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Sample records for amplitude modulated tones

  1. Beating frequency and amplitude modulation of the piano tone due to coupling of tones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartling, Bo

    2005-04-01

    The influence on a piano tone from weak coexcitation of damped adjacent tones due to coupling via the bridge is studied. The frequency and amplitude modulation of the sound resulting from coexcitation of one strong and one or two weak tones is analyzed. One weak tone causes frequency and amplitude modulation of the sound, and two weak tones produce beating frequency and amplitude modulation, where the beatings of the two modulations are of opposite phase. By digital recording of the sound of piano tones, the appearance of these phenomena is verified. The audibility of the observed frequency and amplitude modulation is discussed in terms of previously determined detection thresholds. The beating character of both frequency and amplitude modulations, however, distinguishes the phenomena from those previously studied and prompts further psychoacoustic investigations. It is shown that detuning of unison strings may significantly increase the frequency deviation of the frequency modulation in conjunction with affected amplitude modulation. The modulatory effects of coupling to adjacent tones therefore may possibly be utilized in the tuning process. A coupling of tones analogous to the situation in a piano may arise in other stringed musical instruments transferring string vibrations to a soundboard via a bridge. .

  2. Beating frequency and amplitude modulation of the piano tone due to coupling of tones.

    PubMed

    Cartling, Bo

    2005-04-01

    The influence on a piano tone from weak coexcitation of damped adjacent tones due to coupling via the bridge is studied. The frequency and amplitude modulation of the sound resulting from coexcitation of one strong and one or two weak tones is analyzed. One weak tone causes frequency and amplitude modulation of the sound, and two weak tones produce beating frequency and amplitude modulation, where the beatings of the two modulations are of opposite phase. By digital recording of the sound of piano tones, the appearance of these phenomena is verified. The audibility of the observed frequency and amplitude modulation is discussed in terms of previously determined detection thresholds. The beating character of both frequency and amplitude modulations, however, distinguishes the phenomena from those previously studied and prompts further psychoacoustic investigations. It is shown that detuning of unison strings may significantly increase the frequency deviation of the frequency modulation in conjunction with affected amplitude modulation. The modulatory effects of coupling to adjacent tones therefore may possibly be utilized in the tuning process. A coupling of tones analogous to the situation in a piano may arise in other stringed musical instruments transferring string vibrations to a soundboard via a bridge. PMID:15898666

  3. Amplitude modulation reduces loudness adaptation to high-frequency tones.

    PubMed

    Wynne, Dwight P; George, Sahara E; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2015-07-01

    Long-term loudness perception of a sound has been presumed to depend on the spatial distribution of activated auditory nerve fibers as well as their temporal firing pattern. The relative contributions of those two factors were investigated by measuring loudness adaptation to sinusoidally amplitude-modulated 12-kHz tones. The tones had a total duration of 180 s and were either unmodulated or 100%-modulated at one of three frequencies (4, 20, or 100 Hz), and additionally varied in modulation depth from 0% to 100% at the 4-Hz frequency only. Every 30 s, normal-hearing subjects estimated the loudness of one of the stimuli played at 15 dB above threshold in random order. Without any amplitude modulation, the loudness of the unmodulated tone after 180 s was only 20% of the loudness at the onset of the stimulus. Amplitude modulation systematically reduced the amount of loudness adaptation, with the 100%-modulated stimuli, regardless of modulation frequency, maintaining on average 55%-80% of the loudness at onset after 180 s. Because the present low-frequency amplitude modulation produced minimal changes in long-term spectral cues affecting the spatial distribution of excitation produced by a 12-kHz pure tone, the present result indicates that neural synchronization is critical to maintaining loudness perception over time. PMID:26233027

  4. Stream segregation in the perception of sinusoidally amplitude-modulated tones.

    PubMed

    Dolležal, Lena-Vanessa; Beutelmann, Rainer; Klump, Georg M

    2012-01-01

    Amplitude modulation can serve as a cue for segregating streams of sounds from different sources. Here we evaluate stream segregation in humans using ABA- sequences of sinusoidally amplitude modulated (SAM) tones. A and B represent SAM tones with the same carrier frequency (1000, 4000 Hz) and modulation depth (30, 100%). The modulation frequency of the A signals (f(modA)) was 30, 100 or 300 Hz, respectively. The modulation frequency of the B signals was up to four octaves higher (Δf(mod)). Three different ABA- tone patterns varying in tone duration and stimulus onset asynchrony were presented to evaluate the effect of forward suppression. Subjects indicated their 1- or 2-stream percept on a touch screen at the end of each ABA- sequence (presentation time 5 or 15 s). Tone pattern, f(modA), Δf(mod), carrier frequency, modulation depth and presentation time significantly affected the percentage of a 2-stream percept. The human psychophysical results are compared to responses of avian forebrain neurons evoked by different ABA- SAM tone conditions [1] that were broadly overlapping those of the present study. The neurons also showed significant effects of tone pattern and Δf(mod) that were comparable to effects observed in the present psychophysical study. Depending on the carrier frequency, modulation frequency, modulation depth and the width of the auditory filters, SAM tones may provide mainly temporal cues (sidebands fall within the range of the filter), spectral cues (sidebands fall outside the range of the filter) or possibly both. A computational model based on excitation pattern differences was used to predict the 50% threshold of 2-stream responses. In conditions for which the model predicts a considerably larger 50% threshold of 2-stream responses (i.e., larger Δf(mod) at threshold) than was observed, it is unlikely that spectral cues can provide an explanation of stream segregation by SAM. PMID:22984436

  5. Human Neuromagnetic Steady-State Responses to Amplitude-Modulated Tones, Speech, and Music

    PubMed Central

    Parkkonen, Lauri; Hari, Riitta

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Auditory steady-state responses that can be elicited by various periodic sounds inform about subcortical and early cortical auditory processing. Steady-state responses to amplitude-modulated pure tones have been used to scrutinize binaural interaction by frequency-tagging the two ears’ inputs at different frequencies. Unlike pure tones, speech and music are physically very complex, as they include many frequency components, pauses, and large temporal variations. To examine the utility of magnetoencephalographic (MEG) steady-state fields (SSFs) in the study of early cortical processing of complex natural sounds, the authors tested the extent to which amplitude-modulated speech and music can elicit reliable SSFs. Design: MEG responses were recorded to 90-s-long binaural tones, speech, and music, amplitude-modulated at 41.1 Hz at four different depths (25, 50, 75, and 100%). The subjects were 11 healthy, normal-hearing adults. MEG signals were averaged in phase with the modulation frequency, and the sources of the resulting SSFs were modeled by current dipoles. After the MEG recording, intelligibility of the speech, musical quality of the music stimuli, naturalness of music and speech stimuli, and the perceived deterioration caused by the modulation were evaluated on visual analog scales. Results: The perceived quality of the stimuli decreased as a function of increasing modulation depth, more strongly for music than speech; yet, all subjects considered the speech intelligible even at the 100% modulation. SSFs were the strongest to tones and the weakest to speech stimuli; the amplitudes increased with increasing modulation depth for all stimuli. SSFs to tones were reliably detectable at all modulation depths (in all subjects in the right hemisphere, in 9 subjects in the left hemisphere) and to music stimuli at 50 to 100% depths, whereas speech usually elicited clear SSFs only at 100% depth. The hemispheric balance of SSFs was toward the right hemisphere

  6. The effect of temporal asymmetry on amplitude modulation detection using pure-tone carriers (L).

    PubMed

    Shen, Yi; Lentz, Jennifer J

    2011-11-01

    The effect of temporal asymmetry on amplitude modulation detection was studied using sawtooth modulators with rising (ramped) or falling (damped) temporal envelopes within each period of modulation. For pure-tone carriers, damped modulation was more detectable than ramped modulation for a 5-kHz carrier (by a threshold difference of 3.2 dB on average) but not for a 1-kHz carrier. The threshold difference obtained at 5 kHz between the ramped and damped modulators was consistent across modulation rates (8-128 Hz). This carrier frequency dependence suggests that the effect of temporally asymmetry on modulation detection originates from envelope-based, within-channel mechanisms. PMID:22087889

  7. The Analysis for Activations in the Brain during Hearing the Amplitude-Modulated Tone by fMRI Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukami, Tadanori; Shimada, Takamasa; Akatsuka, Takao; Saito, Yoichi

    In audiometry, ABR (Auditory Brainstem Response) is widely used. However, it shows low accuracy in low frequency band. Meanwhile, AMFR (Amplitude-Modulation-Following Response), the response during hearing an amplitude-modulated tone, has high frequency specificity and is brought to attention. As the first step to clinical application of AMFR, we investigated the activated areas in a brain when the subjects hear SAM tone (Sinusoidally Amplitude-Modulated tone) with both ears. We measured following two signals. One is the difference of BOLD (Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent) signal between hearing SAM tone vs. silence, the other is the difference of BOLD signal between hearing SAM tone vs. unmodulated tone. As a result, in the case of SAM vs. silence, the bilaterally auditory cortex (Broadmann Area 41, 42), the biratelally BA 10, left superior frontal gyrus and right superior temporal gyrus were activated (p<0.0037, uncorrected). In the case of SAM vs. unmodulated tone, the bilaterally superior frontal gyrus (BA 6) and precuneus (BA 7), neighboring area including the bilaterally inferior parietal lobule (BA 40), the bilaterally medial frontal gyrus and superior frontal gyrus were activated (p<0.021, uncorrected). Activations of visual perception due to eye-opened state were detected in some parts of activations. As a result, we inferred that modulated tone was recognized in the medial frontal gyrus and inferior parietal lobule was the part related to perception of amplitude-modulation.

  8. Detection thresholds for amplitude modulations of tones in budgerigar, rabbit, and human.

    PubMed

    Carney, Laurel H; Ketterer, Angela D; Abrams, Kristina S; Schwarz, Douglas M; Idrobo, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    Envelope fluctuations of complex sounds carry information that is -essential for many types of discrimination and for detection in noise. To study the neural representation of envelope information and mechanisms for processing of this temporal aspect of sounds, it is useful to identify an animal model that can -sensitively detect amplitude modulations (AM). Low modulation frequencies, which dominate speech sounds, are of particular interest. Yet, most animal -models studied previously are relatively insensitive to AM at low modulation -frequencies. Rabbits have high thresholds for low-frequency modulations, -especially for tone carriers. Rhesus macaques are less sensitive than humans to low-frequency -modulations of wideband noise (O'Conner et al. Hear Res 277, 37-43, 2011). Rats and -chinchilla also have higher thresholds than humans for amplitude -modulations of noise (Kelly et al. J Comp Psychol 120, 98-105, 2006; Henderson et al. J Acoust Soc Am 75, -1177-1183, 1984). In contrast, the budgerigar has thresholds for AM detection of wideband noise similar to those of human listeners at low -modulation frequencies (Dooling and Searcy. Percept Psychophys 46, 65-71, 1981). A -one-interval, two-alternative operant conditioning procedure was used to estimate AM -detection thresholds for 4-kHz tone carriers at low modulation -frequencies (4-256 Hz). Budgerigar thresholds are comparable to those of human subjects in a comparable task. Implications of these comparative results for temporal coding of complex sounds are discussed. Comparative results for masked AM detection are also presented. PMID:23716245

  9. Detection Thresholds for Amplitude Modulations of Tones in Budgerigar, Rabbit, and Human

    PubMed Central

    Ketterer, Angela D.; Abrams, Kristina S.; Schwarz, Douglas M.; Idrobo, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Envelope fluctuations of complex sounds carry information that is essential for many types of discrimination and for detection in noise. To study the neural representation of envelope information and mechanisms for processing of this temporal aspect of sounds, it is useful to identify an animal model that can sensitively detect amplitude modulations (AM). Low modulation frequencies, which dominate speech sounds, are of particular interest. Yet, most animal models studied previously are relatively insensitive to AM at low modulation frequencies. Rabbits have high thresholds for low-frequency modulations, especially for tone carriers. Rhesus macaques are less sensitive than humans to low-frequency modulations of wideband noise (O’Conner et al. Hear Res 277, 37–43, 2011). Rats and chinchilla also have higher thresholds than humans for amplitude modulations of noise (Kelly et al. J Comp Psychol 120, 98–105, 2006; Henderson et al. J Acoust Soc Am 75, 1177–1183, 1984). In contrast, the budgerigar has thresholds for AM detection of wideband noise similar to those of human listeners at low modulation frequencies (Dooling and Searcy. Percept Psychophys 46, 65–71, 1981). A one-interval, two-alternative operant conditioning procedure was used to estimate AM detection thresholds for 4-kHz tone carriers at low modulation frequencies (4–256 Hz). Budgerigar thresholds are comparable to those of human subjects in a comparable task. Implications of these comparative results for temporal coding of complex sounds are discussed. Comparative results for masked AM detection are also presented. PMID:23716245

  10. Effects of randomizing phase on the discrimination between amplitude-modulated and quasi-frequency-modulated tones.

    PubMed

    Tabuchi, Hisaaki; Borucki, Ewa; Berg, Bruce G

    2012-08-01

    This study investigated the bandwidth of phase sensitivity. Subjects discriminated amplitude-modulated tones (AM), and quasi-frequency-modulated tones (QFM) in a two-interval, forced-choice task. An adaptive threshold procedure was used to estimate the modulation depth needed to discriminate the stimuli as a function of carrier and modulation frequency. Non-monotonicities in threshold-bandwidth functions were often observed at higher modulation frequencies. The results are discussed in terms of two potential cues: (1) waveform envelope, (2) cubic distortion products. In order to degrade the information obtained from auditory distortions, the phase for the carrier frequency was randomly sampled from a uniform distribution, which diminished the non-monotonicities with minimal effect at lower modulation frequencies. Model simulations demonstrated that phase randomization degrades distortion product cues with only a modest effect on temporal cues. Final results show that maximum bandwidths for phase sensitivity (BW(max)) were not proportional to carrier frequencies. PMID:22609773

  11. Comparison of discrete multi-tone and pulse amplitude modulation for beyond 100 Gbps short-reach application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishihara, Masato; Kai, Yutaka; Tanaka, Toshiki; Takahara, Tomoo; Li, Lei; Yan, Weizhen; Liu, Bo; Tao, Zhenning; Rasmussen, Jens C.

    2013-12-01

    Advanced multi-level modulation is an attractive modulation technique for beyond 100 Gbps short reach optical transmission system. Above all, discrete multi-tone (DMT) technique and pulse amplitude modulation (PAM) technique are the strong candidates. We compared the 100 Gbps transmission characteristics of DMT and PAM by simulation and experiment. The comparison was done by using same devices and only the digital signal processing was changed. We studied the transmission distance dependence for 0.5 to 40 km and the impact of the frequency responses of the optical devices. Finally we discuss the features of the both modulation techniques.

  12. Responses of neurons in the rat's ventral nucleus of the lateral lemniscus to amplitude-modulated tones.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huiming; Kelly, Jack B

    2006-12-01

    Recordings were made from single neurons in the rat's ventral nucleus of the lateral lemniscus (VNLL) to determine responses to amplitude-modulated (AM) tones. The neurons were first characterized on the basis of their response to tone bursts presented to the contralateral ear and a distinction was made between those with transient onset responses and those with sustained responses. Sinusoidal AM tones were then presented to the contralateral ear with a carrier that matched the neuron's characteristic frequency (CF). Modulation transfer functions were generated on the basis of firing rate (MTF(FR)) and vector strength (MTF(VS)). Ninety-two percent of onset neurons that responded continuously to AM tones had band-pass MTF(FR)s with best modulation frequencies from 10 to 300 Hz. Fifty-four percent of sustained neurons had band-pass MTF(FR)s with best modulation frequencies from 10 to 500 Hz; other neurons had band-suppressed, all-pass, low-pass, or high-pass functions. Most neurons showed either band-pass or low-pass MTF(VS). Responses were well synchronized to the modulation cycle with maximum vector strengths ranging from 0.37 to 0.98 for sustained neurons and 0.78 to 0.99 for onset neurons. The upper frequency limit for response synchrony was higher than that reported for inferior colliculus, but lower than that seen in more peripheral structures. Results suggest that VNLL neurons, especially those with onset responses to tone bursts, are sensitive to temporal features of sounds and narrowly tuned to different modulation rates. However, there was no evidence of a topographic relation between dorsoventral position along the length of VNLL and best modulation frequency as determined by either firing rate or vector strength. PMID:16928797

  13. A modeling study of the responses of the lateral superior olive to ipsilateral sinusoidally amplitude-modulated tones.

    PubMed

    Wang, Le; Colburn, H Steven

    2012-04-01

    The lateral superior olive (LSO) is a brainstem nucleus that is classically understood to encode binaural information in high-frequency sounds. Previous studies have shown that LSO cells are sensitive to envelope interaural time difference in sinusoidally amplitude-modulated (SAM) tones (Joris and Yin, J Neurophysiol 73:1043-1062, 1995; Joris, J Neurophysiol 76:2137-2156, 1996) and that a subpopulation of LSO neurons exhibit low-threshold potassium currents mediated by Kv1 channels (Barnes-Davies et al., Eur J Neurosci 19:325-333, 2004). It has also been shown that in many LSO cells the average response rate to ipsilateral SAM tones decreases with modulation frequency above a few hundred Hertz (Joris and Yin, J Neurophysiol 79:253-269, 1998). This low-pass feature is not directly inherited from the inputs to the LSO since the response rate of these input neurons changes little with increasing modulation frequency. In the current study, an LSO cell model is developed to investigate mechanisms consistent with the responses described above, notably the emergent rate decrease with increasing frequency. The mechanisms explored included the effects of after-hyperpolarization (AHP) channels, the dynamics of low-threshold potassium channels (KLT), and the effects of background inhibition. In the model, AHP channels alone were not sufficient to induce the observed rate decrease at high modulation frequencies. The model also suggests that the background inhibition alone, possibly from the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body, can account for the small rate decrease seen in some LSO neurons, but could not explain the large rate decrease seen in other LSO neurons at high modulation frequencies. In contrast, both the small and large rate decreases were replicated when KLT channels were included in the LSO neuron model. These results support the conclusion that KLT channels may play a major role in the large rate decreases seen in some units and that background inhibition may be

  14. Effect of attention on 40Hz auditory steady-state response depends on the stimulation type: Flutter amplitude modulated tones versus clicks.

    PubMed

    Voicikas, Aleksandras; Niciute, Ieva; Ruksenas, Osvaldas; Griskova-Bulanova, Inga

    2016-08-26

    Auditory steady-state responses (ASSRs) are used to test the ability of local cortical networks to generate gamma frequency activity in patients with psychiatric disorders. For the effective use of ASSRs in research and clinical applications, it is necessary to find a comfortable stimulation type and to know how ASSRs are modulated by the tasks given to the subjects during the recording session. We aimed to evaluate the suitability of flutter amplitude modulated tone (FAM) stimulation for generation of ASSRs: subjective pleasantness of FAMs and attentional effects on FAM-elicited 40Hz ASSRs were assessed. Commonly used click stimulation was used for comparison. FAMs produced ASSRs that were stable over the variety of tasks - they were not modulated by attentional demands during the task; responses to clicks were reduced and less synchronized during distraction. FAM stimuli were rated as less unpleasant and less arousing than click stimuli, thus being more pleasant to the subjects. Our findings suggest that FAM stimulation might be more suitable in conditions, where attention is difficult to control, i.e. in clinical settings. PMID:27424792

  15. Detection of modulated tones in modulated noise by non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Bohlen, Peter; Dylla, Margit; Timms, Courtney; Ramachandran, Ramnarayan

    2014-10-01

    In natural environments, many sounds are amplitude-modulated. Amplitude modulation is thought to be a signal that aids auditory object formation. A previous study of the detection of signals in noise found that when tones or noise were amplitude-modulated, the noise was a less effective masker, and detection thresholds for tones in noise were lowered. These results suggest that the detection of modulated signals in modulated noise would be enhanced. This paper describes the results of experiments investigating how detection is modified when both signal and noise were amplitude-modulated. Two monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were trained to detect amplitude-modulated tones in continuous, amplitude-modulated broadband noise. When the phase difference of otherwise similarly amplitude-modulated tones and noise were varied, detection thresholds were highest when the modulations were in phase and lowest when the modulations were anti-phase. When the depth of the modulation of tones or noise was varied, detection thresholds decreased if the modulations were anti-phase. When the modulations were in phase, increasing the depth of tone modulation caused an increase in tone detection thresholds, but increasing depth of noise modulations did not affect tone detection thresholds. Changing the modulation frequency of tone or noise caused changes in threshold that saturated at modulation frequencies higher than 20 Hz; thresholds decreased when the tone and noise modulations were in phase and decreased when they were anti-phase. The relationship between reaction times and tone level were not modified by manipulations to the nature of temporal variations in the signal or noise. The changes in behavioral threshold were consistent with a model where the brain subtracted noise from signal. These results suggest that the parameters of the modulation of signals and maskers heavily influence detection in very predictable ways. These results are consistent with some results in humans and avians

  16. The Role of Amplitude Envelope in Lexical Tone Perception: Evidence from Cantonese Lexical Tone Discrimination in Adults with Normal Hearing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Yining Victor

    2012-01-01

    Previously published studies on the role of amplitude envelope in lexical tone perception focused on Mandarin only. Amplitude envelope was found to co-vary with fundamental frequency in Mandarin lexical tones, and amplitude envelope alone could cue tone perception in Mandarin which uses primarily tone contour for phonemic tonal contrasts. The…

  17. Amplitude Modulator Chassis

    SciTech Connect

    Erbert, G

    2009-09-01

    The Amplitude Modulator Chassis (AMC) is the final component in the MOR system and connects directly to the PAM input through a 100-meter fiber. The 48 AMCs temporally shape the 48 outputs of the MOR using an arbitrary waveform generator coupled to an amplitude modulator. The amplitude modulation element is a two stage, Lithium Niobate waveguide device, where the intensity of the light passing through the device is a function of the electrical drive applied. The first stage of the modulator is connected to a programmable high performance Arbitrary Waveform Generator (AWG) consisting of 140 impulse generators space 250 ps apart. An arbitrary waveform is generated by independently varying the amplitude of each impulse generator and then summing the impulses together. In addition to the AWG a short pulse generator is also connected to the first stage of the modulator to provide a sub 100-ps pulse used for timing experiments. The second stage of the modulator is connect to a square pulse generator used to further attenuate any pre or post pulse light passing through the first stage of the modulator. The fast rise and fall time of the square pulse generator is also used to produce fast rise and fall times of the AWG by clipping the AWG pulse. For maximum extinction, a pulse bias voltage is applied to each stage of the modulator. A pulse voltage is applied as opposed to a DC voltage to prevent charge buildup on the modulator. Each bias voltage is adjustable to provide a minimum of 50-dB extinction. The AMC is controlled through ICCS to generate the desired temporal pulse shape. This process involves a closed-loop control algorithm, which compares the desired temporal waveform to the produced optical pulse, and iterates the programming of the AWG until the two waveforms agree within an allowable tolerance.

  18. Achieving Electric-Acoustic Benefit with a Modulated Tone

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Christopher A.; Bacon, Sid P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective When either real or simulated electric stimulation from a cochlear implant (CI) is combined with low-frequency acoustic stimulation (electric-acoustic stimulation [EAS]), speech intelligibility in noise can improve dramatically. We recently showed that a similar benefit to intelligibility can be observed in simulation when the low-frequency acoustic stimulation (low-pass target speech) is replaced with a tone that is modulated both in frequency with the fundamental frequency (F0) of the target talker and in amplitude with the amplitude envelope of the low-pass target speech (Brown & Bacon 2009). The goal of the current experiment was to examine the benefit of the modulated tone to intelligibility in CI patients. Design Eight CI users who had some residual acoustic hearing either in the implanted ear, the unimplanted ear, or both ears participated in this study. Target speech was combined with either multitalker babble or a single competing talker and presented to the implant. Stimulation to the acoustic region consisted of no signal, target speech, or a tone that was modulated in frequency to track the changes in the target talker’s F0 and in amplitude to track the amplitude envelope of target speech low-pass filtered at 500 Hz. Results All patients showed improvements in intelligibility over electric-only stimulation when either the tone or target speech was presented acoustically. The average improvement in intelligibility was 46 percentage points due to the tone and 55 percentage points due to target speech. Conclusions The results demonstrate that a tone carrying F0 and amplitude envelope cues of target speech can provide significant benefit to CI users and may lead to new technologies that could offer EAS benefit to many patients who would not benefit from current EAS approaches. PMID:19546806

  19. Speech recognition with amplitude and frequency modulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Fan-Gang; Nie, Kaibao; Stickney, Ginger S.; Kong, Ying-Yee; Vongphoe, Michael; Bhargave, Ashish; Wei, Chaogang; Cao, Keli

    2005-02-01

    Amplitude modulation (AM) and frequency modulation (FM) are commonly used in communication, but their relative contributions to speech recognition have not been fully explored. To bridge this gap, we derived slowly varying AM and FM from speech sounds and conducted listening tests using stimuli with different modulations in normal-hearing and cochlear-implant subjects. We found that although AM from a limited number of spectral bands may be sufficient for speech recognition in quiet, FM significantly enhances speech recognition in noise, as well as speaker and tone recognition. Additional speech reception threshold measures revealed that FM is particularly critical for speech recognition with a competing voice and is independent of spectral resolution and similarity. These results suggest that AM and FM provide independent yet complementary contributions to support robust speech recognition under realistic listening situations. Encoding FM may improve auditory scene analysis, cochlear-implant, and audiocoding performance. auditory analysis | cochlear implant | neural code | phase | scene analysis

  20. Infant Auditory Sensitivity to Pure Tones and Frequency-Modulated Tones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leibold, Lori J.; Werner, Lynne A.

    2007-01-01

    It has been suggested that infants respond preferentially to infant-directed speech because their auditory sensitivity to sounds with extensive frequency modulation (FM) is better than their sensitivity to less modulated sounds. In this experiment, auditory thresholds for FM tones and for unmodulated, or pure, tones in a background of noise were…

  1. Pulse amplitude modulated chlorophyll fluorometer

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, Elias; Wu, Jie

    2015-12-29

    Chlorophyll fluorometry may be used for detecting toxins in a sample because of changes in micro algae. A portable lab on a chip ("LOAC") based chlorophyll fluorometer may be used for toxin detection and environmental monitoring. In particular, the system may include a microfluidic pulse amplitude modulated ("PAM") chlorophyll fluorometer. The LOAC PAM chlorophyll fluorometer may analyze microalgae and cyanobacteria that grow naturally in source drinking water.

  2. Responses to amplitude modulated infrared stimuli in the guinea pig inferior colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Claus-Peter; Young, Hunter

    2014-01-01

    Responses of units in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus of the guinea pig were recorded with tungsten electrodes. The set of data presented here is limited to high stimulus levels. The effect of changing the modulation frequency and the modulation depth was explored for acoustic and laser stimuli. The selected units responded to sinusoidal amplitude modulated (AM) tones, AM trains of clicks, and AM trains of laser pulses with a modulation of their spike discharge. At modulation frequencies of 20 Hz, some units tended to respond with 40 Hz to the acoustic stimuli, but only at 20 Hz for the trains of laser pulses. For all modes of stimulation the responses revealed a dominant response to the first cycle of the modulation, with decreasing number of action potential during successive cycles. While amplitude modulated tone bursts and amplitude modulated trains of acoustic clicks showed similar patterns, the response to trains of laser pulses was different. PMID:25075264

  3. Reduction of blade passage tone by angle modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiagbedzi, Y. A.

    1982-05-01

    Blade staggering has been used in both centrifugal and axial flow fans to reduce discrete tones. Impeller hub resilience, causing fan torsional oscillations, appears to be equivalent to blade staggering in that both lead to angle modulation of the blade passage sound. By using Jacobi-Anger expansions, the sound reductions resulting from the angle modulation effects of these two equivalent techniques are predicted. Excellent agreement is found with published data.

  4. Amplitude-modulated laser imager.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Linda; Laux, Alan; Concannon, Brian; Zege, Eleonora P; Katsev, Iosif L; Prikhach, Alexander S

    2004-07-01

    Laser systems have been developed to image underwater objects. However, the performance of these systems can be severely degraded in turbid water. We have developed a technique using modulated light to improve underwater detection and imaging. A program, Modulated Vision System (MVS), which is based on a new theoretical approach, has been developed to predict modulated laser imaging performance. Experiments have been conducted in a controlled laboratory environment to test the accuracy of the theory as a function of system and environmental parameters. Results show a strong correlation between experiment and theory and indicate that the MVS program can be used to predict future system performance. PMID:15250554

  5. Coding of amplitude-modulated signals in the cochlear nucleus of a grass frog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibikov, N. G.

    2002-07-01

    To study the mechanisms that govern the coding of temporal features of complex sound signals, responses of single neurons located in the dorsal nucleus of the medulla oblongata (the cochlear nucleus) of a curarized grass frog ( Rana temporaria) to pure tone bursts and amplitude modulated tone bursts with a modulation frequency of 20 Hz and modulation depths of 10 and 80% were recorded. The carrier frequency was equal to the characteristic frequency of a neuron, the average signal level was 20 30 dB above the threshold, and the signal duration was equal to ten full modulation periods. Of the 133 neurons studied, 129 neurons responded to 80% modulated tone bursts by discharges that were phase-locked with the envelope waveform. At this modulation depth, the best phase locking was observed for neurons with the phasic type of response to tone bursts. For tonic neurons with low characteristic frequencies, along with the reproduction of the modulation, phase locking with the carrier frequency of the signal was observed. At 10% amplitude modulation, phasic neurons usually responded to only the onset of a tone burst. Almost all tonic units showed a tendency to reproduce the envelope, although the efficiency of the reproduction was low, and for half of these neurons, it was below the reliability limit. Some neurons exhibited a more efficient reproduction of the weak modulation. For almost half of the neurons, a reliable improvement was observed in the phase locking of the response during the tone burst presentation (from the first to the tenth modulation period). The cooperative histogram of a set of neurons responding to 10% modulated tone bursts within narrow ranges of frequencies and intensities retains the information on the dynamics of the envelope variation. The data are compared with the results obtained from the study of the responses to similar signals in the acoustic midbrain center of the same object and also with the psychophysical effect of a differential

  6. Amplitude and phase modulation with waveguide optics

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhart, S.C.; Wilcox, R.B.; Browning, D.; Penko, F.A.

    1996-12-17

    We have developed amplitude and phase modulation systems for glass lasers using integrated electro-optic modulators and solid state high- speed electronics. The present and future generation of lasers for Inertial Confinement Fusion require laser beams with complex temporal and phase shaping to compensate for laser gain saturation, mitigate parametric processes such as transverse stimulated Brillouin scattering in optics, and to provide specialized drive to the fusion targets. These functions can be performed using bulk optoelectronic modulators, however using high-speed electronics to drive low voltage integrated optical modulators has many practical advantages. In particular, we utilize microwave GaAs transistors to perform precision, 250 ps resolution temporal shaping. Optical bandwidth is generated using a microwave oscillator at 3 GHz amplified by a solid state amplifier. This drives an integrated electrooptic modulator to achieve laser bandwidths exceeding 30 GHz.

  7. Cochlear hearing loss and the detection of sinusoidal versus random amplitude modulation.

    PubMed

    Grose, John H; Porter, Heather L; Buss, Emily; Hall, Joseph W

    2016-08-01

    This study assessed the effect of cochlear hearing loss on detection of random and sinusoidal amplitude modulation. Listeners with hearing loss and normal-hearing listeners (eight per group) generated temporal modulation transfer functions (TMTFs) for envelope fluctuations carried by a 2000-Hz pure tone. TMTFs for the two groups were similar at low modulation rates but diverged at higher rates presumably because of differences in frequency selectivity. For both groups, detection of random modulation was poorer than for sinusoidal modulation at lower rates but the reverse occurred at higher rates. No evidence was found that cochlear hearing loss, per se, affects modulation detection. PMID:27586778

  8. Modulated Source Interferometry with Combined Amplitude and Frequency Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez, Roman C. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An improved interferometer is produced by modifying a conventional interferometer to include amplitude and/or frequency modulation of a coherent light source at radio or higher frequencies. The phase of the modulation signal can be detected in an interfering beam from an interferometer and can be used to determine the actual optical phase of the beam. As such, this improvement can be adapted to virtually any two-beam interferometer, including: Michelson, Mach-Zehnder, and Sagnac interferometers. The use of an amplitude modulated coherent tight source results in an interferometer that combines the wide range advantages of coherent interferometry with the precise distance measurement advantages of white light interferometry.

  9. Modulator-free quadrature amplitude modulation signal synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhixin; Kakande, Joseph; Kelly, Brian; O’Carroll, John; Phelan, Richard; Richardson, David J.; Slavík, Radan

    2014-01-01

    The ability to generate high-speed on–off-keyed telecommunication signals by directly modulating a semiconductor laser’s drive current was one of the most exciting prospective applications of the nascent field of laser technology throughout the 1960s. Three decades of progress led to the commercialization of 2.5 Gbit s−1-per-channel submarine fibre optic systems that drove the growth of the internet as a global phenomenon. However, the detrimental frequency chirp associated with direct modulation forced industry to use external electro-optic modulators to deliver the next generation of on–off-keyed 10 Gbit s−1 systems and is absolutely prohibitive for today’s (>)100 Gbit s−1 coherent systems, which use complex modulation formats (for example, quadrature amplitude modulation). Here we use optical injection locking of directly modulated semiconductor lasers to generate complex modulation format signals showing distinct advantages over current and other currently researched solutions. PMID:25523757

  10. Modulator-free quadrature amplitude modulation signal synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhixin; Kakande, Joseph; Kelly, Brian; O'Carroll, John; Phelan, Richard; Richardson, David J.; Slavík, Radan

    2014-12-01

    The ability to generate high-speed on-off-keyed telecommunication signals by directly modulating a semiconductor laser’s drive current was one of the most exciting prospective applications of the nascent field of laser technology throughout the 1960s. Three decades of progress led to the commercialization of 2.5 Gbit s-1-per-channel submarine fibre optic systems that drove the growth of the internet as a global phenomenon. However, the detrimental frequency chirp associated with direct modulation forced industry to use external electro-optic modulators to deliver the next generation of on-off-keyed 10 Gbit s-1 systems and is absolutely prohibitive for today’s (>)100 Gbit s-1 coherent systems, which use complex modulation formats (for example, quadrature amplitude modulation). Here we use optical injection locking of directly modulated semiconductor lasers to generate complex modulation format signals showing distinct advantages over current and other currently researched solutions.

