fairchild, J.F.; Rothermel, B.B.

    2004-01-01

    We examined the effects of the insecticide carbaryl on larval amphibian communities in large-scale experimental ponds. Tadpoles of two anurans, Woodhouse's toad (Bufo woodhousii) and southern leopard Frog (Rana sphenocephala), were reared in ponds (800 m3 volume) to determine the effects of tadpole density and carbaryl exposure on mass at metamorphosis and on time and survival to metamorphosis. Exposure to carbaryl significantly affected toads at metamorphosis, but not leopard frogs. Carbaryl exposure nearly doubled toad survival compared to controls; this effect may be attributable to an indirect effect of earbaryl increasing algal food resources. The competitive environment (i.e., density) and carbaryl exposure significantly affected the trade-off between mass and time to metamorphosis for toads. Our study is the first to demonstrate that in pond communities where predation and competition may be strong, short-lived insecticides can significantly alter the community dynamics of amphibians.

  2. Overwintered Bullfrog tadpoles negatively affect Salamanders and Anurans in native amphibian communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boone, M.D.; Little, E.E.; Semlitsch, R.D.

    2004-01-01

    We examined the interactive effects of overwintered Bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) tadpoles and pond hydroperiod on a community of larval amphibians in outdoor mesocosms including American Toads (Bufo americanus), Southern Leopard Frogs (Rana sphenocephala), and Spotted Salamanders (Ambystoma maculatum) - species within the native range of Bullfrogs. Spotted Salamanders and Southern Leopard Frogs were negatively influenced by the presence of overwintered Bullfrogs. Spotted Salamanders had shorter larval periods and slightly smaller masses at metamorphosis, and Southern Leopard Frogs had smaller masses at metamorphosis when reared with Bullfrogs than without. Presence of overwintered Bullfrogs, however, did not significantly affect American Toads. Longer pond hydroperiods resulted in greater survival, greater size at metamorphosis, longer larval periods, and later time until emergence of the first metamorphs for Southern Leopard Frog tadpoles and Spotted Salamander larvae. Our study demonstrated that overwintered Bullfrog tadpoles can respond to changing pond hydroperiods and can negatively impact metamorphosis of native amphibians.

  3. Ontogenetic loss of phenotypic plasticity of age at metamorphosis in tadpoles

    SciTech Connect

    Hensley, F.R. )

    1993-12-01

    Amphibian larvae exhibit phenotypic plasticity in size at metamorphosis and duration of the larval period. I used Pseudacris crucifer tadpoles to test two models for predicting tadpole age and size at metamorphosis under changing environmental conditions. The Wilbur-Collins model states that metamorphosis is initiated as a function of a tadpole's size and relative growth rate, and predicts that changes in growth rate throughout the larval period affect age and size at metamorphosis. An alternative model, the fixed-rate model, states that age at metamorphosis is fixed early in larval life, and subsequent changes in growth rate will have no effect on the length of the larval period. My results confirm that food supplies affect both age and size at metamorphosis, but developmental rates became fixed at approximately Gosner (1960) stages 35-37. Neither model completely predicted these results. I suggest that the generally accepted Wilbur-Collins model is improved by incorporating a point of fixed developmental timing. Growth trajectories predicted from this modified model fit the results of this study better than trajectories based on either of the original models. The results of this study suggests a constraint that limits the simultaneous optimization of age and size at metamorphosis. 32 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Amphibian parathyroids: morphological and functional aspects.

    PubMed

    Srivastav, A K; Das, V K; Das, S; Sasayama, Y; Suzuki, N

    1995-10-01

    Amphibians living partially or totally in a terrestrial environment are the first tetrapods to possess parathyroid glands. Purely aquatic amphibians and amphibian larvae lack these endocrine glands. The parathyroids develop at the time of metamorphosis. The parathyroid glands in caecilians consist of a single cell type, that of urodeles may be composed of basal (supporting) cells and suprabasal (chief) cells, and that of anurans of small and large chief cells. Parathyroid glands of caecilians and anurans lack connective tissue, blood vessels, and nerves. The parathyroid cells become activated in response to decreased blood calcium concentration and undergo changes indicating increased parathyroid hormone secretion. Increased blood calcium concentration suppresses secretory activity. Usually, parathyroidectomy elicits hypocalcemia in most amphibians. Such operations have no effect in lower urodeles. Parathyroid hormone administration provokes hypercalcemia in most amphibians. The parathyroids of caecilians have not been studied in detail. The urodeles and anurans exhibit seasonal changes in the parathyroid glands. These changes may be initiated by environmental stimuli such as light, temperature, or alterations in blood calcium levels caused by natural hibernation. PMID:8580512

  5. Origin and Evolution of Insect Metamorphosis

    E-print Network

    Belles, Xavier

    Origin and Evolution of Insect Metamorphosis Xavier Belles, Institute of Evolutionary Biology (CSIC-UPF), Barcelona, Spain Insect metamorphosis can be classified into three modalities: ametabolan (no changes a differential expression and JH dependency in holometabolans and hemimetabolans. Holometabolan metamorphosis

  6. Cadmium pollution and amphibians - Studies in tadpoles of Rana limnocharis.

    PubMed

    Patar, Arabinda; Giri, Anirudha; Boro, Freeman; Bhuyan, Krishna; Singha, Utsab; Giri, Sarbani

    2016-02-01

    Cadmium is released into the environment in increasing amounts from different natural and anthropogenic activities contaminating the aquatic habitats. Amphibian tadpoles develop in water and hence are likely to be adversely affected by cadmium present in the aquatic environment. We have studied the toxic and genotoxic effects of CdCl2 on the tadpoles of Rana limnocharis. CdCl2 in the concentration range between 0.1 and 0.4 mg/L induced significant mortality in R. limnocharis tadpoles in a dose and time dependent manner. The 10-day LC50 which has more ecological relevance was far less than the 24-h LC50. Tadpoles exposed to CdCl2 metamorphosed at an early age possibly as a survival strategy to move out of the stressful environment. The body weight of the CdCl2 exposed animals at metamorphosis was lower compared to the control individuals which may affect survival and reproductive fitness in adult life. Besides, the average body length of the metamorphosed individuals in the CdCl2 exposed group was higher than the control group. CdCl2 was found to be genotoxic in micronucleus test and comet assay. The ambient concentration of Cd could reach up to 60 ?g/L or more. Exposure to 18.5 ?g/L of CdCl2 (1% of 24-h LC50) induced significant increase in DNA strand breaks as compared to the control. The present findings demonstrate that presence of cadmium in the aquatic environment can significantly alter the life history traits and cause DNA damage in amphibians and hence, could contribute towards their population decline. PMID:26451654

  7. Amphibian Bioacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob

    Anuran amphibians (frogs and toads) of most of the 3,500 species that exist today are highly vocal animals. In most frogs, males will spend considerable energy on calling and incur sizeable predation risks and the females’ detection and localization of the calls of conspecific males is often a prerequisite for successful mating. Therefore, acoustic communication is evidently evolutionarily important in the anurans, and their auditory system is probably shaped by the selective pressures associated with production, detection and localization of the communication calls.

  8. Vacuum-driven Metamorphosis

    E-print Network

    Parker, L; Parker, Leonard; Raval, Alpan

    1999-01-01

    We show that nonperturbative vacuum effects can produce a vacuum-driven transition from a matter-dominated universe to one in which the effective equation of state is that of radiation plus cosmological constant. The actual material content of the universe after the transition remains that of non-relativistic matter. This metamorphosis of the equation of state can be traced to nonperturbative vacuum effects that cause the scalar curvature to remain nearly constant at a well-defined value after the transition, and is responsible for the observed acceleration of the recent expansion of the universe.

  9. Vacuum-driven Metamorphosis

    E-print Network

    Leonard Parker; Alpan Raval

    1999-08-26

    We show that nonperturbative vacuum effects can produce a vacuum-driven transition from a matter-dominated universe to one in which the effective equation of state is that of radiation plus cosmological constant. The actual material content of the universe after the transition remains that of non-relativistic matter. This metamorphosis of the equation of state can be traced to nonperturbative vacuum effects that cause the scalar curvature to remain nearly constant at a well-defined value after the transition, and is responsible for the observed acceleration of the recent expansion of the universe.

  10. Here today, gone tomorrow: Short-term retention of pesticide-induced tolerance in amphibians.

    PubMed

    Jones, Devin K; Relyea, Rick A

    2015-10-01

    Pesticide use has led to the ubiquitous contamination of natural habitats, which has inadvertently increased pesticide tolerance in target and nontarget species. Historically, increased pesticide tolerance has been attributed to natural selection for tolerance among individuals of affected populations. Recent research, however, has discovered that pesticide tolerance can be increased through phenotypic plasticity. Although induced pesticide tolerance may benefit organisms experiencing contaminated systems, little is known about its occurrence in vertebrates, its retention through ontogeny, or potential life history tradeoffs. Using time-to-death assays at 2 distinct developmental windows, the authors discovered that gray treefrog (Hyla versicolor) tadpoles exposed to sublethal concentrations (0?mg a.i./L, 0.5?mg a.i./L, and 1.0?mg a.i./L) of the insecticide Sevin® (carbaryl) early in life increased their pesticide tolerance to a lethal carbaryl concentration 5 d after sublethal exposure. However, this increased tolerance was not retained later in ontogeny (23?d post-sublethal exposure). Moreover, no indication was found of pesticide-induced treefrogs experiencing life-history tradeoffs in terms of survival to metamorphosis, mass, or snout-vent length. Gray treefrogs are only the second vertebrate species and the second amphibian family to exhibit pesticide-induced tolerance after sublethal exposure. The authors' data suggest that the ability to induce increased pesticide tolerance may play a critical role in amphibian survival in contaminated ecosystems. However, future work is needed to test the occurrence of inducible pesticide tolerance among numerous amphibian populations worldwide. PMID:25940070

  11. Differential metamorphosis alters the endocrine response in anuran larvae exposed to T3 and atrazine.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Jennifer L; Beccue, Nathan; Rayburn, A Lane

    2005-11-10

    Pesticide chemical contamination is one of the suspected contributors of the amphibian population decline. The herbicide atrazine is one of the major surface water contaminants in the U.S. A previous study has shown that atrazine at concentrations as low as 100 parts per billion (ppb) increased the time to metamorphosis in Xenopus laevis tadpoles. However, questions remain as to the applicability of a study of a non-native species to a native organism. The possible effects of atrazine on developing Bufo americanus were explored. Atrazine at potentially (albeit high) environmental concentrations was found not to delay the metamorphosis of developing B. americanus tadpoles as observed in X. laevis. Several studies have indicated that atrazine affects thyroid hormones. Since thyroid hormones are critical in amphibian metamorphosis, B. americanus and X. laevis tadpoles were exposed to exogenous 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3). X. laevis were found to be more responsive to the effects of exogenous T3 compared to B. americanus, indicating that X. laevis may be more sensitive to endocrine active chemicals than B. americanus. In X. laevis, nuclear heterogeneity has been associated with metamorphosis. Flow cytometric analysis of the nuclei of normal metamorphing B. americanus indicates a decrease in the amount of thyroid mediated chromatin alterations relative to the nuclei of metamorphing X. laevis. Indications are that the differential response to endocrine disruption is due to the differential role of chromatin associated gene expression during metamorphosis of B. americanus versus X. laevis. A second native species, Hyla versicolor, was observed to have the X. laevis nuclear pattern with respect to metamorphosis. As such, sensitivity to endocrine disruption is hypothesized not to be limited to laboratory non-native species. PMID:16213604

  12. Acid tolerance in amphibians

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, B.A.

    1985-04-01

    Studies of amphibian acid tolerance provide information about the potential effects of acid deposition on amphibian communities. Amphibians as a group appear to be relatively acid tolerant, with many species suffering increased mortality only below pH 4. However, amphibians exhibit much intraspecific variation in acid tolerance, and some species are sensitive to even low levels of acidity. Furthermore, nonlethal effects, including depression of growth rates and increases in developmental abnormalities, can occur at higher pH.

  13. Three-Dimensional Distance Field Metamorphosis

    E-print Network

    Frey, Pascal

    Three-Dimensional Distance Field Metamorphosis DANIEL COHEN-OR DAVID LEVIN and AMIRA SOLOMOVICI Tel field metamorphosis. In the presented method the interpolation of the distance field is guided by a warp-blending, warping 1. INTRODUCTION Surface metamorphosis is the continuous evolution of a surface from a source

  14. Metamorphosis: State Assignment by Retiming and Reencoding

    E-print Network

    Ciesielski, Maciej

    Metamorphosis: State Assignment by Retiming and Re­encoding Category : 2 (Sequential Logic & Corresponding Author #12; Metamorphosis: State Assignment by Retiming and Re­encoding Category: 2 (Sequential Logic Synthesis and Verification) ABSTRACT This paper presents Metamorphosis 1 -- a novel technique

  15. What is metamorphosis? C. D. Bishop,*

    E-print Network

    Maslakova, Svetlana

    What is metamorphosis? C. D. Bishop,* D. F. Erezyilmaz,y T. Flatt,z C. D. Georgiou,§ M. G. Hadfield Synopsis Metamorphosis (Gr. meta- "change" ţ morphe "form") as a biological process is generally attributed meeting in Orlando, FL (USA) to discuss metamorphosis in a comparative context. Specifically, we

  16. Metamorphosis in Escher's Art Craig S. Kaplan

    E-print Network

    Kaplan, Craig S.

    Metamorphosis in Escher's Art Craig S. Kaplan David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science of metamorphosis and deformation in his art, using a small set of pictorial devices to express this theme. I classify Escher's various approaches to metamorphosis, and relate them to the works in which they appear. I

  17. Catecholamines modulate metamorphosis in the opisthobranch gastropod Phestilla sibogae.

    PubMed

    Pires, A; Croll, R P; Hadfield, M G

    2000-06-01

    Larvae of the nudibranch Phestilla sibogae are induced to metamorphose by a factor from their adult prey, the coral Porites compressa. Levels of endogenous catecholamines increase 6 to 9 days after fertilization, when larvae become competent for metamorphosis. Six- to nine-day larvae, treated with the catecholamine precursor L-DOPA (0.01 mM for 0.5 h), were assayed for metamorphosis in response to coral inducer and for catecholamine content by high-performance liquid chromatography. L-DOPA treatment caused 20- to 50-fold increases in dopamine, with proportionally greater increases in younger larvae, so that L-DOPA-treated larvae of all ages contained similar levels of dopamine. A much smaller (about twofold) increase in norepinephrine occurred in all larvae. The treatment significantly potentiated the frequency of metamorphosis of 7- to 9-d larvae at low concentrations of inducer. In addition, L-DOPA treatment at 9 d increased aldehyde-induced fluorescence in cells that were also labeled in the controls, and revealed additional cells. However, all labeled cells were consistent with the locations of cells showing tyrosine-hydroxylase-like immunoreactivity. Catecholamines are likely to modulate metamorphosis in P. sibogae, but rising levels of catecholamines around the time of competence are insufficient alone to account for sensitivity to inducer in competent larvae. PMID:10897446

  18. Vertebral development and amphibian evolution.

    PubMed

    Carroll, R L; Kuntz, A; Albright, K

    1999-01-01

    Amphibians provide an unparalleled opportunity to integrate studies of development and evolution through the investigation of the fossil record of larval stages. The pattern of vertebral development in modern frogs strongly resembles that of Paleozoic labyrinthodonts in the great delay in the ossification of the vertebrae, with the centra forming much later than the neural arches. Slow ossification of the trunk vertebrae in frogs and the absence of ossification in the tail facilitate the rapid loss of the tail during metamorphosis, and may reflect retention of the pattern in their specific Paleozoic ancestors. Salamanders and caecilians ossify their centra at a much earlier stage than frogs, which resembles the condition in Paleozoic lepospondyls. The clearly distinct patterns and rates of vertebral development may indicate phylogenetic separation between the ultimate ancestors of frogs and those of salamanders and caecilians within the early radiation of ancestral tetrapods. This divergence may date from the Lower Carboniferous. Comparison with the molecular regulation of vertebral development described in modern mammals and birds suggests that the rapid chondrification of the centra in salamanders relative to that of frogs may result from the earlier migration of sclerotomal cells expressing Pax1 to the area surrounding the notochord. PMID:11324019

  19. Reproduction and larval rearing of amphibians.

    PubMed

    Browne, Robert K; Zippel, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    Reproduction technologies for amphibians are increasingly used for the in vitro treatment of ovulation, spermiation, oocytes, eggs, sperm, and larvae. Recent advances in these reproduction technologies have been driven by (1) difficulties with achieving reliable reproduction of threatened species in captive breeding programs, (2) the need for the efficient reproduction of laboratory model species, and (3) the cost of maintaining increasing numbers of amphibian gene lines for both research and conservation. Many amphibians are particularly well suited to the use of reproduction technologies due to external fertilization and development. However, due to limitations in our knowledge of reproductive mechanisms, it is still necessary to reproduce many species in captivity by the simulation of natural reproductive cues. Recent advances in reproduction technologies for amphibians include improved hormonal induction of oocytes and sperm, storage of sperm and oocytes, artificial fertilization, and high-density rearing of larvae to metamorphosis. The storage of sperm in particular can both increase the security and reduce the cost of maintaining genetic diversity. It is possible to cryopreserve sperm for millennia, or store it unfrozen for weeks in refrigerators. The storage of sperm can enable multiple parentages of individual females' clutches of eggs and reduce the need to transport animals. Cryopreserved sperm can maintain the gene pool indefinitely, reduce the optimum number of males in captive breeding programs, and usher in new generations of Xenopus spp. germ lines for research. Improved in vitro fertilization using genetic diversity from stored sperm means that investigators need the oocytes from only a few females to produce genetically diverse progeny. In both research and captive breeding programs, it is necessary to provide suitable conditions for the rearing of large numbers of a diverse range of species. Compared with traditional systems, the raising of larvae at high densities has the potential to produce these large numbers of larvae in smaller spaces and to reduce costs. PMID:17592185

  20. Introducing Environmental Toxicology in Instructional Labs: The Use of a Modified Amphibian Developmental Toxicity Assay to Support Inquiry-Based Student Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauterer, Roger; Rayburn, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Introducing students to the process of scientific inquiry is a major goal of high school and college labs. Environmental toxins are of great concern and public interest. Modifications of a vertebrate developmental toxicity assay using the frog Xenopus laevis can support student-initiated toxicology experiments that are relevant to humans. Teams of…

  1. Surgery in Amphibians.

    PubMed

    Chai, Norin

    2016-01-01

    Amphibian surgery has been especially described in research. Since the last decade, interest for captive amphibians has increased, so have the indications for surgical intervention. Clinicians should not hesitate to advocate such manipulations. Amphibian surgeries have no overwhelming obstacles. These patients heal well and tolerate blood loss more than higher vertebrates. Most procedures described in reptiles (mostly lizards) can be undertaken in most amphibians if equipment can be matched to the patients' size. In general, the most difficult aspect would be the provision of adequate anesthesia. PMID:26611925

  2. Where have all the tadpoles gone? Individual genetic tracking of amphibian larvae until adulthood

    PubMed Central

    RINGLER, EVA; MANGIONE, ROSANNA; RINGLER, MAX

    2015-01-01

    Reliably marking larvae and reidentifying them after metamorphosis is a challenge that has hampered studies on recruitment, dispersal, migration and survivorship of amphibians for a long time, as conventional tags are not reliably retained through metamorphosis. Molecular methods allow unique genetic fingerprints to be established for individuals. Although microsatellite markers have successfully been applied in mark–recapture studies on several animal species, they have never been previously used in amphibians to follow individuals across different life cycle stages. Here, we evaluate microsatellites for genetic across-stages mark–recapture studies in amphibians and test the suitability of available software packages for genotype matching. We sampled tadpoles of the dendrobatid frog Allobates femoralis, which we introduced on a river island in the Nature Reserve ‘Les Nouragues’ in French Guiana. In two subsequent recapture sessions, we searched for surviving juveniles and adults, respectively. All individuals were genotyped at 14 highly variable microsatellite loci, which yielded unique genetic fingerprints for all individuals. We found large differences in the identification success of the programs tested. The pairwise-relatedness-based approach, conducted with the programs kingroup or ML-Relate, performed best with our data set. Matching ventral patterns of juveniles and adult individuals acted as a control for the reliability of the genetic identification. Our results demonstrate that microsatellite markers are a highly powerful tool for studying amphibian populations on an individual basis. The ability to individually track amphibian tadpoles throughout metamorphosis until adulthood will be of substantial value for future studies on amphibian population ecology and evolution. PMID:25388775

  3. Effects of copper on growth, metamorphosis and endocrine disruption of Bufo gargarizans larvae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Liang, Gang; Chai, Lihong; Wang, Hongyuan

    2016-01-01

    Chinese toad (Bufo gargarizans) tadpoles were exposed to copper (1, 6.4, 32 and 64?gL(-1) copper) from the beginning of larval period through completion of metamorphosis. We examined the effects of chronic copper exposure on mortality, growth, time to metamorphosis, tail resorption time, body size at the metamorphic climax (Gs 42) and completion of metamorphosis (Gs 46) and thyroid gland histology. In addition, type 2 and 3 iodothyronine deiodinase (Dio2 and Dio3), thyroid hormone receptors (TR? and TR?) mRNA levels were also measured to assess disruption of TH synthesis. Our result showed that 6.4-64?gL(-1) copper concentration increased the mortality and inhibited the growth of B. gargarizans tadpoles. In addition, significant reduction in size at Gs 42 and a time delay to Gs 42 were observed at 6.4-64?gL(-1) copper treatments. Moreover, histological examinations have clearly revealed that 64?gL(-1) copper caused follicular cell hyperplasia in thyroid gland. According to real-time PCR results, exposure to 32 and 64?gL(-1) copper significantly up-regulated mRNA expression of Dio3, but down-regulated mRNA expression of TR? and TR? mRNA level. We concluded that copper delayed amphibian metamorphosis through changing mRNA expression of Dio3, TR? and TR?, which suggests that copper might have the endocrine-disrupting effect. PMID:26587739

  4. The Euler-Poincare theory of Metamorphosis

    E-print Network

    Holm, Darryl D; Younes, Laurent

    2008-01-01

    In the pattern matching approach to imaging science, the process of ``metamorphosis'' is template matching with dynamical templates. Here, we recast the metamorphosis equations of into the Euler-Poincare variational framework of and show that the metamorphosis equations contain the equations for a perfect complex fluid \\cite{Ho2002}. This result connects the ideas underlying the process of metamorphosis in image matching to the physical concept of order parameter in the theory of complex fluids. After developing the general theory, we reinterpret various examples, including point set, image and density metamorphosis. We finally discuss the issue of matching measures with metamorphosis, for which we provide existence theorems for the initial and boundary value problems.

  5. The Euler-Poincare theory of Metamorphosis

    E-print Network

    Darryl D. Holm; Alain Trouve; Laurent Younes

    2008-06-04

    In the pattern matching approach to imaging science, the process of ``metamorphosis'' is template matching with dynamical templates. Here, we recast the metamorphosis equations of into the Euler-Poincare variational framework of and show that the metamorphosis equations contain the equations for a perfect complex fluid \\cite{Ho2002}. This result connects the ideas underlying the process of metamorphosis in image matching to the physical concept of order parameter in the theory of complex fluids. After developing the general theory, we reinterpret various examples, including point set, image and density metamorphosis. We finally discuss the issue of matching measures with metamorphosis, for which we provide existence theorems for the initial and boundary value problems.

  6. Fetal adaptations for viviparity in amphibians.

    PubMed

    Wake, Marvalee H

    2015-08-01

    Live-bearing has evolved in all three orders of amphibians--frogs, salamanders, and caecilians. Developing young may be either yolk dependent, or maternal nutrients may be supplied after yolk is resorbed, depending on the species. Among frogs, embryos in two distantly related lineages develop in the skin of the maternal parents' backs; they are born either as advanced larvae or fully metamorphosed froglets, depending on the species. In other frogs, and in salamanders and caecilians, viviparity is intraoviductal; one lineage of salamanders includes species that are yolk dependent and born either as larvae or metamorphs, or that practice cannibalism and are born as metamorphs. Live-bearing caecilians all, so far as is known, exhaust yolk before hatching and mothers provide nutrients during the rest of the relatively long gestation period. The developing young that have maternal nutrition have a number of heterochronic changes, such as precocious development of the feeding apparatus and the gut. Furthermore, several of the fetal adaptations, such as a specialized dentition and a prolonged metamorphosis, are homoplasious and present in members of two or all three of the amphibian orders. At the same time, we know little about the developmental and functional bases for fetal adaptations, and less about the factors that drive their evolution and facilitate their maintenance. PMID:24643944

  7. Larval Environment Alters Amphibian Immune Defenses Differentially across Life Stages and Populations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Recent global declines, extirpations and extinctions of wildlife caused by newly emergent diseases highlight the need to improve our knowledge of common environmental factors that affect the strength of immune defense traits. To achieve this goal, we examined the influence of acidification and shading of the larval environment on amphibian skin-associated innate immune defense traits, pre and post-metamorphosis, across two populations of American Bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana), a species known for its wide-ranging environmental tolerance and introduced global distribution. We assessed treatment effects on 1) skin-associated microbial communities and 2) post-metamorphic antimicrobial peptide (AMP) production and 3) AMP bioactivity against the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). While habitat acidification did not affect survival, time to metamorphosis or juvenile mass, we found that a change in average pH from 7 to 6 caused a significant shift in the larval skin microbial community, an effect which disappeared after metamorphosis. Additionally, we found shifts in skin-associated microbial communities across life stages suggesting they are affected by the physiological or ecological changes associated with amphibian metamorphosis. Moreover, we found that post-metamorphic AMP production and bioactivity were significantly affected by the interactions between pH and shade treatments and interactive effects differed across populations. In contrast, there were no significant interactions between treatments on post-metamorphic microbial community structure suggesting that variation in AMPs did not affect microbial community structure within our study. Our findings indicate that commonly encountered variation in the larval environment (i.e. pond pH and degree of shading) can have both immediate and long-term effects on the amphibian innate immune defense traits. Our work suggests that the susceptibility of amphibians to emerging diseases could be related to variability in the larval environment and calls for research into the relative influence of potentially less benign anthropogenic environmental changes on innate immune defense traits. PMID:26107644

  8. Methods for Evaluating Wetland Condition #12: Using Amphibians in Bioassessments of Wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sparling, D.W.; Richter, K.O.; Calhoun, A.; Micacchion, M.

    2001-01-01

    Because amphibians have both aquatic and terrestrial life stages they can serve in a unique way among vertebrates as sources of information for bioassessments of both wetlands and surrounding habitats. Although there are many data gaps in our knowledge about the habitat requirements and ecology of many amphibian species, it is apparent that community composition, presence and frequency of abnormalities, various mensural characteristics (e.g. snout vent length divided by body weight) and laboratory diagnostics (e.g. cholinesterase activity, blood chemistry) can be used in developing metrics for an index of biotic integrity. In addition, potential metrics can be derived from the various life stages that most amphibians experience such as egg clusters; embryonic development and hatching rates; tadpole growth, development, and survival; progress and success of metamorphosis; and breeding behavior and presence of adults. It is important, however, to focus on regional biodiversity and species assemblages of amphibians in the development of metrics rather than to strive for broadscale application of common metrics. This report discusses the procedures of developing an index of biotic integrity based on amphibians, explains potential pitfalls in using amphibians in bioassessments, and demonstrates where more research is needed to enhance the use of amphibians in evaluating wetland conditions.

  9. IMMUNOLOGICAL STUDIES OF INSECT METAMORPHOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Telfer, William H.; Williams, Carroll M.

    1953-01-01

    1. The cell-free blood of the Cecropia silkworm produces a maximum of nine bands of antigen-antibody precipitate when reacted in antiserum-agar tests with antisera prepared by injecting Cecropia extracts into rabbits. The blood antigens producing these bands of precipitate have the properties of proteins in that they are non-dialyzable, labile at 75°C., and salted out by 75 per cent saturated ammonium sulfate. One antigen was identified as a carotenoid protein. 2. Six bands of precipitate were selected for further study. Absorption tests revealed that the blood, at all stages of metamorphosis, is capable of precipitating the antibodies which produce five of these bands. This result indicates that five of the six antigens are present in the blood throughout metamorphosis. The sixth antigen is undetectable in blood from fourth instar larvae, appears in the blood late in the fifth instar, persists during the pupal stage, and disappears again during adult development. 3. When blood samples from various stages of metamorphosis were tested in antiserum-agar tubes, the rates of advance of the six bands of precipitate underwent systematic change in close correlation with the morphological stage of the silkworm's metamorphosis. These changes are interpreted in terms of concentration changes of the corresponding blood antigens. The validity of this interpretation was tested in several ways, with the conclusion that the interpretation was generally acceptable for the system under consideration. 4. All six antigens appear to increase in concentration during the last larval instar and to decrease in concentration during the period of adult development. However, each antigen has its own characteristic pattern of concentration change which differs from those of the other five. In order to explain this diversity, we conclude that the physiological mechanisms which regulate the synthesis and utilization of the blood antigens control each antigen on an individual basis. PMID:13022934

  10. Climate change and amphibians

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corn, P.S.

    2005-01-01

    Amphibian life histories are exceedingly sensitive to temperature and precipitation, and there is good evidence that recent climate change has already resulted in a shift to breeding earlier in the year for some species. There are also suggestions that the recent increase in the occurrence of El Nińo events has caused declines of anurans in Central America and is linked to elevated mortality of amphibian embryos in the northwestern United States. However, evidence linking amphibian declines in Central America to climate relies solely on correlations, and the mechanisms underlying the declines are not understood. Connections between embryo mortality and declines in abundance have not been demonstrated. Analyses of existing data have generally failed to find a link between climate and amphibian declines. It is likely, however, that future climate change will cause further declines of some amphibian species. Reduced soil moisture could reduce prey species and eliminate habitat. Reduced snowfall and increased summer evaporation could have dramatic effects on the duration or occurrence of seasonal wetlands, which are primary habitat for many species of amphibians. Climate change may be a relatively minor cause of current amphibian declines, but it may be the biggest future challenge to the persistence of many species

  11. Tadpoles of Early Breeding Amphibians are Negatively Affected by Leaf Litter From Invasive Chinese Tallow Trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, N. E.

    2005-05-01

    As wetlands are invaded by Chinese tallow trees (Triadica sebifera), native trees are displaced and detrital inputs to amphibian breeding ponds are altered. I used a mesocosm experiment to examine the effect of Chinese tallow leaf litter on the survival to, size at, and time to metamorphosis of amphibian larvae. Fifty 1000-L cattle watering tanks were treated with 1500 g dry weight of one of five leaf litter treatments: Chinese tallow, laurel oak (Quercus laurifolia), water tupelo (Nyssa aquatica), slash pine (Pinus elliottii), or a 3:1:1:1 mixture. Each tank received 45 tadpoles of Pseudacris feriarum, Bufo terrestris, and Hyla cinerea in sequence according to their natural breeding phonologies. Every Pseudacris feriarum and Bufo terrestris tadpole exposed to Chinese tallow died prior to metamorphosis. Hyla cinerea survival in tanks with tallow-only was significantly lower than that observed for all other leaf treatments. Hyla cinerea tadpoles from tallow-only and mixed-leaf treatments were larger at metamorphosis and transformed faster than those in tanks with native leaves only. These results suggest that Chinese tallow leaf litter may negatively affect tadpoles of early breeding frogs and that Chinese tallow invasion may change the structure of amphibian communities in temporary ponds.

  12. Understanding of the impact of chemicals on amphibians: a meta-analytic review

    PubMed Central

    Egea-Serrano, Andrés; Relyea, Rick A; Tejedo, Miguel; Torralva, Mar

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have assessed the impact of different pollutants on amphibians across a variety of experimental venues (laboratory, mesocosm, and enclosure conditions). Past reviews, using vote-counting methods, have described pollution as one of the major threats faced by amphibians. However, vote-counting methods lack strong statistical power, do not permit one to determine the magnitudes of effects, and do not compare responses among predefined groups. To address these challenges, we conducted a meta-analysis of experimental studies that measured the effects of different chemical pollutants (nitrogenous and phosphorous compounds, pesticides, road deicers, heavy metals, and other wastewater contaminants) at environmentally relevant concentrations on amphibian survival, mass, time to hatching, time to metamorphosis, and frequency of abnormalities. The overall effect size of pollutant exposure was a medium decrease in amphibian survival and mass and a large increase in abnormality frequency. This translates to a 14.3% decrease in survival, a 7.5% decrease in mass, and a 535% increase in abnormality frequency across all studies. In contrast, we found no overall effect of pollutants on time to hatching and time to metamorphosis. We also found that effect sizes differed among experimental venues and among types of pollutants, but we only detected weak differences among amphibian families. These results suggest that variation in sensitivity to contaminants is generally independent of phylogeny. Some publication bias (i.e., selective reporting) was detected, but only for mass and the interaction effect size among stressors. We conclude that the overall impact of pollution on amphibians is moderately to largely negative. This implies that pollutants at environmentally relevant concentrations pose an important threat to amphibians and may play a role in their present global decline. PMID:22957147

  13. ELSEVIER Aquaculture 148 (1997) 247-258 Hydrogen peroxide induced metamorphosis of

    E-print Network

    Boettcher, Anne

    1997-01-01

    ELSEVIER Aquaculture 148 (1997) 247-258 Hydrogen peroxide induced metamorphosis of queen conch, the use of hydrogen peroxide as an alternative to aqueous extracts of the red alga Laurenciu poirei conch to 50 FM hydrogen peroxide for 10 h in both small scale and production scale assays induced full

  14. Vikers Viking Amphibian - biplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1924-01-01

    Vikers Viking Amphibian - biplane: Initially procured in 1921 by the U.S. Navy during their studies of foreign designs, the Vickers Viking IV became NACA 17 during its short period of study at Langley.

  15. AMPHIBIAN POPULATION DYNAMICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Agriculture has contributed to loss of vertebrate biodiversity in many regions, including the U.S. Corn Belt. Amphibian populations, in particular, have experienced widespread and often inexplicable declines, range reductions, and extinctions. However, few attempts have been made...

  16. Interactive effects of competition and predator cues on immune responses of leopard frogs at metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Groner, Maya L; Rollins-Smith, Louise A; Reinert, Laura K; Hempel, John; Bier, Mark E; Relyea, Rick A

    2014-02-01

    Recent hypotheses suggest that immunosuppression, resulting from altered environmental conditions, may contribute to the increased incidence of amphibian disease around the world. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) in amphibian skin are an important innate immune defense against fungal, viral and bacterial pathogens. Their release is tightly coupled with release of the stress hormone noradrenaline (norepinephrine). During metamorphosis, AMPs may constitute the primary immune response in the skin of some species because acquired immune functions are temporarily suppressed in order to prevent autoimmunity against new adult antigens. Suppression of AMPs during this transitional stage may impact disease rates. We exposed leopard frog tadpoles (Lithobates pipiens) to a factorial combination of competitor and caged-predator environments and measured their development, growth and production of hydrophobic skin peptides after metamorphosis. In the absence of predator cues, or if the exposure to predator cues was late in ontogeny, competition caused more than a 250% increase in mass-standardized hydrophobic skin peptides. Predator cues caused a decrease in mass-standardized hydrophobic skin peptides when the exposure was late in ontogeny under low competition, but otherwise had no effect. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry of the skin peptides showed that they include six AMPs in the brevinin and temporin families and at least three of these peptides are previously uncharacterized. Both of these peptide families have previously been shown to inhibit harmful microbes including Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, the fungal pathogen associated with global amphibian declines. Our study shows that amphibians may be able to adjust their skin peptide defenses in response to stressors that are experienced early in ontogeny and that these effects extend through an important life-history transition. PMID:24115058

  17. Amphibian biology and husbandry.

    PubMed

    Pough, F Harvey

    2007-01-01

    Extant amphibians comprise three lineages-- salamanders (Urodela or Caudata), frogs and toads (Anura), and caecilians (Gymnophiona, Apoda, or Caecilia)--which contain more than 6,000 species. Fewer than a dozen species of amphibians are commonly maintained in laboratory colonies, and the husbandry requirements for the vast majority of amphibians are poorly known. For these species, a review of basic characteristics of amphibian biology supplemented by inferences drawn from the morphological and physiological characteristics of the species in question provides a basis for decisions about housing and feeding. Amphibians are ectotherms, and their skin is permeable to water, ions, and respiratory gases. Most species are secretive and, in many cases, nocturnal. The essential characteristics of their environment include appropriate levels of humidity, temperature, and lighting as well as retreat sites. Terrestrial and arboreal species require moist substrates, water dishes, and high relative humidity. Because temperature requirements for most species are poorly known, it is advisable to use a temperature mosaic that will allow an animal to find an appropriate temperature within its cage. Photoperiod may affect physiology and behavior (especially reproduction and hibernation), and although the importance of ultraviolet light for calcium metabolism by amphibians is not yet known, ecological observations suggest that it might be important for some species of frogs. Some amphibians are territorial, and some use olfactory cues to mark their territory and to recognize other individuals of their species. All amphibians are carnivorous as adults, and the feeding response of many species is elicited by the movement of prey. Diets should include a mixture of prey species, and it may be advisable to load prey with vitamins and minerals. PMID:17592184

  18. Distortion of frontal bones results from cell apoptosis by the mechanical force from the up-migrating eye during metamorphosis in Paralichthys olivaceus.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mingyan; Wei, Fen; Li, Hui; Xu, Juan; Chen, Xinye; Gong, Xiaoling; Tian, Yongsheng; Chen, Songlin; Bao, Baolong

    2015-05-01

    Craniofacial remodeling during flatfish metamorphosis, including eye migration, is perhaps the most striking example of asymmetric postembryonic development in the vertebrate world. The asymmetry of the cranium mainly results from distortion of the frontal bones, which depends on eye migration during metamorphosis. However, it is unclear how the up-migrating eye causes distortion of the frontal bones. In this study, we first show that distortion of the frontal bones during metamorphosis in Paralichthys olivaceus is the result of cell apoptosis, rather than cell autophagy or cell proliferation. Secondly, we report that cell apoptosis in the frontal bones is induced by the mechanical force transferred from the up-migrating eye. The mechanical force from the up-migrating eye signals through FAK to downstream molecules that are integrated into the BMP-2 signal pathway. Finally, it is shown that cell apoptosis in the frontal bones is activated by the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway; the extrinsic death receptor is not involved in this process. Moreover, cell apoptosis in frontal bones is not induced directly by thyroid hormones, which are thought to mediate metamorphosis in flatfishes and directly mediate cell apoptosis during amphibian metamorphosis. These findings help identify the major signaling route used during regulation of frontal bone distortion during metamorphosis in flatfish, and indicate that the asymmetry of the cranium, or at least the distortion of frontal bones, is the result of rather than the reason underlying eye migration. PMID:25622577

  19. The cost of metamorphosis in flatfishes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geffen, A. J.; van der Veer, H. W.; Nash, R. D. M.

    2007-07-01

    Flatfish development includes a unique physical metamorphosis with morphological and physiological changes associated with eye migration, a 90° rotation in posture and asymmetrical pigmentation. Flatfish larvae also undergo settlement, a behavioural and ecological change associated with a transition from a pelagic to a benthic existence. These processes are often assumed to be critical in determining recruitment in flatfish, through their impact on feeding, growth and survival. The timing of metamorphosis in relation to settlement varies between different flatfish species and this suggests that growth and development are not closely coupled. Existing information on feeding, growth and survival during metamorphosis and settlement is reviewed. Growth during metamorphosis is reduced in some but not all species. Despite the profound internal and external changes, there are no indications that the process of metamorphosis results in an increased mortality or that it might affect recruitment in flatfishes.

  20. A conceptual model to facilitate amphibian conservation in the northern Great Plains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mushnet, David M.; Euliss, Ned H.; Stockwell, Craig A.

    2012-01-01

    As pressures on agricultural landscapes to meet worldwide resource needs increase, amphibian populations face numerous threats including habitat destruction, chemical contaminants, disease outbreaks, wetland sedimentation, and synergistic effects of these perturbations. To facilitate conservation planning, we developed a conceptual model depicting elements critical for amphibian conservation in the northern Great Plains. First, we linked upland, wetland, and landscape features to specific ecological attributes. Ecological attributes included adult survival; reproduction and survival to metamorphosis; and successful dispersal and recolonization. Second, we linked ecosystem drivers, ecosystem stressors, and ecological effects of the region to each ecological attribute. Lastly, we summarized information on these ecological attributes and the drivers, stressors, and effects that work in concert to influence the maintenance of viable and genetically diverse amphibian populations in the northern Great Plains. While our focus was on the northern Great Plains, our conceptual model can be tailored to other geographic regions and taxa.

  1. Adaptive colouration in amphibians.

    PubMed

    Rudh, Andreas; Qvarnström, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Amphibians, i.e. salamanders, frogs and caecilians show a wide range of bright colours in combination with contrasting patterns. There is variation among species, populations and also within species and populations. Furthermore, individuals often change colours during developmental stages or in response to environmental factors. This extraordinary variation means that there are excellent opportunities to test hypotheses of the adaptive significance of colours using amphibian species as models. We review the present view of functions of colouration in amphibians with the main focus on relatively unexplored topics. Variation in colouration has been found to play a role in thermoregulation, UV protection, predator avoidance and sexual signalling. However, many proposed cases of adaptive functions of colouration in amphibians remain virtually scientifically unexplored and surprisingly few genes influencing pigmentation or patterning have been detected. We would like to especially encourage more studies that take advantage of recent developments in measurement of visual properties of several possible signalling receivers (e.g. predators, competitors or mates). Future investigations on interactions between behaviour, ecology and vision have the potential to challenge our current view of the adaptive function of colouration in amphibians. PMID:23664831

  2. DEVELOPMENTAL DIVERSITY OF AMPHIBIANS

    PubMed Central

    Elinson, Richard P.; del Pino, Eugenia M.

    2011-01-01

    The current model amphibian, Xenopus laevis, develops rapidly in water to a tadpole which metamorphoses into a frog. Many amphibians deviate from the X. laevis developmental pattern. Among other adaptations, their embryos develop in foam nests on land or in pouches on their mother’s back or on a leaf guarded by a parent. The diversity of developmental patterns includes multinucleated oogenesis, lack of RNA localization, huge non-pigmented eggs, and asynchronous, irregular early cleavages. Variations in patterns of gastrulation highlight the modularity of this critical developmental period. Many species have eliminated the larva or tadpole and directly develop to the adult. The wealth of developmental diversity among amphibians coupled with the wealth of mechanistic information from X. laevis permit comparisons that provide deeper insights into developmental processes. PMID:22662314

  3. Toxicity of two insecticides to California, USA, anurans and its relevance to declining amphibian populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sparling, D.W.; Fellers, G.M.

    2009-01-01

    Contaminants have been associated with population declines of several amphibian species in California (USA). Pesticides from the Central Valley of California are transported by winds into the Sierra Nevada Mountains and precipitate into wet meadows where amphibians breed. The present study examined the chronic toxicity of two of the insecticides most commonly used in the Central Valley and found in the mountains, chlorpyrifos and endosulfan, to larval Pacific treefrogs (Pseudacris regilla) and foothill yellow-legged frogs (Rana boylii) and discusses the implications of this toxicity to declining amphibian populations. Larvae were exposed to the pesticides from Gosner stages 25 to 26 through metamorphosis. The estimated median lethal concentration (LC50) for chlorpyrifos was 365 ??g/L in P. regilla and 66.5 ??g/L for R. boylii. Time to metamorphosis increased with concentration of chlorpyrifos in both species, and cholinesterase activity declined with exposure concentration in metamorphs of both species at Gosner stages 42 to 46. For endosulfan, the estimated LC50 was 15.6 ??g/L for P. regilla and 0.55 ??g/L for R. boylii. All R. boylii exposed to concentrations of greater than 0.8 ??g/L died before they entered metamorphosis. Pseudacris regilla remains relatively abundant and is broadly distributed throughout California. In contrast, R. boylii is among the species experiencing severe population declines. The present study adds to the increasing evidence that pesticides are very harmful to amphibians living in areas that are miles from sources of pesticide application. ?? 2009 SETAC.

  4. Exploring nervous system transcriptomes during embryogenesis and metamorphosis in Xenopus tropicalis using EST analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fierro, Ana C; Thuret, Raphaël; Coen, Laurent; Perron, Muriel; Demeneix, Barbara A; Wegnez, Maurice; Gyapay, Gabor; Weissenbach, Jean; Wincker, Patrick; Mazabraud, André; Pollet, Nicolas

    2007-01-01

    Background The western African clawed frog Xenopus tropicalis is an anuran amphibian species now used as model in vertebrate comparative genomics. It provides the same advantages as Xenopus laevis but is diploid and has a smaller genome of 1.7 Gbp. Therefore X. tropicalis is more amenable to systematic transcriptome surveys. We initiated a large-scale partial cDNA sequencing project to provide a functional genomics resource on genes expressed in the nervous system during early embryogenesis and metamorphosis in X. tropicalis. Results A gene index was defined and analysed after the collection of over 48,785 high quality sequences. These partial cDNA sequences were obtained from an embryonic head and retina library (30,272 sequences) and from a metamorphic brain and spinal cord library (27,602 sequences). These ESTs are estimated to represent 9,693 transcripts derived from an estimated 6,000 genes. Comparison of these cDNA sequences with protein databases indicates that 46% contain their start codon. Further annotation included Gene Ontology functional classification, InterPro domain analysis, alternative splicing and non-coding RNA identification. Gene expression profiles were derived from EST counts and used to define transcripts specific to metamorphic stages of development. Moreover, these ESTs allowed identification of a set of 225 polymorphic microsatellites that can be used as genetic markers. Conclusion These cDNA sequences permit in silico cloning of numerous genes and will facilitate studies aimed at deciphering the roles of cognate genes expressed in the nervous system during neural development and metamorphosis. The genomic resources developed to study X. tropicalis biology will accelerate exploration of amphibian physiology and genetics. In particular, the model will facilitate analysis of key questions related to anuran embryogenesis and metamorphosis and its associated regulatory processes. PMID:17506875

  5. Interaction between perchlorate and iodine in the metamorphosis of Hyla versicolor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sparling, D.W.; Harvey, G.; Nzengung, V.

    2003-01-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) is a water-soluble, inorganic anion that is often combined with ammonium, potassium or other cations for use in industry and agriculture. Ammonium perchlorate, for example, is a potent oxidizer and is used in various military applications including rocket fuel. It has also been found in an historically widely used fertilizer, Chilean nitrate and in other fertilizers. It has been found in ground and surface waters of over 30 states and is considered a human health risk. Because of its similar atomic radius and volume, perchlorate competes with iodide for thyroid uptake and storage and thereby inhibits production of thyroid hormones. Amphibians may be particularly affected by perchlorate because they rely on the thyroid for metamorphosis. This study exposed early larval Hyla versicolor to concentrations of perchlorate ranging from 2.2 to 50 ppm to determine the effects of perchlorate on a native amphibian. In addition, three controls, 0 perchlorate, 0 perchlorate with 0.10 ppm iodide (C + I) and 50 ppm perchlorate + 0.10 ppm iodide (50 + I) were tested. Mortality (<11% with all treatments) and growth appeared to be unaffected by perchlorate. Inhibition of development started with 2.2 ppm perchlorate and little or no development occurred at 22.9 ppm and above. This inhibition was particularly apparent at the latter stages of development including hindlimb formation and metamorphosis. The estimated EC50 for total inhibition of metamorphosis at 70 days of treatment was 3.63 ppm. There was no evidence of inhibition of development with the 50 + I, C + I, or controls, indicating that the presence of small concentrations of iodide could counter the effects of perchlorate. When tadpoles that had been inhibited by perchlorate were subsequently treated with iodide, development through prometamorphosis progressed but mortality was very high.

