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Sample records for amplitude collective motion

  1. Rare transition event with self-consistent theory of large-amplitude collective motion

    SciTech Connect

    Tsumura, Kyosuke Maeda, Yoshitaka; Watanabe, Hiroyuki

    2015-06-15

    A numerical simulation method, based on Dang et al.’s self-consistent theory of large-amplitude collective motion, for rare transition events is presented. The method provides a one-dimensional pathway without knowledge of the final configuration, which includes a dynamical effect caused by not only a potential but also kinetic term. Although it is difficult to apply the molecular dynamics simulation to a narrow-gate potential, the method presented is applicable to the case. A toy model with a high-energy barrier and/or the narrow gate shows that while the Dang et al. treatment is unstable for a changing of model parameters, our method stable for it.

  2. Theory of large-amplitude collective motion applied to the structure of 28Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walet, Niels R.; Do Dang, G.; Klein, Abraham

    1991-05-01

    In recent years we have developed a mathematical treatment of large amplitude collective motion in the adiabatic limit and formulated a set of methods, collectively known as the generalized valley approximation, that were applied to the approximate solution of a series of simplified models. In this paper we report the application of one of our algorithms to the study of the nucleus 28Si, our first successful application to a realistic nuclear physics problem. We determine self-consistently a one-dimensional manifold of triaxial Slater determinants that connects the energy minimum of oblate deformation to the prolate minimum. Upon requantization of the implied collective Hamiltonian in the intrinsic frame, reasonable agreement with a shell-model calculation of the low-lying levels is achieved. Application of a theoretical criterion for assessing the quality of decoupling shows that a one-dimensional path is not sufficiently well decoupled in the model studied, thus suggesting one direction for future improvement. We compare our research with the only comparable previous work, that of Pelet and Letourneux.

  3. Microscopic description of large amplitude collective motion in the nuclear astrophysics context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacroix, Denis; Tanimura, Yusuke; Scamps, Guillaume; Simenel, Cédric

    2015-08-01

    In the last 10 years, we have observed an important increase of interest in the application of time-dependent energy density functional (TD-EDF) theory. This approach allows to treat nuclear structure and nuclear reaction from small to large amplitude dynamics in a unified framework. The possibility to perform unrestricted three-dimensional simulations using state-of-the-art effective interactions has opened new perspectives. In the present paper, an overview of applications where the predictive power of TD-EDF has been benchmarked is given. A special emphasize is made on processes that are of astrophysical interest. Illustrations discussed here include giant resonances, fission, binary and ternary collisions leading to fusion, transfer and deep inelastic processes.

  4. Recent progress in the microscopic description of small and large amplitude collective motion

    SciTech Connect

    Lacroix, D. Tanimura, Y.; Ayik, S.; Scamps, G.; Simenel, C.; Yilmaz, B.

    2015-10-15

    Dynamical mean-field theory has recently attracted much interests to provide a unified framework for the description of many aspects of nuclear dynamics [1, 2, 3, 4, 5] (for recent reviews see [6, 7]). In particular, the inclusion of pairing correlation has opened new perspectives [8, 9, 10, 11, 12]. A summary of recent applications including giant resonances and transfer reactions will be made in this talk [13, 14, 15, 16]. While new progresses have been made with the use of sophisticated effective interactions and the development of symmetry unrestricted applications, mean-field dynamics suffer from the poor treatment of quantum fluctuations in collective space. As a consequence, these theories are successful in describing average properties of many different experimental observations but generally fail to account realistically for the width of experimental distribution. The increase of predictive power of dynamical mean-field theory is facing the difficulty of going beyond the independent particle or quasi-particle picture. Nevertheless, in the last decade, novel methods have been proposed to prepare the next generation of microscopic mean-field codes able to account for both average properties and fluctuations around the average. A review of recent progresses in this direction as well as recent applications to heavy-ion collisions will be given [17, 18].

  5. Collective motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicsek, Tamás; Zafeiris, Anna

    2012-08-01

    We review the observations and the basic laws describing the essential aspects of collective motion - being one of the most common and spectacular manifestation of coordinated behavior. Our aim is to provide a balanced discussion of the various facets of this highly multidisciplinary field, including experiments, mathematical methods and models for simulations, so that readers with a variety of background could get both the basics and a broader, more detailed picture of the field. The observations we report on include systems consisting of units ranging from macromolecules through metallic rods and robots to groups of animals and people. Some emphasis is put on models that are simple and realistic enough to reproduce the numerous related observations and are useful for developing concepts for a better understanding of the complexity of systems consisting of many simultaneously moving entities. As such, these models allow the establishing of a few fundamental principles of flocking. In particular, it is demonstrated, that in spite of considerable differences, a number of deep analogies exist between equilibrium statistical physics systems and those made of self-propelled (in most cases living) units. In both cases only a few well defined macroscopic/collective states occur and the transitions between these states follow a similar scenario, involving discontinuity and algebraic divergences.

  6. Stochastic aspects of nuclear large amplitude motion

    SciTech Connect

    Kolomietz, V.M.

    1995-08-01

    A consistent description of the macroscopic large amplitude dynamics and processes of internal excitation of a nucleus is suggested. The cranking model approach is used for the calculation of the response function of the nucleus in a moving frame. Using spectral statistics smearing, the collective mass, friction, and diffusion coefficients are derived. The relation of the response function in a moving frame to the correlation function in a classical chaotic system is established. The rate of dissipation due to the Landau-Zener transitions and through the Kubo mechanism is considered.

  7. Confining collective motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolo, Denis; Bricard, Antoine; Caussin, Jean-Baptiste; Savoie, Charles; Das, Debasish; Chepizhko, Oleskar; Peruani, Fernando; Saintillan, David

    2014-11-01

    It is well established that geometrical confinement have a significant impact on the structure and the flow properties of complex fluids. Prominent examples include the formation of topological defects in liquid crystals, and the flow instabilities of viscoelastic fluids in curved geometries. In striking contrast very little is known about the macroscopic behavior of confined active fluids. In this talk we show how to motorize plastic colloidal beads and turn them into self-propelled particles. Using microfluidic geometries we demonstrate how confinement impacts their collective motion. Combining quantitative experiments, analytical theory and numerical simulations we show how a population of motile bodies interacting via alignement and repulsive interactions self-organizes into a single heterogeneous macroscopic vortex that lives on the verge of a phase separation.

  8. Large-amplitude motion in polymer crystals and mesophases

    SciTech Connect

    Wunderlich, B. |

    1994-12-31

    Large-amplitude motion of macromolecules involves mainly rotation about bonds (conformational motion). In the liquid phases, the large- amplitude motion is coupled with disorder and accounts for the flow and viscoelastic behavior. Perfectly ordered crystals, in contrast, permit only little large-amplitude motion. The mesophases are intermediate in order and mobility. In crystals, large-amplitude motion leads initially to gauche defects and kinks (conformational defects), and ultimately may produce conformationally disordered crystals (conis crystals). Molecular dynamics simulations of crystals with up to 30,000 atoms have been carried out and show the mechanism of defect formation, permit the study of the distribution of defects, and the visualization of hexagonal crystals. Distinction between main-chain liquid-crystalline macromolecules and condis crystals, the two mesophases of polymers, can be done on basis of analysis of phase separation (partial crystallinity), present in condis crystals and not in liquid crystals. Solid state NMR is the tool of choice for detecting mobile and rigid phases. In highly drawn fibers one can find four different states of order and mobility. Besides the (defect) crystalline phase and the isotropic amorphous phase, an intermediate oriented phase and a rigid amorphous phase exists.

  9. Small-amplitude viscous motion on arbitrary potential flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    This paper is concerned with small-amplitude, unsteady, vortical and entropic motion imposed on steady potential flows. It is restricted to the case where the spatial scale of the unsteady motion is small compared to that of the mean flow. Under such conditions, the unsteady motion may be influenced by viscosity even if the mean flow is not. An exact high-frequency (small-wavelength) solution is obtained for the small-amplitude viscous motion imposed on a steady potential flow. It generalizes the one obtained by Pearson (1959) for the homogeneous-strain case to the case of quasi-homogeneous strain. This result is used to study the effect of viscosity on rapidly distorted turbulent flows. Specific numerical results are given for a turbulent flow near a two-dimensional stagnation point.

  10. Collective Motion of Spherical Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Rabani, Amit; Ariel, Gil; Be'er, Avraham

    2013-01-01

    A large variety of motile bacterial species exhibit collective motions while inhabiting liquids or colonizing surfaces. These collective motions are often characterized by coherent dynamic clusters, where hundreds of cells move in correlated whirls and jets. Previously, all species that were known to form such motion had a rod-shaped structure, which enhances the order through steric and hydrodynamic interactions. Here we show that the spherical motile bacteria Serratia marcescens exhibit robust collective dynamics and correlated coherent motion while grown in suspensions. As cells migrate to the upper surface of a drop, they form a monolayer, and move collectively in whirls and jets. At all concentrations, the distribution of the bacterial speed was approximately Rayleigh with an average that depends on concentration in a non-monotonic way. Other dynamical parameters such as vorticity and correlation functions are also analyzed and compared to rod-shaped bacteria from the same strain. Our results demonstrate that self-propelled spherical objects do form complex ordered collective motion. This opens a door for a new perspective on the role of cell aspect ratio and alignment of cells with regards to collective motion in nature. PMID:24376741

  11. Large-amplitude inviscid fluid motion in an accelerating container

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perko, L. M.

    1968-01-01

    Study of dynamic behavior of the liquid-vapor interface of an inviscid fluid in an accelerating cylindrical container includes an analytical-numerical method for determining large amplitude motion. The method is based on the expansion of the velocity potential in a series of harmonic functions with time dependent coefficients.

  12. Optimal Noise Maximizes Collective Motion in Heterogeneous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chepizhko, Oleksandr; Altmann, Eduardo G.; Peruani, Fernando

    2013-06-01

    We study the effect of spatial heterogeneity on the collective motion of self-propelled particles (SPPs). The heterogeneity is modeled as a random distribution of either static or diffusive obstacles, which the SPPs avoid while trying to align their movements. We find that such obstacles have a dramatic effect on the collective dynamics of usual SPP models. In particular, we report about the existence of an optimal (angular) noise amplitude that maximizes collective motion. We also show that while at low obstacle densities the system exhibits long-range order, in strongly heterogeneous media collective motion is quasi-long-range and exists only for noise values in between two critical values, with the system being disordered at both large and low noise amplitudes. Since most real systems have spatial heterogeneities, the finding of an optimal noise intensity has immediate practical and fundamental implications for the design and evolution of collective motion strategies.

  13. Attenuation of ground-motion spectral amplitudes in southeastern Australia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, T.I.; Cummins, P.R.; Dhu, T.; Schneider, J.F.

    2007-01-01

    A dataset comprising some 1200 weak- and strong-motion records from 84 earthquakes is compiled to develop a regional ground-motion model for southeastern Australia (SEA). Events were recorded from 1993 to 2004 and range in size from moment magnitude 2.0 ??? M ??? 4.7. The decay of vertical-component Fourier spectral amplitudes is modeled by trilinear geometrical spreading. The decay of low-frequency spectral amplitudes can be approximated by the coefficient of R-1.3 (where R is hypocentral distance) within 90 km of the seismic source. From approximately 90 to 160 km, we observe a transition zone in which the seismic coda are affected by postcritical reflections from midcrustal and Moho discontinuities. In this hypocentral distance range, geometrical spreading is approximately R+0.1. Beyond 160 km, low-frequency seismic energy attenuates rapidly with source-receiver distance, having a geometrical spreading coefficient of R-1.6. The associated regional seismic-quality factor can be expressed by the polynomial: log Q(f) = 3.66 - 1.44 log f + 0.768 (log f)2 + 0.058 (log f)3 for frequencies 0.78 ??? f ??? 19.9 Hz. Fourier spectral amplitudes, corrected for geometrical spreading and anelastic attenuation, are regressed with M to obtain quadratic source scaling coefficients. Modeled vertical-component displacement spectra fit the observed data well. Amplitude residuals are, on average, relatively small and do not vary with hypocentral distance. Predicted source spectra (i.e., at R = 1 km) are consistent with eastern North American (ENA) Models at low frequencies (f less than approximately 2 Hz) indicating that moment magnitudes calculated for SEA earthquakes are consistent with moment magnitude scales used in ENA over the observed magnitude range. The models presented represent the first spectral ground-motion prediction equations develooed for the southeastern Australian region. This work provides a useful framework for the development of regional ground-motion relations

  14. Collective organization in aerotactic motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazza, Marco G.

    Some bacteria exhibit interesting behavior in the presence of an oxygen concentration. They perform an aerotactic motion along the gradient until they reach their optimal oxygen concentration. But they often organize collectively by forming dense regions, called 'bands', that travel towards the oxygen source. We have developed a model of swimmers with stochastic interaction rules moving in proximity of an air bubble. We perform molecular dynamics simulations and also solve advection-diffusion equations that reproduce the aerotactic behavior of mono-flagellated, facultative anaerobic bacteria. If the oxygen concentration in the system sinks locally below a threshold value, the formation of a migrating aerotactic band toward the bubble can be observed.

  15. Optimality, reduction and collective motion

    PubMed Central

    Justh, Eric W.; Krishnaprasad, P. S.

    2015-01-01

    The planar self-steering particle model of agents in a collective gives rise to dynamics on the N-fold direct product of SE(2), the rigid motion group in the plane. Assuming a connected, undirected graph of interaction between agents, we pose a family of symmetric optimal control problems with a coupling parameter capturing the strength of interactions. The Hamiltonian system associated with the necessary conditions for optimality is reducible to a Lie–Poisson dynamical system possessing interesting structure. In particular, the strong coupling limit reveals additional (hidden) symmetry, beyond the manifest one used in reduction: this enables explicit integration of the dynamics, and demonstrates the presence of a ‘master clock’ that governs all agents to steer identically. For finite coupling strength, we show that special solutions exist with steering controls proportional across the collective. These results suggest that optimality principles may provide a framework for understanding imitative behaviours observed in certain animal aggregations. PMID:27547087

  16. Collective motion in animal groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couzin, Iain

    2004-03-01

    In recent years there has been a growing interest in the relationship between individual behavior and population-level properties in animal groups. One of the fundamental problems is related to spatial scale; how do interactions over a local range result in population properties at larger, averaged, scales, and how can we integrate the properties of aggregates over these scales? Many group-living animals exhibit complex, and coordinated, spatio-temporal patterns which despite their ubiquity and ecological importance are very poorly understood. This is largely due to the difficulties associated with quantifying the motion of, and interactions among, many animals simultaneously. It is on how these behaviors scale to collective behaviors that I will focus here. Using a combined empirical approach (using novel computer vision techniques) and individual-based computer models, I investigate pattern formation in both invertebrate and vertebrate systems, including - Collective memory and self-organized group structure in vertebrate groups (Couzin, I.D., Krause, J., James, R., Ruxton, G.D. & Franks, N.R. (2002) Journal of Theoretical Biology 218, 1-11. (2) Couzin, I.D. & Krause, J. (2003) Advances in the Study of Behavior 32, 1-75. (3) Hoare, D.J., Couzin, I.D. Godin, J.-G. & Krause, J. (2003) Animal Behaviour, in press.) - Self-organized lane formation and optimized traffic flow in army ants (Couzin, I.D. & Franks, N.R. (2003) Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, Series B 270, 139-146) - Leadership and information transfer in flocks, schools and swarms. - Why do hoppers hop? Hopping and the generation of long-range order in some of the largest animal groups in nature, locust hopper bands.

  17. Collective motion from local attraction.

    PubMed

    Strömbom, Daniel

    2011-08-21

    Many animal groups, for example schools of fish or flocks of birds, exhibit complex dynamic patterns while moving cohesively in the same direction. These flocking patterns have been studied using self-propelled particle models, most of which assume that collective motion arises from individuals aligning with their neighbours. Here, we propose a self-propelled particle model in which the only social force between individuals is attraction. We show that this model generates three different phases: swarms, undirected mills and moving aligned groups. By studying our model in the zero noise limit, we show how these phases depend on the relative strength of attraction and individual inertia. Moreover, by restricting the field of vision of the individuals and increasing the degree of noise in the system, we find that the groups generate both directed mills and three dynamically moving, 'rotating chain' structures. A rich diversity of patterns is generated by social attraction alone, which may provide insight into the dynamics of natural flocks. PMID:21620861

  18. Comparison of damping in buildings under low-amplitude and strong motions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Celebi, M.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive assessment of damping values and other dynamic characteristics of five buildings using strong-motion and low-amplitude (ambient vibration) data. The strong-motion dynamic characteristics of five buildings within the San Francisco Bay area are extracted from recordings of the 17 October 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake (LPE). Ambient vibration response characteristics for the same five buildings were inferred using data collected in 1990 following LPE. Additional earthquake data other than LPE for one building and ambient vibration data collected before LPE for two other buildings provide additional confirmation of the results obtained. For each building, the percentages of critical damping and the corresponding fundamental periods determined from low-amplitude test data are appreciably lower than those determined from strong-motion recordings. These differences are attributed mainly to soil-structure interaction and other non-linear behavior affecting the structures during strong shaking. Significant contribution of radiation damping to the effective damping of a specific building is discussed in detail.

  19. Collective motion of microswimmers in viscoelastic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gaojin; Ardekani, Arezoo

    2015-11-01

    The dynamics of suspension of self-propelled microorganisms show fascinating hydrodynamic phenomena, such as, large scale swarming motion, locally correlated motion, enhanced particle diffusion, and enhanced fluid mixing. Even though many studies have been conducted in a Newtonian fluid, the collective motion of microorganisms in non-Newtonian fluids is less understood. The non-Newtonian fluid rheological properties, such as viscoelasticity and shear-dependent viscosity in saliva, mucus and biofilm, significantly affect the swimming properties and hydrodynamic interaction of microorganisms. In this work, we use direct numerical simulation to investigate the collective motion of rod-like swimmers in viscoelastic fluids. Two swimming types, pusher and puller, are investigated. The background viscoelastic fluid is modeled using an Oldroyd-B constitutive equation. This work is supported by NSF CBET-1445955 and Indiana CTSI TR001108.

  20. Emergence of collective motion in bacterial suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Song

    It is well known that bacterial suspensions will exhibit collective motion at high concentrations, in which both steric and hydrodynamic interactions play important roles. We aim to investigate whether steric and hydrodynamic interactions are of equal importance to the emergence of collective motion. Here we will present our efforts to experimentally tune the relative strength of these interactions in bacterial suspensions. Our preliminary results suggest that the transition to collective motion may depend on the interplay between steric and hydrodynamic interactions. Mailing address: Room 306 Science Centre North Block, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T. Hong Kong SAR. Phone: +852-3943-6354. Fax: +852-2603-5204. E-mail: songliuphy@gmail.com.

  1. Locust Collective Motion and Its Modeling.

    PubMed

    Ariel, Gil; Ayali, Amir

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade, technological advances in experimental and animal tracking techniques have motivated a renewed theoretical interest in animal collective motion and, in particular, locust swarming. This review offers a comprehensive biological background followed by comparative analysis of recent models of locust collective motion, in particular locust marching, their settings, and underlying assumptions. We describe a wide range of recent modeling and simulation approaches, from discrete agent-based models of self-propelled particles to continuous models of integro-differential equations, aimed at describing and analyzing the fascinating phenomenon of locust collective motion. These modeling efforts have a dual role: The first views locusts as a quintessential example of animal collective motion. As such, they aim at abstraction and coarse-graining, often utilizing the tools of statistical physics. The second, which originates from a more biological perspective, views locust swarming as a scientific problem of its own exceptional merit. The main goal should, thus, be the analysis and prediction of natural swarm dynamics. We discuss the properties of swarm dynamics using the tools of statistical physics, as well as the implications for laboratory experiments and natural swarms. Finally, we stress the importance of a combined-interdisciplinary, biological-theoretical effort in successfully confronting the challenges that locusts pose at both the theoretical and practical levels. PMID:26656851

  2. Locust Collective Motion and Its Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Ariel, Gil; Ayali, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, technological advances in experimental and animal tracking techniques have motivated a renewed theoretical interest in animal collective motion and, in particular, locust swarming. This review offers a comprehensive biological background followed by comparative analysis of recent models of locust collective motion, in particular locust marching, their settings, and underlying assumptions. We describe a wide range of recent modeling and simulation approaches, from discrete agent-based models of self-propelled particles to continuous models of integro-differential equations, aimed at describing and analyzing the fascinating phenomenon of locust collective motion. These modeling efforts have a dual role: The first views locusts as a quintessential example of animal collective motion. As such, they aim at abstraction and coarse-graining, often utilizing the tools of statistical physics. The second, which originates from a more biological perspective, views locust swarming as a scientific problem of its own exceptional merit. The main goal should, thus, be the analysis and prediction of natural swarm dynamics. We discuss the properties of swarm dynamics using the tools of statistical physics, as well as the implications for laboratory experiments and natural swarms. Finally, we stress the importance of a combined-interdisciplinary, biological-theoretical effort in successfully confronting the challenges that locusts pose at both the theoretical and practical levels. PMID:26656851

  3. Anisotropic collective motion contributes to nuclear spin relaxation in crystalline proteins.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, Józef R; Sein, Julien; Blackledge, Martin; Emsley, Lyndon

    2010-02-01

    A model for calculating the influence of anisotropic collective motions on NMR relaxation rates in crystalline proteins is presented. We show that small-amplitude (<10 degrees ) fluctuations may lead to substantial contributions to the (15)N spin-lattice relaxation rates and propose that the effect of domain motions should be included in solid-state NMR analyses of protein dynamics. PMID:19916496

  4. RW Per - Nodal motion changes its amplitude by 1.4 mag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.; Fried, Robert E.

    1991-01-01

    RW Per was found to have large secular changes in its eclipse amplitude. In blue light, for example, the amplitude was 3.2 mag in the early 1900s, 2.2 mag in the late 1960s, and 1.75 mag in 1990. Throughout this time, the brightness at maximum was constant in all colors. It is shown that the only possible explanation is nodal motion, where the inclination varies with a period of roughly 100,000 yr. The nodal motion is caused by a third star, for which the light curve, the colors, and the O - C curve already provide evidence. Thus, RW Per is only the fourth known star with large changes of eclipse amplitude and is only the second example of nodal motion.

  5. Collective motion in populations of colloidal robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolo, Denis; Bricard, Antoine; Caussin, Jean-Baptiste; Dauchot, Olivier; Desreumaux, Nicolas

    2014-03-01

    Could the behavior of bacteria swarms, fish schools, and bird flocks be understood within a unified framework? Can one ignore the very details of the interaction mechanisms at the individual level to elucidate how strikingly similar collective motion emerges at the group level in this broad range of motile systems? These seemingly provocative questions have triggered significant advance in the physics and the biology, communities over the last decade. In the physics language these systems, made of motile individuals, can all be though as different realizations of ``active matter.'' In this talk, I will show how to gain more insight into this vivid field using self-propelled colloids as a proxy for motile organism. I will show how to motorize colloidal particles capable of sensing the orientation of their neighbors. Then, I will demonstrate that these archetypal populations display spontaneous transitions to swarming motion, and to global directed motion with very few density and orientation fluctuations.

  6. Topological and behavioral disorder in collective motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quint, David

    2014-03-01

    A major underlying assumption in many studies on the collective motion of self-propelled agents has been that the environment is continuous, isotropic and ordered and agents are all identical. In the natural world there are many examples of disordered environments or heterogeneous swarms where collective motion can exist. Examples include bats that navigate natural caverns via echolocation, schools of fish that maneuver through dark and light areas, microbial colonies that move about in heterogeneous soil, quorum sensing bacteria, crowds of people that are evacuating a building and traffic flow in major cities. In general disorder can arise from two basic sources that inhibit/augment both movement and information flow, those that represent physical obstacles (i.e topological), (extrinsic), and those that arise from behavioral heterogeneties within the swarm itself (intrinsic). In either case, extrinsic or intrinsic, disorder can be quenched or dynamic in space or time or both. To understand the effect of the various forms of disorder that can be present in the environment of the agents, we study both discrete and continuous 2 d agent based models that utilize only local interactions and study the transition to the collectively moving state as a function of the amount of disorder or behavioral heterogeneities present in the environment. I will present our recent results and discuss the effect that disorder has on collective motion and the general physical mechanisms that swarms, either real or artificial, could utilize in order to overcome disorder in their environment.

  7. Fault-tolerant quantum cryptographic protocols with collective detection over the collective amplitude damping channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Su, Qi; Li, Yan-Bing; Sun, Ying

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, a quantum key distribution (QKD) protocol, which can be immune to collective amplitude damping noise, is proposed with collective detection strategy. Then a multi-party quantum secret sharing (MQSS) protocol and a quantum private comparison (QPC) protocol are introduced as two applications of the proposed QKD protocol. Except for one participant who is responsible for preparing and measuring quantum states, the rest of the users in each of these protocols only need to perform certain unitary operations due to the utilization of collective detection. Therefore, in addition to the advantage of being secure against collective amplitude damping noise, the proposed protocols still have the advantages of higher qubit efficiency and lower cost for implementation. Moreover, the security of these protocols is guaranteed by theorems on quantum operation discrimination.

  8. Collective motion in populations of colloidal bots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolo, Denis

    One of the origins of active matter physics was the idea that flocks, herds, swarms and shoals could be quantitatively described as emergent ordered phases in self-driven materials. From a somehow dual perspective, I will show how to engineer active materials our of colloidal flocks. I will show how to motorize colloidal particles capable of sensing the orientation of their neighbors and how to handle them in microfluidic chips. These populations of colloidal bots display a non-equilibrium transition toward collective motion. A special attention will be paid to the robustness of the resulting colloidal flocks with respect to geometrical frustration and to quenched disorder.

  9. Casimir invariants for systems undergoing collective motion

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, C. Allen; Byrd, Mark S.; Wu Lianao

    2011-06-15

    Dicke states are an important class of states which exhibit collective behavior in many-body systems. They are interesting because (1) the decay rates of these states can be quite different from a set of independently evolving particles and (2) a particular class of these states are decoherence-free or noiseless with respect to a set of errors. These noiseless states, or more generally subsystems, avoid certain types of errors in quantum-information-processing devices. Here we provide a method for determining a set of transformations of these states which leave the states in their subsystems but still enable them to evolve in particular ways. For subsystems of particles undergoing collective motions, these transformations can be calculated by using essentially the same construction which is used to determine the famous Casimir invariants for quantum systems. Such invariants can be used to determine a complete set of commuting observables for a class of Dicke states as well as to identify possible logical operations for decoherence-free-noiseless subsystems. Our method is quite general and provides results for cases where the constituent particles have more than two internal states.

  10. Complex amplitude correlation for compensation of large in-plane motion in digital speckle pattern interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Svanbro, Angelica; Sjoedahl, Mikael

    2006-12-01

    The use of complex amplitude correlation to compensate for large in-plane motion in digital speckle pattern interferometry is investigated. The result is compared with experiments where digital speckle photography (DSP) is used for compensation. An advantage of using complex amplitude correlation instead of intensity correlation (as in DSP) is that the phase change describing the deformation is retrieved directly from the correlation peak, and there is no need to compensate for the large movement and then use the interferometric algorithms. A discovered drawback of this method is that the correlation values drop quickly if a phase gradient larger than {pi} is present in the subimages used for cross correlation. This means that, for the complex amplitude correlation to be used, the size of the subimages must be well chosen or a third parameter in the cross-correlation algorithm that compensates for the phase variation is needed.Correlation values and wrapped phase maps from the two techniques (intensity and complex amplitude correlation) are presented.

  11. Integrals of motion and semipermeable surfaces to bound the amplitude of a plasma instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neukirch, S.

    2001-03-01

    We study a dissipative dynamical system that models a parametric instability in a plasma. This instability is due to the interaction of a whistler with the ion acoustic wave and a plasma oscillation near the lower hybrid resonance. The amplitude of these three oscillations obey a three-dimensional system of ordinary differential equations which exhibits chaos for certain parameter values. By using certain ``integrability informations'' we have on the system, we get geometrical bounds for its chaotic attractor, leading to an upper bound for its Lyapunov dimension. On the other hand, we also obtain ranges of values of the system's parameters for which there is no chaotic motion.

  12. Integrals of motion and semipermeable surfaces to bound the amplitude of a plasma instability.

    PubMed

    Neukirch, S

    2001-03-01

    We study a dissipative dynamical system that models a parametric instability in a plasma. This instability is due to the interaction of a whistler with the ion acoustic wave and a plasma oscillation near the lower hybrid resonance. The amplitude of these three oscillations obey a three-dimensional system of ordinary differential equations which exhibits chaos for certain parameter values. By using certain "integrability informations" we have on the system, we get geometrical bounds for its chaotic attractor, leading to an upper bound for its Lyapunov dimension. On the other hand, we also obtain ranges of values of the system's parameters for which there is no chaotic motion. PMID:11308736

  13. Aerodynamic and flowfield hysteresis of slender wing aircraft undergoing large-amplitude motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Robert C.; Arena, Andrew S., Jr.; Thompson, Scott A.

    1991-01-01

    The implication of maneuvers through large angles of incidence is discussed by examining the unsteady aerodynamic loads, surface pressures, vortical position, and breakdown on slender, flat plate delta wings. Two examples of large amplitude unsteady motions are presented. First, the unsteady characteristics of a 70 degree swept delta wing undergoing pitch oscillation from 0 to 60 degrees is examined. Data is presented that shows the relationship between vortex breakdown and the overshoot and undershoot of the aerodynamic loads and surface pressure distribution. The second example examines the leading edge vortical flow over an 80 degree swept wing undergoing a limit cycle roll oscillation commonly called wing rock.

  14. Structure of the Small Amplitude Motion on Transversely Sheared Mean Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Marvin E.; Afsar, Mohamed Z.; Leib, Stewart J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper considers the small amplitude unsteady motion of an inviscid non-heat conducting compressible fluid on a transversely sheared mean flow. It extends a previous result given in Goldstein (1978(b) and 1979(a)) which shows that the hydrodynamic component of the motion is determined by two arbitrary convected quantities in the absence of solid surfaces or other external sources. The result is important because it can be used to specify appropriate boundary conditions for unsteady surface interaction problems on transversely sheared mean flows in the same way that the vortical component of the Kovasznay (1953) decomposition is used to specify these conditions for surface interaction problems on uniform mean flows. But unlike the Kovasznay (1953) case the arbitrary convected quantities no longer bear a simple relation to the physical variables. One purpose of this paper is to derive a formula that relates these quantities to the (physically measurable) vorticity and pressure fluctuations in the flow.

  15. Electrocorticographic amplitude predicts finger positions during slow grasping motions of the hand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Soumyadipta; Fifer, Matthew S.; Benz, Heather L.; Crone, Nathan E.; Thakor, Nitish V.