  11. Neurometric amplitude-modulation detection threshold in the guinea-pig ventral cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Sayles, Mark; Füllgrabe, Christian; Winter, Ian M

    2013-07-01

    Amplitude modulation (AM) is a pervasive feature of natural sounds. Neural detection and processing of modulation cues is behaviourally important across species. Although most ecologically relevant sounds are not fully modulated, physiological studies have usually concentrated on fully modulated (100% modulation depth) signals. Psychoacoustic experiments mainly operate at low modulation depths, around detection threshold (∼5% AM). We presented sinusoidal amplitude-modulated tones, systematically varying modulation depth between zero and 100%, at a range of modulation frequencies, to anaesthetised guinea-pigs while recording spikes from neurons in the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN). The cochlear nucleus is the site of the first synapse in the central auditory system. At this locus significant signal processing occurs with respect to representation of AM signals. Spike trains were analysed in terms of the vector strength of spike synchrony to the amplitude envelope. Neurons showed either low-pass or band-pass temporal modulation transfer functions, with the proportion of band-pass responses increasing with increasing sound level. The proportion of units showing a band-pass response varies with unit type: sustained chopper (CS) > transient chopper (CT) > primary-like (PL). Spike synchrony increased with increasing modulation depth. At the lowest modulation depth (6%), significant spike synchrony was only observed near to the unit's best modulation frequency for all unit types tested. Modulation tuning therefore became sharper with decreasing modulation depth. AM detection threshold was calculated for each individual unit as a function of modulation frequency. Chopper units have significantly better AM detection thresholds than do primary-like units. AM detection threshold is significantly worse at 40 dB vs. 10 dB above pure-tone spike rate threshold. Mean modulation detection thresholds for sounds 10 dB above pure-tone spike rate threshold at best modulation

  12. Neurometric amplitude-modulation detection threshold in the guinea-pig ventral cochlear nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Sayles, Mark; Füllgrabe, Christian; Winter, Ian M

    2013-01-01

    Amplitude modulation (AM) is a pervasive feature of natural sounds. Neural detection and processing of modulation cues is behaviourally important across species. Although most ecologically relevant sounds are not fully modulated, physiological studies have usually concentrated on fully modulated (100% modulation depth) signals. Psychoacoustic experiments mainly operate at low modulation depths, around detection threshold (∼5% AM). We presented sinusoidal amplitude-modulated tones, systematically varying modulation depth between zero and 100%, at a range of modulation frequencies, to anaesthetised guinea-pigs while recording spikes from neurons in the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN). The cochlear nucleus is the site of the first synapse in the central auditory system. At this locus significant signal processing occurs with respect to representation of AM signals. Spike trains were analysed in terms of the vector strength of spike synchrony to the amplitude envelope. Neurons showed either low-pass or band-pass temporal modulation transfer functions, with the proportion of band-pass responses increasing with increasing sound level. The proportion of units showing a band-pass response varies with unit type: sustained chopper (CS) > transient chopper (CT) > primary-like (PL). Spike synchrony increased with increasing modulation depth. At the lowest modulation depth (6%), significant spike synchrony was only observed near to the unit's best modulation frequency for all unit types tested. Modulation tuning therefore became sharper with decreasing modulation depth. AM detection threshold was calculated for each individual unit as a function of modulation frequency. Chopper units have significantly better AM detection thresholds than do primary-like units. AM detection threshold is significantly worse at 40 dB vs. 10 dB above pure-tone spike rate threshold. Mean modulation detection thresholds for sounds 10 dB above pure-tone spike rate threshold at best modulation

  13. Detection of time-varying harmonic amplitude alterations due to spectral interpolations between musical instrument tones.

    PubMed

    Horner, Andrew B; Beauchamp, James W; So, Richard H Y

    2009-01-01

    Gradated spectral interpolations between musical instrument tone pairs were used to investigate discrimination as a function of time-averaged spectral difference. All possible nonidentical pairs taken from a collection of eight musical instrument sounds consisting of bassoon, clarinet, flute, horn, oboe, saxophone, trumpet, and violin were tested. For each pair, several tones were generated with different balances between the primary and secondary instruments, where the balance was fixed across the duration of each tone. Among primary instruments it was found that changes to horn and bassoon [corrected] were most easily discriminable, while changes to saxophone and trumpet timbres were least discriminable. Among secondary instruments, the clarinet had the strongest effect on discrimination, whereas the bassoon had the least effect. For primary instruments, strong negative correlations were found between discrimination and their spectral incoherences, suggesting that the presence of dynamic spectral variations tends to increase the difficulty of detecting time-varying alterations such as spectral interpolation. PMID:19173434

  14. The perception of speech modulation cues in lexical tones is guided by early language-specific experience.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Laurianne; Tsao, Feng-Ming; Liu, Huei-Mei; Li, Lu-Yang; Hu, You-Hsin; Lorenzi, Christian; Bertoncini, Josiane

    2015-01-01

    A number of studies showed that infants reorganize their perception of speech sounds according to their native language categories during their first year of life. Still, information is lacking about the contribution of basic auditory mechanisms to this process. This study aimed to evaluate when native language experience starts to noticeably affect the perceptual processing of basic acoustic cues [i.e., frequency-modulation (FM) and amplitude-modulation information] known to be crucial for speech perception in adults. The discrimination of a lexical-tone contrast (rising versus low) was assessed in 6- and 10-month-old infants learning either French or Mandarin using a visual habituation paradigm. The lexical tones were presented in two conditions designed to either keep intact or to severely degrade the FM and fine spectral cues needed to accurately perceive voice-pitch trajectory. A third condition was designed to assess the discrimination of the same voice-pitch trajectories using click trains containing only the FM cues related to the fundamental-frequency (F0) in French- and Mandarin-learning 10-month-old infants. Results showed that the younger infants of both language groups and the Mandarin-learning 10-month-olds discriminated the intact lexical-tone contrast while French-learning 10-month-olds failed. However, only the French 10-month-olds discriminated degraded lexical tones when FM, and thus voice-pitch cues were reduced. Moreover, Mandarin-learning 10-month-olds were found to discriminate the pitch trajectories as presented in click trains better than French infants. Altogether, these results reveal that the perceptual reorganization occurring during the first year of life for lexical tones is coupled with changes in the auditory ability to use speech modulation cues. PMID:26379605

  15. The perception of speech modulation cues in lexical tones is guided by early language-specific experience

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Laurianne; Tsao, Feng-Ming; Liu, Huei-Mei; Li, Lu-Yang; Hu, You-Hsin; Lorenzi, Christian; Bertoncini, Josiane

    2015-01-01

    A number of studies showed that infants reorganize their perception of speech sounds according to their native language categories during their first year of life. Still, information is lacking about the contribution of basic auditory mechanisms to this process. This study aimed to evaluate when native language experience starts to noticeably affect the perceptual processing of basic acoustic cues [i.e., frequency-modulation (FM) and amplitude-modulation information] known to be crucial for speech perception in adults. The discrimination of a lexical-tone contrast (rising versus low) was assessed in 6- and 10-month-old infants learning either French or Mandarin using a visual habituation paradigm. The lexical tones were presented in two conditions designed to either keep intact or to severely degrade the FM and fine spectral cues needed to accurately perceive voice-pitch trajectory. A third condition was designed to assess the discrimination of the same voice-pitch trajectories using click trains containing only the FM cues related to the fundamental-frequency (F0) in French- and Mandarin-learning 10-month-old infants. Results showed that the younger infants of both language groups and the Mandarin-learning 10-month-olds discriminated the intact lexical-tone contrast while French-learning 10-month-olds failed. However, only the French 10-month-olds discriminated degraded lexical tones when FM, and thus voice-pitch cues were reduced. Moreover, Mandarin-learning 10-month-olds were found to discriminate the pitch trajectories as presented in click trains better than French infants. Altogether, these results reveal that the perceptual reorganization occurring during the first year of life for lexical tones is coupled with changes in the auditory ability to use speech modulation cues. PMID:26379605

  16. Roles for Coincidence Detection in Coding Amplitude-Modulated Sounds

    PubMed Central

    Ashida, Go; Kretzberg, Jutta; Tollin, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Many sensory neurons encode temporal information by detecting coincident arrivals of synaptic inputs. In the mammalian auditory brainstem, binaural neurons of the medial superior olive (MSO) are known to act as coincidence detectors, whereas in the lateral superior olive (LSO) roles of coincidence detection have remained unclear. LSO neurons receive excitatory and inhibitory inputs driven by ipsilateral and contralateral acoustic stimuli, respectively, and vary their output spike rates according to interaural level differences. In addition, LSO neurons are also sensitive to binaural phase differences of low-frequency tones and envelopes of amplitude-modulated (AM) sounds. Previous physiological recordings in vivo found considerable variations in monaural AM-tuning across neurons. To investigate the underlying mechanisms of the observed temporal tuning properties of LSO and their sources of variability, we used a simple coincidence counting model and examined how specific parameters of coincidence detection affect monaural and binaural AM coding. Spike rates and phase-locking of evoked excitatory and spontaneous inhibitory inputs had only minor effects on LSO output to monaural AM inputs. In contrast, the coincidence threshold of the model neuron affected both the overall spike rates and the half-peak positions of the AM-tuning curve, whereas the width of the coincidence window merely influenced the output spike rates. The duration of the refractory period affected only the low-frequency portion of the monaural AM-tuning curve. Unlike monaural AM coding, temporal factors, such as the coincidence window and the effective duration of inhibition, played a major role in determining the trough positions of simulated binaural phase-response curves. In addition, empirically-observed level-dependence of binaural phase-coding was reproduced in the framework of our minimalistic coincidence counting model. These modeling results suggest that coincidence detection of excitatory

  17. Preliminary analysis of amplitude and phase fluctuations in the JAPE multiple tone data to distances of 500 meters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, James; Sokolov, Radomir; Hicks, Daniel; Cartwright, Lloyd

    1993-01-01

    The JAPE short range data provide a good opportunity for studying phase and amplitude fluctuations of acoustic signals in the atmosphere over distances of several hundred meters. Several factors contribute to the usefulness of these data: extensive meteorological measurements were made, controlled sources were used, the data were recorded with a high dynamic range digital system that preserved phase information and a significant number of measurement points were obtained allowing both longitudinal and transverse studies. Further, Michigan Tech, in cooperation with the U.S. Army TARDEC, has developed phase tracking algorithms for studying vehicle acoustic signals. These techniques provide an excellent tool for analyzing the amplitude and phase fluctuations of the JAPE data. The results of studies such as those reported here have application at several levels: the mechanisms of signal amplitude and phase fluctuations in propagating acoustic signals are not well understood nor are the mathematical models highly developed, acoustic arrays depend strongly on signal coherence and signal amplitude stability in order to perform to their design specifications and active noise control implementation in regions considerably removed from the primary and secondary sources depends upon signal amplitude and phase stability. Work reported here is preliminary in nature but it does indicate the utility of the phase tracking and amplitude detection algorithms. The results obtained indicate that the phase fluctuations of the JAPE continuous multiple tone data (simultaneous transmission of 80, 200 and 500 Hz) are in general agreement with existing theories but the amplitude fluctuations are seen to be less well behaved and show less consistency.

  18. Age-related shifts in distortion product otoacoustic emissions peak-ratios and amplitude modulation spectra.

    PubMed

    Lai, Jesyin; Bartlett, Edward L

    2015-09-01

    Amplitude modulation (AM) is an important temporal cue for precise speech and complex sound recognition. However, functional decline of the auditory periphery as well as degradation of central auditory processing due to aging can reduce the salience and resolution of temporal cues. Age-related deficits in central temporal processing have previously been observed at more rapid AM frequencies and various AM depths. These centrally observed changes result from cochlear changes compounded with changes along the ascending auditory pathway. In fact, a decrease in ability to detect temporally modulated sounds accurately could originate from changes in cochlear filtering properties and in cochlear mechanics due to aging. Nonetheless, few studies have examined cochlear mechanisms in AM detection. To assess integrity of the mechanical properties of the auditory periphery, distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) are a tool commonly used in clinics and in research. In this study, we measured DPOAEs to reveal age-related changes in peak f2/f1 ratio and degradation in AM detection by basilar membrane vibration. Two tones (f1 and f2, f2 > f1) at various f2/f1 ratios and simultaneous presentation of one AM and one pure tone were used as stimuli to evoke DPOAEs. In addition of observing reduced DPOAE amplitudes and steeper slopes in the input-output DPOAE functions, higher peak f2/f1 ratios and broader f2/f1 tuning were also observed in aged animals. Aged animals generally had lower distortion product (DP) and first sideband (SB 1) responses evoked by an f1 pure tone and an f2 AM tone, regardless of whether the AM frequency was 45 Hz or 128 Hz. SB 1 thresholds, which corresponds to the smallest stimulus AM depth that can induce cochlear vibrations at the DP generator locus, were higher in aged animals as well. The results suggest that age-related changes in peak f2/f1 ratio and AM detection by basilar membrane vibration are consistent with a reduction in endocochlear

  19. Age-related Shifts in Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions Peak-ratios and Amplitude Modulation Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Jesyin; Bartlett, Edward L.

    2015-01-01

    Amplitude modulation (AM) is an important temporal cue for precise speech and complex sound recognition. However, functional decline of the auditory periphery as well as degradation of central auditory processing due to aging can reduce the salience and resolution of temporal cues. Age-related deficits in central temporal processing have previously been observed at more rapid AM frequencies and various AM depths. These centrally observed changes result from cochlear changes compounded with changes along the ascending auditory pathway. In fact, a decrease in ability to detect temporally modulated sounds accurately could originate from changes in cochlear filtering properties and in cochlear mechanics due to aging. Nonetheless, few studies have examined cochlear mechanisms in AM detection. To assess integrity of the mechanical properties of the auditory periphery, distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) are a tool commonly used in clinics and in research. In this study, we measured DPOAEs to reveal age-related changes in peak f2/f1 ratio and degradation in AM detection by basilar membrane vibration. Two tones (f1 and f2, f2>f1) at various f2/f1 ratios and simultaneous presentation of one AM and one pure tone were used as stimuli to evoke DPOAEs. In addition of observing reduced DPOAE amplitudes and steeper slopes in the input-output DPOAE functions, higher peak f2/f1 ratios and broader f2/f1 tuning were also observed in aged animals. Aged animals generally had lower distortion product (DP) and first sideband (SB 1) responses evoked by an f1 pure tone and an f2 AM tone, regardless of whether the AM frequency was 45 Hz or 128 Hz. SB 1 thresholds, which corresponds to the smallest stimulus AM depth that can induce cochlear vibrations at the DP generator locus, were higher in aged animals as well. The results suggest that age-related changes in peak f2/f1 ratio and AM detection by basilar membrane vibration are consistent with a reduction in endocochlear

  20. Signal detection in amplitude-modulated maskers. II. Processing in the songbird's auditory forebrain.

    PubMed

    Nieder, A; Klump, G M

    2001-03-01

    In the natural environment, acoustic signals have to be detected in ubiquitous background noise. Temporal fluctuations of background noise can be exploited by the auditory system to enhance signal detection, especially if spectral masking components are coherently amplitude modulated across several auditory channels (a phenomenon called 'comodulation masking release'). In this study of neuronal mechanisms of masking release in the primary auditory forebrain (field L) of awake European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris), we determined and compared neural detection thresholds for 20-ms probe tones presented in a background of sinusoidally amplitude modulated (10-Hz) noise maskers. Responses of a total of 34 multiunit clusters were recorded via radiotelemetry with chronically implanted microelectrodes from unrestrained birds. For maskers consisting of a single noise band centred around the recording site's characteristic frequency, a substantial reduction in detection threshold (21 dB on average) was found when probe tones were presented during envelope dips rather than during envelope peaks. Such effects could also explain results obtained for masking protocols where the on-frequency noise band was presented together with excitatory or inhibitory flanking bands that were either coherently modulated (in-phase) or incoherently modulated (phase-shifted). Generally, masking release for probe tones in maskers with flanking bands extending beyond the frequency range of a cell cluster's excitatory tuning curve was not substantially improved. Only some of the neurophysiological results are in agreement with behavioural data from the same species if only the average population response is considered. A subsample of individual neurons, however, could account for behavioural thresholds. PMID:11264677

  1. Cholinergic Modulation of the Hippocampus during Encoding and Retrieval of Tone/Shock-Induced Fear Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Jason L.; Kesner, Raymond P.

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the role of acetylcholine (ACh) during encoding and retrieval of tone/shock-induced fear conditioning with the aim of testing Hasselmo's cholinergic modulation model of encoding and retrieval using a task sensitive to hippocampal disruption. Lesions of the hippocampus impair acquisition and retention of contextual conditioning with…

  2. Modulation of Cardiac Potassium Current by Neural Tone and Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Tomson, Todd T; Arora, Rishi

    2016-06-01

    The cardiac action potential is generated by intricate flows of ions across myocyte cell membranes in a coordinated fashion to control myocardial contraction and the heart rhythm. Modulation of the flow of these ions in response to a variety of stimuli results in changes to the action potential. Abnormal or altered ion currents can result in cardiac arrhythmias. Abnormalities of autonomic regulation of potassium current play a role in the genesis of cardiac arrhythmias, and alterations in acetylcholine-activated potassium channels may play a key role in atrial fibrillation. Ischemia is another important modulator of cardiac cellular electrophysiology. PMID:27261826

  3. Multilevel phase and amplitude modulation method for holographic memories with programmable phase modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honma, Satoshi; Sekiguchi, Toru

    2014-09-01

    The utilization of spatial quadrature amplitude modulation (SQAM) signals with amplitude and phase modulation is a simple method used to improve storage capacity in a holographic data storage system. We propose a multilevel phase and amplitude modulation method for holographic memories with a programmable phase modulator (PPM). In this method, holographic page data is recorded by a two-step exposure process for different phase-modulated data. There is no need to adjust the positions of spatial light modulators (SLM) with high accuracy because we use only one spatial modulator. We estimate the quality of 16 SQAM signals produced by our technique.

  4. Coexistence of amplitude and frequency modulations in intracellular calcium dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pittà, Maurizio; Volman, Vladislav; Levine, Herbert; Pioggia, Giovanni; de Rossi, Danilo; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2008-03-01

    The complex dynamics of intracellular calcium regulates cellular responses to information encoded in extracellular signals. Here we study the encoding of these external signals in the context of the Li-Rinzel model. We show that by control of biophysical parameters the information can be encoded in amplitude modulation (AM), frequency modulation (FM), or mixed (AM and FM) modulation. We briefly discuss the possible implications of this role of information encoding for astrocytes.

  5. Two-tone intensity-modulated optical stimulus for self-referencing microwave characterization of high-speed photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Heng; Zhang, Shangjian; Zou, Xinhai; Zhang, Yali; Lu, Rongguo; Zhang, Zhiyao; Zhang, Xiaoxia; Liu, Yong

    2016-08-01

    The two-tone intensity modulated optical stimulus is proposed and demonstrated for measuring the high-frequency response of photodetectors. The method provides a narrow linewidth and wide bandwidth optical stimulus based on the two-tone modulation of a Mach-Zehnder electro-optical intensity modulator, and achieves the self-referenced measurement of photodetectors without the need for correcting the power variation of optical stimulus. Moreover, the two-tone intensity modulation method allows bias-independent measurement with doubled measuring frequency range. In the experiment, the consistency between our method and the conventional methods verifies the simple but accurate measurement.

  6. Auditory evoked potentials to spectro-temporal modulation of complex tones in normal subjects and patients with severe brain injury.

    PubMed

    Jones, S J; Vaz Pato, M; Sprague, L; Stokes, M; Munday, R; Haque, N

    2000-05-01

    In order to assess higher auditory processing capabilities, long-latency auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) were recorded to synthesized musical instrument tones in 22 post-comatose patients with severe brain injury causing variably attenuated behavioural responsiveness. On the basis of normative studies, three different types of spectro-temporal modulation were employed. When a continuous 'clarinet' tone changes pitch once every few seconds, N1/P2 potentials are evoked at latencies of approximately 90 and 180 ms, respectively. Their distribution in the fronto-central region is consistent with generators in the supratemporal cortex of both hemispheres. When the pitch is modulated at a much faster rate ( approximately 16 changes/s), responses to each change are virtually abolished but potentials with similar distribution are still elicited by changing the timbre (e.g. 'clarinet' to 'oboe') every few seconds. These responses appear to represent the cortical processes concerned with spectral pattern analysis and the grouping of frequency components to form sound 'objects'. Following a period of 16/s oscillation between two pitches, a more anteriorly distributed negativity is evoked on resumption of a steady pitch. Various lines of evidence suggest that this is probably equivalent to the 'mismatch negativity' (MMN), reflecting a pre-perceptual, memory-based process for detection of change in spectro-temporal sound patterns. This method requires no off-line subtraction of AEPs evoked by the onset of a tone, and the MMN is produced rapidly and robustly with considerably larger amplitude (usually >5 microV) than that to discontinuous pure tones. In the brain-injured patients, the presence of AEPs to two or more complex tone stimuli (in the combined assessment of two authors who were 'blind' to the clinical and behavioural data) was significantly associated with the demonstrable possession of discriminative hearing (the ability to respond differentially to verbal commands

  7. Optical vector network analyzer based on amplitude-phase modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, Oleg G.; Morozov, Gennady A.; Nureev, Ilnur I.; Kasimova, Dilyara I.; Zastela, Mikhail Y.; Gavrilov, Pavel V.; Makarov, Igor A.; Purtov, Vadim A.

    2016-03-01

    The article describes the principles of optical vector network analyzer (OVNA) design for fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) characterization based on amplitude-phase modulation of optical carrier that allow us to improve the measurement accuracy of amplitude and phase parameters of the elements under test. Unlike existing OVNA based on a single-sideband and unbalanced double sideband amplitude modulation, the ratio of the two side components of the probing radiation is used for analysis of amplitude and phase parameters of the tested elements, and the radiation of the optical carrier is suppressed, or the latter is used as a local oscillator. The suggested OVNA is designed for the narrow band-stop elements (π-phaseshift FBG) and wide band-pass elements (linear chirped FBG) research.

  8. Unpredicted Pitch Modulates Beta Oscillatory Power during Rhythmic Entrainment to a Tone Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Andrew; Bosnyak, Dan J.; Trainor, Laurel J.

    2016-01-01

    Extracting temporal regularities in external stimuli in order to predict upcoming events is an essential aspect of perception. Fluctuations in induced power of beta band (15–25 Hz) oscillations in auditory cortex are involved in predictive timing during rhythmic entrainment, but whether such fluctuations are affected by prediction in the spectral (frequency/pitch) domain remains unclear. We tested whether unpredicted (i.e., unexpected) pitches in a rhythmic tone sequence modulate beta band activity by recording EEG while participants passively listened to isochronous auditory oddball sequences with occasional unpredicted deviant pitches at two different presentation rates. The results showed that the power in low-beta (15–20 Hz) was larger around 200–300 ms following deviant tones compared to standard tones, and this effect was larger when the deviant tones were less predicted. Our results suggest that the induced beta power activities in auditory cortex are consistent with a role in sensory prediction of both “when” (timing) upcoming sounds will occur as well as the prediction precision error of “what” (spectral content in this case). We suggest, further, that both timing and content predictions may co-modulate beta oscillations via attention. These findings extend earlier work on neural oscillations by investigating the functional significance of beta oscillations for sensory prediction. The findings help elucidate the functional significance of beta oscillations in perception. PMID:27014138

  9. Unpredicted Pitch Modulates Beta Oscillatory Power during Rhythmic Entrainment to a Tone Sequence.

    PubMed

    Chang, Andrew; Bosnyak, Dan J; Trainor, Laurel J

    2016-01-01

    Extracting temporal regularities in external stimuli in order to predict upcoming events is an essential aspect of perception. Fluctuations in induced power of beta band (15-25 Hz) oscillations in auditory cortex are involved in predictive timing during rhythmic entrainment, but whether such fluctuations are affected by prediction in the spectral (frequency/pitch) domain remains unclear. We tested whether unpredicted (i.e., unexpected) pitches in a rhythmic tone sequence modulate beta band activity by recording EEG while participants passively listened to isochronous auditory oddball sequences with occasional unpredicted deviant pitches at two different presentation rates. The results showed that the power in low-beta (15-20 Hz) was larger around 200-300 ms following deviant tones compared to standard tones, and this effect was larger when the deviant tones were less predicted. Our results suggest that the induced beta power activities in auditory cortex are consistent with a role in sensory prediction of both "when" (timing) upcoming sounds will occur as well as the prediction precision error of "what" (spectral content in this case). We suggest, further, that both timing and content predictions may co-modulate beta oscillations via attention. These findings extend earlier work on neural oscillations by investigating the functional significance of beta oscillations for sensory prediction. The findings help elucidate the functional significance of beta oscillations in perception. PMID:27014138

  10. Amplitude Modulation in the δ Sct star KIC 7106205

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Dominic. M.; Kurtz, Donald W.

    2015-09-01

    The δ Sct star KIC 7106205 showed amplitude modulation in a single p mode, whilst all other p and g modes remained stable in amplitude and phase over 1470 d of the Kepler dataset. The data were divided into 30 time bins of equal length and a series of consecutive Fourier transforms was calculated. A fixed frequency, calculated from a least-squares fit of all data, allowed amplitude and phase for every mode in each time bin to be tracked. The missing p mode energy was not transferred to any other visible modes.

  11. Discriminating Simulated Vocal Tremor Source Using Amplitude Modulation Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Carbonell, Kathy M.; Lester, Rosemary A.; Story, Brad H.; Lotto, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis Sources of vocal tremor are difficult to categorize perceptually and acoustically. This paper describes a preliminary attempt to discriminate vocal tremor sources through the use of spectral measures of the amplitude envelope. The hypothesis is that different vocal tremor sources are associated with distinct patterns of acoustic amplitude modulations. Study Design Statistical categorization methods (discriminant function analysis) were used to discriminate signals from simulated vocal tremor with different sources using only acoustic measures derived from the amplitude envelopes. Methods Simulations of vocal tremor were created by modulating parameters of a vocal fold model corresponding to oscillations of respiratory driving pressure (respiratory tremor), degree of vocal fold adduction (adductory tremor) and fundamental frequency of vocal fold vibration (F0 tremor). The acoustic measures were based on spectral analyses of the amplitude envelope computed across the entire signal and within select frequency bands. Results The signals could be categorized (with accuracy well above chance) in terms of the simulated tremor source using only measures of the amplitude envelope spectrum even when multiple sources of tremor were included. Conclusions These results supply initial support for an amplitude-envelope based approach to identify the source of vocal tremor and provide further evidence for the rich information about talker characteristics present in the temporal structure of the amplitude envelope. PMID:25532813

  12. Detection of sinusoidal amplitude modulation in logarithmic frequency sweeps across wide regions of the spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, I-Hui; Saberi, Kourosh

    2010-01-01

    Many natural sounds such as speech contain concurrent amplitude and frequency modulation (AM and FM), with the FM components often in the form of directional frequency sweeps or glides. Most studies of modulation coding, however, have employed one modulation type in stationary carriers, and in cases where mixed-modulation sounds have been used, the FM component has typically been confined to an extremely narrow range within a critical band. The current study examined the ability to detect AM signals carried by broad logarithmic frequency sweeps using a 2-alternative forced-choice adaptive psychophysical design. AM detection thresholds were measured as a function of signal modulation rate and carrier sweep frequency region. Thresholds for detection of AM in a sweep carrier ranged from -8 dB for an AM rate of 8 Hz to -30 dB at 128 Hz. Compared to thresholds obtained for stationary carriers (pure tones and filtered Gaussian noise), detection of AM carried by frequency sweeps substantially declined at low (12 dB at 8 Hz) but not high modulation rates. Several trends in the data, including sweep- versus stationary-carrier threshold patterns and effects of frequency region were predicted from a modulation filterbank model with an envelope-correlation decision statistic. PMID:20144700

  13. Self-demodulation of amplitude-modulated signal components in amplitude-modulated bone-conducted ultrasonic hearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Kazuhito; Nakagawa, Seiji

    2015-07-01

    A novel hearing aid system utilizing amplitude-modulated bone-conducted ultrasound (AM-BCU) is being developed for use by profoundly deaf people. However, there is a lack of research on the acoustic aspects of AM-BCU hearing. In this study, acoustic fields in the ear canal under AM-BCU stimulation were examined with respect to the self-demodulation effect of amplitude-modulated signal components generated in the ear canal. We found self-demodulated signals with an audible sound pressure level related to the amplitude-modulated signal components of bone-conducted ultrasonic stimulation. In addition, the increases in the self-demodulated signal levels at low frequencies in the ear canal after occluding the ear canal opening, i.e., the positive occlusion effect, indicate the existence of a pathway by which the self-demodulated signals pass through the aural cartilage and soft tissue, and radiate into the ear canal.

  14. Automated force controller for amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Miyagi, Atsushi; Scheuring, Simon

    2016-05-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is widely used in physics, chemistry, and biology to analyze the topography of a sample at nanometer resolution. Controlling precisely the force applied by the AFM tip to the sample is a prerequisite for faithful and reproducible imaging. In amplitude modulation (oscillating) mode AFM, the applied force depends on the free and the setpoint amplitudes of the cantilever oscillation. Therefore, for keeping the applied force constant, not only the setpoint amplitude but also the free amplitude must be kept constant. While the AFM user defines the setpoint amplitude, the free amplitude is typically subject to uncontrollable drift, and hence, unfortunately, the real applied force is permanently drifting during an experiment. This is particularly harmful in biological sciences where increased force destroys the soft biological matter. Here, we have developed a strategy and an electronic circuit that analyzes permanently the free amplitude of oscillation and readjusts the excitation to maintain the free amplitude constant. As a consequence, the real applied force is permanently and automatically controlled with picoNewton precision. With this circuit associated to a high-speed AFM, we illustrate the power of the development through imaging over long-duration and at various forces. The development is applicable for all AFMs and will widen the applicability of AFM to a larger range of samples and to a larger range of (non-specialist) users. Furthermore, from controlled force imaging experiments, the interaction strength between biomolecules can be analyzed. PMID:27250433

  15. Tailoring quantum superpositions with linearly polarized amplitude-modulated light

    SciTech Connect

    Pustelny, S.; Koczwara, M.; Cincio, L.; Gawlik, W.

    2011-04-15

    Amplitude-modulated nonlinear magneto-optical rotation is a powerful technique that offers a possibility of controllable generation of given quantum states. In this paper, we demonstrate creation and detection of specific ground-state magnetic-sublevel superpositions in {sup 87}Rb. By appropriate tuning of the modulation frequency and magnetic-field induction the efficiency of a given coherence generation is controlled. The processes are analyzed versus different experimental parameters.

  16. Impact of modulator chirp in 100 Gbps class optical discrete multi-tone transmission system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishihara, Masato; Tanaka, Toshiki; Takahara, Tomoo; Li, Lei; Tao, Zhenning; Rasmussen, Jens C.

    2012-12-01

    Discrete multi-tone (DMT) technology is an attractive modulation technique for short reach optical transmission system. One of the main factors that limit the performance of the 1.5-μm band DMT system is the interplay between the chromatic dispersion of the transmission fiber and the chirp characteristic of the transmitter. We experimentally measured and compared the chirp characteristics of various modulator configurations, which are lithium-niobate Mach-Zehnder modulator, directly modulated laser, and electro-absorption modulator, by the frequency discriminator method using MZ interferometer. We also measured and compared the transmission characteristics of the transmitters using above-mentioned modulators and discuss the suitable transmitter configuration for DMT technology.

  17. Contextual Modulation of N400 Amplitude to Lexically Ambiguous Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Titone, Debra A.; Salisbury, Dean F.

    2004-01-01

    Through much is known about the N400 component, an event-related EEG potential that is sensitive to semantic manipulations, it is unclear whether modulations of N400 amplitude reflect automatic processing, controlled processing, or both. We examined this issue using a semantic judgment task that manipulated local and global contextual cues. Word…

  18. Pilot-Tone System for Mobile Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, F.

    1986-01-01

    In mobile communication system called tone-calibrated technique, pilot tone provides phase- and amplitude-calibration reference to enable coherent demodulation of signal at receiver despite fading. Signal received by or from mobile terminal faded due to motion of terminal and propagation of signal along multiple paths. Fading introduces random amplitude modulation and phase modulation with bandwidth of twice Doppler frequency shift. Degrading effects of multipath fading reduced. Tonecalibrated technique for use with phase-modulated data or telephony systems using Manchester digital pulse-code modulation.

  19. Superposed pulse amplitude modulation for visible light communication.

    PubMed

    Li, J F; Huang, Z T; Zhang, R Q; Zeng, F X; Jiang, M; Ji, Y F

    2013-12-16

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a novel modulation scheme called superposed pulse amplitude modulation (SPAM) which is low-cost, insensitive to non-linearity of light emitting diode (LED). Multiple optical pulses transmit parallelly from different spatial position in the LED array and overlap linearly in free space to realize SPAM. With LED arrangement, the experimental results show that using the modulation we proposed the data rate of 120 Mbit/s with BER 1 × 10(-3) can be achieved with an optical blue filter and RC post-equalization. PMID:24514674

  20. Detection and rate discrimination of amplitude modulation in electrical hearing.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Monita; Oberzut, Cherish

    2011-09-01

    Three experiments were designed to examine temporal envelope processing by cochlear implant (CI) listeners. In experiment 1, the hypothesis that listeners' modulation sensitivity would in part determine their ability to discriminate between temporal modulation rates was examined. Temporal modulation transfer functions (TMTFs) obtained in an amplitude modulation detection (AMD) task were compared to threshold functions obtained in an amplitude modulation rate discrimination (AMRD) task. Statistically significant nonlinear correlations were observed between the two measures. In experiment 2, results of loudness-balancing showed small increases in the loudness of modulated over unmodulated stimuli beyond a modulation depth of 16%. Results of experiment 3 indicated small but statistically significant effects of level-roving on the overall gain of the TMTF, but no impact of level-roving on the average shape of the TMTF across subjects. This suggested that level-roving simply increased the task difficulty for most listeners, but did not indicate increased use of intensity cues under more challenging conditions. Data obtained with one subject, however, suggested that the most sensitive listeners may derive some benefit from intensity cues in these tasks. Overall, results indicated that intensity cues did not play an important role in temporal envelope processing by the average CI listener. PMID:21895095

  1. Differential pulse amplitude modulation for multiple-input single-output OWVLC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S. H.; Kwon, D. H.; Kim, S. J.; Son, Y. H.; Han, S. K.

    2015-01-01

    White light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are widely used for lighting due to their energy efficiency, eco-friendly, and small size than previously light sources such as incandescent, fluorescent bulbs and so on. Optical wireless visible light communication (OWVLC) based on LED merges lighting and communications in applications such as indoor lighting, traffic signals, vehicles, and underwater communications because LED can be easily modulated. However, physical bandwidth of LED is limited about several MHz by slow time constant of the phosphor and characteristics of device. Therefore, using the simplest modulation format which is non-return-zero on-off-keying (NRZ-OOK), the data rate reaches only to dozens Mbit/s. Thus, to improve the transmission capacity, optical filtering and pre-, post-equalizer are adapted. Also, high-speed wireless connectivity is implemented using spectrally efficient modulation methods: orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) or discrete multi-tone (DMT). However, these modulation methods need additional digital signal processing such as FFT and IFFT, thus complexity of transmitter and receiver is increasing. To reduce the complexity of transmitter and receiver, we proposed a novel modulation scheme which is named differential pulse amplitude modulation. The proposed modulation scheme transmits different NRZ-OOK signals with same amplitude and unit time delay using each LED chip, respectively. The `N' parallel signals from LEDs are overlapped and directly detected at optical receiver. Received signal is demodulated by power difference between unit time slots. The proposed scheme can overcome the bandwidth limitation of LEDs and data rate can be improved according to number of LEDs without complex digital signal processing.