  6. Interaction between perchlorate and iodine in the metamorphosis of Hyla versicolor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sparling, D.; Harvey, G.; Nzengung, V.

    2003-01-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) is a water-soluble, inorganic anion that is often combined with ammonium, potassium or other cations for use in industry and agriculture. Ammonium perchlorate, for example, is a potent oxidizer and is used in various military applications including rocket fuel. It has also been found in an historically widely used fertilizer, Chilean nitrate and in other fertilizers. It has been found in ground and surface waters of over 30 states and is considered a human health risk. Because of its similar atomic radius and volume, perchlorate competes with iodide for thyroid uptake and storage and thereby inhibits production of thyroid hormones. Amphibians may be particularly affected by perchlorate because they rely on the thyroid for metamorphosis. This study exposed early larval Hyla versicolor to concentrations of perchlorate ranging from 2.2 to 50 ppm to determine the effects of perchlorate on a native amphibian. In addition, three controls, 0 perchlorate, 0 perchlorate with 0.10 ppm iodide (C + I) and 50 ppm perchlorate + 0.10 ppm iodide (50 + I) were tested. Mortality (< 11% with all treatments) and growth appeared to be unaffected by perchlorate. Inhibition of development started with 2.2 ppm perchlorate and little or no development occurred at 22.9 ppm and above. This inhibition was particularly apparent at the latter stages of development including hindlimb formation and metamorphosis. The estimated EC50 for total inhibition of metamorphosis at 70 days of treatment was 3.63 ppm. There was no evidence of inhibition of development with the 50 + I, C + I, or controls, indicating that the presence of small concentrations of iodide could counter the effects of perchlorate. When tadpoles that had been inhibited by perchlorate were subsequently treated with iodide, development through prometamorphosis progressed but mortality was very high.

  7. Growth and developmental effects of coal combustion residues on Southern Leopard Frog (Rana sphenocephala) tadpoles exposed throughout metamorphosis

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J.D.; Peterson, V.A.; Mendonca, M.T.

    2008-09-15

    The effects of aquatic deposition of coal combustion residues (CCRs) on amphibian life histories have been the focus of many recent studies. In summer 2005, we raised larval Southern Leopard Frogs, Rana sphenocephala, on either sand or CCR substrate (approximately 1 cm deep within plastic bins) and documented effects of sediment type on oral disc condition, as well as time to, mass at, and total body length at key developmental stages, including metamorphosis (Gosner stages (GS) 37, 42, and 46). We found no significant difference in mortality between the two treatments and mortality was relatively low (eight of 48 in the control group and four of 48 in the CCR group). Ninety percent of exposed tadpoles displayed oral disc abnormalities, while no control individuals displayed abnormalities. Tadpoles raised on CCR-contaminated sediment had decreased developmental rates and weighed significantly less at all developmental stages, on average, when compared to controls. The CCR treatment group was also significantly shorter In length than controls at the completion of metamorphosis (GS 46). Collectively, these findings are the most severe sub-lethal effects noted for any amphibian exposed to CCRs to date. More research is needed to understand how these long term effects may contribute to the dynamics of local amphibian populations.

  8. Metamorphosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balch, Stephen H.

    2012-01-01

    One thing history's torrent appears to be sweeping away is, ironically, the study of its most productive wellspring, Western civilization. "The Vanishing West", a report the National Association of Scholars released in May 2011, documents the extent of this vanishing. The traditional Western civilization survey requirement, commonplace only…

  9. Rainforest: Reptiles and Amphibians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Susanna

    2006-01-01

    Rainforest reptiles and amphibians are a vibrantly colored, multimedia art experience. To complete the entire project one may need to dedicate many class periods to production, yet in each aspect of the project a new and important skill, concept, or element is being taught or reinforced. This project incorporates the study of warm and cool color…

  10. Effects of hydroperiod duration on survival, developmental rate, and size at metamorphosis in boreal chorus frog tadpoles (Pseudacris maculata)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amburgey, Staci; Funk, W. Chris; Murphy, Melanie; Muths, Erin

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between climate-driven habitat conditions and survival is key to preserving biodiversity in the face of rapid climate change. Hydroperiod—the length of time water is in a wetland—is a critical limiting habitat variable for amphibians as larvae must metamorphose before ponds dry. Changes in precipitation and temperature patterns are affecting hydroperiod globally, but the impact of these changes on amphibian persistence is poorly understood. We studied the responses of Boreal Chorus Frog (Pseudacris maculata) tadpoles to simulated hydroperiods (i.e., water level reductions) in the laboratory using individuals collected from ponds spanning a range of natural hydroperiods (Colorado Front Range, USA). To assess the effects of experimental hydroperiod reduction, we measured mortality, time to metamorphosis, and size at metamorphosis. We found that tadpoles grew at rates reflecting the hydroperiods of their native ponds, regardless of experimental treatment. Tadpoles from permanent ponds metamorphosed faster than those from ephemeral ponds across all experimental treatments, a pattern which may represent a predation selection gradient or countergradient variation in developmental rates. Size at metamorphosis did not vary across experimental treatments. Mortality was low overall but varied with pond of origin. Our results suggest that adaptation to local hydroperiod and/or predation and temperature conditions is important in P. maculata. Moreover, the lack of a plastic response to reduced hydroperiods suggests that P. maculata may not be able to metamorphose quickly enough to escape drying ponds. These results have important implications for amphibian persistence in ponds predicted to dry more quickly due to rapid climate change.

  11. Aquatic eutrophication promotes pathogenic infection in amphibians

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Pieter

    Aquatic eutrophication promotes pathogenic infection in amphibians Pieter T. J. Johnson* , Jonathan Ribeiroia ondatrae sequentially infects birds, snails, and amphibian larvae, frequently causing severe limb of snail hosts, and, ultimately, the intensity of infection in amphibians. Infection also negatively

  12. ARTHROPOD BIOLOGY Phonotaxis to Amphibian Vocalizations in

    E-print Network

    ARTHROPOD BIOLOGY Phonotaxis to Amphibian Vocalizations in Culex territans (Diptera: Culicidae Culex territans Walker (Diptera: Culicidae) acquires bloodmeals from amphibian hosts. Females overwinter tested the hypothesis that Cx. territans uses amphibian vocal- izations as a long-distance attractant

  13. Amphibian Disease Research at the University of Tennessee

    E-print Network

    Gray, Matthew

    1 Amphibian Disease Research at the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture Matthew J. Gray Frog Virus 3 M. paratuberculosis Amphibian Disease Program Interactions of Cattle and Amphibians Goal: Justification: Food Safety Amphibian Conservation Amphibians may increase prevalence of foodborne

  14. Amphibian development in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Souza, K. A.

    1987-01-01

    The results of experiments performed by the U.S. Biosatellites 1 and 2 and the Gemini VIII and XII missions and by the Soviet Salyut and Soyuz missions on the effect of gravity on the development of prefertilized amphibian egg and, in particular, of the vestibular system of amphibian embryo are described. In these experiments, the condition of microgravity was reached only after the prefertilized eggs were in the early stages of first cell division or in the blastula stage. No significant changes were observed in the morphology of the embryos or in the vestibular system of embyos developed, respectively, for 2-5 days or 20 days under conditions of microgravity. Experiments planned for future spaceflights are discussed.

  15. Molecular and Cellular Aspects of Amphibian Lens Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Jonathan J.; Tsonis, Panagiotis A.

    2012-01-01

    Lens regeneration among vertebrates is basically restricted to some amphibians. The most notable cases are the ones that occur in premetamorphic frogs and in adult newts. Frogs and newts regenerate their lens in very different ways. In frogs the lens is regenerated by transdifferentiation of the cornea and is limited only to a time before metamorphosis. On the other hand, regeneration in newts is mediated by transdifferentiation of the pigment epithelial cells of the dorsal iris and is possible in adult animals as well. Thus, the study of both systems could provide important information about the process. Molecular tools have been developed in frogs and recently also in newts. Thus, the process has been studied at the molecular and cellular levels. A synthesis describing both systems was long due. In this review we describe the process in both Xenopus and the newt. The known molecular mechanisms are described and compared. PMID:20638484

  16. Perception metamorphosis phenomenon in autism.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, R

    1998-12-01

    It is well known that various perceptual abnormalities exist in autism. However, because perceptual phenomena are intersubjective, a phenomenological approach is required for getting hold of the reality of the modes of perception involved in autism. From this standpoint, the author has proposed the concept of 'perception metamorphosis phenomenon' (PMP) as the mode of perception peculiar to autistics. This mode of perception is notable to some degree in infancy and adolescence, and points to the appearance of behavior that is indicative of the environmental world being perceived in a manner different from before by the autistic child. The phenomenon has been classified into three basic categories according to the aspect of perception: (i) visual PMP; (ii) auditory PMP; and (iii) situational PMP. The proposal of this concept was made with the objective of capturing the onset of autism or the mechanism of appearance of the various symptoms from a more phenomenological viewpoint, to serve as a possible starting point for understanding the inner world of autistics. The proposal was made emphasizing the validity of this approach in mapping out new therapeutic approaches and for re-investigating the relationship between autism and schizophrenia. PMID:9895210

  17. Field Surveys of Amphibian Populations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodman, Robert

    2000-01-01

    Describes a course on amphibian research for environmental science majors. Involves students in field studies and introduces them to investigative research. Evaluates the course. (Contains 19 references.) (YDS)

  18. Flatfish metamorphosis: a hypothalamic independent process?

    PubMed

    Campinho, Marco A; Silva, Nadia; Roman-Padilla, Javier; Ponce, Marian; Manchado, Manuel; Power, Deborah M

    2015-03-15

    Anuran and flatfish metamorphosis are tightly regulated by thyroid hormones that are the necessary and sufficient factors that drive this developmental event. In the present study whole mount in situ hybridization (WISH) and quantitative PCR in sole are used to explore the central regulation of flatfish metamorphosis. Central regulation of the thyroid in vertebrates is mediated by the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis. Teleosts diverge from other vertebrates as hypothalamic regulation in the HPT axis is proposed to be through hypothalamic inhibition although the regulatory factor remains enigmatic. The dynamics of the HPT axis during sole metamorphosis revealed integration between the activity of the thyrotrophes in the pituitary and the thyroid follicles. No evidence was found supporting a role for thyroid releasing hormone (trh) or corticotrophin releasing hormone (crh) in hypothalamic control of TH production during sole metamorphosis. Intriguingly the results of the present study suggest that neither hypothalamic trh nor crh expression changes during sole metamorphosis and raises questions about the role of these factors and the hypothalamus in regulation of thyrotrophs. PMID:25575457

  19. Three-Dimensional Metamorphosis using Multiplanar Representation Mahesh Ramasubramanian

    E-print Network

    Mittal, Anurag

    Three-Dimensional Metamorphosis using Multiplanar Representation Mahesh Ramasubramanian Program method for three-dimensional metamorphosis between two polyhedral objects with differ- ent topologies the intermediate 3D objects. The user controls the metamorphosis by match- ing features during the 2D morphing

  20. Fast and Intuitive Metamorphosis of 3D Polyhedral Models Using

    E-print Network

    Frey, Pascal

    Fast and Intuitive Metamorphosis of 3D Polyhedral Models Using SMCC Mesh Merging Scheme Tong-Yee Lee and Po-Hua Huang Abstract--A very fast and intuitive approach to generate the metamorphosis of two polyhedral metamorphosis. We demonstrate several examples of aesthetically pleasing morphs, which can

  1. Metamorphosis of 3D Polyhedral Models Using Progressive Connectivity Transformations

    E-print Network

    Frey, Pascal

    Metamorphosis of 3D Polyhedral Models Using Progressive Connectivity Transformations Chao-Hung Lin and Tong-Yee Lee, Member, IEEE Abstract--Three-dimensional metamorphosis is a powerful technique to produce are demonstrated using the proposed method. Index Terms--Metamorphosis, connectivity fransformation, embedding

  2. Ecdysone signaling at metamorphosis triggers apoptosis of Drosophila abdominal muscles

    E-print Network

    Higgins, Darren

    Ecdysone signaling at metamorphosis triggers apoptosis of Drosophila abdominal muscles Jonathan KeywordsQ3 : Metamorphosis Muscle Drosophila Histolysis Apoptosis Autophagy Ecdysone Ftz-f1 a b s t r a c t One of the most dramatic examples of programmed cell death occurs during Drosophila metamorphosis

  3. Recognition of On-Line Handwritten Patterns Through Shape Metamorphosis

    E-print Network

    Recognition of On-Line Handwritten Patterns Through Shape Metamorphosis I. Pavlidis R. Singh N pattern recognition through the use of shape metamorphosis. It is based o n the premise that if two shapes are similar they don't have to undergo a substantial metamorphosis process in order for one to assume

  4. MicroRNA-dependent metamorphosis in hemimetabolan insects

    E-print Network

    Belles, Xavier

    MicroRNA-dependent metamorphosis in hemimetabolan insects Eva Gomez-Orte and Xavier Belles1 metamorphosis, has fasci- nated mankind since ancient times. Modern physiology has estab- lished the endocrine biological processes, and we wondered whether they might be also involved in insect metamorphosis. In insects

  5. Interior Modelling and Object Metamorphosis with Parametric Solids

    E-print Network

    Durikovic, Roman

    Interior Modelling and Object Metamorphosis with Parametric Solids Roman Durikovic and Silvester methodology and modelling tech- nique is applied to metamorphosis of two given 3-D shapes. 1. Introduction metamorphosis is discussed in Section 4.. 2. Three Construction Steps of Coons Body We will restrict ourselves

  6. Metamorphosis of Tangential Visual System Neurons in Drosophila

    E-print Network

    Renn, Susan C.P.

    Metamorphosis of Tangential Visual System Neurons in Drosophila Paul H. Taghert,1 Marie E. Roberts differentiation at the start of metamorphosis. The numerous small OL3 neurons are generated postembry- onically and first detected later in metamorphosis. The onset of dFMRFa transcription coincides

  7. Volume-based three-dimensional metamorphosis using

    E-print Network

    Drummond, Tom

    Volume-based three-dimensional metamorphosis using region correspondence G.M. Treece, R.W. Prager Street Cambridge CB2 1PZ England E-mail: gmt11,rwp,ahg@eng.cam.ac.uk #12;Abstract The metamorphosis-dimensional (3-D) metamorphosis, where a surface is transformed into another surface. One approach

  8. THREE-DIMENSIONAL OBJECT METAMORPHOSIS THROUGH ENERGY MINIMIZATION

    E-print Network

    Frey, Pascal

    WSCG'97 THREE-DIMENSIONAL OBJECT METAMORPHOSIS THROUGH ENERGY MINIMIZATION IOANNIS KORFIATIS Ltd. All rights reserved. Key words: metamorphosis, energy minimization, shortest path algorithm metamorphosis involves a pair of objects represented as a collection of polygons. The vertices of the ®rst

  9. Figure 1. A texture metamorphosis sequence is generated from the leftmost to the rightmost. Pattern-based Texture Metamorphosis

    E-print Network

    Oliva, Aude

    Figure 1. A texture metamorphosis sequence is generated from the leftmost to the rightmost. Pattern-based Texture Metamorphosis Ziqiang Liu Ce Liu Heung-Yeung Shum Yizhou Yu Microsoft Research Asia Zhejiang}@microsoft.com yyz@cs.uiuc.edu Abstract In this paper, we study texture metamorphosis, or how to generate texture

  10. Effects of depleted uranium on survival, growth, and metamorphosis in the african clawed frog (Xenopus laevis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mitchell, S.E.; Caldwell, C.A.; Gonzales, G.; Gould, W.R.; Arimoto, R.

    2005-01-01

    Embryos (stage 8-47, Nieuwkoop and Faber) of the African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis) were subjected to water-borne depleted uranium (DU) concentrations that ranged from 4.8 to 77.7 mg/Lusing an acute 96-h frog embryo teratogenesis assay-Xenopus (FETAX). In a chronic 64-d assay, X. laevis (from embryo through metamorphosis; stages 8-66) were subjected to concentrations of DU that ranged from 6.2 to 54.3 mg/L Our results indicate DU is a non teratogenic metal. No effects on mortality, malformations, or growth were observed in the 96-h FETAX with concentrations of DU that ranged from 4.8 to 77.7 mg/L From stage 8 to stage 47, X. laevis tadpoles do not actively feed and the gills are not well developed. Thus, uptake of DU was reduced despite exposure to elevated concentrations. The 64-d assay resulted in no concentration response for either mortality or malformations; however, a delay in metamorphosis was observed in tadpoles subjected to elevated DU concentrations (from 13.1 to 54.3 mg/L) compared to tadpoles in both the well-water control and reference. The delay in metamorphosis was likely due to increasing body burden of DU that ranged from 0.98 to 2.82 mg/kg. Copyright?? Taylor & Francis Inc.

  11. Responses of Mammalian Insectivores, Amphibians, and Reptiles to Broad-Scale Manipulation of Coarse Woody Debris

    SciTech Connect

    McCay, T.S.; Forschler, B.T.; Komoroski, M.J.; Ford, W.M.

    2002-03-10

    Sampled shrews at 9.3 ha plots from logs manually removed and control plots in loblolly pine forests of the Southeastern Coastal Plain. Capture rates of Cryptotis parva were lower at plots from which deadwood was removed whereas capture rates of Blarina cavolinensis and Sorex longirostris did not differ between control and removal plots. Cryptotis may have been most sensitive to removal plots due to low population density, hence poor ability to move into areas of low reproduction. (Second Abstract, p. 37)Presentation of evidence that juvenile amphibians including Ambystomatid salamanders may disperse hundreds of meter from their natal wetlands within the weeks to months following metamorphosis. Data indicates Ambystoma trigrinum metamorphs can take at least six months to disperse and en route use non-polar lipid reserves garnished as larvae. Report suggests a land management regime that allows for both juvenile amphibian dispersal and also the consumptive use of the surrounding landscape.

  12. Interpreting in vivo Effects of Thyroid Synthesis Inhibitors through the Lens of in vitro and ex vivo Assays

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA has been charged to evaluate chemicals for their ability to disrupt endocrine pathways including estrogen, androgen, and thyroid hormone. Amphibian metamorphosis, which is regulated by thyroid hormone, is an ideal model system for investigating disruption of the thyroi...

  13. Global Amphibian Declines:Global Amphibian Declines: What Have We Done?What Have We Done?

    E-print Network

    Gray, Matthew

    1 Global Amphibian Declines:Global Amphibian Declines: What Have We Done?What Have We Done? Nikki amphibian populations · Amphibian biology - characteristics making them susceptible to declinesthem susceptible to declines · Direct anthropogenic (human caused) effects on amphibian declines · Indirect effects

  14. An examination of amphibian sensitivity to environmental contaminants: are amphibians poor

    E-print Network

    Storfer, Andrew

    LETTER An examination of amphibian sensitivity to environmental contaminants: are amphibians poor of worldwide amphibian declines. Amphibians earned their appellation, Ôcanaries in a coal mineŐ, because, there has been no systematic evaluation of amphibian sensitivity to environmental challenges relative

  15. Amphibian Biology and Husbandry F. Harvey Pough

    E-print Network

    Boynton, Walter R.

    Amphibian Biology and Husbandry F. Harvey Pough Abstract Extant amphibians comprise three lineages)--which contain more than 6000 species. Fewer than a dozen species of amphibians are commonly maintained in laboratory colo- nies, and the husbandry requirements for the vast majority of amphibians are poorly known

  16. Appendix 56 Management of Montana's Amphibians

    E-print Network

    Appendix 56 Management of Montana's Amphibians #12;Management of Montana's Amphibians: A Review. Management of Montana's amphibians: a review of factors that may present a risk to population viability...................................................................................................... 5 Table of Presence and Status Ranks for Amphibians on National Forests in Montana...... 6 Table

  17. Sensory Flask Cells in Sponge Larvae Regulate Metamorphosis via Calcium Signaling.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Nagayasu; Stoupin, Daniel; Degnan, Sandie M; Degnan, Bernard M

    2015-12-01

    The Porifera (sponges) is one of the earliest phyletic lineages to branch off the metazoan tree. Although the body-plan of sponges is among the simplest in the animal kingdom and sponges lack nervous systems that communicate environmental signals to other cells, their larvae have sensory systems that generate coordinated responses to environmental cues. In eumetazoans (Cnidaria and Bilateria), the nervous systems of larvae often regulate metamorphosis through Ca(2+)-dependent signal transduction. In sponges, neither the identity of the receptor system that detects an inductive environmental cue (hereafter "metamorphic cues") nor the signaling system that mediates settlement and metamorphosis are known. Using a combination of behavioral assays and surgical manipulations, we show here that specialized epithelial cells-referred to as flask cells-enriched in the anterior third of the Amphimedon queenslandica larva are most likely to be the sensory cells that detect the metamorphic cues. Surgical removal of the region enriched in flask cells in a larva inhibits the initiation of metamorphosis. The flask cell has an apical sensory apparatus with a cilium surrounded by an apical F-actin-rich protrusion, and numerous vesicles, hallmarks of eumetazoan sensory-neurosecretory cells. We demonstrate that these flask cells respond to metamorphic cues by elevating intracellular Ca(2+) levels, and that this elevation is necessary for the initiation of metamorphosis. Taken together, these analyses suggest that sponge larvae have sensory-secretory epithelial cells capable of converting exogenous cues into internal signals via Ca(2+)-mediated signaling, which is necessary for the initiation of metamorphosis. Similarities in the morphology, physiology, and function of the sensory flask cells in sponge larvae with the sensory/neurosecretory cells in eumetazoan larvae suggest this sensory system predates the divergence of Porifera and Eumetazoa. PMID:25898842

  18. Quantitative Proteomics of an Amphibian Pathogen, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, following Exposure to Thyroid Hormone

    PubMed Central

    Thekkiniath, Jose; Zabet-Moghaddam, Masoud; Kottapalli, Kameswara Rao; Pasham, Mithun R.; San Francisco, Susan; San Francisco, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), a chytrid fungus, has increasingly been implicated as a major factor in the worldwide decline of amphibian populations. The fungus causes chytridiomycosis in susceptible species leading to massive die-offs of adult amphibians. Although Bd infects the keratinized mouthparts of tadpoles and negatively affects foraging behavior, these infections are non-lethal. An important morphogen controlling amphibian metamorphosis is thyroid hormone (T3). Tadpoles may be infected with Bd and the fungus may be exposed to T3 during metamorphosis. We hypothesize that exposure of Bd to T3 may induce the expression of factors associated with host colonization and pathogenicity. We utilized a proteomics approach to better understand the dynamics of the Bd-T3 interaction. Using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), we generated a data set of a large number of cytoplasmic and membrane proteins following exposure of Bd to T3. From these data, we identified a total of 263 proteins whose expression was significantly changed following T3 exposure. We provide evidence for expression of an array of proteins that may play key roles in both genomic and non-genomic actions of T3 in Bd. Additionally, our proteomics study shows an increase in several proteins including proteases and a class of uncommon crinkler and crinkler-like effector proteins suggesting their importance in Bd pathogenicity as well as those involved in metabolism and energy transfer, protein fate, transport and stress responses. This approach provides insights into the mechanistic basis of the Bd-amphibian interaction following T3 exposure. PMID:26046527

  19. Structural Elements in Franz Kafka's "The Metamorphosis."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Scott

    1993-01-01

    Notes that Kafka's "The Metamorphosis" is not only a masterpiece of modern literature but also a work that exemplifies many ideas of structural family therapy. Examines how Kafka's novella embodies concepts such as parentified children, enmeshment, intergenerational boundaries, coalitions and triangles, structural dysfunction, and structural…

  20. Organizational Metamorphosis in Space Research and Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tompkins, Phillip K.

    1978-01-01

    The communicative, and therefore organizational and managerial, aspects of the Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) metamorphosis from Saturn V to Skylab are analyzed. MSFC's consistent successes are attributed to the organization's commitment to communication systems, its technical integrity, and its single-minded purpose. (JMF)

  1. Metamorphosis: Play, Spirituality and the Animal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bone, Jane

    2010-01-01

    Animal- and bird-becoming is an aspect of play as metamorphosis connected to spirituality in early childhood settings. The reconceptualisation of play presented here is supported by research that explored the spiritual experiences of young children in different early childhood contexts. Qualitative case study research carried out in Aotearoa New…

  2. Effects of Pesticide Mixtures on Host-Pathogen Dynamics of the Amphibian Chytrid Fungus

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Julia C.; Hua, Jessica; Brogan, William R.; Dang, Trang D.; Urbina, Jenny; Bendis, Randall J.; Stoler, Aaron B.; Blaustein, Andrew R.; Relyea, Rick A.

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic and natural stressors often interact to affect organisms. Amphibian populations are undergoing unprecedented declines and extinctions with pesticides and emerging infectious diseases implicated as causal factors. Although these factors often co-occur, their effects on amphibians are usually examined in isolation. We hypothesized that exposure of larval and metamorphic amphibians to ecologically relevant concentrations of pesticide mixtures would increase their post-metamorphic susceptibility to the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), a pathogen that has contributed to amphibian population declines worldwide. We exposed five anuran species (Pacific treefrog, Pseudacris regilla; spring peeper, Pseudacris crucifer; Cascades frog, Rana cascadae; northern leopard frog, Lithobates pipiens; and western toad, Anaxyrus boreas) from three families to mixtures of four common insecticides (chlorpyrifos, carbaryl, permethrin, and endosulfan) or herbicides (glyphosate, acetochlor, atrazine, and 2,4-D) or a control treatment, either as tadpoles or as newly metamorphic individuals (metamorphs). Subsequently, we exposed animals to Bd or a control inoculate after metamorphosis and compared survival and Bd load. Bd exposure significantly increased mortality in Pacific treefrogs, spring peepers, and western toads, but not in Cascades frogs or northern leopard frogs. However, the effects of pesticide exposure on mortality were negligible, regardless of the timing of exposure. Bd load varied considerably across species; Pacific treefrogs, spring peepers, and western toads had the highest loads, whereas Cascades frogs and northern leopard frogs had the lowest loads. The influence of pesticide exposure on Bd load depended on the amphibian species, timing of pesticide exposure, and the particular pesticide treatment. Our results suggest that exposure to realistic pesticide concentrations has minimal effects on Bd-induced mortality, but can alter Bd load. This result could have broad implications for risk assessment of amphibians; the outcome of exposure to multiple stressors may be unpredictable and can differ between species and life stages. PMID:26181492

  3. Pesticide Uptake Across the Amphibian Dermis Through Soil and Overspray Exposures.

    PubMed

    Van Meter, Robin J; Glinski, Donna A; Henderson, W Matthew; Garrison, A Wayne; Cyterski, Mike; Purucker, S Thomas

    2015-11-01

    For terrestrial amphibians, accumulation of pesticides through dermal contact is a primary route of exposure in agricultural landscapes and may be contributing to widespread amphibian declines. To show pesticide transfer across the amphibian dermis at permitted label application rates, our study was designed to measure pesticide body burdens after two simulated exposure scenarios. We compared direct exposures, where amphibians were present when spraying occurred, to indirect exposures, where amphibians were exposed to soils after pesticide application. During summer 2012, we reared barking (Hyla gratiosa) and green treefrogs (H. cinerea) through 60-90 days post-metamorphosis at a United States Environmental Protection Agency research laboratory. We tested exposure for 8 h to five pesticide active ingredients (imidacloprid, atrazine, triadimefon, fipronil, or pendimethalin) in glass aquaria lined with soil in the laboratory. We quantified total pesticide body burden and soil concentrations using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. All individuals in both treatments had measurable body burdens at the end of the study. A randomized block design analysis of variance (n = 18) showed that body burdens (p = 0.03) and bioconcentration factors (BCFs) (p = 0.01) were significantly greater in the direct overspray treatment relative to the indirect soil spray treatment for both species and tested pesticides. BCFs ranged from 0.1 to 1.16 and from 0.013 to 0.78 in the direct and indirect treatments, respectively. Our study shows dermal uptake for multiple pesticides from both direct spray and indirect soil exposures and provides empirical support for the degree to which terrestrial phase amphibians have higher body burdens after overspray pesticide exposure. PMID:26135301

  4. Effects of Pesticide Mixtures on Host-Pathogen Dynamics of the Amphibian Chytrid Fungus.

    PubMed

    Buck, Julia C; Hua, Jessica; Brogan, William R; Dang, Trang D; Urbina, Jenny; Bendis, Randall J; Stoler, Aaron B; Blaustein, Andrew R; Relyea, Rick A

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic and natural stressors often interact to affect organisms. Amphibian populations are undergoing unprecedented declines and extinctions with pesticides and emerging infectious diseases implicated as causal factors. Although these factors often co-occur, their effects on amphibians are usually examined in isolation. We hypothesized that exposure of larval and metamorphic amphibians to ecologically relevant concentrations of pesticide mixtures would increase their post-metamorphic susceptibility to the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), a pathogen that has contributed to amphibian population declines worldwide. We exposed five anuran species (Pacific treefrog, Pseudacris regilla; spring peeper, Pseudacris crucifer; Cascades frog, Rana cascadae; northern leopard frog, Lithobates pipiens; and western toad, Anaxyrus boreas) from three families to mixtures of four common insecticides (chlorpyrifos, carbaryl, permethrin, and endosulfan) or herbicides (glyphosate, acetochlor, atrazine, and 2,4-D) or a control treatment, either as tadpoles or as newly metamorphic individuals (metamorphs). Subsequently, we exposed animals to Bd or a control inoculate after metamorphosis and compared survival and Bd load. Bd exposure significantly increased mortality in Pacific treefrogs, spring peepers, and western toads, but not in Cascades frogs or northern leopard frogs. However, the effects of pesticide exposure on mortality were negligible, regardless of the timing of exposure. Bd load varied considerably across species; Pacific treefrogs, spring peepers, and western toads had the highest loads, whereas Cascades frogs and northern leopard frogs had the lowest loads. The influence of pesticide exposure on Bd load depended on the amphibian species, timing of pesticide exposure, and the particular pesticide treatment. Our results suggest that exposure to realistic pesticide concentrations has minimal effects on Bd-induced mortality, but can alter Bd load. This result could have broad implications for risk assessment of amphibians; the outcome of exposure to multiple stressors may be unpredictable and can differ between species and life stages. PMID:26181492

  5. FeatureBased Volume Metamorphosis Apostolos Lerios, Chase D. Garfinkle, Marc Levoy \\Lambda

    E-print Network

    Stanford University

    Feature­Based Volume Metamorphosis Apostolos Lerios, Chase D. Garfinkle, Marc Levoy \\Lambda Computer Science Department Stanford University Abstract Image metamorphosis, or image morphing pre­rendered images. In this paper we consider 3D metamorphosis applied to volume

  6. The Life of the Smooth Newt (Triturus vulgaris) after Metamorphosis Graham Bell

    E-print Network

    Dhindsa, Rajinder

    The Life of the Smooth Newt (Triturus vulgaris) after Metamorphosis Graham Bell Ecological) AFTER METAMORPHOSIS' GRAHAMBELL' Atiinirrl Ecology Resetzrch Group, Deparrtnent of Zoology. South Parks Rotzd, Oxford Abstract. After metamorphosis. smooth or common newts (Tritltrus vulgtzris

  7. Polarity of the Amphibian Egg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malacinski, G. M.

    1983-01-01

    Amphibian egg polarity and the mechanism which generates the polarity is addressed. Of particular concern is the question of whether the activation rotation which responds to gravity is a prerequisite for normal development.

  8. The execution phase of autophagy associated PCD during insect metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Facey, Caroline O B; Lockshin, Richard A

    2010-06-01

    During metamorphosis of Manduca sexta, involution of labial glands follows an autophagic pathway towards programmed cell death (PCD). We looked for evidence of both caspase dependent and independent pathways of PCD by assaying for caspases -1, -2, -3, and -6, proteasomal protease, and cathepsins B & L, using fluorogenic substrates and aldehyde and chloromethylketone inhibitors. The substrates FR-AMC and RR-AMC, preferentially degraded by cathepsins B and L, were the most rapidly degraded, increasing in rate as the gland involuted. Digestion of YVAD-AMC (preferential substrate for caspase-1) and DEVD-AMC (substrate for caspases-3 & -7) was barely detectable, less than 0.02% (on a per-unit-protein basis) of that seen in vertebrate embryos induced to undergo apoptosis. Cleavage of VDVAD-AFC (substrate for caspase -2) and VEID-AFC (substrate for caspase -6) was also assessed, but activity was negligible. Mitochondrial membrane permeabilization (MMP) and cytochrome c release were not detected. Exogenous caspase substrate, polyadenosyl ribose phosphorylase (PARP), is cleaved by labial gland extracts, but only at an acidic pH of 5.5-6.0, and into fragments different from those generated by caspases (confirmed by N-terminal sequencing). The cysteine protease inhibitor leupeptin inhibits PARP cleavage, but the caspase inhibitor DEVD-CHO does not. However, potential caspase-derived fragments of PARP are seen when cytochrome c and dATP are added to cytosolic extracts. Although apoptotic machinery is conserved and functional in this tissue, cell death occurs independently of caspases in metamorphosis. We also postulate that lysosomal proteases play the major proteolytic role similar to the caspase cascade seen in apoptosis. PMID:20405221

  9. Generalized morphological transformation for describing nonhomotopic object metamorphosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hua; Liu, Wen-Yu; Zhu, Yaoting; Zhu, Guang-Xi

    2001-09-01

    Metamorphosis or morphing is the process of continuously transforming one object into another, and is popular in computer animation, industrial design, and growth simulation. In this paper, a novel metamorphosis approach is presented for computing continuous shape transformation between polyhedral objects. Metamorphosis can be achieved by decomposing two objects into sets of individual convex sub- objects respectively and constructing the mapping relationship of subsets, this method can solve the metamorphosis problem of two non-homotopic objects (including concave objects and holey objects). The results of object metamorphosis are also discussed in this paper. The experiments show that this method can generate natural, high quality metamorphosis results with simple computation. This method can also be used in font composition and interpolation between two keyframes in 2D and 3D computer animation automatically.

  10. No evidence for Dark Energy Metamorphosis ?

    E-print Network

    J. Jonsson; A. Goobar; R. Amanullah; L. Bergstrom

    2004-10-11

    Recent attempts to fit Type Ia supernova data by modeling the dark energy density as a truncated Taylor series have suggested the possibility of metamorphosis, i.e., a rapidly evolving equation of state parameter, w_DE(z). However, we show that fits using that parametrization have significant problems: evolution of w_DE(z) is both favoured and in some sense forced, and the equation of state parameter blows up or diverges in large regions of the parameter space. To further elucidate these problems we have simulated sets of supernova data in a Lambda-universe to show that the suggested ``evidence'' for metamorphosis is also common for w_DE=-1.

  11. No evidence for Dark Energy Metamorphosis ?

    E-print Network

    Jonsson, J; Amanullah, R; Bergström, L

    2004-01-01

    Recent attempts to fit Type Ia supernova data by modeling the dark energy density as a truncated Taylor series have suggested the possibility of metamorphosis, i.e., a rapidly evolving equation of state parameter, w_DE(z). However, we show that fits using that parametrization have significant problems: evolution of w_DE(z) is both favoured and in some sense forced, and the equation of state parameter blows up or diverges in large regions of the parameter space used for the truncated series. To further elucidate these problems we have simulated sets of supernova data in a Lambda-universe to show that the suggested ``evidence'' for metamorphosis is also common for w_DE=-1.

  12. Homeomorphisms and Metamorphosis of Polyhedral Models Using Fields of Directions Defined on

    E-print Network

    Kallmann, Marcelo

    1 Homeomorphisms and Metamorphosis of Polyhedral Models Using Fields of Directions Defined interpolation and metamorphosis. Morphing animations have achieved widespread use in the entertainment industry

  13. Metamorphosis in the Cirripede Crustacean Balanus amphitrite

    PubMed Central

    Maruzzo, Diego; Aldred, Nick; Clare, Anthony S.; Hřeg, Jens T.

    2012-01-01

    Stalked and acorn barnacles (Cirripedia Thoracica) have a complex life cycle that includes a free-swimming nauplius larva, a cypris larva and a permanently attached sessile juvenile and adult barnacle. The barnacle cyprid is among the most highly specialized of marine invertebrate larvae and its settlement biology has been intensively studied. By contrast, surprisingly few papers have dealt with the critical series of metamorphic events from cementation of the cyprid to the substratum until the appearance of a suspension feeding juvenile. This metamorphosis is both ontogenetically complex and critical to the survival of the barnacle. Here we use video microscopy to present a timeline and description of morphological events from settled cyprid to juvenile barnacle in the model species Balanus amphitrite, representing an important step towards both a broader understanding of the settlement ecology of this species and a platform for studying the factors that control its metamorphosis. Metamorphosis in B. amphitrite involves a complex sequence of events: cementation, epidermis separation from the cypris cuticle, degeneration of cypris musculature, rotation of the thorax inside the mantle cavity, building of the juvenile musculature, contraction of antennular muscles, raising of the body, shedding of the cypris cuticle, shell plate and basis formation and, possibly, a further moult to become a suspension feeding barnacle. We compare these events with developmental information from other barnacle species and discuss them in the framework of barnacle settlement ecology. PMID:22666355

  14. This information sheet is for the care and use of amphibians. Potential Zoonotic Diseases for Amphibians

    E-print Network

    Wood, Marcelo A.

    This information sheet is for the care and use of amphibians. Potential Zoonotic Diseases for Amphibians The overall incidence of transmission of disease-producing agents from amphibians to humans is low. There are, however, a few agents that are found in amphibians and aquarium water that have the potential

  15. Amphibian Conservation Action Plan Proceedings: IUCN/SSC Amphibian Conservation Summit 2005

    E-print Network

    Georgia, University of

    Amphibian Conservation Action Plan Proceedings: IUCN/SSC Amphibian Conservation Summit 2005 Edited III IUCN Species Survival Commission #12;#12;Amphibian Conservation Action Plan Proceedings: IUCN/SSC Action Plan Proceedings: IUCN/SSC Amphibian Conservation Summit 2005 Edited by: Claude Gascon James P

  16. Vomeronasal System Chemosensory Systems in Amphibians

    E-print Network

    Reiss, John

    Chemoreception FROGS SALAMANDERS CAECILIANS FUNCTION IN WATER AND AIR Taste Comparative Chemoreception in Secondarily Aquatic Amphibians FROGS SALAMANDERS CAECILIANS Evolution of the Chemical Senses in Secondarily Aquatic Amphibians PIPID FROGS SALAMANDRID NEWTS TYPHLONECTID CAECILIANS Conclusions In this chapter, we

  17. Free Reptile & Amphibian Health and Veterinary Websites

    E-print Network

    Peterson, M. Nils

    Free Reptile & Amphibian Health and Veterinary Websites Animal and Veterinary ­ U.S. Food & Drug for Disease Control & Prevention ­ Reptiles, Amphibians and Salmonella www in terms of health, care, feeding, and behavior Avian & Exotic Animal Care ­ Care Sheets for Reptiles

  18. COMPARATIVESENSITIVITYOF AMPHIBIAN TADPOLES TO SINGLEAND PULSEDEXPOSURESOF THE

    E-print Network

    Bertram, Sue

    @ Pergamon COMPARATIVESENSITIVITYOF AMPHIBIAN TADPOLES TO SINGLEAND PULSEDEXPOSURESOF THE FOREST tadpoles,exhibitingparalysisat lower concentrations, and they are affected by exposureto the carrier,whereasthe spottedsalamanderlarvaeareassensi- tive as are the bullfrog and green frog tadpoles. Keywords- Amphibian Pesticide Fenitrothion

  19. Synaptogenesis in the Mushroom Body Calyx During Metamorphosis in the

    E-print Network

    Menzel, Randolf - Institut für Biologie

    Synaptogenesis in the Mushroom Body Calyx During Metamorphosis in the Honeybee Apis mellifera synaptogenesis and morpho- genesis within the mushroom body calyx of the honeybee Apis mellifera and to find out- phosis. We show that synaptogenesis in the mushroom body calycal neuropile starts in early metamorphosis

  20. BIOTIC FACTORS IN AMPHIBIAN POPULATION DECLINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Amphibians evolved in, and continue to exist in, habitats that are replete with many other organisms. Some of these organisms serve as prey for amphibians and others interact with amphibians as predators, competitors, pathogens, or symbionts. Still other organisms in their enviro...

  1. The Reptiles and Amphibians Savannah River Plant

    E-print Network

    Georgia, University of

    SR0-NERP-2 The Reptiles and Amphibians of the Savannah River Plant by J. Whitfield Gib bons THE REPTILES AND AMPHIBIANS OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT by J. Whitfield Gibbons and Karen K. Patterson Savannah is to provide taxonomic, distributional, and ecological information on the reptiles and amphibians

  2. Speciation, Species Boundaries and Phylogeography of Amphibians

    E-print Network

    Wake, David B.

    CHAPTER 4 Speciation, Species Boundaries and Phylogeography of Amphibians Miguel Vences and David B Speciation and their Application in A. Allozyme Threshold Values Amphibians B. Mitochondrial Threshold Values B. Characters Used to Define Amphibian C. Discordance among Datasets Species D. DNA Barcoding

  3. Amphibian commerce and the threat of pathogen

    E-print Network

    Gray, Matthew

    7/16/2011 1 Amphibian commerce and the threat of pathogen pollution Angela Picco, PhD United% for commercial purposes, mostly for pet trade (Smith et al., 2009) W.B. Karesh #12;7/16/2011 2 Amphibian trade · Pet trade · Food trade · Research, biomedical, education · Bait trade · 5 million live amphibians per

  4. Conservation Genetics and Genomics of Amphibians and

    E-print Network

    Shaffer, H. Bradley

    Conservation Genetics and Genomics of Amphibians and Reptiles H. Bradley Shaffer,1­3,Ă Müge Gidis to the conservation of amphibians and rep- tiles. Although genomics has only recently emerged as part of this con;INTRODUCTION Amphibians and nonavian reptiles comprise two of the largest, least well known, and most

  5. Agricultural ponds support amphibian populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knutson, M.G.; Richardson, W.B.; Reineke, D.M.; Gray, B.R.; Parmelee, J.R.; Weick, S.E.

    2004-01-01

    In some agricultural regions, natural wetlands are scarce, and constructed agricultural ponds may represent important alternative breeding habitats for amphibians. Properly managed, these agricultural ponds may effectively increase the total amount of breeding habitat and help to sustain populations. We studied small, constructed agricultural ponds in southeastern Minnesota to assess their value as amphibian breeding sites. Our study examined habitat factors associated with amphibian reproduction at two spatial scales: the pond and the landscape surrounding the pond. We found that small agricultural ponds in southeastern Minnesota provided breeding habitat for at least 10 species of amphibians. Species richness and multispecies reproductive success were more closely associated with characteristics of the pond (water quality, vegetation, and predators) compared with characteristics of the surrounding landscape, but individual species were associated with both pond and landscape variables. Ponds surrounded by row crops had similar species richness and reproductive success compared with natural wetlands and ponds surrounded by nongrazed pasture. Ponds used for watering livestock had elevated concentrations of phosphorus, higher turbidity, and a trend toward reduced amphibian reproductive success. Species richness was highest in small ponds, ponds with lower total nitrogen concentrations, tiger salamanders (Ambystoma tigrinum) present, and lacking fish. Multispecies reproductive success was best in ponds with lower total nitrogen concentrations, less emergent vegetation, and lacking fish. Habitat factors associated with higher reproductive success varied among individual species. We conclude that small, constructed farm ponds, properly managed, may help sustain amphibian populations in landscapes where natural wetland habitat is rare. We recommend management actions such as limiting livestock access to the pond to improve water quality, reducing nitrogen input, and avoiding the introduction of fish.

  6. Perturbation of Organogenesis by the Herbicide Atrazine in the Amphibian Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    Lenkowski, Jenny R.; Reed, J. Michael; Deininger, Lisa; McLaughlin, Kelly A.

    2008-01-01

    Background Exposure to anthropogenic chemicals during development can disrupt the morphogenesis of organ systems. Use of the herbicide atrazine has been debated in recent years because of its implicated, but poorly characterized, effects on vertebrates. Previous studies primarily examined the effects of atrazine exposure during metamorphosis or early developmental stages of amphibians. Objectives We sought to identify and characterize the susceptibility during the often-overlooked developmental stage of organ morphogenesis. Methods We used a static renewal experimental treatment to investigate the effects of 10, 25, and 35 mg/L atrazine from early organ morphogenesis through the onset of tadpole feeding in the aquatic amphibian model system, Xenopus laevis. We quantified malformations of the body axis, heart, and intestine, as well as apoptosis in the midbrain and pronephric kidney. Results We found a significant dose-dependent increase in the percentage of atrazine-exposed tadpoles with malformations of multiple tissues including the main body axis, circulatory system, kidney, and digestive system. Incidence of apoptotic cells also increased in the both midbrain and kidney of atrazine-exposed tadpoles. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that acute atrazine exposure (10–35 mg/L for ? 48 hr) during early organ morphogenesis disrupts proper organ development in an amphibian model system. The concurrent atrazine-induced apoptosis in the pronephric kidney and midbrain begins to elucidate a mechanism by which atrazine may disrupt developmental processes in nontarget organisms. PMID:18288322

  7. Nitric Oxide Inhibits Metamorphosis in Larvae of Crepidula fornicata, the Slippershell Snail

    E-print Network

    Nitric Oxide Inhibits Metamorphosis in Larvae of Crepidula fornicata, the Slippershell Snail JAN A metamorphosis in the marine gastropod Crepidula fornicata. Metamorphosis was stimulated by the nitric oxide) at concentrations of about 100­1000 mol l 1 and 50­200 mol l 1 , respectively. Metamorphosis was not, however

  8. Profound morphological and functional changes of rodent Purkinje cells between the first and the second postnatal weeks: a metamorphosis?

