Science.gov

Sample records for amplicon peptide display

  1. Phage-displayed peptide libraries

    PubMed Central

    Zwick, Michael B; Shen, Juqun; Scott, Jamie K

    2014-01-01

    Over the past year, significant advances have been achieved through the use of phage-displayed peptide libraries. A wide variety of bioactive molecules, including antibodies, receptors and enzymes, have selected high-affinity and/or highly-specific peptide ligands from a number of different types of peptide library. The demonstrated therapeutic potential of some of these peptides, as well as new insights into protein structure and function that peptide ligands have provided, highlight the progress made within this rapidly-expanding field. PMID:9720267

  2. Biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes with phage displayed peptides.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The development of a general approach for the biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) could open up existing opportunities in both fundamental studies as well as a variety of applications. PNTs are spontaneously assembled organic nanostructures made from peptides. Phage display has emerged as a powerful approach for identifying selective peptide binding motifs. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the biochemical functionalization of PNTs via peptides identified from a phage display peptide library. The phage-displayed peptides are shown to recognize PNTs. These advances further allow for the development of bifunctional peptides for the capture of bacteria and the self-assembly of silver particles onto PNTs. We anticipate that these results could provide significant opportunities for using PNTs in both fundamental studies and practical applications, including sensors and biosensors nanoelectronics, energy storage devices, drug delivery, and tissue engineering. PMID:27479451

  3. Biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes with phage displayed peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The development of a general approach for the biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) could open up existing opportunities in both fundamental studies as well as a variety of applications. PNTs are spontaneously assembled organic nanostructures made from peptides. Phage display has emerged as a powerful approach for identifying selective peptide binding motifs. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the biochemical functionalization of PNTs via peptides identified from a phage display peptide library. The phage-displayed peptides are shown to recognize PNTs. These advances further allow for the development of bifunctional peptides for the capture of bacteria and the self-assembly of silver particles onto PNTs. We anticipate that these results could provide significant opportunities for using PNTs in both fundamental studies and practical applications, including sensors and biosensors nanoelectronics, energy storage devices, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

  4. Peptides of the constant region of antibodies display fungicidal activity.

    PubMed

    Polonelli, Luciano; Ciociola, Tecla; Magliani, Walter; Zanello, Pier Paolo; D'Adda, Tiziana; Galati, Serena; De Bernardis, Flavia; Arancia, Silvia; Gabrielli, Elena; Pericolini, Eva; Vecchiarelli, Anna; Arruda, Denise C; Pinto, Marcia R; Travassos, Luiz R; Pertinhez, Thelma A; Spisni, Alberto; Conti, Stefania

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic peptides with sequences identical to fragments of the constant region of different classes (IgG, IgM, IgA) of antibodies (Fc-peptides) exerted a fungicidal activity in vitro against pathogenic yeasts, such as Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Malassezia furfur, including caspofungin and triazole resistant strains. Alanine-substituted derivatives of fungicidal Fc-peptides, tested to evaluate the critical role of each residue, displayed unaltered, increased or decreased candidacidal activity in vitro. An Fc-peptide, included in all human IgGs, displayed a therapeutic effect against experimental mucosal and systemic candidiasis in mouse models. It is intriguing to hypothesize that some Fc-peptides may influence the antifungal immune response and constitute the basis for devising new antifungal agents. PMID:22470523

  5. Identifying reactive peptides from phage-displayed libraries

    PubMed Central

    Eldridge, Glenn M.; Weiss, Gregory A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Phage display enables the synthesis, selection and screening of large, polypeptide libraries (>1 × 1010). Selections from such libraries can identify binding partners to essentially any desired target (1, 2). Peptide with affinity or reactivity to small molecule probes are attractive for numerous uses including the targeted, site-specific labeling of proteins. Here, we describe selection and screening protocols for the identification of short peptides that can selectively bind to and/or react with small molecules. PMID:25616334

  6. Identification of Soft Matter Binding Peptide Ligands Using Phage Display.

    PubMed

    Günay, Kemal Arda; Klok, Harm-Anton

    2015-10-21

    Phage display is a powerful tool for the selection of highly affine, short peptide ligands. While originally primarily used for the identification of ligands to proteins, the scope of this technique has significantly expanded over the past two decades. Phage display nowadays is also increasingly applied to identify ligands that selectively bind with high affinity to a broad range of other substrates including natural and biological polymers as well as a variety of low-molecular-weight organic molecules. Such peptides are of interest for various reasons. The ability to selectively and with high affinity bind to the substrate of interest allows the conjugation or immobilization of, e.g., nanoparticles or biomolecules, or generally, facilitates interactions at materials interfaces. On the other hand, presentation of peptide ligands that selectively bind to low-molecular-weight organic materials is of interest for the development of sensor surfaces. The aim of this article is to highlight the opportunities provided by phage display for the identification of peptide ligands that bind to synthetic or natural polymer substrates or to small organic molecules. The article will first provide an overview of the different peptide ligands that have been identified by phage display that bind to these "soft matter" targets. The second part of the article will discuss the different characterization techniques that allow the determination of the affinity of the identified ligands to the respective substrates. PMID:26275106

  7. Amyloid-forming peptides selected proteolytically from phage display library.

    PubMed

    Koscielska-Kasprzak, Katarzyna; Otlewski, Jacek

    2003-08-01

    We demonstrated that amyloid-forming peptides could be selected from phage-displayed library via proteolysis-based selection protocol. The library of 28-residue peptides based on a sequence of the second zinc finger domain of Zif268, and computationally designed betabetaalpha peptide, FSD-1, was presented monovalently on the surface of M13 phage. The library coupled the infectivity of phage particles to proteolytic stability of a peptide introduced into the coat protein III linker. It was designed to include variants with a strong potential to fold into betabetaalpha motif of zinc finger domains, as expected from secondary structure propensities, but with no structure stabilization via zinc ion coordination. As our primary goal was to find novel monomeric betabetaalpha peptides, the library was selected for stable domains with the assumption that folded proteins are resistant to proteolysis. After less than four rounds of proteolytic selection with trypsin, chymotrypsin, or proteinase K, we obtained a number of proteolysis-resistant phage clones containing several potential sites for proteolytic attack with the proteinases. Eight peptides showing the highest proteolysis resistance were expressed and purified in a phage-free form. When characterized, the peptides possessed proteolytic resistance largely exceeding that of the second zinc finger domain of Zif268 and FSD-1. Six of the characterized peptides formed fibrils when solubilized at high concentrations. Three of them assembled into amyloids as determined through CD measurements, Congo red and thioflavin T binding, and transmission electron microscopy. PMID:12876317

  8. Identification of gliadin-binding peptides by phage display

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Coeliac disease (CD) is a common and complex disorder of the small intestine caused by intolerance to wheat gluten and related edible cereals like barley and rye. Peptides originating from incomplete gliadin digestion activate the lamina propria infiltrating T cells to release proinflammatory cytokines, which in turn cause profound tissue remodelling of the small intestinal wall. There is no cure for CD except refraining from consuming gluten-containing products. Results Phage from a random oligomer display library were enriched by repeated pannings against immobilised gliadin proteins. Phage from the final panning round were plated, individual plaques picked, incubated with host bacteria, amplified to a population size of 1011 to 1012 and purified. DNA was isolated from 1000 purified phage populations and the region covering the 36 bp oligonucleotide insert from which the displayed peptides were translated, was sequenced. Altogether more than 150 different peptide-encoding sequences were identified, many of which were repeatedly isolated under various experimental conditions. Amplified phage populations, each expressing a single peptide, were tested first in pools and then one by one for their ability to inhibit binding of human anti-gliadin antibodies in ELISA assays. These experiments showed that several of the different peptide-expressing phage tested inhibited the interaction between gliadin and anti-gliadin antibodies. Finally, four different peptide-encoding sequences were selected for further analysis, and the corresponding 12-mer peptides were synthesised in vitro. By ELISA assays it was demonstrated that several of the peptides inhibited the interaction between gliadin molecules and serum anti-gliadin antibodies. Moreover, ELISA competition experiments as well as dot-blot and western blot revealed that the different peptides interacted with different molecular sites of gliadin. Conclusions We believe that several of the isolated and

  9. Serum Stable Natural Peptides Designed by mRNA Display

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Shannon M.; Fiacco, Stephen V.; Takahashi, Terry T.; Jalali-Yazdi, Farzad; Millward, Steven W.; Hu, Biliang; Wang, Pin; Roberts, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    Peptides constructed with the 20 natural amino acids are generally considered to have little therapeutic potential because they are unstable in the presence of proteases and peptidases. However, proteolysis cleavage can be idiosyncratic, and it is possible that natural analogues of functional sequences exist that are highly resistant to cleavage. Here, we explored this idea in the context of peptides that bind to the signaling protein Gαi1. To do this, we used a two-step in vitro selection process to simultaneously select for protease resistance while retaining function–first by degrading the starting library with protease (chymotrypsin), followed by positive selection for binding via mRNA display. Starting from a pool of functional sequences, these experiments revealed peptides with 100–400 fold increases in protease resistance compared to the parental library. Surprisingly, selection for chymotrypsin resistance also resulted in similarly improved stability in human serum (~100 fold). Mechanistically, the decreases in cleavage results from both a lower rate of cleavage (kcat) and a weaker interaction with the protease (Km). Overall, our results demonstrate that the hydrolytic stability of functional, natural peptide sequences can be improved by two orders of magnitude simply by optimizing the primary sequence. PMID:25234472

  10. Peptidic Tumor Targeting Agents: The Road from Phage Display Peptide Selections to Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Kathlynn C.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer has become the number one cause of death amongst Americans, killing approximately 1,600 people per day. Novel methods for early detection and the development of effective treatments are an eminent priority in medicine. For this reason, isolation of tumor-specific ligands is a growing area of research. Tumor-specific binding agents can be used to probe the tumor cell surface phenotype and customize treatment accordingly by conjugating the appropriate cell-targeting ligand to an anticancer drug. This refines the molecular diagnosis of the tumor and creates guided drugs that can target the tumor while sparing healthy tissues. Additionally, these targeting agents can be used as in vivo imaging agents that allow for earlier detection of tumors and micrometastasis. Phage display is a powerful technique for the isolation of peptides that bind to a particular target with high affinity and specificity. The biopanning of intact cancer cells or tumors in animals can be used to isolate peptides that bind to cancer-specific cell surface biomarkers. Over the past 10 years, unbiased biopanning of phage-displayed peptide libraries has generated a suite of cancer targeting peptidic ligands. This review discusses the recent advances in the isolation of cancer-targeting peptides by unbiased biopanning methods and highlights the use of the isolated peptides in clinical applications. PMID:20030617

  11. Selection of a peptide mimicking neutralization epitope of hepatitis E virus with phage peptide display technology

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Ying; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Ying-Bing; Li, Shao-Wei; Yang, Hai-Jie; Luo, Wen-Xin; Xia, Ning-Shao

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To select the peptide mimicking the neutralization epitope of hepatitis E virus which bound to non-type-specific and conformational monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) 8C11 and 8H3 fromed 7-peptide phage display library, and expressed the peptide recombinant with HBcAg in E.coli, and to observe whether the recombinant HBcAg could still form virus like particle (VLP) and to test the activation of the recombinant polyprotein and chemo-synthesized peptide that was selected by mAb 8H3. METHODS: 8C11 and 8H3 were used to screen for binding peptides through a 7-peptide phage display library. After 4 rounds of panning, monoclonal phages were selected and sequenced. The obtained dominant peptide coding sequences was then synthesized and inserted into amino acid 78 to 83 of hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg), and then expressed in E.coli. Activity of the recombinant proteins was detected by Western blotting, VLPs of the recombinant polyproteins were tested by transmission electron microscopy and binding activity of the chemo-synthesized peptide was confirmed by BIAcore biosensor. RESULTS: Twenty-one positive monoclonal phages (10 for 8C11, and 11 for 8H3) were selected and the inserted fragments were sequenced. The DNA sequence coding for the obtained dominant peptides 8C11 (N’-His-Pro-Thr-Leu-Leu-Arg-Ile-C’, named 8C11A) and 8H3 (N’-Ser-Ile-Leu-Pro- Tyr-Pro-Tyr-C’, named 8H3A) were then synthesized and cloned to the HBcAg vector, then expressed in E.coli. The recombinant proteins aggregated into homodimer or polymer on SDS-PAGE, and could bind to mAb 8C11 and 8H3 in Western blotting. At the same time, the recombinant polyprotein could form virus like particles (VLPs), which could be visualized on electron micrograph. The dominant peptide 8H3A selected by mAb 8H3 was further chemo-synthesized, and its binding to mAb 8H3 could be detected by BIAcore biosensor. CONCLUSION: These results implicate that conformational neutralizing epitope can be partially modeled by a short

  12. Trastuzumab-binding peptide display by Tobacco mosaic virus

    SciTech Connect

    Frolova, Olga Y.; Petrunia, Igor V.; Komarova, Tatiana V.; Kosorukov, Vyacheslav S.; Sheval, Eugene V.; Gleba, Yuri Y.; Dorokhov, Yuri L.

    2010-11-10

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2/neu) is a target for the humanized monoclonal antibody trastuzumab. Recently, trastuzumab-binding peptides (TBP) of HER2/neu that inhibit proliferation of breast cancer cells were identified. We have now studied conditions of efficient assembly in vivo of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-based particles displaying TBP on its surface. The system is based on an Agrobacterium-mediated co-delivery of binary vectors encoding TMV RNA and coat protein (CP) with TBP in its C-terminal extension into plant leaves. We show how the fusion of amino acid substituted TBP (sTBP) to CP via a flexible peptide linker can improve the manufacturability of recombinant TMV (rTMV). We also reveal that rTMV particles with exposed sTBP retained trastuzumab-binding capacity but lost an anti-HER2/neu immunogenic scaffold function. Mouse antibodies against rTMV did not recognize HER2/neu on surface of human SK-BR-3 cells.

  13. The use of phage display peptide libraries for basic and translational research.

    PubMed

    Brissette, Renee; Goldstein, Neil I

    2007-01-01

    Phage display is a molecular technique, whereby genes are displayed in a functional form on the outer surfaces of bacteriophages by fusion to viral coat proteins. The gene product is encoded by a plasmid contained within the virus, which can be recovered and sequenced, linking the genetic information to the function of the protein. Phage display offers a powerful tool for the identification of short peptides or single chain antibodies that can bind and regulate the function of target proteins. One major advantage of phage display lies in its ability to rapidly identify target-specific peptides with pharmacological activity as agonists or antagonists. PMID:18217687

  14. Analysis of protective antigen peptide binding motifs using bacterial display technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkes, Deborah A.; Dorsey, Brandi L.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.

    2015-05-01

    In today's fast-paced world, a new biological threat could emerge at any time, necessitating a prompt, reliable, inexpensive detection reagent in each case. Combined with magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS), bacterial display technology makes it possible to isolate selective, high affinity peptide reagents in days to weeks. Utilizing the eCPX display scaffold is also a rapid way to screen potential peptide reagents. Peptide affinity reagents for protective antigen (PA) of the biothreat Bacillus anthracis were previously discovered using bacterial display. Bioinformatics analysis resulted in the consensus sequence WXCFTC. Additionally, we have discovered PA binding peptides with a WW motif, one of which, YGLHPWWKNAPIGQR, can pull down PA from 1% human serum. The strength of these two motifs combined, to obtain a WWCFTC consensus, is assessed here using Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS). While monitoring binding to PA, overall expression of the display scaffold was assessed using the YPet Mona expression control tag (YPet), and specificity was assessed by binding to Streptavidin R-Phycoerythrin (SAPE). The importance of high YPet binding is highlighted as many of the peptides in one of the three replicate experiments fell below our 80% binding threshold. We demonstrate that it is preferable to discard this experiment, due to questionable expression of the peptide itself, than to try to normalize for relative expression. The peptides containing the WWCFTC consensus were of higher affinity and greater specificity than the peptides containing the WW consensus alone, validating further investigation to optimize known PA binders.

  15. Phage displayed peptide recognizing porcine aminopeptidase N is a potent small molecule inhibitor of PEDV entry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three phage-displayed peptides designated H, S and F that recognize porcine aminopeptidase N (pAPN), the cellular receptor of porcine transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) were able to inhibit cell infection by TGEV. These same peptides had no inhibitory effects on infection of Vero cells by po...

  16. Chromatographic biopanning for the selection of peptides with high specificity to Pb2+ from phage displayed peptide library.

    PubMed

    Nian, Rui; Kim, Duck Sang; Nguyen, Thuong; Tan, Lihan; Kim, Chan-Wha; Yoo, Ik-Keun; Choe, Woo-Seok

    2010-09-17

    Toxic heavy metal pollution is a global problem occurring in air, soil as well as water. There is a need for a more cost effective, renewable remediation technique, but most importantly, for a recovery method that is selective for one specific metal of concern. Phage display technology has been used as a powerful tool in the discovery of peptides capable of exhibiting specific affinity to various metals or metal ions. However, traditional phage display is mainly conducted in batch mode, resulting in only one equilibrium state hence low-efficiency selection. It is also unable to monitor the selection process in real time mode. In this study, phage display technique was incorporated with chromatography procedure with the use of a monolithic column, facilitating multiple phage-binding equilibrium states and online monitoring of the selection process in search of affinity peptides to Pb2+. In total, 17 candidate peptides were found and their specificity toward Pb2+ was further investigated with bead-based enzyme immunoassay (EIA). A highly specific Pb2+ binding peptide ThrAsnThrLeuSerAsnAsn (TNTLSNN) was obtained. Based on our knowledge, this is the first report on a new chromatographic biopanning method coupled with monolithic column for the selection of metal ion specific binding peptides. It is expected that this monolith-based chromatographic biopanning will provide a promising approach for a high throughput screening of affinity peptides cognitive of a wide range of target species. PMID:20709321

  17. Inhibition of multidrug resistant Listeria monocytogenes by peptides isolated from combinatorial phage display libraries.

    PubMed

    Flachbartova, Z; Pulzova, L; Bencurova, E; Potocnakova, L; Comor, L; Bednarikova, Z; Bhide, M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to isolate and characterize novel antimicrobial peptides from peptide phage library with antimicrobial activity against multidrug resistant Listeria monocytogenes. Combinatorial phage-display library was used to affinity select peptides binding to the cell surface of multidrug resistant L. monocytogenes. After several rounds of affinity selection followed by sequencing, three peptides were revealed as the most promising candidates. Peptide L2 exhibited features common to antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), and was rich in Asp, His and Lys residues. Peptide L3 (NSWIQAPDTKSI), like peptide L2, inhibited bacterial growth in vitro, without any hemolytic or cytotoxic effects on eukaryotic cells. L1 peptide showed no inhibitory effect on Listeria. Structurally, peptides L2 and L3 formed random coils composed of α-helix and β-sheet units. Peptides L2 and L3 exhibited antimicrobial activity against multidrug resistant isolates of L. monocytogenes with no haemolytic or toxic effects. Both peptides identified in this study have the potential to be beneficial in human and veterinary medicine. PMID:27296960

  18. Staphylococcal surface display of metal-binding polyhistidyl peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Samuelson, P.; Wernerus, H.; Svedberg, M.; Staahl, S.

    2000-03-01

    Recombinant Staphylococcus xylosus and Staphylococcus carnosus strains were generated with surface-exposed chimeric proteins containing polyhistidyl peptides designed for binding to divalent metal ions. Surface accessibility of the chimeric surface proteins was demonstrated and the chimeric surface proteins were found to be functional in terms of metal binding, since the recombinant staphylococcal cells were shown to have gained Ni{sup 2+}- and Cd{sup 2+}-binding capacity, suggesting that such bacteria could find use in bioremediation of heavy metals. This is, to their knowledge, the first time that recombinant, surface-exposed metal-binding peptides have been expressed on gram-positive bacteria. Potential environmental or biosensor applications for such recombinant staphylococci as biosorbents are discussed.

  19. Mutations in fd phage major coat protein modulate affinity of the displayed peptide

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmicheva, G.A.; Jayanna, P.K.; Eroshkin, A.M.; Grishina, M.A.; Pereyaslavskaya, E.S.; Potemkin, V.A.; Petrenko, V.A.

    2009-01-01

    Multibillion-clone libraries of phages displaying guest peptides fused to the major coat protein pVIII (landscape libraries) are a rich source of probes for proteinaceous and non-proteinaceous targets. As opposed to the pIII-type fusion phages, which display peptides as independent structural domains, the guest peptides in the pVIII-fusion phages can be structurally and functionally influenced by contiguous subunits. To decipher the impact of the locale of a guest peptide on its affinity characteristics, we constructed a library of phages carrying β-galactosidase-binding peptide ADTFAKSMQ at the N-terminus of the pVIII protein surrounded by random amino acids. It was found that mutagenesis of amino acids 12–19 (domain C) has polar effects on target binding affinity of the displayed peptide. The phages with highest affinity are characterized by: (i) a net electrostatic charge around −1 of domain C of the mutated phages at pH 7.0; (ii) a lower radius of cylinder coaxial to α-helix formed by domain C; (iii) a lower higher occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of domain C leading to a decreased formation of hydrogen bonds and (iv) positively charged surface and torsion energy of domain C, which may require a conformational transition of N-terminal peptide ADTFAKSMQ for its binding with β-galactosidase. Influence of the guest peptide on the diversity of mutations in the neighboring landscape area was also observed. PMID:19633313

  20. Immunodiagnosis of Canine Visceral Leishmaniasis Using Mimotope Peptides Selected from Phage Displayed Combinatorial Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Toledo-Machado, Christina Monerat; Machado de Avila, Ricardo Andrez; NGuyen, Christophe; Granier, Claude; Bueno, Lilian Lacerda; Carneiro, Claudia Martins; Menezes-Souza, Daniel; Carneiro, Rubens Antonio; Chávez-Olórtegui, Carlos; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio

    2015-01-01

    ELISA and RIFI are currently used for serodiagnosis of canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL). The accuracy of these tests is controversial in endemic areas where canine infections by Trypanosoma cruzi may occur. We evaluated the usefulness of synthetic peptides that were selected through phage display technique in the serodiagnosis of CVL. Peptides were chosen based on their ability to bind to IgGs purified from infected dogs pooled sera. We selected three phage clones that reacted only with those IgGs. Peptides were synthesized, polymerized with glutaraldehyde, and used as antigens in ELISA assays. Each individual peptide or a mix of them was reactive with infected dogs serum. The assay was highly sensitive and specific when compared to soluble Leishmania antigen that showed cross-reactivity with anti-T. cruzi IgGs. Our results demonstrate that phage display technique is useful for selection of peptides that may represent valuable synthetic antigens for an improved serodiagnosis of CVL. PMID:25710003

  1. Selection dynamic of Escherichia coli host in M13 combinatorial peptide phage display libraries.

    PubMed

    Zanconato, Stefano; Minervini, Giovanni; Poli, Irene; De Lucrezia, Davide

    2011-01-01

    Phage display relies on an iterative cycle of selection and amplification of random combinatorial libraries to enrich the initial population of those peptides that satisfy a priori chosen criteria. The effectiveness of any phage display protocol depends directly on library amino acid sequence diversity and the strength of the selection procedure. In this study we monitored the dynamics of the selective pressure exerted by the host organism on a random peptide library in the absence of any additional selection pressure. The results indicate that sequence censorship exerted by Escherichia coli dramatically reduces library diversity and can significantly impair phage display effectiveness. PMID:21512219

  2. Evaluation of Phage Display Discovered Peptides as Ligands for Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA)

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, W. Barry

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify potential ligands of PSMA suitable for further development as novel PSMA-targeted peptides using phage display technology. The human PSMA protein was immobilized as a target followed by incubation with a 15-mer phage display random peptide library. After one round of prescreening and two rounds of screening, high-stringency screening at the third round of panning was performed to identify the highest affinity binders. Phages which had a specific binding activity to PSMA in human prostate cancer cells were isolated and the DNA corresponding to the 15-mers were sequenced to provide three consensus sequences: GDHSPFT, SHFSVGS and EVPRLSLLAVFL as well as other sequences that did not display consensus. Two of the peptide sequences deduced from DNA sequencing of binding phages, SHSFSVGSGDHSPFT and GRFLTGGTGRLLRIS were labeled with 5-carboxyfluorescein and shown to bind and co-internalize with PSMA on human prostate cancer cells by fluorescence microscopy. The high stringency requirements yielded peptides with affinities KD∼1 µM or greater which are suitable starting points for affinity maturation. While these values were less than anticipated, the high stringency did yield peptide sequences that apparently bound to different surfaces on PSMA. These peptide sequences could be the basis for further development of peptides for prostate cancer tumor imaging and therapy. PMID:23935860

  3. Expanding the Versatility of Phage Display I: Efficient Display of Peptide-Tags on Protein VII of the Filamentous Phage

    PubMed Central

    Løset, Geir Åge; Bogen, Bjarne; Sandlie, Inger

    2011-01-01

    Background Phage display is a platform for selection of specific binding molecules and this is a clear-cut motivation for increasing its performance. Polypeptides are normally displayed as fusions to the major coat protein VIII (pVIII), or the minor coat protein III (pIII). Display on other coat proteins such as pVII allows for display of heterologous peptide sequences on the virions in addition to those displayed on pIII and pVIII. In addition, pVII display is an alternative to pIII or pVIII display. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we demonstrate how standard pIII or pVIII display phagemids are complemented with a helper phage which supports production of virions that are tagged with octa FLAG, HIS6 or AviTag on pVII. The periplasmic signal sequence required for pIII and pVIII display, and which has been added to pVII in earlier studies, is omitted altogether. Conclusions/Significance Tagging on pVII is an important and very useful add-on feature to standard pIII and pVII display. Any phagemid bearing a protein of interest on either pIII or pVIII can be tagged with any of the tags depending simply on choice of helper phage. We show in this paper how such tags may be utilized for immobilization and separation as well as purification and detection of monoclonal and polyclonal phage populations. PMID:21390217

  4. A polystyrene binding target-unrelated peptide isolated in the screening of phage display library.

    PubMed

    Bakhshinejad, Babak; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2016-11-01

    Phage display is a powerful methodology for the identification of peptide ligands binding to any desired target. However, the selection of target-unrelated peptides (TUPs) appears as a huge problem in the screening of phage display libraries through biopanning. The phage-displayed peptide TLHPAAD has been isolated both in our laboratory and by another reserach group on completely different screening targets prompting us to hypothesize that it may be a potential TUP. In the current study, we analyzed the binding characteristics and propagation rate of phage clone displaying TLHPAAD peptide (SW-TUP clone). The results of ELISA experiment and phage recovery assay provided strong support for the notion that SW-TUP phage binds to polystyrene with a significantly higher affinity than control phage clones. Furthermore, this polystyrene binding was demonstrated to occur in a concentration- and pH-dependent mode. Characterization of the propagation profile of phage clones within a specified time course revealed no statistically significant difference between the amplification rate of SW-TUP and control phages. Our findings lead us to the conclusion that SW-TUP phage clone with the displayed peptide TLHPAAD is not a true target binder and its selection in biopanning experiments results from its bidning affinity to the polystyrene surface of the solid phase. PMID:27555439

  5. An unusual cell penetrating peptide identified using a plasmid display-based functional selection platform

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shan; Simon, Melissa J.; Hue, Christopher D.; Morrison, Barclay; Banta, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) have tremendous potential for use in gene and drug delivery applications. The selection of new CPPs with desired capabilities from randomized peptide libraries is challenging, since the CPP phenotype is a complex selection target. Here we report the discovery of an unusual new CPP from a randomized peptide library using a functional selection system based on plasmid display (PD). After four rounds of screening of a 14-mer peptide library over PC12 cells, several peptides were identified and tested for their ability to deliver the green fluorescent protein (GFP). One peptide (SG3) exhibited a cell penetrating phenotype, however unlike other well-known CPPs such as TAT or Penetratin, the newly identified peptide was not highly cationic. The PD protocol necessitated the addition of a cationic lipid (Lipofectamine2000), and in the presence of this compound, the SG3 peptide significantly outperformed the well-known TAT CPP in the delivery of GFP to PC12 cells and primary astrocytes. When the SG3 peptide was fused to the pro-apoptotic BH3 peptide from the Bak protein, significant cell death was induced in cultured primary astrocytes, indicating relevant, intracellular delivery of a functional cargo. The PD platform is a useful method for identifying functional new CPPs from randomized libraries with unique delivery capabilities. PMID:21291271

  6. Mapping protein-protein interactions with phage-displayed combinatorial peptide libraries and alanine scanning.

    PubMed

    Kokoszka, Malgorzata E; Kay, Brian K

    2015-01-01

    One avenue for inferring the function of a protein is to learn what proteins it may bind to in the cell. Among the various methodologies, one way for doing so is to affinity select peptide ligands from a phage-displayed combinatorial peptide library and then to examine if the proteins that carry such peptide sequences interact with the target protein in the cell. With the protocols described in this chapter, a laboratory with skills in microbiology, molecular biology, and protein biochemistry can readily identify peptides in the library that bind selectively, and with micromolar affinity, to a given target protein on the time scale of 2 months. To illustrate this approach, we use a library of bacteriophage M13 particles, which display 12-mer combinatorial peptides, to affinity select different peptide ligands for two different targets, the SH3 domain of the human Lyn protein tyrosine kinase and a segment of the yeast serine/threonine protein kinase Cbk1. The binding properties of the selected peptide ligands are then dissected by sequence alignment, Kunkel mutagenesis, and alanine scanning. Finally, the peptide ligands can be used to predict cellular interacting proteins and serve as the starting point for drug discovery. PMID:25616333

  7. A novel peptide specifically targeting ovarian cancer identified by in vivo phage display.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chuying; Yin, Guangfu; Yan, Danhong; He, Xueling; Zhang, Li; Wei, Yan; Huang, Zhongbing

    2013-12-01

    Discovery of peptide ligands that can target human ovarian cancer and deliver chemotherapeutics offers new opportunity for cancer therapy. The advent of phage-displayed peptide library facilitated the screening of such peptides. In vivo screening that set in a microanatomic and functional context was applied in our study, and a novel peptide WSGPGVWGASVK targeting ovarian cancer was isolated. The phage clone PC3-1 displaying peptide WSGPGVWGASVK can gain effective access to accumulate in the tumor sites after intravenous injection while reducing its accumulation in normal organs. Positive immunostaining of PC3-1 was located in both sites of tumor cells and tumor blood vessels, which resulted in a diffuse binding pattern through the tumor. In vitro study results confirmed the capability of peptide WSGPGVWGASVK binding to and being internalized by both tumor cells and angiogenic endothelial cells. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that the peptide bound to SKOV3 cells with Kd value of 5.43 ± 0.4 μM. Taken together, it suggested that peptide WSGPGVWGASVK is a lead candidate for delivering therapeutics to penetrate into tumors. PMID:24105738

  8. Recombinant gas vesicles from Halobacterium sp. displaying SIV peptides demonstrate biotechnology potential as a pathogen peptide delivery vehicle

    PubMed Central

    Sremac, Marinko; Stuart, Elizabeth S

    2008-01-01

    Background Previous studies indicated that recombinant gas vesicles (r-GV) from a mutant strain of Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 could express a cassette containing test sequences of SIVmac gag derived DNA, and function as an antigen display/delivery system. Tests using mice indicated that the humoral immune response to the gag encoded sequences evoked immunologic memory in the absence of an exogenous adjuvant. Results The goal of this research was to extend this demonstration to diverse gene sequences by testing recombinant gas vesicles displaying peptides encoded by different SIV genes (SIVtat, rev or nef). Verification that different peptides can be successfully incorporated into the GvpC surface protein of gas vesicle would support a more general biotechnology application of this potential display/delivery system. Selected SIVsm-GvpC fusion peptides were generated by creating and expressing fusion genes, then assessing the resulting recombinant gas vesicles for SIV peptide specific antigenic and immunogenic capabilities. Results from these analyses support three conclusions: (i) Different recombinant gvpC-SIV genes will support the biosynthesis of chimeric, GvpC fusion proteins which are incorporated into the gas vesicles and generate functional organelles. (ii) Monkey antibody elicited by in vivo infection with SHIV recognizes these expressed SIV sequences in the fusion proteins encoded by the gvpC-SIV fusion genes as SIV peptides. (iii) Test of antiserum elicited by immunizing mice with recombinant gas vesicles demonstrated notable and long term antibody titers. The observed level of humoral responses, and the maintenance of elevated responses to, Tat, Rev and Nef1 encoded peptides carried by the respective r-GV, are consistent with the suggestion that in vivo there may be a natural and slow release of epitope over time. Conclusion The findings therefore suggest that in addition to providing information about these specific inserts, r-GV displaying peptide inserts

  9. A Phage Display Screening Derived Peptide with Affinity for the Adeninyl Moiety

    PubMed Central

    Elmlund, Louise; Söderberg, Pernilla; Suriyanarayanan, Subramanian; Nicholls, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    Phage display screening of a surface-immobilized adenine derivative led to the identification of a heptameric peptide with selectivity for adenine as demonstrated through quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) studies. The peptide demonstrated a concentration dependent affinity for an adeninyl moiety decorated surface (KD of 968 ± 53.3 μM), which highlights the power of piezoelectric sensing in the study of weak interactions. PMID:25587414

  10. Glutamine (Q)-peptide screening for transglutaminase reaction using mRNA display.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Hun; Song, Changhyeon; Kim, Do-Hyun; Park, Il-Hyang; Lee, Sun-Gu; Lee, Yoon-Sik; Kim, Byung-Gee

    2013-02-01

    Information on subsite specificity of the transglutaminase (TG) is important to design any specific peptides for TG's applications and inhibitor studies. Here, mRNA display was introduced for identifying the subsite specificity of TG from Streptomyces mobaraensis (STG). Functionally active peptides expressed from mRNA display library were differentially conjugated to hexa lysine (K₆-beads according to their relative activities for STG. The active peptide substrates for STG were enriched through six rounds of screening, and its corresponding cDNA/mRNA sequences were identified by DNA sequencing. The results showed that tripeptides such as LQQ and TQP do not show any activity for STG, but the minimum size of the peptide displaying STG activity is pentapeptide. One such predicted peptide sequence, that is, RLQQP (TQ1), showed higher reactivity (ca. 182% conjugation yield) to STG than that of the highly active sequence, that is, control-Q (PQPQLPYPQPQLPY), well-known previously for mammalian TG2. Furthermore, when recombinant DsRed was tagged with TQ1 sequence at its C-terminal, DsRed-TQ1 underwent efficient covalent-immobilization onto alginate-gelatin bead by STG reaction, showing a Q-peptide application as a useful tagging molecule. PMID:22886446

  11. Exploiting Bacterial Peptide Display Technology to Engineer Biomaterials for Neural Stem Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Little, Lauren; Dane, Karen; Daugherty, Patrick; Healy, Kevin; Schaffer, David

    2010-01-01

    Stem cells are often cultured on substrates that present extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins; however, the heterogeneous and poorly defined nature of ECM proteins presents challenges both for basic biological investigation of cell-matrix investigations and translational applications of stem cells. Therefore, fully synthetic, defined materials conjugated with bioactive ligands, such as adhesive peptides, are preferable for stem cell biology and engineering. However, identifying novel ligands that engage cellular receptors can be challenging, and we have thus developed a high throughput approach to identify new adhesive ligands. We selected an unbiased bacterial peptide display library for the ability to bind adult neural stem cells (NSCs), and 44 bacterial clones expressing peptides were identified and found to bind to NSCs with high avidity. Of these clones, four contained RGD motifs commonly found in integrin binding domains, and three exhibited homology to ECM proteins. Three peptide clones were chosen for further analysis, and their synthetic analogs were adsorbed on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) or grafted onto an interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) for cell culture. These three peptides were found to support neural stem cell self-renewal in defined medium as well as multi-lineage differentiation. Therefore, bacterial peptide display offers unique advantages to isolate bioactive peptides from large, unbiased libraries for applications in biomaterials engineering. PMID:21129772

  12. MULTIVALENT DISPLAY OF PENDANT PRO-APOPTOTIC PEPTIDES INCREASES CYTOTOXIC ACTIVITY

    PubMed Central

    Chu, David S.H.; Bocek, Michael J.; Shi, Julie; Ta, Anh; Ngambenjawong, Chayanon; Rostomily, Robert C.; Pun, Suzie H.

    2015-01-01

    Several cationic antimicrobial peptides have been investigated as potential anti-cancer drugs due to their demonstrated selective toxicity towards cancer cells relative to normal cells. For example, intracellular delivery of KLA, a pro-apoptotic peptide, results in toxicity against a variety of cancer cell lines; however, the relatively low activity and small size leads to rapid renal excretion when applied in vivo, limiting its therapeutic potential. In this work, apoptotic peptide-polymer hybrid materials were developed to increase apoptotic peptide activity via multivalent display. Multivalent peptide materials were prepared with comb-like structure by RAFT copolymerization of peptide macromonomers with N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide (HPMA). Polymers displayed a GKRK peptide sequence for targeting p32, a protein often overexpressed on the surface of cancer cells, either fused with or as a comonomer to a KLA macromonomer. In three tested cancer cell lines, apoptotic polymers were significantly more cytotoxic than free peptides as evidenced by an order of magnitude decrease in IC50 values for the polymers compared to free peptide. The uptake efficiency and intracellular trafficking of one polymer construct was determined by radiolabeling and subcellular fractionation. Despite their more potent cytotoxic profile, polymeric KLA constructs have poor cellular uptake efficiency (<1%). A significant fraction (20%) of internalized constructs localize with intact mitochondrial fractions. In an effort to increase cellular uptake, polymer amines were converted to guanidines by reaction with O-methylisourea. Guanidinylated polymers disrupted function of isolated mitochondria more than their lysine-based analogs, but overall toxicity was decreased, likely due to inefficient mitochondrial trafficking. Thus, while multivalent KLA polymers are more potent than KLA peptides, these materials can be substantially improved by designing next generation materials with improved

  13. Identification and characterization of mutant clones with enhanced propagation rates from phage-displayed peptide libraries.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Kieu T H; Adamkiewicz, Marta A; Hebert, Lauren E; Zygiel, Emily M; Boyle, Holly R; Martone, Christina M; Meléndez-Ríos, Carola B; Noren, Karen A; Noren, Christopher J; Hall, Marilena Fitzsimons

    2014-10-01

    A target-unrelated peptide (TUP) can arise in phage display selection experiments as a result of a propagation advantage exhibited by the phage clone displaying the peptide. We previously characterized HAIYPRH, from the M13-based Ph.D.-7 phage display library, as a propagation-related TUP resulting from a G→A mutation in the Shine-Dalgarno sequence of gene II. This mutant was shown to propagate in Escherichia coli at a dramatically faster rate than phage bearing the wild-type Shine-Dalgarno sequence. We now report 27 additional fast-propagating clones displaying 24 different peptides and carrying 14 unique mutations. Most of these mutations are found either in or upstream of the gene II Shine-Dalgarno sequence, but still within the mRNA transcript of gene II. All 27 clones propagate at significantly higher rates than normal library phage, most within experimental error of wild-type M13 propagation, suggesting that mutations arise to compensate for the reduced virulence caused by the insertion of a lacZα cassette proximal to the replication origin of the phage used to construct the library. We also describe an efficient and convenient assay to diagnose propagation-related TUPS among peptide sequences selected by phage display. PMID:24952360

  14. Identification of high-affinity VEGFR3-binding peptides through a phage-displayed random peptide library

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yan; Li, Cai-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Objective Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) interaction with its receptor, VEGFR-3/Flt-4, regulates lymphangiogenesis. VEGFR-3/Flt-4 expression in cancer cells has been correlated with clinical stage, lymph node metastasis, and lymphatic invasion. The objective of this study is to identify a VEGFR-3/Flt-4-interacting peptide that could be used to inhibit VEGFR-3 for ovarian cancer therapy. Methods The extracellular fragment of recombinant human VEGFR-3/Flt-4 (rhVEGFR-3/Flt-4) fused with coat protein pIII was screened against a phage-displayed random peptide library. Using affinity enrichment and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) screening, positive clones of phages were amplified. Three phage clones were selected after four rounds of biopanning, and the specific binding of the peptides to rhVEGFR-3 was detected by ELISA and compared with that of VEGF-D. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence analyses of ovarian cancer tissue sections was undertaken to demonstrate the specificity of the peptides. Results After four rounds of biopanning, ELISA confirmed the specificity of the enriched bound phage clones for rhVEGFR-3. Sequencing and translation identified three different peptides. Non-competitive ELISA revealed that peptides I, II, and III had binding affinities for VEGFR-3 with Kaff (affinity constant) of 16.4±8.6 µg/mL (n=3), 9.2±2.1 µg/mL (n=3), and 174.8±31.1 µg/mL (n=3), respectively. In ovarian carcinoma tissue sections, peptide III (WHWLPNLRHYAS), which had the greatest binding affinity, also co-localized with VEGFR-3 in endothelial cells lining lymphatic vessels; its labeling of ovarian tumors in vivo was also confirmed. Conclusion These finding showed that peptide III has high specificity and activity and, therefore, may represent a potential therapeutic approach to target VEGF-VEGFR-3 signaling for the treatment or diagnosis of ovarian cancer. PMID:26197772

  15. Inactivation and purification of cowpea mosaic virus-like particles displaying peptide antigens from Bacillus anthracis

    PubMed Central

    Phelps, Jamie P.; Dang, Nghiep; Rasochova, Lada

    2007-01-01

    Chimeric cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) particles displaying foreign peptide antigens on the particle surface are suitable for development of peptide-based vaccines. However, commonly used PEG precipitation-based purification methods are not sufficient for production of high quality vaccine candidates because they do not allow for separation of chimeric particles from cleaved contaminating species. Moreover, the purified particles remain infectious to plants. To advance the CPMV technology further, it is necessary to develop efficient and scalable purification strategies and preferably eliminate the infectivity of chimeric viruses. CPMV was engineered to display a 25 amino acid peptide derived from the Bacillus anthracis protective antigen on the surface loop of the large coat protein subunit. The engineered virus was propagated in cowpea plants and assembled into chimeric virus particles displaying 60 copies of the peptide on the surface. An effective inactivation method was developed to produce non-infectious chimeric CPMV virus-like particles (VLPs). Uncleaved VLPs were separated from the contaminating cleaved forms by anion exchange chromatography. The yield of purified chimeric VLPs was 0.3 g·kg−1 of leaf tissue. The results demonstrate the ability to generate multi-gram quantities of non-infectious, chimeric CPMV VLPs in plants for use in the development of peptide-based vaccines. PMID:17227681

  16. α-Helix peptides designed from EBV-gH protein display higher antigenicity and induction of monocyte apoptosis than the native peptide

    PubMed Central

    Melo-Cardenas, Johanna; Guevara, Tatiana; Echeverria, Ignacia; Rodriguez, Isabel C.; Vanegas, Magnolia; Amzel, Mario; Patarroyo, Manuel E.