  2. Flexible quadrature amplitude modulation with semiconductor optical amplifier and electroabsorption modulator.

    PubMed

    Schrenk, Bernhard; Dris, Stefanos; Bakopoulos, Paraskevas; Lazarou, Ioannis; Voigt, Karsten; Zimmermann, Lars; Avramopoulos, Hercules

    2012-08-01

    Optical quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) is experimentally demonstrated with a low-complexity modulator based on a semiconductor optical amplifier and electroabsorption modulator. Flexible amplitude/phase format transmission is achieved. The applicability of octary QAM for coherent optical access networks with sustainable 3 Gb/s per-user bandwidth is investigated for a long reach of 100 km, and its compatibility with a potentially high split is verified. PMID:22859139

  3. Graphene based plasmonic terahertz amplitude modulator operating above 100 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jessop, D. S.; Kindness, S. J.; Xiao, L.; Braeuninger-Weimer, P.; Lin, H.; Ren, Y.; Ren, C. X.; Hofmann, S.; Zeitler, J. A.; Beere, H. E.; Ritchie, D. A.; Degl'Innocenti, R.

    2016-04-01

    The terahertz (THz) region of the electromagnetic spectrum holds great potential in many fields of study, from spectroscopy to biomedical imaging, remote gas sensing, and high speed communication. To fully exploit this potential, fast optoelectronic devices such as amplitude and phase modulators must be developed. In this work, we present a room temperature external THz amplitude modulator based on plasmonic bow-tie antenna arrays with graphene. By applying a modulating bias to a back gate electrode, the conductivity of graphene is changed, which modifies the reflection characteristics of the incoming THz radiation. The broadband response of the device was characterized by using THz time-domain spectroscopy, and the modulation characteristics such as the modulation depth and cut-off frequency were investigated with a 2.0 THz single frequency emission quantum cascade laser. An optical modulation cut-off frequency of 105 ± 15 MHz is reported. The results agree well with a lumped element circuit model developed to describe the device.

  4. Pulse Amplitude and Delay Modulation: Design and performance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaiman, Iskandar; Tang, Tong Boon; Hamid, Nor Hisham

    2015-06-01

    Power efficient modulation techniques have previously been proposed to provide the uplink in visible light communication systems. However, such techniques have poor bandwidth utilization as multiple bits are mapped to single narrow pulse. When the bandwidth is limited, it has been found that degradation in optical power becomes very high and data rate poor. In this paper we introduce a new modulation technique called Pulse Amplitude and Delay Modulation (PADM). We compare its performance with Dual Header Pulse Interval Modulation (DH-PIM) that has the best reported bandwidth efficiency. Experiment results show that the data rate could be enhanced from 3.2 kps to 4.3 kbs using a red link (640 nm) under same error rate. This suggests PADM has better bandwidth efficiency than DH-PIM.

  5. Amplitude Modulation in the ZZ Ceti Star GD 244

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bognár, Zs.; Paparó, M.; Molnár, L.; Plachy, E.; Sódor, Á.

    2015-06-01

    Previous studies of GD 244 revealed seven pulsation frequencies (two doublets and three single periods) in the light variations of the star. The data obtained at McDonald Observatory between 2003 and 2006, and our additional measurements in 2006 and 2007 at Konkoly Observatory, allow the investigation of the long-term pulsational behaviour of GD 244. We found that the 307.1 s period component of one of the doublets show long-term, periodic amplitude modulation with a time scale of ˜ 740 days. Possible explanations are that nonlinear resonant mode coupling is operating among the rotationally split frequency components, or two modes, unresolved in the yearly data are excited at ˜ 307.1 s. This is the first time that such long-term periodic amplitude modulation is published on a ZZ Ceti star.

  6. Symbol rate identification for auxiliary amplitude modulation optical signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Junyu; Dong, Zhi; Huang, Zhiping; Zhang, Yimeng

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we creatively propose and demonstrate a method for symbol rate identification (SRI) of auxiliary amplitude modulation (AAM) optical signal based on asynchronous delay-tap sampling (ADTS) and average magnitude difference function (AMDF). The method can accurately estimate symbol rate and has large transmission impairments tolerance. Furthermore, it can be realized in the digital signal processor (DSP) with low logical resources because of multiplication-free. In order to improve the accuracy of SRI, the peak to valley ratio (PTVR) of AMDF is introduced into our method for blind chromatic dispersion (CD) compensation. The results of the numerical simulations show that the overall maximum SRI error is smaller 0.079% for return-to-zero (RZ) on-off keying (OOK), RZ differential phase-shift keying (DPSK), RZ differential quadrature phase-shift keying (DQPSK) and RZ 16-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) with 50% duty cycles.

  7. Multi-hit time-to-amplitude CAMAC module (MTAC)

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, H.

    1980-10-01

    A Multi-Hit Time-to-Amplitude Module (MTAC) for the SLAC Mark III drift chamber system has been designed to measure drift time by converting time-proportional chamber signals into analog levels, and converting the analog data by slow readout via a semi-autonomous controller in a CAMAC crate. The single width CAMAC module has 16 wire channels, each with a 4-hit capacity. An externally generated common start initiates an internal precision ramp voltage which is then sampled using a novel shift register gating scheme and CMOS sampling switches. The detailed design and performance specifications are described.

  8. Light focusing through strongly scattering media by binary amplitude modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hui-ling; Sun, Cun-zhi; Chen, Zi-yang; Pu, Ji-xiong

    2015-07-01

    Based on the angular spectrum method and the circular Gaussian distribution (CGD) model of scattering media, we numerically simulate light focusing through strongly scattering media. A high contrast focus in the target area is produced by using feedback optimization algorithm with binary amplitude modulation. It is possible to form the focusing with one focus or multiple foci at arbitrary areas. The influence of the number of square segments of spatial light modulation on the enhancement factor of intensity is discussed. Simulation results are found to be in good agreement with theoretical analysis for light refocusing.

  9. Effient Supply-Modulated Transmitters for Variable Amplitude Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zai, Andrew H.

    This thesis introduces an efficient radar transmitter with improved spectral confinement, enabled by a pulse waveform that contains both amplitude and frequency modulation. The theoretical behavior of the Class-B power amplifier (PA) under Gaussian envelope is compared to that of a Class-A PA. Experimental validation is performed on a 4-W 10-GHz GaN MMIC PA, biased in Class B with a power added efficiency (PAE) of 50%. When driven with a Gaussian-like pulse envelope with a 5 MHz linear frequency modulation (LFM), the PA demonstrates a 31% average efficiency over the pulse duration. To improve the efficiency, a simple resonant supply modulator with a peak efficiency of 92% is used for the pulse Gaussian amplitude modulation, while the LFM is provided only through the PA input. This case results in a 5-point improvement in system efficiency, with an average PAE=40% over the pulse duration for the PA alone, and with simultaneous 40-dB reduction in spectral emissions relative to a rectangular pulse with the same energy. A measurement bench, which was internally developed, and supply-modulation simulations with Applied Wave Research (AWR) Microwave Office and VSS are also presented. Supply modulation simulation is helpful for predicting the performance of a supply-modulated system while a well calibrated bench is essential for verification. Both tools are used to demonstrate resonant supply-modulated GaN MMIC PAs. Lastly, the design of an X-Band GaN Doherty MMIC PA for use in a variable power radar is presented. Simulations and preliminary measurement demonstrate power added efficiency of greater that 40% from 30 to 35 dBm of output power.

  10. Stacked Optical Precursors from Amplitude and Phase Modulations

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J. F.; Feng, L.; Loy, M. M. T.; Wong, G. K. L.; Du, Shengwang; Jeong, Heejeong

    2010-06-04

    We report the generation of stacked optical precursors from a laser beam whose amplitude or phase is modulated by sequenced on-off step waveforms. Making use of the constructive interference between the precursors produced from different steps, as well as the main field, we generate optical transient pulses having peak powers of eight times the input power with electromagnetically induced transparency in laser-cooled atoms.

  11. Observer weighting of interaural cues in positive and negative envelope slopes of amplitude-modulated waveforms.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, I-Hui; Petrosyan, Agavni; Gonçalves, Óscar F; Hickok, Gregory; Saberi, Kourosh

    2011-07-01

    The auditory system can encode interaural delays in highpass-filtered complex sounds by phase locking to their slowly modulating envelopes. Spectrotemporal analysis of interaurally time-delayed highpass waveforms reveals the presence of a concomitant interaural level cue. The current study systematically investigated the contribution of time and concomitant level cues carried by positive and negative envelope slopes of a modified sinusoidally amplitude-modulated (SAM) high-frequency carrier. The waveforms were generated from concatenation of individual modulation cycles whose envelope peaks were extended by the desired interaural delay, allowing independent control of delays in the positive and negative modulation slopes. In experiment 1, thresholds were measured using a 2-interval forced-choice adaptive task for interaural delays in either the positive or negative modulation slopes. In a control condition, thresholds were measured for a standard SAM tone. In experiment 2, decision weights were estimated using a multiple-observation correlational method in a single-interval forced-choice task for interaural delays carried simultaneously by the positive, and independently, negative slopes of the modulation envelope. In experiment 3, decision weights were measured for groups of 3 modulation cycles at the start, middle, and end of the waveform to determine the influence of onset dominance or recency effects. Results were consistent across experiments: thresholds were equal for the positive and negative modulation slopes. Decision weights were positive and equal for the time cue in the positive and negative envelope slopes. Weights were also larger for modulations cycles near the waveform onset. Weights estimated for the concomitant interaural level cue were positive for the positive envelope slope and negative for the negative slope, consistent with exclusive use of time cues. PMID:21272630

  12. Taurine release by astrocytes modulates osmosensitive glycine receptor tone and excitability in the adult supraoptic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Choe, Katrina Y; Olson, James E; Bourque, Charles W

    2012-09-01

    Cells can release the free amino acid taurine through volume-regulated anion channels (VRACs), and it has been hypothesized that taurine released from glial cells is capable of inhibiting action potential (AP) firing by activating neuronal glycine receptors (GlyRs) (Hussy et al., 1997). Although an inhibitory GlyR tone is widely observed in the brain, it remains unknown whether this specifically reflects gliotransmission because most neurons also express VRACs and other endogenous molecules can activate GlyRs. We found that VRACs are absent in neurons of the rat supraoptic nucleus (SON), suggesting that glial cells are the exclusive source of taurine in this nucleus. Application of strychnine to rat hypothalamic explants caused a depolarization of SON neurons associated with a decrease of chloride conductance and could excite these cells in the absence of fast synaptic transmission. This inhibitory GlyR tone was eliminated by pharmacological blockade of VRACs, by cellular taurine depletion, by metabolic inactivation of glia with fluorocitrate, and after retraction of astrocytic processes that intercalate neuronal somata and dendrites. Finally, GlyR tone varied inversely with extracellular fluid tonicity to mediate the osmotic control of AP firing by SON neurons. These findings establish taurine as a physiological gliotransmitter and show that gliotransmission is a spatially constrained process that can be modulated by the morphological rearrangement of astrocytes. PMID:22956842

  13. Habituation of Auditory Steady State Responses Evoked by Amplitude-Modulated Acoustic Signals in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Prado-Gutierrez, Pavel; Castro-Fariñas, Anisleidy; Morgado-Rodriguez, Lisbet; Velarde-Reyes, Ernesto; Martínez, Agustín D.; Martínez-Montes, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Generation of the auditory steady state responses (ASSR) is commonly explained by the linear combination of random background noise activity and the stationary response. Based on this model, the decrease of amplitude that occurs over the sequential averaging of epochs of the raw data has been exclusively linked to the cancelation of noise. Nevertheless, this behavior might also reflect the non-stationary response of the ASSR generators. We tested this hypothesis by characterizing the ASSR time course in rats with different auditory maturational stages. ASSR were evoked by 8-kHz tones of different supra-threshold intensities, modulated in amplitude at 115 Hz. Results show that the ASSR amplitude habituated to the sustained stimulation and that dishabituation occurred when deviant stimuli were presented. ASSR habituation increased as animals became adults, suggesting that the ability to filter acoustic stimuli with no-relevant temporal information increased with age. Results are discussed in terms of the current model of the ASSR generation and analysis procedures. They might have implications for audiometric tests designed to assess hearing in subjects who cannot provide reliable results in the psychophysical trials. PMID:26557360

  14. Amplitude-modulated stimuli reveal auditory-visual interactions in brain activity and brain connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Laing, Mark; Rees, Adrian; Vuong, Quoc C.

    2015-01-01

    The temporal congruence between auditory and visual signals coming from the same source can be a powerful means by which the brain integrates information from different senses. To investigate how the brain uses temporal information to integrate auditory and visual information from continuous yet unfamiliar stimuli, we used amplitude-modulated tones and size-modulated shapes with which we could manipulate the temporal congruence between the sensory signals. These signals were independently modulated at a slow or a fast rate. Participants were presented with auditory-only, visual-only, or auditory-visual (AV) trials in the fMRI scanner. On AV trials, the auditory and visual signal could have the same (AV congruent) or different modulation rates (AV incongruent). Using psychophysiological interaction analyses, we found that auditory regions showed increased functional connectivity predominantly with frontal regions for AV incongruent relative to AV congruent stimuli. We further found that superior temporal regions, shown previously to integrate auditory and visual signals, showed increased connectivity with frontal and parietal regions for the same contrast. Our findings provide evidence that both activity in a network of brain regions and their connectivity are important for AV integration, and help to bridge the gap between transient and familiar AV stimuli used in previous studies. PMID:26483710

  15. Multielectrode distributed feedback laser for pure frequency modulation and chirping suppressed amplitude modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikuni, Yuzo; Motosugi, George

    1987-04-01

    A new concept for operation of distributed feedback lasers with multielectrodes is proposed, and its capability for amplitude or frequency modulation is demonstrated. The device has electrically separated electrodes so that carrier density distribution along the laser cavity can be controlled artificially by adjusting the current distribution for each electrode. The lasing frequency can be controlled by changing the current ratio applied to the electrodes. Frequency modulation experiments disclose that neither frequency modulation efficiency nor phase delay depend on modulation frequency. It turned out that the frequency shift under modulation showed blue shift or red shift, depending on bias current distribution and the position of the modulation applied electrode. Using these characteristics, chirping suppressed amplitude modulation and frequency modulation with constant output power are realized.

  16. Single-tone and two-tone AM-FM spectral calculations for tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Nee-Yin; Sachse, Glen W.

    1987-01-01

    A generalized theory for optical heterodyne spectroscopy with phase modulated laser radiation is used which allows the calculation of signal line shapes for frequency modulation spectroscopy of Lorentzian gas absorption lines. In particular, synthetic spectral line shapes for both single-tone and two-tone modulation of lead-salt diode lasers are presented in which the contributions from both amplitude and frequency modulations are included.

  17. Population transfer by an amplitude-modulated pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Vitanov, N.V.; Yatsenko, L.P.; Bergmann, K.

    2003-10-01

    We propose a technique for coherent population inversion of a two-state system, which uses an amplitude-modulated pulse. In the modulation-free adiabatic basis, the modulation introduces oscillating interaction between the adiabatic states. In a second rotating-wave approximation picture, this oscillating interaction induces a pair of level crossings between the energies of the adiabatic states if the modulation frequency is chosen appropriately. By suitably offsetting the modulation with respect to the center of the pulse, one can make the modulation act only in the vicinity of one of these crossings. In a higher-order adiabatic basis, this crossing shows up as an avoided crossing between the energies of the higher-order adiabatic states. As a result robust and efficient population transfer can be achieved between the adiabatic states, and hence, between the original bare states. We derive analytically the conditions on the interaction parameters for this technique and verify them with numerical simulations. Possible experimental implementations are discussed.

  18. Longitudinal tracking with phase and amplitude modulated rf

    SciTech Connect

    Caussyn, D.D.; Ball, M.; Brabson, B.

    1993-06-01

    Synchrotron motion was induced by phase shifting the rf of the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) cooler-synchrotron. The resulting coherent-bunch motion was tracked in longitudinal phase space for as many as 700,000 turns, or for over 350 synchrotron oscillations. Results of recent experimental studies of longitudinal motion in which the rf phase and amplitude were harmonically modulated are also presented. Comparisons of experimental data with numerical simulations, assuming independent particle motion, are made. Observed multiparticle effects are also discussed.

  19. Neural correlates of behavioral amplitude modulation sensitivity in the budgerigar midbrain.

    PubMed

    Henry, Kenneth S; Neilans, Erikson G; Abrams, Kristina S; Idrobo, Fabio; Carney, Laurel H

    2016-04-01

    Amplitude modulation (AM) is a crucial feature of many communication signals, including speech. Whereas average discharge rates in the auditory midbrain correlate with behavioral AM sensitivity in rabbits, the neural bases of AM sensitivity in species with human-like behavioral acuity are unexplored. Here, we used parallel behavioral and neurophysiological experiments to explore the neural (midbrain) bases of AM perception in an avian speech mimic, the budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus). Behavioral AM sensitivity was quantified using operant conditioning procedures. Neural AM sensitivity was studied using chronically implanted microelectrodes in awake, unrestrained birds. Average discharge rates of multiunit recording sites in the budgerigar midbrain were insufficient to explain behavioral sensitivity to modulation frequencies <100 Hz for both tone- and noise-carrier stimuli, even with optimal pooling of information across recording sites. Neural envelope synchrony, in contrast, could explain behavioral performance for both carrier types across the full range of modulation frequencies studied (16-512 Hz). The results suggest that envelope synchrony in the budgerigar midbrain may underlie behavioral sensitivity to AM. Behavioral AM sensitivity based on synchrony in the budgerigar, which contrasts with rate-correlated behavioral performance in rabbits, raises the possibility that envelope synchrony, rather than average discharge rate, might also underlie AM perception in other species with sensitive AM detection abilities, including humans. These results highlight the importance of synchrony coding of envelope structure in the inferior colliculus. Furthermore, they underscore potential benefits of devices (e.g., midbrain implants) that evoke robust neural synchrony. PMID:26843608

  20. A role for amplitude modulation phase relationships in speech rhythm perception.

    PubMed

    Leong, Victoria; Stone, Michael A; Turner, Richard E; Goswami, Usha

    2014-07-01

    Prosodic rhythm in speech [the alternation of "Strong" (S) and "weak" (w) syllables] is cued, among others, by slow rates of amplitude modulation (AM) within the speech envelope. However, it is unclear exactly which envelope modulation rates and statistics are the most important for the rhythm percept. Here, the hypothesis that the phase relationship between "Stress" rate (∼2 Hz) and "Syllable" rate (∼4 Hz) AMs provides a perceptual cue for speech rhythm is tested. In a rhythm judgment task, adult listeners identified AM tone-vocoded nursery rhyme sentences that carried either trochaic (S-w) or iambic patterning (w-S). Manipulation of listeners' rhythm perception was attempted by parametrically phase-shifting the Stress AM and Syllable AM in the vocoder. It was expected that a 1π radian phase-shift (half a cycle) would reverse the perceived rhythm pattern (i.e., trochaic → iambic) whereas a 2π radian shift (full cycle) would retain the perceived rhythm pattern (i.e., trochaic → trochaic). The results confirmed these predictions. Listeners judgments of rhythm systematically followed Stress-Syllable AM phase-shifts, but were unaffected by phase-shifts between the Syllable AM and the Sub-beat AM (∼14 Hz) in a control condition. It is concluded that the Stress-Syllable AM phase relationship is an envelope-based modulation statistic that supports speech rhythm perception. PMID:24993221

  1. Double-Referential Holography and Spatial Quadrature Amplitude Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zukeran, Keisuke; Okamoto, Atsushi; Takabayashi, Masanori; Shibukawa, Atsushi; Sato, Kunihiro; Tomita, Akihisa

    2013-09-01

    We proposed a double-referential holography (DRH) that allows phase-detection without external additional beams. In the DRH, phantom beams, prepared in the same optical path as signal beams and preliminary multiplexed in a recording medium along with the signal, are used to produce interference fringes on an imager for converting a phase into an intensity distribution. The DRH enables stable and high-accuracy phase detection independent of the fluctuations and vibrations of the optical system owing to medium shift and temperature variation. Besides, the collinear arrangement of the signal and phantom beams leads to the compactness of the optical data storage system. We conducted an experiment using binary phase modulation signals for verifying the DRH operation. In addition, 38-level spatial quadrature amplitude modulation signals were successfully reproduced with the DRH by numerical simulation. Furthermore, we verified that the distributed phase-shifting method moderates the dynamic range consumption for the exposure of phantom beams.

  2. Absorption line CW EPR using an amplitude modulated longitudinal field.

    PubMed

    Fedin, Matvey; Gromov, Igor; Schweiger, Arthur

    2004-11-01

    In standard continuous wave electron paramagnetic resonance (CW-EPR) experiments, the first derivative of absorption lines is detected. This type of a line shape is caused by the magnetic field modulation and is usually an undesired feature, since the sensitivity of CW-EPR drastically decreases with increasing linewidth. A new approach is introduced, which allows for the measurement of absorption line EPR spectra in systems with broad inhomogeneous lines. The method makes use of multiple-photon transitions that are induced in spin systems when a transverse microwave and a longitudinal radio frequency field are simultaneously applied. The absorption lines are obtained by using amplitude modulation of the radio frequency field and slight saturation of the spectral lines. The basics of the new approach are discussed and experimental examples are given. PMID:15504685

  3. Dispersion interferometer using modulation amplitudes on LHD (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Akiyama, T. Yasuhara, R.; Kawahata, K.; Okajima, S.; Nakayama, K.

    2014-11-15

    Since a dispersion interferometer is insensitive to mechanical vibrations, a vibration compensation system is not necessary. The CO{sub 2} laser dispersion interferometer with phase modulations on the Large Helical Device utilizes the new phase extraction method which uses modulation amplitudes and can improve a disadvantage of the original dispersion interferometer: measurement errors caused by variations of detected intensities. The phase variation within ±2 × 10{sup 17} m{sup −3} is obtained without vibration compensation system. The measured line averaged electron density with the dispersion interferometer shows good agreement with that with the existing far infrared laser interferometer. Fringe jump errors in high density ranging up to 1.5 × 10{sup 20} m{sup −3} can be overcome by a sufficient sampling rate of about 100 kHz.

  4. Amplitude modulation detection by human listeners in sound fields

    PubMed Central

    Zahorik, Pavel; Kim, Duck O.; Kuwada, Shigeyuki; Anderson, Paul W.; Brandewie, Eugene; Srinivasan, Nirmal

    2011-01-01

    The temporal modulation transfer function (TMTF) approach allows techniques from linear systems analysis to be used to predict how the auditory system will respond to arbitrary patterns of amplitude modulation (AM). Although this approach forms the basis for a standard method of predicting speech intelligibility based on estimates of the acoustical modulation transfer function (MTF) between source and receiver, human sensitivity to AM as characterized by the TMTF has not been extensively studied under realistic listening conditions, such as in reverberant sound fields. Here, TMTFs (octave bands from 2 – 512 Hz) were obtained in 3 listening conditions simulated using virtual auditory space techniques: diotic, anechoic sound field, reverberant room sound field. TMTFs were then related to acoustical MTFs estimated using two different methods in each of the listening conditions. Both diotic and anechoic data were found to be in good agreement with classic results, but AM thresholds in the reverberant room were lower than predictions based on acoustical MTFs. This result suggests that simple linear systems techniques may not be appropriate for predicting TMTFs from acoustical MTFs in reverberant sound fields, and may be suggestive of mechanisms that functionally enhance modulation during reverberant listening. PMID:22822417

  5. Lipreading and covert speech production similarly modulate human auditory-cortex responses to pure tones.

    PubMed

    Kauramäki, Jaakko; Jääskeläinen, Iiro P; Hari, Riitta; Möttönen, Riikka; Rauschecker, Josef P; Sams, Mikko

    2010-01-27

    Watching the lips of a speaker enhances speech perception. At the same time, the 100 ms response to speech sounds is suppressed in the observer's auditory cortex. Here, we used whole-scalp 306-channel magnetoencephalography (MEG) to study whether lipreading modulates human auditory processing already at the level of the most elementary sound features, i.e., pure tones. We further envisioned the temporal dynamics of the suppression to tell whether the effect is driven by top-down influences. Nineteen subjects were presented with 50 ms tones spanning six octaves (125-8000 Hz) (1) during "lipreading," i.e., when they watched video clips of silent articulations of Finnish vowels /a/, /i/, /o/, and /y/, and reacted to vowels presented twice in a row; (2) during a visual control task; (3) during a still-face passive control condition; and (4) in a separate experiment with a subset of nine subjects, during covert production of the same vowels. Auditory-cortex 100 ms responses (N100m) were equally suppressed in the lipreading and covert-speech-production tasks compared with the visual control and baseline tasks; the effects involved all frequencies and were most prominent in the left hemisphere. Responses to tones presented at different times with respect to the onset of the visual articulation showed significantly increased N100m suppression immediately after the articulatory gesture. These findings suggest that the lipreading-related suppression in the auditory cortex is caused by top-down influences, possibly by an efference copy from the speech-production system, generated during both own speech and lipreading. PMID:20107058

  6. Demonstration of spot size reduction by focussing amplitude modulated radially polarized light on a photoresist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushakova, K.; van den Berg, Q. Y.; Pereira, S. F.; Urbach, H. P.

    2015-12-01

    Spot size reduction is demonstrated by printing focused spots from amplitude-modulated radially polarized light at the wavelength λ = 405 nm on a photoresist. Amplitude modulation is realized by ring illumination and by application of an optimized amplitude distribution function. Amplitude modulation is implemented via spatial light modulator, which is followed by a specially designed radial wire grid polarizer to obtain high-quality radially polarized light. Comparison between full and amplitude modulated apertures of the written focused spots on a photoresist is performed. Rigorous simulations based on the Richards-Wolf integral are made to confirm experimental data.

  7. An additional study and implementation of tone calibrated technique of modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rafferty, W.; Bechtel, L. K.; Lay, N. E.

    1985-01-01

    The Tone Calibrated Technique (TCT) was shown to be theoretically free from an error floor, and is only limited, in practice, by implementation constraints. The concept of the TCT transmission scheme along with a baseband implementation of a suitable demodulator is introduced. Two techniques for the generation of the TCT signal are considered: a Manchester source encoding scheme (MTCT) and a subcarrier based technique (STCT). The results are summarized for the TCT link computer simulation. The hardware implementation of the MTCT system is addressed and the digital signal processing design considerations involved in satisfying the modulator/demodulator requirements are outlined. The program findings are discussed and future direction are suggested based on conclusions made regarding the suitability of the TCT system for the transmission channel presently under consideration.

  8. Shuttle extravehicular activity signal processor pulse amplitude modulation decommutator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, D. E.; Conrad, W. M.

    1974-01-01

    To provide data with long-term stability and accuracy, the pulse amplitude modulation (PAM) decommutator was synchronized to the PAM-return to zero wavetrain, and each channel was sampled with a common sample and hold circuit and digitized sequentially. The digital value of each channel was then scaled by the digital value of the calibration channels. The corrected digital value of each channel was stored for one complete frame and then transferred to the multiplexer-demultiplexer at a high rate in one block of serial digital data. A test model was built to demonstrate this design approach taken for the PAM decom and performance data was provided. The accuracies obtained with various signal to noise ratios are shown.

  9. Phonological awareness and sinusoidal amplitude modulation in phonological dislexia.

    PubMed

    Peñaloza-López, Yolanda; Herrera-Rangel, Aline; Pérez-Ruiz, Santiago J; Poblano, Adrián

    2016-04-01

    Objective Dyslexia is the difficulty of children in learning to read and write as results of neurological deficiencies. The objective was to test the Phonological awareness (PA) and Sinusoidal amplitude modulation (SAM) threshold in children with Phonological dyslexia (PD). Methods We performed a case-control, analytic, cross sectional study. We studied 14 children with PD and 14 control children from 7 to 11 years of age, by means of PA measurement and by SAM test. The mean age of dyslexic children was 8.39 years and in the control group was 8.15. Results Children with PD exhibited inadequate skills in PA, and SAM. We found significant correlations between PA and SAM at 4 Hertz frequency, and calculated regression equations that predicts between one-fourth and one-third of variance of measurements. Conclusion Alterations in PA and SAM found can help to explain basis of deficient language processing exhibited by children with PD. PMID:27097001

  10. Amplitude Modulation Mode of Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Liu, Lianqing; Yang, Yang; Zhou, Lei; Wang, Dong; Wang, Yuechao; Li, Guangyong

    2015-08-01

    Live-cell imaging at the nanoscale resolution is a hot research topic in the field of life sciences for the direct observation of cellular biological activity. Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) is one of the few effective imaging tools for live-cell imaging at the nanoscale resolution. However, there are various problems in existing scanning modes. The hopping and AC modes suffer from low speed, whereas the DC mode is prone to instability because of the DC drift and external electrical interference. In this article, we propose an amplitude modulation (AM) mode of SICM, which employs an AC voltage to enhance the stability and improve the scanning speed. In this AM mode, we introduce a capacitance compensation method to eliminate capacitance effect and use the amplitude of the AC current component to control the tip movement. Experimental results on polydimethylsiloxane samples verify the validity of the AM mode and demonstrate an improved performance of both speed and stability of this new mode. PMID:25759185

  11. Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography using continuous polarization modulation with arbitrary phase modulation amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zenghai; Kasaragod, Deepa K.; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2012-03-01

    We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that the phase retardance and relative optic-axis orientation of a sample can be calculated without prior knowledge of the actual value of the phase modulation amplitude when using a polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography system based on continuous polarization modulation (CPM-PS-OCT). We also demonstrate that the sample Jones matrix can be calculated at any values of the phase modulation amplitude in a reasonable range depending on the system effective signal-to-noise ratio. This has fundamental importance for the development of clinical systems by simplifying the polarization modulator drive instrumentation and eliminating its calibration procedure. This was validated on measurements of a three-quarter waveplate and an equine tendon sample by a fiber-based swept-source CPM-PS-OCT system.

  12. Age-Related Changes in Processing Simultaneous Amplitude Modulated Sounds Assessed Using Envelope Following Responses.

    PubMed

    Parthasarathy, Aravindakshan; Lai, Jesyin; Bartlett, Edward L

    2016-04-01

    Listening conditions in the real world involve segregating the stimuli of interest from competing auditory stimuli that differ in their sound level and spectral content. It is in these conditions of complex spectro-temporal processing that listeners with age-related hearing loss experience the most difficulties. Envelope following responses (EFRs) provide objective neurophysiological measures of auditory processing. EFRs were obtained to two simultaneous sinusoidally amplitude modulated (sAM) tones from young and aged Fischer-344 rats. One was held at a fixed suprathreshold sound level (sAM1FL) while the second varied in sound level (sAM2VL) and carrier frequency. EFR amplitudes to sAM1FL in the young decreased with signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and this reduction was more pronounced when the sAM2VL carrier frequency was spectrally separated from sAM1FL. Aged animals showed similar trends, while having decreased overall response amplitudes compared to the young. These results were replicated using an established computational model of the auditory nerve. The trends observed in the EFRs were shown to be due to the contributions of the low-frequency tails of high-frequency neurons, rather than neurons tuned to the sAM1FL carrier frequency. Modeling changes in threshold and neural loss reproduced some of the changes seen with age, but accuracy improved when combined with an additional decrease representing synaptic loss of auditory nerve neurons. Sound segregation in this case derives primarily from peripheral processing, regardless of age. Contributions by more central neural mechanisms are likely to occur only at low SNRs. PMID:26905273

  13. Wireless multi-level terahertz amplitude modulator using active metamaterial-based spatial light modulation.

    PubMed

    Rout, Saroj; Sonkusale, Sameer

    2016-06-27

    The ever increasing demand for bandwidth in wireless communication systems will inevitably lead to the extension of operating frequencies toward the terahertz (THz) band known as the 'THz gap'. Towards closing this gap, we present a multi-level amplitude shift keying (ASK) terahertz wireless communication system using terahertz spatial light modulators (SLM) instead of traditional voltage mode modulation, achieving higher spectral efficiency for high speed communication. The fundamental principle behind this higher efficiency is the conversion of a noisy voltage domain signal to a noise-free binary spatial pattern for effective amplitude modulation of a free-space THz carrier wave. Spatial modulation is achieved using an an active metamaterial array embedded with pseudomorphic high-electron mobility (pHEMT) designed in a consumer-grade galium-arsenide (GaAs) integrated circuit process which enables electronic control of its THz transmissivity. Each array is assembled as individually controllable tiles for transmissive terahertz spatial modulation. Using the experimental data from our metamaterial based modulator, we show that a four-level ASK digital communication system has two orders of magnitude improvement in symbol error rate (SER) for a degradation of 20 dB in transmit signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) using spatial light modulation compared to voltage controlled modulation. PMID:27410614

  14. Discrimination of Direction in Fast Frequency-Modulated Tones by Rats

    PubMed Central

    King, Isabella; Felsheim, Christian; Ostwald, Joachim; von der Behrens, Wolfger

    2006-01-01

    Fast frequency modulations (FM) are an essential part of species-specific auditory signals in animals as well as in human speech. Major parameters characterizing non-periodic frequency modulations are the direction of frequency change in the FM sweep (upward/downward) and the sweep speed, i.e., the speed of frequency change. While it is well established that both parameters are represented in the mammalian central auditory pathway, their importance at the perceptual level in animals is unclear. We determined the ability of rats to discriminate between upward and downward modulated FM-tones as a function of sweep speed in a two-alternative-forced-choice-paradigm. Directional discrimination in logarithmic FM-sweeps was reduced with increasing sweep speed between 20 and 1,000 octaves/s following a psychometric function. Average threshold sweep speed for FM directional discrimination was 96 octaves/s. This upper limit of perceptual FM discrimination fits well the upper limit of preferred sweep speeds in auditory neurons and the upper limit of neuronal direction selectivity in the rat auditory cortex and midbrain, as it is found in the literature. Influences of additional stimulus parameters on FM discrimination were determined using an adaptive testing-procedure for efficient threshold estimation based on a maximum likelihood approach. Directional discrimination improved with extended FM sweep range between two and five octaves. Discrimination performance declined with increasing lower frequency boundary of FM sweeps, showing an especially strong deterioration when the boundary was raised from 2 to 4 kHz. This deterioration corresponds to a frequency-dependent decline in direction selectivity of FM-encoding neurons in the rat auditory cortex, as described in the literature. Taken together, by investigating directional discrimination of FM sweeps in the rat we found characteristics at the perceptual level that can be related to several aspects of FM encoding in the

  15. Musical experience modulates categorical perception of lexical tones in native Chinese speakers

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Han; Ma, Xiaohui; Zhang, Linjun; Liu, Youyi; Zhang, Yang; Shu, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Although musical training has been shown to facilitate both native and non-native phonetic perception, it remains unclear whether and how musical experience affects native speakers’ categorical perception (CP) of speech at the suprasegmental level. Using both identification and discrimination tasks, this study compared Chinese-speaking musicians and non-musicians in their CP of a lexical tone continuum (from the high level tone, Tone1 to the high falling tone, Tone4). While the identification functions showed similar steepness and boundary location between the two subject groups, the discrimination results revealed superior performance in the musicians for discriminating within-category stimuli pairs but not for between-category stimuli. These findings suggest that musical training can enhance sensitivity to subtle pitch differences between within-category sounds in the presence of robust mental representations in service of CP of lexical tonal contrasts. PMID:25918511

  16. Experimental investigation of 100-Gbps transmission over 80-km single mode fiber using discrete multi-tone modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Toshiki; Nishihara, Masato; Takahara, Tomoo; Li, Lei; Tao, Zhenning; Rasmussen, Jens C.