    PubMed Central

    Dusart, Isabelle; Flamant, Frederic

    2012-01-01

    Between the first and the second postnatal week, the development of rodent Purkinje cells is characterized by several profound transitions. Purkinje cells acquire their typical dendritic “espalier” tree morphology and form distal spines. During the first postnatal week, they are multi-innervated by climbing fibers and numerous collateral branches sprout from their axons, whereas from the second postnatal week, the regression of climbing fiber multi-innervation begins, and Purkinje cells become innervated by parallel fibers and inhibitory molecular layer interneurons. Furthermore, their periods of developmental cell death and ability to regenerate their axon stop and their axons become myelinated. Thus a Purkinje cell during the first postnatal week looks and functions differently from a Purkinje cell during the second postnatal week. These fundamental changes occur in parallel with a peak of circulating thyroid hormone in the mouse. All these features suggest to some extent an interesting analogy with amphibian metamorphosis. PMID:22514522

  9. METAPOPULATION DYNAMICS AND AMPHIBIAN CONSERVATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    In many respects, amphibian spatial dynamics resemble classical metapopulation models, where subpopulations in breeding ponds blink in and out of existance and where extinction and colonization rates are functions of pond spatial arrangement. This "ponds-as-patches" view of amphi...

  10. Ecotoxicology of Amphibians and Reptiles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    2000-01-01

    For many years, ecological research on amphibians and reptiles has lagged behind that of other vertebrates such as fishes, birds, and mammals, despite the known importance of these animals in their environments. The lack of study has been particularly acute in the he area of ecotoxicology where the number of published scientific papers is a fraction of that found for the other vertebrate classes. Recently, scientists have become aware of severe crises among amphibian populations, including unexplained and sudden extinctions, worldwide declines, and hideous malformations. In many of these instances, contaminants have been listed as probable contributors. Data on the effects of contaminants on reptiles are so depauperate that even the most elementary interpretations are difficult. This state-of-the-science review and synthesis of amphibian and reptile ecotoxicology demonstrates the inter-relationships among distribution, ecology, physiology, and contaminant exposure, and interprets these topics as they pertain to comparative toxicity, population declines, malformations, and risk assessment . In this way, the book identifies and serves as a basis for the most pressing research needs in the coming years. The editors have invited 27 other internationally respected experts to examine the state of existing data in specific areas, interpret it in light of current problems, and identify research gaps and needs. Through its emphasis on recent research, extensive reviews and synthesis, Ecotoxicology of Amphibians and Reptiles will remain a definitive reference work well into the new century.

  11. Chronic sublethal exposure to silver nanoparticles disrupts thyroid hormone signaling during Xenopus laevis metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Carew, Amanda C; Hoque, M Ehsanul; Metcalfe, Chris D; Peyrot, Caroline; Wilkinson, Kevin J; Helbing, Caren C

    2015-02-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are engineered in the nanoscale (<100 nm) to have unique physico-chemical properties from their bulk counterparts. Nanosilver particles (AgNPs) are the most prevalent NPs in consumer products due to their strong antimicrobial action. While AgNP toxicity at high concentrations has been thoroughly investigated, the sublethal effects at or below regulatory guidelines are relatively unknown. Amphibian metamorphosis is mediated by thyroid hormone (TH), and initial studies with bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana) indicate that low concentrations of AgNPs disrupt TH-dependent responses in premetamorphic tadpole tailfin tissue. The present study examined the effects of low, non-lethal, environmentally-relevant AgNP concentrations (0.018, 0.18 or 1.8 ?g/L Ag; ?10 nm particle size) on naturally metamorphosing Xenopus laevis tadpoles in two-28 day chronic exposures beginning with either pre- or prometamorphic developmental stages. Asymmetric flow field flow fractionation with online inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and nanoparticle tracking analysis indicated a mixture of single AgNPs with homo-agglomerates in the exposure water with a significant portion (?30-40%) found as dissolved Ag. Tadpoles bioaccumulated AgNPs and displayed transient alterations in snout/vent and hindlimb length with AgNP exposure. Using MAGEX microarray and quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction transcript analyses, AgNP-induced disruption of five TH-responsive targets was observed. The increased mRNA abundance of two peroxidase genes by AgNP exposure suggests the presence of reactive oxygen species even at low, environmentally-relevant concentrations. Furthermore, differential responsiveness to AgNPs was observed at each developmental stage. Therefore, low concentrations of AgNPs had developmental stage-specific endocrine disrupting effects during TH-dependent metamorphosis. PMID:25531432

  12. The metamorphosis of 'culture-bound' syndromes.

    PubMed

    Jilek, W G; Jilek-Aall, L

    1985-01-01

    Starting from a critical review of the concept of 'culture-bound' disorders and its development in comparative psychiatry, the authors present the changing aspects of two so-called culture-bound syndromes as paradigms of transcultural metamorphosis (koro) and intra-cultural metamorphosis (Salish Indian spirit sickness), respectively. The authors present recent data on epidemics of koro, which is supposedly bound to Chinese culture, in Thailand and India among non-Chinese populations. Neither the model of Oedipal castration anxiety nor the model of culture-specific pathogenicity, commonly adduced in psychiatric and ethnological literature, explain these phenomena. The authors' data on Salish Indian spirit sickness describes the contemporary condition as anomic depression, which is significantly different from its traditional namesake. The traditional concept was redefined by Salish ritual specialists in response to current needs imposed by social changes. The stresses involved in creating the contemporary phenomena of koro and spirit sickness are neither culture-specific nor culture-inherent, as postulated for 'culture-bound' syndromes, rather they are generated by a feeling of powerlessness caused by perceived threats to ethnic survival. PMID:4049006

  13. Exposure to coal combustion residues during metamorphosis elevates corticosterone content and adversely affects oral morphology, growth, and development in Rana sphenocephala

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J.D.; Peterson, V.A.; Mendonca, M.T.

    2009-01-15

    Coal combustion residues (CCRs) are documented to negatively impact oral morphology, growth, and development in larval amphibians. It is currently unclear what physiological mechanisms may mediate these effects. Corticosterone, a glucocorticoid hormone, is a likely mediator because when administered exogenously it, like CCRs, also negatively influences oral morphology, growth, and development in larval amphibians. In an attempt to identify if corticosterone mediates these effects, we raised larval Southern Leopard Frogs, Rana sphenocephala, on either sand or CCR substrate and documented effects of sediment type on whole body corticosterone, oral morphology, and time to and mass at key metamorphic stages. Coal combustion residue treated tadpoles contained significantly more corticosterone than controls throughout metamorphosis. However, significantly more oral abnormalities occurred early in metamorphosis when differences in corticosterone levels between treatments were minimal. Overall, CCR-treated tadpoles took significantly more time to transition between key stages and gained less mass between stages than controls, but these differences between treatments decreased during later stages when corticosterone differences between treatments were greatest. Our results suggest endogenous increase in corticosterone content and its influence on oral morphology, growth and development is more complex than previously thought.

  14. Forecasting changes in amphibian biodiversity: aiming at a moving target

    E-print Network

    Forecasting changes in amphibian biodiversity: aiming at a moving target James P. Collins1 Amphibian Populations Task Force (DAPTF), UK Amphibian population declines and sudden species' extinctions by our poor knowledge of the amphibian fauna in many parts of the world. Amphibian taxa are still being

  15. Effects of Underwater Turbine Noise on Crab Larval Metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Pine, Matthew K; Jeffs, Andrew G; Radford, Craig A

    2016-01-01

    The development of marine tidal turbines has advanced at a rapid rate over the last decade but with little detailed understanding of the potential noise impacts on invertebrates. Previous research has shown that underwater reef noise plays an important role in mediating metamorphosis in many larval crabs and fishes. New research suggests that underwater estuarine noise may also mediate metamorphosis in estuarine crab larvae and that the noise emitted from underwater tidal and sea-based wind turbines may significantly influence larval metamorphosis in estuarine crabs. PMID:26611041

  16. Effects of polychlorinated biphenyl 126 on green frog (Rana clamitans) and leopard frog (Rana pipiens) hatching success, development, and metamorphosis

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenshield, M.L.; Jofre, M.B.; Karasov, W.H.

    1999-11-01

    Although increasing evidence links plana chlorinated hydrocarbons, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), to decreases in survival and reproduction of fish, mammals, and birds near Green Bay, Wisconsin, and the Great Lakes, USA, relatively little is known of their bioaccumulation or of their possible effects in amphibians. The authors exposed embryos and larvae of two ranid species commonly occurring in the Green Bay ecosystem, the green frog (Rana clamitans) and the leopard frog (Rana pipiens), to PCB 126, a model coplanar PCB compound. Nominal concentrations ranged from 0.005 to 50 {micro}g/L, and exposure lasted through metamorphosis. Tissue concentrations of PCB 126 in tadpoles that did not metamorphose by the end of the experiment ranged from 1.2 to 9,600 ng/g wet mass. No significant mortality of embryos occurred before hatching; however, survival of larvae was significantly reduced at the highest concentration for both species. Few deformities were observed, but the incidence of edema was significantly higher in tadpoles exposed to 50 {micro}g/L. Swimming speed and growth of tadpoles was also significantly reduced in this treatment. The percent of tadpoles that reached metamorphosis was significantly lower in green frogs at the highest concentration, and no leopard frogs survived past day 47 of the experiment in this treatment. At high concentrations, PCB 126 affected both ranid species; however, sublethal effects were not apparent for the parameters the authors measured at concentrations that occur in water in the Green Bay ecosystem.

  17. Plasticity of lung development in the amphibian, Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Christopher S.; James, Brandon

    2013-01-01

    Summary Contrary to previous studies, we found that Xenopus laevis tadpoles raised in normoxic water without access to air can routinely complete metamorphosis with lungs that are either severely stunted and uninflated or absent altogether. This is the first demonstration that lung development in a tetrapod can be inhibited by environmental factors and that a tetrapod that relies significantly on lung respiration under unstressed conditions can be raised to forego this function without adverse effects. This study compared lung development in untreated, air-deprived (AD) and air-restored (AR) tadpoles and frogs using whole mounts, histology, BrdU labeling of cell division and antibody staining of smooth muscle actin. We also examined the relationship of swimming and breathing behaviors to lung recovery in AR animals. Inhibition and recovery of lung development occurred at the stage of lung inflation. Lung recovery in AR tadpoles occurred at a predictable and rapid rate and correlated with changes in swimming and breathing behavior. It thus presents a new experimental model for investigating the role of mechanical forces in lung development. Lung recovery in AR frogs was unpredictable and did not correlate with behavioral changes. Its low frequency of occurrence could be attributed to developmental, physical and behavioral changes, the effects of which increase with size and age. Plasticity of lung inflation at tadpole stages and loss of plasticity at postmetamorphic stages offer new insights into the role of developmental plasticity in amphibian lung loss and life history evolution. PMID:24337117

  18. Management and Conservation Article Differential Responses of Postmetamorphic Amphibians to

    E-print Network

    Gray, Matthew

    Management and Conservation Article Differential Responses of Postmetamorphic Amphibians to Cattle amphibian declines have been linked to various anthropogenic land uses. Recent studies have documented negative impacts of cropland agriculture and deforestation on amphibians; however, few have examined

  19. Tropical amphibian populations experience higher disease risk in natural habitats

    E-print Network

    Zamudio, Kelly R.

    Tropical amphibian populations experience higher disease risk in natural habitats C. Guilherme drivers of global amphibian declines, yet the interaction between them remains largely un- explored. Here, and infection intensity of the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) in amphibian populations

  20. Population differentiation of temperate amphibians in unpredictable environments

    E-print Network

    Zamudio, Kelly R.

    Population differentiation of temperate amphibians in unpredictable environments LAUREN M. CHAN, NY 14853-2701, USA Abstract Amphibians are a globally distributed and diverse lineage, but much habitats. We characterize the population genetic structure of two sympatric explosive breeding amphibians

  1. The Next Decade in Career Counseling: Cocoon Maintenance or Metamorphosis?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parmer, Twinet; Rush, Lee Covington

    2003-01-01

    Articulates the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats, and future vision for career counseling using a cocoon maintenance or metamorphosis metaphor. Concludes with a vision for the future for the discipline and profession of career counseling. (Contains 40 references.) (GCP)

  2. Metamorphosis of the landlocked sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manion, Patrick J.; Stauffer, Thomas M.

    1970-01-01

    The external metamorphosis of the sea lamprey was divided into four stages, based primarily on the condition of the mouth: mouth reduced, mouth fused, mouth enclosed, and mouth elongated. During metamorphosis, the eye enlarged greatly, the snout and mouth region changed from a fleshy hood enclosing a sieve apparatus to a large sucking disc, the nasopore membrane and the branchial area shrank, the branchiopores changed in shape, the general color changed from dark brown and yellow to an intense blue-black dorsally and white ventrally, and the total length increased. Metamorphosis began in early to mid-July and did not take place after August. The duration of external metamorphosis was about 3 months for lampreys transforming under natural conditions. The mean lengths of metamorphosing lampreys from tributaries of lakes Superior and Michigan were 145 and 136 mm, respectively.

  3. Pesticide Mixtures, Endocrine Disruption, and Amphibian Declines: Are We Underestimating the Impact?

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Tyrone B.; Case, Paola; Chui, Sarah; Chung, Duc; Haeffele, Cathryn; Haston, Kelly; Lee, Melissa; Mai, Vien Phoung; Marjuoa, Youssra; Parker, John; Tsui, Mable

    2006-01-01

    Amphibian populations are declining globally at an alarming rate. Pesticides are among a number of proposed causes for these declines. Although a sizable database examining effects of pesticides on amphibians exists, the vast majority of these studies focus on toxicological effects (lethality, external malformations, etc.) at relatively high doses (parts per million). Very few studies focus on effects such as endocrine disruption at low concentrations. Further, most studies examine exposures to single chemicals only. The present study examined nine pesticides (four herbicides, two fungicides, and three insecticides) used on cornfields in the midwestern United States. Effects of each pesticide alone (0.1 ppb) or in combination were examined. In addition, we also examined atrazine and S-metolachlor combined (0.1 or 10 ppb each) and the commercial formulation Bicep II Magnum, which contains both of these herbicides. These two pesticides were examined in combination because they are persistent throughout the year in the wild. We examined larval growth and development, sex differentiation, and immune function in leopard frogs (Rana pipiens). In a follow-up study, we also examined the effects of the nine-compound mixture on plasma corticosterone levels in male African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis). Although some of the pesticides individually inhibited larval growth and development, the pesticide mixtures had much greater effects. Larval growth and development were retarded, but most significantly, pesticide mixtures negated or reversed the typically positive correlation between time to metamorphosis and size at metamorphosis observed in controls: exposed larvae that took longer to metamorphose were smaller than their counterparts that metamorphosed earlier. The nine-pesticide mixture also induced damage to the thymus, resulting in immunosuppression and contraction of flavobacterial meningitis. The study in X. laevis revealed that these adverse effects may be due to an increase in plasma levels of the stress hormone corticosterone. Although it cannot be determined whether all the pesticides in the mixture contribute to these adverse effects or whether some pesticides are effectors, some are enhancers, and some are neutral, the present study revealed that estimating ecological risk and the impact of pesticides on amphibians using studies that examine only single pesticides at high concentrations may lead to gross underestimations of the role of pesticides in amphibian declines. PMID:16818245

  4. Thyroxine-induced metamorphosis in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum).

    PubMed

    Coots, Peggy S; Seifert, Ashley W

    2015-01-01

    The axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) has remained an important model for regeneration and developmental biology for over a century. Although axolotls in captive-bred colonies usually exist in an aquatic form, they retain the ability to undergo metamorphosis following exposure to thyroid hormone. Here we present a robust method for inducing metamorphosis in adult axolotls that results in high survivability and produces terrestrial animals that can be maintained in long-term captivity. PMID:25740483

  5. The amphibians and reptiles in three urban protected areas... A STUDY ON THE AMPHIBIANS (AMPHIBIA) AND

    E-print Network

    Mollov, Ivelin Aldinov

    The amphibians and reptiles in three urban protected areas... 79 #12; #12; #12;#12; #12;#12; #12; !" #$ %&#' %( )&'( * A STUDY ON THE AMPHIBIANS (AMPHIBIA) AND REPTILES (REPTILIA the species composition and distribution of 2 amphibian (Bufo viridis, Hyla arborea) and 7 reptile species

  6. Vijendravarma et al: Experimental evolution of critical size 1 Chronic malnutrition favours smaller critical size for metamorphosis

    E-print Network

    Kawecki, Tadeusz J.

    critical size for metamorphosis initiation in Drosophila melanogaster Roshan K. Vijendravarma, Sunitha, life history, trade- offs, starvation resistance Abstract Critical size at which metamorphosis of holometabolous insects: the critical size at which metamorphosis is initiated. Although experimentally measured

  7. Survey for the amphibian chytrid Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in Hong Kong in native amphibians and in the international amphibian trade.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Jodi J L; Chan, Simon Kin Fung; Tang, Wing Sze; Speare, Richard; Skerratt, Lee F; Alford, Ross A; Cheung, Ka Shing; Ho, Ching Yee; Campbell, Ruth

    2007-12-13

    Chytridiomycosis, caused by the pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, is responsible for many amphibian declines and has been identified in wild amphibian populations on all continents where they exist, except for Asia. In order to assess whether B. dendrobatidis is present on the native amphibians of Hong Kong, we sampled wild populations of Amolops hongkongensis, Paa exilispinosa, P. spinosa and Rana chloronota during 2005-2006. Amphibians infected with B. dendrobatidis have been found in the international trade, so we also examined the extent and nature of the amphibian trade in Hong Kong during 2005-2006, and assessed whether B. dendrobatidis was present in imported amphibians. All 274 individuals of 4 native amphibian species sampled tested negative for B. dendrobatidis, giving an upper 95% confidence limit for prevalence of 1.3%. Approximately 4.3 million amphibians of 45 species from 11 countries were imported into Hong Kong via air over 12 mo; we did not detect B. dendrobatidis on any of 137 imported amphibians sampled. As B. dendrobatidis generally occurs at greater than 5% prevalence in infected populations during favorable environmental conditions, native amphibians in Hong Kong appear free of B. dendrobatidis, and may be at severe risk of impact if it is introduced. Until it is established that the pathogen is present in Hong Kong, management strategies should focus on preventing it from being imported and decreasing the risk of it escaping into the wild amphibian populations if imported. Further research is needed to determine the status of B. dendrobatidis in Hong Kong with greater certainty. PMID:18286805

  8. Do hormone-modulating chemicals impact on reproduction and development of wild amphibians?

    PubMed

    Orton, Frances; Tyler, Charles R

    2015-11-01

    Globally, amphibians are undergoing a precipitous decline. At the last estimate in 2004, 32% of the approximately 6000 species were threatened with extinction and 43% were experiencing significant declines. These declines have been linked with a wide range of environmental pressures from habitat loss to climate change, disease and pollution. This review evaluates the evidence that endocrine-disrupting contaminants (EDCs) - pollutants that affect hormone systems - are impacting on wild amphibians and contributing to population declines. The review is limited to anurans (frogs and toads) as data for effects of EDCs on wild urodeles (salamanders, newts) or caecilians (limbless amphibians) are extremely limited. Evidence from laboratory studies has shown that a wide range of chemicals have the ability to alter hormone systems and affect reproductive development and function in anurans, but for the most part only at concentrations exceeding those normally found in natural environments. Exceptions can be found for exposures to the herbicide atrazine and polychlorinated biphenyls in leopard frogs (Rana pipiens) and perchlorate in African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis). These contaminants induce feminising effects on the male gonads (including 'intersex' - oocytes within testes) at concentrations measured in some aquatic environments. The most extensive data for effects of an EDC in wild amphibian populations are for feminising effects of atrazine on male gonad development in regions across the USA. Even where strong evidence has been provided for feminising effects of EDCs, however, the possible impact of these effects on fertility and breeding outcome has not been established, making inference for effects on populations difficult. Laboratory studies have shown that various chemicals, including perchlorate, polychlorinated biphenyls and bromodiphenylethers, also act as endocrine disrupters through interfering with thyroid-dependent processes that are fundamental for amphibian metamorphosis. Perchlorate has also been shown to induce these effects in wild anuran populations from perchlorate-contaminated environments. Overall, the published data available suggest that some health effects observed in wild anuran populations, most notably intersex, likely have a chemical aetiology; however they derive only from very few anuran species and for a few pesticides at field sites in the USA. To understand better the impacts of EDCs on wild anuran populations, as well as other amphibian groups, assessment of fertility in exposed animals are required. Development of non-destructive biomarkers that are indicative of specific EDC-effect mechanisms are also needed to allow the study of vulnerable populations. This will help to distinguish the effects of EDCs from other environmental and/or genetic influences on development and reproduction. PMID:25335651

  9. Effects of pond salinization on survival rate of amphibian hosts infected with the chytrid fungus.

    PubMed

    Stockwell, Michelle Pirrie; Storrie, Lachlan James; Pollard, Carla Jean; Clulow, John; Mahony, Michael Joseph

    2015-04-01

    The chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis has been implicated in the decline and extinction of amphibian populations worldwide, but management options are limited. Recent studies show that sodium chloride (NaCl) has fungicidal properties that reduce the mortality rates of infected hosts in captivity. We investigated whether similar results can be obtained by adding salt to water bodies in the field. We increased the salinity of 8 water bodies to 2 or 4 ppt and left an additional 4 water bodies with close to 0 ppt and monitored salinity for 18 months. Captively bred tadpoles of green and golden bell frog (Litoria aurea) were released into each water body and their development, levels of B. dendrobatidis infection, and survival were monitored at 1, 4, and 12 months. The effect of salt on the abundance of nontarget organisms was also investigated in before and after style analyses. Salinities remained constant over time with little intervention. Hosts in water bodies with 4 ppt salt had a significantly lower prevalence of chytrid infection and higher survival, following metamorphosis, than hosts in 0 ppt salt. Tadpoles in the 4 ppt group were smaller in length after 1 month in the release site than those in the 0 and 2 ppt groups, but after metamorphosis body size in all water bodies was similar . In water bodies with 4 ppt salt, the abundance of dwarf tree frogs (Litoria fallax), dragonfly larvae, and damselfly larvae was lower than in water bodies with 0 and 2 ppt salt, which could have knock-on effects for community structure. Based on our results, salt may be an effective field-based B. dendrobatidis mitigation tool for lentic amphibians that could contribute to the conservation of numerous susceptible species. However, as in all conservation efforts, these benefits need to be weighed against negative effects on both target and nontarget organisms. PMID:25354647

  10. Effects of acute and chronic acidification on three larval amphibians that breed in temporary ponds

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, C.L.; Sadinski, W.J.; Dunson, W.A. )

    1992-10-01

    This study explored the effects of acute (7 days) and chronic (4 months) exposure to pH 4.2 on three species of larval amphibians, Ambystoma jeffersonianum, Ambystoma maculatum, and Rana sylvatica. Acute tests were conducted in 24 impermeable enclosures in three temporary ponds. Total dissolved aluminum was higher in acidified enclosures in comparison with controls (pH 4.2, [Al] approximately 10-30 microM and pH greater than 4.7, [Al] approximately 5-15 microM, respectively). Greater mortality of A. jeffersonianum occurred at pH 4.2 than at pH greater than 4.7, whereas survival of A. maculatum and R. sylvatica were unaffected by pH. Mean wet masses of R. sylvatica were significantly lower at pH 4.2 than at pH greater than 4.7, but mean wet masses of surviving A. jeffersonianum and A. maculatum were not influenced by pH. There were no pH-related differences in body sodium concentration in larval R. sylvatica. Chronic acidification of mesocosms to pH 4.2 ([Al] approximately 16 microM) (controls = pH greater than 6, [Al] approximately 0.1 microM) resulted in total mortality of A. jeffersonianum. Survival of A. maculatum and R. sylvatica were not associated with pH, but survival of A. maculatum was low at both pH levels. Time to metamorphosis was longer for R. sylvatica maintained at pH 4.2, but not for A. maculatum. No differences in wet masses at metamorphosis were observed for R. sylvatica or A. maculatum. These results indicate that short and long term acidification of temporary wetlands could dramatically affect amphibians which rely upon them as breeding sites, either by causing mortality or by decreasing growth rates.

  11. Interactions of an insecticide, herbicide, and natural stressors in amphibian community mesocosms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boone, M.D.; James, S.M.

    2003-01-01

    Amphibians developing in wetlands embedded within or near agricultural lands may frequently encounter chemical mixtures. The objectives of our study were to determine the effects that post-application concentrations of an insecticide (carbaryl) and an herbicide (atrazine) have on body mass, development, and survival of two anuran species (southern leopard frog, Rana sphenocephala; American toad, Bufo americanus) and two caudate species (spotted salamander, Ambystoma maculatum; small-mouthed salamander, A. texanum) reared in outdoor cattle tank mesocosms. In one experiment, we manipulated tadpole density (low or high), carbaryl exposure (0, 3.5, 7.0 mg/L), and atrazine exposure (0 or 200 ??g/L) to test for effects on development, mass, and survival of larvae. In a second experiment, we manipulated pond hydroperiod (constant or drying), carbaryl exposure (0 or 5 mg/L), and atrazine exposure (0 or 200 ??g/L) to test for effects on mass, time, and survival to metamorphosis. Salamanders were virtually eliminated in carbaryl treatments, indicating that at realistic levels, this insecticide could cause population declines for salamanders in contaminated habitats. Carbaryl also had negative effects on toad survival. Exposure to atrazine had negative effects on body size, development, and time to metamorphosis in anuran species, which were associated with reduced chlorophyll levels. Both chemicals interacted significantly with density or hydroperiod, indicating that the environmental conditions could influence the impact of a contaminant. A significant atrazine-by-carbaryl interaction resulted in smaller and less developed spotted salamander larvae than in control ponds. Atrazine exposure, however, appeared to moderate negative effects of carbaryl for spotted salamanders. Our research suggests that important changes in the community's food web result from chemical exposure, which influence the susceptibility of amphibian species to contaminants.

  12. Interactions of an insecticide with competition and pond drying in amphibian communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boone, M.D.; Semlitsch, R.D.

    2002-01-01

    Amphibian populations are often imbedded in agricultural landscapes. Therefore the potential for contamination of their habitat is considerable. Our study examined the effects of an insecticide (carbaryl, a neurotoxin), on larval amphibian communities experiencing natural stresses of competition for resources, predation, and pond drying. In a set of experimental ponds, tadpoles of three anuran species (southern leopard frog [Rana sphenocephala], plains leopard frog [R. blairi], and the Woodhouse's toad [Bufo woodhousii]) were added to 1000-L ponds containing leaf litter, plankton, two newts (Notophthalmus viridescens), and four overwintered green frog (R. clamitans) tadpoles. We manipulated the overall tadpole density (low or high), pond hydroperiod (constant or drying), and chemical exposure (0, 3.5, 5.0, or 7.0 mg/L carbaryl) of the ponds. We measured mass, time, and survival to metamorphosis to determine treatment effects. Carbaryl positively affected Woodhouse's toad survival, although it had a negligible effect on both leopard frog species. Tadpole density interacted with the chemical treatment: Proportionately more Woodhouse's toads survived to metamorphosis in high-density environments than in low-density or control environments. Greater survival may be an indirect effect of increased algal food resources from carbaryl exposure. Most newts lost mass over the course of the experiment, although ponds with drying hydroperiods and high anuran density were the least favorable environments. Overwintered green frogs exposed to carbaryl had longer larval periods on average than did green frogs in control ponds. Our study demonstrated that even sublethal, short-lived contaminants can alter natural communities in ways that cannot be predicted from simple, one-factor studies.

  13. Variation in the Presence of Anti-Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis Bacteria of Amphibians Across Life Stages and Elevations in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Bresciano, J C; Salvador, C A; Paz-Y-Mińo, C; Parody-Merino, A M; Bosch, J; Woodhams, D C

    2015-06-01

    Amphibian populations are decreasing worldwide due to a variety of factors. In South America, the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) is linked to many population declines. The pathogenic effect of Bd on amphibians can be inhibited by specific bacteria present on host skin. This symbiotic association allows some amphibians to resist the development of the disease chytridiomycosis. Here, we aimed (1) to determine for the first time if specific anti-Bd bacteria are present on amphibians in the Andes of Ecuador, (2) to monitor anti-Bd bacteria across developmental stages in a focal amphibian, the Andean marsupial tree frog, Gastrotheca riobambae, that deposits larvae in aquatic habitats, and (3) to compare the Bd presence associated with host assemblages including 10 species at sites ranging in biogeography from Amazonian rainforest (450 masl) to Andes montane rainforest (3200 masl). We sampled and identified skin-associated bacteria of frogs in the field using swabs and a novel methodology of aerobic counting plates, and a combination of morphological, biochemical, and molecular identification techniques. The following anti-Bd bacteria were identified and found to be shared among several hosts at high-elevation sites where Bd was present at a prevalence of 32.5%: Janthinobacterium lividum, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Serratia sp. Bd were detected in Gastrotheca spp. and not detected in the lowlands (sites below 1000 masl). In G. riobambae, recognized Bd-resistant bacteria start to be present at the metamorphic stage. Overall bacterial abundance was significantly higher post-metamorphosis and on species sampled at lower elevations. Further metagenomic studies are needed to evaluate the roles of host identity, life-history stage, and biogeography of the microbiota and their function in disease resistance. PMID:25669915

  14. Chironomidae bloodworms larvae as aquatic amphibian food.

    PubMed

    Fard, Mojdeh Sharifian; Pasmans, Frank; Adriaensen, Connie; Laing, Gijs Du; Janssens, Geert Paul Jules; Martel, An

    2014-01-01

    Different species of chironomids larvae (Diptera: Chironomidae) so-called bloodworms are widely distributed in the sediments of all types of freshwater habitats and considered as an important food source for amphibians. In our study, three species of Chironomidae (Baeotendipes noctivagus, Benthalia dissidens, and Chironomus riparius) were identified in 23 samples of larvae from Belgium, Poland, Russia, and Ukraine provided by a distributor in Belgium. We evaluated the suitability of these samples as amphibian food based on four different aspects: the likelihood of amphibian pathogens spreading, risk of heavy metal accumulation in amphibians, nutritive value, and risk of spreading of zoonotic bacteria (Salmonella, Campylobacter, and ESBL producing Enterobacteriaceae). We found neither zoonotic bacteria nor the amphibian pathogens Ranavirus and Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in these samples. Our data showed that among the five heavy metals tested (Hg, Cu, Cd, Pb, and Zn), the excess level of Pb in two samples and low content of Zn in four samples implicated potential risk of Pb accumulation and Zn inadequacy. Proximate nutritional analysis revealed that, chironomidae larvae are consistently high in protein but more variable in lipid content. Accordingly, variations in the lipid: protein ratio can affect the amount and pathway of energy supply to the amphibians. Our study indicated although environmentally-collected chironomids larvae may not be vectors of specific pathogens, they can be associated with nutritional imbalances and may also result in Pb bioaccumulation and Zn inadequacy in amphibians. Chironomidae larvae may thus not be recommended as single diet item for amphibians. PMID:24535989

  15. AMPHIBIANS AS BIOINDICATORS OF WETLAND CONDITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    King county has over ten years of data on the distribution and abundance of amphibians in wetlands. Changes in wetland amphibian composition are being analyzed in relationship to physical changes within wetlands and surrounding land-use development and change. In addition to tes...

  16. Spinal mu, delta and kappa opioids alter chemical, mechanical and thermal sensitivities in amphibians.

    PubMed

    Willenbring, S; Stevens, C W

    1997-01-01

    Previously we demonstrated the use of chemical (topical acetic acid), thermal (radiant heat) and mechanical (von Frey filament) stimuli as quantifiable behavioral response assays in the northern grass frog, Rana pipiens. Furthermore, response thresholds in all of these sensory modalities are significantly elevated by systemic morphine injections, which can be antagonized by naltrexone. The present study employed these three sensory assays to assess changes in chemical, mechanical and thermal sensitivities following spinal administration of mu, delta and kappa opioids. Significant elevations were observed across all three sensory modalities in each subtype category and these effects were abolished by prior systemic administration of naltrexone. However, naltrexone antagonism of morphine produced hyperalgesia in both the mechanical and thermal modalities. The results support other recent work demonstrating that the spinal site for opioid analgesia is present in amphibians and that the thermal, mechanical and acetic acid assays are measures of true nociceptive activity in the amphibian. PMID:9393936

  17. A Metamorphosis Distance for Embryonic Cardiac Action Potential Interpolation and Classification

    E-print Network

    Vidal, René

    A Metamorphosis Distance for Embryonic Cardiac Action Potential Interpolation and Classification a metamorphosis distance for comparing the AP of an hESC-CMs to that of an adult cell model. This involves

  18. Exposure to the herbicide acetochlor alters thyroid hormone-dependent gene expression and metamorphosis in Xenopus Laevis.

    PubMed Central

    Crump, Doug; Werry, Kate; Veldhoen, Nik; Van Aggelen, Graham; Helbing, Caren C

    2002-01-01

    A growing number of substances released into the environment disrupt normal endocrine mechanisms in a wide range of vertebrates. Little is known about the effects and identities of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) that target thyroid hormone (TH) action, particularly at the cellular level. Frog tadpole metamorphosis depends completely on TH, which has led to the suggestion of a metamorphosis-based assay for screening potential EDCs. A major mechanism of TH action is the alteration of gene expression via hormone-bound nuclear receptors. To assess the gene expression profiles in the frog model, we designed a novel multispecies frog cDNA microarray. Recently, the preemergent herbicide acetochlor was shown to accelerate 3,5,3 -triiodothyronine (T3)-induced forelimb emergence and increase mRNA expression of thyroid hormone ss receptors in ranid tadpoles. Here we show that T3-induced metamorphosis of Xenopus laevis, a species commonly used in the laboratory, is accelerated upon acute exposure to an environmentally relevant level of acetochlor. The morphologic changes observed are preceded by alterations in gene expression profiles detected in the tadpole tail, and the nature of these profiles suggest a novel mechanism of action for acetochlor. PMID:12460798

  19. Toxicity of five antidepressant drugs on embryo-larval development and metamorphosis success in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Di Poi, C; Evariste, L; Serpentini, A; Halm-Lemeille, M P; Lebel, J M; Costil, K

    2014-12-01

    Unlike conventional pollutants, pharmaceutical residues are continuously discharged at low levels (low to mid ng l(-1) concentrations), which results in the chronic contamination of non-target organisms, but little is known about the effects of these residues. The purpose of this study was to provide the first assessment of the ecotoxicity of five antidepressants (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors [SSRIs] fluoxetine and sertraline, tricyclic antidepressants [TCAs] clomipramine and amitriptyline, and serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor [SNRI] duloxetine) at a wide range of concentrations from 0.1 to 100,000 ?g l(-1) on two early life stages in the Pacific oyster. The toxicity was quantified in D-shaped larvae after 36 h of exposure, and in 21-day-old pediveliger larvae after 24 h of exposure using the percentage of normal larval development and the metamorphosis rate as endpoints, respectively. The embryotoxicity assays reported that the EC50 values were within the same range of concentrations (67 to 192 ?g l(-1)) for all of the tested molecules. The metamorphosis tests revealed that the antidepressants can be ranked along an increasing severity gradient: clomipramine < amitriptyline < duloxetine ~ fluoxetine. Sertraline appeared to be the less toxic molecule on this endpoint; however, a different concentration range was used. The embryotoxicity test was more sensitive than the metamorphosis bioassay for three of the five molecules tested, but the latter test showed more practical benefits. Overall, the obtained toxicity values were at least 10,000-fold higher than the reported environmental concentrations. PMID:24122267

  20. Fire and amphibians in North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pilliod, D.S.; Bury, R.B.; Hyde, E.J.; Pearl, C.A.; Corn, P.S.

    2003-01-01

    Information on amphibian responses to fire and fuel reduction practices is critically needed due to potential declines of species and the prevalence of new, more intensive fire management practices in North American forests. The goals of this review are to summarize the known and potential effects of fire and fuels management on amphibians and their aquatic habitats, and to identify information gaps to help direct future scientific research. Amphibians as a group are taxonomically and ecologically diverse; in turn, responses to fire and associated habitat alteration are expected to vary widely among species and among geographic regions. Available data suggest that amphibian responses to fire are spatially and temporally variable and incompletely understood. Much of the limited research has addressed short-term (1-3 years) effects of prescribed fire on terrestrial life stages of amphibians in the southeastern United States. Information on the long-term negative effects of fire on amphibians and the importance of fire for maintaining amphibian communities is sparse for the majority of taxa in North America. Given the size and severity of recent wildland fires and the national effort to reduce fuels on federal lands, future studies are needed to examine the effects of these landscape disturbances on amphibians. We encourage studies to address population-level responses of amphibians to fire by examining how different life stages are affected by changes in aquatic, riparian, and upland habitats. Research designs need to be credible and provide information that is relevant for fire managers and those responsible for assessing the potential effects of various fuel reduction alternatives on rare, sensitive, and endangered amphibian species. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. In situ effects of pesticides on amphibians in the Sierra Nevada.

    PubMed

    Sparling, Donald W; Bickham, John; Cowman, Deborah; Fellers, Gary M; Lacher, Thomas; Matson, Cole W; McConnell, Laura

    2015-03-01

    For more than 20 years, conservationists have agreed that amphibian populations around the world are declining. Results obtained through laboratory or mesocosm studies and measurement of contaminant concentrations in areas experiencing declines have supported a role of contaminants in these declines. The current study examines the effects of contaminant exposure to amphibians in situ in areas actually experiencing declines. Early larval Pseudacris regilla were translocated among Lassen Volcanic, Yosemite and Sequoia National Parks, California, USA and caged in wetlands in 2001 and 2002 until metamorphosis. Twenty contaminants were identified in tadpoles with an average of 1.3-5.9 (maximum = 10) contaminants per animal. Sequoia National Park, which had the greatest variety and concentrations of contaminants in 2001, also had tadpoles that experienced the greatest mortality, slowest developmental rates and lowest cholinesterase activities. Yosemite and Sequoia tadpoles and metamorphs had greater genotoxicity than those in Lassen during 2001, as determined by flow cytometry. In 2001 tadpoles at Yosemite had a significantly higher rate of malformations, characterized as hemimelia (shortened femurs), than those at the other two parks but no significant differences were observed in 2002. Fewer differences in contaminant types and concentrations existed among parks during 2002 compared to 2001. In 2002 Sequoia tadpoles had higher mortality and slower developmental rates but there was no difference among parks in cholinesterase activities. Although concentrations of most contaminants were below known lethal concentrations, simultaneous exposure to multiple chemicals and other stressors may have resulted in lethal and sublethal effects. PMID:25381462

  2. Herpetological Review 44(2), 2013 254 AMPHIBIAN DISEASES

    E-print Network

    Zamudio, Kelly R.

    Herpetological Review 44(2), 2013 254 AMPHIBIAN DISEASES Herpetological Review, 2013, 44(2), 254­257. © 2013 by Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles Amphibian Chytrid Fungus Confirmed in Endemic al. 2004), the presence of the pathogen and its potential role in amphibian declines in West

  3. Medicine and Surgery of Amphibians Edward J. Gentz

    E-print Network

    Boynton, Walter R.

    Medicine and Surgery of Amphibians Edward J. Gentz Abstract Amphibians are most notably to handle amphibians only with protective gloves to avoid damaging their skin. These animals absorb water that are applied directly to the skin. Investigators commonly utilize cutaneous respiration in amphibians

  4. First evidence of amphibian chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis) and ranavirus in Hong Kong amphibian trade.

    PubMed

    Kolby, Jonathan E; Smith, Kristine M; Berger, Lee; Karesh, William B; Preston, Asa; Pessier, Allan P; Skerratt, Lee F

    2014-01-01

    The emerging infectious amphibian diseases caused by amphibian chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, Bd) and ranaviruses are responsible for global amphibian population declines and extinctions. Although likely to have been spread by a variety of activities, transcontinental dispersal appears closely associated with the international trade in live amphibians. The territory of Hong Kong reports frequent, high volume trade in amphibians, and yet the presence of Bd and ranavirus have not previously been detected in either traded or free-ranging amphibians. In 2012, a prospective surveillance project was conducted to investigate the presence of these pathogens in commercial shipments of live amphibians exported from Hong Kong International Airport. Analysis of skin (Bd) and cloacal (ranavirus) swabs by quantitative PCR detected pathogen presence in 31/265 (11.7%) and in 105/185 (56.8%) of amphibians, respectively. In addition, the water in which animals were transported tested positive for Bd, demonstrating the risk of pathogen pollution by the disposal of untreated wastewater. It is uncertain whether Bd and ranavirus remain contained within Hong Kong's trade sector, or if native amphibians have already been exposed. Rapid response efforts are now urgently needed to determine current pathogen distribution in Hong Kong, evaluate potential trade-associated exposure to free-ranging amphibians, and identify opportunities to prevent disease establishment. PMID:24599268

  5. FOOD OF YOUNG ATLANTIC MENHADEN, BREVOORTIA TYRANNUS, IN RELATION TO METAMORPHOSIS

    E-print Network

    FOOD OF YOUNG ATLANTIC MENHADEN, BREVOORTIA TYRANNUS, IN RELATION TO METAMORPHOSIS BY FRED C. JUNEI and the composition of the plankton community. Changes in food habits during metamorphosis were Laboratory research was to establish techniques for rearing laboratory stocks of these young fish through metamorphosis

  6. Mtamorphose des IHM et Plasticit Metamorphosis of User Interfaces and Plasticity

    E-print Network

    1 Métamorphose des IHM et Plasticité Metamorphosis of User Interfaces and Plasticity Gaëlle CALVARY'usage, valeur, utilité, utilisabilité. Abstract. Ubiquitous computing has provoked a metamorphosis of User of UI metamorphosis, and then focuses on plasticity. It provides computer scientists with a problem

  7. Larval experience and latent effects--metamorphosis is not a new beginning

    E-print Network

    Larval experience and latent effects--metamorphosis is not a new beginning Jan A. Pechenik1. Such experiences may include delayed metamorphosis, short term starvation, short term salinity stress, or exposure be intuitively difficult to accept initially." (Desai and Hales 1997) Introduction Metamorphosis is a time

  8. Head Modeling from Pictures and Morphing in 3D with Image Metamorphosis based on triangulation

    E-print Network

    Lee, WonSook

    Head Modeling from Pictures and Morphing in 3D with Image Metamorphosis based on triangulation WON with texture metamorphosis. There are various approaches to reconstruct a realistic person using a Laser animation. Other techniques for metamorphosis, or "morphing", involve the transformation between 2D images

  9. Feature-Based Volume Metamorphosis Apostolos Lerios, Chase D. Garfinkle, Marc Levoy

    E-print Network

    Stanford University

    Feature-Based Volume Metamorphosis Apostolos Lerios, Chase D. Garfinkle, Marc Levoy Computer Science Department Stanford University Abstract Image metamorphosis, or image morphing, is a popular tech pre-rendered images. In this paper we con- sider 3D metamorphosis applied to volume

  10. Coupling constant metamorphosis and Nth order symmetries in classical and quantum

    E-print Network

    Miller, Willard

    Coupling constant metamorphosis and Nth order symmetries in classical and quantum mechanics E. G Abstract We review the fundamentals of coupling constant metamorphosis (CCM) and the St¨ackel transform of coupling constant metamorphosis [31], which enables a 1-1 in- vertible transformation between a 2nd order

  11. Interactive Shape Metamorphosis David T. Chen*, Andrei State* and David Banks

    E-print Network

    State, Andrei

    Interactive Shape Metamorphosis David T. Chen*, Andrei State* and David Banks *Department and Engineering 1 INTRODUCTION Image metamorphosis (morphing) is a powerful and easy-to-use tool for generating for controlled, feature-based metamorphosis of certain types of surfaces in 3-space; it applies well-understood 2

  12. Reference: Bid. Bull. 194: 132-142. (April, 1998) Role of Chemical Inducers in Larval Metamorphosis

    E-print Network

    Boettcher, Anne

    Metamorphosis of Queen Conch, Strombus gigas Linnaeus: Relationship to Other Marine Invertebrate Systems ANNE A of metamorphosis in many marine invertebrate larvae. In the queen conch, Strombus gigas Linnaeus, larval metamorphosis is induced by low molecular weight compounds associated with dominant species of red algae found

  13. Evolution of Developmental Control Mechanism The hormonal pathway controlling cell death during metamorphosis in a

    E-print Network

    Belles, Xavier

    metamorphosis in a hemimetabolous insect Daniel Mané-Padrós 1 , Josefa Cruz, Lluisa Vilaplana 2 , Claudia Nieva Hemimetabolous insect Blattella germanica Metamorphosis in holometabolous insects is mainly based metamorphosis, has shown that the steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) signals cell death of larval tissues

  14. Coupling constant metamorphosis and Nth order symmetries in classical and quantum

    E-print Network

    Miller, Willard

    Coupling constant metamorphosis and Nth order symmetries in classical and quantum mechanics E. G Abstract We review the fundamentals of coupling constant metamorphosis (CCM) and the StË?ackel transform results has been the StË?ackel transform [29, 30], a variant of coupling constant metamorphosis [31], which

  15. Conserved repressive function of Kruppel homolog 1 on insect metamorphosis in

    E-print Network

    Belles, Xavier

    Conserved repressive function of Kru¨ppel homolog 1 on insect metamorphosis in hemimetabolous´tim de la Barceloneta 37, 08003 Barcelona, Spain. Insect metamorphosis is regulated by ecdysteroids species. I nsect metamorphosis has fascinated mankind since the time of Aristotle, some two thousand years

  16. Methods for Volume Metamorphosis M. Chen, M.W. Jones and P. Townsend

    E-print Network

    Jones, Mark W.

    Methods for Volume Metamorphosis M. Chen, M.W. Jones and P. Townsend Department of Computer Science volume to another is referred to as volume metamorphosis or volume morphing. Several methods that provide of these methods are capable of produce good quality metamorphosis within an acceptable time. 1 Introduction Volume

  17. An On-Line Handwritten Note Recognition Method Using Shape Metamorphosis

    E-print Network

    An On-Line Handwritten Note Recognition Method Using Shape Metamorphosis Ioannis Pavlidis Rahul- liminary version of this work was reported in [9]. We propose the use of shape metamorphosis as a poten on the fact that two similar shapes do not undergo extensive metamorphosis if one of them is morphed

  18. Host and Symbiont Jointly Control Gut Microbiota during Complete Metamorphosis

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Paul R.; Rolff, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Holometabolous insects undergo a radical anatomical re-organisation during metamorphosis. This poses a developmental challenge: the host must replace the larval gut but at the same time retain symbiotic gut microbes and avoid infection by opportunistic pathogens. By manipulating host immunity and bacterial competitive ability, we study how the host Galleria mellonella and the symbiotic bacterium Enterococcus mundtii interact to manage the composition of the microbiota during metamorphosis. Disenabling one or both symbiotic partners alters the composition of the gut microbiota, which incurs fitness costs: adult hosts with a gut microbiota dominated by pathogens such as Serratia and Staphylococcus die early. Our results reveal an interaction that guarantees the safe passage of the symbiont through metamorphosis and benefits the resulting adult host. Host-symbiont “conspiracies” as described here are almost certainly widespread in holometobolous insects including many disease vectors. PMID:26544881

  19. Host and Symbiont Jointly Control Gut Microbiota during Complete Metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Paul R; Rolff, Jens

    2015-11-01

    Holometabolous insects undergo a radical anatomical re-organisation during metamorphosis. This poses a developmental challenge: the host must replace the larval gut but at the same time retain symbiotic gut microbes and avoid infection by opportunistic pathogens. By manipulating host immunity and bacterial competitive ability, we study how the host Galleria mellonella and the symbiotic bacterium Enterococcus mundtii interact to manage the composition of the microbiota during metamorphosis. Disenabling one or both symbiotic partners alters the composition of the gut microbiota, which incurs fitness costs: adult hosts with a gut microbiota dominated by pathogens such as Serratia and Staphylococcus die early. Our results reveal an interaction that guarantees the safe passage of the symbiont through metamorphosis and benefits the resulting adult host. Host-symbiont "conspiracies" as described here are almost certainly widespread in holometobolous insects including many disease vectors. PMID:26544881

  20. Nutrition and Health in Amphibian Husbandry

    PubMed Central

    Ferrie, Gina M.; Alford, Vance C.; Atkinson, Jim; Baitchman, Eric; Barber, Diane; Blaner, William S.; Crawshaw, Graham; Daneault, Andy; Dierenfeld, Ellen; Finke, Mark; Fleming, Greg; Gagliardo, Ron; Hoffman, Eric A.; Karasov, William; Klasing, Kirk; Koutsos, Elizabeth; Lankton, Julia; Lavin, Shana R.; Lentini, Andrew; Livingston, Shannon; Lock, Brad; Mason, Tom; McComb, Alejandra; Morris, Cheryl; Pessier, Allan P.; Olea-Popelka, Francisco; Probst, Tom; Rodriguez, Carlos; Schad, Kristine; Semmen, Kent; Sincage, Jamie; Stamper, M. Andrew; Steinmetz, Jason; Sullivan, Kathleen; Terrell, Scott; Wertan, Nina; Wheaton, Catharine J.; Wilson, Brad; Valdes, Eduardo V.