    2010-08-01

    Four human subjects undergoing subdural electrocorticography for epilepsy surgery engaged in a range of finger and hand movements. We observed that the amplitudes of the low-pass filtered electrocorticogram (ECoG), also known as the local motor potential (LMP), over specific peri-Rolandic electrodes were correlated (p < 0.001) with the position of individual fingers as the subjects engaged in slow and deliberate grasping motions. A generalized linear model (GLM) of the LMP amplitudes from those electrodes yielded predictions for positions of the fingers that had a strong congruence with the actual finger positions (correlation coefficient, r; median = 0.51, maximum = 0.91), during displacements of up to 10 cm at the fingertips. For all the subjects, decoding filters trained on data from any given session were remarkably robust in their prediction performance across multiple sessions and days, and were invariant with respect to changes in wrist angle, elbow flexion and hand placement across these sessions (median r = 0.52, maximum r = 0.86). Furthermore, a reasonable prediction accuracy for grasp aperture was achievable with as few as three electrodes in all subjects (median r = 0.49; maximum r = 0.90). These results provide further evidence for the feasibility of robust and practical ECoG-based control of finger movements in upper extremity prosthetics.

  16. Notation Confusion of Symmetry Species for Molecules with Several Large-Amplitude Internal Motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groner, P.

    2011-06-01

    The Mulliken convention has become the standard notation for symmetry species (irreducible representations) of point groups for quasi-rigid molecules. No such convention exists for symmetry species of symmetry groups for semi-rigid or non-rigid molecules with large amplitude internal motions (LAMs). As a result, we have a situation where we create notations in a do-it-yourself fashion or adopt them from the literature, sometimes even without proper reference to its derivation or to the character table on which it is based. This may be just a nuisance for those who are comfortable enough with group theory and molecular symmetry groups to figure "it" out, but it represents a real problem for everybody else. The notation confusion is illustrated with examples from the literature (both old and new) on molecules with two or more LAMs. Most authors use the notation introduced by Myers and Wilson for molecules such as acetone or propane. No universal notation is in use for molecules with two methyl groups but lower overall symmetry. For example, the notation G_1_8 is used for one of these groups. As it turns out, different people use the same notation for different groups. This presentation is an attempt to bring some light into the dark and to combat confusion with a call for an anti-confusion convention. R. S. Mulliken, Phys. Rev. 43, 279 (1933). R. J. Myers, E. B. Wilson, J. Chem. Phys. 33, 186 (1960).

  17. Reducing dynamic disorder in small-molecule organic semiconductors by suppressing large-amplitude thermal motions.

    PubMed

    Illig, Steffen; Eggeman, Alexander S; Troisi, Alessandro; Jiang, Lang; Warwick, Chris; Nikolka, Mark; Schweicher, Guillaume; Yeates, Stephen G; Henri Geerts, Yves; Anthony, John E; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2016-01-01

    Thermal vibrations and the dynamic disorder they create can detrimentally affect the transport properties of van der Waals bonded molecular semiconductors. The low-energy nature of these vibrations makes it difficult to access them experimentally, which is why we still lack clear molecular design rules to control and reduce dynamic disorder. In this study we discuss the promising organic semiconductors rubrene, 2,7-dioctyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b][1]benzothio-phene and 2,9-di-decyl-dinaphtho-[2,3-b:20,30-f]-thieno-[3,2-b]-thiophene in terms of an exceptionally low degree of dynamic disorder. In particular, we analyse diffuse scattering in transmission electron microscopy, to show that small molecules that have their side chains attached along the long axis of their conjugated core are better encapsulated in their crystal structure, which helps reduce large-amplitude thermal motions. Our work provides a general strategy for the design of new classes of very high mobility organic semiconductors with a low degree of dynamic disorder. PMID:26898754

  18. Reducing dynamic disorder in small-molecule organic semiconductors by suppressing large-amplitude thermal motions

    PubMed Central

    Illig, Steffen; Eggeman, Alexander S.; Troisi, Alessandro; Jiang, Lang; Warwick, Chris; Nikolka, Mark; Schweicher, Guillaume; Yeates, Stephen G.; Henri Geerts, Yves; Anthony, John E.; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2016-01-01

    Thermal vibrations and the dynamic disorder they create can detrimentally affect the transport properties of van der Waals bonded molecular semiconductors. The low-energy nature of these vibrations makes it difficult to access them experimentally, which is why we still lack clear molecular design rules to control and reduce dynamic disorder. In this study we discuss the promising organic semiconductors rubrene, 2,7-dioctyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b][1]benzothio-phene and 2,9-di-decyl-dinaphtho-[2,3-b:20,30-f]-thieno-[3,2-b]-thiophene in terms of an exceptionally low degree of dynamic disorder. In particular, we analyse diffuse scattering in transmission electron microscopy, to show that small molecules that have their side chains attached along the long axis of their conjugated core are better encapsulated in their crystal structure, which helps reduce large-amplitude thermal motions. Our work provides a general strategy for the design of new classes of very high mobility organic semiconductors with a low degree of dynamic disorder. PMID:26898754

  19. Reducing dynamic disorder in small-molecule organic semiconductors by suppressing large-amplitude thermal motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illig, Steffen; Eggeman, Alexander S.; Troisi, Alessandro; Jiang, Lang; Warwick, Chris; Nikolka, Mark; Schweicher, Guillaume; Yeates, Stephen G.; Henri Geerts, Yves; Anthony, John E.; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2016-02-01

    Thermal vibrations and the dynamic disorder they create can detrimentally affect the transport properties of van der Waals bonded molecular semiconductors. The low-energy nature of these vibrations makes it difficult to access them experimentally, which is why we still lack clear molecular design rules to control and reduce dynamic disorder. In this study we discuss the promising organic semiconductors rubrene, 2,7-dioctyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b][1]benzothio-phene and 2,9-di-decyl-dinaphtho-[2,3-b:20,30-f]-thieno-[3,2-b]-thiophene in terms of an exceptionally low degree of dynamic disorder. In particular, we analyse diffuse scattering in transmission electron microscopy, to show that small molecules that have their side chains attached along the long axis of their conjugated core are better encapsulated in their crystal structure, which helps reduce large-amplitude thermal motions. Our work provides a general strategy for the design of new classes of very high mobility organic semiconductors with a low degree of dynamic disorder.

  20. Cellular Contraction and Polarization Drive Collective Cellular Motion.

    PubMed

    Notbohm, Jacob; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Utuje, Kazage J C; Gweon, Bomi; Jang, Hwanseok; Park, Yongdoo; Shin, Jennifer; Butler, James P; Fredberg, Jeffrey J; Marchetti, M Cristina

    2016-06-21

    Coordinated motions of close-packed multicellular systems typically generate cooperative packs, swirls, and clusters. These cooperative motions are driven by active cellular forces, but the physical nature of these forces and how they generate collective cellular motion remain poorly understood. Here, we study forces and motions in a confined epithelial monolayer and make two experimental observations: 1) the direction of local cellular motion deviates systematically from the direction of the local traction exerted by each cell upon its substrate; and 2) oscillating waves of cellular motion arise spontaneously. Based on these observations, we propose a theory that connects forces and motions using two internal state variables, one of which generates an effective cellular polarization, and the other, through contractile forces, an effective cellular inertia. In agreement with theoretical predictions, drugs that inhibit contractility reduce both the cellular effective elastic modulus and the frequency of oscillations. Together, theory and experiment provide evidence suggesting that collective cellular motion is driven by at least two internal variables that serve to sustain waves and to polarize local cellular traction in a direction that deviates systematically from local cellular velocity. PMID:27332131

  1. Collective motion in Proteus mirabilis swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haoran, Xu

    Proteus mirabilisis a Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium. It is widely distributed in soil and water, and it is well known for exhibiting swarming motility on nutrient agar surfaces. In our study, we focused on the collective motility of P. mirabilis and uncovered a range of interesting phenomena. Here we will present our efforts to understand these phenomena through experiments and simulation. Mailing address: Room 306 Science Centre North Block, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T. Hong Kong SAR. Phone: +852-3943-6354. Fax: +852-2603-5204. E-mail:xhrphx@gmail.com.

  2. Changes in hydration structure are necessary for collective motions of a multi-domain protein.

    PubMed

    Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2016-01-01

    Conformational motions of proteins are necessary for their functions. To date, experimental studies measuring conformational fluctuations of a whole protein structure have revealed that water molecules hydrating proteins are necessary to induce protein functional motions. However, the underlying microscopic mechanism behind such regulation remains unsolved. To clarify the mechanism, multi-domain proteins are good targets because it is obvious that water molecules between domains play an important role in domain motions. Here, we show how changes in hydration structure microscopically correlate with large-amplitude motions of a multi-domain protein, through molecular dynamics simulation supported by structural analyses and biochemical experiments. We first identified collective domain motions of the protein, which open/close an active-site cleft between domains. The analyses on changes in hydration structure revealed that changes in local hydration in the depth of the cleft are necessary for the domain motion and vice versa. In particular, 'wetting'/'drying' at a hydrophobic pocket and 'adsorption'/'dissociation' of a few water molecules at a hydrophilic crevice in the cleft were induced by dynamic rearrangements of hydrogen-bond networks, and worked as a switch for the domain motions. Our results microscopically demonstrated the importance of hydrogen-bond networks of water molecules in understanding energy landscapes of protein motions. PMID:27193111

  3. Changes in hydration structure are necessary for collective motions of a multi-domain protein

    PubMed Central

    Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2016-01-01

    Conformational motions of proteins are necessary for their functions. To date, experimental studies measuring conformational fluctuations of a whole protein structure have revealed that water molecules hydrating proteins are necessary to induce protein functional motions. However, the underlying microscopic mechanism behind such regulation remains unsolved. To clarify the mechanism, multi-domain proteins are good targets because it is obvious that water molecules between domains play an important role in domain motions. Here, we show how changes in hydration structure microscopically correlate with large-amplitude motions of a multi-domain protein, through molecular dynamics simulation supported by structural analyses and biochemical experiments. We first identified collective domain motions of the protein, which open/close an active-site cleft between domains. The analyses on changes in hydration structure revealed that changes in local hydration in the depth of the cleft are necessary for the domain motion and vice versa. In particular, ‘wetting’/‘drying’ at a hydrophobic pocket and ‘adsorption’/‘dissociation’ of a few water molecules at a hydrophilic crevice in the cleft were induced by dynamic rearrangements of hydrogen-bond networks, and worked as a switch for the domain motions. Our results microscopically demonstrated the importance of hydrogen-bond networks of water molecules in understanding energy landscapes of protein motions. PMID:27193111

  4. Predatory fish select for coordinated collective motion in virtual prey.

    PubMed

    Ioannou, C C; Guttal, V; Couzin, I D

    2012-09-01

    Movement in animal groups is highly varied and ranges from seemingly disordered motion in swarms to coordinated aligned motion in flocks and schools. These social interactions are often thought to reduce risk from predators, despite a lack of direct evidence. We investigated risk-related selection for collective motion by allowing real predators (bluegill sunfish) to hunt mobile virtual prey. By fusing simulated and real animal behavior, we isolated predator effects while controlling for confounding factors. Prey with a tendency to be attracted toward, and to align direction of travel with, near neighbors tended to form mobile coordinated groups and were rarely attacked. These results demonstrate that collective motion could evolve as a response to predation, without prey being able to detect and respond to predators. PMID:22903520

  5. Correlation properties of collective motion in bacterial suspensions

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Shawn D.; Sokolov, Andrey; Berlyand, Leonid; Aranson, Igor. S.

    2013-01-01

    The study of collective motion in bacterial suspensions has been of significant recent interest. To better understand the non-trivial spatio-temporal correlations emerging in the course of collective swimming in suspensions of motile bacteria, a simple model is employed: a bacterium is represented as a force dipole with size, through the use of a short-range repelling potential, and shape. The model emphasizes two fundamental mechanisms: dipolar hydrodynamic interactions and short-range bacterial collisions. Using direct particle simulations validated by a dedicated experiment, we show that changing the swimming speed or concentration alters the time scale of sustained collective motion, consistent with experiment. Also, the correlation length in the collective state is almost constant as concentration and swimming speed change even though increasing each greatly increases the input of energy to the system. We demonstrate that the particle shape is critical for the onset of collective effects. In addition, new experimental results are presented illustrating the onset of collective motion with an ultrasound technique. This work exemplifies the delicate balance between various physical mechanisms governing collective motion in bacterial suspensions and provides important insights into its mesoscopic nature. PMID:24391445

  6. A Turing test for collective motion

    PubMed Central

    Herbert-Read, J. E.; Romenskyy, M.; Sumpter, D. J. T.

    2015-01-01

    A widespread problem in biological research is assessing whether a model adequately describes some real-world data. But even if a model captures the large-scale statistical properties of the data, should we be satisfied with it? We developed a method, inspired by Alan Turing, to assess the effectiveness of model fitting. We first built a self-propelled particle model whose properties (order and cohesion) statistically matched those of real fish schools. We then asked members of the public to play an online game (a modified Turing test) in which they attempted to distinguish between the movements of real fish schools or those generated by the model. Even though the statistical properties of the real data and the model were consistent with each other, the public could still distinguish between the two, highlighting the need for model refinement. Our results demonstrate that we can use ‘citizen science’ to cross-validate and improve model fitting not only in the field of collective behaviour, but also across a broad range of biological systems. PMID:26631244

  7. A Turing test for collective motion.

    PubMed

    Herbert-Read, J E; Romenskyy, M; Sumpter, D J T

    2015-12-01

    A widespread problem in biological research is assessing whether a model adequately describes some real-world data. But even if a model captures the large-scale statistical properties of the data, should we be satisfied with it? We developed a method, inspired by Alan Turing, to assess the effectiveness of model fitting. We first built a self-propelled particle model whose properties (order and cohesion) statistically matched those of real fish schools. We then asked members of the public to play an online game (a modified Turing test) in which they attempted to distinguish between the movements of real fish schools or those generated by the model. Even though the statistical properties of the real data and the model were consistent with each other, the public could still distinguish between the two, highlighting the need for model refinement. Our results demonstrate that we can use 'citizen science' to cross-validate and improve model fitting not only in the field of collective behaviour, but also across a broad range of biological systems. PMID:26631244

  8. Arbitrated quantum signature of classical messages against collective amplitude damping noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yu-Guang; Wen, Qiao-Yan

    2010-08-01

    We give an arbitrated signature protocol of classical messages over a collective amplitude damping channel. We analyze its security and prove that it is secure over such a noisy quantum channel even if the arbitrator is compromised. The involvement of the arbitrator is also an appealing advantage in the implementation of a practical quantum distributed communication network.

  9. Depletion force induced collective motion of microtubules driven by kinesin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Daisuke; Mahmot, Bulbul; Kabir, Arif Md. Rashedul; Farhana, Tamanna Ishrat; Tokuraku, Kiyotaka; Sada, Kazuki; Konagaya, Akihiko; Kakugo, Akira

    2015-10-01

    Collective motion is a fascinating example of coordinated behavior of self-propelled objects, which is often associated with the formation of large scale patterns. Nowadays, the in vitro gliding assay is being considered a model system to experimentally investigate various aspects of group behavior and pattern formation by self-propelled objects. In the in vitro gliding assay, cytoskeletal filaments F-actin or microtubules are driven by the surface immobilized associated biomolecular motors myosin or dynein respectively. Although the F-actin/myosin or microtubule/dynein system was found to be promising in understanding the collective motion and pattern formation by self-propelled objects, the most widely used biomolecular motor system microtubule/kinesin could not be successfully employed so far in this regard. Failure in exhibiting collective motion by kinesin driven microtubules is attributed to the intrinsic properties of kinesin, which was speculated to affect the behavior of individual gliding microtubules and mutual interactions among them. In this work, for the first time, we have demonstrated the collective motion of kinesin driven microtubules by regulating the mutual interaction among the gliding microtubules, by employing a depletion force among them. Proper regulation of the mutual interaction among the gliding microtubules through the employment of the depletion force was found to allow the exhibition of collective motion and stream pattern formation by the microtubules. This work offers a universal means for demonstrating the collective motion using the in vitro gliding assay of biomolecular motor systems and will help obtain a meticulous understanding of the fascinating coordinated behavior and pattern formation by self-propelled objects.Collective motion is a fascinating example of coordinated behavior of self-propelled objects, which is often associated with the formation of large scale patterns. Nowadays, the in vitro gliding assay is being

  10. Depletion force induced collective motion of microtubules driven by kinesin.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Daisuke; Mahmot, Bulbul; Kabir, Arif Md Rashedul; Farhana, Tamanna Ishrat; Tokuraku, Kiyotaka; Sada, Kazuki; Konagaya, Akihiko; Kakugo, Akira

    2015-11-21

    Collective motion is a fascinating example of coordinated behavior of self-propelled objects, which is often associated with the formation of large scale patterns. Nowadays, the in vitro gliding assay is being considered a model system to experimentally investigate various aspects of group behavior and pattern formation by self-propelled objects. In the in vitro gliding assay, cytoskeletal filaments F-actin or microtubules are driven by the surface immobilized associated biomolecular motors myosin or dynein respectively. Although the F-actin/myosin or microtubule/dynein system was found to be promising in understanding the collective motion and pattern formation by self-propelled objects, the most widely used biomolecular motor system microtubule/kinesin could not be successfully employed so far in this regard. Failure in exhibiting collective motion by kinesin driven microtubules is attributed to the intrinsic properties of kinesin, which was speculated to affect the behavior of individual gliding microtubules and mutual interactions among them. In this work, for the first time, we have demonstrated the collective motion of kinesin driven microtubules by regulating the mutual interaction among the gliding microtubules, by employing a depletion force among them. Proper regulation of the mutual interaction among the gliding microtubules through the employment of the depletion force was found to allow the exhibition of collective motion and stream pattern formation by the microtubules. This work offers a universal means for demonstrating the collective motion using the in vitro gliding assay of biomolecular motor systems and will help obtain a meticulous understanding of the fascinating coordinated behavior and pattern formation by self-propelled objects. PMID:26260025

  11. Station-keeping of small amplitude motions around the collinear libration point in the real Earth-Moon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Xiyun; Liu, Lin; Tang, Jingshi

    2011-04-01

    Compared with the circular restricted three-body problem, various perturbations exist in the real Earth-Moon system. Out of them, the ones from the Moon's orbit eccentricity and the Sun are the most prominent. For mission design around the collinear libration points in this system, these two perturbations should be taken into consideration. In fact, the collinear libration points are not equilibrium points anymore due to these perturbations. Instead, special quasi-periodic orbits called dynamical substitutes around them exist, playing the role of time-varying equilibrium points. Generally, these dynamical substitutes are unstable, thus station-keeping is necessary for probes around them. In the paper, a short description of the dynamical properties of these dynamical substitutes was made. Then two station-keeping strategies were proposed for small amplitude motions around them. The first strategy has no requirements on the motion amplitude in the x-y plane while the second one has. Taking the point L2 as an example, some numerical simulations were made. Motions with amplitude of 380 km and 3800 km were studied. It turns out that the cost of the two station-keeping strategies increases with increasing amplitude. Besides, the second strategy generally costs more than the first one.

  12. Amplitude equations for collective spatio-temporal dynamics in arrays of coupled systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yanchuk, S.; Wolfrum, M.; Perlikowski, P.; Stefański, A.; Kapitaniak, T.

    2015-03-15

    We study the coupling induced destabilization in an array of identical oscillators coupled in a ring structure where the number of oscillators in the ring is large. The coupling structure includes different types of interactions with several next neighbors. We derive an amplitude equation of Ginzburg-Landau type, which describes the destabilization of a uniform stationary state and close-by solutions in the limit of a large number of nodes. Studying numerically an example of unidirectionally coupled Duffing oscillators, we observe a coupling induced transition to collective spatio-temporal chaos, which can be understood using the derived amplitude equations.

  13. The proton-neutron symplectic model of nuclear collective motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganev, H. G.

    2016-06-01

    The proton-neutron symplectic model of nuclear collective motion is presented. It is shown that it appears as a natural multi-major-shell extension of the generalized proton- neutron SU(3) scheme which includes rotations with intrinsic vortex as well as monopole, quadrupole and dipole giant resonance vibrational degrees of freedom.

  14. New vibration-rotation code for tetraatomic molecules exhibiting wide-amplitude motion: WAVR4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozin, Igor N.; Law, Mark M.; Tennyson, Jonathan; Hutson, Jeremy M.

    2004-11-01

    A general computational method for the accurate calculation of rotationally and vibrationally excited states of tetraatomic molecules is developed. The resulting program is particularly appropriate for molecules executing wide-amplitude motions and isomerizations. The program offers a choice of coordinate systems based on Radau, Jacobi, diatom-diatom and orthogonal satellite vectors. The method includes all six vibrational dimensions plus three rotational dimensions. Vibration-rotation calculations with reduced dimensionality in the radial degrees of freedom are easily tackled via constraints imposed on the radial coordinates via the input file. Program summaryTitle of program: WAVR4 Catalogue number: ADUN Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADUN Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Persons requesting the program must sign the standard CPC nonprofit use license Computer: Developed under Tru64 UNIX, ported to Microsoft Windows and Sun Unix Operating systems under which the program has been tested: Tru64 Unix, Microsoft Windows, Sun Unix Programming language used: Fortran 90 Memory required to execute with typical data: case dependent No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 11 937 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 84 770 Distribution format: tar.gz Nature of physical problem: WAVR4 calculates the bound ro-vibrational levels and wavefunctions of a tetraatomic system using body-fixed coordinates based on generalised orthogonal vectors. Method of solution: The angular coordinates are treated using a finite basis representation (FBR) based on products of spherical harmonics. A discrete variable representation (DVR) [1] based on either Morse-oscillator-like or spherical-oscillator functions [2] is used for the radial coordinates. Matrix elements are computed using an efficient Gaussian quadrature in the angular coordinates and

  15. Emergence of collective motion in suspensions of swimming cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roffin, Maria Chiara; Denissenko, Petr; Kantsler, Vasily

    2015-11-01

    Collective motion is one of the most fascinating manifestations of self-organization in non-equilibrium systems. The phenomena emerges with the increase in concentration of motile individuals ranging from molecular motors to large animals like fish and humans. We have studied the suspension of swimming sperm cells in a microfluidic device which gradually concentrates motile cells in the region of interest. The onset of collective motion is identified by investigating correlations of fluid velocity and image brightness associated with the cell orientation. Cell concentration and the noise parameter are varied to switch on/off the collective interaction. The level of noise is controlled by adjusting the cell motility which depends on the temperature in the microfluidic chip. Fluid velocity is measured by tracing passive fluorescent beads in the suspension.

  16. Trend-Centric Motion Visualization: Designing and Applying a New Strategy for Analyzing Scientific Motion Collections.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, David; Korsakov, Fedor; Knipe, Carissa Mai-Ping; Thorson, Lauren; Ellingson, Arin M; Nuckley, David; Carlis, John; Keefe, Daniel F

    2014-12-01

    In biomechanics studies, researchers collect, via experiments or simulations, datasets with hundreds or thousands of trials, each describing the same type of motion (e.g., a neck flexion-extension exercise) but under different conditions (e.g., different patients, different disease states, pre- and post-treatment). Analyzing similarities and differences across all of the trials in these collections is a major challenge. Visualizing a single trial at a time does not work, and the typical alternative of juxtaposing multiple trials in a single visual display leads to complex, difficult-to-interpret visualizations. We address this problem via a new strategy that organizes the analysis around motion trends rather than trials. This new strategy matches the cognitive approach that scientists would like to take when analyzing motion collections. We introduce several technical innovations making trend-centric motion visualization possible. First, an algorithm detects a motion collection's trends via time-dependent clustering. Second, a 2D graphical technique visualizes how trials leave and join trends. Third, a 3D graphical technique, using a median 3D motion plus a visual variance indicator, visualizes the biomechanics of the set of trials within each trend. These innovations are combined to create an interactive exploratory visualization tool, which we designed through an iterative process in collaboration with both domain scientists and a traditionally-trained graphic designer. We report on insights generated during this design process and demonstrate the tool's effectiveness via a validation study with synthetic data and feedback from expert musculoskeletal biomechanics researchers who used the tool to analyze the effects of disc degeneration on human spinal kinematics. PMID:26356978

  17. Station-keeping of small amplitude motions around the collinear libration point in the real earth-moon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Xiyun; Liu, Lin; Tang, Jingshi

    Compared with the Circular Restricted Three-Body Problem (CRTBP), two kinds of perturbations exist in the real earth-moon system. The first kind comes from the moon's orbit eccentricity. The second kind comes from gravitational perturbations of other major bodies besides the earth and the moon in the solar system. If only the first kind of perturbations is considered, the collinear libration points are still equilibrium points. But when the second kind of perturbations comes into consideration, the collinear libration point can not retain the dynamical meaning as equilibrium points anymore. Nevertheless, as with the case of triangular libration points, a special quasi-periodic orbit called dynamical substitute exists. This special quasi-periodic orbit takes the place of the original collinear libration point. The amplitude of the dynamical substitute is very small, of the magnitude 10-6 for the point L1 , 10-5 for the point L2 and 10-3 for the point L3 . Here "amplitude" means the maximum distance between the dynamical substitute and the collinear libration point, and the length unit is the mean distance between the earth and the moon. Linearized motions around the dynamical substitute can be described by quasi-periodic linear differential equations. Quasi-Floquet theory can be used to analyze these equations. Studies show that the dynamical substitute is unstable, but with central manifolds around it. Due to the instability, station-keeping is necessary for spacecrafts around the collinear libration points. For small amplitude motions around the collinear libration point, a station-keeping strategy is proposed. Usually, the uncontrolled motion consists of two components: the unstable one and the central one. Since the amplitude is small, the linearized results above can be used to distinguish the unstable component from the central one. At regular time intervals, a maneuvering is done to cancel the unstable component, leaving the central component unchanged. By

  18. Coupling spin to velocity: collective motion of Hamiltonian polar particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Løland Bore, Sigbjørn; Schindler, Michael; Nguyen Thu Lam, Khanh-Dang; Bertin, Eric; Dauchot, Olivier

    2016-03-01

    We propose a conservative two-dimensional particle model in which particles carry a continuous and classical spin. The model includes standard ferromagnetic interactions between spins of two different particles, and a nonstandard coupling between spin and velocity of the same particle inspired by the coupling observed in self-propelled hard discs. Because of this coupling Galilean invariance is broken and the conserved linear momentum associated to translation invariance is not proportional to the velocity of the center of mass. Also, the dynamics is not invariant under a global rotation of the spins alone. This, in principle, leaves room for collective motion and thus raises the question whether collective motion can arise in Hamiltonian systems. We study the statistical mechanics of such a system, and show that, in the fully connected (or mean-field) case, a transition to collective motion does exist in spite of momentum conservation. Interestingly, the velocity of the center of mass, which in the absence of Galilean invariance, is a relevant variable, also feeds back on the magnetization properties, as it acts as an external magnetic field that smoothens the transition. Molecular dynamics simulations of finite size systems indeed reveal a rich phase diagram, with a transition from a disordered to a homogeneous polar phase, but also more complex inhomogeneous phases with local order interrupted by topological defects.

  19. Satellite Motion Effects on Current Collection in Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, T. X.; Hwang, K. S.; Wu, S. T.; Stone, N. H.; Chang, C. L.; Drobot, A.; Wright, K. H., Jr.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Results from the Tethered Satellite System (TSS) missions unambiguously show that the electrodynamic tether system produced 2 to 3 times the predicted current levels in the tether. The pre-mission predictions were based on the well-known Parker-Murphy (PM) model, which describes the collection of current by an electrically biased satellite in the ionospheric plasma. How the TSS satellite was able to collect 2-3 times the PM current has remained an open question. In the present study, self-consistent potential and motional effects are introduced into the Thompson and Dobrowolny sheath models. As a result, the magnetic field aligned sheath-an essential variable in determining current collection by a satellite-is derived and is shown to be explicitly velocity dependent. The orientation of the satellite's orbital motion relative to the geomagnetic field is also considered in the derivation and a velocity dependent expression for the collected current is obtained. The resulting model provides a realistic treatment of current collection by a satellite in low earth orbit. Moreover, the predictions, using the appropriate parameters for TSS, are in good agreement with the tether currents measured during the TSS-1R mission.

  20. Evidence of Protein Collective Motions on the Picosecond Timescale

    PubMed Central

    He, Yunfen; Chen, J.-Y.; Knab, J.R.; Zheng, Wenjun; Markelz, A.G.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the presence of structural collective motions on a picosecond timescale for the heme protein, cytochrome c, as a function of oxidation and hydration, using terahertz (THz) time domain spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. The THz response dramatically increases with oxidation, with the largest increase for lowest hydrations, and highest frequencies. For both oxidation states the THz response rapidly increases with hydration saturating above ∼25% (g H2O/g protein). Quasiharmonic vibrational modes and dipole-dipole correlation functions were calculated from molecular dynamics trajectories. The collective mode density of states alone reproduces the measured hydration dependence, providing strong evidence of the existence of these motions. The large oxidation dependence is reproduced only by the dipole-dipole correlation function, indicating the contrast arises from diffusive motions consistent with structural changes occurring in the vicinity of buried internal water molecules. This source for the observed oxidation dependence is consistent with the lack of an oxidation dependence in nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy measurements. PMID:21320451

  1. Directed collective motion of bacteria under channel confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wioland, H.; Lushi, E.; Goldstein, R. E.

    2016-07-01

    Dense suspensions of swimming bacteria are known to exhibit collective behaviour arising from the interplay of steric and hydrodynamic interactions. Unconfined suspensions exhibit transient, recurring vortices and jets, whereas those confined in circular domains may exhibit order in the form of a spiral vortex. Here we show that confinement into a long and narrow macroscopic ‘racetrack’ geometry stabilises bacterial motion to form a steady unidirectional circulation. This motion is reproduced in simulations of discrete swimmers that reveal the crucial role that bacteria-driven fluid flows play in the dynamics. In particular, cells close to the channel wall produce strong flows which advect cells in the bulk against their swimming direction. We examine in detail the transition from a disordered state to persistent directed motion as a function of the channel width, and show that the width at the crossover point is comparable to the typical correlation length of swirls seen in the unbounded system. Our results shed light on the mechanisms driving the collective behaviour of bacteria and other active matter systems, and stress the importance of the ubiquitous boundaries found in natural habitats.

  2. Collective motion of binary self-propelled particle mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, Andreas M.