    2012-12-01

    We experimentally evaluated the transmission performance of discrete multi-tone (DMT) modulation at wavelengths in the 1300-nm and 1550-nm regions and analyzed the degradation factors. By using their countermeasures to extend transmission distance, we realized the capacity of 100 Gbps with 2WDM x 50 Gbps over 80 km. To our knowledge, this work is the highest capacity in 80-km transmission system using direct modulation and direct detection. These results show that the DMT modulation can be used to realize high capacity transceiver with simple and cost effective configuration for the bi-directional transmission system like a passive optical network.

  17. Optical binary switch and amplitude modulator micromirror arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesar, Edward S., Jr.; Allen, Peter B.; Boydston, Noah C.; Howard, Jeffrey T.; Ko, Simon Y.; Wilken, Josh M.

    1999-09-01

    Five types of micromirror arrays were designed and fabricated using a three-level, polysilicon, surface micromachined, micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) process. The electrostatically deflectable micromirror designs included arrays of simple cantilever beams, torsion beams, tethered (piston-style) beams, circular membranes, and oval membranes. The smallest micromirror element was the simple cantilever beam, measuring 50 micrometer square. The largest micromirror element was the oval membrane; it possessed an active optical surface that was 320 micrometer by 920 micrometer. Each of the remaining micromirror designs have gold-coated polysilicon optical surfaces with geometries between these two limits. Electrostatically induced vertical deflections on the order of 2.75 micrometer were achieved. The torsion beam micromirror design exhibits both in-plane and out-of-plane deflection. The other micromirror designs only manifest in-plane deflections. The modeling phase focused on the microdynamical behavior of the torsion beam micromirror. The IntelliCADR finite element analysis program was used to generate a plot of the micromirror's deflection (d) versus applied direct current voltage (V). The data was least-squares fitted to the well- established V varies direct as d3/2 relationship. A resonant frequency analysis predicted an approximate switching speed of 6 microseconds. The reliability (number of operational cycles) of each micromirror design, when operated with a rectified 60 Hz alternating current (ac) signal, was measured to exceed more than 1 million flexure events. Experimental evidence supporting the potential for using micromirrors as binary optical switches and amplitude modulators is also addressed.

  18. Auditory stream segregation using amplitude modulated bandpass noise.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yingjiu; Nelson, Peggy B

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the roles of spectral overlap and amplitude modulation (AM) rate for stream segregation for noise signals, as well as to test the build-up effect based on these two cues. Segregation ability was evaluated using an objective paradigm with listeners' attention focused on stream segregation. Stimulus sequences consisted of two interleaved sets of bandpass noise bursts (A and B bursts). The A and B bursts differed in spectrum, AM-rate, or both. The amount of the difference between the two sets of noise bursts was varied. Long and short sequences were studied to investigate the build-up effect for segregation based on spectral and AM-rate differences. Results showed the following: (1). Stream segregation ability increased with greater spectral separation. (2). Larger AM-rate separations were associated with stronger segregation abilities. (3). Spectral separation was found to elicit the build-up effect for the range of spectral differences assessed in the current study. (4). AM-rate separation interacted with spectral separation suggesting an additive effect of spectral separation and AM-rate separation on segregation build-up. The findings suggest that, when normal-hearing listeners direct their attention towards segregation, they are able to segregate auditory streams based on reduced spectral contrast cues that vary by the amount of spectral overlap. Further, regardless of the spectral separation they are able to use AM-rate difference as a secondary/weaker cue. Based on the spectral differences, listeners can segregate auditory streams better as the listening duration is prolonged-i.e., sparse spectral cues elicit build-up segregation; however, AM-rate differences only appear to elicit build-up when in combination with spectral difference cues. PMID:26300831

  19. ERP responses to processing prosodic phrasing of sentences in amplitude modulated noise.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Rebecca; Ruigendijk, Esther

    2016-02-01

    Intonation phrase boundaries (IPBs) were hypothesized to be especially difficult to process in the presence of an amplitude modulated noise masker because of a potential rhythmic competition. In an event-related potential study, IPBs were presented in silence, stationary, and amplitude modulated noise. We elicited centro-parietal Closure Positive Shifts (CPS) in 23 young adults with normal hearing at IPBs in all acoustic conditions, albeit with some differences. CPS peak amplitudes were highest in stationary noise, followed by modulated noise, and lowest in silence. Both noise types elicited CPS delays, slightly more so in stationary compared to amplitude modulated noise. These data suggest that amplitude modulation is not tantamount to a rhythmic competitor for prosodic phrasing but rather supports an assumed speech perception benefit due to local release from masking. The duration of CPS time windows was, however, not only longer in noise compared to silence, but also longer for amplitude modulated compared to stationary noise. This is interpreted as support for additional processing load associated with amplitude modulation for the CPS component. Taken together, processing prosodic phrasing of sentences in amplitude modulated noise seems to involve the same issues that have been observed for the perception and processing of segmental information that are related to lexical items presented in noise: a benefit from local release from masking, even for prosodic cues, and a detrimental additional processing load that is associated with either stream segregation or signal reconstruction. PMID:26776233

  20. Potential sensitivities in frequency modulation and heterodyne amplitude modulation Kelvin probe force microscopes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the potential sensitivity in Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) was investigated in frequency modulation (FM) and heterodyne amplitude modulation (AM) modes. We showed theoretically that the minimum detectable contact potential difference (CPD) in FM-KPFM is higher than in heterodyne AM-KPFM. We experimentally confirmed that the signal-to-noise ratio in FM-KPFM is lower than that in heterodyne AM-KPFM, which is due to the higher minimum detectable CPD dependence in FM-KPFM. We also compared the corrugations in the local contact potential difference on the surface of Ge (001), which shows atomic resolution in heterodyne AM-KPFM. In contrast, atomic resolution cannot be obtained in FM-KPFM under the same experimental conditions. The higher potential resolution in heterodyne AM-KPFM was attributed to the lower crosstalk and higher potential sensitivity between topographic and potential measurements. PMID:24350866

  1. Visual working memory for amplitude-modulated shapes.

    PubMed

    Salmela, Viljami R; Lähde, Meri; Saarinen, Jussi

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the trade-off between capacity and precision in visual working memory with two different tasks: delayed discrimination and recall. The stimuli were radial frequency patterns that require global pooling of local visual features. The thresholds in delayed amplitude discrimination were measured with a two-interval, forced-choice setup using the Quest procedure. In the recall experiment, the observers' task was to adjust the amplitude of a probe to match the amplitude of a cued item. For one item, the amplitude thresholds were low (0.01-0.05) and the adjustments precise (standard deviations, 0.03-0.05). As the number of items increased from one to six, there was a linear, 6-to-14-fold increase in the thresholds (0.14-0.29) and a 1.5-to-3-fold increase in the standard deviations (0.06-0.11). No sudden or complete breakdown in performance was observed for any subject. The results show a continuous trade-off between memory capacity and precision; six items can be discriminated with the same performance level (75% correct) as one item if the difference between the stimuli is set accordingly. Thus, the stimulus discriminability determines the capacity of visual working memory, and the trade-off between the capacity and precision is linear. PMID:22661608

  2. Quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) using binary-driven coupling-modulated rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimelahi, Samira; Sheikholeslami, Ali

    2016-05-01

    We propose and fully analyze a compact structure for DAC-free pure optical QAM modulation. The proposed structure is the first ring resonator-based DAC-free QAM modulator reported in the literature, to the best of our knowledge. The device consists of two segmented add-drop Mach Zehnder interferometer-assisted ring modulators (MZIARM) in an IQ configuration. The proposed architecture is investigated based on the parameters from SOI technology where various key design considerations are discussed. We have included the loss in the MZI arms in our analysis of phase and amplitude modulation using MZIARM for the first time and show that the imbalanced loss results in a phase error. The output level linearity is also studied for both QAM-16 and QAM-64 not only based on optimizing RF segment lengths but also by optimizing the number of segments. In QAM-16, linearity among levels is achievable with two segments while in QAM-64 an additional segment may be required.

  3. Amplitudes of solar modulation of low energy cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Rosenvinge, T. T.; Paizis, C.

    1982-01-01

    There have been differences of opinion regarding the origin and behavior of the solar modulation of galactic cosmic rays. It has been shown that the return to solar maximum intensity levels beginning in early 1978 was dominated by Forbush decreases. These Forbush decreases were caused by radially moving interplanetary shocks resulting from large solar flares. The present investigation is concerned with solar modulation effects which were observed during the previous solar minimum. The effects were associated with high-speed streams in the solar wind. These streams caused the formation of corotating interaction regions with both forward and reverse shocks. The modulation effects seen near earth are intimately connected with these shocks.

  4. Pitch processing of dynamic lexical tones in the auditory cortex is influenced by sensory and extrasensory processes.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Ananthanarayan; Gandour, Jackson T; Suresh, Chandan H

    2015-05-01

    The aim is to evaluate how language experience (Chinese, English) shapes processing of pitch contours as reflected in the amplitude of cortical pitch response components. Responses were elicited from three dynamic curvilinear nonspeech stimuli varying in pitch direction and location of peak acceleration: Mandarin lexical Tone 2 (rising) and Tone 4 (falling), and a flipped variant of Tone 2, Tone 2' (nonnative). At temporal sites (T7/T8), Chinese listeners' Na-Pb response amplitudes to Tones 2 and 4 were greater than those of English listeners in the right hemisphere only; a rightward asymmetry for Tones 2 and 4 was restricted to the Chinese group. In common to both Fz-to-linked T7/T8 and T7/T8 electrode sites, the stimulus pattern (Tones 2 and 4 > Tone 2') was found in the Chinese group only. As reflected by Pb-Nb at Fz, Chinese subjects' amplitudes were larger than those of English subjects in response to Tones 2 and 4, and Tones 2 and 4 were larger than Tone 2', whereas for English subjects, Tone 2 was larger than Tone 2' and Tone 4. At frontal electrode sites (F3/F4), regardless of component or hemisphere, Chinese subjects' responses were larger in amplitude than those of English subjects across stimuli. For either group, responses to Tones 2 and 4 were larger than Tone 2'. No hemispheric asymmetry was observed at the frontal electrode sites. These findings demonstrate that cortical pitch response components are differentially modulated by experience-dependent, temporally distinct but functionally overlapping, weighting of sensory and extrasensory effects on pitch processing of lexical tones in the right temporal lobe and, more broadly, are consistent with a distributed hierarchical predictive coding process. PMID:25943576

  5. Pitch processing of dynamic lexical tones in the auditory cortex is influenced by sensory and extrasensory processes

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Ananthanarayan; Gandour, Jackson T.; Suresh, Chandan H.

    2015-01-01

    The aim is to evaluate how language experience (Chinese, English) shapes processing of pitch contours as reflected in the amplitude of cortical pitch response components. Responses were elicited from three dynamic, curvilinear, nonspeech stimuli varying in pitch direction and location of peak acceleration: Mandarin lexical Tone2 (rising) and Tone4 (falling); and a flipped variant of Tone2, Tone2′ (nonnative). At temporal sites (T7/T8), Chinese Na-Pb response amplitude to Tones 2 & 4 was greater than English in the right hemisphere only; a rightward asymmetry for Tones 2 & 4 was restricted to the Chinese group. In common to both Fz-to-linked T7/T8 and T7/T8 electrode sites, the stimulus pattern (Tones 2 & 4 > Tone2′) was found in the Chinese group only. As reflected by Pb-Nb at Fz, Chinese amplitude was larger than English in response to Tones 2 & 4; and Tones 2 & 4 were larger than Tone2′; whereas for English, Tone2 was larger than Tone2′ and Tone4. At frontal electrode sites (F3/F4), regardless of component or hemisphere, Chinese responses were larger in amplitude than English across stimuli. For either group, responses to Tones 2 & 4 were larger than Tone2′. No hemispheric asymmetry was observed at the frontal electrode sites. These findings highlight that cortical pitch response components are differentially modulated by experience-dependent, temporally distinct but functionally overlapping weighting of sensory and extrasensory effects on pitch processing of lexical tones in the right temporal lobe and, more broadly, are consistent with a distributed hierarchical predictive coding process. PMID:25943576

  6. Platelet-activating factor modulates pulmonary vasomotor tone in the perinatal lamb.

    PubMed

    Ibe, B O; Hibler, S; Raj, J U

    1998-09-01

    Eight near-term fetal lambs were studied acutely in utero to determine role of platelet-activating factor (PAF) in the regulation of vasomotor tone in systemic and pulmonary circulations in the immediate perinatal period. Four fetal lambs were studied predelivery and 2 h postdelivery to determine circulating PAF levels. Aortic and pulmonary arterial pressures and cardiac output were measured continuously, and systemic and pulmonary vascular resistances were calculated. Left pulmonary arterial blood flow was also measured in four fetal lambs. After delivery and oxygenation, circulating PAF levels fell significantly. When WEB-2170, a specific PAF-receptor antagonist, was infused to block effect of endogenous PAF in the eight near-term fetal lambs, systemic vascular resistance fell 30% but pulmonary vascular resistance fell dramatically by 68%. Specificity of WEB-2170 was tested in juvenile lambs and was found to be very specific in lowering vasomotor tone only when tone was elevated by action of PAF. Our data show that endogenous PAF levels in the fetus contribute to maintain a high basal systemic and pulmonary vasomotor tone and that a normal fall in circulating PAF levels after birth and oxygenation may facilitate fall in pulmonary vascular resistance at birth. PMID:9729586

  7. Modulational instability of finite-amplitude, circularly polarized Alfven waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Derby, N. F., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The simple theory of the decay instability of Alfven waves is strictly applicable only to a small-amplitude parent wave in a low-beta plasma, but, if the parent wave is circularly polarized, it is possible to analyze the situation without either of these restrictions. Results show that a large-amplitude circularly polarized wave is unstable with respect to decay into three waves, one longitudinal and one transverse wave propagating parallel to the parent wave and one transverse wave propagating antiparallel. The transverse decay products appear at frequencies which are the sum and difference of the frequencies of the parent wave and the longitudinal wave. The decay products are not familiar MHD modes except in the limit of small beta and small amplitude of the parent wave, in which case the decay products are a forward-propagating sound wave and a backward-propagating circularly polarized wave. In this limit the other transverse wave disappears. The effect of finite beta is to reduce the linear growth rate of the instability from the value suggested by the simple theory. Possible applications of these results to the theory of the solar wind are briefly touched upon.

  8. Amplitude modulation in δ Sct stars: statistics from an ensemble study of Kepler targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Dominic M.; Kurtz, Donald W.; Breger, Michel; Murphy, Simon J.; Holdsworth, Daniel L.

    2016-08-01

    We present the results of a search for amplitude modulation of pulsation modes in 983 δ Sct stars, which have effective temperatures between 6400 ≤ Teff ≤ 10 000 K in the Kepler Input Catalogue and were continuously observed by the Kepler Space Telescope for 4 yr. We demonstrate the diversity in pulsational behaviour observed, in particular non-linearity, which is predicted for δ Sct stars. We analyse and discuss examples of δ Sct stars with constant amplitudes and phases; those that exhibit amplitude modulation caused by beating of close-frequency pulsation modes; those that exhibit pure amplitude modulation (with no associated phase variation); those that exhibit phase modulation caused by binarity; and those that exhibit amplitude modulation caused by non-linearity. Using models and examples of individual stars, we demonstrate that observations of the changes in amplitude and phase of pulsation modes can be used to distinguish among the different scenarios. We find that 603 δ Sct stars (61.3 per cent) exhibit at least one pulsation mode that varies significantly in amplitude over 4 yr. Conversely, many δ Sct stars have constant pulsation amplitudes so short-length observations can be used to determine precise frequencies, amplitudes and phases for the most coherent and periodic δ Sct stars. It is shown that amplitude modulation is not restricted to a small region on the HR diagram, therefore not necessarily dependent on stellar parameters such as Teff or log g. Our catalogue of 983 δ Sct stars will be useful for comparisons to similar stars observed by K2 and TESS, because the length of the 4-yr Kepler data set will not be surpassed for some time.

  9. Correlation with a spatial light modulator having phase and amplitude cross coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juday, Richard D.

    1989-01-01

    In correlation filtering a spatial light modulators is traditionally modeled as affecting only the phase or only the amplitude of light. Usually, however, a single operating parameter affects both phase and amplitude. An integral constraint is developed that is a necessary condition for optimizing a correlation filter having single parameter coupling between phase and amplitude. The phase-only filter is shown to be a special case.

  10. Active cancellation of residual amplitude modulation in a frequency-modulation based Fabry-Perot interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yinan; Wang, Yicheng; Pratt, Jon R.

    2016-03-01

    Residual amplitude modulation (RAM) is one of the most common noise sources known to degrade the sensitivity of frequency modulation spectroscopy. RAM can arise as a result of the temperature dependent birefringence of the modulator crystal, which causes the orientation of the crystal's optical axis to shift with respect to the polarization of the incident light with temperature. In the fiber-based optical interferometer used on the National Institute of Standards and Technology calculable capacitor, RAM degrades the measured laser frequency stability and correlates with the environmental temperature fluctuations. We have demonstrated a simple approach that cancels out excessive RAM due to polarization mismatch between the light and the optical axis of the crystal. The approach allows us to measure the frequency noise of a heterodyne beat between two lasers individually locked to different resonant modes of a cavity with an accuracy better than 0.5 ppm, which meets the requirement to further determine the longitudinal mode number of the cavity length. Also, this approach has substantially mitigated the temperature dependency of the measurements of the cavity length and consequently the capacitance.

  11. Active cancellation of residual amplitude modulation in a frequency-modulation based Fabry-Perot interferometer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yinan; Wang, Yicheng; Pratt, Jon R

    2016-03-01

    Residual amplitude modulation (RAM) is one of the most common noise sources known to degrade the sensitivity of frequency modulation spectroscopy. RAM can arise as a result of the temperature dependent birefringence of the modulator crystal, which causes the orientation of the crystal's optical axis to shift with respect to the polarization of the incident light with temperature. In the fiber-based optical interferometer used on the National Institute of Standards and Technology calculable capacitor, RAM degrades the measured laser frequency stability and correlates with the environmental temperature fluctuations. We have demonstrated a simple approach that cancels out excessive RAM due to polarization mismatch between the light and the optical axis of the crystal. The approach allows us to measure the frequency noise of a heterodyne beat between two lasers individually locked to different resonant modes of a cavity with an accuracy better than 0.5 ppm, which meets the requirement to further determine the longitudinal mode number of the cavity length. Also, this approach has substantially mitigated the temperature dependency of the measurements of the cavity length and consequently the capacitance. PMID:27036752

  12. The Chandler wobble of the poles and its amplitude modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorenkov, N.

    2015-08-01

    It is shown that the period of the Chandler wobble of the poles (CWP) is a combined oscillation caused by three periodic processes experienced by the Earth: (a) lunisolar tides, (b) the precession of the orbit of the Earth's monthly revolution around the barycenter of the Earth-Moon system, and (c) the motion of the perigee of this orbit. The addition of the 1.20 - year Chandler wobble to sidereal, anomalistic, and synodic lunar yearly forcing gives rise slow periodic variations in the CWP amplitude with periods of 32 to 51 years.

  13. Phase-amplitude crosstalk in intensity modulated near infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alford, K.; Wickramasinghe, Y.

    2000-05-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) instruments that rely on phase sensitive detection suffer from what is called "phase-amplitude crosstalk," i.e., the phase measured is dependent on the average light intensity entering the detector. Changes in detector rise time with input light intensity is the accepted explanation of this phenomenon. It is concluded here that an additional simple mechanism can cause phase-amplitude errors, particularly if the ratio of the ac component of the detected signal to the dc component is low. It is shown that the form of the phase distortion encountered during the development of a new phase sensitive NIR instrument can be modeled by assuming the presence of a synchronous interfering signal, due to rf coupling, at the detector output. This modeling allows a required margin between the detected signal of interest, i.e., the signal from the tissue and the interfering signal to be set in order to achieve a measured phase accuracy necessary to derive sufficiently accurate clinical parameters.

  14. Amplitude Control of Solid-State Modulators for Precision Fast Kicker Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, J A; Anaya, R M; Caporaso, G C; Chen, Y J; Cook, E G; Lee, B S; Hawkins, A

    2002-11-15

    A solid-state modulator with very fast rise and fall times, pulse width agility, and multi-pulse burst and intra-pulse amplitude adjustment capability for use with high speed electron beam kickers has been designed and tested at LLNL. The modulator uses multiple solid-state modules stacked in an inductive-adder configuration. Amplitude adjustment is provided by controlling individual modules in the adder, and is used to compensate for transverse e-beam motion as well as the dynamic response and beam-induced steering effects associated with the kicker structure. A control algorithm calculates a voltage based on measured e-beam displacement and adjusts the modulator to regulate beam centroid position. This paper presents design details of amplitude control along with measured performance data from kicker operation on the ETA-II accelerator at LLNL.

  15. Dissociable Neural Response Signatures for Slow Amplitude and Frequency Modulation in Human Auditory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Molly J.; Obleser, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    Natural auditory stimuli are characterized by slow fluctuations in amplitude and frequency. However, the degree to which the neural responses to slow amplitude modulation (AM) and frequency modulation (FM) are capable of conveying independent time-varying information, particularly with respect to speech communication, is unclear. In the current electroencephalography (EEG) study, participants listened to amplitude- and frequency-modulated narrow-band noises with a 3-Hz modulation rate, and the resulting neural responses were compared. Spectral analyses revealed similar spectral amplitude peaks for AM and FM at the stimulation frequency (3 Hz), but amplitude at the second harmonic frequency (6 Hz) was much higher for FM than for AM. Moreover, the phase delay of neural responses with respect to the full-band stimulus envelope was shorter for FM than for AM. Finally, the critical analysis involved classification of single trials as being in response to either AM or FM based on either phase or amplitude information. Time-varying phase, but not amplitude, was sufficient to accurately classify AM and FM stimuli based on single-trial neural responses. Taken together, the current results support the dissociable nature of cortical signatures of slow AM and FM. These cortical signatures potentially provide an efficient means to dissect simultaneously communicated slow temporal and spectral information in acoustic communication signals. PMID:24205309

  16. Smooth Pursuit Saccade Amplitude Modulation During Exposure to Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, M. F.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.; Sayenko, D. G.; Sayenko, I.; Somers, J. T.; Paloski, W. H.

    2002-01-01

    Russian investigators have reported changes in pursuit tracking of a vertically moving point stimulus during space flight. Early in microgravity, changes were manifested by decreased eye movement amplitude (undershooting) and the appearance of correction saccades. As the flight progressed, pursuit of the moving point stimulus deteriorated while associated saccadic movements were unchanged. Immediately postflight there was an improved execution of active head movements indicating that the deficiencies in pursuit function noted in microgravity may be of central origin. In contrast, tests of two cosmonauts showed that horizontal and vertical smooth pursuit were unchanged inflight. However, results of corresponding saccadic tasks showed a tendency toward the overshooting of a horizontal target early inflight with high accuracy developing later inflight, accompanied by an increased saccade velocity and a trend toward decreased saccade latency. Based on these equivocal results, we have further investigated the effects of space flight on the smooth pursuit mechanism during and after short duration flight, and postflight on returning MIR crewmembers. Sinusoidal target movement was presented horizontally at frequencies of 0.33 and 1.0 Hz. Subjects were asked to perform two trials for each stimulus combination: (1) moving eyes-only (EO) and (2) moving eyes and head (EH) with the target motion. Peak amplitude was 30 deg for 0.33 Hz trials and 15 deg for the 1.0 Hz trials. The relationship between saccade amplitude and peak velocity were plotted as a main sequence for each phase of flight, and linear regression analysis allowed us to determine the slope of each main sequence plot. The linear slopes were then combined for each flight phase for each individual subject. The main sequence for both EO and EH trials at both the 0.33 and 1.0 Hz frequencies during flight for the short duration flyers showed a reduction in saccade velocity and amplitude when compared to the preflight

  17. Smooth Pursuit Saccade Amplitude Modulation During Exposure to Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, M. F.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.; Sayenko, D. G.; Sayenko, I.; Somers, J. T.; Paloski, W. H.

    2002-01-01

    Russian investigators have reported changes in pursuit tracking of a vertically moving point stimulus during space flight. Early in microgravity, changes were manifested by decreased eye movement amplitude (undershooting) and the appearance of correction saccades. As the flight progressed, pursuit of the moving point stimulus deteriorated while associated saccadic movements were unchanged. Immediately postflight there was an improved execution of active head movements indicating that the deficiencies in pursuit function noted in microgravity may be of central origin. In contrast, tests of two cosmonauts showed that horizontal and vertical smooth pursuit were unchanged inflight. However, results of corresponding saccadic tasks showed a tendency toward the overshooting of a horizontal target early inflight with high accuracy developing later inflight, accompanied by an increased saccade velocity and a trend toward decreased saccade latency. Based on these equivocal results, we have further investigated the effects of space flight on the smooth pursuit mechanism during and after short duration flight, and postflight on returning MIR crewmembers. Sinusoidal target movement was presented horizontally at frequencies of 0.33 and 1.0 Hz. Subjects were asked to perform two trials for each stimulus combination: (1) moving eyes-only (EO) and (2) moving eyes and head (EH) with the target motion. Peak amplitude was 30 deg for 0.33 Hz trials and 15 deg for the 1.0 Hz trials. The relationship between saccade amplitude and peak velocity were plotted as a main sequence for each phase of flight, and linear regression analysis allowed us to determine the slope of each main sequence plot. The linear slopes were then combined for each flight phase for each individual subject. The main sequence for both EO and EH trials at both the 0.33 and 1.0 Hz frequencies during flight for the short duration flyers showed a reduction in saccade velocity and amplitude when compared to the preflight

  18. Speckle-reduced holographic display by modulating complex amplitude in single-lens system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chenliang; Xia, Jun; Qi, Yijun; Yuan, Caojin; Nie, Shouping

    2016-06-01

    This paper proposes a method for calculating phase-only computer-generated hologram (CGH) in holographic display with reduced speckle noise. The method works by encoding the desired complex-amplitude field of object into a phase-only CGH by a linear canonical transform algorithm. The complex-amplitude field can then be reconstructed independently from the encoded CGH using a filter at the Fourier plane of a single-lens optical system. The feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method was verified by a simulation experiment. An optical experiment for holographic display was also conducted with reduced speckle using a single phase-only spatial-light modulator. The object was, in fact, reconstructed with different depth of focus clearly without speckle noise due to the simultaneous modulation of both amplitude and phase, confirming our method's ability to suppress speckle noise in holographic displays by modulating complex amplitude in three-dimensional space.

  19. Radio frequency path characterization for wide band quadrature amplitude modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Bracht, R.

    1998-12-31

    Remote, high speed, high explosive wave front monitoring requires very high bandwidth telemetry to allow transmission of diagnostic data before the explosion destroys the sensor system itself. The main motivation for this study is that no known existing implementation of this sort has been applied to realistic weapons environments. These facts have prompted the research and gathering of data that can be used to extrapolate towards finding the best modulation method for this application. In addition to research of similar existing analysis and testing operations, data was recently captured from a Joint Test Assembly (JTA) Air Launched Cruise Missile (ALCM) flight.

  20. EFFECTS OF CONTINUOUS-WAVE, PULSED, AND SINUSOIDAL-AMPLITUDE-MODULATED MICROWAVES ON BRAIN ENERGY METABOLISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    A comparison of the effects of continuous wave, sinusoidal-amplitude modulated, and pulsed square-wave-modulated 591-MHz microwave exposures on brain energy metabolism was made in male Sprague Dawley rats (175-225g). Brain NADH fluorescence, adensine triphosphate (ATP) concentrat...

  1. Two-level atom driven by an intense amplitude-modulated field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Terry; Freedhoff, Helen

    1998-05-01

    We have calculated the entangled eigenstates (dressed states) and spectra of a two-level atom driven by an intense amplitude-modulated field of modulation frequency delta, for both weak and strong modulation amplitudes. The spectra arising with weak modulation are best described by comparison with those of the monochromatically driven atom: For the fluorescence and near-resonance absorption spectra, the central component of the Mollow triplet is unaffected, while the sideband lines are replaced by multiplets with spacing delta and intensity dependent on the ratio of the modulation amplitude to its frequency; in the Autler-Townes spectrum, each line is similarly replaced by a multiplet. For strong modulation, we describe the spectra by comparison with those which arise for an equal amplitude bichromatic (AM with suppressed carrier) driving field: The central lines of the fluorescence and near-resonance absorption multiplets are split into triplet features, while all other lines, as well of those of the Autler-Townes spectra, are split into doublets, with doublet splitting proportional to the amplitude of the carrier frequency. All spectra agree completely with the spectra calculated by numerically solving the optical Bloch equations for the system.

  2. Plasma based optical guiding of an amplitude-modulated electromagnetic beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Mamta; Gupta, D. N.

    2015-06-01

    We propose the stronger optical guiding of an electromagnetic beam in a plasma by considering the amplitude modulation of the fundamental beam. With the advent of high power source of electromagnetic radiation, the electron velocity in a plasma may become quite large (comparable to the light velocity in free space). Thus, the effect of relativistic mass variation must be taken into account. The relativistic effect of the laser propagation in a plasma leads to self-focusing because of the dielectric constant of a plasma being an increasing function of the intensity. The ponderomotive force of the laser beam pushes the electrons out of the region of high intensity, which reduces the local electron density and increases the plasma dielectric function further, leading to even more selffocusing of the laser. In this work, we consider a short pulse laser of finite spot size as an amplitude modulation in time. Our findings show an efficient optical guiding mechanism based on amplitude modulation signal propagation in plasmas. Medium nonlinearity becomes stronger if an amplitude modulated beam is introduced, which contributes significantly in laser guiding in plasmas. Furthermore, the rate of laser self-focusing is increased with modulation index due the fact of stronger Kerr effect. The study related to amplitude modulated optical signal may be useful for communication technology.

  3. Diffusion-induced periodic transition between oscillatory modes in amplitude-modulated patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Xiaodong; He, Yuxiu; Wang, Shaorong; Gao, Qingyu; Epstein, Irving R.; Wang, Qun

    2014-06-15

    We study amplitude-modulated waves, e.g., wave packets in one dimension, overtarget spirals and superspirals in two dimensions, under mixed-mode oscillatory conditions in a three-variable reaction-diffusion model. New transition zones, not seen in the homogeneous system, are found, in which periodic transitions occur between local 1{sup N−1} and 1{sup N} oscillations. Amplitude-modulated complex patterns result from periodic transition between (N − 1)-armed and N-armed waves. Spatial recurrence rates provide a useful guide to the stability of these modulated patterns.

  4. Miniature Surface Plasmon Polariton Amplitude Modulator by Beat Frequency and Polarization Control.

    PubMed

    Chang, Cheng-Wei; Lin, Chu-En; Yu, Chih-Jen; Yeh, Ting-Tso; Yen, Ta-Jen

    2016-01-01

    The miniaturization of modulators keeps pace for the compact devices in optical applications. Here, we present a miniature surface plasmon polariton amplitude modulator (SPPAM) by directing and interfering surface plasmon polaritons on a nanofabricated chip. Our results show that this SPPAM enables two kinds of modulations. The first kind of modulation is controlled by encoding angular-frequency difference from a Zeeman laser, with a beat frequency of 1.66 MHz; the second of modulation is validated by periodically varying the polarization states from a polarization generator, with rotation frequencies of 0.5-10 k Hz. In addition, the normalized extinction ratio of our plasmonic structure reaches 100. Such miniaturized beat-frequency and polarization-controlled amplitude modulators open an avenue for the exploration of ultrasensitive nanosensors, nanocircuits, and other integrated nanophotonic devices. PMID:27558516

  5. Miniature Surface Plasmon Polariton Amplitude Modulator by Beat Frequency and Polarization Control

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Cheng-Wei; Lin, Chu-En; Yu, Chih-Jen; Yeh, Ting-Tso; Yen, Ta-Jen

    2016-01-01

    The miniaturization of modulators keeps pace for the compact devices in optical applications. Here, we present a miniature surface plasmon polariton amplitude modulator (SPPAM) by directing and interfering surface plasmon polaritons on a nanofabricated chip. Our results show that this SPPAM enables two kinds of modulations. The first kind of modulation is controlled by encoding angular-frequency difference from a Zeeman laser, with a beat frequency of 1.66 MHz; the second of modulation is validated by periodically varying the polarization states from a polarization generator, with rotation frequencies of 0.5–10 k Hz. In addition, the normalized extinction ratio of our plasmonic structure reaches 100. Such miniaturized beat-frequency and polarization-controlled amplitude modulators open an avenue for the exploration of ultrasensitive nanosensors, nanocircuits, and other integrated nanophotonic devices. PMID:27558516

  6. Frequency-coded quantum key distribution using amplitude-phase modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, Oleg G.; Gabdulkhakov, Il'daris M.; Morozov, Gennady A.; Zagrieva, Aida R.; Sarvarova, Lutsia M.

    2016-03-01

    Design principals of universal microwave photonics system for quantum key distribution with frequency coding are concerned. Its concept is based on the possibility of creating the multi-functional units to implement the most commonly used technologies of frequency coding: amplitude, phase and combined amplitude-phase modulation and re-modulation of optical carrier. The characteristics of advanced systems based on classical approaches and prospects of their development using a combination of amplitude modulation and phase commutation are discussed. These are the valuations how to build advanced systems with frequency coding quantum key distribution, including at their symmetric and asymmetric constructions, using of the mechanisms of the photon polarization states passive detection, based on the filters for wavelength division multiplexing of modulated optical carrier side components.

  7. Dynamics of fermions in an amplitude-modulated lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakoshi, Tomotake; Watanabe, Shinichi; Ohgoda, Shun; Itin, Alexander P.

    2016-06-01

    We study the dynamics of fermions loaded in an optical lattice with a superimposed parabolic trap potential. In the recent Hamburg experiments [J. Heinze et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 085302 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.085302] on quantum simulation of photoconductivity, a modulation pulse on the optical lattice transferred part of the population of the lowest band to an excited band, leaving a hole in the particle distribution of the lowest band. The subsequent intricate dynamics of both excited particles and holes can be explained by a semiclassical approach based on the evolution of the Wigner function. Here we provide a more detailed analysis of the dynamics, taking into account the dimensionality of the system and finite-temperature effects, aiming at reproducing experimental results on longer time scales. A semiclassical wave packet is constructed more accurately than in the previous theory. As a result, semiclassical dynamics indeed reproduces experimental data and full quantum numerical calculations with a much better accuracy. In particular, the fascinating phenomenon of collapse and revival of holes is investigated in more detail. We presume that the experimental setup can be used for deeper exploration of nonlinear waves in fermionic gases.