    2015-01-01

    Amphibian biology is intricate, and there are many inter-related factors that need to be understood before establishing successful Conservation Breeding Programs (CBPs). Nutritional needs of amphibians are highly integrated with disease and their husbandry needs, and the diversity of developmental stages, natural habitats, and feeding strategies result in many different recommendations for proper care and feeding. This review identifies several areas where there is substantial room for improvement in maintaining healthy ex situ amphibian populations specifically in the areas of obtaining and utilizing natural history data for both amphibians and their dietary items, achieving more appropriate environmental parameters, understanding stress and hormone production, and promoting better physical and population health. Using a scientific or research framework to answer questions about disease, nutrition, husbandry, genetics, and endocrinology of ex situ amphibians will improve specialists’ understanding of the needs of these species. In general, there is a lack of baseline data and comparative information for most basic aspects of amphibian biology as well as standardized laboratory approaches. Instituting a formalized research approach in multiple scientific disciplines will be beneficial not only to the management of current ex situ populations, but also in moving forward with future conservation and reintroduction projects. This overview of gaps in knowledge concerning ex situ amphibian care should serve as a foundation for much needed future research in these areas. PMID:25296396

  1. Cardiovascular physiology and diseases of amphibians.

    PubMed

    Heinz-Taheny, Kathleen M

    2009-01-01

    The class Amphibia includes three orders of amphibians: the anurans (frogs and toads), urodeles (salamanders, axolotls, and newts), and caecilians. The diversity of lifestyles across these three orders has accompanying differences in the cardiovascular anatomy and physiology allowing for adaptations to aquatic or terrestrial habitats, pulmonic or gill respiration, hibernation, and body elongation (in the caecilian). This article provides a review of amphibian cardiovascular anatomy and physiology with discussion of unique species adaptations. In addition, amphibians as cardiovascular animal models and commonly encountered natural diseases are covered. PMID:19131029

  2. Report of Amphibian Development Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malacinski, G.

    1985-01-01

    Amphibian and fish embryos are extremely well suited for studies on pattern specification, whereas other systems (e.g., avian or mammalian) might be just as well suited for studies on differentiation or growth. Those distinctions are important for at least two reasons: (1) More precise focus regarding underlying mechanisms is called for when those distinctions are made. That facilitates the formulation of specific models or hypotheses; and (2) stress effects (i.e., the effects of weightlessness on structures (e.g., bones) which normally bear a load) are distinguished as being indirect, in contrast to direct effects of microgravity, which would be expected to act on pattern specification. That is, direct gravity effects are distinguished from indirect stress effects.

  3. Amphibian responses to photoinduced toxicity of PAHs

    SciTech Connect

    Hatch, A.C.; Burton, G.A. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    Amphibians are essential components of many ecosystems, yet little information exists on their sensitivity to environmental stressors. Recent evidence shows amphibian diversity is declining. Others have suggested this decline is a result of increasing ultraviolet (UV) light levels. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are widespread pollutants in the aquatic environment and their toxicity is increased in the presence of UV light. Embryos of two frogs (Rana pipiens and Xenopus laevis) were exposed to a PAH, fluoranthene, to evaluate amphibian responses to this common contaminant in the presence of sunlight. Hatching rate and development were measured in field and laboratory exposures at multiple concentrations and varying UV intensities. Hatching rate was relatively unaffected, while newly hatched larvae were sensitive to low (ug/L) concentrations. Response was related to both PAH concentration and UV intensity. Results suggest that PAH contamination in the aquatic environment may contribute to declines in amphibian populations.

  4. Altered Reproductive Function and Amphibian Declines

    E-print Network

    Gallipeau, Sherrie

    2014-01-01

    of the male rat reproductive system to the insecticidemale amphibian reproductive function differ across river systems.reproductive endocrinology and morphology (or function) of male bullfrogs, each individual river system

  5. Amphibians and Reptiles of Los Alamos County

    SciTech Connect

    Teralene S. Foxx; Timothy K. Haarmann; David C. Keller

    1999-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that amphibians and reptiles are good indicators of environmental health. They live in terrestrial and aquatic environments and are often the first animals to be affected by environmental change. This publication provides baseline information about amphibians and reptiles that are present on the Pajarito Plateau. Ten years of data collection and observations by researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory, the University of New Mexico, the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish, and hobbyists are represented.

  6. Kafka's Metamorphosis: Transforming the Pre-Graduation Malaise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Sheryl

    1998-01-01

    A teacher of an advanced placement English class of over-stressed, over-busy, and rebellious gifted seniors describes how she used Kafka's "Metamorphosis" to help them adjust to this transitional period in their lives while keeping all reading and assignments within the class period. (DB)

  7. Elemental concentration in mealworm beetle (Tenebrio molitor L.) during metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Simon, Edina; Baranyai, Edina; Braun, Mihály; Fábián, István; Tóthmérész, Béla

    2013-07-01

    Mealworm beetles have been used in numerous experiments as bioindicators. The aim of our experiment was to study the elemental composition in three larvae, pupae and first and second generation adult stages during their life cycle. We selected 180 larvae from a genetically similar population and put them in three groups, in two boxes (60 larvae in each box). Larvae were fed with mashed potato made of the same quality and quantity of potato powder. Then, we selected 10 individuals from each stage to the elemental analysis, using the ICP-OES method. The following elements were analysed in the studied stages: Ca, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, P, S, Sr and Zn. The results of principal component analysis demonstrated that based on elemental composition, different stages were separated with each other, but in the cases of the three larvae stages, high overlap was found. The results of the GLM ANOVA showed significant differences between the different stages of metamorphosis-based elemental composition. Our results show that the calcium and magnesium were found in a relatively high concentration, while the iron and zinc may be essential elements during the metamorphosis. Our results also show that in insect, the concentration of sodium was higher than in the pupa which may cause by hemolymph. We also demonstrated that the metamorphosis has an effect on the concentration of elements. Our study shows that in the different stages of insects, there are significant changes in the elemental composition of different stages of insects during their metamorphosis. PMID:23695727

  8. Widespread occurrence of the amphibian chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in the southeastern USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rothermel, B.B.; Walls, S.C.; Mitchell, J.C.; Dodd, C.K., Jr.; Irwin, L.K.; Green, D.E.; Vazquez, V.M.; Petranka, J.W.; Stevenson, D.J.

    2008-01-01

    From 1999 to 2006, we sampled >1200 amphibians for the fungal pathogen Batrachochytnum dendrobatidis (Bd) at 30 sites in the southeastern USA. Using histological techniques or PCR assays, we detected chytrid infection in 10 species of aquatic-breeding amphibians in 6 states. The prevalence of chytrid infection was 17.8% for samples of postmetamorphic amphibians examined using skin swab-PCR assays (n = 202 samples from 12 species at 4 sites). In this subset of samples, anurans had a much higher prevalence of infection than caudates (39.2% vs. 5.5%, respectively). Mean prevalence in ranid frogs was 40.7 %. The only infected salamanders were Notophthalmus viridescens at 3 sites. We found infected amphibians from late winter through late spring and in 1 autumn sample. Although we encountered moribund or dead amphibians at 9 sites, most mortality events were not attributed to Bd. Chytridiomycosis was established as the probable cause of illness or death in fewer than 10 individuals. Our observations suggest a pattern of widespread and subclinical infections. However, because most of the sites in our study were visited only once, we cannot dismiss the possibility that chytridiomycosis is adversely affecting some populations. Furthermore, although there is no evidence of chytrid-associated declines in our region, the presence of this pathogen is cause for concern given global climate change and other stressors. Although presence-absence surveys may still be needed for some taxa, such as bufonids, we recommend that future researchers focus on potential population-level effects at sites where Bd is now known to occur. ?? Inter-Research 2008.

  9. What are amphibians and reptiles? Like birds and mammals, amphibians and

    E-print Network

    New Hampshire, University of

    What are amphibians and reptiles? Like birds and mammals, amphibians and reptiles are vertebrates through. Reptiles Reptiles include turtles, snakes, and lizards. Most reptiles that you'll encounter in your backyard are terrestrial, spending most of their life on land. Reptiles breathe only through

  10. 2003 Blackwell Publishing Ltd. http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/ddi 89 SPECIAL ISSUE: AMPHIBIAN DECLINES

    E-print Network

    : AMPHIBIAN DECLINES Diversity and Distributions (2003) 9, 89­98 Blackwell Science, Ltd Global amphibian amphibians and global amphibian declines have led to public concern, particularly because amphibians? Complex interactions of several anthropogenic factors are probably at work, and understanding amphibian

  11. Establishing a baseline and faunal history in amphibian monitoring programs: The amphibians of Harris Neck, GA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dodd, C.K., Jr.; Barichivich, W.J.

    2007-01-01

    We conducted an intensive inventory of Harris Neck National Wildlife Refuge in coastal Georgia to determine the feasibility of establishing an amphibian monitoring program at this location. Thirteen semi-aquatic amphibian species were identified at 21 locations. Amphibian species richness at Harris Neck was similar to that of nearby barrier islands. The amphibian fauna of Harris Neck has long been affected by human-induced landscape changes, including the inadvertent introduction of tadpoles from distant fish hatcheries and the creation of artificial impoundments. Land-use history provides important information necessary to understand current amphibian distribution, especially when census data are used to establish a baseline from which to monitor future status and trends.

  12. Countryside biogeography of Neotropical reptiles and amphibians.

    PubMed

    Mendenhall, Chase D; Frishkoff, Luke O; Santos-Barrera, Georgina; Pacheco, Jesús; Mesfun, Eyobed; Mendoza Quijano, Fernando; Ehrlich, Paul R; Ceballos, Gerardo; Daily, Gretchen C; Pringle, Robert M

    2014-04-01

    The future of biodiversity and ecosystem services depends largely on the capacity of human-dominated ecosystems to support them, yet this capacity remains largely unknown. Using the framework of countryside biogeography, and working in the Las Cruces system of Coto Brus, Costa Rica, we assessed reptile and amphibian assemblages within four habitats that typify much of the Neotropics: sun coffee plantations (12 sites), pasture (12 sites), remnant forest elements (12 sites), and a larger, contiguous protected forest (3 sites in one forest). Through analysis of 1678 captures of 67 species, we draw four primary conclusions. First, we found that the majority of reptile (60%) and amphibian (70%) species in this study used an array of habitat types, including coffee plantations and actively grazed pastures. Second, we found that coffee plantations and pastures hosted rich, albeit different and less dense, reptile and amphibian biodiversity relative to the 326-ha Las Cruces Forest Reserve and neighboring forest elements. Third, we found that the small ribbons of "countryside forest elements" weaving through farmland collectively increased the effective size of a 326-ha local forest reserve 16-fold for reptiles and 14-fold for amphibians within our 236-km2 study area. Therefore, countryside forest elements, often too small for most remote sensing techniques to identify, are contributing -95% of the available habitat for forest-dependent reptiles and amphibians in our largely human-dominated study region. Fourth, we found large and pond-reproducing amphibians to prefer human-made habitats, whereas small, stream-reproducing, and directly developing species are more dependent on forest elements. Our investigation demonstrates that tropical farming landscapes can support substantial reptile and amphibian biodiversity. Our approach provides a framework for estimating the conservation value of the complex working landscapes that constitute roughly half of the global land surface, and which are experiencing intensification pressure worldwide. PMID:24933806

  13. ESTIMATING AMPHIBIAN OCCUPANCY RATES IN PONDS UNDER COMPLEX SURVEY DESIGNS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitoring the occurrence of specific amphibian species in ponds is one component of the US Geological Survey's Amphibian Monitoring and Research Initiative. Two collaborative studies were conducted in Olympic National Park and southeastern region of Oregon. The number of ponds...

  14. Estimating terrestrial amphibian pesticide body burden through dermal exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dermal exposure presents a potentially significant but understudied route for pesticide uptake in terrestrial amphibians. Our study measured dermal uptake of pesticides of varying hydrophobicity (logKow) in frogs. Amphibians were indirectly exposed to one of five pesticide active...

  15. Biology and Genetic Characterization of Fish and Amphibian Herpesviruses

    E-print Network

    Kane, Andrew S.

    relationships of the fish & amphibian, oyster, and mammalian, avian, & reptilian herpesviruses supports1 Biology and Genetic Characterization of Fish and Amphibian Herpesviruses Thomas B. Waltzek Program School of Veterinary Medicine University of California, Davis Herpesviruses from Fish

  16. Aquatic eutrophication promotes pathogenic infection in amphibians

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Pieter T. J.; Chase, Jonathan M.; Dosch, Katherine L.; Hartson, Richard B.; Gross, Jackson A.; Larson, Don J.; Sutherland, Daniel R.; Carpenter, Stephen R.

    2007-01-01

    The widespread emergence of human and wildlife diseases has challenged ecologists to understand how large-scale agents of environmental change affect host–pathogen interactions. Accelerated eutrophication of aquatic ecosystems owing to nitrogen and phosphorus enrichment is a pervasive form of environmental change that has been implicated in the emergence of diseases through direct and indirect pathways. We provide experimental evidence linking eutrophication and disease in a multihost parasite system. The trematode parasite Ribeiroia ondatrae sequentially infects birds, snails, and amphibian larvae, frequently causing severe limb deformities and mortality. Eutrophication has been implicated in the emergence of this parasite, but definitive evidence, as well as a mechanistic understanding, have been lacking until now. We show that the effects of eutrophication cascade through the parasite life cycle to promote algal production, the density of snail hosts, and, ultimately, the intensity of infection in amphibians. Infection also negatively affected the survival of developing amphibians. Mechanistically, eutrophication promoted amphibian disease through two distinctive pathways: by increasing the density of infected snail hosts and by enhancing per-snail production of infectious parasites. Given forecasted increases in global eutrophication, amphibian extinctions, and similarities between Ribeiroia and important human and wildlife pathogens, our results have broad epidemiological and ecological significance. PMID:17893332

  17. Amphibian Decline or Extinction? Current Declines Dwarf Background Extinction Rate

    E-print Network

    McCallum, Malcolm

    the background amphibian extinction rate. If current estimates of amphibian species in imminent danger and accelerating rate of extinction as a natural phenomenon. ``As you walk from the terminal toward your airline). Although it is thought that 35 species of amphibians have gone extinct since 1500, this number may

  18. WFS 433/533 AMPHIBIAN ECOLOGY AND CONSERVATION

    E-print Network

    Gray, Matthew

    1 WFS 433/533 AMPHIBIAN ECOLOGY AND CONSERVATION Spring 2015 Instructor: Dr. Matthew Gray) Course Credits: 3 credits Required Text: !The Ecology and Behavior of Amphibians, 2007 (ISBN 9780226893341) Author: Kentwood D. Wells (available online: http://www.lib.utk.edu) !The Amphibians of Tennessee

  19. WFS 433/533 AMPHIBIAN ECOLOGY AND CONSERVATION

    E-print Network

    Gray, Matthew

    1 WFS 433/533 AMPHIBIAN ECOLOGY AND CONSERVATION Spring 2014 Instructor: Dr. Matthew Gray: The Ecology and Behavior of Amphibians, 2007 (ISBN 9780226893341) Author: Kentwood D. Wells (reserved at Pendergrass and available online) The Amphibians of Tennessee (http://utpress.org/) Authors: Matthew Niemiller

  20. Climate change implicated in amphibian and lizard declines

    E-print Network

    Wake, David B.

    Climate change implicated in amphibian and lizard declines David B. Wake* Museum of Vertebrate Amphibian Population Task Force, organized in 1991, served as a conduit for information arriving from many. Many amphibian biologists, especially those in apparently unaffected areas, were dubious and sus

  1. H-02 CONSTRUCTED WETLAND STUDIES AMPHIBIANS AND PLANTS

    E-print Network

    Georgia, University of

    H-02 CONSTRUCTED WETLAND STUDIES AMPHIBIANS AND PLANTS FY-2008 ANNUAL REPORT Savannah River Ecology ................................................................................................. 4 CHAPTER II -- AMPHIBIAN AND REPTILE USE OF THE H-02 WETLAND .................................... 5 ............................................................................................... 17 CHAPTER III: VEGETATION COMMUNITY OF THE H-02 WETLANDS -- IMPORTANCE TO AMPHIBIANS

  2. Measuring the Meltdown: Drivers of Global Amphibian Extinction and Decline

    E-print Network

    Sekercioglu, Cagan Hakki

    Measuring the Meltdown: Drivers of Global Amphibian Extinction and Decline Navjot S. Sodhi1 of amphibian biodiversity. However, the relative importance of and synergies among different drivers are still poorly understood. We present the largest global analysis of roughly 45% of known amphibians (2

  3. Use of Amphibians as Indicators of Ecosystem Restoration Success1

    E-print Network

    Mazzotti, Frank

    CIR 1484 Use of Amphibians as Indicators of Ecosystem Restoration Success1 Ken G. Rice, Frank J. Nick T. Place, dean for UF/IFAS Extension. Introduction There are 18 native amphibians in southern Florida (Figures 2 and 5). Amphibians are found in virtually all habitats from pine forests to sawgrass

  4. erhaps our fascination with frogs and other amphibians starts in

    E-print Network

    Wake, David B.

    P erhaps our fascination with frogs and other amphibians starts in childhood, with the discovery of the overall condition of the environment. Amphibians are valuable as gauges of the planetŐs health for a few amphibians sample many parts of the environment, their health reßects the combined eÝects of many separate

  5. Combined influence of hydroperiod and parasitism on larval amphibian development

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Pieter

    Combined influence of hydroperiod and parasitism on larval amphibian development Janet Koprivnikar1 and development time of many amphibians, and larvae of various species display developmental plasticity this possibility. Pathogens can delay amphibian development, so infec- tions could constrain the ability

  6. Evaluating the links between climate, disease spread, and amphibian declines

    E-print Network

    Rohr, Jason

    Evaluating the links between climate, disease spread, and amphibian declines Jason R. Rohra,1 propelled the Earth into its sixth mass extinction event and amphibians, the most threatened of all vertebrate taxa, are at the forefront. Many of the worldwide amphibian declines have been caused

  7. The Invasion of Exotic Reptiles and Amphibians in Florida

    E-print Network

    Mazzotti, Frank

    The Invasion of Exotic Reptiles and Amphibians in Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural of reptiles and amphibians are strikingly out of balance as a result of nonnative invasions. The state has more introduced species of reptiles and amphibians living and breeding in the wild than anywhere else

  8. Introduction Today, living amphibians comprise more than 6000

    E-print Network

    Vences, Miguel

    Introduction Today, living amphibians comprise more than 6000 known species. In the last 11 years criteria revealed that amphibians are suffering severe declines with about 32.5 % of the known species sequences of amphibians and the compilation of a complete phylogenetic tree of the Amphibia has been

  9. Amphibian diversity: Decimation by disease Pieter T. J. Johnson*

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Pieter

    Amphibian diversity: Decimation by disease Pieter T. J. Johnson* Center for Limnology, University and dramatic losses of amphibian populations and species rep- resent the deadly intersection between these issues (1), as illustrated by the work of Lips et al. (2) in this issue of PNAS. Amphibians are one

  10. Original Article Using amphibians in laboratory studies: precautions against

    E-print Network

    Schmeller, Dirk S.

    Original Article Using amphibians in laboratory studies: precautions against the emerging is by far the most widely used amphibian species in laboratories. In the wild, X. laevis is an asymptomatic Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), which has devastating effects on wild amphibian populations around the world

  11. A Conservation Strategy for the Amphibians of Madagascar

    E-print Network

    Vences, Miguel

    A Conservation Strategy for the Amphibians of Madagascar Monografie del Museo Regionale di Scienze of Braunschweig, Braunschweig. Ché WELDON1 , Louis DU PREEZ1 , Miguel VENCES2 Lack of detection of the amphibian chytridiomycosis can have catastrophic effects on amphibian populations leading to declines and even extinctions

  12. Agrochemicals increase trematode infections in a declining amphibian species

    E-print Network

    Rohr, Jason

    LETTERS Agrochemicals increase trematode infections in a declining amphibian species Jason R. Rohr1 R. Beasley3 Global amphibian declines have often been attributed to disease1,2 , but ignorance by augmenting snail intermediate hosts and suppressing amphibian immunity. A mesocosm experiment demonstrated

  13. H-02 CONSTRUCTED WETLAND STUDIES AMPHIBIANS AND PLANTS

    E-print Network

    Georgia, University of

    H-02 CONSTRUCTED WETLAND STUDIES AMPHIBIANS AND PLANTS FY-2009 ANNUAL REPORT Savannah River Ecology ................................................................................................. 4 Chapter II Amphibian and Reptile Use of the H-02 Wetland .................................... 5 ............................................................................................... 27 Chapter III Vegetation Community of the H-02 Wetlands: Importance to Amphibians

  14. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Co-habiting amphibian species harbor unique skin

    E-print Network

    McKenzie, Valerie

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Co-habiting amphibian species harbor unique skin bacterial communities in wild four pond habitats in Colorado, USA, where multiple amphibian species were present. In total, 32 amphibian individuals were sampled from three different species including northern leopard frogs (Lithobates

  15. Macroparasite Infections of Amphibians: What Can They Tell Us?

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Pieter

    Macroparasite Infections of Amphibians: What Can They Tell Us? Janet Koprivnikar,1 David J in drivers of amphibian microparasite infections and the resulting consequences, com- paratively little research has addressed such questions for amphibian macroparasites. What work has been done in this area

  16. Biology 472 Spring 2009 Biology of Amphibians and Reptiles

    E-print Network

    Jackson, Kate

    Biology 472 Spring 2009 1 Biology of Amphibians and Reptiles Dr. Kate Jackson Office: Science 200 E Encyclopedia of Reptiles and Amphibians. Oxford University Press. (2) Stebbins, R. and R. T. Peterson. 2003. A Field Guide to Western Reptiles and Amphibians. Peterson Field Guides. Houghton Mifflin. (3) Powell, et

  17. Amphibian intersex in suburban landscapes ADRIANNE P. SMITS,1

    E-print Network

    Skelly, David Kiernan

    Amphibian intersex in suburban landscapes ADRIANNE P. SMITS,1 DAVID K. SKELLY,2, AND SUSAN R Citation: Smits, A. P., D. K. Skelly, and S. R. Bolden. 2014. Amphibian intersex in suburban landscapes abnormalities have been discovered in wild amphibian populations of multiple species and in a variety of regions

  18. Spatial network structure and amphibian persistence in stochastic environments

    E-print Network

    Fortuna, Miguel A.

    Spatial network structure and amphibian persistence in stochastic environments Miguel A. Fortuna1, which are used as breeding sites by several amphibian species. We investigate how the structural properties of the spatial network change as a function of the amphibian dispersal distance and the hydric

  19. Amphibians as Indicators of Headwater Processes in Northern California Forests

    E-print Network

    Amphibians as Indicators of Headwater Processes in Northern California Forests: What Are They Telling Us and Why Should We Listen?1 Hartwell H. Welsh, Jr.2 Amphibians are recognized health. Our research on headwater amphibians in the Klamath-Siskiyou and North Coast Bioregions spans

  20. MiR-2 family regulates insect metamorphosis by controlling the juvenile hormone signaling pathway

    E-print Network

    Belles, Xavier

    MiR-2 family regulates insect metamorphosis by controlling the juvenile hormone signaling pathway metamorphosis. We have also found that the 3UTR of Kr-h1 mRNA contains a functional binding site for miR-2 family miRNAs (for miR-2, miR-13a, and miR-13b). These data suggest that metamorphosis impairment caused

  1. Microbiota and Mucosal Immunity in Amphibians

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Bruno M.; Scalvenzi, Thibault; Benlamara, Sarah; Pollet, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    We know that animals live in a world dominated by bacteria. In the last 20?years, we have learned that microbes are essential regulators of mucosal immunity. Bacteria, archeas, and viruses influence different aspects of mucosal development and function. Yet, the literature mainly covers findings obtained in mammals. In this review, we focus on two major themes that emerge from the comparative analysis of mammals and amphibians. These themes concern: (i) the structure and functions of lymphoid organs and immune cells in amphibians, with a focus on the gut mucosal immune system; and (ii) the characteristics of the amphibian microbiota and its influence on mucosal immunity. Lastly, we propose to use Xenopus tadpoles as an alternative small-animal model to improve the fundamental knowledge on immunological functions of gut microbiota. PMID:25821449

  2. Diversity and distribution of amphibians in Romania

    PubMed Central

    Cog?lniceanu, Dan; Székely, Paul; Samoil?, Ciprian; Ruben, Iosif; Tudor, Marian; Pl?ia?u, Rodica; St?nescu, Florina; Rozylowicz, Lauren?iu

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Nineteen species of amphibians inhabit Romania, 9 of which reach their range limit on this territory. Based on published occurrence reports, museum collections and our own data we compiled a national database of amphibian occurrences. We georeferenced 26779 amphibian species occurrences, and performed an analysis of their spatial patterns, checking for hotspots and patterns of species richness. The results of spatial statistic analyses supported the idea of a biased sampling for Romania, with clear hotspots of increased sampling efforts. The sampling effort is biased towards species with high detectability, protected areas, and large cities. Future sampling efforts should be focused mostly on species with a high rarity score in order to accurately map their range. Our results are an important step in achieving the long-term goals of increasing the efficiency of conservation efforts and evaluating the species range shifts under climate change scenarios. PMID:23794877

  3. Emesis and Space Motion Sickness in Amphibians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naitoh, T.; Yamashita, M.; Izumi-Kurotani, A.; Takabatake, I.; Wassersug, R. J.

    Amphibians possess the ability to vomit in response to a variety of stimuli that provoke emesis in mammals. Pharmacological studies have establish that the ejection of gastric contents and the basic mechanism for vomiting have been phylogenetically conserved among these tetrapods. As part of on-going comparative studies on emesis in vertebrates, we previously documented that some postmetamorphic anurans and salamander larvae experience motion-induced emesis when exposed to the provocative stimulus of parabolic aircraft flight. However, more recent experiments suggest that there are strict conditions for inducing emesis in amphibians exposed to parabolic flight and that amphibians are not as sensitive to this stimulus as mammals. Further studies on emesis in lower vertebrates may help us understand the processes that cause emesis in abnormal gravitational regimes

  4. Amphibian monitoring in the Atchafalaya Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waddle, Hardin

    2011-01-01

    Amphibians are a diverse group of animals that includes frogs, toads, and salamanders. They are adapted to living in a variety of habitats, but most require water for at least one life stage. Amphibians have recently become a worldwide conservation concern because of declines and extinctions even in remote protected areas previously thought to be safe from the pressures of habitat loss and degradation. Amphibians are an important part of ecosystem dynamics because they can be quite abundant and serve both as a predator of smaller organisms and as prey to a suite of vertebrate predators. Their permeable skin and aquatic life history also make them useful as indicators of ecosystem health. Since 2002, the U.S. Geological Survey has been studying the frog and toad species inhabiting the Atchafalaya Basin to monitor for population declines and to better understand how the species are potentially affected by disease, environmental contaminants, and climate change.

  5. Diversity and distribution of amphibians in Romania.

    PubMed

    Cog?lniceanu, Dan; Székely, Paul; Samoil?, Ciprian; Ruben, Iosif; Tudor, Marian; Pl?ia?u, Rodica; St?nescu, Florina; Rozylowicz, Lauren?iu

    2013-01-01

    Nineteen species of amphibians inhabit Romania, 9 of which reach their range limit on this territory. Based on published occurrence reports, museum collections and our own data we compiled a national database of amphibian occurrences. We georeferenced 26779 amphibian species occurrences, and performed an analysis of their spatial patterns, checking for hotspots and patterns of species richness. The results of spatial statistic analyses supported the idea of a biased sampling for Romania, with clear hotspots of increased sampling efforts. The sampling effort is biased towards species with high detectability, protected areas, and large cities. Future sampling efforts should be focused mostly on species with a high rarity score in order to accurately map their range. Our results are an important step in achieving the long-term goals of increasing the efficiency of conservation efforts and evaluating the species range shifts under climate change scenarios. PMID:23794877

  6. Chytrid fungus infections in laboratory and introduced Xenopus laevis populations: assessing the risks for U.K. native amphibians

    PubMed Central

    Tinsley, Richard C.; Coxhead, Peter G.; Stott, Lucy C.; Tinsley, Matthew C.; Piccinni, Maya Z.; Guille, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    The chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) is notorious amongst current conservation biology challenges, responsible for mass mortality and extinction of amphibian species. World trade in amphibians is implicated in global dissemination. Exports of South African Xenopus laevis have led to establishment of this invasive species on four continents. Bd naturally infects this host in Africa and now occurs in several introduced populations. However, no previous studies have investigated transfer of infection into co-occurring native amphibian faunas. A survey of 27 U.K. institutions maintaining X. laevis for research showed that most laboratories have low-level infection, a risk for native species if animals are released into the wild. RT-PCR assays showed Bd in two introduced U.K. populations of X. laevis, in Wales and Lincolnshire. Laboratory and field studies demonstrated that infection levels increase with stress, especially low temperature. In the U.K., native amphibians may be exposed to intense transmission in spring when they enter ponds to spawn alongside X. laevis that have cold-elevated Bd infections. Exposure to cross-infection has probably been recurrent since the introduction of X. laevis, >20 years in Lincolnshire and 50 years in Wales. These sites provide an important test for assessing the impact of X. laevis on Bd spread. However, RT-PCR assays on 174 native amphibians (Bufo, Rana, Lissotriton and Triturus spp.), sympatric with the Bd-infected introduced populations, showed no foci of self-sustaining Bd transmission associated with X. laevis. The abundance of these native amphibians suggested no significant negative population-level effect after the decades of co-occurrence. PMID:25843959

  7. Metabolism of a Glycosaminoglycan during Metamorphosis in the Japanese Conger eel, Conger myriaster

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Yutaka; Oku, Hiromi; Nomura, Kazuharu; Gorie, Shigeaki; Ohta, Hiromi

    2009-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is a linear polysaccharide of high molecular weight that exists as a component of the extracellular matrix. The larvae (leptocephali) of the Japanese conger eel (Anguilliformes: Conger myriaster) have high levels of hyaluronan (HA) which is thought to help control body water content. We isolated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) from Japanese conger eel leptocephali and measured the changes in tissue HA content during metamorphosis. HA content decreased during metamorphosis. In contrast, neutral sugar content increased during metamorphosis. We hypothesize that the leptocephali utilize a metabolic pathway that converts HA to glucose during metamorphosis. Glucose may then be metabolized to glycogen and stored in the juvenile life-history stage. PMID:22820749

  8. Time and size at metamorphosis related to adult fitness in Ambystoma talpoideum

    SciTech Connect

    Semlitsch, R.D.; Scott, D.E.; Pechmann, J.H.K.

    1988-02-01

    The relationships among timing of metamorphosis, size at metamorphosis, and traits related to adult fitness were studied for 8 yr in the salamander Ambystoma talpoideum at a temporary pond. Among years, the modal time of metamorphosis and mean body size at metamorphosis were positively correlated with the date the pond dried. In years that the pond dried late, one group of larvae metamorphosed well before the pond dried, whereas the other group metamorphosed just before pond drying. Mean body size of late-metamorphosing individuals was not greater than that of individuals metamorphosing early. Early-metamorphosing males and females were larger at first and second reproduction than were late-metamorphosing individuals. Independent of timing of metamorphosis, larger juveniles at metamorphosis were also larger adults at first reproduction. Age at first reproduction for males was not associated with timing of or size at metamorphosis but large early-metamorphosing females reproduced at a younger age than did small early-metamorphosing females. Neither time of metamorphosis nor size at metamorphosis was associated with survival to first reproduction. These results demonstrate a direct relationship between phenotypic variation generated in the larval stage and adult traits closely associated with an individual's fitness.

  9. The amphibian pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis detected in a community of stream and wetland amphibians

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grant, E.H.C.; Bailey, L.L.; Ware, J.L.; Duncan, K.C.

    2008-01-01

    The amphibian chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, responsible for the potentially fatal amphibian disease chytridiomycosis, is known to occur in a large and ever increasing number of amphibian populations around the world. However, sampling has been biased towards stream- and wetland-breeding anurans, with little attention paid to stream-associated salamanders. We sampled three frog and three salamander species in the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historic Park, Maryland, by swabbing animals for PCR analysis to detect DNA of B. dendrobatidis. Using PCR, we detected B. dendrobatidis DNA in both stream and wetland amphibians, and report here the first occurrence of the pathogen in two species of stream-associated salamanders. Future research should focus on mechanisms within habitats that may affect persistence and dissemination of B. dendrobatidis among stream-associated salamanders.

  10. Helping Your Local Amphibians (HYLA): An Internet-based Amphibian Course for Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Tony P.

    2001-01-01

    Introduces an online zoology course that was offered primarily to upper elementary and middle school teachers in which teachers were expected to take action to help the local amphibian population. (Author/YDS)

  11. Possible interrelations among environmental toxicants, amphibian development, and decline of amphibian populations.

    PubMed Central

    Carey, C; Bryant, C J

    1995-01-01

    Many amphibian populations are declining in a number of geographical locations throughout the world. In most cases, the cause or causes are unknown, but are assumed to result from man-made alterations in the environment. We review existing evidence concerning how environmental xenobiotics could contribute to declines of amphibian populations by impacting growth and development of the young. This paper examines the potential roles of toxicants in: a) affecting the susceptibility of young to disease; b) retarding growth and development of amphibian young; c) affecting the ability of larvae to avoid predation; d) affecting the development of physiological, morphological, or behavioral processes in a manner that subsequently impairs the ability of the young for future reproduction; and e) directly causing mortality of young. These issues are not well studied, and more studies are needed before the roles of environmental xenobiotics in amphibian declines are fully understood. PMID:7556018

  12. Neuron, Vol. 38, 871885, June 19, 2003, Copyright 2003 by Cell Press Axon Pruning during Drosophila Metamorphosis

    E-print Network

    Luo, Liqun

    Drosophila Metamorphosis: Evidence for Local Degeneration and Requirement of the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System the stereotyped pruning of neurons of metamorphosis as a model system to investigate the cellular and molecular

  13. General Amphibian characteristics: 1) Two occipital condyles

    E-print Network

    Dever, Jennifer A.

    that they function as though they were two separate, non- interbreeding species. Caecilians Order Apoda (Gymnophiona aquatic caecilians, with four genera in South America, some to 75 cm. The posterior body is laterally, oviparous #12;4 What makes them different from other amphibians? Characteristics of Caecilians l Elongate

  14. POTENTIAL DEVELOPMENTAL EFFECTS OF ATRAZINE ON AMPHIBIANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent research has generated conflicting results on the effects of atrazine on gonadal developmental (e.g., male hermaphroditism) in amphibians and how these effects influence secondary sexual characteristics (e.g., laryngeal muscle mass). The SAP is being asked to consider the...

  15. Culture of Cells from Amphibian Embryos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanisstreet, Martin

    1983-01-01

    Describes a method for in vitro culturing of cells from amphibian early embryos. Such cells can be used to demonstrate such properties of eukaryote cells as cell motility, adhesion, differentiation, and cell sorting into tissues. The technique may be extended to investigate other factors. (Author/JN)

  16. Universal COI primers for DNA barcoding amphibians.

    PubMed

    Che, Jing; Chen, Hong-Man; Yang, Jun-Xiao; Jin, Jie-Qiong; Jiang, Ke; Yuan, Zhi-Yong; Murphy, Robert W; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2012-03-01

    DNA barcoding is a proven tool for the rapid and unambiguous identification of species, which is essential for many activities including the vouchering tissue samples in the genome 10K initiative, genealogical reconstructions, forensics and biodiversity surveys, among many other applications. A large-scale effort is underway to barcode all amphibian species using the universally sequenced DNA region, a partial fragment of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I COI. This fragment is desirable because it appears to be superior to 16S for barcoding, at least for some groups of salamanders. The barcoding of amphibians is essential in part because many species are now endangered. Unfortunately, existing primers for COI often fail to achieve this goal. Herein, we report two new pairs of primers (?, ?) that in combination serve to universally amplify and sequence all three orders of Chinese amphibians as represented by 36 genera. This taxonomic diversity, which includes caecilians, salamanders and frogs, suggests that the new primer pairs will universally amplify COI for the vast majority species of amphibians. PMID:22145866

  17. Diseases of amphibian eggs and embryos

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Green, D.E.; Converse, K.A.

    2005-01-01

    Amphibians generally are prolific egg producers. In tropical and semi-tropical regions, deposition of eggs may occur year-round or may coincide with rainy seasons, while in temperate regions, deposition of eggs usually occurs immediately after emergence from hibernation. Numbers of eggs produced by each species may vary from a few dozen to thousands. Accordingly, some eggs may be infertile and wastage of embryos is to be expected. Fertility, viability and decomposition of eggs and embryos must be considered before it is assumed that diseases are present. An important consideration in the evaluation of egg masses is the fact that some will contain infertile and non-viable eggs. These infertile and nonviable eggs will undergo decomposition and they may appear similar to eggs that are infected by a pathogen. Evaluation of egg masses and embryos for the presence of disease may require repeated observations in a given breeding season as well as continued monitoring of egg masses during their growth and development and over successive breeding seasons. Amphibian eggs rarely are subjected to a comprehensive health (diagnostic) examination; hence, there is scant literature on the diseases of this life stage. Indeed, the eggs of some North American amphibians have yet to be described. Much basic physiology and normal biomedical baseline data on amphibian eggs is lacking. For example, it is known that the aquatic eggs of some species of shrimp quickly are coated by a protective and commensal bacterium that effectively impedes invasion of the eggs by other environmental organisms and potential pathogens. In the absence of this bacterium, shrimp eggs are rapidly killed by other bacteria and fungi (Green, 2001). The possibility that amphibian eggs also have important symbiotic or commensal bacteria needs to be investigated. Furthermore, the quantity and types of chemicals in the normal gelatinous capsules of amphibian eggs have scarcely been examined. Abnormalities of the female oviduct, either due to infectious disease, nutritional status, hormonal imbalances, or sublethal intoxications, could affect the quality of secreted gelatinous capsules on eggs, thus rendering an egg mass susceptible to other stressors. Diseases of amphibian eggs and embryos presented in this chapter are Lucke frog herpesvirus Ranavirus (iridovirus) infection Bacteria Watermold infection (saprolegniasis) Algae Microsporidia

  18. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON VISUALIZATION AND COMPUTER GRAPHICS, VOL. 2, NO. 4, DECEMBER 1996 337 Image Metamorphosis with

    E-print Network

    Wolberg, George

    Metamorphosis with Scattered Feature Constraints Seungyong Lee, George Wolberg, Kyung-Yong Chwa, and Sung Yong Shin Abstract--This paper describes an image metamorphosis technique to handle scattered feature blending. Implementation details are furnished and comparisons among various metamorphosis techniques

  19. J. Exp. Mar. Biol. Ecol., 1986, Vol. 91, pp. 313-319 FIELD EVIDENCE FOR DELAYED METAMORPHOSIS OF LARVAL

    E-print Network

    FOR DELAYED METAMORPHOSIS OF LARVAL GASTROPODS: CREPZDULA PLANA Say, C. FORNZCATA (L.), AND BZTTZUM ALTERNATUM invertebrate larvae to delay metamorphosis to adult form and habitat is known mostly from laboratory studies metamorphosis in the plankton should be recognizable since the larvae of these species continue to increase

  20. REARING OF PLAICE (PLEURONECTES PLATESSA) LARVAE TO METAMORPHOSIS USING AN ARTIFICIAL DIET

    E-print Network

    REARING OF PLAICE (PLEURONECTES PLATESSA) LARVAE TO METAMORPHOSIS USING AN ARTIFICIAL DIET J. W an artificial diet. The overall survival rate to metamorphosis was of the order of 20%. This compares of the artificial diet is described. The main protein component Was freeze-dried cod muscle and the diet contained

  1. EVIDENCE FOR FIRST YEAR METAMORPHOSIS OF BULLFROGS IN AN EPHEMERAL POND

    EPA Science Inventory

    It is widely accepted that bullfrog ( R catesbeiana) tadpoles in the Pacific Northwest require more than one year for metamorphosis. Often time to metamorphosis increases along a latitudinal gradient. During our pond surveys at the EE Wilson Reserve, we found evidence of first ...

  2. The role of reduced oxygen in the developmental physiology of growth and metamorphosis initiation in Drosophila

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rearing oxygen level is known to affect final body size in a variety of insects, but the physiological mechanisms by which oxygen affects size are incompletely understood. In Manduca and Drosophila, the larval size at which metamorphosis is initiated largely determines adult size, and metamorphosis ...

  3. Differences in sensitivity to the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis among amphibian populations.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Paul W; Gervasi, Stephanie S; Hua, Jessica; Cothran, Rickey D; Relyea, Rick A; Olson, Deanna H; Blaustein, Andrew R

    2015-10-01

    Contributing to the worldwide biodiversity crisis are emerging infectious diseases, which can lead to extirpations and extinctions of hosts. For example, the infectious fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) is associated with worldwide amphibian population declines and extinctions. Sensitivity to Bd varies with species, season, and life stage. However, there is little information on whether sensitivity to Bd differs among populations, which is essential for understanding Bd-infection dynamics and for formulating conservation strategies. We experimentally investigated intraspecific differences in host sensitivity to Bd across 10 populations of wood frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus) raised from eggs to metamorphosis. We exposed the post-metamorphic wood frogs to Bd and monitored survival for 30 days under controlled laboratory conditions. Populations differed in overall survival and mortality rate. Infection load also differed among populations but was not correlated with population differences in risk of mortality. Such population-level variation in sensitivity to Bd may result in reservoir populations that may be a source for the transmission of Bd to other sensitive populations or species. Alternatively, remnant populations that are less sensitive to Bd could serve as sources for recolonization after epidemic events. PMID:26219571

  4. Metabolomic insights into system-wide coordination of vertebrate metamorphosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background After completion of embryogenesis, many organisms experience an additional obligatory developmental transition to attain a substantially different juvenile or adult form. During anuran metamorphosis, the aquatic tadpole undergoes drastic morphological changes and remodelling of tissues and organs to become a froglet. Thyroid hormones are required to initiate the process, but the mechanism whereby the many requisite changes are coordinated between organs and tissues is poorly understood. Metabolites are often highly conserved biomolecules between species and are the closest reflection of phenotype. Due to the extensive distribution of blood throughout the organism, examination of the metabolites contained therein provides a system-wide overview of the coordinated changes experienced during metamorphosis. We performed an untargeted metabolomic analysis on serum samples from naturally-metamorphosing Rana catesbeiana from tadpoles to froglets using ultraperformance liquid chromatography coupled to a mass spectrometer. Total and aqueous metabolite extracts were obtained from each serum sample to select for nonpolar and polar metabolites, respectively, and selected metabolites were validated by running authentic compounds. Results The majority of the detected metabolites (74%) showed statistically significant abundance changes (padj?metamorphosis identifying fundamental pathways involved in the coordination of this important developmental process and paves the way for metabolomic studies on other metamorphic systems including fish and insects. PMID:24495308

  5. [Beier 92] Thaddeus Beier and Shawn Neely, ``FeatureBased Image Metamorphosis,'' Computer Graphics, Vol. 26, No. 2 (SIGGRAPH 92), pp. 3542.

    E-print Network

    Chen, David T.

    7 References [Beier 92] Thaddeus Beier and Shawn Neely, ``Feature­Based Image Metamorphosis. Metamorphosis of surface shapes in 3­space. Top row: 0% and 33% versions of the David ­> Heidi metamorphosis sequence. Bottom row: 67%, and 100% versions of the David ­> Heidi metamorphosis sequence #12; 5 Figure 2b

  6. Particle-Antiparticle Metamorphosis of Massive Majorana Neutrinos and Gauginos

    E-print Network

    Ahluwalia, D V

    2002-01-01

    Recent results on neutrinoless double beta decay, as reported by Klapdor-Kleingrothaus et al., take us for the first time into the realm of Majorana spacetime structure. However, this structure has either been treated as an afterthought to the Dirac construct; or, when it has been attended to in its own right, its physical and mathematical content was never fully unearthed. In this Letter,we undertake to remedy the existing situation. We present a detailed formalism required for the description of the non-trivial spacetime structure underlying the "nu-nubar" metamorphosis - where "nu" generically represents a massive Majorana neutrino, or a massive gaugino.

  7. Particle-Antiparticle Metamorphosis of Massive Majorana Neutrinos and Gauginos

    E-print Network

    D. V. Ahluwalia-Khalilova

    2003-06-13

    Recent results on neutrinoless double beta decay, as reported by Klapdor-Kleingrothaus et al., take us for the first time into the realm of Majorana spacetime structure. However, this structure has either been treated as an afterthought to the Dirac construct; or, when it has been attended to in its own right, its physical and mathematical content was never fully unearthed. In this Letter,we undertake to remedy the existing situation. We present a detailed formalism required for the description of the non-trivial spacetime structure underlying the "nu-nubar" metamorphosis - where "nu" generically represents a massive Majorana neutrino, or a massive gaugino.

  8. Meeting ultraviolet B radiation requirements of amphibians in captivity: a case study with mountain chicken frogs (Leptodactylus fallax) and general recommendations for pre-release health screening.

