Science.gov

Sample records for amplifier control curve

  1. Efficient Power Amplifier for Motor Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    Pulse-width-modulated amplifier supplies high current as efficiently as low current needed for starting and running motor. Key to efficiency of motor-control amplifier is V-channel metal-oxide/semiconductor transistor Q1. Device has low saturation resistance. However, has large gate input capacitance and small margin between its turn-on voltage and maximum allowable gate-to-source voltage. Circuits for output stages overcome limitations of VMOS device.

  2. Magnetic Amplifier for Power Flow Control

    SciTech Connect

    2012-02-24

    GENI Project: ORNL is developing an electromagnet-based, amplifier-like device that will allow for complete control over the flow of power within the electric grid. To date, complete control of power flow within the grid has been prohibitively expensive. ORNL’s controller could provide a reliable, cost-effective solution to this problem. The team is combining two types of pre-existing technologies to assist in flow control, culminating in a prototype iron-based magnetic amplifier. Ordinarily, such a device would require expensive superconductive wire, but the magnetic iron core of ORNL’s device could serve as a low-cost alternative that is equally adept at regulating power flow.

  3. Control of oscillator and amplifier flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Peter

    2012-11-01

    Flow control aims at the targeted manipulation of inherent flow behavior and is a critical component in efforts to delay instabilities, reduce drag, decrease receptivities or extend the operational parameter range of a fluid device. The design of flow control strategies relies on a model for the fluid system but also a model for the noise environment. For flows that are insensitive to external noise (oscillator flows), effective control strategies have been designed with considerable success; for flows that respond sensitively to environmental noise (amplifier flows), however, the design of effective control schemes is far more challenging, as it crucially depends on the quality of the noise model. We will present and discuss the critical steps in the design of flow control schemes for both types of flow behavior and compare and contrast a model based and data-based approach. This presentation summarizes joint work with Denis Sipp (ONERA-DAFE) and various doctoral students.

  4. Ultrafast amplifier additive timing jitter characterization and control.

    PubMed

    Casanova, Alexis; D'Acremont, Quentin; Santarelli, Giorgio; Dilhaire, Stefan; Courjaud, Antoine

    2016-03-01

    We report on the characterization and long-term compensation of additive timing jitter introduced by a femtosecond ytterbium regenerative amplifier with a 100 kHz repetition rate. A balanced optical cross-correlation technique is used to generate a jitter error signal. This approach is well suited to characterize the additive timing jitter of Yb amplifiers seeded by narrow spectrum Yb oscillators. The balanced optical cross-correlator is in a noncollinear configuration allowing a background free coindence detection. This setup enables the measurement of additive timing jitter from the amplifier, with a noise floor of 300 as integrated from 10 Hz to 10 kHz. The measured additive timing jitter level is about 5 fs, integrated from 0.1 Hz to 10 kHz. The amplifier timing drift characterization and control are performed for more than an hour. PMID:26974074

  5. Interferometric control of parametrically amplified waveforms

    SciTech Connect

    Khadka, Utsab; Xiao Min; Zheng Huaibin

    2011-10-15

    Using atomic coherence, four-wave-mixing radiation is generated between the excited states of a ladder-type configuration in rubidium atomic vapor. By using all-optical phase control between the two frequency-swept driving beams connecting the two lower levels, the generated signal is phase modulated across its bandwidth. When homodyned with a local oscillator, such phase control looks promising for applications including waveform shaping and high-resolution metrology. Experimental observations of signal line shape symmetrization, linewidth narrowing, and bandwidth switching are demonstrated.

  6. Curve Squeal of Train Wheels, Part 3: Active Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HECKL, MARIA A.; HUANG, X. Y.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a new method to annul the squeal noise that is produced by trains traversing a curve. The method is a special form of active control, applied to suppress the bending oscillations of a squealing wheel. It is essentially a feedback system with the following components: sensor, narrowband filter, phase-shifter, amplifier and actuator. The control signal driving the actuator has only a single frequency (set at the filter), and that frequency typically corresponds to one of the bending modes of the wheel. Two versions of the feedback system are considered. In the first version, the actuator exerts a control force on the wheel, and in the second version, the actuator imposes a velocity on the rail. A mathematical model is presented and predictions are made for the performance of both versions. The coupling of the different wheel modes by the control system is discussed. A model rig is described which was used for a practical demonstration of this form of active control. Differences from more conventional forms of active control are pointed out.

  7. Magnetic Amplifier-Based Power-Flow Controller

    SciTech Connect

    Dimitrovski, Aleksandar; Li, Zhi; Ozpineci, Burak

    2015-02-05

    The concept of the magnetic amplifier, a common electromagnetic device in electronic applications in the past, has seldom been used in power systems. In this paper, we introduce the magnetic amplifier-based power-flow controller (MAPFC), an innovative low-cost device that adopts the idea of the magnetic amplifier for power-flow control applications. The uniqueness of MAPFC is in the use of the magnetization of the ferromagnetic core, shared by an ac and a dc winding, as the medium to control the ac winding reactance inserted in series with the transmission line to be controlled. Large power flow in the line can be regulated by the small dc input to the dc winding. Moreover, a project on the R&D of an MAPFC has been funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the University of Tennessee-Knoxville, and Waukesha Electric Systems, Inc. since early 2012. Findings from the project are presented along with some results obtained in a laboratory environment.

  8. Magnetic Amplifier-Based Power-Flow Controller

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dimitrovski, Aleksandar; Li, Zhi; Ozpineci, Burak

    2015-02-05

    The concept of the magnetic amplifier, a common electromagnetic device in electronic applications in the past, has seldom been used in power systems. In this paper, we introduce the magnetic amplifier-based power-flow controller (MAPFC), an innovative low-cost device that adopts the idea of the magnetic amplifier for power-flow control applications. The uniqueness of MAPFC is in the use of the magnetization of the ferromagnetic core, shared by an ac and a dc winding, as the medium to control the ac winding reactance inserted in series with the transmission line to be controlled. Large power flow in the line can bemore » regulated by the small dc input to the dc winding. Moreover, a project on the R&D of an MAPFC has been funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the University of Tennessee-Knoxville, and Waukesha Electric Systems, Inc. since early 2012. Findings from the project are presented along with some results obtained in a laboratory environment.« less

  9. Web-controlled optical amplifier for educational purpose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capmas, Frederic; Boffety, Matthieu; Calixte, Laurent; Druart, Guillaume; Avignon, Thierry; Dubreuil, Nicolas; Bondiou, Marc

    2005-10-01

    We describe an experiment that allows distant users to perform a labwork using Erbium Doped Fiber Amplifier (EDFA) in order to understand the basics physics and engineering involved. The EDFA and the measurement instrumentation are specially designed so as to allow for remote control through the web. The purpose of the project can then be distant learning for students from developing countries which cannot afford this kind of high-cost equipment.

  10. Photonic lantern adaptive spatial mode control in LMA fiber amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Juan; Aleshire, Chris; Hwang, Christopher; Fontaine, Nicolas K; Velázquez-Benítez, Amado; Martz, Dale H; Fan, T Y; Ripin, Dan

    2016-02-22

    We demonstrate adaptive-spatial mode control (ASMC) in few-moded double-clad large mode area (LMA) fiber amplifiers by using an all-fiber-based photonic lantern. Three single-mode fiber inputs are used to adaptively inject the appropriate superposition of input modes in a multimode gain fiber to achieve the desired mode at the output. By actively adjusting the relative phase of the single-mode inputs, near-unity coherent combination resulting in a single fundamental mode at the output is achieved. PMID:26906999

  11. Locally Controlled Deeply Saturated Fiber Optic Parametric Amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissim, Ron Reuven

    A new class of highly efficient Optical Parametric Amplifiers (OPA) is explored in this dissertation, which have the potential to reduce the power requirement on the pump and enable new functionalities. This originates from the simple notion that figure of merit (FoM) of an OPA is proportional to the product of the pump power and amplifier's length and nonlinearity. Silica fibers have been developed for over five decades and offer unparalleled transparency. By merely extending the fiber, i.e. the amplifier's length, a high FoM amplifier can be formed while keeping the pump at a moderate, sub-Watt power level. Unfortunately, optical fibers are inherently non-uniform. Their core size fluctuates along the fiber on a nanometer scale which is on the order of the fiber's molecular constituents. It is currently established that the performance of a fiber-based OPA (FOPA) is dictated by its stochastic nature. In fact, given a moderate pump power level, the highly efficient OPA will be required to maintain a strict phase matching condition across hundreds of meters. Facing this challenge, this dissertation focuses on a locally-controlled, high FoM FOPA. A high FoM FOPA operates in the deeply saturated regime in which a weak signal saturates the amplifier and depletes the pump power, effectively generating an inverse response of the pump output power to the signal input power. Given FOPAs' inhomogeneous nature, the performance limit of deeply saturated FOPAs is studied. So far, FOPAs have been commonly treated as a uniform entity; however, this study discovers unique features of the system which originate from and are strongly influenced by the fiber's inhomogeneous nature. One major example is the non-reciprocal response of deeply saturated FOPAs. It was found that deeply saturated FOPAs perform very highly, as the pump can respond to a rapidly varying (sub-THz) weak (sub-muW) signal. This is a novel method which obtained orders of magnitude improvement over current

  12. Narrow linewidth laterally coupled 1.55 μm AlGaInAs/InP distributed feedback lasers integrated with a curved tapered semiconductor optical amplifier.

    PubMed

    Hou, Lianping; Haji, Mohsin; Akbar, Jehan; Marsh, John H

    2012-11-01

    We present a laterally coupled 1.55 μm AlGaInAs/InP distributed feedback laser monolithically integrated with a curved tapered optical amplifier, providing an output power of 210 mW with single transverse and longitudinal mode operation exhibiting a record low linewidth of 64 kHz. PMID:23114351

  13. Electric sail control mode for amplified transverse thrust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toivanen, P.; Janhunen, P.; Envall, J.

    2015-01-01

    The electric solar wind sail produces thrust by centrifugally spanned high voltage tethers interacting with the solar wind protons. The sail attitude can be controlled and attitude maneuvers are possible by tether voltage modulation synchronous with the sail rotation. Especially, the sail can be inclined with respect to the solar wind direction to obtain transverse thrust to change the osculating orbit angular momentum. Such an inclination has to be maintained by a continual control voltage modulation. Consequently, the tether voltage available for the thrust is less than the maximum voltage provided by the power system. Using a spherical pendulum as a model for a single rotating tether, we derive analytical estimations for the control efficiency for two separate sail control modes. One is a continuous control modulation that corresponds to strictly planar tether tip motion. The other is an on-off modulation with the tether tip moving along a closed loop on a saddle surface. The novel on-off mode is introduced here to both amplify the transverse thrust and reduce the power consumption. During the rotation cycle, the maximum voltage is applied to the tether only over two thrusting arcs when most of the transverse thrust is produced. In addition to the transverse thrust, we obtain the thrusting angle and electric power consumption for the two control modes. It is concluded that while the thrusting angle is about half of the sail inclination for the continuous modulation it approximately equals to the inclination angle for the on-off modulation. The efficiency of the on-off mode is emphasized when power consumption is considered, and the on-off mode can be used to improve the propulsive acceleration through the reduced power system mass.

  14. Convex hulls of a curve in control theory

    SciTech Connect

    Kurbatskii, Aleksei N

    2012-03-31

    A classification is obtained for typical singularities of the local transitivity sets of control systems on three-dimensional manifolds with nonconvex indicatrices that are closed smooth spatial curves. Bibliography: 8 titles.

  15. Two stage dual gate MESFET monolithic gain control amplifier for Ka-band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolov, V.; Geddes, J.; Contolatis, A.

    1987-01-01

    A monolithic two stage gain control amplifier has been developed using submicron gate length dual gate MESFETs fabricated on ion implanted material. The amplifier has a gain of 12 dB at 30 GHz with a gain control range of over 30 dB. This ion implanted monolithic IC is readily integrable with other phased array receiver functions such as low noise amplifiers and phase shifters.

  16. Use of a photonic crystal for optical amplifier gain control

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Shawn-Yu; Fleming, James G.; El-Kady, Ihab

    2006-07-18

    An optical amplifier having a uniform gain profile uses a photonic crystal to tune the density-of-states of a gain medium so as to modify the light emission rate between atomic states. The density-of-states of the gain medium is tuned by selecting the size, shape, dielectric constant, and spacing of a plurality of microcavity defects in the photonic crystal. The optical amplifier is particularly useful for the regeneration of DWDM signals in long optical fibers.

  17. Addressing institutional amplifiers in the dynamics and control of tuberculosis epidemics.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sanjay; Stuckler, David; McKee, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis outbreaks originating in prisons, mines, or hospital wards can spread to the larger community. Recent proposals have targeted these high-transmission institutional amplifiers by improving case detection, treatment, or reducing the size of the exposed population. However, what effects these alternative proposals may have is unclear. We mathematically modeled these control strategies and found case detection and treatment methods insufficient in addressing epidemics involving common types of institutional amplifiers. Movement of persons in and out of amplifiers fundamentally altered the transmission dynamics of tuberculosis in a manner not effectively mitigated by detection or treatment alone. Policies increasing the population size exposed to amplifiers or the per-person duration of exposure within amplifiers potentially worsened incidence, even in settings with high rates of detection and treatment success. However, reducing the total population size entering institutional amplifiers significantly lowered tuberculosis incidence and the risk of propagating new drug-resistant tuberculosis strains. PMID:21212197

  18. Active control of compressible flows on a curved surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, L.; Parikh, P.; Bayliss, A.; Turkel, E.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of localized, time periodic surface heating and cooling over a curved surface is studied. This is a mechanism for the active control of unstable disturbances by phase cancellation and reinforcement. It is shown that the pressure gradient induced by the curvature significantly enhances the effectiveness of this form of active control. In particular, by appropriate choice of phase, active surface heating can completely stabilize and unstable wave.

  19. One long and two short pumping pulses control for plasma x-ray amplifier optimization.

    PubMed

    Cojocaru, Gabriel V; Ungureanu, Razvan G; Banici, Romeo A; Ursescu, Daniel; Guilbaud, Olivier; Delmas, Olivier; Le Marec, Andrea; Neveu, Olivier; Demailly, Julien; Pittman, Moana; Kazamias, Sophie; Daboussi, Sameh; Cassou, Kevin; Li, Lu; Klisnick, Annie; Zeitoun, Phillipe; Ros, David

    2016-06-27

    Development of efficient soft x-ray laser plasma amplifiers adapted to seeded operation, requires a better control over amplifier transverse spatial extent, brilliance control and gain lifetime. Here it is shown that pumping the plasma amplifier with one long and two short pump pulses (1L2S) provides advantages in terms of control for the specified parameters in the case of Ni-like Ag x-ray laser. Also, significant tunability of the gain lifetime in the 1L2S pumping scheme for Ne-like Ti x-ray laser is observed. Direct harmonics seeding and chirped harmonics seeding amplification approaches may benefit from the control of the gain lifetime, in terms of better use of the pump energy and as a way to reduce the amplified spontaneous emission in x-ray lasers. PMID:27410582

  20. Robust identification of backbone curves using control-based continuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renson, L.; Gonzalez-Buelga, A.; Barton, D. A. W.; Neild, S. A.

    2016-04-01

    Control-based continuation is a recently developed approach for testing nonlinear dynamic systems in a controlled manner and exploring their dynamic features as system parameters are varied. In this paper, control-based continuation is adapted to follow the locus where system response and excitation are in quadrature, extracting the backbone curve of the underlying conservative system. The method is applied to a single-degree-of-freedom oscillator under base excitation, and the results are compared with the standard resonant-decay method.

  1. Amplifier Distortion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeports, David

    2006-12-01

    By definition, a high fidelity amplifier's instantaneous output voltage is directly proportional to its instantaneous input voltage. While high fidelity is generally valued in the amplification of recorded music, nonlinearity, also known as distortion, is desirable in the amplification of some musical instruments. In particular, guitar amplifiers exploit nonlinearity to increase both the harmonic content and sustain of a guitar's sound. I will discuss how both modifications in sound result from saturation of triode tubes and transistors. Additionally, I will describe the difference in the symmetry of saturation curves for transistors and tubes and the reason why tube guitar amplifiers are generally considered to be superior to solid-state amplifiers. Finally, I will discuss attempts to use solid-state electronics to replicate the sound of tube amplifiers.

  2. Automatic meshing of curved three-dimensional domains: Curving finite elements and curvature-based mesh control

    SciTech Connect

    Shephard, M.S.; Dey, S.; Georges, M.K.

    1995-12-31

    Specific issues associated with the automatic generation of finite element meshes for curved geometric domains axe considered. A review of the definition of when a triangulation is a valid mesh, a geometric triangulation, for curved geometric domains is given. Consideration is then given to the additional operations necessary to maintain the validity of a mesh when curved finite elements are employed. A procedure to control the mesh gradations based on the curvature of the geometric model faces is also given.

  3. Gain spectrum self controlling device and algorithm for mutiply pumped Raman amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jia Ying

    2004-05-01

    For both forward- and backward-pumped Raman amplifiers, devices to perform gain-spectrum self-control of multi-laser pumps are depicted in this paper. The algorithm supporting the devices is presented also. The function of automatic control is suitable for on-line maintenance of WDM equipment.

  4. The power stability of a fiber amplifier based on a multifunction card and PID control program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Linjie; Yang, Wenguang; Zhang, Hao; Zhao, JianMing; Jia, Suotang

    2016-06-01

    The power stability of a fiber amplifier was significantly improved by means of simultaneously controlling the current of a fiber amplifier and the diffraction efficiency of an acousto-optical modulator. The real-time fluctuation of laser power was recorded by a multifunction card and processed by a proportional–integral–derivative (PID) control program. The feedback loop voltage was introduced to the fiber laser amplifier and acoustic-optic modulator through the analog output of the multifunction card. The control method based on a multifunction card and PID program has good scalability, flexibility and reliability for the complex system on the condition in which the frequency and power of the laser need to be precisely stabilized.

  5. Controllable Curved Mirrors Made from Single-Layer EAP Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart

    2004-01-01

    A document proposes that lightweight, deployable, large-aperture, controllable curved mirrors made of reflectively coated thin electroactive-polymer (EAP) films be developed for use in spaceborne microwave and optical systems. In these mirrors, the EAP films would serve as both structures and actuators. EAPs that are potentially suitable for such use include piezoelectric, electrostrictive, ferroelectric, and dielectric polymers. These materials exhibit strains proportional to the squares of applied electric fields. Utilizing this phenomenon, a curved mirror according to the proposal could be made from a flat film, upon which a nonuniform electrostatic potential (decreasing from the center toward the edge) would be imposed to obtain a required curvature. The effect would be analogous to that of an old-fashioned metalworking practice in which a flat metal sheet is made into a bowl by hammering it repeatedly, the frequency of hammer blows decreasing with distance from the center. In operation, the nonuniform electrostatic potential could be imposed by use of an electron gun. Calculations have shown that by use of a single- layer film made of a currently available EAP, it would be possible to control the focal length of a 2-m-diameter mirror from infinity to 1.25 m.

  6. Time Difference Amplifier with Robust Gain Using Closed-Loop Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakura, Toru; Mandai, Shingo; Ikeda, Makoto; Asada, Kunihiro

    This paper presents a Time Difference Amplifier (TDA) that amplifies the input time difference into the output time difference. Cross coupled chains of variable delay cells with the same number of stages are applicable for TDA, and the gain is adjusted via the closed-loop control. The TDA was fabricated using 65nm CMOS and the measurement results show that the time difference gain is 4.78 at a nominal power supply while the designed gain is 4.0. The gain is stable enough to be less than 1.4% gain shift under ±10% power supply voltage fluctuation.

  7. Critical-Dimension Controllability of Chemically Amplified Resists for X-Ray Membrane Mask Fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezaki, Mizunori; Nakayama, Yoshinori; Kikuchi, Yukiko; Tsuboi, Shinji; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Aoyama, Hajime; Matsui, Yasuji; Morosawa, Tetsuo; Ohki, Shigehisa; Saito, Kenichi; Matsuda, Tadahito

    2000-12-01

    The key issues in highly precise X-ray mask fabrication are the high-performance electron beam writer and the mask process on a thin membrane. By the combination of 100 kV electron beam system EB-X3 and highly sensitive chemically amplified resist, the high resolution and the excellent critical-dimension (CD) uniformity of 50-100 nm line-and-space and isolated-space features were obtained with no proximity correction. Temperature uniformity of various hot plate bakers during the post-exposure bake process and CD controllability of pattern size with chemically amplified resists were studied and the 3σ variation of pattern size written in a membrane using chemically amplified resists was reduced to less than 10 nm with an optimized hot plate baker. As a result, the e-beam sensitivity and writing time for 4G-bit level ULSI patterns of chemically amplified resist were reduced to less than half of those with conventional ZEP-520 resist, while the resolution capability and CD accuracy of the membrane mask with chemically amplified resist UV6-SL were almost equal to those with ZEP-520.

  8. Controlling the 1 μm spontaneous emission in Er/Yb co-doped fiber amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Sobon, Grzegorz; Kaczmarek, Pawel; Antonczak, Arkadiusz; Sotor, Jaroslaw; Abramski, Krzysztof M

    2011-09-26

    In this paper we present our experimental studies on controlling the amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) from Yb(3+) ions in Er/Yb co-doped fiber amplifiers. We propose a new method of controlling the Yb-ASE by stimulating a laser emission at 1064 nm in the amplifier, by providing a positive 1 μm signal feedback loop. The results are discussed and compared to a conventional amplifier setup without 1 μm ASE control and to an amplifier with auxiliary 1064 nm seeding. We have shown, that applying a 1064 nm signal loop in an Er/Yb amplifier can increase the output power at 1550 nm and provide stable operation without parasitic lasing at 1 μm. PMID:21996851

  9. Gain control dynamics of thulium-doped fiber amplifier at 2 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khamis, M. A.; Ennser, K.

    2016-02-01

    This work is novel in that it explains the modeling and simulation of a thulium-doped fiber amplifier (TDFA) in a reconfigurable wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) system operating at 2 μm. We use the optical gain-clamping technique in order to control gain amplification and eliminate deleterious channel power fluctuations resulting from input power variation at the TDFA. The investigated system consists of 12 channels with -4 dBm total input power. Simulation results indicate that approximately1.5dB power excursion is produced after dropping 11 channels in unclamped-gain amplifier, and only 0.005 dB in a clamped-gain amplifier. Additionally, a clamped configuration brings the power excursion from 4.2 dB to under 0.08 dB, after adding 11 channels to the investigated system. Hence, optical gainclamping is a simple and robust technique for controlling the power transient in amplifiers at 2 μm.

  10. Selecting RF Amplifiers for Impedance Controlled LLRF Systems - Nonlinear Effects and System Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, John D.; Mastorides, Themis; Rivetta, Claudio Hector; Van Winkle, Daniel; /SLAC

    2007-07-06

    Several high-current accelerators use feedback techniques in the accelerating RF systems to control the impedances seen by the circulating beam. These Direct and Comb Loop architectures put the high power klystron and LLRF signal processing components inside feedback loops, and the ultimate behavior of the systems depends on the individual sub-component properties. Imperfections and non-idealities in the signal processing leads to reduced effectiveness in the impedance control loops. In the PEP-II LLRF systems non-linear effects have been shown to reduce the achievable beam currents, increase low-mode longitudinal growth rates and reduce the margins and stability of the LLRF control loops. We present measurements of the driver amplifiers used in the PEP-II systems, and present measurement techniques needed to quantify the small-signal gain, linearity, transient response and image frequency generation of these amplifiers.

  11. Automatic Frequency Controller for Power Amplifiers Used in Bio-Implanted Applications: Issues and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Hannan, Mahammad A.; Hussein, Hussein A.; Mutashar, Saad; Samad, Salina A.; Hussain, Aini

    2014-01-01

    With the development of communication technologies, the use of wireless systems in biomedical implanted devices has become very useful. Bio-implantable devices are electronic devices which are used for treatment and monitoring brain implants, pacemakers, cochlear implants, retinal implants and so on. The inductive coupling link is used to transmit power and data between the primary and secondary sides of the biomedical implanted system, in which efficient power amplifier is very much needed to ensure the best data transmission rates and low power losses. However, the efficiency of the implanted devices depends on the circuit design, controller, load variation, changes of radio frequency coil's mutual displacement and coupling coefficients. This paper provides a comprehensive survey on various power amplifier classes and their characteristics, efficiency and controller techniques that have been used in bio-implants. The automatic frequency controller used in biomedical implants such as gate drive switching control, closed loop power control, voltage controlled oscillator, capacitor control and microcontroller frequency control have been explained. Most of these techniques keep the resonance frequency stable in transcutaneous power transfer between the external coil and the coil implanted inside the body. Detailed information including carrier frequency, power efficiency, coils displacement, power consumption, supplied voltage and CMOS chip for the controllers techniques are investigated and summarized in the provided tables. From the rigorous review, it is observed that the existing automatic frequency controller technologies are more or less can capable of performing well in the implant devices; however, the systems are still not up to the mark. Accordingly, current challenges and problems of the typical automatic frequency controller techniques for power amplifiers are illustrated, with a brief suggestions and discussion section concerning the progress of

  12. Automatic frequency controller for power amplifiers used in bio-implanted applications: issues and challenges.

    PubMed

    Hannan, Mahammad A; Hussein, Hussein A; Mutashar, Saad; Samad, Salina A; Hussain, Aini

    2014-01-01

    With the development of communication technologies, the use of wireless systems in biomedical implanted devices has become very useful. Bio-implantable devices are electronic devices which are used for treatment and monitoring brain implants, pacemakers, cochlear implants, retinal implants and so on. The inductive coupling link is used to transmit power and data between the primary and secondary sides of the biomedical implanted system, in which efficient power amplifier is very much needed to ensure the best data transmission rates and low power losses. However, the efficiency of the implanted devices depends on the circuit design, controller, load variation, changes of radio frequency coil's mutual displacement and coupling coefficients. This paper provides a comprehensive survey on various power amplifier classes and their characteristics, efficiency and controller techniques that have been used in bio-implants. The automatic frequency controller used in biomedical implants such as gate drive switching control, closed loop power control, voltage controlled oscillator, capacitor control and microcontroller frequency control have been explained. Most of these techniques keep the resonance frequency stable in transcutaneous power transfer between the external coil and the coil implanted inside the body. Detailed information including carrier frequency, power efficiency, coils displacement, power consumption, supplied voltage and CMOS chip for the controllers techniques are investigated and summarized in the provided tables. From the rigorous review, it is observed that the existing automatic frequency controller technologies are more or less can capable of performing well in the implant devices; however, the systems are still not up to the mark. Accordingly, current challenges and problems of the typical automatic frequency controller techniques for power amplifiers are illustrated, with a brief suggestions and discussion section concerning the progress of

  13. Gain transient control for wavelength division multiplexed access networks using semiconductor optical amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbon, T. B.; Osadchiy, A. V.; Kjær, R.; Jensen, J. B.; Monroy, I. Tafur

    2009-06-01

    Gain transients can severely hamper the upstream network performance in wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) access networks featuring erbium doped fiber amplifiers (EDFAs) or Raman amplification. We experimentally demonstrate for the first time using 10 Gb/s fiber transmission bit error rate measurements how a near-saturated semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) can be used to control these gain transients. An SOA is shown to reduce the penalty of transients originating in an EDFA from 2.3 dB to 0.2 dB for 10 Gb/s transmission over standard single mode fiber using a 2 31-1 PRBS pattern. The results suggest that a single SOA integrated within a WDM receiver at the metro node could offer a convenient all-optical solution for upstream transient control in WDM access networks.

  14. Coherent beam combining of pulsed fibre amplifiers with active phase control

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X L; Zhou, Pu; Ma, Y X; Ma, H T; Xu, X J; Liu, Z J; Zhao, Y J

    2011-12-31

    Coherent beam combining of pulsed fibre lasers is a promising method for power scaling while simultaneously maintaining good beam quality. We propose and demonstrate a scalable architecture for coherent beam combining of all-fibre pulsed amplifiers with active phase control using the stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) algorithm. A low-pass filter is introduced to eliminate the fluctuation of the metric function caused by pulsed lasers and to extract the exact phase noise signal. Active control is thereby based on the SPGD algorithm, resulting in stable coherent beam combining at the receiving plane even in a turbulent environment. Experimental results show that the fringe visibility of the long exposure pattern increases from 0 to 0.4, and the power encircled in the main-lobe increases by 1.6 times when the system evolves from the open-loop phase-locking scheme to the closed-loop scheme. This architecture can be easily scaled up to a higher power by increasing the number of amplifying channels and the power of a single amplifier.

  15. Tandem chirped quasi-phase-matching grating optical parametric amplifier design for simultaneous group delay and gain control.

    PubMed

    Charbonneau-Lefort, M; Fejer, M M; Afeyan, Bedros

    2005-03-15

    We present a broadband optical parametric amplifier design using tapered gain and tandem chirped quasi-phase-matching gratings to obtain flat gain and group-delay spectra suitable for applications such as ultrashort-pulse amplification and fiber-optic communication systems. Although a tapered-gain amplifier consisting of a single chirped grating can provide constant gain over a wide frequency range, it cannot be used to control the group delay across the spectrum. We propose controlling both the gain and the group delay profiles using a two-stage amplifier configuration, in which the idler of the first is used as the input signal of the second. PMID:15792000

  16. Bidirectional amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Wright, James T.

    1986-01-01

    A bilateral circuit is operable for transmitting signals in two directions without generation of ringing due to feedback caused by the insertion of the circuit. The circuit may include gain for each of the signals to provide a bidirectional amplifier. The signals are passed through two separate paths, with a unidirectional amplifier in each path. A controlled sampling device is provided in each path for sampling the two signals. Any feedback loop between the two signals is disrupted by providing a phase displacement between the control signals for the two sampling devices.

  17. Bidirectional amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Wright, J.T.

    1984-02-02

    A bilateral circuit is operable for transmitting signals in two directions without generation of ringing due to feedback caused by the insertion of the circuit. The circuit may include gain for each of the signals to provide a bidirectional amplifier. The signals are passed through two separate paths, with a unidirectional amplifier in each path. A controlled sampling device is provided in each path for sampling the two signals. Any feedback loop between the two signals is disrupted by providing a phase displacement between the control signals for the two sampling devices.

  18. Swelling-induced and controlled curving in layered gel beams.

    PubMed

    Lucantonio, A; Nardinocchi, P; Pezzulla, M

    2014-11-01

    We describe swelling-driven curving in originally straight and non-homogeneous beams. We present and verify a structural model of swollen beams, based on a new point of view adopted to describe swelling-induced deformation processes in bilayered gel beams, that is based on the split of the swelling-induced deformation of the beam at equilibrium into two components, both depending on the elastic properties of the gel. The method allows us to: (i) determine beam stretching and curving, once assigned the characteristics of the solvent bath and of the non-homogeneous beam, and (ii) estimate the characteristics of non-homogeneous flat gel beams in such a way as to obtain, under free-swelling conditions, three-dimensional shapes. The study was pursued by means of analytical, semi-analytical and numerical tools; excellent agreement of the outcomes of the different techniques was found, thus confirming the strength of the method. PMID:25383031

  19. Swelling-induced and controlled curving in layered gel beams

    PubMed Central

    Lucantonio, A.; Nardinocchi, P.; Pezzulla, M.

    2014-01-01

    We describe swelling-driven curving in originally straight and non-homogeneous beams. We present and verify a structural model of swollen beams, based on a new point of view adopted to describe swelling-induced deformation processes in bilayered gel beams, that is based on the split of the swelling-induced deformation of the beam at equilibrium into two components, both depending on the elastic properties of the gel. The method allows us to: (i) determine beam stretching and curving, once assigned the characteristics of the solvent bath and of the non-homogeneous beam, and (ii) estimate the characteristics of non-homogeneous flat gel beams in such a way as to obtain, under free-swelling conditions, three-dimensional shapes. The study was pursued by means of analytical, semi-analytical and numerical tools; excellent agreement of the outcomes of the different techniques was found, thus confirming the strength of the method. PMID:25383031

  20. Combining Droop Curve Concepts with Control Systems for Wind Turbine Active Power Control: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Buckspan, A.; Aho, J.; Pao, L.; Fleming, P.; Jeong, Y.

    2012-06-01

    Wind energy is becoming a larger portion of the global energy portfolio and wind penetration has increased dramatically in certain regions of the world. This increasing wind penetration has driven the need for wind turbines to provide active power control (APC) services to the local utility grid, as wind turbines do not intrinsically provide frequency regulation services that are common with traditional generators. It is common for large scale wind turbines to be decoupled from the utility grid via power electronics, which allows the turbine to synthesize APC commands via control of the generator torque and blade pitch commands. Consequently, the APC services provided by a wind turbine can be more flexible than those provided by conventional generators. This paper focuses on the development and implementation of both static and dynamic droop curves to measure grid frequency and output delta power reference signals to a novel power set point tracking control system. The combined droop curve and power tracking controller is simulated and comparisons are made between simulations using various droop curve parameters and stochastic wind conditions. The tradeoffs involved with aggressive response to frequency events are analyzed. At the turbine level, simulations are performed to analyze induced structural loads. At the grid level, simulations test a wind plant's response to a dip in grid frequency.

  1. Note: Wide band amplifier for quartz tuning fork sensors with digitally controlled stray capacitance compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Ping; Hao, Lifeng; Ding, Ning; Jiao, Weicheng; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Rongguo

    2015-11-01

    We presented a preamplifier design for quartz tuning fork (QTF) sensors in which the stray capacitance is digitally compensated. In this design, the manually controlled variable capacitor is replaced by a pair of varicap diodes, whose capacitance could be accurately tuned by a bias voltage. A tuning circuit including a single side low power operational amplifier, a digital-to-analog converter, and a microprocessor is also described, and the tuning process can be conveniently carried out on a personal computer. For the design, the noise level was investigated experimentally.

  2. A low-cost, FPGA-based servo controller with lock-in amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, G.; Barry, J. F.; Shuman, E. S.; Steinecker, M. H.; DeMille, D.

    2012-10-01

    We describe the design and implementation of a low-cost, FPGA-based servo controller with an integrated waveform synthesizer and lock-in amplifier. This system has been designed with the specific application of laser frequency locking in mind but should be adaptable to a variety of other purposes as well. The system incorporates an onboard waveform synthesizer, a lock-in amplifier, two channels of proportional-integral (PI) servo control, and a ramp generator on a single FPGA chip. The system is based on an inexpensive, off-the-shelf FPGA evaluation board with a wide variety of available accessories, allowing the system to interface with standard laser controllers and detectors while minimizing the use of custom hardware and electronics. Gains, filter constants, and other relevant parameters are adjustable via onboard knobs and switches. These parameters and other information are displayed to the user via an integrated LCD, allowing full operation of the device without an accompanying computer. We demonstrate the performance of the system in a test setup, in which the frequency of a tunable external-cavity diode laser (ECDL) is locked to a resonant optical transmission peak of a Fabry-Perot cavity. In this setup, we achieve a total servo-loop bandwidth of ~ 7 kHz and achieve locking of the ECDL to the cavity with a full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) linewidth of ~ 200 kHz.

  3. Practical quality control tools for curves and surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Small, Scott G.

    1992-01-01

    Curves (geometry) and surfaces created by Computer Aided Geometric Design systems in the engineering environment must satisfy two basic quality criteria: the geometric shape must have the desired engineering properties; and the objects must be parameterized in a way which does not cause computational difficulty for geometric processing and engineering analysis. Interactive techniques are described which are in use at Boeing to evaluate the quality of aircraft geometry prior to Computational Fluid Dynamic analysis, including newly developed methods for examining surface parameterization and its effects.

  4. Control of the shape of laser pulses amplified in the strong saturation regime

    SciTech Connect

    Shaykin, A A

    2014-05-30

    A new criterion for estimating the distortions of quasirectangular pulses in high-power amplifiers is proposed together with a method that allows generation of quasi-rectangular pulses at the output of a high-efficiency amplifier, i. e., in the regime of strong saturation. The efficiency of the method is demonstrated by the example of calculating the neodymium glass amplifier, used for pumping the petawatt parametric amplifier. (lasers)

  5. Geometrically controlled snapping transitions in shells with curved creases

    PubMed Central

    Bende, Nakul Prabhakar; Evans, Arthur A.; Innes-Gold, Sarah; Marin, Luis A.; Cohen, Itai; Hayward, Ryan C.; Santangelo, Christian D.

    2015-01-01

    Curvature and mechanics are intimately connected for thin materials, and this coupling between geometry and physical properties is readily seen in folded structures from intestinal villi and pollen grains to wrinkled membranes and programmable metamaterials. While the well-known rules and mechanisms behind folding a flat surface have been used to create deployable structures and shape transformable materials, folding of curved shells is still not fundamentally understood. Shells naturally deform by simultaneously bending and stretching, and while this coupling gives them great stability for engineering applications, it makes folding a surface of arbitrary curvature a nontrivial task. Here we discuss the geometry of folding a creased shell, and demonstrate theoretically the conditions under which it may fold smoothly. When these conditions are violated we show, using experiments and simulations, that shells undergo rapid snapping motion to fold from one stable configuration to another. Although material asymmetry is a proven mechanism for creating this bifurcation of stability, for the case of a creased shell, the inherent geometry itself serves as a barrier to folding. We discuss here how two fundamental geometric concepts, creases and curvature, combine to allow rapid transitions from one stable state to another. Independent of material system and length scale, the design rule that we introduce here explains how to generate snapping transitions in arbitrary surfaces, thus facilitating the creation of programmable multistable materials with fast actuation capabilities. PMID:26294253

  6. Laser amplifier and method

    DOEpatents

    Backus, S.; Kapteyn, H.C.; Murnane, M.M.

    1997-07-01

    Laser amplifiers and methods for amplifying a laser beam are disclosed. A representative embodiment of the amplifier comprises first and second curved mirrors, a gain medium, a third mirror, and a mask. The gain medium is situated between the first and second curved mirrors at the focal point of each curved mirror. The first curved mirror directs and focuses a laser beam to pass through the gain medium to the second curved mirror which reflects and recollimates the laser beam. The gain medium amplifies and shapes the laser beam as the laser beam passes therethrough. The third mirror reflects the laser beam, reflected from the second curved mirror, so that the laser beam bypasses the gain medium and return to the first curved mirror, thereby completing a cycle of a ring traversed by the laser beam. The mask defines at least one beam-clipping aperture through which the laser beam passes during a cycle. The gain medium is pumped, preferably using a suitable pumping laser. The laser amplifier can be used to increase the energy of continuous-wave or, especially, pulsed laser beams including pulses of femtosecond duration and relatively high pulse rate. 7 figs.

  7. Laser amplifier and method

    DOEpatents

    Backus, Sterling; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Murnane, Margaret M.

    1997-01-01

    Laser amplifiers and methods for amplifying a laser beam are disclosed. A representative embodiment of the amplifier comprises first and second curved mirrors, a gain medium, a third mirror, and a mask. The gain medium is situated between the first and second curved mirrors at the focal point of each curved mirror. The first curved mirror directs and focuses a laser beam to pass through the gain medium to the second curved mirror which reflects and recollimates the laser beam. The gain medium amplifies and shapes the laser beam as the laser beam passes therethough. The third mirror reflects the laser beam, reflected from the second curved mirror, so that the laser beam bypasses the gain medium and return to the first curved mirror, thereby completing a cycle of a ring traversed by the laser beam. The mask defines at least one beam-clipping aperture through which the laser beam passes during a cycle. The gain medium is pumped, preferably using a suitable pumping laser. The laser amplifier can be used to increase the energy of continuous-wave or, especially, pulsed laser beams including pulses of femtosecond duration and relatively high pulse rate.

  8. Subluminal optical pulse propagation in amplifying media and temperature controlled laser action in scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kijoon

    In the first half of the thesis, we investigated methods of controlling the group velocity of an optical probe pulse by another optical pulse. We focused on the gain linecenter region of an optical amplifier where group velocity can be very small due to the large dispersion. We made use of an optically pumped barium nitrate (Ba(NO3)2) Raman crystal to delay a probe pulse which is tuned to the Raman gain center, and measured the delay time as a function of pump pulse intensity. Within the intensity region where no significant amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) occurs, we observed pulse delays greater than the input pulse width and obtained predictions based on quasi-steady state Raman gain estimates. We also theoretically studied group velocity control in an optically pumped far-infrared (OPFIR) molecular gas amplifier system, where even larger group velocity reductions are expected due to the extremely narrow low-pressure gain linewidth. By using a 5-level model of a molecular gas, the change of group velocity was calculated as a function of pump beam intensity and gas pressure, and a minimum achievable value of the group velocity was estimated. Furthermore, the effect of static electric field was studied, where the selection rule-dependent level splitting by the DC Stark effect alters the gain lineshape, and hence the group velocity. In the second half, we experimentally and theoretically studied the emission characteristics from a novel random laser system where scattering power can be controlled by temperature. Our system is a laser dye-dissolved aqueous solution of hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) which has a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) at ˜41°C. When pumped with optical pulses, this system exhibits drastic spectral narrowing of emission with increasing temperature. A numerical calculation was performed by using a ring laser model developed for non-coherent random laser system, and the results were compared with the experimental linewidth vs

  9. Few-mode erbium-doped fiber amplifier with photonic lantern for pump spatial mode control.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Galmiche, G; Sanjabi Eznaveh, Z; Antonio-Lopez, J E; Velazquez Benitez, A M; Rodriguez Asomoza, J; Sanchez Mondragon, J J; Gonnet, C; Sillard, P; Li, G; Schülzgen, A; Okonkwo, C M; Amezcua Correa, R

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate a few-mode erbium-doped fiber amplifier employing a mode-selective photonic lantern for controlling the modal content of the pump light. Amplification of six spatial modes in a 5 m long erbium-doped fiber to ∼6.2  dBm average power is obtained while maintaining high modal fidelity. Through mode-selective forward pumping of the two degenerate LP21 modes operating at 976 nm, differential modal gains of <1  dB between all modes and signal gains of ∼16  dB at 1550 nm are achieved. In addition, low differential modal gain for near-full C-band operation is demonstrated. PMID:27244421

  10. A new approach to control noise from entertainment facilities: Active control and measurement of amplified community noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peppin, Richard J.; Casamajó, Joan

    2003-04-01

    While traffic noise is perhaps the most pervasive of community noises, much of the contribution now comes from amplified sound: live music, discos, theme parks, and exercise studios. Those producing the sound or music want it loud and those not interested want to be protected against noise. Noise limits at the receiving or producing property line must be met for the minimum community acceptance. However the time-, and perhaps the spatially-, varying sound in entertainment facilities is often constantly modified (and maybe monitored) near the source of the sound. Hence it is hard to relate and to control the sound at the property line. This paper presents a unique noise control device. It is based on the octave band ``transfer function'' between the sound produced in the entertainment area and the noise received at the property line. The overall insulation can be measured and is input to the instrument. When a noise level limit is exceeded at the receiver, due to the amplified interior noise at the facility, the sound output of the device is automatically controlled to reduce the noise. The paper provides details of the design and possible abatement scenarios with examples.

  11. Technology innovations and experience curves for nitrogen oxides control technologies.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Sonia; Rubin, Edward S; Taylor, Margaret R; Hounshell, David A

    2005-12-01

    This paper reviews the regulatory history for nitrogen oxides (NOx) pollutant emissions from stationary sources, primarily in coal-fired power plants. Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is one of the six criteria pollutants regulated by the 1970 Clean Air Act where National Ambient Air Quality Standards were established to protect public health and welfare. We use patent data to show that in the cases of Japan, Germany, and the United States, innovations in NOx control technologies did not occur until stringent government regulations were in place, thus "forcing" innovation. We also demonstrate that reductions in the capital and operation and maintenance (O&M) costs of new generations of high-efficiency NOx control technologies, selective catalytic reduction (SCR), are consistently associated with the increasing adoption of the control technology: the so-called learning-by-doing phenomena. The results show that as cumulative world coal-fired SCR capacity doubles, capital costs decline to approximately 86% and O&M costs to 58% of their original values. The observed changes in SCR technology reflect the impact of technological advance as well as other factors, such as market competition and economies of scale. PMID:16408687

  12. Control of Nuclear Gloveboxes and Enclosures Using the No-Moving-Part Vortex Amplifier (VXA)

    SciTech Connect

    Crossley, M.J.

    2007-07-01

    This paper describes the components and operation of a no-moving-part control valve known as a Power Fluidic Vortex Amplifier (VXA). VXA's have been successfully used to control the operating environment of nuclear gloveboxes and other enclosures for over 30 years in the United Kingdom. AEA Technology ES. Inc. (AEAT) are now introducing the VXA into the US DOE Complex. Not only is the VXA capable of controlling the environment of small individual enclosures, such as gloveboxes, but it is also applicable to active facility-level ventilation systems that meet the requirements of the DNFSB's recommendation 2004-2 Revision 1. VXAs can be regarded as no moving part control dampers that regulate ventilation blower or header depressions down to a manageable level within an enclosure. VXAs are capable of reacting to perturbations such as containment breaches, hence avoiding the egress of contaminated materials into the working environment. For example, when connected to a 1.0 kPa (4'' wc) ventilation header, a working pressure of less than 0.25 kPa (1'' wc) can be maintained within the glovebox. However, if a loss of glove breach takes place, the VXA can instantaneously react to allow an ingress of air from the operator's environment sufficient to maintain a velocity of 1 ms{sup -1} at the breach. On replacement of the glove, the VXA will instantaneously return to the normal operating condition with no action required by the operator. The VXAs are not limited to the control of small enclosure ventilation systems. They are sufficiently scalable to be applied to large facility-level ventilation systems protecting suites of gloveboxes, personal access enclosures and entire facilities. The VXA and its uses are presented and discussed in this paper. (authors)

  13. Temperature Tolerant Evolvable Systems Utilizing FPGA Boards and Bias-Controlled Amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Nikhil R.

    2005-01-01

    Space missions often require radiation and extreme-temperature hardened electronics to survive the harsh environments beyond Earth's atmosphere. Traditional approaches to preserve electronics incorporate shielding, insulation and redundancy at the expense of power and weight. However, a novel way of bypassing these problems is the concept of evolutionary hardware. A reconfigurable device, consisting of several switches interconnected with analog/digital parts, is controlled by an evolutionary processor (EP). When the EP detects degradation in the circuit it sends signals to reconfigure the switches, thus forming a new circuit with the desired output. This concept has been developed since the mid-l990s, but one problem remains-the EP cannot degrade substantially. For this reason, extensive testing at extreme temperatures (-180 to 120 C) has been done on devices found on FPGA boards (taking the role of the EP), such as the Analog to Digital and the Digital to Analog Converter. The EP is used in conjunction with a bias-controlled amplifier and a new prototype relay board, which is interconnected with 6 G4-FETs, a tri-input transistor-like element developed at JPL. The greatest improvements to be made lie in the reconfigurable device, so future design and testing of the G4-FET chip is required.

  14. Microwave phase shifter with controllable power response based on slow- and fast-light effects in semiconductor optical amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Xue, Weiqi; Sales, Salvador; Capmany, José; Mørk, Jesper

    2009-04-01

    We suggest and experimentally demonstrate a method for increasing the tunable rf phase shift of semiconductor waveguides while at the same time enabling control of the rf power. This method is based on the use of slow- and fast-light effects in a cascade of semiconductor optical amplifiers combined with the use of spectral filtering to enhance the role of refractive index dynamics. A continuously tunable phase shift of approximately 240 degrees at a microwave frequency of 19 GHz is demonstrated in a cascade of two semiconductor optical amplifiers, while maintaining an rf power change of less than 1.6 dB. The technique is scalable to more amplifiers and should allow realization of an rf phase shift of 360 degrees. PMID:19340174

  15. A curved piezo-structure model: implications on active structural acoustic control.

    PubMed

    Henry, J K; Clark, R L

    1999-09-01

    Current research in Active Structural Acoustic Control (ASAC) relies heavily upon accurately capturing the application physics associated with the structure being controlled. The application of ASAC to aircraft interior noise requires a greater understanding of the dynamics of the curved panels which compose the skin of an aircraft fuselage. This paper presents a model of a simply supported curved panel with attached piezoelectric transducers. The model is validated by comparison to previous work. Further, experimental results for a simply supported curved panel test structure are presented in support of the model. The curvature is shown to affect substantially the dynamics of the panel, the integration of transducers, and the bandwidth required for structural acoustic control. PMID:10489701

  16. PULSE AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Johnstone, C.W.

    1958-06-17

    The improvement of pulse amplifiers used with scintillation detectors is described. The pulse amplifier circuit has the advantage of reducing the harmful effects of overloading cause by large signal inputs. In general the pulse amplifier circuit comprises two amplifier tubes with the input pulses applied to one amplifier grid and coupled to the second amplifier tube through a common cathode load. The output of the second amplifier is coupled from the plate circuit to a cathode follower tube grid and a diode tube in connected from grid to cathode of the cathode follower tube. Degenerative feedback is provided in the second amplifier by coupling a signal from the cathode follower cathode to the second amplifier grid. The circuit proqides moderate gain stability, and overload protection for subsequent pulse circuits.

  17. Lane changing trajectory planning and tracking control for intelligent vehicle on curved road.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lukun; Zhao, Xiaoying; Su, Hao; Tang, Gongyou

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores lane changing trajectory planning and tracking control for intelligent vehicle on curved road. A novel arcs trajectory is planned for the desired lane changing trajectory. A kinematic controller and a dynamics controller are designed to implement the trajectory tracking control. Firstly, the kinematic model and dynamics model of intelligent vehicle with non-holonomic constraint are established. Secondly, two constraints of lane changing on curved road in practice (LCCP) are proposed. Thirdly, two arcs with same curvature are constructed for the desired lane changing trajectory. According to the geometrical characteristics of arcs trajectory, equations of desired state can be calculated. Finally, the backstepping method is employed to design a kinematic trajectory tracking controller. Then the sliding-mode dynamics controller is designed to ensure that the motion of the intelligent vehicle can follow the desired velocity generated by kinematic controller. The stability of control system is proved by Lyapunov theory. Computer simulation demonstrates that the desired arcs trajectory and state curves with B-spline optimization can meet the requirements of LCCP constraints and the proposed control schemes can make tracking errors to converge uniformly. PMID:27504248

  18. Daily Time Step Refinement of Optimized Flood Control Rule Curves for a Global Warming Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Fitzgerald, C.; Hamlet, A. F.; Burges, S. J.

    2009-12-01

    Pacific Northwest temperatures have warmed by 0.8 °C since 1920 and are predicted to further increase in the 21st century. Simulated streamflow timing shifts associated with climate change have been found in past research to degrade water resources system performance in the Columbia River Basin when using existing system operating policies. To adapt to these hydrologic changes, optimized flood control operating rule curves were developed in a previous study using a hybrid optimization-simulation approach which rebalanced flood control and reservoir refill at a monthly time step. For the climate change scenario, use of the optimized flood control curves restored reservoir refill capability without increasing flood risk. Here we extend the earlier studies using a detailed daily time step simulation model applied over a somewhat smaller portion of the domain (encompassing Libby, Duncan, and Corra Linn dams, and Kootenai Lake) to evaluate and refine the optimized flood control curves derived from monthly time step analysis. Moving from a monthly to daily analysis, we found that the timing of flood control evacuation needed adjustment to avoid unintended outcomes affecting Kootenai Lake. We refined the flood rule curves derived from monthly analysis by creating a more gradual evacuation schedule, but kept the timing and magnitude of maximum evacuation the same as in the monthly analysis. After these refinements, the performance at monthly time scales reported in our previous study proved robust at daily time scales. Due to a decrease in July storage deficits, additional benefits such as more revenue from hydropower generation and more July and August outflow for fish augmentation were observed when the optimized flood control curves were used for the climate change scenario.