    2012-02-01

    In this study, we investigate the phenomenon of collective motion in binary mixtures of self-propelled particles. More precisely, we consider two particle species, each of which consisting of pointlike objects that propel with a velocity of constant magnitude. Within each species, the particles try to achieve polar alignment of their velocity vectors, whereas we analyze the cases of preferred polar, antiparallel, as well as perpendicular alignment between particles of different species. Our focus is on the effect that the interplay between the two species has on the threshold densities for the onset of collective motion and on the nature of the solutions above onset. For this purpose, we start from suitable Langevin equations in the particle picture, from which we derive mean field equations of the Fokker-Planck type and finally macroscopic continuum field equations. We perform particle simulations of the Langevin equations and linear stability analyses of the Fokker-Planck and macroscopic continuum equations, and we numerically solve the Fokker-Planck equations. Both spatially homogeneous and inhomogeneous solutions are investigated, where the latter correspond to stripelike flocks of collectively moving particles. In general, the interaction between the two species reduces the threshold density for the onset of collective motion of each species. However, this interaction also reduces the spatial organization in the stripelike flocks. The case that shows the most interesting behavior is the one of preferred perpendicular alignment between different species. There a competition between polar and truly nematic orientational ordering of the velocity vectors takes place within each particle species. Finally, depending on the alignment rule for particles of different species and within certain ranges of particle densities, identical and inverted spatial density profiles can be found for the two particle species. The system under investigation is confined to two spatial

  3. Step Coalescence by Collective Motion at an Incommensurate Grain Boundary.

    PubMed

    Bowers, M L; Ophus, C; Gautam, A; Lançon, F; Dahmen, U

    2016-03-11

    Using extended time series scanning transmission electron microscopy, we investigate structural fluctuations at an incommensurate grain boundary in Au. Atomic-resolution imaging reveals the coalescence of two interfacial steps, or disconnections, of different height via coordinated motion of atoms along close-packed directions. Numerical simulations uncover a transition pathway that involves constriction and expansion of a characteristic stacking fault often associated with grain boundaries in face-centered cubic materials. It is found that local atomic fluctuations by enhanced point defect diffusion may play a critical role in initiating this transition. Our results offer new insights into the collective motion of atoms underlying the lateral advance of steps that control the migration of faceted grain boundaries. PMID:27015493

  4. Modelling the emergence of coordinated collective motion by minimizing dissatisfaction.

    PubMed

    Quera, Vicenç; Beltran, Francesc S; Gimeno, Elisabet

    2016-01-01

    Coordinated collective motion (CCM) has been recently studied using agent-based simulations by applying three behavioural rules: repulsion, attraction and alignment. But these rules are so similar to the expected group behaviour that it can hardly be labelled emergent. We developed an agent-based model that produces CCM using a set of low-level dyadic interaction rules. The agents change their positions with regard to other agents in order to minimize their own dissatisfaction with their inter-individual distances. To test the emergence of CCM, several simulation experiments were performed. The results show that the agents were able to achieve CCM after a few thousand time steps, and that the bigger the area perceived by them, the more coordinated and cohesive the group motion became. An increased memory span and capacity to remember other agents' identities improved cohesion and coordination. The relationship with biological referents is discussed. PMID:26626359

  5. Dynamics of essential collective motions in proteins: Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanova, Maria

    2007-11-01

    A general theoretical background is introduced for characterization of conformational motions in protein molecules, and for building reduced coarse-grained models of proteins, based on the statistical analysis of their phase trajectories. Using the projection operator technique, a system of coupled generalized Langevin equations is derived for essential collective coordinates, which are generated by principal component analysis of molecular dynamic trajectories. The number of essential degrees of freedom is not limited in the theory. An explicit analytic relation is established between the generalized Langevin equation for essential collective coordinates and that for the all-atom phase trajectory projected onto the subspace of essential collective degrees of freedom. The theory introduced is applied to identify correlated dynamic domains in a macromolecule and to construct coarse-grained models representing the conformational motions in a protein through a few interacting domains embedded in a dissipative medium. A rigorous theoretical background is provided for identification of dynamic correlated domains in a macromolecule. Examples of domain identification in protein G are given and employed to interpret NMR experiments. Challenges and potential outcomes of the theory are discussed.

  6. Effect of structural setting on blast-induced azimuthal velocities and amplitude of ground motions in perlite

    SciTech Connect

    Aimone-Martin, C.T.; Beattie, S.G.

    1996-12-01

    A series of small scale explosive tests were performed at a perlite mine near Socorro, New Mexico. The tests were designed to investigate the azimuthal or directional relationship between small scale geologic structures such as joints and the propagation of explosively-induced ground motions. Three shots were initiated within a single borehole located at ground zero at depths varying from 83 m to 10 m. An array of three component velocity and acceleration transducers were placed in two concentric rings at distances of 20 m and 40 m surrounding the single hole at 7.5{degree}, 15{degree}, and 30{degree} azimuths as measured from ground zero. Data from the transducers were then used to determine the average propagation velocity and waveform characteristics of the blast vibration through the rock mass at the various azimuths. The rock mass was mapped to determine the predominate joint orientations (strike and dip) and the average propagation velocities were correlated with this geologic information. The results showed that there is a correlation between the predominate joint orientation and ground motion amplitudes and velocity. The more predominate geologic structures allow the wave to follow along their strike thereby forming a planar path of least resistance and in turn, allowing higher velocities and amplitudes. Secondary joints or structures may act in concert with more prominent features to form a network of channels or paths along which the wave moves more freely than it may when traveling against the structures. The greatest azimuthal variations in velocity and amplitude was observed for the shallow shot at 10 m depth.

  7. Large-amplitude quadrupole collective dynamics of shape coexistence phenomena in proton-rich Se and Kr isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Hinohara, Nobuo; Nakatsukasa, Takashi; Sato, Koichi; Matsuo, Masayuki

    2010-06-01

    The five-dimensional quadrupole collective Hamiltonian for large-amplitude collective dynamics is microscopically constructed by the constrained Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (CHFB) method and local quasiparticle random phase approximation (LQRPA). The excitation spectra and the electric quadrupole transitions between the low-lying states in {sup 68}Se are calculated by solving the collective Schroedinger equation.

  8. Effects of curvilinear motion in large-amplitude bending of C3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C. F.; Pearson, W. E.; Henderson, B. J.

    1974-01-01

    The geometry of the bending of a linear triatomic molecule is analyzed, and an expression for the average rotational constant is derived. A harmonic oscillator model of C3 is fitted to the observed rotational constant within 0.6%. The bond distance between atoms at zero bending is 1.287 A according to this model; this is noticeably larger than the average internuclear distance of 1.277 A for the vibrational ground state. The first order perturbation solutions for the vibrational energy levels, taking into account the effect of a quartic perturbation potential, closely match observed levels. For a square well potential model of C3, the effect of curvilinear motion in bending is similar to that found for the harmonic oscillator model, though the decreases in energy are about twice as large. In both models, the average energy decrease is relatively constant at approximately 10% over a wide range of vibrational quantum number.

  9. Shape matters: Near-field fluid mechanics dominate the collective motions of ellipsoidal squirmers.

    PubMed

    Kyoya, K; Matsunaga, D; Imai, Y; Omori, T; Ishikawa, T

    2015-12-01

    Microswimmers show a variety of collective motions. Despite extensive study, questions remain regarding the role of near-field fluid mechanics in collective motion. In this paper, we describe precisely the Stokes flow around hydrodynamically interacting ellipsoidal squirmers in a monolayer suspension. The results showed that various collective motions, such as ordering, aggregation, and whirls, are dominated by the swimming mode and the aspect ratio. The collective motions are mainly induced by near-field fluid mechanics, despite Stokes flow propagation over a long range. These results emphasize the importance of particle shape in collective motion. PMID:26764823

  10. Unsteady surface pressure distributions on a delta wing undergoing large amplitude pitching motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, S. A.; Batill, S. M.; Nelson, R. C.

    1990-01-01

    Wind tunnel experiments were performed on a 70-deg-sweep delta wing to determine the effect of a sinusoidal pitching motion on the pressure field on the suction side of the wing. Pressure taps were placed from 35-90 percent of the chord, at 60 percent of the local semi-span. Pressure coefficients were measured as functions of Reynolds number and pitch rate. The surface pressure distribution was seen to vary at the same frequency as the pitching frequency, though distortion due to the vortex breakdown was observed. Comparing the upstroke (angle of attack increasing) and downstroke (angle of attack decreasing) pressures for a specific angle of attack, a time lag in the pressure distribution was observed. The downstroke pressures were slightly larger at the forward chord locations. Vortex breakdown was seen to have the most significant effect at the 40-45-percent chord location, where an increase in local pressure was apparent, as well as a distortion of the periodic pressure fluctuation.

  11. Modeling closure of circular wounds through coordinated collective motion.

    PubMed

    Li, David S; Zimmermann, Juliane; Levine, Herbert

    2016-02-01

    Wound healing enables tissues to restore their original states, and is achieved through collective cell migration into the wound space, contraction of the wound edge via an actomyosin filament 'purse-string,' as well as cell division. Recently, experimental techniques have been developed to create wounds with various regular morphologies in epithelial monolayers, and these experiments of circular closed-contour wounds support coordinated lamellipodial cell crawling as the predominant driver of gap closure. Through utilizing a particle-based mechanical tissue simulation, exhibiting long-range coordination of cell motility, we computationally model these closed-contour experiments with a high level of agreement between experimentally observed and simulated wound closure dynamics and tissue velocity profiles. We also determine the sensitivity of wound closure time in the model to changes in cell motility force and division rate. Our simulation results confirm that circular wounds can close due to collective cell migration without the necessity for a purse-string mechanism or for cell division, and show that the alignment mechanism of cellular motility force with velocity, leading to collective motion in the model, may speed up wound closure. PMID:26871883

  12. Experimental study of collective motion in the quark gluon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esumi, Shinichi

    2008-04-01

    Collective phenomena have been studied to investigate a property of Quark Gluon Plasma in high-energy heavy-ion collisions at AGS, SPS and RHIC experiments. Whether the origin of elliptic and/or radial collective expansions is given in a partonic or a hadronic phase during the collisons is a key question for the experimetal observables to be sensitive to the QGP or not. The number of quark scaling in the observed elliptic flow parameter v2 is one of intuitive evidences for the existence of the quark phase before the hadronization. The radial and elliptic flow of heavy quarks would also favour the strong interacting plasma phase. The modification of the near- and away-side jet shape and its relation to the elliptic anisotropy could prove the property of the matter in the phase. Experimental measurements especially on the collective motion of the high density and temperature matter created in high-enegy heavy-ion collisions will be presented and discussed.

  13. Modeling closure of circular wounds through coordinated collective motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, David S.; Zimmermann, Juliane; Levine, Herbert

    2016-02-01

    Wound healing enables tissues to restore their original states, and is achieved through collective cell migration into the wound space, contraction of the wound edge via an actomyosin filament ‘purse-string,’ as well as cell division. Recently, experimental techniques have been developed to create wounds with various regular morphologies in epithelial monolayers, and these experiments of circular closed-contour wounds support coordinated lamellipodial cell crawling as the predominant driver of gap closure. Through utilizing a particle-based mechanical tissue simulation, exhibiting long-range coordination of cell motility, we computationally model these closed-contour experiments with a high level of agreement between experimentally observed and simulated wound closure dynamics and tissue velocity profiles. We also determine the sensitivity of wound closure time in the model to changes in cell motility force and division rate. Our simulation results confirm that circular wounds can close due to collective cell migration without the necessity for a purse-string mechanism or for cell division, and show that the alignment mechanism of cellular motility force with velocity, leading to collective motion in the model, may speed up wound closure.

  14. Phase Diagram of Collective Motion of Bacterial Cells in a Shallow Circular Pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakita, Jun-ichi; Tsukamoto, Shota; Yamamoto, Ken; Katori, Makoto; Yamada, Yasuyuki

    2015-12-01

    The collective motion of bacterial cells in a shallow circular pool is systematically studied using the bacterial species Bacillus subtilis. The ratio of cell length to pool diameter (i.e., the reduced cell length) ranges from 0.06 to 0.43 in our experiments. Bacterial cells in a circular pool show various types of collective motion depending on the cell density in the pool and the reduced cell length. The motion is classified into six types, which we call random motion, turbulent motion, one-way rotational motion, two-way rotational motion, random oscillatory motion, and ordered oscillatory motion. Two critical values of reduced cell lengths are evaluated, at which drastic changes in collective motion are induced. A phase diagram is proposed in which the six phases are arranged.

  15. Quantification of mouse in vivo whole-body vibration amplitude from motion-blur using x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhengyi; Welch, Ian; Yuan, Xunhua; Pollmann, Steven I.; Nikolov, Hristo N.; Holdsworth, David W.

    2015-08-01

    Musculoskeletal effects of whole-body vibration on animals and humans have become an intensely studied topic recently, due to the potential of applying this method as a non-pharmacological therapy for strengthening bones. It is relatively easy to quantify the transmission of whole-body mechanical vibration through the human skeletal system using accelerometers. However, this is not the case for small-animal pre-clinical studies because currently available accelerometers have a large mass, relative to the mass of the animals, which causes the accelerometers themselves to affect the way vibration is transmitted. Additionally, live animals do not typically remain motionless for long periods, unless they are anesthetized, and they are required to maintain a static standing posture during these studies. These challenges provide the motivation for the development of a method to quantify vibrational transmission in small animals. We present a novel imaging technique to quantify whole-body vibration transmission in small animals using 280 μm diameter tungsten carbide beads implanted into the hind limbs of mice. Employing time-exposure digital x-ray imaging, vibrational amplitude is quantified based on the blurring of the implanted beads caused by the vibrational motion. Our in vivo results have shown this technique is capable of measuring vibration amplitudes as small as 0.1 mm, with precision as small as  ±10 μm, allowing us to distinguish differences in the transmitted vibration at different locations on the hindlimbs of mice.

  16. A study of the nonlinear aerodynamics of bodies in nonplanar motion. Ph.D. Thesis - Stanford Univ., Calif.; [numerical analysis of aerodynamic force and moment systems during large amplitude, arbitrary motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiff, L. B.

    1974-01-01

    Concepts from the theory of functionals are used to develop nonlinear formulations of the aerodynamic force and moment systems acting on bodies in large-amplitude, arbitrary motions. The analysis, which proceeds formally once the functional dependence of the aerodynamic reactions upon the motion variables is established, ensures the inclusion, within the resulting formulation, of pertinent aerodynamic terms that normally are excluded in the classical treatment. Applied to the large-amplitude, slowly varying, nonplanar motion of a body, the formulation suggests that the aerodynamic moment can be compounded of the moments acting on the body in four basic motions: steady angle of attack, pitch oscillations, either roll or yaw oscillations, and coning motion. Coning, where the nose of the body describes a circle around the velocity vector, characterizes the nonplanar nature of the general motion.

  17. Leadership, collective motion and the evolution of migratory strategies.

    PubMed

    Guttal, Vishwesha; Couzin, Iain D

    2011-05-01

    Migration is a hallmark life history strategy of a diverse range of organisms, and also ubiquitous in ontogenic processes including normal embryonic development as well as tumor progression. In such scenarios, individual organisms/cells typically respond to long range (and often noisy) environmental cues. In addition, individuals may interact socially with one another leading to emergent group-level navigational abilities. Although much progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms of taxis, there is a lack of theoretical and quantitative understanding of how individuals trade-off information obtained through their own migratory ability and that via social interactions. Here, we discuss results and insights from a recent computational model developed to investigate the evolution of leadership and collective motion in migratory populations. It is shown that, for a broad range of parameter values, only a small proportion of the population gather directional information while the majority employ social cues alone. More generally, ecological conditions for the evolution of resident, solitary and collective migratory strategies are obtained. We discuss how consideration of both proximate and ultimate factors within the same framework may provide insights into preserving migratory patterns that are in grave danger due to anthropogenic pressures. PMID:21980562

  18. Fluctuations and nematic order in collective motion of filamentous bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiguchi, Daiki; Nagai, Ken H.; Sano, Masaki

    Although there are many numerical and theoretical studies on Vicsek-like models, there have been no convincing experiments that clearly observe predicted properties of collective motion such as giant number fluctuations. To realize such experiments with a biological system, we used filamentous bacteria, which are 20 times as long as usual bacteria. Due to strong alignment interactions arising from their elongated shapes, these bacteria exhibit a nematic state when their dense suspensions are confined in a quasi-two-dimensional plane. We have quantitatively evaluated the nematic order parameter in this ordered state and concluded that it has true long-range order, and we have obtained giant number fluctuations in this true long-range ordered state. All the obtained experimental results are consistent with a Vicsek-like model with the same symmetry as our experiments, namely, the Vicsek-like self-propelled rods model, in which each particle has polarity and their interactions are nematic. This work is supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Japan Society for Promotion of Science (JSPS) Fellows (Grant No. 26-9915) and KAKENHI (No. 25103004, ``Fluctuation & Structure'') from MEXT, Japan.

  19. Dimensionality reduction of collective motion by principal manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajamannage, Kelum; Butail, Sachit; Porfiri, Maurizio; Bollt, Erik M.

    2015-01-01

    While the existence of low-dimensional embedding manifolds has been shown in patterns of collective motion, the current battery of nonlinear dimensionality reduction methods is not amenable to the analysis of such manifolds. This is mainly due to the necessary spectral decomposition step, which limits control over the mapping from the original high-dimensional space to the embedding space. Here, we propose an alternative approach that demands a two-dimensional embedding which topologically summarizes the high-dimensional data. In this sense, our approach is closely related to the construction of one-dimensional principal curves that minimize orthogonal error to data points subject to smoothness constraints. Specifically, we construct a two-dimensional principal manifold directly in the high-dimensional space using cubic smoothing splines, and define the embedding coordinates in terms of geodesic distances. Thus, the mapping from the high-dimensional data to the manifold is defined in terms of local coordinates. Through representative examples, we show that compared to existing nonlinear dimensionality reduction methods, the principal manifold retains the original structure even in noisy and sparse datasets. The principal manifold finding algorithm is applied to configurations obtained from a dynamical system of multiple agents simulating a complex maneuver called predator mobbing, and the resulting two-dimensional embedding is compared with that of a well-established nonlinear dimensionality reduction method.

  20. Influences of Head Motion Regression on High-Frequency Oscillation Amplitudes of Resting-State fMRI Signals

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Bin-Ke; Zang, Yu-Feng; Liu, Dong-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    High-frequency oscillations (HFOs, >0.1 Hz) of resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI) signals have received much attention in recent years. Denoising is critical for HFO studies. Previous work indicated that head motion (HM) has remarkable influences on a variety of rs-fMRI metrics, but its influences on rs-fMRI HFOs are still unknown. In this study, we investigated the impacts of HM regression (HMR) on HFO results using a fast sampling rs-fMRI dataset. We demonstrated that apparent high-frequency (∼0.2–0.4 Hz) components existed in the HM trajectories in almost all subjects. In addition, we found that individual-level HMR could robustly reveal more between-condition (eye-open vs. eye-closed) amplitude differences in high-frequency bands. Although regression of mean framewise displacement (FD) at the group level had little impact on the results, mean FD could significantly account for inter-subject variance of HFOs even after individual-level HMR. Our findings suggest that HM artifacts should not be ignored in HFO studies, and HMR is necessary for detecting HFO between-condition differences. PMID:27303280

  1. The influence of large-amplitude librational motion on the hydrogen bond energy for alcohol-water complexes.

    PubMed

    Andersen, J; Heimdal, J; Wugt Larsen, R

    2015-10-01

    The far-infrared absorption spectra have been recorded for hydrogen-bonded complexes of water with methanol and t-butanol embedded in cryogenic neon matrices at 2.8 K. The partial isotopic substitution of individual subunits enabled by a dual inlet deposition procedure provides for the first time unambiguous assignments of the intermolecular high-frequency out-of-plane and low-frequency in-plane donor OH librational modes for mixed alcohol-water complexes. The vibrational assignments confirm directly that water acts as the hydrogen bond donor in the most stable mixed complexes and the tertiary alcohol is a superior hydrogen bond acceptor. The class of large-amplitude donor OH librational motion is shown to account for up to 5.1 kJ mol(-1) of the destabilizing change of vibrational zero-point energy upon intermolecular OHO hydrogen bond formation. The experimental findings are supported by complementary electronic structure calculations at the CCSD(T)-F12/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory. PMID:26304774

  2. Modifying fragility and collective motion in polymer melts with nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Starr, Francis W; Douglas, Jack F

    2011-03-18

    We investigate the impact of nanoparticles (NP) on the fragility and cooperative stringlike motion in a model glass-forming polymer melt by molecular dynamics simulation. The NP cause significant changes to both the fragility and the average length of stringlike motion, where the effect depends on the NP-polymer interaction and NP concentration. We interpret these changes via the Adam-Gibbs (AG) theory, assuming the strings can be directly identified with the abstract "cooperatively rearranging regions" of AG. Our findings indicate that fragility is primarily a measure of the temperature dependence of the cooperativity of molecular motion. PMID:21469879

  3. Simulation study of amplitude-modulated (AM) harmonic motion imaging (HMI) for stiffness contrast quantification with experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Maleke, Caroline; Luo, Jianwen; Gamarnik, Viktor; Lu, Xin L; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2010-07-01

    The objective of this study is to show that Harmonic Motion Imaging (HMI) can be used as a reliable tumor-mapping technique based on the tumor's distinct stiffness at the early onset of disease. HMI is a radiation-force-based imaging method that generates a localized vibration deep inside the tissue to estimate the relative tissue stiffness based on the resulting displacement amplitude. In this paper, a finite-element model (FEM) study is presented, followed by an experimental validation in tissue-mimicking polyacrylamide gels and excised human breast tumors ex vivo. This study compares the resulting tissue motion in simulations and experiments at four different gel stiffnesses and three distinct spherical inclusion diameters. The elastic moduli of the gels were separately measured using mechanical testing. Identical transducer parameters were used in both the FEM and experimental studies, i.e., a 4.5-MHz single-element focused ultrasound (FUS) and a 7.5-MHz diagnostic (pulse-echo) transducer. In the simulation, an acoustic pressure field was used as the input stimulus to generate a localized vibration inside the target. Radiofrequency (rf) signals were then simulated using a 2D convolution model. A one-dimensional cross-correlation technique was performed on the simulated and experimental rf signals to estimate the axial displacement resulting from the harmonic radiation force. In order to measure the reliability of the displacement profiles in estimating the tissue stiffness distribution, the contrast-transfer efficiency (CTE) was calculated. For tumor mapping ex vivo, a harmonic radiation force was applied using a 2D raster-scan technique. The 2D HMI images of the breast tumor ex vivo could detect a malignant tumor (20 x 10 mm2) surrounded by glandular and fat tissues. The FEM and experimental results from both gels and breast tumors ex vivo demonstrated that HMI was capable of detecting and mapping the tumor or stiff inclusion with various diameters or

  4. Rotational Spectrum and Large Amplitude Motions of 3,4-, 2,5- and 3,5-DIMETHYL-BENZALDEHYDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleiner, I.; Tudorie, M.; Jahn, M.; Grabow, J.-U.; Goubet, M.

    2012-06-01

    The microwave spectra of the 3,4-, 2,5- and 3,5-Dimethyl-Benzaldehyde (DMBA) molecules have been recorded for the first time in the 2-26.5 GHz frequency range, using the COBRA-FTMW spectrometer in Hannover, with an instrumental uncertainty of 0.5 kHz for unblended lines. The experimental assignments and fits are supplemented by ab initio quantum chemical calculations,conformational energy landscape, and dipole moment components. The analysis of the spectra for the three isomers are in progress. The latest results, including spectroscopic constants and large amplitude motion parameters, will be presented. This investigation follows the study of the spectra of the 4-Methyl-Benzaldehyde molecule. The DMBA isomers belong to a similar series of molecules formally obtained by adding a second methyl group at the aromatic ring. These molecules serve as prototype systems for the development of the theoretical model of asymmetric top molecules having Cs symmetry while containing two inequivalent methyl tops (C3v), exhibiting different barrier heights and coupling terms to methyl internal rotation. Thus, the DMBA isomers represent benchmark species for testing the two-top internal rotors BELGI program written recently. Supported by the ANR-08-BLAN-0054 contract (France), the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, and the Land Niedersachsen (Germany). H. Saal, W. Caminati, I. Kleiner, A. R. Hight-Walker, J. T. Hougen, J.-U. Grabow, to be published. M. Tudorie, I. Kleiner, J. T. Hougen, S. Melandri, L. W. Sutikdja, W. Stahl, J. Mol. Spectrosc., 269 (2011), 211-225

  5. On the spontaneous collective motion of active matter

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shenshen; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous directed motion, a hallmark of cell biology, is unusual in classical statistical physics. Here we study, using both numerical and analytical methods, organized motion in models of the cytoskeleton in which constituents are driven by energy-consuming motors. Although systems driven by small-step motors are described by an effective temperature and are thus quiescent, at higher order in step size, both homogeneous and inhomogeneous, flowing and oscillating behavior emerges. Motors that respond with a negative susceptibility to imposed forces lead to an apparent negative-temperature system in which beautiful structures form resembling the asters seen in cell division. PMID:21876141

  6. On the spontaneous collective motion of active matter.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shenshen; Wolynes, Peter G

    2011-09-13

    Spontaneous directed motion, a hallmark of cell biology, is unusual in classical statistical physics. Here we study, using both numerical and analytical methods, organized motion in models of the cytoskeleton in which constituents are driven by energy-consuming motors. Although systems driven by small-step motors are described by an effective temperature and are thus quiescent, at higher order in step size, both homogeneous and inhomogeneous, flowing and oscillating behavior emerges. Motors that respond with a negative susceptibility to imposed forces lead to an apparent negative-temperature system in which beautiful structures form resembling the asters seen in cell division. PMID:21876141

  7. Effective temperature and spontaneous collective motion of active matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shenshen; Wolynes, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Spontaneous directed motion, a hallmark of cell biology, is unusual in classical statistical physics. Here we study, using both numerical and analytical methods, organized motion in models of the cytoskeleton in which constituents are driven by energy-consuming motors. Although systems driven by small-step motors are described by an effective temperature and are thus quiescent, at higher order in step size, both homogeneous and inhomogeneous, flowing and oscillating behavior emerges. Motors that respond with a negative susceptibility to imposed forces lead to an apparent negative temperature system in which beautiful structures form resembling the asters seen in cell division.

  8. Erratum "New arbitrated quantum signature of classical messages against collective amplitude damping noise" [Optics Communications 284 (2011) 3144

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yi-Ping; Hwang, Tzonelih

    2013-08-01

    We point out that our previous work [Optics Communications 284 (2011) 3144] contains a mistake in the key updating equation. We correct the error to avoid an information leakage problem. We revisit our previous work entitled "New arbitrated quantum signature of classical messages against collective amplitude damping noise" [1] and discover a mistake in the key updating equation which could cause a key to reveal to a semi-honest arbitrator.

  9. Collective Motion and Phase Transitions of Symmetric Camphor Boats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heisler, Eric; Suematsu, Nobuhiko J.; Awazu, Akinori; Nishimori, Hiraku

    2012-07-01

    The motion of several self-propelled boats in a narrow channel displays spontaneous pattern formation and kinetic phase transitions. In contrast with previous studies on self-propelled particles, this model does not require stochastic fluctuations and it is experimentally accessible. By varying the viscosity in the system, it is possible to form either a stationary state, correlated or uncorrelated oscillations, or unidirectional flow. Here, we describe and analyze these self organized patterns and their transitions.

  10. Inelastic X-ray scattering studies of the short-time collective vibrational motions in hydrated lysozyme powders and their possible relation to enzymatic function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhe; Bertrand, Christopher E; Chiang, Wei-Shan; Fratini, Emiliano; Baglioni, Piero; Alatas, Ahmet; Alp, E Ercan; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2013-01-31

    High-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering was used to investigate the collective vibrational excitations in hydrated lysozyme powders as a function of hydration level and temperature. It is found that the samples with strong enzymatic function are "soft", in the sense that they exhibit low frequency and large amplitude intraprotein collective vibrational motions on certain length scales. This is not the case for samples with weak or no enzymatic activity. Thus, we identify a possible correlation between the short-time intraprotein collective vibrational motions and the establishment of enzymatic function in hydrated lysozyme powders, and bring new insight to notions of protein "conformational flexibility" and "softness" in terms of these motions. PMID:23301848

  11. Inherent noise can facilitate coherence in collective swarm motion.

    PubMed

    Yates, Christian A; Erban, Radek; Escudero, Carlos; Couzin, Iain D; Buhl, Jerome; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G; Maini, Philip K; Sumpter, David J T

    2009-04-01

    Among the most striking aspects of the movement of many animal groups are their sudden coherent changes in direction. Recent observations of locusts and starlings have shown that this directional switching is an intrinsic property of their motion. Similar direction switches are seen in self-propelled particle and other models of group motion. Comprehending the factors that determine such switches is key to understanding the movement of these groups. Here, we adopt a coarse-grained approach to the study of directional switching in a self-propelled particle model assuming an underlying one-dimensional Fokker-Planck equation for the mean velocity of the particles. We continue with this assumption in analyzing experimental data on locusts and use a similar systematic Fokker-Planck equation coefficient estimation approach to extract the relevant information for the assumed Fokker-Planck equation underlying that experimental data. In the experiment itself the motion of groups of 5 to 100 locust nymphs was investigated in a homogeneous laboratory environment, helping us to establish the intrinsic dynamics of locust marching bands. We determine the mean time between direction switches as a function of group density for the experimental data and the self-propelled particle model. This systematic approach allows us to identify key differences between the experimental data and the model, revealing that individual locusts appear to increase the randomness of their movements in response to a loss of alignment by the group. We give a quantitative description of how locusts use noise to maintain swarm alignment. We discuss further how properties of individual animal behavior, inferred by using the Fokker-Planck equation coefficient estimation approach, can be implemented in the self-propelled particle model to replicate qualitatively the group level dynamics seen in the experimental data. PMID:19336580

  12. Collective motion with anticipation: flocking, spinning, and swarming.

    PubMed

    Morin, Alexandre; Caussin, Jean-Baptiste; Eloy, Christophe; Bartolo, Denis

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the collective dynamics of self-propelled particles able to probe and anticipate the orientation of their neighbors. We show that a simple anticipation strategy hinders the emergence of homogeneous flocking patterns. Yet anticipation promotes two other forms of self-organization: collective spinning and swarming. In the spinning phase, all particles follow synchronous circular orbits, while in the swarming phase, the population condensates into a single compact swarm that cruises coherently without requiring any cohesive interactions. We quantitatively characterize and rationalize these phases of polar active matter and discuss potential applications to the design of swarming robots. PMID:25679597

  13. Collective motion with anticipation: Flocking, spinning, and swarming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, Alexandre; Caussin, Jean-Baptiste; Eloy, Christophe; Bartolo, Denis

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the collective dynamics of self-propelled particles able to probe and anticipate the orientation of their neighbors. We show that a simple anticipation strategy hinders the emergence of homogeneous flocking patterns. Yet anticipation promotes two other forms of self-organization: collective spinning and swarming. In the spinning phase, all particles follow synchronous circular orbits, while in the swarming phase, the population condensates into a single compact swarm that cruises coherently without requiring any cohesive interactions. We quantitatively characterize and rationalize these phases of polar active matter and discuss potential applications to the design of swarming robots.

  14. Collective motion of self-propelled particles with memory.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Ken H; Sumino, Yutaka; Montagne, Raul; Aranson, Igor S; Chaté, Hugues

    2015-04-24

    We show that memory, in the form of underdamped angular dynamics, is a crucial ingredient for the collective properties of self-propelled particles. Using Vicsek-style models with an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process acting on angular velocity, we uncover a rich variety of collective phases not observed in usual overdamped systems, including vortex lattices and active foams. In a model with strictly nematic interactions the smectic arrangement of Vicsek waves giving rise to global polar order is observed. We also provide a calculation of the effective interaction between vortices in the case where a telegraphic noise process is at play, explaining thus the emergence and structure of the vortex lattices observed here and in motility assay experiments. PMID:25955073

  15. Collective Motion of Self-Propelled Particles with Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Ken H.; Sumino, Yutaka; Montagne, Raul; Aranson, Igor S.; Chaté, Hugues

    2015-04-01

    We show that memory, in the form of underdamped angular dynamics, is a crucial ingredient for the collective properties of self-propelled particles. Using Vicsek-style models with an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process acting on angular velocity, we uncover a rich variety of collective phases not observed in usual overdamped systems, including vortex lattices and active foams. In a model with strictly nematic interactions the smectic arrangement of Vicsek waves giving rise to global polar order is observed. We also provide a calculation of the effective interaction between vortices in the case where a telegraphic noise process is at play, explaining thus the emergence and structure of the vortex lattices observed here and in motility assay experiments.