    PubMed

    Tapley, Benjamin; Rendle, Matthew; Baines, Frances M; Goetz, Matthias; Bradfield, Kay S; Rood, David; Lopez, Javier; Garcia, Gerardo; Routh, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Conservation breeding programmes are a tool used to prevent amphibian extinctions. The husbandry requirements of amphibians are complex. Ongoing research is needed to ensure optimal management of those captive-bred animals destined, in particular, for reintroduction. The UV-B and vitamin D3 requirements of amphibians are largely unknown. Metabolic bone disease has been reported in a number of species. These include the Critically Endangered mountain chicken frog (Leptodactylus fallax) reared in captivity on diets supplemented with a high-calcium multivitamin and mineral supplement containing vitamin D3 but without UV-B provision. Captive-bred L. fallax being reared for reintroduction to Montserrat were provided with UV-B radiation from metamorphosis and were fed on insects supplemented with vitamins and minerals. Overlapping heat, light and UV-B gradients were provided, mimicking what we believe best represents the natural situation and thereby facilitated self-regulation of UV-B exposure. A subset of 10 frogs was periodically radiographed to assess skeletal health. Radiographic bone density and anatomical integrity appeared unremarkable when compared with a wild caught L. fallax. In addition to other routine health-screening, we recommend that radiography be performed to a structured schedule on a subset of all captive-bred and reared amphibians to assess skeletal health and to gauge the appropriateness of captive husbandry. We demonstrate here that, through the appropriate provision of a combination of both UV-B radiation and dietary supplementation, L. fallax can be bred and reared in captivity with healthy skeletal development. PMID:25255994

  9. Pesticide Detection in Rainwater, Stemflow, and Amphibians from Agricultural Spray Drift in Southern Georgia, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Amphibians are important sentinel environmental species since they integrate stressors from both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Pesticides are well established as a significant stressor for amphibians. In order to study spray-drift contributions to amphibian habitats, pestic...

  10. Pesticide Uptake Across the Amphibian Dermis Through Soil and Overspray Exposures

    EPA Science Inventory

    For terrestrial amphibians, accumulation ofpesticides through dermal contact is a primary route ofexposure in agricultural landscapes and may be contributingto widespread amphibian declines. To show pesticidetransfer across the amphibian dermis at permitted labelapplication rates...

  11. The U.S. Geological Survey Amphibian Research and Monitoring Initiative--2011 Annual Update

    E-print Network

    Torgersen, Christian

    The U.S. Geological Survey Amphibian Research and Monitoring Initiative--2011 Annual Update Objective The Amphibian Research and Monitoring Initiative (ARMI) assists Department of the Interior (DOI) resource management agencies with information needs related to amphibian conservation. This includes

  12. Interactions between Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis and its amphibian hosts: a review of pathogenesis and immunity

    E-print Network

    Rosenblum, Erica Bree

    Review Interactions between Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis and its amphibian hosts: a review, Tropical Medicine and Rehabilitation Sciences, Amphibian Disease Ecology Group, James Cook University The fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd ) causes a lethal skin disease of amphibians, chytridiomycosis

  13. Linking global climate and temperature variability to widespread amphibian declines putatively caused

    E-print Network

    Rohr, Jason

    Linking global climate and temperature variability to widespread amphibian declines putatively that the proposed link be- tween climate change and widespread amphibian declines, puta- tively caused widespread amphibian losses in genus Atelopus via increased regional temperature variability, which can

  14. Direct and indirect effects of climate change on amphibian populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blaustein, Andrew R.; Walls, Susan C.; Bancroft, Betsy A.; Lawler, Joshua J.; Searle, Catherine L.; Gervasi, Stephanie S.

    2010-01-01

    As part of an overall decline in biodiversity, populations of many organisms are declining and species are being lost at unprecedented rates around the world. This includes many populations and species of amphibians. Although numerous factors are affecting amphibian populations, we show potential direct and indirect effects of climate change on amphibians at the individual, population and community level. Shifts in amphibian ranges are predicted. Changes in climate may affect survival, growth, reproduction and dispersal capabilities. Moreover, climate change can alter amphibian habitats including vegetation, soil, and hydrology. Climate change can influence food availability, predator-prey relationships and competitive interactions which can alter community structure. Climate change can also alter pathogen-host dynamics and greatly influence how diseases are manifested. Changes in climate can interact with other stressors such as UV-B radiation and contaminants. The interactions among all these factors are complex and are probably driving some amphibian population declines and extinctions.

  15. Thermal, mechanical and chemical peripheral sensation in amphibians: opioid and adrenergic effects.

    PubMed

    Willenbring, S; Stevens, C W

    1996-01-01

    The acetic acid test (AAT) is a quantifiable assay of the response to noxious chemical stimuli on the hindlimb of the northern grass frog, Rana pipiens. AAT is sensitive to both opioid and adrenergic agonist modulation. The present study introduces the novel use of mechanical and thermal stimulus behavioral assays in comparison with the established acetic acid test in studying nociception in frogs. We evaluated mechanical and thermal responses and their sensitivity to systemic morphine (MOR) or dexmedetomidine (DEX) administrations with comparison to AAT. MOR produced dose-related elevations of response thresholds in all three sensory tests, whereas DEX produced elevations in the thermal and AAT assays but had no effect on sensitivity to non-noxious mechanical stimuli. The results suggest a distinct separation of sensory modalities in the frog similar to that observed in mammals and indicate the usefulness of this amphibian model in further studies of nociception. PMID:8606621

  16. Ranavirus outbreaks in amphibian populations of northern Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Russell, Danelle M.; Goldberg, Caren S.; Sprague, Laura; Waits, Lisette P.; Green, D. Earl; Schuler, Krysten L.; Rosenblum, Erica Bree

    2011-01-01

    Ranavirus outbreaks, caused by pathogens in the genus Ranavirus (Family Iridoviridae), were the largest single cause of reported amphibian mass mortality events in the United States from 1996–2001 (Green et al. 2002). Mortality events associated with ranaviruses have been documented on five continents and throughout the latitudes and elevations where amphibians occur (Gray et al. 2009). However, the threat of ranaviruses to amphibian and reptile populations in specific regions is still largely unknown (Chinchar 2002; Gray et al. 2009).

  17. The first anionic defensin from amphibians.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lin; Che, Helong; Han, Yi; Lv, Jing; Mu, Lixian; Lv, Lechun; Wu, Jing; Yang, Hailong

    2015-07-01

    A variety of antimicrobial peptides against infection have been identified from the skin of amphibians. However, knowledge on amphibian defensins is very limited. A novel anionic defensin designated PopuDef was purified from the skin of tree frog Polypedates puerensis, and the cDNA encoding PopuDef precursor was cloned from the skin cDNA library. The amino acid sequence of PopuDef (net charge: -2, pI: 4.75) shared the highest identity of 57 % (25/44) with the salamander defensin CFBD-1 (net charge: 0, pI: 6.14) from urodela amphibians. PopuDef showed moderate antimicrobial activities against P. aeruginosa and S. aureus (MICs are 19.41 and 17.25 ?M, respectively), and relatively weak activities against E. coli and B. subtilis (MICs are 38.82 and 43.14 ?M, respectively). Tissue distribution analysis indicated that relatively high expression level of PopuDef mRNA was observed in immune-related tissues including skin, gut, lung and spleen. Furthermore, the expression level of PopuDef was significantly upregulated in these tissues after tree frogs were infected with different bacteria strains mentioned above. Interestingly, the induction of PopuDef challenged with E. coli or B. subtilis, which was less sensitive to PopuDef, was much higher than that did with P. aeruginosa or S. aureus. These findings highlight the key role of PopuDef in innate immunity against infection. To our knowledge, PopuDef is the first anionic defensin characterized from amphibians. PMID:25792112

  18. Emerging infectious diseases and amphibian population declines.

    PubMed Central

    Daszak, P.; Berger, L.; Cunningham, A. A.; Hyatt, A. D.; Green, D. E.; Speare, R.

    1999-01-01

    We review recent research on the pathology, ecology, and biogeography of two emerging infectious wildlife diseases, chytridiomycosis and ranaviral disease, in the context of host-parasite population biology. We examine the role of these diseases in the global decline of amphibian populations and propose hypotheses for the origins and impact of these panzootics. Finally, we discuss emerging infectious diseases as a global threat to wildlife populations. PMID:10603206

  19. Bent's Old Fort: Amphibians and Reptiles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muths, E.

    2008-01-01

    Bent's Old Fort National Historic Site sits along the Arkansas River in the semi-desert prairie of southeastern Colorado. The USGS provided assistance in designing surveys to assess the variety of herpetofauna (amphibians and reptiles) resident at this site. This brochure is the results of those efforts and provides visitors with information on what frogs, toads, snakes and salamanders might be seen and heard at Bent's Old Fort.

  20. Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva: mechanisms and models of skeletal metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Frederick S; Chakkalakal, Salin A; Shore, Eileen M

    2012-11-01

    Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP; MIM #135100) is a debilitating genetic disorder of connective tissue metamorphosis. It is characterized by malformation of the great (big) toes during embryonic skeletal development and by progressive heterotopic endochondral ossification (HEO) postnatally, which leads to the formation of a second skeleton of heterotopic bone. Individuals with these classic clinical features of FOP have the identical heterozygous activating mutation (c.617G>A; R206H) in the gene encoding ACVR1 (also known as ALK2), a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) type I receptor. Disease activity caused by this ACVR1 mutation also depends on altered cell and tissue physiology that can be best understood in the context of a high-fidelity animal model. Recently, we developed such a knock-in mouse model for FOP (Acvr1(R206H/+)) that recapitulates the human disease, and provides a valuable new tool for testing and developing effective therapies. The FOP knock-in mouse and other models in Drosophila, zebrafish, chickens and mice provide an arsenal of tools for understanding BMP signaling and addressing outstanding questions of disease mechanisms that are relevant not only to FOP but also to a wide variety of disorders associated with regenerative medicine and tissue metamorphosis. PMID:23115204

  1. Embryonic multipotent progenitors remodel the Drosophila airways during metamorphosis

    PubMed Central

    Pitsouli, Chrysoula; Perrimon, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    Adult structures in holometabolous insects such as Drosophila are generated by groups of imaginal cells dedicated to the formation of different organs. Imaginal cells are specified in the embryo and remain quiescent until the larval stages, when they proliferate and differentiate to form organs. The Drosophila tracheal system is extensively remodeled during metamorphosis by a small number of airway progenitors. Among these, the spiracular branch tracheoblasts are responsible for the generation of the pupal and adult abdominal airways. To understand the coordination of proliferation and differentiation during organogenesis of tubular organs, we analyzed the remodeling of Drosophila airways during metamorphosis. We show that the embryonic spiracular branch tracheoblasts are multipotent cells that express the homeobox transcription factor Cut, which is necessary for their survival and normal development. They give rise to three distinct cell populations at the end of larval development, which generate the adult tracheal tubes, the spiracle and the epidermis surrounding the spiracle. Our study establishes the series of events that lead to the formation of an adult tubular structure in Drosophila. PMID:20940225

  2. Analgesia in Amphibians: Preclinical Studies and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Craig W.

    2010-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Preclinical studies of analgesia in amphibians or recommendations for clinical use of analgesics in amphibian species are extremely limited. This article briefly reviews the issues surrounding the use of analgesics in amphibians starting with common definitions of pain and analgesia when applied to non-human animals. Nociceptive and endogenous opioid systems in amphibians are reviewed and results of preclinical research on opioid and non-opioid analgesics summarized. Recommended opioid and non-opioid analgesics are summarized and practical recommendations made for their clinical use. PMID:21074701

  3. INTRODUCTION One of the most influential experiments in amphibian

    E-print Network

    De Robertis, Eddy M.

    INTRODUCTION One of the most influential experiments in amphibian embryology was that of Townes in embryology, Spemann and Mangold (1924) showed that these complex morphogenetic movements are orchestrated

  4. Amphibian Decline: An Integrated Analysis of Multiple Stressor Effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    2003-01-01

    Although the effects of contaminants on amphibians have been studied for decades, relatively little is known about these effects compared to the more intensively studied mammals. and birds. Science has advanced its understanding of the complexities linked to declining amphibian populations; however, there are many remaining questions whose answers would directly benefit amphibians and adaptive management plans ministering to them. In an effort to answer those questions and focus on ecological risk assessment of amphibians, scientists, researchers, and resource management professionals from diverse fields participated in a Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC)-Johnson Foundation Wingspread conference with three goals: characterize a process that would bring a range of interdisciplinary technical and management tools to the tasks of causal analysis; demonstrate the current state of available technical tools to assess amphibian populations exposed to various environmental stressors; and focus on identifying research that would likely benefit sustainable populations through adaptive management programs. A result of the Wingspread conference, Amphibian Decline examines the ecotoxicology and stressors of amphibians in an attempt to address issues related to declining amphibian populations and the role that various stressors might have in those losses. It identifies gaps in current data, interprets information into an existing framework, and points toward critical areas for future research. Through the combined efforts of research and resource management communities, recommendations can be developed to change current policies and management actions to address the problem of amphibian decline.

  5. Changes in the role of the thyroid axis during metamorphosis of the Japanese eel, Anguilla japonica.

    PubMed

    Sudo, Ryusuke; Okamura, Akihiro; Kuroki, Mari; Tsukamoto, Katsumi

    2014-08-01

    To clarify the role of thyroid function during metamorphosis from leptocephalus to glass eel in the Japanese eel, we examined the histology of the thyroid gland and measured whole-body concentrations of thyroid hormones, thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3), and thyroid stimulating hormone ?-subunit TSH (TSH?) mRNA expression levels in five stages of artificially hatched eels (leptocephalus, early-metamorphosis, late-metamorphosis, glass eel, and elver). During metamorphosis, the inner colloid of thyroid follicles showed positive immunoreactivity for T4, and both T4 and T3 levels were significantly increased, whereas a small peak of TSH? mRNA level was observed at the early-metamorphosis stage. Similarly, TSH? mRNA levels were highest in the glass eel stage, and then decreased markedly in the elver stage. In contrast to TSH? mRNA expression, thyroid hormones (both T4 and T3) increased further from the glass eel to elver stages. These results indicated that thyroid function in the Japanese eel was active both during and after metamorphosis. Therefore, the thyrotropic axis may play important roles not only in metamorphosis but also in subsequent inshore or upstream migrations. PMID:24692334

  6. Interacting Symbionts and Immunity in the Amphibian Skin Mucosome Predict Disease Risk and Probiotic Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Woodhams, Douglas C.; Brandt, Hannelore; Baumgartner, Simone; Kielgast, Jos; Küpfer, Eliane; Tobler, Ursina; Davis, Leyla R.; Schmidt, Benedikt R.; Bel, Christian; Hodel, Sandro; Knight, Rob; McKenzie, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenesis is strongly dependent on microbial context, but development of probiotic therapies has neglected the impact of ecological interactions. Dynamics among microbial communities, host immune responses, and environmental conditions may alter the effect of probiotics in human and veterinary medicine, agriculture and aquaculture, and the proposed treatment of emerging wildlife and zoonotic diseases such as those occurring on amphibians or vectored by mosquitoes. Here we use a holistic measure of amphibian mucosal defenses to test the effects of probiotic treatments and to assess disease risk under different ecological contexts. We developed a non-invasive assay for antifungal function of the skin mucosal ecosystem (mucosome function) integrating host immune factors and the microbial community as an alternative to pathogen exposure experiments. From approximately 8500 amphibians sampled across Europe, we compared field infection prevalence with mucosome function against the emerging fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis. Four species were tested with laboratory exposure experiments, and a highly susceptible species, Alytes obstetricans, was treated with a variety of temperature and microbial conditions to test the effects of probiotic therapies and environmental conditions on mucosome function. We found that antifungal function of the amphibian skin mucosome predicts the prevalence of infection with the fungal pathogen in natural populations, and is linked to survival in laboratory exposure experiments. When altered by probiotic therapy, the mucosome increased antifungal capacity, while previous exposure to the pathogen was suppressive. In culture, antifungal properties of probiotics depended strongly on immunological and environmental context including temperature, competition, and pathogen presence. Functional changes in microbiota with shifts in temperature provide an alternative mechanistic explanation for patterns of disease susceptibility related to climate beyond direct impact on host or pathogen. This nonlethal management tool can be used to optimize and quickly assess the relative benefits of probiotic therapies under different climatic, microbial, or host conditions. PMID:24789229

  7. Effects of Delayed Metamorphosis on Larval Survival, Metamorphosis, and Juvenile Performance of Four Closely Related Species of Tropical Sea Urchins (Genus Echinometra)

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, M. Aminur; Yusoff, Fatimah Md.; Arshad, A.; Uehara, Tsuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    We report here, the effects of extended competency on larval survival, metamorphosis, and postlarval juvenile growth of four closely related species of tropical sea urchins, Echinometra sp. A (Ea), E. mathaei (Em), Echinometra sp. C (Ec), and E. oblonga (Eo). Planktotrophic larvae of all four species fed on cultured phytoplankton (Chaetoceros gracilis) attained metamorphic competence within 22–24 days after fertilization. Competent larvae were forced to delay metamorphosis for up to 5 months by preventing them from settling in culture bottles with continuous stirring on a set of 10?rpm rotating rollers and larval survival per monthly intervals was recorded. Larval survival was highest at 24 days, when competence was attained (0 delayed period), and there were no significant differences among the four species. Larvae that had experienced a prolonged delay had reduced survival rate, metamorphosis success, and juvenile survival, but among older larvae, Em had the highest success followed by Ea, Eo, and Ec. Juveniles from larvae of all four species that metamorphosed soon after becoming competent tended to have higher growth rates (test diameter and length of spines) than juveniles from larvae that metamorphosed after a prolonged period of competence with progressively slower growth the longer the prolonged period. Despite the adverse effects of delaying metamorphosis on growth parameters, competent larvae of all four species were able to survive up to 5 months and after metamorphosis grew into 1-month-old juveniles in lab condition. Overall, delayed larvae of Em showed significantly higher larval survival, metamorphosis, and juvenile survival than Ea and Eo, while Ec showed the lowest values in these performances. Em has the most widespread distribution of these species ranging from Africa to Hawaii, while Ec probably has the most restricted distribution. Consequently, differences in distribution may be related to differences in the ability to delay metamorphosis. PMID:24624048

  8. Conceptual Design for the Amphibian Research and Monitoring Initiative (ARMI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglin, W. A.; Langtimm, C. A.; Adams, M. J.; Gallant, A. L.; James, D. L.

    2001-12-01

    In 2000, the President of the United States (US) and Congress directed Department of Interior (DOI) agencies to develop a program for monitoring trends in amphibian populations on DOI lands and to conduct research into causes of declines. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) was given lead responsibility for planning and implementing the Amphibian Research and Monitoring Initiative (ARMI) in cooperation with the National Park Service (NPS), Fish and Wildlife Service, and Bureau of Land Management. The program objectives are to (1) establish a network for monitoring the status and distribution of amphibian species on DOI lands; (2) identify and monitor environmental conditions known to affect amphibian populations; (3) conduct research on causes of amphibian population change and malformations; and (4) provide information to resource managers, policy makers, and the public in support of amphibian conservation. The ARMI program will integrate research efforts of USGS, other Federal, and non-federal herpetologists, hydrologists, and geographers across the Nation. ARMI will conduct a small number (~20) of intensive research efforts (for example, studies linking amphibian population changes to hydrologic conditions) and a larger number (~50) of more generalized inventory and monitoring studies encompassing broader areas such as NPS units. ARMI will coordinate with and try to augment other amphibian inventory studies such as the National Amphibian Atlas and the North American Amphibian Monitoring Program. ARMI will develop and test protocols for the standardized collection of amphibian data and provide a centrally managed database designed to simplify data entry, retrieval, and analysis. ARMI pilot projects are underway at locations across the US.

  9. Rapid Response to Evaluate the Presence of Amphibian Chytrid Fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis) and Ranavirus in Wild Amphibian Populations in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Kolby, Jonathan E.; Smith, Kristine M.; Ramirez, Sara D.; Rabemananjara, Falitiana; Pessier, Allan P.; Brunner, Jesse L.; Goldberg, Caren S.; Berger, Lee; Skerratt, Lee F.

    2015-01-01

    We performed a rapid response investigation to evaluate the presence and distribution of amphibian pathogens in Madagascar following our identification of amphibian chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, Bd) and ranavirus in commercially exported amphibians. This targeted risk-based field surveillance program was conducted from February to April 2014 encompassing 12 regions and 47 survey sites. We simultaneously collected amphibian and environmental samples to increase survey sensitivity and performed sampling both in wilderness areas and commercial amphibian trade facilities. Bd was not detected in any of 508 amphibian skin swabs or 68 water filter samples, suggesting pathogen prevalence was below 0.8%, with 95% confidence during our visit. Ranavirus was detected in 5 of 97 amphibians, including one adult Mantidactylus cowanii and three unidentified larvae from Ranomafana National Park, and one adult Mantidactylus mocquardi from Ankaratra. Ranavirus was also detected in water samples collected from two commercial amphibian export facilities. We also provide the first report of an amphibian mass-mortality event observed in wild amphibians in Madagascar. Although neither Bd nor ranavirus appeared widespread in Madagascar during this investigation, additional health surveys are required to disentangle potential seasonal variations in pathogen abundance and detectability from actual changes in pathogen distribution and rates of spread. Accordingly, our results should be conservatively interpreted until a comparable survey effort during winter months has been performed. It is imperative that biosecurity practices be immediately adopted to limit the unintentional increased spread of disease through the movement of contaminated equipment or direct disposal of contaminated material from wildlife trade facilities. The presence of potentially introduced strains of ranaviruses suggests that Madagascar's reptile species might also be threatened by disease. Standardized population monitoring of key amphibian and reptile species should be established with urgency to enable early detection of potential impacts of disease emergence in this global biodiversity hotspot. PMID:26083349

  10. 50 CFR 17.43 - Special rules-amphibians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Special rules-amphibians. 17.43 Section 17.43 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Special rules—amphibians. (a) San Marcos salamander (Eurycea nana). (1) All provisions of § 17.31 apply...

  11. 50 CFR 17.43 - Special rules-amphibians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special rules-amphibians. 17.43 Section 17.43 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Special rules—amphibians. (a) San Marcos salamander (Eurycea nana). (1) All provisions of § 17.31 apply...

  12. 50 CFR 17.43 - Special rules-amphibians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Special rules-amphibians. 17.43 Section 17.43 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Special rules—amphibians. (a) San Marcos salamander (Eurycea nana). (1) All provisions of § 17.31 apply...

  13. Amphibians and Reptiles from Paramakatoi and Kato, Guyana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacCulloch, Ross D.; Reynolds, Robert P.

    2012-01-01

    We report the herpetofauna of two neighboring upland locations in west-central Guyana. Twenty amphibian and 24 reptile species were collected. Only 40% of amphibians and 12.5% of reptiles were collected in both locations. This is one of the few collections made at upland (750–800 m) locations in the Guiana Shield.

  14. Incorporating Amphibian Malformations into Inquiry-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talley, Brooke L.

    2007-01-01

    Amphibians, a class of vertebrates consisting of frogs and toads, salamanders, and caecilians, are excellent organisms for middle school science students to study because of their ecological significance. Because they exchange oxygen and carbon dioxide through their skin, amphibians absorb any chemicals or substances present in their immediate…

  15. 50 CFR 17.43 - Special rules-amphibians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Special rules-amphibians. 17.43 Section 17.43 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Special rules—amphibians. (a) San Marcos salamander (Eurycea nana). (1) All provisions of § 17.31 apply...

  16. Amphibian Oasis: Designing and Building a Schoolyard Pond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gosselin, Heather; Johnson, Bob

    1996-01-01

    Building a pond in a schoolyard is a rewarding way to help boost local populations of amphibians, to increase the natural value of school grounds, and to serve as a locale for observing the life cycles of plants, invertebrates, and amphibians. This article outlines important considerations in designing and building a pond from siting through…

  17. All about Amphibians. Animal Life for Children. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This videotape teaches children about their favorite amphibious creatures, as well as amphibians' nearest cousins--toads, newts, and salamanders. Young students discover how these amazing creatures can live both in and out of water, learn about the amphibious life cycle, and compare the differences between amphibians and reptiles. This videotape…

  18. 50 CFR 17.43 - Special rules-amphibians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Special rules-amphibians. 17.43 Section 17.43 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Special rules—amphibians. (a) San Marcos salamander (Eurycea nana). (1) All provisions of § 17.31 apply...

  19. MOJAVE DESERT SPRING: THE AMPHIBIAN POINT OF VIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous springs are scattered throughout the eastern Mojave Desert, most of which are concentrated near the bases of mountain ranges. Spring-fed wetlands in this region comprise nearly all the available habitat for amphibians. We surveyed 128 springs for amphibians and habitat t...

  20. BIOACCUMULATION AND MATERNAL TRANSFER OF MERCURY AND SELENIUM IN AMPHIBIANS

    E-print Network

    Hopkins, William A.

    BIOACCUMULATION AND MATERNAL TRANSFER OF MERCURY AND SELENIUM IN AMPHIBIANS CHRISTINE M. BERGERON toxicity to other wildlife, and complex relationships with other elements, such as selenium (Se. 2010;29:989­997. # 2010 SETAC Keywords--Amphibians Mercury Methylmercury Selenium Maternal transfer

  1. AMPHIBIAN DECLINES AND ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE IN THE EASTERN "MOJAVE DESERT"

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of amphibian species historically inhabited sparsely distributed wetlands in the Mojave Desert, USA, habitats that have been dramatically altered or eliminated as a result of human activities. The population status and distribution of amphibians were investigated in a 20...

  2. Xenopus laevis Müllerian ducts are sensitive indicators of estrogenic or androgenic chemical exposure in vivo (poster presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Larval Amphibian Growth and Development Assay (LAGDA) is one of a series of Tier 2 test guidelines developed by the US EPA under the Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program. The LAGDA was designed to evaluate effects on growth, thyroid-mediated amphibian metamorphosis and repr...

  3. Topoisomerase Assays

    PubMed Central

    Nitiss, John L.; Soans, Eroica; Rogojina, Anna; Seth, Aman; Mishina, Margarita

    2012-01-01

    Topoisomerases are nuclear enzymes that play essential roles in DNA replication, transcription, chromosome segregation, and recombination. All cells have two major forms of topoisomerases: type I, which makes single-stranded cuts in DNA, and type II enzymes, which cut and pass double-stranded DNA. DNA topoisomerases are important targets of approved and experimental anti-cancer agents. The protocols described in this unit are of assays used to assess new chemical entities for their ability to inhibit both forms of DNA topoisomerase. Included are an in vitro assay for topoisomerase I activity based on relaxation of supercoiled DNA and an assay for topoisomerase II based on the decatenation of double-stranded DNA. The preparation of mammalian cell extracts for assaying topoisomerase activity is described, along with a protocol for an ICE assay for examining topoisomerase covalent complexes in vivo and an assay for measuring DNA cleavage in vitro. PMID:22684721

  4. Ligand binding pocket function of drosophila USP is necessary for metamorphosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The widely accepted paradigm that epoxidized methyl farnesoates (“juvenile hormones,” JHs) are the principle sesquiterpenoid hormones regulating insect metamorphosis was assessed in Drosophila melanogaster. GC-MS analysis showed that methyl farnesoate, rather than methyl epoxyfarnesoate (= JH III), ...

  5. Salamander Blue-sensitive Cones Lost During Metamorphosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Znoiko, Sergey; DeGrip, Willem J.; Crouch, Rosalie K.; Ma, Jian-xing

    2009-01-01

    The tiger salamander lives in shallow water with bright light in the aquatic phase, and in dim tunnels or caves in the terrestrial phase. In the aquatic phase, there are five types of photoreceptors—two types of rods and three types of cones. Our previous studies showed that the green rods and blue-sensitive cones contain the same visual pigment and have the same absorbance spectra; however, the green rods have a larger photon-catch area and thus have higher light sensitivity than the blue-sensitive cones. Here we show that after metamorphosis, the terrestrial salamander looses the blue-sensitive cones, while the density of the green rods increases. Moreover, the size of the green rod outer segments is increased in the terrestrial phase, compared to that in the aquatic phase. This switch from the blue-sensitive cones to the green rods may represent an adaptation to the dim light environment of the terrestrial phase. PMID:18331398

  6. Is there Supernova Evidence for Dark Energy Metamorphosis ?

    E-print Network

    Alam, U; Saini, T D; Starobinsky, A A; Alam, Ujjaini; Sahni, Varun; Saini, Tarun Deep

    2003-01-01

    We reconstruct the equation of state w(z) of dark energy (DE) using a recently released data set containing 172 type Ia supernovae without imposing any priors on w(z) (in contrast to previous studies). We find that dark energy evolves rapidly and metamorphoses from dust-like behaviour at high z ($w \\simeq 0$ at $z \\sim 1$) to a strongly negative equation of state at present ($w \\lleq -1$ at $z \\simeq 0$). Dark energy metamorphosis appears to be a robust phenomenon which manifests for a large variety of Sn data samples provided one does not invoke the weak energy prior $\\rho + p \\geq 0$. Invoking this prior considerably weakens the rate of growth of w(z). These results demonstrate that dark energy with an evolving equation of state provides a compelling alternative to a cosmological constant if data are analysed in a prior-free manner and the weak energy condition is not imposed by hand.

  7. Is there Supernova Evidence for Dark Energy Metamorphosis ?

    E-print Network

    Ujjaini Alam; Varun Sahni; Tarun Deep Saini; A. A. Starobinsky

    2004-07-10

    We reconstruct the equation of state $w(z)$ of dark energy (DE) using a recently released data set containing 172 type Ia supernovae without assuming the prior $w(z) \\geq -1$ (in contrast to previous studies). We find that dark energy evolves rapidly and metamorphoses from dust-like behaviour at high $z$ ($w \\simeq 0$ at $z \\sim 1$) to a strongly negative equation of state at present ($w \\lleq -1$ at $z \\simeq 0$). Dark energy metamorphosis appears to be a robust phenomenon which manifests for a large variety of SNe data samples provided one does not invoke the weak energy prior $\\rho + p \\geq 0$. Invoking this prior considerably weakens the rate of growth of $w(z)$. These results demonstrate that dark energy with an evolving equation of state provides a compelling alternative to a cosmological constant if data are analysed in a prior-free manner and the weak energy condition is not imposed by hand.

  8. Coupling constant metamorphosis, the Staeckel transform and superintegrability

    SciTech Connect

    Post, Sarah

    2010-12-23

    This paper is dedicated to the memory of Marcos Moshinsky. In this paper, we discuss the important role that coupling constant metamorphosis (CCM) and the Staeckel transform have played in the analysis of superintegrable systems. We explain the relation between the two and in particular show that they coincide when transforming between second-order superintegrable systems. Unlike in the case of second-order superintegrability, the quantum analog of CCM has only been proven for a subclass of systems with integrals of a specific form. We give the proof and as an application show the mapping of a family of superintegrable deformations of the simple harmonic oscillator to an associated family of superintegrable deformations of the Kepler-Coulomb potential.

  9. Partners in amphibian and reptile conservation 2013 annual report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conrad, Paulette M., (Edited By); Weir, Linda A.; Nanjappa, Priya

    2014-01-01

    Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation (PARC) was established in 1999 to address the widespread declines, extinctions, and range reductions of amphibians and reptiles, with a focus on conservation of taxa and habitats in North America. Amphibians and reptiles are affected by a broad range of human activities, both as incidental effects of habitat alteration and direct effect from overexploitation; these animals are also challenged by the perception that amphibians and reptiles are either dangerous or of little environmental or economic value. However, PARC members understand these taxa are important parts of our natural an cultural heritage and they serve important roles in ecosystems throughout the world. With many amphibians and reptiles classified as threatened with extinction, conservation of these animals has never been more important.

  10. Nitric Oxide Acts as a Positive Regulator to Induce Metamorphosis of the Ascidian Herdmania momus

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Nobuo; Degnan, Sandie M.

    2013-01-01

    Marine invertebrates commonly have a biphasic life cycle in which the metamorphic transition from a pelagic larva to a benthic post-larva is mediated by the nitric oxide signalling pathway. Nitric oxide (NO) is synthesised by nitric oxide synthase (NOS), which is a client protein of the molecular chaperon heat shock protein 90 (HSP90). It is notable, then, that both NO and HSP90 have been implicated in regulating metamorphosis in marine invertebrates as diverse as urochordates, echinoderms, molluscs, annelids, and crustaceans. Specifically, the suppression of NOS activity by the application of either NOS- or HSP90-inhibiting pharmacological agents has been shown consistently to induce the initiation of metamorphosis, leading to the hypothesis that a negative regulatory role of NO is widely conserved in biphasic life cycles. Further, the induction of metamorphosis by heat-shock has been demonstrated for multiple species. Here, we investigate the regulatory role of NO in induction of metamorphosis of the solitary tropical ascidian, Herdmania momus. By coupling pharmacological treatments with analysis of HmNOS and HmHSP90 gene expression, we present compelling evidence of a positive regulatory role for NO in metamorphosis of this species, in contrast to all existing ascidian data that supports the hypothesis of NO as a conserved negative regulator of metamorphosis. The exposure of competent H. momus larvae to a NOS inhibitor or an NO donor results in an up-regulation of NOS and HSP90 genes. Heat shock of competent larvae induces metamorphosis in a temperature dependent manner, up to a thermal tolerance that approaches 35°C. Both larval/post-larval survival and the appearance of abnormal morphologies in H. momus post-larvae reflect the magnitude of up-regulation of the HSP90 gene in response to heat-shock. The demonstrated role of NO as a positive metamorphic regulator in H. momus suggests the existence of inter-specific adaptations of NO regulation in ascidian metamorphosis. PMID:24019877

  11. Langerhans-like cells in amphibian epidermis.

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo-Farga, J; Castell, A; Pérez, A; Rondán, A

    1990-01-01

    Langerhans cells have been described in epidermis and other stratified epithelia of mammals. In other vertebrates equivalent cells have not been found. Amphibians show skin graft rejection, so it is possible that these animals have epidermal cells homologous to Langerhans cells. In this work we demonstrate the existence of ATPase-positive dendritic cells in frog epidermis that are similar ultrastructurally to mammalian Langerhans cells, except for the absence of Birbeck granules. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:2148747

  12. Cool Temperatures Reduce Antifungal Activity of Symbiotic Bacteria of Threatened Amphibians – Implications for Disease Management and Patterns of Decline

    PubMed Central

    Daskin, Joshua H.; Bell, Sara C.; Schwarzkopf, Lin; Alford, Ross A.

    2014-01-01

    Chytridiomycosis, caused by the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), is a widespread disease of amphibians responsible for population declines and extinctions. Some bacteria from amphibians’ skins produce antimicrobial substances active against Bd. Supplementing populations of these cutaneous antifungal bacteria might help manage chytridiomycosis in wild amphibians. However, the activity of protective bacteria may depend upon environmental conditions. Biocontrol of Bd in nature thus requires knowledge of how environmental conditions affect their anti-Bd activity. For example, Bd-driven amphibian declines have often occurred at temperatures below Bd’s optimum range. It is possible these declines occurred due to reduced anti-Bd activity of bacterial symbionts at cool temperatures. Better understanding of the effects of temperature on chytridiomycosis development could also improve risk evaluation for amphibian populations yet to encounter Bd. We characterized, at a range of temperatures approximating natural seasonal variation, the anti-Bd activity of bacterial symbionts from the skins of three species of rainforest tree frogs (Litoria nannotis, Litoria rheocola, and Litoria serrata). All three species declined during chytridiomycosis outbreaks in the late 1980s and early 1990s and have subsequently recovered to differing extents. We collected anti-Bd bacterial symbionts from frogs and cultured the bacteria at constant temperatures from 8°C to 33°C. Using a spectrophotometric assay, we monitored Bd growth in cell-free supernatants (CFSs) from each temperature treatment. CFSs from 11 of 24 bacteria showed reduced anti-Bd activity in vitro when they were produced at cool temperatures similar to those encountered by the host species during population declines. Reduced anti-Bd activity of metabolites produced at low temperatures may, therefore, partially explain the association between Bd-driven declines and cool temperatures. We show that to avoid inconsistent antifungal activity, bacteria evaluated for use in chytridiomycosis biocontrol should be tested over a range of environmental temperatures spanning those likely to be encountered in the field. PMID:24941262

  13. Coincident mass extirpation of neotropical amphibians with the emergence of the infectious fungal pathogen

    E-print Network

    Wake, David B.

    Coincident mass extirpation of neotropical amphibians with the emergence of the infectious fungal) Amphibians highlight the global biodiversity crisis because 40% of all amphibian species are currently by histology. We examined specimens collected before, during, and after major amphibian decline events at estab

  14. Amphibian populations around the world are declining at alarming rates, but the causes of

    E-print Network

    Hopkins, William A.

    Amphibian populations around the world are declining at alarming rates, but the causes of most success in amphibians. Developmental pathways in embryonic amphibians can be altered when embryos exposure has formed the foundation for the only widely accepted standardized amphibian toxicity test (frog

  15. 2003 Blackwell Publishing Ltd. http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/ddi 151 SPECIAL ISSUE: AMPHIBIAN DECLINES

    E-print Network

    Storfer, Andrew

    : AMPHIBIAN DECLINES Diversity and Distributions (2003) 9, 151­163 Blackwell Science, Ltd Amphibian declines 99164­4236, U.S.A. E-mail: astorfer@wsu.edu Abstract. The amphibian decline problem is complex amphibian populations. First, a statistically sensitive moni- toring approach is necessary to determine

  16. Human land use and patterns of parasitism in tropical amphibian hosts

    E-print Network

    McKenzie, Valerie

    Human land use and patterns of parasitism in tropical amphibian hosts Valerie J. Mc: Amphibian Parasite Land use Tropics Forest Pasture A B S T R A C T Landscape alterations by humans can amphibians was associated with land use change, I studied three species of amphibians, Rana vaillanti

  17. Historical perspective: Hormonal regulation of behaviors in amphibians Frank L. Moorea,*, Sunny K. Boydb

    E-print Network

    Kelley, Darcy B.

    Historical perspective: Hormonal regulation of behaviors in amphibians Frank L. Moorea,*, Sunny K Abstract This review focuses on research into the hormonal control of behaviors in amphibians behaviors in adult amphibians, but causal relationships are not as well established in amphibians

  18. Global gene expression profiles for life stages of the deadly amphibian pathogen

    E-print Network

    Rosenblum, Erica Bree

    Global gene expression profiles for life stages of the deadly amphibian pathogen Batrachochytrium by the Editorial Board September 8, 2008 (received for review April 30, 2008) Amphibians around the world are being. amphibian population decline chytrid fungal pathogenicity genomics Amphibian populations around the world

  19. Short Communication Amphibian-killing fungus loses genetic diversity as it spreads across the New World

    E-print Network

    Zamudio, Kelly R.

    Short Communication Amphibian-killing fungus loses genetic diversity as it spreads across the New December 2011 Available online 29 December 2011 Keywords: Amphibian declines Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis to identify factors driving disease out- breaks. Amphibian chytridiomycosis is a recently emerged amphibian

  20. Chemoreceptive Control of Ventilation in Amphibians and Air-Breathinq Fishes

    E-print Network

    Burggren, Warren

    7 Chemoreceptive Control of Ventilation in Amphibians and Air-Breathinq Fishes Warren Burggren in amphibians andair-breathing fishes. Additionally. the vital role in modulating ventilatory responses-LIKE ~~~~~ ORGANS ~ (non- pulmonary origin) amphibian species dwell in water (e.g. the anuran amphibians

  1. Current extinction rates of reptiles and amphibians.

    PubMed

    Alroy, John

    2015-10-20

    There is broad concern that a mass extinction of amphibians and reptiles is now underway. Here I apply an extremely conservative Bayesian method to estimate the number of recent amphibian and squamate extinctions in nine important tropical and subtropical regions. The data stem from a combination of museum collection databases and published site surveys. The method computes an extinction probability for each species by considering its sighting frequency and last sighting date. It infers hardly any extinction when collection dates are randomized and it provides underestimates when artificial extinction events are imposed. The method also appears to be insensitive to trends in sampling; therefore, the counts it provides are absolute minimums. Extinctions or severe population crashes have accumulated steadily since the 1970s and 1980s, and at least 3.1% of frog species have already disappeared. Based on these data and this conservative method, the best estimate of the global grand total is roughly 200 extinctions. Consistent with previous results, frog losses are heavy in Latin America, which has been greatly affected by the pathogenic chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis. Extinction rates are now four orders-of-magnitude higher than background, and at least another 6.9% of all frog species may be lost within the next century, even if there is no acceleration in the growth of environmental threats. PMID:26438855

  2. Nitrogen pollution: an assessment of its threat to amphibian survival.

    PubMed Central

    Rouse, J D; Bishop, C A; Struger, J

    1999-01-01

    The potential for nitrate to affect amphibian survival was evaluated by examining the areas in North America where concentrations of nitrate in water occur above amphibian toxicity thresholds. Nitrogen pollution from anthropogenic sources enters bodies of water through agricultural runoff or percolation associated with nitrogen fertilization, livestock, precipitation, and effluents from industrial and human wastes. Environmental concentrations of nitrate in watersheds throughout North America range from < 1 to > 100 mg/L. Of the 8,545 water quality samples collected from states and provinces bordering the Great Lakes, 19.8% contained nitrate concentrations exceeding those which can cause sublethal effects in amphibians. In the laboratory lethal and sublethal effects in amphibians are detected at nitrate concentrations between 2.5 and 100 mg/L. Furthermore, amphibian prey such as insects and predators of amphibians such as fish are also sensitive to these elevated levels of nitrate. From this we conclude that nitrate concentrations in some watersheds in North America are high enough to cause death and developmental anomalies in amphibians and impact other animals in aquatic ecosystems. In some situations, the use of vegetated buffer strips adjacent to water courses can reduce nitrogen contamination of surface waters. Ultimately, there is a need to reduce runoff, sewage effluent discharge, and the use of fertilizers, and to establish and enforce water quality guidelines for nitrate for the protection of aquatic organisms. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10504145

  3. Orchestrating change: The thyroid hormones and GI-tract development in flatfish metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Gomes, A S; Alves, R N; Rřnnestad, I; Power, D M

    2015-09-01

    Metamorphosis in flatfish (Pleuronectiformes) is a late post-embryonic developmental event that prepares the organism for the larval-to-juvenile transition. Thyroid hormones (THs) play a central role in flatfish metamorphosis and the basic elements that constitute the thyroid axis in vertebrates are all present at this stage. The advantage of using flatfish to study the larval-to-juvenile transition is the profound change in external morphology that accompanies metamorphosis making it easy to track progression to climax. This important lifecycle transition is underpinned by molecular, cellular, structural and functional modifications of organs and tissues that prepare larvae for a successful transition to the adult habitat and lifestyle. Understanding the role of THs in the maturation of organs and tissues with diverse functions during metamorphosis is a major challenge. The change in diet that accompanies the transition from a pelagic larvae to a benthic juvenile in flatfish is associated with structural and functional modifications in the gastrointestinal tract (GI-tract). The present review will focus on the maturation of the GI-tract during metamorphosis giving particular attention to organogenesis of the stomach a TH triggered event. Gene transcripts and biological processes that are associated with GI-tract maturation during Atlantic halibut metamorphosis are identified. Gene ontology analysis reveals core biological functions and putative TH-responsive genes that underpin TH-driven metamorphosis of the GI-tract in Atlantic halibut. Deciphering the specific role remains a challenge. Recent advances in characterizing the molecular, structural and functional modifications that accompany the appearance of a functional stomach in Atlantic halibut are considered and future research challenges identified. PMID:24975541

  4. MiR-2 family regulates insect metamorphosis by controlling the juvenile hormone signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Belles, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    In 2009 we reported that depletion of Dicer-1, the enzyme that catalyzes the final step of miRNA biosynthesis, prevents metamorphosis in Blattella germanica. However, the precise regulatory roles of miRNAs in the process have remained elusive. In the present work, we have observed that Dicer-1 depletion results in an increase of mRNA levels of Krüppel homolog 1 (Kr-h1), a juvenile hormone-dependent transcription factor that represses metamorphosis, and that depletion of Kr-h1 expression in Dicer-1 knockdown individuals rescues metamorphosis. We have also found that the 3?UTR of Kr-h1 mRNA contains a functional binding site for miR-2 family miRNAs (for miR-2, miR-13a, and miR-13b). These data suggest that metamorphosis impairment caused by Dicer-1 and miRNA depletion is due to a deregulation of Kr-h1 expression and that this deregulation is derived from a deficiency of miR-2 miRNAs. We corroborated this by treating the last nymphal instar of B. germanica with an miR-2 inhibitor, which impaired metamorphosis, and by treating Dicer-1-depleted individuals with an miR-2 mimic to allow nymphal-to-adult metamorphosis to proceed. Taken together, the data indicate that miR-2 miRNAs scavenge Kr-h1 transcripts when the transition from nymph to adult should be taking place, thus crucially contributing to the correct culmination of metamorphosis. PMID:25775510

  5. ASSESSMENT OF THE RISK OF SOLAR ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION TO AMPHIBIANS. II: IN SITU CHARACTERIZATION OF SOLAR ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION IN AMPHIBIAN HABITATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation has been hypothesized as a potential cause of amphibian population declines and increased incidences of malformations. Realistic studies documenting UV irradiance or dose have rarely been conducted in wetlands used by amphibians. We demonstrate that ...

  6. RAS Assays

    Cancer.gov

    The proportion of oncogenic mutants of KRAS proteins that are in the "active" (GTP-bound) form is far higher than that of wild-type RAS proteins. Scientists at the National Lab are developing high-throughput in vitro assays to measure interactions of GTP-loaded KRAS and effectors, such as CRAF and calmodulin, as well as imaging assays that can detect oncogenic KRAS interactions inside cells.

  7. Exposure to sublethal concentrations of a pesticide or predator cues induces changes in brain architecture in larval amphibians.

    PubMed

    Woodley, Sarah K; Mattes, Brian M; Yates, Erika K; Relyea, Rick A

    2015-11-01

    Naturally occurring environmental factors shape developmental trajectories to produce variable phenotypes. Such developmental phenotypic plasticity can have important effects on fitness, and has been demonstrated for numerous behavioral and morphological traits. However, surprisingly few studies have examined developmental plasticity of the nervous system in response to naturally occurring environmental variation, despite accumulating evidence for neuroplasticity in a variety of organisms. Here, we asked whether the brain is developmentally plastic by exposing larval amphibians to natural and anthropogenic factors. Leopard frog tadpoles were exposed to predator cues, reduced food availability, or sublethal concentrations of the pesticide chlorpyrifos in semi-natural enclosures. Mass, growth, survival, activity, larval period, external morphology, brain mass, and brain morphology were measured in tadpoles and after metamorphosis. Tadpoles in the experimental treatments had lower masses than controls, although developmental rates and survival were similar. Tadpoles exposed to predator cues or a high dose of chlorpyrifos had altered body shapes compared to controls. In addition, brains from tadpoles exposed to predator cues or a low dose of chlorpyrifos were narrower and shorter in several dimensions compared to control tadpoles and tadpoles with low food availability. Interestingly, the changes in brain morphology present at the tadpole stage did not persist in the metamorphs. Our results show that brain morphology is a developmentally plastic trait that is responsive to ecologically relevant natural and anthropogenic factors. Whether these effects on brain morphology are linked to performance or fitness is unknown. PMID:26169394

  8. Amphibian fertilization and development in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Souza, K. A.; Black, S. D.