  8. Beta2-adrenergic activity modulates vascular tone regulation in lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Manzini, S.; Pinna, C.; Busnelli, M.; Cinquanta, P.; Rigamonti, E.; Ganzetti, G.S.; Dellera, F.; Sala, A.; Calabresi, L.; Franceschini, G.; Parolini, C.; Chiesa, G.

    2015-01-01

    Lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) deficiency is associated with hypoalphalipoproteinemia, generally a predisposing factor for premature coronary heart disease. The evidence of accelerated atherosclerosis in LCAT-deficient subjects is however controversial. In this study, the effect of LCAT deficiency on vascular tone and endothelial function was investigated in LCAT knockout mice, which reproduce the human lipoprotein phenotype. Aortas from wild-type (Lcatwt) and LCAT knockout (LcatKO) mice exposed to noradrenaline showed reduced contractility in LcatKO mice (P < 0.005), whereas acetylcholine exposure showed a lower NO-dependent relaxation in LcatKO mice (P < 0.05). Quantitative PCR and Western blotting analyses suggested an adequate eNOS expression in LcatKO mouse aortas. Real-time PCR analysis indicated increased expression of β2-adrenergic receptors vs wild-type mice. Aorta stimulation with noradrenaline in the presence of propranolol, to abolish the β-mediated relaxation, showed the same contractile response in the two mouse lines. Furthermore, propranolol pretreatment of mouse aortas exposed to L-NAME prevented the difference in responses between Lcatwt and LcatKO mice. The results indicate that LCAT deficiency leads to increased β2-adrenergic relaxation and to a consequently decreased NO-mediated vasodilation that can be reversed to guarantee a correct vascular tone. The present study suggests that LCAT deficiency is not associated with an impaired vascular reactivity. PMID:26254103

  9. Beta2-adrenergic activity modulates vascular tone regulation in lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Manzini, S; Pinna, C; Busnelli, M; Cinquanta, P; Rigamonti, E; Ganzetti, G S; Dellera, F; Sala, A; Calabresi, L; Franceschini, G; Parolini, C; Chiesa, G

    2015-11-01

    Lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) deficiency is associated with hypoalphalipoproteinemia, generally a predisposing factor for premature coronary heart disease. The evidence of accelerated atherosclerosis in LCAT-deficient subjects is however controversial. In this study, the effect of LCAT deficiency on vascular tone and endothelial function was investigated in LCAT knockout mice, which reproduce the human lipoprotein phenotype. Aortas from wild-type (Lcat(wt)) and LCAT knockout (Lcat(KO)) mice exposed to noradrenaline showed reduced contractility in Lcat(KO) mice (P<0.005), whereas acetylcholine exposure showed a lower NO-dependent relaxation in Lcat(KO) mice (P<0.05). Quantitative PCR and Western blotting analyses suggested an adequate eNOS expression in Lcat(KO) mouse aortas. Real-time PCR analysis indicated increased expression of β2-adrenergic receptors vs wild-type mice. Aorta stimulation with noradrenaline in the presence of propranolol, to abolish the β-mediated relaxation, showed the same contractile response in the two mouse lines. Furthermore, propranolol pretreatment of mouse aortas exposed to L-NAME prevented the difference in responses between Lcat(wt) and Lcat(KO) mice. The results indicate that LCAT deficiency leads to increased β2-adrenergic relaxation and to a consequently decreased NO-mediated vasodilation that can be reversed to guarantee a correct vascular tone. The present study suggests that LCAT deficiency is not associated with an impaired vascular reactivity. PMID:26254103

  10. Extending single molecule fluorescence observation time by amplitude-modulated excitation

    PubMed Central

    Kisley, Lydia; Chang, Wei-Shun; Cooper, David; Mansur, Andrea P; Landes, Christy F

    2014-01-01

    We present a hardware-based method that can improve single molecule fluorophore observation time by up to 1500% and super-localization by 47% for the experimental conditions used. The excitation was modulated using an acousto-optic modulator (AOM) synchronized to the data acquisition and inherent data conversion time of the detector. The observation time and precision in super-localization of four commonly used fluorophores were compared under modulated and traditional continuous excitation, including direct total internal reflectance excitation of Alexa 555 and Cy3, non-radiative Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) excited Cy5, and direct epi-fluorescence wide field excitation of Rhodamine 6G. The proposed amplitude-modulated excitation does not perturb the chemical makeup of the system or sacrifice signal and is compatible with multiple types of fluorophores. Amplitude-modulated excitation has practical applications for any fluorescent study utilizing an instrumental setup with time-delayed detectors. PMID:24587894

  11. Quantitative measurement of tip-sample interactions in amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hölscher, H.

    2006-09-01

    The author introduces an algorithm for the reconstruction of the tip-sample interactions in amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy ("tapping mode"). The method is based on the recording of amplitude and phase versus distance curves and allows the reconstruction of tip-sample force and energy dissipation as a function of the actual tip-sample distance. The proposed algorithm is verified by a numerical simulation and applied to a silicon sample in ambient conditions.

  12. New asymmetric propagation invariant beams obtained by amplitude and phase modulation in frequency space

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Hernández, J.; Arroyo Carrasco, M.L.; Méndez Otero, M.M.; Chávez-Cerda, S.; Iturbe Castillo, M.D.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate, numerically and experimentally that using the mask-lens setup used by Durnin to generate Bessel beams Durnin [Phys. Rev. Lett. 58, 1499 (1987)], it is possible to generate different kinds of propagation invariant beams. A modification in the amplitude or phase of the field that illuminates the annular slit is proposed that corresponds to modulation in frequency space. In particular, we characterize the new invariant beams that were obtained by modulating the amplitude of the annular mask and when the incident field was modulated with a one-dimensional quadratic or cubic phase. Experimental results using an amplitude mask are shown in order to corroborate the numerical predictions. PMID:25705088

  13. The sympathetic tone mediates leptin's inhibition of insulin secretion by modulating osteocalcin bioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Hinoi, Eiichi; Gao, Nan; Jung, Dae Young; Yadav, Vijay; Yoshizawa, Tatsuya; Myers, Martin G.; Chua, Streamson C.; Kim, Jason K.; Kaestner, Klaus H.; Karsenty, Gerard

    2008-01-01

    The osteoblast-secreted molecule osteocalcin favors insulin secretion, but how this function is regulated in vivo by extracellular signals is for now unknown. In this study, we show that leptin, which instead inhibits insulin secretion, partly uses the sympathetic nervous system to fulfill this function. Remarkably, for our purpose, an osteoblast-specific ablation of sympathetic signaling results in a leptin-dependent hyperinsulinemia. In osteoblasts, sympathetic tone stimulates expression of Esp, a gene inhibiting the activity of osteocalcin, which is an insulin secretagogue. Accordingly, Esp inactivation doubles hyperinsulinemia and delays glucose intolerance in ob/ob mice, whereas Osteocalcin inactivation halves their hyperinsulinemia. By showing that leptin inhibits insulin secretion by decreasing osteocalcin bioactivity, this study illustrates the importance of the relationship existing between fat and skeleton for the regulation of glucose homeostasis. PMID:19103808

  14. Psychometric functions for sentence recognition in sinusoidally amplitude-modulated noises.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yi; Manzano, Nicole K; Richards, Virginia M

    2015-12-01

    Listeners' speech reception is better when speech is masked by a modulated masker compared to an unmodulated masker with the same long-term root-mean-square level. It has been suggested that listeners take advantage of brief periods of quiescence in a modulated masker to extract speech information. Two experiments examined the contribution of such "dip-listening" models. The first experiment estimated psychometric functions for speech intelligibility using sentences masked by sinusoidally modulated and unmodulated speech-shaped noises and the second experiment estimated detection thresholds for a tone pip added at the central dip in the masker. Modulation rates ranging from 1 to 64 Hz were tested. In experiment 1 the slopes of the psychometric functions were shallower for lower modulation rates and the pattern of speech reception thresholds as a function of modulation rate was nonmonotonic with a minimum near 16 Hz. In contrast, the detection thresholds from experiment 2 increased monotonically with modulation rate. The results suggest that the benefits of listening to speech in temporally fluctuating maskers cannot be solely ascribed to the temporal acuity of the auditory system. PMID:26723318

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Kepler δ Sct stars amplitude modulation (Bowman+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, D. M.; Kurtz, D. W.; Breger, M.; Murphy, S. J.; Holdsworth, D. L.

    2016-06-01

    We searched for amplitude modulation of pulsation modes in δ Sct stars observed by the Kepler Space Telescope. The number of pulsation modes out of a maximum of twelve that have constant amplitudes and variable amplitudes are given in the columns NoMod and AMod, respectively, along with stellar parameters from Huber et al. (2014, Cat. J/ApJS/211/2). Table 1 is the full version for all 983 δ Sct stars the abridged version of the paper. (1 data file).

  16. The influence of practice on the detectability of auditory sinusoidal amplitude modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, Matthew B.; Wright, Beverly A.

    2002-05-01

    The capacity to detect fluctuations in sound amplitude influences the perception of many everyday sounds, including speech. Here, the influence of practice on this ability was investigated. Between two testing sessions, one group of nine listeners who were tested on the detection of sinusoidal amplitude modulation (SAM) improved by about 0.7 dB on each of five conditions (300 trials/condition). Nine other listeners participated in these same sessions, but between them, practiced 4320 trials detecting the presence of 80-Hz SAM with a 3- to 4-kHz narrow-band carrier. Only three of these listeners, who had among the highest initial detection thresholds on the trained condition, improved during this training phase. These learners subsequently improved at untrained modulation rates (30 and 150 Hz) with the trained carrier, but not at the trained modulation rate with untrained carriers (0.5-1.5 kHz and 0-5 kHz). These data suggest that (1) at some stage, modulation processing is more linked to the carrier spectrum than to the modulation rate, and (2) while most normal-hearing listeners reach their best modulation-detection performance with minimal experience, listeners with high initial thresholds benefit from extended practice. Thus, training may aid populations that have difficulty detecting amplitude modulation. [Work supported by NIDCD.

  17. Focusing through a turbid medium by amplitude modulation with genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Weijia; Peng, Ligen; Shao, Xiaopeng

    2014-05-01

    Multiple scattering of light in opaque materials such as white paint and human tissue forms a volume speckle field, will greatly reduce the imaging depth and degrade the imaging quality. A novel approach is proposed to focus light through a turbid medium using amplitude modulation with genetic algorithm (GA) from speckle patterns. Compared with phase modulation method, amplitude modulation approach, in which the each element of spatial light modulator (SLM) is either zero or one, is much easier to achieve. Theoretical and experimental results show that, the advantage of GA is more suitable for low the signal to noise ratio (SNR) environments in comparison to the existing amplitude control algorithms such as binary amplitude modulation. The circular Gaussian distribution model and Rayleigh Sommerfeld diffraction theory are employed in our simulations to describe the turbid medium and light propagation between optical devices, respectively. It is demonstrated that the GA technique can achieve a higher overall enhancement, and converge much faster than others, and outperform all algorithms at high noise. Focusing through a turbid medium has potential in the observation of cells and protein molecules in biological tissues and other structures in micro/nano scale.

  18. Micro-antennas for the phase and amplitude modulation of terahertz wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jingwen; Wang, Sen; Zhang, Yan

    2015-11-01

    Based on the localized surface plasmons (LSPs), a series of C-shaped slits antennas are designed to modulate the phase and amplitude of the cross-polarized transmitted wave in THz waveband. By adjusting the structure parameters of the antenna unit, arbitrary phase and amplitude modulation of the cross-polarized THz wave can be obtained. The C-shaped slit antenna units are designed at two operating frequencies f=0.8 THz and f=1.0 THz using a commercial software package (Lumerical Solutions), which is based on the finite-difference time-domain method. According to the simulated results, principles for modulating the phase and amplitude of THz wave are summarized as follows. Firstly, the operating wavelength depends on the effective length of the antenna and the operating wavelength increases as the effective length increases; Secondly, the phase of the cross-polarized wave can be modulated from 0 to 2π by changing the opening angle of the split; Thirdly, the amplitude transmittance of the cross-polarized wave can be changed from the extinction state to the maximum value by rotating the symmetry axis of the C-shaped slit. These principles can be used to direct the design of the field modulator in any other working frequency.

  19. Effect of current focusing on the sensitivity of inferior colliculus neurons to amplitude-modulated stimulation.

    PubMed

    George, Shefin S; Shivdasani, Mohit N; Fallon, James B

    2016-09-01

    In multichannel cochlear implants (CIs), current is delivered to specific electrodes along the cochlea in the form of amplitude-modulated pulse trains, to convey temporal and spectral cues. Our previous studies have shown that focused multipolar (FMP) and tripolar (TP) stimulation produce more restricted neural activation and reduced channel interactions in the inferior colliculus (IC) compared with traditional monopolar (MP) stimulation, suggesting that focusing of stimulation could produce better transmission of spectral information. The present study explored the capability of IC neurons to detect modulated CI stimulation with FMP and TP stimulation compared with MP stimulation. The study examined multiunit responses of IC neurons in acutely deafened guinea pigs by systematically varying the stimulation configuration, modulation depth, and stimulation level. Stimuli were sinusoidal amplitude-modulated pulse trains (carrier rate of 120 pulses/s). Modulation sensitivity was quantified by measuring modulation detection thresholds (MDTs), defined as the lowest modulation depth required to differentiate the response of a modulated stimulus from an unmodulated one. Whereas MP stimulation showed significantly lower MDTs than FMP and TP stimulation (P values <0.05) at stimulation ≤2 dB above threshold, all stimulation configurations were found to have similar modulation sensitivities at 4 dB above threshold. There was no difference found in modulation sensitivity between FMP and TP stimulation. The present study demonstrates that current focusing techniques such as FMP and TP can adequately convey amplitude modulation and are comparable to MP stimulation, especially at higher stimulation levels, although there may be some trade-off between spectral and temporal fidelity with current focusing stimulation. PMID:27306672

  20. Endogenous cholinergic tone modulates spontaneous network level neuronal activity in primary cortical cultures grown on multi-electrode arrays

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cortical cultures grown long-term on multi-electrode arrays (MEAs) are frequently and extensively used as models of cortical networks in studies of neuronal firing activity, neuropharmacology, toxicology and mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity. However, in contrast to the predominantly asynchronous neuronal firing activity exhibited by intact cortex, electrophysiological activity of mature cortical cultures is dominated by spontaneous epileptiform-like global burst events which hinders their effective use in network-level studies, particularly for neurally-controlled animat (‘artificial animal’) applications. Thus, the identification of culture features that can be exploited to produce neuronal activity more representative of that seen in vivo could increase the utility and relevance of studies that employ these preparations. Acetylcholine has a recognised neuromodulatory role affecting excitability, rhythmicity, plasticity and information flow in vivo although its endogenous production by cortical cultures and subsequent functional influence upon neuronal excitability remains unknown. Results Consequently, using MEA electrophysiological recording supported by immunohistochemical and RT-qPCR methods, we demonstrate for the first time, the presence of intrinsic cholinergic neurons and significant, endogenous cholinergic tone in cortical cultures with a characterisation of the muscarinic and nicotinic components that underlie modulation of spontaneous neuronal activity. We found that tonic muscarinic ACh receptor (mAChR) activation affects global excitability and burst event regularity in a culture age-dependent manner whilst, in contrast, tonic nicotinic ACh receptor (nAChR) activation can modulate burst duration and the proportion of spikes occurring within bursts in a spatio-temporal fashion. Conclusions We suggest that the presence of significant endogenous cholinergic tone in cortical cultures and the comparability of its modulatory effects

  1. Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography measurements with different phase modulation amplitude when using continuous polarization modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zenghai; Kasaragod, Deepa K.; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that the phase retardance and relative optic-axis orientation of a sample can be calculated without prior knowledge of the actual value of the phase modulation amplitude when using a polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography system based on continuous polarization modulation (CPM-PS-OCT). We also demonstrate that the sample Jones matrix can be calculated at any values of the phase modulation amplitude in a reasonable range depending on the system effective signal-to-noise ratio. This has fundamental importance for the development of clinical systems by simplifying the polarization modulator drive instrumentation and eliminating its calibration procedure. This was validated on measurements of a three-quarter waveplate and an equine tendon sample by a fiber-based swept-source CPM-PS-OCT system.

  2. Drive-amplitude-modulation atomic force microscopy: From vacuum to liquids

    PubMed Central

    Jaafar, Miriam; Cuenca, Mariano; Melcher, John; Raman, Arvind

    2012-01-01

    Summary We introduce drive-amplitude-modulation atomic force microscopy as a dynamic mode with outstanding performance in all environments from vacuum to liquids. As with frequency modulation, the new mode follows a feedback scheme with two nested loops: The first keeps the cantilever oscillation amplitude constant by regulating the driving force, and the second uses the driving force as the feedback variable for topography. Additionally, a phase-locked loop can be used as a parallel feedback allowing separation of the conservative and nonconservative interactions. We describe the basis of this mode and present some examples of its performance in three different environments. Drive-amplutide modulation is a very stable, intuitive and easy to use mode that is free of the feedback instability associated with the noncontact-to-contact transition that occurs in the frequency-modulation mode. PMID:22563531

  3. Synthesis of electro-optic modulators for amplitude modulation of light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ammann, E. O.; Yarborough, J. M.

    1968-01-01

    Electro-optical modulator realizes voltage transfer function in synthesizing birefringent networks. Choice of the voltage transfer function is important, the most satisfactory optimizes the modulator property.

  4. A high-stability non-contact dilatometer for low-amplitude temperature-modulated measurements.

    PubMed

    Luckabauer, Martin; Sprengel, Wolfgang; Würschum, Roland

    2016-07-01

    Temperature modulated thermophysical measurements can deliver valuable insights into the phase transformation behavior of many different materials. While especially for non-metallic systems at low temperatures numerous powerful methods exist, no high-temperature device suitable for modulated measurements of bulk metallic alloy samples is available for routine use. In this work a dilatometer for temperature modulated isothermal and non-isothermal measurements in the temperature range from room temperature to 1300 K is presented. The length measuring system is based on a two-beam Michelson laser interferometer with an incremental resolution of 20 pm. The non-contact measurement principle allows for resolving sinusoidal length change signals with amplitudes in the sub-500 nm range and physically decouples the length measuring system from the temperature modulation and heating control. To demonstrate the low-amplitude capabilities, results for the thermal expansion of nickel for two different modulation frequencies are presented. These results prove that the novel method can be used to routinely resolve length-change signals of metallic samples with temperature amplitudes well below 1 K. This high resolution in combination with the non-contact measurement principle significantly extends the application range of modulated dilatometry towards high-stability phase transformation measurements on complex alloys. PMID:27475604

  5. Frequency and Amplitude Modulation Have Different Effects on the Percepts Elicited by Retinal Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Fine, Ione; Horsager, Alan; Boynton, Geoffrey M.; Humayun, Mark S.; Greenberg, Robert J.; Weiland, James D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. In an effort to restore functional form vision, epiretinal prostheses that elicit percepts by directly stimulating remaining retinal circuitry were implanted in human subjects with advanced retinitis pigmentosa RP). In this study, manipulating pulse train frequency and amplitude had different effects on the size and brightness of phosphene appearance. Methods. Experiments were performed on a single subject with severe RP (implanted with a 16-channel epiretinal prosthesis in 2004) on nine individual electrodes. Psychophysical techniques were used to measure both the brightness and size of phosphenes when the biphasic pulse train was varied by either modulating the current amplitude (with constant frequency) or the stimulating frequency (with constant current amplitude). Results. Increasing stimulation frequency always increased brightness, while having a smaller effect on the size of elicited phosphenes. In contrast, increasing stimulation amplitude generally increased both the size and brightness of phosphenes. These experimental findings can be explained by using a simple computational model based on previous psychophysical work and the expected spatial spread of current from a disc electrode. Conclusions. Given that amplitude and frequency have separable effects on percept size, these findings suggest that frequency modulation improves the encoding of a wide range of brightness levels without a loss of spatial resolution. Future retinal prosthesis designs could benefit from having the flexibility to manipulate pulse train amplitude and frequency independently (clinicaltrials.gov number, NCT00279500). PMID:22110084

  6. Amplitude modulation of quantum-ion-acoustic wavepackets in electron-positron-ion plasmas: Modulational instability, envelope modes, extreme waves

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, Ata-ur-; Kerr, Michael Mc Kourakis, Ioannis; El-Taibany, Wael F.; Qamar, A.

    2015-02-15

    A semirelativistic fluid model is employed to describe the nonlinear amplitude modulation of low-frequency (ionic scale) electrostatic waves in an unmagnetized electron-positron-ion plasma. Electrons and positrons are assumed to be degenerated and inertialess, whereas ions are warm and classical. A multiscale perturbation method is used to derive a nonlinear Schrödinger equation for the envelope amplitude, based on which the occurrence of modulational instability is investigated in detail. Various types of localized ion acoustic excitations are shown to exist, in the form of either bright type envelope solitons (envelope pulses) or dark-type envelope solitons (voids, holes). The plasma configurational parameters (namely, the relativistic degeneracy parameter, the positron concentration, and the ionic temperature) are shown to affect the conditions for modulational instability significantly, in fact modifying the associated threshold as well as the instability growth rate. In particular, the relativistic degeneracy parameter leads to an enhancement of the modulational instability mechanism. Furthermore, the effect of different relevant plasma parameters on the characteristics (amplitude, width) of these envelope solitary structures is also presented in detail. Finally, the occurrence of extreme amplitude excitation (rogue waves) is also discussed briefly. Our results aim at elucidating the formation and dynamics of nonlinear electrostatic excitations in superdense astrophysical regimes.

  7. A Simple Approximation for the Symbol Error Rate of Triangular Quadrature Amplitude Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duy, Tran Trung; Kong, Hyung Yun

    In this paper, we consider the error performance of the regular triangular quadrature amplitude modulation (TQAM). In particular, using an accurate exponential bound of the complementary error function, we derive a simple approximation for the average symbol error rate (SER) of TQAM over Additive White Gaussian Noise (AWGN) and fading channels. The accuracy of our approach is verified by some simulation results.

  8. Radar transponder operation with compensation for distortion due to amplitude modulation

    DOEpatents

    Ormesher, Richard C.; Tise, Bertice L.; Axline, Jr., Robert M.

    2011-01-04

    In radar transponder operation, a variably delayed gating signal is used to gate a received radar pulse and thereby produce a corresponding gated radar pulse for transmission back to the source of the received radar pulse. This compensates for signal distortion due to amplitude modulation on the retransmitted pulse.

  9. Instrument Reflections and Scene Amplitude Modulation in a Polychromatic Microwave Quadrature Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobson, Chris C.; Jones, Jonathan E.; Chavers, Greg

    2003-01-01

    A polychromatic microwave quadrature interferometer has been characterized using several laboratory plasmas. Reflections between the transmitter and the receiver have been observed, and the effects of including reflection terms in the data reduction equation have been examined. An error analysis which includes the reflections, modulation of the scene beam amplitude by the plasma, and simultaneous measurements at two frequencies has been applied to the empirical database, and the results are summarized. For reflection amplitudes around 1096, the reflection terms were found to reduce the calculated error bars for electron density measurements by about a factor of 2. The impact of amplitude modulation is also quantified. In the complete analysis, the mean error bar for high- density measurements is 7.596, and the mean phase shift error for low-density measurements is 1.2". .

  10. Monocular 3D see-through head-mounted display via complex amplitude modulation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qiankun; Liu, Juan; Han, Jian; Li, Xin

    2016-07-25

    The complex amplitude modulation (CAM) technique is applied to the design of the monocular three-dimensional see-through head-mounted display (3D-STHMD) for the first time. Two amplitude holograms are obtained by analytically dividing the wavefront of the 3D object to the real and the imaginary distributions, and then double amplitude-only spatial light modulators (A-SLMs) are employed to reconstruct the 3D images in real-time. Since the CAM technique can inherently present true 3D images to the human eye, the designed CAM-STHMD system avoids the accommodation-convergence conflict of the conventional stereoscopic see-through displays. The optical experiments further demonstrated that the proposed system has continuous and wide depth cues, which enables the observer free of eye fatigue problem. The dynamic display ability is also tested in the experiments and the results showed the possibility of true 3D interactive display. PMID:27464184

  11. Determination of nanovibration amplitudes using frequency-modulated semiconductor laser autodyne

    SciTech Connect

    Usanov, D A; Skripal, A V; Astakhov, E I

    2014-02-28

    The method for measuring nanovibration amplitudes using the autodyne signal of a semiconductor laser at several laser radiation wavelengths is described. The theoretical description of the frequency-modulated autodyne signal under harmonic vibrations of the reflector is presented and the relations for its spectral components are derived using the expansions into the Fourier and Bessel series. The results of numerical modelling based on the proposed method for measuring the reflector nanovibration amplitudes are presented that make use of the low-frequency spectrum of the autodyne signal from the frequency-modulated laser autodyne and the solution of the appropriate inverse problem. The experimental setup is described; the results of the measurements are presented for the nanovibration amplitudes and the autodyne signal spectra under the reflector nanovibrations. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  12. Novel Interventional Therapies to Modulate the Autonomic Tone in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Neal A; Singh, Jagmeet P

    2015-10-01

    Heart failure (HF) represents a significant and expanding public health burden associated with increasing prevalence and exponential growth in related health care costs. Contemporary advances in both pharmacological and nonpharmacological therapies have often been restricted in application and benefit. Given the critical role of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) in maintaining cardiovascular homeostasis in the failing heart, there has been increasing interest in the role of ANS modulation as a therapeutic modality in HF. In this review, we highlight the anatomy of the ANS and its role in the pathophysiology of HF, as well as metrics of its assessment. Given the limitations associated with pharmacological ANS modulation, including lack of specificity and medication intolerance, we focus in this review on contemporary nonpharmacological ANS modulation therapies. For each therapy-vagal nerve stimulation, carotid baroreceptor stimulation, spinal cord stimulation, and renal denervation-we review the rationale for modulation, pre-clinical and clinical assessments, as well as procedural considerations and limitations. We conclude by commenting on novel technologies and strategies for ANS modulation on the horizon. PMID:26364257

  13. NOTE ON TRAVEL TIME SHIFTS DUE TO AMPLITUDE MODULATION IN TIME-DISTANCE HELIOSEISMOLOGY MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Nigam, R.; Kosovichev, A. G. E-mail: sasha@quake.stanford.ed

    2010-01-10

    Correct interpretation of acoustic travel times measured by time-distance helioseismology is essential to get an accurate understanding of the solar properties that are inferred from them. It has long been observed that sunspots suppress p-mode amplitude, but its implications on travel times have not been fully investigated so far. It has been found in test measurements using a 'masking' procedure, in which the solar Doppler signal in a localized quiet region of the Sun is artificially suppressed by a spatial function, and using numerical simulations that the amplitude modulations in combination with the phase-speed filtering may cause systematic shifts of acoustic travel times. To understand the properties of this procedure, we derive an analytical expression for the cross-covariance of a signal that has been modulated locally by a spatial function that has azimuthal symmetry and then filtered by a phase-speed filter typically used in time-distance helioseismology. Comparing this expression to the Gabor wavelet fitting formula without this effect, we find that there is a shift in the travel times that is introduced by the amplitude modulation. The analytical model presented in this paper can be useful also for interpretation of travel time measurements for the non-uniform distribution of oscillation amplitude due to observational effects.

  14. Numerical generation of a polarization singularity array with modulated amplitude and phase.

    PubMed

    Ye, Dong; Peng, Xinyu; Zhao, Qi; Chen, Yanru

    2016-09-01

    A point having no defined polarized ellipse azimuthal angle (circularly polarized) in a space-variant vector field is called a polarization singularity, and it has three types: Lemon, Monstar, and Star. Recently, the connection of polarization singularities has been performed. Inspired by this, we conduct a numerical generation of a polarization singularity array. Our method is based on two orthogonal linearly polarized light beams with modulated amplitude and phase. With appropriate distribution functions of amplitudes and phases we can control the polarized states of polarization singularities, which offer a possibility to simulate a polarization singularity array. PMID:27607491

  15. Dynamic enhancement of autofocusing property for symmetric Airy beam with exponential amplitude modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weiwei; Lu, Yao; Gong, Lei; Chu, Xiuxiang; Xue, Guosheng; Ren, Yuxuan; Zhong, Mincheng; Wang, Ziqiang; Zhou, Jinhua; Li, Yinmei

    2016-07-01

    A symmetric Airy beam (SAB) autofocuses during free space propagation. Such autofocusing SAB is useful in optical manipulation and biomedical imaging. However, its inherently limited autofocusing property may degrade the performance of the SAB in those applications. To enhance the autofocus, a symmetric apodization mask was proposed to regulate the SAB. In combination with the even cubic phase that shapes the SAB, this even exponential function mask with an adjustable parameter regulates the contribution of different frequency spectral components to the SAB. The propagation properties of this new amplitude modulated SAB (AMSAB) were investigated both theoretically and experimentally. Simulation shows that the energy distribution and autofocusing property of an AMSAB can be adjusted by the exponential amplitude modulation. Especially, the beam energy will be more concentrated in the central lobe once the even cubic phase is modulated by the mask with a higher proportion of high-frequency spectral components. Consequently, the autofocusing property and axial gradient force of AMSABs are efficiently enhanced. The experimental generation and characterization for AMSABs were implemented by modulating the collimated beam with a phase-only spatial light modulator. The experimental results well supported the theoretical predictions. With the ability to enhance the autofocus, the proposed exponential apodization modulation will make SAB more powerful in various applications, including optical trapping, fluorescence imaging and particle acceleration.

  16. Modulation of Muscle Tone and Sympathovagal Balance in Cervical Dystonia Using Percutaneous Stimulation of the Auricular Vagus Nerve.

    PubMed

    Kampusch, Stefan; Kaniusas, Eugenijus; Széles, Jozsef C

    2015-10-01

    Primary cervical dystonia is characterized by abnormal, involuntary, and sustained contractions of cervical muscles. Current ways of treatment focus on alleviating symptomatic muscle activity. Besides pharmacological treatment, in severe cases patients may receive neuromodulative intervention such as deep brain stimulation. However, these (highly invasive) methods have some major drawbacks. For the first time, percutaneous auricular vagus nerve stimulation (pVNS) was applied in a single case of primary cervical dystonia. Auricular vagus nerve stimulation was already shown to modulate the (autonomous) sympathovagal balance of the body and proved to be an effective treatment in acute and chronic pain, epilepsy, as well as major depression. pVNS effects on cervical dystonia may be hypothesized to rely upon: (i) the alteration of sensory input to the brain, which affects structures involved in the genesis of motoric and nonmotoric dystonic symptoms; and (ii) the alteration of the sympathovagal balance with a sustained impact on involuntary movement control, pain, quality of sleep, and general well-being. The presented data provide experimental evidence that pVNS may be a new alternative and minimally invasive treatment in primary cervical dystonia. One female patient (age 50 years) suffering from therapy refractory cervical dystonia was treated with pVNS over 20 months. Significant improvement in muscle pain, dystonic symptoms, and autonomic regulation as well as a subjective improvement in motility, sleep, and mood were achieved. A subjective improvement in pain recorded by visual analog scale ratings (0-10) was observed from 5.42 to 3.92 (medians). Muscle tone of the mainly affected left and right trapezius muscle in supine position was favorably reduced by about 96%. Significant reduction of muscle tone was also achieved in sitting and standing positions of the patient. Habituation to stimulation leading to reduced stimulation efficiency was observed and

  17. Automatic IQ Imbalance Compensation Technique for Quadrature Modulator by Single-Tone Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minseok; Konishi, Yohei; Takada, Jun-Ichi; Gao, Boxin

    This letter proposes an automatic IQ imbalance compensation technique for quadrature modulators by means of spectrum measurement of RF signal using a spectrum analyzer. The analyzer feeds back only magnitude information of the frequency spectrum of the signal. To realize IQ imbalance compensation, the conventional method of steepest descent is modified; the descent direction is empirically determined and a variable step-size is introduced for accelerating convergence. The experimental results for a four-channel transmitter operating at 11GHz are presented for verification.

  18. On the modulational instability of large amplitude waves in supersonic boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Philip; Papageorgiou, Demetrios T.

    1995-01-01

    The evolution of large amplitude Tollmien-Schlichting waves in a supersonic boundary layer is investigated. Disturbances which have their wavenumber and frequency slowly varying in time and space are described using a phase equation type of approach. Unlike the incompressible case we find that the initial bifurcation to a finite amplitude Tollmien-Schlichting wave is subcritical for most Mach numbers. In fact the bifurcation is only supercritical for a small range of Mach numbers and even then for only a finite range of wave propagation angles. The modulational instability of large amplitude wavetrains is considered and is shown to be governed by an equation similar to Burgers equation but with the viscous term replaced by a fractional derivative. A numerical investigation of the solution of this equation is described. It is shown that uniform wavetrains are unstable.

  19. Arbitrary manipulation of spatial amplitude and phase using phase-only spatial light modulators

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Long; Wang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Spatial structure of a light beam is an important degree of freedom to be extensively explored. By designing simple configurations with phase-only spatial light modulators (SLMs), we show the ability to arbitrarily manipulate the spatial full field information (i.e. amplitude and phase) of a light beam. Using this approach to facilitating arbitrary and independent control of spatial amplitude and phase, one can flexibly generate different special kinds of light beams for different specific applications. Multiple collinear orbital angular momentum (OAM) beams, Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beams, and Bessel beams, having both spatial amplitude and phase distributions, are successfully generated in the experiments. Some arbitrary beams with odd-shaped intensity are also generated in the experiments. PMID:25501584

  20. Rhythmic arm cycling differentially modulates stretch and H-reflex amplitudes in soleus muscle.

    PubMed

    Palomino, Andres F; Hundza, Sandra R; Zehr, E Paul

    2011-10-01

    During rhythmic arm cycling, soleus H-reflex amplitudes are reduced by modulation of group Ia presynaptic inhibition. This suppression of reflex amplitude is graded to the frequency of arm cycling with a threshold of 0.8 Hz. Despite the data on modulation of the soleus H-reflex amplitude induced by rhythmic arm cycling, comparatively little is known about the modulation of stretch reflexes due to remote limb movement. Therefore, the present study was intended to explore the effect of arm cycling on stretch and H-reflex amplitudes in the soleus muscle. In so doing, additional information on the mechanism of action during rhythmic arm cycling would be revealed. Although both reflexes share the same afferent pathway, we hypothesized that stretch reflex amplitudes would be less suppressed by arm cycling because they are less inhibited by presynaptic inhibition. Failure to reject this hypothesis would add additional strength to the argument that Ia presynaptic inhibition is the mechanism modulating soleus H-reflex amplitude during rhythmic arm cycling. Participants were seated in a customized chair with feet strapped to footplates. Three motor tasks were performed: static control trials and arm cycling at 1 and 2 Hz. Soleus H-reflexes were evoked using single 1 ms pulses of electrical stimulation delivered to the tibial nerve at the popliteal fossa. A constant M-wave and ~6% MVC activation of soleus were maintained across conditions. Stretch reflexes were evoked using a single sinusoidal pulse at 100 Hz given by a vibratory shaker placed over the triceps surae tendon and controlled by a custom-written LabView program. Results demonstrated that rhythmic arm cycling that was effective for conditioning soleus H-reflexes did not show a suppressive effect on the amplitude of the soleus stretch reflex. We suggest this indicates that stretch reflexes are less sensitive to conditioning by rhythmic arm movement, as compared to H-reflexes, due to the relative insensitivity to

  1. Quantitative security evaluation of optical encryption using hybrid phase- and amplitude-modulated keys.

    PubMed

    Sarkadi, Tamás; Koppa, Pál

    2012-02-20

    In the increasing number of system approaches published in the field of optical encryption, the security level of the system is evaluated by qualitative and empirical methods. To quantify the security of the optical system, we propose to use the equivalent of the key length routinely used in algorithmic encryption. We provide a calculation method of the number of independent keys and deduce the binary key length for optical data encryption. We then investigate and optimize the key length of the combined phase- and amplitude-modulated key encryption in the holographic storage environment, which is one of the promising solutions for the security enhancement of single- and double-random phase-encoding encryption and storage systems. We show that a substantial growth of the key length can be achieved by optimized phase and amplitude modulation compared to phase-only encryption. We also provide experimental confirmation of the model results. PMID:22358164

  2. Velocity-Field Measurements of an Axisymmetric Separated Flow Subjected to Amplitude-Modulated Excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trosin, Barry James

    2007-01-01

    Active flow control was applied at the point of separation of an axisymmetric, backward-facing-step flow. The control was implemented by employing a Helmholtz resonator that was externally driven by an amplitude-modulated, acoustic disturbance from a speaker located upstream of the wind tunnel. The velocity field of the separating/reattaching flow region downstream of the step was characterized using hotwire velocity measurements with and without flow control. Conventional statistics of the data reveal that the separating/reattaching flow is affected by the imposed forcing. Triple decomposition along with conditional averaging was used to distinguish periodic disturbances from random turbulence in the fluctuating velocity component. A significant outcome of the present study is that it demonstrates that amplitude-modulated forcing of the separated flow alters the flow in the same manner as the more conventional method of periodic excitation.