  19. Marginal abatement cost curve for NOx incorporating controls, renewable electricity, energy efficiency and fuel switching

    EPA Science Inventory

    A marginal abatement cost curve (MACC) traces out the relationship between the quantity of pollution abated and the marginal cost of abating each additional unit. In the context of air quality management, MACCs typically are developed by sorting end-of-pipe controls by their resp...

  20. [A novel compact digital amplifier to control a medical equipment (Graseby 3500 pump) by Macintosh computer without external power supply].

    PubMed

    Nakao, M

    1998-05-01

    Most medical equipments now incorporate a digital RS-232 C interface, which enables to log data and/or control equipments by computers. Although the standard voltage specification of RS-232 C is minimum +/- 3 volts, certain devices, such as Graseby syringe driven pump model 3500 (U.K.), need higher voltage than the standard to reduce the risk of electromagnetic interference. Since the output voltage of serial port of Macintosh (Apple Computer Inc.) computer and other portable computers is around +/- 5 volts, an additional voltage amplifier is necessary to control such external devices. A compact digital signal amplifier was developed by using a general RS-232 C driver IC (MAX 232 E, Maxim USA). Bulky external power supply could be eliminated, because power was obtained through digital signal lines themselves. PMID:9621678

  1. Masking technique for coating thickness control on large and strongly curved aspherical optics.

    PubMed

    Sassolas, B; Flaminio, R; Franc, J; Michel, C; Montorio, J-L; Morgado, N; Pinard, L

    2009-07-01

    We discuss a method to control the coating thickness deposited onto large and strongly curved optics by ion beam sputtering. The technique uses an original design of the mask used to screen part of the sputtered materials. A first multielement mask is calculated from the measured two-dimensional coating thickness distribution. Then, by means of an iterative process, the final mask is designed. By using such a technique, it has been possible to deposit layers of tantalum pentoxide having a high thickness gradient onto a curved substrate 500 mm in diameter. Residual errors in the coating thickness profile are below 0.7%. PMID:19571934

  2. Efficient Phase Locking of Fiber Amplifiers Using a Low-Cost and High-Damage-Threshold Phase Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Pu; Ma, Yan-Xing; Wang, Xiao-Lin; Ma, Hao-Tong; Xu, Xiao-Jun; Liu, Ze-Jin

    2010-03-01

    We propose a low-cost and high-damage-threshold phase control system that employs a piezoelectric ceramic transducer modulator controlled by a stochastic parallel gradient descent algorithm. Efficient phase locking of two fiber amplifiers is demonstrated. Experimental results show that energy encircled in the target pinhole is increased by a factor of 1.76 and the visibility of the fringe pattern is as high as 90% when the system is in close-loop. The phase control system has potential in phase locking of large-number and high-power fiber laser endeavors.

  3. Exploring the physical controls of regional patterns of flow duration curves - Part 2: Role of seasonality, the regime curve, and associated process controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, S.; Yaeger, M.; Coopersmith, E.; Cheng, L.; Sivapalan, M.

    2012-11-01

    The goal of this paper is to explore the process controls underpinning regional patterns of variations of streamflow regime behavior, i.e., the mean seasonal variation of streamflow within the year, across the continental United States. The ultimate motivation is to use the resulting process understanding to generate insights into the physical controls of another signature of streamflow variability, namely the flow duration curve (FDC). The construction of the FDC removes the time dependence of flows. Thus in order to better understand the physical controls in regions that exhibit strong seasonal dependence, the regime curve (RC), which is closely connected to the FDC, is studied in this paper and later linked back to the FDC. To achieve these aims a top-down modeling approach is adopted; we start with a simple two-stage bucket model, which is systematically enhanced through addition of new processes on the basis of model performance assessment in relation to observations, using rainfall-runoff data from 197 United States catchments belonging to the MOPEX dataset. Exploration of dominant processes and the determination of required model complexity are carried out through model-based sensitivity analyses, guided by a performance metric. Results indicated systematic regional trends in dominant processes: snowmelt was a key process control in cold mountainous catchments in the north and north-west, whereas snowmelt and vegetation cover dynamics were key controls in the north-east; seasonal vegetation cover dynamics (phenology and interception) were important along the Appalachian mountain range in the east. A simple two-bucket model (with no other additions) was found to be adequate in warm humid catchments along the west coast and in the south-east, with both regions exhibiting strong seasonality, whereas much more complex models are needed in the dry south and south-west. Agricultural catchments in the mid-west were found to be difficult to predict with the use of

  4. LOGARITHMIC AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    De Shong, J.A. Jr.

    1957-12-31

    A logarithmic current amplifier circuit having a high sensitivity and fast response is described. The inventor discovered the time constant of the input circuit of a system utilizing a feedback amplifier, ionization chamber, and a diode, is inversely proportional to the input current, and that the amplifier becomes unstable in amplifying signals in the upper frequency range when the amplifier's forward gain time constant equals the input circuit time constant. The described device incorporates impedance networks having low frequency response characteristic at various points in the circuit to change the forward gain of the amplifler at a rate of 0.7 of the gain magnitude for every two times increased in frequency. As a result of this improvement, the time constant of the input circuit is greatly reduced at high frequencies, and the amplifier response is increased.

  5. Operational Amplifiers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foxcroft, G. E.

    1986-01-01

    Addresses the introduction of low cost equipment into high school and college physical science classes. Examines the properties of an "ideal" operational amplifier and discusses how it might be used under saturated and non-saturated conditions. Notes the action of a "real" operational amplifier. (TW)

  6. Broadband control of plate radiation using a piezoelectric, double-amplifier active-skin and structural acoustic sensing

    PubMed

    Johnson; Fuller

    2000-02-01

    The potential of a piezoelectric, double-amplifier active-skin with structural acoustic sensing (SAS) is demonstrated for the reduction of broadband acoustic radiation from a clamped, aluminum plate. The active-skin is a continuous covering of the vibrating portions of the plate with active, independently controllable piezoelectric, double-amplifier elements and is designed to affect control by altering the continuous structural radiation impedance rather than structural vibration. In simulation, acoustic models are sought for the primary and secondary sources that incorporate finite element methods. Simulation indicates that a total radiated power attenuation in excess of 10 dB may be achieved between 250 and 750 Hz with microphone error sensing, while under SAS the radiated power is reduced by nearly 8 dB in the same frequency range. In experiment, the adaptive feed forward filtered-x LMS (least mean square) algorithm, implemented on a Texas Instruments C40 DSP, was used in conjunction with the 6I6O control system. With microphone error sensing, 11.8-dB attenuation was achieved in the overall radiated power between 175 and 600 Hz, while inclusion of SAS resulted in a 7.3-dB overall power reduction in this frequency band. PMID:10687697

  7. Future path and tangent point models in the visual control of locomotion in curve driving.

    PubMed

    Lappi, Otto

    2014-01-01

    Studying human behavior in the natural context of everyday visual tasks--including locomotor tasks such as driving--can reveal visual strategies or even suggest underlying visual mechanisms. This paper reviews empirical and theoretical work in the past 20 years (1994-2014) on the visual control of steering a vehicle along a winding path-one of the most comprehensively studied forms of visually guided locomotion in humans. The focus is on on-road studies of visual behavior and what they can reveal about the visual strategies in curve driving. Theoretical models and results from simulator studies are discussed where they have direct relevance to the interpretation of on-road data. For the past 20 years, the point of departure in studies of curve driving has been tangent point orientation, and tangent point models (models based on tracking the tangent point) have become established as the default account of how vision is used in curve negotiation. More recent studies have questioned the generality of the tangent point hypothesis, however, arguing that in addition to (or instead of) the tangent point, drivers target visual reference points on their future path. Ecological validity of real-world studies often comes at the cost of methodological challenges that make the data difficult to interpret in terms of underlying mechanisms, and the limitations of existing data and the complementary roles of real-world and laboratory studies are discussed. PMID:25761280

  8. Closed loop engine control for regulating NOx emissions, using a two-dimensional fuel-air curve

    DOEpatents

    Bourn, Gary D.; Smith, Jack A.; Gingrich, Jess W.

    2007-01-30

    An engine control strategy that ensures that NOx emissions from the engine will be maintained at an acceptable level. The control strategy is based on a two-dimensional fuel-air curve, in which air manifold pressure (AMP) is a function of fuel header pressure and engine speed. The control strategy provides for closed loop NOx adjustment to a base AMP value derived from the fuel-air curve.

  9. Gm-Realization of Controlled-Gain Current Follower Transconductance Amplifier

    PubMed Central

    Tangsrirat, Worapong

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the conception of the current follower transconductance amplifier (CFTA) with electronically and linearly current tunable. The newly modified element is realized based on the use of transconductance cells (Gms) as core circuits. The advantage of this element is that the current transfer ratios (iz/ip and ix/iz) can be tuned electronically and linearly by adjusting external DC bias currents. The circuit is designed and analyzed in 0.35 μm TSMC CMOS technology. Simulation results for the circuit with ±1.25 V supply voltages show that it consumes only 0.43 mw quiescent power with 70 MHz bandwidth. As an application example, a current-mode KHN biquad filter is designed and simulated. PMID:24381513

  10. Controlling Chaos Via Knowledge of Initial Condition for a Curved Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, L.

    2000-01-01

    Nonlinear response of a flexible curved panel exhibiting bifurcation to fully developed chaos is demonstrated along with the sensitivity to small perturbation from the initial conditions. The response is determined from the measured time series at two fixed points. The panel is forced by an external nonharmonic multifrequency and monofrequency sound field. Using a low power time-continuous feedback control, carefully tuned at each initial condition, produces large long-term effects on the dynamics toward taming chaos. Without the knowledge of the initial conditions, control may be achieved by destructive interference. In this case, the control power is proportional to the loading power. Calculation of the correlation dimension and the estimation of positive Lyapunov exponents, in practice, are the proof of chaotic response.

  11. Golden curve method for OPC signature stability control in high MEEF applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geidel, Katja; Franke, Torsten; Roling, Stefan; Buck, Peter; Sczyrba, Martin; Mittermeier, Engelbert; Cinque, Russell

    2007-03-01

    The super-sensitivity of wafer critical dimensions (CDs) to mask CDs at low k I, known as the Mask Error Enhancement Factor (MEEF) drives the need for increasingly tighter mask CD control. In addition, the accuracy of the model based optical proximity correction (OPC) used to compensate systematic lithographic errors is partially dependent on a stable mask CD error signature that expands mask CD control requirements over multiple feature types. This paper presents the need for improved quantification and monitoring of mask CD signatures that includes CD characteristics relevant to OPC model calibration. It also introduces and discusses a new method to characterize, quantify, and control mask signatures in a mask manufacturing environment to limit the impact of mask CD variations on the OPC model validity. Multiple approaches to implementing this "golden curve" method are discussed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages.

  12. Gyromagnetron amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Y.-Y.; Barnett, L. R.

    1985-10-29

    A gyromagnetron amplifier for radiation at millimeter wavelengths comprising a tapered waveguide tube with longitudinally running vanes in the walls of the tube with the number of vanes chosen to coincide with a desired cyclotron harmonic frequency to be amplified. A beam of spiralling mildly relativistic electrons with an energy of 100 keV or less is directed into the small end of the tapered waveguide tube. A tapered axial magnetic field is set up within the waveguide tube with a low value appropriate to the amplification of a cyclotron harmonic frequency. An electromagnetic wave to be amplified is launched into the waveguide tube to co-propagate and be amplified by the spiralling electron beam. This device is characterized by a wide bandwidth, a low operating magnetic field, a relatively low operating beam voltage, with high power, and the capability of continuous wave operation.

  13. Tuning Curves for Arm Posture Control in Motor Cortex Are Consistent with Random Connectivity.

    PubMed

    Lalazar, Hagai; Abbott, L F; Vaadia, Eilon

    2016-05-01

    Neuronal responses characterized by regular tuning curves are typically assumed to arise from structured synaptic connectivity. However, many responses exhibit both regular and irregular components. To address the relationship between tuning curve properties and underlying circuitry, we analyzed neuronal activity recorded from primary motor cortex (M1) of monkeys performing a 3D arm posture control task and compared the results with a neural network model. Posture control is well suited for examining M1 neuronal tuning because it avoids the dynamic complexity of time-varying movements. As a function of hand position, the neuronal responses have a linear component, as has previously been described, as well as heterogeneous and highly irregular nonlinearities. These nonlinear components involve high spatial frequencies and therefore do not support explicit encoding of movement parameters. Yet both the linear and nonlinear components contribute to the decoding of EMG of major muscles used in the task. Remarkably, despite the presence of a strong linear component, a feedforward neural network model with entirely random connectivity can replicate the data, including both the mean and distributions of the linear and nonlinear components as well as several other features of the neuronal responses. This result shows that smoothness provided by the regularity in the inputs to M1 can impose apparent structure on neural responses, in this case a strong linear (also known as cosine) tuning component, even in the absence of ordered synaptic connectivity. PMID:27224735

  14. Tuning Curves for Arm Posture Control in Motor Cortex Are Consistent with Random Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, L. F.; Vaadia, Eilon

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal responses characterized by regular tuning curves are typically assumed to arise from structured synaptic connectivity. However, many responses exhibit both regular and irregular components. To address the relationship between tuning curve properties and underlying circuitry, we analyzed neuronal activity recorded from primary motor cortex (M1) of monkeys performing a 3D arm posture control task and compared the results with a neural network model. Posture control is well suited for examining M1 neuronal tuning because it avoids the dynamic complexity of time-varying movements. As a function of hand position, the neuronal responses have a linear component, as has previously been described, as well as heterogeneous and highly irregular nonlinearities. These nonlinear components involve high spatial frequencies and therefore do not support explicit encoding of movement parameters. Yet both the linear and nonlinear components contribute to the decoding of EMG of major muscles used in the task. Remarkably, despite the presence of a strong linear component, a feedforward neural network model with entirely random connectivity can replicate the data, including both the mean and distributions of the linear and nonlinear components as well as several other features of the neuronal responses. This result shows that smoothness provided by the regularity in the inputs to M1 can impose apparent structure on neural responses, in this case a strong linear (also known as cosine) tuning component, even in the absence of ordered synaptic connectivity. PMID:27224735

  15. Joint Subchannel Pairing and Power Control for Cognitive Radio Networks with Amplify-and-Forward Relaying

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yanyan; Wang, Shuqiang; Wei, Zhiming

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic spectrum sharing has drawn intensive attention in cognitive radio networks. The secondary users are allowed to use the available spectrum to transmit data if the interference to the primary users is maintained at a low level. Cooperative transmission for secondary users can reduce the transmission power and thus improve the performance further. We study the joint subchannel pairing and power allocation problem in relay-based cognitive radio networks. The objective is to maximize the sum rate of the secondary user that is helped by an amplify-and-forward relay. The individual power constraints at the source and the relay, the subchannel pairing constraints, and the interference power constraints are considered. The problem under consideration is formulated as a mixed integer programming problem. By the dual decomposition method, a joint optimal subchannel pairing and power allocation algorithm is proposed. To reduce the computational complexity, two suboptimal algorithms are developed. Simulations have been conducted to verify the performance of the proposed algorithms in terms of sum rate and average running time under different conditions. PMID:25045731

  16. Joint subchannel pairing and power control for cognitive radio networks with amplify-and-forward relaying.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yanyan; Wang, Shuqiang; Wei, Zhiming

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic spectrum sharing has drawn intensive attention in cognitive radio networks. The secondary users are allowed to use the available spectrum to transmit data if the interference to the primary users is maintained at a low level. Cooperative transmission for secondary users can reduce the transmission power and thus improve the performance further. We study the joint subchannel pairing and power allocation problem in relay-based cognitive radio networks. The objective is to maximize the sum rate of the secondary user that is helped by an amplify-and-forward relay. The individual power constraints at the source and the relay, the subchannel pairing constraints, and the interference power constraints are considered. The problem under consideration is formulated as a mixed integer programming problem. By the dual decomposition method, a joint optimal subchannel pairing and power allocation algorithm is proposed. To reduce the computational complexity, two suboptimal algorithms are developed. Simulations have been conducted to verify the performance of the proposed algorithms in terms of sum rate and average running time under different conditions. PMID:25045731

  17. Synthetic Transcription Amplifier System for Orthogonal Control of Gene Expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Rantasalo, Anssi; Czeizler, Elena; Virtanen, Riitta; Rousu, Juho; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Penttilä, Merja

    2016-01-01

    This work describes the development and characterization of a modular synthetic expression system that provides a broad range of adjustable and predictable expression levels in S. cerevisiae. The system works as a fixed-gain transcription amplifier, where the input signal is transferred via a synthetic transcription factor (sTF) onto a synthetic promoter, containing a defined core promoter, generating a transcription output signal. The system activation is based on the bacterial LexA-DNA-binding domain, a set of modified, modular LexA-binding sites and a selection of transcription activation domains. We show both experimentally and computationally that the tuning of the system is achieved through the selection of three separate modules, each of which enables an adjustable output signal: 1) the transcription-activation domain of the sTF, 2) the binding-site modules in the output promoter, and 3) the core promoter modules which define the transcription initiation site in the output promoter. The system has a novel bidirectional architecture that enables generation of compact, yet versatile expression modules for multiple genes with highly diversified expression levels ranging from negligible to very strong using one synthetic transcription factor. In contrast to most existing modular gene expression regulation systems, the present system is independent from externally added compounds. Furthermore, the established system was minimally affected by the several tested growth conditions. These features suggest that it can be highly useful in large scale biotechnology applications. PMID:26901642

  18. Interleukin-6 amplifies glucagon secretion: coordinated control via the brain and pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Tammy M.; Otero, Yolanda F.; Elliott, Amicia D.; Locke, Alicia D.; Malabanan, Carlo M.; Coldren, Anastasia G.; Brissova, Marcela; Piston, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Inappropriate glucagon secretion contributes to hyperglycemia in inflammatory disease. Previous work implicates the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) in glucagon secretion. IL-6-KO mice have a blunted glucagon response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) that is restored by intravenous replacement of IL-6. Given that IL-6 has previously been demonstrated to have a transcriptional (i.e., slow) effect on glucagon secretion from islets, we hypothesized that the rapid increase in glucagon following LPS occurred by a faster mechanism, such as by action within the brain. Using chronically catheterized conscious mice, we have demonstrated that central IL-6 stimulates glucagon secretion uniquely in the presence of an accompanying stressor (hypoglycemia or LPS). Contrary to our hypothesis, however, we found that IL-6 amplifies glucagon secretion in two ways; IL-6 not only stimulates glucagon secretion via the brain but also by direct action on islets. Interestingly, IL-6 augments glucagon secretion from both sites only in the presence of an accompanying stressor (such as epinephrine). Given that both adrenergic tone and plasma IL-6 are elevated in multiple inflammatory diseases, the interactions of the IL-6 and catecholaminergic signaling pathways in regulating GCG secretion may contribute to our present understanding of these diseases. PMID:25205821

  19. Synthetic Transcription Amplifier System for Orthogonal Control of Gene Expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Rantasalo, Anssi; Czeizler, Elena; Virtanen, Riitta; Rousu, Juho; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Penttilä, Merja; Jäntti, Jussi; Mojzita, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    This work describes the development and characterization of a modular synthetic expression system that provides a broad range of adjustable and predictable expression levels in S. cerevisiae. The system works as a fixed-gain transcription amplifier, where the input signal is transferred via a synthetic transcription factor (sTF) onto a synthetic promoter, containing a defined core promoter, generating a transcription output signal. The system activation is based on the bacterial LexA-DNA-binding domain, a set of modified, modular LexA-binding sites and a selection of transcription activation domains. We show both experimentally and computationally that the tuning of the system is achieved through the selection of three separate modules, each of which enables an adjustable output signal: 1) the transcription-activation domain of the sTF, 2) the binding-site modules in the output promoter, and 3) the core promoter modules which define the transcription initiation site in the output promoter. The system has a novel bidirectional architecture that enables generation of compact, yet versatile expression modules for multiple genes with highly diversified expression levels ranging from negligible to very strong using one synthetic transcription factor. In contrast to most existing modular gene expression regulation systems, the present system is independent from externally added compounds. Furthermore, the established system was minimally affected by the several tested growth conditions. These features suggest that it can be highly useful in large scale biotechnology applications. PMID:26901642

  20. Accurately control and flatten gain spectrum of L-band erbium doped fiber amplifier based on suitable gain-clamping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jiuru; Meng, Xiangyu; Liu, Chunyu

    2016-04-01

    The increasing traffic with dynamic nature requires the applications of gain-clamped L-band erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA). However, the weak or over clamping may lead the unexpected gain-compression and flatness-worsening. In this article, to enhance practicality, we modify the partly gain-clamping configuration and utilize a pair of C-band fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) to non-uniformly compress the gain spectrum of L-band. Through a comprehensive test and comparison, the suitable gain-clamping region for the amplified signals is found, and the gain in L-band is accurately controlled and flattened under the matched central wavelength of FBGs. The experimental results show that, our designed L-band EDFA achieves a trade-off among the output gain, flatness and stability. The ±0.44 dB flatness and 20.2 dB average gain are together obtained in the range of 1570-1610 nm, with the ±0.1 dB stability of signals in over 30 dBm dynamic range.

  1. LOGARITHMIC AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Wade, E.J.; Stone, R.S.

    1959-03-10

    Electronic,amplifier circuits, especially a logai-ithmic amplifier characterizxed by its greatly improved strability are discussed. According to the in ention, means are provided to feed bach the output valtagee to a diode in the amplifier input circuit, the diode being utilized to produce the logarithmic characteristics. The diode is tics, The diode isition therewith and having its filament operated from thc same source s the filament of the logarithmic diode. A bias current of relatively large value compareii with the signal current is continuously passed through the compiting dioie to render the diode insensitivy to variations in the signal current. by this odes kdu to variaelled, so that the stability of the amlifier will be unimpaired.

  2. Metrology, origins, and control of sidewall roughness in chemically amplified resists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Geoffrey William

    1999-11-01

    With the advances in microelectronics that continuously require shrinking photoresist features, sidewall roughness of resist features will become increasingly important, and properly measuring and describing the roughness with appropriate parameters also becomes vitally important. To this end, three metrology methods have been compared: top-down scanning electron microscopy measurements that provide fast measurements of the profile roughness but are dependent on the sample configuration; an atomic force microscopy technique measures only the top edge of the resist line; and another atomic force microscopy technique that provides roughness data over the entire depth of the sidewall surface. A comparison of these methods, using a common sample, is presented. Factors contributing to the roughness of four chemically amplified resists are estimated by systematically varying processing conditions for each resist. For the negative-tone resist Shipley SAL 605, the extent of linking and development conditions have the greatest effect on the top surface roughness. The observed sidewall roughness of 5.2 nm RMS (root-mean-square), however, is independent of these processing variables. The positive-tone resist Shipley APEX-E has a sidewall roughness of 3.1 nm RMS and is most affected by the development condition, the quality of the x-ray mask, and by pattern-specific parameters. APEX-E also demonstrates depth-dependent roughness, as the resist closest to the substrate is smoother than resist near the top of the feature. The sidewall roughness of the positive-tone resist Shipley UV5 is around 2.7 nm RMS and also shows depth-dependent roughness. Experiments determining the contribution of roughness transferred via the aerial image from the x-ray mask into UV5 indicate that only low frequency roughness less than 2.0 mum -1 is transferred. Higher frequency roughness is due to factors in the photoresist. The sidewall roughness of an experimental bilayer resist is about 5 to 7 nm RMS

  3. Control of lateral thickness gradients of Mo-Si multilayer on curved substrates using genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bo; Jin, Chunshui; Yao, Shun; Li, Chun; Wang, Hui; Zhou, Feng; Guo, Benyin; Xie, Yao; Liu, Yu; Wang, Liping

    2015-09-01

    An inversion method based on a genetic algorithm has been developed to control the lateral thickness gradients of a Mo-Si multilayer deposited on curved substrates by planar magnetron sputtering. At first, the sputtering distribution of the target is inversed from coating thickness profiles of flat substrates at different heights. Then, the speed profiles of substrates sweeping across the target are optimized according to the desired coating thickness profiles of the primary and secondary mirrors in a two-bounce projection system. The measured coating thickness profiles show that the non-compensable added figure error is below 0.1 nm rms, and the wavelength uniformity across each mirror surface is within ±0.2% P-V. The inversion method introduced here exhibits its convenience in obtaining the sputtering distribution of the target and efficiency in coating iterations during process development. PMID:26368686

  4. Portable I/V-Curve Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, S. W.

    1983-01-01

    Electronic load circuit for displaying current/voltage characteristic curves of power sources uses low-cost low-power CMOS operational amplifiers to control load current flowing through power MOSFET Q2 and main load transistor Q3. Thermal cutoff device turns off transistor Q3 in case of overload. To maximize battery life, battery is connected via "push-to-read" momentary-contact pushbutton switch.

  5. Development of primers to amplify mitochondrial DNA control region of Old World porcupines (subgenus Hystrix).

    PubMed

    Trucchi, E; Gentile, G; Sbordoni, V

    2008-09-01

    Eight primers were developed for the amplification of mitochondrial DNA control region of Old world porcupines (subgenus Hystrix). Successful amplifications of low-quality DNA extracted from old (12 years old) and recent quills were performed, thus facilitating field sampling. Successful cross-species amplifications were obtained for Hystrix africaeaustralis, H. cristata and H. indica. Length and structure of mitochondrial DNA control region were analysed and its usefulness as genetic marker for interspecific and population investigation was discussed. PMID:21585995

  6. Robust 1550-nm single-frequency all-fiber ns-pulsed fiber amplifier for wind-turbine predictive control by wind lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beier, F.; de Vries, O.; Schreiber, T.; Eberhardt, R.; Tünnermann, A.; Bollig, C.; Hofmeister, P. G.; Schmidt, J.; Reuter, R.

    2013-02-01

    Scaling of the power yield of offshore wind farms relies on the capacity of the individual wind turbines. This results in a trend to very large rotor diameters, which are difficult to control. It is crucial to monitor the inhomogeneous wind field in front of the wind turbines at different distances to ensure reliable operation and a long lifetime at high output levels. In this contribution, we demonstrate an all-fiber ns-pulsed fiber amplifier based on cost-efficient commercially available components. The amplifier is a suitable source for coherent Doppler lidar pulses making a predictive control of the turbine operation feasible.

  7. High power RF solid state power amplifier system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, III, William Herbert (Inventor); Chavers, Donald Gregory (Inventor); Richeson, James J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A high power, high frequency, solid state power amplifier system includes a plurality of input multiple port splitters for receiving a high-frequency input and for dividing the input into a plurality of outputs and a plurality of solid state amplifier units. Each amplifier unit includes a plurality of amplifiers, and each amplifier is individually connected to one of the outputs of multiport splitters and produces a corresponding amplified output. A plurality of multiport combiners combine the amplified outputs of the amplifiers of each of the amplifier units to a combined output. Automatic level control protection circuitry protects the amplifiers and maintains a substantial constant amplifier power output.

  8. Amplified Policymaking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prince, Katherine; Woempner, Carolyn

    2010-01-01

    This brief examines the policy implications of two drivers of change presented in the "2020 Forecast: Creating the Future of Learning"-- Pattern Recognition and Amplified Organization. These drivers point toward a series of cultural shifts and illuminate how we are developing new ways of organizing, constructing, and managing knowledge.…

  9. Mimicking the cochlear amplifier in a cantilever beam using nonlinear velocity feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, Bryan S.; Tarazaga, Pablo A.

    2014-07-01

    The mammalian cochlea exhibits a nonlinear amplification which allows mammals to detect a large range of sound pressure levels while maintaining high frequency sensitivity. This work seeks to mimic the cochlea’s nonlinear amplification in a mechanical system. A nonlinear, velocity-based feedback control law is applied to a cantilever beam with piezoelectric actuators. The control law reduces the linear viscous damping of the system while introducing a cubic damping term. The result is a system which is positioned close to a Hopf bifurcation. Modelling and experimental results show that the beam with this control law undergoes a one-third amplitude scaling near the resonance frequency and an amplitude-dependent bandwidth. Both behaviors are characteristic of data obtained from the mammalian cochlea. This work could provide insight on the biological cochlea while producing bio-inspired sensors with a large dynamic range and sharp frequency sensitivity.

  10. Local phase control for a planar array of fiber laser amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffanic, Patrick; Johannes, Benjamin T.; Sison, Claudia A.; Hughes, Gary B.; Lubin, Philip; Meinhold, Peter; Suen, Jonathan; O'Neill, Hugh; Kangas, Miikka; Brashears, Travis; Zhang, Qicheng; Griswold, Janelle; Riley, Jordan; Motta, Caio

    2015-09-01

    Arrays of phase-locked lasers have been developed for numerous directed-energy applications. Phased-array designs are capable of producing higher beam intensity than similar sized multi-beam emitters, and also allow beam steering and beam profile manipulation. In phased-array designs, individual emitter phases must be controllable, based on suitable feedback. Most current control schemes sample individual emitter phases, such as with an array-wide beam splitter, and compare to a master phase reference. Reliance on a global beam splitter limits scalability to larger array sizes due to lack of design modularity. This paper describes a conceptual design and control scheme that relies only on feedback from the array structure itself. A modular and scalable geometry is based on individual hexagonal frames for each emitter; each frame cell consists of a conventional lens mounted in front of the fiber tip. A rigid phase tap structure physically connects two adjacent emitter frame cells. A target sensor is mounted on top of the phase tap, representing the local alignment datum. Optical sensors measure the relative position of the phase tap and target sensor. The tap senses the exit phase of both emitters relative to the target normal plane, providing information to the phase controller for each emitter. As elements are added to the array, relative local position data between adjacent phase taps allows accurate prediction of the relative global position of emitters across the array, providing additional constraints to the phase controllers. The approach is scalable for target distance and number of emitters without loss of control.

  11. Efficient ASE control in cryogenic gas cooled Yb:YAG multislab amplifiers with Cr4+:YAG interlayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Kaibo; Yuan, Xiaodong; Yan, Xiongwei; Li, Min; Jiang, Xinying; Wang, Zhenguo; Li, Mingzhong; Zheng, Wanguo; Zheng, Jiangang

    2016-03-01

    A novel approach based on Cr4+:YAG interlayers to break the transmission paths of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) in a cryogenic gas cooled Yb:YAG multislab amplifier geometry was presented for the suppression of ASE in the power scaling of high energy, high average power laser systems. The benefits of Cr4+:YAG interlayers for the overall performance of an amplifier were illustrated with respect to energy storage capacity, heat generation and amplification of the seed pulses based on the theory of quasi-three-level Yb3+ ions and Cr4+:YAG saturable absorption, the Monte Carlo and ray-tracing methods. For the amplifier with optimized Cr4+:YAG interlayers, it was found that the energy storage efficiency was increased from 39.12% to 47.38% in comparison with the amplifier without interlayers. The maximum output energy of 1119.53 J with an optical-to-optical efficiency of 28.91% in the amplifier with interlayers was obtained, while it reduced to 810.61 J with an optical-to-optical efficiency of 20.94% in the amplifier without interlayers. To our knowledge, this is the first quantitative characterization of the performance of a cryogenic gas cooled Yb:YAG multislab amplifier with Cr4+:YAG interlayers.

  12. PERCEIVED WEIGHT DISCRIMINATION AMPLIFIES THE LINK BETWEEN CENTRAL ADIPOSITY AND NONDIABETIC GLYCEMIC CONTROL (HBA1C)

    PubMed Central

    Tsenkova, Vera K.; Carr, Deborah; Schoeller, Dale A.; Ryff, Carol D.

    2010-01-01

    Background While the preclinical development of type 2 diabetes is partly explained by obesity and central adiposity, psychosocial research has shown that chronic stressors such as discrimination have health consequences as well. Purpose We investigated the extent to which the well-established effects of obesity and central adiposity on nondiabetic glycemic control (indexed by HbA1c) were moderated by a targeted psychosocial stressor linked to weight: perceived weight discrimination. Methods Data came from the nondiabetic subsample (n=938) of the Midlife in the United States (MIDUS II) survey. Results Body mass index (BMI), waist-to-hip ratio, and waist circumference were linked to significantly higher HbA1c (p < .001). Multivariate-adjusted models showed that weight discrimination exacerbated the effects of waist-to-hip ratio on HbA1c ( p < .05), such that people who had higher WHR and reported weight discrimination had the highest HbA1c levels. Conclusions Understanding how biological and psychosocial factors interact at nondiabetic levels to increase vulnerability could have important implications for public health and education strategies. Effective strategies may include targeting sources of discrimination, rather than solely targeting health behaviors and practices of overweight and obese persons. PMID:21136227

  13. Precision control of carrier-envelope phase in grating based chirped pulse amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengquan; Moon, Eric; Mashiko, Hiroki; Nakamura, Christopher M; Ranitovic, Predrag; Maharjan, Chakra M; Cocke, C Lewis; Chang, Zenghu; Paulus, Gerhard G

    2006-11-13

    It is demonstrated that the carrier-envelope (CE) phase of pulses from a high power ultrafast laser system with a grating-based stretcher and compressor can be stabilized to a root mean square (rms) value of 180 mrad over almost 2 hours, excluding a brief re-locking period. The stabilization was accomplished via feedback control of the grating separation in the stretcher. It shows that the long term CE phase stability of a grating based chirped pulse amplification system can be as good as that of lasers using a glass-block stretcher and a prism pair compressor. Moreover, by adjusting the grating separation to preset values, the relative CE phase could be locked to an arbitrary value in the range of 2pi. This method is better than using a pair of wedge plates to adjust the phase after the hollow-core fiber compressor. The CE phase stabilization after a hollow-core fiber compressor was confirmed by a CE-phase meter based on the measurement of the left-to-right asymmetry of electrons produced by above-threshold ionization. PMID:19529565

  14. Exploring the physical controls of regional patterns of flow duration curves - Part 2: Role of seasonality and associated process controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, S.; Yaeger, M. A.; Coopersmith, E.; Cheng, L.; Sivapalan, M.

    2012-06-01

    The goal of this paper is to explore the process controls underpinning regional patterns of variations of runoff regime behavior, i.e., the mean seasonal variation of runoff within the year, across the continental United States. The ultimate motivation is to use the resulting process understanding to generate insights into the physical controls of Flow Duration Curves, in view of the close connection between these two alternative signatures of runoff variability. To achieve these aims a top-down modeling approach is adopted; we start with a simple two-stage bucket model, which is systematically enhanced through addition of new processes on the basis of model performance assessment in relation to observations, using rainfall-runoff data from 197 United States catchments belonging to the MOPEX dataset. Exploration of dominant processes and the determination of required model complexity are carried out through model-based sensitivity analyses, guided by a performance metric. Results indicated systematic regional trends in dominant processes: snowmelt was a key process control in cold mountainous catchments in the north and north-west, whereas snowmelt and vegetation cover dynamics were key controls in the north-east; seasonal vegetation cover dynamics (phenology and interception) were important along the Appalachian mountain range in the east. A simple two-bucket model (with no other additions) was found to be adequate in warm humid catchments along the west coast and in the south-east, with both regions exhibiting strong seasonality, whereas much more complex models are needed in the dry south and south-west. Agricultural catchments in the mid-west were found to be difficult to predict with the use of simple lumped models, due to the strong influence of human activities. Overall, these process controls arose from general east-west (seasonality) and north-south (aridity, temperature) trends in climate (with some exceptions), compounded by complex dynamics of

  15. Evaluation of the Phase-Dependent Rhythm Control of Human Walking Using Phase Response Curves.

    PubMed

    Funato, Tetsuro; Yamamoto, Yuki; Aoi, Shinya; Imai, Takashi; Aoyagi, Toshio; Tomita, Nozomi; Tsuchiya, Kazuo

    2016-05-01

    Humans and animals control their walking rhythms to maintain motion in a variable environment. The neural mechanism for controlling rhythm has been investigated in many studies using mechanical and electrical stimulation. However, quantitative evaluation of rhythm variation in response to perturbation at various timings has rarely been investigated. Such a characteristic of rhythm is described by the phase response curve (PRC). Dynamical simulations of human skeletal models with changing walking rhythms (phase reset) described a relation between the effective phase reset on stability and PRC, and phase reset around touch-down was shown to improve stability. A PRC of human walking was estimated by pulling the swing leg, but such perturbations hardly influenced the stance leg, so the relation between the PRC and walking events was difficult to discuss. This research thus examines human response to variations in floor velocity. Such perturbation yields another problem, in that the swing leg is indirectly (and weakly) perturbed, so the precision of PRC decreases. To solve this problem, this research adopts the weighted spike-triggered average (WSTA) method. In the WSTA method, a sequential pulsed perturbation is used for stimulation. This is in contrast with the conventional impulse method, which applies an intermittent impulsive perturbation. The WSTA method can be used to analyze responses to a large number of perturbations for each sequence. In the experiment, perturbations are applied to walking subjects by rapidly accelerating and decelerating a treadmill belt, and measured data are analyzed by the WSTA and impulse methods. The PRC obtained by the WSTA method had clear and stable waveforms with a higher temporal resolution than those obtained by the impulse method. By investigation of the rhythm transition for each phase of walking using the obtained PRC, a rhythm change that extends the touch-down and mid-single support phases is found to occur. PMID:27203839

  16. Evaluation of the Phase-Dependent Rhythm Control of Human Walking Using Phase Response Curves

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Yuki; Aoi, Shinya; Imai, Takashi; Aoyagi, Toshio; Tomita, Nozomi; Tsuchiya, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Humans and animals control their walking rhythms to maintain motion in a variable environment. The neural mechanism for controlling rhythm has been investigated in many studies using mechanical and electrical stimulation. However, quantitative evaluation of rhythm variation in response to perturbation at various timings has rarely been investigated. Such a characteristic of rhythm is described by the phase response curve (PRC). Dynamical simulations of human skeletal models with changing walking rhythms (phase reset) described a relation between the effective phase reset on stability and PRC, and phase reset around touch-down was shown to improve stability. A PRC of human walking was estimated by pulling the swing leg, but such perturbations hardly influenced the stance leg, so the relation between the PRC and walking events was difficult to discuss. This research thus examines human response to variations in floor velocity. Such perturbation yields another problem, in that the swing leg is indirectly (and weakly) perturbed, so the precision of PRC decreases. To solve this problem, this research adopts the weighted spike-triggered average (WSTA) method. In the WSTA method, a sequential pulsed perturbation is used for stimulation. This is in contrast with the conventional impulse method, which applies an intermittent impulsive perturbation. The WSTA method can be used to analyze responses to a large number of perturbations for each sequence. In the experiment, perturbations are applied to walking subjects by rapidly accelerating and decelerating a treadmill belt, and measured data are analyzed by the WSTA and impulse methods. The PRC obtained by the WSTA method had clear and stable waveforms with a higher temporal resolution than those obtained by the impulse method. By investigation of the rhythm transition for each phase of walking using the obtained PRC, a rhythm change that extends the touch-down and mid-single support phases is found to occur. PMID:27203839

  17. Regional and sectoral marginal abatement cost curves for NOx incorporating controls, renewable electricity, energy efficiency and fuel switching

    EPA Science Inventory

    A marginal abatement cost curve (MACC) traces out the relationship between the quantity of pollution abated and the marginal cost of abating each additional unit. In the context of air quality management, MACCs typically are developed by sorting end-of-pipe controls by their resp...

  18. Finite-time Lyapunov exponents and metabolic control coefficients for threshold detection of stimulus-response curves.

    PubMed

    Duc, Luu Hoang; Chávez, Joseph Páez; Son, Doan Thai; Siegmund, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    In biochemical networks transient dynamics plays a fundamental role, since the activation of signalling pathways is determined by thresholds encountered during the transition from an initial state (e.g. an initial concentration of a certain protein) to a steady-state. These thresholds can be defined in terms of the inflection points of the stimulus-response curves associated to the activation processes in the biochemical network. In the present work, we present a rigorous discussion as to the suitability of finite-time Lyapunov exponents and metabolic control coefficients for the detection of inflection points of stimulus-response curves with sigmoidal shape. PMID:27416142

  19. In the Way of Peacemaker Guide Curve between Water Supply and Flood Control for Short Term Reservoir Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uysal, G.; Sensoy, A.; Yavuz, O.; Sorman, A. A.; Gezgin, T.

    2012-04-01

    Effective management of a controlled reservoir system where it involves multiple and sometimes conflicting objectives is a complex problem especially in real time operations. Yuvacık Dam Reservoir, located in the Marmara region of Turkey, is built to supply annual demand of 142 hm3 water for Kocaeli city requires such a complex management strategy since it has relatively small (51 hm3) effective capacity. On the other hand, the drainage basin is fed by both rainfall and snowmelt since the elevation ranges between 80 - 1548 m. Excessive water must be stored behind the radial gates between February and May in terms of sustainability especially for summer and autumn periods. Moreover, the downstream channel physical conditions constraint the spillway releases up to 100 m3/s although the spillway is large enough to handle major floods. Thus, this situation makes short term release decisions the challenging task. Long term water supply curves, based on historical inflows and annual water demand, are in conflict with flood regulation (control) levels, based on flood attenuation and routing curves, for this reservoir. A guide curve, that is generated using both water supply and flood control of downstream channel, generally corresponds to upper elevation of conservation pool for simulation of a reservoir. However, sometimes current operation necessitates exceeding this target elevation. Since guide curves can be developed as a function of external variables, the water potential of a basin can be an indicator to explain current conditions and decide on the further strategies. Besides, releases with respect to guide curve are managed and restricted by user-defined rules. Although the managers operate the reservoir due to several variable conditions and predictions, still the simulation model using variable guide curve is an urgent need to test alternatives quickly. To that end, using HEC-ResSim, the several variable guide curves are defined to meet the requirements by

  20. PEAK LIMITING AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Goldsworthy, W.W.; Robinson, J.B.

    1959-03-31

    A peak voltage amplitude limiting system adapted for use with a cascade type amplifier is described. In its detailed aspects, the invention includes an amplifier having at least a first triode tube and a second triode tube, the cathode of the second tube being connected to the anode of the first tube. A peak limiter triode tube has its control grid coupled to thc anode of the second tube and its anode connected to the cathode of the second tube. The operation of the limiter is controlled by a bias voltage source connected to the control grid of the limiter tube and the output of the system is taken from the anode of the second tube.

  1. Marginal abatement cost curves for NOx incorporating both controls and alternative measures

    EPA Science Inventory

    A marginal abatement cost curve (MACC) traces out the efficient marginal abatement cost level for any aggregate emissions target when a least cost approach is implemented. In order for it to represent the efficient MAC level, all abatement opportunities across all sectors and loc...

  2. Exploring the physical controls of regional patterns of flow duration curves - Part 3: A catchment classification system based on regime curve indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coopersmith, E.; Yaeger, M. A.; Ye, S.; Cheng, L.; Sivapalan, M.

    2012-11-01

    Predictions of hydrological responses in ungauged catchments can benefit from a classification scheme that can organize and pool together catchments that exhibit a level of hydrologic similarity, especially similarity in some key variable or signature of interest. Since catchments are complex systems with a level of self-organization arising from co-evolution of climate and landscape properties, including vegetation, there is much to be gained from developing a classification system based on a comparative study of a population of catchments across climatic and landscape gradients. The focus of this paper is on climate seasonality and seasonal runoff regime, as characterized by the ensemble mean of within-year variation of climate and runoff. The work on regime behavior is part of an overall study of the physical controls on regional patterns of flow duration curves (FDCs), motivated by the fact that regime behavior leaves a major imprint upon the shape of FDCs, especially the slope of the FDCs. As an exercise in comparative hydrology, the paper seeks to assess the regime behavior of 428 catchments from the MOPEX database simultaneously, classifying and regionalizing them into homogeneous or hydrologically similar groups. A decision tree is developed on the basis of a metric chosen to characterize similarity of regime behavior, using a variant of the Iterative Dichotomiser 3 (ID3) algorithm to form a classification tree and associated catchment classes. In this way, several classes of catchments are distinguished, in which the connection between the five catchments' regime behavior and climate and catchment properties becomes clearer. Only four similarity indices are entered into the algorithm, all of which are obtained from smoothed daily regime curves of climatic variables and runoff. Results demonstrate that climate seasonality plays the most significant role in the classification of US catchments, with rainfall timing and climatic aridity index playing somewhat

  3. Rhombic micro-displacement amplifier for piezoelectric actuator and its linear and hybrid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jinglong; Zhang, Chunlin; Xu, Minglong; Zi, Yanyang; Zhang, Xinong

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes rhombic micro-displacement amplifier (RMDA) for piezoelectric actuator (PA). First, the geometric amplification relations are analyzed and linear model is built to analyze the mechanical and electrical properties of this amplifier. Next, the accurate modeling method of amplifier is studied for important application of precise servo control. The classical Preisach model (CPM) is generally implemented using a numerical technique based on the first-order reversal curves (FORCs). The accuracy of CPM mainly depends on the number of FORCs. However, it is generally difficult to achieve enough number of FORCs in practice. So, Support Vector Machine (SVM) is employed in the work to circumvent the deficiency of the CPM. Then the hybrid model, which is based on discrete CPM and SVM is developed to account for hysteresis and dynamic effects. Finally, experimental validation is carried out. The analyzed result shows that this amplifier with the hybrid model is suitable for control application.

  4. Intelligent control for modeling of real-time reservoir operation, part II: artificial neural network with operating rule curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ya-Ting; Chang, Li-Chiu; Chang, Fi-John

    2005-04-01

    To bridge the gap between academic research and actual operation, we propose an intelligent control system for reservoir operation. The methodology includes two major processes, the knowledge acquired and implemented, and the inference system. In this study, a genetic algorithm (GA) and a fuzzy rule base (FRB) are used to extract knowledge based on the historical inflow data with a design objective function and on the operating rule curves respectively. The adaptive network-based fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) is then used to implement the knowledge, to create the fuzzy inference system, and then to estimate the optimal reservoir operation. To investigate its applicability and practicability, the Shihmen reservoir, Taiwan, is used as a case study. For the purpose of comparison, a simulation of the currently used M-5 operating rule curve is also performed. The results demonstrate that (1) the GA is an efficient way to search the optimal input-output patterns, (2) the FRB can extract the knowledge from the operating rule curves, and (3) the ANFIS models built on different types of knowledge can produce much better performance than the traditional M-5 curves in real-time reservoir operation. Moreover, we show that the model can be more intelligent for reservoir operation if more information (or knowledge) is involved.

  5. Low cost instrumentation amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturman, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    Amplifier can be used for many applications requiring high input impedance and common mode rejection, low drift, and gain accuracy on order of one percent. Performance of inexpensive amplifier approaches that of some commercial instrumentation amplifiers in many specifications.

  6. Pulse width dependence of motor threshold and input–output curve characterized with controllable pulse parameter transcranial magnetic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Peterchev, Angel V.; Goetz, Stefan M.; Westin, Gregory G.; Luber, Bruce; Lisanby, Sarah H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate the use of a novel controllable pulse parameter TMS (cTMS) device to characterize human corticospinal tract physiology. Methods Motor threshold and input-output (IO) curve of right first dorsal interosseus were determined in 26 and 12 healthy volunteers, respectively, at pulse widths of 30, 60, and 120 μs using a custom-built cTMS device. Strength–duration curve rheobase and time constant were estimated from the motor thresholds. IO slope was estimated from sigmoid functions fitted to the IO data. Results All procedures were well tolerated with no seizures or other serious adverse events. Increasing pulse width decreased the motor threshold and increased the pulse energy and IO slope. The average strength–duration curve time constant is estimated to be 196 μs, 95% CI [181 μs, 210 μs]. IO slope is inversely correlated with motor threshold both across and within pulse width. A simple quantitative model explains these dependencies. Conclusions Our strength–duration time constant estimate compares well to published values and may be more accurate given increased sample size and enhanced methodology. Multiplying the IO slope by the motor threshold may provide a sensitive measure of individual differences in corticospinal tract physiology. Significance Pulse parameter control offered by cTMS provides enhanced flexibility that can contribute novel insights in TMS studies. PMID:23434439

  7. Frequency curves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riggs, H.C.

    1968-01-01

    This manual describes graphical and mathematical procedures for preparing frequency curves from samples of hydrologic data. It also discusses the theory of frequency curves, compares advantages of graphical and mathematical fitting, suggests methods of describing graphically defined frequency curves analytically, and emphasizes the correct interpretations of a frequency curve.

  8. SQUARE WAVE AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Leavitt, M.A.; Lutz, I.C.

    1958-08-01

    An amplifier circuit is described for amplifying sigmals having an alternating current component superimposed upon a direct current component, without loss of any segnnent of the alternating current component. The general circuit arrangement includes a vibrator, two square wave amplifiers, and recombination means. The amplifier input is connected to the vibrating element of the vibrator and is thereby alternately applied to the input of each square wave amplifier. The detailed circuitry of the recombination means constitutes the novelty of the annplifier and consists of a separate, dual triode amplifier coupled to the output of each square wave amplifier with a recombination connection from the plate of one amplifier section to a grid of one section of the other amplifier. The recombination circuit has provisions for correcting distortion caused by overlapping of the two square wave voltages from the square wave amplifiers.

  9. Curved descending landing approach guidance and control. M.S. Thesis - George Washington Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, D. J.

    1974-01-01

    Linear optimal regulator theory is applied to a nonlinear simulation of a transport aircraft performing a helical landing approach. A closed form expression for the quasi-steady nominal flight path is presented along with the method for determining the corresponding constant nominal control inputs. The Jacobian matrices and the weighting matrices in the cost functional are time varying. A method of solving for the optimal feedback gains is reviewed. The control system is tested on several alternative landing approaches using both three and six degree flight path angles. On each landing approach, the aircraft was subjected to large random initial state errors and to randomly directed crosswinds. The system was also tested for sensitivity to changes in the parameters of the aircraft and of the atmosphere. Performance of the optimal controller on all the three degree approaches was very good, and the control system proved to be reasonably insensitive to parametric uncertainties.

  10. Correcting the Stress-Strain Curve in the Stroke-Rate Controlling Forging Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y. P.; Matsumoto, H.; Chiba, A.

    2009-05-01

    In this article, a detailed description of the friction correction, adiabatic correction, and the correction from the stroke-rate controlling process into the strain-rate controlling process on the IHS38MSV hypoeutectoid steel is provided. By using compensated data, processing maps were plotted and used to predict the optimum hot forging process. The compressive tests were performed at stroke rates ranging from 0.12 to 120 mm/s and temperatures ranging from 800 °C to 1200 °C by using ThermecMaster-Z equipment. The results showed that the correction by instant friction coefficient, which was carried out on the basis of previous research, could be extended to wider experimental conditions. The corrected data from both stroke-rate controlling and strain-rate controlling processes were in good agreement with each other, indicating that the present correction from the stroke rate into the strain-rate correction is practical and appropriate.

  11. Segmented amplifier configurations for laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Hagen, Wilhelm F.

    1979-01-01

    An amplifier system for high power lasers, the system comprising a compact array of segments which (1) preserves high, large signal gain with improved pumping efficiency and (2) allows the total amplifier length to be shortened by as much as one order of magnitude. The system uses a three dimensional array of segments, with the plane of each segment being oriented at substantially the amplifier medium Brewster angle relative to the incident laser beam and with one or more linear arrays of flashlamps positioned between adjacent rows of amplifier segments, with the plane of the linear array of flashlamps being substantially parallel to the beam propagation direction.

  12. All-optical pulse data generation in a semiconductor optical amplifier gain controlled by a reshaped optical clock injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Gong-Ru; Chang, Yung-Cheng; Yu, Kun-Chieh

    2006-05-01

    Wavelength-maintained all-optical pulse data pattern transformation based on a modified cross-gain-modulation architecture in a strongly gain-depleted semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) is investigated. Under a backward dark-optical-comb injection with 70% duty-cycle reshaping from the received data clock at 10GHz, the incoming optical data stream is transformed into a pulse data stream with duty cycle, rms timing jitter, and conversion gain of 15%, 4ps, and 3dB, respectively. The high-pass filtering effect of the gain-saturated SOA greatly improves the extinction ratio of data stream by 8dB and reduces its bit error rate to 10-12 at -18dBm.