  16. Wireless System and Method for Collecting Motion and Non-Motion Related Data of a Rotating System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E. (Inventor); Taylor, Bryant D. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A wireless system for collecting data indicative of a tire's characteristics uses at least one open-circuit electrical conductor in a tire. The conductor is shaped such that it can store electrical and magnetic energy. In the presence of a time-varying magnetic field, the conductor resonates to generate a harmonic response having a frequency, amplitude and bandwidth. A magnetic field response recorder is used to (i) wirelessly transmit the time-varying magnetic field to the conductor, and (ii) wirelessly detect the harmonic response and the frequency, amplitude and bandwidth, associated therewith. The recorder is adapted to be positioned in a location that is fixed with respect to the tire as the tire rotates.

  17. Spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking in collective active motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breier, Rebekka E.; Selinger, Robin L. B.; Ciccotti, Giovanni; Herminghaus, Stephan; Mazza, Marco G.

    2016-02-01

    Chiral symmetry breaking is ubiquitous in biological systems, from DNA to bacterial suspensions. A key unresolved problem is how chiral structures may spontaneously emerge from achiral interactions. We study a simple model of active swimmers in three dimensions that effectively incorporates hydrodynamic interactions. We perform large-scale molecular dynamics simulations (up to 106 particles) and find long-lived metastable collective states that exhibit chiral organization although the interactions are achiral. We elucidate under which conditions these chiral states will emerge and grow to large scales. To explore the complex phase space available to the system, we perform nonequilibrium quenches on a one-dimensional Lebwohl-Lasher model with periodic boundary conditions to study the likelihood of formation of chiral structures.

  18. Extension of a regularizing algorithm for the determination of equilibrium geometry and force field of free molecules from joint use of electron diffraction, molecular spectroscopy and ab initio data on systems with large-amplitude oscillatory motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochikov, I. V.; Tarasov, Yu. I.; Spiridonov, V. P.; Kuramshina, G. M.; Yagola, A. G.; Saakjan, A. S.; Popik, M. V.; Samdal, S.

    1999-08-01

    The previously developed integrated algorithm for the joint treatment of gas-phase electron diffraction and vibrational spectroscopic data is extended to include systems with large-amplitude oscillatory motion. In addition, the treatment is augmented by the inclusion of microwave rotational constants. As in the previous work, the analysis of data from experimental sources is guided by quantum mechanical molecular geometry and force field optimization results. The computed force field matrix can be corrected empirically with the aid of suitable scale factors. Centrifugal distortion corrections to interatomic distances are included. The standard deviations of the parameters determined and the correlation coefficients can now be estimated. The principal design of the developed computer program is outlined, and some methodological problems associated with diffraction analysis of molecules with large-amplitude motion are discussed. To provide an example of a problem susceptible to attack by the present method an account is made of the re-analysis of diffraction data for 4-fluorobenzaldehyde collected earlier on the Balzers apparatus in Oslo.

  19. Social behaviour and collective motion in plant-animal worms.

    PubMed

    Franks, Nigel R; Worley, Alan; Grant, Katherine A J; Gorman, Alice R; Vizard, Victoria; Plackett, Harriet; Doran, Carolina; Gamble, Margaret L; Stumpe, Martin C; Sendova-Franks, Ana B

    2016-02-24

    Social behaviour may enable organisms to occupy ecological niches that would otherwise be unavailable to them. Here, we test this major evolutionary principle by demonstrating self-organizing social behaviour in the plant-animal, Symsagittifera roscoffensis. These marine aceol flat worms rely for all of their nutrition on the algae within their bodies: hence their common name. We show that individual worms interact with one another to coordinate their movements so that even at low densities they begin to swim in small polarized groups and at increasing densities such flotillas turn into circular mills. We use computer simulations to: (i) determine if real worms interact socially by comparing them with virtual worms that do not interact and (ii) show that the social phase transitions of the real worms can occur based only on local interactions between and among them. We hypothesize that such social behaviour helps the worms to form the dense biofilms or mats observed on certain sun-exposed sandy beaches in the upper intertidal of the East Atlantic and to become in effect a super-organismic seaweed in a habitat where macro-algal seaweeds cannot anchor themselves. Symsagittifera roscoffensis, a model organism in many other areas in biology (including stem cell regeneration), also seems to be an ideal model for understanding how individual behaviours can lead, through collective movement, to social assemblages. PMID:26911961

  20. Collective Motion of Humans in Mosh and Circle Pits at Heavy Metal Concerts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverberg, Jesse L.; Bierbaum, Matthew; Sethna, James P.; Cohen, Itai

    2013-05-01

    Human collective behavior can vary from calm to panicked depending on social context. Using videos publicly available online, we study the highly energized collective motion of attendees at heavy metal concerts. We find these extreme social gatherings generate similarly extreme behaviors: a disordered gaslike state called a mosh pit and an ordered vortexlike state called a circle pit. Both phenomena are reproduced in flocking simulations demonstrating that human collective behavior is consistent with the predictions of simplified models.

  1. Unsteady aerodynamic characteristics of a fighter model undergoing large-amplitude pitching motions at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, Jay M.; Shah, Gautam H.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of harmonic or constant-rate-ramp pitching motions (giving angles of attack from 0 to 75 deg) on the aerodynamic performance of a fighter-aircraft model with highly swept leading-edge extensions are investigated experimentally in the NASA Langley 12-ft low-speed wind tunnel. The model configuration and experimental setup are described, and the results of force and moment measurements and flow visualizations are presented graphically and discussed in detail. Large force overshoots and hysteresis are observed and attributed to lags in vortical-flow development and breakup. The motion variables have a strong influence on the persistence of dynamic effects, which are found to affect pitch-rate capability more than flight-path turning performance.

  2. Local collective motion analysis for multi-probe dynamic imaging and microrheology.

    PubMed

    Khan, Manas; Mason, Thomas G

    2016-08-01

    Dynamical artifacts, such as mechanical drift, advection, and hydrodynamic flow, can adversely affect multi-probe dynamic imaging and passive particle-tracking microrheology experiments. Alternatively, active driving by molecular motors can cause interesting non-Brownian motion of probes in local regions. Existing drift-correction techniques, which require large ensembles of probes or fast temporal sampling, are inadequate for handling complex spatio-temporal drifts and non-Brownian motion of localized domains containing relatively few probes. Here, we report an analytical method based on local collective motion (LCM) analysis of as few as two probes for detecting the presence of non-Brownian motion and for accurately eliminating it to reveal the underlying Brownian motion. By calculating an ensemble-average, time-dependent, LCM mean square displacement (MSD) of two or more localized probes and comparing this MSD to constituent single-probe MSDs, we can identify temporal regimes during which either thermal or athermal motion dominates. Single-probe motion, when referenced relative to the moving frame attached to the multi-probe LCM trajectory, provides a true Brownian MSD after scaling by an appropriate correction factor that depends on the number of probes used in LCM analysis. We show that LCM analysis can be used to correct many different dynamical artifacts, including spatially varying drifts, gradient flows, cell motion, time-dependent drift, and temporally varying oscillatory advection, thereby offering a significant improvement over existing approaches. PMID:27269299

  3. Local collective motion analysis for multi-probe dynamic imaging and microrheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Manas; Mason, Thomas G.

    2016-08-01

    Dynamical artifacts, such as mechanical drift, advection, and hydrodynamic flow, can adversely affect multi-probe dynamic imaging and passive particle-tracking microrheology experiments. Alternatively, active driving by molecular motors can cause interesting non-Brownian motion of probes in local regions. Existing drift-correction techniques, which require large ensembles of probes or fast temporal sampling, are inadequate for handling complex spatio-temporal drifts and non-Brownian motion of localized domains containing relatively few probes. Here, we report an analytical method based on local collective motion (LCM) analysis of as few as two probes for detecting the presence of non-Brownian motion and for accurately eliminating it to reveal the underlying Brownian motion. By calculating an ensemble-average, time-dependent, LCM mean square displacement (MSD) of two or more localized probes and comparing this MSD to constituent single-probe MSDs, we can identify temporal regimes during which either thermal or athermal motion dominates. Single-probe motion, when referenced relative to the moving frame attached to the multi-probe LCM trajectory, provides a true Brownian MSD after scaling by an appropriate correction factor that depends on the number of probes used in LCM analysis. We show that LCM analysis can be used to correct many different dynamical artifacts, including spatially varying drifts, gradient flows, cell motion, time-dependent drift, and temporally varying oscillatory advection, thereby offering a significant improvement over existing approaches.

  4. Collective motion of symmetric camphor papers in an annular water channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikura, Yumihiko S.; Heisler, Eric; Awazu, Akinori; Nishimori, Hiraku; Nakata, Satoshi

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the collective motion of symmetric self-propelled objects that are driven by a difference in the surface tension. The objects move around an annular water channel spontaneously and interact through the camphor layer that develops on the water surface. We found that two collective motion modes, discrete and continuous density waves, are generated depending on the number of self-propelled objects. The two modes are characterized by examining the local and global dynamics, and the collective motion mechanism is discussed in relation to the distribution of camphor concentration in the annular water channel. We conclude that the difference between these two modes originates from that of the driving mechanism that pushes a camphor paper away from a cluster, through which mechanism density waves are generated and maintained.

  5. Flocking and Turning: a New Model for Self-organized Collective Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavagna, Andrea; Del Castello, Lorenzo; Giardina, Irene; Grigera, Tomas; Jelic, Asja; Melillo, Stefania; Mora, Thierry; Parisi, Leonardo; Silvestri, Edmondo; Viale, Massimiliano; Walczak, Aleksandra M.

    2015-02-01

    Birds in a flock move in a correlated way, resulting in large polarization of velocities. A good understanding of this collective behavior exists for linear motion of the flock. Yet observing actual birds, the center of mass of the group often turns giving rise to more complicated dynamics, still keeping strong polarization of the flock. Here we propose novel dynamical equations for the collective motion of polarized animal groups that account for correlated turning including solely social forces. We exploit rotational symmetries and conservation laws of the problem to formulate a theory in terms of generalized coordinates of motion for the velocity directions akin to a Hamiltonian formulation for rotations. We explicitly derive the correspondence between this formulation and the dynamics of the individual velocities, thus obtaining a new model of collective motion. In the appropriate overdamped limit we recover the well-known Vicsek model, which dissipates rotational information and does not allow for polarized turns. Although the new model has its most vivid success in describing turning groups, its dynamics is intrinsically different from previous ones in a wide dynamical regime, while reducing to the hydrodynamic description of Toner and Tu at very large length-scales. The derived framework is therefore general and it may describe the collective motion of any strongly polarized active matter system.

  6. Pure collective precession motion of a high-spin torus isomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikawa, T.; Matsuyanagi, K.; Maruhn, J. A.; Itagaki, N.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the precession motion of the exotic torus configuration in high-spin excited states of 40Ca. For this aim, we use the three-dimensional time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) method. Although the high-spin torus isomer is a unique quantum object characterized by the alignment of angular momenta of independent single-particle motions, we find that the obtained moment of inertia for rotations about an axis perpendicular to the symmetry axis is close to the rigid-body value. We also analyze the microscopic structure of the precession motion using the random-phase approximation (RPA) method for high-spin states. In the RPA calculation, the precession motion of the torus isomer is generated by coherent superposition of many one-particle-one-hole excitations across the sloping Fermi surface that strongly violates the time-reversal symmetry. By comparing results of the TDHF and the RPA calculations, we find that the precession motion obtained by the TDHF calculation is a pure collective motion well decoupled from other collective modes.

  7. Effects of structural setting and rock properties on amplitudes of surface motions in the vicinity of small explosive tests

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, C.L.; Pearson, D.C.; Baker, D.F.; Aimone-Martin, C.

    1994-12-31

    A series of small-scale explosive experiments were conducted in a perlite mine near Socorro, New Mexico. These experiments were a joint effort between Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Southern Methodist University, and Defense Nuclear Agency. The purpose of these tests was to measure the changes in the shock wave and seismic coupling as a function of depth of burial and structural setting. The size of the explosive charges ranged from 1 to 68 kg. Over 1,150 measurements of velocity and acceleration were made on thirteen experiments using three component sensors. The sensors were placed to maximize the azimuthal coverage as well as to provide data at a variety of ranges from {approximately}1 to 130 m. A few far field measurements were made at ranges of {approximately}2 km. While the bulk of the measurements were made on the surface, high g accelerometers were placed in one instrumentation borehole to provide some free-field measurements. Preliminary results indicate that significant differences in the amplitudes of signals can occur when the location of the explosive charges are changed by only meters. Part of the observed difference is attributed to variations in the rock immediately adjacent to the charge affecting the shock coupling; and part to the effects of the site characteristics.

  8. Effects of structural setting and rock peroperties on amplitudes of surface motions in the vicinity of small explosive tests

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, C.L.; Pearson, D.C.; Baker, D.F.; Aimone-Martin, C.

    1993-12-01

    A series of small-scale explosive experiments were conducted in a perlite mine near Socorro, New Mexico. These experiments were a joint effort between Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico Institute Of Mining and Technology, Southern Methodist University, and Defense Nuclear Agency. The purpose of these tests was to measure the changes in the shock wave and seismic coupling as a function of depth of burial and structural setting. The size of the explosive charges ranged from 1 to 68 kg. Over 1150 measurements of velocity and acceleration were made on thirteen experiments using three component sensors. The sensors were placed to maximize the azimuthal coverage as well as to provide data at a variety of ranges from {approximately}1 to 130 m. A few far field measurements were made at ranges of {approximately}2 km. While the bulk of the measurements were made on the surface, high g accelerometers were placed in one instrumentation borehole to provide some free-field measurements. Preliminary results indicate that significant differences in the amplitudes of signals can occur when the location of the explosive charges are changed by only meters. Part of the observed difference is attributed to variations in the rock immediately adjacent to the charge affecting the shock coupling; and part to the effects of the site characteristics.

  9. Glassy Interfacial Dynamics of Ni Nanoparticles: Part I Colored Noise, Dynamic Heterogeneity and Collective Atomic Motion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Douglas, Jack F

    2013-01-28

    Most condensed materials exhibit a significant fraction of atoms, molecules or particles that are strongly interacting with each other, while being configured geometrically at any instant of time in an 'amorphous' state having a relatively uniform density. Recently, both simulations and experiments have revealed that the dynamics of diverse condensed amorphous materials is generally characterized by significant heterogeneity in the local mobility and by progressively increasing collective motion upon cooling that takes the form of string-like collective particle rearrangements. The direct experimental observation of this type of collective motion, which has been directly linked to the growing relaxation times of glass-forming materials, and its quantification under different thermodynamic conditions, has so far been restricted to colloidal and driven granular fluids. The present work addresses the fundamental problem of how to determine the scale of this type of collective motion in materials composed of molecules or atoms. The basic premise of our work is that large scale dynamic particle clustering in amorphous materials must give rise to large fluctuations in particle mobility so that transport properties, especially those related to particle mobility, should naturally exhibit noise related to the cooperative motion scale. In our initial exploratory study seeking a relationship of this kind, we find 1/f (α) or 'colored noise', in both potential energy and particle displacements fluctuations of the atoms within the glassy interfacial layer of Ni nanoparticles (NPs). A direct relation between the particle displacement (mobility) noise exponent α and the average polymerization index of the string-like collective motion L is observed for a range of NP sizes, temperatures and for surface doping of the NPs with other metal atoms (Ag, Au, Pt) to change of fragility of the glassy interfacial layer at the surface of the Ni NPs. We also introduce a successful analytic

  10. Coupling of the Decarboxylation of 2-Cyano-2-phenylpropanoic Acid to Large-Amplitude Motions: A Convenient Fuel for an Acid-Base-Operated Molecular Switch.

    PubMed

    Berrocal, José Augusto; Biagini, Chiara; Mandolini, Luigi; Di Stefano, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    The decarboxylation of 2-cyano-2-phenylpropanoic acid is fast and quantitative when carried out in the presence of 1 molar equivalent of a [2]catenane composed of two identical macrocycles incorporating a 1,10-phenanthroline unit in their backbone. When decarboxylation is over, all of the catenane molecules have experienced large-amplitude motions from neutral to protonated catenane, and back again to the neutral form, so that they are ready to perform another cycle. This study provides the first example of the cyclic operation of a molecular switch at the sole expenses of the energy supplied by the substrate undergoing chemical transformation, without recourse to additional stimuli. PMID:27145060

  11. Collective atomic motion and spin dynamics in a driven optical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamper-Kurn, Dan

    2016-05-01

    Cavity quantum electrodynamics generally highlights the interchange of quantum noise and information between light and matter. I will discuss experiments in which the collective motion and spin of a trapped gas of ultracold atoms interact with and are detected by light in a single mode of a high-finesse optical cavity. I will present recent results on quantum-limited force detection, on the damping and amplification of Larmor precession through dynamical backaction, and on cavity-induced coupling between mechanical oscillators and between spin and motional degrees of freedom.

  12. Onset of collective motion in locusts is captured by a minimal model.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Louise; Yates, Christian A; Buhl, Jerome; McKane, Alan J

    2015-11-01

    We present a minimal model to describe the onset of collective motion seen when a population of locusts are placed in an annular arena. At low densities motion is disordered, while at high densities locusts march in a common direction, which may reverse during the experiment. The data are well captured by an individual-based model, in which demographic noise leads to the observed density-dependent effects. By fitting the model parameters to equation-free coefficients, we give a quantitative comparison, showing time series, stationary distributions, and the mean switching times between states. PMID:26651724

  13. Collective motion of two-electron atom in hyperspherical adiabatic approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, A. S.; Nikitin, S. I.

    2015-03-30

    This work is devoted to calculate bound states in the two-electron atoms. The separation of variables has carried out in hyper spherical coordinate system (R, θ, α). Assuming collective motion of the electrons, where the hper angle (α∼π/4) and (θ∼π). The separation of the rotational variables leads to system of differential equations with more simple form as compared with non restricted motion. Energy of doubly excited P{sup e} and D{sup 0} states are calculated semi classically by using quantization condition of Bohr -Somerfield. The results compared with previously published data.

  14. Cavity Nonlinear Optics at Low Photon Numbers from Collective Atomic Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Subhadeep; Moore, Kevin L.; Murch, Kater W.; Stamper-Kurn, Dan M.

    2007-11-23

    We report on Kerr nonlinearity and dispersive optical bistability of a Fabry-Perot optical resonator due to the displacement of ultracold atoms trapped within. In the driven resonator, such collective motion is induced by optical forces acting upon up to 10{sup 5} {sup 87}Rb atoms prepared in the lowest band of a one-dimensional intracavity optical lattice. The longevity of atomic motional coherence allows for strongly nonlinear optics at extremely low cavity photon numbers, as demonstrated by the observation of both branches of optical bistability at photon numbers below unity.

  15. Onset of collective motion in locusts is captured by a minimal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyson, Louise; Yates, Christian A.; Buhl, Jerome; McKane, Alan J.

    2015-11-01

    We present a minimal model to describe the onset of collective motion seen when a population of locusts are placed in an annular arena. At low densities motion is disordered, while at high densities locusts march in a common direction, which may reverse during the experiment. The data are well captured by an individual-based model, in which demographic noise leads to the observed density-dependent effects. By fitting the model parameters to equation-free coefficients, we give a quantitative comparison, showing time series, stationary distributions, and the mean switching times between states.

  16. Small amplitude transverse waves on taut strings: exploring the significant effects of longitudinal motion on wave energy location and propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowland, David R.

    2013-03-01

    Introductory discussions of energy transport due to transverse waves on taut strings universally assume that the effects of longitudinal motion can be neglected, but this assumption is not even approximately valid unless the string is idealized to have a zero relaxed length, a requirement approximately met by the slinky spring. While making this additional idealization is probably the best approach to take when discussing waves on strings at the introductory level, for intermediate to advanced undergraduate classes in continuum mechanics and general wave phenomena where somewhat more realistic models of strings can be investigated, this paper makes the following contributions. First, various approaches to deriving the general energy continuity equation are critiqued and it is argued that the standard continuum mechanics approach to deriving such equations is the best because it leads to a conceptually clear, relatively simple derivation which provides a unique answer of greatest generality. In addition, a straightforward algorithm for calculating the transverse and longitudinal waves generated when a string is driven at one end is presented and used to investigate a cos2 transverse pulse. This example illustrates much important physics regarding energy transport in strings and allows the ‘attack waves’ observed when strings in musical instruments are struck or plucked to be approximately modelled and analysed algebraically. Regarding the ongoing debate as to whether the potential energy density in a string can be uniquely defined, it is shown by coupling an external energy source to a string that a suggested alternative formula for potential energy density requires an unphysical potential energy to be ascribed to the source for overall energy to be conserved and so cannot be considered to be physically valid.

  17. Speed and amplitude of lung tumor motion precisely detected in four-dimensional setup and in real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shirato, Hiroki . E-mail: hshirato@radi.med.hokudai.ac.jp; Suzuki, Keishiro; Sharp, Gregory C.; Fujita, Katsuhisa R.T.; Onimaru, Rikiya; Fujino, Masaharu; Kato, Norio; Osaka, Yasuhiro; Kinoshita, Rumiko; Taguchi, Hiroshi; Onodera, Shunsuke; Miyasaka, Kazuo

    2006-03-15

    Background: To reduce the uncertainty of registration for lung tumors, we have developed a four-dimensional (4D) setup system using a real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy system. Methods and Materials: During treatment planning and daily setup in the treatment room, the trajectory of the internal fiducial marker was recorded for 1 to 2 min at the rate of 30 times per second by the real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy system. To maximize gating efficiency, the patient's position on the treatment couch was adjusted using the 4D setup system with fine on-line remote control of the treatment couch. Results: The trajectory of the marker detected in the 4D setup system was well visualized and used for daily setup. Various degrees of interfractional and intrafractional changes in the absolute amplitude and speed of the internal marker were detected. Readjustments were necessary during each treatment session, prompted by baseline shifting of the tumor position. Conclusion: The 4D setup system was shown to be useful for reducing the uncertainty of tumor motion and for increasing the efficiency of gated irradiation. Considering the interfractional and intrafractional changes in speed and amplitude detected in this study, intercepting radiotherapy is the safe and cost-effective method for 4D radiotherapy using real-time tracking technology.

  18. Absorption Spectroscopy, a Tool for Probing Local Structures and the Onset of Large-Amplitude Motions in Small KAr(n) Clusters at Increasing Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Awali, Slim; Poisson, Lionel; Rhouma, Mounir Ben El Hadj; Mestdagh, Jean-Michel

    2015-09-17

    Photoabsorption spectra of KArn (n = 1-10) are simulated at temperatures ranging between 5 and 25 K. The calculations associate a Monte Carlo (MC) method to sample cluster geometries at temperature T, with a one-electron ab initio model to calculate the ground-state and excited-state energies of the cluster. The latter model replaces the K(+) core electrons and all the electrons of the Ar atoms by appropriate pseudopotentials, complemented by core polarization potentials. It also provides the necessary oscillator strengths to simulate the spectra. Global optimization by basin-hopping is used in combination with MC simulation at low temperature (5 K) to identify the most stable isomer and remarkable isomers of ground-state KArn clusters, which are stable with respect to deformations of the order of those expected with Zero Point Energy motions. The absorption spectra calculated for each of these isomers at 5 K suggest that absorption spectroscopy can probe sensitively the local environment of K atom: surface location of K with respect to a close-packed Ar moiety, number of Ar atom in close vicinity, and local symmetry about K. Simulation at increasing temperatures, up to the evaporation limit of K out of the cluster, shows the onset of large amplitude motions above 20 K, when the K atom experiences a variety of local environments. PMID:26301681

  19. Adding flexibility to the "particles-on-a-sphere" model for large-amplitude motion: POSflex force field for protonated methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhl, Felix; Walewski, Łukasz; Forbert, Harald; Marx, Dominik

    2014-09-01

    The so-called "particles-on-a-sphere" (POS) model has been introduced a while ago in order to describe in simple terms large-amplitude motion of polyatomic hydrides, XHn. The POS model of protonated methane, CH_5^+, has been shown to capture well the essence of the fluxional nature of this enigmatic floppy molecule. Here, we extend this model to the POSflex force field by adding flexibility to the C-H bonds, which are constrained to a common fixed bond length in the original model. This makes the present model extremely efficient for computer simulation, including path integral molecular dynamics in order to assess the crucial quantum effects on nuclear motion at low temperatures. Moreover, the POSflex force field can be conveniently used to study microsolvation effects upon combining it with intermolecular pair potentials to account for solute-solvent interactions. Upon computing static properties as well as thermal and quantum fluctuation effects at ambient and low temperatures, respectively, it is shown that the POSflex model is very well suited to describe the structural properties of bare CH_5^+, including hydrogen scrambling and thus fluxionality in the first place. The far- to mid-infrared spectrum up to the bending band is roughly described, whereas the model fails to account for the well-structured stretching band by construction.

  20. Adding flexibility to the “particles-on-a-sphere” model for large-amplitude motion: POSflex force field for protonated methane

    SciTech Connect

    Uhl, Felix; Walewski, Łukasz; Forbert, Harald; Marx, Dominik

    2014-09-14

    The so-called “particles-on-a-sphere” (POS) model has been introduced a while ago in order to describe in simple terms large-amplitude motion of polyatomic hydrides, XH{sub n}. The POS model of protonated methane, CH{sub 5}{sup +}, has been shown to capture well the essence of the fluxional nature of this enigmatic floppy molecule. Here, we extend this model to the POSflex force field by adding flexibility to the C–H bonds, which are constrained to a common fixed bond length in the original model. This makes the present model extremely efficient for computer simulation, including path integral molecular dynamics in order to assess the crucial quantum effects on nuclear motion at low temperatures. Moreover, the POSflex force field can be conveniently used to study microsolvation effects upon combining it with intermolecular pair potentials to account for solute-solvent interactions. Upon computing static properties as well as thermal and quantum fluctuation effects at ambient and low temperatures, respectively, it is shown that the POSflex model is very well suited to describe the structural properties of bare CH{sub 5}{sup +}, including hydrogen scrambling and thus fluxionality in the first place. The far- to mid-infrared spectrum up to the bending band is roughly described, whereas the model fails to account for the well-structured stretching band by construction.

  1. Theory of collective proton motion at interfaces with densely packed protogenic surface groups.

    PubMed

    Golovnev, Anatoly; Eikerling, Michael

    2013-01-30

    We present a theoretical study of collective proton transport at a 2D array of end-grafted protogenic surface groups with sulfonic acid head groups. The graft positions of the surface groups form a regular hexagonal lattice. We consider the interfacial array at a high packing density of the surface groups and under minimal hydration with one water molecule added per head group. For these conditions, the stable interfacial conformation consists of a bicomponent lattice of hexagonally ordered sulfonate anions and interstitial hydronium cations. Hydronium ion motion occurs as a travelling solitary wave. We analyse the microscopic parameters of the solitons and study the influence of different potential profiles on the proton motion created by rotation and tilting of sidechains and sulfonate anions. Using soliton solutions of the equation of motion, we establish relations between the energy and mobility of the solitons and the microscopic structural and interaction parameters of the array. PMID:23264459

  2. Collective Motion of Cells Mediates Segregation and Pattern Formation in Co-Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Méhes, Előd; Mones, Enys; Németh, Valéria; Vicsek, Tamás

    2012-01-01

    Pattern formation by segregation of cell types is an important process during embryonic development. We show that an experimentally yet unexplored mechanism based on collective motility of segregating cells enhances the effects of known pattern formation mechanisms such as differential adhesion, mechanochemical interactions or cell migration directed by morphogens. To study in vitro cell segregation we use time-lapse videomicroscopy and quantitative analysis of the main features of the motion of individual cells or groups. Our observations have been extensive, typically involving the investigation of the development of patterns containing up to 200,000 cells. By either comparing keratocyte types with different collective motility characteristics or increasing cells' directional persistence by the inhibition of Rac1 GTP-ase we demonstrate that enhanced collective cell motility results in faster cell segregation leading to the formation of more extensive patterns. The growth of the characteristic scale of patterns generally follows an algebraic scaling law with exponent values up to 0.74 in the presence of collective motion, compared to significantly smaller exponents in case of diffusive motion. PMID:22359617

  3. Dynamics of living matter: can we ``see'' collective motions in proteins?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hekstra, Doeke

    2015-03-01

    Proteins are ideal model systems for quantitative study of the interplay of physical and evolutionary forces. Collective, anharmonic motions of amino acid residues within proteins are thought to be central to their function, and to explain, in large part, the complex dependence of protein function on its constituent parts. Currently, the experimental characterization of such motions poses a major stumbling block on the way to a physical understanding of protein function and evolution. We are addressing this problem in two ways. First, alternate conformations of protein residues can often be distinguished in the electron density estimated from room-temperature X-ray crystallography. The dense packing of residues in the folded protein requires that such conformational variations must propagate through networks of amino acids to preclude local steric clashes. Fraser and colleagues showed that such steric conflicts can be used to extract contact networks of residues collectively switching conformation. We ask if these networks are conserved over homologous sequences and connected to the functional reaction coordinate, both of which would demonstrate their fundamental importance. I will describe initial results for the family of PDZ domains: small ligand-binding proteins for which a network of energetically and conformationally coupled residues controlling ligand affinity has been demonstrated previously by a range of methods. Second, the analysis of collective motions in proteins, by nearly any means, is indirect: nothing is seen moving. To directly induce and ``see'' motions on a range of time scales, we developed a new approach based on (a) electric field pulses to induce motions within a protein crystal and (b) time-resolved crystallography to observe these motions. Since proteins generically have a heterogeneous, modifiable charge distribution, this method could provide a powerful, general way of probing the collective motions, and excited states, of proteins in

  4. Promoting collective motion of self-propelled agents by discarding short-range interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Han-Xin; Rong, Zhihai

    2015-08-01

    We study the collective motion of self-propelled agents with the restricted view. The field of view of each agent is an annulus bounded by the outer radius r and inner radius αr, where α ​is a tunable parameter. We find that there exists an optimal value of α leading to the highest degree of direction consensus. This phenomenon indicates that there exists superfluous communication in the collective motion of self-propelled agents and short-range interactions hinder the direction consensus of the system. The value of optimal α decreases as the absolute velocity increases, while it increases as the outer radius r and the system size increase. For a fixed value of α, direction consensus is enhanced when the absolute velocity is small, the outer radius or the system size is large.

  5. Nontoxic colloidal particles impede antibiotic resistance of swarming bacteria by disrupting collective motion and speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Shengtao; Liu, Fang; Xing, Bengang; Yeow, Edwin K. L.