    2010-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that stabilizing α-helix of Epstein–Barr virus gH-derived peptide 11438 used for binding human cells will increase its biological activity. Non-stable α-helix of peptide 11438 was unfolded in an entropy-driven process, despite the opposing effect of the enthalpy factor. Adding and/or changing amino acids in peptide 11438 allowed the designing of peptides 33207, 33208 and 33210; peptides 33208 and 33210 displayed higher helical content due to a decreased unfolding entropy change as was determined by AGADIR, molecular dynamics and circular dichroism analysis. Peptides 33207, 33208 and 33210 inhibited EBV invasion of peripheral blood mononuclear cells and displayed epitopes more similar to native protein than peptide 11438; these peptides could be useful for detecting antibodies induced by native gH protein since they displayed high reactivity with anti-EBV antibodies. Anti-peptide 33207 antibodies showed higher reactivity with EBV than anti-peptide 11438 antibodies being useful for inducing antibodies against EBV. Anti-peptide 33210 antibodies inhibit EBV invasion of epithelial cells better than anti-peptide 11438 antibodies. Peptide 33210 bound to normal T lymphocytes and Raji cells stronger than peptide 11438 and also induced apoptosis of monocytes and Raji cells but not of normal T cells in a similar way to EBV-gH. Peptide 33210 inhibited the monocytes’ development toward dendritic cells better than EBV and peptide 11438. In conclusion, stabilizing the α-helix in peptides 33208 and 33210 designed from peptide 11438 increased the antigenicity and the ability of the antibodies induced by peptides of inhibiting EBV invasion of host cells. PMID:20473772

  17. Engineering RNA phage MS2 virus-like particles for peptide display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Sheldon Keith

    Phage display is a powerful and versatile technology that enables the selection of novel binding functions from large populations of randomly generated peptide sequences. Random sequences are genetically fused to a viral structural protein to produce complex peptide libraries. From a sufficiently complex library, phage bearing peptides with practically any desired binding activity can be physically isolated by affinity selection, and, since each particle carries in its genome the genetic information for its own replication, the selectants can be amplified by infection of bacteria. For certain applications however, existing phage display platforms have limitations. One such area is in the field of vaccine development, where the goal is to identify relevant epitopes by affinity-selection against an antibody target, and then to utilize them as immunogens to elicit a desired antibody response. Today, affinity selection is usually conducted using display on filamentous phages like M13. This technology provides an efficient means for epitope identification, but, because filamentous phages do not display peptides in the high-density, multivalent arrays the immune system prefers to recognize, they generally make poor immunogens and are typically useless as vaccines. This makes it necessary to confer immunogenicity by conjugating synthetic versions of the peptides to more immunogenic carriers. Unfortunately, when introduced into these new structural environments, the epitopes often fail to elicit relevant antibody responses. Thus, it would be advantageous to combine the epitope selection and immunogen functions into a single platform where the structural constraints present during affinity selection can be preserved during immunization. This dissertation describes efforts to develop a peptide display system based on the virus-like particles (VLPs) of bacteriophage MS2. Phage display technologies rely on (1) the identification of a site in a viral structural protein that is

  18. Competitive Mirror Image Phage Display Derived Peptide Modulates Amyloid Beta Aggregation and Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, Stephan; Klein, Antonia Nicole; Tusche, Markus; Schlosser, Christine; Elfgen, Anne; Brener, Oleksandr; Teunissen, Charlotte; Gremer, Lothar; Funke, Susanne Aileen; Kutzsche, Janine; Willbold, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer´s disease is the most prominent type of dementia and currently no causative treatment is available. According to recent studies, oligomeric species of the amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide appear to be the most toxic Aβ assemblies. Aβ monomers, however, may be not toxic per se and may even have a neuroprotective role. Here we describe a competitive mirror image phage display procedure that allowed us to identify preferentially Aβ1–42 monomer binding and thereby stabilizing peptides, which destabilize and thereby eliminate toxic oligomer species. One of the peptides, called Mosd1 (monomer specific d-peptide 1), was characterized in more detail. Mosd1 abolished oligomers from a mixture of Aβ1–42 species, reduced Aβ1–42 toxicity in cell culture, and restored the physiological phenotype in neuronal cells stably transfected with the gene coding for human amyloid precursor protein. PMID:26840229

  19. Identification of a Novel Lysosomal Trafficking Peptide using Phage Display Biopanning Coupled with Endocytic Selection Pressure

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Methods to select ligands that accumulate specifically in cancer cells and traffic through a defined endocytic pathway may facilitate rapid pairing of ligands with linkers suitable for drug conjugate therapies. We performed phage display biopanning on cancer cells that are treated with selective inhibitors of a given mechanism of endocytosis. Using chlorpromazine to inhibit clathrin-mediated endocytosis in H1299 nonsmall cell lung cancer cells, we identified two clones, ATEPRKQYATPRVFWTDAPG (15.1) and a novel peptide LQWRRDDNVHNFGVWARYRL (H1299.3). The peptides segregate by mechanism of endocytosis and subsequent location of subcellular accumulation. The H1299.3 peptide primarily utilizes clathrin-mediated endocytosis and colocalizes with Lamp1, a lysosomal marker. Conversely, the 15.1 peptide is clathrin-independent and localizes to a perinuclear region. Thus, this novel phage display scheme allows for selection of peptides that selectively internalize into cells via a known mechanism of endocytosis. These types of selections may allow for better matching of linker with targeting ligand by selecting ligands that internalize and traffic to known subcellular locations. PMID:25188559

  20. Mapping protein-protein interactions with phage-displayed combinatorial peptide libraries.

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, B. K.; Castagnoli, L.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Rome

    2003-01-01

    This unit describes the process and analysis of affinity selecting bacteriophage M13 from libraries displaying combinatorial peptides fused to either a minor or major capsid protein. Direct affinity selection uses target protein bound to a microtiter plate followed by purification of selected phage by ELISA. Alternatively, there is a bead-based affinity selection method. These methods allow one to readily isolate peptide ligands that bind to a protein target of interest and use the consensus sequence to search proteomic databases for putative interacting proteins.

  1. Display of Peptides and Proteins on the Surface of Bacteriophage λ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternberg, Nat; Hoess, Ronald H.

    1995-02-01

    The display of peptides or proteins on the surface of viruses is an important technology for studying peptides or proteins and their interaction with other molecules. Here we describe a display vehicle based on bacteriophage λ that incorporates a number of features distinct from other currently used display systems. Fusions of peptides or protein domains have been made to the amino terminus of the 11-kDa D protein of the λ capsid. These fusions assemble onto the viral capsid and appear to be accessible to ligand interactions, based on the ability of a monoclonal antibody to recognize an epitope fused to the D protein on phage heads. To produce large D fusion display libraries and yet avoid the cumbersome task of cloning many fragments into λ DNA, we have used the Cre-loxP site-specific recombination system in vivo to incorporate plasmids encoding the D fusions into the phage genome. Finally, we show that D fusion proteins can be added in vitro to phage lacking D protein and be assembled onto the viral capsid.

  2. PhiXing-it, displaying foreign peptides on bacteriophage ΦX174.

    PubMed

    Christakos, Kristofer J; Chapman, Janice A; Fane, Bentley A; Campos, Samuel K

    2016-01-15

    Although bacteriophage φX174 is easy to propagate and genetically tractable, it is use as a peptide display platform has not been explored. One region within the φX174 major spike protein G tolerated 13 of 16 assayed insertions, ranging from 10 to 75 amino acids. The recombinant proteins were functional and incorporated into infectious virions. In the folded protein, the peptides would be icosahedrally displayed within loops that extend from the protein׳s β-barrel core. The well-honed genetics of φX174 allowed permissive insertions to be quickly identified by the cellular phenotypes associated with cloned gene expression. The cloned genes were easily transferred from plasmids to phage genomes via recombination rescue. Direct ELISA validated several recombinant virions for epitope display. Some insertions conferred a temperature-sensitive (ts) protein folding defect, which was suppressed by global suppressors in protein G, located too far away from the insertion to directly alter peptide display. PMID:26655242

  3. ZP-binding peptides identified via phage display stimulate production of sperm antibodies in dogs.

    PubMed

    Samoylova, Tatiana I; Cox, Nancy R; Cochran, Anna M; Samoylov, Alexandre M; Griffin, Brenda; Baker, Henry J

    2010-07-01

    Zona pellucida (ZP) glycoproteins play a central role in sperm-oocyte binding and fertilization. Sperm protein sequences that are involved in sperm-ZP recognition and have an important role in fertilization represent attractive targets for development of contraceptive vaccines, yet are currently unknown. To identify peptide sequences that recognize and bind to ZP proteins, we developed a novel selection procedure from phage display libraries that utilizes intact oocytes surrounded by ZP proteins. The major advantage of this procedure is that ZP proteins remain in their native conformation unlike a selection protocol previously published that utilized solubilized ZP on artificial solid support. Several peptides of 7 and 12 amino acids with binding specificity to canine ZP proteins were identified. Four of them (LNSFLRS, SSWYRGA, YLPIYTIPSMVY, and NNQSPILKLSIH) plus a control ZP-binding peptide (YLPVGGLRRIGG) from the literature were synthesized and tested for antigenic properties in dogs. NNQSPILKLSIH peptide stimulated production of anti-peptide antibodies. These antibodies bind to the acrosomal region of the canine sperm cell, demonstrating ability to act as sperm antibodies. The identified ZP-binding peptides (mimicking sperm cell surface antigens) may be useful in the design of immunocontraceptive agents for dogs. PMID:20434854

  4. Programmable Multivalent Display of Receptor Ligands using Peptide Nucleic Acid Nanoscaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Englund, Ethan A.; Wang, Deyun; Fujigaki, Hidetsugu; Sakai, Hiroyasu; Micklitsch, Christopher M.; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Martin-Manso, Gema; Pendrak, Michael L.; Roberts, David D.; Durell, Stewart R.; Appella, Daniel H.

    2012-01-01

    Multivalent effects dictate the binding affinity of multiple ligands on one molecular entity to receptors. Integrins are receptors that mediate cell attachment through multivalent binding to peptide sequences within the extracellular matrix, and overexpression promotes the metastasis of some cancers. Multivalent display of integrin antagonists enhances their efficacy, but current scaffolds have limited ranges and precision for the display of ligands. Here we present an approach to study multivalent effects across wide ranges of ligand number, density, and three-dimensional arrangement. Using L-lysine γ-substituted peptide nucleic acids, the multivalent effects of an integrin antagonist were examined over a range of 1 to 45 ligands. The optimal construct improves the inhibitory activity of the antagonist by two orders of magnitude against the binding of melanoma cells to the extracellular matrix in both in vitro and in vivo models. PMID:22233624

  5. Application of peptide displaying phage as a novel diagnostic probe for human lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoung Jin; Lee, Jae Hee; Chung, Hye Kyung; Ju, Eun Jin; Song, Si Yeol; Jeong, Seong-Yun; Choi, Eun Kyung

    2016-04-01

    Despite the increasing lung cancer-associated death rate, its therapy has been constrained by impasse of early diagnosis. To apply non-invasive imaging for potential cancer diagnosis system, we screened human lung adenocarcinoma-specific peptides using the phage display technique. For in vivo phage-displayed peptide screening, M13 phage library displaying 2.9 × 10(9) random peptides was injected through tail vein to lung adenocarcinoma cell-derived xenograft mouse model. Through four rounds of biopanning, a specific peptide sequence (CAKATCPAC) was screened out with the highest frequency and was named as Pep-1, and it was analyzed for its targeting ability as an imaging probe by in vitro competitive assay to test its cell-binding ability, immunohistochemical detection in the tumor tissue, and in vivo NIR fluorescent optical imaging. The specificity of Pep-1 toward lung cancer was ensured by in vivo imaging using xenograft animals of various cancer types. The results suggest that Pep-1 is a promising diagnostic lead molecule for rapid and accurate detection of human lung adenocarcinoma. In addition, it was found that the targeting ability was much enhanced by ionizing radiation in both cell-derived and patient-derived lung adenocarcinoma xenografts, suggesting the possibility of applying Pep-1 for prognostic diagnosis after radiotherapy. Taken together, this study suggests that Pep-1 possesses a specific-targeting ability for human lung adenocarcinoma and that this peptide could be directly used as a clinically applicable imaging probe. PMID:26759016

  6. Differential Bacterial Surface Display of Peptides by the Transmembrane Domain of OmpA

    PubMed Central

    Verhoeven, Gertjan S.; Alexeeva, Svetlana; Dogterom, Marileen; den Blaauwen, Tanneke

    2009-01-01

    Peptide libraries or antigenic determinants can be displayed on the surface of bacteria through insertion in a suitable outer membrane scaffold protein. Here, we inserted the well-known antibody epitopes 3xFLAG and 2xmyc in exterior loops of the transmembrane (TM) domain of OmpA. Although these highly charged epitopes were successfully displayed on the cell surface, their levels were 10-fold reduced due to degradation. We verified that the degradation was not caused by the absence of the C-terminal domain of OmpA. In contrast, a peptide that was only moderately charged (SA-1) appeared to be stably incorporated in the outer membrane at normal protein levels. Together, these results suggest that the display efficiency is sensitive to the charge of the inserted epitopes. In addition, the high-level expression of OmpA variants with surface-displayed epitopes adversely affected growth in a strain dependent, transient manner. In a MC4100 derived strain growth was affected, whereas in MC1061 derived strains growth was unaffected. Finally, results obtained using a gel-shift assay to monitor β-barrel folding in vivo show that the insertion of small epitopes can change the heat modifiability of the OmpA TM domain from ‘aberrant’ to normal, and predict that some β-barrels will not display any significant heat-modifiability at all. PMID:19707582

  7. Phage-displayed peptides mimicking the discontinuous neutralization sites of puumala Hantavirus envelope glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Heiskanen, T; Lundkvist, A; Soliymani, R; Koivunen, E; Vaheri, A; Lankinen, H

    1999-09-30

    We selected peptide ligands mimicking the surface structure of discontinuous binding sites of Puumala hantavirus-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies from a random 18-amino acid peptide library containing a disulfide bridge in a fixed position and displayed on a filamentous phage. The varying of selection conditions, either by shortening of the association time or by competitive elution with antigen, was crucial for the selection of peptide inserts that could be aligned with the primary sequences of the envelope glycoproteins G1 and G2. Correspondingly, when the envelope glycoprotein sequences were synthesized as overlapping peptides as spots on membrane, the same site in primary structure was found as with phage display, which corroborates the use of the two methods in mapping of conformational epitopes. Also, epitopes reactive with early-phase sera from Puumala virus infection were defined with the pepspot assay in the amino-terminal region of G1. Similarities of the selected phage clones to a monoclonal antibody-escape mutant site and to a linear early-phase epitope were found. PMID:10502511

  8. Immunodiagnosis of human neurocysticercosis using a synthetic peptide selected by phage-display.

    PubMed

    Hell, R C R; Amim, P; de Andrade, H M; de Avila, R A M; Felicori, L; Oliveira, A G; Oliveira, C A; Nascimento, E; Tavares, C A P; Granier, C; Chávez-Olórtegui, C

    2009-04-01

    The usefulness of a synthetic peptide in the serodiagnosis of Taenia solium human neurocysticercosis (NC) has been evaluated. Phage-displayed peptides were screened with human antibodies to scolex protein antigen from cysticercus cellulosae (SPACc). One clone was found to interact specifically with anti-SPACc IgGs. The corresponding synthetic peptide was found to be recognized in ELISA by NC patient's sera. The study was carried out with sera from 28 confirmed NC patients, 13 control sera and 73 sera from patients suffering from other infectious diseases. A 93% sensibility and a 94.3% specificity was achieved. Figures of 89% and 31.4% of sensibility and specificity were obtained in a SPACc-based ELISA. Immunoblotting of SPACc with anti-peptide antibodies revealed a single band of approximately 45 kDa in 1D and four 45 kDa isoforms in 2D-gel electrophoresis. A strong and specific immunostaining in the fibers beneath the suckers, at the base of the rostellum, and in the tissue surrounding the scolex of cysticerci was observed by immunomicroscopy. Our results show that a peptide-based immunodiagnostic of neurocisticercosis can be envisioned. PMID:19186111

  9. A phage display-selected peptide inhibitor of Agrobacterium vitis polygalacturonase.

    PubMed

    Warren, Jeremy G; Kasun, George W; Leonard, Takara; Kirkpatrick, Bruce C

    2016-05-01

    Agrobacterium vitis, the causal agent of crown gall of grapevine, is a threat to viticulture worldwide. A major virulence factor of this pathogen is polygalacturonase, an enzyme that degrades pectin components of the xylem cell wall. A single gene encodes for the polygalacturonase gene. Disruption of the polygalacturonase gene results in a mutant that is less pathogenic and produces significantly fewer root lesions on grapevines. Thus, the identification of peptides or proteins that could inhibit the activity of polygalacturonase could be part of a strategy for the protection of plants against this pathogen. A phage-displayed combinatorial peptide library was used to isolate peptides with a high binding affinity to A. vitis polygalacturonase. These peptides showed sequence similarity to regions of Oryza sativa (EMS66324, Japonica) and Triticum urartu (NP_001054402, wild wheat) polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs). Furthermore, these panning experiments identified a peptide, SVTIHHLGGGS, which was able to reduce A. vitis polygalacturonase activity by 35% in vitro. Truncation studies showed that the IHHL motif alone is sufficient to inhibit A. vitis polygalacturonase activity. PMID:26177065

  10. Intravenous phage display identifies peptide sequences that target the burn-injured intestine

    PubMed Central

    Costantini, Todd W.; Eliceiri, Brian P.; Putnam, James G.; Bansal, Vishal; Baird, Andrew; Coimbra, Raul

    2015-01-01

    The injured intestine is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality after severe trauma and burn; however, targeting the intestine with therapeutics aimed at decreasing injury has proven difficult. We hypothesized that we could use intravenous phage display technology to identify peptide sequences that target the injured intestinal mucosa in a murine model, and then confirm the cross-reactivity of this peptide sequence with ex vivo human gut. Four hours following 30% TBSA burn we performed an in vivo, intravenous systemic administration of phage library containing 1012 phage in balb/c mice to biopan for gut-targeting peptides. In vivo assessment of the candidate peptide sequences identified after 4 rounds of internalization was performed by injecting 1 × 1012 copies of each selected phage clone into sham or burned animals. Internalization into the gut was assessed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We then incubated this gut-targeting peptide sequence with human intestine and visualized fluorescence using confocal microscopy. We identified 3 gut-targeting peptide sequences which caused collapse of the phage library (4–1: SGHQLLLNKMP, 4–5: ILANDLTAPGPR, 4–11: SFKPSGLPAQSL). Sequence 4–5 was internalized into the intestinal mucosa of burned animals 9.3-fold higher than sham animals injected with the same sequence (2.9 × 105 vs. 3.1 × 104 particles per mg tissue). Sequences 4–1 and 4–11 were both internalized into the gut, but did not demonstrate specificity for the injured mucosa. Phage sequence 4–11 demonstrated cross-reactivity with human intestine. In the future, this gut-targeting peptide sequence could serve as a platform for the delivery of biotherapeutics. PMID:22960048

  11. Blocking peptides against HBV: PreS1 protein selected from a phage display library

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Yang; Zu, Xiangyang; Jin, Rui; Xiao, Gengfu

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} Successfully selected specific PreS1-interacting peptides by using phage displayed library. {yields} Alignment of the positive phage clones revealed a consensus PreS1 binding motif. {yields} A highly enriched peptide named P7 had a strong binding ability for PreS1. {yields} P7 could block PreS1 attachment. -- Abstract: The PreS1 protein is present on the outermost part of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface and has been shown to have a pivotal function in viral infectivity and assembly. The development of reagents with high affinity and specificity for PreS1 is of great significance for early diagnosis and treatment of HBV infection. A phage display library of dodecapeptide was screened for interactions with purified PreS1 protein. Alignment of the positive phage clones revealed a putative consensus PreS1 binding motif of HX{sub n}HX{sub m}HP/R. Moreover, a peptide named P7 (KHMHWHPPALNT) was highly enriched and occurred with a surprisingly high frequency of 72%. A thermodynamic study revealed that P7 has a higher binding affinity to PreS1 than the other peptides. Furthermore, P7 was able to abrogate the binding of HBV virions to the PreS1 antibody, suggesting that P7 covers key functional sites on the native PreS1 protein. This newly isolated peptide may, therefore, be a new therapeutic candidate for the treatment of HBV. The consensus motif could be modified to deliver imaging, diagnostic, and therapeutic agents to tissues affected by HBV.

  12. Construction of a high efficiency copper adsorption bacterial system via peptide display and its application on copper dye polluted wastewater.

    PubMed

    Maruthamuthu, Murali Kannan; Nadarajan, Saravanan Prabhu; Ganesh, Irisappan; Ravikumar, Sambandam; Yun, Hyungdon; Yoo, Ik-Keun; Hong, Soon Ho

    2015-11-01

    For the construction of an efficient copper waste treatment system, a cell surface display strategy was employed. The copper adsorption ability of recombinant bacterial strains displaying three different copper binding peptides were evaluated in LB Luria-Bertani medium (LB), artificial wastewater, and copper phthalocyanine containing textile dye industry wastewater samples. Structural characteristics of the three peptides were also analyzed by similarity-based structure modeling. The best binding peptide was chosen for the construction of a dimeric peptide display and the adsorption ability of the monomeric and dimeric peptide displayed strains were compared. The dimeric peptide displayed strain showed superior copper adsorption in all three tested conditions (LB, artificial wastewater, and textile dye industry wastewater). When the strains were exposed to copper phthalocyanine dye polluted wastewater, the dimeric peptide display [543.27 µmol/g DCW dry cell weight (DCW)] showed higher adsorption of copper when compared with the monomeric strains (243.53 µmol/g DCW). PMID:26219270

  13. Inorganic binding peptides designed by phage display techniques for biotechnology applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Chih-Wei

    Biomacromolecules play an important role in the control of hard tissue structure and function via specific molecular recognition interactions between proteins of the matrix and inorganic species of the biomineral phase. During the construction of the tissue, biomacromolecules are usually folded into a certain comformation, analogous to a "lock" for fitting with other proteins or smaller molecules as a "key". Currently, the rational design of molecular recognition in biomacro-molecules is still hard to accomplish because the protein conformation is too complex to precisely predict based on the existing conformational information of proteins found in biological systems. In the past two decades, the combinatorial approach (e.g. phage display techniques) has been used to select short binding peptides with molecular recognition to an inorganic target material without a prior knowledge of the amino acid sequence required for the specific binding. The technique has been referred to as "biopanning" because bacteriophages are used to "screen" for peptides that exhibit strong binding to a target material of interest. In this study, two diverse applications were chosen to demonstrate the utility of the biopanning approach. In one project, phage display techniques were used to pan for Indium Zinc Oxide (InZnO) binding peptides to serve as linkers between transducer devices and biosensing elements for demonstration of the feasibility of reversibly electro-activated biosensors. The amorphous InZnO, with its homogeneous surface, led to three consensus peptide sequences, AGFPNSTHSSNL, SHAPDSTWFALF, and TNSSSQFVVAIP. In addition, it was demonstrated that some selected phage clones of the InZnO binding peptides were able to be released from the InZnO surface after applying a voltage of 1400 mV on an electro-activated releasing device. In the second project, phage display techniques were used to select phage clones that bind specifically to francolite mineral in order to achieve

  14. Phage Displayed Peptides to Avian H5N1 Virus Distinguished the Virus from Other Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Chengfeng; Ren, Xiaofeng

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to identify potential ligands and develop a novel diagnostic test to highly pathogenic avian influenza A virus (HPAI), subtype H5N1 viruses using phage display technology. The H5N1 viruses were used as an immobilized target in a biopanning process using a 12-mer phage display random peptide library. After five rounds of panning, three phages expressing peptides HAWDPIPARDPF, AAWHLIVALAPN or ATSHLHVRLPSK had a specific binding activity to H5N1 viruses were isolated. Putative binding motifs to H5N1 viruses were identified by DNA sequencing. In terms of the minimum quantity of viruses, the phage-based ELISA was better than antiserum-based ELISA and a manual, semi-quantitative endpoint RT-PCR for detecting H5N1 viruses. More importantly, the selected phages bearing the specific peptides to H5N1 viruses were capable of differentiating this virus from other avian viruses in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. PMID:21887228

  15. Selection of peptides binding to metallic borides by screening M13 phage display libraries

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Metal borides are a class of inorganic solids that is much less known and investigated than for example metal oxides or intermetallics. At the same time it is a highly versatile and interesting class of compounds in terms of physical and chemical properties, like semiconductivity, ferromagnetism, or catalytic activity. This makes these substances attractive for the generation of new materials. Very little is known about the interaction between organic materials and borides. To generate nanostructured and composite materials which consist of metal borides and organic modifiers it is necessary to develop new synthetic strategies. Phage peptide display libraries are commonly used to select peptides that bind specifically to metals, metal oxides, and semiconductors. Further, these binding peptides can serve as templates to control the nucleation and growth of inorganic nanoparticles. Additionally, the combination of two different binding motifs into a single bifunctional phage could be useful for the generation of new composite materials. Results In this study, we have identified a unique set of sequences that bind to amorphous and crystalline nickel boride (Ni3B) nanoparticles, from a random peptide library using the phage display technique. Using this technique, strong binders were identified that are selective for nickel boride. Sequence analysis of the peptides revealed that the sequences exhibit similar, yet subtle different patterns of amino acid usage. Although a predominant binding motif was not observed, certain charged amino acids emerged as essential in specific binding to both substrates. The 7-mer peptide sequence LGFREKE, isolated on amorphous Ni3B emerged as the best binder for both substrates. Fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy confirmed the specific binding affinity of LGFREKE expressing phage to amorphous and crystalline Ni3B nanoparticles. Conclusions This study is, to our knowledge, the first to identify peptides that

  16. Engineering phage materials with desired peptide display: rational design sustained through natural selection.

    PubMed

    Merzlyak, Anna; Lee, Seung-Wuk

    2009-12-01

    Genetic engineering of phage provides novel opportunities to build various nanomaterials by displaying functional peptide motifs on its surface coat protein. However, any genetic modifications of phage coat proteins must be able to accommodate their many biological roles in the phage replication process. To express functional but inherently unfavorable peptide motifs on major coat protein pVIII, we devised a novel genetic conjugation method to circumvent bacterial biological censorship. Constraining the designed peptides among the degenerate flanking residues, we obtained a pVIII library of phage that retained the desired sequences yet could navigate through the phage replication process due to the naturally selected flanking residues. Further, we systematically analyzed the biochemical and size-related compensation mechanisms of the pVIII expressed peptides by constructing four chemically diverse (His, Trp, Glu, Lys) partial library series. Described genetic conjugation methodology can serve to improve the design of engineered phage and allow further exploitation of these particles as functional nanobiomaterials for various applications. PMID:19842621

  17. Selective and Sensitive Sensing of Flame Retardant Chemicals Through Phage Display Discovered Recognition Peptide.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hyo-Eon; Zueger, Chris; Chung, Woo-Jae; Wong, Winnie; Lee, Byung Yang; Lee, Seung-Wuk

    2015-11-11

    We report a highly selective and sensitive biosensor for the detection of an environmentally toxic molecule, decabrominated diphenyl ether (DBDE), one of the most common congeners of the polybrominated frame retardants (polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE)), using newly discovered DBDE peptide receptors integrated with carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNT-FET). The specific DBDE peptide receptor was identified using a high-throughput screening process of phage library display. The resulting binding peptide carries an interesting consensus binding pocket with two Trp-His/Asn-Trp repeats, which binds to the DBDE in a multivalent manner. We integrated the novel DBDE binding peptide onto the CNT-FET using polydiacetylene coating materials linked through cysteine-maleimide click chemistry. The resulting biosensor could detect the desired DBDE selectively with a 1 fM detection limit. Our combined approaches of selective receptor discovery, material nanocoating through click chemistry, and integration onto a sensitive CNT-FET electronic sensor for desired target chemicals will pave the way toward the rapid development of portable and easy-to-use biosensors for desired chemicals to protect our health and environment. PMID:26455834

  18. Identification of a peptide specifically targeting ovarian cancer by the screening of a phage display peptide library

    PubMed Central

    WANG, LEDAN; HU, YUE; LI, WENJU; WANG, FAN; LU, XIAOSHENG; HAN, XUEYING; LV, JIEQIANG; CHEN, JIE

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most common cause of cancer-associated mortality in terms of gynecological malignancies, and is difficult to diagnose due to the absence of reliable biomarkers. To identify ovarian cancer-specific biomarkers, the present study used a Ph.D.-7™ Phage Display Peptide Library to screen for ligands that selectively target HO-8910 ovarian cancer cells. Following 5 rounds of biopanning, the phage clone P2 was selected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and DNA sequencing, and its characteristics were additionally validated by immunofluorescence and immunohistochemical assays. The results revealed the positive phage were enriched 92-fold following 5 rounds of biopanning, and the DNA sequence AAC CCG ATG ATT CGC CGC CAG (amino acid sequence, NPMIRRQ) was repeated most frequently (phage clones, P2, P3, P15, P30 and P54). Immunofluorescence and immunohistochemical assays revealed that the phage clone P2 was able to bind to ovarian cancer cells and tissues, and not those of cervical cancer. In conclusion, the peptide NPMIRRQ may be a potential agent for the diagnosis of ovarian cancer.

  19. Mimotopes of polyreactive anti-DNA antibodies identified using phage-display peptide libraries.

    PubMed

    Sibille, P; Ternynck, T; Nato, F; Buttin, G; Strosberg, D; Avrameas, A

    1997-05-01

    Three monoclonal IgG2a anti-DNA polyreactive autoantibodies, derived from lupus-prone mice (NZB x NZW)F1, were studied by surface plasmon resonance (BIAcore) analysis using three different synthetic double-stranded (ds) oligonucleotides of 25, 30, and 25 base pairs (bp). These monoclonal antibodies (mAb) exhibited dissociation rate constants (k(off)), ranging from 0.0001 (mAb F14.6 and F4.1) to 0.01/s (mAb J20.8) and k(on) ranging from 2 x 10(5) to 2 x 10(6) /M/s. The screening of a constrained random peptide library displayed on M13 bacteriophages on these mAb allowed the determination of the specific consensus motifs (mimotopes) for mAb F14.6 and J20.8, but not for mAb F4.1. No cross-reaction was observed between F14.6- and J20.8-specific peptides (and vice versa). Binding of all phages selected on F14.6 was inhibited with 700 ng/ml soluble DNA. The binding of one group of peptides selected on J20.8 was inhibited by 400 ng/ml soluble DNA, of a second group by 2500 ng/ml, while binding of a third group could not be inhibited. The determined consensus sequences do not match with known sequences. Peptides specific for F14.6 share negative charges and aromatic rings that may mimic a DNA backbone, while peptides selected with J20.8 do not bear any negative charge, implying a different kind of molecular recognition, for example hydrogen or salt bonds. The peptides selected on J20.8 also bind serum antibodies from human patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. In addition, BALB/c mice immunized with some of the selected phages exhibit high serum titers of IgG3 anti-dsDNA antibodies, further supporting the hypothesis that peptide epitopes may mimic an oligonucleotide structure. PMID:9174614

  20. Molecular specialization of breast vasculature: A breast-homing phage-displayed peptide binds to aminopeptidase P in breast vasculature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essler, Markus; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2002-02-01

    In vivo phage display identifies peptides that selectively home to the vasculature of individual organs, tissues, and tumors. Here we report the identification of a cyclic nonapeptide, CPGPEGAGC, which homes to normal breast tissue with a 100-fold selectivity over nontargeted phage. The homing of the phage is inhibited by its cognate synthetic peptide. Phage localization in tissue sections showed that the breast-homing phage binds to the blood vessels in the breast, but not in other tissues. The phage also bound to the vasculature of hyperplastic and malignant lesions in transgenic breast cancer mice. Expression cloning with a phage-displayed cDNA library yielded a phage that specifically bound to the breast-homing peptide. The cDNA insert was homologous to a fragment of aminopeptidase P. The homing peptide bound aminopeptidase P from malignant breast tissue in affinity chromatography. Antibodies against aminopeptidase P inhibited the in vitro binding of the phage-displayed cDNA to the peptide and the in vivo homing of phage carrying the peptide. These results indicate that aminopeptidase P is the receptor for the breast-homing peptide. This peptide may be useful in designing drugs for the prevention and treatment of breast cancer.

  1. Phage-displayed peptide targeting on the Puumala hantavirus neutralization site.

    PubMed Central

    Heiskanen, T; Lundkvist, A; Vaheri, A; Lankinen, H

    1997-01-01

    We have selected ligands for Puumala hantavirus, the causative agent of nephropathia epidemica, from a seven-amino-acid peptide library flanked by cysteines and displayed on a filamentous phage. To direct the selection to areas on the virus particle which are essential for infection, phages were competitively eluted with neutralizing monoclonal antibodies specific for the viral glycoproteins. The selected phage populations were specific for the same sites as the antibodies and mimicked their functions. The peptide insert, CHWMFSPWC, when displayed on the phages, completely inhibited Puumala virus infection in cell culture at the same effective concentration as the eluting antibody specific for envelope glycoprotein G2. The binding of the phage clones to the virus and inhibition of infection were not necessarily coincident; Pro-6 was critical for virus inhibition, while consensus residues Trp-2 and Phe-4 were essential for binding. The strategy described can be applied to any virus for production of molecules mimicking the effect of neutralizing antibodies. PMID:9094664

  2. Adhiron: a stable and versatile peptide display scaffold for molecular recognition applications

    PubMed Central

    Tiede, Christian; Tang, Anna A. S.; Deacon, Sarah E.; Mandal, Upasana; Nettleship, Joanne E.; Owen, Robin L.; George, Suja E.; Harrison, David J.; Owens, Raymond J.; Tomlinson, Darren C.; McPherson, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    We have designed a novel non-antibody scaffold protein, termed Adhiron, based on a phytocystatin consensus sequence. The Adhiron scaffold shows high thermal stability (Tm ca. 101°C), and is expressed well in Escherichia coli. We have determined the X-ray crystal structure of the Adhiron scaffold to 1.75 Å resolution revealing a compact cystatin-like fold. We have constructed a phage-display library in this scaffold by insertion of two variable peptide regions. The library is of high quality and complexity comprising 1.3 × 1010 clones. To demonstrate library efficacy, we screened against the yeast Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO). In selected clones, variable region 1 often contained sequences homologous to the known SUMO interactive motif (V/I-X-V/I-V/I). Four Adhirons were further characterised and displayed low nanomolar affinities and high specificity for yeast SUMO with essentially no cross-reactivity to human SUMO protein isoforms. We have identified binders against >100 target molecules to date including as examples, a fibroblast growth factor (FGF1), platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM-1; CD31), the SH2 domain Grb2 and a 12-aa peptide. Adhirons are highly stable and well expressed allowing highly specific binding reagents to be selected for use in molecular recognition applications. PMID:24668773

  3. Phage display selection of peptides that home to atherosclerotic plaques: IL-4 receptor as a candidate target in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Hai-yan; Lee, Hwa Young; Kwak, Wonjung; Yoo, Jeongsoo; Na, Moon-Hee; So, In Seop; Kwon, Tae-Hwan; Park, Heon-Sik; Huh, Seung; Oh, Goo Taeg; Kwon, Ick-Chan; Kim, In-San; Lee, Byung-Heon

    2008-01-01

    Imaging or drug delivery tools for atherosclerosis based on the plaque biology are still insufficient. Here, we attempted to identify peptides that selectively home to atherosclerotic plaques using phage display. A phage library containing random peptides was ex viv screened for binding to human atheroma tissues. After three to four rounds of selection, the DNA inserts of phage clones wer sequenced. A peptide sequence, CRKRLDRNC, was the most frequently occurring one. Intravenously injected phage displaying the CRKRLDRNC peptide was observed to home to atherosclerotic aortic tissues of low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient (Ldlr−/–) mice at higher levels than to normal aortic tissues of wild-type mice. Moreover, a fluorescein- or radioisotope-conjugated synthetic CRKRLDRNC peptide, but not a control peptide, homed in vivo to atherosclerotic plaques in Ldlr−/– mice, while homing of the peptide to other organs such as brain was minimal. The homing peptide co-localized with endothelial cells, macrophages and smooth muscle cells a mouse and human atherosclerotic plaques. Homology search revealed that the CRKRLDRNC peptide shares a motif of interleukin-receptor (IL-4) that is critical for binding to its receptor. The peptide indeed co-localized with IL-4 receptor (IL-4R) at atherosclerotic plaques. Moreover, the peptide bound to cultured cells expressing IL-4R on the cell surface and the binding was inhibited by the knock-down of IL-4R. These results show that the CRKRLDRNC peptide homes to atherosclerotic plaques through binding to IL-4R as its target and may be a useful tool for selective drug delivery and molecular imaging of atherosclerosis. PMID:19012727

  4. Cell adhesion and invasion inhibitory effect of an ovarian cancer targeting peptide selected via phage display in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pu, Ximing; Ma, Chuying; Yin, Guangfu; You, Fei; Wei, Yan

    2014-01-17

    Organ-specific metastasis is of great importance since most of the cancer deaths are caused by spread of the primary cancer to distant sites. Therefore, targeted anti-metastases therapies are needed to prevent cancer cells from metastasizing to different organs. The phage clone pc3-1 displaying peptide WSGPGVWGASVK selected by phage display had been identified which have high binding efficiency and remarkable cell specificity to SK-OV-3 cells. In the present work, the effects of selected cell-binding phage and cognate peptide on the cell adhesion and invasion of targeted cells were investigated. Results showed that the adhesive ability of SK-OV-3 to extracellular matrix was inhibited by pc3-1 and peptide WSGPGVWGASVK, and pc3-1 blocked SK-OV-3 cells attachment more effective than the cognate peptide. The peptide WSGPGVWGASVK suppressed the cell number of SK-OV-3 that attached to HUVECs monolayer up to 24% and could block the spreading of the attaching cells. Forthermore, the cognate peptide could inhibit the invasion of SK-OV-3 significantly. The number of invaded SK-OV-3 cells and invaded SK-OV-3-activated HUVECs pretreated with peptide WSGPGVWGASVK was decreased by 24.3% and 36.6%, respectively. All these results suggested that peptide WSGPGVWGASVK might possess anti-metastasis against SK-OV-3 cells. PMID:24342617

  5. Biopanning and characterization of peptides with Fe3O4 nanoparticles-binding capability via phage display random peptide library technique.