  3. Cross correlation analysis of plasma perturbation in amplitude modulated reactive dusty plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Teppei; Soejima, Masahiro; Yamashita, Daisuke; Seo, Hyunwoong; Itagaki, Naho; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Inagaki, Shigeru

    2015-09-01

    Interactions between plasmas and nano-interface are one of the most important issues in plasma processing. We have studied effects of plasma perturbation on growth of nanoparticles in amplitude modulated reactive dusty plasmas and have clarified that amplitude modulation (AM) leads to suppression of growth of nanoparticles [1]. Here we report results of cross correlation analysis of time evolution of laser light scattering intensity from nanoparticles in reactive plasmas. Experiments were carried out using a capacitively-coupled rf discharge reactor with a two-dimensional laser light scattering (LLS) system. We employed Ar +DM-DMOS discharge plasmas to generate nanoparticles. The peaks at higher harmonics and subharmonics in spectra of laser light scattering intensity were detected, suggesting nonlinear coupling between plasma and nanoparticle amount. We found high cross correlation t between waves at AM frequency and its higher harmonics. Namely, perturbation at fAM closely correlates with those at higher harmonics.

  4. Amplitude modulation following response in children as a clinical audiometric tool.

    PubMed

    Mauer, G; Döring, W H; Hamacher, V; Bell, C

    1997-11-01

    The current study was designed to investigate the clinical application of amplitude modulation following response (AMFR) in cochlear implant candidates. A new digital signal processor (DSP)-assisted PC-based hardware and software was developed to perform both simultaneous generation of amplitude-modulated stimuli and the recording, and synchronized signal processing of the electrode signals. Our first results show that AMFR can be recorded in adults as well as in children without any contamination by response-like stimulus artifacts. Very high sound pressure levels can be applied, allowing frequency-specific assessment of residual hearing. Response threshold detection, using spectral analysis, proved to be superior compared to visual evaluation of average time waveforms. PMID:9391622

  5. Identification-Based Closed-Loop NMES Limb Tracking With Amplitude-Modulated Control Input.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Teng-Hu; Wang, Qiang; Kamalapurkar, Rushikesh; Dinh, Huyen T; Bellman, Matthew; Dixon, Warren E

    2016-07-01

    An upper motor neuron lesion (UMNL) can be caused by various neurological disorders or trauma and leads to disabilities. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) is a technique that is widely used for rehabilitation and restoration of motor function for people suffering from UMNL. Typically, stability analysis for closed-loop NMES ignores the modulated implementation of NMES. However, electrical stimulation must be applied to muscle as a modulated series of pulses. In this paper, a muscle activation model with an amplitude modulated control input is developed to capture the discontinuous nature of muscle activation, and an identification-based closed-loop NMES controller is designed and analyzed for the uncertain amplitude modulated muscle activation model. Semi-global uniformly ultimately bounded tracking is guaranteed. The stability of the closed-loop system is analyzed with Lyapunov-based methods, and a pulse frequency related gain condition is obtained. Experiments are performed with five able-bodied subjects to demonstrate the interplay between the control gains and the pulse frequency, and results are provided which indicate that control gains should be increased to maintain stability if the stimulation pulse frequency is decreased to mitigate muscle fatigue. For the first time, this paper brings together an analysis of the controller and modulation scheme. PMID:26241989

  6. Exposure to extinction-associated contextual tone during slow-wave sleep and wakefulness differentially modulates fear expression.

    PubMed

    Ai, Si-Zhi; Chen, Jie; Liu, Jian-Feng; He, Jia; Xue, Yan-Xue; Bao, Yan-Ping; Han, Fang; Tang, Xiang-Dong; Lu, Lin; Shi, Jie

    2015-09-01

    Recent research has used context cues (odor or auditory cues) to target memories during sleep and has demonstrated that they can enhance declarative and procedural memories. However, the effects of external cues re-presented during sleep on emotional memory are still not fully understood. In the present study, we conducted a Pavlovian fear conditioning/extinction paradigm and examined the effects of re-exposure to extinction memory associated contextual tones during slow-wave sleep (SWS) and wakefulness on fear expression. The participants underwent fear conditioning on the first day, during which colored squares served as the conditioned stimulus (CS) and a mild shock served as the unconditioned stimulus (US). The next day, they underwent extinction, during which the CSs were presented without the US but accompanied by a contextual tone (pink noise). Immediately after extinction, the participants were required to take a nap or remain awake and randomly assigned to six groups. Four of the groups were separately exposed to the associated tone (i.e. SWS-Tone group and Wake-Tone group) or an irrelevant tone (control tone, CtrT) (i.e. SWS-CtrT group and Wake-CtrT group), while the other two groups were not (i.e. SWS-No Tone group and Wake-No Tone group). Subsequently, the conditioned responses to the CSs were tested to evaluate the fear expression. All of the participants included in the final analysis showed successful levels of fear conditioning and extinction. During the recall test, the fear responses were significantly higher in the SWS-Tone group than that in the SWS-No Tone group or the SWS-CtrT group, while the Wake-Tone group exhibited more attenuated fear responses than either the Wake-No Tone group or Wake-CtrT group. Otherwise, re-exposure to auditory tones during SWS did not affect sleep profiles. These results suggest that distinct conditions during which re-exposure to an extinction memory associated contextual cue contributes to differential effects on

  7. The imaging spectrometer based on dual photoelastic modulator of unequal retardation amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Wang, Zhi-bin; Wen, Ting-dun; Wang, Yao-li; Li, Ke-wu

    2015-10-01

    As the existing photoelastic modulator (PEM) resonant frequency is high (tens to hundreds of kHz), the interference signal frequency is up to hundreds of MHz, even to several GHz. Signal frequency is so high that they can not effectively be detected by charge coupled device (CCD). This paper reports a method for measuring spectroscopy using two PEMs at different frequencies. The difference frequency of dual-PEM system is 2~3 orders of magnitude lower than any one modulation frequency of the two PEMs. Operating the PEMs at slightly different resonant frequencies f1 and f2 respectively, the dual-PEM system generates a difference frequency modulation signal. Therefore, interference signal contains low frequency modulation components which carry the information of the incident light. And low frequency modulation component consists of a series of frequency-multiplier signals whose fundamental frequency is equal to (f1-f2)/2. The low frequency modulation components can be detected by ordinary CCD. Through Fourier transform, modulation signal of CCD is to get a series of frequency-multiplier signals amplitude. Then the incident light spectra can be obtained by the corresponding matrix operations. Furthermore, this method is to realize object imaging spectral measurement by the way of combining with CCD. The peak retardation amplitude of two PEMs does not require being complete equal, and modulation frequencies f1 and f2 do not also require equality. So this can reduce the difficulty of the PEM processing. What's more, the method makes the traditional PEM have both imaging and spectroscopy measurement functions. The basic principle is introduced, the basic equations is derived, and the feasibility is verified through the corresponding numerical simulation and experiment.

  8. Modulation of amplitude and latency of motor evoked potential by direction of transcranial magnetic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Aya; Torii, Tetsuya; Iwahashi, Masakuni; Itoh, Yuji; Iramina, Keiji

    2014-05-01

    The present study analyzed the effects of monophasic magnetic stimulation to the motor cortex. The effects of magnetic stimulation were evaluated by analyzing the motor evoked potentials (MEPs). The amplitude and latency of MEPs on the abductor pollicis brevis muscle were used to evaluate the effects of repetitive magnetic stimulation. A figure eight-shaped flat coil was used to stimulate the region over the primary motor cortex. The intensity of magnetic stimulation was 120% of the resting motor threshold, and the frequency of magnetic stimulation was 0.1 Hz. In addition, the direction of the current in the brain was posterior-anterior (PA) or anterior-posterior (AP). The latency of MEP was compared with PA and AP on initial magnetic stimulation. The results demonstrated that a stimulus in the AP direction increased the latency of the MEP by approximately 2.5 ms. MEP amplitude was also compared with PA and AP during 60 magnetic stimulations. The results showed that a stimulus in the PA direction gradually increased the amplitude of the MEP. However, a stimulus in the AP direction did not modulate the MEP amplitude. The average MEP amplitude induced from every 10 magnetic pulses was normalized by the average amplitude of the first 10 stimuli. These results demonstrated that the normalized MEP amplitude increased up to approximately 150%. In terms of pyramidal neuron indirect waves (I waves), magnetic stimulation inducing current flowing backward to the anterior preferentially elicited an I1 wave, and current flowing forward to the posterior elicited an I3 wave. It has been reported that the latency of the I3 wave is approximately 2.5 ms longer than the I1 wave elicitation, so the resulting difference in latency may be caused by this phenomenon. It has also been reported that there is no alteration of MEP amplitude at a frequency of 0.1 Hz. However, this study suggested that the modulation of MEP amplitude depends on stimulation strength and stimulation direction.

  9. Hydrostatic Vibratory Drive of the Test Stand for Excitation of the Amplitude-Modulated Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizhegorodov, A. I.; Gavrilin, A. N.; Moyzes, B. B.

    2016-01-01

    The article reviews the problems arising during the development of the test stand hydrostatic vibratory drive, which synthesize controlled amplitude-modulated vibrations required testing of vibration strength and vibrostability of technological devices. The newly developed modification can adequately simulate the transport vibration and vibration of the operating power-supply units of technological machinery vibration by means of implementing of a continuous frequency spectrum of the vibration exposure in the desired frequency range.

  10. Amplitude modulation of streamwise velocity fluctuations in the roughness sublayer: evidence from large-eddy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awasthi, Ankit; Anderson, William

    2015-11-01

    Large-scale motions in the logarithmic region of turbulent boundary layers amplitude modulate the viscous sublayer (Marusic et al., 2010: Science; Mathis et al., 2009: J. Fluid Mech.). This finding has promising implications for large-eddy simulation of wall-bounded turbulence at high Reynolds number (wherein the turbulence integral length exhibits linear proportionality with wall-normal elevation). Existing amplitude modulation studies have addressed smooth wall flows, though high Reynolds number rough wall flows are ubiquitous. Under such conditions, roughness-scale vortices ablate the viscous sublayer and result in the roughness sublayer. The roughness sublayer depth scales with aggregate element height, k, and is typically 2k ~ 3k. Above this, Townsend's Hypothesis dictates that the logarithmic layer is unaffected by the roughness sublayer. Here, we present large-eddy simulation results of turbulent channel flow over rough walls. We follow the decoupling procedure of Mathis et al., 2009: J. Fluid Mech., and present evidence that outer-layer dynamics amplitude modulate the roughness sublayer. Below the roughness element height, we report enormous sensitivity to element proximity. Above the elements, but within the roughness sublayer, topography dependence rapidly declines. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Turbulence and Transition Program (PM: Dr. R. Ponnoppan) under Grant # FA9550-14-1-0101. Computational resources were provided by the Texas Adv. Comp. Center at the Univ. of Texas.

  11. Systematic and quantitative analysis of residual amplitude modulation in Pound-Drever-Hall frequency stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Hui; Li, Liufeng; Bi, Jin; Wang, Jia; Chen, Lisheng

    2015-12-01

    We theoretically analyze the effects of two primary mechanisms of residual amplitude modulation, estimate the resulting frequency instabilities, and discuss relevant experimental countermeasures, providing useful information that are beneficial for the development of ultrastable optical oscillators as well as many precision experiments relying on stable lasers. A Pound-Drever-Hall signal comprising contributions from the birefringence of the electro-optic crystal is derived and used to examine the birefringence-related amplitude modulation and the resultant frequency offset in terms of various experimental parameters. The combined effect of the crystal birefringence and pararsitic étalons is further investigated by dividing the étalons into three representative categories according to their locations in the optical path. The analysis shows that introducing a resonant optical cavity only scales the birefringence-generated amplitude modulation by a constant, thereby lending strong support to the active control scheme using a separate detection path. When a parasitic étalon is added, the active control scheme can still suppress the resultant instability except for the parasitic étalon that is located closely in front of the optical cavity. In this case the étalon produces rather large frequency instability and therefore should be avoided. In addition, numerical calculations are performed to assess the impact of a special situation where the front and end surfaces of an ultrastable optical cavity are potential sources of the parasitic étalon that can strongly couple with the cavity.

  12. Amplitude and phase modulation of radiation in a travelling-wave amplifier based on a laser diode

    SciTech Connect

    Bogatov, A P; D'yachkov, N V; Drakin, A E; Gushchik, T I

    2013-08-31

    An analytical solution (in quadratures) to the problem of propagation of quasi-monochromatic optical signal in a semiconductor amplifier under harmonic modulation of its pump current is obtained for the first time. It is shown that the modulation of the output radiation has amplitude and phase features. The relation is found between the coefficients of the amplitude and phase modulation with the effect of gain saturation taken into account. Adequacy of the results obtained is confirmed experimentally. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  13. Fuzzy control with amplitude/pulse-width modulation of nerve electrical stimulation for muscle force control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C.-C. K.; Liu, W.-C.; Chan, C.-C.; Ju, M.-S.

    2012-04-01

    The main goal of this study was to study the performance of fuzzy logic controllers combined with simplified hybrid amplitude/pulse-width (AM/PW) modulation to regulate muscle force via nerve electrical stimulation. The recruitment curves with AM/PW and AM modulations were constructed for the calf muscles of rabbits. Integrated with the modulation methods, a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) and three fuzzy logic controllers were designed and applied for the electrical stimulation of tibial nerves to control the ankle torque under isometric conditions. The performance of the two modulation methods combined with the four controllers was compared when the ankle was fixed at three positions for both in vivo experiments and model simulations using a nonlinear muscle model. For the animal experiments, AM/PW modulation performed better than AM modulation alone. The fuzzy PI controller performed marginally better and was resistant to external noises, though it tended to have a larger overshoot. The performance of the controllers had a similar trend in the three different joint positions, and the simulation results with the nonlinear model matched the experimental results well. In conclusion, AM/PW modulation improved controller performance, while the contribution of fuzzy logic was only marginal.

  14. Extracting binaural information from simultaneous targets and distractors: Effects of amplitude modulation and asynchronous envelopes

    PubMed Central

    Stellmack, Mark A.; Byrne, Andrew J.; Viemeister, Neal F.

    2010-01-01

    When different components of a stimulus carry different binaural information, processing of binaural information in a target component is often affected. The present experiments examine whether such interference is affected by amplitude modulation and the relative phase of modulation of the target and distractors. In all experiments, listeners attempted to discriminate interaural time differences of a target stimulus in the presence of distractor stimuli with ITD=0. In Experiment 1, modulation of the distractors but not the target reduced interference between components. In Experiment 2, synthesized musical notes exhibited little binaural interference when there were slight asynchronies between different streams of notes (31 or 62 ms). The remaining experiments suggested that the reduction in binaural interference in the previous experiments was due neither to the complex spectra of the synthesized notes nor to greater detectability of the target in the presence of modulated distractors. These data suggest that this interference is reduced when components are modulated in ways that result in the target appearing briefly in isolation, not because of segregation cues. These data also suggest that modulation and asynchronies between modulators that might be encountered in real-world listening situations are adequate to reduce binaural interference to inconsequential levels. PMID:20815459

  15. Fast terahertz optoelectronic amplitude modulator based on plasmonic metamaterial antenna arrays and graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jessop, David S.; Sol, Christian W. O.; Xiao, Long; Kindness, Stephen J.; Braeuninger-Weimer, Philipp; Lin, Hungyen; Griffiths, Jonathan P.; Ren, Yuan; Kamboj, Varun S.; Hofmann, Stephan; Zeitler, J. Axel; Beere, Harvey E.; Ritchie, David A.; Degl'Innocenti, Riccardo

    2016-02-01

    The growing interest in terahertz (THz) technologies in recent years has seen a wide range of demonstrated applications, spanning from security screening, non-destructive testing, gas sensing, to biomedical imaging and communication. Communication with THz radiation offers the advantage of much higher bandwidths than currently available, in an unallocated spectrum. For this to be realized, optoelectronic components capable of manipulating THz radiation at high speeds and high signal-to-noise ratios must be developed. In this work we demonstrate a room temperature frequency dependent optoelectronic amplitude modulator working at around 2 THz, which incorporates graphene as the tuning medium. The architecture of the modulator is an array of plasmonic dipole antennas surrounded by graphene. By electrostatically doping the graphene via a back gate electrode, the reflection characteristics of the modulator are modified. The modulator is electrically characterized to determine the graphene conductivity and optically characterization, by THz time-domain spectroscopy and a single-mode 2 THz quantum cascade laser, to determine the optical modulation depth and cut-off frequency. A maximum optical modulation depth of ~ 30% is estimated and is found to be most (least) sensitive when the electrical modulation is centered at the point of maximum (minimum) differential resistivity of the graphene. A 3 dB cut-off frequency > 5 MHz, limited only by the area of graphene on the device, is reported. The results agree well with theoretical calculations and numerical simulations, and demonstrate the first steps towards ultra-fast, graphene based THz optoelectronic devices.

  16. Fuzzy control with amplitude/pulse-width modulation of nerve electrical stimulation for muscle force control.

    PubMed

    Lin, C-C K; Liu, W-C; Chan, C-C; Ju, M-S

    2012-04-01

    The main goal of this study was to study the performance of fuzzy logic controllers combined with simplified hybrid amplitude/pulse-width (AM/PW) modulation to regulate muscle force via nerve electrical stimulation. The recruitment curves with AM/PW and AM modulations were constructed for the calf muscles of rabbits. Integrated with the modulation methods, a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) and three fuzzy logic controllers were designed and applied for the electrical stimulation of tibial nerves to control the ankle torque under isometric conditions. The performance of the two modulation methods combined with the four controllers was compared when the ankle was fixed at three positions for both in vivo experiments and model simulations using a nonlinear muscle model. For the animal experiments, AM/PW modulation performed better than AM modulation alone. The fuzzy PI controller performed marginally better and was resistant to external noises, though it tended to have a larger overshoot. The performance of the controllers had a similar trend in the three different joint positions, and the simulation results with the nonlinear model matched the experimental results well. In conclusion, AM/PW modulation improved controller performance, while the contribution of fuzzy logic was only marginal. PMID:22422279

  17. Diacylglycerol-containing docosahexaenoic acid in acyl chain modulates airway smooth muscle tone.

    PubMed

    Hichami, Aziz; Morin, Caroline; Rousseau, Eric; Khan, Naim A

    2005-10-01

    We synthesized and assessed the role of a diacylglycerol (DAG)-containing docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), that is, 1-stearoyl-2-docosahexaenoyl-sn-glycerol (SDHG), in the contraction of guinea pig airway smooth muscle (ASM). We compared its action with 1-stearoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycerol (SAG) and 1,2-dioctanoyl-sn-glycerol (1,2-DiC8), a stable DAG analog. The three DAGs (SAG, SDHG, and 1,2-DiC8) induced reversible concentration-dependent contraction of ASM. SDHG induced higher guinea pig ASM contraction than did SAG and 1,2-DiC8. The effects of SDHG were blocked, to different extents, by nifedipine (L-type Ca2+ channel blocker). By employing GF-109203X (protein kinase C [PKC] inhibitor) and lanthanum (La3+), a nonselective cation channel blocker, we observed that SDHG evoked ASM contractile response via PKC-dependent and PKC-independent (but Ca2+-dependent) pathways. Interestingly, SAG exerted its action only by increasing [Ca2+]i and did not require PKC activation. To probe the implication of calcium mobilization, we employed thapsigargin (TG), which also induced ASM contraction in a calcium-dependent manner. SDHG and 1,2-DiC8, in a PKC-dependent manner, induced the phosphorylation of CPI-17 (myosin light chain phosphatase inhibitor of 17 kD). Furthermore, SAG and TG failed to phosphorylate CPI-17 in ASM cells. Our results suggest that different DAG species, produced during a dietary supplementation with fatty acids, could modulate the reactivity of airway smooth muscles in a PKC-dependent and -independent manner, and hence, may play a critical role in health and disease. PMID:15961724

  18. Somatosensory spatial attention modulates amplitudes, latencies, and latency jitter of laser-evoked brain potentials

    PubMed Central

    Franz, Marcel; Nickel, Moritz M.; Ritter, Alexander; Miltner, Wolfgang H. R.

    2015-01-01

    Several studies provided evidence that the amplitudes of laser-evoked potentials (LEPs) are modulated by attention. However, previous reports were based on across-trial averaging of LEP responses at the expense of losing information about intertrial variability related to attentional modulation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of somatosensory spatial attention on single-trial parameters (i.e., amplitudes, latencies, and latency jitter) of LEP components (N2 and P2). Twelve subjects participated in a sustained spatial attention paradigm while noxious laser stimuli (left hand) and noxious electrical stimuli (right hand) were sequentially delivered to the dorsum of the respective hand with nonnoxious air puffs randomly interspersed within the sequence of noxious stimuli. Participants were instructed to mentally count all stimuli (i.e., noxious and nonnoxious) applied to the attended location. Laser stimuli, presented to the attended hand (ALS), elicited larger single-trial amplitudes of the N2 component compared with unattended laser stimuli (ULS). In contrast, single-trial amplitudes of the P2 component were not significantly affected by spatial attention. Single-trial latencies of the N2 and P2 were significantly smaller for ALS vs. ULS. Additionally, the across-trial latency jitter of the N2 component was reduced for ALS. Conversely, the latency jitter of the P2 component was smaller for ULS compared with ALS. With the use of single-trial analysis, the study provided new insights into brain dynamics of LEPs related to spatial attention. Our results indicate that single-trial parameters of LEP components are differentially modulated by spatial attention. PMID:25673731

  19. Collinear laser spectroscopy of francium using online rubidium vapor neutralization and amplitude modulated lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Sell, J. F.; Gulyuz, K.; Sprouse, G. D.

    2009-12-15

    Performing collinear laser spectroscopy on low intensity radioactive beams requires sensitive detection techniques. We explain our apparatus to detect atomic resonances in neutralized {sup 208-210}Fr ion beams at beam energies of 5 keV and intensities of 10{sup 5} s{sup -1}. Efficient neutralization ({>=}80%) is accomplished by passing the beam through a dense Rb vapor. Increased detection efficiency is achieved by amplitude modulating the exciting laser to decrease the scattered light background, allowing fluorescence detection only when the laser is near its minimum in the modulation cycle. Using this technique in a collinear geometry we achieve a background reduction by a factor of 180 and a signal-to-noise increase of 2.2, with the lifetime of the atomic state playing a role in the efficiency of this process. Such laser modulation will also produce sidebands on the atomic spectra which we illustrate.

  20. Collinear laser spectroscopy of francium using online rubidium vapor neutralization and amplitude modulated lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sell, J. F.; Gulyuz, K.; Sprouse, G. D.

    2009-12-01

    Performing collinear laser spectroscopy on low intensity radioactive beams requires sensitive detection techniques. We explain our apparatus to detect atomic resonances in neutralized F208-210r ion beams at beam energies of 5 keV and intensities of 105 s-1. Efficient neutralization (≥80%) is accomplished by passing the beam through a dense Rb vapor. Increased detection efficiency is achieved by amplitude modulating the exciting laser to decrease the scattered light background, allowing fluorescence detection only when the laser is near its minimum in the modulation cycle. Using this technique in a collinear geometry we achieve a background reduction by a factor of 180 and a signal-to-noise increase of 2.2, with the lifetime of the atomic state playing a role in the efficiency of this process. Such laser modulation will also produce sidebands on the atomic spectra which we illustrate.

  1. Collinear laser spectroscopy of francium using online rubidium vapor neutralization and amplitude modulated lasers.

    PubMed

    Sell, J F; Gulyuz, K; Sprouse, G D

    2009-12-01

    Performing collinear laser spectroscopy on low intensity radioactive beams requires sensitive detection techniques. We explain our apparatus to detect atomic resonances in neutralized (208-210)Fr ion beams at beam energies of 5 keV and intensities of 10(5) s(-1). Efficient neutralization (> or = 80%) is accomplished by passing the beam through a dense Rb vapor. Increased detection efficiency is achieved by amplitude modulating the exciting laser to decrease the scattered light background, allowing fluorescence detection only when the laser is near its minimum in the modulation cycle. Using this technique in a collinear geometry we achieve a background reduction by a factor of 180 and a signal-to-noise increase of 2.2, with the lifetime of the atomic state playing a role in the efficiency of this process. Such laser modulation will also produce sidebands on the atomic spectra which we illustrate. PMID:20059132

  2. Amplitude modulation of hydromagnetic waves and associated rogue waves in magnetoplasmas.

    PubMed

    Sabry, R; Moslem, W M; Shukla, P K

    2012-09-01

    It is shown that the dynamics of amplitude-modulated compressional dispersive Alfvénic (CDA) waves in a collisional megnetoplasma is governed by a complex Ginzburg-Landau (CGL) equation. The nonlinear dispersion relation for the modulational instability of the CDA waves is derived and investigated numerically. It is found that the growth rate of the modulational instability decreases (increases) with the increase of the normalized electron-ion collision frequency α (the plasma β). The modulational instability criterion for the CGL equation is defined precisely and investigated numerically. The region of the modulational instability becomes narrower with the increase of α and β, indicating that the system dissipates the wave energy by collisions, and a stable CDA wave envelope packet in the form of a hole will be a dominant localized pulse. For a collisionless plasma, i.e., α=0, the CGL equation reduces to the standard nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation. The latter is used to investigate the modulational (in)stability region for the CDA waves in a collisionless magnetoplasma. It is shown that, within unstable regions, a random set of nonlinearly interacting CDA perturbations leads to the formation of CDA rogue waves. In order to demonstrate that the characteristics of the CDA rogue waves are influenced by the plasma β, the relevant numerical analysis of the appropriate nonlinear solution of the NLS equation is presented. The application of our investigation to space and laboratory magnetoplasmas is discussed. PMID:23031035

  3. Tip radius preservation for high resolution imaging in amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos, Jorge R.

    2014-07-28

    The acquisition of high resolution images in atomic force microscopy (AFM) is correlated to the cantilever's tip shape, size, and imaging conditions. In this work, relative tip wear is quantified based on the evolution of a direct experimental observable in amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy, i.e., the critical amplitude. We further show that the scanning parameters required to guarantee a maximum compressive stress that is lower than the yield/fracture stress of the tip can be estimated via experimental observables. In both counts, the optimized parameters to acquire AFM images while preserving the tip are discussed. The results are validated experimentally by employing IgG antibodies as a model system.

  4. An integrated Mach-Zehnder modulator bias controller based on eye-amplitude monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Min-Hyeong; Jung, Hyun-Yong; Zimmermann, Lars; Choi, Woo-Young

    2016-03-01

    A novel integrated Mach-Zehnder modulator (MZM) bias controller based on eye-amplitude monitoring is demonstrated in IHP's 0.25-μm BiCMOS technology. The bias controller monitors the MZM output light, automatically moves the MZM bias voltage to the optimal value that produces the largest eye amplitude, and maintains it there even if the MZM transfer characteristics change due to thermal drift. The controller is based on the feedback loop consisting of Si photodetector, trans-impedance amplifier, rectifier, square amplifier, track-and-hold circuit, comparator, polarity changer, and charge-pump, all of which are monolithically integrated. The area of the controller is 0.083-mm2 and it consumes 92.5-mW. Our bias controller shows successful operation for a commercially-available 850-nm LiNbO3 MZM modulated with 3-Gbps PRBS data by maintaining a very clean eye for at least 30 minutes. Without the controller, the eye for the same MZM modulation becomes completely closed due to thermal drift. The data rate is limited by the Si PD integrated in the controller not by the controller architecture. Since our controller is based on the Si BiCMOS technology which can also provide integrated Si photonics devices on the same Si, it has a great potential for realizing a Si MZM with an integrated bias controller, which should fully demonstrate the advantage of electronic-photonic integrated circuit technology.

  5. Simulation of amplitude-modulated circularly polarized Alfven waves for beta less than one

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Machida, S.; Spangler, S. R.; Goertz, C. K.

    1987-01-01

    The nonlinear properties of the amplitude-modulated circularly polarized Alfven wave are studied for beta less than one. The temporal behavior of the wave packet of the electromagnetic hybrid simulation is compared with a numerical solution of the derivative nonlinear Schroedinger (DNLS) equation. It is shown that the left-hand-polarized mode evolves into a shocklike structure due to the modulational instability. However, both cyclotron damping and a snowplow effect near the steepened wave packet suppress its further steepening, contrary to the predictions of the DNLS equation. For the right-hand mode, formation of the shock does not take place, and the initial time development is well described by the DNLS equation. The daughter Alfven wave and ion acoustic waves are excited due to the decay instability at a later time. Heating or acceleration of the particles takes place for both left- and right-hand waves. Energy transfer from the wave to the particles occurs effectively when substantial modulation in the wave amplitude is present.

  6. Interactive coding of visual spatial frequency and auditory amplitude-modulation rate.

    PubMed

    Guzman-Martinez, Emmanuel; Ortega, Laura; Grabowecky, Marcia; Mossbridge, Julia; Suzuki, Satoru

    2012-03-01

    Spatial frequency is a fundamental visual feature coded in primary visual cortex, relevant for perceiving textures, objects, hierarchical structures, and scenes, as well as for directing attention and eye movements. Temporal amplitude-modulation (AM) rate is a fundamental auditory feature coded in primary auditory cortex, relevant for perceiving auditory objects, scenes, and speech. Spatial frequency and temporal AM rate are thus fundamental building blocks of visual and auditory perception. Recent results suggest that crossmodal interactions are commonplace across the primary sensory cortices and that some of the underlying neural associations develop through consistent multisensory experience such as audio-visually perceiving speech, gender, and objects. We demonstrate that people consistently and absolutely (rather than relatively) match specific auditory AM rates to specific visual spatial frequencies. We further demonstrate that this crossmodal mapping allows amplitude-modulated sounds to guide attention to and modulate awareness of specific visual spatial frequencies. Additional results show that the crossmodal association is approximately linear, based on physical spatial frequency, and generalizes to tactile pulses, suggesting that the association develops through multisensory experience during manual exploration of surfaces. PMID:22326023

  7. Separable developmental trajectories for the abilities to detect auditory amplitude and frequency modulation.

    PubMed

    Banai, Karen; Sabin, Andrew T; Wright, Beverly A

    2011-10-01

    Amplitude modulation (AM) and frequency modulation (FM) are inherent components of most natural sounds. The ability to detect these modulations, considered critical for normal auditory and speech perception, improves over the course of development. However, the extent to which the development of AM and FM detection skills follow different trajectories, and therefore can be attributed to the maturation of separate processes, remains unclear. Here we explored the relationship between the developmental trajectories for the detection of sinusoidal AM and FM in a cross-sectional design employing children aged 8-10 and 11-12 years and adults. For FM of tonal carriers, both average performance (mean) and performance consistency (within-listener standard deviation) were adult-like in the 8-10 y/o. In contrast, in the same listeners, average performance for AM of wideband noise carriers was still not adult-like in the 11-12 y/o, though performance consistency was already mature in the 8-10 y/o. Among the children there were no significant correlations for either measure between the degrees of maturity for AM and FM detection. These differences in developmental trajectory between the two modulation cues and between average detection thresholds and performance consistency suggest that at least partially distinct processes may underlie the development of AM and FM detection as well as the abilities to detect modulation and to do so consistently. PMID:21664958

  8. Independent modulations of the transmission amplitudes and phases by using Huygens metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Xiang; Jia, Sheng Li; Cui, Tie Jun; Zhao, Yong Jiu

    2016-05-01

    We propose ultrathin Huygens metasurfaces to control transmission amplitudes and phases of electromagnetic waves independently, in which each unit cell is comprised of an electric dipole and a magnetic dipole. By altering the electric and magnetic responses of unit cells, arbitrary complex transmission coefficients with modulus values smaller than 0.85 are obtained. Two Huygens metasurfaces capable of controlling the diffraction orders are designed and fabricated by modulating the distributions of the complex transmission coefficients. More complicated functions such as holographic imaging can also be accomplished by using the proposed Huygens metasurfaces.

  9. Independent modulations of the transmission amplitudes and phases by using Huygens metasurfaces

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Xiang; Jia, Sheng Li; Cui, Tie Jun; Zhao, Yong Jiu

    2016-01-01

    We propose ultrathin Huygens metasurfaces to control transmission amplitudes and phases of electromagnetic waves independently, in which each unit cell is comprised of an electric dipole and a magnetic dipole. By altering the electric and magnetic responses of unit cells, arbitrary complex transmission coefficients with modulus values smaller than 0.85 are obtained. Two Huygens metasurfaces capable of controlling the diffraction orders are designed and fabricated by modulating the distributions of the complex transmission coefficients. More complicated functions such as holographic imaging can also be accomplished by using the proposed Huygens metasurfaces. PMID:27197759

  10. Independent modulations of the transmission amplitudes and phases by using Huygens metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiang; Jia, Sheng Li; Cui, Tie Jun; Zhao, Yong Jiu

    2016-01-01

    We propose ultrathin Huygens metasurfaces to control transmission amplitudes and phases of electromagnetic waves independently, in which each unit cell is comprised of an electric dipole and a magnetic dipole. By altering the electric and magnetic responses of unit cells, arbitrary complex transmission coefficients with modulus values smaller than 0.85 are obtained. Two Huygens metasurfaces capable of controlling the diffraction orders are designed and fabricated by modulating the distributions of the complex transmission coefficients. More complicated functions such as holographic imaging can also be accomplished by using the proposed Huygens metasurfaces. PMID:27197759

  11. Measurement of the orbit fluctuation caused by an insertion device with the amplitude modulation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatani, T.; Agui, A.; Yoshigoe, A.; Matsushita, T.; Takao, M.; Aoyagi, H.; Takeuchi, M.; Tanaka, H.