    2015-12-01

    A monolayer of swarming B. subtilis on semisolid agar is shown to display enhanced resistance against antibacterial drugs due to their collective behavior and motility. The dynamics of swarming motion, visualized in real time using time-lapse microscopy, prevents the bacteria from prolonged exposure to lethal drug concentrations. The elevated drug resistance is significantly reduced when the collective motion of bacteria is judiciously disrupted using nontoxic polystyrene colloidal particles immobilized on the agar surface. The colloidal particles block and hinder the motion of the cells, and force large swarming rafts to break up into smaller packs in order to maneuver across narrow spaces between densely packed particles. In this manner, cohesive rafts rapidly lose their collectivity, speed, and group dynamics, and the cells become vulnerable to the drugs. The antibiotic resistance capability of swarming B. subtilis is experimentally observed to be negatively correlated with the number density of colloidal particles on the engineered surface. This relationship is further tested using an improved self-propelled particle model that takes into account interparticle alignment and hard-core repulsion. This work has pertinent implications on the design of optimal methods to treat drug resistant bacteria commonly found in swarming colonies.

  6. Crossing scales, crossing disciplines: collective motion and collective action in the Global Commons†

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Simon

    2010-01-01

    Two conflicting tendencies can be seen throughout the biological world: individuality and collective behaviour. Natural selection operates on differences among individuals, rewarding those who perform better. Nonetheless, even within this milieu, cooperation arises, and the repeated emergence of multicellularity is the most striking example. The same tendencies are played out at higher levels, as individuals cooperate in groups, which compete with other such groups. Many of our environmental and other global problems can be traced to such conflicts, and to the unwillingness of individual agents to take account of the greater good. One of the great challenges in achieving sustainability will be in understanding the basis of cooperation, and in taking multicellularity to yet a higher level, finding the pathways to the level of cooperation that is the only hope for the preservation of the planet. PMID:20008381

  7. One ring to rule them all: tuning bacteria collective motion via geometric confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giomi, Luca

    2016-08-01

    Suspensions of swimming bacteria are known to self-organize into turbulent-like flows for sufficiently high density and nutrients concentration. This spectacular example of collective behavior, on which the survival of the colony itself is believed to rely, appears however impossible to control. In a recent experimental and computational study, Wioland et al (2016 New J. Phys. 18 075002) have demonstrated that the collective motion of B. subtilis can be in fact selectively tuned by confining the system into a ring-shaped channel.

  8. GDR as a Probe of the Collective Motion in Nuclei at High Spins, Temperatures or Isospins

    SciTech Connect

    Maj, Adam

    2008-11-11

    The gamma-decay of the Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR), the high-frequency collective vibration of protons against neutrons, has been proven to be a basic probe for the shapes of hot nuclei, especially to study the effective shape evolution caused by the collective rotation of a nucleus. In this context an interesting question arises: what is the nuclear shape at extreme values of spin or temperatures, close to the limit impose by another collective motion--fission, and how evolves the giant dipole collective vibrations as a function of isospin. Short overview of the results from the experiments aimed to answer these questions are presented and possible perspectives of these type of studies for exotic nuclei to be obtained with the novel gamma-calorimeter PARIS and soon available intense radioactive beams are discussed.

  9. Collective motion of motile cilia: from human airways to model systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicuta, Pietro; Feriani, Luigi; Chioccioli, Maurizio; Kotar, Jurij

    Mammalian airways are a fantastic playground of nonlinear phenomena, from the function of individual active filaments, to the emerging collective behaviour, to the rheology of the mucus solution surrounding cilia. We have been investigating the fundamental physics of this system through a variety of model system approaches, both experimental and computational. In the last year we have started measurements on living human cells, observing cilia shape during beating, and measuring speed and coherence of the collective dynamics. We report on significant differences in the collective motion in ciliated cell carpets from a variety of diseases, and we attempt to reconcile the collective dynamical phenotypes to the properties of individual filaments and the mechanics of the environment.

  10. Physics of active jamming during collective cellular motion in a monolayer.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Simon; Hannezo, Edouard; Elgeti, Jens; Joanny, Jean-François; Silberzan, Pascal; Gov, Nir S

    2015-12-15

    Although collective cell motion plays an important role, for example during wound healing, embryogenesis, or cancer progression, the fundamental rules governing this motion are still not well understood, in particular at high cell density. We study here the motion of human bronchial epithelial cells within a monolayer, over long times. We observe that, as the monolayer ages, the cells slow down monotonously, while the velocity correlation length first increases as the cells slow down but eventually decreases at the slowest motions. By comparing experiments, analytic model, and detailed particle-based simulations, we shed light on this biological amorphous solidification process, demonstrating that the observed dynamics can be explained as a consequence of the combined maturation and strengthening of cell-cell and cell-substrate adhesions. Surprisingly, the increase of cell surface density due to proliferation is only secondary in this process. This analysis is confirmed with two other cell types. The very general relations between the mean cell velocity and velocity correlation lengths, which apply for aggregates of self-propelled particles, as well as motile cells, can possibly be used to discriminate between various parameter changes in vivo, from noninvasive microscopy data. PMID:26627719

  11. Physics of active jamming during collective cellular motion in a monolayer

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Simon; Hannezo, Edouard; Elgeti, Jens; Joanny, Jean-François; Silberzan, Pascal; Gov, Nir S.

    2015-01-01

    Although collective cell motion plays an important role, for example during wound healing, embryogenesis, or cancer progression, the fundamental rules governing this motion are still not well understood, in particular at high cell density. We study here the motion of human bronchial epithelial cells within a monolayer, over long times. We observe that, as the monolayer ages, the cells slow down monotonously, while the velocity correlation length first increases as the cells slow down but eventually decreases at the slowest motions. By comparing experiments, analytic model, and detailed particle-based simulations, we shed light on this biological amorphous solidification process, demonstrating that the observed dynamics can be explained as a consequence of the combined maturation and strengthening of cell−cell and cell−substrate adhesions. Surprisingly, the increase of cell surface density due to proliferation is only secondary in this process. This analysis is confirmed with two other cell types. The very general relations between the mean cell velocity and velocity correlation lengths, which apply for aggregates of self-propelled particles, as well as motile cells, can possibly be used to discriminate between various parameter changes in vivo, from noninvasive microscopy data. PMID:26627719

  12. Collective atomic scattering and motional effects in a dense coherent medium

    PubMed Central

    Bromley, S. L.; Zhu, B.; Bishof, M.; Zhang, X.; Bothwell, T.; Schachenmayer, J.; Nicholson, T. L.; Kaiser, R.; Yelin, S. F.; Lukin, M. D.; Rey, A. M.; Ye, J.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate collective emission from coherently driven ultracold 88Sr atoms. We perform two sets of experiments using a strong and weak transition that are insensitive and sensitive, respectively, to atomic motion at 1 μK. We observe highly directional forward emission with a peak intensity that is enhanced, for the strong transition, by >103 compared with that in the transverse direction. This is accompanied by substantial broadening of spectral lines. For the weak transition, the forward enhancement is substantially reduced due to motion. Meanwhile, a density-dependent frequency shift of the weak transition (∼10% of the natural linewidth) is observed. In contrast, this shift is suppressed to <1% of the natural linewidth for the strong transition. Along the transverse direction, we observe strong polarization dependences of the fluorescence intensity and line broadening for both transitions. The measurements are reproduced with a theoretical model treating the atoms as coherent, interacting radiating dipoles. PMID:26984643

  13. Mosh pits and Circle pits: Collective motion at heavy metal concerts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierbaum, Matthew; Silverberg, Jesse L.; Sethna, James P.; Cohen, Itai

    2013-03-01

    Heavy metal concerts present an extreme environment in which large crowds (~102 -105) of humans experience very loud music (~ 130 dB) in sync with bright, flashing lights, often while intoxicated. In this setting, we find two types of collective motion: mosh pits, in which participants collide with each other randomly in a manner resembling an ideal gas, and circle pits, in which participants run collectively in a circle forming a vortex of people. We model these two collective behaviors using a flocking model and find qualitative and quantitative agreement with the behaviors found in videos of metal concerts. Futhermore, we find a phase diagram showing the transition from a mosh pit to a circle pit as well as a predicted third phase, lane formation.

  14. Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerhart, James B.; Nussbaum, Rudi H.

    This monograph was written for the Conference on the New Instructional Materials in Physics held at the University of Washington in summer, 1965. It is intended for use in an introductory course in college physics. It consists of an extensive qualitative discussion of motion followed by a detailed development of the quantitative methods needed to…

  15. Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This issue of Exploratorium Magazine focuses on the topic of motion. Contents include: (1) "First Word" (Zach Tobias); (2) "Cosmic Collisions" (Robert Irion); (3) "The Mobile Cell" (Karen E. Kalumuck); (4) "The Paths of Paths" (Steven Vogel); (5) "Fragments" (Pearl Tesler); (6) "Moving Pictures" (Amy Snyder); (7) "Plants on the Go" (Katharine…

  16. The HAMP Signal Relay Domain Adopts Multiple Conformational States through Collective Piston and Tilt Motions

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lizhe; Bolhuis, Peter G.; Vreede, Jocelyne

    2013-01-01

    The HAMP domain is a linker region in prokaryotic sensor proteins and relays input signals to the transmitter domain and vice versa. Functional as a dimer, the structure of HAMP shows a parallel coiled-coil motif comprising four helices. To date, it is unclear how HAMP can relay signals from one domain to another, although several models exist. In this work, we use molecular simulation to test the hypothesis that HAMP adopts different conformations, one of which represents an active, signal-relaying configuration, and another an inactive, resting state. We first performed molecular dynamics simulation on the prototype HAMP domain Af1503 from Archaeoglobus fulgidus. We explored its conformational space by taking the structure of the A291F mutant disabling HAMP activity as a starting point. These simulations revealed additional conformational states that differ in the tilt angles between the helices as well as the relative piston shifts of the helices relative to each other. By enhancing the sampling in a metadynamics set up, we investigated three mechanistic models for HAMP signal transduction. Our results indicate that HAMP can access additional conformational states characterized by piston motion. Furthermore, the piston motion of the N-terminal helix of one monomer is directly correlated with the opposite piston motion of the C-terminal helix of the other monomer. The change in piston motion is accompanied by a change in tilt angle between the monomers, thus revealing that HAMP exhibits a collective motion, i.e. a combination of changes in tilt angles and a piston-like displacement. Our results provide insights into the conformational changes that underlie the signaling mechanism involving HAMP. PMID:23468603

  17. Birds, Fish, and Sludge: New Theories of Old Problems in Collective Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toner, John

    2004-03-01

    Theories of 3 problems involving collective motion of large numbers of particles will be presented: 1) "Ferromagnetic" Flocking (1,2), i.e., the collective motion of large "flocks" of biological organisms with non-zero average velocity. A "hydrodynamic" model for such flocks predicts that, unlike simple fluids, flocks show huge fluctuation effects in spatial dimensions d<4 that radically change their behavior. In d=2, it is ONLY these effects that make it possible for the flock to move coherently at all. 2) "Nematic" flocks(3), in which the mean velocity of the flock is zero, but there is a preferred axis for motion. Such phases have been observed experimentally(4). The theory predicts that these flocks should exhibit huge number fluctuations, scaling like the mean number N of creatures, rather than sqrt (N) as in equilibrium materials. 3)Sedimentation. Past theoretical work(5) suggests "unscreened" phases exist in sedimenting systems, in which velocity fluctuations grow linearly with system size L. Extensions of the model of (5) to include effects of the average relative motion of the sedimenting particles and the background fluid show that this divergence of velocity fluctuations stops at sufficiently large L. References: (1)J. Toner and Y-h. Tu, PRL V. 75, 4326(1995);Phys. Rev. E Vol. 58, 4828(1998).(2)Y.-h. Tu, J. Toner, and M. Ulm, PRL, Vol. 80, 4819(1998).(3) S. Ramaswamy, R.A. Simha, and J. Toner, Europhys. Lett. V. 62, 196(2003).(4) R. Kemkemer, et. al., Eur. Phys. J. E v. 1, 215(2000).(5) A. Levine et. al., PRL V. 81, 5944(1998).

  18. Emergence of Collective Motion in a Model of Interacting Brownian Particles.

    PubMed

    Dossetti, Victor; Sevilla, Francisco J

    2015-07-31

    By studying a system of Brownian particles that interact among themselves only through a local velocity-alignment force that does not affect their speed, we show that self-propulsion is not a necessary feature for the flocking transition to take place as long as underdamped particle dynamics can be guaranteed. Moreover, the system transits from stationary phases close to thermal equilibrium, with no net flux of particles, to far-from-equilibrium ones exhibiting collective motion, phase coexistence, long-range order, and giant number fluctuations, features typically associated with ordered phases of models where self-propelled particles with overdamped dynamics are considered. PMID:26274444

  19. Emergence of Collective Motion in a Model of Interacting Brownian Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dossetti, Victor; Sevilla, Francisco J.

    2015-07-01

    By studying a system of Brownian particles that interact among themselves only through a local velocity-alignment force that does not affect their speed, we show that self-propulsion is not a necessary feature for the flocking transition to take place as long as underdamped particle dynamics can be guaranteed. Moreover, the system transits from stationary phases close to thermal equilibrium, with no net flux of particles, to far-from-equilibrium ones exhibiting collective motion, phase coexistence, long-range order, and giant number fluctuations, features typically associated with ordered phases of models where self-propelled particles with overdamped dynamics are considered.

  20. Amplitudes of protein backbone dynamics and correlated motions in a small alpha/beta protein: correspondence of dipolar coupling and heteronuclear relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Clore, G Marius; Schwieters, Charles D

    2004-08-24

    Backbone residual dipolar coupling (N-H, Calpha-Halpha, N-C', and Calpha-C') data collected in five different media on the B3 IgG binding domain of streptococcal protein G (GB3) have been analyzed by simultaneous refinement of the coordinates and optimization of the magnitudes and orientations of the alignment tensors using single and multiple structure representations. We show, using appropriate error analysis, that agreement between observed and calculated dipolar couplings at the level of experimental uncertainty is obtained with a two-structure (N(e) = 2) ensemble representation which represents the simplest equilibrium description of anisotropic motions. The data permit one to determine the magnitude of the anisotropic motions along the four different backbone bond vectors in terms of order parameters. The order parameters, , for the N-H bond vectors are in qualitative agreement with the generalized order parameters, S(2)NH(relaxation), derived from (15)N relaxation measurements, with a correlation coefficient of 0.84. S(2)NH(relaxation) can be regarded as the product of an anisotropic order parameter, corresponding to derived from the residual dipolar couplings, and an axially symmetric order parameter, S(2)NH(axial), corresponding to bond librations which are expected to be essentially uniform along the polypeptide chain. The current data indicate that the average value of S(2)NH(axial) is approximately 0.9. The close correspondence of and S(2)NH(relaxation) indicates that any large-scale displacements from the mean coordinate positions on time scales longer than the rotational correlation time are rare and hence do not perturb the observed dipolar couplings. Analysis of a set of 100 N(e) = 2 ensembles reveals the presence of some long-range correlated motions of N-H and Calpha-Halpha vectors involving residues far apart in the sequence but close together in space. In addition, direct evidence is

  1. Theoretical investigation of polarization effects in solution: Importance of solvent collective motions

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, Tateki

    2015-01-22

    Recent theoretical studies on interesting topics related to polarization effects in solutions are presented. As one of interesting topics, ionic liquids (ILs) solvents are focused on. The collective dynamics of electronic polarizability through interionic dynamics and the effect of polarization in ILs, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([BMIm][PF{sub 6}]), are studied with molecular dynamics simulation. Also, the time-dependent polarization effect on the probe betaine dye molecule, pyridinium N-phenoxide, in water is investigated by a time-dependent reference interaction site model self-consistent field (time-dependent RISM-SCF) approach. The importance of considering polarization effects on solution systems related to solvent collective motions is shown.

  2. From behavioural analyses to models of collective motion in fish schools

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Ugo; Gautrais, Jacques; Couzin, Iain D.; Theraulaz, Guy

    2012-01-01

    Fish schooling is a phenomenon of long-lasting interest in ethology and ecology, widely spread across taxa and ecological contexts, and has attracted much interest from statistical physics and theoretical biology as a case of self-organized behaviour. One topic of intense interest is the search of specific behavioural mechanisms at stake at the individual level and from which the school properties emerges. This is fundamental for understanding how selective pressure acting at the individual level promotes adaptive properties of schools and in trying to disambiguate functional properties from non-adaptive epiphenomena. Decades of studies on collective motion by means of individual-based modelling have allowed a qualitative understanding of the self-organization processes leading to collective properties at school level, and provided an insight into the behavioural mechanisms that result in coordinated motion. Here, we emphasize a set of paradigmatic modelling assumptions whose validity remains unclear, both from a behavioural point of view and in terms of quantitative agreement between model outcome and empirical data. We advocate for a specific and biologically oriented re-examination of these assumptions through experimental-based behavioural analysis and modelling. PMID:24312723

  3. Collective Motion in a Network of Self-Propelled Agent Systems.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hao; Zhao, Dandan; Liu, Xueming; Gao, Jianxi

    2015-01-01

    Collective motions of animals that move towards the same direction is a conspicuous feature in nature. Such groups of animals are called a self-propelled agent (SPA) systems. Many studies have been focused on the synchronization of isolated SPA systems. In real scenarios, different SPA systems are coupled with each other forming a network of SPA systems. For example, a flock of birds and a school of fish show predator-prey relationships and different groups of birds may compete for food. In this work, we propose a general framework to study the collective motion of coupled self-propelled agent systems. Especially, we study how three different connections between SPA systems: symbiosis, predator-prey, and competition influence the synchronization of the network of SPA systems. We find that a network of SPA systems coupled with symbiosis relationship arrive at a complete synchronization as all its subsystems showing a complete synchronization; a network of SPA systems coupled by predator-prey relationship can not reach a complete synchronization and its subsystems converges to different synchronized directions; and the competitive relationship between SPA systems could increase the synchronization of each SPA systems, while the network of SPA systems coupled by competitive relationships shows an optimal synchronization for small coupling strength, indicating that small competition promotes the synchronization of the entire system. PMID:26640954

  4. Collective Motion of Swarming Agents Evolving on a Sphere Manifold: A Fundamental Framework and Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Collective motion of self-propelled agents has attracted much attention in vast disciplines. However, almost all investigations focus on such agents evolving in the Euclidean space, with rare concern of swarms on non-Euclidean manifolds. Here we present a novel and fundamental framework for agents evolving on a sphere manifold, with which a variety of concrete cooperative-rules of agents can be designed separately and integrated easily into the framework, which may perhaps pave a way for considering general spherical collective motion (SCM) of a swarm. As an example, one concrete cooperative-rule, i.e., the spherical direction-alignment (SDA), is provided, which corresponds to the usual and popular direction-alignment rule in the Euclidean space. The SCM of the agents with the SDA has many unique statistical properties and phase-transitions that are unexpected in the counterpart models evolving in the Euclidean space, which unveils that the topology of the sphere has an important impact on swarming emergence. PMID:26350632

  5. Collective Motion in a Network of Self-Propelled Agent Systems

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hao; Zhao, Dandan; Liu, Xueming; Gao, Jianxi

    2015-01-01

    Collective motions of animals that move towards the same direction is a conspicuous feature in nature. Such groups of animals are called a self-propelled agent (SPA) systems. Many studies have been focused on the synchronization of isolated SPA systems. In real scenarios, different SPA systems are coupled with each other forming a network of SPA systems. For example, a flock of birds and a school of fish show predator-prey relationships and different groups of birds may compete for food. In this work, we propose a general framework to study the collective motion of coupled self-propelled agent systems. Especially, we study how three different connections between SPA systems: symbiosis, predator-prey, and competition influence the synchronization of the network of SPA systems. We find that a network of SPA systems coupled with symbiosis relationship arrive at a complete synchronization as all its subsystems showing a complete synchronization; a network of SPA systems coupled by predator-prey relationship can not reach a complete synchronization and its subsystems converges to different synchronized directions; and the competitive relationship between SPA systems could increase the synchronization of each SPA systems, while the network of SPA systems coupled by competitive relationships shows an optimal synchronization for small coupling strength, indicating that small competition promotes the synchronization of the entire system. PMID:26640954

  6. Exploring the Contribution of Collective Motions to the Dynamics of Forced-Unfolding in Tubulin

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Harshad; Momin, Farhana; Haines, Kelly E.; Dima, Ruxandra I.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Decomposition of the intrinsic dynamics of proteins into collective motions among distant regions of the protein structure provides a physically appealing approach that couples the dynamics of the system with its functional role. The cellular functions of microtubules (an essential component of the cytoskeleton in all eukaryotic cells) depend on their dynamic instability, which is altered by various factors among which applied forces are central. To shed light on the coupling between forces and the dynamic instability of microtubules, we focus on the investigation of the response of the microtubule subunits (tubulin) to applied forces. We address this point by adapting an approach designed to survey correlations for the equilibrium dynamics of proteins to the case of correlations for proteins forced-dynamics. The resulting collective motions in tubulin have a number of functional implications, such as the identification of long-range couplings with a role in blocking the dynamic instability of microtubules. A fundamental implication of our study for the life of a cell is that, to increase the likelihood of unraveling of large cytoskeletal filaments under physiological forces, molecular motors must use a combination of pulling and torsion rather than just pulling. PMID:20159162

  7. Physics of microswimmers--single particle motion and collective behavior: a review.

    PubMed

    Elgeti, J; Winkler, R G; Gompper, G

    2015-05-01

    Locomotion and transport of microorganisms in fluids is an essential aspect of life. Search for food, orientation toward light, spreading of off-spring, and the formation of colonies are only possible due to locomotion. Swimming at the microscale occurs at low Reynolds numbers, where fluid friction and viscosity dominates over inertia. Here, evolution achieved propulsion mechanisms, which overcome and even exploit drag. Prominent propulsion mechanisms are rotating helical flagella, exploited by many bacteria, and snake-like or whip-like motion of eukaryotic flagella, utilized by sperm and algae. For artificial microswimmers, alternative concepts to convert chemical energy or heat into directed motion can be employed, which are potentially more efficient. The dynamics of microswimmers comprises many facets, which are all required to achieve locomotion. In this article, we review the physics of locomotion of biological and synthetic microswimmers, and the collective behavior of their assemblies. Starting from individual microswimmers, we describe the various propulsion mechanism of biological and synthetic systems and address the hydrodynamic aspects of swimming. This comprises synchronization and the concerted beating of flagella and cilia. In addition, the swimming behavior next to surfaces is examined. Finally, collective and cooperate phenomena of various types of isotropic and anisotropic swimmers with and without hydrodynamic interactions are discussed. PMID:25919479

  8. Physics of microswimmers—single particle motion and collective behavior: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elgeti, J.; Winkler, R. G.; Gompper, G.

    2015-05-01

    Locomotion and transport of microorganisms in fluids is an essential aspect of life. Search for food, orientation toward light, spreading of off-spring, and the formation of colonies are only possible due to locomotion. Swimming at the microscale occurs at low Reynolds numbers, where fluid friction and viscosity dominates over inertia. Here, evolution achieved propulsion mechanisms, which overcome and even exploit drag. Prominent propulsion mechanisms are rotating helical flagella, exploited by many bacteria, and snake-like or whip-like motion of eukaryotic flagella, utilized by sperm and algae. For artificial microswimmers, alternative concepts to convert chemical energy or heat into directed motion can be employed, which are potentially more efficient. The dynamics of microswimmers comprises many facets, which are all required to achieve locomotion. In this article, we review the physics of locomotion of biological and synthetic microswimmers, and the collective behavior of their assemblies. Starting from individual microswimmers, we describe the various propulsion mechanism of biological and synthetic systems and address the hydrodynamic aspects of swimming. This comprises synchronization and the concerted beating of flagella and cilia. In addition, the swimming behavior next to surfaces is examined. Finally, collective and cooperate phenomena of various types of isotropic and anisotropic swimmers with and without hydrodynamic interactions are discussed.

  9. Collective motion of self-propelled particles with density-dependent switching effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qiu-shi; Ma, Yu-qiang

    2016-05-01

    We study the effect of density-dependent angular response on large scale collective motion, that particles are more likely to switch their moving direction within lower local density region. We show that the presence of density-dependent angular response leads to three typical phases: polar liquid, micro-phase separation and disordered gas states. In our model, the transition between micro-phase separation and disordered gas is discontinuous. Giant number fluctuation is observed in polar liquid phase with statistically homogeneous order. In the micro-phase separation parameter space, high order and high density bands dominate the dynamics. We also compare our results with Vicsek model and show that the density-dependent directional switching response can stabilize the band state to very low noise condition. This band stripe could recruit almost all the particles in the system, which greatly enhances the coherence of the system. Our results could be helpful for understanding extremely coherent motion in nature and also would have practical implications for designing novel self-organization pattern.

  10. The role of collective motion in the ultrafast charge transfer in van der Waals heterostructures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Han; Bang, Junhyeok; Sun, Yiyang; Liang, Liangbo; West, Damien; Meunier, Vincent; Zhang, Shengbai

    2016-01-01

    The success of van der Waals heterostructures made of graphene, metal dichalcogenides and other layered materials, hinges on the understanding of charge transfer across the interface as the foundation for new device concepts and applications. In contrast to conventional heterostructures, where a strong interfacial coupling is essential to charge transfer, recent experimental findings indicate that van der Waals heterostructues can exhibit ultrafast charge transfer despite the weak binding of these heterostructures. Here we find, using time-dependent density functional theory molecular dynamics, that the collective motion of excitons at the interface leads to plasma oscillations associated with optical excitation. By constructing a simple model of the van der Waals heterostructure, we show that there exists an unexpected criticality of the oscillations, yielding rapid charge transfer across the interface. Application to the MoS2/WS2 heterostructure yields good agreement with experiments, indicating near complete charge transfer within a timescale of 100 fs. PMID:27160484

  11. The role of collective motion in the ultrafast charge transfer in van der Waals heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han; Bang, Junhyeok; Sun, Yiyang; Liang, Liangbo; West, Damien; Meunier, Vincent; Zhang, Shengbai

    2016-01-01

    The success of van der Waals heterostructures made of graphene, metal dichalcogenides and other layered materials, hinges on the understanding of charge transfer across the interface as the foundation for new device concepts and applications. In contrast to conventional heterostructures, where a strong interfacial coupling is essential to charge transfer, recent experimental findings indicate that van der Waals heterostructues can exhibit ultrafast charge transfer despite the weak binding of these heterostructures. Here we find, using time-dependent density functional theory molecular dynamics, that the collective motion of excitons at the interface leads to plasma oscillations associated with optical excitation. By constructing a simple model of the van der Waals heterostructure, we show that there exists an unexpected criticality of the oscillations, yielding rapid charge transfer across the interface. Application to the MoS2/WS2 heterostructure yields good agreement with experiments, indicating near complete charge transfer within a timescale of 100 fs. PMID:27160484

  12. The role of collective motion in the ultrafast charge transfer in van der Waals heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Han; Bang, Junhyeok; Sun, Yiyang; Liang, Liangbo; West, Damien; Meunier, Vincent; Zhang, Shengbai

    2016-05-01

    The success of van der Waals heterostructures made of graphene, metal dichalcogenides and other layered materials, hinges on the understanding of charge transfer across the interface as the foundation for new device concepts and applications. In contrast to conventional heterostructures, where a strong interfacial coupling is essential to charge transfer, recent experimental findings indicate that van der Waals heterostructues can exhibit ultrafast charge transfer despite the weak binding of these heterostructures. Here we find, using time-dependent density functional theory molecular dynamics, that the collective motion of excitons at the interface leads to plasma oscillations associated with optical excitation. By constructing a simple model of the van der Waals heterostructure, we show that there exists an unexpected criticality of the oscillations, yielding rapid charge transfer across the interface. Application to the MoS2/WS2 heterostructure yields good agreement with experiments, indicating near complete charge transfer within a timescale of 100 fs.

  13. Poles as the only true resonant-state signals extracted from a worldwide collection of partial-wave amplitudes using only one, well controlled pole-extraction method

    SciTech Connect

    Hadzimehmedovic, M.; Osmanovic, H.; Stahov, J.; Ceci, S.; Svarc, A.

    2011-09-15

    Each and every energy-dependent partial-wave analysis is parametrizing the pole positions in a procedure defined by the way the continuous energy dependence is implemented. These pole positions are, henceforth, inherently model dependent. To reduce this model dependence, we use only one, coupled-channel, unitary, fully analytic method based on the isobar approximation to extract the pole positions from each available member of the worldwide collection of partial-wave amplitudes, which are understood as nothing more but a good energy-dependent representation of genuine experimental numbers assembled in a form of partial-wave data. In that way, the model dependence related to the different assumptions on the analytic form of the partial-wave amplitudes is avoided, and the true confidence limit for the existence of a particular resonant state, at least in one model, is established. The way the method works and first results are demonstrated for the S{sub 11} partial wave.

  14. The role of collective motion in the ultrafast charge transfer in van der Waals heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Han; Bang, Junhyeok; Sun, Yiyang; Liang, Liangbo; West, Damien; Meunier, Vincent; Zhang, Shengbai

    The success of van der Waals (vdW) heterostructures made of graphene, metal dichalcogenides, and other layered materials, hinges on the understanding of charge transfer across the interface as the foundation for new device concepts and applications. In contrast to conventional heterostructures, where a strong interfacial coupling is essential to charge transfer, recent experimental findings indicate that vdW heterostructues can exhibit ultra-fast charge transfer despite the weak binding of these heterostructures. Using time-dependent density functional theory molecular dynamics, we find that the collective motion of excitons at the interface lead to plasma oscillations associated with optical excitation. Furthermore, instability of these oscillations explain the rapid charge transfer across the interface and are shown to be a general feature of vdW heterostructures provided they have a critical minimum dipole coupling. Application to the MoS2/WS2 heterostructure yields good agreement with experiment, indicating near complete charge transfer within a timescale of 100 fs.

  15. Mapping quadrupole collectivity in the Cd isotopes: The breakdown of harmonic vibrational motion

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, P. E.; Green, K. L.; Bangay, J.; Varela, A. Diaz; Sumithrarachchi, C. S.; Bandyopadhyay, D. S.; Bianco, L.; Demand, G. A.; Finlay, P.; Grinyer, G. F.; Leach, K. G.; Phillips, A. A.; Schumaker, M. A.; Svensson, C. E.; Wong, J.; Austin, R. A. E.; Colosimo, S.; Ball, G. C.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Hackman, G.

    2011-10-28

    The stable Cd isotopes have long been used as paradigms for spherical vibrational motion. Extensive investigations with in-beam {gamma} spectroscopy have resulted in very-well-established level schemes, including many lifetimes or lifetime limits. A programme has been initiated to complement these studies with very-high-statistics {beta} decay using the 8{pi} spectrometer at the TRIUMF radioactive beam facility. The decays of {sup 112}In and {sup 112}Ag have been studied with an emphasis on the observation of, or the placement of stringent limits on, low-energy branches between potential multi-phonon levels. A lack of suitable 0{sup +} or 2{sup +} three-phonon candidates has been revealed. Further, the sum of the B(E2) strength from spin 0{sup +} and 2{sup +} states up to 3 MeV in excitation energy to the assigned two-phonon levels falls far short of the harmonic-vibrational expectations. This lack of strength points to the failing of collective models based on vibrational phonon structures.