  13. Control of sound radiation from a wavepacket over a curved surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, Lucio; El Hady, Nabil M.

    1989-01-01

    Active control of acoustic pressure in the far field resulting from the growth and decay of a wavepacket convecting in a boundary layer over a concave-convex surface is investigated numerically using direct computations of the Navier-Stokes equations. The resulting sound radiation is computed using linearized Euler equations with the pressure from the Navier-Stokes solution as a time-dependent boundary condition. The acoustic far field exhibits directivity type of behavior that points upstream to the flow direction. A fixed control algorithm is used where the attenuation signal is synthesized by a filter which actively adapt it to the amplitude-time response of the outgoing acoustic wave.

  14. Scalable shape-controlled fabrication of curved microstructures using a femtosecond laser wet-etching process.

    PubMed

    Bian, Hao; Yang, Qing; Chen, Feng; Liu, Hewei; Du, Guangqing; Deng, Zefang; Si, Jinhai; Yun, Feng; Hou, Xun

    2013-07-01

    Materials with curvilinear surface microstructures are highly desirable for micro-optical and biomedical devices. However, realization of such devices efficiently remains technically challenging. This paper demonstrates a facile and flexible method to fabricate curvilinear microstructures with controllable shapes and dimensions. The method composes of femtosecond laser exposures and chemical etching process with the hydrofluoric acid solutions. By fixed-point and step-in laser irradiations followed by the chemical treatments, concave microstructures with different profiles such as spherical, conical, bell-like and parabola were fabricated on silica glasses. The convex structures were replicated on polymers by the casting replication process. In this work, we used this technique to fabricate high-quality microlens arrays and high-aspect-ratio microwells which can be used in 3D cell culture. This approach offers several advantages such as high-efficient, scalable shape-controllable and easy manipulations. PMID:23623098

  15. Cross-differential amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajimiri, Seyed-Ali (Inventor); Kee, Scott D. (Inventor); Aoki, Ichiro (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A cross-differential amplifier is provided. The cross-differential amplifier includes an inductor connected to a direct current power source at a first terminal. A first and second switch, such as transistors, are connected to the inductor at a second terminal. A first and second amplifier are connected at their supply terminals to the first and second switch. The first and second switches are operated to commutate the inductor between the amplifiers so as to provide an amplified signal while limiting the ripple voltage on the inductor and thus limiting the maximum voltage imposed across the amplifiers and switches.

  16. Hybrid matrix amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Martens, J.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Plut, T.A.

    1995-01-03

    The present invention comprises a novel matrix amplifier. The matrix amplifier includes an active superconducting power divider (ASPD) having N output ports; N distributed amplifiers each operatively connected to one of the N output ports of the ASPD; and a power combiner having N input ports each operatively connected to one of the N distributed amplifiers. The distributed amplifier can included M stages of amplification by cascading superconducting active devices. The power combiner can include N active elements. The resulting (N[times]M) matrix amplifier can produce signals of high output power, large bandwidth, and low noise. 6 figures.

  17. Cross-differential amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajimiri, Seyed-Ali (Inventor); Kee, Scott D. (Inventor); Aoki, Ichiro (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A cross-differential amplifier is provided. The cross-differential amplifier includes an inductor connected to a direct current power source at a first terminal. A first and second switch, such as transistors, are connected to the inductor at a second terminal. A first and second amplifier are connected at their supply terminals to the first and second switch. The first and second switches are operated to commutate the inductor between the amplifiers so as to provide an amplified signal while limiting the ripple voltage on the inductor and thus limiting the maximum voltage imposed across the amplifiers and switches.

  18. Hybrid matrix amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Martens, Jon S.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Plut, Thomas A.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention comprises a novel matrix amplifier. The matrix amplifier includes an active superconducting power divider (ASPD) having N output ports; N distributed amplifiers each operatively connected to one of the N output ports of the ASPD; and a power combiner having N input ports each operatively connected to one of the N distributed amplifiers. The distributed amplifier can included M stages of amplification by cascading superconducting active devices. The power combiner can include N active elements. The resulting (N.times.M) matrix amplifier can produce signals of high output power, large bandwidth, and low noise.

  19. Cross-differential amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajimiri, Seyed-Ali (Inventor); Kee, Scott D. (Inventor); Aoki, Ichiro (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A cross-differential amplifier is provided. The cross-differential amplifier includes an inductor connected to a direct current power source at a first terminal. A first and second switch, such as transistors, are connected to the inductor at a second terminal. A first and second amplifier are connected at their supply terminals to the first and second switch. The first and second switches are operated to commutate the inductor between the amplifiers so as to provide an amplified signal while limiting the ripple voltage on the inductor and thus limiting the maximum voltage imposed across the amplifiers and switches.

  20. Cross-differential amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajimiri, Seyed-Ali (Inventor); Kee, Scott D. (Inventor); Aoki, Ichiro (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A cross-differential amplifier is provided. The cross-differential amplifier includes an inductor connected to a direct current power source at a first terminal. A first and second switch, such as transistors, are connected to the inductor at a second terminal. A first and second amplifier are connected at their supply terminals to the first and second switch. The first and second switches are operated to commutate the inductor between the amplifiers so as to provide an amplified signal while limiting the ripple voltage on the inductor and thus limiting the maximum voltage imposed across the amplifiers and switches.

  1. Numerical Investigation of the Control of Separation from Curved and Blunt Trailing Edges Using DNS and LES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasel, Hermann F.

    2002-07-01

    Wall jets over a curved wall geometry (Coanda flows) are investigated using DNS and turbulence modeling. In experiments large coherent structures have enhanced the effectiveness of wall jets in delaying or preventing flow separation on airfoils. Understanding the behavior of these structures is essential for utilizing wall jets for separation control. The research objective is to investigate curvature effects on large coherent structures, in particular the development of longitudinal (Goertler-type) vortices and their interaction with 2D vortices. The focus is on Coanda cylinders using two computational approaches. With the Flow Simulation Methodology (FSM), a turbulent wall jet is computed over a cylinder segment on a body-fitted grid. In FSM, the contribution of the turbulence model depends on the grid resolution relative to a local turbulent length scale. For a flat-plate reference case, FSM is employed as DNS, LES, and URANS. In all cases the large 2D vortices are captured. For the curved-wall geometry, FSM is employed as a DNS. Goertler-type vortices emerge in the simulation but remain weak due to the narrow computational domain. In the second approach, Coanda flows including nozzle and separated region are computed using immersed boundary techniques (IBT). The feasibility of IBT for Coanda Flows is established.

  2. Optimal control of a universal rotating magnetic vector for petal-shaped capsule robot in curve environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongshun; Bai, Jianwei; Chi, Minglu; Cheng, Cunxin; Wang, Dianlong

    2014-09-01

    Steering control of a capsule robot in curve environment by magnetic navigation is not yet solved completely. A petal-shaped capsule robot with less steering resistance based on multiple wedge effects is presented, and an optimization method with two processes for determining the orientation of a pre-applied universal magnetic spin vector is proposed. To realize quick and non-contact steering swimming, a fuzzy comprehensive evaluation method for optimizing the steering driving angle is presented based on two evaluation indexes including the average steering speed and the average steering trajectory deviation, achieving the initial optimal orientation of a universal magnetic spin vector. To further reduce robotic magnetic vibration, a main target method for optimizing its final orientation, which is used for fine adjustment, is employed under the constrains of the magnetic moments. Swimming experimental results in curve pipe verified the effectiveness of the optimization method, which can be effectively used to realize non-contact steering swimming of the petal-shaped robot and reduce its vibration.

  3. Portable musical instrument amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Christian, David E.

    1990-07-24

    The present invention relates to a musical instrument amplifier which is particularly useful for electric guitars. The amplifier has a rigid body for housing both the electronic system for amplifying and processing signals from the guitar and the system's power supply. An input plug connected to and projecting from the body is electrically coupled to the signal amplifying and processing system. When the plug is inserted into an output jack for an electric guitar, the body is rigidly carried by the guitar, and the guitar is operatively connected to the electrical amplifying and signal processing system without use of a loose interconnection cable. The amplifier is provided with an output jack, into which headphones are plugged to receive amplified signals from the guitar. By eliminating the conventional interconnection cable, the amplifier of the present invention can be used by musicians with increased flexibility and greater freedom of movement.

  4. Implementation of CTRLPOS, a VENTURE module for control rod position criticality searches, control rod worth curve calculations, and general criticality searches

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.A.; Renier, J.P.

    1994-06-01

    A module in the VENTURE reactor analysis code system, CTRLPOS, is developed to position control rods and perform control rod position criticality searches. The module is variably dimensioned so that calculations can be performed with any number of control rod banks each having any number of control rods. CTRLPOS can also calculate control rod worth curves for a single control rod or a bank of control rods. Control rod depletion can be calculated to provide radiation source terms. These radiation source terms can be used to predict radiation doses to personnel and estimate the shielding and long-term storage requirements for spent control rods. All of these operations are completely automated. The numerous features of the module are discussed in detail. The necessary input data for the CTRLPOS module is explained. Several sample problems are presented to show the flexibility of the module. The results presented with the sample problems show that the CTRLPOS module is a powerful tool which allows a wide variety of calculations to be easily performed.

  5. High voltage distributed amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willems, D.; Bahl, I.; Wirsing, K.

    1991-12-01

    A high-voltage distributed amplifier implemented in GaAs MMIC technology has demonstrated good circuit performance over at least two octave bandwidth. This technique allows for very broadband amplifier operation with good efficiency in satellite, active-aperture radar, and battery-powered systems. Also, by increasing the number of FETs, the amplifier can be designed to match different voltage rails. The circuit does require a small amount of additional chip size over conventional distributed amplifiers but does not require power dividers or additional matching networks. This circuit configuration should find great use in broadband power amplifier design.

  6. Laser amplifier chain

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, R.P.

    1992-10-20

    A laser amplifier chain has a plurality of laser amplifiers arranged in a chain to sequentially amplify a low-power signal beam to produce a significantly higher-power output beam. Overall efficiency of such a chain is improved if high-gain, low efficiency amplifiers are placed on the upstream side of the chain where only a very small fraction of the total pumped power is received by the chain and low-gain, high-efficiency amplifiers are placed on the downstream side where a majority of pumping energy is received by the chain. 6 figs.

  7. Laser amplifier chain

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    A laser amplifier chain has a plurality of laser amplifiers arranged in a chain to sequentially amplify a low-power signal beam to produce a significantly higher-power output beam. Overall efficiency of such a chain is improved if high-gain, low efficiency amplifiers are placed on the upstream side of the chain where only a very small fraction of the total pumped power is received by the chain and low-gain, high-efficiency amplifiers are placed on the downstream side where a majority of pumping energy is received by the chain.

  8. A dual-mode highly efficient class-E stimulator controlled by a low-Q class-E power amplifier through duty cycle.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Hung-Wei; Lu, Chien-Chi; Chuang, Jia-min; Lin, Wei-Tso; Lin, Chii-Wann; Kao, Ming-Chien; Lin, Mu-Lien

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents the design flow of two high-efficiency class-E amplifiers for the implantable electrical stimulation system. The implantable stimulator is a high-Q class-E driver that delivers a sine-wave pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) stimulation, which was verified to have a superior efficacy in pain relief to a square wave. The proposed duty-cycle-controlled class-E PRF driver designed with a high-Q factor has two operational modes that are able to achieve 100% DC-AC conversion, and involves only one switched series inductor and an unchanged parallel capacitor. The measured output amplitude under low-voltage (LV) mode using a 22% duty cycle was 0.98 V with 91% efficiency, and under high-voltage (HV) mode using a 47% duty cycle was 2.95 V with 92% efficiency. These modes were inductively controlled by a duty-cycle detector, which can detect the duty-cycle modulated signal generated from the external complementary low-Q class-E power amplifier (PA). The design methodology of the low-Q inductive interface for a non-50% duty cycle is presented. The experimental results exhibits that the 1.5-V PA that consumes DC power of 14.21 mW was able to deliver a 2.9-V sine wave to a 500 Ω load. The optimal 60% drain efficiency of the system from the PA to the load was obtained at a 10-mm coupling distance. PMID:23853324

  9. Low noise tuned amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, L. L. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A bandpass amplifier employing a field effect transistor amplifier first stage is described with a resistive load either a.c. or directly coupled to the non-inverting input of an operational amplifier second stage which is loaded in a Wien Bridge configuration. The bandpass amplifier may be operated with a signal injected into the gate terminal of the field effect transistor and the signal output taken from the output terminal of the operational amplifier. The operational amplifier stage appears as an inductive reactance, capacitive reactance and negative resistance at the non-inverting input of the operational amplifier, all of which appear in parallel with the resistive load of the field effect transistor.

  10. Linear signal-compensated amplifier for reactor power measuring channels

    SciTech Connect

    Khaleeq, M. Tahir; Atique-ur-Rahman,; Ahmed, Eijaz

    2006-07-15

    A linear amplifier with automatic signal compensation has been developed for nuclear channels. The amplifier controls its sensitivity automatically according to the reference input within the desired settings and has automatic signal compensation capability for use in the nuclear channels. The amplifier will be used in the existing safety channel of Pakistan Research Reactor-1, where the system has an independent sensitivity control unit for manual compensation of xenon effect. The new amplifier will improve the safety of the system. The amplifier is tested and the results found are in very good agreement with the designed specifications. This article presents design and construction of the amplifier and test results.

  11. Linear signal-compensated amplifier for reactor power measuring channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaleeq, M. Tahir; Atique-ur-Rahman, Ahmed, Eijaz

    2006-07-01

    A linear amplifier with automatic signal compensation has been developed for nuclear channels. The amplifier controls its sensitivity automatically according to the reference input within the desired settings and has automatic signal compensation capability for use in the nuclear channels. The amplifier will be used in the existing safety channel of Pakistan Research Reactor-1, where the system has an independent sensitivity control unit for manual compensation of xenon effect. The new amplifier will improve the safety of the system. The amplifier is tested and the results found are in very good agreement with the designed specifications. This article presents design and construction of the amplifier and test results.

  12. Wireless Josephson amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Narla, A.; Sliwa, K. M.; Hatridge, M.; Shankar, S.; Frunzio, L.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Devoret, M. H.

    2014-06-09

    Josephson junction parametric amplifiers are playing a crucial role in the readout chain in superconducting quantum information experiments. However, their integration with current 3D cavity implementations poses the problem of transitioning between waveguide, coax cables, and planar circuits. Moreover, Josephson amplifiers require auxiliary microwave components, like directional couplers and/or hybrids, that are sources of spurious losses and impedance mismatches that limit measurement efficiency and amplifier tunability. We have developed a wireless architecture for these parametric amplifiers that eliminates superfluous microwave components and interconnects. This greatly simplifies their assembly and integration into experiments. We present an experimental realization of such a device operating in the 9–11 GHz band with about 100 MHz of amplitude gain-bandwidth product, on par with devices mounted in conventional sample holders. The simpler impedance environment presented to the amplifier also results in increased amplifier tunability.

  13. Multilevel Growth Curve Analyses of Treatment Effects of a Web-Based Intervention for Stress Reduction: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Raeder, Sabine; Kraft, Pål; Bjørkli, Cato Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Background Stress is commonly experienced by many people and it is a contributing factor to many mental and physical health conditions, However, few efforts have been made to develop and test the effects of interventions for stress. Objective The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a Web-based stress-reduction intervention on stress, investigate mindfulness and procrastination as potential mediators of any treatment effects, and test whether the intervention is equally effective for females as males, all ages, and all levels of education. Methods We employed a randomized controlled trial in this study. Participants were recruited online via Facebook and randomly assigned to either the stress intervention or a control condition. The Web-based stress intervention was fully automated and consisted of 13 sessions over 1 month. The controls were informed that they would get access to the intervention after the final data collection. Data were collected at baseline and at 1, 2, and 6 months after intervention onset by means of online questionnaires. Outcomes were stress, mindfulness, and procrastination, which were all measured at every measurement occasion. Results A total of 259 participants were included and were allocated to either the stress intervention (n=126) or the control condition (n=133). Participants in the intervention and control group were comparable at baseline; however, results revealed that participants in the stress intervention followed a statistically different (ie, cubic) developmental trajectory in stress levels over time compared to the controls. A growth curve analysis showed that participants in the stress intervention (unstandardized beta coefficient [B]=–3.45, P=.008) recovered more quickly compared to the control group (B=–0.81, P=.34) from baseline to 1 month. Although participants in the stress intervention did show increases in stress levels during the study period (B=2.23, P=.008), long-term stress levels did decrease

  14. Compact laser amplifier system

    DOEpatents

    Carr, R.B.

    1974-02-26

    A compact laser amplifier system is described in which a plurality of face-pumped annular disks, aligned along a common axis, independently radially amplify a stimulating light pulse. Partially reflective or lasing means, coaxially positioned at the center of each annualar disk, radially deflects a stimulating light directed down the common axis uniformly into each disk for amplification, such that the light is amplified by the disks in a parallel manner. Circumferential reflecting means coaxially disposed around each disk directs amplified light emission, either toward a common point or in a common direction. (Official Gazette)

  15. An Additional Approach to Model Current Followers and Amplifiers with Electronically Controllable Parameters from Commercially Available ICs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotner, R.; Kartci, A.; Jerabek, J.; Herencsar, N.; Dostal, T.; Vrba, K.

    2012-12-01

    Several behavioral models of current active elements for experimental purposes are introduced in this paper. These models are based on commercially available devices. They are suitable for experimental tests of current- and mixed-mode filters, oscillators, and other circuits (employing current-mode active elements) frequently used in analog signal processing without necessity of onchip fabrication of proper active element. Several methods of electronic control of intrinsic resistance in the proposed behavioral models are discussed. All predictions and theoretical assumptions are supported by simulations and experiments. This contribution helps to find a cheaper and more effective way to preliminary laboratory tests without expensive on-chip fabrication of special active elements.

  16. Exploring the physical controls of regional patterns of flow duration curves - Part 1: Insights from statistical analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, L.; Yaeger, M.; Viglione, A.; Coopersmith, E.; Ye, S.; Sivapalan, M.

    2012-11-01

    The flow duration curve (FDC) is a classical method used to graphically represent the relationship between the frequency and magnitude of streamflow. In this sense it represents a compact signature of temporal runoff variability that can also be used to diagnose catchment rainfall-runoff responses, including similarity and differences between catchments. This paper is aimed at extracting regional patterns of the FDCs from observed daily flow data and elucidating the physical controls underlying these patterns, as a way to aid towards their regionalization and predictions in ungauged basins. The FDCs of total runoff (TFDC) using multi-decadal streamflow records for 197 catchments across the continental United States are separated into the FDCs of two runoff components, i.e., fast flow (FFDC) and slow flow (SFDC). In order to compactly display these regional patterns, the 3-parameter mixed gamma distribution is employed to characterize the shapes of the normalized FDCs (i.e., TFDC, FFDC and SFDC) over the entire data record. This is repeated to also characterize the between-year variability of "annual" FDCs for 8 representative catchments chosen across a climate gradient. Results show that the mixed gamma distribution can adequately capture the shapes of the FDCs and their variation between catchments and also between years. Comparison between the between-catchment and between-year variability of the FDCs revealed significant space-time symmetry. Possible relationships between the parameters of the fitted mixed gamma distribution and catchment climatic and physiographic characteristics are explored in order to decipher and point to the underlying physical controls. The baseflow index (a surrogate for the collective impact of geology, soils, topography and vegetation, as well as climate) is found to be the dominant control on the shapes of the normalized TFDC and SFDC, whereas the product of maximum daily precipitation and the fraction of non-rainy days was found to

  17. Exploring the physical controls of regional patterns of flow duration curves - Part 1: Insights from statistical analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, L.; Yaeger, M.; Viglione, A.; Coopersmith, E.; Ye, S.; Sivapalan, M.

    2012-06-01

    The Flow Duration Curve (FDC) is a classical method used to graphically represent the relationship between the frequency and magnitude of streamflow. In this sense it represents a compact signature of temporal runoff variability that can also be used to diagnose catchment rainfall-runoff responses, including similarity and differences between catchments. This paper is aimed at extracting regional patterns of the FDCs from observed daily flow data and elucidating the physical controls underlying these patterns, as a way to aid towards their regionalization and predictions in ungauged basins. The FDCs of total runoff (TFDC) using multi-decadal streamflow records for 197 catchments across the continental United States are separated into the FDCs of two runoff components, i.e., fast flow (FFDC) and slow flow (SFDC). In order to compactly display these regional patterns the 3-parameter mixed gamma distribution is employed to characterize the shapes of the normalized FDCs (i.e., TFDC, FFDC and SFDC) over the entire data record. This is repeated to also characterize the between-year variability of "annual" FDCs for 8 representative catchments chosen across a climate gradient. Results show that the mixed gamma distribution can adequately capture the shapes of the FDCs and their variation between catchments and also between years. Comparison between the between-catchment and between-year variability of the FDCs revealed significant space-time symmetry. Possible relationships between the parameters of the fitted mixed gamma distribution and catchment climatic and physiographic characteristics are explored in order to decipher and point to the underlying physical controls. The baseflow index (a surrogate for the collective impact of geology, soils, topology and vegetation, as well as climate) is found to be the dominant control on the shapes of the normalized TFDC and SFDC, whereas the product of maximum daily precipitation and the fraction of non-rainy days was found to

  18. Research and control of thermal effect in a helium gas-cooled multislab Nd:glass laser amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuqi; Wang, Jiangfeng; Lu, Xinghua; Huang, Wenfa; Li, Xuechun

    2015-08-01

    As the development of the laser-driven technology, the next generation of laser-driven device sets higher requirement for the repetition frequency. The higher repetition gives rise to thermal deposition, which induces thermo-optical effect, elasto-optical effect and bulk displacement. The thermal efficient management is an important approach to dissolve the thermal deposition. The quasi uniform distribution of heat medium is realized by helium cooling Nd:glass slab and the control of edge temperature. In the case, wavefront distortion and depolarization losses is obtained in experiment. Results said that both of them are improved greatly. At the same time, the distribution of temperature, stress and strain and stress birefringence in Nd:glass are analyzed by using finite element numerical simulation method. And the calculation results show that the wavefront distortion and depolarization losses match with the experimental results very well.

  19. Violacein as a genetically-controlled, enzymatically amplified and photobleaching-resistant chromophore for optoacoustic bacterial imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuanyuan; Sigmund, Felix; Reber, Josefine; Luís Deán-Ben, Xosé; Glasl, Sarah; Kneipp, Moritz; Estrada, Héctor; Razansky, Daniel; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Westmeyer, Gil G.

    2015-01-01

    There is growing interest in genetically expressed reporters for in vivo studies of bacterial colonization in the context of infectious disease research, studies of the bacterial microbiome or cancer imaging and treatment. To empower non-invasive high-resolution bacterial tracking with deep tissue penetration, we herein use the genetically controlled biosynthesis of the deep-purple pigment Violacein as a photobleaching-resistant chromophore label for in vivo optoacoustic (photoacoustic) imaging in the near-infrared range. We demonstrate that Violacein-producing bacteria can be imaged with high contrast-to-noise in strongly vascularized xenografted murine tumors and further observe that Violacein shows anti-tumoral activity. Our experiments thus identify Violacein as a robust bacterial label for non-invasive optoacoustic imaging with high potential for basic research and future theranostic applications in bacterial tumor targeting. PMID:26091543

  20. Violacein as a genetically-controlled, enzymatically amplified and photobleaching-resistant chromophore for optoacoustic bacterial imaging.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuanyuan; Sigmund, Felix; Reber, Josefine; Deán-Ben, Xosé Luís; Glasl, Sarah; Kneipp, Moritz; Estrada, Héctor; Razansky, Daniel; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Westmeyer, Gil G

    2015-01-01

    There is growing interest in genetically expressed reporters for in vivo studies of bacterial colonization in the context of infectious disease research, studies of the bacterial microbiome or cancer imaging and treatment. To empower non-invasive high-resolution bacterial tracking with deep tissue penetration, we herein use the genetically controlled biosynthesis of the deep-purple pigment Violacein as a photobleaching-resistant chromophore label for in vivo optoacoustic (photoacoustic) imaging in the near-infrared range. We demonstrate that Violacein-producing bacteria can be imaged with high contrast-to-noise in strongly vascularized xenografted murine tumors and further observe that Violacein shows anti-tumoral activity. Our experiments thus identify Violacein as a robust bacterial label for non-invasive optoacoustic imaging with high potential for basic research and future theranostic applications in bacterial tumor targeting. PMID:26091543

  1. Dye laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Moses, Edward I.

    1992-01-01

    An improved dye laser amplifier is disclosed. The efficiency of the dye lr amplifier is increased significantly by increasing the power of a dye beam as it passes from an input window to an output window within the dye chamber, while maintaining the intensity of the dye beam constant.

  2. Dye laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Moses, E.I.

    1992-12-01

    An improved dye laser amplifier is disclosed. The efficiency of the dye laser amplifier is increased significantly by increasing the power of a dye beam as it passes from an input window to an output window within the dye chamber, while maintaining the intensity of the dye beam constant. 3 figs.

  3. DIRECT COUPLED AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Dandl, R.A.

    1961-09-19

    A transistor amplifier is designed for vyery small currents below 10/sup -8/ amperes. The filrst and second amplifier stages use unusual selected transistors in which the current amplification increases markedly for values of base current below 10/sup -6/ amperes.

  4. Amplifier improvement circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturman, J.

    1968-01-01

    Stable input stage was designed for the use with a integrated circuit operational amplifier to provide improved performance as an instrumentation-type amplifier. The circuit provides high input impedance, stable gain, good common mode rejection, very low drift, and low output impedance.

  5. Linearly polarized fiber amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Kliner, Dahv A.; Koplow, Jeffery P.

    2004-11-30

    Optically pumped rare-earth-doped polarizing fibers exhibit significantly higher gain for one linear polarization state than for the orthogonal state. Such a fiber can be used to construct a single-polarization fiber laser, amplifier, or amplified-spontaneous-emission (ASE) source without the need for additional optical components to obtain stable, linearly polarized operation.

  6. Bradford Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rousseau, Ronald

    1994-01-01

    Discussion of informetric distributions shows that generalized Leimkuhler functions give proper fits to a large variety of Bradford curves, including those exhibiting a Groos droop or a rising tail. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test is used to test goodness of fit, and least-square fits are compared with Egghe's method. (Contains 53 references.) (LRW)

  7. DISTRIBUTED AMPLIFIER INCORPORATING FEEDBACK

    DOEpatents

    Bell, P.R. Jr.

    1958-10-21

    An improved distributed amplifier system employing feedback for stabilization is presented. In accordance with the disclosed invention, a signal to be amplified is applled to one end of a suitable terminated grid transmission line. At intervals along the transmission line, the signal is fed to stable, resistance-capacitance coupled amplifiers incorporating feedback loops therein. The output current from each amplifier is passed through an additional tube to minimize the electrostatic capacitance between the tube elements of the last stage of the amplifier, and fed to appropriate points on an output transmission line, similar to the grid line, but terminated at the opposite (input) end. The output taken from the unterminated end of the plate transmission line is proportional to the input voltage impressed upon the grid line.

  8. Versatile composite amplifier configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gift, Stephan J. G.; Maundy, Brent

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes a versatile composite amplifier in which a current feedback amplifier (CFA) drives an operational amplifier (OPA). In the conventional OPA-CFA composite amplifier, an OPA drives a CFA resulting in a composite structure that combines the DC input stability of the OPA and the high speed capability of the CFA. The proposed composite configuration combines different features of the CFA and OPA, specifically the constant bandwidth property of the CFA and the high power and high current output capacity of the OPA. The new circuit is easily implemented in the standard inverting and non-inverting configurations using commercially available devices, and the accuracy and constant bandwidth features were experimentally verified. Local feedback around the associated CFA ensures that the proposed composite amplifier possesses a higher level of bandwidth constancy than a single CFA.

  9. Small and lightweight power amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shams, Qamar A.; Barnes, Kevin N.; Fox, Robert L.; Moses, Robert W.; Bryant, Robert G.; Robinson, Paul C.; Shirvani, Mir

    2002-07-01

    The control of u wanted structural vibration is implicit in most of NASA's programs. Currently several approaches to control vibrations in large, lightweight, deployable structures and twin tail aircraft at high angles of attack are being evaluated. The Air Force has been examining a vertical tail buffet load alleviation system that can be integrated onboard an F/A-18 and flown. Previous wind tunnel and full-scale ground tests using distributed actuators have shown that the concept works; however, there is insufficient rom available onboard an F/A-18 to store current state-of- the-art system components such as amplifiers, DC-to-DC converter and a computer for performing vibration suppression. Sensor processing, power electronics, DC-to-DC converters, and control electronics that may be collocated with distributed actuators, are particularly desirable. Such electronic system would obviate the need for complex, centralized, control processing and power distribution components that will eliminate the weight associated with lengthy wiring and cabling networks. Several small and lightweight power amplifiers ranging from 300V pp to 650V pp have been designed using off the shelf components for different applications. In this paper, the design and testing of these amplifiers will be presented under various electrical loads.

  10. High power regenerative laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Miller, J.L.; Hackel, L.A.; Dane, C.B.; Zapata, L.E.

    1994-02-08

    A regenerative amplifier design capable of operating at high energy per pulse, for instance, from 20-100 Joules, at moderate repetition rates, for instance from 5-20 Hertz is provided. The laser amplifier comprises a gain medium and source of pump energy coupled with the gain medium; a Pockels cell, which rotates an incident beam in response to application of a control signal; an optical relay system defining a first relay plane near the gain medium and a second relay plane near the rotator; and a plurality of reflectors configured to define an optical path through the gain medium, optical relay and Pockels cell, such that each transit of the optical path includes at least one pass through the gain medium and only one pass through the Pockels cell. An input coupler, and an output coupler are provided, implemented by a single polarizer. A control circuit coupled to the Pockels cell generates the control signal in timed relationship with the input pulse so that the input pulse is captured by the input coupler and proceeds through at least one transit of the optical path, and then the control signal is applied to cause rotation of the pulse to a polarization reflected by the polarizer, after which the captured pulse passes through the gain medium at least once more and is reflected out of the optical path by the polarizer before passing through the rotator again to provide an amplified pulse. 7 figures.

  11. High power regenerative laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Miller, John L.; Hackel, Lloyd A.; Dane, Clifford B.; Zapata, Luis E.

    1994-01-01

    A regenerative amplifier design capable of operating at high energy per pulse, for instance, from 20-100 Joules, at moderate repetition rates, for instance from 5-20 Hertz is provided. The laser amplifier comprises a gain medium and source of pump energy coupled with the gain medium; a Pockels cell, which rotates an incident beam in response to application of a control signal; an optical relay system defining a first relay plane near the gain medium and a second relay plane near the rotator; and a plurality of reflectors configured to define an optical path through the gain medium, optical relay and Pockels cell, such that each transit of the optical path includes at least one pass through the gain medium and only one pass through the Pockels cell. An input coupler, and an output coupler are provided, implemented by a single polarizer. A control circuit coupled to the Pockels cell generates the control signal in timed relationship with the input pulse so that the input pulse is captured by the input coupler and proceeds through at least one transit of the optical path, and then the control signal is applied to cause rotation of the pulse to a polarization reflected by the polarizer, after which the captured pulse passes through the gain medium at least once more and is reflected out of the optical path by the polarizer before passing through the rotator again to provide an amplified pulse.

  12. Amplified OTDR Systems for Multipoint Corrosion Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Jehan F.; Silva, Marcionilo J.; Coêlho, Isnaldo J. S.; Cipriano, Eliel; Martins-Filho, Joaquim F.

    2012-01-01

    We present two configurations of an amplified fiber-optic-based corrosion sensor using the optical time domain reflectometry (OTDR) technique as the interrogation method. The sensor system is multipoint, self-referenced, has no moving parts and can measure the corrosion rate several kilometers away from the OTDR equipment. The first OTDR monitoring system employs a remotely pumped in-line EDFA and it is used to evaluate the increase in system reach compared to a non-amplified configuration. The other amplified monitoring system uses an EDFA in booster configuration and we perform corrosion measurements and evaluations of system sensitivity to amplifier gain variations. Our experimental results obtained under controlled laboratory conditions show the advantages of the amplified system in terms of longer system reach with better spatial resolution, and also that the corrosion measurements obtained from our system are not sensitive to 3 dB gain variations. PMID:22737017

  13. Performance of single semiconductor optical amplifier-based ultrafast nonlinear interferometer with clock-control signals timing deviation in dual rail-switching mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siarkos, Thanassis; Zoiros, Kyriakos E.

    2009-08-01

    The performance of a single semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA)-based ultrafast nonlinear interferometer that is simultaneously driven by two ultrafast data streams with respect to the timing deviation between these signals and the standard clock input is theoretically studied and investigated. For this purpose, a numerical model is applied to simulate the operation of the specific module in pattern-operated dual rail-switching mode and under the presence of such imperfect synchronization. The thorough analysis and interpretation of the obtained results allows one to evaluate the impact of this temporal offset on the achievement of both bitwise logical correctness and high quality at the output. In this manner, the conditions that it must necessarily fulfill are derived and the dependence of its permissible margin and accordingly the way the latter can be extended is revealed, while its optimal amount for maximizing the defined metric is quantified by the difference between the orthogonal polarization clock components' relative walk-off and the control pulse width. These findings can help compensate for the existence of this effect as well as strengthen the tolerance against it so that it can be properly handled in the context of the considered type of SOA-based interferometric switch.

  14. Crystal oscillators using negative voltage gain, single pole response amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, Leonard L. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A simple and inexpensive crystal oscillator is provided which employs negative voltage gain, single pole response amplifiers. The amplifiers may include such configurations as gate inverters, operational amplifiers and conventional bipolar transistor amplifiers, all of which operate at a frequency which is on the roll-off portion of their gain versus frequency curve. Several amplifier feedback circuit variations are employed to set desired bias levels and to allow the oscillator to operate at the crystal's fundamental frequency or at an overtone of the fundamental frequency. The oscillator is made less expensive than comparable oscillators by employing relatively low frequency amplifiers and operating them at roll-off, at frequencies beyond which they are customarily used. Simplicity is provided because operation at roll-off eliminates components ordinarily required in similar circuits to provide sufficient phase-shift in the feedback circuitry for oscillation to occur.

  15. Tuning Broadband Microwave Amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Alaniz, Gabriel

    2003-09-05

    The PEP-II/DA {Phi} NE/ALS longitudinal feedback systems are complex wide bandwidth systems requiring analog, digital and microwave circuits. The solid-state amplifier is one of the components in the microwave circuit that is required to suppress the coupled bunch instabilities that exist in the PEP-II accelerator. The suppression is achieved by using an antenna as a kicker structure that provides an electric field in order to increase or decrease the energy of particles passing through the structure. The amplifier is made up of sixteen 30 to 35W microstrip GaAs FET modules that are combined to obtain 500W over a bandwidth of 850MHz to 1850MHz. The amplifier malfunctioned causing a reduction in the functionality and power output of the individual GaAs FET modules. The amplifier must be repaired. After repair, the amplifier must be tuned to optimize the gain while maintaining proper power output. The amplifier is tuned using microstrip circuit techniques. A variety of microstrip methods are used to obtain the proper line impedance. The result is a working amplifier that operates efficiently.

  16. Universal signal conditioning amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medelius, Pedro J.; Hallberg, Carl; Cecil, Jim

    1994-01-01

    A state-of-the-art instrumentation amplifier capable of being used with most types of transducers has been developed at the Kennedy Space Center. This Universal Signal Conditioning Amplifier (USCA) can eliminate costly measurement setup item and troubleshooting, improve system reliability and provide more accurate data than conventional amplifiers. The USCA can configure itself for maximum resolution and accuracy based on information read from a RAM chip attached to each transducer. Excitation voltages or current are also automatically configured. The amplifier uses both analog and digital state-of-the-art technology with analog-to-digital conversion performed in the early stages in order to minimize errors introduced by offset and gain drifts in the analog components. A dynamic temperature compensation scheme has been designed to achieve and maintain 12-bit accuracy of the amplifier from 0 to 70 C. The digital signal processing section allows the implementation of digital filters up to 511th order. The amplifier can also perform real-time linearizations up to fourth order while processing data at a rate of 23.438 kS/s. Both digital and analog outputs are available from the amplifier.

  17. Orientation and density control of bispecific anti-HER2 antibody on functionalized carbon nanotubes for amplifying effective binding reactivity to cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hye-In; Hwang, Dobeen; Jeon, Su-Ji; Lee, Sangyeop; Park, Jung Hyun; Yim, Dabin; Yang, Jin-Kyoung; Kang, Homan; Choo, Jaebum; Lee, Yoon-Sik; Chung, Junho; Kim, Jong-Ho

    2015-03-01

    Nanomaterial bioconjugates have gained unabated interest in the field of sensing, imaging and therapy. As a conjugation process significantly affects the biological functions of proteins, it is crucial to attach them to nanomaterials with control over their orientation and the nanomaterial-to-protein ratio in order to amplify the binding efficiency of nanomaterial bioconjugates to targets. Here, we describe a targeting nanomaterial platform utilizing carbon nanotubes functionalized with a cotinine-modified dextran polymer and a bispecific anti-HER2 × cotinine tandem antibody. This new approach provides an effective control over antibody orientation and density on the surface of carbon nanotubes through site-specific binding between the anti-cotinine domain of the bispecific tandem antibody and the cotinine group of the functionalized carbon nanotubes. The developed synthetic carbon nanotube/bispecific tandem antibody conjugates (denoted as SNAs) show an effective binding affinity against HER2 that is three orders of magnitude higher than that of the carbon nanotubes bearing a randomly conjugated tandem antibody prepared by carbodiimide chemistry. As the density of a tandem antibody on SNAs increases, their effective binding affinity to HER2 increases as well. SNAs exhibit strong resonance Raman signals for signal transduction, and are successfully applied to the selective detection of HER2-overexpressing cancer cells.Nanomaterial bioconjugates have gained unabated interest in the field of sensing, imaging and therapy. As a conjugation process significantly affects the biological functions of proteins, it is crucial to attach them to nanomaterials with control over their orientation and the nanomaterial-to-protein ratio in order to amplify the binding efficiency of nanomaterial bioconjugates to targets. Here, we describe a targeting nanomaterial platform utilizing carbon nanotubes functionalized with a cotinine-modified dextran polymer and a bispecific anti-HER2

  18. Multipass optical parametric amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Jeys, T.H.

    1996-08-01

    A compact, low-threshold, multipass optical parametric amplifier has been developed for the conversion of short-pulse (360-ps) 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser radiation into eye-safe 1572-nm radiation for laser ranging and radar applications. The amplifier had a threshold pump power of as low as 45{mu}J, and at three to four times this threshold pump power the amplifier converted 30{percent} of the input 1064-nm radiation into 1572-nm output radiation. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  19. Amplify Interest in STS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiappetta, Eugene L; Mays, John D.

    1992-01-01

    Presents activities in which students construct simple crystal radio sets and amplifiers out of diodes, transistors, and integrated circuits. Provides conceptual background, materials needed, instructions, diagrams, and classroom applications. (MDH)

  20. Fully relayed regenerative amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Glass, Alexander J.

    1981-01-01

    A regenerative laser apparatus and method using the optical relay concept to maintain high fill factors, to suppress diffraction effects, and to minimize phase distortions in a regenerative amplifier.

  1. Flight-test evaluation of STOL control and flight director concepts in a powered-lift aircraft flying curved decelerating approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hindson, W. S.; Hardy, G. H.; Innis, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    Flight tests were carried out to assess the feasibility of piloted steep curved, and decelerating approach profiles in powered lift STOL aircraft. Several STOL control concepts representative of a variety of aircraft were evaluated in conjunction with suitably designed flight directions. The tests were carried out in a real navigation environment, employed special electronic cockpit displays, and included the development of the performance achieved and the control utilization involved in flying 180 deg turning, descending, and decelerating approach profiles to landing. The results suggest that such moderately complex piloted instrument approaches may indeed be feasible from a pilot acceptance point of view, given an acceptable navigation environment. Systems with the capability of those used in this experiment can provide the potential of achieving instrument operations on curved, descending, and decelerating landing approaches to weather minima corresponding to CTOL Category 2 criteria, while also providing a means of realizing more efficient operations during visual flight conditions.

  2. Frequency-tunable optoelectronic oscillator using a dual-mode amplified feedback laser as an electrically controlled active microwave photonic filter.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dan; Pan, Biwei; Chen, Haibo; Zhao, Lingjuan

    2015-09-15

    A widely tunable optoelectronic oscillator (OEO) based on a self-injection-locked monolithic dual-mode amplified feedback laser (DM-AFL) is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. In the proposed OEO structure, the DM-AFL functions as an active tunable microwave photonic filter (MPF). By tuning the injection current applied on the amplifier section of the AFL, tunable microwave outputs ranging from 32 to 41 GHz and single sideband phase noises below -97  dBc/Hz at 10 kHz offset from the carriers were realized. PMID:26371931

  3. 100,000-fold concentration of anions in capillary zone electrophoresis using electroosmotic flow controlled counterflow isotachophoretic stacking under field amplified conditions.

    PubMed

    Breadmore, Michael C; Quirino, Joselito P

    2008-08-15

    An electroosmotic flow (EOF) controlled counterflow isotachophoretic stacking boundary (cf-ITPSB) system under field amplified conditions has been examined as a way to improve the sensitivity of anions separated by capillary zone electrophoresis. The system comprised a high concentration of a high-mobility leading ion (100 mM chloride) and a low concentration of low-mobility terminating ion (1-3 mM MES or CHES) added to the sample in an unmodified fused-silica capillary at pH 8.05, buffered with Tris. Computer simulation studies using the software GENTRANS showed an increase in sensitivity of at least 10-fold over the previous cf-ITPSB system for simple inorganic ions, nitrite and nitrate. The simulations also suggested that the cf-ITPSB became stationary within the capillary and that its stationary position was not adversely affected by the concentration of MES. This was in contrast to experimental results that showed a slow and continual movement of the cf-ITPSB. This was more pronounced at lower concentrations of terminator (i.e., <3 mM) and resulted in a loss of resolution due to the cf-ITPSB being closer to the detector upon separation. This discrepancy was attributed to the change in pH across the capillary due to electrolysis and low buffering capacity in the sample, a phenomenon that cannot be simulated by the GENTRANS software. Replacement of MES with CHES as a lower mobility ion with increased buffer capacity failed to reduce the movement of the cf-ITPSB but did provide a further 3-fold improvement in sensitivity. The potential of this approach for sensitivity enhancement was demonstrated for the co-EOF separation of a mixture of six inorganic and small organic ions, with detection limits at the single-figure nanogram per liter level. These detection limits are 100,000 times better than can be achieved by normal hydrodynamic injection (ions prepared in water) and 250 times better than has been achieved by other online preconcentration approaches. The

  4. Electrospun Amplified Fiber Optics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    All-optical signal processing is the focus of much research aiming to obtain effective alternatives to existing data transmission platforms. Amplification of light in fiber optics, such as in Erbium-doped fiber amplifiers, is especially important for efficient signal transmission. However, the complex fabrication methods involving high-temperature processes performed in a highly pure environment slow the fabrication process and make amplified components expensive with respect to an ideal, high-throughput, room temperature production. Here, we report on near-infrared polymer fiber amplifiers working over a band of ∼20 nm. The fibers are cheap, spun with a process entirely carried out at room temperature, and shown to have amplified spontaneous emission with good gain coefficients and low levels of optical losses (a few cm–1). The amplification process is favored by high fiber quality and low self-absorption. The found performance metrics appear to be suitable for short-distance operations, and the large variety of commercially available doping dyes might allow for effective multiwavelength operations by electrospun amplified fiber optics. PMID:25710188

  5. High input impedance amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, Leonard L.

    1995-01-01

    High input impedance amplifiers are provided which reduce the input impedance solely to a capacitive reactance, or, in a somewhat more complex design, provide an extremely high essentially infinite, capacitive reactance. In one embodiment, where the input impedance is reduced in essence, to solely a capacitive reactance, an operational amplifier in a follower configuration is driven at its non-inverting input and a resistor with a predetermined magnitude is connected between the inverting and non-inverting inputs. A second embodiment eliminates the capacitance from the input by adding a second stage to the first embodiment. The second stage is a second operational amplifier in a non-inverting gain-stage configuration where the output of the first follower stage drives the non-inverting input of the second stage and the output of the second stage is fed back to the non-inverting input of the first stage through a capacitor of a predetermined magnitude. These amplifiers, while generally useful, are very useful as sensor buffer amplifiers that may eliminate significant sources of error.

  6. A micropower electrocardiogram amplifier.

    PubMed

    Fay, L; Misra, V; Sarpeshkar, R

    2009-10-01

    We introduce an electrocardiogram (EKG) preamplifier with a power consumption of 2.8 muW, 8.1 muVrms input-referred noise, and a common-mode rejection ratio of 90 dB. Compared to previously reported work, this amplifier represents a significant reduction in power with little compromise in signal quality. The improvement in performance may be attributed to many optimizations throughout the design including the use of subthreshold transistor operation to improve noise efficiency, gain-setting capacitors versus resistors, half-rail operation wherever possible, optimal power allocations among amplifier blocks, and the sizing of devices to improve matching and reduce noise. We envision that the micropower amplifier can be used as part of a wireless EKG monitoring system powered by rectified radio-frequency energy or other forms of energy harvesting like body vibration and body heat. PMID:23853270

  7. STABILIZED FEEDBACK AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Fishbine, H.L.; Sewell, C. Jr.

    1957-08-01

    Negative feedback amplifiers, and particularly a negative feedback circuit which is economical on amode power consumption, are described. Basically, the disclosed circuit comprises two tetrode tubes where the output of the first tube is capacitamce coupled to the grid of the second tube, which in turn has its plate coupled to the cathode of the first tube to form a degenerative feedback circuit. Operating potential for screen of the second tube is supplied by connecting the cathode resistor of the first tube to the screen, while the screen is by-passed to the cathode of its tube for the amplified frequencies. Also, the amplifier incorporates a circuit to stabilize the transconductance of the tubes by making the grid potential of each tube interdependent on anode currents of both lubes by voltage divider circuitry.

  8. Spatial Light Amplifier Modulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eng, Sverre T.; Olsson, N. Anders

    1992-01-01

    Spatial light amplifier modulators (SLAM's) are conceptual devices that effect two-dimensional spatial modulation in optical computing and communication systems. Unlike current spatial light modulators, these provide gain. Optical processors incorporating SLAM's designed to operate in reflection or transmission mode. Each element of planar SLAM array is optical amplifier - surface-emitting diode laser. Array addressed electrically with ac modulating signals superimposed on dc bias currents supplied to lasers. SLAM device provides both desired modulation and enough optical gain to enable splitting of output signal into many optical fibers without excessive loss of power.

  9. A grid amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Moonil; Weikle, Robert M., II; Hacker, Jonathan B.; Delisio, Michael P.; Rutledge, David B.; Rosenberg, James J.; Smith, R. P.

    1991-01-01

    A 50-MESFET grid amplifier is reported that has a gain of 11 dB at 3.3 GHz. The grid isolates the input from the output by using vertical polarization for the input beam and horizontal polarization for the transmitted output beam. The grid unit cell is a two-MESFET differential amplifier. A simple calibration procedure allows the gain to be calculated from a relative power measurement. This grid is a hybrid circuit, but the structure is suitable for fabrication as a monolithic wafer-scale integrated circuit, particularly at millimeter wavelengths.

  10. Universal signal conditioning amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, William E.; Hallberg, Carl; Medelius, Pedro J.

    1994-01-01

    Engineers at NASA's Kennedy Space Center have designed a signal conditioning amplifier which automatically matches itself to almost any kind of transducer. The product, called Universal Signal Conditioning Amplifier (USCA), uses state-of-the-art technologies to deliver high accuracy measurements. USCA's features which can be either programmable or automated include: voltage, current, or pulsed excitation, unlimited resolution gain, digital filtering and both analog and digital output. USCA will be used at Kennedy Space Center's launch pads for environmental measurements such as vibrations, strains, temperatures and overpressures. USCA is presently being commercialized through a co-funded agreement between NASA, the State of Florida, and Loral Test and Information Systems, Inc.

  11. Fourier plane image amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, L.A.; Hermann, M.R.; Dane, C.B.; Tiszauer, D.H.

    1995-12-12

    A solid state laser is frequency tripled to 0.3 {micro}m. A small portion of the laser is split off and generates a Stokes seed in a low power oscillator. The low power output passes through a mask with the appropriate hole pattern. Meanwhile, the bulk of the laser output is focused into a larger stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) amplifier. The low power beam is directed through the same cell in the opposite direction. The majority of the amplification takes place at the focus which is the fourier transform plane of the mask image. The small holes occupy large area at the focus and thus are preferentially amplified. The amplified output is now imaged onto the multichip module where the holes are drilled. Because of the fourier plane amplifier, only about 1/10th the power of a competitive system is needed. This concept allows less expensive masks to be used in the process and requires much less laser power. 1 fig.

  12. Improved RF Isolation Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, G. L.; Macconnell, J.

    1985-01-01

    Circuit has high reverse isolation and wide bandwidth. Wideband isolation amplifier has low intermodulation distortion and high reverse isolation. Circuit does not require selected or matched components or directional coupling device. Circuit used in applications requiring high reverse isolation such as receiver intermediate-frequency (IF) strips and frequency distribution systems. Also applicable in RF and video signaling.

  13. Fourier plane image amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Hermann, Mark R.; Dane, C. Brent; Tiszauer, Detlev H.

    1995-01-01

    A solid state laser is frequency tripled to 0.3 .mu.m. A small portion of the laser is split off and generates a Stokes seed in a low power oscillator. The low power output passes through a mask with the appropriate hole pattern. Meanwhile, the bulk of the laser output is focused into a larger stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) amplifier. The low power beam is directed through the same cell in the opposite direction. The majority of the amplification takes place at the focus which is the fourier transform plane of the mask image. The small holes occupy large area at the focus and thus are preferentially amplified. The amplified output is now imaged onto the multichip module where the holes are drilled. Because of the fourier plane amplifier, only .about.1/10th the power of a competitive system is needed. This concept allows less expensive masks to be used in the process and requires much less laser power.

  14. 32 CFR 245.12 - Amplifying instructions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... flights, agricultural and forest fire flights, border patrol flights, and other essential civil air...) MISCELLANEOUS PLAN FOR THE EMERGENCY SECURITY CONTROL OF AIR TRAFFIC (ESCAT) The ESCAT Plan § 245.12 Amplifying... air traffic identification and control procedures to the more restrictive identification and...

  15. 32 CFR 245.12 - Amplifying instructions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... flights, agricultural and forest fire flights, border patrol flights, and other essential civil air...) MISCELLANEOUS PLAN FOR THE EMERGENCY SECURITY CONTROL OF AIR TRAFFIC (ESCAT) The ESCAT Plan § 245.12 Amplifying... air traffic identification and control procedures to the more restrictive identification and...

  16. Research on fluidics, valves, and proportional amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Research and development being conducted at the Systems and Controls Laboratory is reviewed. Static characteristics (supply, input, transfer, output, and noise characteristics) of laminar proportional amplifiers were investigated. Other topics discussed include velocity profiles for laminar fluidic jets, speed control systems employing a jet pipe valve, and power amplification with a vortex valve.

  17. Design of vortex fluid amplifiers with asymmetrical flow fields.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawley, T. J.; Price, D. C.

    1972-01-01

    Variation of geometric parameters, including supply area, control area, chamber length, and outlet diameter, of a large scale, modular design vortex fluid amplifier with single supply and control jets, has confirmed and extended a previously published design method, developed for vortex amplifiers with symmetric flow fields. This allows application of the method to devices which are more representative of practical, production type components.