    1985-01-01

    An experiment investigating the effects of gravity on embryonic development in amphibians is proposed. The planned procedures for the preparation of the frog eggs for launching in the Space Shuttle, for the injection of the eggs with gonadotropin, for the insertion of the eggs into egg chambers, for the storage of one of the chambers in a microgravity area and the second into a centrifuge, and for the fertilization of the eggs are described. The later organogenesis, swimming behavior, cytoplasmic components, cellular formation, neural plate and archenteron expansion, and allometry and expansion of the organ systems will be examined. Normal morphology for embryos and tadpoles developing at microgravity and the formation of the neural plate opposite the sperm entry point meridian are predicted.

  9. Specification of regional intestinal stem cell identity during Drosophila metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Driver, Ian; Ohlstein, Benjamin

    2014-05-01

    In the adult Drosophila midgut the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling pathway is required to specify and maintain the acid-secreting region of the midgut known as the copper cell region (CCR). BMP signaling is also involved in the modulation of intestinal stem cell (ISC) proliferation in response to injury. How ISCs are able to respond to the same signaling pathway in a regionally different manner is currently unknown. Here, we show that dual use of the BMP signaling pathway in the midgut is possible because BMP signals are only capable of transforming ISC and enterocyte identity during a defined window of metamorphosis. ISC heterogeneity is established prior to adulthood and then maintained in cooperation with regional signals from surrounding tissue. Our data provide a conceptual framework for how other tissues maintained by regional stem cells might be patterned and establishes the pupal and adult midgut as a novel genetic platform for identifying genes necessary for regional stem cell specification and maintenance. PMID:24700821

  10. Frederick Sanger, Erwin Chargaff, and the metamorphosis of specificity.

    PubMed

    Judson, H F

    1993-12-15

    That a transformation of ruling ideas in genetics and biochemistry took place at the dawn of molecular biology, in the late 1940s, is a commonplace; but the nature and components of that transformation are widely misunderstood. The change is often identified with the importation into biology of new styles of thought and new rigor by the many scientists trained in physics or chemistry who came into the nascent field--notably, Max Delbrück, Max Perutz, Francis Crick, John Kendrew, Maurice Wilkins, Rosalind Franklin. Most generally, the change is supposed to be the realization that genes are made not of protein but of nucleic acid--and this change was initiated, of course, by the work of Oswald Avery and his colleagues. These changes are not mutually exclusive, and both were surely important to the genesis of molecular biology. But logically prior to them, more fundamental, was another transformation in ruling preconceptions, one that has been neglected: the revolution in understanding of the chemical structures--the sequences of subunits--of proteins and of nucleic acids which was wrought by the work of Frederick Sanger and of Erwin Chargaff. This was a metamorphosis in the understanding of biochemical specificity, and while it astonished many biochemists it set free the small groups of those who were beginning to call themselves molecular biologists, enabling them to think of the relationship between genes and proteins in entirely new ways. PMID:8276259

  11. Nebular metamorphosis during the post-AGB phase: multiwavelength studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez Contreras, C.

    2011-11-01

    The processes that lead to the formation of Planetary Nebula (PN), through the short intermediate stage of pre-PN, are complex and poorly known. The biggest challenge in the study of PN formation is understanding the origin of the remarkable morphological and kinematical differences between the circumstellar envelopes (CSEs) around Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars, which result from the star mass-loss process during the AGB, and their more evolved counterparts, PPNe and PNe. While AGB CSEs expand isotropically at low velocity (about 5-15 km/s), most PPNe and PNe have clear departures from sphericity and show fast (>100 km/s) bipolar or multipolar outflows. This spectacular metamorphosis is believed to be governed by the interaction between fast, collimated post-AGB winds (or jets), and the slow AGB CSE. In this presentation, I will review these late stages of the evolution of solar type stars and will describe some common observational techniques used to characterize the different nebular components in these objects.

  12. CHARACTERIZATION OF RELATIVE SENSITIVITY OF AMPHIBIANS TO ULTRA VIOLET RADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Different studies have demonstrated that solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation can adversely affect survival and development of embryonic and larval amphibians. However, because of among-laboratory variations in exposure profiles (artificial vs. natural sunlight; natural sunlight at d...

  13. CHARACTERIZATION OF RELATIVE SENSITIVITY OF AMPHIBIANS TO ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Different studies have demonstrated that solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation can adversely affect survival and development of embryonic and larval amphibians. However, because of among-laboratory variations in exposure profiles (artificial vs. natural sunlight; natural sunlight at d...

  14. ALIEN SPECIES: THEIR ROLE IN AMPHIBIAN POPULATION DECLINES AND RESTORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alien species (also referred to as exotic, invasive, introduced, or normative species) have been implicated as causal agents in population declines of many amphibian species. Herein, we evaluate the relative contributions of alien species and other factors in adversely affecting ...

  15. A database of life-history traits of European amphibians

    PubMed Central

    Moulherat, Sylvain; Calvez, Olivier; Stevens, Virginie M; Clobert, Jean; Schmeller, Dirk S

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In the current context of climate change and landscape fragmentation, efficient conservation strategies require the explicit consideration of life history traits. This is particularly true for amphibians, which are highly threatened worldwide, composed by more than 7400 species, which is constitute one of the most species-rich vertebrate groups. The collection of information on life history traits is difficult due to the ecology of species and remoteness of their habitats. It is therefore not surprising that our knowledge is limited, and missing information on certain life history traits are common for in this species group. We compiled data on amphibian life history traits from literature in an extensive database with morphological and behavioral traits, habitat preferences and movement abilities for 86 European amphibian species (50 Anuran and 36 Urodela species). When it were available, we reported data for males, females, juveniles and tadpoles. Our database may serve as an important starting point for further analyses regarding amphibian conservation. PMID:25425939

  16. An alternative framework for responding to the amphibian crisis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muths, Erin L.; Fisher, Robert N.

    2015-01-01

    Volumes of data illustrate the severity of the crisis affecting amphibians, where > 32% of amphibians worldwide are threatened with declining populations. Although there have been isolated victories, the current approach to the issue is unsuccessful. We suggest that a radically different approach, something akin to human emergency response management (i.e. the Incident Command System), is one alternative to addressing the inertia and lack of cohesion in responding to amphibian issues. We acknowledge existing efforts and the useful research that has been conducted, but we suggest that a change is warranted and that the identification of a new amphibian chytrid provides the impetus for such a change. Our goal is to recognize that without a centralized effort we (collectively) are likely to fail in responding to this challenge.

  17. Metabolism of pesticides after dermal exposure to amphibians

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding how pesticide exposure to non-target species influences toxicity is necessary to accurately assess the ecological risks these compounds pose. Aquatic, terrestrial, and arboreal amphibians are often exposed to pesticides during their agricultural application resultin...

  18. Checklist of Helminth parasites of Amphibians from South America.

    PubMed

    Campiăo, Karla Magalhăes; Morais, Drausio Honorio; Dias, Olívia Tavares; Aguiar, Aline; Toledo, Gislayne; Tavares, Luiz Eduardo Roland; Da Silva, Reinaldo José

    2014-01-01

    Parasitological studies on helminths of amphibians in South America have increased in the past few years. Here, we present a list with summarized data published on helminths of South American amphibians from 1925 to 2012, including a list of helminth parasites, host species, and geographic records. We found 194 reports of helminths parasitizing 185 amphibian species from eleven countries: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Equador, French Guyana, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay and Venezuela. Helminth biodiversity includes 278 parasite species of the groups Acanthocephala, Nematoda, Cestoda, Monogenea and Trematoda. A list of helminth parasite species per host, and references are also presented. This contribution aims to document the biodiversity of helminth parasites in South American amphibians, as well as identify gaps in our knowledge, which in turn may guide subsequent studies.  PMID:25082165

  19. Ambient UV-B radiation causes deformities in amphibian embryos

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blaustein, A.R.; Kiesecker, J.M.; Chivers, D.P.; Anthony, R.G.

    1997-01-01

    There has been a great deal of recent attention on the suspected increase in amphibian deformities. However, most reports of amphibian deformities have been anecdotal, and no experiments in the field under natural conditions have been performed to investigate this phenomenon. Under laboratory conditions, a variety of agents can induce deformities in amphibians. We investigated one of these agents, UV-B radiation, in field experiments, as a cause for amphibian deformities. We monitored hatching success and development in long-toed salamanders under UV-B shields and in regimes that allowed UV-B radiation. Embryos under UV-B shields had a significantly higher hatching rate and fewer deformities, and developed more quickly than those exposed to UV-B. Deformities may contribute directly to embryo mortality, and they may affect an individual's subsequent survival after hatching.

  20. ORIGINAL PAPER Ancient behaviors of larval amphibians in response

    E-print Network

    Blaustein, Andrew R.

    displayed by amphibian larvae: aggregation and thermoregulation. Larval aggregation behavior is often essential for foraging, thermoregulation, and antipredator defense, but varies among species or altered thermoregulation in larvae of four species we examined (Pseudacris regilla, Rana aurora, B. boreas

  1. Amphibian and Reptile Trade in Texas: Current Status and Trends 

    E-print Network

    Prestridge, Heather L.

    2010-10-12

    The non-game wildlife trade poses a risk to our natural landscape, natural heritage, economy, and security. Specifically, the trade in non-game reptiles and amphibians exploits native populations, and is likely not sustainable ...

  2. Trends in Amphibian Occupancy in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Michael J.; Miller, David A. W.; Muths, Erin; Corn, Paul Stephen; Grant, Evan H. Campbell; Bailey, Larissa L.; Fellers, Gary M.; Fisher, Robert N.; Sadinski, Walter J.; Waddle, Hardin; Walls, Susan C.

    2013-01-01

    Though a third of amphibian species worldwide are thought to be imperiled, existing assessments simply categorize extinction risk, providing little information on the rate of population losses. We conducted the first analysis of the rate of change in the probability that amphibians occupy ponds and other comparable habitat features across the United States. We found that overall occupancy by amphibians declined 3.7% annually from 2002 to 2011. Species that are Red-listed by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) declined an average of 11.6% annually. All subsets of data examined had a declining trend including species in the IUCN Least Concern category. This analysis suggests that amphibian declines may be more widespread and severe than previously realized. PMID:23717602

  3. Trends in amphibian occupancy in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, Michael J.; Miller, David A.W.; Muths, Erin; Corn, Paul Stephen; Grant, Evan H. Campbell; Bailey, Larissa L.; Fellers, Gary M.; Fisher, Robert N.; Sadinski, Walter J.; Waddle, Hardin; Walls, Susan C.

    2013-01-01

    Though a third of amphibian species worldwide are thought to be imperiled, existing assessments simply categorize extinction risk, providing little information on the rate of population losses. We conducted the first analysis of the rate of change in the probability that amphibians occupy ponds and other comparable habitat features across the United States. We found that overall occupancy by amphibians declined 3.7% annually from 2002 to 2011. Species that are Red-listed by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) declined an average of 11.6% annually. All subsets of data examined had a declining trend including species in the IUCN Least Concern category. This analysis suggests that amphibian declines may be more widespread and severe than previously realized.

  4. Metamorphosis alters contaminants and chemical tracers in insects: implications for food webs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kraus, Johanna M.; Walters, David M.; Wesner, Jeff S.; Stricker, Craig A.; Schmidt, Travis S.; Zuellig, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Insects are integral to most freshwater and terrestrial food webs, but due to their accumulation of environmental pollutants they are also contaminant vectors that threaten reproduction, development, and survival of consumers. Metamorphosis from larvae to adult can cause large chemical changes in insects, altering contaminant concentrations and fractionation of chemical tracers used to establish contaminant biomagnification in food webs, but no framework exists for predicting and managing these effects. We analyzed data from 39 studies of 68 analytes (stable isotopes and contaminants), and found that metamorphosis effects varied greatly. ?15N, widely used to estimate relative trophic position in biomagnification studies, was enriched by 1‰ during metamorphosis, while ?13C used to estimate diet, was similar in larvae and adults. Metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were predominantly lost during metamorphosis leading to 2 to 125-fold higher larval concentrations and higher exposure risks for predators of larvae compared to predators of adults. In contrast, manufactured organic contaminants (such as polychlorinated biphenyls) were retained and concentrated in adults, causing up to 3-fold higher adult concentrations and higher exposure risks to predators of adult insects. Both food web studies and contaminant management and mitigation strategies need to consider how metamorphosis affects the movement of materials between habitats and ecosystems, with special regard for aquatic-terrestrial linkages.

  5. Conceptual foundations of metamorphosis and regeneration: from historical links to common mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Dinsmore, C E

    1998-01-01

    Metamorphosis and regeneration represent two familiar examples of developmental processes. In Western thought, their conceptual link with broader issues of generation or animal reproduction, including "spontaneous generation," began with the ancient Greeks. Their ideas dominated scientific discourse on these topics until William Harvey, in the mid-17th century, redefined and distinguished between epigenesis and metamorphosis as fundamentally different modes of reproduction. However, preformation theories, formulated in response to perceived threats of epigenetic concepts to religious doctrine, eclipsed epigenesis for much of the 18th century. Abraham Trembley's 1740 discovery of hydra regeneration helped to fuel the "epigenesis-preformation debate" at that time. During that period, an exchange between C.F. Wolff, a young epigenesist, and A. von Haller, the reformed preformationist, saw robust models erected to comprehend generation, metamorphosis, and regeneration under each world view. Subsequent elaboration of experimental zoology and the incremental advance of biological knowledge saw the birth of divergent research traditions in pursuit of specialized problems. Embryology, regeneration, and metamorphosis, like genetics, identified independent study topics and elaborated new techniques, thereby creating their own research trajectories. Conceptual reintegration has slowly emerged with the evolution of current biotechnology. We have now begun to discern common molecular mechanisms underlying and reuniting metamorphosis and regeneration, as revealed in the accompanying symposium papers. PMID:9824548

  6. Effects of chemical cues on larval survival, settlement and metamorphosis of abalone Haliotis asinina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaobing; Bai, Yang; Huang, Bo

    2010-11-01

    Low larval survival, poor settlement, and abnormal metamorphosis are major problems in seed production of donkey-ear abalone Haliotis asinina. We examined the effects of chemical cues including epinephrine, nor-epinephrine, and serotonin on larval survival, settlement, and metamorphosis in order to determine the possibility of using these chemicals to induce the problems. The results show that epinephrine could enhance metamorphosis rate at 10-6 mol/L only but higher concentrations (10-3-10-4 mol/L); and nor-epinephrine could inhibit the performance significantly, and serotonin could increase significantly the performance at a wide-range concentration (10-3-10-6 mol/L). Treatment with serotonin at 10-5 mol/L for 72 hours resulted in the highest settlement rate (42.2%) and survival rate (49.3%), while at 10-4 mol/L for 72 hours resulted in the highest metamorphosis rate (38.8%). Therefore, serotonin may be used as a fast metamorphosis inducer in abalone culture.

  7. The Consequences of Metamorphosis on Salamander (Ambystoma) Locomotor Performance Author(s): H. Bradley Shaffer, C. C. Austin, R. B. Huey

    E-print Network

    Shaffer, H. Bradley

    The Consequences of Metamorphosis on Salamander (Ambystoma) Locomotor Performance Author(s): H in morphology and ecology of salamanders during metamorphosis affect many aspects of their life history. Wequantify the effects of metamorphosis on burst speed and endurance capacity on a large sample of

  8. The MEKRE93 (Methoprene tolerant-Krppel homolog 1-E93) pathway in the regulation of insect metamorphosis, and the homology

    E-print Network

    Belles, Xavier

    metamorphosis, and the homology of the pupal stage Xavier Belles a, * , Carolina G. Santos a, b a Institut de homolog 1 Broad complex Insect metamorphosis Juvenile hormone Ecdysone a b s t r a c t Recent studies the prepupal stage). © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Hormones and metamorphosis Two principal

  9. / www.sciencexpress.org / 31 July 2008 / Page 1 / 10.1126/science.1158712 During Drosophila metamorphosis, most larval cells die.

    E-print Network

    Krasnow, Mark A.

    metamorphosis, most larval cells die. Pupal and adult tissues form from imaginal cells, tissue- specific and fate mapping of single, identified cells shows that tracheal system remodeling at metamorphosis or all of larval life, then proliferate and differentiate into pupal and adult tissues at metamorphosis

  10. Image Metamorphosis Using Snakes and FreeForm Deformations SeungYong Lee y , KyungYong Chwa, Sung Yong Shin

    E-print Network

    Wolberg, George

    Image Metamorphosis Using Snakes and Free­Form Deformations Seung­Yong Lee y , Kyung­Yong Chwa transition functions to control geometry and color blending. Keywords: Image metamorphosis, morphing, snakes, multilevel free­form deformation, multilevel B­spline interpolation. 1. Introduction Image metamorphosis

  11. Broad-complex functions in postembryonic development of the cockroach Blattella germanica shed new light on the evolution of insect metamorphosis

    E-print Network

    Belles, Xavier

    light on the evolution of insect metamorphosis Jia-Hsin Huang 1 , Jesus Lozano, Xavier Belles Institute metamorphosis Juvenile hormone Ecdysone Evolution of holometaboly Drosophila Tribolium Background: Insect metamorphosis proceeds in two modes: hemimetaboly, gradual change along the life cycle; and holometaboly, abrupt

  12. Predation of Ladybird Beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) by Amphibians

    PubMed Central

    Sloggett, John J.

    2012-01-01

    Studies of predation of ladybird beetles (Coccinellidae) have focused on a limited number of predator taxa, such as birds and ants, while other potential predators have received limited attention. I here consider amphibians as predators of ladybirds. Published amphibian gut analyses show that ladybirds are quite often eaten by frogs and toads (Anura), with recorded frequencies reaching up to 15% of dietary items. Salamanders (Caudata) eat ladybirds less frequently, probably as their habits less often bring them into contact with the beetles. Amphibians do not appear to be deleteriously affected by the potentially toxic alkaloids that ladybirds possess. Amphibians, especially frogs and toads, use primarily prey movement as a release cue to attack their food; it is thus likely that their ability to discriminate against ladybirds and other chemically defended prey is limited. Because of this poor discriminatory power, amphibians have apparently evolved non-specific resistance to prey defensive chemicals, including ladybird alkaloids. Although amphibian-related ladybird mortality is limited, in certain habitats it could outweigh mortality from more frequently studied predators, notably birds. The gut analyses from the herpetological literature used in this study, suggest that in studying predation of insects, entomologists should consider specialized literature on other animal groups. PMID:26466621

  13. Global patterns of diversification in the history of modern amphibians.

    PubMed

    Roelants, Kim; Gower, David J; Wilkinson, Mark; Loader, Simon P; Biju, S D; Guillaume, Karen; Moriau, Linde; Bossuyt, Franky

    2007-01-16

    The fossil record of modern amphibians (frogs, salamanders, and caecilians) provides no evidence for major extinction or radiation episodes throughout most of the Mesozoic and early Tertiary. However, long-term gradual diversification is difficult to reconcile with the sensitivity of present-day amphibian faunas to rapid ecological changes and the incidence of similar environmental perturbations in the past that have been associated with high turnover rates in other land vertebrates. To provide a comprehensive overview of the history of amphibian diversification, we constructed a phylogenetic timetree based on a multigene data set of 3.75 kb for 171 species. Our analyses reveal several episodes of accelerated amphibian diversification, which do not fit models of gradual lineage accumulation. Global turning points in the phylogenetic and ecological diversification occurred after the end-Permian mass extinction and in the late Cretaceous. Fluctuations in amphibian diversification show strong temporal correlation with turnover rates in amniotes and the rise of angiosperm-dominated forests. Approximately 86% of modern frog species and >81% of salamander species descended from only five ancestral lineages that produced major radiations in the late Cretaceous and early Tertiary. This proportionally late accumulation of extant lineage diversity contrasts with the long evolutionary history of amphibians but is in line with the Tertiary increase in fossil abundance toward the present. PMID:17213318

  14. Cloning and stage-specific expression of CK-M1 gene during metamorphosis of Japanese flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yanjie; Zhang, Quanqi; Qi, Jie; Wang, Zhigang; Wang, Xubo; Sun, Yeying; Zhong, Qiwang; Li, Shuo; Li, Chunmei

    2010-05-01

    The symmetrical body of flatfish larvae changes dramatically into an asymmetrical form after metamorphosis. The molecular mechanisms responsible for this change are poorly understood. As an initial step to clarify these mechanisms, we used representational difference analysis of cDNA for the identification of genes active during metamorphosis in the Japanese flounder, Paralichthys olicaceus. One of the up-regulated genes was identified as creatine kinase muscle type 1 (CK-M1). Sequence analysis of CK-M1 revealed that it spanned 1 708 bp and encoded a protein of 382 amino acids. The overall amino acid sequence of the CK-M1 was highly conserved with those of other organisms. CK-M1 was expressed in adult fish tissues, including skeletal muscle, intestine and gill. Whole mount in-situ hybridization showed that the enhanced expression of CK-M1 expanded from the head to the whole body of larvae as metamorphosis progressed. Quantitative analysis revealed stage-specific high expression of CK-M1 during metamorphosis. The expression level of CK-M1 increased initially and peaked at metamorphosis, decreased afterward, and finally returned to the pre-metamorphosis level. This stage-specific expression pattern suggested strongly that CK-M1 was related to metamorphosis in the Japanese flounder. Its specific role in metamorphosis requires further study.

  15. The effect of pinealectomy, continuous light, and continuous darkness on metamorphosis of anadromous sea lampreys, Petromyzon marinus L

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, W.C.; Youson, J.H.

    1981-12-01

    The role of the pineal complex in lamprey metamorphosis was investigated by examining the influence of pinealectomy and continuous light and darkness on the initiation of this event in anadromous sea lampreys, Petromyzon marinus L. Larval lampreys, which on the basis of a condition factor were considered likely to enter metamorphosis in July, were separated in May of 1979 and 1980 into the following groups: (1) intact controls, (2) sham-operated controls, (3) pinealectomized individuals, (4) those exposed to continuous light, and (5) those exposed to continuous light or dark. The importance of the pineal complex to metamorphosis was supported by morphological evidence that, in all presumably pinealectomized individuals that entered metamorphosis, the complex had apparently not been removed during the surgical procedure. The ways in which the pineal complex may be involved in lamprey metamorphosis are discussed.

  16. Variation in pesticide tolerance of tadpoles among and within species of ranidae and patterns of amphibian decline

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bridges, C.M.; Semlitsch, R.D.

    2000-01-01

    There is significant variation among and within amphibian species with respect to reports of population decline; declining species are often found in environments that are physiograpically similar to environments where the same species is thriving. Because variability exists among organisms in their sensitivity to environmental stressors, it is important to determine the degree of this variation when undertaking conservation efforts. We conducted both lethal (time-to-death) and sublethal (activity change) assays to determine the degree of variation in the sensitivity of tadpoles to a pesticide, carbaryl, at three hierarchical levels: among ranid species, among several populations of a single ranid species (Rana sphenocephala), and within populations of R. sphenocephala. We observed significant variation in time to death among the nine ranid species and among the 10 R. sphenocephala populations we tested. Four out of eight R. sphenocephala populations exhibited significantly different times to death among families. The magnitude of the activity change in response to exposure to sublethal carbaryl levels was significantly different among species and within R. sphenocephala populations. Chemical contamination, at lethal or sublethal levels, can alter natural regulatory processes such as juvenile recruitment in amphibian populations and should be considered a contributing cause of declines in amphibian populations.

  17. Phosphoproteome analysis during larval development and metamorphosis in the spionid polychaete Pseudopolydora vexillosa

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The metamorphosis of the spionid polychaete Pseudopolydora vexillosa includes spontaneous settlement onto soft-bottom habitats and morphogenesis that can be completed in a very short time. A previous study on the total changes to the proteome during the various developmental stages of P. vexillosa suggested that little or no de novo protein synthesis occurs during metamorphosis. In this study, we used multicolor fluorescence detection of proteins in 2-D gels for differential analysis of proteins and phosphoproteins to reveal the dynamics of post-translational modification proteins in this species. A combination of affinity chromatography, 2D-PAGE, and mass spectrometry was used to identify the phosphoproteins in pre-competent larvae, competent larvae, and newly metamorphosed juveniles. Results We reproducibly detected 210, 492, and 172 phosphoproteins in pre-competent larvae, competent larvae, and newly metamorphosed juveniles, respectively. The highest percentage of phosphorylation was observed during the competent larval stage. About 64 stage-specific phosphoprotein spots were detected in the competent stage, and 32 phosphoproteins were found to be significantly differentially expressed in the three stages. We identified 38 phosphoproteins, 10 of which were differentially expressed during metamorphosis. These phosphoproteins belonged to six categories of biological processes: (1) development, (2) cell differentiation and integrity, (3) transcription and translation, (4) metabolism, (5) protein-protein interaction and proteolysis, and (6) receptors and enzymes. Conclusion This is the first study to report changes in phosphoprotein expression patterns during the metamorphosis of the marine polychaete P. vexillosa. The higher degree of phosphorylation during the process of attaining competence to settle and metamorphose may be due to fast morphological transitions regulated by various mechanisms. Our data are consistent with previous studies showing a high percentage of phosphorylation during competency in the barnacle Balanus amphitrite and the bryozoan Bugula neritina. The identified phosphoproteins may play an important role during metamorphosis, and further studies on the location and functions of important proteins during metamorphosis are warranted. PMID:21612608

  18. Effects of density on growth, metamorphosis, and survivorship in tadpoles of Scaphiopus holbrooki

    SciTech Connect

    Semlitsch, R.D.; Caldwell, J.P.

    1982-08-01

    Density-dependent aspects of growth, metamorphosis, and survivorship of Scaphiopus holbrooki tadpoles were examined in the laboratory under two experimental regimes. In the first density experiment, the growth index (W) of tadpoles decreased exponentially with density. Mean growth rate varied from 0.023 mL/d at the lowest density to 0.006 mL/d at the highest density. The mean number of days to metamorphic climax was positively associated with the initial density treatment: 27 d at the lowest density to 86 d at the highest density. The body size of tadpoles at metamorphosis showed a concave curvilinear relationship to initial density, indicating tadpoles at the highest densities are apparently capable to growth recovery once released from density stress. The survival of tadpoles decreased exponentially with initial density, from 90% at the lowest density to 20% at the highest initial density. In the second experiment a cross-classified design was used to examine the effects of density and duration of treatment (time) on growth and metamorphosis. Density and time had significant effects on body size at metamorphosis and days to metamorphosis. There was no significant interaction between density and time. These results indicate that the inhibitory effect of density stress varies with the duration of the stress. Scaphiopus holbrooki tadpoles exhibit developmental traits (rapid growth, short larval period, small body size at metamorphosis) that should be favored by natural selection in high density habitats. Dispersability may be a mechanism whereby S. holbrooki can minimize the detrimental effects of density stress.

  19. Regulation of Drosophila Metamorphosis by Xenobiotic Response Regulators

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Huai; Kerppola, Tom K.

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian Nrf2-Keap1 and the homologous Drosophila CncC-dKeap1 protein complexes regulate both transcriptional responses to xenobiotic compounds as well as native cellular and developmental processes. The relationships between the functions of these proteins in xenobiotic responses and in development were unknown. We investigated the genes regulated by CncC and dKeap1 during development and the signal transduction pathways that modulate their functions. CncC and dKeap1 were enriched within the nuclei in many tissues, in contrast to the reported cytoplasmic localization of Keap1 and Nrf2 in cultured mammalian cells. CncC and dKeap1 occupied ecdysone-regulated early puffs on polytene chromosomes. Depletion of either CncC or dKeap1 in salivary glands selectively reduced early puff gene transcription. CncC and dKeap1 depletion in the prothoracic gland as well as cncCK6/K6 and dKeap1EY5/EY5 loss of function mutations in embryos reduced ecdysone-biosynthetic gene transcription. In contrast, dKeap1 depletion and the dKeap1EY5/EY5 loss of function mutation enhanced xenobiotic response gene transcription in larvae and embryos, respectively. Depletion of CncC or dKeap1 in the prothoracic gland delayed pupation by decreasing larval ecdysteroid levels. CncC depletion suppressed the premature pupation and developmental arrest caused by constitutive Ras signaling in the prothoracic gland; conversely, constitutive Ras signaling altered the loci occupied by CncC on polytene chromosomes and activated transcription of genes at these loci. The effects of CncC and dKeap1 on both ecdysone-biosynthetic and ecdysone-regulated gene transcription, and the roles of CncC in Ras signaling in the prothoracic gland, establish the functions of these proteins in the neuroendocrine axis that coordinates insect metamorphosis. PMID:23408904

  20. Metamorphosis of an identified serotonergic neuron in the Drosophila olfactory system

    E-print Network

    Roy, Bidisha; Singh, Ajeet P; Shetty, Chetak; Chaudhary, Varun; North, Annemarie; Landgraf, Matthias; Vijay Raghavan, K; Rodrigues, Veronica

    2007-10-24

    AcceResearch article Metamorphosis of an identified serotonergic neuron in the Drosophila olfactory system Bidisha Roy1, Ajeet P Singh2, Chetak Shetty2, Varun Chaudhary1, Annemarie North3, Matthias Landgraf3, K VijayRaghavan*1 and Veronica Rodrigues1... in the embryo, has a relatively simple pattern in the larval stages and is remodeled dur- ing pupation to give rise to an elaborate adult pattern. We chart the changes occurring during metamorphosis and examine which events are due to the autonomous action...

  1. Deciphering amphibian diversity through DNA barcoding: chances and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Vences, Miguel; Thomas, Meike; Bonett, Ronald M; Vieites, David R

    2005-01-01

    Amphibians globally are in decline, yet there is still a tremendous amount of unrecognized diversity, calling for an acceleration of taxonomic exploration. This process will be greatly facilitated by a DNA barcoding system; however, the mitochondrial population structure of many amphibian species presents numerous challenges to such a standardized, single locus, approach. Here we analyse intra- and interspecific patterns of mitochondrial variation in two distantly related groups of amphibians, mantellid frogs and salamanders, to determine the promise of DNA barcoding with cytochrome oxidase subunit I (cox1) sequences in this taxon. High intraspecific cox1 divergences of 7–14% were observed (18% in one case) within the whole set of amphibian sequences analysed. These high values are not caused by particularly high substitution rates of this gene but by generally deep mitochondrial divergences within and among amphibian species. Despite these high divergences, cox1 sequences were able to correctly identify species including disparate geographic variants. The main problems with cox1 barcoding of amphibians are (i) the high variability of priming sites that hinder the application of universal primers to all species and (ii) the observed distinct overlap of intraspecific and interspecific divergence values, which implies difficulties in the definition of threshold values to identify candidate species. Common discordances between geographical signatures of mitochondrial and nuclear markers in amphibians indicate that a single-locus approach can be problematic when high accuracy of DNA barcoding is required. We suggest that a number of mitochondrial and nuclear genes may be used as DNA barcoding markers to complement cox1. PMID:16221604

  2. Investigating the Influence of Environmental Factors on Pesticide Exposure in Amphibians

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental factors such as temporal weather patterns and soil characterization coupled with pesticide application rates are known to influence exposure and subsequent absorption of these compounds in amphibians. Amphibians are a unique class of vertebrates due to their varied ...

  3. Advective and diffusive dermal processes for estimating terrestrial amphibian pesticide exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background/Question/Methods Dermal exposure presents a potentially significant but understudied route for pesticide uptake in terrestrial amphibians. Historically, evaluation of pesticide risk to both amphibians and reptiles has been achieved by comparing ingestion and inhalat...

  4. Amphibian populations in the terrestrial environment: Is there evidence of declines of terrestrial forest amphibians in northwestern California?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welsh, H.H., Jr.; Fellers, G.M.; Lind, A.J.

    2007-01-01

    Amphibian declines have been documented worldwide; however the vast majority are species associated with aquatic habitats. Information on the status and trends of terrestrial amphibians is almost entirely lacking. Here we use data collected across a 12-yr period (sampling from 1984-86 and from 1993-95) to address the question of whether evidence exists for declines among terrestrial amphibians in northwestern California forests. The majority of amphibians, both species and relative numbers, in these forests are direct-developing salamanders of the family Plethodontidae. We examined amphibian richness and evenness, and the relative abundances of the four most common species of plethodontid salamanders. We examined evidence of differences between years in two ecological provinces (coastal and interior) and across young, mature, and late seral forests and with reference to a moisture gradient from xeric to hydric within late seral forests. We found evidence of declines in species richness across years on late seral mesic stands and in the coastal ecological province, but these differences appeared to be caused by differences in the detection of rarer species, rather than evidence of an overall pattern. We also found differences among specific years in numbers of individuals of the most abundant species, Ensatina eschscholtzii, but these differences also failed to reflect a consistent pattern of declines between the two decadal sample periods. Results showing differences in richness, evenness, and relative abundances along both the seral and moisture continua were consistent with previous research. Overall, we found no compelling evidence of a downward trend in terrestrial plethodontid salamanders. We believe that continued monitoring of terrestrial salamander populations is important to understanding mechanisms of population declines in amphibian species. Copyright 2007 Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles.

  5. A review of the role of contaminants in amphibian declines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sparling, D.W.

    2003-01-01

    CONCLUSIONS--Although there are no published studies that demonstrate beyond all doubt that contaminants are involved in long term population declines of amphibians, there is ample evidence and reason to encourage active research and concern about effects. Many contaminants are lethal to amphibians at environmentally realistic concentrations. Acute mortality from these compounds may be difficult to detect because investigators would have to be present shortly after exposures. Chronic mortality may be masked by metapopulation phenomena so that areas that serve as population sinks may be repeatedly recolonized and difficult to identify. Metapopulation dynamics also make it more difficult to define discrete populations. Contaminants also have many sublethal effects on behavior, energetics, malformations, and diverse effects on physiological pathways which, by themselves might not lead to overt death but could alter reproduction or interact with other factors to result in gradual declines in populations. Scientific understanding of these interactions, and of the ecotoxicology of amphibians in general is far behind what is known about birds, fish, and mammals, and research is desperately needed in this area. Some specific suggestions for critically needed research include: (1) Determination of lethal concentrations of common contaminants - pesticides, PAHs, metals--under environmentally realistic conditions of light, temperature, and water chemistry. (2) Better understanding of the effects of long term (weeks, months), low- concentration exposure of persistent pesticides and stable contaminants on amphibians. (3) Development and refinement of bioindicators in amphibians to use in monitoring and screening for potential effects of contaminants in declining amphibian populations. (4) Further studies on the interaction between contaminants and disease agents including immunosuppression in amphibians. (5) Additional research on the interaction between ultraviolet radiation - both UV-A and UV-B--and a broader range of contaminants. (6) Development of models to assess risk in amphibians as related to landscape factors and especially in the aquatic-terrestrial interface. (7) Population survival requires that organisms survive through their entire life cycle; to date, there have been no studies that have examined the responses of amphibians to contaminants in all phases (egg, embryo, larvae and adult) of their life cycles.

  6. The cause of global amphibian declines: a developmental endocrinologist's perspective

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, T. B.; Falso, P.; Gallipeau, S.; Stice, M.

    2010-01-01

    Greater than 70% of the world's amphibian species are in decline. We propose that there is probably not a single cause for global amphibian declines and present a three-tiered hierarchical approach that addresses interactions among and between ultimate and proximate factors that contribute to amphibian declines. There are two immediate (proximate) causes of amphibian declines: death and decreased recruitment (reproductive failure). Although much attention has focused on death, few studies have addressed factors that contribute to declines as a result of failed recruitment. Further, a great deal of attention has focused on the role of pathogens in inducing diseases that cause death, but we suggest that pathogen success is profoundly affected by four other ultimate factors: atmospheric change, environmental pollutants, habitat modification and invasive species. Environmental pollutants arise as likely important factors in amphibian declines because they have realized potential to affect recruitment. Further, many studies have documented immunosuppressive effects of pesticides, suggesting a role for environmental contaminants in increased pathogen virulence and disease rates. Increased attention to recruitment and ultimate factors that interact with pathogens is important in addressing this global crisis. PMID:20190117

  7. Annual Report: 2014: Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation (PARC)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weir, Linda A.; Nanjappa, P.; Apodaca, J. J.; Williams, J.

    2015-01-01

    Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation (PARC) was established in 1999 to address the widespread declines, extinctions, and range reductions of amphibians and reptiles, with a focus on conservation of taxa and habitats in North America. Amphibians and reptiles are affected by a broad range of human activities, both as incidental effects of habitat alteration and direct effects from overexploitation; these animals are also burdened by humans attitudes – that amphibians and reptiles are either dangerous or of little environmental or economic value. However, PARC members understand these taxa are important parts of our natural and cultural heritage and they serve important roles in ecosystems throughout the world. With many amphibians and reptiles classified as threatened with extinction, conservation to ensure healthy populations of these animals has never been more important. As you will see herein, PARC’s 15th anniversary has been marked with major accomplishments and an ever-increasing momentum. With your help, PARC can continue to build on its successes and protect these vital species.

  8. Mitogenomic perspectives on the origin and phylogeny of living amphibians.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Zhou, Hui; Chen, Yue-Qin; Liu, Yi-Fei; Qu, Liang-Hu

    2005-06-01

    Establishing the relationships among modern amphibians (lissamphibians) and their ancient relatives is necessary for our understanding of early tetrapod evolution. However, the phylogeny is still intractable because of the highly specialized anatomy and poor fossil record of lissamphibians. Paleobiologists are still not sure whether lissamphibians are monophyletic or polyphyletic, and which ancient group (temnospondyls or lepospondyls) is most closely related to them. In an attempt to address these problems, eight mitochondrial genomes of living amphibians were determined and compared with previously published amphibian sequences. A comprehensive molecular phylogenetic analysis of nucleotide sequences yields a highly resolved tree congruent with the traditional hypotheses (Batrachia). By using a molecular clock-independent approach for inferring dating information from molecular phylogenies, we present here the first molecular timescale for lissamphibian evolution, which suggests that lissamphibians first emerged about 330 million years ago. By observing the fit between molecular and fossil times, we suggest that the temnospondyl-origin hypothesis for lissamphibians is more credible than other hypotheses. Moreover, under this timescale, the potential geographic origins of the main living amphibian groups are discussed: (i) advanced frogs (neobatrachians) may possess an Africa-India origin; (ii) salamanders may have originated in east Asia; (iii) the tropic forest of the Triassic Pangaea may be the place of origin for the ancient caecilians. An accurate phylogeny with divergence times can be also helpful to direct the search for "missing" fossils, and can benefit comparative studies of amphibian evolution. PMID:16012106

  9. Histochemical, enzymatic, and contractile properties of skeletal muscles of three anuran amphibians

    E-print Network

    Bennett, Albert F.

    Histochemical, enzymatic, and contractile properties of skeletal muscles of three anuran amphibians, and contractile properties of skeletal muscles of three anuran amphibians. Am. J. Physiol. 244 (Regulatory with organismal metabolic capacity and behavioral pattern. Anuran amphibians were chosen as the model system

  10. 50 CFR 16.14 - Importation of live amphibians or their eggs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Importation of live amphibians or their eggs. 16.14 Section...Wildlife § 16.14 Importation of live amphibians or their eggs. Upon the filing...under § 14.61, all species of live amphibians or their eggs may be imported,...

  11. 50 CFR 16.14 - Importation of live amphibians or their eggs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Importation of live amphibians or their eggs. 16.14 Section...Wildlife § 16.14 Importation of live amphibians or their eggs. Upon the filing...under § 14.61, all species of live amphibians or their eggs may be imported,...

  12. 50 CFR 16.14 - Importation of live amphibians or their eggs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Importation of live amphibians or their eggs. 16.14 Section...Wildlife § 16.14 Importation of live amphibians or their eggs. Upon the filing...under § 14.61, all species of live amphibians or their eggs may be imported,...

  13. 50 CFR 16.14 - Importation of live amphibians or their eggs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Importation of live amphibians or their eggs. 16.14 Section...Wildlife § 16.14 Importation of live amphibians or their eggs. Upon the filing...under § 14.61, all species of live amphibians or their eggs may be imported,...

  14. 50 CFR 16.14 - Importation of live amphibians or their eggs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Importation of live amphibians or their eggs. 16.14 Section...Wildlife § 16.14 Importation of live amphibians or their eggs. Upon the filing...under § 14.61, all species of live amphibians or their eggs may be imported,...

  15. FrogLog Vol. 100 | January 2012 | 1 www.amphibians.org

    E-print Network

    Funk, W. Chris

    FrogLog Vol. 100 | January 2012 | 1 www.amphibians.org South America Regional Focus INSIDE News Amphibian Specialist Group (ASG) announces the fifth annual award to recognize individuals who have made a significant contribution to promoting the conservation of globally threatened amphibians. The award of US$25

  16. Cardiac output and peripheral resistance during larval development in the anuran amphibian Xenopus laevis

    E-print Network

    Burggren, Warren

    Cardiac output and peripheral resistance during larval development in the anuran amphibian Xenopus larval develop- ment in the anuran amphibian Xenopus Zaeuis. Am. J. PhysioZ. 269 (Regulatory Integrative; amphibians SURPRISINGLYLITTLE is known of the early development of cardiovascular function in vertebrates

  17. AMPHIBIANS AND REPTILES OF THE GREAT FALLS BYPASSED REACHES IN SOUTH CAROLINA

    E-print Network

    Dorcas, Michael E.

    AMPHIBIANS AND REPTILES OF THE GREAT FALLS BYPASSED REACHES IN SOUTH CAROLINA MICHAEL E. DORCAS of the amphibians and reptiles inhabiting the Great Falls Bypassed Reaches of the Catawba River in South Carolina. A list of 85 species of amphibians and reptiles potentially occurring in the Great Falls Bypassed Reaches

  18. Amphibian antimicrobial peptides and Protozoa: Lessons from parasites Luis Rivas a,

    E-print Network

    Pompeu Fabra, Universitat

    Review Amphibian antimicrobial peptides and Protozoa: Lessons from parasites Luis Rivas a, , Juan peptides (AMPs) from amphibians and other eukaryotes recognize pathogenicity patterns mostly related or leishmaniasis. Herein we review the scarce but growing body of knowledge addressing the use of amphibian AMPs

  19. Rapid Global Expansion of the Fungal Disease Chytridiomycosis into Declining and Healthy Amphibian

    E-print Network

    Rapid Global Expansion of the Fungal Disease Chytridiomycosis into Declining and Healthy Amphibian because it occurs globally in both declining and apparently healthy (non-declining) amphibian populations collection of fungal strains from both declining and healthy amphibian populations using DNA sequence

  20. Notes and Discussion Pond-Breeding Amphibian Community Composition in Missouri

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Jarrett

    Notes and Discussion Pond-Breeding Amphibian Community Composition in Missouri ABSTRACT.--We examined pond-breeding amphibian community composition at 210 ponds in Missouri between 2002 and 2012 using drift fence, dipnet, and funnel trap data. We encountered a total of 20 pond-breeding amphibian species

  1. Complexity in conservation: lessons from the global decline of amphibian populations

    E-print Network

    Blaustein, Andrew R.

    REVIEW Complexity in conservation: lessons from the global decline of amphibian populations Andrew@bcc.orst.edu Abstract As part of an overall ``biodiversity crisis'' many amphibian populations are in decline throughout, and the introduction of non-native species. In this paper, we argue that amphibian population declines are caused

  2. Characterization and distribution of neuropeptide Y in the brain of a caecilian amphibian

    E-print Network

    Boyd, Sunny K.

    Characterization and distribution of neuropeptide Y in the brain of a caecilian amphibian Ted J 22 September 2000 Abstract Neuropeptide Y (NPY) from the brain of an amphibian from the order]; teleost [43]; amphibians [14]; reptiles [44]; birds [3]; mammals [1

  3. Is forest close to lakes ecologically unique? Analysis of vegetation, small mammals, amphibians, and songbirds

    E-print Network

    Macdonald, Ellen

    Is forest close to lakes ecologically unique? Analysis of vegetation, small mammals, amphibians. Two species of anuran amphibians [wood frog (Rana sylvatica) and boreal toad (Bufo boreas boreas and sites up to 100 m into the lakeside forest were small. Use of upland habitats by amphibians (juvenile

  4. 11 . Alternative reproductive tactics In amphibians KELLY R . ZAMUDIO AND LAURE

    E-print Network

    Zamudio, Kelly R.

    11 . Alternative reproductive tactics In amphibians KELLY R . ZAMUDIO AND LAURE CHAPTER SUMMARY Frogs and salamanders, the two most diverse lin~agcs of amphibians, differ significantly in reproductive of alternative reproductive tactics. However, OUf understanding of the evolution of amphibian alternative

  5. Climate change and outbreaks of amphibian chytridiomycosis in a montane area

    E-print Network

    Carrascal, Luis M.

    Climate change and outbreaks of amphibian chytridiomycosis in a montane area of Central Spain College Faculty of Medicine, St Mary's Campus, Norfolk Place, London W2 1PG, UK Amphibian species by the chytridiomycete fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis. This disease of amphibians has recently emerged within

  6. Recent global amphibian declines are now un-equivocally linked to chytridiomycosis, an emergent

    E-print Network

    Rosenblum, Erica Bree

    Articles Recent global amphibian declines are now un- equivocally linked to chytridiomycosis the world; however, the reasons for its sudden emergence as an amphibian pathogen remain the subject disease has also been documented in temperate amphibian populations, where die-offs are more temporally

  7. 1098 volume 119 | number 8 | August 2011 Environmental Health Perspectives Amphibians are arguably the "poster child"

    E-print Network

    Rohr, Jason

    1098 volume 119 | number 8 | August 2011 · Environmental Health Perspectives Research Amphibians pollution is a concern for the health of both amphibians and humans. It is consid ered the second greatest of amphibians, such as endocrine and immune systems, are simi lar to those in humans (Hayes 2005), and a genome

  8. Evolutionary dynamics of frequency-dependent growth strategy in cannibalistic amphibians

    E-print Network

    Wakano, Joe Yuichiro

    Evolutionary dynamics of frequency-dependent growth strategy in cannibalistic amphibians J Hiranocho, Otsu, Shiga 520-2113, Japan ABSTRACT Cannibalistic amphibian larval morphs, which have greater, 4: 719­736 © 2002 J.Y. Wakano #12;In amphibians, cannibalism is common during the period from

  9. First Evidence of Amphibian Chytrid Fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis) and Ranavirus in Hong

    E-print Network

    Gray, Matthew

    First Evidence of Amphibian Chytrid Fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis) and Ranavirus in Hong Kong Amphibian Trade Jonathan E. Kolby1,2 *, Kristine M. Smith2 , Lee Berger1 , William B. Karesh2 of America, 3 Amphibian Disease Laboratory, Institute for Conservation Research, San Diego Zoo Global, San

  10. An overview of the evolution and conservation of West Indian amphibians and reptiles

    E-print Network

    Hedges, Blair

    An overview of the evolution and conservation of West Indian amphibians and reptiles S. Blair.15% of Earth's land area, but the region supports 3.0% (180 species) of the world's amphibians and 6.3% (520 status of only the amphibians has been assessed comprehensively, and 84% of those species are considered

  11. Functional Coupling Between Substantia Nigra and Basal Ganglia Homologues in Amphibians

    E-print Network

    Ryan, Michael J.