    PubMed

    You, Fei; Yin, Guangfu; Pu, Ximing; Li, Yucan; Hu, Yang; Huang, Zhongbin; Liao, Xiaoming; Yao, Yadong; Chen, Xianchun

    2016-05-01

    Functionalization of inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) play an important role in biomedical applications. A proper functionalization of NPs can improve biocompatibility, avoid a loss of bioactivity, and further endow NPs with unique performances. Modification with vairous specific binding biomolecules from random biological libraries has been explored. In this work, two 7-mer peptides with sequences of HYIDFRW and TVNFKLY were selected from a phage display random peptide library by using ferromagnetic NPs as targets, and were verified to display strong binding affinity to Fe3O4 NPs. Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, fluorescence microscopy, thermal analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the presence of peptides on the surface of Fe3O4 NPs. Sequence analyses revealed that the probable binding mechanism between the peptide and Fe3O4 NPs might be driven by Pearson hard acid-hard base specific interaction and hydrogen bonds, accompanied with hydrophilic interactions and non-specific electrostatic attractions. The cell viability assay indicated a good cytocompatibility of peptide-bound Fe3O4 NPs. Furthermore, TVNFKLY peptide and an ovarian tumor cell A2780 specific binding peptide (QQTNWSL) were conjugated to afford a liner 14-mer peptide (QQTNWSLTVNFKLY). The binding and targeting studies showed that 14-mer peptide was able to retain both the strong binding ability to Fe3O4 NPs and the specific binding ability to A2780 cells. The results suggested that the Fe3O4-binding peptides would be of great potential in the functionalization of Fe3O4 NPs for the tumor-targeted drug delivery and magnetic hyperthermia. PMID:26896661

  6. Baculovirus display of single chain antibody (scFv) using a novel signal peptide

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cells permissive to virus can become refractory to viral replication upon intracellular expression of single chain fragment variable (scFv) antibodies directed towards viral structural or regulatory proteins, or virus-coded enzymes. For example, an intrabody derived from MH-SVM33, a monoclonal antibody against a conserved C-terminal epitope of the HIV-1 matrix protein (MAp17), was found to exert an inhibitory effect on HIV-1 replication. Results Two versions of MH-SVM33-derived scFv were constructed in recombinant baculoviruses (BVs) and expressed in BV-infected Sf9 cells, N-myristoylation-competent scFvG2/p17 and N-myristoylation-incompetent scFvE2/p17 protein, both carrying a C-terminal HA tag. ScFvG2/p17 expression resulted in an insoluble, membrane-associated protein, whereas scFvE2/p17 was recovered in both soluble and membrane-incorporated forms. When coexpressed with the HIV-1 Pr55Gag precursor, scFvG2/p17 and scFvE2/p17 did not show any detectable negative effect on virus-like particle (VLP) assembly and egress, and both failed to be encapsidated in VLP. However, soluble scFvE2/p17 isolated from Sf9 cell lysates was capable of binding to its specific antigen, in the form of a synthetic p17 peptide or as Gag polyprotein-embedded epitope. Significant amounts of scFvE2/p17 were released in the extracellular medium of BV-infected cells in high-molecular weight, pelletable form. This particulate form corresponded to BV particles displaying scFvE2/p17 molecules, inserted into the BV envelope via the scFv N-terminal region. The BV-displayed scFvE2/p17 molecules were found to be immunologically functional, as they reacted with the C-terminal epitope of MAp17. Fusion of the N-terminal 18 amino acid residues from the scFvE2/p17 sequence (N18E2) to another scFv recognizing CD147 (scFv-M6-1B9) conferred the property of BV-display to the resulting chimeric scFv-N18E2/M6. Conclusion Expression of scFvE2/p17 in insect cells using a BV vector resulted in

  7. Identification of calreticulin as a ligand of GABARAP by phage display screening of a peptide library.

    PubMed

    Mohrlüder, Jeannine; Stangler, Thomas; Hoffmann, Yvonne; Wiesehan, Katja; Mataruga, Anja; Willbold, Dieter

    2007-11-01

    4-Aminobutyrate type A (GABA(A)) receptor-associated protein (GABARAP) is a ubiquitin-like modifier implicated in the intracellular trafficking of GABA(A) receptors, and belongs to a family of proteins involved in intracellular vesicular transport processes, such as autophagy and intra-Golgi transport. In this article, it is demonstrated that calreticulin is a high affinity ligand of GABARAP. Calreticulin, although best known for its functions as a Ca(2+) -dependent chaperone and a Ca(2+) -buffering protein in the endoplasmic reticulum, is also localized to the cytosol and exerts a variety of extra-endoplasmic reticulum functions. By phage display screening of a randomized peptide library, peptides that specifically bind GABARAP were identified. Their amino acid sequences allowed us to identify calreticulin as a potential GABARAP binding protein. GABARAP binding to calreticulin was confirmed by pull-down experiments with brain lysate and colocalization studies in N2a cells. Calreticulin and GABARAP interact with a dissociation constant K(d) = 64 nm and a mean lifetime of the complex of 20 min. Thus, the interaction between GABARAP and calreticulin is the strongest so far reported for each protein. PMID:17916189

  8. Nanoparticles and phage display selected peptides for imaging and therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Cutler, Cathy S; Chanda, Nripen; Shukla, Ravi; Sisay, Nebiat; Cantorias, Melchor; Zambre, Ajit; McLaughlin, Mark; Kelsey, James; Upenandran, Anandhi; Robertson, Dave; Deutscher, Susan; Kannan, Raghuraman; Katti, Kattesh

    2013-01-01

    Molecular imaging probes are a special class of pharmaceuticals that target specific biochemical signatures associated with disease and allow for noninvasive imaging on the molecular level. Because changes in biochemistry occur before diseases reach an advanced stage, molecular imaging probes make it possible to locate and stage disease, track the effectiveness of drugs, treat disease, monitor response, and select patients to allow for more personalized diagnosis and treatment of disease. Targeting agents radiolabeled with positron emitters are of interest due to their ability to quantitatively measure biodistribution and receptor expression to allow for optimal dose determinations. (68)Ga is a positron emitter, which allows for quantitative imaging through positron emission chromatography (PET). The availability of (68)Ga from a generator and its ability to form stable complexes with a variety of chelates hold promise for expanding PET utilization to facilities unable to afford their own cyclotron. Nanoparticles conjugated with various proteins and peptides derived from phage display that can be selectively targeted are being developed and evaluated for guided imaging and therapy. Herein we highlight some initial efforts in combining the enhanced selectivity of nanoparticles and peptides with (68)Ga for use as molecular imaging probes. PMID:22918758

  9. Antagonistic effect of disulfide-rich peptide aptamers selected by cDNA display on interleukin-6-dependent cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Nemoto, Naoto; Tsutsui, Chihiro; Yamaguchi, Junichi; Ueno, Shingo; Machida, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Toshikatsu; Sakai, Takafumi

    2012-04-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Disulfide-rich peptide aptamer inhibits IL-6-dependent cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Disulfide bond of peptide aptamer is essential for its affinity to IL-6R. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibitory effect of peptide depends on number and pattern of its disulfide bonds. -- Abstract: Several engineered protein scaffolds have been developed recently to circumvent particular disadvantages of antibodies such as their large size and complex composition, low stability, and high production costs. We previously identified peptide aptamers containing one or two disulfide-bonds as an alternative ligand to the interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R). Peptide aptamers (32 amino acids in length) were screened from a random peptide library by in vitro peptide selection using the evolutionary molecular engineering method 'cDNA display'. In this report, the antagonistic activity of the peptide aptamers were examined by an in vitro competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and an IL-6-dependent cell proliferation assay. The results revealed that a disulfide-rich peptide aptamer inhibited IL-6-dependent cell proliferation with similar efficacy to an anti-IL-6R monoclonal antibody.

  10. Intra-domain phage display (ID-PhD) of peptides and protein mini-domains censored from canonical pIII phage display

    PubMed Central

    Tjhung, Katrina F.; Deiss, Frédérique; Tran, Jessica; Chou, Ying; Derda, Ratmir

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we describe multivalent display of peptide and protein sequences typically censored from traditional N-terminal display on protein pIII of filamentous bacteriophage M13. Using site-directed mutagenesis of commercially available M13KE phage cloning vector, we introduced sites that permit efficient cloning using restriction enzymes between domains N1 and N2 of the pIII protein. As infectivity of phage is directly linked to the integrity of the connection between N1 and N2 domains, intra-domain phage display (ID-PhD) allows for simple quality control of the display and the natural variations in the displayed sequences. Additionally, direct linkage to phage propagation allows efficient monitoring of sequence cleavage, providing a convenient system for selection and evolution of protease-susceptible or protease-resistant sequences. As an example of the benefits of such an ID-PhD system, we displayed a negatively charged FLAG sequence, which is known to be post-translationally excised from pIII when displayed on the N-terminus, as well as positively charged sequences which suppress production of phage when displayed on the N-terminus. ID-PhD of FLAG exhibited sub-nanomolar apparent Kd suggesting multivalent nature of the display. A TEV-protease recognition sequence (TEVrs) co-expressed in tandem with FLAG, allowed us to demonstrate that 99.9997% of the phage displayed the FLAG-TEVrs tandem and can be recognized and cleaved by TEV-protease. The residual 0.0003% consisted of phage clones that have excised the insert from their genome. ID-PhD is also amenable to display of protein mini-domains, such as the 33-residue minimized Z-domain of protein A. We show that it is thus possible to use ID-PhD for multivalent display and selection of mini-domain proteins (Affibodies, scFv, etc.). PMID:25972845

  11. Intra-domain phage display (ID-PhD) of peptides and protein mini-domains censored from canonical pIII phage display.

    PubMed

    Tjhung, Katrina F; Deiss, Frédérique; Tran, Jessica; Chou, Ying; Derda, Ratmir

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we describe multivalent display of peptide and protein sequences typically censored from traditional N-terminal display on protein pIII of filamentous bacteriophage M13. Using site-directed mutagenesis of commercially available M13KE phage cloning vector, we introduced sites that permit efficient cloning using restriction enzymes between domains N1 and N2 of the pIII protein. As infectivity of phage is directly linked to the integrity of the connection between N1 and N2 domains, intra-domain phage display (ID-PhD) allows for simple quality control of the display and the natural variations in the displayed sequences. Additionally, direct linkage to phage propagation allows efficient monitoring of sequence cleavage, providing a convenient system for selection and evolution of protease-susceptible or protease-resistant sequences. As an example of the benefits of such an ID-PhD system, we displayed a negatively charged FLAG sequence, which is known to be post-translationally excised from pIII when displayed on the N-terminus, as well as positively charged sequences which suppress production of phage when displayed on the N-terminus. ID-PhD of FLAG exhibited sub-nanomolar apparent Kd suggesting multivalent nature of the display. A TEV-protease recognition sequence (TEVrs) co-expressed in tandem with FLAG, allowed us to demonstrate that 99.9997% of the phage displayed the FLAG-TEVrs tandem and can be recognized and cleaved by TEV-protease. The residual 0.0003% consisted of phage clones that have excised the insert from their genome. ID-PhD is also amenable to display of protein mini-domains, such as the 33-residue minimized Z-domain of protein A. We show that it is thus possible to use ID-PhD for multivalent display and selection of mini-domain proteins (Affibodies, scFv, etc.). PMID:25972845

  12. Screening and Antiviral Analysis of Phages That Display Peptides with an Affinity to Subunit C of Porcine Aminopeptidase

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Donghua; Zhu, Qinghe; Feng, Li

    2013-01-01

    The purified C subunit of the recombinant porcine aminopeptidase N (rpAPN-C) protein was used as an immobilized target to screen potential ligands against rpAPN-C from a 12-mer phage display random peptide library. After five rounds of biopanning, five phage clones showed specific binding affinities to rpAPN-C. In 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays, the phage clone PM1, which contained the HDAISWTHYHPW peptide sequence, had a protective effect against TGEV infection in swine testis cells. Therefore, the HDAISWTHYHPW peptide sequence has a potential use as a small molecular therapeutic agent against TGEV infection. PMID:24111863

  13. Enhanced Bioaccumulation of Heavy Metal Ions by Bacterial Cells Due to Surface Display of Short Metal Binding Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kotrba, Pavel; Dolečková, Lucie; de Lorenzo, Víctor; Ruml, Tomas

    1999-01-01

    Metal binding peptides of sequences Gly-His-His-Pro-His-Gly (named HP) and Gly-Cys-Gly-Cys-Pro-Cys-Gly-Cys-Gly (named CP) were genetically engineered into LamB protein and expressed in Escherichia coli. The Cd2+-to-HP and Cd2+-to-CP stoichiometries of peptides were 1:1 and 3:1, respectively. Hybrid LamB proteins were found to be properly folded in the outer membrane of E. coli. Isolated cell envelopes of E. coli bearing newly added metal binding peptides showed an up to 1.8-fold increase in Cd2+ binding capacity. The bioaccumulation of Cd2+, Cu2+, and Zn2+ by E. coli was evaluated. Surface display of CP multiplied the ability of E. coli to bind Cd2+ from growth medium fourfold. Display of HP peptide did not contribute to an increase in the accumulation of Cu2+ and Zn2+. However, Cu2+ ceased contribution of HP for Cd2+ accumulation, probably due to the strong binding of Cu2+ to HP. Thus, considering the cooperation of cell structures with inserted peptides, the relative affinities of metal binding peptide and, for example, the cell wall to metal ion should be taken into account in the rational design of peptide sequences possessing specificity for a particular metal. PMID:10049868

  14. Enhanced bioaccumulation of heavy metal ions by bacterial cells due to surface display of short metal binding peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Kotrba, P.; Ruml, T.; Doleckova, L.; Lorenzo, V. de

    1999-03-01

    Metal binding peptides of sequences Gly-His-His-Pro-His-Gly (named HP) and Gly-Cys-Gly-Cys-Pro-Cys-Gly-Cys-Gly (named CP) were genetically engineered into LamB protein and expressed in Escherichia coli. The Cd{sup 2+}-to-HP and Cd{sup 2+}-to-CP stoichiometries of peptides were 1:1 and 3:1, respectively. Hybrid LamB proteins were found to be properly folded in the outer membrane of E. coli. Isolated cell envelopes of E. coli bearing newly added metal binding peptides showed an up to 1.8-fold increase in Cd{sup 2+} binding capacity. The bioaccumulation of Cd{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, and Zn{sup 2+} by E. coli was evaluated. Surface display of CP multiplied the ability of E. coli to bind Cd{sup 2+} from growth medium fourfold. Display of HP peptide did not contribute to an increase in the accumulation of Cu{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+}. However, Cu{sup 2+} ceased contribution of HP for Cd{sup 2+} accumulation, probably due to the strong binding of Cu{sup 2+} to HP. Thus, considering the cooperation of cell structures with inserted peptides, the relative affinities of metal binding peptide and, for example, the cell wall to metal ion should be taken into account in the rational design of peptide sequences possessing specificity for a particular metal.

  15. Display of a PorA peptide from Neisseria meningitidis on the bacteriophage T4 capsid surface.

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, J; Abu-Shilbayeh, L; Rao, V B

    1997-01-01

    The exterior of bacteriophage T4 capsid is coated with two outer capsid proteins, Hoc (highly antigenic outer capsid protein; molecular mass, 40 kDa) and Soc (small outer capsid protein; molecular mass, 9 kDa), at symmetrical positions on the icosahedron (160 copies of Hoc and 960 copies of Soc per capsid particle). Both these proteins are nonessential for phage infectivity and viability and assemble onto the capsid surface after completion of capsid assembly. We developed a phage display system which allowed in-frame fusions of foreign DNA at a unique cloning site in the 5' end of hoc or soc. A DNA fragment corresponding to the 36-amino-acid PorA peptide from Neisseria meningitidis was cloned into the display vectors to generate fusions at the N terminus of Hoc or Soc. The PorA-Hoc and PorA-Soc fusion proteins retained the ability to bind to the capsid surface, and the bound peptide was displayed in an accessible form as shown by its reactivity with specific monoclonal antibodies in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. By employing T4 genetic strategies, we show that more than one subtype-specific PorA peptide can be displayed on the capsid surface and that the peptide can also be displayed on a DNA-free empty capsid. Both the PorA-Hoc and PorA-Soc recombinant phages are highly immunogenic in mice and elicit strong antipeptide antibody titers even with a weak adjuvant such as Alhydrogel or no adjuvant at all. The data suggest that the phage T4 hoc-soc system is an attractive system for display of peptides on an icosahedral capsid surface and may emerge as a powerful system for construction of the next generation multicomponent vaccines. PMID:9353063

  16. PHASTpep: Analysis Software for Discovery of Cell-Selective Peptides via Phage Display and Next-Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Dasa, Siva Sai Krishna; Kelly, Kimberly A.

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing has enhanced the phage display process, allowing for the quantification of millions of sequences resulting from the biopanning process. In response, many valuable analysis programs focused on specificity and finding targeted motifs or consensus sequences were developed. For targeted drug delivery and molecular imaging, it is also necessary to find peptides that are selective—targeting only the cell type or tissue of interest. We present a new analysis strategy and accompanying software, PHage Analysis for Selective Targeted PEPtides (PHASTpep), which identifies highly specific and selective peptides. Using this process, we discovered and validated, both in vitro and in vivo in mice, two sequences (HTTIPKV and APPIMSV) targeted to pancreatic cancer-associated fibroblasts that escaped identification using previously existing software. Our selectivity analysis makes it possible to discover peptides that target a specific cell type and avoid other cell types, enhancing clinical translatability by circumventing complications with systemic use. PMID:27186887

  17. RGD Peptide Cell-Surface Display Enhances the Targeting and Therapeutic Efficacy of Attenuated Salmonella-mediated Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seung-Hwan; Zheng, Jin Hai; Nguyen, Vu Hong; Jiang, Sheng-Nan; Kim, Dong-Yeon; Szardenings, Michael; Min, Jung Hyun; Hong, Yeongjin; Choy, Hyon E.; Min, Jung-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria-based anticancer therapies aim to overcome the limitations of current cancer therapy by actively targeting and efficiently removing cancer. To achieve this goal, new approaches that target and maintain bacterial drugs at sufficient concentrations during the therapeutic window are essential. Here, we examined the tumor tropism of attenuated Salmonella typhimurium displaying the RGD peptide sequence (ACDCRGDCFCG) on the external loop of outer membrane protein A (OmpA). RGD-displaying Salmonella strongly bound to cancer cells overexpressing αvβ3, but weakly bound to αvβ3-negative cancer cells, suggesting the feasibility of displaying a preferential homing peptide on the bacterial surface. In vivo studies revealed that RGD-displaying Salmonellae showed strong targeting efficiency, resulting in the regression in αvβ3-overexpressing cancer xenografts, and prolonged survival of mouse models of human breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) and human melanoma (MDA-MB-435). Thus, surface engineering of Salmonellae to display RGD peptides increases both their targeting efficiency and therapeutic effect. PMID:27446500

  18. Anaplasma marginale major surface protein 1a directs cell surface display of tick BM95 immunogenic peptides on Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Canales, Mario; Almazán, Consuelo; Pérez de la Lastra, José M; de la Fuente, José

    2008-07-31

    The surface display of heterologous proteins on live Escherichia coli using anchoring motifs from outer membranes proteins has impacted on many areas of biochemistry, molecular biology and biotechnology. The Anaplasma marginale major surface protein 1a (MSP1a) contains N-terminal surface-exposed repeated peptides (28-289 amino acids) that are involved in pathogen interaction with host cell receptors and is surface-displayed when the recombinant protein is expressed in E. coli. Therefore, it was predicted that MSP1a would surface display on E. coli peptides inserted in the N-terminal repeats region of the protein. The Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus BM86 and BM95 glycoproteins are homologous proteins that protect cattle against tick infestations. In this study, we demonstrated that a recombinant protein comprising tick BM95 immunogenic peptides fused to the A. marginale MSP1a N-terminal region is displayed on the E. coli surface and is recognized by anti-BM86 and anti-MSP1a antibodies. This system provides a novel approach to the surface display of heterologous antigenic proteins on live E. coli and suggests the possibility to use the recombinant bacteria for immunization studies against cattle tick infestations. PMID:18582976

  19. RGD Peptide Cell-Surface Display Enhances the Targeting and Therapeutic Efficacy of Attenuated Salmonella-mediated Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Park, Seung-Hwan; Zheng, Jin Hai; Nguyen, Vu Hong; Jiang, Sheng-Nan; Kim, Dong-Yeon; Szardenings, Michael; Min, Jung Hyun; Hong, Yeongjin; Choy, Hyon E; Min, Jung-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria-based anticancer therapies aim to overcome the limitations of current cancer therapy by actively targeting and efficiently removing cancer. To achieve this goal, new approaches that target and maintain bacterial drugs at sufficient concentrations during the therapeutic window are essential. Here, we examined the tumor tropism of attenuated Salmonella typhimurium displaying the RGD peptide sequence (ACDCRGDCFCG) on the external loop of outer membrane protein A (OmpA). RGD-displaying Salmonella strongly bound to cancer cells overexpressing αvβ3, but weakly bound to αvβ3-negative cancer cells, suggesting the feasibility of displaying a preferential homing peptide on the bacterial surface. In vivo studies revealed that RGD-displaying Salmonellae showed strong targeting efficiency, resulting in the regression in αvβ3-overexpressing cancer xenografts, and prolonged survival of mouse models of human breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) and human melanoma (MDA-MB-435). Thus, surface engineering of Salmonellae to display RGD peptides increases both their targeting efficiency and therapeutic effect. PMID:27446500

  20. Selection of Phage Display Peptides Targeting Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Progenitor Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Bignone, Paola A; Krupa, Rachel A; West, Michael D; Larocca, David

    2016-01-01

    The ability of human pluripotent stem cells (hPS) to both self-renew and differentiate into virtually any cell type makes them a promising source of cells for cell-based regenerative therapies. However, stem cell identity, purity, and scalability remain formidable challenges that need to be overcome for translation of pluripotent stem cell research into clinical applications. Directed differentiation from hPS cells is inefficient and residual contamination with pluripotent cells that have the potential to form tumors remains problematic. The derivation of scalable (self-renewing) embryonic progenitor stem cell lines offers a solution because they are well defined and clonally pure. Clonally pure progenitor stem cell lines also provide a means for identifying cell surface targeting reagents that are useful for identification, tracking, and repeated derivation of the corresponding progenitor stem cell types from additional hPS cell sources. Such stem cell targeting reagents can then be applied to the manufacture of genetically diverse banks of human embryonic progenitor cell lines for drug screening, disease modeling, and cell therapy. Here we present methods to identify human embryonic progenitor stem cell targeting peptides by selection of phage display libraries on clonal embryonic progenitor cell lines and demonstrate their use for targeting quantum dots (Qdots) for stem cell labeling. PMID:25410289

  1. An equation to estimate the difference between theoretically predicted and SDS PAGE-displayed molecular weights for an acidic peptide.

    PubMed

    Guan, Yihong; Zhu, Qinfang; Huang, Delai; Zhao, Shuyi; Jan Lo, Li; Peng, Jinrong

    2015-01-01

    The molecular weight (MW) of a protein can be predicted based on its amino acids (AA) composition. However, in many cases a non-chemically modified protein shows an SDS PAGE-displayed MW larger than its predicted size. Some reports linked this fact to high content of acidic AA in the protein. However, the exact relationship between the acidic AA composition and the SDS PAGE-displayed MW is not established. Zebrafish nucleolar protein Def is composed of 753 AA and shows an SDS PAGE-displayed MW approximately 13 kDa larger than its predicted MW. The first 188 AA in Def is defined by a glutamate-rich region containing ~35.6% of acidic AA. In this report, we analyzed the relationship between the SDS PAGE-displayed MW of thirteen peptides derived from Def and the AA composition in each peptide. We found that the difference between the predicted and SDS PAGE-displayed MW showed a linear correlation with the percentage of acidic AA that fits the equation y = 276.5x - 31.33 (x represents the percentage of acidic AA, 11.4% ≤ x ≤ 51.1%; y represents the average ΔMW per AA). We demonstrated that this equation could be applied to predict the SDS PAGE-displayed MW for thirteen different natural acidic proteins. PMID:26311515

  2. Identification of measles virus epitopes using an ultra-fast method of panning phage-displayed random peptide libraries

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaoli; Barmina, Olga; Burgoon, Mark; Gilden, Don

    2010-01-01

    Phage-displayed random peptide libraries, in which high affinity phage peptides are enriched by repetitive selection (panning) on target antibody, provide a unique tool for identifying antigen specificity. This paper describes a new panning method that enables selection of peptides in 1 day as compared to about 6 days required in traditional panning to identify virus-specific epitopes. The method, termed ultra-fast selection of peptide (UFSP), utilizes phage produced by bacterial infection (phage amplification) directly for subsequent panning. Phage amplified in less than 1 h of infection in Escherichia coli are used for binding to target antibody pre-coated in the same wells of an ELISA plate, obviating the need for traditional large-scale amplification and purification. Importantly, phage elution at 37 °C was superior to that at room temperature, and phage amplification in a 150-μl volume of E. coli cells was superior to that in 250-μl volume. Application of UFSP to two monoclonal antibodies generated from clonally expanded plasma cells in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) brain identified high-affinity measles virus-specific-peptide epitopes. The UFSP panning methodology will expedite identification of peptides reacting with antibodies generated in other diseases of unknown antigenic specificity such as multiple sclerosis (MS), sarcoidosis and Behcet’s disease. PMID:19095007

  3. Identification of measles virus epitopes using an ultra-fast method of panning phage-displayed random peptide libraries.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaoli; Barmina, Olga; Burgoon, Mark; Gilden, Don

    2009-03-01

    Phage-displayed random peptide libraries, in which high affinity phage peptides are enriched by repetitive selection (panning) on target antibody, provide a unique tool for identifying antigen specificity. This paper describes a new panning method that enables selection of peptides in 1 day as compared to about 6 days required in traditional panning to identify virus-specific epitopes. The method, termed ultra-fast selection of peptide (UFSP), utilizes phage produced by bacterial infection (phage amplification) directly for subsequent panning. Phage amplified in less than 1h of infection in Escherichia coli are used for binding to target antibody pre-coated in the same wells of an ELISA plate, obviating the need for traditional large-scale amplification and purification. Importantly, phage elution at 37 degrees C was superior to that at room temperature, and phage amplification in a 150-microl volume of E. coli cells was superior to that in 250-microl volume. Application of UFSP to two monoclonal antibodies generated from clonally expanded plasma cells in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) brain identified high-affinity measles virus-specific-peptide epitopes. The UFSP panning methodology will expedite identification of peptides reacting with antibodies generated in other diseases of unknown antigenic specificity such as multiple sclerosis (MS), sarcoidosis and Behcet's disease. PMID:19095007

  4. Organic crystal-binding peptides: morphology control and one-pot formation of protein-displaying organic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niide, Teppei; Ozawa, Kyohei; Nakazawa, Hikaru; Oliveira, Daniel; Kasai, Hitoshi; Onodera, Mari; Asano, Ryutaro; Kumagai, Izumi; Umetsu, Mitsuo

    2015-11-01

    Crystalline assemblies of fluorescent molecules have different functional properties than the constituent monomers, as well as unique optical characteristics that depend on the structure, size, and morphological homogeneity of the crystal particles. In this study, we selected peptides with affinity for the surface of perylene crystal particles by exposing a peptide-displaying phage library in aqueous solution to perylene crystals, eluting the surface-bound phages by means of acidic desorption or liquid-liquid extraction, and amplifying the obtained phages in Escherichia coli. One of the perylene-binding peptides, PeryBPb1: VQHNTKYSVVIR, selected by this biopanning procedure induced perylene molecules to form homogenous planar crystal nanoparticles by means of a poor solvent method, and fusion of the peptide to a fluorescent protein enabled one-pot formation of protein-immobilized crystalline nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were well-dispersed in aqueous solution, and Förster resonance energy transfer from the perylene crystals to the fluorescent protein was observed. Our results show that the crystal-binding peptide could be used for simultaneous control of perylene crystal morphology and dispersion and protein immobilization on the crystals.Crystalline assemblies of fluorescent molecules have different functional properties than the constituent monomers, as well as unique optical characteristics that depend on the structure, size, and morphological homogeneity of the crystal particles. In this study, we selected peptides with affinity for the surface of perylene crystal particles by exposing a peptide-displaying phage library in aqueous solution to perylene crystals, eluting the surface-bound phages by means of acidic desorption or liquid-liquid extraction, and amplifying the obtained phages in Escherichia coli. One of the perylene-binding peptides, PeryBPb1: VQHNTKYSVVIR, selected by this biopanning procedure induced perylene molecules to form homogenous planar

  5. A new non-muscle-invasive bladder tumor-homing peptide identified by phage display in vivo

    PubMed Central

    YANG, XIAOFENG; ZHANG, FAN; LUO, JUNQIAN; PANG, JIANZHI; YAN, SANHUA; LUO, FANG; LIU, JIEHAO; WANG, WEI; CUI, YONGPING; SU, XIXI

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer is common and widespread, and its incidence is increasing. Many new diagnostic methods combined with state-of-the-art technology have been introduced in cystoscopy to collect real-time images of the bladder mucosa for diagnosis, but often miss inconspicuous early-stage tumors. Fluorophore-labeled peptides with high sensitivity and specificity for cancer would be a desirable tool for the detection and treatment of tiny or residual bladder tumors. Phage display and the human non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer cell line BIU-87 were used to identify a peptide. The isolated phage display peptide (CSSPIGRHC, named NYZL1) was tested in vitro for its binding specificity and affinity. Accumulation into xenograft tumors in a nude mouse model was analyzed with FITC-labeled NYZL1. NYZL1, with strong tumor-homing ability, was identified by in vivo phage library selection in the bladder cancer model. The NYZL1 phage and synthetic FITC-labeled NYZL1 peptides bound to tumor tissues and cells, but were hardly detected in normal control organs. Notably, accumulation of FITC-NYZL1 in bladder tumor cells was time-dependent. Biodistribution studies of xenografts of BIU-87 cells showed accumulation of injected FITC-NYZL1 in the tumors, and the bound peptide could not be removed by perfusion after 24 h. The mouse model of bladder tumor showed increased fluorescence intensity in the tumor-bearing bladder in comparison with normal bladder tissues after 4–6 h. In conclusion, NYZL1 may represent a lead peptide structure applicable in the development of optical molecular imaging. PMID:27221614

  6. A new non-muscle-invasive bladder tumor-homing peptide identified by phage display in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Fan; Luo, Junqian; Pang, Jianzhi; Yan, Sanhua; Luo, Fang; Liu, Jiehao; Wang, Wei; Cui, Yongping; Su, Xixi

    2016-07-01

    Bladder cancer is common and widespread, and its incidence is increasing. Many new diagnostic methods combined with state-of-the-art technology have been introduced in cystoscopy to collect real-time images of the bladder mucosa for diagnosis, but often miss inconspicuous early-stage tumors. Fluorophore-labeled peptides with high sensitivity and specificity for cancer would be a desirable tool for the detection and treatment of tiny or residual bladder tumors. Phage display and the human non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer cell line BIU-87 were used to identify a peptide. The isolated phage display peptide (CSSPIGRHC, named NYZL1) was tested in vitro for its binding specificity and affinity. Accumulation into xenograft tumors in a nude mouse model was analyzed with FITC-labeled NYZL1. NYZL1, with strong tumor‑homing ability, was identified by in vivo phage library selection in the bladder cancer model. The NYZL1 phage and synthetic FITC-labeled NYZL1 peptides bound to tumor tissues and cells, but were hardly detected in normal control organs. Notably, accumulation of FITC-NYZL1 in bladder tumor cells was time-dependent. Biodistribution studies of xenografts of BIU-87 cells showed accumulation of injected FITC-NYZL1 in the tumors, and the bound peptide could not be removed by perfusion after 24 h. The mouse model of bladder tumor showed increased fluorescence intensity in the tumor-bearing bladder in comparison with normal bladder tissues after 4-6 h. In conclusion, NYZL1 may represent a lead peptide structure applicable in the development of optical molecular imaging. PMID:27221614

  7. Identification and binding mechanism of phage displayed peptides with specific affinity to acid-alkali treated titanium.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuhua; Tan, Jing; Wu, Baohua; Wang, Jianxin; Qu, Shuxin; Weng, Jie; Feng, Bo

    2016-10-01

    Acid-alkali treatment is one of means widely used for preparing bioactive titanium surfaces. Peptides with specific affinity to titanium surface modified by acid-alkali two-steps treatment were obtained via phage display technology. Out of the eight new unique peptides, titanium-binding peptide 54 displayed by monoclonal M13 phage at its pIII coat protein (TBP54-M13 phage) was proved to have higher binding affinity to the substrate. The binding interaction occurred at the domain from phenylalanine at position 1 to arginine at position 6 in the sequences of TBP54 (FAETHRGFHFSF) mainly via the reaction of these residues with the Ti surface. Together the coordination and electrostatic interactions controlled the specific binding of the phage to the substrate. The binding affinity was dependent on the surface basic hydroxyl group content. In addition, the phage showed a different interaction way with the Ti surface without acid-alkali treatment along with an impaired affinity. This study could provide more understanding of the interaction mechanism between the selected peptide and its specific substrate, and develop a promising method for the biofunctionalization of titanium. PMID:27371890

  8. Peptides Displayed as High Density Brush Polymers Resist Proteolysis and Retain Bioactivity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We describe a strategy for rendering peptides resistant to proteolysis by formulating them as high-density brush polymers. The utility of this approach is demonstrated by polymerizing well-established cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and showing that the resulting polymers are not only resistant to proteolysis but also maintain their ability to enter cells. The scope of this design concept is explored by studying the proteolytic resistance of brush polymers composed of peptides that are substrates for either thrombin or a metalloprotease. Finally, we demonstrate that the proteolytic susceptibility of peptide brush polymers can be tuned by adjusting the density of the polymer brush and offer in silico models to rationalize this finding. We contend that this strategy offers a plausible method of preparing peptides for in vivo use, where rapid digestion by proteases has traditionally restricted their utility. PMID:25314576

  9. Improved eIF4E Binding Peptides by Phage Display Guided Design: Plasticity of Interacting Surfaces Yield Collective Effects

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Chandra S.; Liu, Yun; Lane, David P.; Brown, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF)4E is over-expressed in many types of cancer such as breast, head and neck, and lung. A consequence of increased levels of eIF4E is the preferential translation of pro-tumorigenic proteins (e.g. c-Myc and vascular endothelial growth factor) and as a result is regarded as a potential therapeutic target. In this work a novel phage display peptide has been isolated against eIF4E. From the phage sequence two amino acids were delineated which improved binding when substituted into the eIF4G1 sequence. Neither of these substitutions were involved in direct interactions with eIF4E and acted either via optimization of the helical capping motif or restricting the conformational flexibility of the peptide. In contrast, substitutions of the remaining phage derived amino acids into the eIF4G1 sequence disrupted binding of the peptide to eIF4E. Interestingly when some of these disruptive substitutions were combined with key mutations from the phage peptide, they lead to improved affinities. Atomistic computer simulations revealed that the phage and the eIF4G1 derivative peptide sequences differ subtly in their interaction sites on eIF4E. This raises the issue, especially in the context of planar interaction sites such as those exhibited by eIF4E, that given the intricate plasticity of protein surfaces, the construction of structure-activity relationships should account for the possibility of significant movement in the spatial positioning of the peptide binding interface, including significant librational motions of the peptide. PMID:23094039

  10. Cyclic peptides identified by phage display are competitive inhibitors of the tRNA-dependent amidotransferase of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Pham, Van Hau; Maaroufi, Halim; Levesque, Roger C; Lapointe, Jacques

    2016-05-01

    In Helicobacter pylori, the heterotrimeric tRNA-dependent amidotransferase (GatCAB) is essential for protein biosynthesis because it catalyzes the conversion of misacylated Glu-tRNA(Gln) and Asp-tRNA(Asn) into Gln-tRNA(Gln) and Asn-tRNA(Asn), respectively. In this study, we used a phage library to identify peptide inhibitors of GatCAB. A library displaying loop-constrained heptapeptides was used to screen for phages binding to the purified GatCAB. To optimize the probability of obtaining competitive inhibitors of GatCAB with respect to its substrate Glu-tRNA(Gln), we used that purified substrate in the biopanning process of the phage-display technique to elute phages bound to GatCAB at the third round of the biopanning process. Among the eluted phages, we identified several that encode cyclic peptides rich in Trp and Pro that inhibit H. pylori GatCAB in vitro. Peptides P10 and P9 were shown to be competitive inhibitors of GatCAB with respect to its substrate Glu-tRNA(Gln), with Ki values of 126 and 392μM, respectively. The docking models revealed that the Trp residues of these peptides form π-π stacking interactions with Tyr81 of the synthetase active site, as does the 3'-terminal A76 of tRNA, supporting their competitive behavior with respect to Glu-tRNA(Gln) in the transamidation reaction. These peptides can be used as scaffolds in the search for novel antibiotics against the pathogenic bacteria that require GatCAB for Gln-tRNA(Gln) and/or Asn-tRNA(Asn) formation. PMID:26976271

  11. Targeting Leishmania major parasite with peptides derived from a combinatorial phage display library.

    PubMed

    Rhaiem, Rafik Ben; Houimel, Mehdi

    2016-07-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is a global problem caused by intracellular protozoan pathogens of the genus Leishmania for which there are no suitable vaccine or chemotherapy options. Thus, de novo identification of small molecules binding to the Leishmania parasites by direct screening is a promising and appropriate alternative strategy for the development of new drugs. In this study, we used a random linear hexapeptide library fused to the gene III protein of M13 filamentous bacteriophage to select binding peptides to metacyclic promastigotes from a highly virulent strain of Leishmania major (Zymodeme MON-25; MHOM/TN/94/GLC94). After four rounds of stringent selection and amplification, polyclonal and monoclonal phage-peptides directed against L. major metacyclic promastigotes were assessed by ELISA, and the optimal phage-peptides were grown individually and characterized for binding to L. major by monoclonal phage ELISA. The DNA of 42 phage-peptides clones was amplified by PCR, sequenced, and their amino acid sequences deduced. Six different peptide sequences were obtained with frequencies of occurrence ranging from 2.3% to 85.7%. The biological effect of the peptides was assessed in vitro on human monocytes infected with L. major metacyclic promastigotes, and in vivo on susceptible parasite-infected BALB/c mice. The development of cutaneous lesions in the right hind footpads of infected mice after 13 weeks post-infection showed a protection rate of 81.94% with the injected peptide P2. Moreover, Western blots revealed that the P2 peptide interacted with the major surface protease gp63, a protein of 63kDa molecular weight. Moreover, bioinformatics were used to predict the interaction between peptides and the major surface molecule of the L. major. The molecular docking showed that the P2 peptide has the minimum interaction energy and maximum shape complimentarity with the L. major gp63 active site. Our study demonstrated that the P2 peptide occurs at high frequency

  12. Reactive Center Loop (RCL) Peptides Derived from Serpins Display Independent Coagulation and Immune Modulating Activities.

    PubMed

    Ambadapadi, Sriram; Munuswamy-Ramanujam, Ganesh; Zheng, Donghang; Sullivan, Colin; Dai, Erbin; Morshed, Sufi; McFadden, Baron; Feldman, Emily; Pinard, Melissa; McKenna, Robert; Tibbetts, Scott; Lucas, Alexandra

    2016-02-01

    Serpins regulate coagulation and inflammation, binding serine proteases in suicide-inhibitory complexes. Target proteases cleave the serpin reactive center loop scissile P1-P1' bond, resulting in serpin-protease suicide-inhibitory complexes. This inhibition requires a near full-length serpin sequence. Myxomavirus Serp-1 inhibits thrombolytic and thrombotic proteases, whereas mammalian neuroserpin (NSP) inhibits only thrombolytic proteases. Both serpins markedly reduce arterial inflammation and plaque in rodent models after single dose infusion. In contrast, Serp-1 but not NSP improves survival in a lethal murine gammaherpesvirus68 (MHV68) infection in interferon γ-receptor-deficient mice (IFNγR(-/-)). Serp-1 has also been successfully tested in a Phase 2a clinical trial. We postulated that proteolytic cleavage of the reactive center loop produces active peptide derivatives with expanded function. Eight peptides encompassing predicted protease cleavage sites for Serp-1 and NSP were synthesized and tested for inhibitory function in vitro and in vivo. In engrafted aorta, selected peptides containing Arg or Arg-Asn, not Arg-Met, with a 0 or +1 charge, significantly reduced plaque. Conversely, S-6 a hydrophobic peptide of NSP, lacking Arg or Arg-Asn with -4 charge, induced early thrombosis and mortality. S-1 and S-6 also significantly reduced CD11b(+) monocyte counts in mouse splenocytes. S-1 peptide had increased efficacy in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 serpin-deficient transplants. Plaque reduction correlated with mononuclear cell activation. In a separate study, Serp-1 peptide S-7 improved survival in the MHV68 vasculitis model, whereas an inverse S-7 peptide was inactive. Reactive center peptides derived from Serp-1 and NSP with suitable charge and hydrophobicity have the potential to extend immunomodulatory functions of serpins. PMID:26620556

  13. Selection of staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB)-binding peptide using phage display technology

    SciTech Connect

    Soykut, Esra Acar; Dudak, Fahriye Ceyda; Boyaci, Ismail Hakki

    2008-05-23

    In this study, peptides were selected to recognize staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) which cause food intoxication and can be used as a biological war agent. By using commercial M13 phage library, single plaque isolation of 38 phages was done and binding affinities were investigated with phage-ELISA. The specificities of the selected phage clones showing high affinity to SEB were checked by using different protein molecules which can be found in food samples. Furthermore, the affinities of three selected phage clones were determined by using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors. Sequence analysis was realized for three peptides showing high binding affinity to SEB and WWRPLTPESPPA, MNLHDYHRLFWY, and QHPQINQTLYRM amino acid sequences were obtained. The peptide sequence with highest affinity to SEB was synthesized with solid phase peptide synthesis technique and thermodynamic constants of the peptide-SEB interaction were determined by using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and compared with those of antibody-SEB interaction. The binding constant of the peptide was determined as 4.2 {+-} 0.7 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} which indicates a strong binding close to that of antibody.

  14. Identification of a novel peptide ligand targeting visceral adipose tissue via transdermal route by in vivo phage display.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nam Kyung; Kim, Hong Shin; Kim, Kyung Hyun; Kim, Eun-Bae; Cho, Chong Su; Kang, Sang Kee; Choi, Yun Jaie

    2011-11-01

    To find novel peptide ligands targeting visceral adipose tissue (visceral fat) via transdermal route, in vivo phage display screening was conducted by dermal administration of a phage-peptide library to rats and a peptide sequence, CGLHPAFQC (designated as TDA1), was identified as a targeting ligand to visceral adipose tissue through the consecutive transdermal biopannings. Adipocyte-specific affinity and transdermal activity of the TDA1 were validated in vitro and targeting ability of the dermally administered TDA1 to visceral adipose tissue was also confirmed in vivo. TDA1 was effectively translocated into systemic circulation after dermal administration and selectively targeted visceral adipose tissue without any preference to other organs tested. Fluorescent microscopic analysis revealed that the TDA1 could be specifically localized in the hair follicles of the skin, as well as in the visceral adipose tissue. Thus, we inferred that dermally administered TDA1 would first access systemic circulation via hair follicles as its transdermal route and then could target visceral fat effectively. The overall results suggest that the TDA1 peptide could be potentially applied as a homing moiety for delivery of anti-obesity therapeutics to visceral fat through the convenient transdermal pathway. PMID:21999821

  15. A high affinity phage-displayed peptide as a recognition probe for the detection of Salmonella Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Shailaja; Kulabhusan, Prabir Kumar; Joshi, Manali; Bodas, Dhananjay; Paknikar, Kishore M

    2016-08-10

    Salmonellosis is one of the most common and widely distributed foodborne diseases. A sensitive and robust detection method of Salmonella Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) in food can critically prevent a disease outbreak. In this work, the use of phage displayed peptides was explored for the detection of S. Typhimurium. A phage-displayed random dodecapeptide library was subjected to biopanning against lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of S. Typhimurium. The peptide NFMESLPRLGMH (pep49) derived from biopanning displayed a high affinity (25.8nM) for the LPS of S. Typhimurium and low cross-reactivity with other strains of Salmonella and related Gram-negative bacteria. Molecular insights into the interaction of pep49 with the LPS of S. Typhimurium was gleaned using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations and docking. It was deduced that the specificity of pep49 with S. Typhimurium LPS originated from the interactions of pep49 with abequose that is found only in the O-antigen of S. Typhimurium. Further, pep49 was able to detect S. Typhimurium at a LOD of 10(3) CFU/mL using ELISA, and may be a potential cost efficient alternative to antibodies. PMID:27220907

  16. Phage display identification of functional binding peptides against 4-acetamidophenol (Paracetamol): an exemplified approach to target low molecular weight organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mathew W; Smith, Jonathan W; Harris, Charlotte; Brancale, Andrea; Allender, Christopher J; Gumbleton, Mark

    2007-06-22

    Peptide-phage display has been widely used to explore protein-protein interactions, however, despite the potential range of applications the use of this technology to identify peptides that bind low molecular weight organic molecules has not been explored. In this current study, we identified a phage clone (PARA-061) displaying the cyclic 7-mer peptide sequence N' AC-NPNNLSH-CGGGS C' that binds the low molecular weight organic molecule 4-acetamidophenol (4-AAP; paracetamol). To avoid occupancy of key functional groups on the target 4-AAP molecule our panning strategy was directed against insoluble complexes of 4-AAP rather than against the target linked to a stationary support or bearing an affinity tag. To augment the panning procedure we deleted phage that also bound the 4-AAP isomers, 2-AAP and 3-AAP. The identified PARA-061 peptide-phage clone displayed functional binding properties against 4-AAP in solution, able in a peptide sequence-dependant manner to prevent the in vitro hepatotoxicity of 4-AAP and reduce ( approximately 20%) the permeability of 4-AAP across a semi-permeable membrane. Molecular dynamic simulations generated a stable binding conformation between the PARA-061 peptide sequence and 4-AAP. In conclusion, we show that a phage display library can be used to identify peptide sequence-specific clones able to modulate the functional binding of a low molecular weight organic molecule. Such peptides may be expected to find utility in the next generation of hybrid polymer-based biosensing devices. PMID:17482566

  17. Exploration of the HIF-1α/p300 interface using peptide and Adhiron phage display technologies.

    PubMed

    Kyle, Hannah F; Wickson, Kate F; Stott, Jonathan; Burslem, George M; Breeze, Alexander L; Tiede, Christian; Tomlinson, Darren C; Warriner, Stuart L; Nelson, Adam; Wilson, Andrew J; Edwards, Thomas A

    2015-10-01

    The HIF-1α/p300 protein-protein interaction plays a key role in tumor metabolism and thus represents a high value target for anticancer drug-development. Although several studies have identified inhibitor candidates using rationale design, more detailed understanding of the interaction and binding interface is necessary to inform development of superior inhibitors. In this work, we report a detailed biophysical analysis of the native interaction with both peptide and Adhiron phage display experiments to identify novel binding motifs and binding regions of the surface of p300 to inform future inhibitor design. PMID:26135796

  18. Purification of polyclonal anti-conformational antibodies for use in affinity selection from random peptide phage display libraries: A study using the hydatid vaccine EG95

    PubMed Central

    Read, A.J.; Gauci, C.G.; Lightowlers, M.W.