  18. Learning Curve Assessment of Robot-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy Compared with Open-Surgery Controls from the Premier Perspective Database

    PubMed Central

    Kreaden, Usha S.; Gabbert, Jessica; Thomas, Raju

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: The primary aims of this study were to assess the learning curve effect of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) in a large administrative database consisting of multiple U.S. hospitals and surgeons, and to compare the results of RARP with open radical prostatectomy (ORP) from the same settings. Materials and Methods: The patient population of study was from the Premier Perspective Database (Premier, Inc., Charlotte, NC) and consisted of 71,312 radical prostatectomies performed at more than 300 U.S. hospitals by up to 3739 surgeons by open or robotic techniques from 2004 to 2010. The key endpoints were surgery time, inpatient length of stay, and overall complications. We compared open versus robotic, results by year of procedures, results by case volume of specific surgeons, and results of open surgery in hospitals with and without a robotic system. Results: The mean surgery time was longer for RARP (4.4 hours, standard deviation [SD] 1.7) compared with ORP (3.4 hours, SD 1.5) in the same hospitals (p<0.0001). Inpatient stay was shorter for RARP (2.2 days, SD 1.9) compared with ORP (3.2 days, SD 2.7) in the same hospitals (p<0.0001). The overall complications were less for RARP (10.6%) compared with ORP (15.8%) in the same hospitals, as were transfusion rates. ORP results in hospitals without a robot were not better than ORP with a robot, and pretreatment co-morbidity profiles were similar in all cohorts. Trending of results by year of procedure showed no differences in the three cohorts, but trending of RARP results by surgeon experience showed improvements in surgery time, hospital stay, conversion rates, and complication rates. Conclusions: During the initial 7 years of RARP development, outcomes showed decreased hospital stay, complications, and transfusion rates. Learning curve trends for RARP were evident for these endpoints when grouped by surgeon experience, but not by year of surgery. PMID:24350787

  19. Curves and Their Properties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yates, Robert C.

    This volume, a reprinting of a classic first published in 1952, presents detailed discussions of 26 curves or families of curves, and 17 analytic systems of curves. For each curve the author provides a historical note, a sketch or sketches, a description of the curve, a discussion of pertinent facts, and a bibliography. Depending upon the curve,…

  20. Tapered fiber amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Stephen D.; Stamnitz, Timothy C.

    1990-07-01

    A tapered optical fiber amplifier is designed to provide for long-distance, un-repeatered fiber optic communications. Two single-mode fiber portions are tapered to efficiently intensify and couple an information signal from a laser diode and a pump signal at a shorter wavelength into a fused, tapered single-mode fiber optic coupler. The concentrated information signal and concentrated pump signal are combined via the coupler which is coupled to a several-kilometer length of a relatively small core diametered single-mode fiber to create nonlinear optical effect (stimulated Raman scattering) (SRS). The SRS causes Raman shift of the pump light into the small core diametered single-mode fiber length, thereby generating SRS to result in a signal amplification and an efficient extraction of the amplified signal via the tapered output fiber portion or pigtail.

  1. Monolithic dye laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, Thomas C.

    1993-01-01

    A fluid dye laser amplifier for amplifying a dye beam by pump beams has a channel structure defining a channel through which a laseable fluid flows and the dye and pump beams pass transversely to one another through a lasing region. The channel structure is formed with two pairs of mutually spaced-apart and mutually confronting glass windows, which are interlocked and make surface-contacts with one another and surround the lasing region. One of the glass window pairs passes the dye beam and the other passes the pump beams therethrough and through the lasing region. Where these glass window pieces make surface-contacts, glue is used to join the pieces together to form a monolithic structure so as to prevent the dye in the fluid passing through the channel from entering the space between the mutually contacting glass window pieces.

  2. Monolithic dye laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, T.C.

    1993-03-30

    A fluid dye laser amplifier for amplifying a dye beam by pump beams has a channel structure defining a channel through which a laseable fluid flows and the dye and pump beams pass transversely to one another through a lasing region. The channel structure is formed with two pairs of mutually spaced-apart and mutually confronting glass windows, which are interlocked and make surface-contacts with one another and surround the lasing region. One of the glass window pairs passes the dye beam and the other passes the pump beams therethrough and through the lasing region. Where these glass window pieces make surface-contacts, glue is used to join the pieces together to form a monolithic structure so as to prevent the dye in the fluid passing through the channel from entering the space between the mutually contacting glass window pieces.

  3. STABILIZED TRANSISTOR AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Noe, J.B.

    1963-05-01

    A temperature stabilized transistor amplifier having a pair of transistors coupled in cascade relation that are capable of providing amplification through a temperature range of - 100 un. Concent 85% F to 400 un. Concent 85% F described. The stabilization of the amplifier is attained by coupling a feedback signal taken from the emitter of second transistor at a junction between two serially arranged biasing resistances in the circuit of the emitter of the second transistor to the base of the first transistor. Thus, a change in the emitter current of the second transistor is automatically corrected by the feedback adjustment of the base-emitter potential of the first transistor and by a corresponding change in the base-emitter potential of the second transistor. (AEC)

  4. Man-Amplifying Exoskeleton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosheim, Mark E.

    1990-03-01

    This paper describes a design for a man-amplifying exoskeleton, an electrically powered, articulated frame worn by an operator. The design features modular construction and employ anthropomorphic pitch-yaw joints for arms and legs. These singularity-free designs offer a significant advancement over simple pivot-type joints used in older designs. Twenty-six degrees-of-freedom excluding the hands gives the Man-Amplifier its unique dexterity. A five hundred-pound load capacity is engineered for a diverse range of tasks. Potential applications in emergency rescue work, restoring functionality to the handicapped, and military applications ranging from material handling to an elite fighting core are discussed. A bibliography concludes this paper.

  5. Helical Fiber Amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Koplow, Jeffrey P.; Kliner, Dahy; Goldberg, Lew

    2002-12-17

    A multi-mode gain fiber is provided which affords substantial improvements in the maximum pulse energy, peak power handling capabilities, average output power, and/or pumping efficiency of fiber amplifier and laser sources while maintaining good beam quality (comparable to that of a conventional single-mode fiber source). These benefits are realized by coiling the multimode gain fiber to induce significant bend loss for all but the lowest-order mode(s).

  6. Experimental results of a vortex flow transistor amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    McGinnis, D.P.; Hohenwarter, G.K.G.; Ketkar, M.; Beyer, J.B.; Nordman, J.E.

    1989-03-01

    A Niobium based superconducting amplifier consisting of a series array of 60 vortex flow transistors (VFT) was fabricated and tested. Each VFT consisted of a long Josephson junction biased in the flux flow state, magnetically coupled to a current carrying control line. The topology of the circuit is based on a distributed amplifier configuration. The transresistance of the amplifier in a 50 Ohm environment for frequencies up to 1 MHz was measured.

  7. Improved-Bandwidth Transimpedance Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapsky, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    The widest available operational amplifier, with the best voltage and current noise characteristics, is considered for transimpedance amplifier (TIA) applications where wide bandwidth is required to handle fast rising input signals (as for time-of-flight measurement cases). The added amplifier inside the TIA feedback loop can be configured to have slightly lower voltage gain than the bandwidth reduction factor.

  8. Multiple pass laser amplifier system

    DOEpatents

    Brueckner, Keith A.; Jorna, Siebe; Moncur, N. Kent

    1977-01-01

    A laser amplification method for increasing the energy extraction efficiency from laser amplifiers while reducing the energy flux that passes through a flux limited system which includes apparatus for decomposing a linearly polarized light beam into multiple components, passing the components through an amplifier in delayed time sequence and recombining the amplified components into an in phase linearly polarized beam.

  9. Efficient terahertz wave generation from GaP crystals pumped by chirp-controlled pulses from femtosecond photonic crystal fiber amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jiang; Shi, Junkai; Xu, Baozhong; Xing, Qirong; Wang, Chingyue; Chai, Lu E-mail: yanfengli@tju.edu.cn; Liu, Bowen; Hu, Minglie; Li, Yanfeng E-mail: yanfengli@tju.edu.cn; Fedotov, Andrey B.; Zheltikov, Aleksei M.

    2014-01-20

    A chirp-tunable femtosecond 10 W, 42 MHz photonic-crystal-fiber oscillator-amplifier system that is capable of delivering sub-60 fs light pulses at 1040 nm is used to demonstrate high-efficiency terahertz radiation generation via optical rectification in GaP crystals only a few millimeters in length. The optimization of the chirp of the fiber-laser pulses is shown to radically enhance the terahertz output, indicating one possible way to more efficiently use these extended nonlinear crystals in compact fiber-pumped terahertz radiation sources.

  10. Exploring the physical controls of regional patterns of flow duration curves - Part 4: A synthesis of empirical analysis, process modeling and catchment classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaeger, M.; Coopersmith, E.; Ye, S.; Cheng, L.; Viglione, A.; Sivapalan, M.

    2012-06-01

    The paper reports on a four-pronged study of the physical controls on regional patterns of the Flow Duration Curve (FDC). This involved a comparative analysis of long-term continuous data from nearly 200 catchments around the US, encompassing a wide range of climates, geology and ecology. The analysis was done from three different perspectives - statistical analysis, process-based modeling, and data-based classification, followed by a synthesis, which is the focus of this paper. Streamflow data was separated into fast and slow flow responses, and associated signatures, and both total flow and its components were analyzed to generate patterns. Regional patterns emerged in all aspects of the study. The mixed gamma distribution described well the shape of the FDC; regression analysis indicated that certain climate and catchment properties were first order controls on the shape of the FDC. In order to understand the spatial patterns revealed by the statistical study, and guided by the hypothesis that the middle portion of the FDC is a function of the regime curve (RC, mean within year variation of flow), we set out to classify these catchments, both empirically and through process-based modeling, in terms of their regime behavior. The classification analysis showed that climate seasonality and aridity, either directly (empirical classes) or through phenology (vegetation processes), were the dominant controls on the RC. Quantitative synthesis of these results determined that these classes were indeed related to the FDC through its slope and related statistical parameters. Qualitative synthesis revealed much diversity in the shapes of the FDCs even within each climate-based homogeneous class, especially in the low-flow tails, suggesting that catchment properties may have become the dominant controls. Thus, while the middle portion of the FDC contains the average response of the catchment, and is mainly controlled by climate, the tails of the FDC, notably the low

  11. Exploring the physical controls of regional patterns of flow duration curves - Part 4: A synthesis of empirical analysis, process modeling and catchment classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaeger, M.; Coopersmith, E.; Ye, S.; Cheng, L.; Viglione, A.; Sivapalan, M.

    2012-11-01

    The paper reports on a four-pronged study of the physical controls on regional patterns of the flow duration curve (FDC). This involved a comparative analysis of long-term continuous data from nearly 200 catchments around the US, encompassing a wide range of climates, geology, and ecology. The analysis was done from three different perspectives - statistical analysis, process-based modeling, and data-based classification - followed by a synthesis, which is the focus of this paper. Streamflow data were separated into fast and slow flow responses, and associated signatures, and both total flow and its components were analyzed to generate patterns. Regional patterns emerged in all aspects of the study. The mixed gamma distribution described well the shape of the FDC; regression analysis indicated that certain climate and catchment properties were first-order controls on the shape of the FDC. In order to understand the spatial patterns revealed by the statistical study, and guided by the hypothesis that the middle portion of the FDC is a function of the regime curve (RC, mean within-year variation of flow), we set out to classify these catchments, both empirically and through process-based modeling, in terms of their regime behavior. The classification analysis showed that climate seasonality and aridity, either directly (empirical classes) or through phenology (vegetation processes), were the dominant controls on the RC. Quantitative synthesis of these results determined that these classes were indeed related to the FDC through its slope and related statistical parameters. Qualitative synthesis revealed much diversity in the shapes of the FDCs even within each climate-based homogeneous class, especially in the low-flow tails, suggesting that catchment properties may have become the dominant controls. Thus, while the middle portion of the FDC contains the average response of the catchment, and is mainly controlled by climate, the tails of the FDC, notably the low

  12. Locus of Control Orientations in Students with Intellectual Disability, Learning Disabilities, and No Disabilities: A Latent Growth Curve Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shogren, Karrie A.; Bovaird, James A.; Palmer, Susan B.; Wehmeyer, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has suggested differences in the locus of control (LOC) orientations of students with intellectual disability, learning disabilities, and no disabilities, although this research has been characterized by methodological limitations. The purpose of this study was to examine the development of LOC orientations in students with…

  13. Standard Mastery Curves and Skew Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warries, Egbert

    The objective of the study is to convince educational researchers of the necessity for "standard mastery curves" for the graphical representation of scores on summative tests for a group of students. Attention is drawn to the study of theoretical and empirical skew curves in education and biology. Use of standard mastery curves and study of skew…

  14. Evaluating and comparing biomarkers with respect to the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve in two-phase case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying

    2016-07-01

    Two-phase sampling design, where biomarkers are subsampled from a phase-one cohort sample representative of the target population, has become the gold standard in biomarker evaluation. Many two-phase case-control studies involve biased sampling of cases and/or controls in the second phase. For example, controls are often frequency-matched to cases with respect to other covariates. Ignoring biased sampling of cases and/or controls can lead to biased inference regarding biomarkers' classification accuracy. Considering the problems of estimating and comparing the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) for a binary disease outcome, the impact of biased sampling of cases and/or controls on inference and the strategy to efficiently account for the sampling scheme have not been well studied. In this project, we investigate the inverse-probability-weighted method to adjust for biased sampling in estimating and comparing AUC. Asymptotic properties of the estimator and its inference procedure are developed for both Bernoulli sampling and finite-population stratified sampling. In simulation studies, the weighted estimators provide valid inference for estimation and hypothesis testing, while the standard empirical estimators can generate invalid inference. We demonstrate the use of the analytical variance formula for optimizing sampling schemes in biomarker study design and the application of the proposed AUC estimators to examples in HIV vaccine research and prostate cancer research. PMID:26883772

  15. Evaluating and comparing biomarkers with respect to the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve in two-phase case–control studies

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Two-phase sampling design, where biomarkers are subsampled from a phase-one cohort sample representative of the target population, has become the gold standard in biomarker evaluation. Many two-phase case–control studies involve biased sampling of cases and/or controls in the second phase. For example, controls are often frequency-matched to cases with respect to other covariates. Ignoring biased sampling of cases and/or controls can lead to biased inference regarding biomarkers' classification accuracy. Considering the problems of estimating and comparing the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) for a binary disease outcome, the impact of biased sampling of cases and/or controls on inference and the strategy to efficiently account for the sampling scheme have not been well studied. In this project, we investigate the inverse-probability-weighted method to adjust for biased sampling in estimating and comparing AUC. Asymptotic properties of the estimator and its inference procedure are developed for both Bernoulli sampling and finite-population stratified sampling. In simulation studies, the weighted estimators provide valid inference for estimation and hypothesis testing, while the standard empirical estimators can generate invalid inference. We demonstrate the use of the analytical variance formula for optimizing sampling schemes in biomarker study design and the application of the proposed AUC estimators to examples in HIV vaccine research and prostate cancer research. PMID:26883772

  16. Injection- Seeded Optoplasmonic Amplifier in the Visible

    PubMed Central

    Gartia, Manas Ranjan; Seo, Sujin; Kim, Junhwan; Chang, Te-Wei; Bahl, Gaurav; Lu, Meng; Liu, Gang Logan; Eden, J. Gary

    2014-01-01

    A hybrid optoplasmonic amplifier, injection-seeded by an internally-generated Raman signal and operating in the visible (563–675 nm), is proposed and evidence for amplification is presented. Comprising a gain medium tethered to a whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonator with a protein, and a plasmonic surface, the optical system described here selectively amplifies a single (or a few) Raman line(s) produced within the WGM resonator and is well-suited for routing narrowband optical power on-a-chip. Over the past five decades, optical oscillators and amplifiers have typically been based on the buildup of the field from the spontaneous emission background. Doing so limits the temporal coherence of the output, lengthens the time required for the optical field intensity to reach saturation, and often is responsible for complex, multiline spectra. In addition to the spectral control afforded by injection-locking, the effective Q of the amplifier can be specified by the bandwidth of the injected Raman signal. This characteristic contrasts with previous WGM-based lasers and amplifiers for which the Q is determined solely by the WGM resonator. PMID:25156810

  17. Amplifying Electrochemical Indicators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, Wenhong; Li, Jun; Han, Jie

    2004-01-01

    Dendrimeric reporter compounds have been invented for use in sensing and amplifying electrochemical signals from molecular recognition events that involve many chemical and biological entities. These reporter compounds can be formulated to target specific molecules or molecular recognition events. They can also be formulated to be, variously, hydrophilic or amphiphilic so that they are suitable for use at interfaces between (1) aqueous solutions and (2) electrodes connected to external signal-processing electronic circuits. The invention of these reporter compounds is expected to enable the development of highly miniaturized, low-power-consumption, relatively inexpensive, mass-producible sensor units for diverse applications.

  18. REGENERATIVE TRANSISTOR AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Kabell, L.J.

    1958-11-25

    Electrical circults for use in computers and the like are described. particularly a regenerative bistable transistor amplifler which is iurned on by a clock signal when an information signal permits and is turned off by the clock signal. The amplifier porforms the above function with reduced power requirements for the clock signal and circuit operation. The power requirements are reduced in one way by employing transformer coupling which increases the collector circuit efficiency by eliminating the loss of power in the collector load resistor.

  19. DIAMOND AMPLIFIED PHOTOCATHODES.

    SciTech Connect

    SMEDLEY,J.; BEN-ZVI, I.; BOHON, J.; CHANG, X.; GROVER, R.; ISAKOVIC, A.; RAO, T.; WU, Q.

    2007-11-26

    High-average-current linear electron accelerators require photoinjectors capable of delivering tens to hundreds of mA average current, with peak currents of hundreds of amps. Standard photocathodes face significant challenges in meeting these requirements, and often have short operational lifetimes in an accelerator environment. We report on recent progress toward development of secondary emission amplifiers for photocathodes, which are intended to increase the achievable average current while protecting the cathode from the accelerator. The amplifier is a thin diamond wafer which converts energetic (few keV) primary electrons into hundreds of electron-hole pairs via secondary electron emission. The electrons drift through the diamond under an external bias and are emitted into vacuum via a hydrogen-terminated surface with negative electron affinity (NEA). Secondary emission gain of over 200 has been achieved. Two methods of patterning diamond, laser ablation and reactive-ion etching (RIE), are being developed to produce the required geometry. A variety of diagnostic techniques, including FTIR, SEM and AFM, have been used to characterize the diamonds.

  20. Universal Signal Conditioning Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, Frank

    1997-01-01

    The Technological Research and Development Authority (TRDA) and NASA-KSC entered into a cooperative agreement in March of 1994 to achieve the utilization and commercialization of a technology development for benefiting both the Space Program and U.S. industry on a "dual-use basis". The technology involved in this transfer is a new, unique Universal Conditioning Amplifier (USCA) used in connection with various types of transducers. The project was initiated in partnership with I-Net Corporation, Lockheed Martin Telemetry & Instrumentation (formerly Loral Test and Information Systems) and Brevard Community College. The project consists of designing, miniaturizing, manufacturing, and testing an existing prototype of USCA that was developed for NASA-KSC by the I-Net Corporation. The USCA is a rugged and field-installable self (or remotely)- programmable amplifier that works in combination with a tag random access memory (RAM) attached to various types of transducers. This summary report comprises performance evaluations, TRDA partnership tasks, a project summary, project milestones and results.

  1. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION: Vavilov-Cherenkov amplifiers with irregular electrodynamic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulyaev, Yurii V.; Kravchenko, Viktor F.; Kuraev, Aleksandr A.

    2004-06-01

    Optimal control theory-based methods for improving the efficiency of Cherenkov microwave amplifiers with irregular electrodynamic structures are reviewed. The physics of optimal processes in amplifiers and oscillators with Cherenkov- and combined-type interactions is discussed.

  2. Gyro-amplifiers modeling with MAGY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levush, Baruch; Nguyen, Khanh; Botton, Moti; Vlasov Antonsen, Alexander, Jr.

    1999-11-01

    Recent modeling results of several experiments on gyroklystron amplifier at the Naval Research Laboratory are presented. Modeling was performed using the quasi three-dimensional, self-consistent code MAGY[1] . Amplifiers in both Ka- and W-bands have been studied [2,3]. Using known experimental input parameters, code-predicted salient amplifier performance characteristics, e.g. efficiency, bandwidth, drive curve, have been found to be in good agreement with experimental results. Self-consistent phenomena, such as effects of window reflections on bandwidth and higher-order-mode interaction in uptaper, will also be presented. MAGY has also been used to design gyro-TWTs. The code has been successfully benchmarked against linear theory. Issues such as absolute instability, backward-wave oscillations, and effect of reflection in gyro-TWTs have been investigated. Detailed results of design trade-off studies for a Ka-band gyro-TWT will also be presented and discussed. [1] M. Botton, et al.,IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci.,Vol.26(1998) [3] J.P. Calame, et al.,Phys. of Plasmas,Vol.6(1999) [4] M. Blank, et al.,Submitted to Phys. of Plasmas (1999)

  3. Explicit superconic curves.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sunggoo

    2016-09-01

    Conics and Cartesian ovals are extremely important curves in various fields of science. In addition, aspheric curves based on conics are useful in optical design. Superconic curves, recently suggested by Greynolds, are extensions of both conics and Cartesian ovals and have been applied to optical design. However, they are not extensions of aspheric curves based on conics. In this work, we investigate another type of superconic curves. These superconic curves are extensions of not only conics and Cartesian ovals but also aspheric curves based on conics. Moreover, these are represented in explicit form, while Greynolds's superconic curves are in implicit form. PMID:27607506

  4. Optical Amplifier for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fork, Richard L.; Cole, Spencer T.; Diffey, William M.; Gamble, Lisa J.

    1999-01-01

    We describe an open multipass optical amplifier designed to amplify a sampled region of an optical wavefront to kilowatt average power with low optical phase distortion. The overall goal is to amplify optical fields in a segmented, but phase coherent manner, so as to achieve high average power optical fields with high quality phase coherence over the large apertures needed for transmission of space solar power.

  5. Wavelength tunable alexandrite regenerative amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Harter, D.J.; Bado, P.

    1988-11-01

    We describe a wavelength tunable alexandrite regenerative amplifier which is used to amplify nanosecond slices from a single-frequency cw dye laser or 50-ps pulses emitted by a diode laser to energies in the 10-mJ range. The amplified 5-ns slices generated by the cw-pumped line narrowed dye laser are Fourier transform limited. The 50-ps pulses emitted by a gain-switched diode laser are amplified by more than 10 orders of magnitude in a single stage.

  6. Reflex ring laser amplifier system

    DOEpatents

    Summers, Mark A.

    1985-01-01

    A laser pulse is injected into an unstable ring resonator-amplifier structure. Inside this resonator the laser pulse is amplified, spatially filtered and magnified. The laser pulse is recirculated in the resonator, being amplified, filtered and magnified on each pass. The magnification is chosen so that the beam passes through the amplifier in concentric non-overlapping regions similar to a single pass MOPA. After a number of passes around the ring resonator the laser pulse is spatially large enough to exit the ring resonator system by passing around an output mirror.

  7. Optical Amplifier for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fork, Richard L.; Cole, Spencer T.; Gamble, Lisa J.; Diffey, William M.; Keys, Andrew S.

    1999-01-01

    We describe an optical amplifier designed to amplify a spatially sampled component of an optical wavefront to kilowatt average power. The goal is means for implementing a strategy of spatially segmenting a large aperture wavefront, amplifying the individual segments, maintaining the phase coherence of the segments by active means, and imaging the resultant amplified coherent field. Applications of interest are the transmission of space solar power over multi-megameter distances, as to distant spacecraft, or to remote sites with no preexisting power grid.

  8. Laser amplifier developments at Mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, E.A.; Brucker, J.P.; Honig, E.M.; McCown, A.W.; Romero, V.O.; York, G.W.

    1993-09-01

    Electron-beam pumped laser amplifiers have been modified to address the mission of krypton-fluoride excimer laser technology development. Methods are described for improving the performance and reliability of two pre-existing amplifiers at minimal cost and time. Preliminary performance data are presented to support the credibility of the approach.

  9. Suicide Risk: Amplifiers and Attenuators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plutchik, Robert; Van Praag, Herman M.

    1994-01-01

    Attempts to integrate findings on correlates of suicide and violent risk in terms of a theory called a two-stage model of countervailing forces, which assumes that the strength of aggressive impulses is modified by amplifiers and attenuators. The vectorial interaction of amplifiers and attenuators creates an unstable equilibrium making prediction…

  10. Hybrid thin-film amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleveland, G.

    1977-01-01

    Miniature amplifier for bioelectronic instrumentation consumes only about 100 mW and has frequency response flat to within 0.5 dB from 0.14 to 450 Hz. Device consists of five thin film substrates, which contain eight operational amplifiers and seven field-effect transistor dice.

  11. A wideband RF amplifier for satellite tuners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xueqing, Hu; Zheng, Gong; Yin, Shi; Foster, Dai Fa

    2011-11-01

    This paper presents the design and measured performance of a wideband amplifier for a direct conversion satellite tuner. It is composed of a wideband low noise amplifier (LNA) and a two-stage RF variable gain amplifier (VGA) with linear gain in dB and temperature compensation schemes. To meet the system linearity requirement, an improved distortion compensation technique and a bypass mode are applied on the LNA to deal with the large input signal. Wideband matching is achieved by resistive feedback and an off-chip LC-ladder matching network. A large gain control range (over 80 dB) is achieved by the VGA with process voltage and temperature compensation and dB linearization. In total, the amplifier consumes up to 26 mA current from a 3.3 V power supply. It is fabricated in a 0.35-μm SiGe BiCMOS technology and occupies a silicon area of 0.25 mm2.

  12. Stereoscopy Amplifies Emotions Elicited by Facial Expressions

    PubMed Central

    Kätsyri, Jari; Häkkinen, Jukka

    2015-01-01

    Mediated facial expressions do not elicit emotions as strongly as real-life facial expressions, possibly due to the low fidelity of pictorial presentations in typical mediation technologies. In the present study, we investigated the extent to which stereoscopy amplifies emotions elicited by images of neutral, angry, and happy facial expressions. The emotional self-reports of positive and negative valence (which were evaluated separately) and arousal of 40 participants were recorded. The magnitude of perceived depth in the stereoscopic images was manipulated by varying the camera base at 15, 40, 65, 90, and 115 mm. The analyses controlled for participants’ gender, gender match, emotional empathy, and trait alexithymia. The results indicated that stereoscopy significantly amplified the negative valence and arousal elicited by angry expressions at the most natural (65 mm) camera base, whereas stereoscopy amplified the positive valence elicited by happy expressions in both the narrowed and most natural (15–65 mm) base conditions. Overall, the results indicate that stereoscopy amplifies the emotions elicited by mediated emotional facial expressions when the depth geometry is close to natural. The findings highlight the sensitivity of the visual system to depth and its effect on emotions. PMID:27551358

  13. Stereoscopy Amplifies Emotions Elicited by Facial Expressions.

    PubMed

    Hakala, Jussi; Kätsyri, Jari; Häkkinen, Jukka

    2015-12-01

    Mediated facial expressions do not elicit emotions as strongly as real-life facial expressions, possibly due to the low fidelity of pictorial presentations in typical mediation technologies. In the present study, we investigated the extent to which stereoscopy amplifies emotions elicited by images of neutral, angry, and happy facial expressions. The emotional self-reports of positive and negative valence (which were evaluated separately) and arousal of 40 participants were recorded. The magnitude of perceived depth in the stereoscopic images was manipulated by varying the camera base at 15, 40, 65, 90, and 115 mm. The analyses controlled for participants' gender, gender match, emotional empathy, and trait alexithymia. The results indicated that stereoscopy significantly amplified the negative valence and arousal elicited by angry expressions at the most natural (65 mm) camera base, whereas stereoscopy amplified the positive valence elicited by happy expressions in both the narrowed and most natural (15-65 mm) base conditions. Overall, the results indicate that stereoscopy amplifies the emotions elicited by mediated emotional facial expressions when the depth geometry is close to natural. The findings highlight the sensitivity of the visual system to depth and its effect on emotions. PMID:27551358

  14. X-Band, 17-Watt Solid-State Power Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittskus, Anthony; Stone, Ernest; Boger, William; Burgess, David; Honda, Richard; Nuckolls, Carl

    2005-01-01

    An advanced solid-state power amplifier that can generate an output power of as much as 17 W at a design operating frequency of 8.4 GHz has been designed and constructed as a smaller, lighter, less expensive alternative to traveling-wave-tube X-band amplifiers and to prior solid-state X-band power amplifiers of equivalent output power. This amplifier comprises a monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) amplifier module and a power-converter module integrated into a compact package (see Figure 1). The amplifier module contains an input variable-gain amplifier (VGA), an intermediate driver stage, a final power stage, and input and output power monitors (see Figure 2). The VGA and the driver amplifier are 0.5-m GaAs-based metal semiconductor field-effect transistors (MESFETs). The final power stage contains four parallel high-efficiency, GaAs-based pseudomorphic high-electron-mobility transistors (PHEMTs). The gain of the VGA is voltage-variable over a range of 10 to 24 dB. To provide for temperature compensation of the overall amplifier gain, the gain-control voltage is generated by an operational-amplifier circuit that includes a resistor/thermistor temperature-sensing network. The driver amplifier provides a gain of 14 dB to an output power of 27 dBm to drive the four parallel output PHEMTs, each of which is nominally capable of putting out as much as 5 W. The driver output is sent to the input terminals of the four parallel PHEMTs through microstrip power dividers; the outputs of these PHEMTs are combined by microstrip power combiners (which are similar to the microstrip power dividers) to obtain the final output power of 17 W.

  15. A low-noise Peltier-cooled FET amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askew, R. E.; Wolkstein, H. J.

    1981-12-01

    A description is presented of a Peltier-cooled GaAs FET amplifier designed expressly to replace the complex and expensive parametric amplifier for satellite downlink receivers. The FET amplifier operates with an effective noise temperature (noise figure) at the terminal of less than 160 K (1.9 dB) and has an overall receiver gain of greater than 40 dB over the 7.25 to 7.75 GHz band. Attention is given to the developmental approach, aspects of electrical design, thermal considerations, packaging problems, the power supplies, and questions of cooler control. An investigation demonstrated the feasibility of replacing a parametric amplifier with a Peltier-cooled, low-noise FET amplifier for mast head operation in the 7.25-7.75 GHz band.

  16. DIAMOND AMPLIFIER FOR PHOTOCATHODES.

    SciTech Connect

    RAO,T.; BEN-ZVI,I.; BURRILL,A.; CHANG,X.; HULBERT,S.; JOHNSON,P.D.; KEWISCH,J.

    2004-06-21

    We report a new approach to the generation of high-current, high-brightness electron beams. Primary electrons are produced by a photocathode (or other means) and are accelerated to a few thousand electron-volts, then strike a specially prepared diamond window. The large Secondary Electron Yield (SEY) provides a multiplication of the number of electrons by about two orders of magnitude. The secondary electrons drift through the diamond under an electric field and emerge into the accelerating proper of the ''gun'' through a Negative Electron Affinity surface of the diamond. The advantages of the new approach include the following: (1) Reduction of the number of primary electrons by the large SEY, i.e. a very low laser power in a photocathode producing the primaries. (2) Low thermal emittance due to the NEA surface and the rapid thermalization of the electrons. (3) Protection of the cathode from possible contamination from the gun, allowing the use of large quantum efficiency but sensitive cathodes. (4) Protection of the gun from possible contamination by the cathode, allowing the use of superconducting gun cavities. (5) Production of high average currents, up to ampere class. (6) Encapsulated design, making the ''load-lock'' systems unnecessary. This paper presents the criteria that need to be taken into account in designing the amplifier.

  17. Multi-pass light amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plaessmann, Henry (Inventor); Grossman, William M. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A multiple-pass laser amplifier that uses optical focusing between subsequent passes through a single gain medium so that a reproducibly stable beam size is achieved within the gain region. A confocal resonator or White Cell resonator is provided, including two or three curvilinearly shaped mirrors facing each other along a resonator axis and an optical gain medium positioned on the resonator axis between the mirrors (confocal resonator) or adjacent to one of the mirrors (White Cell). In a first embodiment, two mirrors, which may include adjacent lenses, are configured so that a light beam passing through the gain medium and incident on the first mirror is reflected by that mirror toward the second mirror in a direction approximately parallel to the resonator axis. A light beam translator, such as an optical flat of transparent material, is positioned to translate this light beam by a controllable amount toward or away from the resonator axis for each pass of the light beam through the translator. The optical gain medium may be solid-state, liquid or gaseous medium and may be pumped longitudinally or transversely. In a second embodiment, first and second mirrors face a third mirror in a White Cell configuration, and the optical gain medium is positioned at or adjacent to one of the mirrors. Defocusing means and optical gain medium cooling means are optionally provided with either embodiment, to controllably defocus the light beam, to cool the optical gain medium and to suppress thermal lensing in the gain medium.

  18. Isolated thermocouple amplifier system for stirred fixed-bed gasifier

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, George E.

    1992-01-01

    A sensing system is provided for determining the bed temperature profile of the bed of a stirred, fixed-bed gasifier including a plurality of temperature sensors for sensing the bed temperature at different levels, a transmitter for transmitting data based on the outputs of the sensors to a remote operator's station, and a battery-based power supply. The system includes an isolation amplifier system comprising a plurality of isolation amplifier circuits for amplifying the outputs of the individual sensors. The isolation amplifier circuits each comprise an isolation operational amplifier connected to a sensor; a first "flying capacitor" circuit for, in operation, controlling the application of power from the power supply to the isolation amplifier; an output sample and hold circuit connected to the transmitter; a second "flying capacitor" circuit for, in operation, controlling the transfer of the output of the isolation amplifier to the sample and hold circuit; and a timing and control circuit for activating the first and second capacitor circuits in a predetermined timed sequence.

  19. Final amplifier design and mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, E.A.; Hanson, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    The final amplifier for the Mercury KrF excimer facility is being designed. The design exercise involves extensive modeling to predict amplifier performance. Models of the pulsed-power system, including a Child-Langmuir diode with closure, electron-beam energy deposition, KrF laser kinetics, amplified spontaneous emission (ASE), a time-dependent laser extraction in the presence of ASE are presented as a design package. The design exercise indicates that the energy objective of Phase I -- 100 joules -- will be met.

  20. Final amplifier design and mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, E.A.; Hanson, D.E.

    1991-12-31

    The final amplifier for the Mercury KrF excimer facility is being designed. The design exercise involves extensive modeling to predict amplifier performance. Models of the pulsed-power system, including a Child-Langmuir diode with closure, electron-beam energy deposition, KrF laser kinetics, amplified spontaneous emission (ASE), a time-dependent laser extraction in the presence of ASE are presented as a design package. The design exercise indicates that the energy objective of Phase I -- 100 joules -- will be met.

  1. Frequency-Offset Cartesian Feedback Based on Polyphase Difference Amplifiers

    PubMed Central

    Zanchi, Marta G.; Pauly, John M.; Scott, Greig C.

    2010-01-01

    A modified Cartesian feedback method called “frequency-offset Cartesian feedback” and based on polyphase difference amplifiers is described that significantly reduces the problems associated with quadrature errors and DC-offsets in classic Cartesian feedback power amplifier control systems. In this method, the reference input and feedback signals are down-converted and compared at a low intermediate frequency (IF) instead of at DC. The polyphase difference amplifiers create a complex control bandwidth centered at this low IF, which is typically offset from DC by 200–1500 kHz. Consequently, the loop gain peak does not overlap DC where voltage offsets, drift, and local oscillator leakage create errors. Moreover, quadrature mismatch errors are significantly attenuated in the control bandwidth. Since the polyphase amplifiers selectively amplify the complex signals characterized by a +90° phase relationship representing positive frequency signals, the control system operates somewhat like single sideband (SSB) modulation. However, the approach still allows the same modulation bandwidth control as classic Cartesian feedback. In this paper, the behavior of the polyphase difference amplifier is described through both the results of simulations, based on a theoretical analysis of their architecture, and experiments. We then describe our first printed circuit board prototype of a frequency-offset Cartesian feedback transmitter and its performance in open and closed loop configuration. This approach should be especially useful in magnetic resonance imaging transmit array systems. PMID:20814450

  2. Frequency-Offset Cartesian Feedback Based on Polyphase Difference Amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Zanchi, Marta G; Pauly, John M; Scott, Greig C

    2010-05-01

    A modified Cartesian feedback method called "frequency-offset Cartesian feedback" and based on polyphase difference amplifiers is described that significantly reduces the problems associated with quadrature errors and DC-offsets in classic Cartesian feedback power amplifier control systems.In this method, the reference input and feedback signals are down-converted and compared at a low intermediate frequency (IF) instead of at DC. The polyphase difference amplifiers create a complex control bandwidth centered at this low IF, which is typically offset from DC by 200-1500 kHz. Consequently, the loop gain peak does not overlap DC where voltage offsets, drift, and local oscillator leakage create errors. Moreover, quadrature mismatch errors are significantly attenuated in the control bandwidth. Since the polyphase amplifiers selectively amplify the complex signals characterized by a +90° phase relationship representing positive frequency signals, the control system operates somewhat like single sideband (SSB) modulation. However, the approach still allows the same modulation bandwidth control as classic Cartesian feedback.In this paper, the behavior of the polyphase difference amplifier is described through both the results of simulations, based on a theoretical analysis of their architecture, and experiments. We then describe our first printed circuit board prototype of a frequency-offset Cartesian feedback transmitter and its performance in open and closed loop configuration. This approach should be especially useful in magnetic resonance imaging transmit array systems. PMID:20814450

  3. Exploring the physical controls of regional patterns of flow duration curves - Part 3: A catchment classification system based on seasonality and runoff regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coopersmith, E.; Yaeger, M.; Ye, S.; Cheng, L.; Sivapalan, M.

    2012-06-01

    Predictions of hydrological responses in ungauged catchments can benefit from a classification scheme that can organize and pool together catchments that exhibit a level of hydrologic similarity, especially similarity in some key variable or signature of interest. Since catchments are complex systems with a level of self-organization arising from co-evolution of climate and landscape properties, including vegetation, there is much to be gained from developing a classification system based on a comparative study of a population of catchments across climatic and landscape gradients. The focus of this paper is on climate seasonality and seasonal runoff regime, as characterized by the ensemble mean of within-year variation of climate and runoff. The work on regime behavior is part of an overall study of the physical controls on regional patterns of Flow Duration Curves (FDCs), motivated by the fact that regime behavior leaves a major imprint upon the shape of FDCs, especially the slope of the FDCs. As an exercise in comparative hydrology, the paper seeks to assess the regime behavior of 428 catchments from the MOPEX database simultaneously, classifying and regionalizing them into homogeneous or hydrologically similar groups. A decision tree is developed on the basis of a metric chosen to characterize similarity of regime behavior, using a variant of the Iterative Dichotomiser (ID3) algorithm to form a classification tree and associated catchment classes. In this way, several classes of catchments are distinguished, in which the connection between the catchments' regime behavior and climate and catchment properties becomes self-evident. Only four similarity indices are entered into the algorithm, all of which are obtained from smoothed daily regime curves of climatic variables and runoff. Results demonstrate that climate seasonality plays the most significant role in the classification of US catchments, with rainfall timing and climatic aridity index playing somewhat

  4. Characterization of SLUG microwave amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoi, I.-C.; Zhu, S.; Thorbeck, T.; McDermott, R.; Mutus, J.; Jeffrey, E.; Barends, R.; Chen, Y.; Roushan, P.; Fowler, A.; Sank, D.; White, T.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Z.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Kelly, J.; Megrant, A.; Neill, C.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Quintana, C.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; Martinis, J. M.

    2015-03-01

    With the rapid growth of superconducting circuits quantum technology, a near quantum-limited amplifier at GHz frequency is needed to enable high fidelity measurements. We describe such an amplifier, the SQUID based, superconducting low inductance undulatory galvanometer (SLUG) amplifier. We measure the full scattering matrix of the SLUG. In particular, we measure both forward and reverse gain, as well as reflection. We see 15dB forward gain with added noise from one quanta to several quanta. The -1 dB compression point is around -95 dBm, about two orders of magnitude higher than that of typical Josephson parametric amplifiers. With these properties, SLUG is well suited for the high fidelity, simultaneous multiplexed readout of superconducting qubits.

  5. Enhanced performance CCD output amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Dunham, Mark E.; Morley, David W.

    1996-01-01

    A low-noise FET amplifier is connected to amplify output charge from a che coupled device (CCD). The FET has its gate connected to the CCD in common source configuration for receiving the output charge signal from the CCD and output an intermediate signal at a drain of the FET. An intermediate amplifier is connected to the drain of the FET for receiving the intermediate signal and outputting a low-noise signal functionally related to the output charge signal from the CCD. The amplifier is preferably connected as a virtual ground to the FET drain. The inherent shunt capacitance of the FET is selected to be at least equal to the sum of the remaining capacitances.

  6. Amplifier arrays for CMB polarization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, Todd; Lawrence, Charles R.; Seiffert, Michael D.; Wells, Mary M.; Kangaslahti, Pekka; Dawson, Douglas

    2003-01-01

    Cryogenic low noise amplifier technology has been successfully used in the study of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). MMIC (Monolithic Millimeter wave Integrated Circuit) technology makes the mass production of coherent detection receivers feasible.

  7. New Packaging for Amplifier Slabs

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, M.; Thorsness, C.; Suratwala, T.; Steele, R.; Rogowski, G.

    2015-03-18

    The following memo provides a discussion and detailed procedure for a new finished amplifier slab shipping and storage container. The new package is designed to maintain an environment of <5% RH to minimize weathering.

  8. Implementation of envelope tracking for RF solid state amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larter, Thomas Leigh

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) is currently in its development stages at Michigan State University. The facility uses a large linear accelerator system to accelerate ionized particles which are then collided with other particles in the hopes of finding rare isotopes of elements. This accelerating action depends on several systems to function, with one of the major systems being superconducting cavity structures. These cavities are driven by high-power RF amplifiers which account for a large portion of the accelerator's power consumption. It is important to maximize the efficiency of these amplifiers in order to keep energy costs for the facility low. One of the ways to increase efficiency is to choose an amplifier topology that is highly efficient. A study was done for FRIB testing the prospect of using amplifiers with the envelope tracking (ET) topology. An amplifier's efficiency relies on its output power and the power supplied to it, which are in turn directly related to the output signal voltage and supply rail voltage. In an ET RF amplifier, the supply voltage is made to closely follow the envelope of the output signal voltage. This tracking action allows the RF amplifier to operate with much improved efficiency at low power levels and nearly constant efficiency at high power levels. The ET tests performed for FRIB attempted to verify the validity of ET efficiency gains for RF amplifiers. These tests included the characterization of an RF amplifier, development and verification of an ET control algorithm, and implementation of an ET test bench using FRIB equipment. These tests should attest to the purported increase in efficiency possible with ET and prove that the power consumption budget for the FRIB will benefit from the use of such amplifiers.

  9. Lumped circuit model of RF amplifier for SPICE simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opalska, Katarzyna

    2014-11-01

    The paper presents the lumped model of RF amplifier for the generic SPICE circuit simulator. Model is constructed on the basis of measured s-parameter data set of the amplifier. Data - transformed to admittance (y) domain - is approximated by rational functions, which later are synthesized as RLC (sub)circuits. Final amplifier model - obtained by representing Y matrix of two-port circuit by the set of passive components and controlled voltage/current sources - is shown to be equivalent to the original s-based model and may be used in any generic circuit simulator.

  10. Microwave design optimization for broadband Josephson parametric amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reagor, Matthew; Sete, Eyob; Thompson, Dane; Ranadive, Arpit; Vijay, R.; Rigetti, Chad

    Broadband Josephson parametric amplifiers are crucial components of a scalable superconducting quantum computing architecture. Recently, the bandwidth of a resonator-based Josephson parametric amplifier was significantly enhanced by introducing a controlled reactance in the signal chain. The design was based on a λ/2 section fabricated on an RF circuit board. We present the design of an on-chip version that will improve robustness and minimize performance variability from one device to another. Further, we will discuss microwave design optimization for flux pumping mechanism to minimize cross-talk between different input-output ports of the device. Finally, we will discuss design goals for further improvement of amplifier performance.

  11. Power amplifiers (tube)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, W. C.

    1980-07-01

    An experimental model of the SPS transmitting antenna architecture was developed by combining a microwave oven magnetron with a ferrite circulator, a section of slotted waveguide radiator, and a control system to force the amplitude and the phase of the radiated output to follow phase and amplitude references. The amplitude control arrangement is depicted and evaluated.

  12. Dye laser traveling wave amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, F.; Hohman, J.

    1984-01-01

    A flashlamp pumped dye laser suitable for use as a single stage amplifier is described. Particular emphasis is placed on the efforts to increase output pulse energy and improve the temporal profile of the injected pulse. By using high power thin film polarizers, output energies reach from 4 to 45 mJ. Various dispersive elements are used to develop an amplified pulse with an extremely clean temporal profile.

  13. Regenerative amplifier for the OMEGA laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babushkin, Andrei; Bittle, W.; Letzring, S. A.; Skeldon, Mark D.; Seka, Wolf D.

    1999-07-01

    We present the requirements, design, and experimental results for a negative feedback-controlled Nd:YLF regenerative amplifier for the OMEGA laser system. This externally synchronizable region boosts the energy of temporally shaped optical pulses from the subnanojoule to the submillijoule energy level with a measured long-term output energy stability of 0.2 percent rms. To our knowledge this represents the highest energy stability ever demonstrated for a millijoule-level laser system, either flashlamp pumped or diode pumped. In addition to the excellent stability and reproducibility, the regen output is very insensitive to the injected pulse energy and the temporal distortions due to the negative feedback are immeasurable. Four regenerative amplifiers equipped with this negative feedback system have operated flawlessly on OMEGA over the past two year period.

  14. Curved versus Straight Stem Uncemented Total Hip Arthroplasty Osteoarthritis Multicenter trial (CUSTOM): design of a prospective blinded randomised controlled multicentre trial

    PubMed Central

    van Beers, Loes W A H; van Oldenrijk, Jakob; Scholtes, Vanessa A B; Geerdink, Carel H; Niers, Bob B A M; Runne, Wouter; Bhandari, Mohit; Poolman, Rudolf W

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Answering the demands of an increasingly young and active patient population, recent developments in total hip arthroplasty (THA) have shifted towards minimising tissue damage. The Collum Femoris Preserving (CFP) stem was developed to preserve the trochanteric region of the femur, which potentially preserves the insertion of the gluteus musculature. This might accelerate early postoperative rehabilitation and improve functional outcome. Currently the functional results of the CFP stem have not been compared with conventional straight stems in a randomised controlled trial (RCT). The primary purpose of this trial is to compare the functional result of CFP stem THA with conventional uncemented straight stem THA, measured by the Dutch Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS) at 3-month follow-up. Methods A prospective blinded multicentre RCT will be performed. We aim to recruit 150 patients. The patients will be randomly allocated to a THA with a straight or a curved stem. All patients, research assistants, clinical assessors and investigators will be blinded for the type of prosthesis for 5 years. Clinical assessments and roentgenograms will be taken preoperative, at 6 weeks after surgery, at 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 years after surgery. Patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) will be obtained at the same follow-up moments. In addition, the PROMs will also be sent to the patients at 3 and 6 months after surgery. The HOOS at 3-month follow-up will be our primary outcome. Ethics and dissemination This trial will be performed in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki. A local ethics committee has approved this trial. Written informed consent will be obtained from all participating patients. All serious adverse events will be reported to the ethics committee. Results Results will be submitted for publication to an orthopaedics related journal. Trial registration number NTR1560. PMID:27009147

  15. Motor learning curve and long-term effectiveness of modified constraint-induced movement therapy in children with unilateral cerebral palsy: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Geerdink, Yvonne; Aarts, Pauline; Geurts, Alexander C

    2013-03-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the progression of manual dexterity during 6 weeks (54h) (modified) constraint-induced movement therapy ((m)CIMT) followed by 2 weeks (18h) bimanual training (BiT) in children with unilateral spastic cerebral palsy (CP), to establish whether and when a maximal training effect was reached and which factors might influence the motor learning curve. In addition, long-term retention of effects was determined. In a randomized controlled trial of 52 children with CP, aged 2.5-8 years, comparing mCIMT-BiT to conventional therapy, 28 children were allocated to the mCIMT-BiT group. This group was assessed weekly with the Box and Block test. Long-term effectiveness was determined by collecting follow-up data of the primary (Assisting Hand Assessment, ABILHAND-Kids) and secondary (Melbourne, COPM) outcomes at six months and one year after intervention. Fifteen children (53.6%) reached a maximum training effect within the mCIMT period. This group differed from others with respect to age, but not gender, affected side or manual ability. Children younger than five years had a greater chance to reach a maximum score within 6 weeks mCIMT (OR=6.67, 95%CI=1.24-35.71) that stabilized already after four weeks; older children showed a longer progression and tended to decline afterwards. In both age groups, beneficial effects were retained in the long term. The findings suggest that children of 5 years and older might profit from a longer period of mCIMT than 54h to reach their maximum unimanual capacity and to retain this capacity during subsequent bimanual training. PMID:23291509

  16. Phase-Locked Control of Tiled-Grating Assemblies for Chirped-Pulse-Amplified Lasers Using a Mach-Zehnder Interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bunkenburg, J.; Kessler, T.J.; Skulski, W.; Huang, H.

    2006-04-27

    Multikilojoule petawatt lasers using chirped-pulse amplification are being constructed worldwide. Several systems have adopted a tiled-grating approach to meet the size requirements for the compression gratings. Grating tiles need to be precisely phased to ensure a transform-limited focal spot when focusing high-energy laser pulses in the target plane. A computer-control test system that uses a Mach-Zehnder interferometer capable of monitoring and correcting drift in the tiled-grating assemblies within the compressor is described.

  17. Operational Performance of the Two-Channel 10 Megawatt Feedback Amplifier System for MHD Control on the Columbia University HBT-EP Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Reass, W.A.; Wurden, G.A.

    1997-10-06

    The operational characteristics and performance of the two channel 10 Megawatt MHD feedback control system as installed by Los Alamos National Laboratory on the Columbia University HBT-EP tokamak are described. In the present configuration, driving independent 300 {micro}H saddle coil sets, each channel can deliver 1100 Amperes and 16 kV peak to peak. Full power bandwidth is about 12 kHz, with capabilities at reduced power to 30 kHz. The present system topology is designed to suppress magnetohydrodynamic activity with m=2, n=1 symmetry. Application of either static (single phase) or rotating (twin phased) magnetic perturbations shows the ability to spin up or slow down the plasma, and also prevent (or cause) so-called ''mode-locking''. Open loop and active feedback experiments using a digital signal processor (DSP) have been performed on the HBT-EP tokamak and initial results show the ability to manipulate the plasma MHD mode frequency.

  18. Low-Noise Band-Pass Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, L.

    1982-01-01

    Circuit uses standard components to overcome common limitation of JFET amplifiers. Low-noise band-pass amplifier employs JFET and operational amplifier. High gain and band-pass characteristics are achieved with suitable choice of resistances and capacitances. Circuit should find use as low-noise amplifier, for example as first stage instrumentation systems.