    Functional Coupling Between Substantia Nigra and Basal Ganglia Homologues in Amphibians Kim L. Hoke the existence of a homologue of the mam- malian substantia nigra­basal ganglia circuit in the amphibian brain proposed that homologous basal ganglia circuits may exist in both amphibians and mammals (reviewed

  12. Where have all the tadpoles gone? Individual genetic tracking of amphibian larvae until adulthood

    E-print Network

    Ringler, Eva

    Where have all the tadpoles gone? Individual genetic tracking of amphibian larvae until adulthood is a challenge that has hampered studies on recruitment, dispersal, migration and survivorship of amphibians been previously used in amphibians to follow individuals across different life cycle stages. Here, we

  13. Modelling the future distribution of the amphibian chytrid fungus: the influence of climate and

    E-print Network

    Rohr, Jason

    FORUM Modelling the future distribution of the amphibian chytrid fungus: the influence of climate of amphibians are believed to be caused by the chytrid fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). Hence of this pathogen and curtail the amphibian biodiversity crisis. 2. In this issue of Journal of Applied Ecology

  14. Energy, water and large-scale patterns of reptile and amphibian species richness in Europe

    E-print Network

    Rodríguez, Miguel Ángel

    Energy, water and large-scale patterns of reptile and amphibian species richness in Europe Miguel Á and amphibian species richness in Europe and 11 environmental variables related to five hypotheses in log elevation explaining an additional 6%. For amphibians, annual actual evapotranspiration (AET

  15. The effects of multiple stressors on wetland communities: pesticides, pathogens and competing amphibians

    E-print Network

    Blaustein, Andrew R.

    amphibians JULIA C. BUCK*, ERIN A. SCHEESSELE*, RICK A. RELYEA AND ANDREW R. BLAUSTEIN* *Zoology Department described as the sixth mass extinction, and amphibians are among the most affected groups. The causes of global amphibian population declines and extinctions are varied, complex and context-dependent and may

  16. Use of multiple dispersal pathways facilitates amphibian persistence in stream networks

    E-print Network

    Fagan, William

    Use of multiple dispersal pathways facilitates amphibian persistence in stream networks Evan H. Campbell Granta,b,1 , James D. Nicholsa , Winsor H. Lowec , and William F. Fagand a Northeast Amphibian) Although populations of amphibians are declining worldwide, there is no evidence that salamanders occupying

  17. Epidemic disease decimates amphibian abundance, species diversity, and evolutionary history in the

    E-print Network

    Crawford, Andrew J.

    Epidemic disease decimates amphibian abundance, species diversity, and evolutionary history, and approved June 22, 2010 (received for review December 7, 2009) Amphibian populations around the world.Despitetheseverityofthecrisis,quantitative analyses of the effects of the epidemic on amphibian abundance and diversity have been unavailable

  18. INFLUENCE OF LAND USE ON POSTMETAMORPHIC BODY SIZE OF PLAYA LAKE AMPHIBIANS

    E-print Network

    Gray, Matthew

    INFLUENCE OF LAND USE ON POSTMETAMORPHIC BODY SIZE OF PLAYA LAKE AMPHIBIANS MATTHEW J. GRAY,1, 2 79409, USA Abstract: Agricultural land use may indirectly affect the body size of amphibians by altering the hydroperiods of nearby wetlands and influencing amphibian densities--both factors which can limit the larval

  19. Abundance and species composition of amphibians, small mammals, and songbirds in

    E-print Network

    Macdonald, Ellen

    Abundance and species composition of amphibians, small mammals, and songbirds in riparian forest trapped anuran amphibians and small mammals and spot-mapped bird territories around 12 lakes (4 treatment levels, 3 replicates) before and after harvesting. Changes in small mammal or amphibian abundance were

  20. Climatic change and wetland desiccation cause amphibian decline in Yellowstone National Park

    E-print Network

    Hadly, Elizabeth

    Climatic change and wetland desiccation cause amphibian decline in Yellowstone National Park Sarah) Amphibians are a bellwether for environmental degradation, even in natural ecosystems such as Yellowstone severe declines in 4 once-common amphibian species native to Yellowstone. Climate monitoring over 6

  1. Reproduction and Larval Rearing of Amphibians Robert K. Browne and Kevin Zippel

    E-print Network

    Boynton, Walter R.

    Reproduction and Larval Rearing of Amphibians Robert K. Browne and Kevin Zippel Abstract Reproduction technologies for amphibians are increasingly used for the in vitro treatment of ovulation) the cost of maintaining increasing numbers of amphibian gene lines for both research and conservation. Many

  2. Amphibian Resources on the Internet Michael W. Nolan and Stephen A. Smith

    E-print Network

    Boynton, Walter R.

    Amphibian Resources on the Internet Michael W. Nolan and Stephen A. Smith Abstract The use of amphibians in classrooms and research labora- tories has increased, along with a corresponding increase that the authors of this review cannot assure the accuracy of content in these web resources. Key Words: amphibian

  3. Remarkable Amphibian Biomass and Abundance in an Isolated Wetland: Implications for Wetland

    E-print Network

    Georgia, University of

    Remarkable Amphibian Biomass and Abundance in an Isolated Wetland: Implications for Wetland, Las Vegas, 4505 Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, NV 89154­4004, U.S.A. §Partners in Amphibian and Reptile: Despite the continuing loss of wetland habitats and associated declines in amphibian populations, attempts

  4. AmericanJournalofBotany 77(12):1599-1609. 1990. METAMORPHOSIS IN THE ARACEAE'

    E-print Network

    Ray, Thomas S.

    AmericanJournalofBotany 77(12):1599-1609. 1990. METAMORPHOSIS IN THE ARACEAE' Tsoues S. RaY School with this primary thickening ofthe stern, successive foliage leaves will be larger and often more complex. In many the forest, producing leaves and stems in a variety of microhabitats. However, indi- vidual organs of plants

  5. Effect of epinephrine on the settlement and metamorphosis of Manila clam larvae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Sumin; Bao, Zhenmin; Liu, Hui; Fang, Jianguang

    2006-04-01

    Chemical inducement and DDRT-PCR (differential display reverse transcription PCR) are adopted to investigate the effect of epinephrine (EPI) on the settlement and metamorphosis of Manila clam larvae. Chemical inducement shows that EPI has an effect to some extent on the metamorphosis of Manila clam larvae at all concentrations and in all treatments designed. The most significant result of inducement is obtained at the concentration of 10-6 mol L-1 and for 4h. DDRT-PCR using six primer pairs shows that the gene expression pattern is quite different between EPI treatment and the control. Three hundred and forty-three amplification bands are obtained in total, among which, 67 (19.53%) are differentially appeared. Therefore, EPI has an effect on the gene expression of the eye spot larval Manila clam. It can be hypothesized that EPI is a settlement and metamorphosis inducer for Manila clam. EPI may lead to larvae settlement and metamorphosis by binding to the receptors on the membrane and then changing the gene expression of larvae cells.

  6. EVIDENCE FOR ACCELERATED METAMORPHOSIS IN BULLFROG (RANA CATESBIEANA) TADPOLES IN AN EPHEMERAL POND

    EPA Science Inventory

    It has been widely accepted that time to metamorphosis for non-native bullfrog tadpoles in the Pacific Northwest is greater than one year. We surveyed 22 ponds within the EE Wilson Reserve (Benton County, Oregon) for bullfrog tadpoles and metamorphs from April through September, ...

  7. Caring about Strangers: A Lingisian Reading of Kafka's "Metamorphosis"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, Ruyu

    2013-01-01

    This article explores a significant question, implicit in Kafka's novel "Metamorphosis," explicitly asked by Rorty: "Can I care about a stranger?" Alphonso Lingis's view is adopted to overcome a mainstream belief that there is a distinction between my community and the stranger's community, or us community and…

  8. Control of Pituitary Thyroid-stimulating Hormone Synthesis and Secretion by Thyroid Hormones during Xenopus Metamorphosis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Serum thyroid hormone (TH) concentrations in anuran larvae rise rapidly during metamorphosis. Such a rise in an adult anuran would inevitably trigger a negative feedback response resulting in decreased synthesis and secretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) by the pituitary....

  9. Extended Hamiltonians, Coupling-Constant Metamorphosis and the Post-Winternitz System

    E-print Network

    Claudia Maria Chanu; Luca Degiovanni; Giovanni Rastelli

    2015-11-24

    The coupling-constant metamorphosis is applied to modified extended Hamiltonians and sufficient conditions are found in order that the transformed high-degree first integral of the transformed Hamiltonian is determined by the same algorithm which computes the corresponding first integral of the original extended Hamiltonian. As examples, we consider the Post-Winternitz system and the 2D caged anisotropic oscillator.

  10. Metamorphosis enhances the effects of metal exposure on the mayfly, Centroptilum triangulifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wesner, Jeff S.; Kraus, Johanna M.; Schmidt, Travis S.; Walters, David M.; Clements, William H.

    2014-01-01

    The response of larval aquatic insects to stressors such as metals is used to assess the ecological condition of streams worldwide. However, nearly all larval insects metamorphose from aquatic larvae to winged adults, and recent surveys indicate that adults may be a more sensitive indicator of stream metal toxicity than larvae. One hypothesis to explain this pattern is that insects exposed to elevated metal in their larval stages have a reduced ability to successfully complete metamorphosis. To test this hypothesis we exposed late-instar larvae of the mayfly, Centroptilum triangulifer, to an aqueous Zn gradient (32–476 ?g/L) in the laboratory. After 6 days of exposure, when metamorphosis began, larval survival was unaffected by zinc. However, Zn reduced wingpad development at concentrations above 139 ?g/L. In contrast, emergence of subimagos and imagos tended to decline with any increase in Zn. At Zn concentrations below 105 ?g/L (hardness-adjusted aquatic life criterion), survival between the wingpad and subimago stages declined 5-fold across the Zn gradient. These results support the hypothesis that metamorphosis may be a survival bottleneck, particularly in contaminated streams. Thus, death during metamorphosis may be a key mechanism explaining how stream metal contamination can impact terrestrial communities by reducing aquatic insect emergence.

  11. Stable isotope enrichment in laboratory ant colonies: effects of colony age, metamorphosis, diet, and fat storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ecologists use stable isotopes to infer diets and trophic levels of animals in food webs, yet some assumptions underlying these inferences have not been thoroughly tested. We used laboratory-reared colonies of Solenopsis invicta Buren (Formicidae: Solenopsidini) to test the effects of metamorphosis,...

  12. Amphibian research and monitoring initiative: concepts and implementation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corn, P.S.; Adams, M.J.; Battaglin, W.A.; Gallant, A.L.; James, D.L.; Knutson, M.; Langtimm, C.A.; Sauer, J.R.

    2005-01-01

    This report provides the basis for discussion and subsequent articulation of a national plan for the Amphibian Research and Monitoring Initiative (ARMI). The authors were members of a task force formed from within the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) that included scientists with expertise in biology, cartography, hydrology, and statistics. The assignment of the task force was to extend work begun by the National Amphibian Leadership Group. This group, composed of senior USGS scientists, managers, and external authorities, met in Gainesville, Florida, in February 20001. The product of this meeting was a document outlining the framework for a national program to monitor amphibian populations and to conduct research into the causes of declines.

  13. Amphibian research and monitoring initiative: Concepts and implementation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corn, P.S.; Adams, M.J.; Battaglin, W.A.; Gallant, A.L.; James, D.L.; Knutson, M.; Langtimm, C.A.; Sauer, J.R.

    2005-01-01

    This report provides the basis for discussion and subsequent articulation of a national plan for the Amphibian Research and Monitoring Initiative (ARMI). The authors were members of a task force formed from within the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) that included scientists with expertise in biology, cartography, hydrology, and statistics. The assignment of the task force was to extend work begun by the National Amphibian Leadership Group. This group, composed of senior USGS scientists, managers, and external authorities, met in Gainesville, Florida, in February 20001. The product of this meeting was a document outlining the framework for a national program to monitor amphibian populations and to conduct research into the causes of declines.

  14. Spatial network structure and amphibian persistence in stochastic environments

    PubMed Central

    Fortuna, Miguel A; Gómez-Rodríguez, Carola; Bascompte, Jordi

    2006-01-01

    In the past few years, the framework of complex networks has provided new insight into the organization and function of biological systems. However, in spite of its potential, spatial ecology has not yet fully incorporated tools and concepts from network theory. In the present study, we identify a large spatial network of temporary ponds, which are used as breeding sites by several amphibian species. We investigate how the structural properties of the spatial network change as a function of the amphibian dispersal distance and the hydric conditions. Our measures of network topology suggest that the observed spatial structure of ponds is robust to drought (compared with similar random structures), allowing the movement of amphibians to and between flooded ponds, and hence, increasing the probability of reproduction even in dry seasons. PMID:16777733

  15. Assaying mechanosensation*

    PubMed Central

    Chalfie, Martin; Hart, Anne C.; Rankin, Catharine H.; Goodman, Miriam B.

    2015-01-01

    C. elegans detect and respond to diverse mechanical stimuli using neuronal circuitry that has been defined by decades of work by C. elegans researchers. In this WormMethods chapter, we review and comment on the techniques currently used to assess mechanosensory response. This methods review is intended both as an introduction for those new to the field and a convenient compendium for the expert. A brief discussion of commonly used mechanosensory assays is provided, along with a discussion of the neural circuits involved, consideration of critical protocol details, and references to the primary literature. PMID:25093996

  16. Angiogenesis Assays.

    PubMed

    Nambiar, Dhanya K; Kujur, Praveen K; Singh, Rana P

    2016-01-01

    Neoangiogenesis constitutes one of the first steps of tumor progression beyond a critical size of tumor growth, which supplies a dormant mass of cancerous cells with the required nutrient supply and gaseous exchange through blood vessels essentially needed for their sustained and aggressive growth. In order to understand any biological process, it becomes imperative that we use models, which could mimic the actual biological system as closely as possible. Hence, finding the most appropriate model is always a vital part of any experimental design. Angiogenesis research has also been much affected due to lack of simple, reliable, and relevant models which could be easily quantitated. The angiogenesis models have been used extensively for studying the action of various molecules for agonist or antagonistic behaviour and associated mechanisms. Here, we have described two protocols or models which have been popularly utilized for studying angiogenic parameters. Rat aortic ring assay tends to bridge the gap between in vitro and in vivo models. The chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay is one of the most utilized in vivo model system for angiogenesis-related studies. The CAM is highly vascularized tissue of the avian embryo and serves as a good model to study the effects of various test compounds on neoangiogenesis. PMID:26608294

  17. Rev: Field Guide to the Amphibians and Reptiles of Bali

    E-print Network

    Brown, Rafe M.

    2008-01-01

    ) , the islands constitut­ ing Indonesia represent o n e of the world's true su­ perpowers of biodiversity a n d the origin of many of its most spectacular amphibians a n d reptiles. Given these facts, plus the simple truth that Bali is a popu­ lar vacation spot..., a g o o d field guide of the amphib­ ians and reptiles of this island has been badly needed . Bali is an ecotourism mecca . Its amphibians and reptiles ought to be readily accessible to the many thousands of travelers who visit annually. Thus...

  18. Exposure to suboptimal temperatures during metamorphosis reveals a critical developmental window in the solitary bee, Megachile rotundata

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Metamorphosis is an important developmental stage for holometabolous insects, during which adult morphology and physiology are established. Proper development relies on optimal body temperatures, and natural ambient temperature (Ta) fluctuations, especially in spring or in northern latitudes, could ...

  19. Preliminary checklist of amphibians and reptiles from Baramita, Guyana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, R.P.; MacCulloch, R.D.

    2012-01-01

    We provide an initial checklist of the herpetofauna of Baramita, a lowland rainforest site in the Northwest Region of Guyana. Twenty-five amphibian and 28 reptile species were collected during two separate dry-season visits. New country records for two species of snakes are documented, contributing to the knowledge on the incompletely known herpetofauna of Guyana.

  20. Checklist of nematode parasites of amphibians from Argentina.

    PubMed

    González, Cynthya Elizabeth; Inés, Hamann Monika

    2015-01-01

    This review includes information about 47 taxa of nematode parasites reported from 34 species of Argentinean amphibians, all belonging to order Anura (33 native species and 1 introduced species). Thirty four nematode species have been reported as adults and 13 species were reported as larvae (10 taxa) or juveniles (3 taxa). Two species, Cosmocerca parva and C. podicipinus (Cosmocercidae), collected as adults, are the most commonly occurring adult nematodes in Argentinean amphibians; each of them parasitize 14 amphibian species. The bufonid Rhinella schneideri and the leptodactylid Leptodactylus bufonius present the highest species richness of parasitic nematodes (9 species); followed by Rhinella fernandezae, R. arenarum and Leptodactylus chaquensis, each of which is parasitized by 8 nematode species. Mean species richenss was highest for the family Bufonidae (4.5±3.4; range: 1-9); followed by the Leptodactylidae (3.5±2.8; range: 1-9). Data on hosts, geographical distribution, site of infection, location of deposited materials, and information about life cycles are provided. This is the first compilation of information on nematode parasites of amphibians in Argentina. PMID:26249967

  1. Utricular otoconia of some amphibians have calcitic morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pote, K. G.; Ross, M. D.

    1993-01-01

    This report concerns the morphological features of otoconia removed from the inner ear of four amphibian species. Results from scanning electron microscopic examination are compared based on the site of origin. These results show that utricular otoconia have a mineral structure that mimics calcite, rather than the widely accepted idea that they are mineralized by calcium carbonate of the aragonite polymorph.

  2. AMPHIBIAN DECLINE, ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION AND LOCAL POPULATION ADAPTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Amphibian population declines have been noted on both local and global scales. Causes for these declines are unknown although many hypotheses have been offered. In areas adjacent to human development, loss of habitat is a fairly well accepted cause. However in isolated, seemingl...

  3. RISK ASSESSMENT FOR THE EFFECTS OF SOLAR RADIATION ON AMPHIBIANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent studies have demonstrated that exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) can cause mortality and increase the occurrence of eye and limb malformation in some species of amphibians. Based on these reports and various field observations, it has been hypothesized that UV...

  4. UPDATE ON COORDINATED STUDIES OF AMPHIBIAN DISTRIBUTIONS AND UV RADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    In February of 2000 researchers from the EPA, the National Park Service, other governmental agencies, and academia formulated a plan for coordinated studies of amphibian distributions and aquatic ultraviolet radiation exposure risks in several national parks. At this point we hav...

  5. ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION DOSE AND AMPHIBIAN DISTRIBUTIONS IN NATIONAL PARKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ultraviolet Radiation Dose and Amphibian Distributions in National Parks. Diamond, S. A., Detenbeck, N. E., USEPA, Duluth, MN, USA, Bradford, D. F., USEPA, Las Vegas, NV, USA, Trenham, P. C., University of California, Davis, CA., USA, Adams, M. J., Corn, P. S., Hossack, B., USGS,...

  6. Artificial fertilization for amphibian conservation: current knowledge and future considerations.

    PubMed

    Kouba, A J; Vance, C K; Willis, E L

    2009-01-01

    Amphibian populations in the wild are experiencing massive die-offs that have led to the extinction of an estimated 168 species in the last several decades. To address these declines, zoological institutions are playing an important role in establishing captive assurance colonies to protect species in imminent danger of extinction. Many of the threatened species recently placed into captivity are failing to reproduce before they expire, and maintaining founder populations is becoming a formidable challenge. Assisted reproductive technologies, such as hormone synchronization, gamete storage and artificial fertilization, are valuable tools for addressing reproductive failure of amphibians in captive facilities. Artificial fertilization has been commonly employed for over 60 years in several keystone laboratory species for basic studies in developmental biology and embryology. However, there are few instances of applied studies for the conservation of threatened or endangered amphibian species. In this review, we summarize valuable technological achievements in amphibian artificial fertilization, identify specific processes that need to be considered when developing artificial fertilization techniques for species conservation, and address future concerns that should be priorities for the next decade. PMID:19026442

  7. Pesticides in amphibian habitats of central and northern California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Amphibians in California are facing serious population declines. Contaminants, especially pesticides, have been linked to these declines. This study reports on a survey of central and northern California wetlands sampled along four transects associated with Lassen National Park, Lake Tahoe, Yosemit...

  8. Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans sp. nov. causes lethal chytridiomycosis in amphibians.

    PubMed

    Martel, An; Spitzen-van der Sluijs, Annemarieke; Blooi, Mark; Bert, Wim; Ducatelle, Richard; Fisher, Matthew C; Woeltjes, Antonius; Bosman, Wilbert; Chiers, Koen; Bossuyt, Franky; Pasmans, Frank

    2013-09-17

    The current biodiversity crisis encompasses a sixth mass extinction event affecting the entire class of amphibians. The infectious disease chytridiomycosis is considered one of the major drivers of global amphibian population decline and extinction and is thought to be caused by a single species of aquatic fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis. However, several amphibian population declines remain unexplained, among them a steep decrease in fire salamander populations (Salamandra salamandra) that has brought this species to the edge of local extinction. Here we isolated and characterized a unique chytrid fungus, Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans sp. nov., from this salamander population. This chytrid causes erosive skin disease and rapid mortality in experimentally infected fire salamanders and was present in skin lesions of salamanders found dead during the decline event. Together with the closely related B. dendrobatidis, this taxon forms a well-supported chytridiomycete clade, adapted to vertebrate hosts and highly pathogenic to amphibians. However, the lower thermal growth preference of B. salamandrivorans, compared with B. dendrobatidis, and resistance of midwife toads (Alytes obstetricans) to experimental infection with B. salamandrivorans suggest differential niche occupation of the two chytrid fungi. PMID:24003137

  9. Using Reptile and Amphibian Activities in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomasek, Terry; Matthews, Catherine E.

    2008-01-01

    Reptiles and amphibians are a diverse and interesting group of organisms. The four activities described in this article take students' curiosity into the realm of scientific understanding. The activities involve the concepts of species identification; animal adaptations, communication, and habitat; and conservation. (Contains 1 table and 2…

  10. LAGOON WATER FROM CONFINED ANIMAL FEED OPERATIONS AND AMPHIBIAN DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory


    Lagoon Water from Confined Animal Feed Operations and Amphibian Development. Dumont, J. N.* and Slagle, S., Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, and Hutchins, S. R., U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (NRMRL/SPRD), Ada, OK. There is some evidence that confined anima...

  11. Invasive hybrid tiger salamander genotypes impact native amphibians

    E-print Network

    Shaffer, H. Bradley

    Invasive hybrid tiger salamander genotypes impact native amphibians Maureen E. Ryana,1 , Jarrett R California Tiger Salamander (Amby- stoma californiense) and the introduced Barred Tiger Salamander (Ambystoma for 20 generations. We found that most classes of hybrid tiger salamander larvae dramatically reduced

  12. EFFECTS OF POLLUTION ON FRESHWATER FISH AND AMPHIBIANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A review of the 1982 world literature was conducted on the effects of pollution on freshwater fish and amphibians. This review contained 378 references and included papers on water quality such as dissolved gases and pH; chemical pollutants such as insecticides, herbicides, pesti...

  13. Introduction The decline and wealth of amphibian populations

    E-print Network

    Carranza, Salvador

    in the herpetological scientific community since the past eight decades. One of the most worrisome phenomena sexed based in the presence of secondary sexual characters (morphology of cloacal area) and considered , Fčlix Amat2 and Salvador Carranza3 1 Catalonian Reptile and Amphibian rehabilitation Center (CRARC

  14. Deciphering amphibian diversity through DNA barcoding: chances and challenges

    E-print Network

    Vieites, David R.

    will be greatly facilitated by a DNA barcoding system; however, the mitochondrial population structure of many. We suggest that a number of mitochondrial and nuclear genes may be used as DNA barcoding markersDeciphering amphibian diversity through DNA barcoding: chances and challenges Miguel Vences1

  15. Effects of pollution on freshwater fish and amphibians

    SciTech Connect

    Pickering, Q.H.; Hunt, E.P.; Phipps, G.L.; Roush, T.H.; Smith, W.E.; Spehar, D.L.; Stephan, C.E.; Tanner, D.K.

    1983-06-01

    A literature review is presented dealing with studies on the effects of pollution on freshwater fish and amphibians. The pollutants studied included acid mine drainage, PCBs, cadmium, lead, naphthalene, plutonium, in addition to several studies dealing with pH effects. (JMT)

  16. Using Amphibians and Reptiles To Learn the Process of Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Janice Schnake; Greene, Brian D.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses using amphibians and reptiles as an excellent resource for students to observe and gain an understanding of the process of science. These animals are easy to maintain in the classroom and play important roles in ecosystems as the prey for many birds and mammals and as the predators of various organisms. (SAH)

  17. A view of amphibian embryology during the last century

    E-print Network

    Gurdon, John

    2015-01-01

    Having started working in the field of amphibian embryology over 50 years ago, I make some comments about the changes that seem to me to have taken place in this field over this period. Over the period 1885 to 1960, much of the highly regarded...

  18. Emerging contaminants and their potential effects on amphibians and reptiles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Serious threats to the health and sustainability of global amphibian populations have been well documented over the last few decades. Encroachment upon and destruction of primary habitat is the most critical threat, but some species have disappeared while their habitat remains. Additional stressor...

  19. Amphibian and bird assemblages at hardwood bottomland restoration

    E-print Network

    Gray, Matthew

    farm bill by USDA NRCS ­ Voluntary program for landowners ­ Retires marginal agricultural land from Reference sites Mar ­ Aug 2008 #12;· Two plots at each site ­ minimum 250 m apart ­ Located in highest Call index (1 ­ 3) assigned to each species Sampled 2x per month Mar ­ August 2008 #12;Amphibian

  20. Widespread Occurrence of Ranavirus in Pond-Breeding Amphibian Populations

    E-print Network

    Gray, Matthew

    practices that reduce the water quality of amphibian breeding habitats (e.g., cattle access to wetlands are relatively persistent in these systems. Cattle had negative effects on water quality (turbidity and ammonia field studies in North America, we found a significant positive association between water temperature

  1. On the Worrying Fate of Data Deficient Amphibians

    PubMed Central

    Nori, Javier; Loyola, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    The ‘Data Deficient’ (DD) category of the IUCN Red List assembles species that cannot be placed in another category due to insufficient information. This process generates uncertainty about whether these species are safe or actually in danger. Here, we give a global overview on the current situation of DD amphibian species (almost a quarter of living amphibians) considering land-use change through habitat modification, the degree of protection of each species and the socio-political context of each country harboring DD species. We found that DD amphibians have, on average, 81% of their ranges totally outside protected areas. Worryingly, more than half of DD species have less than 1% of their distribution represented in protected areas. Furthermore, the percentage of overlap between species’ range and human-modified landscapes is high, at approximately 58%. Many countries harboring a large number of DD species show a worrying socio-political trend illustrated by substantial, recent incremental increases in the Human Development Index and lower incremental increases in the establishment of protected areas. Most of these are African countries, which are located mainly in the central and southern regions of the continent. Other countries with similar socio-political trends are in southeastern Asia, Central America, and in the northern region of South America. This situation is concerning, but it also creates a huge opportunity for considering DD amphibians in future conservation assessments, planning, and policy at different levels of government administration. PMID:25965422

  2. Autocrine regulation of ecdysone synthesis by ?3-octopamine receptor in the prothoracic gland is essential for Drosophila metamorphosis

    PubMed Central

    Ohhara, Yuya; Shimada-Niwa, Yuko; Niwa, Ryusuke; Kayashima, Yasunari; Hayashi, Yoshiki; Akagi, Kazutaka; Ueda, Hitoshi; Yamakawa-Kobayashi, Kimiko; Kobayashi, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    In Drosophila, pulsed production of the steroid hormone ecdysone plays a pivotal role in developmental transitions such as metamorphosis. Ecdysone production is regulated in the prothoracic gland (PG) by prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH) and insulin-like peptides (Ilps). Here, we show that monoaminergic autocrine regulation of ecdysone biosynthesis in the PG is essential for metamorphosis. PG-specific knockdown of a monoamine G protein-coupled receptor, ?3-octopamine receptor (Oct?3R), resulted in arrested metamorphosis due to lack of ecdysone. Knockdown of tyramine biosynthesis genes expressed in the PG caused similar defects in ecdysone production and metamorphosis. Moreover, PTTH and Ilps signaling were impaired by Oct?3R knockdown in the PG, and activation of these signaling pathways rescued the defect in metamorphosis. Thus, monoaminergic autocrine signaling in the PG regulates ecdysone biogenesis in a coordinated fashion on activation by PTTH and Ilps. We propose that monoaminergic autocrine signaling acts downstream of a body size checkpoint that allows metamorphosis to occur when nutrients are sufficiently abundant. PMID:25605909

  3. Spatial Biodiversity Patterns of Madagascar's Amphibians and Reptiles.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jason L; Sillero, Neftali; Glaw, Frank; Bora, Parfait; Vieites, David R; Vences, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Madagascar has become a model region for testing hypotheses of species diversification and biogeography, and many studies have focused on its diverse and highly endemic herpetofauna. Here we combine species distribution models of a near-complete set of species of reptiles and amphibians known from the island with body size data and a tabulation of herpetofaunal communities from field surveys, compiled up to 2008. Though taxonomic revisions and novel distributional records arose since compilation, we are confident that the data are appropriate for inferring and comparing biogeographic patterns among these groups of organisms. We observed species richness of both amphibians and reptiles was highest in the humid rainforest biome of eastern Madagascar, but reptiles also show areas of high richness in the dry and subarid western biomes. In several amphibian subclades, especially within the Mantellidae, species richness peaks in the central eastern geographic regions while in reptiles different subclades differ distinctly in their richness centers. A high proportion of clades and subclades of both amphibians and reptiles have a peak of local endemism in the topographically and bioclimatically diverse northern geographic regions. This northern area is roughly delimited by a diagonal spanning from 15.5°S on the east coast to ca. 15.0°S on the west coast. Amphibian diversity is highest at altitudes between 800-1200 m above sea-level whereas reptiles have their highest richness at low elevations, probably reflecting the comparatively large number of species specialized to the extended low-elevation areas in the dry and subarid biomes. We found that the range sizes of both amphibians and reptiles strongly correlated with body size, and differences between the two groups are explained by the larger body sizes of reptiles. However, snakes have larger range sizes than lizards which cannot be readily explained by their larger body sizes alone. Range filling, i.e., the amount of suitable habitat occupied by a species, is less expressed in amphibians than in reptiles, possibly reflecting their lower dispersal capacity. Taxonomic composition of communities assessed by field surveys is largely explained by bioclimatic regions, with communities from the dry and especially subarid biomes distinctly differing from humid and subhumid biomes. PMID:26735688

  4. Applied reproductive technologies and genetic resource banking for amphibian conservation.

    PubMed

    Kouba, Andrew J; Vance, Carrie K

    2009-01-01

    As amphibian populations continue to decline, both government and non-government organisations are establishing captive assurance colonies to secure populations deemed at risk of extinction if left in the wild. For the most part, little is known about the nutritional ecology, reproductive biology or husbandry needs of the animals placed into captive breeding programs. Because of this lack of knowledge, conservation biologists are currently facing the difficult task of maintaining and reproducing these species. Academic and zoo scientists are beginning to examine different technologies for maintaining the genetic diversity of founder populations brought out of the wild before the animals become extinct from rapidly spreading epizootic diseases. One such technology is genetic resource banking and applied reproductive technologies for species that are difficult to reproduce reliably in captivity. Significant advances have been made in the last decade for amphibian assisted reproduction including the use of exogenous hormones for induction of spermiation and ovulation, in vitro fertilisation, short-term cold storage of gametes and long-term cryopreservation of spermatozoa. These scientific breakthroughs for a select few species will no doubt serve as models for future assisted breeding protocols and the increasing number of amphibians requiring conservation intervention. However, the development of specialised assisted breeding protocols that can be applied to many different families of amphibians will likely require species-specific modifications considering their wide range of reproductive modes. The purpose of this review is to summarise the current state of knowledge in the area of assisted reproduction technologies and gene banking for the conservation of amphibians. PMID:19567216

  5. Development of a mobile application for amphibian species recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parveen, B.; H, Chew T.; Shamsir, M. S.; Ahmad, N.

    2014-02-01

    The smartphones mobility and its pervasiveness are beginning to transform practices in biodiversity conservation. The integrated functionalities of a smartphone have created for the public and biodiversity specialists means to identify, gather and record biodiversity data while simultaneously creating knowledge portability in the digital forms of mobile guides. Smartphones enable beginners to recreate the delight of species identification usually reserved for specialist with years of experience. Currently, the advent of Android platform has enabled stakeholders in biodiversity to harness the ubiquity of this platform and create various types of mobile application or "apps" for use in biodiversity research and conservation. However, there is an apparent lack of application devoted to the identification in herpetofauna or amphibian science. Amphibians are a large class of animals with many different species still unidentified under this category. Here we describe the development of an app called Amphibian Recognition Android Application (ARAA) to identify frog amphibian species as well as an accompanying field guide. The app has the amphibian taxonomic key which assists the users in easy and rapid species identification, thus facilitating the process of identification and recording of species occurrences in conservation work. We will also present an overview of the application work flow and how it is designed to meet the needs a conservationist. As this application is still in its beta phase, further research is required to improve the application to include tools such automatic geolocation and geotagging, participative sensing via crowdsourcing and automated identification via image capture. We believe that the introduction of this app will create an impetus to the awareness of nature via species identification.

  6. Widespread occurrence of ranavirus in pond-breeding amphibian populations.

    PubMed

    Hoverman, Jason T; Gray, Matthew J; Miller, Debra L; Haislip, Nathan A

    2012-03-01

    Ranaviruses are an emerging threat for many amphibian populations, yet their distribution in amphibian communities and the association of infection with possible stressors and species is not fully understood due to historically sparse surveillance. Agricultural practices that reduce the water quality of amphibian breeding habitats (e.g., cattle access to wetlands) and environmental stressors (e.g., lower temperatures) may contribute to ranavirus emergence. We tested larval amphibians for ranavirus infection across four seasons in farm ponds (n = 40) located in Tennessee, USA. Cattle at various densities were allowed access to half of the sampled ponds. Ranavirus infections were detected in nine species and in 33 of the sampled ponds (83%), illustrating widespread occurrence of the pathogen. Species within the family Ranidae were the most frequently infected. In 13 of the ponds containing infected individuals, prevalence exceeded 40% during at least one season. Infections were detected in multiple seasons in 20 of the sampled ponds containing infections, suggesting that ranaviruses are relatively persistent in these systems. Cattle had negative effects on water quality (turbidity and ammonia) and there was a positive association between cattle abundance and ranavirus prevalence in the summer. Counter to previous field studies in North America, we found a significant positive association between water temperature and ranavirus prevalence in the fall sampling events. Despite these findings, the influences of cattle and temperature on ranavirus prevalence were not consistent across seasons. As such, the mechanisms driving high ranavirus prevalence across the landscape and over time remain unclear. Given the widespread occurrence of ranaviruses in wild amphibians, we encourage the implementation of surveillance programs to help identify potential drivers of emergence. Sites with high ranavirus prevalence should be monitored annually for outbreaks, and the long-term effects on population size determined. PMID:22173292

  7. Inventory of amphibians and reptiles at Death Valley National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Persons, Trevor B.; Nowak, Erika M.

    2006-01-01

    As part of the National Park Service Inventory and Monitoring Program in the Mojave Network, we conducted an inventory of amphibians and reptiles at Death Valley National Park in 2002-04. Objectives for this inventory were to: 1) Inventory and document the occurrence of reptile and amphibian species occurring at DEVA, primarily within priority sampling areas, with the goal of documenting at least 90% of the species present; 2) document (through collection or museum specimen and literature review) one voucher specimen for each species identified; 3) provide a GIS-referenced list of sensitive species that are federally or state listed, rare, or worthy of special consideration that occur within priority sampling locations; 4) describe park-wide distribution of federally- or state-listed, rare, or special concern species; 5) enter all species data into the National Park Service NPSpecies database; and 6) provide all deliverables as outlined in the Mojave Network Biological Inventory Study Plan. Methods included daytime and nighttime visual encounter surveys, road driving, and pitfall trapping. Survey effort was concentrated in predetermined priority sampling areas, as well as in areas with a high potential for detecting undocumented species. We recorded 37 species during our surveys, including two species new to the park. During literature review and museum specimen database searches, we recorded three additional species from DEVA, elevating the documented species list to 40 (four amphibians and 36 reptiles). Based on our surveys, as well as literature and museum specimen review, we estimate an overall inventory completeness of 92% for Death Valley and an inventory completeness of 73% for amphibians and 95% for reptiles. Key Words: Amphibians, reptiles, Death Valley National Park, Inyo County, San Bernardino County, Esmeralda County, Nye County, California, Nevada, Mojave Desert, Great Basin Desert, inventory, NPSpecies.

  8. Interactions between amphibians' symbiotic bacteria cause the production of emergent anti-fungal metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Loudon, Andrew H.; Holland, Jessica A.; Umile, Thomas P.; Burzynski, Elizabeth A.; Minbiole, Kevin P. C.; Harris, Reid N.

    2014-01-01

    Amphibians possess beneficial skin bacteria that protect against the disease chytridiomycosis by producing secondary metabolites that inhibit the pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). Metabolite production may be a mechanism of competition between bacterial species that results in host protection as a by-product. We expect that some co-cultures of bacterial species or strains will result in greater Bd inhibition than mono-cultures. To test this, we cultured four bacterial isolates (Bacillus sp., Janthinobacterium sp., Pseudomonas sp. and Chitinophaga arvensicola) from red-backed salamanders (Plethodon cinereus) and cultured isolates both alone and together to collect their cell-free supernatants (CFS). We challenged Bd with CFSs from four bacterial species in varying combinations. This resulted in three experimental treatments: (1) CFSs of single isolates; (2) combined CFSs of two isolates; and (3) CFSs from co-cultures. Pair-wise combinations of four bacterial isolates CFSs were assayed against Bd and revealed additive Bd inhibition in 42.2% of trials, synergistic inhibition in 42.2% and no effect in 16.6% of trials. When bacteria isolates were grown in co-cultures, complete Bd inhibition was generally observed, and synergistic inhibition occurred in four out of six trials. A metabolite profile of the most potent co-culture, Bacillus sp. and Chitinophaga arvensicola, was determined with LC-MS and compared with the profiles of each isolate in mono-culture. Emergent metabolites appearing in the co-culture were inhibitory to Bd, and the most potent inhibitor was identified as tryptophol. Thus mono-cultures of bacteria cultured from red-backed salamanders interacted synergistically and additively to inhibit Bd, and such bacteria produced emergent metabolites when cultured together, with even greater pathogen inhibition. Knowledge of how bacterial species interact to inhibit Bd can be used to select probiotics to provide amphibians with protection against Bd. PMID:25191317

  9. Time course for tail regression during metamorphosis of the ascidian Ciona intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Matsunobu, Shohei; Sasakura, Yasunori

    2015-09-01

    In most ascidians, the tadpole-like swimming larvae dramatically change their body-plans during metamorphosis and develop into sessile adults. The mechanisms of ascidian metamorphosis have been researched and debated for many years. Until now information on the detailed time course of the initiation and completion of each metamorphic event has not been described. One dramatic and important event in ascidian metamorphosis is tail regression, in which ascidian larvae lose their tails to adjust themselves to sessile life. In the present study, we measured the time associated with tail regression in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis. Larvae are thought to acquire competency for each metamorphic event in certain developmental periods. We show that the timing with which the competence for tail regression is acquired is determined by the time since hatching, and this timing is not affected by the timing of post-hatching events such as adhesion. Because larvae need to adhere to substrates with their papillae to induce tail regression, we measured the duration for which larvae need to remain adhered in order to initiate tail regression and the time needed for the tail to regress. Larvae acquire the ability to adhere to substrates before they acquire tail regression competence. We found that when larvae adhered before they acquired tail regression competence, they were able to remember the experience of adhesion until they acquired the ability to undergo tail regression. The time course of the events associated with tail regression provides a valuable reference, upon which the cellular and molecular mechanisms of ascidian metamorphosis can be elucidated. PMID:26102482

  10. Changes in the Gut Microbiome of the Sea Lamprey during Metamorphosis

    PubMed Central

    Tetlock, Amanda; Yost, Christopher K.; Stavrinides, John

    2012-01-01

    Vertebrate metamorphosis is often marked by dramatic morphological and physiological changes of the alimentary tract, along with major shifts in diet following development from larva to adult. Little is known about how these developmental changes impact the gut microbiome of the host organism. The metamorphosis of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) from a sedentary filter-feeding larva to a free-swimming sanguivorous parasite is characterized by major physiological and morphological changes to all organ systems. The transformation of the alimentary canal includes closure of the larval esophagus and the physical isolation of the pharynx from the remainder of the gut, which results in a nonfeeding period that can last up to 8 months. To determine how the gut microbiome is affected by metamorphosis, the microbial communities of feeding and nonfeeding larval and parasitic sea lamprey were surveyed using both culture-dependent and -independent methods. Our results show that the gut of the filter-feeding larva contains a greater diversity of bacteria than that of the blood-feeding parasite, with the parasite gut being dominated by Aeromonas and, to a lesser extent, Citrobacter and Shewanella. Phylogenetic analysis of the culturable Aeromonas from both the larval and parasitic gut revealed that at least five distinct species were represented. Phenotypic characterization of these isolates revealed that over half were capable of sheep red blood cell hemolysis, but all were capable of trout red blood cell hemolysis. This suggests that the enrichment of Aeromonas that accompanies metamorphosis is likely related to the sanguivorous lifestyle of the parasitic sea lamprey. PMID:22923392

  11. Effects of nitrate on metamorphosis, thyroid and iodothyronine deiodinases expression in Bufo gargarizans larvae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming; Chai, Lihong; Zhao, Hongfeng; Wu, Minyao; Wang, Hongyuan

    2015-11-01

    Chinese toad (Bufo gargarizans) tadpoles were exposed to nitrate (10, 50 and 100mg/L NO3-N) from the beginning of the larval period through metamorphic climax. We examined the effects of chronic nitrate exposure on metamorphosis, mortality, body size and thyroid gland. In addition, thyroid hormone (TH) levels, type II iodothyronine deiodinase (Dio2) and type III iodothyronine deiodinase (Dio3) mRNA levels were also measured to assess disruption of TH synthesis. Results showed that significant metamorphic delay and mortality increased were caused in larvae exposed to 100mg/L NO3-N. The larvae exposed to 100mg/L NO3-N clearly exhibited a greater reduction in thyroxine (T4) and 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3) levels. Moreover, treatment with NO3-N induced down-regulation of Dio2 mRNA levels and up-regulation of Dio3 mRNA levels, reflecting the disruption of thyroid endocrine. It seems that increased mass and body size may be correlated with prolonged metamorphosis. Interestingly, we observed an exception that exposure to 100mg/L NO3-N did not exhibit remarkable alterations of thyroid gland size. Compared with control groups, 100mg/L NO3-N caused partial colloid depletion in the thyroid gland follicles. These results suggest that nitrate can act as a chemical stressor inducing retardation in development and metamorphosis. Therefore, we concluded that the presence of high concentrations nitrate can influence the growth, decline the survival, impair TH synthesis and induce metamorphosis retardation of B. gargarizans larvae. PMID:26210189

  12. Redefining metamorphosis in spiny lobsters: molecular analysis of the phyllosoma to puerulus transition in Sagmariasus verreauxi

    PubMed Central

    Ventura, Tomer; Fitzgibbon, Quinn P.; Battaglene, Stephen C.; Elizur, Abigail

    2015-01-01

    The molecular understanding of crustacean metamorphosis is hindered by small sized individuals and inability to accurately define molt stages. We used the spiny lobster Sagmariasus verreauxi where the large, transparent larvae enable accurate tracing of the transition from a leaf-shaped phyllosoma to an intermediate larval-juvenile phase (puerulus). Transcriptomic analysis of larvae at well-defined stages prior to, during, and following this transition show that the phyllosoma-puerulus metamorphic transition is accompanied by vast transcriptomic changes exceeding 25% of the transcriptome. Notably, genes previously identified as regulating metamorphosis in other crustaceans do not fluctuate during this transition but in the later, morphologically-subtle puerulus-juvenile transition, indicating that the dramatic phyllosoma-puerulus morphological shift relies on a different, yet to be identified metamorphic mechanism. We examined the change in expression of domains and gene families, with focus on several key genes. Our research implies that the separation in molecular triggering systems between the phyllosoma-puerulus and puerulus-juvenile transitions might have enabled the extension of the oceanic phase in spiny lobsters. Study of similar transitions, where metamorphosis is uncoupled from the transition into the benthic juvenile form, in other commercially important crustacean groups might show common features to point on the evolutionary advantage of this two staged regulation. PMID:26311524

  13. Changes in lipid composition during metamorphosis of bonefish (Albula sp.) leptocephali.

    PubMed

    Padrón, D; Lindley, V A; Pfeiler, E

    1996-05-01

    During metamorphosis of bonefish (Albula sp.) larvae (leptocephali) all energy requirements are provided by breakdown of endogenous compounds, with lipid catabolism accounting for about 80% of total energy production. The principal objective of the present study was to characterize the lipid classes and fatty acids utilized. Analysis of whole-body lipid content indicated that larvae lost about half (3.6 mg) of their total lipid during the 10-d period. Percentages of neutral and polar lipid in early metamorphosing larvae were 64.2 and 35.8%, respectively; these values showed little change during metamorphosis, indicating that both lipid classes were catabolized. Triacylglycerols, the principal neutral lipid of all metamorphic stages, decreased by 1.8 mg, accounting for half of the decrease in total lipid. Levels of phosphatidylethanolamine, the principal polar lipid in early larvae, decreased by more than 50% during metamorphosis; levels of phosphatidylcholine, which was not detected in early larvae, increased. Fatty acids showing the largest net decreases, presumedly used as energy sources, were 16:0 (30.4%), 14:0 (13.8%), 16:1n-7 (12.2%), 20:5n-3 (7.7%), 18:1n-9 (7.4%), and 18:4n-3 (6.9%). Most of 22:6n-3, the second most abundant fatty acid of early larvae, was conserved. PMID:8727644

  14. Redefining metamorphosis in spiny lobsters: molecular analysis of the phyllosoma to puerulus transition in Sagmariasus verreauxi.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Tomer; Fitzgibbon, Quinn P; Battaglene, Stephen C; Elizur, Abigail

    2015-01-01

    The molecular understanding of crustacean metamorphosis is hindered by small sized individuals and inability to accurately define molt stages. We used the spiny lobster Sagmariasus verreauxi where the large, transparent larvae enable accurate tracing of the transition from a leaf-shaped phyllosoma to an intermediate larval-juvenile phase (puerulus). Transcriptomic analysis of larvae at well-defined stages prior to, during, and following this transition show that the phyllosoma-puerulus metamorphic transition is accompanied by vast transcriptomic changes exceeding 25% of the transcriptome. Notably, genes previously identified as regulating metamorphosis in other crustaceans do not fluctuate during this transition but in the later, morphologically-subtle puerulus-juvenile transition, indicating that the dramatic phyllosoma-puerulus morphological shift relies on a different, yet to be identified metamorphic mechanism. We examined the change in expression of domains and gene families, with focus on several key genes. Our research implies that the separation in molecular triggering systems between the phyllosoma-puerulus and puerulus-juvenile transitions might have enabled the extension of the oceanic phase in spiny lobsters. Study of similar transitions, where metamorphosis is uncoupled from the transition into the benthic juvenile form, in other commercially important crustacean groups might show common features to point on the evolutionary advantage of this two staged regulation. PMID:26311524

  15. Does DNA methylation regulate metamorphosis? The case of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) as an example.