  16. d-alpha correlation functions and collective motion in Xe+Au collisions at E/A=50 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Verde, G; Danielewicz, P; Lynch, W; Chan, C; Gelbke, C; Kwong, L; Liu, T; Liu, X; Seymour, D; Tan, W; Tsang, M; Wagner, A; Xu, H; Brown, D; Davin, B; Larochelle, Y; de Souza, R; Charity, R; Sobotka, L

    2006-07-27

    The interplay of the effects of geometry and collective motion on d-{alpha} correlation functions is investigated for central Xe+Au collisions at E/A=50 MeV. The data cannot be explained with out collective motion, which could be partly along the beam axis. A semi-quantitative description of the data can be obtained using a Monte -Carlo model, where thermal emission is superimposed on collective motion. Both the emission volume and the competition between the thermal and collective motion influence significantly the shape of the correlation function, motivating new strategies for extending intensity interferometry studies to massive particles.

  17. Connecting grain motion to large-scale fluctuations in bed load transport: The role of collective dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D. B.; Jerolmack, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    Bed load transport is a notoriously unpredictable process. A primary component of this unpredictability arises from stochastic fluctuations which require non-trivial averaging. This averaging must be informed by the length and time scales of the fluctuations, and a rigorous method for arriving at the proper averaging scales must link grain scale motion to macroscopic transport. A statistical mechanical framework has been suggested by Furbish and colleagues to accomplish this goal. This model assumes that grain motion is independent of other particles. Experiments show that this is not the case, and that bed load fluctuations possess length and time scales larger than any hydrodynamic scaling. This indicates that fluctuations in grain motion are correlated; as hydrodynamics cannot explain this behavior, we posit that its origins lie in the granular dynamics of bed load transport. Evidence to support this view can be found in the work of Ancey and colleagues where they show that, upon approaching the threshold of motion: intermittency of transport grows, dynamics of grain motion slow down, and collective entrainment occurs. These behaviors are hallmarks of a disordered system approaching a jamming transition, or the point where motion ceases. This points to the utility of using the jamming framework to study transport near threshold. We seek to use this framework to document the occurrence and understand the origins of the collective entrainment of grains. This is done using a 2D experiment with spherical particles driven by a turbulent flow where collisions are a significant driver of entrainment due to the momentum transfer that occurs when saltating particles collide with the bed. We characterize the collective particle motion observed in the system using the Χ4 susceptibility. This measure uses the variance of the displacement of a population of sediment in the system to characterize the timescales at which a subset of grains move collectively relative to the

  18. The role of collective motion in the ultrafast charge transfer in van der Waals heterostructures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Han; Bang, Junhyeok; Sun, Yiyang; West, Damien; Meunier, Vincent; Zhang, Shengbai; Liang, Linagbo

    2016-05-10

    Here, the success of van der Waals (vdW) heterostructures, made of graphene, metal dichalcogenides, and other layered materials, hinges on the understanding of charge transfer across the interface as the foundation for new device concepts and applications. In contrast to conventional heterostructures, where a strong interfacial coupling is essential to charge transfer, recent experimental findings indicate that vdW heterostructues can exhibit ultra-fast charge transfer despite the weak binding of the heterostructure. Using time-dependent density functional theory molecular dynamics, we identify a strong dynamic coupling between the vdW layers associated with charge transfer. This dynamic coupling results in rapid nonlinear coherentmore » charge oscillations which constitute a purely electronic phenomenon and are shown to be a general feature of vdW heterostructures provided they have a critical minimum dipole coupling. Application to MoS2/WS2 heterostructure yields good agreement with experiment, indicating near complete charge transfer within a timescale of 100 fs.The success of van der Waals heterostructures made of graphene, metal dichalcogenides and other layered materials, hinges on the understanding of charge transfer across the interface as the foundation for new device concepts and applications. In contrast to conventional heterostructures, where a strong interfacial coupling is essential to charge transfer, recent experimental findings indicate that van der Waals heterostructues can exhibit ultrafast charge transfer despite the weak binding of these heterostructures. Here we find, using time-dependent density functional theory molecular dynamics, that the collective motion of excitons at the interface leads to plasma oscillations associated with optical excitation. By constructing a simple model of the van der Waals heterostructure, we show that there exists an unexpected criticality of the oscillations, yielding rapid charge transfer across the

  19. Systematics of Fragment Spectra and Collective Motion in Au + Au Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keane, Declan

    1998-04-01

    The importance of comprehensive data on single-particle spectra and collective motion has been recognized for many years. The literature contains many references to the need for full ``triple-differential cross section" measurements (d^3σ/dp_⊥ dy dφr , or their equivalent, where φr signifies azimuth relative to the event reaction plane). There are grounds for arguing that talk about triple-differential cross sections is misleading in this context, because the ideal measurements for constraining models in fact resemble eighth-order differentials d^8 σ / dp_⊥ dy dφr dM dm_frag dAt dAp dE_p, where M is a measure of event centrality (e.g., multiplicity), m_frag steps through the possible fragment species, and the subscripts t and p refer to target and projectile, respectively. The ideal goal of a meaningful measurement of the full parameter space in principle requires prohibitively large statistics, and even if those statistics were available, many millions of spectra would be needed to present the eighth-order differential cross sections. In practice, the problem is manageable because the structure of the events in the eight-dimensional parameter space is not nearly as complex as it could be in principle, and a relatively simple phenomenological framework can describe all the known relevant features of the events. The above points will be discussed mostly in the context of measurements of Au + Au data from the EOS Time Projection Chamber at beam energies of 0.25A GeV and above.

  20. The role of collective motion in the ultrafast charge transfer in van der Waals heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Han; Bang, Junhyeok; Sun, Yiyang; Liang, Chen; Damien, West; Meunier, Vincent; Zhang, Prof. Shengbai

    2016-01-01

    The success of van der Waals (vdW) heterostructures, made of graphene, metal dichalcogenides, and other layered materials, hinges on the understanding of charge transfer across the interface as the foundation for new device concepts and applications. In contrast to conventional heterostructures, where a strong interfacial coupling is essential to charge transfer, recent experimental findings indicate that vdW heterostructues can exhibit ultra-fast charge transfer despite the weak binding of the heterostructure. Using time-dependent density functional theory molecular dynamics, we identify a strong dynamic coupling between the vdW layers associated with charge transfer. This dynamic coupling results in rapid nonlinear coherent charge oscillations which constitute a purely electronic phenomenon and are shown to be a general feature of vdW heterostructures provided they have a critical minimum dipole coupling. Application to MoS2/WS2 heterostructure yields good agreement with experiment, indicating near complete charge transfer within a timescale of 100 fs.The success of van der Waals heterostructures made of graphene, metal dichalcogenides and other layered materials, hinges on the understanding of charge transfer across the interface as the foundation for new device concepts and applications. In contrast to conventional heterostructures, where a strong interfacial coupling is essential to charge transfer, recent experimental findings indicate that van der Waals heterostructues can exhibit ultrafast charge transfer despite the weak binding of these heterostructures. Here we find, using time-dependent density functional theory molecular dynamics, that the collective motion of excitons at the interface leads to plasma oscillations associated with optical excitation. By constructing a simple model of the van der Waals heterostructure, we show that there exists an unexpected criticality of the oscillations, yielding rapid charge transfer across the interface. Application

  1. Comparison of human lumbar facet joint capsule strains during simulated high-velocity, low-amplitude spinal manipulation versus physiological motions

    PubMed Central

    Ianuzzi, Allyson; Khalsa, Partap S.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT Spinal manipulation (SM) is a n effective treatment for low back pain (LBP), and it has been theorized that SM induces a beneficial neurophysiological effect by stimulating mechanically sensitive neurons in the lumbar facet joint capsule (FJC). PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to determine whether human lumbar FJC strains during simulated SM were different from those that occur during physiological motions. STUDY DESIGN/SETTING Lumbar FJC strains were measured in human cadaveric spine specimens during physiological motions and simulated SM in a laboratory setting. METHODS Specimens were tested during displacement-controlled physiological motions of flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotations. SM was simulated using combinations of manipulation site (L3, L4, and L5), impulse speed (5, 20, and 50 mm/s), and pre-torque magnitude (applied at T12 to simulate patient position; 0, 5, 10 Nm). FJC strains and vertebral motions (using six degrees of freedom) were measured during both loading protocols. RESULTS During SM, the applied loads were within the range measured during SM in vivo. Vertebral translations occurred primarily in the direction of the applied load, and were similar in magnitude regardless of manipulation site. Vertebral rotations and FJC strain magnitudes during SM were within the range that occurred during physiological motions. At a given FJC, manipulations delivered distally induced capsule strains similar in magnitude to those that occurred when the manipulation was applied proximally. CONCLUSIONS FJC strain magnitudes during SM were within the physiological range, suggesting that SM is biomechanically safe. Successful treatment of patients with LBP using SM may not require precise segmental specificity, because the strain magnitudes at a given FJC during SM do not depend upon manipulation site. PMID:15863084

  2. Alignment vs noise in self-propelled particles: minimal models for collective motion and their continuous descriptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chate, Hugues

    2012-02-01

    Two important 1995 papers have marked the birth of collective motion studies in physics: Vicsek et al introduced what could now be described as the ``Ising model'' of this new subfield. This prompted Toner and Tu to propose a continuum theory of flocks which they showed to give rise to long-range orientational order even in two space dimensions. In this setting, the complexity of most natural instances of collective motion is reduced to the competition between local alignment and noise in interacting self-propelled particles. As I will show, this nevertheless gives rise to important and new physics. In this talk, I will give an update of our current knowledge about the Vicsek model, the Toner-Tu theory, and their relationship. I will also present the emerging picture of universality classes brought about by recent progress in the study of Vicsek-like models together with their continuous descriptions.

  3. Two large-amplitude motions in triatomic molecules. Force field of the 1B2 (1A') state of SO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezey, Paul G.; Ramachandra Rao, Ch. V. S.

    1980-01-01

    A program has been developed to calculate the energy levels associated with the two large-amplitude stretching vibrations ν1 and ν3 of a bent triatomic molecule in which the ν3 oscillation occurs in a double minimum potential. Employing the two large-amplitude Hamiltonian H0s(ρ1,ρ3) obtained earlier by Brand and Rao. [J. Mol. Spectrosc., 61, 360 (1976)], the vibrational energy levels (v1,v3even/odd) of SO2 molecule in its 1B2 (1A') excited state are calculated. The nine parameters of the potential function V0(ρ1,ρ3) are then adjusted to give a least-square fit to the 12 observed vibrational term values corresponding to the levels (v1,v3even) of S16O2 and S18O2. A three-dimensional picture of the potential surface V0(ρ1,ρ3) using the final set of force constants is also presented. The saddle point of this surface is at (ρO1=1.5525 Å, ρO3=0.0 Å) and the absolute minima occur at (ρe1=1.5644 Å, ρe3=±0.0745 Å). Barrier height, i.e., the height of the saddle point above the absolute minima, is 140 cm-1.

  4. Correction of motion artifacts in OCT-AFI data collected in airways (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abouei, Elham; Lane, Pierre M.; Pahlevaninezhad, Hamid; Lee, Anthony; Lam, Stephen; MacAulay, Calum E.

    2016-03-01

    Abstract: Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides in vivo imaging with near-histologic resolution of tissue morphology. OCT has been successfully employed in clinical practice in non-pulmonary fields of medicine such as ophthalmology and cardiology. Studies suggest that OCT has the potential to be a powerful tool for the detection and localization of malignant and non-malignant pulmonary diseases. The combination of OCT with autofluorescence imaging (AFI) provides valuable information about the structural and metabolic state of tissues. Successful application of OCT or OCT-AFI to the field of pulmonary medicine requires overcoming several challenges. This work address those associated with motion: cardiac cycle, breathing and non-uniform rotation distortion (NURD) artifacts. Mechanically rotated endoscopic probes often suffer from image degradation due to NURD. In addition cardiac and breathing motion artifacts may be present in-vivo that are not seen ex-vivo. These motion artifacts can be problematic in OCT-AFI systems with slower acquisition rates and have been observed to generate identifiable prominent artifacts which make confident interpretation of observed structures (blood vessels, etc) difficult. Understanding and correcting motion artifact could improve the image quality and interpretation. In this work, the motion artifacts in pulmonary OCT-AFI data sets are estimated in both AFI and OCT images using a locally adaptive registration algorithm that can be used to correct/reduce such artifacts. Performance of the algorithm is evaluated on images of a NURD phantom and on in-vivo OCT-AFI datasets of peripheral lung airways.

  5. Collective Cell Motion in an Epithelial Sheet Can Be Quantitatively Described by a Stochastic Interacting Particle Model

    PubMed Central

    Cochet, Olivier; Grasland-Mongrain, Erwan; Silberzan, Pascal; Hakim, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Modelling the displacement of thousands of cells that move in a collective way is required for the simulation and the theoretical analysis of various biological processes. Here, we tackle this question in the controlled setting where the motion of Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells in a confluent epithelium is triggered by the unmasking of free surface. We develop a simple model in which cells are described as point particles with a dynamic based on the two premises that, first, cells move in a stochastic manner and, second, tend to adapt their motion to that of their neighbors. Detailed comparison to experimental data show that the model provides a quantitatively accurate description of cell motion in the epithelium bulk at early times. In addition, inclusion of model “leader” cells with modified characteristics, accounts for the digitated shape of the interface which develops over the subsequent hours, providing that leader cells invade free surface more easily than other cells and coordinate their motion with their followers. The previously-described progression of the epithelium border is reproduced by the model and quantitatively explained. PMID:23505356

  6. Nuclear dissipation as damping of collective motion in the time-dependent RPA and extensions of it

    SciTech Connect

    Yannouleas, C.P.

    1982-07-01

    We have formulated a nonperturbative, microscopic dissipative process in the limit of an infinite mean free path which does not require any statistical assumptions. It attributes the damping of the collective motion to real transitions from the collective state to degenerate, more complicated nucelar states. The dissipation is described through wave packets which solve an approximate Schroedinger equation within extended subspaces, larger than the original subspace of the undamped motion. When the simple RPA is used, this process associates the dissipation with the escape width for direct particle emission. When the Second RPA is used, it associates the dissipation with the spreading width for transitions to the 2p-2h components of the nuclear compound states. The energy loss rate for sharp n-phonon initial states is proportional to the total collective energy. The classical dissipation, however, is obtained for coherent, multiphonon, initial packets which describe the damping of the mean field oscillations, and allow a theoretical connection with the Vibrating Potential Model, and thereby with models of one-body dissipation. The present model contrasts with linear response theories. Canonical coordinates for the collective degree of freedom are explicitly introduced. This allows the construction of a nonlinear frictional Hamiltonian which provides a connection with quantal friction. The dissipation process developed here is properly reversible rather than irreversible, in the sense that it is described by an approximate Schroedinger equation which honors time reversibility, rather than by a coarse grained master equation which violates it. Thus, the present theory contrasts with transport theories.

  7. Collective motion of macroscopic spheres floating on capillary ripples: dynamic heterogeneity and dynamic criticality.

    PubMed

    Sanlı, Ceyda; Saitoh, Kuniyasu; Luding, Stefan; van der Meer, Devaraj

    2014-09-01

    When a densely packed monolayer of macroscopic spheres floats on chaotic capillary Faraday waves, a coexistence of large scale convective motion and caging dynamics typical for glassy systems is observed. We subtract the convective mean flow using a coarse graining (homogenization) method and reveal subdiffusion for the caging time scales followed by a diffusive regime at later times. We apply the methods developed to study dynamic heterogeneity and show that the typical time and length scales of the fluctuations due to rearrangements of observed particle groups significantly increase when the system approaches its largest experimentally accessible packing concentration. To connect the system to the dynamic criticality literature, we fit power laws to our results. The resultant critical exponents are consistent with those found in densely packed suspensions of colloids. PMID:25314540

  8. Digital Correction of Motion Artifacts in Microscopy Image Sequences Collected from Living Animals Using Rigid and Non-Rigid Registration

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Kevin S.; Salama, Paul; Dunn, Kenneth W.; Delp, Edward J.

    2013-01-01

    Digital image analysis is a fundamental component of quantitative microscopy. However, intravital microscopy presents many challenges for digital image analysis. In general, microscopy volumes are inherently anisotropic, suffer from decreasing contrast with tissue depth, lack object edge detail, and characteristically have low signal levels. Intravital microscopy introduces the additional problem of motion artifacts, resulting from respiratory motion and heartbeat from specimens imaged in vivo. This paper describes an image registration technique for use with sequences of intravital microscopy images collected in time-series or in 3D volumes. Our registration method involves both rigid and non-rigid components. The rigid registration component corrects global image translations, while the non-rigid component manipulates a uniform grid of control points defined by B-splines. Each control point is optimized by minimizing a cost function consisting of two parts: a term to define image similarity, and a term to ensure deformation grid smoothness. Experimental results indicate that this approach is promising based on the analysis of several image volumes collected from the kidney, lung, and salivary gland of living rodents. PMID:22092443

  9. Digital correction of motion artefacts in microscopy image sequences collected from living animals using rigid and nonrigid registration.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, K S; Salama, P; Dunn, K W; Delp, E J

    2012-02-01

    Digital image analysis is a fundamental component of quantitative microscopy. However, intravital microscopy presents many challenges for digital image analysis. In general, microscopy volumes are inherently anisotropic, suffer from decreasing contrast with tissue depth, lack object edge detail and characteristically have low signal levels. Intravital microscopy introduces the additional problem of motion artefacts, resulting from respiratory motion and heartbeat from specimens imaged in vivo. This paper describes an image registration technique for use with sequences of intravital microscopy images collected in time-series or in 3D volumes. Our registration method involves both rigid and nonrigid components. The rigid registration component corrects global image translations, whereas the nonrigid component manipulates a uniform grid of control points defined by B-splines. Each control point is optimized by minimizing a cost function consisting of two parts: a term to define image similarity, and a term to ensure deformation grid smoothness. Experimental results indicate that this approach is promising based on the analysis of several image volumes collected from the kidney, lung and salivary gland of living rodents. PMID:22092443

  10. Direct observation of ultrafast collective motions in CO myoglobin upon ligand dissociation.

    PubMed

    Barends, Thomas R M; Foucar, Lutz; Ardevol, Albert; Nass, Karol; Aquila, Andrew; Botha, Sabine; Doak, R Bruce; Falahati, Konstantin; Hartmann, Elisabeth; Hilpert, Mario; Heinz, Marcel; Hoffmann, Matthias C; Köfinger, Jürgen; Koglin, Jason E; Kovacsova, Gabriela; Liang, Mengning; Milathianaki, Despina; Lemke, Henrik T; Reinstein, Jochen; Roome, Christopher M; Shoeman, Robert L; Williams, Garth J; Burghardt, Irene; Hummer, Gerhard; Boutet, Sébastien; Schlichting, Ilme

    2015-10-23

    The hemoprotein myoglobin is a model system for the study of protein dynamics. We used time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography at an x-ray free-electron laser to resolve the ultrafast structural changes in the carbonmonoxy myoglobin complex upon photolysis of the Fe-CO bond. Structural changes appear throughout the protein within 500 femtoseconds, with the C, F, and H helices moving away from the heme cofactor and the E and A helices moving toward it. These collective movements are predicted by hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations. Together with the observed oscillations of residues contacting the heme, our calculations support the prediction that an immediate collective response of the protein occurs upon ligand dissociation, as a result of heme vibrational modes coupling to global modes of the protein. PMID:26359336

  11. Collective and Single-Particle Motion in Beyond Mean Field Approaches.

    PubMed

    Egido, J Luis; Borrajo, Marta; Rodríguez, Tomás R

    2016-02-01

    We present a novel nuclear energy density functional method to calculate spectroscopic properties of atomic nuclei. Intrinsic nuclear quadrupole deformations and rotational frequencies are considered simultaneously as the degrees of freedom within a symmetry conserving configuration mixing framework. The present method allows the study of nuclear states with collective and single-particle character. We calculate the fascinating structure of the semimagic ^{44}S nucleus as a first application of the method, obtaining an excellent quantitative agreement both with the available experimental data and with state-of-the-art shell model calculations. PMID:26894706

  12. Dynamical Signatures of Collective Quality Grading in a Social Activity: Attendance to Motion Pictures

    PubMed Central

    Escobar, Juan V.; Sornette, Didier

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the laws governing people’s decisions and interactions by studying the collective dynamics of a well-documented social activity for which there exist ample records of the perceived quality: the attendance to movie theaters in the US. We picture the flows of attendance as impulses or “shocks” driven by external factors that in turn can create new cascades of attendances through direct recommendations whose effectiveness depends on the perceived quality of the movies. This corresponds to an epidemic branching model comprised of a decaying exponential function determining the time between cause and action, and a cascade of actions triggered by previous ones. We find that the vast majority of the ~3,500 movies studied fit our model remarkably well. From our results, we are able to translate a subjective concept such as movie quality into a probability of the deriving individual activity, and from it we build concrete quantitative predictions. Our analysis opens up the possibility of understanding other collective dynamics for which the perceived quality or appeal of an action is also known. PMID:25612292

  13. Modeling the Emergence of Modular Leadership Hierarchy During the Collective Motion of Herds Made of Harems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozogány, Katalin; Vicsek, Tamás

    2015-02-01

    Gregarious animals need to make collective decisions in order to keep their cohesiveness. Several species of them live in multilevel societies, and form herds composed of smaller communities. We present a model for the development of a leadership hierarchy in a herd consisting of loosely connected sub-groups (e.g. harems) by combining self organization and social dynamics. It starts from unfamiliar individuals without relationships and reproduces the emergence of a hierarchical and modular leadership network that promotes an effective spreading of the decisions from more capable individuals to the others, and thus gives rise to a beneficial collective decision. Our results stemming from the model are in a good agreement with our observations of a Przewalski horse herd (Hortobágy, Hungary). We find that the harem-leader to harem-member ratio observed in Przewalski horses corresponds to an optimal network in this approach regarding common success, and that the observed and modeled harem size distributions are close to a lognormal.

  14. Low work-function thermionic emission and orbital-motion-limited ion collection at bare-tether cathodic contact

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xin Sanmartín, J. R.

    2015-05-15

    With a thin coating of low-work-function material, thermionic emission in the cathodic segment of bare tethers might be much greater than orbital-motion-limited (OML) ion collection current. The space charge of the emitted electrons decreases the electric field that accelerates them outwards, and could even reverse it for high enough emission, producing a potential hollow. In this work, at the conditions of high bias and relatively low emission that make the potential monotonic, an asymptotic analysis is carried out, extending the OML ion-collection analysis to investigate the probe response due to electrons emitted by the negatively biased cylindrical probe. At given emission, the space charge effect from emitted electrons increases with decreasing magnitude of negative probe bias. Although emitted electrons present negligible space charge far away from the probe, their effect cannot be neglected in the global analysis for the sheath structure and two thin layers in between sheath and the quasineutral region. The space-charge-limited condition is located. It is found that thermionic emission increases the range of probe radius for OML validity and is greatly more effective than ion collection for cathodic contact of tethers.

  15. Visual and motion cueing in helicopter simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bray, Richard S.

    1986-01-01

    The visual cues presented in the simulator are compared with those of flight in an attempt to identify deficiencies. For the low-amplitude maneuvering tasks normally associated with the hover mode, the unique motion capabilities of the Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) at Ames Research Center permit nearly a full representation of vehicle motion. Especially appreciated in these tasks are the vertical-acceleration responses to collective control. For larger-amplitude maneuvering, motion fidelity must suffer diminution through direct attenuation through high-pass filtering washout of the computer cockpit accelerations or both. Experiments were conducted in an attempt to determine the effects of these distortions on pilot performance of height-control tasks.

  16. Characterization of Protein Flexibility Using Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering and Amplified Collective Motion Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Bin; Peng, Junhui; Zuo, Xiaobing; Gong, Qingguo; Zhang, Zhiyong

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale flexibility within a multidomain protein often plays an important role in its biological function. Despite its inherent low resolution, small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) is well suited to investigate protein flexibility and determine, with the help of computational modeling, what kinds of protein conformations would coexist in solution. In this article, we develop a tool that combines SAXS data with a previously developed sampling technique called amplified collective motions (ACM) to elucidate structures of highly dynamic multidomain proteins in solution. We demonstrate the use of this tool in two proteins, bacteriophage T4 lysozyme and tandem WW domains of the formin-binding protein 21. The ACM simulations can sample the conformational space of proteins much more extensively than standard molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Therefore, conformations generated by ACM are significantly better at reproducing the SAXS data than are those from MD simulations. PMID:25140431

  17. Characterization of protein flexibility using small-angle x-ray scattering and amplified collective motion simulations.

    PubMed

    Wen, Bin; Peng, Junhui; Zuo, Xiaobing; Gong, Qingguo; Zhang, Zhiyong

    2014-08-19

    Large-scale flexibility within a multidomain protein often plays an important role in its biological function. Despite its inherent low resolution, small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) is well suited to investigate protein flexibility and determine, with the help of computational modeling, what kinds of protein conformations would coexist in solution. In this article, we develop a tool that combines SAXS data with a previously developed sampling technique called amplified collective motions (ACM) to elucidate structures of highly dynamic multidomain proteins in solution. We demonstrate the use of this tool in two proteins, bacteriophage T4 lysozyme and tandem WW domains of the formin-binding protein 21. The ACM simulations can sample the conformational space of proteins much more extensively than standard molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Therefore, conformations generated by ACM are significantly better at reproducing the SAXS data than are those from MD simulations. PMID:25140431

  18. Emergence of Swarming Behavior: Foraging Agents Evolve Collective Motion Based on Signaling.

    PubMed

    Witkowski, Olaf; Ikegami, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Swarming behavior is common in biology, from cell colonies to insect swarms and bird flocks. However, the conditions leading to the emergence of such behavior are still subject to research. Since Reynolds' boids, many artificial models have reproduced swarming behavior, focusing on details ranging from obstacle avoidance to the introduction of fixed leaders. This paper presents a model of evolved artificial agents, able to develop swarming using only their ability to listen to each other's signals. The model simulates a population of agents looking for a vital resource they cannot directly detect, in a 3D environment. Instead of a centralized algorithm, each agent is controlled by an artificial neural network, whose weights are encoded in a genotype and adapted by an original asynchronous genetic algorithm. The results demonstrate that agents progressively evolve the ability to use the information exchanged between each other via signaling to establish temporary leader-follower relations. These relations allow agents to form swarming patterns, emerging as a transient behavior that improves the agents' ability to forage for the resource. Once they have acquired the ability to swarm, the individuals are able to outperform the non-swarmers at finding the resource. The population hence reaches a neutral evolutionary space which leads to a genetic drift of the genotypes. This reductionist approach to signal-based swarming not only contributes to shed light on the minimal conditions for the evolution of a swarming behavior, but also more generally it exemplifies the effect communication can have on optimal search patterns in collective groups of individuals. PMID:27119340

  19. Ultrafast Raman-induced Kerr-effect of water: Single molecule versus collective motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Kathrin; Lindner, Jörg; Bürsing, Helge; Vöhringer, Peter

    2000-09-01

    The ultrafast optical Kerr-response of water and heavy water has been measured at 1 bar in the temperature range between 273 and 373 K. The nuclear Kerr response of the liquid exhibits a pronounced double exponential decay on longer time scales after dephasing of impulsively perturbed acoustic modes is completed. The time constant, τ2, characterizing the slowly decaying exponential component of the Kerr-response function is in quantitative agreement with rotational diffusion time constants of the water molecules obtained form nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin-lattice relaxation rates. A detailed comparison with THz time domain spectroscopy demonstrates that the reorientational dynamics responsible for the long time tail of the Kerr response are due to single molecule as opposed to collective effects. Furthermore, a good agreement between the single molecule rotational diffusion and the Stokes-Einstein-Debye equation is found in the temperature range of thermodynamic stability of the liquid. The time constant, τ1, characterizing the fast exponential component of the Kerr-response of water is found to be in qualitative agreement with central Lorentzian linewidths obtained from frequency-domain, depolarized Raman scattering experiments. The temperature dependence of τ2 does not follow an Arrhenius-type behavior, which was previously taken as evidence for thermally activated crossing of a librational barrier with concomitant hydrogen-bond breakage. Instead, the temperature dependence of the fast relaxation time constant can be represented adequately by the Speedy-Angell relation which has been shown to accurately describe a number of transport parameters and thermodynamic properties of water.

  20. Emergence of Swarming Behavior: Foraging Agents Evolve Collective Motion Based on Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ikegami, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Swarming behavior is common in biology, from cell colonies to insect swarms and bird flocks. However, the conditions leading to the emergence of such behavior are still subject to research. Since Reynolds’ boids, many artificial models have reproduced swarming behavior, focusing on details ranging from obstacle avoidance to the introduction of fixed leaders. This paper presents a model of evolved artificial agents, able to develop swarming using only their ability to listen to each other’s signals. The model simulates a population of agents looking for a vital resource they cannot directly detect, in a 3D environment. Instead of a centralized algorithm, each agent is controlled by an artificial neural network, whose weights are encoded in a genotype and adapted by an original asynchronous genetic algorithm. The results demonstrate that agents progressively evolve the ability to use the information exchanged between each other via signaling to establish temporary leader-follower relations. These relations allow agents to form swarming patterns, emerging as a transient behavior that improves the agents’ ability to forage for the resource. Once they have acquired the ability to swarm, the individuals are able to outperform the non-swarmers at finding the resource. The population hence reaches a neutral evolutionary space which leads to a genetic drift of the genotypes. This reductionist approach to signal-based swarming not only contributes to shed light on the minimal conditions for the evolution of a swarming behavior, but also more generally it exemplifies the effect communication can have on optimal search patterns in collective groups of individuals. PMID:27119340

  1. Using smartphone as a motion detector to collect time-microenvironment data for estimating the inhalation dose.

    PubMed

    Hoi, Tran Xuan; Phuong, Huynh Truc; Van Hung, Nguyen

    2016-09-01

    During the production of iodine-131 from neutron irradiated tellurium dioxide by the dry distillation, a considerable amount of (131)I vapor is dispersed to the indoor air. People who routinely work at the production area may result in a significant risk of exposure to chronic intake by inhaled (131)I. This study aims to estimate the inhalation dose for individuals manipulating the (131)I at a radioisotope production. By using an application installed on smartphones, we collected the time-microenvironment data spent by a radiation group during work days in 2015. Simultaneously, we used a portable air sampler combined with radioiodine cartridges for grabbing the indoor air samples and then the daily averaged (131)I concentration was calculated. Finally, the time-microenvironment data jointed with the concentration to estimate the inhalation dose for the workers. The result showed that most of the workers had the annual internal dose in 1÷6mSv. We concluded that using smartphone as a motion detector is a possible and reliable way instead of the questionnaires, diary or GPS-based method. It is, however, only suitable for monitoring on fixed indoor environments and limited the targeted people. PMID:27451110

  2. Visual and motion cueing in helicopter simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bray, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    Early experience in fixed-cockpit simulators, with limited field of view, demonstrated the basic difficulties of simulating helicopter flight at the level of subjective fidelity required for confident evaluation of vehicle characteristics. More recent programs, utilizing large-amplitude cockpit motion and a multiwindow visual-simulation system have received a much higher degree of pilot acceptance. However, none of these simulations has presented critical visual-flight tasks that have been accepted by the pilots as the full equivalent of flight. In this paper, the visual cues presented in the simulator are compared with those of flight in an attempt to identify deficiencies that contribute significantly to these assessments. For the low-amplitude maneuvering tasks normally associated with the hover mode, the unique motion capabilities of the Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) at Ames Research Center permit nearly a full representation of vehicle motion. Especially appreciated in these tasks are the vertical-acceleration responses to collective control. For larger-amplitude maneuvering, motion fidelity must suffer diminution through direct attenuation through high-pass filtering washout of the computer cockpit accelerations or both. Experiments were conducted in an attempt to determine the effects of these distortions on pilot performance of height-control tasks.