  19. Statistical Analyses for Probabilistic Assessments of the Reactor Pressure Vessel Structural Integrity: Building a Master Curve on an Extract of the 'Euro' Fracture Toughness Dataset, Controlling Statistical Uncertainty for Both Mono-Temperature and multi-temperature tests

    SciTech Connect

    Josse, Florent; Lefebvre, Yannick; Todeschini, Patrick; Turato, Silvia; Meister, Eric

    2006-07-01

    Assessing the structural integrity of a nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) subjected to pressurized-thermal-shock (PTS) transients is extremely important to safety. In addition to conventional deterministic calculations to confirm RPV integrity, Electricite de France (EDF) carries out probabilistic analyses. Probabilistic analyses are interesting because some key variables, albeit conventionally taken at conservative values, can be modeled more accurately through statistical variability. One variable which significantly affects RPV structural integrity assessment is cleavage fracture initiation toughness. The reference fracture toughness method currently in use at EDF is the RCCM and ASME Code lower-bound K{sub IC} based on the indexing parameter RT{sub NDT}. However, in order to quantify the toughness scatter for probabilistic analyses, the master curve method is being analyzed at present. Furthermore, the master curve method is a direct means of evaluating fracture toughness based on K{sub JC} data. In the framework of the master curve investigation undertaken by EDF, this article deals with the following two statistical items: building a master curve from an extract of a fracture toughness dataset (from the European project 'Unified Reference Fracture Toughness Design curves for RPV Steels') and controlling statistical uncertainty for both mono-temperature and multi-temperature tests. Concerning the first point, master curve temperature dependence is empirical in nature. To determine the 'original' master curve, Wallin postulated that a unified description of fracture toughness temperature dependence for ferritic steels is possible, and used a large number of data corresponding to nuclear-grade pressure vessel steels and welds. Our working hypothesis is that some ferritic steels may behave in slightly different ways. Therefore we focused exclusively on the basic french reactor vessel metal of types A508 Class 3 and A 533 grade B Class 1, taking the sampling

  20. Reflex ring laser amplifier system

    DOEpatents

    Summers, M.A.

    1983-08-31

    The invention is a method and apparatus for providing a reflex ring laser system for amplifying an input laser pulse. The invention is particularly useful in laser fusion experiments where efficient production of high-energy and high power laser pulses is required. The invention comprises a large aperture laser amplifier in an unstable ring resonator which includes a combination spatial filter and beam expander having a magnification greater than unity. An input pulse is injected into the resonator, e.g., through an aperture in an input mirror. The injected pulse passes through the amplifier and spatial filter/expander components on each pass around the ring. The unstable resonator is designed to permit only a predetermined number of passes before the amplified pulse exits the resonator. On the first pass through the amplifier, the beam fills only a small central region of the gain medium. On each successive pass, the beam has been expanded to fill the next concentric non-overlapping region of the gain medium.

  1. A 500 A device characterizer utilizing a pulsed-linear amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacouture, Shelby; Bayne, Stephen

    2016-02-01

    With the advent of modern power semiconductor switching elements, the envelope defining "high power" is an ever increasing quantity. Characterization of these semiconductor power devices generally falls into two categories: switching, or transient characteristics, and static, or DC characteristics. With the increasing native voltage and current levels that modern power devices are capable of handling, characterization equipment meant to extract quasi-static IV curves has not kept pace, often leaving researchers with no other option than to construct ad hoc curve tracers from disparate pieces of equipment. In this paper, a dedicated 10 V, 500 A curve tracer was designed and constructed for use with state of the art high power semiconductor switching and control elements. The characterizer is a physically small, pulsed power system at the heart of which is a relatively high power linear amplifier operating in a switched manner in order to deliver well defined square voltage pulses. These actively shaped pulses are used to obtain device's quasi-static DC characteristics accurately without causing any damage to the device tested. Voltage and current waveforms from each pulse are recorded simultaneously by two separate high-speed analog to digital converters and averaged over a specified interval to obtain points in the reconstructed IV graph.

  2. A 500 A device characterizer utilizing a pulsed-linear amplifier.

    PubMed

    Lacouture, Shelby; Bayne, Stephen

    2016-02-01

    With the advent of modern power semiconductor switching elements, the envelope defining "high power" is an ever increasing quantity. Characterization of these semiconductor power devices generally falls into two categories: switching, or transient characteristics, and static, or DC characteristics. With the increasing native voltage and current levels that modern power devices are capable of handling, characterization equipment meant to extract quasi-static IV curves has not kept pace, often leaving researchers with no other option than to construct ad hoc curve tracers from disparate pieces of equipment. In this paper, a dedicated 10 V, 500 A curve tracer was designed and constructed for use with state of the art high power semiconductor switching and control elements. The characterizer is a physically small, pulsed power system at the heart of which is a relatively high power linear amplifier operating in a switched manner in order to deliver well defined square voltage pulses. These actively shaped pulses are used to obtain device's quasi-static DC characteristics accurately without causing any damage to the device tested. Voltage and current waveforms from each pulse are recorded simultaneously by two separate high-speed analog to digital converters and averaged over a specified interval to obtain points in the reconstructed IV graph. PMID:26931892

  3. FPGA-Based Digital Current Switching Power Amplifiers Used in Magnetic Bearing Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yin; Zhang, Kai; Dong, Jinping

    For a traditional two-level current switching power amplifier (PA) used in a magnetic bearing system, its current ripple is obvious. To increase its current ripple performance, three-level amplifiers are designed and their current control is generally based on analog and logical circuits. So the required hardware is complex and a performance increase from the hardware adjustment is difficult. To solve this problem, a FPGA-based digital current switching power amplifier (DCSPA) was designed. Its current ripple was obviously smaller than a two-level amplifier and its control circuit was much simpler than a tri-level amplifier with an analog control circuit. Because of the field-programmable capability of a FPGA chip used, different control algorithms including complex nonlinear algorithms could be easily implemented in the amplifier and their effects could be compared with the same hardware.

  4. pH-, sugar-, and temperature-sensitive electrochemical switch amplified by enzymatic reaction and controlled by logic gates based on semi-interpenetrating polymer networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dan; Liu, Hongyun; Hu, Naifei

    2012-02-01

    Phenylboronic acid (PBA) moieties are grafted onto the backbone of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), forming the PAA-PBA polyelectrolyte. The semi-interpenetrating polymer network (semi-IPN) films composed of PAA-PBA and poly(N,N-diethylacrylamide) (PDEA) were then synthesized on electrode surface with entrapped horseradish peroxidase (HRP), designated as PDEA-(PAA-PBA)-HRP. The films demonstrated reversible pH-, fructose-, and thermo-responsive on-off behavior toward electroactive probe K(3)Fe(CN)(6) in its cyclic voltammetric (CV) response. This multiswitchable CV behavior of the system could be further employed to control and modulate the electrochemical reduction of H(2)O(2) catalyzed by HRP immobilized in the films with K(3)Fe(CN)(6) as the mediator in solution. The responsive mechanism of the system was also explored and discussed. The pH-sensitive property was attributed to the electrostatic interaction between the PAA component of the films and the probe at different pH; the thermo-responsive behavior originated from the structure change of PDEA hydrogel component of the films with temperature; the fructose-sensitive property was ascribed to the structure change of the films induced by the complexation between the PBA constituent and the sugar. This smart system could be used as a 3-input logic network composed of enabled OR (EnOR) gates in chemical or biomolecular computing by combining the multiresponsive property of the films and the amplification effect of bioelectrocatalysis and demonstrated the potential perspective for fabricating novel multiswitchable electrochemical biosensors and bioelectronic devices. PMID:22239642

  5. Optical amplifiers for coherent lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fork, Richard

    1996-01-01

    We examine application of optical amplification to coherent lidar for the case of a weak return signal (a number of quanta of the return optical field close to unity). We consider the option that has been explored to date, namely, incorporation of an optical amplifier operated in a linear manner located after reception of the signal and immediately prior to heterodyning and photodetection. We also consider alternative strategies where the coherent interaction, the nonlinear processes, and the amplification are not necessarily constrained to occur in the manner investigated to date. We include the complications that occur because of mechanisms that occur at the level of a few, or one, quantum excitation. Two factors combine in the work to date that limit the value of the approach. These are: (1) the weak signal tends to require operation of the amplifier in the linear regime where the important advantages of nonlinear optical processing are not accessed, (2) the linear optical amplifier has a -3dB noise figure (SN(out)/SN(in)) that necessarily degrades the signal. Some improvement is gained because the gain provided by the optical amplifier can be used to overcome losses in the heterodyned process and photodetection. The result, however, is that introduction of an optical amplifier in a well optimized coherent lidar system results in, at best, a modest improvement in signal to noise. Some improvement may also be realized on incorporating more optical components in a coherent lidar system for purely practical reasons. For example, more compact, lighter weight, components, more robust alignment, or more rapid processing may be gained. We further find that there remain a number of potentially valuable, but unexplored options offered both by the rapidly expanding base of optical technology and the recent investigation of novel nonlinear coherent interference phenomena occurring at the single quantum excitation level. Key findings are: (1) insertion of linear optical

  6. Laser system using regenerative amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Emmett, J.L.

    1980-03-04

    High energy laser system is disclosed using a regenerative amplifier, which relaxes all constraints on laser components other than the intrinsic damage level of matter, so as to enable use of available laser system components. This can be accomplished by use of segmented components, spatial filters, at least one amplifier using solid state or gaseous media, and separated reflector members providing a long round trip time through the regenerative cavity, thereby allowing slower switching and adequate time to clear the spatial filters, etc. The laser system simplifies component requirements and reduces component cost while providing high energy output. 10 figs.

  7. Laser system using regenerative amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Emmett, John L. [Pleasanton, CA

    1980-03-04

    High energy laser system using a regenerative amplifier, which relaxes all constraints on laser components other than the intrinsic damage level of matter, so as to enable use of available laser system components. This can be accomplished by use of segmented components, spatial filters, at least one amplifier using solid state or gaseous media, and separated reflector members providing a long round trip time through the regenerative cavity, thereby allowing slower switching and adequate time to clear the spatial filters, etc. The laser system simplifies component requirements and reduces component cost while providing high energy output.

  8. Amplifier-Discriminator-Multiplexor card

    SciTech Connect

    Graupman, D.

    1986-02-01

    The Amplifier-Discriminator-Multiplexor (ADM) card described was designed for the External Muon Identifier at the 15 ft Bubble Chamber. The general scheme of the data readout of the External Muon Identifier is based on the use of a master clock. The ADM card serves to amplify the signals from the proportional tubes, discriminate them, latch the signals in parallel into a shift register. The data are then shifted out serially to the Time Digitizing System, using the master clock. The shift registers are loaded, and the latches are reset every sixteen cycles of the master clock. (LEW)

  9. The Skipping Rope Curve

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordmark, Arne; Essen, Hanno

    2007-01-01

    The equilibrium of a flexible inextensible string, or chain, in the centrifugal force field of a rotating reference frame is investigated. It is assumed that the end points are fixed on the rotation axis. The shape of the curve, the skipping rope curve or "troposkien", is given by the Jacobi elliptic function sn. (Contains 3 figures.)

  10. Anodic Polarization Curves Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yue; Drew, Michael G. B.; Liu, Ying; Liu, Lin

    2013-01-01

    An experiment published in this "Journal" has been revisited and it is found that the curve pattern of the anodic polarization curve for iron repeats itself successively when the potential scan is repeated. It is surprising that this observation has not been reported previously in the literature because it immediately brings into…

  11. Flow-duration curves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Searcy, James Kincheon

    1959-01-01

    The flow-duration curve is a cumulative frequency curve that shows the percent of time specified discharges were equaled or exceeded during a given period. It combines in one curve the flow characteristics of a stream throughout the range of discharge, without regard to the sequence of occurrence. If the period upon which the curve is based represents the long-term flow of a stream, the curve may be used to predict the distribution of future flows for water- power, water-supply, and pollution studies. This report shows that differences in geology affect the low-flow ends of flow-duration curves of streams in adjacent basins. Thus, duration curves are useful in appraising the geologic characteristics of drainage basins. A method for adjusting flow-duration curves of short periods to represent long-term conditions is presented. The adjustment is made by correlating the records of a short-term station with those of a long-term station.

  12. CURV 3: Characteristics and mission applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, W. W.; Brady, L. K.

    1984-03-01

    The Cable-Controlled Underwater Recovery Vehicle (CURV) program was begun by NOSC for the specific purpose of developing economical systems to recover test ordnance at NOSC's Long Beach and San Clemente Island test ranges. CURV 3 is the latest in this series of tethered, unmanned, remotely controlled vehicles and its present capabilities far exceed the original CURV 1. Originally conceived for use as a search and recovery vehicle, CURV has evolved into a versatile and easily adaptable multipurpose work vehicle capable of performing search and recovery tasks as well as pursuing test, evaluation, exploration, and work projects. Basically, CURV is a composite of integrated subsystems including such items as propulsion, search and navigation, optics, hydraulics, and tools. Because it is unmanned and does not require life support or other complex support systems, CURV is able to perform most undersea tasks more economically and efficiently than maned systems. Also, since it is powered and controlled from the surface, CURV has a continuous, unlimited operating capability. Under emergency conditions, the vehicle can operate to 10,000-foot depths. CURV can be easily transported to any spot in the world. Upon arrival of the vehicle, control van, cable, and support gear can be mounted on a suitable ship of opportunity.

  13. The School as an Amplifier.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vincent, William S.

    1966-01-01

    This paper attempts to show that adaptation of mathematics to the input-output model of the school can provide powerful assistance in the measurement and analysis of school quality and its determinants. The mathematical relationship described here relates an educational model to the field of electronics. More specifically, the amplifier, a device…

  14. Dye laser traveling wave amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, F.

    1983-01-01

    A flash lamp pumped dye laser suitable for use as an amplifier stage was developed. The desired output laser pulses are of nanosecond duration, tunable in center frequency, and of good optical quality. Its usefulness as a laser oscillator is emphasized, because it constitutes a compact, relatively efficient source of tunable dye laser light.

  15. Electrometer Amplifier With Overload Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woeller, F. H.; Alexander, R.

    1986-01-01

    Circuit features low noise, input offset, and high linearity. Input preamplifier includes input-overload protection and nulling circuit to subtract dc offset from output. Prototype dc amplifier designed for use with ion detector has features desirable in general laboratory and field instrumentation.

  16. Stroke amplifier for deformable mirrors

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Robert H.; Albanese, Marc J.; Zhou, Yaopeng; Bifano, Thomas; Burns, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate a simple optical configuration that amplifies the usable stroke of a deformable mirror. By arranging for the wavefront to traverse the deformable mirror more than once, we correct it more than once. The experimental implementation of the idea demonstrates a doubling of 2.0 and 2.04 by two different means. PMID:15495423

  17. Cryogenic MMIC Low Noise Amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinreb, S.; Gaier, T.; Fernandez, J.; Erickson, N.; Wielgus, J.

    2000-01-01

    Monolithic (MMIC) and discrete transistor (MIC) low noise amplifiers are compared on the basis of performance, cost, and reliability. The need for cryogenic LNA's for future large microwave arrays for radio astronomy is briefly discussed and data is presented on a prototype LNA for the 1 to 10 GZH range along with a very wideband LNA for the 1 to 60 GHz range.

  18. Spline Curves, Wire Frames and Bvalue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, L.; Munchmeyer, F.

    1985-01-01

    The methods that were developed for wire-frame design are described. The principal tools for control of a curve during interactive design are mathematical ducks. The simplest of these devices is an analog of the draftsman's lead weight that he uses to control a mechanical spline also create Ducks for controlling differential and integral properties of curves were created. Other methods presented include: constructing the end of a Bezier polygon to gain quick and reasonably confident control of the end tangent vector, end curvature and end torsion; keeping the magnitude of unwanted curvature oscillations within tolerance; constructing the railroad curves that appear in many engineering design problems; and controlling the frame to minimize errors at mesh points and to optimize the shapes of the curve elements.

  19. Frequency-shifted feedback amplifier for broadband laser cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Michael; van Kooy, Alexander; Yanakas, Michael

    2014-03-01

    We have developed a compact, all-solid state laser amplifier for generating asymmetric sidebands with controlled number and spacing of optical frequencies. The gain element is a tapered semiconductor amplifier, used in conjunction with an acousto-optic modulator that generates red-detuned feedback frequencies. This results in asymmetric sidebands that are all lower in optical frequency than the narrowband seed laser frequency. The output laser spectrum has a well-defined edge (the input laser frequency) and multiple sidebands whose number, frequency spacing, and power are fully controlled by the seed laser characteristics and a single radio frequency input. The number of sidebands can be varied in a controlled way, and the output optical power is variable up to the Watt level of the amplifier chip. The system will be used for broadband laser cooling.

  20. Differences in strength-duration curves of electrical diagnosis by physiotherapists between DJ-1 homozygous knockout and wild-type mice: a randomized controlled pilot trial.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ju-Hyun; Lee, Won-Deok; Kim, Mee-Young; Lee, Lim-Kyu; Park, Byoung-Sun; Yang, Seung-Min; Noh, Ji-Woong; Shin, Yong-Sub; Lee, Jeong-Uk; Kwak, Taek-Yong; Lee, Tae-Hyun; Park, Jaehong; Kim, Bokyung; Kim, Junghwan

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] Strength-duration (SD) curves are used in electrical diagnosis by physiotherapists to confirm muscle degeneration. However, the usefulness of SD curves in comparing muscle degeneration in DJ-1 homozygous knockout (DJ-1(-/-)) and wild-type mice (DJ-1(+/+)) is not yet fully understood. The electrical properties of the gastrocnemius muscles of DJ-1(-/-) and DJ-1(+/+) mice were compared in the current study. [Subjects and Methods] The electrode of an electrical stimulator was applied to the gastrocnemius muscle to measure the rheobase until the response of contractive muscle to electrical stimulation became visible in mice. [Results] The rheobase of DJ-1(-/-) mice showed a significant increase in a time-dependent manner, compared to that of DJ-1(+/+) mice. [Conclusion] These results demonstrate that the DJ-1 protein may be implicated in the regulation of neuromuscular activity of gastrocnemius muscles of mice. PMID:27313379

  1. Differences in strength-duration curves of electrical diagnosis by physiotherapists between DJ-1 homozygous knockout and wild-type mice: a randomized controlled pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ju-Hyun; Lee, Won-Deok; Kim, Mee-Young; Lee, Lim-Kyu; Park, Byoung-Sun; Yang, Seung-Min; Noh, Ji-Woong; Shin, Yong-Sub; Lee, Jeong-Uk; Kwak, Taek-Yong; Lee, Tae-Hyun; Park, Jaehong; Kim, Bokyung; Kim, Junghwan

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Strength-duration (SD) curves are used in electrical diagnosis by physiotherapists to confirm muscle degeneration. However, the usefulness of SD curves in comparing muscle degeneration in DJ-1 homozygous knockout (DJ-1−/−) and wild-type mice (DJ-1+/+) is not yet fully understood. The electrical properties of the gastrocnemius muscles of DJ-1−/− and DJ-1+/+ mice were compared in the current study. [Subjects and Methods] The electrode of an electrical stimulator was applied to the gastrocnemius muscle to measure the rheobase until the response of contractive muscle to electrical stimulation became visible in mice. [Results] The rheobase of DJ-1−/− mice showed a significant increase in a time-dependent manner, compared to that of DJ-1+/+ mice. [Conclusion] These results demonstrate that the DJ-1 protein may be implicated in the regulation of neuromuscular activity of gastrocnemius muscles of mice. PMID:27313379

  2. Mechanics of Curved Folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Marcelo A.; Santangelo, Christian D.

    2011-03-01

    Despite an almost two thousand year history, origami, the art of folding paper, remains a challenge both artistically and scientifically. Traditionally, origami is practiced by folding along straight creases. A whole new set of shapes can be explored, however, if, instead of straight creases, one folds along arbitrary curves. We present a mechanical model for curved fold origami in which the energy of a plastically-deformed crease is balanced by the bending energy of developable regions on either side of the crease. Though geometry requires that a sheet buckle when folded along a closed curve, its shape depends on the elasticity of the sheet. NSF DMR-0846582.

  3. Multi-pass light amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plaessmann, Henry (Inventor); Grossman, William M. (Inventor); Olson, Todd E. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A multiple-pass laser amplifier that uses optical focusing between subsequent passes through a single gain medium so that a reproducibly stable beam size is achieved within the gain region. A resonator or a White Cell cavity is provided, including two or more mirrors (planar or curvilinearly shaped) facing each other along a resonator axis and an optical gain medium positioned on a resonator axis between the mirrors or adjacent to one of the mirrors. In a first embodiment, two curvilinear mirrors, which may include adjacent lenses, are configured so that a light beam passing through the gain medium and incident on the first mirror is reflected by that mirror toward the second mirror in a direction approximately parallel to the resonator axis. A light beam translator, such as an optical flat of transparent material, is positioned to translate this light beam by a controllable amount toward or away from the resonator axis for each pass of the light beam through the translator. A second embodiment uses two curvilinear mirrors and one planar mirror, with a gain medium positioned in the optical path between each curvilinear mirror and the planar mirror. A third embodiment uses two curvilinear mirrors and two planar mirrors, with a gain medium positioned adjacent to a planar mirror. A fourth embodiment uses a curvilinear mirror and three planar mirrors, with a gain medium positioned adjacent to a planar mirror. A fourth embodiment uses four planar mirrors and a focusing lens system, with a gain medium positioned between the four mirrors. A fifth embodiment uses first and second planar mirrors, a focusing lens system and a third mirror that may be planar or curvilinear, with a gain medium positioned adjacent to the third mirror. A sixth embodiment uses two planar mirrors and a curvilinear mirror and a fourth mirror that may be planar or curvilinear, with a gain medium positioned adjacent to the fourth mirror. In a seventh embodiment, first and second mirrors face a third

  4. Low Cost RF Amplifier for Community TV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ch, Syafaruddin; Sasongko, Sudi Mariyanto Al; Made Budi Suksmadana, I.; Mustiko Okta Muvianto, Cahyo; Ariessaputra, Suthami

    2016-01-01

    he capability of television to deliver audio video makes this media become the most effective method to spread information. This paper presents an experiment of RF amplifier design having low-cost design and providing sufficient RF power particularly for community television. The RF amplifier consists of two stages of amplifier. The first stage amplifier was used to leverage output of TV modulator from 11dBm to enable to drive next stage amplifier. CAD simulation and fabrication were run to reach optimum RF amplifier design circuit. The associated circuit was made by determining stability circle, stability gain, and matching impedance. Hence, the average power of first stage RF amplifier was 24.68dBm achieved. The second stage used RF modules which was ready match to 50 ohm for both input and output port. The experiment results show that the RF amplifier may operate at frequency ranging from 174 to 230MHz. The average output power of the 2nd stage amplifier was 33.38 Watt with the overall gain of 20.54dB. The proposed RF amplifier is a cheap way to have a stable RF amplifier for community TV. The total budget for the designed RF amplifier is only a 1/5 compared to local design of final TV amplifier.

  5. Curve Stitching in LOGO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muscat, Jean-Paul

    1992-01-01

    Uses LOGO to enhance the applicability of curve stitching in the mathematics curriculum. Presents the formulas and computer programs for the construction of parabolas, concentric circles, and epicycloids. Diagrams of constructed figures are provided. (MDH)

  6. Highly curved microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Cully, S.; Warren, J.; Gaines, G. A.; Priedhorsky, W.; Bloch, J.

    1990-01-01

    Several spherically curved microchannel plate (MCP) stack configurations were studied as part of an ongoing astrophysical detector development program, and as part of the development of the ALEXIS satellite payload. MCP pairs with surface radii of curvature as small as 7 cm, and diameters up to 46 mm have been evaluated. The experiments show that the gain (greater than 1.5 x 10 exp 7) and background characteristics (about 0.5 events/sq cm per sec) of highly curved MCP stacks are in general equivalent to the performance achieved with flat MCP stacks of similar configuration. However, gain variations across the curved MCP's due to variations in the channel length to diameter ratio are observed. The overall pulse height distribution of a highly curved surface MCP stack (greater than 50 percent FWHM) is thus broader than its flat counterpart (less than 30 percent). Preconditioning of curved MCP stacks gives comparable results to flat MCP stacks, but it also decreases the overall gain variations. Flat fields of curved MCP stacks have the same general characteristics as flat MCP stacks.

  7. Highly stable biased amplifier and stretcher system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roddick, R. G.

    1970-01-01

    Amplifier and stretcher system, which minimizes thermal effects and compensates for repetition-rate effects, maintains resolution levels in spectrum analysis. An additional inverting amplifier is used in the system to provide a noiseless charge restorer.

  8. Does surface roughness amplify wetting?

    SciTech Connect

    Malijevský, Alexandr

    2014-11-14

    Any solid surface is intrinsically rough on the microscopic scale. In this paper, we study the effect of this roughness on the wetting properties of hydrophilic substrates. Macroscopic arguments, such as those leading to the well-known Wenzel's law, predict that surface roughness should amplify the wetting properties of such adsorbents. We use a fundamental measure density functional theory to demonstrate the opposite effect from roughness for microscopically corrugated surfaces, i.e., wetting is hindered. Based on three independent analyses we show that microscopic surface corrugation increases the wetting temperature or even makes the surface hydrophobic. Since for macroscopically corrugated surfaces the solid texture does indeed amplify wetting there must exist a crossover between two length-scale regimes that are distinguished by opposite response on surface roughening. This demonstrates how deceptive can be efforts to extend the thermodynamical laws beyond their macroscopic territory.

  9. Improved charge amplifier using hybrid hysteresis compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin-Shahidi, Darya; Trumper, David L.

    2013-08-01

    We present a novel charge amplifier, with a robust feedback circuit and a method for compensating piezoelectric actuator's hysteresis at low frequencies. The amplifier uses a modified feedback circuit which improves robustness to the addition of series load impedance such as in cabling. We also describe a hybrid hysteresis compensation method for enabling the charge amplifier to reduce hysteresis at low frequencies. Experimental results demonstrate the utility of the new amplifier design.

  10. Quantum Theory of Laser Amplifiers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mander, Gillian Linda

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. We calculate the input-output characteristics of a below threshold laser amplifier. Expressions are derived for the output second- and fourth-order spectral and temporal correlation functions in terms of the corresponding input quantities, and for the photocount first and second factorial moments for both homodyne and direct detection. The general results are applied to several cases of practical interest, including specific non-classical input states. We show that a maximum of twofold amplification is permitted if squeezing in the input is to survive at the output. Similarly, for preservation of photon antibunching in amplification we show that only very small gains are allowed. The model treated here provides a detailed example of the amplifier noise limitations imposed by quantum mechanics. In particular, we show that minimum noise occurs in a cavity that is asymmetric with respect to the mirror reflectivities. The latter part of this work treats the above threshold laser amplifier. The laser output is back-scattered from a moving target to provide a weak Doppler-shifted signal which re-enters the laser cavity and is amplified. We show that the three-level atomic lasing medium is equivalent to a two-level medium pumped by an inverted bath. We use the methods of quantum statistical analysis to obtain time -evolution equations for the c-number amplitudes of the laser and signal fields. We show that the results may be applied to the below threshold regime for appropriate values of the pump parameter. By considering the amplitude differential gain we show explicitly that the behaviour of the laser around threshold is characteristic of a second -order phase transition. We calculate the output intensity gain appropriate to a heterodyne detection process, and find good agreement between the predicted gain profiles and measured data for both carbon dioxide and argon-ion lasers.

  11. High temperature current mirror amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Patterson, III, Raymond B.

    1984-05-22

    A high temperature current mirror amplifier having biasing means in the transdiode connection of the input transistor for producing a voltage to maintain the base-collector junction reversed-biased and a current means for maintaining a current through the biasing means at high temperatures so that the base-collector junction of the input transistor remained reversed-biased. For accuracy, a second current mirror is provided with a biasing means and current means on the input leg.

  12. 338-GHz Semiconductor Amplifier Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene A.; Gaier, Todd C.; Soria, Mary M.; Fung, King Man; Rasisic, Vesna; Deal, William; Leong, Kevin; Mei, Xiao Bing; Yoshida, Wayne; Liu, Po-Hsin; Uyeda, Jansen; Lai, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Research findings were reported from an investigation of new gallium nitride (GaN) monolithic millimeter-wave integrated circuit (MMIC) power amplifiers (PAs) targeting the highest output power and the highest efficiency for class-A operation in W-band (75-110 GHz). W-band PAs are a major component of many frequency multiplied submillimeter-wave LO signal sources. For spectrometer arrays, substantial W-band power is required due to the passive lossy frequency multipliers.

  13. High power gas laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Leland, Wallace T.; Stratton, Thomas F.

    1981-01-01

    A high power output CO.sub.2 gas laser amplifier having a number of sections, each comprising a plurality of annular pumping chambers spaced around the circumference of a vacuum chamber containing a cold cathode, gridded electron gun. The electron beam from the electron gun ionizes the gas lasing medium in the sections. An input laser beam is split into a plurality of annular beams, each passing through the sections comprising one pumping chamber.

  14. Compact, harmonic multiplying gyrotron amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, H.Z.; Granatstein, V.L.; Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Levush, B.; Tate, J.; Chen, S.H.

    1995-12-31

    A compact, harmonic multiplying gyrotron traveling wave amplifier is being developed. The device is a three-stage tube with the output section running as a fourth harmonic gyro-TWT, the input section running as a fundamental gyro-TWT, and the middle operating at the second harmonic of the cyclotron frequency. Radiation is suppressed by servers between the sections. The operating beam of the tube is produced by a magnetron injection gun (MIG). A TE{sub 0n} mode selective interaction circuit consisting of mode converters and a filter waveguide is employed for both input and output sections to solve the mode competition problem, which is pervasive in gyro-TWT operation. The input section has an input coupler designed as a TE{sub 0n} mode launcher. It excites a signal at the fundamental cyclotron frequency (17.5 GHz), which is amplified in the first TWT interaction region. So far the device is similar to a two-stage harmonic gyro-TWT. The distinction is that in the three-stage device the second section will be optimized not for output power but for fourth harmonic bunching of the beam. A gyroklystron amplifier has also been designed. The configuration is similar to the gyro-TWT but with the traveling wave interaction structures replaced by mode selective special complex cavities. Cold test results of the wideband input coupler and the TE{sub 0n} mode selective interaction circuit have been obtained.

  15. Cooled Low-Noise HEMT Microwave Amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bautista, J. Javier; Ortiz, Gerardo G.; Duh, Kuanghann George

    1992-01-01

    Prototype cooled low-noise microwave amplifiers based on high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMT's) considered as replacements for cooled ruby masers used as low-noise receiver-front-end amplifiers in communications, radio science, radar systems, radio astronomy, and telemetry. HEMT amplifier operates at 12 K, requires less cooling power and operates at lower cost with simpler, more-reliable cooling system.

  16. Bio-isolated DC operational amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    Possibility of shocks from leakage currents can be reduced by use of isolated preamplifiers. Amplifier consists of battery-powered operational amplifier coupled by means of light-emitting diodes to another amplifier which may be grounded and operated from ac power mains or separate battery supply.

  17. NASA developments in solid state power amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, Regis F.

    1990-01-01

    Over the last ten years, NASA has undertaken an extensive program aimed at development of solid state power amplifiers for space applications. Historically, the program may be divided into three phases. The first efforts were carried out in support of the advanced communications technology satellite (ACTS) program, which is developing an experimental version of a Ka-band commercial communications system. These first amplifiers attempted to use hybrid technology. The second phase was still targeted at ACTS frequencies, but concentrated on monolithic implementations, while the current, third phase, is a monolithic effort that focusses on frequencies appropriate for other NASA programs and stresses amplifier efficiency. The topics covered include: (1) 20 GHz hybrid amplifiers; (2) 20 GHz monolithic MESFET power amplifiers; (3) Texas Instruments' (TI) 20 GHz variable power amplifier; (4) TI 20 GHz high power amplifier; (5) high efficiency monolithic power amplifiers; (6) GHz high efficiency variable power amplifier; (7) TI 32 GHz monolithic power amplifier performance; (8) design goals for Hughes' 32 GHz variable power amplifier; and (9) performance goals for Hughes' pseudomorphic 60 GHz power amplifier.

  18. Design of hysteresis circuits using differential amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, W. A.

    1971-01-01

    Design equations for hysteresis circuit are based on the following assumptions: amplifier input impedance is larger than source impedance; amplifier output impedance is less than load impedance; and amplifier switches state when differential input voltage is approximately zero. Circuits are designed to any given specifications.

  19. Solid state ku-band power amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, H. C.; Lockyear, W. H.

    1972-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of two types of IMPATT diode reflection amplifiers and a transmission amplifier are given. The Ku-band IMPATT diode development is discussed. Circuitry and electrical performance of the final version of the Ku-band amplifier is described. Construction details and an outline and mounting drawing are presented.

  20. Solid state, S-band, power amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Digrindakis, M.

    1973-01-01

    The final design and specifications for a solid state, S-band, power amplifier is reported. Modifications from a previously proposed design were incorporated to improve efficiency and meet input overdrive and noise floor requirements. Reports on the system design, driver amplifier, power amplifier, and voltage and current limiter are included along with a discussion of the testing program.

  1. Improved techniques for switching power amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Flinder, F.M.; Wolfs, P.J.; Kwong, K.C.

    1993-10-01

    The control system design of a dc to 10 kHz bandwidth 45 kVA current sourced power amplifier suitable for geophysical exploration applications is presented. A five-level modulation scheme has been implemented using a modified bridge topology with only four switches. This scheme give as an order of magnitude improvement in switching ripple and control performance over two-level modulation. Using this system, a 50 kHz switch frequency allows a 20 kHz, {minus}3dB bandwidth to be easily achieved. Simulation as well as tenth scale model test results are presented. The current output waveform reproduction is of high quality over the rated dc to 10 kHz frequency range. The THD is 0.3% at 1 kHz.

  2. Rapid Diagnosis of α-Thalassemia by Melting Curve Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Munkongdee, Thongperm; Vattanaviboon, Phantip; Thummarati, Parichut; Sewamart, Paijit; Winichagoon, Pranee; Fucharoen, Suthat; Svasti, Saovaros

    2010-01-01

    α-Thalassemia is an inherited hemoglobin disorder that results from defective synthesis of α-globin protein. Couples who both carry the α-thalassemia-1 gene are at risk of having a fetus with Hb Bart's hydrops fetalis. Rapid and accurate screening for individuals carrying the α-thalassemia-1 gene is the most effective strategy to prevent and control this severe form of thalassemia. In this study, a new and accurate method for α-thalassemia diagnosis was developed by genotyping α-thalassemia-1, the Southeast Asian type (−−SEA) and Thai type (−−THAI) deletions, using multiplex PCR followed by a melting curve analysis. Primers were designed to specifically amplify two deletion fragments, the −−SEA and −−THAI deletions and two normal fragments, ψζ- and α2-globin gene. The primers were capable of distinguishing α-thalassemia 1 heterozygotes from α-thalassemia 2 homozygotes, which are unable to be diagnosed by standard hematological data and hemoglobin typing. The melting temperatures of the −−THAI, −−SEA, ψζ-globin, and α2-globin gene fragments were 79.9 ± 0.2, 89.4 ± 0.5, 92.8 ± 0.2, and 85.0 ± 0.2°C, respectively. Melting curve analysis was performed in 130 subjects in parallel with conventional gap-PCR analysis, and results showed 100% concordance. This method eliminates the post-PCR electrophoresis process, which is laborious, and allows high throughput screening suitable for large population screening for prevention and control of thalassemia. PMID:20190015

  3. Differentiation of infectious bursal disease virus strains using real-time RT-PCR and high resolution melt curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Ghorashi, Seyed A; O'Rourke, Denise; Ignjatovic, Jagoda; Noormohammadi, Amir H

    2011-01-01

    Differentiation of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) strains is crucial for effective vaccination programs and epidemiological investigations. In this study, a combination of real-time RT-PCR and high resolution melt (HRM) curve analysis was developed for simultaneous detection and differentiation of IBDV strains/isolates. The hypervariable region of VP2 gene was amplified from several IBDV strains and subjected to HRM curve analysis. The method could readily differentiate between classical vaccines/isolates and variants. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the amplicons from each strain revealed that each melt curve profile was related to a unique DNA sequence. The real-time RT-PCR HRM curve analysis was also able to differentiate IBDV strains/isolates directly in bursal tissues from field submissions and from vaccinated commercial flocks. The differences between melting peaks generated from IBDV strains were significantly different (P<0.0001) demonstrating the high discriminatory power of this technique. The results presented in this study indicated that real-time RT-PCR followed by HRM curve analysis provides a rapid and robust technique for genotyping IBDV isolates/strains and can contribute to effective control of IBDV outbreaks. PMID:21111004

  4. Visible-infrared self-amplified spontaneous emission amplifier free electron laser undulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Roger; Cornacchia, Max; Emma, Paul; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Poling, Ben; Ruland, Robert; Johnson, Erik; Rakowsky, George; Skaritka, John; Lidia, Steve; Duffy, Pat; Libkind, Marcus; Frigola, Pedro; Murokh, Alex; Pellegrini, Claudio; Rosenzweig, James; Tremaine, Aaron

    2001-12-01

    The visible-infrared self-amplified spontaneous emission amplifier (VISA) free electron laser (FEL) is an experimental device designed to show self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) to saturation in the near infrared to visible light energy range. It generates a resonant wavelength output from 800-600 nm, so that silicon detectors may be used to characterize the optical properties of the FEL radiation. VISA is designed to show how SASE FEL theory corresponds with experiment in this wavelength range, using an electron beam with emittance close to that planned for the future Linear Coherent Light Source at SLAC. VISA comprises a 4 m pure permanent magnet undulator with four 99 cm segments, each of 55 periods, 18 mm long. The undulator has distributed focusing built into it, to reduce the average beta function of the 70-85 MeV electron beam to about 30 cm. There are four FODO cells per segment. The permanent magnet focusing lattice consists of blocks mounted on either side of the electron beam, in the undulator gap. The most important undulator error parameter for a free electron laser is the trajectory walk-off, or lack of overlap of the photon and electron beams. Using pulsed wire magnet measurements and magnet shimming, we were able to control trajectory walk-off to less than +/-50 μm per field gain length.

  5. Log amplifier with pole-zero compensation

    DOEpatents

    Brookshier, William

    1987-01-01

    A logarithmic amplifier circuit provides pole-zero compensation for improved stability and response time over 6-8 decades of input signal frequency. The amplifier circuit includes a first operational amplifier with a first feedback loop which includes a second, inverting operational amplifier in a second feedback loop. The compensated output signal is provided by the second operational amplifier with the log elements, i.e., resistors, and the compensating capacitors in each of the feedback loops having equal values so that each break point or pole is offset by a compensating break point or zero.

  6. HIGH AVERAGE POWER OPTICAL FEL AMPLIFIERS.

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI, ILAN, DAYRAN, D.; LITVINENKO, V.

    2005-08-21

    Historically, the first demonstration of the optical FEL was in an amplifier configuration at Stanford University [l]. There were other notable instances of amplifying a seed laser, such as the LLNL PALADIN amplifier [2] and the BNL ATF High-Gain Harmonic Generation FEL [3]. However, for the most part FELs are operated as oscillators or self amplified spontaneous emission devices. Yet, in wavelength regimes where a conventional laser seed can be used, the FEL can be used as an amplifier. One promising application is for very high average power generation, for instance FEL's with average power of 100 kW or more. The high electron beam power, high brightness and high efficiency that can be achieved with photoinjectors and superconducting Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL) combine well with the high-gain FEL amplifier to produce unprecedented average power FELs. This combination has a number of advantages. In particular, we show that for a given FEL power, an FEL amplifier can introduce lower energy spread in the beam as compared to a traditional oscillator. This properly gives the ERL based FEL amplifier a great wall-plug to optical power efficiency advantage. The optics for an amplifier is simple and compact. In addition to the general features of the high average power FEL amplifier, we will look at a 100 kW class FEL amplifier is being designed to operate on the 0.5 ampere Energy Recovery Linac which is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory's Collider-Accelerator Department.

  7. IGMtransmission: Transmission curve computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Christopher M.; Meiksin, Avery; Stock, David

    2015-04-01

    IGMtransmission is a Java graphical user interface that implements Monte Carlo simulations to compute the corrections to colors of high-redshift galaxies due to intergalactic attenuation based on current models of the Intergalactic Medium. The effects of absorption due to neutral hydrogen are considered, with particular attention to the stochastic effects of Lyman Limit Systems. Attenuation curves are produced, as well as colors for a wide range of filter responses and model galaxy spectra. Photometric filters are included for the Hubble Space Telescope, the Keck telescope, the Mt. Palomar 200-inch, the SUBARU telescope and UKIRT; alternative filter response curves and spectra may be readily uploaded.

  8. ULTRA-STABILIZED D. C. AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Hartwig, E.C.; Kuenning, R.W.; Acker, R.C.

    1959-02-17

    An improved circuit is described for stabilizing the drift and minimizing the noise and hum level of d-c amplifiers so that the output voltage will be zero when the input is zero. In its detailed aspects, the disclosed circuit incorporates a d-c amplifier having a signal input, a second input, and an output circuit coupled back to the first input of the amplifier through inverse feedback means. An electronically driven chopper having a pair of fixed contacts and a moveable contact alternately connects the two inputs of a difference amplifier to the signal input. The A. E. error signal produced in the difference amplifier is amplified, rectified, and applied to the second input of the amplifier as the d-c stabilizing voltage.

  9. Direct solar-pumped iodine laser amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, K. S.

    1985-01-01

    This semiannual progress report covers the period from April 1, 1985 to Sept. 30, 1985 under NASA grant NAS1-441 entitled direct solar pumped iodine laser amplifier. During this period the parametric studies of the iodine laser oscillator pumped by a Vortek simulator was carried out before the amplifier studies. The amplifier studies are postponed to the extended period following completion of the parametric studies. In addition, the kinetic modeling of a solar pumped iodine laser amplifier, and the experimental work for a solar pumped dye laser amplifier are in progress. This report contains three parts: (1) the radiation characteristics of solar simulator and the parametric characteristics of photodissociation iodine laser continuously pumped by a Vortek solar simulator; (2) kinetic modeling of a solar pumped iodine laser amplifier; and (3) the study of the dye laser amplifier pumped by a Tamarack solar simulator.

  10. High temperature charge amplifier for geothermal applications

    DOEpatents

    Lindblom, Scott C.; Maldonado, Frank J.; Henfling, Joseph A.

    2015-12-08

    An amplifier circuit in a multi-chip module includes a charge to voltage converter circuit, a voltage amplifier a low pass filter and a voltage to current converter. The charge to voltage converter receives a signal representing an electrical charge and generates a voltage signal proportional to the input signal. The voltage amplifier receives the voltage signal from the charge to voltage converter, then amplifies the voltage signal by the gain factor to output an amplified voltage signal. The lowpass filter passes low frequency components of the amplified voltage signal and attenuates frequency components greater than a cutoff frequency. The voltage to current converter receives the output signal of the lowpass filter and converts the output signal to a current output signal; wherein an amplifier circuit output is selectable between the output signal of the lowpass filter and the current output signal.

  11. Nondegenerate optical parametric chirped pulse amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Jovanovic, Igor; Ebbers, Christopher A.

    2005-03-22

    A system provides an input pump pulse and a signal pulse. A first dichroic beamsplitter is highly reflective for the input signal pulse and highly transmissive for the input pump pulse. A first optical parametric amplifier nonlinear crystal transfers part of the energy from the input pump pulse to the input signal pulse resulting in a first amplified signal pulse and a first depleted pump pulse. A second dichroic beamsplitter is highly reflective for the first amplified signal pulse and highly transmissive for the first depleted pump pulse. A second optical parametric amplifier nonlinear crystal transfers part of the energy from the first depleted pump pulse to the first amplified signal pulse resulting in a second amplified signal pulse and a second depleted pump pulse. A third dichroic beamsplitter receives the second amplified signal pulse and the second depleted pump pulse. The second depleted pump pulse is discarded.

  12. Field Effect Transistor /FET/ circuit for variable gin amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaid, G. H.

    1969-01-01

    Amplifier circuit using two FETs combines improved input and output impedances with relatively large signal handling capability and an immunity from adverse effects of automatic gain control. Circuit has sources and drains in parallel plus a resistive divider for signal and bias to either of the gate terminals.

  13. A compact 500 MHz 4 kW Solid-State Power Amplifier for accelerator applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspar, M.; Pedrozzi, M.; Ferreira, L. F. R.; Garvey, T.

    2011-05-01

    We present the development of a compact narrow-band Solid-State Power Amplifier (SSPA). We foresee a promising application of solid-state amplifiers specifically in accelerators for new generation synchrotron light sources. Such a new technology has reached a competitive price/performance ratio and expected lifetime in comparison with klystron and IOT amplifiers. The increasing number of synchrotron light sources using 500 MHz as base frequency justifies the effort in the development of the proposed amplifier. Two different techniques are also proposed to improve the control and performance of these new distributed amplification systems which we call, respectively, complete distributed system and forced compression.

  14. High-power phase locking of a fiber amplifier array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shay, T. M.; Baker, J. T.; Sanchez, A. D.; Robin, C. A.; Vergien, C. L.; Zeringue, C.; Gallant, D.; Lu, Chunte A.; Pulford, Benjamin; Bronder, T. J.; Lucero, Arthur

    2009-02-01

    We report high power phase locked fiber amplifier array using the Self-Synchronous Locking of Optical Coherence by Single-detector Electronic-frequency Tagging technique. We report the first experimental results for a five element amplifier array with a total locked power of more than 725-W. We will report on experimental measurements of the phase fluctuations versus time when the control loop is closed. The rms phase error was measured to be λ/60. Recent results will be reported. To the best of the authors' knowledge this is the highest fiber laser power to be coherently combined.

  15. Dispersion-Engineered Traveling Wave Kinetic Inductance Parametric Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zmuidzinas, Jonas (Inventor); Day, Peter K. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A traveling wave kinetic inductance parametric amplifier comprises a superconducting transmission line and a dispersion control element. The transmission line can include periodic variations of its dimension along its length. The superconducting material can include a high normal state resistivity material. In some instances the high normal state resistivity material includes nitrogen and a metal selected from the group consisting of titanium, niobium and vanadium. The traveling wave kinetic inductance parametric amplifier is expected to exhibit a noise temperature below 100 mK/GHz.

  16. Frequency and time domain modeling of high speed amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opalska, Katarzyna

    2015-09-01

    The paper presents the lumped model of high speed amplifier useful for frequency and time domain (also large signal) simulation. Model is constructed on the basis of two-domain device measurements, namely small signal frequency parameters and time response to the input step of varying amplitude. Rational approximation of frequency domain data leads to small signal model composed of RLC subcircuits and controlled sources. Next, the model is complimented with the nonlinearities identified from time-domain measurements, including those taken for large input signals. Final amplifier model implemented in SPICE simulator is shown to correctly render the behavior of the device over the wide variety of operating conditions.

  17. High power metallic halide laser. [amplifying a copper chloride laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pivirotto, T. J. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A laser amplification system is disclosed whereby a metallic halide vapor such as copper chloride is caused to flow through a laser amplifier and a heat exchanger in a closed loop system so that the flow rate is altered to control the temperature rise across the length of the laser amplifier. The copper atoms within the laser amplifier should not exceed a temperature of 3000 K, so that the number of copper atoms in the metastable state will not be high enough to prevent amplification in the amplifier. A molecular dissociation apparatus is provided at the input to the laser amplifier for dissociating the copper chloride into copper atoms and ions and chlorine atoms and ions. The dissociation apparatus includes a hollow cathode tube and an annular ring spaced apart from the tube end. A voltage differential is applied between the annular ring and the hollow cathode tube so that as the copper chloride flows through, it is dissociated into copper and chlorine ions and atoms.

  18. Design and development of digital seismic amplifier recorder

    SciTech Connect

    Samsidar, Siti Alaa; Afuar, Waldy; Handayani, Gunawan

    2015-04-16

    A digital seismic recording is a recording technique of seismic data in digital systems. This method is more convenient because it is more accurate than other methods of seismic recorders. To improve the quality of the results of seismic measurements, the signal needs to be amplified to obtain better subsurface images. The purpose of this study is to improve the accuracy of measurement by amplifying the input signal. We use seismic sensors/geophones with a frequency of 4.5 Hz. The signal is amplified by means of 12 units of non-inverting amplifier. The non-inverting amplifier using IC 741 with the resistor values 1KΩ and 1MΩ. The amplification results were 1,000 times. The results of signal amplification converted into digital by using the Analog Digital Converter (ADC). Quantitative analysis in this study was performed using the software Lab VIEW 8.6. The Lab VIEW 8.6 program was used to control the ADC. The results of qualitative analysis showed that the seismic conditioning can produce a large output, so that the data obtained is better than conventional data. This application can be used for geophysical methods that have low input voltage such as microtremor application.

  19. High temperature current mirror amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Patterson, R.B. III.

    1984-05-22

    Disclosed is a high temperature current mirror amplifier having biasing means in the transdiode connection of the input transistor for producing a voltage to maintain the base-collector junction reversed-biased and a current means for maintaining a current through the biasing means at high temperatures so that the base-collector junction of the input transistor remained reversed-biased. For accuracy, a second current mirror is provided with a biasing means and current means on the input leg. 2 figs.

  20. Charge amplifier with bias compensation

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Gary W.

    2002-01-01

    An ion beam uniformity monitor for very low beam currents using a high-sensitivity charge amplifier with bias compensation. The ion beam monitor is used to assess the uniformity of a raster-scanned ion beam, such as used in an ion implanter, and utilizes four Faraday cups placed in the geometric corners of the target area. Current from each cup is integrated with respect to time, thus measuring accumulated dose, or charge, in Coulombs. By comparing the dose at each corner, a qualitative assessment of ion beam uniformity is made possible. With knowledge of the relative area of the Faraday cups, the ion flux and areal dose can also be obtained.

  1. Graphing Polar Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawes, Jonathan F.

    2013-01-01

    Graphing polar curves typically involves a combination of three traditional techniques, all of which can be time-consuming and tedious. However, an alternative method--graphing the polar function on a rectangular plane--simplifies graphing, increases student understanding of the polar coordinate system, and reinforces graphing techniques learned…

  2. The Bacterial Growth Curve.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulton, Richard J. L.

    1991-01-01

    A procedure that allows students to view an entire bacterial growth curve during a two- to three-hour student laboratory period is described. Observations of the lag phase, logarithmic phase, maximum stationary phase, and phase of decline are possible. A nonpathogenic, marine bacterium is used in the investigation. (KR)

  3. Textbook Factor Demand Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Joe C.

    1994-01-01

    Maintains that teachers and textbook graphics follow the same basic pattern in illustrating changes in demand curves when product prices increase. Asserts that the use of computer graphics will enable teachers to be more precise in their graphic presentation of price elasticity. (CFR)

  4. Method and apparatus for stabilizing pulsed microwave amplifiers

    DOEpatents

    Hopkins, Donald B.

    1993-01-01

    Phase and amplitude variations at the output of a high power pulsed microwave amplifier arising from instabilities of the driving electron beam are suppressed with a feed-forward system that can stabilize pulses which are too brief for regulation by conventional feedback techniques. Such variations tend to be similar during successive pulses. The variations are detected during each pulse by comparing the amplifier output with the low power input signal to obtain phase and amplitude error signals. This enables storage of phase and amplitude correction signals which are used to make compensating changes in the low power input signal during the following amplifier output pulse which suppress the variations. In the preferred form of the invention, successive increments of the correction signals for each pulse are stored in separate channels of a multi-channel storage. Sequential readout of the increments during the next pulse provides variable control voltages to a voltage controlled phase shifter and voltage controlled amplitude modulator in the amplifier input signal path.

  5. Method and apparatus for stabilizing pulsed microwave amplifiers

    DOEpatents

    Hopkins, D.B.

    1993-01-26

    Phase and amplitude variations at the output of a high power pulsed microwave amplifier arising from instabilities of the driving electron beam are suppressed with a feed-forward system that can stabilize pulses which are too brief for regulation by conventional feedback techniques. Such variations tend to be similar during successive pulses. The variations are detected during each pulse by comparing the amplifier output with the low power input signal to obtain phase and amplitude error signals. This enables storage of phase and amplitude correction signals which are used to make compensating changes in the low power input signal during the following amplifier output pulse which suppress the variations. In the preferred form of the invention, successive increments of the correction signals for each pulse are stored in separate channels of a multi-channel storage. Sequential readout of the increments during the next pulse provides variable control voltages to a voltage controlled phase shifter and voltage controlled amplitude modulator in the amplifier input signal path.