    2009-01-01

    The use of polyclonal antibodies to screen random peptide phage display libraries often results in the recognition of a large number of peptides that mimic linear epitopes on various proteins. There appears to be a bias in the use of this technology toward the selection of peptides that mimic linear epitopes. In many circumstances the correct folding of a protein immunogen is required for conferring protection. The use of random peptide phage display libraries to identify peptide mimics of conformational epitopes in these cases requires a strategy for overcoming this bias. Conformational epitopes on the hydatid vaccine EG95 have been shown to result in protective immunity in sheep, whereas linear epitopes are not protective. In this paper we describe a strategy that results in the purification of polyclonal antibodies directed against conformational epitopes while eliminating antibodies directed against linear epitopes. These affinity purified antibodies were then used to select a peptide from a random peptide phage display library that has the capacity to mimic conformational epitopes on EG95. This peptide was subsequently used to affinity purify monospecific antibodies against EG95. PMID:19349218

  19. Phage-displayed peptide that mimics aflatoxins and its application in immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanru; Wang, Hong; Li, Peiwu; Zhang, Qi; Kim, Hee Joo; Gee, Shirley J; Hammock, Bruce D

    2013-03-13

    To search for an alternative to using protein conjugated aflatoxin as a coating antigen in aflatoxin detection by an ELISA method, a random-8-peptide library was constructed and used as a source of peptides that mimic aflatoxins (termed as mimotopes). Five mimotope peptides were obtained by panning-elution from the library and were successfully used in an indirect competitive ELISA for analyzing total aflatoxin concentration. The assay exhibited an IC50 value of 14 μg/kg in samples (with 1 in 7 dilution of sample extract) for aflatoxins. The linear range is 4-24 μg/kg. Further validation indicated relatively good recovery (60-120%) in peanut, rice and corn. Natural contaminated samples (peanut and feedstuff) were analyzed for aflatoxin concentration by both conventional ELISA and phage ELISA. The results showed good correlation. It can be concluded that the mimotope preparation is an effective substitute for the aflatoxin based coating antigen in ELISA and can be used in real sample analysis. PMID:23394544

  20. Antibody Constant Region Peptides Can Display Immunomodulatory Activity through Activation of the Dectin-1 Signalling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cenci, Elio; Monari, Claudia; Magliani, Walter; Ciociola, Tecla; Conti, Stefania; Gatti, Rita; Bistoni, Francesco; Polonelli, Luciano; Vecchiarelli, Anna

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported that a synthetic peptide with sequence identical to a CDR of a mouse monoclonal antibody specific for difucosyl human blood group A exerted an immunomodulatory activity on murine macrophages. It was therapeutic against systemic candidiasis without possessing direct candidacidal properties. Here we demonstrate that a selected peptide, N10K, putatively deriving from the enzymatic cleavage of the constant region (Fc) of human IgG1, is able to induce IL-6 secretion and pIkB-α activation. More importantly, it causes an up-regulation of Dectin-1 expression. This leads to an increased activation of β-glucan-induced pSyk, CARD9 and pIkB-α, and an increase in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-6, IL-12, IL-1β and TNF-α. The increased activation of this pathway coincides with an augmented phagocytosis of non opsonized Candida albicans cells by monocytes. The findings suggest that some Fc-peptides, potentially deriving from the proteolysis of immunoglobulins, may cause an unexpected immunoregulation in a way reminiscent of innate immunity molecules. PMID:22952831

  1. Phage-Displayed Peptides that Mimic Aflatoxins and its Application in Immunoassay

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanru; Wang, Hong; Li, Peiwu; Zhang, Qi; Kim, Hee Joo; Gee, Shirley J.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2013-01-01

    To search for an alternative to using protein conjugated aflatoxin as a coating antigen in aflatoxin detection by an ELISA method, a random-8-peptide library was constructed and used as a source of peptides that mimic aflatoxins (termed as mimotopes). Five mimotope peptides were obtained by panning-elution from the library and were successfully used in an indirect competitive ELISA for analyzing total aflatoxin concentration. The assay exhibited an IC50 value of 14 µg/kg in samples (with 1 in 7 dilution of sample extract) for aflatoxins. The linear range is 4–24 µg/kg. Further validation indicated relatively good recovery (60–120%) in peanut, rice and corn. Natural contaminated samples (peanut and feedstuff) were analyzed for aflatoxin concentration by both conventional ELISA and phage ELISA. The results showed good correlation. It can be concluded that the mimotope preparation is an effective substitute for the aflatoxin based coating antigen in ELISA and can be used in real sample analysis. PMID:23394544

  2. RGD peptide-displaying M13 bacteriophage/PLGA nanofibers as cell-adhesive matrices for smooth muscle cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Yong Cheol; Lee, Jong Ho; Jin, Oh Seong; Lee, Eun Ji; Jin, Lin Hua; Kim, Chang-Seok; Hong, Suck Won; Han, Dong-Wook; Kim, Chuntae; Oh, Jin-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular matrices (ECMs) are network structures that play an essential role in regulating cellular growth and differentiation. In this study, novel nanofibrous matrices were fabricated by electrospinning M13 bacteriophage and poly(lactic- co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and were shown to be structurally and functionally similar to natural ECMs. A genetically-engineered M13 bacteriophage was constructed to display Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptides on its surface. The physicochemical properties of RGD peptide-displaying M13 bacteriophage (RGD-M13 phage)/PLGA nanofibers were characterized by using scanning electron microscopy and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. We used immunofluorescence staining to confirm that M13 bacteriophages were homogenously distributed in RGD-M13 phage/PLGA matrices. Furthermore, RGD-M13 phage/PLGA nanofibrous matrices, having excellent biocompatibility, can enhance the behaviors of vascular smooth muscle cells. This result suggests that RGD-M13 phage/PLGA nanofibrous matrices have potentials to serve as tissue engineering scaffolds.

  3. Phage-displayed peptides as capture antigens in an innovative assay for Taenia saginata-infected cattle.

    PubMed

    Fogaça, Rafaela L; Capelli-Peixoto, Janaína; Yamanaka, Isabel B; de Almeida, Rodrigo P M; Muzzi, João Carlos D; Borges, Mariangela; Costa, Alvimar J; Chávez-Olortegui, Carlos; Thomaz-Soccol, Vanete; Alvarenga, Larissa M; de Moura, Juliana

    2014-11-01

    Bovine cysticercosis is detected during the routine post mortem examination of carcasses by visual inspection (knife and eye method). However, the sensitivity of this procedure is several times lower than immunoassays, even when it is performed by qualified professionals. In the present study, a new generation capture antigens were screened from a phage display peptide library using antibodies from Taenia saginata-infected animals. Eight phage clones were selected, and one, Tsag 3 (VHTSIRPRCQPRAITPR), produced similar results to the T. saginata metacestode crude antigen (TsCa) when used as a capture antigen in an ELISA. The phage-displayed peptides competed with TsCa for binding sites, reducing the reactivity by approximately 30 %. Alanine scanning indicated that proline, arginine, and serine are important residues for antibody binding. Tsag 1 (HFYQITWLPNTFPAR), the most frequent affinity-selected clone, and Tsag 6 (YRWPSTPSASRQATL) shared similarity with highly conserved proteins from the Taeniidae family with known immunogenicity. Due to their epitopic or mimotopic properties, these affinity-selected phages could contribute to the rational design of an ante mortem immunodiagnosis method for bovine cysticercosis, as well as an epitope-based vaccine to interrupt the taeniosis/cysticercosis complex. PMID:25081558

  4. A phage display selected 7-mer peptide inhibitor of the Tannerella forsythia metalloprotease-like enzyme Karilysin can be truncated to Ser-Trp-Phe-Pro.

    PubMed

    Skottrup, Peter Durand; Sørensen, Grete; Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Potempa, Jan; Riise, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Tannerella forsythia is a gram-negative bacteria, which is strongly associated with the development of periodontal disease. Karilysin is a newly identified metalloprotease-like enzyme, that is secreted from T. forsythia. Karilysin modulates the host immune response and is therefore considered a likely drug target. In this study peptides were selected towards the catalytic domain from Karilysin (Kly18) by phage display. The peptides were linear with low micromolar binding affinities. The two best binders (peptide14 and peptide15), shared the consensus sequence XWFPXXXGGG. A peptide15 fusion with Maltose Binding protein (MBP) was produced with peptide15 fused to the N-terminus of MBP. The peptide15-MBP was expressed in E. coli and the purified fusion-protein was used to verify Kly18 specific binding. Chemically synthesised peptide15 (SWFPLRSGGG) could inhibit the enzymatic activity of both Kly18 and intact Karilysin (Kly48). Furthermore, peptide15 could slow down the autoprocessing of intact Kly48 to Kly18. The WFP motif was important for inhibition and a truncation study further demonstrated that the N-terminal serine was also essential for Kly18 inhibition. The SWFP peptide had a Ki value in the low micromolar range, which was similar to the intact peptide15. In conclusion SWFP is the first reported inhibitor of Karilysin and can be used as a valuable tool in structure-function studies of Karilysin. PMID:23119051

  5. A Phage Display Selected 7-mer Peptide Inhibitor of the Tannerella forsythia Metalloprotease-Like Enzyme Karilysin can be Truncated to Ser-Trp-Phe-Pro

    PubMed Central

    Skottrup, Peter Durand; Sørensen, Grete; Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Potempa, Jan; Riise, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Tannerella forsythia is a gram-negative bacteria, which is strongly associated with the development of periodontal disease. Karilysin is a newly identified metalloprotease-like enzyme, that is secreted from T. forsythia. Karilysin modulates the host immune response and is therefore considered a likely drug target. In this study peptides were selected towards the catalytic domain from Karilysin (Kly18) by phage display. The peptides were linear with low micromolar binding affinities. The two best binders (peptide14 and peptide15), shared the consensus sequence XWFPXXXGGG. A peptide15 fusion with Maltose Binding protein (MBP) was produced with peptide15 fused to the N-terminus of MBP. The peptide15-MBP was expressed in E. coli and the purified fusion-protein was used to verify Kly18 specific binding. Chemically synthesised peptide15 (SWFPLRSGGG) could inhibit the enzymatic activity of both Kly18 and intact Karilysin (Kly48). Furthermore, peptide15 could slow down the autoprocessing of intact Kly48 to Kly18. The WFP motif was important for inhibition and a truncation study further demonstrated that the N-terminal serine was also essential for Kly18 inhibition. The SWFP peptide had a Ki value in the low micromolar range, which was similar to the intact peptide15. In conclusion SWFP is the first reported inhibitor of Karilysin and can be used as a valuable tool in structure-function studies of Karilysin. PMID:23119051

  6. Large-scale interaction profiling of PDZ domains through proteomic peptide-phage display using human and viral phage peptidomes.

    PubMed

    Ivarsson, Ylva; Arnold, Roland; McLaughlin, Megan; Nim, Satra; Joshi, Rakesh; Ray, Debashish; Liu, Bernard; Teyra, Joan; Pawson, Tony; Moffat, Jason; Li, Shawn Shun-Cheng; Sidhu, Sachdev S; Kim, Philip M

    2014-02-18

    The human proteome contains a plethora of short linear motifs (SLiMs) that serve as binding interfaces for modular protein domains. Such interactions are crucial for signaling and other cellular processes, but are difficult to detect because of their low to moderate affinities. Here we developed a dedicated approach, proteomic peptide-phage display (ProP-PD), to identify domain-SLiM interactions. Specifically, we generated phage libraries containing all human and viral C-terminal peptides using custom oligonucleotide microarrays. With these libraries we screened the nine PSD-95/Dlg/ZO-1 (PDZ) domains of human Densin-180, Erbin, Scribble, and Disks large homolog 1 for peptide ligands. We identified several known and putative interactions potentially relevant to cellular signaling pathways and confirmed interactions between full-length Scribble and the target proteins β-PIX, plakophilin-4, and guanylate cyclase soluble subunit α-2 using colocalization and coimmunoprecipitation experiments. The affinities of recombinant Scribble PDZ domains and the synthetic peptides representing the C termini of these proteins were in the 1- to 40-μM range. Furthermore, we identified several well-established host-virus protein-protein interactions, and confirmed that PDZ domains of Scribble interact with the C terminus of Tax-1 of human T-cell leukemia virus with micromolar affinity. Previously unknown putative viral protein ligands for the PDZ domains of Scribble and Erbin were also identified. Thus, we demonstrate that our ProP-PD libraries are useful tools for probing PDZ domain interactions. The method can be extended to interrogate all potential eukaryotic, bacterial, and viral SLiMs and we suggest it will be a highly valuable approach for studying cellular and pathogen-host protein-protein interactions. PMID:24550280

  7. Biomining with bacteriophage: selectivity of displayed peptides for naturally occurring sphalerite and chalcopyrite.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Susan B; Hewitt, Jeff; Macgillivray, Ross T A; Dunbar, W Scott

    2009-02-01

    During mineral processing, concentrates of sulfide minerals of economic interest are formed by froth flotation of fine ore particles. The method works well but recovery and selectivity can be poor for ores with complex mineralogy. There is considerable interest in methods that improve the selectivity of this process while avoiding the high costs of using flotation chemicals. Here we show the first application of phage biotechnology to the processing of economically important minerals in ore slurries. A random heptapeptide library was screened for peptide sequences that bind selectively to the minerals sphalerite (ZnS) and chalcopyrite (CuFeS2). After several rounds of enrichment, cloned phage containing the surface peptide loops KPLLMGS and QPKGPKQ bound specifically to sphalerite. Phage containing the peptide loop TPTTYKV bound to both sphalerite and chalcopyrite. By using an enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA), the phage was characterized as strong binders compared to wild-type phage. Specificity of binding was confirmed by immunochemical visualization of phage bound to mineral particles but not to silica (a waste mineral) or pyrite. The current study focused primarily on the isolation of ZnS-specific phage that could be utilized in the separation of sphalerite from silica. At mining sites where sphalerite and chalcopyrite are not found together in natural ores, the separation of sphalerite from silica would be an appropriate enrichment step. At mining sites where sphalerite and chalcopyrite do occur together, more specific phage would be required. This bacteriophage has the potential to be used in a more selective method of mineral separation and to be the basis for advanced methods of mineral processing. PMID:18767194

  8. Temporin-SHa peptides grafted on gold surfaces display antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Lombana, Andres; Raja, Zahid; Casale, Sandra; Pradier, Claire-Marie; Foulon, Thierry; Ladram, Ali; Humblot, Vincent

    2014-07-01

    Development of resistant bacteria onto biomaterials is a major problem leading to nosocomial infections. Antimicrobial peptides are good candidates for the generation of antimicrobial surfaces because of their broad-spectrum activity and their original mechanism of action (i.e. rapid lysis of the bacterial membrane) making them less susceptible to the development of bacterial resistance. In this study, we report on the covalent immobilisation of temporin-SHa on a gold surface modified by a thiolated self-assembled monolayer. Temporin-SHa (FLSGIVGMLGKLF amide) is a small hydrophobic and low cationic antimicrobial peptide with potent and very broad-spectrum activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, yeasts and parasites. We have analysed the influence of the binding mode of temporin-SHa on the antibacterial efficiency by using a covalent binding either via the peptide NH2 groups (random grafting of α- and ε-NH2 to the surface) or via its C-terminal end (oriented grafting using the analogue temporin-SHa-COOH). The surface functionalization was characterised by IR spectroscopy (polarisation modulation reflection absorption IR spectroscopy) while antibacterial activity against Listeria ivanovii was assessed by microscopy techniques, such as atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy equipped with a field emission gun. Our results revealed that temporin-SHa retains its antimicrobial activity after covalent grafting. A higher amount of bound temporin-SHa is observed for the C-terminally oriented grafting compared with the random grafting (NH2 groups). Temporin-SHa therefore represents an attractive candidate as antimicrobial coating agent. PMID:24919960

  9. Development of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for thiacloprid in soil and agro-products with phage-displayed peptide.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wei; Hua, Xiude; Liu, Xiaofeng; Shi, Haiyan; Gee, Shirley J; Wang, Minghua; Hammock, Bruce D

    2015-07-15

    A monoclonal antibody (3A5) that can recognize thiacloprid was produced, and a linear 8-residue peptide phage library was constructed. Six phage-displayed peptides were isolated from the linear 8-residue peptide phage library and a cyclic 8-residue peptide phage library. A phage enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed to detect thiacloprid using a phage-displayed peptide. Under the optimal conditions, the half-maximal inhibition concentration (IC50) and the limit of detection (IC10) of the developed phage ELISA were 8.3 and 0.7 μg/L, respectively. Compared with the conventional ELISA, the sensitivity was improved more than 3-fold. The cross-reactivity (CR) was less than 0.08% for the tested structural analogues and was regarded as negligible. The recoveries of thiacloprid ranged from 80.3% to 116.3% in environmental and agricultural samples, which conformed to the requirements for residue detection. The amount of thiacloprid detected by phage ELISA in the samples was significantly correlated with that detected by high-performance liquid chromatography. The current study indicates that isolating phage-displayed peptides from phage display libraries is an alternative method for the development of a sensitive immunoassay and that the developed assay is a potentially useful tool for detecting thiacloprid in environmental and agricultural samples. PMID:25908560

  10. Production and Evaluation of Antibodies and Phage Display-Derived Peptide Ligands for Immunomagnetic Separation of Mycobacterium bovis

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Linda D.; McNair, James; McCallan, Lyanne; Thompson, Suzan; Kulakov, Leonid A.

    2012-01-01

    This study describes the development and optimization of an immunomagnetic separation (IMS) method to isolate Mycobacterium bovis cells from lymph node tissues. Gamma-irradiated whole M. bovis AF2122/97 cells and ethanol-extracted surface antigens of such cells were used to produce M. bovis-specific polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in rabbits and mice. They were also used to generate M. bovis-specific peptide ligands by phage display biopanning. The various antibodies and peptide ligands obtained were used to coat MyOne tosyl-activated Dynabeads (Life Technologies), singly or in combination, and evaluated for IMS. Initially, M. bovis capture from Middlebrook 7H9 broth suspensions (concentration range, 10 to 105 CFU/ml) was evaluated by IMS combined with an M. bovis-specific touchdown PCR. IMS-PCR results and, subsequently, IMS-culture results indicated that the beads with greatest immunocapture capability for M. bovis in broth were those coated simultaneously with a monoclonal antibody and a biotinylated 12-mer peptide. These dually coated beads exhibited minimal capture (mean of 0.36% recovery) of 12 other Mycobacterium spp. occasionally encountered in veterinary tuberculosis (TB) diagnostic laboratories. When the optimized IMS method was applied to various M. bovis-spiked lymph node matrices, it demonstrated excellent detection sensitivities (50% limits of detection of 3.16 and 57.7 CFU/ml of lymph node tissue homogenate for IMS-PCR and IMS-culture, respectively). The optimized IMS method therefore has the potential to improve isolation of M. bovis from lymph nodes and hence the diagnosis of bovine tuberculosis. PMID:22322353

  11. Development of a novel efficient method to construct an adenovirus library displaying random peptides on the fiber knob

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Yuki; Goto, Naoko; Miura, Kazuki; Narumi, Kenta; Ohnami, Shumpei; Uchida, Hiroaki; Miura, Yoshiaki; Yamamoto, Masato; Aoki, Kazunori

    2014-01-01

    Redirection of adenovirus vectors by engineering the capsid-coding region has shown limited success because proper targeting ligands are generally unknown. To overcome this limitation, we constructed an adenovirus library displaying random peptides on the fiber knob, and its screening led to successful selections of several particular targeted vectors. In the previous library construction method, the full length of an adenoviral genome was generated by a Cre-lox mediated in vitro recombination between a fiber-modified plasmid library and the enzyme-digested adenoviral DNA/terminal protein complex (DNA-TPC) before transfection to the producer cells. In this system, the procedures were complicated and time-consuming, and approximately 30% of the vectors in the library were defective with no displaying peptide. These may hinder further extensive exploration of cancer-targeting vectors. To resolve these problems, in this study, we developed a novel method with the transfection of a fiber-modified plasmid library and a fiberless adenoviral DNA-TPC in Cre-expressing 293 cells. The use of in-cell Cre recombination and fiberless adenovirus greatly simplified the library-making steps. The fiberless adenovirus was useful in suppressing the expansion of unnecessary adenovirus vectors. In addition, the complexity of the library was more than a 104 level in one well in a 6-well dish, which was 10-fold higher than that of the original method. The results demonstrated that this novel method is useful in producing a high quality live adenovirus library, which could facilitate the development of targeted adenovirus vectors for a variety of applications in medicine. PMID:24380399

  12. Development of a novel efficient method to construct an adenovirus library displaying random peptides on the fiber knob.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yuki; Goto, Naoko; Miura, Kazuki; Narumi, Kenta; Ohnami, Shumpei; Uchida, Hiroaki; Miura, Yoshiaki; Yamamoto, Masato; Aoki, Kazunori

    2014-03-01

    Redirection of adenovirus vectors by engineering the capsid-coding region has shown limited success because proper targeting ligands are generally unknown. To overcome this limitation, we constructed an adenovirus library displaying random peptides on the fiber knob, and its screening led to successful selections of several particular targeted vectors. In the previous library construction method, the full length of an adenoviral genome was generated by a Cre-lox mediated in vitro recombination between a fiber-modified plasmid library and the enzyme-digested adenoviral DNA/terminal protein complex (DNA-TPC) before transfection to the producer cells. In this system, the procedures were complicated and time-consuming, and approximately 30% of the vectors in the library were defective with no displaying peptide. These may hinder further extensive exploration of cancer-targeting vectors. To resolve these problems, in this study, we developed a novel method with the transfection of a fiber-modified plasmid library and a fiberless adenoviral DNA-TPC in Cre-expressing 293 cells. The use of in-cell Cre recombination and fiberless adenovirus greatly simplified the library-making steps. The fiberless adenovirus was useful in suppressing the expansion of unnecessary adenovirus vectors. In addition, the complexity of the library was more than a 10(4) level in one well in a 6-well dish, which was 10-fold higher than that of the original method. The results demonstrated that this novel method is useful in producing a high quality live adenovirus library, which could facilitate the development of targeted adenovirus vectors for a variety of applications in medicine. PMID:24380399

  13. Targeting essential Eimeria ninakohlyakimovae sporozoite ligands for caprine host endothelial cell invasion with a phage display peptide library.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, A; Pérez, D; Muñoz, M C; Molina, J M; Taubert, A; Jacobs-Lorena, M; Vega-Rodríguez, J; López, A M; Hermosilla, C

    2015-11-01

    Eimeria ninakohlyakimovae is an important coccidian parasite of goats which causes severe diarrhoea in young animals. Specific molecules that mediate E. ninakohlyakimovae host interactions and molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis are still unknown. Although strong circumstantial evidence indicates that E. ninakohlyakimovae sporozoite interactions with caprine endothelial host cells (ECs) are specific, hardly any information is available about the interacting molecules that confer host cell specificity. In this study, we describe a novel method to identify surface proteins of caprine umbilical vein endothelial cells (CUVEC) using a phage display library. After several panning rounds, we identified a number of peptides that specifically bind to the surface of CUVEC. Importantly, caprine endothelial cell peptide 2 (PCEC2) and PCEC5 selectively reduced the infection rate by E. ninakohlyakimovae sporozoites. These preliminary data give new insight for the molecular identification of ligands involved in the interaction between E. ninakohlyakimovae sporozoites and host ECs. Further studies using this phage approach might be useful to identify new potential target molecules for the development of anti-coccidial drugs or even new vaccine strategies. PMID:26341796

  14. The HGF inhibitory peptide HGP-1 displays promising in vitro and in vivo efficacy for targeted cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lisha; Li, Chunlin; Zhu, Yimin

    2015-01-01

    HGF/MET pathway mediates cancer initiation and development. Thus, inhibition on HGF-initiated MET signaling pathway would provide a new approach to cancer targeted therapeutics. In our study, we identified a targeting peptide candidate binding to HGF which was named HGF binding peptide-1 (HGP-1) via bacterial surface display methods coupled with fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). HGP-1 showed the moderate affinity when determined with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique and high specificity in binding to HGF while assessed by fluorescence-based ELISA assay. The results from MTT and in vitro migration assay indicated that HGF-dependent cell proliferation and migration could be inhibited by HGP-1. In vivo administration of HGP-1 led to an effective inhibitory effect on tumor growth in A549 tumor xenograft models. Moreover, findings from Western Blots revealed that HGP-1 could down-regulated the phosphorylation levels of MET and ERK1/2 initiated by HGF, which suggested that HGP-1 could disrupt the activation of HGF/MET signaling to influence the cell activity. All the data highlighted the potential of HGP-1 to be a potent inhibitor for HGF/MET signaling. PMID:26254225

  15. Synergetic Targeted Delivery of Sleeping-Beauty Transposon System to Mesenchymal Stem Cells Using LPD Nanoparticles Modified with a Phage-Displayed Targeting Peptide.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kun; Wang, Dong-Dong; Lin, Yiyang; Wang, Jianglin; Petrenko, Valery; Mao, Chuanbin

    2013-03-01

    An important criterion for effective gene therapy is sufficient chromosomal integration activity. The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system is a plasmid system allowing efficient insertion of transgenes into the host genome. However, such efficient insertion occurs only after the system is delivered to nuclei. Since transposons do not have the transducing abilities of viral vectors, efficient delivery of this system first into cells and then into cell nuclei is still a challenge. Here, a phage display technique using a major coat displayed phage library is employed to identify a peptide (VTAMEPGQ) that can home to rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs). A nanoparticle, called liposome protamine/DNA lipoplex (LPD), is electrostatically assembled from cationic liposomes and an anionic complex of protamine, DNA and targeting peptides. Various peptides are enveloped inside the LPD to improve its targeting capability for rMSCs and nuclei. The rMSC-targeting peptide and nuclear localization signal (NLS) peptide can execute the synergetic effect to promote transfection action of LPD. The homing peptide directs the LPD to target the MSCs, whereas the NLS peptide directs transposon to accumulate into nuclei once LPD is internalized inside the cells, leading to increased gene expression. This suggests that rMSC-targeting peptide and NLS peptide within LPD can target to rMSCs and then guide transposon into nuclei. After entering the nuclei, SB transposon increase the insertion rates into cellular chromosomes. The targeting LPD does not show obvious cell toxicity and influence on the differentiation potential of rMSCs. Therefore, the integration of SB transposon and LPD system is a promising nonviral gene delivery vector in stem cell therapy. PMID:23885226

  16. Designer and natural peptide toxin blockers of the KcsA potassium channel identified by phage display.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ruiming; Dai, Hui; Mendelman, Netanel; Cuello, Luis G; Chill, Jordan H; Goldstein, Steve A N

    2015-12-15

    Peptide neurotoxins are powerful tools for research, diagnosis, and treatment of disease. Limiting broader use, most receptors lack an identified toxin that binds with high affinity and specificity. This paper describes isolation of toxins for one such orphan target, KcsA, a potassium channel that has been fundamental to delineating the structural basis for ion channel function. A phage-display strategy is presented whereby ∼1.5 million novel and natural peptides are fabricated on the scaffold present in ShK, a sea anemone type I (SAK1) toxin stabilized by three disulfide bonds. We describe two toxins selected by sorting on purified KcsA, one novel (Hui1, 34 residues) and one natural (HmK, 35 residues). Hui1 is potent, blocking single KcsA channels in planar lipid bilayers half-maximally (Ki) at 1 nM. Hui1 is also specific, inhibiting KcsA-Shaker channels in Xenopus oocytes with a Ki of 0.5 nM whereas Shaker, Kv1.2, and Kv1.3 channels are blocked over 200-fold less well. HmK is potent but promiscuous, blocking KcsA-Shaker, Shaker, Kv1.2, and Kv1.3 channels with Ki of 1-4 nM. As anticipated, one Hui1 blocks the KcsA pore and two conserved toxin residues, Lys21 and Tyr22, are essential for high-affinity binding. Unexpectedly, potassium ions traversing the channel from the inside confer voltage sensitivity to the Hui1 off-rate via Arg23, indicating that Lys21 is not in the pore. The 3D structure of Hui1 reveals a SAK1 fold, rationalizes KcsA inhibition, and validates the scaffold-based approach for isolation of high-affinity toxins for orphan receptors. PMID:26627718

  17. Structural analysis and insertion study reveal the ideal sites for surface displaying foreign peptides on a betanodavirus-like particle.

    PubMed

    Xie, Junfeng; Li, Kunpeng; Gao, Yuanzhu; Huang, Runqing; Lai, Yuxiong; Shi, Yan; Yang, Shaowei; Zhu, Guohua; Zhang, Qinfen; He, Jianguo

    2016-01-01

    Betanodavirus infection causes fatal disease of viral nervous necrosis in many cultured marine and freshwater fish worldwide and the virus-like particles (VLP) are effective vaccines against betanodavirus. But vaccine and viral vector designs of betanodavirus VLP based on their structures remain lacking. Here, the three-dimensional structure of orange-spotted grouper nervous necrosis virus (OGNNV) VLP (RBS) at 3.9 Å reveals the organization of capsid proteins (CP). Based on the structural results, seven putative important sites were selected to genetically insert a 6× histidine (His)-tag for VLP formation screen, resulting in four His-tagged VLP (HV) at positions N-terminus, Ala220, Pro292 and C-terminus. The His-tags of N-terminal HV (NHV) were concealed inside virions while those of 220HV and C-terminal HV (CHV) were displayed at the outer surface. NHV, 220HV and CHV maintained the same cell entry ability as RBS in the Asian sea bass (SB) cell line, indicating that their similar surface structures can be recognized by the cellular entry receptor(s). For application of vaccine design, chromatography-purified CHV could provoke NNV-specific antibody responses as strong as those of RBS in a sea bass immunization assay. Furthermore, in carrying capacity assays, N-terminus and Ala220 can only carry short peptides and C-terminus can even accommodate large protein such as GFP to generate fluorescent VLP (CGV). For application of a viral vector, CGV could be real-time visualized to enter SB cells in invasion study. All the results confirmed that the C-terminus of CP is a suitable site to accommodate foreign peptides for vaccine design and viral vector development. PMID:26754256

  18. Designer and natural peptide toxin blockers of the KcsA potassium channel identified by phage display

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ruiming; Dai, Hui; Mendelman, Netanel; Cuello, Luis G.; Chill, Jordan H.; Goldstein, Steve A. N.

    2015-01-01

    Peptide neurotoxins are powerful tools for research, diagnosis, and treatment of disease. Limiting broader use, most receptors lack an identified toxin that binds with high affinity and specificity. This paper describes isolation of toxins for one such orphan target, KcsA, a potassium channel that has been fundamental to delineating the structural basis for ion channel function. A phage-display strategy is presented whereby ∼1.5 million novel and natural peptides are fabricated on the scaffold present in ShK, a sea anemone type I (SAK1) toxin stabilized by three disulfide bonds. We describe two toxins selected by sorting on purified KcsA, one novel (Hui1, 34 residues) and one natural (HmK, 35 residues). Hui1 is potent, blocking single KcsA channels in planar lipid bilayers half-maximally (Ki) at 1 nM. Hui1 is also specific, inhibiting KcsA-Shaker channels in Xenopus oocytes with a Ki of 0.5 nM whereas Shaker, Kv1.2, and Kv1.3 channels are blocked over 200-fold less well. HmK is potent but promiscuous, blocking KcsA-Shaker, Shaker, Kv1.2, and Kv1.3 channels with Ki of 1–4 nM. As anticipated, one Hui1 blocks the KcsA pore and two conserved toxin residues, Lys21 and Tyr22, are essential for high-affinity binding. Unexpectedly, potassium ions traversing the channel from the inside confer voltage sensitivity to the Hui1 off-rate via Arg23, indicating that Lys21 is not in the pore. The 3D structure of Hui1 reveals a SAK1 fold, rationalizes KcsA inhibition, and validates the scaffold-based approach for isolation of high-affinity toxins for orphan receptors. PMID:26627718

  19. Ligand binding analyses of the putative peptide transporter YjdL from E. coli display a significant selectivity towards dipeptides

    SciTech Connect

    Ernst, Heidi A.; Pham, Antony; Hald, Helle; Kastrup, Jette S.; Rahman, Moazur; Mirza, Osman

    2009-11-06

    Proton-dependent oligopeptide transporters (POTs) are secondary active transporters that couple the inwards translocation of di- and tripeptides to inwards proton translocation. Escherichia coli contains four genes encoding the putative POT proteins YhiP, YdgR, YjdL and YbgH. We have over-expressed the previously uncharacterized YjdL and investigated the peptide specificity by means of uptake inhibition. The IC{sub 50} value for the dipeptide Ala-Ala was measured to 22 mM while Ala-Ala-Ala was not able to inhibit uptake. In addition, IC{sub 50} values of 0.3 mM and 1.5 mM were observed for Ala-Lys and Tyr-Ala, respectively, while the alanyl-extended tripeptides Ala-Lys-Ala, Ala-Ala-Lys, Ala-Tyr-Ala and Tyr-Ala-Ala displayed values of 8, >50, 31 and 31 mM, respectively. These results clearly indicate that unlike most POT members characterized to date, including YdgR and YhiP, YjdL shows significantly higher specificity towards dipeptides.

  20. A designed peptide targeting CXCR4 displays anti-acute myelocytic leukemia activity in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaojin; Guo, Hua; Yang, Yanlian; Meng, Jie; Liu, Jian; Wang, Chen; Xu, Haiyan

    2014-01-01

    Leukemia cells highly expressing chemokine receptor CXCR4 can actively response to stroma derived factor 1α (CXCL12), trafficking and homing to the marrow microenvironment, which causes poor prognosis and relapse. Here we demonstrate that a novel designed peptide (E5) targeting CXCR4 inhibits CXCL12- and stroma-induced activation in multiple acute myelocytic leukemia (AML) cell lines and displays anti-AML activity. We show that E5 has high affinity to multiple AML cells with high CXCR4 level in a concentration dependent manner. E5 significantly inhibits CXCL12- or murine stromal cell (MS-5)-induced migration of leukemia cells and prevents the cells from adhering to stromal cells. Mechanistic studies demonstrate that E5 down-regulates CXCL12-induced phosphorylation of Akt, Erk, and p38, which affects the cytoskeleton F-actin organization and ultimately results in the inhibition of CXCL12- and stroma-mediated leukemia cell responses. E5 can induce concentration-dependent apoptosis in the four AML cell lines tested while did not affect the viability of MS-5 or human umbilical vein cell (ea.hy926) even at 80 µM, both of which have a low level of CXCR4. In vivo experimental results show that immunocompromised mice transplanted with HL-60 cells survived longer when treated with E5 twice a week in comparison to those treated with cyclophosphamide. PMID:25312253

  1. Novel engineered cationic antimicrobial peptides display broad-spectrum activity against Francisella tularensis, Yersinia pestis and Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    PubMed

    Abdelbaqi, Suha; Deslouches, Berthony; Steckbeck, Jonathan; Montelaro, Ronald; Reed, Douglas S

    2016-02-01

    Broad-spectrum antimicrobials are needed to effectively treat patients infected in the event of a pandemic or intentional release of a pathogen prior to confirmation of the pathogen's identity. Engineered cationic antimicrobial peptides (eCAPs) display activity against a number of bacterial pathogens including multi-drug-resistant strains. Two lead eCAPs, WLBU2 and WR12, were compared with human cathelicidin (LL-37) against three highly pathogenic bacteria: Francisella tularensis, Yersinia pestis and Burkholderia pseudomallei. Both WLBU2 and WR12 demonstrated bactericidal activity greater than that of LL-37, particularly against F. tularensis and Y. pestis. Only WLBU2 had bactericidal activity against B. pseudomallei. WLBU2, WR12 and LL-37 were all able to inhibit the growth of the three bacteria in vitro. Because these bacteria can be facultative intracellular pathogens, preferentially infecting macrophages and dendritic cells, we evaluated the activity of WLBU2 against F. tularensis in an ex vivo infection model with J774 cells, a mouse macrophage cell line. In that model WLBU2 was able to achieve greater than 50% killing of F. tularensis at a concentration of 12.5 μM. These data show the therapeutic potential of eCAPs, particularly WLBU2, as a broad-spectrum antimicrobial for treating highly pathogenic bacterial infections. PMID:26673248

  2. Targeted gene delivery to human airway epithelial cells with synthetic vectors incorporating novel targeting peptides selected by phage display.

    PubMed

    Writer, Michele J; Marshall, Barry; Pilkington-Miksa, Michael A; Barker, Susie E; Jacobsen, Marianne; Kritz, Angelika; Bell, Paul C; Lester, Douglas H; Tabor, Alethea B; Hailes, Helen C; Klein, Nigel; Hart, Stephen L

    2004-05-01

    Human airway epithelial cell targeting peptides were identified by biopanning on 1HAEo-cells, a well characterised epithelial cell line. Bound phage were recovered after three rounds of binding, high stringency washing and elution, leading to the production of an enriched phage peptide population. DNA sequencing of 56 clones revealed 14 unique sequences. Subsequent binding analysis revealed that 13 of these peptides bound 1HAEo-cells with high affinity. Three peptides, SERSMNF, YGLPHKF and PSGAARA were represented at high frequency. Three clearly defined families of peptide were identified on the basis of sequence motifs including (R/K)SM, L(P/Q)HK and PSG(A/T)ARA. Two peptides, LPHKSMP and LQHKSMP contained two motifs. Further detailed sequence analysis by comparison of peptide sequences with the SWISSPROT protein database revealed that some of the peptides closely resembled the cell binding proteins of viral and bacterial pathogens including Herpes Simplex Virus, rotavirus, Mycoplasma pneumoniae and rhinovirus, the latter two being respiratory pathogens, as well as peptide YGLPHKF having similarity to a protein of unknown function from the respiratory pathogen Legionella pneumophila. Peptides were incorporated into gene delivery formulations with the cationic lipid Lipofectin and plasmid DNA and shown to confer a high degree of transfection efficiency and specificity in 1HAEo-cells. Improved transfection efficiency and specificity was also observed in human endothelial cells, fibroblasts and keratinocytes. Therefore, on the basis of clone frequency after biopanning, cell binding affinity, peptide sequence conservation and pathogenic similarity, we have identified 3 novel peptide families and 5 specific peptides that have the potential for gene transfer to respiratory epithelium in vivo as well as providing useful in vitro transfection reagents for primary human cell types of scientific and commercial interest. PMID:15506167

  3. Phage display allows identification of zona pellucida-binding peptides with species-specific properties: novel approach for development of contraceptive vaccines for wildlife.