  3. An intramolecular hydrogen-bonded system with large proton polarizability — a model with regard to the proton pathway in bacteriorhodopsin and other systems with collective proton motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzeziński, Bogumil; Radziejewski, Piotr; Olejnik, Jerzy; Zundel, Georg

    1994-07-01

    3-Diethylaminomethyl-2,2'-biphenol was synthesized and studied by FT-IR and 1H NMR spectroscopy. The compound forms a system with two hydrogen bonds which shows large proton polarizability due to collective proton motion. This result supports our earlier suggestion that the first part of the proton pathway in bacteriorhodopsin conducting protons is a hydrogen-bonded chain with large proton polarizability built up by arginine and tyrosine residues. Furthermore, we show that in the monotetrachloroaurate of 3,3'-bis(diethylaminomethyl)-2,2'-biphenol and in the tritetrachloroaurates of 3,3',5,5'-tetrakis(diethylaminomethyl)-2,2'-biphenol there is proton polarizability due to collective proton motion.

  4. Lagrangian satellites of Tethys and Dione. II - Theory of motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberti, P.

    1990-02-01

    Numerical simulations of the motion of Tethys and Dione's Lagrangian satellites have been fitted to the observations collected from 1980 to 1985. From these experiments, amplitudes and periods of different perturbations due to the Lagrangian satellite environment have been estimated, and the accuracy of a basic analytical model of the motion have been tested. This model has then been modified to take the most important perturbation into account, and the constants of the motion have been fitted to the observations. The resulting theory provides positions differing from those observed by about 0.5 arcsec for Telesto and Calypso, and less for Helen, primarily due to observation uncertainties.

  5. Calculating scattering amplitudes efficiently

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, L.

    1996-01-01

    We review techniques for more efficient computation of perturbative scattering amplitudes in gauge theory, in particular tree and one- loop multi-parton amplitudes in QCD. We emphasize the advantages of (1) using color and helicity information to decompose amplitudes into smaller gauge-invariant pieces, and (2) exploiting the analytic properties of these pieces, namely their cuts and poles. Other useful tools include recursion relations, special gauges and supersymmetric rearrangements. 46 refs., 11 figs.

  6. Comparison of Markerless and Marker-Based Motion Capture Technologies through Simultaneous Data Collection during Gait: Proof of Concept

    PubMed Central

    Cobelli, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade markerless motion capture techniques have gained an increasing interest in the biomechanics community. In the clinical field, however, the application of markerless techniques is still debated. This is mainly due to a limited number of papers dedicated to the comparison with the state of the art of marker based motion capture, in term of repeatability of the three dimensional joints' kinematics. In the present work the application of markerless technique to data acquired with a marker-based system was investigated. All videos and external data were recorded with the same motion capture system and included the possibility to use markerless and marker-based methods simultaneously. Three dimensional markerless joint kinematics was estimated and compared with the one determined with traditional marker based systems, through the evaluation of root mean square distance between joint rotations. In order to compare the performance of markerless and marker-based systems in terms of clinically relevant joint angles estimation, the same anatomical frames of reference were defined for both systems. Differences in calibration and synchronization of the cameras were excluded by applying the same wand calibration and lens distortion correction to both techniques. Best results were achieved for knee flexion-extension angle, with an average root mean square distance of 11.75 deg, corresponding to 18.35% of the range of motion. Sagittal plane kinematics was estimated better than on the other planes also for hip and ankle (root mean square distance of 17.62 deg e.g. 44.66%, and 7.17 deg e.g. 33.12%), meanwhile estimates for hip joint were the most incorrect. This technique enables users of markerless technology to compare differences with marker-based in order to define the degree of applicability of markerless technique. PMID:24595273

  7. Flutter of articulated pipes at finite amplitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousselet, J.; Herrmann, G.

    1975-01-01

    Previous studies of the behavior of pipes conveying fluid have assumed that the fluid velocity relative to the pipe is a known quantity and is unaffected by the motion of the pipe. This approach eliminates the need to find the flow equations of motion, and is adequate for infinitesimal transverse amplitudes of motion of the pipe system, but is incapable of predicting what will be the effect of larger amplitudes. This last shortcoming may be of importance when flow velocities are near critical velocities, that is, velocities at which the system begins to flutter. It is the purpose of the present study to investigate in greater detail the dynamic behavior of pipes in the vicinity of critical velocities.

  8. Role of string-like collective atomic motion on diffusion and structural relaxation in glass forming Cu-Zr alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hao; Zhong, Cheng; Wang, Xiaodong; Cao, Qingping; Jiang, Jian-Zhong E-mail: jack.douglas@nist.gov; Douglas, Jack F. E-mail: jack.douglas@nist.gov; Zhang, Dongxian

    2015-04-28

    We investigate Cu-Zr liquid alloys using molecular dynamics simulation and well-accepted embedded atom method potentials over a wide range of chemical composition and temperature as model metallic glass-forming (GF) liquids. As with other types of GF materials, the dynamics of these complex liquids are characterized by “dynamic heterogeneity” in the form of transient polymeric clusters of highly mobile atoms that are composed in turn of atomic clusters exhibiting string-like cooperative motion. In accordance with the string model of relaxation, an extension of the Adam-Gibbs (AG) model, changes in the activation free energy ΔG{sub a} with temperature of both the Cu and Zr diffusion coefficients D, and the alpha structural relaxation time τ{sub α} can be described to a good approximation by changes in the average string length, L. In particular, we confirm that the strings are a concrete realization of the abstract “cooperatively rearranging regions” of AG. We also find coexisting clusters of relatively “immobile” atoms that exhibit predominantly icosahedral local packing rather than the low symmetry packing of “mobile” atoms. These two distinct types of dynamic heterogeneity are then associated with different fluid structural states. Glass-forming liquids are thus analogous to polycrystalline materials where the icosahedrally packed regions correspond to crystal grains, and the strings reside in the relatively disordered grain boundary-like regions exterior to these locally well-ordered regions. A dynamic equilibrium between localized (“immobile”) and wandering (“mobile”) particles exists in the liquid so that the dynamic heterogeneity can be considered to be type of self-assembly process. We also characterize changes in the local atomic free volume in the course of string-like atomic motion to better understand the initiation and propagation of these fluid excitations.

  9. Role of string-like collective atomic motion on diffusion and structural relaxation in glass forming Cu-Zr alloys.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Zhong, Cheng; Douglas, Jack F; Wang, Xiaodong; Cao, Qingping; Zhang, Dongxian; Jiang, Jian-Zhong

    2015-04-28

    We investigate Cu-Zr liquid alloys using molecular dynamics simulation and well-accepted embedded atom method potentials over a wide range of chemical composition and temperature as model metallic glass-forming (GF) liquids. As with other types of GF materials, the dynamics of these complex liquids are characterized by "dynamic heterogeneity" in the form of transient polymeric clusters of highly mobile atoms that are composed in turn of atomic clusters exhibiting string-like cooperative motion. In accordance with the string model of relaxation, an extension of the Adam-Gibbs (AG) model, changes in the activation free energy ΔGa with temperature of both the Cu and Zr diffusion coefficients D, and the alpha structural relaxation time τα can be described to a good approximation by changes in the average string length, L. In particular, we confirm that the strings are a concrete realization of the abstract "cooperatively rearranging regions" of AG. We also find coexisting clusters of relatively "immobile" atoms that exhibit predominantly icosahedral local packing rather than the low symmetry packing of "mobile" atoms. These two distinct types of dynamic heterogeneity are then associated with different fluid structural states. Glass-forming liquids are thus analogous to polycrystalline materials where the icosahedrally packed regions correspond to crystal grains, and the strings reside in the relatively disordered grain boundary-like regions exterior to these locally well-ordered regions. A dynamic equilibrium between localized ("immobile") and wandering ("mobile") particles exists in the liquid so that the dynamic heterogeneity can be considered to be type of self-assembly process. We also characterize changes in the local atomic free volume in the course of string-like atomic motion to better understand the initiation and propagation of these fluid excitations. PMID:25933773

  10. Role of string-like collective atomic motion on diffusion and structural relaxation in glass forming Cu-Zr alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Zhong, Cheng; Douglas, Jack F.; Wang, Xiaodong; Cao, Qingping; Zhang, Dongxian; Jiang, Jian-Zhong

    2015-04-01

    We investigate Cu-Zr liquid alloys using molecular dynamics simulation and well-accepted embedded atom method potentials over a wide range of chemical composition and temperature as model metallic glass-forming (GF) liquids. As with other types of GF materials, the dynamics of these complex liquids are characterized by "dynamic heterogeneity" in the form of transient polymeric clusters of highly mobile atoms that are composed in turn of atomic clusters exhibiting string-like cooperative motion. In accordance with the string model of relaxation, an extension of the Adam-Gibbs (AG) model, changes in the activation free energy ΔGa with temperature of both the Cu and Zr diffusion coefficients D, and the alpha structural relaxation time τα can be described to a good approximation by changes in the average string length, L. In particular, we confirm that the strings are a concrete realization of the abstract "cooperatively rearranging regions" of AG. We also find coexisting clusters of relatively "immobile" atoms that exhibit predominantly icosahedral local packing rather than the low symmetry packing of "mobile" atoms. These two distinct types of dynamic heterogeneity are then associated with different fluid structural states. Glass-forming liquids are thus analogous to polycrystalline materials where the icosahedrally packed regions correspond to crystal grains, and the strings reside in the relatively disordered grain boundary-like regions exterior to these locally well-ordered regions. A dynamic equilibrium between localized ("immobile") and wandering ("mobile") particles exists in the liquid so that the dynamic heterogeneity can be considered to be type of self-assembly process. We also characterize changes in the local atomic free volume in the course of string-like atomic motion to better understand the initiation and propagation of these fluid excitations.

  11. PULSE AMPLITUDE ANALYSERS

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, I.A.D.

    1956-05-15

    This patent pentains to an electrical pulse amplitude analyzer, capable of accepting input pulses having a separation between adjacent pulses in the order of one microsecond while providing a large number of channels of classification. In its broad aspect the described pulse amplitude analyzer utilizes a storage cathode ray tube und control circuitry whereby the amplitude of the analyzed pulses controls both the intensity and vertical defiection of the beam to charge particular spots in horizontal sectors of the tube face as the beam is moved horizontally across the tube face. As soon as the beam has swept the length of the tube the information stored therein is read out by scanning individually each horizontal sector corresponding to a certain range of pulse amplitudes and applying the output signal from each scan to separate indicating means.

  12. PULSE AMPLITUDE ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Greenblatt, M.H.

    1958-03-25

    This patent pertains to pulse amplitude analyzers for sorting and counting a serles of pulses, and specifically discloses an analyzer which ls simple in construction and presents the puise height distribution visually on an oscilloscope screen. According to the invention, the pulses are applied to the vertical deflection plates of an oscilloscope and trigger the horizontal sweep. Each pulse starts at the same point on the screen and has a maximum amplitude substantially along the same vertical line. A mask is placed over the screen except for a slot running along the line where the maximum amplitudes of the pulses appear. After the slot has been scanned by a photocell in combination with a slotted rotating disk, the photocell signal is displayed on an auxiliary oscilloscope as vertical deflection along a horizontal time base to portray the pulse amplitude distribution.

  13. Topics in Scattering Amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennen, Tristan Lucas

    In Part 1, we combine on-shell methods with the six-dimensional helicity formalism of Cheung and O'Connell to construct tree-level and multiloop scattering amplitudes. As a nontrivial multiloop example, we confirm that the recently constructed four-loop four-point amplitude of N=4 super-Yang-Mills theory, including nonplanar contributions, is valid for dimensions less than or equal to six. We demonstrate that the tree-level amplitudes of maximal super-Yang-Mills theory in six dimensions, when stripped of their overall momentum and supermomentum delta functions, are covariant with respect to the six-dimensional dual conformal group. We demonstrate that this property is also present for loop amplitudes. In Part 2, we explore consequences of the recently discovered duality between color and kinematics, which states that kinematic numerators in a diagrammatic expansion of gauge-theory amplitudes can be arranged to satisfy Jacobi-like identities in one-to-one correspondence to the associated color factors. The related squaring relations express gravity amplitudes in terms of gauge-theory ingredients. We then present a Yang-Mills Lagrangian whose diagrams through five points manifestly satisfy the duality between color and kinematics. Finally, we compute the coefficient of the potential three-loop divergence in pure N=4 supergravity and show that it vanishes, contrary to expectations from symmetry arguments.

  14. Oscillations of a Simple Pendulum with Extremely Large Amplitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butikov, Eugene I.

    2012-01-01

    Large oscillations of a simple rigid pendulum with amplitudes close to 180[degrees] are treated on the basis of a physically justified approach in which the cycle of oscillation is divided into several stages. The major part of the almost closed circular path of the pendulum is approximated by the limiting motion, while the motion in the vicinity…

  15. Pion-nucleon scattering in the Skyrme model and the P-wave Born amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, A.; Saito, S.; Uehara, M.

    1991-03-01

    We treat fluctuating pion fields around a rotating Skyrmion by means of Dirac's quantization method. The rotational collective motion of the Skyrmion is described by collective coordinates, and conventional gauge-fixing conditions are imposed. Taking into account all the relevant terms at the tree level appearing in the Hamiltonian, we show that pion-nucleon scattering amplitudes exhibit the P-wave Born amplitudes attributed to the Yukawa coupling of order √Nc , which is consistent with the prediction of chiral symmetry such as the Adler-Weisberger relation. This resolves the difficulty that the Skyrme model predicts a wrong Nc dependence for the coupling of order N-3/2c.

  16. Redox-Promoting Protein Motions in Rubredoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Myles, Dean A A; He, Junhong; Meilleur, Flora; Weiss, Kevin L; Agarwal, Pratul K; Borreguero Calvo, Jose M; Barthes, Mariette; Brown, Craig; Herwig, Kenneth W

    2011-01-01

    Proteins are dynamic objects, constantly undergoing conformational fluctuations, yet the linkage between internal protein motion and function is widely debated. This manuscript reports on the characterization of temperature-activated collective and individual atomic motions of oxidized rubredoxin, a small 53 residue protein from thermophilic Pyrococcus furiosus (RdPf), by neutron scattering and computational simulations. The changes in motion have been explored in connection to their role in promoting reduction of the Fe+3 ion which is responsible for the electron transfer function of RdPf. Just above the dynamical transition temperature of 220 K which marks the onset of significant anharmonic motions of the protein, the computer simulations show both a significant reorientation of the average electrostatic force experienced by the Fe+3 ion and a dramatic rise in its strength. At higher temperatures, additional anharmonic modes become activated which dominate the electrostatic fluctuations experienced by the ion. At 360 K, close to the optimal growth temperature of Pyrococcus furiosus, computer simulations show that three anharmonic modes involving two conserved residues located at the protein active site (Ile7 and Ile40) give rise to the majority of the electrostatic fluctuations experienced by the Fe+3 ion and include displacements which allow solvent access to the ion. The low-frequency, high amplitude motions of these residues at low temperatures may be precursors of the high temperature, anharmonic motions necessary for protein function.

  17. Microscopic derivation of the Bohr–Mottelson collective Hamiltonian and its application to quadrupole shape dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuyanagi, Kenichi; Matsuo, Masayuki; Nakatsukasa, Takashi; Yoshida, Kenichi; Hinohara, Nobuo; Sato, Koichi

    2016-06-01

    We discuss the nature of the low-frequency quadrupole vibrations from small-amplitude to large-amplitude regimes. We consider full five-dimensional quadrupole dynamics including three-dimensional rotations restoring the broken symmetries as well as axially symmetric and asymmetric shape fluctuations. Assuming that the time evolution of the self-consistent mean field is determined by five pairs of collective coordinates and collective momenta, we microscopically derive the collective Hamiltonian of Bohr and Mottelson, which describes low-frequency quadrupole dynamics. We show that the five-dimensional collective Schrödinger equation is capable of describing large-amplitude quadrupole shape dynamics seen as shape coexistence/mixing phenomena. We summarize the modern concepts of microscopic theory of large-amplitude collective motion, which is underlying the microscopic derivation of the Bohr-Mottelson collective Hamiltonian.

  18. Coupling of collective motions of the protein matrix to vibrations of the non-heme iron in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Orzechowska, A; Lipińska, M; Fiedor, J; Chumakov, A; Zajac, M; Slezak, T; Matlak, K; Strzałka, K; Korecki, J; Fiedor, L; Burda, K

    2010-10-01

    Non-heme iron is a conservative component of type II photosynthetic reaction centers of unknown function. We found that in the reaction center from Rba. sphaeroides it exists in two forms, high and low spin ferrous states, whereas in Rsp. rubrum mostly in a low spin state, in line with our earlier finding of its low spin state in the algal photosystem II reaction center (Burda et al., 2003). The temperature dependence of the non-heme iron displacement studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy shows that the surrounding of the high spin iron is more flexible (Debye temperature ~165K) than that of the low spin atom (~207K). Nuclear inelastic scattering measurements of the collective motions in the Rba. sphaeroides reaction center show that the density of vibrational states, originating from non-heme iron, has well-separated modes between lower (4-17meV) and higher (17-25meV) energies while in the one from Rsp. rubrum its distribution is more uniform with only little contribution of low energy (~6meV) vibrations. It is the first experimental evidence that the fluctuations of the protein matrix in type II reaction center are correlated to the spin state of non-heme iron. We propose a simple mechanism in which the spin state of non-heme iron directly determines the strength of coupling between the two quinone acceptors (Q(A) and Q(B)) and fast collective motions of protein matrix that play a crucial role in activation and regulation of the electron and proton transfer between these two quinones. We suggest that hydrogen bond network on the acceptor side of reaction center is responsible for stabilization of non-heme iron in different spin states. PMID:20603098

  19. Reinforcing Saccadic Amplitude Variability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paeye, Celine; Madelain, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Saccadic endpoint variability is often viewed as the outcome of neural noise occurring during sensorimotor processing. However, part of this variability might result from operant learning. We tested this hypothesis by reinforcing dispersions of saccadic amplitude distributions, while maintaining constant their medians. In a first experiment we…

  20. Movement amplitude and tempo change in piano performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Caroline

    2001-05-01

    Music performance places stringent temporal and cognitive demands on individuals that should yield large speed/accuracy tradeoffs. Skilled piano performance, however, shows consistently high accuracy across a wide variety of rates. Movement amplitude may affect the speed/accuracy tradeoff, so that high accuracy can be obtained even at very fast tempi. The contribution of movement amplitude changes in rate (tempo) is investigated with motion capture. Cameras recorded pianists with passive markers on hands and fingers, who performed on an electronic (MIDI) keyboard. Pianists performed short melodies at faster and faster tempi until they made errors (altering the speed/accuracy function). Variability of finger movements in the three motion planes indicated most change in the plane perpendicular to the keyboard across tempi. Surprisingly, peak amplitudes of motion before striking the keys increased as tempo increased. Increased movement amplitudes at faster rates may reduce or compensate for speed/accuracy tradeoffs. [Work supported by Canada Research Chairs program, HIMH R01 45764.

  1. Steric interactions lead to collective tilting motion in the ribosome during mRNA-tRNA translocation.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Kien; Whitford, Paul C

    2016-01-01

    Translocation of mRNA and tRNA through the ribosome is associated with large-scale rearrangements of the head domain in the 30S ribosomal subunit. To elucidate the relationship between 30S head dynamics and mRNA-tRNA displacement, we apply molecular dynamics simulations using an all-atom structure-based model. Here we provide a statistical analysis of 250 spontaneous transitions between the A/P-P/E and P/P-E/E ensembles. Consistent with structural studies, the ribosome samples a chimeric ap/P-pe/E intermediate, where the 30S head is rotated ∼18°. It then transiently populates a previously unreported intermediate ensemble, which is characterized by a ∼10° tilt of the head. To identify the origins of head tilting, we analyse 781 additional simulations in which specific steric features are perturbed. These calculations show that head tilting may be attributed to specific steric interactions between tRNA and the 30S subunit (PE loop and protein S13). Taken together, this study demonstrates how molecular structure can give rise to large-scale collective rearrangements. PMID:26838673

  2. Steric interactions lead to collective tilting motion in the ribosome during mRNA-tRNA translocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Kien; Whitford, Paul C.

    2016-02-01

    Translocation of mRNA and tRNA through the ribosome is associated with large-scale rearrangements of the head domain in the 30S ribosomal subunit. To elucidate the relationship between 30S head dynamics and mRNA-tRNA displacement, we apply molecular dynamics simulations using an all-atom structure-based model. Here we provide a statistical analysis of 250 spontaneous transitions between the A/P-P/E and P/P-E/E ensembles. Consistent with structural studies, the ribosome samples a chimeric ap/P-pe/E intermediate, where the 30S head is rotated ~18°. It then transiently populates a previously unreported intermediate ensemble, which is characterized by a ~10° tilt of the head. To identify the origins of head tilting, we analyse 781 additional simulations in which specific steric features are perturbed. These calculations show that head tilting may be attributed to specific steric interactions between tRNA and the 30S subunit (PE loop and protein S13). Taken together, this study demonstrates how molecular structure can give rise to large-scale collective rearrangements.

  3. Steric interactions lead to collective tilting motion in the ribosome during mRNA–tRNA translocation

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Kien; Whitford, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    Translocation of mRNA and tRNA through the ribosome is associated with large-scale rearrangements of the head domain in the 30S ribosomal subunit. To elucidate the relationship between 30S head dynamics and mRNA–tRNA displacement, we apply molecular dynamics simulations using an all-atom structure-based model. Here we provide a statistical analysis of 250 spontaneous transitions between the A/P–P/E and P/P–E/E ensembles. Consistent with structural studies, the ribosome samples a chimeric ap/P–pe/E intermediate, where the 30S head is rotated ∼18°. It then transiently populates a previously unreported intermediate ensemble, which is characterized by a ∼10° tilt of the head. To identify the origins of head tilting, we analyse 781 additional simulations in which specific steric features are perturbed. These calculations show that head tilting may be attributed to specific steric interactions between tRNA and the 30S subunit (PE loop and protein S13). Taken together, this study demonstrates how molecular structure can give rise to large-scale collective rearrangements. PMID:26838673

  4. Amplitude Modulator Chassis

    SciTech Connect

    Erbert, G

    2009-09-01

    The Amplitude Modulator Chassis (AMC) is the final component in the MOR system and connects directly to the PAM input through a 100-meter fiber. The 48 AMCs temporally shape the 48 outputs of the MOR using an arbitrary waveform generator coupled to an amplitude modulator. The amplitude modulation element is a two stage, Lithium Niobate waveguide device, where the intensity of the light passing through the device is a function of the electrical drive applied. The first stage of the modulator is connected to a programmable high performance Arbitrary Waveform Generator (AWG) consisting of 140 impulse generators space 250 ps apart. An arbitrary waveform is generated by independently varying the amplitude of each impulse generator and then summing the impulses together. In addition to the AWG a short pulse generator is also connected to the first stage of the modulator to provide a sub 100-ps pulse used for timing experiments. The second stage of the modulator is connect to a square pulse generator used to further attenuate any pre or post pulse light passing through the first stage of the modulator. The fast rise and fall time of the square pulse generator is also used to produce fast rise and fall times of the AWG by clipping the AWG pulse. For maximum extinction, a pulse bias voltage is applied to each stage of the modulator. A pulse voltage is applied as opposed to a DC voltage to prevent charge buildup on the modulator. Each bias voltage is adjustable to provide a minimum of 50-dB extinction. The AMC is controlled through ICCS to generate the desired temporal pulse shape. This process involves a closed-loop control algorithm, which compares the desired temporal waveform to the produced optical pulse, and iterates the programming of the AWG until the two waveforms agree within an allowable tolerance.

  5. Flutter of articulated pipes at finite amplitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousselet, J.; Herrmann, G.

    1977-01-01

    The plane motion of an articulated pipe made of two segments is examined and the flow velocity at which flutter manifests itself is sought. The pressure in the reservoir feeding the pipe is kept constant. In contrast to previous works, the flow velocity is not taken as a prescribed parameter of the system but is left to follow the laws of motion. This approach requires a nonlinear formulation of the problem and the equations of motion are solved using Krylov-Bogoliubov's method. A graph of the amplitude of the limit cycles, as a function of the fluid-system mass ratio, is presented and conclusions are drawn as to the necessity of considering nonlinearities in the analysis.

  6. China Amplitude Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearn, T. M.

    2014-12-01

    Modern data from the China Bulletin and temporary network deployments has been used to update amplitude tomography using ML and MS seismic amplitudes. This work builds on the results of Hearn et al., 2008. ML attenuation estimates are much better resolved due to the inclusion of subnet data. We find that the trade-off between geometrical spreading and attenuation estimates are well constrained; however, both of these parameters have significant trade-off with the frequency dependence of attenuation. Maps of attenuation using the ML amplitudes are similar to those of Lg attenuation found by other authors suggesting that ML attenuation estimates form a suitable proxy for Lg attenuation estimates. We are now able to associate high attenuation directly with the Longmen Shan and the Qilian Shan mountains and also, where resolved, with the Kunlun Shan, Altyn Tag, and Tian Shan mountains. Grabens around the Ordos Platform also show high attenuation. Basins, however, do not in general show high attenuation. The main exception to this is the Bohai Basin. We conclude that the ML waveforms, like the Lg waveforms, interrogate the entire crustal column and are most sensitive to tectonically active structures and rapid changes in crustal structure. Data from MS data do not include subnet readings and do not have the resolution that was obtained with the ML data. Nonetheless, features are similar with the exception that basins appear more highly attenuative.

  7. PULSE AMPLITUDE ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Gray, G.W.; Jensen, A.S.

    1957-10-22

    A pulse-height analyzer system of improved design for sorting and counting a series of pulses, such as provided by a scintillation detector in nuclear radiation measurements, is described. The analyzer comprises a main transmission line, a cathode-ray tube for each section of the line with its deflection plates acting as the line capacitance; means to bias the respective cathode ray tubes so that the beam strikes a target only when a prearranged pulse amplitude is applied, with each tube progressively biased to respond to smaller amplitudes; pulse generating and counting means associated with each tube to respond when the beam is deflected; a control transmission line having the same time constant as the first line per section with pulse generating means for each tube for initiating a pulse on the second transmission line when a pulse triggers the tube of corresponding amplitude response, the former pulse acting to prevent successive tubes from responding to the pulse under test. This arrangement permits greater deflection sensitivity in the cathode ray tube and overcomes many of the disadvantages of prior art pulse-height analyzer circuits.

  8. Longitudinal tracking with phase and amplitude modulated rf

    SciTech Connect

    Caussyn, D.D.; Ball, M.; Brabson, B.

    1993-06-01

    Synchrotron motion was induced by phase shifting the rf of the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) cooler-synchrotron. The resulting coherent-bunch motion was tracked in longitudinal phase space for as many as 700,000 turns, or for over 350 synchrotron oscillations. Results of recent experimental studies of longitudinal motion in which the rf phase and amplitude were harmonically modulated are also presented. Comparisons of experimental data with numerical simulations, assuming independent particle motion, are made. Observed multiparticle effects are also discussed.

  9. A demonstration of motion base design alternatives for the National Advanced Driving Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccauley, Michael E.; Sharkey, Thomas J.; Sinacori, John B.; Laforce, Soren; Miller, James C.; Cook, Anthony

    1992-01-01

    A demonstration of the capability of NASA's Vertical Motion Simulator to simulate two alternative motion base designs for the National Advanced Driving simulator (NADS) is reported. The VMS is located at ARC. The motion base conditions used in this demonstration were as follows: (1) a large translational motion base; and (2) a motion base design with limited translational capability. The latter had translational capability representative of a typical synergistic motion platform. These alternatives were selected to test the prediction that large amplitude translational motion would result in a lower incidence or severity of simulator induced sickness (SIS) than would a limited translational motion base. A total of 10 drivers performed two tasks, slaloms and quick-stops, using each of the motion bases. Physiological, objective, and subjective measures were collected. No reliable differences in SIS between the motion base conditions was found in this demonstration. However, in light of the cost considerations and engineering challenges associated with implementing a large translation motion base, performance of a formal study is recommended.

  10. PULSE AMPLITUDE DISTRIBUTION RECORDER

    DOEpatents

    Cowper, G.

    1958-08-12

    A device is described for automatica1ly recording pulse annplitude distribution received from a counter. The novelty of the device consists of the over-all arrangement of conventional circuit elements to provide an easy to read permanent record of the pulse amplitude distribution during a certain time period. In the device a pulse analyzer separates the pulses according to annplitude into several channels. A scaler in each channel counts the pulses and operates a pen marker positioned over a drivable recorder sheet. Since the scalers in each channel have the sanne capacity, the control circuitry permits counting of the incoming pulses until one scaler reaches capacity, whereupon the input is removed and an internal oscillator supplies the necessary pulses to fill up the other scalers. Movement of the chart sheet is initiated wben the first scaler reaches capacity to thereby give a series of marks at spacings proportional to the time required to fill the remaining scalers, and accessory equipment marks calibration points on the recorder sheet to facilitate direct reading of the number of external pulses supplied to each scaler.

  11. On the Period-Amplitude and Amplitude-Period Relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.; Hathaway, David H.

    2008-01-01

    Examined are Period-Amplitude and Amplitude-Period relationships based on the cyclic behavior of the 12-month moving averages of monthly mean sunspot numbers for cycles 0.23, both in terms of Fisher's exact tests for 2x2 contingency tables and linear regression analyses. Concerning the Period-Amplitude relationship (same cycle), because cycle 23's maximum amplitude is known to be 120.8, the inferred regressions (90-percent prediction intervals) suggest that its period will be 131 +/- 24 months (using all cycles) or 131 +/- 18 months (ignoring cycles 2 and 4, which have the extremes of period, 108 and 164 months, respectively). Because cycle 23 has already persisted for 142 months (May 1996 through February 2008), based on the latter prediction, it should end before September 2008. Concerning the Amplitude-Period relationship (following cycle maximum amplitude versus preceding cycle period), because cycle 23's period is known to be at least 142 months, the inferred regressions (90-percent prediction intervals) suggest that cycle 24's maximum amplitude will be about less than or equal to 96.1 +/- 55.0 (using all cycle pairs) or less than or equal to 91.0 +/- 36.7 (ignoring statistical outlier cycle pairs). Hence, cycle 24's maximum amplitude is expected to be less than 151, perhaps even less than 128, unless cycle pair 23/24 proves to be a statistical outlier.

  12. Chaotic ion motion in magnetosonic plasma waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varvoglis, H.

    1984-01-01

    The motion of test ions in a magnetosonic plasma wave is considered, and the 'stochasticity threshold' of the wave's amplitude for the onset of chaotic motion is estimated. It is shown that for wave amplitudes above the stochasticity threshold, the evolution of an ion distribution can be described by a diffusion equation with a diffusion coefficient D approximately equal to 1/v. Possible applications of this process to ion acceleration in flares and ion beam thermalization are discussed.