    PubMed

    Covelo-Soto, Lara; Saura, María; Morán, Paloma

    2015-07-01

    Lampreys represent one of the most ancient vertebrate lineages enclosing a special interest for genetic and epigenetic studies. The sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) is an anadromous species that experiences metamorphosis all the way up to the adult stage. Although representing a gradual process, metamorphosis in this species involves dramatic conversions with regard to physiological together with structural body changes preparing individuals for a marine and parasitic life; in consequence, multiple gene expression modifications are expected. The implications of thyroid hormones and HOX gene expression changes have previously been reported in this species and also in other vertebrate species. Nonetheless, information lacks on how these genes are regulated in lampreys. We here report about the existence of methylation pattern differences between the adult and the larvae sea lamprey life cycle stages making use of the Methylation-Sensitive Amplified Polymorphism (MSAP) technique. Differentially methylated fragment sequencing allowed to establish homologous identities with HOX genes involved in morphogenesis, along with genes related to the water balance and to the osmotic homoeostasis, all associated to a marine environment adaptation. These results provide evidences revealing that DNA methylation plays a role in the epigenetic regulation of the P. marinus post-natal development representing a starting point for future studies. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study which detects DNA methylation changes associated with metamorphosis in lampreys. PMID:25863144

  16. Larval development and metamorphosis of the deep-sea cidaroid urchin Cidaris blakei.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Kathleen C; Young, Craig M; Emlet, Richard B

    2012-04-01

    Cidaroids, one of the two major sister clades of sea urchins, first appeared during the lower Permian (ca. 270 mya) and are considered to represent the primitive form of all living echinoids. This study of Cidaris blakei, a deep-sea cidaroid urchin with planktotrophic larvae, provides a description of development from fertilization through early juvenile stages and is the first report of a deep-sea urchin reared through metamorphosis. C. blakei resembles other cidaroids in its lack of a cohesive hyaline layer, the absence of an amniotic invagination for juvenile rudiment formation, and the presence of spines with a single morphotype at metamorphosis. C. blakei differed from other cidaroids in the presence of an apical tuft, the extent of fenestration of postoral skeletal rods, the shape of juvenile spines, and an extended (14-day) lecithotrophic stage prior to development of a complete gut. The development of C. blakei, 120 days from fertilization to metamorphosis, was protracted relative to that of shallow-water cidaroids. Preliminary work on temperature tolerances suggests that C. blakei larvae would be unable to survive the warmer temperatures higher in the water column and are therefore unable to vertically migrate. PMID:22589401

  17. Larger Body Size at Metamorphosis Enhances Survival, Growth and Performance of Young Cane Toads (Rhinella marina)

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera-Guzmán, Elisa; Crossland, Michael R.; Brown, Gregory P.; Shine, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Body size at metamorphosis is a key trait in species (such as many anurans) with biphasic life-histories. Experimental studies have shown that metamorph size is highly plastic, depending upon larval density and environmental conditions (e.g. temperature, food supply, water quality, chemical cues from conspecifics, predators and competitors). To test the hypothesis that this developmental plasticity is adaptive, or to determine if inducing plasticity can be used to control an invasive species, we need to know whether or not a metamorphosing anuran’s body size influences its subsequent viability. For logistical reasons, there are few data on this topic under field conditions. We studied cane toads (Rhinella marina) within their invasive Australian range. Metamorph body size is highly plastic in this species, and our laboratory studies showed that larger metamorphs had better locomotor performance (both on land and in the water), and were more adept at catching and consuming prey. In mark-recapture trials in outdoor enclosures, larger body size enhanced metamorph survival and growth rate under some seasonal conditions. Larger metamorphs maintained their size advantage over smaller siblings for at least a month. Our data support the critical but rarely-tested assumption that all else being equal, larger body size at metamorphosis is likely to enhance an individual’s long term viability. Thus, manipulations to reduce body size at metamorphosis in cane toads may help to reduce the ecological impact of this invasive species. PMID:23922930

  18. Involvement of Wnt Signaling Pathways in the Metamorphosis of the Bryozoan Bugula neritina

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Yue Him; Wang, Hao; Ravasi, Timothy; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed the metamorphosis of the marine bryozoan Bugula neritina. We observed the morphogenesis of the ancestrula. We defined three distinct pre-ancestrula stages based on the anatomy of the developing polypide and the overall morphology of pre-ancestrula. We then used an annotation based enrichment analysis tool to analyze the B. neritina transcriptome and identified over-representation of genes related to Wnt signaling pathways, suggesting its involvement in metamorphosis. Finally, we studied the temporal-spatial gene expression studies of several Wnt pathway genes. We found that one of the Wnt ligand, BnWnt10, was expressed spatially opposite to the Wnt antagonist BnsFRP within the blastemas, which is the presumptive polypide. Down-stream components of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway were exclusively expressed in the blastemas. Bn?catenin and BnFz5/8 were exclusively expressed in the blastemas throughout the metamorphosis. Based on the genes expression patterns, we propose that BnWnt10 and BnsFRP may relate to the patterning of the polypide, in which the two genes served as positional signals and contributed to the polarization of the blastemas. Another Wnt ligand, BnWnt6, was expressed in the apical part of the pre-ancestrula epidermis. Overall, our findings suggest that the Wnt signaling pathway may be important to the pattern formation of polypide and the development of epidermis. PMID:22448242

  19. Evidence for early metamorphosis of sea lampreys in the Chippewa River, Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morkert, Sidney B.; Swink, William D.; Seelye, James G.

    1998-01-01

    We determined age at metamorphosis to the juvenile or parasitic phase for sea lampreys Petromyzon marinus in a highly productive Great Lakes tributary to determine if the age at metamorphosis was earlier than expected. Ages determined from statoliths, a structure analogous to otoliths in teleost fishes, indicated that many sea lampreys collected from the Chippewa River, Michigan, in September 1995 were undergoing metamorphosis at age 2, at least 1 year earlier than previously observed. In all, 141 newly metamorphosed lampreys were examined, and 81% were estimated to be only 2 years old. The length-frequency distribution of newly metamorphosed sea lampreys in the Chippewa River also indicated the possibility of metamorphsis at age 2, but to a lesser extent than indicated by statolith aging. The Chippewa River is a highly productive stream that might require more frequent treatment than previously suspected. More careful examination of other highly productive streams is needed to determine if, and to what extent, sea lampreys metamorphose at age 2 in the Chippewa River and other Great Lakes tributaries.

  20. Initial characterization of receptors for molecules that induce the settlement and metamorphosis of Haliotis rufescens larvae

    SciTech Connect

    Trapido-Rosenthal, H.G.

    1985-01-01

    Larvae of the marine gastropod mollusc Haliotis refescens are induced to undergo metamorphosis by ..gamma..-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and stereochemically related compounds. The most potent of these inducers is (-)-..beta..-(parachlorophenyl)-GABA (baclofen). The inductive response exhibits positive cooperatively, and is subject to both facilitation (up-regulation) and habituation (down-regulation). Facilitation is brought about by diamino acids such as L-diaminopropionic acid (L-DAPA), and is characterized by decreased Hill coefficients (n/sub H/) and concentration requirements (EC/sub 50/) for inducers. Facilitation does not require the simultaneous presence of facilitating and inducing compounds, and the facilitated state is persistent. Larvae are capable of being up-regulated 2 days before they are capable of undergoing settlement and metamorphosis. Habituation can be brought about by exposure of pre-competent larvae to GABA 4 days prior to the attainment of competence; it is then slowly reversible. Larvae specifically bind tritiated (-)-baclofen in a manner that is saturable with both increasing time of exposure of larvae to, and with increasing concentration of, this compound. Specific binding can be competed for by unlabeled GABA-mimetic inducing molecules; the order of effectiveness of these molecules as competitors for specific binding correlates well with their effectiveness as inducers of metamorphosis. Facilitation of larvae by exposure to diamino acids does not alter their specific binding of tritiated (-)-baclofen. It is concluded from these findings that Haliotis larvae possess receptors for GABA-mimetic compounds.

  1. Phase-based metamorphosis of diffusion lesion in relation to perfusion values in acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Rekik, Islem; Allassonničre, Stéphanie; Luby, Marie; Carpenter, Trevor K.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.

    2015-01-01

    Examining the dynamics of stroke ischemia is limited by the standard use of 2D-volume or voxel-based analysis techniques. Recently developed spatiotemporal models such as the 4D metamorphosis model showed promise for capturing ischemia dynamics. We used a 4D metamorphosis model to evaluate acute ischemic stroke lesion morphology from the acute diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) to final T2-weighted imaging (T2-w). In 20 representative patients, we metamorphosed the acute lesion to subacute lesion to final infarct. From the DWI lesion deformation maps we identified dynamic lesion areas and examined their association with perfusion values inside and around the lesion edges, blinded to reperfusion status. We then tested the model in ten independent patients from the STroke Imaging Repository (STIR). Perfusion values varied widely between and within patients, and were similar in contracting and expanding DWI areas in many patients in both datasets. In 25% of patients, the perfusion values were higher in DWI-contracting than DWI-expanding areas. A similar wide range of perfusion values and ongoing expansion and contraction of the DWI lesion were seen subacutely. There was more DWI contraction and less expansion in patients who received thrombolysis, although with widely ranging perfusion values that did not differ. 4D metamorphosis modeling shows promise as a method to improve use of multimodal imaging to understand the evolution of acute ischemic tissue towards its fate. PMID:26288755

  2. Development, organization, and remodeling of phoronid muscles from embryo to metamorphosis (Lophotrochozoa: Phoronida)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The phoronid larva, which is called the actinotrocha, is one of the most remarkable planktotrophic larval types among marine invertebrates. Actinotrochs live in plankton for relatively long periods and undergo catastrophic metamorphosis, in which some parts of the larval body are consumed by the juvenile. The development and organization of the muscular system has never been described in detail for actinotrochs and for other stages in the phoronid life cycle. Results In Phoronopsis harmeri, muscular elements of the preoral lobe and the collar originate in the mid-gastrula stage from mesodermal cells, which have immigrated from the anterior wall of the archenteron. Muscles of the trunk originate from posterior mesoderm together with the trunk coelom. The organization of the muscular system in phoronid larvae of different species is very complex and consists of 14 groups of muscles. The telotroch constrictor, which holds the telotroch in the larval body during metamorphosis, is described for the first time. This unusual muscle is formed by apical myofilaments of the epidermal cells. Most larval muscles are formed by cells with cross-striated organization of myofibrils. During metamorphosis, most elements of the larval muscular system degenerate, but some of them remain and are integrated into the juvenile musculature. Conclusion Early steps of phoronid myogenesis reflect the peculiarities of the actinotroch larva: the muscle of the preoral lobe is the first muscle to appear, and it is important for food capture. The larval muscular system is organized in differently in different phoronid larvae, but always exhibits a complexity that probably results from the long pelagic life, planktotrophy, and catastrophic metamorphosis. Degeneration of the larval muscular system during phoronid metamorphosis occurs in two ways, i.e., by complete or by incomplete destruction of larval muscular elements. The organization and remodeling of the muscular system in phoronids exhibits the combination of protostome-like and deuterostome-like features. This combination, which has also been found in the organization of some other systems in phoronids, can be regarded as an important characteristic and one that probably reflects the basal position of phoronids within the Lophotrochozoa. PMID:23617418

  3. FMAj: a tool for high content analysis of muscle dynamics in Drosophila metamorphosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background During metamorphosis in Drosophila melanogaster, larval muscles undergo two different developmental fates; one population is removed by cell death, while the other persistent subset undergoes morphological remodeling and survives to adulthood. Thanks to the ability to perform live imaging of muscle development in transparent pupae and the power of genetics, metamorphosis in Drosophila can be used as a model to study the regulation of skeletal muscle mass. However, time-lapse microscopy generates sizeable image data that require new tools for high throughput image analysis. Results We performed targeted gene perturbation in muscles and acquired 3D time-series images of muscles in metamorphosis using laser scanning confocal microscopy. To quantify the phenotypic effects of gene perturbations, we designed the Fly Muscle Analysis tool (FMAj) which is based on the ImageJ and MySQL frameworks for image processing and data storage, respectively. The image analysis pipeline of FMAj contains three modules. The first module assists in adding annotations to time-lapse datasets, such as genotypes, experimental parameters and temporal reference points, which are used to compare different datasets. The second module performs segmentation and feature extraction of muscle cells and nuclei. Users can provide annotations to the detected objects, such as muscle identities and anatomical information. The third module performs comparative quantitative analysis of muscle phenotypes. We applied our tool to the phenotypic characterization of two atrophy related genes that were silenced by RNA interference. Reduction of Drosophila Tor (Target of Rapamycin) expression resulted in enhanced atrophy compared to control, while inhibition of the autophagy factor Atg9 caused suppression of atrophy and enlarged muscle fibers of abnormal morphology. FMAj enabled us to monitor the progression of atrophic and hypertrophic phenotypes of individual muscles throughout metamorphosis. Conclusions We designed a new tool to visualize and quantify morphological changes of muscles in time-lapse images of Drosophila metamorphosis. Our in vivo imaging experiments revealed that evolutionarily conserved genes involved in Tor signalling and autophagy, perform similar functions in regulating muscle mass in mammals and Drosophila. Extending our approach to a genome-wide scale has the potential to identify new genes involved in muscle size regulation. PMID:25521203

  4. A field guide to amphibian larvae and eggs of Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parmelee, J.R.; Knutson, M.G.; Lyon, J.E.

    2002-01-01

    Apparent worldwide declines in amphibian populations (Pechmann and Wake 1997) have stimulated interest in amphibians as bioindicators of the health of ecosystems. Because we have little information on the population status of many species, there is interest by public and private land management agencies in monitoring amphibian populations. Amphibian egg and larval surveys are established methods of surveying pond-breeding amphibians. Adults may be widely dispersed across the landscape, but eggs and larvae are confined to the breeding site during a specific season of the year. Also, observations of late-stage larvae or metamorphs are evidence of successful reproduction, which is an important indicator of the viability of the population. The goal of this guide is to help students, natural resources personnel, and biologists identify eggs and larval stages of amphibians in the field without the aid of a microscope.

  5. Salmonella enterica serotype Javiana infections associated with amphibian contact, Mississippi, 2001.

    PubMed Central

    Srikantiah, P.; Lay, J. C.; Hand, S.; Crump, J. A.; Campbell, J.; Van Duyne, M. S.; Bishop, R.; Middendor, R.; Currier, M.; Mead, P. S.; Mřlbak, K.

    2004-01-01

    Salmonella Javiana is a Salmonella serotype that is restricted geographically in the United States to the Southeast. During the summer of 2001, the number of reported S. Javiana infections in Mississippi increased sevenfold. To identify sources of infection, we conducted a case-control study, defining a case as an infection with S. Javiana between August and September in a Mississippi resident. We enrolled 55 cases and 109 controls. Thirty (55%) case patients reported exposure to amphibians, defined as owning, touching, or seeing an amphibian on one's property, compared with 30 (29%) controls (matched odds ratio 2.8, P=0.006). Contact with amphibians and their environments may be a risk factor for human infection with S. Javiana. The geographic pattern of S. Javiana infections in the United States mimics the distribution of certain amphibian species in the Southeast. Public health officials should consider amphibians as potential sources of salmonellosis, and promote hand washing after contact with amphibians. PMID:15061502

  6. The Current and Historical Distribution of Special Status Amphibians at the Livermore Site and Site 300

    SciTech Connect

    Hattem, M V; Paterson, L; Woollett, J

    2008-08-20

    65 surveys were completed in 2002 to assess the current distribution of special status amphibians at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Livermore Site and Site 300. Combined with historical information from previous years, the information presented herein illustrates the dynamic and probable risk that amphibian populations face at both sites. The Livermore Site is developed and in stark contrast to the mostly undeveloped Site 300. Yet both sites have significant issues threatening the long-term sustainability of their respective amphibian populations. Livermore Site amphibians are presented with a suite of challenges inherent of urban interfaces, most predictably the bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana), while Site 300's erosion issues and periodic feral pig (Sus scrofa) infestations reduce and threaten populations. The long-term sustainability of LLNL's special status amphibians will require active management and resource commitment to maintain and restore amphibian habitat at both sites.

  7. Early 1900s Detection of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in Korean Amphibians

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Jonathan J.; Cheng, Tina L.; Bataille, Arnaud; Pessier, Allan P.; Waldman, Bruce; Vredenburg, Vance T.

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) is a major conservation concern because of its role in decimating amphibian populations worldwide. We used quantitative PCR to screen 244 museum specimens from the Korean Peninsula, collected between 1911 and 2004, for the presence of Bd to gain insight into its history in Asia. Three specimens of Rugosa emeljanovi (previously Rana or Glandirana rugosa), collected in 1911 from Wonsan, North Korea, tested positive for Bd. Histology of these positive specimens revealed mild hyperkeratosis – a non-specific host response commonly found in Bd-infected frogs – but no Bd zoospores or zoosporangia. Our results indicate that Bd was present in Korea more than 100 years ago, consistent with hypotheses suggesting that Korean amphibians may be infected by endemic Asian Bd strains. PMID:25738656

  8. Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis infection and lethal chytridiomycosis in caecilian amphibians (Gymnophiona).

    PubMed

    Gower, David J; Doherty-Bone, Thomas; Loader, Simon P; Wilkinson, Mark; Kouete, Marcel T; Tapley, Benjamin; Orton, Frances; Daniel, Olivia Z; Wynne, Felicity; Flach, Edmund; Müller, Hendrik; Menegon, Michele; Stephen, Ian; Browne, Robert K; Fisher, Mathew C; Cunningham, Andrew A; Garner, Trenton W J

    2013-06-01

    Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) is commonly termed the 'amphibian chytrid fungus' but thus far has been documented to be a pathogen of only batrachian amphibians (anurans and caudatans). It is not proven to infect the limbless, generally poorly known, and mostly soil-dwelling caecilians (Gymnophiona). We conducted the largest qPCR survey of Bd in caecilians to date, for more than 200 field-swabbed specimens from five countries in Africa and South America, representing nearly 20 species, 12 genera, and 8 families. Positive results were recovered for 58 specimens from Tanzania and Cameroon (4 families, 6 genera, 6+ species). Quantities of Bd were not exceptionally high, with genomic equivalent (GE) values of 0.052-17.339. In addition, we report the first evidence of lethal chytridiomycosis in caecilians. Mortality in captive (wild-caught, commercial pet trade) Geotrypetes seraphini was associated with GE scores similar to those we detected for field-swabbed, wild animals. PMID:23677560

  9. Evaluating the links between climate, disease spread, and amphibian declines.

    PubMed

    Rohr, Jason R; Raffel, Thomas R; Romansic, John M; McCallum, Hamish; Hudson, Peter J

    2008-11-11

    Human alteration of the environment has arguably propelled the Earth into its sixth mass extinction event and amphibians, the most threatened of all vertebrate taxa, are at the forefront. Many of the worldwide amphibian declines have been caused by the chytrid fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), and two contrasting hypotheses have been proposed to explain these declines. Positive correlations between global warming and Bd-related declines sparked the chytrid-thermal-optimum hypothesis, which proposes that global warming increased cloud cover in warm years that drove the convergence of daytime and nighttime temperatures toward the thermal optimum for Bd growth. In contrast, the spatiotemporal-spread hypothesis states that Bd-related declines are caused by the introduction and spread of Bd, independent of climate change. We provide a rigorous test of these hypotheses by evaluating (i) whether cloud cover, temperature convergence, and predicted temperature-dependent Bd growth are significant positive predictors of amphibian extinctions in the genus Atelopus and (ii) whether spatial structure in the timing of these extinctions can be detected without making assumptions about the location, timing, or number of Bd emergences. We show that there is spatial structure to the timing of Atelopus spp. extinctions but that the cause of this structure remains equivocal, emphasizing the need for further molecular characterization of Bd. We also show that the reported positive multi-decade correlation between Atelopus spp. extinctions and mean tropical air temperature in the previous year is indeed robust, but the evidence that it is causal is weak because numerous other variables, including regional banana and beer production, were better predictors of these extinctions. Finally, almost all of our findings were opposite to the predictions of the chytrid-thermal-optimum hypothesis. Although climate change is likely to play an important role in worldwide amphibian declines, more convincing evidence is needed of a causal link. PMID:18987318

  10. Spemann's organizer and self-regulation in amphibian embryos

    PubMed Central

    De Robertis, Edward M.

    2008-01-01

    In 1924, Spemann and Mangold demonstrated the induction of Siamese twins in transplantation experiments with salamander eggs. Recent work in amphibian embryos has followed their lead and uncovered that cells in signalling centres that are located at the dorsal and ventral poles of the gastrula embryo communicate with each other through a network of secreted growth-factor antagonists, a protease that degrades them, a protease inhibitor and bone-morphogenic-protein signals. PMID:16482093

  11. On the origin of and phylogenetic relationships among living amphibians.

    PubMed

    Zardoya, R; Meyer, A

    2001-06-19

    The phylogenetic relationships among the three orders of modern amphibians (Caudata, Gymnophiona, and Anura) have been estimated based on both morphological and molecular evidence. Most morphological and paleontological studies of living and fossil amphibians support the hypothesis that salamanders and frogs are sister lineages (the Batrachia hypothesis) and that caecilians are more distantly related. Previous interpretations of molecular data based on nuclear and mitochondrial rRNA sequences suggested that salamanders and caecilians are sister groups to the exclusion of frogs. In an attempt to resolve this apparent conflict, the complete mitochondrial genomes of a salamander (Mertensiella luschani) and a caecilian (Typhlonectes natans) were determined (16,656 and 17,005 bp, respectively) and compared with previously published sequences from a frog (Xenopus laevis) and several other groups of vertebrates. Phylogenetic analyses of the mitochondrial data supported with high bootstrap values the monophyly of living amphibians with respect to other living groups of tetrapods, and a sister group relationship of salamanders and frogs. The lack of phylogenetically informative sites in the previous rRNA data sets (because of its shorter size and higher among-site rate variation) likely explains the discrepancy between our results and those based on previous molecular data. Strong support of the Batrachia hypothesis from both molecule- and morphology-based studies provides a robust phylogenetic framework that will be helpful to comparative studies among the three living orders of amphibians and will permit better understanding of the considerably divergent vertebral, brain, and digit developmental patterns found in frogs and salamanders. PMID:11390961

  12. Amphibian Development in the Virtual Absence of Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Souza, Kenneth A.; Black, Steven D.; Wassersug, Richard J.

    1995-01-01

    To test whether gravity is required for normal amphibian development, Xenopus laevis females were induced to ovulate aboard the orbiting Space Shuttle. Eggs were fertilized in vitro, and although early embryonic stages showed some abnormalities, the embryos were able to regulate and produce nearly normal larvae. These results demonstrate that a vertebrate can ovulate in the virtual absence of gravity and that the eggs can develop to a free-living stage.

  13. Synergism between UV-B radiation and a pathogen magnifies amphibian embryo mortality in nature.

    PubMed Central

    Kiesecker, J M; Blaustein, A R

    1995-01-01

    Previous research has shown that amphibians have differential sensitivity to ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation. In some species, ambient levels of UV-B radiation cause embryonic mortality in nature. The detrimental effects of UV-B alone or with other agents may ultimately affect amphibians at the population level. Here, we experimentally demonstrate a synergistic effect between UV-B radiation and a pathogenic fungus in the field that increases the mortality of amphibian embryos compared with either factor alone. Studies investigating single factors for causes of amphibian egg mortality or population declines may not reveal the complex factors involved in declines. PMID:7479934

  14. Restored agricultural wetlands in Central Iowa: habitat quality and amphibian response

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pierce, Clay; Rebecca A. Reeves; Smalling, Kelly; Klaver, Robert W.; Vandever, Mark; Battaglin, William A.; Muths, Erin L.

    2015-01-01

    Amphibians are declining throughout the United States and worldwide due, partly, to habitat loss. Conservation practices on the landscape restore wetlands to denitrify tile drainage effluent and restore ecosystem services. Understanding how water quality, hydroperiod, predation, and disease affect amphibians in restored wetlands is central to maintaining healthy amphibian populations in the region. We examined the quality of amphibian habitat in restored wetlands relative to reference wetlands by comparing species richness, developmental stress, and adult leopard frog (Lithobates pipiens) survival probabilities to a suite of environmental metrics. Although measured habitat variables differed between restored and reference wetlands, differences appeared to have sub-lethal rather than lethal effects on resident amphibian populations. There were few differences in amphibian species richness and no difference in estimated survival probabilities between wetland types. Restored wetlands had more nitrate and alkaline pH, longer hydroperiods, and were deeper, whereas reference wetlands had more amphibian chytrid fungus zoospores in water samples and resident amphibians exhibited increased developmental stress. Restored and reference wetlands are both important components of the landscape in central Iowa and maintaining a complex of fish-free wetlands with a variety of hydroperiods will likely contribute to the persistence of amphibians in this landscape.

  15. Perspectives from the Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute: Amphibians and wilderness

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corn, Paul Stephen

    2001-01-01

    The decline of amphibian species has emerged as a major global conservation issue in the last decade. Last year, the Department of the Interior (DOI) initiated a major national initiative to detect trends in amphibian populations and research the causes of declines. The program, conducted principally by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), emphasizes lands managed by DOI, but collaboration with the Forest Service is encouraged to increase the scope of inference about population trends. Although amphibians are not usually the first group of animals that comes to mind when one thinks of wilderness, conservation of amphibian populations is clearly a wilderness issue.

  16. Amphibians and disease: Implications for conservation in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corn, P.S.

    2007-01-01

    The decline of amphibian populations is a world-wide phenomenon that has received increasing attention since about 1990. In 2004, the World Conservation Union’s global amphibian assessment concluded that 48% of the world’s 5,743 described amphibian species were in decline, with 32% considered threatened (Stuart et al. 2004). Amphibian declines are a significant issue in the western United States, where all native species of frogs in the genus Rana and many toads in the genus Bufo are at risk, particularly those that inhabit mountainous areas (Corn 2003a,b; Bradford 2005).

  17. Synergism between UV-B radiation and pathogen magnifies amphibian embryo mortality in nature

    SciTech Connect

    Kiesecker, J.M.; Blaustein, R.

    1995-11-21

    Previous research has shown that amphibians have differential sensitivity to ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation. In some species, ambient levels of UV-B radiation cause embryonic mortality in nature. The detrimental effects of UV-B alone or with other agents may ultimately affect amphibians at the population level. Here, we experimentally demonstrate a synergistic effect between UV-B radiation and a pathogenic fungus in the field that increases the mortality of amphibian embryos compared with either factor alone. Studies investigating single factors for causes of amphibian egg mortality or population declines may not reveal the complex factors involved in declines.

  18. Pentastomiasis and other parasitic zoonoses from reptiles and amphibians.

    PubMed

    Pantchev, Nikola; Tappe, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    Reptiles are growing in popularity as pets.The colonization of reptiles and amphibians by parasites and the resulting disease conditions are the most common problems seen in captive animals.This review focuses on pentastomiasis and sparganosis, important parasitic zoonoses of reptiles and amphibians, respectively, and free living-amoebae. Humans are suitable accidental hosts for some pentastomid species (particularly Armillifer and Porocephalus). In geographical areas with special ethnics, such as in West and Central Africa, and East Asia, 8-45% of the human population can be affected. Usually the larvae are coincidentally found during abdominal surgeries. However, fatalities have been described. Extreme caution is necessary when handling infected reptiles. Ocular or cerebral sparganosis is not uncommonly found in humans in East Asia. This disease is caused by spargana, tapeworm larvae (plerocercoids) of Spirometra sp. The infection occurs when uncooked meat from reptiles or amphibians is applied to wounds or eyes and the parasites migrate directly to human tissue, or by consumption of contaminated food or water. As a consequence of the reptile's predatory behaviour, the full spectrum of endo- and ectoparasites from potential prey animals can be found as transiting parasites in the intestinal tract, e. g. Hymenolepis nana, Cryptosporidium (C.) muris, C parvum or Capillaria hepatica. Occasionally, free-living amoebae are also found in reptile faeces (Acanthamoeba, Naegleria, Hartmanella, Vahlkampfia or Echinamoeba sp.). PMID:22191176

  19. Interventions for reducing extinction risk in chytridiomycosis-threatened amphibians.

    PubMed

    Scheele, Ben C; Hunter, David A; Grogan, Laura F; Berger, Lee; Kolby, Jon E; McFadden, Michael S; Marantelli, Gerry; Skerratt, Lee F; Driscoll, Don A

    2014-10-01

    Wildlife diseases pose an increasing threat to biodiversity and are a major management challenge. A striking example of this threat is the emergence of chytridiomycosis. Despite diagnosis of chytridiomycosis as an important driver of global amphibian declines 15 years ago, researchers have yet to devise effective large-scale management responses other than biosecurity measures to mitigate disease spread and the establishment of disease-free captive assurance colonies prior to or during disease outbreaks. We examined the development of management actions that can be implemented after an epidemic in surviving populations. We developed a conceptual framework with clear interventions to guide experimental management and applied research so that further extinctions of amphibian species threatened by chytridiomycosis might be prevented. Within our framework, there are 2 management approaches: reducing Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (the fungus that causes chytridiomycosis) in the environment or on amphibians and increasing the capacity of populations to persist despite increased mortality from disease. The latter approach emphasizes that mitigation does not necessarily need to focus on reducing disease-associated mortality. We propose promising management actions that can be implemented and tested based on current knowledge and that include habitat manipulation, antifungal treatments, animal translocation, bioaugmentation, head starting, and selection for resistance. Case studies where these strategies are being implemented will demonstrate their potential to save critically endangered species. PMID:24975971

  20. Engineering a future for amphibians under climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shoo, L.P.; Olson, D.H.; Mcmenamin, S.K.; Murray, K.A.; Van Sluys, M.; Donnelly, M.A.; Stratford, D.; Terhivuo, J.; Merino-Viteri, A.; Herbert, S.M.; Bishop, P.J.; Corn, P.S.; Dovey, L.; Griffiths, R.A.; Lowe, K.; Mahony, M.; McCallum, H.; Shuker, J.D.; Simpkins, C.; Skerratt, L.F.; Williams, S.E.; Hero, J.-M.

    2011-01-01

    1.?Altered global climates in the 21st century pose serious threats for biological systems and practical actions are needed to mount a response for species at risk. 2.?We identify management actions from across the world and from diverse disciplines that are applicable to minimizing loss of amphibian biodiversity under climate change. Actions were grouped under three thematic areas of intervention: (i) installation of microclimate and microhabitat refuges; (ii) enhancement and restoration of breeding sites; and (iii) manipulation of hydroperiod or water levels at breeding sites. 3.?Synthesis and applications. There are currently few meaningful management actions that will tangibly impact the pervasive threat of climate change on amphibians. A host of potentially useful but poorly tested actions could be incorporated into local or regional management plans, programmes and activities for amphibians. Examples include: installation of irrigation sprayers to manipulate water potentials at breeding sites; retention or supplementation of natural and artificial shelters (e.g. logs, cover boards) to reduce desiccation and thermal stress; manipulation of canopy cover over ponds to reduce water temperature; and, creation of hydrologoically diverse wetland habitats capable of supporting larval development under variable rainfall regimes. We encourage researchers and managers to design, test and scale up new initiatives to respond to this emerging crisis.

  1. Optimizing protection efforts for amphibian conservation in Mediterranean landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Muńoz, Enrique; Ceacero, Francisco; Carretero, Miguel A.; Pedrajas-Pulido, Luis; Parra, Gema; Guerrero, Francisco

    2013-05-01

    Amphibians epitomize the modern biodiversity crisis, and attract great attention from the scientific community since a complex puzzle of factors has influence on their disappearance. However, these factors are multiple and spatially variable, and declining in each locality is due to a particular combination of causes. This study shows a suitable statistical procedure to determine threats to amphibian species in medium size administrative areas. For our study case, ten biological and ecological variables feasible to affect the survival of 15 amphibian species were categorized and reduced through Principal Component Analysis. The principal components extracted were related to ecological plasticity, reproductive potential, and specificity of breeding habitats. Finally, the factor scores of species were joined in a presence-absence matrix that gives us information to identify where and why conservation management are requires. In summary, this methodology provides the necessary information to maximize benefits of conservation measures in small areas by identifying which ecological factors need management efforts and where should we focus them on.

  2. Subtle roles of microRNAs let-7, miR-100 and miR-125 on wing morphogenesis in hemimetabolan metamorphosis

    E-print Network

    Belles, Xavier

    metamorphosis Mercedes Rubio, Xavier Belles Institute of Evolutionary Biology (CSIC-UPF), Passeig Marítim de la-7 miR-100 miR-125 Wing morphogenesis Insect metamorphosis Blattella a b s t r a c t In most insect

  3. AMPHIBIAN OCCURRENCE AND AQUATIC INVADERS IN A CHANGING LANDSCAPE: IMPLICATIONS FOR WETLAND MITIGATION IN THE WILLAMETTE VALLEY, OREGON, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Despite concern about the conservation status of amphibians in western North America, few field studies have documented occurrence patterns of amphibians relative to potential stressors. We surveyed wetland fauna in Oregon Willamette Valley and used an information theoretic appro...

  4. In many amphibian genera, including Bufo, Rana and Xenopus, tadpoles hatch at an early `tailbud' stage of

    E-print Network

    In many amphibian genera, including Bufo, Rana and Xenopus, tadpoles hatch at an early `tailbud in Great Britain © The Company of Biologists Limited 2000 JEB2629 Many amphibian tadpoles hatch and swim

  5. Turbine sound may influence the metamorphosis behaviour of estuarine crab megalopae.

    PubMed

    Pine, Matthew K; Jeffs, Andrew G; Radford, Craig A

    2012-01-01

    It is now widely accepted that a shift towards renewable energy production is needed in order to avoid further anthropogenically induced climate change. The ocean provides a largely untapped source of renewable energy. As a result, harvesting electrical power from the wind and tides has sparked immense government and commercial interest but with relatively little detailed understanding of the potential environmental impacts. This study investigated how the sound emitted from an underwater tidal turbine and an offshore wind turbine would influence the settlement and metamorphosis of the pelagic larvae of estuarine brachyuran crabs which are ubiquitous in most coastal habitats. In a laboratory experiment the median time to metamorphosis (TTM) for the megalopae of the crabs Austrohelice crassa and Hemigrapsus crenulatus was significantly increased by at least 18 h when exposed to either tidal turbine or sea-based wind turbine sound, compared to silent control treatments. Contrastingly, when either species were subjected to natural habitat sound, observed median TTM decreased by approximately 21-31% compared to silent control treatments, 38-47% compared to tidal turbine sound treatments, and 46-60% compared to wind turbine sound treatments. A lack of difference in median TTM in A. crassa between two different source levels of tidal turbine sound suggests the frequency composition of turbine sound is more relevant in explaining such responses rather than sound intensity. These results show that estuarine mudflat sound mediates natural metamorphosis behaviour in two common species of estuarine crabs, and that exposure to continuous turbine sound interferes with this natural process. These results raise concerns about the potential ecological impacts of sound generated by renewable energy generation systems placed in the nearshore environment. PMID:23240063

  6. Histone acetylation mediates epigenetic regulation of transcriptional reprogramming in insects during metamorphosis, wounding and infection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gene expression in eukaryotes is regulated by histone acetylation/deacetylation, an epigenetic process mediated by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) whose opposing activities are tightly regulated. The acetylation of histones by HATs increases DNA accessibility and promotes gene expression, whereas the removal of acetyl groups by HDACs has the opposite effect. Results We explored the role of HDACs and HATs in epigenetic reprogramming during metamorphosis, wounding and infection in the lepidopteran model host Galleria mellonella. We measured the expression of genes encoding components of HATs and HDACs to monitor the transcriptional activity of each enzyme complex and found that both enzymes were upregulated during pupation. Specific HAT inhibitors were able to postpone pupation and to reduce insect survival following wounding, whereas HDAC inhibitors accelerated pupation and increased survival. The administration of HDAC inhibitors modulated the expression of effector genes with key roles in tissue remodeling (matrix metalloproteinase), the regulation of sepsis (inhibitor of metalloproteinases from insects) and host defense (antimicrobial peptides), and simultaneously induced HAT activity, suggesting that histone acetylation is regulated by a feedback mechanism. We also discovered that both the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae and the human bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes can delay metamorphosis in G. mellonella by skewing the HDAC/HAT balance. Conclusions Our study provides for the first evidence that pathogenic bacteria can interfere with the regulation of HDACs and HATs in insects which appear to manipulate host immunity and development. We conclude that histone acetylation/deacetylation in insects mediates transcriptional reprogramming during metamorphosis and in response to wounding and infection. PMID:23035888

  7. More similar than you think: Frog metamorphosis as a model of human perinatal endocrinology.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, Daniel R

    2015-12-15

    Hormonal control of development during the human perinatal period is critically important and complex with multiple hormones regulating fetal growth, brain development, and organ maturation in preparation for birth. Genetic and environmental perturbations of such hormonal control may cause irreversible morphological and physiological impairments and may also predispose individuals to diseases of adulthood, including diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Endocrine and molecular mechanisms that regulate perinatal development and that underlie the connections between early life events and adult diseases are not well elucidated. Such mechanisms are difficult to study in uterus-enclosed mammalian embryos because of confounding maternal effects. To elucidate mechanisms of developmental endocrinology in the perinatal period, Xenopus laevis the African clawed frog is a valuable vertebrate model. Frogs and humans have identical hormones which peak at birth and metamorphosis, have conserved hormone receptors and mechanisms of gene regulation, and have comparable roles for hormones in many target organs. Study of molecular and endocrine mechanisms of hormone-dependent development in frogs is advantageous because an extended free-living larval period followed by metamorphosis (1) is independent of maternal endocrine influence, (2) exhibits dramatic yet conserved developmental effects induced by thyroid and glucocorticoid hormones, and (3) begins at a developmental stage with naturally undetectable hormone levels, thereby facilitating endocrine manipulation and interpretation of results. This review highlights the utility of frog metamorphosis to elucidate molecular and endocrine actions, hormone interactions, and endocrine disruption, especially with respect to thyroid hormone. Knowledge from the frog model is expected to provide fundamental insights to aid medical understanding of endocrine disease, stress, and endocrine disruption affecting the perinatal period in humans. PMID:25744725

  8. Analysis of gene expression in Homarus americanus larvae exposed to sublethal concentrations of endosulfan during metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Megan; Greenwood, Spencer J; Clark, K Fraser; Jackman, Paula; Fairchild, Wayne

    2013-12-01

    Agricultural pesticide runoff has been suspected as the cause of numerous fish kills in rivers throughout Prince Edward Island but the impact on the surrounding marine environment is unknown. Endosulfan, an organochlorine pesticide, is a potent neurotoxin and molt inhibitor used to combat the Colorado potato beetle however it has the potential to affect non-target organisms including the American lobster (Homarus americanus). Metamorphosis is a critical stage of development and the effects of contaminant exposure during this time are largely unknown in lobster. A 14day endosulfan exposure was performed to identify the effects on survival, development and gene expression in lobster larvae during metamorphosis; all of which were predicted to be negatively impacted. The higher endosulfan concentrations resulted in greater mortality and a significant increase in the number of days required to reach metamorphosis in surviving animals. A custom made H. americanus microarray was used for monitoring the changes in expression of 14,592 genes at the termination of the exposure. Genes with >1.5 fold change and identified as being significant at p<0.05 using one-way ANOVA were selected for further analysis. A total of 707 genes were identified as being significantly differentiated, however with only ~40% annotation of the array, the majority of these genes were unknown. Annotated genes of interest were involved in many processes: development, metabolism, immunity and oxidative stress response and gene regulation. Nine genes of interest (histone H1, farnesoic acid O-methyltransferase, cuticle protein, glutathione S-transferase, thioredoxin, NADH dehydrogenase, ecdysone nuclear receptor Fushi tarazu F1 (FTZ-F1), ferritin and ecdysone inducible protein E75 (EIP-E75)) were selected for RT-qPCR validation of the microarray results. The RT-qPCR method was more sensitive than the microarray yet detected similar expression patterns. The two highest endosulfan concentrations resulted in increased mortalities, developmental delays in reaching metamorphosis and significant changes in gene expression. This research provides a foundation for using microarray gene expression profiles as screening tools for exploring the impact of environmental contaminants on lobster. PMID:24041715

  9. Energetics of metamorphosis in bonefish (Albula sp.) leptocephali: Role of keratan sulfate glycosaminoglycan.

    PubMed

    Pfeiler, E

    1996-08-01

    Energy budget calculations, based on published values for changes in biochemical composition and oxygen consumption, have confirmed that metamorphosing bonefish (Albula sp.) larvae from the Gulf of California receive all of their metabolic energy requirements from the breakdown of endogenous reserves. The calculations showed that during metamorphosis, about 80% of the energy was supplied by lipid, and most of the remainder was provided by keratan sulfate glycosaminoglycan. These results support the suggestion that keratan sulfate can function as a storage polysaccharide, a novel function for glycosaminoglycans in vertebrates. PMID:24194255

  10. Diagrammar and metamorphosis of coset symmetries in dimensionally reduced type IIB supergravity

    E-print Network

    Nurmagambetov, A J

    2004-01-01

    Studying the reduction of type IIB supergravity from ten to three space-time dimensions we describe the metamorphosis of Dynkin diagram for gravity line "caterpillar" into a type IIB supergravity "dragonfly" that is triggered by inclusion of scalars and antisymmetric tensor fields. The final diagram corresponds to type IIB string theory E8 global symmetry group which is the subgroup of the conjectured E11 hidden symmetry group. Application of the results for getting the type IIA/IIB T-duality rules and for searching for type IIB vacua solutions is considered.

  11. Diagrammar and metamorphosis of coset symmetries in dimensionally reduced type IIB supergravity

    E-print Network

    Alexei J. Nurmagambetov

    2004-03-09

    Studying the reduction of type IIB supergravity from ten to three space-time dimensions we describe the metamorphosis of Dynkin diagram for gravity line "caterpillar" into a type IIB supergravity "dragonfly" that is triggered by inclusion of scalars and antisymmetric tensor fields. The final diagram corresponds to type IIB string theory E8 global symmetry group which is the subgroup of the conjectured E11 hidden symmetry group. Application of the results for getting the type IIA/IIB T-duality rules and for searching for type IIB vacua solutions is considered.

  12. Transition-Metal-Free Synthesis of Carbazoles and Indoles by an SN Ar-Based "Aromatic Metamorphosis" of Thiaarenes.

    PubMed

    Bhanuchandra, M; Murakami, Kei; Vasu, Dhananjayan; Yorimitsu, Hideki; Osuka, Atsuhiro

    2015-08-24

    Dibenzothiophene dioxides, which are readily prepared through oxidation of the parent dibenzothiophenes, undergo nucleophilic aromatic substitution with anilines intermolecularly and then intramolecularly to yield the corresponding carbazoles in a single operation. The "aromatic metamorphosis" of dibenzothiophenes into carbazoles does not require any heavy metals. This strategy is also applicable to the synthesis of indoles. Since electron-deficient thiaarene dioxides exhibit interesting reactivity, which is not observed for that the corresponding electron-rich azaarenes, a combination of a thiaarene-dioxide-specific reaction with the SN Ar-based aromatic metamorphosis allows transition-metal-free construction of difficult-to-prepare carbazoles. PMID:26183910

  13. A Conservation Strategy for the Amphibians of Madagascar Une Stratgie de Conservation pour les Amphibiens de Madagascar

    E-print Network

    Andreone, Franco

    1 A Conservation Strategy for the Amphibians of Madagascar Une Stratégie de Conservation pour les A conservation strategy for amphibians of Madagascar 08.30-09.00 Accueil des participants Welcome le Ministre The Minister La crise des amphibiens The amphibian crisis 09.30-09.50 Talk La

  14. The increased public interest in amphibian conservation and the growing evidence of detrimental effects of habitat frag-

    E-print Network

    The increased public interest in amphibian conservation and the growing evidence of detrimental prompted land managers to seek ways of manag- ing amphibian populations at landscape scales. For example and Gardner, 1991; Forman, 1995). Central to landscape-scale studies of amphibians is an assessment

  15. Are we in the midst of the sixth mass extinction? A view from the world of amphibians

    E-print Network

    Wake, David B.

    Are we in the midst of the sixth mass extinction? A view from the world of amphibians David B. Wake on natural environ- ments. The amphibians--frogs, salamanders, and caecilians--may be the only major group most amphibians occur in the tropics and have small geographic ranges that make them susceptible

  16. Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles Effects of Prey Type on the Feeding Behavior of Alsophis portoricensis (Serpentes

    E-print Network

    Leal, Manuel S.

    Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles Effects of Prey Type on the Feeding Behavior: Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1564932@jstor.org. Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve

  17. Saprolegniaceae identified on amphibian eggs throughout the Pacific Northwest, USA, by internal transcribed spacer sequences and phylogenetic analysis

    E-print Network

    Williams, Charles F. "Rick"

    Saprolegniaceae identified on amphibian eggs throughout the Pacific Northwest, USA, by internal on amphibian eggs from the Pacific Northwest, with particular focus on Saprolegnia ferax, a species implicated in high egg mortality. We identified isolates from eggs of six amphibians with the internal transcribed

  18. Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles A New Frog of the Genus Oreolalax (Pelobatidae) from Sichuan, China

    E-print Network

    Shaffer, H. Bradley

    Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles A New Frog of the Genus Oreolalax (Pelobatidae of Amphibians and Reptiles Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1564828 Accessed: 31/08/2010 18:58 Your use of Amphibians and Reptiles is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access to Journal

  19. Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles Notes on the Feeding Behavior and Caudal Luring by Juvenile Alsophis portoricensis

    E-print Network

    Leal, Manuel S.

    Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles Notes on the Feeding Behavior and Caudal Luring for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1564695 . Accessed: 24 for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access

  20. Relative timescales reveal multiple origins of parallel disjunct distributions of African caecilian amphibians

    E-print Network

    Cotton, James

    of African caecilian amphibians Simon P. Loader1,4 , Davide Pisani2 , James A. Cotton2 , David J. Gower1 origins of African caecilians KEYWORDS: Africa, Amphibians, Gymnophiona, Historical Biogeography east-west distributions in three independent lineages of African caecilians have a common cause. We