    PubMed

    Samoylova, Tatiana I; Cochran, Anna M; Samoylov, Alexandre M; Schemera, Bettina; Breiteneicher, Adam H; Ditchkoff, Stephen S; Petrenko, Valery A; Cox, Nancy R

    2012-12-31

    Multiple phage-peptide constructs, where the peptides mimic sperm epitopes that bind to zona pellucida (ZP) proteins, were generated via selection from a phage display library using a novel approach. Selections were designed to allow for identification of ZP-binding phage clones with potential species-specific properties, an important feature for wildlife oral vaccines as the goal is to control overpopulation of a target species while not affecting non-target species' reproduction. Six phage-peptide antigens were injected intramuscularly into pigs and corresponding immune responses evaluated. Administration of the antigens into pigs stimulated production of anti-peptide antibodies, which were shown to act as anti-sperm antibodies. Potentially, such anti-sperm antibodies could interfere with sperm delivery or function in the male or female genital tract, leading to contraceptive effects. Staining of semen samples collected from different mammalian species, including pig, cat, dog, bull, and mouse, with anti-sera from pigs immunized with ZP-binding phage allowed identification of phage-peptide constructs with different levels of species specificity. Based on the intensity of the immune responses and specificity of these responses in different species, two of the antigens with fusion peptide sequences GEGGYGSHD and GQQGLNGDS were recognized as the most promising candidates for development of contraceptive vaccines for wild pigs. PMID:23079080

  4. Identification of a Peptide from In vivo Bacteriophage Display with Homology to EGFL6: A Candidate Tumor Vasculature Ligand in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Larimer, Benjamin M; Deutscher, Susan L

    2015-01-01

    Background A crucial step in tumorigenesis is the recruitment of novel vasculature to the site of neoplasia. Currently, a number of high throughput techniques are employed to identify genes, mRNA and proteins that are aberrantly expressed in tumor vasculature. One drawback of such techniques is the lack of functional in vivo data that they provide. Bacteriophage (phage) display has been demonstrated in vivo to select peptides that home to tumors and tumor vasculature. The peptides can be compared to sequences of putative cancer-related proteins, in order to identify novel proteins essential for tumorigenesis. Objectives It was hypothesized that an in vivo selection for phage which targeted human breast cancer xenografts could identify peptides with homology to cancer-related proteins for in vivo imaging of breast cancer. Methods Following four rounds of in vivo selection in human MDA-MB-435 breast cancer xenografted mice, peptide 3-G03 was discovered with significant homology to a putative secreted protein termed EGFL6. Egfl6 mRNA is upregulated in several transcriptomic analyses of human cancer biopsies, and the protein may play a role in tumor vascularization. Results Egfl6 mRNA expression was demonstrated in MDA-MB-435 cells and EGFL6 protein was secreted from these cells. Based on homology of 3-G03 to EGFL6, an EGFL6 peptide was synthesized and shown to target MDA-MB-435 cells. EGFL6 peptide was radiolabeled with 111In and analyzed for biodistribution and tumor imaging capabilities. Single photon emission computed tomography imaging revealed uptake of the peptide in a manner consistent with other tumor vasculature targeting agents. PMID:26045973

  5. Isolation and pharmacological characterization of AdTx1, a natural peptide displaying specific insurmountable antagonism of the α1A-adrenoceptor

    PubMed Central

    Quinton, L; Girard, E; Maiga, A; Rekik, M; Lluel, P; Masuyer, G; Larregola, M; Marquer, C; Ciolek, J; Magnin, T; Wagner, R; Molgó, J; Thai, R; Fruchart-Gaillard, C; Mourier, G; Chamot-Rooke, J; Ménez, A; Palea, S; Servent, D; Gilles, N

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Venoms are a rich source of ligands for ion channels, but very little is known about their capacity to modulate G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) activity. We developed a strategy to identify novel toxins targeting GPCRs. Experimental approach: We studied the interactions of mamba venom fractions with α1-adrenoceptors in binding experiments with 3H-prazosin. The active peptide (AdTx1) was sequenced by Edman degradation and mass spectrometry fragmentation. Its synthetic homologue was pharmacologically characterized by binding experiments using cloned receptors and by functional experiments on rabbit isolated prostatic smooth muscle. Key results: AdTx1, a 65 amino-acid peptide stabilized by four disulphide bridges, belongs to the three-finger-fold peptide family. It has subnanomolar affinity (Ki= 0.35 nM) and high specificity for the human α1A-adrenoceptor subtype. We showed high selectivity and affinity (Kd= 0.6 nM) of radio-labelled AdTx1 in direct binding experiments and revealed a slow association constant (kon= 6 × 106·M−1·min−1) with an unusually stable α1A-adrenoceptor/AdTx1 complex (t1/2diss= 3.6 h). AdTx1 displayed potent insurmountable antagonism of phenylephrine's actions in vitro (rabbit isolated prostatic muscle) at concentrations of 10 to 100 nM. Conclusions and implications: AdTx1 is the most specific and selective peptide inhibitor for the α1A-adrenoceptor identified to date. It displays insurmountable antagonism, acting as a potent relaxant of smooth muscle. Its peptidic nature can be exploited to develop new tools, as a radio-labelled-AdTx1 or a fluoro-labelled-AdTx1. Identification of AdTx1 thus offers new perspectives for developing new drugs for treating benign prostatic hyperplasia. PMID:20015090

  6. Identification of a novel aFGF-binding peptide with anti-tumor effect on breast cancer from phage display library

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Xiaoyong; Cai, Cuizan; Xiao, Fei; Xiong, Yaoling; Huang, Yadong; Zhang, Qihao; Xiang, Qi; Lou, Guofeng; Lian, Mengyang; Su, Zhijian; Zheng, Qing

    2014-03-21

    Highlights: • A specific aFGF-binding peptide AP8 was identified from a phage display library. • AP8 could inhibit aFGF-stimulated cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. • AP8 arrested the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase by suppressing Cyclin D1. • AP8 could block the activation of Erk1/2 and Akt kinase. • AP8 counteracted proliferation and cell cycle via influencing PA2G4 and PCNA. - Abstract: It has been reported that acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF) is expressed in breast cancer and via interactions with fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) to promote the stage and grade of the disease. Thus, aFGF/FGFRs have been considered essential targets in breast cancer therapy. We identified a specific aFGF-binding peptide (AGNWTPI, named AP8) from a phage display heptapeptide library with aFGF after four rounds of biopanning. The peptide AP8 contained two (TP) amino acids identical and showed high homology to the peptides of the 182–188 (GTPNPTL) site of high-affinity aFGF receptor FGFR1. Functional analyses indicated that AP8 specifically competed with the corresponding phage clone A8 for binding to aFGF. In addition, AP8 could inhibit aFGF-stimulated cell proliferation, arrested the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase by increasing PA2G4 and suppressing Cyclin D1 and PCNA, and blocked the aFGF-induced activation of Erk1/2 and Akt kinase in both breast cancer cells and vascular endothelial cells. Therefore, these results indicate that peptide AP8, acting as an aFGF antagonist, is a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of breast cancer.

  7. A Conserved Epitope Mapped with a Monoclonal Antibody against the VP3 Protein of Goose Parvovirus by Using Peptide Screening and Phage Display Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chenxi; Liu, Hongyu; Li, Jinzhe; Liu, Dafei; Meng, Runze; Zhang, Qingshan; Shaozhou, Wulin; Bai, Xiaofei; Zhang, Tingting; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Background Waterfowl parvovirus (WPV) infection causes high mortality and morbidity in both geese (Anser anser) and Muscovy ducks (Cairina moschata), resulting in significant losses to the waterfowl industries. The VP3 protein of WPV is a major structural protein that induces neutralizing antibodies in the waterfowl. However, B-cell epitopes on the VP3 protein of WPV have not been characterized. Methods and Results To understand the antigenic determinants of the VP3 protein, we used the monoclonal antibody (mAb) 4A6 to screen a set of eight partially expressed overlapping peptides spanning VP3. Using western blotting and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), we localized the VP3 epitope between amino acids (aa) 57 and 112. To identify the essential epitope residues, a phage library displaying 12-mer random peptides was screened with mAb 4A6. Phage clone peptides displayed a consensus sequence of YxRFHxH that mimicked the sequence 82Y/FNRFHCH88, which corresponded to amino acid residues 82 to 88 of VP3 protein of WPVs. mAb 4A6 binding to biotinylated fragments corresponding to amino acid residues 82 to 88 of the VP3 protein verified that the 82FxRFHxH88 was the VP3 epitope and that amino acids 82F is necessary to retain maximal binding to mAb 4A6. Parvovirus-positive goose and duck sera reacted with the epitope peptide by dot blotting assay, revealing the importance of these amino acids of the epitope in antibody-epitope binding reactivity. Conclusions and Significance We identified the motif FxRFHxH as a VP3-specific B-cell epitope that is recognized by the neutralizing mAb 4A6. This finding might be valuable in understanding of the antigenic topology of VP3 of WPV. PMID:27191594

  8. Phage displayed peptides and anti-idiotype antibodies recognised by a monoclonal antibody directed against a diagnostic antigen of Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Bengurić, D R; Dungu, B; Thiaucourt, F; du Plessis, D H

    2001-07-26

    A monoclonal antibody (Mab 4.52) raised against Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae (Mccp) cell lysate was used as a template to obtain substitute antigens recognised by its paratope. Two approaches were investigated: a 17-mer random peptide library displayed on the surface of a filamentous phage was screened by panning on the immobilised Mab 4.52 and anti-idiotype antibodies were generated by immunising a chicken with the F(ab')(2) fragments of the antibody. Analysis of the peptide sequences displayed by the isolated phages identified two peptides. Both contained two cysteine residues and had identical or similar amino acids in positions 5 (P), 8 (I/L) and 13 (L). The fusion phages were also recognised by Mab 4.52 in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and binding was shown by surface plasmon resonance. One of the peptides was a markedly better inhibitor (67%) of the binding of Mab 4.52 to its original antigen than the other (20%) at 1mg/ml. After absorption, to remove isotypic and allotypic reactivities, the anti-idiotype IgY was specifically recognised by Mab 4.52 in ELISA and was able to inhibit its binding to the original antigen, whereas anti-idiotype antibodies raised against a bluetongue virus-specific antibody had no effect. In spite of unequivocal binding of the anti-idiotype antibodies and the fusion phages to the paratope of Mab 4.52, goat antisera appeared not to react with either of the surrogate antigens. In contrast, the test sera bound to the original antigen suggesting that Mab 4.52 does not recognise exactly the same antigenic site as antibodies in the goat antisera. PMID:11376960

  9. Screening and identification of five peptides from pinto bean with inhibitory activities against α-amylase using phage display technique.

    PubMed

    Ngoh, Ying-Yuan; Lim, Theam Soon; Gan, Chee-Yuen

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to screen and identify α-amylase inhibitor peptides from Pinto bean. Five Pinto bean bioactive peptides were successfully identified: PPHMLP (P1), PLPWGAGF (P3), PPHMGGP (P6), PLPLHMLP (P7) and LSSLEMGSLGALFVCM (P9). Based on ELISA results, their promising optical density values were 1.27; 3.71, 1.67, 3.20 and 1.03, respectively, which indicated the binding interaction between the peptide and α-amylase occurred. The highest inhibitory activity (66.72%) of the chemically synthesized peptide was shown in SyP9 followed by SyP1 (48.86%), SyP3 (31.17%), SyP7 (27.88%) and SyP6 (23.96%). The IC50 values were 1.97, 8.96, 14.63, 18.45 and 20.56mgml(-1), respectively. Structure activity relationship study revealed that α-amylase was inhibited due to its residues of Ala230, Asp229, Asp326, Tyr54, Met195, Leu194 and His233 were bound. On the other hand, the residues of PBBP (i.e. histidine, proline and methionine) were found to have the highest potency in the binding interaction. PMID:27233130

  10. Evolution of potent and stable placental-growth-factor-1-targeting CovX-bodies from phage display peptide discovery.

    PubMed

    Bower, Kristen E; Lam, Son N; Oates, Bryan D; Del Rosario, Joselyn R; Corner, Emily; Osothprarop, Trina F; Kinhikar, Arvind G; Hoye, Julie A; Preston, R Ryan; Murphy, Robert E; Campbell, Lioudmila A; Huang, Hanhua; Jimenez, Judith; Cao, Xia; Chen, Gang; Ainekulu, Zemeda W; Datt, Aakash B; Levin, Nancy J; Doppalapudi, Venkata R; Pirie-Shepherd, Steven R; Bradshaw, Curt; Woodnutt, Gary; Lappe, Rodney W

    2011-03-10

    Novel phage-derived peptides are the first reported molecules specifically targeting human placental growth factor 1 (PlGF-1). Phage data enabled peptide modifications that decreased IC(50) values in PlGF-1/VEGFR-1 competition ELISA from 100 to 1 μM. Peptides exhibiting enhanced potency were bioconjugated to the CovX antibody scaffold 1 (CVX-2000), generating bivalent CovX-Bodies with 2 nM K(D) against PlGF-1. In vitro and in vivo peptide cleavage mapping studies enabled the identification of proteolytic hotspots that were subsequently chemically modified. These changes decreased IC(50) to 0.4 nM and increased compound stability from 5% remaining at 6 h after injection to 35% remaining at 24 h with a β phase half-life of 75 h in mice. In cynomolgus monkey, a 78 h β half-life was observed for lead compound 2. The pharmacological properties of 2 are currently being explored. PMID:21280651

  11. Identification of a novel snake peptide toxin displaying high affinity and antagonist behaviour for the α2-adrenoceptors

    PubMed Central

    Rouget, Céline; Quinton, Loïc; Maïga, Arhamatoulaye; Gales, Céline; Masuyer, Geoffrey; Malosse, Christian; Chamot-Rooke, Julia; Thai, Robert; Mourier, Gilles; de Pauw, Edwin; Gilles, Nicolas; Servent, Denis

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Muscarinic and adrenergic G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the targets of rare peptide toxins isolated from snake or cone snail venoms. We used a screen to identify novel toxins from Dendroaspis angusticeps targeting aminergic GPCRs. These toxins may offer new candidates for the development of new tools and drugs. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH In binding experiments with 3H-rauwolscine, we studied the interactions of green mamba venom fractions with α2-adrenoceptors from rat brain synaptosomes. We isolated, sequenced and chemically synthesized a novel peptide, ρ-Da1b. This peptide was pharmacologically characterized using binding experiments and functional tests on human α2-adrenoceptors expressed in mammalian cells. KEY RESULTS ρ-Da1b, a 66-amino acid peptide stabilized by four disulphide bridges, belongs to the three-finger-fold peptide family. Its synthetic homologue inhibited 80% of 3H-rauwolscine binding to the three α2-adrenoceptor subtypes, with an affinity between 14 and 73 nM and Hill slopes close to unity. Functional experiments on α2A-adrenoceptor demonstrated that ρ-Da1b is an antagonist, shifting adrenaline activation curves to the right. Schild regression revealed slopes of 0.97 and 0.67 and pA2 values of 5.93 and 5.32 for yohimbine and ρ-Da1b, respectively. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS ρ-Da1b is the first toxin identified to specifically interact with α2-adrenoceptors, extending the list of class A GPCRs sensitive to toxins. Additionally, its affinity and atypical mode of interaction open up the possibility of its use as a new pharmacological tool, in the study of the physiological roles of α2-adrenoceptor subtypes. PMID:20659106

  12. Construction, exploitation and evolution of a new peptide library displayed at high density by fusion to the major coat protein of filamentous phage.

    PubMed

    Iannolo, G; Minenkova, O; Gonfloni, S; Castagnoli, L; Cesareni, G

    1997-06-01

    The amino-terminus of the major coat protein (PVIII) of filamentous phage can be extended, up to 6-7 residues, without interfering with the phage life cycle. We have constructed a library of approximately ten millions different phage each displaying a different octapeptide joined to the amino-terminus of the 2700 copies of PVIII. Most of the resulting clones are able to produce infective particles. This molecular repertoire constituted by the periodic regular decoration of the phage filament surface, can be utilized to search elements that bind proteins or relatively small organic molecules like the textile dye Cibacron blue. By sequential growth cycles we have performed a library evolution experiment to select phage clones that have a growth advantage in the absence of any requirement for binding a specific target. The consensus of the best growers reveals a Pro rich sequence with large hydrophobic residues at position 7 and Asn at position 1 of the random peptide insert. We propose that the assembly secretion process is favoured in phages displaying this family of peptides since they fit the groove between two adjacent PVIII subunits by making advantageous molecular contacts on the phage surface. PMID:9224932

  13. Screening a phage display library for a novel FGF8b-binding peptide with anti-tumor effect on prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wenhui; Chen, Xilei; Li, Tao; Li, Yanmei; Wang, Ruixue; He, Dan; Luo, Wu; Li, Xiaokun; Wu, Xiaoping

    2013-05-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 8b (FGF8b) is the major isoform of FGF8 expressed in prostate cancer and it correlates with the stage and grade of the disease. FGF8b has been considered as a potential target for prostate cancer therapy. Here we isolated 12 specific FGF8b-binding phage clones by screening a phage display heptapeptide library with FGF8b. The peptide (HSQAAVP, named as P12) corresponding to one of these clones showed high homology to the immunoglobulin-like (Ig-like) domain II(D2) of high-affinity FGF8b receptor (FGFR3c), contained 3 identical amino acids (AVP) to the authentic FGFR3 D2 sequence aa 163–169 (LLAVPAA) directly participating in ligand binding, carried the same charges as its corresponding motif (aa163–169) in FGFR3c, suggesting that P12 may have a greater potential to interrupt FGF8b binding to its receptors than other identified heptapeptides do. Functional analysis indicated that synthetic P12 peptides mediate significant inhibition of FGF8b-induced cell proliferation, arrest cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase via suppression of Cyclin D1 and PCNA, and blockade of the activations of Erk1/2 and Akt cascades in both prostate cancer cells and vascular endothelial cells. The results demonstrated that the P12 peptide acting as an FGF8b antagonist may have therapeutic potential in prostate cancer. - Highlights: ► A novel FGF8b-binding peptide P12 was isolated from a phage display library. ► The mechanisms for P12 peptide inhibiting cell proliferation were proposed. ► P12 caused cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase via suppression of Cyclin D1 and PCNA. ► P12 suppressed FGF8b-induced activations of Akt and MAP kinases. ► P12 acting as an FGF8b antagonist may have therapeutic potential in prostate cancer.

  14. Identification of rabies virus mimotopes screened from a phage display peptide library with purified dog anti-rabies virus serum IgG.

    PubMed

    Yang, Limin; Cen, Junyu; Xue, Qinghua; Li, Jing; Bi, Yuhai; Sun, Lei; Liu, Wenjun

    2013-06-01

    The rabies virus glycoprotein (G) is a key protein for both virus infectivity and eliciting protective immunity as an antigen. What is more, the nucleoprotein (N) is also a significant rabies virus antigen. In this study, purified anti-rabies virus IgG from dogs immunized with the standard CVS-11 strain was used to screen the Ph.D.-12™ Phage Display Peptide Library for peptides that correspond to or mimic native G and N epitopes. In contrast to previous reports that use monoclonal antibodies or human anti-rabies virus serum, this study describes the first use of dog serum to screen for epitopes. After three rounds of biopanning, selected phage clones were identified by plaque screening, western blotting (WB), and ELISA. Positive phage clones were sequenced, and their amino acid sequences were deduced. Alignment of the peptide sequences to G and N indicated that the epitope peptides matched well with G amino acids at positions 34-42, 198-200, 226-264, 296-371, and 330-343, as well as to N amino acids at positions 22-168 (N-terminal) and 262-450 (C-terminal), confirming that the sequences were indeed mimicking epitopes. Thirty percent of the selected clones matched reported antigenic regions located at sites II and III of the glycoprotein. Two sequences, LEPKGRYDDPWT and ATRYDDIWASTA, that have no homology to the known antigenic sites of either the G or N exhibited a common RYDD-W-T motif that is highly homologous to the amino acid residues at positions 126-141 of the G. This finding indicates that this motif may be a new potential RABV G B cell epitope. Amino acids 126-141 containing the RYDD-W-T motif may become a novel key epitope region and allow the development of a rabies vaccine or diagnostic reagents for the treatment of rabies. PMID:23499997

  15. Improved delivery of the OVA-CD4 peptide to T helper cells by polymeric surface display on Salmonella

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Autotransporter proteins represent a treasure trove for molecular engineers who modify Gram-negative bacteria for the export or secretion of foreign proteins across two membrane barriers. A particularly promising direction is the development of autotransporters as antigen display or secretion systems. Immunologists have been using ovalbumin as a reporter antigen for years and have developed sophisticated tools to detect specific T cells that respond to ovalbumin. Although ovalbumin-expressing bacteria are being used to trace T cell responses to colonizing or invading pathogens, current constructs for ovalbumin presentation have not been optimized. Results The activation of T helper cells in response to ovalbumin was improved by displaying the OVA-CD4 reporter epitope as a multimer on the surface of Salmonella and fused to the autotransporter MisL. Expression was optimized by including tandem in vivo promoters and two post-segregational killing systems for plasmid stabilization. Conclusions The use of an autotransporter protein to present relevant epitope repeats on the surface of bacteria, combined with additional techniques favoring stable and efficient in vivo transcription, optimizes antigen presentation to T cells. The technique of multimeric epitope surface display should also benefit the development of new Salmonella or other enterobacterial vaccines. PMID:24898796

  16. A peptide derived from phage display library exhibits anti-tumor activity by targeting GRP78 in gastric cancer multidrug resistance cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jianqin; Zhao, Guohong; Lin, Tao; Tang, Shanhong; Xu, Guanghui; Hu, Sijun; Bi, Qian; Guo, Changcun; Sun, Li; Han, Shuang; Xu, Qian; Nie, Yongzhan; Wang, Biaoluo; Liang, Shuhui; Ding, Jie; Wu, Kaichun

    2013-10-10

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains a significant challenge to the clinical treatment of gastric cancer (GC). In the present study, using a phage display approach combined with MTT assays, we screened a specific peptide GMBP1 (Gastric cancer MDR cell-specific binding peptide), ETAPLSTMLSPY, which could bind to the surface of GC MDR cells specifically and reverse their MDR phenotypes. Immunocytochemical staining showed that the potential receptor of GMBP1 was located at the membrane and cytoplasm of MDR cells. In vitro and in vivo drug sensitivity assays, FACS analysis and Western blotting confirmed that GMBP1 was able to re-sensitize MDR cells to chemical drugs. Western blotting and proteomic approaches were used to screen the receptor of GMBP1, and GRP78, a MDR-related protein, was identified as a receptor of GMBP1. This result was further supported by immunofluoresence microscopy and Western blot. Additionally, Western blotting demonstrated that pre-incubation of GMBP1 in MDR cells greatly diminished MDR1, Bcl-2 and GRP78 expression but increased the expression of Bax, whereas downregulation of GRP78, function as a receptor and directly target for GMBP1, only inhibited MDR1 expression. Our findings suggest that GMBP1 could re-sensitize GC MDR cells to a variety of chemotherapeutic agents and this role might be mediated partly through down-regulating GRP78 expression and then inhibiting MDR1 expression. These findings indicate that peptide GMBP1 likely recognizes a novel GRP78 receptor and mediates cellular activities associated with the MDR phenotype, which provides new insight into research on the management of MDR in gastric cancer cells. PMID:23792224

  17. Cell-Adhesive Matrices Composed of RGD Peptide-Displaying M13 Bacteriophage/Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) Nanofibers Beneficial to Myoblast Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yong Cheol; Lee, Jong Ho; Jin, Linhua; Kim, Min Jeong; Kim, Chuntae; Hong, Suck Won; Oh, Jin Woo; Han, Dong-Wook

    2015-10-01

    Recently, there has been considerable effort to develop suitable scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. Cell adhesion is a prerequisite for cells to survive. In nature, the extracellular matrix (ECM) plays this role. Therefore, an ideal scaffold should be structurally similar to the natural ECM and have biocompatibility and biodegradability. In addition, the scaffold should have biofunctionality, which provides the potent ability to enhance the cellular behaviors, such as adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. This study concentrates on fabricating cell-adhesive matrices composed of RGD peptide-displaying M13 bacteriophage (RGD-M13 phage) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid, PLGA) nanofibers. Long rod-shaped M13 bacteriophages are non-toxic and can express many desired proteins on their surface. A genetically engineered M13 phage was constructed to display RGD peptides on its surface. PLGA is a biodegradable polymer with excellent biocompatibility and suitable physicochemical property for adhesive matrices. In this study, RGD-M13 phage/PLGA hybrid nanofiber matrices were fabricated by electrospinning. The physicochemical properties of these matrices were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and contact angle measurement. In addition, the cellular behaviors, such as the initial attachment, proliferation and differentiation, were analyzed by a CCK-8 assay and immunofluorescence staining to evaluate the potential application of these matrices to tissue engineering scaffolds. The RGD-M13 phage/PLGA nanofiber matrices could enhance the cellular behaviors and promote the differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts. These results suggest that the RGD-M13 phage/PLGA nanofiber matrices are beneficial to myoblast differentiation and can serve as effective tissue engineering scaffolds. PMID:26726438

  18. Identification of a Conserved Linear B-Cell Epitope of Streptococcus dysgalactiae GapC Protein by Screening Phage-Displayed Random Peptide Library

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ziyao; Zhou, Xue; Yu, Liquan; Sun, Hunan; Wu, Zhijun; Yu, Yongzhong; Song, Baifen; Ma, Jinzhu; Tong, Chunyu; Wang, Xintong; Zhu, Zhanbo; Cui, Yudong

    2015-01-01

    The GapC of Streptococcus dysgalactiae (S. dysgalactiae) is a highly conserved surface protein that can induce protective humoral immune response in animals. However, B-cell epitopes on the S. dysgalactiae GapC have not been well identified. In this study, a monoclonal antibody (mAb5B7) against the GapC1-150 protein was prepared. After passive transfer, mAb5B7 could partially protect mice against S. dysgalactiae infection. Eleven positive phage clones recognized by mAb5B7 were identified by screening phage-displayed random 12-peptide library, most of which matched the consensus motif DTTQGRFD. The motif sequence exactly matches amino acids 48-55 of the S. dysgalactiae GapC protein. In addition, the motif 48DTTQGRFD55 shows high homology among various streptococcus species. Site-directed mutagenic analysis further confirmed that residues D48, T50, Q51, G52 and F54 formed the core motif of 48DTTQGRFD55. This motif was the minimal determinant of the B-cell epitope recognized by the mAb5B7. As expected, epitope-peptide evoked protective immune response against S. dysgalactiae infection in immunized mice. Taken together, this identified conserved B-cell epitope within S. dysgalactiae GapC could provide very valuable insights for vaccine design against S. dysgalactiae infection. PMID:26121648

  19. Integrating Display and Delivery Functionality with a Cell Penetrating Peptide Mimic as a Scaffold for Intracellular Multivalent Multitargeting.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yugang; Nguyen, Lien; Song, Ziyuan; Peng, Shaohong; Lee, JuYeon; Zheng, Nan; Kapoor, Iti; Hagler, Lauren D; Cai, Kaimin; Cheng, Jianjun; Chan, H Y Edwin; Zimmerman, Steven C

    2016-08-01

    The construction of a multivalent ligand is an effective way to increase affinity and selectivity toward biomolecular targets with multiple-ligand binding sites. Adopting this strategy, we used a known cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) mimic as a scaffold to develop a series of multivalent ligand constructs that bind to the expanded dCTG (CTG(exp)) and rCUG nucleotide repeats (CUG(exp)) known to cause myotonic dystrophy type I (DM1), an incurable neuromuscular disease. By assembling this polyvalent construct, the hydrophobic ligands are solubilized and delivered into cell nuclei, and their enhanced binding affinity leads to the inhibition of ribonuclear foci formation and a reversal of splicing defects, all at low concentrations. Some of the multivalent ligands are shown to inhibit selectively the in vitro transcription of (CTG·CAG)74, to reduce the concentration of the toxic CUG RNA in DM1 model cells, and to show phenotypic improvement in vivo in a Drosophila model of DM1. This strategy may be useful in drug design for other trinucleotide repeat disorders and more broadly for intracellular multivalent targeting. PMID:27355522

  20. A disulfide-bridged mutant of natriuretic peptide receptor-A displays constitutive activity. Role of receptor dimerization in signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Labrecque, J; Mc Nicoll, N; Marquis, M; De Léan, A

    1999-04-01

    Natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A), a particulate guanylyl cyclase receptor, is composed of an extracellular domain (ECD) with a ligand binding site, a transmembrane spanning, a kinase homology domain (KHD), and a guanylyl cyclase domain. Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), the natural agonists, bind and activate the receptor leading to cyclic GMP production. This receptor has been reported to be spontaneously dimeric or oligomeric. In response to agonists, the KHD-mediated guanylate cyclase repression is removed, and it is assumed that ATP binds to the KHD. Since NPR-A displays a pair of juxtamembrane cysteines separated by 8 residues, we hypothesized that the removal of one of those cysteines would leave the other unpaired and reactive, thus susceptible to form an interchain disulfide bridge and to favor the dimeric interactions. Here we show that NPR-AC423S mutant, expressed mainly as a covalent dimer, increases the affinity of pBNP for this receptor by enhancing a high affinity binding component. Dimerization primarily depends on ECD since a secreted NPR-A C423S soluble ectodomain (ECDC423S) also documents a covalent dimer. ANP binding to the unmutated ECD yields up to 80-fold affinity loss as compared with the membrane receptor. However, the ECD C423S mutation restores a high binding affinity. Furthermore, C423S mutation leads to cellular constitutive activation (20-40-fold) of basal catalytic production of cyclic GMP by the full-length mutant. In vitro particulate guanylyl cyclase assays demonstrate that NPR-AC423S displays an increased sensitivity to ATP treatment alone and that the effect of ANP + ATP joint treatment is cumulative instead of synergistic. Finally, the cellular and particulate guanylyl cyclase assays indicate that the receptor is desensitized to agonist stimulation. We conclude the following: 1) dimers are functional units of NPR-A guanylyl cyclase activation; and 2) agonists are inducing dimeric contact

  1. Cationicity-enhanced analogues of the antimicrobial peptides, AcrAP1 and AcrAP2, from the venom of the scorpion, Androctonus crassicauda, display potent growth modulation effects on human cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Du, Qiang; Hou, Xiaojuan; Ge, Lilin; Li, Renjie; Zhou, Mei; Wang, Hui; Wang, Lei; Wei, Minjie; Chen, Tianbao; Shaw, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The non disulphide-bridged peptides (NDBPs) of scorpion venoms are attracting increased interest due to their structural heterogeneity and broad spectrum of biological activities. Here, two novel peptides, named AcrAP1 and AcrAP2, have been identified in the lyophilised venom of the Arabian scorpion, Androctonus crassicauda, through "shotgun" molecular cloning of their biosynthetic precursor-encoding cDNAs. The respective mature peptides, predicted from these cloned cDNAs, were subsequently isolated from the same venom sample using reverse phase HPLC and their identities were confirmed by use of mass spectrometric techniques. Both were found to belong to a family of highly-conserved scorpion venom antimicrobial peptides - a finding confirmed through the biological investigation of synthetic replicates. Analogues of both peptides designed for enhanced cationicity, displayed enhanced potency and spectra of antimicrobial activity but, unlike the native peptides, these also displayed potent growth modulation effects on a range of human cancer cell lines. Thus natural peptide templates from venom peptidomes can provide the basis for rational analogue design to improve both biological potency and spectrum of action. The diversity of such templates from such natural sources undoubtedly provides the pharmaceutical industry with unique lead compounds for drug discovery. PMID:25332684

  2. Cytoplasmic bacteriophage display system

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F.W.; Rosenberg, A.H.

    1998-06-16

    Disclosed are display vectors comprising DNA encoding a portion of a structural protein from a cytoplasmic bacteriophage, joined covalently to a protein or peptide of interest. Exemplified are display vectors wherein the structural protein is the T7 bacteriophage capsid protein. More specifically, in the exemplified display vectors the C-terminal amino acid residue of the portion of the capsid protein is joined to the N-terminal residue of the protein or peptide of interest. The portion of the T7 capsid protein exemplified comprises an N-terminal portion corresponding to form 10B of the T7 capsid protein. The display vectors are useful for high copy number display or lower copy number display (with larger fusion). Compositions of the type described herein are useful in connection with methods for producing a virus displaying a protein or peptide of interest. 1 fig.

  3. Cytoplasmic bacteriophage display system

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F. William; Rosenberg, Alan H.

    1998-06-16

    Disclosed are display vectors comprising DNA encoding a portion of a structural protein from a cytoplasmic bacteriophage, joined covalently to a protein or peptide of interest. Exemplified are display vectors wherein the structural protein is the T7 bacteriophage capsid protein. More specifically, in the exemplified display vectors the C-terminal amino acid residue of the portion of the capsid protein is joined to the N-terminal residue of the protein or peptide of interest. The portion of the T7 capsid protein exemplified comprises an N-terminal portion corresponding to form 10B of the T7 capsid protein. The display vectors are useful for high copy number display or lower copy number display (with larger fusion). Compositions of the type described herein are useful in connection with methods for producing a virus displaying a protein or peptide of interest.

  4. PEGylated poly(2-(dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate)/DNA polyplex micelles decorated with phage-displayed TGN peptide for brain-targeted gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yong; Zha, Yuan; Feng, Bing; Pang, Zhiqing; Zhang, Bo; Sun, Xiyang; Ren, Jinfeng; Zhang, Chi; Shao, Xiayan; Zhang, Qizhi; Jiang, Xinguo

    2013-03-01

    Phage-displayed TGN peptide-decorated polymeric micelle-like polyplexes based on pegylated poly(2-(dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate) (PEG-PDMAEMA) were prepared for efficient brain-targeted gene delivery. The diblock copolymers Methoxy-PEG-PDMAEMA and Maleimide-PEG-PDMAEMA were synthesized by the atom transfer radical polymerization method. The TGN ligand, a 12-amino acid peptide that could facilitate blood-brain barrier (BBB) targeting, was conjugated to the PEG terminus of the copolymer via a maleimide-mediated covalent binding procedure. TGN-PEG-PDMAEMA was complexed with plasmid DNA to yield polyplexes. The physiochemical properties of the polyplexes, such as morphology, particle size, zeta potential, cytotoxicity and DNA complex formation ability, were studied prior to the successful in vitro and in vivo transfection. The TGN-PEG-PDMAEMA/DNA polyplexes maintained their stable nano-size, were characterized by good condensation capacity and low toxicity and even provided higher cellular uptake than the unmodified polyplexes (PEG-PDMAEMA/DNA polyplexes). Confocal microscopy studies showed that the DNA of TGN-PEG-PDMAEMA/DNA polyplexes entered into the nuclei through the endosome/lysosome pathway. The transfection efficiency of TGN-modified polyplexes was higher than that of unmodified polyplexes both in vitro and in vivo. The results obtained from frozen sections indicated the widespread expression of an exogenous gene in the mouse brain after intravenous injection. Therefore, the results demonstrate that the TGN-decorated PEG-PDMAEMA developed in this study could be utilized as a potential vehicle for gene delivery to the brain. PMID:23245924

  5. PCR Amplicon Prediction from Multiplex Degenerate Primer and Probe Sets

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, S. N.

    2013-08-08

    Assessing primer specificity and predicting both desired and off-target amplification products is an essential step for robust PCR assay design. Code is described to predict potential polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplicons in a large sequence database such as NCBI nt from either singleplex or a large multiplexed set of primers, allowing degenerate primer and probe bases, with target mismatch annotates amplicons with gene information automatically downloaded from NCBI, and optionally it can predict whether there are also TaqMan/Luminex probe matches within predicted amplicons.

  6. PCR Amplicon Prediction from Multiplex Degenerate Primer and Probe Sets

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2013-08-08

    Assessing primer specificity and predicting both desired and off-target amplification products is an essential step for robust PCR assay design. Code is described to predict potential polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplicons in a large sequence database such as NCBI nt from either singleplex or a large multiplexed set of primers, allowing degenerate primer and probe bases, with target mismatch annotates amplicons with gene information automatically downloaded from NCBI, and optionally it can predict whether theremore » are also TaqMan/Luminex probe matches within predicted amplicons.« less

  7. Identification and characterization of epitopes on Plasmodium knowlesi merozoite surface protein-142 (MSP-142) using synthetic peptide library and phage display library.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Fei Wen; Fong, Mun Yik; Lau, Yee Ling

    2016-02-01

    Plasmodium knowlesi can cause potentially life threatening human malaria. The Plasmodium merozoite surface protein-142 (MSP-142) is a potential target for malaria blood stage vaccine, and for diagnosis of malaria. Two epitope mapping techniques were used to identify the potential epitopes within P. knowlesi MSP-142. Nine and 14 potential epitopes were identified using overlapping synthetic peptide library and phage display library, respectively. Two regions on P. knowlesi MSP-142 (amino acid residues 37-95 and residues 240-289) were identified to be the potential dominant epitope regions. Two of the prominent epitopes, P10 (TAKDGMEYYNKMGELYKQ) and P31 (RCLLGFKEVGGKCVPASI), were evaluated using mouse model. P10- and P31-immunized mouse sera reacted with recombinant P. knowlesi MSP-142, with the IgG isotype distribution of IgG2b>IgG1>IgG2a>IgG3. Significant higher level of cytokines interferon-gamma and interleukin-2 was detected in P31-immunized mice. Both P10 and P31 could be the suitable epitope candidates to be used in malaria vaccine designs and immunodiagnostic assays, provided further evaluation is needed to validate the potential uses of these epitopes. PMID:26624919

  8. Pulmonary Targeting of Adeno-associated Viral Vectors by Next-generation Sequencing-guided Screening of Random Capsid Displayed Peptide Libraries.

    PubMed

    Körbelin, Jakob; Sieber, Timo; Michelfelder, Stefan; Lunding, Lars; Spies, Elmar; Hunger, Agnes; Alawi, Malik; Rapti, Kleopatra; Indenbirken, Daniela; Müller, Oliver J; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih; Kleinschmidt, Jürgen A; Trepel, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Vectors mediating strong, durable, and tissue-specific transgene expression are mandatory for safe and effective gene therapy. In settings requiring systemic vector administration, the availability of suited vectors is extremely limited. Here, we present a strategy to select vectors with true specificity for a target tissue from random peptide libraries displayed on adeno-associated virus (AAV) by screening the library under circulation conditions in a murine model. Guiding the in vivo screening by next-generation sequencing, we were able to monitor the selection kinetics and to determine the right time point to discontinue the screening process. The establishment of different rating scores enabled us to identify the most specifically enriched AAV capsid candidates. As proof of concept, a capsid variant was selected that specifically and very efficiently delivers genes to the endothelium of the pulmonary vasculature after intravenous administration. This technical approach of selecting target-specific vectors in vivo is applicable to any given tissue of interest and therefore has broad implications in translational research and medicine. PMID:27018516

  9. Single-step conversion of cells to retrovirus vector producers with herpes simplex virus-Epstein-Barr virus hybrid amplicons.

    PubMed

    Sena-Esteves, M; Saeki, Y; Camp, S M; Chiocca, E A; Breakefield, X O

    1999-12-01

    We report here on the development and characterization of a novel herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) amplicon-based vector system which takes advantage of the host range and retention properties of HSV-Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) hybrid amplicons to efficiently convert cells to retrovirus vector producer cells after single-step transduction. The retrovirus genes gag-pol and env (GPE) and retroviral vector sequences were modified to minimize sequence overlap and cloned into an HSV-EBV hybrid amplicon. Retrovirus expression cassettes were used to generate the HSV-EBV-retrovirus hybrid vectors, HERE and HERA, which code for the ecotropic and the amphotropic envelopes, respectively. Retrovirus vector sequences encoding lacZ were cloned downstream from the GPE expression unit. Transfection of 293T/17 cells with amplicon plasmids yielded retrovirus titers between 10(6) and 10(7) transducing units/ml, while infection of the same cells with amplicon vectors generated maximum titers 1 order of magnitude lower. Retrovirus titers were dependent on the extent of transduction by amplicon vectors for the same cell line, but different cell lines displayed varying capacities to produce retrovirus vectors even at the same transduction efficiencies. Infection of human and dog primary gliomas with this system resulted in the production of retrovirus vectors for more than 1 week and the long-term retention and increase in transgene activity over time in these cell populations. Although the efficiency of this system still has to be determined in vivo, many applications are foreseeable for this approach to gene delivery. PMID:10559361

  10. Peptide arrays for screening cancer specific peptides.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Sahar; Mathews, Anu Stella; Byeon, Nara; Lavasanifar, Afsaneh; Kaur, Kamaljit

    2010-09-15

    In this paper, we describe a novel method to screen peptides for specific recognition by cancer cells. Seventy peptides were synthesized on a cellulose membrane in an array format, and a direct method to study the peptide-whole cell interaction was developed. The relative binding affinity of the cells for different peptides with respect to a lead 12-mer p160 peptide, identified by phage display, was evaluated using the CyQUANT fluorescence of the bound cells. Screening allowed identification of at least five new peptides that displayed higher affinity (up to 3-fold) for MDA-MB-435 and MCF-7 human cancer cells compared to the p160 peptide. These peptides showed very little binding to the control (noncancerous) human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Three of these peptides were synthesized separately and labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) to study their uptake and interaction with the cancer and control cells using confocal laser scanning microscopy and flow cytometry. The results confirmed the high and specific affinity of an 11-mer peptide 11 (RGDPAYQGRFL) and a 10-mer peptide 18 (WXEAAYQRFL) for the cancer cells versus HUVECs. Peptide 11 binds different receptors on target cancer cells as its sequence contains multiple recognition motifs, whereas peptide 18 binds mainly to the putative p160 receptor. The peptide array-whole cell binding assay reported here is a complementary method to phage display for further screening and optimization of cancer targeting peptides for cancer therapy and diagnosis. PMID:20799711

  11. Development of a workflow for screening and identification of α-amylase inhibitory peptides from food source using an integrated Bioinformatics-phage display approach: Case study - Cumin seed.