  13. Cortical motion deafness.

    PubMed

    Ducommun, Christine Y; Michel, Christoph M; Clarke, Stephanie; Adriani, Michela; Seeck, Margitta; Landis, Theodor; Blanke, Olaf

    2004-09-16

    The extent to which the auditory system, like the visual system, processes spatial stimulus characteristics such as location and motion in separate specialized neuronal modules or in one homogeneously distributed network is unresolved. Here we present a patient with a selective deficit for the perception and discrimination of auditory motion following resection of the right anterior temporal lobe and the right posterior superior temporal gyrus (STG). Analysis of stimulus identity and location within the auditory scene remained intact. In addition, intracranial auditory evoked potentials, recorded preoperatively, revealed motion-specific responses selectively over the resected right posterior STG, and electrical cortical stimulation of this region was experienced by the patient as incoming moving sounds. Collectively, these data present a patient with cortical motion deafness, providing evidence that cortical processing of auditory motion is performed in a specialized module within the posterior STG. PMID:15363389

  14. Measurement, characterization, and prediction of strong ground motion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Joyner, William; Boore, David M.

    1988-01-01

    A number of predictive relationships derived from regression analysis of strong-motion data are available for horizontal peak acceleration, velocity, and response spectral values. Theoretical prediction of ground motion calls for stochastic source models because source heterogeneities control the amplitude of ground motion at most, if not all, frequencies of engineering interest. Theoretical methods have been developed for estimation of ground-motion parameters and simulation of ground-motion time series. These methods are particularly helpful for regions such, as eastern North America where strong-motion data are sparse. The authors survey the field, first reviewing developments in ground-motion measurement and data processing. The authors then consider the choice of parameters for characterizing strong ground motion and describe the wave-types involved in strong ground motion and the factors affecting ground-motion amplitudes. They conclude by describing methods for predicting ground motion.

  15. Plate motion

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, R.G. )

    1991-01-01

    The motion of tectonic plates on the earth is characterized in a critical review of U.S. research from the period 1987-1990. Topics addressed include the NUVEL-1 global model of current plate motions, diffuse plate boundaries and the oceanic lithosphere, the relation between plate motions and distributed deformations, accelerations and the steadiness of plate motions, the distribution of current Pacific-North America motion across western North America and its margin, plate reconstructions and their uncertainties, hotspots, and plate dynamics. A comprehensive bibliography is provided. 126 refs.

  16. CHY formula and MHV amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yi-Jian; Teng, Fei; Wu, Yong-Shi

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we study the relation between the Cachazo-He-Yuan (CHY) formula and the maximal-helicity-violating (MHV) amplitudes of Yang-Mills and gravity in four dimensions. We prove that only one special rational solution of the scattering equations found by Weinzierl supports the MHV amplitudes. Namely, localized at this solution, the integrated CHY formula produces the Parke-Taylor formula for MHV Yang-Mills amplitudes as well as the Hodges formula for MHV gravitational amplitudes, with an arbitrary number of external gluons/gravitons. This is achieved by developing techniques, in a manifestly Möbius covariant formalism, to explicitly compute relevant reduced Pfaffians/determinants. We observe and prove two interesting properties (or identities), which facilitate the computations. We also check that all the other ( n - 3)! - 1 solutions to the scattering equations do not support the MHV amplitudes, and prove analytically that this is indeed true for the other special rational solution proposed by Weinzierl, that actually supports the anti-MHV amplitudes. Our results reveal a mysterious feature of the CHY formalism that in Yang-Mills and gravity theory, solutions of scattering equations, involving only external momenta, somehow know about the configuration of external polarizations of the scattering amplitudes.

  17. Substorm statistics: Occurrences and amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Borovsky, J.E.; Nemzek, R.J.

    1994-05-01

    The occurrences and amplitudes of substorms are statistically investigated with the use of three data sets: the AL index, the Los Alamos 3-satellite geosynchronous energetic-electron measurements, and the GOES-5 and -6 geosynchronous magnetic-field measurements. The investigation utilizes {approximately} 13,800 substorms in AL, {approximately} 1400 substorms in the energetic-electron flux, and {approximately} 100 substorms in the magnetic field. The rate of occurrence of substorms is determined as a function of the time of day, the time of year, the amount of magnetotail bending, the orientation of the geomagnetic dipole, the toward/away configuration of the IMF, and the parameters of the solar wind. The relative roles of dayside reconnection and viscous coupling in the production of substorms are assessed. Three amplitudes are defined for a substorms: the jump in the AL index, the peak of the >30-keV integral electron flux at geosynchronous orbit near midnight, and the angle of rotation of the geosynchronous magnetic field near midnight. The substorm amplitudes are statistically analyzed, the amplitude measurements are cross correlated with each other, and the substorm amplitudes are determined as functions of the solar-wind parameters. Periodically occurring and randomly occurring substorms are analyzed separately. The energetic-particle-flux amplitudes are consistent with unloading and the AL amplitudes are consistent with direct driving plus unloading.

  18. Off-shell CHY amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, C. S.; Yao, York-Peng

    2016-06-01

    The Cachazo-He-Yuan (CHY) formula for on-shell scattering amplitudes is extended off-shell. The off-shell amplitudes (amputated Green's functions) are Möbius invariant, and have the same momentum poles as the on-shell amplitudes. The working principles which drive the modifications to the scattering equations are mainly Möbius covariance and energy momentum conservation in off-shell kinematics. The same technique is also used to obtain off-shell massive scalars. A simple off-shell extension of the CHY gauge formula which is Möbius invariant is proposed, but its true nature awaits further study.

  19. Femtosecond pulse sequences used for optical manipulation of molecular motion.

    PubMed

    Weiner, A M; Leaird, D E; Wiederrecht, G P; Nelson, K A

    1990-03-16

    Optical control over elementary molecular motion is enhanced with timed sequences of femtosecond (10(-15) second) pulses produced by pulse-shaping techniques. Appropriately timed pulse sequences are used to repetitively drive selected vibrations of a crystal lattice, in a manner analogous to repetitively pushing a child on a swing with appropriate timing to build up a large oscillation amplitude. This process corresponds to repetitively "pushing" molecules along selected paths in the lattice. Amplification of selected vibrational modes and discrimination against other modes are demonstrated. Prospects for more extensive manipulation of molecular and collective behavior and structure are clearly indicated. PMID:17843793

  20. Positive amplitudes in the amplituhedron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkani-Hamed, Nima; Hodges, Andrew; Trnka, Jaroslav

    2015-08-01

    The all-loop integrand for scattering amplitudes in planar SYM is determined by an "amplitude form" with logarithmic singularities on the boundary of the amplituhedron. In this note we provide strong evidence for a new striking property of the superamplitude, which we conjecture to be true to all loop orders: the amplitude form is positive when evaluated inside the amplituhedron. The statement is sensibly formulated thanks to the natural "bosonization" of the superamplitude associated with the amplituhedron geometry. However this positivity is not manifest in any of the current approaches to scattering amplitudes, and in particular not in the cellulations of the amplituhedron related to on-shell diagrams and the positive grassmannian. The surprising positivity of the form suggests the existence of a "dual amplituhedron" formulation where this feature would be made obvious. We also suggest that the positivity is associated with an extended picture of amplituhedron geometry, with the amplituhedron sitting inside a co-dimension one surface separating "legal" and "illegal" local singularities of the amplitude. We illustrate this in several simple examples, obtaining new expressions for amplitudes not associated with any triangulations, but following in a more invariant manner from a global view of the positive geometry.

  1. Integrated Verification Experiment data collected as part of the Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Source Region Program. Appendix B: Surface ground motion

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, T.A.; Baker, D.F.; Edwards, C.L.; Freeman, S.H.

    1993-10-01

    Surface ground motion was recorded for many of the Integrated Verification Experiments using standard 10-, 25- and 100-g accelerometers, force-balanced accelerometers and, for some events, using golf balls and 0.39-cm steel balls as surface inertial gauges (SIGs). This report contains the semi-processed acceleration, velocity, and displacement data for the accelerometers fielded and the individual observations for the SIG experiments. Most acceleration, velocity, and displacement records have had calibrations applied and have been deramped, offset corrected, and deglitched but are otherwise unfiltered or processed from their original records. Digital data for all of these records are stored at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  2. Visible Motion Blur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B. (Inventor); Ahumada, Albert J. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method of measuring motion blur is disclosed comprising obtaining a moving edge temporal profile r(sub 1)(k) of an image of a high-contrast moving edge, calculating the masked local contrast m(sub1)(k) for r(sub 1)(k) and the masked local contrast m(sub 2)(k) for an ideal step edge waveform r(sub 2)(k) with the same amplitude as r(sub 1)(k), and calculating the measure or motion blur Psi as a difference function, The masked local contrasts are calculated using a set of convolution kernels scaled to simulate the performance of the human visual system, and Psi is measured in units of just-noticeable differences.

  3. Oscillations of a simple pendulum with extremely large amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butikov, Eugene I.

    2012-11-01

    Large oscillations of a simple rigid pendulum with amplitudes close to 180° are treated on the basis of a physically justified approach in which the cycle of oscillation is divided into several stages. The major part of the almost closed circular path of the pendulum is approximated by the limiting motion, while the motion in the vicinity of the inverted position is described on the basis of the linearized equation. The accepted approach provides additional insight into the dynamics of nonlinear physical systems. The final simple analytical expression gives values for the period of large oscillations that coincide with high precision with the values given by the exact formula.

  4. Shape of Pion Distribution Amplitude

    SciTech Connect

    Radyushkin, Anatoly

    2009-11-01

    A scenario is investigated in which the leading-twist pion distribution amplitude $\\varphi_\\pi (x)$ is approximated by the pion decay constant $f_\\pi$ for all essential values of the light-cone fraction $x$. A model for the light-front wave function $\\Psi (x, k_\\perp)$ is proposed that produces such a distribution amplitude and has a rapidly decreasing (exponential for definiteness) dependence on the light-front energy combination $ k_\\perp^2/x(1-x)$. It is shown that this model easily reproduces the fit of recent large-$Q^2$ BaBar data on the photon-pion transition form factor. Some aspects of scenario with flat pion distribution amplitude are discussed.

  5. OPE for all helicity amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basso, Benjamin; Caetano, João; Córdova, Lucía; Sever, Amit; Vieira, Pedro

    2015-08-01

    We extend the Operator Product Expansion (OPE) for scattering amplitudes in planar SYM to account for all possible helicities of the external states. This is done by constructing a simple map between helicity configurations and so-called charged pentagon transitions. These OPE building blocks are generalizations of the bosonic pentagons entering MHV amplitudes and they can be bootstrapped at finite coupling from the integrable dynamics of the color flux tube. A byproduct of our map is a simple realization of parity in the super Wilson loop picture.

  6. Respiratory Amplitude Guided 4-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Yanle; Caruthers, Shelton D.; Low, Daniel A.; Parikh, Parag J.; Mutic, Sasa

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of prospectively guiding 4-dimensional (4D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) image acquisition using triggers at preselected respiratory amplitudes to achieve T{sub 2} weighting for abdominal motion tracking. Methods and Materials: A respiratory amplitude-based triggering system was developed and integrated into a commercial turbo spin echo MRI sequence. Initial feasibility tests were performed on healthy human study participants. Four respiratory states, the middle and the end of inhalation and exhalation, were used to trigger 4D MRI image acquisition of the liver. To achieve T{sub 2} weighting, the echo time and repetition time were set to 75 milliseconds and 4108 milliseconds, respectively. Single-shot acquisition, together with parallel imaging and partial k-space imaging techniques, was used to improve image acquisition efficiency. 4D MRI image sets composed of axial or sagittal slices were acquired. Results: Respiratory data measured and logged by the MRI scanner showed that the triggers occurred at the appropriate respiratory levels. Liver motion could be easily observed on both 4D MRI image datasets by sensing either the change of liver in size and shape (axial) or diaphragm motion (sagittal). Both 4D MRI image datasets were T{sub 2}-weighted as expected. Conclusions: This study demonstrated the feasibility of achieving T{sub 2}-weighted 4D MRI images using amplitude-based respiratory triggers. With the aid of the respiratory amplitude-based triggering system, the proposed method is compatible with most MRI sequences and therefore has the potential to improve tumor-tissue contrast in abdominal tumor motion imaging.

  7. Simplified theory of large-amplitude wave propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, H.

    1976-01-01

    An orbit perturbation procedure was applied to the description of monochromatic, large-amplitude, electrostatic plasma wave propagation. In the lowest order approximation, untrapped electrons were assumed to follow constant-velocity orbits and trapped electrons were assumed to execute simple harmonic motion. The deviations of these orbits from the actual orbits were regarded as perturbations. The nonlinear damping rate and frequency shift were then obtained in terms of simple functions. The results are in good agreement with previous less approximate analyses.

  8. Positivity of spin foam amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baez, John C.; Christensen, J. Daniel

    2002-04-01

    The amplitude for a spin foam in the Barrett-Crane model of Riemannian quantum gravity is given as a product over its vertices, edges and faces, with one factor of the Riemannian 10j symbols appearing for each vertex, and simpler factors for the edges and faces. We prove that these amplitudes are always nonnegative for closed spin foams. As a corollary, all open spin foams going between a fixed pair of spin networks have real amplitudes of the same sign. This means one can use the Metropolis algorithm to compute expectation values of observables in the Riemannian Barrett-Crane model, as in statistical mechanics, even though this theory is based on a real-time (eiS) rather than imaginary-time e-S path integral. Our proof uses the fact that when the Riemannian 10j symbols are nonzero, their sign is positive or negative depending on whether the sum of the ten spins is an integer or half-integer. For the product of 10j symbols appearing in the amplitude for a closed spin foam, these signs cancel. We conclude with some numerical evidence suggesting that the Lorentzian 10j symbols are always nonnegative, which would imply similar results for the Lorentzian Barrett-Crane model.

  9. Toward complete pion nucleon amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, V.; Danilkin, I. V.; Fernández-Ramírez, C.; Pennington, M. R.; Schott, D.; Szczepaniak, Adam P.; Fox, G.

    2015-10-01

    We compare the low-energy partial-wave analyses of π N scattering with high-energy data via finite-energy sum rules. We construct a new set of amplitudes by matching the imaginary part from the low-energy analysis with the high-energy, Regge parametrization and reconstruct the real parts using dispersion relations.

  10. Toward complete pion nucleon amplitudes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mathieu, Vincent; Danilkin, Igor V.; Fernández-Ramírez, Cesar; Pennington, Michael R.; Schott, Diane M.; Szczepaniak, Adam P.; Fox, G.

    2015-10-05

    We compare the low-energy partial wave analyses πN scattering with a high-energy data via finite energy sum rules. We also construct a new set of amplitudes by matching the imaginary part from the low-energy analysis with the high-energy, Regge parametrization and then reconstruct the real parts using dispersion relations.

  11. Large amplitude drop shape oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Wang, T. G.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental study of large amplitude drop shape oscillation was conducted in immiscible liquids systems and with levitated free liquid drops in air. In liquid-liquid systems the results indicate the existence of familiar characteristics of nonlinear phenomena. The resonance frequency of the fundamental quadrupole mode of stationary, low viscosity Silicone oil drops acoustically levitated in water falls to noticeably low values as the amplitude of oscillation is increased. A typical, experimentally determined relative frequency decrease of a 0.5 cubic centimeters drop would be about 10% when the maximum deformed shape is characterized by a major to minor axial ratio of 1.9. On the other hand, no change in the fundamental mode frequency could be detected for 1 mm drops levitated in air. The experimental data for the decay constant of the quadrupole mode of drops immersed in a liquid host indicate a slight increase for larger oscillation amplitudes. A qualitative investigation of the internal fluid flows for such drops revealed the existence of steady internal circulation within drops oscillating in the fundamental and higher modes. The flow field configuration in the outer host liquid is also significantly altered when the drop oscillation amplitude becomes large.

  12. Constant-amplitude RC oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerwin, W. J.; Westbrook, R. M.

    1970-01-01

    Sinusoidal oscillator has a frequency determined by resistance-capacitance /RC/ values of two charge control devices and a constant-amplitude voltage independent of frequency and RC values. RC elements provide either voltage-control, resistance-control, or capacitance-control of the frequency.

  13. N-loop string amplitude

    SciTech Connect

    Mandelstam, S.

    1986-06-01

    Work on the derivation of an explicit perturbation series for string and superstring amplitudes is reviewed. The light-cone approach is emphasized, but some work on the Polyakov approach is also mentioned, and the two methods are compared. The calculation of the measure factor is outlined in the interacting-string picture. (LEW)

  14. Employing helicity amplitudes for resummation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moult, Ian; Stewart, Iain W.; Tackmann, Frank J.; Waalewijn, Wouter J.

    2016-05-01

    Many state-of-the-art QCD calculations for multileg processes use helicity amplitudes as their fundamental ingredients. We construct a simple and easy-to-use helicity operator basis in soft-collinear effective theory (SCET), for which the hard Wilson coefficients from matching QCD onto SCET are directly given in terms of color-ordered helicity amplitudes. Using this basis allows one to seamlessly combine fixed-order helicity amplitudes at any order they are known with a resummation of higher-order logarithmic corrections. In particular, the virtual loop amplitudes can be employed in factorization theorems to make predictions for exclusive jet cross sections without the use of numerical subtraction schemes to handle real-virtual infrared cancellations. We also discuss matching onto SCET in renormalization schemes with helicities in 4- and d -dimensions. To demonstrate that our helicity operator basis is easy to use, we provide an explicit construction of the operator basis, as well as results for the hard matching coefficients, for p p →H +0 , 1, 2 jets, p p →W /Z /γ +0 , 1, 2 jets, and p p →2 , 3 jets. These operator bases are completely crossing symmetric, so the results can easily be applied to processes with e+e- and e-p collisions.

  15. Circular motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, Isaac; Henry, Richard Conn

    2000-07-01

    An extraordinarily simple and transparent derivation of the formula for the acceleration that occurs in uniform circular motion is presented, and is advocated for use in high school and college freshman physics textbooks.

  16. Polar motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolenkiewicz, R.

    1973-01-01

    Tracking of the Beacon Explorer-C satellite by a precision laser system was used to measure the polar motion and solid earth tide. The tidal perturbation of satellite latitude is plotted as variation in maximum latitude in seconds of arc on earth's surface as a function of the date, and polar motion is shown by plotting the variation in latitude of the laser in seconds of arc along the earth's surface as a function of date

  17. True amplitude prestack depth migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Feng

    Reliable analysis of amplitude variation with offset (or with angle) requires accurate amplitudes from prestack migration. In routine seismic data processing, amplitude balancing and automatic gain control are often used to reduce amplitude lateral variations. However, these methods are empirical and lack a solid physical basis; thus, there are uncertainties that might produce erroneous conclusions, and hence cause economic loss. During wavefield propagation, geometrical spreading, intrinsic attenuation, transmission losses and the energy conversion significantly distort the wavefield amplitude. Most current true-amplitude migrations usually compensate only for geometrical spreading. A new prestack depth migration based on the framework of reverse-time migration in the time-space domain was developed in this dissertation with the aim of compensating all of the propagation effects in one integrated algorithm. Geometrical spreading is automatically included because of the use of full two-way wave extrapolation. Viscoelastic wave equations are solved to handle the intrinsic attenuation with a priori quality factor. Transmission losses for both up- and down-going waves are compensated using a two-pass, recursive procedure based on extracting the angle-dependent reflection/transmission coefficients from prestack migration. The losses caused by the conversion of energy from one elastic model to another are accounted for through elastic wave extrapolation; the influence of the S wave velocity contrast on the P wave reflection coefficient is implicitly included by using the Zoeppritz equations to describe the reflection and transmission at an elastic interface. Only smooth background models are assumed to be known. The contrasts/ratios of the model parameters can be estimated by fitting the compensated angle-dependent reflection coefficients obtained from data for multiple sources. This is one useful by-product of the algorithm. Numerical tests on both 2D and 3D scalar

  18. Modeling the polar motion of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coyette, Alexis; Van Hoolst, Tim; Baland, Rose-Marie; Tokano, Tetsuya

    2016-02-01

    The angular momentum of the atmosphere and of the hydrocarbon lakes of Titan have a large equatorial component that can excite polar motion, a variable orientation of the rotation axis of Titan with respect to its surface. We here use the angular momentum obtained from a General Circulation Model of the atmosphere of Titan and from an Ocean Circulation Model for Titan's polar lakes to model the polar motion of Titan as a function of the interior structure. Besides the gravitational torque exerted by Saturn on Titan's aspherical mass distribution, the rotational model also includes torques arising due to the presence of an ocean under a thin ice shell as well as the influence of the elasticity of the different layers. The Chandler wobble period of a solid and rigid Titan without its atmosphere is about 279 years. The period of the Chandler wobble is mainly influenced by the atmosphere of Titan (-166 years) and the presence of an internal global ocean (+135 to 295 years depending on the internal model) and to a lesser extent by the elastic deformations (+3.7 years). The forced polar motion of a solid and rigid Titan is elliptical with an amplitude of about 50 m and a main period equal to the orbital period of Saturn. It is mainly forced by the atmosphere of Titan while the lakes of Titan are at the origin of a displacement of the mean polar motion, or polar offset. The subsurface ocean can largely increase the polar motion amplitude due to resonant amplification with a wobble free mode of Titan. The amplitudes as well as the main periods of the polar motion depend on whether and which forcing period is close to the period of a free mode. For a thick ice shell, the polar motion mainly has an annual period and an amplitude of about 1 km. For thinner ice shells, the polar motion amplitude can reach several tens of km and shorter periods become dominant. We demonstrate that for thick ice shells, the ice shell rigidity weakly influences the amplitude of the polar motion

  19. Does a motion base prevent simulator sickness?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharkey, Thomas J.; Mccauley, Michael E.

    1992-01-01

    The use of high-fidelity motion cues to reduce the discrepancy between visually implied motion and actual motion is tested experimentally using the NASA Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS). Ten pilot subjects use the VMS to fly simulated S-turns and sawtooths which generate a high incidence of motion sickness. The subjects fly the maneuvers on separate days both with and without use of a motion base provided by the VMS, and data are collected regarding symptoms, dark focus, and postural equilibrium. The motion-base condition is shown to be practically irrelevant with respect to the incidence and severity of motion sickness. It is suggested that the data-collection procedure cannot detect differences in sickness levels, and the false cues of the motion condition are theorized to have an adverse impact approximately equivalent to the absence of cues in a fixed-base condition.

  20. Randomized gap and amplitude estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zintchenko, Ilia; Wiebe, Nathan

    2016-06-01

    We provide a method for estimating spectral gaps in low-dimensional systems. Unlike traditional phase estimation, our approach does not require ancillary qubits nor does it require well-characterized gates. Instead, it only requires the ability to perform approximate Haar random unitary operations, applying the unitary whose eigenspectrum is sought and performing measurements in the computational basis. We discuss application of these ideas to in-place amplitude estimation and quantum device calibration.

  1. Genus dependence of superstring amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Simon

    2006-11-15

    The problem of the consistency of the finiteness of the supermoduli space integral in the limit of vanishing super-fixed point distance and the genus-dependence of the integral over the super-Schottky coordinates in the fundamental region containing a neighborhood of |K{sub n}|=0 is resolved. Given a choice of the categories of isometric circles representing the integration region, the exponential form of bounds for superstring amplitudes is derived.

  2. Pulse amplitude modulated chlorophyll fluorometer

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, Elias; Wu, Jie

    2015-12-29

    Chlorophyll fluorometry may be used for detecting toxins in a sample because of changes in micro algae. A portable lab on a chip ("LOAC") based chlorophyll fluorometer may be used for toxin detection and environmental monitoring. In particular, the system may include a microfluidic pulse amplitude modulated ("PAM") chlorophyll fluorometer. The LOAC PAM chlorophyll fluorometer may analyze microalgae and cyanobacteria that grow naturally in source drinking water.

  3. Phase variation of hadronic amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Dedonder, J.-P.; Gibbs, W. R.; Nuseirat, Mutazz

    2008-04-15

    The phase variation with angle of hadronic amplitudes is studied with a view to understanding the underlying physical quantities that control it and how well it can be determined in free space. We find that unitarity forces a moderately accurate determination of the phase in standard amplitude analyses but that the nucleon-nucleon analyses done to date do not give the phase variation needed to achieve a good representation of the data in multiple scattering calculations. Models are examined that suggest its behavior near forward angles is related to the radii of the real and absorptive parts of the interaction. The dependence of this phase on model parameters is such that if these radii are modified in the nuclear medium (in combination with the change due to the shift in energy of the effective amplitude in the medium) then the larger magnitudes of the phase needed to fit the data might be attainable but only for negative values of the phase variation parameter.

  4. Motion cue effects on pilot tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ringland, R. F.; Stapleford, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    The results of two successive experimental investigations of the effects of motion cues on manual control tracking tasks are reported. The first of these was an IFR single-axis VTOL roll attitude control task. Describing function data show the dominant motion feedback quantity to be angular velocity. The second experimental task was multiaxis, that of precision hovering of a VTOL using separated instrument displays with reduced motion amplitude scaling. Performance data and pilot opinion show angular position to be the dominant cue when simulator linear motion is absent.

  5. Vibration of low amplitude imaged in amplitude and phase by sideband versus carrier correlation digital holography.

    PubMed

    Verrier, N; Alloul, L; Gross, M

    2015-02-01

    Sideband holography can be used to get field images (E0 and E1) of a vibrating object for both the carrier (E0) and the sideband (E1) frequency with respect to vibration. Here we propose to record E0 and E1 sequentially and to image the product E1E0* or the correlation 〈E1E0*〉. We show that these quantities are insensitive to the phase related to the object roughness and directly reflect the phase of the mechanical motion. The signal to noise can be improved by averaging E1E0* over a neighbor pixel, yielding 〈E1E0*〉. Experimental validation is made with a vibrating cube of wood and a clarinet reed. At 2 kHz, vibrations of amplitude down to 0.01 nm are detected. PMID:25680060

  6. Asteroid Motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sykes, Mary V.; Moynihan, P. Daniel

    1996-12-01

    Equations are derived which describe the apparent motion of an asteroid traveling on an elliptical orbit in geocentric ecliptic coordinates. At opposition, the equations are identical to those derived by Bowellet al. (Bowell, E., B. Skiff, and L. Wasserman 1990. InAsteroids, Comets, Meteors III(C.-I. Lagerkvist, M. Rickman, B. A. Lindblad, and M. Lindgren, Eds.), pp. 19-24. Uppsala Universitet, Uppsala, Sweden). These equations can be an important component in the optimization of search strategies for specific asteroid populations based on their apparent motions relative to other populations when observed away from opposition.

  7. Natural and systematic polar motion jumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapanov, Y.; Vondrak, J.; Ron, C.; Pachalieva, R.

    2014-12-01

    Polar motion consists mainly of two harmonic oscillations with variable phases and amplitudes and small irregular variations. The small irregular variations may be due to various geophysical excitations and observation inaccuracy (mostly in the first half of the last century). A part of irregular polar motion variations consists of fast jumps of the mean values of polar motion coordinates. The direct determination of the polar motion jumps is difficult, because the jump values are very small relative to the seasonal and Chandler amplitudes. A useful high sensitive method of data jumps determination is proposed. The method consists of data integration and piecewise linear or parabolic trends determina- tion. This method is applied to determine the natural and systematic polar motion jumps existing in pole coordinates from the solutions OA10 for the period 1899.7ñ1962.0 and C04 for the period 1962.0- 2013.5. Only a few of the determined polar motion jumps can be interpreted as systematic biases due to observational errors. The major part of the detected polar motion jumps occurs almost regularly near the epochs of minimum amplitude (due to the beat of seasonal and Chandler wobbles), so the natural origin of these jumps is supposed.

  8. Focused Ultrasound Surgery Control Using Local Harmonic Motion: VX2 Tumor Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curiel, Laura; Chopra, Rajiv; Goertz, David; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2009-04-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a real-time method for controlling focused ultrasound surgery using ultrasound imaging. The approach uses measurements of localized harmonic motion (LHM) in order to perform controlled FUS exposures by detecting changes in the elastic properties of tissues during coagulation. Methods: Nine New Zealand rabbits with VX2 tumors implanted in the thigh were used for this study. LHM was generated within the tumors by periodic induction of radiation force using a FUS transducer (80-mm focal length, 100-mm diameter, 20-mm central hole, 1.485-MHz). Tissue motion was tracked by collecting and cross-correlating RF signals during the motion using a separate diagnostic transducer (3-kHz PRF, 5-MHz). After locating the tumor in MR images, a series of sonications were performed to treat the tumors using a reduction in LHM amplitude to control the exposure. Results: LHM was successfully used to control the sonications. A LHM amplitude threshold value was determined at which changes were considered significant and then the exposure was started and stopped when the LHM amplitude dropped below the threshold. The appearance of a lesion was then verified by MRI. The feasibility of LHM measurements to control FUS exposure was validated.

  9. Focused Ultrasound Surgery Control Using Local Harmonic Motion: VX2 Tumor Study

    SciTech Connect

    Curiel, Laura; Chopra, Rajiv; Goertz, David; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2009-04-14

    The objective of this study was to develop a real-time method for controlling focused ultrasound surgery using ultrasound imaging. The approach uses measurements of localized harmonic motion (LHM) in order to perform controlled FUS exposures by detecting changes in the elastic properties of tissues during coagulation. Methods: Nine New Zealand rabbits with VX2 tumors implanted in the thigh were used for this study. LHM was generated within the tumors by periodic induction of radiation force using a FUS transducer (80-mm focal length, 100-mm diameter, 20-mm central hole, 1.485-MHz). Tissue motion was tracked by collecting and cross-correlating RF signals during the motion using a separate diagnostic transducer (3-kHz PRF, 5-MHz). After locating the tumor in MR images, a series of sonications were performed to treat the tumors using a reduction in LHM amplitude to control the exposure. Results: LHM was successfully used to control the sonications. A LHM amplitude threshold value was determined at which changes were considered significant and then the exposure was started and stopped when the LHM amplitude dropped below the threshold. The appearance of a lesion was then verified by MRI. The feasibility of LHM measurements to control FUS exposure was validated.

  10. Ground motion input in seismic evaluation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Sewell, R.T.; Wu, S.C.

    1996-07-01

    This report documents research pertaining to conservatism and variability in seismic risk estimates. Specifically, it examines whether or not artificial motions produce unrealistic evaluation demands, i.e., demands significantly inconsistent with those expected from real earthquake motions. To study these issues, two types of artificial motions are considered: (a) motions with smooth response spectra, and (b) motions with realistic variations in spectral amplitude across vibration frequency. For both types of artificial motion, time histories are generated to match target spectral shapes. For comparison, empirical motions representative of those that might result from strong earthquakes in the Eastern U.S. are also considered. The study findings suggest that artificial motions resulting from typical simulation approaches (aimed at matching a given target spectrum) are generally adequate and appropriate in representing the peak-response demands that may be induced in linear structures and equipment responding to real earthquake motions. Also, given similar input Fourier energies at high-frequencies, levels of input Fourier energy at low frequencies observed for artificial motions are substantially similar to those levels noted in real earthquake motions. In addition, the study reveals specific problems resulting from the application of Western U.S. type motions for seismic evaluation of Eastern U.S. nuclear power plants.