    2004-05-01

    We have developed a new method to extract only the orbit fluctuation caused by changing magnetic field error of an insertion device (ID). This method consists of two main parts. (i) The orbit fluctuation is measured with modulating the error field of the ID by using the real-time beam position measuring system. (ii) The orbit fluctuation depending on the variation of the error field of the ID is extracted by the filter applying the Wavelet Transform. We call this approach the amplitude modulation method. This analysis technique was applied to measure the orbit fluctuation caused by the error field of APPLE-2 type undulator (ID23) installed in the SPring-8 storage ring. We quantitatively measured two kinds of the orbit fluctuation which are the static term caused by the magnetic field error and the dynamic term caused by the eddy current on the ID23 chamber.

  12. Sensitive detection of vortex-core resonance using amplitude-modulated magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xiaomin; Hu, Shaojie; Hidegara, Makoto; Yakata, Satoshi; Kimura, Takashi

    2015-12-01

    Understanding and manipulating the dynamic properties of the magnetic vortices stabilized in patterned ferromagnetic structures are of great interest owing to the superior resonant features with the high thermal stability and their flexible tunability. So far, numerous methods for investigating the dynamic properties of the magnetic vortex have been proposed and demonstrated. However, those techniques have some regulations such as spatial resolution, experimental facility and sensitivity. Here, we develop a simple and sensitive method for investigating the vortex-core dynamics by using the electrically separated excitation and detection circuits. We demonstrate that the resonant oscillation of the magnetic vortex induced by the amplitude- modulated alternating-sign magnetic field is efficiently picked up by the lock-in detection with the modulated frequency. By extending this method, we also investigate the size dependence and the influence of the magneto-static interaction in the resonant property of the magnetic vortex.

  13. Reflection-type spatial amplitude modulation of visible light based on a sub-wavelength plasmonic absorber.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Chi-Young; Yi, Yoonsik; Choi, Choon-Gi

    2016-03-01

    We present a method for reflection-type spatial amplitude modulation using a sub-wavelength plasmonic absorber structure that can operate in the visible region. We utilize a pixelated array of absorbing elements based on a two-dimensional sub-wavelength metal grating, and the reflectance of each pixel is controlled by simple structural modification. For the purpose of validation, numerical simulations were performed on an amplitude modulation hologram fabricated using our method. PMID:26974098

  14. Improvement of the Spatial Amplitude Isotropy of a ^4He Magnetometer Using a Modulated Pumping Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chéron, B.; Gilles, H.; Hamel, J.; Moreau, O.; Noël, E.

    1997-08-01

    Optically pumped magnetometers are scalar magnetometers. Contrary to vectoriel magnetometers, they measure the total magnetic field whatever the direction of the sensor. However, for some orientations of the magnetometer with respect to the magnetic field direction, the resonant signal vanishes and the measurement is impossible. In this paper we present a simple solution to reduce the amplitude spatial anisotropy and apply it to a ^4He magnetometer developed in our Laboratory. Les magnétomètres à pompage optique sont des magnétomètres scalaires. Contrairement aux magnétomètres vectoriels, ils mesurent le module du champ magnétique quelle que soit l'orientation du capteur dans l'espace. Cependant, pour certaines orientations du magnétomètre par rapport à la direction du champ à mesurer, l'amplitude du signal de résonance s'annule et la mesure devient impossible. Dans cet article, nous présentons une solution simple pour réduire l'anisotropie spatiale d'amplitude et nous l'appliquons à un magnétomètre à hélium-4 développé dans notre Laboratoire.

  15. Amplitude-sensitive modulation thermography to measure moisture in building materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Walter; Buescher, Konstantin A.; Wiggenhauser, Herbert

    1998-03-01

    There have been reports about moisture detection in building walls by reflective IR-thermography. Typically, only limited results could be obtained because of the emission coefficient variations, leaking radiation or inhomogeneous illumination of the object. In addition, the quantitative relation between remission spectra and the moisture has often been unclear. Reflectometry uses constant excitation illumination which is recorded by the IR camera. With the use of the 'lock-in-technology' a low frequency modulated signal of an IR radiation source is coupled with the thermo camera and a frequency and phase sensitive signal from the thermal images can be derived. The advantage is, that emission coefficient dependencies are eliminated and that leaking radiation does not have any influence on the measured signal. The selective water measurement is possible, because there is an interference filter mounted in front of the radiator which has its transmission maximum at the wavelength of an absorption band of water. The area investigated is therefore illuminated under well defined circumstances and quantitative moisture measurement on the surface of building materials becomes a possibility. The illumination modulation is done with a sine wave to facilitate the calculation of the temporal intensity behavior of the amplitude signal. Subsequently, the amplitude image is used to determine the distribution and the level of moisture quantitatively. Point measurements in the laboratory were carried out on several building materials with changing moisture levels. It could be shown that this method successfully eliminates disturbing contributions to the measured signal like surface effects or leaking radiation.

  16. Comparison of saltation, amplitude modulation, and a hybrid method of vibrotactile stimulation.

    PubMed

    Raisamo, Jukka; Raisamo, Roope; Surakka, Veikko

    2013-01-01

    Illusory vibrotactile movement can be used to provide directional tactile information on the skin. Our research question was how the presentation method affects the perception of vibrotactile movement. Illusion of vibrotactile mediolateral movement was elicited to a left dorsal forearm to investigate cognitive and emotional experiences to vibrotactile stimulation. Eighteen participants were presented with stimuli delivered to a linearly aligned row of three vibrotactile actuators. Three presentation methods were used--saltation, amplitude modulation, and a hybrid method--to form 12 distinct patterns of movement. First, the stimuli were compared pairwise using a two-alternative forced-choice procedure (same-different judgments). Second, the stimuli were rated using three nine-point bipolar scales measuring the continuity, pleasantness, and arousal of each stimulus. The stimuli presented with the amplitude modulation method were rated significantly more continuous and pleasant, and less arousing. Strong correlations between the cognition-related scale of continuity and the emotion-related scales of pleasantness and arousal were found: More continuous stimuli were rated more pleasant and less arousing. PMID:24808403

  17. Amplitude modulated heterodyne reflectometer for density profile and density fluctuation profile measurements at W7-AS

    SciTech Connect

    Hirsch, M.; Hartfuss, H.; Geist, T.; de la Luna, E.

    1996-05-01

    A broadband heterodyne reflectometer operating in the frequency range 75{endash}110 GHz in extraordinary mode polarization is used at the W7-AS stellarator for both fast density profile determination and density fluctuation studies. The probing signal is amplitude modulated at a frequency 133 MHz using the envelope phase for profile evaluation and the carrier phase to determine the fluctuation information simultaneously. Separate Gaussian beam optics for final signal launch and detection permits a beam waist of about 2 cm at the reflecting layer in the plasma. Amplitude modulated detection is accomplished in the intermediate frequency part by synchronous detection after recovery of the carrier by narrow-band filtering. Voltage controlled solid state oscillators followed by active frequency multiplication allow to scan the full frequency band within less than 1 ms. For typical W7-AS operation the accessible density range is 1{times}10{sup 19} to 6{times}10{sup 19} m{sup {minus}3} for on axis magnetic field of 2.5 T and 4.5{times}10{sup 19} to 10{times}10{sup 19} m{sup {minus}3} for 1.25 T, respectively. The probed radial positions range between 0.2{lt}{ital r}/{ital a}{lt}1.1 depending on plasma conditions ({ital a}{approx_equal}17 cm). {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Acoustic change responses to amplitude modulation: a method to quantify cortical temporal processing and hemispheric asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ji Hye; Dimitrijevic, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Sound modulation is a critical temporal cue for the perception of speech and environmental sounds. To examine auditory cortical responses to sound modulation, we developed an acoustic change stimulus involving amplitude modulation (AM) of ongoing noise. The AM transitions in this stimulus evoked an acoustic change complex (ACC) that was examined parametrically in terms of rate and depth of modulation and hemispheric symmetry. Methods: Auditory cortical potentials were recorded from 64 scalp electrodes during passive listening in two conditions: (1) ACC from white noise to 4, 40, 300 Hz AM, with varying AM depths of 100, 50, 25% lasting 1 s and (2) 1 s AM noise bursts at the same modulation rate. Behavioral measures included AM detection from an attend ACC condition and AM depth thresholds (i.e., a temporal modulation transfer function, TMTF). Results: The N1 response of the ACC was large to 4 and 40 Hz and small to the 300 Hz AM. In contrast, the opposite pattern was observed with bursts of AM showing larger responses with increases in AM rate. Brain source modeling showed significant hemispheric asymmetry such that 4 and 40 Hz ACC responses were dominated by right and left hemispheres respectively. Conclusion: N1 responses to the ACC resembled a low pass filter shape similar to a behavioral TMTF. In the ACC paradigm, the only stimulus parameter that changes is AM and therefore the N1 response provides an index for this AM change. In contrast, an AM burst stimulus contains both AM and level changes and is likely dominated by the rise time of the stimulus. The hemispheric differences are consistent with the asymmetric sampling in time hypothesis suggesting that the different hemispheres preferentially sample acoustic time across different time windows. Significance: The ACC provides a novel approach to studying temporal processing at the level of cortex and provides further evidence of hemispheric specialization for fast and slow stimuli. PMID:25717291

  19. Hierarchical effects of task engagement on amplitude modulation encoding in auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Mamiko; O'Connor, Kevin N; Engall, Elizabeth; Johnson, Jeffrey S; Sutter, M L

    2015-01-01

    We recorded from middle lateral belt (ML) and primary (A1) auditory cortical neurons while animals discriminated amplitude-modulated (AM) sounds and also while they sat passively. Engagement in AM discrimination improved ML and A1 neurons' ability to discriminate AM with both firing rate and phase-locking; however, task engagement affected neural AM discrimination differently in the two fields. The results suggest that these two areas utilize different AM coding schemes: a "single mode" in A1 that relies on increased activity for AM relative to unmodulated sounds and a "dual-polar mode" in ML that uses both increases and decreases in neural activity to encode modulation. In the dual-polar ML code, nonsynchronized responses might play a special role. The results are consistent with findings in the primary and secondary somatosensory cortices during discrimination of vibrotactile modulation frequency, implicating a common scheme in the hierarchical processing of temporal information among different modalities. The time course of activity differences between behaving and passive conditions was also distinct in A1 and ML and may have implications for auditory attention. At modulation depths ≥ 16% (approximately behavioral threshold), A1 neurons' improvement in distinguishing AM from unmodulated noise is relatively constant or improves slightly with increasing modulation depth. In ML, improvement during engagement is most pronounced near threshold and disappears at highly suprathreshold depths. This ML effect is evident later in the stimulus, and mainly in nonsynchronized responses. This suggests that attention-related increases in activity are stronger or longer-lasting for more difficult stimuli in ML. PMID:25298387

  20. Hierarchical effects of task engagement on amplitude modulation encoding in auditory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Niwa, Mamiko; O'Connor, Kevin N.; Engall, Elizabeth; Johnson, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    We recorded from middle lateral belt (ML) and primary (A1) auditory cortical neurons while animals discriminated amplitude-modulated (AM) sounds and also while they sat passively. Engagement in AM discrimination improved ML and A1 neurons' ability to discriminate AM with both firing rate and phase-locking; however, task engagement affected neural AM discrimination differently in the two fields. The results suggest that these two areas utilize different AM coding schemes: a “single mode” in A1 that relies on increased activity for AM relative to unmodulated sounds and a “dual-polar mode” in ML that uses both increases and decreases in neural activity to encode modulation. In the dual-polar ML code, nonsynchronized responses might play a special role. The results are consistent with findings in the primary and secondary somatosensory cortices during discrimination of vibrotactile modulation frequency, implicating a common scheme in the hierarchical processing of temporal information among different modalities. The time course of activity differences between behaving and passive conditions was also distinct in A1 and ML and may have implications for auditory attention. At modulation depths ≥ 16% (approximately behavioral threshold), A1 neurons' improvement in distinguishing AM from unmodulated noise is relatively constant or improves slightly with increasing modulation depth. In ML, improvement during engagement is most pronounced near threshold and disappears at highly suprathreshold depths. This ML effect is evident later in the stimulus, and mainly in nonsynchronized responses. This suggests that attention-related increases in activity are stronger or longer-lasting for more difficult stimuli in ML. PMID:25298387

  1. Targeted treatment of cancer with radiofrequency electromagnetic fields amplitude-modulated at tumor-specific frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Jacquelyn W.; Jimenez, Hugo; Pennison, Michael J.; Brezovich, Ivan; Morgan, Desiree; Mudry, Albert; Costa, Frederico P.; Barbault, Alexandre; Pasche, Boris

    2013-01-01

    In the past century, there have been many attempts to treat cancer with low levels of electric and magnetic fields. We have developed noninvasive biofeedback examination devices and techniques and discovered that patients with the same tumor type exhibit biofeedback responses to the same, precise frequencies. Intrabuccal administration of 27.12 MHz radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (EMF), which are amplitude-modulated at tumor-specific frequencies, results in long-term objective responses in patients with cancer and is not associated with any significant adverse effects. Intrabuccal administration allows for therapeutic delivery of very low and safe levels of EMF throughout the body as exemplified by responses observed in the femur, liver, adrenal glands, and lungs. In vitro studies have demonstrated that tumor-specific frequencies identified in patients with various forms of cancer are capable of blocking the growth of tumor cells in a tissue- and tumor-specific fashion. Current experimental evidence suggests that tumor-specific modulation frequencies regulate the expression of genes involved in migration and invasion and disrupt the mitotic spindle. This novel targeted treatment approach is emerging as an appealing therapeutic option for patients with advanced cancer given its excellent tolerability. Dissection of the molecular mechanisms accounting for the anti-cancer effects of tumor-specific modulation frequencies is likely to lead to the discovery of novel pathways in cancer. PMID:24206915

  2. Photon-counting chirped amplitude modulation lidar using a smart premixing method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zijing; Zhang, Jianlong; Wu, Long; Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Yuan; Su, Jianzhong

    2013-11-01

    We proposed a new premixing method for photon-counting chirped amplitude modulation lidar (PCCAML). Earlier studies used the counting results of the returned signal detected by a Geiger mode avalanche photodiode detector (Gm-APD) to mix with the reference signal, called the postmixing method. We use an alternative method known as the premixing method, in which the reference signal is used to directly modulate the sampling gate width of the Gm-APD, and the mixing of the returned signal and the reference signal is completed before the Gm-APD. This premixing method is more flexible and may perform better than the postmixing method in terms of signal-to-noise ratio by cutting down a separated mixer commonly used in the postmixing lidar system. Furthermore, this premixing method lowers the demand for the sampling frequency of the Gm-APD. It allows the use of a much wider modulation bandwidth to improve the range accuracy and resolution. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to use the premixing method in the PCCAML system, which will benefit future lidar applications. PMID:24177101

  3. Amplitude modulation detection by human listeners in reverberant sound fields: Effects of prior listening exposure

    PubMed Central

    Zahorik, Pavel; Anderson, Paul W.

    2013-01-01

    Previous work [Zahorik et al., POMA, 15, 050002 (2012)] has reported that for both broadband and narrowband noise carrier signals in a simulated reverberant sound field, human sensitivity to amplitude modulation (AM) is higher than would be predicted based on the acoustical modulation transfer function (MTF) of the listening environment. These results may be suggestive of mechanisms that functionally enhance modulation in reverberant listening, although many details of this enhancement effect are unknown. Given recent findings that demonstrate improvements in speech understanding with prior exposure to reverberant listening environments, it is of interest to determine whether listening exposure to a reverberant room might also influence AM detection in the room, and perhaps contribute to the AM enhancement effect. Here, AM detection thresholds were estimated (using an adaptive 2-alternative forced-choice procedure) in each of two listening conditions: one in which consistent listening exposure to a particular room was provided, and a second that intentionally disrupted listening exposure by varying the room from trial-to-trial. Results suggest that consistent prior listening exposure contributes to enhanced AM sensitivity in rooms. [Work supported by the NIH/NIDCD.] PMID:24163718

  4. Acousto-optic tomography using amplitude-modulated focused ultrasound and a near-IR laser

    SciTech Connect

    Yao Yong; Xing Da; He Yonghong; Ueda, Ken-ichi

    2001-11-30

    A novel tomographic method that can be applied in strongly scattering optical media is proposed. 1-MHz focused ultrasound is used to tag the scattering photons in the biological tissue; it carries a 10-KHz sinusoidal wave to act as a detection wave through amplitude-modulation (AM). The scattering photons that come from the focused zone carry the modulated information. Their optoelectronic signal is demodulated by real-time FFT. By detecting and discriminating ultrasound-modulated information carried by scattered photons, the optical tomographic images of the media simulating biological tissue and of a buried object are reconstructed by the AM spectral intensity. This ultrasound-tagged optical tomography can be applied to tissue structures with different optical parameters. For the first time, by using this method, we obtained the tomographic image of a 5 mm-wide soft rubber cube buried in a biological tissue-simulating media with a detecting depth of 30 mm. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  5. Performance of a Coded Non-Square Quadrature Amplitude Modulation Scheme over Fading Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Divsalar, D.; Dolinar, S.

    2004-02-01

    It is shown that a non-square (NS) 2^(2n+1)-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) can be decomposed into a single-parity-check (SPC) block encoder and a memoryless modulator with independent in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) symbol mapping. When NS-2^(2n+1)-QAM is concatenated with a forward-error-correcting (FEC) code, iterative demodulation and decoding of the FEC code and the inherent SPC code of NS-2^(2n+1)-QAM exploits the modulation's inherent memory and its independent I- and Q-channel mapping and demapping. The capacity and the bit-/symbol-error-rate (BER/SER) performance of coded and uncoded NS-2^(2n+1)-QAM systems are given for both additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) channels and Rayleigh fading channels and are compared to those of other conventional 2^(2n+1)-ary systems. Simulation results show that, with iterative demodulation and decoding, coded NS-8QAM outperforms three conventional 8-ary systems by at least 0.65 dB on AWGN channels and by at least 0.57 dB on Rayleigh fading channels at BER = 10^(-5), when the FEC code is a concatenation of (15,11) Hamming codes with rate-1 accumulator codes, while coded NS-32QAM outperforms standard 32QAM by about 0.45 dB on AWGN channels and by about 0.27 dB on Rayleigh fading channels.

  6. Minimising the effect of nanoparticle deformation in intermittent contact amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babic, Bakir; Lawn, Malcolm A.; Coleman, Victoria A.; Jämting, Åsa K.; Herrmann, Jan

    2016-06-01

    The results of systematic height measurements of polystyrene (PS) nanoparticles using intermittent contact amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy (IC-AM-AFM) are presented. The experimental findings demonstrate that PS nanoparticles deform during AFM imaging, as indicated by a reduction in the measured particle height. This deformation depends on the IC-AM-AFM imaging parameters, material composition, and dimensional properties of the nanoparticles. A model for nanoparticle deformation occurring during IC-AM-AFM imaging is developed as a function of the peak force which can be calculated for a particular set of experimental conditions. The undeformed nanoparticle height can be estimated from the model by extrapolation to zero peak force. A procedure is proposed to quantify and minimise nanoparticle deformation during IC-AM-AFM imaging, based on appropriate adjustments of the experimental control parameters.

  7. Modulation of spin transfer torque amplitude in double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Clément, P.-Y.; Baraduc, C. Chshiev, M.; Diény, B.; Ducruet, C.; Vila, L.

    2015-09-07

    Magnetization switching induced by spin transfer torque is used to write magnetic memories (Magnetic Random Access Memory, MRAM) but can be detrimental to the reading process. It would be quite convenient therefore to modulate the efficiency of spin transfer torque. A solution is adding an extra degree of freedom by using double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions with two spin-polarizers, with controllable relative magnetic alignment. We demonstrate, for these structures, that the amplitude of in-plane spin transfer torque on the middle free layer can be efficiently tuned via the magnetic configuration of the electrodes. Using the proposed design could thus pave the way towards more reliable read/write schemes for MRAM. Moreover, our results suggest an intriguing effect associated with the out-of-plane (field-like) spin transfer torque, which has to be further investigated.

  8. Improvement in underwater phase measurement of an amplitude-modulated laser beam by polarimetric techniques.

    PubMed

    Bartolini, L; De Dominicis, L; Fornetti, G; Francucci, M; Guarneri, M; Poggi, C; Ricci, R

    2007-06-01

    The phase of the amplitude-modulated radiation reflected by a Lambertian target immersed in water was measured by using a linearly and circularly polarized sounding laser beam. Different values of the water extinction coefficient in the range of 0.06 - 2 m(-1) were realized by adding skim milk as a scattering element. It is shown that very efficient rejection of optical noise, resulting in reliable phase measurements, is accomplished with a cross-polarized and copolarized detection scheme for linear and circular polarization, respectively. The experiment demonstrates that phase measurements are very sensitive to optical noise suppression and that, as far as single scattering is the main involved mechanism, significant improvements can be achieved by adopting a polarization control on both the transmitter and the receiver stages of the apparatus. PMID:17546135

  9. Generation of nondiffracting quasi-circular polarization beams using an amplitude modulated phase hologram.

    PubMed

    Yuan, G H; Wei, S B; Yuan, X-C

    2011-08-01

    We propose an approach to the generation of nondiffracting quasi-circularly polarized beams by a highly focusing azimuthally polarized beam using an amplitude modulated spiral phase hologram. Numerical verifications are implemented in the calculation of the electromagnetic fields and Poynting vector field near the focus based on the vector diffraction theory, and the polarization of the wavefront near the focal plane is analyzed in detail by calculating the Stokes polarization parameters. It is found that the electric field, magnetic field, and Poynting vector field can simultaneously be uniform and nondiverging over a relatively long axial range of ~7.23λ. In the transverse plane, the ellipticity and azimuthal angle of the local polarization ellipse varies from point to point. No polarization singularity and phase singularity are found at the beam center, which makes the bright spot possible. PMID:21811334

  10. Response of a coupled two-spin system to on-resonance amplitude modulated RF pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jinyuan; Ye, Chaohui; Sanctuary, B. C.

    A weakly scalar-coupled two-spin system subjected to two amplitude modulated RF pulses on exact resonance is treated by means of the rotation operator approach. The theory presented here enables coherence evolution to be evaluated by the routine procedure and to be expressed in analytical form. The evolution behaviour from the equilibrium state is discussed in some detail. It is shown that the application of rotation matrix and quaternion elements clarifies evolution expressions. The numerical calculation is performed by way of quaternions. Examples of BURP (band-selective, uniform response, purephase) and sinc-shaped RF pulses are given and the case of time-symmetrical RF pulses is analysed further.

  11. Piezo-drive circuits for amplitude-modulated locomoton for miniature wireless robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, Sylvain M.; Hunter, Ian W.

    2001-10-01

    Piezo-actuators due to their relatively high resonant frequencies and small deflections are ideally suited as accurate displacement transducers. As such, they have been used to implement the legs of the miniature wireless NanoWalker robot where step sizes in the order of a few tenths of nanometers are required for final positioning within the range of an embedded instrument designed to operate at the atomic scale. The relatively high capacitance combined with the high-drive voltage requirement of the actuators, impose constraints on the miniaturization of the electronics. The amplitude modulation scheme requires one amplifier per quadrant electrode on the piezo-legs. Although power amplifiers are suited to drive large capacitive loads with large signal amplitudes without stability problems, the quiescent current of the amplifiers requires several DC/DC converters of significant size. During locomotion, the sudden current increase occurring when high slew rate signals are used during the charging/discharging cycle of the capacitive loads at each walking step, causes the power rail voltage to drop, yielding a reduction in the amplitude of the deflections of the piezo-legs. To minimize the number of DC/DC converters, the slew rate requirement of the drive signal is reduced by an increase of the angular acceleration of the leg created by an initial static friction force with the walking surface. It is then suggested that further miniaturization of the embedded electronics can be achieved by adjusting the kinematic behavior of the piezo-legs with an appropriate mechanical design and the right friction coefficient through careful materials selection.

  12. Mechanics of interaction and atomic-scale wear of amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy probes.

    PubMed

    Vahdat, Vahid; Grierson, David S; Turner, Kevin T; Carpick, Robert W

    2013-04-23

    Wear is one of the main factors that hinders the performance of probes for atomic force microscopy (AFM), including for the widely used amplitude modulation (AM-AFM) mode. Unfortunately, a comprehensive scientific understanding of nanoscale wear is lacking. We have developed a protocol for conducting consistent and quantitative AM-AFM wear experiments. The protocol involves controlling the tip-sample interaction regime during AM-AFM scanning, determining the tip-sample contact geometry, calculating the peak repulsive force and normal stress over the course of the wear test, and quantifying the wear volume using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging. The peak repulsive tip-sample interaction force is estimated from a closed-form equation accompanied by an effective tip radius measurement procedure, which combines transmission electron microscopy and blind tip reconstruction. The contact stress is estimated by applying Derjaguin-Müller-Toporov contact mechanics model and also numerically solving a general contact mechanics model recently developed for the adhesive contact of arbitrary axisymmetric punch shapes. We discuss the important role that the assumed tip shape geometry plays in calculating both the interaction forces and the contact stresses. Contact stresses are significantly affected by the tip geometry while the peak repulsive force is mainly determined by experimentally controlled parameters, specifically, the free oscillation amplitude and amplitude ratio. The applicability of this protocol is demonstrated experimentally by assessing the performance of diamond-like carbon-coated and silicon-nitride-coated silicon probes scanned over ultrananocrystalline diamond substrates in repulsive mode AM-AFM. There is no sign of fracture or plastic deformation in the case of diamond-like carbon; wear could be characterized as a gradual atom-by-atom process. In contrast, silicon nitride wears through removal of the cluster of atoms and plastic

  13. A coronagraph based on two spatial light modulators for active amplitude apodizing and phase corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Jiangpei; Ren, Deqing; Zhang, Xi; Zhu, Yongtian; Zhao, Gang; Wu, Zhen; Chen, Rui; Liu, Chengchao; Yang, Feng; Yang, Chao

    2014-08-01

    Almost all high-contrast imaging coronagraphs proposed until now are based on passive coronagraph optical components. Recently, Ren and Zhu proposed for the first time a coronagraph that integrates a liquid crystal array (LCA) for the active pupil apodizing and a deformable mirror (DM) for the phase corrections. Here, for demonstration purpose, we present the initial test result of a coronagraphic system that is based on two liquid crystal spatial light modulators (SLM). In the system, one SLM is served as active pupil apodizing and amplitude correction to suppress the diffraction light; another SLM is used to correct the speckle noise that is caused by the wave-front distortions. In this way, both amplitude and phase error can be actively and efficiently compensated. In the test, we use the stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) algorithm to control two SLMs, which is based on the point spread function (PSF) sensing and evaluation and optimized for a maximum contrast in the discovery area. Finally, it has demonstrated a contrast of 10-6 at an inner working angular distance of ~6.2 λ/D, which is a promising technique to be used for the direct imaging of young exoplanets on ground-based telescopes.

  14. RGS2 squelches vascular Gi/o and Gq signaling to modulate myogenic tone and promote uterine blood flow.

    PubMed

    Jie, Li; Owens, Elizabeth A; Plante, Lauren A; Fang, Zhuyuan; Rensing, Derek T; Moeller, Kevin D; Osei-Owusu, Patrick

    2016-02-01

    Uterine artery blood flow (UABF) is critical to maintaining uterine perfusion in nonpregnant states and for uteroplacental delivery of nutrients and oxygen to the fetus during pregnancy. Impaired UABF is implicated in infertility and several pregnancy complications including fetal growth restriction, small for gestational age, and preeclampsia. The etiology of abnormal UABF is not known. Here, we determined whether deficiency or loss of RGS2, a GTPase-activating protein for Gq/11 and Gi/o class G proteins, affects UABF in nonpregnant mice. We used Doppler ultrasonography to assess UABF in wild type (WT), Rgs2 heterozygous (Rgs2+/-), and homozygous knockout (Rgs2-/-) mice. Video microscopy was used for ex vivo examination of uterine artery myogenic tone and fura-2 imaging for in vitro assessment of internal stores Ca(2+) release. We found that baseline UABF velocity was markedly decreased while impedance measured as resistive index (WT = 0.58 ± 0.04 vs. Rgs2-/- = 0.71 ± 0.03, P < 0.01) and pulsatile index (WT = 0.90 ± 0.06 vs. Rgs2-/- = 1.25 ± 0.11, P < 0.01) was increased in Rgs2-/- mice. Uterine artery tone was augmented in Rgs2+/- and Rgs2-/- mice, which was normalized to WT levels following Gi/o and Gq inactivation. Conversely, blockade of ryanodine receptors increased WT myogenic tone to RGS2 mutant levels. The data together indicate that RGS2 deficiency decreases UABF by increasing myogenic tone at least partly through prolonged G protein activation. Mutations that decrease vascular RGS2 expression may be a predisposition to decreased uterine blood flow. Targeting G protein signaling therefore might improve uterine and uteroplacental underperfusion disorders. PMID:26811058

  15. Toward automatic phenotyping of retinal images from genetically determined mono- and dizygotic twins using amplitude modulation-frequency modulation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliz, P.; Davis, B.; Murray, V.; Pattichis, M.; Barriga, S.; Russell, S.

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents an image processing technique for automatically categorize age-related macular degeneration (AMD) phenotypes from retinal images. Ultimately, an automated approach will be much more precise and consistent in phenotyping of retinal diseases, such as AMD. We have applied the automated phenotyping to retina images from a cohort of mono- and dizygotic twins. The application of this technology will allow one to perform more quantitative studies that will lead to a better understanding of the genetic and environmental factors associated with diseases such as AMD. A method for classifying retinal images based on features derived from the application of amplitude-modulation frequency-modulation (AM-FM) methods is presented. Retinal images from identical and fraternal twins who presented with AMD were processed to determine whether AM-FM could be used to differentiate between the two types of twins. Results of the automatic classifier agreed with the findings of other researchers in explaining the variation of the disease between the related twins. AM-FM features classified 72% of the twins correctly. Visual grading found that genetics could explain between 46% and 71% of the variance.

  16. Probing the adsorption of weak acids on graphite using amplitude modulation-frequency modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Ahmed M A; Huang, Jun; McPhedran, Kerry N; Zeng, Hongbo; El-Din, Mohamed Gamal

    2015-03-17

    Recent thermodynamics calculations and adsorption isotherms showed that the adsorption of a self-assembled layer (SAL) of ionized weak acids to carbon was attributed to the negatively charged hydrogen bonding (-CAHB), yet the direct visualization and characterization of this adsorption behavior have not been reported. Here, an amplitude modulation-frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (AM-FM AFM) technique was applied to discriminate the adsorption of decanoic acids (DA) on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). Thermodynamics calculations revealed that the adsorption of SAL was driven by the formation of -CAHB with negatively charged functional groups of HOPG. Multilayer adsorption could occur over the adsorbed ionized SAL, leading to the development of aggregates. AM-FM AFM imaging showed that the adsorption of the DA molecules forming aggregates occurred only for the HOPG-functionalized steps, while DA molecules were found to adsorb over the entire functionalized HOPG surface after water-plasma treatment, as evident from the frequency shifts identified in AFM images. PMID:25710305

  17. Shaping symmetric Airy beam through binary amplitude modulation for ultralong needle focus

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Zhao-Xiang; Gong, Lei; Ren, Yu-Xuan; Vaveliuk, Pablo; Chen, Yue; Lu, Rong-De

    2015-11-28

    Needle-like electromagnetic field has various advantages for the applications in high-resolution imaging, Raman spectroscopy, as well as long-distance optical transportation. The realization of such field often requires high numerical aperture (NA) objective lens and the transmission masks. We demonstrate an ultralong needle-like focus in the optical range produced with an ordinary lens. This is achieved by focusing a symmetric Airy beam (SAB) generated via binary spectral modulation with a digital micromirror device. Such amplitude modulation technique is able to shape traditional Airy beams, SABs, as well as the dynamic transition modes between the one-dimensional and two-dimensional (2D) symmetric Airy modes. The created 2D SAB was characterized through measurement of the propagating fields with one of the four main lobes blocked by an opaque mask. The 2D SAB was verified to exhibit self-healing property against propagation with the obstructed major lobe reconstructed after a certain distance. We further produced an elongated focal line by concentrating the SAB via lenses with different NAs and achieved an ultralong longitudinal needle focus. The produced long needle focus will be applied in optical, chemical, and biological sciences.

  18. Pitch of amplitude-modulated irregular-rate stimuli in acoustic and electric hearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Wieringen, Astrid; Carlyon, Robert P.; Long, Christopher J.; Wouters, Jan

    2003-09-01

    The pitch of stimuli was studied under conditions where place-of-excitation was held constant, and where pitch was therefore derived from ``purely temporal'' cues. In experiment 1, the acoustical and electrical pulse trains consisted of pulses whose amplitudes alternated between a high and a low value, and whose interpulse intervals alternated between 4 and 6 ms. The attenuated pulses occurred after the 4-ms intervals in condition A, and after the 6-ms intervals in condition B. For both normal-hearing subjects and cochlear implantees, the period of an isochronous pulse train equal in pitch to this ``4-6'' stimulus increased from near 6 ms at the smallest modulation depth to nearly 10 ms at the largest depth. Additionally, the modulated pulse trains in condition A were perceived as being lower in pitch than those in condition B. Data are interpreted in terms of increased refractoriness in condition A, where the larger pulses are more closely followed by the smaller ones than in condition B. Consistent with this conclusion, the A-B difference was reduced at longer interpulse intervals. These findings provide a measure of supra-threshold effects of refractoriness on pitch perception, and increase our understanding of coding of temporal information in cochlear implant speech processing schemes.