    PubMed

    Siow, Hwee-Leng; Lim, Theam Soon; Gan, Chee-Yuen

    2017-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to develop an efficient workflow to discover α-amylase inhibitory peptides from cumin seed. A total of 56 unknown peptides was initially found in the cumin seed protein hydrolysate. They were subjected to 2 different in silico screenings and 6 peptides were shortlisted. The peptides were then subjected to in vitro selection using phage display technique and 3 clones (CSP3, CSP4 and CSP6) showed high affinity in binding α-amylase. These clones were subjected to the inhibitory test and only CSP4 and CSP6 exhibited high inhibitory activity. Therefore, these peptides were chemically synthesized for validation purposes. CSP4 exhibited inhibition of bacterial and human salivary α-amylases with IC50 values of 0.11 and 0.04μmol, respectively, whereas CSP6 was about 0.10 and 0.15μmol, respectively. Results showed that the strength of each protocol has been successfully combined as deemed fit to enhance the α-amylase inhibitor peptide discovery. PMID:27507449

  12. A novel Omp25-binding peptide screened by phage display can inhibit Brucella abortus 2308 infection in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junbo; Guo, Fei; Huang, Xiaoqiang; Chen, Chuangfu; Liu, Ruitian; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Yuanzhi; Yin, Shuanghong; Li, Zhiqiang

    2014-06-01

    Brucellosis is a globally distributed zoonotic disease affecting animals and humans, and current antibiotic and vaccine strategies are not optimal. The surface-exposed protein Omp25 is involved in Brucella virulence and plays an important role in Brucella pathogenesis during infection, suggesting that Omp25 could be a useful target for selecting potential therapeutic molecules to inhibit Brucella pathogenesis. In this study, we identified, we believe for the first time, peptides that bind specifically to the Omp25 protein of pathogens, using a phage panning technique, After four rounds of panning, 42 plaques of eluted phages were subjected to pyrosequencing. Four phage clones that bound better than the other clones were selected following confirmation by ELISA and affinity constant determination. The peptides selected could significantly inhibit Brucella abortus 2308 (S2308) internalization and intracellular growth in RAW264.7 macrophages, and significantly induce secretion of TNF-α and IL-12 in peptide- and S2308-treated cells. Any observed peptide (OP11, OP27, OP35 or OP40) could significantly inhibit S2308 infection in BALB/c mice. Moreover, the peptide OP11 was the best candidate peptide for inhibiting S2308 infection in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that peptide OP11 has potential for exploitation as a peptide drug in resisting S2308 infection. PMID:24722798

  13. A novel microtubule de-stabilizing complementarity-determining region C36L1 peptide displays antitumor activity against melanoma in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Carlos R.; Matsuo, Alisson L.; Azevedo, Ricardo A.; Massaoka, Mariana H.; Girola, Natalia; Polonelli, Luciano; Travassos, Luiz R.

    2015-01-01

    Short peptide sequences from complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) of different immunoglobulins may exert anti-infective, immunomodulatory and antitumor activities regardless of the specificity of the original monoclonal antibody (mAb). In this sense, they resemble early molecules of innate immunity. C36L1 was identified as a bioactive light-chain CDR1 peptide by screening 19 conserved CDR sequences targeting murine B16F10-Nex2 melanoma. The 17-amino acid peptide is readily taken up by melanoma cells and acts on microtubules causing depolymerization, stress of the endoplasmic reticulum and intrinsic apoptosis. At low concentrations, C36L1 inhibited migration, invasion and proliferation of B16F10-Nex2 cells with cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase, by regulating the PI3K/Akt signaling axis involving Rho-GTPase and PTEN mediation. Peritumor injection of the peptide delayed growth of subcutaneously grafted melanoma cells. Intraperitoneal administration of C36L1 induced a significant immune-response dependent anti-tumor protection in a syngeneic metastatic melanoma model. Dendritic cells stimulated ex-vivo by the peptide and transferred to animals challenged with tumor cells were equally effective. The C36 VL CDR1 peptide is a promising microtubule-interacting drug that induces tumor cell death by apoptosis and inhibits metastases of highly aggressive melanoma cells. PMID:26391685

  14. Using Amplicon Sequencing To Characterize and Monitor Bacterial Diversity in Drinking Water Distribution Systems

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Jennifer L. A.; Weyrich, Laura S.; Sawade, Emma; Drikas, Mary; Cooper, Alan J.

    2015-01-01

    Drinking water assessments use a variety of microbial, physical, and chemical indicators to evaluate water treatment efficiency and product water quality. However, these indicators do not allow the complex biological communities, which can adversely impact the performance of drinking water distribution systems (DWDSs), to be characterized. Entire bacterial communities can be studied quickly and inexpensively using targeted metagenomic amplicon sequencing. Here, amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene region was performed alongside traditional water quality measures to assess the health, quality, and efficiency of two distinct, full-scale DWDSs: (i) a linear DWDS supplied with unfiltered water subjected to basic disinfection before distribution and (ii) a complex, branching DWDS treated by a four-stage water treatment plant (WTP) prior to disinfection and distribution. In both DWDSs bacterial communities differed significantly after disinfection, demonstrating the effectiveness of both treatment regimes. However, bacterial repopulation occurred further along in the DWDSs, and some end-user samples were more similar to the source water than to the postdisinfection water. Three sample locations appeared to be nitrified, displaying elevated nitrate levels and decreased ammonia levels, and nitrifying bacterial species, such as Nitrospira, were detected. Burkholderiales were abundant in samples containing large amounts of monochloramine, indicating resistance to disinfection. Genera known to contain pathogenic and fecal-associated species were also identified in several locations. From this study, we conclude that metagenomic amplicon sequencing is an informative method to support current compliance-based methods and can be used to reveal bacterial community interactions with the chemical and physical properties of DWDSs. PMID:26162884

  15. Synthetic peptide-targeted selection of phage display mimotopes highlights immunogenic features of α-helical vs non-helical epitopes of Taenia solium paramyosin: implications for parasite- and host-protective roles of the protein.

    PubMed

    Gazarian, Karlen G; Solis, Carlos F; Gazarian, Tatiana G; Rowley, Merrill; Laclette, Juan P

    2012-03-01

    Paramyosin of the pig-human parasite Taenia solium (TPmy) is a α-helical protein located on the worm surface that is suggested to fulfill an immunomodulatory role protecting the parasite against host immune system. Besides, in challenging experiments the protein shows a vaccine potential. These observations imply that TPmy harbors antigenic determinants for each of these contrasting actions. However the suggestion was not given a support from experimental data because respective epitopes have not been described thus far. To circumvent this difficulty, we use synthetic peptides with sequences of regions composed of α-helical or linear structure to induce rabbit antibody responses for phage-display mapping of epitope core amino-acid sets. Antibodies to α-helical regions were weak binders and M13 phage-displayed peptides selected by them from two different libraries exhibited no amino-acid similarities with the original protein site. In contrast, the antibodies produced in response to non-helical segment within α-helical structure were better binders and selectors of perfect structural mimics of the protein site. This first phage display epitope analysis of TPmy supports the notion that the rod-like α-helix, which encompasses over 90% of the total amino acids, may serve as an immunomodulatory shield that protects the parasite. Further, the seven non-helical segments of the TPmy molecule may represent the only anti-parasite discrete immunogenic epitopes whose representative mimotopes can be utilized in development of pure epitope vaccines. PMID:22015270

  16. Systems consequences of amplicon formation in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Inaki, Koichiro; Menghi, Francesca; Woo, Xing Yi; Wagner, Joel P.; Jacques, Pierre-Étienne; Lee, Yi Fang; Shreckengast, Phung Trang; Soon, Wendy WeiJia; Malhotra, Ankit; Teo, Audrey S.M.; Hillmer, Axel M.; Khng, Alexis Jiaying; Ruan, Xiaoan; Ong, Swee Hoe; Bertrand, Denis; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Karuturi, R. Krishna Murthy; Hidalgo Miranda, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal structural variations play an important role in determining the transcriptional landscape of human breast cancers. To assess the nature of these structural variations, we analyzed eight breast tumor samples with a focus on regions of gene amplification using mate-pair sequencing of long-insert genomic DNA with matched transcriptome profiling. We found that tandem duplications appear to be early events in tumor evolution, especially in the genesis of amplicons. In a detailed reconstruction of events on chromosome 17, we found large unpaired inversions and deletions connect a tandemly duplicated ERBB2 with neighboring 17q21.3 amplicons while simultaneously deleting the intervening BRCA1 tumor suppressor locus. This series of events appeared to be unusually common when examined in larger genomic data sets of breast cancers albeit using approaches with lesser resolution. Using siRNAs in breast cancer cell lines, we showed that the 17q21.3 amplicon harbored a significant number of weak oncogenes that appeared consistently coamplified in primary tumors. Down-regulation of BRCA1 expression augmented the cell proliferation in ERBB2-transfected human normal mammary epithelial cells. Coamplification of other functionally tested oncogenic elements in other breast tumors examined, such as RIPK2 and MYC on chromosome 8, also parallel these findings. Our analyses suggest that structural variations efficiently orchestrate the gain and loss of cancer gene cassettes that engage many oncogenic pathways simultaneously and that such oncogenic cassettes are favored during the evolution of a cancer. PMID:25186909

  17. Systems consequences of amplicon formation in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Inaki, Koichiro; Menghi, Francesca; Woo, Xing Yi; Wagner, Joel P; Jacques, Pierre-Étienne; Lee, Yi Fang; Shreckengast, Phung Trang; Soon, Wendy WeiJia; Malhotra, Ankit; Teo, Audrey S M; Hillmer, Axel M; Khng, Alexis Jiaying; Ruan, Xiaoan; Ong, Swee Hoe; Bertrand, Denis; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Karuturi, R Krishna Murthy; Miranda, Alfredo Hidalgo; Liu, Edison T

    2014-10-01

    Chromosomal structural variations play an important role in determining the transcriptional landscape of human breast cancers. To assess the nature of these structural variations, we analyzed eight breast tumor samples with a focus on regions of gene amplification using mate-pair sequencing of long-insert genomic DNA with matched transcriptome profiling. We found that tandem duplications appear to be early events in tumor evolution, especially in the genesis of amplicons. In a detailed reconstruction of events on chromosome 17, we found large unpaired inversions and deletions connect a tandemly duplicated ERBB2 with neighboring 17q21.3 amplicons while simultaneously deleting the intervening BRCA1 tumor suppressor locus. This series of events appeared to be unusually common when examined in larger genomic data sets of breast cancers albeit using approaches with lesser resolution. Using siRNAs in breast cancer cell lines, we showed that the 17q21.3 amplicon harbored a significant number of weak oncogenes that appeared consistently coamplified in primary tumors. Down-regulation of BRCA1 expression augmented the cell proliferation in ERBB2-transfected human normal mammary epithelial cells. Coamplification of other functionally tested oncogenic elements in other breast tumors examined, such as RIPK2 and MYC on chromosome 8, also parallel these findings. Our analyses suggest that structural variations efficiently orchestrate the gain and loss of cancer gene cassettes that engage many oncogenic pathways simultaneously and that such oncogenic cassettes are favored during the evolution of a cancer. PMID:25186909

  18. Functional Overexpression of Vomeronasal Receptors Using a Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1)-Derived Amplicon.

    PubMed

    Stein, Benjamin; Alonso, María Teresa; Zufall, Frank; Leinders-Zufall, Trese; Chamero, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    In mice, social behaviors such as mating and aggression are mediated by pheromones and related chemosignals. The vomeronasal organ (VNO) detects olfactory information from other individuals by sensory neurons tuned to respond to specific chemical cues. Receptors expressed by vomeronasal neurons are implicated in selective detection of these cues. Nearly 400 receptor genes have been identified in the mouse VNO, but the tuning properties of individual receptors remain poorly understood, in part due to the lack of a robust heterologous expression system. Here we develop a herpes virus-based amplicon delivery system to overexpress three types of vomeronasal receptor genes and to characterize cell responses to their proposed ligands. Through Ca2+ imaging in native VNO cells we show that virus-induced overexpression of V1rj2, V2r1b or Fpr3 caused a pronounced increase of responsivity to sulfated steroids, MHC-binding peptide or the synthetic hexapeptide W-peptide, respectively. Other related ligands were not recognized by infected individual neurons, indicating a high degree of selectivity by the overexpressed receptor. Removal of G-protein signaling eliminates Ca2+ responses, indicating that the endogenous second messenger system is essential for observing receptor activation. Our results provide a novel expression system for vomeronasal receptors that should be useful for understanding the molecular logic of VNO ligand detection. Functional expression of vomeronasal receptors and their deorphanization provides an essential requirement for deciphering the neural mechanisms controlling behavior. PMID:27195771

  19. Functional Overexpression of Vomeronasal Receptors Using a Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1)-Derived Amplicon

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Benjamin; Alonso, María Teresa; Zufall, Frank; Leinders-Zufall, Trese; Chamero, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    In mice, social behaviors such as mating and aggression are mediated by pheromones and related chemosignals. The vomeronasal organ (VNO) detects olfactory information from other individuals by sensory neurons tuned to respond to specific chemical cues. Receptors expressed by vomeronasal neurons are implicated in selective detection of these cues. Nearly 400 receptor genes have been identified in the mouse VNO, but the tuning properties of individual receptors remain poorly understood, in part due to the lack of a robust heterologous expression system. Here we develop a herpes virus-based amplicon delivery system to overexpress three types of vomeronasal receptor genes and to characterize cell responses to their proposed ligands. Through Ca2+ imaging in native VNO cells we show that virus-induced overexpression of V1rj2, V2r1b or Fpr3 caused a pronounced increase of responsivity to sulfated steroids, MHC-binding peptide or the synthetic hexapeptide W-peptide, respectively. Other related ligands were not recognized by infected individual neurons, indicating a high degree of selectivity by the overexpressed receptor. Removal of G-protein signaling eliminates Ca2+ responses, indicating that the endogenous second messenger system is essential for observing receptor activation. Our results provide a novel expression system for vomeronasal receptors that should be useful for understanding the molecular logic of VNO ligand detection. Functional expression of vomeronasal receptors and their deorphanization provides an essential requirement for deciphering the neural mechanisms controlling behavior. PMID:27195771

  20. A Genetically Modified Adenoviral Vector with a Phage Display-Derived Peptide Incorporated into Fiber Fibritin Chimera Prolongs Survival in Experimental Glioma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Julius W; Kane, J Robert; Young, Jacob S; Chang, Alan L; Kanojia, Deepak; Morshed, Ramin A; Miska, Jason; Ahmed, Atique U; Balyasnikova, Irina V; Han, Yu; Zhang, Lingjiao; Curiel, David T; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2015-09-01

    The dismal clinical context of advanced-grade glioma demands the development of novel therapeutic strategies with direct patient impact. Adenovirus-mediated virotherapy represents a potentially effective approach for glioma therapy. In this research, we generated a novel glioma-specific adenovirus by instituting more advanced genetic modifications that can maximize the efficiency and safety of therapeutic adenoviral vectors. In this regard, a glioma-specific targeted fiber was developed through the incorporation of previously published glioma-specific, phage-panned peptide (VWT peptide) on a fiber fibritin-based chimeric fiber, designated as "GliomaFF." We showed that the entry of this virus was highly restricted to glioma cells, supporting the specificity imparted by the phage-panned peptide. In addition, the stability of the targeting moiety presented by fiber fibritin structure permitted greatly enhanced infectivity. Furthermore, the replication of this virus was restricted in glioma cells by controlling expression of the E1 gene under the activity of the tumor-specific survivin promoter. Using this approach, we were able to explore the combinatorial efficacy of various adenoviral modifications that could amplify the specificity, infectivity, and exclusive replication of this therapeutic adenovirus in glioma. Finally, virotherapy with this modified virus resulted in up to 70% extended survival in an in vivo murine glioma model. These data demonstrate that this novel adenoviral vector is a safe and efficient treatment for this difficult malignancy. PMID:26058317

  1. Low molecular weight oligomers of amyloid peptides display β-barrel conformations: A replica exchange molecular dynamics study in explicit solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Simone, Alfonso; Derreumaux, Philippe

    2010-04-01

    The self-assembly of proteins and peptides into amyloid fibrils is connected to over 40 pathological conditions including neurodegenerative diseases and systemic amyloidosis. Diffusible, low molecular weight protein and peptide oligomers that form in the early steps of aggregation appear to be the harmful cytotoxic species in the molecular etiology of these diseases. So far, the structural characterization of these oligomers has remained elusive owing to their transient and dynamic features. We here address, by means of full atomistic replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations, the energy landscape of heptamers of the amyloidogenic peptide NHVTLSQ from the beta-2 microglobulin protein. The simulations totaling 5 μs show that low molecular weight oligomers in explicit solvent consist of β-barrels in equilibrium with amorphous states and fibril-like assemblies. The results, also accounting for the influence of the pH on the conformational properties, provide a strong evidence of the formation of transient β-barrel assemblies in the early aggregation steps of amyloid-forming systems. Our findings are discussed in terms of oligomers cytotoxicity.

  2. AmpliconDuo: A Split-Sample Filtering Protocol for High-Throughput Amplicon Sequencing of Microbial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Anja; Jost, Steffen; Heider, Dominik; Bock, Christina; Budeus, Bettina; Schilling, Elmar; Strittmatter, Axel; Boenigk, Jens; Hoffmann, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    High throughput sequencing (HTSeq) of small ribosomal subunit amplicons has the potential for a comprehensive characterization of microbial community compositions, down to rare species. However, the error-prone nature of the multi-step experimental process requires that the resulting raw sequences are subjected to quality control procedures. These procedures often involve an abundance cutoff for rare sequences or clustering of sequences, both of which limit genetic resolution. Here we propose a simple experimental protocol that retains the high genetic resolution granted by HTSeq methods while effectively removing many low abundance sequences that are likely due to PCR and sequencing errors. According to this protocol, we split samples and submit both halves to independent PCR and sequencing runs. The resulting sequence data is graphically and quantitatively characterized by the discordance between the two experimental branches, allowing for a quick identification of problematic samples. Further, we discard sequences that are not found in both branches (“AmpliconDuo filter”). We show that the majority of sequences removed in this way, mostly low abundance but also some higher abundance sequences, show features expected from random modifications of true sequences as introduced by PCR and sequencing errors. On the other hand, the filter retains many low abundance sequences observed in both branches and thus provides a more reliable census of the rare biosphere. We find that the AmpliconDuo filter increases biological resolution as it increases apparent community similarity between biologically similar communities, while it does not affect apparent community similarities between biologically dissimilar communities. The filter does not distort overall apparent community compositions. Finally, we quantitatively explain the effect of the AmpliconDuo filter by a simple mathematical model. PMID:26523925

  3. DNA-based methods to prepare helper virus-free herpes amplicon vectors and versatile design of amplicon vector plasmids.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Kazue; Saeki, Yoshinaga

    2006-06-01

    The herpes simplex virus (HSV) amplicon vector is a versatile plasmid-based gene delivery vehicle with a large transgene capacity (up to 150 kb) and the ability to infect a broad range of cell types. The vector system was originally developed by Frenkel and her colleagues in 1980. Ever since, a great deal of effort by various investigators has been directed at minimizing the toxicity associated with the inevitable contamination by helper virus. In 1996, Fraefel and his colleagues successfully devised a cosmid-based packaging system that was free of contamination by helper virus (so-called helper virus-free packaging), which utilized as helper a set of 5 overlapping cosmid clones that covered the entire HSV genome, which lacked the DNA packaging/cleavage signals. With the helper virus-free system, broader applications of the vector became possible. Cloning of the entire HSV genome in bacteria artificial chromosome (BAC) plasmids enabled stable maintenance and propagation of the helper HSV genome in bacteria. It also allowed for the development of BAC-based helper virus-free packaging systems. In this article, we review various versions of DNA-based methods to prepare HSV amplicon vectors free of helper virus contamination. We also examine recent advances in vector design, including methods of vector construction, hybrid amplicon vectors, and the infectious BAC system. Future directions in improving packaging systems and vector designs are discussed. PMID:16787182

  4. Mutascope: sensitive detection of somatic mutations from deep amplicon sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Yost, Shawn E.; Alakus, Hakan; Matsui, Hiroko; Schwab, Richard B.; Jepsen, Kristen; Frazer, Kelly A.; Harismendy, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Summary: We present Mutascope, a sequencing analysis pipeline specifically developed for the identification of somatic variants present at low-allelic fraction from high-throughput sequencing of amplicons from matched tumor-normal specimen. Using datasets reproducing tumor genetic heterogeneity, we demonstrate that Mutascope has a higher sensitivity and generates fewer false-positive calls than tools designed for shotgun sequencing or diploid genomes. Availability: Freely available on the web at http://sourceforge.net/projects/mutascope/. Contact: oharismendy@ucsd.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:23712659

  5. A portable automatic endpoint detection system for amplicons of loop mediated isothermal amplification on microfluidic compact disk platform.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Shah Mukim; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Sayad, Abkar Ahmed; Thiha, Aung; Pei, Koh Xiu; Mohktar, Mas S; Hashim, Uda; Cho, Jongman; Thong, Kwai Lin

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, many improvements have been made in foodborne pathogen detection methods to reduce the impact of food contamination. Several rapid methods have been developed with biosensor devices to improve the way of performing pathogen detection. This paper presents an automated endpoint detection system for amplicons generated by loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) on a microfluidic compact disk platform. The developed detection system utilizes a monochromatic ultraviolet (UV) emitter for excitation of fluorescent labeled LAMP amplicons and a color sensor to detect the emitted florescence from target. Then it processes the sensor output and displays the detection results on liquid crystal display (LCD). The sensitivity test has been performed with detection limit up to 2.5 × 10(-3) ng/µL with different DNA concentrations of Salmonella bacteria. This system allows a rapid and automatic endpoint detection which could lead to the development of a point-of-care diagnosis device for foodborne pathogens detection in a resource-limited environment. PMID:25751077

  6. A Portable Automatic Endpoint Detection System for Amplicons of Loop Mediated Isothermal Amplification on Microfluidic Compact Disk Platform

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Shah Mukim; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Sayad, Abkar Ahmed; Thiha, Aung; Pei, Koh Xiu; Mohktar, Mas S.; Hashim, Uda; Cho, Jongman; Thong, Kwai Lin

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, many improvements have been made in foodborne pathogen detection methods to reduce the impact of food contamination. Several rapid methods have been developed with biosensor devices to improve the way of performing pathogen detection. This paper presents an automated endpoint detection system for amplicons generated by loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) on a microfluidic compact disk platform. The developed detection system utilizes a monochromatic ultraviolet (UV) emitter for excitation of fluorescent labeled LAMP amplicons and a color sensor to detect the emitted florescence from target. Then it processes the sensor output and displays the detection results on liquid crystal display (LCD). The sensitivity test has been performed with detection limit up to 2.5 × 10−3 ng/µL with different DNA concentrations of Salmonella bacteria. This system allows a rapid and automatic endpoint detection which could lead to the development of a point-of-care diagnosis device for foodborne pathogens detection in a resource-limited environment. PMID:25751077

  7. A synthetic heparan sulfate-mimetic peptide conjugated to a mini CD4 displays very high anti- HIV-1 activity independently of coreceptor usage.

    PubMed

    Connell, Bridgette Janine; Baleux, Françoise; Coic, Yves-Marie; Clayette, Pascal; Bonnaffé, David; Lortat-Jacob, Hugues

    2012-01-27

    The HIV-1 envelope gp120, which features both the virus receptor (CD4) and coreceptor (CCR5/CXCR4) binding sites, offers multiple sites for therapeutic intervention. However, the latter becomes exposed, thus vulnerable to inhibition, only transiently when the virus has already bound cellular CD4. To pierce this defense mechanism, we engineered a series of heparan sulfate mimicking tridecapeptides and showed that one of them target the gp120 coreceptor binding site with μM affinity. Covalently linked to a CD4-mimetic that binds to gp120 and renders the coreceptor binding domain available to be targeted, the conjugated tridecapeptide now displays nanomolar affinity for its target. Using solubilized coreceptors captured on top of sensorchip we show that it inhibits gp120 binding to both CCR5 and CXCR4 and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells broadly inhibits HIV-1 replication with an IC(50) of 1 nM. PMID:22284360

  8. Improvement in the UV resistance of baculoviruses by displaying nano-zinc oxide-binding peptides on the surfaces of their occlusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Zhou, Yin; Lei, Chengfeng; Fang, Wei; Sun, Xiulian

    2015-08-01

    The sensitivity of baculoviruses to UV radiation severely limits their large-scale application as biological insecticides. The polyhedron envelope of a baculovirus, which is composed of carbohydrate and polyhedron envelope protein (PEP), is a significant structure for the stability and persistence of occlusion bodies (OBs) under environmental conditions. The results of this study revealed that the rough pitted surface phenotype of a pep-null Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) could not be rescued by any of its homologues, such as Helicoverpa armigera nucleopolyhedrovirus pep or Cydia pomonella granulovirus putative peps. In contrast, the N-terminal and middle flexible region (NM region, 1-167 aa) of AcMNPV PEP were able to form an intact OB envelope. Furthermore, this region was capable of carrying eGFP to the surfaces of the OBs. To improve the UV resistance of AcMNPV OBs, two peptides capable of specifically binding to nano-ZnO were separately fused to the NM region of PEP. Under laboratory conditions, infectivity of the recombinant viruses binding to nano-ZnO particles was about ninefold higher than that without the nano-ZnO particles after UV-B irradiation. Pot experiments revealed that the half-life of the recombinant baculovirus binding nano-ZnO particles was 3.3 ± 0.15 days, which was significantly longer than that of the control virus (0.49 ± 0.06 days). These results therefore represent a new approach for the protection the baculoviral insecticides against UV irradiation in the field. PMID:25895092

  9. Display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Story, A. W. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A situational display and a means for creating the display are disclosed. The display comprises a moving line or raster, on a cathode ray tube, which is disposed intermediate of two columns of lamps or intensifications on the cathode ray tube. The raster and lights are controlled in such a manner that pairs of lights define a line which is either tracked or chased by the raster in accordance with the relationship between the optimum and actual values of a monitored parameter.

  10. Biodiscovery of aluminum binding peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Bryn L.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Finch, Amethist S.; Hurley, Margaret M.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra

    2013-05-01

    Cell surface peptide display systems are large and diverse libraries of peptides (7-15 amino acids) which are presented by a display scaffold hosted by a phage (virus), bacteria, or yeast cell. This allows the selfsustaining peptide libraries to be rapidly screened for high affinity binders to a given target of interest, and those binders quickly identified. Peptide display systems have traditionally been utilized in conjunction with organic-based targets, such as protein toxins or carbon nanotubes. However, this technology has been expanded for use with inorganic targets, such as metals, for biofabrication, hybrid material assembly and corrosion prevention. While most current peptide display systems employ viruses to host the display scaffold, we have recently shown that a bacterial host, Escherichia coli, displaying peptides in the ubiquitous, membrane protein scaffold eCPX can also provide specific peptide binders to an organic target. We have, for the first time, extended the use of this bacterial peptide display system for the biodiscovery of aluminum binding 15mer peptides. We will present the process of biopanning with macroscopic inorganic targets, binder enrichment, and binder isolation and discovery.

  11. Mice lacking the intestinal peptide transporter display reduced energy intake and a subtle maldigestion/malabsorption that protects them from diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Kolodziejczak, Dominika; Spanier, Britta; Pais, Ramona; Kraiczy, Judith; Stelzl, Tamara; Gedrich, Kurt; Scherling, Christian; Zietek, Tamara; Daniel, Hannelore

    2013-05-15

    The intestinal transporter PEPT1 mediates the absorption of di- and tripeptides originating from breakdown of dietary proteins. Whereas mice lacking PEPT1 did not display any obvious changes in phenotype on a high-carbohydrate control diet (HCD), Pept1(-/-) mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) showed a markedly reduced weight gain and reduced body fat stores. They were additionally protected from hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. Energy balance studies revealed that Pept1(-/-) mice on HFD have a reduced caloric intake, no changes in energy expenditure, but increased energy content in feces. Cecal biomass in Pept1(-/-) mice was as well increased twofold on both diets, suggesting a limited capacity in digesting and/or absorbing the dietary constituents in the small intestine. GC-MS-based metabolite profiling of cecal contents revealed high levels and a broad spectrum of sugars in PEPT1-deficient mice on HCD, whereas animals fed HFD were characterized by high levels of free fatty acids and absence of sugars. In search of the origin of the impaired digestion/absorption, we observed that Pept1(-/-) mice lack the adaptation of the upper small intestinal mucosa to the trophic effects of the diet. Whereas wild-type mice on HFD adapt to diet with increased villus length and surface area, Pept1(-/-) mice failed to show this response. In search for the origin of this, we recorded markedly reduced systemic IL-6 levels in all Pept1(-/-) mice, suggesting that IL-6 could contribute to the lack of adaptation of the mucosal architecture to the diets. PMID:23494121

  12. Display Tactics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tetlow, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Display took a wide variety of forms ranging from students presenting their initial planning and thought processes, to displays of their finished work, and their suggestions for extending the task should they, or others, have time to return to it in the future. A variety of different media were used from traditional posters in many shapes and…

  13. Projection displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, George L.; Yang, Kei H.

    1998-08-01

    Projection display in today's market is dominated by cathode ray tubes (CRTs). Further progress in this mature CRT projector technology will be slow and evolutionary. Liquid crystal based projection displays have gained rapid acceptance in the business market. New technologies are being developed on several fronts: (1) active matrix built from polysilicon or single crystal silicon; (2) electro- optic materials using ferroelectric liquid crystal, polymer dispersed liquid crystals or other liquid crystal modes, (3) micromechanical-based transducers such as digital micromirror devices, and grating light valves, (4) high resolution displays to SXGA and beyond, and (5) high brightness. This article reviews the projection displays from a transducer technology perspective along with a discussion of markets and trends.

  14. The herpes simplex virus amplicon: analyses of cis-acting replication functions.

    PubMed Central

    Spaete, R R; Frenkel, N

    1985-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that defective virus vectors (amplicons) derived from herpes simplex viruses could be efficiently propagated in virus stocks in the presence of trans-acting helper virus functions. The present study established that two separate cis-acting functions--a DNA replication origin and a cleavage/packaging signal--are required for amplicon propagation. Using deleted derivatives of cloned amplicons, we mapped one of the viral DNA replication origins (ori-2 or oriL) at coordinate 0.422 of the standard HSV-1 genome and at an equivalent position within the HSV-2 genome. Images PMID:2983310

  15. Integrated Microfluidic Nucleic Acid Isolation, Isothermal Amplification, and Amplicon Quantification

    PubMed Central

    Mauk, Michael G.; Liu, Changchun; Song, Jinzhao; Bau, Haim H.

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidic components and systems for rapid (<60 min), low-cost, convenient, field-deployable sequence-specific nucleic acid-based amplification tests (NAATs) are described. A microfluidic point-of-care (POC) diagnostics test to quantify HIV viral load from blood samples serves as a representative and instructive example to discuss the technical issues and capabilities of “lab on a chip” NAAT devices. A portable, miniaturized POC NAAT with performance comparable to conventional PCR (polymerase-chain reaction)-based tests in clinical laboratories can be realized with a disposable, palm-sized, plastic microfluidic chip in which: (1) nucleic acids (NAs) are extracted from relatively large (~mL) volume sample lysates using an embedded porous silica glass fiber or cellulose binding phase (“membrane”) to capture sample NAs in a flow-through, filtration mode; (2) NAs captured on the membrane are isothermally (~65 °C) amplified; (3) amplicon production is monitored by real-time fluorescence detection, such as with a smartphone CCD camera serving as a low-cost detector; and (4) paraffin-encapsulated, lyophilized reagents for temperature-activated release are pre-stored in the chip. Limits of Detection (LOD) better than 103 virons/sample can be achieved. A modified chip with conduits hosting a diffusion-mode amplification process provides a simple visual indicator to readily quantify sample NA template. In addition, a companion microfluidic device for extracting plasma from whole blood without a centrifuge, generating cell-free plasma for chip-based molecular diagnostics, is described. Extensions to a myriad of related applications including, for example, food testing, cancer screening, and insect genotyping are briefly surveyed.

  16. Taxonomic Assessment of Rumen Microbiota Using Total RNA and Targeted Amplicon Sequencing Approaches.

    PubMed

    Li, Fuyong; Henderson, Gemma; Sun, Xu; Cox, Faith; Janssen, Peter H; Guan, Le Luo

    2016-01-01

    Taxonomic characterization of active gastrointestinal microbiota is essential to detect shifts in microbial communities and functions under various conditions. This study aimed to identify and quantify potentially active rumen microbiota using total RNA sequencing and to compare the outcomes of this approach with the widely used targeted RNA/DNA amplicon sequencing technique. Total RNA isolated from rumen digesta samples from five beef steers was subjected to Illumina paired-end sequencing (RNA-seq), and bacterial and archaeal amplicons of partial 16S rRNA/rDNA were subjected to 454 pyrosequencing (RNA/DNA Amplicon-seq). Taxonomic assessments of the RNA-seq, RNA Amplicon-seq, and DNA Amplicon-seq datasets were performed using a pipeline developed in house. The detected major microbial phylotypes were common among the three datasets, with seven bacterial phyla, fifteen bacterial families, and five archaeal taxa commonly identified across all datasets. There were also unique microbial taxa detected in each dataset. Elusimicrobia and Verrucomicrobia phyla; Desulfovibrionaceae, Elusimicrobiaceae, and Sphaerochaetaceae families; and Methanobrevibacter woesei were only detected in the RNA-Seq and RNA Amplicon-seq datasets, whereas Streptococcaceae was only detected in the DNA Amplicon-seq dataset. In addition, the relative abundances of four bacterial phyla, eight bacterial families and one archaeal taxon were different among the three datasets. This is the first study to compare the outcomes of rumen microbiota profiling between RNA-seq and RNA/DNA Amplicon-seq datasets. Our results illustrate the differences between these methods in characterizing microbiota both qualitatively and quantitatively for the same sample, and so caution must be exercised when comparing data. PMID:27446027

  17. Taxonomic Assessment of Rumen Microbiota Using Total RNA and Targeted Amplicon Sequencing Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fuyong; Henderson, Gemma; Sun, Xu; Cox, Faith; Janssen, Peter H.; Guan, Le Luo

    2016-01-01

    Taxonomic characterization of active gastrointestinal microbiota is essential to detect shifts in microbial communities and functions under various conditions. This study aimed to identify and quantify potentially active rumen microbiota using total RNA sequencing and to compare the outcomes of this approach with the widely used targeted RNA/DNA amplicon sequencing technique. Total RNA isolated from rumen digesta samples from five beef steers was subjected to Illumina paired-end sequencing (RNA-seq), and bacterial and archaeal amplicons of partial 16S rRNA/rDNA were subjected to 454 pyrosequencing (RNA/DNA Amplicon-seq). Taxonomic assessments of the RNA-seq, RNA Amplicon-seq, and DNA Amplicon-seq datasets were performed using a pipeline developed in house. The detected major microbial phylotypes were common among the three datasets, with seven bacterial phyla, fifteen bacterial families, and five archaeal taxa commonly identified across all datasets. There were also unique microbial taxa detected in each dataset. Elusimicrobia and Verrucomicrobia phyla; Desulfovibrionaceae, Elusimicrobiaceae, and Sphaerochaetaceae families; and Methanobrevibacter woesei were only detected in the RNA-Seq and RNA Amplicon-seq datasets, whereas Streptococcaceae was only detected in the DNA Amplicon-seq dataset. In addition, the relative abundances of four bacterial phyla, eight bacterial families and one archaeal taxon were different among the three datasets. This is the first study to compare the outcomes of rumen microbiota profiling between RNA-seq and RNA/DNA Amplicon-seq datasets. Our results illustrate the differences between these methods in characterizing microbiota both qualitatively and quantitatively for the same sample, and so caution must be exercised when comparing data. PMID:27446027

  18. Cell Penetrating Peptides and Cationic Antibacterial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez Plaza, Jonathan G.; Morales-Nava, Rosmarbel; Diener, Christian; Schreiber, Gabriele; Gonzalez, Zyanya D.; Lara Ortiz, Maria Teresa; Ortega Blake, Ivan; Pantoja, Omar; Volkmer, Rudolf; Klipp, Edda; Herrmann, Andreas; Del Rio, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPP) and cationic antibacterial peptides (CAP) have similar physicochemical properties and yet it is not understood how such similar peptides display different activities. To address this question, we used Iztli peptide 1 (IP-1) because it has both CPP and CAP activities. Combining experimental and computational modeling of the internalization of IP-1, we show it is not internalized by receptor-mediated endocytosis, yet it permeates into many different cell types, including fungi and human cells. We also show that IP-1 makes pores in the presence of high electrical potential at the membrane, such as those found in bacteria and mitochondria. These results provide the basis to understand the functional redundancy of CPPs and CAPs. PMID:24706763

  19. Analysis of a Drosophila amplicon in follicle cells highlights the diversity of metazoan replication origins.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jane C; Orr-Weaver, Terry L

    2011-10-01

    To investigate the properties of metazoan replication origins, recent studies in cell culture have adopted the strategy of identifying origins using genome-wide approaches and assessing correlations with such features as transcription and histone modifications. Drosophila amplicon in follicle cells (DAFCs), genomic regions that undergo repeated rounds of DNA replication to increase DNA copy number, serve as powerful in vivo model replicons. Because there are six DAFCs, compared with thousands of origins activated in the typical S phase, close molecular characterization of all DAFCs is possible. To determine the extent to which the six DAFCs are different or similar, we investigated the developmental and replication properties of the newly identified DAFC-34B. DAFC-34B contains two genes expressed in follicle cells, although the timing and spatial patterns of expression suggest that amplification is not a strategy to promote high expression at this locus. Like the previously characterized DAFC-62D, DAFC-34B displays origin activation at two separate stages of development. However, unlike DAFC-62D, amplification at the later stage is not transcription-dependent. We mapped the DAFC-34B amplification origin to 1 kb by nascent strand analysis and delineated cis requirements for origin activation, finding that a 6-kb region, but not the 1-kb origin alone, is sufficient for amplification. We analyzed the developmental localization of the origin recognition complex (ORC) and the minichromosome maintenance (MCM)2-7 complex, the replicative helicase. Intriguingly, the final round of origin activation at DAFC-34B occurs in the absence of detectable ORC, although MCMs are present, suggesting a new amplification initiation mechanism. PMID:21933960

  20. Polycyclic peptide therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Baeriswyl, Vanessa; Heinis, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Owing to their excellent binding properties, high stability, and low off-target toxicity, polycyclic peptides are an attractive molecule format for the development of therapeutics. Currently, only a handful of polycyclic peptides are used in the clinic; examples include the antibiotic vancomycin, the anticancer drugs actinomycin D and romidepsin, and the analgesic agent ziconotide. All clinically used polycyclic peptide drugs are derived from natural sources, such as soil bacteria in the case of vancomycin, actinomycin D and romidepsin, or the venom of a fish-hunting coil snail in the case of ziconotide. Unfortunately, nature provides peptide macrocyclic ligands for only a small fraction of therapeutic targets. For the generation of ligands of targets of choice, researchers have inserted artificial binding sites into natural polycyclic peptide scaffolds, such as cystine knot proteins, using rational design or directed evolution approaches. More recently, large combinatorial libraries of genetically encoded bicyclic peptides have been generated de novo and screened by phage display. In this Minireview, the properties of existing polycyclic peptide drugs are discussed and related to their interesting molecular architectures. Furthermore, technologies that allow the development of unnatural polycyclic peptide ligands are discussed. Recent application of these technologies has generated promising results, suggesting that polycyclic peptide therapeutics could potentially be developed for a broad range of diseases. PMID:23355488

  1. The DcMaster Transposon Display maps polymorphic insertion sites in the carrot (Daucus carota L.) genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DcMaster is a family of PIF/Harbinger-like class II transposable elements identified in carrot. We present a modified Transposon Display molecular marker system allowing amplification of genomic regions containing DcMaster elements. We scored 77 DcMaster Transposon Display (DcMTD) amplicons, of whic...