  6. Integrating amplifiers using cooled JFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, F. J.

    1984-05-01

    It is shown how a simple integrating amplifier based on commercially available JFET and MOSFET switches can be used to measure photocurrents from detectors with noise levels as low as 1.6 x 10 to the -18th A/root Hz (10 electrons/sec). A figure shows the basic circuit, along with the waveform at the output. The readout is completely nondestructive; the reset noise does not contribute since sampling of the accumulated charge occurs between resets which are required only when the stored charge has reached a very high level. The storage capacity ranges from 10 to the 6th to 10 to the 9th electrons, depending on detector parameters and linearity requirements. Data taken with an Si:Sb detector operated at 24 microns are presented. The responsivity agrees well with the value obtained by Young et al. (1981) in the transimpedance amplifier circuit. The data are seen as indicating that extremely low values of NEP can be obtained for integration times of 1 sec and that longer integrations continue to improve the SNR at a rate faster than the square root of time when background noise is not present.

  7. A revealed preference approach to estimating supply curves for ecosystem services: use of auctions to set payments for soil erosion control in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Jack, B Kelsey; Leimona, Beria; Ferraro, Paul J

    2009-04-01

    To supply ecosystem services, private landholders incur costs. Knowledge of these costs is critical for the design of conservation-payment programs. Estimating these costs accurately is difficult because the minimum acceptable payment to a potential supplier is private information. We describe how an auction of payment contracts can be designed to elicit this information during the design phase of a conservation-payment program. With an estimate of the ecosystem-service supply curve from a pilot auction, conservation planners can explore the financial, ecological, and socioeconomic consequences of alternative scaled-up programs. We demonstrate the potential of our approach in Indonesia, where soil erosion on coffee farms generates downstream ecological and economic costs. Bid data from a small-scale, uniform-price auction for soil-conservation contracts allowed estimates of the costs of a scaled-up program, the gain from integrating biophysical and economic data to target contracts, and the trade-offs between poverty alleviation and supply of ecosystem services. Our study illustrates an auction-based approach to revealing private information about the costs of supplying ecosystem services. Such information can improve the design of programs devised to protect and enhance ecosystem services. PMID:18983597

  8. Factorization with genus 2 curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosset, Romain

    2010-04-01

    The elliptic curve method (ECM) is one of the best factorization methods available. It is possible to use hyperelliptic curves instead of elliptic curves but it is in theory slower. We use special hyperelliptic curves and Kummer surfaces to reduce the complexity of the algorithm. Our implementation GMP-HECM is faster than GMP-ECM for factoring large numbers.

  9. Multistaged stokes injected Raman capillary waveguide amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Kurnit, Norman A.

    1980-01-01

    A multistaged Stokes injected Raman capillary waveguide amplifier for providing a high gain Stokes output signal. The amplifier uses a plurality of optically coupled capillary waveguide amplifiers and one or more regenerative amplifiers to increase Stokes gain to a level sufficient for power amplification. Power amplification is provided by a multifocused Raman gain cell or a large diameter capillary waveguide. An external source of CO.sub.2 laser radiation can be injected into each of the capillary waveguide amplifier stages to increase Raman gain. Devices for injecting external sources of CO.sub.2 radiation include: dichroic mirrors, prisms, gratings and Ge Brewster plates. Alternatively, the CO.sub.2 input radiation to the first stage can be coupled and amplified between successive stages.

  10. High-efficiency solid state power amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallis, Robert E. (Inventor); Cheng, Sheng (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A high-efficiency solid state power amplifier (SSPA) for specific use in a spacecraft is provided. The SSPA has a mass of less than 850 g and includes two different X-band power amplifier sections, i.e., a lumped power amplifier with a single 11-W output and a distributed power amplifier with eight 2.75-W outputs. These two amplifier sections provide output power that is scalable from 11 to 15 watts without major design changes. Five different hybrid microcircuits, including high-efficiency Heterostructure Field Effect Transistor (HFET) amplifiers and Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) phase shifters have been developed for use within the SSPA. A highly efficient packaging approach enables the integration of a large number of hybrid circuits into the SSPA.

  11. Atlas of fatigue curves

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, H.E.

    1986-01-01

    This Atlas was developed to serve engineers who are looking for fatigue data on a particular metal or alloy. Having these curves compiled in a single book will also facilitate the computerization of the involved data. It is pointed out that plans are under way to make the data in this book available in ASCII files for analysis by computer programs. S-N curves which typify effects of major variables are considered along with low-carbon steels, medium-carbon steels, alloy steels, HSLA steels, high-strength alloy steels, heat-resisting steels, stainless steels, maraging steels, cast irons, and heat-resisting alloys. Attention is also given to aluminum alloys, copper alloys, magnesium alloys, molybdenum, tin alloys, titanium and titanium alloys, zirconium, steel castings, closed-die forgings, powder metallurgy parts, composites, effects of surface treatments, and test results for component parts.

  12. Mouse Curve Biometrics

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, Douglas A.

    2007-10-08

    A biometric system suitable for validating user identity using only mouse movements and no specialized equipment is presented. Mouse curves (mouse movements with little or no pause between them) are individually classied and used to develop classication histograms, which are representative of an individual's typical mouse use. These classication histograms can then be compared to validate identity. This classication approach is suitable for providing continuous identity validation during an entire user session.

  13. Spinal curves and scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Susan M

    2007-01-01

    Scoliosis, an abnormal side-to-side curve of the spine with associated vertebral rotation, affects as many as 4% of all adolescents. Several different categories of scoliosis exist, and treatment can range from observation and follow-up to bracing and surgical correction. This article discusses special imaging series for scoliosis and emphasizes the need for proper radiation protection techniques for patients with scoliosis, most of whom are girls in their early to mid-teens. PMID:17848532

  14. Signal-Conditioning Amplifier Recorders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medelius, Pedro J.; Taylor, John

    2003-01-01

    Signal-conditioning amplifier recorders (SCAmpRs) have been proposed as a means of simplifying and upgrading the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Ground Measurement System (GMS), which is a versatile data-acquisition system that gathers and records a variety of measurement data before and during the launch of a space shuttle. In the present version of the GMS system, signal conditioning amplifiers digitize and transmit data to a VME chassis that multiplexes up to 416 channels. The data is transmitted via a high-speed data bus to a second VME chassis where it is available for snapshots. The data is passed from the second VME chassis to a high-speed data recorder. This process is duplicated for installations at two launch pads and the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). Since any failure of equipment in the data path results in loss of data, much of the system is redundant. The architecture of the existing GMS limits expansion or any modification to the system to meet changing requirements because of the cost and time required. A SCAmpR-based system is much more flexible. The basis of the simplification, flexibility, and reliability is the shifting of the recording function to the individual amplifier channels. Each SCAmpR is a self-contained single channel data acquisition system, which in its current implementation, has a data storage capacity of up to 30 minutes when operating at the fastest data sampling rates. The SCAmpR channels are self-configuring and self-calibrating. Multiple SCAmpR channels are ganged on printed circuit boards and mounted in a chassis that provides power, a network hub, and Inter-Range Instrument Group (IRIG) time signals. The SCAmpR channels share nothing except physical mounting on a circuit board. All circuitry is electrically separate for each channel. All that is necessary to complete the data acquisition system is a single master computer tied to the SCAmpR channels by standard network equipment. The size of the data acquisition system

  15. The Stephan Curve revisited.

    PubMed

    Bowen, William H

    2013-01-01

    The Stephan Curve has played a dominant role in caries research over the past several decades. What is so remarkable about the Stephan Curve is the plethora of interactions it illustrates and yet acid production remains the dominant focus. Using sophisticated technology, it is possible to measure pH changes in plaque; however, these observations may carry a false sense of accuracy. Recent observations have shown that there may be multiple pH values within the plaque matrix, thus emphasizing the importance of the milieu within which acid is formed. Although acid production is indeed the immediate proximate cause of tooth dissolution, the influence of alkali production within plaque has received relative scant attention. Excessive reliance on Stephan Curve leads to describing foods as "safe" if they do not lower the pH below the so-called "critical pH" at which point it is postulated enamel dissolves. Acid production is just one of many biological processes that occur within plaque when exposed to sugar. Exploration of methods to enhance alkali production could produce rich research dividends. PMID:23224410

  16. Broadband Microwave Amplifier Design with Lumped Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şengül, Metin

    2016-03-01

    This study introduces a broadband microwave amplifier design that utilizes the measured scattering parameters of active devices without assuming an initial topology for the matching networks or an analytic form of the system transfer function. The algorithm can be extended to design multistage broadband microwave amplifiers. An example is given to illustrate the application of the proposed method. It was found that the proposed method provides very good initials for CAD tools to further improve amplifier performance by working on the element values.

  17. Simulation of a regenerative MW FEL amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, R.T.; Colson, W.B.; Wong, R.K.; Sheffield, R.L.

    1997-08-01

    Both oscillator and regenerative amplifier configurations are being studied to optimize the design of a MW class FEL. The regenerative amplifier uses a longer undulator and relies on higher extraction efficiency to achieve high average power, whereas the oscillator is a more compact overall design requiring the transport of the high energy electron beam around bends for energy recovery. Using parameters extrapolated from the 1 kW LANL regenerative amplifier, simulations study the feasibility of achieving 1 MW average power.

  18. A dc amplifier for nuclear particle measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macnee, A. B.; Masnari, N. A.

    1978-01-01

    A monolithic preamplifier-postamplifier combination has been developed for use with solid state particle detectors. The direct coupled amplifiers employ interdigitated n-channel JFET's, diodes, and diffused resistors. The circuits developed demonstrate the feasibility of matching the performance of existing discrete component designs. The fabrication procedures for the monolithic amplifier fabrication are presented and the results of measurements on a limited number of sample amplifiers are given.

  19. Results from a Bragg curve spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leach, D. D.; Davis, K. J.

    The Bragg Curve Spectrometer (BCS) is an ionization chamber long enough to stop particles of interest. Particles enter through the cathode window and leave an ionization track parallel to the electric field. The ionization electrons drift through a Frisch grid and are collected on an anode. The anode current, as a function of time, is split and used as input for two amplifiers, one with a long integration time constant for energy measurement, and one with a short time constant to pick off the maximum ionization or Bragg peak. The Bragg peak, which is proportional to the nuclear charge, is used for particle identification. Several versions of the BCS have been constructed and tested. The results are described.

  20. Class E/F switching power amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajimiri, Seyed-Ali (Inventor); Aoki, Ichiro (Inventor); Rutledge, David B. (Inventor); Kee, Scott David (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The present invention discloses a new family of switching amplifier classes called class E/F amplifiers. These amplifiers are generally characterized by their use of the zero-voltage-switching (ZVS) phase correction technique to eliminate of the loss normally associated with the inherent capacitance of the switching device as utilized in class-E amplifiers, together with a load network for improved voltage and current wave-shaping by presenting class-F.sup.-1 impedances at selected overtones and class-E impedances at the remaining overtones. The present invention discloses a several topologies and specific circuit implementations for achieving such performance.

  1. Log amplifier with pole-zero compensation

    DOEpatents

    Brookshier, W.

    1985-02-08

    A logarithmic amplifier circuit provides pole-zero compensation for improved stability and response time over 6-8 decades of input signal frequency. The amplifer circuit includes a first operational amplifier with a first feedback loop which includes a second, inverting operational amplifier in a second feedstock loop. The compensated output signal is provided by the second operational amplifier with the log elements, i.e., resistors, and the compensating capacitors in each of the feedback loops having equal values so that each break point is offset by a compensating break point or zero.

  2. Direct nuclear-pumped laser amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalufka, N. W.

    1981-01-01

    A (He-3)-Xe gas mixture, excited by the He-3(n,p)H-3 reaction, has been employed to amplify the output of a (He-3)Xe direct nuclear-pumped laser. Lasing occurred at the 2.63 micron line of XeI in the oscillator. The oscillator output was reflected through 180 deg and passed through the amplifier system. Power measurements of the oscillator output and the amplifier output show the laser power to be amplified by a factor of 3 for the (He-3)-Xe system. Amplification by a factor of 5 was obtained for a (He-3)-CO system.

  3. Ping-pong auto-zero amplifier with glitch reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Mark R.

    2008-01-22

    A ping-pong amplifier with reduced glitching is described. The ping-pong amplifier includes a nulling amplifier coupled to a switching network. The switching network is used to auto-zero a ping amplifier within a ping-pong amplifier. The nulling amplifier drives the output of a ping amplifier to a proper output voltage level during auto-zeroing of the ping amplifier. By being at a proper output voltage level, glitches associated with transitioning between a ping amplifier and a pong amplifier are reduced or eliminated.

  4. Fiber networks amplify active stress.

    PubMed

    Ronceray, Pierre; Broedersz, Chase P; Lenz, Martin

    2016-03-15

    Large-scale force generation is essential for biological functions such as cell motility, embryonic development, and muscle contraction. In these processes, forces generated at the molecular level by motor proteins are transmitted by disordered fiber networks, resulting in large-scale active stresses. Although these fiber networks are well characterized macroscopically, this stress generation by microscopic active units is not well understood. Here we theoretically study force transmission in these networks. We find that collective fiber buckling in the vicinity of a local active unit results in a rectification of stress towards strongly amplified isotropic contraction. This stress amplification is reinforced by the networks' disordered nature, but saturates for high densities of active units. Our predictions are quantitatively consistent with experiments on reconstituted tissues and actomyosin networks and shed light on the role of the network microstructure in shaping active stresses in cells and tissue. PMID:26921325

  5. Hydraulically amplified PZT mems actuator

    DOEpatents

    Miles, Robin R.

    2004-11-02

    A hydraulically amplified microelectromechanical systems actuator. A piece of piezoelectric material or stacked piezo bimorph is bonded or deposited as a thin film. The piece is operatively connected to a primary membrane. A reservoir is operatively connected to the primary membrane. The reservoir contains a fluid. A membrane is operatively connected to the reservoir. In operation, energizing the piezoelectric material causing the piezoelectric material to bow. Bowing of the piezoelectric material causes movement of the primary membrane. Movement of the primary membrane results in a force in being transmitted to the liquid in the reservoir. The force in the liquid causes movement of the membrane. Movement of the membrane results in an operating actuator.

  6. Transverse pumped laser amplifier architecture

    DOEpatents

    Bayramian, Andrew James; Manes, Kenneth R.; Deri, Robert; Erlandson, Alvin; Caird, John; Spaeth, Mary L.

    2015-05-19

    An optical gain architecture includes a pump source and a pump aperture. The architecture also includes a gain region including a gain element operable to amplify light at a laser wavelength. The gain region is characterized by a first side intersecting an optical path, a second side opposing the first side, a third side adjacent the first and second sides, and a fourth side opposing the third side. The architecture further includes a dichroic section disposed between the pump aperture and the first side of the gain region. The dichroic section is characterized by low reflectance at a pump wavelength and high reflectance at the laser wavelength. The architecture additionally includes a first cladding section proximate to the third side of the gain region and a second cladding section proximate to the fourth side of the gain region.

  7. Transverse pumped laser amplifier architecture

    DOEpatents

    Bayramian, Andrew James; Manes, Kenneth; Deri, Robert; Erlandson, Al; Caird, John; Spaeth, Mary

    2013-07-09

    An optical gain architecture includes a pump source and a pump aperture. The architecture also includes a gain region including a gain element operable to amplify light at a laser wavelength. The gain region is characterized by a first side intersecting an optical path, a second side opposing the first side, a third side adjacent the first and second sides, and a fourth side opposing the third side. The architecture further includes a dichroic section disposed between the pump aperture and the first side of the gain region. The dichroic section is characterized by low reflectance at a pump wavelength and high reflectance at the laser wavelength. The architecture additionally includes a first cladding section proximate to the third side of the gain region and a second cladding section proximate to the fourth side of the gain region.

  8. High voltage electrical amplifier having a short rise time

    DOEpatents

    Christie, David J.; Dallum, Gregory E.

    1991-01-01

    A circuit, comprising an amplifier and a transformer is disclosed that produces a high power pulse having a fast response time, and that responds to a digital control signal applied through a digital-to-analog converter. The present invention is suitable for driving a component such as an electro-optic modulator with a voltage in the kilovolt range. The circuit is stable at high frequencies and during pulse transients, and its impedance matching circuit matches the load impedance with the output impedance. The preferred embodiment comprises an input stage compatible with high-speed semiconductor components for amplifying the voltage of the input control signal, a buffer for isolating the input stage from the output stage; and a plurality of current amplifiers connected to the buffer. Each current amplifier is connected to a field effect transistor (FET), which switches a high voltage power supply to a transformer which then provides an output terminal for driving a load. The transformer comprises a plurality of transmission lines connected to the FETs and the load. The transformer changes the impedance and voltage of the output. The preferred embodiment also comprises a low voltage power supply for biasing the FETs at or near an operational voltage.

  9. Smarandache curves according to Sabban frame of fixed pole curve belonging to the Bertrand curves pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şenyurt, Süleyman; Altun, Yasin; Cevahir, Ceyda

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we investigate the Smarandache curves according to Sabban frame of fixed pole curve which drawn by the unit Darboux vector of the Bertrand partner curve. Some results have been obtained. These results were expressed as the depends Bertrand curve.

  10. Piecewise power laws in individual learning curves.

    PubMed

    Donner, Yoni; Hardy, Joseph L

    2015-10-01

    The notion that human learning follows a smooth power law (PL) of diminishing gains is well-established in psychology. This characteristic is observed when multiple curves are averaged, potentially masking more complex dynamics underpinning the curves of individual learners. Here, we analyzed 25,280 individual learning curves, each comprising 500 measurements of cognitive performance taken from four cognitive tasks. A piecewise PL (PPL) model explained the individual learning curves significantly better than a single PL, controlling for model complexity. The PPL model allows for multiple PLs connected at different points in the learning process. We also explored the transition dynamics between PL curve component pieces. Performance in later pieces typically surpassed that in earlier pieces, after a brief drop in performance at the transition point. The transition rate was negatively associated with age, even after controlling for overall performance. Our results suggest at least two processes at work in individual learning curves: locally, a gradual, smooth improvement, with diminishing gains within a specific strategy, which is modeled well as a PL; and globally, a discrete sequence of strategy shifts, in which each strategy is better in the long term than the ones preceding it. The piecewise extension of the classic PL of practice has implications for both individual skill acquisition and theories of learning. PMID:25711183

  11. Practical technique for improving all-fiber coherent combination of multistage high-power ytterbium fiber amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuoqin; Mangir, Metin S; Nee, Phillip

    2015-04-10

    We demonstrate coherent combination of two high-gain and high-power single-mode 1 μm fiber amplifiers via direct pump current modulation. Each all-fiber amplifier channel, which is built as a master oscillator-multiple amplifier architecture, can operate either continuous waves or 4 ns, 1 MHz pulses with average power of 50 W and more than 55 dB gain. These two amplifiers are coherently combined by modulating the pump currents of the preamplifiers in a multidither arrangement. The key feature of the scaling scheme is the insertion of a designated second stage preamplifier between the first stage preamplifier and the final power amplifier stage, so as to improve the coherency and to minimize the gain variation of the preamplifier to the power amplifier. Otherwise, overall phase control of the fiber amplifiers with this method is not possible at such a high power level. PMID:25967298

  12. Dynamic Curving Simulation of Tilting Train

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Jing; Luo, Ren

    The application of carbody tilting technology is the most efficient way to raise train speed during curve negotiations. This paper mainly deals with the dynamic performance simulation of the tilting train. Through the establishment of the nonlinear mathematical model for the titling train electromechanical coupled system, the carbody tilting control law, bogie radial steering mechanism, and titling train curving performance are investigated. The effect of time delay caused by the sensing and control system on the tilting performance of the train is analyzed, and the compensation methods for the time delay effect are studied.

  13. Method for reducing snap in magnetic amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, R. L. E.; Word, J. L.

    1968-01-01

    Method of reducing snap in magnetic amplifiers uses a degenerative feedback circuit consisting of a resistor and a separate winding on a magnetic core. The feedback circuit extends amplifier range by allowing it to be used at lower values of output current.

  14. Integrated-circuit balanced parametric amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickens, L. E.

    1975-01-01

    Amplifier, fabricated on single dielectric substrate, has pair of Schottky barrier varactor diodes mounted on single semiconductor chip. Circuit includes microstrip transmission line and slot line section to conduct signals. Main features of amplifier are reduced noise output and low production cost.

  15. Preliminary Investigation of Curved Liner Sample in the NASA LaRC Curved Duct Test Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Jones, Michael G.; Brown, Martha C.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the preliminary investigation of the curved liner sample in the NASA LaRC Curved Duct Test Rig (CDTR). It reviews the purpose of the Curved Duct Test Rig. Its purpose is to develop capability to investigate acoustic and aerodynamic properties in ducts. It has several features to accomplish that purpose: (1) Large scale (2) Flow rate to M = 0.275 (3) Higher order mode control (4) Curved flow path (5) Adaptable test section (6) Flexible test configurations. The liner has minimal effect on turbulence or boundary layer growth in duct. The curved duct sample attenuation is affected by mode scattering. In conclusion, the CDTR is valid tool for aerodynamic and acoustic evaluation of duct treatment

  16. Direct solar-pumped iodine laser amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, K. S.

    1986-01-01

    During this period the parametric studies of the iodine laser oscillator pumped by a Vortek simulator were carried out before amplifier studies. The amplifier studies are postponed to the extended period after completing the parametric studies. In addition, the kinetic modeling of a solar-pumped iodine laser amplifier, and the experimental work for a solar pumped dye laser amplifier are in progress. This report contains three parts: (1) a 10 W CW iodine laser pumped by a Vortek solar simulator; (2) kinetic modeling to predict the time to lasing threshold, lasing time, and energy output of solar-pumped iodine laser; and (3) the study of the dye laser amplifier pumped by a Tamarack solar simulator.

  17. Design and performance of the beamlet amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Erlandson, A.C.; Rotter, M.D.; Frank, M.D.; McCracken, R.W.

    1996-06-01

    In future laser systems, such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF), multi-segment amplifiers (MSAs) will be used to amplify the laser beam to the required levels. As a prototype of such a laser architecture, the authors have designed, built, and tested flash-lamp-pumped, Nd:Glass, Brewster-angle slab MSAs for the Beamlet project. In this article, they review the fundamentals of Nd:Glass amplifiers, describe the MSA geometry, discuss parameters that are important in amplifier design, and present our results on the characterization of the Beamlet MSAs. In particular, gain and beam steering measurements show that the Beamlet amplifiers meet all optical performance specifications and perform close to model predictions.

  18. Dual-range linearized transimpedance amplifier system

    DOEpatents

    Wessendorf, Kurt O.

    2010-11-02

    A transimpedance amplifier system is disclosed which simultaneously generates a low-gain output signal and a high-gain output signal from an input current signal using a single transimpedance amplifier having two different feedback loops with different amplification factors to generate two different output voltage signals. One of the feedback loops includes a resistor, and the other feedback loop includes another resistor in series with one or more diodes. The transimpedance amplifier system includes a signal linearizer to linearize one or both of the low- and high-gain output signals by scaling and adding the two output voltage signals from the transimpedance amplifier. The signal linearizer can be formed either as an analog device using one or two summing amplifiers, or alternately can be formed as a digital device using two analog-to-digital converters and a digital signal processor (e.g. a microprocessor or a computer).

  19. Post pulse shutter for laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Bradley, L.P.; Carder, B.M.; Gagnon, W.L.

    1981-03-17

    Disclosed are an apparatus and method for quickly closing off the return path for an amplified laser pulse at the output of an amplifier so as to prevent damage to amplifiers and other optical components appearing earlier in the chain by the return of an amplified pulse. The apparatus consists of a fast retropulse or post pulse shutter to suppress target reflection and/or beam return. This is accomplished by either quickly placing a solid across the light transmitting aperture of a component in the chain, such as a spatial filter pinhole, or generating and directing a plasma with sufficiently high density across the aperture, so as to, in effect, close the aperture to the returning amplified energy pulse. 13 figs.

  20. Post pulse shutter for laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Bradley, Laird P. [Livermore, CA; Carder, Bruce M. [Antioch, CA; Gagnon, William L. [Berkeley, CA

    1981-03-17

    Apparatus and method for quickly closing off the return path for an amplified laser pulse at the output of an amplifier so as to prevent damage to amplifiers and other optical components appearing earlier in the chain by the return of an amplified pulse. The apparatus consists of a fast retropulse or post pulse shutter to suppress target reflection and/or beam return. This is accomplished by either quickly placing a solid across the light transmitting aperture of a component in the chain, such as a spatial filter pinhole, or generating and directing a plasma with sufficiently high density across the aperture, so as to, in effect, close the aperture to the returning amplified energy pulse.

  1. Qubit readout with a directional parametric amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sliwa, K. M.; Abdo, B.; Narla, A.; Shankar, S.; Hatridge, M.; Frunzio, L.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Devoret, M. H.

    2014-03-01

    Josephson junction based quantum limited parametric amplifiers play an essential role in superconducting qubit measurements. These measurements necessitate circulators and isolators between the amplifier and qubit to add directionality and/or isolation. Unfortunately, this extra hardware limits both quantum measurement efficiency and experimental scalability. Here we present a quantum-limited Josephson-junction-based directional amplifier (JDA) based on a novel coupling between two nominally identical Josephson parametric converters (JPCs). The device achieves a forward gain of 11 dB with a 15 MHz dynamical bandwidth, but higher gains are possible at the expense of bandwidth. We also present measurements of a transmon qubit made with the JDA, and show minimal measurement back-action despite the absence of any isolator or circulator before the amplifier. These results provide a first step toward realizing on-chip integration of qubits and parametric amplifiers. Work supported by: IARPA, ARO, and NSF.

  2. mm-wave solid state amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfert, P. H.; Crowley, J. D.; Fank, F. B.

    The development of mm-wave amplifiers using InP Gunn diodes is reviewed including a low-noise eight-stage amplifier for replacement of a Ka-band TWTA and a three-stage amplifier for the 42.5 to 44.5 range with an output power of 100 mW and 20 dB associated gain. A detailed description of a three-stage amplifier for the 54 to 58 GHz range is given with 100 mW output power and 15 dB associated gain, a small signal gain of 30 dB and an N.F. of 15.5 to 16.5 dB. The design of a broad band, low-loss V-band circulator, which was used in the amplifier, is described.

  3. The spectacular human nose: an amplifier of individual quality?

    PubMed Central

    Mikalsen, Åse Kristine Rognmo; Yoccoz, Nigel Gilles; Laeng, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Amplifiers are signals that improve the perception of underlying differences in quality. They are cost free and advantageous to high quality individuals, but disadvantageous to low quality individuals, as poor quality is easier perceived because of the amplifier. For an amplifier to evolve, the average fitness benefit to the high quality individuals should be higher than the average cost for the low quality individuals. The human nose is, compared to the nose of most other primates, extraordinary large, fragile and easily broken—especially in male–male interactions. May it have evolved as an amplifier among high quality individuals, allowing easy assessment of individual quality and influencing the perception of attractiveness? We tested the latter by manipulating the position of the nose tip or, as a control, the mouth in facial pictures and had the pictures rated for attractiveness. Our results show that facial attractiveness failed to be influenced by mouth manipulations. Yet, facial attractiveness increased when the nose tip was artificially centered according to other facial features. Conversely, attractiveness decreased when the nose tip was displaced away from its central position. Our results suggest that our evaluation of attractiveness is clearly sensitive to the centering of the nose tip, possibly because it affects our perception of the face’s symmetry and/or averageness. However, whether such centering is related to individual quality remains unclear. PMID:24765588

  4. The Characteristic Curves of Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumaier, Arnold; Deiters, Ulrich K.

    2016-09-01

    In 1960, E. H. Brown defined a set of characteristic curves (also known as ideal curves) of pure fluids, along which some thermodynamic properties match those of an ideal gas. These curves are used for testing the extrapolation behaviour of equations of state. This work is revisited, and an elegant representation of the first-order characteristic curves as level curves of a master function is proposed. It is shown that Brown's postulate—that these curves are unique and dome-shaped in a double-logarithmic p, T representation—may fail for fluids exhibiting a density anomaly. A careful study of the Amagat curve (Joule inversion curve) generated from the IAPWS-95 reference equation of state for water reveals the existence of an additional branch.

  5. Ultrafast laser and amplifier sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rundquist, A.; Durfee, C.; Chang, Z.; Taft, G.; Zeek, E.; Backus, S.; Murnane, M. M.; Kapteyn, H. C.; Christov, I.; Stoev, V.

    1997-08-01

    There has been remarkable progress in the development of high peak-power ultrafast lasers in recent years. Lasers capable of generating terawatt peak powers with unprecedented short pulse durations can now be built on a single optical table in a small laboratory. The rapid technological progress has made possible a host of new scientific advances in high-field science, such as the generation of coherent femtosecond X-ray pulses, and the generation of MeV-energy electron beams and high-energy ions. In this paper, we review progress in the development and design of ultrafast high-power lasers based on Ti:sapphire, including the ultrafast laser oscillators that are a very important enabling technology for high-power ultrafast systems, and ultrafast amplified laser systems that generate 20 fs duration pulses with several watts average power at kilohertz repetition-rates. Ultrafast waveform measurements of these pulses demonstrate that such short pulses can be generated with high fidelity. Finally, we discuss applications of ultrafast high-power pulses, including the generation of femtosecond to attosecond X-ray pulses.

  6. Fiber networks amplify active stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Martin; Ronceray, Pierre; Broedersz, Chase

    Large-scale force generation is essential for biological functions such as cell motility, embryonic development, and muscle contraction. In these processes, forces generated at the molecular level by motor proteins are transmitted by disordered fiber networks, resulting in large-scale active stresses. While fiber networks are well characterized macroscopically, this stress generation by microscopic active units is not well understood. I will present a comprehensive theoretical study of force transmission in these networks. I will show that the linear, small-force response of the networks is remarkably simple, as the macroscopic active stress depends only on the geometry of the force-exerting unit. In contrast, as non-linear buckling occurs around these units, local active forces are rectified towards isotropic contraction and strongly amplified. This stress amplification is reinforced by the networks' disordered nature, but saturates for high densities of active units. I will show that our predictions are quantitatively consistent with experiments on reconstituted tissues and actomyosin networks, and that they shed light on the role of the network microstructure in shaping active stresses in cells and tissue.

  7. Light shaping along 3D curves and particle manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigo, José A.; Alieva, Tatiana

    2015-03-01

    We present a non-iterative holographic technique for efficient and versatile laser beam shaping along arbitrary 3D curves. Light beams with intensity shaped for several 3D curves: Tilted ring, Viviani's curve, Archimedean spiral, and trefoil-knotted curve have been experimentally generated and applied for optical trapping of micrometer-sized dielectric particles. The high intensity gradients and independent phase control prescribed along the curve make this kind of laser trap attractive for multiple particle manipulation and allow for forward and backward motion to the light source. Indeed, different configurations of tractor beam traps are experimentally demonstrated. This technique can also be applied for laser micro-machining.

  8. Titration Curves: Fact and Fiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamberlain, John

    1997-01-01

    Discusses ways in which datalogging equipment can enable titration curves to be measured accurately and how computing power can be used to predict the shape of curves. Highlights include sources of error, use of spreadsheets to generate titration curves, titration of a weak acid with a strong alkali, dibasic acids, weak acid and weak base, and…

  9. Demonstration of slow light in semiconductor optical amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Anoop C.; Venkitesh, Deepa; Dexter, Karl; Anandarajah, Prince; Barry, Liam P.

    2011-08-01

    Slow light generation through four wave mixing is experimentally investigated in a non-linear semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA). The mechanism of slow-light generation is analyzed through gain saturation behavior of the SOA. The delay of the probe beam is controlled optically by pump-probe detuning. A delay of 260 ps is achieved for sinusoidal modulation at 0.5 GHz corresponding to a RF phase change of 0.26π.

  10. Demonstration of slow light in semiconductor optical amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Anoop C.; Venkitesh, Deepa; Dexter, Karl; Anandarajah, Prince; Barry, Liam P.

    2010-12-01

    Slow light generation through four wave mixing is experimentally investigated in a non-linear semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA). The mechanism of slow-light generation is analyzed through gain saturation behavior of the SOA. The delay of the probe beam is controlled optically by pump-probe detuning. A delay of 260 ps is achieved for sinusoidal modulation at 0.5 GHz corresponding to a RF phase change of 0.26π.

  11. Progress on diamond amplified photo-cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, E.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Burrill, A.; Kewisch, J.; Chang, X.; Rao, T.; Smedley, J.; Wu, Q.; Muller, E.; Xin, T.

    2011-03-28

    Two years ago, we obtained an emission gain of 40 from the Diamond Amplifier Cathode (DAC) in our test system. In our current systematic study of hydrogenation, the highest gain we registered in emission scanning was 178. We proved that our treatments for improving the diamond amplifiers are reproducible. Upcoming tests planned include testing DAC in a RF cavity. Already, we have designed a system for these tests using our 112 MHz superconducting cavity, wherein we will measure DAC parameters, such as the limit, if any, on emission current density, the bunch charge, and the bunch length. The diamond-amplified photocathode, that promises to support a high average current, low emittance, and a highly stable electron beam with a long lifetime, is under development for an electron source. The diamond, functioning as a secondary emitter amplifies the primary current, with a few KeV energy, that comes from the traditional cathode. Earlier, our group recorded a maximum gain of 40 in the secondary electron emission from a diamond amplifier. In this article, we detail our optimization of the hydrogenation process for a diamond amplifier that resulted in a stable emission gain of 140. We proved that these characteristics are reproducible. We now are designing a system to test the diamond amplifier cathode using an 112MHz SRF gun to measure the limits of the emission current's density, and on the bunch charge and bunch length.

  12. High power Ka band TWT amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Golkowski, C.; Ivers, J.D.; Nation, J.A.; Wang, P.; Schachter, L.

    1999-07-01

    Two high power 35 GHz TWT amplifiers driven by a relativistic pencil, 850 kV, 200A electron beam have been assembled and tested. The first had a dielectric slow wave structure and was primarily used to develop diagnostics, and to gain experience in working with high power systems in Ka band. The source of the input power for the amplifier was a magnetron producing a 30 kW, 200ns long pulse of which 10 kW as delivered to the experiment. The 30 cm long dielectric (Teflon) amplifier produced output power levels of about 1 MW with a gain of about 23 dB. These results are consistent with expectations from PIC code simulations for this arrangement. The second amplifier, which is a single stage disk loaded slow wave structure, has been designed. It consists of one hundred uniform cells with two sets of ten tapered calls at the ends to lower the reflection coefficient. The phase advance per cell is {pi}/2. The amplifier passband extends from 28 to 40 GHz. It is designed to increase the output power to about 20 MW. The amplifier is in construction and will be tested in the near future. Details of the design of both systems will be provided and initial results from the new amplifier presented.

  13. Estimating power curves of flying vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Rayner, J M

    1999-12-01

    The power required for flight in any flying animal is a function of flight speed. The power curve that describes this function has become an icon of studies of flight mechanics and physiology because it encapsulates the accessible animal's flight performance. The mechanical or aerodynamic power curve, describing the increase in kinetic energy of the air due to the passage of the bird, is necessarily U-shaped, for aerodynamic reasons, and can be estimated adequately by lifting-line theory. Predictions from this and related models agree well with measured mechanical work in flight and with results from flow visualization experiments. The total or metabolic power curve also includes energy released by the animal as heat, and is more variable in shape. These curves may be J-shaped for smaller birds and bats, but are difficult to predict theoretically owing to uncertainty about internal physiological processes and the efficiency of the flight muscles. The limitations of some existing models aiming to predict metabolic power curves are considered. The metabolic power curve can be measured for birds or bats flying in wind tunnels at controlled speeds. Simultaneous determination in European starlings Sturnus vulgaris of oxygen uptake, total metabolic rate (using labelled isotopes), aerodynamic power output and heat released (using digital video thermography) enable power curves to be determined with confidence; flight muscle efficiency is surprisingly low (averaging 15-18 %) and increases moderately with flight speed, so that the metabolic power curve is shallower than predicted by models. Accurate knowledge of the power curve is essential since extensive predictions of flight behaviour have been based upon it. The hypothesis that the power curve may not in fact exist, in the sense that the cost of flight may not be perceived by a bird as a continuous smooth function of air speed, is advanced but has not yet formally been tested. This hypothesis is considered together with

  14. A Low-Noise Semiconductor Optical Amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Ratowsky, R.P.; Dijaili, S.; Kallman, J.S.; Feit, M.D.; Walker, J.

    1999-03-23

    Optical amplifiers are essential devices for optical networks, optical systems, and computer communications. These amplifiers compensate for the inevitable optical loss in long-distance propagation (>50 km) or splitting (>10x). Fiber amplifiers such as the erbium-doped fiber amplifier have revolutionized the fiber-optics industry and are enjoying widespread use. Semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) are an alternative technology that complements the fiber amplifiers in cost and performance. One obstacle to the widespread use of SOAs is the severity of the inevitable noise output resulting from amplified spontaneous emission (ASE). Spectral filtering is often used to reduce ASE noise, but this constrains the source spectrally, and improvement is typically limited to about 10 dB. The extra components also add cost and complexity to the final assembly. The goal of this project was to analyze, design, and take significant steps toward the realization of an innovative, low-noise SOA based on the concept of ''distributed spatial filtering'' (DSF). In DSF, we alternate active SOA segments with passive free-space diffraction regions. Since spontaneous emission radiates equally in all directions, the free-space region lengthens the amplifier for a given length of gain region, narrowing the solid angle into which the spontaneous emission is amplified [1,2]. Our innovation is to use spatial filtering in a differential manner across many segments, thereby enhancing the effect when wave-optical effects are included [3]. The structure quickly and effectively strips the ASE into the higher-order modes, quenching the ASE gain relative to the signal.

  15. Is the Water Heating Curve as Described?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riveros, H. G.; Oliva, A. I.

    2008-01-01

    We analysed the heating curve of water which is described in textbooks. An experiment combined with some simple heat transfer calculations is discussed. The theoretical behaviour can be altered by changing the conditions under which the experiment is modelled. By identifying and controlling the different parameters involved during the heating…

  16. Very high gain Nd:YLF amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Knights, M.G.; Thomas, M.D.; Chicklis, E.P.; Rines, G.A.; Seka, W.

    1988-05-01

    The authors report on high gain Nd:YLF rod amplifiers in which single-pass, small signal gains of over 1700 have been obtained along with stored energy densitiesgreater than or equal to0.4J/cm/sup 3/. The ability of Nd:YLF amplifiers to support such gains is a result of high parasitic oscillation thresholds, due primarily to the low refractive index of the material. These results suggest that Nd:YLF is an excellent candidate for amplifiers where high specific stored energies and/or very high gains are required.

  17. Diode amplifier of modulated optical beam power

    SciTech Connect

    D'yachkov, N V; Bogatov, A P; Gushchik, T I; Drakin, A E

    2014-11-30

    Analytical relations are obtained between characteristics of modulated light at the output and input of an optical diode power amplifier operating in the highly saturated gain regime. It is shown that a diode amplifier may act as an amplitude-to-phase modulation converter with a rather large bandwidth (∼10 GHz). The low sensitivity of the output power of the amplifier to the input beam power and its high energy efficiency allow it to be used as a building block of a high-power multielement laser system with coherent summation of a large number of optical beams. (lasers)

  18. Achieving and maintaining cleanliness in NIF amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Burnham, A. K.; Horvath, J. A.; Letts, S. A.; Menapace, J. A.; Stowers, I. F.

    1998-07-28

    Cleanliness measurements made on AMPLAB prototype National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser amplifiers during assembly, cassette transfer, and amplifier operation are summarized. These measurements include particle counts from surface cleanliness assessments using filter swipe techniques and from airborne particle monitoring. Results are compared with similar measurements made on the Beamlet and Nova lasers and in flashlamp test fixtures. Observations of Class 100,000 aerosols after flashlamp firings are discussed. Comparisons are made between typical damage densities on laser amplifier optics from Novette, NOVA, Beamlet, and AMPLAB.

  19. High Efficiency Microwave Power Amplifier (HEMPA) Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, W. Herbert

    2004-01-01

    This paper will focus on developing an exotic switching technique that enhances the DC-to-RF conversion efficiency of microwave power amplifiers. For years, switching techniques implemented in the 10 kHz to 30 MHz region have resulted in DC-to-RF conversion efficiencies of 90-95-percent. Currently amplifier conversion efficiency, in the 2-3 GHz region approaches, 10-20-percent. Using a combination of analytical modeling and hardware testing, a High Efficiency Microwave Power Amplifier was built that demonstrated conversion efficiencies four to five times higher than current state of the art.

  20. The 60 GHz solid state power amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclymonds, J.

    1991-01-01

    A new amplifier architecture was developed during this contract that is superior to any other solid state approach. The amplifier produced 6 watts with 4 percent efficiency over a 2 GHz band at 61.5 GHz. The unit was 7 x 9 x 3 inches in size, 5.5 pounds in weight, and the conduction cooling through the baseplate is suitable for use in space. The amplifier used high efficiency GaAs IMPATT diodes which were mounted in 1-diode circuits, called modules. Eighteen modules were used in the design, and power combining was accomplished with a proprietary passive component called a combiner plate.

  1. Phase noise in RF and microwave amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Boudot, Rodolphe; Rubiola, Enrico

    2012-12-01

    Understanding amplifier phase noise is a critical issue in many fields of engineering and physics, such as oscillators, frequency synthesis, telecommunication, radar, and spectroscopy; in the emerging domain of microwave photonics; and in exotic fields, such as radio astronomy, particle accelerators, etc. Focusing on the two main types of base noise in amplifiers, white and flicker, the power spectral density of the random phase φ(t) is Sφ(f) = b(0) + b(-1)/f. White phase noise results from adding white noise to the RF spectrum in the carrier region. For a given RF noise level, b(0) is proportional to the reciprocal of the carrier power P(0). By contrast, flicker results from a near-dc 1/f noise-present in all electronic devices-which modulates the carrier through some parametric effect in the semiconductor. Thus, b(-1) is a parameter of the amplifier, constant in a wide range of P(0). The consequences are the following: Connecting m equal amplifiers in parallel, b(-1) is 1/m times that of one device. Cascading m equal amplifiers, b(-1) is m times that of one amplifier. Recirculating the signal in an amplifier so that the gain increases by a power of m (a factor of m in decibels) as a result of positive feedback (regeneration), we find that b(-1) is m(2) times that of the amplifier alone. The feedforward amplifier exhibits extremely low b(-1) because the carrier is ideally nulled at the input of its internal error amplifier. Starting with an extensive review of the literature, this article introduces a system-oriented model which describes the phase flickering. Several amplifier architectures (cascaded, parallel, etc.) are analyzed systematically, deriving the phase noise from the general model. There follow numerous measurements of amplifiers using different technologies, including some old samples, and in a wide frequency range (HF to microwaves), which validate the theory. In turn, theory and results provide design guidelines and give suggestions for CAD and

  2. Wiggler taper optimization for free-electron-laser amplifiers with moderate space-charge effects

    SciTech Connect

    Jong, R.A.; Scharlemann, E.T.; Fawley, W.M.

    1987-01-01

    The standard synchronous tapering method used to design the wiggler magnetic field for free-electron-laser (FEL) amplifiers operating in the Compton regime will not work for amplifier systems where space-charge effects are important. The space-charge effects lower the overall gain in the amplifier system and, even more importantly, shift the peak in the gain curve to magnetic field values that are significantly less than the synchronous magnetic field value. As a result, the overall predicted gain using the synchronous tapering method is too low. Moreover, the synchronous magnetic field corresponds to the peak in the gain curve for a frequency below the fundamental frequency. Consequently, shot noise at frequencies below the fundamental frequency can grow to levels that may prevent amplification of the fundamental. We have developed a new tapering strategy that improves the predicted amplifier gain and circumvents the shot-noise growth for systems with moderate space-charge effects. For this new strategy, we hold the wiggler magnetic field constant at a value below the synchronous value but near the peak of the gain curve for the fundamental frequency, for some optimized length at the front end of the wiggler. Beyond this constant wiggler section, the field is tapered using the standrd synchronous tapering algorithm. This new tapering scheme results in significant improvement in predicted amplifier gains and limits the growth of shot noise to insignificant levels. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this new tapering algorithm using the tapered wiggler design for the proposed microwave heating experiment (MTX) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). 4 refs., 8 figs.

  3. Multi-curve spectrum representation of facial movements and expressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Li; Zhang, Zhijiang; Chen, Zhixiang; Zeng, Dan

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents a method of multi-curve spectrum representation of facial movements and expressions. Based on 3DMCF (3D muscle-controlled facial) model, facial movements and expressions are controlled by 21 virtual muscles. So, facial movements and expressions can be described by a group of time-varying curves of normalized muscle contraction, called multi-curve spectrum. The structure and basic characters of multi-curve spectrum is introduced. The performance of the proposed method is among the best. This method needs small quantity of data, and is easy to apply. It can also be used to transplant facial animation between different faces.

  4. Birational maps that send biquadratic curves to biquadratic curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, John A. G.; Jogia, Danesh

    2015-02-01

    Recently, many papers have begun to consider so-called non-Quispel-Roberts-Thompson (QRT) birational maps of the plane. Compared to the QRT family of maps which preserve each biquadratic curve in a fibration of the plane, non-QRT maps send a biquadratic curve to another biquadratic curve belonging to the same fibration or to a biquadratic curve from a different fibration of the plane. In this communication, we give the general form of a birational map derived from a difference equation that sends a biquadratic curve to another. The necessary and sufficient condition for such a map to exist is that the discriminants of the two biquadratic curves are the same (and hence so are the j-invariants). The result allows existing examples in the literature to be better understood and allows some statements to be made concerning their generality.

  5. Phase properties of multicomponent superposition states in various amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kang-Soo; Kim, M. S.

    1994-01-01

    There have been theoretical studies for generation of optical coherent superposition states. Once the superposition state is generated it is natural to ask if it is possible to amplify it without losing the nonclassical properties of the field state. We consider amplification of the superposition state in various amplifiers such as a sub-Poissonian amplifier, a phase-sensitive amplifier and a classical amplifier. We show the evolution of phase probability distribution functions in the amplifier.

  6. Experimental studies of low-voltage, grating TWT amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Joe, J.; Basten, M.A.; Scharer, J.E.; Booske, J.H.; Wagner, K.

    1995-12-31

    Recent results are presented from experimental studies of spontaneous emission and linear gain in a low-voltage, sheet-beam-compatible, grating TWT amplifier. A round probe beam from a 10 kV, 0.25 A Pierce gun electron source is utilized for 14 GHz amplifier experiments. From the spontaneous emission measurements the authors obtain the following valuable information: (a) measurements of the grating-induced spontaneous emission spectrum which can be correlated with the theoretically predicted linear gain curves, (b) measurements of broad-band noise emission which are critical for amplifier sensitivity characterization, and (c) measurements of spontaneous emission in the backward-wave regime to correlate with start oscillation predictions. The noise emission spectra have been correlated with the most dominant experimental factors including guide magnetic field intensity and body currents. Measurements of linear gain are also compared with the theoretical prediction in both forward and backward-wave regimes. The slow-wave structure consists of a uniform grating that adiabatically tapers to a smooth wall at both ends for impedance matching between the conventional TE{sub 10} rectangular guide mode and the TE{sub x10} hybrid slow-wave mode of the grating circuit. Small loop antennas are inserted at each end in smooth-walled rectangular guide sections for input and output signal coupling with the TE{sub 10} mode. Broadband, high-vacuum-compatible, SiC waveguide attenuator fins provide excellent suppression of unwanted end reflections and prevent the system from self-oscillation in the forward-wave regime.

  7. Testing methodologies and systems for semiconductor optical amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieckowski, Michael

    Semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOA's) are gaining increased prominence in both optical communication systems and high-speed optical processing systems, due primarily to their unique nonlinear characteristics. This in turn, has raised questions regarding their lifetime performance reliability and has generated a demand for effective testing techniques. This is especially critical for industries utilizing SOA's as components for system-in-package products. It is important to note that very little research to date has been conducted in this area, even though production volume and market demand has continued to increase. In this thesis, the reliability of dilute-mode InP semiconductor optical amplifiers is studied experimentally and theoretically. The aging characteristics of the production level devices are demonstrated and the necessary techniques to accurately characterize them are presented. In addition, this work proposes a new methodology for characterizing the optical performance of these devices using measurements in the electrical domain. It is shown that optical performance degradation, specifically with respect to gain, can be directly qualified through measurements of electrical subthreshold differential resistance. This metric exhibits a linear proportionality to the defect concentration in the active region, and as such, can be used for prescreening devices before employing traditional optical testing methods. A complete theoretical analysis is developed in this work to explain this relationship based upon the device's current-voltage curve and its associated leakage and recombination currents. These results are then extended to realize new techniques for testing semiconductor optical amplifiers and other similarly structured devices. These techniques can be employed after fabrication and during packaged operation through the use of a proposed stand-alone testing system, or using a proposed integrated CMOS self-testing circuit. Both methods are capable

  8. Breadboard Amplifier: Building and Using Simple Electrophysiology Equipment

    PubMed Central

    Crisp, Kevin M.; Lin, Hunter; Prosper, Issa

    2016-01-01

    Electrophysiology is a valuable skill for the neuroscientist, but the learning curve for students can be steep. Here we describe a very simple electromyography (EMG) amplifier that can be built from scratch by students with no electronics experience in about 30 minutes, making it ideal for incorporating into a laboratory activity. With few parts and no adjustments except the gain, students can begin physiology experiments quickly while having the satisfaction of having built the equipment themselves. Because the output of the circuit goes to a computer sound card, students can listen to electrophysiological activity as they see it on the computer screen, a feature many of our students greatly appreciated. Various applications are discussed, including dual channel recording, using streaming media platforms with remote lab partners and acquiring data in the field on a smart phone. Our students reported that they enjoyed being able to build a working device and using it to record from their own muscles. PMID:27385921

  9. Linearized traveling wave amplifier with hard limiter characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmahl, H. G. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A dynamic velocity taper is provided for a traveling wave tube with increased linearity to avoid intermodulation of signals being amplified. In a traveling wave tube, the slow wave structure is a helix including a sever. A dynamic velocity taper is provided by gradually reducing the spacing between the repeating elements of the slow wave structure which are the windings of the helix. The reduction which takes place coincides with the ouput point of helix. The spacing between the repeating elements of the slow wave structure is ideally at an exponential rate because the curve increases the point of maximum efficiency and power, at an exponential rate. A coupled cavity traveling wave tube having cavities is shown. The space between apertured discs is gradually reduced from 0.1% to 5% at an exponential rate. Output power (or efficiency) versus input power for a commercial tube is shown.

  10. Breadboard Amplifier: Building and Using Simple Electrophysiology Equipment.

    PubMed

    Crisp, Kevin M; Lin, Hunter; Prosper, Issa

    2016-01-01

    Electrophysiology is a valuable skill for the neuroscientist, but the learning curve for students can be steep. Here we describe a very simple electromyography (EMG) amplifier that can be built from scratch by students with no electronics experience in about 30 minutes, making it ideal for incorporating into a laboratory activity. With few parts and no adjustments except the gain, students can begin physiology experiments quickly while having the satisfaction of having built the equipment themselves. Because the output of the circuit goes to a computer sound card, students can listen to electrophysiological activity as they see it on the computer screen, a feature many of our students greatly appreciated. Various applications are discussed, including dual channel recording, using streaming media platforms with remote lab partners and acquiring data in the field on a smart phone. Our students reported that they enjoyed being able to build a working device and using it to record from their own muscles. PMID:27385921

  11. Cascaded transformerless DC-DC voltage amplifier with optically isolated switching devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridharan, Govind (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A very high voltage amplifier is provided in which plural cascaded banks of capacitors are switched by optically isolated control switches so as to be charged in parallel from the preceding stage or capacitor bank and to discharge in series to the succeeding stage or capacitor bank in alternating control cycles. The optically isolated control switches are controlled by a logic controller whose power supply is virtually immune to interference from the very high voltage output of the amplifier by the optical isolation provided by the switches, so that a very high voltage amplification ratio may be attained using many capacitor banks in cascade.