  19. Auditory Discrimination Using Frequency-Modulated Amplification with Long-Term Amplitude Compression.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shea, Bernard David

    This dissertation considers the effects of long -term amplitude compression used in narrow-band frequency modulated (FM) assistive listening devices on the auditory discrimination of severely and profoundly hearing-impaired individuals. Compression has been used in narrow-band FM transmitters for hearing-impaired children in educational programs for over twenty years. It restricts the peak deviation of the FM signal to within allowable limits. Narrow -band FM equipment can vary in peak limitation approaches via compression, i.e., using a form of compression limiting or using long-term compression (automatic volume control). Numerous investigations have studied the benefits of FM system use, but none have tested the benefits or deleterious effects of these compression forms on the auditory discrimination of hearing-impaired individuals. Despite the marked limitations associated with severe or profound sensorineural hearing impairment in children, spoken language development is possible. Research and experience have suggested that the auditory system represents the best sensory input channel for these children. With appropriate amplification and educational intervention they can achieve dramatic improvements in speech perception, speech production, language development, and educational achievement (Boothroyd, 1985; Hudgins, 1953, 1954; Ling & Milne, 1981; Wedenberg, 1954). Most hearing-impaired children in educational programs across the United States receive the amplified teacher's speech signal via narrow-band frequency modulated (FM) transmission, yet a controlled investigation of the input compression used in these systems has never been conducted. This dissertation reviews and discusses narrow -band frequency modulated (FM) radio wave systems and the use of audio compression. The experiment tested 32 students with severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss under two narrow -band FM transmitter conditions. The FM transmitter conditions were varied on the basis

  20. Underwater three-dimensional imaging with an amplitude-modulated laser radar at a 405 nm wavelength.

    PubMed

    Bartolini, Luciano; De Dominicis, Luigi; de Collibus, Mario Ferri; Fornetti, Giorgio; Guarneri, Massimiliano; Paglia, Emiliano; Poggi, Claudio; Ricci, Roberto

    2005-11-20

    We report the results of underwater imaging with an amplitude-modulated single-mode laser beam and miniaturized piezoactuator-based scanning system. The basic elements of the device are a diode laser source at 405 nm with digital amplitude modulation and a microscanning system realized with a small-aperture aspheric lens mounted on a pair of piezoelectric translators driven by sawtooth waveforms. The system has been designed to be a low-weight and rugged imaging device suitable to operate at medium range (approximately 10 m) in clear seawater as also demonstrated by computer simulation of layout performance. In the controlled laboratory conditions a submillimeter range accuracy has been obtained at a laser amplitude modulation frequency of 36.7 MHz. PMID:16318184

  1. Heteronuclear refocusing by nonlinear phase and amplitude modulation on a single transmitter channel.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jay; Colón, Raul D; Tadanki, Sasidhar; Waddell, Kevin W

    2014-08-01

    The application of low magnetic fields to heteronuclear NMR has expanded recently alongside the emergence of methods for achieving near unity polarization of spin ensembles, independent of magnetic field strength. The parahydrogen induced hyperpolarization methods in particular, often use a hybrid arrangement where a high field spectrometer is used to detect or image polarized molecules that have been conjured on a separate, dedicated polarizer instrument operating at fields in the mT regime where yields are higher. For controlling polarizer chemistry, spare TTL channels of portable NMR spectrometers can be used to pulse program reaction timings in synchrony with heteronuclear RF transformations. The use of a spectrometer as a portable polarizer control module has the advantage of allowing detection in situ, simplifying the process of optimizing polarization yields prior to in vivo experimental trials. Suitable heteronuclear spectrometers compatible with this application are becoming more common, but are still sparsely available in comparison to a large existing infrastructure of single channel NMR consoles. With the goal of expanding the range of these systems to multinuclear applications, the feasibility of rotating a pair of heteronuclear spins ((13)C and (1)H) at 12mT was investigated in this study. Nonlinear phase and amplitude modulated waveforms designed to simultaneously refocus magnetization at 128kHz ((13)C) and 510kHz ((1)H) were generated numerically with optimal control. Although precise quantitative comparisons were not attempted due to limitations of the experimental setup, signals refocused at heteronuclear frequencies with this PANORAMIC approach (Precession And Nutation for Observing Rotation At Multiple Intervals about the Carrier) yielded amplitudes comparable to signals which were refocused using traditional block pulses on heteronuclear channels. Using this PANORAMIC approach to heteronuclear NMR at low field would reduce expense as well as

  2. Correlation of neural responses in the cochlear nucleus with low-frequency noise amplitude modulation of a tonal signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibikov, N. G.

    2014-09-01

    The responses of single neurons of the cochlear nucleus of a grass frog to long tonal signals amplitude-modulated by repeat intervals of low-frequency noise have been studied. The carrier frequency always corresponded to the characteristic frequency of the studied cell (a range of 0.2 kHz-2 kHz); the modulated signal was noise in the ranges 0-15 Hz, 0-50 Hz, or 0-150 Hz. We obtained the correlation functions of the cyclic histogram reflecting the change in probability of a neuron pulse discharge (spike) during the modulation period with the shape of the signal envelope in the same period. The form of the obtained correlation functions usually does not change qualitatively with a change in carrier level or modulation depth; however, this could essentially depend of the frequency component of the modulating function. In the majority of cases, comparison of the cyclic histogram of the reaction with only the current amplitude value does not adequately reveal the signal's time features that determine the reaction of a neuron. The response is also determined by the other sound features, primarily by the rate of the change in amplitude. The studied neurons differed among themselves, both in preference toward a certain range of modulated frequencies and in the features of the envelope that caused the cell's response.

  3. Observations of amplitude saturation in ELF/VLF wave generation by modulated HF heating of the auroral electrojet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, R. C.; Inan, U. S.; Bell, T. F.

    2006-06-01

    We present detailed observations of the onset of amplitude saturation in ELF/VLF waves generated via modulated HF heating of naturally-forming, large-scale current systems, such as the auroral electrojet. Broadband ELF/VLF measurements at a ground-based receiver located near the High-Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) HF transmitter in Gakona, Alaska, exhibit variations in signal amplitude which are qualitatively consistent with a hard-limiting approximation of the saturation process. A method to approximate the saturation curve as a function of HF power from experimental data is presented, and the results indicate that a ~5-10% reduction in generated ELF signal amplitude is typical at the maximum radiated HF power level (771 kW) for modulation frequencies between 1225 Hz and 3365 Hz. For HF transmissions using sinusoidal amplitude modulation, the saturation dominantly affects the second harmonic of the generated ELF/VLF signal, with amplitudes on average 16% lower than expected at the maximum HF power level.

  4. Wave-packet dynamics of noninteracting ultracold bosons in an amplitude-modulated parabolic optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakoshi, Tomotake; Watanabe, Shinichi

    2015-06-01

    The recent Aarhus experiment [Phys. Rev. A 88, 023620 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevA.88.023620] produced wave packets by applying amplitude modulation to a trapped Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) of 87Rb using an optical lattice. The present paper renders a theoretical account of this experimental production of wave packets and their subsequent time evolution, focusing on a one-dimensional noninteracting bosonic system as a fundamental starting point for accurate quantum analysis. Since experimental manipulation requires efficient wave-packet creation, we introduce the "single-Q Rabi model" to give a simple and reliable description of the interband transition. As a natural extension, we demonstrate enhancement of the wave-packet production by the "two-step Rabi oscillation method" using either one or two frequencies. The subsequent time evolution is affected by the intertwining of Bragg reflection and the Landau-Zener transition at each band gap, which is analyzed with the aid of a semiclassical theory [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 085302 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.085302].

  5. Efficient Amplitude-Modulated Pulses for Triple- to Single-Quantum Coherence Conversion in MQMAS NMR

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The conversion between multiple- and single-quantum coherences is integral to many nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments of quadrupolar nuclei. This conversion is relatively inefficient when effected by a single pulse, and many composite pulse schemes have been developed to improve this efficiency. To provide the maximum improvement, such schemes typically require time-consuming experimental optimization. Here, we demonstrate an approach for generating amplitude-modulated pulses to enhance the efficiency of the triple- to single-quantum conversion. The optimization is performed using the SIMPSON and MATLAB packages and results in efficient pulses that can be used without experimental reoptimisation. Most significant signal enhancements are obtained when good estimates of the inherent radio-frequency nutation rate and the magnitude of the quadrupolar coupling are used as input to the optimization, but the pulses appear robust to reasonable variations in either parameter, producing significant enhancements compared to a single-pulse conversion, and also comparable or improved efficiency over other commonly used approaches. In all cases, the ease of implementation of our method is advantageous, particularly for cases with low sensitivity, where the improvement is most needed (e.g., low gyromagnetic ratio or high quadrupolar coupling). Our approach offers the potential to routinely improve the sensitivity of high-resolution NMR spectra of nuclei and systems that would, perhaps, otherwise be deemed “too challenging”. PMID:25047226

  6. Amplitude modulation of sexy phrases is salient for song attractiveness in female canaries (Serinus canaria).

    PubMed

    Pasteau, Magali; Ung, Davy; Kreutzer, Michel; Aubin, Thierry

    2012-07-01

    Song discrimination and recognition in songbird species have usually been studied by measuring responses to song playbacks. In female canaries, Serinus canaria, copulation solicitation displays (CSDs) are used as an index of female preferences, which are related to song recognition. Despite the fact that many studies underline the role of song syntax in this species, we observed that short segments of songs (a few seconds long) are enough for females to discriminate between conspecific and heterospecific songs, whereas such a short duration is not sufficient to identify the syntax rules. This suggests that other cues are salient for song recognition. In this experiment, we investigated the influence of amplitude modulation (AM) on the responses (CSDs) of female canaries to song playbacks. We used two groups of females: (1) raised in acoustic isolation and (2) raised in normal conditions. When adult, we tested their preferences for sexy phrases with different AMs. We broadcast three types of stimuli: (1) songs with natural canary AM, (2) songs with AM removed, or (3) song with wren Troglodytes troglodytes AM. Results indicate that female canaries prefer and have predispositions for a song type with the natural canary AM. Thus, this acoustic parameter is a salient cue for song attractiveness. PMID:22476242

  7. Efficient amplitude-modulated pulses for triple- to single-quantum coherence conversion in MQMAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Colaux, Henri; Dawson, Daniel M; Ashbrook, Sharon E

    2014-08-01

    The conversion between multiple- and single-quantum coherences is integral to many nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments of quadrupolar nuclei. This conversion is relatively inefficient when effected by a single pulse, and many composite pulse schemes have been developed to improve this efficiency. To provide the maximum improvement, such schemes typically require time-consuming experimental optimization. Here, we demonstrate an approach for generating amplitude-modulated pulses to enhance the efficiency of the triple- to single-quantum conversion. The optimization is performed using the SIMPSON and MATLAB packages and results in efficient pulses that can be used without experimental reoptimisation. Most significant signal enhancements are obtained when good estimates of the inherent radio-frequency nutation rate and the magnitude of the quadrupolar coupling are used as input to the optimization, but the pulses appear robust to reasonable variations in either parameter, producing significant enhancements compared to a single-pulse conversion, and also comparable or improved efficiency over other commonly used approaches. In all cases, the ease of implementation of our method is advantageous, particularly for cases with low sensitivity, where the improvement is most needed (e.g., low gyromagnetic ratio or high quadrupolar coupling). Our approach offers the potential to routinely improve the sensitivity of high-resolution NMR spectra of nuclei and systems that would, perhaps, otherwise be deemed "too challenging". PMID:25047226

  8. Anti-ship missile tracking with a chirped amplitude modulation ladar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redman, Brian C.; Stann, Barry L.; Ruff, William C.; Giza, Mark M.; Aliberti, Keith; Lawler, William B.

    2004-09-01

    Shipboard infrared search and track (IRST) systems can detect sea-skimming anti-ship missiles at long ranges. Since IRST systems cannot measure range and velocity, they have difficulty distinguishing missiles from slowly moving false targets and clutter. ARL is developing a ladar based on its patented chirped amplitude modulation (AM) technique to provide unambiguous range and velocity measurements of targets handed over to it by the IRST. Using the ladar's range and velocity data, false alarms and clutter objects will be distinguished from valid targets. If the target is valid, it's angular location, range, and velocity, will be used to update the target track until remediation has been effected. By using an array receiver, ARL's ladar can also provide 3D imagery of potential threats in support of force protection. The ladar development program will be accomplished in two phases. In Phase I, currently in progress, ARL is designing and building a breadboard ladar test system for proof-of-principle static platform field tests. In Phase II, ARL will build a brassboard ladar test system that will meet operational goals in shipboard testing against realistic targets. The principles of operation for the chirped AM ladar for range and velocity measurements, the ladar performance model, and the top-level design for the Phase I breadboard are presented in this paper.

  9. Digital services using quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) over CATV analog DWDM system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, JengRong; Selker, Mark D.; Trail, J.; Piehler, David; Levi, Israel

    2000-04-01

    Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexing (DWDM) has recently gained great popularity as it provides a cost effective way to increase the transmission capacity of the existing fiber cable plant. For a long time, Dense WDM was exclusively used for baseband digital applications, predominantly in terrestrial long haul networks and in some cases in metropolitan and enterprise networks. Recently, the performance of DWDM components and frequency-stabilized lasers has substantially improved while the costs have down significantly. This makes a variety of new optical network architectures economically viable. The first commercial 8- wavelength DWDM system designed for Hybrid Fiber Coax networks was reported in 1998. This type of DWDM system utilizes Sub-Carrier Multiplexing (SCM) of Quadrature Amplitude Modulated (QAM) signals to transport IP data digital video broadcast and Video on Demand on ITU grid lightwave carriers. The ability of DWDM to provide scalable transmission capacity in the optical layer with SCM granularity is now considered by many to be the most promising technology for future transport and distribution of broadband multimedia services.

  10. Wavelet analysis of pulse-amplitude-modulated chlorophyll fluorescence for differentiation of plant samples.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ya; Zhou, Yesen; Tan, Jinglu

    2015-04-01

    Pulse-amplitude-modulated (PAM) chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) from photosystem II (PSII) of plants has been routinely measured for the analysis of photosynthesis and environmental changes. PAM ChlF from PSII is non-stationary and has time-varying frequency characteristics; however, existing analysis of PAM ChlF has been limited to selected characteristic values in the time domain. Wavelet transform is recognized as an efficient tool for analyzing non-stationary signals. In this research, an attempt was made to analyze PAM ChlF through wavelet transform. Features of PAM ChlF signals were computed from wavelet decomposition to classify two tree species and to detect chilling and detachment stresses. The wavelet-based features were compared with the commonly-used maximal PSII efficiency Fv/Fm. Both the wavelet-based features and Fv/Fm could effectively classify two tree species, but the former showed superiority than the latter in detecting the stresses. Wavelet transform revealed chilling stress earlier than Fv/Fm and detected detachment stress Fv/Fm failed to show. The results show that wavelet transform is a useful technique for analysis of PAM ChlF. PMID:25665719

  11. Practical loss tangent imaging with amplitude-modulated atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proksch, Roger; Kocun, Marta; Hurley, Donna; Viani, Mario; Labuda, Aleks; Meinhold, Waiman; Bemis, Jason

    2016-04-01

    Amplitude-modulated (AM) atomic force microscopy (AFM), also known as tapping or AC mode, is a proven, reliable, and gentle imaging method with widespread applications. Previously, the contrast in AM-AFM has been difficult to quantify. AFM loss tangent imaging is a recently introduced technique that recasts AM mode phase imaging into a single term tan δ that includes both the dissipated and stored energy of the tip-sample interaction. It promises fast, versatile mapping of variations in near-surface viscoelastic properties. However, experiments to date have generally obtained values larger than expected for the viscoelastic loss tangent of materials. Here, we explore and discuss several practical considerations for AFM loss tangent imaging experiments. A frequent limitation to tapping in air is Brownian (thermal) motion of the cantilever. This fundamental noise source limits the accuracy of loss tangent estimation to approximately 0.01

  12. Reconfigurable optical quadrature amplitude modulation converter/encoder using a tunable complex coefficient optical tapped delay line.

    PubMed

    Khaleghi, Salman; Chitgarha, Mohammad Reza; Yilmaz, Omer F; Tur, Moshe; Haney, Michael W; Langrock, Carsten; Fejer, Martin M; Willner, Alan E

    2013-05-15

    We experimentally demonstrate a reconfigurable optical converter/encoder for quadrature amplitude modulated (QAM) signals. The system utilizes nonlinear wavelength multicasting, conversion-dispersion delays, and simultaneous nonlinear multiplexing and sampling. We show baud rate tunability (31 and 20 Gbaud) and reconfigurable conversions from lower-order QAM signals to higher-order QAM signals (e.g., 64-QAM). PMID:23938882

  13. Aharonov-Bohm oscillations, quantum decoherence and amplitude modulation in mesoscopic InGaAs/InAlAs rings.

    PubMed

    Ren, S L; Heremans, J J; Gaspe, C K; Vijeyaragunathan, S; Mishima, T D; Santos, M B

    2013-10-30

    Low-temperature Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in the magnetoresistance of mesoscopic interferometric rings patterned on an InGaAs/InAlAs heterostructure are investigated for their dependence on excitation current and temperature. The rings have an average radius of 650 nm, and a lithographic arm width of 300 nm, yielding pronounced interference oscillations over a wide range of magnetic fields. Apart from a current and temperature dependence, the oscillation amplitude also shows a quasi-periodic modulation with applied magnetic field. The phase coherence length is extracted by analysis of the fundamental and higher Fourier components of the oscillations, and by direct analysis of the amplitude and its dependence on parameters. It is concluded that the Thouless energy forms the measure of excitation energies for quantum decoherence. The amplitude modulation finds an explanation in the effect of the magnetic flux threading the finite width of the interferometer arms. PMID:24096892

  14. Hindlimb movement in the cat induced by amplitude-modulated stimulation using extra-spinal electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, Changfeng; Wang, Jicheng; Shen, Bing; Wang, Xianchun; Roppolo, James R.; de Groat, William C.

    2008-06-01

    Hindlimb movement in the cat induced by electrical stimulation with an amplitude-modulated waveform of the dorsal surface of the L5-S1 spinal cord or the L5-S1 dorsal/ventral roots was investigated before and after acute spinal cord transection at the T13-L1 level. Stimulation of the spinal cord or dorsal/ventral root at the same spinal segment induced similar movements including coordinated multi-joint flexion or extension. The induced movements changed from flexion to extension when the stimulation was moved from rostral (L5) to caudal (S1) spinal segments. Stimulation of a dorsal or ventral root on one side induced only ipsilateral hindlimb movement. However, stimulation on the dorsal surface of the spinal cord along the midline or across the spinal cord induced bilateral movements. The extension induced by stimulation of L7 dorsal root produced the largest ground reaction force that was strong enough to support body weight. Dorsal root stimulation induced a larger ground reaction force than ventral root stimulation and produced a more graded recruitment curve. Stepping at different speeds could be generated by combined stimulation of the rostral (L5) and the caudal (L6/L7) spinal segments with an appropriate timing between the different stimulation channels. Acute transection of the spinal cord did not change the responses indicating that the induced movements did not require the involvement of the supraspinal locomotor centers. The methods and the stimulation strategy developed in this study might be utilized to restore locomotor function after spinal cord injury.

  15. Hindlimb Movement in the Cat Induced by Amplitude-Modulated Stimulation Using Extra-Spinal Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Changfeng; Wang, Jicheng; Shen, Bing; Wang, Xianchun; Roppolo, James R.; de Groat, William C.

    2010-01-01

    Hindlimb movement in the cat induced by electrical stimulation with an amplitude-modulated waveform of the dorsal surface of L5-S1 spinal cord or the L5-S1 dorsal/ventral roots was investigated before and after acute spinal cord transection at the T13-L1 level. Stimulation of the spinal cord or dorsal/ventral root at the same spinal segment induced similar movements including coordinated multi-joint flexion or extension. The induced movements changed from flexion to extension when the stimulation was moved from rostral (L5) to caudal (S1) spinal segments. Stimulation of a dorsal or ventral root on one side induced only ipsilateral hindlimb movement. However, stimulation on the dorsal surface of the spinal cord along the midline or across the spinal cord induced bilateral movements. The extension induced by stimulation of L7 dorsal root produced the largest ground reaction force that was strong enough to support body weight. Dorsal root stimulation induced a larger ground reaction force than ventral root stimulation and produced a more graded recruitment curve. Stepping at different speeds could be generated by combined stimulation of the rostral (L5) and the caudal (L6/L7) spinal segments with an appropriate timing between the different stimulation channels. Acute transection of the spinal cord did not change the responses indicating that the induced movements did not require the involvement of the supraspinal locomotor centers. The methods and the stimulation strategy developed in this study might be utilized to restore locomotor function after spinal cord injury. PMID:18369283

  16. Resolving the contribution of the uncoupled phycobilisomes to cyanobacterial pulse-amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorometry signals.

    PubMed

    Acuña, Alonso M; Snellenburg, Joris J; Gwizdala, Michal; Kirilovsky, Diana; van Grondelle, Rienk; van Stokkum, Ivo H M

    2016-01-01

    Pulse-amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorometry is extensively used to characterize photosynthetic organisms on the slow time-scale (1-1000 s). The saturation pulse method allows determination of the quantum yields of maximal (F(M)) and minimal fluorescence (F(0)), parameters related to the activity of the photosynthetic apparatus. Also, when the sample undergoes a certain light treatment during the measurement, the fluorescence quantum yields of the unquenched and the quenched states can be determined. In the case of cyanobacteria, however, the recorded fluorescence does not exclusively stem from the chlorophyll a in photosystem II (PSII). The phycobilins, the pigments of the cyanobacterial light-harvesting complexes, the phycobilisomes (PB), also contribute to the PAM signal, and therefore, F(0) and F(M) are no longer related to PSII only. We present a functional model that takes into account the presence of several fluorescent species whose concentrations can be resolved provided their fluorescence quantum yields are known. Data analysis of PAM measurements on in vivo cells of our model organism Synechocystis PCC6803 is discussed. Three different components are found necessary to fit the data: uncoupled PB (PB(free)), PB-PSII complexes, and free PSI. The free PSII contribution was negligible. The PB(free) contribution substantially increased in the mutants that lack the core terminal emitter subunits allophycocyanin D or allophycocyanin F. A positive correlation was found between the amount of PB(free) and the rate constants describing the binding of the activated orange carotenoid protein to PB, responsible for non-photochemical quenching. PMID:25893897

  17. Method of Phase and Amplitude Modulation/Demodulation Using Datapages with Embedded Phase-Shift for Holographic Data Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunsen, Masatoshi; Umetsu, Shuhei; Takabayashi, Masanori; Okamoto, Atsushi

    2013-09-01

    A technique for the phase and amplitude detection of object beams with multivalued phase and amplitude modulation is proposed for holographic storage systems. Generally, the spatial distribution of the complex amplitude of the object beam can be precisely detected by phase-shifting interferometric measurements in which the phase of the reference wave for interferometry is temporally or spatially changed in the datapage retrieval process. On the other hand, our technique allows fast, accurate, and feasible phase and amplitude demodulations by preliminary embedding phase shift into the phase signal of the datapage during recording. This technique will significantly improve the data transfer rate and vibration tolerance of the holographic storage system because the complex amplitudes of the object beam carrying datapages can be detected by single-shot image capturing. The optical system for datapage replay will also be simplified because there is no need to use any phase-shifting device during data retrieval. The single-shot detection of the phase-modulated datapage is experimentally demonstrated.

  18. Analysis of frequency noise in ultra-stable optical oscillators with active control of residual amplitude modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liufeng; Shen, Hui; Bi, Jin; Wang, Chun; Lv, Shasha; Chen, Lisheng

    2014-12-01

    Two 1,064-nm Nd:YAG lasers frequency stabilized by high-finesse optical cavities are developed to investigate various noise mechanisms in ultra-stable optical oscillators. Active control of residual amplitude modulation using a separate sensing path is implemented and its effectiveness in the presence of a resonant optical cavity is theoretically analyzed and experimentally verified by measuring the rejection ratios in optical heterodyne beat between a perturbed laser and a stable reference. Laser frequency noises originated from vibration, residual amplitude modulation, quantum-limited shot noise, and electronic noise are experimentally analyzed. With active control, residual amplitude modulation is suppressed to below 1 × 10-6 at 0.02-1,000 s, reaching a minimum of 2 × 10-7 at ~2 s. A frequency stability of 2 × 10-15 is obtained from 0.1 to 10 s, and the optical heterodyne beat of the two Nd:YAG lasers shows 1-Hz linewidth with a measurement time of 4.096 s. In addition, the experimentally determined linewidths agree well with the calculation according to a simplified relationship between the linewidth and the underlying flicker noise that modulates the laser frequency.

  19. Analysis of frequency noise in ultra-stable optical oscillators with active control of residual amplitude modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liufeng; Shen, Hui; Bi, Jin; Wang, Chun; Lv, Shasha; Chen, Lisheng

    2014-09-01

    Two 1,064-nm Nd:YAG lasers frequency stabilized by high-finesse optical cavities are developed to investigate various noise mechanisms in ultra-stable optical oscillators. Active control of residual amplitude modulation using a separate sensing path is implemented and its effectiveness in the presence of a resonant optical cavity is theoretically analyzed and experimentally verified by measuring the rejection ratios in optical heterodyne beat between a perturbed laser and a stable reference. Laser frequency noises originated from vibration, residual amplitude modulation, quantum-limited shot noise, and electronic noise are experimentally analyzed. With active control, residual amplitude modulation is suppressed to below 1 × 10-6 at 0.02-1,000 s, reaching a minimum of 2 × 10-7 at ~2 s. A frequency stability of 2 × 10-15 is obtained from 0.1 to 10 s, and the optical heterodyne beat of the two Nd:YAG lasers shows 1-Hz linewidth with a measurement time of 4.096 s. In addition, the experimentally determined linewidths agree well with the calculation according to a simplified relationship between the linewidth and the underlying flicker noise that modulates the laser frequency.

  20. On the solar cycle dependence of the amplitude modulation characterizing the mid-latitude sporadic E layer diurnal periodicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzopane, M.; Pignalberi, A.; Pietrella, M.

    2016-01-01

    Spectral analyses are employed to investigate how the diurnal periodicity of the critical frequency of the sporadic E (Es) layer varies with solar activity. The study is based on ionograms recorded at the ionospheric station of Rome (41.8°N, 12.5°E), Italy, from 1976 to 2009, a period of time covering three solar cycles. It was confirmed that the diurnal periodicity is always affected by an amplitude modulation with periods of several days, which is the proof that Es layers are affected indirectly by planetary waves through their nonlinear interaction with atmospheric tides at lower altitudes. The most striking features coming out from this study is however that this amplitude modulation is greater for high-solar activity than for low-solar activity.

  1. Amplitude modulation of steady-state visual evoked potentials by event-related potentials in a working memory task

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Dezhong; Tang, Yu; Huang, Yilan; Su, Sheng

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the amplitude and phase of the steady-state visual-evoked potential (SSVEP) can be influenced by a cognitive task, yet the mechanism of this influence has not been understood. As the event-related potential (ERP) is the direct neural electric response to a cognitive task, studying the relationship between the SSVEP and ERP would be meaningful in understanding this underlying mechanism. In this work, the traditional average method was applied to extract the ERP directly, following the stimulus of a working memory task, while a technique named steady-state probe topography was utilized to estimate the SSVEP under the simultaneous stimulus of an 8.3-Hz flicker and a working memory task; a comparison between the ERP and SSVEP was completed. The results show that the ERP can modulate the SSVEP amplitude, and for regions where both SSVEP and ERP are strong, the modulation depth is large. PMID:19960240

  2. Arbitrary shaping of on-axis amplitude of femtosecond Bessel beams with a single phase-only spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Ouadghiri-Idrissi, Ismail; Giust, Remo; Froehly, Luc; Jacquot, Maxime; Furfaro, Luca; Dudley, John M; Courvoisier, Francois

    2016-05-30

    Arbitrary shaping of the on-axis intensity of Bessel beams requires spatial modulation of both amplitude and phase. We develop a non-iterative direct space beam shaping method to generate Bessel beams with high energy throughput from direct space with a single phase-only spatial light modulator. For this purpose, we generalize the approach of Bolduc et al. to non-uniform input beams. We point out the physical limitations imposed on the on-axis intensity profile for unidirectional beams. Analytical, numerical and experimental results are provided. PMID:27410077

  3. Ability of primary auditory cortical neurons to detect amplitude modulation with rate and temporal codes: neurometric analysis

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jeffrey S.; Yin, Pingbo; O'Connor, Kevin N.

    2012-01-01

    Amplitude modulation (AM) is a common feature of natural sounds, and its detection is biologically important. Even though most sounds are not fully modulated, the majority of physiological studies have focused on fully modulated (100% modulation depth) sounds. We presented AM noise at a range of modulation depths to awake macaque monkeys while recording from neurons in primary auditory cortex (A1). The ability of neurons to detect partial AM with rate and temporal codes was assessed with signal detection methods. On average, single-cell synchrony was as or more sensitive than spike count in modulation detection. Cells are less sensitive to modulation depth if tested away from their best modulation frequency, particularly for temporal measures. Mean neural modulation detection thresholds in A1 are not as sensitive as behavioral thresholds, but with phase locking the most sensitive neurons are more sensitive, suggesting that for temporal measures the lower-envelope principle cannot account for thresholds. Three methods of preanalysis pooling of spike trains (multiunit, similar to convergence from a cortical column; within cell, similar to convergence of cells with matched response properties; across cell, similar to indiscriminate convergence of cells) all result in an increase in neural sensitivity to modulation depth for both temporal and rate codes. For the across-cell method, pooling of a few dozen cells can result in detection thresholds that approximate those of the behaving animal. With synchrony measures, indiscriminate pooling results in sensitive detection of modulation frequencies between 20 and 60 Hz, suggesting that differences in AM response phase are minor in A1. PMID:22422997

  4. Mosquito (Aedes aegypti) flight tones: Frequency, harmonicity, spherical spreading, and phase relationships

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, Benjamin J.; Emr, Kevin S.; Wyttenbach, Robert A.; Hoy, Ronald R.

    2014-01-01

    Mosquito flight produces a tone as a side effect of wing movement; this tone is also a communication signal that is frequency-modulated during courtship. Recordings of tones produced by tethered flying male and female Aedes aegypti were undertaken using pairs of pressure-gradient microphones above and below, ahead and behind, and to the left and right over a range of distances. Fundamental frequencies were close to those previously reported, although amplitudes were lower. The male fundamental frequency was higher than that of the female and males modulated it over a wider range. Analysis of harmonics shows that the first six partials were nearly always within 1 Hz of integer multiples of the fundamental, even when the fundamental was being modulated. Along the front-back axis, amplitude attenuated as a function of distance raised to the power 2.3. Front and back recordings were out of phase, as were above and below, while left and right were in phase. Recordings from ahead and behind showed quadratic phase coupling, while others did not. Finally, two methods are presented for separating simultaneous flight tones in a single recording and enhancing their frequency resolution. Implications for mosquito behavior are discussed. PMID:25234901

  5. Cortical activities of single-trial P300 amplitudes modulated by memory load using simultaneous EEG-fMRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiushi; Zhao, Xiaojie; Zhu, Chaozhe; Yang, Xueqian; Yao, Li

    2015-03-01

    The functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) researches on working memory have found that activation of cortical areas appeared dependent on memory load, and event-related potentials (ERP) studies have demonstrated that amplitudes of P300 decreased significantly when working memory load increased. However, the cortical activities related with P300 amplitudes under different memory loads remains unclear. Joint fMRI and EEG analysis which fusions the time and spatial information in simultaneous EEG-fMRI recording can reveal the regional activation at each ERP time point. In this paper, we first used wavelet transform to obtain the single-trial amplitudes of P300 caused by a digital N-back task in the simultaneous EEG-fMRI recording as the ERP feature sequences. Then the feature sequences in 1-back condition and 3-back condition were introduced into general linear model (GLM) separately as parametric modulations to compare the cortical activation under different memory loads. The results showed that the average amplitudes of P300 in 3-back significantly decreased than that in 1-back, and the activities induced by ERP feature sequences in 3-back also significantly decreased than that in the 1-back, including the insular, anterior cingulate cortex, right inferior frontal gyrus, and medial frontal gyrus, which were relevant to the storage, monitoring, and manipulation of information in working memory task. Moreover, the difference in the activation caused by ERP feature showed a positive correlation with the difference in behavioral performance. These findings demonstrated the locations of P300 amplitudes differences modulated by the memory load and its relationship with the behavioral performance.

  6. Triggerable electro-optic amplitude modulator bias stabilizer for integrated optical devices

    DOEpatents

    Conder, A.D.; Haigh, R.E.; Hugenberg, K.F.

    1995-09-26

    An improved Mach-Zehnder integrated optical electro-optic modulator is achieved by application and incorporation of a DC bias box containing a laser synchronized trigger circuit, a DC ramp and hold circuit, a modulator transfer function negative peak detector circuit, and an adjustable delay circuit. The DC bias box ramps the DC bias along the transfer function curve to any desired phase or point of operation at which point the RF modulation takes place. 7 figs.

  7. Triggerable electro-optic amplitude modulator bias stabilizer for integrated optical devices

    DOEpatents

    Conder, Alan D.; Haigh, Ronald E.; Hugenberg, Keith F.

    1995-01-01

    An improved Mach-Zehnder integrated optical electro-optic modulator is achieved by application and incorporation of a DC bias box containing a laser synchronized trigger circuit, a DC ramp and hold circuit, a modulator transfer function negative peak detector circuit, and an adjustable delay circuit. The DC bias box ramps the DC bias along the transfer function curve to any desired phase or point of operation at which point the RF modulation takes place.

  8. Tone-activated, remote, alert communication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, C. D.; Couvillon, L. A.; Hubbard, W. P.; Kollar, F. J.; Postal, R. B.; Tegnelia, C. R.

    1971-01-01

    Pocket sized transmitter, frequency modulated by crystal derived tones, with integral loop antenna provides police with easy operating alert signal communicator which uses patrol car radio to relay signal. Communication channels are time shared by several patrol units.

  9. The onion fly modulates the adult eclosion time in response to amplitude of temperature cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kazuhiro; Watari, Yasuhiko

    2011-08-01

    To confirm whether the amplitude of diel temperature cycles causes a phase shift of adult eclosion rhythm of the onion fly, Delia antiqua, the peak time ( Ø E) of adult eclosion was determined under various thermoperiods with a fixed temperature either in the warm or cool phase and temperature differences ranging from 1°C to 4°C between the two phases. Irrespective of the temperature level during the warm or cool phase, Ø E occurred earlier with decreasing amplitude of the temperature cycle. The results strongly support the previous conclusion of Tanaka and Watari (Naturwissenschaften 90:76-79, 2003) that D. antiqua responds to the amplitude of temperature cycle as a cue for the circadian adult eclosion timing. The phase advance was larger in thermoperiods with a fixed warm-phase temperature than in those with a fixed cool-phase temperature. This might be ascribed to the interaction between the amplitude and level of temperature in the thermoperiodic regimes.

  10. Event-related desynchronization and synchronization in MEG: Framework for analysis and illustrative datasets related to discrimination of frequency-modulated tones.

    PubMed

    Zygierewicz, J; Sieluzycki, C; König, R; Durka, P J

    2008-02-15

    We introduce a complete framework for the calculation of statistically significant event-related desynchronization and synchronization (ERD/ERS) in the time-frequency plane for magnetoencephalographic (MEG) data, and provide free Internet access to software and illustrative datasets related to a classification task of frequency-modulated (FM) tones. Event-related changes in MEG were analysed on the basis of the normal component of the magnetic field acquired by the 148 magnetometers of the hardware configuration of our whole-head MEG device, and by computing planar gradients in longitudinal and latitudinal direction. Time-frequency energy density for the magnetometer as well as the two gradient configurations is first approximated using short-time Fourier transform. Subsequently, detailed information is obtained from high-resolution time-frequency maps for the most interesting sensors by means of the computationally much more demanding matching pursuit parametrization. We argue that the ERD/ERS maps are easier to interpret in the gradient approaches and discuss the superior resolution of the matching pursuit time-frequency representation compared to short-time Fourier and wavelet transforms. Experimental results are accompanied by the following resources, available from http://brain.fuw.edu.pl/MEG: (a) 48 high-resolution figures presenting the results of four subjects in all applicable settings, (b) raw datasets, and (c) complete software environment, allowing to recompute these figures from the raw datasets. PMID:17983663