  2. JRC GMO-Amplicons: a collection of nucleic acid sequences related to genetically modified organisms.

    PubMed

    Petrillo, Mauro; Angers-Loustau, Alexandre; Henriksson, Peter; Bonfini, Laura; Patak, Alex; Kreysa, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    The DNA target sequence is the key element in designing detection methods for genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Unfortunately this information is frequently lacking, especially for unauthorized GMOs. In addition, patent sequences are generally poorly annotated, buried in complex and extensive documentation and hard to link to the corresponding GM event. Here, we present the JRC GMO-Amplicons, a database of amplicons collected by screening public nucleotide sequence databanks by in silico determination of PCR amplification with reference methods for GMO analysis. The European Union Reference Laboratory for Genetically Modified Food and Feed (EU-RL GMFF) provides these methods in the GMOMETHODS database to support enforcement of EU legislation and GM food/feed control. The JRC GMO-Amplicons database is composed of more than 240 000 amplicons, which can be easily accessed and screened through a web interface. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt at pooling and collecting publicly available sequences related to GMOs in food and feed. The JRC GMO-Amplicons supports control laboratories in the design and assessment of GMO methods, providing inter-alia in silico prediction of primers specificity and GM targets coverage. The new tool can assist the laboratories in the analysis of complex issues, such as the detection and identification of unauthorized GMOs. Notably, the JRC GMO-Amplicons database allows the retrieval and characterization of GMO-related sequences included in patents documentation. Finally, it can help annotating poorly described GM sequences and identifying new relevant GMO-related sequences in public databases. The JRC GMO-Amplicons is freely accessible through a web-based portal that is hosted on the EU-RL GMFF website. Database URL: http://gmo-crl.jrc.ec.europa.eu/jrcgmoamplicons/. PMID:26424080

  3. Efficient error correction for next-generation sequencing of viral amplicons

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Next-generation sequencing allows the analysis of an unprecedented number of viral sequence variants from infected patients, presenting a novel opportunity for understanding virus evolution, drug resistance and immune escape. However, sequencing in bulk is error prone. Thus, the generated data require error identification and correction. Most error-correction methods to date are not optimized for amplicon analysis and assume that the error rate is randomly distributed. Recent quality assessment of amplicon sequences obtained using 454-sequencing showed that the error rate is strongly linked to the presence and size of homopolymers, position in the sequence and length of the amplicon. All these parameters are strongly sequence specific and should be incorporated into the calibration of error-correction algorithms designed for amplicon sequencing. Results In this paper, we present two new efficient error correction algorithms optimized for viral amplicons: (i) k-mer-based error correction (KEC) and (ii) empirical frequency threshold (ET). Both were compared to a previously published clustering algorithm (SHORAH), in order to evaluate their relative performance on 24 experimental datasets obtained by 454-sequencing of amplicons with known sequences. All three algorithms show similar accuracy in finding true haplotypes. However, KEC and ET were significantly more efficient than SHORAH in removing false haplotypes and estimating the frequency of true ones. Conclusions Both algorithms, KEC and ET, are highly suitable for rapid recovery of error-free haplotypes obtained by 454-sequencing of amplicons from heterogeneous viruses. The implementations of the algorithms and data sets used for their testing are available at: http://alan.cs.gsu.edu/NGS/?q=content/pyrosequencing-error-correction-algorithm PMID:22759430

  4. JRC GMO-Amplicons: a collection of nucleic acid sequences related to genetically modified organisms

    PubMed Central

    Petrillo, Mauro; Angers-Loustau, Alexandre; Henriksson, Peter; Bonfini, Laura; Patak, Alex; Kreysa, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    The DNA target sequence is the key element in designing detection methods for genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Unfortunately this information is frequently lacking, especially for unauthorized GMOs. In addition, patent sequences are generally poorly annotated, buried in complex and extensive documentation and hard to link to the corresponding GM event. Here, we present the JRC GMO-Amplicons, a database of amplicons collected by screening public nucleotide sequence databanks by in silico determination of PCR amplification with reference methods for GMO analysis. The European Union Reference Laboratory for Genetically Modified Food and Feed (EU-RL GMFF) provides these methods in the GMOMETHODS database to support enforcement of EU legislation and GM food/feed control. The JRC GMO-Amplicons database is composed of more than 240 000 amplicons, which can be easily accessed and screened through a web interface. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt at pooling and collecting publicly available sequences related to GMOs in food and feed. The JRC GMO-Amplicons supports control laboratories in the design and assessment of GMO methods, providing inter-alia in silico prediction of primers specificity and GM targets coverage. The new tool can assist the laboratories in the analysis of complex issues, such as the detection and identification of unauthorized GMOs. Notably, the JRC GMO-Amplicons database allows the retrieval and characterization of GMO-related sequences included in patents documentation. Finally, it can help annotating poorly described GM sequences and identifying new relevant GMO-related sequences in public databases. The JRC GMO-Amplicons is freely accessible through a web-based portal that is hosted on the EU-RL GMFF website. Database URL: http://gmo-crl.jrc.ec.europa.eu/jrcgmoamplicons/ PMID:26424080

  5. Quantitative and qualitative differences in celiac disease epitopes among durum wheat varieties identified through deep RNA-amplicon sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Wheat gluten is important for the industrial quality of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and durum wheat (T. turgidum L.). Gluten proteins are also the source of immunogenic peptides that can trigger a T cell reaction in celiac disease (CD) patients, leading to inflammatory responses in the small intestine. Various peptides with three major T cell epitopes involved in CD are derived from alpha-gliadin fraction of gluten. Alpha-gliadins are encoded by a large multigene family and amino acid variation in the CD epitopes is known to influence the immunogenicity of individual gene family members. Current commercial methods of gluten detection are unable to distinguish between immunogenic and non-immunogenic CD epitope variants and thus to accurately quantify the overall CD epitope load of a given wheat variety. Such quantification is indispensable for correct selection of wheat varieties with low potential to cause CD. Results A 454 RNA-amplicon sequencing method was developed for alpha-gliadin transcripts encompassing the three major CD epitopes and their variants. The method was used to screen developing grains on plants of 61 different durum wheat cultivars and accessions. A dedicated sequence analysis pipeline returned a total of 304 unique alpha-gliadin transcripts, corresponding to a total of 171 ‘unique deduced protein fragments’ of alpha-gliadins. The numbers of these fragments obtained in each plant were used to calculate quantitative and quantitative differences between the CD epitopes expressed in the endosperm of these wheat plants. A few plants showed a lower fraction of CD epitope-encoding alpha-gliadin transcripts, but none were free of CD epitopes. Conclusions The dedicated 454 RNA-amplicon sequencing method enables 1) the grouping of wheat plants according to the genetic variation in alpha-gliadin transcripts, and 2) the screening for plants which are potentially less CD-immunogenic. The resulting alpha-gliadin sequence database will

  6. Phage display of proteins.

    PubMed

    Kościelska, K; Kiczak, L; Kasztura, M; Wesołowska, O; Otlewski, J

    1998-01-01

    In recent years the phage display approach has become an increasingly popular method in protein research. This method enables the presentation of large peptide and protein libraries on the surface of phage particles from which molecules of desired functional property(ies) can be rapidly selected. The great advantage of this method is a direct linkage between an observed phenotype and encapsulated genotype, which allows fast determination of selected sequences. The phage display approach is a powerful tool in generating highly potent biomolecules, including: search for specific antibodies, determining enzyme specificity, exploring protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions, minimizing proteins, introducing new functions into different protein scaffolds, and searching sequence space of protein folding. In this article many examples are given to illustrate that this technique can be used in different fields of protein science. The phage display has a potential of the natural evolution and its possibilities are far beyond rational prediction. Assuming that we can design the selection agents and conditions we should be able to engineer any desired protein function or feature. PMID:9918498

  7. Integration of complete chloroplast genome sequences with small amplicon datasets improves phylogenetic resolution in Acacia.

    PubMed

    Williams, Anna V; Miller, Joseph T; Small, Ian; Nevill, Paul G; Boykin, Laura M

    2016-03-01

    Combining whole genome data with previously obtained amplicon sequences has the potential to increase the resolution of phylogenetic analyses, particularly at low taxonomic levels or where recent divergence, rapid speciation or slow genome evolution has resulted in limited sequence variation. However, the integration of these types of data for large scale phylogenetic studies has rarely been investigated. Here we conduct a phylogenetic analysis of the whole chloroplast genome and two nuclear ribosomal loci for 65 Acacia species from across the most recent Acacia phylogeny. We then combine this data with previously generated amplicon sequences (four chloroplast loci and two nuclear ribosomal loci) for 508 Acacia species. We use several phylogenetic methods, including maximum likelihood bootstrapping (with and without constraint) and ExaBayes, in order to determine the success of combining a dataset of 4000bp with one of 189,000bp. The results of our study indicate that the inclusion of whole genome data gave a far better resolved and well supported representation of the phylogenetic relationships within Acacia than using only amplicon sequences, with the greatest support observed when using a whole genome phylogeny as a constraint on the amplicon sequences. Our study therefore provides methods for optimal integration of genomic and amplicon sequences. PMID:26702955

  8. Assessing copy number alterations in targeted, amplicon-based next-generation sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Grasso, Catherine; Butler, Timothy; Rhodes, Katherine; Quist, Michael; Neff, Tanaya L; Moore, Stephen; Tomlins, Scott A; Reinig, Erica; Beadling, Carol; Andersen, Mark; Corless, Christopher L

    2015-01-01

    Changes in gene copy number are important in the setting of precision medicine. Recent studies have established that copy number alterations (CNAs) can be detected in sequencing libraries prepared by hybridization-capture, but there has been comparatively little attention given to CNA assessment in amplicon-based libraries prepared by PCR. In this study, we developed an algorithm for detecting CNAs in amplicon-based sequencing data. CNAs determined from the algorithm mirrored those from a hybridization-capture library. In addition, analysis of 14 pairs of matched normal and breast carcinoma tissues revealed that sequence data pooled from normal samples could be substituted for a matched normal tissue without affecting the detection of clinically relevant CNAs (>|2| copies). Comparison of CNAs identified by array comparative genomic hybridization and amplicon-based libraries across 10 breast carcinoma samples showed an excellent correlation. The CNA algorithm also compared favorably with fluorescence in situ hybridization, with agreement in 33 of 38 assessments across four different genes. Factors that influenced the detection of CNAs included the number of amplicons per gene, the average read depth, and, most important, the proportion of tumor within the sample. Our results show that CNAs can be identified in amplicon-based targeted sequencing data, and that their detection can be optimized by ensuring adequate tumor content and read coverage. PMID:25468433

  9. Macrocyclization of Unprotected Peptide Isocyanates.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, Alexander A; Choo, Zi-Ning; Totaro, Kyle A; Pentelute, Bradley L

    2016-03-18

    A chemistry for the facile two-component macrocyclization of unprotected peptide isocyanates is described. Starting from peptides containing two glutamic acid γ-hydrazide residues, isocyanates can be readily accessed and cyclized with hydrazides of dicarboxylic acids. The choice of a nucleophilic linker allows for the facile modulation of biochemical properties of a macrocyclic peptide. Four cyclic NYAD-1 analogues were synthesized using the described method and displayed a range of biological activities. PMID:26948900

  10. Advance in phage display technology for bioanalysis.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yuyu; Tian, Tian; Liu, Wenli; Zhu, Zhi; J Yang, Chaoyong

    2016-06-01

    Phage display technology has emerged as a powerful tool for target gene expression and target-specific ligand selection. It is widely used to screen peptides, proteins and antibodies with the advantages of simplicity, high efficiency and low cost. A variety of targets, including ions, small molecules, inorganic materials, natural and biological polymers, nanostructures, cells, bacteria, and even tissues, have been demonstrated to generate specific binding ligands by phage display. Phages and target-specific ligands screened by phage display have been widely used as affinity reagents in therapeutics, diagnostics and biosensors. In this review, comparisons of different types of phage display systems are first presented. Particularly, microfluidic-based phage display, which enables screening with high throughput, high efficiency and integration, is highlighted. More importantly, we emphasize the advances in biosensors based on phages or phage-derived probes, including nonlytic phages, lytic phages, peptides or proteins screened by phage display, phage assemblies and phage-nanomaterial complexes. However, more efficient and higher throughput phage display methods are still needed to meet an explosion in demand for bioanalysis. Furthermore, screening of cyclic peptides and functional peptides will be the hotspot in bioanalysis. PMID:27061133

  11. Silencing Status Epilepticus-Induced BDNF Expression with Herpes Simplex Virus Type-1 Based Amplicon Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Falcicchia, Chiara; Trempat, Pascal; Binaschi, Anna; Perrier-Biollay, Coline; Roncon, Paolo; Soukupova, Marie; Berthommé, Hervé; Simonato, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been found to produce pro- but also anti-epileptic effects. Thus, its validity as a therapeutic target must be verified using advanced tools designed to block or to enhance its signal. The aim of this study was to develop tools to silence the BDNF signal. We generated Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) derived amplicon vectors, i.e. viral particles containing a genome of 152 kb constituted of concatameric repetitions of an expression cassette, enabling the expression of the gene of interest in multiple copies. HSV-1 based amplicon vectors are non-pathogenic and have been successfully employed in the past for gene delivery into the brain of living animals. Therefore, amplicon vectors should represent a logical choice for expressing a silencing cassette, which, in multiple copies, is expected to lead to an efficient knock-down of the target gene expression. Here, we employed two amplicon-based BDNF silencing strategies. The first, antisense, has been chosen to target and degrade the cytoplasmic mRNA pool of BDNF, whereas the second, based on the convergent transcription technology, has been chosen to repress transcription at the BDNF gene. Both these amplicon vectors proved to be effective in down-regulating BDNF expression in vitro, in BDNF-expressing mesoangioblast cells. However, only the antisense strategy was effective in vivo, after inoculation in the hippocampus in a model of status epilepticus in which BDNF mRNA levels are strongly increased. Interestingly, the knocking down of BDNF levels induced with BDNF-antisense was sufficient to produce significant behavioral effects, in spite of the fact that it was produced only in a part of a single hippocampus. In conclusion, this study demonstrates a reliable effect of amplicon vectors in knocking down gene expression in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, this approach may find broad applications in neurobiological studies. PMID:26954758

  12. Constitutive and Inducible Innate Responses in Cells Infected by HSV-1-Derived Amplicon Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Tsitoura, Eliza; Epstein, Alberto L

    2010-01-01

    Amplicons are helper-dependent herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)-based vectors that can deliver very large foreign DNA sequences and, as such, are good candidates both for gene delivery and vaccine development. However, many studies have shown that innate constitutive or induced cellular responses, elicited or activated by the entry of HSV-1 particles, can play a significant role in the control of transgenic expression and in the induction of inflammatory responses. Moreover, transgene expression from helper-free amplicon stocks is often weak and transient, depending on the particular type of infected cells, suggesting that cellular responses could be also responsible for the silencing of amplicon-mediated transgene expression. This review summarizes the current experimental evidence underlying these latter concepts, focusing on the impact on transgene expression of very-early interactions between amplicon particles and the infected cells, and speculates on possible ways to counteract the cellular protective mechanisms, thus allowing stable transgene expression without enhancement of vector toxicity. PMID:20811588

  13. Characterizing partial AZFc deletions of the Y chromosome with amplicon-specific sequence markers

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Costa, Paulo; Pereira, Luísa; Alves, Cíntia; Gusmão, Leonor; Proença, Carmen; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Rocha, Tiago; Correia, Sónia C; Jorge, Sónia; Neves, António; Soares, Ana P; Nunes, Joaquim; Calhaz-Jorge, Carlos; Amorim, António; Plancha, Carlos E; Gonçalves, João

    2007-01-01

    Background The AZFc region of the human Y chromosome is a highly recombinogenic locus containing multi-copy male fertility genes located in repeated DNA blocks (amplicons). These AZFc gene families exhibit slight sequence variations between copies which are considered to have functional relevance. Yet, partial AZFc deletions yield phenotypes ranging from normospermia to azoospermia, thwarting definite conclusions on their real impact on fertility. Results The amplicon content of partial AZFc deletion products was characterized with novel amplicon-specific sequence markers. Data indicate that partial AZFc deletions are a male infertility risk [odds ratio: 5.6 (95% CI: 1.6–30.1)] and although high diversity of partial deletion products and sequence conversion profiles were recorded, the AZFc marker profiles detected in fertile men were also observed in infertile men. Additionally, the assessment of rearrangement recurrence by Y-lineage analysis indicated that while partial AZFc deletions occurred in highly diverse samples, haplotype diversity was minimal in fertile men sharing identical marker profiles. Conclusion Although partial AZFc deletion products are highly heterogeneous in terms of amplicon content, this plasticity is not sufficient to account for the observed phenotypical variance. The lack of causative association between the deletion of specific gene copies and infertility suggests that AZFc gene content might be part of a multifactorial network, with Y-lineage evolution emerging as a possible phenotype modulator. PMID:17903263

  14. Bacterial metabarcoding by 16S rRNA gene ion torrent amplicon sequencing.

    PubMed

    Fantini, Elio; Gianese, Giulio; Giuliano, Giovanni; Fiore, Alessia

    2015-01-01

    Ion Torrent is a next generation sequencing technology based on the detection of hydrogen ions produced during DNA chain elongation; this technology allows analyzing and characterizing genomes, genes, and species. Here, we describe an Ion Torrent procedure applied to the metagenomic analysis of 16S rRNA gene amplicons to study the bacterial diversity in food and environmental samples. PMID:25343859

  15. Evaluation of Hybridization Capture Versus Amplicon-Based Methods for Whole-Exome Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Samorodnitsky, Eric; Jewell, Benjamin M; Hagopian, Raffi; Miya, Jharna; Wing, Michele R; Lyon, Ezra; Damodaran, Senthilkumar; Bhatt, Darshna; Reeser, Julie W; Datta, Jharna; Roychowdhury, Sameek

    2015-09-01

    Next-generation sequencing has aided characterization of genomic variation. While whole-genome sequencing may capture all possible mutations, whole-exome sequencing remains cost-effective and captures most phenotype-altering mutations. Initial strategies for exome enrichment utilized a hybridization-based capture approach. Recently, amplicon-based methods were designed to simplify preparation and utilize smaller DNA inputs. We evaluated two hybridization capture-based and two amplicon-based whole-exome sequencing approaches, utilizing both Illumina and Ion Torrent sequencers, comparing on-target alignment, uniformity, and variant calling. While the amplicon methods had higher on-target rates, the hybridization capture-based approaches demonstrated better uniformity. All methods identified many of the same single-nucleotide variants, but each amplicon-based method missed variants detected by the other three methods and reported additional variants discordant with all three other technologies. Many of these potential false positives or negatives appear to result from limited coverage, low variant frequency, vicinity to read starts/ends, or the need for platform-specific variant calling algorithms. All methods demonstrated effective copy-number variant calling when evaluated against a single-nucleotide polymorphism array. This study illustrates some differences between whole-exome sequencing approaches, highlights the need for selecting appropriate variant calling based on capture method, and will aid laboratories in selecting their preferred approach. PMID:26110913

  16. Co-existence of circular and multiple linear amplicons in methotrexate-resistant Leishmania.

    PubMed Central

    Olmo, A; Arrebola, R; Bernier, V; González-Pacanowska, D; Ruiz-Pérez, L M

    1995-01-01

    Circular and linear amplicons were analyzed in detail in Leishmania tropica cells resistant to methotrexate (MTX). Both types of elements presented sequences related to the H locus and coexisted in resistant cells. The linear amplicons appeared first during the selection process (at 10 microM MTX) and varied with regard to size and structure in cells exposed to increasing concentrations of drug. The circular element was evident at higher concentrations (50 microMs) but was the major amplified DNA in cells resistant to 1000 microM MTX while the level of amplification of the linear elements remained low. The extrachromosomal DNAs were unstable in the absence of drug and their disappearance coincided with an increase in sensitivity to MTX. Mapping of the minichromosomes and the circular element showed that they were all constituted by inverted duplications. The circular amplicon contained an inverted repeat derived from the H locus that encompassed the pteridine reductase gene (PTR1) responsible for MTX resistance. The amplified segment in the linear amplicons was longer and included the pgpB and pgpC genes that encode P-glycoproteins of unknown function previously characterized in different Leishmania species. Images PMID:7659507

  17. De novo-generated small palindromes are characteristic of amplicon boundary junction of double minutes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jing; Yu, Yang; Meng, Xiangning; Fan, Yihui; Zhang, Yu; Zhou, Chunshui; Yue, Zhichao; Jin, Yan; Zhang, Chunyu; Yu, Lisa; Ji, Wei; Jia, Xueyuan; Guan, Rongwei; Wu, Jie; Yu, Jingcui; Bai, Jing; Guan, Xin-Yuan; Wang, Mingrong; Lee, Ki-Young; Sun, Wenjing; Fu, Songbin

    2013-08-15

    Double minutes (DMs) are hallmarks of gene amplification. However, their molecular structure and the mechanisms of formation are largely unknown. To elucidate the structure and underlying molecular mechanism of DMs, we obtained and cloned DMs using microdissection; and degenerated oligonucleotide primed polymerase chain reaction (DOP-PCR) from the ovarian cancer cell line UACC-1598. Two large amplicons, the 284 kb AmpMYCN, originating from locus 2p24.3 and the 391 kb AmpEIF5A2, from locus 3q26.2, were found co-amplified on the same DMs. The two amplicons are joined through a complex 7 kb junction DNA sequence. Analysis of the junction has revealed three de novo created small palindromes surrounding the six breakpoints. Consistent with these observations, we further found that 70% of the 57 reported DM junction sequences have de novo creation of small palindromic sequences surrounding the breakpoints. Together, our findings indicate that de novo-generated small palindromic sequences are characteristic of amplicon boundary junctions on DMs. It is possible that the de novo-generated small palindromic sequences, which may be generated through non-homologous end joining in concert with a novel DNA repair machinery, play a common role in amplicon rejoining and gene amplification. PMID:23382041

  18. Estimation of copy number using SYBR Green: confounding by AT-rich DNA and by variation in amplicon length.

    PubMed

    Colborn, James M; Byrd, Brian D; Koita, Ousmane A; Krogstad, Donald J

    2008-12-01

    Although SYBR Green is used to estimate copy number, its fluorescence varies with amplicon length and adenine/thymine (AT) content. As a result, threshold cycle (Ct) values obtained using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) are lower for longer amplicons (P<0.001) and amplicons with greater AT content (P<0.001). In contrast, neither amplicon length nor AT content affects the Ct with TaqMan probes or LUX-labeled primers. Because SYBR Green yields lower Cts with AT-rich templates and longer templates, it overestimates copy number for those templates. Therefore, sequence-specific methods such as TaqMan probes or LUX-labeled primers should be considered when using real-time PCR to estimate copy number if the amplicons generated are AT-rich or vary in length. PMID:19052298

  19. Antimicrobial peptides

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    With increasing antibiotics resistance, there is an urgent need for novel infection therapeutics. Since antimicrobial peptides provide opportunities for this, identification and optimization of such peptides have attracted much interest during recent years. Here, a brief overview of antimicrobial peptides is provided, with focus placed on how selected hydrophobic modifications of antimicrobial peptides can be employed to combat also more demanding pathogens, including multi-resistant strains, without conferring unacceptable toxicity. PMID:24758244

  20. Peptide modulators of alpha-glucosidase

    PubMed Central

    Roskar, Irena; Molek, Peter; Vodnik, Miha; Stempelj, Mateja; Strukelj, Borut; Lunder, Mojca

    2015-01-01

    Aims/Introduction Acute glucose fluctuations during the postprandial period pose great risk for cardiovascular complications and thus represent an important therapeutic approach in type 2 diabetes. In the present study, screening of peptide libraries was used to select peptides with an affinity towards mammalian intestinal alpha-glucosidase as potential leads in antidiabetic agent development. Materials and Methods Three phage-displayed peptide libraries were used in independent selections with different elution strategies to isolate target-binding peptides. Selected peptides displayed on phage were tested to compete for an enzyme-binding site with known competitive inhibitors, acarbose and voglibose. The four best performing peptides were synthesized. Their binding to the mammalian alpha-glucosidase and their effect on enzyme activity were evaluated. Results Two linear and two cyclic heptapeptides with high affinity towards intestinal alpha-glucosidase were selected. Phage-displayed as well as synthetic peptides bind into or to the vicinity of the active site on the enzyme. Both cyclic peptides inhibited enzyme activity, whereas both linear peptides increased enzyme activity. Conclusions Although natural substrates of glycosidase are polysaccharides, in the present study we successfully isolated novel peptide modulators of alpha-glucosidase. Modulatory activity of selected peptides could be further optimized through peptidomimetic design. They represent promising leads for development of efficient alpha-glucosidase inhibitors. PMID:26543535

  1. Screening peptide array library for the identification of cancer cell-binding peptides.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Kamaljit; Ahmed, Sahar; Soudy, Rania; Azmi, Sarfuddin

    2015-01-01

    The identification of cancer cell-specific ligands is a key requirement for the targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic agents. Usually phage display system is employed to discover cancer-specific peptides through a biopanning process. Synthetic peptide array libraries can be used as a complementary method to phage display for screening and identifying cancer cell-specific ligands. Here, we describe a peptide array-whole cell binding assay to identify cancer cell-specific peptides. A peptide array library based on a lead dodecapeptide, p160, is synthesized on a functionalized cellulose membrane using solid phase chemistry and a robotic synthesizer. The relative binding affinity of the peptide library is evaluated by incubating the library with fluorescently labeled cancerous or non-cancerous cells. Thereby the assay allows picking peptides that show selective and high binding to cancerous cells. These peptides represent potential candidates for use in cancer-targeted drug delivery, imaging, and diagnosis. PMID:25616337

  2. Fast, accurate and easy-to-pipeline methods for amplicon sequence processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonielli, Livio; Sessitsch, Angela

    2016-04-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies established since years as an essential resource in microbiology. While on the one hand metagenomic studies can benefit from the continuously increasing throughput of the Illumina (Solexa) technology, on the other hand the spreading of third generation sequencing technologies (PacBio, Oxford Nanopore) are getting whole genome sequencing beyond the assembly of fragmented draft genomes, making it now possible to finish bacterial genomes even without short read correction. Besides (meta)genomic analysis next-gen amplicon sequencing is still fundamental for microbial studies. Amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene and ITS (Internal Transcribed Spacer) remains a well-established widespread method for a multitude of different purposes concerning the identification and comparison of archaeal/bacterial (16S rRNA gene) and fungal (ITS) communities occurring in diverse environments. Numerous different pipelines have been developed in order to process NGS-derived amplicon sequences, among which Mothur, QIIME and USEARCH are the most well-known and cited ones. The entire process from initial raw sequence data through read error correction, paired-end read assembly, primer stripping, quality filtering, clustering, OTU taxonomic classification and BIOM table rarefaction as well as alternative "normalization" methods will be addressed. An effective and accurate strategy will be presented using the state-of-the-art bioinformatic tools and the example of a straightforward one-script pipeline for 16S rRNA gene or ITS MiSeq amplicon sequencing will be provided. Finally, instructions on how to automatically retrieve nucleotide sequences from NCBI and therefore apply the pipeline to targets other than 16S rRNA gene (Greengenes, SILVA) and ITS (UNITE) will be discussed.

  3. Characterization of FGFR1 Locus in sqNSCLC Reveals a Broad and Heterogeneous Amplicon

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, Claire; Geh, Catherine; Williams, Victoria; Heuckmann, Johannes M.; Menon, Roopika; Schneider, Petra; Al-Kadhimi, Katherine; Dymond, Michael; Smith, Neil R.; Baker, Dawn; French, Tim; Smith, Paul D.; Harrington, Elizabeth A.; Barrett, J. Carl; Kilgour, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    FGFR1 amplification occurs in ~20% of sqNSCLC and trials with FGFR inhibitors have selected FGFR1 amplified patients by FISH. Lung cancer cell lines were profiled for sensitivity to AZD4547, a potent, selective inhibitor of FGFRs 1–3. Sensitivity to FGFR inhibition was associated with but not wholly predicted by increased FGFR1 gene copy number. Additional biomarker assays evaluating expression of FGFRs and correlation between amplification and expression in clinical tissues are therefore warranted. We validated nanoString for mRNA expression analysis of 194 genes, including FGFRs, from clinical tumour tissue. In a panel of sqNSCLC tumours 14.4% (13/90) were FGFR1 amplified by FISH. Although mean FGFR1 expression was significantly higher in amplified samples, there was significant overlap in the range of expression levels between the amplified and non-amplified cohorts with several non-amplified samples expressing FGFR1 to levels equivalent to amplified samples. Statistical analysis revealed increased expression of FGFR1 neighboring genes on the 8p12 amplicon (BAG4, LSM1 and WHSC1L1) in FGFR1 amplified tumours, suggesting a broad rather than focal amplicon and raises the potential for codependencies. High resolution aCGH analysis of pre-clinical and clinical samples supported the presence of a broad and heterogeneous amplicon around the FGFR1 locus. In conclusion, the range of FGFR1 expression levels in both FGFR1 amplified and non-amplified NSCLC tissues, together with the breadth and intra-patient heterogeneity of the 8p amplicon highlights the need for gene expression analysis of clinical samples to inform the understanding of determinants of response to FGFR inhibitors. In this respect the nanoString platform provides an attractive option for RNA analysis of FFPE clinical samples. PMID:26905262

  4. DADA2: High-resolution sample inference from Illumina amplicon data.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Benjamin J; McMurdie, Paul J; Rosen, Michael J; Han, Andrew W; Johnson, Amy Jo A; Holmes, Susan P

    2016-07-01

    We present the open-source software package DADA2 for modeling and correcting Illumina-sequenced amplicon errors (https://github.com/benjjneb/dada2). DADA2 infers sample sequences exactly and resolves differences of as little as 1 nucleotide. In several mock communities, DADA2 identified more real variants and output fewer spurious sequences than other methods. We applied DADA2 to vaginal samples from a cohort of pregnant women, revealing a diversity of previously undetected Lactobacillus crispatus variants. PMID:27214047

  5. Molecular cloning and characterization of a 20q13.2 amplicon in breast carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, C.; Froula, J.; Kowbel, D.

    1994-09-01

    Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) has identified an amplification event involving chromosome band 20q13.2 in 15-20% of primary breast carcinomas. The application of FISH to the study of tumor interphase nuclei using 33 locus specific cosmid and P1 probes revealed amplification of band 20q13.2 in 35% of breast cancer cell lines and 8% of primary tumors. Moreover, this study localized the amplification event to the 1.5Mb interval defined by (Flpter 0.80-0.84.) and excluded all known genes in the region as candidates for the putative oncogene(s). To both identify the putative oncogene(s) and characterize the amplicon, a 12 member 4Mb YAC contig has been assembled by STS mapping that spans the core of the amplicon. The YAC contig is now being converted to a P1 contig to facilitate sequencing, exon trapping and direct selection of cDNAs. This is being accomplished by performing interAlu PCR reactions on individual YACs and sequencing the reaction products to create 5-10 new STSs per megaYAC. The DuPont P1 library is then screened for these STSs by the PCR. To date 21 P1 clones, forming 6 contigs, have been isolated by screening the DuPont P1 library for existing and/or newly created STSs. The ends of the 21 P1 clones are being sequenced to facilitate contig alignment and to enable chromosome walking. In collaboration with the Human Genome Center at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory we have initiated the directed sequencing of two P1 contigs, localized within the amplicon core, and ultimately will sequence the entire 1-2Mb amplicon.

  6. Massively parallel sequencing of 17 commonly used forensic autosomal STRs and amelogenin with small amplicons.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Hye; Lee, Hwan Young; Yang, In Seok; Jung, Sang-Eun; Yang, Woo Ick; Shin, Kyoung-Jin

    2016-05-01

    The next-generation sequencing (NGS) method has been utilized to analyze short tandem repeat (STR) markers, which are routinely used for human identification purposes in the forensic field. Some researchers have demonstrated the successful application of the NGS system to STR typing, suggesting that NGS technology may be an alternative or additional method to overcome limitations of capillary electrophoresis (CE)-based STR profiling. However, there has been no available multiplex PCR system that is optimized for NGS analysis of forensic STR markers. Thus, we constructed a multiplex PCR system for the NGS analysis of 18 markers (13CODIS STRs, D2S1338, D19S433, Penta D, Penta E and amelogenin) by designing amplicons in the size range of 77-210 base pairs. Then, PCR products were generated from two single-sources, mixed samples and artificially degraded DNA samples using a multiplex PCR system, and were prepared for sequencing on the MiSeq system through construction of a subsequent barcoded library. By performing NGS and analyzing the data, we confirmed that the resultant STR genotypes were consistent with those of CE-based typing. Moreover, sequence variations were detected in targeted STR regions. Through the use of small-sized amplicons, the developed multiplex PCR system enables researchers to obtain successful STR profiles even from artificially degraded DNA as well as STR loci which are analyzed with large-sized amplicons in the CE-based commercial kits. In addition, successful profiles can be obtained from mixtures up to a 1:19 ratio. Consequently, the developed multiplex PCR system, which produces small size amplicons, can be successfully applied to STR NGS analysis of forensic casework samples such as mixtures and degraded DNA samples. PMID:26799314

  7. Ioncopy: a novel method for calling copy number alterations in amplicon sequencing data including significance assessment

    PubMed Central

    Budczies, Jan; Pfarr, Nicole; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Treue, Denise; Endris, Volker; Ismaeel, Fakher; Bangemann, Nikola; Blohmer, Jens-Uwe; Dietel, Manfred; Loibl, Sibylle; Klauschen, Frederick; Weichert, Wilko; Denkert, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Recently, it has been demonstrated that calling of copy number alterations (CNAs) from amplicon sequencing (AS) data is feasible. Most approaches, however, require non-tumor (germline) DNA for data normalization. Here, we present the method Ioncopy for CNA detection which requires no normal controls and includes a significance assessment for each detected alteration. Ioncopy was evaluated in a cohort of 184 clinically annotated breast carcinomas. A total number of 252 amplifications were detected, of which 183 (72.6%) could be validated by a call of an additional amplicon interrogating the same gene. Moreover, a total number of 33 deletions were found, whereof 27 (81.8%) could be validated. Analyzing the 16 most frequently amplified genes, validation rates of over 89% could be achieved for 11 of these genes. 11 of the top 16 genes showed significant overexpression in the amplified tumors. 89.5% of the HER2-amplified tumors were GRB7 and STARD3 co-amplified, whereas 68.4% of the HER2-amplified tumors had additional MED1 amplifications. Correlations between CNAs measured by amplicons in HER2 exons 19, 20 and 21 were strong (all R > 0.93). AS based detection of HER2 amplifications had a sensitivity of 90.0% and a specificity of 98.8% compared to the gold standard of HER2 immunohistochemistry combined with in situ hybridization. In summary, we developed and validated a novel method for detection and significance assessment of CNAs in amplicon sequencing data. Using Ioncopy, AS offers a straightforward and efficient approach to simultaneously analyze gene amplifications and gene deletions together with simple somatic mutations in a single assay. PMID:26910888

  8. Electrochemical DNA sensor for anthrax toxin activator gene atxA-detection of PCR amplicons.

    PubMed

    Das, Ritu; Goel, Ajay K; Sharma, Mukesh K; Upadhyay, Sanjay

    2015-12-15

    We report the DNA probe functionalized electrochemical genosensor for the detection of Bacillus anthracis, specific towards the regulatory gene atxA. The DNA sensor is fabricated on electrochemically deposited gold nanoparticle on self assembled layer of (3-Mercaptopropyl) trimethoxysilane (MPTS) on GC electrode. DNA hybridization is monitored by differential pulse voltammogram (DPV). The modified GC electrode is characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), cyclic voltammetry (CV), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) method. We also quantified the DNA probe density on electrode surface by the chronocoulometric method. The detection is specific and selective for atxA gene by DNA probe on the electrode surface. No report is available for the detection of B. anthracis by using atxA an anthrax toxin activator gene. In the light of real and complex sample, we have studied the PCR amplicons of 303, 361 and 568 base pairs by using symmetric and asymmetric PCR approaches. The DNA probe of atxA gene efficiently hybridizes with different base pairs of PCR amplicons. The detection limit is found to be 1.0 pM (S/N ratio=3). The results indicate that the DNA sensor is able to detect synthetic target as well as PCR amplicons of different base pairs. PMID:26257186

  9. Induction of humoral responses to BHV-1 glycoprotein D expressed by HSV-1 amplicon vectors

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, Andrea Maria; Berois, Mabel Beatriz; Tomé, Lorena Magalí; Epstein, Alberto L.

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) amplicon vectors are versatile and useful tools for transferring genes into cells that are capable of stimulating a specific immune response to their expressed antigens. In this work, two HSV-1-derived amplicon vectors were generated. One of these expressed the full-length glycoprotein D (gD) of bovine herpesvirus 1 while the second expressed the truncated form of gD (gDtr) which lacked the trans-membrane region. After evaluating gD expression in the infected cells, the ability of both vectors to induce a specific gD immune response was tested in BALB/c mice that were intramuscularly immunized. Specific serum antibody responses were detected in mice inoculated with both vectors, and the response against truncated gD was higher than the response against full-length gD. These results reinforce previous findings that HSV-1 amplicon vectors can potentially deliver antigens to animals and highlight the prospective use of these vectors for treating infectious bovine rhinotracheitis disease. PMID:22437537

  10. From Benchtop to Desktop: Important Considerations when Designing Amplicon Sequencing Workflows

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Dáithí C.; Coghlan, Megan L.; Bunce, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Amplicon sequencing has been the method of choice in many high-throughput DNA sequencing (HTS) applications. To date there has been a heavy focus on the means by which to analyse the burgeoning amount of data afforded by HTS. In contrast, there has been a distinct lack of attention paid to considerations surrounding the importance of sample preparation and the fidelity of library generation. No amount of high-end bioinformatics can compensate for poorly prepared samples and it is therefore imperative that careful attention is given to sample preparation and library generation within workflows, especially those involving multiple PCR steps. This paper redresses this imbalance by focusing on aspects pertaining to the benchtop within typical amplicon workflows: sample screening, the target region, and library generation. Empirical data is provided to illustrate the scope of the problem. Lastly, the impact of various data analysis parameters is also investigated in the context of how the data was initially generated. It is hoped this paper may serve to highlight the importance of pre-analysis workflows in achieving meaningful, future-proof data that can be analysed appropriately. As amplicon sequencing gains traction in a variety of diagnostic applications from forensics to environmental DNA (eDNA) it is paramount workflows and analytics are both fit for purpose. PMID:25902146

  11. Analysing 454 amplicon resequencing experiments using the modular and database oriented Variant Identification Pipeline

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Next-generation amplicon sequencing enables high-throughput genetic diagnostics, sequencing multiple genes in several patients together in one sequencing run. Currently, no open-source out-of-the-box software solution exists that reliably reports detected genetic variations and that can be used to improve future sequencing effectiveness by analyzing the PCR reactions. Results We developed an integrated database oriented software pipeline for analysis of 454/Roche GS-FLX amplicon resequencing experiments using Perl and a relational database. The pipeline enables variation detection, variation detection validation, and advanced data analysis, which provides information that can be used to optimize PCR efficiency using traditional means. The modular approach enables customization of the pipeline where needed and allows researchers to adopt their analysis pipeline to their experiments. Clear documentation and training data is available to test and validate the pipeline prior to using it on real sequencing data. Conclusions We designed an open-source database oriented pipeline that enables advanced analysis of 454/Roche GS-FLX amplicon resequencing experiments using SQL-statements. This modular database approach allows easy coupling with other pipeline modules such as variant interpretation or a LIMS system. There is also a set of standard reporting scripts available. PMID:20487544

  12. Sample Preparation for Fungal Community Analysis by High-Throughput Sequencing of Barcode Amplicons.

    PubMed

    Clemmensen, Karina Engelbrecht; Ihrmark, Katarina; Durling, Mikael Brandström; Lindahl, Björn D

    2016-01-01

    Fungal species participate in vast numbers of processes in the landscape around us. However, their often cryptic growth, inside various substrates and in highly diverse species assemblages, has been a major obstacle to thorough analysis of fungal communities, hampering exhaustive description of the fungal kingdom. Recent technological developments allowing rapid, high-throughput sequencing of mixed communities from many samples at once are currently having a tremendous impact in fungal community ecology. Universal DNA extraction followed by amplification and sequencing of fungal species-level barcodes such as the nuclear internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region now enable identification and relative quantification of fungal community members across well-replicated experimental settings. Here, we present the sample preparation procedure presently used in our laboratory for fungal community analysis by high-throughput sequencing of amplified ITS2 markers. We focus on the procedure optimized for studies of total fungal communities in humus-rich soils, wood, and litter. However, this procedure can be applied to other sample types and markers. We focus on the laboratory-based part of sample preparation, that is, the procedure from the point where samples enter the laboratory until amplicons are submitted for sequencing. Our procedure comprises four main parts: (1) universal DNA extraction, (2) optimization of PCR conditions, (3) production of tagged ITS amplicons, and (4) preparation of the multiplexed amplicon mix to be sequenced. The presented procedure is independent of the specific high-throughput sequencing technology used, which makes it highly versatile. PMID:26791497

  13. A mimotope peptide of Aβ42 fibril-specific antibodies with Aβ42 fibrillation inhibitory activity induces anti-Aβ42 conformer antibody response by a displayed form on an M13 phage in mice.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Koichi; Nishimura, Masaaki; Yamaguchi, Yuya; Hashiguchi, Shuhei; Takiguchi, Sho; Yamaguchi, Makoto; Tahara, Haruna; Gotanda, Takuma; Abe, Risa; Ito, Yuji; Sugimura, Kazuhisa

    2011-07-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides accumulate in the brain in different forms, including fibrils and oligomers. Recently, we established three distinct conformation-dependent human single-chain Fv (scFv) antibodies, including B6 scFv, which bound to Aβ42 fibril but not to soluble-form Aβ, inhibiting Aβ42 fibril formation. In this study, we determined the mimotopes of these antibodies and found a common mimotope sequence, B6-C15, using the Ph.D.-C7C phage library. The B6-C15 showed weak homology to the C-terminus of Aβ42 containing GXXXG dimerization motifs. We synthesized the peptide of B6-C15 fused with biotinylated TAT at the N-terminus (TAT-B6-C15) and characterized its biochemical features on an Aβ42-fibrillation reaction in vitro. We demonstrated that, first, TAT-B6-C15 inhibited Aβ42 fibril formation; secondly, TAT-B6-C15 bound to prefibril Aβ42 oligomers but not to monomers, trimers, tetramers, fibrils, or ultrasonicated fragments; thirdly, TAT-B6-C15 inhibited Aβ42-induced cytotoxicity against human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells; and, fourthly, when mice were administered B6-C15-phages dissolved in phosphate-buffered saline, the anti-Aβ42 conformer IgG antibody response was induced. These results suggested that the B6-C15 peptide might provide unique opportunities to analyze the Aβ42 fibrillation pathway and develop a vaccine vehicle for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:21641049

  14. Potential of novel antimicrobial peptide P3 from bovine erythrocytes and its analogs to disrupt bacterial membranes in vitro and display activity against drug-resistant bacteria in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qinghua; Xu, Yanzhao; Wang, Qing; Hang, Bolin; Sun, Yawei; Wei, Xiaoxiao; Hu, Jianhe

    2015-05-01

    With the emergence of many antibiotic-resistant strains worldwide, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are being evaluated as promising alternatives to conventional antibiotics. P3, a novel hemoglobin peptide derived from bovine erythrocytes, exhibited modest antimicrobial activity in vitro. We evaluated the antimicrobial activities of P3 and an analog, JH-3, both in vitro and in vivo. The MICs of P3 and JH-3 ranged from 3.125 μg/ml to 50 μg/ml when a wide spectrum of bacteria was tested, including multidrug-resistant strains. P3 killed bacteria within 30 min by disrupting the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane and disturbing the intracellular calcium balance. Circular dichroism (CD) spectrometry showed that P3 assumed an α-helical conformation in bacterial lipid membranes, which was indispensable for antimicrobial activity. Importantly, the 50% lethal dose (LD50) of JH-3 was 180 mg/kg of mouse body weight after intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection, and no death was observed at any dose up to 240 mg/kg body weight following subcutaneous (s.c.) injection. Furthermore, JH-3 significantly decreased the bacterial count and rescued infected mice in a model of mouse bacteremia. In conclusion, P3 and an analog exhibited potent antimicrobial activities and relatively low toxicities in a mouse model, indicating that they may be useful for treating infections caused by drug-resistant bacteria. PMID:25753638

  15. Ultra-high resolution HLA genotyping and allele discovery by highly multiplexed cDNA amplicon pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background High-resolution HLA genotyping is a critical diagnostic and research assay. Current methods rarely achieve unambiguous high-resolution typing without making population-specific frequency inferences due to a lack of locus coverage and difficulty in exon-phase matching. Achieving high-resolution typing is also becoming more challenging with traditional methods as the database of known HLA alleles increases. Results We designed a cDNA amplicon-based pyrosequencing method to capture 94% of the HLA class I open-reading-frame with only two amplicons per sample, and an analogous method for class II HLA genes, with a primary focus on sequencing the DRB loci. We present a novel Galaxy server-based analysis workflow for determining genotype. During assay validation, we performed two GS Junior sequencing runs to determine the accuracy of the HLA class I amplicons and DRB amplicon at different levels of multiplexing. When 116 amplicons were multiplexed, we unambiguously resolved 99%of class I alleles to four- or six-digit resolution, as well as 100% unambiguous DRB calls. The second experiment, with 271 multiplexed amplicons, missed some alleles, but generated high-resolution, concordant typing for 93% of class I alleles, and 96% for DRB1 alleles. In a third, preliminary experiment we attempted to sequence novel amplicons for other class II loci with mixed success. Conclusions The presented assay is higher-throughput and higher-resolution than existing HLA genotyping methods, and suitable for allele discovery or large cohort sampling. The validated class I and DRB primers successfully generated unambiguously high-resolution genotypes, while further work is needed to validate additional class II genotyping amplicons. PMID:22866951

  16. Impact of Mutation Type and Amplicon Characteristics on Genetic Diversity Measures Generated Using a High-Resolution Melting Diversity Assay

    PubMed Central

    Cousins, Matthew M.; Donnell, Deborah; Eshleman, Susan H.