  12. Noise in phase-preserving linear amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Shashank; Jiang, Zhang; Combes, Joshua; Caves, Carlton M.

    2014-12-04

    The purpose of a phase-preserving linear amplifier is to make a small signal larger, so that it can be perceived by instruments incapable of resolving the original signal, while sacrificing as little as possible in signal-to-noise. Quantum mechanics limits how well this can be done: the noise added by the amplifier, referred to the input, must be at least half a quantum at the operating frequency. This well-known quantum limit only constrains the second moments of the added noise. Here we provide the quantum constraints on the entire distribution of added noise: any phasepreserving linear amplifier is equivalent to a parametric amplifier with a physical state σ for the ancillary mode; σ determines the properties of the added noise.

  13. Advanced Concepts in Josephson Junction Reflection Amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lähteenmäki, Pasi; Vesterinen, Visa; Hassel, Juha; Paraoanu, G. S.; Seppä, Heikki; Hakonen, Pertti

    2014-06-01

    Low-noise amplification at microwave frequencies has become increasingly important for the research related to superconducting qubits and nanoelectromechanical systems. The fundamental limit of added noise by a phase-preserving amplifier is the standard quantum limit, often expressed as noise temperature . Towards the goal of the quantum limit, we have developed an amplifier based on intrinsic negative resistance of a selectively damped Josephson junction. Here we present measurement results on previously proposed wide-band microwave amplification and discuss the challenges for improvements on the existing designs. We have also studied flux-pumped metamaterial-based parametric amplifiers, whose operating frequency can be widely tuned by external DC-flux, and demonstrate operation at pumping, in contrast to the typical metamaterial amplifiers pumped via signal lines at.

  14. Ku band low noise parametric amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A low noise, K sub u-band, parametric amplifier (paramp) was developed. The unit is a spacecraft-qualifiable, prototype, parametric amplifier for eventual application in the shuttle orbiter. The amplifier was required to have a noise temperature of less than 150 K. A noise temperature of less than 120 K at a gain level of 17 db was achieved. A 3-db bandwidth in excess of 350 MHz was attained, while deviation from phase linearity of about + or - 1 degree over 50 MHz was achieved. The paramp operates within specification over an ambient temperature range of -5 C to +50 C. The performance requirements and the operation of the K sub u-band parametric amplifier system are described. The final test results are also given.

  15. High dynamic range Josephson parametric amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roch, Nicolas; Murch, Kater W.; Vijay, Rajamani

    Josephson parametric amplifiers (JPAs) have become the technology of choice to amplify small amplitude microwave signals since they show noise performances close to the quantum limit of amplification. An important challenge that faces this technology is the low dynamic range of current devices, which limits the number of measurements that can be performed concurrently and the rate of information acquisition for single measurements. We have fabricated and tested novel parametric amplifiers based on arrays of up to 100 SQUIDS. The amplifiers produce gain in excess of 20 dB over a large bandwidth and match the dynamic range achieved with traveling wave devices. Compared to the latter devices they are fabricated in a single lithography step and we will show that their bandwidth performance can be further extended using a recently developed impedance matching technique.

  16. Operational Amplifier Experiments for the Chemistry Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Robert D.

    1996-01-01

    Provides details of experiments that deal with the use of operational amplifiers and are part of a course in instrumental analysis. These experiments are performed after the completion of a set of electricity and electronics experiments. (DDR)

  17. Cryogenic Amplifier Based Receivers at Submillimeter Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Reck, Theodore and; Schlecht, Erich; Lin, Robert; Deal, William

    2012-01-01

    The operating frequency of InP high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) based amplifiers has moved well in the submillimeter-wave frequencies over the last couple of years. Working amplifiers with usable gain in waveguide packages has been reported beyond 700 GHz. When cooled cryogenically, they have shown substantial improvement in their noise temperature. This has opened up the real possibility of cryogenic amplifier based heterodyne receivers at submillimeter wavelengths for ground-based, air-borne, and space-based instruments for astrophysics, planetary, and Earth science applications. This paper provides an overview of the science applications at submillimeter wavelengths that will benefit from this technology. It also describes the current state of the InP HEMT based cryogenic amplifier receivers at submillimeter wavelengths.

  18. How to characterize the nonlinear amplifier?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kallistratova, Dmitri Kouznetsov; Cotera, Carlos Flores

    1994-01-01

    The conception of the amplification of the coherent field is formulated. The definition of the coefficient of the amplification as the relation between the mean value of the field at the output to the value at the input and the definition of the noise as the difference between the number of photons in the output mode and square of the modulus of the mean value of the output amplitude are considered. Using a simple example it is shown that by these definitions the noise of the nonlinear amplifier may be less than the noise of the ideal linear amplifier of the same amplification coefficient. Proposals to search another definition of basic parameters of the nonlinear amplifiers are discussed. This definition should enable us to formulate the universal fundamental lower limit of the noise which should be valid for linear quantum amplifiers as for nonlinear ones.

  19. Two-stage hybrid microcircuit amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Pyo, M.L.

    1987-04-01

    This report documents the design, development, and fabrication of a two-stage amplifier operating at 400 to 600 MHz. Included are characterization data, predictions generated during design, and measured performance.

  20. High Bandwidth Differential Amplifier for Shock Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, P., Tran, V., Chau, R.

    2012-10-01

    We developed a high bandwidth differential amplifier for gas gun shock experiments. The circuit has a bandwidth up to 1 GHz, and is capable of measuring signals of ≤1.5 V with a common mode rejection of 250 V. Conductivity measurements of gas gun targets are measured by flowing high currents through the targets. The voltage is measured across the target using a technique similar to a four-point probe. Because of the design of the current source and load, the target voltage is approximately 250 V relative to ground. Since the expected voltage change in the target is < 1 V, the differential amplifier must have a large common mode rejection. Various amplifying designs are shown, although the increased amplification decreases bandwidth. Bench tests show that the amplifier can withstand significant common mode DC voltage and measure 10 ns, and 50 mV signals.

  1. Noise in phase-preserving linear amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Shashank; Jiang, Zhang; Combes, Joshua; Caves, Carlton M.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of a phase-preserving linear amplifier is to make a small signal larger, so that it can be perceived by instruments incapable of resolving the original signal, while sacrificing as little as possible in signal-to-noise. Quantum mechanics limits how well this can be done: the noise added by the amplifier, referred to the input, must be at least half a quantum at the operating frequency. This well-known quantum limit only constrains the second moments of the added noise. Here we provide the quantum constraints on the entire distribution of added noise: any phasepreserving linear amplifier is equivalent to a parametric amplifier with a physical state σ for the ancillary mode; σ determines the properties of the added noise.

  2. Tester periodically registers dc amplifier characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cree, D.; Wenzel, G. E.

    1966-01-01

    Motor-driven switcher-recorder periodically registers the zero drift and gain drift signals of a dc amplifier subjected to changes in environment. A time coding method is used since several measurements are shared on a single recorder trace.

  3. Experimental design studies and flow visualization of proportional laminar-flow fluidic amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hellbaum, R. F.; Mcdermon, J. N.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of certain parameter variations on the performance characteristics of laminar, proportional, jet-deflection fluidic amplifiers were studied. The matching and staging of amplifiers to obtain high pressure gain was included, but dynamic effects were not. The parameter variations considered were aspect ratio, setback, control length, splitter distance, receiver-duct width, width of center-vent duct, and bias pressure. Usable pressure gains of 19 per stage were achieved, and 5 amplifier stages were integrated to yield an overall pressure gain of 2,000,000.

  4. MMIC Amplifiers for 90 to 130 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene; Pukala, David; Peralta, Alejandro; Bryerton, Eric; Morgan, Matt; Boyd, T.; Hu, Ming; Schmitz, Adele

    2007-01-01

    This brief describes two monolithic microwave integrated-circuit (MMIC) amplifier chips optimized to function in the frequency range of 90 to 130 GHz, covering nearly all of F-band (90 - 140 GHz). These amplifiers were designed specifically for local-oscillator units in astronomical radio telescopes such as the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA). They could also be readily adapted for use in electronic test equipment, automotive radar systems, and communications systems that operate between 90 and 130 GHz.

  5. Direct solar-pumped iodine laser amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Kwang S.; Hwang, In Heon; Stock, Larry V.

    1989-01-01

    This semiannual progress report covers the period from September 1, 1988 to February 28, 1989 under NASA grant NAG-1-441 entitled, Direct Solar-Pumped Iodine Laser Amplifier. During this period, the research effort was concentrated on the solar pumped master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) system using n-C3F7I. In the experimental work, the amplification measurement was conducted to identify the optimum conditions for amplification of the center's Vortek solar simulator pumped iodine laser amplifier. A modeling effort was also pursued to explain the experimental results in the theoretical work. The amplification measurement of the solar simulator pumped iodine laser amplifier is the first amplification experiment on the continuously pumped amplifier. The small signal amplification of 5 was achieved for the triple pass geometry of the 15 cm long solar simulator pumped amplifier at the n-C3F7I pressure of 20 torr, at the flow velocity of 6 m/sec and at the pumping intensity of 1500 solar constants. The XeCl laser pumped iodine laser oscillator, which was developed in the previous research, was employed as the master oscillator for the amplification measurement. In the theoretical work, the rate equations of the amplifier was established and the small signal amplification was calculated for the solar simulator pumped iodine laser amplifier. The amplification calculated from the kinetic equations with the previously measured rate coefficients reveals very large disagreement with experimental measurement. Moreover, the optimum condition predicted by the kinetic equation is quite discrepant with that measured by experiment. This fact indicates the necessity of study in the measurement of rate coefficients of the continuously pumped iodine laser system.

  6. High-Frequency, Conformable Organic Amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Reuveny, Amir; Lee, Sunghoon; Yokota, Tomoyuki; Fuketa, Hiroshi; Siket, Christian M; Lee, Sungwon; Sekitani, Tsuyoshi; Sakurai, Takayasu; Bauer, Siegfried; Someya, Takao

    2016-05-01

    Large-bandwidth, low-operation-voltage, and uniform organic amplifiers are fabricated on ultrathin foils. By the integration of short-channel OTFTs and AlOx capacitors, organic amplifiers with a bandwidth of 25 kHz are realized, demonstrating the highest gain-bandwidth product (GBWP) reported to date. Owing to material and process advancements, closed-loop architectures operate at frequencies of several kilohertz with an area smaller than 30 mm(2) . PMID:26922899

  7. Bolometers - Ultimate sensitivity, optimization, and amplifier coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    Theoretical expressions for Johnson noise and thermal noise in bolometers are considered, and optimization with respect to thermal conductivity and bias power is performed. Numerical approximations are given for the ultimate NEP of bolometers as a function of material parameters and compared with photon noise including photon correlations. A resonating capacitor is shown to improve the coupling to an amplifier, so that the amplifier need not limit performance even for very low temperature bolometers.

  8. Some Notes on Wideband Feedback Amplifiers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Fitch, V.

    1949-03-16

    The extension of the passband of wideband amplifiers is a highly important problem to the designer of electronic circuits. Throughout the electronics industry and in many research programs in physics and allied fields where extensive use is made of video amplifiers, the foremost requirement is a passband of maximum width. This is necessary if it is desired to achieve a more faithful reproduction of transient wave forms, a better time resolution in physical measurements, or perhaps just a wider band gain-frequency response to sine wave signals. The art of electronics is continually faced with this omnipresent amplifier problem. In particular, the instrumentation techniques of nuclear physics require amplifiers with short rise times, a high degree of gain stability, and a linear response to high signal levels. While the distributed amplifier may solve the problems of those seeking only a wide passband, the requirements of stability and linearity necessitate using feedback circuits. This paper considers feedback amplifiers from the standpoint of high-frequency performance. The circuit conditions for optimum steady-state (sinusoidal) and transient response are derived and practical circuits (both interstage and output) are presented which fulfill these conditions. In general, the results obtained may be applied to the low-frequency end.

  9. Multiple excitation regenerative amplifier inertial confinement system

    DOEpatents

    George, Victor E. [Livermore, CA; Haas, Roger A. [Pleasanton, CA; Krupke, William F. [Pleasanton, CA; Schlitt, Leland G. [Livermore, CA

    1980-05-27

    The invention relates to apparatus and methods for producing high intensity laser radiation generation which is achieved through an optical amplifier-storage ring design. One or two synchronized, counterpropagating laser pulses are injected into a regenerative amplifier cavity and amplified by gain media which are pumped repetitively by electrical or optical means. The gain media excitation pulses are tailored to efficiently amplify the laser pulses during each transit. After the laser pulses have been amplified to the desired intensity level, they are either switched out of the cavity by some switch means, as for example an electro-optical device, for any well known laser end uses, or a target means may be injected into the regenerative amplifier cavity in such a way as to intercept simultaneously the counterpropagating laser pulses. One such well known end uses to which this invention is intended is for production of high density and temperature plasmas suitable for generating neutrons, ions and x-rays and for studying matter heated by high intensity laser radiation.

  10. Multiple excitation regenerative amplifier inertial confinement system

    DOEpatents

    George, V.E.; Haas, R.A.; Krupke, W.F.; Schlitt, L.G.

    1980-05-27

    The invention relates to apparatus and methods for producing high intensity laser radiation generation which is achieved through an optical amplifier-storage ring design. One or two synchronized, counterpropagating laser pulses are injected into a regenerative amplifier cavity and amplified by gain media which are pumped repetitively by electrical or optical means. The gain media excitation pulses are tailored to efficiently amplify the laser pulses during each transit. After the laser pulses have been amplified to the desired intensity level, they are either switched out of the cavity by some switch means, as for example an electro-optical device, for any well known laser end uses, or a target means may be injected into the regenerative amplifier cavity in such a way as to intercept simultaneously the counterpropagating laser pulses. One such well known end uses to which this invention is intended is for production of high density and temperature plasmas suitable for generating neutrons, ions and x-rays and for studying matter heated by high intensity laser radiation. 11 figs.

  11. V-band IMPATT power amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schell, S. W.

    1985-01-01

    This program is the result of the continuing demand and future requirement for a high data rate 60-GHz communications link. A reliable solid-state transmitter which delivers the necessary power over a wide bandwidth using the present IMPATT diode technology required the development of combining techniques. The development of a 60-GHz IMPATT power combiner amplifier is detailed. The results form a basis from which future wideband, high-power IMPATT amplifiers may be developed. As a result, several state-of-the-art advancements in millimeter-wave components technology were achieved. Specific achievements for the amplifier integration were: development of a nonresonant divider/combiner circuit; reproducible multiple junction circulator assemblies; and reliable high power 60-GHz IMPATT diodes. The various design approaches and tradeoffs which lead to the final amplifier configuration are discussed. A detailed circuit design is presented for the various amplifier components, and the conical line combiner, radial line combiner, and circulator development are discussed. The performance of the amplifier, the overall achievement of the program, the implications of the results, and an assessment of future development needs and recommendations are examined.

  12. V-band IMPATT power amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schell, S. W.

    1985-09-01

    This program is the result of the continuing demand and future requirement for a high data rate 60-GHz communications link. A reliable solid-state transmitter which delivers the necessary power over a wide bandwidth using the present IMPATT diode technology required the development of combining techniques. The development of a 60-GHz IMPATT power combiner amplifier is detailed. The results form a basis from which future wideband, high-power IMPATT amplifiers may be developed. As a result, several state-of-the-art advancements in millimeter-wave components technology were achieved. Specific achievements for the amplifier integration were: development of a nonresonant divider/combiner circuit; reproducible multiple junction circulator assemblies; and reliable high power 60-GHz IMPATT diodes. The various design approaches and tradeoffs which lead to the final amplifier configuration are discussed. A detailed circuit design is presented for the various amplifier components, and the conical line combiner, radial line combiner, and circulator development are discussed. The performance of the amplifier, the overall achievement of the program, the implications of the results, and an assessment of future development needs and recommendations are examined.

  13. EXPERIMENTAL CHARACTERIZATION OF SEEDED FEL AMPLIFIER AT THE NSLS SDL.

    SciTech Connect

    WATANABE, T.; LIU, D.; MURPHY, J.B.; ROSE, J.; SHAFTAN, T.; TSANG, T.; WANG, X.J.; YU, L.H.

    2005-08-21

    Experimental characterization of a near-IR FEL amplifier at the NSLS SDL is presented in this report. SASE was observed from 0.8-1 {micro}m with 5 orders of magnitude gain. We have experimentally demonstrated saturation of a laser seeded FEL amplifier and control of the FEL output by the seed laser. Nonlinear harmonics have also been explored. The FEL pulse length for the first three harmonics was experimentally characterized and the increase of the FEL pulse length with harmonic number was observed for the first time. Computer simulation confirmed that the observed wide spectrum of the laser seeded FEL is due to the positive chirp of the seed laser.

  14. Nanoparticles that communicate in vivo to amplify tumour targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Maltzahn, Geoffrey; Park, Ji-Ho; Lin, Kevin Y.; Singh, Neetu; Schwöppe, Christian; Mesters, Rolf; Berdel, Wolfgang E.; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Sailor, Michael J.; Bhatia, Sangeeta N.

    2011-07-01

    Nanomedicines have enormous potential to improve the precision of cancer therapy, yet our ability to efficiently home these materials to regions of disease in vivo remains very limited. Inspired by the ability of communication to improve targeting in biological systems, such as inflammatory-cell recruitment to sites of disease, we construct systems where synthetic biological and nanotechnological components communicate to amplify disease targeting in vivo. These systems are composed of ‘signalling’ modules (nanoparticles or engineered proteins) that target tumours and then locally activate the coagulation cascade to broadcast tumour location to clot-targeted ‘receiving’ nanoparticles in circulation that carry a diagnostic or therapeutic cargo, thereby amplifying their delivery. We show that communicating nanoparticle systems can be composed of multiple types of signalling and receiving modules, can transmit information through multiple molecular pathways in coagulation, can operate autonomously and can target over 40 times higher doses of chemotherapeutics to tumours than non-communicating controls.

  15. Photon acceleration in the amplified plasma density wake of two copropagating laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Raj, G.; Islam, M. R.; Ersfeld, B.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2010-07-15

    Photon acceleration of a laser pulse occurs in a medium with a space and time-varying permittivity. Using Hamiltonian formulation, a theoretical study of the frequency upshift of a probe laser pulse, which is considered as a 'quasiphoton' or 'test particle,' propagating through an amplified plasma density wake of two copropagating laser pulses, is presented. The linear superposition of wakefields studied using an analytical model shows that the presence of a controlling pulse amplifies the wake of a driver pulse. The amplified wake amplitude can be controlled by varying the delay between the two pulses. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations demonstrate wake superposition due to the two copropagating laser pulses. A phase space analysis shows that the probe photon can experience a significant frequency upshift in the amplified density wake. Furthermore, the range of photon frequencies trapped and accelerated is determined by the amplitude of the density wake.

  16. Synthetic RR Lyrae velocity curves

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tianxing Boston Univ., MA )

    1991-02-01

    An amplitude correlation between the pulsation velocity curves and visual light curves of ab-type RR Lyrae stars is derived from a large number of RR Lyrae that have high-precision radial-velocity and photometric data. Based on the determined AVp, AV ralation, a synthetic radial-velocity curve for a typical ab-type RR Lyrae star is constructed. This would be of particular use in determining the systemic velocities of RR Lyrae. 17 refs.

  17. Real Time Calibration Method for Signal Conditioning Amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medelius, Pedro J. (Inventor); Mata, Carlos T. (Inventor); Eckhoff, Anthony (Inventor); Perotti, Jose (Inventor); Lucena, Angel (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A signal conditioning amplifier receives an input signal from an input such as a transducer. The signal is amplified and processed through an analog to digital converter and sent to a processor. The processor estimates the input signal provided by the transducer to the amplifier via a multiplexer. The estimated input signal is provided as a calibration voltage to the amplifier immediately following the receipt of the amplified input signal. The calibration voltage is amplified by the amplifier and provided to the processor as an amplified calibration voltage. The amplified calibration voltage is compared to the amplified input signal, and if a significant error exists, the gain and/or offset of the amplifier may be adjusted as necessary.

  18. An Adjustable Gain-Clamped Semiconductor Optical Amplifier (AGC-SOA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michie, C.; Kelly, A. E.; Armstrong, I.; Andonovic, I.; Tombling, C.

    2007-06-01

    The operation of a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA)-ring laser-based subsystem, with the capability to provide adjustable gain-clamped operation, will be described, and preliminary characterization results will be presented. The device uses two SOAs in a ring-cavity topology: one to amplify the signal and the other to control the gain. This type of subsystem finds applications in packet-based dynamic systems where it may be used for power equalization and linear amplification.

  19. RF System High Power Amplifier Software Conversion at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    G. Lahti; H. Dong; T. Seegerger

    2006-10-31

    Jefferson Lab is in the process of converting the RF system from analog RF modules and non-smart high power amplifiers (HPAs) to digital RF modules and smart HPAs. The present analog RF module controls both the RF signal and the non-smart HPA hardware. The new digital RF module will only control the RF signal, so the new HPA must include embedded software. This paper will describe the conversion from a software perspective, including the initial testing, the intermediate mixed system of old and new units, and finally the totally new RF system.

  20. High-Efficiency Microwave Power Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, Williams H.

    2005-01-01

    A high-efficiency power amplifier that operates in the S band (frequencies of the order of a few gigahertz) utilizes transistors operating under class-D bias and excitation conditions. Class-D operation has been utilized at lower frequencies, but, until now, has not been exploited in the S band. Nominally, in class D operation, a transistor is switched rapidly between "on" and "off" states so that at any given instant, it sustains either high current or high voltage, but not both at the same time. In the ideal case of zero "on" resistance, infinite "off" resistance, zero inductance and capacitance, and perfect switching, the output signal would be a perfect square wave. Relative to the traditional classes A, B, and C of amplifier operation, class D offers the potential to achieve greater power efficiency. In addition, relative to class-A amplifiers, class-D amplifiers are less likely to go into oscillation. In order to design this amplifier, it was necessary to derive mathematical models of microwave power transistors for incorporation into a larger mathematical model for computational simulation of the operation of a class-D microwave amplifier. The design incorporates state-of-the-art switching techniques applicable only in the microwave frequency range. Another major novel feature is a transmission-line power splitter/combiner designed with the help of phasing techniques to enable an approximation of a square-wave signal (which is inherently a wideband signal) to propagate through what would, if designed in a more traditional manner, behave as a more severely band-limited device (see figure). The amplifier includes an input, a driver, and a final stage. Each stage contains a pair of GaAs-based field-effect transistors biased in class D. The input signal can range from -10 to +10 dBm into a 50-ohm load. The table summarizes the performances of the three stages

  1. Digital-voltage curve generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlman, M.

    1970-01-01

    Curve generator capable of producing precisely repeatable curve for any single-valued function of voltage versus time uses digital approach, implemented by means of clocked feedback shift register, large scale integrated circuit diode matrix comprising about 12,000 diodes, counter, and digital-to-analog converter.

  2. Tool For Making Curved Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allard, Robert; Calve, Andrew; Pastreck, Edwin; Padden, Edward

    1992-01-01

    Tool for use in electrical-discharge machining (EDM) guides EDM electrode in making curved holes. Guide rod fits in slot in arm, which moves through arc. Motion drives electrode into workpiece along desired curved path. Electrode burns into workpiece while arm rotates on spindle. Discharge cuts hole of same radius of curvature.

  3. Improved Grid-Array Millimeter-Wave Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, James J.; Rutledge, David B.; Smith, R. Peter; Weikle, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Improved grid-array amplifiers operating at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths developed for use in communications and radar. Feedback suppressed by making input polarizations orthogonal to output polarizations. Amplifier made to oscillate by introducing some feedback. Several grid-array amplifiers concatenated to form high-gain beam-amplifying unit.

  4. Method to amplify variable sequences without imposing primer sequences

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Zeytun, Ahmet

    2006-11-14

    The present invention provides methods of amplifying target sequences without including regions flanking the target sequence in the amplified product or imposing amplification primer sequences on the amplified product. Also provided are methods of preparing a library from such amplified target sequences.

  5. Amplified Electrokinetic Response Concentration Polarization near Nanofluidic Channel

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Jae; Li, Leon D.; Han, Jongyoon

    2009-01-01

    Ion concentration polarization is the fundamental transport phenomenon that occurs near ion-selective membranes, but this important membrane phenomenon has been poorly understood due to theoretical and experimental challenges. Here, we report the first direct measurements of detailed flow and electric potential profiles within and near the depletion region. This work is an important step towards a full characterization of this coupled transport problem. Using microfabricated electrodes integrated with the microfluidic device, we measured and confirmed that the electric field inside an ion depletion region is amplified more than 30 fold compared to outside of the depletion zone due to the highly non-uniform ion concentration distribution along the microchannel. As a result, the electrokinetic motion of both fluid (electroosmosis) and particle (electrophoresis) was significantly amplified. The detailed flow profile within the depletion zone was also measured for the first time by optically tracking photobleached neutral dye molecules. We further showed that the amplified electrokinetic flows generated in this device may be used as a field-controlled, microfluidic fluid pump and switch. PMID:19358584

  6. Thermal recovery of the NIF amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, Steven B.; Erlandson, A. E.; London, Richard A.; Manes, Kenneth R.; Marshall, Christopher D.; Petty, Charles S.; Pierce, R.; Smith, Larry K.; Zapata, Luis E.; Beullier, J.; Bicrel, B.

    1999-07-01

    With approximately 99 percent of the electrical energy supplied to the NIF appearing as heat in the amplifiers, thermal recovery of the NIF system is a major consideration in the design process. The NIF shot rate is one shot every 8 hours, with a goal of 4 hours between shots. This necessitates that thermal recovery take place in no more than 7 hours, with a goal of 3 hours for the accelerated shot rate. Residual optical distortions, which restrict the shot rate, are grouped into two discrete categories: (1) distortions associated with residual temperature gradients in the laser slabs, and (2) distortions associated with buoyantly driven convective currents in the amplifier cavity and beam-tube regions. Thermal recovery of the amplifiers is achieved by cooling the flashlamps and blastshields with a heat deposited in the slabs and edge claddings. Advanced concepts, such as the use of slightly chilled gas to accelerate some aspects of recovery, are addressed. To quantify recovery rates of the amplifiers, experiments and numerical models are used to measure and calculate the temperatures and optical distortions in NIF-like amplifier elements. The calculation results are benchmarked against AMPLAB temperature measurements, thus allowing a quantitative prediction of NIF thermal recovery. These results indicate that the NIF requirement of 7 hour thermal recovery can be achieved with chilled temperature cooling gas. It is further shown that residual temperature gradient driven distortions in the slabs reach an acceptable level, after 4 hours of thermal recovery.

  7. High power, high beam quality regenerative amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Dane, Clifford B.

    1993-01-01

    A regenerative laser amplifier system generates high peak power and high energy per pulse output beams enabling generation of X-rays used in X-ray lithography for manufacturing integrated circuits. The laser amplifier includes a ring shaped optical path with a limited number of components including a polarizer, a passive 90 degree phase rotator, a plurality of mirrors, a relay telescope, and a gain medium, the components being placed close to the image plane of the relay telescope to reduce diffraction or phase perturbations in order to limit high peak intensity spiking. In the ring, the beam makes two passes through the gain medium for each transit of the optical path to increase the amplifier gain to loss ratio. A beam input into the ring makes two passes around the ring, is diverted into an SBS phase conjugator and proceeds out of the SBS phase conjugator back through the ring in an equal but opposite direction for two passes, further reducing phase perturbations. A master oscillator inputs the beam through an isolation cell (Faraday or Pockels) which transmits the beam into the ring without polarization rotation. The isolation cell rotates polarization only in beams proceeding out of the ring to direct the beams out of the amplifier. The diffraction limited quality of the input beam is preserved in the amplifier so that a high power output beam having nearly the same diffraction limited quality is produced.

  8. High power, high beam quality regenerative amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, L.A.; Dane, C.B.

    1993-08-24

    A regenerative laser amplifier system generates high peak power and high energy per pulse output beams enabling generation of X-rays used in X-ray lithography for manufacturing integrated circuits. The laser amplifier includes a ring shaped optical path with a limited number of components including a polarizer, a passive 90 degree phase rotator, a plurality of mirrors, a relay telescope, and a gain medium, the components being placed close to the image plane of the relay telescope to reduce diffraction or phase perturbations in order to limit high peak intensity spiking. In the ring, the beam makes two passes through the gain medium for each transit of the optical path to increase the amplifier gain to loss ratio. A beam input into the ring makes two passes around the ring, is diverted into an SBS phase conjugator and proceeds out of the SBS phase conjugator back through the ring in an equal but opposite direction for two passes, further reducing phase perturbations. A master oscillator inputs the beam through an isolation cell (Faraday or Pockels) which transmits the beam into the ring without polarization rotation. The isolation cell rotates polarization only in beams proceeding out of the ring to direct the beams out of the amplifier. The diffraction limited quality of the input beam is preserved in the amplifier so that a high power output beam having nearly the same diffraction limited quality is produced.

  9. Operational amplifier with adjustable frequency response.

    PubMed

    Gulisek, D; Hencek, M

    1978-01-01

    The authors describe an operational amplifier with an adjustable frequency response and its use in membrane physiology, using the voltage clamp and current clamp method. The amplifier eliminates feedback poles causing oscillation. It consists of a follower with a high input resistance in the form of a tube and of an actual amplifier with an adjustable frequency response allowing the abolition of clicks by one pole and of oscillation by two poles in the 500 Hz divided by infinity range. Further properties of the amplifier: a long-term voltage drift of 1 mv, a temperature voltage drift of 0.5 mv/degrees K, input resistance greater than 1 GOhm, amplification greater than 80 dB, output +/- 12 v, 25 ma, noise, measured from the width of the oscilloscope track in the presence of a ray of normal brightness, not exceeding 50 muv in the 0-250 kHz band, f1 = 1 MHz. A short report on the amplifier was published a few years ago (Gulísek and Hencek 1973). PMID:149322

  10. Why subduction zones are curved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadevan, L.; Bendick, R.; Liang, Haiyi

    2010-12-01

    We give an explanation for the polarity, localization, shape, size, and initiation of subduction zones on Earth. By considering a soft, thin, curved lithospheric cap with either elastic or viscous rheology supported by a thick, nearly incompressible mantle, we find two different characteristic subduction geometries arise depending on boundary conditions: (1) plate boundaries where subduction results primarily from the gravitational body force (free subduction) have characteristic plate lengths and form arc-shaped dimpled segments resulting from the competition between bending and stretching in edge buckling modes of thin spherical shells, and (2) subduction zones due to localized applied loads that push one slab of thin, positively buoyant lithosphere beneath an overriding plate (forced subduction) form localized straight segments, consistent with the deformation of indented spherical shells. Both types of subduction are nonlinear subcritical instabilities, so small perturbations in the mechanical properties of the lithosphere have pronounced effects on subduction initiation and evolution. Yet in both cases, geometric relationships determined by the shape of the Earth itself play the most critical role in controlling the basic morphology and characteristic length scales of subduction zones.

  11. Ultraflexible organic amplifier with biocompatible gel electrodes.

    PubMed

    Sekitani, Tsuyoshi; Yokota, Tomoyuki; Kuribara, Kazunori; Kaltenbrunner, Martin; Fukushima, Takanori; Inoue, Yusuke; Sekino, Masaki; Isoyama, Takashi; Abe, Yusuke; Onodera, Hiroshi; Someya, Takao

    2016-01-01

    In vivo electronic monitoring systems are promising technology to obtain biosignals with high spatiotemporal resolution and sensitivity. Here we demonstrate the fabrication of a biocompatible highly conductive gel composite comprising multi-walled carbon nanotube-dispersed sheet with an aqueous hydrogel. This gel composite exhibits admittance of 100 mS cm(-2) and maintains high admittance even in a low-frequency range. On implantation into a living hypodermal tissue for 4 weeks, it showed a small foreign-body reaction compared with widely used metal electrodes. Capitalizing on the multi-functional gel composite, we fabricated an ultrathin and mechanically flexible organic active matrix amplifier on a 1.2-μm-thick polyethylene-naphthalate film to amplify (amplification factor: ∼200) weak biosignals. The composite was integrated to the amplifier to realize a direct lead epicardial electrocardiography that is easily spread over an uneven heart tissue. PMID:27125910

  12. Single mode terahertz quantum cascade amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Y. Wallis, R.; Shah, Y. D.; Jessop, D. S.; Degl'Innocenti, R.; Klimont, A.; Kamboj, V.; Beere, H. E.; Ritchie, D. A.

    2014-10-06

    A terahertz (THz) optical amplifier based on a 2.9 THz quantum cascade laser (QCL) structure has been demonstrated. By depositing an antireflective coating on the QCL facet, the laser mirror losses are enhanced to fully suppress the lasing action, creating a THz quantum cascade (QC) amplifier. Terahertz radiation amplification has been obtained, by coupling a separate multi-mode THz QCL of the same active region design to the QC amplifier. A bare cavity gain is achieved and shows excellent agreement with the lasing spectrum from the original QCL without the antireflective coating. Furthermore, a maximum optical gain of ∼30 dB with single-mode radiation output is demonstrated.

  13. Ultraflexible organic amplifier with biocompatible gel electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekitani, Tsuyoshi; Yokota, Tomoyuki; Kuribara, Kazunori; Kaltenbrunner, Martin; Fukushima, Takanori; Inoue, Yusuke; Sekino, Masaki; Isoyama, Takashi; Abe, Yusuke; Onodera, Hiroshi; Someya, Takao

    2016-04-01

    In vivo electronic monitoring systems are promising technology to obtain biosignals with high spatiotemporal resolution and sensitivity. Here we demonstrate the fabrication of a biocompatible highly conductive gel composite comprising multi-walled carbon nanotube-dispersed sheet with an aqueous hydrogel. This gel composite exhibits admittance of 100 mS cm-2 and maintains high admittance even in a low-frequency range. On implantation into a living hypodermal tissue for 4 weeks, it showed a small foreign-body reaction compared with widely used metal electrodes. Capitalizing on the multi-functional gel composite, we fabricated an ultrathin and mechanically flexible organic active matrix amplifier on a 1.2-μm-thick polyethylene-naphthalate film to amplify (amplification factor: ~200) weak biosignals. The composite was integrated to the amplifier to realize a direct lead epicardial electrocardiography that is easily spread over an uneven heart tissue.

  14. Ultrashort pulse amplification in cryogenically cooled amplifiers

    DOEpatents

    Backus, Sterling J.; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Murnane, Margaret Mary

    2004-10-12

    A laser amplifier system amplifies pulses in a single "stage" from .about.10.sup.-9 joules to more than 10.sup.-3 joules, with average power of 1-10 watts, and beam quality M.sup.2 <2. The laser medium is cooled substantially below room temperature, as a means to improve the optical and thermal characteristics of the medium. This is done with the medium inside a sealed, evacuated or purged cell to avoid moisture or other materials condensing on the surface. A "seed" pulse from a separate laser is passed through the laser medium, one or more times, in any of a variety of configurations including single-pass, multiple-pass, and regenerative amplifier configurations.

  15. Optical switches based on semiconductor optical amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalman, Robert F.; Dias, Antonio R.; Chau, Kelvin K.; Goodman, Joseph W.

    1991-12-01

    Fiber-optic switching systems typically exhibit large losses associated with splitting and combining of the optical power, and with excess component losses. These losses increase quickly with switch size. To obtain acceptable signal-to-noise performance through large optical switching, optical amplifiers can be used. In applications requiring optical switching, semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) are preferred over erbium-doped fiber amplifiers due to their fast switching speeds and the possibility of their integration in monolithic structures with passive waveguides and electronics. We present a general analysis of optical switching systems utilizing SOAs. These systems, in which the gain provided by SOAs is distributed throughout the optical system, are referred to as distributed optical gain (DOG) systems. Our model predicts the performance and achievable sizes of switches based on the matrix-vector multiplier crossbar and Benes network. It is found that for realistic SOA parameters optical switches accommodating extremely large numbers of nodes are, in principle, achievable.

  16. High Bandwidth Differential Amplifier for Shock Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, P. W., Tran, V., Chau, R.

    2012-04-30

    We developed a high bandwidth differential amplifier for gas gun shock experiments/applications. The circuit has a bandwidth > 1 GHz, and is capable of measuring signals of ≤1.5 V with a common mode rejection of 250 V. Conductivity measurements of gas gun targets are measured by flowing high currents through the targets. The voltage is measured across the target using a technique similar to a four-point probe. Because of the design of the current source and load, the target voltage is approximately 250 V relative to ground. Since the expected voltage change in the target is < 1 V, the differential amplifier must have a large common mode rejection. High pass filters suppress internal ringing of operational amplifiers. Results of bench tests are shown.

  17. Short pulse free electron laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Schlitt, Leland G.; Szoke, Abraham

    1985-01-01

    Method and apparatus for amplification of a laser pulse in a free electron laser amplifier where the laser pulse duration may be a small fraction of the electron beam pulse duration used for amplification. An electron beam pulse is passed through a first wiggler magnet and a short laser pulse to be amplified is passed through the same wiggler so that only the energy of the last fraction, f, (f<1) of the electron beam pulse is consumed in amplifying the laser pulse. After suitable delay of the electron beam, the process is repeated in a second wiggler magnet, a third, . . . , where substantially the same fraction f of the remainder of the electron beam pulse is consumed in amplification of the given short laser pulse in each wiggler magnet region until the useful electron beam energy is substantially completely consumed by amplification of the laser pulse.

  18. A 2 kHz-100 MHz dynamic amplifier for tracking targets of variable amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Mahaveer K.; Bitler, J. Samuel; Grimes, Craig A.

    2001-06-01

    A 2 kHz-100 MHz constant-output dynamic amplifier design is presented. Application of the amplifier is shown for tracking wireless magnetoelastic and magnetoacoustic environmental sensors [C. A. Grimes et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 70, 4711 (1999); K. Loiselle and C. A. Grimes, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 71, 1141 (2000)], the detected amplitude which varies significantly with spatial location from the detector. The amplification of the dynamic amplifier, 80 dB, is controlled by inverted feedback voltage; the design is suitable for an input voltage range of -150 to -10 dB. The dynamic amplifier enhances the detection range of magnetoacoustic sensors by an approximate factor of three, and that of magnetoelastic sensors by a factor of 1.25, with the magnetoelastic sensors having comparatively less detection range increase due to higher background noise levels.

  19. Transverse intensity transformation by laser amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvin, Igor A.; King, Gary; Collett, Oliver J. P.; Strauss, Hencharl J.

    2015-03-01

    Lasers beams with a specific intensity profile such as super-Gaussian, Airy or Dougnut-like are desirable in many applications such as laser materials processing, medicine and communications. We propose a new technique for laser beam shaping by amplifying a beam in an end-pumped bulk amplifier that is pumped with a beam that has a modified intensity profile. Advantages of this method are that it is relatively easy to implement, has the ability to reshape multimode beams and is naturally suited to high power/energy beams. Both three and four level gain materials can be used as amplifier media. However, a big advantage of using three level materials is their ability to attenuate of the seed beam, which enhances the contrast of the shaping. We first developed a numerical method to obtain the required pump intensity for an arbitrary beam transformation. This method was subsequently experimentally verified using a three level system. The output of a 2.07 μm seed laser was amplified in a Ho:YLF bulk amplifier which was being pumped by a 1.89 μm Tm:YLF laser which had roughly a TEM10 Hermit Gaussian intensity profile. The seed beam was amplified from 0.3 W to 0.55 W at the full pump power of 35 W. More importantly, the beam profile in one transverse direction was significantly shaped from Gaussian to roughly flat-top, as the model predicted. The concept has therefore been shown to be viable and can be used to optimise the beam profile for a wide range of applications.

  20. Beyond nonlinear saturation of backward Raman amplifiers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Barth, Ido; Toroker, Zeev; Balakin, Alexey A.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2016-06-27

    Backward Raman amplification is limited by relativistic nonlinear dephasing resulting in saturation of the leading spike of the amplified pulse. We employed pump detuning in order to mitigate the relativistic phase mismatch and to overcome the associated saturation. In an amplified pulse can then be reshaped into a monospike pulse with little precursory power ahead of it, with the maximum intensity increasing by a factor of two. Finally, this detuning can be employed advantageously both in regimes where the group velocity dispersion is unimportant and where the dispersion is important but small.

  1. Beyond nonlinear saturation of backward Raman amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Barth, Ido; Toroker, Zeev; Balakin, Alexey A; Fisch, Nathaniel J

    2016-06-01

    Backward Raman amplification is limited by relativistic nonlinear dephasing resulting in saturation of the leading spike of the amplified pulse. Pump detuning is employed to mitigate the relativistic phase mismatch and to overcome the associated saturation. The amplified pulse can then be reshaped into a monospike pulse with little precursory power ahead of it, with the maximum intensity increasing by a factor of two. This detuning can be employed advantageously both in regimes where the group velocity dispersion is unimportant and where the dispersion is important but small. PMID:27415380

  2. Master-Oscillator/Power-Amplifier Laser System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Anthony W.; Krainak, Michael A.; Unger, Glenn L.

    1994-01-01

    Master-oscillator/power-amplifier (MOPA) laser system operates in continuous-wave mode or in amplitude-modulation (e.g., pulse) mode by modulation of oscillator current. Power amplifier is laser-diode-pumped neodymium:yttrium lithium fluoride (Nd:YLF) laser; oscillator is laser diode. Offers relatively high efficiency and power. Because drive current to oscillator modulated, external electro-optical modulator not needed. Potential uses include free-space optical communications, coded laser ranging, and generation of high-power, mode-locked pulses.

  3. Noise figure of amplified dispersive Fourier transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Goda, Keisuke; Jalali, Bahram

    2010-09-15

    Amplified dispersive Fourier transformation (ADFT) is a powerful tool for fast real-time spectroscopy as it overcomes the limitations of traditional optical spectrometers. ADFT maps the spectrum of an optical pulse into a temporal waveform using group-velocity dispersion and simultaneously amplifies it in the optical domain. It greatly simplifies spectroscopy by replacing the diffraction grating and detector array in the conventional spectrometer with a dispersive fiber and single-pixel photodetector, enabling ultrafast real-time spectroscopic measurements. Following our earlier work on the theory of ADFT, here we study the effect of noise on ADFT. We derive the noise figure of ADFT and discuss its dependence on various parameters.

  4. Transportable setup for amplifier phase fidelity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tröbs, M.; Bogan, C.; Barke, S.; Kühn, G.; Reiche, J.; Heinzel, G.; Danzmann, K.

    2015-05-01

    One possible laser source for the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) consists of an Ytterbium-doped fiber amplifier originally developed for inter-satellite communication, seeded by the laser used for the technology demonstrator mission LISA Pathfinder. LISA needs to transmit clock information between its three spacecraft to correct for phase noise between the clocks on the individual spacecraft. For this purpose phase modulation sidebands at GHz frequencies will be imprinted on the laser beams between spacecraft. Differential phase noise between the carrier and a sideband introduced within the optical chain must be very low. We report on a transportable setup to measure the phase fidelity of optical amplifiers.

  5. Beyond nonlinear saturation of backward Raman amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Ido; Toroker, Zeev; Balakin, Alexey A.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2016-06-01

    Backward Raman amplification is limited by relativistic nonlinear dephasing resulting in saturation of the leading spike of the amplified pulse. Pump detuning is employed to mitigate the relativistic phase mismatch and to overcome the associated saturation. The amplified pulse can then be reshaped into a monospike pulse with little precursory power ahead of it, with the maximum intensity increasing by a factor of two. This detuning can be employed advantageously both in regimes where the group velocity dispersion is unimportant and where the dispersion is important but small.

  6. High-energy regenerative thin disk amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chyla, Michal; Smrz, Martin; Mocek, Tomas

    2012-07-01

    Design of a compact regenerative laser amplifier based on two Yb:YAG thin-disks is presented. Energy up to 100 mJ in picoseconds pulses will be delivered with a repetition rate of 1 kHz. System is designed for seeding a kW-class multipass amplifier for industrial and scientific applications. Laser heads are pumped at zero-phonon line (968.825 nm [1]) by stabilized high-power pump diodes operated in pulsed regime. Seed pulses are produced in a fiber oscillator at 1030 nm and CPA technique utilizing transmission gratings for pulse stretching and compression is applied.

  7. Poiseuille flow in curved spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debus, J.-D.; Mendoza, M.; Succi, S.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate Poiseuille channel flow through intrinsically curved media, equipped with localized metric perturbations. To this end, we study the flux of a fluid driven through the curved channel in dependence of the spatial deformation, characterized by the parameters of the metric perturbations (amplitude, range, and density). We find that the flux depends only on a specific combination of parameters, which we identify as the average metric perturbation, and derive a universal flux law for the Poiseuille flow. For the purpose of this study, we have improved and validated our recently developed lattice Boltzmann model in curved space by considerably reducing discrete lattice effects.

  8. Poiseuille flow in curved spaces.

    PubMed

    Debus, J-D; Mendoza, M; Succi, S; Herrmann, H J

    2016-04-01

    We investigate Poiseuille channel flow through intrinsically curved media, equipped with localized metric perturbations. To this end, we study the flux of a fluid driven through the curved channel in dependence of the spatial deformation, characterized by the parameters of the metric perturbations (amplitude, range, and density). We find that the flux depends only on a specific combination of parameters, which we identify as the average metric perturbation, and derive a universal flux law for the Poiseuille flow. For the purpose of this study, we have improved and validated our recently developed lattice Boltzmann model in curved space by considerably reducing discrete lattice effects. PMID:27176437

  9. Pleats in crystals on curved surfaces.

    PubMed

    Irvine, William T M; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Chaikin, Paul M

    2010-12-16

    Hexagons can easily tile a flat surface, but not a curved one. Introducing heptagons and pentagons (defects with topological charge) makes it easier to tile curved surfaces; for example, soccer balls based on the geodesic domes of Buckminster Fuller have exactly 12 pentagons (positive charges). Interacting particles that invariably form hexagonal crystals on a plane exhibit fascinating scarred defect patterns on a sphere. Here we show that, for more general curved surfaces, curvature may be relaxed by pleats: uncharged lines of dislocations (topological dipoles) that vanish on the surface and play the same role as fabric pleats. We experimentally investigate crystal order on surfaces with spatially varying positive and negative curvature. On cylindrical capillary bridges, stretched to produce negative curvature, we observe a sequence of transitions-consistent with our energetic calculations-from no defects to isolated dislocations, which subsequently proliferate and organize into pleats; finally, scars and isolated heptagons (previously unseen) appear. This fine control of crystal order with curvature will enable explorations of general theories of defects in curved spaces. From a practical viewpoint, it may be possible to engineer structures with curvature (such as waisted nanotubes and vaulted architecture) and to develop novel methods for soft lithography and directed self-assembly. PMID:21164482

  10. Measuring the energy of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) in a short pulse laser amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliev, Marin; Adams, Daniel; Greco, Michael; Meier, Amanda; Squier, Jeff; Durfee, Charles

    2010-10-01

    In high-gain pulsed laser amplifiers, amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) tends to limit the gain in single stage fiber amplifiers. Even if ASE is not strong enough to deplete the gain of the amplifier, it still contributes strongly to a low-intensity background output in the amplified signal. The intensity contrast between the amplified short pulse and this background ASE pedestal can be measured with third-order autocorrelation, but this method cannot be used to completely specify the ASE's energy, which is distributed over many nanoseconds. We have developed a novel method that allows us to determine the energy and the spectrum of the ASE. We use a cross polarized wave (XPW) generating crystal such as BaF2 to ``clean up'' the ASE from the short pulse(SP). The input pulse (SP and ASE) and the cross-polarized signal are passed through a birefringent crystal such as sapphire. The relative group velocity difference along each crystal axis results in a delay between both channels. After passing through a polarizer, an interferogram is obtained in a spectrometer. This interferogram results from interference of the XPW pulse with the short-pulse content of the amplifier output, with a background of the ASE spectrum. Fourier analysis yields both the ASE energy and its spectrum.

  11. Curved characteristics behind blast waves.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laporte, O.; Chang, T. S.

    1972-01-01

    The behavior of nonisentropic flow behind a propagating blast wave is theoretically studied. Exact solutions, expressed in closed form in terms of elementary functions, are presented for three sets of curved characteristicseind a self-similar, strong blast wave.

  12. Parabolic curves in Lie groups

    SciTech Connect

    Pauley, Michael

    2010-05-15

    To interpolate a sequence of points in Euclidean space, parabolic splines can be used. These are curves which are piecewise quadratic. To interpolate between points in a (semi-)Riemannian manifold, we could look for curves such that the second covariant derivative of the velocity is zero. We call such curves Jupp and Kent quadratics or JK-quadratics because they are a special case of the cubic curves advocated by Jupp and Kent. When the manifold is a Lie group with bi-invariant metric, we can relate JK-quadratics to null Lie quadratics which arise from another interpolation problem. We solve JK-quadratics in the Lie groups SO(3) and SO(1,2) and in the sphere and hyperbolic plane, by relating them to the differential equation for a quantum harmonic oscillator00.

  13. Strong environmental coupling in a Josephson parametric amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Mutus, J. Y.; White, T. C.; Barends, R.; Chen, Yu; Chen, Z.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Jeffrey, E.; Kelly, J.; Neill, C.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Roushan, P.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; Cleland, A. N.; Martinis, John M.; Megrant, A.; Sundqvist, K. M.

    2014-06-30

    We present a lumped-element Josephson parametric amplifier designed to operate with strong coupling to the environment. In this regime, we observe broadband frequency dependent amplification with multi-peaked gain profiles. We account for this behavior using the “pumpistor” model which allows for frequency dependent variation of the external impedance. Using this understanding, we demonstrate control over the complexity of gain profiles through added variation in the environment impedance at a given frequency. With strong coupling to a suitable external impedance, we observe a significant increase in dynamic range, and large amplification bandwidth up to 700 MHz giving near quantum-limited performance.

  14. Asymmetric laser sideband generation with a tapered semiconductor amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanakas, Michael; Lim, Michael

    2013-03-01

    We have constructed a free-space, frequency-shifted feedback amplifier using a tapered semiconductor gain element. The general layout of the system is similar to that described in Littler, et al., Opt. Comm. 88, 523 (1992). Traveling-wave feedback is demonstrated with the m = - 1 order of several different acousto-optic modulators driven at variable frequency. Asymmetric sideband production is observed in the rf spectrum of a fast photodiode and in the transmission of a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer. The number of asymmetric modes is controlled with the AOM rf drive power and the seed laser optical power. Supported by NSF PHY-0613659

  15. Flow over riblet curved surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loureiro, J. B. R.; Silva Freire, A. P.

    2011-12-01

    The present work studies the mechanics of turbulent drag reduction over curved surfaces by riblets. The effects of surface modification on flow separation over steep and smooth curved surfaces are investigated. Four types of two-dimensional surfaces are studied based on the morphometric parameters that describe the body of a blue whale. Local measurements of mean velocity and turbulence profiles are obtained through laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) and particle image velocimetry (PIV).

  16. Multi-pass amplifier architecture for high power laser systems

    DOEpatents

    Manes, Kenneth R; Spaeth, Mary L; Erlandson, Alvin C

    2014-04-01

    A main amplifier system includes a first reflector operable to receive input light through a first aperture and direct the input light along an optical path. The input light is characterized by a first polarization. The main amplifier system also includes a first polarizer operable to reflect light characterized by the first polarization state. The main amplifier system further includes a first and second set of amplifier modules. Each of the first and second set of amplifier modules includes an entrance window, a quarter wave plate, a plurality of amplifier slablets arrayed substantially parallel to each other, and an exit window. The main amplifier system additionally includes a set of mirrors operable to reflect light exiting the first set of amplifier modules to enter the second set of amplifier modules and a second polarizer operable to reflect light characterized by a second polarization state.