    2013-01-01

    We adapted high-resolution melting (HRM) technology to measure genetic diversity without sequencing. Diversity is measured as a single numeric HRM score. Herein, we determined the impact of mutation types and amplicon characteristics on HRM diversity scores. Plasmids were generated with single-base changes, insertions, and deletions. Different primer sets were used to vary the position of mutations within amplicons. Plasmids and plasmid mixtures were analyzed to determine the impact of mutation type, position, and concentration on HRM scores. The impact of amplicon length and G/C content on HRM scores was also evaluated. Different mutation types affected HRM scores to varying degrees (1-bp deletion < 1-bp change < 3-bp insertion < 9-bp insertion). The impact of mutations on HRM scores was influenced by amplicon length and the position of the mutation within the amplicon. Mutations were detected at concentrations of 5% to 95%, with the greatest impact at 50%. The G/C content altered melting temperature values of amplicons but had no impact on HRM scores. These data are relevant to the design of assays that measure genetic diversity using HRM technology. PMID:23178437

  17. Display formats manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runnels, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    The standards and procedures for the generation of operational display formats to be used in the Mission Control Center (MCC) display control system are presented. The required effort, forms, and fundamentals for the design, specifications, and production of display formats are identified. The principles of display design and system constraints controlling the creation of optimum operational displays for mission control are explained. The basic two types of MCC display systems for presenting information are described.

  18. Phage display and Shiga toxin neutralizers.

    PubMed

    Bernedo-Navarro, Robert Alvin; Yano, Tomomasa

    2016-04-01

    The current work presents an overview of the use of phage display technology for the identification and characterization of potential neutralizing agents for Shiga toxins. The last major Shiga toxin-associated disease outbreak, which took place in Germany in 2011, showed the international community that Shiga toxins remain a serious threat to public health. This is also demonstrated by the lack of specific therapies against Shiga toxin-induced Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS). Since its inception, phage display technology has played a key role in the development of antigen-specific (poly)-peptides or antibody fragments with specific biological properties. Herein, we review the current literature regarding the application of phage display to identify novel neutralizing agents against Shiga toxins. We also briefly highlight reported discoveries of peptides and heavy chain antibodies (VHH fragments or nanobodies) that can neutralize the cellular damage caused by these potent toxins. PMID:26898657

  19. Clinical impact of targeted amplicon sequencing for meningioma as a practical clinical-sequencing system.

    PubMed

    Yuzawa, Sayaka; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Shigeru; Mohri, Hiromi; Wang, Lei; Kimura, Taichi; Tsuda, Masumi; Tanino, Mishie; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Terasaka, Shunsuke; Houkin, Kiyohiro; Sato, Norihiro; Tanaka, Shinya

    2016-07-01

    Recent genetic analyses using next-generation sequencers have revealed numerous genetic alterations in various tumors including meningioma, which is the most common primary brain tumor. However, their use as routine laboratory examinations in clinical applications for tumor genotyping is not cost effective. To establish a clinical sequencing system for meningioma and investigate the clinical significance of genotype, we retrospectively performed targeted amplicon sequencing on 103 meningiomas and evaluated the association with clinicopathological features. We designed amplicon-sequencing panels targeting eight genes including NF2 (neurofibromin 2), TRAF7, KLF4, AKT1, and SMO. Libraries prepared with genomic DNA extracted from PAXgene-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues of 103 meningioma specimens were sequenced using the Illumina MiSeq. NF2 loss in some cases was also confirmed by interphase-fluorescent in situ hybridization. We identified NF2 loss and/or at least one mutation in NF2, TRAF7, KLF4, AKT1, and SMO in 81 out of 103 cases (79%) by targeted amplicon sequencing. On the basis of genetic status, we categorized meningiomas into three genotype groups: NF2 type, TRAKLS type harboring mutation in TRAF7, AKT1, KLF4, and/or SMO, and 'not otherwise classified' type. Genotype significantly correlated with tumor volume, tumor location, and magnetic resonance imaging findings such as adjacent bone change and heterogeneous gadolinium enhancement, as well as histopathological subtypes. In addition, multivariate analysis revealed that genotype was independently associated with risk of recurrence. In conclusion, we established a rapid clinical sequencing system that enables final confirmation of meningioma genotype within 7 days turnaround time. Our method will bring multiple benefits to neuropathologists and neurosurgeons for accurate diagnosis and appropriate postoperative management. PMID:27102344

  20. The bias associated with amplicon sequencing does not affect the quantitative assessment of bacterial community dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ibarbalz, Federico M; Pérez, María Victoria; Figuerola, Eva L M; Erijman, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    The performance of two sets of primers targeting variable regions of the 16S rRNA gene V1-V3 and V4 was compared in their ability to describe changes of bacterial diversity and temporal turnover in full-scale activated sludge. Duplicate sets of high-throughput amplicon sequencing data of the two 16S rRNA regions shared a collection of core taxa that were observed across a series of twelve monthly samples, although the relative abundance of each taxon was substantially different between regions. A case in point was the changes in the relative abundance of filamentous bacteria Thiothrix, which caused a large effect on diversity indices, but only in the V1-V3 data set. Yet the relative abundance of Thiothrix in the amplicon sequencing data from both regions correlated with the estimation of its abundance determined using fluorescence in situ hybridization. In nonmetric multidimensional analysis samples were distributed along the first ordination axis according to the sequenced region rather than according to sample identities. The dynamics of microbial communities indicated that V1-V3 and the V4 regions of the 16S rRNA gene yielded comparable patterns of: 1) the changes occurring within the communities along fixed time intervals, 2) the slow turnover of activated sludge communities and 3) the rate of species replacement calculated from the taxa-time relationships. The temperature was the only operational variable that showed significant correlation with the composition of bacterial communities over time for the sets of data obtained with both pairs of primers. In conclusion, we show that despite the bias introduced by amplicon sequencing, the variable regions V1-V3 and V4 can be confidently used for the quantitative assessment of bacterial community dynamics, and provide a proper qualitative account of general taxa in the community, especially when the data are obtained over a convenient time window rather than at a single time point. PMID:24923665

  1. Analysis and Visualization Tool for Targeted Amplicon Bisulfite Sequencing on Ion Torrent Sequencers.

    PubMed

    Pabinger, Stephan; Ernst, Karina; Pulverer, Walter; Kallmeyer, Rainer; Valdes, Ana M; Metrustry, Sarah; Katic, Denis; Nuzzo, Angelo; Kriegner, Albert; Vierlinger, Klemens; Weinhaeusel, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Targeted sequencing of PCR amplicons generated from bisulfite deaminated DNA is a flexible, cost-effective way to study methylation of a sample at single CpG resolution and perform subsequent multi-target, multi-sample comparisons. Currently, no platform specific protocol, support, or analysis solution is provided to perform targeted bisulfite sequencing on a Personal Genome Machine (PGM). Here, we present a novel tool, called TABSAT, for analyzing targeted bisulfite sequencing data generated on Ion Torrent sequencers. The workflow starts with raw sequencing data, performs quality assessment, and uses a tailored version of Bismark to map the reads to a reference genome. The pipeline visualizes results as lollipop plots and is able to deduce specific methylation-patterns present in a sample. The obtained profiles are then summarized and compared between samples. In order to assess the performance of the targeted bisulfite sequencing workflow, 48 samples were used to generate 53 different Bisulfite-Sequencing PCR amplicons from each sample, resulting in 2,544 amplicon targets. We obtained a mean coverage of 282X using 1,196,822 aligned reads. Next, we compared the sequencing results of these targets to the methylation level of the corresponding sites on an Illumina 450k methylation chip. The calculated average Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.91 confirms the sequencing results with one of the industry-leading CpG methylation platforms and shows that targeted amplicon bisulfite sequencing provides an accurate and cost-efficient method for DNA methylation studies, e.g., to provide platform-independent confirmation of Illumina Infinium 450k methylation data. TABSAT offers a novel way to analyze data generated by Ion Torrent instruments and can also be used with data from the Illumina MiSeq platform. It can be easily accessed via the Platomics platform, which offers a web-based graphical user interface along with sample and parameter storage. TABSAT is freely

  2. Analysis and Visualization Tool for Targeted Amplicon Bisulfite Sequencing on Ion Torrent Sequencers

    PubMed Central

    Pabinger, Stephan; Ernst, Karina; Pulverer, Walter; Kallmeyer, Rainer; Valdes, Ana M.; Metrustry, Sarah; Katic, Denis; Nuzzo, Angelo; Kriegner, Albert; Vierlinger, Klemens; Weinhaeusel, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Targeted sequencing of PCR amplicons generated from bisulfite deaminated DNA is a flexible, cost-effective way to study methylation of a sample at single CpG resolution and perform subsequent multi-target, multi-sample comparisons. Currently, no platform specific protocol, support, or analysis solution is provided to perform targeted bisulfite sequencing on a Personal Genome Machine (PGM). Here, we present a novel tool, called TABSAT, for analyzing targeted bisulfite sequencing data generated on Ion Torrent sequencers. The workflow starts with raw sequencing data, performs quality assessment, and uses a tailored version of Bismark to map the reads to a reference genome. The pipeline visualizes results as lollipop plots and is able to deduce specific methylation-patterns present in a sample. The obtained profiles are then summarized and compared between samples. In order to assess the performance of the targeted bisulfite sequencing workflow, 48 samples were used to generate 53 different Bisulfite-Sequencing PCR amplicons from each sample, resulting in 2,544 amplicon targets. We obtained a mean coverage of 282X using 1,196,822 aligned reads. Next, we compared the sequencing results of these targets to the methylation level of the corresponding sites on an Illumina 450k methylation chip. The calculated average Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.91 confirms the sequencing results with one of the industry-leading CpG methylation platforms and shows that targeted amplicon bisulfite sequencing provides an accurate and cost-efficient method for DNA methylation studies, e.g., to provide platform-independent confirmation of Illumina Infinium 450k methylation data. TABSAT offers a novel way to analyze data generated by Ion Torrent instruments and can also be used with data from the Illumina MiSeq platform. It can be easily accessed via the Platomics platform, which offers a web-based graphical user interface along with sample and parameter storage. TABSAT is freely

  3. Quick diagnosis of human brain meningitis using omp85 gene amplicon as a genetic marker.

    PubMed

    Dash, Sandip K; Sharma, Minakshi; Khare, Shashi; Kumar, Ashok

    2013-06-01

    The usual diagnosis of life-threatening human brain bacterial meningitis are expensive, time consuming or non-confirmatory. A quick PCR based diagnosis of meningitis in cerebrospinal fluids (CSF) using specific primers of virulent Omp85 gene of Neisseria meningitidis can detect as low as 1.0 ng of genomic DNA (G-DNA) in 80 min for confirmation of bacterial meningitis caused by N. meningitidis infection. The 257 bp amplicon of Omp85 gene does not show homology with other suspected pathogens in CSF and can be used as a specific genetic marker for diagnosis of the disease. PMID:24426115

  4. Parallel tagged amplicon sequencing of relatively long PCR products using the Illumina HiSeq platform and transcriptome assembly.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yan-Jie; Liu, Qing-Feng; Chen, Meng-Yun; Liang, Dan; Zhang, Peng

    2016-01-01

    In phylogenetics and population genetics, a large number of loci are often needed to accurately resolve species relationships. Normally, loci are enriched by PCR and sequenced by Sanger sequencing, which is expensive when the number of amplicons is large. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) techniques are increasingly used for parallel amplicon sequencing, which reduces sequencing costs tremendously, but has not reduced preparation costs very much. Moreover, for most current NGS methods, amplicons need to be purified and quantified before sequencing and their lengths are also restricted (normally <700 bp). Here, we describe an approach to sequence pooled amplicons of any length using the Illumina platform. Using this method, amplicons are pooled at equal volume rather than at equal concentration, thus eliminating the laborious purification and quantification steps. We then shear the pooled amplicons, repair the ends, add sample identifying linkers and pool multiple samples prior to Illumina library preparation. Data are then assembled using the transcriptome assembly program trinity, which is optimized to deal with templates of highly varying quantities. We demonstrated the utility of our approach by recovering 93.5% of the target amplicons (size up to 1650 bp) in full length for a 16 taxa × 101 loci project, using ~2.0 GB of Illumina HiSeq paired-end 90-bp data. Overall, we validate a rapid, cost-effective and scalable approach to sequence a large number of targeted loci from a large number of samples that is particularly suitable for both phylogenetics and population genetics studies that require a modest scale of data. PMID:25959587

  5. Multiple Miniature Avionic Displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rye, Jeffrey M. (Inventor); Dorneich, Michael C. (Inventor); Gannon, Aaron J. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A display screen for displaying multiple sets of information is provided. In one embodiment, an aviation display screen includes a main window and a plurality of miniature windows. The main window is adapted to illustrate one set of information. Each miniature window is adapted to display a set of avionic information. The avionic display is further adapted to toggle a select set of avionic information in one of the miniature windows into the main window.

  6. System status display information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, L. G.; Erickson, J. B.

    1984-01-01

    The system Status Display is an electronic display system which provides the flight crew with enhanced capabilities for monitoring and managing aircraft systems. Guidelines for the design of the electronic system displays were established. The technical approach involved the application of a system engineering approach to the design of candidate displays and the evaluation of a Hernative concepts by part-task simulation. The system engineering and selection of candidate displays are covered.

  7. Biomimetic peptide nanosensors.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yue; Kim, Sang N; Naik, Rajesh R; McAlpine, Michael C

    2012-05-15

    The development of a miniaturized sensing platform tailored for sensitive and selective detection of a variety of biochemical analytes could offer transformative fundamental and technological opportunities. Due to their high surface-to-volume ratios, nanoscale materials are extremely sensitive sensors. Likewise, peptides represent robust substrates for selective recognition due to the potential for broad chemical diversity within their relatively compact size. Here we explore the possibilities of linking peptides to nanosensors for the selective detection of biochemical targets. Such systems raise a number of interesting fundamental challenges: What are the peptide sequences, and how can rational design be used to derive selective binders? What nanomaterials should be used, and what are some strategies for assembling hybrid nanosensors? What role does molecular modeling play in elucidating response mechanisms? What is the resulting performance of these sensors, in terms of sensitivity, selectivity, and response time? What are some potential applications? This Account will highlight our early attempts to address these research challenges. Specifically, we use natural peptide sequences or sequences identified from phage display as capture elements. The sensors are based on a variety of nanomaterials including nanowires, graphene, and carbon nanotubes. We couple peptides to the nanomaterial surfaces via traditional surface functionalization methods or self-assembly. Molecular modeling provides detailed insights into the hybrid nanostructure, as well as the sensor detection mechanisms. The peptide nanosensors can distinguish chemically camouflaged mixtures of vapors and detect chemical warfare agents with sensitivities as low as parts-per-billion levels. Finally, we anticipate future uses of this technology in biomedicine: for example, devices based on these sensors could detect disease from the molecular components in human breath. Overall, these results provide a

  8. Seamless tiled display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubin, Matthew B. (Inventor); Larson, Brent D. (Inventor); Kolosowsky, Aleksandra (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A modular and scalable seamless tiled display apparatus includes multiple display devices, a screen, and multiple lens assemblies. Each display device is subdivided into multiple sections, and each section is configured to display a sectional image. One of the lens assemblies is optically coupled to each of the sections of each of the display devices to project the sectional image displayed on that section onto the screen. The multiple lens assemblies are configured to merge the projected sectional images to form a single tiled image. The projected sectional images may be merged on the screen by magnifying and shifting the images in an appropriate manner. The magnification and shifting of these images eliminates any visual effect on the tiled display that may result from dead-band regions defined between each pair of adjacent sections on each display device, and due to gaps between multiple display devices.

  9. Thin optical display panel

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James Thomas

    1997-01-01

    An optical display includes a plurality of optical waveguides each including a cladding bound core for guiding internal display light between first and second opposite ends by total internal reflection. The waveguides are stacked together to define a collective display thickness. Each of the cores includes a heterogeneous portion defining a light scattering site disposed longitudinally between the first and second ends. Adjacent ones of the sites are longitudinally offset from each other for forming a longitudinal internal image display over the display thickness upon scattering of internal display light thereagainst for generating a display image. In a preferred embodiment, the waveguides and scattering sites are transparent for transmitting therethrough an external image in superposition with the display image formed by scattering the internal light off the scattering sites for defining a heads up display.

  10. Bioinformatic Amplicon Read Processing Strategies Strongly Affect Eukaryotic Diversity and the Taxonomic Composition of Communities

    PubMed Central

    Majaneva, Markus; Hyytiäinen, Kirsi; Varvio, Sirkka Liisa; Nagai, Satoshi; Blomster, Jaanika

    2015-01-01

    Amplicon read sequencing has revolutionized the field of microbial diversity studies. The technique has been developed for bacterial assemblages and has undergone rigorous testing with mock communities. However, due to the great complexity of eukaryotes and the numbers of different rDNA copies, analyzing eukaryotic diversity is more demanding than analyzing bacterial or mock communities, so studies are needed that test the methods of analyses on taxonomically diverse natural communities. In this study, we used 20 samples collected from the Baltic Sea ice, slush and under-ice water to investigate three program packages (UPARSE, mothur and QIIME) and 18 different bioinformatic strategies implemented in them. Our aim was to assess the impact of the initial steps of bioinformatic strategies on the results when analyzing natural eukaryotic communities. We found significant differences among the strategies in resulting read length, number of OTUs and estimates of diversity as well as clear differences in the taxonomic composition of communities. The differences arose mainly because of the variable number of chimeric reads that passed the pre-processing steps. Singleton removal and denoising substantially lowered the number of errors. Our study showed that the initial steps of the bioinformatic amplicon read processing strategies require careful consideration before applying them to eukaryotic communities. PMID:26047335

  11. Photochemical immobilization of anthraquinone conjugated oligonucleotides and PCR amplicons on solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Koch, T; Jacobsen, N; Fensholdt, J; Boas, U; Fenger, M; Jakobsen, M H

    2000-01-01

    Ligand immobilization on solid surfaces is an essential step in fields such as diagnostics, bio sensor manufacturing, and new material sciences in general. In this paper a photochemical approach based on anthraquinone as the chromophore is presented. Photochemical procedures offer special advantages as they are able to generate highly reactive species in an orientation specific manner. As presented here, anthraquinone (AQ) mediated covalent DNA immobilization appears to be superior to currently known procedures. A synthetic procedure providing AQ-phosphoramidites is presented. These reagents facilitate AQ conjugation during routine DNA synthesis, thus enabling the AQ-oligonucleotides to be immobilized in a very convenient and efficient manner. AQ-conjugated PCR primers can be used directly in PCR. When the PCR is performed in solution, the amplicons can be immobilized after the PCR. Moreover, when the primers are immobilized prior to the PCR, a solid-phase PCR can be performed and the amplicons are thus produced directly on the solid support. PMID:10898568

  12. AMPLISAS: a web server for multilocus genotyping using next-generation amplicon sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Alvaro; Herdegen, Magdalena; Migalska, Magdalena; Radwan, Jacek

    2016-03-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies are revolutionizing the fields of biology and medicine as powerful tools for amplicon sequencing (AS). Using combinations of primers and barcodes, it is possible to sequence targeted genomic regions with deep coverage for hundreds, even thousands, of individuals in a single experiment. This is extremely valuable for the genotyping of gene families in which locus-specific primers are often difficult to design, such as the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). The utility of AS is, however, limited by the high intrinsic sequencing error rates of NGS technologies and other sources of error such as polymerase amplification or chimera formation. Correcting these errors requires extensive bioinformatic post-processing of NGS data. Amplicon Sequence Assignment (AMPLISAS) is a tool that performs analysis of AS results in a simple and efficient way, while offering customization options for advanced users. AMPLISAS is designed as a three-step pipeline consisting of (i) read demultiplexing, (ii) unique sequence clustering and (iii) erroneous sequence filtering. Allele sequences and frequencies are retrieved in excel spreadsheet format, making them easy to interpret. AMPLISAS performance has been successfully benchmarked against previously published genotyped MHC data sets obtained with various NGS technologies. PMID:26257385

  13. Multiplex amplicon sequencing for microbe identification in community-based culture collections.

    PubMed

    Armanhi, Jaderson Silveira Leite; de Souza, Rafael Soares Correa; de Araújo, Laura Migliorini; Okura, Vagner Katsumi; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Imperial, Juan; Arruda, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Microbiome analysis using metagenomic sequencing has revealed a vast microbial diversity associated with plants. Identifying the molecular functions associated with microbiome-plant interaction is a significant challenge concerning the development of microbiome-derived technologies applied to agriculture. An alternative to accelerate the discovery of the microbiome benefits to plants is to construct microbial culture collections concomitant with accessing microbial community structure and abundance. However, traditional methods of isolation, cultivation, and identification of microbes are time-consuming and expensive. Here we describe a method for identification of microbes in culture collections constructed by picking colonies from primary platings that may contain single or multiple microorganisms, which we named community-based culture collections (CBC). A multiplexing 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing based on two-step PCR amplifications with tagged primers for plates, rows, and columns allowed the identification of the microbial composition regardless if the well contains single or multiple microorganisms. The multiplexing system enables pooling amplicons into a single tube. The sequencing performed on the PacBio platform led to recovery near-full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences allowing accurate identification of microorganism composition in each plate well. Cross-referencing with plant microbiome structure and abundance allowed the estimation of diversity and abundance representation of microorganism in the CBC. PMID:27404280

  14. Amplicon-based metagenomics identified candidate organisms in soils that caused yield decline in strawberry.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiangming; Passey, Thomas; Wei, Feng; Saville, Robert; Harrison, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    A phenomenon of yield decline due to weak plant growth in strawberry was recently observed in non-chemo-fumigated soils, which was not associated with the soil fungal pathogen Verticillium dahliae, the main target of fumigation. Amplicon-based metagenomics was used to profile soil microbiota in order to identify microbial organisms that may have caused the yield decline. A total of 36 soil samples were obtained in 2013 and 2014 from four sites for metagenomic studies; two of the four sites had a yield-decline problem, the other two did not. More than 2000 fungal or bacterial operational taxonomy units (OTUs) were found in these samples. Relative abundance of individual OTUs was statistically compared for differences between samples from sites with or without yield decline. A total of 721 individual comparisons were statistically significant - involving 366 unique bacterial and 44 unique fungal OTUs. Based on further selection criteria, we focused on 34 bacterial and 17 fungal OTUs and found that yield decline resulted probably from one or more of the following four factors: (1) low abundance of Bacillus and Pseudomonas populations, which are well known for their ability of supressing pathogen development and/or promoting plant growth; (2) lack of the nematophagous fungus (Paecilomyces species); (3) a high level of two non-specific fungal root rot pathogens; and (4) wet soil conditions. This study demonstrated the usefulness of an amplicon-based metagenomics approach to profile soil microbiota and to detect differential abundance in microbes. PMID:26504572

  15. Multiplex amplicon sequencing for microbe identification in community-based culture collections

    PubMed Central

    Armanhi, Jaderson Silveira Leite; de Souza, Rafael Soares Correa; de Araújo, Laura Migliorini; Okura, Vagner Katsumi; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Imperial, Juan; Arruda, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Microbiome analysis using metagenomic sequencing has revealed a vast microbial diversity associated with plants. Identifying the molecular functions associated with microbiome-plant interaction is a significant challenge concerning the development of microbiome-derived technologies applied to agriculture. An alternative to accelerate the discovery of the microbiome benefits to plants is to construct microbial culture collections concomitant with accessing microbial community structure and abundance. However, traditional methods of isolation, cultivation, and identification of microbes are time-consuming and expensive. Here we describe a method for identification of microbes in culture collections constructed by picking colonies from primary platings that may contain single or multiple microorganisms, which we named community-based culture collections (CBC). A multiplexing 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing based on two-step PCR amplifications with tagged primers for plates, rows, and columns allowed the identification of the microbial composition regardless if the well contains single or multiple microorganisms. The multiplexing system enables pooling amplicons into a single tube. The sequencing performed on the PacBio platform led to recovery near-full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences allowing accurate identification of microorganism composition in each plate well. Cross-referencing with plant microbiome structure and abundance allowed the estimation of diversity and abundance representation of microorganism in the CBC. PMID:27404280

  16. Analysis of the microbiome: Advantages of whole genome shotgun versus 16S amplicon sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Ravi; Rani, Asha; Metwally, Ahmed; McGee, Halvor S; Perkins, David L

    2016-01-22

    The human microbiome has emerged as a major player in regulating human health and disease. Translational studies of the microbiome have the potential to indicate clinical applications such as fecal transplants and probiotics. However, one major issue is accurate identification of microbes constituting the microbiota. Studies of the microbiome have frequently utilized sequencing of the conserved 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene. We present a comparative study of an alternative approach using whole genome shotgun sequencing (WGS). In the present study, we analyzed the human fecal microbiome compiling a total of 194.1 × 10(6) reads from a single sample using multiple sequencing methods and platforms. Specifically, after establishing the reproducibility of our methods with extensive multiplexing, we compared: 1) The 16S rRNA amplicon versus the WGS method, 2) the Illumina HiSeq versus MiSeq platforms, 3) the analysis of reads versus de novo assembled contigs, and 4) the effect of shorter versus longer reads. Our study demonstrates that whole genome shotgun sequencing has multiple advantages compared with the 16S amplicon method including enhanced detection of bacterial species, increased detection of diversity and increased prediction of genes. In addition, increased length, either due to longer reads or the assembly of contigs, improved the accuracy of species detection. PMID:26718401

  17. Bioinformatic Amplicon Read Processing Strategies Strongly Affect Eukaryotic Diversity and the Taxonomic Composition of Communities.

    PubMed

    Majaneva, Markus; Hyytiäinen, Kirsi; Varvio, Sirkka Liisa; Nagai, Satoshi; Blomster, Jaanika

    2015-01-01

    Amplicon read sequencing has revolutionized the field of microbial diversity studies. The technique has been developed for bacterial assemblages and has undergone rigorous testing with mock communities. However, due to the great complexity of eukaryotes and the numbers of different rDNA copies, analyzing eukaryotic diversity is more demanding than analyzing bacterial or mock communities, so studies are needed that test the methods of analyses on taxonomically diverse natural communities. In this study, we used 20 samples collected from the Baltic Sea ice, slush and under-ice water to investigate three program packages (UPARSE, mothur and QIIME) and 18 different bioinformatic strategies implemented in them. Our aim was to assess the impact of the initial steps of bioinformatic strategies on the results when analyzing natural eukaryotic communities. We found significant differences among the strategies in resulting read length, number of OTUs and estimates of diversity as well as clear differences in the taxonomic composition of communities. The differences arose mainly because of the variable number of chimeric reads that passed the pre-processing steps. Singleton removal and denoising substantially lowered the number of errors. Our study showed that the initial steps of the bioinformatic amplicon read processing strategies require careful consideration before applying them to eukaryotic communities. PMID:26047335

  18. Application of novel "mini-amplicon" STR multiplexes to high volume casework on degraded skeletal remains.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Thomas J; Huel, Rene; Davoren, Jon; Katzmarzyk, Cheryl; Milos, Ana; Selmanović, Arijana; Smajlović, Lejla; Coble, Michael D; Rizvić, Adnan

    2007-06-01

    The International Commission on Missing Persons (ICMP) conducts high throughput STR profiling on degraded skeletal remains, primarily recovered from mass graves relating to conflicts from 1992 to 1999 in the former Yugoslavia. To date, over 11,000 individuals have been identified through comparison of bone profiles to a large database of profiles from family members of the missing. To increase success rates in STR recovery, three short amplicon STR multiplexes (a 7-plex, a 6-plex, and a 5-plex) have been devised and implemented. These target loci from large commercial multiplexes, with an average decrease in amplicon size of 144 bp. The ICMP "miniplexes" have proven to provide substantially greater recovery of DNA data from a certain subset of difficult samples. However, the circumstances under which miniplexes provide additional data are restricted, and their advantages do not outweigh those of large commercial multiplexes for a majority of cases. The miniplexes, however, also have a very powerful use in DNA testing to support large scale reassociation of commingled, partial skeletons recovered from secondary mass graves. PMID:19083751

  19. Amplicon-based metagenomics identified candidate organisms in soils that caused yield decline in strawberry

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiangming; Passey, Thomas; Wei, Feng; Saville, Robert; Harrison, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    A phenomenon of yield decline due to weak plant growth in strawberry was recently observed in non-chemo-fumigated soils, which was not associated with the soil fungal pathogen Verticillium dahliae, the main target of fumigation. Amplicon-based metagenomics was used to profile soil microbiota in order to identify microbial organisms that may have caused the yield decline. A total of 36 soil samples were obtained in 2013 and 2014 from four sites for metagenomic studies; two of the four sites had a yield-decline problem, the other two did not. More than 2000 fungal or bacterial operational taxonomy units (OTUs) were found in these samples. Relative abundance of individual OTUs was statistically compared for differences between samples from sites with or without yield decline. A total of 721 individual comparisons were statistically significant – involving 366 unique bacterial and 44 unique fungal OTUs. Based on further selection criteria, we focused on 34 bacterial and 17 fungal OTUs and found that yield decline resulted probably from one or more of the following four factors: (1) low abundance of Bacillus and Pseudomonas populations, which are well known for their ability of supressing pathogen development and/or promoting plant growth; (2) lack of the nematophagous fungus (Paecilomyces species); (3) a high level of two non-specific fungal root rot pathogens; and (4) wet soil conditions. This study demonstrated the usefulness of an amplicon-based metagenomics approach to profile soil microbiota and to detect differential abundance in microbes. PMID:26504572

  20. ICO amplicon NGS data analysis: a Web tool for variant detection in common high-risk hereditary cancer genes analyzed by amplicon GS Junior next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Doriga, Adriana; Feliubadaló, Lídia; Menéndez, Mireia; Lopez-Doriga, Sergio; Morón-Duran, Francisco D; del Valle, Jesús; Tornero, Eva; Montes, Eva; Cuesta, Raquel; Campos, Olga; Gómez, Carolina; Pineda, Marta; González, Sara; Moreno, Victor; Capellá, Gabriel; Lázaro, Conxi

    2014-03-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has revolutionized genomic research and is set to have a major impact on genetic diagnostics thanks to the advent of benchtop sequencers and flexible kits for targeted libraries. Among the main hurdles in NGS are the difficulty of performing bioinformatic analysis of the huge volume of data generated and the high number of false positive calls that could be obtained, depending on the NGS technology and the analysis pipeline. Here, we present the development of a free and user-friendly Web data analysis tool that detects and filters sequence variants, provides coverage information, and allows the user to customize some basic parameters. The tool has been developed to provide accurate genetic analysis of targeted sequencing of common high-risk hereditary cancer genes using amplicon libraries run in a GS Junior System. The Web resource is linked to our own mutation database, to assist in the clinical classification of identified variants. We believe that this tool will greatly facilitate the use of the NGS approach in routine laboratories. PMID:24227591

  1. Peptide identification

    DOEpatents

    Jarman, Kristin H [Richland, WA; Cannon, William R [Richland, WA; Jarman, Kenneth D [Richland, WA; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro [Richland, WA

    2011-07-12

    Peptides are identified from a list of candidates using collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry data. A probabilistic model for the occurrence of spectral peaks corresponding to frequently observed partial peptide fragment ions is applied. As part of the identification procedure, a probability score is produced that indicates the likelihood of any given candidate being the correct match. The statistical significance of the score is known without necessarily having reference to the actual identity of the peptide. In one form of the invention, a genetic algorithm is applied to candidate peptides using an objective function that takes into account the number of shifted peaks appearing in the candidate spectrum relative to the test spectrum.

  2. Advances in synthetic peptides reagent discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Bryn L.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Finch, Amethist S.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.

    2013-05-01

    Bacterial display technology offers a number of advantages over competing display technologies (e.g, phage) for the rapid discovery and development of peptides with interaction targeted to materials ranging from biological hazards through inorganic metals. We have previously shown that discovery of synthetic peptide reagents utilizing bacterial display technology is relatively simple and rapid to make laboratory automation possible. This included extensive study of the protective antigen system of Bacillus anthracis, including development of discovery, characterization, and computational biology capabilities for in-silico optimization. Although the benefits towards CBD goals are evident, the impact is far-reaching due to our ability to understand and harness peptide interactions that are ultimately extendable to the hybrid biomaterials of the future. In this paper, we describe advances in peptide discovery including, new target systems (e.g. non-biological materials), advanced library development and clone analysis including integrated reporting.

  3. Screens and Displays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edstrom, Malin

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the characteristics of different computer screen technologies including the possible harmful effects on health of cathode ray tube (CRT) terminals. CRT's are compared to other technologies including liquid crystal displays, plasma displays, electroluminiscence displays, and light emitting diodes. A chart comparing the different…

  4. XVD Image Display Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deen, Robert G.; Andres, Paul M.; Mortensen, Helen B.; Parizher, Vadim; McAuley, Myche; Bartholomew, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The XVD [X-Windows VICAR (video image communication and retrieval) Display] computer program offers an interactive display of VICAR and PDS (planetary data systems) images. It is designed to efficiently display multiple-GB images and runs on Solaris, Linux, or Mac OS X systems using X-Windows.

  5. Herpes simplex virus amplicon: effect of size on replication of constructed defective genomes containing eucaryotic DNA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, A D; Frenkel, N

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies (R. R. Spaete and N. Frenkel, Cell 30:295-304, 1982) have documented the potential use of defective virus vectors (amplicons) derived from herpes simplex virus for the efficient introduction of foreign DNA sequences into eucaryotic cells. Specifically, cotransfection of cells with helper virus DNA and cloned amplicons (8 to 10 kilobases [kb]) containing bacterial plasmid DNA sequences linked to a set of herpes simplex virus cis-acting propagation signals (a replication origin and a cleavage-packaging signal) resulted in the generation of virus stocks containing packaged defective genomes that consisted of uniform head-to-tail reiterations of the chimeric seed amplicon sequences. The chimeric defective genomes could be stably propagated in virus stocks and could thus be used to efficiently infect cells. We now report on additional studies designed to propagate relatively large sets of eucaryotic DNA sequences within chimeric packaged defective genomes. These studies have utilized a 12-kb chicken DNA sequence encoding the chicken ovalbumin gene and cloned by Lai et al. (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77:244-248, 1980) in the plasmid pOV12. Virus stocks derived from cells cotransfected with helper virus DNA and chimeric amplicons (overall size of 19.8 kb, of which 12 kb corresponded to the chicken DNA) contained defective genomes composed of reiterations of the 19.8-kb seed amplicon sequences. However, in addition to the authentically sized repeat units, defective genomes in the derivative virus stocks contained smaller repeat units representing deleted versions of the seed 19.8-kb amplicons. The recombinational events leading to the formation of deleted repeats did not appear to occur at unique sites, as shown by comparative analyses of multiple, independently generated virus series propagated from separate transfections. In contast, seed amplicons ranging in size from 11 to 15 kb and containing subsets of the 12-kb chicken DNA sequences replicated

  6. The Bias Associated with Amplicon Sequencing Does Not Affect the Quantitative Assessment of Bacterial Community Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Figuerola, Eva L. M.; Erijman, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    The performance of two sets of primers targeting variable regions of the 16S rRNA gene V1–V3 and V4 was compared in their ability to describe changes of bacterial diversity and temporal turnover in full-scale activated sludge. Duplicate sets of high-throughput amplicon sequencing data of the two 16S rRNA regions shared a collection of core taxa that were observed across a series of twelve monthly samples, although the relative abundance of each taxon was substantially different between regions. A case in point was the changes in the relative abundance of filamentous bacteria Thiothrix, which caused a large effect on diversity indices, but only in the V1–V3 data set. Yet the relative abundance of Thiothrix in the amplicon sequencing data from both regions correlated with the estimation of its abundance determined using fluorescence in situ hybridization. In nonmetric multidimensional analysis samples were distributed along the first ordination axis according to the sequenced region rather than according to sample identities. The dynamics of microbial communities indicated that V1–V3 and the V4 regions of the 16S rRNA gene yielded comparable patterns of: 1) the changes occurring within the communities along fixed time intervals, 2) the slow turnover of activated sludge communities and 3) the rate of species replacement calculated from the taxa–time relationships. The temperature was the only operational variable that showed significant correlation with the composition of bacterial communities over time for the sets of data obtained with both pairs of primers. In conclusion, we show that despite the bias introduced by amplicon sequencing, the variable regions V1–V3 and V4 can be confidently used for the quantitative assessment of bacterial community dynamics, and provide a proper qualitative account of general taxa in the community, especially when the data are obtained over a convenient time window rather than at a single time point. PMID:24923665

  7. Evaluating Peripheral Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Tara; Hsieh, Gary; Mankoff, Jennifer

    Although peripheral displays have been a domain of inquiry for over a decade now, evaluation criteria and techniques for this area are still being created. Peripheral display evaluation is an acknowledged challenge in a field setting. This chapter first describes models and methods that have been tailored specifically to evaluating peripheral displays (measuring how well they achieve their goals). Then, we present evaluation criteria used in past evaluations of peripheral displays, ranging from issues such as learnability to distraction. After explaining how these criteria have been assessed in the past, we present a case study evaluation of two e-mail peripheral displays that demonstrates the pros and cons of various evaluation techniques.

  8. Interaction Analysis through Proteomic Phage Display

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Phage display is a powerful technique for profiling specificities of peptide binding domains. The method is suited for the identification of high-affinity ligands with inhibitor potential when using highly diverse combinatorial peptide phage libraries. Such experiments further provide consensus motifs for genome-wide scanning of ligands of potential biological relevance. A complementary but considerably less explored approach is to display expression products of genomic DNA, cDNA, open reading frames (ORFs), or oligonucleotide libraries designed to encode defined regions of a target proteome on phage particles. One of the main applications of such proteomic libraries has been the elucidation of antibody epitopes. This review is focused on the use of proteomic phage display to uncover protein-protein interactions of potential relevance for cellular function. The method is particularly suited for the discovery of interactions between peptide binding domains and their targets. We discuss the largely unexplored potential of this method in the discovery of domain-motif interactions of potential biological relevance. PMID:25295249

  9. Interaction analysis through proteomic phage display.

    PubMed

    Sundell, Gustav N; Ivarsson, Ylva

    2014-01-01

    Phage display is a powerful technique for profiling specificities of peptide binding domains. The method is suited for the identification of high-affinity ligands with inhibitor potential when using highly diverse combinatorial peptide phage libraries. Such experiments further provide consensus motifs for genome-wide scanning of ligands of potential biological relevance. A complementary but considerably less explored approach is to display expression products of genomic DNA, cDNA, open reading frames (ORFs), or oligonucleotide libraries designed to encode defined regions of a target proteome on phage particles. One of the main applications of such proteomic libraries has been the elucidation of antibody epitopes. This review is focused on the use of proteomic phage display to uncover protein-protein interactions of potential relevance for cellular function. The method is particularly suited for the discovery of interactions between peptide binding domains and their targets. We discuss the largely unexplored potential of this method in the discovery of domain-motif interactions of potential biological relevance. PMID:25295249

  10. Development of a candidate influenza vaccine based on virus-like particles displaying influenza M2e peptide into the immunodominant region of hepatitis B core antigen: Broad protective efficacy of particles carrying four copies of M2e.

    PubMed

    Tsybalova, Liudmila M; Stepanova, Liudmila A; Kuprianov, Victor V; Blokhina, Elena A; Potapchuk, Marina V; Korotkov, Alexander V; Gorshkov, Andrey N; Kasyanenko, Marina A; Ravin, Nikolai V; Kiselev, Oleg I

    2015-06-26

    A long-term objective when designing influenza vaccines is to create one with broad cross-reactivity that will provide effective control over influenza, no matter which strain has caused the disease. Here we summarize the results from an investigation into the immunogenic and protective capacities inherent in variations of a recombinant protein, HBc/4M2e. This protein contains four copies of the ectodomain from the influenza virus protein M2 (M2e) fused within the immunodominant loop of the hepatitis B virus core antigen (HBc). Variations of this basic design include preparations containing M2e from the consensus human influenza virus; the M2e from the highly pathogenic avian A/H5N1 virus and a combination of two copies from human and two copies from avian influenza viruses. Intramuscular delivery in mice with preparations containing four identical copies of M2e induced high IgG titers in blood sera and bronchoalveolar lavages. It also provoked the formation of memory T-cells and antibodies were retained in the blood sera for a significant period of time post immunization. Furthermore, these preparations prevented the death of 75-100% of animals, which were challenged with lethal doses of virus. This resulted in a 1.2-3.5 log10 decrease in viral replication within the lungs. Moreover, HBc particles carrying only "human" or "avian" M2e displayed cross-reactivity in relation to human (A/H1N1, A/H2N2 and A/H3N2) or A/H5N1 and A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses, respectively; however, with the particles carrying both "human" and "avian" M2e this effect was much weaker, especially in relation to influenza virus A/H5N1. It is apparent from this work that to quickly produce vaccine for a pandemic it would be necessary to have several variations of a recombinant protein, containing four copies of M2e (each one against a group of likely influenza virus strains) with these relevant constructs housed within a comprehensive collection Escherichia coli-producers and maintained ready for use