  17. Ultra-low noise miniaturized neural amplifier with hardware averaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dweiri, Yazan M.; Eggers, Thomas; McCallum, Grant; Durand, Dominique M.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. Peripheral nerves carry neural signals that could be used to control hybrid bionic systems. Cuff electrodes provide a robust and stable interface but the recorded signal amplitude is small (<3 μVrms 700 Hz-7 kHz), thereby requiring a baseline noise of less than 1 μVrms for a useful signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Flat interface nerve electrode (FINE) contacts alone generate thermal noise of at least 0.5 μVrms therefore the amplifier should add as little noise as possible. Since mainstream neural amplifiers have a baseline noise of 2 μVrms or higher, novel designs are required. Approach. Here we apply the concept of hardware averaging to nerve recordings obtained with cuff electrodes. An optimization procedure is developed to minimize noise and power simultaneously. The novel design was based on existing neural amplifiers (Intan Technologies, LLC) and is validated with signals obtained from the FINE in chronic dog experiments. Main results. We showed that hardware averaging leads to a reduction in the total recording noise by a factor of 1/√N or less depending on the source resistance. Chronic recording of physiological activity with FINE using the presented design showed significant improvement on the recorded baseline noise with at least two parallel operation transconductance amplifiers leading to a 46.1% reduction at N = 8. The functionality of these recordings was quantified by the SNR improvement and shown to be significant for N = 3 or more. The present design was shown to be capable of generating <1.5 μVrms total recording baseline noise when connected to a FINE placed on the sciatic nerve of an awake animal. An algorithm was introduced to find the value of N that can minimize both the power consumption and the noise in order to design a miniaturized ultralow-noise neural amplifier. Significance. These results demonstrate the efficacy of hardware averaging on noise improvement for neural recording with cuff electrodes, and can accommodate the

  18. High Power Amplifier Harmonic Output Level Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, R. M.; Hoppe, D. J.; Khan, A. R.

    1995-01-01

    A method is presented for the measurement of the harmonic output power of high power klystron amplifiers, involving coherent hemispherical radiation pattern measurements of the radiated klystron output. Results are discussed for the operation in saturated and unsaturated conditions, and with a waveguide harmonic filter included.

  19. Wide-Temperature-Range Integrated Operational Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mojarradi, Mohammad; Levanas, Greg; Chen, Yuan; Kolawa, Elizabeth; Cozy, Raymond; Blalock, Benjamin; Greenwell, Robert; Terry, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    A document discusses a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) integrated- circuit operational amplifier to be replicated and incorporated into sensor and actuator systems of Mars-explorer robots. This amplifier is designed to function at a supply potential less than or equal to 5.5 V, at any temperature from -180 to +120 C. The design is implemented on a commercial radiation-hard SOI CMOS process rated for a supply potential of less than or equal to 3.6 V and temperatures from -55 to +110 C. The design incorporates several innovations to achieve this, the main ones being the following: NMOS transistor channel lengths below 1 m are generally not used because research showed that this change could reduce the adverse effect of hot carrier injection on the lifetimes of transistors at low temperatures. To enable the amplifier to withstand the 5.5-V supply potential, a circuit topology including cascade devices, clamping devices, and dynamic voltage biasing was adopted so that no individual transistor would be exposed to more than 3.6 V. To minimize undesired variations in performance over the temperature range, the transistors in the amplifier are biased by circuitry that maintains a constant inversion coefficient over the temperature range.

  20. Reflected-wave maser. [low noise amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauss, R. C. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A number of traveling-wave, slow-wave maser structures, containing active maser material but absent the typical ferrite isolators, are immersed in a nonuniform magnetic field. The microwave signal to be amplified is inserted at a circulator which directs the signal to a slow-wave structure. The signal travels through the slow-wave structure, being amplified according to the distance traveled. The end of the slow-wave structure farthest from the circulator is arranged to be a point of maximum reflection of the signal traveling through the slow-wave structure. As a consequence, the signal to be amplified traverses the slow-wave structure again, in the opposite direction (towards the circulator) experiencing amplification equivalent to that achieved by a conventional traveling-wave maser having twice the length. The circulator directs the amplified signal to following like stages of amplification. Isolators are used in between stages to prevent signals from traveling in the wrong direction, between the stages. Reduced signal loss is experienced at each stage. The high gain produced by each slow-wave structure is reduced to a moderate value by use of a nonuniform magnetic field which also broadens the line width of the maser material. The resulting bandwidth can be exceptionally wide. Cascaded stages provide high gain, exceptionally wide bandwith and very low noise temperature.

  1. Simulations of the LANL regenerative amplifier FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Kesselring, M.; Colson, W.B.; Wong, R.K.; Sheffield, R.L.

    1997-08-01

    The LANL regenerative amplifier FEL is designed to produce an average output power of 1 kW. Simulations study the transverse effects due to guiding by the intense electron beam and feedback. These simulations coupled with experimental measurements can be used to improve future high-power FEL designs.

  2. NON-BLOCKING STABILIZED FEED BACK AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Fairstein, E.

    1960-03-01

    A plural stuge nonblocking degenerative feed-back amplifier was designed particularly suitable for counting circuits because of the stability and linearity in operation, characterized by the fact that the inltial stage employs a cathode coupled input circuit fed from a cathode follower and the final stage has a tline constant greater than those of the other stages.

  3. LOW-LEVEL DIRECT CURRENT AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, Q.A.

    1959-05-01

    A d-c amplifier is described. Modulation is provided between a d-c signal and an alternating current to give an output signal proportional to the d- c signal. The circuit has high sensitivity and accuracy. (T.R.H.)

  4. Gyrotron: A high-frequency microwave amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kupiszewski, A.

    1979-01-01

    A proposed microwave amplifier mechanism for future generations of millimeter high power uplinks to spacecraft and planetary radar transmitters is introduced. Basic electron-electromagnetic field interaction theory for RF power gain is explained. The starting point for general analytical methods leading to detailed design results is presented.

  5. Narrow-linewidth master-oscillator power amplifier based on a semiconductor tapered amplifier.

    PubMed

    Wilson, A C; Sharpe, J C; McKenzie, C R; Manson, P J; Warrington, D M

    1998-07-20

    The output of a grating-stabilized external-cavity diode laser was injected into a semiconductor tapered amplifier in a master-oscillator power amplifier configuration, producing as much as 500 mW of power with narrow linewidth. The additional linewidth that is due to the tapered amplifier is much smaller than the typical linewidth of grating-stabilized laser diodes. To demonstrate the usefulness of the narrow linewidth and high output power, we used the system to perform Doppler-free two-photon spectroscopy with rubidium. PMID:18285950

  6. Frequency-offset Cartesian feedback for MRI power amplifier linearization.

    PubMed

    Zanchi, Marta G; Stang, Pascal; Kerr, Adam; Pauly, John M; Scott, Greig C

    2011-02-01

    High-quality magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) requires precise control of the transmit radio-frequency (RF) field. In parallel excitation applications such as transmit SENSE, high RF power linearity is essential to cancel aliased excitations. In widely-employed class AB power amplifiers, gain compression, cross-over distortion, memory effects, and thermal drift all distort the RF field modulation and can degrade image quality. Cartesian feedback (CF) linearization can mitigate these effects in MRI, if the quadrature mismatch and dc offset imperfections inherent in the architecture can be minimized. In this paper, we present a modified Cartesian feedback technique called "frequency-offset Cartesian feedback" (FOCF) that significantly reduces these problems. In the FOCF architecture, the feedback control is performed at a low intermediate frequency rather than dc, so that quadrature ghosts and dc errors are shifted outside the control bandwidth. FOCF linearization is demonstrated with a variety of typical MRI pulses. Simulation of the magnetization obtained with the Bloch equation demonstrates that high-fidelity RF reproduction can be obtained even with inexpensive class AB amplifiers. Finally, the enhanced RF fidelity of FOCF over CF is demonstrated with actual images obtained in a 1.5 T MRI system. PMID:20959264

  7. Frequency-Offset Cartesian Feedback for MRI Power Amplifier Linearization

    PubMed Central

    Zanchi, Marta Gaia; Stang, Pascal; Kerr, Adam; Pauly, John Mark; Scott, Greig Cameron

    2011-01-01

    High-quality magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) requires precise control of the transmit radio-frequency field. In parallel excitation applications such as transmit SENSE, high RF power linearity is essential to cancel aliased excitations. In widely-employed class AB power amplifiers, gain compression, cross-over distortion, memory effects, and thermal drift all distort the RF field modulation and can degrade image quality. Cartesian feedback (CF) linearization can mitigate these effects in MRI, if the quadrature mismatch and DC offset imperfections inherent in the architecture can be minimized. In this paper, we present a modified Cartesian feedback technique called “frequency-offset Cartesian feedback” (FOCF) that significantly reduces these problems. In the FOCF architecture, the feedback control is performed at a low intermediate frequency rather than DC, so that quadrature ghosts and DC errors are shifted outside the control bandwidth. FOCF linearization is demonstrated with a variety of typical MRI pulses. Simulation of the magnetization obtained with the Bloch equation demonstrates that high-fidelity RF reproduction can be obtained even with inexpensive class AB amplifiers. Finally, the enhanced RF fidelity of FOCF over CF is demonstrated with actual images obtained in a 1.5 T MRI system. PMID:20959264

  8. RF Variable-Gain Amplifiers and AGC Loops for Digital TV Receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizuka, Kunihiko; Koutani, Masato; Mitsunaka, Takeshi; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Toyoyama, Shinji; Miyamoto, Masayuki; Matsuzawa, Akira

    RF Variable Gain Amplifiers (RF-VGA) are important components for integrated TV broadcast receivers. Analog and digital controlled RF-VGAs are compared in terms of linearity and an AGC loop architecture suitable for digitally controlled RF-VGA is proposed. Further linearity enhancement applicable for CMOS implementation is also discussed.

  9. Ankle moment generation and maximum-effort curved sprinting performance.

    PubMed

    Luo, Geng; Stefanyshyn, Darren

    2012-11-15

    Turning at high speed along acute curves is crucial for athletic performance. One determinant of curved sprinting speed is the ground reaction force that can be created by the supporting limb; the moment generated at the ankle joint may influence such force generation. Body lean associated with curved sprints positions the ankle joints in extreme in-/eversion, and may hinder the ankle moment generation. To examine the influence of ankle moment generation on curved sprinting performance, 17 male subjects performed maximum-effort curved sprints in footwear with and without a wedge. The wedged footwear was constructed with the intention to align the ankle joints closer to their neutral frontal-plane configuration during counter-clockwise curved sprints so greater joint moments might be generated. We found, with the wedged footwear, the average eversion angle of the inside leg ankle was reduced, and the plantarflexion moment generation increased significantly. Meanwhile, the knee extension moment remained unchanged. With the wedged footwear, stance-average centripetal ground reaction force increased significantly while no difference in the vertical ground reaction force was detected. The subjects created a greater centripetal ground reaction impulse in the wedged footwear despite a shortened stance phase when compared to the control. Stance-average curved sprinting speed improved by 4.3% with the wedged footwear. The changes in ankle moment and curved sprinting speed observed in the current study supports the notion that the moment generation at the ankle joint may be a performance constraint for curved sprinting. PMID:23022207

  10. Low phase noise oscillator using two parallel connected amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, Leonard L.

    1987-01-01

    A high frequency oscillator is provided by connecting two amplifier circuits in parallel where each amplifier circuit provides the other amplifier circuit with the conditions necessary for oscillation. The inherent noise present in both amplifier circuits causes the quiescent current, and in turn, the generated frequency, to change. The changes in quiescent current cause the transconductance and the load impedance of each amplifier circuit to vary, and this in turn results in opposing changes in the input susceptance of each amplifier circuit. Because the changes in input susceptance oppose each other, the changes in quiescent current also oppose each other. The net result is that frequency stability is enhanced.

  11. Cochlear microphonic broad tuning curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayat, Mohammad; Teal, Paul D.; Searchfield, Grant D.; Razali, Najwani

    2015-12-01

    It is known that the cochlear microphonic voltage exhibits much broader tuning than does the basilar membrane motion. The most commonly used explanation for this is that when an electrode is inserted at a particular point inside the scala media, the microphonic potentials of neighbouring hair cells have different phases, leading to cancelation at the electrodes location. In situ recording of functioning outer hair cells (OHCs) for investigating this hypothesis is exceptionally difficult. Therefore, to investigate the discrepancy between the tuning curves of the basilar membrane and those of the cochlear microphonic, and the effect of phase cancellation of adjacent hair cells on the broadness of the cochlear microphonic tuning curves, we use an electromechanical model of the cochlea to devise an experiment. We explore the effect of adjacent hair cells (i.e., longitudinal phase cancellation) on the broadness of the cochlear microphonic tuning curves in different locations. The results of the experiment indicate that active longitudinal coupling (i.e., coupling with active adjacent outer hair cells) only slightly changes the broadness of the CM tuning curves. The results also demonstrate that there is a π phase difference between the potentials produced by the hair bundle and the soma near the place associated with the characteristic frequency based on place-frequency maps (i.e., the best place). We suggest that the transversal phase cancellation (caused by the phase difference between the hair bundle and the soma) plays a far more important role than longitudinal phase cancellation in the broadness of the cochlear microphonic tuning curves. Moreover, by increasing the modelled longitudinal resistance resulting the cochlear microphonic curves exhibiting sharper tuning. The results of the simulations suggest that the passive network of the organ of Corti determines the phase difference between the hair bundle and soma, and hence determines the sharpness of the

  12. Engineering modular and tunable genetic amplifiers for scaling transcriptional signals in cascaded gene networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baojun; Barahona, Mauricio; Buck, Martin

    2014-08-01

    Synthetic biology aims to control and reprogram signal processing pathways within living cells so as to realize repurposed, beneficial applications. Here we report the design and construction of a set of modular and gain-tunable genetic amplifiers in Escherichia coli capable of amplifying a transcriptional signal with wide tunable-gain control in cascaded gene networks. The devices are engineered using orthogonal genetic components (hrpRS, hrpV and PhrpL) from the hrp (hypersensitive response and pathogenicity) gene regulatory network in Pseudomonas syringae. The amplifiers can linearly scale up to 21-fold the transcriptional input with a large output dynamic range, yet not introducing significant time delay or significant noise during signal amplification. The set of genetic amplifiers achieves different gains and input dynamic ranges by varying the expression levels of the underlying ligand-free activator proteins in the device. As their electronic counterparts, these engineered transcriptional amplifiers can act as fundamental building blocks in the design of biological systems by predictably and dynamically modulating transcriptional signal flows to implement advanced intra- and extra-cellular control functions. PMID:25030903

  13. The Use of a Solid State Analog Television Transmitter as a Superconducting Electron Gun Power Amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    J.G. Kulpin, K.J. Kleman, R.A. Legg

    2012-07-01

    A solid state analog television transmitter designed for 200 MHz operation is being commissioned as a radio frequency power amplifier on the Wisconsin superconducting electron gun cavity. The amplifier consists of three separate radio frequency power combiner cabinets and one monitor and control cabinet. The transmitter employs rugged field effect transistors built into one kilowatt drawers that are individually hot swappable at maximum continuous power output. The total combined power of the transmitter system is 33 kW at 200 MHz, output through a standard coaxial transmission line. A low level radio frequency system is employed to digitally synthesize the 200 MHz signal and precisely control amplitude and phase.

  14. Power-Amplifier Module for 145 to 165 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene; Peralta, Alejandro

    2007-01-01

    A power-amplifier module that operates in the frequency range of 145 to 165 GHz has been designed and constructed as a combination of (1) a previously developed monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) power amplifier and (2) a waveguide module. The amplifier chip was needed for driving a high-electron-mobility-transistor (HEMT) frequency doubler. While it was feasible to connect the amplifier and frequency-doubler chips by use of wire bonds, it was found to be much more convenient to test the amplifier and doubler chips separately. To facilitate separate testing, it was decided to package the amplifier and doubler chips in separate waveguide modules. Figure 1 shows the resulting amplifier module. The amplifier chip was described in "MMIC HEMT Power Amplifier for 140 to 170 GHz" (NPO-30127), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 27, No. 11, (November 2003), page 49. To recapitulate: This is a three-stage MMIC power amplifier that utilizes HEMTs as gain elements. The amplifier was originally designed to operate in the frequency range of 140 to 170 GHz. The waveguide module is based on a previously developed lower frequency module, redesigned to support operation in the frequency range of 140 to 220 GHz. Figure 2 presents results of one of several tests of the amplifier module - measurements of output power and gain as functions of input power at an output frequency of 150 GHz. Such an amplifier module has many applications to test equipment for power sources above 100 GHz.

  15. Assembly and maintenance of full scale NIF amplifiers in the amplifier module prototype laboratory (AMPLAB)

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, J. A.

    1998-07-16

    Mechanical assembly and maintenance of the prototype National Ignition Facility amplifiers in the Amplifier Module Prototype Laboratory (AMPLAB) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory requires specialized equipment designed to manipulate large and delicate amplifier components in a safe and clean manner. Observations made during the operation of this assembly and maintenance equipment in AMPLAB provide design guidance for similar tools being built for the National Ignition Facility. Fixtures used for amplifier frame installation, laser slab and flashlamp cassette assembly, transport, and installation, and in-situ blastshield exchange are presented. Examples include a vacuum slab gripper, slab handling clean crane, slab cassette assembly fixture, sealed transport vehicle for slab cassette movement between the cleanroom and amplifier, slab cassette transfer fixture between the cleanroom and transport vehicle, and equipment needed for frame assembly unit, blastshield, an d flashlamp cassette installation and removal. The use of these tools for amplifier assembly, system reconfiguration, reflector replacement, and recovery from an abnormal occurrence such as a flashlamp explosion is described. Observations are made on the design and operation of these tools and their contribution to the final design.

  16. Relative Locality in Curved Spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski-Glikman, Jerzy; Rosati, Giacomo

    2013-07-01

    In this paper we construct the action describing dynamics of the particle moving in curved spacetime, with a nontrivial momentum space geometry. Curved momentum space is the core feature of theories where relative locality effects are present. So far aspects of nonlinearities in momentum space have been studied only for flat or constantly expanding (de Sitter) spacetimes, relying on their maximally symmetric nature. The extension of curved momentum space frameworks to arbitrary spacetime geometries could be relevant for the opportunities to test Planck-scale curvature/deformation of particles momentum space. As a first example of this construction we describe the particle with κ-Poincaré momentum space on a circular orbit in Schwarzschild spacetime, where the contributes of momentum space curvature turn out to be negligible. The analysis of this problem relies crucially on the solution of the soccer ball problem.

  17. Phase nucleation in curved space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Leopoldo; García, Nicolás; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Lorenzana, José; Daniel, Vega

    Nucleation and growth is the dominant relaxation mechanism driving first-order phase transitions. In two-dimensional flat systems, nucleation has been applied to a wide range of problems in physics, chemistry and biology. Here we study nucleation and growth of two-dimensional phases lying on curved surfaces and show that curvature modifies both critical sizes of nuclei and paths towards the equilibrium phase. In curved space, nucleation and growth becomes inherently inhomogeneous and critical nuclei form faster on regions of positive Gaussian curvature. Substrates of varying shape display complex energy landscapes with several geometry-induced local minima, where initially propagating nuclei become stabilized and trapped by the underlying curvature (Gómez, L. R. et al. Phase nucleation in curved space. Nat. Commun. 6:6856 doi: 10.1038/ncomms7856 (2015).).

  18. Tiny biomedical amplifier combines high performance, low power drain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deboo, G. J.

    1965-01-01

    Transistorized, portable, high performance amplifier with low power drain facilitates biomedical studies on mobile subjects. This device, which utilizes a differential input to obtain a common-mode rejection, is used for amplifying electrocardiogram and electromyogram signals.

  19. Matched wideband low-noise amplifiers for radio astronomy.

    PubMed

    Weinreb, S; Bardin, J; Mani, H; Jones, G

    2009-04-01

    Two packaged low noise amplifiers for the 0.3-4 GHz frequency range are described. The amplifiers can be operated at temperatures of 300-4 K and achieve noise temperatures in the 5 K range (<0.1 dB noise figure) at 15 K physical temperature. One amplifier utilizes commercially available, plastic-packaged SiGe transistors for first and second stages; the second amplifier is identical except it utilizes an experimental chip transistor as the first stage. Both amplifiers use resistive feedback to provide input reflection coefficient S11<-10 dB over a decade bandwidth with gain over 30 dB. The amplifiers can be used as rf amplifiers in very low noise radio astronomy systems or as i.f. amplifiers following superconducting mixers operating in the millimeter and submillimeter frequency range. PMID:19405681

  20. Experimental research of a chain of diode pumped rubidium amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunfei; Hua, Weihong; Li, Lei; Wang, Hongyan; Yang, Zining; Xu, Xiaojun

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we have set up a diode pumped rubidium MOPA system with a chain of two amplifiers. The experimental results show an amplified laser power of 26W with amplification factor of 16.3 and power extraction efficiency of 53% for a single amplifier, and an amplified laser power of 11W with amplification factor of 7.9 and power extraction efficiency of 26% for a chain of two amplifiers. The reason for lower performance of cascade amplification is mainly due to the limited total pump power, which will be not sufficient for efficient pumping when assigned from a single amplifier into two amplifiers. The situation could be well improved by increasing the seed laser power as well as the pump power for each amplifier to realize high efficient saturated amplification. Such MOPA configuration has the potential for scaling high beam quality alkali laser into high powers. PMID:26480105

  1. Active particles on curved surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fily, Yaouen; Baskaran, Aparna; Hagan, Michael

    Active systems have proved to be very sensitive to the geometry of their environment. This is often achieved by spending significant time at the boundary, probing its shape by gliding along it. I will discuss coarse graining the microscopic dynamics of self-propelled particles on a general curved surface to predict the way the density profile on the surface depends on its geometry. Beyond confined active particles, this formalism is a natural starting point to study objects that cannot leave the boundary at all, such as cells crawling on a curved substrate, animals running on uneven ground, or active colloids trapped at an interface.

  2. Fitting curves to cyclic data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langbein, W.B.

    1955-01-01

    A common problem in hydrology is to fit a smooth curve to cyclic or periodic data, either to define the most probable values of the data or to test some principle that one wishes to demonstrate.  This study treats of those problems where the length or period of the cycle is know beforehand - as a day, year, or meander length for example.  Curve-fitting can be made by free-hand drawing, and where the data are closely aligned this method offers the simplest and most direct course.  However, there are many problems where the best fit is far from obvious, and analytical methods may be necessary.

  3. Ideal photon number amplifier and duplicator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dariano, G. M.

    1992-01-01

    The photon number-amplification and number-duplication mechanism are analyzed in the ideal case. The search for unitary evolutions leads to consider also a number-deamplification mechanism, the symmetry between amplification and deamplification being broken by the integer-value nature of the number operator. Both transformations, amplification and duplication, need an auxiliary field which, in the case of amplification, turns out to be amplified in the inverse way. Input-output energy conservation is accounted for using a classical pump or through frequency-conversion of the fields. Ignoring one of the fields is equivalent to considering the amplifier as an open system involving entropy production. The Hamiltonians of the ideal devices are given and compared with those of realistic systems.

  4. Solid state radiographic image amplifiers, part C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szepesi, Z.

    1971-01-01

    The contrast sensitivity of the radiographic amplifiers, both the storage type and nonstorage type, their absolute sensitivity, and the reproducibility of fabrication were investigated. The required 2-2T quality level was reached with the radiographic storage screen. The sensitivity threshold was 100 to 200 mR with 45 to 100 kV filtered X-rays. The quality level of the radiographic amplifier screen (without storage) was 4-4T; for a 6 mm (0.25 in.) thick aluminum specimen, a 1 mm (0.040 in.) diameter hole in a 0.25 mm (0.010 in.) thick penetrameter was detected. Its sensitivity threshold was 2 to 6 mR/min. The developed radiographic screens are applicable for uses in nondestructive testing.

  5. High power single-frequency Innoslab amplifier.

    PubMed

    Han, Ke-Zhen; Ning, Jian; Zhang, Bai-Tao; Wang, Yi-Ran; Zhang, Hai-Kun; Nie, Hong-Kun; Sun, Xiao-Li; He, Jing-Liang

    2016-07-10

    A laser diode array (LDA) end-pumped continuous-wave single-frequency Innoslab amplifier has been demonstrated. The Gaussian ray bundle method was used to model the light propagation in the Innoslab amplifier for the first time to the best of our knowledge. With discrete reflectors, the maximum output of 60 W with a linewidth of 44 MHz was achieved under the pump power of 245 W, corresponding to the optical-optical efficiency of 24.5%. The beam quality factor M2 at the output power of 51 W in the horizontal and vertical direction was measured to be 1.4 and 1.3, respectively. The long-term power instability in 2 h was less than 0.25%. PMID:27409308

  6. First Lasing of the Regenerative Amplifier FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.C.; Sheffield, R.L.; Fortang, C.M.; Goldstein, J.C.; Kinross-Wright, J.M.; Ebrahim, N.A.

    1998-08-17

    The Regenerative Amplifier Free-Electron Laser (RAFEL) is a high-gain RF-linac FEL capable of producing high optical power from a compact design. The combination of a high-gain and small optical feedback enables the FEL to reach saturation and produce a high optical power and high extraction efficiency without risk of optical damage to the mirrors. This paper summarizes the first lasing of the Regenerative Amplifier FEL and describes recent experimental results. The highest optical energy achieved thus far at 16.3 {micro}m is 1.7 J over an 9-{micro}s macropulse, corresponding to an average power during the macropulse of 190 kW. They deduce an energy of 1.7 mJ in each 16 ps micropulse, corresponding to a peak power of 110 MW.

  7. Direct solar-pumped iodine laser amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Kwang S.; Kim, K. H.; Stock, L. V.

    1986-01-01

    In order to evaluate the feasibility of the solar pumped dye laser, the parametric study of a dye laser amplifier pumped by a solar simulator and flashlamp was carried out, and the amplifier gains were measured at various pump beam irradiances on the dye cell. Rhodamine 6G was considered as a candidate for the solar pumped laser because of its good utilization of the solar spectrum and high quantum efficiency. The measurement shows that a solar concentration of 20,000 is required to reach the threshold of the dye. The work to construct a kinetic model algorithm which predicts the output parameter of laser was progressed. The kinetic model was improved such that there is good agreement between the theoretical model and experimental data for the systems defined previously as flashlamp pumped laser oscillator, and the long path length solar pumped laser.

  8. Cryogenic cooling for high power laser amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perin, J. P.; Millet, F.; Divoky, M.; Rus, B.

    2013-11-01

    Using DPSSL (Diode Pumped Solid State Lasers) as pumping technology, PW-class lasers with enhanced repetition rates are developed. Each of the Yb YAG amplifiers will be diode-pumped at a wavelength of 940 nm. This is a prerequisite for achieving high repetition rates (light amplification duration 1 millisecond and repetition rate 10 Hz). The efficiency of DPSSL is inversely proportional to the temperature, for this reason the slab amplifier have to be cooled at a temperature in the range of 100 K-170 K with a heat flux of 1 MW*m-2. This paper describes the thermo-mechanical analysis for the design of the amplification laser head, presents a preliminary proposal for the required cryogenic cooling system and finally outlines the gain of cryogenic operation for the efficiency of high pulsed laser.

  9. NEXT Performance Curve Analysis and Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saripalli, Pratik; Cardiff, Eric; Englander, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Performance curves of the NEXT thruster are highly important in determining the thruster's ability in performing towards mission-specific goals. New performance curves are proposed and examined here. The Evolutionary Mission Trajectory Generator (EMTG) is used to verify variations in mission solutions based on both available thruster curves and the new curves generated. Furthermore, variations in BOL and EOL curves are also examined. Mission design results shown here validate the use of EMTG and the new performance curves.

  10. Anterior Overgrowth in Primary Curves, Compensatory Curves and Junctional Segments in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    van Stralen, Marijn; Chu, Winnie C. W.; Lam, Tsz-Ping; Ng, Bobby K. W.; Vincken, Koen L.; Cheng, Jack C. Y.; Castelein, René M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although much attention has been given to the global three-dimensional aspect of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), the accurate three-dimensional morphology of the primary and compensatory curves, as well as the intervening junctional segments, in the scoliotic spine has not been described before. Methods A unique series of 77 AIS patients with high-resolution CT scans of the spine, acquired for surgical planning purposes, were included and compared to 22 healthy controls. Non-idiopathic curves were excluded. Endplate segmentation and local longitudinal axis in endplate plane enabled semi-automatic geometric analysis of the complete three-dimensional morphology of the spine, taking inter-vertebral rotation, intra-vertebral torsion and coronal and sagittal tilt into account. Intraclass correlation coefficients for interobserver reliability were 0.98–1.00. Coronal deviation, axial rotation and the exact length discrepancies in the reconstructed sagittal plane, as defined per vertebra and disc, were analyzed for each primary and compensatory curve as well as for the junctional segments in-between. Results The anterior-posterior difference of spinal length, based on “true” anterior and posterior points on endplates, was +3.8% for thoracic and +9.4% for (thoraco)lumbar curves, while the junctional segments were almost straight. This differed significantly from control group thoracic kyphosis (-4.1%; P<0.001) and lumbar lordosis (+7.8%; P<0.001). For all primary as well as compensatory curves, we observed linear correlations between the coronal Cobb angle, axial rotation and the anterior-posterior length difference (r≥0.729 for thoracic curves; r≥0.485 for (thoraco)lumbar curves). Conclusions Excess anterior length of the spine in AIS has been described as a generalized growth disturbance, causing relative anterior spinal overgrowth. This study is the first to demonstrate that this anterior overgrowth is not a generalized phenomenon. It is

  11. Novel 140 GHz gyro-TWT amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, W.; Kreischer, K.E.; Shapiro, M.; Temkin, R.J.

    1996-12-31

    The authors have designed and are currently building a novel gyro-TWT amplifier at powers up to 100 kW at a frequency of 140 GHz. The electron beam will be provided by an existing MIG electron gun which has been previously used in gyrotron oscillator research at the 100 kW power level at 140 GHz. The gun operates at 65 kV and up to 8A with {nu}{sub {perpendicular}}/{nu}{sub {parallel}} equal to 1.5. The novel wave circuit consists of two facing mirrors with confocal profiles in the transverse direction and flat profiles in the longitudinal direction. The mode is Gaussian-like in the transverse direction. This cavity design effectively reduces the mode competition problem in conventional amplifiers from two dimensions to one dimension. Another advantage of this circuit is the relatively large circuit size, which improves power capacity. Preliminary calculations indicate that the linear gain is about 2.7 dB/cm with an efficiency exceeding 20%. The driver of the Gyro-TWT amplifier is a 95 GHz Varian EIO generator with 100 W peak output power. The amplifier also employs a confocal mode converter which launches a gaussian beam along the axis. The slot size of the cavity is optimized to have minimal operating mode loss while maximizing losses of competing modes. A preliminary experiment using an oscillator configuration has also been designed. The device could easily be scaled to 95 GHz to meet D.O.D. needs at that frequency.

  12. Amplifying youth voices in the developing world.

    PubMed

    Fotenos, Saori; Rohatgi, Deepti

    2007-01-01

    Low-literacy youth in the slums of Brazil have been historically unequipped to share their ideas on how to improve their lives, because outside of the spoken word, it is difficult for them to express their thoughts persuasively. The Amplifying Voices afterschool video program piloted at Projeto Uerê in Rio de Janeiro shows that youth can leverage technological tools to voice their perspectives on social issues relevant to themselves and their communities. PMID:18271053

  13. Radiographic amplifier screens: Fabrication process and characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szepesi, Z. P.

    1977-01-01

    The fabrication process and transfer characteristics for solid state radiographic image transducers (radiographic amplifier screens) is described. These screens were developed for use in real time nondestructive evaluation procedures that require large format radiographic images with contrast and resolution capabilities unavailable with conventional fluoroscopic screens. This work was directed toward screens usable for inmotion, on-line radiographic inspection by means of closed circuit television.

  14. Reconfigurable Josephson Circulator/Directional Amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sliwa, K. M.; Hatridge, M.; Narla, A.; Shankar, S.; Frunzio, L.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Devoret, M. H.

    2015-10-01

    Circulators and directional amplifiers are crucial nonreciprocal signal routing and processing components involved in microwave read-out chains for a variety of applications. They are particularly important in the field of superconducting quantum information, where the devices also need to have minimal photon losses to preserve the quantum coherence of signals. Conventional commercial implementations of each device suffer from losses and are built from very different physical principles, which has led to separate strategies for the construction of their quantum-limited versions. However, as recently theoretically, by establishing simultaneous pairwise conversion and/or gain processes between three modes of a Josephson-junction-based superconducting microwave circuit, it is possible to endow the circuit with the functions of either a phase-preserving directional amplifier or a circulator. Here, we experimentally demonstrate these two modes of operation of the same circuit. Furthermore, in the directional amplifier mode, we show that the noise performance is comparable to standard nondirectional superconducting amplifiers, while in the circulator mode, we show that the sense of circulation is fully reversible. Our device is far simpler in both modes of operation than previous proposals and implementations, requiring only three microwave pumps. It offers the advantage of flexibility, as it can dynamically switch between modes of operation as its pump conditions are changed. Moreover, by demonstrating that a single three-wave process yields nonreciprocal devices with reconfigurable functions, our work breaks the ground for the development of future, more complex directional circuits, and has excellent prospects for on-chip integration.

  15. Phase stabilization of spatiotemporally multiplexed ultrafast amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Mueller, M; Kienel, M; Klenke, A; Eidam, T; Limpert, J; Tünnermann, A

    2016-04-18

    Actively stabilized, simultaneous spatial and temporal coherent beam combination is a promising power-scaling technique for ultrafast laser systems. For a temporal combination based on optical delay lines, multiple stable states of operation arise for common stabilization techniques. A time resolved Jones' calculus is applied to investigate the issue. A mitigation strategy based on a temporally gated error signal acquisition is derived and demonstrated, enabling to stabilize laser systems with arbitrary numbers of amplifier channels and optical delay lines. PMID:27137231

  16. Radiation and particle detector and amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, K. C. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A radiation or charged particle detector is described which incorporates a channel multiplier structure to amplify the detected rays or particles. The channel multiplier structure has a support multiplying element with a longitudinal slot along one side. The element supports a pair of plates positioned contiguous with the slot. The plates funnel the particles or rays to be detected into the slotted aperture and the element, thus creating an effectively wide aperture detector of the windowless type.

  17. Design and simulation of a gyroklystron amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Chauhan, M. S. Swati, M. V.; Jain, P. K.

    2015-03-15

    In the present paper, a design methodology of the gyroklystron amplifier has been described and subsequently used for the design of a typically selected 200 kW, Ka-band, four-cavity gyroklystron amplifier. This conceptual device design has been validated through the 3D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation and nonlinear analysis. Commercially available PIC simulation code “MAGIC” has been used for the electromagnetic study at the different location of the device RF interaction structure for the beam-absent case, i.e., eigenmode study as well as for the electron beam and RF wave interaction behaviour study in the beam present case of the gyroklystron. In addition, a practical problem of misalignment of the RF cavities with drift tubes within the tube has been also investigated and its effect on device performance studied. The analytical and simulation results confirmed the validity of the gyroklystron device design. The PIC simulation results of the present gyroklystron produced a stable RF output power of ∼218 kW for 0% velocity spread at 35 GHz, with ∼45 dB gain, 37% efficiency, and a bandwidth of 0.3% for a 70 kV, 8.2 A gyrating electron beam. The simulated values of RF output power have been found in agreement with the nonlinear analysis results within ∼5%. Further, the PIC simulation has been extended to study a practical problem of misalignment of the cavities axis and drift tube axis of the gyroklystron amplifier and found that the RF output power is more sensitive to misalignments in comparison to the device bandwidth. The present paper, gyroklystron device design, nonlinear analysis, and 3D PIC simulation using commercially available code had been systematically described would be of use to the high-power gyro-amplifier tube designers and research scientists.

  18. Experimental realization of a polariton beam amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemietz, Dominik; Schmutzler, Johannes; Lewandowski, Przemyslaw; Winkler, Karol; Aßmann, Marc; Schumacher, Stefan; Brodbeck, Sebastian; Kamp, Martin; Schneider, Christian; Höfling, Sven; Bayer, Manfred

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we demonstrate a versatile concept for a planar cavity polariton beam amplifier using nonresonant excitation. In contrast to resonant excitation schemes, background carriers are injected which form excitons, providing both gain and a repulsive potential for a polariton condensate. Using an attractive potential environment induced by a locally elongated cavity layer, the repulsive potential of the injected background carriers is compensated, and a significant amplification of polariton beams is achieved without beam distortion.

  19. Multiwatts narrow linewidth fiber Raman amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yan; Taylor, Luke; Bonaccini Calia, Domenico

    2008-07-21

    Up to 4.8 W, approximately 10 MHz, 1178 nm laser is obtained by Raman amplification of a distributed feedback diode laser in standard single mode fibers pumped by an 1120 nm Yb fiber laser. More than 10% efficiency and 27 dB amplification is achieved, limited by onset of stimulated Brillouin scattering. The ratio of Raman to Brillouin gain coefficient of a fiber is identified as a figure of merit for building a narrow linewidth fiber Raman amplifier. PMID:18648406

  20. Amplifier/compressor fiber Raman lasers.

    PubMed

    Islam, M N; Mollenauer, L F; Stolen, R H; Simpson, J R; Shang, H T

    1987-10-01

    We show that the chirp from cross-phase modulation (XPM) dominates the operation of fiber Raman lasers (FRL's). Thus a FRL in the anomalous group-velocity regime is best described as a XPM-chirped Raman amplifier followed by a linear fiber compressor. While the output of such a laser is generally a narrow pulse with a broad pedestal, we show both experimentally and by computer simulation that negligible background is achievable. PMID:19741882

  1. Design and simulation of a gyroklystron amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, M. S.; Swati, M. V.; Jain, P. K.

    2015-03-01

    In the present paper, a design methodology of the gyroklystron amplifier has been described and subsequently used for the design of a typically selected 200 kW, Ka-band, four-cavity gyroklystron amplifier. This conceptual device design has been validated through the 3D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation and nonlinear analysis. Commercially available PIC simulation code "MAGIC" has been used for the electromagnetic study at the different location of the device RF interaction structure for the beam-absent case, i.e., eigenmode study as well as for the electron beam and RF wave interaction behaviour study in the beam present case of the gyroklystron. In addition, a practical problem of misalignment of the RF cavities with drift tubes within the tube has been also investigated and its effect on device performance studied. The analytical and simulation results confirmed the validity of the gyroklystron device design. The PIC simulation results of the present gyroklystron produced a stable RF output power of ˜218 kW for 0% velocity spread at 35 GHz, with ˜45 dB gain, 37% efficiency, and a bandwidth of 0.3% for a 70 kV, 8.2 A gyrating electron beam. The simulated values of RF output power have been found in agreement with the nonlinear analysis results within ˜5%. Further, the PIC simulation has been extended to study a practical problem of misalignment of the cavities axis and drift tube axis of the gyroklystron amplifier and found that the RF output power is more sensitive to misalignments in comparison to the device bandwidth. The present paper, gyroklystron device design, nonlinear analysis, and 3D PIC simulation using commercially available code had been systematically described would be of use to the high-power gyro-amplifier tube designers and research scientists.

  2. Gas amplified ionization detector for gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Huston, Gregg C.

    1992-01-01

    A gas-amplified ionization detector for gas chromatrography which possesses increased sensitivity and a very fast response time. Solutes eluding from a gas chromatographic column are ionized by UV photoionization of matter eluting therefrom. The detector is capable of generating easily measured voltage signals by gas amplification/multiplication of electron products resulting from the UV photoionization of at least a portion of each solute passing through the detector.

  3. Self-amplifying mRNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Brito, Luis A; Kommareddy, Sushma; Maione, Domenico; Uematsu, Yasushi; Giovani, Cinzia; Berlanda Scorza, Francesco; Otten, Gillis R; Yu, Dong; Mandl, Christian W; Mason, Peter W; Dormitzer, Philip R; Ulmer, Jeffrey B; Geall, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    This chapter provides a brief introduction to nucleic acid-based vaccines and recent research in developing self-amplifying mRNA vaccines. These vaccines promise the flexibility of plasmid DNA vaccines with enhanced immunogenicity and safety. The key to realizing the full potential of these vaccines is efficient delivery of nucleic acid to the cytoplasm of a cell, where it can amplify and express the encoded antigenic protein. The hydrophilicity and strong net negative charge of RNA impedes cellular uptake. To overcome this limitation, electrostatic complexation with cationic lipids or polymers and physical delivery using electroporation or ballistic particles to improve cellular uptake has been evaluated. This chapter highlights the rapid progress made in using nonviral delivery systems for RNA-based vaccines. Initial preclinical testing of self-amplifying mRNA vaccines has shown nonviral delivery to be capable of producing potent and robust innate and adaptive immune responses in small animals and nonhuman primates. Historically, the prospect of developing mRNA vaccines was uncertain due to concerns of mRNA instability and the feasibility of large-scale manufacturing. Today, these issues are no longer perceived as barriers in the widespread implementation of the technology. Currently, nonamplifying mRNA vaccines are under investigation in human clinical trials and can be produced at a sufficient quantity and quality to meet regulatory requirements. If the encouraging preclinical data with self-amplifying mRNA vaccines are matched by equivalently positive immunogenicity, potency, and tolerability in human trials, this platform could establish nucleic acid vaccines as a versatile new tool for human immunization. PMID:25620012

  4. Automatic alignment of double optical paths in excimer laser amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dahui; Zhao, Xueqing; Hua, Hengqi; Zhang, Yongsheng; Hu, Yun; Yi, Aiping; Zhao, Jun

    2013-05-01

    A kind of beam automatic alignment method used for double paths amplification in the electron pumped excimer laser system is demonstrated. In this way, the beams from the amplifiers can be transferred along the designated direction and accordingly irradiate on the target with high stabilization and accuracy. However, owing to nonexistence of natural alignment references in excimer laser amplifiers, two cross-hairs structure is used to align the beams. Here, one crosshair put into the input beam is regarded as the near-field reference while the other put into output beam is regarded as the far-field reference. The two cross-hairs are transmitted onto Charge Coupled Devices (CCD) by image-relaying structures separately. The errors between intersection points of two cross-talk images and centroid coordinates of actual beam are recorded automatically and sent to closed loop feedback control mechanism. Negative feedback keeps running until preset accuracy is reached. On the basis of above-mentioned design, the alignment optical path is built and the software is compiled, whereafter the experiment of double paths automatic alignment in electron pumped excimer laser amplifier is carried through. Meanwhile, the related influencing factors and the alignment precision are analyzed. Experimental results indicate that the alignment system can achieve the aiming direction of automatic aligning beams in short time. The analysis shows that the accuracy of alignment system is 0.63μrad and the beam maximum restoration error is 13.75μm. Furthermore, the bigger distance between the two cross-hairs, the higher precision of the system is. Therefore, the automatic alignment system has been used in angular multiplexing excimer Main Oscillation Power Amplification (MOPA) system and can satisfy the requirement of beam alignment precision on the whole.

  5. High power X-band TWT amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Naqvi, S.; Kuang, E.; Kerslick, G.S.; Nation, J.A.; Schaechter, L.

    1995-12-31

    The recent research into multi-stage X-Band TWT`s producing output powers of 100--200 MW has shown that it is essential to minimize the reflections in each stage of the amplifier in order to avoid sideband development. These reflections also cause fluctuations in the RF output power envelope. Following extensive MAGIC code simulations they have designed tapers that adiabatically increase the iris diameter in the output sections of the amplifier to provide a smooth, broad-band transition from the slow-wave structure to cylindrical waveguide. They report results, extracting in the TM{sub 01} mode, showing smooth output pulses in the range 30--50 MW, with no evidence of sidebands. A second approach seeks to isolate the first amplifier stage with a drift tube beyond cutoff. The second stage and output section are quasi-periodic structures designed to minimize reflections, and allow the radial or longitudinal RF power extraction to be distributed over an extended region. The first stage of this system has been developed and initial operation results using an 0.8--1.0 MV, 0.5--1.0 kA, 50 ns cylindrical beam will be reported.

  6. High gain holmium-doped fibre amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Simakov, Nikita; Li, Zhihong; Jung, Yongmin; Daniel, Jae M O; Barua, Pranabesh; Shardlow, Peter C; Liang, Sijing; Sahu, Jayanta K; Hemming, Alexander; Clarkson, W Andrew; Alam, Shaif-Ul; Richardson, David J

    2016-06-27

    We investigate the operation of holmium-doped fibre amplifiers (HDFAs) in the 2.1 µm spectral region. For the first time we demonstrate a diode-pumped HDFA. This amplifier provides a peak gain of 25 dB at 2040 nm with a 15 dB gain window spanning the wavelength range 2030 - 2100 nm with an external noise figure (NF) of 4-6 dB. We also compare the operation of HDFAs when pumped at 1950 nm and 2008 nm. The 1950 nm pumped HDFA provides 41 dB peak gain at 2060 nm with 15 dB of gain spanning the wavelength range 2050 - 2120 nm and an external NF of 7-10 dB. By pumping at the longer wavelength of 2008 nm the gain bandwidth of the amplifier is shifted to longer wavelengths and using this architecture a HDFA was demonstrated with a peak gain of 39 dB at 2090 nm and 15 dB of gain spanning the wavelength range 2050 - 2150 nm. The external NF over this wavelength range was 8-14 dB. PMID:27410557

  7. Direct solar-pumped iodine laser amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Kwang S.; Hwang, In H.; Stock, Larry V.

    1988-01-01

    A XeCl laser which was developed earlier for an iodine laser oscillator was modified in order to increase the output pulse energy of XeCl laser so that the iodine laser output energy could be increased. The electrical circuit of the XeCl laser was changed from a simple capacitor discharge circuit of the XeCl laser to a Marx system. Because of this improvement the output energy from the XeCl laser was increased from 60 mj to 80 mj. Subsequently, iodine laser output energy was increased from 100 mj to 3 mj. On the other hand, the energy storage capability and amplification characteristics of the Vortek solar simulator-pumped amplifier was calculated expecting the calculated amplification factor is about 2 and the energy extraction efficiency is 26 percent due to the very low input energy density to the amplifier. As a result of an improved kinetic modeling for the iodine solar simulator pumped power amplifier, it is found that the I-2 along the axis of the tube affects seriously the gain profile. For the gas i-C3F7I at the higher pressures, the gain will decrease due to the I-2 as the pumping intensity increases, and at these higher pressures an increase in flow velocity will increase the gain.

  8. Sheet beam slow-wave amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Kirolous, H.; Joe, J.; Basten, M.A.; Booske, J.H.; Scharer, J.E.; Anderson, J.; True, R.; Scheitrum, G.

    1994-12-31

    Sheet electron beams used in conjunction with slow-wave (Cerenkov) structures are a promising way to realize higher average power millimeter-wave amplifiers. For example, a sheet beam with a meander line structure is proposed to obtain a 100 watt W-band power booster amplifier. A sheet beam with a tapered grating structure is also being considered as a wideband ({approximately} 10--20% instantaneous bandwidth) Ka-band amplifier with approximately 10 kW of average output power. The authors describe results of research that examine critical technological issues relevant to the realization of the proposed devices. The method of forming a sheet beam using magnetic quadrupole lenses and focusing it using periodically-cusped magnetic (PCM) fields are discussed. A pencil beam from a 10 kV, 0.25 A Pierce electron source is used for the initial investigations. The EGUN simulations with the measured magnetic field indicates that a thin (2 mm dia.) beam is available at the interaction region. Beam characterization has been performed using current density probes and an electrostatic velocity spread analyzer. Numerical modeling and cold test measurements of a tapered slow-wave structure together with the simulations and measurements of small-signal gain and bandwidth are also presented.

  9. High Power 35GHz Gyroklystron Amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jin; McCurdy, A.; Wood, F.; Kyser, R.; Danly, B.; Levush, B.; Parker, R.

    1997-05-01

    High power coherent radiation sources at 35GHz are attractive for next generation high gradient particle accelerators. A multi-cavity gyroklystron amplifier is considered a promising candidate for high power millimeter wave generation. Experiments on two-cavity and three cavity gyroklystron amplifiers are underway to demonstrate a 140kW, 35GHz coherent radiation amplification. Though this power is low compared with that needed for colliders, many of the issues associated with the bandwidth of such devices can be addressed in the present experiments. High bandwidth is important to permit the rapid phase shifts required for RF pulse compression schemes presently under investigation. Large signal calculations (P.E. Latham, W. Lawson, V. Irwin, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci., Vol. 22, No. 5, pp. 804-817, 1994.) predict that the two-cavity gyroklystron produces a peak power of 140kW, corresponding to 33% efficiency. Calculations also show that a stagger tuned three cavity circuit increases a bandwidth to more than 0.7%. Experimental results of the amplifier will be presented and compared with the theory.

  10. 21 CFR 870.2060 - Transducer signal amplifier and conditioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Transducer signal amplifier and conditioner. 870.2060 Section 870.2060 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Transducer signal amplifier and conditioner. (a) Identification. A transducer signal amplifier...

  11. 47 CFR 2.815 - External radio frequency power amplifiers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false External radio frequency power amplifiers. 2... External radio frequency power amplifiers. (a) As used in this part, an external radio frequency power amplifier is any device which, (1) when used in conjunction with a radio transmitter as a signal source...

  12. 21 CFR 882.1835 - Physiological signal amplifier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Physiological signal amplifier. 882.1835 Section 882.1835 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... signal amplifier. (a) Identification. A physiological signal amplifier is a general purpose device...

  13. 21 CFR 870.2050 - Biopotential amplifier and signal conditioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Biopotential amplifier and signal conditioner. 870.2050 Section 870.2050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Biopotential amplifier and signal conditioner. (a) Identification. A biopotential amplifier and...

  14. 47 CFR 2.815 - External radio frequency power amplifiers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false External radio frequency power amplifiers. 2... External radio frequency power amplifiers. (a) As used in this part, an external radio frequency power amplifier is any device which, (1) when used in conjunction with a radio transmitter as a signal source...

  15. 21 CFR 870.2050 - Biopotential amplifier and signal conditioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Biopotential amplifier and signal conditioner. 870.2050 Section 870.2050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Biopotential amplifier and signal conditioner. (a) Identification. A biopotential amplifier and...

  16. 21 CFR 870.2050 - Biopotential amplifier and signal conditioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Biopotential amplifier and signal conditioner. 870.2050 Section 870.2050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Biopotential amplifier and signal conditioner. (a) Identification. A biopotential amplifier and...

  17. 21 CFR 870.2050 - Biopotential amplifier and signal conditioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Biopotential amplifier and signal conditioner. 870.2050 Section 870.2050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Biopotential amplifier and signal conditioner. (a) Identification. A biopotential amplifier and...

  18. 47 CFR 2.815 - External radio frequency power amplifiers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false External radio frequency power amplifiers. 2... External radio frequency power amplifiers. (a) As used in this part, an external radio frequency power amplifier is any device which, (1) when used in conjunction with a radio transmitter as a signal source...

  19. 21 CFR 882.1835 - Physiological signal amplifier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Physiological signal amplifier. 882.1835 Section 882.1835 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... signal amplifier. (a) Identification. A physiological signal amplifier is a general purpose device...

  20. 21 CFR 870.2060 - Transducer signal amplifier and conditioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Transducer signal amplifier and conditioner. 870.2060 Section 870.2060 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Transducer signal amplifier and conditioner. (a) Identification. A transducer signal amplifier...